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Sample records for diagnostic pcr assay

  1. Assessing the Validity of Diagnostic Quantitative PCR Assays for Phakopsora pachyrhizi and P. meibomiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are 123 confirmed species in the genus Phakopsora worldwide, with 19 species reported in the continental United States. In 2002, a quantitative PCR (qPCR) diagnostic assay was developed by Frederick et al. that has been used for detecting Phakopsora pachyrhizi in spore trapping studies. Based ...

  2. Improved detection of Tritrichomonas foetus in bovine diagnostic specimens using a novel probe-based real time PCR assay.

    PubMed

    McMillen, Lyle; Lew, Ala E

    2006-11-01

    A Tritrichomonas foetus-specific 5' Taq nuclease assay using a 3' minor groove binder-DNA probe (TaqMan MGB) targeting conserved regions of the internal transcribed spacer-1 (ITS-1) was developed and compared to established diagnostic procedures. Specificity of the assay was evaluated using bovine venereal microflora and a range of related trichomonad species. Assay sensitivity was evaluated with log(10) dilutions of known numbers of cells, and compared to that for microscopy following culture (InPouch TF test kit) and the conventional TFR3-TFR4 PCR assay. The 5' Taq nuclease assay detected a single cell per assay from smegma or mucus which was 2500-fold or 250-fold more sensitive than microscopy following selective culture from smegma or mucus respectively, and 500-fold more sensitive than culture followed by conventional PCR assay. The sensitivity of the conventional PCR assay was comparable to the 5' Taq nuclease assay when testing purified DNA extracted from clinical specimens, whereas the 5' Taq nuclease assay sensitivity improved using crude cell lysates, which were not suitable as template for the conventional PCR assay. Urine was evaluated as a diagnostic specimen providing improved and equivalent levels of T. foetus detection in spiked urine by both microscopy following culture and direct 5' Taq nuclease detection, respectively, compared with smegma and mucus, however inconclusive results were obtained with urine samples from the field study. Diagnostic specimens (n=159) were collected from herds with culture positive animals and of the 14 animals positive by 5' Taq nuclease assay, 3 were confirmed by selective culture/microscopy detection (Fisher's exact test P<0.001). The 5' Taq nuclease assay described here demonstrated superior sensitivity to traditional culture/microscopy and offers advantages over the application of conventional PCR for the detection of T. foetus in clinical samples. PMID:16860481

  3. Performance of a real-time PCR assay in routine bovine mastitis diagnostics compared with in-depth conventional culture.

    PubMed

    Hiitiö, Heidi; Riva, Rauna; Autio, Tiina; Pohjanvirta, Tarja; Holopainen, Jani; Pyörälä, Satu; Pelkonen, Sinikka

    2015-05-01

    Reliable identification of the aetiological agent is crucial in mastitis diagnostics. Real-time PCR is a fast, automated tool for detecting the most common udder pathogens directly from milk. In this study aseptically taken quarter milk samples were analysed with a real-time PCR assay (Thermo Scientific PathoProof Mastitis Complete-12 Kit, Thermo Fisher Scientific Ltd.) and by semi-quantitative, in-depth bacteriological culture (BC). The aim of the study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of the real-time PCR assay in routine use. A total of 294 quarter milk samples from routine mastitis cases were cultured in the national reference laboratory of Finland and examined with real-time PCR. With BC, 251 out of 294 (85.7%) of the milk samples had at least one colony on the plate and 38 samples were considered contaminated. In the PCR mastitis assay, DNA of target species was amplified in 244 samples out of 294 (83.0%). The most common bacterial species detected in the samples, irrespective of the diagnostic method, was the coagulase negative staphylococci (CNS) group (later referred as Staphylococcus spp.) followed by Staphylococcus aureus. Sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp) for the PCR assay to provide a positive Staph. aureus result was 97.0 and 95.8% compared with BC. For Staphylococcus spp., the corresponding figures were 86.7 and 75.4%. Our results imply that PCR performed well as a diagnostic tool to detect Staph. aureus but may be too nonspecific for Staphylococcus spp. in routine use with the current cut-off Ct value (37.0). Using PCR as the only microbiological method for mastitis diagnostics, clinical relevance of the results should be carefully considered before further decisions, for instance antimicrobial treatment, especially when minor pathogens with low amount of DNA have been detected. Introducing the concept of contaminated samples should also be considered. PMID:25704849

  4. Development and Evaluation of a Next-Generation Digital PCR Diagnostic Assay for Ocular Chlamydia trachomatis Infections

    PubMed Central

    Last, Anna; Molina-Gonzalez, Sandra; Cassama, Eunice; Butcher, Robert; Nabicassa, Meno; McCarthy, Elizabeth; Burr, Sarah E.; Mabey, David C.; Bailey, Robin L.; Holland, Martin J.

    2013-01-01

    Droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) is an emulsion PCR process that performs absolute quantitation of nucleic acids. We developed a ddPCR assay for Chlamydia trachomatis infections and found it to be accurate and precise. Using PCR mixtures containing plasmids engineered to include the PCR target sequences, we were able to quantify with a dynamic range between 0.07 and 3,160 targets/μl (r2 = 0.9927) with >95% confidence. Using 1,509 clinical conjunctival swab samples from a population in which trachoma is endemic in Guinea Bissau, we evaluated the specificity and sensitivity of the quantitative ddPCR assay in diagnosing ocular C. trachomatis infections by comparing the performances of ddPCR and the Roche Amplicor CT/NG test. We defined ddPCR tests as positive when we had ≥95% confidence in a nonzero estimate of target load. The sensitivity of ddPCR against Amplicor was 73.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 67.9 to 78.7%), and specificity was 99.1% (95% CI, 98.6 to 99.6%). Negative and positive predictive values were 94.6% (95% CI, 93.4 to 95.8%) and 94.5% (95% CI, 91.3 to 97.7%), respectively. Based on Amplicor CT/NG testing, the estimated population prevalence of C. trachomatis ocular infection was ∼17.5%. Receiver-operator curve analysis was used to select critical cutoff values for use in clinical settings in which a balance between higher sensitivity and specificity is required. We concluded that ddPCR is an effective diagnostic technology suitable for both research and clinical use in diagnosing ocular C. trachomatis infections. PMID:23637300

  5. Development a diagnostic pan-dermatophyte TaqMan probe real-time PCR assay based on beta tubulin gene.

    PubMed

    Mirhendi, Hossein; Motamedi, Marjan; Makimura, Koichi; Satoh, Kazuo

    2016-08-01

    Early differentiation of dermatophytosis from other cutaneous mycoses is essential to avoid inaccurate therapy. DNA-based techniques including real-time PCR have increasingly been considered for detection of fungal elements in clinical specimens. In this study, after partial sequence analysis of beta tubulin (BT2) gene in 13 common and rare pathogenic dermatophyte species, a pan-dermatophyte primer and probe set was designed in a TaqMan probe-based PCR format. The sensitivity and specificity of the system was tested with 22 reference strains of dermatophytes, 234 positive clinical specimens, 32 DNA samples extracted from normal nails, several fungi other than dermatophytes and human DNAs. Analytical detection limit of the designed PCR on serially diluted DNAs of prepared recombinant plasmid indicated that only five molecules per sample are the minimum number for reliable detection by the assay. A total of 226 out of 234 (96.5%) DNAs extracted from clinical samples, but none of the 32 nail samples, from healthy volunteers were positive in PCR. The real-time PCR targeted beta tubulin gene established in this study could be a sensitive diagnostic tool which is significantly faster than the conventional culture method and should be useful in the clinical settings, in large-scale epidemiological studies and in clinical trials of antifungal therapy. PMID:27071371

  6. Diagnostic evaluation of a multiplexed RT-PCR microsphere array assay for the detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus and look-alike disease viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Hindson, B J; Reid, S M; Baker, B R; Ebert, K; Ferris, N P; Bentley Tammero, L F; Lenhoff, R J; Naraghi-Arani, P; Vitalis, E A; Slezak, T R; Hullinger, P J; King, D P

    2007-07-26

    A high-throughput multiplexed assay was developed for the differential laboratory diagnosis of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) from viruses which cause clinically similar diseases of livestock. This assay simultaneously screens for five RNA and two DNA viruses using multiplexed reverse transcription PCR (mRT-PCR) amplification coupled with a microsphere hybridization array and flow-cytometric detection. Two of the seventeen primer-probe sets included in this multiplex assay were adopted from previously characterized real-time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR) assays for FMDV. The diagnostic accuracy of the mRT-PCR was evaluated using 287 field samples, including 248 (true positive n= 213, true negative n=34) from suspect cases of foot-and-mouth disease collected from 65 countries between 1965 and 2006 and 39 true negative samples collected from healthy animals. The mRT-PCR assay results were compared with two singleplex rRT-PCR assays, using virus isolation with antigen-ELISA as the reference method. The diagnostic sensitivity of the mRT-PCR assay for FMDV was 93.9% [95% C.I. 89.8-96.4%], compared to 98.1% [95% C.I. 95.3-99.3%] for the two singleplex rRT-PCR assays used in combination. In addition, the assay could reliably differentiate between FMDV and other vesicular viruses such as swine vesicular disease virus and vesicular exanthema of swine virus. Interestingly, the mRT-PCR detected parapoxvirus (n=2) and bovine viral diarrhea virus (n=2) in clinical samples, demonstrating the screening potential of this mRT-PCR assay to identify viruses in FMDV-negative material not previously recognized using focused single-target rRT-PCR assays.

  7. Diagnostic evaluation of a multiplexed RT-PCR microsphere array assay for the detection of foot-and-mouth and look-alike disease viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Hindson, B J; Baker, B R; Bentley Tammero, L F; Lenhoff, R J; Naraghi-Arani, P; Vitalis, E A; Slezak, T R; Hullinger, P J; Reid, S M; Ebert, K; Ferris, N P; King, D P

    2007-09-18

    A high-throughput multiplexed assay (Multiplex Version 1.0) was developed for the differential laboratory diagnosis of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) from viruses which cause clinically similar diseases of livestock. This assay simultaneously screens for five RNA and two DNA viruses using multiplexed reverse transcription PCR (mRT-PCR) amplification coupled with a microsphere hybridization array and flow-cytometric detection. Two of the seventeen primer-probe sets included in this multiplex assay were adopted from previously characterized real-time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR) assays for FMDV. The diagnostic accuracy of the mRT-PCR was evaluated using 287 field samples, including 248 (true positive n= 213, true negative n=34) from suspect cases of foot-and-mouth disease collected from 65 countries between 1965 and 2006 and 39 true negative samples collected from healthy animals. The mRT-PCR assay results were compared with two singleplex rRT-PCR assays, using virus isolation with antigen-ELISA as the reference method. The diagnostic sensitivity of the mRT-PCR assay for FMDV was 93.9% [95% C.I. 89.8-96.4%], compared to 98.1% [95% C.I. 95.3-99.3%] for the two singleplex rRTPCR assays used in combination. In addition, the assay could reliably differentiate between FMDV and other vesicular viruses such as swine vesicular disease virus and vesicular exanthema of swine virus. Interestingly, the mRT-PCR detected parapoxvirus (n=2) and bovine viral diarrhea virus (n=2) in clinical samples, demonstrating the screening potential of this mRT-PCR assay to identify viruses in FMDV-negative material not previously recognized using focused single-target rRT-PCR assays.

  8. Evaluation of a novel PCR-based diagnostic assay for detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in sputum samples.

    PubMed Central

    Maher, M; Glennon, M; Martinazzo, G; Turchetti, E; Marcolini, S; Smith, T; Dawson, M T

    1996-01-01

    We report on a PCR-based assay we have developed for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in sputum samples. One hundred sputum specimens, which included 34 culture-positive and 66 culture-negative specimens, were evaluated with this system. Of the 34 culture-positive specimens, 31 were PCR positive, and 60 of the culture-negative specimens were PCR negative. An internal standard has been included in the assay system to monitor PCR inhibition and to confirm the reliability of the PCR assay. PMID:8862607

  9. Comparison and evaluation of Renibacterium salmoninarum quantitative PCR diagnostic assays using field samples of Chinook and coho salmon.

    PubMed

    Sandell, Todd A; Jacobson, Kym C

    2011-01-21

    Renibacterium salmoninarum is a Gram-positive bacterium causing bacterial kidney disease (BKD) in susceptible salmonid fishes. Several quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays to measure R. salmoninarum infection intensity have been reported, but comparison and evaluation of these assays has been limited. Here, we compared 3 qPCR primer/probe sets for detection of R. salmoninarum in field samples of naturally exposed Chinook and coho salmon first identified as positive by nested PCR (nPCR). Additional samples from a hatchery population of Chinook salmon with BKD were included to serve as strong positive controls. The 3 qPCR assays targeted either the multiple copy major soluble antigen (msa) genes or the single copy abc gene. The msa/non-fluorescent quencher (NFQ) assay amplified R. salmoninarum DNA in 53.2% of the nPCR positive samples, whereas the abc/NFQ assay amplified 21.8% of the samples and the abc/TAMRA assay 18.2%. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) successfully quantified only 16.4% of the nPCR positive samples. Although the msa/NFQ assay amplified a greater proportion of nPCR positive samples, the abc/NFQ assay better amplified those samples with medium and high ELISA values. A comparison of the geometric mean quantity ratios highlighted limitations of the assays, and the abc/NFQ assay strongly amplified some samples that were negative in other tests, in contrast to its performance among the sample group as a whole. These data demonstrate that both the msa/NFQ and abc/NFQ qPCR assays are specific and effective at higher infection levels and outperform the ELISA. However, most pathogen studies will continue to require multiple assays to both detect and quantify R. salmoninarum infection. PMID:21381519

  10. Real-Time Reverse Transcription PCR Assay for Detection of Senecavirus A in Swine Vesicular Diagnostic Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Fabian, Andrew W.; Barrette, Roger W.; Sayed, Abu

    2016-01-01

    Senecavirus A (SV-A), formerly, Seneca Valley virus (SVV), has been detected in swine with vesicular lesions and is thought to be associated with swine idiopathic vesicular disease (SIVD), a vesicular disease syndrome that lacks a defined causative agent. The clinical presentation of SIVD resembles that of other more contagious and economically devastating vesicular diseases, such as foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), swine vesicular disease (SVD), and vesicular stomatitis (VS), that typically require immediate rule out diagnostics to lift restrictions on animal quarantine, movement, and trade. This study presents the development of a sensitive, SYBR Green RT-qPCR assay suitable for detection of SV-A in diagnostic swine specimens. After testing 50 pigs with clinical signs consistent with vesicular disease, 44 (88%) were found to be positive for SV-A by RT-qPCR as compared to none from a negative cohort of 35 animals without vesicular disease, indicating that the assay is able to successfully detect the virus in an endemic population. SV-A RNA was also detectable at a low level in sera from a subset of pigs that presented with (18%) or without (6%) vesicular signs. In 2015, there has been an increase in the occurrence of SV-A in the US, and over 200 specimens submitted to our laboratory for vesicular investigation have tested positive for the virus using this method. SV-A RNA was detectable in all common types of vesicular specimens including swabs and tissue from hoof lesions, oral and snout epithelium, oral swabs, scabs, and internal organ tissues such as liver and lymph node. Genome sequencing analysis from recent virus isolates was performed to confirm target amplicon specificity and was aligned to previous isolates. PMID:26757142

  11. Real-Time Reverse Transcription PCR Assay for Detection of Senecavirus A in Swine Vesicular Diagnostic Specimens.

    PubMed

    Bracht, Alexa J; O'Hearn, Emily S; Fabian, Andrew W; Barrette, Roger W; Sayed, Abu

    2016-01-01

    Senecavirus A (SV-A), formerly, Seneca Valley virus (SVV), has been detected in swine with vesicular lesions and is thought to be associated with swine idiopathic vesicular disease (SIVD), a vesicular disease syndrome that lacks a defined causative agent. The clinical presentation of SIVD resembles that of other more contagious and economically devastating vesicular diseases, such as foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), swine vesicular disease (SVD), and vesicular stomatitis (VS), that typically require immediate rule out diagnostics to lift restrictions on animal quarantine, movement, and trade. This study presents the development of a sensitive, SYBR Green RT-qPCR assay suitable for detection of SV-A in diagnostic swine specimens. After testing 50 pigs with clinical signs consistent with vesicular disease, 44 (88%) were found to be positive for SV-A by RT-qPCR as compared to none from a negative cohort of 35 animals without vesicular disease, indicating that the assay is able to successfully detect the virus in an endemic population. SV-A RNA was also detectable at a low level in sera from a subset of pigs that presented with (18%) or without (6%) vesicular signs. In 2015, there has been an increase in the occurrence of SV-A in the US, and over 200 specimens submitted to our laboratory for vesicular investigation have tested positive for the virus using this method. SV-A RNA was detectable in all common types of vesicular specimens including swabs and tissue from hoof lesions, oral and snout epithelium, oral swabs, scabs, and internal organ tissues such as liver and lymph node. Genome sequencing analysis from recent virus isolates was performed to confirm target amplicon specificity and was aligned to previous isolates. PMID:26757142

  12. Design and evaluation of a unique RT-qPCR assay for diagnostic quality control assessment that is applicable to pathogen detection in three species of salmonid fish

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The detection of pathogens at early stages of infection is a key point for disease control in aquaculture. Therefore, accurate diagnostic procedures are a must. Real-time PCR has been a mainstay in diagnostics over the years due to its speed, specificity, sensitivity, reproducibility and throughput; as such, real-time PCR is a target for improvement. Nevertheless, to validate a novel diagnostic tool, correct setup of the assay, including proper endogenous controls to evaluate the quantity and quality of the samples and to detect possible sample degradation, is compulsory. This work aims to design a unique RT-qPCR assay for pathogen detection in the three salmonid species reared in Chile. The assay uses elongation factor 1 alpha as the single endogenous control, thus avoiding the need for multiple endogenous controls, as well as multiple validations and non-comparable quality control parameters. Results The in vivo and in vitro analyses of samples from Salmo salar, Oncorhynchus mykiss and Oncorhynchus kisutch showed that when primers were accurately selected to target conserved regions of the elongation factor 1 alpha (ELF1α) gene, a single novel RT-qPCR assay yielding similar and reproducible Ct values between the three species could be designed. The opposite occurred when an assay originally designed for Salmo salar was tested in samples from the two species of the genus Oncorhynchus. Conclusions Here, we report the design and evaluation of an accurate trans-species RT-qPCR assay that uses the elongation factor 1 alpha (ELF1α) gene as an endogenous control and is applicable for diagnostic purposes in samples obtained from the three salmonid species reared in Chile. PMID:24040749

  13. PCR AS A DIAGNOSTIC TOOL FOR BRUCELLOSIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Numerous PCR-based assays have been developed for the identification of Brucella to improve diagnostic capabilities. Collectively, the repertoire of assays addresses several aspects of the diagnostic process. For some purposes, the simple identification of Brucella is adequate (e.g. diagnosis of ...

  14. Diagnostic Utility of a Clonality Test for Lymphoproliferative Diseases in Koreans Using the BIOMED-2 PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young; Choi, Yoo Duk; Choi, Chan

    2013-01-01

    Background A clonality test for immunoglobulin (IG) and T cell receptor (TCR) is a useful adjunctive method for the diagnosis of lymphoproliferative diseases (LPDs). Recently, the BIOMED-2 multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay has been established as a standard method for assessing the clonality of LPDs. We tested clonality in LPDs in Koreans using the BIOMED-2 multiplex PCR and compared the results with those obtained in European, Taiwanese, and Thai participants. We also evaluated the usefulness of the test as an ancillary method for diagnosing LPDs. Methods Two hundred and nineteen specimens embedded in paraffin, including 78 B cell lymphomas, 80 T cell lymphomas and 61 cases of reactive lymphadenitis, were used for the clonality test. Results Mature B cell malignancies showed 95.7% clonality for IG, 2.9% co-existing clonality, and 4.3% polyclonality. Mature T cell malignancies exhibited 83.8% clonality for TCR, 8.1% co-existing clonality, and 16.2% polyclonality. Reactive lymphadenitis showed 93.4% polyclonality for IG and TCR. The majority of our results were similar to those obtained in Europeans. However, the clonality for IGK of B cell malignancies and TCRG of T cell malignancies was lower in Koreans than Europeans. Conclusions The BIOMED-2 multiplex PCR assay was a useful adjunctive method for diagnosing LPDs. PMID:24255634

  15. Novel Multiplex Real-Time PCR Diagnostic Assay for Identification and Differentiation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium canettii, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Strains▿†

    PubMed Central

    Reddington, Kate; O'Grady, Justin; Dorai-Raj, Siobhan; Maher, Majella; van Soolingen, Dick; Barry, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) in humans is caused by members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC). Rapid detection of the MTC is necessary for the timely initiation of antibiotic treatment, while differentiation between members of the complex may be important to guide the appropriate antibiotic treatment and provide epidemiological information. In this study, a multiplex real-time PCR diagnostics assay using novel molecular targets was designed to identify the MTC while simultaneously differentiating between M. tuberculosis and M. canettii. The lepA gene was targeted for the detection of members of the MTC, the wbbl1 gene was used for the differentiation of M. tuberculosis and M. canettii from the remainder of the complex, and a unique region of the M. canettii genome, a possible novel region of difference (RD), was targeted for the specific identification of M. canettii. The multiplex real-time PCR assay was tested using 125 bacterial strains (64 MTC isolates, 44 nontuberculosis mycobacteria [NTM], and 17 other bacteria). The assay was determined to be 100% specific for the mycobacteria tested. Limits of detection of 2.2, 2.17, and 0.73 cell equivalents were determined for M. tuberculosis/M. canettii, the MTC, and M. canettii, respectively, using probit regression analysis. Further validation of this diagnostics assay, using clinical samples, should demonstrate its potential for the rapid, accurate, and sensitive diagnosis of TB caused by M. tuberculosis, M. canettii, and the other members of the MTC. PMID:21123525

  16. Diagnostic Molecular Mycobacteriology in Regions With Low Tuberculosis Endemicity: Combining Real-time PCR Assays for Detection of Multiple Mycobacterial Pathogens With Line Probe Assays for Identification of Resistance Mutations.

    PubMed

    Deggim-Messmer, Vanessa; Bloemberg, Guido V; Ritter, Claudia; Voit, Antje; Hömke, Rico; Keller, Peter M; Böttger, Erik C

    2016-07-01

    Molecular assays have not yet been able to replace time-consuming culture-based methods in clinical mycobacteriology. Using 6875 clinical samples and a study period of 35months we evaluated the use of PCR-based assays to establish a diagnostic workflow with a fast time-to-result of 1-2days, for 1. detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTB), 2. detection and identification of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), and 3. identification of drug susceptible MTB. MTB molecular-based detection and culture gave concordant results for 97.7% of the specimens. NTM PCR-based detection and culture gave concordant results for 97.0% of the specimens. Defining specimens on the basis of combined laboratory data as true positives or negatives with discrepant results resolved by clinical chart reviews, we calculated sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV for PCR-based MTB detection as 84.7%, 100%, 100%, and 98.7%; the corresponding values for culture-based MTB detection were 86.3%, 100%, 100%, and 98.8%. PCR-based detection of NTM had a sensitivity of 84.7% compared to 78.0% of that of culture-based NTM detection. Molecular drug susceptibility testing (DST) by line-probe assay was found to predict phenotypic DST results in MTB with excellent accuracy. Our findings suggest a diagnostic algorithm to largely replace lengthy culture-based techniques by rapid molecular-based methods. PMID:27333026

  17. Multicenter Evaluation of a Commercial PCR-Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay Diagnostic Kit (Onychodiag) for Diagnosis of Dermatophytic Onychomycosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Savin, C.; Huck, S.; Rolland, C.; Benderdouche, M.; Faure, O.; Noacco, G.; Menotti, J.; Candolfi, E.; Pelloux, H.; Grillot, R.; Coupe, S.; Derouin, F.

    2007-01-01

    We prospectively evaluated a new PCR-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit (Onychodiag; BioAdvance, France) for the diagnosis of dermatophytic onychomycosis by testing nail samples from 438 patients with suspected onychomycosis and from 108 healthy controls in three independent laboratories. In two laboratories, samples were collected by trained mycologists as close as possible to the lesions (proximal samples). In one laboratory, samples were collected by other physicians. All samples were processed by conventional mycological techniques and by Onychodiag, blindly to the mycological results. An additional distal sample, collected by clipping the nail plate, was obtained from 75 patients and tested with Onychodiag alone. In patients with culture-proven dermatophytic onychomycosis, the sensitivity of Onychodiag was 83.6% (87.9% including the gray zone) and ranged from 75 to 100% according to the laboratory and the sampling conditions. The specificity was 100% when healthy subjects were considered true negative controls. Onychodiag was positive on 68 patient samples that were sterile or yielded nondermatophyte species in culture. Based on the results of Onychodiag for mycologically proven positive samples and true-negative samples, these results were considered true positives, and the poor performance of mycology on these samples was attributed to inconvenient sampling conditions or to contaminants. When tested on distal samples, Onychodiag was positive in 49/53 (92%) cases of proven dermatophytic onychomycosis. Finally, with either proximal or distal samples, Onychodiag provided a diagnosis of dermatophytic onychomycosis within 24 to 48 h after sampling, and its sensitivity was close to that of mycological techniques applied to proximal samples. PMID:17287330

  18. Use of DNA melting simulation software for in silico diagnostic assay design: targeting regions with complex melting curves and confirmation by real-time PCR using intercalating dyes

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, John P; Saint, Christopher P; Monis, Paul T

    2007-01-01

    Background DNA melting curve analysis using double-stranded DNA-specific dyes such as SYTO9 produce complex and reproducible melting profiles, resulting in the detection of multiple melting peaks from a single amplicon and allowing the discrimination of different species. We compare the melting curves of several Naegleria and Cryptosporidium amplicons generated in vitro with in silico DNA melting simulations using the programs POLAND and MELTSIM., then test the utility of these programs for assay design using a genetic marker for toxin production in cyanobacteria. Results The SYTO9 melting curve profiles of three species of Naegleria and two species of Cryptosporidium were similar to POLAND and MELTSIM melting simulations, excepting some differences in the relative peak heights and the absolute melting temperatures of these peaks. MELTSIM and POLAND were used to screen sequences from a putative toxin gene in two different species of cyanobacteria and identify regions exhibiting diagnostic melting profiles. For one of these diagnostic regions the POLAND and MELTSIM melting simulations were observed to be different, with POLAND more accurately predicting the melting curve generated in vitro. Upon further investigation of this region with MELTSIM, inconsistencies between the melting simulation for forward and reverse complement sequences were observed. The assay was used to accurately type twenty seven cyanobacterial DNA extracts in vitro. Conclusion Whilst neither POLAND nor MELTSIM simulation programs were capable of exactly predicting DNA dissociation in the presence of an intercalating dye, the programs were successfully used as tools to identify regions where melting curve differences could be exploited for diagnostic melting curve assay design. Refinements in the simulation parameters would be required to account for the effect of the intercalating dye and salt concentrations used in real-time PCR. The agreement between the melting curve simulations for

  19. Diagnostic performance of a multiplex PCR assay for meningitis in an HIV-infected population in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Rhein, Joshua; Bahr, Nathan C; Hemmert, Andrew C; Cloud, Joann L; Bellamkonda, Satya; Oswald, Cody; Lo, Eric; Nabeta, Henry; Kiggundu, Reuben; Akampurira, Andrew; Musubire, Abdu; Williams, Darlisha A; Meya, David B; Boulware, David R

    2016-03-01

    Meningitis remains a worldwide problem, and rapid diagnosis is essential to optimize survival. We evaluated the utility of a multiplex PCR test in differentiating possible etiologies of meningitis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 69 HIV-infected Ugandan adults with meningitis was collected at diagnosis (n=51) and among persons with cryptococcal meningitis during therapeutic lumbar punctures (n=68). Cryopreserved CSF specimens were analyzed with BioFire FilmArray® Meningitis/Encephalitis panel, which targets 17 pathogens. The panel detected Cryptococcus in the CSF of patients diagnosed with a first episode of cryptococcal meningitis by fungal culture with 100% sensitivity and specificity and differentiated between fungal relapse and paradoxical immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in recurrent episodes. A negative FilmArray result was predictive of CSF sterility on follow-up lumbar punctures for cryptococcal meningitis. EBV was frequently detected in this immunosuppressed population (n=45). Other pathogens detected included: cytomegalovirus (n=2), varicella zoster virus (n=2), human herpes virus 6 (n=1), and Streptococcus pneumoniae (n=1). The FilmArray Meningitis/Encephalitis panel offers a promising platform for rapid meningitis diagnosis. PMID:26711635

  20. Development of a diagnostic PCR assay based on novel DNA sequences for the detection of Mycoplasma suis (Eperythrozoon suis) in porcine blood.

    PubMed

    Hoelzle, Ludwig E; Adelt, Dagmar; Hoelzle, Katharina; Heinritzi, Karl; Wittenbrink, Max M

    2003-05-29

    An efficient method of control of porcine eperythrozoonosis (PE) caused by Mycoplasma suis is eradication of infection by detection and removal of infected carrier animals. At present, only a few tests are available for the diagnosis of these latent M. suis infections in pigs. The objective of this study was to develop a PCR assay based on novel DNA sequences for the identification of M. suis-infected pigs. A 1.8 kb EcoRI DNA fragment of the M. suis genome was isolated from the blood of pigs experimentally infected with M. suis. Specificity of the DNA fragment was confirmed by DNA sequence analysis and PCR using primers directed against sequences contained in the 1.8 kb fragment. PCR products of 782 bp in size were amplified only from M. suis particles prepared from the blood of experimentally infected pigs but not from any controls, comprising blood from gnotobiotic piglets and a panel of bacteria including other porcine mycoplasmas. PCR results were confirmed by dot blot hybridisation. The applicability of the PCR assay to diagnose M. suis infections in pigs was evaluated by investigating blood samples from 10 symptomatic pigs with clinical signs typical of porcine eperythrozoonosis and blood samples from 10 healthy pigs. The M. suis-specific PCR product was amplified from all samples taken at episodes of acute disease as well as from samples taken during the latent stage of infection, thus demonstrating the suitability of the PCR assay for detecting latent infected carrier animals. PMID:12695043

  1. Diagnostic PCR of dermatophytes--an overview.

    PubMed

    Gräser, Yvonne; Czaika, Viktor; Ohst, Torsten

    2012-10-01

    The prevalence of onychomycosis is increasing steadily, sevenfold alone in the US within the last twenty years. An important aspect in this development is the demographic development of the human population of the industrial countries like Germany. A fast and accurate laboratory diagnosis is essential for successful treatment because 50% of the cases are misdiagnosed when relying on the clinical appearance only. The current diagnosis of dermatophytosis, based on direct microscopy and culture of the clinical specimen, is problematic given the lacking specificity of the former and the length of time needed for the latter. Molecular techniques can help to solve these problems. In recent years, a number of in-house PCR assays have been developed to identify dermatophytes directly from clinical specimens. Based on the "Mikrobiologisch-infektiologischen Qualitätsstandards (MIQ) für Nukleinsäure-Amplifikationstechniken" and the MIQE guideline (Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Real-Time PCR Experiments) 11 studies are reviewed which were published between 2007 and 2010. The present article evaluates the quality of the PCR assays regarding false positive and false negative results due to contamination, PCR format, statistical analysis, and diagnostic performance of the studies. It shows that we are only at the beginning of providing high quality PCR diagnosis of dermatophytes. PMID:23013298

  2. Comparison of Established Diagnostic Methodologies and a Novel Bacterial smpB Real-Time PCR Assay for Specific Detection of Haemophilus influenzae Isolates Associated with Respiratory Tract Infections.

    PubMed

    Reddington, Kate; Schwenk, Stefan; Tuite, Nina; Platt, Gareth; Davar, Danesh; Coughlan, Helena; Personne, Yoann; Gant, Vanya; Enne, Virve I; Zumla, Alimuddin; Barry, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is a significant causative agent of respiratory tract infections (RTI) worldwide. The development of a rapid H. influenzae diagnostic assay that would allow for the implementation of infection control measures and also improve antimicrobial stewardship for patients is required. A number of nucleic acid diagnostics approaches that detect H. influenzae in RTIs have been described in the literature; however, there are reported specificity and sensitivity limitations for these assays. In this study, a novel real-time PCR diagnostic assay targeting the smpB gene was designed to detect all serogroups of H. influenzae. The assay was validated using a panel of well-characterized Haemophilus spp. Subsequently, 44 Haemophilus clinical isolates were collected, and 36 isolates were identified as H. influenzae using a gold standard methodology that combined the results of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and a fucK diagnostic assay. Using the novel smpB diagnostic assay, 100% concordance was observed with the gold standard, demonstrating a sensitivity of 100% (95% confidence interval [CI], 90.26% to 100.00%) and a specificity of 100% (95% CI, 63.06% to 100.00%) when used on clinical isolates. To demonstrate the clinical utility of the diagnostic assay presented, a panel of lower RTI samples (n = 98) were blindly tested with the gold standard and smpB diagnostic assays. The results generated were concordant for 94/98 samples tested, demonstrating a sensitivity of 90.91% (95% CI, 78.33% to 97.47%) and a specificity of 100% (95% CI, 93.40% to 100.00%) for the novel smpB assay when used directly on respiratory specimens. PMID:26109443

  3. Comparison of Established Diagnostic Methodologies and a Novel Bacterial smpB Real-Time PCR Assay for Specific Detection of Haemophilus influenzae Isolates Associated with Respiratory Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Reddington, Kate; Schwenk, Stefan; Tuite, Nina; Platt, Gareth; Davar, Danesh; Coughlan, Helena; Personne, Yoann; Gant, Vanya; Enne, Virve I.; Zumla, Alimuddin

    2015-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is a significant causative agent of respiratory tract infections (RTI) worldwide. The development of a rapid H. influenzae diagnostic assay that would allow for the implementation of infection control measures and also improve antimicrobial stewardship for patients is required. A number of nucleic acid diagnostics approaches that detect H. influenzae in RTIs have been described in the literature; however, there are reported specificity and sensitivity limitations for these assays. In this study, a novel real-time PCR diagnostic assay targeting the smpB gene was designed to detect all serogroups of H. influenzae. The assay was validated using a panel of well-characterized Haemophilus spp. Subsequently, 44 Haemophilus clinical isolates were collected, and 36 isolates were identified as H. influenzae using a gold standard methodology that combined the results of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and a fucK diagnostic assay. Using the novel smpB diagnostic assay, 100% concordance was observed with the gold standard, demonstrating a sensitivity of 100% (95% confidence interval [CI], 90.26% to 100.00%) and a specificity of 100% (95% CI, 63.06% to 100.00%) when used on clinical isolates. To demonstrate the clinical utility of the diagnostic assay presented, a panel of lower RTI samples (n = 98) were blindly tested with the gold standard and smpB diagnostic assays. The results generated were concordant for 94/98 samples tested, demonstrating a sensitivity of 90.91% (95% CI, 78.33% to 97.47%) and a specificity of 100% (95% CI, 93.40% to 100.00%) for the novel smpB assay when used directly on respiratory specimens. PMID:26109443

  4. Diagnostic Real-Time PCR Assays for the Detection of Emetic Bacillus cereus Strains in Foods and Recent Food-Borne Outbreaks▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Fricker, Martina; Messelhäußer, Ute; Busch, Ulrich; Scherer, Siegfried; Ehling-Schulz, Monika

    2007-01-01

    Cereulide-producing Bacillus cereus can cause an emetic type of food-borne disease that mimics the symptoms provoked by Staphylococcus aureus. Based on the recently discovered genetic background for cereulide formation, a novel 5′ nuclease (TaqMan) real-time PCR assay was developed to provide a rapid and sensitive method for the specific detection of emetic B. cereus in food. The TaqMan assay includes an internal amplification control and primers and a probe designed to target a highly specific part of the cereulide synthetase genes. Additionally, a specific SYBR green I assay was developed and extended to create a duplex SYBR green I assay for the one-step identification and discrimination of the two emesis-causing food pathogens B. cereus and S. aureus. The inclusivity and exclusivity of the assay were assessed using a panel of 100 strains, including 23 emetic B. cereus and 14 S. aureus strains. Different methods for DNA isolation from artificially contaminated foods were evaluated, and established real-time assays were used to analyze two recent emetic food poisonings in southern Germany. One of the food-borne outbreaks included 17 children visiting a day care center who vomited after consuming a reheated rice dish, collapsed, and were hospitalized; the other case concerned a single food-poisoning incident occurring after consumption of cauliflower. Within 2 h, the etiological agent of these food poisonings was identified as emetic B. cereus by using the real-time PCR assay. PMID:17259359

  5. A PCR-based diagnostic assay for the detection of Roseovarius crassostreae in Crassostrea virginica affected by juvenile oyster disease (JOD)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maloy, A.P.; Barber, B.J.; Boettcher, K.J.

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a PCR-assay for the diagnosis of juvenile oyster disease (JOD) based on the detection of Roseovarius crassostreae directly from affected oysters. Species-specific primers are used to amplify the 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of R. crassostreae, and confirmation of product identity is accomplished by restriction enzyme analysis. No false positives were obtained with either closely related bacterial species or from other DNAs present in oyster samples. The assay has the potential to detect as few as 10 cells of R. crassostreae per oyster when samples are taken from the inner valve surfaces of the animal. Inclusion of material from soft body surfaces is not necessary, and may reduce sensitivity approximately 10-fold. In a JOD-affected population, a positive PCR result was obtained from all oysters from which these bacteria were subsequently cultured. The assay also detected the presence of R. crassostreae in 2 oysters from which no R. crassostreae isolates were recovered. No R. crassostreae was detected by either PCR or bacteriology in oysters from a population that was not exhibiting JOD-signs. This assay is expected to advance regional disease management efforts and provide valuable insights into the disease process and epizootiology of JOD. ?? Inter-Research 2005.

  6. Variola Virus-Specific Diagnostic Assays: Characterization, Sensitivity, and Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Kondas, Ashley V.; Olson, Victoria A.; Li, Yu; Abel, Jason; Laker, Miriam; Rose, Laura; Wilkins, Kimberly; Turner, Jonathan; Kline, Richard

    2015-01-01

    A public health response relies upon rapid and reliable confirmation of disease by diagnostic assays. Here, we detail the design and validation of two variola virus-specific real-time PCR assays, since previous assays cross-reacted with newly identified cowpox viruses. The assay specificity must continually be reassessed as other closely related viruses are identified. PMID:25673790

  7. Rapid, Simultaneous Detection of Clostridium sordellii and Clostridium perfringens in Archived Tissues by a Novel PCR-Based Microsphere Assay: Diagnostic Implications for Pregnancy-Associated Toxic Shock Syndrome Cases

    PubMed Central

    Bhatnagar, Julu; DeLeon-Carnes, Marlene; Kellar, Kathryn L.; Bandyopadhyay, Kakali; Antoniadou, Zoi-Anna; Shieh, Wun-Ju; Paddock, Christopher D.; Zaki, Sherif R.

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium sordellii and Clostridium perfringens are infrequent human pathogens; however, the case-fatality rates for the infections are very high, particularly in obstetric C. sordellii infections (>90%). Deaths from Clostridium sordellii and Clostridium perfringens toxic shock (CTS) are sudden, and diagnosis is often challenging. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues usually are the only specimens available for sudden fatal cases, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) for Clostridia is generally performed but it cannot identify species. A clear need exists for a rapid, species-specific diagnostic assay for FFPE tissues. We developed a duplex PCR-based microsphere assay for simultaneous detection of C. sordellii and C. perfringens and evaluated DNA extracted from 42 Clostridium isolates and FFPE tissues of 28 patients with toxic shock/endometritis (20 CTS, 8 non-CTS, as confirmed by PCR and sequencing). The microsphere assay correctly identified C. sordellii and C. perfringens in all known isolates and in all CTS patients (10 C. sordellii, 8 C. perfringens, 2 both) and showed 100% concordance with PCR and sequencing results. The microsphere assay is a rapid, specific, and cost-effective method for the diagnosis of CTS and offers the advantage of simultaneous testing for C. sordellii and C. perfringens in FFPE tissues using a limited amount of DNA. PMID:22536012

  8. Diagnostic utility of droplet digital PCR for HIV reservoir quantification.

    PubMed

    Trypsteen, Wim; Kiselinova, Maja; Vandekerckhove, Linos; De Spiegelaere, Ward

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) is implemented in many molecular laboratories worldwide for the quantification of viral nucleic acids. However, over the last two decades, there has been renewed interest in the concept of digital PCR (dPCR) as this platform offers direct quantification without the need for standard curves, a simplified workflow and the possibility to extend the current detection limit. These benefits are of great interest in terms of the quantification of low viral levels in HIV reservoir research because changes in the dynamics of residual HIV reservoirs will be important to monitor HIV cure efforts. Here, we have implemented a systematic literature screening and text mining approach to map the use of droplet dPCR (ddPCR) in the context of HIV quantification. In addition, several technical aspects of ddPCR were compared with qPCR: accuracy, sensitivity, precision and reproducibility, to determine its diagnostic utility. We have observed that ddPCR was used in different body compartments in multiple HIV-1 and HIV-2 assays, with the majority of reported assays focusing on HIV-1 DNA-based applications (i.e. total HIV DNA). Furthermore, ddPCR showed a higher accuracy, precision and reproducibility, but similar sensitivity when compared to qPCR due to reported false positive droplets in the negative template controls with a need for standardised data analysis (i.e. threshold determination). In the context of a low level of detection and HIV reservoir diagnostics, ddPCR can offer a valid alternative to qPCR-based assays but before this platform can be clinically accredited, some remaining issues need to be resolved. PMID:27482456

  9. Bayesian estimation of the diagnostic accuracy of a multiplex real-time PCR assay and bacteriological culture for 4 common bovine intramammary pathogens.

    PubMed

    Paradis, M-È; Haine, D; Gillespie, B; Oliver, S P; Messier, S; Comeau, J; Scholl, D T

    2012-11-01

    Bacteriological culture (BC) is the traditional method for intramammary infection diagnosis but lacks sensitivity and is time consuming. Multiplex real-time PCR (mr-PCR) enables testing the presence of several bacteria and reduces diagnosis time. Our objective was to estimate bacterial species-specific sensitivity (Se) and specificity of both BC and mr-PCR tests for detecting bacteria in milk samples from clinical mastitis cases and from apparently normal quarters, using a Bayesian latent class model. Milk samples from 1,014 clinical mastitis cases and 1,495 samples from apparently normal quarters were analyzed by BC and mr-PCR. Two positive culture definitions were used: ≥1 cfu/0.01 mL and ≥10 cfu/0.01 mL of the specified bacteria. The mr-PCR was designed to simultaneously detect Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus uberis, Escherichia coli, and Streptococcus agalactiae. The priors used in our Bayesian model were weakly informative, with BC priors using the best available error data. Results were compared with those obtained using uniform priors for mr-PCR to test robustness. Weak and uniform priors gave about the same posterior distributions except for Strep. uberis from normal quarters and Strep. agalactiae. Multiplex real-time PCR Se on milk from clinical mastitis were lower than mr-PCR Se on milk from normal quarters. Multiplex real-time PCR Se was higher than BC on milk from normal quarters. Multiplex real-time PCR Se was generally lower than BC on milk from clinical mastitis and it varied by clinical severity. The estimate specificities of detection for all pathogens were ≥99%, regardless of sample type. The effect of milk sample preservation before testing was evaluated and may have been a factor that affected our observed results. A significant association was observed between sample age and mr-PCR results leading to reduced detection of E. coli and Strep. agalactiae in nonclinical samples. Differences in sample age between conduct of BC and of mr-PCR

  10. PCR and real-time PCR assays to detect fungi of Alternaria alternata species.

    PubMed

    Kordalewska, Milena; Brillowska-Dąbrowska, Anna; Jagielski, Tomasz; Dworecka-Kaszak, Bożena

    2015-01-01

    Fungi of the Alternaria genus are mostly associated with allergic diseases. However, with a growing number of immunocompromised patients, these fungi, with A. alternata being the most prevalent one, are increasingly recognized as etiological agents of infections (phaeohyphomycoses) in humans. Nowadays, identification of Alternaria spp. requires their pure culture and is solely based on morphological criteria. Clinically, Alternaria infections may be indistinguishable from other fungal diseases. Therefore, a diagnostic result is often delayed or even not achieved at all. In this paper we present easy to perform and interpret PCR and real-time PCR assays enabling detection of A. alternata species. On the basis of alignment of β-tubulin gene sequences, A. alternata-specific primers were designed. DNA from fungal isolates, extracted in a two-step procedure, were used in PCR and real-time PCR assays followed by electrophoresis or melting temperature analysis, respectively. The assays specificity was confirmed, since positive results were obtained for all A. alternata isolates, and no positive results were obtained neither for other molds, dermatophytes, yeast-like fungi, nor human DNA. The assays developed here enable fast and unambiguous identification of A. alternata pathogens. PMID:26610309

  11. Real-time PCR in Food Science: PCR Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Lazaro, David; Cook, Nigel; Hernandez, Marta

    2013-01-01

    A principal consumer demand is a guarantee of the safety and quality of food. The presence of foodborne pathogens and their potential hazard, the use of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in food production, and the correct labelling in foods suitable for vegetarians are among the subjects where society demands total transparency. The application of controls within the quality assessment programmes of the food industry is a way to satisfy these demands, and is necessary to ensure efficient analytical methodologies are possessed and correctly applied by the Food Sector. The use of real-time PCR has become a promising alternative approach in food diagnostics. It possesses a number of advantages over conventional culturing approaches, including rapidity, excellent analytical sensitivity and selectivity, and potential for quantification. However, the use of expensive equipment and reagents, the need for qualified personnel, and the lack of standardized protocols are impairing its practical implementation for food monitoring and control. PMID:23513039

  12. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for detection of aquatic animal pathogens in a diagnostic laboratory setting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Getchell, Rodman G.; McClure, Carol A.; Weber, S.E.; Garver, Kyle A.

    2011-01-01

    Real-time, or quantitative, polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is quickly supplanting other molecular methods for detecting the nucleic acids of human and other animal pathogens owing to the speed and robustness of the technology. As the aquatic animal health community moves toward implementing national diagnostic testing schemes, it will need to evaluate how qPCR technology should be employed. This review outlines the basic principles of qPCR technology, considerations for assay development, standards and controls, assay performance, diagnostic validation, implementation in the diagnostic laboratory, and quality assurance and control measures. These factors are fundamental for ensuring the validity of qPCR assay results obtained in the diagnostic laboratory setting.

  13. Development and validation of a quantitative PCR assay for Ichthyophonus spp.

    PubMed

    White, Vanessa C; Morado, J Frank; Crosson, Lisa M; Vadopalas, Brent; Friedman, Carolyn S

    2013-04-29

    Members of the genus Ichthyophonus are trophically transmitted, cosmopolitan parasites that affect numerous fish species worldwide. A quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay specific for genus Ichthyophonus 18S ribosomal DNA was developed for parasite detection and surveillance. The new assay was tested for precision, repeatability, reproducibility, and both analytical sensitivity and specificity. Diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were estimated using tissue samples from a wild population of walleye pollock Theragra chalcogramma. Ichthyophonus sp. presence in tissue samples was determined by qPCR, conventional PCR (cPCR), and histology. Parasite prevalence estimates varied depending upon the detection method employed and tissue type tested. qPCR identified the greatest number of Ichthyophonus sp.-positive cases when applied to walleye pollock skeletal muscle. The qPCR assay proved sensitive and specific for Ichthyophonus spp. DNA, but like cPCR, is only a proxy for infection. When compared to cPCR, qPCR possesses added benefits of parasite DNA quantification and a 100-fold increase in analytical sensitivity. Because this novel assay is specific for known members of the genus, it is likely appropriate for detecting Ichthyophonus spp. DNA in various hosts from multiple regions. However, species-level identification and isotype variability would require DNA sequencing. In addition to distribution and prevalence applications, this assay could be modified and adapted for use with zooplankton or environmental samples. Such applications could aid in investigating alternate routes of transmission and life history strategies typical to members of the genus Ichthyophonus. PMID:23670081

  14. A Ribeiroia spp. (Class: Trematoda) - Specific PCR-based diagnostic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reinitz, D.M.; Yoshino, T.P.; Cole, R.A.

    2007-01-01

    Increased reporting of amphibian malformations in North America has been noted with concern in light of reports that amphibian numbers and species are declining worldwide. Ribeiroia ondatrae has been shown to cause a variety of types of malformations in amphibians. However, little is known about the prevalence of R. ondatrae in North America. To aid in conducting field studies of Ribeiroia spp., we have developed a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based diagnostic. Herein, we describe the development of an accurate, rapid, simple, and cost-effective diagnostic for detection of Ribeiroia spp. infection in snails (Planorbella trivolvis). Candidate oligonucleotide primers for PCR were designed via DNA sequence analyses of multiple ribosomal internal transcribed spacer-2 regions from Ribeiroia spp. and Echinostoma spp. Comparison of consensus sequences determined from both genera identified areas of sequence potentially unique to Ribeiroia spp. The PCR reliably produced a diagnostic 290-base pair (bp) product in the presence of a wide concentration range of snail or frog DNA. Sensitivity was examined with DNA extracted from single R. ondatrae cercaria. The single-tube PCR could routinely detect less than 1 cercariae equivalent, because DNA isolated from a single cercaria could be diluted at least 1:50 and still yield a positive result via gel electrophoresis. An even more sensitive nested PCR also was developed that routinely detected 100 fg of the 290-bp fragment. The assay did not detect furcocercous cercariae of certain Schistosomatidae, Echinostoma sp., or Sphaeridiotrema globulus nor adults of Clinostomum sp. or Cyathocotyle bushiensis. Field testing of 137 P. trivolvis identified 3 positives with no overt environmental cross-reactivity, and results concurred with microscopic examinations in all cases. ?? American Society of Parasitologists 2007.

  15. Diagnostic performance of HPV E6/E7, hTERT, and Ki67 mRNA RT-qPCR assays on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded cervical tissue specimens from women with cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hye-Young; Kim, Geehyuk; Cho, Hyemi; Kim, Sunghyun; Lee, Dongsup; Park, Sunyoung; Park, Kwang Hwa; Lee, Hyeyoung

    2015-06-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a major cause of cervical cancer, which is the third most common cancer in women. Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) and Ki67 are tumor cell markers indicating cancer cell proliferation in cancer patients, and activation of hTERT and Ki67 leads to progressive cervical carcinogenesis. In the present study, we evaluated the CervicGen HPVE6/E7 mRNA RT-qDx assay, which detects 16 HPV high-risk (HR) genotypes (HPV 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 53, 56, 58, 59, 66, 68 and 69), and the CervicGen hTERT and Ki67 mRNA RT-qDx assay using 117 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) cervical cancer tissue samples. The diagnostic validity of the CervicGen HPV RT-qDx assay for detecting histologically proven prevalent squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) was 94% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 77.8% positive predictive value (PPV), and 78.9% negative predictive value (NPV). The most common HPV genotypes detected in FFPE cervical cancer tissue samples were HPV 16 (56%) and HPV 18 (10%). The positivity rate of hTERT and Ki67 mRNA expressions in FFPE cervical cancer tissue samples on RT-qPCR was 65% and 93% respectively. Moreover, the positivity rates were 92% for a combination of HPV E6/E7 and hTERT mRNA expressions, 97% for HPV E6/E7 and Ki67 mRNA expressions, and 99% (99/100) for the combination of HPV E6/E7, hTERT, and Ki67 mRNA expressions. These data showed that SSC FFPE cervical cancer tissue samples correlated more strongly with high Ki67 mRNA expressions than with hTERT mRNA expressions. Notably, hTERT and Ki67 mRNA expression level was increased in high-grade cervical lesions, but was very low in normal samples. Our findings suggest that the combination of HPV E6/E7, hTERT, and Ki67 mRNA expression levels could be used in a complementary manner in diagnosing high-grade cervical lesions. Further studies are required to evaluate these assays as a useful predictive tool for screening low-grade cervical lesions. PMID:25835783

  16. Multiplex PCR: Optimization and Application in Diagnostic Virology

    PubMed Central

    Elnifro, Elfath M.; Ashshi, Ahmed M.; Cooper, Robert J.; Klapper, Paul E.

    2000-01-01

    PCR has revolutionized the field of infectious disease diagnosis. To overcome the inherent disadvantage of cost and to improve the diagnostic capacity of the test, multiplex PCR, a variant of the test in which more than one target sequence is amplified using more than one pair of primers, has been developed. Multiplex PCRs to detect viral, bacterial, and/or other infectious agents in one reaction tube have been described. Early studies highlighted the obstacles that can jeopardize the production of sensitive and specific multiplex assays, but more recent studies have provided systematic protocols and technical improvements for simple test design. The most useful of these are the empirical choice of oligonucleotide primers and the use of hot start-based PCR methodology. These advances along with others to enhance sensitivity and specificity and to facilitate automation have resulted in the appearance of numerous publications regarding the application of multiplex PCR in the diagnosis of infectious agents, especially those which target viral nucleic acids. This article reviews the principles, optimization, and application of multiplex PCR for the detection of viruses of clinical and epidemiological importance. PMID:11023957

  17. Rapid detection of Serpulina hyodysenteriae in diagnostic specimens by PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Elder, R O; Duhamel, G E; Schafer, R W; Mathiesen, M R; Ramanathan, M

    1994-01-01

    A PCR assay for the detection of Serpulina hyodysenteriae in diagnostic specimens was developed on the basis of sequence analysis of a recombinant clone designated pRED3C6. Clone pRED3C6, which contained a 2.3-kb DNA fragment unique to S. hyodysenteriae, was identified by screening a plasmid library of S. hyodysenteriae isolate B204 genomic DNA in Escherichia coli by colony immunoblot with the mouse monoclonal antibody 10G6/G10, which was produced against cell-free supernatant antigens from the same isolate. Southern blot analysis of HindIII-digested genomic DNA of S. hyodysenteriae serotypes 1 through 7 and of four weakly beta-hemolytic intestinal spirochetes, including Serpulina innocens, with the 2.3-kb DNA fragment of pRED3C6 indicated that the cloned sequence was present exclusively in the seven serotypes of S. hyodysenteriae. An oligonucleotide primer pair for PCR amplification of a 1.55-kb fragment and an internal oligonucleotide probe were designed and synthesized on the basis of sequence analysis of the 2.3-kb DNA fragment of pRED3C6. Purified genomic DNAs from reference isolates of S. hyodysenteriae serotypes 1 through 9, S. innocens, weakly beta-hemolytic intestinal spirochetes belonging to genotypic groups distinct from those of reference Serpulina spp., other cultivable reference isolates of the order Spirochaetales, and enteric bacteria including Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., Campylobacter spp., and Bacteroides vulgatus were amplified with the oligonucleotide primer pair in a hot-start PCR. The 1.55-kb products were obtained only in the presence of genomic DNA from each of the nine serotypes of S. hyodysenteriae. The specificity of the 1.55-kb products for S. hyodysenteriae was confirmed on the basis of production of a restriction endonuclease pattern of the PCR products identical to the predicted restriction map analysis of pRED3C6 and positive hybridization signal with the S. hyodysenteriae-specific internal oligonucleotide probe. By using

  18. An improved molecular diagnostic assay for canine and feline dermatophytosis.

    PubMed

    Cafarchia, Claudia; Gasser, Robin B; Figueredo, Luciana A; Weigl, Stefania; Danesi, Patrizia; Capelli, Gioia; Otranto, Domenico

    2013-02-01

    The few studies attempting to specifically characterize dermatophytes from hair samples of dogs and cats using PCR-based methodology relied on sequence-based analysis of selected genetic markers. The aim of the present investigation was to establish and evaluate a PCR-based approach employing genetic markers of nuclear DNA for the specific detection of dermatophytes on such specimens. Using 183 hair samples, we directly compared the test results of our one-step and nested-PCR assays with those based on conventional microscopy and in vitro culture techniques (using the latter as the reference method). The one step-PCR was highly accurate (AUC > 90) for the testing of samples from dogs, but only moderately accurate (AUC = 78.6) for cats. A nested-PCR was accurate (AUC = 93.6) for samples from cats, and achieved higher specificity (94.1 and 94.4%) and sensitivity (100 and 94.9%) for samples from dogs and cats, respectively. In addition, the nested-PCR allowed the differentiation of Microsporum canis from Trichophyton interdigitale (zoophilic) and geophilic dermatophytes (i.e., Microsporum gypseum or Trichophyton terrestre), which was not possible using the one step-assay. The PCRs evaluated here provide practical tools for diagnostic applications to support clinicians in initiating prompt and targeted chemotherapy of dermatophytoses. PMID:22686247

  19. REAL-TIME PCR ASSAY DEVELOPMENT FOR MULTIPLE MAIZE PATHOGENS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This talk presents updates on the development of real-time PCR assays for two seedborne pathogens of maize, Pantoea (Erwinia) stewartii, the causal agent of Stewart's bacterial wilt, and Stenocarpella (Diplodia) maydis, the causal agent of Diplodia ear rot. We developed primers and a real-time PCR p...

  20. Gold nanoparticle-based RT-PCR and real-time quantitative RT-PCR assays for detection of Japanese encephalitis virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Su-Hua; Yang, Tsuey-Ching; Tsai, Ming-Hong; Tsai, I.-Shou; Lu, Huang-Chih; Chuang, Pei-Hsin; Wan, Lei; Lin, Ying-Ju; Lai, Chih-Ho; Lin, Cheng-Wen

    2008-10-01

    Virus isolation and antibody detection are routinely used for diagnosis of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) infection, but the low level of transient viremia in some JE patients makes JEV isolation from clinical and surveillance samples very difficult. We describe the use of gold nanoparticle-based RT-PCR and real-time quantitative RT-PCR assays for detection of JEV from its RNA genome. We tested the effect of gold nanoparticles on four different PCR systems, including conventional PCR, reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR), and SYBR green real-time PCR and RT-PCR assays for diagnosis in the acute phase of JEV infection. Gold nanoparticles increased the amplification yield of the PCR product and shortened the PCR time compared to the conventional reaction. In addition, nanogold-based real-time RT-PCR showed a linear relationship between Ct and template amount using ten-fold dilutions of JEV. The nanogold-based RT-PCR and real-time quantitative RT-PCR assays were able to detect low levels (1-10 000 copies) of the JEV RNA genomes extracted from culture medium or whole blood, providing early diagnostic tools for the detection of low-level viremia in the acute-phase infection. The assays described here were simple, sensitive, and rapid approaches for detection and quantitation of JEV in tissue cultured samples as well as clinical samples.

  1. PCR assays for detection of Baylisascaris procyonis eggs and larvae.

    PubMed

    Dangoudoubiyam, Sriveny; Vemulapalli, Ramesh; Kazacos, Kevin R

    2009-06-01

    The objective of this study was to develop polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays for detection of Baylisascaris procyonis eggs and larvae in fecal, environmental, and tissue samples. We have optimized conventional and real-time PCR assays for B. procyonis using the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase 2 gene as the target for amplification. The lower limit of detection of the parasite genomic DNA was 10 pg in the conventional PCR and 100 fg in the real-time PCR. In both PCR assays, specific amplification of a 146 bp product was achieved with DNA extracted from a single in vitro hatched B. procyonis larva and also from canine fecal samples spiked with as few as 20 unembryonated B. procyonis eggs per gram of feces. The PCR assays were successfully used for detection of B. procyonis eggs and larvae in fecal, environmental, and tissue samples. No DNA amplification was seen when the genomic DNA of related ascarids (including B. transfuga) and a hookworm was used as template in the PCR; however, amplification was seen with the very closely related B. columnaris. PMID:19090651

  2. Viral diagnostics in the era of digital PCR

    PubMed Central

    Sedlak, Ruth Hall; Jerome, Keith R.

    2012-01-01

    Unlike quantitative PCR (qPCR), digital PCR (dPCR) achieves sensitive and accurate absolute quantitation of a DNA sample without the need for a standard curve. A single PCR reaction is divided into many separate reactions that each have a positive or negative signal. By applying Poisson statistics, the number of DNA molecules in the original sample is directly calculated from the number of positive and negative reactions. The recent availability of multiple commercial dPCR platforms has led to increased interest in clinical diagnostic applications, such as low viral load detection and low abundance mutant detection, where dPCR could be superior to traditional qPCR.Here we review current literature that demonstrates dPCR’s potential utility in viral diagnostics, particularly through absolute quantification of target DNA sequences and rare mutant allele detection. PMID:23182074

  3. Development of multiplex PCR assay for simultaneous detection of five bacterial fish pathogens.

    PubMed

    Altinok, Ilhan; Capkin, Erol; Kayis, Sevki

    2008-10-15

    A multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method was designed for the simultaneous detection of the five major fish pathogens, Aeromonas hydrophila, Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida, Flavobacterium columnare, Renibacterium salmoninarum, and Yersinia ruckeri. Each of the five pairs of oligonucleotide primers exclusively amplified the targeted gene of the specific microorganism. The detection limits of the multiplex PCR was in the range of 2, 1, 1, 3, and 1CFU for A. hydrophila, A. salmonicida, F. columnare, R. salmoninarum, and Y. ruckeri, respectively. Multiplex PCR did not produce any nonspecific amplification products when tested against 23 related species of bacteria. The multiplex PCR assay was useful for the detection of the bacteria in naturally infected fish. This assay is a sensitive and specific and reproducible diagnostic tool for the simultaneous detection of five pathogenic bacteria that cause disease in fish. Therefore, it could be a useful alternative to the conventional culture based method. PMID:18499358

  4. International collaborative study to compare reverse transcriptase PCR assays for detection and genotyping of noroviruses.

    PubMed

    Vinjé, Jan; Vennema, Harry; Maunula, Leena; von Bonsdorff, Carl-Henrik; Hoehne, Marina; Schreier, Eckart; Richards, Alison; Green, Jon; Brown, David; Beard, Suzanne S; Monroe, Stephan S; de Bruin, Erwin; Svensson, Lennart; Koopmans, Marion P G

    2003-04-01

    To allow more rapid and internationally standardized assessment of the spread of noroviruses (previously called Norwalk-like viruses [NLVs]) as important food-borne pathogens, harmonization of methods for their detection is needed. Diagnosis of NLVs in clinical diagnostic laboratories is usually performed by reverse transciptase PCR (RT-PCR) assays. In the present study, the performance of five different RT-PCR assays for the detection of NLVs was evaluated in an international collaborative study by five laboratories in five countries with a coded panel of 91 fecal specimens. The assays were tested for their sensitivity, detection limit, and ease of standardization. In total, NLVs could be detected by at least one RT-PCR assay in 69 (84%) of the samples that originally tested positive. Sensitivity ranged from 52 to 73% overall and from 54 to 100% and 58 to 85% for genogroup I and II viruses, respectively. In all, 64% of the false-negative results were obtained with a set of diluted stools (n = 20) that may have lost quality upon storage. Sensitivity was improved when these samples were excluded from analysis. No one single assay stood out as the best, although the p1 assay demonstrated the most satisfactory overall performance. To promote comparability of data, this assay will be recommended for newly starting groups in future collaborative studies. PMID:12682125

  5. Novel real-time PCR detection assay for Brucella suis

    PubMed Central

    Hänsel, C.; Mertens, K.; Elschner, M. C.; Melzer, F.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Brucella suis is the causative agent of brucellosis in suidae and is differentiated into five biovars (bv). Biovars 1 and 3 possess zoonotic potential and can infect humans, whereas biovar 2 represents the main source of brucellosis in feral and domestic pigs in Europe. Both aspects, the zoonotic threat and the economic loss, emphasize the necessity to monitor feral and domestic pig populations. Available serological or PCR based methods lack sensitivity and specificity. Results Here a bioinformatics approach was used to identify a B. suis specific 17 bp repeat on chromosome II (BS1330_II0657 locus). This repeat is common for B. suis bv 1 to 4 and was used to develop a TaqMan probe assay. The average PCR efficiency was determined as 95% and the limit of detection as 12,5 fg/µl of DNA, equally to 3.7 bacterial genomes. This assay has the highest sensitivity of all previously described B. suis specific PCR assays, making it possible to detect 3-4 bacterial genomes per 1 µl of sample. The assay was tested 100% specific for B. suis and negative for other Brucella spp. and closely related non-Brucella species. Conclusions This novel qPCR assay could become a rapid, inexpensive and reliable screening method for large sample pools of B. suis 1 to 4. This method will be applicable for field samples after validation. PMID:26392898

  6. Rapid and sensitive detection of major uropathogens in a single-pot multiplex PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Padmavathy, B; Vinoth Kumar, R; Patel, Amee; Deepika Swarnam, S; Vaidehi, T; Jaffar Ali, B M

    2012-07-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is among the most common bacterial infections and poses a significant healthcare burden. Escherichia coli is the most common cause of UTI accounting for up to 70 % and a variable contribution from Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae. To establish a complete diagnostic system, we have developed a single-tube multiplex PCR assay (mPCR) for the detection of the above-mentioned four major uropathogens. The sensitivity of the assay was found to be as low as 10(2) cfu/ml of cells. The mPCR evaluated on 280 clinical isolates detected 100 % of E. coli, P. aeruginosa, P. mirabilis and 95 % of K. pneumonia. The assay was performed on 50 urine samples and found to be specific and sensitive for clinical diagnosis. In addition, the mPCR was also validated on spiked urine samples using 40 clinical isolates to demonstrate its application under different strain used in this assay. In total, mPCR reported here is a rapid and simple screening tool that can compete with conventional biochemical-based screening assays that may require 2-3 days for detection. PMID:22526571

  7. Development and validation of a real-time PCR assay for the detection of Aeromonas salmonicida.

    PubMed

    Keeling, S E; Brosnahan, C L; Johnston, C; Wallis, R; Gudkovs, N; McDonald, W L

    2013-05-01

    A real-time PCR assay using a molecular beacon was developed and validated to detect the vapA (surface array protein) gene in the fish pathogen, Aeromonas salmonicida. The assay had 100% analytical specificity and analytical sensitivities of 5 ± 0 fg (DNA), 2.2 × 10(4) ± 1 × 10(4) CFU g(-1) (without enrichment) and 40 ± 10 CFU g(-1) (with enrichment) in kidney tissue. The assay was highly repeatable and proved to be robust following equivalency testing using a different real-time PCR platform. Following analytical validation, diagnostic specificity was determined using New Zealand farmed Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum), (n = 750) and pink shubunkin, Carassius auratus (L.) (n = 157). The real-time PCR was run in parallel with culture and all fish tested were found to be negative by both methods for A. salmonicida, resulting in 100% diagnostic specificity (95% confidence interval). The molecular beacon real-time PCR system is specific, sensitive and a reproducible method for the detection of A. salmonicida. It can be used for diagnostic testing, health certification and active surveillance programmes. PMID:23121198

  8. Primer Extension Reactions for the PCR- based α- complementation Assay

    PubMed Central

    Achuthan, Vasudevan; DeStefano, Jeffrey J.

    2016-01-01

    The PCR- based- α- complementation assay is an effective technique to measure the fidelity of polymerases, especially RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRP) and Reverse Transcriptases (RT). It has been successfully employed to determine the fidelity of the poliovirus polymerase 3D-pol (DeStefano, 2010) as well as the human immunodeficiency virus Reverse Transcriptase (HIV RT) (Achuthan et al., 2014). A major advantage of the assay is that since the PCR step is involved, even the low yield of products obtained after two rounds of low yield of RNA synthesis (for RDRP) or reverse transcription (for RT) can be measured using the assay. The assay also mimics the reverse transcription process, since both RNA- and DNA- directed RT synthesis steps are performed. We recently used this assay to show that the HIV RT, at physiologically relevant magnesium concentration, has accuracy in the same range as other reverse transcriptases (Achuthan et al., 2014). Here, we describe in detail how to prepare the inserts using the primer extension reactions. The prepared inserts are then processed further in the PCR- based- α- complementation assay.

  9. Comparison of Droplet Digital PCR and Quantitative PCR Assays for Quantitative Detection of Xanthomonas citri Subsp. citri.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yun; Xia, Qingyan; Yin, Youping; Wang, Zhongkang

    2016-01-01

    Droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR) is a novel molecular biology technique providing absolute quantification of target nucleic acids without the need for an external calibrator. Despite its emerging applications in medical diagnosis, there are few reports of its use for the detection of plant pathogens. This work was designed to assess the diagnosis potential of the ddPCR for absolute quantitative detection of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri, a quarantine plant pathogenic bacterium that causes citrus bacterial canker in susceptible Citrus species. We transferred an established quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for citrus bacterial canker diagnosis directly to the ddPCR format and compared the performance of the two methods. The qPCR assay has a broader dynamic range compared to the ddPCR assay and the ddPCR assay has a significantly higher degree of sensitivity compared to the qPCR assay. The influence of PCR inhibitors can be reduced considerably in the ddPCR assay because the collection of end-point fluorescent signals and the counting of binomial events (positive or negative droplets) are associated with a Poisson algorithm. The ddPCR assay also shows lower coefficient of variation compared to the qPCR assay especially in low target concentration. The linear association of the measurements by ddPCR and qPCR assays is strong (Pearson correlation = 0.8633; P<0.001). Receiver operating characteristic analysis indicates the ddPCR methodology is a more robust approach for diagnosis of citrus bacterial canker. In summary, the results demonstrated that the ddPCR assay has the potential for the quantitative detection of X. citri subsp. citri with high precision and accuracy as compared with the results from qPCR assay. Further studies are required to evaluate and validate the value of ddPCR technology in the diagnosis of plant disease and quarantine applications. PMID:27427975

  10. Comparison of Droplet Digital PCR and Quantitative PCR Assays for Quantitative Detection of Xanthomonas citri Subsp. citri

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Youping; Wang, Zhongkang

    2016-01-01

    Droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR) is a novel molecular biology technique providing absolute quantification of target nucleic acids without the need for an external calibrator. Despite its emerging applications in medical diagnosis, there are few reports of its use for the detection of plant pathogens. This work was designed to assess the diagnosis potential of the ddPCR for absolute quantitative detection of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri, a quarantine plant pathogenic bacterium that causes citrus bacterial canker in susceptible Citrus species. We transferred an established quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for citrus bacterial canker diagnosis directly to the ddPCR format and compared the performance of the two methods. The qPCR assay has a broader dynamic range compared to the ddPCR assay and the ddPCR assay has a significantly higher degree of sensitivity compared to the qPCR assay. The influence of PCR inhibitors can be reduced considerably in the ddPCR assay because the collection of end-point fluorescent signals and the counting of binomial events (positive or negative droplets) are associated with a Poisson algorithm. The ddPCR assay also shows lower coefficient of variation compared to the qPCR assay especially in low target concentration. The linear association of the measurements by ddPCR and qPCR assays is strong (Pearson correlation = 0.8633; P<0.001). Receiver operating characteristic analysis indicates the ddPCR methodology is a more robust approach for diagnosis of citrus bacterial canker. In summary, the results demonstrated that the ddPCR assay has the potential for the quantitative detection of X. citri subsp. citri with high precision and accuracy as compared with the results from qPCR assay. Further studies are required to evaluate and validate the value of ddPCR technology in the diagnosis of plant disease and quarantine applications. PMID:27427975

  11. Development of a PCR Assay for Rapid Detection of Enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Danbing; Picard, François J.; Martineau, Francis; Ménard, Christian; Roy, Paul H.; Ouellette, Marc; Bergeron, Michel G.

    1999-01-01

    Enterococci are becoming major nosocomial pathogens, and increasing resistance to vancomycin has been well documented. Conventional identification methods, which are based on culturing, require 2 to 3 days to provide results. PCR has provided a means for the culture-independent detection of enterococci in a variety of clinical specimens and is capable of yielding results in just a few hours. However, all PCR-based assays developed so far are species specific only for clinically important enterococci. We have developed a PCR-based assay which allows the detection of enterococci at the genus level by targeting the tuf gene, which encodes elongation factor EF-Tu. Initially, we compared the nucleotide sequences of the tuf gene from several bacterial species (available in public databases) and designed degenerate PCR primers derived from conserved regions. These primers were used to amplify a target region of 803 bp from four enterococcal species (Enterococcus avium, E. faecalis, E. faecium, and E. gallinarum). Subsequently, the complete nucleotide sequences of these amplicons were determined. The analysis of a multiple alignment of these sequences revealed regions conserved among enterococci but distinct from those of other bacteria. PCR primers complementary to these regions allowed amplification of genomic DNAs from 14 of 15 species of enterococci tested (E. solitarius DNA could not be amplified). There was no amplification with a majority of 79 nonenterococcal bacterial species, except for 2 Abiotrophia species and several Listeria species. Furthermore, this assay efficiently amplified all 159 clinical isolates of enterococci tested (61 E. faecium, 77 E. faecalis, 9 E. gallinarum, and 12 E. casseliflavus isolates). Interestingly, the preliminary sequence comparison of the amplicons for four enterococcal species demonstrated that there were some sequence variations which may be used to generate species-specific internal probes. In conclusion, this rapid PCR

  12. Novel Multitarget Real-Time PCR Assay for Rapid Detection of Bordetella Species in Clinical Specimens ▿

    PubMed Central

    Tatti, Kathleen M.; Sparks, Kansas N.; Boney, Kathryn O.; Tondella, Maria Lucia

    2011-01-01

    A novel multitarget real-time PCR (RT-PCR) assay for the rapid identification of Bordetella pertussis, B. parapertussis, and B. holmesii was developed using multicopy insertion sequences (ISs) in combination with the pertussis toxin subunit S1 (ptxS1) singleplex assay. The RT-PCR targets for the multiplex assay include IS481, commonly found in B. pertussis and B. holmesii; IS1001 of B. parapertussis; and the IS1001-like sequence of B. holmesii. Overall, 402 Bordetella species and 66 non-Bordetella species isolates were tested in the multitarget assay. Cross-reactivity was found only with 5 B. bronchiseptica isolates, which were positive with IS1001 of B. parapertussis. The lower limit of detection (LLOD) of the multiplex assay was similar to the LLOD of each target in an individual assay format, which was approximately 1 genomic equivalent per reaction for all targets. A total of 197 human clinical specimens obtained during cough-illness outbreak investigations were used to evaluate the multitarget RT-PCR assay. The multiplex assay results from 87 clinical specimens were compared to the individual RT-PCR assay and culture results. The multitarget assay is useful as a diagnostic tool to confirm B. pertussis infections and to rapidly identify other Bordetella species. In conclusion, the use of this multitarget RT-PCR approach increases specificity, while it decreases the amount of time, reagents, and specimen necessary for RT-PCRs used for accurate diagnosis of pertussis-like illness. PMID:21940464

  13. Ready to use dry-reagent PCR assays for the four common bacterial pathogens using switchable lanthanide luminescence probe system.

