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1

Compressive and diametral tensile strengths of current adhesive luting agents.  

PubMed

Strength parameters greatly influence the selection of luting agents. This study compared the compressive and diametral tensile strengths of six classes of new adhesive luting agents (ALAs) with zinc phosphate as the controls. The 11 materials tested were prepared according to the manufacturers' instructions for use as luting agents. Mean compressive and diametral strengths and standard errors were calculated for each luting agent (n = 10). Analysis of variance was computed (p < 0.0011) and multiple comparisons tests were performed. Compressive strengths varied from 41.5 MPa for a hydroxyapatite ALA to 178.5 MPa for a composite resin ALA. Diametral tensile strengths ranged from 8.1 MPa for a hydroxyapatite ALA to 45.1 MPa for a composite resin ALA. Conventional powder-liquid glass ionomer ALAs, an encapsulated glass ionomer ALA, a composite resin-glass ionomer hybrid ALA, and the composite resin ALAs demonstrated significantly greater compressive and diametral strengths than the zinc phosphate cements. PMID:8391577

White, S N; Yu, Z

1993-06-01

2

General and mechanistic optimal relationships for tensile strength of doubly convex tablets under diametrical compression.  

PubMed

We propose a general framework for determining optimal relationships for tensile strength of doubly convex tablets under diametrical compression. This approach is based on the observation that tensile strength is directly proportional to the breaking force and inversely proportional to a non-linear function of geometric parameters and materials properties. This generalization reduces to the analytical expression commonly used for flat faced tablets, i.e., Hertz solution, and to the empirical relationship currently used in the pharmaceutical industry for convex-faced tablets, i.e., Pitt's equation. Under proper parametrization, optimal tensile strength relationship can be determined from experimental results by minimizing a figure of merit of choice. This optimization is performed under the first-order approximation that a flat faced tablet and a doubly curved tablet have the same tensile strength if they have the same relative density and are made of the same powder, under equivalent manufacturing conditions. Furthermore, we provide a set of recommendations and best practices for assessing the performance of optimal tensile strength relationships in general. Based on these guidelines, we identify two new models, namely the general and mechanistic models, which are effective and predictive alternatives to the tensile strength relationship currently used in the pharmaceutical industry. PMID:25683146

Razavi, Sonia M; Gonzalez, Marcial; Cuitiño, Alberto M

2015-04-30

3

Diametral tensile strength and film thickness of an experimental dental luting agent derived from castor oil  

PubMed Central

The need to develop new dental luting agents in order to improve the success of treatments has greatly motivated research. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the diametral tensile strength (DTS) and film thickness (FT) of an experimental dental luting agent derived from castor oil (COP) with or without addition of different quantities of filler (calcium carbonate - CaCO3). Material and Methods Eighty specimens were manufactured (DTS N=40; FT N=40) and divided into 4 groups: Pure COP; COP 10%; COP 50% and zinc phosphate (control). The cements were mixed according to the manufacturers' recommendations and submitted to the tests. The DTS test was performed in the MTS 810 testing machine (10 KN, 0.5 mm/min). For FT test, the cements were sandwiched between two glass plates (2 cm2) and a load of 15 kg was applied vertically on the top of the specimen for 10 min. The data were analyzed by means of one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (?=0.05). Results The values of DTS (MPa) were: Pure COP- 10.94±1.30; COP 10%- 30.06±0.64; COP 50%- 29.87±0.27; zinc phosphate- 4.88±0.96. The values of FT (µm) were: Pure COP- 31.09±3.16; COP 10%- 17.05±4.83; COP 50%- 13.03±4.83; Zinc Phosphate- 20.00±0.12. One-way ANOVA showed statistically significant differences among the groups (DTS - p=1.01E-40; FT - p=2.4E-10). Conclusion The experimental dental luting agent with 50% of filler showed the best diametral tensile strength and film thickness. PMID:22437672

CARMELLO, Juliana Cabrini; FAIS, Laiza Maria Grassi; RIBEIRO, Lígia Nunes de Moraes; CLARO NETO, Salvador; GUAGLIANONI, Dalton Geraldo; PINELLI, Lígia Antunes Pereira

2012-01-01

4

The diametral tensile strength and hydrostability of polymer-ceramic nano-composite (pcnc) material prototypes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Statement of the problem: There is a weak connection between the filler and the resin matrix of dental composites caused primarily by hydrolysis of silane coupling agent, therefore, jeopardizing the mechanical properties of the dental restorations. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the diametral tensile strength (DTS) of a nano-mechanically bonded polymer ceramic nano composite (pcnc) versus the chemically bonding prototype polymer ceramic nano composite (pcnc) fabricated by using hydrolytically stable interphase. Materials and Methods: Composites were made with 60wt % filler, 38% triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (TEDGMA), 1% camphorquinone (CQ) and 1% 2-(dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA). Tests for DTS were performed using a universal testing machine. The disk-shaped specimens were loaded in compression between two supporting plates at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until fracture. The samples, measuring 3 mm in height and 6 mm in diameter, were produced in a round stainless steel (SS) mold. A total of 144 samples were created. Groups of 48 samples were made for each of three different fillers. Specimens were soaked in artificial saliva at 37° for four time periods, dry(t=0), 1 day, 7 days, 28 days). At the end of each soaking time DTS tests were performed. Results: There where statistically significant differences in the DTS between the filler groups and the soaking times (p=<0.001) as well as for the pairwise comparison between the different filler group values and between the different soaking times as an individual treatment. Overall, longer soaking times resulted in lower mean DTS values. The DTS of the PCNC for filler #1 decreased to 82.4% of the original value after 1 day of soaking, 67.2% after 7 days and 27.2 % after 28 days. For filler #2 decreased to 54.8% of the original value after 1 day of soaking, 62.3% after 7 days and 61.2% after 28 days. For filler #3 decreased to 71.2% of the original value, 67.3% after 7 days and 51.4% after 28 days (Fig 8). Conclusions: Within the limitation of this study it can be concluded that the use of coupling agent will significantly influence the degradation of the material under wet environment. Clinical Implication: Changes within matrix composition and bonding interphase of resin base composites promise improvements of mechanical properties, decreasing the incidence of clinical failure of posterior composite restorations, hence resulting in a more ideal restorative material for use in posterior segment. The results of this investigation showed that the deficiency of hydrostability in dental composites is a detrimental factor in the mechanical behavior. The silanation of the filler particles have a positive influence on the mechanical properties of dental composites but the hydrolysis of the silane coupling agent can dramatically reduce the average lifetime of dental composites.

Yepez, Johanna

5

Finite Element Simulation of Diametral Strength Test of Hydroxyapatite  

SciTech Connect

In this study, the diametral strength test of sintered hydroxyapatite was simulated by the finite element software, ABAQUS/Standard. Stress distributions on diametral test sample were determined. The effect of sintering temperature on stress distribution of hydroxyapatite was studied. It was concluded that high sintering temperatures did not reduce the stress on hydroxyapatite. It had a negative effect on stress distribution of hydroxyapatite after 1300 deg. C. In addition to the porosity, other factors (sintering temperature, presence of phases and the degree of crystallinity) affect the diametral strength of the hydroxyapatite.

Ozturk, Fahrettin; Toros, Serkan [Nigde University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Nigde, 51245 (Turkey); Evis, Zafer [Middle East Technical University, Department of Engineering Sciences, Ankara, 06531 (Turkey)

2011-01-17

6

The Effect of Temperature on Compressive and Tensile Strengths of Commonly Used Luting Cements: An In Vitro Study  

PubMed Central

Background: The luting cements must withstand masticatory and parafunctional stresses in the warm and wet oral environment. Mouth temperature and the temperature of the ingested foods may induce thermal variation and plastic deformation within the cements and might affect the strength properties. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of temperature on the compressive and diametral tensile strengths of two polycarboxylate, a conventional glass ionomer and a resin modified glass ionomer luting cements and, to compare the compressive strength and the diametral tensile strength of the selected luting cements at varying temperatures. Materials and Methods: In this study, standardized specimens were prepared. The temperature of the specimens was regulated prior to testing them using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Six specimens each were tested at 23°C, 37°C and 50°C for both the compressive and diametral tensile strengths, for all the luting cements. Results: All the luting cements showed a marginal reduction in their compressive and diametral tensile strengths at raised temperatures. Fuji Plus was strongest in compression, followed by Fuji I > Poly F > Liv Carbo. Fuji Plus had the highest diametral tensile strength values, followed by Poly F = Fuji I = Liv Carbo, at all temperatures. Conclusion: An increase in the temperature caused no significant reduction in the compressive and diametral tensile strengths of the cements evaluated. The compressive strength of the luting cements differed significantly from one another at all temperatures. The diametral tensile strength of resin modified glass ionomers differed considerably from the other cements, whereas there was no significant difference between the other cements, at all the temperatures.

Patil, Suneel G; Sajjan, MC Suresh; Patil, Rekha

2015-01-01

7

Investigations into the tensile failure of doubly-convex cylindrical tablets under diametral loading using finite element methodology.  

PubMed

In the literature various solutions exist for the calculation of the diametral compression tensile strength of doubly-convex tablets and each approach is based on experimental data obtained from single materials (gypsum, microcrystalline cellulose) only. The solutions are represented by complex equations and further differ for elastic and elasto-plastic behaviour of the compacts. The aim of this work was to develop a general equation that is applicable independently of deformation behaviour and which is based on simple tablet dimensions such as diameter and total tablet thickness only. With the help of 3D-FEM analysis the tensile failure stress of doubly-convex tables with central cylinder to total tablet thickness ratios W/D between 0.06 and 0.50 and face-curvature ratios D/R between 0.25 and 1.85 were evaluated. Both elastic and elasto-plastic deformation behaviour were considered. The results of 80 individual simulations were combined and showed that the tensile failure stress ?t of doubly-convex tablets can be calculated from ?t=(2P/?DW)(W/T)=2P/?DT with P being the failure load, D the diameter, W the central cylinder thickness, and T the total thickness of the tablet. This equation converts into the standard Brazilian equation (?t=2P/?DW) when W equals T, i.e. is equally valid for flat cylindrical tablets. In practice, the use of this new equation removes the need for complex measurements of tablet dimensions, because it only requires values for diameter and total tablet thickness. It also allows setting of standards for the mechanical strength of doubly-convex tablets. The new equation holds both for elastic and elasto-plastic deformation behaviour of the tablets under load. It is valid for all combinations of W/D-ratios between 0.06 and 0.50 with D/R-ratios between 0.00 and 1.85 except for W/D=0.50 in combination with D/R-ratios of 1.85 and 1.43 and for W/D-ratios of 0.40 and 0.30 in combination with D/R=1.85. FEM-analysis indicated a tendency to failure by capping or even more complex failure patterns in these exceptional cases. The FEM-results further indicated that in general W/D-ratios between 0.15 and 0.20 are favourable when the overall size and shape of the tablets is modified to give maximum tablet tensile strength. However, the maximum tensile stress of doubly-convex tablets will never exceed that of a flat-face cylindrical tablet of similar W/D-ratio. The lowest tensile stress depends on the W/D-ratio. For the thinnest central cylinder thickness, this minimum stress occurs at D/R=0.50; for W/D-ratios between 0.10 and 0.20 the D/R-ratio for the minimum tensile stress increases to 0.67, and for all other central cylinder thicknesses the minimum tensile stress is found at D/R=1.00. PMID:23834836

Podczeck, Fridrun; Drake, Kevin R; Newton, J Michael

2013-09-15

8

Determination of tensile strength of paraffin waxes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The tensile strength of paraffin wax is considered to be one of the important property indices that are used to characterize the service properties of this material. Methods used to determine the tensile strength of waxes are based on the use of Perkins and Tinius-Olsen testers [1]. Essentially, these methods consist of determinations of the force required to break a

O. G. Asadchii; B. Z. Votlokhin; N. F. Bogdanov; V. P. Gladyshev

1979-01-01

9

Surfactant effects on soil aggregate tensile strength  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Little is known regarding a soil aggregate's tensile strength response to surfactants that may be applied to alleviate soil water repellency. Two laboratory investigations were performed to determine surfactant effects on the tensile strength of 1) Ap horizons of nine wettable, agricultural soils co...

10

CHARACTERIZATION OF TENSILE STRENGTH OF GLOVEBOX GLOVES  

SciTech Connect

A task was undertaken to compare various properties of different glovebox gloves, having various compositions, for use in gloveboxes at the Savannah River Site (SRS). One aspect of this project was to determine the tensile strength (TS) of the gloves. Longitudinal tensile samples were cut from 15 different gloves and tensile tested. The stress, load, and elongation at failure were determined. All of the gloves that are approved for glovebox use and listed in the glovebox procurement specification met the tensile and elongation requirements. The Viton{reg_sign} compound gloves are not listed in the specification, but exhibited lower tensile strengths than permissible based on the Butyl rubber requirements. Piercan Polyurethane gloves were the thinnest samples and exhibited the highest tensile strength of the materials tested.

Korinko, P.; Chapman, G.

2012-02-29

11

Method and apparatus for determining tensile strength  

DOEpatents

A method and apparatus is described for determining the statistical distribution of apparent tensile strength of rock, the size effect with respect to tensile strength, as well as apparent deformation modulus of both intact and fractured or jointed rock. The method is carried out by inserting a plug of deformable material, such as rubber, in an opening of a specimen to be tested. The deformable material is loaded by an upper and lower platen until the specimen ruptures, whereafter the tensile strength is calculated based on the parameters of the test specimen and apparatus.

Ratigan, J.L.

