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Sample records for diametral tensile strength

  1. Flexural and diametral tensile strength of composite resins.

    PubMed

    Della Bona, Alvaro; Benetti, Paula; Borba, Márcia; Cecchetti, Dileta

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the flexural strength (sf) and the diametral tensile strength (st) of light-cured composite resins, testing the hypothesis that there is a positive relation between these properties. Twenty specimens were fabricated for each material (Filtek Z250- 3M-Espe; AM- Amelogen, Ultradent; VE- Vit-l-escence, Ultradent; EX- Esthet-X, Dentsply/Caulk), following ISO 4049 and ANSI/ADA 27 specifications and the manufacturers instructions. For the st test, cylindrical shaped (4 mm x 6 mm) specimens (n = 10) were placed with their long axes perpendicular to the applied compressive load at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. The sf was measured using the 3-point bending test, in which bar shaped specimens (n = 10) were tested at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Both tests were performed in a universal testing machine (EMIC 2000) recording the fracture load (N). Strength values (MPa) were calculated and statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey (a = 0.05). The mean and standard deviation values (MPa) were Z250-45.06 +/- 5.7; AM-35.61 +/- 5.4; VE-34.45 +/- 7.8; and EX-42.87 +/- 6.6 for st; and Z250-126.52 +/- 3.3; AM-87.75 +/- 3.8; VE-104.66 +/- 4.4; and EX-119.48 +/- 2.1 for sf. EX and Z250 showed higher st and sf values than the other materials evaluated (p < 0.05), which followed a decreasing trend of mean values. The results confirmed the study hypothesis, showing a positive relation between the material properties examined. PMID:18425251

  2. Diametral tensile strength and bonding to dentin of type I glass ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    Galun, E A; Saleh, N; Lewinstein, I

    1994-10-01

    This study evaluated the diametral tensile strength of type I glass ionomer cements and measured their tensile and shear bond strengths to dentin with and without conditioning. Four brands of glass ionomer cement and one brand of zinc phosphate cement were tested. Disks of each cement type were prepared and the 7-day diametral compression test for tension was conducted. The shear and tensile tests, with and without 10% polyacrylic acid dentin conditioning, were performed with an Instron testing machine. Two additional groups, one for each bond test, were prepared and conditioned with 90% trichloracetic acid. No significant differences of the diametral strength were found among the various glass ionomer cements. The comparison of means suggests that, except for trichloracetic acid dentin pretreatment, the conditioning is an effective promoter of shear strength and has no significant effect (p < 0.01) on the tensile bond strength. However, trichloracetic acid was found to be a most effective dentin conditioner for both shear and tensile bond strengths (p < 0.01). PMID:7990049

  3. Diametral tensile strength and film thickness of an experimental dental luting agent derived from castor oil

    PubMed Central

    CARMELLO, Juliana Cabrini; FAIS, Laiza Maria Grassi; RIBEIRO, Lígia Nunes de Moraes; CLARO NETO, Salvador; GUAGLIANONI, Dalton Geraldo; PINELLI, Lígia Antunes Pereira

    2012-01-01

    The need to develop new dental luting agents in order to improve the success of treatments has greatly motivated research. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the diametral tensile strength (DTS) and film thickness (FT) of an experimental dental luting agent derived from castor oil (COP) with or without addition of different quantities of filler (calcium carbonate - CaCO3). Material and Methods Eighty specimens were manufactured (DTS N=40; FT N=40) and divided into 4 groups: Pure COP; COP 10%; COP 50% and zinc phosphate (control). The cements were mixed according to the manufacturers' recommendations and submitted to the tests. The DTS test was performed in the MTS 810 testing machine (10 KN, 0.5 mm/min). For FT test, the cements were sandwiched between two glass plates (2 cm2) and a load of 15 kg was applied vertically on the top of the specimen for 10 min. The data were analyzed by means of one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). Results The values of DTS (MPa) were: Pure COP- 10.94±1.30; COP 10%- 30.06±0.64; COP 50%- 29.87±0.27; zinc phosphate- 4.88±0.96. The values of FT (µm) were: Pure COP- 31.09±3.16; COP 10%- 17.05±4.83; COP 50%- 13.03±4.83; Zinc Phosphate- 20.00±0.12. One-way ANOVA showed statistically significant differences among the groups (DTS - p=1.01E-40; FT - p=2.4E-10). Conclusion The experimental dental luting agent with 50% of filler showed the best diametral tensile strength and film thickness. PMID:22437672

  4. Diametral tensile strength and Vickers hardness of a composite after storage in different solutions.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Igor S; Gomes, Maurcio N; Loguercio, Alessandro D; Filho, Leonardo E R

    2007-03-01

    This study evaluated the Vickers hardness (VHN) and diametral tensile strength (DTS) of the composite Z100 (3M ESPE) cured with: Quartz-Tungsten-Halogen light curing unit (QTH) (700mW/cm2- 40 s) and Argon laser (1,000mW/cm2- 10 s). Specimens of 2 mm depth and 8 mm diameter were immersed for 30 days at 37 degrees C in different storage means: water, alcohol, acetic acid, propionic acid and dry (control). The DTS (n = 8) was determined with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The VHN (n = 8) test was carried out using a 50 g load for 60 s. Statistical analysis was performed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (alpha = 0.05). The relationship between VHN and DTS was observed by Pearson correlation. The light source was not significant in both tests (VHN: P < 0.18; DTS: P < 0.92), but the factor storage showed significance (P < .001). Mechanical properties of the control group were statistically superior to those of the other storage groups (VHN = 102.2; DTS = 42.3 MPa). The alcohol group showed the lowest VHN (93.3) and DTS (33.8 MPa) values, which were similar to values for propionic (VHN = 97.5; DTS = 35.9 MPa) and acetic acids (VHN = 97.8; DTS = 36.1 MPa), but different from that of water (VHN = 102.2; DTS = 42.3 MPa). The relationship between VHN and DTS values presented a positive correlation (r2 = 0.90; P < 0.01). PMID:17429184

  5. The diametral tensile strength and hydrostability of polymer-ceramic nano-composite (pcnc) material prototypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yepez, Johanna

    Statement of the problem: There is a weak connection between the filler and the resin matrix of dental composites caused primarily by hydrolysis of silane coupling agent, therefore, jeopardizing the mechanical properties of the dental restorations. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the diametral tensile strength (DTS) of a nano-mechanically bonded polymer ceramic nano composite (pcnc) versus the chemically bonding prototype polymer ceramic nano composite (pcnc) fabricated by using hydrolytically stable interphase. Materials and Methods: Composites were made with 60wt % filler, 38% triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (TEDGMA), 1% camphorquinone (CQ) and 1% 2-(dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA). Tests for DTS were performed using a universal testing machine. The disk-shaped specimens were loaded in compression between two supporting plates at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until fracture. The samples, measuring 3 mm in height and 6 mm in diameter, were produced in a round stainless steel (SS) mold. A total of 144 samples were created. Groups of 48 samples were made for each of three different fillers. Specimens were soaked in artificial saliva at 37° for four time periods, dry(t=0), 1 day, 7 days, 28 days). At the end of each soaking time DTS tests were performed. Results: There where statistically significant differences in the DTS between the filler groups and the soaking times (p=<0.001) as well as for the pairwise comparison between the different filler group values and between the different soaking times as an individual treatment. Overall, longer soaking times resulted in lower mean DTS values. The DTS of the PCNC for filler #1 decreased to 82.4% of the original value after 1 day of soaking, 67.2% after 7 days and 27.2 % after 28 days. For filler #2 decreased to 54.8% of the original value after 1 day of soaking, 62.3% after 7 days and 61.2% after 28 days. For filler #3 decreased to 71.2% of the original value, 67.3% after 7 days and 51.4% after 28 days (Fig 8). Conclusions: Within the limitation of this study it can be concluded that the use of coupling agent will significantly influence the degradation of the material under wet environment. Clinical Implication: Changes within matrix composition and bonding interphase of resin base composites promise improvements of mechanical properties, decreasing the incidence of clinical failure of posterior composite restorations, hence resulting in a more ideal restorative material for use in posterior segment. The results of this investigation showed that the deficiency of hydrostability in dental composites is a detrimental factor in the mechanical behavior. The silanation of the filler particles have a positive influence on the mechanical properties of dental composites but the hydrolysis of the silane coupling agent can dramatically reduce the average lifetime of dental composites.

  6. Influence of different crosshead speeds on diametral tensile strength of a methacrylate based resin composite: An in-vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Anubhav; Ramarao, Sathyanarayanan; Carounanidy, Usha

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to evaluate the influence of different crosshead speeds on diametral tensile strength (DTS) of a resin composite material (Tetric N-Ceram). Materials and Methods: The DTS of Tetric N-Ceram was evaluated using four different crosshead speeds 0.5 mm/min (DTS 1), 1 mm/min (DTS 2), 5 mm/min (DTS 3), 10 mm/min (DTS 4). A total of 48 specimens were prepared and divided into four subgroups with 12 specimens in each group. Specimens were made using stainless steel split custom molds of dimensions 6 mm diameter and 3 mm height. The specimens were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 24 h. Universal testing machine was used and DTS values were calculated in MPa. Results: Analysis of variance was used to compare the four groups. Higher mean DTS value was recorded in DTS 2 followed by DTS 4, DTS 1, and DTS 3, respectively. However, the difference in mean tensile strength between the groups was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Conclusion: The crosshead speed variation between 0.5 and 10 mm/min does not seem to influence the DTS of a resin composite. PMID:26069407

  7. Effect of activation modes on the compressive strength, diametral tensile strength and microhardness of dual-cured self-adhesive resin cements.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ah-Rang; Jeon, Yong-Chan; Jeong, Chang-Mo; Yun, Mi-Jung; Choi, Jae Won; Kwon, Yong Hoon; Huh, Jung-Bo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the compressive strength, diametral tensile strength and microhardnss of several selfadhesive resin cements (Rely-X U200, Clearfill SA Luting, G-CEM LinkAce, Maxcem Elite, PermaCem 2.0, and Zirconite) using different activation modes (self-cured, light-cured) and testing time (immediately, 24 h, thermocycling). Specimens were prepared for the compressive strength (Ø 4×6 mm) and diametral tensile strength and microhardness (Ø 6×3 mm) according to ISO standards. The strength after 24 h was higher than immediately after. In addition, G-CEM showed the highest values. In terms of the activation modes, Rely-X U200, PermaCem 2.0 had higher values in the light-curing than the self-curing. In conclusion, all cements demonstrated clinically available strength values and revealed differences in strength according to their composition, testing time and activation mode. Furthermore, correlation was found between the microhardness (degree of conversion) and mechanical strengths of the cements tested. PMID:27041021

  8. Comparative evaluation of compressive strength, diametral tensile strength and shear bond strength of GIC type IX, chlorhexidine-incorporated GIC and triclosan-incorporated GIC: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Jaidka, Shipra; Somani, Rani; Singh, Deepti J.; Shafat, Shazia

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To comparatively evaluate the compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, and shear bond strength of glass ionomer cement type IX, chlorhexidine-incorporated glass ionomer cement, and triclosan-incorporated glass ionomer cement. Materials and Methods: In this study, glass ionomer cement type IX was used as a control. Chlorhexidine diacetate, and triclosan were added to glass ionomer cement type IX powder, respectively, in order to obtain 0.5, 1.25, and 2.5% concentrations of the respective experimental groups. Compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, and shear bond strength were evaluated after 24 h using Instron Universal Testing Machine. The results obtained were statistically analyzed using the independent t-test, Dunnett test, and Tukey test. Results: There was no statistical difference in the compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, and shear bond strength of glass ionomer cement type IX (control), 0.5% triclosan-glass ionomer cement, and 0.5% chlorhexidine-glass ionomer cement. Conclusion: The present study suggests that the compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, and shear bond strength of 0.5% triclosan-glass ionomer cement and 0.5% chlorhexidine-glass ionomer cement were similar to those of the glass ionomer cement type IX, discernibly signifying that these can be considered as viable options for use in pediatric dentistry with the additional value of antimicrobial property along with physical properties within the higher acceptable range. PMID:27195231

  9. Influence of powder/liquid ratio on the radiodensity and diametral tensile strength of glass ionomer cements

    PubMed Central

    FONSECA, Rodrigo Borges; BRANCO, Carolina Assaf; QUAGLIATTO, Paulo Sérgio; GONÇALVES, Luciano de Souza; SOARES, Carlos José; CARLO, Hugo Lemes; CORRER-SOBRINHO, Lourenço

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine the influence of P/L ratio on the radiodensity and diametral tensile strength (DTS) of glass ionomer cements. Material and Methods There were 2 factors under study: P/L ratio (manufacturer's recommended P/L ratio and a 50% reduced P/L ratio), and materials (Vitro Molar, Vitro Fil, Vitro Cem conventional GICs and Vitro Fil LC, Ortho Glass LC RMGICs). Five 1-mm-thick samples of each material-P/L ratio were produced for radiodensity evaluation. Samples were x-ray exposed onto Digora phosphor plate and radiodensity was obtained using the software Digora for Windows 2.5 Rev 0. For DTS, five (4.0x8.0 mm) cylinder samples of each material were tested (0.5 mm/min). Data were subjected to one- and two-way ANOVA (5x2) followed by Tukey's HSD test, or Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's method. For paired comparisons, t-test or Mann-Whitney test were used (a=0.05). Results There was a significant interaction (P=0.001) for the studied factors (materials vs. P/L ratio). Reduced P/L ratio resulted in significantly lower DTS for the RMGICs, but radiodensity was affected for all materials (P<0.05). Conclusions Reduced P/L ratio affected properties of the tested glass ionomer cements. RMGICs were more susceptible to lower values of DTS, but radiodensity decreased for all materials following P/L ratio reduction. PMID:21308288

  10. Finite Element Simulation of Diametral Strength Test of Hydroxyapatite

    SciTech Connect

    Ozturk, Fahrettin; Toros, Serkan; Evis, Zafer

    2011-01-17

    In this study, the diametral strength test of sintered hydroxyapatite was simulated by the finite element software, ABAQUS/Standard. Stress distributions on diametral test sample were determined. The effect of sintering temperature on stress distribution of hydroxyapatite was studied. It was concluded that high sintering temperatures did not reduce the stress on hydroxyapatite. It had a negative effect on stress distribution of hydroxyapatite after 1300 deg. C. In addition to the porosity, other factors (sintering temperature, presence of phases and the degree of crystallinity) affect the diametral strength of the hydroxyapatite.

  11. A novel dentin bond strength measurement technique using a composite disk in diametral compression.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shih-Hao; Lin, Lian-Shan; Rudney, Joel; Jones, Rob; Aparicio, Conrado; Lin, Chun-Pin; Fok, Alex

    2012-04-01

    New methods are needed that can predict the clinical failure of dental restorations that primarily rely on dentin bonding. Existing methods have shortcomings, e.g. severe deviation in the actual stress distribution from theory and a large standard deviation in the measured bond strength. We introduce here a novel test specimen by examining an endodontic model for dentin bonding. Specifically, we evaluated the feasibility of using the modified Brazilian disk test to measure the post-dentin interfacial bond strength. Four groups of resin composite disks which contained a slice of dentin with or without an intracanal post in the center were tested under diametral compression until fracture. Advanced nondestructive examination and imaging techniques in the form of acoustic emission (AE) and digital image correlation (DIC) were used innovatively to capture the fracture process in real time. DIC showed strain concentration first appearing at one of the lateral sides of the post-dentin interface. The appearance of the interfacial strain concentration also coincided with the first AE signal detected. Utilizing both the experimental data and finite-element analysis, the bond/tensile strengths were calculated to be: 11.2 MPa (fiber posts), 12.9 MPa (metal posts), 8.9 MPa (direct resin fillings) and 82.6 MPa for dentin. We have thus established the feasibility of using the composite disk in diametral compression to measure the bond strength between intracanal posts and dentin. The new method has the advantages of simpler specimen preparation, no premature failure, more consistent failure mode and smaller variations in the calculated bond strength. PMID:22266033

  12. 7 CFR 29.3061 - Strength (tensile).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Strength (tensile). 29.3061 Section 29.3061... Type 93) § 29.3061 Strength (tensile). The stress a tobacco leaf can bear without tearing. Tensile strength is not an important element of quality in Burley tobacco....

  13. An Interlaminar Tensile Strength Specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Roderick H.; Jackson, Wade C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a technique to determine interlaminar tensile strength, sigma(sub 3c), of a fiber reinforced composite material using a curved beam. The specimen was a unidirectional curved beam, bent 90 deg, with straight arms. Attached to each arm was a hinged loading mechanism that was held by the grips of a tension testing machine. Geometry effects of the specimen, including the effects of loading arm length, inner radius, thickness, and width, were studied. The data sets fell into two categories: low strength corresponding to a macroscopic flaw related failure and high strength corresponding to a microscopic flaw related failure. From the data available, the specimen width and loading arm length had little effect on sigma(sub 3c). The inner radius was not expected to have a significant effect on sigma(sub 3c), but this conclusion could not be confirmed because of differences in laminate quality for each curve geometry. The thicker specimens had the lowest value of sigma(sub 3c) because of poor laminate quality.

  14. Surfactant effects on soil aggregate tensile strength

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known regarding a soil aggregate's tensile strength response to surfactants that may be applied to alleviate soil water repellency. Two laboratory investigations were performed to determine surfactant effects on the tensile strength of 1) Ap horizons of nine wettable, agricultural soils co...

  15. 7 CFR 29.6040 - Strength (tensile).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Strength (tensile). 29.6040 Section 29.6040 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6040 Strength (tensile). The stress a tobacco...

  16. CHARACTERIZATION OF TENSILE STRENGTH OF GLOVEBOX GLOVES

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P.; Chapman, G.

    2012-02-29

    A task was undertaken to compare various properties of different glovebox gloves, having various compositions, for use in gloveboxes at the Savannah River Site (SRS). One aspect of this project was to determine the tensile strength (TS) of the gloves. Longitudinal tensile samples were cut from 15 different gloves and tensile tested. The stress, load, and elongation at failure were determined. All of the gloves that are approved for glovebox use and listed in the glovebox procurement specification met the tensile and elongation requirements. The Viton{reg_sign} compound gloves are not listed in the specification, but exhibited lower tensile strengths than permissible based on the Butyl rubber requirements. Piercan Polyurethane gloves were the thinnest samples and exhibited the highest tensile strength of the materials tested.

  17. Method and apparatus for determining tensile strength

    DOEpatents

    Ratigan, Joe L.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining the statistical distribution of apparent tensile strength of rock, the size effect with respect to tensile strength, as well as apparent deformation modulus of both intact and fractured or jointed rock. The method is carried out by inserting a plug of deformable material, such as rubber, in an opening of a specimen to be tested. The deformable material is loaded by an upper and lower platen until the specimen ruptures, whereafter the tensile strength is calculated based on the parameters of the test specimen and apparatus.

  18. Method and apparatus for determining tensile strength

    DOEpatents

    Ratigan, J.L.

    1982-05-28

    A method and apparatus is described for determining the statistical distribution of apparent tensile strength of rock, the size effect with respect to tensile strength, as well as apparent deformation modulus of both intact and fractured or jointed rock. The method is carried out by inserting a plug of deformable material, such as rubber, in an opening of a specimen to be tested. The deformable material is loaded by an upper and lower platen until the specimen ruptures, whereafter the tensile strength is calculated based on the parameters of the test specimen and apparatus.

  19. Dynamic tensile strength of lunar rock types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohn, S. N.; Ahrens, T. J.

    1981-01-01

    The dynamic tensile strength of four rocks are determined. A flat plate impact experiment is employed to generate approximately one-microsecond-duration tensile stress pulses in rock samples by superposing rarefaction waves to induce fracture. It is noted that the effect of chemical weathering and other factors has not been explicitly studied. The given tensile strengths are based on a series of experiments on each rock where determination of incipient spallation is made by terminal microscopic examination. The data are generally consistent with previous determinations, at least one of which was for a significantly chemically altered but physically coherent rock.

  20. Making High-Tensile-Strength Amalgam Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Structural components made of amalgams can be made to have tensile strengths much greater than previously known to be possible. Amalgams, perhaps best known for their use in dental fillings, have several useful attributes, including room-temperature fabrication, corrosion resistance, dimensional stability, and high compressive strength. However, the range of applications of amalgams has been limited by their very small tensile strengths. Now, it has been discovered that the tensile strength of an amalgam depends critically on the sizes and shapes of the particles from which it is made and, consequently, the tensile strength can be greatly increased through suitable choice of the particles. Heretofore, the powder particles used to make amalgams have been, variously, in the form of micron-sized spheroids or flakes. The tensile reinforcement contributed by the spheroids and flakes is minimal because fracture paths simply go around these particles. However, if spheroids or flakes are replaced by strands having greater lengths, then tensile reinforcement can be increased significantly. The feasibility of this concept was shown in an experiment in which electrical copper wires, serving as demonstration substitutes for copper powder particles, were triturated with gallium by use of a mortar and pestle and the resulting amalgam was compressed into a mold. The tensile strength of the amalgam specimen was then measured and found to be greater than 10(exp 4) psi (greater than about 69 MPa). Much remains to be done to optimize the properties of amalgams for various applications through suitable choice of starting constituents and modification of the trituration and molding processes. The choice of wire size and composition are expected to be especially important. Perusal of phase diagrams of metal mixtures could give insight that would enable choices of solid and liquid metal constituents. Finally, whereas heretofore, only binary alloys have been considered for amalgams, ternary additions to liquid or solid components should be considered as means to impart desired properties to amalgams.

  1. 49 CFR 230.26 - Tensile strength of shell plates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Strength of Materials § 230.26 Tensile strength of shell plates. When the tensile strength of... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Tensile strength of shell plates. 230.26...

  2. 49 CFR 230.26 - Tensile strength of shell plates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Strength of Materials § 230.26 Tensile strength of shell plates. When the tensile strength of... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Tensile strength of shell plates. 230.26...

  3. 49 CFR 230.26 - Tensile strength of shell plates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Strength of Materials § 230.26 Tensile strength of shell plates. When the tensile strength of... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Tensile strength of shell plates. 230.26...

  4. 49 CFR 230.26 - Tensile strength of shell plates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Strength of Materials § 230.26 Tensile strength of shell plates. When the tensile strength of... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Tensile strength of shell plates. 230.26...

  5. 49 CFR 230.26 - Tensile strength of shell plates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tensile strength of shell plates. 230.26 Section 230.26 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Appurtenances Strength of Materials § 230.26 Tensile strength of shell plates. When the tensile strength...

  6. Stochastic models for the tensile strength, fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phoenix, S. L.

    1976-01-01

    The time-to-failure of a single fiber is modeled as a functional of the fiber load history and reasonable forms for this functional are proposed. Earlier models by Daniels and Coleman are shown to be special cases of the proposed model and apparent disparities in their behavior are discussed. Techniques are presented for determining analytically the asymptotic distributions of the tensile strength and time-to-failure for bundles of a large number of fibers. For smaller bundles, exact results are far too cumbersome to be of use so that efficient Monte Carlo simulation procedures are proposed.

  7. Structure and tensile strength of LaS(1.4)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. Daniel; Smoak, Richard H.

    1987-01-01

    The tensile strength of LaS(1.4) has been estimated by diametral stress testing at room temperature, 800 and 1300 K. Brittle, tensile-type failures were obtained at all temperatures when the crosshead speed was 0.0021 mm/s; however, a 1300 K test at 0.00085 mm/s produced plastic flow. The microstructure of LaS(1.4) consisted of two phases with beta-La2S3 comprising about 15 vol percent of the structure and gamma-La2S3 the remainder. Because of the limited amount of material available for testing, no correlation between microstructure and mechanical strength could be drawn.

  8. Measuring the Tensile Strength of B/AL Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    Proposed nondestructive technique correlates damping measurements with material strength. Increasing axial damping and decreasing axial tensile strength are observed after 1-hour treatment of B/AL composites containing about 50 percent fiber. Damping was measured in vacuum at frequencies near 2,000 Hz, and tensile strength was normalized by maximum strength observed before thermally induced degradation.

  9. Silphenylene elastomers have high thermal stability and tensile strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Two polymeric silphenylene ethers, when cured by reactions with ethyl silicates and metal salts at room temperature, form elastomers having excellent thermal stability and tensile properties. The highest tensile strength obtained in a reinforced elastomer was 2800 psi.

  10. Aluminum/steel wire composite plates exhibit high tensile strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Composite plate of fine steel wires imbedded in an aluminum alloy matrix results in a lightweight material with high tensile strength. Plates have been prepared having the strength of titanium with only 85 percent of its density.

  11. An experimental evaluation of the tensile strength of impact ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xian, X.; Chu, M. L.; Scavuzzo, R. J.; Srivatsan, T. S.

    1989-01-01

    The evaluation of the tensile strength of impact built-up ice on structural components has been prompted by such problems as electrical transmission line losses and catastrophic failures in Arctic regions, deicing problems with fixed-wing and rotary-wing aircraft, etc. It is demonstrated that the conventional tensile-testing technique furnishes adequate data on artificially refrigerated ice, and helps establish the influence of extrinsic factors on ice tensile strength.

  12. Dynamic Tensile Strength of Coal under Dry and Saturated Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yixin; Liu, Shimin; Jiang, Yaodong; Wang, Kai; Huang, Yaqiong

    2016-05-01

    The tensile failure characterization of dry and saturated coals under different impact loading conditions was experimentally investigated using a Split Hopkinson pressure bar. Indirect dynamic Brazilian disc tension tests for coals were carried out. The indirect tensile strengths for different bedding angles under different impact velocities, strain rates and loading rates are analyzed and discussed. A high-speed high-resolution digital camera was employed to capture and record the dynamic failure process of coal specimens. Based on the experimental results, it was found that the saturated specimens have stronger loading rate dependence than the dry specimens. The bedding angle has a smaller effect on the dynamic indirect tensile strength compared to the impact velocity. Both shear and tensile failures were observed in the tested coal specimens. Saturated coal specimens have higher indirect tensile strength than dry ones.

  13. Tensile and shear strength of adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stibolt, Kenneth A.

    1990-01-01

    This experiment is conducted in a freshman-level course: Introduction to Engineering Materials. There are no prerequisites for the course although students should have some knowledge of basic algebra. The objectives are to tension and shear test adhesives and to determine the tensile and shear properties of adhesives. Details of equipment of procedure are given.

  14. Discrete Analysis of Clay Layer Tensile Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lê, T. N. H.; Plé, O.; Villard, P.; Gotteland, P.; Gourc, J. P.

    2009-06-01

    The Discrete Element Method is used to investigate the tensile behaviour and cracks mechanisms of a clay material submitted to bending loading. It is the case of compacted clay liners in landfill cap cover application. Such as the soil tested in this study is plastic clay, the distinct elements model was calibrated with previous data results by taking into account cohesive properties. Various contact and cohesion laws are tested to show that the numerical model is able to reproduce the failure mechanism. Numerical results are extending to simulate a landfill cap cover.

  15. Silicon nitride having a high tensile strength

    DOEpatents

    Pujari, Vimal K.; Tracey, Dennis M.; Foley, Michael R.; Paille, Norman I.; Pelletier, Paul J.; Sales, Lenny C.; Willkens, Craig A.; Yeckley, Russell L.

    1996-01-01

    A silicon nitride ceramic comprising: a) inclusions no greater than 25 microns in length, b) agglomerates no greater than 20 microns in diameter, and c) a surface finish of less than about 8 microinches, said ceramic having a four-point flexural strength of at least about 900 MPa.

  16. Silicon nitride having a high tensile strength

    DOEpatents

    Pujari, V.K.; Tracey, D.M.; Foley, M.R.; Paille, N.I.; Pelletier, P.J.; Sales, L.C.; Willkens, C.A.; Yeckley, R.L.

    1996-11-05

    A silicon nitride ceramic is disclosed comprising: (a) inclusions no greater than 25 microns in length, (b) agglomerates no greater than 20 microns in diameter, and (c) a surface finish of less than about 8 microinches, said ceramic having a four-point flexural strength of at least about 900 MPa. 4 figs.

  17. Water's tensile strength measured using an optofluidic chip.

    PubMed

    Li, Z G; Xiong, S; Chin, L K; Ando, K; Zhang, J B; Liu, A Q

    2015-05-21

    In this paper, for the first time, the tensile strength of water is directly measured using an optofluidic chip based on the displacement of air-water interface deformation with homogeneous nucleation. When water in a microchannel is stretched dynamically via laser-induced shock reflection at the air-water interface, the shock pressures are determined by measuring the displacements of the deformed interface. Observation of the vapor bubbles is used as a probe to identify the cavitation threshold with a critical distance, and the tensile strength of water at 20 °C is measured to be -33.3 ± 2.8 MPa. This method can be extended to investigate the tensile strength of other soft materials such as glycerol, which is measured to be -59.8 ± 10.7 MPa at 20 °C. PMID:25812076

  18. Covalent Crosslinking of Carbon Nanotube Materials for Improved Tensile Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, James S.; Miller, Sandi G.; Williams, Tiffany A.; Meador, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have attracted much interest in recent years due to their exceptional mechanical properties. Currently, the tensile properties of bulk carbon nanotube-based materials (yarns, sheets, etc.) fall far short of those of the individual nanotube elements. The premature failure in these materials under tensile load has been attributed to inter-tube sliding, which requires far less force than that needed to fracture individual nanotubes.1,2 In order for nanotube materials to achieve their full potential, methods are needed to restrict this tube-tube shear and increase inter-tube forces.Our group is examining covalent crosslinking between the nanotubes as a means to increase the tensile properties of carbon nanotube materials. We are working with multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) sheet and yarn materials obtained from commercial sources. Several routes to functionalize the nanotubes have been examined including nitrene, aryl diazonium, and epoxide chemistries. The functional nanotubes were crosslinked through small molecule or polymeric bridges. Additionally, electron beam irradiation induced crosslinking of the non-functional and functional nanotube materials was conducted. For example, a nanotube sheet material containing approximately 3.5 mol amine functional groups exhibited a tensile strength of 75 MPa and a tensile modulus of 1.16 GPa, compared to 49 MPa and 0.57 GPa, respectively, for the as-received material. Electron beam irradiation (2.2x 1017 ecm2) of the same amine-functional sheet material further increased the tensile strength to 120 MPa and the modulus to 2.61 GPa. This represents approximately a 150 increase in tensile strength and a 360 increase in tensile modulus over the as-received material with only a 25 increase in material mass. Once we have optimized the nanotube crosslinking methods, the performance of these materials in polymer matrix composites will be evaluated.

  19. Tensile strength of cementitious materials under triaxial loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubota, Shuji

    1998-11-01

    A general tension-compression-compression (sigmasb1, sigmasb2=sigmasb3) failure criterion for brittle materials is mathematically developed using FEM analysis and experimentally verified by use of the cementitious composite axial tensile test (CCATT). This tensile failure criterion is based on the stress concentration derived from the classical theory of elasticity. This analytical approach shows the upper bound of the tension-compression-compression failure surface for brittle materials. Since the CCATT applies confining hydraulic pressure, a tensile specimen is subjected to triaxial loading defined by the principal stress ratio sigmasb1/|sigmasb2|. When lateral pressure increases, tensile strength decreases; therefore, stress concentration is defined as a function of the principal stress ratio. The model has three distinct regions of behavior corresponding to the principal stress ratio, 0≤sigmasb1/|sigmasb2|<0.9 (high-lateral pressure), 0.9≤sigmasb1/|sigmasb2|<3.0 (medium-lateral pressure), 3.0≤sigmasb1/|sigmasb2| (low-lateral pressure). The experimental failure line shows true tensile strength of cementitious materials under low-lateral pressure. The predicted nominal stress fsb{ta} with large size specimens for the CCATT is written as$fsb{ta}=gamma*{1/{Kt}}*alpha* pwhere gamma$ is the size effect obtained by experimental results; Kt is the stress concentration factor derived from triaxial loading. Tensile strength values from the CCATT are compared to experimental results from other tests such as the uniaxial tensile test and the split cylinder test. CCATT results are analyzed using Weibull theory to measure material reliability and to develop characteristic stresses for construction design. Failure analysis using fractography was conducted on fractured cementitious materials and composites. The failure analysis on test specimens correlated well with FEM stress distributions and with the principal stress ratio. The observed fracture behavior (fracture patterns) was correlated to different strength regions of the model. Additionally, a failure model of fiber wrapped cementitious composite is developed. Using data on load-extension behavior from the UTT and ultimate strength from the CCATT models for fiber wrapped cementitious composites were developed. These models predict the mechanical behavior of fiber sheets subjected to cycles of wetting and drying in a simulated seawater environment; therefore, the tensile strength using the CCATT is applicable to a wide range of brittle materials including cementitious composites.

  20. [Tensile strength of new and modified flexor tendon sutures].

    PubMed

    Sántha, E; Répásy, G; Szabó, L

    1991-01-01

    Authors tested modified and new sutures and different sewing materials on the deep flexor tendons of the hand in cadavera. Tensile and pull strength examinations were performed. The results were compared with the Kirchmayr-Kessler suture. Suture types suitable for immediate postoperative active motion exercises are suggested. PMID:2011044

  1. Improved molding process ensures plastic parts of higher tensile strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heier, W. C.

    1968-01-01

    Single molding process ensures that plastic parts /of a given mechanical design/ produced from a conventional thermosetting molding compound will have a maximum tensile strength. The process can also be used for other thermosetting compounds to produce parts with improved physical properties.

  2. Importance of Tensile Strength on the Shear Behavior of Discontinuities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazvinian, A. H.; Azinfar, M. J.; Geranmayeh Vaneghi, R.

    2012-05-01

    In this study, the shear behavior of discontinuities possessing two different rock wall types with distinct separate compressive strengths was investigated. The designed profiles consisted of regular artificial joints molded by five types of plaster mortars, each representing a distinct uniaxial compressive strength. The compressive strengths of plaster specimens ranged from 5.9 to 19.5 MPa. These specimens were molded considering a regular triangular asperity profile and were designed so as to achieve joint walls with different strength material combinations. The results showed that the shear behavior of discontinuities possessing different joint wall compressive strengths (DDJCS) tested under constant normal load (CNL) conditions is the same as those possessing identical joint wall strengths, but the shear strength of DDJCS is governed by minor joint wall compressive strength. In addition, it was measured that the predicted values obtained by Barton's empirical criterion are greater than the experimental results. The finding indicates that there is a correlation between the joint roughness coefficient (JRC), normal stress, and mechanical strength. It was observed that the mode of failure of asperities is either pure tensile, pure shear, or a combination of both. Therefore, Barton's strength criterion, which considers the compressive strength of joint walls, was modified by substituting the compressive strength with the tensile strength. The validity of the modified criterion was examined by the comparison of the predicted shear values with the laboratory shear test results reported by Grasselli (Ph.D. thesis n.2404, Civil Engineering Department, EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland, 2001). These comparisons infer that the modified criterion can predict the shear strength of joints more precisely.

  3. Tensile and shear strength of porous dust agglomerates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seizinger, A.; Speith, R.; Kley, W.

    2013-11-01

    Context. Within the sequential accretion scenario of planet formation, planets are built up through a sequence of sticking collisions. The outcome of collisions between porous dust aggregates is very important for the growth from very small dust particles to planetesimals. In this work we determine the necessary material properties of dust aggregates as a function of porosity. Aims: Continuum models such as SPH that are capable of simulating collisions of macroscopic dust aggregates require a set of material parameters. Some of them, such as the tensile and shear strength, are difficult to obtain from laboratory experiments. The aim of this work is to determine these parameters from ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Methods: We simulated the behavior of porous dust aggregates using a detailed micro-physical model of the interaction of spherical grains that includes adhesion forces, rolling, twisting, and sliding. Using different methods of preparing the samples, we studied the strength behavior of our samples with varying porosity and coordination number of the material. Results: For the tensile strength, we can reproduce data from laboratory experiments very well. For the shear strength, there are no experimental data available. The results from our simulations differ significantly from previous theoretical models, which indicates that the latter might not be sufficient to describe porous dust aggregates. Conclusions: We have provided the functional behavior of tensile and shear strength of porous dust aggregates as a function of the porosity, which can be directly applied to continuum simulations of these objects in planet formation scenarios.

  4. Chain Ends and the Ultimate Tensile Strength of Polyethylene Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Thomas C.; Robbins, Mark O.

    Determining the tensile yield mechanisms of oriented polymer fibers remains a challenging problem in polymer mechanics. By maximizing the alignment and crystallinity of polyethylene (PE) fibers, tensile strengths σ ~ 6 - 7 GPa have been achieved. While impressive, first-principal calculations predict carbon backbone bonds would allow strengths four times higher (σ ~ 20 GPa) before breaking. The reduction in strength is caused by crystal defects like chain ends, which allow fibers to yield by chain slip in addition to bond breaking. We use large scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to determine the tensile yield mechanism of orthorhombic PE crystals with finite chains spanning 102 -104 carbons in length. The yield stress σy saturates for long chains at ~ 6 . 3 GPa, agreeing well with experiments. Chains do not break but always yield by slip, after nucleation of 1D dislocations at chain ends. Dislocations are accurately described by a Frenkel-Kontorova model, parametrized by the mechanical properties of an ideal crystal. We compute a dislocation core size ξ = 25 . 24 Å and determine the high and low strain rate limits of σy. Our results suggest characterizing such 1D dislocations is an efficient method for predicting fiber strength. This research was performed within the Center for Materials in Extreme Dynamic Environments (CMEDE) under the Hopkins Extreme Materials Institute at Johns Hopkins University. Financial support was provided by Grant W911NF-12-2-0022.

  5. Dentin adhesive tensile strength after Nd:YAG laser application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizarelli, Rosane F. Z.; Miranda, Walter G., Jr.; Eduardo, Carlos d. P.

    1999-05-01

    The authors evaluated, in vitro, the tensile strength of a hydrophilic adhesive on dentin surface, with and without previous treatment with high power Nd:YAG laser. Power of 1.0 W and 2.0 W with respective frequencies of 25 Hz and 50 Hz were used. Thirteen human extracted molars were prepared and randomly separated in five groups: GI, Nd:YAG laser with 1.0 W plus SBMPP (3M) adhesive system; GII, laser with 2.0 W, plus adhesive system; GIII, laser with 1.0 W; GIV, laser with 2.0 W; GV, adhesive system to treat dentin surface. To each group five samples with a composite bottom each, totalling in 25 samples, which were kept in distilled water, by 37C, during 30 days. After that, thermal cycling was applied. After this period, the samples were submitted the tensile strength test to evaluate the necessary threshold of power to break up the adhesive bond of composite button from dentin surface. The statistical evaluation was done through variance analysis. Results showed that the values of tensile strength of the GV (26.4 kgf/cm2) were better than GI (4.6 kgf/cm2) which was the best laser group: GIII (2.4 kgf/cm2); GII (1.7 kgf/cm2) and GIV (1.2 kgf/cm2).

  6. Tensile Strength of Cell Walls of Living Cells 1

    PubMed Central

    Carpita, Nicholas C.

    1985-01-01

    A gas decompression technique was used to determine the breaking strength of cell walls of single cells. Breaking strengths of the bacterium Salmonella typhimurium and the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas eugametos were 100 and 95 atmospheres, respectively, while those of sporophytes of the water mold Blastocladiella emersonii were 65 atmospheres, and those of suspension cultured cells of carrot were only 30 atmospheres. Estimation of wall tensile stress based on breaking pressures, cell radii, and estimation of wall thickness, indicates that microfibrillar walls are not necessarily stronger than walls of primitive organisms. Hence, alternative hypotheses for their evolution must be considered. PMID:16664436

  7. Effects of parachute-ribbon surface treatments on tensile strength

    SciTech Connect

    Auerbach, I.; Whinery, L.D.; Johnson, D.W.; Mead, K.E.; Sheldon, D.D.

    1986-01-01

    Routine quality-assurance evaluations of nylon ribbons used on test-deployed parachutes revealed tensile-strength degradation had occurred in some of the ribbons. The degradation occurred exclusively in some of the noncritical skirt ribbons with stenciled blue-ink identification markings. Although the strength loss was excessive, the reliability of the parachute was not affected. These results motivated an accelerated-aging study of the effects on tensile strength of not only the inks but also of the sizing chemicals that are used to coat fabrics in parachute construction. Nylon ribbons and Kevlar webbing were treated with these materials and stored both under ambient conditions and at 60/sup 0/C (140/sup 0/F) for periods of time up to eight months. Small increases in strength developed under ambient conditions whereas small decreases developed at elevated temperatures. Samples stored in glass degraded more than those stored in stainless steel. None of these laboratory results correlated with those obtained from parachutes. Possible explanations for the lack of a correlation are provided in this paper. Additional studies are in progress.

  8. Tensile strength of bilayered ceramics and corresponding glass veneers

    PubMed Central

    Champirat, Tharee; Jirajariyavej, Bundhit

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE To investigate the microtensile bond strength between two all-ceramic systems; lithium disilicate glass ceramic and zirconia core ceramics bonded with their corresponding glass veneers. MATERIALS AND METHODS Blocks of core ceramics (IPS e.max Press and Lava Frame) were fabricated and veneered with their corresponding glass veneers. The bilayered blocks were cut into microbars; 8 mm in length and 1 mm2 in cross-sectional area (n = 30/group). Additionally, monolithic microbars of these two veneers (IPS e.max Ceram and Lava Ceram; n = 30/group) were also prepared. The obtained microbars were tested in tension until fracture, and the fracture surfaces of the microbars were examined with fluorescent black light and scanning electron microscope (SEM) to identify the mode of failure. One-way ANOVA and the Dunnett's T3 test were performed to determine significant differences of the mean microtensile bond strength at a significance level of 0.05. RESULTS The mean microtensile bond strength of IPS e.max Press/IPS e.max Ceram (43.40 5.51 MPa) was significantly greater than that of Lava Frame/Lava Ceram (31.71 7.03 MPa)(P<.001). Fluorescent black light and SEM analysis showed that most of the tested microbars failed cohesively in the veneer layer. Furthermore, the bond strength of Lava Frame/Lava Ceram was comparable to the tensile strength of monolithic glass veneer of Lava Ceram, while the bond strength of bilayered IPS e.max Press/IPS e.max Ceram was significantly greater than tensile strength of monolithic IPS e.max Ceram. CONCLUSION Because fracture site occurred mostly in the glass veneer and most failures were away from the interfacial zone, microtensile bond test may not be a suitable test for bonding integrity. Fracture mechanics approach such as fracture toughness of the interface may be more appropriate to represent the bonding quality between two materials. PMID:25006377

  9. Through-the-thickness tensile strength of textile composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Wade C.; Ifju, Peter G.

    1994-01-01

    A series of tests was run to characterize the through-the-thickness tensile strength for a variety of composites that included 2D and 3D braids, 2D and 3D weaves, and prepreg tapes. A new test method based on a curved beam was evaluated. The through-the-thickness deformations were characterized using moire interferometry. Failures were significantly different between the 2D and 3D materials. The 2D materials delaminated between layers due to out-of-plane tensile stresses. The strength of the 2D textile composites did not increase relative to the tapes. The 3D materials failed due to the formation of radial cracks caused by high circumferential stresses along the inner radius. A circumferential crack similar to the 2D materials produced the final failure. Final failure in the 3D materials occurred at a lower bending moment than in other materials. The early failures were caused by radial crack formation rather than low through-the-thickness strength.

  10. Dynamic compressive and tensile strengths of spark plasma sintered alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Girlitsky, I.; Zaretsky, E.; Kalabukhov, S.; Dariel, M. P.; Frage, N.

    2014-06-28

    Fully dense submicron grain size alumina samples were manufactured from alumina nano-powder using Spark Plasma Sintering and tested in two kinds of VISAR-instrumented planar impact tests. In the first kind, samples were loaded by 1-mm tungsten impactors, accelerated to a velocity of about 1 km/s. These tests were aimed at studying the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL) of Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS)-processed alumina and the decay, with propagation distance, of the elastic precursor wave. In the tests of the second kind, alumina samples of 3-mm thickness were loaded by 1-mm copper impactors accelerated to 100–1000 m/s. These tests were aimed at studying the dynamic tensile (spall) strength of the alumina specimens. The tensile fracture of the un-alloyed alumina shows a monotonic decline of the spall strength with the amplitude of the loading stress pulse. Analysis of the decay of the elastic precursor wave allowed determining the rate of the irreversible (inelastic) strains in the SPS-processed alumina at the initial stages of the shock-induced inelastic deformation and to clarify the mechanisms responsible for the deformation. The 1-% addition of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} decreases the HEL of the SPS-processed alumina by 5-% and its spall strength by 50% but barely affects its static properties.

  11. Predicting Tensile Strengths of Boron/Aluminum Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decarlo, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    To develop predictive theory to account for time/temperature effect of B/A1 composites, series of deformation and fracture studies was performed on commercial boron fibers over wide ranges of stress, stress application time, and temperature. By combining these single fiber results with fracture theory for metal matrix composites, design formulas were derived that describe B/A1 composite tensile and stress rupture strengths as function of time and temperature. Using derived formulas, calculated and experimental results agree to within 3 percent.

  12. Strain rate effects on tensile strength of iron green bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Masahiro; Kuroyanagi, Yuki; Häggblad, Hans-Åke; Jonsén, Pär; Gustafsson, Gustaf

    2015-09-01

    Impact tensile strength of iron green bodies with densities of 7.2 and 7.4 g/cm3 was examined by Brazilian test using the split-Hopkinson pressure bar (Kolsky bar) method. The powder material used for the experiments was a press-ready premix containing Distaloy AE, graphite, and lubricant. During dynamic compression, the failure behavior of specimens was observed using a high-speed video camera. The failure stress and failure behavior of dynamic compressive tests were compared with those of static compressive tests.

  13. Some investigations about the tensile strength and the desiccation process of unsaturated clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trabelsi, H.; Jamei, M.; Guiras, H.; Hatem, Z.; Romero, E.; Sebastia, O.

    2010-06-01

    The current paper presents an investigation on the tensile strength of unsaturated clay, and a discussion about the significant differences between the behaviours of compacted soils and those of the completely remoulded soils. The adapted experimental device based on the shear box for the measurement of the tensile strength is also presented. In the tensile tests, stress-strain characteristics are measured using high precision transducers and electronic data acquisition. The equipment is capable of measuring tensile strengths of soil (about 10 MPa). Moreover, a new model to predict cracks is presented in 3D. This analytical model for the prediction of tensile strength, as a function of suction and porosity, is given.

  14. Evaluation of ultimate tensile strength using Miniature Disk Bend Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Kundan; Pooleery, Arun; Madhusoodanan, K.; Singh, R. N.; Chakravartty, J. K.; Shriwastaw, R. S.; Dutta, B. K.; Sinha, R. K.

    2015-06-01

    Correlations for evaluation of Ultimate Tensile Strength (UTS) using Miniature Disk Bend Test (MDBT) or Small Punch Test (SPT) has been an open issue since the development of the techniques. The larger plastic strains, in tri-axial state of stress during SPT, make the translation to the equivalent uniaxial parameter less certain. Correlations based on Pmax of load-displacement curve are also in disagreement as the point corresponding to Pmax does not represent a necking situation as in case of UTS, in a uniaxial tensile test. In present work, an attempt has been made for locating necking zone, which appears prior to Pmax, through experiments and FEM analyses. Experimental results on disk specimens from 20MnMoNi55, CrMoV ferritic steel and SS304LN materials along with FEM analyses found that load corresponding to 0.48 mm displacement is to be very close to the necking zone, and gives best fit for a UTS correlation.

  15. Tensile Strength and the Mining of Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Adam R.

    2013-11-01

    There are a number of important thought experiments that involve raising and lowering boxes full of radiation in the vicinity of black hole horizons. This Letter looks at the limitations placed on these thought experiments by the null energy condition, which imposes a fundamental bound on the tensile-strength-to-weight ratio of the materials involved, makes it impossible to build a box near the horizon that is wider than a single wavelength of the Hawking quanta, and puts a severe constraint on the operation of “space elevators” near black holes. In particular, it is shown that proposals for mining black holes by lowering boxes near the horizon, collecting some Hawking radiation, and dragging it out to infinity cannot proceed nearly as rapidly as has previously been claimed. As a consequence of this limitation, the boxes and all the moving parts are superfluous and black holes can be destroyed equally rapidly by threading the horizon with strings.

  16. Prediction of residual tensile strength of transversely impacted composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lal, K. M.

    1982-01-01

    The response to low velocity impact of graphite-epoxy T300/5208 composite laminates is discussed. Steel balls of 3/8 inch, 5/8 inch, and 1 inch diameter were the projectiles. Impact energy was limited to 1.2 joules. Impacted specimens were ultrasonically C scanned to determine the impact damaged region. The threshold value of impact energy for impact damage was found to be approximately 0.3 joules. A model was developed to predict the tensile residual strength of impact damaged specimens from fracture mechanics concepts. Impacted specimens were tested in tension to provide a fracture data base. The experimental results agreed well with the predictions from fracture mechanics. In this study, the maximum impact velocity used to simulate the low velocity transverse impact from common objects like tool drops was 10 m/s.

  17. Tensile strength and the mining of black holes.

    PubMed

    Brown, Adam R

    2013-11-22

    There are a number of important thought experiments that involve raising and lowering boxes full of radiation in the vicinity of black hole horizons. This Letter looks at the limitations placed on these thought experiments by the null energy condition, which imposes a fundamental bound on the tensile-strength-to-weight ratio of the materials involved, makes it impossible to build a box near the horizon that is wider than a single wavelength of the Hawking quanta, and puts a severe constraint on the operation of "space elevators" near black holes. In particular, it is shown that proposals for mining black holes by lowering boxes near the horizon, collecting some Hawking radiation, and dragging it out to infinity cannot proceed nearly as rapidly as has previously been claimed. As a consequence of this limitation, the boxes and all the moving parts are superfluous and black holes can be destroyed equally rapidly by threading the horizon with strings. PMID:24313473

  18. Improved Tensile Adhesion Specimens for High Strength Epoxy Systems in Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddock, M. Reed; McLennan, Michael L.

    2000-01-01

    An improved tensile adhesion button has been designed and tested that results in higher measured tensile adhesion strength while providing increased capability for testing high strength epoxy adhesive systems. The best attributes of two well-established tensile button designs were combined and refined into an optimized tensile button. The most significant design change to the tensile button was to improve alignment of the bonded tensile button specimens during tensile testing by changing the interface between the tensile button and the tensile test machine. The established or old button design uses a test fixture that pulls from a grooved annulus or anvil head while the new button design pulls from a threaded hole in the centerline of the button. Finite element (FE) analysis showed that asymmetric loading of the established anvil head tensile button significantly increases the stress concentration in the adhesive, causing failure at lower tensile test loads. The new tensile button was designed to eliminate asymmetric loading and eliminate misalignment sensitivity. Enhanced alignment resulted in improved tensile adhesion strength measurement up to 13.8 MPa (2000psi) over the established button design. Another design change increased the capability of the button by increasing the threaded hole diameter allowing it to test high strength epoxy systems up to 85 MPa(less than 12,000 psi). The improved tensile button can be used in button- to-button or button-to-panel configurations.

  19. The relation between the tensile strength and the hardness of metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, O

    1930-01-01

    This report presents methods determining the hardness and tensile strength of metals by showing the effect and dependence of the hardness numbers on the strain-hardening. Relations between the hardness numbers and the ordinary stress-strain diagrams and tensile strength are given. Procedures for finding the Brinell strength are also presented.

  20. Thermal degradation and tensile strength of sansevieria trifasciata-polypropylene composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abral, H.; Kenedy, E.

    2015-07-01

    The paper exhibits thermal degradation and tensile strength of Sansevieria Trifasciata (ST) fibers and polypropylene (PP) composites. Thermal degradation of ST fibers PP composites was conducted by using thermogravimetry (TGA) instrument, meanwhile tensile strength of the composite was done by using tensile equipment. The results show that the thermal resistance of ST fibers PP composites was higher than that of virgin PP only. Increases in volume fraction of fibers in the composites enhance the tensile strength. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) observation exhibits good interface bonding between ST fibers and PP matrix.

  1. The tensile strength properties of CFRPs and GRRPs for Unnes electric car body material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khumaedi, Muhammad; Sumbodo, Wirawan; Widodo, Rahmat Doni

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes composite materials tensile testing of electric car body material. The UNNES electric car body must be developed using a high strength and lightweight material. A fiber-reinforced plastic composite is widely used for the concerned objective. Selection of the type of composites, variations in fiber orientation, and the number of fiber layers will affect the tensile strength of the material. Composite materials use Carbon-fiber-reinforced plastics (CFRPs) and glass-fiber-reinforced plastics (GFRPs) variation to the fiber areal weight, variations in fiber orientation and the number of fiber layers. The CFRPs areal weight consists of 230 gsm and 400 gsm. The GFRPsareal weight consists of 400 gsm and 600 gsm. Fibre orientationsconsist of 0° and 45°. Number of fiber layers consists of one layer and two layers. Various variations were then tested to figure out their tensile to get ultimate tensile strength of materials. Standard test method for tensile test was conducted using ASTM D3039. Tensile specimen geometry used a type of balanced and symmetric fiber orientation, with 25mm in width, 250 mm in length, and 2.5 mm in thickness. The result shows that the more fiber areal weight and the layer number were used, the more its tensile strength would increase, beside it increased the ultimate tensile strength of the material for both glass and carbon fiber with 0o and 45o fiber arientation. Fiber plain wave with 45o has greater tensile strength compared to any other variation.

  2. Asteroids With Tensile Strength: The Case of 2015 HM10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, Michael W.; Benner, Lance A. M.; Naidu, Shantanu P.; Brozovic, Marina; Richardson, James E.; Rivera-Valentin, Edgard G.; Taylor, Patrick A.; Ford, H. Alyson; Ghigo, Frank D.; Giorgini, Jon D.; Jao, Joseph S.; Teitelbaum, Lawrence

    2015-11-01

    Near-Earth asteroid 2015 HM10 was discovered on 2015 April 19 with the 4-m Blanco Telescope at Cerro Tololo (MPEC 2015-H90). HM10 made a 0.00295 AU / 1.14 lunar distance flyby of Earth on July 7. This was the asteroid’s closest approach to Earth until at least 2419.We observed HM10 with radar between July 5 and July 8 using Arecibo, the 70 m DSS-14 and 34 m DSS-13 antennas at Goldstone, Green Bank, and elements of the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). Bistatic observations were crucial to obtain high-resolution images of HM10 due to the short round-trip travel time of the radar signal, which was as low as 2.95 s on July 7. Our finest image resolution was 3.75 m/pixel in range, obtained on July 7 with the new 80 kW C-band (7190 MHz, 4.2 cm) transmitter on DSS-13 and receiving at Green Bank with the new radar backend.Optical lightcurves obtained prior to closest approach indicated that HM10 has a spin period of ~22.2 minutes and an elongated shape (W. Ryan, pers. comm). The delay-Doppler radar images confirm the rotation period estimated from photometry and reveal that HM10 has a long-axis extent of 80-100 m with an equatorial aspect ratio of about 2:1. Radar speckle tracking transmitting from Arecibo and receiving with the VLBA on July 6 rule out any non-principal axis ‘wobble’ with an amplitude greater than ~10º.HM10’s rapid rotation implies significant cohesion, with a minimum tensile strength of 25-150 Pa required at its center to prevent disruption, assuming overall bulk density between 0.7 and 3.9 g cm-3. This is comparable to strength predictions for rubble-pile aggregates (e.g. Scheeres, Britt, Carry, & Holsapple 2015, Asteroids IV, in press). HM10 is not necessarily a ‘monolith’.HM10’s shape is complex and irregular. The radar images show angular features and ‘facets’ up to ~30 m across. There is also a cluster of radar-bright pixels that tracks with HM10’s rotation, consistent with a high standing feature 15-20 m across. This feature is similar in appearance to radar images of decameter-scale boulders on other asteroids.

  3. Correlation of tensile and shear strengths of metals with their friction properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    The relation between the theoretical tensile and the shear strengths and the friction properties of metals in contact with diamond, boron nitride, silicon carbide, manganese-zinc ferrite, and the metals themselves in vacuum was investigated. The relationship between the actual shear strength and the friction properties of the metal was also investigated. An estimate of the theoretical uniaxial tensile strength was obtained in terms of the equilibrium surface energy, interplanar spacing of the planes perpendicular to the tensile axis, and the Young's modulus of elasticity. An estimate of the theoretical shear strength for metals was obtained from the shear modulus, the repeat distance of atoms in the direction of shear of the metal and the interplanar spacing of the shear planes. The coefficient of friction for metals was found to be related to the theoretical tensile, theoretical shear, and actual shear strengths of metals. The higher the strength of the metal, the lower the coefficient of friction.

  4. Differences between the tensile and compressive strengths of bovine tibial trabecular bone depend on modulus.

    PubMed

    Keaveny, T M; Wachtel, E F; Ford, C M; Hayes, W C

    1994-09-01

    The conflicting conclusions regarding the relationship between the tensile and compressive strengths of trabecular bone remain unexplained. To help resolve this issue, we compared measurements of the tensile (n = 22) and compressive (n = 22) yield strengths, and yield strains, of trabecular bone specimens taken from 38 bovine proximal tibiae. We also studied how these failure properties depended on modulus and apparent density. To enhance accuracy, trabecular orientation was controlled, and each specimen had a reduced section where strains were measured with a miniature extensometer. We found that the mean yield strength was 30% lower for tensile loading. However, the difference between individual values of the tensile and compressive strengths increased linearly with increasing modulus and density, being negligible for low moduli, but substantial for high moduli. By contrast, both the tensile and compressive yield strains were independent of modulus and density, with the yield strain being 30% lower for tensile loading. Thus, the difference between the tensile and compressive strengths of bovine tibial trabecular bone depends on the modulus, but the difference between yield strains does not. This phenomenon may explain in part that conflicting conclusions reached previously on the tensile and compressive strengths of trabecular bone since the mean modulus has varied among different studies. Realizing that our data pertain only directly to bovine tibial trabecular bone for longitudinal loading, our results nevertheless suggest that failure parameters based on strains may provide more powerful and general comparisons of the failure properties for trabecular bone than measures based on stress. PMID:7929463

  5. Effect of strain rate on formability in warm deep drawing of high tensile strength steel sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshihara, Shoichiro; Iwamatsu, Go

    2014-10-01

    In tensile test of the high tensile strength steel, tensile strength isdrastically decreased as the temperature is raised. Then, the strain rate sensitivity exponent of high tensile strength steel (SUS631) in this study is high at 800 degrees especially. Also, elongation is increased as the temperature is raised. In deep drawing, the maximum punch load of the high tensile strength steel is examined on difference punch speed at 600 and 800 degrees. On the other hand, finite element (FE) simulation was used for the possibility to evaluate the forming load on difference punch speed in warm deep drawing. In FE simulation, we have considered both the strain hardening exponent and the strain rate sensitivity exponent (m-value) because we cannot neglect m-value 0.184 at 800 degrees. The tendency of the forming load in the experiments agrees the results in FE simulation.

  6. The dynamic tensile strength of ice and ice-silicate mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, M. A.; Ahrens, T. J.

    1983-01-01

    The dynamic tensile strength of icy media is measured at strain rates on the order of 10,000/sec to aid in the understanding of impact and cratering phenomena. Compressed samples consisting of ice and ice-silicate mixtures with 5 and 30 wt % sand were impacted at temperatures between 230 and 250 K by projectile plexiglas plates imparting the required strain rates in less than 0.75 microsec. Taking the tensile stress corresponding to the transition from intact to spalled or fragmented samples as the dynamic tensile strength, strengths of 17, 20 and 22 MPa were obtained for the pure ice, 5 wt % sand, and 30 wt % sand specimens, respectively. The values lie considerably above those observed in static testing. A continuum fracturing model is used to obtain relations between tensile strength and stress rate as well as to derive stress and damage histories during tensile loading and the size distribution of icy fragments as a function of strain rate.

  7. Increased tensile strength of carbon nanotube yarns and sheets through chemical modification and electron beam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Miller, Sandi G; Williams, Tiffany S; Baker, James S; Sol, Francisco; Lebron-Colon, Marisabel; McCorkle, Linda S; Wilmoth, Nathan G; Gaier, James; Chen, Michelle; Meador, Michael A

    2014-05-14

    The inherent strength of individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs) offers considerable opportunity for the development of advanced, lightweight composite structures. Recent work in the fabrication and application of CNT forms such as yarns and sheets has addressed early nanocomposite limitations with respect to nanotube dispersion and loading and has pushed the technology toward structural composite applications. However, the high tensile strength of an individual CNT has not directly translated into that of sheets and yarns, where the bulk material strength is limited by intertube electrostatic attractions and slippage. The focus of this work was to assess postprocessing of CNT sheets and yarns to improve the macro-scale strength of these material forms. Both small-molecule functionalization and electron-beam irradiation were evaluated as means to enhance the tensile strength and Young's modulus of the bulk CNT materials. Mechanical testing revealed a 57% increase in tensile strength of CNT sheets upon functionalization compared with unfunctionalized sheets, while an additional 48% increase in tensile strength was observed when functionalized sheets were irradiated. Similarly, small-molecule functionalization increased tensile strength of yarn by up to 25%, whereas irradiation of the functionalized yarns pushed the tensile strength to 88% beyond that of the baseline yarn. PMID:24720450

  8. Tensile and flexural strength of commercially pure titanium submitted to laser and tungsten inert gas welds.

    PubMed

    Atoui, Juliana Abdallah; Felipucci, Daniela Nair Borges; Pagnano, Valéria Oliveira; Orsi, Iara Augusta; Nóbilo, Mauro Antônio de Arruda; Bezzon, Osvaldo Luiz

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the tensile and flexural strength of tungsten inert gas (TIG) welds in specimens made of commercially pure titanium (CP Ti) compared with laser welds. Sixty cylindrical specimens (2 mm diameter x 55 mm thick) were randomly assigned to 3 groups for each test (n=10): no welding (control), TIG welding (10 V, 36 A, 8 s) and Nd:YAG laser welding (380 V, 8 ms). The specimens were radiographed and subjected to tensile and flexural strength tests at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min using a load cell of 500 kgf applied on the welded interface or at the middle point of the non-welded specimens. Tensile strength data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test, and flexural strength data by the Kruskal-Wallis test (α=0.05). Non-welded specimens presented significantly higher tensile strength (control=605.84 ± 19.83) (p=0.015) and flexural strength (control=1908.75) (p=0.000) than TIG- and laser-welded ones. There were no significant differences (p>0.05) between the welding types for neither the tensile strength test (TIG=514.90 ± 37.76; laser=515.85 ± 62.07) nor the flexural strength test (TIG=1559.66; laser=1621.64). As far as tensile and flexural strengths are concerned, TIG was similar to laser and could be suitable to replace laser welding in implant-supported rehabilitations. PMID:24474361

  9. Increased Tensile Strength of Carbon Nanotube Yarns and Sheets through Chemical Modification and Electron Beam Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Williams, Tiffany S.; Baker, James S.; Sola, Francisco; Lebron-Colon, Marisabel; McCorkle, Linda S.; Wilmoth, Nathan G.; Gaier, James; Chen, Michelle; Meador, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The inherent strength of individual carbon nanotubes offers considerable opportunity for the development of advanced, lightweight composite structures. Recent work in the fabrication and application of carbon nanotube (CNT) forms such as yarns and sheets has addressed early nanocomposite limitations with respect to nanotube dispersion and loading; and has pushed the technology toward structural composite applications. However, the high tensile strength of an individual CNT has not directly translated to macro-scale CNT forms where bulk material strength is limited by inter-tube electrostatic attraction and slippage. The focus of this work was to assess post processing of CNT sheet and yarn to improve the macro-scale strength of these material forms. Both small molecule functionalization and e-beam irradiation was evaluated as a means to enhance tensile strength and Youngs modulus of the bulk CNT material. Mechanical testing results revealed a tensile strength increase in CNT sheets by 57 when functionalized, while an additional 48 increase in tensile strength was observed when functionalized sheets were irradiated; compared to unfunctionalized sheets. Similarly, small molecule functionalization increased yarn tensile strength up to 25, whereas irradiation of the functionalized yarns pushed the tensile strength to 88 beyond that of the baseline yarn.

  10. Small screw study: Interim report on fastener tensile strength and optimum thread depth

    SciTech Connect

    Diegert, K.V.; Dorrell, L.R.; Reese, R.T.; Lazarus, L.J.; Allied-Signal Aerospace Co., Kansas City, MO . Kansas City Div.)

    1989-10-01

    This report summarizes about 1260 tests performed on small threaded fasteners (equal to or less than 1/4 inch in diameter and designated as 1/4-20 UNC, {number sign}4-40 UNC, {number sign}2-56 UNC, and 1.0 UNM). Tests determined the tensile strengths of the screws, the lengths of engagement needed to develop the full tensile strengths when the screws were engaged in 6061-T6 Aluminum, Hiperco 50, and 303 Stainless Steel, and whether relationships existed between the tensile strengths and Knoop Micro-Hardness measurements taken on the threaded ends of the screws. 17 figs., 13 tabs.

  11. Computer simulation of fatigue under diametrical compression

    SciTech Connect

    Carmona, H. A.; Kun, F.; Andrade, J. S. Jr.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2007-04-15

    We study the fatigue fracture of disordered materials by means of computer simulations of a discrete element model. We extend a two-dimensional fracture model to capture the microscopic mechanisms relevant for fatigue and we simulate the diametric compression of a disc shape specimen under a constant external force. The model allows us to follow the development of the fracture process on the macrolevel and microlevel varying the relative influence of the mechanisms of damage accumulation over the load history and healing of microcracks. As a specific example we consider recent experimental results on the fatigue fracture of asphalt. Our numerical simulations show that for intermediate applied loads the lifetime of the specimen presents a power law behavior. Under the effect of healing, more prominent for small loads compared to the tensile strength of the material, the lifetime of the sample increases and a fatigue limit emerges below which no macroscopic failure occurs. The numerical results are in a good qualitative agreement with the experimental findings.

  12. Predicting the Open-Hole Tensile Strength of Composite Plates Based on Probabilistic Neural Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Hai-Tao; Wang, Hai

    2014-12-01

    Tensile experiments were performed for open-hole composite plates with three different layups. With the limited number of experimental results, a probabilistic neural network (PNN) based approach is proposed to predict the tensile strength of composite plates with an open-hole. The predictive model takes the geometric parameters, the layup features and the average tensile stress of open-hole composite plates as the inputs and produces the safety status as the intermediate output with the classification function of PNN. Then the critical safety point, that is the open-hole tensile strength, where the safety status turns from survival to failure, is determined with the bi-section searching method. The predictions produce acceptable results whose errors are comparable to the coefficient of variation of experimental results. With experimental data from other studies, further assessments are also made to prove the capability of this model in predicting the open-hole tensile strength of composite plates.

