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Sample records for diametral tensile strength

  1. Compressive, diametral tensile and biaxial flexural strength of cutting-edge calcium phosphate cements.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jun; Ajaxon, Ingrid; Ginebra, Maria Pau; Engqvist, Håkan; Persson, Cecilia

    2016-07-01

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) are widely used in bone repair. Currently there are two main types of CPCs, brushite and apatite. The aim of this project was to evaluate the mechanical properties of particularly promising experimental brushite and apatite formulations in comparison to commercially available brushite- and apatite-based cements (chronOS(™) Inject and Norian(®) SRS(®), respectively), and in particular evaluate the diametral tensile strength and biaxial flexural strength of these cements in both wet and dry conditions for the first time. The cements׳ porosity and their compressive, diametral tensile and biaxial flexural strength were tested in wet (or moist) and dry conditions. The surface morphology was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Phase composition was assessed with X-ray diffraction. It was found that the novel experimental cements showed better mechanical properties than the commercially available cements, in all loading scenarios. The highest compressive strength (57.2±6.5MPa before drying and 69.5±6.0MPa after drying) was found for the experimental brushite cement. This cement also showed the highest wet diametral tensile strength (10.0±0.8MPa) and wet biaxial flexural strength (30.7±1.8MPa). It was also the cement that presented the lowest porosity (approx. 12%). The influence of water content was found to depend on cement type, with some cements showing higher mechanical properties after drying and some no difference after drying. PMID:27082025

  2. General and mechanistic optimal relationships for tensile strength of doubly convex tablets under diametrical compression.

    PubMed

    Razavi, Sonia M; Gonzalez, Marcial; Cuitiño, Alberto M

    2015-04-30

    We propose a general framework for determining optimal relationships for tensile strength of doubly convex tablets under diametrical compression. This approach is based on the observation that tensile strength is directly proportional to the breaking force and inversely proportional to a non-linear function of geometric parameters and materials properties. This generalization reduces to the analytical expression commonly used for flat faced tablets, i.e., Hertz solution, and to the empirical relationship currently used in the pharmaceutical industry for convex-faced tablets, i.e., Pitt's equation. Under proper parametrization, optimal tensile strength relationship can be determined from experimental results by minimizing a figure of merit of choice. This optimization is performed under the first-order approximation that a flat faced tablet and a doubly curved tablet have the same tensile strength if they have the same relative density and are made of the same powder, under equivalent manufacturing conditions. Furthermore, we provide a set of recommendations and best practices for assessing the performance of optimal tensile strength relationships in general. Based on these guidelines, we identify two new models, namely the general and mechanistic models, which are effective and predictive alternatives to the tensile strength relationship currently used in the pharmaceutical industry. PMID:25683146

  3. Diametral tensile strength and film thickness of an experimental dental luting agent derived from castor oil

    PubMed Central

    CARMELLO, Juliana Cabrini; FAIS, Laiza Maria Grassi; RIBEIRO, Lígia Nunes de Moraes; CLARO NETO, Salvador; GUAGLIANONI, Dalton Geraldo; PINELLI, Lígia Antunes Pereira

    2012-01-01

    The need to develop new dental luting agents in order to improve the success of treatments has greatly motivated research. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the diametral tensile strength (DTS) and film thickness (FT) of an experimental dental luting agent derived from castor oil (COP) with or without addition of different quantities of filler (calcium carbonate - CaCO3). Material and Methods Eighty specimens were manufactured (DTS N=40; FT N=40) and divided into 4 groups: Pure COP; COP 10%; COP 50% and zinc phosphate (control). The cements were mixed according to the manufacturers' recommendations and submitted to the tests. The DTS test was performed in the MTS 810 testing machine (10 KN, 0.5 mm/min). For FT test, the cements were sandwiched between two glass plates (2 cm2) and a load of 15 kg was applied vertically on the top of the specimen for 10 min. The data were analyzed by means of one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). Results The values of DTS (MPa) were: Pure COP- 10.94±1.30; COP 10%- 30.06±0.64; COP 50%- 29.87±0.27; zinc phosphate- 4.88±0.96. The values of FT (µm) were: Pure COP- 31.09±3.16; COP 10%- 17.05±4.83; COP 50%- 13.03±4.83; Zinc Phosphate- 20.00±0.12. One-way ANOVA showed statistically significant differences among the groups (DTS - p=1.01E-40; FT - p=2.4E-10). Conclusion The experimental dental luting agent with 50% of filler showed the best diametral tensile strength and film thickness. PMID:22437672

  4. The diametral tensile strength and hydrostability of polymer-ceramic nano-composite (pcnc) material prototypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yepez, Johanna

    Statement of the problem: There is a weak connection between the filler and the resin matrix of dental composites caused primarily by hydrolysis of silane coupling agent, therefore, jeopardizing the mechanical properties of the dental restorations. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the diametral tensile strength (DTS) of a nano-mechanically bonded polymer ceramic nano composite (pcnc) versus the chemically bonding prototype polymer ceramic nano composite (pcnc) fabricated by using hydrolytically stable interphase. Materials and Methods: Composites were made with 60wt % filler, 38% triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (TEDGMA), 1% camphorquinone (CQ) and 1% 2-(dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA). Tests for DTS were performed using a universal testing machine. The disk-shaped specimens were loaded in compression between two supporting plates at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until fracture. The samples, measuring 3 mm in height and 6 mm in diameter, were produced in a round stainless steel (SS) mold. A total of 144 samples were created. Groups of 48 samples were made for each of three different fillers. Specimens were soaked in artificial saliva at 37° for four time periods, dry(t=0), 1 day, 7 days, 28 days). At the end of each soaking time DTS tests were performed. Results: There where statistically significant differences in the DTS between the filler groups and the soaking times (p=<0.001) as well as for the pairwise comparison between the different filler group values and between the different soaking times as an individual treatment. Overall, longer soaking times resulted in lower mean DTS values. The DTS of the PCNC for filler #1 decreased to 82.4% of the original value after 1 day of soaking, 67.2% after 7 days and 27.2 % after 28 days. For filler #2 decreased to 54.8% of the original value after 1 day of soaking, 62.3% after 7 days and 61.2% after 28 days. For filler #3 decreased to 71.2% of the original value, 67.3% after 7 days and 51

  5. Influence of different crosshead speeds on diametral tensile strength of a methacrylate based resin composite: An in-vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Anubhav; Ramarao, Sathyanarayanan; Carounanidy, Usha

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to evaluate the influence of different crosshead speeds on diametral tensile strength (DTS) of a resin composite material (Tetric N-Ceram). Materials and Methods: The DTS of Tetric N-Ceram was evaluated using four different crosshead speeds 0.5 mm/min (DTS 1), 1 mm/min (DTS 2), 5 mm/min (DTS 3), 10 mm/min (DTS 4). A total of 48 specimens were prepared and divided into four subgroups with 12 specimens in each group. Specimens were made using stainless steel split custom molds of dimensions 6 mm diameter and 3 mm height. The specimens were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 24 h. Universal testing machine was used and DTS values were calculated in MPa. Results: Analysis of variance was used to compare the four groups. Higher mean DTS value was recorded in DTS 2 followed by DTS 4, DTS 1, and DTS 3, respectively. However, the difference in mean tensile strength between the groups was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Conclusion: The crosshead speed variation between 0.5 and 10 mm/min does not seem to influence the DTS of a resin composite. PMID:26069407

  6. Comparative evaluation of compressive strength, diametral tensile strength and shear bond strength of GIC type IX, chlorhexidine-incorporated GIC and triclosan-incorporated GIC: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Jaidka, Shipra; Somani, Rani; Singh, Deepti J.; Shafat, Shazia

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To comparatively evaluate the compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, and shear bond strength of glass ionomer cement type IX, chlorhexidine-incorporated glass ionomer cement, and triclosan-incorporated glass ionomer cement. Materials and Methods: In this study, glass ionomer cement type IX was used as a control. Chlorhexidine diacetate, and triclosan were added to glass ionomer cement type IX powder, respectively, in order to obtain 0.5, 1.25, and 2.5% concentrations of the respective experimental groups. Compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, and shear bond strength were evaluated after 24 h using Instron Universal Testing Machine. The results obtained were statistically analyzed using the independent t-test, Dunnett test, and Tukey test. Results: There was no statistical difference in the compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, and shear bond strength of glass ionomer cement type IX (control), 0.5% triclosan-glass ionomer cement, and 0.5% chlorhexidine-glass ionomer cement. Conclusion: The present study suggests that the compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, and shear bond strength of 0.5% triclosan-glass ionomer cement and 0.5% chlorhexidine-glass ionomer cement were similar to those of the glass ionomer cement type IX, discernibly signifying that these can be considered as viable options for use in pediatric dentistry with the additional value of antimicrobial property along with physical properties within the higher acceptable range. PMID:27195231

  7. Influence of powder/liquid ratio on the radiodensity and diametral tensile strength of glass ionomer cements

    PubMed Central

    FONSECA, Rodrigo Borges; BRANCO, Carolina Assaf; QUAGLIATTO, Paulo Sérgio; GONÇALVES, Luciano de Souza; SOARES, Carlos José; CARLO, Hugo Lemes; CORRER-SOBRINHO, Lourenço

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine the influence of P/L ratio on the radiodensity and diametral tensile strength (DTS) of glass ionomer cements. Material and Methods There were 2 factors under study: P/L ratio (manufacturer's recommended P/L ratio and a 50% reduced P/L ratio), and materials (Vitro Molar, Vitro Fil, Vitro Cem conventional GICs and Vitro Fil LC, Ortho Glass LC RMGICs). Five 1-mm-thick samples of each material-P/L ratio were produced for radiodensity evaluation. Samples were x-ray exposed onto Digora phosphor plate and radiodensity was obtained using the software Digora for Windows 2.5 Rev 0. For DTS, five (4.0x8.0 mm) cylinder samples of each material were tested (0.5 mm/min). Data were subjected to one- and two-way ANOVA (5x2) followed by Tukey's HSD test, or Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's method. For paired comparisons, t-test or Mann-Whitney test were used (a=0.05). Results There was a significant interaction (P=0.001) for the studied factors (materials vs. P/L ratio). Reduced P/L ratio resulted in significantly lower DTS for the RMGICs, but radiodensity was affected for all materials (P<0.05). Conclusions Reduced P/L ratio affected properties of the tested glass ionomer cements. RMGICs were more susceptible to lower values of DTS, but radiodensity decreased for all materials following P/L ratio reduction. PMID:21308288

  8. Finite Element Simulation of Diametral Strength Test of Hydroxyapatite

    SciTech Connect

    Ozturk, Fahrettin; Toros, Serkan; Evis, Zafer

    2011-01-17

    In this study, the diametral strength test of sintered hydroxyapatite was simulated by the finite element software, ABAQUS/Standard. Stress distributions on diametral test sample were determined. The effect of sintering temperature on stress distribution of hydroxyapatite was studied. It was concluded that high sintering temperatures did not reduce the stress on hydroxyapatite. It had a negative effect on stress distribution of hydroxyapatite after 1300 deg. C. In addition to the porosity, other factors (sintering temperature, presence of phases and the degree of crystallinity) affect the diametral strength of the hydroxyapatite.

  9. Dynamic tensile strength of glass fiber reinforced pultruded composites

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, P.K.; Kumar, M.M.; Hui, D.

    1994-12-31

    This paper discusses the stress-strain behavior, fracture strength, influence of low temperature, and energy absorption in the diametral tensile splitting fracturing of a Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite. Experiments were conducted at low-temperature in a thermal chamber installed on a servo-hydraulic universal testing machine. The tensile strength was determined by diametral compression of disc samples at 24, {minus}5 and {minus}40 C.

  10. Tensile strength of dried gelcast green bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Nunn, S.D.; Omatete, O.O.; Walls, C.A.; Barker, D.L.

    1994-04-01

    Ceramic green bodies were prepared by three different techniques, dry pressing, slip casting, and gelcasting. The tensile strength of the green bodies was measured using a diametral compression test. It was found that the gelcast samples were from 2 to 20 times stronger than the conventionally formed green bodies. SEM examination of the gelcast samples revealed a homogeneous, brittle fracture surface indicating a very uniform distribution of the binder and excellent dispersion of the ceramic powder.

  11. A novel dentin bond strength measurement technique using a composite disk in diametral compression.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shih-Hao; Lin, Lian-Shan; Rudney, Joel; Jones, Rob; Aparicio, Conrado; Lin, Chun-Pin; Fok, Alex

    2012-04-01

    New methods are needed that can predict the clinical failure of dental restorations that primarily rely on dentin bonding. Existing methods have shortcomings, e.g. severe deviation in the actual stress distribution from theory and a large standard deviation in the measured bond strength. We introduce here a novel test specimen by examining an endodontic model for dentin bonding. Specifically, we evaluated the feasibility of using the modified Brazilian disk test to measure the post-dentin interfacial bond strength. Four groups of resin composite disks which contained a slice of dentin with or without an intracanal post in the center were tested under diametral compression until fracture. Advanced nondestructive examination and imaging techniques in the form of acoustic emission (AE) and digital image correlation (DIC) were used innovatively to capture the fracture process in real time. DIC showed strain concentration first appearing at one of the lateral sides of the post-dentin interface. The appearance of the interfacial strain concentration also coincided with the first AE signal detected. Utilizing both the experimental data and finite-element analysis, the bond/tensile strengths were calculated to be: 11.2 MPa (fiber posts), 12.9 MPa (metal posts), 8.9 MPa (direct resin fillings) and 82.6 MPa for dentin. We have thus established the feasibility of using the composite disk in diametral compression to measure the bond strength between intracanal posts and dentin. The new method has the advantages of simpler specimen preparation, no premature failure, more consistent failure mode and smaller variations in the calculated bond strength. PMID:22266033

  12. Investigations into the tensile failure of doubly-convex cylindrical tablets under diametral loading using finite element methodology.

    PubMed

    Podczeck, Fridrun; Drake, Kevin R; Newton, J Michael

    2013-09-15

    In the literature various solutions exist for the calculation of the diametral compression tensile strength of doubly-convex tablets and each approach is based on experimental data obtained from single materials (gypsum, microcrystalline cellulose) only. The solutions are represented by complex equations and further differ for elastic and elasto-plastic behaviour of the compacts. The aim of this work was to develop a general equation that is applicable independently of deformation behaviour and which is based on simple tablet dimensions such as diameter and total tablet thickness only. With the help of 3D-FEM analysis the tensile failure stress of doubly-convex tables with central cylinder to total tablet thickness ratios W/D between 0.06 and 0.50 and face-curvature ratios D/R between 0.25 and 1.85 were evaluated. Both elastic and elasto-plastic deformation behaviour were considered. The results of 80 individual simulations were combined and showed that the tensile failure stress σt of doubly-convex tablets can be calculated from σt=(2P/πDW)(W/T)=2P/πDT with P being the failure load, D the diameter, W the central cylinder thickness, and T the total thickness of the tablet. This equation converts into the standard Brazilian equation (σt=2P/πDW) when W equals T, i.e. is equally valid for flat cylindrical tablets. In practice, the use of this new equation removes the need for complex measurements of tablet dimensions, because it only requires values for diameter and total tablet thickness. It also allows setting of standards for the mechanical strength of doubly-convex tablets. The new equation holds both for elastic and elasto-plastic deformation behaviour of the tablets under load. It is valid for all combinations of W/D-ratios between 0.06 and 0.50 with D/R-ratios between 0.00 and 1.85 except for W/D=0.50 in combination with D/R-ratios of 1.85 and 1.43 and for W/D-ratios of 0.40 and 0.30 in combination with D/R=1.85. FEM-analysis indicated a tendency to

  13. 7 CFR 29.3061 - Strength (tensile).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Strength (tensile). 29.3061 Section 29.3061... Type 93) § 29.3061 Strength (tensile). The stress a tobacco leaf can bear without tearing. Tensile strength is not an important element of quality in Burley tobacco....

  14. 7 CFR 29.3061 - Strength (tensile).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Strength (tensile). 29.3061 Section 29.3061... Type 93) § 29.3061 Strength (tensile). The stress a tobacco leaf can bear without tearing. Tensile strength is not an important element of quality in Burley tobacco....

  15. 7 CFR 29.3061 - Strength (tensile).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Strength (tensile). 29.3061 Section 29.3061... Type 93) § 29.3061 Strength (tensile). The stress a tobacco leaf can bear without tearing. Tensile strength is not an important element of quality in Burley tobacco....

  16. 7 CFR 29.3061 - Strength (tensile).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Strength (tensile). 29.3061 Section 29.3061... Type 93) § 29.3061 Strength (tensile). The stress a tobacco leaf can bear without tearing. Tensile strength is not an important element of quality in Burley tobacco....

  17. 7 CFR 29.3061 - Strength (tensile).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Strength (tensile). 29.3061 Section 29.3061... Type 93) § 29.3061 Strength (tensile). The stress a tobacco leaf can bear without tearing. Tensile strength is not an important element of quality in Burley tobacco....

  18. An Interlaminar Tensile Strength Specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Roderick H.; Jackson, Wade C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a technique to determine interlaminar tensile strength, sigma(sub 3c), of a fiber reinforced composite material using a curved beam. The specimen was a unidirectional curved beam, bent 90 deg, with straight arms. Attached to each arm was a hinged loading mechanism that was held by the grips of a tension testing machine. Geometry effects of the specimen, including the effects of loading arm length, inner radius, thickness, and width, were studied. The data sets fell into two categories: low strength corresponding to a macroscopic flaw related failure and high strength corresponding to a microscopic flaw related failure. From the data available, the specimen width and loading arm length had little effect on sigma(sub 3c). The inner radius was not expected to have a significant effect on sigma(sub 3c), but this conclusion could not be confirmed because of differences in laminate quality for each curve geometry. The thicker specimens had the lowest value of sigma(sub 3c) because of poor laminate quality.

  19. Experimental and Numerical Studies on Determination of Indirect Tensile Strength of Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erarslan, Nazife; Liang, Zheng Zhao; Williams, David John

    2012-09-01

    Indirect tension tests using Brisbane tuff Brazilian disc specimens under standard Brazilian jaws and various loading arcs were performed. The standard Brazilian indirect tensile tests caused catastrophic, crushing failure of the disc specimens, rather than the expected tensile splitting failure initiated by a central crack. This led to an investigation of the fracturing of Brazilian disc specimens and the existing indirect tensile Brazilian test using steel loading arcs with different angles. The results showed that the ultimate failure load increased with increasing loading arc angles. With no international standard for determining indirect tensile strength of rocks under diametral load, numerical modelling and analytical solutions were undertaken. Numerical simulations using RFPA2D software were conducted with a heterogeneous material model. The results predicted tensile stress in the discs and visually reproduced the progressive fracture process. It was concluded that standard Brazilian jaws cause catastrophic, crushing failure of the disc specimens instead of producing a central splitting crack. The experimental and numerical results showed that 20° and 30° loading arcs result in diametral splitting fractures starting at the disc centre. Moreover, intrinsic material properties (e.g. fracture toughness) may be used to propose the best loading configuration to determine the indirect tensile strength of rocks. Here, by using numerical outcomes and empirical relationships between fracture toughness and tensile strength, the best loading geometry to obtain the most accurate indirect tensile strength of rocks was the 2α = 30° loading arc.

  20. 7 CFR 29.6040 - Strength (tensile).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Strength (tensile). 29.6040 Section 29.6040 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6040 Strength (tensile). The stress a tobacco...

  1. 7 CFR 29.6040 - Strength (tensile).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Strength (tensile). 29.6040 Section 29.6040 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6040 Strength (tensile). The stress a tobacco...

  2. 7 CFR 29.6040 - Strength (tensile).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Strength (tensile). 29.6040 Section 29.6040 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6040 Strength (tensile). The stress a tobacco...

  3. 7 CFR 29.6040 - Strength (tensile).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Strength (tensile). 29.6040 Section 29.6040 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6040 Strength (tensile). The stress a tobacco...

  4. 7 CFR 29.6040 - Strength (tensile).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Strength (tensile). 29.6040 Section 29.6040 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6040 Strength (tensile). The stress a tobacco...

  5. Surfactant effects on soil aggregate tensile strength

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known regarding a soil aggregate's tensile strength response to surfactants that may be applied to alleviate soil water repellency. Two laboratory investigations were performed to determine surfactant effects on the tensile strength of 1) Ap horizons of nine wettable, agricultural soils co...

  6. CHARACTERIZATION OF TENSILE STRENGTH OF GLOVEBOX GLOVES

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P.; Chapman, G.

    2012-02-29

    A task was undertaken to compare various properties of different glovebox gloves, having various compositions, for use in gloveboxes at the Savannah River Site (SRS). One aspect of this project was to determine the tensile strength (TS) of the gloves. Longitudinal tensile samples were cut from 15 different gloves and tensile tested. The stress, load, and elongation at failure were determined. All of the gloves that are approved for glovebox use and listed in the glovebox procurement specification met the tensile and elongation requirements. The Viton{reg_sign} compound gloves are not listed in the specification, but exhibited lower tensile strengths than permissible based on the Butyl rubber requirements. Piercan Polyurethane gloves were the thinnest samples and exhibited the highest tensile strength of the materials tested.

  7. Method and apparatus for determining tensile strength

    DOEpatents

    Ratigan, Joe L.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining the statistical distribution of apparent tensile strength of rock, the size effect with respect to tensile strength, as well as apparent deformation modulus of both intact and fractured or jointed rock. The method is carried out by inserting a plug of deformable material, such as rubber, in an opening of a specimen to be tested. The deformable material is loaded by an upper and lower platen until the specimen ruptures, whereafter the tensile strength is calculated based on the parameters of the test specimen and apparatus.

  8. Method and apparatus for determining tensile strength

    DOEpatents

    Ratigan, J.L.

    1982-05-28

    A method and apparatus is described for determining the statistical distribution of apparent tensile strength of rock, the size effect with respect to tensile strength, as well as apparent deformation modulus of both intact and fractured or jointed rock. The method is carried out by inserting a plug of deformable material, such as rubber, in an opening of a specimen to be tested. The deformable material is loaded by an upper and lower platen until the specimen ruptures, whereafter the tensile strength is calculated based on the parameters of the test specimen and apparatus.

  9. Dynamic tensile strength of lunar rock types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohn, S. N.; Ahrens, T. J.

    1981-01-01

    The dynamic tensile strength of four rocks are determined. A flat plate impact experiment is employed to generate approximately one-microsecond-duration tensile stress pulses in rock samples by superposing rarefaction waves to induce fracture. It is noted that the effect of chemical weathering and other factors has not been explicitly studied. The given tensile strengths are based on a series of experiments on each rock where determination of incipient spallation is made by terminal microscopic examination. The data are generally consistent with previous determinations, at least one of which was for a significantly chemically altered but physically coherent rock.

  10. Strength Measurement of Ceramic Spheres Using a Diametrally Compressed "C-Sphere" Specimen

    SciTech Connect

    Wereszczak, Andrew A; Jadaan, Osama M.; Kirkland, Timothy Philip

    2007-01-01

    A "C-sphere" flexure strength specimen geometry was conceived and developed to measure the hoop tensile strength of bearing-grade silicon nitride (Si3N4) balls. Because such a strength can be measured, the important study of surface-located strength-limiting flaws in ceramic sphere is also enabled with this specimen. A slot is machined into the balls to a set depth to produce the C-sphere geometry. A simple, monotonically increasing uniaxial compressive force produces a hoop tensile stress at the C-sphere's outer surface that ultimately initiates fracture. The strength is determined using the combination of failure load, C-sphere geometry, and finite element analysis. Additionally, the stress field was used to determine C-sphere effective areas and effective volumes as a function of Weibull modulus. To demonstrate this new specimen, C-sphere flexure strength distributions were determined for three commercially available bearing-grade Si3N4 materials (NBD200, SN101C, and TSN-03NH), and differences among their characteristic strengths and Weibull moduli were found.

  11. A comparison of pressure compaction and diametral compression tests for determining granule strengths

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, S.J.; Newton, C.

    1994-12-31

    Lightning strikes can cause structural damage, ignite flammable materials, and produce circuit malfunctions in missiles, aircraft, and ground systems. Lightning arrestor connectors (LACs) are used to divert harmful lightning energy away from these systems by providing less destructive breakdown paths. Ceramic granules in the size range of 150--200 {micro}m are used in LACs to provide physical and electrical separation of contacts (pins) from the surrounding metal web, and to control the voltage breakdown level. Pressure compaction (P-C) tests were used to characterize the strength of ceramic granules. When compaction data are plotted as relative density of the compact versus the compaction pressure two linear regions are generally observed. The intersection of these regions, which is known as the ``breakpoint,`` has been used as a semi-quantitative measure of granule strength. Comparisons were made between the P-C breakpoint and strengths of 150--200 {micro}m diameter ZnO, TiO{sub 2} (rutile), and lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) granules, where the strengths were determined by diametral compression (D-C) tests. At high compaction pressures the compliance of the die itself is significant and was accounted for in the analyses. Tests were conducted at different compaction rates, and with different aspect ratio compacts. High aspect ratios and loading rates decrease the slope of the second linear portion of the compaction curve and produce higher apparent P-C breakpoints. Comparison of the P-C breakpoint to the average D-C strength indicates that the D-C strength is approximately fifty percent higher for PMN-PT granules. To eliminate the uncertainty in results due to irregular granules sizes and shapes, comparisons were made for uniform size (210 {micro}m) glass spheres. In this case the average D-C strength coincided with a second breakpoint in the P-C data, which occurred after compaction by a mechanism of bridge formation and collapse had ceased.

  12. Making High-Tensile-Strength Amalgam Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Structural components made of amalgams can be made to have tensile strengths much greater than previously known to be possible. Amalgams, perhaps best known for their use in dental fillings, have several useful attributes, including room-temperature fabrication, corrosion resistance, dimensional stability, and high compressive strength. However, the range of applications of amalgams has been limited by their very small tensile strengths. Now, it has been discovered that the tensile strength of an amalgam depends critically on the sizes and shapes of the particles from which it is made and, consequently, the tensile strength can be greatly increased through suitable choice of the particles. Heretofore, the powder particles used to make amalgams have been, variously, in the form of micron-sized spheroids or flakes. The tensile reinforcement contributed by the spheroids and flakes is minimal because fracture paths simply go around these particles. However, if spheroids or flakes are replaced by strands having greater lengths, then tensile reinforcement can be increased significantly. The feasibility of this concept was shown in an experiment in which electrical copper wires, serving as demonstration substitutes for copper powder particles, were triturated with gallium by use of a mortar and pestle and the resulting amalgam was compressed into a mold. The tensile strength of the amalgam specimen was then measured and found to be greater than 10(exp 4) psi (greater than about 69 MPa). Much remains to be done to optimize the properties of amalgams for various applications through suitable choice of starting constituents and modification of the trituration and molding processes. The choice of wire size and composition are expected to be especially important. Perusal of phase diagrams of metal mixtures could give insight that would enable choices of solid and liquid metal constituents. Finally, whereas heretofore, only binary alloys have been considered for amalgams

  13. Tensile bond strength of repaired amalgam.

    PubMed

    Hadavi, F; Hey, J H; Czech, D; Ambrose, E R

    1992-03-01

    This study evaluated the tensile strength of repaired high-copper amalgams and analyzed the different treatments of the amalgam interface prior to repair. One hundred specimens were divided into 10 groups: group 1 was left intact and was considered as the control group. In groups 2 through 8, the specimens were sectioned into halves after 10 days and were reconstructed with new amalgam. Groups 9 and 10 were condensed with time intervals of 15 minutes and all specimens were subjected to tensile loads in a Universal Testing Machine. The tensile strengths at the junction between old and new amalgam ranged between 50% to 79% of those of the control group and verified that the same type of amalgam and uncontaminated interfaces had higher strengths. The results also suggested that if an amalgam repair is anticipated, additional retention is critical to the longevity of the restoration. PMID:1507091

  14. Tensile strength of SiC fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Zok, F.W.; Chen, X.; Weber, C.H.

    1995-07-01

    An experimental investigation has been conducted on the effects of gauge length on the tensile strength of SiC fibers. The results show that the overall strength distribution cannot be described solely in terms of the two-parameter Weibull function. The overall distribution is found to be consistent with two concurrent flaw populations, one of them being characteristic of the pristine fibers, and the other characteristic of the additional flaws introduced into the fiber during processing of the composite.

  15. Tensile Strength of Carbon/Carbon Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatta, Hiroshi; Aoi, Tatsuji; Kawahara, Itaru; Kogo, Yasuo; Shiota, Ichiro

    In order to identify ruling mechanisms of tensile fracture of Carbon/Carbon composites (C/Cs), tensile tests were carried out for various C/Cs as functions of the density, heat treatment temperature, and interfacial strength between fiber and matrix. Three processing routes of preformed yarn, resin char, and HIP processes were adopted to densify C/Cs. These C/Cs were finally heat-treated at temperatures from 2273K to 3300K. The interfacial strength between fiber and matrix was varied by the selection of processing routes. As a result, two ruling failure mechanisms were identified. At density lower than 1.6g/cm3, the tensile fracture was controlled by stress transfer capability from the matrix to reinforcing fibers. However, at higher density than 1.6g/cm3, tensile strength was primarily governed by the interfacial strength between the matrix and fibers. Thus the latter mechanism is nearly same as ceramic matrix composites.

  16. Tensile strength and durability of bovine dentin.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Toshiko; Miyazaki, Takashi; Nishimura, Fumio

    2007-05-01

    This study investigated the effects of thermal cycling on the tensile strength of dentin. Bovine dentin were divided into 10 groups, which were then subjected to various conditions: intact after preparation, thereby serving as a control; heating in boiling water for 45 minutes; 10,000 thermal cycles in water; 10,000 thermal cycles in PBS; storage in water at 5, 23, or 55 degrees C for two weeks; and storage in PBS at 5, 23, or 55 degrees C for two weeks. Subsequently, bovine dentin were trimmed into dumbbell-shaped specimens and the tensile test performed in distilled water at 37 degrees C. Mean tensile strengths were compared statistically by one-way ANOVA and Fisher's PLTD test (p<0.05). Fracture surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscopy, and reliability of the results was analyzed with Weibull distribution. Tensile strength did not significantly change after thermal cycling or storage in water and PBS at all temperatures tested (71.2-77.0 MPa) but decreased after treatment with boiling water (65.5 MPa). PMID:17694743

  17. Tensile strength of bovine trabecular bone.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, S J; Hayes, W C; Stone, J L; Beaupré, G S

    1985-01-01

    Data on the tensile and compressive properties of trabecular bone are needed to define input parameters and failure criteria for modeling total joint replacements. To help resolve differences in reports comparing tensile and compressive properties of trabecular bone, we have developed new methods, based on porous foam technology, for tensile testing of fresh/frozen trabecular bone specimens. Using bovine trabecular bone from an isotropic region from the proximal humerus as a model material, we measured ultimate strengths in tension and compression for two groups of 24 specimens each. The average ultimate strength in tension was 7.6 +/- 2.2 (95% C.I.) MPa and in compression was 12.4 +/- 3.2 MPa. This difference was statistically significant (p = 0.013) and was not related to density differences between the test groups (p = 0.28). Strength was related by a power-law function of the local apparent density, but, even accounting for density influences, isotropic bovine trabecular bone exhibits significantly lower strengths in tension than in compression. PMID:4077868

  18. 49 CFR 230.26 - Tensile strength of shell plates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Strength of Materials § 230.26 Tensile strength of shell plates. When the tensile strength of... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Tensile strength of shell plates. 230.26...

