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Sample records for diameter-dependent dopant location

  1. Dopant location identification in Nd3+ doped TiO2 nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.; Frenkel, A.; Woicik, J.; Ni, C.; Shah, S.

    2010-12-03

    Large band gap semiconductors are typically doped in order to enhance their photocatalytic, photovoltaic, and other chemical and optoelectronic properties. The identification of dopant position and its local environment are essential to explore the effect of doping. X ray techniques, including extended x ray absorption fine structure, x ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and x ray diffraction, were performed to analyze the Nd (0 to 1.5 at. %) dopant location and the structural changes associated with the doping in anatase TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles, which were synthesized by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. Nd ions were determined to have a trivalent chemical state and substitute for Ti{sup 4+} in the TiO{sub 2} structure. The substitutional Nd{sup 3+} ions cause anatase lattice expansion along c direction with a maximum value of 0.15 {angstrom} at 1.5% Nd doping level and the local structure of the dopants changes towards rutile like configuration. The lengths of the nearest neighbor Nd-O and Nd-Ti bonds increase by 0.5-0.8 {angstrom} compared to their counterparts in the pure TiO{sub 2} host structure. The substitutional nature of Nd{sup 3+} dopants explains why they are efficient not only for charge carrier separation but also for visible light absorption in TiO{sub 2}.

  2. Diameter-dependent hydrophobicity in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyakuno, Haruka; Fukasawa, Mamoru; Ichimura, Ryota; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Nakai, Yusuke; Miyata, Yasumitsu; Saito, Takeshi; Maniwa, Yutaka

    2016-08-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are a good model system that provides atomically smooth nanocavities. It has been reported that water-SWCNTs exhibit hydrophobicity depending on the temperature T and the SWCNT diameter D. SWCNTs adsorb water molecules spontaneously in their cylindrical pores around room temperature, whereas they exhibit a hydrophilic-hydrophobic transition or wet-dry transition (WDT) at a critical temperature Twd ≈ 220-230 K and above a critical diameter Dc ≈ 1.4-1.6 nm. However, details of the WDT phenomenon and its mechanism remain unknown. Here, we report a systematic experimental study involving X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry. It is found that water molecules inside thick SWCNTs (D > Dc) evaporate and condense into ice Ih outside the SWCNTs at Twd upon cooling, and the ice Ih evaporates and condenses inside the SWCNTs upon heating. On the other hand, residual water trapped inside the SWCNTs below Twd freezes. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that upon lowering T, the hydrophobicity of thick SWCNTs increases without any structural transition, while the water inside thin SWCNTs (D < Dc) exhibits a structural transition, forming an ordered ice. This ice has a well-developed hydrogen bonding network adapting to the cylindrical pores of the SWCNTs. Thus, the unusual diameter dependence of the WDT is attributed to the adaptability of the structure of water to the pore dimension and shape.

  3. Wire diameter dependence in the catalytic decomposition of H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umemoto, Hironobu

    2014-01-01

    Jansen et al. have demonstrated that the dissociaiton rate of H2 molecules on hot wire surfaces, normalized per unit surface area, depends on the wire diameter based on the electrical power consumption measurements [J. Appl. Phys. 66, 5749 (1989)]. Mathematical modeling calculations have also been presented to support their experimental results. In the present paper, it is shown that such a wire diameter dependence cannot be observed and that the H-atom density normalized by the wire surface area depends little on the wire diameter. Modeling calculations also show that the wire diameter dependence of the dissociation rate cannot be expected under typical decomposition conditions.

  4. Diameter dependent thermoelectric properties of individual SnTe nanowires.

    PubMed

    Xu, E Z; Li, Z; Martinez, J A; Sinitsyn, N; Htoon, H; Li, Nan; Swartzentruber, B; Hollingsworth, J A; Wang, Jian; Zhang, S X

    2015-02-21

    The lead-free compound tin telluride (SnTe) has recently been suggested to be a promising thermoelectric material. In this work, we report on the first thermoelectric study of individual single-crystalline SnTe nanowires with different diameters ranging from ∼218 to ∼913 nm. Measurements of thermopower S, electrical conductivity σ and thermal conductivity κ were carried out on the same nanowires over a temperature range of 25-300 K. While the electrical conductivity does not show a strong diameter dependence, the thermopower increases by a factor of two when the nanowire diameter is decreased from ∼913 nm to ∼218 nm. The thermal conductivity of the measured NWs is lower than that of the bulk SnTe, which may arise from the enhanced phonon - surface boundary scattering and phonon-defect scattering. Temperature dependent figure of merit ZT was determined for individual nanowires and the achieved maximum value at room temperature is about three times higher than that in bulk samples of comparable carrier density. PMID:25623253

  5. Diameter Dependent Thermoelectric Properties of Individual SnTe Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, E. Z.; Li, Z.; Martinez, J.; Sinitsyn, N.; Htoon, H.; Li, N.; Swartzentruber, B.; Hollingsworth, J.; Wang, J.; Zhang, S. X.

    2015-03-01

    Tin telluride (SnTe), a newly discovered topological crystalline insulator, has recently been suggested to be a promising thermoelectric material. In this work, we report on a systematic study of the thermoelectric properties of individual single-crystalline SnTe nanowires with different diameters. Measurements of thermopower, electrical conductivity and thermal conductivity were carried out on the same nanowires over a temperature range of 25 - 300 K. While the electrical conductivity does not show a strong diameter dependence, we found that the thermopower increases by a factor of two when the nanowire diameter is decreased from 913 nm to 218 nm. The thermal conductivity of the measured NWs is lower than that of the bulk SnTe, which may be attributed to the enhanced phonon - surface boundary scattering and phonon-defect scattering. We further calculated the temperature dependent figure of merit ZT for each individual nanowire. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, an Office of Science User Facility operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science by Los Alamos National Laboratory (Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396) and Sandia National Laboratories (Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000). We acknowledge support by the Los Alamos LDRD program.

  6. Diameter dependent thermoelectric properties of individual SnTe nanowires

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xu, E. Z.; Li, Z.; Martinez, J. A.; Sinitsyn, N.; Htoon, H.; Li, Nan; Swartzentruber, B.; Hollingsworth, J. A.; Wang, Jian; Zhang, S. X.

    2015-01-15

    The lead-free compound tin telluride (SnTe) has recently been suggested to be a potentially promising thermoelectric material because of its similar electronic band structure as the well-known lead telluride. Here we report on the first thermoelectric study of individual single crystalline SnTe nanowires (NWs) with different diameters ranging from ~200 to ~1000 nm. Measurements of thermopower S, electrical conductivity σ, and thermal conductivity κ were carried out on the same nanowires over a temperature range of 25 - 300 K. While σ does not show a strong diameter dependence, the thermopower increases by a factor of 2 when the nanowiremore » diameter is decreased from 1000 nm to 200 nm. The thermal conductivities of the measured NWs are only about half of that of the bulk SnTe, which may arise from the enhanced phonon-grain boundary and phonon-defect scatterings. Temperature dependent figure-of-merit ZT was determined and the maximum value at room temperature is ~3 times higher than what was obtained in bulk samples of comparable carrier density.« less

  7. Diameter dependent thermoelectric properties of individual SnTe nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, E. Z.; Li, Z.; Martinez, J. A.; Sinitsyn, N.; Htoon, H.; Li, Nan; Swartzentruber, B.; Hollingsworth, J. A.; Wang, Jian; Zhang, S. X.

    2015-01-15

    The lead-free compound tin telluride (SnTe) has recently been suggested to be a potentially promising thermoelectric material because of its similar electronic band structure as the well-known lead telluride. Here we report on the first thermoelectric study of individual single crystalline SnTe nanowires (NWs) with different diameters ranging from ~200 to ~1000 nm. Measurements of thermopower S, electrical conductivity σ, and thermal conductivity κ were carried out on the same nanowires over a temperature range of 25 - 300 K. While σ does not show a strong diameter dependence, the thermopower increases by a factor of 2 when the nanowire diameter is decreased from 1000 nm to 200 nm. The thermal conductivities of the measured NWs are only about half of that of the bulk SnTe, which may arise from the enhanced phonon-grain boundary and phonon-defect scatterings. Temperature dependent figure-of-merit ZT was determined and the maximum value at room temperature is ~3 times higher than what was obtained in bulk samples of comparable carrier density.

  8. Sb- and Bi-doped Mg2Si: location of the dopants, micro- and nanostructures, electronic structures and thermoelectric properties.

    PubMed

    Farahi, Nader; VanZant, Mathew; Zhao, Jianbao; Tse, John S; Prabhudev, Sagar; Botton, Gianluigi A; Salvador, James R; Borondics, Ferenc; Liu, Zhenxian; Kleinke, Holger

    2014-10-28

    Due to increasing global energy concerns, alternative sustainable methods to create energy such as thermoelectric energy conversion have become increasingly important. Originally, research into thermoelectric materials was focused on tellurides of bismuth and lead because of the exemplary thermoelectric properties of Bi2Te3 and PbTe. These materials, however, contain toxic lead and tellurium, which is also scarce and thus expensive. A viable alternative material may exist in Mg2Si, which needs to be doped and alloyed in order to achieve reasonable thermoelectric efficiency. Doping is a major problem, as p-type doping has thus far not produced competitive efficiencies, and n-type doping is problematic because of the low solubility of the typical dopants Sb and Bi. This investigation shows experimentally that these dopants can indeed replace Si in the crystal lattice, and excess Sb and Bi atoms are present in the grain boundaries in the form of Mg3Sb2 and Mg3Bi2. As a consequence, the carrier concentration is lower than the formal Sb/Bi concentration suggests, and the thermal conductivity is significantly reduced. DFT calculations are in good agreement with the experimental data, including the band gap and the Seebeck coefficient. Overall, this results in competitive efficiencies despite the low carrier concentration. While ball-milling was previously shown to enhance the solubility of the dopants and thus the carrier concentration, this did not lead to enhanced thermoelectric properties. PMID:25005794

  9. Location of trivalent lanthanide dopant energy levels in (Lu{sub 0.5}Gd{sub 0.5}){sub 2}O{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Retot, H.; Viana, B.; Bessiere, A.; Galtayries, A.

    2011-06-15

    The location of Ln{sup 3+} dopant energy levels relative to bands in (Lu{sub 0.5}Gd{sub 0.5}){sub 2}O{sub 3} was studied. A several-steps analysis of XPS measurements on heavy lanthanides sesquioxides Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3} (Ln = Gd, Tb, Dy, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu) and on Sc{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} reference materials were used to locate Ln{sup 3+} dopant ground state relative to the top of the valence band in (Lu{sub 0.5}Gd{sub 0.5}){sub 2}O{sub 3} within an error bar of {+-}0.4 eV. The agreement between XPS data and model was found improved relative to previous studies. When compared to XPS analysis, prediction based on optical absorption shows a slight underestimation attributed to the lack of precision in Ce{sup 4+} charge transfer band measurement.

  10. Diameter Dependence of Lattice Thermal Conductivity of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: Study from Ab Initio

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Sheng-Ying; Ouyang, Tao; Hu, Ming

    2015-01-01

    The effects of temperature, tube length, defects, and surface functionalization on the thermal conductivity (κ) of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were well documented in literature. However, diameter dependence of thermal conductivity of SWCNTs received less attentions. So far, diverse trends of the diameter dependence have been discussed by different methods and all the previous results were based on empirical interatomic potentials. In this paper, we emphasize to clarify accurate κ values of SWCNTs with different diameters and in-plane κ of graphene. All the studies were under the framework of anharmonic lattice dynamics and Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) based on first principle calculations. We try to infer the right trend of diameter dependent thermal conductivity of SWCNTs. We infer that graphene is the limitation as SWCNT with an infinite diameter. We analyzed the thermal conductivity contributions from each phonon mode in SWCNTs to explain the trend. Meanwhile, we also identify the extremely low thermal conductivity of ultra-thin SWCNTs. PMID:26490342

  11. Diameter Dependence of Lattice Thermal Conductivity of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: Study from Ab Initio.

    PubMed

    Yue, Sheng-Ying; Ouyang, Tao; Hu, Ming

    2015-01-01

    The effects of temperature, tube length, defects, and surface functionalization on the thermal conductivity (κ) of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were well documented in literature. However, diameter dependence of thermal conductivity of SWCNTs received less attentions. So far, diverse trends of the diameter dependence have been discussed by different methods and all the previous results were based on empirical interatomic potentials. In this paper, we emphasize to clarify accurate κ values of SWCNTs with different diameters and in-plane κ of graphene. All the studies were under the framework of anharmonic lattice dynamics and Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) based on first principle calculations. We try to infer the right trend of diameter dependent thermal conductivity of SWCNTs. We infer that graphene is the limitation as SWCNT with an infinite diameter. We analyzed the thermal conductivity contributions from each phonon mode in SWCNTs to explain the trend. Meanwhile, we also identify the extremely low thermal conductivity of ultra-thin SWCNTs. PMID:26490342

  12. Diameter-dependent electronic transport properties of Au-catalyst/Ge-nanowire Schottky diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Picraux, S Thomas; Leonard, Francois; Swartzentruber, Brian S; Talin, A Alee

    2008-01-01

    We present electronic transport measurements in individual Au-catalyst/Ge-nanowire interfaces demonstrating the presence of a Schottky barrier. Surprisingly, the small-bias conductance density increases with decreasing diameter. Theoretical calculations suggest that this effect arises because electron-hole recombination in the depletion region is the dominant charge transport mechanism, with a diameter dependence of both the depletion width and the electron-hole recombination time. The recombination time is dominated by surface contributions and depends linearly on the nanowire diameter.

  13. Diameter dependence of the thermal conductivity of InAs nanowires.

    PubMed

    Swinkels, M Y; van Delft, M R; Oliveira, D S; Cavalli, A; Zardo, I; van der Heijden, R W; Bakkers, E P A M

    2015-09-25

    The diameter dependence of the thermal conductivity of InAs nanowires in the range of 40-1500 nm has been measured. We demonstrate a reduction in thermal conductivity of 80% for 40 nm nanowires, opening the way for further design strategies for nanoscaled thermoelectric materials. Furthermore, we investigate the effect of thermal contact in the most common measurement method for nanoscale thermal conductivity. Our study allows for the determination of the thermal contact using existing measurement setups. The thermal contact resistance is found to be comparable to the wire thermal resistance for wires with a diameter of 90 nm and higher. PMID:26329133

  14. Successful location of tin dopant cations on surface sites of anatase-type TiO2 crystallites evidenced by 119Sn Mössbauer spectroscopic probe and XPS techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astashkin, R. A.; Fabritchnyi, P. B.; Afanasov, M. I.; Korolenko, M. V.; Wattiaux, A.; Bordère, S.; Labrugère, C.; Delmas, C.

    2013-11-01

    The present study provides the first experimental evidence for the stabilization of tin dopant cations immediately on the surface of an oxide having a tetragonal structure. 119Sn Mössbauer spectra of the dopant, introduced by air annealing into the bulk of anatase microcrystals, showed that it was located, in the tetravalent state, in somewhat distorted octahedral sites of a unique type. On the contrary, the reduced tin species, formed upon subsequent hydrogen annealing the Sn4+-doped samples, are found to occupy different sites being characterized by two sets of the isomer shift δ and quadrupole splitting ΔEQ values (δI = 3.25 mm s-1, ΔEQI = 1.75 mm s-1; and δII = 2.85 mm s-1, ΔEQII = 1.71 mm s-1). Either of them implies both the divalent state of tin atoms and their presence at low-coordination sites that can be assigned to the surface of crystallites. Mössbauer spectra of Sn4+←2+ daughter ions, formed upon contact with air of Sn2+, consist of a symmetrically broadened peak characterized by only slightly different average values of both the isomer shift (<δ> = 0.07 mm s-1) and quadrupole splitting (<ΔEQ> = 0.50 mm s-1), as compared to the δ and ΔEQ values for the bulk-located Sn4+. However, considerable broadening of Sn4+←2+ doublet components (Γ = 0.97 mm s-1) allows one to suggest that these secondary formed ions remain distributed over the non equivalent sites inherited from their Sn2+ precursors. The occurrence of Sn4+←2+ at surface sites is independently proven by XPS measurements that revealed a greater than 10-fold enrichment with tin of 3-5 nm thick surface layers.

  15. Kinetics of PL quenching during single-walled carbon nanotube rebundling and diameter-dependent surfactant interactions.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Timothy J; Engtrakul, Chaiwat; Jones, Marcus; Rumbles, Garry; Heben, Michael J

    2006-12-21

    The kinetics of single-walled carbon nanotube rebundling have been investigated by photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The rate of loss of PL intensity was measured for 12 different nanotubes in three common aqueous surfactants (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS; sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate, SDBS; and sodium cholate, SC) as the surfactant suspensions were diluted to promote nanotube rebundling, quenching of semiconductor nanotube PL, and precipitation. The rate of PL decay was first-order in the concentration of isolated nanotubes, as expected if surfactant desorption is rate-limiting in the rebundling process. Temperature-dependent measurements permitted an Arrhenius analysis from which diameter-dependent activation energies were determined. SDS was found to have very strong diameter dependence for activation energy, with stronger binding to smaller-diameter nanotubes, whereas SDBS displayed a weaker diameter dependence. SC was found to bind strongly to certain nanotubes and weakly to the (10,2) nanotube. The PL emission red shifted with time after dilution as surfactant desorption proceeded. This effect is attributed to an increase in the micropolarity at the nanotube surface. PMID:17165980

  16. Imaging "invisible" dopant atoms in semiconductor nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Gunawan, Aloysius A; Mkhoyan, K Andre; Wills, Andrew W; Thomas, Malcolm G; Norris, David J

    2011-12-14

    Nanometer-scale semiconductors that contain a few intentionally added impurity atoms can provide new opportunities for controlling electronic properties. However, since the physics of these materials depends strongly on the exact arrangement of the impurities, or dopants, inside the structure, and many impurities of interest cannot be observed with currently available imaging techniques, new methods are needed to determine their location. We combine electron energy loss spectroscopy with annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (ADF-STEM) to image individual Mn impurities inside ZnSe nanocrystals. While Mn is invisible to conventional ADF-STEM in this host, our experiments and detailed simulations show consistent detection of Mn. Thus, a general path is demonstrated for atomic-scale imaging and identification of individual dopants in a variety of semiconductor nanostructures. PMID:22107439

  17. SU-F-18C-11: Diameter Dependency of the Radial Dose Distribution in a Long Polyethylene Cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Bakalyar, D; McKenney, S; Feng, W

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The radial dose distribution in the central plane of a long cylinder following a long CT scan depends upon the diameter and composition of the cylinder. An understanding of this behavior is required for determining the spatial average of the dose in the central plane. Polyethylene, the material for construction of the TG200/ICRU phantom (30 cm in diameter) was used for this study. Size effects are germane to the principles incorporated in size specific dose estimates (SSDE); thus diameter dependency was explored as well. Method: ssuming a uniform cylinder and cylindrically symmetric conditions of irradiation, the dose distribution can be described using a radial function. This function must be an even function of the radial distance due to the conditions of symmetry. Two effects are accounted for: The direct beam makes its weakest contribution at the center while the contribution due to scatter is strongest at the center and drops off abruptly at the outer radius. An analytic function incorporating these features was fit to Monte Carlo results determined for infinite polyethylene cylinders of various diameters. A further feature of this function is that it is integrable. Results: Symmetry and continuity dictate a local extremum at the center which is a minimum for the larger sizes. The competing effects described above can Resultin an absolute maximum occurring between the center and outer edge of the cylinders. For the smallest cylinders, the maximum dose may occur at the center. Conclusion: An integrable, analytic function can be used to characterize the radial dependency of dose for cylindrical CT phantoms of various sizes. One use for this is to help determine average dose distribution over the central cylinder plane when equilibrium dose has been reached.

  18. Activation of shallow dopants in II-VI compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Walukiewicz, W.

    1995-08-01

    The amphoteric native defect model is applied to the understanding of the variations in the dopant activation efficiency in II-VI compounds. It is shown that the location of the common energy reference, the Fermi level stabilization energy, relative to the band edges can be used to determine the doping induced reduction of the formation energy and the enhancement of the concentration of compensating native defects. The model is applied to the most extensively studied compound semiconductors as well as to ternary and quaternary alloys. The effects of the compound ionicity on the dopant activation are briefly discussed.

  19. Dopant diffusion in tungsten silicide

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, P.; Hsieh, N.; Geipel, H.J. Jr.; Slusser, G.J.

    1982-04-01

    The dopant (B, P, and As) redistribution in a silicide on polycrystalline silicon structure after annealing at 800 and 1000 /sup 0/C was studied. The distribution of boron was found to be quite different from these of phosphorus and arsenic. At 1000 /sup 0/C, the distribution coefficient for boron at the WSi/sub 2//polycrystalline silicon interface was found to be 2.7. The solubilities of phosphorus and arsenic in WSi/sub 2/ at 1000 /sup 0/C were estimated to be 6 x 10/sup 19/ and 1.6 x 10/sup 19/ atoms/cm/sup 3/, respectively. At 800 /sup 0/C, the diffusion coefficient for the dopants was found to be equal to, or greater than 3.3 x 10/sup -12/ cm/sup 2//s, which is at least three orders of magnitude larger than in silicon.

  20. Dopant Distribution in NIF Beryllium Ablator Capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H.; Xu, H. W.; Youngblood, K. P.; Wall, D. R.; Stephens, R. B.; Moreno, K. A.; Nikroo, A.; Salmonson, J. D.; Haan, S. W.; Wu, K. J.; Wang, Y. M.; Hamza, A. V.

    2012-10-01

    Good implosion performance requires capsule ablator material with spherically uniform x-ray opacity, which is controlled by one of several dopants (Cu, Si, Al, etc.) in the Be shell. During production, the dopant concentration is radially stepped. However, the various Be-dopant interactions result in vastly different dopant distribution patterns, some quite inhomogeneous. We have characterized these structures and established the phenomenological basis and the magnitudes of the inhomogeneity both in spatial length scales and in atomic percent. We will discuss the case of inhomogeneous Cu diffusion in detail, followed by discussions of other dopants and the estimate of the impact of these structures on target implosion.

  1. Interface engineering through atomic dopants in HfO2-based gate stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, H.; Ramanath, Ganpati; Ramprasad, R.

    2013-09-01

    Controlling the effective work function (ϕeff) of metal electrodes is critical and challenging in metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors. The introduction of atomic dopants (also referred to as "capping" layers) is an emerging approach to controllably modify ϕeff. Here, we investigate the energetic preference of the location of La, Y, Sc, Al, Ce, Ti, and Zr as atomic dopants within a model Pt/HfO2/Si stack and the resulting variation of ϕeff using density functional theory calculations. Our results indicate that all the considered atomic dopants prefer to be situated at the interfaces. The dopant-induced variation of ϕeff is found to be strongly correlated to the dopant electronegativity and location. Dopants at the metal/HfO2 interface decrease ϕeff with increasing dopant electronegativity, while a contrary trend is seen for dopants at the Si/HfO2 interface. These results are consistent with available experimental data for La, Al, and Ti doping. Our findings, especially the identified correlations, have important implications for the further optimization and "scaling down" of transistors.

  2. Location, Location, Location!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsdell, Kristin

    2004-01-01

    Of prime importance in real estate, location is also a key element in the appeal of romances. Popular geographic settings and historical periods sell, unpopular ones do not--not always with a logical explanation, as the author discovered when she conducted a survey on this topic last year. (Why, for example, are the French Revolution and the…

  3. Transient enhanced diffusion and gettering of dopants in ion implanted silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Pennycook, S.J.; Narayan, J.; Culbertson, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    We have studied in detail the transient enhanced diffusion observed during furnace or rapid-thermal-annealing of ion-implanted Si. We show that the effect originates in the trapping of Si atoms by dopant atoms during implantation, which are retained during solid-phase-epitaxial (SPE) growth but released by subsequent annealing to cause a transient dopant precipitation or profile broadening. The interstitials condense to form a band of dislocation loops located at the peak of the dopant profile, which may be distinct from the band formed at the original amorphous/crystalline interface. The band can develop into a network and effectively getter the dopant. We discuss the conditions under which the various effects may or may not be observed, and discuss conflicting observations on As/sup +/ implanted Si.

  4. Organo-lanthanide complexes as luminescent dopants in polymer waveguides fabricated by hot embossing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moynihan, S.; Van Deun, R.; Binnemans, K.; Krueger, J.; von Papen, G.; Kewell, A.; Crean, G.; Redmond, G.

    2007-08-01

    Lanthanide complexes, Eu(dbm)3(Phen) and Er(dbm)3(Phen), are employed as luminescent dopants within polymer channel waveguide devices fabricated by hot embossing. Spectroscopic properties of the complexes as dopants in the waveguide core polymer are investigated in detail. Judd-Ofelt parameters are calculated for the europium chelate and radiative properties are determined viz. potential for optical amplification. Channel waveguides fabricated by single level embossing are shown to be capable of guiding visible and infrared light emitted following optical excitation of the dopants. Multi-level polymer micro-optical benches incorporating doped channel waveguides and passive locational features for self-alignment and integration of optical fibres are fabricated in a multi-level single-step embossing process and are shown to successfully out-couple the waveguided dopant emission.

  5. Dopant precipitation in silicon-germanium alloys.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raag, V.

    1972-01-01

    The model commonly used to describe dopant precipitation in silicon-germanium alloys is discussed. The results of an experimental program are fit to the model in order to determine the long-term behavior of the thermoelectric properties of the n-type 80 at. % Si/20 at. % Ge alloy. Thermoelectric property projections to twelve years of operating time are given.

  6. Liquid-phase electroepitaxy - Dopant segregation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagowski, J.; Jastrzebski, L.; Gatos, H. C.

    1980-01-01

    A theoretical model is presented which accounts for the dopant segregation in liquid-phase electroepitaxy in terms of dopant transport in the liquid phase (by electromigration and diffusion), the growth velocity, and the Peltier effect at the substrate-solution interface. The contribution of dopant electromigration to the magnitude of the effective segregation coefficient is dominant in the absence of convection; the contribution of the Peltier effect becomes significant only in the presence of pronounced convection. Quantitative expressions which relate the segregation coefficient to the growth parameters also permit the determination of the diffusion constant and electromigration mobility of the dopant in the liquid phase. The model was found to be in good agreement with the measured segregation characteristics of Sn in the electroepitaxial growth of GaAs from Ga-As solutions. For Sn in Ga-As solution at 900 C the diffusion constant was found to be 4 x 10 to the -5 sq cm/s and the electromigration velocity (toward the substrate with a positive polarity 2 x 10 to the -5 cm/s current density of 10 A/sq cm.

  7. Atom-probe for FinFET dopant characterization.

    PubMed

    Kambham, A K; Mody, J; Gilbert, M; Koelling, S; Vandervorst, W

    2011-05-01

    With the continuous shrinking of transistors and advent of new transistor architectures to keep in pace with Moore's law and ITRS goals, there is a rising interest in multigate 3D-devices like FinFETs where the channel is surrounded by gates on multiple surfaces. The performance of these devices depends on the dimensions and the spatial distribution of dopants in source/drain regions of the device. As a result there is a need for new metrology approach/technique to characterize quantitatively the dopant distribution in these devices with nanometer precision in 3D. In recent years, atom probe tomography (APT) has shown its ability to analyze semiconductor and thin insulator materials effectively with sub-nm resolution in 3D. In this paper we will discuss the methodology used to study FinFET-based structures using APT. Whereas challenges and solutions for sample preparation linked to the limited fin dimensions already have been reported before, we report here an approach to prepare fin structures for APT, which based on their processing history (trenches filled with Si) are in principle invisible in FIB and SEM. Hence alternative solutions in locating and positioning them on the APT-tip are presented. We also report on the use of the atom probe results on FinFETs to understand the role of different dopant implantation angles (10° and 45°) when attempting conformal doping of FinFETs and provide a quantitative comparison with alternative approaches such as 1D secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and theoretical model values. PMID:21288644

  8. Dopant Incorporation Efficiency in CVD Silicon Carbide Epilayers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larkin, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    In order to ensure reproducible and reliable SiC semiconductor device characteristics, controlled dopant incorporation must be accomplished. Some of the many factors which greatly influence dopant incorporation are the site-competition effect, SiC(0001) substrate polarity, substrate temperature, and the dopant-source reactor concentration. In this paper, dopant incorporation is considered and compared for various dopants in the context of dopant incorporation efficiency. By using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), the relative dopant incorporation efficiencies were calculated by dividing the SIMS determined dopant concentration in the resulting epitaxial layer by the intentional gas phase dopant concentration used during the SiC CVD. Specifically, the relative magnitudes of dopant incorporation efficiencies for nitrogen, phosphorus, and boron in 6H-SiC (0001) Si-face epitaxial layers are compared as a function of the site-competition effect and the dopant-source reactor concentrations. This serves as a first approximation for comparison of the relative 'doping potencies' of some common dopants used in SiC CVD epitaxial growth.

  9. Deposition of dopant impurities and pulsed energy drive-in

    DOEpatents

    Wickboldt, Paul; Carey, Paul G.; Smith, Patrick M.; Ellingboe, Albert R.

    1999-01-01

    A semiconductor doping process which enhances the dopant incorporation achievable using the Gas Immersion Laser Doping (GILD) technique. The enhanced doping is achieved by first depositing a thin layer of dopant atoms on a semiconductor surface followed by exposure to one or more pulses from either a laser or an ion-beam which melt a portion of the semiconductor to a desired depth, thus causing the dopant atoms to be incorporated into the molten region. After the molten region recrystallizes the dopant atoms are electrically active. The dopant atoms are deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) or other known deposition techniques.

  10. Deposition of dopant impurities and pulsed energy drive-in

    DOEpatents

    Wickboldt, Paul; Carey, Paul G.; Smith, Patrick M.; Ellingboe, Albert R.

    2008-01-01

    A semiconductor doping process which enhances the dopant incorporation achievable using the Gas Immersion Laser Doping (GILD) technique. The enhanced doping is achieved by first depositing a thin layer of dopant atoms on a semiconductor surface followed by exposure to one or more pulses from either a laser or an ion-beam which melt a portion of the semiconductor to a desired depth, thus causing the dopant atoms to be incorporated into the molten region. After the molten region recrystallizes the dopant atoms are electrically active. The dopant atoms are deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) or other known deposition techniques.

  11. Deposition of dopant impurities and pulsed energy drive-in

    DOEpatents

    Wickboldt, P.; Carey, P.G.; Smith, P.M.; Ellingboe, A.R.

    1999-06-29

    A semiconductor doping process which enhances the dopant incorporation achievable using the Gas Immersion Laser Doping (GILD) technique is disclosed. The enhanced doping is achieved by first depositing a thin layer of dopant atoms on a semiconductor surface followed by exposure to one or more pulses from either a laser or an ion-beam which melt a portion of the semiconductor to a desired depth, thus causing the dopant atoms to be incorporated into the molten region. After the molten region recrystallizes the dopant atoms are electrically active. The dopant atoms are deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) or other known deposition techniques. 2 figs.

  12. Quantum interference and correlations in single dopants and exchange-coupled dopants in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salfi, Joe

    2015-03-01

    Quantum electronics exploiting the highly coherent states of single dopants in silicon invariably requires interactions between states and interfaces, and inter-dopant coupling by exchange interactions. We have developed a low temperature STM scheme for spatially resolved single-electron transport in a device-like environment, providing the first wave-function measurements of single donors and exchange-coupled acceptors in silicon. For single donors, we directly observed valley quantum interference due to linear superpositions of the valleys, and found that valley degrees of freedom are highly robust to the symmetry-breaking perturbation of nearby (3 nm) surfaces. For exchange-coupled acceptors, we measured the singlet-triplet splitting, and from the spatial tunneling probability, extracted enough information about the 2-body wavefunction amplitudes to determine the entanglement entropy, a measure of the quantum inseparability (quantum correlations) generated by the interactions between indistinguishable particles. Entanglement entropy of the J=3/2 holes was found to increase with increasing dopant distance, as Coulomb interactions overcome tunneling, coherently localizing spin towards a Heitler-London singlet, mimicing S=1/2 particles. In the future these capabilities will be exploited to peer into the inner workings of few-dopant quantum devices and shed new light on multi-dopant correlated states, engineered atom-by-atom. Work done collaboratively with J. A. Mol, R. Rahman, G. Klimeck, M. Y. Simmons, L. C. L. Hollenberg, and S. Rogge. Primary financial support from the ARC.

  13. Dopant materials used in the microelectronics industry

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Advances in microelectronics have transformed the occupational environment of the electronics industry. Large quantities of potentially hazardous materials are now in routine use as integrated circuit manufacturing becomes more complex and specialized. While the acute hazards associated with these dopant materials are clear, the subacute and chronic effects are less evident. Many of these elements are trace elements in humans and may play roles in health and disease in minute concentrations. Early detection and prevention of adverse health effects requires both astute medical surveillance, industrial hygiene, and safety engineering efforts to eliminate the sources of exposure to workers. 24 references.

  14. Atom devices based on single dopants in silicon nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Silicon field-effect transistors have now reached gate lengths of only a few tens of nanometers, containing a countable number of dopants in the channel. Such technological trend brought us to a research stage on devices working with one or a few dopant atoms. In this work, we review our most recent studies on key atom devices with fundamental structures of silicon-on-insulator MOSFETs, such as single-dopant transistors, preliminary memory devices, single-electron turnstile devices and photonic devices, in which electron tunneling mediated by single dopant atoms is the essential transport mechanism. Furthermore, observation of individual dopant potential in the channel by Kelvin probe force microscopy is also presented. These results may pave the way for the development of a new device technology, i.e., single-dopant atom electronics. PMID:21801408

  15. Dopant morphology as the factor limiting graphene conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Mario; Hsieh, Ya-Ping; Chang, Kai-Wen; Tsai, He-Guang; Chen, Tzung-Te

    2015-11-01

    Graphene’s low intrinsic carrier concentration necessitates extrinsic doping to enhance its conductivity and improve its performance for application as electrodes or transparent conductors. Despite this importance limited knowledge of the doping process at application-relevant conditions exists. Employing in-situ carrier transport and Raman characterization of different dopants, we here explore the fundamental mechanisms limiting the effectiveness of doping at different doping levels. Three distinct transport regimes for increasing dopant concentration could be identified. First the agglomeration of dopants into clusters provides a route to increase the graphene conductivity through formation of ordered scatterers. As the cluster grows, the charge transfer efficiency between graphene and additional dopants decreases due to emerging polarization effects. Finally, large dopant clusters hinder the carrier motion and cause percolative transport that leads to an unexpected change of the Hall effect. The presented results help identifying the range of beneficial doping density and guide the choice of suitable dopants for graphene’s future applications.