  13. Ideal Strength of graphene under general states of tensile strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Moon-Hyun; Hwang, Jeongwoon; Ihm, Jisoon; Kim, Kyung-Suk

    2014-03-01

    Phonon softening of graphene under general directional tensile strain is investigated based on ab initio density functional theory calculations. Under a wide range of tensile strain configurations, we demonstrate that phonon instabilities are responsible for the mechanical failure of graphene through the strain-induced enhancement of phonon softening. It is shown that there are two types of phonon instabilities which induce symmetry-breaking structural distortions, and both of them lead to mechanical failure prior to the elastic failure commonly expected when the structural symmetry is retained. This work was supported by the Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) and Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE).

  14. Tensile-strength apparatus applies high strain-rate loading with minimum shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotrill, H. E., Jr.; Mac Glashan, W. F., Jr.

    1966-01-01

    Tensile-strength testing apparatus employs a capillary bundle through which a noncompressible fluid is extruded and a quick-release valve system. This apparatus applies the test loads at relatively constant very high strain rates with minimal shock and vibration to the tensile specimen and apparatus.

  15. Experimental and numerical study on tensile strength of concrete under different strain rates.

    PubMed

    Min, Fanlu; Yao, Zhanhu; Jiang, Teng

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic characterization of concrete is fundamental to understand the material behavior in case of heavy earthquakes and dynamic events. The implementation of material constitutive law is of capital importance for the numerical simulation of the dynamic processes as those caused by earthquakes. Splitting tensile concrete specimens were tested at strain rates of 10(-7) s(-1) to 10(-4) s(-1) in an MTS material test machine. Results of tensile strength versus strain rate are presented and compared with compressive strength and existing models at similar strain rates. Dynamic increase factor versus strain rate curves for tensile strength were also evaluated and discussed. The same tensile data are compared with strength data using a thermodynamic model. Results of the tests show a significant strain rate sensitive behavior, exhibiting dynamic tensile strength increasing with strain rate. In the quasistatic strain rate regime, the existing models often underestimate the experimental results. The thermodynamic theory for the splitting tensile strength of concrete satisfactorily describes the experimental findings of strength as effect of strain rates. PMID:24883355

  16. Experimental and Numerical Study on Tensile Strength of Concrete under Different Strain Rates

    PubMed Central

    Min, Fanlu; Yao, Zhanhu; Jiang, Teng

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic characterization of concrete is fundamental to understand the material behavior in case of heavy earthquakes and dynamic events. The implementation of material constitutive law is of capital importance for the numerical simulation of the dynamic processes as those caused by earthquakes. Splitting tensile concrete specimens were tested at strain rates of 10−7 s−1 to 10−4 s−1 in an MTS material test machine. Results of tensile strength versus strain rate are presented and compared with compressive strength and existing models at similar strain rates. Dynamic increase factor versus strain rate curves for tensile strength were also evaluated and discussed. The same tensile data are compared with strength data using a thermodynamic model. Results of the tests show a significant strain rate sensitive behavior, exhibiting dynamic tensile strength increasing with strain rate. In the quasistatic strain rate regime, the existing models often underestimate the experimental results. The thermodynamic theory for the splitting tensile strength of concrete satisfactorily describes the experimental findings of strength as effect of strain rates. PMID:24883355

  17. Optimization and Prediction of Ultimate Tensile Strength in Metal Active Gas Welding.

    PubMed

    Ampaiboon, Anusit; Lasunon, On-Uma; Bubphachot, Bopit

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect of welding parameters on ultimate tensile strength of structural steel, ST37-2, welded by Metal Active Gas welding. A fractional factorial design was used for determining the significance of six parameters: wire feed rate, welding voltage, welding speed, travel angle, tip-to-work distance, and shielded gas flow rate. A regression model to predict ultimate tensile strength was developed. Finally, we verified optimization of the process parameters experimentally. We achieved an optimum tensile strength (558 MPa) and wire feed rate, 19 m/min, had the greatest effect, followed by tip-to-work distance, 7 mm, welding speed, 200 mm/min, welding voltage, 30 V, and travel angle, 60°. Shield gas flow rate, 10 L/min, was slightly better but had little effect in the 10-20 L/min range. Tests showed that our regression model was able to predict the ultimate tensile strength within 4%. PMID:26491719

  18. Anisotropy of tensile strength and fracture mode of perfect face-centered-cubic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, R. F.; Xu, J.; Qu, R. T.; Liu, Z. Q.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2015-06-01

    This study presents an effective method to calculate the ideal tensile strength of six face-centered-cubic (fcc) crystals (Cu, Au, Ni, Pt, Al, and Ir) along an arbitrary tensile direction by considering the coupling effect of normal stress and shear stress on a given crystallographic plane. Meanwhile, the fracture modes of the six crystals can also be derived from the competition between shear and cleavage fracture along different crystallographic planes. The results show that both the intrinsic factors (the ideal shear strength and cleavage strength of low-index planes) and the orientation may affect the tensile strength and fracture modes of ideal fcc crystals, which may give the reliable strength limit of fcc metals and well interpret the observed high strength in nano-scale mechanical experiments.

  19. High efficient preparation of carbon nanotube-grafted carbon fibers with the improved tensile strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Wenxin; Wang, Yanxiang; Wang, Chengguo; Chen, Jiqiang; Wang, Qifen; Yuan, Yan; Niu, Fangxu

    2016-02-01

    An innovative technique has been developed to obtain the uniform catalyst coating on continuously moving carbon fibers. Carbon nanotube (CNT)-grafted carbon fibers with significantly improved tensile strength have been succeeded to produce by using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) when compared to the tensile strength of untreated carbon fibers. The critical requirements for preparation of CNT-grafted carbon fibers with high tensile strength have been found, mainly including (i) the obtainment of uniform coating of catalyst particles with small particle size, (ii) the low catalyst-induced and mechano-chemical degradation of carbon fibers, and (iii) the high catalyst activity which could facilitate the healing and strengthening of carbon fibers during the growth of CNTs. The optimum growth temperature was found to be about 500 °C, and the optimum catalyst is Ni due to its highest activity, there is a pronounced increase of 10% in tensile strength of carbon fibers after CNT growth at 500 °C by using Ni catalyst. Based on the observation from HRTEM images, a healing and crosslink model of neighboring carbon crystals by CNTs has been formulated to reveal the main reason that causes an increase in tensile strength of carbon fibers after the growth of CNTs. Such results have provided the theoretical and experimental foundation for the large-scale preparation of CNT-grafted carbon fibers with the improved tensile strength, significantly promoting the development of CNT-grafted carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites.

  20. Tensile bond strength of resin luting cement to a porcelain-fusing noble alloy.

    PubMed

    Stoknorm, R; Isidor, F; Ravnholt, G

    1996-01-01

    This study evaluated the tensile bond strength of resin composites to a noble alloy for ceramic bonding after various surface treatments. The flat end of bars cast in the alloy were used as test specimens. Eighteen clinically relevant combinations of luting agent, airborne particle abrasion, and surface treatment were applied. After surface treatment, two bars were bonded together. Resin cement, either dual-polymerizing (Twinlook) or chemically polymerizing (Panavia EX, Panavia 21, or RBBC), was used as a luting agent. The specimens were subjected to 1,000 thermal cycles between 15 degrees C and 60 degrees C before tensile bond strength testing. The highest median bond strengths were obtained using the Silicoater MD method/Twinlook (20.6 to 26.1 MPa) or with tin-plating/ Panavia EX (24.0 MPa), but more low values were recorded among the latter specimens. Tin-plating/Panavia 21 gave median tensile bond strengths (18.1 MPa) similar to tin-plating/Panavia EX. The Silicoater MD method resulted in similar bond strengths with or without the addition of a layer of Opaquer. The traditional Silicoater method (8.0 to 12.4 MPa) gave significantly lower median tensile bond strength values, and the lost sugar crystals method resulted in a tensile bond strength of 15.4 MPa. PMID:8957870

  1. Tensile and tear strength of carrageenan film from Philippine eucheuma species.

    PubMed

    Briones, Annabelle V; Ambal, Wilhelmina O; Estrella, Romulo R; Pangilinan, Rolando; De Vera, Carlos J; Pacis, Raymund L; Rodriguez, Ner; Villanueva, Merle A

    2004-01-01

    The tensile and tear strength of carrageenan film from Philippines Eucheuma species were investigated using NEC tensilon universal-testing machine according to American Society for Testing Materials methods. These properties are important for assessing carrageenan film as packaging material. The kappa and iota types were used in the study. The effect of glycerine on the tensile and tear strength including elongation was also evaluated. Addition of glycerine tended to lower the tensile strength of the film and increase its elongation properties including the tear strength. Carrageenan film without glycerine was much stronger. Glycerine made the film more flexible and easy to deform. The composite film of carrageenan and konjac gum did not exhibit elongation. It also showed higher tensile strength than did the composite film of carrageenan and xanthan gum. Compared with iota-type carrageenan film, kappa-type carrageenan film without glycerine was more comparable to low-density polyethylene (LDPE) film in terms of tensile strength as was the composite film of carrageenan-konjac gum. The kappa-type carrageenan film with glycerine was more comparable to LDPE film in terms of tear strength. The elongation reading for carrageenan film was lower than that for LDPE film. Morphologic studies showed that the carrageenan film had sets of pores distributed randomly at different places as compared to LDPE film. It also showed that the carrageenan film was more fibrous than LDPE film. PMID:15085409

  2. Effective Size Analysis of the Diametral Compression (Brazil) Test Specimen

    SciTech Connect

    Jadaan, Osama M.; Wereszczak, Andrew A

    2009-04-01

    This study considers the finite element analysis (FEA) simulation and Weibull effective size analysis for the diametral compression (DC) or Brazil specimen loaded with three different push-rod geometries. Those geometries are a flat push-rod, a push-rod whose radius of curvature is larger than that for the DC specimen, and a push-rod whose radius of curvature matches that of the DC specimen. Such established effective size analysis recognizes that the tensile strength of structural ceramics is typically one to two orders of magnitude less than its compressive strength. Therefore, because fracture is much more apt to result from a tensile stress than a compressive one, this traditional analysis only considers the first principal tensile stress field in the mechanically loaded ceramic component for the effective size analysis. The effective areas and effective volumes were computed as function of Weibull modulus using the CARES/Life code. Particular attention was devoted to the effect of mesh sensitivity and localized stress concentration. The effect of specimen width on the stress state was also investigated. The effects of push-rod geometry, the use of steel versus WC push-rods, and considering a frictionless versus no-slip interface between push-rod and specimen on the maximum stresses, where those stresses are located, and the effective area and effective volume results are described. Of the three push-rod geometries, it is concluded that the push-rod (made from WC rather than steel) whose radius of curvature matches that of the DC specimen is the most apt to cause fracture initiation within the specimen's bulk rather than at the loading interface. Therefore, its geometry is the most likely to produce a valid diametral compression strength test. However, the DC specimen remains inefficient in terms of its area and volume efficiencies; namely, the tensile strength of only a few percent of the specimen's entire area or volume is sampled. Given the high probability that a valid (or invalid) test can be proven by ceramic fractographic practices suggests that this test method and specimen is questionable for use with relatively strong structural ceramics.

  3. The Effect of Gap Angle on Tensile Strength of Preceramic Base Metal Solder Joints

    PubMed Central

    Fattahi, Farnaz; Hashemi Ardakani, Zahra; Hashemi Ardakani, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Soldering is a process commonly used in fabricating dental prosthesis. Since most soldered prosthesis fail at the solder joints; the joint strength is of utmost importance. Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of gap angle on the tensile strength of base metal solder joints. Materials and Method A total number of 40 Ni-Cr samples were fabricated according to ADA/ISO 9693 specifications for tensile test. Samples were cut at the midpoint of the bar, and were placed at the considered angles by employing an explicitly designed device. They were divided into 4 groups regarding the gap angle; Group C (control group) with parallel gap on steady distance of 0.2mm, Group 1: 10°, Group 2: 20°, and Group3: 30° gap angles. When soldered, the specimens were all tested for tensile strength using a universal testing machine at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min with a preload of 10N. Kruskal-Wallis H test was used to compare tensile strength among the groups (p< 0.05). Results The mean tensile strength values obtained from the study groups were respectively 307.84, 391.50, 365.18, and 368.86 MPa. The tensile strength was not statistically different among the four groups in general (p≤ 0.490). Conclusion Making the gap angular at the solder joints and the subsequent unsteady increase of the gap distance would not change the tensile strength of the joint. PMID:26636118

  4. Effects of Thermal Treatment on Tensile Strength of Laurentian Granite Using Brazilian Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Tubing; Li, Xibing; Cao, Wenzhuo; Xia, Kaiwen

    2015-11-01

    The effect of thermal treatment on several physical properties and the tensile strength of Laurentian granite (LG) are measured in this study. Brazilian disc LG specimens are treated at temperatures of up to 850 °C. The physical properties such as grain density, relative volume change per degree, and P-wave velocity are investigated under the effect of heat treatment. The results indicate that both the density and the P-wave velocity decrease with the increase in heating temperature. However, the relative volume change per degree is not sensitive below 450 °C, while a remarkable increase appears from 450 to 850 °C. All cases are explained by the increase in both number and width of the thermally induced microcracks with the heating temperature. Brazilian tests are carried out statically with an MTS hydraulic servo-control testing system and dynamically with a modified split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) system to measure both static and dynamic tensile strength of LG. The relationship between the tensile strength and treatment temperatures shows that static tensile strength decreases with temperature while the dynamic tensile strength first increases and then decreases with a linear increase in the loading rate. However, the increase in dynamic tensile strength with treatment temperatures from 25 to 100 °C is due to slight dilation of the grain boundaries as the initial thermal action, which leads to compaction of rock. When the treatment temperature rises above 450 °C, the quartz phase transition results in increased size of microcracks due to the differential expansion between the quartz grains and other minerals, which is the main cause of the sharp reduction in tensile strength.

  5. Biophotonic effect of diode laser irradiance on tensile strength of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Lau, Pik Suan; Bidin, Noriah; Krishnan, Ganesan; Nassir, Zaleha; Bahktiar, Hazri

    2015-04-01

    Low-energy laser irradiance at certain wavelengths is able to stimulate the tissue bio-reaction and enhance the healing process. Collagen deposition is one of the important aspects in healing process because it can increase the strength of the skin. This study was designed to examine the biophotonic effect of irradiance on collagen production of diabetic wound in rat model. The tensile strength of skin was employed as a parameter to describe the wound. Diabetic rat models were induced by streptozotocin via intravenous injection. Skin-breaking strength was measured using an Instron tensile test machine. The experimental animals were treated with 808-nm diode laser at two different powers-0.1 and 0.5 W/cm(2)-and 30, 60, and 120 s for each session. The tensile strength was optimized after treated with high-power diode laser. The photostimulation effect was revealed by accelerated healing process and enhanced tensile strength of wound. Laser photostimulation on tensile strength in diabetic wound suggests that such therapy facilitates collagen production in diabetic wound healing. PMID:25260140

  6. Quantitative fracture strength and plasticity measurements of lithiated silicon nanowires by in situ TEM tensile experiments.

    PubMed

    Kushima, Akihiro; Huang, Jian Yu; Li, Ju

    2012-11-27

    We report in situ tensile strength measurement of fully lithiated Si (Li-Si alloy) nanowires inside a transmission electron microscope. A specially designed dual probe with an atomic force microscopy cantilever and a scanning tunneling microscopy electrode was used to conduct lithiation of Si nanowires and then perform in situ tension of the lithiated nanowires. The axial tensile strength decreased from the initial value of 3.6 GPa for the pristine unlithiated Si nanowires to 0.72 GPa for the lithiated Li-Si alloy. We observed large fracture strain ranging from 8% to 16% for Li-Si alloy, 70% of which remained permanent after fracture. This indicates a certain degree of tensile plasticity in the lithiated silicon before fracture, important for constitutive modeling of the lithium-ion battery cyclability. We also compare the ab initio computed ideal strengths with our measured strengths and attribute the differences to the morphology and flaws in the lithiated nanowires. PMID:23025575

  7. Characterization of Optical Fiber Strength Under Applied Tensile Stress and Bending Stress

    SciTech Connect

    P.E. Klingsporn

    2011-08-01

    Various types of tensile testing and bend radius tests were conducted on silica core/silica cladding optical fiber of different diameters with different protective buffer coatings, fabricated by different fiber manufacturers. The tensile tests were conducted to determine not only the average fiber strengths at failure, but also the distribution in fracture strengths, as well as the influence of buffer coating on fracture strength. The times-to-failure of fiber subjected to constant applied bending stresses of various magnitudes were measured to provide a database from which failure times of 20 years or more, and the corresponding minimum bend radius, could be extrapolated in a statistically meaningful way. The overall study was done to provide an understanding of optical fiber strength in tensile loading and in applied bending stress as related to applications of optical fiber in various potential coizfgurations for weapons and enhanced surveillance campaigns.

  8. Effect of Silver Nano-particles on Tensile Strength of Acrylic Resins

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffari, Tahereh; Hamedi-rad, Fahimeh

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) is widely used for the fabrication of removable prostheses. Silver nano-particles (AgNps) have been added to PMMA because of their antimicrobial properties, but their effect on the mechanical properties of PMMA is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of AgNps on the tensile strength of PMMA. Materials and methods. For this study, 12 specimens were prepared and divided into two groups. Group 1 included PMMA without AgNps and group 2 included PMMA mixed with 5 wt% of AgNps. Tensile strength of the specimens was measured by Zwick Z100 apparatus. Statistical analysis was carried out by SPSS using t-test. Statistical significance was defined at P<0.05. Results. This study showed that the mean tensile strength of PMMA in group 2 was significantly lower than that in group 1. Therefore, the tensile strength decreased significantly after incorporation of silver nano-particles. Conclusion. Within the limitations of this study, tensile strength of acrylic resin specimens was influenced by silver nano-particles. PMID:25973153

  9. Thermal degradation of the tensile strength of unidirectional boron/aluminum composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimes, H. H.; Lad, R. A.; Maisel, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    The variation of ultimate tensile strength with thermal treatment of B-Al composite materials and of boron fibers chemically removed from these composites in an attempt to determine the mechanism of the resulting strength degradation was studied. Findings indicate that thermally cycling B-Al represents a more severe condition than equivalent time at temperature. Degradation of composite tensile strength from about 1.3 GN/m squared to as low as 0.34 GN/m squared was observed after 3,000 cycles to 420 C for 203 micrometers B-1100 Al composite. In general, the 1100 Al matrix composites degraded somewhat more than the 6061 matrix material studied. Measurement of fiber strengths confirmed a composite strength loss due to the degradation of fiber strength. Microscopy indicated a highly flawed fiber surface.

  10. Environmental effects on the tensile strength of chemically vapor deposited silicon carbide fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, R. T.; Kraitchman, M. D.

    1985-01-01

    The room temperature and elevated temperature tensile strengths of commercially available chemically vapor-deposited (CVD) silicon carbide fibers were measured after 15 min heat treatment to 1600 C in various environments. These environments included oxygen, air, argon and nitrogen at one atmosphere and vacuum at 10/9 atmosphere. Two types of fibers were examined which differed in the SiC content of their carbon-rich coatings. Threshold temperature for fiber strength degradation was observed to be dependent on the as-received fiber-flaw structure, on the environment and on the coating. Fractographic analyses and flexural strength measurements indicate that tensile strength losses were caused by surface degradation. Oxidation of the surface coating is suggested as one possible degradation mechanism. The SiC fibers containing the higher percentage of SiC near the surface of the carbon-rich coating show better strength retention and higher elevated temperature strength.

  11. An investigation into geometry and microstructural effects upon the ultimate tensile strengths of butt welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S.

    1992-01-01

    A mathematical theory was evaluated empirically. This theory predicts weld ultimate tensile strength based on material properties and fusion line angles, mismatch, peaking, and weld widths. Welds were made on 1/4 and 1/2 in. aluminum 2219-T87, their geometries were measured, they were tensile tested, and these results were compared to theoretical predictions. Statistical analysis of results was performed to evaluate correlation of theory to results for many different categories of weld geometries.

  12. Estimating the tensile strength of super hard brittle materials using truncated spheroidal specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serati, Mehdi; Alehossein, Habib; Williams, David J.

    2015-05-01

    New approaches need to be introduced to measure the tensile capacity of super hard materials since the standard methods are not effective. To pursue this objective, a series of laboratory tests were constructed to replicate the fracture mechanism of diamond-based materials. Experiments indicate that under a certain compressive test condition, stresses normal to the axisymmetric line in truncated spheroidal specimens (bullet-shaped specimens) are in tension contributing to the tensile fracture of the material. From experimental and numerical studies, it is concluded that semi-prolate spheroidal specimens can be used to determine precisely the tensile strength of brittle stiff diamond-like composites.

  13. On the Compressive and Tensile Strength of Magnesium Aluminate Spinel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paris, V.; Hayun, S.; Dariel, M. P.; Frage, N.; Zaretsky, E.

    2009-12-01

    Magnesium aluminate spinel is a strong polycrystalline transparent ceramic. Spinel is an attractive material for armor applications and its behavior under shock wave loading is of obvious interest. The purpose of the present study was to determine the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL) of this material, its Hugoniot response above the HEL, and its spall strength. Planar impact experiments were performed over the 2 to 40 GPa stress range using the Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) as a principal diagnostics tool. According to these tests, spinel has a HEL of about 11.3 GPa. The spall strength of the material was found to be close to zero at low, about 2 GPa, impact stress.

  14. SIZE EFFECTS IN THE TENSILE STRENGTH OF UNIDIRECTIONAL FIBER COMPOSITES

    SciTech Connect

    M. SIVASAMBU; ET AL

    1999-08-01

    Monte Carlo simulation and theoretical modeling are used to study the statistical failure modes in unidirectional composites consisting of elastic fibers in an elastic matrix. Both linear and hexagonal fiber arrays are considered, forming 2D and 3D composites, respectively. Failure is idealized using the chain-of-bundles model in terms of {delta}-bundles of length {delta}, which is the length-scale of fiber load transfer. Within each {delta}-bundle, fiber load redistribution is determined by local load-sharing models that approximate the in-plane fiber load redistribution from planar break clusters as predicted from 2D and 3D shear-lag models. As a result these models are 1D and 2D, respectively. Fiber elements have random strengths following either the Weibull or the power-law distribution with shape and scale parameters {rho} and {sigma}{sub {delta}}, respectively. Simulations of {delta}-bundle failure, reveal two regimes. When fiber strength variability is low (roughly {rho} > 2) the dominant failure mode is by growing clusters of fiber breaks up to instability. When this variability is high (roughly 0 < {rho} < 1) cluster formation is suppressed by a dispersed fiber failure mode. For these two cases, closed-form approximations to the strength distribution of a {delta}-bundle are developed under the local load-sharing model and an equal load-sharing model of Daniels, respectively. The results compare favorably with simulations on {delta}-bundles with up to 1500 fibers. The location of the transition in terms of {rho} is affected by the upper tail properties of the fiber strength distributions as well as the number of fibers.

  15. Treatment of bleached wool with trans-glutaminases to enhance tensile strength, whiteness, and alkali resistance.

    PubMed

    Montazer, Majid; Lessan, Fatemeh; Pajootan, Elmira; Dadashian, Fatemeh

    2011-09-01

    Trans-glutaminases is known as a cross-linking enzyme for proteins. Wool is a proteinous fiber conventionally is treated through several processes to obtain the desirable characteristics. Bleaching is also one of the most important processes usually carried out by using an oxidizing agent in a conventional method. The tensile strength of wool yarns was reduced as a consequence of oxidative bleaching. Here, with the help of microbial trans-glutaminases (m-TGases), a novel bleaching process was disclosed in a way to obtain a bleached wool yarn with no significant reduction in the tensile strength. The results confirmed that the bleached wool yarns with H(2)O(2) could be modified by m-TGases post-treatment. The m-TGases treatment on the bleached wool yarns improved the tensile strength and whiteness along with the higher alkali resistance. PMID:21638062

  16. Experimental Study On The Effect Of Micro-Cracks On Brazilian Tensile Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiangyu

    2015-12-01

    For coal mine ground control issues, it is necessary to propose a failure criteria accounting for the transversely isotropic behaviors of rocks. Hence, it is very helpful to provide experimental data for the validation of the failure criteria. In this paper, the method for preparing transversely isotropic specimens and the scheme of the Brazilian tensile strength test are presented. Results obtained from Brazilian split tests under dry and water-saturated conditions reflect the effect of the development direction β of the structural plane, such as the bedding fissure, on the tensile strength, ultimate displacement, failure mode, and the whole splitting process. The results show that the tensile strength decreases linearly with increasing β. The softening coefficient of the tensile strength shows a sinusoidal function. The values of the slope and inflection point for the curve vary at the different stages of the Brazilian test. The failure mode of the rock specimen presented in this paper generally coincides with the standard Brazilian splitting failure mode. Based on the test results, the major influencing factors for the Brazilian splitting strength are analyzed and a mathematical model for solving the Brazilian splitting strength is proposed. The findings in this paper would greatly benefit the coal mine ground control studies when the surrounding rocks of interest show severe transversely isotropic behaviors.

  17. Establishing a Mathematical Model to Predict the Tensile Strength of Friction Stir Welded Pure Copper Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidarzadeh, A.; Saeid, T.; Khodaverdizadeh, H.; Mahmoudi, A.; Nazari, E.

    2013-02-01

    This investigation was undertaken to predict the tensile strength of friction stir welded pure copper. Response surface methodology based on a central composite rotatable design with four welding parameters, five levels, and 31 runs was used to conduct the experiments and to develop the mathematical regression model by means of Design-Expert software. Four welding parameters considered were tool profile design, rotational speed, welding speed, and axial force. Analysis of variance was applied to validate the predicted model. Confirmation experiments including microstructural characterization and conducted tensile tests showed that developed models are reasonably accurate. The results showed that the joints welded using the square and triangular tools had higher tensile strength compared to the joints welded using other tools. The increase in tool rotational speed, welding speed, and axial force resulted in increasing the tensile strength of the joints up to a maximum value. Also, the developed model showed that the optimum parameters to get a maximum of tensile strength were rotational speed, welding speed, and axial force of 942 rpm, 84 mm/min, and 1.62 kN, respectively.

  18. Comparison of the Tensile, Creep, and Rupture Strength Properties of Stoichiometric SiC Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, H. M.; DiCarlo, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    Tensile strength, creep strength, and rupture strength properties were measured for the following types of polymer-derived stoichiometric SiC fibers: Hi-Nicalon Type S from Nippon Carbon, Tyranno SA from Ube, and Sylramic from Dow Corning. Also included in this study were an earlier version of the SA fiber plus two recent developmental versions of the Sylramic fiber. The tensile strength measurements were made at room temperature on as-received fibers and on fibers after high-temperature inert exposure. The creep-rupture property data were obtained at 1400 deg C in air as well as, argon. Some fiber types showed strong effects of environment on their strength properties. These results are compared and discussed in terms of underlying mechanisms and implications for ceramic composites.

  19. A micromechanics model for predicting the tensile strength of unidirectional metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, S.

    1995-12-31

    In this paper, a micromechanics model has been developed to predict the tensile strength of unidirectional metal matrix composites (MMC). A simplified shear lag analysis is used to estimate the local stresses in the various constituents (fiber/matrix/interface). In this work, the matrix is assumed to carry both normal and shear stresses. Global matrix plasticity is considered by assuming that the matrix behaves in an elastic-perfectly plastic manner. Local interfacial debonding is assumed to occur when the average interfacial shear stress exceeds the interfacial shear strength value. The shear lag analysis including the effects of interfacial debonding and global matrix plasticity is used to estimate the stress concentration in fibers adjacent to broken fibers and the ineffective length. The tensile strength is estimated by considering the accumulation of fiber fractures. The effects of residual thermal stresses and statistical distribution of strength of the fibers are also included in this analysis. Parametric studies were conducted to investigate the influence of various parameters such as fiber volume fraction, temperature, interfacial shear strength, matrix properties and fiber strength, on the unidirectional tensile strength of MMC. The model was also used to predict the effects of volume fraction and temperature, on the strength of SCS6/Ti 24-11 composites. The predicted values compared well with the experimental results.

  20. Predicting the tensile modulus and strength of single and hybrid natural fibre reinforced thermoplastic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facca, Angelo George

    Natural fibre reinforced thermoplastics (NFRT) are used in a variety of commercial applications, but there is little theoretical modeling of structure/property relationships in these materials. In this thesis, micromechanical models available in the short-fibre literature were adapted to predict the tensile modulus and strength of some NFRT formulations. Hemp, 20 and 40-mesh hardwood, rice hulls and E-glass fibres were blended into HDPE to produce single and hybrid composites. Changes in fibre density and moisture content that occur during composite manufacturing were included in the micromechanical models. To account for fibre densification, the Young's modulus of the natural fibres was determined on a cell wall basis. A modified hybrid rule of mixtures (HROM) equation that uses experimental data from single NFRT was developed and found to adequately predict the tensile modulus of the hybrid composites. The tensile modulus for both the single and hybrid composites was found to linearly increase with an increase in fibre loading. The failure mechanism for all composite specimens was due to fibre pullout followed by matrix failure. Consequently the tensile strength of the NFRT was predicted using a ROM strength equation, which was modified with a derived semi-empirical fibre clustering parameter. The clustering parameter correctly predicted that as fibre loading increased, the average fibre stress would decrease. By assuming no contact between different types of fibres it was possible to use a modified HROM strength equation to predict the tensile strength of the hybrid composites. As a result parameters taken from the respective single fibre systems could be applied directly to the HROM equation. The modified ROM and HROM strength equations adequately predicted the tensile strength of various single and hybrid fibre reinforced composites over a wide range of composite loading. In this study experiments were conducted to shed light on the effect of a coupling agent (maleic anhydride) on the tensile strength and stiffness of various NFRT. Coupling agents, which alter the interfacial shear strength between the fibre and matrix, were determined to have a minimal effect on composite stiffness but produced increases in composite strength.

  1. Instrumented impact and residual tensile strength testing of eight-ply carbon eopoxy specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A. T.

    1990-01-01

    Instrumented drop weight impact testing was utilized to examine a puncture-type impact on thin carbon-epoxy coupons. Four different material systems with various eight-ply lay-up configurations were tested. Specimens were placed over a 10.3-mm diameter hole and impacted with a smaller tup (4.2-mm diameter) than those used in previous studies. Force-time plots as well as data on absorbed energy and residual tensile strength were gathered and examined. It was found that a critical impact energy level existed for each material tested, at which point tensile strength began to rapidly decrease with increasing impact energy.

  2. Tensile strength of dome rocks and lavas at Santiaguito dome complex, Guatemala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornby, Adrian; Lamb, Oliver; Lamur, Anthony; Lavallée, Yan

    2015-04-01

    Lava domes are inherently unstable structures, subject to intense gas flux and rapid variations in the state of stress. At shallow depths confining stresses are minimal and deformation is dilatant, occurring predominantly through tensile fractures. This fracture mode facilitates outgassing and contributes to the development of gas-and-ash activity as well as vulcanian eruptions. However, there is a paucity of tensile strength data for volcanic materials in the published literature, and we know of no paper which addresses this at high temperatures. We study the tensile strength of dome rocks collected at the Santiaguito dome complex, Guatemala, over a porosity range of 3-25%. Indirect tensile (Brazilian) tests were conducted on 40-mm diameter cores, by imposing a compressive displacement rate (radial to the core) of 4 micron/s at room temperature as well as an eruptive temperature of ca. 850 °C. An acoustic monitoring system is employed to track the nucleation, propagation and coalescence of fractures leading to complete sample failure. We find that the rocks' tensile strength exhibits a nonlinear decrease with porosity. Preliminary tests at high temperature indicate that some rocks exhibit a higher tensile strength (than at room temperature); in these experiments, samples containing a higher fraction of interstitial melt revealed an additional component of viscous flow. Further experiments conducted at higher strain rates will define the brittle response of the liquid during tensile failure. The data is compared against similar datasets for volcanic rocks. We will discuss implications for shallow volcanic processes ranging from dilation bands and tuffisite formation to gas-and-ash explosions and dome structural stability.

  3. Modeling the Tensile Strength of Carbon Fiber - Reinforced Ceramic - Matrix Composites Under Multiple Fatigue Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Longbiao

    2015-09-01

    An analytical method has been developed to investigate the effect of interface wear on the tensile strength of carbon fiber - reinforced ceramic - matrix composites (CMCs) under multiple fatigue loading. The Budiansky - Hutchinson - Evans shear - lag model was used to describe the micro stress field of the damaged composite considering fibers failure and the difference existed in the new and original interface debonded region. The statistical matrix multicracking model and fracture mechanics interface debonding criterion were used to determine the matrix crack spacing and interface debonded length. The interface shear stress degradation model and fibers strength degradation model have been adopted to analyze the interface wear effect on the tensile strength of the composite subjected to multiple fatigue loading. Under tensile loading, the fibers failure probabilities were determined by combining the interface wear model and fibers failure model based on the assumption that the fiber strength is subjected to two - parameter Weibull distribution and the loads carried by broken and intact fibers satisfy the Global Load Sharing criterion. The composite can no longer support the applied load when the total loads supported by broken and intact fibers approach its maximum value. The conditions of a single matrix crack and matrix multicrackings for tensile strength corresponding to multiple fatigue peak stress levels and different cycle number have been analyzed.

  4. Development of Yield and Tensile Strength Design Curves for Alloy 617

    SciTech Connect

    Nancy Lybeck; T. -L. Sham

    2013-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Very High Temperature Reactor Program is acquiring data in preparation for developing an Alloy 617 Code Case for inclusion in the nuclear section of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel (B&PV) Code. A draft code case was previously developed, but effort was suspended before acceptance by ASME. As part of the draft code case effort, a database was compiled of yield and tensile strength data from tests performed in air. Yield strength and tensile strength at temperature are used to set time independent allowable stress for construction materials in B&PV Code, Section III, Subsection NH. The yield and tensile strength data used for the draft code case has been augmented with additional data generated by Idaho National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the U.S. and CEA in France. The standard ASME Section II procedure for generating yield and tensile strength at temperature is presented, along with alternate methods that accommodate the change in temperature trends seen at high temperatures, resulting in a more consistent design margin over the temperature range of interest.

  5. Scale effects on the transverse tensile strength of graphite epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. Kevin; Salpekar, Satish A.

    1992-01-01

    The influence of material volume on the transverse tensile strength of AS4/3501-6 graphite epoxy composites was investigated. Tensile tests of 90 degree laminates with 3 different widths and 5 different thicknesses were conducted. A finite element analysis was performed to determine the influence of the grip on the stress distribution in the coupons and explain the tendency for the distribution of failure locations to be skewed toward the grip. Specimens were instrumented with strain gages and extensometers to insure good alignment and to measure failure strains. Data indicated that matrix dominated strength properties varied with the volume of material that was stressed, with the strength decreasing as volume increased. Transverse strength data were used in a volumetric scaling law based on Weibull statistics to predict the strength of 90 degree laminates loaded in three point bending. Comparisons were also made between transverse strength measurements and out-of-plane interlaminar tensile strength measurements from curved beam bending tests. The significance of observed scale effects on the use of tests for material screening, quality assurance, and design allowables is discussed.

  6. Tensile Strength of Carbon Nanotubes Under Realistic Temperature and Strain Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, Chen-Yu; Cho, Kyeong-Jae; Srivastava, Deepak; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Strain rate and temperature dependence of the tensile strength of single-wall carbon nanotubes has been investigated with molecular dynamics simulations. The tensile failure or yield strain is found to be strongly dependent on the temperature and strain rate. A transition state theory based predictive model is developed for the tensile failure of nanotubes. Based on the parameters fitted from high-strain rate and temperature dependent molecular dynamics simulations, the model predicts that a defect free micrometer long single-wall nanotube at 300 K, stretched with a strain rate of 1%/hour, fails at about 9 plus or minus 1% tensile strain. This is in good agreement with recent experimental findings.

  7. Tensile properties of an ultrahigh-strength graphite fiber in an epoxy matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiao, T. T.; Hamstad, M. A.; Jessop, E. S.

    1974-01-01

    The fiber performance and reinforcement potential for fiber composites of a special PAN-based graphite fiber were evaluated by testing the fiber's tensile properties in an epoxy matrix. Representative strand samples were taken from 30 spools of single-end, 1500-filament fiber to make over 5000 fiber/epoxy strand specimens using the filament-winding process. Characteristics studied were fiber uniformity, strength and modulus distributions at room and liquid-nitrogen temperatures, stress-strain behavior, the effect of strain rate on fiber strength, and acoustic emission during tensile loading to failure. The fiber was found to have a 3570-MPa failure stress, a 1.7% failure strain, a 206-GPa modulus, and a density of 1.77 Mg/cu m at 23 C. Liquid-nitrogen temperature and various strain rates had no significant effect on fiber tensile properties.

  8. The effect of volume on the tensile strength of several nuclear-grade graphites

    SciTech Connect

    Strizak, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    This report will present the results of a study on the effects of stress volume on the tensile strength of two nuclear-grade graphites. The materials selected were H-451, an extruded near-isotropic graphite manufactured by Great Lakes Carbon Corporation, and IG-110, a fine-grained isotropic molded graphite manufactured by Toyo Tanso Company, Ltd. The tensile properties of H-451 were examined extensively in the past in order to characterize the variability of strength within billets, between billets, and between lots. But, the variability within a billet was, for the most part, studied only casually. The problem was the strong influence of a limited sampling plan in describing the mean strength and the variability. Therefore, an extensive, statistically sound sampling plan has been devised to fully characterize the spatial variability within a single billet. The effects of stress volume are being reexamined by comparing the strengths of four specimen sizes covering a broad range in stress volume. Two models will be employed for analysis of the stress volume data for the selected graphites. The popular Weibull model has previously been found to grossly overestimate the volume dependence of the strength of H-451 graphite. The model will be reevaluated using the improved statistical distribution of strength expected from the current sampling plan. A new fracture model developed by Burchell and Tucker has potential for determining the effect of stress volume on the tensile strength of graphite. This probabilistic failure criterion combines a microstructural basis with a fracture-mechanics approach to failure. An initial evaluation of H-451 data showed that the model closely predicted the mean tensile strength for the two smaller specimen sizes. 9 refs., 24 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Effects of compaction variables on porosity and material tensile strength of convex-faced aspirin tablets.

    PubMed

    Pitt, K G; Newton, J M; Stanley, P

    1991-04-01

    The porosity and tensile strength of convex-faced aspirin tablets formed under a compaction pressure in the range 40-320 MPa and at punch velocities in the range 0.008 to 500 mm s-1 have been determined. The material tensile strength, sigma f, was calculated from the observed fracture load, Ps, using the equation of Pitt et al (1988): sigma f = 10 Ps/pi D2(2.84 t/D - 0.126 t/W + 3.15 W/D + 0.01)-1 where D is the tablet diameter, t is the overall tablet thickness and W is the central cylinder thickness. Tablets formed at lower compaction pressures had a higher porosity and lower tensile strength than those formed at higher compaction pressures. Tablets of face curvature ratio (D/R) in the range 0.25-0.67 and a normalized cylinder length (W/D) of 0.2 had the optimum tensile strength. (R is the radius of curvature of the tablet face.) Tablets formed at high compaction rates were significantly weaker than those formed at lower compaction rates. PMID:1676731

  10. Optimization and Prediction of Ultimate Tensile Strength in Metal Active Gas Welding

    PubMed Central

    Ampaiboon, Anusit; Lasunon, On-Uma; Bubphachot, Bopit

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect of welding parameters on ultimate tensile strength of structural steel, ST37-2, welded by Metal Active Gas welding. A fractional factorial design was used for determining the significance of six parameters: wire feed rate, welding voltage, welding speed, travel angle, tip-to-work distance, and shielded gas flow rate. A regression model to predict ultimate tensile strength was developed. Finally, we verified optimization of the process parameters experimentally. We achieved an optimum tensile strength (558 MPa) and wire feed rate, 19 m/min, had the greatest effect, followed by tip-to-work distance, 7 mm, welding speed, 200 mm/min, welding voltage, 30 V, and travel angle, 60°. Shield gas flow rate, 10 L/min, was slightly better but had little effect in the 10–20 L/min range. Tests showed that our regression model was able to predict the ultimate tensile strength within 4%. PMID:26491719

  11. Effects of reclaimed asphalt pavement on indirect tensile strength test of conditioned foamed asphalt mix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yati Katman, Herda; Rasdan Ibrahim, Mohd; Yazip Matori, Mohd; Norhisham, Shuhairy; Ismail, Norlela

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents the results of Indirect Tensile Strength (ITS) Test for samples prepared with reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP). Samples were conditioned in water at 25°C for 24 hours prior to testing. Results show that recycled aggregate from reclaimed asphalt pavement performs as well as virgin aggregate.

  12. Aggregate tensile strength and friability characteristics of furrow and sprinkler irrigated fields in Southern Idaho

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural crops grown in southern Idaho are furrow or sprinkler irrigated. Therefore, the soil experiences several wetting and drying cycles each growing season that can contribute to changes in aggregate tensile strength and friability. The objective of the research was to evaluate the influence...

  13. Melt reaction of zein with glyoxal to improve tensile strength and reduce solubility

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glyoxal, in the presence of base, has been used to crosslink zein in a melt process, involving reaction in a melt state combined with compression molding. The resulting zein articles had improved tensile strength, increasing from 34.3 to 40.6 MPa, when the amount of glyoxal was 6% by zein weight. ...

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF TENSILE STRENGTH DURING DISTRACTION OSTEOGENESIS IN A RAT MODEL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    These studies were designed to determine the reliability of in vitro tensile testing to measure the temporal development of regenerate bone strength in rats during limb lengthening (distraction osteogenesis, DO). External fixators were placed on the right tibiae of 36 virus-free, 400-450 g male Spr...

  15. Developmental exposure to xenoestrogens at low doses alters femur length and tensile strength in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Pelch, Katherine E; Carleton, Stephanie M; Phillips, Charlotte L; Nagel, Susan C

    2012-03-01

    Developmental exposure to high doses of the synthetic xenoestrogen diethylstilbestrol (DES) has been reported to alter femur length and strength in adult mice. However, it is not known if developmental exposure to low, environmentally relevant doses of xenoestrogens alters adult bone geometry and strength. In this study we investigated the effects of developmental exposure to low doses of DES, bisphenol A (BPA), or ethinyl estradiol (EE(2)) on bone geometry and torsional strength. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to DES, 0.1 ?g/kg/day, BPA, 10 ?g/kg/day, EE(2), 0.01, 0.1, or 1.0 ?g/kg/day, or vehicle from Gestation Day 11 to Postnatal Day 12 via a mini-osmotic pump in the dam. Developmental Xenoestrogen exposure altered femoral geometry and strength, assessed in adulthood by micro-computed tomography and torsional strength analysis, respectively. Low-dose EE(2), DES, or BPA increased adult femur length. Exposure to the highest dose of EE(2) did not alter femur length, resulting in a nonmonotonic dose response. Exposure to EE(2) and DES but not BPA decreased tensile strength. The combined effect of increased femur length and decreased tensile strength resulted in a trend toward decreased torsional ultimate strength and energy to failure. Taken together, these results suggest that exposure to developmental exposure to environmentally relevant levels of xenoestrogens may negatively impact bone length and strength in adulthood. PMID:22088916

  16. Effect of TiO2 Nanoparticles on Tensile Strength of Dental Acrylic Resins.

    PubMed

    Shirkavand, Saeed; Moslehifard, Elnaz

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Adding further fillers to dental resins may enhance their physical characteristics. The aim of this study was to evaluate the tensile strength of heat-curing acrylic resin reinforced by TiO2nanoparticles added into the resin matrix. Materials and methods. Commercially available TiO2 nanoparticles were obtained and characterized using X-ray diffrac-tion (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to determine their crystalline structure, particle size and morphology. TiO2-acrylic resin nanocomposite was prepared by mixing 0.5, 1 and 2 (wt%) of surface modified TiO2 nanoparticles in an amalgamator providing three groups of samples. Before curing, the obtained paste was packed into steel molds. After cur-ing, the specimens were removed from the molds. The tensile strength test samples were prepared according to ISO 1567. Results. Two crystalline phases were found in TiO2 nanoparticles including: (i) anatase as the major one, and (ii) rutile. The average particle size calculated according to the Scherrer equation was 20.4 nm, showing a normal size distribution. According to SEM images, the nanocomposite with 1wt% TiO2 nanoparticles had a better distribution compared to other groups. In addition, the group by 1wt% TiO2 exhibited higher tensile strength with a significant difference compared to other groups. ANOVA showed significant differences between the contents of TiO2 particles in acrylic resin (F = 22.19; P < 0.001). Conclusion. A considerable increase in tensile strength was observed with titania NPs reinforcement agents in 1wt% by weight. Further increase of TiO2 nanoparticles decreased the tensile strength. PMID:25587380

  17. Effect of TiO2 Nanoparticles on Tensile Strength of Dental Acrylic Resins

    PubMed Central

    Shirkavand, Saeed; Moslehifard, Elnaz

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Adding further fillers to dental resins may enhance their physical characteristics. The aim of this study was to evaluate the tensile strength of heat-curing acrylic resin reinforced by TiO2nanoparticles added into the resin matrix. Materials and methods. Commercially available TiO2 nanoparticles were obtained and characterized using X-ray diffrac-tion (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to determine their crystalline structure, particle size and morphology. TiO2-acrylic resin nanocomposite was prepared by mixing 0.5, 1 and 2 (wt%) of surface modified TiO2 nanoparticles in an amalgamator providing three groups of samples. Before curing, the obtained paste was packed into steel molds. After cur-ing, the specimens were removed from the molds. The tensile strength test samples were prepared according to ISO 1567. Results. Two crystalline phases were found in TiO2 nanoparticles including: (i) anatase as the major one, and (ii) rutile. The average particle size calculated according to the Scherrer equation was 20.4 nm, showing a normal size distribution. According to SEM images, the nanocomposite with 1wt% TiO2 nanoparticles had a better distribution compared to other groups. In addition, the group by 1wt% TiO2 exhibited higher tensile strength with a significant difference compared to other groups. ANOVA showed significant differences between the contents of TiO2 particles in acrylic resin (F = 22.19; P < 0.001). Conclusion. A considerable increase in tensile strength was observed with titania NPs reinforcement agents in 1wt% by weight. Further increase of TiO2 nanoparticles decreased the tensile strength. PMID:25587380

  18. Influence of surface defects on the tensile strength of carbon fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vautard, F.; Dentzer, J.; Nardin, M.; Schultz, J.; Defoort, B.

    2014-12-01

    The mechanical properties of carbon fibers, especially their tensile properties, are affected by internal and surface defects. In order to asses in what extent the generation of surface defects can result in a loss of the mechanical properties, non-surface treated carbon fibers were oxidized with three different surface treatment processes: electro-chemical oxidation, oxidation in nitric acid, and oxidation in oxygen plasma. Different surface topographies and surface chemistries were obtained, as well as different types and densities of surface defects. The density of surface defects was measured with both a physical approach (Raman spectroscopy) and a chemical approach (Active Surface Area). The tensile properties were evaluated by determining the Weibull modulus and the scale parameter of each reference, after measuring the tensile strength for four different gauge lengths. A relationship between the tensile properties and the nature and density of surface defects was noticed, as large defects largely control the value of the tensile strength. When optimized, some oxidation surface treatment processes can generate surface functional groups as well as an increase of the mechanical properties of the fibers, because of the removal of the contamination layer of pyrolytic carbon generated during the carbonization of the polyacrylonitrile precursor. Oxidation in oxygen plasma revealed to be a promising technology for alternative surface treatment processes, as high levels of functionalization were achieved and a slight improvement of the mechanical properties was obtained too.

  19. Evaluation of tensile strength of hybrid fiber (jute/gongura) reinforced hybrid polymer matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatachalam, G.; Gautham Shankar, A.; Vijay, Kumar V.; Chandan, Byral R.; Prabaharan, G. P.; Raghav, Dasarath

    2015-07-01

    The polymer matrix composites attract many industrial applications due to its light weight, less cost and easy for manufacturing. In this paper, an attempt is made to prepare and study of the tensile strength of hybrid (two natural) fibers reinforced hybrid (Natural + Synthetic) polymer matrix composites. The samples were prepared with hybrid reinforcement consists of two different fibers such as jute and Gongura and hybrid polymer consists of polyester and cashew nut shell resins. The hybrid composites tensile strength is evaluated to study the influence of various fiber parameters on mechanical strength. The parameters considered here are the duration of fiber treatment, the concentration of alkali in fiber treatment and nature of fiber content in the composites.

  20. Correlation of Fiber Composite Tensile Strength with the Ultrasonic Stress Wave Factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.; Lark, R. F.

    1978-01-01

    An ultrasonic-acoustic technique was used to indicate the strength variations of tensile specimens of a graphite-epoxy composite. A stress wave factor was determined and its value was found to depend on variations of the fiber-resin bonding as well as fiber orientation. The fiber orientations studied were 0 deg (longitudinal), 10 deg (off-axis), 90 deg (transverse), 0 deg + or - 45 deg/0 deg symmetrical, and + or - 45 deg] symmetrical. The stress wave factor can indicate variations of the tensile and shear strengths of composite materials. The stress wave factor was also found to be sensitive to strength variations associated with microporosity and differences in fiber-resin ratio.

  1. Effects of processing induced defects on laminate response - Interlaminar tensile strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurdal, Zafer; Tomasino, Alfred P.; Biggers, S. B.

    1991-01-01

    Four different layup methods were used in the present study of the interlaminar tensile strength of AS4/3501-6 graphite-reinforced epoxy as a function of defects from manufacturing-induced porosity. The methods were: (1) baseline hand layup, (2) solvent wipe of prepreg for resin removal, (3) moisture-introduction between plies, and (4) a low-pressure cure cycle. Pore characterization was conducted according to ASTM D-2734. A significant reduction is noted in the out-of-plane tensile strength as a function of increasing void content; the porosity data were used in an empirical model to predict out-of-plane strength as a function of porosity.

  2. Correlation of fiber composite tensile strength with the ultrasonic stress wave factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.; Lark, R. F.

    1978-01-01

    An ultrasonic-acoustic technique was used to indicate the strength variations of tensile specimens of a graphite-epoxy composite. A 'stress wave factor' was determined and its value was found to depend on variations of the fiber-resin bonding as well as fiber orientation. The fiber orientations studied were 0 deg (longitudinal), 10 deg (off-axis), 90 deg (transverse), (0 deg/+ or - 45 deg/0) symmetrical, and (+ or - 45 deg) symmetrical. The stress wave factor can indicate variations of the tensile and shear strengths of composite materials. The stress wave factor was also found to be sensitive to strength variations associated with microporosity and differences in fiber-resin ratio.

  3. High Tensile Strength Amalgams for In-Space Repair and Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.

    2005-01-01

    Amalgams are defined as an alloy of mercury with one or more other metals. These, along with those based on gallium (also liquid at near room temperature), are widely used in dental practice as a tooth filling material. Amalgams have a number of useful attributes that indude room temperature compounding. corrosion resistance, dimensional stability, and good compressive strength. These properties well serve dental needs but, unfortunately, amalgams have extremely poor tensile strength, a feature that severely limits their applications. The work presented here demonstrates how, by modifying particle geometry, the tensile strength of amalgams can be increased and thus extending the range of potential applications. This is relevant to, for example, the freeform fabrication of replacement parts that might be necessary during an extended space mission. Advantages, i.e. Figures-of-Merit. include the ability to produce complex parts, minimum crew interaction, high yield - minimum wasted material, reduced gravity compatibility, minimum final finishing, safety, and minimum power consumption.

  4. Modelling weathering induced retreat of c-φ cliffs with limited tensile strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voulgari, C.

    2015-09-01

    Natural cliffs subject to weathering induced retreat are typically made of hard soils and / or weak rocks exhibiting limited tensile strength. In this paper, the morphologic evolution of uniform c, φ slopes subject to weathering is investigated for a range of values of tensile strengths employing the limit analysis upper bound method. This paper extends the analytical framework set up in [1, 2] by accounting for the limited tensile strength of the ground which was previously disregarded. The solutions were obtained by employing the kinematic method of limit analysis providing rigorous upper bounds to the true collapse values. The inclusion of tension cracks leads to modified analytical expressions of the energy balance equation (the balance between external work and dissipated energy) and as a consequence, of the function whose minimum provides the solution in terms of failure mechanisms and associated values of soil strength. Pre-existing cracks are considered, as well as cracks that form as part of the failure mechanism. It turns out that the presence of tension cracks may significantly alter the size of each landslide contributing to the retrogression of the slope. Results in the form of dimensionless ready-to-use charts are produced for any value of engineering interest of friction angle and slope inclination for the case of dry cracks. Moreover, upper bounds for values not included in the charts can be achieved either by interpolation from the charts or by running the minimisation of the analytical functions provided in the paper.

  5. Effects of porosity on weld-joint tensile strength of aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovoy, C. V.

    1974-01-01

    Tensile properties in defect-free weldments of aluminum alloys 2014-T6 and 2219-T87 (sheet and plate) are shown to be related to the level or concentration of induced simulated porosity. The scatter diagram shows that the ultimate tensile strength of the weldments displays the most pronounced linear relationship with the level of porosity. The relationships between yield strength or elongation and porosity are either trivial or inconsequential in the lower and intermediate levels of porosity content. In highly concentrated levels of porosity, both yield strength and elongation values decrease markedly. Correlation coefficients were obtained by simple straight line regression analysis between the variables of ultimate tensile strength and pore level. The coefficients were greater, indicating a better correlation, using a pore area accumulation concept or pore volume accumulation than the accumulation of the pore diameters. These relationships provide a useful tool for assessing the existing aerospace radiographic acceptance standards with respect to permissible porosity. In addition, these relationships, in combination with known design load requirements, will serve as an engineering guideline in determining when a weld repair is necessary based on accumulative pore level as detected by radiographic techniques.

  6. Powder flow studies III: tensile strength, consolidation ratio, flow rate, and capsule-filling-weight variation relationships.

    PubMed

    Chowhan, Z T; Yang, I C

    1981-08-01

    The tensile strength of consolidated powder beds was studied by applying a series of loads to the surface of the powder beds in a tensile tester. The results were plotted as tensile strength versus consolidation pressure. The linearity of these plots suggests a direct relationship between tensile strength and consolidation pressure. The following plots gave linear relationships: (1) tensile strength versus consolidation ratio, (b) tensile strength versus coefficient of variation of the filled weight of the capsules, and (c) logarithm of the tensile strength versus logarithm of the flow rate. These results suggest a direct relationship between tensile strength and consolidation ratio and their usefulness in studying powder flow. The physical significance of the empirical equation used in consolidation studies was explored. A comparison of the empirical equation with a theoretically derived equation, under certain assumptions, suggests that the consolidation ratio is a function of the ratio of the initial volume to the net volume and a function of the coefficient of Rankine. The coefficient of Rankine is a function of the angle of internal friction in the static powder bed. PMID:7310665

  7. FE Analysis of Buckling Behavior Caused by Welding in Thin Plates of High Tensile Strength Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiangchao; Rashed, Sherif; Murakawa, Hidekazu

    2014-09-01

    The target of this study was to investigate buckling behavior during the entire welding process which consists of the heating and the cooling processes. For thin plate structures made of high tensile strength steel, not only residual buckling during or after cooling down but also transient buckling during heating may occur. The thermal elastic plastic FE analysis to investigate welding-induced buckling during the entire welding process is presented. Because of the high yield stress of high tensile strength steel, larger longitudinal compressive thermal stress is produced near the welding line compared with that in the case of carbon steel. Therefore, the plate may buckle due to thermal expansion, before the material nears yielding. During cooling down, the longitudinal compressive thermal stress close to the welding line disappears, and longitudinal tensile residual stress is produced due to contraction. Meanwhile, longitudinal compressive residual stress occurs far from the welding line to balance the tensile stress close to the welding line. This distribution of longitudinal residual stress would change the deformed dish shape of transient buckling into a saddle buckling type when the stress exceeds the critical buckling condition.

  8. FE Analysis of Buckling Behavior Caused by Welding in Thin Plates of High Tensile Strength Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiangchao; Rashed, Sherif; Murakawa, Hidekazu

    2014-12-01

    The target of this study was to investigate buckling behavior during the entire welding process which consists of the heating and the cooling processes. For thin plate structures made of high tensile strength steel, not only residual buckling during or after cooling down but also transient buckling during heating may occur. The thermal elastic plastic FE analysis to investigate welding-induced buckling during the entire welding process is presented. Because of the high yield stress of high tensile strength steel, larger longitudinal compressive thermal stress is produced near the welding line compared with that in the case of carbon steel. Therefore, the plate may buckle due to thermal expansion, before the material nears yielding. During cooling down, the longitudinal compressive thermal stress close to the welding line disappears, and longitudinal tensile residual stress is produced due to contraction. Meanwhile, longitudinal compressive residual stress occurs far from the welding line to balance the tensile stress close to the welding line. This distribution of longitudinal residual stress would change the deformed dish shape of transient buckling into a saddle buckling type when the stress exceeds the critical buckling condition.

  9. Thermal degradation of the tensile strength of unidirectional boron/aluminum composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimes, H. H.; Lad, R. A.; Maisel, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    The variation of ultimate tensile strength with thermal treatment of B-Al composite materials and of boron fibers chemically removed from these composites is studied systematically in an attempt to determine the mechanism of the resulting strength degradation. The results indicate that thermally cycling of B-Al represents a more severe condition than equivalent time at temperature. Degradation of composite tensile strength from about 1.3 GN/sq m to as low as 0.34 GN/sq m was observed after 3000 cycles to 420 C for 203-micron B-1100 Al composite. In general, the 1100 Al-matrix composites degraded somewhat more than the 6061 matrix material studied. Measurement of fiber strengths confirmed a composite strength loss due to the degradation of fiber strength. Microscopy indicated a highly flawed fiber surface. On the basis of various thermal-cycling studies and electron diffraction analysis, a mechanism is favored in which B reacts with Al, freshly exposed by cold working during cycling, to form AlB2. The nonuniform interface reaction leads to a highly flawed and weakened B fiber.

  10. Enhancement of tensile strength of lignocellulosic jute fibers by alkali-steam treatment.

    PubMed

    Saha, Prosenjit; Manna, Suvendu; Chowdhury, Sougata Roy; Sen, Ramkrishna; Roy, Debasis; Adhikari, Basudam

    2010-05-01

    The physico-chemical properties of jute fibers treated with alkali (NaOH) solution have been investigated in this study. The treatments were applied under ambient and elevated temperatures and high pressure steaming conditions. To the knowledge of these authors the influence of alkali-steam treatment on the uniaxial tensile strength of natural ligno-cellulosic fibers, such as jute, has not been investigated earlier. The results from this investigation indicate that a 30 min dipping of the fibers in 0.5% alkali solution followed by 30 min alkali-steam treatment leads to an increase in the tensile strength of up to 65%. The increase appears to be due to fiber separation and removal of non-cellulosic materials, which, in turn, resulted in an increased crystallinity. PMID:20074944

  11. Coating of carbon nanotube fibers: variation of tensile properties, failure behavior and adhesion strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäder, Edith; Liu, Jian-Wen; Hiller, Janett; Lu, Weibang; Li, Qingwen; Zhandarov, Serge; Chou, Tsu-Wei

    2015-07-01

    An experimental study of the tensile properties of CNT fibers and their interphasial behavior in epoxy matrices is reported. One of the most promising applications of CNT fibers is their use as reinforcement in multifunctional composites. For this purpose, an increase of the tensile strength of the CNT fibers in unidirectional composites as well as strong interfacial adhesion strength is desirable. However, the mechanical performance of the CNT fiber composites manufactured so far is comparable to that of commercial fiber composites. The interfacial properties of CNT fiber/polymer composites have rarely been investigated and provided CNT fiber/epoxy interfacial shear strength of 14.4 MPa studied by the microbond test. In order to improve the mechanical performance of the CNT fibers, an epoxy compatible coating with nano-dispersed aqueous based polymeric film formers and low viscous epoxy resin, respectively, was applied. For impregnation of high homogeneity, low molecular weight epoxy film formers and polyurethane film formers were used. The aqueous based epoxy film formers were not crosslinked and able to interdiffuse with the matrix resin after impregnation. Due to good wetting of the individual CNT fibers by the film formers, the degree of activation of the fibers was improved leading to increased tensile strength and Young’s modulus. Cyclic tensile loading and simultaneous determination of electric resistance enabled to characterize the fiber’s durability in terms of elastic recovery and hysteresis. The pull-out tests and SEM study reveal different interfacial failure mechanisms in CNT fiber/epoxy systems for untreated and film former treated fibers, on the one hand, and epoxy resin treated ones, on the other hand. The epoxy resin penetrated between the CNT bundles in the reference or film former coated fiber, forming a relatively thick CNT/epoxy composite layer and thus shifting the fracture zone within the fiber. In contrast to this, shear sliding along the

  12. Tensile strength of simulated and welded butt joints in W-Cu composite sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas J.; Watson, Gordon K.

    1994-01-01

    The weldability of W-Cu composite sheet was investigated using simulated and welded joints. The welded joints were produced in a vacuum hot press. Tensile test results showed that simulated joints can provide strength and failure mode data which can be used in joint design for actual weldments. Although all of the welded joints had flaws, a number of these joints were as strong as the W-Cu composite base material.

  13. Effect of laser welding on the titanium ceramic tensile bond strength

    PubMed Central

    GALO, Rodrigo; RIBEIRO, Ricardo Faria; RODRIGUES, Renata Cristina Silveira; PAGNANO, Valéria de Oliveira; de MATTOS, Maria da Glória Chiarello

    2011-01-01

    Titanium reacts strongly with elements, mainly oxygen at high temperature. The high temperature of titanium laser welding modifies the surface, and may interfere on the metal-ceramic tensile bond strength. Objective The influence of laser welding on the titanium-ceramic bonding has not yet been established. The purpose of this in vitro study was to analyze the influence of laser welding applied to commercially pure titanium (CpTi) substructure on the bond strength of commercial ceramic. The influence of airborne particle abrasion (Al2O3) conditions was also studied. Material and Methods Forty CpTi cylindrical rods (3 mm x 60 mm) were cast and divided into 2 groups: with laser welding (L) and without laser welding (WL). Each group was divided in 4 subgroups, according to the size of the particles used in airborne particle abrasion: A - Al2O3 (250 µm); B - Al2O3 (180 µm); C - Al2O3 (110 µm); D - Al2O3 (50 µm). Ceramic rings were fused around the CpTi rods. Specimens were invested and their tensile strength was measured at fracture with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 2.0 mm/min and 200 kgf load cell. Statistical analysis was carried out with analysis of variance and compared using the independent t test (p≤0.05). Results Significant differences were found among all subgroups (p<0.05). The highest and the lowest bond strength means were recorded in subgroups WLC (52.62 MPa) and LD (24.02 MPa), respectively. Conclusion Airborne particle abrasion yielded significantly lower bond strength as the Al2O3 particle size decreased. Mechanical retention decreased in the laser-welded specimens, i.e. the metal-ceramic tensile bond strength was lower. PMID:21956585

  14. The dependence of bedrock erodibility on rock material properties: is tensile strength enough?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyeler, J. D.; Sklar, L. S.; Litwin, K.; Johnson, J. P.; Collins, G. C.; Whipple, K. X.

    2009-12-01

    Rock resistance to fluvial abrasion by bedload sediment impacts has been shown experimentally to depend on the square of rock tensile strength across the full range of rock strengths encountered in the field. This result is consistent with fracture mechanics theory which predicts that fractures propagate when the capacity of brittle materials to store impact energy by elastic deformation is exceeded. Strain energy depends on the square of tensile strength, but also on the elastic modulus. Log-log linear regression of laboratory measurements of bedrock erosion rates against tensile strength shows order-of -magnitude variability about the power-law fit, particularly for stronger rocks. In this investigation we seek to explain this variability in terms of other rock material properties. In particular we are examining elastic modulus, crystal grain size, mineralogy, degree of cementation, rock bulk density and porosity. We have access to the same rocks used in previous bedrock abrasion experiments, as well as artificial bedrock made from controlled mixtures of sand and portland cement. We measure tensile strength by the Brazilian splitting test, and estimate elastic modulus from measurements of the velocity of ultrasonic pulses through core samples. We are analyzing thin sections and photomicrographs to measure crystal grain size, and mineral and cement composition. Bulk density, as well as porosity, are measured by comparison of dry and saturated weights for known volumes of material. Preliminary results suggest that coarse-grained rocks, such as granite and some sandstones, are less erodible for a given measured tensile strength than the fine-grained rocks tested, which include greenstone, andesite and limestone. We also find, with a small subset of rock types tested to-date, that inclusion of elastic modulus in a multiple regression reduces the uncertainty in the regression slope estimate, but that substantial variability remains to be explained. This work may have broad applicability in understanding erodibility of terrestrial bedrock by fluvial as well as eolian mechanisms, as well as controls on the surface erodibility of ice ‘bedrock’ on outer solar system satellites such as Titan.

  15. Enhancement of hydrophobicity and tensile strength of muga silk fiber by radiofrequency Ar plasma discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoi, D.; Choudhury, A. J.; Chutia, J.; Pal, A. R.; Dass, N. N.; Devi, D.; Patil, D. S.

    2011-10-01

    The hydrophobicity and tensile strength of muga silk fiber are investigated using radiofrequency (RF) Ar plasma treatment at various RF powers (10-30 W) and treatment times (5-20 min). The Ar plasma is characterized using self-compensated Langmuir and emissive probe. The ion energy is observed to play an important role in determining the tensile strength and hydrophobicity of the plasma treated fibers. The chemical compositions of the fibers are observed to be affected by the increase in RF power rather than treatment time. XPS study reveals that the ions that are impinging on the substrates are mainly responsible for the cleavage of peptide bond and side chain of amino acid groups at the surface of the fibers. The observed properties (tensile strength and hydrophobicity) of the treated fibers are found to be dependent on their variation in atomic concentration and functional composition at the surfaces. All the treated muga fibers exhibit almost similar thermal behavior as compared to the virgin one. At RF power of 10 W and treatment time range of 5-20 min, the treated fibers exhibit properties similar to that of the virgin one. Higher RF power (30 W) and the increase in treatment time deteriorate the properties of the fibers due to incorporation of more surface roughness caused by sufficiently high energetic ion bombardment. The properties of the plasma treated fibers are attempted to correlate with the XPS analysis and their surface morphologies.