  19. 49 CFR 230.26 - Tensile strength of shell plates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Strength of Materials § 230.26 Tensile strength of shell plates. When the tensile strength of... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Tensile strength of shell plates. 230.26...

  20. 49 CFR 230.26 - Tensile strength of shell plates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Strength of Materials § 230.26 Tensile strength of shell plates. When the tensile strength of... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tensile strength of shell plates. 230.26...

  1. 49 CFR 230.26 - Tensile strength of shell plates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Strength of Materials § 230.26 Tensile strength of shell plates. When the tensile strength of... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Tensile strength of shell plates. 230.26...

  2. 49 CFR 230.26 - Tensile strength of shell plates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Tensile strength of shell plates. 230.26 Section 230.26 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Appurtenances Strength of Materials § 230.26 Tensile strength of shell plates. When the tensile strength...

  3. Stochastic models for the tensile strength, fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phoenix, S. L.

    1976-01-01

    The time-to-failure of a single fiber is modeled as a functional of the fiber load history and reasonable forms for this functional are proposed. Earlier models by Daniels and Coleman are shown to be special cases of the proposed model and apparent disparities in their behavior are discussed. Techniques are presented for determining analytically the asymptotic distributions of the tensile strength and time-to-failure for bundles of a large number of fibers. For smaller bundles, exact results are far too cumbersome to be of use so that efficient Monte Carlo simulation procedures are proposed.

  4. Structure and tensile strength of LaS(1.4)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. Daniel; Smoak, Richard H.

    1987-01-01

    The tensile strength of LaS(1.4) has been estimated by diametral stress testing at room temperature, 800 and 1300 K. Brittle, tensile-type failures were obtained at all temperatures when the crosshead speed was 0.0021 mm/s; however, a 1300 K test at 0.00085 mm/s produced plastic flow. The microstructure of LaS(1.4) consisted of two phases with beta-La2S3 comprising about 15 vol percent of the structure and gamma-La2S3 the remainder. Because of the limited amount of material available for testing, no correlation between microstructure and mechanical strength could be drawn.

  5. Measuring the Tensile Strength of B/AL Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    Proposed nondestructive technique correlates damping measurements with material strength. Increasing axial damping and decreasing axial tensile strength are observed after 1-hour treatment of B/AL composites containing about 50 percent fiber. Damping was measured in vacuum at frequencies near 2,000 Hz, and tensile strength was normalized by maximum strength observed before thermally induced degradation.

  6. Toward predicting tensile strength of pharmaceutical tablets by ultrasound measurement in continuous manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Razavi, Sonia M; Callegari, Gerardo; Drazer, German; Cuitiño, Alberto M

    2016-06-30

    An ultrasound measurement system was employed as a non-destructive method to evaluate its reliability in predicting the tensile strength of tablets and investigate the benefits of incorporating it in a continuous line, manufacturing solid dosage forms. Tablets containing lactose, acetaminophen, and magnesium stearate were manufactured continuously and in batches. The effect of two processing parameters, compaction force and level of shear strain were examined. Young's modulus and tensile strength of tablets were obtained by ultrasound and diametrical mechanical testing, respectively. It was found that as the blend was exposed to increasing levels of shear strain, the speed of sound in the tablets decreased and the tablets became both softer and mechanically weaker. Moreover, the results indicate that two separate tablet material properties (e.g., relative density and Young's modulus) are necessary in order to predict tensile strength. A strategy for hardness prediction is proposed that uses the existing models for Young's modulus and tensile strength of porous materials. Ultrasound testing was found to be very sensitive in differentiating tablets with similar formulation but produced under different processing conditions (e.g., different level of shear strain), thus, providing a fast, and non-destructive method for hardness prediction that could be incorporated to a continuous manufacturing process. PMID:27157310

  7. Silphenylene elastomers have high thermal stability and tensile strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Two polymeric silphenylene ethers, when cured by reactions with ethyl silicates and metal salts at room temperature, form elastomers having excellent thermal stability and tensile properties. The highest tensile strength obtained in a reinforced elastomer was 2800 psi.

  8. On the tensile strength of insect swarms.

    PubMed

    Ni, Rui; Ouellette, Nicholas T

    2016-01-01

    Collective animal groups are often described by the macroscopic patterns they form. Such global patterns, however, convey limited information about the nature of the aggregation as a whole. Here, we take a different approach, drawing on ideas from materials testing to probe the macroscopic mechanical properties of mating swarms of the non-biting midge Chironomus riparius. By manipulating ground-based visual features that tend to position the swarms in space, we apply an effective tensile load to the swarms, and show that we can quasi-statically pull single swarms apart into multiple daughter swarms. Our results suggest that swarms surprisingly have macroscopic mechanical properties similar to solids, including a finite Young's modulus and yield strength, and that they do not flow like viscous fluids. PMID:27559838

  9. Aluminum/steel wire composite plates exhibit high tensile strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Composite plate of fine steel wires imbedded in an aluminum alloy matrix results in a lightweight material with high tensile strength. Plates have been prepared having the strength of titanium with only 85 percent of its density.

  10. Hoop tensile strength testing of small diameter ceramic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wereszczak, A. A.; Jadaan, O. M.; Lin, H.-T.; Champoux, G. J.; Ryan, D. P.

    2007-03-01

    A method to measure hoop tensile strength of 1-mm-diameter brittle ceramic spheres was demonstrated through the use of a 'C-sphere' flexure strength specimen. This innovative specimen geometry was chosen because a simple, monotonically increasing uniaxial compressive force produces a hoop tensile stress at the C-sphere's outer surface that ultimately initiates fracture. This enables strength quantification and strength-limiting-flaw identification of the sphere itself. Such strength information is relevant to design optimization and durability assessments of ceramic fuel particles and breeder/multiplier pebbles for fusion when particle surfaces are subjected to tensile stresses during their manufacturing or service.

  11. An experimental evaluation of the tensile strength of impact ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xian, X.; Chu, M. L.; Scavuzzo, R. J.; Srivatsan, T. S.

    1989-01-01

    The evaluation of the tensile strength of impact built-up ice on structural components has been prompted by such problems as electrical transmission line losses and catastrophic failures in Arctic regions, deicing problems with fixed-wing and rotary-wing aircraft, etc. It is demonstrated that the conventional tensile-testing technique furnishes adequate data on artificially refrigerated ice, and helps establish the influence of extrinsic factors on ice tensile strength.

  12. A novel dentin bond strength measurement technique using the composite disk in diametral compression

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shih-Hao; Lin, Lian-Shan; Rudney, Joel; Jones, Rob; Aparicio, Conrado; Lin, Chun-Pin

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the feasibility of using the modified Brazilian disk test to measure the post-dentin interfacial bond strength. Advanced nondestructive examination and imaging techniques in the form of acoustic emission (AE) and digital image correlation (DIC) were used innovatively to capture the fracture process in real time. DIC showed strain concentration first appearing at one of the lateral sides of the post-dentin interface. The appearance of the interfacial strain concentration also coincided with the first AE signal detected. The new method has the advantages of simpler specimen preparation, no premature failure, more consistent failure mode and smaller variations in the calculated bond strength. PMID:22266033

  13. Dynamic Tensile Strength of Coal under Dry and Saturated Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yixin; Liu, Shimin; Jiang, Yaodong; Wang, Kai; Huang, Yaqiong

    2016-05-01

    The tensile failure characterization of dry and saturated coals under different impact loading conditions was experimentally investigated using a Split Hopkinson pressure bar. Indirect dynamic Brazilian disc tension tests for coals were carried out. The indirect tensile strengths for different bedding angles under different impact velocities, strain rates and loading rates are analyzed and discussed. A high-speed high-resolution digital camera was employed to capture and record the dynamic failure process of coal specimens. Based on the experimental results, it was found that the saturated specimens have stronger loading rate dependence than the dry specimens. The bedding angle has a smaller effect on the dynamic indirect tensile strength compared to the impact velocity. Both shear and tensile failures were observed in the tested coal specimens. Saturated coal specimens have higher indirect tensile strength than dry ones.

  14. Tensile and shear strength of adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stibolt, Kenneth A.

    1990-01-01

    This experiment is conducted in a freshman-level course: Introduction to Engineering Materials. There are no prerequisites for the course although students should have some knowledge of basic algebra. The objectives are to tension and shear test adhesives and to determine the tensile and shear properties of adhesives. Details of equipment of procedure are given.

  15. Tensile Bond Strength of Latex-Modified Bonded Concrete Overlays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Cameron; Ramseyer, Chris

    2010-10-01

    The tensile bond strength of bonded concrete overlays was tested using the in-situ pull-off method described in ASTM C 1583 with the goal of determining whether adding latex to the mix design increases bond strength. One slab of ductile concrete (f'c > 12,000 psi) was cast with one half tined, i.e. roughened, and one half steel-troweled, i.e. smooth. The slab surface was sectioned off and overlay mixtures containing different latex contents cast in each section. Partial cores were drilled perpendicular to the surface through the overlay into the substrate. A tensile loading device applied a direct tensile load to each specimen and the load was increased until failure occurred. The tensile bond strength was then calculated for comparison between the specimens.

  16. Discrete Analysis of Clay Layer Tensile Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lê, T. N. H.; Plé, O.; Villard, P.; Gotteland, P.; Gourc, J. P.

    2009-06-01

    The Discrete Element Method is used to investigate the tensile behaviour and cracks mechanisms of a clay material submitted to bending loading. It is the case of compacted clay liners in landfill cap cover application. Such as the soil tested in this study is plastic clay, the distinct elements model was calibrated with previous data results by taking into account cohesive properties. Various contact and cohesion laws are tested to show that the numerical model is able to reproduce the failure mechanism. Numerical results are extending to simulate a landfill cap cover.

  17. Limiting tensile strength of liquid nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baidakov, Vladimir G.; Vinogradov, Vladimir E.; Pavlov, Pavel A.

    2016-05-01

    The method of pulsed liquid superheating in a tension wave that forms when a compression pulse is reflected from the liquid free surface has been used to investigate the kinetics of spontaneous cavitation in liquid nitrogen. The limiting tensile stress pn of nitrogen corresponding to nucleation rates J = 1020 - 1022 s-1 m-3 and the slope of the temperature dependence of the nucleation rate GT = dlnJ/dT have been determined by experiment. The results of experiments are compared with classical nucleation theory (CNT) and a modified classical nucleation theory (MCNT), which takes into account the size dependence of the properties of a critical bubble. It has been noted that experimental data are in better agreement with the results of MCNT than with those of CNT.

  18. Silicon nitride having a high tensile strength

    DOEpatents

    Pujari, V.K.; Tracey, D.M.; Foley, M.R.; Paille, N.I.; Pelletier, P.J.; Sales, L.C.; Willkens, C.A.; Yeckley, R.L.

    1996-11-05

    A silicon nitride ceramic is disclosed comprising: (a) inclusions no greater than 25 microns in length, (b) agglomerates no greater than 20 microns in diameter, and (c) a surface finish of less than about 8 microinches, said ceramic having a four-point flexural strength of at least about 900 MPa. 4 figs.

  19. Silicon nitride having a high tensile strength

    DOEpatents

    Pujari, Vimal K.; Tracey, Dennis M.; Foley, Michael R.; Paille, Norman I.; Pelletier, Paul J.; Sales, Lenny C.; Willkens, Craig A.; Yeckley, Russell L.

    1996-01-01

    A silicon nitride ceramic comprising: a) inclusions no greater than 25 microns in length, b) agglomerates no greater than 20 microns in diameter, and c) a surface finish of less than about 8 microinches, said ceramic having a four-point flexural strength of at least about 900 MPa.

  20. Characteristic tensile strength and Weibull shape parameter of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Claude A.

    2007-06-01

    Recently, it has been argued [N. M. Pugno and R. S. Ruoff, J. Appl. Phys. 99, 024301 (2006)] that available carbon-nanotube (CNT) tensile strength data do not obey the "classical" Weibull statistical model. In this paper we formulate Weibull's theory in a manner suitable for assessing CNT fracture-strength data and demonstrate that, on taking into account the area S subjected to uniform tensile stresses, the data are consistent with Weibull's model. Based on available data, a characteristic strength σC (S=1μm2) equal to 17.6±2.5GPa in conjunction with a shape parameter m equal to 2.77±0.34 provides a good description of the CNT fracture strength. In terms of effective strengths, and on assuming that the relevant area-scaling laws apply, carbon nanotubes and diamond nanofilms exhibit similar features for stressed areas ranging from 1to104μm2.

  1. Covalent Crosslinking of Carbon Nanotube Materials for Improved Tensile Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, James S.; Miller, Sandi G.; Williams, Tiffany A.; Meador, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have attracted much interest in recent years due to their exceptional mechanical properties. Currently, the tensile properties of bulk carbon nanotube-based materials (yarns, sheets, etc.) fall far short of those of the individual nanotube elements. The premature failure in these materials under tensile load has been attributed to inter-tube sliding, which requires far less force than that needed to fracture individual nanotubes.1,2 In order for nanotube materials to achieve their full potential, methods are needed to restrict this tube-tube shear and increase inter-tube forces.Our group is examining covalent crosslinking between the nanotubes as a means to increase the tensile properties of carbon nanotube materials. We are working with multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) sheet and yarn materials obtained from commercial sources. Several routes to functionalize the nanotubes have been examined including nitrene, aryl diazonium, and epoxide chemistries. The functional nanotubes were crosslinked through small molecule or polymeric bridges. Additionally, electron beam irradiation induced crosslinking of the non-functional and functional nanotube materials was conducted. For example, a nanotube sheet material containing approximately 3.5 mol amine functional groups exhibited a tensile strength of 75 MPa and a tensile modulus of 1.16 GPa, compared to 49 MPa and 0.57 GPa, respectively, for the as-received material. Electron beam irradiation (2.2x 1017 ecm2) of the same amine-functional sheet material further increased the tensile strength to 120 MPa and the modulus to 2.61 GPa. This represents approximately a 150 increase in tensile strength and a 360 increase in tensile modulus over the as-received material with only a 25 increase in material mass. Once we have optimized the nanotube crosslinking methods, the performance of these materials in polymer matrix composites will be evaluated.

  2. Tensile strength of cementitious materials under triaxial loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubota, Shuji

    1998-11-01

    A general tension-compression-compression (sigmasb1, sigmasb2=sigmasb3) failure criterion for brittle materials is mathematically developed using FEM analysis and experimentally verified by use of the cementitious composite axial tensile test (CCATT). This tensile failure criterion is based on the stress concentration derived from the classical theory of elasticity. This analytical approach shows the upper bound of the tension-compression-compression failure surface for brittle materials. Since the CCATT applies confining hydraulic pressure, a tensile specimen is subjected to triaxial loading defined by the principal stress ratio sigmasb1/|sigmasb2|. When lateral pressure increases, tensile strength decreases; therefore, stress concentration is defined as a function of the principal stress ratio. The model has three distinct regions of behavior corresponding to the principal stress ratio, 0≤sigmasb1/|sigmasb2|<0.9 (high-lateral pressure), 0.9≤sigmasb1/|sigmasb2|<3.0 (medium-lateral pressure), 3.0≤sigmasb1/|sigmasb2| (low-lateral pressure). The experimental failure line shows true tensile strength of cementitious materials under low-lateral pressure. The predicted nominal stress fsb{ta} with large size specimens for the CCATT is written as$fsb{ta}=gamma*{1/{Kt}}*alpha* pwhere gamma$ is the size effect obtained by experimental results; Kt is the stress concentration factor derived from triaxial loading. Tensile strength values from the CCATT are compared to experimental results from other tests such as the uniaxial tensile test and the split cylinder test. CCATT results are analyzed using Weibull theory to measure material reliability and to develop characteristic stresses for construction design. Failure analysis using fractography was conducted on fractured cementitious materials and composites. The failure analysis on test specimens correlated well with FEM stress distributions and with the principal stress ratio. The observed fracture behavior (fracture

  3. UV exposure and the tensile strength of optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloan, Diann A.; Le Blanc, S. P.; Kane, Martin D.

    2001-04-01

    The tensile strength of fiber Bragg gratings is dependent on the type of UV laser exposure. The basic conclusion for the traditional method of producing gratings (exposure in the near-field region of a phase mask) is that the pulsed KrF excimer laser (248 nm) damages the fiber and the continuous wave frequency-doubled argon ion laser (244 nm) does not, provided that the fibers are handled carefully. Using the excimer laser at a low fluence (~5 mJ/cm2 pulse) and hydrogen loaded fiber, we demonstrate that Bragg gratings with an index change of 1.25x10-4 can be written. Although this index change is not enough to write a highly reflecting WDM grating, it is enough to write a weakly reflecting pump stabilization grating. The tensile strength of these fibers follow a Weibull distribution similar to pristine fiber with a median tensile strength of ~4.4 GPa (640 kpsi). A small percentage of the fibers are minimally damaged. As the fluence is increased, the median tensile strength decreases and the variability increases. The probability of damage from the laser as a function of the laser intensity suggests a damage mechanism related to laser-induced dielectric breakdown.

  4. Improved molding process ensures plastic parts of higher tensile strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heier, W. C.

    1968-01-01

    Single molding process ensures that plastic parts /of a given mechanical design/ produced from a conventional thermosetting molding compound will have a maximum tensile strength. The process can also be used for other thermosetting compounds to produce parts with improved physical properties.

  5. Tensile strength of randomly perforated aluminum plates: Weibull distribution parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Claude A.

    2008-07-01

    Recently, Yanay and collaborators [J. Appl. Phys. 101, 104911 (2007)] addressed issues regarding the fracture strength of randomly perforated aluminum plates subjected to tensile loads. Based on comprehensive measurements and computational simulations, they formulate statistical predictions for the tensile strength dependence on the hole density but conclude that their data are inadequate for the purpose of deriving the strength distribution function. The primary purpose of this contribution is to demonstrate that, on dividing the totality of applicable data into seven "bins" of comparable population, the strength distribution of perforated plates of similar hole density obeys a conventional two-parameter Weibull model. Furthermore, on examining the fracture stresses as recorded in the vicinity of the percolation threshold, we find that the strength obeys the expression σo(P -Pth)β with Pth≃0.64 and β ≃0.4. In this light, and taking advantage of percolation theory, we formulate equations that specify how the two Weibull parameters (characteristic strength and shape factor) depend on the hole density. This enables us to express the failure probability as a function of the tensile stress, over the entire range of hole densities, i.e., P =0.02 up to the percolation threshold.

  6. Importance of Tensile Strength on the Shear Behavior of Discontinuities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazvinian, A. H.; Azinfar, M. J.; Geranmayeh Vaneghi, R.

    2012-05-01

    In this study, the shear behavior of discontinuities possessing two different rock wall types with distinct separate compressive strengths was investigated. The designed profiles consisted of regular artificial joints molded by five types of plaster mortars, each representing a distinct uniaxial compressive strength. The compressive strengths of plaster specimens ranged from 5.9 to 19.5 MPa. These specimens were molded considering a regular triangular asperity profile and were designed so as to achieve joint walls with different strength material combinations. The results showed that the shear behavior of discontinuities possessing different joint wall compressive strengths (DDJCS) tested under constant normal load (CNL) conditions is the same as those possessing identical joint wall strengths, but the shear strength of DDJCS is governed by minor joint wall compressive strength. In addition, it was measured that the predicted values obtained by Barton's empirical criterion are greater than the experimental results. The finding indicates that there is a correlation between the joint roughness coefficient (JRC), normal stress, and mechanical strength. It was observed that the mode of failure of asperities is either pure tensile, pure shear, or a combination of both. Therefore, Barton's strength criterion, which considers the compressive strength of joint walls, was modified by substituting the compressive strength with the tensile strength. The validity of the modified criterion was examined by the comparison of the predicted shear values with the laboratory shear test results reported by Grasselli (Ph.D. thesis n.2404, Civil Engineering Department, EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland, 2001). These comparisons infer that the modified criterion can predict the shear strength of joints more precisely.

  7. In vitro tensile strength of luting cements on metallic substrate.

    PubMed

    Orsi, Iara A; Varoli, Fernando K; Pieroni, Carlos H P; Ferreira, Marly C C G; Borie, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the tensile strength of crowns cemented on metallic substrate with four different types of luting agents. Twenty human maxillary molars with similar diameters were selected and prepared to receive metallic core castings (Cu-Al). After cementation and preparation the cores were measured and the area of crown's portion was calculated. The teeth were divided into four groups based on the luting agent used to cement the crowns: zinc phosphate cement; glass ionomer cement; resin cement Rely X; and resin cement Panavia F. The teeth with the crowns cemented were subjected to thermocycling and later to the tensile strength test using universal testing machine with a load cell of 200 kgf and a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The load required to dislodge the crowns was recorded and converted to MPa/mm(2). Data were subjected to Kruskal-Wallis analysis with a significance level of 1%. Panavia F showed significantly higher retention in core casts (3.067 MPa/mm(2)), when compared with the other cements. Rely X showed a mean retention value of 1.877 MPa/mm(2) and the zinc phosphate cement with 1.155 MPa/mm(2). Glass ionomer cement (0.884 MPa/mm(2)) exhibited the lowest tensile strength value. Crowns cemented with Panavia F on cast metallic posts and cores presented higher tensile strength. The glass ionomer cement showed the lowest tensile strength among all the cements studied. PMID:25140718

  8. Ideal tensile strength of B2 transition-metal aluminides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tianshu; Morris, J. W., Jr.; Chrzan, D. C.

    2004-08-01

    The ideal tensile strengths of the B2 -type (CsCl) transition-metal aluminides FeAl , CoAl , and NiAl have been investigated using an ab initio electronic structure total energy method. The three materials exhibit dissimilar mechanical behaviors under the simulated ideal tensile tests along [001], [110], and [111] directions. FeAl is weakest in tension along [001] whereas CoAl and NiAl are strongest in the same direction. The weakness of FeAl along [001] direction is attributed to the instability introduced by the filling of antibonding d states.

  9. Chain Ends and the Ultimate Tensile Strength of Polyethylene Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Thomas C.; Robbins, Mark O.

    Determining the tensile yield mechanisms of oriented polymer fibers remains a challenging problem in polymer mechanics. By maximizing the alignment and crystallinity of polyethylene (PE) fibers, tensile strengths σ ~ 6 - 7 GPa have been achieved. While impressive, first-principal calculations predict carbon backbone bonds would allow strengths four times higher (σ ~ 20 GPa) before breaking. The reduction in strength is caused by crystal defects like chain ends, which allow fibers to yield by chain slip in addition to bond breaking. We use large scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to determine the tensile yield mechanism of orthorhombic PE crystals with finite chains spanning 102 -104 carbons in length. The yield stress σy saturates for long chains at ~ 6 . 3 GPa, agreeing well with experiments. Chains do not break but always yield by slip, after nucleation of 1D dislocations at chain ends. Dislocations are accurately described by a Frenkel-Kontorova model, parametrized by the mechanical properties of an ideal crystal. We compute a dislocation core size ξ = 25 . 24 Å and determine the high and low strain rate limits of σy. Our results suggest characterizing such 1D dislocations is an efficient method for predicting fiber strength. This research was performed within the Center for Materials in Extreme Dynamic Environments (CMEDE) under the Hopkins Extreme Materials Institute at Johns Hopkins University. Financial support was provided by Grant W911NF-12-2-0022.

  10. Tensile Fracture Strength of Brisbane Tuff by Static and Cyclic Loading Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erarslan, N.; Alehossein, H.; Williams, D. J.

    2014-07-01

    This research presents the results of laboratory experiments during the investigation of tensile strength-strain characteristics of Brisbane tuff disc specimens under static and diametral cyclic loading. Three different cyclic loading methods were used; namely, sinusoidal cyclic loading, type I and II increasing cyclic loading with various amplitude values. The first method applied the stress amplitude-cycle number (s-n) curve approach to the measurement of the indirect tensile strength (ITS) and fracture toughness ( K IC) values of rocks for the first time in the literature. The type I and II methods investigated the effect of increasing cyclic loading on the ITS and K IC of rocks. For Brisbane tuff, the reduction in ITS was found to be 30 % under sinusoidal loading, whereas type I and II increasing cyclic loading caused a maximum reduction in ITS of 36 %. The maximum reduction of the static K IC of 46 % was obtained for the highest amplitude type I cyclic loading tested. For sinusoidal cyclic loading, a maximum reduction of the static K IC of 30 % was obtained. A continuous irreversible accumulation of damage was observed in dynamic cyclic tests conducted at different amplitudes and mean stress levels. Scanning electron microscope images showed that fatigue damage in Brisbane tuff is strongly influenced by the failure of the matrix because of both inter-granular fracturing and trans-granular fracturing. The main characteristic was grain breakage under cyclic loading, which probably starts at points of contact between grains and is accompanied by the production of very small fragments, probably due to frictional sliding within the weak matrix.

  11. On the tensile strength distribution of multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, Asa H.; Andrews, Rodney; Schadler, Linda S.; Wagner, H. Daniel

    2005-11-01

    Individual multiwalled carbon nanotubes grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) were tensile tested within the chamber of an electron microscope using an atomic force microscope-based technique. Weibull-Poisson statistics could accurately model the nanotube tensile strength data. Weibull shape and scale parameters of 1.7 and 109GPa were obtained. The former reflects a wide variability in strength similar to that observed for high-modulus graphite fibers, while the latter indicates that the irregular CVD-grown tube wall structure requires, in some cases, higher breaking forces than more regular tube wall structures. This apparent strengthening mechanism is most likely caused by an enhanced interaction between the walls of the nanotube.

  12. Dependence of tablet brittleness on tensile strength and porosity.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xingchu; Chang, Shao-Yu; Osei-Yeboah, Frederick; Paul, Shubhajit; Perumalla, Sathyanarayana Reddy; Shi, Limin; Sun, Wei-Jhe; Zhou, Qun; Sun, Changquan Calvin

    2015-09-30

    An analysis of data collected from 25 sets of diverse pharmaceutical powders has identified that an exponential growth function satisfactorily describes the relationship between tablet brittleness and tablet porosity while a power law function well describes the relationship between tablet brittleness and tensile strength. These equations have the potential to facilitate better characterization of tablet mechanical properties and to guide the design and optimization of pharmaceutical tablet products. PMID:26226338

  13. Tensile Strength of Cell Walls of Living Cells 1

    PubMed Central

    Carpita, Nicholas C.

    1985-01-01

    A gas decompression technique was used to determine the breaking strength of cell walls of single cells. Breaking strengths of the bacterium Salmonella typhimurium and the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas eugametos were 100 and 95 atmospheres, respectively, while those of sporophytes of the water mold Blastocladiella emersonii were 65 atmospheres, and those of suspension cultured cells of carrot were only 30 atmospheres. Estimation of wall tensile stress based on breaking pressures, cell radii, and estimation of wall thickness, indicates that microfibrillar walls are not necessarily stronger than walls of primitive organisms. Hence, alternative hypotheses for their evolution must be considered. PMID:16664436

  14. Effects of parachute-ribbon surface treatments on tensile strength

    SciTech Connect

    Auerbach, I.; Whinery, L.D.; Johnson, D.W.; Mead, K.E.; Sheldon, D.D.

    1986-01-01

    Routine quality-assurance evaluations of nylon ribbons used on test-deployed parachutes revealed tensile-strength degradation had occurred in some of the ribbons. The degradation occurred exclusively in some of the noncritical skirt ribbons with stenciled blue-ink identification markings. Although the strength loss was excessive, the reliability of the parachute was not affected. These results motivated an accelerated-aging study of the effects on tensile strength of not only the inks but also of the sizing chemicals that are used to coat fabrics in parachute construction. Nylon ribbons and Kevlar webbing were treated with these materials and stored both under ambient conditions and at 60/sup 0/C (140/sup 0/F) for periods of time up to eight months. Small increases in strength developed under ambient conditions whereas small decreases developed at elevated temperatures. Samples stored in glass degraded more than those stored in stainless steel. None of these laboratory results correlated with those obtained from parachutes. Possible explanations for the lack of a correlation are provided in this paper. Additional studies are in progress.

  15. Tensile strength and fracture of cemented granular aggregates.

    PubMed

    Affes, R; Delenne, J-Y; Monerie, Y; Radjaï, F; Topin, V

    2012-11-01

    Cemented granular aggregates include a broad class of geomaterials such as sedimentary rocks and some biomaterials such as the wheat endosperm. We present a 3D lattice element method for the simulation of such materials, modeled as a jammed assembly of particles bound together by a matrix partially filling the interstitial space. From extensive simulation data, we analyze the mechanical properties of aggregates subjected to tensile loading as a function of matrix volume fraction and particle-matrix adhesion. We observe a linear elastic behavior followed by a brutal failure along a fracture surface. The effective stiffness before failure increases almost linearly with the matrix volume fraction. We show that the tensile strength of the aggregates increases with both the increasing tensile strength at the particle-matrix interface and decreasing stress concentration as a function of matrix volume fraction. The proportion of broken bonds in the particle phase reveals a range of values of the particle-matrix adhesion and matrix volume fraction for which the cracks bypass the particles and hence no particle damage occurs. This limit is shown to depend on the relative toughness of the particle-matrix interface with respect to the particles. PMID:23160765

  16. Dynamic compressive and tensile strengths of spark plasma sintered alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girlitsky, I.; Zaretsky, E.; Kalabukhov, S.; Dariel, M. P.; Frage, N.

    2014-06-01

    Fully dense submicron grain size alumina samples were manufactured from alumina nano-powder using Spark Plasma Sintering and tested in two kinds of VISAR-instrumented planar impact tests. In the first kind, samples were loaded by 1-mm tungsten impactors, accelerated to a velocity of about 1 km/s. These tests were aimed at studying the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL) of Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS)-processed alumina and the decay, with propagation distance, of the elastic precursor wave. In the tests of the second kind, alumina samples of 3-mm thickness were loaded by 1-mm copper impactors accelerated to 100-1000 m/s. These tests were aimed at studying the dynamic tensile (spall) strength of the alumina specimens. The tensile fracture of the un-alloyed alumina shows a monotonic decline of the spall strength with the amplitude of the loading stress pulse. Analysis of the decay of the elastic precursor wave allowed determining the rate of the irreversible (inelastic) strains in the SPS-processed alumina at the initial stages of the shock-induced inelastic deformation and to clarify the mechanisms responsible for the deformation. The 1-% addition of Cr2O3 decreases the HEL of the SPS-processed alumina by 5-% and its spall strength by 50% but barely affects its static properties.

  17. Through-the-thickness tensile strength of textile composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Wade C.; Ifju, Peter G.

    1994-01-01

    A series of tests was run to characterize the through-the-thickness tensile strength for a variety of composites that included 2D and 3D braids, 2D and 3D weaves, and prepreg tapes. A new test method based on a curved beam was evaluated. The through-the-thickness deformations were characterized using moire interferometry. Failures were significantly different between the 2D and 3D materials. The 2D materials delaminated between layers due to out-of-plane tensile stresses. The strength of the 2D textile composites did not increase relative to the tapes. The 3D materials failed due to the formation of radial cracks caused by high circumferential stresses along the inner radius. A circumferential crack similar to the 2D materials produced the final failure. Final failure in the 3D materials occurred at a lower bending moment than in other materials. The early failures were caused by radial crack formation rather than low through-the-thickness strength.