1982-05-28

12

Method and apparatus for determining tensile strength  

DOEpatents

A method and apparatus for determining the statistical distribution of apparent tensile strength of rock, the size effect with respect to tensile strength, as well as apparent deformation modulus of both intact and fractured or jointed rock. The method is carried out by inserting a plug of deformable material, such as rubber, in an opening of a specimen to be tested. The deformable material is loaded by an upper and lower platen until the specimen ruptures, whereafter the tensile strength is calculated based on the parameters of the test specimen and apparatus.

Ratigan, Joe L. (Rapid City, SD)

1984-01-01

13

Dynamic tensile strength of lunar rock types  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The dynamic tensile strength of four rocks are determined. A flat plate impact experiment is employed to generate approximately one-microsecond-duration tensile stress pulses in rock samples by superposing rarefaction waves to induce fracture. It is noted that the effect of chemical weathering and other factors has not been explicitly studied. The given tensile strengths are based on a series of experiments on each rock where determination of incipient spallation is made by terminal microscopic examination. The data are generally consistent with previous determinations, at least one of which was for a significantly chemically altered but physically coherent rock.

Cohn, S. N.; Ahrens, T. J.

1981-01-01

14

Making High-Tensile-Strength Amalgam Components  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Structural components made of amalgams can be made to have tensile strengths much greater than previously known to be possible. Amalgams, perhaps best known for their use in dental fillings, have several useful attributes, including room-temperature fabrication, corrosion resistance, dimensional stability, and high compressive strength. However, the range of applications of amalgams has been limited by their very small tensile strengths. Now, it has been discovered that the tensile strength of an amalgam depends critically on the sizes and shapes of the particles from which it is made and, consequently, the tensile strength can be greatly increased through suitable choice of the particles. Heretofore, the powder particles used to make amalgams have been, variously, in the form of micron-sized spheroids or flakes. The tensile reinforcement contributed by the spheroids and flakes is minimal because fracture paths simply go around these particles. However, if spheroids or flakes are replaced by strands having greater lengths, then tensile reinforcement can be increased significantly. The feasibility of this concept was shown in an experiment in which electrical copper wires, serving as demonstration substitutes for copper powder particles, were triturated with gallium by use of a mortar and pestle and the resulting amalgam was compressed into a mold. The tensile strength of the amalgam specimen was then measured and found to be greater than 10(exp 4) psi (greater than about 69 MPa). Much remains to be done to optimize the properties of amalgams for various applications through suitable choice of starting constituents and modification of the trituration and molding processes. The choice of wire size and composition are expected to be especially important. Perusal of phase diagrams of metal mixtures could give insight that would enable choices of solid and liquid metal constituents. Finally, whereas heretofore, only binary alloys have been considered for amalgams, ternary additions to liquid or solid components should be considered as means to impart desired properties to amalgams.

Grugel, Richard

2008-01-01

15

A comparison of pressure compaction and diametral compression tests for determining granule strengths  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Lightning strikes can cause structural damage, ignite flammable materials, and produce circuit malfunctions in missiles, aircraft, and ground systems. Lightning arrestor connectors (LAC's) are used to divert harmful lightning energy away from these systems by providing less destructive breakdown paths. Ceramic granules in the size range of 150-200 micrometers are used in LAC's to provide physical and electrical separation of contacts (pins) from the surrounding metal web, and to control the voltage breakdown level. Pressure compaction (P-C) tests were used to characterize the strength of ceramic granules. When compaction data are plotted as relative density of the compact versus the compaction pressure two linear regions are generally observed. The intersection of these regions, which is known as the 'breakpoint,' has been used as a semi-quantitative measure of granule strength. Comparisons were made between the P-C breakpoint and strengths of 150-200 micrometers diameter ZnO, TiO2 (rutile), and lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) granules, where the strengths were determined by diametral compression (D-C) tests. At high compaction pressures the compliance of the die itself is significant and was accounted for in the analyses. Tests were conducted at different compaction rates, and with different aspect ratio compacts. High aspect ratios and loading rates decrease the slope of the second linear portion of the compaction curve and produce higher apparent P-C breakpoints. Comparison of the P-C breakpoint to the average D-C strength indicates that the D-C strength is approximately fifty percent higher for PMN-PT granules. To eliminate the uncertainty in results due to irregular granules sizes and shapes, comparisons were made for uniform size (210 micrometers) glass spheres. In this case the average D-C strength coincided with a second breakpoint in the P-C data, which occurred after compaction by a mechanism of bridge formation and collapse had ceased.

Glass, S. J.; Newton, C.

16

Tensile & shear strength of porous dust agglomerates  

E-print Network

Context.Within the sequential accretion scenario of planet formation, planets are build up through a sequence sticking collisions. The outcome of collisions between porous dust aggregates is very important for the growth from very small dust particles to planetesimals. In this work we determine the necessary material properties of dust aggregates as a function the porosity. Aims: Continuum models such as SPH that are capable of simulating collisions of macroscopic dust aggregates require a set of material parameters. Some of them such as the tensile and shear strength are ?difficult to obtain from laboratory experiments. The aim of this work is to determine these parameters from ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations. Methods: We simulate the behavior of porous dust aggregates using a detailed micro-physical model of the interaction of spherical grains that includes adhesion forces, rolling, twisting, and sliding. Using different methods of preparing the samples we study the strength behavior of our samples with varying porosity and coordination number of the material. Results: For the tensile strength, we can reproduce data from laboratory experiments very well. For the shear strength, there are no experimental data available. The results from our simulations differ significantly from previous theoretical models, which indicates that the latter might not be sufficient to describe porous dust aggregates. Conclusions: We have provided functional behavior of tensile and shear strength of porous dust aggregates as a function of the porosity that can be directly applied in continuum simulations of these objects in planet formation scenarios.

Alexander Seizinger; Roland Speith; Wilhelm Kley

2013-08-23

17

Strength Measurement of Ceramic Spheres Using a Diametrally Compressed "C-Sphere" Specimen  

SciTech Connect

A "C-sphere" flexure strength specimen geometry was conceived and developed to measure the hoop tensile strength of bearing-grade silicon nitride (Si3N4) balls. Because such a strength can be measured, the important study of surface-located strength-limiting flaws in ceramic sphere is also enabled with this specimen. A slot is machined into the balls to a set depth to produce the C-sphere geometry. A simple, monotonically increasing uniaxial compressive force produces a hoop tensile stress at the C-sphere's outer surface that ultimately initiates fracture. The strength is determined using the combination of failure load, C-sphere geometry, and finite element analysis. Additionally, the stress field was used to determine C-sphere effective areas and effective volumes as a function of Weibull modulus. To demonstrate this new specimen, C-sphere flexure strength distributions were determined for three commercially available bearing-grade Si3N4 materials (NBD200, SN101C, and TSN-03NH), and differences among their characteristic strengths and Weibull moduli were found.

Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL; Jadaan, Osama M. [University of Wisconsin, Platteville; Kirkland, Timothy Philip [ORNL

2007-01-01

18

A comparison of pressure compaction and diametral compression tests for determining granule strengths  

SciTech Connect

Lightning strikes can cause structural damage, ignite flammable materials, and produce circuit malfunctions in missiles, aircraft, and ground systems. Lightning arrestor connectors (LACs) are used to divert harmful lightning energy away from these systems by providing less destructive breakdown paths. Ceramic granules in the size range of 150--200 {micro}m are used in LACs to provide physical and electrical separation of contacts (pins) from the surrounding metal web, and to control the voltage breakdown level. Pressure compaction (P-C) tests were used to characterize the strength of ceramic granules. When compaction data are plotted as relative density of the compact versus the compaction pressure two linear regions are generally observed. The intersection of these regions, which is known as the ``breakpoint,`` has been used as a semi-quantitative measure of granule strength. Comparisons were made between the P-C breakpoint and strengths of 150--200 {micro}m diameter ZnO, TiO{sub 2} (rutile), and lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) granules, where the strengths were determined by diametral compression (D-C) tests. At high compaction pressures the compliance of the die itself is significant and was accounted for in the analyses. Tests were conducted at different compaction rates, and with different aspect ratio compacts. High aspect ratios and loading rates decrease the slope of the second linear portion of the compaction curve and produce higher apparent P-C breakpoints. Comparison of the P-C breakpoint to the average D-C strength indicates that the D-C strength is approximately fifty percent higher for PMN-PT granules. To eliminate the uncertainty in results due to irregular granules sizes and shapes, comparisons were made for uniform size (210 {micro}m) glass spheres. In this case the average D-C strength coincided with a second breakpoint in the P-C data, which occurred after compaction by a mechanism of bridge formation and collapse had ceased.

Glass, S.J.; Newton, C.

1994-12-31

19

Tensile strength of liquid 4He  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Experiments to measure the tensile strength of liquids have often failed to reach the predicted value, presumably due to the onset of heterogeneous nucleation. Since it seemed impossible to completely eliminate all heterogeneous nucleation, we adopted a strategy that minimized its effect. A piezoelectric transducer in the form of a hemispherical shell was used to focus a short burst of ultrasound into a small volume of liquid 4He. The onset of cavitation was detected by the scattering of laser light. The experimental results both above and below the ? transition are in agreement with homogeneous-nucleation theory for a nucleation rate of approximately 1015 critical-size bubbles/s cm3. An apparent lowering of the tensile strength near the extension of the ? line into the metastable liquid is noted and discussed. This experiment extends the range of confirmation of the theoretically predicted tensile strength of liquids to a reduced pressure eight times further into the negative-pressure region than previous studies in any other liquid.

Nissen, J. A.; Bodegom, E.; Brodie, L. C.; Semura, J. S.

1989-10-01

20

The tensile strength of liquid helium four  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is well known that most liquids exhibit a tensile strength which is much smaller in magnitude than the tensile strength predicted by homogeneous nucleation theory. Liquid helium occupies a unique place among liquids for tensile strength measurements because all foreign gases are frozen out at liquid temperatures. Moreover, superfluid He-4 should fill all crevises on solid surfaces, eliminating the chance of heterogeneous nucleation on helium vapor pockets. A piezoelectric transducer in the form of a hemispherical shell was used to focus high intensity ultrasound into a small volume of He-4. The transducer was gated at its resonant frequency of 566 kHz with gate widths of less than 1 msec in order to minimize the effects of transducer heating and acoustic streaming. The onset of nucleation was detected from the absorption of acoustic energy and the scattering of laser light from microscopic bubbles. A theory for light diffraction from the focal zone of a spherical converging sound wave was developed to confirm calculations of the acoustic pressure amplitude at the focus of the transducer, calculations based on the acoustic power radiated into the liquid and nonlinear sound absorption.

Nissen, Joel Alan

1988-08-01

21

Tensile & shear strength of porous dust agglomerates  

E-print Network

Context.Within the sequential accretion scenario of planet formation, planets are build up through a sequence sticking collisions. The outcome of collisions between porous dust aggregates is very important for the growth from very small dust particles to planetesimals. In this work we determine the necessary material properties of dust aggregates as a function the porosity. Aims: Continuum models such as SPH that are capable of simulating collisions of macroscopic dust aggregates require a set of material parameters. Some of them such as the tensile and shear strength are ?difficult to obtain from laboratory experiments. The aim of this work is to determine these parameters from ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations. Methods: We simulate the behavior of porous dust aggregates using a detailed micro-physical model of the interaction of spherical grains that includes adhesion forces, rolling, twisting, and sliding. Using different methods of preparing the samples we study the strength behavior of our samples...

Seizinger, Alexander; Kley, Wilhelm

2013-01-01

22

Tensile strength of the chromaffin granule membrane.  

PubMed

Catecholamine release from chromaffin granules, suspended in sucrose solutions of various osmotic strengths, was determined at different temperatures between 2 degrees and 44 degrees C. Dynamic measurements showed that steady state is achieved within 15 min of incubation at all temperatures. The effect of temperature on the release was established in terms of the median granular fragility (MGF) defined as the concentration of sucrose solution causing 50% lysis. The MGF was determined as the inflection point of the Gaussian distribution of granular fragility. The MGF was found to decrease with fall in temperature implying a corresponding increase of the tensile strength of the vesicle membrane. Critical resultant forces at lysis were calculated and found to vary from 8.2 dyn/cm at 2 degrees C to 4.2 dyn/cm at 44 degrees C. These compare well with tensions at lysis found earlier for erythrocytes. PMID:7104452

Hiram, Y; Nir, A; Zinder, O

1982-07-01

23

Tensile Strength of the Chromaffin Granule Membrane  

PubMed Central

Catecholamine release from chromaffin granules, suspended in sucrose solutions of various osmotic strengths, was determined at different temperatures between 2° and 44°C. Dynamic measurements showed that steady state is achieved within 15 min of incubation at all temperatures. The effect of temperature on the release was established in terms of the median granular fragility (MGF) defined as the concentration of sucrose solution causing 50% lysis. The MGF was determined as the inflection point of the Gaussian distribution of granular fragility. The MGF was found to decrease with fall in temperature implying a corresponding increase of the tensile strength of the vesicle membrane. Critical resultant forces at lysis were calculated and found to vary from 8.2 dyn/cm at 2°C to 4.2 dyn/cm at 44°C. These compare well with tensions at lysis found earlier for erythrocytes. PMID:7104452

Hiram, Yael; Nir, Avinoam; Zinder, Oren

1982-01-01

24

Aluminum/steel wire composite plates exhibit high tensile strength  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Composite plate of fine steel wires imbedded in an aluminum alloy matrix results in a lightweight material with high tensile strength. Plates have been prepared having the strength of titanium with only 85 percent of its density.

1966-01-01

25

Tensile and shear strength of adhesives  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This experiment is conducted in a freshman-level course: Introduction to Engineering Materials. There are no prerequisites for the course although students should have some knowledge of basic algebra. The objectives are to tension and shear test adhesives and to determine the tensile and shear properties of adhesives. Details of equipment of procedure are given.

Stibolt, Kenneth A.