  16. Patterning Superatom Dopants on Transition Metal Dichalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jaeeun; Lee, Chul-Ho; Bouilly, Delphine; Han, Minyong; Kim, Philip; Steigerwald, Michael L; Roy, Xavier; Nuckolls, Colin

    2016-05-11

    This study describes a new and simple approach to dope two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) using the superatom Co6Se8(PEt3)6 as the electron dopant. Semiconducting TMDCs are wired into field-effect transistor devices and then immersed into a solution of these superatoms. The degree of doping is determined by the concentration of the superatoms in solution and by the length of time the films are immersed in the dopant solution. Using this chemical approach, we are able to turn mono- and few-layer MoS2 samples from moderately to heavily electron-doped states. The same approach applied on WSe2 films changes their characteristics from hole transporting to electron transporting. Moreover, we show that the superatom doping can be patterned on specific areas of TMDC films. To illustrate the power of this technique, we demonstrate the fabrication of a lateral p-n junction by selectively doping only a portion of the channel in a WSe2 device. Finally, encapsulation of the doped films with crystalline hydrocarbon layers stabilizes their properties in an ambient environment. PMID:27082448

  17. Dopant ink composition and method of fabricating a solar cell there from

    DOEpatents

    Loscutoff, Paul; Wu, Kahn; Molesa, Steven Edward

    2015-03-31

    Dopant ink compositions and methods of fabricating solar cells there from are described. A dopant ink composition may include a cross-linkable matrix precursor, a bound dopant species, and a solvent. A method of fabricating a solar cell may include delivering a dopant ink composition to a region above a substrate. The dopant ink composition includes a cross-linkable matrix precursor, a bound dopant species, and a solvent. The method also includes baking the dopant ink composition to remove a substantial portion of the solvent of the dopant ink composition, curing the baked dopant ink composition to cross-link a substantial portion of the cross-linkable matrix precursor of the dopant ink composition, and driving dopants from the cured dopant ink composition toward the substrate.

  18. Dopant segregation at silicon-oxide interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Lirong

    With the fast scaling of MOSFET devices, interfaces between silicon and dielectric layers are becoming increasingly important. However, a physical understanding of dopant segregation at such interfaces using atomic resolution remains elusive in spite of intensive study. In this thesis, As and Sb are selected as dopants to achieve different levels of segregation in equilibrium conditions. This study utilizes a combination of theoretical and experimental concepts. Experimentally, three different methods (SIMS, GI-XRF and high resolution Z-contrast imaging/EELS) are used. Due to the fact that each method has its own artifacts, we use a combination of all of them to allow accurate determination of position and concentration of dopants. Additionally, ab initio calculations provide appropriate structure model by calculating the energy of different preferred segregation sites. After implanting As (1015 and 1016 cm -2) into Czochralski Si (100) wafer at 32keV, a SiO2 layer is thermally grown. Then Si/SiO2 samples are annealed at 900°C for 360min in N2, with a final SiO2 thin film less than 15nm measured by ellipsometry. Combining the above three experimental methods, the segregation of As to the Si/SiO2 interface is observed. The As concentration profiles of both samples are analyzed close to the interface region by EELS, and compared with those measured by GI-XRF and SIMS. A maximum of 4˜5x1021 cm-3 arsenic (10 16 cm-2) and 1.2x1021 cm -3 arsenic (1015 cm-2) are observed at the last monolayer of Si. The total dose loss at the interface of the 10 16 cm-2 As doped sample is 8˜9%. With the incorporation of ab initio calculations, a physical explanation of the segregation mechanism is given based on both theoretical and experimental results. Due to the overlap of Sb, Si and O edges, neither EELS nor GI-XRF can be applied to Sb-concentration profiling in Sb (3x1015 cm-2) doped Si/SiO2 samples, which are annealed at 950°C for 360min, 1000°C for 20 or 60 min separately

  19. Arrangement, Dopant Source, And Method For Making Solar Cells

    DOEpatents

    Rohatgi, Ajeet; Krygowski, Thomas W.

    1999-10-26

    Disclosed is an arrangement, dopant source and method used in the fabrication of photocells that minimize handling of cell wafers and involve a single furnace step. First, dopant sources are created by depositing selected dopants onto both surfaces of source wafers. The concentration of dopant that is placed on the surface is relatively low so that the sources are starved sources. These sources are stacked with photocell wafers in alternating orientation in a furnace. Next, the temperature is raised and thermal diffusion takes place whereby the dopant leaves the source wafers and becomes diffused in a cell wafer creating the junctions necessary for photocells to operate. The concentration of dopant diffused into a single side of the cell wafer is proportional to the concentration placed on the respective dopant source facing the side of the cell wafer. Then, in the same thermal cycle, a layer of oxide is created by introducing oxygen into the furnace environment after sufficient diffusion has taken place. Finally, the cell wafers receive an anti-reflective coating and electrical contacts for the purpose of gathering electrical charge.

  20. Atom location by electron channeling analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pennycook, S.J.

    1984-07-01

    For many years the orientation dependence of the characteristic x-ray emission close to a Bragg reflection has been regarded as a hindrance to accurate microanalysis, and a random incident beam direction has always been recommended for accurate composition analysis. However, this orientation dependence can be put to use to extract information on the lattice location of foreign atoms within the crystalline matrix. Here a generalization of the technique is described which is applicable to any crystal structure including monatomic crystals, and can quantitatively determine substitutional fractions of impurities. The technique was referred to as electron channeling analysis, by analogy with the closely related and widely used bulk technique of ion channeling analysis, and was developed for lattice location studies of dopants in semiconductors at high spatial resolution. Only two spectra are required for each channeling analysis, one in each of the channeling conditions described above. If the matrix and dopant x-ray yields vary identically between the two orientations then the dopant necessarily lies within the reflecting matrix planes. If the dopant x-ray yield does not vary the dopant atoms are randomly located with respect to the matrix planes. 10 references, 2 figures.

  1. Alumina as a dopant in optical fiber by OVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ji

    2014-08-01

    Alumina is an indispensable dopant in modern optical fiber technology, particularly due to its important role played in the recent developments of optical fiber amplifiers and high-power fiber lasers over the last decade or so, which have revolutionized the telecommunication systems, and the industrial laser landscapes, respectively. In this paper, Alumina-doped optical fibers advanced through the outside vapor deposition process and their key attributes in the respective applications are reviewed, with Alumina both as a sole dopant for its potential use in the low-loss transmission lines and as a co-dopant for active use in the high-brightness, high-power fiber laser applications.

  2. Diffusion of n-type dopants in germanium

    SciTech Connect

    Chroneos, A.; Bracht, H.

    2014-03-15

    Germanium is being actively considered by the semiconductor community as a mainstream material for nanoelectronic applications. Germanium has advantageous materials properties; however, its dopant-defect interactions are less understood as compared to the mainstream material, silicon. The understanding of self- and dopant diffusion is essential to form well defined doped regions. Although p-type dopants such as boron exhibit limited diffusion, n-type dopants such as phosphorous, arsenic, and antimony diffuse quickly via vacancy-mediated diffusion mechanisms. In the present review, we mainly focus on the impact of intrinsic defects on the diffusion mechanisms of donor atoms and point defect engineering strategies to restrain donor atom diffusion and to enhance their electrical activation.

  3. Dopant-mediated oxygen vacancy tuning in ceria nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Babu, Suresh; Thanneeru, Ranjith; Inerbaev, Talgat; Day, Richard; Masunov, Artëm E; Schulte, Alfons; Seal, Sudipta

    2009-02-25

    Ceria nanoparticles with 20 and 40 at.% RE (RE = Y, Sm, Gd, and Yb) dopants were synthesized through a microemulsion method. Independently of the dopant nature and concentration, nearly monodispersed nanoparticles of size 3-5 nm were observed in high resolution transmission electron microscopic analysis. The ceria lattice either expands or contracts depending on the dopant cation ionic radii, as indicated by x-ray diffraction studies. X-ray photoelectron and Raman spectroscopic studies were used to quantify the cerium oxidation state and oxygen vacancy concentration. The results show the tunability of the oxygen vacancy and Ce(3+) concentrations based on the dopant properties. First principles simulations using the free energy density functional theory method support the observed experimental trends. The reported results establish a relationship between the oxygen vacancies and oxidation states in doped ceria required for tailoring properties in catalytic and biomedical applications. PMID:19417474

  4. Dopant profile engineering of advanced Si MOSFET's using ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolk, P. A.; Ponomarev, Y. V.; Schmitz, J.; van Brandenburg, A. C. M. C.; Roes, R.; Montree, A. H.; Woerlee, P. H.

    1999-01-01

    Ion implantation has been used to realize non-uniform, steep retrograde (SR) dopant profiles in the active channel region of advanced Si MOSFET's. After defining the transistor configuration, SR profiles were formed by dopant implantation through the polycrystalline Si gate and the gate oxide (through-the-gate, TG, implantation). The steep nature of the as-implanted profile was retained by applying rapid thermal annealing for dopant activation and implantation damage removal. For NMOS transistors, TG implantation of B yields improved transistor performance through increased carrier mobility, reduced junction capacitances, and reduced susceptibility to short-channel effects. Electrical measurements show that the gate oxide quality is not deteriorated by the ion-induced damage, demonstrating that transistor reliability is preserved. For PMOS transistors, TG implantation of P or As leads to unacceptable source/drain junction broadening as a result of transient enhanced dopant diffusion during thermal activation.

  5. Conducting molecular composites of polypyrrole with electroactive polymeric dopantions

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, D.A.; Reynolds, J.R.

    1996-10-01

    Polypyrrole is one of the most widely used and studied electroactive polymers due to its good conductivity and stability in air. A variety of low molecular weight and polymeric ions have been used as charge compensating dopants in conductive polypyrrole in its oxidized state. In this work we report the electro-polymerization of polypyrrole films incorporating electroactive N-substituted polyaniline polyelectrolytes as dopant ions.

  6. Calibrated nanoscale dopant profiling using a scanning microwave microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, H. P.; Hochleitner, M.; Hinterdorfer, P.; Humer, I.; Smoliner, J.; Fenner, M.; Moertelmaier, M.; Rankl, C.; Tanbakuchi, H.; Kienberger, F.; Imtiaz, A.; Wallis, T. M.; Kabos, P.; Kopanski, J. J.

    2012-01-01

    The scanning microwave microscope is used for calibrated capacitance spectroscopy and spatially resolved dopant profiling measurements. It consists of an atomic force microscope combined with a vector network analyzer operating between 1-20 GHz. On silicon semiconductor calibration samples with doping concentrations ranging from 10{sup 15} to 10{sup 20} atoms/cm{sup 3}, calibrated capacitance-voltage curves as well as derivative dC/dV curves were acquired. The change of the capacitance and the dC/dV signal is directly related to the dopant concentration allowing for quantitative dopant profiling. The method was tested on various samples with known dopant concentration and the resolution of dopant profiling determined to 20% while the absolute accuracy is within an order of magnitude. Using a modeling approach the dopant profiling calibration curves were analyzed with respect to varying tip diameter and oxide thickness allowing for improvements of the calibration accuracy. Bipolar samples were investigated and nano-scale defect structures and p-n junction interfaces imaged showing potential applications for the study of semiconductor device performance and failure analysis.

  7. Dopant morphology as the factor limiting graphene conductivity

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Mario; Hsieh, Ya-Ping; Chang, Kai-Wen; Tsai, He-Guang; Chen, Tzung-Te

    2015-01-01

    Graphene’s low intrinsic carrier concentration necessitates extrinsic doping to enhance its conductivity and improve its performance for application as electrodes or transparent conductors. Despite this importance limited knowledge of the doping process at application-relevant conditions exists. Employing in-situ carrier transport and Raman characterization of different dopants, we here explore the fundamental mechanisms limiting the effectiveness of doping at different doping levels. Three distinct transport regimes for increasing dopant concentration could be identified. First the agglomeration of dopants into clusters provides a route to increase the graphene conductivity through formation of ordered scatterers. As the cluster grows, the charge transfer efficiency between graphene and additional dopants decreases due to emerging polarization effects. Finally, large dopant clusters hinder the carrier motion and cause percolative transport that leads to an unexpected change of the Hall effect. The presented results help identifying the range of beneficial doping density and guide the choice of suitable dopants for graphene’s future applications. PMID:26617255

  8. Substituted molecular p-dopants: A theoretical study

    SciTech Connect

    Padmaperuma, Asanga B.

    2012-09-28

    Conductivity dopants with processing properties suitable for industrial applications are of importance to the organic electronics field. However, the number of commercially available organic molecular dopants is limited. The electron acceptor 2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-7,7,8,8,-tetracyanoquinodimethane (F4-TCNQ) is the most utilized p-dopant; however, it has high volatility and a poor sticking coefficient, which makes it difficult to control doping levels and prevent vacuum system contamination. A design concept for p-type molecular dopants based on the TCNQ core which are substituted to improve processing properties without sacrificing the electronic properties necessary is presented. The correlation between the LUMO energy and the position of substitution as well as the choice of linker is evaluated. The position of substitution as well as the choice of linker has a significant effect on the electronic properties. However, the geometry of the substituted molecules was not significantly distorted from that of the parent F4-TCNQ, and the electron density was delocalized on the TCNQ core. We also put forward four possible molecular dopants with suitable energy levels.

  9. Detecting excitation and magnetization of individual dopants in a semiconductor.

    PubMed

    Khajetoorians, Alexander A; Chilian, Bruno; Wiebe, Jens; Schuwalow, Sergej; Lechermann, Frank; Wiesendanger, Roland

    2010-10-28

    An individual magnetic atom doped into a semiconductor is a promising building block for bottom-up spintronic devices and quantum logic gates. Moreover, it provides a perfect model system for the atomic-scale investigation of fundamental effects such as magnetism in dilute magnetic semiconductors. However, dopants in semiconductors so far have not been studied by magnetically sensitive techniques with atomic resolution that correlate the atomic structure with the dopant's magnetism. Here we show electrical excitation and read-out of a spin associated with a single magnetic dopant in a semiconductor host. We use spin-resolved scanning tunnelling spectroscopy to measure the spin excitations and the magnetization curve of individual iron surface-dopants embedded within a two-dimensional electron gas confined to an indium antimonide (110) surface. The dopants act like isolated quantum spins the states of which are governed by a substantial magnetic anisotropy that forces the spin to lie in the surface plane. This result is corroborated by our first principles calculations. The demonstrated methodology opens new routes for the investigation of sample systems that are more widely studied in the field of spintronics-that is, Mn in GaAs (ref. 5), magnetic ions in semiconductor quantum dots, nitrogen-vacancy centres in diamond and phosphorus spins in silicon. PMID:20981095

  10. Refractive index modification of polymers using nanosized dopants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanemann, Thomas; Boehm, Johannes; Müller, Claas; Ritzhaupt-Kleissl, Eberhard

    2008-04-01

    The addition of nanosized inorganic or organic dopants to polymers allows the modification of the polymers physical properties enabling the realization of functionalized polymers with new application fields e.g. in microoptics. Exemplarily electron rich organic dopants, solved in polymers, cause a pronounced increase of the refractive index. Polymer based reactive resins like PMMA, solved in MMA, or unsaturated polyester, solved in styrene, can be cured to thermoplastic polymers. The resin's low viscous flow behaviour enables an easy composite formation by solving the organic dopants in the liquid up to a dopant content of 50 wt%, followed by solidification to a thermoplastic. The addition of simple organic molecules like phenanthrene or benzochinoline allows a refractive index elevation at 633 nm from 1.56 up to 1.60 retaining the good transmission properties. In comparison the refractive index of PMMA can be increased from the initial value of 1.49 up to values around 1.58 (@633 nm). All composites show an almost linear correlation between dopant content and refractive index. Using these composites devices like 3dB-couplers or an electrooptical modulator applying injection molded or hot embossed substrates have been realized.

  11. Method for enhancing the solubility of dopants in silicon

    DOEpatents

    Sadigh, Babak; Lenosky, Thomas J.; De La Rubia, Tomas Diaz

    2003-09-30

    A method for enhancing the equilibrium solid solubility of dopants in silicon, germanium and silicon-germanium alloys. The method involves subjecting silicon-based substrate to biaxial or compression strain. It has been determined that boron solubility was largely enhanced (more than 100%) by a compressive bi-axial strain, based on a size-mismatch theory since the boron atoms are smaller than the silicon atoms. It has been found that the large enhancement or mixing properties of dopants in silicon and germanium substrates is primarily governed by their, and to second order by their size-mismatch with the substrate. Further, it has been determined that the dopant solubility enhancement with strain is most effective when the charge and the size-mismatch of the impurity favor the same type of strain. Thus, the solid solubility of small p-type (e.g., boron) as well as large n-type (e.g., arsenic) dopants can be raised most dramatically by appropriate bi-axial (compressive) strain, and that solubility of a large p-type dopant (e.g, indium) in silicon will be raised due to size-mismatch with silicon, which favors tensile strain, while its negative charge prefers compressive strain, and thus the two effects counteract each other.

  12. The effect of oxide overlayers on secondary electron dopant mapping.

    PubMed

    Dapor, Maurizio; Jepson, Mark A E; Inkson, Beverley J; Rodenburg, Cornelia

    2009-06-01

    The International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors ranks dopant profiling as one of the most difficult challenges for analysis of semiconductors. Dopant mapping in the scanning electron microscope (SEM) has the potential to provide a solution. This technique has not yet found widespread application, however, mainly due to the lack of a comprehensive theoretical model, uncertain quantification, and its inability to differentiate doping levels in n-type silicon. Although a Monte Carlo model was recently published that closely matched experimental data obtained in p-doped silicon to data obtained from the theoretical model, a large discrepancy between experimental data obtained for n-type silicon was found. Here we present a Monte Carlo model that provides close matches between experimental and calculated data in both n- and p-type silicon, paving the way for a widespread application of SEM dopant contrast. PMID:19460180

  13. Non-equilibrium Green's functions study of discrete dopants variability on an ultra-scaled FinFET

    SciTech Connect

    Valin, R. Martinez, A.; Barker, J. R.

    2015-04-28

    In this paper, we study the effect of random discrete dopants on the performance of a 6.6 nm channel length silicon FinFET. The discrete dopants have been distributed randomly in the source/drain region of the device. Due to the small dimensions of the FinFET, a quantum transport formalism based on the non-equilibrium Green's functions has been deployed. The transfer characteristics for several devices that differ in location and number of dopants have been calculated. Our results demonstrate that discrete dopants modify the effective channel length and the height of the source/drain barrier, consequently changing the channel control of the charge. This effect becomes more significant at high drain bias. As a consequence, there is a strong effect on the variability of the on-current, off-current, sub-threshold slope, and threshold voltage. Finally, we have also calculated the mean and standard deviation of these parameters to quantify their variability. The obtained results show that the variability at high drain bias is 1.75 larger than at low drain bias. However, the variability of the on-current, off-current, and sub-threshold slope remains independent of the drain bias. In addition, we have found that a large source to drain current by tunnelling current occurs at low gate bias.

  14. Sodium dopants in helium clusters: Structure, equilibrium and submersion kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Calvo, F.

    2015-12-31

    Alkali impurities bind to helium nanodroplets very differently depending on their size and charge state, large neutral or charged dopants being wetted by the droplet whereas small neutral impurities prefer to reside aside. Using various computational modeling tools such as quantum Monte Carlo and path-integral molecular dynamics simulations, we have revisited some aspects of the physical chemistry of helium droplets interacting with sodium impurities, including the onset of snowball formation in presence of many-body polarization forces, the transition from non-wetted to wetted behavior in larger sodium clusters, and the kinetics of submersion of small dopants after sudden ionization.

  15. Development of an ion beam alignment system for real-time scanning tunneling microscope observation of dopant-ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kamioka, Takefumi; Sato, Kou; Kazama, Yutaka; Watanabe, Takanobu; Ohdomari, Iwao

    2008-07-15

    An ion beam alignment system has been developed in order to realize real-time scanning tunneling microscope (STM) observation of 'dopant-ion' irradiation that has been difficult due to the low emission intensity of the liquid-metal-ion-source (LMIS) containing dopant atoms. The alignment system is installed in our original ion gun and STM combined system (IG/STM) which is used for in situ STM observation during ion irradiation. By using an absorbed electron image unit and a dummy sample, ion beam alignment operation is drastically simplified and accurized. We demonstrate that sequential STM images during phosphorus-ion irradiation are successfully obtained for sample surfaces of Si(111)-7x7 at room temperature and a high temperature of 500 deg. C. The LMIS-IG/STM equipped with the developed ion beam alignment system would be a powerful tool for microscopic investigation of the dynamic processes of ion irradiation.

  16. Polarization charge as a reconfigurable quasi-dopant in ferroelectric thin films.

    PubMed

    Crassous, Arnaud; Sluka, Tomas; Tagantsev, Alexander K; Setter, Nava

    2015-07-01

    Impurity elements used as dopants are essential to semiconductor technology for controlling the concentration of charge carriers. Their location in the semiconductor crystal is determined during the fabrication process and remains fixed. However, another possibility exists whereby the concentration of charge carriers is modified using polarization charge as a quasi-dopant, which implies the possibility to write, displace, erase and re-create channels having a metallic-type conductivity inside a wide-bandgap semiconductor matrix. Polarization-charge doping is achieved in ferroelectrics by the creation of charged domain walls. The intentional creation of stable charged domain walls has so far only been reported in BaTiO3 single crystals, with a process that involves cooling the material through its phase transition under a strong electric bias, but this is not a viable technology when real-time reconfigurability is sought in working devices. Here, we demonstrate a technique allowing the creation and nanoscale manipulation of charged domain walls and their action as a real-time doping activator in ferroelectric thin films. Stable individual and multiple conductive channels with various lengths from 3 μm to 100 nm were created, erased and recreated in another location, and their high metallic-type conductivity was verified. This takes the idea of hardware reconfigurable electronics one step forward. PMID:26076468

  17. Polarization charge as a reconfigurable quasi-dopant in ferroelectric thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crassous, Arnaud; Sluka, Tomas; Tagantsev, Alexander K.; Setter, Nava

    2015-07-01

    Impurity elements used as dopants are essential to semiconductor technology for controlling the concentration of charge carriers. Their location in the semiconductor crystal is determined during the fabrication process and remains fixed. However, another possibility exists whereby the concentration of charge carriers is modified using polarization charge as a quasi-dopant, which implies the possibility to write, displace, erase and re-create channels having a metallic-type conductivity inside a wide-bandgap semiconductor matrix. Polarization-charge doping is achieved in ferroelectrics by the creation of charged domain walls. The intentional creation of stable charged domain walls has so far only been reported in BaTiO3 single crystals, with a process that involves cooling the material through its phase transition under a strong electric bias, but this is not a viable technology when real-time reconfigurability is sought in working devices. Here, we demonstrate a technique allowing the creation and nanoscale manipulation of charged domain walls and their action as a real-time doping activator in ferroelectric thin films. Stable individual and multiple conductive channels with various lengths from 3 μm to 100 nm were created, erased and recreated in another location, and their high metallic-type conductivity was verified. This takes the idea of hardware reconfigurable electronics one step forward.

  18. Multiple dopant injection system for small rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakala, G. G.; Raines, N. G.

    1992-07-01

    The Diagnostics Test Facility (DTF) at NASA's Stennis Space Center (SSC) was designed and built to provide a standard rocket engine exhaust plume for use in the research and development of engine health monitoring instrumentation. A 1000 lb thrust class liquid oxygen (LOX)-gaseous hydrogen (GH2) fueled rocket engine is used as the subscale plume source to simulate the SSME during experimentation and instrument development. The ability of the DTF to provide efficient, and low cost test operations makes it uniquely suited for plume diagnostic experimentation. The most unique feature of the DTF is the Multiple Dopant Injection System (MDIS) that is used to seed the exhaust plume with the desired element or metal alloy. The dopant injection takes place at the fuel injector, yielding a very uniform and homogeneous distribution of the seeding material in the exhaust plume. The MDIS allows during a single test firing of the DTF, the seeding of the exhaust plume with up to three different dopants and also provides distilled water base lines between the dopants. A number of plume diagnostic-related experiments have already utilized the unique capabilities of the DTF.

  19. Dopant profiling in the TEM, progress towards quantitative electron holography

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, David; Truche, Robert; Chabli, Amal; Twitchett-Harrison, Alison C.; Midgley, Paul A.; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    2007-09-26

    Off-axis electron holography has been used to characterise the dopant potential in GaAs p-n junctions. We show that the measured potential across the junctions is affected by both FIB specimen preparation and by charging in the TEM and suggest methods that can be used to minimise these problems.

  20. Band engineering of GaN/AlN quantum wells by Si dopants

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuo, Xiaolong; Ni, Jianchao; Li, Jinchai; Lin, Wei; Cai, Duanjun; Li, Shuping E-mail: jykang@xmu.edu.cn; Kang, Junyong E-mail: jykang@xmu.edu.cn

    2014-03-28

    The electronic properties of GaN/AlN quantum wells are engineered by Si doped in different positions with the aid of the first-principle calculations. The local potential where the dopant located is dragged down as a result of negative center induced by the Si atom, leading to a different shift of the potential, and further affects the band bending and carrier distribution. The band profiles are depicted by analyzing the projected densities of states, it is found that the different positions of Si doping lead to a different band bending owing to the modified polarization fields. The spatial distributions of electrons and holes plotted by the partial charge densities reveal that electrons and holes experience redistribution by Si dopant in different positions. The above results demonstrate that the effect of polarization on the band bending has been significantly modulated by Si doped in different positions. Such modification of electronic structure is especially valuable for the fabrication of GaN/AlN QWs under desired control.

  1. Implant activation and redistribution of dopants in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Zolper, J.C.; Pearton, S.J.; Wilson, R.G.; Stall, R.A.

    1996-07-01

    GaN and related III-Nitride materials (IN, an) have recently been the focus of extensive research for photonic and electronic device applications. As this material system matures, ion implantation doping and isolation is expected to play an important role in advance device demonstrations. To this end, we report the demonstration of implanted p-type doping with Mg+P and Ca as well as n-type doping with Si in GaN. These implanted dopants require annealing 105 approximately1100 {degrees}C to achieve electrical activity, but demonstrate limited redistribution at this temperature. The redistribution of other potential dopants in GaN (such as Be, Zn, and Cd) will also be reported. Results for a GaN junction field effect transistor (JFET), the first GaN device to use implantation doping, will also be presented.

  2. Raman characterization of defects and dopants in graphene.

    PubMed

    Beams, Ryan; Gustavo Cançado, Luiz; Novotny, Lukas

    2015-03-01

    In this article we review Raman studies of defects and dopants in graphene as well as the importance of both for device applications. First a brief overview of Raman spectroscopy of graphene is presented. In the following section we discuss the Raman characterization of three defect types: point defects, edges, and grain boundaries. The next section reviews the dependence of the Raman spectrum on dopants and highlights several common doping techniques. In the final section, several device applications are discussed which exploit doping and defects in graphene. Generally defects degrade the figures of merit for devices, such as carrier mobility and conductivity, whereas doping provides a means to tune the carrier concentration in graphene thereby enabling the engineering of novel material systems. Accurately measuring both the defect density and doping is critical and Raman spectroscopy provides a powerful tool to accomplish this task. PMID:25634863

  3. Boosting the Boron Dopant Level in Monolayer Doping by Carboranes.

    PubMed

    Ye, Liang; González-Campo, Arántzazu; Núñez, Rosario; de Jong, Michel P; Kudernac, Tibor; van der Wiel, Wilfred G; Huskens, Jurriaan

    2015-12-16

    Monolayer doping (MLD) presents an alternative method to achieve silicon doping without causing crystal damage, and it has the capability of ultrashallow doping and the doping of nonplanar surfaces. MLD utilizes dopant-containing alkene molecules that form a monolayer on the silicon surface using the well-established hydrosilylation process. Here, we demonstrate that MLD can be extended to high doping levels by designing alkenes with a high content of dopant atoms. Concretely, carborane derivatives, which have 10 B atoms per molecule, were functionalized with an alkene group. MLD using a monolayer of such a derivative yielded up to ten times higher doping levels, as measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and dynamic secondary mass spectroscopy, compared to an alkene with a single B atom. Sheet resistance measurements showed comparably increased conductivities of the Si substrates. Thermal budget analyses indicate that the doping level can be further optimized by changing the annealing conditions. PMID:26595856

  4. The role of isoelectronic dopants in organic light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crone, B. K.; Campbell, I. H.; Smith, D. L.

    2007-09-01

    Power efficiency is an important parameter for all OLEDs, and is particularly critical for lighting applications. To maximize the power efficiency one must optimize charge injection, carrier transport, and radiative quantum efficiency, while minimizing energy losses. In this work we discuss how isoelectronic dopants can be used to address these problems. It can be difficult to produce efficient electrical contacts, particularly to large energy gap organic materials, and thus the contacts often limit the performance and stability of OLEDs . Recent results by several groups have attributed improved hole injection in poly (9,9' dioctylfluorene) [PFO] based LEDs to charge trapping, but the origin of the traps is unknown. In order to understand the role of traps in improving injection we studied poly[2-methoxy, 5-(2'- ethyl-hexyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene] (MEH-PPV) devices with C 60 molecules at the anode to improve hole injection. Isoelectronic dopants are used widely as recombination centers in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). In these systems one wants to maximize quantum efficiency by effectively trapping charges on the emitting dopants, while at the same time maximizing power efficiency by maintaining good charge transport. An understanding of the influence of the depth of the dopant on charge capture, and charge transport will aid in optimizing doped organic LEDs. We have looked at the OLED system consisting of the polymer PFO, and the organometallic molecule PhqIr. We show that PhqIr acts as a shallow hole trap in PFO, and that the charge transport and luminescence properties of this system are described by quasi-equilibrium statistics.

  5. The interstitial fraction of diffusivity of common dopants in Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gossmann, H.-J.; Haynes, T. E.; Stolk, P. A.; Jacobson, D. C.; Gilmer, G. H.; Poate, J. M.; Luftman, H. S.; Mogi, T. K.; Thompson, M. O.

    1997-12-01

    The relative contributions of interstitials and vacancies to diffusion of a dopant A in silicon are specified by the interstitial fraction of diffusivity, fA. Accurate knowledge of fA is required for predictive simulations of Si processing during which the point defect population is perturbed, such as transient enhanced diffusion. While experimental determination of fA is traditionally based on an underdetermined system of equations, we show here that it is actually possible to derive expressions that give meaningful bounds on fA without any further assumptions but that of local equilibrium. By employing a pair of dopants under the same point-defect perturbance, and by utilizing perturbances very far from equilibrium, we obtain experimentally fSb⩽0.012 and fB⩾0.98 at temperatures of ˜800 °C, which are the strictest bounds reported to date. Our results are in agreement with a theoretical expectation that a substitutional dopant in Si should either be a pure vacancy, or a pure interstitial(cy) diffuser.

  6. Simulation and bonding of dopants in nanocrystalline diamond.

    PubMed

    Barnard, A S; Russo, S P; Snook, I K

    2005-09-01

    The doping of the wide-band gap semiconductor diamond has led to the invention of many electronic and optoelectronic devices. Impurities can be introduced into diamond during chemical vapor deposition or high pressure-high temperature growth, resulting in materials with unusual physical and chemical properties. For electronic applications one of the main objectives in the doping of diamond is the production of p-type and n-type semiconductors materials; however, the study of dopants in diamond nanoparticles is considered important for use in nanodevices, or as qubits for quantum computing. Such devices require that bonding of dopants in nanodiamond must be positioned substitutionally at a lattice site, and must exhibit minimal or no possibility of diffusion to the nanocrystallite surface. In light of these requirements, a number of computational studies have been undertaken to examine the stability of various dopants in various forms of nanocrystalline diamond. Presented here is a review of some such studies, undertaken using quantum mechanical based simulation methods, to provide an overview of the crystal stability of doped nanodiamond for use in diamondoid nanodevices. PMID:16193953

  7. Photoluminescence imaging of solitary dopant sites in covalently doped single-wall carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann, Nicolai F.; Yalcin, Sibel Ebru; Adamska, Lyudmyla; Haroz, Erik H.; Ma, Xuedan; Tretiak, Sergei; Htoon, Han; Doorn, Stephen K.

    2015-11-11

    Covalent dopants in semiconducting single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are becoming important as routes for introducing new photoluminescent emitting states with potential for enhanced quantum yields, new functionality, and as species capable of near-IR room-temperature single photon emission. The origin and behavior of the dopant-induced emission is thus important to understand as a key requirement for successful room-T photonics and optoelectronics applications. Here, we use direct correlated two-color photoluminescence imaging to probe how the interplay between the SWCNT bright E11 exciton and solitary dopant sites yields the dopant-induced emission for three different dopant species: oxygen, 4-methoxybenzene, and 4-bromobenzene. We introduce a route to control dopant functionalization to a low level as a means for introducing spatially well-separated solitary dopant sites. Resolution of emission from solitary dopant sites and correlation to their impact on E11 emission allows confirmation of dopants as trapping sites for localization of E11 excitons following their diffusive transport to the dopant site. Imaging of the dopant emission also reveals photoluminescence intermittency (blinking), with blinking dynamics being dependent on the specific dopant. Density functional theory calculations were performed to evaluate the stability of dopants and delineate the possible mechanisms of blinking. Furthermore, theoretical modeling suggests that the trapping of free charges in the potential well created by permanent dipoles introduced by dopant atoms/groups is likely responsible for the blinking, with the strongest effects being predicted and observed for oxygen-doped SWCNTs.