    PubMed

    Lehmusvuori, A; Soikkeli, M; Tuunainen, E; Seppä, T; Spangar, A; Rantakokko-Jalava, K; von Lode, P; Karhunen, U; Soukka, T; Wittfooth, S

    2015-11-01

    Ready to use dry-reagent PCR assays for Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Pseudomonas spp. and for broad-range bacteria detection were developed. The assays were based on novel switchable lanthanide probes that provide sensitive target DNA detection with exceptionally high signal-to-background ratio, thus enabling clear discrimination between positive and negative results. For example, sensitivity of three S. aureus and two S. pneumonia bacteria (colony forming units) per PCR assay was measured with fluorescence signal more than 30 times over the background signal level. The rapid and easy-to-use assays are suitable for routine clinical diagnostics without molecular biology expertise and facilities. PMID:26342433

  14. Optimization of LipL32 PCR assay for increased sensitivity in diagnosing leptospirosis.

    PubMed

    Galloway, Renee L; Hoffmaster, Alex R

    2015-07-01

    Early diagnosis of leptospirosis in humans is critical with regard to initiation of appropriate treatment; however, the gold standard serological test cannot detect antibodies until nearly a week after symptom onset. PCR has been shown to be sensitive and specific in the early phase of leptospirosis. Previously, we developed and validated a TaqMan PCR assay targeting lipL32. We reoptimized and validated this assay using PerfeCTa® qPCR ToughMix®, Low ROX™ (Quanta Biosciences, Gaithersburg, MD, USA). For optimization with the new mix, the final primer concentrations were increased from 0.5 μmol/L to 0.9 μmol/L compared to our previous assay, and the probe concentration increased from 0.1 μmol/L to 0.125 μmol/L. This newly optimized assay resulted in a lower limit of detection and increased diagnostic sensitivity. Here, we present the performance data of the improved assay and describe several clinical cases that were initially negative but tested positive using the optimized assay. PMID:25912810

  15. Improved PCR-Based Detection of Soil Transmitted Helminth Infections Using a Next-Generation Sequencing Approach to Assay Design

    PubMed Central

    Pilotte, Nils; Papaiakovou, Marina; Grant, Jessica R.; Bierwert, Lou Ann; Llewellyn, Stacey; McCarthy, James S.; Williams, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The soil transmitted helminths are a group of parasitic worms responsible for extensive morbidity in many of the world’s most economically depressed locations. With growing emphasis on disease mapping and eradication, the availability of accurate and cost-effective diagnostic measures is of paramount importance to global control and elimination efforts. While real-time PCR-based molecular detection assays have shown great promise, to date, these assays have utilized sub-optimal targets. By performing next-generation sequencing-based repeat analyses, we have identified high copy-number, non-coding DNA sequences from a series of soil transmitted pathogens. We have used these repetitive DNA elements as targets in the development of novel, multi-parallel, PCR-based diagnostic assays. Methodology/Principal Findings Utilizing next-generation sequencing and the Galaxy-based RepeatExplorer web server, we performed repeat DNA analysis on five species of soil transmitted helminths (Necator americanus, Ancylostoma duodenale, Trichuris trichiura, Ascaris lumbricoides, and Strongyloides stercoralis). Employing high copy-number, non-coding repeat DNA sequences as targets, novel real-time PCR assays were designed, and assays were tested against established molecular detection methods. Each assay provided consistent detection of genomic DNA at quantities of 2 fg or less, demonstrated species-specificity, and showed an improved limit of detection over the existing, proven PCR-based assay. Conclusions/Significance The utilization of next-generation sequencing-based repeat DNA analysis methodologies for the identification of molecular diagnostic targets has the ability to improve assay species-specificity and limits of detection. By exploiting such high copy-number repeat sequences, the assays described here will facilitate soil transmitted helminth diagnostic efforts. We recommend similar analyses when designing PCR-based diagnostic tests for the detection of other

  16. Validation of a quantitative PCR assay for detection and quantification of 'Candidatus Xenohaliotis californiensis'.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Carolyn S; Wight, Nate; Crosson, Lisa M; White, Samuel J; Strenge, Robyn M

    2014-04-01

    Withering syndrome (WS), a serious disease affecting abalone Haliotis spp., is caused by infection from an intracellular Rickettsia-like organism (WS-RLO). Diagnosis of the disease currently relies on a combination of histological examination and molecular methods (in situ hybridization, standard PCR, and sequence analysis). However, these techniques only provide a semi-quantitative assessment of bacterial load. We created a real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay to specifically identify and enumerate bacterial loads of WS-RLO in abalone tissue, fecal, and seawater samples based on 16S rDNA gene copy numbers. The qPCR assay designed to detect DNA of the WS-RLO was validated according to standards set by the World Organisation for Animal Health. Standard curves derived from purified plasmid dilutions were linear across 7 logs of concentration, and efficiencies ranged from 90.2 to 97.4%. The limit of detection was 3 gene copies per reaction. Diagnostic sensitivity was 100% and specificity was 99.8%. The qPCR assay was robust, as evidenced by its high level of repeatability and reproducibility. This study has shown for the first time that WS-RLO DNA can be detected and quantified in abalone tissue, fecal, and seawater samples. The ability to detect and quantify RLO gene copies in a variety of materials will enable us to better understand transmission dynamics in both farmed and natural environments. PMID:24695238

  17. PCR diagnostic system in the treatment of prosthetic joint infections.

    PubMed

    Jahoda, D; Landor, I; Benedík, J; Pokorný, D; Judl, T; Barták, V; Jahodová, I; Fulín, P; Síbek, M

    2015-09-01

    In our prospective study, we examined whether a multiplex PCR diagnostic method is suitable for the primary detection of pathogens. We also examined the possibility and sensitivity of detecting genes responsible for biofilm production and methicillin resistance. From 2007 to 2009, 94 patients were included in the study. A UNB (universal detection of 16S ribosomal bacterial DNA) and UNF (universal detection of pathogenic fungi) were used in the primary detection. A multiplex assay for biofilm production, methicillin resistance allowed us to distinguish between Gram positivity and negativity and to detect Staphylococci. From all the samples, the culture was positive in 53.2 % of cases, and by using the UNB method, we detected bacteria in 79.8 % of cases-the UNF detection of fungi was positive in 10.6 % of cases. In 75 % of positive findings, we detected a Gram-negative bacterium in 65.3 % of cases. In 47.2 % of Staphylococci detected, the ability to produce biofilm was confirmed. 61.1 % of the Staphylococci exhibited a methicillin resistance. Our multiplex scheme cannot yet fully replace microbial cultivation but can be a rational guide when choosing an appropriate antibiotic therapy in cases where the microbial culture is negative. PMID:25523034

  18. Use of Bacteriophage MS2 as an Internal Control in Viral Reverse Transcription-PCR Assays

    PubMed Central

    Dreier, Jens; Störmer, Melanie; Kleesiek, Knut

    2005-01-01

    Diagnostic systems based on reverse transcription (RT)-PCR are widely used for the detection of viral genomes in different human specimens. The application of internal controls (IC) to monitor each step of nucleic acid amplification is necessary to prevent false-negative results due to inhibition or human error. In this study, we designed various real-time RT-PCRs utilizing the coliphage MS2 replicase gene, which differ in detection format, amplicon size, and efficiency of amplification. These noncompetitive IC assays, using TaqMan, hybridization probe, or duplex scorpion probe techniques, were tested on the LightCycler and Rotorgene systems. In our approach, clinical specimens were spiked with the control virus to monitor the efficiency of extraction, reverse transcription, and amplification steps. The MS2 RT-PCR assays were applied for internal control when using a second target hepatitis C virus RNA in duplex PCR in blood donor screening. The 95% detection limit was calculated by probit analysis to 44.9 copies per PCR (range, 38.4 to 73.4). As demonstrated routinely, application of MS2 IC assays exhibits low variability and can be applied in various RT-PCR assays. MS2 phage lysates were obtained under standard laboratory conditions. The quantification of phage and template RNA was performed by plating assays to determine PFU or via real-time RT-PCR. High stability of the MS2 phage preparations stored at −20°C, 4°C, and room temperature was demonstrated. PMID:16145106

  19. Evaluation of Chikungunya Diagnostic Assays: Differences in Sensitivity of Serology Assays in Two Independent Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Grace; Pok, Kwoon-Yong; Lai, Yee-Ling; Hapuarachchi, Hapuarachchige-Chanditha; Chow, Angela; Leo, Yee-Sin; Tan, Li-Kiang; Ng, Lee-Ching

    2010-01-01

    Background The sensitivity and specificity of two in-house MAC-ELISA assays were tested and compared with the performance of commercially-available CTK lateral flow rapid test and EUROIMMUN IFA assays for the detection of anti-Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) IgM. Each MAC-ELISA assay used a whole virus-based antigen derived from genetically distinct CHIKV strains involved in two chikungunya disease outbreaks in Singapore (2008); a January outbreak strain with alanine at amino acid residue 226 of the E1 glycoprotein (CHIKV-A226) and a May-to-September outbreak strain that possessed valine at the same residue (CHIKV-226V). We report differences in IgM detection efficacy of different assays between the two outbreaks. The sensitivities of two PCR protocols were also tested. Methods and Findings For sera from January outbreak, the average detection threshold of CTK lateral flow test, MAC-ELISAs and EUROIMMUN IFA assays was 3.75, 4.38 and 4.88 days post fever onset respectively. In contrast, IgM detection using CTK lateral flow test was delayed to more than 7 days after fever onset in the second outbreak sera. However, MAC-ELISA using CHIKV-226V detected IgM in the second outbreak sera 3.96 days after fever onset, which was approximately one day earlier compared to the same assay using CHIKV-A226 (4.86 days). Specificity was 100% for both commercial assays, and 95.6% for the in-house MAC-ELISAs. For sensitivity determination of the PCR protocols, the probe-based real time RT-PCR method was found to be 10 times more sensitive than one based on SYBR Green. Conclusion Our findings suggested that the two strains of CHIKV using variants A226 and 226V resulted in variation in sensitivities of the assays evaluated. We postulated that the observed difference in antigen efficacy could be due to the amino acid substitution differences in viral E1 and E2 envelope proteins, especially the E1-A226V substitution. This evaluation demonstrates the importance of appraisal of different

  20. Identification and Differentiation of Verticillium Species and V. longisporum Lineages by Simplex and Multiplex PCR Assays

    PubMed Central

    Inderbitzin, Patrik; Davis, R. Michael; Bostock, Richard M.; Subbarao, Krishna V.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate species identification is essential for effective plant disease management, but is challenging in fungi including Verticillium sensu stricto (Ascomycota, Sordariomycetes, Plectosphaerellaceae), a small genus of ten species that includes important plant pathogens. Here we present fifteen PCR assays for the identification of all recognized Verticillium species and the three lineages of the diploid hybrid V. longisporum. The assays were based on DNA sequence data from the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region, and coding and non-coding regions of actin, elongation factor 1-alpha, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and tryptophan synthase genes. The eleven single target (simplex) PCR assays resulted in amplicons of diagnostic size for V. alfalfae, V. albo-atrum, V. dahliae including V. longisporum lineage A1/D3, V. isaacii, V. klebahnii, V. nonalfalfae, V. nubilum, V. tricorpus, V. zaregamsianum, and Species A1 and Species D1, the two undescribed ancestors of V. longisporum. The four multiple target (multiplex) PCR assays simultaneously differentiated the species or lineages within the following four groups: Verticillium albo-atrum, V. alfalfae and V. nonalfalfae; Verticillium dahliae and V. longisporum lineages A1/D1, A1/D2 and A1/D3; Verticillium dahliae including V. longisporum lineage A1/D3, V. isaacii, V. klebahnii and V. tricorpus; Verticillium isaacii, V. klebahnii and V. tricorpus. Since V. dahliae is a parent of two of the three lineages of the diploid hybrid V. longisporum, no simplex PCR assay is able to differentiate V. dahliae from all V. longisporum lineages. PCR assays were tested with fungal DNA extracts from pure cultures, and were not evaluated for detection and quantification of Verticillium species from plant or soil samples. The DNA sequence alignments are provided and can be used for the design of additional primers. PMID:23823707

  1. Use of PCR in resolving diagnostic difficulties potentially caused by genetic variation of hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed Central

    van Deursen, F J; Hino, K; Wyatt, D; Molyneaux, P; Yates, P; Wallace, L A; Dow, B C; Carman, W F

    1998-01-01

    AIMS: To assess the relevance of genetic variants of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and to demonstrate the usefulness of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in cases of HBV diagnostic difficulty. METHODS: Five serum samples from patients that presented diagnostic difficulty in routine laboratories were sent to a research laboratory for PCR, and if appropriate, S gene sequencing, in vitro expression, and antigenic analysis. RESULTS: The demonstration of HBV in serum by PCR allowed a definitive diagnosis of current infection. One serum sample with poor reactivity in a diagnostic assay had a minor hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) variant and another with very poor reactivity had multiple variants of HBsAg. Transient HBsAg reactivity was observed in a recently vaccinated patient. A hepatitis Be antigen (HBeAg) false positive reaction was noted in a patient from a well defined risk group for HBV. One patient who was strongly HBsAg/HBeAg positive, but anti-hepatitis B core antibody negative, was viraemic. CONCLUSIONS: PCR may become the gold standard for the diagnosis of current HBV infection. HBV variants are responsible for a proportion of diagnostically difficult cases. Modification of commercial assays is necessary to increase the sensitivity of detection of such variants. PMID:9602690

  2. Real-Time PCR Assays for Detection of Bocavirus in Human Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaoyan; Chittaganpitch, Malinee; Olsen, Sonja J.; Mackay, Ian M.; Sloots, Theo P.; Fry, Alicia M.; Erdman, Dean D.

    2006-01-01

    The recently discovered human bocavirus (HBoV) is the first member of the family Parvoviridae, genus Bocavirus, to be potentially associated with human disease. Several studies have identified HBoV in respiratory specimens from children with acute respiratory disease, but the full spectrum of clinical disease and the epidemiology of HBoV infection remain unclear. The availability of rapid and reliable molecular diagnostics would therefore aid future studies of this novel virus. To address this, we developed two sensitive and specific real-time TaqMan PCR assays that target the HBoV NS1 and NP-1 genes. Both assays could reproducibly detect 10 copies of a recombinant DNA plasmid containing a partial region of the HBoV genome, with a dynamic range of 8 log units (101 to 108 copies). Eight blinded clinical specimen extracts positive for HBoV by an independent PCR assay were positive by both real-time assays. Among 1,178 NP swabs collected from hospitalized pneumonia patients in Sa Kaeo Province, Thailand, 53 (4.5%) were reproducibly positive for HBoV by one or both targets. Our data confirm the possible association of HBoV infection with pneumonia and demonstrate the utility of these real-time PCR assays for HBoV detection. PMID:16954253

  3. Multiplex PCR and Reverse Line Blot Hybridization Assay (mPCR/RLB)

    PubMed Central

    O'Sullivan, Matthew V. N.; Zhou, Fei; Sintchenko, Vitali; Kong, Fanrong; Gilbert, Gwendolyn L.

    2011-01-01

    Multiplex PCR/Reverse Line Blot Hybridization assay allows the detection of up to 43 molecular targets in 43 samples using one multiplex PCR reaction followed by probe hybridization on a nylon membrane, which is re-usable. Probes are 5' amine modified to allow fixation to the membrane. Primers are 5' biotin modified which allows detection of hybridized PCR products using streptavidin-peroxidase and a chemiluminescent substrate via photosensitive film. With low setup and consumable costs, this technique is inexpensive (approximately US$2 per sample), high throughput (multiple membranes can be processed simultaneously) and has a short turnaround time (approximately 10 hours). The technique can be utilized in a number of ways. Multiple probes can be designed to detect sequence variation within a single amplified product, or multiple products can be amplified simultaneously, with one (or more) probes used for subsequent detection. A combination of both approaches can also be used within a single assay. The ability to include multiple probes for a single target sequence makes the assay highly specific. Published applications of mPCR/RLB include detection of antibiotic resistance genes1,2, typing of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus3-5 and Salmonella sp6, molecular serotyping of Streptococcus pneumoniae7,8, Streptococcus agalactiae9 and enteroviruses10,11, identification of Mycobacterium sp12, detection of genital13-15 and respiratory tract16 and other17 pathogens and detection and identification of mollicutes18. However, the versatility of the technique means the applications are virtually limitless and not restricted to molecular analysis of micro-organisms. The five steps in mPCR/RLB are a) Primer and Probe design, b) DNA extraction and PCR amplification c) Preparation of the membrane, d) Hybridization and detection, and e) Regeneration of the Membrane. PMID:21847083

  4. Genetic detection of Babesia bigemina from Mongolian cattle using apical membrane antigen-1 gene-based PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Altangerel, Khukhuu; Battsetseg, Badgar; Battur, Banzragch; Aboulaila, Mahmoud; Munkhjargal, Tserendorj; Yoshinari, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Igarashi, Ikuo

    2012-06-01

    We developed a new nested PCR (nPCR) assay based on the Babesia bigemina apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA-1) gene sequence for parasite-specific detection. The primers were designed to amplify 738-bp and 211-bp fragments of the AMA-1 gene by primary and nested PCRs, respectively. The assay was proven to be specific for the B. bigemina, whereas the previously established SpeI-AvaI nPCR assay amplified not only the target fragment of B. bigemina but also a homologous one from Babesia ovata. The AMA-1 nPCR assay was also evaluated using field DNA samples extracted from 266 bovine blood samples collected from Mongolia in 2010. In a comparative evaluation, 90 (33.8%) and 25 (9.4%) of the blood samples showed positive reactions for B. bigemina by the SpeI-AvaI nPCR and AMA-1 nPCR assays, respectively. The sequencing analysis of the nPCR products confirmed that the AMA-1 nPCR method had specifically detected the target B. bigemina DNA. However, 4 different kinds of sequences were determined among the SpeI-AvaI nPCR amplicons. Two of them were derived from B. bigemina and B. ovata, while the origins of the others were unknown. In the current study, the presence of B. bigemina was clearly demonstrated among Mongolian cattle populations by the current nPCR assay for the first time. Furthermore, our findings also indicate that the AMA-1 nPCR assay may be a useful diagnostic tool for the specific detection of B. bigemina. PMID:22284301

  5. Universal Single-Probe RT-PCR Assay for Diagnosis of Dengue Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Alm, Erik; Lesko, Birgitta; Lindegren, Gunnel; Ahlm, Clas; Söderholm, Sandra; Falk, Kerstin I.; Lagerqvist, Nina

    2014-01-01

    Background Dengue is a mosquito-borne viral disease that has become more prevalent in the last few decades. Most patients are viremic when they present with symptoms, and early diagnosis of dengue is important in preventing severe clinical complications associated with this disease and also represents a key factor in differential diagnosis. Here, we designed and validated a hydrolysis-probe-based one-step real-time RT-PCR assay that targets the genomes of dengue virus serotypes 1–4. Methodology/Principal Findings The primers and probe used in our RT-PCR assay were designed to target the 3′ untranslated region of all complete genome sequences of dengue virus available in GenBank (n = 3,305). Performance of the assay was evaluated using in vitro transcribed RNA, laboratory-adapted virus strains, external control panels, and clinical specimens. The linear dynamic range was found to be 104–1011 GCE/mL, and the detection limit was between 6.0×102 and 1.1×103 GCE/mL depending on target sequence. The assay did not cross-react with human RNA, nor did it produce false-positive results for other human pathogenic flaviviruses or clinically important etiological agents of febrile illnesses. We used clinical serum samples obtained from returning travelers with dengue-compatible symptomatology (n = 163) to evaluate the diagnostic relevance of our assay, and laboratory diagnosis performed by the RT-PCR assay had 100% positive agreement with diagnosis performed by NS1 antigen detection. In a retrospective evaluation including 60 archived serum samples collected from confirmed dengue cases 1–9 days after disease onset, the RT-PCR assay detected viral RNA up to 9 days after appearance of symptoms. Conclusions/Significance The validation of the RT-PCR assay presented here indicates that this technique can be a reliable diagnostic tool, and hence we suggest that it be introduced as the method of choice during the first 5 days of dengue symptoms. PMID:25522325

  6. Sensitive multiplex PCR assay to differentiate Lyme spirochetes and emerging pathogens Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Babesia microti

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The infection with Borrelia burgdorferi can result in acute to chronic Lyme disease. In addition, coinfection with tick-borne pathogens, Babesia species and Anaplasma phagocytophilum has been increasing in endemic regions of the USA and Europe. The currently used serological diagnostic tests are often difficult to interpret and, moreover, antibodies against the pathogens persist for a long time making it difficult to confirm the cure of the disease. In addition, these tests cannot be used for diagnosis of early disease state before the adaptive immune response is established. Since nucleic acids of the pathogens do not persist after the cure, DNA-based diagnostic tests are becoming highly useful for detecting infectious diseases. Results In this study, we describe a real-time multiplex PCR assay to detect the presence of B. burgdorferi, B. microti and A. phagocytophilum simultaneously even when they are present in very low copy numbers. Interestingly, this quantitative PCR technique is also able to differentiate all three major Lyme spirochete species, B. burgdorferi, B. afzelii, and B. garinii by utilizing a post-PCR denaturation profile analysis and a single molecular beacon probe. This could be very useful for diagnosis and discrimination of various Lyme spirochetes in European countries where all three Lyme spirochete species are prevalent. As proof of the principle for patient samples, we detected the presence of low number of Lyme spirochetes spiked in the human blood using our assay. Finally, our multiplex assay can detect all three tick-borne pathogens in a sensitive and specific manner irrespective of the level of each pathogen present in the sample. We anticipate that this novel diagnostic method will be able to simultaneously diagnose early to chronic stages of Lyme disease, babesiosis and anaplasmosis using the patients’ blood samples. Conclusion Real-time quantitative PCR using specific primers and molecular beacon probes for the selected

  7. Rapid semi-automated quantitative multiplex tandem PCR (MT-PCR) assays for the differential diagnosis of influenza-like illness

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Influenza A, including avian influenza, is a major public health threat in developed and developing countries. Rapid and accurate detection is a key component of strategies to contain spread of infection, and the efficient diagnosis of influenza-like-illness is essential to protect health infrastructure in the event of a major influenza outbreak. Methods We developed a multiplexed PCR (MT-PCR) assay for the simultaneous diagnosis of respiratory viruses causing influenza-like illness, including the specific recognition of influenza A haemagglutinin subtypes H1, H3, and H5. We tested several hundred clinical specimens in two diagnostic reference laboratories and compared the results with standard techniques. Results The sensitivity and specificity of these assays was higher than individual assays based on direct antigen detection and standard PCR against a range of control templates and in several hundred clinical specimens. The MT-PCR assays provided differential diagnoses as well as potentially useful quantitation of virus in clinical samples. Conclusions MT-PCR is a potentially powerful tool for the differential diagnosis of influenza-like illness in the clinical diagnostic laboratory. PMID:20459845

  8. Species identification of cattle and buffalo fat through PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Vaithiyanathan, S; Kulkarni, V V

    2016-04-01

    A method was standardized to isolate quality DNA from cattle and buffalo fat for species identification using QIAamp DNA stool mini kit. The quality of the DNA was sufficient enough to amplify universal primers viz., mt 12S rRNA and mt 16S rRNA, and species specific D loop primers for cattle and buffalo. The sensitivity of the PCR assay in the species specific D loop primer amplification was with a detection level of 0. 47 ng cattle DNA and 0.23 ng buffalo DNA in simplex and, 0. 47 ng cattle DNA and 0.12 ng buffalo DNA in duplex PCR. It is a potentially reliable method for DNA detection to authenticate animal fat. PMID:27413237

  9. Demonstration of Array-Based Analysis for Highly Multiplexed PCR Assays

    PubMed Central

    Spence, Janice M.; Rothberg, Paul G.; Wang, Nancy; Burack, W. Richard

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate an approach that allowed rapid development of a robust assay for the detection of chromosomal translocations. The method includes highly multiplexed PCR with analysis of the PCR products performed by array detection. As proof of principle, we applied this approach to the detection of IGH@-BCL2 translocations in DNA prepared from FFPE specimens. This translocation and specimen type were chosen because of the known difficulties associated with PCR-based detection of this lesion and the additional loss of sensitivity associated with FFPE samples. The multiplex PCR with array detection method detected the IGH@-BCL2 translocation in 26 of 36 FFPE follicular lymphoma specimens, whereas the BIOMED-2 assay detected 13 of 36 specimens. This increased sensitivity was the result of both the increased density of BCL2 primers and identification of PCR products by low-density array. The method was specific and allowed mapping of the BCL2 break point in all cases. The method detected the IGH@-BCL2 lesion when the tumor DNA was diluted more than 1:20 in normal DNA but not when it was diluted more than 1:100. This sensitivity allows detection of diagnostically relevant levels of IGH@-BCL2 but will not detect the rare cells with IGH@-BCL2 translocations in healthy individuals. PMID:21497287

  10. Rapid, multiplex-tandem PCR assay for automated detection and differentiation of toxigenic cyanobacterial blooms.

    PubMed

    Baker, Louise; Sendall, Barbara C; Gasser, Robin B; Menjivar, Toni; Neilan, Brett A; Jex, Aaron R

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobacterial blooms are a major water quality issue and potential public health risk in freshwater, marine and estuarine ecosystems globally, because of their potential to produce cyanotoxins. To date, a significant challenge in the effective management of cyanobacterial has been an inability of classical microscopy-based approaches to consistently and reliably detect and differentiate toxic from non-toxic blooms. The potential of cyanobacteria to produce toxins has been linked to the presence of specific biosynthetic gene clusters. Here, we describe the application of a robotic PCR-based assay for the semi-automated and simultaneous detection of toxin biosynthesis genes of each of the toxin classes characterized to date for cyanobacteria [i.e., microcystins (MCYs), nodularins (NODs), cylindrospermopsins (CYNs) and paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs)/saxitoxins (SXTs)]. We demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity for each assay using well-characterized, cultured isolates, and establish its utility as a quantitative PCR using DNA, clone and cell-based dilution series. In addition, we used 206 field-collected samples and 100 known negative controls to compare the performance of each assay with conventional PCR and direct toxin detection. We report a diagnostic specificity of 100% and a sensitivity of ≥97.7% for each assay. PMID:23850895

  11. Screening metagenomic data for viruses using the E-Probe Diagnostic Nucleic Acid Assay (EDNA)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are many plant pathogen-specific diagnostic assays, based on PCR and immune-detection. However, the ability to test for large numbers of pathogens simultaneously is lacking. Next generation sequencing (NGS) allows one to detect all organisms within a given sample, but has computational limitat...

  12. Detection of four important Eimeria species by multiplex PCR in a single assay.

    PubMed

    You, Myung-Jo

    2014-06-01

    The oocysts of some of the recognized species of chicken coccidiosis are difficult to distinguish morphologically. Diagnostic laboratories are increasingly utilizing DNA-based technologies for the specific identification of Eimeria species. This study reports a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay based on internal transcribed spacer-1 (ITS-1) for the simultaneous diagnosis of the Eimeria tenella, Eimeria acervulina, Eimeria maxima, and Eimeria necatrix species, which infect domestic fowl. Primer pairs specific to each species were designed in order to generate a ladder of amplification products ranging from 20 to 25 bp, and a common optimum annealing temperature for these species was determined to be 52.5 °C. Sensitivity tests were performed for each species, showing a detection threshold of 1-5 pg. All the species were amplified homogeneously, and a homogenous band ladder was observed, indicating that the assay permitted the simultaneous detection of all the species in a single-tube reaction. In the phylogenic study, there was a clear species clustering, which was irrespective of geographical location, for all the ITS-1 sequences used. This multiplex PCR assay represents a rapid and potential cost-effective diagnostic method for the detection of some key Eimeria species that infect domestic fowl. PMID:24495953

  13. Computational tradeoffs in multiplex PCR assay design for SNP genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Rachlin, John; Ding, Chunming; Cantor, Charles; Kasif, Simon

    2005-01-01

    Background Multiplex PCR is a key technology for detecting infectious microorganisms, whole-genome sequencing, forensic analysis, and for enabling flexible yet low-cost genotyping. However, the design of a multiplex PCR assays requires the consideration of multiple competing objectives and physical constraints, and extensive computational analysis must be performed in order to identify the possible formation of primer-dimers that can negatively impact product yield. Results This paper examines the computational design limits of multiplex PCR in the context of SNP genotyping and examines tradeoffs associated with several key design factors including multiplexing level (the number of primer pairs per tube), coverage (the % of SNP whose associated primers are actually assigned to one of several available tube), and tube-size uniformity. We also examine how design performance depends on the total number of available SNPs from which to choose, and primer stringency criterial. We show that finding high-multiplexing/high-coverage designs is subject to a computational phase transition, becoming dramatically more difficult when the probability of primer pair interaction exceeds a critical threshold. The precise location of this critical transition point depends on the number of available SNPs and the level of multiplexing required. We also demonstrate how coverage performance is impacted by the number of available snps, primer selection criteria, and target multiplexing levels. Conclusion The presence of a phase transition suggests limits to scaling Multiplex PCR performance for high-throughput genomics applications. Achieving broad SNP coverage rapidly transitions from being very easy to very hard as the target multiplexing level (# of primer pairs per tube) increases. The onset of a phase transition can be "delayed" by having a larger pool of SNPs, or loosening primer selection constraints so as to increase the number of candidate primer pairs per SNP, though the latter

  14. A Pentaplex PCR Assay for the Detection and Differentiation of Shigella Species

    PubMed Central

    Ojha, Suvash Chandra; Yean Yean, Chan; Ismail, Asma; Banga Singh, Kirnpal-Kaur

    2013-01-01

    The magnitude of shigellosis in developing countries is largely unknown because an affordable detection method is not available. Current laboratory diagnosis of Shigella spp. is laborious and time consuming and has low sensitivity. Hence, in the present study, a molecular-based diagnostic assay which amplifies simultaneously four specific genes to identify invC for Shigella genus, rfc for S. flexneri, wbgZ for S. sonnei, and rfpB for S. dysenteriae, as well as one internal control (ompA) gene, was developed in a single reaction to detect and differentiate Shigella spp. Validation with 120 Shigella strains and 37 non-Shigella strains yielded 100% specificity. The sensitivity of the PCR was 100 pg of genomic DNA, 5.4 × 104 CFU/ml, or approximately 120 CFU per reaction mixture of bacteria. The sensitivity of the pentaplex PCR assay was further improved following preincubation of the stool samples in Gram-negative broth. A preliminary study with 30 diarrhoeal specimens resulted in no cross-reaction with other non-Shigella strains tested. We conclude that the developed pentaplex PCR assay is robust and can provide information about the four target genes that are essential for the identification of the Shigella genus and the three Shigella species responsible for the majority of shigellosis cases. PMID:23509722

  15. Virological Diagnosis of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Esophagitis by Quantitative Real-Time PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Jazeron, Jean-François; Barbe, Coralie; Frobert, Emilie; Renois, Fanny; Talmud, Déborah; Brixi-Benmansour, Hedia; Brodard, Véronique; Andréoletti, Laurent; Diebold, Marie-Danièle

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) esophagitis diagnosis is routinely based on the endoscopic findings confirmed by histopathological examination of the esophagitis lesions. Virological diagnosis is not systematically performed and restricted to viral culture or to qualitative PCR assay from esophagitis biopsy specimens. The aim of this study was to assess the interest of quantitative real-time PCR assay in HSV-1 esophagitis diagnosis by comparing the results obtained to those of histological examination associated with immunohistochemical staining, which is considered the “gold standard.” From 53 esophagitis biopsy specimens, the PCR assay detected HSV-1 in 18 of 19 histologically proven to have herpetic esophagitis and in 9 of 34 that had esophagitis related to other causes, demonstrating sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of 94.7%, 73%, 66.7%, and 96%, respectively. Interestingly, HSV-1 was not detected in 16 specimens without the histological aspect of esophagitis. The viral loads normalized per μg of total extracted DNA in each biopsy specimen detected positive by HSV PCR were then compared and appeared to be significantly higher in histopathologically positive herpetic esophagitis (median = 2.9 × 106 ± 1.1 × 108) than in histopathologically negative herpetic esophagitis (median = 3.1 × 103 ± 6.2 × 103) (P = 0.0009). Moreover, a receiver operating characteristics analysis revealed that a viral load threshold greater than 2.5 × 104 copies would allow an HSV-1 esophagitis diagnosis with a sensitivity and specificity of 83.3% and 100%, respectively. In conclusion, this work demonstrated that HSV quantitative PCR results for paraffin-embedded esophageal tissue was well correlated to histopathological findings for an HSV-1 esophagitis diagnosis and could be diagnostic through viral load assessment when histopathological results are missing or uncertain. PMID:22170921

  16. Virological diagnosis of herpes simplex virus 1 esophagitis by quantitative real-time PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Jazeron, Jean-François; Barbe, Coralie; Frobert, Emilie; Renois, Fanny; Talmud, Déborah; Brixi-Benmansour, Hedia; Brodard, Véronique; Andréoletti, Laurent; Diebold, Marie-Danièle; Lévêque, Nicolas

    2012-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) esophagitis diagnosis is routinely based on the endoscopic findings confirmed by histopathological examination of the esophagitis lesions. Virological diagnosis is not systematically performed and restricted to viral culture or to qualitative PCR assay from esophagitis biopsy specimens. The aim of this study was to assess the interest of quantitative real-time PCR assay in HSV-1 esophagitis diagnosis by comparing the results obtained to those of histological examination associated with immunohistochemical staining, which is considered the "gold standard." From 53 esophagitis biopsy specimens, the PCR assay detected HSV-1 in 18 of 19 histologically proven to have herpetic esophagitis and in 9 of 34 that had esophagitis related to other causes, demonstrating sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of 94.7%, 73%, 66.7%, and 96%, respectively. Interestingly, HSV-1 was not detected in 16 specimens without the histological aspect of esophagitis. The viral loads normalized per μg of total extracted DNA in each biopsy specimen detected positive by HSV PCR were then compared and appeared to be significantly higher in histopathologically positive herpetic esophagitis (median = 2.9 × 10(6) ± 1.1 × 10(8)) than in histopathologically negative herpetic esophagitis (median = 3.1 × 10(3) ± 6.2 × 10(3)) (P = 0.0009). Moreover, a receiver operating characteristics analysis revealed that a viral load threshold greater than 2.5 × 10(4) copies would allow an HSV-1 esophagitis diagnosis with a sensitivity and specificity of 83.3% and 100%, respectively. In conclusion, this work demonstrated that HSV quantitative PCR results for paraffin-embedded esophageal tissue was well correlated to histopathological findings for an HSV-1 esophagitis diagnosis and could be diagnostic through viral load assessment when histopathological results are missing or uncertain. PMID:22170921

  17. Comparison of Commercial Real-Time PCR Assays for Quantification of Epstein-Barr Virus DNA

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Guillermo; Peña, Pilar; de Ory, Fernando; Echevarría, Juan Emilio

    2005-01-01

    Clinical research suggests a role for viral load measurement in predicting and monitoring Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated diseases. The aim of this study was to assess the performance of the recently commercially available quantitative assays for EBV based on real-time PCR: the RealArt EBV LC PCR kit and the LightCycler EBV quantification kit. A total of 87 samples were analyzed: 67 samples were obtained from transplant recipients and patients with EBV-associated diseases, 8 samples were obtained from the Quality Control for Molecular Diagnostics 2002 EBV Proficiency Program, and 12 negative qualitative nested PCR samples were used as negative controls. Inter- and intra-assay variabilities were determined by running replicates of two samples. All samples were run in a LightCycler instrument. The differences between positive and negative results were not considered statistically significant (P = 0.5355). There were no false-positive results using either method for nested PCR negative-control samples. The difference in viral load values using the two different methods was considered statistically significant (P < 0.01). The logarithmic linear correlation for both assays was low (r = 0.449) but significant (P < 0.01). The LightCycler EBV quantification kit showed a wider dispersal in results but produced substantially more-accurate melting temperature profile curves. The bias towards lower measurements was considerable in comparison with higher viral load. The differences in PCR efficiency and the presence of mutations could explain the disparity between the two methods. It was concluded that confidence intervals would be required to report the results rather than plain absolute values of viral load for patient monitoring. PMID:15872221

  18. Detection of Legionella Contamination in Tabriz Hospitals by PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Ghotaslou, Reza; Yeganeh Sefidan, Fatemeh; Akhi, Mohammad Taghi; Soroush, Mohammad Hussein; Hejazi, Mohammad Saeid

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The present study was designed to evaluate the occurrence of Legionella contamination in the tap water of Tabriz hospitals, Azerbaijan, Iran. Methods: One hundred and forty water samples from diverse water supply systems of 17 hospitals were collected and analyzed for the presence of Legionella spp. by PCR assay. Results: In this study, 10 of 140 (7.1%) samples were positive for Legionella which L. pneumophila was detected in 4 (2.85%) water samples. Conclusion: In conclusion, hospital potable systems are the primary reservoirs for Legionnaires’ disease. This study concludes that Legionella spp. are present in aquatic hospitals environment of Tabriz. Due to the serious risk of infections, it is better to make efforts to eliminate Legionella spp. in water supplies. PMID:24312825

  19. Duplex Real-Time RT-PCR Assays for the Detection and Typing of Epizootic Haemorrhagic Disease Virus

    PubMed Central

    Viarouge, Cyril; Breard, Emmanuel; Zientara, Stephan; Vitour, Damien; Sailleau, Corinne

    2015-01-01

    Epizootic haemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) may cause severe clinical episodes in some species of deer and sometimes in cattle. Laboratory diagnosis provides a basis for the design and timely implementation of disease control measures. There are seven distinct EHDV serotypes, VP2 coding segment 2 being the target for serotype specificity. This paper reports the development and validation of eight duplex real-time RT-PCR assays to simultaneously amplify the EHDV target (S9 for the pan-EHDV real-time RT-PCR assay and S2 for the serotyping assays) and endogenous control gene Beta-actin. Analytical and diagnostic sensitivity and specificity, inter- and intra-assay variation and efficiency were evaluated for each assay. All were shown to be highly specific and sensitive. PMID:26161784

  20. Single-tube nested PCR assay for the detection of avian botulism in cecal contents of chickens.

    PubMed

    Jang, Il; Lee, Jae-Il; Kwon, Yong-Kuk; Kang, Min-Su; Kim, Hye-Ryoung; Park, Ji-Young; Lee, Song-Hyun; Lee, Hee-Soo; Bae, You-Chan

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes a novel diagnostic method for the detection of avian botulism caused by Clostridium botulinum type C and C/D, using single-tube nested PCR assay. This assay was developed to overcome the disadvantages of bioassays used in experiments with mice. Three primer pairs including an antisense primer were designed to target the N-terminal of the toxin gene from C. botulinum types C and C/D. The specificity of the PCR assay was confirmed by using 33 bacterial strains and chicken cecal contents from farms that experienced botulism outbreaks. The detection limit for purified DNA was 1.1 fg/μl, and for bacterial spores was 4.3 spores/200 mg of cecal contents. While checking for specificity of the PCR assay, the reactions with the templates form C. botulinum type C and C/D which were tested became positive, but the rest of the reactions turned negative. However, the results for all clinical samples (n = 8) were positive. The PCR assay results for cecal samples obtained from 300 healthy chickens (150 Korean native chickens and 150 broilers) were all negative. This assay is rapid and straightforward and evades ethical issues associated with mouse bioassay. Moreover, it is more economical than real-time PCR. PMID:26159405

  1. Bioengineering of Tobacco Mosaic Virus to Create a Non-Infectious Positive Control for Ebola Diagnostic Assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Patricia; Gulati, Neetu M.; Stewart, Phoebe L.; Keri, Ruth A.; Steinmetz, Nicole F.

    2016-03-01

    The 2014 Ebola epidemic is the largest to date. There is no cure or treatment for this deadly disease; therefore there is an urgent need to develop new diagnostics to accurately detect Ebola. Current RT-PCR assays lack sensitive and reliable positive controls. To address this critical need, we devised a bio-inspired positive control for use in RT-PCR diagnostics: we encapsulated scrambled Ebola RNA sequences inside of tobacco mosaic virus to create a biomimicry that is non-infectious, but stable, and could therefore serve as a positive control in Ebola diagnostic assays. Here, we report the bioengineering and validation of this probe.

  2. Bioengineering of Tobacco Mosaic Virus to Create a Non-Infectious Positive Control for Ebola Diagnostic Assays

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Patricia; Gulati, Neetu M.; Stewart, Phoebe L.; Keri, Ruth A.; Steinmetz, Nicole F.

    2016-01-01

    The 2014 Ebola epidemic is the largest to date. There is no cure or treatment for this deadly disease; therefore there is an urgent need to develop new diagnostics to accurately detect Ebola. Current RT-PCR assays lack sensitive and reliable positive controls. To address this critical need, we devised a bio-inspired positive control for use in RT-PCR diagnostics: we encapsulated scrambled Ebola RNA sequences inside of tobacco mosaic virus to create a biomimicry that is non-infectious, but stable, and could therefore serve as a positive control in Ebola diagnostic assays. Here, we report the bioengineering and validation of this probe. PMID:27030058

  3. Bioengineering of Tobacco Mosaic Virus to Create a Non-Infectious Positive Control for Ebola Diagnostic Assays.

    PubMed

    Lam, Patricia; Gulati, Neetu M; Stewart, Phoebe L; Keri, Ruth A; Steinmetz, Nicole F

    2016-01-01

    The 2014 Ebola epidemic is the largest to date. There is no cure or treatment for this deadly disease; therefore there is an urgent need to develop new diagnostics to accurately detect Ebola. Current RT-PCR assays lack sensitive and reliable positive controls. To address this critical need, we devised a bio-inspired positive control for use in RT-PCR diagnostics: we encapsulated scrambled Ebola RNA sequences inside of tobacco mosaic virus to create a biomimicry that is non-infectious, but stable, and could therefore serve as a positive control in Ebola diagnostic assays. Here, we report the bioengineering and validation of this probe. PMID:27030058

  4. A lateral electrophoretic flow diagnostic assay

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Robert; Skandarajah, Arunan; Gerver, Rachel E.; Neira, Hector D.; Fletcher, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Immunochromatographic assays are a cornerstone tool in disease screening. To complement existing lateral flow assays (based on wicking flow) we introduce a lateral flow format that employs directed electrophoretic transport. The format is termed a “lateral e-flow assay” and is designed to support multiplexed detection using immobilized reaction volumes of capture antigen. To fabricate the lateral e-flow device, we employ mask-based UV photopatterning to selectively immobilize unmodified capture antigen along the microchannel in a barcode-like pattern. The channel-filling polyacrylamide hydrogel incorporates a photoactive moiety (benzophenone) to immobilize capture antigen to the hydrogel without a priori antigen modification. We report a heterogeneous sandwich assay using low-power electrophoresis to drive biospecimen through the capture antigen barcode. Fluorescence barcode readout is collected via a low-resource appropriate imaging system (CellScope). We characterize lateral e-flow assay performance and demonstrate a serum assay for antibodies to the hepatitis C virus (HCV). In a pilot study, the lateral e-flow assay positively identifies HCV+ human sera in 60 min. The lateral e-flow assay provides a flexible format for conducting multiplexed immunoassays relevant to confirmatory diagnosis in near-patient settings. PMID:25608872

  5. Real-Time PCR Assay for the Identification of the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (Halyomorpha halys)

    PubMed Central

    Dhami, Manpreet K.; Dsouza, Melissa; Waite, David W.; Anderson, Diane; Li, Dongmei

    2016-01-01

    The brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae), is a gregarious crop pest that has rapidly spread across the world in the last two decades. It is an excellent hitchhiker species, especially as an over-wintering adult. During this period it is often associated with non-biological commodities such as shipping containers and machinery that travel long distances. Inadequate identification keys and similarity to common species has assisted its spread across Europe, while accurate identification from immature stages or eggs is not possible. We developed a real-time TaqMan PCR assay for the accurate and sensitive detection of the brown marmorated stink bug from all life stages. The assay performance against required diagnostic criterion and within a quarantine framework are described. PMID:26955631

  6. Lab-on-a-chip PCR: real time PCR in miniaturized format for HLA diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaertner, Claudia; Becker, Holger; Hlawatsch, Nadine; Klemm, Richard; Moche, Christian; Sewart, René; Frank, Rainer; Willems, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    In case of transplantation or the identification of special metabolic diseases like coeliac disease, HLA typing has to be done fast and reliably with easy-to-handle devices by using limited amount of sample. Against this background a lab-on-a-chip device was realized enabling a fast HLA typing via miniaturized Real-time PCR. Hereby, two main process steps were combined, namely the extraction of DNA from whole blood and the amplification of the target DNA by Real-time PCR giving rise-to a semi-quantitative analysis. For the implementation of both processes on chip, a sample preparation and a real-time module were used. Sample preparation was carried out by using magnetic beads that were stored directly on chip as dry powder, together with all lysis reagents. After purification of the DNA by applying a special buffer regime, the sample DNA was transferred into the PCR module for amplification and detection. Coping with a massively increased surface-to-volume ratio, which results in a higher amount of unspecific binding on the chip surface, special additives needed to be integrated to compensate for this effect. Finally the overall procedure showed a sensitivity comparable to standard Real-time PCR but reduced the duration of analysis to significantly less than one hour. The presented work demonstrates that the combination of lab-on-a-chip PCR with direct optical read-out in a real-time fashion is an extremely promising tool for molecular diagnostics.

  7. A FRET-based real-time PCR assay to identify the main causal agents of New World tegumentary leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Tsukayama, Pablo; Núñez, Jorge H; De Los Santos, Maxy; Soberón, Valeria; Lucas, Carmen M; Matlashewski, Greg; Llanos-Cuentas, Alejandro; Ore, Marianela; Baldeviano, G Christian; Edgel, Kimberly A; Lescano, Andres G; Graf, Paul C F; Bacon, David J

    2013-01-01

    In South America, various species of Leishmania are endemic and cause New World tegumentary leishmaniasis (NWTL). The correct identification of these species is critical for adequate clinical management and surveillance activities. We developed a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay and evaluated its diagnostic performance using 64 archived parasite isolates and 192 prospectively identified samples collected from individuals with suspected leishmaniasis enrolled at two reference clinics in Lima, Peru. The real-time PCR assay was able to detect a single parasite and provided unambiguous melting peaks for five Leishmania species of the Viannia subgenus that are highly prevalent in South America: L. (V.) braziliensis, L. (V.) panamensis, L. (V.) guyanensis, L. (V.) peruviana and L. (V.) lainsoni. Using kinetoplastid DNA-based PCR as a gold standard, the real-time PCR had sensitivity and specificity values of 92% and 77%, respectively, which were significantly higher than those of conventional tests such as microscopy, culture and the leishmanin skin test (LST). In addition, the real-time PCR identified 147 different clinical samples at the species level, providing an overall agreement of 100% when compared to multilocus sequence typing (MLST) data performed on a subset of these samples. Furthermore, the real-time PCR was three times faster and five times less expensive when compared to PCR - MLST for species identification from clinical specimens. In summary, this new assay represents a cost-effective and reliable alternative for the identification of the main species causing NWTL in South America. PMID:23301111

  8. A duplex quantitative real-time PCR assay for the detection of Haplosporidium and Perkinsus species in shellfish.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhixun; Xie, Liji; Fan, Qing; Pang, Yaoshan; Deng, Xianwen; Xie, Zhi Qin; Liu, Jiabo; Khan, Mazhar I

    2013-04-01

    A duplex quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (dq-PCR) assay was optimized to simultaneously detect Haplosporidium spp. and Perkinsus spp. of shellfish in one reaction. Two sets of specific oligonucleotide primers for Haplosporidium spp. and Perkinsus spp., along with two hydrolysis probes specific for each parasite group, were used in the assay. The dq-PCR results were detected and analyzed using the Light Cycler 2.0 software system. The dq-PCR identified and differentiated the two protozoan parasite groups. The sensitivity of the dq-PCR assay was 200 template copies for both Haplosporidium spp. and Perkinsus spp. No DNA product was amplified when known DNA from Marteilia refringens, Toxoplasma gondii, Bonamia ostreae, Escherichia coli, Cymndinium spp., Mykrocytos mackini, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and shellfish tissue were used as templates. A total of 840 oyster samples from commercial cultivated shellfish farms from two coastal areas in China were randomly collected and tested by dq-PCR. The detection rate of Haplosporidium spp. was 8.6% in the Qindao, Shandong coastal area, whereas Perkinsus spp. was 8.3% coastal oysters cultivated from shellfish farms of Beihai, Guangxi. The dqPCR results suggested that Haplosporidium spp. was prevalent in oysters from Qindao, Shandong, while Perkinsus spp. was prevalent in oysters from the coastal areas of Beihai, Guangxi. This dq-PCR could be used as a diagnostic tool to detect Haplosporidium spp. and Perkinsus spp. in cultivated shellfish. PMID:23371501

  9. Simultaneous Detection of Six Diarrhea-Causing Bacterial Pathogens with an In-House PCR-Luminex Assay

    PubMed Central

    Gratz, Jean; Maro, Athanasia; Kumburu, Happy; Kibiki, Gibson; Taniuchi, Mami; Howlader, Arif Mahmud; Sobuz, Shihab U.; Haque, Rashidul; Talukder, Kaisar A.; Qureshi, Shahida; Zaidi, Anita; Haverstick, Doris M.; Houpt, Eric R.

    2012-01-01

    Diarrhea can be caused by a range of pathogens, including several bacteria. Conventional diagnostic methods, such as culture, biochemical tests, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), are laborious. We developed a 7-plex PCR-Luminex assay to simultaneously screen for several of the major diarrhea-causing bacteria directly in fecal specimens, including pathogenic Aeromonas, Campylobacter jejuni, Campylobacter coli, Salmonella, Shigella, enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (EIEC), Vibrio, and Yersinia. We included an extrinsic control to verify extraction and amplification. The assay was first validated with reference strains or isolates and exhibited a limit of detection of 103 to 105 CFU/g of stool for each pathogen as well as quantitative detection up to 109 CFU/g. A total of 205 clinical fecal specimens from individuals with diarrhea, previously cultured for enteric pathogens and tested for Campylobacter by ELISA, were evaluated. Using these predicate methods as standards, sensitivities and specificities of the PCR-Luminex assay were 89% and 94% for Aeromonas, 89% and 93% for Campylobacter, 96% and 95% for Salmonella, 94% and 94% for Shigella, 92% and 97% for Vibrio, and 100% and 100% for Yersinia, respectively. All discrepant results were further examined by singleplex real-time PCR assays targeting different gene regions, which revealed 89% (55/62 results) concordance with the PCR-Luminex assay. The fluorescent signals obtained with this approach exhibited a statistically significant correlation with the cycle threshold (CT) values from the cognate real-time PCR assays (P < 0.05). This multiplex PCR-Luminex assay enables sensitive, specific, and quantitative detection of the major bacterial causes of gastroenteritis. PMID:22075596

  10. Simultaneous detection of six diarrhea-causing bacterial pathogens with an in-house PCR-luminex assay.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Gratz, Jean; Maro, Athanasia; Kumburu, Happy; Kibiki, Gibson; Taniuchi, Mami; Howlader, Arif Mahmud; Sobuz, Shihab U; Haque, Rashidul; Talukder, Kaisar A; Qureshi, Shahida; Zaidi, Anita; Haverstick, Doris M; Houpt, Eric R

    2012-01-01

    Diarrhea can be caused by a range of pathogens, including several bacteria. Conventional diagnostic methods, such as culture, biochemical tests, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), are laborious. We developed a 7-plex PCR-Luminex assay to simultaneously screen for several of the major diarrhea-causing bacteria directly in fecal specimens, including pathogenic Aeromonas, Campylobacter jejuni, Campylobacter coli, Salmonella, Shigella, enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (EIEC), Vibrio, and Yersinia. We included an extrinsic control to verify extraction and amplification. The assay was first validated with reference strains or isolates and exhibited a limit of detection of 10(3) to 10(5) CFU/g of stool for each pathogen as well as quantitative detection up to 10(9) CFU/g. A total of 205 clinical fecal specimens from individuals with diarrhea, previously cultured for enteric pathogens and tested for Campylobacter by ELISA, were evaluated. Using these predicate methods as standards, sensitivities and specificities of the PCR-Luminex assay were 89% and 94% for Aeromonas, 89% and 93% for Campylobacter, 96% and 95% for Salmonella, 94% and 94% for Shigella, 92% and 97% for Vibrio, and 100% and 100% for Yersinia, respectively. All discrepant results were further examined by singleplex real-time PCR assays targeting different gene regions, which revealed 89% (55/62 results) concordance with the PCR-Luminex assay. The fluorescent signals obtained with this approach exhibited a statistically significant correlation with the cycle threshold (C(T)) values from the cognate real-time PCR assays (P < 0.05). This multiplex PCR-Luminex assay enables sensitive, specific, and quantitative detection of the major bacterial causes of gastroenteritis. PMID:22075596

  11. Rapid identification of bacterial pathogens using a PCR- and microarray-based assay

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background During the course of a bacterial infection, the rapid identification of the causative agent(s) is necessary for the determination of effective treatment options. We have developed a method based on a modified broad-range PCR and an oligonucleotide microarray for the simultaneous detection and identification of 12 bacterial pathogens at the species level. The broad-range PCR primer mixture was designed using conserved regions of the bacterial topoisomerase genes gyrB and parE. The primer design allowed the use of a novel DNA amplification method, which produced labeled, single-stranded DNA suitable for microarray hybridization. The probes on the microarray were designed from the alignments of species- or genus-specific variable regions of the gyrB and parE genes flanked by the primers. We included mecA-specific primers and probes in the same assay to indicate the presence of methicillin resistance in the bacterial species. The feasibility of this assay in routine diagnostic testing was evaluated using 146 blood culture positive and 40 blood culture negative samples. Results Comparison of our results with those of a conventional culture-based method revealed a sensitivity of 96% (initial sensitivity of 82%) and specificity of 98%. Furthermore, only one cross-reaction was observed upon investigating 102 culture isolates from 70 untargeted bacteria. The total assay time was only three hours, including the time required for the DNA extraction, PCR and microarray steps in sequence. Conclusion The assay rapidly provides reliable data, which can guide optimal antimicrobial treatment decisions in a timely manner. PMID:19664269

  12. Diagnostic assays used to control small ruminant lentiviruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The serological diagnostic tests such as the agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) assay and various types of enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) have contributed to the reduction of small ruminant lentivirus infections worldwide. Since there are no treatments or efficacious vaccines, the serolog...

  13. Performances of Four Real-Time PCR Assays for Diagnosis of Pneumocystis jirovecii Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Sasso, Milène; Chastang-Dumas, Elsa; Bastide, Sophie; Alonso, Sandrine; Lechiche, Catherine; Bourgeois, Nathalie; Lachaud, Laurence

    2016-03-01

    Pneumonia due to Pneumocystis jirovecii (PCP) is a frequent infection among HIV-positive or other immunocompromised patients. In the past several years, PCR on pulmonary samples has become an essential element for the laboratory diagnosis of PCP. Nevertheless, very few comparative studies of available PCR assays have been published. In this work, we evaluated the concordance between four real-time PCR assays, including three commercial kits, AmpliSens, MycAssay, and Bio-Evolution PCR, and an in-house PCR (J. Fillaux et al. 2008, J Microbiol Methods 75:258-261, doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mimet.2008.06.009), on 148 pulmonary samples. The results showed concordance rates ranging from 81.6% to 96.6% (kappa, 0.64 to 0.93). Concordance was excellent between three assays: the in-house assay, AmpliSens, and the MycAssay PCR (kappa, >0.8). The performances of these PCR assays were also evaluated according to the classification of the probability of PCP (proven, probable, possible, or no final diagnosis of PCP) based on clinical and radiological signs as well as on the direct examination of bronchoalveolar lavage samples. In the proven PCP category, Pneumocystis jirovecii DNA was detected with all four assays. In the probable PCP category, the in-house PCR, AmpliSens, and the MycAssay PCR were positive for all samples, while the Bio-Evolution PCR failed to detect Pneumocystis jirovecii DNA in two samples. In the possible PCP category, the percentage of positive samples according to PCR varied from 54.5% to 86.4%. Detection of colonized patients is discussed. Finally, among the four evaluated PCR assays, one was not suitable for colonization detection but showed good performance in the proven and probable PCP groups. For the three other assays, performances were excellent and allowed detection of a very low fungal burden. PMID:26719435

  14. Performance Assessment PCR-Based Assays Targeting Bacteroidales Genetic Markers of Bovine Fecal Pollution▿

    PubMed Central

    Shanks, Orin C.; White, Karen; Kelty, Catherine A.; Hayes, Sam; Sivaganesan, Mano; Jenkins, Michael; Varma, Manju; Haugland, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    There are numerous PCR-based assays available to characterize bovine fecal pollution in ambient waters. The determination of which approaches are most suitable for field applications can be difficult because each assay targets a different gene, in many cases from different microorganisms, leading to variation in assay performance. We describe a performance evaluation of seven end-point PCR and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays reported to be associated with either ruminant or bovine feces. Each assay was tested against a reference collection of DNA extracts from 247 individual bovine fecal samples representing 11 different populations and 175 fecal DNA extracts from 24 different animal species. Bovine-associated genetic markers were broadly distributed among individual bovine samples ranging from 39 to 93%. Specificity levels of the assays spanned 47.4% to 100%. End-point PCR sensitivity also varied between assays and among different bovine populations. For qPCR assays, the abundance of each host-associated genetic marker was measured within each bovine population and compared to results of a qPCR assay targeting 16S rRNA gene sequences from Bacteroidales. Experiments indicate large discrepancies in the performance of bovine-associated assays across different bovine populations. Variability in assay performance between host populations suggests that the use of bovine microbial source-tracking applications will require a priori characterization at each watershed of interest. PMID:20061457

  15. A duplex PCR assay for the detection of Ralstonia solanacearum phylotype II strains in Musa spp.

    PubMed

    Cellier, Gilles; Moreau, Aurélie; Chabirand, Aude; Hostachy, Bruno; Ailloud, Florent; Prior, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Banana wilt outbreaks that are attributable to Moko disease-causing strains of the pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum (Rs) remain a social and economic burden for both multinational corporations and subsistence farmers. All known Moko strains belong to the phylotype II lineage, which has been previously recognized for its broad genetic basis. Moko strains are paraphyletic and are distributed among seven related but distinct phylogenetic clusters (sequevars) that are potentially major threats to Musaceae, Solanaceae, and ornamental crops in many countries. Although clustered within the Moko IIB-4 sequevar, strains of the epidemiologically variant IIB-4NPB do not cause wilt on Cavendish or plantain bananas; instead, they establish a latent infection in the vascular tissues of plantains and demonstrate an expanded host range and high aggressiveness toward Solanaceae and Cucurbitaceae. Although most molecular diagnostic methods focus on strains that wilt Solanaceae (particularly potato), no relevant protocol has been described that universally detects strains of the Musaceae-infecting Rs phylotype II. Thus, a duplex PCR assay targeting Moko and IIB-4NPB variant strains was developed, and its performance was assessed using an extensive collection of 111 strains representing the known diversity of Rs Moko-related strains and IIB-4NPB variant strains along with certain related strains and families. The proposed diagnostic protocol demonstrated both high accuracy (inclusivity and exclusivity) and high repeatability, detected targets on either pure culture or spiked plant extracts. Although they did not belong to the Moko clusters described at the time of the study, recently discovered banana-infecting strains from Brazil were also detected. According to our comprehensive evaluation, this duplex PCR assay appears suitable for both research and diagnostic laboratories and provides reliable detection of phylotype II Rs strains that infect Musaceae. PMID:25811378

  16. A Duplex PCR Assay for the Detection of Ralstonia solanacearum Phylotype II Strains in Musa spp.

    PubMed Central

    Cellier, Gilles; Moreau, Aurélie; Chabirand, Aude; Hostachy, Bruno; Ailloud, Florent; Prior, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Banana wilt outbreaks that are attributable to Moko disease-causing strains of the pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum (Rs) remain a social and economic burden for both multinational corporations and subsistence farmers. All known Moko strains belong to the phylotype II lineage, which has been previously recognized for its broad genetic basis. Moko strains are paraphyletic and are distributed among seven related but distinct phylogenetic clusters (sequevars) that are potentially major threats to Musaceae, Solanaceae, and ornamental crops in many countries. Although clustered within the Moko IIB-4 sequevar, strains of the epidemiologically variant IIB-4NPB do not cause wilt on Cavendish or plantain bananas; instead, they establish a latent infection in the vascular tissues of plantains and demonstrate an expanded host range and high aggressiveness toward Solanaceae and Cucurbitaceae. Although most molecular diagnostic methods focus on strains that wilt Solanaceae (particularly potato), no relevant protocol has been described that universally detects strains of the Musaceae-infecting Rs phylotype II. Thus, a duplex PCR assay targeting Moko and IIB-4NPB variant strains was developed, and its performance was assessed using an extensive collection of 111 strains representing the known diversity of Rs Moko-related strains and IIB-4NPB variant strains along with certain related strains and families. The proposed diagnostic protocol demonstrated both high accuracy (inclusivity and exclusivity) and high repeatability, detected targets on either pure culture or spiked plant extracts. Although they did not belong to the Moko clusters described at the time of the study, recently discovered banana-infecting strains from Brazil were also detected. According to our comprehensive evaluation, this duplex PCR assay appears suitable for both research and diagnostic laboratories and provides reliable detection of phylotype II Rs strains that infect Musaceae. PMID:25811378

  17. Automated DNA diagnostics using an ELISA-based oligonucleotide ligation assay.

    PubMed Central

    Nickerson, D A; Kaiser, R; Lappin, S; Stewart, J; Hood, L; Landegren, U

    1990-01-01

    DNA diagnostics, the detection of specific DNA sequences, will play an increasingly important role in medicine as the molecular basis of human disease is defined. Here, we demonstrate an automated, nonisotopic strategy for DNA diagnostics using amplification of target DNA segments by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the discrimination of allelic sequence variants by a colorimetric oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA). We have applied the automated PCR/OLA procedure to diagnosis of common genetic diseases, such as sickle cell anemia and cystic fibrosis (delta F508 mutation), and to genetic linkage mapping of gene segments in the human T-cell receptor beta-chain locus. The automated PCR/OLA strategy provides a rapid system for diagnosis of genetic, malignant, and infectious diseases as well as a powerful approach to genetic linkage mapping of chromosomes and forensic DNA typing. Images PMID:2247466

  18. Multilaboratory Comparison of Quantitative PCR Assays for Detection and Quantification of Fusarium virguliforme from Soybean Roots and Soil.

    PubMed

    Kandel, Yuba R; Haudenshield, James S; Srour, Ali Y; Islam, Kazi Tariqul; Fakhoury, Ahmad M; Santos, Patricia; Wang, Jie; Chilvers, Martin I; Hartman, Glen L; Malvick, Dean K; Floyd, Crystal M; Mueller, Daren S; Leandro, Leonor F S

    2015-12-01

    The ability to accurately detect and quantify Fusarium virguliforme, the cause of sudden death syndrome (SDS) in soybean, in samples such as plant root tissue and soil is extremely valuable for accurate disease diagnoses and to address research questions. Numerous quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays have been developed for this pathogen but their sensitivity and specificity for F. virguliforme have not been compared. In this study, six qPCR assays were compared in five independent laboratories using the same set of DNA samples from fungi, plants, and soil. Multicopy gene-based assays targeting the ribosomal DNA intergenic spacer (IGS) or the mitochondrial small subunit (mtSSU) showed relatively high sensitivity (limit of detection [LOD] = 0.05 to 5 pg) compared with a single-copy gene (FvTox1)-based assay (LOD = 5 to 50 pg). Specificity varied greatly among assays, with the FvTox1 assay ranking the highest (100%) and two IGS assays being slightly less specific (95 to 96%). Another IGS assay targeting four SDS-causing fusaria showed lower specificity (70%), while the two mtSSU assays were lowest (41 and 47%). An IGS-based assay showed consistently highest sensitivity (LOD = 0.05 pg) and specificity and inclusivity above 94% and, thus, is suggested as the most useful qPCR assay for F. virguliforme diagnosis and quantification. However, specificity was also above 94% in two other assays and their selection for diagnostics and research will depend on objectives, samples, and materials used. These results will facilitate both fundamental and disease management research pertinent to SDS. PMID:26368513

  19. Validation of a real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR assay for the detection of H7 avian influenza virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pedersen, J.; Killian, M.L.; Hines, N.; Senne, D.; Panigrahy, B.; Ip, H.S.; Spackman, Erica

    2010-01-01

    This report describes the validation of an avian influenza virus (AIV) H7 subtype-specific real-time reverse transcriptasePCR (rRT-PCR) assay developed at the Southeast Poultry Research Laboratory (SEPRL) for the detection of H7 AI in North and South American wild aquatic birds and poultry. The validation was a collaborative effort by the SEPRL and the National Veterinary Services Laboratories. The 2008 H7 rRT-PCR assay detects 101 50% embryo infectious doses per reaction, or 103104 copies of transcribed H7 RNA. Diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were estimated to be 97.5% and 82.4%, respectively; the assay was shown to be specific for H7 AI when tested with >270 wild birds and poultry viruses. Following validation, the 2008 H7 rRT-PCR procedure was adopted as an official U.S. Department of Agriculture procedure for the detection of H7 AIV. The 2008 H7 assay replaced the previously used (2002) assay, which does not detect H7 viruses currently circulating in wild birds in North and South America. ?? 2010 American Association of Avian Pathologists.

  20. Detection of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus by a Duplex Droplet Digital PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, KaShonda; Cosman, Angela; Belgrader, Phillip; Chapman, Brenda

    2013-01-01

    Health care-associated infections with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) contribute to significant hospitalization costs. We report here a droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) assay, which is a next-generation emulsion-based endpoint PCR assay for high-precision MRSA analysis. Reference cultures of MRSA, methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), and confounders were included as controls. Copan swabs were used to sample cultures and collect specimens for analysis from patients at a large teaching hospital. Swab extraction and cell lysis were accomplished using magnetic-driven agitation of silica beads. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) (Roche Light Cycler 480) and ddPCR (Bio-Rad QX100 droplet digital PCR system) assays were used to detect genes for the staphylococcal protein SA0140 (SA) and the methicillin resistance (mecA) gene employing standard TaqMan chemistries. Both qPCR and ddPCR assays correctly identified culture controls for MRSA (76), MSSA (12), and confounder organisms (36) with 100% sensitivity and specificity. Analysis of the clinical samples (211 negative and 186 positive) collected during a study of MRSA nasal carriage allowed direct comparison of the qPCR and ddPCR assays to the Cepheid MRSA GeneXpert assay. A total of 397 clinical samples were examined in this study. Cepheid MRSA GeneXpert values were used to define negative and positive samples. Both the qPCR and ddPCR assays were in good agreement with the reference assay. The sensitivities for the qPCR and ddPCR assays were 96.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 93.1 to 98.5%) and 96.8% (95% CI, 93.1 to 98.5%), respectively. Both the qPCR and ddPCR assays had specificities of 91.9% (95% CI, 87.5 to 94.9%) for qPCR and 91.0% (95% CI, 86.4 to 94.2%) for ddPCR technology. PMID:23596244

  1. Real-Time PCR Assay for Detection and Differentiation of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli from Clinical Samples

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Eileen J.; Galanakis, Emmanouil; Thomas, Anita A.; Stapp, Jennifer R.; Rich, Shannon; Buccat, Anne Marie; Tarr, Phillip I.

    2015-01-01

    Timely accurate diagnosis of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infections is important. We evaluated a laboratory-developed real-time PCR (LD-PCR) assay targeting stx1, stx2, and rfbEO157 with 2,386 qualifying stool samples submitted to the microbiology laboratory of a tertiary care pediatric center between July 2011 and December 2013. Broth cultures of PCR-positive samples were tested for Shiga toxins by enzyme immunoassay (EIA) (ImmunoCard STAT! enterohemorrhagic E. coli [EHEC]; Meridian Bioscience) and cultured in attempts to recover both O157 and non-O157 STEC. E. coli O157 and non-O157 STEC were detected in 35 and 18 cases, respectively. Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) occurred in 12 patients (10 infected with STEC O157, one infected with STEC O125ac, and one with PCR evidence of STEC but no resulting isolate). Among the 59 PCR-positive STEC specimens from 53 patients, only 29 (54.7%) of the associated specimens were toxin positive by EIA. LD-PCR differentiated STEC O157 from non-O157 using rfbEO157, and LD-PCR results prompted successful recovery of E. coli O157 (n = 25) and non-O157 STEC (n = 8) isolates, although the primary cultures and toxin assays were frequently negative. A rapid “mega”-multiplex PCR (FilmArray gastrointestinal panel; BioFire Diagnostics) was used retrospectively, and results correlated with LD-PCR findings in 25 (89%) of the 28 sorbitol-MacConkey agar culture-negative STEC cases. These findings demonstrate that PCR is more sensitive than EIA and/or culture and distinguishes between O157 and non-O157 STEC in clinical samples and that E. coli O157:H7 remains the predominant cause of HUS in our institution. PCR is highly recommended for rapid diagnosis of pediatric STEC infections. PMID:25926491

  2. Identification of the major capsid protein of erythrocytic necrosis virus (ENV) and development of quantitative real-time PCR assays for quantification of ENV DNA.

    PubMed

    Purcell, Maureen K; Pearman-Gillman, Schuyler; Thompson, Rachel L; Gregg, Jacob L; Hart, Lucas M; Winton, James R; Emmenegger, Eveline J; Hershberger, Paul K

    2016-07-01

    Viral erythrocytic necrosis (VEN) is a disease of marine and anadromous fish that is caused by the erythrocytic necrosis virus (ENV), which was recently identified as a novel member of family Iridoviridae by next-generation sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis of the ENV DNA polymerase grouped ENV with other erythrocytic iridoviruses from snakes and lizards. In the present study, we identified the gene encoding the ENV major capsid protein (MCP) and developed a quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay targeting this gene. Phylogenetic analysis of the MCP gene sequence supported the conclusion that ENV does not group with any of the currently described iridovirus genera. Because there is no information regarding genetic variation of the MCP gene across the reported host and geographic range for ENV, we also developed a second qPCR assay for a more conserved ATPase-like gene region. The MCP and ATPase qPCR assays demonstrated good analytical and diagnostic sensitivity and specificity based on samples from laboratory challenges of Pacific herring Clupea pallasii The qPCR assays had similar diagnostic sensitivity and specificity as light microscopy of stained blood smears for the presence of intraerythrocytic inclusion bodies. However, the qPCR assays may detect viral DNA early in infection prior to the formation of inclusion bodies. Both qPCR assays appear suitable for viral surveillance or as a confirmatory test for ENV in Pacific herring from the Salish Sea. PMID:27154315

  3. Identification of the major capsid protein of erythrocytic necrosis virus (ENV) and development of quantitative real-time PCR assays for quantification of ENV DNA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Pearman-Gillman, Schuyler; Thompson, Rachel L.; Gregg, Jacob L.; Hart, Lucas M.; Winton, James R.; Emmenegger, Eveline J.; Hershberger, Paul K.

    2016-01-01

    Viral erythrocytic necrosis (VEN) is a disease of marine and anadromous fish that is caused by the erythrocytic necrosis virus (ENV), which was recently identified as a novel member of family Iridoviridae by next-generation sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis of the ENV DNA polymerase grouped ENV with other erythrocytic iridoviruses from snakes and lizards. In the present study, we identified the gene encoding the ENV major capsid protein (MCP) and developed a quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay targeting this gene. Phylogenetic analysis of the MCP gene sequence supported the conclusion that ENV does not group with any of the currently described iridovirus genera. Because there is no information regarding genetic variation of the MCP gene across the reported host and geographic range for ENV, we also developed a second qPCR assay for a more conserved ATPase-like gene region. The MCP and ATPase qPCR assays demonstrated good analytical and diagnostic sensitivity and specificity based on samples from laboratory challenges of Pacific herring Clupea pallasii. The qPCR assays had similar diagnostic sensitivity and specificity as light microscopy of stained blood smears for the presence of intraerythrocytic inclusion bodies. However, the qPCR assays may detect viral DNA early in infection prior to the formation of inclusion bodies. Both qPCR assays appear suitable for viral surveillance or as a confirmatory test for ENV in Pacific herring from the Salish Sea.

  4. Development of a consensus reverse transcription PCR assay for the specific detection of tortoise picornaviruses.

    PubMed

    Marschang, Rachel E; Ihász, Katalin; Kugler, Renáta; Lengyel, György; Fehér, Enikő; Marton, Szilvia; Bányai, Krisztián; Aqrawi, Tara; Farkas, Szilvia L

    2016-05-01

    Picornaviruses (PVs) of different terrestrial tortoise species, previously designated as Virus "X," have been frequently detected from various tissues by virus isolation in Terrapene heart cell culture as the preferred laboratory method for diagnosis. Here, we describe the development of 2 diagnostic reverse transcription (RT)-PCR-based assays for the identification and characterization of tortoise PVs belonging to the tentative genus Topivirus To test the novel diagnostic systems, PVs were isolated from swab and tissue samples collected in Germany, Italy, and Hungary between 2000 and 2013. All 25 tested isolates gave positive results with both novel consensus primer sets. Sequencing of the amplified products confirmed that all studied viruses were members of the new proposed genus Topivirus Phylogenetic analyses clearly distinguished 2 lineages within the genus. Based on sequence analysis, no association was observed between the geographic distribution and genetic relatedness. Furthermore, no strict host specificity was indicated. The PCR-based diagnosis may provide a time-saving and sensitive method to detect tortoise PVs, and evaluation of PV presence in these animals may help control virus spread. PMID:27034342

  5. A new nanoPCR molecular assay for detection of porcine bocavirus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoling; Bai, Aiquan; Zhang, Jing; Kong, Miaomiao; Cui, Yuchao; Ma, Xingjie; Ai, Xia; Tang, Qinghai; Cui, Shangjin

    2014-06-01

    Nanoparticle-assisted polymerase chain reaction (nanoPCR) is a novel method for the rapid amplification of DNA and has been used for the detection of virus. For detection of porcine bocavirus (PBoV), a sensitive and specific nanoPCR assay was developed with a pair of primers that were designed based on NS1 gene sequences available in GenBank. Under the optimized conditions of the PBoV nanoPCR assay, the nanoPCR assay was 100-fold more sensitive than a conventional PCR assay. The lower detection limit of the nanoPCR assay was about 6.70×10(1) copies. The nanoPCR assay amplified the specific 482-bp fragment of the PBoV NS1 recombinant plasmid but did not produce any product with genomic DNA or cDNA of porcine parvovirus, porcine circovirus type II, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, pseudorabies virus, classic swine fever virus, Encephalomyocarditis virus, Porcine Teschovirus or African swine fever virus plasmid. Of 65 clinical samples collected from diseased pigs, 73.8% and 86.2% were determined to be PBoV positive by PBoV conventional PCR and PBoV nanoPCR assay, respectively. Of 36 clinical samples from healthy pigs, 27.8% and 44.4% were PBoV positive by PBoV conventional PCR and PBoV nanoPCR assay, respectively. The nanoPCR assay will be useful for diagnosing PBoV and for studying its epidemiology and pathology. PMID:24642242

  6. Advantages of real-time PCR assay for diagnosis and monitoring of canine leishmaniosis.

    PubMed

    Francino, O; Altet, L; Sánchez-Robert, E; Rodriguez, A; Solano-Gallego, L; Alberola, J; Ferrer, L; Sánchez, A; Roura, X

    2006-04-30

    The aim of the present study is to highlight the advantages of real-time quantitative PCR intended to aid in the diagnosis and monitoring of canine leishmaniosis. Diagnosis of canine leishmaniosis is extremely challenging, especially in endemic areas, due to the diverse and non-specific clinical manifestations, and due to the high seroprevalence rate in sub-clinical dogs. Veterinarian clinicians are usually confronted with cases that are compatible with the disease, and with several diagnostic tests, sometimes with contradictory results. We have developed a new TaqMan assay, targeting the kinetoplast, applied to 44 samples of bone marrow aspirate or peripheral blood. The dynamic range of detection of Leishmania DNA was established in 7 logs and the limit of detection is 0.001 parasites in the PCR reaction. At the time of diagnosis parasitemia ranges from less than 1 to 10(7)parasites/ml. The ability to quantify the parasite burden allowed: (i) to elucidate the status of positive dogs by conventional PCR, although larger studies are necessary to clarify the dividing line between infection and disease, (ii) to estimate the kinetics of the parasite load and the different response to the treatment in a follow-up and (iii) to validate blood as less invasive sample for qPCR. The continuous data provided by real-time qPCR could solve the dilemma for the clinician managing cases of canine leishmaniosis by differentiating between Leishmania-infected dogs or dogs with active disease of leishmaniosis. PMID:16473467

  7. Comparison of quantitative PCR assays for Escherichia coli targeting ribosomal RNA and single copy genes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aims: Compare specificity and sensitivity of quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays targeting single and multi-copy gene regions of Escherichia coli. Methods and Results: A previously reported assay targeting the uidA gene (uidA405) was used as the basis for comparing the taxono...