  16. Effect of dimethylpolysiloxane liquid on the cryogenic tensile strength and thermal contraction behavior of epoxy resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Jin Woo; Lee, Yu Jin; Lee, Sang Bok; Lee, Wonoh; Um, Moon Kwang

    2014-05-01

    Dimethylpolysiloxane liquid was blended with diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A epoxy resin including anhydride curing agent to improve the tensile strength of the epoxy resin at 77 K without any increase in its coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE). A bifunctional polymer, silicone-modified epoxy resin (SME), was also added to the mixture as a compatibilizer. The results of UV transmittance for the blend resin showed that the incorporation of the SME could stabilize effectively spherical domains of the siloxane liquid which was immiscible with the epoxy matrix. The tensile strengths of the blend resins at both room temperature and 77 K were measured and SEM analysis for the fractured cross sections was carried out to verify the toughening behavior of the liquid droplets. The results indicated that even small amount of addition of the siloxane liquid (0.05 phr) coupled with SME (20 phr) could enhance the tensile strength at 77 K by 77.6% compared to that of the neat epoxy resin. This improvement is attributed to the fact that the solid and s droplets can disperse the localized stress and interrupt the crack propagation by cavitation mechanism followed by multiple generation of numerous micro-deformation. From the CTE measurement, the siloxane liquid has no influence on the thermal contraction behavior of the blend resin.

  17. Studies on the reduction of tensile strength of tablets after roll compaction/dry granulation.

    PubMed

    Herting, Michael G; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2008-09-01

    Roll compaction/dry granulation is a widely used technique for granulation. A major drawback is the reduction of tablet tensile strength compared to other granulation methods. The purpose of this study was to determine the reasons for the partial loss in compactibility. Microcrystalline cellulose of different particle sizes was roll-compacted/dry-granulated. The granules were sieved to obtain two sieve cuts and then compressed into tablets. The particle-size distribution within the sieve cut was determined using image analysis. The specific surface area of sieve cut was obtained by nitrogen adsorption. Heckel equation was used to determine the change in compressibility. The work-hardening phenomenon was found to be caused by a combination of particle-size enlargement and hardening of material. Although particle size of granules was equal, the use of smaller particles as raw material resulted in tablets with higher tensile strength due to higher specific surface area. Both work-hardening and particle-size enlargement cause the partial loss in compactibility. The reduction in tensile strength could be compensated by producing smaller granules or using raw materials with small particle sizes. PMID:18511247

  18. Parameters of tensile strength, elongation, and tenacity of 70mm IIaO spectroscopic film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, Ernest C., Jr.; Peters, Kevin A.

    1989-01-01

    The 70mm IIaO spectroscopic film was tested to determine its tensile strength, elongation, and breaking strength, using an Instron (strength and compression) 4201 Test Instrument. These data provide information leading to the upper and lower limits of the above parameters for 70mm IIaO spectroscopic film. This film will be developed by a commercial developing machine after the Ultraviolet Telescope Space Shuttle Mission returns to the Earth in the early 1990's; thus, it is necessary to understand these force parameters. Several test strips of approximately 200mm in length were used. The results indicate that when a stress load of 100 kg was applied, the film elongated approximately 1.06mm and the break strength was 19.45 kilograms.

  19. Strength properties of visible-light-cured resin-modified glass-ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    Kerby, R E; Knobloch, L; Thakur, A

    1997-01-01

    A new generation of glass ionomers containing polymerizable methacrylate monomers and/or prepolymers are now available for use as direct esthetic restorative materials. Proper clinical application of these new resin-modified glass ionomers requires an understanding of their benefits and limitations. The purpose of this investigation was to compare the compressive and diametral tensile strength at 1 hour, 24 hours, and 7 days of three visible-light-cured glass-ionomer cements, a polyacid-modified composite resin, and a composite resin core build-up material under both light-cure and dark-cure conditions. Statistical analysis indicated significant differences between several of the cements tested for both compressive and diametral tensile strengths at all three testing times (P > 0.05). Prosthodent composite resin and Vitremer tricure visible-light-cured glass-ionomer cement are significantly greater in both compressive and diametral tensile strength than any of the other materials tested after 7 days. PMID:9484165

  20. Effects of HF Treatments on Tensile Strength of Hi-Nicalon Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    1998-01-01

    Tensile strengths of as-received Hi-Nicalon fibers and those having a dual BN/SiC surface coating, deposited by chemical vapor deposition, have been measured at room temperature. These fibers were also treated with HF for 24 h followed by tensile strength measurements. Strengths of uncoated and BN/SiC coated Hi-Nicalon fibers extracted from celsian matrix composites, by dissolving away the matrix in HF for 24 h, were also determined. The average tensile strength of uncoated Hi-Nicalon was 3.19 +/- 0.73 GPa with a Weibull modulus of 5.41. The Hi-Nicalon/BN/SiC fibers showed an average strength of 3.04 q 0.53 GPa and Weibull modulus of 6.66. After HF treatments, the average strengths of the uncoated and BN/SiC coated Hi-Nicalon fibers were 2.69 +/- 0.67 GPa and 2.80 +/- 0.53 GPa and the Weibull moduli were 4.93 and 5.96, respectively. The BN/SiC coated fibers extracted from the celsian matrix composite exhibited a strength of 2.38 +/- 0.40 GPa and a Weibull modulus of 7.15. The strength of the uncoated Hi-Nicalon fibers in the composite was so severely degraded that they disintegrated into small fragments during extraction with HF. The uncoated fibers probably undergo mechanical surface damage during hot pressing of the composites. Also, the BN layer on the coated fibers acts as a compliant layer which protects the fibers from mechanical damage during composite processing. The elemental composition and thickness of the fiber coatings were deten-nined using scanning Auger analysis. Microstructural analyses of the fibers and the coatings were done by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Strengths of fibers calculated using average and measured fiber diameters were in good agreement. Thus, the strength of fibers can be evaluated using an average fiber diameter instead of the measured diameter of each filament.

  1. Surface morphology changes of lignin filled natural rubber latex films investigated using AFM in relation to tensile strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asrul, M.; Othman, M.; Zakaria, M.

    2015-07-01

    The paper describes the preparation of lignin filled natural rubber latex composite and the consequential changes in tensile strength observed with varying lignin loading. The changes in tensile strength were shown to be associated with the changes in surface morphology as investigated via AFM. From the AFM analysis it can be inferred that lignin filled rubber latex film which exhibited an increase in tensile strength also demonstrated better phase homogeneity with lowest surface roughness value in comparison to the rest of the lignin filled rubber latex films analysed.

  2. Modeling approach for tensile strength of interphase layers in polymer nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Zare, Yasser

    2016-06-01

    At the first step, this paper describes a developed model for tensile strength of interphase layers (σk) in polymer nanocomposites. The "σk" is expressed as linear, exponential and power functions of the distance between nanoparticles and polymer matrix (xk). Afterwards, the predictions of these equations at the central layer of interphase (the average strength) are compared to the calculations of interphase strength (σi) by several micromechanical models including the developed Leidner-Woodhams and Pukanszky models to choose the best equation which expresses "σk". The calculations are carried out for several reported samples. The equation which expresses the "σk" as a power function of "xk" shows the best results compared to others. Also, its predictions significantly depend to an exponent as "Z" which demonstrates the level of interphase properties. According to the chosen equation, the "σm" and "σp" play positive roles in "σi" predictions at low "Z" value, but a high "Z" eliminates the effect of "σm" on the tensile strength of interphase layers. PMID:26990956

  3. Tensile Bond Strength of Self Adhesive Resin Cement After Various Surface Treatment of Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Sekhri, Sahil; Garg, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In self adhesive resin cements adhesion is achieved to dental surface without surface pre-treatment, and requires only single step application. This makes the luting procedure less technique-sensitive and decreases postoperative sensitivity. Aim The purpose of this study was to evaluate bond strength of self adhesive resin after surface treatment of enamel for bonding base metal alloy. Materials and Methods On the labial surface of 64 central incisor rectangular base metal block of dimension 6 mm length, 5mm width and 1 mm height was cemented with RelyX U200 and Maxcem Elite self adhesive cements with and without surface treatment of enamel. Surface treatment of enamel was application of etchant, one step bonding agent and both. Tensile bond strength of specimen was measured with universal testing machine at a cross head speed of 1mm/min. Results Least tensile bond strength (MPa) was in control group i.e. 1.33 (0.32) & 1.59 (0.299), Highest bond strength observed when enamel treated with both etchant and bonding agent i.e. 2.72 (0.43) & 2.97 (0.19) for Relyx U200 and Elite cement. When alone etchant and bonding agent were applied alone bond strength is 2.19 (0.18) & 2.24 (0.47) for Relyx U200, and 2.38 (0.27) 2.49 (0.16) for Max-cem elite. Mean bond strength was higher in case of Max-cem Elite as compared to RelyX U200 resin cement, although differences were non–significant (p > 0.05). Conclusion Surface treatment of enamel increases the bond strength of self adhesive resin cement. PMID:26894165

  4. Chitosan films with improved tensile strength and toughness from N-acetyl-cysteine mediated disulfide bonds.

    PubMed

    Miles, Kevin Barrett; Ball, Rebecca Lee; Matthew, Howard William Trevor

    2016-03-30

    To improve the mechanical properties of chitosan (Ct) materials without the use of cytotoxic crosslinkers, disulfide cross-linkable Ct was synthesized by grafting N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) to Ct using carbodiimide chemistry. Cast films of NAC-Ct conjugates were prepared with degrees of substitution (DS) of 0%, 6%, 15%, and 20%, and the disulfide bond formation was induced by increasing the reaction media pH to 11. The tensile strength, breaking strain, elastic moduli and toughness of disulfide cross-linked polymers were analyzed by monotonic tensile testing of hydrated NAC-Ct films. Crystallinity was determined via XRD. Results demonstrated that NAC incorporation and crosslinking in chitosan produced tougher polymer films with 4-fold higher tensile strength (10 MPa) and 6-fold greater elongation (365%), but reduced crystallinity, compared to unmodified chitosan. The resilience of NAC-Ct films was evaluated by cyclic testing, and results demonstrate that increasing NAC content produced a more resilient material that dissipated less energy when deformed. These improved mechanical properties broaden chitosan's applicability towards the construction of mechanically robust implantable scaffolds for tissue regeneration. PMID:26794940

  5. Effect of Heat Treatment and Layer Orientation on the Tensile Strength of a Crystalline Rock Under Brazilian Test Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha Roy, Debanjan; Singh, T. N.

    2016-05-01

    The effect of heat treatment and the layer orientation on the tensile properties of granitic gneiss were studied under the unconfined stress condition. The tensile strength of the samples was studied using a Brazilian configuration, and the geochemical and microstructural properties were studied using the X-ray diffraction technique as well as scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The fracture pattern and the geometrical analyses were performed using the digital photographs. The results show that both the heat treatment and layer orientation have strong control on the tensile strength, force-parallel and layer-parallel strains, and on the tensile fracture geometry. A general decrease in the tensile strength of the rock was documented with the increasing heat treatment. Although, in the heat-treated samples, X-ray diffraction study do not reveal any major change in the mineral composition, but the SEM shows the development of several micro-cracks in the grains. In the samples with different layer orientation, along with the changes in the tensile strength and layer-parallel to force-parallel strain ratio, the layer activation under shear stress is also noticed. Here, the ratio between the tensile to shear stress, acting along the layers is thought to be the major controlling factor of the tensile properties of rocks, which has many applications in mining, civil constructions, and waste disposal work.

  6. Bulk metallic glass composite with good tensile ductility, high strength and large elastic strain limit

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fu-Fa; Chan, K. C.; Jiang, Song-Shan; Chen, Shun-Hua; Wang, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Bulk metallic glasses exhibit high strength and large elastic strain limit but have no tensile ductility. However, bulk metallic glass composites reinforced by in-situ dendrites possess significantly improved toughness but at the expense of high strength and large elastic strain limit. Here, we report a bulk metallic glass composite with strong strain-hardening capability and large elastic strain limit. It was found that, by plastic predeformation, the bulk metallic glass composite can exhibit both a large elastic strain limit and high strength under tension. These unique elastic mechanical properties are attributed to the reversible B2↔B19′ phase transformation and the plastic-predeformation-induced complicated stress state in the metallic glass matrix and the second phase. These findings are significant for the design and application of bulk metallic glass composites with excellent mechanical properties. PMID:24931632

  7. Bulk metallic glass composite with good tensile ductility, high strength and large elastic strain limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Fu-Fa; Chan, K. C.; Jiang, Song-Shan; Chen, Shun-Hua; Wang, Gang

    2014-06-01

    Bulk metallic glasses exhibit high strength and large elastic strain limit but have no tensile ductility. However, bulk metallic glass composites reinforced by in-situ dendrites possess significantly improved toughness but at the expense of high strength and large elastic strain limit. Here, we report a bulk metallic glass composite with strong strain-hardening capability and large elastic strain limit. It was found that, by plastic predeformation, the bulk metallic glass composite can exhibit both a large elastic strain limit and high strength under tension. These unique elastic mechanical properties are attributed to the reversible B2<-->B19' phase transformation and the plastic-predeformation-induced complicated stress state in the metallic glass matrix and the second phase. These findings are significant for the design and application of bulk metallic glass composites with excellent mechanical properties.

  8. Tensile and flexural strength of nongraphitic superhybrid composites - Predictions and comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.; Lark, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    Equations are presented and described which can be used to predict bounds on the tensile and flexural strengths of nongraphitic superhybrid (NGSH) composites. These equations are derived by taking into account the measured stress-strain behavior, the lamination residual stresses and the sequence of events leading to fracture. The required input for using these equations includes constituent composites, elastic and strength properties, NGSH elastic properties, cure temperature, and ply stress influence coefficients. Results predicted by these equations are in reasonably good agreement with measured data for strength and for the apparent 'knees' in the nonlinear stress-strain curve. The lower bound values are conservative compared to measured data. These equations are relatively simple and should be suitable for use in the preliminary design and initial sizing of structural components made from NGSH composites.

  9. Tensile and flexural strength of non-graphitic superhybrid composites: Predictions and comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.; Lark, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    Equations are presented and described which can be used to predict bounds on the tensile and flexural strengths of nongraphitic superhybrid (NGSH) composites. These equations are derived by taking into account the measured stress-strain behavior, the lamination residual stresses and the sequence of events leading to fracture. The required input for using these equations includes constituents, properties (elastic and strength), NGSH elastic properties, cure temperature, and ply stress influence coefficients. Results predicted by these equations are in reasonably good agreement with measured data for strength and for the apparent knees in the nonlinear stress-strain curve. The lower bound values are conservative compared to measured data. These equations are relatively simple and are suitable for use in the preliminary design and initial sizing of structural components made from NGSH composites.

  10. High Tensile Strength Amalgams for In-Space Fabrication and Repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.

    2006-01-01

    Amalgams are well known for their use in dental practice as a tooth filling material. They have a number of useful attributes that include room temperature fabrication, corrosion resistance, dimensional stability, and very good compressive strength. These properties well serve dental needs but, unfortunately, amalgams have extremely poor tensile strength, a feature that severely limits other potential applications. Improved material properties (strength and temperature) of amalgams may have application to the freeform fabrication of repairs or parts that might be necessary during an extended space mission. Advantages would include, but are not limited to: the ability to produce complex parts, a minimum number of processing steps, minimum crew interaction, high yield - minimum wasted material, reduced gravity compatibility, minimum final finishing, safety, and minimum power consumption. The work presented here shows how the properties of amalgams can be improved by changing particle geometries in conjunction with novel engineering metals.

  11. Tensile and fatigue strength properties of Kevlar 29 aramid/epoxy unidirectional composites

    SciTech Connect

    Zweben, C.

    1981-07-22

    Static and fatigue tensile strength properties of filament wound undirectional Kevlar 29/epoxy, typical of filament wound material used in flywheel rotors, were studied. Machining techniques were developed to minimize fiber fuzzing on edges. The static modulus, normalized to 70% fiber volume fraction is 8.87 x 10/sup 6/ psi. The major Poisson's ratio is 0.37. The static composite tensile strength, normalized to 70% fiber volume fraction is 200 x 10/sup 3/ psi, corresponding to a fiber stress at failure of 286 x 10/sup 3/ psi, which is good for materials having a very high fiber volume fraction. The S-N curve for R = 0.7 was found to be quite flat. Although the techniques used in this program had previously been employed successfully to study the fatigue behavior of Kevlar 29/epoxy and Kevlar 49/epoxy unidirectional materials, we were unable to overcome the persistent problem of cohesive material failure in the tab regions. The apparent reason for this is the very low interlaminar shear strength of the filament wound material. 16 figures.

  12. Tensile Strength and Microstructural Characterization of Uncoated and Coated HPZ Ceramic Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Wheeler, Donald R.; Dickerson, Robert M.

    1996-01-01

    Tensile strengths of as-received HPZ fiber and those surface coated with BN, BN/SiC, and BN/Si3N4 have been determined at room temperature using a two-parameter Weibull distribution. Nominally approx. 0.4 micron BN and 0.2 micron SiC or Si3N4 coatings were deposited on the fibers by chemical vapor deposition using a continuous reactor. The average tensile strength of uncoated HPZ fiber was 2.0 +/- 0.56 GPa (290 +/- 81 ksi) with a Weibull modulus of 4.1. For the BN coated fibers, the average strength and the Weibull modulus increased to 2.39 +/- 0.44 GPa (346 +/- 64 ksi) and 6.5, respectively. The HPZ/BN/SiC fibers showed an average strength of 2.0 +/- 0.32 GPa (290 +/- 47 ksi) and Weibull modulus of 7.3. Average strength of the fibers having a dual BN/Si3N4 surface coating degraded to 1.15 +/- 0.26 GPa (166 +/- 38 ksi) with a Weibull modulus of 5.3. The chemical composition and thickness of the fiber coatings were determined using scanning Auger analysis. Microstructural analysis of the fibers and the coatings was carried out by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. A microporous silica-rich layer approx. 200 nm thick is present on the as-received HPZ fiber surface. The BN coatings on the fibers are amorphous to partly turbostratic and contaminated with carbon and oxygen. Silicon carbide coating was crystalline whereas the silicon nitride coating was amorphous. The silicon carbide and silicon nitride coatings are non-stoichiometric, non-uniform, and granular. Within a fiber tow, the fibers on the outside had thicker and more granular coatings than those on the inside.

  13. Relationship between the ideal tensile strength and the friction properties of metals in contact with nonmetals and themselves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    The adhesion and friction properties of metals in contact with diamond, boron nitride, silicon carbide, manganese-zinc ferrite, and the metals themselves in vacuum was investigated. An estimate of the ideal uniaxial tensile was obtained in terms of the equilibrium surface energy, interplanar spacing of the planes perpendicular to the tensile axis, and the Young's modulus of elasticity. The coefficient of friction for metals was found to be related to the ideal tensile strength of metals. The higher the strength of the metal, the lower the coefficient of friction.

  14. Optimization of tensile strength of ferritic/austenitic laser-welded components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anawa, E. M.; Olabi, A. G.

    2008-08-01

    Ferritic/austenitic (F/A) joints are a popular dissimilar metal combination used in many applications. F/A joints are usually produced using conventional processes. Laser beam welding (LBW) has recently been successfully used for the production of F/A joints with suitable mechanical properties. In this study, a statistical design of experiment (DOE) was used to optimize selected LBW parameters (laser power, welding speed and focus length). Taguchi approach was used for the selected factors, each having five levels (L-25; 5×3). Joint strength was determined using the notched-tensile strength (NTS) method. The results were analysed using analyses of variance (ANOVA) and the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios for the optimal parameters, and then compared with the base material. The experimental results indicate that the F/A laser-welded joints are improved effectively by optimizing the input parameters using the Taguchi approach.

  15. An experimental investigation on the tensile moduli and strengths of graphite/epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeow, Y. T.; Brinson, H. F.

    1977-01-01

    The results of a series of tensile tests on some graphite/epoxy laminates, at rates varying from 0.002 to 2 in./min are examined. The loads were applied at various angles to the fiber directions in each case. The rate-dependent behavior of the stress-strain response is assessed. Evidence is presented to indicate that failure first occurs on inner plies, and that, in some cases, moduli increase with increasing stress (or strain) level. Lamination theory is used to predict the moduli, and comparisons with experiment are given. This theory is also used in conjunction with three failure theories to predict ultimate strengths (with varying degrees of success). Further, two approaches to ply unloading after first-ply failure are used and discussed. One is a standard method found in the literature while the other is a proposed 'strength-of-materials' type of technique which is computationally much simpler.

  16. Enzymatic Surface Erosion of High Tensile Strength Polycarbonates Based on Natural Phenols

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Surface erosion has been recognized as a valuable design tool for resorbable biomaterials within the context of drug delivery devices, surface coatings, and when precise control of strength retention is critical. Here we report on high tensile strength, aromatic–aliphatic polycarbonates based on natural phenols, tyrosol (Ty) and homovanillyl alcohol (Hva), that exhibit enzymatic surface erosion by lipase. The Young’s moduli of the polymers for dry and fully hydrated samples are 1.0 to 1.2 GPa and 0.8 to 1.2 GPa, respectively. Typical characteristics of enzymatic surface erosion were confirmed for poly(tyrosol carbonate) films with concomitant mass-loss and thickness-loss at linear rates of 0.14 ± 0.01 mg cm–2 d–1 and 3.0 ± 0.8 μm d–1, respectively. The molecular weight and the mechanical properties of the residual films remained constant. Changing the ratio of Ty and Hva provided control over the glass transition temperature (Tg) and the enzymatic surface erosion: increasing the Hva content in the polymers resulted in higher Tg and lower enzymatic erosion rate. Polymers with more than 50 mol % Hva were stable at 37 °C in enzyme solution. Analysis on thin films using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) demonstrated that the onset temperature of the enzymatic erosion was approximately 20 °C lower than the wet Tg for all tested polymers. This new finding demonstrates that relatively high tensile strength polycarbonates can undergo enzymatic surface erosion. Moreover, it also sheds light on the connection between Tg and enzymatic degradation and explains why few of the high strength polymers follow an enzyme-meditated degradation pathway. PMID:24432806

  17. The impact of polymerization method on tensile bond strength between denture base and acrylic teeth.

    PubMed

    Hashem, Mohamed; Binmgren, Mohammed A; Alsaleem, Samah O; Vellappally, Sajith; Assery, Mansour K; Sukumaran, Anil

    2014-01-01

    Failure of the bond between acrylic teeth and the denture base resin interface is one of the major concern in prosthodontics. The new generation of denture bases that utilize alternate polymerization methods are being introduced in the market. The aim of the study is to evaluate the influence of polymerization methods on bonding quality between the denture base and artificial teeth. Sixty test specimens were prepared (20 in each group) and were polymerized using heat, microwave and visible light curing. The tensile strength was recorded for each of the samples, and the results were analyzed statistically. The light-activated Eclipse™ System showed the highest tensile strength, followed by heat curing. The microwave-cured samples exhibited the least bonding to the acrylic teeth. Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that the new generation of light-cured denture bases showed significantly better bonding to acrylic teeth and can be used as an alternative to the conventional heat-polymerized denture base. PMID:25307813

  18. TENSILE STRENGTH AND FRACTURE SURFACE CHARACTERIZATION OF HI-NICALONTM SIC FIBERS

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblood, Gerald E.; Lewinsohn, Charles A.; Jones, Russell H.; Kohyama, Akira

    2000-06-30

    Dimensional, tensile strength and fracture surface characterizations were carried out for a particular batch (51 samples) of unirradiated Hi-Nicalon™ SiC fiber. This batch of SiC fibers is included in the radiation test matrix as part of the JUPITER 12J and 14J experiments. In general, filaments of Hi-Nicalon™ fiber with larger cross-sectional areas (equivalent diameters) had lower strengths than filaments with smaller cross-sectional areas. During tensile tests at room temperature, fracture originated at critical flaws that typically consisted of internal pores or carbonaceous inclusions. Well-demarcated mirror and hackle regions usually surrounded the critical flaws. With a few exceptions, the critical flaw size (ac) was linearly related to the mirror size (rm) by ac » 0.33rm. From fracture mechanics principles, values for the average mirror constant (Am) and effective fracture toughness for this batch of Hi-NicalonÔ fiber were estimated to be 2.99 ± 0.33 and 1.1 ± 0.2 MPa m1/2, respectively.

  19. Tensile strength of glass fiber posts submitted to different surface treatments.

    PubMed

    Faria, Maria Isabel A; Gomes, Érica Alves; Messias, Danielle Cristine; Silva Filho, João Manoel; Souza Filho, Celso Bernardo; Paulino, Silvana Maria

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the tensile strength of glass fiber posts submitted to different surface treatments. Forty-eight maxillary canines had their crowns sectioned and root canals endodontically treated. The roots were embedded in acrylic resin and distributed into 3 groups according to the surface treatment: Group I: the posts were treated with silane agent for 30 s and adhesive; Group II: the posts were cleaned with alcohol before treatment with silane agent and adhesive; Group III: the posts were submitted to conditioning with 37% phosphoric acid for 30 s before treatment with silane agent and adhesive. Each group was divided into 2 subgroups for adhesive polymerization or not before insertion into the canal: A - adhesive was not light cured and B - adhesive was light cured. All posts were cemented with Panavia F and the samples were subjected to tensile strength test in a universal testing machine at crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were submitted to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test at 5% significance level. There was statistically significant difference (p<0.01) only between group GIII-B and groups GI-A and GI-B. No significant difference was found among the other groups (p>0.05). It was concluded that the products used for cleaning the posts influenced the retention regardless of adhesive light curing. PMID:24474360

  20. Effect of Preparation Methods on Crystallization Behavior and Tensile Strength of Poly(vinylidene fluoride) Membranes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Lu, Xiaolong; Wu, Chunrui

    2013-01-01

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) membranes were prepared by non solvent induced phase separation (NIPS), melt spinning and the solution-cast method. The effect of preparation methods with different membrane formation mechanisms on crystallization behavior and tensile strength of PVDF membranes was investigated. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy-attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were employed to examine the crystal form of the surface layers and the overall membranes, respectively. Spherulite morphologies and thermal behavior of the membranes were studied by polarized light optical microscopy (PLO) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) separately. It was found that the crystallization behavior of PVDF membranes was closely related to the preparation methods. For membranes prepared by the NIPS method, the skin layers had a mixture of α and β phases, the overall membranes were predominantly α phase, and the total crystallinity was 60.0% with no spherulite. For melt spinning membranes, the surface layers also showed a mixture of α and β phases, the overall membranes were predominantly α phase. The total crystallinity was 48.7% with perfect spherulites. Whereas the crystallization behavior of solution-cast membranes was related to the evaporation temperature and the additive, when the evaporation temperature was 140 °C with a soluble additive in the dope solution, obvious spherulites appeared. The crystalline morphology of PVDF exerted a great influence on the tensile strength of the membranes, which was much higher with perfect spherulites. PMID:24957064

  1. Tensile Strength and Hardness Correlations with Microscopy in Friction welded Aluminium to Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satish, Rengarajan; Seshagiri Rao, Vaddi; Ananthapadmanaban, Dattaguru; Ravi, Balappa

    2016-01-01

    Aluminium and copper are good conductors of heat and electricity, copper being the better conductor, is a costly metal indeed. On the other hand, aluminium is cheap, easily available and also has a lower density than copper. Hence, worldwide efforts are being made to partially replace copper wire. Solid state welding should be used to join aluminium to copper. This is because the use of fusion welding results in brittle phases formed in the weld interface. One of the solid state welding techniques used for joining aluminium to copper is friction welding. In this paper, an attempt has been made to join aluminium to copper by friction welding by varying the friction welding parameters, namely friction pressure, upset pressure, burn-off length and speed of rotation of the workpiece. Nine different friction welding parameter combinations were used during welding in accordance with ASTM standards and results have been reported. Tensile strength and hardness tests were carried out for each parameter combination. Optimum friction welding parameter combination was identified with respect to tensile strength. Scanning Electron Microscopy and Electron dispersive spectroanalysis were obtained to identify modes of fracture and presence of intermetallic phases for each friction welding combination with the aim to narrow down friction welding parameters that give good properties on the whole.

  2. Effect of Preparation Methods on Crystallization Behavior and Tensile Strength of Poly(vinylidene fluoride) Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Lu, Xiaolong; Wu, Chunrui

    2013-01-01

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) membranes were prepared by non solvent induced phase separation (NIPS), melt spinning and the solution-cast method. The effect of preparation methods with different membrane formation mechanisms on crystallization behavior and tensile strength of PVDF membranes was investigated. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy-attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were employed to examine the crystal form of the surface layers and the overall membranes, respectively. Spherulite morphologies and thermal behavior of the membranes were studied by polarized light optical microscopy (PLO) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) separately. It was found that the crystallization behavior of PVDF membranes was closely related to the preparation methods. For membranes prepared by the NIPS method, the skin layers had a mixture of α and β phases, the overall membranes were predominantly α phase, and the total crystallinity was 60.0% with no spherulite. For melt spinning membranes, the surface layers also showed a mixture of α and β phases, the overall membranes were predominantly α phase. The total crystallinity was 48.7% with perfect spherulites. Whereas the crystallization behavior of solution-cast membranes was related to the evaporation temperature and the additive, when the evaporation temperature was 140 °C with a soluble additive in the dope solution, obvious spherulites appeared. The crystalline morphology of PVDF exerted a great influence on the tensile strength of the membranes, which was much higher with perfect spherulites. PMID:24957064

  3. Accuracy of Prediction Method of Cryogenic Tensile Strength for Austenitic Stainless Steels in ITER Toroidal Field Coil Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Takeru; Icuchi, Masahide; Nakahira, Masatake; Saito, Toru; Morimoto, Masaaki; Inagaki, Takashi; Hong, Yunseok; Matsui, Kunihiro; Hemmi, Tsutomu; Kajitani, Hideki; Koizumi, Norikiyo

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has developed the prediction method for yield stress and ultimate tensile strength at liquid helium temperature (4 K) using the quadratic curve as a function of the content of carbon and nitrogen. Prediction method was formulated based on the tensile strength data of materials with shape of rectangle. In this study, tensile strength of the forged materials with round bar and complex shape were obtained so as to compare with the predicted value. The accuracy of the prediction method was 10.2% of Yield Strength (YS), 2.5% of Ultimate Tensile Strength (UTS) when the prediction method was applied to round bar forged materials. By contrast, the accuracy about prediction method was 1.8% of YS, -0.8% of UTS when prediction method was applied to complex shape forged materials. It can be presumed the tendency of tensile strength other than materials with shape of rectangle. However, it was found accuracy of round bar is larger than other materials because of difference in the forging method."The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of the ITER Organization"

  4. Tensile Bond Strengths of Two Adhesives on Irradiated and Nonirradiated Human Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Cécile; Abouelleil, Hazem; Gustin, Marie-Paule; Grosgogeat, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of radiotherapy on bond efficiency of two different adhesive systems using tensile bond strength test. Twenty extracted teeth after radiotherapy and twenty nonirradiated extracted teeth were used. The irradiation was applied in vivo to a minimal dose of 50 Gy. The specimens of each group were randomly assigned to two subgroups to test two different adhesive systems. A three-step/etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Optibond FL) and a two-steps/self-etch adhesive system (Optibond XTR) were used. Composite buildups were performed with a nanohybrid composite (Herculite XTR). All specimens were submitted to thermocycling ageing (10000 cycles). The specimens were sectioned in 1 mm2 sticks. Microtensile bond strength tests were measured. Nonparametric statistical analyses were performed due to nonnormality of data. Optibond XTR on irradiated and nonirradiated teeth did not show any significant differences. However, Optibond FL bond strength was more effective on nonirradiated teeth than on irradiated teeth. Within the limitations of an in vitro study, it can be concluded that radiotherapy had a significant detrimental effect on bond strength to human dentin. However, it seems that adhesive choice could be adapted to the substrata. According to the present study, the two-steps/self-etch (Optibond XTR) adhesive system tested could be more effective on irradiated dentin compared to three-steps/etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Optibond FL). PMID:26783528

  5. Symbiosis of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi and Robinia pseudoacacia L. Improves Root Tensile Strength and Soil Aggregate Stability

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haoqiang; Liu, Zhenkun; Chen, Hui; Tang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Robinia pseudoacacia L. (black locust) is a widely planted tree species on Loess Plateau for revegetation. Due to its symbiosis forming capability with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, we explored the influence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on plant biomass, root morphology, root tensile strength and soil aggregate stability in a pot experiment. We inoculated R. pseudoacacia with/without AM fungus (Rhizophagus irregularis or Glomus versiforme), and measured root colonization, plant growth, root morphological characters, root tensile force and tensile strength, and parameters for soil aggregate stability at twelve weeks after inoculation. AM fungi colonized more than 70% plant root, significantly improved plant growth. Meanwhile, AM fungi elevated root morphological parameters, root tensile force, root tensile strength, Glomalin-related soil protein (GRSP) content in soil, and parameters for soil aggregate stability such as water stable aggregate (WSA), mean weight diameter (MWD) and geometric mean diameter (GMD). Root length was highly correlated with WSA, MWD and GMD, while hyphae length was highly correlated with GRSP content. The improved R. pseudoacacia growth, root tensile strength and soil aggregate stability indicated that AM fungi could accelerate soil fixation and stabilization with R. pseudoacacia, and its function in revegetation on Loess Plateau deserves more attention. PMID:27064570

  6. Symbiosis of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi and Robinia pseudoacacia L. Improves Root Tensile Strength and Soil Aggregate Stability.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haoqiang; Liu, Zhenkun; Chen, Hui; Tang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Robinia pseudoacacia L. (black locust) is a widely planted tree species on Loess Plateau for revegetation. Due to its symbiosis forming capability with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, we explored the influence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on plant biomass, root morphology, root tensile strength and soil aggregate stability in a pot experiment. We inoculated R. pseudoacacia with/without AM fungus (Rhizophagus irregularis or Glomus versiforme), and measured root colonization, plant growth, root morphological characters, root tensile force and tensile strength, and parameters for soil aggregate stability at twelve weeks after inoculation. AM fungi colonized more than 70% plant root, significantly improved plant growth. Meanwhile, AM fungi elevated root morphological parameters, root tensile force, root tensile strength, Glomalin-related soil protein (GRSP) content in soil, and parameters for soil aggregate stability such as water stable aggregate (WSA), mean weight diameter (MWD) and geometric mean diameter (GMD). Root length was highly correlated with WSA, MWD and GMD, while hyphae length was highly correlated with GRSP content. The improved R. pseudoacacia growth, root tensile strength and soil aggregate stability indicated that AM fungi could accelerate soil fixation and stabilization with R. pseudoacacia, and its function in revegetation on Loess Plateau deserves more attention. PMID:27064570

  7. Comparison of the flexural strength of six reinforced restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Cohen, B I; Volovich, Y; Musikant, B L; Deutsch, A S

    2001-01-01

    This study calculated the flexural strength for six reinforced restorative materials and demonstrated that flexural strength values can be determined simply by using physical parameters (diametral tensile strength and Young's modulus values) that are easily determined experimentally. A one-way ANOVA analysis demonstrated a statistically significant difference between the two reinforced glass ionomers and the four composite resin materials, with the composite resin being stronger than the glass ionomers. PMID:12017792

  8. The tensile strength of the union between various glass ionomer cements and various composite resins.

    PubMed

    Mount, G J

    1989-04-01

    Increasing use is being made of the glass ionomer cements as a lining for composite resin restorations, particularly when restoring posterior teeth. It has been suggested that it is possible to obtain a mechanical union between the two materials by etching the surface of the cement. This paper discusses the result of testing a broad variety of combinations of different glass ionomer cements and composite resins that have been reported on previously, and suggests that a number of factors need to be taken into account if the optimum physical properties are to be achieved from the union. There would appear to be four main factors which dictate the final strength of the union. The tensile strength of the cement itself is of primary importance and it seems the wettability of the resin bonding agent is also significant. When using some of the less heavily filled composite resins, the stresses set up by the setting contraction of the resin may be too great and, finally, the more heavily filled composite resins for restoration of posterior teeth often prove difficult to adapt to the underlying cement. With careful clinical handling, the so-called 'sandwich' technique is very useful. However, not all combinations of glass ionomer cement and composite resin will unite with sufficient strength to be successful clinically. PMID:2658936

  9. Back Propagation Neural Networks for Predicting Ultimate Strengths of Unidirectional Graphite/Epoxy Tensile Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.; Hill, Eric v. K.

    1993-01-01

    The research presented herein demonstrates the feasibility of predicting ultimate strengths in simple composite structures through a neural network analysis of their acoustic emission (AE) amplitude distribution data. A series of eleven ASTM D-3039 unidirectional graphite/epoxy tensile samples were loaded to failure to generate the amplitude distributions for this analysis. A back propagation neural network was trained to correlate the AE amplitude distribution signatures generated during the first 25% of loading with the ultimate strengths of the samples. The network was trained using two sets of inputs: (1) the statistical parameters obtained from a Weibull distribution fit of the amplitude distribution data, and (2) the event frequency (amplitude) distribution itself. The neural networks were able to predict ultimate strengths with a worst case error of -8.99% for the Weibull modeled amplitude distribution data and 3.74% when the amplitude distribution itself was used to train the network. The principal reason for the improved prediction capability of the latter technique lies in the ability of the neural network to extract subtle features from within the amplitude distribution.

  10. Tensile strength of ramie yarn (spinning by machine)/HDPE thermoplastic matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banowati, Lies; Hadi, Bambang K.; Suratman, Rochim; Faza, Aulia

    2016-03-01

    Technological developments should be trooped to prevent a gap between technology and environmental sustainability, then it needs to be developed "Green technology". In this research is making of green composites which use natural fiber ramie as reinforcement. Whereas the matrix used was HDPE (High Density Polyethylene) thermoplastic polymer which could be recycled and had a good formability and flexibility. The ramie yarns and fibers for unidirectional (0°) direction respectively were mixed with HDPE powder and processed using hot compression molding. The surface morphology was observed by SEM (Scanning Electrone Microscopy). Results showed that both tensile strength of the ramie fiber/HDPE composites increased in comparison with the ramie yarn (spinning by machine)/HDPE composites. However, the ramie yarn (spinning by machine)/HDPE composites have a good producibility for wider application. Analysis of the test results using the Weibull distribution as approaches to modeling the reliability of the specimens.

  11. Galactans and cellulose in flax fibres: putative contributions to the tensile strength.

    PubMed

    Girault, R; Bert, F; Rihouey, C; Jauneau, A; Morvan, C; Jarvis, M

    1997-08-01

    The proton spin-spin relaxation time, T2, measured from solid-state NMR, indicates a greater rigidity for cellulose than for the adhesive matrix between the microfibrils of flax ultimate fibres. Cytochemical and biochemical analyses allow the identification of: (1) EDTA-soluble RG I-polymers in the primary walls and cell junctions of fibres; (2) long 1 --> 4-beta-D-galactan chains between primary and secondary wall layers; and (3) arabinogalactan-proteins throughout the secondary walls. These polymers in the adhesive matrix between microfibrils and/or cellulose layers ensure that cracks propagate along the matrix rather than across the fibres and play an important role in allowing flax fibres to approach the tensile strength of advanced synthetic fibres like carbon and Kevlar. PMID:9283034

  12. Influence of residual stresses on the tensile strength of composite-metal sandwich laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herakovich, C. T.; Wong, D. M.

    1977-01-01

    The tensile strength of boron-epoxy/aluminum sandwich laminates is discussed relative to the residual thermal stresses generated by curing and bonding at elevated temperatures. It is shown that the sandwich laminates investigated exhibit three dinstinct modes of failure, depending upon the fiber orientation of the composite. Sandwich laminates with moderate to high percentage of 0-deg fibers exhibit early failures initiated by edge effect; laminates with moderate to high percentage of 90-deg fibers fail according to a first-ply failure criterion; laminates with moderate to high percentages of plus or minus 45 deg plies fail at strains equal to or greater than the failure strain of the corresponding all-composite laminate.

  13. Analysis of Ninety Degree Flexure Tests for Characterization of Composite Transverse Tensile Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OBrien, T. Kevin; Krueger, Ronald

    2001-01-01

    Finite element (FE) analysis was performed on 3-point and 4-point bending test configurations of ninety degree oriented glass-epoxy and graphite-epoxy composite beams to identify deviations from beam theory predictions. Both linear and geometric non-linear analyses were performed using the ABAQUS finite element code. The 3-point and 4-point bending specimens were first modeled with two-dimensional elements. Three-dimensional finite element models were then performed for selected 4-point bending configurations to study the stress distribution across the width of the specimens and compare the results to the stresses computed from two-dimensional plane strain and plane stress analyses and the stresses from beam theory. Stresses for all configurations were analyzed at load levels corresponding to the measured transverse tensile strength of the material.

  14. Tensile Strength of Liquids: Equivalence of Temporal and Spatial Scales in Cavitation.

    PubMed

    Cai, Y; Huang, J Y; Wu, H A; Zhu, M H; Goddard, W A; Luo, S N

    2016-03-01

    It is well known that strain rate and size effects are both important in material failure, but the relationships between them are poorly understood. To establish this connection, we carry out molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of cavitation in Lennard-Jones and Cu liquids over a very broad range of size and strain rate. These studies confirm that temporal and spatial scales play equivalent roles in the tensile strengths of these two liquids. Predictions based on smallest-scale MD simulations of Cu for larger temporal and spatial scales are consistent with independent simulations, and comparable to experiments on liquid metals. We analyze these results in terms of classical nucleation theory and show that the equivalence arises from the role of both size and strain rate in the nucleation of a daughter phase. Such equivalence is expected to hold for a wide range of materials and processes and to be useful as a predictive bridging tool in multiscale studies. PMID:26885747

  15. Tensile strength as a function of thermal history of Inconel 718 and Inconel 625 alloys for glass-ceramic headers

    SciTech Connect

    Rey, M.C.; Henderson, W.R.

    1982-06-11

    Tensile strength tests were conducted on Inconel 718 specimens following a variety of heat treatments, and on as-received and heat-treated specimens of Inconel 625. A heat treatment cycle for Inconel 718 was found that represents an acceptable compromise between a thermal cycle that yields the strongest metal and one that least taxes a glass-ceramic material to which the Inconel 718 is bonded. Heat treating resulted in a moderate decrease in the tensile strength of the as-received Inconel 625.

  16. Tensile strengths of polyamide based 3D printed polymers in liquid nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, P.; Shoemake, E. D.; Adam, P.; Leachman, J.

    2015-12-01

    Advances in additive manufacturing technology have made 3D printing a viable solution for many industries, allowing for the manufacture of designs that could not be made through traditional subtractive methods. Applicability of additive manufacturing in cryogenic applications is hindered, however, by a lack of accurate material properties information. Nylon is available for printing using fused deposition modeling (FDM) and selective laser sintering (SLS). We selected 5 SLS (DuraForm® EX, DuraForm® HST, DuraForm® PA, PA 640-GSL, and PA 840-GSL) and 2 FDM (Nylon 12, ULTEM) nylon variants based on the bulk material properties and printed properties at room temperature. Tensile tests were performed on five samples of each material while immersed in liquid nitrogen at approximately 77 Kelvin. Samples were tested in XY and, where available, Z printing directions to determine influence on material properties. Results show typical SLS and FDM nylon ultimate strength retention at 77 K, when compared to (extruded or molded) nylon ultimate strength.

  17. Quantitative Fracture Strength of Lithiated Tin Oxide Nanowires by In-Situ SEM Tensile Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Bill S.

    The quantitative fracture strength of lithiated and pristine tin oxide (SnO2) nanowires was gathered from in situ scanning electron microscope (SEM) mechanical tests using a micro electromechanical system (MEMS) uniaxial tensile testing device. Stress values were calculated from load and displacement data from an inSEM nanoindenter tip while strain values were obtained using digital image correlation (DIC) from in situ SEM test images. The SnO2 nanowires were synthesized using the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth mechanism on stainless steel substrates using a gold (Au) catalyst. Ex-situ lithiation of the SnO2 nanowires was performed directly using the stainless steel growth substrates by the electrochemical half-cell method which did not involve the use of binders or conductive agents. The fracture strength decreased from 2.4 GPa +/- 0.2 GPa for the pristine SnO2 nanowires to 814.8 MPa +/- 429.7 MPa for the lithiated SnO2 nanowires. This study provides the first quantitative mechanical data for pristine and lithiated SnO2 nanowires.

  18. Modeling the Effect of Oxidation on Tensile Strength of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2015-12-01

    An analytical method has been developed to investigate the effect of oxidation on the tensile strength of carbon fiber - reinforced ceramic - matrix composites (CMCs). The Budiansky - Hutchinson - Evans shear - lag model was used to describe the micro stress field of the damaged composite considering fibers failure. The statistical matrix multicracking model and fracture mechanics interface debonding criterion were used to determine the matrix crack spacing and interface debonded length. The fiber strength degradation model and oxidation region propagation model have been adopted to analyze the oxidation effect on tensile strength of the composite, which is controlled by diffusion of oxygen gas through matrix cracks. Under tensile loading, the fibers failure probabilities were determined by combining oxidation model and fiber statistical failure model based on the assumption that fiber strength is subjected to two-parameter Weibull distribution and the loads carried by broken and intact fibers statisfy the global load sharing criterion. The composite can no longer support the applied load when the total loads supported by broken and intact fibers approach its maximum value. The conditions of a single matrix crack and matrix multicrackings for tensile strength considering oxidation time and temperature have been analyzed.

  19. Dimensional stability and tensile strength of irradiated Nicalon-CG and Hi-Nicalon SiC fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblood, G.E.; Henager, C.H. Jr.; Senor, D.J.; Newsome, G.A.; Woods, J.J.

    1997-05-01

    Nicalon-CG and Hi-Nicalon fibers were characterized by measuring their length, density, and tensile strength in the unirradiated, thermal annealed, and irradiated conditions. The irradiation was conducted in the EBR-II to a dose of 43 dpa-SiC at a nominal irradiation temperature of 1,000 C. The annealed specimens were held at 1,010 C for 165 days to approximately duplicate the thermal exposure of the irradiated specimens. The results indicate the fibers that perform best in an irradiation environment are those that approach stoichiometric and crystalline SiC. Hi-Nicalon exhibited negligible densification, accompanied by an increase in tensile strength after irradiation. Nicalon-CG possessed a higher tensile strength than hi-Nicalon in the unirradiated condition, but was significantly weakened in the annealed and irradiated conditions. In addition, Nicalon-CG exhibited unacceptable irradiation-induced shrinkage. Loss o fiber tensile strength after irradiation is shown to reduce the flexural strength of irradiated composites and Nicalon-CG fiber shrinkage observed in irradiated composites.

  20. Laboratory measurements of ice tensile strength dependence on density and concentration of silicate and polymer impurities at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litwin, K. L.; Beyeler, J. D.; Polito, P. J.; Zygielbaum, B. R.; Sklar, L. S.; Collins, G. C.

    2009-12-01

    The tensile strength of ice bedrock on Titan should strongly influence the effectiveness of the erosional processes responsible for carving the extensive fluvial drainage networks and other surface features visible in images returned by the Cassini and Huygens probes. Recent measurements of the effect of temperature on the tensile strength of low-porosity, polycrystalline ice, without impurities, suggest that ice bedrock at the Titan surface temperature of 93 K may be as much as five times stronger than ice at terrestrial surface temperatures. However, ice bedrock on Titan and other outer solar system bodies may have significant porosity, and impurities such silicates or polymers are possible in such ices. In this laboratory investigation we are exploring the dependence of tensile strength on the density and concentration of impurities, for polycrystalline ice across a wide range of temperatures. We use the Brazilian tensile splitting test to measure strength, and control temperature with dry ice and liquid nitrogen. The 50 mm diameter ice cores are made from a log-normally distributed seed crystal mixture with a median size of 1.4 mm. To control ice density and porosity we vary the packing density of the seed grains in core molds and vary the degree of saturation of the matrix with added near-freezing distilled water. We also vary ice density by blending in a similarly-sized mixture of angular fragments of two types of impurities, a fine-grained volcanic rock and a polyethylene polymer. Because both types of impurities have greater tensile strength than ice at Earth surface temperatures, we expect higher concentrations of impurities to correlate with increased strength for ice-rock and ice-polymer mixtures. However, at the ultra-cold temperatures of the outer planets, we expect significant divergence in the temperature dependence of ice tensile strength for the various mixtures and resulting densities. These measurements will help constrain the range of possible ice tensile strengths that might occur on Titan and other solar system bodies.

  1. Effects of reclaimed asphalt pavement on indirect tensile strength test of foamed asphalt mix tested in dry condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yati Katman, Herda; Rasdan Ibrahim, Mohd; Yazip Matori, Mohd; Norhisham, Shuhairy; Ismail, Norlela

    2013-06-01

    Indirect tensile strength (ITS) test was conducted to analyse strength of the foamed asphalt mixes incorporating reclaimed asphalt pavement. Samples were tested for ITS after cured in the oven at 40°C for 72 hours. This testing condition known as dry condition or unconditioned. Laboratory results show that reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) contents insignificantly affect the ITS results. ITS results significantly affected by foamed bitumen contents.

  2. Resistance to densification, tensile strength and capsule-filling performance of some pharmaceutical diluents.

    PubMed

    Nikolakakis, I; Aragon, O B; Malamataris, S

    1998-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare some indicators of capsule-filling performance, as measured by tapped density under different conditions, and elucidate possible quantitative relationships between variation of capsule fill-weight (%CV) and gravitational and inter-particle forces (attractive or frictional) derived from measurements of particle size, true density, low compression and tensile strength. Five common pharmaceutical diluents (lactose, maize starch, talc, Emcocel and Avicel) were investigated and two capsule-filling methods (pouring powder and dosator nozzle) were employed. It was found that for the pouring-type method the appropriateness of Hausner's ratio (HR), Carr's compressibility index (CC%) and Kawakita's constant (alpha) as indicators of capsule fill-weight variation decreases in the order alpha > CC% > HR; the appropriateness of these indicators also decreases with increasing cylinder size and with impact velocity during tapping. For the dosator-type method the appropriateness of the indicators decreases in the order HR > CC% > alpha, the opposite of that for the pouring-type method; the appropriateness of the indicators increases with decreasing cylinder size and impact velocity. The relationship between %CV and the ratio of inter-particle attractive to gravitational forces calculated from measurements of particle size and true density (Fvdw/Wp) was more significant for the pouring-type capsule-filling method. For the dosator-type method a significant relationship (1% level) was found between %CV and the product of Fvdw/Wp and a function expressing the increase, with packing density (p(f)), in the ratio of frictional to attractive inter-particle forces derived from compression (P) and tensile-strength (T) testing, d(log(P/T))/d(p(f)). The value of tapped density in predictions of capsule-filling performance is affected by the testing conditions in a manner depending on the filling method applied. For the pouring-type method predictions can be based on the ratio of attractive (inter-particle) to gravitational forces, whereas for the dosator-type method the contribution of frictional and attractive forces should, because of packing density change, also be taken into account. PMID:9720619

  3. A new derivation of the tensile strength of cometary nuclei: Application to comet Shoemaker-Levy 9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, J. Mayo; Mizutani, Hitoshi; Yamamoto, Tetsuo

    1994-01-01

    The splitting of comets as exemplified by comet Shoemaker-Levy 9, when it passed near Jupiter, is a common phenomenon. Multiple splitting is also not an uncommon occurrence. It is clear that the comet nucleus is fragile, i.e., its tensile strength is small compared with that of solid materials. We show that aggregates of sub-micron interstellar dust particles presumed to consist of a silicate core, an inner mantle of complex organic refractory molecules, and an outer mantle dominated by H2O ice (Greenberg, 1982) provide the basis for a quantitative derivation of the tensile strength of comet SL9 using molecular interactions at the contact interfaces. In fact, using a mean particle size representing interstellar dust as it would appear in its final presolar state one derives a tensile strength which describes remarkably well the multiple splitting phenomenon. This derivation of the tensile strength of a particle aggregate resulting from molecular interactions is quite general and can be applied to physical situations involving any sorts of aggregates as well as those representing comet nuclei.

  4. Evaluation of Surface Roughness and Tensile Strength of Base Metal Alloys Used for Crown and Bridge on Recasting (Recycling)

    PubMed Central

    Hashmi, Syed W.; Rao, Yogesh; Garg, Akanksha

    2015-01-01

    Background Dental casting alloys play a prominent role in the restoration of the partial dentition. Casting alloys have to survive long term in the mouth and also have the combination of structure, molecules, wear resistance and biologic compatibility. According to ADA system casting alloys were divided into three groups (wt%); high noble, Noble and predominantly base metal alloys. Aim To evaluate the mechanical properties such as tensile strength and surface roughness of the new and recast base metal (nickel-chromium) alloys. Materials and Methods Recasting of the base metal alloys derived from sprue and button, to make it reusable has been done. A total of 200 test specimens were fabricated using specially fabricated jig of metal and divided into two groups- 100 specimens of new alloy and 100 specimens of recast alloys, which were tested for tensile strength on universal testing machine and surface roughness on surface roughness tester. Results Tensile strength of new alloy showed no statistically significant difference (p-value>0.05) from recast alloy whereas new alloy had statistically significant surface roughness (Maximum and Average surface roughness) difference (p-value<0.01) as compared to recast alloy. Conclusion Within the limitations of the study it is concluded that the tensile strength will not be affected by recasting of nickel-chromium alloy whereas surface roughness increases markedly. PMID:26393194

  5. Modeling and predicting the tensile strength of poly (lactic acid)/graphene nanocomposites by using support vector regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, W. D.; Cai, C. Z.; Luo, Y.; Li, Y. H.; Zhao, C. J.

    2016-04-01

    According to an experimental dataset under different process parameters, support vector regression (SVR) combined with particle swarm optimization (PSO) for its parameter optimization was employed to establish a mathematical model for prediction of the tensile strength of poly (lactic acid) (PLA)/graphene nanocomposites. Four variables, while graphene loading, temperature, time and speed, were employed as input variables, while tensile strength acted as output variable. Using leave-one-out cross validation test of 30 samples, the maximum absolute percentage error does not exceed 1.5%, the mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) is only 0.295% and the correlation coefficient (R2) is as high as 0.99. Compared with the results of response surface methodology (RSM) model, it is shown that the estimated errors by SVR are smaller than those achieved by RSM. It revealed that the generalization ability of SVR is superior to that of RSM model. Meanwhile, multifactor analysis is adopted for investigation on significances of each experimental factor and their influences on the tensile strength of PLA/graphene nanocomposites. This study suggests that the SVR model can provide important theoretical and practical guide to design the experiment, and control the intensity of the tensile strength of PLA/graphene nanocomposites via rational process parameters.

  6. Developmental Exposure to Xenoestrogens at Low Doses Alters Femur Length and Tensile Strength in Adult Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Pelch, Katherine E.; Carleton, Stephanie M.; Phillips, Charlotte L.; Nagel, Susan C.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Developmental exposure to high doses of the synthetic xenoestrogen diethylstilbestrol (DES) has been reported to alter femur length and strength in adult mice. However, it is not known if developmental exposure to low, environmentally relevant doses of xenoestrogens alters adult bone geometry and strength. In this study we investigated the effects of developmental exposure to low doses of DES, bisphenol A (BPA), or ethinyl estradiol (EE2) on bone geometry and torsional strength. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to DES, 0.1 μg/kg/day, BPA, 10 μg/kg/day, EE2, 0.01, 0.1, or 1.0 μg/kg/day, or vehicle from Gestation Day 11 to Postnatal Day 12 via a mini-osmotic pump in the dam. Developmental Xenoestrogen exposure altered femoral geometry and strength, assessed in adulthood by micro-computed tomography and torsional strength analysis, respectively. Low-dose EE2, DES, or BPA increased adult femur length. Exposure to the highest dose of EE2 did not alter femur length, resulting in a nonmonotonic dose response. Exposure to EE2 and DES but not BPA decreased tensile strength. The combined effect of increased femur length and decreased tensile strength resulted in a trend toward decreased torsional ultimate strength and energy to failure. Taken together, these results suggest that exposure to developmental exposure to environmentally relevant levels of xenoestrogens may negatively impact bone length and strength in adulthood. PMID:22088916

  7. In vitro Comparative Evaluation of Tensile Bond Strength of 6th, 7th and 8th Generation Dentin Bonding Agents

    PubMed Central

    Kamble, Suresh S; Kandasamy, Baburajan; Thillaigovindan, Ranjani; Goyal, Nitin Kumar; Talukdar, Pratim; Seal, Mukut

    2015-01-01

    Background: Newer dentin bonding agents were developed to improve the quality of composite restoration and to reduce time consumption in its application. The aim of the present study was to evaluate tensile bond strength of 6th, 7th and 8th generation bonding agents by in vitro method. Materials and Methods: Selected 60 permanent teeth were assigned into 20 in each group (Group I: 6th generation bonding agent-Adper SE plus 3M ESPE, Group II: 7th generation bonding agent-G-Bond GC Corp Japan and Group III: 8th generation dentin adhesives-FuturaBond, DC, Voco, Germany). With high-speed diamond disc, coronal dentin was exposed, and selected dentin bonding agents were applied, followed by composite restoration. All samples were saved in saline for 24 h and tensile bond strength testing was done using a universal testing machine. The obtained data were tabulated and statistically analyzed using ANOVA test. Results: The tensile bond strength readings for 6th generation bonding agent was 32.2465, for 7th generation was 31.6734, and for 8th-generation dentine bonding agent was 34.74431. The highest tensile bond strength was seen in 8th generation bonding agent compared to 6th and 7th generation bonding agents. Conclusion: From the present study it can be conclude that 8th generation dentine adhesive (Futura DC, Voco, Germany) resulted in highest tensile bond strength compared to 6th (Adper SE plus, 3M ESPE) and 7th generation (G-Bond) dentin bonding agents. PMID:26028901

  8. Research on tensile strength characteristics of bridge deck pavement bonding layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shaopeng; Han, Jun

    2010-03-01

    As the development of the traffic in the world, the bridge deck pavement is playing a more and more important role in the whole traffic system. Big span bridge has become more and more especially cement concrete bridge, therefore the bridge deck pavement bonding layers are emphasized as an important part of bridge traffic system, which can mitigate travel impact to bridge and magnify stationary or traffic amenity. The quality and durability of deck pavement bonding layer has directly effect on traffic safety, comfort, durability and investment of bridge. It represents the first line of defence against the ingress of water, road de-icing salts and aggressive chemicals. In real project, many early age damage of bridge deck pavement has become serious disease that affecting the function of bridge. During the construction of the bridge deck, many types of asphalt binders were used, such as styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS) modified asphalt, styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) modified asphalt, neoprene latex asphalt, etc. In this paper UTM-25 was used to test the tensile strength of different bridge deck pavement bonding layers with the different treatment methods to inter-surface.

  9. Research on tensile strength characteristics of bridge deck pavement bonding layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shaopeng; Han, Jun

    2009-12-01

    As the development of the traffic in the world, the bridge deck pavement is playing a more and more important role in the whole traffic system. Big span bridge has become more and more especially cement concrete bridge, therefore the bridge deck pavement bonding layers are emphasized as an important part of bridge traffic system, which can mitigate travel impact to bridge and magnify stationary or traffic amenity. The quality and durability of deck pavement bonding layer has directly effect on traffic safety, comfort, durability and investment of bridge. It represents the first line of defence against the ingress of water, road de-icing salts and aggressive chemicals. In real project, many early age damage of bridge deck pavement has become serious disease that affecting the function of bridge. During the construction of the bridge deck, many types of asphalt binders were used, such as styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS) modified asphalt, styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) modified asphalt, neoprene latex asphalt, etc. In this paper UTM-25 was used to test the tensile strength of different bridge deck pavement bonding layers with the different treatment methods to inter-surface.

  10. Thermal dilatation, density, porosity and tensile strength of porous Miocene limestone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pápay, Zita; Török, Ákos

    2015-04-01

    Porous Miocene limestone is one of the most important stone that have been used as in the monuments from Roman times in the present territory of Hungary. Thermal behaviour of these structures plays an important role in the structural integrity of the monument. Very limited data is available on the thermal dilatation of porous limestone and to bridge this information gap limestone from Sóskút quarry was analyzed. The present study focuses on the thermal dilatation and its relationship with other physical properties and fabric. Three different lithotypes were tested: i) fine-grained, ii) medium-grained and iii) coarse-grained porous limestone. Prismatic test specimens were placed in thermal dilatometers and were subjected to thermal cycles within the temperature range of 20°C - 100°C. Thermal dilation and shrinkage was recorded. Measurements on bulk density, porosity and indirect tensile strength of the three different lithologies were also made. Data set suggests that the thermal dilatation of porous limestone is in the order of 0.2-0.8 mm/m. The differences are related to different fabric and also suggest an oriented micro-fabric, since thermal expansion in the X,Y Z direction is different.

  11. Hydrogen Embrittlement of a 1500-MPa Tensile Strength Level Steel with an Ultrafine Elongated Grain Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Yihong; Kimura, Yuuji; Inoue, Tadanobu; Yin, Fuxing; Akiyama, Eiji; Tsuzaki, Kaneaki

    2012-05-01

    A deformation of a tempered martensitic structure ( i.e., tempforming) at 773 K (500 °C) was applied to a 0.6 pct C-2 pct Si-1 pct Cr steel. The hydrogen embrittlement (HE) property of the tempformed (TF) steel was investigated by a slow strain rate test (SSRT) and an accelerated atmospheric corrosion test (AACT). Hydrogen content within the samples after SSRT and AACT was measured by thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS). The tempforming at 773 K (500 °C) using multipass caliber rolling with an accumulative are reduction of 76 pct resulted in the evolution of an ultrafine elongated grain (UFEG) structure with a strong <110>//rolling direction (RD) fiber deformation texture and a dispersion of spheroidized cementite particles. The SSRT of the pre-hydrogen-charged notched specimens and the AACT demonstrated that the TF sample had superior potential for HE resistance to the conventional quenched and tempered (QT) sample at a tensile strength of 1500 MPa. The TDS analysis also indicated that the hydrogen might be mainly trapped by reversible trapping sites such as grain boundaries and dislocations in the TF sample, and the hydrogen trapping states of the TF sample were similar to those of the QT sample. The QT sample exhibited hydrogen-induced intergranular fracture along the boundaries of coarse prior-austenite grains. In contrast, the hydrogen-induced cracking occurred in association with the UFEG structure in the TF sample, leading to the higher HE resistance of the TF sample.

  12. Microstructure, hardness profile and tensile strength in welds of AA6013 T6 extrusions

    SciTech Connect

    Guitterez, L.A.; Neye, G.; Zschech, E.

    1996-04-01

    Alloy AA6013 is easily welded by conventional arc welding processes as well as by high-energy-density processes. However, some physical properties, which are inherent to all aluminum alloys, have to be considered during welding. In comparison to steel, the high thermal conductivity of aluminum alloys requires the use of higher heat input for welding. This is realized by a greater welding current during GTAW of aluminum alloys. One of the main problems associated with LBW of aluminum alloys is the high surface reflectivity. In particular, the threshold intensity for the development of a keyhole is much higher for aluminum than for steel. Finally, aluminum alloys, and particularly the heat-treatable alloys, are sensitive to weld cracking. This phenomenon can be avoided by proper filler and base metal alloy selection and adequate filler metal dilution. In order to improve the mechanical integrity of Al-Mg-Si weldments, it would be desirable to study the microstructure of the FZ and of the HAZ, as well as the residual stress distribution. The present study was performed in order to show differences in microstructure, hardness profile and tensile strength of gas tungsten arc (GTA) and laser beam (LB) welded AA6013-T6 extrusions. In addition, grain boundary liquations and hot tearing are discussed.

  13. Effect of Fiber Strength on the Room Temperature Tensile Properties of Sic/Ti-24Al-11Nb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draper, S. L.; Brindley, P. K.; Nathal, M. V.

    1991-01-01

    SCA-6 SiC fibers of known strength were incorporated into SiC/Ti-24Al-11Nb (at. percent) composites and the effect of fiber strength variability on room temperature composite strength was investigated. Fiber was etched out of a composite fabricated by the powder cloth technique and the effect of the fabrication process on fiber strength was assessed. The strength of the composite was directly correlated with the strength of the as-received fiber. The strength of composite plates containing mixed fiber strengths was dominated by the lower strength fiber. Fabrication by the powder cloth technique resulted in only a slight degradation of fiber strength. The strength of the composite was found to be overestimated by the rule of mixtures strength calculation. Examination of failed tensile specimens revealed periodic fiber cracks and the failure mode was concluded to be cumulative. With the variation in fiber strength eliminated, the composite UTS was found to have a positive correlation with volume fraction of fiber.

  14. Addition of antibacterial agents to MMA-TBB dentin bonding systems--influence on tensile bond strength and antibacterial effect.

    PubMed

    Kudou, Y; Obara, K; Kawashima, T; Kubota, M; Abe, S; Endo, T; Komatsu, M; Okuda, R

    2000-03-01

    To produce a bonding system which has both high bond strength and antibacterial properties, an antibacterial agent (vancomycin: VCM or metronidazol: MN) was added to the PMMA powder of 4-META/MMA-TBB resin (CB). The influence of the addition of an antibacterial agent on tensile bond strength to dentin and the antibacterial effect were investigated in this study. Forty-seven freshly extracted bovine first or second incisors were used to measure the tensile bond strength to dentin. The bond strengths to bovine dentin were not significantly decreased by addition of VCM (1%, 2%, 5%), or MN (1%) to CB (p < 0.05). The antibacterial effect of CB containing antibacterial agent on six strains of bacteria was investigated by the agar plate diffusion method, analyzing the appearance of the inhibition zone around a resin disk following anaerobic culturing. The resin disks containing VCM showed antibacterial effects on all of the strains examined; the widths of the inhibition zones were 4-15 mm. The resin disks containing MN showed antibacterial effects on three strains; the widths of the inhibition zones were 0-4 mm. It was thus possible to produce a bonding system with both antibacterial effect and high tensile bond strength by addition of VCM to PMMA powder. PMID:11219091

  15. Effect of cooling rate on eutectic cell count, grain size, microstructure, and ultimate tensile strength of hypoeutectic cast iron

    SciTech Connect

    Hemanth, J.; Rao, K.V.S. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1999-08-01

    This article describes a series of microstructural and strength studies performed on hypoeutectic cast iron, which was sand cast using a variety of end chills (metallic, nonmetallic, water-cooled, and subzero, respectively). The effects of cooling rate on the eutectic cell count (ECC), grain size, and the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) were evaluated. Attempts were also made to explain these effects and to correlate the UTS with ECC. It was found that subzero chilled and water-cool, chilled cast iron exhibit severe undercooling compared to normal sand cast iron. It was concluded from this investigation that nucleation conditions are completely altered but growth conditions prevail as usual. Therefore, undercooling during solidification is considered to be responsible for variation in ECC, grain size, and microstructure, and tensile strength.