  8. Photoluminescence imaging of solitary dopant sites in covalently doped single-wall carbon nanotubes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hartmann, Nicolai F.; Yalcin, Sibel Ebru; Adamska, Lyudmyla; Haroz, Erik H.; Ma, Xuedan; Tretiak, Sergei; Htoon, Han; Doorn, Stephen K.

    2015-11-11

    Covalent dopants in semiconducting single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are becoming important as routes for introducing new photoluminescent emitting states with potential for enhanced quantum yields, new functionality, and as species capable of near-IR room-temperature single photon emission. The origin and behavior of the dopant-induced emission is thus important to understand as a key requirement for successful room-T photonics and optoelectronics applications. Here, we use direct correlated two-color photoluminescence imaging to probe how the interplay between the SWCNT bright E11 exciton and solitary dopant sites yields the dopant-induced emission for three different dopant species: oxygen, 4-methoxybenzene, and 4-bromobenzene. We introducemore » a route to control dopant functionalization to a low level as a means for introducing spatially well-separated solitary dopant sites. Resolution of emission from solitary dopant sites and correlation to their impact on E11 emission allows confirmation of dopants as trapping sites for localization of E11 excitons following their diffusive transport to the dopant site. Imaging of the dopant emission also reveals photoluminescence intermittency (blinking), with blinking dynamics being dependent on the specific dopant. Density functional theory calculations were performed to evaluate the stability of dopants and delineate the possible mechanisms of blinking. Furthermore, theoretical modeling suggests that the trapping of free charges in the potential well created by permanent dipoles introduced by dopant atoms/groups is likely responsible for the blinking, with the strongest effects being predicted and observed for oxygen-doped SWCNTs.« less

  9. Dopant-site-dependent scattering by dislocations in epitaxial films of perovskite semiconductor BaSnO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Useong; Park, Chulkwon; Kim, Rokyeon; Mun, Hyo Sik; Kim, Hoon Min; Kim, Namwook; Yu, Jaejun; Char, Kookrin; Ha, Taewoo; Kim, Jae Hoon; Kim, Hyung Joon; Kim, Tai Hoon; Kim, Kee Hoon

    2014-05-01

    We studied the conduction mechanism in Sb-doped BaSnO{sub 3} epitaxial films, and compared its behavior with that of the mechanism of its counterpart, La-doped BaSnO{sub 3}. We found that the electron mobility in BaSnO{sub 3} films was reduced by almost 7 times when the dopant was changed from La to Sb, despite little change in the effective mass of the carriers. This indicates that the scattering rate of conduction electrons in the BaSnO{sub 3} system is strongly affected by the site at which the dopants are located. More importantly, we found that electron scattering by threading dislocations also depends critically on the dopant site. We propose that the large enhancement of scattering by the threading dislocations in Sb-doped BaSnO{sub 3} films is caused by the combination effect of the change in the distribution of Sb impurities in the films, the formation of the Sb impurity clusters near the threading dislocations, and the conduction electron clustering near the Sb impurities.

  10. Quantum confinement, core level shifts, and dopant segregation in P-doped Si⟨110⟩ nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jiaxin; Chan, Tzu-Liang; Chelikowsky, James R.

    2010-10-01

    We examine P-doped Si⟨110⟩ nanowires by employing a real-space pseudopotential method. We find the defect wave function becomes more localized along the nanowire axis and the donor ionization energy increases, owing to quantum confinement. It is more difficult to dope a P atom into a Si⟨110⟩ nanowire than to dope Si bulk because the formation energy increases with decreasing size. By comparing the formation energy for different P positions within a nanowire, we find that if a P atom at the nanowire surface can overcome the energy barrier close to the surface, there is a tendency for the dopant to reside within the nanowire core. We calculate P core levels shift as P changes position within the nanowire and provide a means for x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy experiments to determine the location of P atoms within a Si nanowire.

  11. Influence of electron–phonon interactions in single dopant nanowire transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Carrillo-Nuñez, H. Bescond, M. Cavassilas, N.; Dib, E.; Lannoo, M.

    2014-10-28

    Single dopant nanowire transistors can be viewed as the ultimate miniaturization of nano electronic devices. In this work, we theoretically investigate the influence of the electron-phonon coupling on their transport properties using a non-equilibrium Green's function approach in the self-consistent Born approximation. For an impurity located at the center of the wire we find that, at room temperature, acoustic phonons broaden the impurity level so that the bistability predicted in the ballistic regime is suppressed. Optical phonons are found to have a beneficial impact on carrier transport via a phonon-assisted tunneling effect. We discuss the position and temperature dependence of these effects, showing that such systems might be very promising for engineering of ultimate devices.

  12. The Effect of Rare Earth Dopants on UO2 Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Brady D.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Scheele, Randall D.; Sell, Rachel L.

    2003-06-01

    Recent work by Hanson [1] has demonstrated a clear dependence of the oxidation of Light Water Reactor spent fuel on burnup. Oxidation of spent fuel was shown to proceed via the two-step reaction UO2?UO2.4?UO2.67+x, where the U3O8-like phase does not form until conversion to UO2.4 is complete. The temperature-dependent activation energy (Ea) of the transition from UO2.4 to the hyperstoichiometric U3O8 was found to be {approx}150 kJ mol-1. Each MWD/kg M burnup added {approx}1.0 kJ mol-1. The work of McEachern et.al. [2], Choi et. al. [3], and You et. al. [4] have all verified this oxidation dependence on SIMFUEL or unirradiated doped-UO2. All present work agrees that the soluble actinides or fission products that substitute in the U matrix act to delay the onset of U3O8. However, no single model exists to explain the observed behavior, including the fact that most dopants actually allow an earlier onset for UO2.4 formation. The present work is part of a Nuclear Energy Research Initiative project attempting to develop a UO2-based matrix capable of achieving extended burnups by including soluble dopants. The resulting fuel should be highly oxidation and dissolution resistant, which will be beneficial during accident scenarios or for disposal in a geologic repository. In addition, the stabilized matrix may help delay the onset of fuel restructuring that occurs at higher burnups. Initial results of the oxidation tests to quantify effects as a function of ionic radii and charge of the dopant are presented.

  13. Polymer-Dopant-Systems: Tailoring of Optical and Thermomechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanemann, Thomas; Honnef, Kirsten

    2010-06-01

    For modern application in microoptics the refractive index of polymers can be adjusted in a certain range by the addition of electron-rich organic dopants. As an unwanted side-effect a pronounced plasticizing occurs. In this work the addition of a crosslinker (divinylbenzene) to the unsaturated polyester matrix, doped with phenanthrene for refractive index adjustment, allows for a successful suppression of the plasticizing effect measured after polymerization. Even at high phenanthrene concentrations the glass transition temperature of the initial polymer could be almost retained. An increase of the polymers refractive index from 1.5684 up to a value of 1.6425 could be achieved.

  14. Characterization of microstructure and dopant distribution of laser diffused resistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Yougui

    In order to completely understand the laser-processing mechanisms and accurately control the electrical and material properties of the LDRs, the research during this thesis was focused on microstructural characterization and dopant distribution measurements of LDRs fabricated under various laser parameters and different initial device structures The aim of the project was to use theses results to improve the accuracy, thermal coefficient of resistance (TCR) and long-term stability of those microdevices. Obtaining accurate quantified electrically activated dopant distribution in the actual microelectronic devices was a real challenge, especially when one considers microdevices (LDRs) having a very small area of few mum 2. By considering a vector as etching rate instead of a scalar (as considered by previous researchers) and by using a novel calibration method, the reliability, reproducibility and accuracy of quantification of dopant concentrations, ranging from 9x1016 to 6x10 19 atoms/cm3, of the dopant evaluation technique have been significantly improved. Therefore, the dopant profiles in the non-irradiated heavily doped regions in our devices were obtained using dopant selective etching (DSE) in combination with cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and focused ion beam (FIB) techniques. Furthermore, the developed method has been applied to our LDRs and the two-dimensional (2D) dopant distributions with wide range of boron concentrations of the resistive links were quantified with spatial resolution of 1 to 5 nm. This results shows that the LDRs with boron concentrations up to ˜0.24x1018 atoms/cm 3 and 8.9x1018 atoms/cm3 can be produced depending on different structures of initial microdevices and laser parameters. Those profiles were accurately compared with numerical simulation results based on heat transfer and diffusion equations. Three-dimensional (3D) and two-dimensional (2D) periodic silicon nanostructures formed by polarized focused Nd

  15. A theoretical study of dopant atom detection and probe behavior in STEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Anudha

    Very detailed information about the atomic and electronic structure of materials can be obtained via atomic-scale resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). These experiments reach the limits of current microscopes, which means that optimal experimental design is a key ingredient in success. The step following experiment, extraction of information from experimental data is also complex. Comprehension of experimental data depends on comparison with simulated data and on fundamental understanding of aspects of scattering behavior. The research projects discussed in this thesis are formulated within three large concepts. 1. Usage of simulation to suggest experimental technique for observation of a particular structural feature.. Two specific structural features are explored. One is the characterization of a substitutional dopant atom in a crystal. Annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscope (ADF-STEM) images allow detection of individual dopant atoms in a crystal based on contrast between intensities of doped and non-doped column in the image. The magnitude of the said contrast is heavily influenced by specimen and microscope parameters. Analysis of multislice-based simulations of ADF-STEM images of crystals doped with one substitutional dopant atom for a wide range of crystal thicknesses, types and locations of dopant atom inside the crystal, and crystals with different atoms revealed trends and non-intuitive behaviors in visibility of the dopant atom. The results provide practical guidelines for the optimal experimental setup regarding both the microscope and specimen conditions in order to characterize the presence and location of a dopant atom. Furthermore, the simulations help in recognizing the cases where detecting a single dopant atom via ADF-STEM imaging is not possible. The second is a more specific case of detecting intrinsic twist in MoS2 nanotubes. Objective molecular dynamics simulations coupled with a density

  16. Nanowire dopant measurement using secondary ion mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Chia, A. C. E.; Boulanger, J. P.; Wood, B. A.; LaPierre, R. R.; Dhindsa, N.; Saini, S. S.

    2015-09-21

    A method is presented to improve the quantitative determination of dopant concentration in semiconductor nanowire (NW) arrays using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). SIMS measurements were used to determine Be dopant concentrations in a Be-doped GaAs thin film and NW arrays of various pitches that were dry-etched from the same film. A comparison of these measurements revealed a factor of 3 to 12 difference, depending on the NW array pitch, between the secondary Be ion yields of the film and the NW arrays, despite being identically doped. This was due to matrix effects and ion beam mixing of Be from the NWs into the surrounding benzocyclobutene that was used to fill the space between the NWs. This indicates the need for etched NWs to be used as doping standards instead of 2D films when evaluating NWs of unknown doping by SIMS. Using the etched NWs as doping standards, NW arrays of various pitches grown by the vapour-liquid-solid mechanism were characterized by SIMS to yield valuable insights into doping mechanisms.

  17. Dopant activation in ion implanted silicon by microwave annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Alford, T. L.; Thompson, D. C.; Mayer, J. W.; Theodore, N. David

    2009-12-01

    Microwaves are used as a processing alternative for the electrical activation of ion implanted dopants and the repair of ion implant damage within silicon. Rutherford backscattering spectra demonstrate that microwave heating reduces the damage resulting from ion implantation of boron or arsenic into silicon. Cross-section transmission electron microscopy and selective area electron diffraction patterns demonstrate that the silicon lattice regains nearly all of its crystallinity after microwave processing of arsenic implanted silicon. Sheet resistance readings indicate the time required for boron or arsenic electrical activation within implanted silicon. Hall measurements demonstrate the extent of dopant activation after microwave heating of implanted silicon. Physical and electrical characterization determined that the mechanism of recrystallization in arsenic implanted silicon is solid phase epitaxial regrowth. The boron implanted silicon samples did not result in enough lattice damage to amorphize the silicon lattice and resulted in low boron activation during microwave annealing even though recrystallization of the Si lattice damage did take place. Despite low boron activation levels, the level of boron activation in this work was higher than that expected from traditional annealing techniques. The kinetics of microwave heating and its effects on implanted Si are also discussed.

  18. Nanowire dopant measurement using secondary ion mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chia, A. C. E.; Dhindsa, N.; Boulanger, J. P.; Wood, B. A.; Saini, S. S.; LaPierre, R. R.

    2015-09-01

    A method is presented to improve the quantitative determination of dopant concentration in semiconductor nanowire (NW) arrays using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). SIMS measurements were used to determine Be dopant concentrations in a Be-doped GaAs thin film and NW arrays of various pitches that were dry-etched from the same film. A comparison of these measurements revealed a factor of 3 to 12 difference, depending on the NW array pitch, between the secondary Be ion yields of the film and the NW arrays, despite being identically doped. This was due to matrix effects and ion beam mixing of Be from the NWs into the surrounding benzocyclobutene that was used to fill the space between the NWs. This indicates the need for etched NWs to be used as doping standards instead of 2D films when evaluating NWs of unknown doping by SIMS. Using the etched NWs as doping standards, NW arrays of various pitches grown by the vapour-liquid-solid mechanism were characterized by SIMS to yield valuable insights into doping mechanisms.

  19. A Safe Solution to Dopant Gas Desorption from Metal Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanoya, Tsutomu; Egami, Maki

    2006-11-01

    TOXICAPTURE™ is used to further minimize trace toxic dopant gas inside cylinder valve outlets, which, over time, may desorb from metal surfaces. When outlet caps or connections to ion source gas cylinders are disconnected in order to perform installations or bottle changes, there always is some risk that toxic fumes resulting from desorption of the metal surface in contact with dopant gas are released in air and inhaled by the operator. TOXICAPTURE™ is a simple and easy solution to reduce this risk that may damage human health or may pollute clean room environment. TOXICAPTURE™ will react with the poison gas vapor to form nontoxic and solid material through irreversible chemical reactions. TOXICAPTURE™ prevents contamination and corrosion on gas contact surfaces of gas pipings, pressure regulators, pneumatic valves, mass flow controllers, and other parts in a gas box. TOXICAPTURE™ is highly effective in shortening the time to achieve high vacuum and in extending the lifetime of devices in the gas box. In this paper, we introduce the structure, functions, reactivity, applications, and effectivity of TOXICAPTURE™.

  20. Charge-transfer crystallites as molecular electrical dopants

    PubMed Central

    Méndez, Henry; Heimel, Georg; Winkler, Stefanie; Frisch, Johannes; Opitz, Andreas; Sauer, Katrein; Wegner, Berthold; Oehzelt, Martin; Röthel, Christian; Duhm, Steffen; Többens, Daniel; Koch, Norbert; Salzmann, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Ground-state integer charge transfer is commonly regarded as the basic mechanism of molecular electrical doping in both, conjugated polymers and oligomers. Here, we demonstrate that fundamentally different processes can occur in the two types of organic semiconductors instead. Using complementary experimental techniques supported by theory, we contrast a polythiophene, where molecular p-doping leads to integer charge transfer reportedly localized to one quaterthiophene backbone segment, to the quaterthiophene oligomer itself. Despite a comparable relative increase in conductivity, we observe only partial charge transfer for the latter. In contrast to the parent polymer, pronounced intermolecular frontier-orbital hybridization of oligomer and dopant in 1:1 mixed-stack co-crystallites leads to the emergence of empty electronic states within the energy gap of the surrounding quaterthiophene matrix. It is their Fermi–Dirac occupation that yields mobile charge carriers and, therefore, the co-crystallites—rather than individual acceptor molecules—should be regarded as the dopants in such systems. PMID:26440403

  1. Charge-transfer crystallites as molecular electrical dopants.

    PubMed

    Méndez, Henry; Heimel, Georg; Winkler, Stefanie; Frisch, Johannes; Opitz, Andreas; Sauer, Katrein; Wegner, Berthold; Oehzelt, Martin; Röthel, Christian; Duhm, Steffen; Többens, Daniel; Koch, Norbert; Salzmann, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Ground-state integer charge transfer is commonly regarded as the basic mechanism of molecular electrical doping in both, conjugated polymers and oligomers. Here, we demonstrate that fundamentally different processes can occur in the two types of organic semiconductors instead. Using complementary experimental techniques supported by theory, we contrast a polythiophene, where molecular p-doping leads to integer charge transfer reportedly localized to one quaterthiophene backbone segment, to the quaterthiophene oligomer itself. Despite a comparable relative increase in conductivity, we observe only partial charge transfer for the latter. In contrast to the parent polymer, pronounced intermolecular frontier-orbital hybridization of oligomer and dopant in 1:1 mixed-stack co-crystallites leads to the emergence of empty electronic states within the energy gap of the surrounding quaterthiophene matrix. It is their Fermi-Dirac occupation that yields mobile charge carriers and, therefore, the co-crystallites-rather than individual acceptor molecules-should be regarded as the dopants in such systems. PMID:26440403

  2. Amphoteric behavior and precipitation of Ge dopants in InP

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, K.M.; Moll, A.J.; Walukiewicz, W.

    1996-11-01

    We have directly correlated the electrical behavior, the impurity lattice site location, ion damage, and the local bonding environments of Ge-dopant ions implanted into InP. We have found that after rapid thermal annealing the free electron concentration in the samples implanted at room temperature (RT) are always higher than those implanted at liquid nitrogen temperature (LNT). Although the macroscopic structure seems to be insensitive to the implantation temperature, significantly more local disorder is created in the LNT implanted amorphous layers. Moreover, the amphoteric bonding structure of the Ge atoms is found to be well established already in the as-implanted amorphous InP. After high temperature annealing ({approx_gt}800{degree}C), the Ge atoms rearrange locally with more of the Ge substituting the In site than the P site resulting in {ital n}-type conductivity. The solid solubility of Ge in the InP is measured to be {approximately}1.4{endash}1.6{times}10{sup 20}/cm{sup 3} while the free electron concentration is estimated to saturate at {approximately}3.4{times}10{sup 19}/cm{sup 3}. The relatively low electron concentration can be explained by Ge precipitation and the compensation of Ge{sub In} donors by Ge{sub P} acceptors in the RT implanted case. The further reduction in electron concentration in the LNT implanted samples is believed to be related to the high residual damage found in these samples. The high solubility of Ge in InP can be attributed to the availability of two possible sublattice sites for the dopant and the compensation of the local strains due to the amphoteric substitution of the Ge. The concentration ratio of the Ge{sub In} to Ge{sub P} determined in the heavily implanted material has been used to estimate the difference in the formation energy of Ge substituting those two different sites.

  3. Ab-initio study of the segregation and electronic properties of neutral and charged B and P dopants in Si and Si/SiO{sub 2} nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Schoeters, Bob; Leenaerts, Ortwin Partoens, Bart; Pourtois, Geoffrey

    2015-09-14

    We perform first-principles calculations to investigate the preferred positions of B and P dopants, both neutral and in their preferred charge state, in Si and Si/SiO{sub 2} core-shell nanowires (NWs). In order to understand the observed trends in the formation energy, we isolate the different effects that determine these formation energies. By making the distinction between the unrelaxed and the relaxed formation energy, we separate the impact of the relaxation from that of the chemical environment. The unrelaxed formation energies are determined by three effects: (i) the effect of strain caused by size mismatch between the dopant and the host atoms, (ii) the local position of the band edges, and (iii) a screening effect. In the case of the SiNW (Si/SiO{sub 2} NW), these effects result in an increase of the formation energy away from the center (interface). The effect of relaxation depends on the relative size mismatch between the dopant and host atoms. A large size mismatch causes substantial relaxation that reduces the formation energy considerably, with the relaxation being more pronounced towards the edge of the wires. These effects explain the surface segregation of the B dopants in a SiNW, since the atomic relaxation induces a continuous drop of the formation energy towards the edge. However, for the P dopants, the formation energy starts to rise when moving from the center but drops to a minimum just next to the surface, indicating a different type of behavior. It also explains that the preferential location for B dopants in Si/SiO{sub 2} core-shell NWs is inside the oxide shell just next to the interface, whereas the P dopants prefer the positions next to the interface inside the Si core, which is in agreement with recent experiments. These preferred locations have an important impact on the electronic properties of these core-shell NWs. Our simulations indicate the possibility of hole gas formation when B segregates into the oxide shell.

  4. Ab-initio study of the segregation and electronic properties of neutral and charged B and P dopants in Si and Si/SiO2 nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoeters, Bob; Leenaerts, Ortwin; Pourtois, Geoffrey; Partoens, Bart

    2015-09-01

    We perform first-principles calculations to investigate the preferred positions of B and P dopants, both neutral and in their preferred charge state, in Si and Si/SiO2 core-shell nanowires (NWs). In order to understand the observed trends in the formation energy, we isolate the different effects that determine these formation energies. By making the distinction between the unrelaxed and the relaxed formation energy, we separate the impact of the relaxation from that of the chemical environment. The unrelaxed formation energies are determined by three effects: (i) the effect of strain caused by size mismatch between the dopant and the host atoms, (ii) the local position of the band edges, and (iii) a screening effect. In the case of the SiNW (Si/SiO2 NW), these effects result in an increase of the formation energy away from the center (interface). The effect of relaxation depends on the relative size mismatch between the dopant and host atoms. A large size mismatch causes substantial relaxation that reduces the formation energy considerably, with the relaxation being more pronounced towards the edge of the wires. These effects explain the surface segregation of the B dopants in a SiNW, since the atomic relaxation induces a continuous drop of the formation energy towards the edge. However, for the P dopants, the formation energy starts to rise when moving from the center but drops to a minimum just next to the surface, indicating a different type of behavior. It also explains that the preferential location for B dopants in Si/SiO2 core-shell NWs is inside the oxide shell just next to the interface, whereas the P dopants prefer the positions next to the interface inside the Si core, which is in agreement with recent experiments. These preferred locations have an important impact on the electronic properties of these core-shell NWs. Our simulations indicate the possibility of hole gas formation when B segregates into the oxide shell.

  5. Eldercare Locator

    MedlinePlus

    ... page content Skip Navigation Department of Health and Human Services Your Browser ... Welcome to the Eldercare Locator, a public service of the U.S. Administration on Aging connecting you to services for older ...

  6. Dopant selection for control of charge carrier density and mobility in amorphous indium oxide thin-film transistors: Comparison between Si- and W-dopants

    SciTech Connect

    Mitoma, Nobuhiko E-mail: TSUKAGOSHI.Kazuhito@nims.go.jp; Kizu, Takio; Lin, Meng-Fang; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito E-mail: TSUKAGOSHI.Kazuhito@nims.go.jp; Aikawa, Shinya; Ou-Yang, Wei; Gao, Xu; Fujiwara, Akihiko

    2015-01-26

    The dependence of oxygen vacancy suppression on dopant species in amorphous indium oxide (a-InO{sub x}) thin film transistors (TFTs) is reported. In a-InO{sub x} TFTs incorporating equivalent atom densities of Si- and W-dopants, absorption of oxygen in the host a-InO{sub x} matrix was found to depend on difference of Gibbs free energy of the dopants for oxidation. For fully oxidized films, the extracted channel conductivity was higher in the a-InO{sub x} TFTs containing dopants of small ionic radius. This can be explained by a reduction in the ionic scattering cross sectional area caused by charge screening effects.

  7. Nanoscale doping of compound semiconductors by solid phase dopant diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Jaehyun; Chou, Harry; Koh, Donghyi; Kim, Taegon; Roy, Anupam; Song, Jonghan; Banerjee, Sanjay K.

    2016-03-01

    Achieving damage-free, uniform, abrupt, ultra-shallow junctions while simultaneously controlling the doping concentration on the nanoscale is an ongoing challenge to the scaling down of electronic device dimensions. Here, we demonstrate a simple method of effectively doping ΙΙΙ-V compound semiconductors, specifically InGaAs, by a solid phase doping source. This method is based on the in-diffusion of oxygen and/or silicon from a deposited non-stoichiometric silicon dioxide (SiOx) film on InGaAs, which then acts as donors upon activation by annealing. The dopant profile and concentration can be controlled by the deposited film thickness and thermal annealing parameters, giving active carrier concentration of 1.4 × 1018 cm-3. Our results also indicate that conventional silicon based processes must be carefully reviewed for compound semiconductor device fabrication to prevent unintended doping.

  8. Influence of dopants on defect formation in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Liliental-Weber, Z.; Jasinski, J.; Benamara, M.; Grzegory, I.; Porowski, S.; Lampert, D.J.H.; Eiting, C.J.; Dupuis R.D.

    2001-10-15

    Influence of p-dopants (Mg and Be) on the structure of GaN has been studied using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Bulk GaN:Mg and GaN:Be crystals grown by a high pressure and high temperature process and GaN:Mg grown by metal-organic chemical-vapor deposition (MOCVD) have been studied. Structural dependence on growth polarity was observed in the bulk crystals. Spontaneous ordering in bulk GaN:Mg on c-plane (formation of Mg-rich planar defects with characteristics of inversion domains) was observed for growth in the N to Ga polar direction (N polarity). On the opposite site of the crystal (growth in the Ga to N polar direction) Mg-rich pyramidal defects empty inside (pinholes) were observed. Both these defects were also observed in MOCVD grown crystals. Pyramidal defects were also observed in the bulk GaN:Be crystals.

  9. Charged dopants in semiconductor nanowires under partially periodic boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Tzu-Liang; Zhang, S. B.; Chelikowsky, James R.

    2011-06-01

    We develop a one-dimensional, periodic real-space formalism for examining the electronic structure of charged nanowires from first principles. The formalism removes spurious electrostatic interactions between charged unit cells by appropriately specifying a boundary condition for the Kohn-Sham equation. The resultant total energy of the charged system remains finite, and a Madelung-type correction is unnecessary. We demonstrate our scheme by examining the ionization energy of P-doped Si<110> nanowires. We find that there is an effective repulsion between charged P dopants along the nanowire owing to the repulsive interaction of the induced surface charge between adjacent periodic cells. This repulsive interaction decays exponentially with unit cell size instead of a power law behavior assumed in typical charged calculations.

  10. Recognizing nitrogen dopant atoms in graphene using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Heijden, Nadine J.; Smith, Daniël; Calogero, Gaetano; Koster, Rik S.; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniel; van Huis, Marijn A.; Swart, Ingmar

    2016-06-01

    Doping graphene by heteroatoms such as nitrogen presents an attractive route to control the position of the Fermi level in the material. We prepared N-doped graphene on Cu(111) and Ir(111) surfaces via chemical vapor deposition of two different molecules. Using scanning tunneling microscopy images as a benchmark, we show that the position of the dopant atoms can be determined using atomic force microscopy. Specifically, the frequency shift-distance curves Δ f (z ) acquired above a N atom are significantly different from the curves measured over a C atom. Similar behavior was found for N-doped graphene on Cu(111) and Ir(111). The results are corroborated by density functional theory calculations employing a van der Waals functional.

  11. Dopant concentration dependent growth of Fe:ZnO nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, Anshuman; Goswami, Navendu

    2016-05-01

    Systematic investigations of structural properties of 1-10% Fe doped ZnO nanostructure (Fe:ZnO NS) prepared via chemical precipitation method have been reported. Structural properties were probed thoroughly employing scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDAX) analysis and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Morphological transformation of nanostructures (NS) with Fe incorporation is evident in SEM/TEM images. Nanoparticles (NP) obtained with 1% Fe, evolve to nanorods (NR) for 3% Fe; NR transform to nanocones (NC) (for 5% and 7% Fe) and finally NC transform to nanoflakes (NF) at 10% Fe. Morover, primary phase of Zn1-xFexO along with secondary phases of ZnFe2O4 and Fe2O3 were also revealed through XRD measurements. Based on collective XRD, SEM, TEM, and EDAX interpretations, a model for morphological evolution of NS was proposed and the pivotal role of Fe dopant was deciphered.

  12. Neutron Vibrational Spectroscopy and modeling of polymer/dopant interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moule, Adam; Harrelson, Thomas; Cheng, Yongqiang; Ramirez-Cuesta, Anibal; Faller, Roland; Huang, David

    Neutron vibrational spectroscopy (VISION and ORNL) is a powerful technique to determine the configurations of organic species in amorphous samples. We apply this technique to samples of the semiconducting polymer regio-regular P3HT to determine the molecular configurations outside of the crystalline domains, which have never been investigated. Application of density functional theory modeling using crystal field theory and for the single molecule approach yield a variety of configurations of the polymer backbone and side chains. These results demonstrate that only 1% of the volume corresponds to the assumed crystal structure solved using x-ray diffraction. In addition we investigate the configurations of P3HT doped with the molecular dopant F4TCNQ and determine that the charging of the polymer backbone leads to increased side chain stiffness. These results have significant implications for design of organic electronic devices based on thiophenes.

  13. Interplay between quantum confinement and dielectric mismatch for ultrashallow dopants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mol, J. A.; Salfi, J.; Miwa, J. A.; Simmons, M. Y.; Rogge, S.

    2013-06-01

    Understanding the electronic properties of dopants near an interface is a critical challenge for nanoscale devices. We have determined the effect of dielectric mismatch and quantum confinement on the ionization energy of individual acceptors beneath a hydrogen passivated silicon (100) surface. While dielectric mismatch between the vacuum and the silicon at the interface results in an image charge which enhances the binding energy of subsurface acceptors, quantum confinement is shown to reduce the binding energy. Using scanning tunneling spectroscopy we measure resonant transport through the localized states of individual acceptors. Thermal broadening of the conductance peaks provides a direct measure for the absolute energy scale. Our data unambiguously demonstrates that these two independent effects compete with the result that the ionization energy is less than 5 meV lower than the bulk value for acceptors less than a Bohr radius from the interface.

  14. Dopant gas effect on silicon chemical vapor depositions: A surface potential model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. A.

    1975-01-01

    A surface potential model is proposed to consistently explain the known dopant gas effects on silicon chemical vapor deposition. This model predicts that the effects of the same dopant gases on the diamond deposition rate using methane and carbon tetrachloride should be opposite and similar to those of silane, respectively. Available data are in agreement with this prediction.

  15. Theoretical Study of High-Valent Vanadium Oxo-Porphyrins as a Dopant of Crude Oil

    SciTech Connect

    Salcedo, Roberto; Martinez, LMR; Martinez-Magadan, Jose M.

    2001-06-15

    The role played by the vanadyl porphyrinate as a dopant for zeolites in the refinement process of crude oil is analyzed using DFT calculations. The pair formed by the vanadium atom and its bonded oxygen atoms seems to be the responsible items in the dopant reaction. However, the present paper shows the participation of the vanadium atom as being the most important.

  16. Femtosecond-laser hyperdoping silicon in an SF{sub 6} atmosphere: Dopant incorporation mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Sher, Meng-Ju; Mangan, Niall M.; Lin, Yu-Ting; Brenner, Michael P.; Smith, Matthew J.; Gradečak, Silvija; Marbach, Sophie; Schneider, Tobias M.; Mazur, Eric

    2015-03-28

    In this paper, we examine the fundamental processes that occur during femtosecond-laser hyperdoping of silicon with a gas-phase dopant precursor. We probe the dopant concentration profile as a function of the number of laser pulses and pressure of the dopant precursor (sulfur hexafluoride). In contrast to previous studies, we show the hyperdoped layer is single crystalline. From the dose dependence on pressure, we conclude that surface adsorbed molecules are the dominant source of the dopant atoms. Using numerical simulation, we estimate the change in flux with increasing number of laser pulses to fit the concentration profiles. We hypothesize that the native oxide plays an important role in setting the surface boundary condition. As a result of the removal of the native oxide by successive laser pulses, dopant incorporation is more efficient during the later stage of laser irradiation.

  17. Femtosecond-laser hyperdoping silicon in an SF6 atmosphere: Dopant incorporation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sher, Meng-Ju; Mangan, Niall M.; Smith, Matthew J.; Lin, Yu-Ting; Marbach, Sophie; Schneider, Tobias M.; Gradečak, Silvija; Brenner, Michael P.; Mazur, Eric

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we examine the fundamental processes that occur during femtosecond-laser hyperdoping of silicon with a gas-phase dopant precursor. We probe the dopant concentration profile as a function of the number of laser pulses and pressure of the dopant precursor (sulfur hexafluoride). In contrast to previous studies, we show the hyperdoped layer is single crystalline. From the dose dependence on pressure, we conclude that surface adsorbed molecules are the dominant source of the dopant atoms. Using numerical simulation, we estimate the change in flux with increasing number of laser pulses to fit the concentration profiles. We hypothesize that the native oxide plays an important role in setting the surface boundary condition. As a result of the removal of the native oxide by successive laser pulses, dopant incorporation is more efficient during the later stage of laser irradiation.

  18. Optical characterizations of doped silicon nanocrystals grown by co-implantation of Si and dopants in SiO₂

    SciTech Connect

    Frégnaux, M.; Khelifi, R.; Muller, D.; Mathiot, D.

    2014-10-14

    Co-implantation, with overlapping implantation projected ranges, of Si and doping species (P, As, and B) followed by a thermal annealing step is a viable route to form doped Si nanocrystals (NCs) embedded in silica (SiO₂). In this paper, we investigate optical characterizations of both doped and un-doped Si-NCs prepared by this method. The effective NC presence in the oxide layer and their crystallinity is verified by Raman spectrometry. Photoluminescence (PL) and PL excitation measurements reveal quantum confinement effects and a gradual PL quenching with increasing dopant concentrations. In un-doped NC, the measured Stokes shift remains constant and its value ~0.2 eV is almost twice the Si–O vibration energy. This suggests that a possible radiative recombination path is a fundamental transition assisted by a local phonon. PL lifetime investigations show that PL time-decays follow a stretched exponential. Using a statistical model for luminescence quenching, a typical NC diameter close to 2 nm is obtained for As- and P-doped samples, consistent with our previous atomic probe tomography (APT) analyses. APT also demonstrated that n-type dopant (P and As) are efficiently introduced in the NC core, whereas p-type dopant (B) are located at the NC/SiO₂ interface. This last observation could explain the failure of the luminescence-quenching model to determine NC size in B-doped samples. All together, these experimental observations question on possible different carrier recombination paths in P or As doped NC compared to B one's.