  8. Single Laboratory Comparison of Quantitative Real-time PCR Assays for the Detection of Fecal Pollution

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are numerous quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assays available to detect and enumerate fecal pollution in ambient waters. Each assay employs distinct primers and probes that target different rRNA genes and microorganisms leading to potential variations in concentration es...

  9. An improved multiplex IC-RT-PCR assay distinguishes nine strains of Potato virus Y

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A multiplex RT-PCR assay was previously developed to identify a group of PVY isolates with unusual recombinant structures, e.g. PVYNTN-NW and SYR-III, and to differentiate them from other PVY strains. In the present study, the efficiency of this multiplex RT-PCR assay was validated and extended cons...

  10. Evaluation of three real-time PCR assays for differential identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and nontuberculous mycobacteria species in liquid culture media.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yu Jung; Kim, Ji-Youn; Song, Dong Joon; Koh, Won-Jung; Huh, Hee Jae; Ki, Chang-Seok; Lee, Nam Yong

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated the analytical performance of M. tuberculosis complex (MTBC)/nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) PCR assays for differential identification of MTBC and NTM using culture-positive liquid media. Eighty-five type strains and 100 consecutive mycobacterial liquid media cultures (MGIT 960 system) were analyzed by a conventional PCR assay (MTB-ID(®) V3) and three real-time PCR assays (AdvanSure™ TB/NTM real-time PCR, AdvanSure; GENEDIA(®) MTB/NTM Detection Kit, Genedia; Real-Q MTB & NTM kit, Real-Q). The accuracy rates for reference strains were 89.4%, 100%, 98.8%, and 98.8% for the MTB-ID V3, AdvanSure, Genedia, and Real-Q assays, respectively. Cross-reactivity in the MTB-ID V3 assay was mainly attributable to non-mycobacterium Corynebacterineae species. The diagnostic performance was determined using clinical isolates grown in liquid media, and the overall sensitivities for all PCR assays were higher than 95%. In conclusion, the three real-time PCR assays showed better performance in discriminating mycobacterium species and non-mycobacterium Corynebacterineae species than the conventional PCR assay. PMID:27105774

  11. Development of nested PCR assays for detection of bovine respiratory syncytial virus in clinical samples.

    PubMed Central

    Vilcek, S; Elvander, M; Ballagi-Pordány, A; Belák, S

    1994-01-01

    Two nested PCR assays were developed for the detection of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV). Primers were selected from the gene encoding the F fusion protein (PCR-F) and the gene encoding the G attachment protein (PCR-G). Biotinylated oligonucleotide probes, termed F and G, were selected for the hybridization of the respective PCR products. The sensitivities of the PCR-F and PCR-G assays were similar, both detecting 0.1 tissue culture infective dose of the virus. The PCR-F assay amplified all bovine strains and one human strain (RS32) tested. No cross-reactions were observed with nine heterologous respiratory viruses. PCR-F products of bovine and human RSV strains were discriminated by using endonuclease restriction enzyme ScaI, which specifically cleaved, products of BRSV. Oligonucleotide probe F was also specific for products of BRSV. The PCR-G assay detected all bovine strains and none of the human strains tested. A faint electrophoretic band was also observed with products of Sendai virus. However, probe G did not hybridize with this product, only with products of BRSV. Nasal swabs collected from cattle with no symptoms and cattle in the acute stage of respiratory disease were analyzed for BRSV by the immunofluorescence (IF) method and by the PCR-F and PCR-G assays. The virus was detected by the PCR assays in 31 of 35 (89%) samples tested. Only 23 samples (66%) were positive by the IF method, and these samples were also positive by both the PCR-F and PCR-G assays. The 31 samples detected as positive by PCR originated from cattle presenting clinical signs of acute respiratory disease; the four PCR-negative samples originated from clinically asymptomatic neighboring cattle. All sampled animals subsequently seroconverted and became reactive to BRSV. Thus, the detection of BRSV by PCR correlated with clinical observations and was considerably more sensitive (66 versus 89%) than IF. These results indicate that both nested PCR assays provide rapid and

  12. Rapid detection and typing of pathogenic nonpneumophila Legionella spp. isolates using a multiplex real-time PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Benitez, Alvaro J; Winchell, Jonas M

    2016-04-01

    We developed a single tube multiplex real-time PCR assay that allows for the rapid detection and typing of 9 nonpneumophila Legionella spp. isolates that are clinically relevant. The multiplex assay is capable of simultaneously detecting and discriminating L. micdadei, L. bozemanii, L. dumoffii, L. longbeachae, L. feeleii, L. anisa, L. parisiensis, L. tucsonensis serogroup (sg) 1 and 3, and L. sainthelensis sg 1 and 2 isolates. Evaluation of the assay with nucleic acid from each of these species derived from both clinical and environmental isolates and typing strains demonstrated 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity when tested against 43 other Legionella spp. Typing of L. anisa, L. parisiensis, and L. tucsonensis sg 1 and 3 isolates was accomplished by developing a real-time PCR assay followed by high-resolution melt (HRM) analysis targeting the ssrA gene. Further typing of L. bozemanii, L. longbeachae, and L. feeleii isolates to the serogroup level was accomplished by developing a real-time PCR assay followed by HRM analysis targeting the mip gene. When used in conjunction with other currently available diagnostic tests, these assays may aid in rapidly identifying specific etiologies associated with Legionella outbreaks, clusters, sporadic cases, and potential environmental sources. PMID:26867966

  13. Microfluidic barcode assay for antibody-based confirmatory diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Araz, M Kursad; Apori, Akwasi A; Salisbury, Cleo M; Herr, Amy E

    2013-10-01

    Confirmatory diagnostics offer high clinical sensitivity and specificity typically by assaying multiple disease biomarkers. Employed in clinical laboratory settings, such assays confirm a positive screening diagnostic result. These important multiplexed confirmatory assays require hours to complete. To address this performance gap, we introduce a simple 'single inlet, single outlet' microchannel architecture with multiplexed analyte detection capability. A streptavidin-functionalized, channel-filling polyacrylamide gel in a straight glass microchannel operates as a 3D scaffold for a purely electrophoretic yet heterogeneous immunoassay. Biotin and biotinylated capture reagents are patterned in discrete regions along the axis of the microchannel resulting in a barcode-like pattern of reagents and spacers. To characterize barcode fabrication, an empirical study of patterning behaviour was conducted across a range of electromigration and binding reaction timescales. We apply the heterogeneous barcode immunoassay to detection of human antibodies against hepatitis C virus and human immunodeficiency virus antigens. Serum was electrophoresed through the barcode patterned gel, allowing capture of antibody targets. We assess assay performance across a range of Damkohler numbers. Compared to clinical immunoblots that require 4-10 h long sample incubation steps with concomitant 8-20 h total assay durations; directed electromigration and reaction in the microfluidic barcode assay leads to a 10 min sample incubation step and a 30 min total assay duration. Further, the barcode assay reports clinically relevant sensitivity (25 ng ml(-1) in 2% human sera) comparable to standard HCV confirmatory diagnostics. Given the low voltage, low power and automated operation, we see the streamlined microfluidic barcode assay as a step towards rapid confirmatory diagnostics for a low-resource clinical laboratory setting. PMID:23925585

  14. Development and validation of a real-time PCR assay for specific and sensitive detection of canid herpesvirus 1.

    PubMed

    Decaro, Nicola; Amorisco, Francesca; Desario, Costantina; Lorusso, Eleonora; Camero, Michele; Bellacicco, Anna Lucia; Sciarretta, Rossana; Lucente, Maria Stella; Martella, Vito; Buonavoglia, Canio

    2010-10-01

    A TaqMan-based real-time PCR assay targeting the glycoprotein B-encoding gene was developed for diagnosis of canid herpesvirus 1 (CHV-1) infection. The established assay was highly specific, since no cross-reactions were observed with other canine DNA viruses, including canine parvovirus type 2, canine minute virus, or canine adenovirus types 1 and 2. The detection limit was 10(1) and 1.20 x 10(1) DNA copies per 10 microl(-1) of template for standard DNA and a CHV-1-positive kidney sample, respectively: about 1-log higher than a gel-based PCR assay targeting the thymidine kinase gene. The assay was also reproducible, as shown by satisfactory low intra-assay and inter-assay coefficients of variation. CHV-1 isolates of different geographical origins were recognised by the TaqMan assay. Tissues and clinical samples collected from three pups which died of CHV-1 neonatal infection were also tested, displaying a wide distribution of CHV-l DNA in their organs. Unlike other CHV-1-specific diagnostic methods, this quantitative assay permits simultaneous detection and quantitation of CHV-1 DNA in a wide range of canine tissues and body fluids, thus providing a useful tool for confirmation of a clinical diagnosis, for the study of viral pathogenesis and for evaluation of the efficacy of vaccines and antiviral drugs. PMID:20674611

  15. A Rapid and Low-Cost PCR Thermal Cycler for Infectious Disease Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kamfai; Wong, Pui-Yan; Yu, Peter; Hardick, Justin; Wong, Kah-Yat; Wilson, Scott A.; Wu, Tiffany; Hui, Zoe; Gaydos, Charlotte; Wong, Season S.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to make rapid diagnosis of infectious diseases broadly available in a portable, low-cost format would mark a great step forward in global health. Many molecular diagnostic assays are developed based on using thermal cyclers to carry out polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse-transcription PCR for DNA and RNA amplification and detection, respectively. Unfortunately, most commercial thermal cyclers are expensive and need continuous electrical power supply, so they are not suitable for uses in low-resource settings. We have previously reported a low-cost and simple approach to amplify DNA using vacuum insulated stainless steel thermoses food cans, which we have named it thermos thermal cycler or TTC. Here, we describe the use of an improved set up to enable the detection of viral RNA targets by reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR), thus expanding the TTC’s ability to identify highly infectious, RNA virus-based diseases in low resource settings. The TTC was successful in demonstrating high-speed and sensitive detection of DNA or RNA targets of sexually transmitted diseases, HIV/AIDS, Ebola hemorrhagic fever, and dengue fever. Our innovative TTC costs less than $200 to build and has a capacity of at least eight tubes. In terms of speed, the TTC’s performance exceeded that of commercial thermal cyclers tested. When coupled with low-cost endpoint detection technologies such as nucleic acid lateral-flow assay or a cell-phone-based fluorescence detector, the TTC will increase the availability of on-site molecular diagnostics in low-resource settings. PMID:26872358

  16. A Rapid and Low-Cost PCR Thermal Cycler for Infectious Disease Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kamfai; Wong, Pui-Yan; Yu, Peter; Hardick, Justin; Wong, Kah-Yat; Wilson, Scott A; Wu, Tiffany; Hui, Zoe; Gaydos, Charlotte; Wong, Season S

    2016-01-01

    The ability to make rapid diagnosis of infectious diseases broadly available in a portable, low-cost format would mark a great step forward in global health. Many molecular diagnostic assays are developed based on using thermal cyclers to carry out polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse-transcription PCR for DNA and RNA amplification and detection, respectively. Unfortunately, most commercial thermal cyclers are expensive and need continuous electrical power supply, so they are not suitable for uses in low-resource settings. We have previously reported a low-cost and simple approach to amplify DNA using vacuum insulated stainless steel thermoses food cans, which we have named it thermos thermal cycler or TTC. Here, we describe the use of an improved set up to enable the detection of viral RNA targets by reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR), thus expanding the TTC's ability to identify highly infectious, RNA virus-based diseases in low resource settings. The TTC was successful in demonstrating high-speed and sensitive detection of DNA or RNA targets of sexually transmitted diseases, HIV/AIDS, Ebola hemorrhagic fever, and dengue fever. Our innovative TTC costs less than $200 to build and has a capacity of at least eight tubes. In terms of speed, the TTC's performance exceeded that of commercial thermal cyclers tested. When coupled with low-cost endpoint detection technologies such as nucleic acid lateral-flow assay or a cell-phone-based fluorescence detector, the TTC will increase the availability of on-site molecular diagnostics in low-resource settings. PMID:26872358

  17. Specific detection of common pathogens of acute bacterial meningitis using an internally controlled tetraplex-PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Farahani, Hamidreza; Ghaznavi-Rad, Ehsanollah; Mondanizadeh, Mahdieh; MirabSamiee, Siamak; Khansarinejad, Behzad

    2016-08-01

    Accurate and timely diagnosis of acute bacterial meningitis is critical for antimicrobial treatment of patients. Although PCR-based methods have been widely used for the diagnosis of acute meningitis caused by bacterial pathogens, the main disadvantage of these methods is their high cost. This disadvantage has hampered the widespread use of molecular assays in many developing countries. The application of multiplex assays and "in-house" protocols are two main approaches that can reduce the overall cost of a molecular test. In the present study, an internally controlled tetraplex-PCR was developed and validated for the specific detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis and Haemophilus influenzae in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples. The analysis of a panel of other human pathogens showed no cross-reactivity in the assay. The analytical sensitivity of the in-house assay was 792.3 copies/ml, when all three bacteria were presentin the specimens. This value was calculated as 444.5, 283.7, 127.8 copies/ml when only S. pneumoniae, N. meningitidis and H. influenzae, respectively, were present. To demonstrate the diagnostic performance of the assay, a total of 150 archival CSF samples were tested and compared with a commercial multiplex real-time PCR kit. A diagnostic sensitivity of 92.8% and a specificity of 95.1% were determined for the present tetraplex-PCR assay. The results indicate that the established method is sensitive, specific and cost-effective, and can be used particularly in situations where the high cost of commercial kits prevents the use of molecular methods for the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. PMID:27401970

  18. Comparison of a singleplex real‐time RT‐PCR assay and multiplex respiratory viral panel assay for detection of influenza “A” in respiratory specimens

    PubMed Central

    Pabbaraju, Kanti; Wong, Sallene; Lee, Bonita; Tellier, Raymond; Fonseca, Kevin; Louie, Marie; Drews, Steven J.

    2010-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Pabbaraju et al. (2011) Comparison of a singleplex real‐time RT‐PCR assay and multiplex respiratory viral panel assay for detection of influenza “A” in respiratory specimens. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 5(2), 99–103. Background  Evaluation of different molecular tests for the detection of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus is important before the next wave of the pandemic. Objectives  To compare a hydrolysis probe‐based real‐time RT‐PCR assay recommended by the CDC to the xTAG® respiratory viral panel (RVP) (Luminex® Molecular Diagnostics) for the detection of influenza A. Methods  Eleven thousand eight hundred and ninety‐eight respiratory specimens were tested by the real‐time RT‐PCR and RVP assays for the detection of influenza A. The distribution of seasonal H1, H3 and pandemic H1N1 subtypes in these specimens was compared. Results  The RVP assay was generally unable to identify influenza A–positive samples with a low viral load, whereas the real‐time RT‐PCR assay detected most of these samples resulting in a subset of specimens that could not be confirmed as either seasonal or pandemic influenza A subtypes. Conclusions  When the prevalence of influenza A is high, the CDC recommended real‐time RT‐PCR has significant advantages as a frontline assay, namely higher sensitivity and shorter time to reporting a result. Anticipated scenarios would be during the peaks of the pandemic and episodes of seasonal influenza. Furthermore, the better sensitivity of the RT‐PCR makes it the preferred assay to detect influenza in patients with severe respiratory disease tested late in their clinical course. If pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus is not the dominant virus and there is a high proportion of other respiratory viruses circulating, laboratories will be faced with the decision to use the RVP assay for the detection of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus. PMID:21244644

  19. Comparative Assessment of a Commercial Kit and Two Laboratory-Developed PCR Assays for Molecular Diagnosis of Congenital Toxoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Morelle, Christelle; Varlet-Marie, Emmanuelle; Brenier-Pinchart, Marie-Pierre; Cassaing, Sophie; Pelloux, Hervé; Bastien, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a worldwide infection that may cause severe disease and is regarded as a serious health problem in France. Detection of the parasite by molecular methods is crucial for diagnosing the disease. The extreme diversity of methods and performances of Toxoplasma PCR assays makes the use of commercial PCR kits an attractive alternative, as they offer a chance for standardization. We compared the performances of three molecular methods for the detection of Toxoplasma gondii DNA in amniotic fluid: a commercial method using nested PCR and two laboratory-developed methods, one using conventional PCR and the other one real-time PCR. This evaluation was based upon a T. gondii DNA serial dilution assay, three amniotic fluid samples spiked with T. gondii at different concentrations, and a clinical cohort of 33 amniotic fluid samples. The T. gondii DNA serial dilution assay showed a much lower sensitivity for the commercial kit than for the laboratory-developed methods. Moreover, out of 12 proven congenital toxoplasmosis cases, 91.7% were detected by the laboratory-developed assays, whereas only 50% were detected by the commercial kit. A lack of sensitivity of the method, partly due to the presence of PCR inhibitors, was the main drawback of the commercial method. This study emphasizes that commercial PCR diagnostic kits do not systematically perform better than carefully optimized laboratory-developed methods. There is a need for thorough evaluation of such kits by proficient groups, as well as for performance standards that commercial kits can be tested against to improve confidence in those selected by health care providers. PMID:23035184

  20. Detection of a Molecular Biomarker for Zygomycetes by Quantitative PCR Assays of Plasma, Bronchoalveolar Lavage, and Lung Tissue in a Rabbit Model of Experimental Pulmonary Zygomycosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Kasai, Miki; Harrington, Susan M.; Francesconi, Andrea; Petraitis, Vidmantas; Petraitiene, Ruta; Beveridge, Mara G.; Knudsen, Tena; Milanovich, Jeffery; Cotton, Margaret P.; Hughes, Johanna; Schaufele, Robert L.; Sein, Tin; Bacher, John; Murray, Patrick R.; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.; Walsh, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    We developed two real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays, targeting the 28S rRNA gene, for the diagnosis of zygomycosis caused by the most common, clinically significant Zygomycetes. The amplicons of the first qPCR assay (qPCR-1) from Rhizopus, Mucor, and Rhizomucor species were distinguished through melt curve analysis. The second qPCR assay (qPCR-2) detected Cunninghamella species using a different primer/probe set. For both assays, the analytic sensitivity for the detection of hyphal elements from germinating sporangiospores in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissue homogenates from rabbits was 1 to 10 sporangiospores/ml. Four unique and clinically applicable models of invasive pulmonary zygomycosis served as surrogates of human infections, facilitating the validation of these assays for potential diagnostic utility. For qPCR-1, 5 of 98 infarcted lung specimens were positive by qPCR and negative by quantitative culture (qCx). None were qCx positive only. Among 23 BAL fluid samples, all were positive by qPCR, while 22 were positive by qCx. qPCR-1 detected Rhizopus and Mucor DNA in 20 (39%) of 51 serial plasma samples as early as day 1 postinoculation. Similar properties were observed for qPCR-2, which showed greater sensitivity than qCx for BAL fluid (100% versus 67%; P = 0.04; n = 15). The assay detected Cunninghamella DNA in 18 (58%) of 31 serial plasma samples as early as day 1 postinoculation. These qPCR assays are sensitive and specific for the detection of Rhizopus, Mucor, Rhizomucor, and Cunninghamella species and can be used for the study and detection of infections caused by these life-threatening pathogens. PMID:18845827

  1. Development and Evaluation of a Blood Culture PCR Assay for Rapid Detection of Salmonella Paratyphi A in Clinical Samples

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Liqing; Jones, Claire; Gibani, Malick M.; Dobinson, Hazel; Thomaides-Brears, Helena; Shrestha, Sonu; Blohmke, Christoph J.; Darton, Thomas C.; Pollard, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Enteric fever remains an important cause of morbidity in many low-income countries and Salmonella Paratyphi A has emerged as the aetiological agent in an increasing proportion of cases. Lack of adequate diagnostics hinders early diagnosis and prompt treatment of both typhoid and paratyphoid but development of assays to identify paratyphoid has been particularly neglected. Here we describe the development of a rapid and sensitive blood culture PCR method for detection of Salmonella Paratyphi A from blood, potentially allowing for appropriate diagnosis and antimicrobial treatment to be initiated on the same day. Methods Venous blood samples from volunteers experimentally challenged orally with Salmonella Paratyphi A, who subsequently developed paratyphoid, were taken on the day of diagnosis; 10 ml for quantitative blood culture and automated blood culture, and 5 ml for blood culture PCR. In the latter assay, bacteria were grown in tryptone soy broth containing 2.4% ox bile and micrococcal nuclease for 5 hours (37°C) before bacterial DNA was isolated for PCR detection targeting the fliC-a gene of Salmonella Paratyphi A. Results An optimized broth containing 2.4% ox bile and micrococcal nuclease, as well as a PCR test was developed for a blood culture PCR assay of Salmonella Paratyphi A. The volunteers diagnosed with paratyphoid had a median bacterial burden of 1 (range 0.1–6.9) CFU/ml blood. All the blood culture PCR positive cases where a positive bacterial growth was shown by quantitative blood culture had a bacterial burden of ≥ 0.3 CFU/ ml blood. The blood culture PCR assay identified an equal number of positive cases as automated blood culture at higher bacterial loads (≥0.3 CFU/ml blood), but utilized only half the volume of specimens. Conclusions The blood culture PCR method for detection of Salmonella Paratyphi A can be completed within 9 hours and offers the potential for same-day diagnosis of enteric fever. Using 5 ml blood, it exhibited a

  2. Bench-top validation testing of selected immunological and molecular Renibacterium salmoninarum diagnostic assays by comparison with quantitative bacteriological culture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, D.G.; Applegate, L.J.; Murray, A.L.; Purcell, M.K.; McKibben, C.L.

    2013-01-01

    No gold standard assay exhibiting error-free classification of results has been identified for detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of salmonid bacterial kidney disease. Validation of diagnostic assays for R. salmoninarum has been hindered by its unique characteristics and biology, and difficulties in locating suitable populations of reference test animals. Infection status of fish in test populations is often unknown, and it is commonly assumed that the assay yielding the most positive results has the highest diagnostic accuracy, without consideration of misclassification of results. In this research, quantification of R. salmoninarum in samples by bacteriological culture provided a standardized measure of viable bacteria to evaluate analytical performance characteristics (sensitivity, specificity and repeatability) of non-culture assays in three matrices (phosphate-buffered saline, ovarian fluid and kidney tissue). Non-culture assays included polyclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), direct smear fluorescent antibody technique (FAT), membrane-filtration FAT, nested polymerase chain reaction (nested PCR) and three real-time quantitative PCR assays. Injection challenge of specific pathogen-free Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum), with R. salmoninarum was used to estimate diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. Results did not identify a single assay demonstrating the highest analytical and diagnostic performance characteristics, but revealed strengths and weaknesses of each test.

  3. Bench-top validation testing of selected immunological and molecular Renibacterium salmoninarum diagnostic assays by comparison with quantitative bacteriological culture.

    PubMed

    Elliott, D G; Applegate, L J; Murray, A L; Purcell, M K; McKibben, C L

    2013-09-01

    No gold standard assay exhibiting error-free classification of results has been identified for detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of salmonid bacterial kidney disease. Validation of diagnostic assays for R. salmoninarum has been hindered by its unique characteristics and biology, and difficulties in locating suitable populations of reference test animals. Infection status of fish in test populations is often unknown, and it is commonly assumed that the assay yielding the most positive results has the highest diagnostic accuracy, without consideration of misclassification of results. In this research, quantification of R. salmoninarum in samples by bacteriological culture provided a standardized measure of viable bacteria to evaluate analytical performance characteristics (sensitivity, specificity and repeatability) of non-culture assays in three matrices (phosphate-buffered saline, ovarian fluid and kidney tissue). Non-culture assays included polyclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), direct smear fluorescent antibody technique (FAT), membrane-filtration FAT, nested polymerase chain reaction (nested PCR) and three real-time quantitative PCR assays. Injection challenge of specific pathogen-free Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum), with R. salmoninarum was used to estimate diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. Results did not identify a single assay demonstrating the highest analytical and diagnostic performance characteristics, but revealed strengths and weaknesses of each test. PMID:23346868

  4. Field-based multiplex and quantitative assay platforms for diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatasubbarao, Srivatsa; Dixon, C. Edward; Chipman, Russell; Scherer, Axel; Beshay, Manal; Kempen, Lothar U.; Chandra Sekhar, Jai Ganesh; Yan, Hong; Puccio, Ava; Okonkwo, David; McClain, Stephen; Gilbert, Noah; Vyawahare, Saurabh

    2011-06-01

    The U.S. military has a continued interest in the development of handheld, field-usable sensors and test kits for a variety of diagnostic applications, such as traumatic brain injury (TBI) and infectious diseases. Field-use presents unique challenges for biosensor design, both for the readout unit and for the biological assay platform. We have developed robust biosensor devices that offer ultra-high sensitivity and also meet field-use needs. The systems under development include a multiplexed quantitative lateral flow test strip for TBI diagnostics, a field test kit for the diagnosis of pathogens endemic to the Middle East, and a microfluidic assay platform with a label-free reader for performing complex biological automated assays in the field.

  5. Development of real-time PCR assays for the detection of Moraxella macacae associated with bloody nose syndrome in rhesus (Macaca mulatta) and cynomolgus (Macaca fascicularis) macaques

    PubMed Central

    Whitehouse, Chris A.; Chase, Kitty; Embers, Monica E.; Kulesh, David A.; Ladner, Jason T.; Palacios, Gustavo F.; Minogue, Timothy D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Moraxella macacae is a recently described bacterial pathogen that causes epistaxis or so-called bloody nose syndrome in captive macaques. The aim of this study was to develop specific molecular diagnostic assays for M. macacae and to determine their performance characteristics. Methods We developed six real-time PCR assays on the Roche LightCycler. The accuracy, precision, selectivity, and limit of detection (LOD) were determined for each assay, in addition to further validation by testing nasal swabs from macaques presenting with epistaxis at the Tulane National Primate Research Center. Results All assays exhibited 100% specificity and were highly sensitive with an LOD of 10 fg for chromosomal assays and 1 fg for the plasmid assay. Testing of nasal swabs from 10 symptomatic macaques confirmed the presence of M. macacae in these animals. Conclusions We developed several accurate, sensitive, and species-specific real-time PCR assays for the detection of M. macacae in captive macaques. PMID:26365904

  6. Detection of MPLW515L/K Mutations and Determination of Allele Frequencies with a Single-Tube PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Takei, Hiraku; Morishita, Soji; Araki, Marito; Edahiro, Yoko; Sunami, Yoshitaka; Hironaka, Yumi; Noda, Naohiro; Sekiguchi, Yuji; Tsuneda, Satoshi; Ohsaka, Akimichi; Komatsu, Norio

    2014-01-01

    A gain-of-function mutation in the myeloproliferative leukemia virus (MPL) gene, which encodes the thrombopoietin receptor, has been identified in patients with essential thrombocythemia and primary myelofibrosis, subgroups of classic myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). The presence of MPL gene mutations is a critical diagnostic criterion for these diseases. Here, we developed a rapid, simple, and cost-effective method of detecting two major MPL mutations, MPLW515L/K, in a single PCR assay; we termed this method DARMS (dual amplification refractory mutation system)-PCR. DARMS-PCR is designed to produce three different PCR products corresponding to MPLW515L, MPLW515K, and all MPL alleles. The amplicons are later detected and quantified using a capillary sequencer to determine the relative frequencies of the mutant and wild-type alleles. Applying DARMS-PCR to human specimens, we successfully identified MPL mutations in MPN patients, with the exception of patients bearing mutant allele frequencies below the detection limit (5%) of this method. The MPL mutant allele frequencies determined using DARMS-PCR correlated strongly with the values determined using deep sequencing. Thus, we demonstrated the potential of DARMS-PCR to detect MPL mutations and determine the allele frequencies in a timely and cost-effective manner. PMID:25144224

  7. Comparison of PCR and Plaque Assay for Detection and Enumeration of Coliphage in Polluted Marine Waters

    PubMed Central

    Rose, J. B.; Zhou, X.; Griffin, D. W.; Paul, J. H.

    1997-01-01

    A total of 68 marine samples from various sites impacted by sewage and storm waters were analyzed by both the plaque assay and a reverse transcriptase (RT) PCR technique for F(sup+)-specific coliphage. The coliphage levels detected by the plaque assay averaged 1.90 x 10(sup4) PFU/100.0 ml. Using a most probable number (MPN) PCR approach, the levels averaged 2.40 x 10(sup6) MPN-PCR units/100.0 ml. Two samples were positive by RT-PCR but negative by plaque assay, and 12 samples were positive by plaque assay but negative by RT-PCR (levels lower than 11.00 PFU/100.0 ml). The host system used for the plaque assay may detect somatic coliphage in addition to the F(sup+)-specific coliphage. When it is used as an indicator of pollution, contamination may be missed with more restrictive systems. The difference in results may be due to the sensitivity, specificity, or inhibition of RT-PCR in marine samples. This study provides information on quantifying PCR results by an MPN method and insights into interpretation of PCR data for detection of viruses in marine environments. PMID:16535737

  8. PCR and in vitro cultivation for detection of Leishmania spp. in diagnostic samples from humans and dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Mathis, A; Deplazes, P

    1995-01-01

    A PCR assay for the diagnosis of leishmaniosis was developed by using primers that were selected from the sequence of the small-subunit rRNA gene. The assay was optimized for routine diagnostic use. Processing of the clinical samples is rapid and simple (lysis of erythrocytes in Tris-EDTA buffer, digestion with proteinase K directly in PCR buffer, and no further purification steps). Furthermore, an internal control is included in every specimen in order to detect the presence of PCR inhibitors. The PCR was compared with diagnostic in vitro cultivation of promastigote stages for the detection of Leishmania spp. in clinical specimens from humans and dogs with a tentative diagnosis of leishmaniosis. PCR and cultivation gave identical results with all but 1 of the 95 specimens from humans. The PCR result in this case was false negative, possibly because of unequal apportionment of this sample. With 10 skin biopsies from six patients with cutaneous leishmaniosis, the sensitivity was 60%. For six human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients with visceral leishmaniosis, all bone marrow biopsies and 7 of 11 whole blood samples (after isolation of leukocytes by Ficoll-Paque) were positive in both tests. PCR detected one more case with the use of 500 microliters of whole blood with direct lysis of the erythrocytes in Tris-EDTA buffer. With dog lymph node aspirates, the sensitivity was 100% (16 of 16 samples) for both methods; furthermore, PCR was positive for 5 of 13 whole blood samples from dogs with leishmaniosis. The specificity of the PCR was 100% (70 specimens from patients without leishmaniosis).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7615719

  9. A Trio of Human Molecular Genetics PCR Assays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinking, Jeffrey L.; Waldo, Jennifer T.; Dinsmore, Jannett

    2013-01-01

    This laboratory exercise demonstrates three different analytical forms of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) that allow students to genotype themselves at four different loci. Here, we present protocols to allow students to a) genotype a non-coding polymorphic Variable Number of Tandem Repeat (VNTR) locus on human chromosome 5 using conventional…

  10. Real-Time Reverse Transcription-PCR Assay for Detection of Mumps Virus RNA in Clinical Specimens▿

    PubMed Central

    Boddicker, Jennifer D.; Rota, Paul A.; Kreman, Trisha; Wangeman, Andrea; Lowe, Louis; Hummel, Kimberly B.; Thompson, Robert; Bellini, William J.; Pentella, Michael; DesJardin, Lucy E.

    2007-01-01

    The mumps virus is a negative-strand RNA virus in the family Paramyxoviridae. Mumps infection results in an acute illness with symptoms including fever, headache, and myalgia, followed by swelling of the salivary glands. Complications of mumps can include meningitis, deafness, pancreatitis, orchitis, and first-trimester abortion. Laboratory confirmation of mumps infection can be made by the detection of immunoglobulin M-specific antibodies to mumps virus in acute-phase serum samples, the isolation of mumps virus in cell culture, or by detection of the RNA of the mumps virus by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. We developed and validated a multiplex real-time RT-PCR assay for rapid mumps diagnosis in a clinical setting. This assay used oligonucleotide primers and a TaqMan probe targeting the mumps SH gene, as well as primers and a probe that targeted the human RNase P gene to assess the presence of PCR inhibitors and as a measure of specimen quality. The test was specific, since it did not amplify a product from near-neighbor viruses, as well as sensitive and accurate. Real-time RT-PCR results showed 100% correlation with results from viral culture, the gold standard for mumps diagnostic testing. Assay efficiency was over 90% and displayed good precision after performing inter- and intraassay replicates. Thus, we have developed and validated a molecular method for rapidly diagnosing mumps infection that may be used to complement existing techniques. PMID:17652480

  11. Acoustic detection of DNA conformation in genetic assays combined with PCR.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, G; Tsortos, A; Kordas, A; Tiniakou, I; Morou, E; Vontas, J; Kardassis, D; Gizeli, E

    2013-01-01

    Application of PCR to multiplexing assays is not trivial; it requires multiple fluorescent labels for amplicon detection and sophisticated software for data interpretation. Alternative PCR-free methods exploiting new concepts in nanotechnology exhibit high sensitivities but require multiple labeling and/or amplification steps. Here, we propose to simplify the problem of simultaneous analysis of multiple targets in genetic assays by detecting directly the conformation, rather than mass, of target amplicons produced in the same PCR reaction. The new methodology exploits acoustic wave devices which are shown to be able to characterize in a fully quantitative manner multiple double stranded DNAs of various lengths. The generic nature of the combined acoustic/PCR platform is shown using real samples and, specifically, during the detection of SNP genotyping in Anopheles gambiae and gene expression quantification in treated mice. The method possesses significant advantages to TaqMan assay and real-time PCR regarding multiplexing capability, speed, simplicity and cost. PMID:23778520

  12. Acoustic detection of DNA conformation in genetic assays combined with PCR

    PubMed Central

    Papadakis, G.; Tsortos, A.; Kordas, A.; Tiniakou, I.; Morou, E.; Vontas, J.; Kardassis, D.; Gizeli, E.

    2013-01-01

    Application of PCR to multiplexing assays is not trivial; it requires multiple fluorescent labels for amplicon detection and sophisticated software for data interpretation. Alternative PCR-free methods exploiting new concepts in nanotechnology exhibit high sensitivities but require multiple labeling and/or amplification steps. Here, we propose to simplify the problem of simultaneous analysis of multiple targets in genetic assays by detecting directly the conformation, rather than mass, of target amplicons produced in the same PCR reaction. The new methodology exploits acoustic wave devices which are shown to be able to characterize in a fully quantitative manner multiple double stranded DNAs of various lengths. The generic nature of the combined acoustic/PCR platform is shown using real samples and, specifically, during the detection of SNP genotyping in Anopheles gambiae and gene expression quantification in treated mice. The method possesses significant advantages to TaqMan assay and real-time PCR regarding multiplexing capability, speed, simplicity and cost. PMID:23778520

  13. Sequence polymorphism can produce serious artifacts in real-time PCR assays: lessons from Pacific oysters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since it was first described in the mid-1990s, quantitative real time PCR (Q-PCR) has been widely used in many fields of biomedical research and molecular diagnostics. This method is routinely used to validate whole transcriptome analyses such as DNA microarrays, suppressive subtractive hybridizati...

  14. Evaluation of Two PCR-Based Swine-Specific Fecal Source Tracking Assays (Poster)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several PCR-based methods have been proposed to identify swine fecal pollution in environmental waters. However, the specificity and distribution of these targets have not been adequately assessed. Consequently, the utility of these assays in identifying swine fecal contamination...

  15. Performance Assessment of Human and Cattle Associated Quantitative Real-time PCR Assays - slides

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation overview is (1) Single laboratory performance assessment of human- and cattle associated PCR assays and (2) A Field Study: Evaluation of two human fecal waste management practices in Ohio watershed.

  16. Differential Detection of Entamoeba histolytica, Entamoeba dispar, and Entamoeba moshkovskii by a Single-Round PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Hamzah, Zulhainan; Petmitr, Songsak; Mungthin, Mathirut; Leelayoova, Saovanee; Chavalitshewinkoon-Petmitr, Porntip

    2006-01-01

    A single-round PCR assay was developed for detection and differential diagnosis of the three Entamoeba species found in humans, Entamoeba moshkovskii, Entamoeba histolytica, and Entamoeba dispar, that are morphologically identical as both cysts and trophozoites. A conserved forward primer was derived from the middle of the small-subunit rRNA gene, and reverse primers were designed from signature sequences specific to each of these three Entamoeba species. PCR generates a 166-bp product with E. histolytica DNA, a 752-bp product with E. dispar DNA, and a 580-bp product with E. moshkovskii DNA. Thirty clinical specimens were examined, and the species present were successfully detected and differentiated using this assay. It was possible to detect as little as 10 pg of E. moshkovskii and E. histolytica DNA, while for E. dispar the sensitivity was about 20 pg of DNA. Testing with DNA from different pathogens, including bacteria and other protozoa, confirmed the high specificity of the assay. We propose the use of this PCR assay as an accurate, rapid, and effective diagnostic method for the detection and discrimination of these three morphologically indistinguishable Entamoeba species in both routine diagnosis of amoebiasis and epidemiological surveys. PMID:16954247

  17. Diagnostic real-time RT-PCR for the simultaneous detection of Citrus exocortis viroid and Hop stunt viroid.

    PubMed

    Papayiannis, Lambros C

    2014-02-01

    Citrus exocortis viroid (CEVd) and Hop stunt viroid (HSVd) are two important viroids known to infect several plant species worldwide. In this study, a real-time reverse transcription (RT) TaqMan polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed and optimized for the simultaneous detection of CEVd and HSVd. The assay's analytical and diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were evaluated using reference isolates. Two different RNA extraction methods and one rapid crude template preparation procedure were compared in terms of extraction purity and efficiency for PCR applications. Extraction method Q included a commercially available kit, whereas method C was a modified chloroform-phase extraction in house protocol. Procedure S involved blotting the sap extract on a positively charged nylon membrane and elution. The multiplex RT-TaqMan PCR assay successfully discriminated the two viroid species from all reference samples and its recorded diagnostic sensitivity (Dse) and specificity (Dsp) was 100%. On the contrary, in conventional RT-PCR tests, the overall Dse and Dsp were lower and estimated at 94 and 95% for CEVd, and 97 and 98% for HSVd, respectively. In a direct comparison, the developed assay presented 1000-fold more analytical sensitivity. Spectrophotometric results showed that RNA extraction methods Q and C, yielded the purest RNA, and gave the lowest mean Ct values. Alternative template preparation method S resulted in Ct values statistically similar to those obtained with methods Q to C when tested by RT-TaqMan PCR. The developed assay, using crude template preparation S, allows the simple, accurate and cost-effective testing of a large number of plant samples, and can be applied in surveys and certification schemes. PMID:24252553

  18. Optimisation of DNA extraction and validation of PCR assays to detect Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Timms, Verlaine J; Mitchell, Hazel M; Neilan, Brett A

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate DNA extraction methods and PCR assays suitable for the detection of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis in bovine tissue. The majority of methods currently used to detect M. paratuberculosis have been developed using bovine samples, such as faeces, blood or tissue and, in many cases, have been based on detection from pooled samples from a herd. However most studies have not compared PCR results to culture results. In order to address this problem, four DNA extraction protocols and three PCR assays were employed to detect M. paratuberculosis in bovine tissue. Given that culture is reliable from cows, the results were then compared with the known M. paratuberculosis culture status. The following DNA extractions were included, two commercial kits, a boiling method, an in house extraction based on a published method and enrichment by sonication. The three PCR assays used included single round IS900 and f57 assays and a nested IS900 assay. In addition, another PCR assay was validated for the detection of any Mycobacterial species and a universal bacterial 16S rRNA gene assay was used to detect sample inhibition. The in-house DNA extraction was the most consistent in extracting good quality DNA compared to all other methods. The use of two PCR markers, IS900 and f57, and a universal PCR enabled the correct samples to be identified as M. paratuberculosis positive. In addition, when compared to the culture result, false-positives did not occur and PCR inhibition was readily identified. Using an in house DNA extraction coupled with the IS900 and f57 PCR markers, this study provides a reliable and simple method to detect M. paratuberculosis in both veterinary and spill over infections. PMID:25797305

  19. Development of a real-time PCR assay for quantification of Citrobacter rodentium.

    PubMed

    Sagaidak, Sofia; Taibi, Amel; Wen, Bijun; Comelli, Elena M

    2016-07-01

    Molecular tools to quantify Citrobacter rodentium are not available. We developed a quantitative PCR assay targeting the espB gene. This assay is specific, has a linearity range of about 6.7×10(1) to 6.7×10(6)cells/PCR reaction (92% efficiency) and a detection limit of about 10(4)cells/g wet feces. PMID:27196638

  20. Development of three triplex real-time reverse transcription PCR assays for the qualitative molecular typing of the nine serotypes of African horse sickness virus.

    PubMed

    Weyer, Camilla T; Joone, Christopher; Lourens, Carina W; Monyai, Mpho S; Koekemoer, Otto; Grewar, John D; van Schalkwyk, Antoinette; Majiwa, Phelix O A; MacLachlan, N James; Guthrie, Alan J

    2015-10-01

    Blood samples collected as part of routine diagnostic investigations from South African horses with clinical signs suggestive of African horse sickness (AHS) were subjected to analysis with an AHS virus (AHSV) group specific reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (AHSV RT-qPCR) assay and virus isolation (VI) with subsequent serotyping by plaque inhibition (PI) assays using AHSV serotype-specific antisera. Blood samples that tested positive by AHSV RT-qPCR were then selected for analysis using AHSV type specific RT-qPCR (AHSV TS RT-qPCR) assays. The TS RT-qPCR assays were evaluated using both historic stocks of the South African reference strains of each of the 9 AHSV serotypes, as well as recently derived stocks of these same viruses. Of the 503 horse blood samples tested, 156 were positive by both AHSV RT-qPCR and VI assays, whereas 135 samples that were VI negative were positive by AHSV RT-qPCR assay. The virus isolates made from the various blood samples included all 9 AHSV serotypes, and there was 100% agreement between the results of conventional serotyping of individual virus isolates by PI assay and AHSV TS RT-qPCR typing results. Results of the current study confirm that the AHSV TS RT-qPCR assays for the identification of individual AHSV serotypes are applicable and practicable and therefore are potentially highly useful and appropriate for virus typing in AHS outbreak situations in endemic or sporadic incursion areas, which can be crucial in determining appropriate and timely vaccination and control strategies. PMID:26232526

  1. TqPCR: A Touchdown qPCR Assay with Significantly Improved Detection Sensitivity and Amplification Efficiency of SYBR Green qPCR

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Wang, Jing; Deng, Fang; Yan, Zhengjian; Xia, Yinglin; Wang, Zhongliang; Ye, Jixing; Deng, Youlin; Zhang, Zhonglin; Qiao, Min; Li, Ruifang; Denduluri, Sahitya K.; Wei, Qiang; Zhao, Lianggong; Lu, Shun; Wang, Xin; Tang, Shengli; Liu, Hao; Luu, Hue H.; Haydon, Rex C.; He, Tong-Chuan; Jiang, Li

    2015-01-01

    The advent of fluorescence-based quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) has revolutionized the quantification of gene expression analysis in many fields, including life sciences, agriculture, forensic science, molecular diagnostics, and medicine. While SYBR Green-based qPCR is the most commonly-used platform due to its inexpensive nature and robust chemistry, quantifying the expression of genes with low abundance or RNA samples extracted from highly restricted or limited sources can be challenging because the detection sensitivity of SYBR Green-based qPCR is limited. Here, we develop a novel and effective touchdown qPCR (TqPCR) protocol by incorporating a 4-cycle touchdown stage prior to the quantification amplification stage. Using the same cDNA templates, we find that TqPCR can reduce the average Cq values for Gapdh, Rps13, and Hprt1 reference genes by 4.45, 5.47, and 4.94 cycles, respectively, when compared with conventional qPCR; the overall average Cq value reduction for the three reference genes together is 4.95. We further find that TqPCR can improve PCR amplification efficiency and thus increase detection sensitivity. When the quantification of Wnt3A-induced target gene expression in mesenchymal stem cells is analyzed, we find that, while both conventional qPCR and TqPCR can detect the up-regulation of the relatively abundant target Axin2, only TqPCR can detect the up-regulation of the lowly-expressed targets Oct4 and Gbx2. Finally, we demonstrate that the MRQ2 and MRQ3 primer pairs derived from mouse reference gene Tbp can be used to validate the RNA/cDNA integrity of qPCR samples. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that TqPCR may increase detection sensitivity and PCR amplification efficiency. Overall, TqPCR should be advantageous over conventional qPCR in expression quantification, especially when the transcripts of interest are lowly expressed, and/or the availability of total RNA is highly restricted or limited. PMID:26172450

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF MULTIPLEX REAL-TIME RT-PCR AS A DIAGNOSTIC TOOL FOR AVIAN INFLUENZA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A multiplex real-time RT-PCR (RRT-PCR) assay for the simultaneous detection of the H5 and H7 hemagglutinin (HA) subtypes was developed with hydrolysis type probes labeled with the FAM (H5 probe) and ROX (H7 probe) dyes. The sensitivity of the H5-H7 subtyping assay was determined, using in vitro tran...

  3. Development of a nanoparticle-assisted PCR assay for detection of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wanzhe; Li, Yanan; Li, Peng; Song, Qinye; Li, Limin; Sun, Jiguo

    2015-08-01

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) is an important pig pathogen that can cause vomiting, diarrhea, and dehydration, leading to serious damage to the swine industry worldwide. In this study, a nanoparticle-assisted polymerase chain reaction (nanoPCR) assay targeting the N gene of PEDV was developed and the sensitivity and specificity were investigated. Under the optimized conditions for detection of PEDV RNA, the nanoPCR assay was 100-fold more sensitive than a conventional RT-PCR assay. The lower detection limit of the nanoPCR assay was 2.7 × 10(-6) ng/μL of PEDV RNA and no cross-reaction was observed with other viruses. This is the first report to demonstrate the application of a nanoPCR assay for the detection of PEDV. The sensitive and specific nanoPCR assay developed in this study can be applied widely in clinical diagnosis and field surveillance of PEDV-infection. PMID:25887451

  4. Development of a nested-PCR assay for the detection of Cryptosporidium parvum in finished water.

    PubMed

    Monis, P T; Saint, C P

    2001-05-01

    A nested-PCR assay, incorporating an internal positive control, was developed for Cryptosporidium monitoring in finished water. This assay was capable of reproducibly detecting 8 oocysts in spiked-filtered water samples collected from 5 South Australian water treatment plants. The RT-PCR assay of Kaucner and Stinear (Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 64(5) (1998) 1743) was also evaluated for the detection of Cryptosporidium parvum. Initially, under our experimental conditions, a detection level of 27 oocysts was achieved for spiked reagent water samples. This level was improved to 5 oocysts by modification of the method. Untreated South Australian source waters concentrated by calcium carbonate flocculation were found to be highly inhibitory to the RT-PCR assay. Concentration of similar samples using Envirochek filters appeared to eliminate PCR inhibition. While both methods possessed similar sensitivities the nested-PCR assay was more reproducible, more cost effective, simpler to perform and could detect both viable and non-viable intact Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts, which is an important consideration for plant operators. These factors make the nested-PCR assay the method of choice for screening large numbers of potable water samples, where a reliable low level of detection is essential. PMID:11329665

  5. Recombinase Polymerase Amplification Assay for Rapid Diagnostics of Dengue Infection

    PubMed Central

    Abd El Wahed, Ahmed; Patel, Pranav; Faye, Oumar; Thaloengsok, Sasikanya; Heidenreich, Doris; Matangkasombut, Ponpan; Manopwisedjaroen, Khajohnpong; Sakuntabhai, Anavaj; Sall, Amadou A.; Hufert, Frank T.; Weidmann, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Background Over 2.5 billion people are exposed to the risk of contracting dengue fever (DF). Early diagnosis of DF helps to diminish its burden on public health. Real-time reverse transcription polymerase amplification assays (RT-PCR) are the standard method for molecular detection of the dengue virus (DENV). Real-time RT-PCR analysis is not suitable for on-site screening since mobile devices are large, expensive, and complex. In this study, two RT-recombinase polymerase amplification (RT-RPA) assays were developed to detect DENV1-4. Methodology/Principal Findings Using two quantitative RNA molecular standards, the analytical sensitivity of a RT-RPA targeting the 3´non-translated region of DENV1-4 was found to range from 14 (DENV4) to 241 (DENV1-3) RNA molecules detected. The assay was specific and did not cross detect other Flaviviruses. The RT-RPA assay was tested in a mobile laboratory combining magnetic-bead based total nucleic acid extraction and a portable detection device in Kedougou (Senegal) and in Bangkok (Thailand). In Kedougou, the RT-RPA was operated at an ambient temperature of 38°C with auxiliary electricity tapped from a motor vehicle and yielded a clinical sensitivity and specificity of 98% (n=31) and 100% (n=23), respectively. While in the field trial in Bangkok, the clinical sensitivity and specificity were 72% (n=90) and 100%(n=41), respectively. Conclusions/Significance During the first 5 days of infection, the developed DENV1-4 RT-RPA assays constitute a suitable accurate and rapid assay for DENV diagnosis. Moreover, the use of a portable fluorescence-reading device broadens its application potential to the point-of-care for outbreak investigations. PMID:26075598

  6. Real-Time Quantitative PCR Assay for Monitoring of Nervous Necrosis Virus Infection in Grouper Aquaculture▿†

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Hsiao-Che; Wang, Ting-Yu; Chen, Peng-Peng; Chen, Young-Mao; Chuang, Hui-Ching; Chen, Tzong-Yueh

    2011-01-01

    Viral nervous necrosis caused by nervous necrosis virus (NNV) exacts a high mortality and results in huge economic losses in grouper aquaculture in Taiwan. The present study developed a real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) method for NNV monitoring. The assay showed a strong linear correlation (r2 = 0.99) between threshold cycle (CT) and RNA quantities, which allowed identification of infected groupers by the CT value and could be exploited to warn of NNV infection prior to an outbreak in grouper fish farms. Real-time qPCR also confirmed the copious content of NNV in grouper fin, similar to that in primary tissues; the result was verified by using in situ reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). This indicated that grouper fin was a suitable sample for NNV detection, in a manner that could be relatively benign to the fish. The rapid spread of NNV infection to the entire population of affected farms was evident. The developed real-time qPCR method is rapid, highly sensitive, and applicable to routine high-throughput detection of large numbers of samples and has potential as a suitable tool for diagnostic, epidemiological, and genetic studies of grouper aquaculture. PMID:21233077

  7. Final Report Nucleic Acid System - Hybrid PCR and Multiplex Assay Project Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, R P; Langlois, R G; Nasarabadi, S; Benett, W J; Colston, B W; Johnson, D C; Brown, S B; Stratton, P L; Milanovich, F P

    2002-04-17

    This report covers phase 2 (year 2) of the Nucleic Acid System--Hybrid PCR and Multiplex Assay project. The objective of the project is to reduce to practice the detection and identification of biological warfare pathogens by the nucleic acid recognition technique of PCR (polymerase chain reaction) in a multiplex mode using flow cytometry. The Hybrid instrument consists of a flow-through PCR module capable of handling a multiplexed PCR assay, a hybridizing module capable of hybridizing multiplexed PCR amplicons and beads, and a flow cytometer module for bead-based identification, all controlled by a single computer. Multiplex immunoassay using bead-based Luminex flow cytometry is available, allowing rapid screening for many agents. PCR is highly specific and complements and verifies immunoassay. It can also be multiplexed and detection provided using the bead-based Luminex flow cytometer. This approach allows full access to the speed and 100-fold multiplex capability of flow cytometry for rapid screening as well as the accuracy and specificity of PCR. This project has two principal activities: (1) Design, build and test a prototype hybrid PCR/flow cytometer with the basic capabilities for rapid, broad spectrum detection and identification, and (2) Develop and evaluate multiplex flow analysis assay protocols and reagents for the simultaneous detection of PCR products. This project requires not only building operationally functional instrumentation but also developing the chemical assays for detection of priority pathogens. This involves development and evaluation of multiplex flow analysis assay protocols and reagents for the simultaneous detection of PCR products.

  8. DNA Barcode-Based PCR-RFLP and Diagnostic PCR for Authentication of Jinqian Baihua She (Bungarus Parvus)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaolei; Zeng, Weiping; Liao, Jing; Liang, Zhenbiao; Huang, Shuhua

    2015-01-01

    We established polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and diagnostic PCR based on cytochrome C oxidase subunit I (COI) barcodes of Bungarus multicinctus, genuine Jinqian Baihua She (JBS), and adulterant snake species. The PCR-RFLP system utilizes the specific restriction sites of SpeI and BstEII in the COI sequence of B. multicinctus to allow its cleavage into 3 fragments (120 bp, 230 bp, and 340 bp); the COI sequences of the adulterants do not contain these restriction sites and therefore remained intact after digestion with SpeI and BstEII (except for that of Zaocys dhumnades, which could be cleaved into a 120 bp and a 570 bp fragment). For diagnostic PCR, a pair of species-specific primers (COI37 and COI337) was designed to amplify a specific 300 bp amplicon from the genomic DNA of B. multicinctus; no such amplicons were found in other allied species. We tested the two methods using 11 commercial JBS samples, and the results demonstrated that barcode-based PCR-RFLP and diagnostic PCR both allowed effective and accurate authentication of JBS. PMID:26078770

  9. DNA Barcode-Based PCR-RFLP and Diagnostic PCR for Authentication of Jinqian Baihua She (Bungarus Parvus).

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaolei; Zeng, Weiping; Liao, Jing; Liang, Zhenbiao; Huang, Shuhua; Chao, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    We established polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and diagnostic PCR based on cytochrome C oxidase subunit I (COI) barcodes of Bungarus multicinctus, genuine Jinqian Baihua She (JBS), and adulterant snake species. The PCR-RFLP system utilizes the specific restriction sites of SpeI and BstEII in the COI sequence of B. multicinctus to allow its cleavage into 3 fragments (120 bp, 230 bp, and 340 bp); the COI sequences of the adulterants do not contain these restriction sites and therefore remained intact after digestion with SpeI and BstEII (except for that of Zaocys dhumnades, which could be cleaved into a 120 bp and a 570 bp fragment). For diagnostic PCR, a pair of species-specific primers (COI37 and COI337) was designed to amplify a specific 300 bp amplicon from the genomic DNA of B. multicinctus; no such amplicons were found in other allied species. We tested the two methods using 11 commercial JBS samples, and the results demonstrated that barcode-based PCR-RFLP and diagnostic PCR both allowed effective and accurate authentication of JBS. PMID:26078770

  10. Specific qPCR assays for the detection of orf virus, pseudocowpox virus and bovine papular stomatitis virus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hui; Wilkins, Kimberly; Damon, Inger K; Li, Yu

    2013-12-01

    The genus Parapoxvirus (PAPV) is comprised traditionally of orf virus (ORFV), pseudocowpox virus (PCPV) and bovine papular stomatitis virus (BPSV), which cause infections of ruminants and their handlers in the U.S. and worldwide. Unlike orthopoxvirus infections, which can cause systemic or localized infections, PAPV infections present normally as benign, self-limited and localized skin lesions; infections do not confer lifelong immunity. In recent years, related potentially to enhanced awareness and the availability of diagnostic methods, there has been an observed increase in reported cases of PAPV in animals and humans. This study describes TaqMan based real-time PCR assays for both generic and specific detection of PAPV species for surveillance and outbreak investigations. These assays target highly conserved PAPV RNA polymerase gene sequences and are capable of detecting three known species of PAPVs (ORFV, PCPV, and BPSV). The assays were evaluated using a panel of PAPV DNA derived from human infections or animal specimen remainders. The sensitivities of all four assays were determined using droplet digital PCR; fewer than 10 copies of clinical PAPV DNA can be detected consistently. These assays provide a reliable and sensitive method for rapid confirmation and characterization PAPV infections with varying clinical presentations. PMID:24035807

  11. Development and optimization of a PCR assay for detection of Dobrava and Puumala hantaviruses in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

    PubMed

    Smajlović, Lejla; Davoren, Jon; Heyman, Paul; Cochez, Christel; Haas, Cordula; Maake, Caroline; Hukić, Mirsada

    2012-06-01

    Hantavirus-specific serology tests are the main diagnostic technique for detection of hantavirus infection in Bosnia and Herzegovina. In order to enhance hantavirus infections monitoring a sensitive PCR based assay was developed to detect Dobrava (DOBV) and Puumala (PUUV) hantaviruses. Nested primer sets were designed within three different regions of the viral RNA (S and M segment of DOBV and M segment of PUUV) based on highly similar regions from a number of different European hantavirus strains. Assay conditions were optimized using cell cultures infected with DOBV Slovenia, PUUV Sotkamo and PUUV CG 18-20. This sensitive and specific assay has proven to be useful for detection of both Puumala and Dobrava hantaviruses. PMID:22433513

  12. Rapid Staphylococcus aureus agr type determination by a novel multiplex real-time quantitative PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Francois, Patrice; Koessler, Thibaud; Huyghe, Antoine; Harbarth, Stephan; Bento, Manuela; Lew, Daniel; Etienne, Jérôme; Pittet, Didier; Schrenzel, Jacques

    2006-05-01

    The accessory gene regulator (agr) is a crucial regulatory component of Staphylococcus aureus involved in the control of bacterial virulence factor expression. We developed a real-time multiplex quantitative PCR assay for the rapid determination of S. aureus agr type. This assay represents a rapid and affordable alternative to sequence-based strategies for assessing relevant epidemiological information. PMID:16672433

  13. Rapid Staphylococcus aureus agr Type Determination by a Novel Multiplex Real-Time Quantitative PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Francois, Patrice; Koessler, Thibaud; Huyghe, Antoine; Harbarth, Stephan; Bento, Manuela; Lew, Daniel; Etienne, Jérôme; Pittet, Didier; Schrenzel, Jacques

    2006-01-01

    The accessory gene regulator (agr) is a crucial regulatory component of Staphylococcus aureus involved in the control of bacterial virulence factor expression. We developed a real-time multiplex quantitative PCR assay for the rapid determination of S. aureus agr type. This assay represents a rapid and affordable alternative to sequence-based strategies for assessing relevant epidemiological information. PMID:16672433

  14. Quantitative assay of photoinduced DNA strand breaks by real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Wiczk, Justyna; Westphal, Kinga; Rak, Janusz

    2016-09-01

    Real-time PCR (qPCR) - a modern methodology primarily used for studying gene expression has been employed for the quantitative assay of an important class of DNA damage - single strand breaks. These DNA lesions which may lead to highly cytotoxic double strand breaks were quantified in a model system where double stranded DNA was sensitized to UV photons by labeling with 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine. The amount of breaks formed due to irradiation with several doses of 320nm photons was assayed by two independent methods: LC-MS and qPCR. A very good agreement between the relative damage measured by the two completely different analytical tools proves the applicability of qPCR for the quantitative analysis of SSBs. Our results suggest that the popularity of the hitherto underestimated though accurate and site-specific technique of real-time PCR may increase in future DNA damage studies. PMID:27371921

  15. Development and evaluation of a new PCR assay for detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa D genotype.

    PubMed

    Lødeng, A G G; Ahlén, C; Lysvand, H; Mandal, L H; Iversen, O J

    2006-08-01

    This report describes a new PCR-based assay for the detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa genotype D in occupational saturation diving systems in the North Sea. This genotype has persisted in these systems for 11 years (1993-2003) and represents 18% of isolates from infections analysed during this period. The new PCR assay was based on sequences obtained after randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR analysis of a group of isolates related to diving that had been identified previously by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The primer set for the D genotype targets a gene that codes for a hypothetical class 4 protein in the P. aeruginosa PAO1 genome. A primer set able to detect P. aeruginosa at the species level was also designed, based on the 23S-5S rDNA spacer region. The two assays produced 382-bp and 192-bp amplicons, respectively. The PCR assay was evaluated by analysing 100 P. aeruginosa isolates related to diving, representing 28 PFGE genotypes, and 38 clinical and community P. aeruginosa isolates and strains from other species. The assay identified all of the genotype D isolates tested. Two additional diving-relevant genotypes (TP2 and TP27) were also identified, as well as three isolates of non-diving origin. It was concluded that the new PCR assay is a useful tool for early detection and prevention of infections with the D genotype. PMID:16842571

  16. Evaluation of Signature Erosion in Ebola Virus Due to Genomic Drift and Its Impact on the Performance of Diagnostic Assays

    PubMed Central

    Sozhamannan, Shanmuga; Holland, Mitchell Y.; Hall, Adrienne T.; Negrón, Daniel A.; Ivancich, Mychal; Koehler, Jeffrey W.; Minogue, Timothy D.; Campbell, Catherine E.; Berger, Walter J.; Christopher, George W.; Goodwin, Bruce G.; Smith, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Genome sequence analyses of the 2014 Ebola Virus (EBOV) isolates revealed a potential problem with the diagnostic assays currently in use; i.e., drifting genomic profiles of the virus may affect the sensitivity or even produce false-negative results. We evaluated signature erosion in ebolavirus molecular assays using an in silico approach and found frequent potential false-negative and false-positive results. We further empirically evaluated many EBOV assays, under real time PCR conditions using EBOV Kikwit (1995) and Makona (2014) RNA templates. These results revealed differences in performance between assays but were comparable between the old and new EBOV templates. Using a whole genome approach and a novel algorithm, termed BioVelocity, we identified new signatures that are unique to each of EBOV, Sudan virus (SUDV), and Reston virus (RESTV). Interestingly, many of the current assay signatures do not fall within these regions, indicating a potential drawback in the past assay design strategies. The new signatures identified in this study may be evaluated with real-time reverse transcription PCR (rRT-PCR) assay development and validation. In addition, we discuss regulatory implications and timely availability to impact a rapidly evolving outbreak using existing but perhaps less than optimal assays versus redesign these assays for addressing genomic changes. PMID:26090727

  17. Evaluation of Signature Erosion in Ebola Virus Due to Genomic Drift and Its Impact on the Performance of Diagnostic Assays.

    PubMed

    Sozhamannan, Shanmuga; Holland, Mitchell Y; Hall, Adrienne T; Negrón, Daniel A; Ivancich, Mychal; Koehler, Jeffrey W; Minogue, Timothy D; Campbell, Catherine E; Berger, Walter J; Christopher, George W; Goodwin, Bruce G; Smith, Michael A

    2015-06-01

    Genome sequence analyses of the 2014 Ebola Virus (EBOV) isolates revealed a potential problem with the diagnostic assays currently in use; i.e., drifting genomic profiles of the virus may affect the sensitivity or even produce false-negative results. We evaluated signature erosion in ebolavirus molecular assays using an in silico approach and found frequent potential false-negative and false-positive results. We further empirically evaluated many EBOV assays, under real time PCR conditions using EBOV Kikwit (1995) and Makona (2014) RNA templates. These results revealed differences in performance between assays but were comparable between the old and new EBOV templates. Using a whole genome approach and a novel algorithm, termed BioVelocity, we identified new signatures that are unique to each of EBOV, Sudan virus (SUDV), and Reston virus (RESTV). Interestingly, many of the current assay signatures do not fall within these regions, indicating a potential drawback in the past assay design strategies. The new signatures identified in this study may be evaluated with real-time reverse transcription PCR (rRT-PCR) assay development and validation. In addition, we discuss regulatory implications and timely availability to impact a rapidly evolving outbreak using existing but perhaps less than optimal assays versus redesign these assays for addressing genomic changes. PMID:26090727

  18. A quadruplex PCR (qxPCR) assay for adulteration in dairy products.

    PubMed

    Agrimonti, Caterina; Pirondini, Andrea; Marmiroli, Marta; Marmiroli, Nelson

    2015-11-15

    This study describes the development of a quadruplex quantitative Real Time PCR (qxPCR) based on SYBR®GreenER chemistry, for rapid identification of DNA of cow, goat, sheep and buffalo in dairy products, and for quantification of cow DNA in these products. The platform was applied to: (i) mixes of milks at fixed percentages; (ii) cheeses prepared with the same mixes; (iii) commercial dairy products. The methodology enabled the detection of DNA from cow in mixes of milk and cheeses with a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.1%. When applied to commercial dairy products the qxPCR gave results comparable with each single-plex Real Time PCR. A good correlation (R(2)>0.9) between peaks' area of derivative of melting curves of amplicons and percentages of cow milk in milk mixes and cheeses, allows for an estimation of cow DNA in a dynamic range varying from 0.1-5% to 1-25%. PMID:25976998

  19. Authentication of beef, carabeef, chevon, mutton and pork by a PCR-RFLP assay of mitochondrial cytb gene.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Deepak; Singh, S P; Karabasanavar, Nagappa S; Singh, Rashmi; Umapathi, V

    2014-11-01

    Authentication of meat assumes significance in view of religious, quality assurance, food safety, public health, conservation and legal concerns. Here, we describe a PCR-RFLP (Polymerase Chain Reaction- Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism) assay targeting mitochondrial cytochrome-b gene for the identification of meats of five most common food animals namely cattle, buffalo, goat, sheep and pig. A pair of forward and reverse primers (VPH-F & VPH-R) amplifying a conserved region (168-776 bp) of mitochondrial cytochrome-b (cytb) gene for targeted species was designed which yielded a 609 bp PCR amplicon. Further, restriction enzyme digestion of the amplicons with Alu1 and Taq1 restriction enzymes resulted in a distinctive digestion pattern that was able to discriminate each species. The repeatability of the PCR-RFLP assay was validated ten times with consistent results observed. The developed assay can be used in routine diagnostic laboratories to differentiate the meats of closely related domestic livestock species namely cattle from buffalo and sheep from goat. PMID:26396346

  20. Risk of Misdiagnosis Due to Allele Dropout and False-Positive PCR Artifacts in Molecular Diagnostics: Analysis of 30,769 Genotypes.

    PubMed

    Blais, Jonatan; Lavoie, Sébastien B; Giroux, Sylvie; Bussières, Johanne; Lindsay, Carmen; Dionne, Jacqueline; Laroche, Mélissa; Giguère, Yves; Rousseau, François

    2015-09-01

    Quality control is a complex issue for clinical molecular diagnostic applications. In the case of genotyping assays, artifacts such as allele dropout represent a risk of misdiagnosis for amplification-based methods. However, its frequency of occurrence in PCR-based diagnostic assays remains unknown. To maximize the likelihood of detecting allele dropout, our clinical genotyping PCR-based assays are designed with two independent assays for each allele (nonoverlapping primers on each DNA strand). To estimate the incidence of allelic dropout, we took advantage of the capacity of our clinical assays to detect such events. We retrospectively studied their occurrence in the initial PCR assay for 30,769 patient reports for mutations involved in four diseases produced over 8 years. Ninety-three allele dropout events were detected and all were solved before reporting. In addition, 42 cases of artifacts caused by amplification of an allele ultimately confirmed to not be part of the genotype (drop-in events) were detected and solved. These artifacts affected 1:227 genotypes, 94% of which were due to nonreproducible PCR failures rather than sequence variants interfering with the assay, suggesting that careful primer design cannot prevent most of these errors. This provides a quantitative estimate for clinical laboratories to take this phenomenon into account in quality management and to favor assay designs that can detect (and minimize) occurrence of these artifacts in routine clinical use. PMID:26146130

  1. Development and Evaluation of an Enterovirus D68 Real-Time Reverse Transcriptase PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, Todd N.; Wylie, Kristine M.; Buller, Richard S.; Cannella, Maria

    2015-01-01

    We have developed and evaluated a real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) assay for the detection of human enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) in clinical specimens. This assay was developed in response to the unprecedented 2014 nationwide EV-D68 outbreak in the United States associated with severe respiratory illness. As part of our evaluation of the outbreak, we sequenced and published the genome sequence of the EV-D68 virus circulating in St. Louis, MO. This sequence, along with other GenBank sequences from past EV-D68 occurrences, was used to computationally select a region of EV-D68 appropriate for targeting in a strain-specific RT-PCR assay. The RT-PCR assay amplifies a segment of the VP1 gene, with an analytic limit of detection of 4 copies per reaction, and it was more sensitive than commercially available assays that detect enteroviruses and rhinoviruses without distinguishing between the two, including three multiplex respiratory panels approved for clinical use by the FDA. The assay did not detect any other enteroviruses or rhinoviruses tested and did detect divergent strains of EV-D68, including the first EV-D68 strain (Fermon) identified in California in 1962. This assay should be useful for identifying and studying current and future outbreaks of EV-D68 viruses. PMID:26063859

  2. Development and Evaluation of an Enterovirus D68 Real-Time Reverse Transcriptase PCR Assay.

    PubMed

    Wylie, Todd N; Wylie, Kristine M; Buller, Richard S; Cannella, Maria; Storch, Gregory A

    2015-08-01

    We have developed and evaluated a real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) assay for the detection of human enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) in clinical specimens. This assay was developed in response to the unprecedented 2014 nationwide EV-D68 outbreak in the United States associated with severe respiratory illness. As part of our evaluation of the outbreak, we sequenced and published the genome sequence of the EV-D68 virus circulating in St. Louis, MO. This sequence, along with other GenBank sequences from past EV-D68 occurrences, was used to computationally select a region of EV-D68 appropriate for targeting in a strain-specific RT-PCR assay. The RT-PCR assay amplifies a segment of the VP1 gene, with an analytic limit of detection of 4 copies per reaction, and it was more sensitive than commercially available assays that detect enteroviruses and rhinoviruses without distinguishing between the two, including three multiplex respiratory panels approved for clinical use by the FDA. The assay did not detect any other enteroviruses or rhinoviruses tested and did detect divergent strains of EV-D68, including the first EV-D68 strain (Fermon) identified in California in 1962. This assay should be useful for identifying and studying current and future outbreaks of EV-D68 viruses. PMID:26063859

  3. A highly sensitive telomerase activity assay that eliminates false-negative results caused by PCR inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Yaku, Hidenobu; Murashima, Takashi; Miyoshi, Daisuke; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2013-01-01

    An assay for telomerase activity based on asymmetric polymerase chain reaction (A-PCR) on magnetic beads (MBs) and subsequent application of cycling probe technology (CPT) is described. In this assay, the telomerase reaction products are immobilized on MBs, which are then washed to remove PCR inhibitors that are commonly found in clinical samples. The guanine-rich sequences (5'-(TTAGGG)n-3') of the telomerase reaction products are then preferentially amplified by A-PCR, and the amplified products are subsequently detected via CPT, where a probe RNA with a fluorophore at the 5' end and a quencher at the 3' end is hydrolyzed by RNase H in the presence of the target DNA. The catalyst-mediated cleavage of the probe RNA enhances fluorescence from the 5' end of the probe. The assay allowed us to successfully detect HeLa cells selectively over normal human dermal fibroblast (NHDF) cells. Importantly, this selectivity produced identical results with regard to detection of HeLa cells in the absence and presence of excess NHDF cells; therefore, this assay can be used for practical clinical applications. The lower limit of detection for HeLa cells was 50 cells, which is lower than that achieved with a conventional telomeric repeat amplification protocol assay. Our assay also eliminated false-negative results caused by PCR inhibitors. Furthermore, we show that this assay is appropriate for screening among G-quadruplex ligands to find those that inhibit telomerase activity. PMID:24071983

  4. Accurate, Fast and Cost-Effective Diagnostic Test for Monosomy 1p36 Using Real-Time Quantitative PCR

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Pricila da Silva; Pena, Heloisa B.; D'Angelo, Carla Sustek; Koiffmann, Celia P.; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Shaffer, Lisa G.; Stofanko, Martin; Gonçalves-Dornelas, Higgor; Pena, Sérgio Danilo Junho

    2014-01-01

    Monosomy 1p36 is considered the most common subtelomeric deletion syndrome in humans and it accounts for 0.5–0.7% of all the cases of idiopathic intellectual disability. The molecular diagnosis is often made by microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), which has the drawback of being a high-cost technique. However, patients with classic monosomy 1p36 share some typical clinical characteristics that, together with its common prevalence, justify the development of a less expensive, targeted diagnostic method. In this study, we developed a simple, rapid, and inexpensive real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for targeted diagnosis of monosomy 1p36, easily accessible for low-budget laboratories in developing countries. For this, we have chosen two target genes which are deleted in the majority of patients with monosomy 1p36: PRKCZ and SKI. In total, 39 patients previously diagnosed with monosomy 1p36 by aCGH, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), and/or multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) all tested positive on our qPCR assay. By simultaneously using these two genes we have been able to detect 1p36 deletions with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. We conclude that qPCR of PRKCZ and SKI is a fast and accurate diagnostic test for monosomy 1p36, costing less than 10 US dollars in reagent costs. PMID:24839341

  5. An rRT-PCR assay to detect the matrix gene of a broad range of avian paramyxovirus serotype-1 strains.

    PubMed

    Hines, Nichole L; Killian, Mary Lea; Pedersen, Janice C; Reising, Monica M; Mosos, Nestor A; Mathieu-Benson, Christian; Miller, Cathy L

    2012-06-01

    The current U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)-validated real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) assay designed to detect the matrix gene of avian paramyxovirus serotype-1 (APMV-1) is the primary screening assay used in the United States. It has previously been shown to be unable to consistently detect all members of class I APMV-1. Diagnostic testing relies on rRT-PCR to quickly detect APMV-1 in wild birds, backyard flocks, live bird markets, commercial poultry, and for export testing. Limitations of the current USDA assay have raised concerns about the potential for some strains of APMV-1 to remain undetected by the primary screening assay. Mismatches in the probe were shown to cause a loss in template binding efficiency, resulting in lack of detection by the assay. Here, we describe the development and analytical validation of a new rRT-PCR assay designed to target a highly conserved region of the matrix gene across a wide range of APMV-1 strains. Limit of detection testing revealed a 3 log10 decrease in sensitivity for one low-virulence strain when compared to the USDA validated assay. Conversely, the assay showed increased sensitivity for a class I isolate and two virulent strains of APMV-1 that were not detected by the USDA-validated assay. The new assay also demonstrated a high degree of specificity by the lack of detection of 43 non-APMV-1 viruses. PMID:22856199

  6. PCR Assays That Identify the Grapevine Dieback Fungus Eutypa lata

    PubMed Central

    Lecomte, Pascal; Péros, Jean-Pierre; Blancard, Dominique; Bastien, Nicolas; Délye, Christophe

    2000-01-01

    Eutypa lata is the causal fungal agent of Eutypa dieback, a serious grapevine necrotic disease. The erratic and delayed (1 to 2 months) appearance of characteristic conidia on culture media and the presence of numerous microorganisms in decaying wood make it difficult either to identify or to detect E. lata in grapevine wood samples. We designed six pairs of PCR primers for diagnosis of E. lata. Three primer pairs were derived from ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer sequences, and three pairs were derived from randomly amplified polymorphic DNA fragments. The six primer pairs could be used to amplify DNAs extracted from all of the E. lata isolates tested. They did not amplify DNAs from fungi and bacteria representing more than 50 different species of microorganisms associated with grapevine. We developed a simple protocol, leading to a rapid release of DNA, that enabled us to identify E. lata from pure or mixed cultures as well as from grapevine wood samples. Identification of E. lata in wood was achieved within a few hours, instead of the several weeks required for classical cultures on agar medium. We believe that the procedure described here can be adapted to detect other microorganisms involved in woody plant diseases. PMID:11010901

  7. Establishing a TaqMan-Based Real-Time PCR Assay for the rapid detection and quantification of the newly emerged duck tembusu virus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    To establish an accurate, rapid, and a quantifiable method for the detection of the newly emerged duck Tembusu virus (DTMUV) that recently caused a widespread infectious disease in ducks in China, we developed a TaqMan-based real-time PCR assay by using E gene-specific primers and a TaqMan probe. This real-time PCR assay was 100 times more sensitive than the conventional PCR. The reproducibility and specificity of the real-time PCR assay were confirmed using plasmids containing E genes or RNAs and DNAs extracted from well-known viruses causing duck diseases. The reliability of this real-time PCR assay was confirmed in 19 of the 24 swab samples, 22 of the 24 tissue samples collected from experimentally infected ducks, as well as 15 of the 21 clinical samples collected from sick ducks since they were verified as DTMUV-positive. The results reveal that the newly established real-time PCR assay might be a useful diagnostic method for epidemiologically investigating and closely observing the newly emerged DTMUV. PMID:21978536

  8. Panfungal PCR Assay for Detection of Fungal Infection in Human Blood Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Van Burik, Jo-Anne; Myerson, David; Schreckhise, Randall W.; Bowden, Raleigh A.