  16. Strength of secondary-cured resin composite inlay repairs.

    PubMed

    Davies, B R; Millar, B J; Wood, D J; Bubb, N L

    1997-06-01

    A study was designed to simulate the repair of an indirect resin composite restoration with conventionally cured resin composite. Two-part specimens were prepared to test the diametral tensile strength of the repair interface between the base material of an indirectly cured resin composite (Herculite XRV) and repairs carried out with three directly cured materials (Herculite XRV, TPH, and Charisma). The repairs were carried out with and without use of the bonding resin for the repair material. The diametral tensile strengths of all repaired specimens were significantly less than those of bulk unrepaired specimens. There were no significant differences between the diametral tensile strengths of repaired blocks when the repair materials were used without bonding resin. The use of an intermediate layer of bonding resin significantly increased the bond strengths obtained when Herculite XRV and TPH were used for repair. There was no significant difference between the strength values of Herculite XRV and TPH, but Charisma exhibited the lowest strengths of repaired specimens. PMID:9477907

  17. Effect of Saliva on the Tensile Bond Strength of Different Generation Adhesive Systems: An In-Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Abhay Mani; Saha, Sonali; Dhinsa, Kavita; Garg, Aarti

    2015-01-01

    Background Newer development of bonding agents have gained a better understanding of factors affecting adhesion of interface between composite and dentin surface to improve longevity of restorations. Objective The present study evaluated the influence of salivary contamination on the tensile bond strength of different generation adhesive systems (two-step etch-and-rinse, two-step self-etch and one-step self-etch) during different bonding stages to dentin where isolation is not maintained. Materials and Methods Superficial dentin surfaces of 90 extracted human molars were randomly divided into three study Groups (Group A: Two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system; Group B: Two-step self-etch adhesive system and Group C: One-step self-etch adhesive system) according to the different generation of adhesives used. According to treatment conditions in different bonding steps, each Group was further divided into three Subgroups containing ten teeth in each. After adhesive application, resin composite blocks were built on dentin and light cured subsequently. The teeth were then stored in water for 24 hours before sending for testing of tensile bond strength by Universal Testing Machine. The collected data were then statistically analysed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD test. Results One-step self-etch adhesive system revealed maximum mean tensile bond strength followed in descending order by Two-step self-etch adhesive system and Two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system both in uncontaminated and saliva contaminated conditions respectively. Conclusion Unlike One-step self-etch adhesive system, saliva contamination could reduce tensile bond strength of the two-step self-etch and two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system. Furthermore, the step of bonding procedures and the type of adhesive seems to be effective on the bond strength of adhesives contaminated with saliva. PMID:26393214

  18. Structural basis of the tensile strength of protein complexes mediating cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayas, Marco Vinicio

    This study explores the behaviour of adhesive complexes of cell adhesion molecules undergoing forced detachment. Molecular-forces measurements combined with Steered Molecular Dynamic (SMD) simulations were used to investigate the mechanical response of the CD2 C58 and hemophilic C-cadherin bonds. The CD2-CD58 adhesive complex, important for the adaptive immune response, contains several salt-bridges in the adhesive interface. SMD simulations showed that these inter-protein salt bridges contribute independently to the tensile strength of the complex. Consistent with this, force measurements with the Surface Force Apparatus (SFA) demonstrated that the elimination of single salt bridges weakens the bond. The corresponding loss in adhesion energy of the CD2-CD58 complex correlates with the importance of the salt bridges observed in the simulations. These findings correlate closely with the effect of the elimination of single salt bridges observed in cell aggregation assays and binding measurements. On the other hand, the hemophilic C-cadherin interaction determines specific cell-cell adhesion during development in Xenopus laevis . Single molecule force spectroscopy was used to characterize the multiple bound states between C-cadherin ectodomains. The experiments showed two short-lived bound states associated with the two outermost ectodomains and two long-lived states associated with the full ectodomain. It is likely that the two short-lived states are involved in the specificity of the interaction since previous studies showed that the corresponding states in E-cadherin have different lifetimes. In addition, SMD simulations of the forced dissociation of the strand dieter of C-cadherin suggested a mechanism for the specificity of cadherin interactions.

  19. The Disulfide Bonds within BST-2 Enhance Tensile Strength during Viral Tethering.

    PubMed

    Du Pont, Kelly E; McKenzie, Aidan M; Kokhan, Oleksandr; Sumner, Isaiah; Berndsen, Christopher E

    2016-02-16

    Human BST-2/tetherin is a host factor that inhibits the release of enveloped viruses, including HIV-1, HIV-2, and SIV, from the cell surface by tethering viruses to the host cell membrane. BST-2 has an α-helical ectodomain that forms disulfide-linked dimers between two monomers forming a coiled coil. The ectodomain contains three cysteine residues that can participate in disulfide bond formation and are critical for viral tethering. The role of the disulfides in viral tethering is unknown but proposed to be for maintaining the dimer. We explored the role of the disulfides in the structure of BST-2 using experimental, biophysical methods. To understand the role of the disulfides in viral tethering, we used a new approach in viral tethering, steered molecular dynamics. We find that the disulfides coordinate the unfolding of the BST-2 monomers, which adds tensile strength to the coiled coil. Structural differences between oxidized and reduced BST-2 are apparent during unfolding, showing the monomers slide past each other in the absence of the disulfides. We found no evidence to support dissociation of the dimer upon reduction of the disulfide bonds. Moreover, the structure of BST-2 in the absence of the disulfides is similar to that of the oxidized form of BST-2, supporting previous X-ray crystallography and cellular work that showed the disulfides are not required for expression of BST-2. These data provide new insights into viral tethering by using novel techniques in the analysis of BST-2 to give amino acid level insight into functions of BST-2. PMID:26789136

  20. A Unified Model for Predicting the Open Hole Tensile and Compressive Strengths of Composite Laminates for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Paul; Pineda, Evan J.; Heinrich, Christian; Waas, Anthony M.

    2013-01-01

    The open hole tensile and compressive strengths are important design parameters in qualifying fiber reinforced laminates for a wide variety of structural applications in the aerospace industry. In this paper, we present a unified model that can be used for predicting both these strengths (tensile and compressive) using the same set of coupon level, material property data. As a prelude to the unified computational model that follows, simplified approaches, referred to as "zeroth order", "first order", etc. with increasing levels of fidelity are first presented. The results and methods presented are practical and validated against experimental data. They serve as an introductory step in establishing a virtual building block, bottom-up approach to designing future airframe structures with composite materials. The results are useful for aerospace design engineers, particularly those that deal with airframe design.

  1. Evaluation of tensile strength and surface topography of orthodontic wires after infection control procedures: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Brindha, M.; Kumaran, N. Kurunji; Rajasigamani, K.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate, the influence of four types of sterilization/disinfection procedures (autoclave, hot air oven, glutaraldehyde, and ultraviolet [UV] light) on the tensile strength and surface topography of three orthodontic wires (stainless steel (SS), titanium - molybdenum alloy [TMA], and cobalt chromium (CoCr)). Materials and Methods: Sample comprised of three types of 8 inches straight length segments of orthodontic wires. They were divided into three groups according to wire composition comprising of 50 samples each. Totally 50 samples of each group were then equally divided into five subgroups according to sterilization method. After sterilization and disinfection of the experimental group, surface topography was examined with scanning electron microscope (SEM) and tensile strength was tested using universal testing machine. Result: The results of this study show that the mean ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of SS wire after four sterilization procedures were similar to the control group (1845.815 ± 142.29 MPa). The mean UTS of TMA wire increases after four sterilization procedures when compared with the control group (874.107 ± 275.939 MPa). The mean UTS of CoCr wire remains same after UV light disinfection, but increases after other three sterilization procedures when compared with the control group (1449.759 ± 156.586 MPa). SEM photographs of the present study shows gross increase in pitting roughness of the surface topography of all the three types of wires after four types of sterilization. Conclusion: Orthodontists who want to offer maximum safety for their patients can sterilize orthodontic wires before placement, as it does not deteriorate the tensile strength and surface roughness of the alloys. PMID:25210383

  2. Factors which influence tensile strength of a SiC/Ti-24Al-11Nb (at. pct) composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, P. K.; Draper, S. L.; Nathal, M. V.; Eldridge, J. I.

    1990-01-01

    Tensile and fiber pullout tests were used in conjunction with SEM to investigate structural and processing effects on SiC fiber, a neat Ti-24Al-11Nb matrix alloy, and a composite fabricated from the two. The effects of oxygen content, fiber spacing, fiber volume fraction, fiber-matrix reaction thickness, Teflon content, and matrix powder size, appear to be smaller than the effects of variability in fiber strength. Fiber spacing did not influence radial crack formation, interfacial bond shear strength, or stress-strain behavior in the composite. The temperature dependence of composite properties was investigated over the 23-815 C range.

  3. EFFECT OF CONVENTIONAL AND EXPERIMENTAL GINGIVAL RETRACTION SOLUTIONS ON THE TENSILE STRENGTH AND INHIBITION OF POLYMERIZATION OF FOUR TYPES OF IMPRESSION MATERIALS

    PubMed Central

    Sábio, Sérgio; Franciscone, Paulo Afonso; Mondelli, José

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, two types of tests (tensile strength test and polymerization inhibition test) were performed to evaluate the physical and chemical properties of four impression materials [a polysulfide (Permlastic), a polyether (Impregum), a condensation silicone (Xantopren) and a polyvinylsiloxane (Aquasil)] when polymerized in contact with of one conventional (Hemostop) and two experimental (Vislin and Afrin) gingival retraction solutions. For the tensile strength test, the impression materials were mixed and packed into a steel plate with perforations that had residues of the gingival retraction solutions. After polymerization, the specimens were tested in tensile strength in a universal testing machine. For the polymerization inhibition test, specimens were obtained after taking impressions from a matrix with perforations that contained 1 drop of the gingival retraction solutions. Two independent examiners decided on whether or not impression material remnants remained unpolymerized, indicating interference of the chemical solutions. Based on the analysis of the results of both tests, the following conclusions were reached: 1. The tensile strength of the polysulfide decreased after contact with Hemostop and Afrin. 2. None of the chemical solutions inhibited the polymerization of the polysulfide; 3. The polyether presented lower tensile strength after polymerization in contact with the three gingival retraction agents; 4. The polyether had its polymerization inhibited only by Hemostop; 5. None of the chemical solutions affected the tensile strength of the condensation silicone; 6. Only Hemostop inhibited the polymerization of the condensation silicone; 7. The polyvinylsiloxane specimens polymerized in contact with Hemostop had significantly lower tensile strength; 8. Neither of the chemical solutions (Afrin and Vislin) affected the tensile strength of the polyvinylsiloxane and the condensation silicone; 9. Results of the tensile strength and polymerization inhibition tests suggest that Vislin can be used as substance of gingival retraction without affecting the tested properties of four impression materials. PMID:19089261

  4. Modelling and Simulation of Tensile Fracture in High Velocity Compacted Metal Powder

    SciTech Connect

    Jonsen, P.; Haeggblad, H.-A.

    2007-05-17

    In cold uniaxial powder compaction, powder is formed into a desired shape with rigid tools and a die. After pressing, but before sintering, the compacted powder is called green body. A critical property in the metal powder pressing process is the mechanical properties of the green body. Beyond a green body free from defects, desired properties are high strength and uniform density. High velocity compaction (HVC) using a hydraulic operated hammer is a production method to form powder utilizing a shock wave. Pre-alloyed water atomised iron powder has been HVC-formed into circular discs with high densities. The diametral compression test also called the Brazilian disc test is an established method to measure tensile strength in low strength material like e.g. rock, concrete, polymers and ceramics. During the test a thin disc is compressed across the diameter to failure. The compression induces a tensile stress perpendicular to the compressed diameter. In this study the test have been used to study crack initiation and the tensile fracture process of HVC-formed metal powder discs with a relative density of 99%. A fictitious crack model controlled by a stress versus crack-width relationship is utilized to model green body cracking. Tensile strength is used as a failure condition and limits the stress in the fracture interface. The softening rate of the model is obtained from the corresponding rate of the dissipated energy. The deformation of the powder material is modelled with an elastic-plastic Cap model. The characteristics of the tensile fracture development of the central crack in a diametrically loaded specimen is numerically studied with a three dimensional finite element simulation. Results from the finite element simulation of the diametral compression test shows that it is possible to simulate fracturing of HVC-formed powder. Results from the simulation agree reasonably with experiments.

  5. Effects of Cyclic Tensile Forces on the Strength of Fibrous Tissue Examined in an in Vivo Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takakuda, Kazuo; Koyama, Yoshihisa; Matsumoto, Hiroko N.; Katakura, Hiroshi; Muneta, Takeshi

    Adaptive remodeling of soft fibrous tissues under cyclic tensile forces was investigated. Patellar tendons of rat’s knee were harvested and mounted on apparatuses for mechanical stimuli. They were transplanted into the subcutaneous tissues and experienced mechanical stimuli of cyclic tensile forces (1N, 1Hz). Then the tendons were retrieved and their mechanical properties were evaluated with a tensile tester. Four experimental groups were examined in which loading conditions were (1) three times a day (2700 cycles a day) throughout 4 weeks, (2) twice a week (1800 cycles a week) throughout 4 weeks, (3) load-free throughout 4 weeks, or (4) control. Comparing to control group, the tendons in load-free conditions were very weak and shown statistically significant decrease in maximum load, strength and tangent modulus. Contrarily, the tendons in frequent loadings (three times a day) nearly maintained their mechanical properties. Thus the present study clearly elucidated the fact that cyclic tensile forces have significant effects on the mechanical properties of transplanted fibrous tissues.

  6. An investigation into the effects of metal primer and surface topography on the tensile bond strength between cobalt chromium alloy and composite resin.

    PubMed

    Newsum, David; Juszczyk, Andrzej; Clark, Robert K F; Radford, David R

    2011-03-01

    This study examined the influence of surface preparation and metal primer on the tensile bond strength between cobalt chromium alloy and composite resin. The bond strength between 168 cobalt chromium alloy dumb-bells with one of three test surfaces (beaded, machined or sandblasted) to composite resin were tested. Half of each group were treated with metal primer. The weakest bond strength was produced by the unprimed machined surface, many specimens failing before testing. The metal primer increased the bond strengths of all groups tested. The greatest bond strengths were achieved with the primed beaded and sandblasted surfaces. Within the limits of the study it has been shown that the surface preparation of the cobalt-chromium alloy did influence tensile bond strengths with composite resin and Metal Primer II increased the tensile bond strengths for all groups tested. The sandblasted surface treated with Metal Primer II is recommended for the bonding of composite resin to cobalt chromium alloy. PMID:21528688

  7. The effects of orientation and thickness on the notch-tensile creep strength of single crystals of a nickel-base superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, K.; Sakaki, T.; Horie, T.; Kuramoto, K.; Miyagawa, O.

    1985-08-01

    The effects of crystallographic orientation and thickness of specimen on the notch-tensile creep strength of single crystals of a nickel-base superalloy UDIMET∗520 has been examined at 700°, 850°, and 900 °C. It was found that the notch-tensile creep strength of thin specimens depended on the crystallographic orientations not only in the tensile direction but also in the normal direction of the specimens, and that the creep strength was superior in the thin specimens with the [011] tensile and the [011] normal orientations or the [001] tensile and the [110] normal orientations. The thick-notched specimens exhibited great creep resistance regardless of the crystallographic orientations.

  8. Effects of different disinfection and sterilization methods on tensile strength of materials used for single-use devices.

    PubMed

    Brown, Stanley A; Merritt, Katharine; Woods, Terry O; McNamee, Scott G; Hitchins, Victoria M

    2002-01-01

    Driven by economic and time constraints, some medical centers and third parties are resterilizing single-use devices (SUDs) for reuse. The steam autoclave is quick, but most plastics used in SUDs cannot survive the temperature. Thus, a number of new methods of cleaning, disinfecting, and sterilizing these complex devices are being introduced on the market. The present study investigated the effects of a range of methods on the tensile strength of latex rubber, silicone elastomer, 2 different formulations of polyurethane, nylon, and high-density polyethylene (HDPE) specimens. The methods used were sodium hypochlorite bleach (Clorox), peracetic acid + hydrogen peroxide (Steris), formaldehyde gas (Chemiclave), low-temperature peracetic acid and gas plasma (Plazlyte), and low-temperature hydrogen peroxide gas plasma (Sterrad). The results showed that silicone elastomer was minimally affected, whereas the strengths of nylon, polyethylene, and latex were reduced by some of the methods. Depending on the formulation, the strength of polyurethane either increased or decreased. The data demonstrated that disinfection and sterilization can affect the tensile strength of certain materials used in medical devices. PMID:11831098

  9. A scaffold-enhanced light-activated surgical adhesive technique: surface selection for enhanced tensile strength in wound repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soller, Eric C.; Hoffman, Grant T.; Heintzelman, Douglas L.; Duffy, Mark T.; Bloom, Jeffrey N.; McNally-Heintzelman, Karen M.

    2004-07-01

    An ex vivo study was conducted to determine the effect of the irregularity of the scaffold surface on the tensile strength of repairs formed using our Scaffold-Enhanced Biological Adhesive (SEBA). Two different scaffold materials were investigated: (i) a synthetic biodegradable material fabricated from poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid); and (ii) a biological material, small intestinal submucosa, manufactured by Cook BioTech. The scaffolds were doped with protein solder composed of 50%(w/v) bovine serum albumin solder and 0.5mg/ml indocyanine green dye mixed in deionized water, and activated with an 808-nm diode laser. The tensile strength of repairs performed on bovine thoracic aorta, liver, spleen, small intestine and lung, using the smooth and irregular surfaces of the above scaffold-enhanced materials were measured and the time-to-failure was recorded. The tensile strength of repairs formed using the irregular surfaces of the scaffolds were consistently higher than those formed using the smooth surfaces of the scaffolds. The largest difference was observed on repairs formed on the aorta and small intestine, where the repairs were, on average, 50% stronger using the irregular versus the smooth scaffold surfaces. In addition, the time-to-failure of repairs formed using the irregular surfaces of the scaffolds were between 50% and 100% longer than that achieved using the smooth surfaces of the scaffolds. It has previously been shown that distributing or dispersing the adhesive forces over the increased surface area of the scaffold, either smooth or irregular, produces stronger repairs than albumin solder alone. The increase in the absolute strength and longevity of repairs seen in this new study when the irregular surfaces of the scaffolds are used is thought to be due to the distribution of forces between the many independent micro-adhesions provided by the irregular surfaces.

  10. Influence of different brazing and welding methods on tensile strength and microhardness of orthodontic stainless steel wire.

    PubMed

    Bock, Jens Johannes; Fraenzel, Wolfgang; Bailly, Jacqueline; Gernhardt, Christian Ralf; Fuhrmann, Robert Andreas Werner

    2008-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the mechanical strength and microhardness of joints made by conventional brazing and tungsten inert gas (TIG) and laser welding. A standardized end-to-end joint configuration of the orthodontic wire material in spring hard quality was used. The joints were made using five different methods: brazing (soldering > 450 degrees C) with universal silver solder, two TIG, and two laser welders. Laser parameters and welding conditions were used according to the manufacturers' guidance. The tensile strengths were measured with a universal testing machine (Zwick 005). The microhardness measurements were carried out with a hardness tester (Zwick 3202). Data were analysed using one-way analysis of variance and Bonferroni's post hoc correction (P < 0.05). In all cases, brazing joints ruptured at low levels of tensile strength (198 +/- 146 MPa). Significant differences (P < 0.001) between brazing and TIG or laser welding were found. The highest means were observed for TIG welding (699-754 MPa). Laser welding showed a significantly lower mean tensile strength (369-520 MPa) compared with TIG welding. Significant differences (P < 0.001) were found between the original orthodontic wire and the mean microhardness at the centre of the welded area. The mean microhardness differed significantly between brazing (1.99 GPa), TIG (2.22-2.39 GPa) and laser welding (2.21-2.68 GPa). For orthodontic purposes, laser and TIG welding are solder-free alternatives to joining metal. TIG welding with a lower investment cost is comparable with laser welding. However, while expensive, the laser technique is a sophisticated and simple method. PMID:18617503

  11. Study of austenitic stainless steel welded with low alloy steel filler metal. [tensile and impact strength tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, F. A.; Dyke, R. A., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The tensile and impact strength properties of 316L stainless steel plate welded with low alloy steel filler metal were determined. Tests were conducted at room temperature and -100 F on standard test specimens machined from as-welded panels of various chemical compositions. No significant differences were found as the result of variations in percentage chemical composition on the impact and tensile test results. The weldments containing lower chromium and nickel as the result of dilution of parent metal from the use of the low alloy steel filler metal corroded more severely in a marine environment. The use of a protective finish, i.e., a nitrile-based paint containing aluminum powder, prevented the corrosive attack.

  12. Effects of polymerization and briquetting parameters on the tensile strength of briquettes formed from coal coke and aniline-formaldehyde resin

    SciTech Connect

    Demirbas, A.; Simsek, T.

    2006-10-15

    In this work, the utilization of aniline (C{sub 6}H{sub 7}N) formaldehyde (HCHO) resins as a binding agent of coke briquetting was investigated. Aniline (AN) formaldehyde (F) resins are a family of thermoplastics synthesized by condensing AN and F in an acid solution exhibiting high dielectric strength. The tensile strength sharply increases as the ratio of F to AN from 0.5 to 1.6, and it reaches the highest values between 1.6 and 2.2 F/AN ratio; it then slightly decreases. The highest tensile strength of F-AN resin-coke briquette (23.66 MN/m{sup 2}) was obtained from the run with 1.5 of F/AN ratio by using (NH4){sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 8} catalyst at 310 K briquetting temperature. The tensile strength of F-AN resin-coke briquette slightly decreased with increasing the catalyst percent to 0.10%, and then it sharply decreased to zero with increasing the catalyst percent to 0.2%. The effect of pH on the tensile strength is irregular. As the pH of the mixture increases from 9.0 to 9.2, the tensile strength shows a sharp increase, and the curve reaches a plateau value between pH 9.3 and 9.9; then the tensile strength shows a slight increase after pH = 9.9.

  13. Ultimate Tensile Strength as a Function of Test Rate for Various Ceramic Matrix Composites at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Bansal, Narottam P.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2002-01-01

    Ultimate tensile strength of five different continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic composites, including SiC/BSAS (2D 2 types), SiC/MAS-5 (2D), SiC/SiC (2D enhanced), and C/SiC(2D) was determined as a function of test rate at I 100 to 1200 'C in air. All five composite materials exhibited a significant dependency of ultimate strength on test rate such that the ultimate strength decreased with decreasing test rate, similar to the behavior observed in many advanced monolithic ceramics at elevated temperatures. The application of the preloading technique as well as the prediction of life from one loading configuration (constant stress rate) to another (constant stress loading) for SiC/BSAS suggested that the overall macroscopic failure mechanism of the composites would be the one governed by a power-law type of damage evolution/accumulation, analogous to slow crack growth commonly observed in advanced monolithic ceramics.

  14. Influence of Specimen Preparation and Specimen Size on Composite Transverse Tensile Strength and Scatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OBrien, T. Kevin; Chawan, Arun D.; DeMarco, Kevin; Paris, Isabelle

    2001-01-01

    The influence of specimen polishing, configuration, and size on the transverse tension strength of two glass-epoxy materials, and one carbon-epoxy material, loaded in three and four point bending was evaluated. Polishing machined edges, arid/or tension side failure surfaces, was detrimental to specimen strength characterization instead of yielding a higher, more accurate, strength as a result of removing inherent manufacture and handling flaws. Transverse tension strength was typically lower for longer span lengths due to the classical weakest link effect. However, strength was less sensitive to volume changes achieved by increasing specimen width. The Weibull scaling law typically over-predicted changes in transverse tension strengths in three point bend tests and under-predicted changes in transverse tension strengths in four point bend tests. Furthermore, the Weibull slope varied with specimen configuration, volume, and sample size. Hence, this scaling law was not adequate for predicting transverse tension strength of heterogeneous, fiber-reinforced, polymer matrix composites.

  15. Relevance of impacter shape to nonvisible damage and residual tensile strength of a thick graphite/epoxy laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poe, Clarence C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A study was made to determine the relevance of impacter shape to nonvisible damage and tensile residual strength of a 36 mm thick graphite/epoxy motor case. The shapes of the impacters were as follows: 12.7 mm and 25.4 mm diameter hemispheres, a sharp corner, and a 6.3 mm diameter bolt-like rod. The investigation revealed that damage initiated when the contact pressure exceeded a critical level. However, the damage was not visible on the surface until an even higher pressure was exceeded. The impact energy to initiate damage or cause visible damage on the surface increased approximately with impacter diameter to the third power. The reduction in strength for nonvisible damage increased with increasing diameter, 9 and 30 percent for the 12.7 mm and 25.4 mm diameter hemispheres, respectively. The corner impacter made visible damage on the surface for even the smallest impact energy. The rod impacter acted like a punch and sliced through the composite. Even so, the critical level of pressure to initiate damage was the same for the rod and hemispherical impacters. Factors of safety for nonvisible damage increased with increasing kinetic energy of impact. The effects of impacter shape on impact force, damage size, damage visibility, and residual tensile strength were predicted quite well assuming Hertzian contact and using maximum stress criteria and a surface crack analysis.

  16. Experimental assessments of notch ductility and tensile strength of stainless steel weldments after 120/sup 0/C neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hawthorne, J.R.; Menke, B.H.; Awadalla, N.G.; O'Kula, K.R.

    1986-01-01

    The Charpy-V (C/sub v/) properties of AISI 300 series stainless steel plate, weld, and weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) materials from commercial production weldments in 406-mm-diameter pipe (12.7-mm wall) were investigated in unirradiated and irradiated conditions. Weld and HAZ tensile properties were also assessed in the two conditions. The plates and weld filler wires represent different steel melts; the welds were produced using the multipass MIG process. Weldment properties in two test orientations were evaluated. Specimens were irradiated in the UBR reactor to 1 x 10/sup 20/ n/cm/sup 2/, E >0.1 MeV in a controlled temperature assembly. Specimen tests were performed at 25/sup 0/C and 125/sup 0/C. The radiation-induced reductions in C/sub v/ energy absorption at 25/sup 0/C were about 42 percent for the weld and HAZ materials evaluated. A trend of energy increase with temperature was observed. The concomitant elevation in yield strength was about 53%. In contrast, the increase in tensile strength was only 16%. The postirradiation yield strength of the axial test orientation in the pipe was less than that of the circumferential test orientation. Results for the HAZ indicate that this component may be the weakest link in the weldment from a fracture resistant viewpoint.

  17. Diametrical diseases reflect evolutionary-genetic tradeoffs

    PubMed Central

    Crespi, Bernard J.; Go, Matthew C.

    2015-01-01

    Tradeoffs centrally mediate the expression of human adaptations. We propose that tradeoffs also influence the prevalence and forms of human maladaptation manifest in disease. By this logic, increased risk for one set of diseases commonly engenders decreased risk for another, diametric, set of diseases. We describe evidence for such diametric sets of diseases from epidemiological, genetic and molecular studies in four clinical domains: (i) psychiatry (autism vs psychotic-affective conditions), (ii) rheumatology (osteoarthritis vs osteoporosis), (iii) oncology and neurology (cancer vs neurodegenerative disorders) and (iv) immunology (autoimmunity vs infectious disease). Diametric disorders are important to recognize because genotypes or environmental factors that increase risk for one set of disorders protect from opposite disorders, thereby providing novel and direct insights into disease causes, prevention and therapy. Ascertaining the mechanisms that underlie disease-related tradeoffs should also indicate means of circumventing or alleviating them, and thus reducing the incidence and impacts of human disease in a more general way. PMID:26354001

  18. A Comparative Study of the Shear and Tensile Bond Strength using three types of Direct Bonding Adhesives on Stainless Steel Brackets - An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Sunilkumar, P; Patil, Chandrashekhara; H, Baswaraj; Putturaj, KT; Sangolgi, Vijaykumar C; Jayasudha, K

    2013-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to compare the shear and tensile bond strength of three adhesive systems with increasing concentrations of filler for bonding brackets. Materials & Methods: The study was carried out on 120 extracted human premolars; randomly divided into six groups, three groups for shear bond strength & three for tensile bond strength, each subgroup consisting of 20 teeth; using light cured adhesive systems: Group 1: FORTIFY Unfilled, (unfilled penetrating resin) Group 2: ALITEF Low Filled (filler load 58% by weight) Group 3: PYRAMID Highly Filled (filler load greater than 80% by weight) with metal brackets (TP 256-650. TP orthodontic inc. Po.box 73,La Porte 46350,USA). Results: The findings showed that in vitro tensile bond strength and shear bond strength of PYRAMID [9.88/11.46 MPa resp.] is significantly greater than ALITEFLO[5.34/9.50 MPa resp.] and FORTIFY [2.65/5.39 MPa resp.]. Conclusion: Using the same bracket and force mode but different adhesive filler concentrations revealed increased shear and tensile bond strength with increased filler concentration. How to cite this article: Kumar PS, Patil C, Hullal B, Putturaj KT, Sangolgi VC, Jayasudha K. A Comparative Study of the Shear and Tensile Bond Strength using three types of Direct Bonding Adhesives on Stainless Steel Brackets - An In Vitro Study. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(4):26-29. PMID:24155616

  19. Tensile Strength and Microstructure of Al2O3-ZrO2 Hypo-Eutectic Fibers Studied

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, Serene C.; Sayir, Ali

    2001-01-01

    Oxide eutectics offer high-temperature strength retention and creep resistance in oxidizing environments. Al2O3-ZrO2 eutectic strengths have been studied since the 1970's. Directionally solidified oxide eutectics exhibit improved resistance to slow crack growth and excellent strength retention at high temperatures up to 1400 C. Materials studied typically contain Y2O3 to metastably retain the high-temperature cubic and tetragonal polymorphs at room temperature. Al2O3-ZrO2 is of fundamental interest for creep studies because it combines a creep-resistant material, Al2O3, with a very low creep resistance material, ZrO2. Results on mechanical properties and microstructures of these materials will be used to define compositions for creep testing in future work. Substantial variations from the eutectic alumina to zirconia ratio can be tolerated without a loss in room-temperature strength. The effect of increasing Y2O3 addition on the room-temperature tensile strength of an Al2O3-ZrO2 material containing excess Al2O3 was examined at the NASA Glenn Research Center, where the materials were grown using Glenn's world-class laser growth facilities.

  20. AEREX 350 alloy: A 220 ksi minimum tensile strength fastener alloy for service up to 1350{degree}F

    SciTech Connect

    Buzolits, S.R.; Lawler, M.J.; Erickson, G.L.; Maloney, J.L.

    1995-12-31

    AEREX{trademark} 350 Alloy is a new high strength, high temperature, corrosion resistant fastener material which has been developed to service the more demanding requirements typical of newer gas turbine engines. It exhibits the highest creep- and stress-rupture resistance known for any fastener material between 620 and 760 C (1,150 and 1,400 F). Furthermore, its coefficient of thermal expansion is equivalent to conventional nickel base superalloys, such as Waspaloy and Udimet 720. These characteristics combined with its excellent tensile and impact strengths, thermal stability and resistance to stress relaxation suggest that AEREX 350 Alloy is an excellent candidate for high temperature fastener applications, such as those existing in aircraft and land-based gas turbine engines.

  1. Development of Cold-Rolled Dual-Phase Steels with Tensile Strength Above 1000 MPa and Good Bendability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, Gejza; Sinaiová, Iveta; Hvizdoš, Pavol; Juhar, L'uboš

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents the most important results of the study oriented on development of low-silicon (<0.03Si), precipitation-strengthened, fine-grained, cold-rolled dual-phase (DP) steels with tensile strength greater than 1000 MPa, primarily intended for the automotive industry. For this purpose, extensive systematic investigations were conducted with the aim to optimize the composition/processing conditions with regard to the microstructural effects on tensile properties and bendability of DP steels. Within this study, influence of the addition of Mn, Cr, Mo and/or both Mo and Ti on the microstructure and tensile properties of eight steels molded in the form of ~20 kg ingots processed by controlled rolling has been investigated. The effect of simulated coiling temperature on hot-rolled steels followed by cold rolling and intercritical annealing at temperatures 1023 K and 1073 K (750 °C and 800 °C) as well as the interaction between ferrite recrystallization and austenite formation were examined. Investigation of the effect of intercritical annealing on the structure-property relationships was carried out on steels in both the hot-rolled and cold-rolled states. It was found that in spite of strength above 1000 MPa, good bendability (steel strip may have been bent to 180 deg at radius of 0.5 mm) can be achieved in the cold-rolled intercritically annealed steel with nominal composition 0.15-C-1.2Mn-0.02Si-0.2Mo-0.1Ti by more or less homogeneous distribution of fine Ti precipitates (<5 nm) within fine ferrite grains (<2 μm) and about 35 pct martensite volume fraction in the microstructure of DP steel.

  2. Waiting Time for Coronal Preparation and the Influence of Different Cements on Tensile Strength of Metal Posts

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Ilione Kruschewsky Costa Sousa; Arsati, Ynara Bosco de Oliveira Lima; Basting, Roberta Tarkany; França, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the effect of post-cementation waiting time for core preparation of cemented cast posts and cores had on retention in the root canal, using two different luting materials. Sixty extracted human canines were sectioned 16 mm from the root apex. After cast nickel-chromium metal posts and cores were fabricated and luted with zinc phosphate (ZP) cement or resin cement (RC), the specimens were divided into 3 groups (n = 10) according to the waiting time for core preparation: no preparation (control), 15 minutes, or 1 week after the core cementation. At the appropriate time, the specimens were subjected to a tensile load test (0.5 mm/min) until failure. Two-way ANOVA (time versus cement) and the Tukey tests (P < 0.05) showed significantly higher (P < 0.05) tensile strength values for the ZP cement groups than for the RC groups. Core preparation and post-cementation waiting time for core recontouring did not influence the retention strength. ZP was the best material for intraradicular metal post cementation. PMID:22291705

  3. Measurement of ultimate tensile strength and Young modulus in LYSO scintillating crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalise, Lorenzo; Rinaldi, Daniele; Davì, Fabrizio; Paone, Nicola

    2011-10-01

    Scintillating crystals are employed in high energy physics, in medical imaging, diagnostic and security. Two mechanical properties of lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate cerium-doped Lu 2(1- x) Y 2 xSiO 5:Ce with x=0.1 (LYSO) crystals have been measured: the ultimate tensile stress ( σUTS) and the Young elastic modulus ( E). Measurements are made by means of a 4-points loading device and the experimental results account for an elastic-brittle stress-strain relation, which depends heavily on the specimen preparation and the material defects. σUTS along the [0 1 0] tensile direction ranges within 68.14 and 115.61 MPa, which, in the lowest case, is more than twice with respect to those measured for PbWO 4 (PWO), exhibiting a marked difference between the annealed and the not-annealed samples. The mean elastic modulus ( E), along the same direction, is E=1.80×10 11 (±2.15×10 10) N/m 2, with lower dispersion respect to UTS data. This type of analysis and study can be included into quality control procedures of crystals, based on samples taken out of production; such procedures can be established for industrial processing of crystals aimed to the high energy physics (calorimeters) and medical imaging (PET, etc.) applications.

  4. Effect of laser welding on the titanium composite tensile bond strength.

    PubMed

    Galo, Rodrigo; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria; Rodrigues, Renata Cristina Silveira; Pagnano, Valéria de Oliveira; de Mattos, Maria da Glória Chiarello

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the shear bond strength between commercially pure titanium, with and without laser welding, after airbone-particle abrasion (Al(2)O(3)) and 2 indirect composites. Sixty-four specimens were cast and divided into 2 groups with and without laser welding. Each group was divided in 4 subgroups, related to Al(2)O(3) grain size: A - 250 microm; B - 180 microm; C- 110 microm; and D - 50 microm. Composite rings were formed around the rods and light polymerized using UniXS unit. Specimens were invested and their shear bond strength at failure was measured with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 2.0 mm/min. Statistical analysis was carried out with ANOVA and Tukey's test (alpha=0.05). The highest bond strength means were recorded in 250 microm group without laser welding. The lowest shear bond strength means were recorded in 50 microm group with laser welding. Statistically significant differences (p<0.05) were found between all groups. In conclusion, airborne particle abrasion yielded significantly lower bond strength as the Al(2)O(3) particle size decreased. Shear bond strength decreased in the laser welded specimens. PMID:20126909

  5. Effect of varying chromophores used in light-activated protein solders on tensile strength and thermal damage profile of repairs.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Grant T; Byrd, Brian D; Soller, Eric C; Heintzelman, Douglas L; McNally-Heintzelman, Karen M

    2003-01-01

    Clinical adoption of laser tissue welding (LTW) techniques has been beleaguered by problems associated with thermal damage of tissue and insufficient strength of the resulting tissue bond. The magnitude of these problems has been significantly reduced with the incorporation of indocyanine green (ICG)-doped protein solders into the LTW procedure to form a new technique known as laser tissue soldering (LTS). With the addition of ICG, a secondary concern has arisen relating to the potential harmful effects of the degradation products of the chromophore upon thermal denaturation of the protein solder with a laser. In this study, two different food colorings were investigated, including blue #1 and green consisting of yellow #5 and blue #1, as alternative chromophores for use in LTS techniques. Food coloring has been found to have a suitable stability and safety profile for enteral use when heated to temperatures above 200 degrees C; thus, it is a promising candidate chromophore for LTS which typically requires temperatures between 50 degrees C and 100 degrees C. Experimental investigations were conducted to test the tensile strength of ex vivo repairs formed using solders doped with these alternative chromophores in a bovine model. Two commonly used chromophores, ICG and methylene blue (MB), were investigated as a reference. In addition, the temperature rise, depth of thermal coagulation in the protein solder, and the extent of thermal damage in the surrounding tissue were measured. Temperature rise at the solder/tissue interface, and consequently the degree of solder coagulation and collateral tissue thermal damage, was directly related to the penetration depth of laser light in the protein solder. Variation of the chromophore concentration such that the laser light penetrated to a depth approximately equal to half the thickness of the solder resulted in uniform results between each group of chromophores investigated. Optimal tensile strength of repairs was achieved by optimizing laser and solder parameters to obtain a temperature of approximately 65 degrees C at the solder/tissue interface. The two alternative chromophores tested in this study show considerable promise for application in LTS techniques, with equivalent tensile strength to solders doped with ICG or MB, and the potential advantage of eliminating the risks associated with harmful byproducts. PMID:12724861

  6. Müller glia provide essential tensile strength to the developing retina.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Ryan B; Randlett, Owen; Oswald, Julia; Yoshimatsu, Takeshi; Franze, Kristian; Harris, William A

    2015-09-28

    To investigate the cellular basis of tissue integrity in a vertebrate central nervous system (CNS) tissue, we eliminated Müller glial cells (MG) from the zebrafish retina. For well over a century, glial cells have been ascribed a mechanical role in the support of neural tissues, yet this idea has not been specifically tested in vivo. We report here that retinas devoid of MG rip apart, a defect known as retinoschisis. Using atomic force microscopy, we show that retinas without MG have decreased resistance to tensile stress and are softer than controls. Laser ablation of MG processes showed that these cells are under tension in the tissue. Thus, we propose that MG act like springs that hold the neural retina together, finally confirming an active mechanical role of glial cells in the CNS. PMID:26416961

  7. Müller glia provide essential tensile strength to the developing retina

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Ryan B.; Randlett, Owen; Oswald, Julia; Yoshimatsu, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the cellular basis of tissue integrity in a vertebrate central nervous system (CNS) tissue, we eliminated Müller glial cells (MG) from the zebrafish retina. For well over a century, glial cells have been ascribed a mechanical role in the support of neural tissues, yet this idea has not been specifically tested in vivo. We report here that retinas devoid of MG rip apart, a defect known as retinoschisis. Using atomic force microscopy, we show that retinas without MG have decreased resistance to tensile stress and are softer than controls. Laser ablation of MG processes showed that these cells are under tension in the tissue. Thus, we propose that MG act like springs that hold the neural retina together, finally confirming an active mechanical role of glial cells in the CNS. PMID:26416961

  8. Effects on stress rupture life and tensile strength of tin additions to Inconel 718

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreshfield, R. L.; Johnson, W.

    1982-01-01

    Because Inconel 718 represents a major use of columbium and a large potential source of columbium for aerospace alloys could be that of columbium derived from tin slags, the effects of tin additions to Inconel 718 at levels which might be typical of or exceed those anticipated if tin slag derived columbium were used as a melting stock were investigated. Tin was added to 15 pound Inconel 718 heats at levels varying from none added to approximately 10,000 ppm (1 wt%). Limited 1200 F stress rupture testing was performed at stresses from 68,000 to 115,000 psi and a few tensile tests were performed at room temperature, 800 and 1200 F. Additions of tin in excess of 800 ppm were detrimental to ductility and stress rupture life.

  9. Relevance of impacter shape to nonvisible damage and residual tensile strength of a thick graphite/epoxy laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poe, C. C., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    A study was made to determine the relevance of impacter shape to nonvisible damage and tensile residual strength of a 36 mm (1.4 in.) thick graphite/epoxy motor case. The shapes of the impacters were as follows: 12.7 mm (0.5 in.) and 25.4 mm (1.0 in.) diameter hemispheres, a sharp corner, and a 6.3 mm (0.25 in.) diameter bolt-like rod. The investigation revealed that damage initiated when the contact pressure exceeded a critical level. However, the damage was not visible on the surface until an even higher pressure was exceeded. The damage on the surface consisted of a crater shaped like the impacter, and the damage below the surface consisted of broken fibers. The impact energy to initiate damage or cause visible damage on the surface increased approximately with impacter diameter to the third power. The reduction in strength for nonvisible damage increased with increasing diameter, 9 and 30 percent for the 12.7 mm (0.5 in.) and 25.4 mm (1.0 in.) diameter hemispheres, respectively. The corner impacter made visible damage on the surface for even the smallest impact energy. The rod impacter acted like a punch and sliced through the composite. Even so, the critical level of pressure to initiate damage was the same for the rod and hemispherical impacters. Factors of safety for nonvisible damage increased with increasing kinetic energy of impact. The effects of impacter shape on impact force, damage size, damage visibility, and residual tensile strength were predicted quite well assuming Hertzian contact and using maximum stress criteria and a surface crack analysis.

  10. Alternative chromophores for use in light-activated surgical adhesives: optimization of parameters for tensile strength and thermal damage profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Grant T.; Byrd, Brian D.; Soller, Eric C.; Heintzelman, Douglas L.; McNally-Heintzelman, Karen M.

    2003-06-01

    The use of indocyanine green-doped albumin protein solders has been shown to vastly improve the anastomotic strength that can be achieved by laser tissue repair techniques, while at the same time minimizing collateral thermal tissue damage. However, the safety of the degradation products of the chromophore following laser irradiation is uncertain. Therefore, we studied the feasibility of using alternative chromophores in terms of temperature rise at the solder/tissue interface, the extent of thermal damage in the sourrounding tissue, and the tensile strength of repairs. Biodegradable polymer scaffolds of controlled porosity were fabricated with poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid), using a solvent-casting and particulate-leaching technique. The porous scaffold acted as a carrier to the traditional protein solder composition of serum albumin and an absorbing chromophore mixed in deionized water. Two commonly used chromophores, indocyanine green and methylene blue were investigated, as well as blue and green food colorings. Temperature rise at the solder surface and at the interface between the solder and tissue were monitored by an IR temperature monitoring system and a type-K thermocouple, respectively, and the extent of thermal damage in the underlying tissue was determined using light microscopy. As expected, temperature rise at the solder/tissue interface, and consequently the degree of collateral thermal tissue damage, was directly related to the penetration depth of the laser light in the protein solder. Optimal tensile strength of repairs was achieved by selecting a chromophore concentration that resulted in a temperature of 66 +/- 3°C at the solder/tissue interface.

  11. Diametric Quadrilaterals with Two Equal Sides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beauregard, Raymond A.

    2009-01-01

    If you take a circle with a horizontal diameter and mark off any two points on the circumference above the diameter, then these two points together with the end points of the diameter form the vertices of a cyclic quadrilateral with the diameter as one of the sides. We refer to the quadrilaterals in question as diametric. In this note we consider

  12. Diametric Quadrilaterals with Two Equal Sides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beauregard, Raymond A.

    2009-01-01

    If you take a circle with a horizontal diameter and mark off any two points on the circumference above the diameter, then these two points together with the end points of the diameter form the vertices of a cyclic quadrilateral with the diameter as one of the sides. We refer to the quadrilaterals in question as diametric. In this note we consider…

  13. On the Compressive and Tensile Dynamic Strength of Magnesium Aluminate Spinel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayun, Shmuel; Paris, Vitaly; Dariel, Moshe; Zaretsky, Eugene; Frage, Nahum

    2009-06-01

    Polycrystalline transparent Magnesium Aluminate Spinel (MAS) is an attractive material for a wide range of optical, electronic, structural and armor applications. Transparent MAS samples of 20-30 mm diameter and 3-5 mm thickness has been successfully fabricated by means of Field Assisted Sintering Technology. The dynamic response of MAS was investigated by plate impact experiments. The values of the Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL) and the spall strength were derived from the VISAR records of the velocities of the free sample surface or of the sample/window (PMMA) interface. The dependence of the HEL and the spall strength on the impact stress, as well as, correlation between the spall strength and the width of the loading pulse are discussed.

  14. Tensile strength of composite sheets with unidirectional stringers and crack-like damage: A brief report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poe, C. C., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The residual strength of composite sheets with bonded composite stringers loaded in tension was determined. The results are summarized. About 50 graphite/epoxy composite panels with crack-like slots were monotonically loaded in tension to failure. Both sheet layup and stringer configuration were varied. The composite panels have considerable damage tolerance. The stringers arrested cracks that ran from the crack-like slots, and the residual strengths were considerably greater than those of unstiffened composite sheets. A stress-intensity factor analysis was developed to predict the failing strains of the stiffened panels. Using the analysis, a single design curve was produced for composite sheets with bonded stringers of any configuration.

  15. Tensile strength of composite sheets with unidirectional stringers and crack-like damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poe, C. C., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The damage tolerance characteristics of metal tension panels with riveted and bonded stringers are well known. The stringers arrest unstable cracks and retard propagation of fatigue cracks. Residual strengths and fatigue lives are considerably greater than those of unstiffened or integrally stiffened sheets. The damage tolerance of composite sheets with bonded composite stringers loaded in tension was determined. Cracks in composites do not readily propagate in fatigue, at least not through fibers. Moreover, the residual strength of notched composites is sometimes even increased by fatigue loading. Therefore, the residual strength aspect of damage tolerance, and not fatigue crack propagation, was investigated. About 50 graphite/epoxy composite panels were made with two sheet layups and several stringer configurations. Crack-like slots were cut in the middle of the panels to simulate damage. The panels were instrumented and monotonically loaded in tension to failure. The tests indicate that the composite panels have considerable damage tolerance, much like metal panels. The stringers arrested cracks that ran from the crack-like slots, and the residual strengths were considerably greater than those of unstiffened composite sheets. A stress intensity factor analysis was developed to predict the failing strains of the stiffened panels. Using the analysis, a single design curve was produced for composite sheets with bonded stringers of any configuration.

  16. Evaluation of a sugar based edible adhesive utilizing a tensile strength tester

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new method to evaluate adhesives has been developed and utilized to formulate a recently patented adhesive based on sugar and citric acid. Factors affecting adhesive performance were uncovered, such as reduced strength due to improper heating time, and an optimal curing temperature of 60oC was ac...

  17. Simplified method measures changes in tensile yield strength using least number of specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, C. E.

    1967-01-01

    Simplified method determines yield strength due to heat treat, irradiation or mechanical treatment. Each specimen in a group of specimens is tested for yield stress point, subjected to heat treat or irradiation, and retested for new yield stress point which is a measure of change in material.

  18. A curved beam test specimen for determining the interlaminar tensile strength of a laminated composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiel, Clement C.; Sumich, Mark; Chappell, David P.

    1991-01-01

    A curved beam type of test specimen is evaluated for use in determining the through-the-thickness strength of laminated composites. Two variations of a curved beam specimen configuration (semicircular and elliptical) were tested to failure using static and fatigue loads. The static failure load for the semicircular specimens was found to be highly sensitive to flaw content, with the specimens falling into two distinct groups. This result supports the use of proof testing for structural validation. Static design allowables are derived based on the Weibull distribution. Fatigue data indicates no measured increase in specimen compliance prior to final fracture. All static and fatigue failures at room temperature dry conditions occurred catastrophically. The elliptical specimens demonstrated unusually high failure strengths indicating the presence of phenomena requiring further study. Results are also included for specimens exposed to a wet environment showing a matrix strength degradation due to moisture content. Further testing is underway to evaluate a fatigue methodology for matrix dominated failures based on residual static strength (wearout).

  19. A curved beam test specimen for determining the interlaminar tensile strength of a laminated composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiel, Clement C.; Sumich, Mark; Chappell, David P.

    1990-01-01

    A curved beam type of test specimen is evaluated for use in determining the through-the-thickness strength of laminated composites. Two variations of a curved beam specimen configuration (semi-circular and elliptical) were tested to failure using static and fatigue loads. The static failure load for the semi-circular specimens was found to be highly sensitive to flaw content, with the specimens falling into two distinct groups. This result supports the use of proof testing for structural validation. Static design allowables are derived based on the Weibull distribution. Fatigue data indicates no measured increase in specimen compliance prior to final fracture. All static and fatigue failures at room temperature dry conditions occurred catastrophically. The elliptical specimens demonstrated unusually high failure strengths indicating the presence of phenomena requiring further study. Results are also included for specimens exposed to a wet environment showing a matrix strength degradation due to moisture content. Further testing is under way to evaluate a fatigue methodology for matrix dominated failures based on residual static strength (wearout).

  20. [Tensile strength of various anchor systems in surgical correction of instability of the shoulder joint].

    PubMed

    Gohlke, F; Schneider, P; Siegel, K; Balzer, C

    1993-10-01

    Commercially available fixation devices used for reattachment of capsuloligamentous tissue to the glenoid rim were tested until they failed in 42 human cadaveric shoulders, and compared to the tension strength of the standard Bankart procedure and that of the intact anterior capsule. The bone quality in the glenoid was measured by quantitative computed tomography, which allowed selective quantification of cortical and cancellous quantification of cortical and cancellous bone. The mean load at failure perpendicular to the bone surface varied from 90 to 115 N and was lower than in the standard Bankart procedure (127 N). All suture anchors demonstrated similar holding strength with the exception of an absorbable wedge (P < 0.05). Due to reduced mineral content in the inferior part of the glenoid, the fixation strength of all suture anchors was significantly decreased. In more than 20% a tension load of 100 N caused the suture anchor to pull out, but in general the fixation strength was limited by the suture attachment and the quality of the soft tissues. These data together with the first clinical results of 49 cases of anterior instability operated on between 1988 and 1992 allow the conclusion to be made that this modification will provide sufficient stability for early mobilization after surgical repair. PMID:8235676

  1. Micro-tensile bond strength of different adhesive systems on sound dentin and resin-based composite: An in-vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Mallick, Rashmirekha; Sarangi, Priyanka; Mohanty, Sandhyarani; Behera, Subasish; Nanda, Soumyaranjan; Satapathy, Sukanta Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To analyze the difference in the micro-tensile bond strength of specimens made with two different adhesive systems and compare them with two homogenous substrates. Materials and Methods: Sixty permanent mandibular molars were mounted in acrylic blocks and sectioned with exposed dentin surfaces. Samples were then divided into four groups. To Group-I Adper Single Bond 2 and to Group-II Adper Self-Etch plus bonding agents were applied. For Group-I and Group-II beams consisted of resin composite in the upper half and dentin in the lower half. In Group-III beams were made of only dentin. In Group-IV beams were made of only composite. Fifteen specimens of each group were taken for the micro-tensile bond strength test. Statistical Analysis: The results are analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Critical Difference test. Results: The interface bonded with the two adhesive systems had lower micro-tensile bond strength than those of dentin and resin composite and the self-etching adhesive Adper Self-Etch plus had comparable bond strength with total-etch adhesive Adper Single Bond 2. Conclusion: The bond strength values for current adhesive systems cannot be compared to the micro-tensile bond strength of dentin and resin composite, and self-etching adhesives have comparable bond strength with total-etch adhesives. PMID:26430301

  2. Semi-analytical and Numerical Studies on the Flattened Brazilian Splitting Test Used for Measuring the Indirect Tensile Strength of Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y. G.; Wang, L. G.; Lu, Y. L.; Chen, J. R.; Zhang, J. H.

    2015-09-01

    Based on the two-dimensional elasticity theory, this study established a mechanical model under chordally opposing distributed compressive loads, in order to perfect the theoretical foundation of the flattened Brazilian splitting test used for measuring the indirect tensile strength of rocks. The stress superposition method was used to obtain the approximate analytic solutions of stress components inside the flattened Brazilian disk. These analytic solutions were then verified through a comparison with the numerical results of the finite element method (FEM). Based on the theoretical derivation, this research carried out a contrastive study on the effect of the flattened loading angles on the stress value and stress concentration degree inside the disk. The results showed that the stress concentration degree near the loading point and the ratio of compressive/tensile stress inside the disk dramatically decreased as the flattened loading angle increased, avoiding the crushing failure near-loading point of Brazilian disk specimens. However, only the tensile stress value and the tensile region were slightly reduced with the increase of the flattened loading angle. Furthermore, this study found that the optimal flattened loading angle was 20°-30°; flattened load angles that were too large or too small made it difficult to guarantee the central tensile splitting failure principle of the Brazilian splitting test. According to the Griffith strength failure criterion, the calculative formula of the indirect tensile strength of rocks was derived theoretically. This study obtained a theoretical indirect tensile strength that closely coincided with existing and experimental results. Finally, this paper simulated the fracture evolution process of rocks under different loading angles through the use of the finite element numerical software ANSYS. The modeling results showed that the Flattened Brazilian Splitting Test using the optimal loading angle could guarantee the tensile splitting failure initiated by a central crack.

  3. Ultrasonic Spot Welding of Aluminum to High-Strength Low-Alloy Steel: Microstructure, Tensile and Fatigue Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, V. K.; Bhole, S. D.; Chen, D. L.

    2014-04-01

    The structural applications of lightweight aluminum alloys inevitably involve dissimilar welding with steels and the related durability issues. This study was aimed at evaluating the microstructural change, lap shear tensile load, and fatigue resistance of dissimilar ultrasonic spot-welded joints of aluminum-to-galvanized high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steel. Two non-uniform layers were identified in between Al and HSLA steel via SEM/EDS and XRD. One was an Al-Zn eutectic layer and the other was a thin (<2 μm) layer of intermetallic compound (IMC) of Al and Fe in the nugget zone. The lap shear tensile testing gave a maximum load of 3.7 kN and the sample failed initially in between the Al-Zn eutectic film and Al-Fe IMC, and afterward from the region containing Al on both matching fracture surfaces. The fatigue test results showed a fatigue limit of about 0.5 kN (at 1 × 107 cycles). The maximum cyclic stress at which transition of the fatigue fracture from transverse through-thickness crack growth mode to the interfacial failure mode occurs increases with increasing energy input.

  4. Effect of reactive adhesives on the tensile bond strength of polyvinyl siloxane impression materials to methyl methacrylate tray material.

    PubMed

    Ona, Masahiro; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Sato, Masayuki; Igarashi, Yoshimasa; Wakabayashi, Noriyuki

    2010-05-01

    The effect of new adhesives on the bond strength of elastomeric impression materials to acrylic trays was evaluated. Two polyvinyl siloxane impression materials (Fusion and Imprinsis) with reactive adhesives and one (Examix) with a conventional adhesive were tested. Flat, double-sided plates of auto-polymerizing methyl methacrylate (10 x 10 x 2.5 mm) were prepared with one of the adhesives. Five specimens were prepared by injecting each impression material into a 2-mm gap between the two plates. Tensile tests were conducted until separation failure occurred. The mean bond strengths of Fusion (1.0 MPa) and Imprinsis (0.8 MPa) were significantly greater than that of Examix (0.2 MPa). On the contrary, one of five Fusion showed adhesive failure mode while all the Imprinsis exhibited mixed failure. The conflicting results were presumably attributed to the mean tear strength of Fusion (0.8 N/mm) being higher than that of Imprinsis (0.5 N/mm). PMID:20484844

  5. Comparison of Tensile Strength of Composite Material Elements with Drilled and Molded-in Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langella, A.; Durante, M.

    2008-11-01

    Holes are generally obtained through drilling operations; this causes a property decrease for polymer composites reinforced by fibers, brought about by damage due to fiber continuity interruption, and to delamination between the laminate layers. In this study, specimens with circular holes, both drilled and molded-in, obtained in different ways, are tested in order to investigate on whether it is possible to avoid the decrease in mechanical properties of components with holes. In particular, a number of laminates were manufactured by RIFT (Resin Infusion under Flexible Tool), a closed mold process capable of obtaining large and complex forms, impregnating, under vacuum, a dry preform placed on the rigid mold. At specific points of these laminates, molded-in holes are generated during the resin infusion phase, operating in two different ways: displacing or cutting the fibers in the dry preform. Tensile tests were carried out in order to compare the mechanical properties of elements in composite materials which have molded-in holes generated during the impregnation process, with the properties of those with holes produced after the resin cure by drill operations.

  6. Effect of the fiber-matrix interphase on the transverse tensile strength of the unidirectional composite material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, H. C.; Arocho, A. M.

    1992-01-01

    A simple one-dimensional fiber-matrix interphase model has been developed and analytical results obtained correlated well with available experimental data. It was found that by including the interphase between the fiber and matrix in the model, much better local stress results were obtained than with the model without the interphase. A more sophisticated two-dimensional micromechanical model, which included the interphase properties was also developed. Both one-dimensional and two-dimensional models were used to study the effect of the interphase properties on the local stresses at the fiber, interphase and matrix. From this study, it was found that interphase modulus and thickness have significant influence on the transverse tensile strength and mode of failure in fiber reinforced composites.

  7. A Discrete Element Model for Predicting Shear Strength and Degradation of Rock Joint by Using Compressive and Tensile Test Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazerani, T.; Yang, Z. Y.; Zhao, J.

    2012-09-01

    A discrete element model is proposed to examine rock strength and failure. The model is implemented by UDEC, which is developed for this purpose. The material is represented as a collection of irregular-sized deformable particles interacting at their cohesive boundaries. The interface between two adjacent particles is viewed as a flexible contact whose constitutive law controls the material fracture and fragmentation properties. To reproduce rock anisotropy, an orthotropic cohesive law is developed for the contacts, which allows their shear and tensile behaviors to be different from each other. Using a combination of original closed-form expressions and statistical calibrations, a unique set of the contact microparameters are found based on the uniaxial/triaxial compression and Brazilian tension test data of a plaster. Applying the obtained microparameters, joint specimens, made of the same plaster, are simulated, where the comparison of the obtained results to laboratory data shows a reasonable agreement.

  8. Effect of Load Rate on Ultimate Tensile Strength of Ceramic Matrix Composites at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2001-01-01

    The strengths of three continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic composites, including SiC/CAS-II, SiC/MAS-5 and SiC/SiC, were determined as a function of test rate in air at 1100 to 1200 C. All three composite materials exhibited a strong dependency of strength on test rate, similar to the behavior observed in many advanced monolithic ceramics at elevated temperatures. The application of the preloading technique as well as the prediction of life from one loading configuration (constant stress-rate) to another (constant stress loading) suggested that the overall macroscopic failure mechanism of the composites would be the one governed by a power-law type of damage evolution/accumulation, analogous to slow crack growth commonly observed in advanced monolithic ceramics. It was further found that constant stress-rate testing could be used as an alternative to life prediction test methodology even for composite materials, at least for short range of lifetimes and when ultimate strength is used as the failure criterion.

  9. Compressive and tensile failure of inclined well bores and determination of in situ stress and rock strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PešKa, Pavel; Zoback, Mark D.

    1995-07-01

    In this paper we investigate the occurrence of compressive and tensile failures of arbitrarily inclined well bores under a wide variety of stress conditions. The principal assumptions in this analysis are that the rock is isotropic and that it deforms elastically to the point of failure. As has been shown by previous investigators, for a given stress state and well bore orientation, it is straightforward to predict the orientation of the failures around the well bore as well as whether failure is likely to occur depending on such parameters as rock strength and borehole fluid pressure. However, as the stress state is almost never known in situ, we demonstrate how observations of compressive and tensile wall failures in inclined holes can be used to constrain in situ stress orientations and magnitudes if there are independent data on the magnitude of the least principal stress from either leak-off or microfrac tests and on the formation pore pressure. We further demonstrate how once the stress state is determined, it is possible to assess both an upper bound on the effective in situ rock strength and the degree to which increasing the borehole fluid pressure (or mud weight) can reduce the likelihood of borehole failure. Through application of this methodology to an inclined well bore in an area of complex faulting in the Gulf of Mexico, we illustrate how it is possible to utilize observations of borehole failures to determine the magnitude and orientation of the stress tensor in areas such as offshore sedimentary basins where drilling inclined well bores is quite common.

  10. Gas bubble retention and its effect on waste properties: Retention mechanisms, viscosity, and tensile and shear strengths

    SciTech Connect

    Gauglitz, P.A.; Rassat, S.D.; Powell, M.R.

    1995-08-01

    Several of the underground nuclear storage tanks at Hanford have been placed on a flammable gas watch list, because the waste is either known or suspected to generate, store, and episodically release flammable gases. Because retention and episodic release of flammable gases from these tanks containing radioactive waste slurries are critical safety concerns, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is studying physical mechanisms and waste properties that contribute to the episodic gas release from these storage tanks. This study is being conducted for Westinghouse Hanford Company as part of the PNL Flammable Gas project. Previous investigations have concluded that gas bubbles are retained by the slurry or sludge that has settled at the bottom of the tanks; however, the mechanisms responsible for the retention of these bubbles are not well understood. Understanding the rheological behavior of the waste, particularly of the settled sludge, is critical to characterizing the tendency of the waste to retain gas bubbles and the dynamics of how these bubbles are released from the waste. The presence of gas bubbles is expected to affect the rheology of the sludge, specifically its viscosity and tensile and shear strengths, but essentially no literature data are available to assess the effect of bubbles. The objectives of this study were to conduct experiments and develop theories to understand better how bubbles are retained by slurries and sludges, to measure the effect of gas bubbles on the viscosity of simulated slurries, and to measure the effect of gas bubbles on the tensile and shear strengths of simulated slurries and sludges. In addition to accomplishing these objectives, this study developed correlations, based on the new experimental data, that can be used in large-scale computations of waste tank physical phenomena.

  11. Tensile and shear bond strength of hard and soft denture relining materials to the conventional heat cured acrylic denture base resin: An In-vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Mayank; Amarnath, G S; Muddugangadhar, B C; Swetha, M U; Das, Kopal Anshuraj Ashok Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Background: The condition of the denture bearing tissues may be adversely affected by high stress concentration during function. Chairside Denture (Hard and Soft) reliners are used to distribute forces applied to soft tissues during function. Tensile and shear bond strength has been shown to be dependent on their chemical composition. A weak bond could harbor bacteria, promote staining and delamination of the lining material. To investigate tensile and shear bond strength of 4 different commercially available denture relining materials to conventional heat cured acrylic denture base resin. Materials & Methods: 4 mm sections in the middle of 160 Acrylic cylindrical specimens (20 mm x 8 mm) were removed, packed with test materials (Mollosil, G C Reline Soft, G C Reline Hard (Kooliner) and Ufi Gel Hard and polymerized. Specimens were divided into 8 groups of 20 each. Tensile and shear bond strength to the conventional heat cured acrylic denture base resin were examined by Instron Universal Tensile Testing Machine using the equation F=N/A (F-maximum force exerted on the specimen (Newton) and A-bonding area= 50.24 mm2). One-way ANOVA was used for multiple group comparisons followed by Bonferroni Test and Hsu’s MCB for multiple pairwise comparisons to asses any significant differences between the groups. Results: The highest mean Tensile bond strength value was obtained for Ufi Gel Hard (6.49+0.08 MPa) and lowest for G C Reline Soft (0.52+0.01 MPa). The highest mean Shear bond strength value was obtained for Ufi Gel Hard (16.19+0.1 MPa) and lowest for Mollosil (0.59+0.05 MPa). The Benferroni test showed a significant difference in the mean tensile bond strength and the mean shear bond strength when the two denture soft liners were compared as well as when the two denture hard liners were compared. Hsu’s MCB implied that Ufi gel hard is better than its other closest competitors. Conclusion: The Tensile and Shear bond strength values of denture soft reliners were significantly lower than denture hard reliners. How to cite the article: Lau M, Amarnath GS, Muddugangadhar BC, Swetha MU, Das KA. Tensile and shear bond strength of hard and soft denture relining materials to the conventional heat cured acrylic denture base resin: An In-vitro study. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(2):55-61. PMID:24876703

  12. The effects of fibre reinforcement and gold plating on the flexural and tensile strength of PGA/PLA copolymer materials in vitro.