  19. A Block Copolymer Self-Assembly Approach for 3D Nanoconfined Dopants in Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popere, Bhooshan; Russ, Boris; Chang, William; Heitsch, Andrew; Trefonas, Peter; Segalman, Rachel

    2015-03-01

    Continuous shrinking of electronic circuits presents a new challenge to demonstrate reliable, uniform nanoscale doping. Directed self-assembly (DSA) of block copolymers (BCP) has proved critical in meeting the technology nodes by enabling excellent pitch control for lithography. Yet, controlling the 3D dopant distribution remains a fundamental design challenge. To this end, we have utilized BCP self-assembly in a novel approach to confine dopants to nanoscopic domains within a semiconductor. The periodic nature of these domains affords precise control over the dosage and spatial positions of dopant atoms. Dopant incorporation within the block copolymer domains via hydrogen bonding eliminates the need for tailored synthesis, making the approach highly modular. Rapid thermal annealing of the self-assembled films effectively drives the dopants into the underlying substrate, thus confining them to within 10-20 nm in all dimensions. Additionally, the size, pitch, dopant dosage and the junction depth can be independently varied for a wide range of dopants. Compositional and electronic measurements indicate that the domains are indeed discrete and nanoconfined. Our approach, thereby, enables a facile method for controlled nanoscopic doping in semiconductors.

  20. Preparation and characterization of electropolymerized poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) thin films with different dopant anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deguchi, Toshiaki; Tomeoku, Hiroya; Takashiri, Masayuki

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the structural and thermoelectric properties poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) films with several dopants (counter ions, ClO4, PF6, and BF4), synthesised by electropolymerization. We first performed cyclic voltammetry analysis to determine the optimum synthesis conditions of the PEDOT thin films. We found that the surface morphology of the PEDOT thin films was dependent on the type of the dopant. The PF6-doped PEDOT (PEDOT:PF6) thin films showed a dense structure, and the PEDOT:ClO4 thin films showed a highly porous microstructure. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy showed that all the PEDOT thin films showed similar chemical structures and the p-type state. Regarding their thermoelectric properties, the electrical conductivity of the all the doped PEDOT thin films increased as the dopant concentration increased, with the PEDOT:PF6 thin films showing the highest value. On the other hand, the Seebeck coefficient of the PEDOT thin films with all the dopants decreased as the dopant concentration increased, with the PEDOT:BF4 thin films achieving the highest value. As a result, the PEDOT:BF4 thin films exhibited the highest power factor of 0.75 µW/(m·K2) at a dopant concentration of 1.0 M. We think that the PEDOT microstructure produced using the different types of dopant may affect the thermoelectric properties.

  1. Quantitative Dopant/Impurity Analysis for ICF Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Haibo; Nikroo, Abbas; Stephens, Richard; Eddinger, Samual; Xu, Hongwei; Chen, K. C.; Moreno, Kari

    2008-11-01

    We developed a number of new or improved metrology techniques to measure the spatial distributions of multiple elements in ICF ablator capsules to tight NIF specifications (0.5±0.1 at% Cu, 0.25±0.10 at% Ar, 0.4±0.4 at% O). The elements are either the graded dopants for shock timing, such as Cu in Be, or process-induced impurities, such as Ar and O. Their low concentration, high spatial variation and simultaneous presence make the measurement very difficult. We solved this metrology challenge by combining several techniques: Cu and Ar profiles can be nondestructively measured by operating Contact Radiography (CR) in a differential mode. The result, as well as the O profile, can be checked destructively by a quantitative Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) method. Non-spatially resolved methods, such as absorption edge spectroscopy (and to a lesser accuracy, x-ray fluorescence) can calibrate the Ar and Cu measurement in EDS and CR. In addition, oxygen pick-up during mandrel removal can be validated by before-and-after CR and by density change. Use of all these methods gives multiple checks on the reported profiles.

  2. Efficient silicon solar cells with dopant-free asymmetric heterocontacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullock, James; Hettick, Mark; Geissbühler, Jonas; Ong, Alison J.; Allen, Thomas; Sutter-Fella, Carolin M.; Chen, Teresa; Ota, Hiroki; Schaler, Ethan W.; de Wolf, Stefaan; Ballif, Christophe; Cuevas, Andrés; Javey, Ali

    2016-03-01

    A salient characteristic of solar cells is their ability to subject photo-generated electrons and holes to pathways of asymmetrical conductivity—‘assisting’ them towards their respective contacts. All commercially available crystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cells achieve this by making use of doping in either near-surface regions or overlying silicon-based films. Despite being commonplace, this approach is hindered by several optoelectronic losses and technological limitations specific to doped silicon. A progressive approach to circumvent these issues involves the replacement of doped-silicon contacts with alternative materials which can also form ‘carrier-selective’ interfaces on c-Si. Here we successfully develop and implement dopant-free electron and hole carrier-selective heterocontacts using alkali metal fluorides and metal oxides, respectively, in combination with passivating intrinsic amorphous silicon interlayers, resulting in power conversion efficiencies approaching 20%. Furthermore, the simplified architectures inherent to this approach allow cell fabrication in only seven low-temperature (≤200 ∘C), lithography-free steps. This is a marked improvement on conventional doped-silicon high-efficiency processes, and highlights potential improvements on both sides of the cost-to-performance ratio for c-Si photovoltaics.

  3. Dopant Profiling of III-V Nanostructures for Electronic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Alexandra Caroline

    2011-12-01

    High electron mobility III-V compound semiconductors such as indium arsenide (InAs) are promising candidates for future active channel materials of electron devices to further enhance device performance. In particular, compound semiconductors heterogeneously integrated on Si substrates have been studied, combining the high mobility of III-V semiconductors and the well-established, low cost processing of Si technology. However, one of the primary challenges of III-V device fabrication is controllable, post-growth dopant profiling. Here InAs nanowires and ultrathin layers (nanoribbons) on SiO2/Si are investigated as the channel material for high performance field-effect transistors (FETs) and post-growth, patterned doping techniques are demonstrated. First, the synthesis of crystalline InAs nanowires with high yield and tunable diameters by using Ni nanoparticles as the catalyst material on SiO 2/Si substrates is demonstrated. The back-gated InAs nanowire FETs have electron field-effect mobilities of ˜4,000 cm2/Vs and ION/IOFF ˜104. The uniformity of the InAs nanowires is demonstrated by large-scale assembly of parallel arrays of nanowires (˜400 nanowires) on SiO2/Si substrates by a contact printing process. This enables high performance, "printable" transistors with 5--10 mA ON currents. Second, an epitaxial transfer method for the integration of ultrathin layers of single-crystalline InAs on SiO2/Si substrates is demonstrated. As a parallel to silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology, the abbreviation "XOI" is used to represent this compound semiconductor-on-insulator platform. A high quality InAs/dielectric interface is obtained by the use of a thermally grown interfacial InAsOx layer (˜1 nm thick). Top-gated FETs exhibit a peak transconductance of ˜1.6 mS/microm at V DS=0.5V with ION/I OFF >104 and subthreshold swings of 107--150 mV/decade for a channel length of ˜0.5 microm. Next, temperature-dependent I-V and C-V studies of single InAs nanowire FETs are

  4. Light Propagation in Liquid Crystals with a Chiral Dopant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Justin; Saunders, Karl; Gantner, Logan

    2009-11-01

    This project will investigate the design and feasibility of a novel liquid crystal sensor that could be used to detect the presence and amount of foreign biological and/or chemical airborne agents. Such a sensor would have the advantage of being very portable. As such could have particular value in detecting biological or chemical weapons in the field of military operations. It would also be of use in a rapid response to a chemical or biological terrorist attack. The device would operate on the basic principal that when certain types of molecules bind to a liquid crystal molecule, the conformation of the liquid crystal molecule changes. This would in turn lead to a change in the overall arrangement of the liquid crystal, which could be detected using polarized light. In the absence of a contaminant the average molecular direction (optical axis, n ) is constant throughout the liquid crystal. The dopant adds a chirality or twist so that n precesses as a function of depth. We first solve for the reflected and transmitted light off of the air-liquid crystal boundary in the simplified case where there is linear chirality or a spiral configuration which repeats itself over some fixed interval (or pitch). We then generalize for cases in which this repeat distance varies with crystal depth. Finally we will obtain an expression for the contaminated crystal configuration which should depend on time and a diffusion constant and examine how the light properties change with respect to intensity and duration of exposure to the contaminant.

  5. Antimony as an amphoteric dopant in lead telluride

    SciTech Connect

    Jaworski, Christopher M.; Tobola, Janusz; Levin, E.M.; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus; Heremans, Joseph P.

    2009-09-24

    We elucidate the amphoteric nature of antimony as a dopant in PbTe. Band-structure calculations show that Sb substituting for Pb is a donor and that Sb on the Te site is an acceptor giving rise to a large excess density of states (DOS). Experimentally, in Te-rich Pb{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x}Te samples, {sup 125}Te NMR spectroscopy shows that Sb substitutes for Pb and transport data reveal that it then acts as a simple donor. In Pb-rich PbSb{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} samples, {sup 125}Te NMR shows that little Sb substitutes for Te when samples are prepared above 770 K and then quenched; {sup 207}Pb NMR shows four types of charge carriers, but only a majority hole and a minority electron contribute to transport. Sb acts as an acceptor in PbSb{sub x}Te{sub 1-x}, but the large DOS calculated must correspond to a large concentration of localized holes and the Seebeck coefficient is not enhanced.

  6. D-Limonene as a Chiral Dopant for Thermotropic Liquid Crystalline Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zola, Rafael S.; Hurley, Shawn; Yang, Deng-Ke

    2011-06-01

    We used the chiral molecule D-limonene to induce thermotropic cholesteric phases. The methods used to characterize the chiral nematic phase and its features are given. We substituted D-limonene for conventional synthesized chiral dopants in the twisted nematic (TN) displays and showed an improvement in the response time. Despite the large number of synthesized chiral dopants, D-limonene can be used as a dopant for making cholesteric phases having the advantage of being a naturally occurring substance. It is surprising how many more synthesized chiral molecules have been used as the liquid crystal field moves forward in comparison to naturally occurring molecules.

  7. Carrier injection engineering in nanowire transistors via dopant and shape monitoring of the access regions

    SciTech Connect

    Berrada, Salim Bescond, Marc Cavassilas, Nicolas; Raymond, Laurent; Lannoo, Michel

    2015-10-12

    This work theoretically studies the influence of both the geometry and the discrete nature of dopants of the access regions in ultra-scaled nanowire transistors. By means of self-consistent quantum transport simulations, we show that discrete dopants induce quasi-localized states which govern carrier injection into the channel. Carrier injection can be enhanced by taking advantage of the dielectric confinement occurring in these access regions. We demonstrate that the optimization of access resistance can be obtained by a careful control of shape and dopant position. These results pave the way for contact resistance engineering in forthcoming device generations.

  8. Measurement of Temperature, Density, and Particle Transport with Localized Dopants in Wire-Array Z Pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, B.; Deeney, C.; McKenney, J. L.; Ampleford, D. J.; Coverdale, C. A.; Lepell, P. D.; Shelton, K. P.; Safronova, A. S.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Osborne, G.; Sotnikov, V. I.; Ivanov, V. V.; Fedin, D.; Nalajala, V.; Yilmaz, F.; Shrestha, I.

    2008-03-01

    Axially localized NaF dopants are coated onto Al cylindrical wire arrays in order to act as spectroscopic tracers in the stagnated z-pinch plasma. Non-local-thermodynamic-equilibrium kinetic models fit to Na K-shell lines provide an independent measurement of the density and temperature that is consistent with spectroscopic analysis of K-shell emissions from Al and an alloyed Mg dopant. Axial transport of the Na dopant is observed, enabling quantitative study of instabilities in dense z-pinch plasmas.

  9. Drain current modulation in a nanoscale field-effect-transistor channel by single dopant implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. C.; Tettamanzi, G. C.; Alves, A. D. C.; Thompson, S.; Yang, C.; Verduijn, J.; Mol, J. A.; Wacquez, R.; Vinet, M.; Sanquer, M.; Rogge, S.; Jamieson, D. N.

    2010-06-01

    We demonstrate single dopant implantation into the channel of a silicon nanoscale metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistor. This is achieved by monitoring the drain current modulation during ion irradiation. Deterministic doping is crucial for overcoming dopant number variability in present nanoscale devices and for exploiting single atom degrees of freedom. The two main ion stopping processes that induce drain current modulation are examined. We employ 500 keV He ions, in which electronic stopping is dominant, leading to discrete increases in drain current and 14 keV P dopants for which nuclear stopping is dominant leading to discrete decreases in drain current.

  10. Comparison of Cathodoluminescent and Photoluminescent Emission Spectra of LuPO4 with Different Dopants

    SciTech Connect

    Goedeke, Shawn; Hollerman, William Andrew; Allison, Stephen W; Gray, P A; Lewis, Linda A; Smithwick III, Robert W; Boatner, Lynn A; Glasgow, David C; Wise, H.

    2008-01-01

    The current interest in returning human exploration to the Moon and Mars makes cost-effective and low-mass health monitoring sensors essential for spacecraft development. In space, there are many surface measurements that are required to monitor the condition of the spacecraft including: surface temperature, radiation dose, and impact. Through the use of tailored phosphors, these conditions can be monitored. Practical space-based phosphor sensors will depend heavily upon research investigating the resistance of phosphors to ionizing radiation and their ability to anneal or 'self-heal' from damage caused by ionizing radiation. For the present research, a group of lutetium orthophosphate (LuPO{sub 4}) crystals with dopants including europium, erbium, and neodymium were characterized. Cathodoluminescence (CL) testing was performed using the low energy electron system located at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The data were collected using an Ocean Optics HR4000 spectrometer and a fiber optic feed-through. Previous research has shown that increases in both beam energy and current density improved the CL fluorescence yield. While the total electron dose was small, the intention was to maximize the number of irradiated materials. Additionally, these samples were evaluated using a PTI Quantum Master Spectrophotometer to determine the photoluminescence emission spectra.

  11. Diameter Dependence of the Transport Properties of Antimony Telluride Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuev, Yuri; Lee, Jin Sook; Park, Hongkun; Kim, Philip

    2010-03-01

    We report measurements of electronic, thermoelectric, and galvanometric properties of individual semimetallic single crystal antimony telluride (Sb2Te3) nanowires. Microfabricated heater and thermometer electrodes were used to probe the transport properties of the nanowires with diameters in the range of 22 - 95nm and temperatures in the range of 2 - 300K. Temperature dependent resistivity varies depending on nanowire diameter. Thermoelectric power (TEP) measurements indicate hole dominant diffusive thermoelectric generation, with an enhancement of the TEP for smaller diameter wires. The large surface-to-volume ratio of Sb2Te3 nanowires makes them an excellent platform to explore novel phenomena in this predicted topological insulator. We investigate mesoscopic magnetoresistance effects in magnetic fields both parallel and perpendicular to the nanowire axis.

  12. Diameter-dependent solubility of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Duque, Juan G; Parra-Vasquez, A Nicholas G; Behabtu, Natnael; Green, Micah J; Higginbotham, Amanda L; Price, B Katherine; Leonard, Ashley D; Schmidt, Howard K; Lounis, Brahim; Tour, James M; Doorn, Stephen K; Cognet, Laurent; Pasquali, Matteo

    2010-06-22

    We study the solubility and dispersibility of as-produced and purified HiPco single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Variation in specific operating conditions of the HiPco process are found to lead to significant differences in the respective SWNT solubilities in oleum and surfactant suspensions. The diameter distributions of SWNTs dispersed in surfactant solutions are batch-dependent, as evidenced by luminescence and Raman spectroscopies, but are identical for metallic and semiconducting SWNTs within a batch. We thus find that small diameter SWNTs disperse at higher concentration in aqueous surfactants and dissolve at higher concentration in oleum than do large-diameter SWNTs. These results highlight the importance of controlling SWNT synthesis methods in order to optimize processes dependent on solubility, including macroscopic processing such as fiber spinning, material reinforcement, and films production, as well as for fundamental research in type selective chemistry, optoelectronics, and nanophotonics. PMID:20521799

  13. Diameter Dependence of Planar Defects in InP Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fengyun; Wang, Chao; Wang, Yiqian; Zhang, Minghuan; Han, Zhenlian; Yip, SenPo; Shen, Lifan; Han, Ning; Pun, Edwin Y B; Ho, Johnny C

    2016-01-01

    In this work, extensive characterization and complementary theoretical analysis have been carried out on Au-catalyzed InP nanowires in order to understand the planar defect formation as a function of nanowire diameter. From the detailed transmission electron microscopic measurements, the density of stacking faults and twin defects are found to monotonically decrease as the nanowire diameter is decreased to 10 nm, and the chemical analysis clearly indicates the drastic impact of In catalytic supersaturation in Au nanoparticles on the minimized planar defect formation in miniaturized nanowires. Specifically, during the chemical vapor deposition of InP nanowires, a significant amount of planar defects is created when the catalyst seed sizes are increased with the lower degree of In supersaturation as dictated by the Gibbs-Thomson effect, and an insufficient In diffusion (or Au-rich enhancement) would lead to a reduced and non-uniform In precipitation at the NW growing interface. The results presented here provide an insight into the fabrication of "bottom-up" InP NWs with minimized defect concentration which are suitable for various device applications. PMID:27616584

  14. Nanofiber diameter-dependent MAPK activity in osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Devina; Brown, Justin L

    2012-11-01

    The major challenge for bone tissue engineering lies in the fabrication of scaffolds that can mimic the extracellular matrix and promote osteogenesis. Electrospun fibers are being widely researched for this application due to high porosity, interconnectivity, and mechanical strength of the fibrous scaffolds. Electrospun poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA, 2.416 ± 0.100 μm) fibers were fabricated and etched using a 60% propylene glycol methyl ether acetate (PGMEA)/limonene (vol/vol) solution to obtain fiber diameters ranging from 2.5 to 0.5 μm in a time-dependent manner. The morphology of the fibrous scaffolds was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy and cellular compatibility with etchant-treated scaffold was assessed using immunoflurescence. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) activation in response to different fiber diameter was evaluated with western blot as well as quantitative in-cell western. We report that electrospun micro-fibers can be etched to 0.552 ± 0.047 μm diameter without producing beads. Osteoblasts adhered to the fibers and a change in fiber diameter played a major role in modulating the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38 kinases with 0.882 ± 0.091 μm diameter fibers producing an inverse effect on ERK and p38 phosphorylation. These results indicate that nanofibers produced by wet etching can be effectively utilized to produce diameters that can differentially modulate MAPK activation patterns. PMID:22700490

  15. Controlling the Adsorption of Carbon Monoxide on Platinum Clusters by Dopant-Induced Electronic Structure Modification.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Piero; Molina, Luis M; Kaydashev, Vladimir E; Alonso, Julio A; Lievens, Peter; Janssens, Ewald

    2016-09-01

    A major drawback of state-of-the-art proton exchange membrane fuel cells is the CO poisoning of platinum catalysts. It is known that CO poisoning is reduced if platinum alloys are used, but the underlying mechanism therefore is still under debate. We study the influence of dopant atoms on the CO adsorption on small platinum clusters using mass spectrometry experiments and density functional calculations. A significant reduction in the reactivity for Nb- and Mo-doped clusters is attributed to electron transfer from those highly coordinated dopants to the Pt atoms and the concomitant lower CO binding energies. On the other hand Sn and Ag dopants have a lower Pt coordination and have a limited effect on the CO adsorption. Analysis of the density of states demonstrates a correlation of dopant-induced changes in the electronic structure with the enhanced tolerance to CO poisoning. PMID:27464653

  16. The dopant dependent photocatalytic activity of polyaniline towards the degradation of Rose Bengal dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Mukulika Jana; Banerjee, Dipali; Ghosh, Amrita; Mondal, Anup

    2016-05-01

    Polyaniline (PANI) with two different dopants, hydrochloric acid (HCl) and bismuth nitrate (Bi (NO3)3), were synthesized to investigate the effect of dopant on photocatalytic degradation of Rose Bengal, an organic dye, in presence of sunlight. PANI, synthesized by in situ polymerization was characterized by FESEM images, FTIR and UV-Vis spectra. FESEM images show rod like structures obtained for both the dopants. FTIR spectra confirms the formation of conducting PANI with the presence of C=N, C=C stretching modes in quinoid and benzenoid units. Band gap of PANI has been obtained from UV-Vis spectrum. Doped polyaniline exhibited a fast degradation of dye by 98.62 % & 98.12 % within 5 min & 8 min under visible light illumination for the dopant HCl & Bi (NO3)3 respectively.

  17. First-principles study of n-type dopants and their clustering in SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rurali, R.; Godignon, P.; Rebollo, J.; Hernández, E.; Ordejón, P.

    2003-06-01

    We report the results of an ab initio study of N and P dopants in SiC. We find that while N substitutes most favorably at a C lattice site, P does so preferably at a Si site, except in n-doping and Si-rich 3C-SiC. Furthermore, we consider a series of dopant complexes that could form in high-dose implantation, in order to investigate the dopant activation behavior in this limit. We find that all N complexes considered lead to passivation through the formation of a deep level. For P, the most stable aggregate is still an active dopant, while passivation is only observed for complexes with a higher formation energy. We discuss how these results could help in the understanding of the observed experimental high-dose doping and codoping behavior of these species.

  18. Analysis of the dopant segregation effects at the floating zone growth of large silicon crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühlbauer, A.; Muiznieks, A.; Virbulis, J.

    1997-10-01

    A computer simulation is carried out to study the dopant concentration fields in the molten zone and in the growing crystal for the floating zone (FZ) growth of large (> 100mm) Si crystals with the needle-eye technique and with feed/crystal rotation. The mathematical model developed in the previous work is used to calculate the shape of the molten zone and the velocity field in the melt. The influence of melt convection on the dopant concentration field is considered. The significance of the rotation scheme of the feed rod and crystal on the dopant distribution is investigated. The calculated dopant concentration directly at the growth interface is used to determine the normalized lateral resistivity distribution in the single crystal. The calculated resistivity distributions are compared with lateral spreading resistivity measurements in the single crystal.

  19. Controlling the dopant dose in silicon by mixed-monolayer doping.

    PubMed

    Ye, Liang; Pujari, Sidharam P; Zuilhof, Han; Kudernac, Tibor; de Jong, Michel P; van der Wiel, Wilfred G; Huskens, Jurriaan

    2015-02-11

    Molecular monolayer doping (MLD) presents an alternative to achieve doping of silicon in a nondestructive way and holds potential for realizing ultrashallow junctions and doping of nonplanar surfaces. Here, we report the mixing of dopant-containing alkenes with alkenes that lack this functionality at various ratios to control the dopant concentration in the resulting monolayer and concomitantly the dopant dose in the silicon substrate. The mixed monolayers were grafted onto hydrogen-terminated silicon using well-established hydrosilylation chemistry. Contact angle measurements, X-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS) on the boron-containing monolayers, and Auger electron spectroscopy on the phosphorus-containing monolayers show clear trends as a function of the dopant-containing alkene concentration. Dynamic secondary-ion mass spectroscopy (D-SIMS) and Van der Pauw resistance measurements on the in-diffused samples show an effective tuning of the doping concentration in silicon. PMID:25607722

  20. Charge separation technique for metal-oxide-silicon capacitors in the presence of hydrogen deactivated dopants

    SciTech Connect

    Witczak, Steven C.; Winokur, Peter S.; Lacoe, Ronald C.; Mayer, Donald C.

    2000-06-01

    An improved charge separation technique for metal-oxide-silicon (MOS) capacitors is presented which accounts for the deactivation of substrate dopants by hydrogen at elevated irradiation temperatures or small irradiation biases. Using high-frequency capacitance-voltage measurements, radiation-induced inversion voltage shifts are separated into components due to oxide trapped charge, interface traps, and deactivated dopants, where the latter is computed from a reduction in Si capacitance. In the limit of no radiation-induced dopant deactivation, this approach reduces to the standard midgap charge separation technique used widely for the analysis of room-temperature irradiations. The technique is demonstrated on a p-type MOS capacitor irradiated with {sup 60}Co {gamma} rays at 100 degree sign C and zero bias, where the dopant deactivation is significant.(c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  1. Dopant-controlled single-electron pumping through a metallic island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenz, Tobias; Hohls, Frank; Jehl, Xavier; Sanquer, Marc; Barraud, Sylvain; Klochan, Jevgeny; Barinovs, Girts; Kashcheyevs, Vyacheslavs

    2016-05-01

    We investigate a hybrid metallic island/single dopant electron pump based on fully depleted silicon-on-insulator technology. Electron transfer between the central metallic island and the leads is controlled by resonant tunneling through single phosphorus dopants in the barriers. Top gates above the barriers are used to control the resonance conditions. Applying radio frequency signals to the gates, non-adiabatic quantized electron pumping is achieved. A simple deterministic model is presented and confirmed by comparing measurements with simulations.

  2. Wide Band-Gap Bismuth-based p-Dopants for Opto-Electronic Applications.

    PubMed

    Pecqueur, Sébastien; Maltenberger, Anna; Petrukhina, Marina A; Halik, Marcus; Jaeger, Arndt; Pentlehner, Dominik; Schmid, Günter

    2016-08-22

    Ten new efficient p-dopants for conductivity doping of organic semiconductors for OLEDs are identified. The key advantage of the electrophilic tris(carboxylato) bismuth(III) compounds is the unique low absorption of the resulting doped layers which promotes the efficiency of OLED devices. The combination of these features with their low fabrication cost, volatility, and stability, make these materials very attractive as dopants in organic electronics. PMID:27440434

  3. Dopant and self-diffusion in extrinsic n-type silicon isotopically controlled heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Silvestri, Hughes H.; Sharp, Ian D.; Bracht, Hartmut A.; Nicols, Sam P.; Beeman, Jeff W.; Hansen, John; Nylandsted-Larsen, Arme; Haller, Eugene E.

    2002-04-01

    We present experimental results of dopant- and self-diffusion in extrinsic silicon doped with As. Multilayers of isotopically controlled {sup 28}Si and natural silicon enable simultaneous analysis of {sup 30}Si diffusion into the {sup 28}Si enriched layers and dopant diffusion throughout the multilayer structure. In order to suppress transient enhanced self- and dopant diffusion caused by ion implantation, we adopted a special approach to dopant introduction. First, an amorphous 250-nm thick Si layer was deposited on top of the Si isotope heterostructure. Then the dopant ions were implanted to a depth such that all the radiation damage resided inside this amorphous cap layer. These samples were annealed for various times and temperatures to study the impact of As diffusion and doping on Si self-diffusion. The Si self-diffusion coefficient and the dopant diffusivity for various extrinsic n-type conditions were determined over a wide temperature range. We observed increased diffusivities that we attribute to the increase in the concentration of the native defect promoting the diffusion.

  4. Numerical study on the radial dopant distribution in micro-pulling-down crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zhong; Qiao, Long; Liu, Yaping; Yokota, Yuui; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki; Yoshikawa, Akira

    2016-01-01

    To improve the dopant homogeneity in the radial direction, the micro-pulling-down apparatus was modified for Ce-doped Y3Al5O12 (Ce3+:YAG) crystal growth. Two effective crucible variants, diffusion-channel and multi-channel crucibles, were adopted to alleviate the inhomogeneity of dopant concentration in the radial direction. In the diffusion-channel model, two different inclination angles were investigated. The results demonstrate that the radial dopant distribution at the melt-crystal interface (i.e., the growth front) is improved notably by using the diffusion-channel crucible. Furthermore, the better radial distribution is achieved with the larger inclination angle. In the multi-channel model, more capillary-channels result in a smaller inflow velocity from every single capillary-channel with the same growth rate. Therefore, the effect of inflow on the dopant distribution is reduced, and thus the radial dopant homogeneity is improved apparently. Besides, although the symmetry of concentration distribution along the azimuthal direction is broken in the multi-channel model, the whole homogeneity of dopant at the melt-crystal interface is ameliorated.

  5. Benefitting from Dopant Loss and Ostwald Ripening in Mn Doping of II-VI Semiconductor Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Zhai, You; Shim, Moonsub

    2015-12-01

    Annealing or growth at high temperatures for an extended period of time is considered detrimental for most synthetic strategies for high-quality Mn-doped II-VI semiconductor nanocrystals. It can lead to the broadening of size distribution and, more importantly, to the loss of dopants. Here, we examine how ripening can be beneficial to doping in a simple "heat-up" approach, where high dopant concentrations can be achieved. We discuss the interplay of the loss of dopants, Ostwald ripening, and the clustering of Mn near the surface during nanocrystal growth. Smaller nanocrystals in a reaction batch, on average, exhibit higher undesirable band-edge photoluminescence (PL) and lower desirable dopant PL. The optimization of dopant loss and the removal of such smaller undesirable nanocrystals through Ostwald ripening along with surface exchange/passivation to remove Mn clustering lead to high Mn PL quantum yields (45 to 55 %) for ZnSxSe1-x, ZnS, CdS, and CdSxSe1-x host nanocrystals. These results provide an improved understanding of the doping process in a simple and potentially scalable synthetic strategy for achieving "pure" and bright dopant emission. PMID:26510444

  6. Benefitting from Dopant Loss and Ostwald Ripening in Mn Doping of II-VI Semiconductor Nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, You; Shim, Moonsub

    2015-10-01

    Annealing or growth at high temperatures for an extended period of time is considered detrimental for most synthetic strategies for high-quality Mn-doped II-VI semiconductor nanocrystals. It can lead to the broadening of size distribution and, more importantly, to the loss of dopants. Here, we examine how ripening can be beneficial to doping in a simple "heat-up" approach, where high dopant concentrations can be achieved. We discuss the interplay of the loss of dopants, Ostwald ripening, and the clustering of Mn near the surface during nanocrystal growth. Smaller nanocrystals in a reaction batch, on average, exhibit higher undesirable band-edge photoluminescence (PL) and lower desirable dopant PL. The optimization of dopant loss and the removal of such smaller undesirable nanocrystals through Ostwald ripening along with surface exchange/passivation to remove Mn clustering lead to high Mn PL quantum yields (45 to 55 %) for ZnSxSe1-x, ZnS, CdS, and CdSxSe1-x host nanocrystals. These results provide an improved understanding of the doping process in a simple and potentially scalable synthetic strategy for achieving "pure" and bright dopant emission.

  7. Comprehensive examination of dopants and defects in BaTiO3 from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, V.; Pilania, G.; Rossetti, G. A., Jr.; Slenes, K.; Ramprasad, R.

    2013-04-01

    An extensive assessment of the physicochemical factors that control the behavior of dopant-related defects in BaTiO3 has been performed using high-throughput first-principles computations. Dopants spanning the Periodic Table—44 in total—including K-As, Rb-Sb, and Cs-Bi were considered, and have allowed us to reveal previously unknown correlations, chemical trends, and the interplay between stability, chemistry, and electrical activity. We quantitatively show that the most important factor that determines dopant stability in BaTiO3 is the dopant ionic size (followed by its oxidation state). Moreover, we are also able to identify definitively dopants that are O vacancy formers and suppressors, and those that would lead to p-type versus n-type conduction. Our results are in agreement with available experimental data (with no violations thus far), and point to an attractive computational route to dopant selection in BaTiO3 as well as in other materials.

  8. spds* Tight-Binding Model for Transition Metal Dopants in SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kortan, Victoria R.; Şahin, Cüneyt; Flatté, Michael E.

    2014-03-01

    SiC is a well known, wide-band-gap semiconductor with excellent chemical, thermal and mechanical stability. These traits make it an attractive material for high temperature, hostile environment, high power and high frequency device design. A necessary step in the development of SiC technology is the understanding and subsequent control of point defects. In addition to altering optoelectronic properties, single dopants can add effects dependent on the specific dopant species. In particular the d-states of transition metal dopants have been predicted to allow the control of the single Ni spin state with the application of strain in diamond and single Fe dopants in GaAs have a core transition that can be manipulated by a STM and produce a decrease in tunneling current. Here we choose a first and second nearest neighbor spds* tight-binding model to calculate the electronic trends and defect wavefunctions of transition metal dopants in 3C-SiC. Additionally we calculate the exchange interaction between pairs of dopants. This work was supported by an AFOSR MURI.

  9. Imaging Dirac-mass disorder from magnetic dopant atoms in the ferromagnetic topological insulator Crx(Bi0.1Sb0.9)2-xTe3

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lee, Inhee; Kim, Chung Koo; Lee, Jinho; Billinge, Simon J. L.; Zhong, Ruidan D.; Schneeloch, John A.; Liu, Tiansheng S.; Valla, Tonica; Tranquada, John M.; Gu, Genda D.; et al

    2015-01-20

    To achieve and use the most exotic electronic phenomena predicted for the surface states of 3D topological insulators (TIs), it is necessary to open a “Dirac-mass gap” in their spectrum by breaking time-reversal symmetry. Use of magnetic dopant atoms to generate a ferromagnetic state is the most widely applied approach. However, it is unknown how the spatial arrangements of the magnetic dopant atoms influence the Dirac-mass gap at the atomic scale or, conversely, whether the ferromagnetic interactions between dopant atoms are influenced by the topological surface states. Here we image the locations of the magnetic (Cr) dopant atoms in themore » ferromagnetic TI Cr₀.₀₈(Bi₀.₁Sb₀.₉)₁.₉₂Te₃. Simultaneous visualization of the Dirac-mass gap Δ(r) reveals its intense disorder, which we demonstrate is directly related to fluctuations in n(r), the Cr atom areal density in the termination layer. We find the relationship of surface-state Fermi wavevectors to the anisotropic structure of Δ(r) not inconsistent with predictions for surface ferromagnetism mediated by those states. Moreover, despite the intense Dirac-mass disorder, the anticipated relationship Δ(r)∝n(r) is confirmed throughout and exhibits an electron–dopant interaction energy J* = 145 meV·nm². In addition, these observations reveal how magnetic dopant atoms actually generate the TI mass gap locally and that, to achieve the novel physics expected of time-reversal symmetry breaking TI materials, control of the resulting Dirac-mass gap disorder will be essential.« less

  10. Dopant in Near-Surface Semiconductor Layers of Metal-Insulator-Semiconductor Structures Based on Graded-Gap p-Hg0.78Cd0.22Te Grown by Molecular-Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voitsekhovskii, A. V.; Nesmelov, S. N.; Dzyadukh, S. M.