    1998-01-01

    A novel panfungal PCR assay which detects the small-subunit rRNA gene sequence of the two major fungal organism groups was used to test whole-blood specimens obtained from a series of blood or bone marrow transplant recipients. The 580-bp PCR product was identified after amplification by panfungal primers and hybridization to a 245-bp digoxigenin-labeled probe. The lower limit of detection of the assay was approximately four organisms per milliliter of blood. Multiple whole-blood specimens from five patients without fungal infection or colonization had negative PCR results. Specimens from 11 infected patients had positive PCR results. Blood from three patients with pulmonary aspergillosis had positive PCR results: one patient’s blood specimen obtained in the week prior to the diagnosis of infection by a positive bronchoalveolar lavage fluid culture result was positive by PCR, and blood specimens obtained from two patients 1 to 2 days after lung biopsy and which were sterile by culture were positive by PCR. The blood of four patients with candidemia, three patients with mixed fungal infections, and one patient with fusariosis also had positive PCR signals. The panfungal PCR assay can detect multiple fungal genera and may be used as an adjunct to conventional methods for the detection of fungal infection or for describing the natural history of fungal infection. Further studies are needed to define the sensitivity and specificity of this assay for the diagnosis of fungal infection prior to the existence of other clinical or laboratory indications of invasive fungal infection. PMID:9574670

  9. Development of one-step real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR-based assays for the rapid and simultaneous detection of four viruses causing porcine diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Tsuneyuki; Tsuchiaka, Shinobu; Ashiba, Tomoko; Yamasato, Hiroshi; Fukunari, Kazuhiro; Omatsu, Tsutomu; Furuya, Tetsuya; Shirai, Junsuke; Mizutani, Tetsuya; Nagai, Makoto

    2016-02-01

    Porcine diarrhea caused by viruses is a major problem of the pig farming industry and can result in substantial losses of revenue. Thus, diagnosing the infectious agents is important to prevent and control diseases in pigs. We developed novel one-step real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qPCR) assays that can detect four porcine diarrheal viruses simultaneously: porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV), porcine deltacoronavirus (PDCoV), and porcine group A rotavirus (PRVA). The qPCR analysis takes only 75 minutes to detect the presence of the four viruses. The limits of detection of our new assays for PEDV, TGEV, PDCoV, and PRVA were 100, 10, 10 and 10 copies per reaction, respectively. The sensitivity of qPCR was 1-1000 times higher than that of published gel-based RT-PCR. We used our qPCR method to successfully diagnose clinical samples from infected pigs, and no false positive results were obtained. In conclusion, qPCR can drastically reduce the diagnostic time to detect viruses compared to currently employed methods. We predict that the qPCR assays will become a useful tool for detecting viral infections that cause diarrhea and other complications in pigs. PMID:27348884

  10. PCR assay confirms diagnosis in syndrome with variably expressed phenotype: mutation detection in Stickler syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, N N; McDonald-McGinn, D M; Dixon, P; Zackai, E H; Tasman, W S

    1996-01-01

    Stickler syndrome is an autosomal dominant disease with ocular (severe myopia, vitreal degeneration, and retinal detachment) and other systemic manifestations (hearing loss, cleft palate, epiphyseal dysplasia, and premature osteoarthritis). As with other dominantly inherited conditions, the clinical phenotype of Stickler syndrome varies considerably. To date, all mutations have been located in the type II procollagen (COL2A1) gene. Analysis of a C-->T mutation we had identified previously, in COL2A1 gene in exon 40, in a three generation pedigree showed the loss of a cleavage site for the TaqI restriction enzyme. We designed a rapid PCR based restriction enzyme assay to detect this mutation and used it to establish the diagnosis in a neonate from the same pedigree, presenting with the first occurrence of the Pierre-Robin sequence in the family and minimal ocular findings. These results underline the potential diagnostic value of many as yet undetected DNA mutations in families affected with Stickler syndrome, since the variability of the phenotype can impede accurate diagnosis, appropriate genetic counselling, and effective intervention and prophylactic treatment for affected people. Images PMID:8863161

  11. Development of a real-time PCR assay for detection and quantification of Anaplasma ovis infection.

    PubMed

    Chi, Q; Liu, Z; Li, Y; Yang, J; Chen, Z; Yue, C; Luo, J; Yin, H

    2013-11-01

    Anaplasma ovis is a tick-borne intra-erythrocytic rickettsial pathogen of small ruminants. Real-time PCR possesses merits of rapidity, accuracy, reliability, automation and ease of standardization, but has not been used for detection of A. ovis, to the best of our knowledge. In this study, a real-time PCR assay was developed for detection and quantification of A. ovis. Species-specific primers and TaqMan probe were designed based on the gltA gene. No cross-reactions were observed with Anaplasma marginale, Anaplasma bovis, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Borrelia burgdorferi s. l., Chlamydia psittaci, Mycoplasma mycoides, Theileria luwenshuni and Babesia sp. Xinjiang isolate. Analytic sensitivity results revealed that real-time PCR could detect as few as 10 copies of the gltA gene. The performance of real-time PCR was assessed by testing 254 blood samples from goats and comparing with the results from conventional PCR. This demonstrated that the real-time PCR assay was significantly more sensitive than conventional PCR. Our results indicated that real-time PCR is a useful approach for detecting A. ovis infections and has potential as an alternative tool for ecological and epidemiological surveillance of ovine anaplasmosis. PMID:24589111

  12. Development of a multiplex PCR assay to detect gastroenteric pathogens in the feces of Mexican children.

    PubMed

    Tolentino-Ruiz, R; Montoya-Varela, D; García-Espitia, M; Salas-Benito, M; Gutiérrez-Escolano, A; Gómez-García, C; Figueroa-Arredondo, P; Salas-Benito, J; De Nova-Ocampo, M

    2012-10-01

    Acute gastroenteritis (AGE) is a major cause of childhood morbidity and mortality worldwide; the etiology of AGE includes viruses, bacteria, and parasites. A multiplex PCR assay to simultaneously identify human Astrovirus (HAstV), Calicivirus (HuCVs), Entamoeba histolytica (E. histolytica), and enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (EIEC) in stool samples is described. A total of 103 samples were individually analyzed by ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays) and RT-PCR/PCR. HAstV and HuCVs were detected in four out of 103 samples (3.8 %) by RT-PCR, but ELISAs found only one sample as positive for HuCVs (2.5 %). E. histolytica was identified in two out of 19 samples (10.5 %) and EIEC in 13 out of 20 samples (70 %) by PCR, and all PCR products were sequenced to verify their identities. Our multiplex PCR results demonstrate the simultaneous amplification of different pathogens such as HAstV, EIEC, and E. histolytica in the same reaction, though the HuCVs signal was weak in every replicate. Regardless, this multiplex PCR protocol represents a novel tool for the identification of distinct pathogens and may provide support for the diagnosis of AGE in children. PMID:22711331

  13. Molecular Surveillance of True Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae: An Evaluation of PCR Screening Assays

    PubMed Central

    Binks, Michael J.; Temple, Beth; Kirkham, Lea-Ann; Wiertsema, Selma P.; Dunne, Eileen M.; Richmond, Peter C.; Marsh, Robyn L.; Leach, Amanda J.; Smith-Vaughan, Heidi C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Unambiguous identification of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is not possible by conventional microbiology. Molecular characterisation of phenotypically defined NTHi isolates suggests that up to 40% are Haemophilus haemolyticus (Hh); however, the genetic similarity of NTHi and Hh limits the power of simple molecular techniques such as PCR for species discrimination. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we assess the ability of previously published and novel PCR-based assays to identify true NTHi. Sixty phenotypic NTHi isolates, classified by a dual 16S rRNA gene PCR algorithm as NTHi (n = 22), Hh (n = 27) or equivocal (n = 11), were further characterised by sequencing of the 16S rRNA and recA genes then interrogated by PCR-based assays targeting the omp P2, omp P6, lgtC, hpd, 16S rRNA, fucK and iga genes. The sequencing data and PCR results were used to define NTHi for this study. Two hpd real time PCR assays (hpd#1 and hpd#3) and the conventional iga PCR assay were equally efficient at differentiating study-defined NTHi from Hh, each with a receiver operator characteristic curve area of 0.90 [0.83; 0.98]. The hpd#1 and hpd#3 assays were completely specific against a panel of common respiratory bacteria, unlike the iga PCR, and the hpd#3 assay was able to detect below 10 copies per reaction. Conclusions/Significance Our data suggest an evolutionary continuum between NTHi and Hh and therefore no single gene target could completely differentiate NTHi from Hh. The hpd#3 real time PCR assay proved to be the superior method for discrimination of NTHi from closely related Haemophilus species with the added potential for quantification of H. influenzae directly from specimens. We suggest the hpd#3 assay would be suitable for routine NTHi surveillance and to assess the impact of antibiotics and vaccines, on H. influenzae carriage rates, carriage density, and disease. PMID:22470516

  14. Performance of PCR-based and Bioluminescent assays for mycoplasma detection.

    PubMed

    Falagan-Lotsch, Priscila; Lopes, Talíria Silva; Ferreira, Nívea; Balthazar, Nathália; Monteiro, Antônio M; Borojevic, Radovan; Granjeiro, José Mauro

    2015-11-01

    Contaminated eukaryotic cell cultures are frequently responsible for unreliable results. Regulatory entities request that cell cultures must be mycoplasma-free. Mycoplasma contamination remains a significant problem for cell cultures and may have an impact on biological analysis since they affect many cell parameters. The gold standard microbiological assay for mycoplasma detection involves laborious and time-consuming protocols. PCR-based and Bioluminescent assays have been considered for routine cell culture screening in research laboratories since they are fast, easy and sensitive. Thus, the aim of this work is to compare the performance of two popular commercial assays, PCR-based and Bioluminescent assays, by assessing the level of mycoplasma contamination in cell cultures from Rio de Janeiro Cell Bank (RJCB) and also from customers' laboratories. The results obtained by both performed assays were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. In addition, we evaluated the limit of detection of the PCR kit under our laboratory conditions and the storage effects on mycoplasma detection in frozen cell culture supernatants. The performance of both assays for mycoplasma detection was not significantly different and they showed very good agreement. The Bioluminescent assay for mycoplasma detection was slightly more dependable than PCR-based due to the lack of inconclusive results produced by the first technique, especially considering the ability to detect mycoplasma contamination in frozen cell culture supernatants. However, cell lines should be precultured for four days or more without antibiotics to obtain safe results. On the other hand, a false negative result was obtained by using this biochemical approach. The implementation of fast and reliable mycoplasma testing methods is an important technical and regulatory issue and PCR-based and Bioluminescent assays may be good candidates. However, validation studies are needed. PMID:26296900

  15. Quantitative Real-Time PCR Assay for QPX (Thraustochytriidae), a Parasite of the Hard Clam (Mercenaria mercenaria)▿

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qianqian; Allam, Bassem; Collier, Jackie L.

    2009-01-01

    We developed a real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay targeting the rRNA internal transcribed spacer region of the hard clam pathogen QPX. The qPCR assay was more sensitive than was histology in detecting clams with light QPX infections. QPX was detected in 4 of 43 sediment samples but in none of 40 seawater samples. PMID:19465523

  16. Performance of Simplexa Dengue Molecular Assay Compared to Conventional and SYBR Green RT-PCR for Detection of Dengue Infection in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Wardhani, Puspa; Yohan, Benediktus; Trimarsanto, Hidayat; Fahri, Sukmal; Setianingsih, Tri Y.; Meutiawati, Febrina

    2014-01-01

    Diagnostic tests based on detection of dengue virus (DENV) genome are available with varying sensitivities and specificities. The Simplexa Dengue assay (Focus Diagnostics) is a newly developed real-time RT-PCR method designed to detect and serotype DENV simultaneously. To assess the performance of the Simplexa Dengue assay, we performed comparison with conventional RT-PCR and SYBR Green real-time RT-PCR on patients sera isolated from eight cities across Indonesia, a dengue endemic country. A total of 184 sera that were confirmed using NS1 and/or IgM and IgG ELISA were examined. Using conventional and SYBR Green real-time RT-PCR, we detected DENV in 53 (28.8%) and 81 (44.0%) out of 184 sera, respectively. When the Simplexa Dengue assay was employed, the detection rate was increased to 76.6% (141 out of 184 samples). When tested in 40 sera that were confirmed by virus isolation as the gold standard, the conventional RT-PCR yielded 95% sensitivity while the sensitivity of SYBR Green real-time RT-PCR and Simplexa Dengue assay reached 97.5% and 100%, respectively. The specificities of all methods were 100% when tested in 43 non-dengue illness and 20 healthy human samples. Altogether, our data showed the higher detection rate of Simplexa Dengue compared to conventional and SYBR Green real-time RT-PCR in field/surveillance setting. In conclusion, Simplexa Dengue offers rapid and accurate detection and typing of dengue infection and is suitable for both routine diagnostic and surveillance. PMID:25102066

  17. Evaluation of a Genus- and Group-Specific Rapid PCR Assay Panel on Synovial Fluid for Diagnosis of Prosthetic Knee Infection

    PubMed Central

    Melendez, Dante P.; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E.; Berbari, Elie F.; Osmon, Douglas R.; Mandrekar, Jayawant N.; Hanssen, Arlen D.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated a genus- and group-specific PCR assay panel using 284 prosthetic knee synovial fluid samples collected from patients presenting to our institution with implant failure. Using the Musculoskeletal Infection Society diagnostic criteria, 88 and 196 samples were classified as showing prosthetic joint infection (PJI) and aseptic failure (AF), respectively. Sensitivities of the synovial fluid PCR panel and culture were 55.6% and 76.1% (P ≤ 0.001), respectively, and specificities were 91.8% and 97.4% (P = 0.016), respectively. Among the 70 subjects who had received antibiotics within the month preceding synovial fluid aspiration (48 of whom had PJI), PCR panel and synovial fluid culture sensitivities were 64.5% and 85.4%, respectively (P < 0.0001). In this group, the PCR panel detected Staphylococcus aureus in two culture-negative PJI cases. Overall, the evaluated molecular diagnostic tool had low sensitivity when applied to synovial fluid. PMID:26537446

  18. DNA Sequence Signatures for Rapid Detection of Six Target Bacterial Pathogens Using PCR Assays

    PubMed Central

    Nagamine, Kenjiro; Hung, Guo-Chiuan; Li, Bingjie; Lo, Shyh-Ching

    2015-01-01

    Using Streptococcus pyogenes as a model, we previously established a stepwise computational workflow to effectively identify species-specific DNA signatures that could be used as PCR primer sets to detect target bacteria with high specificity and sensitivity. In this study, we extended the workflow for the rapid development of PCR assays targeting Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium difficile, Clostridium tetani, and Staphylococcus aureus, which are of safety concern for human tissue intended for transplantation. Twenty-one primer sets that had sensitivity of detecting 5–50 fg DNA from target bacteria with high specificity were selected. These selected primer sets can be used in a PCR array for detecting target bacteria with high sensitivity and specificity. The workflow could be widely applicable for the rapid development of PCR-based assays for a wide range of target bacteria, including those of biothreat agents. PMID:26279626

  19. DNA Sequence Signatures for Rapid Detection of Six Target Bacterial Pathogens Using PCR Assays.

    PubMed

    Nagamine, Kenjiro; Hung, Guo-Chiuan; Li, Bingjie; Lo, Shyh-Ching

    2015-01-01

    Using Streptococcus pyogenes as a model, we previously established a stepwise computational workflow to effectively identify species-specific DNA signatures that could be used as PCR primer sets to detect target bacteria with high specificity and sensitivity. In this study, we extended the workflow for the rapid development of PCR assays targeting Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium difficile, Clostridium tetani, and Staphylococcus aureus, which are of safety concern for human tissue intended for transplantation. Twenty-one primer sets that had sensitivity of detecting 5-50 fg DNA from target bacteria with high specificity were selected. These selected primer sets can be used in a PCR array for detecting target bacteria with high sensitivity and specificity. The workflow could be widely applicable for the rapid development of PCR-based assays for a wide range of target bacteria, including those of biothreat agents. PMID:26279626

  20. Comparison of Quantitative PCR and Droplet Digital PCR Multiplex Assays for Two Genera of Bloom-Forming Cyanobacteria, Cylindrospermopsis and Microcystis

    PubMed Central

    Te, Shu Harn; Chen, Enid Yingru

    2015-01-01

    The increasing occurrence of harmful cyanobacterial blooms, often linked to deteriorated water quality and adverse public health effects, has become a worldwide concern in recent decades. The use of molecular techniques such as real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) has become increasingly popular in the detection and monitoring of harmful cyanobacterial species. Multiplex qPCR assays that quantify several toxigenic cyanobacterial species have been established previously; however, there is no molecular assay that detects several bloom-forming species simultaneously. Microcystis and Cylindrospermopsis are the two most commonly found genera and are known to be able to produce microcystin and cylindrospermopsin hepatotoxins. In this study, we designed primers and probes which enable quantification of these genera based on the RNA polymerase C1 gene for Cylindrospermopsis species and the c-phycocyanin beta subunit-like gene for Microcystis species. Duplex assays were developed for two molecular techniques—qPCR and droplet digital PCR (ddPCR). After optimization, both qPCR and ddPCR assays have high linearity and quantitative correlations for standards. Comparisons of the two techniques showed that qPCR has higher sensitivity, a wider linear dynamic range, and shorter analysis time and that it was more cost-effective, making it a suitable method for initial screening. However, the ddPCR approach has lower variability and was able to handle the PCR inhibition and competitive effects found in duplex assays, thus providing more precise and accurate analysis for bloom samples. PMID:26025892

  1. Comparison of Quantitative PCR and Droplet Digital PCR Multiplex Assays for Two Genera of Bloom-Forming Cyanobacteria, Cylindrospermopsis and Microcystis.

    PubMed

    Te, Shu Harn; Chen, Enid Yingru; Gin, Karina Yew-Hoong

    2015-08-01

    The increasing occurrence of harmful cyanobacterial blooms, often linked to deteriorated water quality and adverse public health effects, has become a worldwide concern in recent decades. The use of molecular techniques such as real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) has become increasingly popular in the detection and monitoring of harmful cyanobacterial species. Multiplex qPCR assays that quantify several toxigenic cyanobacterial species have been established previously; however, there is no molecular assay that detects several bloom-forming species simultaneously. Microcystis and Cylindrospermopsis are the two most commonly found genera and are known to be able to produce microcystin and cylindrospermopsin hepatotoxins. In this study, we designed primers and probes which enable quantification of these genera based on the RNA polymerase C1 gene for Cylindrospermopsis species and the c-phycocyanin beta subunit-like gene for Microcystis species. Duplex assays were developed for two molecular techniques-qPCR and droplet digital PCR (ddPCR). After optimization, both qPCR and ddPCR assays have high linearity and quantitative correlations for standards. Comparisons of the two techniques showed that qPCR has higher sensitivity, a wider linear dynamic range, and shorter analysis time and that it was more cost-effective, making it a suitable method for initial screening. However, the ddPCR approach has lower variability and was able to handle the PCR inhibition and competitive effects found in duplex assays, thus providing more precise and accurate analysis for bloom samples. PMID:26025892

  2. Quantitative nucleic acid amplification by digital PCR for clinical viral diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kuo; Lin, Guigao; Li, Jinming

    2016-09-01

    In the past few years, interest in the development of digital PCR (dPCR) as a direct nucleic acid amplification technique for clinical viral diagnostics has grown. The main advantages of dPCR over qPCR include: quantification of nucleic acid concentrations without a calibration curve, comparable sensitivity, superior quantitative precision, greater resistance to perturbations by inhibitors, and increased robustness to the variability of the target sequence. In this review, we address the application of dPCR to viral nucleic acid quantification in clinical applications and for nucleic acid quantification standardization. Further development is required to overcome the current limitations of dPCR in order to realize its widespread use for viral load measurements in clinical diagnostic applications. PMID:26845722

  3. Development and validation of a multiplex reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) assay for the rapid detection of Citrus tristeza virus, Citrus psorosis virus, and Citrus leaf blotch virus.

    PubMed

    Osman, Fatima; Hodzic, Emir; Kwon, Sun-Jung; Wang, Jinbo; Vidalakis, Georgios

    2015-08-01

    A single real-time multiplex reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) assay for the simultaneous detection of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), Citrus psorosis virus (CPsV), and Citrus leaf blotch virus (CLBV) was developed and validated using three different fluorescently labeled minor groove binding qPCR probes. To increase the detection reliability, coat protein (CP) genes from large number of different isolates of CTV, CPsV and CLBV were sequenced and a multiple sequence alignment was generated with corresponding CP sequences from the GenBank and a robust multiplex RT-qPCR assay was designed. The capacity of the multiplex RT-qPCR assay in detecting the viruses was compared to singleplex RT-qPCR designed specifically for each virus and was assessed using multiple virus isolates from diverse geographical regions and citrus species as well as graft-inoculated citrus plants infected with various combination of the three viruses. No significant difference in detection limits was found and specificity was not affected by the inclusion of the three assays in a multiplex RT-qPCR reaction. Comparison of the viral load for each virus using singleplex and multiplex RT-qPCR assays, revealed no significant differences between the two assays in virus detection. No significant difference in Cq values was detected when using one-step and two-step multiplex RT-qPCR detection formats. Optimizing the RNA extraction technique for citrus tissues and testing the quality of the extracted RNA using RT-qPCR targeting the cytochrome oxidase citrus gene as an RNA specific internal control proved to generate better diagnostic assays. Results showed that the developed multiplex RT-qPCR can streamline viruses testing of citrus nursery stock by replacing three separate singleplex assays, thus reducing time and labor while retaining the same sensitivity and specificity. The three targeted RNA viruses are regulated pathogens for California's mandatory "Section 3701

  4. A quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) assay to detect genome segment 9 of all 26 bluetongue virus serotypes.

    PubMed

    Maan, Narender S; Maan, Sushila; Belaganahalli, Manjunatha; Pullinger, Gillian; Montes, Antonio J Arenas; Gasparini, Marcela R; Guimera, Marc; Nomikou, Kyriaki; Mertens, Peter P C

    2015-03-01

    Bluetongue (BT) is an arboviral disease, which can often be fatal in naïve sheep and white tailed deer, but is usually less severe, or unapparent in other ruminants. Twenty-six bluetongue virus (BTV) serotypes have been recognised so far, two of which (BTV-25 and BTV-26) were recently identified by phylogenetic comparisons of genome-segment/outer-capsid protein VP2 (subsequently confirmed by serological 'virus-neutralisation' assays). Rapid, sensitive, reliable and quantitative diagnostic-assays for detection and identification of BTV represent important components of effective surveillance and control strategies. The BTV genome comprises 10 linear segments of dsRNA. We describe a 'TaqMan' fluorescence-probe based quantitative real-time RT-PCR assay, targeting the highly conserved genome-segment-9 (encoding the viral-helicase 'VP6' and NS4). The assay detected Seg-9 from isolates of all 26 BTV types, as well as from clinical samples derived from BTV-6w and BTV-8w outbreaks (in Europe), BTV-25 from Switzerland, BTV-26 from Kuwait, BTV-1w, BTV-4w and BTV-8w from Spain, BTV-4w, BTV-8, BTV-10 and BTV-16 from Brazil. Assay efficiency was evaluated with RNA derived from the reference strain of BTV-1w [RSArrrr/01] and was 99.6%, detecting down to 4 copies per reaction. Samples from uninfected insect or mammalian cell-cultures, hosts-species (uninfected sheep blood) or vector-insects, all gave negative results. The assay failed to detect RNA from heterologous but related Orbivirus species (including the nine African horse sickness virus [AHSV] and seven epizootic haemorrhagic disease virus [EHDV] serotypes). PMID:25486080

  5. Comparison of Simplexa Universal Direct PCR with Cytotoxicity Assay for Diagnosis of Clostridium difficile Infection: Performance, Cost, and Correlation with Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, David; Topal, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Simplexa Clostridium difficile universal direct PCR, a real-time PCR assay for the detection of the C. difficile toxin B (tcdB) gene using the 3M integrated cycler, was compared with a two-step algorithm which includes the C. Diff Chek-60 glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) antigen assay followed by cytotoxin neutralization. Three hundred forty-two liquid or semisolid stools submitted for diagnostic C. difficile testing, 171 GDH antigen positive and 171 GDH antigen negative, were selected for the study. All samples were tested by the C. Diff Chek-60 GDH antigen assay, cytotoxin neutralization, and Simplexa direct PCR. Of 171 GDH-positive samples, 4 were excluded (from patients on therapy or from whom duplicate samples were obtained) and 88 were determined to be true positives for toxigenic C. difficile. Of the 88, 67 (76.1%) were positive by the two-step method and 86 (97.7%) were positive by PCR. Seventy-nine were positive by the GDH antigen assay only. Of 171 GDH antigen-negative samples, none were positive by PCR. One antigen-negative sample positive by the cytotoxin assay only was deemed a false positive based on chart review. Simplexa C. difficile universal direct PCR was significantly more sensitive for detecting toxigenic C. difficile bacteria than cytotoxin neutralization (P = 0.0002). However, most PCR-positive/cytotoxin-negative patients did not have clear C. difficile disease. The estimated cost avoidance provided by a more rapid molecular diagnosis was outweighed by the cost of isolating and treating PCR-positive/cytotoxin-negative patients. The costs, clinical consequences, and impact on nosocomial transmission of treating and/or isolating patients positive for toxigenic C. difficile by PCR but negative for in vivo toxin production merit further study. PMID:24226924

  6. Multiplex PCR Assay Targeting a Diguanylate Cyclase-Encoding Gene, cgcA, To Differentiate Species within the Genus Cronobacter

    PubMed Central

    Carter, L.; Lindsey, L. A.; Grim, C. J.; Sathyamoorthy, V.; Jarvis, K. G.; Gopinath, G.; Lee, C.; Sadowski, J. A.; Trach, L.; Pava-Ripoll, M.; McCardell, B. A.; Tall, B. D.

    2013-01-01

    In a comparison to the widely used Cronobacter rpoB PCR assay, a highly specific multiplexed PCR assay based on cgcA, a diguanylate cyclase gene, that identified all of the targeted six species among 305 Cronobacter isolates was designed. This assay will be a valuable tool for identifying suspected Cronobacter isolates from food-borne investigations. PMID:23144142

  7. A Pan-Dengue Virus Reverse Transcription-Insulated Isothermal PCR Assay Intended for Point-of-Need Diagnosis of Dengue Virus Infection by Use of the POCKIT Nucleic Acid Analyzer.

    PubMed

    Go, Yun Young; Rajapakse, R P V Jayanthe; Kularatne, Senanayake A M; Lee, Pei-Yu Alison; Ku, Keun Bon; Nam, Sangwoo; Chou, Pin-Hsing; Tsai, Yun-Long; Liu, Yu-Lun; Chang, Hsiao-Fen Grace; Wang, Hwa-Tang Thomas; Balasuriya, Udeni B R

    2016-06-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection is considered a major public health problem in developing tropical countries where the virus is endemic and continues to cause major disease outbreaks every year. Here, we describe the development of a novel, inexpensive, and user-friendly diagnostic assay based on a reverse transcription-insulated isothermal PCR (RT-iiPCR) method for the detection of all four serotypes of DENV in clinical samples. The diagnostic performance of the newly established pan-DENV RT-iiPCR assay targeting a conserved 3' untranslated region of the viral genome was evaluated. The limit of detection with a 95% confidence was estimated to be 10 copies of in vitro-transcribed (IVT) RNA. Sensitivity analysis using RNA prepared from 10-fold serial dilutions of tissue culture fluid containing DENVs suggested that the RT-iiPCR assay was comparable to the multiplex real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) assay for DENV-1, -3, and -4 detection but 10-fold less sensitive for DENV-2 detection. Subsequently, plasma collected from patients suspected of dengue virus infection (n = 220) and individuals not suspected of dengue virus infection (n = 45) were tested by the RT-iiPCR and compared to original test results using a DENV NS1 antigen rapid test and the qRT-PCR. The diagnostic agreement of the pan-DENV RT-iiPCR, NS1 antigen rapid test, and qRT-PCR tests was 93.9%, 84.5%, and 97.4%, respectively, compared to the composite reference results. This new RT-iiPCR assay along with the portable POCKIT nucleic acid analyzer could provide a highly reliable, sensitive, and specific point-of-need diagnostic assay for the diagnosis of DENV in clinics and hospitals in developing countries. PMID:27030492

  8. Ultrasensitive Detection of RNA and DNA Viruses Simultaneously Using Duplex UNDP-PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zengguo; Zhang, Xiujuan; Zhao, Xiaomin; Du, Qian; Chang, Lingling; Tong, Dewen

    2015-01-01

    Mixed infection of multiple viruses is common in modern intensive pig rearing. However, there are no methods available to detect DNA and RNA viruses in the same reaction system in preclinical level. In this study, we aimed to develop a duplex ultrasensitive nanoparticle DNA probe-based PCR assay (duplex UNDP-PCR) that was able to simultaneously detect DNA and RNA viruses in the same reaction system. PCV2 and TGEV are selected as representatives of the two different types of viruses. PCV2 DNA and TGEV RNA were simultaneously released from the serum sample by boiling with lysis buffer, then magnetic beads and gold nanoparticles coated with single and/or duplex specific probes for TGEV and PCV2 were added to form a sandwich-like complex with nucleic acids released from viruses. After magnetic separation, DNA barcodes specific for PCV2 and TGEV were eluted using DTT and characterized by specific PCR assay for specific DNA barcodes subsequently. The duplex UNDP-PCR showed similar sensitivity as that of single UNDP-PCR and was able to detect 20 copies each of PCV2 and TGEV in the serum, showing approximately 250-fold more sensitivity than conventional duplex PCR/RT-PCR assays. No cross-reaction was observed with other viruses. The positive detection rate of single MMPs- and duplex MMPs-based duplex UNDP-PCR was identical, with 29.6% for PCV2, 9.3% for TGEV and 3.7% for PCV2 and TGEV mixed infection. This duplex UNDP-PCR assay could detect TGEV (RNA virus) and PCV2 (DNA virus) from large-scale serum samples simultaneously without the need for DNA/RNA extraction, purification and reverse transcription of RNA, and showed a significantly increased positive detection rate for PCV2 (29%) and TGEV (11.7%) preclinical infection than conventional duplex PCR/RT-PCR. Therefore, the established duplex UNDP-PCR is a rapid and economical detection method, exhibiting high sensitivity, specificity and reproducibility. PMID:26544710

  9. Establishment of two quantitative nested qPCR assays targeting the human EPO transgene.

    PubMed

    Neuberger, E W I; Perez, I; Le Guiner, C; Moser, D; Ehlert, T; Allais, M; Moullier, P; Simon, P; Snyder, R O

    2016-04-01

    For ethical and safety reasons it is critical to develop easily implemented assays with high sensitivity and specificity for gene doping surveillance. Two nested quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assays were developed that target the human EPO (hEPO) cDNA sequence in a circular form, representative of recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vector genomes found in vivo. Through an interlaboratory evaluation, the assays were validated and utilized in an in vitro blinded study. These assays are specific and extremely sensitive with a limit of detection (LOD) of 1 copy of circular plasmid DNA and a limit of quantification (LOQ) of 10 to 20 copies in the presence of 500 ng of human genomic DNA (hgDNA) extracted from WBCs. Additionally, using the two nested qPCR assays in a non-human primate study, where macaques were injected intramuscularly with a rAAV8 vector harboring a promoterless hEPO cDNA sequence, the viral vector was detected 8 to 14 weeks post-injection in macaque WBCs. The high sensitivity of the nested qPCR approach along with the capability of quantifying target DNA, make this approach a reliable tool for gene doping surveillance and the monitoring of exogenous DNA sequences. PMID:26752352

  10. Reverse transcription-PCR assays for the differentiation of various US porcine epidemic diarrhea virus strains.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinsheng; Wang, Qiuhong

    2016-08-01

    Concurrently, several porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) variants are circulating in US swine farms, including the original US and the spike insertion-deletion (S-INDEL) strains. In this study, reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assays for the detection and differentiation of different US PEDV variants were developed based on the differences in the S1 domain of the spike (S) gene. This assay successfully differentiated three PEDV strains: PC22A (the original US virulent), Iowa106 (S-INDEL), and PC177 (S-197DEL) that was derived from cell culture adaptation and has a 197 amino acid-deletion in the S1 domain. The assays did not amplify the porcine deltacoronavirus OH-FD22 strain or transmissible gastroenteritis virus Miller strain. It is the first report on the development of RT-PCR assays allowing the detection and differentiation of all major types of US PEDV variants. PMID:27134071

  11. Development and evaluation of real-time PCR assays for bloodmeal identification in Culicoides midges.

    PubMed

    VAN DER Saag, M R; Gu, X; Ward, M P; Kirkland, P D

    2016-06-01

    Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) midges are the biological vectors of a number of arboviruses of veterinary importance. However, knowledge relating to the basic biology of some species, including their host-feeding preferences, is limited. Identification of host-feeding preferences in haematophagous insects can help to elucidate the transmission dynamics of the arboviruses they may transmit. In this study, a series of semi-quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays to identify the vertebrate host sources of bloodmeals of Culicoides midges was developed. Two pan-reactive species group and seven species-specific qPCR assays were developed and evaluated. The assays are quick to perform and less expensive than nucleic acid sequencing of bloodmeals. Using these assays, it was possible to rapidly test nearly 700 blood-fed midges of various species from several geographic locations in Australia. PMID:26854008

  12. Techniques for minimizing the effects of PCR inhibitors in the chytridiomycosis assay.

    PubMed

    Kosch, T A; Summers, K

    2013-03-01

    Chytridiomycosis is an amphibian disease of global conservation concern that is caused by the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). Since the discovery of Bd in 1998, several methods have been used for detection of Bd; among these polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from skin swabs is accepted as the best method due to its noninvasiveness, high sensitivity and ease of use. However, PCR is not without problems - to be successful, this technique is dependent upon the presence of nondegraded DNA template and reaction contents that are free from inhibitors. Here, we report on an investigation of several techniques aimed at improving the reliability of the Bd PCR assay by minimizing the effects of humic acid (HA), a potent PCR inhibitor. We compared the effectiveness of four DNA extraction kits (DNeasy, QIAamp DNA Stool, PowerLyzer Power Soil and PrepMan Ultra) and four PCR methods (Amplitaq Gold, bovine serum albumin, PowerClean DNA Clean-up and inhibitor resistant Taq Polymerase). The results of this and previous studies indicate that chytridiomycosis studies that use PCR methods for disease detection may be significantly underestimating the occurrence of Bd. Our results suggest that to minimize the inhibitory effects of HA, DNeasy should be used for sample DNA extraction and Amplitaq Gold with bovine serum albumin should be used for the Bd PCR assay. We also outline protocols tested, show the results of our methods comparisons and discuss the pros and cons of each method. PMID:23241137

  13. Development and Evaluation of a PCR-Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Diagnosis of Human Brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Morata, Pilar; Queipo-Ortuño, María I.; Reguera, Jose M.; García-Ordoñez, Miguel A.; Cárdenas, Ana; Colmenero, Juan D.

    2003-01-01

    In order to overcome some of the limitations of conventional microbiological techniques in the diagnosis of human brucellosis, a simple PCR-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (PCR-ELISA) was developed. After amplification of a 223-bp sequence of a gene that codes for the synthesis of an immunogenetic membrane protein specific for the Brucella genus (BCSP31), the digoxigenin-labeled amplified product was hybridized with a biotinylated capture probe which was complementary to the inner part of the amplicon. The hybrid was captured on streptavidin-coated microtiter plates and detected by using an antidigoxigenin Fab-peroxidase conjugate. The detection limit of the PCR-ELISA in a background of 3.5 μg of human genomic DNA was 10 fg (two bacterial cells). The PCR-ELISA showed an analytical sensitivity higher than that of ethidium bromide staining and equal to that obtained by conventional PCR followed by dot blot hybridization. In 59 peripheral blood samples from 57 consecutive patients with active brucellosis and 113 control samples, the PCR-ELISA was found to be 94.9% sensitive and 96.5% specific, whereas the sensitivity of the blood culture was only 70.1%. Since the assay can be performed in 1 day, is very reproducible, is easily standardized, and avoids the risk of infection in laboratory workers, this PCR-ELISA seems to be a practical and reliable tool for the diagnosis of human brucellosis. PMID:12517839

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF HOMOLOGOUS VIRAL INTERNAL CONTROLS FOR USE IN RT-PCR ASSAYS OF WATERBORNE ENTERIC VIRUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Enteric viruses often contaminate water sources causing frequent outbreaks of gastroenteritis. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays are commonly used for detection of human enteric viruses in environmental and drinking water samples. RT-PCR provides ...

  15. Evaluation of Five Real-Time PCR Assays for Detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Enno

    2014-01-01

    Four commercial real-time PCR assays to detect Mycoplasma pneumoniae were tested, and the results were compared with the results for an in-house approach. Despite differences of crossing threshold values of up to 4, assays were able to detect at least 20 CFU/5 μl (52 fg DNA/5 μl) of sample with the Diagenode kit showing the best clinical sensitivity. PMID:25210063

  16. A PCR assay for gender assignment in dugong (Dugong dugon) and West Indian manatee (Trichechus manatus).

    PubMed

    McHale, M; Broderick, D; Ovenden, J R; Lanyon, J M

    2008-05-01

    Gender assignment for some aquatic mammals in the field is difficult. Molecular sexing from tissue biopsies is possible as males are heterogametic. Here we describe a multiplex PCR assay that amplifies the male specific SRY gene and differentiates ZFX and ZFY gametologues in two sirenian species, dugong (Dugong dugon) and West Indian manatee (Trichechus manatus). The assay was validated with animals of known gender and proved accurate and robust to experimental failure. PMID:21585866

  17. Development and Validation of a Real-Time PCR Assay for Rapid Detection of Two-Spotted Spider Mite, Tetranychus urticae (Acari: Tetranychidae)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dongmei; Fan, Qing-Hai; Waite, David W.; Gunawardana, Disna; George, Sherly; Kumarasinghe, Lalith

    2015-01-01

    Spider mites of the genus Tetranychus are difficult to identify due to their limited diagnostic characters. Many of them are morphologically similar and males are needed for species-level identification. Tetranychus urticae is a common interception and non-regulated pest at New Zealand’s borders, however, most of the intercepted specimens are females and the identification was left at Tetranychus sp. Consequently, the shipments need to be fumigated. DNA sequencing and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) protocols could be used to facilitate the accurate identification. However, in the context of border security practiced in New Zealand, insect identifications are required to be provided within four hours of receiving the samples; thus, those molecular methods are not sufficient to meet this requirement. Therefore, a real-time PCR TaqMan assay was developed for identification of T. urticae by amplification of a 142 bp Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) 1 sequence. The developed assay is rapid, detects all life stages of T. urticae within three hours, and does not react with closely related species. Plasmid DNA containing ITS1 sequence of T. uritcae was serially diluted and used as standards in the real-time PCR assay. The quantification cycle (Cq) value of the assay depicted a strong linear relationship with T. urticae DNA content, with a regression coefficient of 0.99 and efficiency of 98%. The detection limit was estimated to be ten copies of the T. urticae target region. The assay was validated against a range of T. urticae specimens from various countries and hosts in a blind panel test. Therefore the application of the assay at New Zealand will reduce the unnecessary fumigation and be beneficial to both the importers and exporters. It is expected that the implementation of this real-time PCR assay would have wide applications in diagnostic and research agencies worldwide. PMID:26147599

  18. Validation of real-time PCR assays for bioforensic detection of model plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    James, Mindy; Blagden, Trenna; Moncrief, Ian; Burans, James P; Schneider, Katherine; Fletcher, Jacqueline

    2014-03-01

    The U.S. agricultural sector is vulnerable to intentionally introduced microbial threats because of its wide and open distribution and economic importance. To investigate such events, forensically valid assays for plant pathogen detection are needed. In this work, real-time PCR assays were developed for three model plant pathogens: Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato, Xylella fastidiosa, and Wheat streak mosaic virus. Validation included determination of the linearity and range, limit of detection, sensitivity, specificity, and exclusivity of each assay. Additionally, positive control plasmids, distinguishable from native signature by restriction enzyme digestion, were developed to support forensic application of the assays. Each assay displayed linear amplification of target nucleic acid, detected 100 fg or less of target nucleic acid, and was specific to its target pathogen. Results obtained with these model pathogens provide the framework for development and validation of similar assays for other plant pathogens of high consequence. PMID:24261870

  19. Comparison of a Real-Time Multiplex PCR and Sequetyping Assay for Pneumococcal Serotyping

    PubMed Central

    Robberts, Lourens; Wolter, Nicole; Nicol, Paul; Mafofo, Joseph; Africa, Samantha; Zar, Heather J.; Nicol, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Pneumococcal serotype identification is essential to monitor pneumococcal vaccine effectiveness and serotype replacement. Serotyping by conventional serological methods are costly, labour-intensive, and require significant technical expertise. We compared two different molecular methods to serotype pneumococci isolated from the nasopharynx of South African infants participating in a birth cohort study, the Drakenstein Child Health Study, in an area with high 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) coverage. Methods A real-time multiplex PCR (rmPCR) assay detecting 21 different serotypes/-groups and a sequetyping assay, based on the sequence of the wzh gene within the pneumococcal capsular locus, were compared. Forty pneumococcal control isolates, with serotypes determined by the Quellung reaction, were tested. In addition, 135 pneumococcal isolates obtained from the nasopharynx of healthy children were tested by both serotyping assays and confirmed by Quellung testing. Discordant results were further investigated by whole genome sequencing of four isolates. Results Of the 40 control isolates tested, 25 had a serotype covered by the rmPCR assay. These were all correctly serotyped/-grouped. Sequetyping PCR failed in 7/40 (18%) isolates. For the remaining isolates, sequetyping assigned the correct serotype/-group to 29/33 (88%) control isolates. Of the 132/135 (98%) nasopharyngeal pneumococcal isolates that could be typed, 69/132 (52%) and 112/132 (85%) were assigned the correct serotype/-group by rmPCR and sequetyping respectively. The serotypes of 63/132 (48%) isolates were not included in the rmPCR panel. All except three isolates (serotype 25A and 38) were theoretically amplified and differentiated into the correct serotype/-group with some strains giving ambigous results (serotype 13/20, 17F/33C, and 11A/D/1818F). Of the pneumococcal serotypes detected in this study, 69/91 (76%) were not included in the current PCV13. The most frequently

  20. BactQuant: An enhanced broad-coverage bacterial quantitative real-time PCR assay

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Bacterial load quantification is a critical component of bacterial community analysis, but a culture-independent method capable of detecting and quantifying diverse bacteria is needed. Based on our analysis of a diverse collection of 16 S rRNA gene sequences, we designed a broad-coverage quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay—BactQuant—for quantifying 16 S rRNA gene copy number and estimating bacterial load. We further utilized in silico evaluation to complement laboratory-based qPCR characterization to validate BactQuant. Methods The aligned core set of 4,938 16 S rRNA gene sequences in the Greengenes database were analyzed for assay design. Cloned plasmid standards were generated and quantified using a qPCR-based approach. Coverage analysis was performed computationally using >670,000 sequences and further evaluated following the Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Real-Time PCR Experiments (MIQE) guidelines. Results A bacterial TaqMan® qPCR assay targeting a 466 bp region in V3-V4 was designed. Coverage analysis showed that 91% of the phyla, 96% of the genera, and >80% of the 89,537 species analyzed contained at least one perfect sequence match to the BactQuant assay. Of the 106 bacterial species evaluated, amplification efficiencies ranged from 81 to 120%, with r2-value of >0.99, including species with sequence mismatches. Inter- and intra-run coefficient of variance was <3% and <16% for Ct and copy number, respectively. Conclusions The BactQuant assay offers significantly broader coverage than a previously reported universal bacterial quantification assay BactQuant in vitro performance was better than the in silico predictions. PMID:22510143

  1. Multiplex PCR assay for immediate identification of the infecting species in patients with mycobacterial disease.

    PubMed Central

    Kox, L F; Jansen, H M; Kuijper, S; Kolk, A H

    1997-01-01

    Rapid identification of infecting mycobacterial species enables appropriate medical care decisions to be made. Our aim was to demonstrate the clinical usefulness of the multiplex PCR assay, a test based on PCR, which permits direct identification of 12 mycobacterial species in clinical specimens. A total of 259 specimens from 177 patients who had clinical symptoms of mycobacterial disease but for whom there were difficulties in diagnosis were tested. Specimens were analyzed within 48 h of receipt of the sample. Mycobacteria were identified in 102 specimens; 66 specimens contained nontuberculous mycobacteria, and 36 specimens contained Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex mycobacteria. The PCR assay identified the mycobacterial species in 43 (97.7%) of 44 microscopy- and culture-positive specimens and in 15 (93.8%) of 16 culture-positive, microscopy-negative specimens. It also permitted species identification in infections caused by more than one mycobacterial species. For 56 (96.5%) of the 58 specimens from patients with infections caused by opportunistic mycobacteria, the organisms were identified with the PCR assay. The test was useful also for the identification of fastidious mycobacteria, e.g., M. genavense, and those that cannot be cultured, e.g., M. leprae. After resolution of discrepant results, the sensitivity of the PCR assay was 97.9%, the specificity was 96.9%, the positive predictive value was 95.0%, and the negative predictive value was 98.7%. For culture these values were 60.8, 100, 100, and 81.0%, respectively. Thus, the multiplex PCR assay enables prompt diagnosis when rapid identification of infecting mycobacteria is necessary. PMID:9163468

  2. Real-time PCR assay is superior to other methods for the detection of mycoplasma contamination in the cell lines of the National Cell Bank of Iran.

    PubMed

    Molla Kazemiha, Vahid; Bonakdar, Shahin; Amanzadeh, Amir; Azari, Shahram; Memarnejadian, Arash; Shahbazi, Shirin; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Mahdian, Reza

    2016-08-01

    Mycoplasmas are the most important contaminants of cell cultures throughout the world. They are considered as a major problem in biological studies and biopharmaceutical economic issues. In this study, our aim was to find the best standard technique as a rapid method with high sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for the detection of mycoplasma contamination in the cell lines of the National Cell Bank of Iran. Thirty cell lines suspected to mycoplasma contamination were evaluated by five different techniques including microbial culture, indirect DNA DAPI staining, enzymatic mycoalert(®) assay, conventional PCR and real-time PCR. Five mycoplasma-contaminated cell lines were assigned as positive controls and five mycoplasma-free cell lines as negative controls. The enzymatic method was performed using the mycoalert(®) mycoplasma detection kit. Real-time PCR technique was conducted by PromoKine diagnostic kits. In the conventional PCR method, mycoplasma genus-specific primers were designed to analyze the sequences based on a fixed and common region on 16S ribosomal RNA with PCR product size of 425 bp. Mycoplasma contamination was observed in 60, 56.66, 53.33, 46.66 and 33.33 % of 30 different cell cultures by real-time PCR, PCR, enzymatic mycoalert(®), indirect DNA DAPI staining and microbial culture methods, respectively. The analysis of the results of the different methods showed that the real-time PCR assay was superior the other methods with the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, predictive value of positive and negative results of 100 %. These values were 94.44, 100, 96.77, 100 and 92.85 % for the conventional PCR method, respectively. Therefore, this study showed that real-time PCR and PCR assays based on the common sequences in the 16S ribosomal RNA are reliable methods with high sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for detection of mycoplasma contamination in cell cultures and other biological products. PMID:25742733

  3. Highly Sensitive PCR Assay for Routine Diagnosis of African Swine Fever Virus in Clinical Samples

    PubMed Central

    Agüero, M.; Fernández, J.; Romero, L.; Sánchez Mascaraque, C.; Arias, M.; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    This work provides a novel, highly sensitive, hot start PCR method for rapid and specific detection of African swine fever virus (ASFV) that can be used as a routine diagnostic test for ASFV in surveillance, control, and eradication programs. A confirmatory test of the specificity of this method based on restriction endonuclease analysis was also developed. PMID:12958285

  4. A TaqMan Real-Time PCR Assay for Detection and Quantification of Sporisorium scitamineum in Sugarcane

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yachun; Guo, Jinlong; Xu, Liping

    2013-01-01

    Sporisorium scitamineum is a fungal smut pathogen epidemic in sugarcane producing areas. Early detection and proper identification of the smut are an essential requirement in its management practice. In this study, we developed a TaqMan real-time PCR assay using specific primers (bEQ-F/bEQ-R) and a TaqMan probe (bEQ-P) which were designed based on the bE (b East mating type) gene (Genbank Accession no. U61290.1). This method was more sensitive (a detection limit of 10 ag pbE DNA and 0.8 ng sugarcane genomic DNA) than that of conventional PCR (10 fg and 100 ng, resp.). Reliability was demonstrated through the positive detection of samples collected from artificially inoculated sugarcane plantlets (FN40). This assay was capable of detecting the smut pathogen at the initial stage (12 h) of infection and suitable for inspection of sugarcane pathogen-free seed cane and seedlings. Furthermore, quantification of pathogen was verified in pathogen-challenged buds in different sugarcane genotypes, which suggested its feasibility for evaluation of smut resistance in different sugarcane genotypes. Taken together, this novel assay can be used as a diagnostic tool for sensitive, accurate, fast, and quantitative detection of the smut pathogen especially for asymptomatic seed cane or plants and evaluation of smut resistance of sugarcane genotypes. PMID:24228020

  5. Promising Nucleic Acid Lateral Flow Assay Plus PCR for Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Terao, Yoshitaka; Takeshita, Kana; Nishiyama, Yasutaka; Morishita, Naoki; Matsumoto, Takashi; Morimatsu, Fumiki

    2015-08-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is a frequent cause of foodborne infections, and methods for rapid and reliable detection of STEC are needed. A nucleic acid lateral flow assay (NALFA) plus PCR was evaluated for detecting STEC after enrichment. When cell suspensions of 45 STEC strains, 14 non-STEC strains, and 13 non-E. coli strains were tested with the NALFA plus PCR, all of the STEC strains yielded positive results, and all of the non-STEC and non-E. coli strains yielded negative results. The lower detection limit for the STEC strains ranged from 0.1 to 1 pg of genomic DNA (about 20 to 200 CFU) per test, and the NALFA plus PCR was able to detect Stx1- and Stx2-producing E. coli strains with similar sensitivities. The ability of the NALFA plus PCR to detect STEC in enrichment cultures of radish sprouts, tomato, raw ground beef, and beef liver inoculated with 10-fold serially diluted STEC cultures was comparable to that of a real-time PCR assay (at a level of 100 to 100,000 CFU/ml in enrichment culture). The bacterial inoculation test in raw ground beef revealed that the lower detection limit of the NALFA plus PCR was also comparable to that obtained with a real-time PCR assay that followed the U.S. Department of Agriculture guidelines. Although further evaluation is required, these results suggest that the NALFA plus PCR is a specific and sensitive method for detecting STEC in a food manufacturing plant. PMID:26219371

  6. Real-Time Reverse Transcription-PCR Assay for Comprehensive Detection of Human Rhinoviruses▿

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaoyan; Holloway, Brian; Dare, Ryan K.; Kuypers, Jane; Yagi, Shigeo; Williams, John V.; Hall, Caroline B.; Erdman, Dean D.

    2008-01-01

    Human rhinoviruses (HRVs) are important contributors to respiratory disease, but their healthcare burden remains unclear, primarily because of the lack of sensitive, accurate, and convenient means of determining their causal role. To address this, we developed and clinically validated the sensitivity and specificity of a real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) assay targeting the viral 5′ noncoding region defined by sequences obtained from all 100 currently recognized HRV prototype strains and 85 recently circulating field isolates. The assay successfully amplified all HRVs tested and could reproducibly detect 50 HRV RNA transcript copies, with a dynamic range of over 7 logs. In contrast, a quantified RNA transcript of human enterovirus 68 (HEV68) that showed the greatest sequence homology to the HRV primers and probe set was not detected below a concentration of 5 × 105 copies per reaction. Nucleic acid extracts of 111 coded respiratory specimens that were culture positive for HRV or HEV were tested with the HRV real-time RT-PCR assay and by two independent laboratories that used different in-house HRV/HEV RT-PCR assays. Eighty-seven HRV-culture-positive specimens were correctly identified by the real-time RT-PCR assay, and 4 of the 24 HEV-positive samples were positive for HRV. HRV-specific sequences subsequently were identified in these four specimens, suggesting HRV/HEV coinfection in these patients. The assay was successfully applied in an investigation of a coincidental outbreak of HRV respiratory illness among laboratory staff. PMID:18057136

  7. Optimization of a Relative Telomere Length Assay by Monochromatic Multiplex Real-Time Quantitative PCR on the LightCycler 480: Sources of Variability and Quality Control Considerations.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Anthony Y Y; Saberi, Sara; Ajaykumar, Abhinav; Hukezalie, Kyle; Gadawski, Izabella; Sattha, Beheroze; Côté, Hélène C F

    2016-05-01

    Telomere length (TL) measurement is central to many biomedical research, population, and epidemiology studies, with promising potential as a clinical tool. Various assays are used to determine TL, depending on the type and size of the sample. We describe the detailed optimization of a monochromatic multiplex real-time quantitative PCR (MMqPCR) assay for relative TL using the LightCycler 480. MMqPCR was initially developed using a different instrument with many separate reagents. Differences in instrument performance, reagents, and workflow required substantial optimization for the assay to be compatible with the LightCycler 480. We optimized the chemistry of the assay using a purchased one-component reaction mix and herein describe sources of variability and quality control relevant to the MMqPCR TL assay on any instrument. Finally, the assay was validated against other TL assays, such as terminal restriction fragment, Southern blot, and flow fluorescent in situ hybridization. The correlations obtained between data from MMqPCR and these assays (R(2) = 0.88 and 0.81) were comparable to those seen with the monoplex version (R(2) = 0.85 and 0.82) when the same samples were assayed. The intrarun and interrun CV ranged from 4.2% to 6.2% and 3.2% to 4.9%, respectively. We describe a protocol for measuring TL on the LightCycler platform that provides a robust high-throughput method applicable to clinical diagnostics or large-scale studies of archived specimens. PMID:26972047

  8. Development of a Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay for the Detection of Treponema pallidum, HCV, HIV-1, and HBV.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Gong, Rui; Lu, Xuan; Zhang, Yi; Tang, Jingfeng

    2015-01-01

    Treponema pallidum, hepatitis C virus (HCV), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1, and hepatitis B virus (HBV) are major causes of sexually transmitted diseases passed through blood contact. The development of a sensitive and efficient method for detection is critical for early diagnosis and for large-scale screening of blood specimens in China. This study aims to establish an assay to detect these pathogens in clinical serum specimens. We established a TaqMan-locked nucleic acid (LNA) real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for rapid, sensitive, specific, quantitative, and simultaneous detection and identification. The copy numbers of standards of these 4 pathogens were quantified. Standard curves were generated by determining the mean cycle threshold values versus 10-fold serial dilutions of standards over a range of 10(6) to 10(1) copies/μL, with the lowest detection limit of the assay being 10(1) copies/μL. The assay was applied to 328 clinical specimens and compared with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and commercial nucleic acid testing (NAT) methods. The assay identified 39 T. pallidum-, 96 HCV-, 13 HIV-1-, 123 HBV-, 5 HBV/HCV-, 1 T. pallidum/HBV-, 1 HIV-1/HCV-, and 1 HIV-1/T. pallidum-positive specimens. The high sensitivity of the assay confers strong potential for its use as a highly reliable, cost-effective, and useful molecular diagnostic tool for large-scale screening of clinical specimens. This assay will assist in the study of the pathogenesis and epidemiology of sexually transmitted blood diseases. PMID:25866106

  9. Novel PCR Assays Complement Laser Biosensor-Based Method and Facilitate Listeria Species Detection from Food

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwang-Pyo; Singh, Atul K.; Bai, Xingjian; Leprun, Lena; Bhunia, Arun K.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to develop the Listeria species-specific PCR assays based on a house-keeping gene (lmo1634) encoding alcohol acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (Aad), previously designated as Listeria adhesion protein (LAP), and compare results with a label-free light scattering sensor, BARDOT (bacterial rapid detection using optical scattering technology). PCR primer sets targeting the lap genes from the species of Listeria sensu stricto were designed and tested with 47 Listeria and 8 non-Listeria strains. The resulting PCR primer sets detected either all species of Listeria sensu stricto or individual L. innocua, L. ivanovii and L. seeligeri, L. welshimeri, and L. marthii without producing any amplified products from other bacteria tested. The PCR assays with Listeria sensu stricto-specific primers also successfully detected all species of Listeria sensu stricto and/or Listeria innocua from mixed culture-inoculated food samples, and each bacterium in food was verified by using the light scattering sensor that generated unique scatter signature for each species of Listeria tested. The PCR assays based on the house-keeping gene aad (lap) can be used for detection of either all species of Listeria sensu stricto or certain individual Listeria species in a mixture from food with a detection limit of about 104 CFU/mL. PMID:26371000

  10. Development of rapid canine fecal source identification PCR-based assays.

    PubMed

    Green, Hyatt C; White, Karen M; Kelty, Cathy A; Shanks, Orin C

    2014-10-01

    The extent to which dogs contribute to aquatic fecal contamination is unknown despite the potential for zoonotic transfer of harmful human pathogens. We used genome fragment enrichment (GFE) to identify novel nonribosomal microbial genetic markers potentially useful for detecting dog fecal contamination with PCR-based methods in environmental samples. Of the 679 sequences obtained from GFE, we used 84 for the development of PCR assays targeting putative canine-associated genetic markers. Twelve genetic markers were shown to be prevalent among dog fecal samples and were rarely found in other animals. Three assays, DG3, DG37, and DG72, performed best in terms of specificity and sensitivity and were used for the development of SYBR Green and TaqMan quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays. qPCR analysis of 244 fecal samples collected from a wide geographic range indicated that marker concentrations were below limits of detection in noncanine hosts. As a proof-of-concept, these markers were detected in urban stormwater samples, suggesting a future application of newly developed methods for water quality monitoring. PMID:25203917

  11. Real-time RT-PCR Assay for Detection and Differentiation of Citrus Tristeza Virus Isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multiplex one step real time RT-PCR assays using TaqMan probes were developed for detection and strain differentiation of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV). For broad spectrum CTV detection, a TaqMan primer and Cy5-labeled probe were designed using CP gene sequences. An internal control was developed us...

  12. A Multiplexed, Probe-Based Quantitative PCR Assay for DNA of Phytophthora sojae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora sojae (Kaufm. & Gerd.) causes seed rot, pre- and post-emergence damping off, and sometimes foliar blight in soybean (Glycine max). Crop loss may approach 100% with susceptible cultivars. We report here the development of a unique quantitative PCR assay specific to DNA of P. sojae, and a...

  13. DETECTION OF PHAKOPSORA PACHYRHIZI SPORES IN RAIN USING REAL-TIME PCR ASSAY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2005, rain samples were collected weekly at selected National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) sites in the eastern and central US and screened for Phakopsora pachyrhizi (Asian soybean rust) spores. A nested real-time PCR assay was used to detect P. pachyrhizi DNA in the filter residue. A su...

  14. Genotyping of Toxoplasma gondii isolates with 15 microsatellite markers in a single multiplex PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Ajzenberg, Daniel; Collinet, Frédéric; Mercier, Aurélien; Vignoles, Philippe; Dardé, Marie-Laure

    2010-12-01

    We developed an easy-to-use method for genotyping Toxoplasma gondii isolates in a single multiplex PCR assay with 15 microsatellite markers. This method was validated by testing 26 reference isolates that had been characterized with other sets of markers. PMID:20881166

  15. Genotyping of Toxoplasma gondii Isolates with 15 Microsatellite Markers in a Single Multiplex PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Ajzenberg, Daniel; Collinet, Frédéric; Mercier, Aurélien; Vignoles, Philippe; Dardé, Marie-Laure

    2010-01-01

    We developed an easy-to-use method for genotyping Toxoplasma gondii isolates in a single multiplex PCR assay with 15 microsatellite markers. This method was validated by testing 26 reference isolates that had been characterized with other sets of markers. PMID:20881166

  16. Evaluation of Two PCR-based Swine-specific Fecal Source Tracking Assays (Abstract)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several PCR-based methods have been proposed to identify swine fecal pollution in environmental waters. However, the utility of these assays in identifying swine fecal contamination on a broad geographic scale is largely unknown. In this study, we evaluated the specificity, distr...

  17. Two RT-PCR based assays to detect human metapneumovirus in nasopharyngeal aspirates.

    PubMed

    López-Huertas, María Rosa; Casas, Inmaculada; Acosta-Herrera, Belsy; García, María Luz; Coiras, María Teresa; Pérez-Breña, Pilar

    2005-10-01

    Two sensitive and specific RT-PCR assays were standardised for testing the presence of human metapneumovirus. A total of 300 nasopharyngeal aspirates collected from infants suffering from bronchiolitis since October 2000 to June 2003 and shown previously as negative to common respiratory viruses were examined. Matrix and polymerase viral genes, which show a low rate of variation, were chosen to design amplification assays to ensure that any genotype of the human metapneumovirus could be detected. A RT-PCR followed by a reverse line blotting hybridisation was developed for viral polymerase gene. For the matrix gene, after the RT-PCR assay, a subsequent nested PCR was carried out. Both assays had similar sensitivity, equivalent to 0.1 TCID50 of human metapneumovirus strain NL/1/99 which was used as the positive control. The human metapneumovirus was present in 16.6% of the specimens studied. The approaches described below are not only a robust method for rapid diagnosis of the human metapneumovirus, but also to establish an etiological surveillance tool for epidemiological studies. Based on the results obtained, human metapneumovirus infections in Madrid followed a seasonal pattern, with most of the infections occurring between February and April. PMID:15961167

  18. Final Report Nucleic Acid System - PCR, Multiplex Assays and Sample Preparation Project

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, R.P.; Langlois, R.G.; Nasarabadi, S.; Benett, W.J.; Richards, J.B.; Hadley, D.R.; Miles, R.R.; Brown, S.B.; Stratton, P.L.; Milanovich, F.P.

    2001-04-20

    The objective of this project was to reduce to practice the detection and identification of biological warfare pathogens by the nucleic acid recognition technique of PCR (polymerase chain reaction). This entailed not only building operationally functional instrumentation but also developing the chemical assays for detection of priority pathogens. This project had two principal deliverables: (1) design, construct, test and deliver a 24 chamber, multiplex capable suitcase sized PCR instrument, and (2) develop and reduce to practice a multiplex assay for the detection of PCR product by flow cytometry. In addition, significant resources were allocated to test and evaluation of the Hand-held Advanced Nucleic Acid Analyzer (HANAA). This project helps provide the signature and intelligence gathering community the ability to perform, on-site or remote, rapid analysis of environmental or like samples for the presence of a suite of biological warfare pathogens.

  19. Development of Quantitative Real-time PCR Assays for Different Clades of "Candidatus Accumulibacter".

    PubMed

    Zhang, An Ni; Mao, Yanping; Zhang, Tong

    2016-01-01

    We designed novel quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) primers for the polyphosphate kinase 1 (ppk1) gene, targeting eight individual "Candidatus Accumulibacter" (referred to as Accumulibacter) clades. An evaluation of primer sets was conducted regarding the coverage, specificity, and PCR efficiency. (i) All primer sets were designed to cover all available sequences of the target clade. (ii) The phylogenetic analysis of the sequences retrieved from the qPCR products by each primer set demonstrated a high level of specificity. (iii) All calibration curves presented high PCR efficiencies in the range of 85-112% (R(2) = 0.962-0.998). In addition, the possible interference of non-target amplicons was individually examined using the qPCR assay for 13 Accumulibacter clades, which were either undetected or showed negligible detection. With the primers designed by other research groups, a highly selective and sensitive qPCR-based method was developed to quantify all Accumulibacter clades, with the exception of Clade IE, in one assay, which enables more comprehensive insights into the community dynamics. The applicability to environmental samples was demonstrated by profiling the Accumulibacter clades in activated sludge samples of nine full-scale wastewater treatment plants. PMID:27142574

  20. Development of Quantitative Real-time PCR Assays for Different Clades of “Candidatus Accumulibacter”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, An Ni; Mao, Yanping; Zhang, Tong

    2016-05-01

    We designed novel quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) primers for the polyphosphate kinase 1 (ppk1) gene, targeting eight individual “Candidatus Accumulibacter” (referred to as Accumulibacter) clades. An evaluation of primer sets was conducted regarding the coverage, specificity, and PCR efficiency. (i) All primer sets were designed to cover all available sequences of the target clade. (ii) The phylogenetic analysis of the sequences retrieved from the qPCR products by each primer set demonstrated a high level of specificity. (iii) All calibration curves presented high PCR efficiencies in the range of 85–112% (R2 = 0.962–0.998). In addition, the possible interference of non-target amplicons was individually examined using the qPCR assay for 13 Accumulibacter clades, which were either undetected or showed negligible detection. With the primers designed by other research groups, a highly selective and sensitive qPCR-based method was developed to quantify all Accumulibacter clades, with the exception of Clade IE, in one assay, which enables more comprehensive insights into the community dynamics. The applicability to environmental samples was demonstrated by profiling the Accumulibacter clades in activated sludge samples of nine full-scale wastewater treatment plants.

  1. Development of Quantitative Real-time PCR Assays for Different Clades of “Candidatus Accumulibacter”

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, An Ni; Mao, Yanping; Zhang, Tong

    2016-01-01

    We designed novel quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) primers for the polyphosphate kinase 1 (ppk1) gene, targeting eight individual “Candidatus Accumulibacter” (referred to as Accumulibacter) clades. An evaluation of primer sets was conducted regarding the coverage, specificity, and PCR efficiency. (i) All primer sets were designed to cover all available sequences of the target clade. (ii) The phylogenetic analysis of the sequences retrieved from the qPCR products by each primer set demonstrated a high level of specificity. (iii) All calibration curves presented high PCR efficiencies in the range of 85–112% (R2 = 0.962–0.998). In addition, the possible interference of non-target amplicons was individually examined using the qPCR assay for 13 Accumulibacter clades, which were either undetected or showed negligible detection. With the primers designed by other research groups, a highly selective and sensitive qPCR-based method was developed to quantify all Accumulibacter clades, with the exception of Clade IE, in one assay, which enables more comprehensive insights into the community dynamics. The applicability to environmental samples was demonstrated by profiling the Accumulibacter clades in activated sludge samples of nine full-scale wastewater treatment plants. PMID:27142574

  2. Comparison of a PNA clamp PCR and an ARMS/Scorpion PCR assay for the detection of K-ras mutations.

    PubMed

    Nordgård, Oddmund; Oltedal, Satu; Janssen, Emiel A M; Gilje, Bjørnar; Kørner, Hartwig; Tjensvoll, Kjersti; Smaaland, Rune

    2012-03-01

    Point mutations in the K-ras gene have been shown to confer resistance against epidermal growth factor receptor-directed therapy of metastatic colorectal cancer. Accordingly, K-ras mutation testing has become mandatory in hospitals offering such treatment. We compared the performance and reagent costs of 2 sensitive methods for detection of K-ras mutations: a peptide nucleic acid (PNA) clamp polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay and a commercially available amplification refractory mutation system/Scorpion (ARMS/S) PCR assay. Both methods were applied in parallel to 101 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor and metastasis samples from patients with colon cancer. The PNA clamp PCR assay detected K-ras mutations in 35% (35 of 101) of the samples, whereas the ARMS/S PCR assay detected mutations in 27% (27 of 101) of them. There was 92% (93 of 101) concordance between the 2 methods and the κ coefficient for the comparison was 0.82. The 8 discordant cases were exclusively positive by PNA clamp PCR. Finally, the reagent costs of the PNA clamp PCR assay were estimated to be at least 20 times lower than the ARMS/S assay. We concluded that the high performance and low costs associated with the PNA clamp PCR assay encourage its use in the administration of personalized epidermal growth factor receptor-directed therapy. PMID:22306670

  3. Validation of an ultrasensitive digital droplet PCR assay for HIV-2 plasma RNA quantification

    PubMed Central

    Ruelle, Jean; Yfantis, Vasilieios; Duquenne, Armelle; Goubau, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Low or undetectable plasma viral load (VL) using current qPCR assays is common for HIV-2 patients. Digital PCR is an emerging technology enabling more precision and reproducibility than qPCR at low DNA/RNA copy numbers. Available data related to digital droplet PCR (ddPCR, Bio-Rad) underscore issues linked to the threshold definition of positivity, coupled to the specificity of low copy results [1]. Materials and Methods A RT-PCR protocol was set up using the One-Step RT-ddPCR Kit for Probes on the QX200 platform (Bio-Rad, Hercules, CA) in an accredited environment (ISO15189:2012 norm). Parameters tested were in line with the digital MIQE guidelines [2]. Inter-run coefficient of variation (CV) was established using synthetic RNA controls diluted in HIV-negative plasma. The ddPCR assay was compared to a qRT-PCR previously used in routine (LOQ 50 cop/mL [3]) using 46 clinical samples and the NIBSC international HIV-2 RNA standard. Results The optimal PCR efficiency and the best separation between positive and negative droplets were obtained with a mixture containing 0.5 mM manganese acetate, 700 nM primers and 250 nM of the 5'FAM-probe. Using a manual threshold to define positivity, 7.74% of negative controls (n=168) were scored as positive due to one positive droplet. The presence of two positive droplets or more was not observed for negative controls. Serial dilutions of a positive control showed excellent linearity (R2=0.999) and enabled us to define a limit of quantification of two positives droplets, which corresponds to 0.14 copies/μL in the reaction mixture and to seven copies per mL of plasma. The inter-run coefficient of variation was 3.37% at a mean value of 4,468 cop/mL, 19.59% at 416 cop/mL and 32.28% at 8 cop/mL. The NIBSC standard of 1,000 IU was quantified 1,400 copies by ddPCR and close to 5,000 copies by qPCR (delta log superior to 0.5). Among 46 clinical samples, 22 were undetectable with both qPCR and ddPCR, 12 were detected with both

  4. Temporal Assessment of the Impact of Exposure to Cow Feces in Two Watersheds by Multiple Host-Specific PCR Assays

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to feces in two watersheds with different management histories was assessed by tracking cattle feces bacterial populations using multiple host-specific PCR assays. In addition, environmental factors affecting the occurrence of these markers were identified. Each assay wa...

  5. Development of Conventional and Real-Time Quantitative PCR Assays for Diagnosis and Monitoring of Scabies.

    PubMed

    Wong, Samson S Y; Poon, Rosana W S; Chau, Sandy; Wong, Sally C Y; To, Kelvin K W; Cheng, Vincent C C; Fung, Kitty S C; Yuen, K Y

    2015-07-01

    Scabies remains the most prevalent, endemic, and neglected ectoparasitic infestation globally and can cause institutional outbreaks. The sensitivity of routine microscopy for demonstration of Sarcoptes scabiei mites or eggs in skin scrapings is only about 50%. Except for three studies using conventional or two-tube nested PCR on a small number of cases, no systematic study has been performed to improve the laboratory diagnosis of this important infection. We developed a conventional and a real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay based on the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene of S. scabiei. The cox1 gene is relatively well conserved, with its sequence having no high levels of similarity to the sequences of other human skin mites, pathogenic zoonotic mites, or common house dust mite species. This mitochondrial gene is also present in large quantities in arthropod cells, potentially improving the sensitivity of a PCR-based assay. In our study, both assays were specific and were more sensitive than microscopy in diagnosing scabies, with positive and negative predictive values of 100%. The S. scabiei DNA copy number in the microscopy-positive specimens was significantly higher than that in the microscopy-negative specimens (median S. scabiei DNA copy number, 3.604 versus 2.457 log10 copies per reaction; P = 0.0213). In the patient with crusted scabies, the qPCR assay performed on lesional skin swabs instead of scrapings revealed that the parasite DNA load took about 2 weeks to become negative after treatment. The utility of using lesional skin swabs as an alternative sample for diagnosis of scabies by PCR should be further evaluated. PMID:25903566

  6. Development of Conventional and Real-Time Quantitative PCR Assays for Diagnosis and Monitoring of Scabies

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Samson S. Y.; Poon, Rosana W. S.; Chau, Sandy; Wong, Sally C. Y.; To, Kelvin K. W.; Cheng, Vincent C. C.; Fung, Kitty S. C.