  18. Dynamic compressive and tensile strengths of spark plasma sintered alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Girlitsky, I.; Zaretsky, E.; Kalabukhov, S.; Dariel, M. P.; Frage, N.

    2014-06-28

    Fully dense submicron grain size alumina samples were manufactured from alumina nano-powder using Spark Plasma Sintering and tested in two kinds of VISAR-instrumented planar impact tests. In the first kind, samples were loaded by 1-mm tungsten impactors, accelerated to a velocity of about 1 km/s. These tests were aimed at studying the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL) of Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS)-processed alumina and the decay, with propagation distance, of the elastic precursor wave. In the tests of the second kind, alumina samples of 3-mm thickness were loaded by 1-mm copper impactors accelerated to 100–1000 m/s. These tests were aimed at studying the dynamic tensile (spall) strength of the alumina specimens. The tensile fracture of the un-alloyed alumina shows a monotonic decline of the spall strength with the amplitude of the loading stress pulse. Analysis of the decay of the elastic precursor wave allowed determining the rate of the irreversible (inelastic) strains in the SPS-processed alumina at the initial stages of the shock-induced inelastic deformation and to clarify the mechanisms responsible for the deformation. The 1-% addition of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} decreases the HEL of the SPS-processed alumina by 5-% and its spall strength by 50% but barely affects its static properties.

  19. Predicting Tensile Strengths of Boron/Aluminum Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decarlo, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    To develop predictive theory to account for time/temperature effect of B/A1 composites, series of deformation and fracture studies was performed on commercial boron fibers over wide ranges of stress, stress application time, and temperature. By combining these single fiber results with fracture theory for metal matrix composites, design formulas were derived that describe B/A1 composite tensile and stress rupture strengths as function of time and temperature. Using derived formulas, calculated and experimental results agree to within 3 percent.

  20. Strain rate effects on tensile strength of iron green bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Masahiro; Kuroyanagi, Yuki; Häggblad, Hans-Åke; Jonsén, Pär; Gustafsson, Gustaf

    2015-09-01

    Impact tensile strength of iron green bodies with densities of 7.2 and 7.4 g/cm3 was examined by Brazilian test using the split-Hopkinson pressure bar (Kolsky bar) method. The powder material used for the experiments was a press-ready premix containing Distaloy AE, graphite, and lubricant. During dynamic compression, the failure behavior of specimens was observed using a high-speed video camera. The failure stress and failure behavior of dynamic compressive tests were compared with those of static compressive tests.

  1. Effects of conventional welding and laser welding on the tensile strength, ultimate tensile strength and surface characteristics of two cobalt-chromium alloys: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Madhan Kumar, Seenivasan; Sethumadhava, Jayesh Raghavendra; Anand Kumar, Vaidyanathan; Manita, Grover

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of laser welding and conventional welding on the tensile strength and ultimate tensile strength of the cobalt-chromium alloy. Samples were prepared with two commercially available cobalt-chromium alloys (Wironium plus and Diadur alloy). The samples were sectioned and the broken fragments were joined using Conventional and Laser welding techniques. The welded joints were subjected to tensile and ultimate tensile strength testing; and scanning electron microscope to evaluate the surface characteristics at the welded site. Both on laser welding as well as on conventional welding technique, Diadur alloy samples showed lesser values when tested for tensile and ultimate tensile strength when compared to Wironium alloy samples. Under the scanning electron microscope, the laser welded joints show uniform welding and continuous molt pool all over the surface with less porosity than the conventionally welded joints. Laser welding is an advantageous method of connecting or repairing cast metal prosthetic frameworks. PMID:23858281

  2. Tensile strength of bilayered ceramics and corresponding glass veneers

    PubMed Central

    Champirat, Tharee; Jirajariyavej, Bundhit

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE To investigate the microtensile bond strength between two all-ceramic systems; lithium disilicate glass ceramic and zirconia core ceramics bonded with their corresponding glass veneers. MATERIALS AND METHODS Blocks of core ceramics (IPS e.max® Press and Lava™ Frame) were fabricated and veneered with their corresponding glass veneers. The bilayered blocks were cut into microbars; 8 mm in length and 1 mm2 in cross-sectional area (n = 30/group). Additionally, monolithic microbars of these two veneers (IPS e.max® Ceram and Lava™ Ceram; n = 30/group) were also prepared. The obtained microbars were tested in tension until fracture, and the fracture surfaces of the microbars were examined with fluorescent black light and scanning electron microscope (SEM) to identify the mode of failure. One-way ANOVA and the Dunnett's T3 test were performed to determine significant differences of the mean microtensile bond strength at a significance level of 0.05. RESULTS The mean microtensile bond strength of IPS e.max® Press/IPS e.max® Ceram (43.40 ± 5.51 MPa) was significantly greater than that of Lava™ Frame/Lava™ Ceram (31.71 ± 7.03 MPa)(P<.001). Fluorescent black light and SEM analysis showed that most of the tested microbars failed cohesively in the veneer layer. Furthermore, the bond strength of Lava™ Frame/Lava™ Ceram was comparable to the tensile strength of monolithic glass veneer of Lava™ Ceram, while the bond strength of bilayered IPS e.max® Press/IPS e.max® Ceram was significantly greater than tensile strength of monolithic IPS e.max® Ceram. CONCLUSION Because fracture site occurred mostly in the glass veneer and most failures were away from the interfacial zone, microtensile bond test may not be a suitable test for bonding integrity. Fracture mechanics approach such as fracture toughness of the interface may be more appropriate to represent the bonding quality between two materials. PMID:25006377

  3. Evaluation of ultimate tensile strength using Miniature Disk Bend Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Kundan; Pooleery, Arun; Madhusoodanan, K.; Singh, R. N.; Chakravartty, J. K.; Shriwastaw, R. S.; Dutta, B. K.; Sinha, R. K.

    2015-06-01

    Correlations for evaluation of Ultimate Tensile Strength (UTS) using Miniature Disk Bend Test (MDBT) or Small Punch Test (SPT) has been an open issue since the development of the techniques. The larger plastic strains, in tri-axial state of stress during SPT, make the translation to the equivalent uniaxial parameter less certain. Correlations based on Pmax of load-displacement curve are also in disagreement as the point corresponding to Pmax does not represent a necking situation as in case of UTS, in a uniaxial tensile test. In present work, an attempt has been made for locating necking zone, which appears prior to Pmax, through experiments and FEM analyses. Experimental results on disk specimens from 20MnMoNi55, CrMoV ferritic steel and SS304LN materials along with FEM analyses found that load corresponding to 0.48 mm displacement is to be very close to the necking zone, and gives best fit for a UTS correlation.

  4. Prediction of residual tensile strength of transversely impacted composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lal, K. M.

    1982-01-01

    The response to low velocity impact of graphite-epoxy T300/5208 composite laminates is discussed. Steel balls of 3/8 inch, 5/8 inch, and 1 inch diameter were the projectiles. Impact energy was limited to 1.2 joules. Impacted specimens were ultrasonically C scanned to determine the impact damaged region. The threshold value of impact energy for impact damage was found to be approximately 0.3 joules. A model was developed to predict the tensile residual strength of impact damaged specimens from fracture mechanics concepts. Impacted specimens were tested in tension to provide a fracture data base. The experimental results agreed well with the predictions from fracture mechanics. In this study, the maximum impact velocity used to simulate the low velocity transverse impact from common objects like tool drops was 10 m/s.

  5. Tensile strength and the mining of black holes.

    PubMed

    Brown, Adam R

    2013-11-22

    There are a number of important thought experiments that involve raising and lowering boxes full of radiation in the vicinity of black hole horizons. This Letter looks at the limitations placed on these thought experiments by the null energy condition, which imposes a fundamental bound on the tensile-strength-to-weight ratio of the materials involved, makes it impossible to build a box near the horizon that is wider than a single wavelength of the Hawking quanta, and puts a severe constraint on the operation of "space elevators" near black holes. In particular, it is shown that proposals for mining black holes by lowering boxes near the horizon, collecting some Hawking radiation, and dragging it out to infinity cannot proceed nearly as rapidly as has previously been claimed. As a consequence of this limitation, the boxes and all the moving parts are superfluous and black holes can be destroyed equally rapidly by threading the horizon with strings. PMID:24313473

  6. Improved Tensile Adhesion Specimens for High Strength Epoxy Systems in Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddock, M. Reed; McLennan, Michael L.

    2000-01-01

    An improved tensile adhesion button has been designed and tested that results in higher measured tensile adhesion strength while providing increased capability for testing high strength epoxy adhesive systems. The best attributes of two well-established tensile button designs were combined and refined into an optimized tensile button. The most significant design change to the tensile button was to improve alignment of the bonded tensile button specimens during tensile testing by changing the interface between the tensile button and the tensile test machine. The established or old button design uses a test fixture that pulls from a grooved annulus or anvil head while the new button design pulls from a threaded hole in the centerline of the button. Finite element (FE) analysis showed that asymmetric loading of the established anvil head tensile button significantly increases the stress concentration in the adhesive, causing failure at lower tensile test loads. The new tensile button was designed to eliminate asymmetric loading and eliminate misalignment sensitivity. Enhanced alignment resulted in improved tensile adhesion strength measurement up to 13.8 MPa (2000psi) over the established button design. Another design change increased the capability of the button by increasing the threaded hole diameter allowing it to test high strength epoxy systems up to 85 MPa(less than 12,000 psi). The improved tensile button can be used in button- to-button or button-to-panel configurations.

  7. ZERODUR: bending strength data for tensile stress loaded support structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizjak, Tanja; Hartmann, Peter; Westerhoff, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    In the past ZERODUR® was mainly used for mirror and substrate applications, where mechanical loads were given by its own weight. Nowadays substrates become more sophisticated and subject to higher stresses as consequences of high operational accelerations or vibrations. The integrity of structures such as reticle and wafer stages e.g. must be guaranteed with low failure probability over their full intended life time. Their design requires statistically relevant strength data and information. The usual way determining the design strength employs statistical Weibull distributions obtained from a set of experimental data extrapolating the results to low acceptable failure probability values. However, in many cases this led to allowable stress values too low for the intended application. Moreover, the experimental basis has been found to be too small for reliable calculations. For these reasons measurement series on the strength of ZERODUR® have been performed with different surface conditions employing a standardized ring-on-ring test setup. The numbers of specimens per sample have been extended from about 20 to 100 or even much more. The results for surfaces ground with different diamond grain sizes D151, D64 and D25 as well as for etched surfaces are presented in this paper. Glass ceramics like all glassy materials exhibit some strength reduction when being exposed to loads above a tensile stress threshold over long time periods. The strength change of ZERODUR® with time will be discussed on the basis of known and newly determined stress corrosion data. The results for samples with large numbers of specimens contribute new aspects to the common practice of extrapolation to low failure probability, since they provide evidence for the existence of minimum strength values depending on the structures surface conditions. For ground surfaces the evidence for minimum strength values is quite obvious. For etched surfaces minimum values are to be expected also. However

  8. The relation between the tensile strength and the hardness of metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, O

    1930-01-01

    This report presents methods determining the hardness and tensile strength of metals by showing the effect and dependence of the hardness numbers on the strain-hardening. Relations between the hardness numbers and the ordinary stress-strain diagrams and tensile strength are given. Procedures for finding the Brinell strength are also presented.

  9. The tensile strength properties of CFRPs and GRRPs for Unnes electric car body material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khumaedi, Muhammad; Sumbodo, Wirawan; Widodo, Rahmat Doni

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes composite materials tensile testing of electric car body material. The UNNES electric car body must be developed using a high strength and lightweight material. A fiber-reinforced plastic composite is widely used for the concerned objective. Selection of the type of composites, variations in fiber orientation, and the number of fiber layers will affect the tensile strength of the material. Composite materials use Carbon-fiber-reinforced plastics (CFRPs) and glass-fiber-reinforced plastics (GFRPs) variation to the fiber areal weight, variations in fiber orientation and the number of fiber layers. The CFRPs areal weight consists of 230 gsm and 400 gsm. The GFRPsareal weight consists of 400 gsm and 600 gsm. Fibre orientationsconsist of 0° and 45°. Number of fiber layers consists of one layer and two layers. Various variations were then tested to figure out their tensile to get ultimate tensile strength of materials. Standard test method for tensile test was conducted using ASTM D3039. Tensile specimen geometry used a type of balanced and symmetric fiber orientation, with 25mm in width, 250 mm in length, and 2.5 mm in thickness. The result shows that the more fiber areal weight and the layer number were used, the more its tensile strength would increase, beside it increased the ultimate tensile strength of the material for both glass and carbon fiber with 0o and 45o fiber arientation. Fiber plain wave with 45o has greater tensile strength compared to any other variation.

  10. Asteroids With Tensile Strength: The Case of 2015 HM10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, Michael W.; Benner, Lance A. M.; Naidu, Shantanu P.; Brozovic, Marina; Richardson, James E.; Rivera-Valentin, Edgard G.; Taylor, Patrick A.; Ford, H. Alyson; Ghigo, Frank D.; Giorgini, Jon D.; Jao, Joseph S.; Teitelbaum, Lawrence

    2015-11-01

    Near-Earth asteroid 2015 HM10 was discovered on 2015 April 19 with the 4-m Blanco Telescope at Cerro Tololo (MPEC 2015-H90). HM10 made a 0.00295 AU / 1.14 lunar distance flyby of Earth on July 7. This was the asteroid’s closest approach to Earth until at least 2419.We observed HM10 with radar between July 5 and July 8 using Arecibo, the 70 m DSS-14 and 34 m DSS-13 antennas at Goldstone, Green Bank, and elements of the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). Bistatic observations were crucial to obtain high-resolution images of HM10 due to the short round-trip travel time of the radar signal, which was as low as 2.95 s on July 7. Our finest image resolution was 3.75 m/pixel in range, obtained on July 7 with the new 80 kW C-band (7190 MHz, 4.2 cm) transmitter on DSS-13 and receiving at Green Bank with the new radar backend.Optical lightcurves obtained prior to closest approach indicated that HM10 has a spin period of ~22.2 minutes and an elongated shape (W. Ryan, pers. comm). The delay-Doppler radar images confirm the rotation period estimated from photometry and reveal that HM10 has a long-axis extent of 80-100 m with an equatorial aspect ratio of about 2:1. Radar speckle tracking transmitting from Arecibo and receiving with the VLBA on July 6 rule out any non-principal axis ‘wobble’ with an amplitude greater than ~10º.HM10’s rapid rotation implies significant cohesion, with a minimum tensile strength of 25-150 Pa required at its center to prevent disruption, assuming overall bulk density between 0.7 and 3.9 g cm-3. This is comparable to strength predictions for rubble-pile aggregates (e.g. Scheeres, Britt, Carry, & Holsapple 2015, Asteroids IV, in press). HM10 is not necessarily a ‘monolith’.HM10’s shape is complex and irregular. The radar images show angular features and ‘facets’ up to ~30 m across. There is also a cluster of radar-bright pixels that tracks with HM10’s rotation, consistent with a high standing feature 15-20 m across. This feature is

  11. Evaluation of press-and-sinter parameters for tantalum pentoxide by the diametral compression test

    SciTech Connect

    Livne, Z.; Fields, R.J.; Agulyansky, A.

    1997-05-15

    Submicron Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} powder was consolidated by cold pressing using pressures between 24 MPa and 240 MPa followed by sintering at temperatures in the range 1300 degrees C to 1500 degrees C. The resulting disks were fractured in diametral compression tests (DCT) to determine the tensile strength. The strength, mode of fracture, and fracture surface were subsequently used to identify potential processing routes for high density, fine grained Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} for the use as sputtering targets. Besides the conventional single or triple cleft fracture, two other modes of failure were observed in the diametrical compression test: delamination due to stratification flaws introduced by high pressure pre-pressing before sintering, and fragmentation caused by slow microcrack growth in the presence of phase transformation stresses arising in samples sintered above the transformation temperature of 1360 degrees C.

  12. Correlation of tensile and shear strengths of metals with their friction properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    The relation between the theoretical tensile and the shear strengths and the friction properties of metals in contact with diamond, boron nitride, silicon carbide, manganese-zinc ferrite, and the metals themselves in vacuum was investigated. The relationship between the actual shear strength and the friction properties of the metal was also investigated. An estimate of the theoretical uniaxial tensile strength was obtained in terms of the equilibrium surface energy, interplanar spacing of the planes perpendicular to the tensile axis, and the Young's modulus of elasticity. An estimate of the theoretical shear strength for metals was obtained from the shear modulus, the repeat distance of atoms in the direction of shear of the metal and the interplanar spacing of the shear planes. The coefficient of friction for metals was found to be related to the theoretical tensile, theoretical shear, and actual shear strengths of metals. The higher the strength of the metal, the lower the coefficient of friction.

  13. The dynamic tensile strength of ice and ice-silicate mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, M. A.; Ahrens, T. J.

    1983-01-01

    The dynamic tensile strength of icy media is measured at strain rates on the order of 10,000/sec to aid in the understanding of impact and cratering phenomena. Compressed samples consisting of ice and ice-silicate mixtures with 5 and 30 wt % sand were impacted at temperatures between 230 and 250 K by projectile plexiglas plates imparting the required strain rates in less than 0.75 microsec. Taking the tensile stress corresponding to the transition from intact to spalled or fragmented samples as the dynamic tensile strength, strengths of 17, 20 and 22 MPa were obtained for the pure ice, 5 wt % sand, and 30 wt % sand specimens, respectively. The values lie considerably above those observed in static testing. A continuum fracturing model is used to obtain relations between tensile strength and stress rate as well as to derive stress and damage histories during tensile loading and the size distribution of icy fragments as a function of strain rate.

  14. Effect of strain rate on formability in warm deep drawing of high tensile strength steel sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshihara, Shoichiro; Iwamatsu, Go

    2014-10-01

    In tensile test of the high tensile strength steel, tensile strength isdrastically decreased as the temperature is raised. Then, the strain rate sensitivity exponent of high tensile strength steel (SUS631) in this study is high at 800 degrees especially. Also, elongation is increased as the temperature is raised. In deep drawing, the maximum punch load of the high tensile strength steel is examined on difference punch speed at 600 and 800 degrees. On the other hand, finite element (FE) simulation was used for the possibility to evaluate the forming load on difference punch speed in warm deep drawing. In FE simulation, we have considered both the strain hardening exponent and the strain rate sensitivity exponent (m-value) because we cannot neglect m-value 0.184 at 800 degrees. The tendency of the forming load in the experiments agrees the results in FE simulation.

  15. Computer simulation of fatigue under diametrical compression

    SciTech Connect

    Carmona, H. A.; Kun, F.; Andrade, J. S. Jr.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2007-04-15

    We study the fatigue fracture of disordered materials by means of computer simulations of a discrete element model. We extend a two-dimensional fracture model to capture the microscopic mechanisms relevant for fatigue and we simulate the diametric compression of a disc shape specimen under a constant external force. The model allows us to follow the development of the fracture process on the macrolevel and microlevel varying the relative influence of the mechanisms of damage accumulation over the load history and healing of microcracks. As a specific example we consider recent experimental results on the fatigue fracture of asphalt. Our numerical simulations show that for intermediate applied loads the lifetime of the specimen presents a power law behavior. Under the effect of healing, more prominent for small loads compared to the tensile strength of the material, the lifetime of the sample increases and a fatigue limit emerges below which no macroscopic failure occurs. The numerical results are in a good qualitative agreement with the experimental findings.

  16. Increased Tensile Strength of Carbon Nanotube Yarns and Sheets through Chemical Modification and Electron Beam Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Williams, Tiffany S.; Baker, James S.; Sola, Francisco; Lebron-Colon, Marisabel; McCorkle, Linda S.; Wilmoth, Nathan G.; Gaier, James; Chen, Michelle; Meador, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The inherent strength of individual carbon nanotubes offers considerable opportunity for the development of advanced, lightweight composite structures. Recent work in the fabrication and application of carbon nanotube (CNT) forms such as yarns and sheets has addressed early nanocomposite limitations with respect to nanotube dispersion and loading; and has pushed the technology toward structural composite applications. However, the high tensile strength of an individual CNT has not directly translated to macro-scale CNT forms where bulk material strength is limited by inter-tube electrostatic attraction and slippage. The focus of this work was to assess post processing of CNT sheet and yarn to improve the macro-scale strength of these material forms. Both small molecule functionalization and e-beam irradiation was evaluated as a means to enhance tensile strength and Youngs modulus of the bulk CNT material. Mechanical testing results revealed a tensile strength increase in CNT sheets by 57 when functionalized, while an additional 48 increase in tensile strength was observed when functionalized sheets were irradiated; compared to unfunctionalized sheets. Similarly, small molecule functionalization increased yarn tensile strength up to 25, whereas irradiation of the functionalized yarns pushed the tensile strength to 88 beyond that of the baseline yarn.

  17. Increased tensile strength of carbon nanotube yarns and sheets through chemical modification and electron beam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Miller, Sandi G; Williams, Tiffany S; Baker, James S; Solá, Francisco; Lebron-Colon, Marisabel; McCorkle, Linda S; Wilmoth, Nathan G; Gaier, James; Chen, Michelle; Meador, Michael A

    2014-05-14

    The inherent strength of individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs) offers considerable opportunity for the development of advanced, lightweight composite structures. Recent work in the fabrication and application of CNT forms such as yarns and sheets has addressed early nanocomposite limitations with respect to nanotube dispersion and loading and has pushed the technology toward structural composite applications. However, the high tensile strength of an individual CNT has not directly translated into that of sheets and yarns, where the bulk material strength is limited by intertube electrostatic attractions and slippage. The focus of this work was to assess postprocessing of CNT sheets and yarns to improve the macro-scale strength of these material forms. Both small-molecule functionalization and electron-beam irradiation were evaluated as means to enhance the tensile strength and Young's modulus of the bulk CNT materials. Mechanical testing revealed a 57% increase in tensile strength of CNT sheets upon functionalization compared with unfunctionalized sheets, while an additional 48% increase in tensile strength was observed when functionalized sheets were irradiated. Similarly, small-molecule functionalization increased tensile strength of yarn by up to 25%, whereas irradiation of the functionalized yarns pushed the tensile strength to 88% beyond that of the baseline yarn. PMID:24720450

  18. Tensile and flexural strength of commercially pure titanium submitted to laser and tungsten inert gas welds.

    PubMed

    Atoui, Juliana Abdallah; Felipucci, Daniela Nair Borges; Pagnano, Valéria Oliveira; Orsi, Iara Augusta; Nóbilo, Mauro Antônio de Arruda; Bezzon, Osvaldo Luiz

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the tensile and flexural strength of tungsten inert gas (TIG) welds in specimens made of commercially pure titanium (CP Ti) compared with laser welds. Sixty cylindrical specimens (2 mm diameter x 55 mm thick) were randomly assigned to 3 groups for each test (n=10): no welding (control), TIG welding (10 V, 36 A, 8 s) and Nd:YAG laser welding (380 V, 8 ms). The specimens were radiographed and subjected to tensile and flexural strength tests at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min using a load cell of 500 kgf applied on the welded interface or at the middle point of the non-welded specimens. Tensile strength data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test, and flexural strength data by the Kruskal-Wallis test (α=0.05). Non-welded specimens presented significantly higher tensile strength (control=605.84 ± 19.83) (p=0.015) and flexural strength (control=1908.75) (p=0.000) than TIG- and laser-welded ones. There were no significant differences (p>0.05) between the welding types for neither the tensile strength test (TIG=514.90 ± 37.76; laser=515.85 ± 62.07) nor the flexural strength test (TIG=1559.66; laser=1621.64). As far as tensile and flexural strengths are concerned, TIG was similar to laser and could be suitable to replace laser welding in implant-supported rehabilitations. PMID:24474361

  19. Small screw study: Interim report on fastener tensile strength and optimum thread depth

    SciTech Connect

    Diegert, K.V.; Dorrell, L.R.; Reese, R.T.; Lazarus, L.J.; Allied-Signal Aerospace Co., Kansas City, MO . Kansas City Div.)

    1989-10-01

    This report summarizes about 1260 tests performed on small threaded fasteners (equal to or less than 1/4 inch in diameter and designated as 1/4-20 UNC, {number sign}4-40 UNC, {number sign}2-56 UNC, and 1.0 UNM). Tests determined the tensile strengths of the screws, the lengths of engagement needed to develop the full tensile strengths when the screws were engaged in 6061-T6 Aluminum, Hiperco 50, and 303 Stainless Steel, and whether relationships existed between the tensile strengths and Knoop Micro-Hardness measurements taken on the threaded ends of the screws. 17 figs., 13 tabs.

  20. Relationships between tensile strength, morphology and crystallinity of treated kenaf bast fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosiati, H.; Rohim, Ar; Ma`arif, Triyana, K.; Harsojo

    2013-09-01

    Surface treatments on kenaf bast fibers were carried out with steam, alkali and a combination of steam-alkali. To verify and gain an understanding of their inter-relationship, tensile strength, surface morphology and crystallinity of treated and raw fibers were characterized. Tensile strength of fibers was measured with a universal tensile machine (UTM), crystallinity was estimated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and surface morphology was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Tensile strength of the treated fibers was higher than that of the raw fiber. Tensile strength increased after steam treatment and was further improved by alkali treatment, but slightly reduced after steam treatment followed by alkalization. Increase of concentration of alkali tended to increase tensile strength. Differences in tensile strength of the treated fibers are discussed in relation to the changes in surface morphology and crystallinity. Understanding of these relationships may provide direction towards the goal of producing better performance of natural fiber composites.

  1. Tensile-strength apparatus applies high strain-rate loading with minimum shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotrill, H. E., Jr.; Mac Glashan, W. F., Jr.

    1966-01-01

    Tensile-strength testing apparatus employs a capillary bundle through which a noncompressible fluid is extruded and a quick-release valve system. This apparatus applies the test loads at relatively constant very high strain rates with minimal shock and vibration to the tensile specimen and apparatus.

  2. Experimental and Numerical Study on Tensile Strength of Concrete under Different Strain Rates

    PubMed Central

    Min, Fanlu; Yao, Zhanhu; Jiang, Teng

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic characterization of concrete is fundamental to understand the material behavior in case of heavy earthquakes and dynamic events. The implementation of material constitutive law is of capital importance for the numerical simulation of the dynamic processes as those caused by earthquakes. Splitting tensile concrete specimens were tested at strain rates of 10−7 s−1 to 10−4 s−1 in an MTS material test machine. Results of tensile strength versus strain rate are presented and compared with compressive strength and existing models at similar strain rates. Dynamic increase factor versus strain rate curves for tensile strength were also evaluated and discussed. The same tensile data are compared with strength data using a thermodynamic model. Results of the tests show a significant strain rate sensitive behavior, exhibiting dynamic tensile strength increasing with strain rate. In the quasistatic strain rate regime, the existing models often underestimate the experimental results. The thermodynamic theory for the splitting tensile strength of concrete satisfactorily describes the experimental findings of strength as effect of strain rates. PMID:24883355

  3. Experimental and numerical study on tensile strength of concrete under different strain rates.

    PubMed

    Min, Fanlu; Yao, Zhanhu; Jiang, Teng

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic characterization of concrete is fundamental to understand the material behavior in case of heavy earthquakes and dynamic events. The implementation of material constitutive law is of capital importance for the numerical simulation of the dynamic processes as those caused by earthquakes. Splitting tensile concrete specimens were tested at strain rates of 10(-7) s(-1) to 10(-4) s(-1) in an MTS material test machine. Results of tensile strength versus strain rate are presented and compared with compressive strength and existing models at similar strain rates. Dynamic increase factor versus strain rate curves for tensile strength were also evaluated and discussed. The same tensile data are compared with strength data using a thermodynamic model. Results of the tests show a significant strain rate sensitive behavior, exhibiting dynamic tensile strength increasing with strain rate. In the quasistatic strain rate regime, the existing models often underestimate the experimental results. The thermodynamic theory for the splitting tensile strength of concrete satisfactorily describes the experimental findings of strength as effect of strain rates. PMID:24883355

  4. Optimization and Prediction of Ultimate Tensile Strength in Metal Active Gas Welding.

    PubMed

    Ampaiboon, Anusit; Lasunon, On-Uma; Bubphachot, Bopit

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect of welding parameters on ultimate tensile strength of structural steel, ST37-2, welded by Metal Active Gas welding. A fractional factorial design was used for determining the significance of six parameters: wire feed rate, welding voltage, welding speed, travel angle, tip-to-work distance, and shielded gas flow rate. A regression model to predict ultimate tensile strength was developed. Finally, we verified optimization of the process parameters experimentally. We achieved an optimum tensile strength (558 MPa) and wire feed rate, 19 m/min, had the greatest effect, followed by tip-to-work distance, 7 mm, welding speed, 200 mm/min, welding voltage, 30 V, and travel angle, 60°. Shield gas flow rate, 10 L/min, was slightly better but had little effect in the 10-20 L/min range. Tests showed that our regression model was able to predict the ultimate tensile strength within 4%. PMID:26491719

  5. Anisotropy of tensile strength and fracture mode of perfect face-centered-cubic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, R. F.; Xu, J.; Qu, R. T.; Liu, Z. Q.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2015-06-01

    This study presents an effective method to calculate the ideal tensile strength of six face-centered-cubic (fcc) crystals (Cu, Au, Ni, Pt, Al, and Ir) along an arbitrary tensile direction by considering the coupling effect of normal stress and shear stress on a given crystallographic plane. Meanwhile, the fracture modes of the six crystals can also be derived from the competition between shear and cleavage fracture along different crystallographic planes. The results show that both the intrinsic factors (the ideal shear strength and cleavage strength of low-index planes) and the orientation may affect the tensile strength and fracture modes of ideal fcc crystals, which may give the reliable strength limit of fcc metals and well interpret the observed high strength in nano-scale mechanical experiments.

  6. Experimental determination of the dynamic tensile strength of liquid Sn, Pb, and Zn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaretsky, E. B.

    2016-07-01

    An experimental technique capable of determining the dynamic tensile (spall) strength of metals in the liquid state is described. Relying on this technique, spall data on samples of tin, lead, and zinc pre-heated to 20 K above their melting points were obtained. It is found that the spall strength of the metals is low, 40-100 MPa, but not zero and is, seemingly, affected by material purity and by the rate of tensile deformation preceding sample spallation.