1990-01-01

26

Numerical simulation of microstructural damage and tensile strength of snow  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This contribution uses finite-element analysis to simulate microstructural failure processes and the tensile strength of snow. The 3-D structure of snow was imaged by microtomography. Modeling procedures used the elastic properties of ice with bond fracture assumptions as inputs. The microstructure experiences combined tensile and compressive stresses in response to macroscopic tensile stress. The simulated nonlocalized failure of ice lattice bonds before or after reaching peak stress creates a pseudo-plastic yield curve. This explains the occurrence of acoustic events observed in advance of global failure. The measured and simulated average tensile strengths differed by 35%, a typical range for strength measurements in snow given its low Weibull modulus. The simulation successfully explains damage, fracture nucleation, and strength according to the geometry of the microstructure of snow and the mechanical properties of ice. This novel method can be applied to more complex snow structures including the weak layers that cause avalanches.

Hagenmuller, Pascal; Theile, Thiemo C.; Schneebeli, Martin

2014-01-01

27

Effect of Tensile Strength by Variations in Peel Strength in Laminated Film for Liquid Package  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Good tensile strength of a laminated film for packaging is an indispensable property in preventing leakage. It is known that the peel strength between laminated film layers is closely related to the tensile strength of the film. In this study, we have measured the tensile strength for various peel strengths of two kinds of three layered laminated film; Nylon + Aluminum + Polyethylene and Nylon + Polyester + Polyethylene. These films have two peel layers, so we escalated one peel strength and fix another one. Then we found that the peel strength between the sealant and the boundaries strongly influences the tensile strength. About Nylon + Polyester + Polyethylene film, we researched applied amount of adhesive and observed cross section of specimen at measurement of peel strength. Then we found that there is difference in specimen condition at measurement of peel strength, and examined about relationship of peel strength and stiffness of specimen.

Machida, Yukihiko; Shimamoto, Akira; Aoki, Hiroyuki; Futase, Katsunori

28

Silicon nitride having a high tensile strength  

DOEpatents

A silicon nitride ceramic comprising: a) inclusions no greater than 25 microns in length, b) agglomerates no greater than 20 microns in diameter, and c) a surface finish of less than about 8 microinches, said ceramic having a four-point flexural strength of at least about 900 MPa.

Pujari, Vimal K. (Northboro, MA); Tracey, Dennis M. (Medfield, MA); Foley, Michael R. (Oxford, MA); Paille, Norman I. (Oxford, MA); Pelletier, Paul J. (Millbury, MA); Sales, Lenny C. (Grafton, MA); Willkens, Craig A. (Sterling, MA); Yeckley, Russell L. (Oakham, MA)

1996-01-01

29

Silicon nitride having a high tensile strength  

DOEpatents

A silicon nitride ceramic is disclosed comprising: (a) inclusions no greater than 25 microns in length, (b) agglomerates no greater than 20 microns in diameter, and (c) a surface finish of less than about 8 microinches, said ceramic having a four-point flexural strength of at least about 900 MPa. 4 figs.

Pujari, V.K.; Tracey, D.M.; Foley, M.R.; Paille, N.I.; Pelletier, P.J.; Sales, L.C.; Willkens, C.A.; Yeckley, R.L.

1996-11-05

30

Relationship of z-tensile strength with in-plane strength properties of paper  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several methods are available for the measurement of strength of paper in the thickness direction. However, the values obtained from these methods are highly correlated with each other and also with the in-plane strength measurements. The relationship between z-direction tensile strength and in-plane tensile index of handsheets made at varying extents of pulp beating, types of strength aids and doses

S P Singh

31

Characterizing Curing-Cement Slurries by Permeability, Tensile Strength,  

E-print Network

Characterizing Curing-Cement Slurries by Permeability, Tensile Strength, and Shrinkage K.R. Backe oilwell cements. The results show that the curing characteristics are a function of temperature and that there is a correlation between shrinkage and cement content. The paper also introduces a new mechanism for gas migration

Backe, Knut

32

Improved molding process ensures plastic parts of higher tensile strength  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Single molding process ensures that plastic parts /of a given mechanical design/ produced from a conventional thermosetting molding compound will have a maximum tensile strength. The process can also be used for other thermosetting compounds to produce parts with improved physical properties.

Heier, W. C.

1968-01-01

33

Importance of Tensile Strength on the Shear Behavior of Discontinuities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study, the shear behavior of discontinuities possessing two different rock wall types with distinct separate compressive strengths was investigated. The designed profiles consisted of regular artificial joints molded by five types of plaster mortars, each representing a distinct uniaxial compressive strength. The compressive strengths of plaster specimens ranged from 5.9 to 19.5 MPa. These specimens were molded considering a regular triangular asperity profile and were designed so as to achieve joint walls with different strength material combinations. The results showed that the shear behavior of discontinuities possessing different joint wall compressive strengths (DDJCS) tested under constant normal load (CNL) conditions is the same as those possessing identical joint wall strengths, but the shear strength of DDJCS is governed by minor joint wall compressive strength. In addition, it was measured that the predicted values obtained by Barton's empirical criterion are greater than the experimental results. The finding indicates that there is a correlation between the joint roughness coefficient (JRC), normal stress, and mechanical strength. It was observed that the mode of failure of asperities is either pure tensile, pure shear, or a combination of both. Therefore, Barton's strength criterion, which considers the compressive strength of joint walls, was modified by substituting the compressive strength with the tensile strength. The validity of the modified criterion was examined by the comparison of the predicted shear values with the laboratory shear test results reported by Grasselli (Ph.D. thesis n.2404, Civil Engineering Department, EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland, 2001). These comparisons infer that the modified criterion can predict the shear strength of joints more precisely.

Ghazvinian, A. H.; Azinfar, M. J.; Geranmayeh Vaneghi, R.

2012-05-01

34

Strength and modulus of carbon nanotubes under a tensile load  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were fabricated using low-pressure chemical vapor deposition and then embedded in epoxy polymer at several weight ratios, 0, 0.75, 1.5, and 3 wt%, for tensile testing and Young's modulus determination using an Instron machine. The tensile strength and Young's modulus of the epoxy resin were increased with the addition of CNTs to a certain extent, and then decreased with the increase in the weight fraction of CNTs. The best properties occurred at 1.5 wt% of CNTs. Scanning electron microscopy was used to reveal the dispersion status of CNTs in the nanocomposites.

Alnefaie, Khaled A.

2014-05-01

35

Microstructure-based simulations of the tensile strength of snow  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The mechanical behavior of snow is essential to understand the formation of snow avalanches. In particular, the failure properties of snow are determinant in snow slab avalanche release. Direct experiments on snow are difficult to conduct and to interpret. First, seasonal snow is often a very fragile material which can be easily damaged before a mechanical test is finished. Second, natural snow is generally not homogenous, but consists of many thin layers. Thus, a direct mechanical test is in this case very difficult to interpret. This motivated us to implement a numerical simulation that uses the full 3D-structure of snow. The microstructure of snow samples was captured with a micro-computer tomograph and the tensile strength of the same samples was measured. A subvolume (about 30 mm3) of the zone where the fracture occurred in the mechanical test was numerically simulated. To this purpose, the mechanical properties of monocrystalline ice were considered to model the constitutive material of snow. Because the orientation of ice grains cannot be determined in adsorption tomography, orientation-averaged properties were used as a first approximation. The results show that the average simulated tensile strength is in good agreement with the measurements for the tested snow, rounded grains at a density of about 350 kg m-3. In a second approach, a geometrical grain selection algorithm was used to associate to each ice grain a specific c-axis and the corresponding oriented anisotropic stiffness and strength. This artificial orientation of ice grains does not modify significantly the elastic stress distribution in the snow sample but decreases slightly the effective tensile strength of snow compared to the simulation using orientation-averaged properties of ice. As a conclusion, even if the size of the simulated volume remains relatively small (about 30 mm3), the direct numerical simulation of the tensile strength of snow is possible and enables the investigation of the failure behavior of snow at a microscopic scale.

Hagenmuller, P.; Theile, T.; Schneebeli, M.

2012-04-01

36

Tensile strength of bilayered ceramics and corresponding glass veneers  

PubMed Central

PURPOSE To investigate the microtensile bond strength between two all-ceramic systems; lithium disilicate glass ceramic and zirconia core ceramics bonded with their corresponding glass veneers. MATERIALS AND METHODS Blocks of core ceramics (IPS e.max® Press and Lava™ Frame) were fabricated and veneered with their corresponding glass veneers. The bilayered blocks were cut into microbars; 8 mm in length and 1 mm2 in cross-sectional area (n = 30/group). Additionally, monolithic microbars of these two veneers (IPS e.max® Ceram and Lava™ Ceram; n = 30/group) were also prepared. The obtained microbars were tested in tension until fracture, and the fracture surfaces of the microbars were examined with fluorescent black light and scanning electron microscope (SEM) to identify the mode of failure. One-way ANOVA and the Dunnett's T3 test were performed to determine significant differences of the mean microtensile bond strength at a significance level of 0.05. RESULTS The mean microtensile bond strength of IPS e.max® Press/IPS e.max® Ceram (43.40 ± 5.51 MPa) was significantly greater than that of Lava™ Frame/Lava™ Ceram (31.71 ± 7.03 MPa)(P<.001). Fluorescent black light and SEM analysis showed that most of the tested microbars failed cohesively in the veneer layer. Furthermore, the bond strength of Lava™ Frame/Lava™ Ceram was comparable to the tensile strength of monolithic glass veneer of Lava™ Ceram, while the bond strength of bilayered IPS e.max® Press/IPS e.max® Ceram was significantly greater than tensile strength of monolithic IPS e.max® Ceram. CONCLUSION Because fracture site occurred mostly in the glass veneer and most failures were away from the interfacial zone, microtensile bond test may not be a suitable test for bonding integrity. Fracture mechanics approach such as fracture toughness of the interface may be more appropriate to represent the bonding quality between two materials. PMID:25006377

Champirat, Tharee; Jirajariyavej, Bundhit

2014-01-01

37

Tensile strength and fracture of cemented granular aggregates.  

PubMed

Cemented granular aggregates include a broad class of geomaterials such as sedimentary rocks and some biomaterials such as the wheat endosperm. We present a 3D lattice element method for the simulation of such materials, modeled as a jammed assembly of particles bound together by a matrix partially filling the interstitial space. From extensive simulation data, we analyze the mechanical properties of aggregates subjected to tensile loading as a function of matrix volume fraction and particle-matrix adhesion. We observe a linear elastic behavior followed by a brutal failure along a fracture surface. The effective stiffness before failure increases almost linearly with the matrix volume fraction. We show that the tensile strength of the aggregates increases with both the increasing tensile strength at the particle-matrix interface and decreasing stress concentration as a function of matrix volume fraction. The proportion of broken bonds in the particle phase reveals a range of values of the particle-matrix adhesion and matrix volume fraction for which the cracks bypass the particles and hence no particle damage occurs. This limit is shown to depend on the relative toughness of the particle-matrix interface with respect to the particles. PMID:23160765

Affes, R; Delenne, J-Y; Monerie, Y; Radjaï, F; Topin, V

2012-11-01

38

A novel indirect tensile test method to measure the biaxial tensile strength of concretes and other quasibrittle materials  

SciTech Connect

A novel indirect tensile test method, the biaxial flexure test (BFT) method, has been developed to measure the biaxial tensile strength of concretes. The classical modulus of rupture (MOR) test has been generalized to three dimensions. In this method, we use a circular plate as the new test specimen. This plate is supported by an annular ring. We apply an external load to this specimen through a circular edge. The centers of the specimen, the loading device and the support are identical. The biaxial tensile strength measured by this new method is about 19% greater than the uniaxial tensile strength obtained from the classical modulus of rupture test as reported by other researchers. However, at the same time, we also found that the stochastic deviation of the biaxial tensile strength is about 63% greater than the uniaxial strength.

Zi, Goangseup [Department of Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering, Korea, University, 5 Ga 1, An-Am Dong, Sung-Buk Gu, Seoul, 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: g-zi@korea.ac.kr; Oh, Hongseob [Department of Civil Engineering, Jinju National University, 150 Chilam Dong, Jinju, Kyongnam, 660-758 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sun-Kyu [Department of Civil Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, 300 Cheoncheon Dong, Jangan Gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi, 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

2008-06-15

39

Gigacycle fatigue behaviors of two SNCM439 steels with different tensile strengthes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gigacycle fatigue behaviors of two SNCM439 steels with different tensile strengthes were experimentally studied by rotating\\u000a bending tests, to investigate the effects of the tensile strength obtained by different heat treatment processes on very high\\u000a cycle fatigue failure mechanisms. The material with higher tensile strength of 1 710MPa exhibited typical gigacycle fatigue\\u000a failure characteristics, whereas one with lower tensile strength

Zheng Duan; Xian-Feng Ma; Hui-Ji Shi; Ryosuke Murai; Eiichi Yanagisawa

40

Through-the-thickness tensile strength of textile composites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A series of tests was run to characterize the through-the-thickness tensile strength for a variety of composites that included 2D and 3D braids, 2D and 3D weaves, and prepreg tapes. A new test method based on a curved beam was evaluated. The through-the-thickness deformations were characterized using moire interferometry. Failures were significantly different between the 2D and 3D materials. The 2D materials delaminated between layers due to out-of-plane tensile stresses. The strength of the 2D textile composites did not increase relative to the tapes. The 3D materials failed due to the formation of radial cracks caused by high circumferential stresses along the inner radius. A circumferential crack similar to the 2D materials produced the final failure. Final failure in the 3D materials occurred at a lower bending moment than in other materials. The early failures were caused by radial crack formation rather than low through-the-thickness strength.

Jackson, Wade C.; Ifju, Peter G.