    2015-01-01

    Scabies remains the most prevalent, endemic, and neglected ectoparasitic infestation globally and can cause institutional outbreaks. The sensitivity of routine microscopy for demonstration of Sarcoptes scabiei mites or eggs in skin scrapings is only about 50%. Except for three studies using conventional or two-tube nested PCR on a small number of cases, no systematic study has been performed to improve the laboratory diagnosis of this important infection. We developed a conventional and a real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay based on the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene of S. scabiei. The cox1 gene is relatively well conserved, with its sequence having no high levels of similarity to the sequences of other human skin mites, pathogenic zoonotic mites, or common house dust mite species. This mitochondrial gene is also present in large quantities in arthropod cells, potentially improving the sensitivity of a PCR-based assay. In our study, both assays were specific and were more sensitive than microscopy in diagnosing scabies, with positive and negative predictive values of 100%. The S. scabiei DNA copy number in the microscopy-positive specimens was significantly higher than that in the microscopy-negative specimens (median S. scabiei DNA copy number, 3.604 versus 2.457 log10 copies per reaction; P = 0.0213). In the patient with crusted scabies, the qPCR assay performed on lesional skin swabs instead of scrapings revealed that the parasite DNA load took about 2 weeks to become negative after treatment. The utility of using lesional skin swabs as an alternative sample for diagnosis of scabies by PCR should be further evaluated. PMID:25903566

  7. Comparative Evaluation of the Diagnostic Performance of the Prototype Cepheid GeneXpert Ebola Assay.

    PubMed

    Jansen van Vuren, Petrus; Grobbelaar, Antoinette; Storm, Nadia; Conteh, Ousman; Konneh, Kelfala; Kamara, Abdul; Sanne, Ian; Paweska, Janusz T

    2016-02-01

    The Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in West Africa has highlighted an urgent need for point-of-care (POC) assays for the diagnosis of this devastating disease in resource-limited African countries. The diagnostic performance characteristics of a prototype Cepheid GeneXpert Ebola POC used to detect Ebola virus (EBOV) in stored serum and plasma samples collected from suspected EVD cases in Sierra Leone in 2014 and 2015 was evaluated. The GeneXpert Ebola POC is a self-contained single-cartridge automated system that targets the glycoprotein (GP) and nucleoprotein (NP) genes of EBOV and yields results within 90 min. Results from 281 patient samples were compared to the results of a TaqMan real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) targeting the polymerase gene and performed on two real-time PCR machines. Agreement between the three platforms was 100% at cycle threshold (CT) values of ≤34.99, but discordant results were noted between CT values of 35 and 45.The diagnostic sensitivity of the three platforms was 100% in 91 patient samples that were confirmed to be infectious by virus isolation. All three molecular platforms detected viral EBOV RNA in additional samples that did not contain viable EBOV. The analytical sensitivity of the GeneXpert Ebola POC for the detection of NP was higher, and comparable to that of polymerase gene detection, than that for the detection of GP when using a titrated laboratory stock of EBOV. There was no detectable cross-reactivity with other hemorrhagic fever viruses or arboviruses. The GeneXpert Ebola POC offers an easy to operate and sensitive diagnostic tool that can be used for the rapid screening of suspected EVD cases in treatment or in holding centers during EVD outbreaks. PMID:26637383

  8. Development of a PCR-Based Line Probe Assay for Identification of Fungal Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Cara; Roberts, David; van der Weide, Marjo; Rossau, Rudi; Jannes, Geert; Smith, Terry; Maher, Majella

    2000-01-01

    We report on a reverse-hybridization line probe assay (LiPA) which when combined with PCR amplification detects and identifies clinically significant fungal pathogens including Candida, Aspergillus, and Cryptococcus species. DNA probes have been designed from the internal transcribed-spacer (ITS) regions of Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis, Candida krusei, Candida dubliniensis, Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus versicolor, Aspergillus nidulans and Aspergillus flavus. The probes were incorporated into a LiPA for detection of biotinylated ITS PCR products, and the specificity of the probes was evaluated. We established LiPA detection limits for ITS 1 and for full ITS amplicons for genomic DNA from C. albicans, A. fumigatus, and C. neoformans. Further evaluation of the LiPA was carried out on clinical fungal isolates. One hundred twenty-seven isolates consisting of dimorphic yeasts and dermatophytic and filamentous fungi were tested by the LiPA, which correctly identified 77 dimorphic yeasts and 23 of the filamentous isolates; the remaining 27 isolates represented species of fungi for which probes were not included in the LiPA. The fungal-PCR-LiPA technology was applied to blood samples inoculated with Candida cells which were pretreated by minibead beating to mechanically disrupt the cells, with the DNA extracted by either a previously described guanidium thiocyanate-silica method or the commercially available QIAmp tissue kit. PCR amplification of the extracted DNA and subsequent DNA probe hybridization in the LiPA assay yielded detection limits of 2 to 10 cells/ml. An internal standard control was included in the PCR amplification to monitor for PCR inhibition. This fungal PCR-LiPA assay is robust and sensitive and can easily be integrated into a clinical-testing laboratory with the potential for same-day diagnosis of fungal infection. PMID:11015393

  9. Development of a PCR assay for rapid diagnosis of Mycobacterium ulcerans infection.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, B C; Marino, L; Oppedisano, F; Edwards, R; Robins-Browne, R M; Johnson, P D

    1997-01-01

    The diagnosis of Mycobacterium ulcerans infection is hampered by the slow growth of the bacterium in culture, resulting in a delay of several months before a specific diagnosis can be obtained. In addition, M. ulcerans cannot be isolated from water even when there is convincing epidemiological evidence implicating this as the source of infection. The aim of the present study was to develop a PCR assay to circumvent the problems of delayed diagnosis and insensitivity of standard bacterial culture for M. ulcerans. For the PCR, we isolated an M. ulcerans-specific DNA fragment, 1,109 bp long, which is repeated at least 50 times throughout the genome. Use of this sequence as a target for PCR allowed us to detect as few as 2 molecules of genomic DNA in vitro. The PCR was used to detect M. ulcerans DNA in fresh tissue and paraffin-embedded sections from all seven patients with culture-confirmed cases of infection. PMID:9196176

  10. Rapid Leptospira identification by direct sequencing of the diagnostic PCR products in New Caledonia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Most of the current knowledge of leptospirosis epidemiology originates from serological results obtained with the reference Microscopic Agglutination Test (MAT). However, inconsistencies and weaknesses of this diagnostic technique are evident. A growing use of PCR has improved the early diagnosis of leptospirosis but a drawback is that it cannot provide information on the infecting Leptospira strain which provides important epidemiologic data. Our work is aimed at evaluating if the sequence polymorphism of diagnostic PCR products could be used to identify the infecting Leptospira strains in the New Caledonian environment. Results Both the lfb1 and secY diagnostic PCR products displayed a sequence polymorphism that could prove useful in presumptively identifying the infecting leptospire. Using both this polymorphism and MLST results with New Caledonian isolates and clinical samples, we confirmed the epidemiological relevance of the sequence-based identification of Leptospira strains. Additionally, we identified one cluster of L. interrogans that contained no reference strain and one cluster of L. borgpetersenii found only in the introduced Rusa deer Cervus timorensis russa that is its probable reservoir. Conclusions The sequence polymorphism of diagnostic PCR products proved useful in presumptively identifying the infecting Leptospira strains. This could contribute to a better understanding of leptospirosis epidemiology by providing epidemiological information that cannot be directly attained from the use of PCR as an early diagnostic test for leptospirosis. PMID:21176235

  11. Direct Comparison of Flow-FISH and qPCR as Diagnostic Tests for Telomere Length Measurement in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez-Rodrigues, Fernanda; Santana-Lemos, Bárbara A.; Scheucher, Priscila S.; Alves-Paiva, Raquel M.; Calado, Rodrigo T.

    2014-01-01

    Telomere length measurement is an essential test for the diagnosis of telomeropathies, which are caused by excessive telomere erosion. Commonly used methods are terminal restriction fragment (TRF) analysis by Southern blot, fluorescence in situ hybridization coupled with flow cytometry (flow-FISH), and quantitative PCR (qPCR). Although these methods have been used in the clinic, they have not been comprehensively compared. Here, we directly compared the performance of flow-FISH and qPCR to measure leukocytes' telomere length of healthy individuals and patients evaluated for telomeropathies, using TRF as standard. TRF and flow-FISH showed good agreement and correlation in the analysis of healthy subjects (R2 = 0.60; p<0.0001) and patients (R2 = 0.51; p<0.0001). In contrast, the comparison between TRF and qPCR yielded modest correlation for the analysis of samples of healthy individuals (R2 = 0.35; p<0.0001) and low correlation for patients (R2 = 0.20; p = 0.001); Bland-Altman analysis showed poor agreement between the two methods for both patients and controls. Quantitative PCR and flow-FISH modestly correlated in the analysis of healthy individuals (R2 = 0.33; p<0.0001) and did not correlate in the comparison of patients' samples (R2 = 0.1, p = 0.08). Intra-assay coefficient of variation (CV) was similar for flow-FISH (10.8±7.1%) and qPCR (9.5±7.4%; p = 0.35), but the inter-assay CV was lower for flow-FISH (9.6±7.6% vs. 16±19.5%; p = 0.02). Bland-Altman analysis indicated that flow-FISH was more precise and reproducible than qPCR. Flow-FISH and qPCR were sensitive (both 100%) and specific (93% and 89%, respectively) to distinguish very short telomeres. However, qPCR sensitivity (40%) and specificity (63%) to detect telomeres below the tenth percentile were lower compared to flow-FISH (80% sensitivity and 85% specificity). In the clinical setting, flow-FISH was more accurate, reproducible, sensitive, and specific in the

  12. Real-time PCR assays for genotyping of Cryptococcus gattii in North America

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cryptococcus gattii has been the cause of an ongoing outbreak starting in 1999 on Vancouver Island, British Columbia and spreading to mainland Canada and the US Pacific Northwest. In the course of the outbreak, C. gattii has been identified outside of its previously documented climate, habitat, and host disease. Genotyping of C. gattii is essential to understand the ecological and geographical expansion of this emerging pathogen. Methods We developed and validated a mismatch amplification mutation assay (MAMA) real-time PCR panel for genotyping C. gattii molecular types VGI-VGIV and VGII subtypes a,b,c. Subtype assays were designed based on whole-genome sequence of 20 C. gattii strains. Publically available multilocus sequence typing (MLST) data from a study of 202 strains was used for the molecular type (VGI-VGIV) assay design. All assays were validated across DNA from 112 strains of diverse international origin and sample types, including animal, environmental and human. Results Validation revealed each assay on the panel is 100% sensitive, specific and concordant with MLST. The assay panel can detect down to 0.5 picograms of template DNA. Conclusions The (MAMA) real-time PCR panel for C. gattii accurately typed a collection of 112 diverse strains and demonstrated high sensitivity. This is a time and cost efficient method of genotyping C. gattii best suited for application in large-scale epidemiological studies. PMID:24886039

  13. An improved real-time PCR assay for the detection of Old World screwworm flies.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Jess A T; Urech, Rudolf

    2014-10-01

    The Old World screwworm (OWS) fly, Chrysomya bezziana, is a serious pest of livestock, wildlife and humans in tropical Africa, parts of the Middle East, the Indian subcontinent, south-east Asia and Papua New Guinea. Although to date Australia remains free of OWS flies, an incursion would have serious economic and animal welfare implications. For these reasons Australia has an OWS fly preparedness plan including OWS fly surveillance with fly traps. The recent development of an improved OWS fly trap and synthetic attractant and a specific and sensitive real-time PCR molecular assay for the detection of OWS flies in trap catches has improved Australia's OWS fly surveillance capabilities. Because all Australian trap samples gave negative results in the PCR assay, it was deemed necessary to include a positive control mechanism to ensure that fly DNA was being successfully extracted and amplified and to guard against false negative results. A new non-competitive internal amplification control (IAC) has been developed that can be used in conjunction with the OWS fly PCR assay in a multiplexed single-tube reaction. The multiplexed assay provides an indicator of the performance of DNA extraction and amplification without greatly increasing labour or reagent costs. The fly IAC targets a region of the ribosomal 16S mitochondrial DNA which is conserved across at least six genera of commonly trapped flies. Compared to the OWS fly assay alone, the multiplexed OWS fly and fly IAC assay displayed no loss in sensitivity or specificity for OWS fly detection. The multiplexed OWS fly and fly IAC assay provides greater confidence for trap catch samples returning negative OWS fly results. PMID:24613153

  14. Detection of toxigenic strains of Aeromonas species in foods by a multiplex PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Balakrishna, K; Murali, H S; Batra, H V

    2010-06-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila and other aeromonads are ubiquitous organisms found in meat, vegetables, drinking water and various other food items. They cause diarrhea and extra-intestinal infections in normal and immunocompromised patients. The aim of the study was to develop a multiplex PCR assay for the detection of virulence-associated genes of Aeromonas including hemolysin (hlyA), aerolysin (aerA), glycerophospholipid-cholesterol acyl transferase (GCAT) alongwith a 16S rRNA gene. Internal amplification control (IAC), which was coamplified with aerA primers, was also included in this study. The results showed that all cultures of Aeromonas were accurately identified by the assay without showing non-specificity. A. hydrophila could be detected at a range of 10-50 CFU ml(-1) from experimentally spiked fish, chicken and milk samples following overnight enrichment in alkaline peptone water supplemented with 10 μg/ml ampicillin (APW-A) by this multiplex PCR (mPCR). When evaluated on a total of 74 naturally occurring food samples, four samples were identified to contain Aeromonas by mPCR. All these results were compared to the conventional culture, isolation and biochemical identification procedures. The high throughput and cost-effective mPCR method developed in this study could provide a powerful tool for detection of pathogenic Aeromonas spp. from food and environmental samples and in addition, the method has advantages in terms of specificity, sensitivity and ease of use compared to other reported PCR methods and DNA hybridization assays. PMID:23100820

  15. High-Throughput Direct Fecal PCR Assay for Detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Sheep and Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Waldron, Anna M.; Galea, Francesca; Whittington, Ann-Michele; Saunders, Vanessa F.; Begg, Douglas J.; de Silva, Kumudika; Purdie, Auriol C.; Whittington, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Johne's disease (JD) is a chronic enteric disease caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis that affects ruminants. Transmission occurs by the fecal-oral route. A commonly used antemortem diagnostic test for the detection of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in feces is liquid culture; however, a major constraint is the 2- to 3-month incubation period needed for this method. Rapid methods for the detection of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis based on PCR have been reported, but comprehensive validation data are lacking. We describe here a new test, the high-throughput-Johnes (HT-J), to detect M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in feces. Its diagnostic accuracy was compared with that of liquid radiometric (Bactec) fecal culture using samples from cattle (1,330 samples from 23 herds) and sheep (596 samples from 16 flocks). The multistage protocol involves the recovery of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells from a fecal suspension, cell rupture by bead beating, extraction of DNA using magnetic beads, and IS900 quantitative PCR. The limit of detection of the assay was 0.0005 pg, and the limit of quantification was 0.005 pg M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis genomic DNA. Only M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was detected from a panel of 51 mycobacterial isolates, including 10 with IS900-like sequences. Of the 549 culture-negative fecal samples from unexposed herds and flocks, 99% were negative in the HT-J test, while 60% of the bovine- and 84% of the ovine-culture-positive samples were positive in the HT-J test. As similar total numbers of samples from M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-exposed animals were positive in culture and HT-J tests in both species, and as the results of a McNemar's test were not significant, these methods probably have similar sensitivities, but the true diagnostic sensitivities of these tests are unknown. These validation data meet the consensus-based reporting standards for diagnostic test accuracy studies for paratuberculosis and

  16. Detection of Dientamoeba fragilis in animal faeces using species specific real time PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Chan, Douglas; Barratt, Joel; Roberts, Tamalee; Phillips, Owen; Šlapeta, Jan; Ryan, Una; Marriott, Deborah; Harkness, John; Ellis, John; Stark, Damien

    2016-08-30

    Dientamoeba fragilis is a potentially pathogenic, enteric, protozoan parasite with a worldwide distribution. While clinical case reports and prevalence studies appear regularly in the scientific literature, little attention has been paid to this parasite's biology, life cycle, host range, and possible transmission routes. Overall, these aspects of Dientamoeba biology remain poorly understood at best. In this study, a total of 420 animal samples, collected from Australia, were surveyed for the presence of Dientamoeba fragilis using PCR. Several PCR assays were evaluated for sensitivity and specificity. Two previously published PCR methods demonstrated cross reactivity with other trichomonads commonly found in animal samples. Only one assay exhibited excellent specificity. Using this assay D. fragilis was detected from one dog and one cat sample. This is the first report of D. fragilis from these animals and highlights the role companion animals may play in D. fragilis transmission. This study demonstrated that some published D. fragilis molecular assays cross react with other closely related trichomonads and consequently are not suitable for animal prevalence studies. PMID:27523936

  17. Rapid Preclinical Detection of Sheeppox Virus by a Real-Time PCR Assay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sheeppox virus (SPPV) is a member of the Capripoxvirus (CaPV) genus of the Poxviridae family. Members of this genus, which also includes goatpox (GTPV) and lumpy skin disease (LSDV) viruses, cause economically significant disease in sheep, goats and cattle. A rapid diagnostic assay for CaPV would ...

  18. Comparison of the host specificities of two bacteroidales quantitative PCR assays used for tracking human fecal contamination.

    PubMed

    Van De Werfhorst, Laurie C; Sercu, Bram; Holden, Patricia A

    2011-09-01

    The sewage-associated real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays BacHum and HF183 SYBR were compared for specificity against local fecal sources. Both assays were equally sensitive to sewage, but BacHum showed substantially more false-positive results for cat, dog, gull, and raccoon feces. PMID:21742921

  19. Comparison of cell-based and PCR-based assays as methods for measuring infectivity of Tulane virus.

    PubMed

    Shan, Lei; Yang, David; Wang, Dapeng; Tian, Peng

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we used Tulane virus (TV) as a surrogate for HuNoV to evaluate for correlation between two cell-based assays and three PCR-based assays. Specifically, the cell-based plaque and TCID50 assays measure for infectious virus particles, while the PCR-based RNase exposure, porcine gastric mucin in-situ-capture qRT-PCR (PGM-ISC-qRT-PCR), and antibody in-situ-capture qRT-PCR (Ab-ISC-qRT-PCR) assays measure for an amplicon within encapsidated viral genome. Ten batches of viral stocks ranging from 3.41 × 10(5) to 6.67 × 10(6) plaque forming units (PFUs) were used for side by side comparison with PFU as a reference. The results indicate that one PFU was equivalent to 6.69 ± 2.34 TCID50 units, 9.75 ± 10.87 RNase-untreated genomic copies (GCs), 2.87 ± 3.05 RNase-treated GCs, 0.07 ± 0.07 PGM-ISC-qRT-PCR GCs, and 0.52 ± 0.39 Ab-ISC-qRT-PCR GCs. We observed that while the cell-based assays were consistent with each other, the TCID50 assay was more sensitive than the plaque assay. In contrast, the PCR-based assays were not always consistent with the cell-based assays. The very high variations in GCs as measured by both ISC-RT-qPCR assays made them difficult to correlate against the relatively small variations (<20-fold) in the PFUs or TCID50 units as measured by the cell-based assays. PMID:26875997

  20. Pre-PCR processing in bioterrorism preparedness: improved diagnostic capabilities for laboratory response networks.

    PubMed

    Hedman, Johannes; Knutsson, Rickard; Ansell, Ricky; Rådström, Peter; Rasmusson, Birgitta

    2013-09-01

    Diagnostic DNA analysis using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has become a valuable tool for rapid detection of biothreat agents. However, analysis is often challenging because of the limited size, quality, and purity of the biological target. Pre-PCR processing is an integrated concept in which the issues of analytical limit of detection and simplicity for automation are addressed in all steps leading up to PCR amplification--that is, sampling, sample treatment, and the chemical composition of PCR. The sampling method should maximize target uptake and minimize uptake of extraneous substances that could impair the analysis--so-called PCR inhibitors. In sample treatment, there is a trade-off between yield and purity, as extensive purification leads to DNA loss. A cornerstone of pre-PCR processing is to apply DNA polymerase-buffer systems that are tolerant to specific sample impurities, thereby lowering the need for expensive purification steps and maximizing DNA recovery. Improved awareness among Laboratory Response Networks (LRNs) regarding pre-PCR processing is important, as ineffective sample processing leads to increased cost and possibly false-negative or ambiguous results, hindering the decision-making process in a bioterrorism crisis. This article covers the nature and mechanisms of PCR-inhibitory substances relevant for agroterrorism and bioterrorism preparedness, methods for quality control of PCR reactions, and applications of pre-PCR processing to optimize and simplify the analysis of various biothreat agents. Knowledge about pre-PCR processing will improve diagnostic capabilities of LRNs involved in the response to bioterrorism incidents. PMID:23971826

  1. Development of a SYBR-Green Ⅰ quantitative PCR assay for the detection and genotyping of different hantaviruses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ziyu; Wang, Fang; Yuan, Lijuan; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Ying, Qikang; Yu, Lan; Zhang, Liang; Cheng, Linfeng; Zhang, Fanglin; Lu, Jianguo; Wu, Xing'an

    2016-09-01

    Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) is a severe, viral zoonotic disease which occurs worldwide, particularly in Asia and Europe. In China, the Hantaan virus (HTNV) and the Seoul virus (SEOV) are known to be the most prevalent causative agents of HFRS. Since no protective vaccines or effective treatments are available for human use, accurate and reliable diagnostic methods are essential for disease surveillance. In the present study, the viral loads in cell culture supernatant, infected mice blood and clinical serum samples were quantified using the SYBR‑Green I-based reverse transcription-quantitiative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) assay, which targeted the S gene sequence of the HTNV and SEOV genomes. The cRNA of these two viruses were synthesized as a positive control and 10-fold serially diluted from 1x105 to 1x100 copies/µl. Standard curves were generated by plotting the mean cycle threshold (Ct) values versus copy numbers. The standard curve of HTNV had a correlation coefficient (R2) of 0.994, efficiency of amplification (E) of 101.9%, and the slope of -3.278, whereas that of SEOV had an R2 of 0.993, E of 104.8%, and the slope of -3.212. The minimum detection limit of the RT-qPCR assay for HTNV and SEOV was 101 copies/µl. Two qPCR assays were successfully established for the detection of HTNV and SEOV, respectively. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that using the SYBR‑Green I-based RT-qPCR assay, the HTNV and SEOV may be genotyped precisely without cross-reactivity. Furthermore, viral RNA may be detected and quantified in cells, mice and infected individuals, which may be useful in epidemiological studies as well as for early monitoring and further preventative treatment against SEOV and HTNV-induced diseases. PMID:27430149

  2. Biomarker-based diagnostic work-up of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in immunocompromised paediatric patients--is Aspergillus PCR appropriate?

    PubMed

    Buchheidt, Dieter; Reinwald, Mark; Spiess, Birgit; Boch, Tobias; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Groll, Andreas H; Lehrnbecher, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Invasive aspergillosis (IA) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in children and adults with haematologic malignancies or undergoing allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and early diagnosis and adequate antifungal treatment improve outcome. However, important differences exist between children and adults regarding epidemiology, underlying disease, and comorbidities, and the value of diagnostic tools to detect IA may also differ between these patient populations. Imaging studies are important to detect IA early, but typical findings of IA in chest computed tomography of adults are not detected in the majority of children. Whereas the value of the serum marker galactomannan seems to be comparable in children and adults, data on the performance of beta-d-glucan in children are too limited for firm conclusions. PCR-based assays are a promising diagnostic approach to rapidly and reliably detect and identify Aspergillus species in various clinical samples. However, as the majority of data on PCR-based approaches has been obtained in adult patients, the value of this method in paediatric patients has not been defined to date. The present review focuses on studies of PCR-based methods to diagnose IA in immunocompromised paediatric patients. PMID:26756571

  3. Evaluation of a PCR/DNA Probe Colorimetric Membrane Assay for Identification of Campylobacter spp. in Human Stool Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Evelyn; Glennon, Maura; Hanley, Shirley; Murray, Anne-Marie; Cormican, Martin; Smith, Terry; Maher, Majella

    2001-01-01

    DNA was extracted from 50 human stool specimens using the QIAamp DNA stool minikit. PCR amplification was followed by post-PCR hybridization to DNA probes specific for the Campylobacter genus, Campylobacter jejuni, and Campylobacter coli in a colorimetric membrane assay. Thirty-two of 38 culture-positive specimens were PCR/DNA probe positive for C. jejuni. The assay is rapid and simple and can be applied to stool specimens for the detection of Campylobacter. PMID:11682549

  4. Real-time PCR assay for detection of a new simulant for poxvirus biothreat agents.

    PubMed

    Garnier, Laurence; Gaudin, Jean-Christophe; Bensadoun, Paul; Rebillat, Isabelle; Morel, Yannick

    2009-03-01

    Research and financial efforts spent on biodefense technologies highlight the current concern for biothreat event preparedness. Nonhazardous but relevant "simulant" microorganisms are typically used to simplify technological developments, testing, and staff training. The bacteriophage MS2, a small RNA virus, is classically used as the reference simulant for biothreat viruses within the biodefense community. However, variola virus, considered a major threat, displays very different features (size, envelope, and double-stranded DNA genome). The size parameter is critical for aerosol sampling, detection, and protection/filtration technologies. Therefore, a panel of relevant simulants should be used to cover the diversity of biothreat agents. Thus, we investigated a new virus model, the Cydia pomonella granulovirus (baculovirus), which is currently used as a biopesticide. It displays a size similar to that of poxviruses, is enveloped, and contains double-stranded DNA. To provide a molecular tool to detect and quantify this model virus, we developed an assay based on real-time PCR, with a limit of detection ranging from roughly 10 to a few tens of target copies per microl according to the sample matrix. The specificity of the assay against a large panel of potential cross-reactive microorganisms was checked, and the suitability of the assay for environmental samples, especially aerosol studies, was determined. In conclusion, we suggest that our PCR assay allows Cydia pomonella granulovirus to be used as a simulant for poxviruses. This assay may also be useful for environmental or crop treatment studies. PMID:19168659

  5. Measurement of the Infection and Dissemination of Bluetongue Virus in Culicoides Biting Midges Using a Semi-Quantitative RT-PCR Assay and Isolation of Infectious Virus

    PubMed Central

    Veronesi, Eva; Antony, Frank; Gubbins, Simon; Golding, Nick; Blackwell, Alison; Mertens, Peter PC.; Brownlie, Joe; Darpel, Karin E.; Mellor, Philip S.; Carpenter, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Background Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are the biological vectors of globally significant arboviruses of livestock including bluetongue virus (BTV), African horse sickness virus (AHSV) and the recently emerging Schmallenberg virus (SBV). From 2006–2009 outbreaks of BTV in northern Europe inflicted major disruption and economic losses to farmers and several attempts were made to implicate Palaearctic Culicoides species as vectors. Results from these studies were difficult to interpret as they used semi-quantitative RT-PCR (sqPCR) assays as the major diagnostic tool, a technique that had not been validated for use in this role. In this study we validate the use of these assays by carrying out time-series detection of BTV RNA in two colony species of Culicoides and compare the results with the more traditional isolation of infectious BTV on cell culture. Methodology/Principal Findings A BTV serotype 1 strain mixed with horse blood was fed to several hundred individuals of Culicoides sonorensis (Wirth & Jones) and C. nubeculosus (Mg.) using a membrane-based assay and replete individuals were then incubated at 25°C. At daily intervals 25 Culicoides of each species were removed from incubation, homogenised and BTV quantified in each individual using sqPCR (Cq values) and virus isolation on a KC-C. sonorensis embryonic cell line, followed by antigen enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In addition, comparisons were also drawn between the results obtained with whole C. sonorensis and with individually dissected individuals to determine the level of BTV dissemination. Conclusions/Significance Cq values generated from time-series infection experiments in both C. sonorensis and C. nubeculosus confirmed previous studies that relied upon the isolation and detection of infectious BTV. Implications on the testing of field-collected Culicoides as potential virus vectors by PCR assays and the use of such assays as front-line tools for use in

  6. Development and Validation of a Quantitative, One-Step, Multiplex, Real-Time Reverse Transcriptase PCR Assay for Detection of Dengue and Chikungunya Viruses.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Monika; Myers, Todd; Guevara, Carolina; Jungkind, Donald; Williams, Maya; Houng, Huo-Shu

    2016-07-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) and chikungunya virus (CHIKV) are important human pathogens with common transmission vectors and similar clinical presentations. Patient care may be impacted by the misdiagnosis of DENV and CHIKV in areas where both viruses cocirculate. In this study, we have developed and validated a one-step multiplex reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) to simultaneously detect, quantify, and differentiate between four DENV serotypes (pan-DENV) and chikungunya virus. The assay uses TaqMan technology, employing two forward primers, three reverse primers, and four fluorophore-labeled probes in a single-reaction format. Coextracted and coamplified RNA was used as an internal control (IC), and in vitro-transcribed DENV and CHIKV RNAs were used to generate standard curves for absolute quantification. The diagnostic 95% limits of detection (LOD) within the linear range were 50 and 60 RNA copies/reaction for DENV (serotypes 1 to 4) and CHIKV, respectively. Our assay was able to detect 53 different strains of DENV, representing four serotypes, and six strains of CHIKV. No cross-reactivity was observed with related flaviviruses and alphaviruses, To evaluate diagnostic sensitivity and specificity, 89 clinical samples positive or negative for DENV (serotypes 1 to 4) and CHIKV by the standard virus isolation method were tested in our assay. The multiplex RT-PCR assay showed 95% sensitivity and 100% specificity for DENV and 100% sensitivity and specificity for CHIKV. With an assay turnaround time of less than 2 h, including extraction of RNA, the multiplex quantitative RT-PCR assay provides rapid diagnosis for the differential detection of two clinically indistinguishable diseases, whose geographical occurrence is increasingly overlapping. PMID:27098955

  7. From SOMAmer-Based Biomarker Discovery to Diagnostic and Clinical Applications: A SOMAmer-Based, Streamlined Multiplex Proteomic Assay

    PubMed Central

    Kraemer, Stephan; Vaught, Jonathan D.; Bock, Christopher; Gold, Larry; Katilius, Evaldas; Keeney, Tracy R.; Kim, Nancy; Saccomano, Nicholas A.; Wilcox, Sheri K.; Zichi, Dom; Sanders, Glenn M.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, we reported a SOMAmer-based, highly multiplexed assay for the purpose of biomarker identification. To enable seamless transition from highly multiplexed biomarker discovery assays to a format suitable and convenient for diagnostic and life-science applications, we developed a streamlined, plate-based version of the assay. The plate-based version of the assay is robust, sensitive (sub-picomolar), rapid, can be highly multiplexed (upwards of 60 analytes), and fully automated. We demonstrate that quantification by microarray-based hybridization, Luminex bead-based methods, and qPCR are each compatible with our platform, further expanding the breadth of proteomic applications for a wide user community. PMID:22022604

  8. Testing the feasibility of DNA typing for human identification by PCR and an oligonucleotide ligation assay

    SciTech Connect

    Delahunty, C.; Ankener, W.; Deng, Qiang

    1996-06-01

    The use of DNA typing in human genome analysis is increasing and finding widespread application in the area of forensic and paternity testing. In this report, we explore the feasibility of typing single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) by using a semiautomated method for analyzing human DNA samples. In this approach, PCR is used to amplify segments of human DNA containing a common SNP. Allelic nucleotides in the amplified product are then typed by a calorimetric implementation of the oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA). The results of the combined assay, PCR/OLA, are read directly by a spectrophotometer; the absorbances are compiled and the genotypes are automatically determined. A panel of 20 markers has been developed for DNA typing and has been tested using a sample panel from the CEPH pedigrees (CEPH parents). The results of this typing, as well as the potential to apply this method to larger populations, are discussed. 62 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Development of a Quantitative PCR Assay for Thermophilic Spore-Forming Geobacillus stearothermophilus in Canned Food.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Miyo

    2015-01-01

    The thermophilic spore forming bacteria Geobacillus stearothermophilus is recognized as a major cause of spoilage in canned food. A quantitative real-time PCR assay was developed to specifically detect and quantify the species G. stearothermophilus in samples from canned food. The selected primer pairs amplified a 163-bp fragment of the 16S rRNA gene in a specific PCR assay with a detection limit of 12.5 fg of pure culture DNA, corresponding to DNA extracted from approximately 0.7 CFU/mL of G. stearothermophilus. Analysis showed that the bacterial species G. stearothermophilus was not detected in any canned food sample. Our approach presented here will be useful for tracking or quantifying species G. stearotethermophilus in canned food and ingredients. PMID:26412704

  10. Diagnosis of gastric cryptosporidiosis in birds using a duplex real-time PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Alex A; Homem, Camila G; da Silva, Adriana M J; Meireles, Marcelo V

    2014-09-15

    Three species and several genotypes of Cryptosporidium can infect the epithelial surface of the bursa of Fabricius, the respiratory tract, the proventriculus, the intestine, and the urinary tract in birds. There is reason to believe that gastric cryptosporidiosis in birds is caused by Cryptosporidium galli and Cryptosporidium avian genotype III, resulting in a chronic illness of the proventriculus that can lead to a debilitating and fatal clinical condition in birds of the orders Passeriformes and Psittaciformes. The objectives of the present study were to develop a duplex real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) that targets the 18S rRNA gene to simultaneously detect C. galli and Cryptosporidium avian genotype III DNA and to compare the duplex real-time PCR results to those of nested PCR targeting a partial fragment of the 18S rRNA gene, followed by sequencing of the amplified products (nPCR/S). A total of 1027 fecal samples were collected from birds of the orders Psittaciformes and Passeriformes originating either from captivity or the wild. Duplex real-time PCR results were positive in 580 (56.47%) and 21 (2.04%) samples, respectively, for C. galli and Cryptosporidium avian genotype III, whereas nPCR/S was positive in 28 (2.73%) and three (0.29%) samples, respectively, for C. galli and Cryptosporidium avian genotype III. Novel host birds were identified for both of the above gastric species, and it was also possible to identify Cryptosporidium baileyi and, for the first time in Brazil, Cryptosporidium avian genotype V. The duplex real-time PCR assay developed in the present study represents a sensitive and specific method for the detection of C. galli and Cryptosporidium avian genotype III in bird fecal samples. Moreover, this method may serve as an alternative to nPCR/S as a gold standard for the diagnosis of gastric cryptosporidiosis in birds. PMID:25155280

  11. Leishmania species: Detection and identification by nested PCR assay from skin samples of rodent reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Akhavan, Amir Ahmad; Mirhendi, Hossein; Khamesipour, Ali; Alimohammadian, Mohammad Hossein; Rassi, Yavar; Bates, Paul; Kamhawi, Shaden; Valenzuela, Jesus G.; Arandian, Mohammad Hossein; Abdoli, Hamid; Jalali-zand, Niloufar; Jafari, Reza; Shareghi, Niloufar; Ghanei, Maryam; Yaghoobi-Ershadi, Mohammad Reza

    2010-01-01

    Many rodent species act as reservoir hosts of zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis in endemic areas. In the present study a simple and reliable assay based on nested PCR was developed for the detection and identification of Leishmania parasites from rodent skin samples. We designed Leishmania-specific primers that successfully amplified ITS regions of Leishmania major, Leishmania gerbilli and Leishmania turanica using nested PCR. Out of 95 field collected Rhombomys opimus, 21 were positive by microscopic examination and 48 by nested PCR. The percentage of gerbils infected with L. major, L. gerbilli and L. turanica was 3.2%, 1.1% and 27.4%, respectively. In 15.8% of the rodents, we found mixed natural infections by L. major and L. turanica, 1.1% by L. major and L. gerbilli, and 2.1% by the three species. We concluded that this method is simple and reliable for detecting and identifying Leishmania species circulating in rodent populations. PMID:20566364

  12. Monitoring toxic Ostreopsis cf. ovata in recreational waters using a qPCR based assay.

    PubMed

    Casabianca, Silvia; Perini, Federico; Casabianca, Anna; Battocchi, Cecilia; Giussani, Valentina; Chiantore, Mariachiara; Penna, Antonella

    2014-11-15

    Ostreopsis sp. is a toxic marine benthic dinoflagellate that causes high biomass blooms, posing a threat to human health, marine biota and aquaculture activities, and negatively impacting coastal seawater quality. Species-specific identification and enumeration is fundamental because it can allow the implementation of all the necessary preventive measures to properly manage Ostreopsis spp. bloom events in recreational waters and aquaculture farms. The aim of this study was to apply a rapid and sensitive qPCR method to quantify Ostreopsis cf. ovata abundance in environmental samples collected from Mediterranean coastal sites and to develop site-specific environmental standard curves. Similar PCR efficiencies of plasmid and environmental standard curves allowed us to estimate the LSU rDNA copy number per cell. Moreover, we assessed the effectiveness of mitochondrial COI and cob genes as alternative molecular markers to ribosomal genes in qPCR assays for Ostreopsis spp. quantification. PMID:25282181

  13. New PCR diagnostic systems for the detection and quantification of porcine cytomegalovirus (PCMV).

    PubMed

    Morozov, Vladimir A; Morozov, Alexey V; Denner, Joachim

    2016-05-01

    Pigs are frequently infected with porcine cytomegalovirus (PCMV). Infected adult animals may not present with symptoms of disease, and the virus remains latent. However, the virus may be transmitted to human recipients receiving pig transplants. Recently, it was shown that pig-to-non-human-primate xenotransplantations showed 2 to 3 times lower transplant survival when the donor pig was infected with PCMV. Therefore, highly sensitive methods are required to select virus-free pigs and to examine xenotransplants. Seven previously established PCR detection systems targeting the DNA polymerase gene of PCMV were examined by comparison of thermodynamic parameters of oligonucleotides, and new diagnostic nested PCR and real-time PCR systems with improved parameters and high sensitivity were established. The detection limit of conventional PCR was estimated to be 15 copies, and that of the nested PCR was 5 copies. The sensitivity of the real-time PCR with a TaqMan probe was two copies. An equal efficiency of the newly established detection systems was shown by parallel testing of DNA from sera and blood of six pigs, identifying the same animals as PCMV infected. These new diagnostic PCR systems will improve the detection of PCMV and therefore increase the safety of porcine xenotransplants. PMID:26839086

  14. Improved HF183 quantitative real-time PCR assay for characterization of human fecal pollution in ambient surface water samples.

    PubMed

    Green, Hyatt C; Haugland, Richard A; Varma, Manju; Millen, Hana T; Borchardt, Mark A; Field, Katharine G; Walters, William A; Knight, R; Sivaganesan, Mano; Kelty, Catherine A; Shanks, Orin C

    2014-05-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assays that target the human-associated HF183 bacterial cluster within members of the genus Bacteroides are among the most widely used methods for the characterization of human fecal pollution in ambient surface waters. In this study, we show that a current TaqMan HF183 qPCR assay (HF183/BFDrev) routinely forms nonspecific amplification products and introduce a modified TaqMan assay (HF183/BacR287) that alleviates this problem. The performance of each qPCR assay was compared in head-to-head experiments investigating limits of detection, analytical precision, predicted hybridization to 16S rRNA gene sequences from a reference database, and relative marker concentrations in fecal and sewage samples. The performance of the modified HF183/BacR287 assay is equal to or improves upon that of the original HF183/BFDrev assay. In addition, a qPCR chemistry designed to combat amplification inhibition and a multiplexed internal amplification control are included. In light of the expanding use of PCR-based methods that rely on the detection of extremely low concentrations of DNA template, such as qPCR and digital PCR, the new TaqMan HF183/BacR287 assay should provide more accurate estimations of human-derived fecal contaminants in ambient surface waters. PMID:24610857

  15. Evaluation of Various Campylobacter-Specific Quantitative PCR (qPCR) Assays for Detection and Enumeration of Campylobacteraceae in Irrigation Water and Wastewater via a Miniaturized Most-Probable-Number–qPCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Banting, Graham S.; Braithwaite, Shannon; Scott, Candis; Kim, Jinyong; Jeon, Byeonghwa; Ashbolt, Nicholas; Ruecker, Norma; Tymensen, Lisa; Charest, Jollin; Pintar, Katarina; Checkley, Sylvia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Campylobacter spp. are the leading cause of bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide, and water is increasingly seen as a risk factor in transmission. Here we describe a most-probable-number (MPN)–quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay in which water samples are centrifuged and aliquoted into microtiter plates and the bacteria are enumerated by qPCR. We observed that commonly used Campylobacter molecular assays produced vastly different detection rates. In irrigation water samples, detection rates varied depending upon the PCR assay and culture method used, as follows: 0% by the de Boer Lv1-16S qPCR assay, 2.5% by the Van Dyke 16S and Jensen glyA qPCR assays, and 75% by the Linton 16S endpoint PCR when cultured at 37°C. Primer/probe specificity was the major confounder, with Arcobacter spp. routinely yielding false-positive results. The primers and PCR conditions described by Van Dyke et al. (M. I. Van Dyke, V. K. Morton, N. L. McLellan, and P. M. Huck, J Appl Microbiol 109:1053–1066, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2672.2010.04730.x) proved to be the most sensitive and specific for Campylobacter detection in water. Campylobacter occurrence in irrigation water was found to be very low (<2 MPN/300 ml) when this Campylobacter-specific qPCR was used, with the most commonly detected species being C. jejuni, C. coli, and C. lari. Campylobacters in raw sewage were present at ∼102/100 ml, with incubation at 42°C required for reducing microbial growth competition from arcobacters. Overall, when Campylobacter prevalence and/or concentration in water is reported using molecular methods, considerable validation is recommended when adapting methods largely developed for clinical applications. Furthermore, combining MPN methods with molecular biology-based detection algorithms allows for the detection and quantification of Campylobacter spp. in environmental samples and is potentially suited to quantitative microbial risk assessment for improved public health disease

  16. A New Real-Time PCR Assay for Improved Detection of the Parasite Babesia microti

    PubMed Central

    Teal, Allen E.; Habura, Andrea; Ennis, Jill; Keithly, Janet S.

    2012-01-01

    Babesiosis is an emerging zoonosis with important public health implications, as the incidence of the disease has risen dramatically over the past decade. Because the current gold standard for detection of Babesia is microscopic examination of blood smears, accurate identification requires trained personnel. Species in the genus cannot be distinguished microscopically, and Babesia can also be confused with the early trophozoite stage (ring forms) of Plasmodium parasites. To allow more accurate diagnosis in a format that is accessible to a wider variety of laboratories, we developed a real-time PCR assay targeting the 18S rRNA gene of Babesia microti, the dominant babesiosis pathogen in the United States. The real-time PCR is performed on DNA extracted from whole-blood specimens and detects Babesia microti with a limit of detection of ∼100 gene copies in 5 μl of blood. The real-time PCR assay was shown to be 100% specific when tested against a panel of 24 organisms consisting of Babesia microti, other Babesia species, Plasmodium species, tick-borne and other pathogenic bacteria, and other blood-borne parasites. The results using clinical specimens show that the assay can detect infections of lower parasitemia than can be detected by microscopic examination. This method is therefore a rapid, sensitive, and accurate method for detection of Babesia microti in patient specimens. PMID:22170915

  17. Multilocus PCR Assays Elucidate Vegetative Incompatibility Gene Profiles of Cryphonectria parasitica in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Short, Dylan P. G.; Double, Mark; Nuss, Donald L.; Stauder, Cameron M.; MacDonald, William

    2015-01-01

    Chestnut blight is a devastating disease of Castanea spp. Mycoviruses that reduce virulence (hypovirulence) of the causative agent, Cryphonectria parasitica, can be used to manage chestnut blight. However, vegetative incompatibility (vic) barriers that restrict anastomosis-mediated virus transmission hamper hypovirulence efficacy. In order to effectively determine the vegetative incompatibility genetic structure of C. parasitica field populations, we have designed PCR primer sets that selectively amplify and distinguish alleles for each of the six known diallelic C. parasitica vic genetic loci. PCR assay results were validated using a panel of 64 European tester strains with genetically determined vic genotypes. Analysis of 116 C. parasitica isolates collected from five locations in the eastern United States revealed 39 unique vic genotypes and generally good agreement between PCR and tester strain coculturing assays in terms of vic diversity and genotyping. However, incongruences were observed for isolates from multiple locations and suggested that the coculturing assay can overestimate diversity at the six known vic loci. The availability of molecular tools for rapid and precise vic genotyping significantly improves the ability to predict and evaluate the efficacy of hypovirulence and related management strategies. PMID:26070681

  18. Rapid Simultaneous Detection of Enterovirus and Parechovirus RNAs in Clinical Samples by One-Step Real-Time Reverse Transcription-PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Susan; Harvala, Heli; Witteveldt, Jeroen; McWilliam Leitch, E. Carol; McLeish, Nigel; Templeton, Kate; Gunson, Rory; Carman, William F.; Simmonds, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Enteroviruses (EVs) are recognized as the major etiological agent in meningitis in children and young adults. The use of molecular techniques, such as PCR, has substantially improved the sensitivity of enterovirus detection compared to that of virus culture methods. PCR-based methods also can detect a much wider range of EV variants, including those within species A, as well as human parechoviruses (HPeVs) that often grow poorly in vitro and which previously have been underdiagnosed by traditional methods. To exploit these developments, we developed a real-time one-step reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) for the rapid and sensitive detection of EV and HPeV in clinical specimens. Two commercially available RT-PCR kits were used (method I, Platinum one-step kit; method II, Express qPCR one-step kit) with primers and probes targeting the EV and HPeV 5′-untranslated regions (5′UTR). Amplification dynamics (threshold cycle [CT]values and efficiencies) of absolutely quantified full-length RNA transcripts representative of EV species A to D and HPeV were similar, demonstrating the effectiveness of both assays across the range of currently described human EV and HPeV variants. Probit analysis of multiple endpoint replicates demonstrated comparable sensitivities of the assays for EV and HPeV (method I, approximately 10 copies per reaction for both targets; method II, 20 copies per reaction). CT values were highly reproducible on repeat testing of positive controls within assays and between assay runs. Considering the sample turnaround time of less than 3 h, the multiplexed one-step RT-PCR method provides rapid diagnostic testing for EV and HPeV in cases of suspected central nervous system infections in a clinically relevant time frame. PMID:21593263

  19. A multiplex RT-PCR assay for detection and differentiation of avian H3, H5, and H9 subtype influenza viruses and Newcastle disease viruses.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qingdong; Wang, Jinliang; Bao, Jingnan; Sun, Honglei; Sun, Yipeng; Liu, Jinhua; Pu, Juan

    2012-05-01

    Avian influenza viruses (AIVs) and Newcastle disease viruses (NDVs) co-circulate in the poultry population in China. These viruses cause repeated disease outbreaks that exhibit similar clinical symptoms and epidemiological patterns. H5 and H9 influenza viruses are the major pathogens infecting poultry stocks. Recently, H3 AIV (one of the main subtypes in waterfowl) has become endemic in chickens. A multiplex reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (mRT-PCR) assay was designed for simultaneous detection and differentiation of avian H3, H5, H9 subtype AIVs and NDVs. Four primer sets were evaluated, three of which specifically targeted the hemagglutinin genes of H3, H5 and H9 AIVs, while the other targeted the NDV fusion gene. The sensitivity and specificity of the mRT-PCR assay was determined. The assay detected the major clades or genotypes of all of the reference AIVs and NDVs currently circulating in China. In addition, the mRT-PCR results obtained from screening 380 clinical swabs and 12 experimental tracheal samples were consistent with those obtained using conventional virus isolation methods. The mRT-PCR assay was established successfully for the detection and differentiation of avian H3, H5, and H9 subtype AIVs and NDVs. The method should, therefore, provide a valuable diagnostic tool for these infections. PMID:22387341

  20. Diagnostic Assays for Polyomavirus JC and Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    White, Martyn K.; Sariyer, Ilker K.; Gordon, Jennifer; Delbue, Serena; Pietropaolo, Valeria; Berger, Joseph R.; Khalili, Kamel

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a devastating and often fatal demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) for which effective therapies are lacking. It is caused by the replication of polyomavirus JC (JCV) in the oligodendrocytes and astrocytes leading to their cytolytic death and loss of myelin from the subcortical white matter. While the virus is very common in human populations worldwide, the incidence of the disease is very low and confined almost exclusively to individuals with some form of immunological dysfunction. However, the number of people who constitute the at-risk population is growing larger and includes individuals with HIV-1/AIDS and patients receiving immunomodulatory therapies such as multiple sclerosis patients treated with natalizumab. Further adding to the public health significance of this disease are the difficulties encountered in the diagnosis of PML and the lack of useful biomarkers for PML progression. In this review, we examine the diagnostic assays that are available for different aspects of the JCV life cycle, their usefulness and drawbacks, and the prospects for improvements. PMID:26663440

  1. Development of a Real-Time PCR Assay To Detect Treponema pallidum in Clinical Specimens and Assessment of the Assay's Performance by Comparison with Serological Testing▿

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, David E.; Azzato, Franca; Karapanagiotidis, Theo; Leydon, Jennie; Fyfe, Janet

    2007-01-01

    The incidence of infectious syphilis in men who have sex with men and human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients has increased steadily in Victoria, Australia, since 2002. A TaqMan real-time PCR assay targeting the polA gene of Treponema pallidum (TpPCR) was developed. The analytical sensitivity of the assay was estimated to be 1.75 target copies per reaction. Initially, the assay was used to test a variety of specimens (excluding blood) from 598 patients. Of the 660 tests performed, positive PCR results were obtained for 55 patients. TpPCR results were compared with serology results for 301 patients being investigated for early syphilis. Of these patients, 41 were positive by both TpPCR and serology, 246 were negative by both TpPCR and serology, 4 were TpPCR positive but negative by serology, and 10 were TpPCR negative but showed evidence of recent or active infection by serology. Directly compared with serology, TpPCR showed 95% agreement, with a sensitivity of 80.39% and a specificity of 98.40%. Potential factors leading to the discrepant results are discussed. Concurrent serology on 21 patients with TpPCR-positive primary syphilitic lesions demonstrated that a panel of current syphilis serological tests has high sensitivity for the detection of early syphilis. We found that TpPCR is a useful addition to serology for the diagnosis of infectious syphilis. Direct comparison with other T. pallidum PCR assays will be required to fully assess the limitations of the assay. PMID:17065262

  2. Rapid detection of west nile virus from human clinical specimens, field-collected mosquitoes, and avian samples by a TaqMan reverse transcriptase-PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Lanciotti, R S; Kerst, A J; Nasci, R S; Godsey, M S; Mitchell, C J; Savage, H M; Komar, N; Panella, N A; Allen, B C; Volpe, K E; Davis, B S; Roehrig, J T

    2000-11-01

    The authors report on the development and application of a rapid TaqMan assay for the detection of West Nile (WN) virus in a variety of human clinical specimens and field-collected specimens. Oligonucleotide primers and FAM- and TAMRA-labeled WN virus-specific probes were designed by using the nucleotide sequence of the New York 1999 WN virus isolate. The TaqMan assay was compared to a traditional reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR assay and to virus isolation in Vero cells with a large number ( approximately 500) of specimens obtained from humans (serum, cerebrospinal fluid, and brain tissue), field-collected mosquitoes, and avian tissue samples. The TaqMan assay was specific for WN virus and demonstrated a greater sensitivity than the traditional RT-PCR method and correctly identified WN virus in 100% of the culture-positive mosquito pools and 98% of the culture-positive avian tissue samples. The assay should be of utility in the diagnostic laboratory to complement existing human diagnostic testing and as a tool to conduct WN virus surveillance in the United States. PMID:11060069

  3. Detection of mandarin in orange juice by single-nucleotide polymorphism qPCR assay.

    PubMed

    Aldeguer, Miriam; López-Andreo, María; Gabaldón, José A; Puyet, Antonio

    2014-02-15

    A dual-probe real time PCR (qPCR) DNA-based analysis was devised for the identification of mandarin in orange juice. A single nucleotide polymorphism at the trnL-trnF intergenic region of the chloroplast chromosome was confirmed in nine orange (Citrus sinensis) and thirteen commercial varieties of mandarin, including Citrus reticulata and Citrus unshiu species and a mandarin × tangelo hybrid. Two short minor-groove binding fluorescent probes targeting the polymorphic sequence were used in the dual-probe qPCR, which allowed the detection of both species in single-tube reactions. The similarity of PCR efficiencies allowed a simple estimation of the ratio mandarin/orange in the juice samples, which correlated to the measured difference of threshold cycle values for both probes. The limit of detection of the assay was 5% of mandarin in orange juice, both when the juice was freshly prepared (not from concentrate) or reconstituted from concentrate, which would allow the detection of fraudulently added mandarin juice. The possible use of the dual-probe system for quantitative measurements was also tested on fruit juice mixtures. qPCR data obtained from samples containing equal amounts of mandarin and orange juice revealed that the mandarin target copy number was approximately 2.6-fold higher than in orange juice. The use of a matrix-adapted control as calibrator to compensate the resulting C(T) bias allowed accurate quantitative measurements to be obtained. PMID:24128588

  4. Edesign: Primer and Enhanced Internal Probe Design Tool for Quantitative PCR Experiments and Genotyping Assays

    PubMed Central

    Kasahara, Naoko; Delobel, Diane; Hanami, Takeshi; Tanaka, Yuki; de Hoon, Michiel J. L.; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Usui, Kengo; Harbers, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Analytical PCR experiments preferably use internal probes for monitoring the amplification reaction and specific detection of the amplicon. Such internal probes have to be designed in close context with the amplification primers, and may require additional considerations for the detection of genetic variations. Here we describe Edesign, a new online and stand-alone tool for designing sets of PCR primers together with an internal probe for conducting quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and genotypic experiments. Edesign can be used for selecting standard DNA oligonucleotides like for instance TaqMan probes, but has been further extended with new functions and enhanced design features for Eprobes. Eprobes, with their single thiazole orange-labelled nucleotide, allow for highly sensitive genotypic assays because of their higher DNA binding affinity as compared to standard DNA oligonucleotides. Using new thermodynamic parameters, Edesign considers unique features of Eprobes during primer and probe design for establishing qPCR experiments and genotyping by melting curve analysis. Additional functions in Edesign allow probe design for effective discrimination between wild-type sequences and genetic variations either using standard DNA oligonucleotides or Eprobes. Edesign can be freely accessed online at http://www.dnaform.com/edesign2/, and the source code is available for download. PMID:26863543

  5. A real-time RT-PCR assay for rapid detection of coxsackievirus A10.

    PubMed

    Mu, C Y; Wang, A Y; Chen, C; Zhao, L; Li, Z

    2015-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) and coxsackievirus A16 (CA16) have been the primary causative agents of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) outbreaks in mainland China in the past. Hence, the surveillance of HFMD has mostly focused on these viruses. However, in recent years, coxsackievirus A10 (CA10) has also been associated with the increasing sporadic HFMD cases and outbreaks. Therefore, a sensitive assay for rapid detection of the CA10 RNA is necessary for disease control. Here, we have developed a specific TaqMan real-time RT-PCR assay by analyzing VP1 gene sequences of CA10 strains from different locations. The assay has been shown to be specific, sensitive, and robust through detection of other related viruses, standard curves, and clinical samples, respectively. This is the first report on development of a VP1 gene-based TaqMan real-time RT-PCR assay for rapid diagnosis of CA10 virus. PMID:26782393

  6. Real-Time PCR Assay for a Unique Chromosomal Sequence of Bacillus anthracis

    PubMed Central

    Bode, Elizabeth; Hurtle, William; Norwood, David

    2004-01-01

    Real-time PCR has become an important method for the rapid identification of Bacillus anthracis since the 2001 anthrax mailings. Most real-time PCR assays for B. anthracis have been developed to detect virulence genes located on the pXO1 and pXO2 plasmids. In contrast, only two published chromosomal targets exist, the rpoB gene and the gyrA gene. In the present study, subtraction-hybridization with a plasmid-cured B. anthracis tester strain and a Bacillus cereus driver was used to find a unique chromosomal sequence. By targeting this region, a real-time assay was developed with the Ruggedized Advanced Pathogen Identification Device. Further testing has revealed that the assay has 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity, with a limit of detection of 50 fg of DNA. The results of a search for sequences with homology with the BLAST program demonstrated significant alignment to the recently published B. anthracis Ames strain, while an inquiry for protein sequence similarities indicated homology with an abhydrolase from B. anthracis strain A2012. The importance of this chromosomal assay will be to verify the presence of B. anthracis independently of plasmid occurrence. PMID:15583318

  7. Evaluation of four endogenous reference genes and their real-time PCR assays for common wheat quantification in GMOs detection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huali; Cheng, Fang; Wang, Ruoan; Zhang, Dabing; Yang, Litao

    2013-01-01

    Proper selection of endogenous reference genes and their real-time PCR assays is quite important in genetically modified organisms (GMOs) detection. To find a suitable endogenous reference gene and its real-time PCR assay for common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) DNA content or copy number quantification, four previously reported wheat endogenous reference genes and their real-time PCR assays were comprehensively evaluated for the target gene sequence variation and their real-time PCR performance among 37 common wheat lines. Three SNPs were observed in the PKABA1 and ALMT1 genes, and these SNPs significantly decreased the efficiency of real-time PCR amplification. GeNorm analysis of the real-time PCR performance of each gene among common wheat lines showed that the Waxy-D1 assay had the lowest M values with the best stability among all tested lines. All results indicated that the Waxy-D1 gene and its real-time PCR assay were most suitable to be used as an endogenous reference gene for common wheat DNA content quantification. The validated Waxy-D1 gene assay will be useful in establishing accurate and creditable qualitative and quantitative PCR analysis of GM wheat. PMID:24098735

  8. Evaluation of Four Endogenous Reference Genes and Their Real-Time PCR Assays for Common Wheat Quantification in GMOs Detection

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Huali; Cheng, Fang; Wang, Ruoan; Zhang, Dabing; Yang, Litao

    2013-01-01

    Proper selection of endogenous reference genes and their real-time PCR assays is quite important in genetically modified organisms (GMOs) detection. To find a suitable endogenous reference gene and its real-time PCR assay for common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) DNA content or copy number quantification, four previously reported wheat endogenous reference genes and their real-time PCR assays were comprehensively evaluated for the target gene sequence variation and their real-time PCR performance among 37 common wheat lines. Three SNPs were observed in the PKABA1 and ALMT1 genes, and these SNPs significantly decreased the efficiency of real-time PCR amplification. GeNorm analysis of the real-time PCR performance of each gene among common wheat lines showed that the Waxy-D1 assay had the lowest M values with the best stability among all tested lines. All results indicated that the Waxy-D1 gene and its real-time PCR assay were most suitable to be used as an endogenous reference gene for common wheat DNA content quantification. The validated Waxy-D1 gene assay will be useful in establishing accurate and creditable qualitative and quantitative PCR analysis of GM wheat. PMID:24098735

  9. Monitoring Acidophilic Microbes with Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) Assays

    SciTech Connect

    Frank F. Roberto

    2008-08-01

    Many techniques that are used to characterize and monitor microbial populations associated with sulfide mineral bioleaching require the cultivation of the organisms on solid or liquid media. Chemolithotrophic species, such as Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Leptospirillum ferrooxidans, or thermophilic chemolithotrophs, such as Acidianus brierleyi and Sulfolobus solfataricus can grow quite slowly, requiring weeks to complete efforts to identify and quantify these microbes associated with bioleach samples. Real-time PCR (polymerase chain reaction) assays in which DNA targets are amplified in the presence of fluorescent oligonucleotide primers, allowing the monitoring and quantification of the amplification reactions as they progress, provide a means of rapidly detecting the presence of microbial species of interest, and their relative abundance in a sample. This presentation will describe the design and use of such assays to monitor acidophilic microbes in the environment and in bioleaching operations. These assays provide results within 2-3 hours, and can detect less than 100 individual microbial cells.

  10. Multiplex PCR assay for the detection of five meat species forbidden in Islamic foods.

    PubMed

    Ali, Md Eaqub; Razzak, Md Abdur; Hamid, Sharifah Bee Abd; Rahman, Md Mahfujur; Amin, Md Al; Rashid, Nur Raifana Abd; Asing

    2015-06-15

    Food falsification has direct impact on public health, religious faith, fair-trades and wildlife. For the first time, here we described a multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay for the accurate identification of five meat species forbidden in Islamic foods in a single assay platform. Five pairs of species-specific primers were designed targeting mitochondrial ND5, ATPase 6, and cytochrome b genes to amplify 172, 163, 141, 129 and 108 bp DNA fragments from cat, dog, pig, monkey and rat meats, respectively. All PCR products were identified in gel-images and electrochromatograms obtained from Experion Bioanalyzer. Species-specificity checking against 15 important meat and fish and 5 plant species detected no cross-species amplification. Screening of target species in model and commercial meatballs reflected its application to detect target species in process foods. The assay was tested to detect 0.01-0.02 ng DNA under raw states and 1% suspected meats in meatball formulation. PMID:25660879

  11. Advances in Microfluidic PCR for Point-of-Care Infectious Disease Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seungkyung; Zhang, Yi; Lin, Shin; Wang, Tza-Huei; Yang, Samuel

    2011-01-01

    Global burdens from existing or emerging infectious diseases emphasize the need for point-of-care (POC) diagnostics to enhance timely recognition and intervention. Molecular approaches based on PCR methods have made significant inroads by improving detection time and accuracy but are still largely hampered by resource-intensive processing in centralized laboratories, thereby precluding their routine bedside- or field-use. Microfluidic technologies have enabled miniaturization of PCR processes onto a chip device with potential benefits including speed, cost, portability, throughput, and automation. In this review, we provide an overview of recent advances in microfluidic PCR technologies and discuss practical issues and perspectives related to implementing them into infectious disease diagnostics. PMID:21741465

  12. Real time RT-PCR assays for detection and typing of African horse sickness virus.

    PubMed

    Bachanek-Bankowska, Katarzyna; Maan, Sushila; Castillo-Olivares, Javier; Manning, Nicola M; Maan, Narender Singh; Potgieter, Abraham C; Di Nardo, Antonello; Sutton, Geoff; Batten, Carrie; Mertens, Peter P C

    2014-01-01

    Although African horse sickness (AHS) can cause up to 95% mortality in horses, naïve animals can be protected by vaccination against the homologous AHSV serotype. Genome segment 2 (Seg-2) encodes outer capsid protein VP2, the most variable of the AHSV proteins. VP2 is also a primary target for AHSV specific neutralising antibodies, and consequently determines the identity of the nine AHSV serotypes. In contrast VP1 (the viral polymerase) and VP3 (the sub-core shell protein), encoded by Seg-1 and Seg-3 respectively, are highly conserved, representing virus species/orbivirus-serogroup-specific antigens. We report development and evaluation of real-time RT-PCR assays targeting AHSV Seg-1 or Seg-3, that can detect any AHSV type (virus species/serogroup-specific assays), as well as type-specific assays targeting Seg-2 of the nine AHSV serotypes. These assays were evaluated using isolates of different AHSV serotypes and other closely related orbiviruses, from the 'Orbivirus Reference Collection' (ORC) at The Pirbright Institute. The assays were shown to be AHSV virus-species-specific, or type-specific (as designed) and can be used for rapid, sensitive and reliable detection and identification (typing) of AHSV RNA in infected blood, tissue samples, homogenised Culicoides, or tissue culture supernatant. None of the assays amplified cDNAs from closely related heterologous orbiviruses, or from uninfected host animals or cell cultures. PMID:24721971

  13. A multiplex-PCR assay for identification of the quarantine plant pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli.

    PubMed

    Boureau, T; Kerkoud, M; Chhel, F; Hunault, G; Darrasse, A; Brin, C; Durand, K; Hajri, A; Poussier, S; Manceau, C; Lardeux, F; Saubion, F; Jacques, M-A

    2013-01-01

    In this study we developed an algorithm to screen for all exact molecular signatures of the quarantine pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli (Xap), based on available data of the presence or absence of virulence-associated genes. The simultaneous presence of genes avrBsT and xopL is specific to Xap. Therefore we developed a multiplex PCR assay targeting avrBsT and xopL for the molecular identification of Xap. The specificity of this multiplex was validated by comparison to that of other molecular identification assays aimed at Xap, on a wide collection of reference strains. This multiplex was further validated on a blind collection of Xanthomonas isolates for which pathogenicity was assayed by stem wounding and by dipping leaves into calibrated inocula. This multiplex was combined to the previously described X4c/X4e molecular identification assay for Xap. Such a combination enables the molecular identification of all strains of Xanthomonas pathogenic on bean. Results also show that assay by stem wounding does not give reliable results in the case of Xap, and that pathogenicity assays by dipping should be preferred. PMID:23142341

  14. Rapid quantification of Salmonella in seafood by real-time PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh; Surendran, P K; Thampuran, Nirmala

    2010-03-01

    A quantitative detection method for Salmonella in seafood was developed using a SYBR Green-based real-time PCR assay. The assay was developed using pure Salmonella DNA at different dilution levels [i.e., 1,000 to 2 genome equivalents (GE)]. The sensitivity of the real-time assay for Salmonella in seeded seafood samples was determined, and the minimum detection level was 20 CFU/g, whereas a detection level of 2 CFU/ml was obtained for pure culture in water with an efficiency of > or =85%. The real-time assay was evaluated in repeated experiments with seeded seafood samples and the regression coefficient (R(2)) values were calculated. The performance of the real-time assay was further assessed with naturally contaminated seafood samples, where 4 out of 9 seafood samples tested positive for Salmonella and harbored cells <100 GE/g, which were not detected by direct plating on Salmonella Chromagar media. Thus, the method developed here will be useful for the rapid quantification of Salmonella in seafood, as the assay can be completed within 2-3 h. In addition, with the ability to detect a low number of Salmonella cells in seafood, this proposed method can be used to generate quantitative data on Salmonella in seafood, facilitating the implementation of control measures for Salmonella contamination in seafood at harvest and post-harvest levels. PMID:20372029

  15. Evaluation of a commercially developed semiautomated PCR-surface-enhanced raman scattering assay for diagnosis of invasive fungal disease.

    PubMed

    White, P Lewis; Hibbitts, Samantha J; Perry, Michael D; Green, Julie; Stirling, Emma; Woodford, Luke; McNay, Graeme; Stevenson, Ross; Barnes, Rosemary A

    2014-10-01

    Nonculture-based tests are gaining popularity in the diagnosis of invasive fungal disease (IFD), but PCR is excluded from disease-defining criteria because of limited standardization and a lack of commercial assays. Commercial PCR assays may have a standardized methodology while providing quality assurance. The detection of PCR products by a surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) assay potentially provides superior analytical sensitivity and multiplexing capacity compared to that of real-time PCR. Using this approach, the RenDx Fungiplex assay was developed to detect Candida and Aspergillus. Analytical and clinical evaluations of the assay were undertaken using extraction methods according to European Aspergillus PCR Initiative (EAPCRI) recommendations. A total of 195 previously extracted samples (133 plasma, 49 serum, and 13 whole blood) from 112 patients (29 with proven/probable IFD) were tested. The 95% limit of detection of Candida and Aspergillus was 200 copies per reaction, with an overall reproducibility of 92.1% for detecting 20 input copies per PCR, and 89.8% for the nucleic acid extraction-PCR-SERS process for detecting fungal burdens of <20 genome equivalents per sample. A clinical evaluation showed that assay positivity significantly correlated with IFD (P < 0.0001). The sensitivity of the assay was 82.8% and was similar for both Candida (80.0%) and Aspergillus (85.7%). The specificity was 87.5% and was increased (97.5%) by using a multiple (≥ 2 samples) PCR-positive threshold. In summary, the RenDx Fungiplex assay is a PCR-SERS assay for diagnosing IFD and demonstrates promising clinical performance on a variety of samples. This was a retrospective clinical evaluation, and performance is likely to be enhanced through a prospective analysis of clinical validity and by determining clinical utility. PMID:25031443

  16. FungiQuant: A broad-coverage fungal quantitative real-time PCR assay

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Fungal load quantification is a critical component of fungal community analyses. Limitation of current approaches for quantifying the fungal component in the human microbiome suggests the need for new broad-coverage techniques. Methods We analyzed 2,085 18S rRNA gene sequences from the SILVA database for assay design. We generated and quantified plasmid standards using a qPCR-based approach. We evaluated assay coverage against 4,968 sequences and performed assay validation following the Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Real-Time PCR Experiments (MIQE) guidelines. Results We designed FungiQuant, a TaqMan® qPCR assay targeting a 351 bp region in the fungal 18S rRNA gene. Our in silico analysis showed that FungiQuant is a perfect sequence match to 90.0% of the 2,617 fungal species analyzed. We showed that FungiQuant’s is 100% sensitive and its amplification efficiencies ranged from 76.3% to 114.5%, with r2-values of >0.99 against the 69 fungal species tested. Additionally, FungiQuant inter- and intra-run coefficients of variance ranged from <10% and <20%, respectively. We further showed that FungiQuant has a limit of quantification 25 copies and a limit of detection at 5 copies. Lastly, by comparing results from human-only background DNA with low-level fungal DNA, we showed that amplification in two or three of a FungiQuant performed in triplicate is statistically significant for true positive fungal detection. Conclusions FungiQuant has comprehensive coverage against diverse fungi and is a robust quantification and detection tool for delineating between true fungal detection and non-target human DNA. PMID:23136846

  17. A Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay for Screening Gypsy Moths (Lepidoptera: Erebidae) in the United States for Evidence of an Asian Genotype.

    PubMed

    Islam, M S; Barr, N B; Braswell, W E; Martinez, M; Ledezma, L A; Molongoski, J; Mastro, V; Schuenzel, E L

    2015-10-01

    European gypsy moth populations (Lymantria dispar L.) are well established and a proven destructive force in hardwood trees throughout the United States and Canada. Introduction of the exotic Asian gypsy moth into North America would be even more impactful, as Asian gypsy moth populations have wider host ranges, and are capable of naturally dispersing more rapidly due to female flight ability. To support early detection and exclusion of Asian gypsy moth, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) uses molecular techniques to screen moths trapped in North America for evidence of common Asian genotype. In order to strengthen U.S. domestic capacity to screen moths quickly and efficiently, we report a real-time PCR assay for this pest. A probe system using TaqMan 5' nuclease chemistry is reported for detection of an allele associated with common Asian gypsy moth genotypes. The targeted allele is located at the nuclear FS1 locus currently used by the USDA in conventional PCR tests to screen for evidence of Asian gypsy moth introductions or introgression. The diagnostic probe is successfully multiplexed with a conserved 18S probe system to detect reaction failure due to poor sample quality or quantity. The specificity, sensitivity, and repeatability of the FS1-18S multiplex real-time PCR assay were tested on laboratory-reared and field-collected moths to demonstrate diagnostic utility. Implications of the new assay as a screening tool for evidence of Asian gypsy moth introgression and introduction are discussed. PMID:26453734

  18. A TaqMan-based multiplex real-time PCR assay for the simultaneous detection of Wuchereria bancrofti and Brugia malayi.

    PubMed

    Pilotte, N; Torres, M; Tomaino, F R; Laney, S J; Williams, S A

    2013-05-01

    With the Global Program for the Elimination of Lymphatic Filariasis continuing to make strides towards disease eradication, many locations endemic for the causative parasites of lymphatic filariasis are realizing a substantial decrease in levels of infection and rates of disease transmission. However, with measures of disease continuing to decline, the need for time-saving and economical molecular diagnostic assays capable of detecting low levels of parasite presence is increasing. This need is greatest in locations co-endemic for both Wuchereria bancrofti and Brugia parasites because testing for both causative agents individually results in significant increases in labor and reagent costs. Here we describe a multiplex, TaqMan-based, real-time PCR assay capable of simultaneously detecting W. bancrofti and Brugia malayi DNA extracted from human bloodspots or vector mosquito pools. With comparable sensitivity to established singleplex assays, this assay provides significant cost and labor savings for disease monitoring efforts in co-endemic locations. PMID:23669148

  19. The IRIDICA PCR/Electrospray Ionization–Mass Spectrometry Assay on Bronchoalveolar Lavage for Bacterial Etiology in Mechanically Ventilated Patients with Suspected Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Ehn, Fredrik; Giske, Christian G.; Ullberg, Måns; Hedlund, Jonas; Petersson, Johan; Spindler, Carl; Özenci, Volkan

    2016-01-01

    We studied the diagnostic performance of the IRIDICA PCR/electrospray ionization–mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS) assay applied on bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples, from 51 mechanically ventilated patients with suspected pneumonia, in a prospective study. In 32 patients with X-ray verified pneumonia, PCR/ESI-MS was positive in 66% and BAL culture was positive in 38% (p = 0.045), and either of the methods was positive in 69%. The following BAL result combinations were noted: PCR/ESI-MS+/culture+, 34%; PCR/ESI-MS+/culture-, 31%; PCR/ESI-MS-/culture+, 3.1%; PCR/ESI-MS-/culture-, 31%; kappa 0.36 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.10–0.63). In pneumonia patients without prior antibiotic treatment, optimal agreement was noted with 88% PCR/ESI-MS+/culture+ and 12% PCR/ESI-MS-/culture- (kappa 1.0). However, in patients with prior antibiotic treatment, the test agreement was poor (kappa 0.16; 95% CI, -0.10–0.44), as 10 patients were PCR/ESI-MS+/culture-. In 8/10 patients the pathogens detected by PCR/ESI-MS could be detected by other conventional tests or PCR tests on BAL. Compared with BAL culture, PCR/ESI-MS showed specificities and negative predictive values of ≥87% for all individual pathogens, an overall sensitivity of 77% and positive predictive value (PPV) of 42%. When other conventional tests and PCR tests were added to the reference standard, the overall PPV increased to 87%. The PCR/ESI-MS semi-quantitative level tended to be higher for PCR/ESI-MS positive cases with pneumonia compared with cases without pneumonia (p = 0.074). In conclusion, PCR/ESI-MS applied on BAL showed a promising performance and has potential to be clinically useful in mechanically ventilated patients with suspected pneumonia. The usefulness of the method for establishment of pneumonia etiology and selection of antibiotic therapy should be further studied. PMID:27463099

  20. Novel Luminex Assay for Telomere Repeat Mass Does Not Show Well Position Effects Like qPCR

    PubMed Central

    Jasmine, Farzana; Roy, Shantanu; Ahsan, Habibul; Pierce, Brandon L.