  7. Comparative evaluation of tensile strength of Gutta-percha cones with a herbal disinfectant

    PubMed Central

    Mahali, Raghunandhan Raju; Dola, Binoy; Tanikonda, Rambabu; Peddireddi, Suresh

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate and compare the tensile strength values and influence of taper on the tensile strength of Gutta-percha (GP) cones after disinfection with sodium hypochlorite (SH) and Aloe vera gel (AV). Materials and Methods: Sixty GP cones of size 110, 2% taper, 60 GP cones F3 ProTaper, and 60 GP of size 30, 6% taper were obtained from sealed packs as three different groups. Experimental groups were disinfected with 5.25% SH and 90% AV gel except the control group. Tensile strengths of GP were measured using the universal testing machine. Results: The mean tensile strength values for Group IA, IIA and IIIA are 11.8 MPa, 8.69 MPa, and 9.24 MPa, respectively. Results were subjected to statistical analysis one-way analysis of variance test and Tukey post-hoc test. 5.25% SH solutions decreased the tensile strength of GP cones whereas with 90% AV gel it was not significantly altered. Conclusion: Ninety percent Aloe vera gel as a disinfectant does not alter the tensile strength of GP cones PMID:26752842

  8. High efficient preparation of carbon nanotube-grafted carbon fibers with the improved tensile strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Wenxin; Wang, Yanxiang; Wang, Chengguo; Chen, Jiqiang; Wang, Qifen; Yuan, Yan; Niu, Fangxu

    2016-02-01

    An innovative technique has been developed to obtain the uniform catalyst coating on continuously moving carbon fibers. Carbon nanotube (CNT)-grafted carbon fibers with significantly improved tensile strength have been succeeded to produce by using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) when compared to the tensile strength of untreated carbon fibers. The critical requirements for preparation of CNT-grafted carbon fibers with high tensile strength have been found, mainly including (i) the obtainment of uniform coating of catalyst particles with small particle size, (ii) the low catalyst-induced and mechano-chemical degradation of carbon fibers, and (iii) the high catalyst activity which could facilitate the healing and strengthening of carbon fibers during the growth of CNTs. The optimum growth temperature was found to be about 500 °C, and the optimum catalyst is Ni due to its highest activity, there is a pronounced increase of 10% in tensile strength of carbon fibers after CNT growth at 500 °C by using Ni catalyst. Based on the observation from HRTEM images, a healing and crosslink model of neighboring carbon crystals by CNTs has been formulated to reveal the main reason that causes an increase in tensile strength of carbon fibers after the growth of CNTs. Such results have provided the theoretical and experimental foundation for the large-scale preparation of CNT-grafted carbon fibers with the improved tensile strength, significantly promoting the development of CNT-grafted carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites.

  9. Effective Size Analysis of the Diametral Compression (Brazil) Test Specimen

    SciTech Connect

    Jadaan, Osama M.; Wereszczak, Andrew A

    2009-04-01

    This study considers the finite element analysis (FEA) simulation and Weibull effective size analysis for the diametral compression (DC) or Brazil specimen loaded with three different push-rod geometries. Those geometries are a flat push-rod, a push-rod whose radius of curvature is larger than that for the DC specimen, and a push-rod whose radius of curvature matches that of the DC specimen. Such established effective size analysis recognizes that the tensile strength of structural ceramics is typically one to two orders of magnitude less than its compressive strength. Therefore, because fracture is much more apt to result from a tensile stress than a compressive one, this traditional analysis only considers the first principal tensile stress field in the mechanically loaded ceramic component for the effective size analysis. The effective areas and effective volumes were computed as function of Weibull modulus using the CARES/Life code. Particular attention was devoted to the effect of mesh sensitivity and localized stress concentration. The effect of specimen width on the stress state was also investigated. The effects of push-rod geometry, the use of steel versus WC push-rods, and considering a frictionless versus no-slip interface between push-rod and specimen on the maximum stresses, where those stresses are located, and the effective area and effective volume results are described. Of the three push-rod geometries, it is concluded that the push-rod (made from WC rather than steel) whose radius of curvature matches that of the DC specimen is the most apt to cause fracture initiation within the specimen's bulk rather than at the loading interface. Therefore, its geometry is the most likely to produce a valid diametral compression strength test. However, the DC specimen remains inefficient in terms of its area and volume efficiencies; namely, the tensile strength of only a few percent of the specimen's entire area or volume is sampled. Given the high probability

  10. Modeling of statistical tensile strength of short-fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Y.T.; Blumenthal, W.R.; Stout, M.G.; Lowe, T.C.

    1995-10-01

    This paper develops a statistical strength theory for three-dimensionally (3-D) oriented short-fiber reinforced composites. Short-fiber composites are usually reinforced with glass and ceramic short fibers and whiskers. These reinforcements are brittle and display a range of strength values, which can be statistically characterized by a Weibull distribution. This statistical nature of fiber strength needs to be taken into account in the prediction of composite strength. In this paper, the statistical nature of fiber strength is incorporated into the calculation of direct fiber strengthening, and a maximum-load composite failure criterion is adopted to calculate the composite strength. Other strengthening mechanisms such as residual thermal stress, matrix work hardening, and short-fiber dispersion hardening are also briefly discussed.

  11. Modeling of statistical tensile strength tensile of short-fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Y.T.; Blumenthal, W.R.; Stout, M.G.; Lowe, T.C.

    1995-10-05

    This Paper develops a statistical strength theory for three-dimensionally (3-D) oriented short-fiber reinforced composites. Short-fiber composites are usually reinforced with glass and ceramic short fibers and whiskers. These reinforcements are brittle and display a range of strength values, which can be statistically characterized by a Weibull distribution. This statistical nature of fiber strength needs to be taken into account in the prediction of composite strength. In this paper, the statistical nature of fiber strength is incorporated into the calculation of direct fiber strengthening, and a maximum-load composite failure criterion is adopted to calculate the composite strength. Other strengthening mechanisms such as residual thermal stress, matrix work hardening, and short-fiber dispersion hardening are also briefly discussed.

  12. Tensile and tear strength of carrageenan film from Philippine eucheuma species.

    PubMed

    Briones, Annabelle V; Ambal, Wilhelmina O; Estrella, Romulo R; Pangilinan, Rolando; De Vera, Carlos J; Pacis, Raymund L; Rodriguez, Ner; Villanueva, Merle A

    2004-01-01

    The tensile and tear strength of carrageenan film from Philippines Eucheuma species were investigated using NEC tensilon universal-testing machine according to American Society for Testing Materials methods. These properties are important for assessing carrageenan film as packaging material. The kappa and iota types were used in the study. The effect of glycerine on the tensile and tear strength including elongation was also evaluated. Addition of glycerine tended to lower the tensile strength of the film and increase its elongation properties including the tear strength. Carrageenan film without glycerine was much stronger. Glycerine made the film more flexible and easy to deform. The composite film of carrageenan and konjac gum did not exhibit elongation. It also showed higher tensile strength than did the composite film of carrageenan and xanthan gum. Compared with iota-type carrageenan film, kappa-type carrageenan film without glycerine was more comparable to low-density polyethylene (LDPE) film in terms of tensile strength as was the composite film of carrageenan-konjac gum. The kappa-type carrageenan film with glycerine was more comparable to LDPE film in terms of tear strength. The elongation reading for carrageenan film was lower than that for LDPE film. Morphologic studies showed that the carrageenan film had sets of pores distributed randomly at different places as compared to LDPE film. It also showed that the carrageenan film was more fibrous than LDPE film. PMID:15085409

  13. High temperature, short term tensile strength of C6000/PMR-15 composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Digiovanni, P. R.; Paterson, D.

    1985-01-01

    Tensile tests were conducted on 0 unidirectionally reinforced Celion 6000 graphite fibers in PMR-15 polyimide matrix. Tensile strengths for coupons subjected to short and long term uniform temperatures were obtained. Thick coupons, heated on one side to produce significant transient through thickness temperature gradients, were tested and compared to the strength of specimens with uniform temperature distributions. All coupons were radiantly heated and reached maximum test temperatures within 15 sec. Tensile loads were applied to the coupons after 15 sec of elevated temperature exposure. Loading rates were selected so that specimen failures occurred within a maximum of 45 sec after reaching the test temperature. Results indicate that significant tensile strength remains beyond the material post cure temperature.

  14. Impact tensile properties and strength development mechanism of glass for reinforcement fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, T.; Oshima, K.; Kawada, H.

    2013-07-01

    In this study, impact tensile properties of E-glass were investigated by fiber bundle testing under a high strain rate. The impact tests were performed employing two types of experiments. One is the tension-type split Hopkinson pressure bar system, and the other is the universal high-speed tensile-testing machine. As the results, it was found that not only the tensile strength but also the fracture strain of E-glass fiber improved with the strain rate. The absorbed strain energy of this material significantly increased. It was also found that the degree of the strain rate dependency of E-glass fibers on the tensile strength was varied according to fiber diameter. As for the strain rate dependency of the glass fiber under tensile loading condition, change of the small crack-propagation behaviour was considered to clarify the development of the fiber strength. The tensile fiber strength was estimated by employing the numerical simulation based on the slow crack-growth model (SCG). Through the parametric study against the coefficient of the crack propagation rate, the numerical estimation value was obtained for the various testing conditions. It was concluded that the slow crack-growth behaviour in the glass fiber was an essential for the increase in the strength of this material.

  15. The Effect of Gap Angle on Tensile Strength of Preceramic Base Metal Solder Joints

    PubMed Central

    Fattahi, Farnaz; Hashemi Ardakani, Zahra; Hashemi Ardakani, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Soldering is a process commonly used in fabricating dental prosthesis. Since most soldered prosthesis fail at the solder joints; the joint strength is of utmost importance. Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of gap angle on the tensile strength of base metal solder joints. Materials and Method A total number of 40 Ni-Cr samples were fabricated according to ADA/ISO 9693 specifications for tensile test. Samples were cut at the midpoint of the bar, and were placed at the considered angles by employing an explicitly designed device. They were divided into 4 groups regarding the gap angle; Group C (control group) with parallel gap on steady distance of 0.2mm, Group 1: 10°, Group 2: 20°, and Group3: 30° gap angles. When soldered, the specimens were all tested for tensile strength using a universal testing machine at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min with a preload of 10N. Kruskal-Wallis H test was used to compare tensile strength among the groups (p< 0.05). Results The mean tensile strength values obtained from the study groups were respectively 307.84, 391.50, 365.18, and 368.86 MPa. The tensile strength was not statistically different among the four groups in general (p≤ 0.490). Conclusion Making the gap angular at the solder joints and the subsequent unsteady increase of the gap distance would not change the tensile strength of the joint. PMID:26636118

  16. Effects of Thermal Treatment on Tensile Strength of Laurentian Granite Using Brazilian Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Tubing; Li, Xibing; Cao, Wenzhuo; Xia, Kaiwen

    2015-11-01

    The effect of thermal treatment on several physical properties and the tensile strength of Laurentian granite (LG) are measured in this study. Brazilian disc LG specimens are treated at temperatures of up to 850 °C. The physical properties such as grain density, relative volume change per degree, and P-wave velocity are investigated under the effect of heat treatment. The results indicate that both the density and the P-wave velocity decrease with the increase in heating temperature. However, the relative volume change per degree is not sensitive below 450 °C, while a remarkable increase appears from 450 to 850 °C. All cases are explained by the increase in both number and width of the thermally induced microcracks with the heating temperature. Brazilian tests are carried out statically with an MTS hydraulic servo-control testing system and dynamically with a modified split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) system to measure both static and dynamic tensile strength of LG. The relationship between the tensile strength and treatment temperatures shows that static tensile strength decreases with temperature while the dynamic tensile strength first increases and then decreases with a linear increase in the loading rate. However, the increase in dynamic tensile strength with treatment temperatures from 25 to 100 °C is due to slight dilation of the grain boundaries as the initial thermal action, which leads to compaction of rock. When the treatment temperature rises above 450 °C, the quartz phase transition results in increased size of microcracks due to the differential expansion between the quartz grains and other minerals, which is the main cause of the sharp reduction in tensile strength.

  17. Biophotonic effect of diode laser irradiance on tensile strength of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Lau, Pik Suan; Bidin, Noriah; Krishnan, Ganesan; Nassir, Zaleha; Bahktiar, Hazri

    2015-04-01

    Low-energy laser irradiance at certain wavelengths is able to stimulate the tissue bio-reaction and enhance the healing process. Collagen deposition is one of the important aspects in healing process because it can increase the strength of the skin. This study was designed to examine the biophotonic effect of irradiance on collagen production of diabetic wound in rat model. The tensile strength of skin was employed as a parameter to describe the wound. Diabetic rat models were induced by streptozotocin via intravenous injection. Skin-breaking strength was measured using an Instron tensile test machine. The experimental animals were treated with 808-nm diode laser at two different powers-0.1 and 0.5 W/cm(2)-and 30, 60, and 120 s for each session. The tensile strength was optimized after treated with high-power diode laser. The photostimulation effect was revealed by accelerated healing process and enhanced tensile strength of wound. Laser photostimulation on tensile strength in diabetic wound suggests that such therapy facilitates collagen production in diabetic wound healing. PMID:25260140

  18. Characterization of Optical Fiber Strength Under Applied Tensile Stress and Bending Stress

    SciTech Connect

    P.E. Klingsporn

    2011-08-01

    Various types of tensile testing and bend radius tests were conducted on silica core/silica cladding optical fiber of different diameters with different protective buffer coatings, fabricated by different fiber manufacturers. The tensile tests were conducted to determine not only the average fiber strengths at failure, but also the distribution in fracture strengths, as well as the influence of buffer coating on fracture strength. The times-to-failure of fiber subjected to constant applied bending stresses of various magnitudes were measured to provide a database from which failure times of 20 years or more, and the corresponding minimum bend radius, could be extrapolated in a statistically meaningful way. The overall study was done to provide an understanding of optical fiber strength in tensile loading and in applied bending stress as related to applications of optical fiber in various potential coizfgurations for weapons and enhanced surveillance campaigns.

  19. Tensile Strength of Welded Steel Tubes : First Series of Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rechtlich, A

    1928-01-01

    The purpose of the experiments was to determine the difference in the strength of steel tubes welded by different methods, as compared with one another and also with unwelded, unannealed tubes, including; moreover, a comparison of the results obtained by experienced and inexperienced welders.

  20. Effect of Silver Nano-particles on Tensile Strength of Acrylic Resins

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffari, Tahereh; Hamedi-rad, Fahimeh

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) is widely used for the fabrication of removable prostheses. Silver nano-particles (AgNps) have been added to PMMA because of their antimicrobial properties, but their effect on the mechanical properties of PMMA is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of AgNps on the tensile strength of PMMA. Materials and methods. For this study, 12 specimens were prepared and divided into two groups. Group 1 included PMMA without AgNps and group 2 included PMMA mixed with 5 wt% of AgNps. Tensile strength of the specimens was measured by Zwick Z100 apparatus. Statistical analysis was carried out by SPSS using t-test. Statistical significance was defined at P<0.05. Results. This study showed that the mean tensile strength of PMMA in group 2 was significantly lower than that in group 1. Therefore, the tensile strength decreased significantly after incorporation of silver nano-particles. Conclusion. Within the limitations of this study, tensile strength of acrylic resin specimens was influenced by silver nano-particles. PMID:25973153

  1. Specimen type and size effects on lithium hydride tensile strength distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Oakes, Jr, R E

    1991-12-01

    Weibull's two-parameter statistical-distribution function is used to account for the effects of specimen size and loading differences on strength distributions of lithium hydride. Three distinctly differing uniaxial specimen types (i.e., an elliptical-transition pure tensile specimen, an internally pressurized ring tensile, and two sizes of four-point-flexure specimens) are shown to provide different strength distributions as expected, because of their differing sizes and modes of loading. After separation of strengths into volumetric- and surface-initiated failure distributions, the Weibull characteristic strength parameters for the higher-strength tests associated with internal fracture initiations are shown to vary as predicted by the effective specimen volume Weibull relationship. Lower-strength results correlate with the effective area to much lesser degree, probably because of the limited number of surface-related failures and the different machining methods used to prepare the specimen. The strength distribution from the fourth specimen type, the predominantly equibiaxially stressed disk-flexure specimen, is well below that predicted by the two-parameter Weibull-derived effective volume or surface area relations. The two-parameter Weibull model cannot account for the increased failure probability associated with multiaxial stress fields. Derivations of effective volume and area relationships for those specimens for which none were found in the literature, the elliptical-transition tensile, the ring tensile, and the disk flexure (including the outer region), are also included.

  2. Correlation Between Tensile Strength and Hardness of Electron Beam Welded TC4-DT Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wei; Shi, Yaowu; Li, Xiaoyan; Lei, Yongping

    2013-06-01

    Correlation between tensile strength and hardness for damage-tolerant Ti-6Al-4V (TC4-DT) alloy and its electron beam welded joints was investigated. Yield strength (YS), ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and strain hardening coefficient of base metal and weld metal were obtained using uniaxial tensile tests. Microhardness of the base metal, heat affected zone, and weld metal was measured. Then, the linear correlations among the yield strength, tensile strength, and hardness were proposed. Moreover, correlation between strain hardening coefficient and the ratio of YS to UTS (YS/UTS) was established. The results indicate that microhardness can be used to predict the YS and UTS of the TC4-DT welded joint successfully. In addition, the strain hardening coefficient can be predicted by the YS/UTS. The prediction of strength and strain hardening coefficient is in agreement with the experiments. The correlations are applicable and valuable for the strength prediction of narrow welded fusion zone and heat affected zone based on the microhardness measurement.

  3. Environmental effects on the tensile strength of chemically vapor deposited silicon carbide fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, R. T.; Kraitchman, M. D.

    1985-01-01

    The room temperature and elevated temperature tensile strengths of commercially available chemically vapor-deposited (CVD) silicon carbide fibers were measured after 15 min heat treatment to 1600 C in various environments. These environments included oxygen, air, argon and nitrogen at one atmosphere and vacuum at 10/9 atmosphere. Two types of fibers were examined which differed in the SiC content of their carbon-rich coatings. Threshold temperature for fiber strength degradation was observed to be dependent on the as-received fiber-flaw structure, on the environment and on the coating. Fractographic analyses and flexural strength measurements indicate that tensile strength losses were caused by surface degradation. Oxidation of the surface coating is suggested as one possible degradation mechanism. The SiC fibers containing the higher percentage of SiC near the surface of the carbon-rich coating show better strength retention and higher elevated temperature strength.

  4. Thermal degradation of the tensile strength of unidirectional boron/aluminum composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimes, H. H.; Lad, R. A.; Maisel, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    The variation of ultimate tensile strength with thermal treatment of B-Al composite materials and of boron fibers chemically removed from these composites in an attempt to determine the mechanism of the resulting strength degradation was studied. Findings indicate that thermally cycling B-Al represents a more severe condition than equivalent time at temperature. Degradation of composite tensile strength from about 1.3 GN/m squared to as low as 0.34 GN/m squared was observed after 3,000 cycles to 420 C for 203 micrometers B-1100 Al composite. In general, the 1100 Al matrix composites degraded somewhat more than the 6061 matrix material studied. Measurement of fiber strengths confirmed a composite strength loss due to the degradation of fiber strength. Microscopy indicated a highly flawed fiber surface.

  5. An investigation into geometry and microstructural effects upon the ultimate tensile strengths of butt welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S.

    1992-01-01

    A mathematical theory was evaluated empirically. This theory predicts weld ultimate tensile strength based on material properties and fusion line angles, mismatch, peaking, and weld widths. Welds were made on 1/4 and 1/2 in. aluminum 2219-T87, their geometries were measured, they were tensile tested, and these results were compared to theoretical predictions. Statistical analysis of results was performed to evaluate correlation of theory to results for many different categories of weld geometries.

  6. Estimating the tensile strength of super hard brittle materials using truncated spheroidal specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serati, Mehdi; Alehossein, Habib; Williams, David J.

    2015-05-01

    New approaches need to be introduced to measure the tensile capacity of super hard materials since the standard methods are not effective. To pursue this objective, a series of laboratory tests were constructed to replicate the fracture mechanism of diamond-based materials. Experiments indicate that under a certain compressive test condition, stresses normal to the axisymmetric line in truncated spheroidal specimens (bullet-shaped specimens) are in tension contributing to the tensile fracture of the material. From experimental and numerical studies, it is concluded that semi-prolate spheroidal specimens can be used to determine precisely the tensile strength of brittle stiff diamond-like composites.

  7. On the Compressive and Tensile Strength of Magnesium Aluminate Spinel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paris, V.; Hayun, S.; Dariel, M. P.; Frage, N.; Zaretsky, E.

    2009-12-01

    Magnesium aluminate spinel is a strong polycrystalline transparent ceramic. Spinel is an attractive material for armor applications and its behavior under shock wave loading is of obvious interest. The purpose of the present study was to determine the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL) of this material, its Hugoniot response above the HEL, and its spall strength. Planar impact experiments were performed over the 2 to 40 GPa stress range using the Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) as a principal diagnostics tool. According to these tests, spinel has a HEL of about 11.3 GPa. The spall strength of the material was found to be close to zero at low, about 2 GPa, impact stress.

  8. SIZE EFFECTS IN THE TENSILE STRENGTH OF UNIDIRECTIONAL FIBER COMPOSITES

    SciTech Connect

    M. SIVASAMBU; ET AL

    1999-08-01

    Monte Carlo simulation and theoretical modeling are used to study the statistical failure modes in unidirectional composites consisting of elastic fibers in an elastic matrix. Both linear and hexagonal fiber arrays are considered, forming 2D and 3D composites, respectively. Failure is idealized using the chain-of-bundles model in terms of {delta}-bundles of length {delta}, which is the length-scale of fiber load transfer. Within each {delta}-bundle, fiber load redistribution is determined by local load-sharing models that approximate the in-plane fiber load redistribution from planar break clusters as predicted from 2D and 3D shear-lag models. As a result these models are 1D and 2D, respectively. Fiber elements have random strengths following either the Weibull or the power-law distribution with shape and scale parameters {rho} and {sigma}{sub {delta}}, respectively. Simulations of {delta}-bundle failure, reveal two regimes. When fiber strength variability is low (roughly {rho} > 2) the dominant failure mode is by growing clusters of fiber breaks up to instability. When this variability is high (roughly 0 < {rho} < 1) cluster formation is suppressed by a dispersed fiber failure mode. For these two cases, closed-form approximations to the strength distribution of a {delta}-bundle are developed under the local load-sharing model and an equal load-sharing model of Daniels, respectively. The results compare favorably with simulations on {delta}-bundles with up to 1500 fibers. The location of the transition in terms of {rho} is affected by the upper tail properties of the fiber strength distributions as well as the number of fibers.

  9. Ultrahigh Tensile Strength Nanowires with a Ni/Ni-Au Multilayer Nanocrystalline Structure.

    PubMed

    An, Boo Hyun; Jeon, In Tak; Seo, Jong-Hyun; Ahn, Jae-Pyoung; Kraft, Oliver; Choi, In-Suk; Kim, Young Keun

    2016-06-01

    Superior mechanical properties of nanolayered structures have attracted great interest recently. However, previously fabricated multilayer metallic nanostructures have high strength under compressive load but never reached such high strength under tensile loads. Here, we report that our microalloying-based electrodeposition method creates a strong and stable Ni/Ni-Au multilayer nanocrystalline structure by incorporating Au atoms that makes nickel nanowires (NWs) strongest ever under tensile loads even with diameters exceeding 200 nm. When the layer thickness is reduced to 10 nm, the tensile strength reaches the unprecedentedly high 7.4 GPa, approximately 10 times that of metal NWs with similar diameters, and exceeding that of most metal nanostructures previously reported at any scale. PMID:27159629

  10. Treatment of bleached wool with trans-glutaminases to enhance tensile strength, whiteness, and alkali resistance.

    PubMed

    Montazer, Majid; Lessan, Fatemeh; Pajootan, Elmira; Dadashian, Fatemeh

    2011-09-01

    Trans-glutaminases is known as a cross-linking enzyme for proteins. Wool is a proteinous fiber conventionally is treated through several processes to obtain the desirable characteristics. Bleaching is also one of the most important processes usually carried out by using an oxidizing agent in a conventional method. The tensile strength of wool yarns was reduced as a consequence of oxidative bleaching. Here, with the help of microbial trans-glutaminases (m-TGases), a novel bleaching process was disclosed in a way to obtain a bleached wool yarn with no significant reduction in the tensile strength. The results confirmed that the bleached wool yarns with H(2)O(2) could be modified by m-TGases post-treatment. The m-TGases treatment on the bleached wool yarns improved the tensile strength and whiteness along with the higher alkali resistance. PMID:21638062

  11. Experimental Study On The Effect Of Micro-Cracks On Brazilian Tensile Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiangyu

    2015-12-01

    For coal mine ground control issues, it is necessary to propose a failure criteria accounting for the transversely isotropic behaviors of rocks. Hence, it is very helpful to provide experimental data for the validation of the failure criteria. In this paper, the method for preparing transversely isotropic specimens and the scheme of the Brazilian tensile strength test are presented. Results obtained from Brazilian split tests under dry and water-saturated conditions reflect the effect of the development direction β of the structural plane, such as the bedding fissure, on the tensile strength, ultimate displacement, failure mode, and the whole splitting process. The results show that the tensile strength decreases linearly with increasing β. The softening coefficient of the tensile strength shows a sinusoidal function. The values of the slope and inflection point for the curve vary at the different stages of the Brazilian test. The failure mode of the rock specimen presented in this paper generally coincides with the standard Brazilian splitting failure mode. Based on the test results, the major influencing factors for the Brazilian splitting strength are analyzed and a mathematical model for solving the Brazilian splitting strength is proposed. The findings in this paper would greatly benefit the coal mine ground control studies when the surrounding rocks of interest show severe transversely isotropic behaviors.

  12. Estimation of hyphal tensile strength in production-scale Aspergillus oryzae fungal fermentations.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng Jian; Shukla, Vivek; Wenger, Kevin; Fordyce, Andrew; Pedersen, Annemarie Gade; Marten, Mark

    2002-03-20

    Fragmentation of filamentous fungal hyphae depends on two phenomena: hydrodynamic stresses, which lead to hyphal breakage, and hyphal tensile strength, which resists breakage. The goal of this study was to use turbulent hydrodynamic theory to develop a correlation that allows experimental data of morphology and hydrodynamics to be used to estimate relative (pseudo) tensile strength (sigma(pseudo)) of filamentous fungi. Fed-batch fermentations were conducted with a recombinant strain of Aspergillus oryzae in 80 m(3) fermentors, and measurements were made of both morphological (equivalent hyphal length, L) and hydrodynamic variables (specific power input, epsilon; kinematic viscosity, v). We found that v increased over 100-fold during these fermentations and, hence, Kolmogorov microscale (lambda) also changed significantly with time. In the impeller discharge zone, where hyphal fragmentation is thought to actually take place, lambda was calculated to be 700-3500 microm, which is large compared to the size of typical fungal hyphae (100-300 microm). This result implies that eddies in the viscous subrange are responsible for fragmentation. Applying turbulent theory for this subrange, it was possible to calculate sigma(pseudo)from morphological and hydrodynamic measurements. Pseudo tensile strength was not constant but increased to a maximum during the first half and then decreased during the second half of each fermentation, presumably due to differences in physiological state. When a literature correlation for hyphal fragmentation rate (k(frag)) was modified by adding a term to account for viscosity and tensile strength, the result was better qualitative agreement with morphological data. Taken together, these results imply hyphal tensile strength can change significantly over the course of large-scale, fed-batch fungal fermentations and that existing fragmentation and morphology models may be improved if they accounted for variations in hyphal tensile strength with

  13. Comparison of the Tensile, Creep, and Rupture Strength Properties of Stoichiometric SiC Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, H. M.; DiCarlo, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    Tensile strength, creep strength, and rupture strength properties were measured for the following types of polymer-derived stoichiometric SiC fibers: Hi-Nicalon Type S from Nippon Carbon, Tyranno SA from Ube, and Sylramic from Dow Corning. Also included in this study were an earlier version of the SA fiber plus two recent developmental versions of the Sylramic fiber. The tensile strength measurements were made at room temperature on as-received fibers and on fibers after high-temperature inert exposure. The creep-rupture property data were obtained at 1400 deg C in air as well as, argon. Some fiber types showed strong effects of environment on their strength properties. These results are compared and discussed in terms of underlying mechanisms and implications for ceramic composites.

  14. Predicting the tensile modulus and strength of single and hybrid natural fibre reinforced thermoplastic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facca, Angelo George

    Natural fibre reinforced thermoplastics (NFRT) are used in a variety of commercial applications, but there is little theoretical modeling of structure/property relationships in these materials. In this thesis, micromechanical models available in the short-fibre literature were adapted to predict the tensile modulus and strength of some NFRT formulations. Hemp, 20 and 40-mesh hardwood, rice hulls and E-glass fibres were blended into HDPE to produce single and hybrid composites. Changes in fibre density and moisture content that occur during composite manufacturing were included in the micromechanical models. To account for fibre densification, the Young's modulus of the natural fibres was determined on a cell wall basis. A modified hybrid rule of mixtures (HROM) equation that uses experimental data from single NFRT was developed and found to adequately predict the tensile modulus of the hybrid composites. The tensile modulus for both the single and hybrid composites was found to linearly increase with an increase in fibre loading. The failure mechanism for all composite specimens was due to fibre pullout followed by matrix failure. Consequently the tensile strength of the NFRT was predicted using a ROM strength equation, which was modified with a derived semi-empirical fibre clustering parameter. The clustering parameter correctly predicted that as fibre loading increased, the average fibre stress would decrease. By assuming no contact between different types of fibres it was possible to use a modified HROM strength equation to predict the tensile strength of the hybrid composites. As a result parameters taken from the respective single fibre systems could be applied directly to the HROM equation. The modified ROM and HROM strength equations adequately predicted the tensile strength of various single and hybrid fibre reinforced composites over a wide range of composite loading. In this study experiments were conducted to shed light on the effect of a coupling agent

  15. Instrumented impact and residual tensile strength testing of eight-ply carbon eopoxy specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A. T.

    1990-01-01

    Instrumented drop weight impact testing was utilized to examine a puncture-type impact on thin carbon-epoxy coupons. Four different material systems with various eight-ply lay-up configurations were tested. Specimens were placed over a 10.3-mm diameter hole and impacted with a smaller tup (4.2-mm diameter) than those used in previous studies. Force-time plots as well as data on absorbed energy and residual tensile strength were gathered and examined. It was found that a critical impact energy level existed for each material tested, at which point tensile strength began to rapidly decrease with increasing impact energy.

  16. Guidelines to come to minimized tensile strength loss upon cellulase application.

    PubMed

    Lenting, H B; Warmoeskerken, M M

    2001-08-23

    Application of cellulase technology in the textile production process often results in a certain loss of tensile strength along with the desired performance. In this paper guidelines are given how to come to minimization or even prevention of tensile strength loss. Part of the considerations is based on the hypothesis given in the accompanying paper (Lenting and Warmoeskerken, 2001, J. Biotechnol.) concerning the mechanism of interaction between cellulase action and applied shear force. Recommendations given concern the enzyme choice, process parameters and enzyme targeting. PMID:11500216

  17. Tensile strength of dome rocks and lavas at Santiaguito dome complex, Guatemala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornby, Adrian; Lamb, Oliver; Lamur, Anthony; Lavallée, Yan

    2015-04-01

    Lava domes are inherently unstable structures, subject to intense gas flux and rapid variations in the state of stress. At shallow depths confining stresses are minimal and deformation is dilatant, occurring predominantly through tensile fractures. This fracture mode facilitates outgassing and contributes to the development of gas-and-ash activity as well as vulcanian eruptions. However, there is a paucity of tensile strength data for volcanic materials in the published literature, and we know of no paper which addresses this at high temperatures. We study the tensile strength of dome rocks collected at the Santiaguito dome complex, Guatemala, over a porosity range of 3-25%. Indirect tensile (Brazilian) tests were conducted on 40-mm diameter cores, by imposing a compressive displacement rate (radial to the core) of 4 micron/s at room temperature as well as an eruptive temperature of ca. 850 °C. An acoustic monitoring system is employed to track the nucleation, propagation and coalescence of fractures leading to complete sample failure. We find that the rocks' tensile strength exhibits a nonlinear decrease with porosity. Preliminary tests at high temperature indicate that some rocks exhibit a higher tensile strength (than at room temperature); in these experiments, samples containing a higher fraction of interstitial melt revealed an additional component of viscous flow. Further experiments conducted at higher strain rates will define the brittle response of the liquid during tensile failure. The data is compared against similar datasets for volcanic rocks. We will discuss implications for shallow volcanic processes ranging from dilation bands and tuffisite formation to gas-and-ash explosions and dome structural stability.