    2016-02-01

    Peculiarities in determining the dopant concentration and dopant distribution profile in the near-surface layer of a semiconductor are investigated by measuring the admittance of metal-insulator-semiconductor structures (MIS structures) based on p-Hg0.78Cd0.22Te grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The dopant concentrations in the near-surface layer of the semiconductor are determined by measuring the admittance of MIS structures in the frequency range of 50 kHz to 1 MHz. It is shown that in this frequency range, the capacitance-voltage characteristics of MIS structures based on p-Hg0.78Cd0.22Te with a near-surface graded gap layer demonstrate a high-frequency behavior with respect to the recharge time of surface states located near the Fermi level for an intrinsic semiconductor. The formation time of the inversion layer is decreased by less than two times, if a near-surface graded-gap layer is created. The dopant distribution profile in the near-surface layer of the semiconductor is found, and it is shown that for structures based on p-Hg0.78Cd0.22Te with a near-surface graded-gap layer, the dopant concentration has a minimum near the interface with the insulator. For MIS structure based on n-Hg0.78Cd0.22Te, the dopant concentration is more uniformly distributed in the near-surface layer of the semiconductor.

  11. Imaging Dirac-mass disorder from magnetic dopant atoms in the ferromagnetic topological insulator Crx(Bi0.1Sb0.9)2-xTe3.

    PubMed

    Lee, Inhee; Kim, Chung Koo; Lee, Jinho; Billinge, Simon J L; Zhong, Ruidan; Schneeloch, John A; Liu, Tiansheng; Valla, Tonica; Tranquada, John M; Gu, Genda; Davis, J C Séamus

    2015-02-01

    To achieve and use the most exotic electronic phenomena predicted for the surface states of 3D topological insulators (TIs), it is necessary to open a "Dirac-mass gap" in their spectrum by breaking time-reversal symmetry. Use of magnetic dopant atoms to generate a ferromagnetic state is the most widely applied approach. However, it is unknown how the spatial arrangements of the magnetic dopant atoms influence the Dirac-mass gap at the atomic scale or, conversely, whether the ferromagnetic interactions between dopant atoms are influenced by the topological surface states. Here we image the locations of the magnetic (Cr) dopant atoms in the ferromagnetic TI Cr0.08(Bi0.1Sb0.9)1.92Te3. Simultaneous visualization of the Dirac-mass gap Δ(r) reveals its intense disorder, which we demonstrate is directly related to fluctuations in n(r), the Cr atom areal density in the termination layer. We find the relationship of surface-state Fermi wavevectors to the anisotropic structure of Δ(r) not inconsistent with predictions for surface ferromagnetism mediated by those states. Moreover, despite the intense Dirac-mass disorder, the anticipated relationship [Formula: see text] is confirmed throughout and exhibits an electron-dopant interaction energy J* = 145 meV·nm(2). These observations reveal how magnetic dopant atoms actually generate the TI mass gap locally and that, to achieve the novel physics expected of time-reversal symmetry breaking TI materials, control of the resulting Dirac-mass gap disorder will be essential. PMID:25605947

  12. Incorporation of dopant impurities into a silicon oxynitride matrix containing silicon nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrhardt, Fabien; Ulhaq-Bouillet, Corinne; Muller, Dominique; Slaoui, Abdelilah; Ferblantier, Gérald

    2016-05-01

    Dopant impurities, such as gallium (Ga), indium (In), and phosphorus (P), were incorporated into silicon-rich silicon oxynitride (SRSON) thin films by the ion implantation technique. To form silicon nanoparticles, the implanted layers were thermally annealed at temperatures up to 1100 °C for 60 min. This thermal treatment generates a phase separation of the silicon nanoparticles from the SRSON matrix in the presence of the dopant atoms. We report on the position of the dopant species within the host matrix and relative to the silicon nanoparticles, as well as on the effect of the dopants on the crystalline structure and the size of the Si nanoparticles. The energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy technique is thoroughly used to identify the chemical species. The distribution of the dopant elements within the SRSON compound is determined using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. Energy dispersive X-ray mapping coupled with spectral imaging of silicon plasmons was performed to spatially localize at the nanoscale the dopant impurities and the silicon nanoparticles in the SRSON films. Three different behaviors were observed according to the implanted dopant type (Ga, In, or P). The In-doped SRSON layers clearly showed separated nanoparticles based on indium, InOx, or silicon. In contrast, in the P-doped SRSON layers, Si and P are completely miscible. A high concentration of P atoms was found within the Si nanoparticles. Lastly, in Ga-doped SRSON the Ga atoms formed large nanoparticles close to the SRSON surface, while the Si nanoparticles were localized in the bulk of the SRSON layer. In this work, we shed light on the mechanisms responsible for these three different behaviors.

  13. Use of scanning probe microscopies to study dopants at semiconductor surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Mark William

    Dopants, in semiconductors, are detected as either protrusions or depressions in scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images. Measured dopant heights for layered semiconductors are considerably larger than for conventional semiconductors. This is interpreted as the influence of dopant induced electrostatic forces between the tip and the sample leading to a structural deformation of the surface around the dopant atoms. To investigate the influence of electrostatic forces, we performed STM measurements on p-type MoS2 at different bias voltages. The bias dependence of the STM images indicates the presence of electrostatic forces. Additional measurements with current imaging tunneling spectroscopy (CITS) show that changes in the density of states at dopant sites play only a minor role and cannot account for the large protrusions observed. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), with an applied D.C. voltage between the cantilever and sample, also confirms the role of electrostatic forces. Recently, we developed a new TappingmodeRTM AFM (TMAFM) based dopant profiling method based on an electrostatic mechanism similar to the STM imaging of dopants in layered semiconductors. TMAFM with an applied bias was used to spatially resolve areas of different doping type and density on silicon patterned via ion implantation. The application of a D.C. bias between the cantilever and sample during the measurement results in a Coulomb interaction between the tip and sample, whose magnitude depends on the spatial variation in the doping density. This effect was utilized to detect areas differing in doping by monitoring the phase angle between the drive frequency and cantilever response while scanning over areas of differing doping density. Measurements at various bias voltages are presented to demonstrate that the phase contrast observed between differently doped areas is directly connected to the bias induced surface potential (band bending) present on these areas. A quantitative investigation

  14. Dopant profiling and surface analysis of silicon nanowires using capacitance-voltage measurements.

    PubMed

    Garnett, Erik C; Tseng, Yu-Chih; Khanal, Devesh R; Wu, Junqiao; Bokor, Jeffrey; Yang, Peidong

    2009-05-01

    Silicon nanowires are expected to have applications in transistors, sensors, resonators, solar cells and thermoelectric systems. Understanding the surface properties and dopant distribution will be critical for the fabrication of high-performance devices based on nanowires. At present, determination of the dopant concentration depends on a combination of experimental measurements of the mobility and threshold voltage in a nanowire field-effect transistor, a calculated value for the capacitance, and two assumptions--that the dopant distribution is uniform and that the surface (interface) charge density is known. These assumptions can be tested in planar devices with the capacitance-voltage technique. This technique has also been used to determine the mobility of nanowires, but it has not been used to measure surface properties and dopant distributions, despite their influence on the electronic properties of nanowires. Here, we measure the surface (interface) state density and the radial dopant profile of individual silicon nanowire field-effect transistors with the capacitance-voltage technique. PMID:19421217

  15. Molecular Dynamics Approach for Predicting Helical Twisting Powers of Metal Complex Dopants in Nematic Solvents.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Go; Yoshida, Jun

    2016-07-14

    Nematic liquid crystals of small molecules are known to transform into chiral nematic liquid crystals with supramolecular helical structures upon doping with enantiomeric compounds. Although this phenomenon is well established, the basic mechanism is still unclear. We have previously examined metal complexes with Δ and Λ chiralities as dopants in nematic liquid crystals and have found that slight differences in the molecular structure determine the handedness of the induced helical structure. In this study, we investigated the microscopic arrangement of liquid crystal molecules around metal complex dopants with the aid of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. There are several restrictions to performing MD simulations of the chiral nematic system; for example, one pitch of the helix usually exceeds one side of an applicable periodic boundary box (∼10(2) nm). In view of these simulation problems, we therefore examined racemic systems in which a pair of Δ- and Λ-isomers of the chiral dopant is mixed with liquid crystal molecules. We selected two different octahedral ruthenium complexes as the chiral dopant molecules. As a result, we accurately calculated the ordering matrix that is essential parameter to estimate the helical twisting power of the chiral dopant based on the surface chirality model. Since the microscopic ordering is experimentally hard to be determined, our new approach with using MD simulations accurately deduced the ordering matrix and, with the aid of the surface chirality model, gave reasonable values for the helical twisting powers of each complex. PMID:27333445

  16. Method for implantation of high dopant concentrations in wide band gap materials

    DOEpatents

    Usov, Igor; Arendt, Paul N.

    2009-09-15

    A method that combines alternate low/medium ion dose implantation with rapid thermal annealing at relatively low temperatures. At least one dopant is implanted in one of a single crystal and an epitaxial film of the wide band gap compound by a plurality of implantation cycles. The number of implantation cycles is sufficient to implant a predetermined concentration of the dopant in one of the single crystal and the epitaxial film. Each of the implantation cycles includes the steps of: implanting a portion of the predetermined concentration of the one dopant in one of the single crystal and the epitaxial film; annealing one of the single crystal and the epitaxial film and implanted portion at a predetermined temperature for a predetermined time to repair damage to one of the single crystal and the epitaxial film caused by implantation and activates the implanted dopant; and cooling the annealed single crystal and implanted portion to a temperature of less than about 100.degree. C. This combination produces high concentrations of dopants, while minimizing the defect concentration.

  17. Design of molecularly imprinted conducting polymer protein-sensing films via substrate-dopant binding.

    PubMed

    Komarova, Elena; Aldissi, Matt; Bogomolova, Anastasia

    2015-02-21

    Addressing the challenge of protein biosensing using molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP), we have developed and tested a novel approach to creating sensing conducive polymer films imprinted with a protein substrate, ricin toxin chain A (RTA). Our approach for creating MIP protein sensing films is based on a concept of substrate-guided dopant immobilization with subsequent conducting polymer film formation. In this proof-of-concept work we have tested three macromolecular dopants with strong protein affinity, Ponceau S, Coomassie BB R250 and ι-Carrageenan. The films were formed using sequential interactions of the substrate, dopant and pyrrole, followed by electrochemical polymerization. The films were formed on gold array electrodes allowing for extensive data acquisition. The thickness of the films was optimized to allow for efficient substrate extraction, which was removed by a combination of protease and detergent treatment. The MIP films were tested for substrate rebinding using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The presence of macromolecular dopants was essential for MIP film specificity. Out of three dopants tested, RTA-imprinted polypyrrole films doped with Coomassie BB performed with highest specificity towards detection of RTA with a level of detection (LOD) of 0.1 ng ml(-1). PMID:25574520

  18. Disproportionation, dopant incorporation, and defect clustering in Perovskite-structured NdCoO3.

    PubMed

    Tealdi, Cristina; Malavasi, Lorenzo; Fisher, Craig A J; Islam, M Saiful

    2006-03-23

    Atomistic simulation techniques are used to examine the defect chemistry of perovskite-structured NdCoO(3), a material whose electrochemical properties make it attractive for use in heterogeneous oxidation catalysis, as well as in gas sensors and mixed ionic/electronic conductors. In practice, dopants are added to NdCoO(3) to obtain the desired properties, such as high electrical conductivity and rapid gas adsorption/desorption; thus, a wide range of dopants substituted on both Nd and Co sites are examined. Charge compensation for aliovalent dopants is predicted to occur via formation of oxide ion vacancies; these are understood to be key sites with respect to catalytic and sensor activity. Low activation energies calculated for oxide ion migration are consistent with high oxygen mobilities measured experimentally. Sr and Ca, which occupy Nd sites in the lattice, are found to be the most soluble of the alkaline earth metals, in agreement with experiment. These two dopant ions also have the weakest binding energies for dopant-vacancy cluster formation. Mechanisms of electronic defect formation, critical to the overall transport properties of the material, are also considered. The results suggest that disproportionation of the Co ion to form small polaron species is the most favorable intrinsic defect process. In doped compounds, formation of electronic holes via uptake of oxygen at vacant sites is found to be a low energy process. PMID:16539474

  19. Electron-donor dopant, method of improving conductivity of polymers by doping therewith, and a polymer so treated

    DOEpatents

    Liepins, Raimond; Aldissi, Mahmoud

    1988-01-01

    Polymers with conjugated backbones, both polyacetylene and polyaromatic heterocyclic types, are doped with electron-donor agents to increase their electrical conductivity. The electron-donor agents are either electride dopants made in the presence of lithium or dopants derived from alkalides made in the presence of lithium. The dopants also contain a metal such as cesium and a trapping agent such as a crown ether.

  20. Electron-donor dopant, method of improving conductivity of polymers by doping therewith, and a polymer so treated

    DOEpatents

    Liepins, R.; Aldissi, M.

    1984-07-27

    Polymers with conjugated backbones, both polyacetylene and polyaromatic heterocyclic types, are doped with electron-donor agents to increase their electrical conductivity. The electron-donor agents are either electride dopants made in the presence of lithium or dopants derived from alkalides made in the presence of lithium. The dopants also contain a metal such as cesium and a trapping agent such as a crown ether.

  1. Defect development and dopant location due to elevated temperature implantation of InP with MeV zinc ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, H.; Flagmeyer, R.-H.; Vogt, J.; Kling, A.; Butz, T.

    1996-06-01

    Zinc implantations in the MeV energy regime at temperatures of about 200°C within the dose range of 5 × 10 14-1 × 10 16 cm -2 were carried out. The investigations included RBS and PIXE measurements combined with ion channeling in the major crystallographic axes and additionally SNMS and XTEM. The implantation-induced damage is characterized by mobile point defects at the elevated implantation temperature. This results in damaged layers containing point-like defects, but far from amorphization. During rapid thermal annealing the surface up to about 0.6 Rp recovered channeling-perfect, while in a depth of (1-2) Rp a band of extrinsic dislocation loops was formed. Comparing the experimental with the calculated PIXE minimum yields, conclusions about the zinc positions were drawn: Due to the low ZnK aligned yield nearly all zinc atoms occupy substitutional lattice sites in the as-implanted samples. After annealing a remarkable diffusion of zinc combined with lattice site changes is observed.

  2. Modulation of thermoelectric power factor via radial dopant inhomogeneity in B-doped Si nanowires.

    PubMed

    Zhuge, Fuwei; Yanagida, Takeshi; Fukata, Naoki; Uchida, Ken; Kanai, Masaki; Nagashima, Kazuki; Meng, Gang; He, Yong; Rahong, Sakon; Li, Xiaomin; Kawai, Tomoji

    2014-10-01

    We demonstrate a modulation of thermoelectric power factor via a radial dopant inhomogeneity in B-doped Si nanowires. These nanowires grown via vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) method were naturally composed of a heavily doped outer shell layer and a lightly doped inner core. The thermopower measurements for a single nanowire demonstrated that the power factor values were higher than those of homogeneously B-doped Si nanowires. The field effect measurements revealed the enhancement of hole mobility for these VLS grown B-doped Si nanowires due to the modulation doping effect. This mobility enhancement increases overall electrical conductivity of nanowires without decreasing the Seebeck coefficient value, resulting in the increase of thermoelectric power factor. In addition, we found that tailoring the surface dopant distribution by introducing surface δ-doping can further increase the power factor value. Thus, intentionally tailoring radial dopant inhomogeneity promises a way to modulate the thermoelectric power factor of semiconductor nanowires. PMID:25229842

  3. Nanoporous Ge thin film production combining Ge sputtering and dopant implantation

    PubMed Central

    Portavoce, Alain; Hoummada, Khalid; Texier, Michaël; Bertoglio, Maxime; Bernardini, Sandrine; Abbarchi, Marco; Chow, Lee

    2015-01-01

    Summary In this work a novel process allowing for the production of nanoporous Ge thin films is presented. This process uses the combination of two techniques: Ge sputtering on SiO2 and dopant ion implantation. The process entails four successive steps: (i) Ge sputtering on SiO2, (ii) implantation preannealing, (iii) high-dose dopant implantation, and (iv) implantation postannealing. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize the morphology of the Ge film at different process steps under different postannealing conditions. For the same postannealing conditions, the Ge film topology was shown to be similar for different implantation doses and different dopants. However, the film topology can be controlled by adjusting the postannealing conditions. PMID:25821672

  4. Study of dopant concentrations on thermally induced mode instability in high-power fiber amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Rumao; Ma, Pengfei; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhou, Pu; Liu, Zejin

    2016-06-01

    The dependence of mode instabilities (MIs) on ytterbium dopant concentrations in high-power fiber amplifiers has been investigated. It is theoretically shown that, by only varying the fiber length to maintain the same total small-signal pump absorption, the MI threshold is independent of dopant concentration. MI thresholds of gain fibers with ytterbium dopant concentrations of 5.93  ×  1025 m‑3 and 1.02  ×  1026 m‑3 have been measured which exhibit similar MI thresholds and agree with the theoretical results. The result indicates that heavy doping of active fiber can be adopted to suppress nonlinear effects without decreasing the MI threshold. This provides a method of maximizing the power output of fiber laser, taking into account the stimulated Brillouin scattering, stimulated Raman Scattering, and MI thresholds simultaneously.

  5. A model of dopant diffusion through a strongly correlated p-n junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieteska, Jedrzej; Brierley, Richard; Guzman-Verri, Gian; Moller, Gunnar; Littlewood, Peter; Littlewood group Collaboration

    The diffusion of charged ions in a solid depends on an equation of state that balances diffusive and screened electrostatic forces, and is well understood in the case of conventional semiconductors and metals. In the case of a strongly-correlated material, the physics is different, and expected to be relevant, for example, in Li-ion battery cathodes. We propose a model of dopant ion motion through a strongly correlated p-n junction. Our approach is to consider diffusive (Nernst-Planck) dynamics of dopants under screened electrostatic interactions computed within a mean-field (Thomas-Fermi) approximation. Dopant profiles as function of time are calculated for a p-n junction held at constant voltage. In the case where filling levels are near a correlation-induced gap, Mott insulating regions can form at the p-n interface and their dynamics is studied.

  6. Impact of different dopants on the switching properties of ferroelectric hafniumoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Uwe; Yurchuk, Ekaterina; Müller, Johannes; Martin, Dominik; Schenk, Tony; Polakowski, Patrick; Adelmann, Christoph; Popovici, Mihaela I.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Mikolajick, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    The wake-up behavior of ferroelectric thin film capacitors based on doped hafnium oxide dielectrics in TiN-based metal-insulator-metal structures is reported. After field cycling a remanent polarization up to 40 µC/cm2 and a high coercive field of about 1 MV/cm was observed. Doping of HfO2 by different dopants with a crystal radius ranging from 54 pm (Si) to 132 pm (Sr) was evaluated. In all cases, an improved polarization-voltage hysteresis after wake-up cycling is visible. For smaller dopant atoms like Si and Al stronger pinching of the polarization hysteresis appeared with increasing dopant concentration and proved to be stable during cycling.

  7. Influence of pentavalent dopant addition to polarization and bioactivity of hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Dhal, Jharana; Bose, Susmita; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2013-07-01

    Influence of pentavalent tantalum doping in bulk hydroxyapatite (HAp) ceramics has been investigated for polarizability and bioactivity. Phase analysis from X-ray diffraction measurement indicates that increasing dopant concentration decreased the amount of HAp phase and increased β-TCP and/or α-TCP phases during sintering at 1250 °C in a muffle furnace. Results from thermally stimulated depolarization current (TSDC) measurements showed that doping hindered charge storage ability in HAp ceramics, and doped samples stored fewer charge compared to pure HAp. However, doping enhanced wettability of HAp samples, which was improved further due to polarization. In vitro human osteoblast cell-material interaction study revealed an increase in bioactivity due to dopant addition and polarization compared to pure HAp. This increase in bioactivity was attributed to the increase in wettability due to surface charge and dopant addition. PMID:23623133

  8. Peculiarities of Determining the Dopant Concentration in the Near-Surface Layer of a Semiconductor by Measuring the Admittance of MIS Structures Based on P-Hg0.78Cd0.22Te Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voitsekhovskii, A. V.; Nesmelov, S. N.; Dzyadukh, S. M.

    2016-06-01

    Peculiarities of determining the concentration and distribution profile of dopant in the near-surface layer of a semiconductor by measuring the admittance of MIS structures based on p-Hg0.78Cd0.22Te grown by molecular beam epitaxy are studied. A technique is proposed for the determining the concentration of dopant based on the measurement of the admittance of MIS structures in the frequency range of 50 kHz - 1 MHz. It is shown that in this frequency range, the capacitance-voltage characteristics of MIS structures based on p-Hg0.78Cd0.22Te with a near-surface graded-gap layer have a high- frequency behavior with respect to the recharge time of surface states located near the Fermi level of intrinsic semiconductor. The distribution profile of dopant in the nearsurface layer of the semiconductor is calculated. It is shown that in p-Hg0.78Cd0.22Te with a near-surface graded-gap layer, the dopant concentration has the lowest value near the interface with the insulator.

  9. Dependence of Ablative Rayleigh—Taylor Instability on High-Z Dopant Concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiroto, Takashi; Ohnishi, Naofumi; Sunahara, Atsushi; Fujioka, Shinsuke

    2016-03-01

    We conducted two-dimensional simulations of inertial confinement fusion targets to evaluate effects of high-Z doping on implosion hydrodynamics. It was found that an ablation structure drastically changes with concentration of dopant material. We also confirmed that even a lightly-doped target can suppress Rayleigh-Taylor instability on short wavelength, while a long-wavelength perturbation is difficult to be suppressed with any dopant concentration. The high-Z doping is thus only effective for a spherical implosion with high-mode perturbations.

  10. Investigation of dopant clustering and segregation to defects in semiconductors using atom probe tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blavette, D.; Duguay, S.

    2016-05-01

    The role of atom probe tomography in the investigation of clustering and segregation of dopants to lattice defects in semiconductors is highlighted on the basis of some selected salient illustrations obtained at the Groupe de Physique des Matériaux of Rouen (France). The instrument is shown to be able to map out the 3D distribution of chemical species in the three dimensions of space at the ultimate scale. Results related to clustering, segregation of dopants (As, B, and P) to grain boundaries, dislocation loops, and extended defects in silicon are discussed.

  11. Simple and highly efficient chiral dopant molecules possessing both rod- and arch-like units.

    PubMed

    Kishikawa, Keiki; Aoyagi, Shota; Kohri, Michinari; Taniguchi, Tatsuo; Takahashi, Masahiro; Kohmoto, Shigeo

    2014-09-14

    A simple chiral dopant molecule (R)-1 with both rod- and arch-like units was prepared, and extremely large helical twisting powers (+123 to +228 μm(-1)) in nematic liquid crystal phases were achieved. We have demonstrated that the introduction of an arch-like unit in addition to rod-like units is highly effective in controlling the helical molecular alignment. As an application of the dopant, induction of blue phases by addition of a small amount of it was achieved. PMID:25041949

  12. Dopant-induced random telegraph signal in nanoscale lateral silicon pn diodes at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Purwiyanti, Sri; Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Indonesia, Depok, 16424 Jakarta ; Nowak, Roland; Division of Sensors and Measuring Systems, Warsaw University of Technology, Sw. A. Boboli 8, 02-525 Warsaw ; Moraru, Daniel; Mizuno, Takeshi; Tabe, Michiharu; Hartanto, Djoko; Jablonski, Ryszard

    2013-12-09

    We studied current-voltage characteristics of nanoscale pn diodes having the junction formed in a laterally patterned ultrathin silicon-on-insulator layer. At temperatures below 30 K, we observed random telegraph signal (RTS) in a range of forward bias. Since RTS is observed only for pn diodes, but not for pin diodes, one dopant among phosphorus donors or boron acceptors facing across the junction is likely responsible for potential changes affecting the current. Based also on potential measurements by low-temperature Kelvin probe force microscope, RTS is ascribed to trapping/detrapping of carriers by/from a single dopant near the farther edge of the depletion region.

  13. Dopant distributions in n-MOSFET structure observed by atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Inoue, K; Yano, F; Nishida, A; Takamizawa, H; Tsunomura, T; Nagai, Y; Hasegawa, M

    2009-11-01

    The dopant distributions in an n-type metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) structure were analyzed by atom probe tomography. The dopant distributions of As, P, and B atoms in a MOSFET structure (gate, gate oxide, channel, source/drain extension, and halo) were obtained. P atoms were segregated at the interface between the poly-Si gate and the gate oxide, and on the grain boundaries of the poly-Si gate, which had an elongated grain structure along the gate height direction. The concentration of B atoms was enriched near the edge of the source/drain extension where the As atoms were implanted. PMID:19775815

  14. A fixed-grid method for transient simulations of dopant segregation in VGF-RMF growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikrityuk, Petr A.; Pätzold, Olf; Stelter, Michael

    2012-01-01

    In this work a fixed-grid, virtual-front tracking model originally developed for modeling dendritic growth has been adopted for transient simulations of dopant segregation in vertical gradient freeze (VGF) melt growth of Ga-doped germanium under the influence of a rotating magnetic field (RMF). The interfacial Stefan conditions for temperature and solute are formulated in volumetric terms in energy and solute conservation equations, which allow the interface to be tracked implicitly with no need to calculate the growth velocity. The model and the code are validated against an analytical solution for the transient solidification of a binary alloy at constant velocity. The numerical results show the strong relationship between the melt flow pattern and the dopant concentration in the crystal grown. The better melt mixing during growth under the influence of RMF is found to have a significant impact on the axial and radial macrosegregation of dopants. Simulation results are in good qualitative agreement with previous experimental observations of the dopant segregation in VGF-RMF growth, which now are seen ass a direct consequence of the mixing state of the melt.

  15. Rare Earth Dopant (Nd, Gd, Dy, and Er) Hybridization in Lithium Tetraborate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Tony; Petrosky, James; McClory, John; Adamiv, Volodymyr; Burak, Yaroslav; Padlyak, Bohdan; Teslyuk, Ihor; Lu, Ning; Wang, Lu; Mei, Wai-Ning; Dowben, Peter

    2014-05-01

    The four dopants (Nd, Gd, Dy, and Er) substitutionally occupy the Li+ sites in lithium tetraborate (Li2B4O7: RE) glasses as determined by analysis of the extended X-ray absorption fine structure. The dopants are coordinated by 6-8 oxygen at a distance of 2.3 to 2.5 Å, depending on the rare earth. The inverse relationship between the RE¬ O coordination distance and rare earth (RE) atomic number is consistent with the expected lanthanide atomic radial contraction with increased atomic number. Through analysis of the X-ray absorption near edge structure, the rare earth dopants adopt the RE3+ valence state. There are indications of strong rare earth 5d hybridization with the trigonal and tetrahedral formations of BO3 and BO4 based on the determination of the rare earth substitutional Li+ site occupancy from the X-ray absorption near edge structure data. The local oxygen disorder around the RE3+ luminescence centers evident in the structural determination of the various glasses, and the hybridization of the RE3+ dopants with the host may contribute to the asymmetry evident in the luminescence emission spectral lines. The luminescence emission spectra are indeed characteristic of the expected f-to-f transitions; however, there is an observed asymmetry in some emission lines.

  16. Gas-Phase Dopant-Induced Conformational Changes Monitored with Transversal Modulation Ion Mobility Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Nicole Andrea; Root, Katharina; Zenobi, Renato; Vidal-de-Miguel, Guillermo

    2016-02-16

    The potential of a Transversal Modulation Ion Mobility Spectrometry (TMIMS) instrument for protein analysis applications has been evaluated. The Collision Cross Section (CCS) of cytochrome c measured with the TMIMS is in agreement with values reported in the literature. Additionally, it enables tandem IMS-IMS prefiltration in dry gas and in vapor doped gas. The chemical specificity of the different dopants enables interesting studies on the structure of proteins as CCS changed strongly depending on the specific dopant. Hexane produced an unexpectedly high CCS shift, which can be utilized to evaluate the exposure of hydrophobic parts of the protein. Alcohols produced higher shifts with a dual behavior: an increase in CCS due to vapor uptake at specific absorption sites, followed by a linear shift typical for unspecific and unstable vapor uptake. The molten globule +8 shows a very specific transition. Initially, its CCS follows the trend of the compact folded states, and then it rapidly increases to the levels of the unfolded states. This strong variation suggests that the +8 charge state undergoes a dopant-induced conformational change. Interestingly, more sterically demanding alcohols seem to unfold the protein more effectively also in the gas phase. This study shows the capabilities of the TMIMS device for protein analysis and how tandem IMS-IMS with dopants could provide better understanding of the conformational changes of proteins. PMID:26845079

  17. Self- and dopant diffusion in extrinsic boron doped isotopically controlled silicon multilayer structures

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, Ian D.; Bracht, Hartmut A.; Silvestri, Hughes H.; Nicols, Samuel P.; Beeman, Jeffrey W.; Hansen, John L.; Nylandsted Larsen, Arne; Haller, Eugene E.

    2002-04-01

    Isotopically controlled silicon multilayer structures were used to measure the enhancement of self- and dopant diffusion in extrinsic boron doped silicon. {sup 30}Si was used as a tracer through a multilayer structure of alternating natural Si and enriched {sup 28}Si layers. Low energy, high resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) allowed for simultaneous measurement of self- and dopant diffusion profiles of samples annealed at temperatures between 850 C and 1100 C. A specially designed ion- implanted amorphous Si surface layer was used as a dopant source to suppress excess defects in the multilayer structure, thereby eliminating transient enhanced diffusion (TED) behavior. Self- and dopant diffusion coefficients, diffusion mechanisms, and native defect charge states were determined from computer-aided modeling, based on differential equations describing the diffusion processes. We present a quantitative description of B diffusion enhanced self-diffusion in silicon and conclude that the diffusion of both B and Si is mainly mediated by neutral and singly positively charged self-interstitials under p-type doping. No significant contribution of vacancies to either B or Si diffusion is observed.

  18. Dopant activation during solid phase crystallization of poly-Si and influence of fluorine and hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Kalkan, A.K.; Kingi, R.M.; Fonash, S.J.

    1997-07-01

    Dopant activation for ion implanted solid phase crystallized (SPC) a-Si:H films, deposited by low temperature PECVD, was investigated. The impact of film thickness, the effect of subsequent hydrogenation, and a possible role for fluorine in this process have been studied.

  19. Influence of dopant distribution on the plasmonic properties of indium tin oxide nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Lounis, Sebastien D; Runnerstrom, Evan L; Bergerud, Amy; Nordlund, Dennis; Milliron, Delia J

    2014-05-14

    Doped metal oxide nanocrystals represent an exciting frontier for colloidal synthesis of plasmonic materials, displaying unique optoelectronic properties and showing promise for a variety of applications. However, fundamental questions about the nature of doping in these materials remain. In this article, the strong influence of radial dopant distribution on the optoelectronic properties of colloidal indium tin oxide nanocrystals is reported. Comparing elemental depth-profiling by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) with detailed modeling and simulation of the optical extinction of these nanocrystals using the Drude model for free electrons, a correlation between surface segregation of tin ions and the average activation of dopants is observed. A strong influence of surface segregation of tin on the line shape of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) is also reported. Samples with tin segregated near the surface show a symmetric line shape that suggests weak or no damping of the plasmon by ionized impurities. It is suggested that segregation of tin near the surface facilitates compensation of the dopant ions by electronic defects and oxygen interstitials, thus reducing activation. A core-shell model is proposed to explain the observed differences in line shape. These results demonstrate the nuanced role of dopant distribution in determining the optoelectronic properties of semiconductor nanocrystals and suggest that more detailed study of the distribution and structure of defects in plasmonic colloidal nanocrystals is warranted. PMID:24786283

  20. Dopant-assisted reactive low temperature plasma probe for sensitive and specific detection of explosives.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wendong; Hou, Keyong; Hua, Lei; Li, Haiyang

    2015-09-01

    A dopant-assisted reactive low temperature plasma (DARLTP) probe was developed for sensitive and specific detection of explosives by a miniature rectilinear ion trap mass spectrometer. The DARLTP probe was fabricated using a T-shaped quartz tube. The dopant gas was introduced into the plasma stream through a side-tube. Using CH2Cl2 doped wet air as the dopant gas, the detection sensitivities were improved about 4-fold (RDX), 4-fold (PETN), and 3-fold (tetryl) compared with those obtained using the conventional LTP. Furthermore, the formation of [M + (35)Cl](-) and [M + (37)Cl](-) for these explosives enhanced the specificity for their identification. Additionally, the quantities of fragment ions of tetryl and adduct ions such as [RDX + NO2](-) and [PETN + NO2](-) were dramatically reduced, which simplified the mass spectra and avoided the overlap of mass peaks for different explosives. The sensitivity improvement may be attributed to the increased intensity of reactant ion [HNO3 + NO3](-), which was enhanced 4-fold after the introduction of dopant gas. The limits of detection (LODs) for RDX, tetryl, and PETN were down to 3, 6, and 10 pg, respectively. Finally, an explosive mixture was successfully analyzed, demonstrating the potential of the DARLTP probe for qualitative and quantitative analysis of complicated explosives. PMID:26191543

  1. Detecting excitation and magnetization of individual dopants in a semiconductor two-dimensional electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, Jens

    2011-03-01

    Magnetic atoms doped into a semiconductor are the building blocks for bottom up spintronic and quantum logic devices. They also provide model systems for the investigation of fundamental effects. In order to correlate the dopant's atomic structure with its magnetism magnetically sensitive techniques with atomic resolution are a prerequisite. Here, I show electrical excitation and read-out [ 1 ] of single magnetic dopant associated spins in a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) confined to a semiconductor surface [ 2 ] using spin-resolved scanning tunneling spectroscopy [ 3 ] . I will review our real-space study of the quantum Hall transition in the 2DEG [ 2 ] and of the magnetic properties of the dopants [ 1 ] . Finally, I will demonstrate that the dopant serves as an atomic scale probe for local magnetometry of the 2DEG. This work was done in collaboration with A. A. Khajetoorians, B. Chillian, S. Schuwalow, F. Lechermann, K. Hashimoto, C. Sohrmann, T. Inaoka, F. Meier, Y. Hirayama, R. A. Römer, M. Morgenstern, and R. Wiesendanger. [ 1 ] A. A. Khajetoorians et al., Nature 467, 1084 (2010). [ 2 ] K. Hashimoto et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 256802 (2008). [ 3 ] J. Wiebe et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 4871 (2004). We acknowledge financial support from ERC Advanced Grant ``FURORE'', by the DFG via SFB668 and GrK1286, and by the city of Hamburg via the cluster of excellence ``Nanospintronics''.