    PubMed

    Törmälä, P; Vainionpää, S; Kilpikari, J; Rokkanen, P

    1987-01-01

    Changes in the flexural and/or tensile strength of plates and rods made of PGA/PLA copolymer submerged in water for a period of 4 wk were investigated. During this time, the effects of PGA/PLA fibre self-reinforcement, carbon fibre reinforcement and gold plating on tensile and/or flexural strength were examined. The results were used for evaluation of the surgical applications of PGA/PLA copolymer and its composites. The initial tensile strength of non-reinforced material was 45 Mpa and its flexural strength was 150 MPa: the flexural strength of self-reinforced material was 265 MPa. The tensile strength of carbon fibre reinforced material was 90 MPa and its flexural strength 190 MPa. The initial strengths of plated and unplated samples were the same but plating delayed the loss of the mechanical strength of carbon fibre reinforced samples. After 4 wk the flexural strength of self-reinforced and carbon fibre reinforced samples was decreased to the level of cancellous bone (10-20 MPa) while the flexural strength of non-reinforced samples was below that level (less than or equal to 5 MPa). The results suggested that self-reinforced PGA/PLA composites may be used for the treatment of fractures in cancellous bone. Positive animal experiments led to clinical studies in vivo. These studies showed that there was no difference in outcome between 2 groups of patients with displaced fractures of the ankle treated with metallic implants or PGA/PLA fibre self-reinforced implants, respectively. Self-reinforced biodegradable implants are now used routinely in Helsinki University Central Hospital. PMID:3828444

  13. Effect of Beverages on the Hardness and Tensile Bond Strength of Temporary Acrylic Soft Liners to Acrylic Resin Denture Base

    PubMed Central

    Safari, A; Vojdani, M; Mogharrabi, S; Iraji Nasrabadi, N; Derafshi, R

    2013-01-01

    Statement of Problem: Two potential problems commonly identified with a denture base incorporating a resilient liner are failure of the bond between acrylic resin and soft liner material, and loss of resiliency of the soft liner over time. Since patients may drink different beverages, it is important to evaluate their effects on physical properties of soft lining materials. Purpose: The objective of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of different beverages on the hardness of two temporary acrylic-based soft lining materials and their bond strength to the denture base resin. Materials and Method: For the hardness test; a total of 80 rectangular specimens (40mm×10mm×3mm) were fabricated from a heat-polymerized polymethylmethacrylate. Two commercially auto-polymerized acrylic resin-based resilient liners; Coe-Soft and Visco-gel were prepared according to the manufacturers’ instructions and applied on the specimens. For the tensile test, 160 cylindrical specimens (30mm×10mm) were prepared. The liners were added between specimens with a thickness of 3 mm. The specimens of both soft liners were divided into 4 groups (n=10) and immersed in distilled water as the control group, Coca-Cola, 8% and 50% ethanol. All groups were stored in separate containers at 37oC for 12 days. All beverages were changed daily. The hardness was determined using a Shore A durometer and tensile bond strength was determined in a ZwickRoell testing machine at a cross-head speed of 5mm/min. The results were analyzed using two-way ANOVA. Results: There was no significant interaction between the soft liners and the drinks for both hardness (p= 0.748) and bond strength (p= 0.902). There were statistically significant differences between all drinks for both hardness (p< 0.001) and bond strength (p< 0.05). Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, it seems that drinking Coca-Cola and alcoholic beverages would not be potentially causing any problems for the temporary acrylic soft liners. PMID:24724142

  14. Evaluation of a sugar-based edible adhesive using a tensile strength tester.

    PubMed

    Doll, Kenneth M; Erhan, Sevim Z

    2011-04-01

    A method to evaluate adhesives has been developed and used to reformulate a recently patented adhesive which is based on sugar and citric acid. Factors affecting adhesive performance were uncovered, such as an optimal curing temperature of 60°C. The addition of maltodextrin and soy protein at optimized levels was shown to nearly double the bonding strength of the adhesive, from 0.46 ± 0.076 to 0.74 ± 0.26 kN, under our test conditions. Also discussed is the potential for this method to be automated using commercially available equipment. PMID:21609697

  15. An evaluation of the +/-45 deg tensile test for the determination of the in-plane shear strength of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellas, S.; Morton, J.; Jackson, K. E.

    1991-01-01

    The applicability of the +/-45 deg tensile test for the determination of the in-plane shear strength of advanced composite laminates is studied. The assumptions used for the development of the shear strength formulas were examined, and factors such as the specimen geometry and stacking sequence were assessed experimentally. It was found that the strength of symmetric and balanced +/-45 deg laminates depends primarily upon the specimen thickness rather than the specimen width. These findings have important implications for the +/-45 deg tensile test which is recommended by several organizations for the determination of the in-plane shear stress/strain response and the shear strength of continuous fiber reinforced composites. Modifications to the recommended practices for specimen selection and shear strength determination are suggested.

  16. Tensile strength and elongation of laser-welded Ti and Ti-6AL-7NB.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Ikuya; Topham, D Scott

    2004-10-15

    This study established data demonstrating the possible laser-welded strengths of cast Ti and Ti-6Al-7Nb and compared them to those of two dental-casting alloys. Cast plates of Ti, Ti-6Al-7Nb, gold, and Co-Cr alloy were prepared. After polishing the surfaces to be welded, two plates were abutted and welded using an Nd:YAG laser at a pulse duration of 10 ms, spot diameter of 1 mm, and voltage of 200 V. Five specimens were prepared for each metal by welding either three or five spots unilaterally or bilaterally. The fracture load and percent elongation were measured at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. The bilaterally welded specimens performed significantly greater than unilaterally welded specimens in both fracture load and elongation whether they were welded with three or five spots per side. The bilaterally welded Ti and Ti-6Al-7Nb specimens were nearly as strong as their corresponding control specimens, whereas the gold and Co-Cr specimens were approximately half as strong. When a large proportion of the cross-sectional area of the joint is laser welded, the strength of the laser-welded portion of the cast Ti and Ti-6Al-7Nb may approach or equal that of the nonwelded metal frameworks. PMID:15368227

  17. On the determination of tensile and compressive strengths of unidirectional fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, S.N.; Yen, C.F.; Oplinger, D.W.

    1997-12-31

    Stress fields in tabbed unidirectional composite coupons and in cross-ply specimens are examined with a goal towards improving the methods for determining the axial strengths of the unidirectional material. Results of parametric studies for evaluation of the influence of tab materials and geometries as well as adhesive properties on the stress peaks in unidirectional tension coupons are presented. Use of ductile (but tough) adhesives, soft tabs, and low taper angles is recommended to reduce failures near tab ends. Data reduction schemes for evaluation of cross-ply test data are critically examined with due consideration to subcritical damages (such as ply cracks) and expected failure modes. Test results from cross-ply and unidirectional tension and compression specimens of carbon and glass-fiber composites are compared. Some recommendations are made based on the results reported. Tests and data correlations for other composites are suggested for selecting a data reduction scheme acceptable to the composites community.

  18. Ultimate tensile strength of embedded I-sections: a comparison of experimental and numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heristchian, Mahmoud; Pourakbar, Pouyan; Imeni, Saeed; Ramezani, M. Reza Adib

    2014-12-01

    Exposed baseplates together with anchor bolts are the customary method of connection of steel structures to the concrete footings. Post-Kobe studies revealed that the embedded column bases respond better to the earthquake uplift forces. The embedded column bases also, offer higher freedom in achieving the required strength, rigidity and ductility. The paper presents the results of the pullout failure of three embedded IPE140 sections, tested under different conditions. The numerical models are then, generated in Abaqus 6.10-1 software. It is concluded that, the steel profiles could be directly anchored in concrete without using anchor bolts as practiced in the exposed conventional column bases. Such embedded column bases can develop the required resistance against pullout forces at lower constructional costs.

  19. Metalloproteases meprin α and meprin β are C- and N-procollagen proteinases important for collagen assembly and tensile strength

    PubMed Central

    Broder, Claudia; Arnold, Philipp; Vadon-Le Goff, Sandrine; Konerding, Moritz A.; Bahr, Kerstin; Müller, Stefan; Overall, Christopher M.; Bond, Judith S.; Koudelka, Tomas; Tholey, Andreas; Hulmes, David J. S.; Moali, Catherine; Becker-Pauly, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Type I fibrillar collagen is the most abundant protein in the human body, crucial for the formation and strength of bones, skin, and tendon. Proteolytic enzymes are essential for initiation of the assembly of collagen fibrils by cleaving off the propeptides. We report that Mep1a−/− and Mep1b−/− mice revealed lower amounts of mature collagen I compared with WT mice and exhibited significantly reduced collagen deposition in skin, along with markedly decreased tissue tensile strength. While exploring the mechanism of this phenotype, we found that cleavage of full-length human procollagen I heterotrimers by either meprin α or meprin β led to the generation of mature collagen molecules that spontaneously assembled into collagen fibrils. Thus, meprin α and meprin β are unique in their ability to process and release both C- and N-propeptides from type I procollagen in vitro and in vivo and contribute to the integrity of connective tissue in skin, with consequent implications for inherited connective tissue disorders. PMID:23940311

  20. Parametric studies on tensile strength in joining AA6061- T6 and AA7075-T6 by gas metal arc welding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishak, M.; Noordin, N. F. M.; Shah, L. H.

    2015-12-01

    Proper selection of the welding parameters can result in better joining. In this study, the effects of various welding parameters on tensile strength in joining dissimilar aluminum alloys AA6061-T6 and AA7075-T6 were investigated. 2 mm thick samples of both base metals were welded by semi-automatic gas metal arc welding (GMAW) using filler wire ER5356. The welding current, arc voltage and welding speed were chosen as variables parameters. The strength of each specimen after the welding operations were tested and the effects of these parameters on tensile strength were identified by using Taguchi method. The range of parameter for welding current were chosen from 100 to 115 A, arc voltage from 17 to 20 V and welding speed from 2 to 5 mm/s. L16 orthogonal array was used to obtained 16 runs of experiments. It was found that the highest tensile strength (194.34 MPa) was obtained with the combination of a welding current of 115 A, welding voltage of 18 V and welding speed of 4 mm/s. Through analysis of variance (ANOVA), the welding voltage was the most effected parameter on tensile strength with percentage of contribution at 41.30%.

  1. The influence of impurities in Titan ice bedrock on tensile strength and resistance to fluvial erosion: experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litwin, K. L.; Polito, P.; Zygielbaum, B.; Sklar, L. S.; Collins, G. C.

    2010-12-01

    Images of the surface of Titan returned by the Cassini-Huygens mission show extensive fluvial drainage networks, which may be eroded by low-velocity impacts by ice clasts moving as bedload in rivers of liquid methane. Recent work has shown that the strength of polycrystalline water ice at Titan surface temperature of 93K is comparable to moderate strength rocks on Earth, and is significantly stronger than ice at terrestrial temperatures. However, the ice bedrock on Titan is likely to contain impurities such as silicates, atmospherically-derived hydrocarbon polymers and compounds of cryovolcanic origin. In this laboratory investigation, we examine the dependence of ice erosion resistance on the concentration of impurities, across a wide range of temperatures. The polycrystalline ice is made from a log-normally distributed seed crystal material with a median size of 1.4mm, which we combine with particles of basalt, ammonium-sulfate, and a urea polymer. We use the Brazilian tensile splitting test to measure the strength of the ice as a function of the concentration of each impurity. We erode 57-cm diameter drums of ice by repeatedly dropping a clast of known mass from a constant height and measure volume eroded with a topographic scanning technique where photographs are taken at an oblique angle to a vertically-oriented laser sheet. We control the temperature of the ice with dry ice and liquid nitrogen, as well as by conducting experiments in a walk-in freezer. The strength tests indicate that the ice strengthens with decreasing temperature and increasing concentration of impurity, for all impurity types. Additionally, the grain size of the added impurities is a strongly influences ice strength. The results of the erosion tests indicate that ice, regardless of composition, becomes stronger, and becomes more resistant to erosion, as it gets colder. However, the ice containing impurities is more resistant to erosion as compared to pure ice. Combining the results of both the strength tests and erosion experiments, we conclude that the resistance to erosion of the ice increases with increasing concentration of each impurity. These results will help constrain estimates of ice resistance to erosion, and possible erosion rates, that may occur on Titan and other icy satellites.

  2. EFFECT OF CARBAMIDE PEROXIDE-BASED BLEACHING AGENTS CONTAINING FLUORIDE OR CALCIUM ON TENSILE STRENGTH OF HUMAN ENAMEL

    PubMed Central

    Giannini, Marcelo; Silva, Alessandra Peres; Cavalli, Vanessa; Leme, Adriana Franco Paes

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of carbamide peroxide-based bleaching agents (CPG) containing fluoride (CF) or calcium (CCa) on the ultimate tensile strength of enamel (UTS). Method: A "cube-like" resin composite structure was built-up on the occlusal surface of twenty-two sound third molars to facilitate specimen preparation for the micro-tensile test. The restored teeth were serially sectioned in buccal-lingual direction in slices with approximate 0.7 mm thickness. Each slice was trimmed with a fine diamond bur to reduce the buccal, internal slope enamel of the cusps to a dumb-bell shape with a cross-sectional area at the "neck" of less than 0.5 mm2. The samples were randomly divided into 12 groups (n=11). The control groups were not submitted to the bleaching regimen. Specimens were treated with 10% CPG gel or with 10% CPG formulations containing CF (0.2% and 0.5%) or CCa (0.05% and 0.2%). Bleached groups received the application of the 10% CPGs for 6 hours/day at 37° C, during 14 consecutive days and were stored in artificial saliva (AS) or 100% relative humidity (RH) among each application. After bleaching, specimens were tested with the microtensile method at 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (5%). Results: No significant difference was observed between groups stored in AS or RH. Specimens treated with CF or CCa presented similar UTS as unbleached control groups. Conclusion: Either 10% CPG formulations containing CF or CCa can preserve the UTS after bleaching regimen. PMID:19089036

  3. Evaluation of pH, ultimate tensile strength, and micro-shear bond strength of two self-adhesive resin cements.

    PubMed

    Costa, Luciana Artioli; Carneiro, Karina Kato; Tanaka, Auro; Lima, Darlon Martins; Bauer, José

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the pH, ultimate tensile strength (UTS), and micro-shear bond strength (µSBS) of two self-adhesive resin cements to enamel and dentin. Sound bovine incisors (n = 10) and two self-adhesive resin cements (i.e., RelyX U-100 and seT PP) were used. The pH of the resin cements was measured using a pH-indicator paper (n = 3). Specimens for UTS were obtained from an hourglass-shaped mold. For µSBS, cylinders with internal diameter of 0.75 mm and height of 0.5 mm were bonded to the flat enamel and dentin surfaces. Bonded cylinders were tested in the shear mode using a loop wire. The fracture mode was also evaluated. The cement seT PP showed a low pH; U-100 showed significantly higher UTS (49.9 ± 2.0) than seT PP (40.0 ± 2.1) (p < 0.05) and high µSBS to enamel (10.7 ± 3.7). The lowest µSBS was found for seT PP to dentin (0.7 ± 0.6); seT PP to enamel (4.8 ± 1.7), and for U-100 to dentin (7.2 ± 1.9), showing an intermediate µSBS value (p < 0.05). Adhesive failure was the most frequently observed failure mode. The resin cement that presented the lowest pH and UTS also presented the lowest micro-shear bond strength to enamel and dentin. PMID:25337932

  4. In-plane tensile strength and residual stress in thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings on aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Uenal, O.; Sordelet, D.J.

    2000-03-17

    Three types of strength are important for coating materials; bond (adhesive) strength, cohesive strength and in-plane strength. The distinction between the first two can be made by failure location; if failure occurs at the coating/substrate interface, the corresponding strength value is adhesive; and if it occurs within the ceramic coating, the strength value is cohesive. Between the two, adhesive strength is the most important since coatings often fail by debonding at the interface. In fact, there is a standard test procedure to determine both of these strengths, ASTM C633-79. In-plane strength characterizes the point of coating failure under in-plane applied loads. Since it is not the primary failure parameter, little attention has been given for its measurement. Therefore, work in the area of in-plane properties is limited. However, the knowledge of in-plane strength could be important for weaker coatings, but there is no simple way of measuring it. In this study as attempt was made to determine in-plane tensile strength of thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings on Al-alloy through straightforward strength of materials approach. The residual stresses, which invariably occur in coatings, affect the in-plant strength. The magnitude of apparent average residual stress in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was determined indirectly by comparing the in-plane strength of coating/substrate system with the intrinsic strength of coating (no substrate).

  5. Low-output carbon dioxide laser for cutaneous wound closure of scalpel incisions: comparative tensile strength studies of the laser to the suture and staple for wound closure

    SciTech Connect

    Garden, J.M.; Robinson, J.K.; Taute, P.M.; Lautenschlager, E.P.; Leibovich, S.J.; Hartz, R.S.

    1986-01-01

    The low-output carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/) laser was used for cutaneous wound closure of scalpel incisions. Cutaneous scalpel incisions were placed over the dorsum of three minipigs and were then closed by either the laser, sutures, or staples. At multiple time points after wound closure, up to day 90, the tensile strengths of these wounds were comparatively evaluated. All wounds, including those closed with the laser, clinically appeared to heal similarly with no evidence of wound dehiscence or infection. Tensile strength studies revealed similar sigmoid curves for all wound closure modalities with low initial tensile strengths up to days 14 to 21, which afterwards increased rapidly, with a plateau toward day 90. From our study, it appears that the CO/sub 2/ laser, in the low-output mode, can be used for cutaneous wound closure and that similar clinical healing and tensile strength measurements are obtained relative to the conventional cutaneous wound closure modalities of the suture or staple.

  6. Editorial Commentary: High-Tensile Strength Polyblend Tape Outperforms Suture for Whip and Krackow Stitch Models at Time Zero, Which Is No Surprise.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Michael J

    2016-02-01

    The matched, head-to-head comparison of high-tensile strength tape versus suture shows a higher load to failure for tape. This may be the first step to showing the advantage of polyblend tape in clinical models as we await further cyclic load testing to extend beyond time zero in cadaveric biomechanical modeling. PMID:26814398

  7. INFLUENCE OF THE FINAL TEMPERATURE OF INVESTMENT HEALTING ON THE TENSILE STRENGTH AND VICKERS HARDNESS OF CP TI AND TI-6AL-4V ALLOY

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Pedro César Garcia; Adabo, Gelson Luis; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria; da Rocha, Sicknan Soares; Ávila, Fabiano Araújo; do Valle, Accácio Lins

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the work was to evaluate the influence of the temperature of investment healting on the tensile strength and Vickers hardness of CP Ti and Ti-6Al-4V alloy casting. Were obtained for the tensile strength test dumbbell rods that were invested in the Rematitan Plus investment and casting in the Discovery machine cast. Thirty specimens were obtained, fiftten to the CP Titanium and fifteen to the Ti-6Al-4V alloy, five samples to each an of the three temperatures of investment: 430°C (control group), 480°C and 530°C. The tensile test was measured by means of a universal testing machine, MTS model 810, at a strain of 1.0 mm/min. After the tensile strenght test the specimens were secctioned, embedded and polished to hardness measurements, using a Vickers tester, Micromet 2100. The means values to tensile tests to the temperatures 430°C, 480 and 530: CP Ti (486.1 – 501.16 – 498.14 –mean 495.30 MPa) and Ti-6Al-4V alloy (961.33 – 958.26 – 1005.80 – mean 975.13 MPa) while for the Vickers hardness the values were (198.06, 197.85, 202.58 – mean 199.50) and (352.95, 339.36, 344.76 – mean 345.69), respectively. The values were submitted to Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Tukey,s Test that indicate differences significant only between the materials, but not between the temperature, for both the materias. It was conclued that increase of the temperature of investment its not chance the tensile strength and the Vickers hardness of the CP Titanium and Ti-6Al-4V alloy. PMID:19089099

  8. The effect of using different rinsing angles on the micro-tensile bond strength of the sealant to the etched enamel

    PubMed Central

    Afshar, Hossein; Nakhjavani, Yahya Baradaran; Ahmadi, Rahil

    2014-01-01

    Background: Attempts to enhance bond strength of the sealant have been among the most important sides of dental research. Aim: The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of using different rinsing angles on the micro-tensile bond strength of the sealant to the etched enamel. Settings and Design: Experimental study. Materials and Methods: Sixty first-premolars were randomly assigned to six groups based on the rinsing angle applied (15°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 75°, and 90°). Following etching and rinsing, a 4-mm height build up of sealant material was created. Bonded specimens were sectioned into sticks (1 × 1 mm), which were subjected to micro-tensile bond strength, testing at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min. Statistical Analysis Used: The data were analyzed by Kolmogorov-Smirnov and post-hoc Tukey test. Results: The tensile bond strength in specimens rinsed at 90° were statistically higher compared to those rinsed at 15° and 30° (P < 0.05), and increasing the angle from 15° to 90° was correlated with a reduction in the number of specimens with adhesive failures. Conclusions: Rinsing the conditioned enamel surface at 90° may improve the bond strength and retention of the sealant. PMID:24808698

  9. Direct Tensile Strength and Characteristics of Dentin Restored with All-Ceramic, Resin-Composite, and Cast Metal Prostheses Cemented with Resin Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Piemjai, Morakot; Nakabayashi, Nobuo

    2015-01-01

    A dentin-cement-prosthesis complex restored with either all-porcelain, cured resin-composite, or cast base metal alloy and cemented with either of the different resin cements was trimmed into a mini-dumbbell shape for tensile testing. The fractured surfaces and characterization of the dentin-cement interface of bonded specimens were investigated using a Scanning Electron Microscope. A significantly higher tensile strength of all-porcelain (12.5 ± 2.2 MPa) than that of cast metal (9.2 ± 3.5 MPa) restorations was revealed with cohesive failure in the cement and failure at the prosthesis-cement interface in Super-Bond C&B group. No significant difference in tensile strength was found among the types of restorations using the other three cements with adhesive failure on the dentin side and cohesive failure in the cured resin. SEM micrographs demonstrated the consistent hybridized dentin in Super-Bond C&B specimens that could resist degradation when immersed in hydrochloric acid followed by NaOCl solutions whereas a detached and degraded interfacial layer was found for the other cements. The results suggest that when complete hybridization of resin into dentin occurs tensile strength at the dentin-cement is higher than at the cement-prosthesis interfaces. The impermeable hybridized dentin can protect the underlying dentin and pulp from acid demineralization, even if detachment of the prosthesis has occurred. PMID:26539520

  10. Influence Of Holes On The In-Plane Tensile Strength And Fatigue Durability Of A NICALON(Trademark)/Si-N-C Ceramic Matrix Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalluri, Sreeramesh; Verrilli, Michael J.

    2003-01-01

    Effects of different sizes of holes as well as different percentages of open areas on the in-plane tensile strength and fatigue durability of the SiC/Si-N-C composite were investigated in this study. Test specimens with no holes, four different diameters of holes (1.0 to 3.2 mm), and four different open areas (20 to 35%) were machined. All mechanical testing was performed in air at a temperature of 910 C. Fatigue tests were conducted with a load ratio, R = 0.05, and a frequency of 0.33 Hz. In general, both the in-plane tensile strength of the composite and its fatigue durability decreased with an increase in the size of the hole and percentage of the open area. Reductions in the in-plane tensile strength and cyclic fatigue life of the composite were described by empirical equations with the diameter of the hole and the percent open area as the independent variables. The validity of these two empirical equations was verified with additional tensile and fatigue test data generated on the composite specimens.

  11. Tensile bond strength of silicone-based soft denture liner to two chemically different denture base resins after various surface treatments.

    PubMed

    Akin, Hakan; Tugut, Faik; Guney, Umit; Kirmali, Omer; Akar, Turker

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of various surface treatments on the tensile bond strength of a silicone-based soft denture liner to two chemically different denture base resins, heat-cured polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), and light-activated urethane dimethacrylate or Eclipse denture base resin. PMMA test specimens were fabricated and relined with a silicone-based soft denture liner (group AC). Eclipse test specimens were prepared according to the manufacturer's recommendation. Before they were relined with a silicone-based soft denture liner, each received one of three surface treatments: untreated (control, group EC), Eclipse bonding agent applied (group EB), and laser-irradiated (group EL). Tensile bond strength tests (crosshead speed = 5 mm/min) were performed for all specimens, and the results were analyzed using the analysis of variance followed by Tukey's test (p = 0.05). Eclipse denture base and PMMA resins presented similar bond strengths to the silicone-based soft denture liner. The highest mean force was observed in group EL specimens, and the tensile bond strengths in group EL were significantly different (p < 0.05) from those in the other groups. PMID:22447403

  12. Pre-heated dual-cured resin cements: analysis of the degree of conversion and ultimate tensile strength.

    PubMed

    Frana, Flvio lvares; Oliveira, Michele de; Rodrigues, Jos Augusto; Arrais, Csar Augusto Galvo

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the degree of conversion (DC) and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of dual-cured resin cements heated to 50 C prior to and during polymerization. Disc- and hourglass-shaped specimens of Rely X ARC (RX) and Variolink II (VII) were obtained using addition silicon molds. The products were manipulated at 25 C or 50 C and were subjected to 3 curing conditions: light-activation through a glass slide or through a pre-cured 2-mm thick resin composite disc, or they were allowed to self-cure (SC). All specimens were dark-stored dry for 15 days. For DC analysis, the resin cements were placed into the mold located on the center of a horizontal diamond on the attenuated total reflectance element in the optical bench of a Fourier Transformed Infrared spectrometer. Infrared spectra (n = 6) were collected between 1680 and 1500 cm-1, and DC was calculated by standard methods using changes in ratios of aliphatic-to-aromatic C=C absorption peaks from uncured and cured states. For UTS test, specimens (n = 10) were tested in tension in a universal testing machine (crosshead speed of 1 mm/min) until failure. DC and UTS data were submitted to 2-way ANOVA, followed by Tukey's test (?= 5%). Both products showed higher DC at 50 C than at 25 C in all curing conditions. No significant difference in UTS was noted between most light-activated groups at 25 C and those at 50 C. VII SC groups showed higher UTS at 50 C than at 25 C (p < 0.05). Increased temperature led to higher DC, but its effects on resin cement UTS depended on the curing condition. PMID:21537644

  13. Molecular-Level Study of the Effect of Prior Axial Compression/Torsion on the Axial-Tensile Strength of PPTA Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Yavari, R.; Ramaswami, S.; Snipes, J. S.; Yen, C.-F.; Cheeseman, B. A.

    2013-11-01

    A comprehensive all-atom molecular-level computational investigation is carried out in order to identify and quantify: (i) the effect of prior longitudinal-compressive or axial-torsional loading on the longitudinal-tensile behavior of p-phenylene terephthalamide (PPTA) fibrils/fibers; and (ii) the role various microstructural/topological defects play in affecting this behavior. Experimental and computational results available in the relevant open literature were utilized to construct various defects within the molecular-level model and to assign the concentration to these defects consistent with the values generally encountered under "prototypical" PPTA-polymer synthesis and fiber fabrication conditions. When quantifying the effect of the prior longitudinal-compressive/axial-torsional loading on the longitudinal-tensile behavior of PPTA fibrils, the stochastic nature of the size/potency of these defects was taken into account. The results obtained revealed that: (a) due to the stochastic nature of the defect type, concentration/number density and size/potency, the PPTA fibril/fiber longitudinal-tensile strength is a statistical quantity possessing a characteristic probability density function; (b) application of the prior axial compression or axial torsion to the PPTA imperfect single-crystalline fibrils degrades their longitudinal-tensile strength and only slightly modifies the associated probability density function; and (c) introduction of the fibril/fiber interfaces into the computational analyses showed that prior axial torsion can induce major changes in the material microstructure, causing significant reductions in the PPTA-fiber longitudinal-tensile strength and appreciable changes in the associated probability density function.

  14. In Vitro Comparison of Compressive and Tensile Strengths ofAcrylic Resins Reinforced by Silver Nanoparticles at 2% and0.2% Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffari, Tahereh; Hamedirad, Fahimeh; Ezzati, Baharak

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Polymethyl methacrylate, PMMA, is widely used in prosthodontics for fabrication of removable prostheses. This study was undertaken to investigate the effect of adding silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) to PMMA at 2% and 0.2% concentrations on compressive and tensile strengths of PMMA. Materials and methods. The silver nanoparticles were mixed with heat-cured acrylic resin in an amalgamator in two groups at 0.2 and 2 wt% of AgNPs. Eighteen 2×20×200-mm samples were prepared for tensile strength test, 12 samples containing silver nanoparticle and 6 samples for the control group. Another 18 cylindrical 25×38-mm samples were prepared for compressive strength test. Scanning electron microscopy was used to verify homogeneous distribution of particles. The powder was manually mixed with a resin monomer and then the mixture was properly blended. Before curing, the paste was packed into steel molds. After curing, the specimens were removed from the molds. One-way ANOVA was used for statistical analysis, followed by multiple comparison test (Scheffé’s test). Results. This study showed that the mean compressive strength of PMMA reinforced with AgNPs was significantly higher than that of the unmodified PMMA (P<0.05). It was not statistically different between the two groups reinforced with AgNPs. The tensile strength was not significantly different between the 0.2% group and unmodified PMMA and it de-creased significantly after incorporation of 2% AgNPs (P<0.05). Conclusion. Based on the results and the desirable effect of nanoparticles of silver on improvement of compressive strength of PMMA, use of this material with proper concentration in the palatal area of maxillary acrylic resin dentures is recommended. PMID:25587381

  15. pGlcNAc Nanofiber Treatment of Cutaneous Wounds Stimulate Increased Tensile Strength and Reduced Scarring via Activation of Akt1

    PubMed Central

    Lindner, Haley Buff; Felmly, Lloyd McPherson; Demcheva, Marina; Seth, Arun; Norris, Russell; Bradshaw, Amy D.; Vournakis, John; Muise-Helmericks, Robin C.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of cutaneous wounds with poly-N-acetyl-glucosamine containing nanofibers (pGlcNAc), a novel polysaccharide material derived from a marine diatom, results in increased wound closure, antibacterial activities and innate immune responses. We have shown that Akt1 plays a central role in the regulation of these activities. Here, we show that pGlcNAc treatment of cutaneous wounds results in a smaller scar that has increased tensile strength and elasticity. pGlcNAc treated wounds exhibit decreased collagen content, increased collagen organization and decreased myofibroblast content. A fibrin gel assay was used to assess the regulation of fibroblast alignment in vitro. In this assay, fibrin lattice is formed with two pins that provide focal points upon which the gel can exert force as the cells align from pole to pole. pGlcNAc stimulation of embedded fibroblasts results in cellular alignment as compared to untreated controls, by a process that is Akt1 dependent. We show that Akt1 is required in vivo for the pGlcNAc-induced increased tensile strength and elasticity. Taken together, our findings suggest that pGlcNAc nanofibers stimulate an Akt1 dependent pathway that results in the proper alignment of fibroblasts, decreased scarring, and increased tensile strength during cutaneous wound healing. PMID:25955155

  16. Effects of pulsed Nd:YAG laser on tensile bond strength and caries resistance of human enamel.

    PubMed

    Wen, X; Zhang, L; Liu, R; Deng, M; Wang, Y; Liu, L; Nie, X

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effects of pulsed Nd:YAG laser on the tensile bond strength (TBS) of resin to human enamel and caries resistance of human enamel. A total of 201 human premolars were used in this in vitro study. A flat enamel surface greater than 4 × 4 mm in area was prepared on each specimen using a low-speed cutting machine under a water coolant. Twenty-one specimens were divided into seven groups for morphology observations with no treatment, 35% phosphoric acid etching (30 seconds), and laser irradiation (30 seconds) of pulsed Nd:YAG laser with five different laser-parameter combinations. Another 100 specimens were used for TBS testing. They were embedded in self-cured acrylic resin and randomly divided into 10 groups. After enamel surface pretreatments according to the group design, resin was applied. The TBS values were tested using a universal testing machine. The other 80 specimens were randomly divided into eight groups for acid resistance evaluation. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) results showed that the enamel surfaces treated with 1.5 W/20 Hz and 2.0 W/20 Hz showed more etching-like appearance than those with other laser-parameter combinations. The laser-parameter combinations of 1.5 W/15 Hz and 1.5 W/20 Hz were found to be efficient for the TBS test. The mean TBS value of 14.45 ± 1.67 MPa in the laser irradiated group was significantly higher than that in the untreated group (3.48 ± 0.35 MPa) but lower than that in the 35% phosphoric acid group (21.50 ± 3.02 MPa). The highest mean TBS value of 26.64 ± 5.22 MPa was identified in the combination group (laser irradiation and then acid etching). Acid resistance evaluation showed that the pulsed Nd:YAG laser was efficient in preventing enamel demineralization. The SEM results of the fractured enamel surfaces, resin/enamel interfaces, and demineralization depths were consistent with those of the TBS test and the acid resistance evaluation. Pulsed Nd:YAG laser as an enamel surface pretreatment method presents a potential clinical application, especially for the caries-susceptible population or individuals with recently bleached teeth. PMID:23919623

  17. Simultaneous enhancement of tensile/compressive strength and ductility of magnesium alloy AZ31 using carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Paramsothy, M; Hassan, S F; Srikanth, N; Gupta, M

    2010-02-01

    AZ31 nanocomposite containing carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforcement was fabricated using solidification processing followed by hot extrusion. The CNT reinforcement was integrated with AZ31 using an Al foil method. The AZ31 nanocomposite exhibited slightly smaller grain and intermetallic particle sizes than monolithic AZ31, reasonable CNT distribution, dominant (10 - 11) texture in the transverse and longitudinal directions unlike monolithic AZ31, and 48% higher hardness than monolithic AZ31. Compared to monolithic AZ31, the AZ31 nanocomposite exhibited higher 0.2%TYS, UTS, tensile failure strain and tensile work of fracture (WOF) (+10%, +17%, +68% and +92%, respectively). Similarly, compared to monolithic AZ31, the AZ31 nanocomposite exhibited higher 0.2%CYS, UCS, average compressive failure strain and compressive WOF (+58%, +3%, +5% and +17%, respectively). Inclusive of crystallographic texture changes, the effect of CNT integration on the enhancement of tensile and compressive properties of AZ31 is investigated in this paper. PMID:20352742

  18. High-Temperature Tensile Strength of Al10Co25Cr8Fe15Ni36Ti6 Compositionally Complex Alloy (High-Entropy Alloy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daoud, H. M.; Manzoni, A. M.; Wanderka, N.; Glatzel, U.

    2015-06-01

    Homogenizing at 1220°C for 20 h and subsequent aging at 900°C for 5 h and 50 h of a novel Al10Co25Cr8Fe15Ni36Ti6 compositionally complex alloy (high-entropy alloy) produces a microstructure consisting of an L12 ordered γ' phase embedded in a face-centered cubic solid-solution γ matrix together with needle-like B2 precipitates (NiAl). The volume fraction of γ' phase is ~46% and of needle-like B2 precipitates <5%, which is in accordance with the prediction of calculation of phase diagram method (CALPHAD using Thermo-Calc software with TTNi7 database; Thermo-Calc Software, Stockholm, Sweden). The high-temperature tensile tests were carried out at room temperature, 600°C, 700°C, 800°C, and 1000°C. The tensile strength as well as the elongation to failure of both heat-treated specimens is very high at all tested temperatures. The values of tensile strength has been compared with literature data of well-known Alloy 800H and Inconel 617, and is discussed in terms of the observed microstructure.

  19. Influence of Specimen Preparation and Specimen Size on the Transverse Tensile Strength and Scatter of Glass Epoxy Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OBrien, T. Kevin; Chawan, Arun D.; DeMarco, Kevin

    1999-01-01

    The influence of specimen polishing, specimen configuration, and specimen size on the transverse tension strength of two glass epoxy materials loaded in three and four point bending was evaluated. Polishing machined edges, and/or tension side failure surfaces, was detrimental to specimen strength characterization instead of yielding a higher, more accurate, strength as a result of removing inherent manufacture and handling flaws. Transverse tension strength was sensitive to span length due to the classical weakest link effect. However, strength was less sensitive to volume changes achieved by increasing specimen width. The Weibull scaling law over-predicted changes in transverse tension strengths in three point bend tests and under-predicted changes in transverse tension strengths in four point bend tests. Furthermore, the Weibull slope varied with specimen configuration, volume, and sample size. Hence, the utility of this scaling law for predicting transverse tension strength is unclear.

  20. Root tensile strength of grey alder and mountain maple grown on a coarse grained eco-engineered slope in the Swiss Alps related to wood anatomical features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kink, Dimitri; Bast, Alexander; Meyer, Christine; Meier, Wolfgang; Egli, Markus; Gärtner, Holger

    2014-05-01

    Steep, vegetation free slopes are a common feature in alpine areas. The material covering these slopes is prone to all kind of erosional processes, resulting in a high risk potential for population and infrastructure. This risk potential is likely to increase with the predicted change in the spatiotemporal distribution of precipitation events. A potential increase in extreme precipitation events will also result in a higher magnitude and frequency of erosional processes. In the Swiss Alps as in many other mountainous areas, there is a need to stabilize these slopes to reduce their direct or indirect hazard potential. In this regard, eco-engineering is a very promising and sustainable approach for slope stabilization. Planting trees and shrubs is a central task in eco-engineering. A developing vegetation cover will on one hand reduce the mechanical effects of rainfall by an increased interception, on the other hand, the root systems cause modifications of soil properties. Roots not only provide anchorage for the plants, they also promote soil aggregation and are able to penetrate possible shear horizons. Overall, anchorage of plants is at the same extend also stabilizing the near subsurface. When rainfall occurs, the saturated soil exerts downhill pressure to a tree or shrub. As long as the root distribution supports anchorage, the respective slope area remains stable. At this point, the tensile strength of the roots is a critical measure, because it is more likely that the supporting roots break than the entire root system being pulled out of the soil completely. As a consequence, root tensile strength is an important parameter in characterizing the soil stabilization potential of trees and shrubs. It is known that tree roots show a high variability in their anatomical structure depending on their depth below soil surface as well as their distance to the main stem. Therefore, we assume that these structural changes affect the tensile strength of every single root. In order to confirm this assumption and possibly find more important root properties which have an influence on soil stabilization, the root systems of seven trees (three grey alder, four mountain maple) were excavated and analyzed. The study site is a catchment, where shallow landslides are common. It is located in the Prättigau valley in the Eastern Swiss Alps and was eco-engineered in 1997. The substrate is coarse-grained morainic material, mean annual air temperature reaches 4.64°C, average precipitation is 1170 mm, and the altitude is about 1000 m a.s.l.. The root system of each tree was uncovered carefully by hand to keep the roots undamaged, before removal it was photographed in situ to document the root distribution. The root systems were then cut into single root pieces of about 20 cm length and the position of each sample was documented. The root samples were then hierarchically classified in several root classes. The tensile strength of more than 500 samples was determined. In addition, the values for age, diameter, and root moisture were ascertained. Since it was assumed, that the cellular structure of the roots has an influence on the tensile strength, two microscopic thin-sections were prepared from all successfully tested root samples. The microscopic analysis focused on anatomical parameters such as the size and number of vessels, their distribution as well as their conductivity. The results for the final correlation between the anatomical characteristics and the root's tensile strength are presented for both tree species.

  1. Evaluation of the tensile bond strength of an adhesive system self-etching in dentin irradiated with Er:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mello, Andrea M. D.; Mello, Fabiano A. S.; Matson, Edmir; Mattos, Adriana B.; Mello, Guilerme S.

    2001-04-01

    Since Buonocore, several researchers have been seeking for the best adhesive system and treatment for the enamel and dentin surfaces. The use of the acid has been presented as one of the best techniques of dentin conditioning, because this promotes the removal of the 'smear layer' and exhibition of dentinal structure, for a best penetration and micro-retention of the adhesive system. However, some conditioning methods have been appearing in the literature, for the substitution or interaction with the acid substances, as the laser. The objective of this work is to evaluate the tensile bond strength of the adhesive system 'self-etching' associated to a composed resin, in dentin surfaces conditioned with the Er:YAG laser. For this study, freshly extracted human teeth were used and in each one the dentinal surfaces, which were treated with three sandpapers of different granulations to obtain a standard of the smear layer, before the irradiation of the laser and of the restoring procedure. After these procedures the specimens were storage in distilled water at 37 degrees for 24 hours. Soon after, they were submitted to the tensile strength test. After analyzing the results, we can conclude that the use of the Er:YAG laser can substitute the drill without the need of conditioning, when using the adhesive system 'self etching' in the dentinal surfaces because there was a decline in the strength of adhesion in the groups conditioned with the laser.

  2. Damage Initiation and Ultimate Tensile Strength of Scaled [0 deg n/90 deg n/0 deg n]sub T Graphite-Epoxy Coupons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Prosser, William H.

    1997-01-01

    Previous research on scaling effects in composite materials has demonstrated that the stress levels at first ply failure and ultimate failure of composite laminates are dependent on the size of the laminate. In particular, the thickness dimension has been shown to be the most influential parameter in strength scaling of composite coupons loaded in tension. Geometrically and constitutively scaled laminates exhibit decreasing strength with increasing specimen size, and the magnitude of the strength-size effect is a function of both material properties and laminate stacking sequence. Some of the commonly used failure criteria for composite materials such as maximum stress, maximum strain, and tensor polynomial (e.g., Tsai-Wu) cannot account for the strength-size effect. In this paper, three concepts are developed and evaluated for incorporating size dependency into failure criteria for composite materials. An experimental program of limited scope was performed to determine the first ply failure stress in scaled cross-ply laminates loaded in tension. Test specimens were fabricated of AS-4/3502 graphite-epoxy composite material with laminate stacking sequences of [0 deg n/90 deg n/o deg n]subT where n=1-6. Two experimental techniques were used to determine first ply failure, defined as a transverse matrix crack in the 90 deg ply: (1) step loading with dye penetrant x-ray of the specimen at each load interval, and (2) acoustic emission. The best correlation between first ply failure analysis and experimental data was obtained using a modified Weibull approach which incorporated the residual thermal stress and the outer ply constraint, as well as the ply thickness effect. Finally, a second set of experiments was performed to determine the tensile response and ultimate failure of the scaled cross-ply laminates. The results of these experiments indicated no influence of specimen size on tensile response or ultimate strength.

  3. Data Qualification and Data Summary Report: Intact Rock Properties Data on Tensile Strength, Schmidt Hammer Rebound Hardness, and Rock Triaxial Creep

    SciTech Connect

    E.M. Cikanek; R.J. Blakely; T.A. Grant; L.E. Safley

    2003-07-29

    This report presents a systematic review of the available data in the TDMS that are relevant to the following intact rock properties: rock tensile strength, Schmidt hammer rebound hardness, and rock triaxial creep. Relevant data are compiled from qualified and unqualified sources into the summary DTNs and these DTNs are evaluated for qualification using the method of corroborating data as defined in AP-SIII.2Q, ''Qualification of Unqualified Data''. This report also presents a summary of the compiled information in the form of descriptive statistics and recommended values that will be contained in a Reference Information Base (RIB) item prepared in accordance with AP-SIII.4Q, ''Development, Review, Online Placement, and Maintenance of Individual Reference Information Base Data Items''. The primary purpose of this report is to produce qualified sets of data that include all relevant intact rock tensile strength, Schmidt hammer rebound hardness, and rock triaxial creep testing done over the course of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). A second purpose is to provide a qualified summary (i.e., a RIB data item) of the test results using descriptive statistics. The immediate purpose of the report is to support the data needs of repository design; however, the products are designed to be appropriate for general use by the YMP. The appropriateness and limitations, if any, of the data, with respect to the intended use, are addressed in this report.

  4. Incorporating Turbula mixers into a blending scale-up model for evaluating the effect of magnesium stearate on tablet tensile strength and bulk specific volume.

    PubMed

    Kushner, Joseph

    2012-06-15

    Turbula bottle blenders are often used in lab-scale experiments during early-stage pharmaceutical product development. Unfortunately, applying knowledge gained with these blenders to larger-sized diffusion mixers is limited by the lack of blending models that include Turbula mixers. To address this need for lubrication blending scale-up, 2:1 blends of microcrystalline cellulose and spray-dried lactose or dibasic calcium phosphate were mixed with 1% magnesium stearate using Turbula bottle blenders, varying bottle volume, V (30-1250mL); bottle headspace fraction, F(headspace) (30-70%); and the number of blending cycles, r (24 to ∼190,000 cycles). The impact of lubrication blending on tensile strength and bulk specific volume quality attributes, QA, was modeled by:where QA(0) is initial QA value, β is sensitivity of QA to lubrication, γ is formulation-specific lubrication rate constant, and L is characteristic mixing length scale (i.e. 1.5V(1/3) for Turbula blenders, V(1/3) for simple diffusion mixers). The factor of 1.5 captures the bottle dimensions and the more complex mixing dynamics of the Turbula blender. This lubrication blending process model is valid for scale-up from 30-mL to 200-L blenders. Assessing bulk specific volume may provide a simpler, more material-sparing means for determining γ than tensile strength, since these QAs exhibited similar γ values. PMID:22405966

  5. Root tensile strength assessment of Dryas octopetala L. and implications for its engineering mechanism on lateral moraine slopes (Turtmann Valley, Switzerland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eibisch, Katharina; Eichel, Jana; Dikau, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Geomorphic processes and properties are influenced by vegetation. It has been shown that vegetation cover intercepts precipitation, enhances surface detention and storage, traps sediment and provides additional surface roughness. Plant roots impact the soil in a mechanical and hydrological manner and affect shear strength, infiltration capacity and moisture content. Simultaneously, geomorphic processes disturb the vegetation development. This strong coupling of the geomorphic and ecologic system is investigated in Biogeomorphology. Lateral moraine slopes are characterized by a variety of geomorphic processes, e. g. sheet wash, solifluction and linear erosion. However, some plant species, termed engineer species, possess specific functional traits which allow them to grow under these conditions and also enable them to influence the frequency, magnitude and even nature of geomorphic processes. For lateral moraine slopes, Dryas octopetala L., an alpine dwarf shrub, was identified as a potential engineer species. The engineering mechanism of D. octopetala, based on its morphological (e.g., growth form) and biomechanical (e.g., root strength) traits, yet remains unclear and only little research has been conducted on alpine plant species. The objectives of this study are to fill this gap by (A) quantifying D. octopetala root tensile strength as an important trait considering anchorage in and stabilization of the slope and (B) linking plant traits to the geomorphic process they influence on lateral moraine slopes. D. octopetala traits were studied on a lateral moraine slope in Turtmann glacier forefield, Switzerland. (A) Root strength of single root threads of Dryas octopetala L. were tested using the spring scale method (Schmidt et al., 2001; Hales et al., 2013). Measurement equipment was modified to enable field measurements of roots shortly after excavation. Tensile strength of individual root threads was calculated and statistically analyzed. First results show that Dryas roots appear to be quite strong compared to other alpine species with a mean tensile strength of 22,63 N mm -². (B) On a micro scale, morphological and biomechanical features of above and below-ground biomass were qualitatively studied through field observations on D. octopetala individuals. Findings indicate that D. octopetala's dense cushions, covering many square meters of the moraines surface, traps fine sediment, stores moisture and significantly reduces erosion through wind and water. Furthermore, Dryas is well adapted to rock fall or burial by forming stabilized patches of ground despite steep slope inclinations and strong, episodic surface runoff and creep processes. Anchorage is provided by its strong root, which in all studied cases grew upslope parallel to the moraines surface. Insights from this study allow to relate root tensile strength and other specific plant traits of Dryas octopetala to an engineering mechanism and effect on geomorphic processes on lateral moraine slopes. Knowledge about Dryas as an engineering species may help to understand its biotic influence on the geomorphic system of a lateral moraine and aid in the selection of species for erosion control or rehabilitation of ecosystems, where Dryas is native.

  6. A Comparative Evaluation of the Effect of Bonding Agent on the Tensile Bond Strength of Two Pit and Fissure Sealants Using Invasive and Non-invasive Techniques: An in–vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shamsher; Adlakha, Vivek; Babaji, Prashant; Chandna, Preetika; Thomas, Abi M.; Chopra, Saroj

    2013-01-01

    Background: Newer technologies and the development of pit and fissure sealants have shifted the treatment philosophy from ‘drill and fill’ to that of ‘seal and heal’. Aims: The purpose of this in–vitro study was to evaluate the effects of bonding agents on the tensile bond strengths of two pit and fissure sealants by using invasive and non-invasive techniques. Study Design and Methods: One hundred and twenty bicuspids were collected and teeth were divided into two groups: Group-I (Clinpro) and Group-II (Conseal f) with 60 teeth in each group. For evaluating tensile bond strengths, occlusal surfaces of all the teeth were flattened by reducing buccal and lingual cusps without disturbing fissures. Standardised polyvinyl tube was bonded to occlusal surfaces with respective materials. Sealants were applied, with or without bonding agents, in increments and they were light cured. Tensile bond strengths were determined by using Universal Testing Machine. Statistical Analysis: Data were then statistically analysed by using Student t–test for comparison. Results: A statistically significant difference was found in tensile bond strength in invasive with bonding agent group than in non-invasive with bonding agent group. Conclusion: This study revealed that invasive techniques increase the tensile bond strengths of sealants as compared to non- invasive techniques and that the use of a bonding agent as an intermediate layer between the tooth and fissure sealant is beneficial for increasing the bond strength. PMID:24298525

  7. Comparative Evaluation of Tensile – Bond Strength of An Orthodontic Adhesive with and without Fluoride Application, After Acid Etching -An Invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Yugandhar, G; Ramana, I Venkata; Srinivas, K; Yadav, S. Sarjeev Singh

    2015-01-01

    Background Fixed appliances hinder the effective control of plaque accumulation and white spot lesions may develop under the ill fitting bands or adjacent to the stainless steel brackets during orthodontic treatment particularly the etching process. Aims and Objectives Comparative study of tensile bond strength of an orthodontic adhesive with and without fluoride application after acid etching to know the effect of fluoride on bond strength. Materials and Methods This study is carried out on 90 non carious human premolar teeth, and divided in 6 groups with each group of 15 specimens. In those Groups I and IV were control group acid etch treatment, Group II and V is 1.23% APF gel (acid etch plus APF gel treatment,) and group III and VI is 8% SnF2 (acid etch plus SnF2 treatment). Samples of Group I, II and III bond strength were tested after 24 h and groups IV, V and VI after one month on microtechtensometer machine. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) investigation was carried out for the 2 specimens for the control group after acid etch and 4 specimens after acid etch with fluoride application for fluoride groups. Results Control and SnF2 treated groups was found to be nearly similar to the control group whereas APF treated group showed less focal holes than the other 2 groups. Conclusion Fluoride application after acid etching without having an adverse effect on bond strength but we can prevent the white spot lesions and caries. PMID:26023648

  8. Effect of low fluency dentin conditioning on tensile bond strength of composite bonded to Er:YAG laser-prepared dentin: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, B; Askari, N; Tielemans, M; Heysselaer, D; Lamard, L; Peremans, A; Nyssen-Behets, C; Nammour, S

    2011-03-01

    Several studies in the literature have previously shown that the bond strength of a composite bonded to dentin is almost equivalent as when dentin is prepared by either bur or Er:YAG laser. The aim of this preliminary study is to assess the hypothesis that dentin conditioning at low fluency by means of Er:YAG laser can improve the value of adhesion of composites resin to dentin. Sixty surfaces of caries-free human third molars extracted for orthodontic purposes were randomly divided into five groups of 12 teeth. The bur group was the control, prepared using bur, group L was prepared using Er:YAG 200mJ, SSP (50s), 20Hz, 15 seconds of sweeping, for groups L80, L100, L120, they were prepared first, with the same parameters of the group L 200, and then they received a conditioning, which is, respectively, 15 s of irradiations at: 80mJ (SSP, 10Hz), 100mJ (SSP, 10Hz), and 120mJ (SSP, 10Hz). All samples were restored in a single-component adhesive system: Xenon (DENTSPLY), and ceramX (DENTSPLY) as the resin composite. The specimens were submitted to tensile bond strength test using a universal testing machine. Data were submitted to statistical analysis using ANOVA coupled to a Tukey-Kramer test at the 95% level. The mean values in MPa were 33.3 for group B, 36.73 for group L 200, 41.7 for group L80, 37.9 for group L100, and 39.1 for group L120. Our results showed that dentin conditioning at a low fluency of 12.58J/cm(2) per pulse, with 80mJ output energy and 50-s pulse duration can significantly improve tensile bond strength of a composite bonded to Er:YAG laser-prepared dentine. PMID:20309596

  9. Tensile bond strength of different adhesive systems to primary dentin treated by Er:YAG laser and conventional high-speed drill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Barbara A.; Navarro, Ricardo S.; Silvestre, Fellipe D.; Pinheiro, Sergio L.; Freitas, Patricia M.; Imparato, Jose Carlos P.; Oda, Margareth

    2005-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the tensile strength of different adhesive systems to primary tooth dentin prepared by high-speed drill and Er:YAG laser (2.94?m). Buccal surfaces of 38 primary canines were ground and flattened with sand paper disks (#120-600 grit) and distributed into five groups (n=15): G1: diamond bur in high-speed drill (HD)+ 35% phosphoric acid (PA)+Single Bond (SB); G2: HD+self-etching One Up Bond F (OUB);G3: Er:YAG laser (KaVo 3- LELO-FOUSP)(4Hz, 80mJ, 25,72J/cm2) (L)+PA+SB, G4: L+SB, G5: L+OUB. The inverted truncated cone samples built with Z-100 composite resin after storage in water (37C/24h) were submitted to tensile bond strength test on Mini Instron 4442 (0.5mm/min, 500N). The data were analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey Test (p<0.05). The mean (MPa) were: G1-3.18(+/-1.24) G2-1.79(+/-0.73) G3-3.17(+/-0.44) G4-8.29(+/-1.86) G5-7.11(+/-2.07). The data analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey Test showed that Laser associated with PA+SB, SB or OUB lead to increased bonding values when compared to HD+PA+SB and HD+OUB (p=0.000), L+SB showed higher values than L+PA+SB and L+OUB (p=0.0311). Er:YAG laser radiation promoted significant increase of bond strength of different adhesive systems evaluated in the dentin of primary teeth.

  10. Compressive and tensile failure at high fluid pressure where preexisting fractures have cohesive strength, with application to the San Andreas fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fournier, R.O.

    1996-01-01

    In thrusting and strike-slip situations, when the maximum principal horizontal stress S1 acts nearly normal to a fault (a misoriented fault, such as the San Andreas), pore-fluid pressure > the lithostatic load, Pf > Sv, is required to reactivate movement on that fault. Pf > Sv may be achieved without causing hydraulic tensile fracturing if (1) previously existing cracks have regained cohesive strength by chemical processes, (2) subcritical crack growth has been blunted, and (3) the least principal horizontal stress S3 nearly equals Sv. Where Pf > Sv has been attained within a misaligned fault, increasing the stress difference (S1 - S3) at constant Pf > Sv will not lead to shear failure, while a decrease in (S1 - S3) can lead to shear failure of that fault. However, where the cohesive strength of material in a broad misaligned fault zone is less than that of the surrounding intact rock, increasing (S1 - S3) while Pf > Sv can result in shear failure of fractures at near optimum angles to S1, but confined within this weak fault zone. If this faulting results in the local short-lived attainment of Pf > Sv (cataclastic deformation and frictional heating overcoming dilation) and a simultaneous decrease in (S1 - S3), this combination of effects can trigger movement along the main trace of the misaligned fault. When increasing Pf results in hydraulic failure, anisotropy in tensile strength or fracture toughness resulting from foliation within faults allows fractures to propagate along the planes of weakness rather than across the foliation perpendicular to S3.

  11. Effect of a ductility layer on the tensile strength of TiAl-based multilayer composite sheets prepared by EB-PVD

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rubing; Zhang, Yaoyao; Liu, Qiang; Chen, Guiqing; Zhang, Deming

    2014-09-15

    TiAl/Nb and TiAl/NiCoCrAl laminate composite sheets with a thickness of 0.4–0.6 mm and dimensions of 150 mm × 100 mm were successfully fabricated by electron beam physical vapor deposition. The microstructures of the sheets were examined, and their mechanical properties were compared with those of TiAl monolithic sheet produced by electron beam physical vapor deposition. Tensile testing was performed at room temperature and 750 °C, and the fracture surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy. Among the three microlaminate sheets, the TiAl/NiCoCrAl micro-laminate sheet had the best comprehensive properties at room temperature, and the TiAl/Nb micro-laminate sheet showed the ideal high-temperature strength and plasticity at 750 °C. The result was discussed in terms of metal strengthening mechanism. - Highlights: • TiAl-based multilayer foils was fabricated successfully by using EB-PVD method; • The tensile properties and micro-fracture morphologies of the sheet were investigated; • The deformation behavior of the multilayer foils was discussed.

  12. Role of matrix microstructure on room-temperature tensile properties and fiber-strength utilization of an orthorhombic Ti-alloy-based composite

    SciTech Connect

    Boehlert, C.J.; Majumdar, B.S.; Krishnamurthy, S.; Miracle, D.B.

    1997-02-01

    Microstructure-property understanding obtained for a nominally Ti-25Al-17Nb (at. pct) monolithic sheet alloy was used to heat treat a unidirectional four-ply SCS-6/Ti-25Al-17Nb metal-matrix composite (MMC) and a fiberless neat material of the same alloy for enhancing mechanical properties. The unreinforced alloy and [0]{sub 4} composite recorded significant improvements in ductility and strength, which were related to the microstructural condition. Modeling of the tensile strength based on fiber fracture statistics helped in understanding how improved matrix microstructure provided more efficient utilization, which was related to an {alpha}{sub 2} stabilized zone around the fiber. A Nb coating on the fiber was used to modify the local microstructure, and it produced a modest improvement in strength and ductility in the transverse direction. Structure-property relations of the matrix under different heat-treatment conditions are described in terms of deformation and failure mechanisms of the constituent phases; {alpha}{sub 2} (ordered hexagonal close-packed), B2 (ordered body-centered cubic), and O (ordered orthorhombic based on Ti{sub 2}AlNb).

  13. Effect of Load Rate on Tensile Strength of Various CFCCs at Elevated Temperatures: An Approach to Life Prediction Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2001-01-01

    Strength of three continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic composites, including SiC/CAS-11, SiC/MAS-5 and SiC/SiC, was determined as a function of test rate in air at 1100 - 1200 C. All three composite materials exhibited a strong dependency of strength on test rate, similar to the behavior observed in many advanced monolithic ceramics at elevated temperatures. The application of the preloading technique as well as the prediction of life from one loading configuration (constant stress-rate) to another (constant stress loading) suggested that the overall macroscopic failure mechanism of the composites would be the one governed by a power-law tyw of damage evolution/accumulation, analogous to slow crack growth commonly observed in advanced monolithic ceramics. It was further found that constant stress-rate testing could be used as an alternative to life prediction test methodology even for the composite materials at least for the short range of lifetime.

  14. Time/Temperature Dependent Tensile Strength of SiC and Al2O3-Based Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, Hee Mann; DiCarlo, James A.

    1997-01-01

    In order to understand and model the thermomechanical behavior of fiber-reinforced composites, stress-rupture, fast-fracture, and warm-up rupture studies were conducted on various advanced SiC and Al2O3-based fibers in the,temperature range from 20 to 1400 C in air as well as in inert environments. The measured stress-rupture, fast fracture, and warm-up rupture strengths were correlated into a single master time/temperature-dependent strength plot for each fiber type using thermal activation and slow crack growth theories. It is shown that these plots are useful for comparing and selecting fibers for CMC and MMC reinforcement and that, in comparison to stress rupture tests, the fast-fracture and warm-up tests can be used for rapid generation of these plots.

  15. Comparative Evaluation of Tensile Bond Strength between Silicon Soft Liners and Processed Denture Base Resin Conditioned by Three Modes of Surface Treatment: An Invitro Study.

    PubMed

    Surapaneni, Hemchand; Ariga, Padma; Haribabu, R; Ravi Shankar, Y; Kumar, V H C; Attili, Sirisha

    2013-09-01

    Soft denture liners act as a cushion for the denture bearing mucosa through even distribution of functional load, avoiding local stress concentrations and improving retention of dentures there by providing comfort to the patient. The objective of the present study was to compare and evaluate the tensile bond strengths of silicone-based soft lining materials (Ufi Gel P and GC Reline soft) with different surface pre treatments of heat cure PMMA denture base acrylic resin. Stainless steel dies measuring 40 mm in length; 10 mm in width and 10 mm in height (40 × 10 × 10) were machined to prepare standardized for the polymethyl methacrylate resin blocks. Stainless steel dies (spacer for resilient liner) measuring 3 mm thick; 10 mm long and 10 mm wide were prepared as spacers to ensure uniformity of the soft liner being tested. Two types of Addition silicone-based soft lining materials (room temperature polymerised soft lining materials (RTPSLM): Ufi Gel P and GC Reline soft) were selected. Ufi Gel P (VOCO, Germany), GC Reline soft (GC America) are resilient, chairside vinyl polysiloxane denture reliners of two different manufacturers. A total of 80 test samples were prepared of which 40 specimens were prepared for Group A (Ufi Gel P) and 40 specimens for Group B (GC Reline soft). In these groups, based on Pre-treatment of acrylic resin specimens each group was subdivided into four sub groups of 10 samples each. Sub-group I-without any surface treatment. Sub-group II-sand blasted Sub-group III-treated with Methyl Methacrylate monomer Sub-group IV-treated with chemical etchant Acetone. The results were statistically analysed by Kruscal Wallis test, Mann-Whitney U test, and Independent t test. The specimens treated with MMA monomer wetting showed superior and significant bond strength than those obtained by other surface treatments. The samples belonging to subgroups of GC Reline soft exhibit superior tensile bond strength than subgroups of Ufi Gel P. The modes of failure of all specimens were mostly adhesive in nature. Surface pre treatments by chemical means improved the bond strength between the silicone liners and denture base. PMID:24431747

  16. Effects of Rolling and Cooling Conditions on Microstructure and Tensile and Charpy Impact Properties of Ultra-Low-Carbon High-Strength Bainitic Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Hyo Kyung; Shin, Sang Yong; Hwang, Byoungchul; Lee, Chang Gil; Kim, Nack J.; Lee, Sunghak

    2011-07-01

    Six ultra-low-carbon high-strength bainitic steel plates were fabricated by controlling rolling and cooling conditions, and effects of bainitic microstructure on tensile and Charpy impact properties were investigated. The microstructural evolution was more critically affected by start cooling temperature and cooling rate than by finish rolling temperature. Bainitic microstructures such as granular bainites (GBs) and bainitic ferrites (BFs) were well developed as the start cooling temperature decreased or the cooling rate increased. When the steels cooled from 973 K or 873 K (700 °C or 600 °C) were compared under the same cooling rate of 10 K/s (10 °C/s), the steels cooled from 973 K (700 °C) consisted mainly of coarse GBs, while the steels cooled from 873 K (600 °C) contained a considerable amount of BFs having high strength, thereby resulting in the higher strength but the lower ductility and upper shelf energy (USE). When the steels cooled from 673 K (400 °C) at a cooling rate of 10 K/s (10 °C/s) or 0.1 K/s (0.1 °C/s) were compared under the same start cooling temperature of 873 K (600 °C), the fast cooled specimens were composed mainly of coarse GBs or BFs, while the slowly cooled specimens were composed mainly of acicular ferrites (AFs). Since AFs had small effective grain size and contained secondary phases finely distributed at grain boundaries, the slowly cooled specimens had a good combination of strength, ductility, and USE, together with very low energy transition temperature (ETT).

  17. Optical diametric drive acceleration through action-reaction symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimmer, Martin; Regensburger, Alois; Bersch, Christoph; Miri, Mohammad-Ali; Batz, Sascha; Onishchukov, Georgy; Christodoulides, Demetrios N.; Peschel, Ulf

    2013-12-01

    Newton's third law of motion is one of the pillars of classical physics. This fundamental principle states that the forces two bodies exert on each other are equal and opposite. Had the resulting accelerations been oriented in the same direction, this would have instead led to a counterintuitive phenomenon, that of diametric drive. In such a hypothetical arrangement, two interacting particles constantly accelerate each other in the same direction through a violation of the action-reaction symmetry. Although in classical mechanics any realization of this process requires one of the two particles to have a negative mass and hence is strictly forbidden, it could nevertheless be feasible in periodic structures where the effective mass can also attain a negative sign. Here we report the first experimental observation of such diametric drive acceleration for pulses propagating in a nonlinear optical mesh lattice. The demonstrated reversal of action-reaction symmetry could enable altogether new possibilities for frequency conversion and pulse-steering applications.

  18. Comparison of tensile bond strengths of four one-bottle self-etching adhesive systems with Er:YAG laser-irradiated dentin.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qianzhou; Chen, Minle; Ding, Jiangfeng

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the interaction of current one-bottle self-etching adhesives and Er:YAG laser with dentin using a tensile bond strength (TBS) test and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in vitro. Two hundred and thirteen dentin discs were randomly distributed to the Control Group using bur cutting and to the Laser Group using an Er:YAG laser (200 mJ, VSP, 20 Hz). The following adhesives were investigated: one two-step total-etch adhesive [Prime & Bond NT (Dentsply)] and four one-step self-etch adhesives [G-Bond plus (GC), XENO V (Dentsply), iBond Self Etch (Heraeus) and Adper Easy One (3 M ESPE)]. Samples were restored with composite resin, and after 24-hour storage in distilled water, subjected to the TBS test. For morphological analysis, 12 dentin specimens were prepared for SEM. No significant differences were found between the control group and laser group (p = 0.899); dentin subjected to Prime & Bond NT, XENOV and Adper Easy One produced higher TBS. In conclusion, this study indicates that Er:YAG laser-prepared dentin can perform as well as bur on TBS, and some of the one-step one-bottle adhesives are comparable to the total-etch adhesives in TBS on dentin. PMID:24190486

  19. Comparison of J[sub Ic] and J--R curves for short crack and tensilely loaded specimen geometries of a high strength structural steel

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, J.A. ); Hackett, E.M. ); Roe, C. )

    1992-11-01

    This paper describes an experimental program which had the objective of developing a series of J-R curve data from laboratory specimens of varied constraint. Constraint was varied by testing specimens with different thicknesses, crack lengths, and mode of loading. All specimens were relatively small and were kept simple in geometry and loading to allow estimation of the applied J integral. All tests were conducted on high strength structural steel, at ambient temperature, on the ductile upper shelf for this alloy. Results of these tests have shown that different constraint condition can dramatically affect the J[sub Ic] and the J-R curve for the full range of crack lengths and loading modes studied here. The results are compared in terms of the T Stress'' (T[sub sigma]) parameter and the Q constraint parameter, but the trends in the data do not seem to correlate well with either parameter. Although both the T[sub sigma] and Q parameters predict that the single edge notched tensile bar (SE(T)) would have relatively high constraint, this geometry .,demonstrated the highest J[sub Ic] properties. The double edge notched bars were predicted by the T[sub sigma] or Q parameters to be a low constraint geometry, however this geometry resulted in J[sub Ic] results lower than those measured on standard deeply crack bend bars.