  18. Modeling the Tensile Strength of Carbon Fiber - Reinforced Ceramic - Matrix Composites Under Multiple Fatigue Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Longbiao

    2016-06-01

    An analytical method has been developed to investigate the effect of interface wear on the tensile strength of carbon fiber - reinforced ceramic - matrix composites (CMCs) under multiple fatigue loading. The Budiansky - Hutchinson - Evans shear - lag model was used to describe the micro stress field of the damaged composite considering fibers failure and the difference existed in the new and original interface debonded region. The statistical matrix multicracking model and fracture mechanics interface debonding criterion were used to determine the matrix crack spacing and interface debonded length. The interface shear stress degradation model and fibers strength degradation model have been adopted to analyze the interface wear effect on the tensile strength of the composite subjected to multiple fatigue loading. Under tensile loading, the fibers failure probabilities were determined by combining the interface wear model and fibers failure model based on the assumption that the fiber strength is subjected to two - parameter Weibull distribution and the loads carried by broken and intact fibers satisfy the Global Load Sharing criterion. The composite can no longer support the applied load when the total loads supported by broken and intact fibers approach its maximum value. The conditions of a single matrix crack and matrix multicrackings for tensile strength corresponding to multiple fatigue peak stress levels and different cycle number have been analyzed.

  19. Development of Yield and Tensile Strength Design Curves for Alloy 617

    SciTech Connect

    Nancy Lybeck; T. -L. Sham

    2013-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Very High Temperature Reactor Program is acquiring data in preparation for developing an Alloy 617 Code Case for inclusion in the nuclear section of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel (B&PV) Code. A draft code case was previously developed, but effort was suspended before acceptance by ASME. As part of the draft code case effort, a database was compiled of yield and tensile strength data from tests performed in air. Yield strength and tensile strength at temperature are used to set time independent allowable stress for construction materials in B&PV Code, Section III, Subsection NH. The yield and tensile strength data used for the draft code case has been augmented with additional data generated by Idaho National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the U.S. and CEA in France. The standard ASME Section II procedure for generating yield and tensile strength at temperature is presented, along with alternate methods that accommodate the change in temperature trends seen at high temperatures, resulting in a more consistent design margin over the temperature range of interest.

  20. Modeling the Tensile Strength of Carbon Fiber - Reinforced Ceramic - Matrix Composites Under Multiple Fatigue Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Longbiao

    2015-09-01

    An analytical method has been developed to investigate the effect of interface wear on the tensile strength of carbon fiber - reinforced ceramic - matrix composites (CMCs) under multiple fatigue loading. The Budiansky - Hutchinson - Evans shear - lag model was used to describe the micro stress field of the damaged composite considering fibers failure and the difference existed in the new and original interface debonded region. The statistical matrix multicracking model and fracture mechanics interface debonding criterion were used to determine the matrix crack spacing and interface debonded length. The interface shear stress degradation model and fibers strength degradation model have been adopted to analyze the interface wear effect on the tensile strength of the composite subjected to multiple fatigue loading. Under tensile loading, the fibers failure probabilities were determined by combining the interface wear model and fibers failure model based on the assumption that the fiber strength is subjected to two - parameter Weibull distribution and the loads carried by broken and intact fibers satisfy the Global Load Sharing criterion. The composite can no longer support the applied load when the total loads supported by broken and intact fibers approach its maximum value. The conditions of a single matrix crack and matrix multicrackings for tensile strength corresponding to multiple fatigue peak stress levels and different cycle number have been analyzed.

  1. Tensile strengths and porosities of solar system primitive bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigo-Rodriguez, J. M.; Llorca, J.; Blum, J.

    Recent measurements of asteroid bulk densities suggest that rubble-pile asteroids with typical porosities of 30 to 50% may be common (Britt et al., 2006). However, the presence of such objects doesn't mean necessarily that the initial porosity had been preserved (Kerridge, 1993). In fact, the fluffy aggregates produced in laboratory experiments that we expect to be representative of the oldest protoplanetary disk materials, exhibit even higher porosities (Blum et al., 2006). Recent results confirm that primitive meteorites (like e.g. CM carbonaceous chondrites) are compacted samples of the nebula matter exhibiting different density and porosity that their precursors materials (Trigo-Rodríguez et al., 2006). Consequently, aqueous alteration, brecciation, and impact-induced metamorphism make very unlikely to find pristine bodies between the asteroidal population. However, there is clear evidence for the existence of high-porosity bodies between the C-type asteroids like e.g. Mathilde (Housen et al., 1999) or the Tagish Lake parent body (Brown et al., 2002). Although extensive post-accretionary processing of meteorite parent bodies can produce high degrees of porosity, only the most pristine ones seem to preserve more than 50% of porosity. Consequently, we should look for these low strength bodies among the C-type asteroids, or very especially in some unprocessed comets that continue being representative of the precursor materials. Recent suggestion that CI1 chondrites are originated from comets should be studied in this context (Gounelle et al., 2006). Particularly, we think that studies of the porosity and strength of primitive meteorites would provide valuable clues on the origin and nature of their parent bodies. REFERENCES Blum J., R. Schräpler, B.J.R. Davidson and J.M. Trigo-Rodríguez (2006) Astroph. J., submitted. Britt D.T., G.J. Consolmagno, and W.J. Merline (2006) Lunar Planet. Sci. Conf. Abstract #2214. Brown, P. G., D. O. Revelle, E. Tagliaferri, and A

  2. Scale effects on the transverse tensile strength of graphite epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. Kevin; Salpekar, Satish A.

    1992-01-01

    The influence of material volume on the transverse tensile strength of AS4/3501-6 graphite epoxy composites was investigated. Tensile tests of 90 degree laminates with 3 different widths and 5 different thicknesses were conducted. A finite element analysis was performed to determine the influence of the grip on the stress distribution in the coupons and explain the tendency for the distribution of failure locations to be skewed toward the grip. Specimens were instrumented with strain gages and extensometers to insure good alignment and to measure failure strains. Data indicated that matrix dominated strength properties varied with the volume of material that was stressed, with the strength decreasing as volume increased. Transverse strength data were used in a volumetric scaling law based on Weibull statistics to predict the strength of 90 degree laminates loaded in three point bending. Comparisons were also made between transverse strength measurements and out-of-plane interlaminar tensile strength measurements from curved beam bending tests. The significance of observed scale effects on the use of tests for material screening, quality assurance, and design allowables is discussed.

  3. Tensile Strength of Carbon Nanotubes Under Realistic Temperature and Strain Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, Chen-Yu; Cho, Kyeong-Jae; Srivastava, Deepak; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Strain rate and temperature dependence of the tensile strength of single-wall carbon nanotubes has been investigated with molecular dynamics simulations. The tensile failure or yield strain is found to be strongly dependent on the temperature and strain rate. A transition state theory based predictive model is developed for the tensile failure of nanotubes. Based on the parameters fitted from high-strain rate and temperature dependent molecular dynamics simulations, the model predicts that a defect free micrometer long single-wall nanotube at 300 K, stretched with a strain rate of 1%/hour, fails at about 9 plus or minus 1% tensile strain. This is in good agreement with recent experimental findings.

  4. Tensile properties of an ultrahigh-strength graphite fiber in an epoxy matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiao, T. T.; Hamstad, M. A.; Jessop, E. S.

    1974-01-01

    The fiber performance and reinforcement potential for fiber composites of a special PAN-based graphite fiber were evaluated by testing the fiber's tensile properties in an epoxy matrix. Representative strand samples were taken from 30 spools of single-end, 1500-filament fiber to make over 5000 fiber/epoxy strand specimens using the filament-winding process. Characteristics studied were fiber uniformity, strength and modulus distributions at room and liquid-nitrogen temperatures, stress-strain behavior, the effect of strain rate on fiber strength, and acoustic emission during tensile loading to failure. The fiber was found to have a 3570-MPa failure stress, a 1.7% failure strain, a 206-GPa modulus, and a density of 1.77 Mg/cu m at 23 C. Liquid-nitrogen temperature and various strain rates had no significant effect on fiber tensile properties.

  5. Statistical characterization of tensile strengths for a nuclear-type core graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, C.R.; Eatherly, W.P.

    1986-09-01

    A data set of tensile strengths comprising over 1200 experimental points has been analyzed statistically in conformance with the observed phenomenon of background and disparate flaws. The data are consistent with a bimodal normal distribution. If corrections are made for strength dependence on density, the background mode is Weibull. It is proposed the disparate mode can be represented by a combination of binomial and order statistics. The resultant bimodal model would show a strong dependence on stress volume.

  6. The effect of volume on the tensile strength of several nuclear-grade graphites

    SciTech Connect

    Strizak, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    This report will present the results of a study on the effects of stress volume on the tensile strength of two nuclear-grade graphites. The materials selected were H-451, an extruded near-isotropic graphite manufactured by Great Lakes Carbon Corporation, and IG-110, a fine-grained isotropic molded graphite manufactured by Toyo Tanso Company, Ltd. The tensile properties of H-451 were examined extensively in the past in order to characterize the variability of strength within billets, between billets, and between lots. But, the variability within a billet was, for the most part, studied only casually. The problem was the strong influence of a limited sampling plan in describing the mean strength and the variability. Therefore, an extensive, statistically sound sampling plan has been devised to fully characterize the spatial variability within a single billet. The effects of stress volume are being reexamined by comparing the strengths of four specimen sizes covering a broad range in stress volume. Two models will be employed for analysis of the stress volume data for the selected graphites. The popular Weibull model has previously been found to grossly overestimate the volume dependence of the strength of H-451 graphite. The model will be reevaluated using the improved statistical distribution of strength expected from the current sampling plan. A new fracture model developed by Burchell and Tucker has potential for determining the effect of stress volume on the tensile strength of graphite. This probabilistic failure criterion combines a microstructural basis with a fracture-mechanics approach to failure. An initial evaluation of H-451 data showed that the model closely predicted the mean tensile strength for the two smaller specimen sizes. 9 refs., 24 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Aggregate tensile strength and friability characteristics of furrow and sprinkler irrigated fields in Southern Idaho

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural crops grown in southern Idaho are furrow or sprinkler irrigated. Therefore, the soil experiences several wetting and drying cycles each growing season that can contribute to changes in aggregate tensile strength and friability. The objective of the research was to evaluate the influence...

  8. Effects of reclaimed asphalt pavement on indirect tensile strength test of conditioned foamed asphalt mix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yati Katman, Herda; Rasdan Ibrahim, Mohd; Yazip Matori, Mohd; Norhisham, Shuhairy; Ismail, Norlela

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents the results of Indirect Tensile Strength (ITS) Test for samples prepared with reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP). Samples were conditioned in water at 25°C for 24 hours prior to testing. Results show that recycled aggregate from reclaimed asphalt pavement performs as well as virgin aggregate.

  9. Effects of compaction variables on porosity and material tensile strength of convex-faced aspirin tablets.

    PubMed

    Pitt, K G; Newton, J M; Stanley, P

    1991-04-01

    The porosity and tensile strength of convex-faced aspirin tablets formed under a compaction pressure in the range 40-320 MPa and at punch velocities in the range 0.008 to 500 mm s-1 have been determined. The material tensile strength, sigma f, was calculated from the observed fracture load, Ps, using the equation of Pitt et al (1988): sigma f = 10 Ps/pi D2(2.84 t/D - 0.126 t/W + 3.15 W/D + 0.01)-1 where D is the tablet diameter, t is the overall tablet thickness and W is the central cylinder thickness. Tablets formed at lower compaction pressures had a higher porosity and lower tensile strength than those formed at higher compaction pressures. Tablets of face curvature ratio (D/R) in the range 0.25-0.67 and a normalized cylinder length (W/D) of 0.2 had the optimum tensile strength. (R is the radius of curvature of the tablet face.) Tablets formed at high compaction rates were significantly weaker than those formed at lower compaction rates. PMID:1676731

  10. Melt reaction of zein with glyoxal to improve tensile strength and reduce solubility

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glyoxal, in the presence of base, has been used to crosslink zein in a melt process, involving reaction in a melt state combined with compression molding. The resulting zein articles had improved tensile strength, increasing from 34.3 to 40.6 MPa, when the amount of glyoxal was 6% by zein weight. ...

  11. Optimization and Prediction of Ultimate Tensile Strength in Metal Active Gas Welding

    PubMed Central

    Ampaiboon, Anusit; Lasunon, On-Uma; Bubphachot, Bopit

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect of welding parameters on ultimate tensile strength of structural steel, ST37-2, welded by Metal Active Gas welding. A fractional factorial design was used for determining the significance of six parameters: wire feed rate, welding voltage, welding speed, travel angle, tip-to-work distance, and shielded gas flow rate. A regression model to predict ultimate tensile strength was developed. Finally, we verified optimization of the process parameters experimentally. We achieved an optimum tensile strength (558 MPa) and wire feed rate, 19 m/min, had the greatest effect, followed by tip-to-work distance, 7 mm, welding speed, 200 mm/min, welding voltage, 30 V, and travel angle, 60°. Shield gas flow rate, 10 L/min, was slightly better but had little effect in the 10–20 L/min range. Tests showed that our regression model was able to predict the ultimate tensile strength within 4%. PMID:26491719

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF TENSILE STRENGTH DURING DISTRACTION OSTEOGENESIS IN A RAT MODEL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    These studies were designed to determine the reliability of in vitro tensile testing to measure the temporal development of regenerate bone strength in rats during limb lengthening (distraction osteogenesis, DO). External fixators were placed on the right tibiae of 36 virus-free, 400-450 g male Spr...

  13. Degree of compression as a potential process control tool of tablet tensile strength.

    PubMed

    Nordström, Josefina; Alderborn, Goran

    2011-01-01

    The current view on the development and manufacturing of pharmaceutical preparations points towards improved control tools that can be implemented in pharmaceutical manufacturing as a means to better control end product properties. The objective of this paper was to investigate the relationship between tablet tensile strength and the degree of bed compression in order to evaluate the suitability of assessing the straining of the powder bed during tableting as a process control tool of tablet tensile strength. Microcrystalline cellulose was used as powder raw material and subjected to wet granulation by different procedures to create agglomerates of different physical and compression properties. The produced agglomerates thus showed a large variation in compressibility and compactibility. However, in terms of the relationship between the degree of compression and the tablet tensile strength, all agglomerates gathered reasonably around a single general relationship. The degree of compression hence appears to be a potential valuable process control tool of the tablet tensile strength that may enable the use of an adaptive tableting process with improved product quality consistency. PMID:20649411

  14. Effect of TiO2 Nanoparticles on Tensile Strength of Dental Acrylic Resins.

    PubMed

    Shirkavand, Saeed; Moslehifard, Elnaz

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Adding further fillers to dental resins may enhance their physical characteristics. The aim of this study was to evaluate the tensile strength of heat-curing acrylic resin reinforced by TiO2nanoparticles added into the resin matrix. Materials and methods. Commercially available TiO2 nanoparticles were obtained and characterized using X-ray diffrac-tion (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to determine their crystalline structure, particle size and morphology. TiO2-acrylic resin nanocomposite was prepared by mixing 0.5, 1 and 2 (wt%) of surface modified TiO2 nanoparticles in an amalgamator providing three groups of samples. Before curing, the obtained paste was packed into steel molds. After cur-ing, the specimens were removed from the molds. The tensile strength test samples were prepared according to ISO 1567. Results. Two crystalline phases were found in TiO2 nanoparticles including: (i) anatase as the major one, and (ii) rutile. The average particle size calculated according to the Scherrer equation was 20.4 nm, showing a normal size distribution. According to SEM images, the nanocomposite with 1wt% TiO2 nanoparticles had a better distribution compared to other groups. In addition, the group by 1wt% TiO2 exhibited higher tensile strength with a significant difference compared to other groups. ANOVA showed significant differences between the contents of TiO2 particles in acrylic resin (F = 22.19; P < 0.001). Conclusion. A considerable increase in tensile strength was observed with titania NPs reinforcement agents in 1wt% by weight. Further increase of TiO2 nanoparticles decreased the tensile strength. PMID:25587380

  15. Effect of TiO2 Nanoparticles on Tensile Strength of Dental Acrylic Resins

    PubMed Central

    Shirkavand, Saeed; Moslehifard, Elnaz

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Adding further fillers to dental resins may enhance their physical characteristics. The aim of this study was to evaluate the tensile strength of heat-curing acrylic resin reinforced by TiO2nanoparticles added into the resin matrix. Materials and methods. Commercially available TiO2 nanoparticles were obtained and characterized using X-ray diffrac-tion (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to determine their crystalline structure, particle size and morphology. TiO2-acrylic resin nanocomposite was prepared by mixing 0.5, 1 and 2 (wt%) of surface modified TiO2 nanoparticles in an amalgamator providing three groups of samples. Before curing, the obtained paste was packed into steel molds. After cur-ing, the specimens were removed from the molds. The tensile strength test samples were prepared according to ISO 1567. Results. Two crystalline phases were found in TiO2 nanoparticles including: (i) anatase as the major one, and (ii) rutile. The average particle size calculated according to the Scherrer equation was 20.4 nm, showing a normal size distribution. According to SEM images, the nanocomposite with 1wt% TiO2 nanoparticles had a better distribution compared to other groups. In addition, the group by 1wt% TiO2 exhibited higher tensile strength with a significant difference compared to other groups. ANOVA showed significant differences between the contents of TiO2 particles in acrylic resin (F = 22.19; P < 0.001). Conclusion. A considerable increase in tensile strength was observed with titania NPs reinforcement agents in 1wt% by weight. Further increase of TiO2 nanoparticles decreased the tensile strength. PMID:25587380

  16. Influence of surface defects on the tensile strength of carbon fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vautard, F.; Dentzer, J.; Nardin, M.; Schultz, J.; Defoort, B.

    2014-12-01

    The mechanical properties of carbon fibers, especially their tensile properties, are affected by internal and surface defects. In order to asses in what extent the generation of surface defects can result in a loss of the mechanical properties, non-surface treated carbon fibers were oxidized with three different surface treatment processes: electro-chemical oxidation, oxidation in nitric acid, and oxidation in oxygen plasma. Different surface topographies and surface chemistries were obtained, as well as different types and densities of surface defects. The density of surface defects was measured with both a physical approach (Raman spectroscopy) and a chemical approach (Active Surface Area). The tensile properties were evaluated by determining the Weibull modulus and the scale parameter of each reference, after measuring the tensile strength for four different gauge lengths. A relationship between the tensile properties and the nature and density of surface defects was noticed, as large defects largely control the value of the tensile strength. When optimized, some oxidation surface treatment processes can generate surface functional groups as well as an increase of the mechanical properties of the fibers, because of the removal of the contamination layer of pyrolytic carbon generated during the carbonization of the polyacrylonitrile precursor. Oxidation in oxygen plasma revealed to be a promising technology for alternative surface treatment processes, as high levels of functionalization were achieved and a slight improvement of the mechanical properties was obtained too.

  17. Determination of the mechanical properties of solid and cellular polymeric dosage forms by diametral compression.

    PubMed

    Blaesi, Aron H; Saka, Nannaji

    2016-07-25

    At present, the immediate-release solid dosage forms, such as the oral tablets and capsules, are granular solids. They release drug rapidly and have adequate mechanical properties, but their manufacture is fraught with difficulties inherent in processing particulate matter. Such difficulties, however, could be overcome by liquid-based processing. Therefore, we have recently introduced polymeric cellular (i.e., highly porous) dosage forms prepared from a melt process. Experiments have shown that upon immersion in a dissolution medium, the cellular dosage forms with polyethylene glycol (PEG) as excipient and with predominantly open-cell topology disintegrate by exfoliation, thus enabling rapid drug release. If the volume fraction of voids of the open-cell structures is too large, however, their mechanical strength is adversely affected. At present, the common method for determining the tensile strength of brittle, solid dosage forms (such as select granular forms) is the diametral compression test. In this study, the theory of diametral compression is first refined to demonstrate that the relevant mechanical properties of ductile and cellular solids (i.e., the elastic modulus and the yield strength) can also be extracted from this test. Diametral compression experiments are then conducted on PEG-based solid and cellular dosage forms. It is found that the elastic modulus and yield strength of the open-cell structures are about an order of magnitude smaller than those of the non-porous solids, but still are substantially greater than the stiffness and strength requirements for handling the dosage forms manually. This work thus demonstrates that melt-processed polymeric cellular dosage forms that release drug rapidly can be designed and manufactured to have adequate mechanical properties. PMID:27178343

  18. The tensile strength of bilayered tablets made from different grades of microcrystalline cellulose.

    PubMed

    Podczeck, Fridrun; Al-Muti, Emad

    2010-11-20

    The aim of this work was to determine the tensile strength of bilayered tablets made from different grades of microcrystalline cellulose. While these grades are chemically identical, they differ significantly in their particle size distribution and in their mechanical properties such as Young's modulus of elasticity. Tablets were produced in the shape of beams of similar dimensions using uniaxial compression, and solid beams made from one material only were compared with bilayered beams made from various combinations of powders. It was found that in the production of layered tablets it is important for the purpose of quality assurance and control that the upper and lower layer of the compact can be identified. Otherwise, tensile strength measurements will result in large variability depending on which layer faces upwards during the test. Both particle size and Young's modulus of elasticity influenced the overall strength of layered tablets. If the material forming the lower layer was more elastic, then the beam strength was reduced due to tension introduced into the system, acting especially at the layer interface and potentially causing partial or complete delamination. Larger differences in the particle size of the materials forming the tablet layers resulted in an overall reduced compact tensile strength. PMID:20696243

  19. Correlation of fiber composite tensile strength with the ultrasonic stress wave factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.; Lark, R. F.

    1978-01-01

    An ultrasonic-acoustic technique was used to indicate the strength variations of tensile specimens of a graphite-epoxy composite. A 'stress wave factor' was determined and its value was found to depend on variations of the fiber-resin bonding as well as fiber orientation. The fiber orientations studied were 0 deg (longitudinal), 10 deg (off-axis), 90 deg (transverse), (0 deg/+ or - 45 deg/0) symmetrical, and (+ or - 45 deg) symmetrical. The stress wave factor can indicate variations of the tensile and shear strengths of composite materials. The stress wave factor was also found to be sensitive to strength variations associated with microporosity and differences in fiber-resin ratio.

  20. Correlation of Fiber Composite Tensile Strength with the Ultrasonic Stress Wave Factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.; Lark, R. F.

    1978-01-01

    An ultrasonic-acoustic technique was used to indicate the strength variations of tensile specimens of a graphite-epoxy composite. A stress wave factor was determined and its value was found to depend on variations of the fiber-resin bonding as well as fiber orientation. The fiber orientations studied were 0 deg (longitudinal), 10 deg (off-axis), 90 deg (transverse), 0 deg + or - 45 deg/0 deg symmetrical, and + or - 45 deg] symmetrical. The stress wave factor can indicate variations of the tensile and shear strengths of composite materials. The stress wave factor was also found to be sensitive to strength variations associated with microporosity and differences in fiber-resin ratio.

  1. Evaluation of tensile strength of hybrid fiber (jute/gongura) reinforced hybrid polymer matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatachalam, G.; Gautham Shankar, A.; Vijay, Kumar V.; Chandan, Byral R.; Prabaharan, G. P.; Raghav, Dasarath

    2015-07-01

    The polymer matrix composites attract many industrial applications due to its light weight, less cost and easy for manufacturing. In this paper, an attempt is made to prepare and study of the tensile strength of hybrid (two natural) fibers reinforced hybrid (Natural + Synthetic) polymer matrix composites. The samples were prepared with hybrid reinforcement consists of two different fibers such as jute and Gongura and hybrid polymer consists of polyester and cashew nut shell resins. The hybrid composites tensile strength is evaluated to study the influence of various fiber parameters on mechanical strength. The parameters considered here are the duration of fiber treatment, the concentration of alkali in fiber treatment and nature of fiber content in the composites.

  2. High Tensile Strength Amalgams for In-Space Repair and Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.

    2005-01-01

    Amalgams are defined as an alloy of mercury with one or more other metals. These, along with those based on gallium (also liquid at near room temperature), are widely used in dental practice as a tooth filling material. Amalgams have a number of useful attributes that indude room temperature compounding. corrosion resistance, dimensional stability, and good compressive strength. These properties well serve dental needs but, unfortunately, amalgams have extremely poor tensile strength, a feature that severely limits their applications. The work presented here demonstrates how, by modifying particle geometry, the tensile strength of amalgams can be increased and thus extending the range of potential applications. This is relevant to, for example, the freeform fabrication of replacement parts that might be necessary during an extended space mission. Advantages, i.e. Figures-of-Merit. include the ability to produce complex parts, minimum crew interaction, high yield - minimum wasted material, reduced gravity compatibility, minimum final finishing, safety, and minimum power consumption.

  3. Carbon nanotube yarns with high tensile strength made by a twisting and shrinking method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Sun, Yinghui; Zhou, Ruifeng; Zhu, Hanyu; Wang, Jiaping; Liu, Liang; Fan, Shoushan; Jiang, Kaili

    2010-01-29

    We report a simple and continuous spinning method that combines twisting and shrinking processes to produce carbon nanotube yarns. In this method, a yarn freshly spun from a super-aligned carbon nanotube array is first twisted and then passes through a volatile solvent for shrinking. The as-produced yarn consists of densely packed carbon nanotubes, and thus has a tensile strength up to about 1 GPa. The tensile strength depends on the diameter and the twisting angle of the yarn. Different kinds of solvents, such as water, ethanol, and acetone, are used to shrink the twisted yarns, and acetone shows the best shrinking effect. The origin of the solvent shrinking effect is investigated. Our method is favorable for continuous mass production of high strength carbon nanotube yarns with a wide range of diameters, especially ultra-thin yarns. PMID:20009208

  4. Effects of processing induced defects on laminate response - Interlaminar tensile strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurdal, Zafer; Tomasino, Alfred P.; Biggers, S. B.

    1991-01-01

    Four different layup methods were used in the present study of the interlaminar tensile strength of AS4/3501-6 graphite-reinforced epoxy as a function of defects from manufacturing-induced porosity. The methods were: (1) baseline hand layup, (2) solvent wipe of prepreg for resin removal, (3) moisture-introduction between plies, and (4) a low-pressure cure cycle. Pore characterization was conducted according to ASTM D-2734. A significant reduction is noted in the out-of-plane tensile strength as a function of increasing void content; the porosity data were used in an empirical model to predict out-of-plane strength as a function of porosity.

  5. Cryogenic Tensile Strength and Fatigue Life of Carbon Nanotube Multi-Yarn.

    PubMed

    Misak, H E; Mall, S

    2016-03-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) multi-yarns, consisting of 30 yarns, were tested under monotonic tensile load and fatigue at the room temperature (298 K) and two cryogenic temperatures (232 and 123 K). Tensile stiffness increased with the decrease of temperature. The average ultimate tensile strength was higher at 123 K when compared to the higher temperatures (232 and 298 K). Failure mechanism changed from a combination of classical variant and independent fiber breakage at the two higher temperatures to mostly classical variant failure mechanism at the lower temperature. The CNT-yarn's fatigue life also increased with decreasing temperature. CNT-yarns have been shown to function well at lower temperatures making them usable for applications requiring operation at cryogenic temperatures, such as in satellites and high altitude aircraft. PMID:27455753

  6. Relationship between fractional porosity and tensile strength for high-porosity sintered ferrous powder compacts

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, R.P.; Wawner, F.E.; Wert, J.A.

    1998-07-03

    The current study examines the mechanical properties of pressed and sintered ferrous powder metallurgy compacts with low relative densities, between 0.6 and 0.8. Three different powder particle compositions were investigated: eutectoid steel, stainless steel, and stainless tool steel compacts. To obtain information concerning the tensile properties of these low-density compacts, simple tensile tests were performed. In addition, Vickers microhardness tests were performed on metallographic sections of the tensile bars. The results from these tests are used to compare the measured relative strength values with estimates generated by previously published models. Also, the fracture surfaces of selected compacts were examined in the scanning electron microscope to obtain information concerning the fracture process.

  7. Effects of porosity on weld-joint tensile strength of aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovoy, C. V.

    1974-01-01

    Tensile properties in defect-free weldments of aluminum alloys 2014-T6 and 2219-T87 (sheet and plate) are shown to be related to the level or concentration of induced simulated porosity. The scatter diagram shows that the ultimate tensile strength of the weldments displays the most pronounced linear relationship with the level of porosity. The relationships between yield strength or elongation and porosity are either trivial or inconsequential in the lower and intermediate levels of porosity content. In highly concentrated levels of porosity, both yield strength and elongation values decrease markedly. Correlation coefficients were obtained by simple straight line regression analysis between the variables of ultimate tensile strength and pore level. The coefficients were greater, indicating a better correlation, using a pore area accumulation concept or pore volume accumulation than the accumulation of the pore diameters. These relationships provide a useful tool for assessing the existing aerospace radiographic acceptance standards with respect to permissible porosity. In addition, these relationships, in combination with known design load requirements, will serve as an engineering guideline in determining when a weld repair is necessary based on accumulative pore level as detected by radiographic techniques.

  8. Modelling weathering induced retreat of c-φ cliffs with limited tensile strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voulgari, C.

    2015-09-01

    Natural cliffs subject to weathering induced retreat are typically made of hard soils and / or weak rocks exhibiting limited tensile strength. In this paper, the morphologic evolution of uniform c, φ slopes subject to weathering is investigated for a range of values of tensile strengths employing the limit analysis upper bound method. This paper extends the analytical framework set up in [1, 2] by accounting for the limited tensile strength of the ground which was previously disregarded. The solutions were obtained by employing the kinematic method of limit analysis providing rigorous upper bounds to the true collapse values. The inclusion of tension cracks leads to modified analytical expressions of the energy balance equation (the balance between external work and dissipated energy) and as a consequence, of the function whose minimum provides the solution in terms of failure mechanisms and associated values of soil strength. Pre-existing cracks are considered, as well as cracks that form as part of the failure mechanism. It turns out that the presence of tension cracks may significantly alter the size of each landslide contributing to the retrogression of the slope. Results in the form of dimensionless ready-to-use charts are produced for any value of engineering interest of friction angle and slope inclination for the case of dry cracks. Moreover, upper bounds for values not included in the charts can be achieved either by interpolation from the charts or by running the minimisation of the analytical functions provided in the paper.