  2. Tunneling in Systems of Coupled Dopant-Atoms in Silicon Nano-devices.

    PubMed

    Moraru, Daniel; Samanta, Arup; Tyszka, Krzysztof; Anh, Le The; Muruganathan, Manoharan; Mizuno, Takeshi; Jablonski, Ryszard; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Tabe, Michiharu

    2015-12-01

    Following the rapid development of the electronics industry and technology, it is expected that future electronic devices will operate based on functional units at the level of electrically active molecules or even atoms. One pathway to observe and characterize such fundamental operation is to focus on identifying isolated or coupled dopants in nanoscale silicon transistors, the building blocks of present electronics. Here, we review some of the recent progress in the research along this direction, with a focus on devices fabricated with simple and CMOS-compatible-processing technology. We present results from a scanning probe method (Kelvin probe force microscopy) which show direct observation of dopant-induced potential modulations. We also discuss tunneling transport behavior based on the analysis of low-temperature I-V characteristics for devices representative for different regimes of doping concentration, i.e., different inter-dopant coupling strengths. This overview outlines the present status of the field, opening also directions toward practical implementation of dopant-atom devices. PMID:26403925

  3. Influence of Dopant Distribution on the Plasmonic Properties of Indium Tin Oxide Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Lounis, SD; Runnerstrom, EL; Bergerud, A; Nordlund, D; Milliron, DJ

    2014-05-14

    Doped metal oxide nanocrystals represent an exciting frontier for colloidal synthesis of plasmonic materials, displaying unique optoelectronic properties and showing promise for a variety of applications. However, fundamental questions about the nature of doping in these materials remain. In this article, the strong influence of radial dopant distribution on the optoelectronic properties of colloidal indium tin oxide nanocrystals is reported. Comparing elemental depth-profiling by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) with detailed modeling and simulation of the optical extinction of these nanocrystals using the Drude model for free electrons, a correlation between surface segregation of tin ions and the average activation of dopants is observed. A strong influence of surface segregation of tin on the line shape of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) is also reported. Samples with tin segregated near the surface show a symmetric line shape that suggests weak or no damping of the plasmon by ionized impurities. It is suggested that segregation of tin near the surface facilitates compensation of the dopant ions by electronic defects and oxygen interstitials, thus reducing activation. A core shell model is proposed to explain the observed differences in line shape. These results demonstrate the nuanced role of dopant distribution in determining the optoelectronic properties of semiconductor nanocrystals and suggest that more detailed study of the distribution and structure of defects in plasmonic colloidal nanocrystals is warranted.

  4. Tunneling in Systems of Coupled Dopant-Atoms in Silicon Nano-devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraru, Daniel; Samanta, Arup; Tyszka, Krzysztof; Anh, Le The; Muruganathan, Manoharan; Mizuno, Takeshi; Jablonski, Ryszard; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Tabe, Michiharu

    2015-09-01

    Following the rapid development of the electronics industry and technology, it is expected that future electronic devices will operate based on functional units at the level of electrically active molecules or even atoms. One pathway to observe and characterize such fundamental operation is to focus on identifying isolated or coupled dopants in nanoscale silicon transistors, the building blocks of present electronics. Here, we review some of the recent progress in the research along this direction, with a focus on devices fabricated with simple and CMOS-compatible-processing technology. We present results from a scanning probe method (Kelvin probe force microscopy) which show direct observation of dopant-induced potential modulations. We also discuss tunneling transport behavior based on the analysis of low-temperature I- V characteristics for devices representative for different regimes of doping concentration, i.e., different inter-dopant coupling strengths. This overview outlines the present status of the field, opening also directions toward practical implementation of dopant-atom devices.

  5. Two-dimensional dopant analysis in silicon using chemical etching and transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neogi, Suneeta Shamanna

    The purpose of this research has been to develop a methodologoy to map two-dimensional dopant distributions in silicon and investigate the factors that influence the interpretation of the results. The analysis exploits the image contrast obtained by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using cross-section specimens which have undergone selective chemical etching. The appearance of iso-thickness contours in a selectively etched TEM sample must represent iso-concentration contours when imaged under constant diffraction conditions. The application of this technique is two-fold: (1) to establish a physical metrology of semiconductor devices for the purpose of research and development efforts that impact on future nodes outlined in the semiconductor roadmap and (2) to provide physical data for validation of simulation tools in technology computer aided design (TCAD). The research involves an investigation into the selective removal of doped regions for both test and device structures, followed by an analysis to obtain two-dimensional (2-D) dopant profiles. The critical issues which arise in the development of a methodology to profile dopant distributions and which are addressed in this investigation are, wedge technique versus conventional dimple and ion-mill procedures for thin-film preparation, thin-film versus bulk chemical etching, data acquisition using TEM and choice of diffraction conditions, sensitivity in terms of the etch detection limit, resolution influenced by the effective extinction length of the operating reflection, digital image processing to extract profiles from thickness contours, calibration of the 2-D profiles using a one-dimensional (1-D) calibrator and role of structure/dopant interactions such as stress, interfaces and point defects in test structures and real device structures containing additional processing sequences. Selective chemical etching in combination with TEM has the sensitivity, resolution and reproducibility required to be used

  6. Charge Exchange Reaction in Dopant-Assisted Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization and Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaikkinen, Anu; Kauppila, Tiina J.; Kostiainen, Risto

    2016-04-01

    The efficiencies of charge exchange reaction in dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DA-APCI) and dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization (DA-APPI) mass spectrometry (MS) were compared by flow injection analysis. Fourteen individual compounds and a commercial mixture of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were chosen as model analytes to cover a wide range of polarities, gas-phase ionization energies, and proton affinities. Chlorobenzene was used as the dopant, and methanol/water (80/20) as the solvent. In both techniques, analytes formed the same ions (radical cations, protonated molecules, and/or fragments). However, in DA-APCI, the relative efficiency of charge exchange versus proton transfer was lower than in DA-APPI. This is suggested to be because in DA-APCI both dopant and solvent clusters can be ionized, and the formed reagent ions can react with the analytes via competing charge exchange and proton transfer reactions. In DA-APPI, on the other hand, the main reagents are dopant-derived radical cations, which favor ionization of analytes via charge exchange. The efficiency of charge exchange in both DA-APPI and DA-APCI was shown to depend heavily on the solvent flow rate, with best efficiency seen at lowest flow rates studied (0.05 and 0.1 mL/min). Both DA-APCI and DA-APPI showed the radical cation of chlorobenzene at 0.05-0.1 mL/min flow rate, but at increasing flow rate, the abundance of chlorobenzene M+. decreased and reagent ion populations deriving from different gas-phase chemistry were recorded. The formation of these reagent ions explains the decreasing ionization efficiency and the differences in charge exchange between the techniques.

  7. Charge Exchange Reaction in Dopant-Assisted Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization and Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization.

    PubMed

    Vaikkinen, Anu; Kauppila, Tiina J; Kostiainen, Risto

    2016-08-01

    The efficiencies of charge exchange reaction in dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DA-APCI) and dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization (DA-APPI) mass spectrometry (MS) were compared by flow injection analysis. Fourteen individual compounds and a commercial mixture of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were chosen as model analytes to cover a wide range of polarities, gas-phase ionization energies, and proton affinities. Chlorobenzene was used as the dopant, and methanol/water (80/20) as the solvent. In both techniques, analytes formed the same ions (radical cations, protonated molecules, and/or fragments). However, in DA-APCI, the relative efficiency of charge exchange versus proton transfer was lower than in DA-APPI. This is suggested to be because in DA-APCI both dopant and solvent clusters can be ionized, and the formed reagent ions can react with the analytes via competing charge exchange and proton transfer reactions. In DA-APPI, on the other hand, the main reagents are dopant-derived radical cations, which favor ionization of analytes via charge exchange. The efficiency of charge exchange in both DA-APPI and DA-APCI was shown to depend heavily on the solvent flow rate, with best efficiency seen at lowest flow rates studied (0.05 and 0.1 mL/min). Both DA-APCI and DA-APPI showed the radical cation of chlorobenzene at 0.05-0.1 mL/min flow rate, but at increasing flow rate, the abundance of chlorobenzene M(+.) decreased and reagent ion populations deriving from different gas-phase chemistry were recorded. The formation of these reagent ions explains the decreasing ionization efficiency and the differences in charge exchange between the techniques. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27126470

  8. Nucleophilic Aromatic Substitution Between Halogenated Benzene Dopants and Nucleophiles in Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauppila, Tiina J.; Haack, Alexander; Kroll, Kai; Kersten, Hendrik; Benter, Thorsten

    2016-03-01

    In a preceding work with dopant assisted-atmospheric pressure photoionization (DA-APPI), an abundant ion at [M + 77]+ was observed in the spectra of pyridine and quinoline with chlorobenzene dopant. This contribution aims to reveal the identity and route of formation of this species, and to systematically investigate structurally related analytes and dopants. Compounds containing N-, O-, and S-lone pairs were investigated with APPI in the presence of fluoro-, chloro-, bromo-, and iodobenzene dopants. Computational calculations on a density functional theory (DFT) level were carried out to study the reaction mechanism for pyridine and the different halobenzenes. The experimental and computational results indicated that the [M + 77]+ ion was formed by nucleophilic aromatic ipso-substitution between the halobenzene radical cation and nucleophilic analytes. The reaction was most efficient for N-heteroaromatic compounds, and it was weakened by sterical effects and enhanced by resonance stabilization. The reaction was most efficient with chloro-, bromo-, and iodobenzenes, whereas with fluorobenzene the reaction was scarcely observed. The calculated Gibbs free energies for the reaction between pyridine and the halobenzenes were shown to increase in the order I < Br < Cl < F. The reaction was found endergonic for fluorobenzene due to the strong C-F bonding, and exergonic for the other halobenzenes. For fluoro- and chlorobenzenes the reaction was shown to proceed through an intermediate state corresponding to [M + dopant]+, which was highly stable for fluorobenzene. For the bulkier bromine and iodine, this intermediate did not exist, but the halogens were shown to detach already during the approach by the nucleophile.

  9. A Thermodynamic Study of Dopant Interfacial Segregation Effect on Nanostability and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Longjia

    Nanoparticles, with great surface area and high surface to volume ratio, have been widely applied in many applications due to their unique size related effects. However, this high surface area character of nanoparticles also brings great excess energy to the whole system, making the system unstable and even causing the failure of nanoparticles, especially at higher temperatures. In order to maintain nanocrystalline structure of the materials, nanostability enhancement is of great significance in nanotechnology. It is well known that the global driving force for particles growth is to eliminate the excess energy brought by surface and grain boundary. Therefore, interfacial energetics has a great influence on the nanostability of the materials. And according to previous studies, dopant interfacial segregation could be a potential way to control the interfacial energetics of the nanoparticles and possibly lead to an improved nanostability. Furthermore, the interfacial energetics even can affect mechanical properties of nano-grain ceramic materials based on recent research. The main goals of the present work were to experimentally measure the interfacial energies of nanoparticles as well as nano-grain ceramics, modify the interfacial energetics through dopant segregation effect and engineer the nanostability and mechanical properties of the nanocrystalline materials through interfacial energetics modification. To achieve this goal, Mn cation has been chosen to introduce Mn interfacial segregation on ceria nanoparticles, and La cation has been added to 12 mol% yttria stabilized zirconia (12YSZ) and magnesium aluminate spinel (MAO) two-phase nano-grain ceramics to cause La interfacial segregation. Both of the dopant segregation phenomena were directly proved by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). To quantify the dopant segregation effect on the interfacial energies, high-temperature oxide melt drop solution calorimetry, water adsorption calorimetry and differential

  10. Charge Exchange Reaction in Dopant-Assisted Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization and Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaikkinen, Anu; Kauppila, Tiina J.; Kostiainen, Risto

    2016-08-01

    The efficiencies of charge exchange reaction in dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DA-APCI) and dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization (DA-APPI) mass spectrometry (MS) were compared by flow injection analysis. Fourteen individual compounds and a commercial mixture of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were chosen as model analytes to cover a wide range of polarities, gas-phase ionization energies, and proton affinities. Chlorobenzene was used as the dopant, and methanol/water (80/20) as the solvent. In both techniques, analytes formed the same ions (radical cations, protonated molecules, and/or fragments). However, in DA-APCI, the relative efficiency of charge exchange versus proton transfer was lower than in DA-APPI. This is suggested to be because in DA-APCI both dopant and solvent clusters can be ionized, and the formed reagent ions can react with the analytes via competing charge exchange and proton transfer reactions. In DA-APPI, on the other hand, the main reagents are dopant-derived radical cations, which favor ionization of analytes via charge exchange. The efficiency of charge exchange in both DA-APPI and DA-APCI was shown to depend heavily on the solvent flow rate, with best efficiency seen at lowest flow rates studied (0.05 and 0.1 mL/min). Both DA-APCI and DA-APPI showed the radical cation of chlorobenzene at 0.05-0.1 mL/min flow rate, but at increasing flow rate, the abundance of chlorobenzene M+. decreased and reagent ion populations deriving from different gas-phase chemistry were recorded. The formation of these reagent ions explains the decreasing ionization efficiency and the differences in charge exchange between the techniques.

  11. Nucleophilic Aromatic Substitution Between Halogenated Benzene Dopants and Nucleophiles in Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization.

    PubMed

    Kauppila, Tiina J; Haack, Alexander; Kroll, Kai; Kersten, Hendrik; Benter, Thorsten

    2016-03-01

    In a preceding work with dopant assisted-atmospheric pressure photoionization (DA-APPI), an abundant ion at [M + 77](+) was observed in the spectra of pyridine and quinoline with chlorobenzene dopant. This contribution aims to reveal the identity and route of formation of this species, and to systematically investigate structurally related analytes and dopants. Compounds containing N-, O-, and S-lone pairs were investigated with APPI in the presence of fluoro-, chloro-, bromo-, and iodobenzene dopants. Computational calculations on a density functional theory (DFT) level were carried out to study the reaction mechanism for pyridine and the different halobenzenes. The experimental and computational results indicated that the [M + 77](+) ion was formed by nucleophilic aromatic ipso-substitution between the halobenzene radical cation and nucleophilic analytes. The reaction was most efficient for N-heteroaromatic compounds, and it was weakened by sterical effects and enhanced by resonance stabilization. The reaction was most efficient with chloro-, bromo-, and iodobenzenes, whereas with fluorobenzene the reaction was scarcely observed. The calculated Gibbs free energies for the reaction between pyridine and the halobenzenes were shown to increase in the order I < Br < Cl < F. The reaction was found endergonic for fluorobenzene due to the strong C-F bonding, and exergonic for the other halobenzenes. For fluoro- and chlorobenzenes the reaction was shown to proceed through an intermediate state corresponding to [M + dopant](+), which was highly stable for fluorobenzene. For the bulkier bromine and iodine, this intermediate did not exist, but the halogens were shown to detach already during the approach by the nucleophile. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26637323

  12. Hf dopants in γ'-Ni3Al alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanovski, V. N.; Cekić, B.; Umićević, A.; Belošević-Čavor, J.; Schumacher, G.; Koteski, V.; Barudzija, T.

    2013-08-01

    The Time Differential Perturbed Angular (TDPAC) measurements of nuclear quadrupole interactions (NQIs) at 181Ta ion probe in the polycrystalline intermetallic alloy γ'-Ni3Al doped with 0.2 at. % Hf were performed in the temperature range 78-1230 K, in order to determine the lattice location of Hf atoms in the ordered γ'-Ni3Al structure. The two NQIs obtained are discussed within the present L12 cubic structure and a tetragonal distortion of L12 to another two DO22 and L60 type structures. The first low frequency NQI at the site of the 181Ta ion-probe after substitution of aluminum for hafnium in DO22 at ambient temperature, is vQ1(300 K) = 39(1) MHz with η1 = 0. The corresponding high frequency value on the second crystallographic site in L60, is vQ2(300 K) = 204(14) MHz with η2 = 0.47(11). These two NQI's have different temperature behavior. The presence of both DO22 and L60 tetragonal distortions of the parent cubic L12 lattice, detected after adding 0.2 at. % Hf, are with modulations to the lattice constant (a) with a ratio (c/a), 2.04 and 0.87, respectively. Ab initio calculations of electronic and structural properties and hyperfine parameters at the 181Ta ion probe of the γ'-Ni3Al-0.2 at. % Hf alloy were performed using the full potential augmented plane wave plus local-orbital (APW+lo) method as implemented in the WIEN2k code. The accuracy of the calculations and comparison with the experimental results enabled us to identify the observed hyperfine interactions and to infer the EFG sign that cannot be measured in conventional TDPAC measurements.

  13. Two-dimensional dopant profiling of gallium nitride p-n junctions by scanning capacitance microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamhamdi, M.; Cayrel, F.; Frayssinet, E.; Bazin, A. E.; Yvon, A.; Collard, E.; Cordier, Y.; Alquier, D.

    2016-04-01

    Two-dimensional imaging of dopant profiles for n and p-type regions are relevant for the development of new power semiconductors, especially for gallium nitride (GaN) for which classical profiling techniques are not adapted. This is a challenging task since it needs a technique with simultaneously good sensitivity, high spatial resolution and high dopant gradient resolution. To face these challenges, scanning capacitance microscopy combined with Atomic Force Microscopy is a good candidate, presenting reproducible results, as demonstrated in literature. In this work, we attempt to distinguish reliably and qualitatively the various doping concentrations and type at p-n and unipolar junctions. For both p-n and unipolar junctions three kinds of samples were prepared and measured separately. The space-charge region of the p-n metallurgical junction, giving rise to different contrasts under SCM imaging, is clearly observed, enlightening the interest of the SCM technique.

  14. Profiling the local carrier concentration and dopant distribution across a semiconductor quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walrath, J. C.; Chang, A. S.; Lin, Y. H.; Huang, S.; Goldman, R. S.

    We profile the local carrier concentration, n, across epitaxial InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) consisting of 3D islands on top of a 2D alloy layer. We use scanning thermoelectric microscopy to profile the temperature gradient-induced voltage, which is converted to a profile of the local Seebeck coefficient, S. The S profile is then converted to a conduction band-edge profile and compared with Poisson-Schrodinger band-edge simulations. Our combined computational-experimental approach suggests a reduced carrier concentration in the QD center in comparison to that of the 2D alloy layer. We further use 3D atom probe tomography, which enables 3D imaging with a few Angstrom resolution, to profile the distribution of Si dopants. We discuss the correlation between the Si dopant distribution and the observed carrier concentration profile.

  15. RETRACTION: Redistribution of infused and implanted dopants in a multilayer structure during annealing of dopant and radiation defects for the production of a system of p-n junctions Redistribution of infused and implanted dopants in a multilayer structure during annealing of dopant and radiation defects for the production of a system of p-n junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankratov, E. L.

    2009-04-01

    It has come to the attention of IOP Publishing that this article should not have been submitted for publication owing to its substantial replication of other published papers by the same author: E L Pankratov 2008 Optimization of laser annealing of radiation defects for production of an implanted-junction rectifier J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 41 115105 E L Pankratov 2008 Redistribution of dopant during microwave annealing of a multilayer structure for production p-junction J. Appl. Phys. 103 064320 and E L Pankratov 2008 Redistribution of dopant in a multilayer structure during annealing of radiation defects by laser pulses for production an implanted-junction rectifier Phys. Lett. A 372 4510-4516 Consequently the two papers in Semiconductor Science and Technology and Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics have been retracted by IOP Publishing.

  16. Characterization of Spin-on Dopant by Sol-gel Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamil, S. Ahmad; Ibrahim, K.; Aziz, A. Abdul

    2008-05-01

    P-N junction is a basic building block for many important electron devices from as simple as a solar cell to very complicated integrated circuit. In this work, spin-on dopant (SOD) was used as the diffusion source in order to create p-n junction. SOD was prepared by using sol gel method. The spin-on dopant solution ingredients contain tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS), isopropanol (IPA), distilled water (H2O), acetone and phosphoric acid (H3PO4). The coated silicon wafers were put inside the conventional furnace for predepostion and drive in oxidation. Effect caused by varying the molarity of the acid were observed and studied using Hall Effect measurement by comparing their differences in sheet resistance, mobility, resistivity as well as sheet and bulk concentaration.

  17. Electron probe microanalysis of the dopant concentrations in complex perovskite ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samardžija, Z.

    2016-02-01

    Quantitative EPMA-WDS microanalyses were applied for the compositional characterisation of complex perovskite ferroelectrics based on cerium-doped barium titanate, a solid solution between lead-magnesium-niobate/lead-titanate and niobium-doped barium- bismuth-titanate. The analyses were optimized for high analytical sensitivity, precision and an ultimate accuracy of ≈ ± 1 % relative. The inherent problem with the WDS peak overlap of the Ce-Lα1 and Ba-Lβ1,4 spectral lines was solved by introducing overlap-correction methods in order to obtain consistent quantitative results for the Ce-doped BaTiO3. The quantitative results made it possible to obtain accurate chemical formulae for these materials, to determine the solubility of the dopants as well as to define the mode of the dopant incorporation and the charge-compensation mechanisms.

  18. Effectiveness of a dopant in U-Zr metallic fuel to prevent lanthanide migration

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yeon Soo; Wieneck, T.; O'Hare, E.; Fortner, J.

    2013-07-01

    The advanced fast reactor concepts to achieve ultra-high burnup (about 50%) without requiring refueling by way of using metallic alloy fuel have gained interest. Fission product lanthanide accumulation at high burnup is substantial and its migration to cladding and reaction with cladding is a potential life-limiting phenomenon. As a means to solve this problem, adding an element that forms stable compounds with lanthanides to immobilize them has been proposed. The theoretical assessment shows that indium, thallium, gallium, and antimony are good candidates. Except for Sb, because these elements are low-melting temperature elements, liquid metal embrittlement of cladding is a concern if large sized agglomerates exist contacting the cladding. Alloy characterization of as-fabricated samples was performed to examine the effectiveness of the dopant addition method using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Although preliminary, the present results showed that indium is a better dopant to immobilize lanthanides.

  19. Impact of Dopant Compensation on Graded p-n Junctions in Si Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Amit, Iddo; Jeon, Nari; Lauhon, Lincoln J; Rosenwaks, Yossi

    2016-01-13

    The modulation between different doping species required to produce a diode in VLS-grown nanowires (NWs) yields a complex doping profile, both axially and radially, and a gradual junction at the interface. We present a detailed analysis of the dopant distribution around the junction. By combining surface potential measurements, performed by KPFM, with finite element simulations, we show that the highly doped (5 × 10(19) cm(-3)) shell surrounding the NW can screen the junction's built in voltage at shell thickness as low as 3 nm. By comparing NWs with high and low doping contrast at the junction, we show that dopant compensation dramatically decreases the electrostatic width of the junction and results in relatively low leakage currents. PMID:26650197

  20. Modulating the Electronic and Optical Properties of Tetragonal ZnSe Monolayers by Chalcogen Dopants.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jia; Li, Yang; Wu, Xiaohong; Qin, Wei

    2016-07-01

    The recently proposed three-atom-thick single-layer ZnSe sheet demonstrates a strong quantum confinement effect by exhibiting a large enhancement of band gap relative to the zinc blende (ZB) bulk phase. In this work, we aim at investigating the electronic and optical properties of this ultrathin tetragonal ZnSe single-layer sheet with various chalcogen dopant atoms, based on density functional theory (DFT). We find that these single-layer sheets with dopant atoms are still direct-band semiconductors with tunable band gaps, which can lead to strong light absorption and potential applications in solar energy harvesting. Theoretical optical absorbance results show that the S-doped ZnSe monolayer exhibits a higher absorption performance compared to other doped and undoped ZnSe monolayers. These findings pave a way for the modulation of novel ultrathin tetragonal ZnSe monolayers for a wealth of potential optoelectronic applications. PMID:26972924

  1. DBR laser with nondynamic plasma grating formed by focused ion beam implanted dopants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boenke, Myra M.; Wu, M. C.; Wang, Shyh; Clark, William M., Jr.; Stevens, Eugene H.

    1989-01-01

    A static plasma grating has been demonstrated experimentally (Wu et al., 1988) in a large-optical-cavity focused-ion-beam-distributed-Bragg-reflector (FIB-DBR) GaAlAs/GaAs laser diode. The grating is formed by implanting stripes of dopants with a focused ion beam. The dopants ionize to form periodic fluctuations in the carrier concentration which, through the Kramers-Kronig relations, form an index grating. A model of the grating strength for optimizaton of the laser design is developed and presented. The computed results show that the coupling coefficient k can be increased by more than an order of magnitude over the 15/cm experimentally. Therefore, FIB-DBR or FIB-distributed-feedback (DFB) lasers with performance comparable to that of conventional DBR (or DFB) lasers can be expected.

  2. Tuning the magnetic interaction between Mn dopants in GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohlke, David; Gupta, Jay

    2012-02-01

    Manganese can be used as a dopant in gallium arsenide to create a ferromagnetic semiconductor. We use low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy to study these magnetic properties. The magnetic coupling between Mn dopants in GaAs(110) changes between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic depending on the orientation of the acceptors due to the zincblende crystal structure of the surface [Kitchen et al, Nature, 2006]. We have recently reported tuning of the resonance energy for a single Mn acceptor by moving charged atomic point defects [Lee and Gupta, Science, 2010]. Here, we tune the magnetic interaction between surface-layer Mn atoms in the same way. Funding for this research was provided by the Center for Emergent Materials at the Ohio State University, an NSF MRSEC (Award Number DMR-0820414). http://www.physics.ohio-state.edu/˜jgupta/

  3. The determination of dopant ion valence distributions in insulating crystals using XANES measurements.

    PubMed

    Hughes-Currie, Rosa B; Ivanovskikh, Konstantin V; R Wells, Jon-Paul; Reid, Michael F; Gordon, Robert A

    2016-04-01

    Ytterbium-doped wide-bandgap fluoride crystals CaF2, SrF2 and NaMgF3 have been measured using x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) on the L3 edge to determine the ratio of trivalent to divalent Yb ions present in the crystals. This study improves upon previous XANES measurements of dopant ion valency by taking into account the x-ray emission transition probabilities for the divalent and trivalent species instead of simply assuming that the relative concentrations may be determined by the ratio of the x-ray excitation band areas. Trivalent to divalent ratios as high as 5 are inferred even at low total dopant ion concentrations of 0.05 mol% Yb. PMID:26941175

  4. The determination of dopant ion valence distributions in insulating crystals using XANES measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes-Currie, Rosa B.; Ivanovskikh, Konstantin V.; Wells, Jon-Paul R.; Reid, Michael F.; Gordon, Robert A.

    2016-04-01

    Ytterbium-doped wide-bandgap fluoride crystals CaF2, SrF2 and NaMgF3 have been measured using x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) on the L3 edge to determine the ratio of trivalent to divalent Yb ions present in the crystals. This study improves upon previous XANES measurements of dopant ion valency by taking into account the x-ray emission transition probabilities for the divalent and trivalent species instead of simply assuming that the relative concentrations may be determined by the ratio of the x-ray excitation band areas. Trivalent to divalent ratios as high as 5 are inferred even at low total dopant ion concentrations of 0.05 mol% Yb.

  5. High Resolution Dopant Profiles Revealed by Atom Probe Tomography and STEM-EBIC for CdTe Based Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Poplawsky, Jonathan D.; Li, Chen; Paudel, Naba; Guo, Wei; Yan, Yanfa; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Segregated elements and their diffusion profiles within grain boundaries and interfaces resulting from post deposition heat treatments are revealed using atom probe tomography (APT), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), and electron beam induced current (EBIC) techniques. The results demonstrate how these techniques complement each other to provide conclusive evidence for locations of space charge regions and mechanisms that create them at the nanoscale. Most importantly, a Cl dopant profile that extends ~5 nm into CdTe grains interfacing the CdS is shown using APT and STEM synergy, which has been shown to push the pn-junction into the CdTe layer indicative of a homojunction (revealed by STEM EBIC). In addition, Cu and Cl concentrations within grain boundaries within several nms and µms from the CdS/CdTe interface are compared, Na segregation of <0.1% is detected, and S variations of ~1–3% are witnessed between CdTe grains close to the CdS/CdTe interface. The segregation and diffusion of these elements directly impacts on the material properties, such as band gap energy and n/p type properties. Optimization of the interfacial and grain boundary doping will lead to higher efficiency solar cells.

  6. High Resolution Dopant Profiles Revealed by Atom Probe Tomography and STEM-EBIC for CdTe Based Solar Cells

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Poplawsky, Jonathan D.; Li, Chen; Paudel, Naba; Guo, Wei; Yan, Yanfa; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Segregated elements and their diffusion profiles within grain boundaries and interfaces resulting from post deposition heat treatments are revealed using atom probe tomography (APT), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), and electron beam induced current (EBIC) techniques. The results demonstrate how these techniques complement each other to provide conclusive evidence for locations of space charge regions and mechanisms that create them at the nanoscale. Most importantly, a Cl dopant profile that extends ~5 nm into CdTe grains interfacing the CdS is shown using APT and STEM synergy, which has been shown to push the pn-junction into the CdTe layer indicative ofmore » a homojunction (revealed by STEM EBIC). In addition, Cu and Cl concentrations within grain boundaries within several nms and µms from the CdS/CdTe interface are compared, Na segregation of <0.1% is detected, and S variations of ~1–3% are witnessed between CdTe grains close to the CdS/CdTe interface. The segregation and diffusion of these elements directly impacts on the material properties, such as band gap energy and n/p type properties. Optimization of the interfacial and grain boundary doping will lead to higher efficiency solar cells.« less

  7. Perovskite Solar Cells Employing Dopant-Free Organic Hole Transport Materials with Tunable Energy Levels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongsheng; Hong, Ziruo; Chen, Qi; Chen, Huajun; Chang, Wei-Hsuan; Yang, Yang Michael; Song, Tze-Bin; Yang, Yang

    2016-01-20

    Conjugated small-molecule hole-transport materials (HTMs) with tunable energy levels are designed and synthesized for efficient perovskite solar cells. A champion device with efficiency of 16.2% is demonstrated using a dopant-free DERDTS-TBDT HTM, while the DORDTS-DFBT-HTM-based device shows an inferior performance of 6.2% due to its low hole mobility and unmatched HOMO level with the valence band of perovskite film. PMID:26588665

  8. Atomistic Interrogation of B-N Co-dopant Structures and Their Electronic Effects in Graphene.

    PubMed

    Schiros, Theanne; Nordlund, Dennis; Palova, Lucia; Zhao, Liuyan; Levendorf, Mark; Jaye, Cherno; Reichman, David; Park, Jiwoong; Hybertsen, Mark; Pasupathy, Abhay

    2016-07-26

    Chemical doping has been demonstrated to be an effective method for producing high-quality, large-area graphene with controlled carrier concentrations and an atomically tailored work function. The emergent optoelectronic properties and surface reactivity of carbon nanostructures are dictated by the microstructure of atomic dopants. Co-doping of graphene with boron and nitrogen offers the possibility to further tune the electronic properties of graphene at the atomic level, potentially creating p- and n-type domains in a single carbon sheet, opening a gap between valence and conduction bands in the 2-D semimetal. Using a suite of high-resolution synchrotron-based X-ray techniques, scanning tunneling microscopy, and density functional theory based computation we visualize and characterize B-N dopant bond structures and their electronic effects at the atomic level in single-layer graphene grown on a copper substrate. We find there is a thermodynamic driving force for B and N atoms to cluster into BNC structures in graphene, rather than randomly distribute into isolated B and N graphitic dopants, although under the present growth conditions, kinetics limit segregation of large B-N domains. We observe that the doping effect of these BNC structures, which open a small band gap in graphene, follows the B:N ratio (B > N, p-type; B < N, n-type; B═N, neutral). We attribute this to the comparable electron-withdrawing and -donating effects, respectively, of individual graphitic B and N dopants, although local electrostatics also play a role in the work function change. PMID:27327863

  9. Effect of dopants on crystal structure and thermal properties of pentaglycerine

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, D.; Ding, W.