1994-01-01

41

Dynamic compressive and tensile strengths of spark plasma sintered alumina  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fully dense submicron grain size alumina samples were manufactured from alumina nano-powder using Spark Plasma Sintering and tested in two kinds of VISAR-instrumented planar impact tests. In the first kind, samples were loaded by 1-mm tungsten impactors, accelerated to a velocity of about 1 km/s. These tests were aimed at studying the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL) of Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS)-processed alumina and the decay, with propagation distance, of the elastic precursor wave. In the tests of the second kind, alumina samples of 3-mm thickness were loaded by 1-mm copper impactors accelerated to 100-1000 m/s. These tests were aimed at studying the dynamic tensile (spall) strength of the alumina specimens. The tensile fracture of the un-alloyed alumina shows a monotonic decline of the spall strength with the amplitude of the loading stress pulse. Analysis of the decay of the elastic precursor wave allowed determining the rate of the irreversible (inelastic) strains in the SPS-processed alumina at the initial stages of the shock-induced inelastic deformation and to clarify the mechanisms responsible for the deformation. The 1-% addition of Cr2O3 decreases the HEL of the SPS-processed alumina by 5-% and its spall strength by 50% but barely affects its static properties.

Girlitsky, I.; Zaretsky, E.; Kalabukhov, S.; Dariel, M. P.; Frage, N.

2014-06-01

42

Dynamic compressive and tensile strengths of spark plasma sintered alumina  

SciTech Connect

Fully dense submicron grain size alumina samples were manufactured from alumina nano-powder using Spark Plasma Sintering and tested in two kinds of VISAR-instrumented planar impact tests. In the first kind, samples were loaded by 1-mm tungsten impactors, accelerated to a velocity of about 1?km/s. These tests were aimed at studying the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL) of Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS)-processed alumina and the decay, with propagation distance, of the elastic precursor wave. In the tests of the second kind, alumina samples of 3-mm thickness were loaded by 1-mm copper impactors accelerated to 100–1000?m/s. These tests were aimed at studying the dynamic tensile (spall) strength of the alumina specimens. The tensile fracture of the un-alloyed alumina shows a monotonic decline of the spall strength with the amplitude of the loading stress pulse. Analysis of the decay of the elastic precursor wave allowed determining the rate of the irreversible (inelastic) strains in the SPS-processed alumina at the initial stages of the shock-induced inelastic deformation and to clarify the mechanisms responsible for the deformation. The 1-% addition of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} decreases the HEL of the SPS-processed alumina by 5-% and its spall strength by 50% but barely affects its static properties.

Girlitsky, I.; Zaretsky, E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, P.O. Box 653, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Kalabukhov, S.; Dariel, M. P.; Frage, N. [Department of Materials Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, P.O. Box 653, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)

2014-06-28

43

Predicting Tensile Strengths of Boron/Aluminum Composites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

To develop predictive theory to account for time/temperature effect of B/A1 composites, series of deformation and fracture studies was performed on commercial boron fibers over wide ranges of stress, stress application time, and temperature. By combining these single fiber results with fracture theory for metal matrix composites, design formulas were derived that describe B/A1 composite tensile and stress rupture strengths as function of time and temperature. Using derived formulas, calculated and experimental results agree to within 3 percent.

Decarlo, J. A.

1982-01-01

44

Dynamic yield and tensile strengths of spark plasma sintered alumina  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fully dense alumina samples with 0.6 ?m grain size were produced from alumina powder using Spark Plasma Sintering and tested in two types of VISAR-instrumented planar impact tests. In the tests of the first type the samples of 0.28 to 6-mm thickness were loaded by 1-mm tungsten impactors accelerated up to a velocity of about 1 km/s. These tests were aimed to study the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL) of the SPS-processed alumina and the decay of the elastic precursor wave with propagation distance. In the second type of test the samples of ~3-mm thickness were loaded by 1-mm copper impactors accelerated up to velocities 100-1000 m/s. These tests were aimed to study the dynamic tensile (spall) strength of the alumina. The data on tensile fracture of the alumina demonstrate a monotonic decline of the spall strength with the amplitude of the loading stress pulse. The data on the decay of the elastic precursor wave allows for determining the rates of the irreversible (inelastic) strains in the SPS-processed alumina at the initial stages of shock-induced inelastic deformation and, thus, to derive some conclusions concerning the mechanisms responsible of the deformation.

Girlitsky, I.; Zaretsky, E.; Kalabukhov, S.; Dariel, M.; Frage, N.

2014-05-01

45

Some investigations about the tensile strength and the desiccation process of unsaturated clay  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The current paper presents an investigation on the tensile strength of unsaturated clay, and a discussion about the significant differences between the behaviours of compacted soils and those of the completely remoulded soils. The adapted experimental device based on the shear box for the measurement of the tensile strength is also presented. In the tensile tests, stress-strain characteristics are measured using high precision transducers and electronic data acquisition. The equipment is capable of measuring tensile strengths of soil (about 10 MPa). Moreover, a new model to predict cracks is presented in 3D. This analytical model for the prediction of tensile strength, as a function of suction and porosity, is given.

Trabelsi, H.; Jamei, M.; Guiras, H.; Hatem, Z.; Romero, E.; Sebastia, O.

2010-06-01

46

Tensile strength and the mining of black holes.  

PubMed

There are a number of important thought experiments that involve raising and lowering boxes full of radiation in the vicinity of black hole horizons. This Letter looks at the limitations placed on these thought experiments by the null energy condition, which imposes a fundamental bound on the tensile-strength-to-weight ratio of the materials involved, makes it impossible to build a box near the horizon that is wider than a single wavelength of the Hawking quanta, and puts a severe constraint on the operation of "space elevators" near black holes. In particular, it is shown that proposals for mining black holes by lowering boxes near the horizon, collecting some Hawking radiation, and dragging it out to infinity cannot proceed nearly as rapidly as has previously been claimed. As a consequence of this limitation, the boxes and all the moving parts are superfluous and black holes can be destroyed equally rapidly by threading the horizon with strings. PMID:24313473

Brown, Adam R

2013-11-22

47

Improved Tensile Adhesion Specimens for High Strength Epoxy Systems in Aerospace Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An improved tensile adhesion button has been designed and tested that results in higher measured tensile adhesion strength while providing increased capability for testing high strength epoxy adhesive systems. The best attributes of two well-established tensile button designs were combined and refined into an optimized tensile button. The most significant design change to the tensile button was to improve alignment of the bonded tensile button specimens during tensile testing by changing the interface between the tensile button and the tensile test machine. The established or old button design uses a test fixture that pulls from a grooved annulus or anvil head while the new button design pulls from a threaded hole in the centerline of the button. Finite element (FE) analysis showed that asymmetric loading of the established anvil head tensile button significantly increases the stress concentration in the adhesive, causing failure at lower tensile test loads. The new tensile button was designed to eliminate asymmetric loading and eliminate misalignment sensitivity. Enhanced alignment resulted in improved tensile adhesion strength measurement up to 13.8 MPa (2000psi) over the established button design. Another design change increased the capability of the button by increasing the threaded hole diameter allowing it to test high strength epoxy systems up to 85 MPa(less than 12,000 psi). The improved tensile button can be used in button- to-button or button-to-panel configurations.

Haddock, M. Reed; McLennan, Michael L.

2000-01-01

48

The relation between the tensile strength and the hardness of metals  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report presents methods determining the hardness and tensile strength of metals by showing the effect and dependence of the hardness numbers on the strain-hardening. Relations between the hardness numbers and the ordinary stress-strain diagrams and tensile strength are given. Procedures for finding the Brinell strength are also presented.

Schwarz, O

1930-01-01

49

Effect of surface treatment on the hydrolytic stability of E-glass fiber bundle tensile strength  

E-print Network

Effect of surface treatment on the hydrolytic stability of E-glass fiber bundle tensile strength E surface treatment on the hydrolytic stability of tensile strength is investigated for E-glass fiber and silane, starch and wax, and epoxy surface treatments are tested following exposure to 10%, 40%, 80

Sottos, Nancy R.

50

Strength and Breaking Mechanism of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Under Tensile Load  

Microsoft Academic Search

The tensile strengths of individual multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were measured with a ``nanostressing stage'' located within a scanning electron microscope. The tensile-loading experiment was prepared and observed entirely within the microscope and was recorded on video. The MWCNTs broke in the outermost layer (``sword-in-sheath'' failure), and the tensile strength of this layer ranged from 11 to 63 gigapascals for

Min-Feng Yu; Oleg Lourie; Mark J. Dyer; Katerina Moloni; Thomas F. Kelly; Rodney S. Ruoff

2000-01-01

51

Correlation of tensile and shear strengths of metals with their friction properties  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The relation between the theoretical tensile and the shear strengths and the friction properties of metals in contact with diamond, boron nitride, silicon carbide, manganese-zinc ferrite, and the metals themselves in vacuum was investigated. The relationship between the actual shear strength and the friction properties of the metal was also investigated. An estimate of the theoretical uniaxial tensile strength was obtained in terms of the equilibrium surface energy, interplanar spacing of the planes perpendicular to the tensile axis, and the Young's modulus of elasticity. An estimate of the theoretical shear strength for metals was obtained from the shear modulus, the repeat distance of atoms in the direction of shear of the metal and the interplanar spacing of the shear planes. The coefficient of friction for metals was found to be related to the theoretical tensile, theoretical shear, and actual shear strengths of metals. The higher the strength of the metal, the lower the coefficient of friction.

Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

1982-01-01

52

Effect of strain rate on formability in warm deep drawing of high tensile strength steel sheet  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In tensile test of the high tensile strength steel, tensile strength isdrastically decreased as the temperature is raised. Then, the strain rate sensitivity exponent of high tensile strength steel (SUS631) in this study is high at 800 degrees especially. Also, elongation is increased as the temperature is raised. In deep drawing, the maximum punch load of the high tensile strength steel is examined on difference punch speed at 600 and 800 degrees. On the other hand, finite element (FE) simulation was used for the possibility to evaluate the forming load on difference punch speed in warm deep drawing. In FE simulation, we have considered both the strain hardening exponent and the strain rate sensitivity exponent (m-value) because we cannot neglect m-value 0.184 at 800 degrees. The tendency of the forming load in the experiments agrees the results in FE simulation.

Yoshihara, Shoichiro; Iwamatsu, Go

2014-10-01

53

Increased Tensile Strength of Carbon Nanotube Yarns and Sheets through Chemical Modification and Electron Beam Irradiation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The inherent strength of individual carbon nanotubes offers considerable opportunity for the development of advanced, lightweight composite structures. Recent work in the fabrication and application of carbon nanotube (CNT) forms such as yarns and sheets has addressed early nanocomposite limitations with respect to nanotube dispersion and loading; and has pushed the technology toward structural composite applications. However, the high tensile strength of an individual CNT has not directly translated to macro-scale CNT forms where bulk material strength is limited by inter-tube electrostatic attraction and slippage. The focus of this work was to assess post processing of CNT sheet and yarn to improve the macro-scale strength of these material forms. Both small molecule functionalization and e-beam irradiation was evaluated as a means to enhance tensile strength and Youngs modulus of the bulk CNT material. Mechanical testing results revealed a tensile strength increase in CNT sheets by 57 when functionalized, while an additional 48 increase in tensile strength was observed when functionalized sheets were irradiated; compared to unfunctionalized sheets. Similarly, small molecule functionalization increased yarn tensile strength up to 25, whereas irradiation of the functionalized yarns pushed the tensile strength to 88 beyond that of the baseline yarn.

Miller, Sandi G.; Williams, Tiffany S.; Baker, James S.; Sola, Francisco; Lebron-Colon, Marisabel; McCorkle, Linda S.; Wilmoth, Nathan G.; Gaier, James; Chen, Michelle; Meador, Michael A.

2014-01-01

54

Predicting the Open-Hole Tensile Strength of Composite Plates Based on Probabilistic Neural Network  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Tensile experiments were performed for open-hole composite plates with three different layups. With the limited number of experimental results, a probabilistic neural network (PNN) based approach is proposed to predict the tensile strength of composite plates with an open-hole. The predictive model takes the geometric parameters, the layup features and the average tensile stress of open-hole composite plates as the inputs and produces the safety status as the intermediate output with the classification function of PNN. Then the critical safety point, that is the open-hole tensile strength, where the safety status turns from survival to failure, is determined with the bi-section searching method. The predictions produce acceptable results whose errors are comparable to the coefficient of variation of experimental results. With experimental data from other studies, further assessments are also made to prove the capability of this model in predicting the open-hole tensile strength of composite plates.

Fan, Hai-Tao; Wang, Hai

2014-12-01

55

Unbinding force of chemical bonds and tensile strength in strong crystals  

Microsoft Academic Search

A model of covalent and ionic bond strength is proposed in terms of the tensile unbinding force by introducing the concept of the effectively bonded valence electron (EBVE) number of a chemical bond. Bond strength proves to be exclusively dependent on two microscopic parameters: bond length and EBVE number. This model allows us to determine bond strength for a variety

Xiaoju Guo; Li-Min Wang; Bo Xu; Zhongyuan Liu; Dongli Yu; Julong He; Hui-Tian Wang; Yongjun Tian

2009-01-01

56

Concrete Material Models Concrete_1: Concrete Model with No Tensile Strength  

E-print Network

Concrete Material Models Concrete_1: Concrete Model with No Tensile Strength INPUT Concrete_1, matID ¢f fc cu u, , ,e e0 Definitions (Fig. 1): fc : concrete compressive strength at 28 days (compression is negative) A0 : concrete strain at maximum strength (compression is negative) fcu : concrete crushing

Filippou, Filip C.