  9. Microtensile and tensile bond strength of single-bottle adhesives: a new test method.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, A I

    2004-04-01

    To evaluate the tensile and microtensile bond strength of five single-bottle adhesives to dentine, extracted human molar teeth were used. For each tooth dentine was exposed on the occlusal surface by cutting with an isomet saw and the remaining part was mounted in a plastic ring using dental stone. The tested adhesive materials were: Scotchbond 1, Syntac SC, One-Step, Prime & Bond 2.1 and Clearfil SE Bond. The adhesive was applied to either 1 mm(2) of dentine or a circular area with a diameter of 3.9 mm. Composite resin Clearfil AP-X was placed to the adhesives using a Teflon split mould 3.9 mm in diameter and 2.5 mm in height. Tensile and microtensile bond strengths were measured using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm min(-1). Under tensile mode, the bond strengths were 16.7 +/- 3.5, 15.2 +/- 2.5, 11.5 +/- 3.2, 13.7 +/- 2.6, 20.9 +/- 4.2 MPa for each material. Under microtensile mode, the bond strengths were 52.5 +/- 9.5, 55.3 +/- 8.3, 40.5 +/- 5.2, 37.5 +/- 8.7, 60 +/- 6.21 MPa. Fracture pattern of bonded specimens showed 66% cohesive dentine failure in samples tested for tensile bond strength. For the microtensile test, failures were mainly adhesive at the interface between adhesive and dentine (94%). PMID:15089946

  10. Thermal degradation of the tensile strength of unidirectional boron/aluminum composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimes, H. H.; Lad, R. A.; Maisel, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    The variation of ultimate tensile strength with thermal treatment of B-Al composite materials and of boron fibers chemically removed from these composites is studied systematically in an attempt to determine the mechanism of the resulting strength degradation. The results indicate that thermally cycling of B-Al represents a more severe condition than equivalent time at temperature. Degradation of composite tensile strength from about 1.3 GN/sq m to as low as 0.34 GN/sq m was observed after 3000 cycles to 420 C for 203-micron B-1100 Al composite. In general, the 1100 Al-matrix composites degraded somewhat more than the 6061 matrix material studied. Measurement of fiber strengths confirmed a composite strength loss due to the degradation of fiber strength. Microscopy indicated a highly flawed fiber surface. On the basis of various thermal-cycling studies and electron diffraction analysis, a mechanism is favored in which B reacts with Al, freshly exposed by cold working during cycling, to form AlB2. The nonuniform interface reaction leads to a highly flawed and weakened B fiber.

  11. Tensile bond strength of gold and porcelain inlays to extracted teeth using three cements.

    PubMed

    Michelini, F S; Belser, U C; Scherrer, S S; De Rijk, W G

    1995-01-01

    This in vitro study compared the tensile bond strength of gold and porcelain inlays to extracted molars in standardized cavities. Three cements were used: zinc phosphate, glass-ionomer, and a resin composite cement. The gold inlays were cemented using zinc phosphate or glass-ionomer cement, and the porcelain inlays were luted using resin composite or glass-ionomer cement. Surface treatments included, for gold inlays, either no treatment (zinc phosphate cement) or airborne particle abraded and tinplated (glass-ionomer cement); and for porcelain inlays, either no treatment (glass-ionomer cement) or etched and silane-treated (resin composite cement). Statistical analysis was performed using the Weibull distribution. Results showed no significant differences between gold inlays cemented using zinc phosphate or glass-ionomer cements and porcelain inlays luted using glass-ionomer cements. The bonded porcelain inlays (resin composite cement) showed tensile bond strengths two to three times higher than those obtained for cemented gold inlays. PMID:7575974

  12. Synthesis, characterization, and tensile strength of CVI SiC/BN/SiC composites

    SciTech Connect

    Kmetz, M.A.; Laliberte, J.M.; Willis, W.S.; Suib, S.L.; Galasso, F.S.

    1991-10-01

    Tows of Nicalon yarn were first precoated by CVD with amorphous BN, then infiltrated with SiC by CVD to form single strand composites. Two different methods for the preparation of BN were investigated. The first involved the formation of a BCl3-NH3 adduct; the second consisted of the direct reaction of the gases in hot zone. Tensile strength measurements made on the composites were about 277 MPa and displayed a considerable amount of fiber pull-out and crack bridging. In order to establish their thermal stability, the ends of the composites were cut, exposing the fiber and interface, and annealed in air to 1100 C for 70 h. This annealing process did not result in a decrease in tensile strength. The composites were characterized by AES, SEM, and X-ray diffraction analysis. 16 refs.

  13. Correlation Between Shear Punch and Tensile Strength for Low-Carbon Steel and Stainless Steel Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmudi, R.; Sadeghi, M.

    2013-02-01

    The deformation behavior of AISI 1015 low-carbon steel, and AISI 304 stainless steel sheets was investigated by uniaxial tension and the shear punch test (SPT). Both materials were cold rolled to an 80% thickness reduction and subsequently annealed in the temperature range 25-850 °C to produce a wide range of yield and ultimate strength levels. The correlations between shear punch and tensile yield and ultimate stresses were established empirically. Different linear relationships having different slopes and intercepts were found for the low-carbon and stainless steel sheets, and the possible parameters affecting the correlation were discussed. It was shown that, within limits, yield and tensile strength of thin steel sheets can be predicted from the shear data obtained by the easy-to-perform SPT.

  14. Tensile strength of simulated and welded butt joints in W-Cu composite sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas J.; Watson, Gordon K.

    1994-01-01

    The weldability of W-Cu composite sheet was investigated using simulated and welded joints. The welded joints were produced in a vacuum hot press. Tensile test results showed that simulated joints can provide strength and failure mode data which can be used in joint design for actual weldments. Although all of the welded joints had flaws, a number of these joints were as strong as the W-Cu composite base material.

  15. Coating of carbon nanotube fibers: variation of tensile properties, failure behavior and adhesion strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäder, Edith; Liu, Jian-Wen; Hiller, Janett; Lu, Weibang; Li, Qingwen; Zhandarov, Serge; Chou, Tsu-Wei

    2015-07-01

    An experimental study of the tensile properties of CNT fibers and their interphasial behavior in epoxy matrices is reported. One of the most promising applications of CNT fibers is their use as reinforcement in multifunctional composites. For this purpose, an increase of the tensile strength of the CNT fibers in unidirectional composites as well as strong interfacial adhesion strength is desirable. However, the mechanical performance of the CNT fiber composites manufactured so far is comparable to that of commercial fiber composites. The interfacial properties of CNT fiber/polymer composites have rarely been investigated and provided CNT fiber/epoxy interfacial shear strength of 14.4 MPa studied by the microbond test. In order to improve the mechanical performance of the CNT fibers, an epoxy compatible coating with nano-dispersed aqueous based polymeric film formers and low viscous epoxy resin, respectively, was applied. For impregnation of high homogeneity, low molecular weight epoxy film formers and polyurethane film formers were used. The aqueous based epoxy film formers were not crosslinked and able to interdiffuse with the matrix resin after impregnation. Due to good wetting of the individual CNT fibers by the film formers, the degree of activation of the fibers was improved leading to increased tensile strength and Young’s modulus. Cyclic tensile loading and simultaneous determination of electric resistance enabled to characterize the fiber’s durability in terms of elastic recovery and hysteresis. The pull-out tests and SEM study reveal different interfacial failure mechanisms in CNT fiber/epoxy systems for untreated and film former treated fibers, on the one hand, and epoxy resin treated ones, on the other hand. The epoxy resin penetrated between the CNT bundles in the reference or film former coated fiber, forming a relatively thick CNT/epoxy composite layer and thus shifting the fracture zone within the fiber. In contrast to this, shear sliding along

  16. The tensile bond strength of new and rebonded stainless steel orthodontic brackets.

    PubMed

    Regan, D; LeMasney, B; van Noort, R

    1993-04-01

    The study investigated the effect on the tensile/peel bond strength of the variables associated with the bracket base, the enamel surface, and the type of adhesive when both new and used brackets were rebonded to a previously bonded enamel surface. The tensile/peel bond strength was firstly evaluated for three different types of stainless steel orthodontic bracket/base combinations. The cast integral base gave a significantly lower bond strength than the foil-mesh and photo-etched bases. Following debonding, a group of new brackets were bonded to the teeth using a chemically-activated or a light-cured adhesive. The old adhesive had been removed from the enamel by either a hand scaler or a tungsten-carbide bur. The rebonded new brackets demonstrated a small, but statistically significant fall in bond strength. No differences were found between the enamel preparations or the adhesives. A further group of previously debonded brackets were rebonded to the same teeth. The bracket bases were prepared by either smoothing with a green stone or heating in a bunsen flame followed by sandblasting and electropolishing. Highly significant falls in bond strength were obtained with all the bases. No significant differences were found between the two methods of bracket preparation. PMID:8500538

  17. Tensile bond strength of ceramic orthodontic brackets bonded to porcelain surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kocadereli, I; Canay, S; Akça, K

    2001-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare various surface treatment methods to define the procedure that produces adequate bond strength between ceramic brackets and porcelain. The specimens used in this study, 60 porcelain tabs, were produced by duplication of the labial surface of a maxillary first premolar. The 6 different preparation procedures tested were: (1) sandblasting with 50 microm aluminum oxide in a sandblasting device, (2) application of silane to the porcelain and the bracket base, (3) sandblasting followed by application of silane, (4) acid etching with 9.6% hydrofluoric acid, (5) acid etching with 9.6% hydrofluoric acid followed by application of silane, and (6) sandblasting followed by application of 4-Meta adhesive. The ceramic brackets were bonded with no-mix orthodontic bonding material. A bonding force testing machine was used to determine tensile bond strengths at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm per second. The results of the study showed that porcelain surface preparation with acid etching followed by silane application resulted in a statistically significant higher tensile bond strength (P < .05). Sandblasting the porcelain surface before silane treatment provided similar bond strengths, but sandblasting or acid etching alone were less effective. Silane application was recommended to bond a ceramic bracket to the porcelain surface to achieve bond strengths that are clinically acceptable. PMID:11395705

  18. Parameters of tensile strength, elongation, and tenacity of 70mm IIaO spectroscopic film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, Ernest C., Jr.; Peters, Kevin A.

    1989-01-01

    The 70mm IIaO spectroscopic film was tested to determine its tensile strength, elongation, and breaking strength, using an Instron (strength and compression) 4201 Test Instrument. These data provide information leading to the upper and lower limits of the above parameters for 70mm IIaO spectroscopic film. This film will be developed by a commercial developing machine after the Ultraviolet Telescope Space Shuttle Mission returns to the Earth in the early 1990's; thus, it is necessary to understand these force parameters. Several test strips of approximately 200mm in length were used. The results indicate that when a stress load of 100 kg was applied, the film elongated approximately 1.06mm and the break strength was 19.45 kilograms.

  19. Characterization of tensile strength and fracture toughness of nuclear graphite NBG-18 using subsize specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, J. H.; Byun, T. S.; Strizak, J. P.; Snead, L. L.

    2011-05-01

    The mechanical properties of NBG-18 nuclear grade graphite were characterized using small specimen test techniques and statistical treatment on the test results. New fracture strength and toughness test techniques were developed to use subsize cylindrical specimens with glued heads and to reuse their broken halves. Three sets of subsize cylindrical specimens of different sizes were tested to obtain tensile fracture strength and fracture toughness. The mean fracture strength decreased as the specimen size increased. The fracture strength data indicate that in the given diameter range the size effect is not significant and much smaller than that predicted by the Weibull moduli estimated for individual specimen groups of the Weibull distribution. Further, no noticeable size effect existed in the fracture toughness data. The mean values of the fracture toughness datasets were in a narrow range of 1.21-1.26 MPa√m.

  20. Effects of HF Treatments on Tensile Strength of Hi-Nicalon Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    1998-01-01

    Tensile strengths of as-received Hi-Nicalon fibers and those having a dual BN/SiC surface coating, deposited by chemical vapor deposition, have been measured at room temperature. These fibers were also treated with HF for 24 h followed by tensile strength measurements. Strengths of uncoated and BN/SiC coated Hi-Nicalon fibers extracted from celsian matrix composites, by dissolving away the matrix in HF for 24 h, were also determined. The average tensile strength of uncoated Hi-Nicalon was 3.19 +/- 0.73 GPa with a Weibull modulus of 5.41. The Hi-Nicalon/BN/SiC fibers showed an average strength of 3.04 q 0.53 GPa and Weibull modulus of 6.66. After HF treatments, the average strengths of the uncoated and BN/SiC coated Hi-Nicalon fibers were 2.69 +/- 0.67 GPa and 2.80 +/- 0.53 GPa and the Weibull moduli were 4.93 and 5.96, respectively. The BN/SiC coated fibers extracted from the celsian matrix composite exhibited a strength of 2.38 +/- 0.40 GPa and a Weibull modulus of 7.15. The strength of the uncoated Hi-Nicalon fibers in the composite was so severely degraded that they disintegrated into small fragments during extraction with HF. The uncoated fibers probably undergo mechanical surface damage during hot pressing of the composites. Also, the BN layer on the coated fibers acts as a compliant layer which protects the fibers from mechanical damage during composite processing. The elemental composition and thickness of the fiber coatings were deten-nined using scanning Auger analysis. Microstructural analyses of the fibers and the coatings were done by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Strengths of fibers calculated using average and measured fiber diameters were in good agreement. Thus, the strength of fibers can be evaluated using an average fiber diameter instead of the measured diameter of each filament.

  1. Surface morphology changes of lignin filled natural rubber latex films investigated using AFM in relation to tensile strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asrul, M.; Othman, M.; Zakaria, M.

    2015-07-01

    The paper describes the preparation of lignin filled natural rubber latex composite and the consequential changes in tensile strength observed with varying lignin loading. The changes in tensile strength were shown to be associated with the changes in surface morphology as investigated via AFM. From the AFM analysis it can be inferred that lignin filled rubber latex film which exhibited an increase in tensile strength also demonstrated better phase homogeneity with lowest surface roughness value in comparison to the rest of the lignin filled rubber latex films analysed.

  2. Effect of cement types on the tensile strength of metallic crowns submitted to thermocycling.

    PubMed

    Consani, Simonides; Santos, Julie Guzela dos; Correr Sobrinho, Lourenço; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho; Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damião

    2003-01-01

    The relationship between metallic cast crowns and tensile strength according to cement types submitted to thermocycling was studied. Seventy-two metallic crowns were cast with Verabond II Ni-Cr alloy and cemented in standardized preparations with 10 masculine tapering. Three types of finishing line (45-degree chamfered, 20-degree bevel shoulder and right shoulder) were made with diamond burs on bovine teeth. Twenty-four metallic crowns in each group were randomly subdivided into three subgroups of 8 samples each according to the cement used: SS White zinc phosphate cement, Vitremer resin-modified glass ionomer cement, and Rely X resin cement and were submitted to thermocycling. Retention was evaluated according to tensile load required to displace the metallic cast crowns from tooth preparations with an Instron testing machine. ANOVA and Tukey's test showed a statistically significant difference among luting materials, with greater results for Rely X resin cement (24.9 kgf) followed by SS White zinc phosphate cement (13.3 kgf) and Vitremer resin-modified glass ionomer cement (10.1 kgf). The finishing line types did not influence the tensile resistance of the crowns fixed with the three cements. Increased tensile resistance of metallic crowns fixed on bovine teeth was obtained with resin cement, independent of the finishing line types. PMID:15057396

  3. Tensile strength of fiber reinforced plastics at 77K irradiated by various radiation sources

    SciTech Connect

    Humer, K.; Weber, H.W.; Tschegg, E.K.; Egusa, S.; Birtcher, R.C.; Gerstenberg, H.

    1993-08-01

    The influence of radiation damage on the mechanical properties of fiber reinforced plastics (FRPs), which are considered as candidate materials for the insulation of superconducting magnets for nuclear fusion reactors, has been investigated. Different types of FRPs (epoxies, bismaleimides; two- and three-dimensional reinforcement structures with E-, S-, or T-glass fibers) has been included in the test program. Three aspects of our present results will be discussed in detail. The first is related to an assessment of the tensile strength and its radiation dependence under the influence of strongly varying radiation conditions. The second aspect refers to low temperature ({approx}5 K) reactor irradiation of selected materials. In this case, identical sets of tensile test samples were transferred into the tensile testing machine, one without warming-up to room temperature and the other after an annealing cycle to room temperature. Finally, a comparison between the radiation response of different materials is made. It turns out that the three-dimensionally reinforced bismaleimide shows the smallest degradation of its tensile properties under all irradiation conditions.

  4. Modeling approach for tensile strength of interphase layers in polymer nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Zare, Yasser

    2016-06-01

    At the first step, this paper describes a developed model for tensile strength of interphase layers (σk) in polymer nanocomposites. The "σk" is expressed as linear, exponential and power functions of the distance between nanoparticles and polymer matrix (xk). Afterwards, the predictions of these equations at the central layer of interphase (the average strength) are compared to the calculations of interphase strength (σi) by several micromechanical models including the developed Leidner-Woodhams and Pukanszky models to choose the best equation which expresses "σk". The calculations are carried out for several reported samples. The equation which expresses the "σk" as a power function of "xk" shows the best results compared to others. Also, its predictions significantly depend to an exponent as "Z" which demonstrates the level of interphase properties. According to the chosen equation, the "σm" and "σp" play positive roles in "σi" predictions at low "Z" value, but a high "Z" eliminates the effect of "σm" on the tensile strength of interphase layers. PMID:26990956

  5. Tensile Bond Strength of Self Adhesive Resin Cement After Various Surface Treatment of Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Sekhri, Sahil; Garg, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In self adhesive resin cements adhesion is achieved to dental surface without surface pre-treatment, and requires only single step application. This makes the luting procedure less technique-sensitive and decreases postoperative sensitivity. Aim The purpose of this study was to evaluate bond strength of self adhesive resin after surface treatment of enamel for bonding base metal alloy. Materials and Methods On the labial surface of 64 central incisor rectangular base metal block of dimension 6 mm length, 5mm width and 1 mm height was cemented with RelyX U200 and Maxcem Elite self adhesive cements with and without surface treatment of enamel. Surface treatment of enamel was application of etchant, one step bonding agent and both. Tensile bond strength of specimen was measured with universal testing machine at a cross head speed of 1mm/min. Results Least tensile bond strength (MPa) was in control group i.e. 1.33 (0.32) & 1.59 (0.299), Highest bond strength observed when enamel treated with both etchant and bonding agent i.e. 2.72 (0.43) & 2.97 (0.19) for Relyx U200 and Elite cement. When alone etchant and bonding agent were applied alone bond strength is 2.19 (0.18) & 2.24 (0.47) for Relyx U200, and 2.38 (0.27) 2.49 (0.16) for Max-cem elite. Mean bond strength was higher in case of Max-cem Elite as compared to RelyX U200 resin cement, although differences were non–significant (p > 0.05). Conclusion Surface treatment of enamel increases the bond strength of self adhesive resin cement. PMID:26894165

  6. Chitosan films with improved tensile strength and toughness from N-acetyl-cysteine mediated disulfide bonds.

    PubMed

    Miles, Kevin Barrett; Ball, Rebecca Lee; Matthew, Howard William Trevor

    2016-03-30

    To improve the mechanical properties of chitosan (Ct) materials without the use of cytotoxic crosslinkers, disulfide cross-linkable Ct was synthesized by grafting N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) to Ct using carbodiimide chemistry. Cast films of NAC-Ct conjugates were prepared with degrees of substitution (DS) of 0%, 6%, 15%, and 20%, and the disulfide bond formation was induced by increasing the reaction media pH to 11. The tensile strength, breaking strain, elastic moduli and toughness of disulfide cross-linked polymers were analyzed by monotonic tensile testing of hydrated NAC-Ct films. Crystallinity was determined via XRD. Results demonstrated that NAC incorporation and crosslinking in chitosan produced tougher polymer films with 4-fold higher tensile strength (10 MPa) and 6-fold greater elongation (365%), but reduced crystallinity, compared to unmodified chitosan. The resilience of NAC-Ct films was evaluated by cyclic testing, and results demonstrate that increasing NAC content produced a more resilient material that dissipated less energy when deformed. These improved mechanical properties broaden chitosan's applicability towards the construction of mechanically robust implantable scaffolds for tissue regeneration. PMID:26794940

  7. Dynamic Tensile Strength of Low Temperature Ice and Kuiper Belt Size Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.; Fat'yanov, O. V.; Engelhardt, H.; Fraser, W. C.

    2009-09-01

    We model mutual gravitationally driven impact interactions in a nearly gas-free environment of the Kuiper belt (KB) and use low-temperature (< 100 K) ice dynamic strength dependent collisional out-come (accretion vs. erosion and fragmentation) models. These lead to theoretically predictable distributions of object number density, vs. mass distributions. These derived mass distributions are comparable to the now rapidly growing KB survey data. Tensional failure of single and polycrystalline ice in the temperature range from 263 to 128 K was measured for high strain rate, c.a. 104 s-1, dynamic loading conditions. Experiments, similar to Lange and Ahrens(1991)(LA), were conducted using a gas gun launched Lexan projectile. The liquid nitrogen cooled ice target approaching KB-like temperatures was partially confined, rather than using the LA confined geometry. Another set of experiments used a drop tube projectile launcher within the 263 K Caltech Ice Laboratory and at 163 K in a liquid nitrogen cooled chamber. New experiments give tensile strengths of 7.6±1.5 MPa at 263 K and 9.1±1.5 MPa at 163 K for unconfined, free of visual initial defects and measurable imperfections ice samples. The new strengths are lower than the earlier LA data ( 17 MPa). The major differences arise from ice target assembly. LA used polycrystalline ice samples confined in annular stainless steel target rings. New measurements were partially confined, in not initially contacting concentric target rings. Later shots used unconfined configurations with ice pellets affixed to aluminum foil. Circumferential confinement is known to increase the material damage threshold upon both compression and tensile loading. Previous confinement in LA is the main cause of the above discrepancy. Present tensile strengths are only a few times higher than 0.7 - 3.0 MPa summarized in Petrovic (2003) for quasistatic tension at 10-7 to 10-3 s-1 strain rate.

  8. The tensile strength characteristics study of the laser welds of biological tissue using the nanocomposite solder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimshan, I. B.; Ryabkin, D. I.; Savelyev, M. S.; Zhurbina, N. N.; Pyanov, I. V.; Eganova, E. M.; Pavlov, A. A.; Podgaetsky, V. M.; Ichkitidze, L. P.; Selishchev, S. V.; Gerasimenko, A. Y.

    2016-04-01

    Laser welding device for biological tissue has been developed. The main device parts are the radiation system and adaptive thermal stabilization system of welding area. Adaptive thermal stabilization system provided the relation between the laser radiation intensity and the weld temperature. Using atomic force microscopy the structure of composite which is formed by the radiation of laser solder based on aqua- albuminous dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes was investigated. AFM topograms nanocomposite solder are mainly defined by the presence of pores in the samples. In generally, the surface structure of composite is influenced by the time, laser radiation power and MWCNT concentration. Average size of backbone nanoelements not exceeded 500 nm. Bulk density of nanoelements was in the range 106-108 sm-3. The data of welding temperature maintained during the laser welding process and the corresponding tensile strength values were obtained. Maximum tensile strength of the suture was reached in the range 50-55°C. This temperature and the pointwise laser welding technology (point area ~ 2.5mm) allows avoiding thermal necrosis of healthy section of biological tissue and provided reliable bonding construction of weld join. In despite of the fact that tensile strength values of the samples are in the range of 15% in comparison with unbroken strips of pigskin leather. This situation corresponds to the initial stage of the dissected tissue connection with a view to further increasing of the joint strength of tissues with the recovery of tissue structure; thereby achieved ratio is enough for a medical practice in certain cases.

  9. Effect of Heat Treatment and Layer Orientation on the Tensile Strength of a Crystalline Rock Under Brazilian Test Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha Roy, Debanjan; Singh, T. N.

    2016-05-01

    The effect of heat treatment and the layer orientation on the tensile properties of granitic gneiss were studied under the unconfined stress condition. The tensile strength of the samples was studied using a Brazilian configuration, and the geochemical and microstructural properties were studied using the X-ray diffraction technique as well as scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The fracture pattern and the geometrical analyses were performed using the digital photographs. The results show that both the heat treatment and layer orientation have strong control on the tensile strength, force-parallel and layer-parallel strains, and on the tensile fracture geometry. A general decrease in the tensile strength of the rock was documented with the increasing heat treatment. Although, in the heat-treated samples, X-ray diffraction study do not reveal any major change in the mineral composition, but the SEM shows the development of several micro-cracks in the grains. In the samples with different layer orientation, along with the changes in the tensile strength and layer-parallel to force-parallel strain ratio, the layer activation under shear stress is also noticed. Here, the ratio between the tensile to shear stress, acting along the layers is thought to be the major controlling factor of the tensile properties of rocks, which has many applications in mining, civil constructions, and waste disposal work.

  10. Tensile and flexural strength of non-graphitic superhybrid composites: Predictions and comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.; Lark, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    Equations are presented and described which can be used to predict bounds on the tensile and flexural strengths of nongraphitic superhybrid (NGSH) composites. These equations are derived by taking into account the measured stress-strain behavior, the lamination residual stresses and the sequence of events leading to fracture. The required input for using these equations includes constituents, properties (elastic and strength), NGSH elastic properties, cure temperature, and ply stress influence coefficients. Results predicted by these equations are in reasonably good agreement with measured data for strength and for the apparent knees in the nonlinear stress-strain curve. The lower bound values are conservative compared to measured data. These equations are relatively simple and are suitable for use in the preliminary design and initial sizing of structural components made from NGSH composites.

  11. Tensile and flexural strength of nongraphitic superhybrid composites - Predictions and comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.; Lark, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    Equations are presented and described which can be used to predict bounds on the tensile and flexural strengths of nongraphitic superhybrid (NGSH) composites. These equations are derived by taking into account the measured stress-strain behavior, the lamination residual stresses and the sequence of events leading to fracture. The required input for using these equations includes constituent composites, elastic and strength properties, NGSH elastic properties, cure temperature, and ply stress influence coefficients. Results predicted by these equations are in reasonably good agreement with measured data for strength and for the apparent 'knees' in the nonlinear stress-strain curve. The lower bound values are conservative compared to measured data. These equations are relatively simple and should be suitable for use in the preliminary design and initial sizing of structural components made from NGSH composites.

  12. High Tensile Strength Amalgams for In-Space Fabrication and Repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.

    2006-01-01

    Amalgams are well known for their use in dental practice as a tooth filling material. They have a number of useful attributes that include room temperature fabrication, corrosion resistance, dimensional stability, and very good compressive strength. These properties well serve dental needs but, unfortunately, amalgams have extremely poor tensile strength, a feature that severely limits other potential applications. Improved material properties (strength and temperature) of amalgams may have application to the freeform fabrication of repairs or parts that might be necessary during an extended space mission. Advantages would include, but are not limited to: the ability to produce complex parts, a minimum number of processing steps, minimum crew interaction, high yield - minimum wasted material, reduced gravity compatibility, minimum final finishing, safety, and minimum power consumption. The work presented here shows how the properties of amalgams can be improved by changing particle geometries in conjunction with novel engineering metals.

  13. Bulk metallic glass composite with good tensile ductility, high strength and large elastic strain limit

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fu-Fa; Chan, K. C.; Jiang, Song-Shan; Chen, Shun-Hua; Wang, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Bulk metallic glasses exhibit high strength and large elastic strain limit but have no tensile ductility. However, bulk metallic glass composites reinforced by in-situ dendrites possess significantly improved toughness but at the expense of high strength and large elastic strain limit. Here, we report a bulk metallic glass composite with strong strain-hardening capability and large elastic strain limit. It was found that, by plastic predeformation, the bulk metallic glass composite can exhibit both a large elastic strain limit and high strength under tension. These unique elastic mechanical properties are attributed to the reversible B2↔B19′ phase transformation and the plastic-predeformation-induced complicated stress state in the metallic glass matrix and the second phase. These findings are significant for the design and application of bulk metallic glass composites with excellent mechanical properties. PMID:24931632

  14. Ultimate tensile strength of dentin: Evidence for a damage mechanics approach to dentin failure.

    PubMed

    Staninec, Michal; Marshall, Grayson W; Hilton, Joan F; Pashley, David H; Gansky, Stuart A; Marshall, Sally J; Kinney, John H

    2002-01-01

    Dentin structure and properties are known to vary with orientation and location. The present study explored the variation in the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of dentin with location in the tooth. Hourglass specimens were prepared from dentin located in the center, under cusps, and in the cervical regions of human molar teeth. These were tested in tension at various distances from the pulp. Median tensile strengths ranged from 44.4 MPa in the inner dentin near the pulp, to 97.8 MPa near the dentino-enamel junction (DEJ). This increase in the median UTS with distance from the pulp to the DEJ was statistically significant (P <.001). Of particular importance was the observation that the UTS measurements followed a Weibull probability distribution, with a Weibull modulus of about 4.5. The Weibull behavior of the UTS data strongly suggests that the large variances in fracture strength data result from a distribution of preexisting defects in the dentin. These findings justify a damage-mechanics approach to studies of dentin failure. PMID:12115767

  15. Tensile and fatigue strength properties of Kevlar 29 aramid/epoxy unidirectional composites

    SciTech Connect

    Zweben, C.

    1981-07-22

    Static and fatigue tensile strength properties of filament wound undirectional Kevlar 29/epoxy, typical of filament wound material used in flywheel rotors, were studied. Machining techniques were developed to minimize fiber fuzzing on edges. The static modulus, normalized to 70% fiber volume fraction is 8.87 x 10/sup 6/ psi. The major Poisson's ratio is 0.37. The static composite tensile strength, normalized to 70% fiber volume fraction is 200 x 10/sup 3/ psi, corresponding to a fiber stress at failure of 286 x 10/sup 3/ psi, which is good for materials having a very high fiber volume fraction. The S-N curve for R = 0.7 was found to be quite flat. Although the techniques used in this program had previously been employed successfully to study the fatigue behavior of Kevlar 29/epoxy and Kevlar 49/epoxy unidirectional materials, we were unable to overcome the persistent problem of cohesive material failure in the tab regions. The apparent reason for this is the very low interlaminar shear strength of the filament wound material. 16 figures.

  16. Tensile strength and disintegration of tableted silicified microcrystalline cellulose: influences of interparticle bonding.