    1989-03-01

    The overall objective of this research program is to develop practical solid-state thermal energy storage materials. Research is focused on polyalcohol {open_quotes}Plastic Crystals{close_quotes} which undergo crystallographic changes at constant transition temperature absorbing or releasing amounts of latent heat. The known pure polyalcohols have high transition temperatures; therefore, adjustment of transformation temperature is important to develop practical materials. The approach taken is to introduce substitutional and interstitial dopants so as to strain the lattice of the host crystal which results in lowering the transition temperature. Current research is on temperature adjustment of pentaglycerine [PG] (C{sub 5}H{sub 12}O{sub 3}) initiated approximately four months ago. Results, so far, show that the substitutional dopants are more effective in reducing the transition temperature than interstitial dopants. The results in the first phase of this program show that the transition temperature of PG reduced significantly by using trimethylol propane [TMP] (C{sub 6}H{sub 14}O{sub 3}), 2-amino 2-methyl 1,3 propanediol [AMPL] (C{sub 4}H{sub 11}NO{sub 2}) as dopants. It appears that some of these doped samples have near room temperature transitions; however, these results are not conclusive at this time. Recently, it was discovered that TMP has an additional solid-solid phase transformation, slightly below room temperature. Crystal structure analyses showed some surprising results with regards to thermal expansion behavior of PG. Several sets of low as well as high temperature data were obtained from the pure and doped PG to characterize the structural changes, if any, and the thermal expansions. Research is in progress on crystal structure and thermal analyses.

  10. Final results from the SDC dopant search for new green wavelength shifting (WLS) fibers: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Pla-Dalmau, A.; Foster, G.W.; Zhang, G.

    1993-12-01

    A scintillating tile/fiber design had been selected for the SDC calorimeter. It consisted of scintillator plates embedded with a wavelength shifting (WLS) fiber which was spliced to a clear fiber. Based on the results from previous radiation damage studies on different scintillating materials, SCSN38 had been chosen for the scintillating tile and BCF91 or Y7 for the WLS fiber. SCSN38 is a blue-emitting scintillator and both WLS fibers use K-27, a green-emitting compound, as dopant. K-27 has a decay time of approximately 12 ns which is long in comparison to that of most blue-emitting materials. Of all the factors that affect the speed of the scintillator tile/fiber calorimeter, the lifetime of the green-emitting dopant is the dominant component. To increase the speed of the calorimeter, it would be desirable that the green WLS fibers utilized had lifetimes between 3 and 5 ns. However, currently available green WLS fibers exhibit decay times between 7 and 12 ns. Development of new green-emitting WLS fibers with short decay times must be investigated. The goal of this project was to search for commercially available fluorescent compounds with {lambda}{sub abs} = 400--450 nm, {lambda}{sub em} = 450--550 nm, {tau} = 3--7 ns, and quantum efficiency of minimum 0.7 (current K-27 baseline). Large Stokes shift and low self-absorption were not important requirements since the optical pathlength for the shifted light was small. Characterization of the spectroscopic properties of these compounds after styrene polymerization is important since this is an essential part of the manufacturing of WLS fibers. This summary presents the transmittance and fluorescence data for each dopant tested. However, many fluorescence measurements using different excitation wavelengths and orientations were recorded. Volume 1 presents a plot for each dopant combining transmittance and the most representative fluorescence measurement.

  11. Optical properties of active bismuth centres in silica fibres containing no other dopants

    SciTech Connect

    Bufetov, Igor' A; Semenov, S L; Vel'miskin, V V; Firstov, Sergei V; Dianov, Evgenii M; Bufetova, G A

    2010-09-10

    Optical fibre preforms and fibres with a bismuth-doped silica core containing no other dopants have been fabricated by the powder-in-tube technique. The optical loss has been measured for the first time in such fibres in a wide spectral range, from 190 to 1700 nm. We have studied the luminescence of active bismuth centres and the luminescence lifetime for some of their bands in both the preforms and the fibres drawn out from them. (optical fibres)

  12. Quantum simulation of the Hubbard model with dopant atoms in silicon

    PubMed Central

    Salfi, J.; Mol, J. A.; Rahman, R.; Klimeck, G.; Simmons, M. Y.; Hollenberg, L. C. L.; Rogge, S.

    2016-01-01

    In quantum simulation, many-body phenomena are probed in controllable quantum systems. Recently, simulation of Bose–Hubbard Hamiltonians using cold atoms revealed previously hidden local correlations. However, fermionic many-body Hubbard phenomena such as unconventional superconductivity and spin liquids are more difficult to simulate using cold atoms. To date the required single-site measurements and cooling remain problematic, while only ensemble measurements have been achieved. Here we simulate a two-site Hubbard Hamiltonian at low effective temperatures with single-site resolution using subsurface dopants in silicon. We measure quasi-particle tunnelling maps of spin-resolved states with atomic resolution, finding interference processes from which the entanglement entropy and Hubbard interactions are quantified. Entanglement, determined by spin and orbital degrees of freedom, increases with increasing valence bond length. We find separation-tunable Hubbard interaction strengths that are suitable for simulating strongly correlated phenomena in larger arrays of dopants, establishing dopants as a platform for quantum simulation of the Hubbard model. PMID:27094205

  13. The effect of random dopant fluctuation on threshold voltage and drain current variation in junctionless nanotransistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezapour, Arash; Rezapour, Pegah

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the effect of dopant random fluctuation on threshold voltage and drain current variation in a two-gate nanoscale transistor. We used a quantum-corrected technology computer aided design simulation to run the simulation (10000 randomizations). With this simulation, we could study the effects of varying the dimensions (length and width), and thicknesses of oxide and dopant factors of a transistor on the threshold voltage and drain current in subthreshold region (off) and overthreshold (on). It was found that in the subthreshold region the variability of the drain current and threshold voltage is relatively fixed while in the overthreshold region the variability of the threshold voltage and drain current decreases remarkably, despite the slight reduction of gate voltage diffusion (compared with that of the subthreshold). These results have been interpreted by using previously reported models for threshold current variability, load displacement, and simple analytical calculations. Scaling analysis shows that the variability of the characteristics of this semiconductor increases as the effects of the short channel increases. Therefore, with a slight increase of length and a reduction of width, oxide thickness, and dopant factor, we could correct the effect of the short channel.

  14. Dopant-Enabled Supramolecular Approach for Controlled Synthesis of Nanostructured Conductive Polymer Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaqun; Shi, Ye; Pan, Lijia; Ding, Yu; Zhao, Yu; Li, Yun; Shi, Yi; Yu, Guihua

    2015-11-11

    Conducting polymer hydrogels emerge as a novel class of polymeric materials that show great potential in many energy, environmental, and biomedical devices. We describe here for the first time a general supramolecular approach toward controlled in situ synthesis of one-dimensional nanostructured conductive hydrogels (polypyrrole (PPy) as a model system) using a rational dopant counterion, which is a disc-shaped liquid crystal molecular copper phthalocyanine-3,4',4″,4‴-tetrasulfonic acid tetrasodium salt (CuPcTs). The dopant molecule CuPcTs cross-linked the PPy chains to form a three-dimensional network that gelated into a hydrogel. The PPy hydrogel could be synthesized in bulk quantities with uniform morphology of self-assembled interconnected nanofibers. The tetra-functional dopant favors a supramolecular self-assembly mechanism to form one-dimensional PPy nanostructures. Furthermore, the enhanced interchain charge transport of CuPcTs doped PPy resulted in greatly enhanced conductivity and pseudocapacitance compared with pristine PPy. PMID:26505784

  15. Spontaneous reorientation from planar to homeotropic alignment in dual-frequency mixture doped with chiral dopant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkowski, Paweł; Mrukiewicz, Mateusz; Chojnowska, Olga; Piecek, Wiktor; Dąbrowski, Roman

    2014-11-01

    We investigate a dual-frequency (DF) nematic mixture by means of the dielectric spectroscopy. A chiral dopant has been added to the DF matrix. A pure DF matrix as well as three samples with increasing concentration of chiral dopant (DF*) have been prepared. Investigated samples have shown a selective reflection band, according to a helical pitch induced in proportion to the chiral dopant amount. Such system promises a great application potential as a selective light reflecting shutter or spectral filter due to nearly symmetrical switching times and defectless structures. When we put the non-doped DF mixture into homogenous (HG) oriented cell we found that planar orientation is permanent on both cooling and heating cycles. In the case of DF* chiral mixtures, the behavior changes substantially. One can observe that the oriented virgin planar structure of DF* within the HG cell starts to change its orientation to homeotropic one at different temperature. When heating is continued the homeotropic orientation in the HG cell is preserved up to the clearing temperature. Upon a subsequent cooling from the isotropic state, the homeotropic orientation is preserved within the whole mesogenic state. The effect of induction of the homeotropic state observed within HG cells is analyzed and discussed.

  16. Dopant effects on charge transport to enhance performance of phosphorescent white organic light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Liping; Chen, Jiangshan; Ma, Dongge

    2015-11-07

    We compared the performance of phosphorescent white organic light emitting diodes (WOLEDs) with red-blue-green and green-blue-red sequent emissive layers. It was found that the influence of red and green dopants on electron and hole transport in emissive layers leads to the large difference in the efficiency of fabricated WOLEDs. This improvement mechanism is well investigated by the current density-voltage characteristics of single-carrier devices based on dopant doped emissive layers and the comparison of electroluminescent and photoluminescence spectra, and attributed to the different change of charge carrier transport by the dopants. The optimized device achieves a maximum power efficiency, current efficiency, and external quantum efficiency of 37.0 lm/W, 38.7 cd/A, and 17.7%, respectively, which are only reduced to 32.8 lm/W, 38.5 cd/A, and 17.3% at 1000 cd/m{sup 2} luminance. The critical current density is as high as 210 mA/cm{sup 2}. It can be seen that the efficiency roll-off in phosphorescent WOLEDs can be well improved by effectively designing the structure of emissive layers.

  17. Optical Behaviors of Cholesteric Liquid-Crystalline Polyester Composites with Various Chiral Photochromic Dopants.

    PubMed

    Chien, Chih-Chieh; Liu, Jui-Hsiang

    2015-12-15

    New developments in the field of chiral nematic liquid crystals, such as color displays, are now being widely proposed. This article describes the tunable incident reflection band based on composite materials of low-molecular-weight chiroptical dopants and polymeric networks. These materials have advantages including easily manageable color according to a change in the helical pitch of the cholesteric liquid crystal upon exposure to light. A series of novel chiral dopants of isosorbide derivatives containing photochromic groups and three new main-chain liquid crystalline polyesters were synthesized and identified using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and elemental analyses. The phase-transition temperatures and the liquid-crystal phase determination of the synthesized polymers were estimated using DSC, WAXD, and POM analyses. The influence of the dopant concentrations and the solubility in a liquid crystalline polymer blend were also studied. The reflection band of the cholesteric liquid crystalline composites could be adjusted and tuned with a wide range of color variation across the entire visible region. A real image recording of the chiral photochromic liquid crystalline polymer blend was achieved by exposing it to UV light through a mask. PMID:26636344

  18. Structure-property-composition relationships in doped zinc oxides: enhanced photocatalytic activity with rare earth dopants.

    PubMed

    Goodall, Josephine B M; Illsley, Derek; Lines, Robert; Makwana, Neel M; Darr, Jawwad A

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the use of continuous hydrothermal flow synthesis (CHFS) technology to rapidly produce a library of 56 crystalline (doped) zinc oxide nanopowders and two undoped samples, each with different particle properties. Each sample was produced in series from the mixing of an aqueous stream of basic zinc nitrate (and dopant ion or modifier) solution with a flow of superheated water (at 450 °C and 24.1 MPa), whereupon a crystalline nanoparticle slurry was rapidly formed. Each composition was collected in series, cleaned, freeze-dried, and then characterized using analytical methods, including powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area measurement, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and UV-vis spectrophotometry. Photocatalytic activity of the samples toward the decolorization of methylene blue dye was assessed, and the results revealed that transition metal dopants tended to reduce the photoactivity while rare earth ions, in general, increased the photocatalytic activity. In general, low dopant concentrations were more beneficial to having greater photodecolorization in all cases. PMID:25602735

  19. n-Dopants Based on Dimers of Benzimidazoline Radicals: Structures and Mechanism of Redox Reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Siyuan; Naab, Benjamin D; Jucov, Evgheni V; Parkin, Sean; Evans, Eric G B; Millhauser, Glenn L; Timofeeva, Tatiana V; Risko, Chad; Brédas, Jean-Luc; Bao, Zhenan; Barlow, Stephen; Marder, Seth R

    2015-07-20

    Dimers of 2-substituted N,N'-dimethylbenzimidazoline radicals, (2-Y-DMBI)2 (Y=cyclohexyl (Cyc), ferrocenyl (Fc), ruthenocenyl (Rc)), have recently been reported as n-dopants for organic semiconductors. Here their structural and energetic characteristics are reported, along with the mechanisms by which they react with acceptors, A (PCBM, TIPS-pentacene), in solution. X-ray data and DFT calculations both indicate a longer C-C bond for (2-Cyc-DMBI)2 than (2-Fc-DMBI)2 , yet DFT and ESR data show that the latter dissociates more readily due to stabilization of the radical by Fc. Depending on the energetics of dimer (D2 ) dissociation and of D2 -to-A electron transfer, D2 reacts with A to form D(+) and A(-) by either of two mechanisms, differing in whether the first step is endergonic dissociation or endergonic electron transfer. However, the D(+) /0.5 D2 redox potentials-the effective reducing strengths of the dimers-vary little within the series (ca. -1.9 V vs. FeCp2 (+/0) ) (Cp=cyclopentadienyl) due to cancelation of trends in the D(+/0) potential and D2 dissociation energy. The implications of these findings for use of these dimers as n-dopants, and for future dopant design, are discussed. PMID:26088609

  20. Density functional theory study of dopants in polycrystalline TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Körner, Wolfgang; Elsässer, Christian

    2011-05-01

    We present a density functional theory (DFT) study of doped rutile and anatase TiO2 in which we investigate the impact of grain boundaries on the physics of atomic defects. The main goal is to obtain information about the positions of the defect levels generated by an oxygen vacancy, a titanium interstitial, cation dopants Nb, Al, and Ga, and an anion dopant N in the electronic band gap having in mind the application of TiO2 as a transparent conducting oxide (TCO) or its use in heterogeneous catalysis. Due to the known deficiency of the local density approximation (LDA) of DFT to yield accurate values for band gap energies for insulators such as TiO2, a self-interaction correction (SIC) to the LDA is employed. The main result of our study is that grain boundaries do affect the defect formation energies as well as the position and shape of the dopant-induced electronic energy levels significantly with respect to the single crystal. According to our study Nb doping may lead to n-conducting TiO2 whereas doping with N, Al, or Ga is not promising in order to achieve p-conducting TiO2. Furthermore an increase in the photoconductivity of TiO2:N and the colorlessness of TiO2:Al may be explained by our results.

  1. n-Dopants Based on Dimers of Benzimidazoline Radicals: Structures and Mechanism of Redox Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Siyuan; Naab, Benjamin D.; Jucov, Evgheni V.; Parkin, Sean; Evans, Eric G. B.; Millhauser, Glenn L.; Timofeeva, Tatiana V.; Risko, Chad; Brédas, Jean-Luc; Bao, Zhenan; Barlow, Stephen; Marder, Seth R.

    2015-01-01

    Dimers of 2-substituted N,N'-dimethylbenzimidazoline radicals, (2-Y-DMBI)2 {Y = cyclohexyl (Cyc), ferrocenyl (Fc), ruthenocenyl (Rc)} have recently been reported as n-dopants for organic semiconductors. Here their structural and energetic characteristics are reported, along with the mechanisms by which they react with acceptors, A (PCBM, TIPS-pentacene), in solution. X-ray data and DFT both indicate a longer C—C bond for (2-Cyc-DMBI)2 than (2-Fc-DMBI)2, yet DFT and ESR data show that the latter dissociates more readily due to stabilization of the radical by Fc. Depending on the energetics of dimer (D2) dissociation and of D2-to-A electron transfer, D2 reacts with A to form D+ and A•– by either of two mechanisms, differing in whether the first step is endergonic dissociation or endergonic electron transfer. However, the D+/0.5D2 redox potentials – the effective reducing strengths of the dimers – vary little within the series (ca. –1.9 V vs. FeCp2+/0) due to cancelation of trends in the D+/0 potential and D2 dissociation energy. The implications of these findings for use of these dimers as n-dopants, and for future dopant design, are discussed. PMID:26088609

  2. Predicting Low Energy Dopant Implant Profiles in Semiconductors using Molecular Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Beardmore, K.M.; Gronbech-Jensen, N.

    1999-05-02

    The authors present a highly efficient molecular dynamics scheme for calculating dopant density profiles in group-IV alloy, and III-V zinc blende structure materials. Their scheme incorporates several necessary methods for reducing computational overhead, plus a rare event algorithm to give statistical accuracy over several orders of magnitude change in the dopant concentration. The code uses a molecular dynamics (MD) model to describe ion-target interactions. Atomic interactions are described by a combination of 'many-body' and pair specific screened Coulomb potentials. Accumulative damage is accounted for using a Kinchin-Pease type model, inelastic energy loss is represented by a Firsov expression, and electronic stopping is described by a modified Brandt-Kitagawa model which contains a single adjustable ion-target dependent parameter. Thus, the program is easily extensible beyond a given validation range, and is therefore truly predictive over a wide range of implant energies and angles. The scheme is especially suited for calculating profiles due to low energy and to situations where a predictive capability is required with the minimum of experimental validation. They give examples of using the code to calculate concentration profiles and 2D 'point response' profiles of dopants in crystalline silicon and gallium-arsenide. Here they can predict the experimental profile over five orders of magnitude for <100> and <110> channeling and for non-channeling implants at energies up to hundreds of keV.

  3. An Efficient Molecular Dynamics Scheme for Predicting Dopant Implant Profiles in Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Beardmore, K.M.; Gronbech-Jensen, N.

    1998-09-15

    The authors present a highly efficient molecular dynamics scheme for calculating the concentration profile of dopants implanted in group-IV alloy, and III-V zinc blende structure materials. The program incorporates methods for reducing computational overhead, plus a rare event algorithm to give statistical accuracy over several orders of magnitude change in the dopant concentration. The code uses a molecular dynamics (MD) model, instead of the binary collision approximation (BCA) used in implant simulators such as TRIM and Marlowe, to describe ion-target interactions. Atomic interactions are described by a combination of 'many-body' and screened Coulomb potentials. Inelastic energy loss is accounted for using a Firsov model, and electronic stopping is described by a Brandt-Kitagawa model which contains the single adjustable parameter for the entire scheme. Thus, the program is easily extensible to new ion-target combinations with the minimum of tuning, and is predictive over a wide range of implant energies and angles. The scheme is especially suited for calculating profiles due to low energy, large angle implants, and for situations where a predictive capability is required with the minimum of experimental validation. They give examples of using their code to calculate concentration profiles and 2D 'point response' profiles of dopants in crystalline silicon, silicon-germanium blends, and gallium-arsenide. They can predict the experimental profiles over five orders of magnitude for <100> and <110> channeling and for non-channeling implants at energies up to hundreds of keV.

  4. Effects of Li and Cu dopants on structural properties of zinc oxide nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyung Ho; Jin, Zhuguang; Abe, Yoshio; Kawamura, Midori

    2015-01-01

    We fabricated undoped zinc oxide (ZnO), Li-doped zinc oxide (LZO), and Cu-doped zinc oxide (CZO) nanorods (NRs) on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO)-coated glass substrates using chemical solution deposition and investigated their structural properties. With the incorporation of the Li dopant, the length and crystallinity of LZO NRs increased and improved, respectively, compared to that of the ZnO NRs. The average optical transmittance of LZO NRs was slightly lower than that of the ZnO NRs, but otherwise very similar over the visible wavelength region. With the incorporation of the Cu dopant, however, the morphology of the CZO sample was remarkably different from that of the pure ZnO NRs. Rods with a length of ∼12 μm and a diameter of 0.5-1.2 μm were randomly oriented on the substrate, and copper oxide (CuO) nanocrystals were uniformly grown on the surface of substrate. This paper presents a simple way to tune the growth behaviors of the ZnO NRs by adding dopants.

  5. Effect of isovalent dopants on photodegradation ability of ZnS nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Khaparde, Rohini; Acharya, Smita

    2016-06-15

    Isovalent (Mn, Cd, Cu, Co)-doped-ZnS nanoparticles having size vary in between 2 to 5nm are synthesized by co-precipitation route. Their photocatalytic activity for decoloration of Cango Red and Malachite Green dyes is tested in visible radiation under natural conditions. Structural and morphological features of the samples are investigated by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and UVVis spectrometer. Single phase zinc blende structure of as-synthesized undoped and doped-ZnS is confirmed by XRD and revealed by Rietveld fitting. SEM and TEM images show ultrafine nanoparticles having size in the range of 2 to 5nm. UV-Vis absorption spectra exhibit blue shift in absorption edge of undoped and doped ZnS as compared to bulk counterpart. The photocatalytic activity as a function of dopant concentration and irradiation time is systematically studied. The rate of de-coloration of dyes is detected by UVVis absorption spectroscopy and organic dye mineralization is confirmed by table of carbon (TOC) study. The photocatalytic activity of Mn-doped ZnS is highest amongst all dopants; however Co as a dopant is found to reduce photocatalytic activity than pure ZnS. PMID:27037762

  6. Effect of isovalent dopants on photodegradation ability of ZnS nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaparde, Rohini; Acharya, Smita

    2016-06-01

    Isovalent (Mn, Cd, Cu, Co)-doped-ZnS nanoparticles having size vary in between 2 to 5 nm are synthesized by co-precipitation route. Their photocatalytic activity for decoloration of Cango Red and Malachite Green dyes is tested in visible radiation under natural conditions. Structural and morphological features of the samples are investigated by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and UVsbnd Vis spectrometer. Single phase zinc blende structure of as-synthesized undoped and doped-ZnS is confirmed by XRD and revealed by Rietveld fitting. SEM and TEM images show ultrafine nanoparticles having size in the range of 2 to 5 nm. UV-Vis absorption spectra exhibit blue shift in absorption edge of undoped and doped ZnS as compared to bulk counterpart. The photocatalytic activity as a function of dopant concentration and irradiation time is systematically studied. The rate of de-coloration of dyes is detected by UVsbnd Vis absorption spectroscopy and organic dye mineralization is confirmed by table of carbon (TOC) study. The photocatalytic activity of Mn-doped ZnS is highest amongst all dopants; however Co as a dopant is found to reduce photocatalytic activity than pure ZnS.

  7. Design of new anchored p-dopants for high power efficiency OLEDs

    SciTech Connect

    Koech, Phillip K; Sapochak, Linda S; Rainbolt, James E; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Polikarpov, Evgueni; Swensen, James S; Wang, Liang; Padmaperuma, Asanga B; Gaspar, Daniel J

    2009-08-27

    Conductivity doping of charge transporting layers is increasingly becoming attractive for improving power efficiency in OLEDs. However, the number of organic molecular p-dopants is limited for instance the electron acceptor 2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-7,7,8,8,-tetracyanoquinodimethane (F4-TCNQ) is the most utilized p-dopant. F4-TCNQ can dope most hole transporting materials (HTL), but it is very volatility, and has a low sticking coefficient thus difficult to deposit. Here we present the design of anchored molecular dopants based on the TCNQ core. We first review how the reduction potential of TCNQ core is affected by substitution with alkyl groups of different electronic properties. Electron donating groups have negative effect on the reduction potential of the acceptor. However, attaching electron withdrawing groups such as halogens counteracts the effect of electron donating groups. Using gas phase theoretical calculations we determined that trifluorinated TCNQ can be anchored through a σ-coupled alkyl chain to an inert molecular anchor without sacrificing the electron affinity.

  8. Quantum simulation of the Hubbard model with dopant atoms in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salfi, J.; Mol, J. A.; Rahman, R.; Klimeck, G.; Simmons, M. Y.; Hollenberg, L. C. L.; Rogge, S.

    2016-04-01

    In quantum simulation, many-body phenomena are probed in controllable quantum systems. Recently, simulation of Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonians using cold atoms revealed previously hidden local correlations. However, fermionic many-body Hubbard phenomena such as unconventional superconductivity and spin liquids are more difficult to simulate using cold atoms. To date the required single-site measurements and cooling remain problematic, while only ensemble measurements have been achieved. Here we simulate a two-site Hubbard Hamiltonian at low effective temperatures with single-site resolution using subsurface dopants in silicon. We measure quasi-particle tunnelling maps of spin-resolved states with atomic resolution, finding interference processes from which the entanglement entropy and Hubbard interactions are quantified. Entanglement, determined by spin and orbital degrees of freedom, increases with increasing valence bond length. We find separation-tunable Hubbard interaction strengths that are suitable for simulating strongly correlated phenomena in larger arrays of dopants, establishing dopants as a platform for quantum simulation of the Hubbard model.

  9. Quantum simulation of the Hubbard model with dopant atoms in silicon.

    PubMed

    Salfi, J; Mol, J A; Rahman, R; Klimeck, G; Simmons, M Y; Hollenberg, L C L; Rogge, S

    2016-01-01

    In quantum simulation, many-body phenomena are probed in controllable quantum systems. Recently, simulation of Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonians using cold atoms revealed previously hidden local correlations. However, fermionic many-body Hubbard phenomena such as unconventional superconductivity and spin liquids are more difficult to simulate using cold atoms. To date the required single-site measurements and cooling remain problematic, while only ensemble measurements have been achieved. Here we simulate a two-site Hubbard Hamiltonian at low effective temperatures with single-site resolution using subsurface dopants in silicon. We measure quasi-particle tunnelling maps of spin-resolved states with atomic resolution, finding interference processes from which the entanglement entropy and Hubbard interactions are quantified. Entanglement, determined by spin and orbital degrees of freedom, increases with increasing valence bond length. We find separation-tunable Hubbard interaction strengths that are suitable for simulating strongly correlated phenomena in larger arrays of dopants, establishing dopants as a platform for quantum simulation of the Hubbard model. PMID:27094205

  10. Deionization of Dopants in Silicon Nanofilms Even with Donor Concentration of Greater than 10(19) cm(-3).

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takahisa; Kurosawa, Yuya; Kadotani, Naotoshi; Takahashi, Tsunaki; Oda, Shunri; Uchida, Ken

    2016-02-10

    Understanding the dopant properties in heavily doped nanoscale semiconductors is essential to design nanoscale devices. We report the deionization or finite ionization energy of dopants in silicon (Si) nanofilms with dopant concentration (ND) of greater than 10(19) cm(-3), which is in contrast to the zero ionization energy (ED) in bulk Si at the same ND. From the comparison of experimentally observed and theoretically calculated ED, we attribute the deionization to the suppression of metal-insulator transition in highly doped nanoscale semiconductors in addition to the quantum confinement and the dielectric mismatch, which greatly increase ED in low-doped nanoscale semiconductors. Thus, for nanoscale transistors, ND should be higher than that estimated from bulk Si dopant properties in order to reduce their resistivity by the metal-insulator transition. PMID:26741540

  11. Variable-angle high-angle annular dark-field imaging: application to three-dimensional dopant atom profiling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jack Y.; Hwang, Jinwoo; Isaac, Brandon J.; Stemmer, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Variable-angle high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) imaging in scanning transmission electron microscopy is developed for precise and accurate determination of three-dimensional (3D) dopant atom configurations. Gd-doped SrTiO3 films containing Sr columns containing zero, one, or two Gd dopant atoms are imaged in HAADF mode using two different collection angles. Variable-angle HAADF significantly increases both the precision and accuracy of 3D dopant profiling. Using image simulations, it is shown that the combined information from the two detectors reduces the uncertainty in the dopant depth position measurement and can uniquely identify certain atomic configurations that are indistinguishable with a single detector setting. Additional advances and applications are discussed. PMID:26206489

  12. Coupling of erbium dopants to yttrium orthosilicate photonic crystal cavities for on-chip optical quantum memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazono, Evan; Zhong, Tian; Craiciu, Ioana; Kindem, Jonathan M.; Faraon, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    Erbium dopants in crystals exhibit highly coherent optical transitions well suited for solid-state optical quantum memories operating in the telecom band. Here, we demonstrate coupling of erbium dopant ions in yttrium orthosilicate to a photonic crystal cavity fabricated directly in the host crystal using focused ion beam milling. The coupling leads to reduction of the photoluminescence lifetime and enhancement of the optical depth in microns-long devices, which will enable on-chip quantum memories.

  13. From Bimetallic Metal-Organic Framework to Porous Carbon: High Surface Area and Multicomponent Active Dopants for Excellent Electrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Zhen; Wang, Chengming; Wu, Zhen-Yu; Xiong, Yujie; Xu, Qiang; Yu, Shu-Hong; Jiang, Hai-Long

    2015-09-01

    Bimetallic metal-organic frameworks are rationally synthesized as templates and employed for porous carbons with retained morphology, high graphitization degree, hierarchical porosity, high surface area, CoNx moiety and uniform N/Co dopant by pyrolysis. The optimized carbon with additional phosphorus dopant exhibits excellent electrocatalytic performance for the oxygen reduction reaction, which is much better than the benchmark Pt/C in alkaline media. PMID:26193083

  14. Hybrid Modulation-Doping of Solution-Processed Ultrathin Layers of ZnO Using Molecular Dopants.

    PubMed

    Schießl, Stefan P; Faber, Hendrik; Lin, Yen-Hung; Rossbauer, Stephan; Wang, Qingxiao; Zhao, Kui; Amassian, Aram; Zaumseil, Jana; Anthopoulos, Thomas D

    2016-05-01

    An alternative doping approach that exploits the use of organic donor/acceptor molecules for the effective tuning of the free electron concentration in quasi-2D ZnO transistor channel layers is reported. The method relies on the deposition of molecular dopants/formulations directly onto the ultrathin ZnO channels. Through careful choice of materials combinations, electron transfer from the dopant molecule to ZnO and vice versa is demonstrated. PMID:26437002

  15. Location, Location, Location: Development of Spatiotemporal Sequence Learning in Infancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkham, Natasha Z.; Slemmer, Jonathan A.; Richardson, Daniel C.; Johnson, Scott P.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated infants' sensitivity to spatiotemporal structure. In Experiment 1, circles appeared in a statistically defined spatial pattern. At test 11-month-olds, but not 8-month-olds, looked longer at a novel spatial sequence. Experiment 2 presented different color/shape stimuli, but only the location sequence was violated during test;…

  16. Imaging Dirac-mass disorder from magnetic dopant atoms in the ferromagnetic topological insulator Crx(Bi0.1Sb0.9)2-xTe3

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Inhee; Kim, Chung Koo; Lee, Jinho; Billinge, Simon J. L.; Zhong, Ruidan D.; Schneeloch, John A.; Liu, Tiansheng S.; Valla, Tonica; Tranquada, John M.; Gu, Genda D.; Davis, J. C. Séamus

    2015-01-20

    To achieve and use the most exotic electronic phenomena predicted for the surface states of 3D topological insulators (TIs), it is necessary to open a “Dirac-mass gap” in their spectrum by breaking time-reversal symmetry. Use of magnetic dopant atoms to generate a ferromagnetic state is the most widely applied approach. However, it is unknown how the spatial arrangements of the magnetic dopant atoms influence the Dirac-mass gap at the atomic scale or, conversely, whether the ferromagnetic interactions between dopant atoms are influenced by the topological surface states. Here we image the locations of the magnetic (Cr) dopant atoms in the ferromagnetic TI Cr₀.₀₈(Bi₀.₁Sb₀.₉)₁.₉₂Te₃. Simultaneous visualization of the Dirac-mass gap Δ(r) reveals its intense disorder, which we demonstrate is directly related to fluctuations in n(r), the Cr atom areal density in the termination layer. We find the relationship of surface-state Fermi wavevectors to the anisotropic structure of Δ(r) not inconsistent with predictions for surface ferromagnetism mediated by those states. Moreover, despite the intense Dirac-mass disorder, the anticipated relationship Δ(r)∝n(r) is confirmed throughout and exhibits an electron–dopant interaction energy J* = 145 meV·nm². In addition, these observations reveal how magnetic dopant atoms actually generate the TI mass gap locally and that, to achieve the novel physics expected of time-reversal symmetry breaking TI materials, control of the resulting Dirac-mass gap disorder will be essential.

  17. Molecular Electrical Doping of Organic Semiconductors: Fundamental Mechanisms and Emerging Dopant Design Rules.

    PubMed

    Salzmann, Ingo; Heimel, Georg; Oehzelt, Martin; Winkler, Stefanie; Koch, Norbert

    2016-03-15

    Today's information society depends on our ability to controllably dope inorganic semiconductors, such as silicon, thereby tuning their electrical properties to application-specific demands. For optoelectronic devices, organic semiconductors, that is, conjugated polymers and molecules, have emerged as superior alternative owing to the ease of tuning their optical gap through chemical variability and their potential for low-cost, large-area processing on flexible substrates. There, the potential of molecular electrical doping for improving the performance of, for example, organic light-emitting devices or organic solar cells has only recently been established. The doping efficiency, however, remains conspicuously low, highlighting the fact that the underlying mechanisms of molecular doping in organic semiconductors are only little understood compared with their inorganic counterparts. Here, we review the broad range of phenomena observed upon molecularly doping organic semiconductors and identify two distinctly different scenarios: the pairwise formation of both organic semiconductor and dopant ions on one hand and the emergence of ground state charge transfer complexes between organic semiconductor and dopant through supramolecular hybridization of their respective frontier molecular orbitals on the other hand. Evidence for the occurrence of these two scenarios is subsequently discussed on the basis of the characteristic and strikingly different signatures of the individual species involved in the respective doping processes in a variety of spectroscopic techniques. The critical importance of a statistical view of doping, rather than a bimolecular picture, is then highlighted by employing numerical simulations, which reveal one of the main differences between inorganic and organic semiconductors to be their respective density of electronic states and the doping induced changes thereof. Engineering the density of states of doped organic semiconductors, the Fermi

  18. Quantitative dopant distributions in GaAs nanowires using atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Du, Sichao; Burgess, Timothy; Gault, Baptiste; Gao, Qiang; Bao, Peite; Li, Li; Cui, Xiangyuan; Kong Yeoh, Wai; Liu, Hongwei; Yao, Lan; Ceguerra, Anna V; Hoe Tan, Hark; Jagadish, Chennupati; Ringer, Simon P; Zheng, Rongkun

    2013-09-01

    Controllable doping of semiconductor nanowires is critical to realize their proposed applications, however precise and reliable characterization of dopant distributions remains challenging. In this article, we demonstrate an atomic-resolution three-dimensional elemental mapping of pristine semiconductor nanowires on growth substrates by using atom probe tomography to tackle this major challenge. This highly transferrable method is able to analyze the full diameter of a nanowire, with a depth resolution better than 0.17 nm thanks to an advanced reconstruction method exploiting the specimen's crystallography, and an enhanced chemical sensitivity of better than 8-fold increase in the signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:23489910

  19. Off-center Tl and Na dopant centers in CsI

    SciTech Connect

    Van Ginhoven, Renee M.; Schultz, P. A.