  20. Effects of excipients on the tensile strength, surface properties and free volume of Klucel® free films of pharmaceutical importance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottnek, Mihály; Süvegh, Károly; Pintye-Hódi, Klára; Regdon, Géza

    2013-08-01

    The physicochemical properties of polymers planned to be applied as mucoadhesive films were studied. Two types of Klucel® hydroxypropylcellulose (LF and MF) were used as film-forming polymers. Hydroxypropylcellulose was incorporated in 2 w/w% with glycerol and xylitol as excipients and lidocaine base as an active ingredient at 5, 10 or 15 w/w% of the mass of the film-forming polymer. The free volume changes of the films were investigated by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy, the mechanical properties of the samples were measured with a tensile strength tester and contact angles were determined to assess the surface properties of the films. It was found that the Klucel® MF films had better physicochemical properties than those of the LF films. Klucel® MF as a film-forming polymer with lidocaine base and both excipients at 5 w/w% exhibited physicochemical properties and good workability. The excipients proved to exert strong effects on the physicochemical properties of the tested systems and it is very important to study them intensively in preformulation studies in the pharmaceutical technology in order to utilise their benefits and to avoid any disadvantageous effects.

  1. Simultaneous determination of the impurity and radial tensile strength of reduced glutathione tablets by a high selective NIR-PLS method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Juan; Jiang, Yue; Fan, Qi; Chen, Yang; Wu, Ruanqi

    This paper establishes a high-throughput and high selective method to determine the impurity named oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and radial tensile strength (RTS) of reduced glutathione (GSH) tablets based on near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy and partial least squares (PLS). In order to build and evaluate the calibration models, the NIR diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS) and transmittance spectra (TS) for 330 GSH tablets were accurately measured by using the optimized parameter values. For analyzing GSSG or RTS of GSH tablets, the NIR-DRS or NIR-TS were selected, subdivided reasonably into calibration and prediction sets, and processed appropriately with chemometric techniques. After selecting spectral sub-ranges and neglecting spectrum outliers, the PLS calibration models were built and the factor numbers were optimized. Then, the PLS models were evaluated by the root mean square errors of calibration (RMSEC), cross-validation (RMSECV) and prediction (RMSEP), and by the correlation coefficients of calibration (Rc) and prediction (Rp). The results indicate that the proposed models have good performances. It is thus clear that the NIR-PLS can simultaneously, selectively, nondestructively and rapidly analyze the GSSG and RTS of GSH tablets, although the contents of GSSG impurity were quite low while those of GSH active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) quite high. This strategy can be an important complement to the common NIR methods used in the on-line analysis of API in pharmaceutical preparations. And this work expands the NIR applications in the high-throughput and extraordinarily selective analysis.

  2. Temperature-dependent tensile strength, surface roughness diagnostics, and magnetic support and positioning of polymer ICF shells. Final report, October 1, 1993--April 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Honig, A.

    1995-12-15

    During the course of this grant, we perfected emissivity and accommodation coefficient measurements on polymer ICF shells in the temperature range 250 to 350 K. Values for polystyrene shells are generally between 10{sup -2} and 10{sup -3}, which are very advantageous for ICF at cryogenic temperatures. Preliminary results on Br doped target shells indicate an accommodation coefficient, presumably associated with surface roughness on an atomic scale, about an order of magnitude larger than for ordinary polystyrene target shells. We also constructed apparatus with optical access for low temperature tensile strength and emissivity measurements, and made preliminary tests on this system. Magnetic shells were obtained both from GDP coating and from doping styrene with 10 manometer size ferromagnetic particles. The magnetic properties were measured through electron spin resonance (ESR). These experiments confirm the applicability of the Curie law, and establish the validity of using ESR measurements to determine shell temperature in the low temperature regime from 4K to 250K, thus complementing our presently accessible range. The high electron spin densities (> 10{sup 20}/CM{sup 3}) suggest magnetic levitation should be feasible at cryogenic temperatures. This work has resulted in two conference presentations, a Technical Report, a paper to be published in Fusion Technology, and a Master`s Thesis.

  3. High-strain rate tensile characterization of graphite platelet reinforced vinyl ester based nanocomposites using split-Hopkinson pressure bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramanik, Brahmananda

    The dynamic response of exfoliated graphite nanoplatelet (xGnP) reinforced and carboxyl terminated butadiene nitrile (CTBN) toughened vinyl ester based nanocomposites are characterized under both dynamic tensile and compressive loading. Dynamic direct tensile tests are performed applying the reverse impact Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) technique. The specimen geometry for tensile test is parametrically optimized by Finite Element Analysis (FEA) using ANSYS Mechanical APDLRTM. Uniform stress distribution within the specimen gage length has been verified using high-speed digital photography. The on-specimen strain gage installation is substituted by a non-contact Laser Occlusion Expansion Gage (LOEG) technique for infinitesimal dynamic tensile strain measurements. Due to very low transmitted pulse signal, an alternative approach based on incident pulse is applied for obtaining the stress-time history. Indirect tensile tests are also performed combining the conventional SHPB technique with Brazilian disk test method for evaluating cylindrical disk specimens. The cylindrical disk specimen is held snugly in between two concave end fixtures attached to the incident and transmission bars. Indirect tensile stress is estimated from the SHPB pulses, and diametrical transverse tensile strain is measured using LOEG. Failure diagnosis using high-speed digital photography validates the viability of utilizing this indirect test method for characterizing the tensile properties of the candidate vinyl ester based nanocomposite system. Also, quasi-static indirect tensile response agrees with previous investigations conducted using the traditional dog-bone specimen in quasi-static direct tensile tests. Investigation of both quasi-static and dynamic indirect tensile test responses show the strain rate effect on the tensile strength and energy absorbing capacity of the candidate materials. Finally, the conventional compressive SHPB tests are performed. It is observed that both strength and energy absorbing capacity of these candidate material systems are distinctively less under dynamic tension than under compressive loading. Nano-reinforcement appears to marginally improve these properties for pure vinyl ester under dynamic tension, although it is found to be detrimental under dynamic compression.

  4. Advances in experimental assessment of dynamic tensile strength of concrete by the spalling technique. …in tribute to Janusz Roman Klepaczko, Emeritus Professor at the Université Paul Verlaine in Metz, passed away on August 15, 2008.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brara, Ahmed

    2015-09-01

    An experimental method to test concrete in dynamic tension by spalling with a Hopkinson bar as loading and measuring tool was developed in 1999. The dynamic strength of concrete specimen and strain rate were indirectly derived from an accurate data processing of the signals measured on the Hopkinson bar surface. This method suggested by late Prof. Klepaczko, allowed for reaching the highest strain rate reported in literature for which an intriguing tensile strength increase was highlighted. This simple and efficient technique has been adopted by many researchers around the world. Some significant improvements in terms of definition and reproducibility of the incident loading pulse travelling along the bar and direct and/or contactless measurements on concrete specimens have been introduced. The very high rate sensitivity of concrete tensile strength was corroborated by the additional experimental data obtained with this experimental technique during the last fifteen years.

  5. Light-curing efficiency of dental adhesives by gallium nitride violet-laser diode determined in terms of ultimate micro-tensile strength.

    PubMed

    Kameyama, Atsushi; Kato, Junji; De Munck, Jan; Hatayama, Hitoshi; Haruyama, Akiko; Yoshinari, Masao; Takase, Yasuaki; Van Meerbeek, Bart; Tsunoda, Masatake

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether violet-laser diode (VLD) can be used as light-curing source. The ultimate (micro-)tensile strength (μTS) of three adhesives was determined when cured by VLD in comparison with curing by two different types of commercial LED light-curing units. One VLD (VLM 500) and two LED units (Curenos and G-Light Prima) were used to cure the adhesive resin of the two-step self-etch adhesives Clearfil SE Bond, Tokuso Mac Bond II, and FL-Bond II. A 0.6-mm thick acrylic mould was filled with adhesive resin and cured for 60 s. After 24-h water storage, specimens were trimmed into an hourglass shape with a width of 1.2 mm at the narrowest part, after which the μTS was determined (n=10). In addition, the light transmittance of each adhesive was characterized using a UV-vis-NIR spectrometer. No significant difference in curing efficiency between VLD and LED were observed for both Tokuso Mac Bond II and FL-Bond II (p>0.05). For Clearfil SE Bond, the μTS of VLD-cured specimens was higher than that of the specimens cured by the LED Curenos unit (p<0.05). Spectrometry revealed that this marked difference must be attributed to a different light transmittance of Clearfil SE Bond for visible blue light versus for the lower area of UV and visible violet light. In conclusion, A GaN-based violet laser diode can be used as light-curing source to initiate polymerization of dental resins. PMID:22561254

  6. Improved Tensile Test for Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osiecki, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    For almost-nondestructive tensile testing of ceramics, steel rod is bonded to sample of ceramic. Assembly is then pulled apart in conventional tensile-test machine. Test destroys only shallow surface layer which can be machined away making specimen ready for other uses. Method should be useful as manufacturing inspection procedure for low-strength brittle materials.

  7. Comparative evaluation of tensile bond strength of a polyvinyl acetate-based resilient liner following various denture base surface pre-treatment methods and immersion in artificial salivary medium: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Philip, Jacob M.; Ganapathy, Dhanraj M.; Ariga, Padma

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aim: This study was formulated to evaluate and estimate the influence of various denture base resin surface pre-treatments (chemical and mechanical and combinations) upon tensile bond strength between a poly vinyl acetate-based denture liner and a denture base resin. Materials and Methods: A universal testing machine was used for determining the bond strength of the liner to surface pre-treated acrylic resin blocks. The data was analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and the t-test (? =.05). Results: This study infers that denture base surface pre-treatment can improve the adhesive tensile bond strength between the liner and denture base specimens. The results of this study infer that chemical, mechanical, and mechano-chemical pre-treatments will have different effects on the bond strength of the acrylic soft resilient liner to the denture base. Conclusion: Among the various methods of pre-treatment of denture base resins, it was inferred that the mechano-chemical pre-treatment method with air-borne particle abrasion followed by monomer application exhibited superior bond strength than other methods with the resilient liner. Hence, this method could be effectively used to improve bond strength between liner and denture base and thus could minimize delamination of liner from the denture base during function. PMID:23293485

  8. Reexamination of the present stress state of the Atera fault system, central Japan, based on the calibrated crustal stress data of hydraulic fracturing tests obtained by measuring the tensile strength of rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Futoshi; Mizoguchi, Kazuo; Fukuyama, Eiichi; Omura, Kentaro

    2010-04-01

    To investigate past faulting activity and the present physical state of intraplate faults in Japan, we reexamined the crustal stress measured by hydraulic fracturing tests (HFTs) incorporating the tensile strength of rocks. The tensile strength was measured by fracturing hollow cylindrical rock samples which were obtained close to the Atotsugawa, the Atera, and the Rokko-Awaji fault systems in central Japan, where in situ stress measurements had been conducted with HFTs. The measured tensile strength data reveal that the reopening pressure was obviously biased in the conventional HFT with a large compliance system. We reestimated the reopening pressure using the measured tensile strength and recalculated the in situ stress around the Atera fault system. We found that the shear stress decreases toward the fault. Although the past long-term slip direction of the Atera fault system has been considered to be left-lateral from the geomorphological features, the reestimated stress suggests that the present slip direction is right-lateral, a finding that is also supported by the present-day horizontal crustal deformation observed by triangulation and GPS surveys. The amount of accumulated right-lateral dislocation estimated from the stress data using the dislocation model of Okada (1992) was 2.1 m. Because the current slip rate from the GPS survey is 1.9 ± 1.4 mm/yr, the accumulation period of the right-lateral dislocation becomes approximately 1100 ± 800 years if the slip rate is stable. This estimation suggests that during the latest earthquake the Atera fault system underwent right-lateral dislocation.

  9. The theoretical strength of rubber: numerical simulations of polyisoprene networks at high tensile strains evidence the role of average chain tortuosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, David E.; Barber, John L.

    2013-10-01

    The ultimate stress and strain of polyisoprene rubber were studied by numerical simulations of three-dimensional random networks, subjected to tensile strains high enough to cause chain rupture. Previously published molecular chain force extension models and a numerical network construction procedure were used to perform the simulations for network crosslink densities between 2 × 1019 and 1 × 1020 cm-3, corresponding to experimental dicumyl-peroxide concentrations of 1-5 parts per hundred. At tensile failure (defined as the point of maximum stress), we find that the fraction of network chains ruptured is between 0.1% and 1%, depending on the crosslink density. The fraction of network chains that are taut, i.e. their end-to-end distance is greater than their unstretched contour length, ranges between 10% and 15% at failure. Our model predicts that the theoretical (defect-free) failure stress should be about twice the highest experimental value reported. For extensions approaching failure, tensile stress is dominated by the network morphology and purely enthalpic bond distortion forces and, in this regime, the model has essentially no free parameters. The average initial chain tortuosity (τ) appears to be an important statistical property of rubber networks; if the stress is scaled by τ and the tensile strain is scaled by τ-1, we obtain a master curve for stress versus strain, valid for all crosslink densities. We derive an analytic expression for the average tortuosity, which is in agreement with values calculated in the simulations.

  10. In-Plane Cracking Behavior and Ultimate Strength for 2D Woven and Braided Melt-Infiltrated SiC/SiC Composites Tensile Loaded in Off-Axis Fiber Directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Yun, Hee Mann; DiCarlo, James A.

    2007-01-01

    The tensile mechanical properties of ceramic matrix composites (CMC) in directions off the primary axes of the reinforcing fibers are important for architectural design of CMC components that are subjected to multi-axial stress states. In this study, 2D-woven melt-infiltrated (MI) SiC/SiC composite panels with balanced fiber content in the 0 degree and 90 degree directions were tensile loaded in-plane in the 0 degree direction and at 45 degree to this direction. In addition, a 2D triaxially-braided MI composite panel with balanced fiber content in the plus or minus 67 degree bias directions and reduced fiber content in the axial direction was tensile loaded perpendicular to the axial direction tows (i.e., 23 degrees from the bias fibers). Stress-strain behavior, acoustic emission, and optical microscopy were used to quantify stress-dependent matrix cracking and ultimate strength in the panels. It was observed that both off-axis loaded panels displayed higher composite onset stresses for through-thickness matrix cracking than the 2D-woven 0/90 panels loaded in the primary 0 degree direction. These improvements for off-axis cracking strength can in part be attributed to higher effective fiber fractions in the loading direction, which in turn reduces internal stresses on critical matrix flaws for a given composite stress. Also for the 0/90 panel loaded in the 45 degree direction, an improved distribution of matrix flaws existed due to the absence of fiber tows perpendicular to the loading direction. In addition, for the +67/0/-67 braided panel, the axial tows perpendicular to the loading direction were not only low in volume fraction, but were also were well separated from one another. Both off-axis oriented panels also showed relatively good ultimate tensile strength when compared to other off-axis oriented composites in the literature, both on an absolute strength basis as well as when normalized by the average fiber strength within the composites. Initial implications are discussed for constituent and architecture design to improve the directional cracking of SiC/SiC CMC components with MI matrices.

  11. STRENGTH OF A C-SPHERE FLEXURE SPECIMEN

    SciTech Connect

    Wereszczak, Andrew A; Wang, Wei; Jadaan, Osama M.; Lance, Michael J; Lin, Hua-Tay

    2007-01-01

    A 'C-Sphere' flexure strength specimen geometry was conceived and developed to measure a relevant strength of bearing-grade Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} balls and to relate that to surface-located strength-limiting flaws and to ultimately link those flaw populations to rolling contact fatigue performance. A slot was machined into the balls to a set depth to produce the C-sphere geometry. C-sphere specimens were then diametrally compressed to produce a monotonically increasing flexure or hoop tensile stress at their surface that caused their fracture. The strength was determined using the combination of failure load, C-sphere geometry, and FEA, and the stress field was used to determine C-sphere effective areas and effective volumes as a function of Weibull modulus. A description of the specimen and the aforementioned analysis are provided and a comparison of C-sphere flexure strength distributions of two bearing grade Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} materials (NBD200 and SN101C) is given.

  12. Tensile Test For Arboform Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plavanescu (Mazurchevici), Simona; Quadrini, Fabrizio; Nedelcu, Dumitru

    2015-07-01

    Petroleum-based plastic materials constitute a major environmental problem due to their low biodegradability and accumulation in various environments. Therefore, searching for novel biodegradable plastics is received particular attention. Our studied material, "Liquid wood" produced from lignin, natural fibres and natural additives, is completely biodegradable in natural environment, in normal conditions. This paper presents the behaviour of Arboform and Arboform reinforced with Aramidic Fibers tensile test analysis. Experimental data show that the tensile strength reached an average value of 15.8 MPa, the modulus of elasticity after tests is 3513.3MPA for Arboform and for the reinforcement the tensile strength is 23.625MPa, the modulus of elasticity after tests is 3411.5MPA, the materials present a brittle behaviour. The high mechanical properties of newly developed material, better than of other ordinary plastics, recommend it as a potential environment-friendly substituent for synthetic plastics, which are present in all fields of activity.

  13. Cassini First Diametric Radio Occultation of Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marouf, E.; French, R.; Rappaport, N.; Kliore, A.; Flasar, M.; Nagy, A.; Ambrosini, R.; McGhee, C.; Schinder, P.; Anabtawi, A.; Barbinis, E.; Goltz, G.; Thomson, F.; Wong, K.

    2005-05-01

    We present preliminary results expected from the first planned Cassini radio occultation observation of Saturn's rings, to be conducted on May 3rd, 2005. The path of Cassini as seen from Earth (the occultation track) has been designed to cross the rings from the west to the east ansa almost diametrically, allowing for occultation of all major ring features at two widely separated longitudes (about 180 deg apart). The duration of the geometric occultation is about 1.5 hours on each side. During the occultation, Cassini transmits through the rings three coherent monochromatic radio signals of wavelength 0.94, 3.6, and 13 cm (Ka-, X-, and S-band respectively), a capability unique to Cassini. The perturbed signals received at the Earth are recorded at the NASA DSN complexes at Goldstone and Canberra. Both direct and forward-scattered components of the signal may be identified in spectrograms of the received signals. The time history of the extinction of the direct signal is expected to yield high-spatial-resolution optical depth and phase shift profiles of ring structure. The timing of the occultation was optimized to allow probing the rings when the ring-opening-angle B (the angle between the line-of-sight and the ring plane) is relatively large (B = 23 deg), hence maximizing chances of measuring for the first time the structure of the relatively optically thick Ring B. In a similar experiment by Voyager in 1980, excessive signal attenuation along the long path within the nearly closed rings (B = 5.9 deg) limited the utility of the observations in relatively thick ring regions, in particular the main Ring B. For the Cassini optimized occultation geometry, a large B, slow radial velocity along the occultation track, and much improved phase stability of the reference ultrastable oscillator (USO) on board Cassini combine to promise achievable radial resolution approaching 100 m over a good fraction of the rings. Measurement of the amplitude and phase of the diffracted signal enables reconstruction of the observations to remove diffraction effects. Reliable high resolution profiling of ring structure at multiple ring longitudes is at the heart of investigating ring kinematics and dynamics, a major scientific objective of this experiment. In addition, observations of the scattered signal combined with measurements of the differential extinction of the three radio signals are expected to yield complementary information about ring physical properties, including particle size distribution and thickness, another major scientific objective.

  14. Investigation of strength of a hybrid adhesive anchor system used in precast concrete welded repair applications subjected to tensile and eccentric shear loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eilers, Michael Glenn

    A common precast industry repair for missing or misplaced connection plates is the use of an adhesive anchor system to fasten repair plates to precast members. Typically, the repair plate will experience elevated temperatures during the welding of the loose erection plate to the repair plate. Limited testing and theoretical data are currently available to provide design guidelines on how the elevated temperatures induced by welding affect the behavior and capacity of the adhesive anchoring systems. This dissertation outlines bond tests, eccentric shear tests, and a temperature investigation performed using a hybrid adhesive system in precast concrete repair applications. In addition, limited bond strength testing data using a high strength two-part epoxy adhesive is also included. The overall aim of this work is to provide test data and guidance to the industry and design professionals when designing adhesive anchoring systems for repair applications exposed to welding.

  15. Time/temperature dependent tensile strength of SiC and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-based fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Hee Mann; DiCarlo, J.A.

    1996-12-31

    In order to understand and model the thermomechanical behavior of fiber-reinforced composites, stress-rupture, fast-fracture, and warm-up rupture studies were conducted on various advanced SiC and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-based fibers in the temperature range from 20 to 1400 C in air as well as in inert environments. The measured stress-rupture, fast fracture, and warm-up rupture strengths were correlated into a single master time/temperature-dependent strength plot for each fiber type using thermal activation and slow crack growth theories. It is shown that these plots are useful for comparing and selecting fibers for CMC and MMC reinforcement and that, in comparison to stress rupture tests, the fast-fracture and warm-up tests can be used for rapid generation of these plots.

  16. Experimental Analysis of Work-piece's Diametrical Error in Ultrasonic-Vibration-Assisted Turning

    SciTech Connect

    Soleimanimehr, H.; Nategh, M. J.; Gholamzadeh, B.

    2011-01-17

    Vibration at an ultrasonic frequency is superimposed on the ordinary cutting motion in ultrasonic-vibration-assisted turning (UAT). This combinatory cutting motion results in reduction of the cutting force and surface roughness, and improvement of the dimensional tolerances compared with conventional turning (CT). The advantages obtainable from UAT has made this process suitable for machining hard-to-cut and brittle materials such as super-alloys and ceramics, as well as ordinary materials. The elastic deflection of work-pieces is primarily responsible for the diametrical errors of the machined parts. This is of course more obvious for slender work-pieces. The influence of UAT process on the diametrical error has not yet been investigated. This has been partly undertaken by the authors of the present paper. It has been experimentally illustrated in this paper that ultrasonic vibration superimposed on the tool tip can result in reduction of the diametrical error and thus reduced scrap rate is ensued.

  17. Experimental Analysis of Work-piece's Diametrical Error in Ultrasonic-Vibration-Assisted Turning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soleimanimehr, H.; Nategh, M. J.; Gholamzadeh, B.

    2011-01-01

    Vibration at an ultrasonic frequency is superimposed on the ordinary cutting motion in ultrasonic-vibration-assisted turning (UAT). This combinatory cutting motion results in reduction of the cutting force and surface roughness, and improvement of the dimensional tolerances compared with conventional turning (CT). The advantages obtainable from UAT has made this process suitable for machining hard-to-cut and brittle materials such as super-alloys and ceramics, as well as ordinary materials. The elastic deflection of work-pieces is primarily responsible for the diametrical errors of the machined parts. This is of course more obvious for slender work-pieces. The influence of UAT process on the diametrical error has not yet been investigated. This has been partly undertaken by the authors of the present paper. It has been experimentally illustrated in this paper that ultrasonic vibration superimposed on the tool tip can result in reduction of the diametrical error and thus reduced scrap rate is ensued.

  18. Do Diametric Measurements Provide Sufficient and Reliable Tumor Assessment? An Evaluation of Diametric, Areametric, and Volumetric Variability of Lung Lesion Measurements on Computerized Tomography Scans

    PubMed Central

    Fogarty, Edward; Beal, James; Chaudhary, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Diametric analysis is the standard approach utilized for tumor measurement on medical imaging. However, the availability of newer more sophisticated techniques may prove advantageous. An evaluation of diameter, area, and volume was performed on 64 different lung lesions by three trained users. These calculations were obtained using a free DICOM viewer and standardized measuring procedures. Measurement variability was then studied using relative standard deviation (RSD) and intraclass correlation. Volumetric measurements were shown to be more precise than diametric. With minimal RSD and variance between different users, volumetric analysis was demonstrated as a reliable measurement technique. Additionally, the diameters were used to calculate an estimated area and volume; thereafter the estimated area and volume were compared against the actual measured values. The results in this study showed independence of the estimated and actual values. Estimated area deviated an average of 43.5% from the actual measured, and volume deviated 88.03%. The range of this variance was widely scattered and without trend. These results suggest that diametric measurements cannot be reliably correlated to actual tumor size. Access to appropriate software capable of producing volume measurements has improved drastically and shows great potential in the clinical assessment of tumors. Its applicability merits further consideration. PMID:26064117

  19. Effects of retained austenite on the tensile properties and toughness of ultra-high strength martensitic precipitation hardened stainless steels. Final technical report, 1 April 1997--31 March 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, W.M.

    1998-12-14

    The purpose of this work was to assess the effects of the amount of retained austenite content on the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of martensitic precipitation strengthened stainless steels for four different precipitation strengthening systems, one utilizing NiTi strengthening and three utilizing R-phase strengthening. The retained austenite contents in the four systems were varied by varying composition. The austenite content in the NiTi strengthened system was varied by varying the chromium content and the austenite content in the R-phase strengthened Systems was varied by varying the nickel content. The room temperature toughness levels of the NiTi strengthened system were quite low and it was decided not to pursue this system further. The three R-phase strengthened systems had sufficient room temperature toughness and strength to be of further interest. Of these three systems the primary focus was on the 12Cr/12Co/5Mo system. In this system four alloys, identical except for variations in nickel content, were the primary focus of the work. These alloys achieved, on tempering at 5250 C for 3.16 hours, yield strengths on the order of 210 ksi and ultimate tensile strengths of 235 ksi. The effect of test temperature on the Charpy impact energy was investigated for two tempering temperatures for these four alloys. It was found for both tempering conditions that lower ductile-to-brittle transition temperatures were favored by increasing amounts of austenite in the structure. In fact, the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature was quite low, about -750 C, for the tempered at 5250 C for 3.16 hours microstructure of the alloy in this series which contained the highest nickel and the highest amount of retained austenite after quenching. At this point it is believed the austenite content is an important contributor to the low ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of this microstructure.

  20. An in vitro study to compare the effect of two etching techniques on the tensile bond strength of resin cement bonded to base metal alloy and enamel.

    PubMed

    Sudheer, Arunachalam; Shetty, Gautam

    2013-12-01

    Resin-bonded retainers are being preferred for anterior restorations. To increase the retentive strength of the metal fixed to the tooth, the retainer surface has to be etched. Different etching techniques are described in the literature with different researchers expressing the superiority of one technique over the other. This study was conducted to compare electro chemical and chemical etching techniques and the mode of bond failure. Twenty human maxillary premolars with the crown portion separated from root were embedded in resin block such that mesial or distal portion of it was exposed on the top of the block. 4 × 5 mm area was marked on the tooth, and wax pattern was prepared to cover the exact area, with the opposite end having a hook like structure which was later attached to universal testing machine. Wiron99 Ni-Cr alloy was used for casting. Once the casting and etching procedures were finished, wax patterns were invested, casted and half the samples were etched chemically using Aqua-regia and the other half samples were etched electrochemically. The castings were cleaned and cemented to tooth structure using Rely-X ARC (3 M ESPE, USA) resin cement. Specimens were fixed to universal testing machine and de-bonded. The load required to de-bond and mode of de-bonding was noted. Results were subjected to five different statistical tests, each test specific to the variable being tested. The mean failure load was calculated as 5.95 kg for electrochemically etched samples and that of chemically etched samples was calculated as 11.15 kg. The standard deviation of the force required to debond the specimens (Kgf) was calculated and found to be 0.65 for electrochemically etched samples and 1.11 for chemically etched samples. The following conclusions have been drawn from the study. 1. Chemical etching of the samples created better retentive surfaces than electrochemical etching. 2. The results of mode of de-bonding show that in case of chemical etching maximum debonding occurred at resin-enamel interface and in electrochemical type it occurred at resin-metal interface. PMID:24431780

  1. Are the Autism and Positive Schizotypy Spectra Diametrically Opposed in Empathizing and Systemizing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell-Smith, Suzanna N.; Bayliss, Donna M.; Maybery, Murray T.; Tomkinson, Rosy L.

    2013-01-01

    Crespi and Badcock's (Behaviour Brain Sci 31: 241-261, 2008) novel theory, which presents autism and positive schizophrenia as diametrical opposites on a cognitive continuum, has received mixed support in the literature to date. The current study aimed to further assess the validity of this theory by investigating predictions in relation to

  2. Are the Autism and Positive Schizotypy Spectra Diametrically Opposed in Empathizing and Systemizing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell-Smith, Suzanna N.; Bayliss, Donna M.; Maybery, Murray T.; Tomkinson, Rosy L.

    2013-01-01

    Crespi and Badcock's (Behaviour Brain Sci 31: 241-261, 2008) novel theory, which presents autism and positive schizophrenia as diametrical opposites on a cognitive continuum, has received mixed support in the literature to date. The current study aimed to further assess the validity of this theory by investigating predictions in relation to…

  3. Effect of the strain-induced melt activation (SIMA) process on the tensile properties of a new developed super high strength aluminum alloy modified by Al-5Ti-1B grain refiner

    SciTech Connect

    Haghparast, Amin; Nourimotlagh, Masoud; Alipour, Mohammad

    2012-09-15

    In this study, the effect of Al-5Ti-1B grain refiners and modified strain-induced melt activation process on an Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy was studied. The optimum level of Ti was found to be 0.1 wt.%. The specimens subjected to deformation ratio of 40% (at 300 Degree-Sign C) and various heat treatment times (10-40 min) and temperature (550-600 Degree-Sign C) regimes were characterized in this study. Reheating condition to obtain a fine globular microstructure was optimized. Microstructural examinations were conducted by optical and scanning electron microscopy coupled with an energy dispersive spectrometry. The optimum temperature and time in strain-induced melt activation process are 575 Degree-Sign C and 20 min, respectively. T6 heat treatment including quenching to room temperature and aging at 120 Degree-Sign C for 24 h was employed to reach to the maximum strength. Significant improvements in mechanical properties were obtained with the addition of grain refiner combined with T6 heat treatment. After the T6 heat treatment, the average tensile strength increased from 283 MPa to 587 and 332 MPa to 617 for samples refined with 2 wt.% Al-5Ti-1B before and after strain-induced melt activation process and extrusion process, respectively. Ultimate strength of Ti-refined specimens without SIMA process has a lower value than globular microstructure specimens after SIMA and extrusion process. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of Al-5Ti-1B on the aluminum alloy produced by SIMA process was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al-5Ti-1B is an effective in reducing the grain and reagent fine microstructure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reheating condition to obtain a fine globular microstructure was optimized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The optimum temperature and time in SIMA process are 575 Degree-Sign C and 20 min respectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UTS of globular structure specimens have a more value than Ti-refined specimens.

  4. Performance of end-face seals with diametral tilt and coning - Hydrodynamic effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharoni, A.; Etsion, I.

    1979-01-01

    Hydrodynamic effects in end-face seals with diametral tilt and coning are analyzed. A closed-form solution for the axial separating force and the restoring and transverse moments is presented that covers the whole range from zero to full angular misalignment at various degrees of coning. Both low-pressure seals with cavitating flow and high-pressure seals with full fluid film are considered. The effect of coning is to reduce the axial force and the restoring and transverse moments compared to their magnitude in flat-face seals. Strong coupling between diametral tilt and transverse moment is demonstrated. This transverse moment which is entirely due to hydrodynamic effects can be the source of dynamic instability in the form of seal wobble.

  5. An open-end burst test method to obtain uniaxial hoop tensile properties of fuel cladding in a hot cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatsuka, Masafumi; Aita, Makoto; Sakamoto, Kan; Higuchi, Toru

    2013-03-01

    The hoop stress-hoop strain relationship of fuel cladding is one of the essential input parameters for safety analysis of fuel rods. The three objectives of this paper were: to propose a burst test method for open-end tube specimens with the uniaxial hoop stress condition; to develop the necessary in-cell high temperature open-end burst (OEB) techniques to implement the method; and to determine the optimum specimen length for the proposed OEB test method. Silicone oil was selected as the pressurization medium, and it was sealed inside the specimens not by welding but by O-rings so that no axial tensile stress was induced in the specimens. The specimens with combined end plugs and O-rings were successfully assembled by manipulators in a hot cell, and a high temperature (⩽350 °C), high pressure (⩽100 MPa) seal was achieved. The optimum specimen length was determined by using ductile and embrittled tubes with various lengths of 30-60 mm and was found to be around 45 mm for typical BWR fuel rods. During the OEB test, internal pressure and diametral expansion were monitored to obtain the basic mechanical performance properties of the fuel cladding such as yield stress, ultimate strength, as well as the true hoop stress-hoop strain curve.

  6. Numerical evaluation of the capping tendency of microcrystalline cellulose tablets during a diametrical compression test.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Ryoichi; Chen, Yuan; Horiguchi, Akio; Takagaki, Keisuke; Nishi, Junichi; Konishi, Akira; Shirakawa, Yoshiyuki; Sugimoto, Masaaki; Narisawa, Shinji

    2015-09-30

    Capping is one of the major problems that occur during the tabletting process in the pharmaceutical industry. This study provided an effective method for evaluating the capping tendency during diametrical compression test using the finite element method (FEM). In experiments, tablets of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) were compacted with a single tabletting machine, and the capping tendency was determined by visual inspection of the tablet after a diametrical compression test. By comparing the effects of double-radius and single-radius concave punch shapes on the capping tendency, it was observed that the capping tendency of double-radius tablets occurred at a lower compaction force compared with single-radius tablets. Using FEM, we investigated the variation in plastic strain within tablets during the diametrical compression test and visualised it using the output variable actively yielding (AC YIELD) of ABAQUS. For both single-radius and double-radius tablets, a capping tendency is indicated if the variation in plastic strain was initiated from the centre of tablets, while capping does not occur if the variation began from the periphery of tablets. The compaction force estimated by the FEM analysis at which the capping tendency was observed was in reasonable agreement with the experimental results. PMID:26188313

  7. Study of the optomechanical response of a diametrically loaded high-birefringent optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Yu-Lung; Sirkis, James S.; Ritchie, K. T.

    1995-04-01

    This paper describes an experimental and finite-element study of the optomechanical response of a diametrically loaded Bow-Tie high-birefringent optical fiber. The thermomechanical finite-element analysis performed in this study uses PATRAN as the solid modeler and ABAQUS as the analysis package. The purpose of the study is to determine the effect of a diametrical load on the optical phase generated by polarimetric sensors as a function of polar angle. This is done in order to understand the behavior of structurally embedded polarimetric sensors, and to determine the effect of load-induced rotation of principal optical axis in a Bow- Tie fiber so as to assess the response of the lead-insensitivity of lead-insensitive embedded polarimetric sensor configurations. The results indicate that the stress concentrations produced by the stress applying parts are responsible for a polarimetric phase sensitivity that is a function of the applied load direction. The results further indicate that the diametric loads do not significantly alter the principal optical axes in the lead-in fiber.

  8. Tensile Properties of GRCop-84

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, David L.; Loewenthal, William S.; Yun, Hee-Man

    2012-01-01

    This is a chapter in the final report on GRCop-84 for the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Second Generation/Project Constellation Program. It contains information on the tensile properties of GRCop-84. GRCop-84 (Cu-8 at.% Cr-4 at.% Nb) was produced by extrusion and Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIPing). Some of the extrusions were rolled to plate and sheet while other extrusions were drawn into tubing. The material was further subjected to various heat treatments corresponding to annealing, anticipated typical brazing conditions, an end-of-life condition and various elevated temperature exposures to attempt to improve creep resistance. As anticipated, cold work increased strength while decreasing ductility. Annealing at 600 C (1112 F) and higher temperatures was effective. An exposure for 100 h at 500 C (932 F) resulted in an increase in strength rather than the anticipated decrease. High temperature simulated-braze cycles and thermal exposures lowered the strength of GRCop-84, but the deceases were small compared to precipitation strengthened copper alloys. It was observed that the excess Cr could form large precipitates that lower the reduction in area though it appears a minimum amount is required. Overall, GRCop-84 exhibits good stability of its tensile properties, which makes it an excellent candidate for rocket engine liners and many other high temperature applications.

  9. Tensile properties of nanoclay reinforced epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, H.; Trada, Mohan

    2013-08-01

    Kinetic epoxy resin was filled with nanoclay to increase tensile properties of the composite for civil and structural. This project manufactured samples with different percentages by weight of nanoclay in the composites in steps of 1 wt %, which were then post-cured in an oven. The samples were then subjected to tensile tests. The results showed that the composite with 3 wt % of nanoclay produced the highest yield and tensile strengths. However, the Young's modulus increased with increasing nanoparticulate loading. It is hoped that the discussion and results in this work would not only contribute towards the further development of nanoclay reinforced epoxy composites with enhanced material properties, but also provide useful information for the studies of fracture toughness, tensile properties and flexural properties of other composites.

  10. Tensile-property characterization of thermally aged cast stainless steels.

    SciTech Connect

    Michaud, W. F.; Toben, P. T.; Soppet, W. K.; Chopra, O. K.; Energy Technology

    1994-03-03

    The effect of thermal aging on tensile properties of cast stainless steels during service in light water reactors has been evaluated. Tensile data for several experimental and commercial heats of cast stainless steels are presented. Thermal aging increases the tensile strength of these steels. The high-C Mo-bearing CF-8M steels are more susceptible to thermal aging than the Mo-free CF-3 or CF-8 steels. A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting the change in tensile flow and yield stresses and engineering stress-vs.-strain curve of cast stainless steel as a function of time and temperature of service. The tensile properties of aged cast stainless steel are estimated from known material information, i.e., chemical composition and the initial tensile strength of the steel. The correlations described in this report may be used for assessing thermal embrittlement of cast stainless steel components.

  11. Tensile properties of sand-reinforced low density polyethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Kandeil, A.Y.; Zahran, R.R.

    1995-10-01

    Sand-reinforced low density polyethylene samples were prepared using injection molding. The effect of some processing and structural parameters on the tensile properties of the prepared samples was investigated. The processing parameters were the melt and the die temperatures. The investigated structural parameters were sand content and sand particle size. The studied tensile properties were modulus of elasticity, tensile strength, ductility and toughness. The obtained results are thoroughly analyzed and interpreted as structure-property relationships.

  12. Tensile properties of the modified 13Cr martensitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabruri, Efendi; Anwar, Moch. Syaiful; Prifiharni, Siska; Romijarso, Toni B.; Adjiantoro, Bintang

    2016-04-01

    This paper reports the influence of Mo and Ni on the tensile properties of the modified 13Cr martensitic stainless steels in tempered condition. Four steels with different content of Mo and Ni were prepared by induction melting followed by hot forging, quenching and tempering. The experimental results showed that the addition of about 1% and 3% Mo has a beneficial effect to increase both the tensile strength and the elongation of the steels. On the contrary, the addition of about 3% Ni into the martensitic stainless steel results in decreasing of both the tensile strength and the elongation. Among the alloys investigated the 13Cr3Mo type steel exhibited largest tensile strength of 1348 MPa and largest elongation of 12%. The observation on the tensile fractured surfaces by using scanning electron microscope supported these findings.

  13. A comparative study of tensile fracture mechanisms.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullin, J. V.; Mazzio, V. F.

    1972-01-01

    Identification of the failure mechanism characteristic for the more widely used carbon fibers in epoxy matrices under tensile loads as an aid toward improvements and more reliable predictions of the performance of these composites. The presented results pertain to high-strength, high-modulus, and low-modulus fibers in unmodified and modified epoxy novolac matrices.

  14. Tensile Mechanical Properties of Swine Cortical Mandibular Bone

    PubMed Central

    Brosh, Tamar; Rozitsky, Doron; Geron, Silvia; Pilo, Raphael

    2014-01-01

    Temporary orthodontic mini implants serve as anchorage devices in orthodontic treatments. Often, they are inserted in the jaw bones, between the roots of the teeth. The stability of the mini implants within the bone is one of the major factors affecting their success and, consequently, that of the orthodontic treatment. Bone mechanical properties are important for implant stability. The aim of this study was to determine the tensile properties of the alveolar and basal mandible bones in a swine model. The diametral compression test was employed to study the properties in two orthogonal directions: mesio-distal and occluso-gingival. Small cylindrical cortical bone specimens (2.6 mm diameter, 1.5 mm thickness) were obtained from 7 mandibles using a trephine drill. The sites included different locations (anterior and posterior) and aspects (buccal and lingual) for a total of 16 specimens from each mandible. The load-displacement curves were continuously monitored while loading half of the specimens in the oclluso-gingival direction and half in the mesio-distal direction. The stiffness was calculated from the linear portion of the curve. The mesio-distal direction was 31% stiffer than the occluso-gingival direction. The basal bone was 40% stiffer than the alveolar bone. The posterior zone was 46% stiffer than the anterior zone. The lingual aspect was stiffer than the buccal aspect. Although bone specimens do not behave as brittle materials, the diametral compression test can be adequately used for determining tensile behavior when only small bone specimens can be obtained. In conclusion, to obtain maximal orthodontic mini implant stability, the force components on the implants should be oriented mostly in the mesio-distal direction. PMID:25463971

  15. Quest for the Vulnerable Atheroma: Carotid Stenosis and Diametric Strain-A Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Canxing; Yuan, Chun; Stutzman, Edward; Canton, Gador; Comess, Keith A; Beach, Kirk W

    2016-03-01

    The Bernoulli effect may result in eruption of a vulnerable carotid atheroma, causing a stroke. We measured electrocardiography (ECG)-registered QRS intra-stenotic blood velocity and atheroma strain dynamics in carotid artery walls using ultrasonic tissue Doppler methods, providing displacement and time resolutions of 0.1 ?m and 3.7 ms. Of 22 arteries, 1 had a peak systolic velocity (PSV) >280 cm/s, 4 had PSVs between 165 and 280 cm/s and 17 had PSVs <165 cm/s. Eight arteries with PSVs <65 cm/s and 4 of 9 with PSVs between 65 and 165 cm/s had normal systolic diametric expansion (0% and 7%) and corresponding systolic wall thinning. The remaining 10 arteries had abnormal systolic strain dynamics, 2 with diametric reduction (>-0.05 mm), 2 with extreme wall expansion (>0.1 mm), 2 with extreme wall thinning (>-0.1 mm) and 4 with combinations. Decreases in systolic diameter and/or extreme systolic arterial wall thickening may indicate imminent atheroma rupture. PMID:26705891

  16. Effects of Coating and Diametric Load on Fiber Bragg Gratings as Cryogenic Temperature Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, meng-Chou; Pater, Ruth H.; DeHaven, Stanton L.

    2008-01-01

    Cryogenic temperature sensing was demonstrated using pressurized fiber Bragg gratings (PFBGs) with polymer coating of various thicknesses. The PFBG was obtained by applying a small diametric load to a regular fiber Bragg grating (FBG). The Bragg wavelengths of FBGs and PFBG were measured at temperatures from 295 K to 4.2 K. The temperature sensitivities of the FBGs were increased by the polymer coating. A physical model was developed to relate the Bragg wavelength shifts to the thermal expansion coefficients, Young's moduli, and thicknesses of the coating polymers. When a diametric load of no more than 15 N was applied to a FBG, a pressure-induced transition occurred at 200 K during the cooling cycle. The pressure induced transition yielded PFBG temperature sensitivities three times greater than conventional FBGs for temperatures ranging from 80 to 200 K, and ten times greater than conventional fibers for temperatures below 80 K. PFBGs were found to produce an increased Bragg wavelength shift of 2.2 nm compared to conventional FBGs over the temperature range of 4.2 to 300 K. This effect was independent of coating thickness and attributed to the change of the fiber thermo-optic coefficient.

  17. Assessing the Strength Enhancement of Heterogeneous Networks of Miscible Polymer Blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giller, Carl; Roland, Mike

    2013-03-01

    At the typical crosslink densities of elastomers, the failure properties vary inversely with mechanical stiffness, so that compounding entails a compromise between stiffness and strength. Our approach to circumvent this conventional limitation is by forming networks of two polymers that: (i) are thermodynamically miscible, whereby the chemical composition is uniform on the segmental level; and (ii) have markedly different reactivities for network formation. The resulting elastomer consists of one highly crosslinked component and one that is lightly or uncrosslinked. This disparity in crosslinking causes their respective contributions to the network mechanical response to differ diametrically. Earlier results showed some success with this approach for thermally crosslinked blends of 1,2-polybutadiene (PVE) and polyisoprene (PI), as well as ethylene-propylene copolymer (EPM) and ethylene-propylene-diene random terpolymer (EPDM), taking advantage of their differing reactivities to sulfur. In this work we demonstrate the miscibility of polyisobutylene (PIB) with butyl rubber (BR) (a copolymer of PIB and polyisoprene) and show that networks in which only the BR is crosslinked possess greater tensile strengths than neat BR over the same range of moduli. Office of Naval Research

  18. Tensile Tests of Round-head, Flat-head, and Brazier-head Rivets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuette, Evan H; Bartone, Leonard M; Mandel, Merven W

    1944-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the tensile strength of round-head (AN43C), flat-head(AN442), and brazier-head (AN4556) aluminum-alloy rivets because of the scarcity of information on the tensile strength of rivets. The results of the investigation are presented as curves that show the variation of the ratio of the tensile strength of the rivet to the tensile strength of the rivet crank with the ratio of the sheet thickness to the rivet diameter for the different types of rivet.

  19. High strength, superplastic superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashbrook, R. L.; Freche, J. C.; Waters, W. J.

    1969-01-01

    High strength superplastic superalloys are produced by extruding a pre-alloyed powder. The cast nickel base superalloy was remelted and converted to pre-alloyed powder by inert gas atomization. The superalloy shows high tensile strength and superplasticity and finds use in hot working and casting.

  20. Tree Diametric Increment and Litterfall Production in an Eastern Amazonian Forest: the Role of Functional Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camargo, P. B. D.; Ferreira, M. L.; Oliveira Junior, R. C.; Saleska, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    Tree growth is a biotic variable of great importance in understanding the dynamics of tree communities and may be used as a tool in studies of biological or climate modeling. Some climate models predict more recurrent climate anomalies in this century, which may alter the functioning of tropical forests with serious structural and demographic implications. The present study aimed to evaluate the profile of tree growth and litterfall production in an eastern Amazon forest, which has suffered recent climatic disturbances. We contrasted different functional groups based on wood density (stem with 0.55; 0.56-0.7; >0.7 g cm-3), light availability (crown illumination index; high illuminated crown - IIC1 until shaded crown - IIC5), and, size class (trees 10-22.5; 22.6-35; 35.1-55; 55,1-90; >90 cm dbh). Tree diameter increment was monthly measured from November 2011 to September 2013 by using dendrometer bands installed on 850 individuals from different families. Litterfall was collected in 64 circular traps, oven dried and weighed, separated into leaves, twigs, reproductive parts and miscellaneous. During the rainy season the sampled trees had the highest rates of tree diametric increment. When analyzing the data by functional groups, large trees had faster growth, but when grouped by wood density, trees with wood density up to 0.55 and between 0.56 and 0.7 g cm-3 had the fastest rates of growth. When grouped by crown illumination index, trees exposed to higher levels of light grew more in comparison to partially shaded trees. Maximum daily air temperature and precipitation were the most important environmental variables in determining the diametric increment profile of the trees. Litterfall production was estimated to be 7.1 Mg ha-1.year-1 and showed a strong seasonal pattern, with dry season production being higher than in the rainy season. Leaves formed the largest fraction of the litterfall, followed by twigs, reproductive parts, and finally miscellaneous. These results show that the profile of tree diametric growth and litterfall production are recorded at close intervals in the preterit analyzes in the same study area and highlights the efficiency of functional groups in determining the tree growth profile.

  1. Approaches for Tensile Testing of Braided Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Gary D.; Salem, Jonathan A.; Bail, Justin L.; Kohlman, Lee W.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Martin, Richard E.

    2011-01-01

    For angleply composites, lamina tension and compression strengths are commonly determined by applying classical lamination theory to test data obtained from testing of angleply composite specimens. For textile composites such as 2D triaxial braids, analysis is more complex and standard test methods do not always yield reliable strength measurements. This paper describes recent research focused on development of more reliable tensile test methods for braided composites and presents preliminary data for various approaches. The materials investigated in this work have 0deg+/-60 2D triaxial braid architecture with nearly equal fiber volume fraction in each of the three fiber directions. Flat composite panels are fabricated by resin transfer molding (RTM) using six layers of the braided preform aligned along the 0deg fiber direction. Various epoxy resins are used as matrix materials. Single layer panels are also fabricated in order to examine local variations in deformation related to the braid architecture. Specimens are cut from these panels in the shape of standard straight-sided coupons, an alternative bowtie geometry, and an alternative notched geometry. Axial tensile properties are measured using specimens loaded along the 0deg fiber direction. Transverse tensile properties are measured using specimens loaded perpendicular to the 0deg fibers. Composite tubes are also fabricated by RTM. These tubes are tested by internal pressurization using a soft rubbery material sealed between the inside diameter of the tube and the load fixtures. The ends of the tube are unconstrained, so the primary load is in the hoop direction. Tubes are fabricated with the 0deg fibers aligned along the tube axis by overbraiding the preform on a mandrel. Since the loading is in the hoop direction, testing of the overbraided tube provides a measure of transverse tensile strength. Previous work has indicated that straight-sided coupons yield a transverse tensile strength that is much lower than the expected material strength because of premature edge-initiated failure. Full-field strain measured during transverse tensile tests clearly showed accumulation of edge damage prior to failure. In the current work, high speed video and testing of single layer specimens are used to investigate potential failure mechanisms in more detail. High speed video clearly shows the edge initiation in six layer transverse tensile test coupons. Specimens with the bowtie geometry and the notched geometry minimize this edge effect and yield significantly higher transverse tensile strength values compared to the straight-sided coupons. However, bowtie and notched specimens geometries are not ideal because of the non-uniform stress and strain fields in the region of failure. Testing of tubes using internal pressurization eliminates edge-initiated failure and provides a more uniform state of stress and strain. Preliminary results indicate that bowtie, notched, and tube specimens yield comparable values for transverse tensile strength and that these values are much higher than the strength measured using a straight-sided coupon.

  2. Effect of Strain Rate on Tensile Properties of Carbon Fiber Epoxy-Impregnated Bundle Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naito, Kimiyoshi

    2014-03-01

    The tensile tests for high tensile strength polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based (T1000GB) carbon fiber epoxy-impregnated bundle composite at various strain rates ranging from 3.33 × 10-5 to 6.0 × 102 s-1 (various crosshead speeds ranging from 8.33 × 10-7 to 1.5 × 101 m/s) were investigated. The statistical distributions of the tensile strength were also evaluated. The results clearly demonstrated that the tensile strength of bundle composite slightly increased with an increase in the strain rate (crosshead speed) and the Weibull modulus of tensile strength for the bundle composite decreased with an increase in the strain rate (crosshead speed), there is a linear relation between the Weibull modulus and the average tensile strength on log-log scale.

  3. Tensile properties of austempered ductile iron under thermomechanical treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Achary, J.

    2000-02-01

    A new processing method was investigated for improving the strength and elongation of austempered ductile iron (ADI) by grain refinement of parent austenite using thermomechanical treatment. The material was deformed at the austenitization temperature by single and multipass rolling before the austempering treatment. The effects of the amount of deformation, austenitization temperature, austempering temperatures, reaustenitization, and secondary deformation on the tensile properties were studied. The properties obtained using the method were compared with those of the ASTM standards. The effect of deformation on the graphite shape was also studied. Tensile strength/yield strength/elongation values were found to increase with increasing austenite deformation up to 40% and then to start decreasing. Tensile strength/yield strength and elongation values of 1,700 MPa/1,300 MPa/5% and 1,350 MPa/920 MPa/15% can be achieved with this method in the ranges of variables studied.

  4. Tensile properties of textile composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avva, V. Sarma; Sadler, Robert L.; Lyon, Malcolm

    1992-01-01

    The importance of textile composite materials in aerospace structural applications has been gaining momentum in recent years. With a view to better understand the suitability of these materials in aerospace applications, an experimental program was undertaken to assess the mechanical properties of these materials. Specifically, the braided textile preforms were infiltrated with suitable polymeric matrices leading to the fabrication of composite test coupons. Evaluation of the tensile properties and the analyses of the results in the form of strength moduli, Poisson's ratio, etc., for the braided composites are presented. Based on our past experience with the textile coupons, the fabrication techniques have been modified (by incorporating glass microballoons in the matrix and/or by stabilizing the braid angle along the length of the specimen with axial fibers) to achieve enhanced mechanical properties of the textile composites. This paper outlines the preliminary experimental results obtained from testing these composites.

  5. Strength properties of separators in alkaline solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Danko, T.

    1996-11-01

    Battery separator non-wovens that were coated with regenerated cellulose via the viscose process were subjected to storage in 40% potassium hydroxide (KOH) over a two month period. Samples were periodically checked for wet MD tensile strength. The test showed that among the non-wovens, the polyamide retained about 93% of its initial tensile strength whereas polyvinyl alcohol and cellulosic non-wovens retained only 55% and 35%, respectively. Adding a viscose coating to the non-wovens improved tensile strength retention by 20--25% for the polyvinyl alcohol and cellulosic materials. The viscose-coated polyamide retained more than 98% of its initial tensile strength.

  6. Alumina fiber strength improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, R. T.; Nelson, D. C.

    1982-01-01

    The effective fiber strength of alumina fibers in an aluminum composite was increased to 173,000 psi. A high temperature heat treatment, combined with a glassy carbon surface coating, was used to prevent degradation and improve fiber tensile strength. Attempts to achieve chemical strengthening of the alumina fiber by chromium oxide and boron oxide coatings proved unsuccessful. A major problem encountered on the program was the low and inconsistent strength of the Dupont Fiber FP used for the investigation.

  7. Tensile Properties of Under-Matched Weld Joints for 950 MPa Steel.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kouji; Arakawa, Toshiaki; Akazawa, Nobuki; Yamamoto, Kousei; Matsuo, Hiroki; Nakagara, Kiyoyuki; Suita, Yoshikazu

    In welding of 950 MPa-class high tensile strength steel, preheating is crucial in order to avoid cold cracks, which, however, eventually increases welding deformations. One way to decrease welding deformations is lowering preheating temperature by using under-matched weld metal. Toyota and others clarify that although breaking elongation can decrease due to plastic constraint effect under certain conditions, static tensile of under-matched weld joints is comparable to that of base metal. However, there has still been no report about joint static tensile of under-matched weld joints applied to 950 MPa-class high tensile strength steel. In this study, we aim to research tensile strength and fatigue strength of under-matched weld joints applied to 950 MPa-class high tensile steel.

  8. Effect of Electron Beam Irradiation on the Tensile Properties of Carbon Nanotubes Sheets and Yarns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Tiffany S.; Miller, Sandi G.; Baker, James S.; McCorkle, Linda S.; Meador, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotube sheets and yarns were irradiated using electron beam (e-beam) energy to determine the effect of irradiation dose on the tensile properties. Results showed that a slight change in tensile strength occurred after irradiating as-received CNT sheets for 20 minutes, and a slight decrease in tensile strength as the irradiation time approached 90 minutes. On the other hand, the addition of small molecules to the CNT sheet surface had a greater effect on the tensile properties of e-beam irradiated CNT sheets. Some functionalized CNT sheets displayed up to a 57% increase in tensile strength following 90 minutes of e-beam exposure. In addition, as-received CNT yarns showed a significant increase in tensile strength as the irradiation time increased.

  9. Tensile properties of titanium electrolytically charged with hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. J.; Otterson, D. A.

    1971-01-01

    Yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, and elongation were studied for annealed titanium electrolytically charged with hydrogen. The hydrogen was present as a surface hydride layer. These tensile properties were generally lower for uncharged titanium than for titanium with a continuous surface hydride; they were greater for uncharged titanium than for titanium with an assumed discontinuous surface hydride. We suggest that the interface between titanium and titanium hydride is weak. And the hydride does not necessarily impair strength and ductility of annealed titanium. The possibility that oxygen and/or nitrogen can embrittle titanium hydride is discussed.

  10. Development of Manila Hemp Fiber Epoxy Composite with High Tensile Properties Through Handpicking Fiber Fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ke; Takagi, Hitoshi; Yang, Zhimao

    Manila hemp fibers are separated to several sequent fragments from single fiber. The tensile strength of each fiber fragments and their epoxy composite are measured, followed by scanning electronic microscopic (SEM) analysis. The results show that the tensile strength of fiber fragments is almost constant along fiber. For composite, the tensile strength first increases and then decreases at the position near to root. The Young's modulus presents increasing with location from root to top for fiber and composite. Microstructure analysis indicates that the difference of tensile properties between fiber fragments derive from the difference of fiber diameter.

  11. Strength of Rewelded Inconel 718

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayless, E.; Lovoy, C. V.; Mcllwain, M. C.; Munafo, P.

    1982-01-01

    Inconel 718, nickel-based alloy used extensively for high-temperature structural service, welded repeatedly without detriment to its strength. According to NASA report, tests show 12 repairs on same weld joint do not adversely affect ultimate tensile strenth, yield strength, fatigue strength, metallurgical grain structures, or ability of weld joint to respond to post weld heat treatments.

  12. Improve the Strength of PLA/HA Composite Through the Use of Surface Initiated Polymerization and Phosphonic Acid Coupling Agent

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tongxin; Chow, Laurence C.; Frukhtbeyn, Stanislav A.; Ting, Andy Hai; Dong, Quanxiao; Yang, Mingshu; Mitchell, James W.

    2011-01-01

    Bioresorbable composite made from degradable polymers, e.g., polylactide (PLA), and bioactive calcium phosphates, e.g., hydroxyapatite (HA), are clinically desirable for bone fixation, repair and tissue engineering because they do not need to be removed by surgery after the bone heals. However, preparation of PLA/HA composite from non-modified HA usually results in mechanical strength reductions due to a weak interface between PLA and HA. In this study, a calcium-phosphate/phosphonate hybrid shell was developed to introduce a greater amount of reactive hydroxyl groups onto the HA particles. Then, PLA was successfully grafted on HA by surface-initiated polymerization through the non-ionic surface hydroxyl groups. Thermogravimetric analysis indiated that the amount of grafted PLA on HA can be up to 7 %, which is about 50 % greater than that from the literature. PLA grafted HA shows significantly different pH dependent ζ-potential and particle size profiles from those of uncoated HA. By combining the phosphonic acid coupling agent and surface initiated polymerization, PLA could directly link to HA through covalent bond so that the interfacial interaction in the PLA/HA composite can be significantly improved. The diametral tensile strength of PLA/HA composite prepared from PLA-grafted HA was found to be over twice that of the composite prepared from the non-modified HA. Moreover, the tensile strength of the improved composite was 23 % higher than that of PLA alone. By varying additional variables, this approach has the potential to produce bioresorbable composites with improved mechanical properties that are in the range of natural bones, and can have wide applications for bone fixation and repair in load-bearing areas. PMID:22399838

  13. Notch Effect on Tensile Deformation Behavior of 304L and 316L Steels in Liquid Helium and Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, K.; Fujii, H.

    2004-06-01

    Tensile tests of type 304L and 316L steels were carried out using round bar specimens with a notch in liquid helium, hydrogen, liquid nitrogen and at ambient temperature. The obtained tensile strengths were compared with the tensile strengths of smooth specimens. For smooth specimens, tensile strength increased with a decrease in temperature and the strengths in liquid helium and hydrogen show similar values in both steels. For notched specimen of 304L steel, tensile strength (including fracture strength) increased noticeably from ambient to liquid nitrogen temperature but showed a large decrease in liquid helium and hydrogen. In liquid hydrogen and helium, the tensile strength is a little lower in liquid hydrogen than in liquid helium and both strengths are lower than tensile strengths of smooth specimens. For notched specimen of 316L steel, an increase in tensile strength from ambient to liquid nitrogen temperature was not so large and a decrease from liquid nitrogen to liquid hydrogen was small. The tensile strengths in liquid helium and hydrogen were nearly same and higher than those of smooth specimens. Different behavior of serration was observed between liquid helium and hydrogen, and between 304L and 316L steels. The reasons for these differences were discussed using computer simulation.

  14. Controlling factors in tensile deformation of nanocrystalline cobalt and nickel

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y. M.; Ott, R. T.; van Buuren, T.; Willey, T. M.; Biener, M. M.; Hamza, A. V.

    2012-01-05

    In our effort to understand and enhance the tensile ductility of truly nanocrystalline metals, we have investigated and compared the mechanical behavior, especially the tensile behavior, of hexagonal close-packed (hcp) nanocrystalline cobalt (~20 nm) and face-centered cubic (fcc) nanocrystalline nickel (~28 nm). Although both materials exhibit obvious plasticity in tension, their uniform tensile ductility, tensile elongation-to-failure, and fracture behavior are drastically different. In-situsynchrotron x-ray diffraction and ultra-small angle x-ray scattering reveal distinct deformation disparity in terms of residual strain development, texture evolution, nanovoid formation, and subsequent strain-hardening and strain-rate-hardening behavior. Moreover, the dependence of tensile property on the strain rate and temperature is examined and discussed. Factors that influence the strength and ductility of nanocrystalline metals are considered and prioritized according to the current findings. A new Hall-petch relationship is proposed for nanocrystalline nickel.

  15. Strength enhancement process for prealloyed powder superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, W. J.; Freche, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    A technique involving superplastic processing and high pressure autoclaving was applied to a nickel base prealloyed powder alloy. Tensile strengths as high as 2865 MN/sq m at 480 C were obtained with as-superplastically deformed material. Appropriate treatments yielding materials with high temperature tensile and stress rupture strengths were also devised.

  16. The tensile properties of single sugar palm (Arenga pinnata) fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachtiar, D.; Sapuan, S. M.; Zainudin, E. S.; Khalina, A.; Dahlan, K. Z. M.

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents a brief description and characterization of the sugar palm fibres, still rare in the scientific community, compared to other natural fibres employed in polymeric composites. Sugar palm fibres are cellulose-based fibres extracted from the Arenga pinnata plant. The characterization consists of tensile test and the morphological examination. The average tensile properties results of fibres such as Young's modulus is equal to 3.69 GPa, tensile strength is equal to 190.29 MPa, and strain at failure is equal to 19.6%.

  17. Velocity anti-correlation of diametrically opposed galaxy satellites in the low-redshift Universe.

    PubMed

    Ibata, Neil G; Ibata, Rodrigo A; Famaey, Benoit; Lewis, Geraint F

    2014-07-31

    Recent work has shown that the Milky Way and the Andromeda galaxies both possess the unexpected property that their dwarf satellite galaxies are aligned in thin and kinematically coherent planar structures. It is interesting to evaluate the incidence of such planar structures in the larger galactic population, because the Local Group may not be a representative environment. Here we report measurements of the velocities of pairs of diametrically opposed satellite galaxies. In the local Universe (redshift z < 0.05), we find that satellite pairs out to a distance of 150 kiloparsecs from the galactic centre are preferentially anti-correlated in their velocities (99.994 per cent confidence level), and that the distribution of galaxies in the larger-scale environment (out to distances of about 2 megaparsecs) is strongly clumped along the axis joining the inner satellite pair (>7σ confidence). This may indicate that planes of co-rotating satellites, similar to those seen around the Andromeda galaxy, are ubiquitous, and their coherent motion suggests that they represent a substantial repository of angular momentum on scales of about 100 kiloparsecs. PMID:25043008

  18. Comparison of the Morphology and Histomorphometry of Spermatogenic Cyst of Three Sharks Species With Diametric Testes.

    PubMed

    Gomes do Rêgo, Mariana; Fitzpatrick, John L; Hissa V Hazin, Fabio; Araujo, Maria Lucia G; Barros, Maria Edna Gomes; Evêncio Neto, Joaquim

    2016-06-01

    Characterization of the reproductive anatomy of elasmobranchs (sharks, skates, rays, and sawfish) offers unique insights into the evolution of reproductive traits in animals due to their phylogenetic position at the base of the vertebrate tree of life. Yet, despite advances in our understanding of male elasmobranch reproductive physiology and testes histology, very little is known about how testes histomorphometrics varies with male maturation. In this study, we characterize and contrast testes morphology and histomorphology of males at different maturation stages in three shark species with diametric testes development: Prionaceglauca, Rhizoprionodon lalandii, and Mustelus canis. All stages of spermatogenesis were observed in P. glauca and R. lalandii, while for M. canis, only males at early stages of maturation were examined and therefore all the spermatogenesis cells lineage were not present. The number of Sertoli cells increased with cell development by six times in R. lalandii and roughly four times in P. glauca, and were statistically different among stages of spermatogenesis cysts in both species. Statistical differences in cyst diameter and Sertoli cell numbers were observed between P. glauca and R. lalandii. The increase of spermatocyte II cell diameter described for R. Lalandii in this study was not usual to elasmobranch species as compared, for example, to P. glauca. This information proves the importance of studying the testicular development and the process of spermatogenesis is necessary for understanding the reproductive biology of the species, including life cycles and history, variation of reproductive morphology. Anat Rec, 299:759-768, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26864330

  19. Tensile Properties of Single Desmin Intermediate Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Kreplak, Laurent; Herrmann, Harald; Aebi, Ueli

    2008-01-01

    Within muscle fibers, desmin intermediate filaments (IFs) are major constituents of the extrasarcomeric cytoskeleton. However, their contribution to the mechanical properties of myocytes has remained elusive. We present an experimental approach to measure the extensibility and the tensile strength of in vitro reconstituted desmin IFs adsorbed to a solid support. The tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to push on single filaments perpendicular to the filament axis. The torque of the AFM cantilever was monitored during the pushing events to yield an estimate of the lateral force necessary to bend and stretch the filaments. Desmin IFs were stretched up to 3.4-fold with a maximum force of ∼3.5 nN. Fully stretched filaments exhibited a much smaller diameter than did native IFs, i.e., ∼3.5 nm compared to 12.6 nm, both by AFM and electron microscopy. Moreover, we combined the morphological and lateral force data to compute an average stress-strain curve for a single desmin filament. The main features were a pronounced strain-hardening regime above 50% extension and a tensile strength of at least 240 MPa. Because of these nonlinear tensile properties, desmin IFs may dissipate mechanical energy and serve as a physical link between successive sarcomeres during large deformation. PMID:18178641

  20. Temperature controlled tensile testing of individual nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lisa Y.; Terrab, Soraya; Murphy, Kathryn F.; Sullivan, John P.; Cheng, Xuemei; Gianola, Daniel S.

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel experimental method for quantitatively characterizing the temperature-dependent mechanical behavior of individual nanostructures during uniaxial straining. By combining a microelectromechanical tensile testing device with a low thermal mass and digital image correlation providing nm-level displacement resolution, we show successful incorporation of a testing platform in a vacuum cryostat system with an integrated heater and temperature control. Characterization of the local sample temperature and time-dependent response at both low and high temperature demonstrates a testing range of ˜90-475 K and steady-state drift rates less than 0.04 K/min. In situ operation of the tensile testing device employing resistively heated thermal actuators while imaging with an optical microscope enables high-resolution displacement measurements, from which stress-strain behavior of the nanoscale specimens is deduced. We demonstrate the efficacy of our approach in measuring the temperature dependence of tensile strength in nominally defect-free ⟨110⟩ Pd nanowhiskers. We uncover a pronounced sensitivity of the plastic response to testing temperature over a range of ˜300 K, with an ultimate strength in excess of 6 GPa at low temperature. The results are discussed in the context of thermally activated deformation mechanisms and defect nucleation in defect-free metallic nanostructures.