    2016-01-01

    Telomere length is a potential biomarker of aging and risk for age-related diseases. For measurement of relative telomere repeat mass (TRM), qPCR is typically used primarily due to its low cost and low DNA input. But the position of the sample on a plate often impacts the qPCR-based TRM measurement. Recently we developed a novel, probe-based Luminex assay for TRM that requires ~50ng DNA and involves no DNA amplification. Here we report, for the first time, a comparison among TRM measurements obtained from (a) two singleplex qPCR assays (using two different primer sets), (b) a multiplex qPCR assay, and (c) our novel Luminex assay. Our comparison is focused on characterizing the effects of sample positioning on TRM measurement. For qPCR, DNA samples from two individuals (K and F) were placed in 48 wells of a 96-well plate. For each singleplex qPCR assay, we used two plates (one for Telomere and one for Reference gene). For the multiplex qPCR and the Luminex assay, the telomere and the reference genes were assayed from the same well. The coefficient of variation (CV) of the TRM for Luminex (7.2 to 8.4%) was consistently lower than singleplex qPCR (11.4 to 14.9%) and multiplex qPCR (19.7 to 24.3%). In all three qPCR assays the DNA samples in the left- and right-most columns showed significantly lower TRM than the samples towards the center, which was not the case for the Luminex assay (p = 0.83). For singleplex qPCR, 30.5% of the variation in TL was explained by column-to-column variation and 0.82 to 27.9% was explained by sample-to-sample variation. In contrast, only 5.8% of the variation in TRM for the Luminex assay was explained by column-to column variation and 50.4% was explained by sample-to-sample variation. Our novel Luminex assay for TRM had good precision and did not show the well position effects of the sample that were seen in all three of the qPCR assays that were tested. PMID:27182778

  1. Novel Luminex Assay for Telomere Repeat Mass Does Not Show Well Position Effects Like qPCR.

    PubMed

    Kibriya, Muhammad G; Jasmine, Farzana; Roy, Shantanu; Ahsan, Habibul; Pierce, Brandon L

    2016-01-01

    Telomere length is a potential biomarker of aging and risk for age-related diseases. For measurement of relative telomere repeat mass (TRM), qPCR is typically used primarily due to its low cost and low DNA input. But the position of the sample on a plate often impacts the qPCR-based TRM measurement. Recently we developed a novel, probe-based Luminex assay for TRM that requires ~50ng DNA and involves no DNA amplification. Here we report, for the first time, a comparison among TRM measurements obtained from (a) two singleplex qPCR assays (using two different primer sets), (b) a multiplex qPCR assay, and (c) our novel Luminex assay. Our comparison is focused on characterizing the effects of sample positioning on TRM measurement. For qPCR, DNA samples from two individuals (K and F) were placed in 48 wells of a 96-well plate. For each singleplex qPCR assay, we used two plates (one for Telomere and one for Reference gene). For the multiplex qPCR and the Luminex assay, the telomere and the reference genes were assayed from the same well. The coefficient of variation (CV) of the TRM for Luminex (7.2 to 8.4%) was consistently lower than singleplex qPCR (11.4 to 14.9%) and multiplex qPCR (19.7 to 24.3%). In all three qPCR assays the DNA samples in the left- and right-most columns showed significantly lower TRM than the samples towards the center, which was not the case for the Luminex assay (p = 0.83). For singleplex qPCR, 30.5% of the variation in TL was explained by column-to-column variation and 0.82 to 27.9% was explained by sample-to-sample variation. In contrast, only 5.8% of the variation in TRM for the Luminex assay was explained by column-to column variation and 50.4% was explained by sample-to-sample variation. Our novel Luminex assay for TRM had good precision and did not show the well position effects of the sample that were seen in all three of the qPCR assays that were tested. PMID:27182778

  2. Detection of Nicotiana DNA in Tobacco Products Using a Novel Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay.

    PubMed

    Korchinski, Katie L; Land, Adrian D; Craft, David L; Brzezinski, Jennifer L

    2016-07-01

    Establishing that a product contains tobacco is a requirement for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's regulation and/or prosecution of tobacco products. Therefore, a multiplex real-time PCR method was designed to determine if Nicotiana (tobacco) DNA is present in tobacco products. The PCR method simultaneously amplifies a 73 bp fragment of the cytochrome P450 monoxygenase CYP82E4 gene and 66 bp fragment in the nia-1 gene for nitrate reductase, which are detected using dual-labeled TaqMan probes. The assay is capable of detecting approximately 7.8 pg purified tobacco DNA, with a similar sensitivity for either gene target while incorporating an internal positive control (IPC). DNA was extracted from prepared tobacco products-including chewing tobacco, pipe tobacco, and snuff-or from the cut fill (no wrapper) of cigarettes and cigars. Of the 13 products analyzed, 12 were positive for both tobacco-specific markers and the IPC. DNA was also extracted from the fill of five varieties of herbal cigarettes, which were negative for both tobacco-specific gene targets and positive for the IPC. Our method expands on current assays by introducing a multiplex reaction, targeting two sequences in two different genes of interest, incorporating an IPC into the reaction, and lowering the LOD and LOQ while increasing the efficiency of the PCR. PMID:27143320

  3. Detection of EGFR Mutations by TaqMan Mutation Detection Assays Powered by Competitive Allele-Specific TaqMan PCR Technology

    PubMed Central

    Roma, Cristin; Esposito, Claudia; Rachiglio, Anna Maria; Pasquale, Raffaella; Chicchinelli, Nicoletta; Mancini, Rita; Pisconti, Salvatore; Botti, Gerardo; Morabito, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are predictive of response to treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Competitive Allele-Specific TaqMan PCR (castPCR) is a highly sensitive and specific technology. EGFR mutations were assessed by TaqMan Mutation Detection Assays (TMDA) based on castPCR technology in 64 tumor samples: a training set of 30 NSCLC and 6 colorectal carcinoma (CRC) samples and a validation set of 28 NSCLC cases. The sensitivity and specificity of this method were compared with routine diagnostic techniques including direct sequencing and the EGFR Therascreen RGQ kit. Analysis of the training set allowed the identification of the threshold value for data analysis (0.2); the maximum cycle threshold (Ct = 37); and the cut-off ΔCt value (7) for the EGFR TMDA. By using these parameters, castPCR technology identified both training and validation set EGFR mutations with similar frequency as compared with the Therascreen kit. Sequencing detected rare mutations that are not identified by either castPCR or Therascreen, but in samples with low tumor cell content it failed to detect common mutations that were revealed by real-time PCR based methods. In conclusion, our data suggest that castPCR is highly sensitive and specific to detect EGFR mutations in NSCLC clinical samples. PMID:24364033

  4. Malaria surveillance in the Democratic Republic of the Congo: comparison of microscopy, PCR, and rapid diagnostic test.

    PubMed

    Doctor, Stephanie M; Liu, Yunhao; Whitesell, Amy; Thwai, Kyaw L; Taylor, Steve M; Janko, Mark; Emch, Michael; Kashamuka, Melchior; Muwonga, Jérémie; Tshefu, Antoinette; Meshnick, Steven R

    2016-05-01

    Malaria surveillance is critical for control efforts, but diagnostic methods frequently disagree. Here, we compare microscopy, PCR, and a rapid diagnostic test in 7137 samples from children in the Democratic Republic of the Congo using latent class analysis. PCR had the highest sensitivity (94.6%) and microscopy had the lowest (76.7%). PMID:26915637

  5. Validation of a real-time PCR assay for the molecular identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sales, Mariana L.; Fonseca, Antônio Augusto; Orzil, Lívia; Alencar, Andrea Padilha; Silva, Marcio Roberto; Issa, Marina Azevedo; Filho, Paulo Martins Soares; Lage, Andrey Pereira; Heinemann, Marcos Bryan

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the major cause of tuberculosis in humans. This bacillus gained prominence with the occurrence of HIV, presenting itself as an important opportunistic infection associated with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The current study aimed to develop a real-time PCR using Eva Green technology for molecular identification of M. tuberculosis isolates. The primers were designed to Rv1510 gene. Ninety nine samples of M. tuberculosis and sixty samples of M. bovis were tested and no sample of the bovine bacillus was detected by the qPCR. Statistical tests showed no difference between the qPCR and biochemical tests used to identify the Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The correlation between tests was perfect with Kappa index of 1.0 (p < 0.001, CI = 0.84 – 1.0). The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were 100% (CI = 95.94% – 100%) and 100% (CI = 93.98% – 100%). This qPCR was developed with the goal of diagnosing the bacillus M. tuberculosis in samples of bacterial suspension. TB reference laboratories (health and agriculture sectors), public health programs and epidemiological studies probably may benefit from such method. PMID:25763042

  6. Diagnostic Accuracy and Applicability of a PCR System for the Detection of Schistosoma mansoni DNA in Human Urine Samples from an Endemic Area

    PubMed Central

    Enk, Martin Johannes; Oliveira e Silva, Guilherme; Rodrigues, Nilton Barnabé

    2012-01-01

    Schistosomiasis caused by Schistosoma mansoni, one of the most neglected human parasitoses in Latin America and Africa, is routinely confirmed by microscopic visualization of eggs in stool. The main limitation of this diagnostic approach is its lack of sensitivity in detecting individual low worm burdens and consequently data on infection rates in low transmission settings are little reliable. According to the scientific literature, PCR assays are characterized by high sensitivity and specificity in detecting parasite DNA in biological samples. A simple and cost effective extraction method for DNA of Schistosoma mansoni from urine samples in combination with a conventional PCR assay was developed and applied in an endemic area. This urine based PCR system was tested for diagnostic accuracy among a population of a small village in an endemic area, comparing it to a reference test composed of three different parasitological techniques. The diagnostic parameters revealed a sensitivity of 100%, a specificity of 91.20%, positive and negative predictive values of 86.25% and 100%, respectively, and a test accuracy of 94.33%. Further statistical analysis showed a k index of 0.8806, indicating an excellent agreement between the reference test and the PCR system. Data obtained from the mouse model indicate the infection can be detected one week after cercariae penetration, opening a new perspective for early detection and patient management during this stage of the disease. The data indicate that this innovative PCR system provides a simple to handle and robust diagnostic tool for the detection of S. mansoni DNA from urine samples and a promising approach to overcome the diagnostic obstacles in low transmission settings. Furthermore the principals of this molecular technique, based on the examination of human urine samples may be useful for the diagnosis of other neglected tropical diseases that can be detected by trans-renal DNA. PMID:22701733

  7. Diagnostic accuracy and applicability of a PCR system for the detection of Schistosoma mansoni DNA in human urine samples from an endemic area.

    PubMed

    Enk, Martin Johannes; Oliveira e Silva, Guilherme; Rodrigues, Nilton Barnabé

    2012-01-01

    Schistosomiasis caused by Schistosoma mansoni, one of the most neglected human parasitoses in Latin America and Africa, is routinely confirmed by microscopic visualization of eggs in stool. The main limitation of this diagnostic approach is its lack of sensitivity in detecting individual low worm burdens and consequently data on infection rates in low transmission settings are little reliable. According to the scientific literature, PCR assays are characterized by high sensitivity and specificity in detecting parasite DNA in biological samples. A simple and cost effective extraction method for DNA of Schistosoma mansoni from urine samples in combination with a conventional PCR assay was developed and applied in an endemic area. This urine based PCR system was tested for diagnostic accuracy among a population of a small village in an endemic area, comparing it to a reference test composed of three different parasitological techniques. The diagnostic parameters revealed a sensitivity of 100%, a specificity of 91.20%, positive and negative predictive values of 86.25% and 100%, respectively, and a test accuracy of 94.33%. Further statistical analysis showed a k index of 0.8806, indicating an excellent agreement between the reference test and the PCR system. Data obtained from the mouse model indicate the infection can be detected one week after cercariae penetration, opening a new perspective for early detection and patient management during this stage of the disease. The data indicate that this innovative PCR system provides a simple to handle and robust diagnostic tool for the detection of S. mansoni DNA from urine samples and a promising approach to overcome the diagnostic obstacles in low transmission settings. Furthermore the principals of this molecular technique, based on the examination of human urine samples may be useful for the diagnosis of other neglected tropical diseases that can be detected by trans-renal DNA. PMID:22701733

  8. Development of a reliable dual-gene amplification RT-PCR assay for the detection of Turkey Meningoencephalitis virus in Turkey brain tissues.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Irit; Raibstein, Israel; Al-Tori, Amira; Khinich, Yevgeny; Simanov, Michael; Yuval, Chanoch; Perk, Shimon; Lublin, Avishai

    2012-11-01

    The Turkey Meningoencephalitis virus (TMEV) causes neuroparalytic signs, paresis, in-coordination, morbidity and mortality in turkeys. In parallel to the increased worldwide scientific interest in veterinary avian flaviviruses, including the Bagaza, Tembusu and Tembusu-related BYD virus, TMEV-caused disease also reemergence in commercial turkeys during late summer of 2010. While initially TMEV was detected by NS5-gene RT-PCR, subsequently, the env-gene RT-PCR was employed. As lately several inconsistencies were observed between the clinical, serological and molecular detection of the TMEV env gene, this study evaluated whether genetic changes occurred in the recently isolated viruses, and sought to optimize and improve the direct TMEV amplification from brain tissues of affected turkeys. The main findings indicated that no changes occurred during the years in the TMEV genome, but the PCR detection sensitivities of the env and NS5 genes differed. The RT-PCR and RNA purification were optimized for direct amplification from brain tissues without pre-replication of clinical samples in tissue cultures or in embryonated eggs. The amplification sensitivity of the NS5-gene was 10-100 times more than the env-gene when separate. The new dual-gene amplification RT-PCR was similar to that of the NS5 gene, therefore the assay can be considered as a reliable diagnostic assay. Cases where one of the two amplicons would be RT-PCR negative would alert and warn on the virus identity, and possible genetic changes. In addition, the biochemical environment of the dual-gene amplification reaction seemed to contribute in deleting non-specific byproducts that occasionally appeared in the singular RT-PCR assays on RNA purified from brain tissues. PMID:22705084

  9. Multicentric comparative assessment of the bio-evolution Toxoplasma gondii detection kit with eight laboratory-developed PCR assays for molecular diagnosis of congenital toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Filisetti, Denis; Sterkers, Yvon; Brenier-Pinchart, Marie-Pierre; Cassaing, Sophie; Dalle, Frédéric; Delhaes, Laurence; Pelloux, Hervé; Touafek, Fériel; Varlet-Marie, Emmanuelle; Yera, Hélène; Candolfi, Ermano; Bastien, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The detection of Toxoplasma gondii in amniotic fluid is an essential tool for the prenatal diagnosis of congenital toxoplasmosis and is currently essentially based on the use of PCR. Although some consensus is emerging, this molecular diagnosis suffers from a lack of standardization and an extreme diversity of laboratory-developed methods. Commercial kits for the detection of T. gondii by PCR were recently developed and offer certain advantages; however, they must be assessed in comparison with optimized reference PCR assays. The present multicentric study aimed to compare the performances of the Bio-Evolution T. gondii detection kit and laboratory-developed PCR assays set up in eight proficient centers in France. The study compared 157 amniotic fluid samples and found concordances of 99% and 100% using 76 T. gondii-infected samples and 81 uninfected samples, respectively. Moreover, taking into account the classification of the European Research Network on Congenital Toxoplasmosis, the overall diagnostic sensitivity of all assays was identical and calculated to be 86% (54/63); specificity was 100% for all assays. Finally, the relative quantification results were in good agreement between the kit and the laboratory-developed assays. The good performances of this commercial kit are probably in part linked to the use of a number of good practices: detection in multiplicate, amplification of the repetitive DNA target rep529, and the use of an internal control for the detection of PCR inhibitors. The only drawbacks noted at the time of the study were the absence of uracil-N-glycosylase and small defects in the reliability of the production of different reagents. PMID:25339393

  10. Multicentric Comparative Assessment of the Bio-Evolution Toxoplasma gondii Detection Kit with Eight Laboratory-Developed PCR Assays for Molecular Diagnosis of Congenital Toxoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Filisetti, Denis; Sterkers, Yvon; Brenier-Pinchart, Marie-Pierre; Cassaing, Sophie; Dalle, Frédéric; Delhaes, Laurence; Pelloux, Hervé; Touafek, Fériel; Varlet-Marie, Emmanuelle; Yera, Hélène; Candolfi, Ermano

    2014-01-01

    The detection of Toxoplasma gondii in amniotic fluid is an essential tool for the prenatal diagnosis of congenital toxoplasmosis and is currently essentially based on the use of PCR. Although some consensus is emerging, this molecular diagnosis suffers from a lack of standardization and an extreme diversity of laboratory-developed methods. Commercial kits for the detection of T. gondii by PCR were recently developed and offer certain advantages; however, they must be assessed in comparison with optimized reference PCR assays. The present multicentric study aimed to compare the performances of the Bio-Evolution T. gondii detection kit and laboratory-developed PCR assays set up in eight proficient centers in France. The study compared 157 amniotic fluid samples and found concordances of 99% and 100% using 76 T. gondii-infected samples and 81 uninfected samples, respectively. Moreover, taking into account the classification of the European Research Network on Congenital Toxoplasmosis, the overall diagnostic sensitivity of all assays was identical and calculated to be 86% (54/63); specificity was 100% for all assays. Finally, the relative quantification results were in good agreement between the kit and the laboratory-developed assays. The good performances of this commercial kit are probably in part linked to the use of a number of good practices: detection in multiplicate, amplification of the repetitive DNA target rep529, and the use of an internal control for the detection of PCR inhibitors. The only drawbacks noted at the time of the study were the absence of uracil-N-glycosylase and small defects in the reliability of the production of different reagents. PMID:25339393

  11. Real-time FRET PCR assay for Salmonella enterica serotype detection in food.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Eric V; Gibbins, Carl S; Grayson, J Kevin

    2009-09-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotypes are leading etiological agents of food-borne gastroenteritis. Traditional identification is laborious and time intensive. Faster molecular methods may allow early identification in contaminated food products. We developed a real-time, fluorescence resonance energy transfer hybridization probe polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for S. enterica serotypes on the basis of the exclusive presence of the apeE gene in Salmonella Typhimurium. Assay sensitivity for 12 S. enterica serotypes was as low as 1.87 x 10(2) genomic equivalents per milliliter. PCR efficiency was 94% and the dynamic range was linear over six orders of magnitude from 10(0) to 10(6) copies. The lower limit of detection for 12 different food matrices was between 1.5 x 10(2) and 1.5 x 10(5) CFU/mL without pre-enrichment. When combined with high-throughput automated DNA extraction, 32 food specimens were processed and assayed in less than 2 hours, allowing rapid, specific, sensitive detection of S. enterica serotypes in food products. PMID:19780376

  12. A short target real-time RT-PCR assay for detection of pestiviruses infecting cattle.

    PubMed

    La Rocca, S A; Sandvik, T

    2009-10-01

    A rapid single step real-time duplex TaqMan RT-PCR was developed for detection of bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV)-1, BVDV-2 and border disease virus (BDV). Based on alignment of available and newly generated partial 5'-UTR nucleotide sequences, one forward and two reverse primers were designed, which amplify a 104bp PCR product. Two TaqMan probes labelled with different fluorochromes were designed to detect BVDV-1/BVDV-2 and BDVs, respectively. The assay was able to detect a selection of strains and isolates that represent the genetic diversity of these three viruses, with an analytical sensitivity that corresponded to 3.6, 48 and 4.8 TCID(50) of BVDV-1, BVDV-2 and BDV, respectively. With an overall cycling time of around 70 min, the assay allows rapid diagnosis and efficient use of modern thermocycling machines. Although developed principally for the diagnosis of BVD, the assay should be equally useful for diagnosis of BD in sheep. PMID:19523981

  13. Specific detection of Aspergillus parasiticus in wheat flour using a highly sensitive PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Sardiñas, Noelia; Vázquez, Covadonga; Gil-Serna, Jessica; González-Jaen, M Teresa; Patiño, Belén

    2010-06-01

    Aspergillus parasiticus is one of the most important aflatoxin-producing species that contaminates foodstuffs and beverages for human consumption. In this work, a specific and highly sensitive PCR protocol was developed to detect A. parasiticus using primers designed on the multicopy internal transcribed region of the rDNA unit (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 rDNA). The assay proved to be highly specific for A. parasiticus when tested on a wide range of related and other fungal species commonly found in commodities, and allowing discrimination from the closely related A. flavus. Accuracy of detection and quantification by conventional PCR were tested with genomic DNA obtained from wheat flour artificially contaminated with spore suspensions of known concentrations. Spore concentrations equal or higher than 10(6) spore/g could be detected by the assay directly without prior incubation of the samples. The assay described is suitable for incorporation in routine analyses at critical points of the food chain within HACCP strategies. PMID:20486001

  14. Quantitative fluorogenic PCR assay for measuring ovine herpesvirus 2 replication in sheep.

    PubMed

    Hüssy, D; Stäuber, N; Leutenegger, C M; Rieder, S; Ackermann, M

    2001-01-01

    A fluorogenic PCR specific for ovine herpesvirus 2 (OvHV-2) DNA was developed and compared to a previously established conventional seminested PCR. Testing of a total of 152 blood samples from both positive and negative animals revealed that the results of both assays corresponded to each other in 100% of the cases. A second fluorogenic PCR for genomic sheep DNA was required to normalize the quantity of viral DNA in the sample. Separate standard curves had to be constructed for each PCR. The analytical sensitivity of the new PCRs ranged between at least 10 copies and sometimes even 1 copy of target DNA per reaction mixture. In dilution series of the target DNAs, linear decreases of the signals were observed over 7 orders of magnitude. Thus, it was possible to calculate the amounts of viral DNA in relation to the amounts of cellular DNA by normalizing the absolute quantity of OvHV-2 DNA with the amount of genomic sheep DNA. By this technique, it was possible for the first time to quantitatively characterize the course of OvHV-2 replication in naturally infected sheep. PMID:11139205

  15. Quantitative Fluorogenic PCR Assay for Measuring Ovine Herpesvirus 2 Replication in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Hüssy, D.; Stäuber, N.; Leutenegger, C. M.; Rieder, S.; Ackermann, M.

    2001-01-01

    A fluorogenic PCR specific for ovine herpesvirus 2 (OvHV-2) DNA was developed and compared to a previously established conventional seminested PCR. Testing of a total of 152 blood samples from both positive and negative animals revealed that the results of both assays corresponded to each other in 100% of the cases. A second fluorogenic PCR for genomic sheep DNA was required to normalize the quantity of viral DNA in the sample. Separate standard curves had to be constructed for each PCR. The analytical sensitivity of the new PCRs ranged between at least 10 copies and sometimes even 1 copy of target DNA per reaction mixture. In dilution series of the target DNAs, linear decreases of the signals were observed over 7 orders of magnitude. Thus, it was possible to calculate the amounts of viral DNA in relation to the amounts of cellular DNA by normalizing the absolute quantity of OvHV-2 DNA with the amount of genomic sheep DNA. By this technique, it was possible for the first time to quantitatively characterize the course of OvHV-2 replication in naturally infected sheep. PMID:11139205

  16. Considerations for optimization of microRNA PCR assays for molecular diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Dellett, Margaret; Simpson, David Arthur

    2016-01-01

    The remarkable stability of microRNAs in biofluids underlies their potential as biomarkers, but their small size presents challenges for detection by RT-qPCR. The heterogeneity of microRNAs, with each one comprising a series of variants or 'isomiRs', adds additional complexity. Presented here are the key considerations for use of RT-qPCR to measure microRNAs and their isomiRs, with a focus on plasma. Modified nucleotides can be incorporated into primer sequences to enhance affinity and provide increased specificity and sensitivity for RT-qPCR assays. Approaches based upon polyA tailing and use of a common oligo(dT)-based reverse transcription oligonucleotide will detect most isomiRs. Conversely, stem-loop RT oligonucleotides and sequence specific probes can enable detection of specific isomiRs of interest. Next generation sequencing of all the products of a microRNA RT-PCR reaction is a promising new approach for both microRNA quantification and characterization. PMID:26854938

  17. Suitability of stx-PCR directly from fecal samples in clinical diagnostics of STEC.

    PubMed

    Tunsjø, Hege S; Kvissel, Anne K; Follin-Arbelet, Benoit; Brotnov, Beth-Marie; Ranheim, Trond E; Leegaard, Truls M

    2015-10-01

    PCR-based testing for Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) directly from fecal samples is increasingly being implemented in routine diagnostic laboratories. These methods aim to detect clinically relevant amounts of microbes and not stx-carrying phages or low backgrounds of STEC. We present a diagnostic procedure and results from 1 year of stx-targeted real-time PCR of fecal samples from patients with gastrointestinal symptoms in Norway. A rapid stx2 subtyping strategy is described, which aims to quickly reveal the virulence potential of the microbe. stx was detected in 22 of 3320 samples, corresponding to a PCR positive rate of 0.66%. STEC were cultured from 72% of the PCR positive samples. Four stx1 isolates, eight stx2 isolates, and four isolates with both stx1 and stx2 were identified. With the method presented, stx-carrying phages are not commonly detected. Our results support the use of molecular testing combined with classical culture techniques for routine diagnostic purposes. PMID:26303619

  18. Development of a Rapid, Sensitive, and Field-Deployable Razor Ex BioDetection System and Quantitative PCR Assay for Detection of Phymatotrichopsis omnivora Using Multiple Gene Targets

    PubMed Central

    Arif, M.; Marek, S. M.; Melcher, U.

    2013-01-01

    A validated, multigene-based method using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) and the Razor Ex BioDetection system was developed for detection of Phymatotrichopsis omnivora. This soilborne fungus causes Phymatotrichopsis root rot of cotton, alfalfa, and other dicot crops in the southwestern United States and northern Mexico, leading to significant crop losses and limiting the range of crops that can be grown in soils where the fungus is established. It is on multiple lists of regulated organisms. Because P. omnivora is difficult to isolate, accurate and sensitive culture-independent diagnostic tools are needed to confirm infections by this fungus. Specific PCR primers and probes were designed based on P. omnivora nucleotide sequences of the genes encoding rRNA internal transcribed spacers, beta-tubulin, and the second-largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (RPB2). PCR products were cloned and sequenced to confirm their identity. All primer sets allowed early detection of P. omnivora in infected but asymptomatic plants. A modified rapid DNA purification method, which facilitates a quick (∼30-min) on-site assay capability for P. omnivora detection, was developed. Combined use of three target genes increased the assay accuracy and broadened the range of detection. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a multigene-based, field-deployable, rapid, and reliable identification method for a fungal plant pathogen and should serve as a model for the development of field-deployable assays of other phytopathogens. PMID:23354717

  19. Development of a rapid, sensitive, and field-deployable razor ex BioDetection system and quantitative PCR assay for detection of Phymatotrichopsis omnivora using multiple gene targets.

    PubMed

    Arif, M; Fletcher, J; Marek, S M; Melcher, U; Ochoa-Corona, F M

    2013-04-01

    A validated, multigene-based method using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) and the Razor Ex BioDetection system was developed for detection of Phymatotrichopsis omnivora. This soilborne fungus causes Phymatotrichopsis root rot of cotton, alfalfa, and other dicot crops in the southwestern United States and northern Mexico, leading to significant crop losses and limiting the range of crops that can be grown in soils where the fungus is established. It is on multiple lists of regulated organisms. Because P. omnivora is difficult to isolate, accurate and sensitive culture-independent diagnostic tools are needed to confirm infections by this fungus. Specific PCR primers and probes were designed based on P. omnivora nucleotide sequences of the genes encoding rRNA internal transcribed spacers, beta-tubulin, and the second-largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (RPB2). PCR products were cloned and sequenced to confirm their identity. All primer sets allowed early detection of P. omnivora in infected but asymptomatic plants. A modified rapid DNA purification method, which facilitates a quick (∼30-min) on-site assay capability for P. omnivora detection, was developed. Combined use of three target genes increased the assay accuracy and broadened the range of detection. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a multigene-based, field-deployable, rapid, and reliable identification method for a fungal plant pathogen and should serve as a model for the development of field-deployable assays of other phytopathogens. PMID:23354717

  20. Comparative studies of a real-time PCR method and three enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for the detection of central nervous system tissues in meat products.

    PubMed

    Schönenbrücher, Holger; Göbel, Katrin Annette; Abdulmawjood, Amir; Richt, Jürgen A; Bülte, Michael

    2008-10-01

    The removal of certain central nervous system (CNS) tissues (part of the bovine spongiform encephalopathy risk material) from the food chain is one of the highest priority tasks associated with avoiding contamination of the human food chain with the agent of bovine spongiform encephalopathy. A recently developed real-time PCR assay and three commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for the detection of CNS tissues in minced meat and three types of heat-treated sausages were evaluated. Bovine brain was used for spiking of internal reference material, and its detectability was examined during storage times of 12 months (for frozen minced meat and liver sausage) and 24 months (for sausages treated with medium and high heat). The real-time PCR method and both ELISA kits detected 0.1% CNS tissue in frozen minced meat and 0.1 or 1% CNS tissue in heat-treated meat products. The detectability of the amplified mRNA target region with the PCR assay was similar to the detectability of antigen by the ELISAs. Because the real-time PCR method also can be used to distinguish cattle, ovine, and caprine CNS tissues from porcine CNS tissues, it seems to be suitable as a routine diagnostic test for the sensitive and specific detection of CNS tissues in meat and meat products. PMID:18939753

  1. A Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay for Identification of Pneumocystis jirovecii, Histoplasma capsulatum, and Cryptococcus neoformans/Cryptococcus gattii in Samples from AIDS Patients with Opportunistic Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Gago, Sara; Esteban, Cristina; Valero, Clara; Zaragoza, Óscar; Puig de la Bellacasa, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    A molecular diagnostic technique based on real-time PCR was developed for the simultaneous detection of three of the most frequent causative agents of fungal opportunistic pneumonia in AIDS patients: Pneumocystis jirovecii, Histoplasma capsulatum, and Cryptococcus neoformans/Cryptococcus gattii. This technique was tested in cultured strains and in clinical samples from HIV-positive patients. The methodology used involved species-specific molecular beacon probes targeted to the internal transcribed spacer regions of the rDNA. An internal control was also included in each assay. The multiplex real-time PCR assay was tested in 24 clinical strains and 43 clinical samples from AIDS patients with proven fungal infection. The technique developed showed high reproducibility (r2 of >0.98) and specificity (100%). For H. capsulatum and Cryptococcus spp., the detection limits of the method were 20 and 2 fg of genomic DNA/20 μl reaction mixture, respectively, while for P. jirovecii the detection limit was 2.92 log10 copies/20 μl reaction mixture. The sensitivity in vitro was 100% for clinical strains and 90.7% for clinical samples. The assay was positive for 92.5% of the patients. For one of the patients with proven histoplasmosis, P. jirovecii was also detected in a bronchoalveolar lavage sample. No PCR inhibition was detected. This multiplex real-time PCR technique is fast, sensitive, and specific and may have clinical applications. PMID:24478409

  2. Optimisation of a droplet digital PCR assay for the diagnosis of Schistosoma japonicum infection: A duplex approach with DNA binding dye chemistry.

    PubMed

    Weerakoon, Kosala G; Gordon, Catherine A; Gobert, Geoffrey N; Cai, Pengfei; McManus, Donald P

    2016-06-01

    Schistosomiasis is a chronically debilitating helminth infection with a significant socio-economic and public health impact. Accurate diagnostics play a pivotal role in achieving current schistosomiasis control and elimination goals. However, many of the current diagnostic procedures, which rely on detection of schistosome eggs, have major limitations including lack of accuracy and the inability to detect pre-patent infections. DNA-based detection methods provide a viable alternative to the current tests commonly used for schistosomiasis diagnosis. Here we describe the optimisation of a novel droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) duplex assay for the diagnosis of Schistosoma japonicum infection which provides improved detection sensitivity and specificity. The assay involves the amplification of two specific and abundant target gene sequences in S. japonicum; a retrotransposon (SjR2) and a portion of a mitochondrial gene (nad1). The assay detected target sequences in different sources of schistosome DNA isolated from adult worms, schistosomules and eggs, and exhibits a high level of specificity, thereby representing an ideal tool for the detection of low levels of parasite DNA in different clinical samples including parasite cell free DNA in the host circulation and other bodily fluids. Moreover, being quantitative, the assay can be used to determine parasite infection intensity and, could provide an important tool for the detection of low intensity infections in low prevalence schistosomiasis-endemic areas. PMID:27021661

  3. Comparison of Luminex xTAG® RVP fast assay and real time RT-PCR for the detection of respiratory viruses in adults with community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Luchsinger, Vivian; Prades, Yara; Ruiz, Mauricio; Pizarro, Rolando; Rossi, Patricio; Lizama, Luis; Garmendia, María Luisa; Meza, Angela; Larrañaga, Carmen; Avendaño, Luis F

    2016-07-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is the third cause of death worldwide. Viruses are frequently detected in adult CAP. Highly sensitive diagnostic techniques should be used due to poor viral shedding. Different sampling methods can affect viral detection, being necessary to establish the optimal type of sample for identifying respiratory viruses in adults. The detection rates of respiratory viruses by Luminex xTAG® RVP fast assay, real time RT-PCR (rtRT-PCR) (Sacace®), and immunofluorescence assay (IFA) in adult CAP were performed in nasopharyngeal swabs (NPS) and aspirates (NPA) from 179 hospitalized adults. Positivity was 47.5% for Luminex®, 42.5% for rtRT-PCR (P = 0.3), and 2.7% for IFA (2.7%) (P < 0.0). The sensitivity, specificity, and kappa coefficient of xTAG® RVP compared with rtRT-PCR were 84.2%, 79.6%, and 0.62%, respectively. Luminex® and rtRT-PCR detected 65 (58.0%) and 57 (50.9%) viruses in 112 NPA and 35 (34.3%) and 31 (30.4%) in 102 NPS, respectively (P < 0.01). xTAG® RVP is appropriate for detecting respiratory viruses in CAP adults. Both molecular techniques yielded better results with nasopharyngeal aspirate than swabs. J. Med. Virol. 88:1173-1179, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27061405

  4. Development and Validation of a Multiplex, Real-Time RT PCR Assay for the Simultaneous Detection of Classical and African Swine Fever Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Haines, Felicity J.; Hofmann, Martin A.; King, Donald P.; Drew, Trevor W.; Crooke, Helen R.

    2013-01-01

    A single-step, multiplex, real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was developed for the simultaneous and differential laboratory diagnosis of Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) and African swine fever virus (ASFV) alongside an exogenous internal control RNA (IC-RNA). Combining a single extraction methodology and primer and probe sets for detection of the three target nucleic acids CSFV, ASFV and IC-RNA, had no effect on the analytical sensitivity of the assay and the new triplex RT-PCR was comparable to standard PCR techniques for CSFV and ASFV diagnosis. After optimisation the assay had a detection limit of 5 CSFV genome copies and 22 ASFV genome copies. Analytical specificity of the triplex assay was validated using a panel of viruses representing 9 of the 11 CSFV subgenotypes, at least 8 of the 22 ASFV genotypes as well as non-CSFV pestiviruses. Positive and negative clinical samples from animals infected experimentally, due to field exposure or collected from the UK which is free from both swine diseases, were used to evaluate the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity for detection of both viruses. The diagnostic sensitivity was 100% for both viruses whilst diagnostic specificity estimates were 100% for CSFV detection and 97.3% for ASFV detection. The inclusion of a heterologous internal control allowed identification of false negative results, which occurred at a higher level than expected. The triplex assay described here offers a valuable new tool for the differential detection of the causative viruses of two clinically indistinguishable porcine diseases, whose geographical occurrence is increasingly overlapping. PMID:23923045

  5. Diagnosis of Upper and Lower Respiratory Tract Bacterial Infections with the Use of Multiplex PCR Assays

    PubMed Central

    Xirogianni, Athanasia; Tsolia, Maria; Voyiatzi, Aliki; Sioumala, Maria; Makri, Antonia; Argyropoulou, Athina; Paniara, Olga; Markoulatos, Panayotis; Kourea-Kremastinou, Jenny; Tzanakaki, Georgina

    2013-01-01

    The investigation of respiratory infections by molecular techniques provides important information about the epidemiology of respiratory disease, especially during the post-vaccination era. The objective of the present study was the detection of bacterial pathogens directly in clinical samples from patients with upper and lower respiratory tract infections using multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays developed in our laboratory. Clinical samples taken over a three-year period (2007–2009) and obtained from 349 patients (adults (n = 66); children (n = 283)) with signs and symptoms of certain upper or lower respiratory tract infections, consisted of: bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL, n = 83), pleural fluids (n = 29), and middle-ear aspirates (n = 237). Overall, 212 samples (61%) were confirmed by culture and/or PCR. Among the positive samples, Streptococcus pneumoniae (mainly serotype 3) was predominant (104/212; 49.0%), followed by non-typable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) 59/212; 27.8%) and Streptococcus pyogenes (47/212; 22%). Haemophilus influenzae type b was detected in only three samples. The underlying microbiology of respiratory infections is gradually changing in response to various selective pressures, such as vaccine use and antibiotic consumption. The application of multiplex PCR (mPCR) assays is particularly useful since it successfully identified the microorganisms implicated in acute otitis media or lower respiratory tract infections in nearly 75% of patients with a positive result compared to conventional cultures. Non-culture identification of the implicated pneumococcal serotypes is also an important issue for monitoring pneumococcal infections in the era of conjugate pneumococcal vaccines. PMID:26835676

  6. Comparison of an in-house PCR assay, direct fluorescence assay and the Roche AMPLICOR Chlamydia trachomatis kit for detection of C. trachomatis.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Poonam; Patel, Achchhe Lal; Sachdev, Divya; Ali, Mashook; Mittal, Aruna; Saluja, Daman

    2009-07-01

    To improve the control of Chlamydia trachomatis infection in India, a rapid, specific and cost-effective method is much needed. We developed an in-house PCR assay by targeting a unique genomic sequence encoding a protein from the C. trachomatis phospholipase D endonuclease superfamily that produces an amplified fragment of 368 bp. The specificity of the primers was confirmed using genomic DNA from other sexually transmitted disease-causing and related micro-organisms and from humans. The assay was highly sensitive and could detect as low as 10 fg C. trachomatis DNA. Clinical evaluation of the in-house-developed PCR was carried out using 450 endocervical specimens that were divided in two groups. In group I (n=274), in-house PCR was evaluated against the direct fluorescence assay. The resolved sensitivity of the in-house PCR method was 97.22 % compared with 88 % for the direct fluorescent antibody assay. In group II (n=176), the in-house PCR was compared with the commercial Roche AMPLICOR MWP CT detection kit. The resolved sensitivity of the in-house PCR assay reported here was 93.1 % and the specificity was 97.46 %, making it a cost-effective alternative for routine diagnosis of genital infection by C. trachomatis. The method should facilitate early detection leading to better prevention and treatment of genital infection in India. PMID:19502371

  7. Performance of PCR-based assays targeting Bacteroidales genetic markers of human fecal pollution in sewage and fecal samples

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are numerous PCR-based methods available to characterize human fecal pollution in ambient waters. Each assay employs distinct oligonucleotides and many target different genes and microorganisms leading to potential variations in method performance. Laboratory comparisons ...

  8. Inhibition Controls for Qualitative Real-Time PCR Assays: Are They Necessary for All Specimen Matrices?

    PubMed Central

    Buckwalter, S. P.; Sloan, L. M.; Cunningham, S. A.; Espy, M. J.; Uhl, J. R.; Jones, M. F.; Vetter, E. A.; Mandrekar, J.; Cockerill, F. R.; Pritt, B. S.; Patel, R.

    2014-01-01

    A retrospective analysis of 386,706 specimens representing a variety of matrix types used in qualitative real-time PCR assays determined the overall inhibition rate to be 0.87% when the inhibition control was added preextraction to 5,613 specimens and 0.01% when the inhibition control was added postextraction but preamplification in 381,093 specimens. Inhibition rates of ≤1% were found for all specimen matrix types except urine and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue. PMID:24740078

  9. Indeterminate tcdB using a Clostridium difficile PCR assay: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background C. difficile (CD) real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for toxin B gene (tcdB) is more sensitive, and reduces turnaround time when compared to toxin immunoassay. We noted typical amplification curves with high tcdB cycle thresholds (Ct) and low endpoints (Ept) that are labeled negative by the Xpert® C. difficile assay (Cepheid) and undertook this study to determine their significance. Methods We defined an indeterminate CD assay result as detection of a typical PCR amplification curve with an Ept >10 that was interpreted as negative by the Xpert® assay. Samples with indeterminate Xpert® result were collected for 5 months and retested by Xpert®, cultured for toxigenic CD, and isolates subjected to PCR ribotyping, detection of toxin genes and multilocus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) typing. Chart reviews were completed to assess if patients met the Society of Healthcare Epidemiology of America and the Infectious Diseases Society of America CD infection (CDI) clinical case definition. Illness severity was compared with tcdB Ct and culture results. Results During the 5-month study period, 48/3620 (1%) of specimens were indeterminate and 387/3620 (11%) were positive. Of the 48 patients with indeterminate results, 39 (81%) met the clinical case definition of CDI, and 7 of these (18%) met criteria for severe CDI. Toxigenic stool cultures were positive for 86% (6/7) of patients with severe CDI, 19% (6/32) of patients with non-severe CDI, and 44% (4/9) of patients who did not meet the clinical case definition of CDI (p = 0.002). Lower tcdB Ct and higher Ept were associated with greater likelihood of toxigenic culture positivity (p = 0.03) and more severe symptoms (p = 0.06). Indeterminate results were not associated with a particular technologist or instrument module, or CD strain type. Conclusions A subset of specimens (1%) using the Xpert® C. difficile assay have typical amplification curves and are interpreted as negative

  10. Molecular identification of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Gallinarum biovars Gallinarum and Pullorum by a duplex PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Batista, Diego Felipe Alves; de Freitas Neto, Oliveiro Caetano; de Almeida, Adriana Maria; Barrow, Paul Andrew; de Oliveira Barbosa, Fernanda; Berchieri Junior, Angelo

    2016-07-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Gallinarum biovar Gallinarum (S Gallinarum) and biovar Pullorum (S Pullorum) are 2 poultry pathogens that cause major economic losses to the poultry industry worldwide. Control of both diseases mainly relies on the adoption of biosecurity programs, and success is dependent on accurate and fast detection. Based on this concept, we developed a duplex PCR assay, targeting 2 chromosomal sequences, which allowed us to precisely identify and differentiate S Gallinarum and S Pullorum field strains. This assay was validated by testing genomic DNA from 40 S Gallinarum and 29 S Pullorum field strains, 87 other Salmonella serovars, and 7 non-Salmonella strains. The serovar identifier region (SIR) primers produced a fragment only in S Gallinarum and S Pullorum strains, whereas the fragment from the ratA coding sequence, which was previously demonstrated to differentiate the 2 biovars, was also amplified from other Salmonella serovars. Our results showed that the combination of both SIR and ratA amplifications could be used to identify as well as to differentiate colonies of S Gallinarum and S Pullorum reliably. Thus, we believe this methodology can be a useful ancillary tool for routine veterinary diagnostic laboratories by providing rapid, accurate results. PMID:27216724

  11. Development of PCR and TaqMan PCR Assays to Detect Pseudomonas coronafaciens, a Causal Agent of Halo Blight of Oats

    PubMed Central

    An, Ji-Hye; Noh, Young-Hee; Kim, Yong-Eon; Lee, Hyok-In; Cha, Jae-Soon

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas coronafaciens causes halo blight on oats and is a plant quarantine bacterium in many countries, including the Republic of Korea. Using of the certificated seed is important for control of the disease. Since effective detection method of P. coronafaciens is not available yet, PCR and TaqMan PCR assays for specific detection of P. coronafaciens were developed in this study. PCR primers were designed from the draft genome sequence of P. coronafaciens LMG 5060 which was obtained by the next-generation sequencing in this study. The PCR primer set Pc-12-F/Pc-12-R specifically amplified 498 bp from the 13 strains of P. coronafaciens isolated in the seven different countries (Canada, Japan, United Kingdom, Zimbabwe, Kenya, Germany, and New Zealand) and the nested primer set Pc-12-ne-F/Pc-12-ne-R specifically amplified 298 bp from those strains. The target-size PCR product was not amplified from the non-target bacteria with the PCR and nested primer sets. TaqMan PCR with Pc-12-ne-F/Pc-12-ne-R and a TaqMan probe, Pc-taqman, which were designed inside of the nested PCR amplicon, generated Ct values which in a dose-dependent manner to the amount of the target DNA and the Ct values of all the P. coronafaciens strains were above the threshold Ct value for positive detection. The TaqMan PCR generated positive Ct values from the seed extracts of the artificially inoculated oat seeds above 10 cfu/ml inoculation level. PCR and TaqMan PCR assays developed in this study will be useful tools to detect and identify the plant quarantine pathogen, P. coronafaciens. PMID:25774107

  12. Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay for Rapid Detection of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococci Directly from Positive Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hye-young; Kim, Sunghyun; Kim, Jungho; Park, Soon-Deok

    2014-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is the most prevalent cause of bloodstream infections (BSIs) and is recognized as a major nosocomial pathogen. This study aimed to evaluate a newly designed multiplex real-time PCR assay capable of the simultaneous detection of mecA, S. aureus, and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) in blood culture specimens. The Real-MRSA and Real-MRCoNS multiplex real-time PCR assays (M&D, Republic of Korea) use the TaqMan probes 16S rRNA for Staphylococcus spp., the nuc gene for S. aureus, and the mecA gene for methicillin resistance. The detection limit of the multiplex real-time PCR assay was 103 CFU/ml per PCR for each gene target. The multiplex real-time PCR assay was evaluated using 118 clinical isolates from various specimen types and a total of 350 positive blood cultures from a continuous monitoring blood culture system. The results obtained with the multiplex real-time PCR assay for the three targets were in agreement with those of conventional identification and susceptibility testing methods except for one organism. Of 350 positive bottle cultures, the sensitivities of the multiplex real-time PCR kit were 100% (166/166 cultures), 97.2% (35/36 cultures), and 99.2% (117/118 cultures) for the 16S rRNA, nuc, and mecA genes, respectively, and the specificities for all three targets were 100%. The Real-MRSA and Real-MRCoNS multiplex real-time PCR assays are very useful for the rapid accurate diagnosis of staphylococcal BSIs. In addition, the Real-MRSA and Real-MRCoNS multiplex real-time PCR assays could have an important impact on the choice of appropriate antimicrobial therapy, based on detection of the mecA gene. PMID:24648566

  13. A one step real-time RT-PCR assay for the quantitation of Wheat yellow mosaic virus (WYMV)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Wheat yellow mosaic virus (WYMV) is an important pathogen in China and other countries. It is the member of the genus Bymovirus and transmitted primarily by Polymyxa graminis. The incidence of wheat infections in endemic areas has risen in recent years. Prompt and dependable identification of WYMV is a critical component of response to suspect cases. Methods In this study, a one step real-time RT-PCR, followed by standard curve analysis for the detection and identification of WYMV, was developed. Two reference genes, 18s RNA and β-actin were selected in order to adjust the veracity of the real-time RT-PCR assay. Results We developed a one-step Taqman-based real-time quantitative RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) assay targeting the conserved region of the 879 bp long full-length WYMV coat protein gene. The accuracy of normalized data was analyzed along with appropriate internal control genes: β-actin and 18s rRNA which were included in detecting of WYMV-infected wheat leaf tissues. The detectable end point sensitivity in RT-qPCR assay was reaching the minimum limit of the quantitative assay and the measurable copy numbers were about 30 at106-fold dilution of total RNA. This value was close to 104-fold more sensitive than that of indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. More positive samples were detected by RT-qPCR assay than gel-based RT-PCR when detecting the suspected samples collected from 8 regions of China. Based on presented results, RT-qPCR will provide a valuable method for the quantitative detection of WYMV. Conclusions The Taqman-based RT-qPCR assay is a faster, simpler, more sensitive and less expensive procedure for detection and quantification of WYMV than other currently used methods. PMID:23725024

  14. Development and evaluation of a reverse transcription-insulated isothermal polymerase chain reaction (RT-iiPCR) assay for detection of equine arteritis virus in equine semen and tissue samples using the POCKIT™ system.

    PubMed

    Carossino, Mariano; Lee, Pei-Yu A; Nam, Bora; Skillman, Ashley; Shuck, Kathleen M; Timoney, Peter J; Tsai, Yun-Long; Ma, Li-Juan; Chang, Hsiao-Fen G; Wang, Hwa-Tang T; Balasuriya, Udeni B R

    2016-08-01

    Equine arteritis virus (EAV) is the causative agent of equine viral arteritis (EVA), a respiratory and reproductive disease of horses. Most importantly, EAV induces abortion in pregnant mares and can establish persistent infection in up to 10-70% of the infected stallions, which will continue to shed the virus in their semen. The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate a reverse transcription insulated isothermal polymerase chain reaction (RT-iiPCR) for the detection of EAV in semen and tissue samples. The newly developed assay had a limit of detection of 10 RNA copies and a 10-fold higher sensitivity than a previously described real-time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR). Evaluation of 125 semen samples revealed a sensitivity and specificity of 98.46% and 100.00%, respectively for the RT-qPCR assay, and 100.00% and 98.33%, respectively for the RT-iiPCR assay. Both assays had the same accuracy (99.2%, k=0.98) compared to virus isolation. Corresponding values derived from testing various tissue samples (n=122) collected from aborted fetuses, foals, and EAV carrier stallions are as follows: relative sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 88.14%, 96.83%, and 92.62% (k=0.85), respectively for the RT-qPCR assay, and 98.31%, 92.06%, and 95.08% (k=0.90), respectively for the RT-iiPCR assay. These results indicate that RT-iiPCR is a sensitive, specific, and a robust test enabling detection of EAV in semen and tissue samples with very considerable accuracy. Even though the RT-qPCR assay showed a sensitivity and specificity equal to virus isolation for semen samples, its diagnostic performance was somewhat limited for tissue samples. Thus, this new RT-iiPCR could be considered as an alternative tool in the implementation of EAV control and prevention strategies. PMID:27036504

  15. Development of a real-time PCR assay for quantification of Acanthamoeba trophozoites and cysts.

    PubMed

    Rivière, Delphine; Szczebara, Florence Ménard; Berjeaud, Jean-Marc; Frère, Jacques; Héchard, Yann

    2006-01-01

    Free-living amoebae have been found to be a reservoir for various pathogenic bacteria in aquatic environments. For example, the Acanthamoeba genus renders possible the intracellular multiplication of Legionella pneumophila, which is responsible for legionellosis. It consequently matters to quantify Acanthamoeba cells and thereby enhance our assessment of the risk of contamination. The classical microbiological method of quantification relies on amoebae growth and most probable number calculation. We have developed a real-time PCR assay based on a TaqMan probe that hybridizes onto 18S rDNA. This probe is specific to the Acanthamoeba genus. The assay was successful with both the trophozoite and the cyst forms of Acanthamoeba. Highly sensitive, it proved to permit detection of fewer than 10 cells, even those that are not easily cultivable, such as the cyst forms. PMID:15923051

  16. Sources of Blood Meals of Sylvatic Triatoma guasayana near Zurima, Bolivia, Assayed with qPCR and 12S Cloning

    PubMed Central

    Lucero, David E.; Ribera, Wilma; Pizarro, Juan Carlos; Plaza, Carlos; Gordon, Levi W.; Peña, Reynaldo; Morrissey, Leslie A.; Rizzo, Donna M.; Stevens, Lori

    2014-01-01

    Background In this study we compared the utility of two molecular biology techniques, cloning of the mitochondrial 12S ribosomal RNA gene and hydrolysis probe-based qPCR, to identify blood meal sources of sylvatic Chagas disease insect vectors collected with live-bait mouse traps (also known as Noireau traps). Fourteen T. guasayana were collected from six georeferenced trap locations in the Andean highlands of the department of Chuquisaca, Bolivia. Methodology/Principal Findings We detected four blood meals sources with the cloning assay: seven samples were positive for human (Homo sapiens), five for chicken (Gallus gallus) and unicolored blackbird (Agelasticus cyanopus), and one for opossum (Monodelphis domestica). Using the qPCR assay we detected chicken (13 vectors), and human (14 vectors) blood meals as well as an additional blood meal source, Canis sp. (4 vectors). Conclusions/Significance We show that cloning of 12S PCR products, which avoids bias associated with developing primers based on a priori knowledge, detected blood meal sources not previously considered and that species-specific qPCR is more sensitive. All samples identified as positive for a specific blood meal source by the cloning assay were also positive by qPCR. However, not all samples positive by qPCR were positive by cloning. We show the power of combining the cloning assay with the highly sensitive hydrolysis probe-based qPCR assay provides a more complete picture of blood meal sources for insect disease vectors. PMID:25474154

  17. Single Laboratory Comparison of Quantitative Real-Time PCR Assays for the Detection of Human Fecal Pollution

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are numerous quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) methods available to detect and enumerate human fecal pollution in ambient waters. Each assay employs distinct primers and/or probes and many target different genes and microorganisms leading to potential variations in method ...

  18. Single Laboratory Comparison of Quantitative Real-Time PCR Assays for the Detection of Human Fecal Pollution - Poster

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are numerous quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) methods available to detect and enumerate human fecal pollution in ambient waters. Each assay employs distinct primers and/or probes and many target different genes and microorganisms leading to potential variations in method p...

  19. Multi-laboratory comparison of quantitative PCR assays for detection and quantification of Fusarium virguliforme from soybean roots and soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate identification and quantification of Fusarium virguliforme, the cause of sudden death syndrome (SDS) in soybean, within root tissue and soil are important tasks. Several quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays have been developed but there are no reports comparing their use in sensitive and specific...

  20. Development and evaluation of the internal-controlled real-time PCR assay for Rhodococcus equi detection in various clinical specimens

    PubMed Central

    STEFAŃSKA, Ilona; WITKOWSKI, Lucjan; RZEWUSKA, Magdalena; DZIECIĄTKOWSKI, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is the causative agent of rhodococcosis in horses, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality in foals. This bacterium has also been isolated from a variety of animals and is being increasingly reported as a cause of infection in humans, mainly in immunosuppressed individuals. Laboratory diagnostics of R. equi infections based only on conventional microbiological methods shows low accuracy and can lead to misidentification. The objective of the study was to develop and evaluate a real-time PCR assay for direct detection of R. equi in various clinical specimens, including tissue samples. The species-specific region of the gene encoding R. equi cholesterol oxidase, choE, was used as a qPCR-target. The diagnostic applicability of the assay was confirmed by testing various tissue specimens obtained from horses with clinical signs of rhodoccocal infection and swine submaxillary lymph nodes. The rate of R. equi detection in clinical specimens by the developed assay was higher in comparison to the culture method (90% vs. 60.0% of positive samples) and conventional PCR (90.0% vs. 20.0% of positive samples). In case of 13 samples that were negative in the culture-based method, R. equi was detected by the developed assay. Only in one case, it gave negative result for culture-positive sample. The assay may provide a simple and rapid tool to complement the classical methods of R. equi detection based on culture and phenotypic identification of isolates, as the performed evaluation indicated a high specificity and accuracy of the results. PMID:26655770

  1. Development of a PCR-ELISA assay for diagnosis of Perkinsus marinus and Perkinsus atlanticus infections in bivalve molluscs.

    PubMed

    Elandalloussi, Laurence M; Leite, Ricardo M; Afonso, Ricardo; Nunes, Patrícia A; Robledo, José A F; Vasta, Gerardo R; Cancela, M Leonor

    2004-04-01

    Perkinsus atlanticus and P. marinus have been associated with mass mortality of bivalve molluscs. Perkinsus infections are routinely diagnosed by histology or the fluid thioglycollate medium (FTM) assay. In this study, we describe the development of a PCR-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for amplification and rapid detection of Perkinsus species. The PCR reactions were selected to either amplify an IGS sequence region shared by currently accepted Perkinsus species or to simultaneously amplify IGS regions specific to either P. atlanticus or P. marinus. The specific hybridisation of DIG-labelled amplified products to species-specific capture probes was detected colorimetrically. This assay is able to specifically detect P. atlanticus and P. marinus, and the intensity of the colorimetric signal is dependent upon the amount of amplified product. The PCR-ELISA assay format is 100-fold more sensitive than visualisation of PCR products on ethidium bromide (EtdBr)-stained agarose gels, and as sensitive as Southern hybridisation. The sensitivity limit of PCR-ELISA was 1 pg of DNA from P. atlanticus. No cross-reactivity of the assay was observed against the host DNA. When applied to the detection of P. atlanticus in clams, 39 samples out of 45 yielded concordant results for FTM assay and PCR-ELISA detection. PMID:15051117

  2. Performance of PCR-reverse blot hybridization assay for detection of rifampicin-resistant Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hye-young; Kim, Hyunjung; Kim, Yeun; Bang, Hyeeun; Kim, Jong-Pill; Hwang, Joo Hwan; Cho, Sang-Nae; Kim, Tae Ue; Lee, Hyeyoung

    2015-10-01

    Drug resistance in Mycobacterium leprae is a significant problem in countries where leprosy is endemic. A sensitive, specific, and high-throughput reverse blot hybridization assay (REBA) for the detection of genotypic resistance to rifampicin (RIF) was designed and evaluated. It has been shown that resistance to RIF in M. leprae involves mutations in the rpoB gene encoding the -subunit of the RNA polymerase. The PCR-REBA simultaneously detects both 6 wild-type regions and 5 different mutations (507 AGC, 513 GTG, 516 TAT, 531 ATG, and 531 TTC) including the most prevalent mutations at positions 507 and 531. Thirty-one clinical isolates provided by Korea Institute of Hansen-s Disease were analyzed by PCR-REBA with RIF resistance of rpoB gene. As a result, missense mutations at codons 507 AGC and 531 ATG with 2-nucleotide substitutions were found in one sample, and a missense mutation at codon 516 TAT and ΔWT6 (deletion of 530-534) was found in another sample. These cases were confirmed by DNA sequence analysis. This rapid, simple, and highly sensitive assay provides a practical alternative to sequencing for genotypic evaluation of RIF resistance in M. leprae. PMID:26428919

  3. An epidemiological survey on the determination of Taenia saginata cysticercosis in Iran, using a PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh, S; Setayesh, A; Shekarforoush, S S; Fariman, S H

    2013-04-27

    Bovine cysticercosis caused by Taenia saginata is a zoonotic disease affirming routine inspection measures for the postmortem detection of cysticerci (cysts) in beef destined for human consumption. Detection is based on gross examination of traditional carcase predilection sites; although there is evidence to suggest that examination of other sites may offer improvements in sensitivity. In the current study, a biomolecular-based assay was employed to confirm and differentiate T saginata cysticercosis from other comparable parasitic infection in cattle carcases. Out of 7371 cattle carcases routinely inspected, 72 (0.97 per cent) were initially detected, from which 57 (79.16 per cent), 11(15.27 per cent) and 4 (5.55 per cent) were recorded in masseter muscle, heart and diaphragm, respectively. The PCR assay was also conducted to confirm different stages of the cysts, being able to detect the cyst, and to discriminate its various degenerative stages with other parasitic structures. The technique was proposed as a reliable tool to differentiate the cysticerci and, thus, could be used in further epidemiological studies as there was no difference in view of negative PCR results in lesions found by routine inspection. PMID:23571031

  4. Multiplex PCR assay specific for the multidrug-resistant strain W of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Plikaytis, B B; Marden, J L; Crawford, J T; Woodley, C L; Butler, W R; Shinnick, T M

    1994-06-01

    In 1991, a multidrug-resistant strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was isolated from eight people with tuberculosis at a state correctional facility in New York. This strain, which is designated strain W (IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism type 212072), was resistant to isoniazid, rifampin, ethambutol, streptomycin, kanamycin, ethionamide, and rifabutin. Since that outbreak, the W strain has been associated with outbreaks in five hospitals in the New York City area and is a continuing public health problem in the area. To be able to identify this strain rapidly, we developed a multiplex PCR assay which targets a direct repeat of IS6110 with a 556-bp intervening sequence (NTF-1). The amplification generates two amplicons from strain W, which indicate the presence and orientation of the NTF-1 sequence between the direct repeat of IS6110, and a third amplicon, which serves as an internal PCR control. The assay was evaluated with 193 isolates of M. tuberculosis, and all 48 strain W isolates among those 193 isolates were correctly identified. PMID:7915723

  5. RAPHIDOPHYCEAE [CHADEFAUD EX SILVA] SYSTEMATICS AND RAPID IDENTIFICATION: SEQUENCE ANALYSES AND REAL-TIME PCR ASSAYS

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Holly A.; Tomas, Carmelo; Tengs, Torstein; Kempton, Jason W.; Lewitus, Alan J.; Oldach, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Species within the class Raphidophyceae were associated with fish kill events in Japanese, European, Canadian, and U.S. coastal waters. Fish mortality was attributable to gill damage with exposure to reactive oxygen species (peroxide, superoxide, and hydroxide radicals), neurotoxins, physical clogging, and hemolytic substances. Morphological identification of these organisms in environmental water samples is difficult, particularly when fixatives are used. Because of this difficulty and the continued global emergence of these species in coastal estuarine waters, we initiated the development and validation of a suite of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. Sequencing was used to generate complete data sets for nuclear encoded small-subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA; 18S); internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2, 5.8S; and plastid encoded SSU rRNA (16S) for confirmed raphidophyte cultures from various geographic locations. Sequences for several Chattonella species (C. antiqua, C. marina, C. ovata, C. subsalsa, and C. verruculosa), Heterosigma akashiwo, and Fibrocapsa japonica were generated and used to design rapid and specific PCR assays for several species including C. verruculosa Hara et Chihara, C. subsalsa Biecheler, the complex comprised of C. marina Hara et Chihara, C. antiqua Ono and C. ovata, H. akashiwo Ono, and F. japonica Toriumi et Takano using appropriate loci. With this comprehensive data set, we were also able to perform phylogenetic analyses to determine the relationship between these species. PMID:20411032

  6. Accurate Detection and Quantification of the Fish Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia virus (VHSv) with a Two-Color Fluorometric Real-Time PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Palsule, Vrushalee V.; Yeo, Jiyoun; Shepherd, Brian S.; Crawford, Erin L.; Stepien, Carol A.

    2013-01-01

    Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia virus (VHSv) is one of the world's most serious fish pathogens, infecting >80 marine, freshwater, and estuarine fish species from Eurasia and North America. A novel and especially virulent strain – IVb – appeared in the Great Lakes in 2003, has killed many game fish species in a series of outbreaks in subsequent years, and shut down interstate transport of baitfish. Cell culture is the diagnostic method approved by the USDA-APHIS, which takes a month or longer, lacks sensitivity, and does not quantify the amount of virus. We thus present a novel, easy, rapid, and highly sensitive real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) assay that incorporates synthetic competitive template internal standards for quality control to circumvent false negative results. Results demonstrate high signal-to-analyte response (slope = 1.00±0.02) and a linear dynamic range that spans seven orders of magnitude (R2 = 0.99), ranging from 6 to 6,000,000 molecules. Infected fishes are found to harbor levels of virus that range to 1,200,000 VHSv molecules/106 actb1 molecules with 1,000 being a rough cut-off for clinical signs of disease. This new assay is rapid, inexpensive, and has significantly greater accuracy than other published qRT-PCR tests and traditional cell culture diagnostics. PMID:23977162

  7. Simultaneous Detection of CDC Category “A” DNA and RNA Bioterrorism Agents by Use of Multiplex PCR & RT-PCR Enzyme Hybridization Assays

    PubMed Central

    He, Jie; Kraft, Andrea J.; Fan, Jiang; Van Dyke, Meredith; Wang, Lihua; Bose, Michael E.; Khanna, Marilyn; Metallo, Jacob A.; Henrickson, Kelly J.

    2009-01-01

    Assays to simultaneously detect multiple potential agents of bioterrorism are limited. Two multiplex PCR and RT-PCR enzyme hybridization assays (mPCR-EHA, mRT-PCR-EHA) were developed to simultaneously detect many of the CDC category “A” bioterrorism agents. The “Bio T” DNA assay was developed to detect: Variola major (VM), Bacillus anthracis (BA), Yersinia pestis (YP), Francisella tularensis (FT) and Varicella zoster virus (VZV). The “Bio T” RNA assay (mRT-PCR-EHA) was developed to detect: Ebola virus (Ebola), Lassa fever virus (Lassa), Rift Valley fever (RVF), Hantavirus Sin Nombre species (HSN) and dengue virus (serotypes 1–4). Sensitivity and specificity of the 2 assays were tested by using genomic DNA, recombinant plasmid positive controls, RNA transcripts controls, surrogate (spiked) clinical samples and common respiratory pathogens. The analytical sensitivity (limit of detection (LOD)) of the DNA asssay for genomic DNA was 1×100∼1×102 copies/mL for BA, FT and YP. The LOD for VZV whole organism was 1×10−2 TCID50/mL. The LOD for recombinant controls ranged from 1×102∼1×103copies/mL for BA, FT, YP and VM. The RNA assay demonstrated LOD for RNA transcript controls of 1×104∼1×106 copies/mL without extraction and 1×105∼1×106 copies/mL with extraction for Ebola, RVF, Lassa and HSN. The LOD for dengue whole organisms was ∼1×10−4 dilution for dengue 1 and 2, 1×104 LD50/mL and 1×102 LD50/mL for dengue 3 and 4. The LOD without extraction for recombinant plasmid DNA controls was ∼1×103 copies/mL (1.5 input copies/reaction) for Ebola, RVF, Lassa and HSN. No cross-reactivity of primers and probes used in both assays was detected with common respiratory pathogens or between targeted analytes. Clinical sensitivity was estimated using 264 surrogate clinical samples tested with the BioT DNA assay and 549 samples tested with the BioT RNA assay. The clinical specificity is 99.6% and 99.8% for BioT DNA assay and BioT RNA assay

  8. New Quadriplex PCR Assay for Detection of Methicillin and Mupirocin Resistance and Simultaneous Discrimination of Staphylococcus aureus from Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kunyan; Sparling, Jennifer; Chow, Barbara L.; Elsayed, Sameer; Hussain, Zafar; Church, Deirdre L.; Gregson, Daniel B.; Louie, Thomas; Conly, John M.

    2004-01-01

    Major challenges in diagnostic molecular microbiology are to develop a simple assay to distinguish Staphylococcus aureus from the less virulent but clinically important coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) and to simultaneously determine their antibiotic resistance profiles. Multiplex PCR assays have been developed for the detection of methicillin- and mupirocin-resistant S. aureus and CoNS but not for the simultaneous discrimination of S. aureus from CoNS. We designed a new set of Staphylococcus genus-specific primers and developed a novel quadriplex PCR assay targeting the 16S rRNA (Staphylococcus genus specific), nuc (S. aureus species specific), mecA (a determinant of methicillin resistance), and mupA (a determinant of mupirocin resistance) genes to identify most staphylococci, to discriminate S. aureus from CoNS and other bacteria, and to simultaneously detect methicillin and mupirocin resistance. Validation of the assay with 96 ATCC control strains and 323 previously characterized clinical isolates, including methicillin- and mupirocin-sensitive and -resistant S. aureus and CoNS isolates and other bacteria, demonstrated 100% sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy. This assay represents a simple, rapid, accurate, and reliable approach for the detection of methicillin- and mupirocin-resistant staphylococci and offers the hope of preventing their widespread dissemination through early and reliable detection. PMID:15528678

  9. Validation and standardization of IS900 and F57 real-time quantitative PCR assays for the specific detection and quantification of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sidoti, Francesca; Banche, Giuliana; Astegiano, Sara; Allizond, Valeria; Cuffini, Anna Maria; Bergallo, Massimiliano

    2011-05-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) is the causative agent of Johne's disease and may contribute to the onset and development of Crohn's disease in humans. Rapid detection of Map is fundamental because of its reported isolation from pasteurized milk and its potential for transmission through environmental sources. In this study, we developed two independent real-time quantitative PCR assays targeting the IS900 genetic insertion sequence and the F57 sequence, which proved capable of detecting and quantifying Map DNA. Validation and standardization of the developed methods were performed by evaluating diagnostic trueness, precision, and accuracy of the techniques. Specificity of the IS900 and F57 methods was verified in both in silico and experimental studies. The assays were found to be very accurate and precise with high repeatability and reproducibility. Moreover, the two real-time assays were very specific for Map, discriminating most of mycobacterial and nonmycobacterial species. PMID:21510779

  10. Duplex TaqMan real-time PCR assay for quantitative detection of Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii and Stenocarpella maydis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new TaqMan real-time PCR assay was developed for the simultaneous quantitative detection of two seedborne maize pathogens in a single assay. Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii (Pnss) (syn. Erwinia stewartii) is the causal agent of Stewart's bacterial wilt and leaf blight of maize. Stewart's wilt i...

  11. Optimized Diagnostic Assays Based on Redox Tagged Bioreceptive Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Bedatty Fernandes, Flavio C; Patil, Amol V; Bueno, Paulo R; Davis, Jason J

    2015-12-15

    Among the numerous label free electronic biomarker assay methodologies now available, impedance based electrochemical capacitance spectroscopy (ECS), based upon mapping the perturbations in interfacial charging of redox elements incorporated into a biologically receptive interface, has recently been shown to be a convenient and highly sensitive mode of transduction and one which, additionally, requires no predoping of analytical solution. We present, herein, a data acquisition and analysis methodology based on frequency resolved immittance function analysis. Ultimately, this enables both a maximization of assay sensitivity and a reduction in assay acquisition time by an order of magnitude. PMID:26583592

  12. Quantitative assay of PCR-amplified hepatitis B virus DNA using a peroxidase-labelled DNA probe and enhanced chemiluminescence.

    PubMed Central

    Erhardt, A; Schaefer, S; Athanassiou, N; Kann, M; Gerlich, W H

    1996-01-01

    We have developed a sensitive and quantitative assay for hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA in serum or plasma in which PCR and then microtiter hybridization analysis are used. Assay of HBV DNA in serum or plasma is important for demonstrating viral replication, indicating and monitoring antiviral therapy, determining the infectivities of virus carriers, and ensuring the safety of blood products. Under optimum conditions PCR can amplify one HBV DNA molecule to 10(8) copies, but detection of this amount of DNA still requires hybridization with labelled probes or a nested PCR. We labelled one strand of the PCR product with a biotinylated primer. The double-stranded amplicon was incubated in streptavidin-coated microplate wells. The nonlabelled strand was removed after denaturation of the double-stranded DNA with alkali, and the bound strand was hybridized with a peroxidase-coupled single-stranded probe. The amount of bound peroxidase was measured in a luminometer. Four picograms of amplicon was detectable in this system, whereas conventional ethidium bromide staining requires a 1,000 times higher amplicon concentration. The performance of the new assay was compared with those of nested PCR and a PCR system that uses a digoxigenin label, hybridization to a solid-phase adsorbed probe, and colorimetric detection. The chemiluminescence assay was found to be almost as sensitive as nested PCR and approximately five times more sensitive than the colorimetric test. PMID:8818875

  13. Rapid Detection of Ceratocystis platani Inoculum by Quantitative Real-Time PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Ghelardini, Luisa; Belbahri, Lassaâd; Quartier, Marion; Santini, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Ceratocystis platani is the causal agent of canker stain of plane trees, a lethal disease able to kill mature trees in one or two successive growing seasons. The pathogen is a quarantine organism and has a negative impact on anthropogenic and natural populations of plane trees. Contaminated sawdust produced during pruning and sanitation fellings can contribute to disease spread. The goal of this study was to design a rapid, real-time quantitative PCR assay to detect a C. platani airborne inoculum. Airborne inoculum traps (AITs) were placed in an urban setting in the city of Florence, Italy, where the disease was present. Primers and TaqMan minor groove binder (MGB) probes were designed to target cerato-platanin (CP) and internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) genes. The detection limits of the assay were 0.05 pg/μl and 2 fg/μl of fungal DNA for CP and ITS, respectively. Pathogen detection directly from AITs demonstrated specificity and high sensitivity for C. platani, detecting DNA concentrations as low as 1.2 × 10−2 to 1.4 × 10−2 pg/μl, corresponding to ∼10 conidia per ml. Airborne inoculum traps were able to detect the C. platani inoculum within 200 m of the closest symptomatic infected plane tree. The combination of airborne trapping and real-time quantitative PCR assay provides a rapid and sensitive method for the specific detection of a C. platani inoculum. This technique may be used to identify the period of highest risk of pathogen spread in a site, thus helping disease management. PMID:23811499

  14. A quantitative reverse transcription-PCR assay for rapid, automated analysis of breast cancer sentinel lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Steven J; Xi, Liqiang; Gooding, William E; Cole, David J; Mitas, Michael; Metcalf, John; Bhargava, Rohit; Dabbs, David; Ching, Jesus; Kozma, Lynn; McMillan, William; Godfrey, Tony E

    2009-11-01

    We have previously reported that a quantitative reverse transcription (QRT)-PCR assay accurately analyzes sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) from breast cancer patients. The aim of this study was to assess a completely automated, cartridge-based version of the assay for accuracy, predictive value, and reproducibility. The triplex (two markers + control) QRT-PCR assay was incorporated into a single-use cartridge for point-of-care use on the GeneXpert system. Three academic centers participated equally. Twenty-nine positive lymph nodes and 30 negative lymph nodes were analyzed to establish classification rules. SLNs from 120 patients were subsequently analyzed by QRT-PCR and histology (including immunohistochemistry), and the predetermined decision rules were used to classify the SLNs; 112 SLN specimens produced an informative result by both QRT-PCR and histology. By histological analysis, 21 SLNs were positive and 91 SLNs were negative for metastasis. QRT-PCR characterization produced a classification with 100% sensitivity, 97.8% specificity, and 98.2% accuracy compared with histology (91.3% positive predictive value and 100% negative predictive value). Interlaboratory reproducibility analyses demonstrated that a 95% prediction interval for a new measurement (DeltaCt) ranged between 0.403 and 0.956. This fully automated QRT-PCR assay accurately characterizes breast cancer SLNs for the presence of metastasis. Furthermore, the assay is not dependent on subjective interpretation, is reproducible across three clinical environments, and is rapid enough to allow intraoperative decision making. PMID:19797614

  15. Development of a caseinase assay for PCR independent detection of esp gene carriage among enterococci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dada, Ayokunle Christopher; Asmat, Ahmad; Lee, Yook Heng; Usup, Gires

    2013-11-01

    Currently, there is no known relationship between caseinase and carriage of esp gene. Also, no breakpoints exist for phenotypic assays that are used to infer virulence characteristics among Enterococci. In the present study, caseinase activity was measured by a radial diffusion assay for 113 enterococci isolates. A standard curve with predictive r2 value of 0.939 was produced by dispensing several doubling dilutions of proteinase K into 3% skimmed milk agar wells. Caseinase activity for all tested enterococci was subsequently converted into proteinase K activity, using the obtained chart. Caseinase activity ranged from 1.74 × 10-8 to 4.47 × 10-7ug/ml and 6.37 × 10-8 to 8.82 × 10-8 ug/ml per colony of environmental and clinical enterocococci tested, proportionate to proteinase K activity. Caseinase activity among environmental strains was five-fold higher than was observed among clinical strains. Fishers exact test revealed significant associations between esp gene carriage and caseinase activity (diameter on skimmed milk, z=8 to 13mm) at p<0.1. However, the probability of association was strongest at z=13 mm (p=0.033) suggesting a range of diameter cut-offs that was exclusive to and may be used to predict the presence of environmental enterococci strains harbouring esp gene. Results obtained from sensitivity analysis showed increasing assay sensitivity from cut-off of 9 mm (61.54%) up to 84.62% (13 mm). Specificity of the caseinase assay slightly decreased from 50% to 42.86% as cut-off increased from 9 to 13 mm. The caseinase assay described here potentially proves useful in preliminary PCR independent screening of environmental enterococci isolates for the detection of strains which carry the esp gene known to increase the severity of enterococcal infections.