57

Experimental and Numerical Study on Tensile Strength of Concrete under Different Strain Rates  

PubMed Central

The dynamic characterization of concrete is fundamental to understand the material behavior in case of heavy earthquakes and dynamic events. The implementation of material constitutive law is of capital importance for the numerical simulation of the dynamic processes as those caused by earthquakes. Splitting tensile concrete specimens were tested at strain rates of 10?7?s?1 to 10?4?s?1 in an MTS material test machine. Results of tensile strength versus strain rate are presented and compared with compressive strength and existing models at similar strain rates. Dynamic increase factor versus strain rate curves for tensile strength were also evaluated and discussed. The same tensile data are compared with strength data using a thermodynamic model. Results of the tests show a significant strain rate sensitive behavior, exhibiting dynamic tensile strength increasing with strain rate. In the quasistatic strain rate regime, the existing models often underestimate the experimental results. The thermodynamic theory for the splitting tensile strength of concrete satisfactorily describes the experimental findings of strength as effect of strain rates. PMID:24883355

Min, Fanlu; Yao, Zhanhu; Jiang, Teng

2014-01-01

58

Experimental and numerical study on tensile strength of concrete under different strain rates.  

PubMed

The dynamic characterization of concrete is fundamental to understand the material behavior in case of heavy earthquakes and dynamic events. The implementation of material constitutive law is of capital importance for the numerical simulation of the dynamic processes as those caused by earthquakes. Splitting tensile concrete specimens were tested at strain rates of 10(-7) s(-1) to 10(-4) s(-1) in an MTS material test machine. Results of tensile strength versus strain rate are presented and compared with compressive strength and existing models at similar strain rates. Dynamic increase factor versus strain rate curves for tensile strength were also evaluated and discussed. The same tensile data are compared with strength data using a thermodynamic model. Results of the tests show a significant strain rate sensitive behavior, exhibiting dynamic tensile strength increasing with strain rate. In the quasistatic strain rate regime, the existing models often underestimate the experimental results. The thermodynamic theory for the splitting tensile strength of concrete satisfactorily describes the experimental findings of strength as effect of strain rates. PMID:24883355

Min, Fanlu; Yao, Zhanhu; Jiang, Teng

2014-01-01

59

Low-velocity impact and residual tensile strength analysis to carbon fiber composite laminates  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, low-velocity impact characteristics and residual tensile strength of carbon fiber composite laminates are investigated by experimentally and numerically. Low-velocity impact tests and residual tensile strength tests are performed using an instrumented drop-weight machine (Instron 9250HV) and static test machine (Instron 5569), respectively. The finite element (FE) software, ABAQUS\\/Explicit is employed to simulate low-velocity impact characteristics and predict

Shi-Xun Wang; Lin-Zhi Wu; Li Ma

2010-01-01

60

Development on the Tensile Fatigue Test Apparatus and Strength Evaluation of Thin Metal Films  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recently, development of medical devices such as catheter and stent are advanced in the low invasion medical field. Considering the functions of human body are affected severely by the medical devices, the high strength reliability of devices must be secured. In these circumstances, the thin metal film, which has high reliability of strength, is useful structural material for further development of low invasion medical device. As the strength characteristics of a thin film depend on thickness and formation process of itself, there is little strength database concerning a thin metal film. In this study, a tensile fatigue testing apparatus with cyclic loading frequency up to 30Hz and maximum loading 8 N for the thin metal film has been developed, and thin rolled films Ti and SUS304 were evaluated on tensile and load-controlled fatigue strength. The static tensile tests give that both are also over the twice of the bulk material on the tensile strength, and the proof stress is high-strength with over 90% of tensile strength respectively. The fatigue test shows that Ti thin film has long life in comparison with the bulk material, however, the fatigue characteristic itself is similar like that of bulk material.

Fukushi, Miyuki; Miyata, Hiroshi; Murakami, Akira

61

Impact tensile properties and strength development mechanism of glass for reinforcement fiber  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study, impact tensile properties of E-glass were investigated by fiber bundle testing under a high strain rate. The impact tests were performed employing two types of experiments. One is the tension-type split Hopkinson pressure bar system, and the other is the universal high-speed tensile-testing machine. As the results, it was found that not only the tensile strength but also the fracture strain of E-glass fiber improved with the strain rate. The absorbed strain energy of this material significantly increased. It was also found that the degree of the strain rate dependency of E-glass fibers on the tensile strength was varied according to fiber diameter. As for the strain rate dependency of the glass fiber under tensile loading condition, change of the small crack-propagation behaviour was considered to clarify the development of the fiber strength. The tensile fiber strength was estimated by employing the numerical simulation based on the slow crack-growth model (SCG). Through the parametric study against the coefficient of the crack propagation rate, the numerical estimation value was obtained for the various testing conditions. It was concluded that the slow crack-growth behaviour in the glass fiber was an essential for the increase in the strength of this material.

Kim, T.; Oshima, K.; Kawada, H.

2013-07-01

62

Impact of a microwave curing process on tensile strength of selected carbon fiber composites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The traditional process for curing carbon fiber (CF) composites has been the autoclave system. A review of recent research indicates curing CF composites in a microwave oven has the potential for reducing processing time. The problem statement of the experimental study was that the impact of a microwave curing process on tensile strength of selected CF composite specimens was unknown. The research study describes the statistical procedure and analysis of data to answer the specific question for the experimental trials: What is the effect on the tensile strength of cured CF composite samples due to the relationship of the autoclave and microwave curing process cycle time and temperature? ASTM International standard test method designation D 5083 - 02 was used for testing tensile strength of reinforced carbon fiber plastics using straight-sided specimens. Analytical data was obtained for evaluating the effects of process cycle time and temperature on tensile strength of the CF composite specimens. The result was that curing time of the autoclave system and microwave process had significant effects on the maximum tensile stress of CF composite specimen. Although 83% faster than the autoclave system, the microwave curing process had CF specimens with lower maximum tensile strength compared with the autoclave system results. The primary reason for the difference was that the microwave process did not use vacuum or pressure. Considering the cost/benefit ratio, the research study indicated that the microwave oven would be a viable and efficient process for curing CF composites.

Balzer, Brian B.

63

The degradation in tensile strength of polymer-coated glass optical fibres under ?-irradiation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The tensile strength of glass optical fibres when coated with various polymers has been measured as a function of ?-ray dose. Fibres protected with acrylate, silicone + acrylate or polyimide coatings showed little degradation after receiving a total dose of 1 MGy (they retained >95% of their preirradiated strength). For a fibre with an extruded nylon overcoat the nylon became

J. O. W. Norris; S. A. Norman; M. J. Tribble

1991-01-01

64

Ideal tensile and shear strength of a gum metal approximant: Ab initio density functional calculations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ideal tensile and shear strengths of binary ?-phase Ti3Nb alloys have been investigated using ab initio density functional calculations. The binary alloy is considered as an approximant to the multifunctional Ti-Nb-Ta-Zr-O alloy known as “gum metal,” which displays high strength, low elastic modulus, high yield strain, and very good ductility. This alloy has been reported to deform elastically until the stress approaches the ideal tensile strength. Our calculations have been performed for an optimized chemical decoration of the body-centered cubic (bcc) structure of the ? phase. Previous work has demonstrated that this model yields elastic constants in very good agreement with those measured for gum metal specimens and leads to a reasonably accurate description of the martensitic transformations between the bcc ?, the orthorhombic ?'' and the hexagonal ? phases [Lazar , Phys. Rev. BPLRBAQ0556-280510.1103/PhysRevB.84.054202 84, 054202 (2011)]. The simulations of the response to tensile and shear loading have been performed for large supercells which account also for the different orientations of the -Nb-Nb- chains characteristic for the ?-phase structure relative to the direction of the applied load. The energy-strain and stress-strain curves are found to be very different from those reported for all bcc metals. Under uniaxial <100> loading we find an ideal tensile strength of 2.4 GPa, the upper limit to the tensile stress arising from a shear instability of the structure. Under uniaxial <110> load we calculate an ideal tensile strength of 2.2 or 2.8 GPa, depending on the orientation of the -Nb-Nb- chains relative to the loading direction. For a realistic multidomain structure the ideal strength is expected to correspond to the average of these values. An ideal strength of 2.6 GPa under <110> loading is roughly the same as under <100> load, despite a considerable anisotropy of the tensile moduli. For {211}<111> shear we calculate an ideal shear strength of 1.6 GPa, again as an average over different possible shearing directions relative to the Nb-Nb bonds. For the {110}<110> shear system we find a lower strength of 0.9 GPa. The structures reached at the stress maximum under <100> uniaxial tension and {211}<111> shear are identical, and since the maximal shear stress is much lower than the tensile stress, the alloy will fail by shear even under strictly uniaxial tension. The values of the ideal tensile and shear strengths are significantly low, even in comparison with those calculated for bcc V and Nb with very small shear moduli and approach the values reported for gum metal alloys.

Nagasako, Naoyuki; Asahi, Ryoji; Hafner, Jürgen

2012-01-01

65

Characterization of Optical Fiber Strength Under Applied Tensile Stress and Bending Stress  

SciTech Connect

Various types of tensile testing and bend radius tests were conducted on silica core/silica cladding optical fiber of different diameters with different protective buffer coatings, fabricated by different fiber manufacturers. The tensile tests were conducted to determine not only the average fiber strengths at failure, but also the distribution in fracture strengths, as well as the influence of buffer coating on fracture strength. The times-to-failure of fiber subjected to constant applied bending stresses of various magnitudes were measured to provide a database from which failure times of 20 years or more, and the corresponding minimum bend radius, could be extrapolated in a statistically meaningful way. The overall study was done to provide an understanding of optical fiber strength in tensile loading and in applied bending stress as related to applications of optical fiber in various potential coizfgurations for weapons and enhanced surveillance campaigns.

P.E. Klingsporn

2011-08-01

66

Environmental effects on the tensile strength of chemically vapor deposited silicon carbide fibers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The room temperature and elevated temperature tensile strengths of commercially available chemically vapor-deposited (CVD) silicon carbide fibers were measured after 15 min heat treatment to 1600 C in various environments. These environments included oxygen, air, argon and nitrogen at one atmosphere and vacuum at 10/9 atmosphere. Two types of fibers were examined which differed in the SiC content of their carbon-rich coatings. Threshold temperature for fiber strength degradation was observed to be dependent on the as-received fiber-flaw structure, on the environment and on the coating. Fractographic analyses and flexural strength measurements indicate that tensile strength losses were caused by surface degradation. Oxidation of the surface coating is suggested as one possible degradation mechanism. The SiC fibers containing the higher percentage of SiC near the surface of the carbon-rich coating show better strength retention and higher elevated temperature strength.

Bhatt, R. T.; Kraitchman, M. D.

1985-01-01

67

Computer simulation of fatigue under diametrical compression  

SciTech Connect

We study the fatigue fracture of disordered materials by means of computer simulations of a discrete element model. We extend a two-dimensional fracture model to capture the microscopic mechanisms relevant for fatigue and we simulate the diametric compression of a disc shape specimen under a constant external force. The model allows us to follow the development of the fracture process on the macrolevel and microlevel varying the relative influence of the mechanisms of damage accumulation over the load history and healing of microcracks. As a specific example we consider recent experimental results on the fatigue fracture of asphalt. Our numerical simulations show that for intermediate applied loads the lifetime of the specimen presents a power law behavior. Under the effect of healing, more prominent for small loads compared to the tensile strength of the material, the lifetime of the sample increases and a fatigue limit emerges below which no macroscopic failure occurs. The numerical results are in a good qualitative agreement with the experimental findings.

Carmona, H. A. [Centro de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade Estadual do Ceara, 60740-903 Fortaleza, Ceara (Brazil); IfB, HIF, E18, ETH, Hoenggerberg, 8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Kun, F. [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of Debrecen, P.O. Box 5, H-4010 Debrecen (Hungary); Andrade, J. S. Jr. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, 60451-970 Fortaleza, Ceara (Brazil); Herrmann, H. J. [IfB, HIF, E18, ETH, Hoenggerberg, 8093 Zuerich (Switzerland)

2007-04-15

68

Acceleration of tensile strength of incisions treated with EGF and TGF-beta.  

PubMed Central

The ability of surgeons to accelerate wound healing through pharmacologic intervention is limited. The effects of locally applied, biosynthetic human epidermal growth factor (EGF) and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) on tensile strength of experimental incisions were investigated. A single dose of EGF in saline failed to increase tensile strength over controls. Thus, EGF was incorporated into multilamellar liposomes, which prolonged the exposure of incisions to EGF (p less than 0.001). A single dose of EGF in multilamellar liposomes produced a 200% increase in wound tensile strength over controls between 7 and 14 days (p less than 0.05). Light and electron microscopy of the wounds revealed increased collagen formation and fibroblast proliferation. A single dose of TGB-beta in a collagen vehicle stimulated a 51% increase in wound tensile strength at 9 days (p less than 0.01). We conclude that addition of EGF and TGF-beta in appropriate vehicles stimulates early transient increases in wound tensile strength in normal rats. PMID:3264140

Brown, G L; Curtsinger, L J; White, M; Mitchell, R O; Pietsch, J; Nordquist, R; von Fraunhofer, A; Schultz, G S

1988-01-01

69

Modeling of the temperature-dependent ideal tensile strength of solids  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To reveal the fracture failure mechanisms of single crystals at elevated temperatures, a new temperature-dependent ideal tensile strength model for solids has been developed, based on the critical strain principle. At the same time, the uniaxial tensile strength model, based on the critical failure energy density principle for isotropic materials that was presented in the previous study, is generalized to multi-axial loading and to cubic single crystals. The relationship between the two models is discussed, and how to obtain the material properties needed in the calculations is summarized. The two well-established models are used to predict the temperature-dependent ideal tensile strength of W, Fe and Al single crystals. The predictions from the critical strain principle agree well with the predictions from the critical failure energy density principle. The theoretical values from the critical strain principle at 0 K is in reasonable agreement with the ab initio results. The study shows that the temperature dependence of the ideal tensile strength is similar to that of Young’s modulus; that is, the ideal tensile strength firstly remains approximately constant and then decreases linearly with the temperature. The fracture failure for single crystals at elevated temperatures has been identified, for the first time, as a strain-controlled criterion.