  1. Laser-induced generation of pure tensile stresses

    SciTech Connect

    Niemz, M.H.; Lin, C.P.; Pitsillides, C.; Cui, J.; Doukas, A.G.; Deutsch, T.F.

    1997-05-01

    While short compressive stresses can readily be produced by laser ablation, the generation of pure tensile stresses is more difficult. We demonstrate that a 90{degree} prism made of polyethylene can serve to produce short and pure tensile stresses. A compressive wave is generated by ablating a thin layer of strongly absorbing ink on one surface of the prism with a Q-switched frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser. The compressive wave driven into the prism is reflected as a tensile wave by the polyethylene-air interface at its long surface. The low acoustic impedance of polyethylene makes it ideal for coupling tensile stresses into liquids. In water, tensile stresses up to {minus}200bars with a rise time of the order of 20 ns and a duration of 100 ns are achieved. The tensile strength of water is determined for pure tensile stresses lasting for 100 ns only. The technique has potential application in studying the initiation of cavitation in liquids and in comparing the effect of compressive and tensile stress transients on biological media. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. The Effect of Reprocessing on the Tensile Properties of Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodur, Mehmet Safa; Bakkal, Mustafa; Berkalp, Omer Berk; Sadikoglu, Telem Gok

    2011-01-01

    In this study, waste cotton fabric reinforced polymer matrix composite material has been manufactured by a custom made recycling extruder. Composites with different reinforcement ratios as 12,5%wt ( 12,5%wtRPE ) and 25%wt ( 25%wtRPE ) were tested for their mechanical properties such as tensile strength and young's modulus. The material was then granulated down to the size enough to be used in the extrusion process in order to observe the effects of reprocessing. Reprocessing leads to improve Tensile Strength of composite materials and slows down the reduction of tensile strength of polyethylene. It was observed that composite materials were highly affected by the fiber orientation and acts as anisotropic material under the load.

  3. PBX 9502 TENSILE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Idar, D.J.; Larson, S.A.

    2000-10-01

    With the recent creation of the PX HE Core Surveillance Database, individual specimen surveillance values can be easily compared to the corresponding individual qualification values to evaluate for trends. A review of the data shows a broad scatter in measured stress-strain values. Using the available HE surveillance database, it is clear that the surveillance measurements from the two Cycle 15 charges fall within the range of qualification stress and strain values recorded previously for PBX 9502 lots and that no apparent stockpile-age related trends are evident in the tensile stress-strain data. As a result of this investigation, some changes are being made to the core surveillance specifications to minimize the effects on tensile data scatter due to temperature and humidity differences and method to method changes. These data analyses do point out the need for a comprehensive understanding of the effect of a number of variables, i.e. formulation and pressing method, density, stockpile age, lot-to-lot variations, temperature, and humidity on the mechanical property behavior of HE composite materials. Too often data have been compared without the relevant details made available to determine if the test conditions were nominally the same or different. These results also point out the critical need to establish useful stress-strain limits for qualification and surveillance testing of HEs.

  4. Ceramic granule strength variability and compaction behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, S.J.; Ewsuk, K.G.; Readey, M.J.

    1995-08-01

    Diametral compression strength distributions and the compaction behavior and of irregular shape 150--200 {mu}m ceramic granules and uniform-size 210 {mu}m glass spheres were measured to determine how granule strength variability relates to compaction behavior of granular assemblies. High variability in strength, represented by low Weibull modulus values (m<3) was observed for ceramic granules having a distribution of sizes and shapes, and for uniform-size glass spheres. Compaction pressure data were also analyzed using a Weibull distribution function, and the results were very similar to those obtained from the diametral compression strength tests for the same material. This similarity suggests that it may be possible to model granule compaction using a weakest link theory, whereby an assemblage of granules is viewed as the links of a chain, and failure of the weakest granule (i.e., the weakest link) leads to rearrangement and compaction. Additionally, with the use of Weibull statistics, it appears to be possible to infer the variability in strength of individual granules from a simple pressure compaction test, circumventing the tedious task of testing individual granules.

  5. Tensile Fracture of Ductile Materials. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, D. M.

    1984-01-01

    For brittle materials, circular voids play an important role relative to fracture, intensifing both tensile and compressive stresses. A maximum intensified tensile stress failure criterion applies quite well to brittle materials. An attempt was made to explore the possibility of extending the approach to the tensile fracture of ductile materials. The three dimensional voids that exist in reality are modelled by circular holes in sheet metal. Mathematical relationships are sought between the shape and size of the hole, after the material is plastically deformed, and the amount of deformation induced. Then, the effect of hole shape, size and orientation on the mechanical properties is considered experimentally. The presence of the voids does not affect the ultimate tensile strength of the ductile materials because plastic flow wipes out the stress intensification caused by them. However, the shape and orientation of the defect is found to play an important role in affecting the strain at fracture.

  6. Electrothermal fracturing of tensile specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blinn, H. O.; Hanks, J. G.; Perkins, H. P.

    1970-01-01

    Pulling device consisting of structural tube, connecting rod, spring-loaded nuts, loading rod, heating element, and three bulkheads fractures tensile specimens. Alternate heating and cooling increases tensile loading by increments until fracturing occurs. Load cell or strain gage, applied to pulling rod, determines forces applied.

  7. Tunable Tensile Ductility in Metallic Glasses

    PubMed Central

    Magagnosc, D. J.; Ehrbar, R.; Kumar, G.; He, M. R.; Schroers, J.; Gianola, D. S.

    2013-01-01

    Widespread adoption of metallic glasses (MGs) in applications motivated by high strength and elasticity combined with plastic-like processing has been stymied by their lack of tensile ductility. One emerging strategy to couple the attractive properties of MGs with resistance to failure by shear localization is to employ sub-micron sample or feature length scales, although conflicting results shroud an atomistic understanding of the responsible mechanisms in uncertainty. Here, we report in situ deformation experiments of directly moulded Pt57.5Cu14.7Ni5.3P22.5 MG nanowires, which show tunable tensile ductility. Initially brittle as-moulded nanowires can be coerced to a distinct glassy state upon irradiation with Ga+ ions, leading to tensile ductility and quasi-homogeneous plastic flow. This behaviour is reversible and the glass returns to a brittle state upon subsequent annealing. Our results suggest a novel mechanism for homogenous plastic flow in nano-scaled MGs and strategies for circumventing the poor damage tolerance that has long plagued MGs.

  8. Tensile and creep properties of titanium-vanadium, titanium-molybdenum, and titanium-niobium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.

    1975-01-01

    Tensile and creep properties of experimental beta-titanium alloys were determined. Titanium-vanadium alloys had substantially greater tensile and creep strength than the titanium-niobium and titanium-molybdenum alloys tested. Specific tensile strengths of several titanium-vanadium-aluminum-silicon alloys were equivalent or superior to those of commercial titanium alloys to temperatures of 650 C. The Ti-50V-3Al-1Si alloy had the best balance of tensile strength, creep strength, and metallurgical stability. Its 500 C creep strength was far superior to that of a widely used commercial titanium alloy, Ti-6Al-4V, and almost equivalent to that of newly developed commercial titanium alloys.

  9. Tensile Tests of NACA and Conventional Machine-countersunk Flush Rivets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartone, Leonard M.; Mandel, Merven W.

    1944-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine and compare the tensile strength of NACA and conventional machine-countersunk flush rivets of several rivet-head angles and varying countersunk depth. The results of the investigation are presented in the form of curves that show the variation of the tensile strength of the rivet with the ratio of the sheet thickness to the rivet diameter. For the same rivet-head angle and for a given angle of c/d, the NACA rivets developed higher tensile strength than the conventional rivets.

  10. Tensile creep behavior of polycrystalline alumina fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, H. M.; Goldsby, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    Tensile creep studies were conducted on polycrystalline Nextel 610 and Fiber FP alumina fibers with grain sizes of 100 and 300 nm, respectively. Test conditions were temperatures from 800 to 1050 C and stresses from 60 to 1000 MPa. For both fibers, only a small primary creep portion occurred followed by steady-state creep. The stress exponents for steady-state creep of Nextel 610 and Fiber FP were found to be about 3 and 1, respectively. At lower temperatures, below 1000 C, the finer grained Nextel 610 had a much higher 0.2 percent creep strength for 100 hr than the Fiber FP; while at higher temperatures, Nextel 610 had a comparable creep strength to the Fiber FP. The stress and grain size dependencies suggest Nextel 610 and Fiber FP creep rates are due to grain boundary sliding controlled by interface reaction and Nabarro-Herring mechanisms, respectively.

  11. Effects of Effective Dendrite Size on Dynamic Tensile Properties of Ti-Based Amorphous Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Changwoo; Park, Jaeyeong; Kim, Choongnyun Paul; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Lee, Sunghak

    2016-04-01

    In this study, dynamic tensile properties of dendrite-containing Ti-based amorphous matrix composites were examined, and effects of dendrite size on dynamic deformation were investigated. The composites contained 73 to 76 vol pct of dendrites whose effective sizes were varied from 63 to 103 μm. The dynamic tensile test results indicated that the ultimate tensile strength increased up to 1.25 GPa, whereas the elongation decreased to 1 pct, although the overall strength and elongation trends followed those of the quasi-static tensile test. According to the observation of dynamic tensile deformation behavior, very few deformation bands were observed beneath the fracture surface in the composite containing large dendrites. In the composite containing small dendrites, deformation bands initiated inside small dendrites propagated into adjacent dendrites through the amorphous matrix, and were crossly intersect perpendicularly in widely deformed areas, which beneficially worked for elongation as well as strength.

  12. Tensile and fatigue properties of Inconel 718 at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, C. O.; Schmidt, E. H.

    1969-01-01

    Tests to determine the tensile and fatigue properties of Inconel 718 at cryogenic temperatures show that the alloy increases in strength at low temperatures, with very little change in toughness. The effect of surface finish and grain size on the fatigue properties was also determined.

  13. Effect of Root Moisture Content and Diameter on Root Tensile Properties.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuanjun; Chen, Lihua; Li, Ning; Zhang, Qiufen

    2016-01-01

    The stabilization of slopes by vegetation has been a topical issue for many years. Root mechanical characteristics significantly influence soil reinforcement; therefore it is necessary to research into the indicators of root tensile properties. In this study, we explored the influence of root moisture content on tensile resistance and strength with different root diameters and for different tree species. Betula platyphylla, Quercus mongolica, Pinus tabulaeformis, and Larix gmelinii, the most popular tree species used for slope stabilization in the rocky mountainous areas of northern China, were used in this study. A tensile test was conducted after root samples were grouped by diameter and moisture content. The results showedthat:1) root moisture content had a significant influence on tensile properties; 2) slightly loss of root moisture content could enhance tensile strength, but too much loss of water resulted in weaker capacity for root elongation, and consequently reduced tensile strength; 3) root diameter had a strong positive correlation with tensile resistance; and4) the roots of Betula platyphylla had the best tensile properties when both diameter and moisture content being controlled. These findings improve our understanding of root tensile properties with root size and moisture, and could be useful for slope stabilization using vegetation. PMID:27003872

  14. Effect of Root Moisture Content and Diameter on Root Tensile Properties

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yuanjun; Chen, Lihua; Li, Ning; Zhang, Qiufen

    2016-01-01

    The stabilization of slopes by vegetation has been a topical issue for many years. Root mechanical characteristics significantly influence soil reinforcement; therefore it is necessary to research into the indicators of root tensile properties. In this study, we explored the influence of root moisture content on tensile resistance and strength with different root diameters and for different tree species. Betula platyphylla, Quercus mongolica, Pinus tabulaeformis, and Larix gmelinii, the most popular tree species used for slope stabilization in the rocky mountainous areas of northern China, were used in this study. A tensile test was conducted after root samples were grouped by diameter and moisture content. The results showedthat:1) root moisture content had a significant influence on tensile properties; 2) slightly loss of root moisture content could enhance tensile strength, but too much loss of water resulted in weaker capacity for root elongation, and consequently reduced tensile strength; 3) root diameter had a strong positive correlation with tensile resistance; and4) the roots of Betula platyphylla had the best tensile properties when both diameter and moisture content being controlled. These findings improve our understanding of root tensile properties with root size and moisture, and could be useful for slope stabilization using vegetation. PMID:27003872

  15. Tensile testing of nylon and Kevlar parachute materials under Federal specified temperature and relative humidity conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Botner, W.T.

    1980-01-01

    A small 10-ft x 12-ft temperature and relative humidity controlled room for tensile testing of parachute materials is presented. Tensile tests of nylon and Kevlar parachute materials indicate there is a negligible change in break strength of test samples soaked in the controlled environment vs samples soaked in ambient conditions.

  16. Tensile Testing: A Simple Introduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Tensile testing may be used to decide, say, which steel to use in various constructions. Analogous testing can be done simply in the classroom using plasticine and helps to introduce pupils to the various properties studied in materials science.

  17. Tensile shock waves in rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi-Chandar, Krishnaswamy; Niemczura, Johnathan

    2011-03-01

    We examine the propagation of waves of finite deformation in rubbers through experiments and analysis; in particular attention is focused on the propagation of one-dimensional tensile shock waves in strips of latex and nitrile rubber. Tensile wave propagation experiments were conducted at high strain-rates by holding one end fixed and displacing the other end at a constant velocity. A high-speed video camera was used to monitor the motion and to determine the evolution of strain and particle velocity in rubber strips. Shock waves have been generated under tensile impact in pre-stretched rubber strips; analysis of the response yields the tensile shock adiabat for rubbers. The propagation of shocks is analyzed by developing an analogy with the theory of detonation; it is shown that the condition for shock propagation can be determined using the Chapman-Jouguet shock condition.

  18. Manufacturing of Plutonium Tensile Specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, Cameron M

    2012-08-01

    Details workflow conducted to manufacture high density alpha Plutonium tensile specimens to support Los Alamos National Laboratory's science campaigns. Introduces topics including the metallurgical challenge of Plutonium and the use of high performance super-computing to drive design. Addresses the utilization of Abaqus finite element analysis, programmable computer numerical controlled (CNC) machining, as well as glove box ergonomics and safety in order to design a process that will yield high quality Plutonium tensile specimens.

  19. Contact hardening of Al interlayer in laminated Mg/Al composites during compressive and tensile loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurevich, L.; Pronichev, D.; Trunov, M.

    2016-02-01

    The study presents result of the FEM simulation of Mg alloy/Al/Ti alloy composite under tensile and compression loads. The simulation revealed the strength of Al interlayer at its various thickness values.

  20. Specimen Inertia in high strain rate tensile testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockly, Meyrick; Siviour, Clive R.

    2015-09-01

    It is well established that measurements of the dynamic mechanical response of materials are susceptible to errors due to the inertia of the specimen, which causes stresses in addition to the intrinsic material strength. A number of authors have derived equations for these stresses in compression experiments; these equations can be used as a guideline for good specimen design. However, no such equations have been presented in the literature for the equivalent effects in tensile experiments. This paper begins by considering and rationalising the equations available for compression, before producing a set of equations which can be used in design of specimens for, e.g., tensile Hopkinson bar experiments.

  1. Fluid dynamic lateral slicing of high tensile strength carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vimalanathan, Kasturi; Gascooke, Jason R.; Suarez-Martinez, Irene; Marks, Nigel A.; Kumari, Harshita; Garvey, Christopher J.; Atwood, Jerry L.; Lawrance, Warren D.; Raston, Colin L.

    2016-03-01

    Lateral slicing of micron length carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is effective on laser irradiation of the materials suspended within dynamic liquid thin films in a microfluidic vortex fluidic device (VFD). The method produces sliced CNTs with minimal defects in the absence of any chemical stabilizers, having broad length distributions centred at ca 190, 160 nm and 171 nm for single, double and multi walled CNTs respectively, as established using atomic force microscopy and supported by small angle neutron scattering solution data. Molecular dynamics simulations on a bent single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) with a radius of curvature of order 10 nm results in tearing across the tube upon heating, highlighting the role of shear forces which bend the tube forming strained bonds which are ruptured by the laser irradiation. CNT slicing occurs with the VFD operating in both the confined mode for a finite volume of liquid and continuous flow for scalability purposes.

  2. Rod Has High Tensile Strength And Low Thermal Expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. E.; Everton, R. L.; Howe, E.; O'Malley, M.

    1996-01-01

    Thoriated tungsten extension rod fabricated to replace stainless-steel extension rod attached to linear variable-differential transformer in gap-measuring gauge. Threads formed on end of rod by machining with special fixtures and carefully chosen combination of speeds and feeds.

  3. Fluid dynamic lateral slicing of high tensile strength carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Vimalanathan, Kasturi; Gascooke, Jason R; Suarez-Martinez, Irene; Marks, Nigel A; Kumari, Harshita; Garvey, Christopher J; Atwood, Jerry L; Lawrance, Warren D; Raston, Colin L

    2016-01-01

    Lateral slicing of micron length carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is effective on laser irradiation of the materials suspended within dynamic liquid thin films in a microfluidic vortex fluidic device (VFD). The method produces sliced CNTs with minimal defects in the absence of any chemical stabilizers, having broad length distributions centred at ca 190, 160 nm and 171 nm for single, double and multi walled CNTs respectively, as established using atomic force microscopy and supported by small angle neutron scattering solution data. Molecular dynamics simulations on a bent single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) with a radius of curvature of order 10 nm results in tearing across the tube upon heating, highlighting the role of shear forces which bend the tube forming strained bonds which are ruptured by the laser irradiation. CNT slicing occurs with the VFD operating in both the confined mode for a finite volume of liquid and continuous flow for scalability purposes. PMID:26965728

  4. Fluid dynamic lateral slicing of high tensile strength carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Vimalanathan, Kasturi; Gascooke, Jason R.; Suarez-Martinez, Irene; Marks, Nigel A.; Kumari, Harshita; Garvey, Christopher J.; Atwood, Jerry L.; Lawrance, Warren D.; Raston, Colin L.

    2016-01-01

    Lateral slicing of micron length carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is effective on laser irradiation of the materials suspended within dynamic liquid thin films in a microfluidic vortex fluidic device (VFD). The method produces sliced CNTs with minimal defects in the absence of any chemical stabilizers, having broad length distributions centred at ca 190, 160 nm and 171 nm for single, double and multi walled CNTs respectively, as established using atomic force microscopy and supported by small angle neutron scattering solution data. Molecular dynamics simulations on a bent single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) with a radius of curvature of order 10 nm results in tearing across the tube upon heating, highlighting the role of shear forces which bend the tube forming strained bonds which are ruptured by the laser irradiation. CNT slicing occurs with the VFD operating in both the confined mode for a finite volume of liquid and continuous flow for scalability purposes. PMID:26965728

  5. Tensile strengths of problem shales and clays. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Rechner, F.J.

    1990-01-01

    The greatest single expense faced by oil companies involved in the exploration for crude oil is that of drilling wells. The most abundant rock drilled is shale. Some of these shales cause wellbore stability problems during the drilling process. These can range from slow rate of penetration and high torque up to stuck pipe and hole abandonment. The mechanical integrity of the shale must be known when the shalers are subjected to drilling fluids to develop an effective drilling plan.

  6. Ab initio LDA+U prediction of the tensile properties of chromia across multiple length scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosey, Nicholas J.; Carter, Emily A.

    2009-02-01

    Periodic density functional theory (DFT) and DFT+U calculations are used to evaluate various mechanical properties associated with the fracture of chromia (Cr 2O 3) along the [0 0 0 1] and [0 1 1¯ (3/2) (a/c)2 2] directions. The properties investigated include the tensile strength, elastic constants, and surface energies. The tensile strengths are evaluated using an ideal tensile test, which provides the theoretical tensile strength, and by fitting the calculated data to universal binding energy relationships (UBER), which permit the extrapolation of the calculated results to arbitrary length scales. The results demonstrate the ability of the UBER to yield a realistic estimate of the tensile strength of a 10-μm-thick sample of Cr 2O 3 using data obtained through calculations on nanoscopic systems. We predict that Cr 2O 3 will fracture most easily in the [0 1 1¯ (3/2) (a/c)2 2] direction, with a best estimate for the tensile strength of 386 MPa for a 10 μm grain, consistent with flexural strength measurements for chromia. The grain becomes considerably stronger at the nanoscale, where we predict a tensile strength along the same direction of 32.1 GPa for 1.45 nm crystallite. The results also provide insight into the origin of the direction dependence of the mechanical properties of Cr 2O 3, with the differences in the behavior along different directions being related to the number of Cr-O bonds supporting the applied tensile load. Additionally, the results shed light on various practical aspects of modeling the mechanical properties of materials with DFT+U calculations and in using UBERs to estimate the mechanical properties of materials across disparate length scales.

  7. Collagen network strengthening following cyclic tensile loading.

    PubMed

    Susilo, Monica E; Paten, Jeffrey A; Sander, Edward A; Nguyen, Thao D; Ruberti, Jeffrey W

    2016-02-01

    The bulk mechanical properties of tissues are highly tuned to the physiological loads they experience and reflect the hierarchical structure and mechanical properties of their constituent parts. A thorough understanding of the processes involved in tissue adaptation is required to develop multi-scale computational models of tissue remodelling. While extracellular matrix (ECM) remodelling is partly due to the changing cellular metabolic activity, there may also be mechanically directed changes in ECM nano/microscale organization which lead to mechanical tuning. The thermal and enzymatic stability of collagen, which is the principal load-bearing biopolymer in vertebrates, have been shown to be enhanced by force suggesting that collagen has an active role in ECM mechanical properties. Here, we ask how changes in the mechanical properties of a collagen-based material are reflected by alterations in the micro/nanoscale collagen network following cyclic loading. Surprisingly, we observed significantly higher tensile stiffness and ultimate tensile strength, roughly analogous to the effect of work hardening, in the absence of network realignment and alterations to the fibril area fraction. The data suggest that mechanical loading induces stabilizing changes internal to the fibrils themselves or in the fibril-fibril interactions. If such a cell-independent strengthening effect is operational in vivo, then it would be an important consideration in any multiscale computational approach to ECM growth and remodelling. PMID:26855760

  8. Distributed measurements of fiber birefringence and diametric load using optical low-coherence reflectometry and fiber gratings.

    PubMed

    Coric, Dragan; Limberger, Hans G; Salathé, René P

    2006-11-27

    Polarization sensitive optical low-coherence reflectometry (OLCR) is used for measuring the complex fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) reflection coefficient. We determine the beat length directly from oscillations in the OLCR amplitude with a resolution of 10(-6) and a spatial resolution only limited by the minimum beat length or the coherence length of the light source. Using the OLCR amplitude and phase in combination with an inverse scattering algorithm the birefringence is retrieved with a resolution of 2x10(-5) while the spatial resolution is 25 mum. The two developed techniques are applied for measuring position, magnitude and footprint of induced birefringence of an FBG under uniform and non-uniform diametric loading. PMID:19529603

  9. Cryogenic Temperature-Gradient Foam/Substrate Tensile Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vailhe, Christophe

    2003-01-01

    The figure shows a fixture for measuring the tensile strength of the bond between an aluminum substrate and a thermally insulating polymeric foam. The specimen is meant to be representative of insulating foam on an aluminum tank that holds a cryogenic liquid. Prior to the development of this fixture, tensile tests of this type were performed on foam/substrate specimens immersed in cryogenic fluids. Because the specimens were cooled to cryogenic temperatures throughout their thicknesses, they tended to become brittle and to fracture at loads below true bond tensile strengths. The present fixture is equipped to provide a thermal gradient from cryogenic temperature at the foam/substrate interface to room temperature on the opposite foam surface. The fixture includes an upper aluminum block at room temperature and a lower aluminum block cooled to -423 F (approx. -253 C) by use of liquid helium. In preparation for a test, the metal outer surface (the lower surface) of a foam/substrate specimen is bonded to the lower block and the foam outer surface (the upper surface) of the specimen is bonded to the upper block. In comparison with the through-the-thickness cooling of immersion testing, the cryogenic-to-room-temperature thermal gradient that exists during testing on this fixture is a more realistic approximation of the operational thermal condition of sprayed insulating foam on a tank of cryogenic liquid. Hence, tensile tests performed on this fixture provide more accurate indications of operational bond tensile strengths. In addition, the introduction of the present fixture reduces the cost of testing by reducing the amount of cryogenic liquid consumed and the time needed to cool a specimen.

  10. Tensile properties of fresh human calcaneal (Achilles) tendons.

    PubMed

    Louis-Ugbo, John; Leeson, Benjamin; Hutton, William C

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the tensile properties of fresh human calcaneal (Achilles) tendons. Twenty fresh cadaveric (age range = 57-93 years) bone-Achilles tendon complexes were harvested within 24 hr postmortem. The calcaneus together with 15 cm of the Achilles tendon extending proximally from the insertion on the calcaneus was clamped and biomechanically tested. Each tendon was firmly fixed in clamps in an MTS Systems Corporation MTS testing machine and tension was applied at a displacement rate of 8 cm per minute until the tendon failed. The tensile force and tensile strain (as measured using an extensometer) were recorded and plotted using onboard software. The narrow age range of our donors prevented any meaningful correlation between age and tensile properties; however, the results showed that: 1) the average ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of the human Achilles tendon was 1189 N (range = 360-1,965), 2) there was a correlation between left and right legs for UTS, 3) there was a correlation between left and right legs in regard to cross sectional area, and 4) there was no correlation between UTS and cross-sectional area. PMID:14695585

  11. Tensile Properties of Electrodeposited Nanocrystalline Ni-Cu Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, P. Q.; Zhang, C.; Wen, J. C.; Rao, H. C.; Wang, Q. T.

    2016-02-01

    Nanocrystalline Ni-Cu alloys with a Cu content of 6, 10, 19, and 32 wt.% were prepared by pulse electrodeposition. The microstructure and tensile properties of the nanocrystalline Ni-Cu alloys were characterized by x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and tensile testing. The x-ray diffraction analysis indicates that the structure of the nanocrystalline Ni-Cu alloys is a face-centered cubic, single-phase solid solution with an average grain size of 18 to 24 nm, and that the average grain size decreased with increasing Cu content. The ultimate tensile strength (~1265 to 1640 MPa) and elongation to failure (~5.8 to 8.9%) of the Ni-Cu alloys increased with increasing Cu content. The increase in tensile strength results from the solid solution and fine-grain strengthening. Elemental Cu addition results in a decrease in stacking fault energy, an increase in work hardening rate, a delay in plasticity instability, and consequently, a higher plasticity.

  12. Extreme strength observed in limpet teeth

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Asa H.; Lu, Dun; Pugno, Nicola M.

    2015-01-01

    The teeth of limpets exploit distinctive composite nanostructures consisting of high volume fractions of reinforcing goethite nanofibres within a softer protein phase to provide mechanical integrity when rasping over rock surfaces during feeding. The tensile strength of discrete volumes of limpet tooth material measured using in situ atomic force microscopy was found to range from 3.0 to 6.5 GPa and was independent of sample size. These observations highlight an absolute material tensile strength that is the highest recorded for a biological material, outperforming the high strength of spider silk currently considered to be the strongest natural material, and approaching values comparable to those of the strongest man-made fibres. This considerable tensile strength of limpet teeth is attributed to a high mineral volume fraction of reinforcing goethite nanofibres with diameters below a defect-controlled critical size, suggesting that natural design in limpet teeth is optimized towards theoretical strength limits. PMID:25694539

  13. Extreme strength observed in limpet teeth.

    PubMed

    Barber, Asa H; Lu, Dun; Pugno, Nicola M

    2015-04-01

    The teeth of limpets exploit distinctive composite nanostructures consisting of high volume fractions of reinforcing goethite nanofibres within a softer protein phase to provide mechanical integrity when rasping over rock surfaces during feeding. The tensile strength of discrete volumes of limpet tooth material measured using in situ atomic force microscopy was found to range from 3.0 to 6.5 GPa and was independent of sample size. These observations highlight an absolute material tensile strength that is the highest recorded for a biological material, outperforming the high strength of spider silk currently considered to be the strongest natural material, and approaching values comparable to those of the strongest man-made fibres. This considerable tensile strength of limpet teeth is attributed to a high mineral volume fraction of reinforcing goethite nanofibres with diameters below a defect-controlled critical size, suggesting that natural design in limpet teeth is optimized towards theoretical strength limits. PMID:25694539

  14. The Cryogenic Tensile Properties of an Extruded Aluminum-Beryllium Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamwell, W. R.

    2002-01-01

    Basic mechanical properties; i.e., ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, percent elongation, and elastic modulus, were obtained for the aluminum-beryllium alloy, AlBeMet162, at cryogenic (-195.5 C (-320 F) and -252.8 C (-423 F)) temperatures. The material evaluated was purchased to the requirements of SAE-AMS7912, "Aluminum-Beryllium Alloy, Extrusions."

  15. Mechanical tensile testing of titanium 15-3-3-3 and Kevlar 49 at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, B. L.; Martinez, R. M.; Shirron, P.; Tuttle, J.; Galassi, N. M.; McGuinness, D. S.; Puckett, D.; Francis, J. J.; Flom, Y.

    2012-06-01

    Titanium 15-3-3-3 and Kevlar 49 are highly desired materials for structural components in cryogenic applications due to their low thermal conductivity at low temperatures. Previous tests have indicated that titanium 15-3-3-3 becomes increasingly brittle as the temperature decreases. Furthermore, little is known regarding the mechanical properties of Kevlar 49 at low temperatures, most specifically its Young's modulus. This testing investigates the mechanical properties of both materials at cryogenic temperatures through cryogenic mechanical tensile testing to failure. The elongation, ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, and break strength of both materials are provided and analyzed here.

  16. Manual for LDEF tensile tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, W. G., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    One of the experiments aboard the NASA Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) consists of a tray of approximately one hundred tensile specimens of several candidate space structure composite materials. During the LDEF flight the materials will be subjected to the space environment and to possible contamination during launch and recovery. Tensile tests of representative samples were made before the LDEF flight to obtain baseline data. Similar tests will be made on control specimens stored on earth for the length of the LDEF flight and on recovered flight specimens. This manual codifies the details of testing, data acquisition, and handling used in obtaining the baseline data so that the same procedures and equipment will be used on the subsequent tests.

  17. Elongation Transducer For Tensile Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Paul W.; Stokes, Thomas R.

    1994-01-01

    Extensometer transducer measures elongation of tensile-test specimen with negligible distortion of test results. Used in stress-versus-strain tests of small specimens of composite materials. Clamping stress distributed more evenly. Specimen clamped gently between jaw and facing surface of housing. Friction force of load points on conical tips onto specimen depends on compression of spring, adjusted by turning cover on housing. Limp, light nylon-insulated electrical leads impose minimal extraneous loads on measuring elements.

  18. Probabilistic Modeling of Ceramic Matrix Composite Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shan, Ashwin R.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Mital, Subodh K.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1998-01-01

    Uncertainties associated with the primitive random variables such as manufacturing process (processing temperature, fiber volume ratio, void volume ratio), constituent properties (fiber, matrix and interface), and geometric parameters (ply thickness, interphase thickness) have been simulated to quantify the scatter in the first matrix cracking strength (FMCS) and the ultimate tensile strength of SCS-6/RBSN (SiC fiber (SCS-6) reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride composite) ceramic matrix composite laminate at room temperature. Cumulative probability distribution function for the FMCS and ultimate tensile strength at room temperature (RT) of (0)(sub 8), (0(sub 2)/90(sub 2), and (+/-45(sub 2))(sub S) laminates have been simulated and the sensitivity of primitive variables to the respective strengths have been quantified. Computationally predicted scatter of the strengths for a uniaxial laminate have been compared with those from limited experimental data. Also the experimental procedure used in the tests has been described briefly. Results show a very good agreement between the computational simulation and the experimental data. Dominating failure modes in (0)(sub 8), (0/90)(sub s) and (+/-45)(sub S) laminates have been identified. Results indicate that the first matrix cracking strength for the (0)(sub S), and (0/90)(sub S) laminates is sensitive to the thermal properties, modulus and strengths of both the fiber and matrix whereas the ultimate tensile strength is sensitive to the fiber strength and the fiber volume ratio. In the case of a (+/-45)(sub S), laminate, both the FMCS and the ultimate tensile strengths have a small scatter range and are sensitive to the fiber tensile strength as well as the fiber volume ratio.

  19. A tensile deformation model for in-situ dendrite/metallic glass matrix composites.

    PubMed

    Qiao, J W; Zhang, T; Yang, F Q; Liaw, P K; Pauly, S; Xu, B S

    2013-01-01

    In-situ dendrite/metallic glass matrix composites (MGMCs) with a composition of Ti₄₆Zr₂₀V₁₂Cu₅Be₁₇ exhibit ultimate tensile strength of 1510 MPa and fracture strain of about 7.6%. A tensile deformation model is established, based on the five-stage classification: (1) elastic-elastic, (2) elastic-plastic, (3) plastic-plastic (yield platform), (4) plastic-plastic (work hardening), and (5) plastic-plastic (softening) stages, analogous to the tensile behavior of common carbon steels. The constitutive relations strongly elucidate the tensile deformation mechanism. In parallel, the simulation results by a finite-element method (FEM) are in good agreement with the experimental findings and theoretical calculations. The present study gives a mathematical model to clarify the work-hardening behavior of dendrites and softening of the amorphous matrix. Furthermore, the model can be employed to simulate the tensile behavior of in-situ dendrite/MGMCs. PMID:24085187

  20. Development of High Specific Strength Envelope Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Keiji; Sano, Masa-Aki; Kakuta, Yoshiaki

    Progress in materials technology has produced a much more durable synthetic fabric envelope for the non-rigid airship. Flexible materials are required to form airship envelopes, ballonets, load curtains, gas bags and covering rigid structures. Polybenzoxazole fiber (Zylon) and polyalirate fiber (Vectran) show high specific tensile strength, so that we developed membrane using these high specific tensile strength fibers as a load carrier. The main material developed is a Zylon or Vectran load carrier sealed internally with a polyurethane bonded inner gas retention film (EVOH). The external surface provides weather protecting with, for instance, a titanium oxide integrated polyurethane or Tedlar film. The mechanical test results show that tensile strength 1,000 N/cm is attained with weight less than 230g/m2. In addition to the mechanical properties, temperature dependence of the joint strength and solar absorptivity and emissivity of the surface are measured. 

  1. Tensile testing and scanning electron microscope examination of Charpy impact specimens from the HFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Czajkowski, C.J.; Schuster, M.H.; Roberts, T.C.

    1990-01-01

    The Materials Technology Group of the Department of Nuclear Energy (DNE) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has performed a fractographic examination of neutron irradiated and unirradiated Charpy V'' notch specimens which have been deformed to failure in a tensile testing apparatus. The evaluation was carried out using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to evaluate the fracture mode. Photomicrographs were then evaluated to determine if ductile areas were present on the fracture surfaces of the specimens. The irradiated tensile tests (Charpy V'' notch configuration) showed minimum notch tensile strengths of 37.2 Ksi before failure. The unirradiated 6061 T-6 material exhibited a minimum notch tensile strength of 41.9 Ksi. 2 refs., 21 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Insights into the effects of tensile and compressive loadings on human femur bone

    PubMed Central

    Havaldar, Raviraj; Pilli, S. C.; Putti, B. B.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Fragile fractures are most likely manifestations of fatigue damage that develop under repetitive loading conditions. Numerous microcracks disperse throughout the bone with the tensile and compressive loads. In this study, tensile and compressive load tests are performed on specimens of both the genders within 19 to 83 years of age and the failure strength is estimated. Materials and Methods: Fifty five human femur cortical samples are tested. They are divided into various age groups ranging from 19-83 years. Mechanical tests are performed on an Instron 3366 universal testing machine, according to American Society for Testing and Materials International (ASTM) standards. Results: The results show that stress induced in the bone tissue depends on age and gender. It is observed that both tensile and compression strengths reduces as age advances. Compressive strength is more than tensile strength in both the genders. Conclusion: The compression and tensile strength of human femur cortical bone is estimated for both male and female subjecting in the age group of 19-83 years. The fracture toughness increases till 35 years in male and 30 years in female and reduces there after. Mechanical properties of bone are age and gender dependent. PMID:24800190

  3. Inert strength of pristine silica glass fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.L.; Michalske, T.A.

    1993-11-01

    Silica glass fibers have been produced and tested under ultra high vacuum (UHV) conditions to investigate the inert strength of pristine fibers in absence of reactive agents. Analysis of the coefficient of variation in diameter ({upsilon}{sub d}) vs the coefficient of variation of breaking strength ({upsilon}{sub {sigma}}) does not adequately explain the variation of breaking stress. Distribution of fiber tensile strength data suggests that the inert strength of such fibers is not single valued and that the intrinsic strength is controlled by defects in the glass. Furthermore, comparison of room temperature UHV data with LN{sub 2} data indicates that these intrinsic strengths are not temperature dependent.

  4. Diametral strain of fast reactor MOX fuel pins with austenitic stainless steel cladding irradiated to high burnup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uwaba, Tomoyuki; Ito, Masahiro; Maeda, Koji

    2011-09-01

    The C3M irradiation test, which was conducted in the experimental fast reactor, "Joyo", demonstrated that mixed oxide (MOX) fuel pins with austenitic steel cladding could attain a peak pellet burnup of about 130 GWd/t safely. The test fuel assembly consisted of 61 fuel pins, whose design specifications were similar to those of driver fuel pins of a prototype fast breeder reactor, "Monju". The irradiated fuel pins exhibited diametral strain due to cladding void swelling and irradiation creep. The cladding irradiation creep strain were due to the pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) as well as the internal gas pressure. From the fuel pin ceramographs and 137Cs gamma scanning, it was found that the PCMI was associated with the pellet swelling which was enhanced by the rim structure formation or by cesium uranate formation. The PCMI due to cesium uranate, which occurred near the top of the MOX fuel column, significantly affected cladding hoop stress and thermal creep, and the latter effect tended to increase the cumulative damage fraction (CDF) of the cladding though the CDF indicated that the cladding still had some margin to failure due to the creep damage.

  5. Tensile softening of metallic-glass-matrix composites in the supercooled liquid region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, J. W.; Zhang, Y.; Jia, H. L.; Yang, H. J.; Liaw, P. K.; Xu, B. S.

    2012-03-01

    A Ti-based metallic-glass-matrix composite exhibits tensile softening (necking) in the supercooled liquid region, accompanied by a large tensile ductility and a fragmentation of dendrites. Subjected to high temperatures, concurrent crystallization does not occur, suggesting a good thermal stability of the glass matrix. The presence of high-volume-fractioned dendrites lowers the rheology of the viscous glass matrix at high temperatures, which results in an absence of super elongation as monolithic bulk metallic glasses (BMGs). A tensile strength of 970 MPa is higher than those of most BMGs under varying strain rates, ascribing to the retardation of softening by the dendrites.

  6. Establishing Correlations for Predicting Tensile Properties Based on the Shear Punch Test and Vickers Microhardness data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milot, Timothy S.

    A series of mechanical tests was performed on a matrix of pressure vessel alloys to establish correlations between shear punch tests (SPT), microhardness (Hv), and tensile data. The purpose is to estimate tensile properties from SPT and Hv data. Small specimen testing is central to characterization of irradiation-induced changes in alloys used for nuclear applications. SPT have the potential for estimating tensile yield and ultimate strengths, strain hardening and ductility data, by using TEM disks, for example. Additional insight into SPT was gained by performing finite element analysis (FEA) simulations.

  7. Changes in boron fiber strength due to surface removal by chemical etching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of chemical etching on the tensile strength of commercial boron/tungsten fibers were investigated. Fibers with as-received diameters of 203, 143, and 100 micrometers were etched to diameters as small as 43 micrometers. The etching generally resulted in increasing fiber tensile strength with decreasing fiber diameter. And for the 203 micrometer fibers there was an accompanying significant decrease in the coefficient of variation of the tensile strength for diameters down to 89 micrometers. Heat treating these fibers above 1,173 K in a vacuum caused a marked decrease in the average tensile strength of at least 80 percent. But after the fibers were etched, their strengths exceeded the as-received strengths. The tensile strength behavior is explained in terms of etching effects on surface flaws and the residual stress pattern of the as-received fibers.

  8. Tensile behavior of the L(1)2 compound Al67Ti25Cr8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, K. S.; Brown, S. A.

    1992-01-01

    Temperature-related variations in tensile yield strength and ductility were studied on cast, homogenized and isothermally forged Al67Ti25Cr8. Yield strength dropped discontinuously between 623 K and 773 K and then decreased gradually with increasing temperature. Below 623 K, fracture occurred prior to macroscopic yielding. Ductility decreased from 0.2 percent at 623 K to zero at 773 K, but increased again at higher temperatures. At 1073 K, an elongation of 19 percent was obtainable, and ultimate tensile strength and localized necking were observed. Fracture surfaces and deformed microstructures were examined. The 1073 K tensile specimen that exhibited 19 percent elongation showed grain boundary serrations and some evidence of recrystallization (likely dynamic) although fracture occurred predominantly via an intergranular mode.

  9. Tensile properties of irradiated and unirradiated welds of A533 steel plate and A508 forgings

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    The tensile properties of welds of base metals ASTM A533, Grade B, Class 1 steel plate and ASTM A508, Class 1 forgings were evaluated in irradiated (3 to 21 x 10/sup 18/ n/cm/sup 2/) and unirradiated conditions. Yield strength and ultimate strength both increased with increasing fluence, while small ductility losses were generally independent of fluence. Yield strength was found to be more sensitive to irradiation than ultimate strength for all welds. The strength and ductility responses to irradiation varied between the weld materials. These variations were attributed to differences in chemical constituents of the welds.

  10. Study on ARALL failure behavior under tensile loading

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Hai; Ren Rongzhen; Tao Chunhu; Li Hongyun

    1996-12-15

    This paper studies the failure behavior of ARALL (Aramid Aluminum Laminate) under tensile loading by means of acoustic emission (AE), optical metallography (OM) and scanning electronic microscope (SEM), and analyzes the fracture appearance of ARALL and its fracture characteristics. The damage models of ARALL are concluded in this paper. The results show that ARALL will yield under tensile loading, and its strength will decrease as the content of resin increases. During fracture process, AE amplitude distribution curves show that there are three obvious peaks, which respectively correspond to separation of the interface between fibers and resin, local delamination damage and fracture of a small quantity of fibers, and delamination damage of large area and final fracture of a large numbers of fibers. Dynamic damage and fracture process of ARALL can be detected by AE.

  11. Tensile stress acoustic constants of unidirectional graphite/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, W. H.

    1990-01-01

    Previously, the stress acoustic constants (SACs) of unidirectional graphite/epoxy composites were measured to determine the nonlinear moduli of this material. These measurements were made under compressive loading in order to obtain the sufficient number of values needed to calculate these moduli. However, because their strength in tension along fiber directions can be several times greater, most composites are used under tensile loading. Thus, it is important to characterize the nonlinear properties of these materials in tension as well. The SACs which are defined as the slope of the normalized change in ultrasonic 'natural' velocity as a function of stress were measured in a unidirectional laminate of T300/5208 graphite/epoxy. Tensile load was applied along the fiber axis with the ultrasonic waves propagating perpendicular to the fiber direction. Changes in velocity were measured using a pulsed phase locked loop ultrasonic interferometer with the nominal frequency of the ultrasonic waves being 2.25 MHz.

  12. Tensile Stress Acoustic Constants of Unidirectional Graphite/Epoxy Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, W. H.

    1990-01-01

    Previously, the stress acoustic constants (SAC's) of unidirectional graphite/epoxy composites were measured to determine the nonlinear moduli of this material. These measurements were made under compressive loading in order to obtain the sufficient number of values needed to calculate these moduli. However, because their strength in tension along fiber directions can be several times greater, most composites are used under tensile loading. Thus, it is important to characterize the nonlinear properties of these materials in tension as well. The SAC's which are defined as the slope of the normalized change in ultrasonic "natural" velocity as a function of stress were measured in a unidirectional laminate of T300/5208 graphite/epoxy. Tensile load was applied along the fiber axis with the ultrasonic waves propagating perpendicular to the fiber direction. Changes in velocity were measured using a pulsed phase locked loop ultrasonic interferometer with the nominal frequency of the ultrasonic waves being 2.25 MHz.

  13. Tensile stress acoustic constants of unidirectional graphite/epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Prosser, W.H. )

    1990-03-01

    Previously, the stress acoustic constants (SACs) of unidirectional graphite/epoxy composites were measured to determine the nonlinear moduli of this material. These measurements were made under compressive loading in order to obtain the sufficient number of values needed to calculate these moduli. However, because their strength in tension along fiber directions can be several times greater, most composites are used under tensile loading. Thus, it is important to characterize the nonlinear properties of these materials in tension as well. The SACs which are defined as the slope of the normalized change in ultrasonic natural velocity as a function of stress were measured in a unidirectional laminate of T300/5208 graphite/epoxy. Tensile load was applied along the fiber axis with the ultrasonic waves propagating perpendicular to the fiber direction. Changes in velocity were measured using a pulsed phase locked loop ultrasonic interferometer with the nominal frequency of the ultrasonic waves being 2.25 MHz. 6 refs.

  14. Probabilistic simulation of uncertainties in composite uniaxial strengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Stock, T. A.

    1990-01-01

    Probabilistic composite micromechanics methods are developed that simulate uncertainties in unidirectional fiber composite strengths. These methods are in the form of computational procedures using composite mechanics with Monte Carlo simulation. The variables for which uncertainties are accounted include constituent strengths and their respective scatter. A graphite/epoxy unidirectional composite (ply) is studied to illustrate the procedure and its effectiveness to formally estimate the probable scatter in the composite uniaxial strengths. The results show that ply longitudinal tensile and compressive, transverse compressive and intralaminar shear strengths are not sensitive to single fiber anomalies (breaks, intergacial disbonds, matrix microcracks); however, the ply transverse tensile strength is.

  15. An Assessment of Variability in the Average Tensile Properties of a Melt-Infiltrated SiC/SiC Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalluri, Sreeramesh; Brewer, David N.; Calomino, Anthony M.

    2004-01-01

    Woven SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs), manufactured by the slurry-cast, melt-infiltration process are under consideration as combustor liner materials in aircraft gas turbine engines. Tensile properties (elastic modulus, proportional limit strength, in-plane tensile strength and strain to failure) of the CMC, manufactured during two separate time periods (9/99 and 1/01) were determined at 816 and 1024 C by conducting tensile tests on specimens machined from the CMC plates. A total of 24 tensile tests were conducted for each temperature and CMC variant combination. In this study average tensile properties of the two cMC variants were statistically compared to evaluate significant differences, if any, within the CMC's properties.

  16. A cryo-jaw designed for in vitro tensile testing of the healing Achilles tendons in rats.

    PubMed

    Wieloch, Peter; Buchmann, Gerhard; Roth, Wolfgang; Rickert, Markus

    2004-11-01

    We present a simple but very secure non-compressive clamping device for in vitro tensile testing of the Achilles tendon in rats. Biomechanical studies were performed on 178 native and injured specimens without any registration of slippage out of the clamp. The average tensile strength of the native rat Achilles tendon was determined to be 48 N (+/-11 N) and its displacement to failure averaged 0.8 mm (+/-0.2 mm). The mean values for tensile strength within the injured tendons increased with time and were above the native tendon values from week 2 and later. Correspondingly, the displacement to failure decreased with time. PMID:15388314

  17. Tensile Properties and Fracture Behavior of Different Carbon Nanotube-Grafted Polyacrylonitrile-Based Carbon Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naito, Kimiyoshi

    2014-11-01

    The tensile properties and fracture behavior of different carbon nanotube (CNT)-grafted polyacrylonitrile-based (T1000GB) single carbon fibers were investigated. Grafting of CNTs was achieved via chemical vapor deposition (CVD). When Fe(C5H5)2 (also applied via CVD) was used as the catalyst, the tensile strength and Weibull modulus of the carbon fibers were improved, possibly due to the growth of dense CNT networks on the carbon fibers, which may have led to a reduction in the number of strength-limiting defects. Separately, at lower concentrations of an Fe(NO3)3·9H2O catalyst in ethanol, which was applied via dipping, the tensile strength of CNT-grafted fibers was nearly identical to that of the as-received fibers, although the Weibull modulus was higher. For higher concentrations of the Fe(NO3)3·9H2O catalyst, however, the tensile strength and the Weibull modulus were lower than those for the as-received material. Although the density of the CNT network increased with the concentration of the Fe(NO3)3·9H2O catalyst in the ethanol solution, heating of the ethanolic Fe(NO3)3·9H2O catalyst solution generated nitric acid (HNO3) due to decomposition, which damaged the fiber surfaces, resulting in an increase in the number of flaws and consequently a reduction in the tensile strength. Therefore, the tensile strength and Weibull modulus of CNT-grafted carbon fibers vary due to the combination of these effects and as a function of the catalyst concentration.

  18. Tensile Properties of Hydrogels and of Snake Skin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkley, Jeffrey A.; Savitzky, Alan H.; Rivera, Gabriel; Gehrke, Stevin H.

    2002-01-01

    Stimulus-responsive or 'smart' gels are of potential interest as sensors and actuators, in industrial separations, and as permeable delivery systems. In most applications, a certain degree of mechanical strength and toughness will be required, yet the large-strain behavior of gels has not been widely reported. Some exceptions include work on gelatin and other food gels, some characterization of soft gels applicable for in-vitro cell growth studies, and toughness determinations on commercial contact lens materials. In general, it can be anticipated that the gel stiffness will increase with increasing degree of crosslinking, but the tensile strength may go through a maximum. Gel properties can be tailored by varying not only the degree of crosslinking, but also the polymer concentration and the nature of the polymer backbone (e.g. its stiffness or solubility). Polypeptides provide an especially interesting case, where secondary structure affects trends in moduli and conformational transitions may accompany phase changes. A few papers on the tensile properties of responsive gels have begun to appear. The responsive hydrogel chosen for the present study, crosslinked hydroxypropylcellulose, shrinks over a rather narrow temperature range near 44 C. Some vertebrate skin is also subject to substantial strain. Among reptiles, the morphologies of the skin and scales show wide variations. Bauer et al. described the mechanical properties and histology of gecko skin; longitudinal tensile properties of snake skin were examined by Jayne with reference to locomotion. The present measurements focus on adaptations related to feeding, including the response of the skin to circumferential tension. Tensile properties will be related to interspecific and regional variation in skin structure and folding.

  19. Tensile test of pressureless-sintered silicon nitride at elevated temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsusue, K.; Fujisawa, Y.; Takahara, K.

    1985-01-01

    Uniaxial tensile strength tests of pressureless sintered silicon nitride were carried out in air at temperatures ranging from room temperature up to 1600 C. Silicon nitrides containing Y2O3, Al2O3, Al2O3-MgO, or MgO-CeO2 additives were tested. The results show that the composition of the additive used influences the strength characteristics of the silicon nitride. The tensile strength rapidly decreased at temperatures above 1000 C for the materials containing MgO as the additive and above 1000 C for the material with Y2O3. When the temperature increased to as high as 1300 C, the strength decreased to about 10 percent of the room temperature strength in each case. Observations of the fracture origin and of the crack propagation on the fracture surfaces are discussed.

  20. Apple Strength Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Syn, C

    2009-12-22

    Strength of the apple parts has been noticed to decrease, especially those installed by the new induction heating system since the LEP campaign started. Fig. 1 shows the ultimate tensile strength (UTS), yield strength (YS), and elongation of the installed or installation-simulated apples on various systems. One can clearly see the mean values of UTS and YS of the post-LEP parts decreased by about 8 ksi and 6 ksi respectively from those of the pre-LEP parts. The slight increase in elongation seen in Fig.1 can be understood from the weak inverse relationship between the strength and elongation in metals. Fig.2 shows the weak correlation between the YS and elongation of the parts listed in Fig. 1. Strength data listed in Figure 1 were re-plotted as histograms in Figs. 3 and 4. Figs. 3a and 4a show histograms of all UTS and YS data. Figs. 3b and 4b shows histograms of pre-LEP data and Figs. 3c and 4c of post-LEP data. Data on statistical scatter of tensile strengths have been rarely published by material suppliers. Instead, only the minimum 'guaranteed' strength data are typically presented. An example of strength distribution of aluminum 7075-T6 sheet material, listed in Fig. 5, show that its scatter width of both UTS and YS for a single sheet can be about 6 ksi and for multi-lot scatter can be as large as 11 ksi even though the sheets have been produced through well-controlled manufacturing process. By approximating the histograms shown in Figs. 3 and 4 by a Gaussian or similar type of distribution curves, one can plausibly see the strength reductions in the later or more recent apples. The pre-LEP data in Figs. 3b and 4b show wider scatter than the post-LEP data in Figs. 3c and 4c and seem to follow the binomial distribution of strength indicating that the apples might have been made from two different lots of material, either from two different vendors or from two different melts of perhaps slightly different chemical composition by a single vendor. The post-LEP apples seem to have been from a single batch of material. The pre-LEP apples of the weak strength and the post-LEP apples with even weaker strength could have been made of the same batch of material, and the small strength differential might be due to the difference in the induction heating system. If the pre-LEP apples with the lower strength and the post LEP apples are made from the same batch of material, their combined scatter of strength data would be wider and can be understood as a result of the additional processing steps of stress relief and induction heating as discussed.

  1. INFUENCE OF SPECIMEN TYPE AND LOADING CONFIGURATION ON THE FRACTURE STRENGTH OF SiC LAYER IN COATED PARTICLE FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, Thak Sang; Hong, Seong Gu; Katoh, Yutai; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2006-01-01

    Internal pressurization and diametrical loading techniques were developed to measure the fracture strength of the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) silicon carbide (SiC) coatings in nuclear fuel particles. Miniature tubular and hemispherical shell specimens were used for both test methods. In the internal pressurization test an expansion load was applied to the inner surface of a specimen by use of a compressively loaded elastomeric insert (polyurethane). In the crush test a diametrical compressive load was applied to the outer surface(s) of a specimen. The test results revealed that the fracture strengths from four test methods obeyed Weibull's two-parameter distribution, and the measured values of the Weibull modulus were consistent for different test methods. The fracture strengths measured by crush test techniques were larger than those by internal pressurization tests. This is because the internal pressurization produces uniform stress distribution while the diametrical loading technique produces severely localized stress distribution. The test method dependence of fracture strength was explained by the size effect predicted by effective surface.

  2. Galvanic corrosion induced degredation of tensile properties in micromachined polycrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, David C.; Boyce, Brad L.; Gall, Ken; Stoldt, Conrad R.

    2007-05-01

    Immersion of polycrystalline silicon in hydrofluoric acid-based solutions is often utilized in microsystem fabrication to liberate mechanical structures. The authors demonstrate, using microfabricated tensile specimens, that such etching can cause a catastrophic reduction in tensile strength and elastic modulus in silicon galvanically coupled to a metallic layer, such as commonly used gold. Galvanically corroded silicon exhibits grain-boundary attack leading to intergranular fracture and/or generalized material removal. The severity of damage and corresponding losses in strength and modulus depend on etch duration and etch chemistry. In contrast, without a metallic layer, uncorroded silicon fails transgranularly and independent of etch duration or chemistry.

  3. Microstructure-Tensile Properties Correlation for the Ti-6Al-4V Titanium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiaohui; Zeng, Weidong; Sun, Yu; Han, Yuanfei; Zhao, Yongqing; Guo, Ping

    2015-04-01

    Finding the quantitative microstructure-tensile properties correlations is the key to achieve performance optimization for various materials. However, it is extremely difficult due to their non-linear and highly interactive interrelations. In the present investigation, the lamellar microstructure features-tensile properties correlations of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy are studied using an error back-propagation artificial neural network (ANN-BP) model. Forty-eight thermomechanical treatments were conducted to prepare the Ti-6Al-4V alloy with different lamellar microstructure features. In the proposed model, the input variables are microstructure features including the α platelet thickness, colony size, and β grain size, which were extracted using Image Pro Plus software. The output variables are the tensile properties, including ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, elongation, and reduction of area. Fourteen hidden-layer neurons which can make ANN-BP model present the most excellent performance were applied. The training results show that all the relative errors between the predicted and experimental values are within 6%, which means that the trained ANN-BP model is capable of providing precise prediction of the tensile properties for Ti-6Al-4V alloy. Based on the corresponding relations between the tensile properties predicted by ANN-BP model and the lamellar microstructure features, it can be found that the yield strength decreases with increasing α platelet thickness continuously. However, the α platelet thickness exerts influence on the elongation in a more complicated way. In addition, for a given α platelet thickness, the yield strength and the elongation both increase with decreasing β grain size and colony size. In general, the β grain size and colony size play a more important role in affecting the tensile properties of Ti-6Al-4V alloy than the α platelet thickness.

  4. Micro-tensile testing system

    DOEpatents

    Wenski, Edward G.

    2007-08-21

    A micro-tensile testing system providing a stand-alone test platform for testing and reporting physical or engineering properties of test samples of materials having thicknesses of approximately between 0.002 inch and 0.030 inch, including, for example, LiGA engineered materials. The testing system is able to perform a variety of static, dynamic, and cyclic tests. The testing system includes a rigid frame and adjustable gripping supports to minimize measurement errors due to deflection or bending under load; serrated grips for securing the extremely small test sample; high-speed laser scan micrometers for obtaining accurate results; and test software for controlling the testing procedure and reporting results.

  5. Micro-tensile testing system

    DOEpatents

    Wenski, Edward G.

    2007-07-17

    A micro-tensile testing system providing a stand-alone test platform for testing and reporting physical or engineering properties of test samples of materials having thicknesses of approximately between 0.002 inch and 0.030 inch, including, for example, LiGA engineered materials. The testing system is able to perform a variety of static, dynamic, and cyclic tests. The testing system includes a rigid frame and adjustable gripping supports to minimize measurement errors due to deflection or bending under load; serrated grips for securing the extremely small test sample; high-speed laser scan micrometers for obtaining accurate results; and test software for controlling the testing procedure and reporting results.

  6. Micro-tensile testing system

    DOEpatents

    Wenski, Edward G.

    2006-01-10

    A micro-tensile testing system providing a stand-alone test platform for testing and reporting physical or engineering properties of test samples of materials having thicknesses of approximately between 0.002 inch and 0.030 inch, including, for example, LiGA engineered materials. The testing system is able to perform a variety of static, dynamic, and cyclic tests. The testing system includes a rigid frame and adjustable gripping supports to minimize measurement errors due to deflection or bending under load; serrated grips for securing the extremely small test sample; high-speed laser scan micrometers for obtaining accurate results; and test software for controlling the testing procedure and reporting results.

  7. In situ tensile fracture toughness of surficial cohesive marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Bruce D.; Barry, Mark A.; Boudreau, Bernard P.; Jumars, Peter A.; Dorgan, Kelly M.

    2012-02-01

    This study reports the first in situ measurements of tensile fracture toughness, K IC, of soft, surficial, cohesive marine sediments. A newly developed probe continuously measures the stress required to cause tensile failure in sediments to depths of up to 1 m. Probe measurements are in agreement with standard laboratory methods of K IC measurements in both potter's clay and natural sediments. The data comprise in situ depth profiles from three field sites in Nova Scotia, Canada. Measured K IC at two muddy sites (median grain size of 23-50 μm) range from near zero at the sediment surface to >1,800 Pa m1/2 at 0.2 m depth. These profiles also appear to identify the bioturbated/mixed depth. K IC for a sandy site (>90% sand) is an order of magnitude lower than for the muddy sediments, and reflects the lack of cohesion/adhesion. A comparison of K IC, median grain size, and porosity in muddy sediments indicates that consolidation increases fracture strength, whereas inclusion of sand causes weakening; thus, sand-bearing layers can be easily identified in K IC profiles. K IC and vane-measured shear strength correlate strongly, which suggests that the vane measurements should perhaps be interpreted as shear fracture toughness, rather than shear strength. Comparison of in situ probe-measured values with K IC of soils and gelatin shows that sediments have a K IC range intermediate between denser compacted soils and softer, elastic gelatin.

  8. Tensile behavior of bonded scarf joints between composite adherends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adkins, David W.; Pipes, R. Byron

    1989-01-01

    Tensile tests of bonded scarf joints indicate that shallow angle joints are sensitive to slight adherend tip bluntness. For scarf angles ranging from 9.2 to 1.1 degrees stress concentrations from blunt adherend tips significantly limit the increased strength expected from larger bond area. The bonded joints fail by two failure modes depending on the scarf angle. Although most of the joints in this study were scarfed by a surface grinder, small angle scarfs can be cut very accurately with a hand held rotary bur.

  9. A Weibull characterization for tensile fracture of multicomponent brittle fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrows, R. G.

    1977-01-01

    Necessary to the development and understanding of brittle fiber reinforced composites is a means to statistically describe fiber strength and strain-to-failure behavior. A statistical characterization for multicomponent brittle fibers is presented. The method, which is an extension of usual Weibull distribution procedures, statistically considers the components making up a fiber (e.g., substrate, sheath, and surface) as separate entities and taken together as in a fiber. Tensile data for silicon carbide fiber and for an experimental carbon-boron alloy fiber are evaluated in terms of the proposed multicomponent Weibull characterization.

  10. A Novel Ni-Containing Powder Metallurgy Steel with Ultrahigh Impact, Fatigue, and Tensile Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ming-Wei; Shu, Guo-Jiun; Chang, Shih-Ying; Lin, Bing-Hao

    2014-08-01

    The impact toughness of powder metallurgy (PM) steel is typically inferior, and it is further impaired when the microstructure is strengthened. To formulate a versatile PM steel with superior impact, fatigue, and tensile properties, the influences of various microstructures, including ferrite, pearlite, bainite, and Ni-rich areas, were identified. The correlations between impact toughness with other mechanical properties were also studied. The results demonstrated that ferrite provides more resistance to impact loading than Ni-rich martensite, followed by bainite and pearlite. However, Ni-rich martensite presents the highest transverse rupture strength (TRS), fatigue strength, tensile strength, and hardness, followed by bainite, pearlite, and ferrite. With 74 pct Ni-rich martensite and 14 pct bainite, Fe-3Cr-0.5Mo-4Ni-0.5C steel achieves the optimal combination of impact energy (39 J), TRS (2170 MPa), bending fatigue strength at 2 × 106 cycles (770 MPa), tensile strength (1323 MPa), and apparent hardness (38 HRC). The impact energy of Fe-3Cr-0.5Mo-4Ni-0.5C steel is twice as high as those of the ordinary high-strength PM steels. These findings demonstrate that a high-strength PM steel with high-toughness can be produced by optimized alloy design and microstructure.

  11. An improved tensile deformation model for in-situ dendrite/metallic glass matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, X. H.; Qiao, J. W.; Jiao, Z. M.; Wang, Z. H.; Yang, H. J.; Xu, B. S.

    2015-09-01

    With regard to previous tensile deformation models simulating the tensile behavior of in-situ dendrite-reinforced metallic glass matrix composites (MGMCs) [Qiao et al., Acta Mater. 59 (2011) 4126; Sci. Rep. 3 (2013) 2816], some parameters, such as yielding strength of the dendrites and glass matrix, and the strain-hardening exponent of the dendrites, are estimated based on literatures. Here, Ti48Zr18V12Cu5Be17 MGMCs are investigated in order to improve the tensile deformation model and reveal the tensile deformation mechanisms. The tensile behavior of dendrites is obtained experimentally combining nano-indentation measurements and finite-element-method analysis for the first time, and those of the glass matrix and composites are obtained by tension. Besides, the tensile behavior of the MGMCs is divided into four stages: (1) elastic-elastic, (2) elastic-plastic, (3) plastic-plastic (work-hardening), and (4) plastic-plastic (softening). The respective constitutive relationships at different deformation stages are quantified. The calculated results coincide well with the experimental results. Thus, the improved model can be applied to clarify and predict the tensile behavior of the MGMCs.

  12. An improved tensile deformation model for in-situ dendrite/metallic glass matrix composites.

    PubMed

    Sun, X H; Qiao, J W; Jiao, Z M; Wang, Z H; Yang, H J; Xu, B S

    2015-01-01

    With regard to previous tensile deformation models simulating the tensile behavior of in-situ dendrite-reinforced metallic glass matrix composites (MGMCs) [Qiao et al., Acta Mater. 59 (2011) 4126; Sci. Rep. 3 (2013) 2816], some parameters, such as yielding strength of the dendrites and glass matrix, and the strain-hardening exponent of the dendrites, are estimated based on literatures. Here, Ti48Zr18V12Cu5Be17 MGMCs are investigated in order to improve the tensile deformation model and reveal the tensile deformation mechanisms. The tensile behavior of dendrites is obtained experimentally combining nano-indentation measurements and finite-element-method analysis for the first time, and those of the glass matrix and composites are obtained by tension. Besides, the tensile behavior of the MGMCs is divided into four stages: (1) elastic-elastic, (2) elastic-plastic, (3) plastic-plastic (work-hardening), and (4) plastic-plastic (softening). The respective constitutive relationships at different deformation stages are quantified. The calculated results coincide well with the experimental results. Thus, the improved model can be applied to clarify and predict the tensile behavior of the MGMCs. PMID:26354724

  13. An improved tensile deformation model for in-situ dendrite/metallic glass matrix composites

    PubMed Central

    Sun, X. H.; Qiao, J. W.; Jiao, Z. M.; Wang, Z. H.; Yang, H. J.; Xu, B. S.

    2015-01-01

    With regard to previous tensile deformation models simulating the tensile behavior of in-situ dendrite-reinforced metallic glass matrix composites (MGMCs) [Qiao et al., Acta Mater. 59 (2011) 4126; Sci. Rep. 3 (2013) 2816], some parameters, such as yielding strength of the dendrites and glass matrix, and the strain-hardening exponent of the dendrites, are estimated based on literatures. Here, Ti48Zr18V12Cu5Be17 MGMCs are investigated in order to improve the tensile deformation model and reveal the tensile deformation mechanisms. The tensile behavior of dendrites is obtained experimentally combining nano-indentation measurements and finite-element-method analysis for the first time, and those of the glass matrix and composites are obtained by tension. Besides, the tensile behavior of the MGMCs is divided into four stages: (1) elastic-elastic, (2) elastic-plastic, (3) plastic-plastic (work-hardening), and (4) plastic-plastic (softening). The respective constitutive relationships at different deformation stages are quantified. The calculated results coincide well with the experimental results. Thus, the improved model can be applied to clarify and predict the tensile behavior of the MGMCs. PMID:26354724

  14. Notched Strength Allowables and Inplane Shear Strength of AS4/VRM-34 Textile Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grenoble, Ray W.; Johnston, William M.