    PubMed

    Kachrimanis, Kyriakos; Nikolakakis, Ioannis; Malamataris, Stavros

    2003-07-01

    The effects of some material variables (particle size and moisture content) on the tensile strength and disintegration time of tableted standard microcrystalline cellulose (MCC, Avicel) and a silicified brand (SMCC, Prosolv) were studied. Three particle size fractions were employed, after equilibration in three levels of environmental relative humidity (RH%), and the tensile strength and disintegration time were determined at different levels of total tablet porosity or packing fraction (p(f)). The MCC grade or silicification affects the moisture sorption and the packing during tapping as well as the particle deformation (yield pressure, P(y)) during tableting. There was a slight increase in the tensile strength but a marked increase in the disintegration time of Prosolv compared with Avicel in the p(f) range 0.7-0.9, which corresponds the range for pharmaceutical tablets. These increases are explained in terms of the range and magnitude of the interparticle forces developed and the interparticle separation. Despite the higher moisture content of Prosolv after equilibration compared with Avicel, compression of Prosolv results in higher P(y), in tablets of higher energy of interparticle bonding, longer interparticle separation, and extended disintegration compared with Avicel. The incorporated SiO(2) is thought to play the role of barrier or sink for the moisture sorbed, but only for RH up to 52%, which is a moisture content range less than twice that of tightly bound water. At higher RH (72%), the incorporated SiO(2) does not increase the P(y), but reduces the energy of interparticle bonding and the interparticle separation because of its probable saturation. The latter, in turn, results in more extended disintegration times due to reduced uptake of water into the tablets and to the probable reduction of water available for the deployment of the microcrystalline cellulose activity as disintegrant. PMID:12820153

  17. New enzyme-based process direction to prevent wool shrinking without substantial tensile strength loss.

    PubMed

    Lenting, H B M; Schroeder, M; Guebitz, G M; Cavaco-Paulo, A; Shen, J

    2006-05-01

    In this paper a new enzymatic process direction is described for obtaining machine washable wool with acceptable quality. In general, application of protease enzyme technology in wool processing results in considerable loss of tensile strength by diffusion of the enzyme into the interior of wool fibers. To overcome this disadvantage enzymatic activity has been more targeted to the outer surface of the scales by improving the susceptibility of the outer surface scale protein for proteolytic degradation. This has been realized by a pretreatment of wool with hydrogen peroxide at alkaline pH in the presence of high concentrations of salt. PMID:16791725

  18. Tensile Strength and Microstructural Characterization of Uncoated and Coated HPZ Ceramic Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Wheeler, Donald R.; Dickerson, Robert M.

    1996-01-01

    Tensile strengths of as-received HPZ fiber and those surface coated with BN, BN/SiC, and BN/Si3N4 have been determined at room temperature using a two-parameter Weibull distribution. Nominally approx. 0.4 micron BN and 0.2 micron SiC or Si3N4 coatings were deposited on the fibers by chemical vapor deposition using a continuous reactor. The average tensile strength of uncoated HPZ fiber was 2.0 +/- 0.56 GPa (290 +/- 81 ksi) with a Weibull modulus of 4.1. For the BN coated fibers, the average strength and the Weibull modulus increased to 2.39 +/- 0.44 GPa (346 +/- 64 ksi) and 6.5, respectively. The HPZ/BN/SiC fibers showed an average strength of 2.0 +/- 0.32 GPa (290 +/- 47 ksi) and Weibull modulus of 7.3. Average strength of the fibers having a dual BN/Si3N4 surface coating degraded to 1.15 +/- 0.26 GPa (166 +/- 38 ksi) with a Weibull modulus of 5.3. The chemical composition and thickness of the fiber coatings were determined using scanning Auger analysis. Microstructural analysis of the fibers and the coatings was carried out by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. A microporous silica-rich layer approx. 200 nm thick is present on the as-received HPZ fiber surface. The BN coatings on the fibers are amorphous to partly turbostratic and contaminated with carbon and oxygen. Silicon carbide coating was crystalline whereas the silicon nitride coating was amorphous. The silicon carbide and silicon nitride coatings are non-stoichiometric, non-uniform, and granular. Within a fiber tow, the fibers on the outside had thicker and more granular coatings than those on the inside.

  19. Relationship between the ideal tensile strength and the friction properties of metals in contact with nonmetals and themselves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    The adhesion and friction properties of metals in contact with diamond, boron nitride, silicon carbide, manganese-zinc ferrite, and the metals themselves in vacuum was investigated. An estimate of the ideal uniaxial tensile was obtained in terms of the equilibrium surface energy, interplanar spacing of the planes perpendicular to the tensile axis, and the Young's modulus of elasticity. The coefficient of friction for metals was found to be related to the ideal tensile strength of metals. The higher the strength of the metal, the lower the coefficient of friction.

  20. Influence of strain rate on the quasi-static tensile strength of Kevlar 29 narrow fabrics

    SciTech Connect

    Ericksen, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    Increasing the strain rate from 3 x 10/sup -4/ min/sup -1/ to 1.4 min/sup -1/ resulted in a 20% increase in fabric strength. Similar changes in strength with strain rate were obtained for warp yarns removed from the fabrics. Static and sliding loop yarn tests, and tests in which yarn was interwoven through wires, were used to determine effect of abrasion, bending and lateral compression as a function of strain rate. Results eliminated yarn damage by abrasion and demonstrated that unwoven yarn strength, in presence of bending or lateral compression, was dependent on strain rate. Yarn and fiber pullout tests showed that increasing strain rate caused a transition from stick-slip to smooth curves. Results suggested a mechanism whereby strain-rate dependent frictional behavior of Kevlar influences woven fabric strength. It appears that friction restrains highly loaded fibers in a fabric from adjusting their position to relieve stress concentrations. Yarn tensile strength is influenced by strain rate when the fiber arrangement has been altered by weaving or when bending or lateral compressive forces are also present.

  1. [Effect of magnesium stearate on the tensile strength of tablets made with the binder Prosolv SMCC 90].

    PubMed

    Muzíková, J

    2002-01-01

    The present paper evaluated the tensile strength of tablets made from the dry binder Prosolv SMCC 90 and the influence of three concentrations of the lubricant magnesium stearate on the tensile strength of tablets manufactured from this material. The results were compared with the same evaluation in Avicel PH 102. The tested concentrations of the stearate were 0.4, 0.8 and 1.2%. The tablets were compressed by three press powers (3, 3.5, and 4 kN). On the basis of obtained results it can be stated that under the same press powers Prosolv SMCC 90 alone yields stronger compacts than Avicel PH 102. From the viewpoint of decreased strength of compacts by adding magnesium stearate, the dry binder Prosolv SMCC 90 is much less sensitive than Avicel PH 102. In Avicel PH 102 a marked decrease in tensile strength was recorded with an addition of 0.4%, which was not observed with Prosolv SMCC90. A more significant decrease in the strength of compacts was shown by the substance not until a stearate concentration of 0.8%. The highest employed stearate concentration of 1.2% decreases the tensile strength of tablets made from Prosolv SMCC 90 in the press powers of 3.5 and 4 kN two times less than the tensile strength of the compacts from Avicel PH 102. PMID:11910741

  2. Optimization of tensile strength of ferritic/austenitic laser-welded components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anawa, E. M.; Olabi, A. G.

    2008-08-01

    Ferritic/austenitic (F/A) joints are a popular dissimilar metal combination used in many applications. F/A joints are usually produced using conventional processes. Laser beam welding (LBW) has recently been successfully used for the production of F/A joints with suitable mechanical properties. In this study, a statistical design of experiment (DOE) was used to optimize selected LBW parameters (laser power, welding speed and focus length). Taguchi approach was used for the selected factors, each having five levels (L-25; 5×3). Joint strength was determined using the notched-tensile strength (NTS) method. The results were analysed using analyses of variance (ANOVA) and the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios for the optimal parameters, and then compared with the base material. The experimental results indicate that the F/A laser-welded joints are improved effectively by optimizing the input parameters using the Taguchi approach.

  3. An experimental investigation on the tensile moduli and strengths of graphite/epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeow, Y. T.; Brinson, H. F.

    1977-01-01

    The results of a series of tensile tests on some graphite/epoxy laminates, at rates varying from 0.002 to 2 in./min are examined. The loads were applied at various angles to the fiber directions in each case. The rate-dependent behavior of the stress-strain response is assessed. Evidence is presented to indicate that failure first occurs on inner plies, and that, in some cases, moduli increase with increasing stress (or strain) level. Lamination theory is used to predict the moduli, and comparisons with experiment are given. This theory is also used in conjunction with three failure theories to predict ultimate strengths (with varying degrees of success). Further, two approaches to ply unloading after first-ply failure are used and discussed. One is a standard method found in the literature while the other is a proposed 'strength-of-materials' type of technique which is computationally much simpler.

  4. Enzymatic Surface Erosion of High Tensile Strength Polycarbonates Based on Natural Phenols

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Surface erosion has been recognized as a valuable design tool for resorbable biomaterials within the context of drug delivery devices, surface coatings, and when precise control of strength retention is critical. Here we report on high tensile strength, aromatic–aliphatic polycarbonates based on natural phenols, tyrosol (Ty) and homovanillyl alcohol (Hva), that exhibit enzymatic surface erosion by lipase. The Young’s moduli of the polymers for dry and fully hydrated samples are 1.0 to 1.2 GPa and 0.8 to 1.2 GPa, respectively. Typical characteristics of enzymatic surface erosion were confirmed for poly(tyrosol carbonate) films with concomitant mass-loss and thickness-loss at linear rates of 0.14 ± 0.01 mg cm–2 d–1 and 3.0 ± 0.8 μm d–1, respectively. The molecular weight and the mechanical properties of the residual films remained constant. Changing the ratio of Ty and Hva provided control over the glass transition temperature (Tg) and the enzymatic surface erosion: increasing the Hva content in the polymers resulted in higher Tg and lower enzymatic erosion rate. Polymers with more than 50 mol % Hva were stable at 37 °C in enzyme solution. Analysis on thin films using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) demonstrated that the onset temperature of the enzymatic erosion was approximately 20 °C lower than the wet Tg for all tested polymers. This new finding demonstrates that relatively high tensile strength polycarbonates can undergo enzymatic surface erosion. Moreover, it also sheds light on the connection between Tg and enzymatic degradation and explains why few of the high strength polymers follow an enzyme-meditated degradation pathway. PMID:24432806

  5. Mechanical reliability of microstructured optical fibers: a comparative study of tensile and bending strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnenfeld, C.; Sulejmani, S.; Geernaert, T.; Eve, S.; Gomina, M.; Makara, M.; Skorupski, K.; Mergo, P.; Berghmans, F.; Thienpont, H.

    2012-04-01

    Microstructured optical fibers are increasingly used in optical fiber sensing applications such as for example optical fiber based structural health monitoring. In such an application the fiber may experience substantial mechanical loads and has to remain functional during the entire lifetime of the structure to be monitored. The resistance to different types of mechanical loads has therefore to be characterized in order to assess the maximum stress and strain that a fiber can sustain. In this paper we therefore report on the extensive set of tensile tests and bending experiments that we have conducted both on microstructured optical fibers with an hexagonal air hole lattice and on standard optical fibers. We use Weibull statistics to model the strength distribution of the fibers and we follow a fracture mechanics approach in conjunction with microscopic observations of the fractured end faces to study crack initiation and propagation in both types of fibers. We show that the failure strain of microstructured fibers is about 4.3% as obtained with tensile tests, compared to 6.7% for reference fibers. Although the mechanical strength of microstructured optical fibers is lower than that of the standard fibers it is still adequate for these fibers to be used in many applications.

  6. Tensile Strength and Hardness Correlations with Microscopy in Friction welded Aluminium to Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satish, Rengarajan; Seshagiri Rao, Vaddi; Ananthapadmanaban, Dattaguru; Ravi, Balappa

    2016-01-01

    Aluminium and copper are good conductors of heat and electricity, copper being the better conductor, is a costly metal indeed. On the other hand, aluminium is cheap, easily available and also has a lower density than copper. Hence, worldwide efforts are being made to partially replace copper wire. Solid state welding should be used to join aluminium to copper. This is because the use of fusion welding results in brittle phases formed in the weld interface. One of the solid state welding techniques used for joining aluminium to copper is friction welding. In this paper, an attempt has been made to join aluminium to copper by friction welding by varying the friction welding parameters, namely friction pressure, upset pressure, burn-off length and speed of rotation of the workpiece. Nine different friction welding parameter combinations were used during welding in accordance with ASTM standards and results have been reported. Tensile strength and hardness tests were carried out for each parameter combination. Optimum friction welding parameter combination was identified with respect to tensile strength. Scanning Electron Microscopy and Electron dispersive spectroanalysis were obtained to identify modes of fracture and presence of intermetallic phases for each friction welding combination with the aim to narrow down friction welding parameters that give good properties on the whole.

  7. Effect of Preparation Methods on Crystallization Behavior and Tensile Strength of Poly(vinylidene fluoride) Membranes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Lu, Xiaolong; Wu, Chunrui

    2013-01-01

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) membranes were prepared by non solvent induced phase separation (NIPS), melt spinning and the solution-cast method. The effect of preparation methods with different membrane formation mechanisms on crystallization behavior and tensile strength of PVDF membranes was investigated. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy-attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were employed to examine the crystal form of the surface layers and the overall membranes, respectively. Spherulite morphologies and thermal behavior of the membranes were studied by polarized light optical microscopy (PLO) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) separately. It was found that the crystallization behavior of PVDF membranes was closely related to the preparation methods. For membranes prepared by the NIPS method, the skin layers had a mixture of α and β phases, the overall membranes were predominantly α phase, and the total crystallinity was 60.0% with no spherulite. For melt spinning membranes, the surface layers also showed a mixture of α and β phases, the overall membranes were predominantly α phase. The total crystallinity was 48.7% with perfect spherulites. Whereas the crystallization behavior of solution-cast membranes was related to the evaporation temperature and the additive, when the evaporation temperature was 140 °C with a soluble additive in the dope solution, obvious spherulites appeared. The crystalline morphology of PVDF exerted a great influence on the tensile strength of the membranes, which was much higher with perfect spherulites. PMID:24957064

  8. Effect of Preparation Methods on Crystallization Behavior and Tensile Strength of Poly(vinylidene fluoride) Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Lu, Xiaolong; Wu, Chunrui

    2013-01-01

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) membranes were prepared by non solvent induced phase separation (NIPS), melt spinning and the solution-cast method. The effect of preparation methods with different membrane formation mechanisms on crystallization behavior and tensile strength of PVDF membranes was investigated. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy-attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were employed to examine the crystal form of the surface layers and the overall membranes, respectively. Spherulite morphologies and thermal behavior of the membranes were studied by polarized light optical microscopy (PLO) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) separately. It was found that the crystallization behavior of PVDF membranes was closely related to the preparation methods. For membranes prepared by the NIPS method, the skin layers had a mixture of α and β phases, the overall membranes were predominantly α phase, and the total crystallinity was 60.0% with no spherulite. For melt spinning membranes, the surface layers also showed a mixture of α and β phases, the overall membranes were predominantly α phase. The total crystallinity was 48.7% with perfect spherulites. Whereas the crystallization behavior of solution-cast membranes was related to the evaporation temperature and the additive, when the evaporation temperature was 140 °C with a soluble additive in the dope solution, obvious spherulites appeared. The crystalline morphology of PVDF exerted a great influence on the tensile strength of the membranes, which was much higher with perfect spherulites. PMID:24957064

  9. TENSILE STRENGTH AND FRACTURE SURFACE CHARACTERIZATION OF HI-NICALONTM SIC FIBERS

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblood, Gerald E.; Lewinsohn, Charles A.; Jones, Russell H.; Kohyama, Akira

    2000-06-30

    Dimensional, tensile strength and fracture surface characterizations were carried out for a particular batch (51 samples) of unirradiated Hi-Nicalon™ SiC fiber. This batch of SiC fibers is included in the radiation test matrix as part of the JUPITER 12J and 14J experiments. In general, filaments of Hi-Nicalon™ fiber with larger cross-sectional areas (equivalent diameters) had lower strengths than filaments with smaller cross-sectional areas. During tensile tests at room temperature, fracture originated at critical flaws that typically consisted of internal pores or carbonaceous inclusions. Well-demarcated mirror and hackle regions usually surrounded the critical flaws. With a few exceptions, the critical flaw size (ac) was linearly related to the mirror size (rm) by ac » 0.33rm. From fracture mechanics principles, values for the average mirror constant (Am) and effective fracture toughness for this batch of Hi-NicalonÔ fiber were estimated to be 2.99 ± 0.33 and 1.1 ± 0.2 MPa m1/2, respectively.

  10. The impact of polymerization method on tensile bond strength between denture base and acrylic teeth.

    PubMed

    Hashem, Mohamed; Binmgren, Mohammed A; Alsaleem, Samah O; Vellappally, Sajith; Assery, Mansour K; Sukumaran, Anil

    2014-01-01

    Failure of the bond between acrylic teeth and the denture base resin interface is one of the major concern in prosthodontics. The new generation of denture bases that utilize alternate polymerization methods are being introduced in the market. The aim of the study is to evaluate the influence of polymerization methods on bonding quality between the denture base and artificial teeth. Sixty test specimens were prepared (20 in each group) and were polymerized using heat, microwave and visible light curing. The tensile strength was recorded for each of the samples, and the results were analyzed statistically. The light-activated Eclipse™ System showed the highest tensile strength, followed by heat curing. The microwave-cured samples exhibited the least bonding to the acrylic teeth. Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that the new generation of light-cured denture bases showed significantly better bonding to acrylic teeth and can be used as an alternative to the conventional heat-polymerized denture base. PMID:25307813

  11. Origin of tensile strength of a woven sample cut in bias directions

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Ning; Kovar, Radko; Dolatabadi, Mehdi Kamali; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Diantang; Sun, Ying; Chen, Li

    2015-01-01

    Textile fabrics are highly anisotropic, so that their mechanical properties including strengths are a function of direction. An extreme case is when a woven fabric sample is cut in such a way where the bias angle and hence the tension loading direction is around 45° relative to the principal directions. Then, once loaded, no yarn in the sample is held at both ends, so the yarns have to build up their internal tension entirely via yarn–yarn friction at the interlacing points. The overall fabric strength in such a sample is a result of contributions from the yarns being pulled out and those broken during the process, and thus becomes a function of the bias direction angle θ, sample width W and length L, along with other factors known to affect fabric strength tested in principal directions. Furthermore, in such a bias sample when the major parameters, e.g. the sample width W, change, not only the resultant strengths differ, but also the strength generating mechanisms (or failure types) vary. This is an interesting problem and is analysed in this study. More specifically, the issues examined in this paper include the exact mechanisms and details of how each interlacing point imparts the frictional constraint for a yarn to acquire tension to the level of its strength when both yarn ends were not actively held by the testing grips; the theoretical expression of the critical yarn length for a yarn to be able to break rather than be pulled out, as a function of the related factors; and the general relations between the tensile strength of such a bias sample and its structural properties. At the end, theoretical predictions are compared with our experimental data. PMID:26064655

  12. Origin of tensile strength of a woven sample cut in bias directions.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ning; Kovar, Radko; Dolatabadi, Mehdi Kamali; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Diantang; Sun, Ying; Chen, Li

    2015-05-01

    Textile fabrics are highly anisotropic, so that their mechanical properties including strengths are a function of direction. An extreme case is when a woven fabric sample is cut in such a way where the bias angle and hence the tension loading direction is around 45° relative to the principal directions. Then, once loaded, no yarn in the sample is held at both ends, so the yarns have to build up their internal tension entirely via yarn-yarn friction at the interlacing points. The overall fabric strength in such a sample is a result of contributions from the yarns being pulled out and those broken during the process, and thus becomes a function of the bias direction angle θ, sample width W and length L, along with other factors known to affect fabric strength tested in principal directions. Furthermore, in such a bias sample when the major parameters, e.g. the sample width W, change, not only the resultant strengths differ, but also the strength generating mechanisms (or failure types) vary. This is an interesting problem and is analysed in this study. More specifically, the issues examined in this paper include the exact mechanisms and details of how each interlacing point imparts the frictional constraint for a yarn to acquire tension to the level of its strength when both yarn ends were not actively held by the testing grips; the theoretical expression of the critical yarn length for a yarn to be able to break rather than be pulled out, as a function of the related factors; and the general relations between the tensile strength of such a bias sample and its structural properties. At the end, theoretical predictions are compared with our experimental data. PMID:26064655

  13. Accuracy of Prediction Method of Cryogenic Tensile Strength for Austenitic Stainless Steels in ITER Toroidal Field Coil Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Takeru; Icuchi, Masahide; Nakahira, Masatake; Saito, Toru; Morimoto, Masaaki; Inagaki, Takashi; Hong, Yunseok; Matsui, Kunihiro; Hemmi, Tsutomu; Kajitani, Hideki; Koizumi, Norikiyo

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has developed the prediction method for yield stress and ultimate tensile strength at liquid helium temperature (4 K) using the quadratic curve as a function of the content of carbon and nitrogen. Prediction method was formulated based on the tensile strength data of materials with shape of rectangle. In this study, tensile strength of the forged materials with round bar and complex shape were obtained so as to compare with the predicted value. The accuracy of the prediction method was 10.2% of Yield Strength (YS), 2.5% of Ultimate Tensile Strength (UTS) when the prediction method was applied to round bar forged materials. By contrast, the accuracy about prediction method was 1.8% of YS, -0.8% of UTS when prediction method was applied to complex shape forged materials. It can be presumed the tendency of tensile strength other than materials with shape of rectangle. However, it was found accuracy of round bar is larger than other materials because of difference in the forging method."The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of the ITER Organization"

  14. Tensile Bond Strengths of Two Adhesives on Irradiated and Nonirradiated Human Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Cécile; Abouelleil, Hazem; Gustin, Marie-Paule; Grosgogeat, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of radiotherapy on bond efficiency of two different adhesive systems using tensile bond strength test. Twenty extracted teeth after radiotherapy and twenty nonirradiated extracted teeth were used. The irradiation was applied in vivo to a minimal dose of 50 Gy. The specimens of each group were randomly assigned to two subgroups to test two different adhesive systems. A three-step/etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Optibond FL) and a two-steps/self-etch adhesive system (Optibond XTR) were used. Composite buildups were performed with a nanohybrid composite (Herculite XTR). All specimens were submitted to thermocycling ageing (10000 cycles). The specimens were sectioned in 1 mm2 sticks. Microtensile bond strength tests were measured. Nonparametric statistical analyses were performed due to nonnormality of data. Optibond XTR on irradiated and nonirradiated teeth did not show any significant differences. However, Optibond FL bond strength was more effective on nonirradiated teeth than on irradiated teeth. Within the limitations of an in vitro study, it can be concluded that radiotherapy had a significant detrimental effect on bond strength to human dentin. However, it seems that adhesive choice could be adapted to the substrata. According to the present study, the two-steps/self-etch (Optibond XTR) adhesive system tested could be more effective on irradiated dentin compared to three-steps/etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Optibond FL). PMID:26783528

  15. Tensile Bond Strengths of Two Adhesives on Irradiated and Nonirradiated Human Dentin.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Cécile; Villat, Cyril; Abouelleil, Hazem; Gustin, Marie-Paule; Grosgogeat, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of radiotherapy on bond efficiency of two different adhesive systems using tensile bond strength test. Twenty extracted teeth after radiotherapy and twenty nonirradiated extracted teeth were used. The irradiation was applied in vivo to a minimal dose of 50 Gy. The specimens of each group were randomly assigned to two subgroups to test two different adhesive systems. A three-step/etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Optibond FL) and a two-steps/self-etch adhesive system (Optibond XTR) were used. Composite buildups were performed with a nanohybrid composite (Herculite XTR). All specimens were submitted to thermocycling ageing (10000 cycles). The specimens were sectioned in 1 mm(2) sticks. Microtensile bond strength tests were measured. Nonparametric statistical analyses were performed due to nonnormality of data. Optibond XTR on irradiated and nonirradiated teeth did not show any significant differences. However, Optibond FL bond strength was more effective on nonirradiated teeth than on irradiated teeth. Within the limitations of an in vitro study, it can be concluded that radiotherapy had a significant detrimental effect on bond strength to human dentin. However, it seems that adhesive choice could be adapted to the substrata. According to the present study, the two-steps/self-etch (Optibond XTR) adhesive system tested could be more effective on irradiated dentin compared to three-steps/etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Optibond FL). PMID:26783528

  16. A modified Weibull model for tensile strength distribution of carbon nanotube fibers with strain rate and size effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Gengzhi; Pang, John H. L.; Zhou, Jinyuan; Zhang, Yani; Zhan, Zhaoyao; Zheng, Lianxi

    2012-09-01

    Fundamental studies on the effects of strain rate and size on the distribution of tensile strength of carbon nanotube (CNT) fibers are reported in this paper. Experimental data show that the mechanical strength of CNT fibers increases from 0.2 to 0.8 GPa as the strain rate increases from 0.00001 to 0.1 (1/s). In addition, the influence of fiber diameter at low and high strain rate conditions was investigated further with statistical analysis. A modified Weibull distribution model for characterizing the tensile strength distribution of CNT fibers taking into account the effect of strain rate and fiber diameter is proposed.

  17. Symbiosis of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi and Robinia pseudoacacia L. Improves Root Tensile Strength and Soil Aggregate Stability.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haoqiang; Liu, Zhenkun; Chen, Hui; Tang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Robinia pseudoacacia L. (black locust) is a widely planted tree species on Loess Plateau for revegetation. Due to its symbiosis forming capability with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, we explored the influence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on plant biomass, root morphology, root tensile strength and soil aggregate stability in a pot experiment. We inoculated R. pseudoacacia with/without AM fungus (Rhizophagus irregularis or Glomus versiforme), and measured root colonization, plant growth, root morphological characters, root tensile force and tensile strength, and parameters for soil aggregate stability at twelve weeks after inoculation. AM fungi colonized more than 70% plant root, significantly improved plant growth. Meanwhile, AM fungi elevated root morphological parameters, root tensile force, root tensile strength, Glomalin-related soil protein (GRSP) content in soil, and parameters for soil aggregate stability such as water stable aggregate (WSA), mean weight diameter (MWD) and geometric mean diameter (GMD). Root length was highly correlated with WSA, MWD and GMD, while hyphae length was highly correlated with GRSP content. The improved R. pseudoacacia growth, root tensile strength and soil aggregate stability indicated that AM fungi could accelerate soil fixation and stabilization with R. pseudoacacia, and its function in revegetation on Loess Plateau deserves more attention. PMID:27064570

  18. Symbiosis of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi and Robinia pseudoacacia L. Improves Root Tensile Strength and Soil Aggregate Stability

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haoqiang; Liu, Zhenkun; Chen, Hui; Tang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Robinia pseudoacacia L. (black locust) is a widely planted tree species on Loess Plateau for revegetation. Due to its symbiosis forming capability with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, we explored the influence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on plant biomass, root morphology, root tensile strength and soil aggregate stability in a pot experiment. We inoculated R. pseudoacacia with/without AM fungus (Rhizophagus irregularis or Glomus versiforme), and measured root colonization, plant growth, root morphological characters, root tensile force and tensile strength, and parameters for soil aggregate stability at twelve weeks after inoculation. AM fungi colonized more than 70% plant root, significantly improved plant growth. Meanwhile, AM fungi elevated root morphological parameters, root tensile force, root tensile strength, Glomalin-related soil protein (GRSP) content in soil, and parameters for soil aggregate stability such as water stable aggregate (WSA), mean weight diameter (MWD) and geometric mean diameter (GMD). Root length was highly correlated with WSA, MWD and GMD, while hyphae length was highly correlated with GRSP content. The improved R. pseudoacacia growth, root tensile strength and soil aggregate stability indicated that AM fungi could accelerate soil fixation and stabilization with R. pseudoacacia, and its function in revegetation on Loess Plateau deserves more attention. PMID:27064570

  19. Evaluation of the effects of tableting speed on the relationships between compaction pressure, tablet tensile strength, and tablet solid fraction.

    PubMed

    Tye, Ching Kim; Sun, Changquan Calvin; Amidon, Gregory E

    2005-03-01

    It is well known that compression speed can have significant effects on the compaction properties of pharmaceutical powders. This is a challenge during scale up and technology transfer when tableting speeds are significantly increased. This study examined the effects of tableting speed on the compressibility (solid fraction vs. compaction pressure), tabletability (tensile strength vs. compaction pressure), and compactibility (tensile strength vs. solid fraction) of four common direct compression excipients and a placebo formulation. The tabletability and compressibility of some of these materials were observed to be speed dependent whereas the compactibility of all materials tested was essentially independent of tableting speed. It is therefore proposed that the compactibility profile (tensile strength vs. solid fraction) is a predictor that is independent of tableting speed and can be used to predict tablet strength during formulation development and scale up. PMID:15696587

  20. Relationship between apposition pressure during welding and tensile strength of the acute weld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Paul J.; Walsh, Joseph T., Jr.

    2001-05-01

    Dye-assisted photothermal welding is a technique used to close wounds by thermally cross-linking collagen across apposed tissue edges. For a successful weld, not only do laser parameters have to be optimized, but also apposition of the incision has to be consistent and controlled. The objective of this study was to quantify the relationship between the applied apposition pressure (i.e., the compressive force holding the wound closed during the welding procedure divided by the area of the skin-to-skin interface) and the tensile strength of the wound following the welding procedure. By using a clamping device made of two complementary pieces, each 3 cm wide with a row of 10 equally spaced blunt wire mesh tips, the apposition pressure along a 2-cm-long incision in each albino guinea pig was quantified using a 127-micrometers -thick load cell and varied from 0-1.8 kgf/cm2. A continuous wave, Nd:YAG laser emitting 10.0 W of 1.06-micrometers radiation from a 600-micrometers -diameter fiber irradiating a 5-mm-diameter spot size was scanned across the incision in order to deliver 300 J of total energy. As the apposition pressure of the incisions was increased, the resulting tensile strength of welded skin increased in a sigmoidal manner. For this welding technique, an apposition pressure of at least 1.2 kgf/cm2 is necessary to obtain maximum weld strength of the skin (2.56+/- 0.36 kg/cm2).

  1. Comparison of the flexural strength of six reinforced restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Cohen, B I; Volovich, Y; Musikant, B L; Deutsch, A S

    2001-01-01

    This study calculated the flexural strength for six reinforced restorative materials and demonstrated that flexural strength values can be determined simply by using physical parameters (diametral tensile strength and Young's modulus values) that are easily determined experimentally. A one-way ANOVA analysis demonstrated a statistically significant difference between the two reinforced glass ionomers and the four composite resin materials, with the composite resin being stronger than the glass ionomers. PMID:12017792

  2. Back Propagation Neural Networks for Predicting Ultimate Strengths of Unidirectional Graphite/Epoxy Tensile Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.; Hill, Eric v. K.

    1993-01-01

    The research presented herein demonstrates the feasibility of predicting ultimate strengths in simple composite structures through a neural network analysis of their acoustic emission (AE) amplitude distribution data. A series of eleven ASTM D-3039 unidirectional graphite/epoxy tensile samples were loaded to failure to generate the amplitude distributions for this analysis. A back propagation neural network was trained to correlate the AE amplitude distribution signatures generated during the first 25% of loading with the ultimate strengths of the samples. The network was trained using two sets of inputs: (1) the statistical parameters obtained from a Weibull distribution fit of the amplitude distribution data, and (2) the event frequency (amplitude) distribution itself. The neural networks were able to predict ultimate strengths with a worst case error of -8.99% for the Weibull modeled amplitude distribution data and 3.74% when the amplitude distribution itself was used to train the network. The principal reason for the improved prediction capability of the latter technique lies in the ability of the neural network to extract subtle features from within the amplitude distribution.

  3. Influence of residual stresses on the tensile strength of composite-metal sandwich laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herakovich, C. T.; Wong, D. M.