Cheng, Tianbao; Li, Weiguo; Fang, Daining

2014-08-01

70

On the Compressive and Tensile Strength of Magnesium Aluminate Spinel  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Magnesium aluminate spinel is a strong polycrystalline transparent ceramic. Spinel is an attractive material for armor applications and its behavior under shock wave loading is of obvious interest. The purpose of the present study was to determine the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL) of this material, its Hugoniot response above the HEL, and its spall strength. Planar impact experiments were performed over the 2 to 40 GPa stress range using the Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) as a principal diagnostics tool. According to these tests, spinel has a HEL of about 11.3 GPa. The spall strength of the material was found to be close to zero at low, about 2 GPa, impact stress.

Paris, V.; Hayun, S.; Dariel, M. P.; Frage, N.; Zaretsky, E.

2009-12-01

71

Tensile strengths of hydrous vesicular glasses: An experimental study  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have measured the pressures of decrepitation of vesicles in synthetic glasses of feldspar compositions (NaAlSi30g-KAlSi30g). Vesicles filled with Xe do not decrepitate at internal pressures of 160 MPa, indicating that the unflawed surface of the vesicle wall has an intrinsic strength > 80 MPa. Vesicles containing C02 escaped decrepitation and displayed ductile deformation when the Tg was reached at

C. ROMANO; J. E. MUNGALL; T. SHARP; B. DINGWELL

72

SIZE EFFECTS IN THE TENSILE STRENGTH OF UNIDIRECTIONAL FIBER COMPOSITES  

SciTech Connect

Monte Carlo simulation and theoretical modeling are used to study the statistical failure modes in unidirectional composites consisting of elastic fibers in an elastic matrix. Both linear and hexagonal fiber arrays are considered, forming 2D and 3D composites, respectively. Failure is idealized using the chain-of-bundles model in terms of {delta}-bundles of length {delta}, which is the length-scale of fiber load transfer. Within each {delta}-bundle, fiber load redistribution is determined by local load-sharing models that approximate the in-plane fiber load redistribution from planar break clusters as predicted from 2D and 3D shear-lag models. As a result these models are 1D and 2D, respectively. Fiber elements have random strengths following either the Weibull or the power-law distribution with shape and scale parameters {rho} and {sigma}{sub {delta}}, respectively. Simulations of {delta}-bundle failure, reveal two regimes. When fiber strength variability is low (roughly {rho} > 2) the dominant failure mode is by growing clusters of fiber breaks up to instability. When this variability is high (roughly 0 < {rho} < 1) cluster formation is suppressed by a dispersed fiber failure mode. For these two cases, closed-form approximations to the strength distribution of a {delta}-bundle are developed under the local load-sharing model and an equal load-sharing model of Daniels, respectively. The results compare favorably with simulations on {delta}-bundles with up to 1500 fibers. The location of the transition in terms of {rho} is affected by the upper tail properties of the fiber strength distributions as well as the number of fibers.

M. SIVASAMBU; ET AL

1999-08-01

73

Differences of tensile strength distribution between mechanically high-grade and low-grade Japanese larch lumber 11: Effect of knots on tensile strength distribution  

Microsoft Academic Search

The tensile strength (TS) test results of Japanese larch (Larix kaempferi, Carriere) lumber of varying length have shown that the length effects on TS were different between high-grade (H) and low-grade\\u000a (L) lumber. In this paper, we examined the effect of knots on the TS distribution by measuring the number of knots and the\\u000a knot area ratio of each specimen.

Takashi Takeda; Takeo Hashizume

1999-01-01

74

Semicircular bend testing with split Hopkinson pressure bar for measuring dynamic tensile strength of brittle solids  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We propose and validate an indirect tensile testing method to measure the dynamic tensile strength of rocks and other brittle solids: semicircular bend (SCB) testing with a modified split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) system. A strain gauge is mounted near the failure spot on the specimen to determine the rupture time. The momentum trap technique is utilized to ensure single pulse loading for postmortem examination. Tests without and with pulse shaping are conducted on rock specimens. The evolution of tensile stress at the failure spot is determined via dynamic and quasistatic finite element analyses with the dynamic loads measured from SHPB as inputs. Given properly shaped incident pulse, far-field dynamic force balance is achieved and the peak of the loading matches in time with the rupture onset of the specimen. In addition, the dynamic tensile stress history at the failure spot obtained from the full dynamic finite element analysis agrees with the quasistatic analysis. The opposite occurs for the test without pulse shaping. These results demonstrate that when the far-field dynamic force balance is satisfied, the inertial effects associated with stress wave loading are minimized and thus one can apply the simple quasistatic analysis to obtain the tensile strength in the SCB-SHPB testing. This method provides a useful and cost effective way to measure indirectly the dynamic tensile strength of rocks and other brittle materials.

Dai, F.; Xia, K.; Luo, S. N.

2008-12-01

75

Semicircular bend testing with split Hopkinson pressure bar for measuring dynamic tensile strength of brittle solids.  

PubMed

We propose and validate an indirect tensile testing method to measure the dynamic tensile strength of rocks and other brittle solids: semicircular bend (SCB) testing with a modified split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) system. A strain gauge is mounted near the failure spot on the specimen to determine the rupture time. The momentum trap technique is utilized to ensure single pulse loading for postmortem examination. Tests without and with pulse shaping are conducted on rock specimens. The evolution of tensile stress at the failure spot is determined via dynamic and quasistatic finite element analyses with the dynamic loads measured from SHPB as inputs. Given properly shaped incident pulse, far-field dynamic force balance is achieved and the peak of the loading matches in time with the rupture onset of the specimen. In addition, the dynamic tensile stress history at the failure spot obtained from the full dynamic finite element analysis agrees with the quasistatic analysis. The opposite occurs for the test without pulse shaping. These results demonstrate that when the far-field dynamic force balance is satisfied, the inertial effects associated with stress wave loading are minimized and thus one can apply the simple quasistatic analysis to obtain the tensile strength in the SCB-SHPB testing. This method provides a useful and cost effective way to measure indirectly the dynamic tensile strength of rocks and other brittle materials. PMID:19123575

Dai, F; Xia, K; Luo, S N

2008-12-01

76

Tensile strength of laser welded cobalt-chromium alloy with and without an argon atmosphere.  

PubMed

The tensile strength and depth of weld of two cobalt chromium alloys before and after laser welding with and without an argon gas atmosphere were investigated. Using two cobalt chromium alloys, rod shaped specimens (5 cm x 1.5 mm) were cast. Specimens were sand blasted, sectioned and welded with a pulsed Nd: YAG laser welding machine and tested in tension using an Instron universal testing machine. A statistically significant difference in tensile strength was observed between the two alloys. The tensile strength of specimens following laser welding was significantly less than the unwelded controls. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the micro-structure of the cast alloy was altered in the region of the weld. No statistically significant difference was found between specimens welded with or without an argon atmosphere. PMID:20698419

Tartari, Anna; Clark, Robert K F; Juszczyk, Andrzej S; Radford, David R

2010-06-01

77

Comparison of the Tensile, Creep, and Rupture Strength Properties of Stoichiometric SiC Fibers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Tensile strength, creep strength, and rupture strength properties were measured for the following types of polymer-derived stoichiometric SiC fibers: Hi-Nicalon Type S from Nippon Carbon, Tyranno SA from Ube, and Sylramic from Dow Corning. Also included in this study were an earlier version of the SA fiber plus two recent developmental versions of the Sylramic fiber. The tensile strength measurements were made at room temperature on as-received fibers and on fibers after high-temperature inert exposure. The creep-rupture property data were obtained at 1400 deg C in air as well as, argon. Some fiber types showed strong effects of environment on their strength properties. These results are compared and discussed in terms of underlying mechanisms and implications for ceramic composites.

Yun, H. M.; DiCarlo, J. A.

1999-01-01

78

A micromechanics model for predicting the tensile strength of unidirectional metal matrix composites  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, a micromechanics model has been developed to predict the tensile strength of unidirectional metal matrix composites (MMC). A simplified shear lag analysis is used to estimate the local stresses in the various constituents (fiber/matrix/interface). In this work, the matrix is assumed to carry both normal and shear stresses. Global matrix plasticity is considered by assuming that the matrix behaves in an elastic-perfectly plastic manner. Local interfacial debonding is assumed to occur when the average interfacial shear stress exceeds the interfacial shear strength value. The shear lag analysis including the effects of interfacial debonding and global matrix plasticity is used to estimate the stress concentration in fibers adjacent to broken fibers and the ineffective length. The tensile strength is estimated by considering the accumulation of fiber fractures. The effects of residual thermal stresses and statistical distribution of strength of the fibers are also included in this analysis. Parametric studies were conducted to investigate the influence of various parameters such as fiber volume fraction, temperature, interfacial shear strength, matrix properties and fiber strength, on the unidirectional tensile strength of MMC. The model was also used to predict the effects of volume fraction and temperature, on the strength of SCS6/Ti 24-11 composites. The predicted values compared well with the experimental results.

Subramanian, S. [Ad Tech Systems Research, Beavercreek, OH (United States)

1995-12-31

79

Tensile and shear bond strength of resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement to glazed porcelain.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to measure the tensile and shear bond strength of resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement (RGIC) to glazed porcelain, to evaluate the durability of RGIC by thermal cycling, and to examine the RGIC remaining on the surface of the porcelain after the bond strength test to evaluate bonding conditions. Three adhesives were used in this study: Concise (CO) as a chemically cured composite resin, Fuji ORTHO (FO) as a chemically cured RGIC, and Fuji ORTHO LC (FOLC) as a light-cured RGIC. Tensile and shear bond strengths were measured 24 hours after bonding orthodontic brackets and also after thermal cycling. Tensile bond strength after 24 hours was 6.6 +/- 3.2 MPa in CO, 7.3 +/- 1.4 MPa in FO, and 8.6 +/- 1.9 MPa in FOLC, and the strength significantly decreased after the thermal cycling test. Shear bond strength after 24 hours was 32.5 +/- 8.9 MPa in CO, 23.3 +/- 6.8 MPa in FO, and 24.7 +/- 6.5 MPa in FOLC, and in contrast to tensile bond strength, no decreases in the strength were detected after the thermal cycling test. CO showed significantly higher shear bond strength than did FO and FOLC. When using the shear bond strength test and CO, destruction of porcelain surfaces frequently occurred after 24 hours and was observed in every specimen after the thermal cycling. RGIC was found to be an advantageous alternative to resin adhesive for bracket bonding to porcelain and to enamel. PMID:12940567

Kitayama, Yoshitaka; Komori, Akira; Nakahara, Rizako

2003-08-01

80

Instrumented impact and residual tensile strength testing of eight-ply carbon eopoxy specimens  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Instrumented drop weight impact testing was utilized to examine a puncture-type impact on thin carbon-epoxy coupons. Four different material systems with various eight-ply lay-up configurations were tested. Specimens were placed over a 10.3-mm diameter hole and impacted with a smaller tup (4.2-mm diameter) than those used in previous studies. Force-time plots as well as data on absorbed energy and residual tensile strength were gathered and examined. It was found that a critical impact energy level existed for each material tested, at which point tensile strength began to rapidly decrease with increasing impact energy.

Nettles, A. T.

1990-01-01

81

Development of Yield and Tensile Strength Design Curves for Alloy 617  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy Very High Temperature Reactor Program is acquiring data in preparation for developing an Alloy 617 Code Case for inclusion in the nuclear section of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel (B&PV) Code. A draft code case was previously developed, but effort was suspended before acceptance by ASME. As part of the draft code case effort, a database was compiled of yield and tensile strength data from tests performed in air. Yield strength and tensile strength at temperature are used to set time independent allowable stress for construction materials in B&PV Code, Section III, Subsection NH. The yield and tensile strength data used for the draft code case has been augmented with additional data generated by Idaho National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the U.S. and CEA in France. The standard ASME Section II procedure for generating yield and tensile strength at temperature is presented, along with alternate methods that accommodate the change in temperature trends seen at high temperatures, resulting in a more consistent design margin over the temperature range of interest.

Nancy Lybeck; T. -L. Sham

2013-10-01

82

The effects of ZnO2 nanoparticles on split tensile strength of self-compacting concrete  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, split tensile strength of self-compacting concrete (SCC) with different amounts of ZnO2 nanoparticles has been investigated. ZnO2 nanoparticles with the average particle size of 15?nm were added partially to SCC and split tensile strength of the specimens has been measured. The results indicate that ZnO2 nanoparticles are able to improve the split tensile strength of SCC and

Ali Nazari; Shadi Riahi

2012-01-01

83

Effective Size Analysis of the Diametral Compression (Brazil) Test Specimen  

SciTech Connect

This study considers the finite element analysis (FEA) simulation and Weibull effective size analysis for the diametral compression (DC) or Brazil specimen loaded with three different push-rod geometries. Those geometries are a flat push-rod, a push-rod whose radius of curvature is larger than that for the DC specimen, and a push-rod whose radius of curvature matches that of the DC specimen. Such established effective size analysis recognizes that the tensile strength of structural ceramics is typically one to two orders of magnitude less than its compressive strength. Therefore, because fracture is much more apt to result from a tensile stress than a compressive one, this traditional analysis only considers the first principal tensile stress field in the mechanically loaded ceramic component for the effective size analysis. The effective areas and effective volumes were computed as function of Weibull modulus using the CARES/Life code. Particular attention was devoted to the effect of mesh sensitivity and localized stress concentration. The effect of specimen width on the stress state was also investigated. The effects of push-rod geometry, the use of steel versus WC push-rods, and considering a frictionless versus no-slip interface between push-rod and specimen on the maximum stresses, where those stresses are located, and the effective area and effective volume results are described. Of the three push-rod geometries, it is concluded that the push-rod (made from WC rather than steel) whose radius of curvature matches that of the DC specimen is the most apt to cause fracture initiation within the specimen's bulk rather than at the loading interface. Therefore, its geometry is the most likely to produce a valid diametral compression strength test. However, the DC specimen remains inefficient in terms of its area and volume efficiencies; namely, the tensile strength of only a few percent of the specimen's entire area or volume is sampled. Given the high probability that a valid (or invalid) test can be proven by ceramic fractographic practices suggests that this test method and specimen is questionable for use with relatively strong structural ceramics.