    2013-12-11

    We use density functional theory calculations to characterize the electronic and structural properties of the Tl and Na dopant centers in CsI. We nd that the Tl and Na centers can accept one or two electrons and couple to long-range relaxations in the surrounding crystal lattice to distort strongly off-center to multiple distinct minima, even without a triplet excitation. The long-range distortions are a mechanism to couple to phonon modes in the crystal, and are expected to play an important role in the phonon-assisted transport of polarons in activated CsI and subsequent light emission in this scintillator.

  20. Removing grain boundaries from three-dimensional colloidal crystals using active dopants.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, B; Dijkstra, M; Filion, L

    2016-07-01

    Using computer simulations we explore how grain boundaries can be removed from three-dimensional colloidal crystals by doping with a small fraction of active colloids. We show that for sufficient self-propulsion, the system is driven into a crystal-fluid coexistence. In this phase separated regime, the active dopants become mobile and spontaneously gather at the grain boundaries. The resulting surface melting and recrystallization of domains result in the motion of the grain boundaries over time and lead to the formation of a large single crystal. However, when the self-propulsion is too low to cause a phase separation, we observe no significant enhancement of grain growth. PMID:27257054

  1. Semiconductor material and method for enhancing solubility of a dopant therein

    DOEpatents

    Sadigh, Babak; Lenosky, Thomas J.; Rubia, Tomas Diaz; Giles, Martin; Caturla, Maria-Jose; Ozolins, Vidvuds; Asta, Mark; Theiss, Silva; Foad, Majeed; Quong, Andrew

    2003-09-09

    A method for enhancing the equilibrium solubility of boron and indium in silicon. The method involves first-principles quantum mechanical calculations to determine the temperature dependence of the equilibrium solubility of two important p-type dopants in silicon, namely boron and indium, under various strain conditions. The equilibrium thermodynamic solubility of size-mismatched impurities, such as boron and indium in silicon, can be raised significantly if the silicon substrate is strained appropriately. For example, for boron, a 1% compressive strain raises the equilibrium solubility by 100% at 1100.degree. C.; and for indium, a 1% tensile strain at 1100.degree. C., corresponds to an enhancement of the solubility by 200%.

  2. Enhancing ionic conductivity of bulk single-crystal yttria-stabilized zirconia by tailoring dopant distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.; Prinz, F. B.; Cai, W.

    2011-02-11

    We present an ab initio–based kinetic Monte Carlo model for ionic conductivity in single-crystal yttria-stabilized zirconia. Ionic interactions are taken into account by combining density functional theory calculations and the cluster expansion method and are found to be essential in reproducing the effective activation energy observed in experiments. The model predicts that the effective energy barrier can be reduced by 0.15–0.25 eV by arranging the dopant ions into a superlattice.

  3. A Semiconductor Material And Method For Enhancing Solubility Of A Dopant Therein

    DOEpatents

    Sadigh, Babak; Lenosky, Thomas J.; Diaz de la Rubia, Tomas; Giles, Martin; Caturla, Maria-Jose; Ozolins, Vidvuds; Asta, Mark; Theiss, Silva; Foad, Majeed; Quong, Andrew

    2005-03-29

    A method for enhancing the equilibrium solubility of boron ad indium in silicon. The method involves first-principles quantum mechanical calculations to determine the temperature dependence of the equilibrium solubility of two important p-type dopants in silicon, namely boron and indium, under various strain conditions. The equilibrium thermodynamic solubility of size-mismatched impurities, such as boron and indium in silicon, can be raised significantly if the silicon substrate is strained appropriately. For example, for boron, a 1% compressive strain raises the equilibrium solubility by 100% at 1100.degree. C.; and for indium, a 1% tensile strain at 1100.degree. C., corresponds to an enhancement of the solubility by 200%.

  4. Laser ablation at 337 nm of nitrocellulose and nylon sensitized with organic dopants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skordoulis, Constantine D.; Kosmidis, Constantine E.

    1993-05-01

    The laser induced ablative decomposition of nitrocellulose and nylon sensitized with organic dopants (Stilbene 420, Coumarin 120, and Rhodamine 6G) has been studied. Ablation with a low power nitrogen laser is hereby reported for the first time. With the addition of dyes strongly absorbing at 337 nm the photoetching rate of the pure materials can be significantly increased. A two step photochemical mechanism considering the decomposition of the polymers from excited electronic states and the energy transfer process from the dye to the polymer are discussed.

  5. Ternary logic implemented on a single dopant atom field effect silicon transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, M.; Mol, J. A.; Verduijn, J.; Lansbergen, G. P.; Rogge, S.; Levine, R. D.; Remacle, F.

    2010-01-01

    We provide an experimental proof of principle for a ternary multiplier realized in terms of the charge state of a single dopant atom embedded in a fin field effect transistor (Fin-FET). Robust reading of the logic output is made possible by using two channels to measure the current flowing through the device and the transconductance. A read out procedure that allows for voltage gain is proposed. Long numbers can be multiplied by addressing a sequence of Fin-FET transistors in a row.

  6. Cable-fault locator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cason, R. L.; Mcstay, J. J.; Heymann, A. P., Sr.

    1979-01-01

    Inexpensive system automatically indicates location of short-circuited section of power cable. Monitor does not require that cable be disconnected from its power source or that test signals be applied. Instead, ground-current sensors are installed in manholes or at other selected locations along cable run. When fault occurs, sensors transmit information about fault location to control center. Repair crew can be sent to location and cable can be returned to service with minimum of downtime.

  7. Location, Location, Location: Where Do Location-Based Services Fit into Your Institution's Social Media Mix?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nekritz, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Foursquare is a location-based social networking service that allows users to share their location with friends. Some college administrators have been thinking about whether and how to take the leap into location-based services, which are also known as geosocial networking services. These platforms, which often incorporate gaming elements like…

  8. Incorporation and diffusion of dopants in gallium arsenide, indium phosphide and indium gallium arsenide: Implications for devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tandon, Ashish

    Incorporation and diffusion of dopants in the InP, InGaAs and GaAs material systems by atmospheric pressure organometallic vapor phase epitaxy (APOMVPE) is discussed. A better understanding of the role point defect mechanisms play in driving dopant diffusion in III-V compounds has been obtained from experimental results. A study of Fermi level pinning at the surface of InP, InGaAs and GaAs is presented to explain the anomalously fast diffusion of dopants (such as Zn and Be which reside on the group III sublattice) observed in the base region of InP/InGaAs HBTs. Experimental results indicated that the Fermi level is not pinned at the surface of InGaAs while it appears to be pinned close to the valence band in InP. The Fermi level pinning at the surface of GaAs was found to vary with the crystal orientation. A solution to the problem of obtaining p-type base in InP/InGaAs HBTs has been presented in the form of carbon doped (p-type) InGaAs. The effects of growth temperature, V/III ratio and dopant source partial pressure on the concentration and mobility of holes in carbon doped InGaAs epilayers are reported. Record doping levels with negligible dopant passivation have been attained for carbon doped InGaAs epilayers. Studies linking dopant passivation to macroscopic defect formation are presented. A culmination of these findings in the growth and fabrication of InP/InGaAs HBTs with low base resistance and moderate gains is reported. A design resulting in the improvement of the collector-base breakdown voltage in InGaAs diodes is also discussed. The chemical treatment and history of the substrate were shown to play an important role in the diffusion of dopants in grown epilayers. Chlorine based compounds, thermal oxidation of the surface and growth of buffer layers (between the substrate and the epilayer) reduced diffusion in the epilayer. Sodium based compounds and anodic oxides tend to enhance dopant diffusion in the epilayer. A theoretical model for calculating

  9. Optimizing the Dopant and Carrier Concentration of Ca5Al2Sb6 for High Thermoelectric Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yuli; Zhang, Guangbiao; Wang, Chao; Peng, Chengxiao; Zhang, Peihong; Wang, Yuanxu; Ren, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The effects of doping on the transport properties of Ca5Al2Sb6 are investigated using first-principles electronic structure methods and Boltzmann transport theory. The calculated results show that a maximum ZT value of 1.45 is achieved with an optimum carrier concentration at 1000 K. However, experimental studies have shown that the maximum ZT value is no more than 1 at 1000 K. By comparing the calculated Seebeck coefficient with experimental values, we find that the low dopant solubility in this material is not conductive to achieve the optimum carrier concentration, leading a smaller experimental value of the maximum ZT. Interestingly, the calculated dopant formation energies suggest that optimum carrier concentrations can be achieved when the dopants and Sb atoms have similar electronic configurations. Therefore, it might be possible to achieve a maximum ZT value of 1.45 at 1000 K with suitable dopants. These results provide a valuable theoretical guidance for the synthesis of high-performance bulk thermoelectric materials through dopants optimization. PMID:27406178

  10. Optimizing the Dopant and Carrier Concentration of Ca5Al2Sb6 for High Thermoelectric Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yuli; Zhang, Guangbiao; Wang, Chao; Peng, Chengxiao; Zhang, Peihong; Wang, Yuanxu; Ren, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The effects of doping on the transport properties of Ca5Al2Sb6 are investigated using first-principles electronic structure methods and Boltzmann transport theory. The calculated results show that a maximum ZT value of 1.45 is achieved with an optimum carrier concentration at 1000 K. However, experimental studies have shown that the maximum ZT value is no more than 1 at 1000 K. By comparing the calculated Seebeck coefficient with experimental values, we find that the low dopant solubility in this material is not conductive to achieve the optimum carrier concentration, leading a smaller experimental value of the maximum ZT. Interestingly, the calculated dopant formation energies suggest that optimum carrier concentrations can be achieved when the dopants and Sb atoms have similar electronic configurations. Therefore, it might be possible to achieve a maximum ZT value of 1.45 at 1000 K with suitable dopants. These results provide a valuable theoretical guidance for the synthesis of high-performance bulk thermoelectric materials through dopants optimization. PMID:27406178

  11. Optimizing the Dopant and Carrier Concentration of Ca5Al2Sb6 for High Thermoelectric Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yuli; Zhang, Guangbiao; Wang, Chao; Peng, Chengxiao; Zhang, Peihong; Wang, Yuanxu; Ren, Wei

    2016-07-01

    The effects of doping on the transport properties of Ca5Al2Sb6 are investigated using first-principles electronic structure methods and Boltzmann transport theory. The calculated results show that a maximum ZT value of 1.45 is achieved with an optimum carrier concentration at 1000 K. However, experimental studies have shown that the maximum ZT value is no more than 1 at 1000 K. By comparing the calculated Seebeck coefficient with experimental values, we find that the low dopant solubility in this material is not conductive to achieve the optimum carrier concentration, leading a smaller experimental value of the maximum ZT. Interestingly, the calculated dopant formation energies suggest that optimum carrier concentrations can be achieved when the dopants and Sb atoms have similar electronic configurations. Therefore, it might be possible to achieve a maximum ZT value of 1.45 at 1000 K with suitable dopants. These results provide a valuable theoretical guidance for the synthesis of high-performance bulk thermoelectric materials through dopants optimization.

  12. Schottky barrier formation and reduction at Au/TiO2 interfaces by dopants from quantum simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Yang; Hellman, Anders; Fang, Yurui; Gao, Shiwu; Käll, Mikael

    2015-03-01

    Excitation of localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) in metallic nanoparticles, especially particles made of noble metals, results in efficient light absorption and strong field enhancement, thereby enabling a multitude of nanooptical applications of high current interest. Recently, the possibility of utilizing LSPRs to generate hot electrons has attracted considerable attention. One method to extract and make use of the hot electrons is by attaching the nanoparticles on a semiconductor surface such that excited electrons with proper energy and momentum can be transferred through the Schottky barrier at the interface. Using ab initio calculations for Au/TiO2 interfaces, we investigate dopant induced Schottky barrier height reduction effects. We show that dopant induced polarization at the interface is the dominant reason behind the semiconductor band bending and Schottky barrier formation. Calculations for Nb-dopants at different depths (d) below the interface show that the Schottky barrier height reduction depends on the depth and varies from 0.1 eV at d = 4 nm to up to 1.3 eV when the dopant is situated at the interfacial layer. The calculations also indicate that the Schottky barrier can be tuned by up to 1.5 eV by using different transition metal dopants.

  13. Modification of dopant profiles due to surface and interface interactions: Applications to semiconductor materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jagannadham, K.; Narayan, J.

    1987-02-01

    The kinetics of segregation of dopant solute atoms in the presence of free surfaces and interfaces are analyzed by solving the diffusion equation with a drift term. The drift term includes the configurational interaction energy associated with an oversize or an undersize atom near a coherent interface when the continuity conditions are satisfied. Both an analytical solution and a numerical procedure are provided to solve the problem by eigenfunction expansion method. A new procedure for evaluating the eigenvalues to include higher-order terms is given. It is further established that an attractive force due to either a soft second phase or a free surface gives rise to a minimum in the concentration profile near the interface while a hard second phase results in a monotonically increasing concentration. The position of the minimum in the concentration profile in the presence of a soft second phase or the slope of the concentration profile in the presence of a hard second phase provides a measure of the strength of the defect and the interaction-energy term which can be compared with experimental observations. In particular, we have considered changes in the dopant profiles in silicon under the influence of the free surface, in silicon with silicon dioxide, gallium arsenide, germanium, magnesium oxide and in germanium with silicon, all deposited as a second phase, respectively.

  14. Theoretical investigation of single dopant in core/shell nanocrystal in magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talbi, A.; Feddi, E.; Oukerroum, A.; Assaid, E.; Dujardin, F.; Addou, M.

    2015-09-01

    The control of single dopant or "solitary dopant" in semiconductors constitute a challenge to achieve new range of tunable optoelectronic devices. Knowing that the properties of doped monocrystals are very sensitive to different external perturbations, the aim of this study is to understand the effect of a magnetic field on the ground state energy of an off-center ionized donor in a core/shell quantum dot (CSQD). The binding energies with and without an applied magnetic field are determined by the Ritz variational method taking into account the electron-impurity correlation in the trial wave function deduced from the second-order perturbation. It has been found that the external magnetic field affects strongly the binding energy, and its effect varies as a function of the core radius and the shell thickness. We have shown the existence of a threshold ratio (a / b) crit which represents the limit between the tridimensional and the spherical surface confinement. In addition our analysis demonstrates the important influence of the position of ionized donor in the shell material.

  15. Effects of dopants on the biomechanical properties of conducting polymer films on platinum electrodes.

    PubMed

    Baek, Sungchul; Green, Rylie A; Poole-Warren, Laura A

    2014-08-01

    Conducting polymers have often been described in literature as a coating for metal electrodes which will dampen the mechanical mismatch with neural tissue, encouraging intimate cell interactions. However, there is very limited quantitative analysis of conducting polymer mechanics and the relation to tissue interactions. This article systematically analyses the impact of coating platinum (Pt) electrodes with the conducting polymer poly(ethylene dioxythiophene) (PEDOT) doped with a series of common anions which have been explored for neural interfacing applications. Nanoindentation was used to determine the coating modulus and it was found that the polymer stiffness increased as the size of the dopant ion was increased, with PEDOT doped with polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) having the highest modulus at 3.2 GPa. This was more than double that of the ClO4 doped PEDOT at 1.3 GPa. Similarly, the electrical properties of these materials were shown to have a size dependent behavior with the smaller anions producing PEDOT films with the highest charge transfer capacity and lowest impedance. Coating stiffness was found to have a negligible effect on in vitro neural cell survival and differentiation, but rather polymer surface morphology, dopant toxicity and mobility is found to have the greatest impact. PMID:24027227

  16. Heterovalent Dopant Incorporation for Bandgap and Type Engineering of Perovskite Crystals.

    PubMed

    Abdelhady, Ahmed L; Saidaminov, Makhsud I; Murali, Banavoth; Adinolfi, Valerio; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Katsiev, Khabiboulakh; Alarousu, Erkki; Comin, Riccardo; Dursun, Ibrahim; Sinatra, Lutfan; Sargent, Edward H; Mohammed, Omar F; Bakr, Osman M

    2016-01-21

    Controllable doping of semiconductors is a fundamental technological requirement for electronic and optoelectronic devices. As intrinsic semiconductors, hybrid perovskites have so far been a phenomenal success in photovoltaics. The inability to dope these materials heterovalently (or aliovalently) has greatly limited their wider utilizations in electronics. Here we show an efficient in situ chemical route that achieves the controlled incorporation of trivalent cations (Bi(3+), Au(3+), or In(3+)) by exploiting the retrograde solubility behavior of perovskites. We term the new method dopant incorporation in the retrograde regime. We achieve Bi(3+) incorporation that leads to bandgap tuning (∼300 meV), 10(4) fold enhancement in electrical conductivity, and a change in the sign of majority charge carriers from positive to negative. This work demonstrates the successful incorporation of dopants into perovskite crystals while preserving the host lattice structure, opening new avenues to tailor the electronic and optoelectronic properties of this rapidly emerging class of solution-processed semiconductors. PMID:26727130

  17. High-resolution patterning electronic polymers using dopant induced solubility control (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moule, Adam J.; Jacobs, Ian E.; Li, Jun; Burg, Stephanie L.; Bilsky, David J.; Rotondo, Brandon T.; Stroeve, Pieter

    2015-08-01

    Organic electronics promise to provide flexible, large-area circuitry such as photovoltaics, displays, and light emitting diodes that can be fabricated inexpensively from solutions. A major obstacle to this vision is that most conjugated organic materials are miscible, making solution-based fabrication of multilayer or micro- to nanoscale patterned films problematic. Here we demonstrate that the solubility of prototypical conductive polymer poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) can be reversibly "switched off" using high electron affinity molecular dopants, then later recovered with light or a suitable dedoping solution. Using this technique, we are able to stack mutually soluble materials and laterally pattern polymer films using evaporation of dopants through a shadow mask or with light, achieving sub-micrometer, optically limited feature sizes. After forming these structures, the films can be dedoped without disrupting the patterned features; dedoped films have identical optical characteristics, charge carrier mobilities, and NMR spectra as as-cast P3HT films. This method greatly simplifies solution-based device fabrication, is easily adaptable to current manufacturing workflows, and is potentially generalizable to other classes of materials.

  18. Room-temperature single-photon generation from solitary dopants of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xuedan; Hartmann, Nicolai F; Baldwin, Jon K S; Doorn, Stephen K; Htoon, Han

    2015-08-01

    On-demand single-photon sources capable of operating at room temperature and the telecom wavelength range of 1,300-1,500 nm hold the key to the realization of novel technologies that span from sub-diffraction imaging to quantum key distribution and photonic quantum information processing. Here, we show that incorporation of undoped (6,5) single-walled carbon nanotubes into a SiO2 matrix can lead to the creation of solitary oxygen dopant states capable of fluctuation-free, room-temperature single-photon emission in the 1,100-1,300 nm wavelength range. We investigated the effects of temperature on photoluminescence emission efficiencies, fluctuations and decay dynamics of the dopant states and determined the conditions most suitable for the observation of single-photon emission. This emission can in principle be extended to 1,500 nm by doping of smaller-bandgap single-walled carbon nanotubes. This easy tunability presents a distinct advantage over existing defect centre single-photon emitters (for example, diamond defect centres). Our SiO2-encapsulated sample also presents exciting opportunities to apply Si/SiO2-based micro/nano-device fabrication techniques in the development of electrically driven single-photon sources and integration of these sources into quantum photonic devices and networks. PMID:26167766

  19. Multi-Excitonic Emission from Solitary Dopant States of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Htoon, H.; Ma, X.; Hartmann, N. F.; Adamska, L.; Velizhanin, K. A.; Tretiak, S.; Baldwin, J. K. S.; Doorn, S. K.

    Oxygen doping of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) has been rapidly emerging as an effective mean for introduction of new functionalities. Recently, through demonstration of fluctuation free, room temperature single photon generation, we established these states as a new type of solid-state two level atom with potentials in quantum information technologies. This study further showed that while some doped tubes were characterized with a near complete photon antibunching, significant numbers of doped tubes exhibit some degree of photon bunching indicating that they emit more than one photon in one excitation cycle. Here in this work, by separating slow and fast photons in the time domain, we show for the first time that the multiple photon emissions originated from higher order multi-exciton states of solitary dopants. We also show that such multi-exciton states can allow emission of photon pairs with efficiency as high as 20-30% of single exciton emission. With this work, we bring out multi-excitonic processes of the solitary dopant states as a new area to be explored for potential applications in lasing, entangled photon generation and carrier multiplication.

  20. Dopant and carrier concentration in Si in equilibrium with monoclinic SiP precipitates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solmi, S.; Parisini, A.; Angelucci, R.; Armigliato, A.; Nobili, D.; Moro, L.

    1996-03-01

    The behavior of silicon slices very heavily implanted (1.5×1017 cm-2) with phosphorus was investigated by transmission electron microscopy and secondary neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS) after annealing at 800, 850, 900, and 1000 °C. Precipitation of large monoclinic, and partially orthorhombic, SiP particles takes place in the most heavily doped region. From the shape of the SNMS profiles in the dissolution stage of these precipitates, we determined the concentration Csat of P in equilibrium with the conjugate phase: Csat=2.45×1023exp(-0.62/kT) cm-3. This concentration has to be compared with the equilibrium concentration ne of the electrically active dopant. To this end, more accurate determinations of ne were performed on heavily P-doped polysilicon films. It was found that ne=1.3×1022exp(-0.37/kT) cm-3. Hence for T>~750 °C, Csat exceeds ne and the concentration (Csat-ne) of inactive mobile P increases with temperature. The formation and the diffusion behavior of this inactive dopant are in keeping with a preprecipitation phenomenon.

  1. Origin of electrolyte-dopant dependent sulfur poisoning of SOFC anodes.

    PubMed

    Zeng, ZhenHua; Björketun, Mårten E; Ebbesen, Sune; Mogensen, Mogens B; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2013-05-14

    The mechanisms governing the sulfur poisoning of the triple phase boundary (TPB) of Ni-XSZ (X2O3 stabilized zirconia) anodes have been investigated using density functional theory. The calculated sulfur adsorption energies reveal a clear correlation between the size of the cation dopant X(3+) and the sulfur tolerance of the Ni-XSZ anode; the smaller the ionic radius, the higher the sulfur tolerance. The mechanistic study shows that the size of X(3+) strongly influences XSZ's surface energy, which in turn determines the adhesion of Ni to XSZ. The Ni-XSZ interaction has a direct impact on the Ni-S interaction and on the relative stability of reconstructed and pristine Ni(100) facets at the TPB. Together, these two effects control the sulfur adsorption on the Ni atoms at the TPB. The established relationships explain experimentally observed dopant-dependent anode performances and provide a blueprint for the future search for and preparation of highly sulfur tolerant anodes. PMID:23549289

  2. Role of dopant counter-anion functionality in polyaniline salts/blends and implications to morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, A.R.; Rasmussen, P.G.; Basheer, R.A.; Annis, B.K.; Wignall, G.D.

    1997-04-01

    Polyanilines are of particular current interest primarily due to their relative ease of synthesis, low cost and stable conductivity in air. The insulating, polyaniline emeraldine base (PANI-EB) form becomes electrically conducting by preferential protonation or doping the imine nitrogen sites to yield an electrically conducting polyaniline emeraldine salt (PANI-ES). In this paper, wide and small angle X-ray scattering techniques (i.e., WAXS and SAXS) and light microscopy are used to characterize the influence of the dopant`s structure on the morphology of both polyaniline salt and blend. In an attempt to modify the morphology of the PANI-ES, the authors have evaluated a number of doping acids (i.e., methane sulfonic acid (HMSA), butane sulfonic acid (HBSA), dodecyl benzene sulfonic acid (HDBSA) and camphor sulfonic acid (HCSA)) that vary in size and polarity to better understanding the role of the acid in PANI-ES`s morphology and the resulting electrical conductivity. The other goal was to investigate the effect of the counter-anion structure on the nature of the phase separated PANI-ES network. The shape of the PANI-ES network in the host polycaprolactam has important implications on the nature of conduction behavior and the final electrical conductivity of the blend.

  3. Role of dopant counter-anion functionality in polyaniline salts/blends and implications to morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, A.R.; Rasmussen, P.G.; Basheer, R.A.; Annis, B.K.; Wignall, G.D.

    1997-03-01

    In this paper, wide and small angle X-ray scattering techniques (i.e., WAXS and SAXS) and light microscopy are used to characterize the influence of the dopant`s structure on the morphology of both polyaniline salt and blend. In an attempt to modify the morphology of the PANI-ES, the authors have evaluated a number of doping acids (i.e., methane sulfonic acid (HMSA), butane sulfonic acid (HBSA), dodecyl benzene sulfonic acid (HDBSA) and camphor sulfonic acid (HCSA)) that vary in size and polarity to better understand the role of the acid in PANI-ES`s morphology and the resulting electrical conductivity. These salts were solution blended with polycaprolactam using hexafluoro-2-propanol (HFIP) as a solvent. The other goal was to investigate the effect of the counter-anion structure on the nature of the phase separated PANI-ES network. The shape of the PANI-ES network in the host polycaprolactam has important implications on the nature of conduction behavior and the final electrical conductivity of the blend.

  4. Electrical properties of tin-doped zinc oxide nanostructures doped at different dopant concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasir, M. F.; Zainol, M. N.; Hannas, M.; Mamat, M. H.; Rahman, S. A.; Rusop, Mohamad

    2016-07-01

    This project has been focused on the electrical and optical properties respectively on the effect of Tin doped zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films at different dopant concentrations. These thin films were doped with different Sn dopant concentrations at 1 at%, 2 at%, 3 at%, 4 at% and 5 at% was selected as the parameter to optimize the thin films quality while the annealing temperature is fixed 500 °C. Sn doped ZnO solutions were deposited onto the glass substrates using sol-gel spin coating method. This project was involved with three phases, which are thin films preparation, deposition and characterization. The thin films were characterized using Current Voltage (I-V) measurement and ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared (UV-vis-NIR) spectrophotometer (Perkin Elmer Lambda 750) for electrical properties and optical properties. The electrical properties show that the resistivity is the lowest at 4 at% Sn doping concentration with the value 3.08 × 103 Ωcm-1. The absorption coefficient spectrum obtained shows all films exhibit very low absorption in the visible (400-800nm) and near infrared (NIR) (>800nm) range but exhibit high absorption in the UV range.

  5. Characteristics of titanium oxide memristor with coexistence of dopant drift and a tunnel barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xiao-Bo; Xu, Hui

    2014-06-01

    The recent published experimental data of titanium oxide memristor devices which are tested under the same experimental conditions exhibit the strange instability and complexity of these devices. Such undesired characteristics preclude the understanding of the device conductive processes and the memristor-based practical applications. The possibility of the coexistence of dopant drift and tunnel barrier conduction in a memristor provides preliminary explanations for the undesired characteristics. However, current research lacks detailed discussion about the coexistence case. In this paper, dopant drift and tunnel barrier-based theories are first analyzed for studying the relations between parameters and physical variables which affect characteristics of memristors, and then the influences of each parameter change on the conductive behaviors in the single and coexistence cases of the two mechanisms are simulated and discussed respectively. The simulation results provide further explanations of the complex device conduction. Theoretical methods of eliminating or reducing the coexistence of the two mechanisms are proposed, in order to increase the stability of the device conduction. This work also provides the support for optimizing the fabrications of memristor devices with excellent performance.

  6. Effect of Dopants on the Adsorption of Carbon Dioxide on Ceria Surfaces

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Meijun; Tumuluri, Uma; Wu, Zili; Dai, Sheng

    2015-09-25

    Here, high-surface-area nanosized CeO2 and M-doped CeO2 (M=Cu, La, Zr, and Mg) prepared by a surfactant-templated method were tested for CO2 adsorption. Cu, La, and Zr are doped into the lattice of CeO2, whereas Mg is dispersed on the CeO2 surface. The doping of Cu and La into CeO2 leads to an increase of the CO2 adsorption capacity, whereas the doping of Zr has little or no effect. The addition of Mg causes a decrease of the CO2 adsorption capacity at a low Mg content and a gradual increase at a higher content. The CO2 adsorption capacity follows the sequencemore » Cu-CeO2>La-CeO2>Zr-CeO2≈CeO2>Mg-CeO2 at low dopant contents, in line with the relative amount of defect sites in the samples. It is the defect sites on the surface, not in the bulk of CeO2, modified by the dopants that play the vital role in CO2 chemisorption. Lastly, the role of surface oxygen vacancies is further supported by an in situ IR spectroscopic study of the surface chemistry during CO2 adsorption on the doped CeO2.« less

  7. Dopant-specific unzipping of carbon nanotubes for intact crystalline graphene nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Joonwon; Narayan Maiti, Uday; Kim, Na-Young; Narayan, Rekha; Jun Lee, Won; Sung Choi, Dong; Oh, Youngtak; Min Lee, Ju; Yong Lee, Gil; Hun Kang, Seok; Kim, Hyunwoo; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Ouk Kim, Sang

    2016-01-01

    Atomic level engineering of graphene-based materials is in high demand to enable customize structures and properties for different applications. Unzipping of the graphene plane is a potential means to this end, but uncontrollable damage of the two-dimensional crystalline framework during harsh unzipping reaction has remained a key challenge. Here we present heteroatom dopant-specific unzipping of carbon nanotubes as a reliable and controllable route to customized intact crystalline graphene-based nanostructures. Substitutional pyridinic nitrogen dopant sites at carbon nanotubes can selectively initiate the unzipping of graphene side walls at a relatively low electrochemical potential (0.6 V). The resultant nanostructures consisting of unzipped graphene nanoribbons wrapping around carbon nanotube cores maintain the intact two-dimensional crystallinity with well-defined atomic configuration at the unzipped edges. Large surface area and robust electrical connectivity of the synergistic nanostructure demonstrate ultrahigh-power supercapacitor performance, which can serve for AC filtering with the record high rate capability of -85° of phase angle at 120 Hz.

  8. Dopant-specific unzipping of carbon nanotubes for intact crystalline graphene nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Joonwon; Narayan Maiti, Uday; Kim, Na-Young; Narayan, Rekha; Jun Lee, Won; Sung Choi, Dong; Oh, Youngtak; Min Lee, Ju; Yong Lee, Gil; Hun Kang, Seok; Kim, Hyunwoo; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Ouk Kim, Sang

    2016-01-01

    Atomic level engineering of graphene-based materials is in high demand to enable customize structures and properties for different applications. Unzipping of the graphene plane is a potential means to this end, but uncontrollable damage of the two-dimensional crystalline framework during harsh unzipping reaction has remained a key challenge. Here we present heteroatom dopant-specific unzipping of carbon nanotubes as a reliable and controllable route to customized intact crystalline graphene-based nanostructures. Substitutional pyridinic nitrogen dopant sites at carbon nanotubes can selectively initiate the unzipping of graphene side walls at a relatively low electrochemical potential (0.6 V). The resultant nanostructures consisting of unzipped graphene nanoribbons wrapping around carbon nanotube cores maintain the intact two-dimensional crystallinity with well-defined atomic configuration at the unzipped edges. Large surface area and robust electrical connectivity of the synergistic nanostructure demonstrate ultrahigh-power supercapacitor performance, which can serve for AC filtering with the record high rate capability of −85° of phase angle at 120 Hz. PMID:26796993

  9. The effect of low levels of dopants upon the formation and properties of beta-phase molybdenum nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Cairns, A.G.; Gallagher, J.G.; Hargreaves, J.S.J.; Mckay, D.; Rico, J.L.; Wilson, K.

    2010-03-15

    The addition of 1 wt% Pd, Au, Ni and Cu dopants has been demonstrated to strongly alter the morphology of beta-phase molybdenum nitride prepared by treatment of MoO{sub 3} with a 3/1 H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} mixture at 750 deg. C. Furthermore, the addition of Pd significantly enhances the surface area and the formation of the nitride phase. It is proposed that the facile formation of molybdenum bronzes in this system is important in this respect. The dopants have also been observed to modify the denitridation characteristics of the beta-phase, with an overall reduction of the proportion of NH{sub 3} formed upon using a 3/1 H{sub 2}/Ar mixture with respect to the undoped sample. - Graphical abstract: Low levels of Pd, Au, Ni and Cu dopant have significant effects upon the morphology, formation and dentitridation characteristics of beta-phase molybdenum nitride.

  10. Dopant effects on 2-ethyl-1-hexanol: A dual-channel impedance spectroscopy and neutron scattering study

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Lokendra P.; Richert, Ranko; Raihane, Ahmed; Alba-Simionesco, Christiane

    2015-01-07

    A two-channel impedance technique has been used to study the relaxation behavior of 2-ethyl-1-hexanol with polar and non-polar dopants at the few percent concentration level over a wide temperature and frequency range. The non-polar dopants shift both the Debye and the primary structural relaxation time in the same direction, to shorter times for 3-methylpentane and to longer times for squalane, consistent with the relative glass transition temperatures (T{sub g}) of the components. By contrast, polar dopants such as water or methanol modify the α-process towards slower dynamics and increased amplitude, while the Debye process is accelerated and with a decreased amplitude. This effect of adding water to alcohol is explained by water promoting more compact structures with reduced Kirkwood correlation factors. This picture is consistent with a shift in the neutron scattering pre-peak to lower scattering vectors and with simulation work on alcohol-water systems.