  16. Detection limits and cost comparisons of human- and gull-associated conventional and quantitative PCR assays in artificial and environmental waters.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Timothy E; Zimmer-Faust, Amity G; Thulsiraj, Vanessa; Madi, Tania; Hanley, Kaitlyn T; Ebentier, Darcy L; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara; Layton, Blythe; Raith, Meredith; Boehm, Alexandria B; Griffith, John F; Holden, Patricia A; Shanks, Orin C; Weisberg, Stephen B; Jay, Jennifer A

    2014-04-01

    Some molecular methods for tracking fecal pollution in environmental waters have both PCR and quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays available for use. To assist managers in deciding whether to implement newer qPCR techniques in routine monitoring programs, we compared detection limits (LODs) and costs of PCR and qPCR assays with identical targets that are relevant to beach water quality assessment. For human-associated assays targeting Bacteroidales HF183 genetic marker, qPCR LODs were 70 times lower and there was no effect of target matrix (artificial freshwater, environmental creek water, and environmental marine water) on PCR or qPCR LODs. The PCR startup and annual costs were the lowest, while the per reaction cost was 62% lower than the Taqman based qPCR and 180% higher than the SYBR based qPCR. For gull-associated assays, there was no significant difference between PCR and qPCR LODs, target matrix did not effect PCR or qPCR LODs, and PCR startup, annual, and per reaction costs were lower. Upgrading to qPCR involves greater startup and annual costs, but this increase may be justified in the case of the human-associated assays with lower detection limits and reduced cost per sample. PMID:24583609

  17. Detection limits and cost comparisons of human- and gull-associated conventional and quantitative PCR assays in artificial and environmental waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riedel, Timothy E.; Zimmer-Faust, Amity G.; Thulsiraj, Vanessa; Madi, Tania; Hanley, Kaitlyn T.; Ebentier, Darcy L.; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.; Layton, Blythe; Raith, Meredith; Boehm, Alexandria B.; Griffith, John F.; Holden, Patricia A.; Shanks, Orin C.; Weisberg, Stephen B.; Jay, Jennifer A.

    2014-01-01

    Some molecular methods for tracking fecal pollution in environmental waters have both PCR and quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays available for use. To assist managers in deciding whether to implement newer qPCR techniques in routine monitoring programs, we compared detection limits (LODs) and costs of PCR and qPCR assays with identical targets that are relevant to beach water quality assessment. For human-associated assays targeting Bacteroidales HF183 genetic marker, qPCR LODs were 70 times lower and there was no effect of target matrix (artificial freshwater, environmental creek water, and environmental marine water) on PCR or qPCR LODs. The PCR startup and annual costs were the lowest, while the per reaction cost was 62% lower than the Taqman based qPCR and 180% higher than the SYBR based qPCR. For gull-associated assays, there was no significant difference between PCR and qPCR LODs, target matrix did not effect PCR or qPCR LODs, and PCR startup, annual, and per reaction costs were lower. Upgrading to qPCR involves greater startup and annual costs, but this increase may be justified in the case of the human-associated assays with lower detection limits and reduced cost per sample.

  18. Quantitative Detection and Resolution of BRAF V600 Status in Colorectal Cancer Using Droplet Digital PCR and a Novel Wild-Type Negative Assay.

    PubMed

    Bidshahri, Roza; Attali, Dean; Fakhfakh, Kareem; McNeil, Kelly; Karsan, Aly; Won, Jennifer R; Wolber, Robert; Bryan, Jennifer; Hughesman, Curtis; Haynes, Charles

    2016-03-01

    A need exists for robust and cost-effective assays to detect a single or small set of actionable point mutations, or a complete set of clinically informative mutant alleles. Knowledge of these mutations can be used to alert the clinician to a rare mutation that might necessitate more aggressive clinical monitoring or a personalized course of treatment. An example is BRAF, a (proto)oncogene susceptible to either common or rare mutations in codon V600 and adjacent codons. We report a diagnostic technology that leverages the unique capabilities of droplet digital PCR to achieve not only accurate and sensitive detection of BRAF(V600E) but also all known somatic point mutations within the BRAF V600 codon. The simple and inexpensive two-well droplet digital PCR assay uses a chimeric locked nucleic acid/DNA probe against wild-type BRAF and a novel wild-type-negative screening paradigm. The assay shows complete diagnostic accuracy when applied to formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor specimens from metastatic colorectal cancer patients deficient for Mut L homologue-1. PMID:26762843

  19. Laboratory utility of coproscopy, copro immunoassays and copro nPCR assay targeting Hsp90 gene for detection of Cryptosporidium in children, Cairo, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Ghallab, Marwa M I; Aziz, Inas Z Abdel; Shoeib, Eman Y; El-Badry, Ayman A

    2016-09-01

    Cryptosporidium is a significant cause of diarrhea worldwide especially in children. Infection may end fatally in immunocompromised patients. Multi-attribute analysis was used to determine the lab utility of 4 diagnostics; coproscopy of AF stained fecal smear, fecal immunoassays by ICT and ELISA and copro-nPCR assay targeting Hsp90 gene, for detection of Cryptosporidium in stool of 250 Egyptian children (150 diarrheic and 100 non-diarrhaeic children). Also, to determine Cryptosporidium molecular prevalence. Cryptosporidium was an important enteric pathogen among both diarrheic and non-diarrheic study children with a clearly high prevalence of 16.4 % (n = 41). Conventional methods had perfect specificity (100 %) but couldn`t be used as a consistent single detection method due to their lowered sensitivities. Multi-attribute analysis ranked nPCR the highest test for lab use. Being the test with the best diagnostic yield, nPCR is a reliable diagnostic test and is going to replace conventional methods for reliable detection of Cryptosporidium. PMID:27605806

  20. Detection and quantification by PCR assay of the biocontrol agent Pantoea agglomerans CPA-2 on apples.

    PubMed

    Soto-Muñoz, Lourdes; Teixidó, Neus; Usall, Josep; Viñas, Inmaculada; Torres, Rosario

    2014-04-01

    The registration of biological control agents requires the development of monitoring systems to detect and quantify the agent in the environment. Pantoea agglomerans CPA-2 is an effective biocontrol agent for postharvest diseases of citrus and pome fruits. The monitoring of CPA-2 in postharvest semi-commercial trials was evaluated by Rodac impression plates and the colonies isolated were confirmed by conventional PCR using the SCAR primers PAGA1 and PAGB1. Samples were taken from different surfaces that had contact with CPA-2, the surrounding environment and working clothes worn by handlers. Moreover, population dynamics of the strain CPA-2 were determined on apple surfaces using both the classical plating technique and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). A qPCR assay using a 3'-minor groove-binding (MGB) probe was developed for the specific detection and quantification of P. agglomerans strain CPA-2. Based on the nucleotide sequence of a SCAR fragment of CPA-2, one primer set and TaqMan MGB probe were designed. The primers SP2-F/SP2-R and the TaqMan MGB probe showed a specific detection of strain CPA-2 on apple surfaces, which was verified tested against purified DNA from 17 strains of P. agglomerans, 4 related Pantoea species, and 21 bacterial strains from other genera isolated from whole and also freshly-cut fruit and vegetables. The detection level was approximately 10(3) cells per reaction, and the standard curve was linear within a range of 5log units. Results from semi-commercial trials showed that CPA-2 had a low impact. The maximum persistence of P. agglomerans CPA-2 was not longer than 5days in plastic boxes stored at 0°C. Significant differences in CPA-2 population level dynamics were observed in results obtained by qPCR and dilution plating. These differences may indicate the presence of non-degraded DNA from non-viable cells. In conclusion, qPCR is a novel potential tool to quickly and specifically monitor recent surface colonisation by CPA-2

  1. Discrimination between E. granulosus sensu stricto, E. multilocularis and E. shiquicus Using a Multiplex PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Yan, Hong-Bin; Blair, David; Lei, Meng-Tong; Cai, Jin-Zhong; Fan, Yan-Lei; Li, Jian-Qiu; Fu, Bao-Quan; Yang, Yu-Rong; McManus, Donald P.; Jia, Wan-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Background Infections of Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto (s.s), E. multilocularis and E. shiquicus are commonly found co-endemic on the Qinghai-Tibet plateau, China, and an efficient tool is needed to facilitate the detection of infected hosts and for species identification. Methodology/Principal Findings A single-tube multiplex PCR assay was established to differentiate the Echinococcus species responsible for infections in intermediate and definitive hosts. Primers specific for E. granulosus, E. multilocularis and E. shiquicus were designed based on sequences of the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (nad1), NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 (nad5) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) genes, respectively. This multiplex PCR accurately detected Echinococcus DNA without generating nonspecific reaction products. PCR products were of the expected sizes of 219 (nad1), 584 (nad5) and 471 (cox1) bp. Furthermore, the multiplex PCR enabled diagnosis of multiple infections using DNA of protoscoleces and copro-DNA extracted from fecal samples of canine hosts. Specificity of the multiplex PCR was 100% when evaluated using DNA isolated from other cestodes. Sensitivity thresholds were determined for DNA from protoscoleces and from worm eggs, and were calculated as 20 pg of DNA for E. granulosus and E. shiquicus, 10 pg of DNA for E. multilocularis, 2 eggs for E. granulosus, and 1 egg for E. multilocularis. Positive results with copro-DNA could be obtained at day 17 and day 26 after experimental infection of dogs with larval E. multilocularis and E. granulosus, respectively. Conclusions/Significance The multiplex PCR developed in this study is an efficient tool for discriminating E. granulosus, E. multilocularis and E. shiquicus from each other and from other taeniid cestodes. It can be used for the detection of canids infected with E. granulosus s.s. and E. multilocularis using feces collected from these definitive hosts. It can also be used for the identification

  2. Establishment and validation of two duplex one-step real-time RT-PCR assays for diagnosis of foot-and-mouth disease.

    PubMed

    Gorna, K; Relmy, A; Romey, A; Zientara, S; Blaise-Boisseau, S; Bakkali-Kassimi, L

    2016-09-01

    Two duplex one-step TaqMan-based RT-PCR protocols for detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) were established and validated. Each RT-PCR test consists of a ready-to-use master mix for simultaneous detection of the well established 3D or IRES FMDV targets and incorporates the host β-actin mRNA as an internal control target, in a single-tube assay. The two real-time RT-PCR 3D/β-actin and IRES/β-actin tests are highly sensitive and able to detect up to 7TCID50/ml of FMDV and 10 copies/1μl of viral RNA. In field epithelium samples, the diagnostic sensitivity was 100% (95% CI; 91-100%) for the 3D/β-actin test and 97% (95% CI; 87-100%) for the IRES/β-actin test. The diagnostic specificity was 100% (95% CI; 95-100%) for both RT-PCRs. In addition, the two protocols proved to be robust, showing inter-assay coefficients of variation ranging from 1.94% to 6.73% for the IRES target and from 2.33% to 5.42% for the 3D target for different RNA extractions and different RT-PCR conditions. The internally controlled one-step real-time RT-PCR protocols described in this study provide a rapid, effective and reliable method for the detection of FMDV and thus may improve the routine diagnosis for foot-and-mouth disease. PMID:27317973

  3. A multiplex real-time PCR panel assay for simultaneous detection and differentiation of 12 common swine viruses.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiju; Liu, Xuming; Wang, Qin; Das, Amaresh; Ma, Guiping; Xu, Lu; Sun, Qing; Peddireddi, Lalitha; Jia, Wei; Liu, Yanhua; Anderson, Gary; Bai, Jianfa; Shi, Jishu

    2016-10-01

    Mixed infection with different pathogens is common in swine production systems especially under intensive production conditions. Quick and accurate detection and differentiation of different pathogens are necessary for epidemiological surveillance, disease management and import and export controls. In this study, we developed and validated a panel of multiplex real-time PCR/RT-PCR assays composed of four subpanels, each detects three common swine pathogens. The panel detects 12 viruses or viral serotypes, namely, VSV-IN, VSV-NJ, SVDV, CSFV, ASFV, FMDV, PCV2, PPV, PRV, PRRSV-NA, PRRSV-EU and SIV. Correlation coefficients (R(2)) and PCR amplification efficiencies of all singular and triplex real-time PCR reactions are within the acceptable range. Comparison between singular and triplex real-time PCR assays of each subpanel indicates that there is no significant interference on assay sensitivities caused by multiplexing. Specificity tests on 226 target clinical samples or 4 viral strains and 91 non-target clinical samples revealed that the real-time PCR panel is 100% specific, and there is no cross amplification observed. The limit of detection of each triplex real-time PCR is less than 10 copies per reaction for DNA, and less than 16 copies per reaction for RNA viruses. The newly developed multiplex real-time PCR panel also detected different combinations of co-infections as confirmed by other means of detections. PMID:27506582

  4. Multiplex PCR Assay for Detection and Identification of Clostridium botulinum Types A, B, E, and F in Food and Fecal Material

    PubMed Central

    Lindström, Miia; Keto, Riikka; Markkula, Annukka; Nevas, Mari; Hielm, Sebastian; Korkeala, Hannu

    2001-01-01

    Botulism is diagnosed by detecting botulinum neurotoxin and Clostridium botulinum cells in the patient and in suspected food samples. In this study, a multiplex PCR assay for the detection of Clostridium botulinum types A, B, E, and F in food and fecal material was developed. The method employs four new primer pairs with equal melting temperatures, each being specific to botulinum neurotoxin gene type A, B, E, or F, and enables a simultaneous detection of the four serotypes. A total of 43 C. botulinum strains and 18 strains of other bacterial species were tested. DNA amplification fragments of 782 bp for C. botulinum type A alone, 205 bp for type B alone, 389 bp for type E alone, and 543 bp for type F alone were obtained. Other bacterial species, including C. sporogenes and the nontoxigenic nonproteolytic C. botulinum-like organisms, did not yield a PCR product. Sensitivity of the PCR for types A, E, and F was 102 cells and for type B was 10 cells per reaction mixture. With a two-step enrichment, the detection limit in food and fecal samples varied from 10−2 spore/g for types A, B, and F to 10−1 spore/g of sample material for type E. Of 72 natural food samples investigated, two were shown to contain C. botulinum type A, two contained type B, and one contained type E. The assay is sensitive and specific and provides a marked improvement in the PCR diagnostics of C. botulinum. PMID:11722924

  5. Development of a Species-specific PCR Assay for Three Xanthomonas Species, Causing Bulb and Flower Diseases, Based on Their Genome Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Back, Chang-Gi; Lee, Seung-Yeol; Lee, Boo-Ja; Yea, Mi-Chi; Kim, Sang-Mok; Kang, In-Kyu; Cha, Jae-Soon; Jung, Hee-Young

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we developed a species-specific PCR assay for rapid and accurate detection of three Xanthomonas species, X. axonopodis pv. poinsettiicola (XAP), X. hyacinthi (XH) and X. campestris pv. zantedeschiae (XCZ), based on their draft genome sequences. XAP, XH and XCZ genomes consist of single chromosomes that contain 5,221, 4,395 and 7,986 protein coding genes, respectively. Species-specific primers were designed from variable regions of the draft genome sequence data and assessed by a PCR-based detection method. These primers were also tested for specificity against 17 allied Xanthomonas species as well as against the host DNA and the microbial community of the host surface. Three primer sets were found to be very specific and no amplification product was obtained with the host DNA and the microbial community of the host surface. In addition, a detection limit of 1 pg/μl per PCR reaction was detected when these primer sets were used to amplify corresponding bacterial DNAs. Therefore, these primer sets and the developed species-specific PCR assay represent a valuable, sensitive, and rapid diagnostic tool that can be used to detect three specific pathogens at early stages of infection and may help control diseases. PMID:26361469

  6. Real time PCR assay for detection of all known lineages of West Nile virus.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Ana; Herrero, Laura; Negredo, Anabel; Hernández, Lourdes; Sánchez-Seco, María Paz; Tenorio, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is one of the most widespread arbovirus and a large variety of WNV strains and lineages have been described. The molecular methods for the diagnosis of WNV target mainly lineages 1 and 2, which have caused outbreaks in humans, equines and birds. But the last few years new and putative WNV lineages of unknown pathogenicity have been described. Here we describe a new sensitive and specific real-time PCR assay for the detection and quantification of all the WNV lineages described until now. Primers and probe were designed in the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of the WNV genome and were designed to match all sequenced WNV strains perfectly. The sensitivity of the assay ranged from 1,5 to 15 copies per reaction depending on the WNV lineage tested. The method was validated for WNV diagnosis using different viral strains, human samples (cerebrospinal fluid, biopsies, serum and plasma) and mosquito pools. The assay did not amplify any other phylogenetically or symptomatically related viruses. All of the above make it a very suitable tool for the diagnosis of WNV and for surveillance studies. PMID:27481597

  7. Determination of phenanthrene by antibody-coated competitive real-time immuno-PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chun; Wang, Qiong-E; Zhuang, Hui-Sheng

    2008-08-01

    A reliable selective and sensitive antibody-coated competitive real-time immuno-PCR (RT-IPCR) assay for the determination of phenanthrene (PH) was developed. Phenanthrene butanoic acid (gamma-oxo-PHA) was synthesized as the hapten of PH. An active ester method was used to couple the PHA to bovine serum albumin to form an artificial immune antigen. Male New Zealand white rabbits were immunized with immune antigen to obtain polyclonal antibodies, with which a novel RT-IPCR assay for determination of PH was developed. Under the optimized assay conditions, PH can be determined in the concentration range from 10 fg/mL to 100 pg/mL with a detection limit of 5 fg/mL. The cross-reactivities of the anti-PH antibody to seven structurally related compounds were below 12.5%. Some environmental water samples were analyzed with satisfactory results, which showed good accuracy and suitability to analyze PH in environmental water. Compared with high-performance liquid chromatography, the recovery was lower or higher with agitation but would still be acceptable for use in an on-site field test to provide rapid, semiquantitative, and reliable test results for making environmental decisions. PMID:18587564

  8. Simultaneous detection of influenza viruses A, B, and swine origin influenza A using multiplex one-step real-time RT-PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Monavari, S H R; Mollaie, H R; Fazlalipour, M

    2014-01-01

    Every year, seasonal epidemics of influenza viruses are causing considerable morbidity and mortality worldwide. Also infrequent novel and rearranged strains of influenza viruses have caused quick, acute universal pandemics resulting in millions of mortalities. The usage of efficient and accurate detection is superior for infection control, effective treatment, and epidemiological supervision. Therefore, evaluation of useful real-time PCR molecular tests for the detection of pandemic viruses is important before the next wave of the pandemic. A novel quantitative real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assay with specific primers was used successfully for detection and monitoring of the influenza A, B, and swine influenza. The newly designed primers target highly conserved regions in influenza viruses. Our qRT-PCR assay is highly specific for detecting influenza A, B, and swine influenza viruses. The cutoff CT value was determined <38 for domestic human diagnostic test, under conditions of FDA emergency, and the reaction efficiency of the InfA, swInfA, and InfB assays were thereby estimated to be 97.9 % (R2 = 0.998), 98.3 % (R2 = 0.986), and 99.5 % (R2 = 0.995), respectively. Interestingly, based on our finding, there is no cross reactivity of detecting other viruses. PMID:24142356

  9. Evaluation of a gp63–PCR Based Assay as a Molecular Diagnosis Tool in Canine Leishmaniasis in Tunisia

    PubMed Central

    Guerbouj, Souheila; Djilani, Fattouma; Bettaieb, Jihene; Lambson, Bronwen; Diouani, Mohamed Fethi; Ben Salah, Afif; Ben Ismail, Riadh; Guizani, Ikram

    2014-01-01

    A gp63PCR method was evaluated for the detection and characterization of Leishmania (Leishmania) (L.) parasites in canine lymph node aspirates. This tool was tested and compared to other PCRs based on the amplification of 18S ribosomal genes, a L. infantum specific repetitive sequence and kinetoplastic DNA minicircles, and to classical parasitological (smear examination and/or culture) or serological (IFAT) techniques on a sample of 40 dogs, originating from different L. infantum endemic regions in Tunisia. Sensitivity and specificity of all the PCR assays were evaluated on parasitologically confirmed dogs within this sample (N = 18) and control dogs (N = 45) originating from non–endemic countries in northern Europe and Australia. The gp63 PCR had 83.5% sensitivity and 100% specificity, a performance comparable to the kinetoplast PCR assay and better than the other assays. These assays had comparable results when the gels were southern transferred and hybridized with a radioactive probe. As different infection rates were found according to the technique, concordance of the results was estimated by (κ) test. Best concordance values were between the gp63PCR and parasitological methods (74.6%, 95% confidence intervals CI: 58.8–95.4%) or serology IFAT technique (47.4%, 95% CI: 23.5–71.3%). However, taken together Gp63 and Rib assays covered most of the samples found positive making of them a good alternative for determination of infection rates. Potential of the gp63PCR-RFLP assay for analysis of parasite genetic diversity within samples was also evaluated using 5 restriction enzymes. RFLP analysis confirmed assignment of the parasites infecting the dogs to L. infantum species and illustrated occurrence of multiple variants in the different endemic foci. Gp63 PCR assay thus constitutes a useful tool in molecular diagnosis of L. infantum infections in dogs in Tunisia. PMID:25153833

  10. Diagnostic accuracy of an IgM enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and comparison with 2 polymerase chain reactions for early diagnosis of human leptospirosis.

    PubMed

    Vanasco, N B; Jacob, P; Landolt, N; Chiani, Y; Schmeling, M F; Cudos, C; Tarabla, H; Lottersberger, J

    2016-04-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) tests and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) may play a key role for early detection and treatment of human leptospirosis in developing countries. The aims of this study were to develop and validate an IgM ELISA under field conditions and to compare the diagnostic accuracy among IgG, IgM ELISAs, conventional PCR (cPCR), and real-time PCR (rtPCR) for early detection of human leptospirosis. Overall accuracy of IgM ELISA was sensitivity of 87.9%, specificity of 97.0%, and area under the curve of 0.940. When the 4 methods were compared, IgM ELISA showed the greatest diagnostic accuracy (J=0.6) followed by rtPCR (J=0.4), cPCR (J=0.2) and IgG ELISA (J=0.1). Our results support the use of IgM ELISA and rtPCR for early diagnosis of the disease. Moreover, due to their high specificity, they could be also useful to replace or supplement microscopic agglutination test as a confirmatory test, allowing more confirmations. PMID:26867967

  11. Performance and Cost Evaluation of One Commercial and Six In-House Conventional and Real-Time Reverse Transcription-PCR Assays for Detection of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus

    PubMed Central

    Mahony, James B.; Petrich, Astrid; Louie, Lisa; Song, Xinyu; Chong, Sylvia; Smieja, Marek; Chernesky, Max; Loeb, Mark; Richardson, Susan

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated seven reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) assays, including six in-house assays and one commercial assay for the detection of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) RNA in clinical specimens. RT-PCR assays targeted different genomic regions and included three conventional assays (one nested and two non-nested) run on a conventional heat block and four real-time assays performed in a LightCycler (LC; Roche Diagnostics). All in-house assays were optimized for assay parameters, including MgCl2, primer, and probe concentrations. The commercial assay was the RealArt HPA CoV RT-PCR assay (Artus), which was run in the LC. Testing serial dilutions of cultured SARS-CoV showed that the analytical sensitivity of the assays ranged from 10−8 to 10−6, corresponding to 1 and 100 copies of viral RNA, respectively. Significant differences in analytical sensitivities were observed between assays (P < 0.01, probit regression analysis for 50% sensitivity levels for the top two assays versus the others). Testing 68 clinical specimens (including 17 respiratory tract specimens, 29 urine samples, and 22 stools or rectal swabs) demonstrated that six of the seven assays detected at least 17 of 18 positives (defined as positive in at least two assays), and two of the assays had a sensitivity of 100%. There were no significant differences in sensitivity between the assays (P = 0.5 [Cochrance Q test, least sensitive 15 of 18 versus 18 of 18]). The specificities of the assays ranged from 94.0 to 100% without significant differences (P = 0.25 to 0.5 [McNemar test]). The reagent and technologist cost of performing the in-house PCR assays ranged from $5.46 to $9.81 Canadian dollars (CDN) per test. The commercial assay cost was considerably higher at $40.37 per test. The results demonstrated good performance for all assays, providing laboratories that need to do SARS RNA testing with a choice of assay formats. PMID:15070991

  12. Development of a polymerase chain reaction diagnostic assay for Ceratomyxa shasta, a myxosporean parasite of salmonid fish.

    PubMed

    Palenzuela, O; Trobridge, G; Bartholomew, J L

    1999-04-15

    A diagnostic procedure based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was developed for the myxosporean parasite Ceratomyxa shasta. Three sets of oligonucleotide primers were designed to specifically amplify C. shasta ribosomal RNA genes and several parameters of the assay were tested and optimised. A simple protocol for the processing of fish tissue samples was also developed. In a single round, 20 microliters volume reaction the optimised procedure allows the detection of 50 fg of purified C. shasta genomic DNA, or 0.01 spore from a seeded fish intestine sample. This protocol is considerably faster, cheaper and more reliable than any previous diagnostic procedure for a myxosporean parasite, and can be an invaluable tool for the monitoring of early and/or subclinical C. shasta infections in wild and cultured salmon populations. PMID:10349552

  13. Performance of PCR-based assays targeting Bacteroidales genetic markers of human fecal pollution in sewage and fecal samples.

    PubMed

    Shanks, Orin C; White, Karen; Kelty, Catherine A; Sivaganesan, Mano; Blannon, Janet; Meckes, Mark; Varma, Manju; Haugland, Richard A

    2010-08-15

    There are numerous PCR-based assays available to characterize human fecal pollution in ambient waters. Each assay employs distinct oligonucleotides and many target different genes and microorganisms leading to potential variations in assay performance. Performance comparisons utilizing feces and raw sewage samples are needed to determine which assays are best suited for expensive and time-consuming field validation, fate, transport, and epidemiology studies. We report the assessment of five end-point PCR and 10 real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays that target genes from presumptive Bacteroidales microorganisms reported to be associated with human feces. Each assay was tested against a reference collection of 54 primary influent sewage samples collected from different geographical locations across the United States and 174 fecal DNA extracts from 23 different animal sources. Experiments indicate that human-associated genetic markers are distributed across a broad range of human populations but show substantial differences in specificity for human feces suggesting that particular assays may be more suitable than others depending on the abundance of genetic marker required for detection and the animal sources impacting a particular watershed or beach of interest. PMID:20704227

  14. Application of statistical process control to qualitative molecular diagnostic assays.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Cathal P; Finn, Stephen P

    2014-01-01

    Modern pathology laboratories and in particular high throughput laboratories such as clinical chemistry have developed a reliable system for statistical process control (SPC). Such a system is absent from the majority of molecular laboratories and where present is confined to quantitative assays. As the inability to apply SPC to an assay is an obvious disadvantage this study aimed to solve this problem by using a frequency estimate coupled with a confidence interval calculation to detect deviations from an expected mutation frequency. The results of this study demonstrate the strengths and weaknesses of this approach and highlight minimum sample number requirements. Notably, assays with low mutation frequencies and detection of small deviations from an expected value require greater sample numbers to mitigate a protracted time to detection. Modeled laboratory data was also used to highlight how this approach might be applied in a routine molecular laboratory. This article is the first to describe the application of SPC to qualitative laboratory data. PMID:25988159

  15. Development and evaluation of a quantitative PCR assay targeting sandhill crane (Grus canadensis) fecal pollution.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Hodon; Lu, Jingrang; Vogel, Jason; Elk, Michael; Chávez-Ramírez, Felipe; Ashbolt, Nicholas; Santo Domingo, Jorge

    2012-06-01

    While the microbial water quality in the Platte River is seasonally impacted by excreta from migrating cranes, there are no methods available to study crane fecal contamination. Here we characterized microbial populations in crane feces using phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene fecal clone libraries. Using these sequences, a novel crane quantitative PCR (Crane1) assay was developed, and its applicability as a microbial source tracking (MST) assay was evaluated by determining its host specificity and detection ability in environmental waters. Bacteria from crane excreta were dominated by bacilli and proteobacteria, with a notable paucity of sequences homologous to Bacteroidetes and Clostridia. The Crane1 marker targeted a dominant clade of unclassified Lactobacillales sequences closely related to Catellicoccus marimammalium. The host distribution of the Crane1 marker was relatively high, being positive for 69% (66/96) of the crane excreta samples tested. The assay also showed high host specificity, with 95% of the nontarget fecal samples (i.e., n = 553; 20 different free-range hosts) being negative. Of the presumed crane-impacted water samples (n = 16), 88% were positive for the Crane1 assay, whereas none of the water samples not impacted by cranes were positive (n = 165). Bayesian statistical models of the Crane1 MST marker demonstrated high confidence in detecting true-positive signals and a low probability of false-negative signals from environmental water samples. Altogether, these data suggest that the newly developed marker could be used in environmental monitoring studies to study crane fecal pollution dynamics. PMID:22492437

  16. CRISPR Is an Optimal Target for the Design of Specific PCR Assays for Salmonella enterica Serotypes Typhi and Paratyphi A

    PubMed Central

    Fabre, Laetitia; Le Hello, Simon; Roux, Chrystelle; Issenhuth-Jeanjean, Sylvie; Weill, François-Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Background Serotype-specific PCR assays targeting Salmonella enterica serotypes Typhi and Paratyphi A, the causal agents of typhoid and paratyphoid fevers, are required to accelerate formal diagnosis and to overcome the lack of typing sera and, in some situations, the need for culture. However, the sensitivity and specificity of such assays must be demonstrated on large collections of strains representative of the targeted serotypes and all other bacterial populations producing similar clinical symptoms. Methodology Using a new family of repeated DNA sequences, CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats), as a serotype-specific target, we developed a conventional multiplex PCR assay for the detection and differentiation of serotypes Typhi and Paratyphi A from cultured isolates. We also developed EvaGreen-based real-time singleplex PCR assays with the same two sets of primers. Principal findings We achieved 100% sensitivity and specificity for each protocol after validation of the assays on 188 serotype Typhi and 74 serotype Paratyphi A strains from diverse genetic groups, geographic origins and time periods and on 70 strains of bacteria frequently encountered in bloodstream infections, including 29 other Salmonella serotypes and 42 strains from 38 other bacterial species. Conclusions The performance and convenience of our serotype-specific PCR assays should facilitate the rapid and accurate identification of these two major serotypes in a large range of clinical and public health laboratories with access to PCR technology. These assays were developed for use with DNA from cultured isolates, but with modifications to the assay, the CRISPR targets could be used in the development of assays for use with clinical and other samples. PMID:24498453

  17. Rapid and sensitive detection of Feline immunodeficiency virus using an insulated isothermal PCR-based assay with a point-of-need PCR detection platform.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, Rebecca Penrose; Kania, Stephen A; Tsai, Yun-Long; Lee, Pei-Yu Alison; Chang, Hsiu-Hui; Ma, Li-Juan; Chang, Hsiao-Fen Grace; Wang, Hwa-Tang Thomas

    2015-07-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is an important infectious agent of cats. Clinical syndromes resulting from FIV infection include immunodeficiency, opportunistic infections, and neoplasia. In our study, a 5' long terminal repeat/gag region-based reverse transcription insulated isothermal polymerase chain reaction (RT-iiPCR) was developed to amplify all known FIV strains to facilitate point-of-need FIV diagnosis. The RT-iiPCR method was applied in a point-of-need PCR detection platform--a field-deployable device capable of generating automatically interpreted RT-iiPCR results from nucleic acids within 1 hr. Limit of detection 95% of FIV RT-iiPCR was calculated to be 95 copies standard in vitro transcription RNA per reaction. Endpoint dilution studies with serial dilutions of an ATCC FIV type strain showed that the sensitivity of lyophilized FIV RT-iiPCR reagent was comparable to that of a reference nested PCR. The established reaction did not amplify any nontargeted feline pathogens, including Felid herpesvirus 1, feline coronavirus, Feline calicivirus, Feline leukemia virus, Mycoplasma haemofelis, and Chlamydophila felis. Based on analysis of 76 clinical samples (including blood and bone marrow) with the FIV RT-iiPCR, test sensitivity was 97.78% (44/45), specificity was 100.00% (31/31), and agreement was 98.65% (75/76), determined against a reference nested-PCR assay. A kappa value of 0.97 indicated excellent correlation between these 2 methods. The lyophilized FIV RT-iiPCR reagent, deployed on a user-friendly portable device, has potential utility for rapid and easy point-of-need detection of FIV in cats. PMID:26185125

  18. [Rapid detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by the fluorescence quantitative PCR assay targeting 16S rDNA].

    PubMed

    Xue, Li-Jun; Wang, Yong-Zhi; Ren, Hao; Tong, Yi-Min; Zhao, Ping; Zhu, Shi-Ying; Qi, Zhong-Tian

    2006-09-01

    The 16S rDNA specific primers were designed for rapid detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) by the fluorescence quantitative PCR (FQ-PCR) assay, based upon multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree analysis of the 16S rDNAs of over 20 bacteria. After extraction of PA genomic DNA, the target 16S rDNA fragment was amplified by PCR with specific primers, and used to construct recombinant pMDT-Pfr plasmid, the dilution gradients of which were subjected to the standard quantitation curve in FQ-PCR assay. Different concentrations of PA genomic DNA were detected by FQ-PCR in a 20microL of reaction system with SYBR Green I. At the same time, various genomic DNAs of Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhi, Shigella flexneri, Proteus vulgaris, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Escherichia coli, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis were used as negative controls to confirm specificity of the FQ-PCR detection assay. Results demonstrated that the predicted amplified product of designed primers was of high homology only with PA 16S rDNA, and that sensitivity of the FQ-PCR assay was of 3.6pg/microL of bacterial DNA or (2.1 x 10(3) +/- 3.1 x 10(2)) copies/microL of 16S rDNA, accompanied with high specificity, and that the whole detection process including DNA extraction could be completed in about two hours. In contrast to traditional culture method, the FQ-PCR assay targeting 16S rDNA gene can be used to detect PA rapidly, which exhibits perfect application prospect in future. PMID:17037203

  19. Development and evaluation of multiplex PCR assays for rapid detection of virulence-associated genes in Arcobacter species.

    PubMed

    Whiteduck-Léveillée, Jenni; Cloutier, Michel; Topp, Edward; Lapen, David R; Talbot, Guylaine; Villemur, Richard; Khan, Izhar U H

    2016-02-01

    As the pathogenicity of Arcobacter species might be associated with various virulence factors, this study was aimed to develop and optimize three single-tube multiplex PCR (mPCR) assays that can efficiently detect multiple virulence-associated genes (VAGs) in Arcobacter spp. including the Arcobacter butzleri, Arcobacter cryaerophilus and Arcobacter skirrowii, respectively. The recognized target virulence factors used in the study were fibronectin binding protein (cj1349), filamentous hemagglutinin (hecA), hemolysin activation protein (hecB), hemolysin (tlyA), integral membrane protein virulence factor (mviN), invasin (ciaB), outer membrane protein (irgA) and phospholipase (pldA). Identical results were obtained between singleplex PCR and mPCR assays and no cross- and/or non-specific amplification products were obtained when tested against other closely related bacterial species. The sensitivities of these three mPCR assays were ranging from 1ngμL(-1) to 100ngμL(-1) DNA. The developed assays with combinations of duplex or triplex PCR primer pairs of VAGs were further evaluated and validated by applying them to isolates of the A. butzleri, A. cryaerophilus and A. skirrowii recovered from fecal samples of human and animal origins. The findings revealed that the distribution of the ciaB (90%), mviN (70%), tlyA (50%) and pldA (45%) genes among these target species was significantly higher than the hecA (16%), hecB (10%) and each of irgA and cj1349 (6%) genes, respectively. The newly developed mPCR assays can be used as rapid technique and useful markers for the detection, prevalence and profiling of VAGs in the Arcobacter spp. Moreover, these assays can easily be performed with a high throughput to give a presumptive identification of the causal pathogen in epidemiological investigation of human infections. PMID:26769558

  20. A nested PCR assay exhibits enhanced sensitivity for detection of Theileria parva infections in bovine blood samples from carrier animals.

    PubMed

    Odongo, David O; Sunter, Jack D; Kiara, Henry K; Skilton, Robert A; Bishop, Richard P

    2010-01-01

    Theileria parva causes East Coast fever, an economically important disease of cattle in sub-Saharan Africa. We describe a nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR) assay for the detection of T. parva DNA in cattle blood spotted onto filter paper using primers derived from the T. parva-specific 104-kDa antigen (p104) gene. The sensitivity of this assay was compared to a previously described p104-based PCR and also the reverse line blot (RLB) technique, using serial dilutions of blood from a calf with known T. parva piroplasm parasitaemia. The relative sensitivities of the three assays were 0.4, 1.4 and 4 parasites/microl corresponding to blood parasitaemias of 9.2 x 10(-6)%, 2.8 x 10(-5)% and 8.3 x 10(-5)%, respectively. The three assays were applied to samples from two calves infected with the T. parva Muguga stock. Parasite DNA was consistently detectable by the two p104 PCR assays until 48 and 82 days post-infection, respectively, and thereafter sporadically. RLB detected parasite DNA in the two infected calves until days 43 and 45. Field samples from 151 Kenyan cattle exhibited 37.7% positivity for T. parva by regular p104 PCR and 42.3% positivity using p104 nPCR. Among 169 cattle blood samples from Southern Sudan, 36% were positive for T. parva using nPCR. The nPCR assay represents a highly sensitive tool for detection and monitoring of asymptomatic carrier state infections of T. parva in the blood of cattle. PMID:19902251

  1. Comparison of Conventional PCR, Multiplex PCR, and Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Assays for Rapid Detection of Arcobacter Species

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Seo, Dong Joo; Lee, Min Hwa

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method for the rapid detection of Arcobacter species. Specific primers targeting the 23S ribosomal RNA gene were used to detect Arcobacter butzleri, Arcobacter cryaerophilus, and Arcobacter skirrowii. The specificity of the LAMP primer set was assessed using DNA samples from a panel of Arcobacter and Campylobacter species, and the sensitivity was determined using serial dilutions of Arcobacter species cultures. LAMP showed a 10- to 1,000-fold-higher sensitivity than multiplex PCR, with a detection limit of 2 to 20 CFU per reaction in vitro. Whereas multiplex PCR showed cross-reactivity with Campylobacter species, the LAMP method developed in this study was more sensitive and reliable than conventional PCR or multiplex PCR for the detection of Arcobacter species. PMID:24478488

  2. Assay for estimating total bacterial load: relative qPCR normalisation of bacterial load with associated clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Brukner, Ivan; Longtin, Yves; Oughton, Matthew; Forgetta, Vincenzo; Dascal, Andre

    2015-09-01

    Relative microorganism abundance is a parameter describing biodiversity, referring to how common a bacterial species is within the total bacterial flora. Anal, rectal, skin, mucal, and respiratory swabs are typical clinical samples where knowledge of relative bacterial abundance might make distinction between asymptomatic carriers and symptomatic cases. Assays trying to measure total bacterial load are usually based on the amplification of universal segments of 16S rRNA genes. Previous assays were not adoptable to "direct" PCR protocols, and/or they were not compatible with hydrolysis-based detection. Using the latest summary of universal 16S sequence motifs present in literature and testing our design with 500 liquid and 50 formed stool samples, we illustrate the performance characteristics of a new 16S quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay, which addresses well-known technical problems, including a) positive priming reaction in the absence of intended target due to self-priming and/or mispriming of unintended targets; b) amplification bias due to nonoptimal primer/probe coverage; and c) too large amplicons for clinical qPCR. Stool swabs ranked into bins of different bacterial loads show significant correlation with threshold cycle values of our new assay. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of qPCR assay measuring individual differences of total bacterial load present in human stool. PMID:26008123

  3. Development of a Rapid PCR Assay Specific for Staphylococcus saprophyticus and Application to Direct Detection from Urine Samples

    PubMed Central

    Martineau, Francis; Picard, François J.; Ménard, Christian; Roy, Paul H.; Ouellette, Marc; Bergeron, Michel G.

    2000-01-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus is one of the most frequently encountered microorganisms associated with acute urinary tract infections (UTIs) in young, sexually active female outpatients. Conventional identification methods based on biochemical characteristics can efficiently identify S. saprophyticus, but the rapidities of these methods need to be improved. Rapid and direct identification of this bacterium from urine samples would be useful to improve time required for the diagnosis of S. saprophyticus infections in the clinical microbiology laboratory. We have developed a PCR-based assay for the specific detection of S. saprophyticus. An arbitrarily primed PCR amplification product of 380 bp specific for S. saprophyticus was sequenced and used to design a set of S. saprophyticus-specific PCR amplification primers. The PCR assay was specific for S. saprophyticus when tested with DNA from 49 gram-positive and 31 gram-negative bacterial species. This assay was also able to amplify efficiently DNA from all 60 strains of S. saprophyticus from various origins tested. This assay was adapted for direct detection from urine samples. The sensitivity levels achieved with urine samples was 19 CFU with 30 cycles of amplification and 0.5 CFU with 40 cycles of amplification. This PCR assay for the specific detection of S. saprophyticus is simple and rapid (approximately 90 min, including the time for urine specimen preparation). PMID:10970371

  4. Limitations of automated remnant lipoprotein cholesterol assay for diagnostic use

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    I wish to comment on the limitations of automated remnant lipoprotein cholesterol (RemL-C) assay reported in Clinical Chemistry. Remnants are lipoprotein particles produced after newly formed triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) of either hepatic or intestinal origin enter the plasma space and unde...

  5. Development of an FgMito assay: A highly sensitive mitochondrial based qPCR assay for quantification of Fusarium graminearum sensu stricto.

    PubMed

    Kulik, Tomasz; Ostrowska, Anna; Buśko, Maciej; Pasquali, Matias; Beyer, Marco; Stenglein, Sebastian; Załuski, Dariusz; Sawicki, Jakub; Treder, Kinga; Perkowski, Juliusz

    2015-10-01

    An ascomycete fungus, Fusarium graminearum sensu stricto (s.s.), is the major cause of Fusarium head blight (FHB), a devastating disease of cereals worldwide. The fungus contaminates crops with mycotoxins, which pose a serious threat to food and feed safety. In this study, we developed a highly sensitive mitochondrial based qPCR assay (FgMito qPCR) for quantification of F. graminearum s.s. To ensure high sensitivity of the assay, primers and a Minor-groove binding (MGB) probe were designed based on multi-copy mitochondrial DNA. The FgMito assay was successfully validated against a range of geographically diverse F. graminearum s.s. strains to ensure uniformity of the assay at an intraspecific level, as well as with other fungal species to ensure specificity. The assay was further evaluated in terms of efficiency and sensitivity against a test panel of different F. graminearum s.s. strains with various levels of pure fungal DNA and in the presence of wheat background DNA. The results showed a high efficiency of the assay developed, ranging from 93% to 101% with r(2)-values of >0.99. We further showed that three low concentrations of fungal template 2 pg, 0.6 pg and 0.2 pg could be reliably quantified in the presence of wheat background DNA. The FgMito assay was used to quantify F. graminearum s.s. DNA on 65 field samples from a range of hosts with defined levels of trichothecenes. We revealed a significant positive correlation between fungal DNA quantity and the sum of trichothecenes. Lastly, we showed a higher sensitivity of the FgMito assay than the nuclear based qPCR assay for F. graminearum s.s. by comparing Ct-values from both assays. PMID:26087129

  6. Identification of cytoplasm types in rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) accessions by a multiplex PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H X; Li, Z J; Hu, S W; Sun, G L; Chang, J J; Zhang, Z H

    2010-08-01

    Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) has widely been used as an efficient pollination control system in rapeseed hybrid production. Identification of cytoplasm type of rapeseed accessions is becoming the most important basic work for hybrid-rapeseed breeding. In this study, we report a simple multiplex PCR method to distinguish the existing common cytoplasm resources, Pol, Nap, Cam, Ogu and Ogu-NWSUAF cytoplasm, in rapeseed. Cytoplasm type of 35 F(1) hybrids and 140 rapeseed open pollinated varieties or breeding lines in our rapeseed breeding programme were tested by this method. The results indicated that 10 of 35 F(1) hybrids are the Nap, and 25 the Pol cytoplasm type, which is consistent with the information provided by the breeders. Out of 140 accessions tested, 100 (71.4%), 21 (15%) and 19 (13.6%) accessions possess Nap, Cam and Pol cytoplasm, respectively. All 19 accessions with Pol cytoplasm are from China. Pedigree analysis indicated that these accessions with Pol cytoplasm were either restorers for Pol CMS, including Shaan 2C, Huiyehui, 220, etc. or derived from hybrids with Pol CMS as female parent. Our molecular results are consistent with those of the classical testcross, suggesting the reliability of this method. The multiplex PCR assay method can be applied to CMS "three-line" breeding, selection and validation of hybrid rapeseed. PMID:20401459

  7. Novel diagnostic assays for heparin-induced thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Rux, Ann H.; Hinds, Jillian L.; Dela Cruz, May; Yarovoi, Serge V.; Brown, Isola A. M.; Yang, Wei; Konkle, Barbara A.; Arepally, Gowthami M.; Watson, Stephen P.; Cines, Douglas B.; Sachais, Bruce S.

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory testing for heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) has important shortcomings. Immunoassays fail to discriminate platelet-activating from nonpathogenic antibodies. Specific functional assays are impracticable due to the need for platelets and radioisotope. We describe 2 assays that may overcome these limitations. The KKO-inhibition test (KKO-I) measures the effect of plasma on binding of the HIT-like monoclonal antibody KKO to platelet factor 4 (PF4)/heparin. DT40-luciferase (DT40-luc) is a functional test comprised of a B-cell line expressing FcγRIIa coupled to a luciferase reporter. We compared these assays to polyspecific and immunoglobulin (Ig)G-specific PF4/heparin enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) in samples from 58 patients with suspected HIT and circulating anti-PF4/heparin antibodies. HIT was defined as a 4Ts score ≥ 4 and positive 14C-serotonin release assay. HIT-positive plasma demonstrated greater mean inhibition of KKO binding than HIT-negative plasma (78.9% vs 26.0%; P < .0001) and induced greater luciferase activity (3.14-fold basal vs 0.96-fold basal; P < .0001). The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve was greater for KKO-I (0.93) than for the polyspecific (0.82; P = .020) and IgG-specific ELISA (0.76; P = .0044) and for DT40-luc (0.89) than for the IgG-specific ELISA (P = .046). KKO-I and DT40-luc showed better discrimination than 2 commercially available immunoassays, are simple to perform, and hold promise for improving the specificity and feasibility of HIT laboratory testing. PMID:23446735

  8. MeltMan: Optimization, Evaluation, and Universal Application of a qPCR System Integrating the TaqMan qPCR and Melting Analysis into a Single Assay

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Alexander; Černíková, Lenka; Vitásková, Eliška; Křivda, Vlastimil; Dán, Ádám; Dirbáková, Zuzana; Jiřincová, Helena; Procházka, Bohumír; Sedlák, Kamil; Havlíčková, Martina

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, we optimised and evaluated a qPCR system integrating 6-FAM (6-carboxyfluorescein)-labelled TaqMan probes and melting analysis using the SYTO 82 (S82) DNA binding dye in a single reaction. We investigated the influence of the S82 on various TaqMan and melting analysis parameters and defined its optimal concentration. In the next step, the method was evaluated in 36 different TaqMan assays with a total of 729 paired reactions using various DNA and RNA templates, including field specimens. In addition, the melting profiles of interest were correlated with the electrophoretic patterns. We proved that the S82 is fully compatible with the FAM-TaqMan system. Further, the advantages of this approach in routine diagnostic TaqMan qPCR were illustrated with practical examples. These included solving problems with flat or other atypical amplification curves or even false negativity as a result of probe binding failure. Our data clearly show that the integration of the TaqMan qPCR and melting analysis into a single assay provides an additional control option as well as the opportunity to perform more complex analyses, get more data from the reactions, and obtain analysis results with higher confidence. PMID:27031831

  9. Detection of Brugia malayi in laboratory and wild-caught Mansonioides mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) using Hha I PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Hoti, S L; Vasuki, V; Lizotte, M W; Patra, K P; Ravi, G; Vanamail, P; Manonmani, A; Sabesan, S; Krishnamoorthy, K; Williams, S A

    2001-04-01

    An Hha 1 based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay developed for the detection of Brugia malayi, the causative agent of Brugian lymphatic filariasis, was evaluated for its sensitivity in the laboratory and for its usefulness in measuring changes in transmission of the disease in the field. Laboratory studies showed that the new assay was highly sensitive in comparison with the standard dissection and microscopy technique. The assay can detect as little as 4 pg of parasite DNA or a single microfilaria in pools of up to 100 mosquitoes. The optimum pool size for convenience was found to be 50 mosquitoes per pool. The efficacy of PCR assay was evaluated in filariasis control programmes in operation in endemic areas of Kerala State, South India. The infection rates obtained by the Hha I PCR assay and the conventional dissection and microscopy technique were 1.2% and 1.7% respectively in operational areas and 8.3% and 4.4% respectively, in check areas, which were not significantly different (P < 0.05). Thus, the Hha I PCR assay was found to be as sensitive as the conventional technique and hence it can be used as a new epidemiological tool for assessing parasite infection in field-collected mosquitoes. PMID:11260722

  10. Molecular diagnostic assays for infectious diseases in cats.

    PubMed

    Veir, Julia K; Lappin, Michael R

    2010-11-01

    With the advent of more accessible polymerase chain reaction panels, the use of molecular techniques for the detection of infectious organisms has become more routine in veterinary medicine. The use of molecular diagnostics is best reserved for the detection of organisms that are difficult to detect or identify expediently. In this article, the fundamentals of molecular techniques are reviewed along with an examination of specific feline infectious diseases in which diagnosis via molecular techniques is advantageous. PMID:20933144

  11. Comparison of two poultry litter qPCR assays targeting the 16S rRNA gene of Brevibacterium sp.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Hodon; Elk, Michael; Khan, Izhar U H; Harwood, Valerie J; Molina, Marirosa; Edge, Thomas A; Domingo, Jorge Santo

    2014-01-01

    Chicken feces commonly contain human pathogens and are also important sources of fecal pollution in environmental waters. Consequently, methods that can detect chicken fecal pollution are needed in public health and environmental monitoring studies. In this study, we compared a previously developed SYBR green qPCR assay (LA35) to a novel TaqMan qPCR assay (CL) for the environmental detection of poultry-associated fecal pollution. We tested both assays against chicken litter (n = 40), chicken fecal samples (n = 186), non-chicken fecal sources (n = 484), and environmental water samples (n = 323). Most chicken litter samples (i.e., ≥ 98%) were positive for both assays with relatively high signal intensities, whereas only 23% and 12% of poultry fecal samples (n = 186) were positive with the LA35 and the CL assays, respectively. Data using fecal samples from non-target animal species showed that the assays are highly host-associated (≥ 95%). Bayesian statistical models showed that the two assays are associated with relatively low probability of false-positive and false-negative signals in water samples. The CL marker had a lower prevalence than the LA35 assay when tested against environmental water samples (i.e., 21% vs. 31% positive signals). However, by combining the results from the two assays the detection levels increased to 41%, suggesting that using multiple assays can improve the detection of chicken-fecal pollution in environmental waters. PMID:24169514

  12. RT-PCR is a more accurate diagnostic tool for detection of BCR-ABL rearrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Zehnbauer, B.A.; Allen, A.P.; McGrath, S.D.

    1994-09-01

    Detection of the Philadelphia chromosome (Ph1) or genomic Southern hybridization for clonal gene rearrangement (GSH-R) has provided very specific identification of BCR-ABL gene rearrangement. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) is diagnostic for patterns of BCR-ABL expression which are undetected by GSH-R and/or Ph1 and provides increased sensitivity both at diagnosis and in detection of minimal residual leukemia. Fifty-three specimens (of 150 tested from 119 consecutive leukemia patients) were RT-PCR positive for BCR-ABL gene expression confirmed by hybridization of PCR products with b{sub 3}a{sub 2}, b{sub 2}a{sub 2}, or e{sub 1}a{sub 2} junction-specific oligonucleotides. In 6 cases of CML with GSH-R{sup {minus}}at diagnosis, RT-PCR provided specific BCR-ABL identification. Deletion of BCR regions, low mitotic index, or e{sub 1}a{sub 2} expression caused failure to detect GSH-R or Ph1 translocation.

  13. Development of a neutralization assay for influenza virus using an endpoint assessment based on quantitative reverse-transcription PCR.

    PubMed

    Teferedegne, Belete; Lewis, Andrew M; Peden, Keith; Murata, Haruhiko

    2013-01-01

    A microneutralization assay using an ELISA-based endpoint assessment (ELISA-MN) is widely used to measure the serological response to influenza virus infection and vaccination. We have developed an alternative microneutralization assay for influenza virus using a quantitative reverse transcription PCR-based endpoint assessment (qPCR-MN) in order to improve upon technical limitations associated with ELISA-MN. For qPCR-MN, infected MDCK-London cells in 96-well cell-culture plates are processed with minimal steps such that resulting samples are amenable to high-throughput analysis by downstream one-step quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR; SYBR Green chemistry with primers targeting a conserved region of the M1 gene of influenza A viruses). The growth curves of three recent vaccine strains demonstrated that the qRT-PCR signal detected at 6 hours post-infection reflected an amplification of at least 100-fold over input. Using ferret antisera, we have established the feasibility of measuring virus neutralization at 6 hours post-infection, a duration likely confined to a single virus-replication cycle. The neutralization titer for qPCR-MN was defined as the highest reciprocal serum dilution necessary to achieve a 90% inhibition of the qRT-PCR signal; this endpoint was found to be in agreement with ELISA-MN using the same critical reagents in each assay. qPCR-MN was robust with respect to assay duration (6 hours vs. 12 hours). In addition, qPCR-MN appeared to be compliant with the Percentage Law (i.e., virus neutralization results appear to be consistent over an input virus dose ranging from 500 to 12,000 TCID(50)). Compared with ELISA-MN, qPCR-MN might have inherent properties conducive to reducing intra- and inter-laboratory variability while affording suitability for automation and high-throughput uses. Finally, our qRT-PCR-based approach may be broadly applicable to the development of neutralization assays for a wide variety of viruses. PMID:23437084

  14. Molecular diagnostics via mass spectrometry of PCR-amplified DNA products

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, M.; Doktycz, M.; Hurst, G.

    1995-12-31

    Identifying the presence of a specific DNA fragment is becoming increasingly critical to many applications in medical, clinical, forensic and other research laboratories. At present, regions of interest in DNA are amplified using the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) or other reactions to produce fragments containing a specific number of nucleotide units that are diagnostic for the targeted genetic disease, person, or pathogen. These fragments are then typically analyzed by slab gel electrophoresis. Mass spectrometry has the potential of characterizing the DNA fragments faster and more confidently than chromatography-based methods. The authors have evaluated matrix assisted laser desorption (MALDI) time-of-flight (TOF) and electrospray (ES) quadrupole ion trap (QIT) mass spectrometry for the rapid analysis of PCR fragments.

  15. A new real-time RT-qPCR assay for the detection, subtyping and quantification of human respiratory syncytial viruses positive- and negative-sense RNAs.

    PubMed

    Essaidi-Laziosi, Manel; Lyon, Matthieu; Mamin, Aline; Fernandes Rocha, Mélanie; Kaiser, Laurent; Tapparel, Caroline

    2016-09-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major health problem and the main cause of hospitalization due to bronchiolitis. RSV is divided into two antigenic subgroups, RSV-A and -B that co-circulate worldwide. Rapid and sensitive detection is desirable for proper patient handling while assessment of viral load may help to evaluate disease severity and progression. Finally RSV subtyping is needed to determine the prevalence and pathogenicity of each RSV subgroup, as well as their sensitivity to treatment. In this study, we took into account the most recent circulating RSV variants and designed two quantitative TaqMan one-step RT-PCR assays to detect and quantify both RSV subgroups separately. Standard dilutions of transcripts of positive and negative polarities were included in the assay validation to assess potential differences in sensitivity on negative-sense genomes and positive-sense RNAs. In addition, RSV detection in respiratory specimens of different types and sampled in different populations was compared to commercially available RSV diagnostic tools. Altogether, the RSV-A and -B assays revealed sensitive and quantitative over a wide range of viral loads, with a slight improved sensitivity of the RSV-B assay on positive sense transcripts, and allowed accurate RSV subtyping. We thus provide a useful tool for both RSV diagnostics and research. PMID:27180039

  16. Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay with High-Resolution Melting Analysis for Characterization of Antimicrobial Resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Donà, Valentina; Kasraian, Sara; Lupo, Agnese; Guilarte, Yuvia N; Hauser, Christoph; Furrer, Hansjakob; Unemo, Magnus; Low, Nicola; Endimiani, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Resistance to antibiotics used against Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections is a major public health concern. Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) testing relies on time-consuming culture-based methods. Development of rapid molecular tests for detection of AMR determinants could provide valuable tools for surveillance and epidemiological studies and for informing individual case management. We developed a fast (<1.5-h) SYBR green-based real-time PCR method with high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis. One triplex and three duplex reactions included two sequences for N. gonorrhoeae identification and seven determinants of resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins (ESCs), azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, and spectinomycin. The method was validated by testing 39 previously fully characterized N. gonorrhoeae strains, 19 commensal Neisseria species strains, and an additional panel of 193 gonococcal isolates. Results were compared with results of culture-based AMR determination. The assay correctly identified N. gonorrhoeae and the presence or absence of the seven AMR determinants. There was some cross-reactivity with nongonococcal Neisseria species, and the detection limit was 10(3) to 10(4) genomic DNA (gDNA) copies/reaction. Overall, the platform accurately detected resistance to ciprofloxacin (sensitivity and specificity, 100%), ceftriaxone (sensitivity, 100%; specificity, 90%), cefixime (sensitivity, 92%; specificity, 94%), azithromycin (sensitivity and specificity, 100%), and spectinomycin (sensitivity and specificity, 100%). In conclusion, our methodology accurately detects mutations that generate resistance to antibiotics used to treat gonorrhea. Low assay sensitivity prevents direct diagnostic testing of clinical specimens, but this method can be used to screen collections of gonococcal isolates for AMR more quickly than current culture-based AMR testing. PMID:27225407

  17. An alternative nested-PCR assay for the detection of Toxoplasma gondii strains based on GRA7 gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Costa, Maria Eduarda S M; Oliveira, Claudio Bruno S; Andrade, Joelma Maria de A; Medeiros, Thatiany A; Neto, Valter F Andrade; Lanza, Daniel C F

    2016-07-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a widespread parasite able to infect virtually any nucleated cells of warm-blooded hosts. In some cases, T. gondii detection using already developed PCR primers can be inefficient in routine laboratory tests, especially to detect atypical strains. Here we report a new nested-PCR protocol able to detect virtually all T. gondii isolates. Analyzing 685 sequences available in GenBank, we determine that GRA7 is one of the most conserved genes of T. gondii genome. Based on an alignment of 85 GRA7 sequences new primer sets that anneal in the highly conserved regions of this gene were designed. The new GRA7 nested-PCR assay providing sensitivity and specificity equal to or greater than the gold standard PCR assays for T. gondii detection, that amplify the B1 sequence or the repetitive 529bp element. PMID:27036222

  18. PCR assay for identification of Anopheles quadriannulatus species B from Ethiopia and other sibling species of the Anopheles gambiae complex.

    PubMed

    Fettene, M; Koekemoer, L L; Hunt, R H; Coetzee, M

    2002-06-01

    Sibling species A and B of Anopheles quadriannulatus (Theobald) are recognized as allopatric members of the Anopheles gambiae Giles complex of Afrotropical mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae). Species A represents An. quadriannulatus sensu stricto, widespread in southern Africa, whereas An. quadriannulatus species B occurs in Ethiopia. Because of difficulty of identification, distribution of An. quadriannulatus sensu lato remains poorly known. Cytotaxonomy and the standard DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay do not distinguish between species A and B of An. quadriannulatus. By optimizing the standard PCR assay (Scott et al., 1993) for identification of members of the An. gambiae complex, we identified two discriminant fragments of 153 bp and 900 bp from DNA of An. quadriannulatus species B, whereas only the 153 bp fragment was amplified for species A from South Africa. This modified PCR assay can therefore be used to distinguish between species A and B of An. quadriannulatus s.l. as well as other members of the An. gambiae complex. PMID:12109717

  19. Development of a multiplex PCR assay to detect the major clonal complexes of Streptococcus suis relevant to human infection.

    PubMed

    Hatrongjit, Rujirat; Kerdsin, Anusak; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Hamada, Shigeyuki; Oishi, Kazunori; Akeda, Yukihiro

    2016-05-01

    Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) is considered a reliable method for providing insight into the Streptococcus suis population structure, clonal relationships and the potential of particular clones to cause disease. Indeed, MLST has revealed the presence of several clonal complexes (CCs) within the Streptococcus suis population. However, the method is costly, time-consuming and difficult to use for screening large numbers of isolates. In this study, a multiplex PCR assay was developed to identify Streptococcus suis CCs that are relevant to human infections. The multiplex PCR assay was capable of simultaneously distinguishing CC1, CC25, CC28, CC104, CC221/234 and CC233/379, which are related to human infections in Thailand, in a single reaction. The multiplex PCR assay is useful for low-cost screening of large numbers of isolates with rapid analytical capacity and could be utilized in most laboratories. PMID:26932590

  20. Comparison of three multiplex PCR assays for the detection of respiratory viral infections: evaluation of xTAG respiratory virus panel fast assay, RespiFinder 19 assay and RespiFinder SMART 22 assay

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A broad spectrum of pathogens is causative for respiratory tract infections, but symptoms are mostly similar. Therefore, the identification of the causative viruses and bacteria is only feasible using multiplex PCR or several monoplex PCR tests in parallel. Methods The analytical sensitivity of three multiplex PCR assays, RespiFinder-19, RespiFinder-SMART-22 and xTAG-Respiratory-Virus-Panel-Fast-Assay (RVP), were compared to monoplex real-time PCR with quantified standardized control material. All assays include the most common respiratory pathogens. Results To compare the analytical sensitivity of the multiplex assays, samples were inoculated with 13 different quantified viruses in the range of 101 to 105 copies/ml. Concordant results were received for rhinovirus, whereas the RVP detected influenzavirus, RSV and hMPV more frequently in low concentrations. The RespiFinder-19 and the RespiFinder-SMART-22 showed a higher analytical sensitivity for adenoviruses and coronaviruses, whereas the RVP was incapable to detect adenovirus and coronavirus in concentrations of 104 copies/ml. The RespiFinder-19 and RespiFinder-SMART-22A did not detect influenzaviruses (104 copies/ml) and RSV (103 copies/ml). The detection of all 13 viruses in one sample was only achieved using monoplex PCR. To analyze possible competitive amplification reactions between the different viruses, samples were further inoculated with only 4 different viruses in one sample. Compared to the detection of 13 viruses in parallel, only a few differences were found. The incidence of respiratory viruses was compared in tracheal secretion (TS) samples (n = 100) of mechanically ventilated patients in winter (n = 50) and summer (n = 50). In winter, respiratory viruses were detected in 32 TS samples (64%) by RespiFinder-19, whereas the detection rate with RVP was only 22%. The most frequent viruses were adenovirus (32%) and PIV-2 (20%). Multiple infections were detected in 16 TS samples (32

  1. Dopamine Receptors in Human Lymphocytes: Radioligand Binding and Quantitative RT-PCR Assays

    PubMed Central

    Kirillova, Galina P.; Hrutkay, Rebecca J.; Shurin, Michael R.; Shurin, Galina V.; Tourkova, Irina L.; Vanyukov, Michael M.

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of dopamine receptors (DR) in lymphocytes of the human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) fraction is an attractive tool for evaluation of functional properties of dopaminergic function underlying variation in complex psychological/psychopathological traits. Receptor binding assays (RBA) with selective radioligands, which are widely used in CNS studies, have not produced consistent results when applied to isolated PBMC. We tested the assay conditions that could be essential for detection of DR in human PBMC and their membrane preparations. Using [3H]SCH23390, a dopamine D1-like receptor antagonist, we demonstrated the presence of two binding sites in PBMC-derived membrane fraction. One of them is characterized by the Kd value consistent with that reported for D5 dopamine receptors in human lymphocytes, whereas the other Kd value possibly corresponds to serotonin receptor(s). Although D5 receptor binding sites in PBMC membranes could be characterized by binding assays, the low protein expression and the large volume of blood needed for membrane preparation render the binding method impracticable for individual phenotyping. In contrast, real-time RT-PCR may be used for this purpose, contingent on the relationship between DR expression in the brain and in lymphocytes. The expression of the DRD2-DRD5 genes, as detected by this method, varied widely among samples, whereas the DRD1 expression was not detected. The expression levels were comparable with those in the brain for DRD3 and DRD4, and were significantly lower for DRD2 and DRD5. PMID:18721826

  2. Tissue-Specific Methylation of Human Insulin Gene and PCR Assay for Monitoring Beta Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Husseiny, Mohamed I.; Kaye, Alexander; Zebadua, Emily; Kandeel, Fouad; Ferreri, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    The onset of metabolic dysregulation in type 1 diabetes (T1D) occurs after autoimmune destruction of the majority of pancreatic insulin-producing beta cells. We previously demonstrated that the DNA encoding the insulin gene is uniquely unmethylated in these cells and then developed a methylation-specific PCR (MSP) assay to identify circulating beta cell DNA in streptozotocin-treated mice prior to the rise in blood glucose. The current study extends to autoimmune non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice and humans, showing in NOD mice that beta cell death occurs six weeks before the rise in blood sugar and coincides with the onset of islet infiltration by immune cells, demonstrating the utility of MSP for monitoring T1D. We previously reported unique patterns of methylation of the human insulin gene, and now extend this to other human tissues. The methylation patterns of the human insulin promoter, intron 1, exon 2, and intron 2 were determined in several normal human tissues. Similar to our previous report, the human insulin promoter was unmethylated in beta cells, but methylated in all other tissues tested. In contrast, intron 1, exon 2 and intron 2 did not exhibit any tissue-specific DNA methylation pattern. Subsequently, a human MSP assay was developed based on the methylation pattern of the insulin promoter and human islet DNA was successfully detected in circulation of T1D patients after islet transplantation therapy. Signal levels of normal controls and pre-transplant samples were shown to be similar, but increased dramatically after islet transplantation. In plasma the signal declines with time but in whole blood remains elevated for at least two weeks, indicating that association of beta cell DNA with blood cells prolongs the signal. This assay provides an effective method to monitor beta cell destruction in early T1D and in islet transplantation therapy. PMID:24722187

  3. Preclinical detection of porcine circovirus type 2 infection using an ultrasensitive nanoparticle DNA probe-based PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yong; Zhang, Xiujuan; Du, Qian; Wang, Fengyu; Zhao, Xiaomin; Zhang, Wenlong; Tong, Dewen

    2014-01-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) has emerged as one of the most important pathogens affecting swine production globally. Preclinical identification of PCV2 is very important for effective prophylaxis of PCV2-associated diseases. In this study, we developed an ultrasensitive nanoparticle DNA probe-based PCR assay (UNDP-PCR) for PCV2 detection. Magnetic microparticles coated with PCV2 specific DNA probes were used to enrich PCV2 DNA from samples, then gold nanoparticles coated with PCV2 specific oligonucleotides were added to form a sandwich nucleic acid-complex. After the complex was formed, the oligonucleotides were released and characterized by PCR. This assay exhibited about 500-fold more sensitive than conventional PCR, with a detection limit of 2 copies of purified PCV2 genomic DNA and 10 viral copies of PCV2 in serum. The assay has a wide detection range for all of PCV2 genotypes with reliable reproducibility. No cross-reactivity was observed from the samples of other related viruses including porcine circovirus type 1, porcine parvovirus, porcine pseudorabies virus, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and classical swine fever virus. The positive detection rate of PCV2 specific UNDP-PCR in 40 preclinical field samples was 27.5%, which appeared greater than that by conventional and real-time PCR and appeared application potency in evaluation of the viral loads levels of preclinical infection samples. The UNDP-PCR assay reported here can reliably rule out false negative results from antibody-based assays, provide a nucleic acid extraction free, specific, ultrasensitive, economic and rapid diagnosis method for preclinical PCV2 infection in field, which may help prevent large-scale outbreaks. PMID:24842840

  4. Multi-Fluorescence Real-Time PCR Assay for Detection of RIF and INH Resistance of M. tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jingfu; Yu, Xiaoli; Cui, Zhenling; Xue, Wenfei; Luo, Ziyi; Wen, Zilu; Liu, Minghua; Jiang, Danqing; Zheng, Heping; Wu, Hai; Zhang, Shulin; Li, Yao

    2016-01-01

    Background: Failure to early detect multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) results in treatment failure and poor clinical outcomes, and highlights the need to rapidly detect resistance to rifampicin (RIF) and isoniazid (INH). Methods: In Multi-Fluorescence quantitative Real-Time PCR (MF-qRT-PCR) assay, 10 probes labeled with four kinds of fluorophores were designed to detect the mutations in regions of rpoB, katG, mabA-inhA, oxyR-ahpC, and rrs. The efficiency of MF-qRT-PCR assay was tested using 261 bacterial isolates and 33 clinical sputum specimens. Among these samples, 227 Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates were analyzed using drug susceptibility testing (DST), DNA sequencing and MF-qRT-PCR assay. Results: Compared with DST, MF-qRT-PCR sensitivity and specificity for RIF-resistance were 94.6 and 100%, respectively. And the detection sensitivity and specificity for INH-resistance were 85.9 and 95.3%, respectively. Compared with DNA sequencing, the sensitivity and specificity of our assay were 97.2 and 100% for RIF-resistance and 97.9 and 96.4% for INH-resistance. Compared with Phenotypic strain identification, MF-qRT-PCR can distinguish 227 M. tuberculosis complexes (MTC) from 34 Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) isolates with 100% accuracy rate. Conclusions: MF-qRT-PCR assay was an efficient, accurate, reliable, and easy-operated method for detection of RIF and INH-resistance, and distinction of MTC and NTM of clinical isolates. PMID:27199947

  5. Multiplex PCR assay for detection of Clostridium perfringens in feces and intestinal contents of pigs and in swine feed.

    PubMed

    Kanakaraj, R; Harris, D L; Songer, J G; Bosworth, B

    1998-08-28

    A multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay, developed to detect the alpha-toxin and enterotoxin genes (cpa and cpe, respectively) of Clostridium perfringens, was used to identify enterotoxigenic isolates of this organism from feces and intestinal contents of pigs and from feed samples from pig farms in Iowa. The organism was grown on tryptose-sulfite-cycloserine (TSC) agar, TSC agar without egg-yolk, sheep blood agar, or in brain heart infusion broth or cooked meat medium. DNA was extracted by boiling and the PCR assay was carried out using reagents from a commercial kit. The 319 bp amplification product of cpa and the 364 bp product of cpe were visualized under UV light after electrophoresis in a 2% agarose gel containing ethidium bromide. The average sensitivity of the assay, determined on artificially contaminated feces, was 9.2 x 10(4) colony forming units per gram. Assay of 97 isolates from feces and intestinal contents revealed cpa in 89, but all were negative for cpe. While 28% of the 442 total samples cultured yielded C. perfringens, only 5% of 298 fecal or intestinal contents samples were positive upon direct examination by the PCR assay. Ninety-one and eight-tenths % of isolates with the phenotype of C. perfringens were cpa positive by PCR. Forty-three percent of feed samples were culture positive, while 48.3% were PCR positive for cpa. None of these were cpe positive. We conclude that PCR is a useful assay for rapid detection of C. perfringens in feed, and for confirmation of the identity of isolates presumed to be C. perfringens. PMID:9810619

  6. Development and application of a real-time PCR assay for the detection and quantitation of lymphocystis disease virus.