    1977-01-01

    The tensile strength of boron-epoxy/aluminum sandwich laminates is discussed relative to the residual thermal stresses generated by curing and bonding at elevated temperatures. It is shown that the sandwich laminates investigated exhibit three dinstinct modes of failure, depending upon the fiber orientation of the composite. Sandwich laminates with moderate to high percentage of 0-deg fibers exhibit early failures initiated by edge effect; laminates with moderate to high percentage of 90-deg fibers fail according to a first-ply failure criterion; laminates with moderate to high percentages of plus or minus 45 deg plies fail at strains equal to or greater than the failure strain of the corresponding all-composite laminate.

  4. Tensile Strength of Liquids: Equivalence of Temporal and Spatial Scales in Cavitation.

    PubMed

    Cai, Y; Huang, J Y; Wu, H A; Zhu, M H; Goddard, W A; Luo, S N

    2016-03-01

    It is well known that strain rate and size effects are both important in material failure, but the relationships between them are poorly understood. To establish this connection, we carry out molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of cavitation in Lennard-Jones and Cu liquids over a very broad range of size and strain rate. These studies confirm that temporal and spatial scales play equivalent roles in the tensile strengths of these two liquids. Predictions based on smallest-scale MD simulations of Cu for larger temporal and spatial scales are consistent with independent simulations, and comparable to experiments on liquid metals. We analyze these results in terms of classical nucleation theory and show that the equivalence arises from the role of both size and strain rate in the nucleation of a daughter phase. Such equivalence is expected to hold for a wide range of materials and processes and to be useful as a predictive bridging tool in multiscale studies. PMID:26885747

  5. Analysis of Ninety Degree Flexure Tests for Characterization of Composite Transverse Tensile Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OBrien, T. Kevin; Krueger, Ronald

    2001-01-01

    Finite element (FE) analysis was performed on 3-point and 4-point bending test configurations of ninety degree oriented glass-epoxy and graphite-epoxy composite beams to identify deviations from beam theory predictions. Both linear and geometric non-linear analyses were performed using the ABAQUS finite element code. The 3-point and 4-point bending specimens were first modeled with two-dimensional elements. Three-dimensional finite element models were then performed for selected 4-point bending configurations to study the stress distribution across the width of the specimens and compare the results to the stresses computed from two-dimensional plane strain and plane stress analyses and the stresses from beam theory. Stresses for all configurations were analyzed at load levels corresponding to the measured transverse tensile strength of the material.

  6. Tensile strength of ramie yarn (spinning by machine)/HDPE thermoplastic matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banowati, Lies; Hadi, Bambang K.; Suratman, Rochim; Faza, Aulia

    2016-03-01

    Technological developments should be trooped to prevent a gap between technology and environmental sustainability, then it needs to be developed "Green technology". In this research is making of green composites which use natural fiber ramie as reinforcement. Whereas the matrix used was HDPE (High Density Polyethylene) thermoplastic polymer which could be recycled and had a good formability and flexibility. The ramie yarns and fibers for unidirectional (0°) direction respectively were mixed with HDPE powder and processed using hot compression molding. The surface morphology was observed by SEM (Scanning Electrone Microscopy). Results showed that both tensile strength of the ramie fiber/HDPE composites increased in comparison with the ramie yarn (spinning by machine)/HDPE composites. However, the ramie yarn (spinning by machine)/HDPE composites have a good producibility for wider application. Analysis of the test results using the Weibull distribution as approaches to modeling the reliability of the specimens.

  7. Influence of association of "EVA-NBR" on indirect tensile strength of modified bituminous concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinoun, M.; Soudani, K.; Haddadi, S.

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this work is to contribute to the improvement of the mechanical properties of bituminous concrete by modification of bituminous concrete. In this study, we present the results of the indirect tensile strength "ITS" of modified bituminous concrete by the combination of two modifiers, one is a plastomer EVA (Ethylene Vinyl Acetate) and the other is a industrial waste from the shoe soles grinding NBR (Nitrile Butadiene Rubber) as crumb rubber. To modify the bitumen a wet process was used. The results show that the modification of bitumen by EVA-NBR combination increases their resistance to the indirect traction "ITS" compared to the bituminous concrete control. The mixture of 5% [50% EVA+ 50% NBR] is given the best result among the other associations.

  8. Analysis of the influence of voids and a crack on the ultimate tensile strength of REBCO bulk superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasaba, K.; Oshida, Y.; Hokari, T.; Katagiri, K.

    2008-09-01

    Since the high Tc rare-earth based bulk superconductor is subjected to the tensile load in radial and circumferential direction by the Lorentz force generated in the magnetization process, the evaluation of the strength by the tensile test is indispensable. Ultimate tensile strength of the bulk superconductor depends on the defects in each sample. Many artificial specimens containing voids were generated for numerical stress calculations. The distribution of the voids diameter in each artificial specimen was based on the observations of Dy123 containing 25 wt% Dy211 (abbreviated as Dy25). Furthermore, the effect of a center crack superposed to the field of the voids on the strength was analytically evaluated. The strength depends on both the size and the location of the voids. The maximum crack length which has eventually no effect on the strength was evaluated. By the evaluation method proposed in this study, it was found that if there had been no void in the Dy25 bulk sample, the tensile strength could have been estimated to be 63 MPa. The voids increase the stress intensity factor at the crack tip. If there is a crack with 0.16 mm or more in the Dy25 superconductor bulk with the porosity 10%, the fracture may not be originated around a void but at a crack tip.

  9. Tensile strength as a function of thermal history of Inconel 718 and Inconel 625 alloys for glass-ceramic headers

    SciTech Connect

    Rey, M.C.; Henderson, W.R.

    1982-06-11

    Tensile strength tests were conducted on Inconel 718 specimens following a variety of heat treatments, and on as-received and heat-treated specimens of Inconel 625. A heat treatment cycle for Inconel 718 was found that represents an acceptable compromise between a thermal cycle that yields the strongest metal and one that least taxes a glass-ceramic material to which the Inconel 718 is bonded. Heat treating resulted in a moderate decrease in the tensile strength of the as-received Inconel 625.

  10. Tensile strengths of polyamide based 3D printed polymers in liquid nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, P.; Shoemake, E. D.; Adam, P.; Leachman, J.

    2015-12-01

    Advances in additive manufacturing technology have made 3D printing a viable solution for many industries, allowing for the manufacture of designs that could not be made through traditional subtractive methods. Applicability of additive manufacturing in cryogenic applications is hindered, however, by a lack of accurate material properties information. Nylon is available for printing using fused deposition modeling (FDM) and selective laser sintering (SLS). We selected 5 SLS (DuraForm® EX, DuraForm® HST, DuraForm® PA, PA 640-GSL, and PA 840-GSL) and 2 FDM (Nylon 12, ULTEM) nylon variants based on the bulk material properties and printed properties at room temperature. Tensile tests were performed on five samples of each material while immersed in liquid nitrogen at approximately 77 Kelvin. Samples were tested in XY and, where available, Z printing directions to determine influence on material properties. Results show typical SLS and FDM nylon ultimate strength retention at 77 K, when compared to (extruded or molded) nylon ultimate strength.

  11. Dimensional stability and tensile strength of irradiated Nicalon-CG and Hi-Nicalon SiC fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblood, G.E.; Henager, C.H. Jr.; Senor, D.J.; Newsome, G.A.; Woods, J.J.

    1997-05-01

    Nicalon-CG and Hi-Nicalon fibers were characterized by measuring their length, density, and tensile strength in the unirradiated, thermal annealed, and irradiated conditions. The irradiation was conducted in the EBR-II to a dose of 43 dpa-SiC at a nominal irradiation temperature of 1,000 C. The annealed specimens were held at 1,010 C for 165 days to approximately duplicate the thermal exposure of the irradiated specimens. The results indicate the fibers that perform best in an irradiation environment are those that approach stoichiometric and crystalline SiC. Hi-Nicalon exhibited negligible densification, accompanied by an increase in tensile strength after irradiation. Nicalon-CG possessed a higher tensile strength than hi-Nicalon in the unirradiated condition, but was significantly weakened in the annealed and irradiated conditions. In addition, Nicalon-CG exhibited unacceptable irradiation-induced shrinkage. Loss o fiber tensile strength after irradiation is shown to reduce the flexural strength of irradiated composites and Nicalon-CG fiber shrinkage observed in irradiated composites.

  12. Modeling the Effect of Oxidation on Tensile Strength of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2015-12-01

    An analytical method has been developed to investigate the effect of oxidation on the tensile strength of carbon fiber - reinforced ceramic - matrix composites (CMCs). The Budiansky - Hutchinson - Evans shear - lag model was used to describe the micro stress field of the damaged composite considering fibers failure. The statistical matrix multicracking model and fracture mechanics interface debonding criterion were used to determine the matrix crack spacing and interface debonded length. The fiber strength degradation model and oxidation region propagation model have been adopted to analyze the oxidation effect on tensile strength of the composite, which is controlled by diffusion of oxygen gas through matrix cracks. Under tensile loading, the fibers failure probabilities were determined by combining oxidation model and fiber statistical failure model based on the assumption that fiber strength is subjected to two-parameter Weibull distribution and the loads carried by broken and intact fibers statisfy the global load sharing criterion. The composite can no longer support the applied load when the total loads supported by broken and intact fibers approach its maximum value. The conditions of a single matrix crack and matrix multicrackings for tensile strength considering oxidation time and temperature have been analyzed.

  13. Establishment of a model predicting tensile shear strength and fracture portion of laser-welded lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furusako, Seiji; Miyazaki, Yasunobu; Hashimoto, Koji; Kobayashi, Junichi

    2003-03-01

    This study was aimed at establishment of a model that can predict tensile shear strength and fracture portion laser-welded lap joints in the tensile test. To clear influence of the bead length and width on them, the joints employed steel sheets with a thickness in the range of 0.8 mm to 1.2 mm were evaluated. It was found that the tensile shear strength increased with the bead size, and the fracture occurred at base metal (BM), weld metal (WM) or portion between them with a curvature (referred to as portion R). Also to clarify rotational deformation process around WM during the tensile test, joint cross-sections were observed at some applied load levels in the test. This observation derived the relationship between the radius, Ri, at the inner plane of portion R and the rotational angle, θ, of the center of sheet thickness, and the relationship between Ri and applied load. A plastic analysis based on these functions and assumptions that the joint consists of BM, WM and R, which are under simplified stress mode respectively, could estimate the tensile shear strength and the fracture portion of the joints. This estimation made good accord with experimental results.

  14. Laboratory measurements of ice tensile strength dependence on density and concentration of silicate and polymer impurities at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litwin, K. L.; Beyeler, J. D.; Polito, P. J.; Zygielbaum, B. R.; Sklar, L. S.; Collins, G. C.

    2009-12-01

    The tensile strength of ice bedrock on Titan should strongly influence the effectiveness of the erosional processes responsible for carving the extensive fluvial drainage networks and other surface features visible in images returned by the Cassini and Huygens probes. Recent measurements of the effect of temperature on the tensile strength of low-porosity, polycrystalline ice, without impurities, suggest that ice bedrock at the Titan surface temperature of 93 K may be as much as five times stronger than ice at terrestrial surface temperatures. However, ice bedrock on Titan and other outer solar system bodies may have significant porosity, and impurities such silicates or polymers are possible in such ices. In this laboratory investigation we are exploring the dependence of tensile strength on the density and concentration of impurities, for polycrystalline ice across a wide range of temperatures. We use the Brazilian tensile splitting test to measure strength, and control temperature with dry ice and liquid nitrogen. The 50 mm diameter ice cores are made from a log-normally distributed seed crystal mixture with a median size of 1.4 mm. To control ice density and porosity we vary the packing density of the seed grains in core molds and vary the degree of saturation of the matrix with added near-freezing distilled water. We also vary ice density by blending in a similarly-sized mixture of angular fragments of two types of impurities, a fine-grained volcanic rock and a polyethylene polymer. Because both types of impurities have greater tensile strength than ice at Earth surface temperatures, we expect higher concentrations of impurities to correlate with increased strength for ice-rock and ice-polymer mixtures. However, at the ultra-cold temperatures of the outer planets, we expect significant divergence in the temperature dependence of ice tensile strength for the various mixtures and resulting densities. These measurements will help constrain the range of possible

  15. A Tensile Strength of Bermuda Grass and Vetiver Grass in Terms of Root Reinforcement Ability Toward Soil Slope Stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noorasyikin, M. N.; Zainab, M.

    2016-07-01

    An examination on root characteristics and root properties has been implemented in this study. Two types of bioengineering were chose which are Vetiver grass and Bermuda grass as these grasses were widely applied for slope stabilization. The root samples were taken to the laboratory to investigate its classification, characteristics and strength. The root of both grasses was found grow with fibrous root matrix system. In terms of root anchorage, the root matrix system of Vetiver grass was exhibits more strengthen than the Bermuda grass. However, observation on root image from Scanning Electron Microscope test reveals that the root of Vetiver grass becomes non-porous as the moisture content reduced. Meanwhile, the root tensile strength of Bermuda grass was obtained acquired low value with higher percentage of moisture content, root morphology and bonding strength. The results indicated that the root tensile strength is mainly influence by percentage of moisture content and root morphology.

  16. Effects of reclaimed asphalt pavement on indirect tensile strength test of foamed asphalt mix tested in dry condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yati Katman, Herda; Rasdan Ibrahim, Mohd; Yazip Matori, Mohd; Norhisham, Shuhairy; Ismail, Norlela

    2013-06-01

    Indirect tensile strength (ITS) test was conducted to analyse strength of the foamed asphalt mixes incorporating reclaimed asphalt pavement. Samples were tested for ITS after cured in the oven at 40°C for 72 hours. This testing condition known as dry condition or unconditioned. Laboratory results show that reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) contents insignificantly affect the ITS results. ITS results significantly affected by foamed bitumen contents.

  17. Resistance to densification, tensile strength and capsule-filling performance of some pharmaceutical diluents.

    PubMed

    Nikolakakis, I; Aragon, O B; Malamataris, S

    1998-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare some indicators of capsule-filling performance, as measured by tapped density under different conditions, and elucidate possible quantitative relationships between variation of capsule fill-weight (%CV) and gravitational and inter-particle forces (attractive or frictional) derived from measurements of particle size, true density, low compression and tensile strength. Five common pharmaceutical diluents (lactose, maize starch, talc, Emcocel and Avicel) were investigated and two capsule-filling methods (pouring powder and dosator nozzle) were employed. It was found that for the pouring-type method the appropriateness of Hausner's ratio (HR), Carr's compressibility index (CC%) and Kawakita's constant (alpha) as indicators of capsule fill-weight variation decreases in the order alpha > CC% > HR; the appropriateness of these indicators also decreases with increasing cylinder size and with impact velocity during tapping. For the dosator-type method the appropriateness of the indicators decreases in the order HR > CC% > alpha, the opposite of that for the pouring-type method; the appropriateness of the indicators increases with decreasing cylinder size and impact velocity. The relationship between %CV and the ratio of inter-particle attractive to gravitational forces calculated from measurements of particle size and true density (Fvdw/Wp) was more significant for the pouring-type capsule-filling method. For the dosator-type method a significant relationship (1% level) was found between %CV and the product of Fvdw/Wp and a function expressing the increase, with packing density (p(f)), in the ratio of frictional to attractive inter-particle forces derived from compression (P) and tensile-strength (T) testing, d(log(P/T))/d(p(f)). The value of tapped density in predictions of capsule-filling performance is affected by the testing conditions in a manner depending on the filling method applied. For the pouring-type method predictions

  18. Modeling and predicting the tensile strength of poly (lactic acid)/graphene nanocomposites by using support vector regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, W. D.; Cai, C. Z.; Luo, Y.; Li, Y. H.; Zhao, C. J.

    2016-04-01

    According to an experimental dataset under different process parameters, support vector regression (SVR) combined with particle swarm optimization (PSO) for its parameter optimization was employed to establish a mathematical model for prediction of the tensile strength of poly (lactic acid) (PLA)/graphene nanocomposites. Four variables, while graphene loading, temperature, time and speed, were employed as input variables, while tensile strength acted as output variable. Using leave-one-out cross validation test of 30 samples, the maximum absolute percentage error does not exceed 1.5%, the mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) is only 0.295% and the correlation coefficient (R2) is as high as 0.99. Compared with the results of response surface methodology (RSM) model, it is shown that the estimated errors by SVR are smaller than those achieved by RSM. It revealed that the generalization ability of SVR is superior to that of RSM model. Meanwhile, multifactor analysis is adopted for investigation on significances of each experimental factor and their influences on the tensile strength of PLA/graphene nanocomposites. This study suggests that the SVR model can provide important theoretical and practical guide to design the experiment, and control the intensity of the tensile strength of PLA/graphene nanocomposites via rational process parameters.

  19. Evaluation of Surface Roughness and Tensile Strength of Base Metal Alloys Used for Crown and Bridge on Recasting (Recycling)

    PubMed Central

    Hashmi, Syed W.; Rao, Yogesh; Garg, Akanksha

    2015-01-01

    Background Dental casting alloys play a prominent role in the restoration of the partial dentition. Casting alloys have to survive long term in the mouth and also have the combination of structure, molecules, wear resistance and biologic compatibility. According to ADA system casting alloys were divided into three groups (wt%); high noble, Noble and predominantly base metal alloys. Aim To evaluate the mechanical properties such as tensile strength and surface roughness of the new and recast base metal (nickel-chromium) alloys. Materials and Methods Recasting of the base metal alloys derived from sprue and button, to make it reusable has been done. A total of 200 test specimens were fabricated using specially fabricated jig of metal and divided into two groups- 100 specimens of new alloy and 100 specimens of recast alloys, which were tested for tensile strength on universal testing machine and surface roughness on surface roughness tester. Results Tensile strength of new alloy showed no statistically significant difference (p-value>0.05) from recast alloy whereas new alloy had statistically significant surface roughness (Maximum and Average surface roughness) difference (p-value<0.01) as compared to recast alloy. Conclusion Within the limitations of the study it is concluded that the tensile strength will not be affected by recasting of nickel-chromium alloy whereas surface roughness increases markedly. PMID:26393194

  20. A new derivation of the tensile strength of cometary nuclei: Application to comet Shoemaker-Levy 9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, J. Mayo; Mizutani, Hitoshi; Yamamoto, Tetsuo

    1994-01-01

    The splitting of comets as exemplified by comet Shoemaker-Levy 9, when it passed near Jupiter, is a common phenomenon. Multiple splitting is also not an uncommon occurrence. It is clear that the comet nucleus is fragile, i.e., its tensile strength is small compared with that of solid materials. We show that aggregates of sub-micron interstellar dust particles presumed to consist of a silicate core, an inner mantle of complex organic refractory molecules, and an outer mantle dominated by H2O ice (Greenberg, 1982) provide the basis for a quantitative derivation of the tensile strength of comet SL9 using molecular interactions at the contact interfaces. In fact, using a mean particle size representing interstellar dust as it would appear in its final presolar state one derives a tensile strength which describes remarkably well the multiple splitting phenomenon. This derivation of the tensile strength of a particle aggregate resulting from molecular interactions is quite general and can be applied to physical situations involving any sorts of aggregates as well as those representing comet nuclei.

  1. Research on tensile strength characteristics of bridge deck pavement bonding layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shaopeng; Han, Jun

    2010-03-01

    As the development of the traffic in the world, the bridge deck pavement is playing a more and more important role in the whole traffic system. Big span bridge has become more and more especially cement concrete bridge, therefore the bridge deck pavement bonding layers are emphasized as an important part of bridge traffic system, which can mitigate travel impact to bridge and magnify stationary or traffic amenity. The quality and durability of deck pavement bonding layer has directly effect on traffic safety, comfort, durability and investment of bridge. It represents the first line of defence against the ingress of water, road de-icing salts and aggressive chemicals. In real project, many early age damage of bridge deck pavement has become serious disease that affecting the function of bridge. During the construction of the bridge deck, many types of asphalt binders were used, such as styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS) modified asphalt, styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) modified asphalt, neoprene latex asphalt, etc. In this paper UTM-25 was used to test the tensile strength of different bridge deck pavement bonding layers with the different treatment methods to inter-surface.

  2. Research on tensile strength characteristics of bridge deck pavement bonding layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shaopeng; Han, Jun

    2009-12-01

    As the development of the traffic in the world, the bridge deck pavement is playing a more and more important role in the whole traffic system. Big span bridge has become more and more especially cement concrete bridge, therefore the bridge deck pavement bonding layers are emphasized as an important part of bridge traffic system, which can mitigate travel impact to bridge and magnify stationary or traffic amenity. The quality and durability of deck pavement bonding layer has directly effect on traffic safety, comfort, durability and investment of bridge. It represents the first line of defence against the ingress of water, road de-icing salts and aggressive chemicals. In real project, many early age damage of bridge deck pavement has become serious disease that affecting the function of bridge. During the construction of the bridge deck, many types of asphalt binders were used, such as styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS) modified asphalt, styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) modified asphalt, neoprene latex asphalt, etc. In this paper UTM-25 was used to test the tensile strength of different bridge deck pavement bonding layers with the different treatment methods to inter-surface.

  3. Hydrogen Embrittlement of a 1500-MPa Tensile Strength Level Steel with an Ultrafine Elongated Grain Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Yihong; Kimura, Yuuji; Inoue, Tadanobu; Yin, Fuxing; Akiyama, Eiji; Tsuzaki, Kaneaki

    2012-05-01

    A deformation of a tempered martensitic structure ( i.e., tempforming) at 773 K (500 °C) was applied to a 0.6 pct C-2 pct Si-1 pct Cr steel. The hydrogen embrittlement (HE) property of the tempformed (TF) steel was investigated by a slow strain rate test (SSRT) and an accelerated atmospheric corrosion test (AACT). Hydrogen content within the samples after SSRT and AACT was measured by thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS). The tempforming at 773 K (500 °C) using multipass caliber rolling with an accumulative are reduction of 76 pct resulted in the evolution of an ultrafine elongated grain (UFEG) structure with a strong <110>//rolling direction (RD) fiber deformation texture and a dispersion of spheroidized cementite particles. The SSRT of the pre-hydrogen-charged notched specimens and the AACT demonstrated that the TF sample had superior potential for HE resistance to the conventional quenched and tempered (QT) sample at a tensile strength of 1500 MPa. The TDS analysis also indicated that the hydrogen might be mainly trapped by reversible trapping sites such as grain boundaries and dislocations in the TF sample, and the hydrogen trapping states of the TF sample were similar to those of the QT sample. The QT sample exhibited hydrogen-induced intergranular fracture along the boundaries of coarse prior-austenite grains. In contrast, the hydrogen-induced cracking occurred in association with the UFEG structure in the TF sample, leading to the higher HE resistance of the TF sample.

  4. Effect of Fiber Strength on the Room Temperature Tensile Properties of Sic/Ti-24Al-11Nb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draper, S. L.; Brindley, P. K.; Nathal, M. V.

    1991-01-01

    SCA-6 SiC fibers of known strength were incorporated into SiC/Ti-24Al-11Nb (at. percent) composites and the effect of fiber strength variability on room temperature composite strength was investigated. Fiber was etched out of a composite fabricated by the powder cloth technique and the effect of the fabrication process on fiber strength was assessed. The strength of the composite was directly correlated with the strength of the as-received fiber. The strength of composite plates containing mixed fiber strengths was dominated by the lower strength fiber. Fabrication by the powder cloth technique resulted in only a slight degradation of fiber strength. The strength of the composite was found to be overestimated by the rule of mixtures strength calculation. Examination of failed tensile specimens revealed periodic fiber cracks and the failure mode was concluded to be cumulative. With the variation in fiber strength eliminated, the composite UTS was found to have a positive correlation with volume fraction of fiber.

  5. Structural disorder effects on the tensile strength distribution of heterogeneous brittle materials with emphasis on fiber networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hristopulos, Dionissios T.; Uesaka, Tetsu

    2004-08-01

    Understanding the interplay of structural disorder and strength properties at various length scales can lead to improvements in the strength reliability of heterogeneous brittle materials. Various studies in ordered fiber- matrix composites have shown the existence of critical clusters of breaks and macroscopic weak-link scaling behavior. The fiber network in paper is structurally disordered. We verify experimentally that the tensile strength of newsprint samples follows weak-link scaling and obtain an estimate for the link and critical-cluster sizes. However, a slight nonlinear behavior is observed in the Weibull plots of the experimental strength distributions. We propose that this is due to mesoscopic structural disorder (e.g., at length scales between millimeters and centimeters), which we incorporate in the strength distribution of the links by averaging over the elastic stress variations. The prevailing industry perception is that mesoscopic disorder controls the strength reliability. In contrast, we find that it does not significantly affect the crucial lower tail of the strength distribution. Based on our analysis, we suggest a more reliable measurement approach for the tensile strength of newsprint paper. We also obtain explicit expressions for the effects of disorder on stress variations and the macroscopic Young’s modulus, including dependence on the shear modulus and anisotropic effects.

  6. Addition of antibacterial agents to MMA-TBB dentin bonding systems--influence on tensile bond strength and antibacterial effect.

    PubMed

    Kudou, Y; Obara, K; Kawashima, T; Kubota, M; Abe, S; Endo, T; Komatsu, M; Okuda, R

    2000-03-01

    To produce a bonding system which has both high bond strength and antibacterial properties, an antibacterial agent (vancomycin: VCM or metronidazol: MN) was added to the PMMA powder of 4-META/MMA-TBB resin (CB). The influence of the addition of an antibacterial agent on tensile bond strength to dentin and the antibacterial effect were investigated in this study. Forty-seven freshly extracted bovine first or second incisors were used to measure the tensile bond strength to dentin. The bond strengths to bovine dentin were not significantly decreased by addition of VCM (1%, 2%, 5%), or MN (1%) to CB (p < 0.05). The antibacterial effect of CB containing antibacterial agent on six strains of bacteria was investigated by the agar plate diffusion method, analyzing the appearance of the inhibition zone around a resin disk following anaerobic culturing. The resin disks containing VCM showed antibacterial effects on all of the strains examined; the widths of the inhibition zones were 4-15 mm. The resin disks containing MN showed antibacterial effects on three strains; the widths of the inhibition zones were 0-4 mm. It was thus possible to produce a bonding system with both antibacterial effect and high tensile bond strength by addition of VCM to PMMA powder. PMID:11219091

  7. Effect of Saliva on the Tensile Bond Strength of Different Generation Adhesive Systems: An In-Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Abhay Mani; Saha, Sonali; Dhinsa, Kavita; Garg, Aarti

    2015-01-01

    Background Newer development of bonding agents have gained a better understanding of factors affecting adhesion of interface between composite and dentin surface to improve longevity of restorations. Objective The present study evaluated the influence of salivary contamination on the tensile bond strength of different generation adhesive systems (two-step etch-and-rinse, two-step self-etch and one-step self-etch) during different bonding stages to dentin where isolation is not maintained. Materials and Methods Superficial dentin surfaces of 90 extracted human molars were randomly divided into three study Groups (Group A: Two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system; Group B: Two-step self-etch adhesive system and Group C: One-step self-etch adhesive system) according to the different generation of adhesives used. According to treatment conditions in different bonding steps, each Group was further divided into three Subgroups containing ten teeth in each. After adhesive application, resin composite blocks were built on dentin and light cured subsequently. The teeth were then stored in water for 24 hours before sending for testing of tensile bond strength by Universal Testing Machine. The collected data were then statistically analysed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD test. Results One-step self-etch adhesive system revealed maximum mean tensile bond strength followed in descending order by Two-step self-etch adhesive system and Two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system both in uncontaminated and saliva contaminated conditions respectively. Conclusion Unlike One-step self-etch adhesive system, saliva contamination could reduce tensile bond strength of the two-step self-etch and two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system. Furthermore, the step of bonding procedures and the type of adhesive seems to be effective on the bond strength of adhesives contaminated with saliva. PMID:26393214

  8. The Disulfide Bonds within BST-2 Enhance Tensile Strength during Viral Tethering.

    PubMed

    Du Pont, Kelly E; McKenzie, Aidan M; Kokhan, Oleksandr; Sumner, Isaiah; Berndsen, Christopher E

    2016-02-16

    Human BST-2/tetherin is a host factor that inhibits the release of enveloped viruses, including HIV-1, HIV-2, and SIV, from the cell surface by tethering viruses to the host cell membrane. BST-2 has an α-helical ectodomain that forms disulfide-linked dimers between two monomers forming a coiled coil. The ectodomain contains three cysteine residues that can participate in disulfide bond formation and are critical for viral tethering. The role of the disulfides in viral tethering is unknown but proposed to be for maintaining the dimer. We explored the role of the disulfides in the structure of BST-2 using experimental, biophysical methods. To understand the role of the disulfides in viral tethering, we used a new approach in viral tethering, steered molecular dynamics. We find that the disulfides coordinate the unfolding of the BST-2 monomers, which adds tensile strength to the coiled coil. Structural differences between oxidized and reduced BST-2 are apparent during unfolding, showing the monomers slide past each other in the absence of the disulfides. We found no evidence to support dissociation of the dimer upon reduction of the disulfide bonds. Moreover, the structure of BST-2 in the absence of the disulfides is similar to that of the oxidized form of BST-2, supporting previous X-ray crystallography and cellular work that showed the disulfides are not required for expression of BST-2. These data provide new insights into viral tethering by using novel techniques in the analysis of BST-2 to give amino acid level insight into functions of BST-2. PMID:26789136

  9. Tensile bond strength of a lithium-disilicate pressed glass ceramic to dentin of different surface treatments.

    PubMed

    Zortuk, Mustafa; Kilic, Kerem; Gurbulak, Aysegul Guleryuz; Kesim, Bulent; Uctasli, Sadullah

    2010-08-01

    The effects of desensitizer, disinfectant, saliva, blood, and hydrogen peroxide on the tensile bond strength between adhesive and ceramic as well as between adhesive and dentin were examined. Sixty 7x3 mm pressed ceramic discs of IPS e.max were fabricated and randomly assigned to six groups of different dentin surface treatments (control, desensitizer, disinfectant, saliva, blood, and hydrogen peroxide). Representative samples of fractured specimens were observed by SEM (scanning electron microscopy). There were significant differences between the control group and saliva, blood, and hydrogen peroxide groups (p<0.05). However, there were no significant differences between any other dentin surface treatment groups (p>0.05). Results of this study suggested that only saliva, blood, and hydrogen peroxide influenced the tensile bond strength between dentin and ceramic. PMID:20657150

  10. A Unified Model for Predicting the Open Hole Tensile and Compressive Strengths of Composite Laminates for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Paul; Pineda, Evan J.; Heinrich, Christian; Waas, Anthony M.

    2013-01-01

    The open hole tensile and compressive strengths are important design parameters in qualifying fiber reinforced laminates for a wide variety of structural applications in the aerospace industry. In this paper, we present a unified model that can be used for predicting both these strengths (tensile and compressive) using the same set of coupon level, material property data. As a prelude to the unified computational model that follows, simplified approaches, referred to as "zeroth order", "first order", etc. with increasing levels of fidelity are first presented. The results and methods presented are practical and validated against experimental data. They serve as an introductory step in establishing a virtual building block, bottom-up approach to designing future airframe structures with composite materials. The results are useful for aerospace design engineers, particularly those that deal with airframe design.