Jadaan, Osama M. [University of Wisconsin, Platteville; Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL

2009-04-01

84

Scale effects on the transverse tensile strength of graphite epoxy composites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The influence of material volume on the transverse tensile strength of AS4/3501-6 graphite epoxy composites was investigated. Tensile tests of 90 degree laminates with 3 different widths and 5 different thicknesses were conducted. A finite element analysis was performed to determine the influence of the grip on the stress distribution in the coupons and explain the tendency for the distribution of failure locations to be skewed toward the grip. Specimens were instrumented with strain gages and extensometers to insure good alignment and to measure failure strains. Data indicated that matrix dominated strength properties varied with the volume of material that was stressed, with the strength decreasing as volume increased. Transverse strength data were used in a volumetric scaling law based on Weibull statistics to predict the strength of 90 degree laminates loaded in three point bending. Comparisons were also made between transverse strength measurements and out-of-plane interlaminar tensile strength measurements from curved beam bending tests. The significance of observed scale effects on the use of tests for material screening, quality assurance, and design allowables is discussed.

Obrien, T. Kevin; Salpekar, Satish A.

1992-01-01

85

Tensile Strength of Carbon Nanotubes Under Realistic Temperature and Strain Rate  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Strain rate and temperature dependence of the tensile strength of single-wall carbon nanotubes has been investigated with molecular dynamics simulations. The tensile failure or yield strain is found to be strongly dependent on the temperature and strain rate. A transition state theory based predictive model is developed for the tensile failure of nanotubes. Based on the parameters fitted from high-strain rate and temperature dependent molecular dynamics simulations, the model predicts that a defect free micrometer long single-wall nanotube at 300 K, stretched with a strain rate of 1%/hour, fails at about 9 plus or minus 1% tensile strain. This is in good agreement with recent experimental findings.

Wei, Chen-Yu; Cho, Kyeong-Jae; Srivastava, Deepak; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

2002-01-01

86

Tensile properties of an ultrahigh-strength graphite fiber in an epoxy matrix  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The fiber performance and reinforcement potential for fiber composites of a special PAN-based graphite fiber were evaluated by testing the fiber's tensile properties in an epoxy matrix. Representative strand samples were taken from 30 spools of single-end, 1500-filament fiber to make over 5000 fiber/epoxy strand specimens using the filament-winding process. Characteristics studied were fiber uniformity, strength and modulus distributions at room and liquid-nitrogen temperatures, stress-strain behavior, the effect of strain rate on fiber strength, and acoustic emission during tensile loading to failure. The fiber was found to have a 3570-MPa failure stress, a 1.7% failure strain, a 206-GPa modulus, and a density of 1.77 Mg/cu m at 23 C. Liquid-nitrogen temperature and various strain rates had no significant effect on fiber tensile properties.

Chiao, T. T.; Hamstad, M. A.; Jessop, E. S.

1974-01-01

87

The ultimate tensile strength of metal and ceramic-matrix composites  

Microsoft Academic Search

The tensile strength of ceramic and metal matrix composites is subject to an important role of the fiber\\/matrix interface. The mechanical properties of this interface dictate the stress concentration that develops in fibers that surround a failed fiber. An analysis of this phenomenon is used to illustrate interface conditions that sufficiently diminish the stress concentration that a global load sharing

M. Y. He; A. G. Evans; W. A. Curtin

1993-01-01

88

Aggregate tensile strength and friability characteristics of furrow and sprinkler irrigated fields in Southern Idaho  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Agricultural crops grown in southern Idaho are furrow or sprinkler irrigated. Therefore, the soil experiences several wetting and drying cycles each growing season that can contribute to changes in aggregate tensile strength and friability. The objective of the research was to evaluate the influence...

89

Abaca Fiber Reinforced Phosphogypsum Concrete Panels (modulus Of Rupture, Toughness, Splitting Tensile Strength)  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this experimental study the possibilities of utilization of phosphogypsum--industrial waste--in concrete, reinforced with abaca vegetable fibers, were investigated. Effects of varying the abaca fiber content and the phosphogypsum content on flexural, tensile and compressive strengths and ductility of concrete were examined. The flexural behavior of abaca fiber reinforced phosphogypsum concrete panels was studied extensively and compared with gypsum wall

Selcuk Yetimoglu

1984-01-01

90

Tensile bond strength of glass fiber posts luted with different cements.  

PubMed

Proper selection of the luting agent is fundamental to avoid failure due to lack of retention in post-retained crowns. The objective of this study was to investigate the tensile bond strength and failure mode of glass fiber posts luted with different cements. Glass fiber posts were luted in 40 mandibular premolars, divided into 4 groups (n = 10): Group 1--resin-modified glass ionomer RelyX Luting; Group 2--resin-modified glass ionomer Fuji Plus; Group 3--resin cement RelyX ARC; Group 4--resin cement Enforce. Specimens were assessed by tensile strength testing and light microscopy analysis for observation of failure mode. The tensile bond strength values of each group were compared by ANOVA and Tukey test. The significance level was set at 5%. The failure modes were described as percentages. The following tensile strength values were obtained: Group 1--247.6 N; Group 2--256.7 N; Group 3--502.1 N; Group 4--477.3 N. There was no statistically significant difference between Groups 1 and 2 or between Groups 3 and 4, yet the resin cements presented significantly higher tensile bond strength values than those presented by the glass ionomer cements. Group 1 displayed 70% of cohesive failures, whereas Groups 2, 3 and 4 exhibited 70% to 80% of adhesive failures at the dentin-cement interface. We concluded that resin cements and glass ionomer cements are able to provide clinically sufficient retention of glass fiber posts, and that glass ionomer cements may be especially indicated when the application of adhesive techniques is difficult. PMID:17589652

Bonfante, Gerson; Kaizer, Osvaldo Bazzan; Pegoraro, Luiz Fernando; do Valle, Accácio Lins

2007-01-01

91

Effect of TiO2 Nanoparticles on Tensile Strength of Dental Acrylic Resins  

PubMed Central

Background and aims. Adding further fillers to dental resins may enhance their physical characteristics. The aim of this study was to evaluate the tensile strength of heat-curing acrylic resin reinforced by TiO2nanoparticles added into the resin matrix. Materials and methods. Commercially available TiO2 nanoparticles were obtained and characterized using X-ray diffrac-tion (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to determine their crystalline structure, particle size and morphology. TiO2-acrylic resin nanocomposite was prepared by mixing 0.5, 1 and 2 (wt%) of surface modified TiO2 nanoparticles in an amalgamator providing three groups of samples. Before curing, the obtained paste was packed into steel molds. After cur-ing, the specimens were removed from the molds. The tensile strength test samples were prepared according to ISO 1567. Results. Two crystalline phases were found in TiO2 nanoparticles including: (i) anatase as the major one, and (ii) rutile. The average particle size calculated according to the Scherrer equation was 20.4 nm, showing a normal size distribution. According to SEM images, the nanocomposite with 1wt% TiO2 nanoparticles had a better distribution compared to other groups. In addition, the group by 1wt% TiO2 exhibited higher tensile strength with a significant difference compared to other groups. ANOVA showed significant differences between the contents of TiO2 particles in acrylic resin (F = 22.19; P < 0.001). Conclusion. A considerable increase in tensile strength was observed with titania NPs reinforcement agents in 1wt% by weight. Further increase of TiO2 nanoparticles decreased the tensile strength. PMID:25587380

Shirkavand, Saeed; Moslehifard, Elnaz

2014-01-01

92

Influence of surface defects on the tensile strength of carbon fibers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The mechanical properties of carbon fibers, especially their tensile properties, are affected by internal and surface defects. In order to asses in what extent the generation of surface defects can result in a loss of the mechanical properties, non-surface treated carbon fibers were oxidized with three different surface treatment processes: electro-chemical oxidation, oxidation in nitric acid, and oxidation in oxygen plasma. Different surface topographies and surface chemistries were obtained, as well as different types and densities of surface defects. The density of surface defects was measured with both a physical approach (Raman spectroscopy) and a chemical approach (Active Surface Area). The tensile properties were evaluated by determining the Weibull modulus and the scale parameter of each reference, after measuring the tensile strength for four different gauge lengths. A relationship between the tensile properties and the nature and density of surface defects was noticed, as large defects largely control the value of the tensile strength. When optimized, some oxidation surface treatment processes can generate surface functional groups as well as an increase of the mechanical properties of the fibers, because of the removal of the contamination layer of pyrolytic carbon generated during the carbonization of the polyacrylonitrile precursor. Oxidation in oxygen plasma revealed to be a promising technology for alternative surface treatment processes, as high levels of functionalization were achieved and a slight improvement of the mechanical properties was obtained too.

Vautard, F.; Dentzer, J.; Nardin, M.; Schultz, J.; Defoort, B.

2014-12-01

93

High Tensile Strength Amalgams for In-Space Repair and Fabrication  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Amalgams are defined as an alloy of mercury with one or more other metals. These, along with those based on gallium (also liquid at near room temperature), are widely used in dental practice as a tooth filling material. Amalgams have a number of useful attributes that indude room temperature compounding. corrosion resistance, dimensional stability, and good compressive strength. These properties well serve dental needs but, unfortunately, amalgams have extremely poor tensile strength, a feature that severely limits their applications. The work presented here demonstrates how, by modifying particle geometry, the tensile strength of amalgams can be increased and thus extending the range of potential applications. This is relevant to, for example, the freeform fabrication of replacement parts that might be necessary during an extended space mission. Advantages, i.e. Figures-of-Merit. include the ability to produce complex parts, minimum crew interaction, high yield - minimum wasted material, reduced gravity compatibility, minimum final finishing, safety, and minimum power consumption.

Grugel, R. N.

2005-01-01

94

Tensile properties of carbon nanotubes grown on ultrahigh strength polyacrylonitrile-based and ultrahigh modulus pitch-based carbon fibers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The tensile properties and fracture behavior of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) grown on ultrahigh tensile strength polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based (T1000GB) and ultrahigh modulus pitch-based (K13D) carbon fibers have been investigated. The CNTs were grown on the carbon fiber surface using chemical vapor deposition. The statistical scattering of the tensile strength was also evaluated. The results clearly show that grafting of CNTs improves the mechanical properties and the Weibull modulus of ultrahigh tensile strength PAN-based and ultrahigh modulus pitch-based carbon fibers.

Naito, Kimiyoshi; Yang, Jenn-Ming; Tanaka, Yoshihisa; Kagawa, Yutaka

2008-06-01

95

A comparison of direct and indirect methods of determining tensile strength of concrete  

E-print Network

A COMPARISON OF DIRECT AND INDIRECT METHODS OF DETERMINING TENSILE STRENGTH OF CONCRETE JAMES TIMON BROWN A Thesis Submitted to ths Graduate School of the Agricultural and . Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August~ 1957 Ma3or Sub]ect: Civil Engineering A COMPARISON OF DIRECT AND IiiDIR?'CT METIiODS OF DETERMINING TENSILE STRENGTii OF CONCRETE A Thesis JAMES TIMON BHONN Approved as to style and content by: a rman o omm ee...

Brown, James Timon

1957-01-01

96

Tensile properties of carbon nanotubes grown on ultrahigh strength polyacrylonitrile-based and ultrahigh modulus pitch-based carbon fibers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The tensile properties and fracture behavior of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) grown on ultrahigh tensile strength polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based (T1000GB) and ultrahigh modulus pitch-based (K13D) carbon fibers have been investigated. The CNTs were grown on the carbon fiber surface using chemical vapor deposition. The statistical scattering of the tensile strength was also evaluated. The results clearly show that grafting of CNTs improves

Kimiyoshi Naito; Jenn-Ming Yang; Yoshihisa Tanaka; Yutaka Kagawa

2008-01-01

97

Amplitude distribution modelling and ultimate strength prediction of ASTM D-3039 graphite/epoxy tensile specimens  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As the aerospace industry increases its usage of composite materials in primary structures, techniques must be developed to nondestructively predict and monitor structural integrity at low proof stresses. This paper demonstrates the feasibility of predicting ultimate strengths at stress levels less than 25 percent of the expected ultimate strength, thereby reducing the unintentional structural damage caused by higher proof loads. The research presented herein has shown that an ultimate strength prediction equation can be generated for ASTM D-3039 unidirectional graphite/epoxy tensile specimens. From an original sample set of six specimens, a multivariate statistical analysis was used to generate an ultimate strength prediction equation. The variables of the multivariate statistical analysis were obtained through the mathematical modelling of the low amplitude (matrix cracking) portion of the specimens' AE amplitude distributions produced during the early stages of proof testing. A Weibull distribution was used to represent the amplitude band, and its parameters were correlated with known failure strengths to produce ultimate strength prediction equations. Ultimate strengths were then accurately predicted at proof stresses less than 25 percent of the expected failure stress for several randomly drawn tensile coupons.

Walker, James L., II; Hill, Eric V. K.