    PubMed

    Ciulli, Sara; Pinheiro, Ana Cristina de Aguiar Saldana; Volpe, Enrico; Moscato, Michele; Jung, Tae Sung; Galeotti, Marco; Stellino, Sabrina; Farneti, Riccardo; Prosperi, Santino

    2015-03-01

    Lymphocystis disease virus (LCDV) is responsible for a chronic self-limiting disease that affects more than 125 teleosts. Viral isolation of LCDV is difficult, time-consuming and often ineffective; the development of a rapid and specific tool to detect and quantify LCDV is desirable for both diagnosis and pathogenic studies. In this study, a quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay was developed using a Sybr-Green-based assay targeting a highly conserved region of the MCP gene. Primers were designed on a multiple alignment that included all known LCDV genotypes. The viral DNA segment was cloned within a plasmid to generate a standard curve. The limit of detection was as low as 2.6DNA copies/μl of plasmid and the qPCR was able to detect viral DNA from cell culture lysates and tissues at levels ten-times lower than conventional PCR. Both gilthead seabream and olive flounder LCDV has been amplified, and an in silico assay showed that LCDV of all genotypes can be amplified. LCDV was detected in target and non-target tissues of both diseased and asymptomatic fish. The LCDV qPCR assay developed in this study is highly sensitive, specific, reproducible and versatile for the detection and quantitation of Lymphocystivirus, and may also be used for asymptomatic carrier detection or pathogenesis studies of different LCDV strains. PMID:25522921

  7. Development of a simple PCR-based assay for the identification of triazine resistance in the noxious plant common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) and its applicability in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Mátyás, Kinga Klára; Taller, János; Cseh, András; Poczai, Péter; Cernák, István

    2011-12-01

    Bidirectional allele-specific PCR (Bi-PASA) was used to detect a point mutation causing triazine resistance in common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia). The external primers amplified a 278 bp standard DNA fragment in all genotypes. In the susceptible S264S genotypes, a 208 bp fragment was expected while in resistant S264G common ragweed genotypes a 109 bp band was expected. In resistant plants, both the wild and mutant type fragments were detected, indicating that the original triazine sensitive cpDNA is maintained in a heteroplasmic state in the resistant S264G genotypes. Additionally, in silico analysis confirmed the potential applicability of our diagnostic assay for other plant species. In 24 out of 74 taxa (32%), the assay could be used without any change, while in the others some of the primers should be redesigned before use. PMID:21809088

  8. Development of a rapid diagnostic assay for the detection of tomato chlorotic dwarf viroid based on isothermal reverse-transcription-recombinase polymerase amplification.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Rosemarie W; Zhang, Shulu

    2016-10-01

    A molecular diagnostic assay utilizing reverse transcription-recombinase polymerase amplification (RT-RPA) at an isothermal constant temperature of 39°C and target-specific primers and probe were developed for the rapid, sensitive, and specific detection of tomato chlorotic dwarf viroid (TCDVd) in infected leaf and seed tissues. The performance of the AmplifyRP(®) Acceler8™ RT-RPA diagnostic assay, utilizing a lateral flow strip contained within an amplicon detection chamber, was evaluated and the results were compared with a standard RT-PCR assay. The AmplifyRP(®) Acceler8™ assay was specific for TCDVd in leaf and seed tissues, its sensitivity was comparable to conventional RT-PCR in leaf tissues, and it does not require extensive sample purification, specialized equipment, or technical expertise. This is the first report utilizing an RT-RPA assay to detect viroids and the assay can be used both in the laboratory and in the field for TCDVd detection. PMID:27427473

  9. Real-Time PCR Assay for Clostridium perfringens in Broiler Chickens in a Challenge Model of Necrotic Enteritis▿

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shu-Biao; Rodgers, Nicholas; Choct, Mingan

    2011-01-01

    We compared ileal Clostridium perfringens quantification results produced by real-time PCR and culture-based methods in broiler chickens in a challenge model of necrotic enteritis. Assessment of the relative standard deviations (RSDs) revealed that the real-time PCR assay generated a smaller standard deviation and thus was more precise than the culture-based method. Linear regression analysis indicated that the bacterial counts of these two methods were highly correlated (R2 = 0.845). We suggest that real-time PCR could be a replacement of the culture method for quantifying C. perfringens in the intestinal tracts of broiler chickens. PMID:21148703

  10. Duplex Quantitative PCR Assay for Detection of Haemophilus influenzae That Distinguishes Fucose- and Protein D-Negative Strains.

    PubMed

    de Gier, Camilla; Pickering, Janessa L; Richmond, Peter C; Thornton, Ruth B; Kirkham, Lea-Ann S

    2016-09-01

    We have developed a specific Haemophilus influenzae quantitative PCR (qPCR) that also identifies fucose-negative and protein D-negative strains. Analysis of 100 H. influenzae isolates, 28 Haemophilus haemolyticus isolates, and 14 other bacterial species revealed 100% sensitivity (95% confidence interval [CI], 96% to 100%) and 100% specificity (95% CI, 92% to 100%) for this assay. The evaluation of 80 clinical specimens demonstrated a strong correlation between semiquantitative culture and the qPCR (P < 0.001). PMID:27335148

  11. Development and validation of a quantitative real-time PCR assay for the early diagnosis of coccidioidomycosis.

    PubMed

    Gago, Sara; Buitrago, María José; Clemons, Karl V; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Mirels, Laurence F; Stevens, David A

    2014-06-01

    A new real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay based on a Coccidioides genus-specific molecular beacon probe was developed for the detection of coccidioidomycosis and validated with tissues from animal models and clinical samples. The assay showed high analytic reproducibility (r(2) > 0.99) and specificity for cultured strains (100%); the lower limit of detection was 1 fg of genomic DNA/μL of reaction. Fungal burdens in the organs of mice infected with Coccidioides posadasii strain Silveira were more accurately quantified by RT-PCR compared to colony-forming unit for all tissues. The RT-PCR assay was positive for 97.7% of spleen and 100% of liver or lung. Progression of infection in all organs was similar by both methods (P > 0.05). The sensitivity of the assay also was 100% for paraffin-embedded samples and samples from patients with positive cultures. Our RT-PCR assay is effective for the diagnosis and monitoring of Coccidioides infection, and its use also avoids the biohazard and time delay of identifying cultures in the clinical setting. PMID:24657173

  12. Nested-PCR and TaqMan real-time quantitative PCR assays for human adenoviruses in environmental waters.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Chien; Chou, Yi-Pen; Kao, Po-Min; Hsu, Tsui-Kang; Su, Hung-Chang; Ho, Ying-Ning; Yang, Yi-Chun; Hsu, Bing-Mu

    2016-01-01

    Human adenovirus (HAdV) infections can occur throughout the year. Cases of HAdV-associated respiratory disease have been more common in the late winter, spring, and early summer. In this study, to provide viral pollution data for further epidemiological studies and governmental actions, the presence of HAdV in the aquatic environment was quantitatively surveyed in the summer. This study was conducted to compare the efficiencies of nested-PCR (polymerase chain reaction) and qPCR (quantitative PCR) for detecting HAdV in environmental waters. A total of 73 water samples were collected from Puzi River in Taiwan and subjected to virus concentration methods. In the results, qPCR had much better efficiency for specifying the pathogen in river sample. HAdV41 was detected most frequently in the river water sample (10.9%). The estimated HAdV concentrations ranged between 6.75 × 10(2) and 2.04 × 10(9) genome copies/L. Significant difference was also found in heterotrophic plate counts, conductivity, water temperature, and water turbidity between presence/absence of HAdV. HAdV in the Puzi River may pose a significant health risk. PMID:27120637

  13. Development and Comparison of TaqMan-Based Real-Time PCR Assays for Detection and Differentiation of Ralstonia solanacearum strains.

    PubMed

    Stulberg, Michael J; Rascoe, John; Li, Wenbin; Yan, Zonghe; Nakhla, Mark K; Huang, Qi

    2016-10-01

    Bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearum is destructive to many plant species worldwide. The race 3 biovar 2 (r3b2) strains of R. solanacearum infect potatoes in temperate climates and are listed as select agents by the U.S. government. TaqMan-based real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) is commonly used in federal and state diagnostic laboratories over conventional PCR due to its speed and sensitivity. We developed the Rs16S primers and probe set and compared it with a widely used set (RS) for detecting R. solanacearum species complex strains. We also developed the RsSA3 primers and probe set and compared it with the previously published B2 and RsSA2 sets for specific detection of r3b2 strains. Both comparisons were done under standardized qPCR master mix and cycling conditions. The Rs16S and RS assays detected all 90 R. solanacearum species complex strains and none of the five outgroups, but the former was more sensitive than the latter. For r3b2 strain detection, the RsSA2 and RsSA3 sets specifically detected the 34 r3b2 strains and none of the 56 R. solanacearum non-r3b2 strains or out-group strains. The B2 set, however, detected five non-r3b2 R. solanacearum strains and was less sensitive than the other two sets under the same testing conditions. We conclude that the Rs16S, RsSA2, and RsSA3 sets are best suited under the standardized conditions for the detection of R. solanacearum species complex and r3b2 strains by TaqMan-based qPCR assays. PMID:27402488

  14. Quantitative Real-Time PCR Assays for Detection of Human Adenoviruses and Identification of Serotypes 40 and 41

    PubMed Central

    Jothikumar, Narayanan; Cromeans, Theresa L.; Hill, Vincent R.; Lu, Xiaoyan; Sobsey, Mark D.; Erdman, Dean D.

    2005-01-01

    A quantitative real-time TaqMan PCR assay for detection of human adenoviruses (HAdV) was developed using broadly reactive consensus primers and a TaqMan probe targeting a conserved region of the hexon gene. The TaqMan assay correctly identified 56 representative adenovirus prototype strains and field isolates from all six adenovirus species (A to F). Based on infectious units, the TaqMan assay was able to detect as few as 0.4 and 0.004 infectious units of adenovirus serotype 2 (AdV2) and AdV41, respectively, with results obtained in less than 90 min. Using genomic equivalents, the broadly reactive TaqMan assay was able to detect 5 copies of AdV40 (which had zero mismatches with the PCR primers and probe), 8 copies of AdV41, and 350 copies of AdV3 (which had the most mismatches [seven] of any adenovirus serotype tested). For specific detection and identification of F species serotypes AdV40 and AdV41, a second real-time PCR assay was developed using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) probes that target the adenovirus fiber gene. The FRET-based assay had a detection limit of 3 to 5 copies of AdV40 and AdV41 standard DNA and was able to distinguish between AdV40 and AdV41 based on melting curve analysis. Both the TaqMan and FRET PCR assays were quantitative over a wide range of virus titers. Application of these assays for detection of adenoviruses and type-specific identification of AdV40 and AdV41 will be useful for identifying these viruses in environmental and clinical samples. PMID:15933012

  15. Development and Validation of a Laboratory-Developed Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay on the BD Max System for Detection of Herpes Simplex Virus and Varicella-Zoster Virus DNA in Various Clinical Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Pillet, Sylvie; Verhoeven, Paul O.; Epercieux, Amélie; Bourlet, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    A multiplex real-time PCR (quantitative PCR [qPCR]) assay detecting herpes simplex virus (HSV) and varicella-zoster virus (VZV) DNA together with an internal control was developed on the BD Max platform combining automated DNA extraction and an open amplification procedure. Its performance was compared to those of PCR assays routinely used in the laboratory, namely, a laboratory-developed test for HSV DNA on the LightCycler instrument and a test using a commercial master mix for VZV DNA on the ABI7500fast system. Using a pool of negative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples spiked with either calibrated controls for HSV-1 and VZV or dilutions of a clinical strain that was previously quantified for HSV-2, the empirical limit of detection of the BD Max assay was 195.65, 91.80, and 414.07 copies/ml for HSV-1, HSV-2, and VZV, respectively. All the samples from HSV and VZV DNA quality control panels (Quality Control for Molecular Diagnostics [QCMD], 2013, Glasgow, United Kingdom) were correctly identified by the BD Max assay. From 180 clinical specimens of various origins, 2 CSF samples were found invalid by the BD Max assay due to the absence of detection of the internal control; a concordance of 100% was observed between the BD Max assay and the corresponding routine tests. The BD Max assay detected the PCR signal 3 to 4 cycles earlier than did the routine methods. With results available within 2 h on a wide range of specimens, this sensitive and fully automated PCR assay exhibited the qualities required for detecting simultaneously HSV and VZV DNA on a routine basis. PMID:25878344

  16. Comparison of a PCR serotyping assay, Check&Trace assay for Salmonella, and Luminex Salmonella serotyping assay for the characterization of Salmonella enterica identified from fresh and naturally contaminated cilantro.

    PubMed

    Jean-Gilles Beaubrun, J; Ewing, L; Jarvis, K; Dudley, K; Grim, C; Gopinath, G; Flamer, M-L; Auguste, W; Jayaram, A; Elmore, J; Lamont, M; McGrath, T; Hanes, D E

    2014-09-01

    Salmonella enterica isolated from fresh cilantro samples collected through the USDA/AMS Microbiological Data Program (MDP) were used to compare a PCR serotyping assay against the Check&Trace assay and the Luminex (BioPlex) Salmonella serotyping assay. The study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the three methods for serotyping Salmonella from both enrichment broth cultures and pure Salmonella cultures. In this investigation, Salmonella spp. serotyping was conducted using 24 h enrichment broth cultures and pure Salmonella cultures from cilantro samples, with the PCR serotyping assay. Conversely, the Check&Trace and Luminex for Salmonella assays required pure cultures for Salmonella serotyping. The cilantro samples contained S. enterica serovar Montevideo, Newport, Saintpaul, and Tennessee, identified by the PCR serotyping assay and Check&Trace for Salmonella, but the Luminex assay only identified two of the four serotypes of the cilantro samples. The anticipated impact from this study is that the PCR serotyping assay provides a time- and cost-effective means for screening, identifying and serotyping Salmonella using DNA extracted from 24 h enrichment cilantro samples. PMID:24929735

  17. Multiplex Real-Time qPCR Assay for Simultaneous and Sensitive Detection of Phytoplasmas in Sesame Plants and Insect Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Ikten, Cengiz; Ustun, Rustem; Catal, Mursel; Yol, Engin; Uzun, Bulent

    2016-01-01

    Phyllody, a destructive and economically important disease worldwide caused by phytoplasma infections, is characterized by the abnormal development of floral structures into stunted leafy parts and contributes to serious losses in crop plants, including sesame (Sesamum indicum L.). Accurate identification, differentiation, and quantification of phyllody-causing phytoplasmas are essential for effective management of this plant disease and for selection of resistant sesame varieties. In this study, a diagnostic multiplex qPCR assay was developed using TaqMan® chemistry based on detection of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene of phytoplasmas and the 18S ribosomal gene of sesame. Phytoplasma and sesame specific primers and probes labeled with different fluorescent dyes were used for simultaneous amplification of 16SrII and 16SrIX phytoplasmas in a single tube. The multiplex real-time qPCR assay allowed accurate detection, differentiation, and quantification of 16SrII and 16SrIX groups in 109 sesame plant and 92 insect vector samples tested. The assay was found to have a detection sensitivity of 1.8 x 102 and 1.6 x 102 DNA copies for absolute quantification of 16SrII and 16SrIX group phytoplasmas, respectively. Relative quantification was effective and reliable for determination of phyllody phytoplasma DNA amounts normalized to sesame DNA in infected plant tissues. The development of this qPCR assay provides a method for the rapid measurement of infection loads to identify resistance levels of sesame genotypes against phyllody phytoplasma disease. PMID:27195795

  18. Multiplex Real-Time qPCR Assay for Simultaneous and Sensitive Detection of Phytoplasmas in Sesame Plants and Insect Vectors.

    PubMed

    Ikten, Cengiz; Ustun, Rustem; Catal, Mursel; Yol, Engin; Uzun, Bulent

    2016-01-01

    Phyllody, a destructive and economically important disease worldwide caused by phytoplasma infections, is characterized by the abnormal development of floral structures into stunted leafy parts and contributes to serious losses in crop plants, including sesame (Sesamum indicum L.). Accurate identification, differentiation, and quantification of phyllody-causing phytoplasmas are essential for effective management of this plant disease and for selection of resistant sesame varieties. In this study, a diagnostic multiplex qPCR assay was developed using TaqMan® chemistry based on detection of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene of phytoplasmas and the 18S ribosomal gene of sesame. Phytoplasma and sesame specific primers and probes labeled with different fluorescent dyes were used for simultaneous amplification of 16SrII and 16SrIX phytoplasmas in a single tube. The multiplex real-time qPCR assay allowed accurate detection, differentiation, and quantification of 16SrII and 16SrIX groups in 109 sesame plant and 92 insect vector samples tested. The assay was found to have a detection sensitivity of 1.8 x 102 and 1.6 x 102 DNA copies for absolute quantification of 16SrII and 16SrIX group phytoplasmas, respectively. Relative quantification was effective and reliable for determination of phyllody phytoplasma DNA amounts normalized to sesame DNA in infected plant tissues. The development of this qPCR assay provides a method for the rapid measurement of infection loads to identify resistance levels of sesame genotypes against phyllody phytoplasma disease. PMID:27195795

  19. Application of the 5′-Nuclease PCR Assay in Evaluation and Development of Methods for Quantitative Detection of Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Nogva, Hege Karin; Bergh, Anette; Holck, Askild; Rudi, Knut

    2000-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is recognized as a leading human food-borne pathogen. Traditional diagnostic testing for C. jejuni is not reliable due to special growth requirements and the possibility that this bacterium can enter a viable but nonculturable state. Nucleic acid-based tests have emerged as a useful alternative to traditional enrichment testing. In this article, we present a 5′-nuclease PCR assay for quantitative detection of C. jejuni and describe its evaluation. A probe including positions 381121 to 381206 of the published C. jejuni strain NCTC 11168 genome sequence was identified. When this probe was applied, the assay was positive for all of the isolates of C. jejuni tested (32 isolates, including the type strain) and negative for all other Campylobacter spp. (11 species tested) and several other bacteria (41 species tested). The total assay could be completed in 3 h with a detection limit of approximately 1 CFU. Quantification was linear over at least 6 log units. Quantitative detection methods are important for both research purposes and further development of C. jejuni detection methods. In this study, we used the assay to investigate to what extent the PCR signals generated by heat-killed bacteria interfere with the detection of viable C. jejuni after exposure at elevated temperatures for up to 5 days. An approach to the reduction of the PCR signal generated by dead bacteria was also investigated by employing externally added DNases to selectively inactivate free DNA and exposed DNA in heat-killed bacteria. The results indicated relatively good discrimination between exposed DNA from dead C. jejuni and protected DNA in living bacteria. PMID:10966425

  20. Development of a Multiplex PCR Assay for Detection of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli, Enterohemorrhagic E. coli, and Enteropathogenic E. coli Strains

    PubMed Central

    Botkin, Douglas J.; Galli, Lucía; Sankarapani, Vinoth; Soler, Michael; Rivas, Marta; Torres, Alfredo G.

    2012-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 and other pathogenic E. coli strains are enteric pathogens associated with food safety threats and which remain a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In the current study, we investigated whether enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC), and enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) strains can be rapidly and specifically differentiated with multiplex PCR (mPCR) utilizing selected biomarkers associated with each strain’s respective virulence genotype. Primers were designed to amplify multiple intimin (eae) and long polar fimbriae (lpfA) variants, the bundle-forming pilus gene bfpA, and the Shiga toxin-encoding genes stx1 and stx2. We demonstrated consistent amplification of genes specific to the prototype EHEC O157:H7 EDL933 (lpfA1-3, lpfA2-2, stx1, stx2, and eae-γ) and EPEC O127:H6 E2348/69 (eae-α, lpfA1-1, and bfpA) strains using the optimized mPCR protocol with purified genomic DNA (gDNA). A screen of gDNA from isolates in a diarrheagenic E. coli collection revealed that the mPCR assay was successful in predicting the correct pathotype of EPEC and EHEC clones grouped in the distinctive phylogenetic disease clusters EPEC1 and EHEC1, and was able to differentiate EHEC1 from EHEC2 clusters. The assay detection threshold was 2 × 104 CFU per PCR reaction for EHEC and EPEC. mPCR was also used to screen Argentinean clinical samples from hemolytic uremic syndrome and diarrheal patients, resulting in 91% sensitivity and 84% specificity when compared to established molecular diagnostic procedures. In conclusion, our mPCR methodology permitted differentiation of EPEC, STEC and EHEC strains from other pathogenic E. coli; therefore, the assay becomes an additional tool for rapid diagnosis of these organisms. PMID:22919600

  1. Development of a multiplex real-time PCR assay for identification of members of the Anopheles gambiae species complex.

    PubMed

    Bass, Chris; Williamson, Martin S; Field, Linda M

    2008-07-01

    Two high-throughput assays for the identification of members of the Anopheles gambiae sensu lato species complex have recently been reported. These methods, are based on TaqMan single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping that enables rapid scoring of mosquito DNA samples in real-time PCR reactions. Unfortunately, both assays are restricted in the number of species that they can identify and a combination of the two assays may be required to identify all possible species in certain regions. To overcome this limitation, and thereby further increase throughput while reducing costs, we have developed a new multiplex real-time PCR assay for identifying members of the An. gambiae complex. The new method uses three probes labelled with fluorophores with distinct emission and excitation spectra, allowing simultaneous detection of the two main malaria vectors from the non-vector sibling species, and can be used on single mosquito legs from silica-dried specimens. A genotyping trial of over 450 specimens collected from 13 countries in sub-Saharan Africa showed the multiplex assay to be highly specific and sensitive and it compared well against the two previously reported TaqMan assays and standard allele-specific PCR. PMID:18490000

  2. Comparison of BD GeneOhm Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) PCR versus the CHROMagar MRSA Assay for Screening Patients for the Presence of MRSA Strains▿

    PubMed Central

    Boyce, John M.; Havill, Nancy L.

    2008-01-01

    We compared the BD GeneOhm methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) real-time PCR assay with the CHROMagar MRSA assay for the detection of MRSA in 286 nasal surveillance specimens. Compared with the CHROMagar MRSA assay, PCR had sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive values of 100%, 98.6%, 95.8%, and 100%, respectively. The mean PCR turnaround time was 14.5 h. PMID:18032616

  3. Selection of Reference Genes for Quantitative Real Time PCR (qPCR) Assays in Tissue from Human Ascending Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Rueda-Martínez, Carmen; Lamas, Oscar; Mataró, María José; Robledo-Carmona, Juan; Sánchez-Espín, Gemma; Jiménez-Navarro, Manuel; Such-Martínez, Miguel; Fernández, Borja

    2014-01-01

    Dilatation of the ascending aorta (AAD) is a prevalent aortopathy that occurs frequently associated with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV), the most common human congenital cardiac malformation. The molecular mechanisms leading to AAD associated with BAV are still poorly understood. The search for differentially expressed genes in diseased tissue by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) is an invaluable tool to fill this gap. However, studies dedicated to identify reference genes necessary for normalization of mRNA expression in aortic tissue are scarce. In this report, we evaluate the qPCR expression of six candidate reference genes in tissue from the ascending aorta of 52 patients with a variety of clinical and demographic characteristics, normal and dilated aortas, and different morphologies of the aortic valve (normal aorta and normal valve n = 30; dilated aorta and normal valve n = 10; normal aorta and BAV n = 4; dilated aorta and BAV n = 8). The expression stability of the candidate reference genes was determined with three statistical algorithms, GeNorm, NormFinder and Bestkeeper. The expression analyses showed that the most stable genes for the three algorithms employed were CDKN1β, POLR2A and CASC3, independently of the structure of the aorta and the valve morphology. In conclusion, we propose the use of these three genes as reference genes for mRNA expression analysis in human ascending aorta. However, we suggest searching for specific reference genes when conducting qPCR experiments with new cohort of samples. PMID:24841551

  4. Diagnostic usefulness of PCR profiling of the differentially expressed marker genes in thyroid papillary carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Aiko; Mankovskaya, Svetlana; Saenko, Vladimir; Rogounovitch, Tatiana; Mine, Mariko; Namba, Hiroyuki; Nakashima, Masahiro; Demidchik, Yuri; Demidchik, Eugeny; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2005-06-28

    The study was set out to determine whether characteristic changes in the gene expression profile in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) discovered by microarray assays can be used for conventional molecular diagnosis. Expression levels of five reported to be overexpressed and three underexpressed genes were examined in PTC and normal human tissues by real-time PCR and semi-quantitative duplex PCR. Stepwise logistic regression analysis, duplex PCR data evaluation with recursive partition machine algorithm and hierarchical cluster analysis identified SFTPB (upregulated) and TFF3 (downregulated) gene combination as most favorable for differential molecular diagnosis of PTC. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy obtained in a series of histologically characterized thyroid tumor and normal tissue samples were 88.9, 96.7 and 94.9%, respectively. Applicability of the method to fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) samples was demonstrated using a collection of needle washouts. In spite individual thyroid tumor and normal tissues as well as FNAB samples displayed a substantial degree of variability in the expression levels of analyzed genes, simultaneous molecular analysis of a panel of optimal markers allows making a high probability predictive estimate and may be considered as an informative method of preoperative PTC diagnosis. PMID:15914279

  5. Development and evaluation of a real-time reverse transcription-PCR assay for quantification of gamma interferon mRNA to diagnose tuberculosis in multiple animal species.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Noel P; Surujballi, Om P; Waters, W Ray; Prescott, John F

    2007-12-01

    Tuberculosis of free-ranging and captive wildlife, including species implicated in the maintenance and transmission of Mycobacterium bovis, is a difficult disease to diagnose and control. Historically, diagnosis of tuberculosis has relied largely upon assays of cell-mediated immunity (CMI), such as tuberculin skin testing. This approach, however, is problematic or impractical for use with many wildlife species. Increasingly, in vitro diagnostic tests, including gamma interferon (IFN-gamma)-based assays, are replacing or complementing skin testing of cattle and humans. Analogous assays are unavailable for most wildlife because of a lack of species-specific immunological reagents. This report describes the development and validation of a whole-blood assay to quantify antigen-specific IFN-gamma mRNA expression by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR. Oligonucleotide primers and probes were designed and tested for reactivity towards several susceptible species of interest with respect to tuberculosis infection. The assay was subsequently optimized to quantify the IFN-gamma mRNA expression in elk and red deer (Cervus elaphus) and was evaluated for its ability to detect mycobacterial antigen-specific responses of experimentally tuberculosis-infected animals. The assay was a simple, rapid, and sensitive measure of antigen-specific CMI. The IFN-gamma mRNA responses correlated well with IFN-gamma protein production and showed performance in determining an animal's infection status superior to that of either lymphocyte proliferation or IFN-gamma protein enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methods. An additional advantage is the ease with which the assay can be modified to reliably quantify IFN-gamma expression by using consensus sequences of closely related species or of other species for which IFN-gamma sequence information is available. PMID:17942606

  6. Development and Evaluation of a Real-Time Reverse Transcription-PCR Assay for Quantification of Gamma Interferon mRNA To Diagnose Tuberculosis in Multiple Animal Species▿

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Noel P.; Surujballi, Om P.; Waters, W. Ray; Prescott, John F.

    2007-01-01

    Tuberculosis of free-ranging and captive wildlife, including species implicated in the maintenance and transmission of Mycobacterium bovis, is a difficult disease to diagnose and control. Historically, diagnosis of tuberculosis has relied largely upon assays of cell-mediated immunity (CMI), such as tuberculin skin testing. This approach, however, is problematic or impractical for use with many wildlife species. Increasingly, in vitro diagnostic tests, including gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-based assays, are replacing or complementing skin testing of cattle and humans. Analogous assays are unavailable for most wildlife because of a lack of species-specific immunological reagents. This report describes the development and validation of a whole-blood assay to quantify antigen-specific IFN-γ mRNA expression by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR. Oligonucleotide primers and probes were designed and tested for reactivity towards several susceptible species of interest with respect to tuberculosis infection. The assay was subsequently optimized to quantify the IFN-γ mRNA expression in elk and red deer (Cervus elaphus) and was evaluated for its ability to detect mycobacterial antigen-specific responses of experimentally tuberculosis-infected animals. The assay was a simple, rapid, and sensitive measure of antigen-specific CMI. The IFN-γ mRNA responses correlated well with IFN-γ protein production and showed performance in determining an animal's infection status superior to that of either lymphocyte proliferation or IFN-γ protein enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methods. An additional advantage is the ease with which the assay can be modified to reliably quantify IFN-γ expression by using consensus sequences of closely related species or of other species for which IFN-γ sequence information is available. PMID:17942606

  7. Evaluation of PCR inhibitory effect of enrichment broths and comparison of DNA extraction methods for detection of Salmonella Enteritidis using real-time PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Hyeon, Ji Yeon; Hwang, In Gyun; Kwak, Hyo Sun; Park, Chankyu; Choi, In Soo; Seo, Kun Ho

    2010-06-01

    The best enrichment broth and DNA extraction scheme was determined for rapid and sensitive detection of Salmonella Enteritidis in steamed pork using real-time PCR. The inhibitory effect of commonly used Salmonella enrichment broths, Rappaport-Vassiliadis (RV) and Muller-Kauffmann tetrathionate with novobiocin (MKTTn), on real-time PCR was confirmed. The inhibition of PCR was statistically significant (p < 0.05) in RV and MKTTn, as compared with buffered peptone water (BPW) or phosphate-buffered saline. The inhibitory effect of the selective enrichment media was successfully removed by using a modified DNA extraction, PrepMan Ultra Reagent with an additional washing step or the DNeasy Tissue Kit. In three experiments, when applied to detection of Salmonella Enteritidis in steamed pork, the real-time PCR coupled with single 24 h enrichment with BPW performed better than double 48 h enrichment with BPW plus RV or MKTTn. The simple real-time PCR assay using BPW proved to be a rapid and sensitive test for detection of low concentrations of Salmonella Enteritidis in steamed pork samples as compared with the conventional culture method. PMID:20458155

  8. Duplex PCR assay and in situ hybridization for detection of Francisella spp. and Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis in red tilapia.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ha T; Gangnonngiw, Warachin; Phiwsaiya, Kornsunee; Charoensapsri, Walaiporn; Nguyen, Vuong V; Nilsen, Pål; Pradeep, Padmaja J; Withyachumnarnkul, Boonsirm; Senapin, Saengchan; Rodkhum, Channarong

    2016-06-15

    Conventional isolation and identification based on phenotypic characteristics is challenging with the highly fastidious, intracellular bacterium Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis (Fno). Here, we developed a duplex PCR method for simultaneous detection of the Francisella genus and Fno in one PCR reaction and an in situ hybridization method for paraffin section based diagnosis of Fno. The PCR results showed genus- and species-specific bands (1140 and 203 bp) from Fno but only one genus-specific band (1140 bp) from F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis. Sensitivity of the duplex PCR assay revealed a detection limit of 20 to 200 fg genomic DNA (~10 to 100 genome equivalents) depending on DNA template extraction methods. The newly developed duplex PCR assay could be used to detect Fno from clinically sick fish exhibiting signs of visceral granulomas and would also be able to detect Fno infection in naturally diseased fish without symptoms of francisellosis, indicating potential application for diagnosis of field samples. The in situ hybridization assay using Fno species-specific probe revealed positive signals in multiple organs including the spleen, liver, kidney, gills and intestine of infected fish. PMID:27304869

  9. Development of a Novel Genus-Specific Real-Time PCR Assay for Detection and Differentiation of Bartonella Species and Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Ying; Malania, Lile; Winchell, Jonas M.; Kosoy, Michael Y.

    2012-01-01

    The genus Bartonella includes numerous species with varied host associations, including several that infect humans. Development of a molecular diagnostic method capable of detecting the diverse repertoire of Bartonella species while maintaining genus specificity has been a challenge. We developed a novel real-time PCR assay targeting a 301-bp region of the ssrA gene of Bartonella and demonstrated specific amplification in over 30 Bartonella species, subspecies, and strains. Subsequent analysis of ssrA sequences was sufficient to discriminate Bartonella species and provided phylogenetic data consistent with that of gltA, a commonly used gene for differentiating Bartonella genotypes. Using this assay, we identified Bartonella DNA in 29% and 47% of blood specimens from elk in Wyoming and cattle in the Republic of Georgia, respectively. Sequence analysis of a subset of genotypes from elk specimens revealed a cluster most closely related to Bartonella capreoli, and genotypes from cattle were identified as Bartonella bovis, both Bartonella species commonly found in wild and domestic ruminants. Considering the widespread geographic distribution and infectivity potential to a variety of hosts, this assay may be an effective diagnostic method for identification of Bartonella infections in humans and have utility in Bartonella surveillance studies. PMID:22378904

  10. Development of PCR-based assays for detecting and differentiating three species of botrytis infecting broad bean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botrytis cinerea, B. fabae and B. fabiopsis are known to cause chocolate spot on broad bean. This study was conducted to develop PCR-based assays to detect and differentiate this three species. Two sets of primers, Bc-f/Bc-r for B. cinerea and Bfab-f/Bfab-r for B. fabiopsis, were designed based on t...

  11. Two quantitative real-time PCR assays for the detection of penaeid shrimp and blue crab, crustacean shellfish allergens.

    PubMed

    Eischeid, Anne C; Kim, Bang-hyun; Kasko, Sasha M

    2013-06-19

    Food allergen detection methods must be able to specifically detect minute quantities of an allergenic food in a complex food matrix. One technique that can be used is real-time PCR. For the work described here, real-time PCR assays were developed to detect penaeid shrimp and blue crab, crustacean shellfish allergens. The method was tested using shrimp meat and crab meat spiked into several types of foods, including canned soups, deli foods, meat, seafood, and prepared seafood products. Foods were spiked with either shrimp or crab at levels ranging from 0.1 to 10⁶ parts per million (ppm) and analyzed either raw or cooked by a variety of methods. Real-time PCR data were used to generate linear standard curves, and assays were evaluated with respect to linear range and reaction efficiency. Results indicate that both assays performed well in a variety of food types. High reaction efficiencies were achieved across a linear range of 6-8 orders of magnitude. Limits of detection were generally between 0.1 and 1 ppm. Cooking methods used to simulate thermal processing of foods had little effect on assay performance. This work demonstrates that real-time PCR can be a valuable tool in the detection of crustacean shellfish. PMID:23190158

  12. A sensitive and specific PCR assay for the detection of Baylisascaris schroederi eggs in giant panda feces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Li, De-Sheng; Zhou, Xuan; Xie, Yue; Liang, Yi-Nan; Wang, Cheng-Dong; Yu, Hua; Chen, Shi-Jie; Yan, Yu-Bo; Gu, Xiao-Bin; Wang, Shu-Xian; Peng, Xue-Rong; Yang, Guang-You

    2013-10-01

    Baylisascaris schroederi is one of the most common intestinal nematodes in giant pandas. It can cause severe baylisascariasis which is highly infectious in its natural hosts. A rapid and reliable diagnosis of parasite infections is crucial to protect giant pandas, as well as for environmental monitoring and disease surveillance. Here, we established a specific PCR assay for B. schroederi detection which was targeting a 331-bp long fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (COII) gene. Fifty fresh fecal samples collected from captive giant pandas were tested by the established PCR assay and the traditional flotation technique. DNA extracted from a single B. schroederi egg could be successfully amplified, while no cross-reactivity was found with DNA from Ancylostoma caninum eggs. The detection rate of the PCR assay was 68%, which was higher than that of the traditional egg flotation (46%). Our findings demonstrated that the PCR assay is sensitive and specific for the detection and identification of B. schroederi eggs. Therefore, it could become a useful tool for the investigation of B. schroederi infections in giant pandas. PMID:23688803

  13. Development of species-, strain- and antibiotic biosynthesis-specific quantitative PCR assays for Pantoea agglomerans as tools for biocontrol monitoring.

    PubMed

    Braun-Kiewnick, Andrea; Lehmann, Andreas; Rezzonico, Fabio; Wend, Chris; Smits, Theo H M; Duffy, Brion

    2012-09-01

    Pantoea agglomerans is a cosmopolitan plant epiphytic bacterium that includes some of the most effective biological antagonists against the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora, a major threat to pome fruit production worldwide. Strain E325 is commercially available as Bloomtime Biological™ in the USA and Canada. New quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays were developed for species- and strain -specific detection in the environment, and for detection of indigenous strains carrying the biocontrol antibacterial peptide biosynthesis gene paaA. The qPCR assays were highly specific, efficient and sensitive, detecting fewer than three cells per reaction or 700 colony forming units per flower, respectively. The qPCR assays were tested on field samples, giving first indications to the incidence of P. agglomerans E325 related strains, total P. agglomerans and pantocin A producing bacteria in commercial orchards. These assays will facilitate monitoring the environmental behavior of biocontrol P. agglomerans after orchard application for disease protection, proprietary strain-tracking, and streamlined screening for discovery of new biocontrol strains. PMID:22705381

  14. Development of a multiplex PCR assay for rapid virulence factor profiling of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli isolated from cattle.

    PubMed

    Ojima, Toru; Hirano, Kaori; Honda, Kohei; Kusumoto, Masahiro

    2016-09-01

    Virulence factor (VF) profiling is important for the control of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) infection because VF prevalence is highly variable. We analyzed the VF profile of ExPEC isolated from cattle in Yamagata prefecture, Japan, 2000-2015 and developed a rapid VF profiling method using a multiplex PCR assay. PMID:27380962

  15. In situ detection of the Clostridium botulinum type C1 toxin gene in wetland sediments with a nested PCR assay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williamson, J.L.; Rocke, T.E.; Aiken, Judd M.

    1999-01-01

    A nested PCR was developed for detection of the Clostridium botulinum type C1 toxin gene in sediments collected from wetlands where avian botulism outbreaks had or had not occurred. The C1 toxin gene was detected in 16 of 18 sites, demonstrating both the ubiquitous distribution of C. botulinum type C in wetland sediments and the sensitivity of the detection assay.

  16. Development of a non invasion real-time PCR assay for the quantitation of chicken parvovirus in fecal swabs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present study describes the development of a real time Taqman polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay using a fluorescent labeled probe for the detection and quantitation of chicken parvovirus (ChPV) in feces. The primers and probes were designed based on the nucleotide sequence of the non struct...

  17. Simultaneous typing of nine avian respiratory pathogens using a novel GeXP analyzer-based multiplex PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhixun; Luo, Sisi; Xie, Liji; Liu, Jiabo; Pang, Yaoshan; Deng, Xianwen; Xie, Zhiqin; Fan, Qing; Khan, Mazhar I

    2014-10-01

    A new, rapid, and high-throughput GenomeLab Gene Expression Profiler (GeXP) analyzer-based multiplex PCR method was developed for simultaneous detection and differentiation of nine avian respiratory pathogens. The respiratory pathogens included in this study were avian influenza subtypes H5, H7, and H9, infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), Newcastle disease virus (NDV), infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV), Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG), Mycoplasma synoviae (MS) and Haemophilus paragallinarum (HPG). Ten pairs of primers were designed using conserved and specific sequence genes of AIV subtypes and respiratory pathogens from GenBank. Single and mixed pathogen cDNA/DNA templates were used to evaluate the specificity of the GeXP-multiplex assay. The corresponding specific DNA products were amplified for each pathogen. The specific DNA product amplification peaks of nine respiratory pathogens were observed on the GeXP analyzer. Non-respiratory avian pathogens, including chicken infectious anemia virus, fowl adenovirus, avian reovirus and infectious bursal disease virus, did not produce DNA products. The detection limit for the GeXP-multiplex assay was determined to be 100 copies/μl using various pre-mixed plasmids/ssRNAs containing known target genes of the respiratory pathogens. Further, GeXP-multiplex PCR assay was 100% specific when 24 clinical samples with respiratory infections were tested in comparison with conventional PCR method. The GeXP-multiplex PCR assay provides a novel tool for simultaneous detection and differentiation of nine avian respiratory pathogens. PMID:25025815

  18. Validation of a real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR assay for the detection of H7 avian influenza virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A subtype specific H7 real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay developed by the Southeast Poultry Research Laboratory (SEPRL) for the detection of H7 in North and South American wild aquatic birds and poultry was validated as a collaborative effort by the SEPRL and Na...

  19. Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay for Detection of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Associated Toxin Genes▿

    PubMed Central

    Fosheim, G. E.; Nicholson, A. C.; Albrecht, V. S.; Limbago, B. M.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a real-time PCR assay for the detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and genes encoding toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 and Panton-Valentine leukocidin. Rapid screening and detection of toxins is a useful tool for surveillance studies and outbreak investigations involving large numbers of isolates. PMID:21697325

  20. Improved HF183 quantitative real-time PCR assay for characterization of human fecal pollution in ambient surface water samples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Real-time quantitative PCR assays that target the human-associated HF183 bacterial cluster have been found to be some of the top performing methods for the characterization of human fecal pollution in ambient surface waters. The United States Environmental Protection Agency is planning to conduct a ...

  1. Improved HF183 quantitative real-time PCR assay for characterization of human fecal pollution in ambient surface water samples

    EPA Science Inventory

    Real-time quantitative PCR assays that target the human-associated HF183 bacterial cluster are considered to be some of the top performing methods for the characterization of human fecal pollution in ambient surface waters. In response, the United States Environmental Protectio...

  2. Development of real-time PCR assay for genetic identification of the mottled skate, Beringraja pulchra.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In Kwan; Lee, Hae Young; Kim, Min-Hee; Jo, Hyun-Su; Choi, Dong-Ho; Kang, Pil-Won; Lee, Yang-Han; Cho, Nam-Soo; Park, Ki-Won; Chae, Ho Zoon

    2015-10-01

    The mottled skate, Beringraja pulchra is one of the commercially important fishes in the market today. However, B. pulchra identification methods have not been well developed. The current study reports a novel real-time PCR method based on TaqMan technology developed for the genetic identification of B. pulchra. The mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI) nucleotide sequences of 29 B. pulchra, 157 skates and rays reported in GenBank DNA database were comparatively analyzed and the COI sequences specific to B. pulchra was identified. Based on this information, a system of specific primers and Minor Groove Binding (MGB) TaqMan probe were designed. The assay successfully discriminated in 29 specimens of B. pulchra and 27 commercial samples with unknown species identity. For B. pulchra DNA, an average Threshold Cycle (Ct) value of 19.1±0.1 was obtained. Among 27 commercial samples, two samples showed average Ct values 19.1±0.0 and 26.7±0.1, respectively and were confirmed to be B. pulchra based on sequencing. The other samples tested showed undetectable or extremely weak signals for the target fragment, which was also consistent with the sequencing results. These results reveal that the method developed is a rapid and efficient tool to identify B. pulchra and might prevent fraud or mislabeling during the distribution of B. pulchra products. PMID:26092191

  3. Genotoxicity Evaluation of Acephate and Profenofos by the PCR-RFLP Assay

    PubMed Central

    Bhinder, Preety; Chaudhry, Asha

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: In this study we have evaluated the genotoxic potential of pesticides acephate and profenofos by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay with the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus taken as experimental model. Material and Methods: Second instar larvae were treated with LC20 of each pesticide for 24 h and induced mutations in the sequence of mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene were studied from restriction patterns generated with PacI and PsiI restriction endonucleases. Results: Variations in the number and size of digested fragments were recorded from treated individuals compared with controls showing that the restriction enzymes created a cut at different locations. In addition, sequences of the 16S gene from control and treated individuals were also used to confirm the RFLP patterns. From the sequence alignment data, it was found that mutations caused the destruction and generation of restriction sites in the gene sequence of treated individuals. Conclusion: This study indicates that both the pesticides had significant potential to induce mutations in the 16S gene of Culex quinquefasciatus. PMID:24748740

  4. Preclinical Diagnosis of African Swine Fever in Contact-Exposed Swine by a Real-Time PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Zsak, L.; Borca, M. V.; Risatti, G. R.; Zsak, A.; French, R. A.; Lu, Z.; Kutish, G. F.; Neilan, J. G.; Callahan, J. D.; Nelson, W. M.; Rock, D. L.

    2005-01-01

    A fluorogenic probe hydrolysis (TaqMan) PCR assay for African swine fever virus (ASFV) was developed and evaluated in experimentally infected swine. This sensitive and specific one-step single-tube assay, which can be performed in 2 h or less, detected viral DNA in tonsil scraping samples 2 to 4 days prior to onset of clinical disease. Thus, the assay would have application for preclinical diagnosis of African swine fever and surveillance and/or emergency management of a disease outbreak. PMID:15634958

  5. Preclinical diagnosis of African swine fever in contact-exposed swine by a real-time PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Zsak, L; Borca, M V; Risatti, G R; Zsak, A; French, R A; Lu, Z; Kutish, G F; Neilan, J G; Callahan, J D; Nelson, W M; Rock, D L

    2005-01-01

    A fluorogenic probe hydrolysis (TaqMan) PCR assay for African swine fever virus (ASFV) was developed and evaluated in experimentally infected swine. This sensitive and specific one-step single-tube assay, which can be performed in 2 h or less, detected viral DNA in tonsil scraping samples 2 to 4 days prior to onset of clinical disease. Thus, the assay would have application for preclinical diagnosis of African swine fever and surveillance and/or emergency management of a disease outbreak. PMID:15634958

  6. A multiple RT-PCR assay for simultaneous detection and differentiation of latent viruses and apscarviroids in apple trees.

    PubMed

    Hao, Lu; Xie, Jipeng; Chen, Shanyi; Wang, Shaojie; Gong, Zhuoqun; Ling, Kai-Shu; Guo, Liyun; Fan, Zaifeng; Zhou, Tao

    2016-08-01

    Apple chlorotic leaf spot virus (ACLSV), Apple stem grooving virus (ASGV), and Apple stem pitting virus (ASPV) are three latent viruses frequently occurring in apple trees worldwide. In field orchards, these viruses are frequently found in a mixed infection with viroids in the genus Apscarviroid, including Apple scar skin viroid, and Apple dimple fruit viroid. Together these viruses and viroids could cause serious damage to apple fruit production worldwide. Rapid and efficient detection methods are pivotal to identify and select the virus-free propagation material for healthy apple orchard management. In this study a multiplex Reverse Transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) was developed and optimized for simultaneous detection and differentiation of the three latent viruses and apscarviroids. With newly designed specific primers for ACLSV, ASGV, APSV, and EF-1α (as an internal control), and a pair of degenerate primers for apscarviroids, optimized parameters for multiplex RT-PCR were determined. The resulting PCR products from each target virus and viroid could be easily identified because their product sizes differ by at least a 100bp. The multiplex RT-PCR method is expected to detect different variants of the viruses as the test results showed that a variety of isolates from different regions in China gave positive results. To the best of our knowledge, this multiplex RT-PCR assay is the first to simultaneously detect multiple viruses and viroids infecting apple trees in a single reaction tube. This assay, therefore, offers a useful tool for routine certification and quarantine programs. PMID:27054889

  7. Temporal Assessment of the Impact of Exposure to Cow Feces inTwo Watersheds by Multiple Host-Specific PCR Assays

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fecal exposure in two watersheds with different management histories was assessed by tracking cattle fecal bacterial populations using multiple host-specific PCR assays. In addition, environmental factors affecting the occurrence of these markers were identified. Each assay was t...

  8. Evaluation of a multiplex PCR assay for simultaneous detection of bacterial and viral enteropathogens in stool samples of paediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Onori, Manuela; Coltella, Luana; Mancinelli, Livia; Argentieri, Marta; Menichella, Donato; Villani, Alberto; Grandin, Annalisa; Valentini, Diletta; Raponi, Massimiliano; Russo, Cristina

    2014-06-01

    We evaluated a multiplex PCR assay, the Seeplex Diarrhoea ACE detection, that simultaneously detects 15 enteric pathogens, including Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., Vibrio spp., toxin B producer Clostridium difficile, Campylobacter spp., Clostridium perfringens, Yersinia enterocolitica, Aeromonas spp., Escherichia coli O157:H7, verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli, adenovirus, Group A rotavirus, norovirus GI and GII, and astrovirus. We compared this assay with clinical methods routinely used in our laboratory, for detecting enteropathogens in stool samples collected from 245 paediatric patients with suspected infectious gastroenteritis. We recovered 61 bacterial pathogens and 121 enteric viruses with our laboratory assays, while we detected 78 bacteria and 167 viruses with the molecular assay. We calculated specificity and sensitivity for both methods after analysis of discordant results and demonstrated greater sensitivity for multiplex PCR than for our routine methods, with the exception of Salmonella spp. and toxigenic C. difficile detection. The multiplex PCR assay proved to be a reliable tool to directly detect the most common enteropathogens in stool samples but with some limitations. PMID:24656922

  9. Pilot Evaluation of RT-PCR/Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (PLEX-ID/Flu assay) on Influenza-Positive Specimens.

    PubMed

    Cordey, Samuel; Thomas, Yves; Suter, Patricia; Kaiser, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    The PLEX-ID/Flu assay has been recently developed to enable the detection and typing of influenza viruses based on the RT-PCR/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry technology.This novel assay was evaluated for typing performance on 201 positive influenza A or B nasopharyngeal swab specimens (NPS) detected by real-time RT-PCR during the 2010-2011 season. The PLEX-ID/Flu assay detected and characterized 91.3% and 95.3% of all influenza A and B samples, respectively. All non-typeable influenza A and B specimens by the assay showed low viral loads with threshold cycle values ≥ 33. Taken together, and although our results need to be confirmed by further prospective studies, the PLEX-ID/Flu assay detected positively and gave a typing result for 93% of all NPS detected positively by real-time RT-PCR, thus suggesting a potential role for influenza virus surveillance among other techniques. PMID:22611461

  10. Pilot Evaluation of RT-PCR/Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (PLEX-ID/Flu assay) on Influenza-Positive Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Cordey, Samuel; Thomas, Yves; Suter, Patricia; Kaiser, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    The PLEX-ID/Flu assay has been recently developed to enable the detection and typing of influenza viruses based on the RT-PCR/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry technology. This novel assay was evaluated for typing performance on 201 positive influenza A or B nasopharyngeal swab specimens (NPS) detected by real-time RT-PCR during the 2010-2011 season. The PLEX-ID/Flu assay detected and characterized 91.3% and 95.3% of all influenza A and B samples, respectively. All non-typeable influenza A and B specimens by the assay showed low viral loads with threshold cycle values ≥ 33. Taken together, and although our results need to be confirmed by further prospective studies, the PLEX-ID/Flu assay detected positively and gave a typing result for 93% of all NPS detected positively by real-time RT-PCR, thus suggesting a potential role for influenza virus surveillance among other techniques. PMID:22611461

  11. Rapid Differential Diagnosis between Extrapulmonary Tuberculosis and Focal Complications of Brucellosis Using a Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Queipo-Ortuño, María Isabel; Colmenero, Juan D.; Bermudez, Pilar; Bravo, María José; Morata, Pilar

    2009-01-01

    Background Arduous to differ clinically, extrapulmonary tuberculosis and focal complications of brucellosis remain important causes of morbidity and mortality in many countries. We developed and applied a multiplex real-time PCR assay (M RT-PCR) for the simultaneous detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and Brucella spp. Methodology Conventional microbiological techniques and M RT-PCR for M. tuberculosis complex and Brucella spp were performed on 45 clinical specimens from patients with focal complications of brucellosis or extrapulmonary tuberculosis and 26 control samples. Fragments of 207 bp and 164 bp from the conserved region of the genes coding for an immunogenic membrane protein of 31 kDa of B. abortus (BCSP31) and the intergenic region SenX3-RegX3 were used for the identification of Brucella and M. tuberculosis complex, respectively. Conclusions The detection limit of the M RT-PCR was 2 genomes per reaction for both pathogens and the intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation were 0.44% and 0.93% for Brucella and 0.58% and 1.12% for Mycobacterium. M RT-PCR correctly identified 42 of the 45 samples from patients with tuberculosis or brucellosis and was negative in all the controls. Thus, the overall sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV values of the M RT PCR assay were 93.3%, 100%, 100% and 89.7%, respectively, with an accuracy of 95.8% (95% CI, 91.1%–100%). Since M RT-PCR is highly reproducible and more rapid and sensitive than conventional microbiological tests, this technique could be a promising and practical approach for the differential diagnosis between extrapulmonary tuberculosis and focal complications of brucellosis. PMID:19225565

  12. Exogeneous controls to increase negative call veracity in multiplexed, quantitative PCR assays for Phakopsora pachyrhizi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) utilizing specific primer sequences and a fluorogenic, 5’-exonuclease linear hydrolysis probe is well established as a detection and identification method for Phakopsora pachyrhizi and P. meibomiae, two rust pathogens of soybean. Because of the extreme sensitivity of Q-PCR, ...

  13. Evaluation of Quantitative Real-Time PCR Assays for Detection of Citrus Greening

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus huanglongbing (HLB), or citrus greening, is a serious and industry-limiting disease. Preliminary diagnoses can be made through visual symptoms, and greater certainty can be achieved through quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). Several qPCR procedures are available including those by designed by...

  14. Development of a multiplex PCR assay for identification of Klebsiella pneumoniae hypervirulent clones of capsular serotype K2.

    PubMed

    Bialek-Davenet, Suzanne; Criscuolo, Alexis; Ailloud, Florent; Passet, Virginie; Nicolas-Chanoine, Marie-Hélène; Decré, Dominique; Brisse, Sylvain

    2014-12-01

    Hypervirulent Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates of capsular serotype K2 (hvKP-K2) that cause community-acquired invasive infections represent several unrelated clones, which all belong to phylogenetic group KpI. These clones can be recognized using multilocus sequence typing and genomic analyses, but no rapid method currently exists to differentiate them. In this work, a multiplex PCR assay was developed to identify three hvKP-K2 groups: (i) sequence type (ST)86; (ii) ST380 and ST679 (i.e. clonal group 380); and (iii) ST65 and ST375. A specific genetic marker, Kp50233, allowing K. pneumoniae sensu stricto (corresponding to phylogroup KpI) to be distinguished from closely related species, was included in the assay. This PCR assay will be useful in better defining the epidemiology and clinical features of emerging virulent K. pneumoniae clones. PMID:25261063

  15. A rapid real-time qRT-PCR assay for ovine beta-actin mRNA.

    PubMed

    Bjarnadottir, Helga; Jonsson, Jon J

    2005-05-01

    Beta-Actin mRNA is often used for normalization in gene expression experiments. We describe a sensitive, rapid and specific quantitative assay for the cytoplasmic ovine beta-actin mRNA. The assay was based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with real-time fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements to amplify cDNA products reverse transcribed from mRNA. A part of the ovine beta-actin sequence was amplified from cDNA from fetal ovine synovial (FOS) cells with mRNA-specific primers and cloned into a plasmid clone. The assay standard curve was constructed with dilutions of this plasmid. The assay was linear over five orders of magnitude and detected down to 600 copies per reaction of target DNA. Intraassay coefficient of variation was 12%. Detection of the beta-actin gene was eliminated by designing FRET probes at splice junctions and detection of putative processed pseudogenes was minimized by using FRET assay design with four oligonucleotides. We measured 0.2 copies per cell in RNA preparations without reverse transcription and DNase digestion. This might represent processed pseudogenes. In constrast, we measured 1400 beta-actin mRNA copies per cell in RNA preparations after the RT and DNase steps. The assay should, therefore, be sensitive enough to measure beta-actin from a single individual cell. Dilution of target DNA in murine RNA or ovine cDNA preparations did not effect efficiency of PCR or linearity of the assay. The quantitative assay described in this work can be used to correct for variations in various real-time qRT-PCR experiments in ovine cells with diverse goals, including gene expression studies, quantitation of viral load in infected cells and in various gene therapy experiments measuring vector load and expression in transduced cells. PMID:15823406

  16. Parasitological diagnosis combining an internally controlled real-time PCR assay for the detection of four protozoa in stool samples with a testing algorithm for microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bruijnesteijn van Coppenraet, L E S; Wallinga, J A; Ruijs, G J H M; Bruins, M J; Verweij, J J

    2009-09-01

    Molecular detection of gastrointestinal protozoa is more sensitive and more specific than microscopy but, to date, has not routinely replaced time-consuming microscopic analysis. Two internally controlled real-time PCR assays for the combined detection of Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia lamblia, Cryptosporidium spp. and Dientamoeba fragilis in single faecal samples were compared with Triple Faeces Test (TFT) microscopy results from 397 patient samples. Additionally, an algorithm for complete parasitological diagnosis was created. Real-time PCR revealed 152 (38.3%) positive cases, 18 of which were double infections: one (0.3%) sample was positive for E. histolytica, 44 (11.1%) samples were positive for G. lamblia, 122 (30.7%) samples were positive for D. fragilis, and three (0.8%) samples were positive for Cryptosporidium. TFT microscopy yielded 96 (24.2%) positive cases, including five double infections: one sample was positive for E. histolytica/Entamoeba dispar, 29 (7.3%) samples were positive for G. lamblia, 69 (17.4%) samples were positive for D. fragilis, and two (0.5%) samples were positive for Cryptosporidium hominis/Cryptosporidium parvum. Retrospective analysis of the clinical patient information of 2887 TFT sets showed that eosinophilia, elevated IgE levels, adoption and travelling to (sub)tropical areas are predisposing factors for infection with non-protozoal gastrointestinal parasites. The proposed diagnostic algorithm includes application of real-time PCR to all samples, with the addition of microscopy on an unpreserved faecal sample in cases of a predisposing factor, or a repeat request for parasitological examination. Application of real-time PCR improved the diagnostic yield by 18%. A single stool sample is sufficient for complete parasitological diagnosis when an algorithm based on clinical information is applied. PMID:19624500

  17. Absolute mRNA quantification using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A novel approach by a PCR aided transcript titration assay (PATTY).

    PubMed Central

    Becker-André, M; Hahlbrock, K

    1989-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is used as part of a new approach to the absolute quantification of mRNA. We describe a PCR aided transcript titration assay (PATTY) which is based on the co-amplification of an in vitro generated transcript differing by a single base exchange from the target mRNA. Identical portions of a total RNA sample are "spiked" with different amounts of this mutated standard RNA, converted to cDNA and amplified by PCR. Because the base exchange creates a novel restriction endonuclease site, the ratio of co-amplified DNA derived from target mRNA to amplified DNA derived from standard RNA can be determined after restriction endonuclease digestion and separation by gel electrophoresis. This method gives accurate results within 24 hours and is useful especially for the quantification of either low-abundance mRNA or more abundant mRNA present in very small amounts of total RNA. The low-abundance mRNA encoding 4-coumarate:CoA ligase (4CL) in cultured potato cells (Solanum tuberosum L.) was measured in a case study. About 100 molecules per assay could be accurately detected by the new method. Images PMID:2479917

  18. A novel COLD-PCR/FMCA assay enhances the detection of low-abundance IDH1 mutations in gliomas.

    PubMed

    Pang, Brendan; Durso, Mary B; Hamilton, Ronald L; Nikiforova, Marina N

    2013-03-01

    Point mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) have been identified in many gliomas. The detection of IDH1 mutations becomes challenging on suboptimal glioma biopsies when a limited number of tumor cells is available for analysis. Coamplification at lower denaturing-polymerase chain reaction (COLD-PCR) is a PCR technique that deliberately lowers the denaturing cycle temperature to selectively favor amplification of mutant alleles, allowing for the sensitive detection of low-abundance mutations. We developed a novel COLD-PCR assay on the LightCycler platform (Roche, Applied Science, Indianapolis, IN), using post-PCR fluorescent melting curve analysis (FMCA) for the detection of mutant IDH1 with a detection limit of 1%. Thirty-five WHO grade I to IV gliomas and 9 non-neoplastic brain and spinal cord biopsies were analyzed with this technique and the results were compared with the conventional real-time PCR and the Sanger sequencing analysis. COLD-PCR/FMCA was able to detect the most common IDH1 R132H mutation and rare mutation types including R132H, R132C, R132L, R132S, and R132G mutations. Twenty-five glioma cases were positive for IDH1 mutations by COLD-PCR/FMCA, and 23 gliomas were positive by the conventional real-time PCR and Sanger sequencing. A pilocytic astrocytoma (PA I) and a glioblastoma multiforme (GBM IV) showed low-abundance IDH1 mutations detected by COLD-PCR/FMCA. The remaining 10 glioma and 9 non-neoplastic samples were negative by all the 3 methods. In summary, we report a novel COLD-PCR/FMCA method that provides rapid and sensitive detection of IDH1 mutations in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue and can be used in the clinical setting to assess the small brain biopsies. PMID:23370430

  19. Application of PCR to multiple specimen types for diagnosis of cytomegalovirus infection: comparison with cell culture and shell vial assay.

    PubMed

    Miller, M J; Bovey, S; Pado, K; Bruckner, D A; Wagar, E A

    1994-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a herpesvirus that is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality in congenitally infected infants and immunocompromised patients. Antiviral therapies are available, thus making timely diagnosis of significant importance to at-risk patients. A PCR system was devised. The newly devised system, unlike previously described systems, can be applied to a wide variety of specimen types in a clinical microbiology laboratory setting. Specimens from all sites routinely accepted for CMV culture were shown to be acceptable for CMV PCR. Sensitivity and specificity were established in comparison with those of both monolayer culture and shell vial assay (SVA). The sensitivity and specificity of PCR for detection of CMV in specimens exclusive of urine and blood were 97.5 (77 of 79 specimens) and 87.2% (41 of 47 specimens), respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of PCR for urine and blood specimens were 100 (10 of 10) and 95.7% (45 of 47) and 66.7 (4 of 6) and 78.8% (41 of 52), respectively. Discrepancies of positive PCR results with negative culture or SVA results occurred for specimens flanked chronologically by other culture- or SVA-positive specimens and were likely culture failures, increasing the specificity (100%) of PCR. Discrepancies of negative PCR results with positive culture or SVA results occurred in specimens with few cells or infectious foci by SVA or culture and may represent sampling variability associated with low virus titers. PMID:8126204

  20. An examination of the utility of a nuclear DNA/mitochondrial DNA duplex qPCR assay to assess surface decontamination of hair.

    PubMed

    Date-Chong, Mavis; Buoncristiani, Martin R; Aceves, Margaret; Orrego, Cristián

    2013-05-01

    The goal of this study was to compare two commonly used methods for the surface decontamination of human hair shafts, and to evaluate the use of a duplex real-time qPCR assay to assess decontamination effectiveness for the purpose of mitochondrial DNA typing. Hair shafts of known mitochondrial DNA haplotype were coated with undiluted saliva, semen or blood, each of known mitochondrial haplotype distinct from the test hair. Surface decontamination was conducted by enzymatic treatment with Terg-a-zyme™ and by chemical treatment with dilutions of sodium hypochlorite (NaClO, bleach). Following DNA extraction, a duplex (nuclear and mitochondrial DNA) real-time qPCR assay was used to quantify mitochondrial DNA and to test for surface contamination by quantifying the exogenous nuclear DNA not removed from the hair shaft. The NaClO treatment was found to be more effective for removing surface contamination than the Terg-a-zyme™ treatment, and it was procedurally simpler to implement, resulting in a significant savings of sample processing time. Exposure to 3% NaClO for up to two minutes had no detrimental effect on quantity or typing of the mitochondrial DNA belonging to the hair. In addition, we demonstrated that the duplex real-time PCR assay is a convenient early-warning diagnostic method for the detection of the presence of external DNA contamination, providing an assessment of the purity of the sample prior to embarking on further analysis by more laborious mitochondrial DNA typing methods. PMID:23582697

  1. Evaluation of Xpert® Norovirus Assay performance in comparison with real-time RT-PCR in hospitalized adult patients with acute gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Rovida, Francesca; Premoli, Marta; Campanini, Giulia; Sarasini, Antonella; Baldanti, Fausto

    2016-08-01

    Xpert® Norovirus Assay (Cepheid, Sunnyvale, CA) was compared with a laboratory-developed real-time RT-PCR assay for the detection of Norovirus GI and GII in hospitalized patients with acute gastroenteritis. The two assays showed a high level of concordance but Xpert® Norovirus Assay allowed faster detection of Norovirus and a simpler sample handling. PMID:27233425

  2. Development and Evaluation of Three Real-Time PCR Assays for Genotyping and Source Tracking Cryptosporidium spp. in Water

    PubMed Central

    Li, Na; Neumann, Norman F.; Ruecker, Norma; Alderisio, Kerri A.; Sturbaum, Gregory D.; Villegas, Eric N.; Chalmers, Rachel; Monis, Paul; Feng, Yaoyu

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of Cryptosporidium oocysts in drinking source water can present a serious public health risk. To rapidly and effectively assess the source and human-infective potential of Cryptosporidium oocysts in water, sensitive detection and correct identification of oocysts to the species level (genotyping) are essential. In this study, we developed three real-time PCR genotyping assays, two targeting the small-subunit (SSU) rRNA gene (18S-LC1 and 18S-LC2 assays) and one targeting the 90-kDa heat shock protein (hsp90) gene (hsp90 assay), and evaluated the sensitivity and Cryptosporidium species detection range of these assays. Using fluorescence resonance energy transfer probes and melt curve analysis, the 18S-LC1 and hsp90 assays could differentiate common human-pathogenic species (C. parvum, C. hominis, and C. meleagridis), while the 18S-LC2 assay was able to differentiate nonpathogenic species (such as C. andersoni) from human-pathogenic ones commonly found in source water. In sensitivity evaluations, the 18S-LC2 and hsp90 genotyping assays could detect as few as 1 Cryptosporidium oocyst per sample. Thus, the 18S-LC2 and hsp90 genotyping assays might be used in environmental monitoring, whereas the 18S-LC1 genotyping assay could be useful for genotyping Cryptosporidium spp. in clinical specimens or wastewater samples. PMID:26092455

  3. Development and Evaluation of Three Real-Time PCR Assays for Genotyping and Source Tracking Cryptosporidium spp. in Water.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Neumann, Norman F; Ruecker, Norma; Alderisio, Kerri A; Sturbaum, Gregory D; Villegas, Eric N; Chalmers, Rachel; Monis, Paul; Feng, Yaoyu; Xiao, Lihua

    2015-09-01

    The occurrence of Cryptosporidium oocysts in drinking source water can present a serious public health risk. To rapidly and effectively assess the source and human-infective potential of Cryptosporidium oocysts in water, sensitive detection and correct identification of oocysts to the species level (genotyping) are essential. In this study, we developed three real-time PCR genotyping assays, two targeting the small-subunit (SSU) rRNA gene (18S-LC1 and 18S-LC2 assays) and one targeting the 90-kDa heat shock protein (hsp90) gene (hsp90 assay), and evaluated the sensitivity and Cryptosporidium species detection range of these assays. Using fluorescence resonance energy transfer probes and melt curve analysis, the 18S-LC1 and hsp90 assays could differentiate common human-pathogenic species (C. parvum, C. hominis, and C. meleagridis), while the 18S-LC2 assay was able to differentiate nonpathogenic species (such as C. andersoni) from human-pathogenic ones commonly found in source water. In sensitivity evaluations, the 18S-LC2 and hsp90 genotyping assays could detect as few as 1 Cryptosporidium oocyst per sample. Thus, the 18S-LC2 and hsp90 genotyping assays might be used in environmental monitoring, whereas the 18S-LC1 genotyping assay could be useful for genotyping Cryptosporidium spp. in clinical specimens or wastewater samples. PMID:26092455

  4. Development of a real-time PCR assay for monitoring anaerobic fungal and cellulolytic bacterial populations within the rumen.

    PubMed

    Denman, Stuart E; McSweeney, Christopher S

    2006-12-01

    Traditional methods for enumerating and identifying microbial populations within the rumen can be time consuming and cumbersome. Methods that involve culturing and microscopy can also be inconclusive, particularly when studying anaerobic rumen fungi. A real-time PCR SYBR Green assay, using PCR primers to target total rumen fungi and the cellulolytic bacteria Ruminococcus flavefaciens and Fibrobacter succinogenes, is described, including design and validation. The DNA and crude protein contents with respect to the fungal biomass of both polycentric and monocentric fungal isolates were investigated across the fungal growth stages to aid in standard curve generation. The primer sets used were found to be target specific with no detectable cross-reactivity. Subsequently, the real-time PCR assay was employed in a study to detect these populations within cattle rumen. The anaerobic fungal target was observed to increase 3.6-fold from 0 to 12 h after feeding. The results also indicated a 5.4-fold increase in F. succinogenes target between 0 and 12 h after feeding, whereas R. flavefaciens was observed to maintain more or less consistent levels. This is the first report of a real-time PCR assay to estimate the rumen anaerobic fungal population. PMID:17117998

  5. Quantitation of Taura syndrome virus by real-time RT-PCR with a TaqMan assay.

    PubMed

    Tang, Kathy F J; Wang, Jun; Lightner, Donald V

    2004-01-01

    A real-time RT-PCR assay was developed using a TaqMan probe to detect and quantify Taura syndrome virus (TSV) in penaeid shrimp. A pair of RT-PCR primers, which amplify a 72 bp DNA fragment, and a TaqMan probe were selected from open reading frame 1 (ORF1) of the TSV genome. The primers and TaqMan probe used in this assay reacted with TSV isolates from Hawaii, Texas, Colombia, Mexico, Belize, Indonesia, and Thailand, but neither with RNA of healthy shrimp nor with an isolate of yellow head virus. A plasmid (pTSV-1) that contains the target TSV sequence was constructed and used to generate positive control RNA through in vitro transcription. The positive control RNA was used to demonstrate that the real-time RT-PCR assay has a detection limit of 100 copies and a log-linear range up to 10(8) copies of TSV RNA. This quantitative method was found to be highly reproducible, with low intra- and inter-assay variation. Coefficient of variation (CVs) values were 0.04-8.9 and 0.05-3.7%, respectively, for replicates within and among assays. This assay was used to quantify TSV in both acutely and chronically infected shrimp in a laboratory experiment. The quantities of TSV in the tissues of pleopods and gills were not significantly different, and there was no difference in TSV levels between the acutely and chronically infected groups. However, in the chronically infected shrimp, the quantities of TSV were one to two orders of magnitude higher in the lymphoid organ than in either gills or pleopods. This assay proved to be specific with high sensitivity, and it can be used to detect and quantify TSV in shrimp samples. PMID:14656468

  6. Diagnostic PCR can be used to illuminate meiofaunal diets and trophic relationships

    PubMed Central

    Maghsoud, Hanna; Weiss, Austin; Smith, Julian P.S.; Litvaitis, Marian K.; Fegley, Stephen R.

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of the meiofaunal food web is hampered because few prey have features that persist long enough in a predator’s digestive tract to allow identification to species. Hence, at least for platyhelminth predators, direct observations of prey preference are almost nonexistent, and where they occur, prey identification is often limited to phylum. Studies using an in vitro approach are rare because they are extremely time-consuming and are subject to the criticism that predators removed from their natural environment may exhibit altered behaviors. Although PCR-based approaches have achieved wide application in food-web analysis, their application to meiofaunal flatworms suffers from a number of limitations. Most importantly, the microscopic size of both the predator and prey does not allow for removal of prey material from the digestive tract of the predator, and thus the challenge is to amplify prey sequences in the presence of large quantities of predator sequence. Here, we report on the successful use of prey-taxon-specific primers in diagnostic PCR to identify, to species level, specific prey items of 13 species of meiofaunal flatworms. Extension of this method will allow, for the first time, the development of a species-level understanding of trophic interactions among the meiofauna. PMID:25071364

  7. Real-time PCR-based assay for quantitative detection of Hematodinium sp. in the blue crab Callinectes sapidus.

    PubMed

    Nagle, L; Place, A R; Schott, E J; Jagus, R; Messick, G; Pitula, J S

    2009-03-01

    Hematodinium sp. is a parasitic dinoflagellate infecting the blue crab Callinectes sapidus and other crustaceans. PCR-based assays are currently being used to identify infections in crabs that would have been undetectable by traditional microscopic examination. We therefore sought to define the limits of quantitative PCR (qPCR) detection within the context of field collection protocols. We present a qPCR assay based on the Hematodinium sp. 18S rRNA gene that can detect 10 copies of the gene per reaction. Analysis of a cell dilution series vs. defined numbers of a cloned Hematodinium sp. 18S rRNA gene suggests a copy number of 10,000 per parasite and predicts a sensitivity of 0.001 cell equivalents. In practice, the assays are based on analysis of 1% of the DNA extracted from 200 microl of serum, yielding a theoretical detection limit of 5 cells ml(-1) hemolymph, assuming that 1 cell is present per sample. When applied to a limited field survey of blue crabs collected in Maryland coastal bays from May to August 2005, 24 of 128 crabs (18.8%) were identified as positive for Hematodinium sp. infection using qPCR. In comparison, only 6 of 128 crabs (4.7%) were identified as positive using traditional hemolymph microscopic examination. The qPCR method also detected the parasite in gill, muscle, heart and hepatopancreas tissues, with 17.2% of the crabs showing infection in at least one of these tissues. Importantly, it is now possible to enumerate parasites within defined quantities of crab tissue, which permits collection of more detailed information on the epizootiology of the pathogen. PMID:19419009

  8. Burkholderia pseudomallei in soil samples from an oceanarium in Hong Kong detected using a sensitive PCR assay

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Susanna KP; Chan, San-Yuen; Curreem, Shirly OT; Hui, Suk-Wai; Lau, Candy CY; Lee, Paul; Ho, Chi-Chun; Martelli, Paolo; Woo, Patrick CY

    2014-01-01

    Melioidosis, caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei, is an emerging infectious disease with an expanding geographical distribution. Although assessment of the environmental load of B. pseudomallei is important for risk assessment in humans or animals in endemic areas, traditional methods of bacterial culture for isolation have low sensitivities and are labor-intensive. Using a specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay targeting a Tat domain protein in comparison with a bacterial culture method, we examined the prevalence of B. pseudomallei in soil samples from an oceanarium in Hong Kong where captive marine mammals and birds have contracted melioidosis. Among 1420 soil samples collected from various sites in the oceanarium over a 15-month period, B. pseudomallei was detected in nine (0.6%) soil samples using bacterial culture, whereas it was detected in 96 (6.8%) soil samples using the specific PCR assay confirmed by sequencing. The PCR-positive samples were detected during various months, with higher detection rates observed during summer months. Positive PCR detection was significantly correlated with ambient temperature (P<0.0001) and relative humidity (P=0.011) but not with daily rainfall (P=0.241) or a recent typhoon (P=0.787). PCR-positive samples were obtained from all sampling locations, with the highest detection rate in the valley. Our results suggest that B. pseudomallei is prevalent and endemic in the oceanarium. The present PCR assay is more sensitive than the bacterial culture method, and it may be used to help better assess the transmission of melioidosis and to design infection control measures for captive animals in this unique and understudied environment. PMID:26038496

  9. Evaluation of Antibiotic Susceptibilities of Three Rickettsial Species Including Rickettsia felis by a Quantitative PCR DNA Assay

    PubMed Central

    Rolain, Jean-Marc; Stuhl, Laetitia; Maurin, Max; Raoult, Didier

    2002-01-01

    Rickettsiae grow only intracellularly, and the antibiotic susceptibilities of these bacteria have been assessed by either plaque, dye uptake, or immunofluorescence assays, which are time-consuming. We used a quantitative PCR (with the LightCycler instrument) to assess the levels of inhibition of Rickettisa felis, R. conorii, and R. typhi DNA synthesis in the presence of various antibiotics. We established the kinetics of rickettsial DNA during growth and showed that R. conorii grows more quickly than R. typhi in cell culture, with maximum replication occurring after 5 and 7 days, respectively. The MICs of the antibiotics tested for R. conorii and R. typhi by the quantitative PCR assay were similar to those previously obtained by plaque and dye uptake assays. We found that R. felis is susceptible to doxycycline, rifampin, thiamphenicol, and fluoroquinolones but not to gentamicin, erythromycin, amoxicillin, or trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. The resistance of this new species to erythromycin is consistent with its current taxonomic position within the spotted fever group. We believe that quantitative PCR could be used in the future to simplify and shorten antibiotic susceptibility assays of other rickettsiae and other strict intracellular pathogens. PMID:12183224

  10. Use of novel RT-PCR assay to detect picobirnavirus in Poultry Intestinal samples collected from the field

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent metagenomic analyses of the turkey gut ribonucleic acid (RNA) virus community in our laboratory have identified novel enteric RNA viruses that may play roles in the poultry enteric diseases and in performance problems noted in the field. This has lead to new molecular diagnostic assays for ce...

  11. Development and evaluation of a 28S rRNA gene-based nested PCR assay for P. falciparum and P. vivax

    PubMed Central

    Pakalapati, Deepak; Garg, Shilpi; Middha, Sheetal; Acharya, Jyoti; Subudhi, Amit K; Boopathi, Arunachalam P; Saxena, Vishal; Kochar, Sanjay K; Kochar, Dhanpat K; Das, Ashis

    2013-01-01

    The 28S rRNA gene was amplified and