    2013-01-01

    Notched and unnotched strength allowables were developed for a textile composite to provide input data to analytical structural models based on the Pultruded Rod Stiffened Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) concept. Filled-hole tensile strength, filled-hole compressive strength, and inplane shear strength along stitch lines have been measured. The material system evaluated in this study is based on warp-knitted preforms of AS4 carbon fibers and VRM-34 epoxy resin, which have been processed via resin infusion and oven curing. All specimens were tested in as-fabricated (dry) condition. Filled-hole strengths were evaluated with and without through-thickness stitching. The effects of scaling on filled-hole tensile strength were evaluated by testing specimens in two widths, but with identical width / hole-diameter ratios. Inplane shear specimens were stitched in two configurations, and two specimen thicknesses were tested for each stitch configuration.

  15. Tensile Properties of Al-Cu 206 Cast Alloys with Various Iron Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, K.; Cao, X.; Chen, X.-G.

    2014-05-01

    The Al-Cu 206 cast alloys with varying alloy compositions ( i.e., different levels of Fe, Mn, and Si) were investigated to evaluate the effect of the iron-rich intermetallics on the tensile properties. It is found that the tensile strength decreases with increasing iron content, but its overall loss is less than 10 pct over the range of 0.15 to 0.5 pct Fe at 0.3 pct Mn and 0.3 pct Si. At similar iron contents, the tensile properties of the alloys with dominant Chinese script iron-rich intermetallics are generally higher than those with the dominant platelet phase. In the solution and artificial overaging condition (T7), the tensile strength of the 206 cast alloys with more than 0.15 pct Fe is satisfactory, but the elongation does not sufficiently meet the minimum requirement of ductility (>7 pct) for critical automotive applications. However, it was found that both the required ductility and tensile strength can be reached at high Fe levels of 0.3 to 0.5 pct for the alloys with well-controlled alloy chemistry and microstructure in the solution and natural aging condition (T4), reinforcing the motivation for developing recyclable high-iron Al-Cu 206 cast alloys.

  16. Effect of particle size and volume fraction on tensile properties of fly ash/polyurea composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Jing; Schaaf, Kristin; Amirkhizi, Alireza V.; Nemat-Nasser, Siavouche

    2010-04-01

    Fly ash, which consists of hollow particles with porous shells, was introduced into polyurea elastomer. A one-step method was chosen to fabricate pure polyurea and the polyurea matrix for the composites based on Isonate® 2143L (diisocyanate) and Versalink® P-1000 (diamine). Scanning electron microscopy was used to observe the fracture surfaces of the composites. Particle size and volume fraction were varied to study their effects on the tensile properties of the composites. The tensile properties of the pure polyurea and fly ash/polyurea (FA/PU) composites were tested using an Instron load frame with a 1 kN Interface model 1500ASK-200 load cell. Results showed that fly ash particles were distributed homogeneously in the polyurea matrix, and all of the composites displayed rubber-like tensile behavior similar to that of pure polyurea. The tensile strength of the composites was influenced by both the fly ash size and the volume fraction. Compared to the largest particle size or the highest volume fraction, an increase in tensile strength was achieved by reducing particle size and/or volume fraction. The strain at break of the composites also increased by using fine particles. In addition, the composites filled with 20% fly ash became softer. These samples showed lower plateau strength and larger strain at break than the other composites.

  17. Tensile Properties, Ferrite Contents, and Specimen Heating of Stainless Steels in Cryogenic Gas Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, T.; Yuri, T.; Ono, Y.

    2006-03-01

    We performed tensile tests at cryogenic temperatures below 77 K and in helium gas environment for SUS 304L and SUS 316L in order to obtain basic data of mechanical properties of the materials for liquid hydrogen tank service. We evaluate tensile curves, tensile properties, ferrite contents, mode of deformation and/or fracture, and specimen heating during the testing at 4 to 77 K. For both SUS 304L and 316L, tensile strength shows a small peak around 10 K, and specimen heating decreases above 30 K. The volume fraction of α-phase increases continuously up to 70 % with plastic strain, at approximately 15 % plastic strain for 304L and up to 35 % for 316L. There was almost no clear influence of testing temperature on strain-induced martensitic transformation at the cryogenic temperatures.

  18. Characterization of a dual phase steel using tensile and free bending tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendiguren, Joseba; Hanselman, Stijn; Atzema, Eisso; Hodgson, Peter; Rolfe, Bernard; Weiss, Matthias

    2013-12-01

    Accurate material characterization is needed for good simulation and process design and to achieve high quality standards in the automobile industry. Previous studies have shown that the material behaviour near the yield point is strongly affected by residual stress and recent investigations have revealed that tensile test data does not reflect well the effect of residual stresses. A test procedure promising a higher sensitivity to residual stress is the free bending test. In this work the difference between material data generated using the tensile test is compared with that obtained from a pure bending for a cold rolled Dual Phase high strength steel. Tensile tests and bending tests were performed on specimens oriented in the rolling, diagonal and transverse directions and material anisotropy and hardening studied. The results show that there are significant differences in material hardening and anisotropy between the material data generated by the tensile test and that obtained using the bending testing.

  19. Tensile and creep properties of reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steel for fusion energy application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, M. D.; Vanaja, J.; Laha, K.; Varaprasad Reddy, G.; Chandravathi, K. S.; Bhanu Sankara Rao, K.

    2011-10-01

    Tensile and creep properties of a reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steel for Indian Test Blanket Module (TBM) to be tested in ITER have been evaluated. The tensile strength was found to decrease with temperature; the rate of decrease being slower in the intermediate temperature range of 450-650 K. Tensile ductility of the steel decreased with increase in temperature up to 650 K, followed by a rapid increase beyond 650 K. Creep studies have been carried out at 773, 823 and 873 K over a stress range of 100-300 MPa. The variation of minimum creep rate with applied stress followed a power law, ɛ = Aσ n. The ' n' value decreased with increase in temperature. The creep rupture life was found to relate inversely with minimum creep rate through the Monkman-Grant relation, t r · ɛ = constant. The tensile and creep properties of the steel were comparable with those of Eurofer 97.

  20. Machining technique prevents undercutting in tensile specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moscater, R. E.; Royster, D. M.

    1968-01-01

    Machining technique prevents undercutting at the test section in tensile specimens when machining the four corners of the reduced section. Made with a gradual taper in the test section, the width of the center of the tensile specimen is less than the width at the four corners of the reduced section.

  1. Tensile Deformation and Morphological Evolution of Precise Acid Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, Luri Robert; Szewczyk, Steve; Schwartz, Eric; Azoulay, Jason; Murtagh, Dustin; Cordaro, Joseph; Wagener, Kenneth; Winey, Karen

    2015-03-01

    Acid- and ion-containing polymers have specific interactions that produce complex and hierarchical morphologies that provide tunable mechanical properties. We report tensile testing and in situ x-ray scattering measurements of a homologous series of precise poly(ethylene-co-acrylic acid) copolymers (pxAA). Upon variation of the number of backbone carbons (x = 9, 15, 21) between pendant acrylic acid groups along the linear polyethylene chain, these materials exhibit pronounced changes in both their tensile properties as well as their morphological evolution during deformation. The hierarchical layered acid aggregate structure coincides with the onset of a strain hardening mechanism and was observed in both a semi-crystalline sample (p21AA) as well as an amorphous sample (p15AA). The polymer with the shortest spacing between acid groups (p9AA) maintains a liquid-like distribution of acid aggregates during deformation, exhibiting low tensile strength which we attribute to facile acid exchange between acid aggregates during deformation. Our results indicate that the formation of the hierarchical layered structure, which coincides with polymer strain-hardening regime, originates from the associating acid groups cooperatively preventing disentanglement. NSF-DMR-1103858.

  2. Microstructure and tensile properties of tungsten at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Tielong; Dai, Yong; Lee, Yongjoong

    2016-01-01

    In order to support the development of the 5 MW spallation target for the European Spallation Source, the effect of fabrication process on microstructure, ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT), tensile and fracture behaviour of powder-metallurgy pure tungsten materials has been investigated. A hot-rolled (HR) tungsten piece of 12 mm thickness and a hot-forged (HF) piece of about 80 mm thickness were used to simulate the thin and thick blocks in the target. The two tungsten pieces were characterized with metallography analysis, hardness measurement and tensile testing. The HR piece exhibits an anisotropic grain structure with an average size of about 330 × 140 × 40 μm in rolling, long transverse and short transverse (thickness) directions. The HF piece possesses a bimodal grain structure with about 310 × 170 × 70 μm grain size in deformed part and about 25 μm sized grains remained from sintering process. Hardness (HV0.2) of the HR piece is slightly greater than that of the HF one. The ductility of the HR tungsten specimens is greater than that of the HF tungsten. For the HF tungsten piece, specimens with small grains in gauge section manifest lower ductility but higher strength. The DBTT evaluated from the tensile results is 250-300 °C for the HR tungsten and about 350 °C for the HF tungsten.

  3. Tensile properties of SiC/aluminum filamentary composites - Thermal degradation effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, A.; Koczak, M. J.; Lawley, A.

    1982-01-01

    Aluminium metal matrix composites with a low cost fiber, e.g. SiC, provide for an attractive combination of high elastic modulus and longitudinal strengths coupled with a low density. SiC (volume fraction 0.55)-aluminum (6061) systems have been studied in order to optimize fiber composite strength and processing parameters. A comparison of two SiC/aluminum composites produced by AVCO and DWA is provided. Fiber properties are shown to alter composite tensile properties and fracture morphology. The room temperature tensile strengths appear to be insensitive to thermal exposures at 500 C up to 150 h. The elastic modulus of the composites also appears to be stable up to 400 C, however variations in the loss modulus are apparent. The fracture morphology reflects the quality of the interfacial bond, fiber strengths and fiber processing.

  4. Tensile and transient burst properties of advanced ferritic/martensitic steel claddings after neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Y.; Yoshitake, T.; Yamashita, S.; Akasaka, N.; Onose, S.; Takahashi, H.

    2007-08-01

    The effects of fast neutron irradiation on tensile and transient burst properties of advanced ferritic/martensitic steel claddings for fast breeder reactors were investigated. Specimens were irradiated in the experimental fast reactor JOYO using the material irradiation rig at temperatures between 773 and 1013 K to fast neutron doses ranging from 11 to 102 dpa. The post-irradiation tensile and temperature-transient-to-burst tests were carried out. The results of mechanical tests showed that there was no significant degradation in tensile and transient burst strengths after neutron irradiation below 873 K. This was attributed to grain boundary strengthening caused by precipitates that preferentially formed on prior-austenite grain boundaries. Both strengths at neutron irradiation above about 903 K up to 102 dpa decreased due to radiation enhanced recovery of lath martensite structures and recrystallization.

  5. The tensile properties of polyimide film at cryogenic temperatures and radiation effects on polyimide films

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.; Hosoyama, K.; Hara, K.

    1997-06-01

    Polyimide films has been used as insulating component in superconducting machinery. A full understanding of the property at low temperatures and the radiation effect is very important for stabilization of superconducting coils. The tensile properties of polyimide films have been measured at 4.2 K {approximately} 473 K. Stress-Strain curve profiles vary as a function of temperature. At cryogenic temperature, the elongation is much lower but the tensile strength is higher than that at room temperature. Also, polyimide film degradation performances after exposure of to an electron beam at very high dose level are examined. The test device for irradiation has a cooling system for preventing polyimide film from heating by electron absorption. The tests are performed at room temperature in He gas. After 80 MGy absorption, the elongation maintains about 60% level of the non irradiated film, and the tensile strength maintains about 85%.

  6. Fundamental mechanisms of tensile fracture in aluminum sheet undirectionally reinforced with boron filament

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, H. W.

    1972-01-01

    Results are presented from an experimental study of the tensile-fracture process in aluminum sheet unidirectionally reinforced with boron filament. The tensile strength of the material is severely limited by a noncumulative fracture mechanism which involves the initiation and sustenance of a chain reaction of filament fractures at a relatively low stress level. Matrix fracture follows in a completely ductile manner. The minimum filament stress for initiation of the fracture mechanism is shown to be approximately 1.17 GN/sq m (170 ksi), and appears to be independent of filament diameter, number of filament layers, and the strength of the filament-matrix bond. All the commonly observed features of tensile fracture surfaces are explained in terms of the observed noncumulative fracture mechanism.

  7. Postoperative irradiation impairs or enhances wound strength depending on time of administration

    SciTech Connect

    Vegesna, V.; McBride, W.H.; Withers, H.R.

    1995-08-01

    Irradiation can complicate surgical wound healing, yet little is known of the importance of the time between surgery and irradiation on this process. This study investigated the impact of post-operative irradiation on gain in wound tensile strength in a murine skin model. Irradiation on the same day as wounding or to 2-day-old wounds reduced wound tensile strength. In contrast, postoperative irradiation delivered at 7, 9 and 14 days transiently enhanced wound tensile strength, as measure d 3 but not 4 or 5 weeks later. This effect was independent of the inclusion (hemi-body) or exclusion (skin alone) of the hematopoietic system in the field of irradiation. Radiation-enhanced wound tensile strength was greater and occurred earlier after higher radiation doses. Even though the effect of irradiation in enhancing wound tensile strength is transitory, it could be important in assisting early wound healing. 14 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Tensile adhesion testing methodology for thermally sprayed coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, Christopher C.

    1990-01-01

    The structure of thermally sprayed coatings consists of lamellae which are oriented parallel to the substrate surface. The lamellae separate and fracture by distinctive mechanisms which are reflected in the failure morphology, and these may be described as adhesive (between the coating and substrate), cohesive (within the coating), or mixed mode. There is a large variability in the failure stress for any nominally identical group of coatings. A lower bound for the fracture toughness of alumina coatings can be calculated as 0.2 MNm exp -3/2. The coating strength values may also be treated as belonging to the statistical distribution of the Weibull function. The Weibull modulus of the coating strength varied from 1.4 to 3.8. This analysis infers that the flaw size within coatings is highly variable and that the flaws are nonuniformly dispersed. The present work focuses on the question of whether tensile adhesion tests are an appropriate testing method for thermally sprayed materials.

  9. Tensile stress-strain behavior of boron/aluminum laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sova, J. A.; Poe, C. C., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The tensile stress-strain behavior of five types of boron/aluminum laminates was investigated. Longitudinal and transverse stress-strain curves were obtained for monotonic loading to failure and for three cycles of loading to successively higher load levels. The laminate strengths predicted by assuming that the zero deg plies failed first correlated well with the experimental results. The stress-strain curves for all the boron/aluminum laminates were nonlinear except at very small strains. Within the small linear regions, elastic constants calculated from laminate theory corresponded to those obtained experimentally to within 10 to 20 percent. A limited amount of cyclic loading did not affect the ultimate strength and strain for the boron/aluminum laminates. The laminates, however, exhibited a permanent strain on unloading. The Ramberg-Osgood equation was fitted to the stress-strain curves to obtain average curves for the various laminates.

  10. High temperature tensile properties and fracture characteristics of bimodal 12Cr-ODS steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, Ankur; Litvinov, Dimitri; Aktaa, Jarir

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the tensile properties and fracture characteristics of a 12Cr oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel with unique elongated bimodal grain size distribution. The tensile tests were carried out at four different temperatures, ranging from room temperature to 700 °C, at a nominal strain rate of 10-3 s-1. At room temperature the material exhibits a high tensile strength of 1294 MPa and high yield strength of 1200 MPa. At 700 °C, the material still exhibits relatively high tensile strength of 300 MPa. The total elongation-to-failure exceeds 18% over the whole temperature range and has a maximum value of 29% at 600 °C. This superior ductility is attributed to the material's bimodal grain size distribution. In comparison to other commercial, as well as experimental, ODS steels, the material shows an excellent compromise between strength and ductility. The fracture surface studies reveal a change in fracture behavior from a mixed mode fracture at room temperature to fully ductile fracture at 600 °C. At 700 °C, the fracture path changes from intragranular to intergranular fracture, which is associated with a reduced ductility.

  11. A combined analytical-experimental tensile test technique for brittle materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, M. L.; Scavuzzo, R. J.; Srivatsan, T. S.

    1992-01-01

    A semiconventional tensile test technique is developed for impact ices and other brittle materials. Accurate results have been obtained on ultimate strength and modulus of elasticity in a refrigerated ice test. It is noted that the technique can be used to determine the physical properties of impact ices accreted inside icing wind tunnels or other brittle materials.

  12. Dynamic-tensile-extrusion response of fluoropolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Eric N; Trujillo, Carl P; Gray, George T

    2009-01-01

    The current work applies the recently developed Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion (Dyn-Ten-Ext) technique to polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polychlorotrifluoroethylene (PCTFE). Similar to the Taylor Impact Rod, Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion is a strongly integrated test, probing a wide range of strain rates and stress states. However, the stress state is primarily tensile enabling investigation of dynamic tensile failure modes. Here we investigate the influence of this propensity to neck or not between PCTFE and PTFE on their response under dynamic tensile extrusion loading. The results of the Dyn-Ten-Ext technique are compared with two classic techniques. Both polymers have been investigated using Tensile Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar. The quasistatic and dynamic responses of both fluoro-polymers have been extensively characterized. The two polymers exhibit significantly different failure behavior under tensile loading at moderate strain rates. Polytetrafluoroethylene resists formation of a neck and exhibits significant strain hardening. Independent of temperature or strain rate, PTFE sustains true strains to failure of approximately 1.5. Polychlorotrifluoroethylene, on the other hand, consistently necks at true strains of approximately 0.05.

  13. In situ tensile and creep testing of lithiated silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Boles, Steven T.; Kraft, Oliver; Thompson, Carl V.; Mönig, Reiner; Helmholtz Institute Ulm for Electrochemical Energy Storage , 89069 Ulm

    2013-12-23

    We present experimental results for uniaxial tensile and creep testing of fully lithiated silicon nanowires. A reduction in the elastic modulus is observed when silicon nanowires are alloyed with lithium and plastic deformation becomes possible when the wires are saturated with lithium. Creep testing was performed at fixed force levels above and below the tensile strength of the material. A linear dependence of the strain-rate on the applied stress was evident below the yield stress of the alloy, indicating viscous deformation behavior. The observed inverse exponential relationship between wire radius and strain rate below the yield stress indicates that material transport was controlled by diffusion. At stress levels approaching the yield strength of fully lithiated silicon, power-law creep appears to govern the strain-rate dependence on stress. These results have direct implications on the cycling conditions, rate-capabilities, and charge capacity of silicon and should prove useful for the design and construction of future silicon-based electrodes.

  14. Intrinsic tensile properties of cocoon silk fibres can be estimated by removing flaws through repeated tensile tests.

    PubMed

    Rajkhowa, Rangam; Kaur, Jasjeet; Wang, Xungai; Batchelor, Warren

    2015-06-01

    Silk fibres from silkworm cocoons have lower strength than spider silk and have received less attention as a source of high-performance fibres. In this work, we have used an innovative procedure to eliminate the flaws gradually of a single fibre specimen by retesting the unbroken portion of the fibre, after each fracture test. This was done multiple times so that the final test may provide the intrinsic fibre strength. During each retest, the fibre specimen began to yield once the failure load of the preceding test was exceeded. For each fibre specimen, a composite curve was constructed from multiple tests. The composite curves and analysis show that strengths of mass-produced Muga and Eri cocoon silk fibres increased from 446 to 618 MPa and from 337 to 452 MPa, respectively. Similarly, their toughness increased from 84 to 136 MJ m(-3) and from 61 to 104 MJ m(-3), respectively. Composite plots produced significantly less inter-specimen variations compared to values from single tests. The fibres with reduced flaws as a result of retests in the tested section have a tensile strength and toughness comparable to naturally spun dragline spider silk with a reported strength of 574 MPa and toughness of 91-158 MJ m(-3), which is used as a benchmark for developing high-performance fibres. This retesting approach is likely to provide useful insights into discrete flaw distributions and intrinsic mechanical properties of other fatigue-resistant materials. PMID:25948613

  15. Opposite risk patterns for autism and schizophrenia are associated with normal variation in birth size: phenotypic support for hypothesized diametric gene-dosage effects

    PubMed Central

    Byars, Sean G.; Stearns, Stephen C.; Boomsma, Jacobus J.

    2014-01-01

    Opposite phenotypic and behavioural traits associated with copy number variation and disruptions to imprinted genes with parent-of-origin effects have led to the hypothesis that autism and schizophrenia share molecular risk factors and pathogenic mechanisms, but a direct phenotypic comparison of how their risks covary has not been attempted. Here, we use health registry data collected on Denmark's roughly 5 million residents between 1978 and 2009 to detect opposing risks of autism and schizophrenia depending on normal variation (mean ± 1 s.d.) in adjusted birth size, which we use as a proxy for diametric gene-dosage variation in utero. Above-average-sized babies (weight, 3691–4090 g; length, 52.8–54.3 cm) had significantly higher risk for autism spectrum (AS) and significantly lower risk for schizophrenia spectrum (SS) disorders. By contrast, below-average-sized babies (2891–3290 g; 49.7–51.2 cm) had significantly lower risk for AS and significantly higher risk for SS disorders. This is the first study directly comparing autism and schizophrenia risks in the same population, and provides the first large-scale empirical support for the hypothesis that diametric gene-dosage effects contribute to these disorders. Only the kinship theory of genomic imprinting predicts the opposing risk patterns that we discovered, suggesting that molecular research on mental disease risk would benefit from considering evolutionary theory. PMID:25232142

  16. IMPACT STRENGTH OF GLASS AND GLASS CERAMIC

    SciTech Connect

    Bless, S.; Tolman, J.

    2009-12-28

    Strength of glass and glass ceramic was measured with a bar impact technique. High-speed movies show regions of tensile and compressive failure. The borosilicate glass had a compressive strength of at least 2.2 GPa, and the glass ceramic at least 4 GPa. However, the BSG was much stronger in tension than GC. In ballistic tests, the BSG was the superior armor.

  17. High-Hot-Strength Ceramic Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayir, Ali; Matson, Lawrence E.

    1994-01-01

    Continuous fibers consisting of laminae of alumina and yttrium aluminum garnet offer exceptionally high strength, resistance to creep, and chemical stability at high temperatures. These fibers exceed tensile strength of sapphire fibers. Leading candidates for reinforcement of intermetallic-matrix composites in exhaust nozzles of developmental high-speed civil transport aircraft engines. Other applications are in aerospace, automotive, chemical-process, and power-generation industries.

  18. Suture anchor strength revisited.

    PubMed

    Barber, F A; Herbert, M A; Click, J N

    1996-02-01

    The rapid proliferation of suture anchors continues. Our prior report on the pullout strength of 14 different anchors is supplemented by a similar test conducted on 8 additional anchors. Comparative data on modes of failure and failure strengths (ultimate loads to failure) for these new devices are compared statistically with the previously tested anchors. In a fresh never-frozen porcine femur model, 10 samples of each of the additional anchors tested were threaded with stainless steel sutures and inserted into three different test areas (diaphyseal cortex, metaphyseal cortex, and a cancellous trough). Tensile stress parallel to the axis of insertion was applied at a rate of 12.5 mm/s by an Instron 1321 testing machine (Instron Corp, Canton, MA) until failure and mean anchor failure strengths calculated. The anchors tested were the Mitek G2 as a control, miniMitek, Mitek Superanchor, Mitek Rotator Cuff anchor (Mitek Products, Westwood, MA), Innovasive Devices Radial Osteal Compression device (Innovasive Devices, Hopkinton, MA), Arthrex Fastak (Arthrex Inc, Naples, FL), Arthrotek miniHarpoon (Arthrotek, Warsaw, IN), Orthopedic Biosystems PeBA 3 and PeBA 5 (Orthopedic Biosystems, Scottsdale, AZ), and AME 5.5 screw (American Medical Electronics, Richardson, TX). Failure mode (anchor pullout, suture eyelet cut out, or wire breakage) was generally consistent for each anchor type. The size of insertion hole is clinically important and each anchor's performance was evaluated as a function of its minor diameter or drill hole. For screw anchors, the larger the minor diameter of the screw, the higher the mean failure strengths in all three test areas (P = .001). However, larger drill holes for non-screw anchors resulted in lower mean failure strengths in cancellous bone (P = .03) and diaphyseal cortex (P < .005). PMID:8838726

  19. Effect of Thermal Exposure on the Tensile Properties of Aluminum Alloys for Elevated Temperature Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edahl, Robert A., Jr.; Domack, Marcia

    2004-01-01

    Tensile properties were evaluated for four aluminum alloys that are candidates for airframe applications on high speed transport aircraft. These alloys included the Al-Cu-Mg-Ag alloys C415 and C416 and the Al-Cu-Li-Mg-Ag alloys RX818 and ML377. The Al-Cu-Mg alloys CM001, which was used on the Concorde SST, and 1143, which was modified from the alloy used on the TU144 Russian supersonic aircraft, were tested for comparison. The alloys were subjected to thermal exposure at 200 F, 225 F and 275 F for times up to 30,000 hours. Tensile tests were performed on thermally-exposed and as-received material at -65 F, room temperature, 200 F, 225 F and 275 F. All four candidate alloys showed significant tensile property improvements over CM001 and 1143. Room temperature yield strengths of the candidate alloys were at least 20% greater than for CM001 and 1143, for both the as-received and thermally-exposed conditions. The strength levels of alloy RX818 were the highest of all materials investigated, and were 5-10% higher than for ML377, C415 and C416 for the as-received condition and after 5,000 hours thermal exposure. RX818 was removed from this study after 5,000 hours exposure due to poor fracture toughness performance observed in a parallel study. After 30,000 hours exposure at 200 F and 225 F, the alloys C415, C416 and ML377 showed minor decreases in yield strength, tensile strength and elongation when compared to the as-received properties. Reductions in tensile strength from the as-received values were up to 25% for alloys C415, C416 and ML377 after 15,000 hours exposure at 275 F.

  20. Influences of post-weld heat treatment on tensile properties of friction stir-welded AA6061 aluminum alloy joints

    SciTech Connect

    Elangovan, K.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2008-09-15

    This paper reports on studies of the influences of various post-weld heat treatment procedures on tensile properties of friction stir-welded AA6061 aluminum alloy joints. Rolled plates of 6-mm thick AA6061 aluminum alloy were used to fabricate the joints. Solution treatment, an artificial aging treatment and a combination of both were given to the welded joints. Tensile properties such as yield strength, tensile strength, elongation and joint efficiency were evaluated. Microstructures of the welded joints were analyzed using optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. A simple artificial aging treatment was found to be more beneficial than other treatment methods to enhance the tensile properties of the friction stir-welded AA6061 aluminum alloy joints.

  1. Preparation and tensile properties of linear low density polyethylene/rambutan peels (Nephelium chryseum Blum.) flour blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadhirah, A. Ainatun.; Sam, S. T.; Noriman, N. Z.; Voon, C. H.; Samera, S. S.

    2015-05-01

    The effect of rambutan peels flour (RPF) content on the tensile properties of linear low density polyethylene filled with rambutan peel flour was studied. RPF was melt blended with linear low-density polyethylene (LLDPE). LLDPE/RPF blends were prepared by using internal mixer (brabender) at 160 °C with the flour content ranged from 0 to 15 wt%. The tensile properties were tested by using a universal testing machine (UTM) according to ASTM D638. The highest tensile strength was observed for pure LLDPE while the tensile strength LLDPE/RPF decreased gradually with the addition of rambutan peels flour content from 0% to 15%. Young's modulus of 63 µm to 250 µm rambutan peels blends with LLDPE with the fiber loading of 0 - 15 wt% increased with increasing fiber loading.

  2. Strength Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Londeree, Ben R.

    1981-01-01

    Postural deviations resulting from strength and flexibility imbalances include swayback, scoliosis, and rounded shoulders. Screening tests are one method for identifying strength problems. Tests for the evaluation of postural problems are described, and exercises are presented for the strengthening of muscles. (JN)

  3. Ball Indentation Studies on the Effect of Nitrogen on the Tensile Properties of 316LN SS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, M. D.; Ganesh Kumar, J.; Ganesan, V.; Laha, K.

    2015-12-01

    Type 316L(N) stainless steel (SS) containing 0.02-0.03 wt% carbon and 0.06-0.08 wt% nitrogen is used as the major structural material for the components of fast reactors. Research is underway to improve the high-temperature mechanical properties of 316LN SS by increasing the nitrogen content in the steel above the level of 0.08 wt%. In this investigation, ball indentation (BI) technique was used to evaluate the effect of nitrogen content on the tensile properties of 316LN SS. BI tests were conducted on four different heats of 316LN SS containing 0.07, 0.11, 0.14 and 0.22 wt% nitrogen in the temperature range 300-923 K. The tensile properties such as yield strength and ultimate tensile strength increased with increase in nitrogen content at all the investigated temperatures. These results were consistent with the corresponding uniaxial tensile test results. These studies showed that BI technique can be used to optimize the chemical composition during alloy development by evaluating tensile properties with minimum volume of material.

  4. Influence of Width of Specimen on Tensile Properties of NiCo Thin Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jun-Hyub; An, Joong-Hyok; Jeon, Yun-Bae; Kim, Yun-Jae; Huh, Yong-Hak

    This paper represents the results of tensile test for NiCo thin films, to investigate the size effect on tensile properties. An axial loading tensile tester developed by authors was used to measure the mechanical characteristics of thin film materials. The tester has a load cell with maximum capacity of 0.5N and a non-contact position measuring system based on the principle of capacitance micrometry. The dog-bone type specimen was designed and fabricated by electroplating process. The 50 and 150?m width of reduced section respectively were designed on 6 in. wafer. The length of reduced section is 1,000?m and the radius of the blending fillet is 1,000?m to minimize a stress concentration of the specimen. The thickness is 10?m. The elastic moduli of NiCo thin film were about 18 4.1GPa for 50?m width and about 148 8.4GPa for 150?m width. The ultimate tensile strength for the width of 50 and 150?m were 2,43187.8 and 2,34893.3MPa, respectively. However, the difference between tensile strengths is a little, as 3.3%.

  5. Effect of cryogenic treatment on tensile behavior of case carburized steel-815M17

    SciTech Connect

    Bensely, A. . E-mail: benzlee@annauniv.edu; Senthilkumar, D.; Mohan Lal, D.; Nagarajan, G.; Rajadurai, A.

    2007-05-15

    The crown wheel and pinion represent the most highly stressed parts of a heavy vehicle; these are typically made of 815M17 steel. The reasons for the frequent failure of these components are due to tooth bending impact, wear and fatigue. The modern processes employed to produce these as high, durable components include cryogenic treatment as well as conventional heat treatment. It helps to convert retained austenite into martensite as well as promote carbide precipitation. This paper deals with the influence of cryogenic treatment on the tensile behavior of case carburized steel 815M17. The impetus for studying the tensile properties of gear steels is to ensure that steels used in gears have sufficient tensile strength to prevent failure when gears are subjected to tensile or fatigue loads, and to provide basic design information on the strength of 815M17 steel. A comparative study on the effects of deep cryogenic treatment (DCT), shallow cryogenic treatment (SCT) and conventional heat treatment (CHT) was made by means of tension testing. This test was conducted as per ASTM standard designation E 8M. The present results confirm that the tensile behavior is marginally reduced after cryogenic treatment (i.e. both shallow and deep cryogenic treatment) for 815M17 when compared with conventional heat treatment. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) analysis of the fracture surface indicates the presence of dimples and flat fracture regions are more common in SCT specimens than for CHT and DCT-processed material.

  6. Tensile set behavior of Foley catheter balloons.

    PubMed

    Joseph, R; Ramesh, P; Sivakumar, R

    1999-01-01

    The removal of indwelling urinary balloon catheters from patients is usually associated with many problems. The problems such as balloon deflation failure; encrustations on balloons, eyes, and lumen; and catheter associated infections are widely discussed in the literature. The tensile set exhibited by the catheter balloon material could also play a role and further complicate the removal process. This article addresses this issue by comparing the tensile set behavior of the balloon material from three commercially available Foley catheters. The balloon materials were subjected to aging in synthetic urine at 37 degrees C for 28 days to simulate clinical conditions. The deflation time of catheter balloons aged in similar conditions were also measured. It was found that different brands of catheters exhibited statistically significant differences in their properties. The tensile set data of the aged samples could be correlated with the deflation time of the balloons. The clinical significance of the tensile set is also highlighted. PMID:10029146

  7. High temperature tensile testing of ceramic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, John Z.; Hemann, John H.

    1988-01-01

    The various components of a high temperature tensile testing system are evaluated. The objective is the high temperature tensile testing of SiC fiber reinforced reaction bonded Si3N4 specimens at test temperatures up to 1650 C (3000 F). Testing is to be conducted in inert gases and air. Gripping fixtures, specimen configurations, furnaces, optical strain measuring systems, and temperature measurement techniques are reviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of the various techniques are also noted.

  8. Characteristics of the tensile mechanical properties of fresh and dry forewings of beetles.

    PubMed

    Tuo, Wanyong; Chen, Jinxiang; Wu, Zhishen; Xie, Juan; Wang, Yong

    2016-08-01

    Based on a tensile experiment and observations by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), this study demonstrated the characteristics of the tensile mechanical properties of the fresh and dry forewings of two types of beetles. The results revealed obvious differences in the tensile fracture morphologies and characteristics of the tensile mechanical properties of fresh and dry forewings of Cybister tripunctatus Olivier and Allomyrina dichotoma. For fresh forewings of these two types of beetles, a viscous, flow-like, polymer matrix plastic deformation was observed on the fracture surfaces, with soft morphologies and many fibers being pulled out, whereas on the dry forewings, the tensile fracture surfaces were straightforward, and there were no features resembling those found on the fresh forewings. The fresh forewings exhibited a greater fracture strain than the dry forewings, which was caused by the relative slippage of hydroxyl inter-chain bonds due to the presence of water in the fibers and proteins in the fresh forewings. Our study is the first to demonstrate the phenomenon of sudden stress drops caused by the fracturing of the lower skin because the lower skin fractured before the forewings of A. dichotoma reached their ultimate tensile strength. We also investigated the reasons underlying this phenomenon. This research provides a much better understanding of the mechanical properties of beetle forewings and facilitates the correct selection of study objects for biomimetic materials and development of the corresponding applications. PMID:27157727

  9. Static and dynamic tensile behaviour of aluminium processed by high pressure torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verleysen, Patricia; Oelbrandt, Wouter; Naghdy, Soroosh; Kestens, Leo

    2015-09-01

    High pressure torsion (HPT) is a severe plastic deformation technique in which a small, disk-like sample is subjected to a torsional deformation under a high hydrostatic pressure. In present study, the static and dynamic tensile behaviour of commercially pure aluminium (99.6 wt%) processed by HPT is studied. The high strain rate tensile behaviour is characterized using a purpose-developed miniature split Hopkinson tensile bar setup by which strain rates up to 5 × 103 s-1 can be reached. During the tests, the deformation of a speckle pattern applied to the samples is recorded, by which local information on the strain is obtained using a digital image correlation technique. Electron back scatter diffraction images are used to investigate the microstructural evolution, more specifically the grain refinement obtained by HPT. The fracture surfaces of the tensile samples are studied by scanning electron microscopy. Results show that the imposed severe plastic deformation significantly increases the tensile strength, however, at the expense of ductility. The strain rate only has a minor influence on the materials tensile behaviour.

  10. Effect of Welding and Post-weld Heat Treatment on Tensile Properties of Nimonic 263 at Room and Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Minwoo; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Woo, Ta Kwan; Kim, Sangshik

    2011-04-01

    Nimonic 263 has been developed for the improved ductility in welded assemblies and is a candidate material for gas turbine combustor and transition pieces along with its good weldability and mechanical properties at room and elevated temperatures. In this study, the tensile behavior of an as-welded Nimonic 263 specimen at room temperature and 1053 K (780 °C) was examined in conjunction with microstructural evolution during welding and postweld heat treatment (PWHT). With the welding and the PWHT, the yield strength (YS), ultimate tensile strength (UTS), and tensile elongation of Nimonic 263 varied in a complex manner. It was observed that the PWHT of resolutionization at 1423 K (1150 °C) for 2 hours gave the highest YS and UTS values, whereas the tensile elongation was the lowest, at both testing temperatures. With increasing resolutionization time, the YS and UTS tended to decrease along with the increase in tensile ductility. The tensile behaviors of as-welded Nimonic 263 specimens was affected by several factors, including grain size, residual stress, possible microsegregation of γ' forming elements, a tendency for interdendritic or intergranular fracture and a morphological change in both M23C6 and MC type carbides, depending on the testing temperature and the PWHT. The complex changes in tensile properties of Nimonic 263 with welding and PWHT at room temperature and 1053 K (780 °C) were discussed based on the micrographic and fractographic observations.

  11. Enhancing tensile ductility of a particulate-reinforced aluminum MMC by lamination with Mg-9% Li alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Syn, C.K.; Lesuer, D.R.; Sherby, O.D.

    1995-05-01

    A laminated metal composite has been made by press bonding alternating layers of a particulate-reinforced aluminum MMC, 6090/SiC/25p, and a Mg-9%Li alloy. The mechanical properties including tensile ductility were evaluated. The tensile ductility of the Al MMC was found to increase from 3.5% to 11.5%. In contrast to other laminates based on ultrahigh carbon, steel, the laminate of this study and other Al MMC laminates exhibited tensile yield strengths that did not follow the rule of averages. This is attributed to interlayer reaction products developed during processing of the Al MMC laminates.

  12. Effect of Hybrid Surface Modifications on Tensile Properties of Polyacrylonitrile- and Pitch-Based Carbon Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naito, Kimiyoshi

    2016-03-01

    Recent interest has emerged in techniques that modify the surfaces of carbon fibers, such as carbon nanotube (CNT) grafting or polymer coating. Hybridization of these surface modifications has the potential to generate highly tunable, high-performance materials. In this study, the mechanical properties of surface-modified polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based and pitch-based carbon fibers were investigated. Single-filament tensile tests were performed for fibers modified by CNT grafting, dipped polyimide coating, high-temperature vapor deposition polymerized polyimide coating, grafting-dipping hybridization, and grafting-vapor deposition hybridization. The Weibull statistical distributions of the tensile strengths of the surface-modified PAN- and pitch-based carbon fibers were examined. All surface modifications, especially hybrid modifications, improved the tensile strengths and Weibull moduli of the carbon fibers. The results exhibited a linear relationship between the Weibull modulus and average tensile strength on a log-log scale for all surface-modified PAN- and pitch-based carbon fibers.

  13. Tensile Properties of Polyimide Composites Incorporating Carbon Nanotubes-Grafted and Polyimide-Coated Carbon Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naito, Kimiyoshi

    2014-09-01

    The tensile properties and fracture behavior of polyimide composite bundles incorporating carbon nanotubes-grafted (CNT-grafted) and polyimide-coated (PI-coated) high-tensile-strength polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based (T1000GB), and high-modulus pitch-based (K13D) carbon fibers were investigated. The CNT were grown on the surface of the carbon fibers by chemical vapor deposition. The pyromellitic dianhydride/4,4'-oxydianiline PI nanolayer coating was deposited on the surface of the carbon fiber by high-temperature vapor deposition polymerization. The results clearly demonstrate that CNT grafting and PI coating were effective for improving the Weibull modulus of T1000GB PAN-based and K13D pitch-based carbon fiber bundle composites. In addition, the average tensile strength of the PI-coated T1000GB carbon fiber bundle composites was also higher than that of the as-received carbon fiber bundle composites, while the average tensile strength of the CNT-grafted T1000GB, K13D, and the PI-coated K13D carbon fiber bundle composites was similar to that of the as-received carbon fiber bundle composites.

  14. Effect of Hybrid Surface Modifications on Tensile Properties of Polyacrylonitrile- and Pitch-Based Carbon Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naito, Kimiyoshi

    2016-05-01

    Recent interest has emerged in techniques that modify the surfaces of carbon fibers, such as carbon nanotube (CNT) grafting or polymer coating. Hybridization of these surface modifications has the potential to generate highly tunable, high-performance materials. In this study, the mechanical properties of surface-modified polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based and pitch-based carbon fibers were investigated. Single-filament tensile tests were performed for fibers modified by CNT grafting, dipped polyimide coating, high-temperature vapor deposition polymerized polyimide coating, grafting-dipping hybridization, and grafting-vapor deposition hybridization. The Weibull statistical distributions of the tensile strengths of the surface-modified PAN- and pitch-based carbon fibers were examined. All surface modifications, especially hybrid modifications, improved the tensile strengths and Weibull moduli of the carbon fibers. The results exhibited a linear relationship between the Weibull modulus and average tensile strength on a log-log scale for all surface-modified PAN- and pitch-based carbon fibers.

  15. Elevated-temperature tensile and creep properties of several ferritic stainless steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    The elevated-temperature mechanical properties of several ferritic stainless steels were determined. The alloys evaluated included Armco 18SR, GE 1541, and NASA-18T-A. Tensile and creep strength properties at 1073 and 1273 K and residual room temperature tensile properties after creep testing were measured. In addition, 1273 K tensile and creep tests and residual property testing were conducted with Armco 18SR and GE 1541 which were exposed for 200 hours to a severe oxidizing environment in automotive thermal reactors. Aside from the residual tensile properties for Armco 18SR, prior exposure did not affect the mechanical properties of either alloy. The 1273 K creep strength parallel to the sheet-rolling direction was similar for all three alloys. At 1073 K, NASA-18T-A had better creep strength than either Armco 18SR or GE 1541. NASA-18T-A possesses better residual properties after creep testing than either Armco 18SR or Ge 1541.

  16. Tensile testing method for rare earth based bulk superconductors at liquid nitrogen temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasaba, K.; Katagiri, K.; Murakami, A.; Sato, G.; Sato, T.; Murakami, M.; Sakai, N.; Teshima, H.; Sawamura, M.

    2005-10-01

    Bending tests have been commonly carried out to investigate the mechanical properties of melt-processed rare earth based bulk superconductors. Tensile tests by using small specimen, however, are preferable to evaluate the detailed distribution of the mechanical properties and the intrinsic elastic modulus because no stress distributions exist in the cross-section. In this study, the tensile test method at low temperature by using specimens with the dimensions of 3 × 3 × 4 mm from Y123 and Gd123 bulks was examined. They were glued to Al alloy rods at 400 K by using epoxy resin. Tests were carried out at liquid nitrogen temperature (LNT) by using the immersion type jig. Although the bending strength in the direction perpendicular to the c-axis of the bulks at LNT is higher than that at room temperature (RT), the tensile strength at LNT was lower than that at RT. Many of specimens fractured near the interface between the specimen and the Al alloy rod at LNT. According to the finite element method analysis, it was shown that there was a peak thermal stress in the loading direction near the interface and it was significantly higher at LNT than that at RT. It was also shown that the replacement of the Al alloy rod to Ti rod of which the coefficient of thermal expansion is close to that of bulks significantly increased the tensile strength.

  17. Interfacial Shear Strength Evaluation of Jute/Poly(Lactic Acid)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Tatsuro; Nakai, Asami

    In order to evaluate the interfacial shear strength between fiber bundle and matrix of jute/poly(lactic acid) (PLA), a fiber bundle pull-out test method is proposed. Shear stress distribution was calculated based on the parabolic shear-lag analysis. Fiber bundle pull-out tests were conducted to evaluate the effects of molding condition on the interfacial shear strength. The interfacial shear strength increased with increasing molding temperature up to 185C. Then gradual decrease in the interfacial shear strength with molding temperature was observed. Similar tendency was also observed in the effect of molding time, whereas the interfacial shear strength decreased with increasing molding pressure. Comparing the result of the tensile tests in the previous study, interfacial shear strength has corelations with tensile strength.

  18. Tensile behavior of tungsten/niobium composites at 1300--1600 K

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Hee Mann ); Titran, R.H. . Lewis Research Center)

    1989-01-01

    The tensile behavior of continuous-tungsten-fiber-reinforced niobium composites (W/Nb), fabricated by an arc-spray process, was studied in the 1300 to 1600 K temperature range. The tensile properties of the fiber and matrix components as well as the composites were measured and were compared to rule of mixtures (ROM) predictions. The deviation from the ROM was found to depend upon the chemistry of the tungsten alloy fibers, with positive deviations for ST300/Nb (i.e., stronger composite strength than the ROM) and negative or zero deviations for 218/Nb. 16 refs., 13 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Tensile strain-rate sensitivity of tungsten/niobium composites at 1300 to 1600 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, H. M.; Titran, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The tensile behavior of continuous tungsten fiber reinforced niobium composites (W/Nb), fabricated by an arc-spray process, was studied in the 1300 to 1600 K temperature range. The tensile properties of the fiber and matrix components as well as of the composites were measured and were compared to rule of mixtures (ROM) predictions. The deviation from the ROM was found to depend upon the chemistry of the tungsten alloy fibers, with positive deviations for ST300/Nb (i.e., stronger composite strength than the ROM) and negative or zero deviations for 218/Nb.

  20. Tensile Behavior of Tungsten/Niobium Composites at 1300 to 1600 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, Hee Mann; Titran, Robert H.

    1989-01-01

    The tensile behavior of continuous tungsten fiber reinforced niobium composites (W/Nb), fabricated by an arc-spray process, was studied in the 1300 to 1600 K temperature range. The tensile properties of the fiber and matrix components as well as of the composites were measured and were compared to rule of mixtures (ROM) predictions. The deviation from the ROM was found to depend upon the chemistry of the tungsten alloy fibers, with positive deviations for ST300/Nb (i.e., stronger composite strength than the ROM) and negative or zero deviations for 218/Nb.

  1. Tensile Properties of Some Structural Sheet Materials Under Rapid-Heating Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heimerl, George J.

    1957-01-01

    The results of the NACA tests to determine the tensile strength of some structural sheet materials heated to failure at temperature rates from 0.2 deg. F to 100 deg F per second under constant load conditions are reviewed . Yield and rupture stresses obtained under rapid-heating conditions are compared with the results of conventional elevated-temperature tensile tests. The relation between rapid-heating tests, short-time creep tests, and conventional creep tests is discussed . The application of a phenomenological theory for calculating rapid-heating curves is shown. Methods are given for predicting yield and rupture stresses and temperatures from master curves and temperature-rate parameters

  2. Multi-scale investigation of tensile creep of ultra-high performance concrete for bridge applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garas Yanni, Victor Youssef

    Ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC) is relatively a new generation of concretes optimized at the nano and micro-scales to provide superior mechanical and durability properties compared to conventional and high performance concretes. Improvements in UHPC are achieved through: limiting the water-to-cementitious materials ratio (i.e., w/cm ≤ 0.20), optimizing particle packing, eliminating coarse aggregate, using specialized materials, and implementing high temperature and high pressure curing regimes. In addition, and randomly dispersed and short fibers are typically added to enhance the material's tensile and flexural strength, ductility, and toughness. There is a specific interest in using UHPC for precast prestressed bridge girders because it has the potential to reduce maintenance costs associated with steel and conventional concrete girders, replace functionally obsolete or structurally deficient steel girders without increasing the weight or the depth of the girder, and increase bridge durability to between 75 and 100 years. UHPC girder construction differs from that of conventional reinforced concrete in that UHPC may not need transverse reinforcement due to the high tensile and shear strengths of the material. Before bridge designers specify such girders without using shear reinforcement, the long-term tensile performance of the material must be characterized. This multi-scale study provided new data and understanding of the long-term tensile performance of UHPC by assessing the effect of thermal treatment, fiber content, and stress level on the tensile creep in a large-scale study, and by characterizing the fiber-cementitious matrix interface at different curing regimes through nanoindentation and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in a nano/micro-scale study. Tensile creep of UHPC was more sensitive to investigated parameters than tensile strength. Thermal treatment decreased tensile creep by about 60% after 1 year. Results suggested the possibility of achieving satisfactory microstructural refinement at the same temperature input despite the maximum temperature applied. For the first time, the presence of a 10 microm (394 micro inch) wide porous fiber-cementitious matrix interface was demonstrated by nanoindentation and SEM for non-thermally treated UHPC only. Tensile creep at 90 days increased by 64% and 46% upon eliminating fibers for thermally and non-thermally treated UHPC, respectively. Increases in creep upon reducing the fiber content suggested that fibers carry part of the sustained load and thus reduce creep. Tensile creep strain was proportional to the stress applied up to 60% of the ultimate strength. No tensile creep failure occurred for a period of 1 year for pre-cracked UHPC under stress level of 40%. Also, no tensile creep failure occurred for a period of 90 days under stress level of 60%. Tensile creep failure occurred at stress levels of 70% and 80%. This study showed that fibers cannot be accounted for as shear reinforcement in lieu of stirrups unless micro-defect-free fiber-matrix interface is achieved.

  3. Leached components from dental composites in oral simulating fluids and the resultant composite strengths.

    PubMed

    Lee, S Y; Huang, H M; Lin, C Y; Shih, Y H

    1998-08-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the leached moieties of dental composites after storage in ethanol and organic acids of plaque and further evaluate the resultant effect on the diametral tensile strength (DTS) of the composites. Three commercial composites were used: Bis-GMA-based Z100, Bis-GMA/UDMA-based Heliomolar, and Bis-MPEPP-based Marathon One. The solutions used were: 99.9% acetic acid, 99% propionic acid and 75% ethanol. Specimens (4 mm diam. x 2 mm thick) were stored at 37 degrees C in 3 mL of solution for up to 30 days. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry was used to characterize the leached moieties and DTS of the specimens after immersion was evaluated. Data were analysed using ANOVA and Tukey LSD test. The eluted substances were not all the same in different solutions and composites but mostly increased with immersion time, and included diluents (TEGDMA and decamethacrylate) and some additives, such as an ultra-violet stabilizer (TINUVINP), plasticizers (dicyclohexyl phthalate and bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate), initiator (triphenyl stibine), coupling agent (gamma-methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane), and phenyl benzoate. The chief polymerizing monomers were not found. More kinds of components were found in the acetic acid and ethanol groups studied. The fewest kinds and quantities of leached moieties were found for Bis-GMA specimens and then Bis-GMA/UDMA ones, most of which are diluent agents. Bis-MPEPP specimens leached the most substances, which were composed mostly of a short phenyl group chain structure. The BisGMA composite showed the highest DTS (54.8 +/- 5.7 MPa), which was not greatly affected by the length of storage. Bis-GMA/UDMA (36.2 +/- 6.8 MPa) and Bis-MPEPP (26.1 +/- 4.5 MPa) composites were significantly reduced (P < 0.05) after 30 days storage in the ethanol (35-50%), in the propionic acid (25-30%), and in the acetic acid (40-60%). Irreversible processes such as the leaching of components occur in fluids simulating an oral environment, which may contribute to irreversible material degradation, especially for non-Bis-GMA-based composites. PMID:9781860

  4. Influence of Prepackaged Polymer-Modified Mortar as a Modifier on Strength of Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saand, Abdullah; Ismail, Mohammad; Radin Sumadi, Salihuddin

    This study introduce a new trend of utilising Prepackaged Polymer-Modified Mortar (PPMM) as a modifier to ordinary concrete for producing Polymer-Modified Concrete (PMC). The experimental study articulates the strength development of proposed polymer-modified concrete. A range of quantities of PPMM, as 5 to 50%, were mixed with ordinary concrete of 30 N mmG2 characteristic strength to produce polymer-modified concrete and to evaluate for compressive strength, tensile strength, density and workability. The material behaviour in terms of compressive strength and tensile strength, together with density and slump was investigated by casting and testing cubes of 100 mm size, cylinders 100 mm dia and 200 mm height. This Preliminary study shows that compressive strength and tensile strength is improved significantly by inclusion of various quantities as percentages of PPMM to ordinary concrete and curing regime as specified by JIS. PPMM dosages of 5 to 20% resulted considerably higher compressive and tensile strength than that of ordinary concrete, on the other hand further increase in percentage of PPMM gave less strengths. Results demonstrated more prominent percentage increase in tensile strength than compressive strength of produced polymer-modified concrete. Polymer-mod fied concrete mixes with all percentage dosages of PPMM were found cohesive and workable.

  5. Strength Training

    MedlinePlus

    ... great way to improve strength, endurance, and muscle tone. But remember to start slowly, use proper form, ... week will really pay off — besides better muscle tone and definition, you may find that you have ...

  6. VALIDITY OF THE HIGH-TENSILE-STRENG TH BOLT FOR THE SOFT ROCK WITH LARGE CROSS SECTIONAL TUNNEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Hiroshi; Tamamura, Kouji; Uneda, Atsushi; Domon, Tsuyoshi; Nishimura, Kazuo

    This paper reports the experiential result about the applications of the high tensile strength bolts as a countermeasure for the displacement, considered about the denaturalization of the large cross sectional tunnel in mudstone layer. In Kanaya Tunnel of the New Tomei Expressway, the soft rock section appeared where we cannot restrain support denaturizi ng and internal displacement by materials of the standard design. Then fore, we adopted the high tensile strength bolts (748kN) replacing with of the standard design, and improved the support proof for stress. As the result, we got possible to control the displacement and execute the work safety and economi cally. We compared the analysis result (FEM) by the limited element method with the measure result on the spot, and inspected the supportability effect of the higt tensile strength bolts.

  7. Effect of boron on post irradiation tensile properties of reduced activation ferritic steel (F-82H) irradiated in HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Shiba, Kiyoyuki; Suzuki, Masahide; Hishinuma, Akimichi; Pawel, J.E.

    1994-12-31

    Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel, F-82H (Fe-8Cr-2W-V-Ta), was irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to doses between 11 and 34 dpa at 400 and 500 C. Post irradiation tensile tests were performed at the nominal irradiation temperature in vacuum. Some specimens included {sup 10}B or natural boron (nB) to estimate the helium effect on tensile properties. Tensile properties including the 0.2% offset yield stress, the ultimate tensile strength, the uniform elongation and the total elongation were measured. The tensile properties were not dependent on helium content in specimens irradiated to 34 dpa, however {sup 10}B-doped specimens with the highest levels of helium showed slightly higher yield strength and less ductility than boron-free specimens. Strength appears to go through a peak, and ductility through a trough at about 11 dpa. The irradiation to more than 21 dpa reduced the strength and increased the elongation to the unirradiated levels. Ferritic steels are one of the candidate alloys for nuclear fusion reactors because of their good thermophysical properties, their superior swelling resistance, and the low corrosion rate in contact with potential breeder and coolant materials.

  8. Strength Scaling in Fiber Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellas, Sotiris; Morton, John

    1990-01-01

    A research program was initiated to study and isolate the factors responsible for scale effects in the tensile strength of graphite/epoxy composite laminates. Four layups were chosen with appropriate stacking sequences so as to highlight individual and interacting failure modes. Four scale sizes were selected for investigation including full scale size, 3/4, 2/4, and 1/4, with n = to 4, 3, 2, and 1, respectively. The full scale specimen sizes was 32 piles thick as compared to 24, 16, and 8 piles for the 3/4, 2/4, and 1/4 specimen sizes respectively. Results were obtained in the form of tensile strength, stress-strain curves and damage development. Problems associated with strength degradation with increasing specimen sizes are isolated and discussed. Inconsistencies associated with strain measurements were also identified. Enhanced x ray radiography was employed for damage evaluation, following step loading. It was shown that fiber dominated layups were less sensitive to scaling effects compared to the matrix dominated layups.

  9. Superior Tensile Ductility in Bulk Metallic Glass with Gradient Amorphous Structure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Q.; Yang, Y.; Jiang, H.; Liu, C. T.; Ruan, H. H.; Lu, J.

    2014-01-01

    Over centuries, structural glasses have been deemed as a strong yet inherently ‘brittle’ material due to their lack of tensile ductility. However, here we report bulk metallic glasses exhibiting both a high strength of ~2 GPa and an unprecedented tensile elongation of 2–4% at room temperature. Our experiments have demonstrated that intense structural evolution can be triggered in theses glasses by the carefully controlled surface mechanical attrition treatment, leading to the formation of gradient amorphous microstructures across the sample thickness. As a result, the engineered amorphous microstructures effectively promote multiple shear banding while delay cavitation in the bulk metallic glass, thus resulting in superior tensile ductility. The outcome of our research uncovers an unusual work-hardening mechanism in monolithic bulk metallic glasses and demonstrates a promising yet low-cost strategy suitable for producing large-sized, ultra-strong and stretchable structural glasses. PMID:24755683

  10. A new concept for the determination of tensile properties of nanofilms and materials via nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jong-Bong; Yoo, Yo-Han; Shin, Hyunho

    2005-09-01

    Here we present a new concept to determine tensile properties of nanofilms and materials via nanoindentation. The proposed methodology utilizes a conical or truncated conical indenter and requires the fabrication of an upwardly obtruded well shaped tube from the substrate. The downward stroke of the indenter along the centreline of the tube mainly produces tensile hoop stress in the upper region of the tube where the nanofilm exists. In the present work, the feasibility of the proposed method has been demonstrated through finite element analysis, as the first stage of a longer project on the topic. It has been demonstrated that Young's modulus and the yield strength of the nanofilm can be suitably determined in tensile mode from the load-stroke relation.

  11. Effects of annealing on tensile property and corrosion behavior of Ti-Al-Zr alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae-Kyu; Choi, Byung-Seon; Jeong, Yong-Hwan; Lee, Doo-Jeong; Chang, Moon-Hee

    2002-03-01

    The effects of annealing on the tensile property and corrosion behavior of Ti-Al-Zr alloy were evaluated. The annealing in the temperature range from 500 to 800 C for 1 h induced the growth of the grain and the precipitate sizes. The results of tensile tests at room temperature showed that the strengths and the ductility were almost independent of the annealing temperature. However, the results of corrosion test in an ammonia aqueous solution of pH 9.98 at 360 C showed that the corrosion resistance depended on the annealing temperature, and the corrosion rate was accelerated with increasing annealing temperature. Hydrogen contents absorbed during the corrosion test of 220 days also increased with the annealing temperature. It could be attributed to the growth of Fe-rich precipitates by annealing. It is thus suggested that the lower annealing temperatures provide the better corrosion properties without degrading the tensile properties.

  12. Effect of loading rate on tensile properties and failure behavior of glass fibre/epoxy composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahato, K. K.; Biswal, M.; Rathore, D. K.; Prusty, R. K.; Dutta, K.; Ray, B. C.

    2016-02-01

    Fibre reinforced polymeric (FRP) composite materials are subjected to different range of loading rates during their service life. Present investigation is focused on to study the effects of variation of loading rates on mechanical behavior and various dominating failure modes of these potential materials when subjected to tensile loading. The results revealed that on the variation of loading rates the ultimate tensile strength varies but the tensile modulus is mostly unaffected. Furthermore, the strain to failure is also increasing with increase in loading rates. Different failure patterns of glass/epoxy composite tested at 1, 10,100, 500 and 1000 mm/min loading rates are identified. Scanning electron micrographs shows various dominating failures modes in the glass/epoxy composite.

  13. Experimental Study on Tensile Behavior of Carbon Fiber and Carbon Fiber Reinforced Aluminum at Different Strain Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuanxin; Wang, Ying; Jeelani, Shaik; Xia, Yuanming

    2007-01-01

    In this study, dynamic and quasi-static tensile behaviors of carbon fiber and unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced aluminum composite have been investigated. The complete stress strain curves of fiber bundles and the composite at different strain rates were obtained. The experimental results show that carbon fiber is a strain rate insensitive material, but the tensile strength and critical strain of the Cf/Al composite increased with increasing of strain rate because of the strain rate strengthening effect of aluminum matrix. Based on experimental results, a fiber bundles model has been combined with Weibull strength distribution function to establish a one-dimensional damage constitutive equation for the Cf/Al composite.

  14. Lifetimes of fiber composites under sustained tensile loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiao, T. T.; Sherry, R. J.; Chiao, C. C.

    1977-01-01

    Results are presented for a study intended to summarize lifetime data on several fiber/epoxy composite materials subjected to sustained uniaxial tensile loading, to report preliminary results of an accelerated test method for predicting the life of simple composites, and to describe related work in progress on pressure vessels and other filament-wound structures. The lifetime performance of the tested composites was compared by plotting the percent of ultimate strength (applied fiber stress normalized with respect to fiber failure stress in a composite) versus lifetime. In terms of performance in long-term tensile applications, the tested composites are ranked in the following order: graphite/epoxy, Be wire/epoxy, Aramid/epoxy, and S-glass/epoxy. The accelerated test using temperature and stress to simulate the passage of time proves to be encouraging, at least in the case of the Aramid/epoxy composite. The potential of a statistical analysis based on Weibull distribution analyses or a power law relationship is demonstrated.

  15. High temperature tensile deformation behavior of Grade 92 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsagabi, Sultan; Shrestha, Triratna; Charit, Indrajit

    2014-10-01

    Candidate structural materials for advanced reactors need to have superior high temperature strength and creep-rupture properties among other characteristics. The ferritic-martensitic Grade 92 steel (Fe-9Cr-2W-0.5Mo, wt.%) is considered such a candidate structural material. Tensile tests were performed at temperatures of 600, 650 and 700 C in the strain rate range of 10-5-10-3 s-1. After analyzing the tensile results using the Bird-Mukherjee-Dorn (BMD) equation, a stress exponent of about 9.5 and an activation energy of about 646 kJ/mol were obtained. In the light of high values of the stress exponent and activation energy, the threshold stress concept was used to elucidate the operating high temperature deformation mechanism. As a result of this modification, the true activation energy and stress exponent of the high temperature deformation in Grade 92 steel were found to be about 245 kJ/mol and 5, respectively. Thus, the dominant high temperature deformation mechanism was identified as the high temperature climb of edge dislocations and the appropriate constitutive equation was developed.

  16. Tensile Behavior of Single-Crystal Tin Whiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. S.; Sarkar, R.; Xie, H.-X.; Mayer, C.; Rajagopalan, J.; Chawla, N.

    2014-04-01

    The growth of metallic (predominantly Sn) whiskers from pure metallic platings has been studied for over 50 years. While the phenomenon of Sn whiskering has been studied for decades, very little is known about the mechanical properties of these materials. This can be attributed to the difficulty in handling, gripping, and testing such fine-diameter and high-aspect-ratio whiskers. We report on the stress-strain behavior of Sn whiskers inside a dual-beam focused ion beam (FIB) with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Lift-out of the whiskers was conducted in situ in the FIB, and the whiskers were tested using a microelectromechanical system tensile testing stage. Using this technique, the whiskers had minimum exposure to ambient air and were not handled by hand. SEM images after fracture enabled reliable calculation of the whisker cross-sectional area. Tests on two different whiskers revealed relatively high tensile strengths of 720 MPa and 880 MPa, respectively, and a limited strain to failure of ˜2% to 3%. For both whiskers, the Young's modulus was between 42 GPa and 45 GPa. It is interesting to note that the whiskers were quite strong and had limited ductility. These findings are intriguing and provide a basis for further work to understand the effect of Sn whisker mechanical properties on short circuits in electronics.

  17. Distinct Tensile Response of Model Semi-flexible Elastomer Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilera-Mercado, Bernardo M.; Cohen, Claude; Escobedo, Fernando A.

    2011-03-01

    Through coarse-grained molecular modeling, we study how the elastic response strongly depends upon nanostructural heterogeneities in model networks made of semi-flexible chains exhibiting both regular and realistic connectivity. Idealized regular polymer networks have been shown to display a peculiar elastic response similar to that of super-tough natural materials (e.g., organic adhesives inside abalone shells). We investigate the impact of chain stiffness, and the effect of including tri-block copolymer chains, on the network's topology and elastic response. We find in some systems a dual tensile response: a liquid-like behavior at small deformations, and a distinct saw-tooth shaped stress-strain curve at moderate to large deformations. Additionally, stiffer regular networks exhibit a marked hysteresis over loading-unloading cycles that can be deleted by heating-cooling cycles or by performing deformations along different axes. Furthermore, small variations of chain stiffness may entirely change the nature of the network's tensile response from an entropic to an enthalpic elastic regime, and micro-phase separation of different blocks within elastomer networks may significantly enhance their mechanical strength. This work was supported by the American Chemical Society.

  18. High Technique for T-Peel Strength Enhancement of Al/AFRP Hybrid Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Cheol-Woong; Oh, Dong-Joon

    The interlaminar peel strength of Al/AFRP (Aluminum alloy/Aramid Fiber Reinforced Plastic) hybrid composite is affected by the adhesive strength between the Al alloy layer and the aramid fiber layer. The study of the tensile strength and the T-peel strength of the Al/AFRP should be accomplished first. Therefore, this study focused on the effect of the resin mixture ratio as the Al/AFRP on the tensile strength and T-peel strength. In conclusions, the resin mixture ratio by equivalence ratio of equal to <1:1> of Al/AFRP-I and the resin mixture ratio by equivalence ratio of equal to <1:1:0.2> of Al/AFRP-II showed the highest ultimate tensile strength. After the T-peel test, it is found that the T-peel strength of Al/AFRP-II is approximately 1.5 times higher than that of Al/AFRP-I. Reviewing the characteristics of the tensile and T-peel strengths, the resin mixture ratio <1:1:0.2> of Al/AFRP-II showed the highest tensile strength and T-peel strength.

  19. In Situ Radiography During Tensile Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baaklini, George Y.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1994-01-01

    Laboratory system for testing specimens of metal-, ceramic-, and intermetallic-matrix composite materials incorporates both electromechanical tensile-testing subsystem and either of two imaging subsystems that take x-ray photographs of specimens before, during, and after tensile tests. Used to test specimens of reaction-bonded silicon nitride reinforced with silicon carbide fibers (SiC/RBSN) considered for high-temperature service in advanced aircraft turbine engines. Provides data on effects of preexisting flaws (e.g., high-density impurities and local variations of density) on fracture behavior. Accumulated internal damage monitored during loading. X-ray source illuminates specimen in load frame while specimen is pulled. X-ray images on film correlated with stress-vs.-strain data from tensile test.

  20. Pressure reversal study through tensile tests

    SciTech Connect

    Swinson, W.F.; Battiste, R.L.; Wright, A.L.; Yahr, G.T.; Robertson, J.P.

    1997-12-31

    This paper is a summary of the results from a study of the variables related to pressure reversal and was sponsored by the US Department of Transportation, Office of Pipeline Safety. The circumferential pipe stress, which is the most significant variable in pressure reversal, was examined by using tensile specimens and then relating the results to pressurized pipe. A model is proposed that gives some insight into how pressure reversal can be minimized when a section of pipe is being hydrotested. Twenty tensile specimens from X-42 electric resistance welded (ERW) pipe and twenty specimens from X-52 ERW pipe were tested. Each specimen had a machined flaw. The flaw regions were monitored using strain gages and photoelasticity. These tensile tests represent the first phase of a research effort to examine and understand the variables related to pressure reversal. The second phase of this effort will be with pipe specimens and presently is in progress.