98

Effects of porosity on weld-joint tensile strength of aluminum alloys  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Tensile properties in defect-free weldments of aluminum alloys 2014-T6 and 2219-T87 (sheet and plate) are shown to be related to the level or concentration of induced simulated porosity. The scatter diagram shows that the ultimate tensile strength of the weldments displays the most pronounced linear relationship with the level of porosity. The relationships between yield strength or elongation and porosity are either trivial or inconsequential in the lower and intermediate levels of porosity content. In highly concentrated levels of porosity, both yield strength and elongation values decrease markedly. Correlation coefficients were obtained by simple straight line regression analysis between the variables of ultimate tensile strength and pore level. The coefficients were greater, indicating a better correlation, using a pore area accumulation concept or pore volume accumulation than the accumulation of the pore diameters. These relationships provide a useful tool for assessing the existing aerospace radiographic acceptance standards with respect to permissible porosity. In addition, these relationships, in combination with known design load requirements, will serve as an engineering guideline in determining when a weld repair is necessary based on accumulative pore level as detected by radiographic techniques.

Lovoy, C. V.

1974-01-01

99

Developing an Empirical Relationship to Predict Tensile Strength of Friction Stir Welded AA2219 Aluminum Alloy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

AA2219 aluminum alloy (Al-Cu-Mn alloy) has gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of lightweight structures requiring a high strength-to-weight ratio and good corrosion resistance. Friction stir welding (FSW) process is an emerging solid state joining process in which the material that is being welded does not melt and recast. This process uses a nonconsumable tool to generate frictional heat in the abutting surfaces. The welding parameters such as tool rotational speed, welding speed, axial force, etc., and tool pin profile play a major role in deciding the joint strength. An attempt has been made to develop an empirical relationship between FSW variables to predict tensile strength of the friction stir welded AA2219 aluminum alloy. To obtain the desired strength, it is essential to have a complete control over the relevant process parameters to maximize the tensile strength on which the quality of a weldment is based. Therefore, it is very important to select and control the welding process parameter for obtaining maximum strength. To achieve this various prediction methods such as response surface method (RSM), analysis of variance (ANOVA), Student’s t-test, coefficient of determination, etc., can be applied to define the desired output variables through developing mathematical models to specify the relationship between the output parameters and input variables. Four factors, five levels central composite design have been used to minimize number of experimental conditions. The developed mathematical relationship can be effectively used to predict the tensile strength of FSW joints of AA2219 aluminum alloy at 95% confidence level.

Elangovan, K.; Balasubramanian, V.; Babu, S.

2008-12-01

100

Thermal degradation of the tensile strength of unidirectional boron/aluminum composites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The variation of ultimate tensile strength with thermal treatment of B-Al composite materials and of boron fibers chemically removed from these composites is studied systematically in an attempt to determine the mechanism of the resulting strength degradation. The results indicate that thermally cycling of B-Al represents a more severe condition than equivalent time at temperature. Degradation of composite tensile strength from about 1.3 GN/sq m to as low as 0.34 GN/sq m was observed after 3000 cycles to 420 C for 203-micron B-1100 Al composite. In general, the 1100 Al-matrix composites degraded somewhat more than the 6061 matrix material studied. Measurement of fiber strengths confirmed a composite strength loss due to the degradation of fiber strength. Microscopy indicated a highly flawed fiber surface. On the basis of various thermal-cycling studies and electron diffraction analysis, a mechanism is favored in which B reacts with Al, freshly exposed by cold working during cycling, to form AlB2. The nonuniform interface reaction leads to a highly flawed and weakened B fiber.

Grimes, H. H.; Lad, R. A.; Maisel, J. E.

1977-01-01

101

FE Analysis of Buckling Behavior Caused by Welding in Thin Plates of High Tensile Strength Steel  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The target of this study was to investigate buckling behavior during the entire welding process which consists of the heating and the cooling processes. For thin plate structures made of high tensile strength steel, not only residual buckling during or after cooling down but also transient buckling during heating may occur. The thermal elastic plastic FE analysis to investigate welding-induced buckling during the entire welding process is presented. Because of the high yield stress of high tensile strength steel, larger longitudinal compressive thermal stress is produced near the welding line compared with that in the case of carbon steel. Therefore, the plate may buckle due to thermal expansion, before the material nears yielding. During cooling down, the longitudinal compressive thermal stress close to the welding line disappears, and longitudinal tensile residual stress is produced due to contraction. Meanwhile, longitudinal compressive residual stress occurs far from the welding line to balance the tensile stress close to the welding line. This distribution of longitudinal residual stress would change the deformed dish shape of transient buckling into a saddle buckling type when the stress exceeds the critical buckling condition.

Wang, Jiangchao; Rashed, Sherif; Murakawa, Hidekazu

2014-12-01

102

FE Analysis of Buckling Behavior Caused by Welding in Thin Plates of High Tensile Strength Steel  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The target of this study was to investigate buckling behavior during the entire welding process which consists of the heating and the cooling processes. For thin plate structures made of high tensile strength steel, not only residual buckling during or after cooling down but also transient buckling during heating may occur. The thermal elastic plastic FE analysis to investigate welding-induced buckling during the entire welding process is presented. Because of the high yield stress of high tensile strength steel, larger longitudinal compressive thermal stress is produced near the welding line compared with that in the case of carbon steel. Therefore, the plate may buckle due to thermal expansion, before the material nears yielding. During cooling down, the longitudinal compressive thermal stress close to the welding line disappears, and longitudinal tensile residual stress is produced due to contraction. Meanwhile, longitudinal compressive residual stress occurs far from the welding line to balance the tensile stress close to the welding line. This distribution of longitudinal residual stress would change the deformed dish shape of transient buckling into a saddle buckling type when the stress exceeds the critical buckling condition.

Wang, Jiangchao; Rashed, Sherif; Murakawa, Hidekazu

2014-09-01

103

Tensile bond strength of gold and porcelain inlays to extracted teeth using three cements.  

PubMed

This in vitro study compared the tensile bond strength of gold and porcelain inlays to extracted molars in standardized cavities. Three cements were used: zinc phosphate, glass-ionomer, and a resin composite cement. The gold inlays were cemented using zinc phosphate or glass-ionomer cement, and the porcelain inlays were luted using resin composite or glass-ionomer cement. Surface treatments included, for gold inlays, either no treatment (zinc phosphate cement) or airborne particle abraded and tinplated (glass-ionomer cement); and for porcelain inlays, either no treatment (glass-ionomer cement) or etched and silane-treated (resin composite cement). Statistical analysis was performed using the Weibull distribution. Results showed no significant differences between gold inlays cemented using zinc phosphate or glass-ionomer cements and porcelain inlays luted using glass-ionomer cements. The bonded porcelain inlays (resin composite cement) showed tensile bond strengths two to three times higher than those obtained for cemented gold inlays. PMID:7575974

Michelini, F S; Belser, U C; Scherrer, S S; De Rijk, W G

1995-01-01

104

Ab initio study of the ideal tensile strength and mechanical stability of transition-metal disilicides  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ideal tensile test in transition metal disilicides MoSi2 and WSi2 with a C11b structure is simulated by ab initio electronic structure calculations using the full-potential linearized augmented plane wave method. The theoretical tensile strength for [001] loading is determined for both disilicides and compared with that of other materials. A full relaxation of all external and one internal structural parameter is performed, and the influence of each relaxation process on energetics and strength of materials studied is investigated. Differences in the behavior of various interatomic bonds including tension-compression asymmetry are analyzed and their origin in connection with the changes of the internal structural parameter is traced. For comparison, the response of bonds in MoSi and CoSi with B2 structure to the [001] loading is also studied.

Friák, M.; Šob, M.; Vitek, V.

2003-11-01

105

Tensile strength of sand, palygorskite and calcium carbonate mixtures and interpretation with the effective stress theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many soils in arid regions of the world including those of central Iran contain palygorskite and carbonates in their mineral fraction. There is, however, little information on the effects of these minerals on soil physical and mechanical behaviour. A laboratory experiment was carried out to evaluate tensile strength of artificial mixtures of sand–palygorskite–calcium carbonate (CaCO3). Palygorskite and calcium carbonate were

M. R. Mosaddeghi; M. A. Hajabbasi; H. Khademi

2006-01-01

106

Dependence of fatigue limit of high-tension bolts on mean stress and ultimate tensile strength  

Microsoft Academic Search

High tension bolts in critical joints in internal combustion engines are susceptible to fatigue failure. Computeraided bolted\\u000a joint design procedures require knowledge of the dependence of bolt fatigue limit on the mean stress and ultimate tensile\\u000a strength. This dependence is investigated with staircase fatigue limit tests. The test results show that when the bolt fatigue\\u000a limit is estimated with the

S.-S. Cho; H. Chang; K. W. Lee

2009-01-01

107

Influence of Bolting Parameters on the Ultimate Tensile Strength and Stiffness of Composite-Metal Joints  

Microsoft Academic Search

The joining of dissimilar materials poses a challenge in mechanical structures. The objective of this research was to investigate the effect of joining parameters such as bolt spacing, geometry configuration, and overlap length on ultimate failure strength and stiffness of composite-metal hybrid joints. Woven fiberglass\\/epoxy and unidirectional carbon-fiber\\/epoxy composites have been manufactured and tested under tensile loads to obtain their

William S. Slovinsky; Parsaoran Hutapea

2010-01-01

108

Continuous extrusion and tensile strength of self-reinforced HDPE\\/UHMWPE sheet  

Microsoft Academic Search

A specially designed fish-tail shaped extrusion die was used to continuously extrude self-reinforcing sheet of HDPE\\/UHMWPE. The result indicated that under conventional extrusion conditions, the tensile strength of extruded sheet was comparable to conventional molded HDPE samples and was almost the same in both MD (machine direction) and TD (transverse direction) directions. While at temperatures slightly above the melting point

Jun Chen; Wei Yang; Guo-ping Yu; Min Wang; Hai-ying Ni; Kai-zhi Shen

2008-01-01

109

Effect of laser welding on the titanium ceramic tensile bond strength  

PubMed Central

Titanium reacts strongly with elements, mainly oxygen at high temperature. The high temperature of titanium laser welding modifies the surface, and may interfere on the metal-ceramic tensile bond strength. Objective The influence of laser welding on the titanium-ceramic bonding has not yet been established. The purpose of this in vitro study was to analyze the influence of laser welding applied to commercially pure titanium (CpTi) substructure on the bond strength of commercial ceramic. The influence of airborne particle abrasion (Al2O3) conditions was also studied. Material and Methods Forty CpTi cylindrical rods (3 mm x 60 mm) were cast and divided into 2 groups: with laser welding (L) and without laser welding (WL). Each group was divided in 4 subgroups, according to the size of the particles used in airborne particle abrasion: A - Al2O3 (250 µm); B - Al2O3 (180 µm); C - Al2O3 (110 µm); D - Al2O3 (50 µm). Ceramic rings were fused around the CpTi rods. Specimens were invested and their tensile strength was measured at fracture with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 2.0 mm/min and 200 kgf load cell. Statistical analysis was carried out with analysis of variance and compared using the independent t test (p?0.05). Results Significant differences were found among all subgroups (p<0.05). The highest and the lowest bond strength means were recorded in subgroups WLC (52.62 MPa) and LD (24.02 MPa), respectively. Conclusion Airborne particle abrasion yielded significantly lower bond strength as the Al2O3 particle size decreased. Mechanical retention decreased in the laser-welded specimens, i.e. the metal-ceramic tensile bond strength was lower. PMID:21956585

GALO, Rodrigo; RIBEIRO, Ricardo Faria; RODRIGUES, Renata Cristina Silveira; PAGNANO, Valéria de Oliveira; de MATTOS, Maria da Glória Chiarello

2011-01-01

110

The dependence of bedrock erodibility on rock material properties: is tensile strength enough?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Rock resistance to fluvial abrasion by bedload sediment impacts has been shown experimentally to depend on the square of rock tensile strength across the full range of rock strengths encountered in the field. This result is consistent with fracture mechanics theory which predicts that fractures propagate when the capacity of brittle materials to store impact energy by elastic deformation is exceeded. Strain energy depends on the square of tensile strength, but also on the elastic modulus. Log-log linear regression of laboratory measurements of bedrock erosion rates against tensile strength shows order-of -magnitude variability about the power-law fit, particularly for stronger rocks. In this investigation we seek to explain this variability in terms of other rock material properties. In particular we are examining elastic modulus, crystal grain size, mineralogy, degree of cementation, rock bulk density and porosity. We have access to the same rocks used in previous bedrock abrasion experiments, as well as artificial bedrock made from controlled mixtures of sand and portland cement. We measure tensile strength by the Brazilian splitting test, and estimate elastic modulus from measurements of the velocity of ultrasonic pulses through core samples. We are analyzing thin sections and photomicrographs to measure crystal grain size, and mineral and cement composition. Bulk density, as well as porosity, are measured by comparison of dry and saturated weights for known volumes of material. Preliminary results suggest that coarse-grained rocks, such as granite and some sandstones, are less erodible for a given measured tensile strength than the fine-grained rocks tested, which include greenstone, andesite and limestone. We also find, with a small subset of rock types tested to-date, that inclusion of elastic modulus in a multiple regression reduces the uncertainty in the regression slope estimate, but that substantial variability remains to be explained. This work may have broad applicability in understanding erodibility of terrestrial bedrock by fluvial as well as eolian mechanisms, as well as controls on the surface erodibility of ice ‘bedrock’ on outer solar system satellites such as Titan.

Beyeler, J. D.; Sklar, L. S.; Litwin, K.; Johnson, J. P.; Collins, G. C.; Whipple, K. X.

2009-12-01

111

The Effect of Teucrium Polium Hney on the Wound Healing and Tensile Strength in Rat  

PubMed Central

Objective(s) Wound healing represents a dynamic physiological process influenced by many factors. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of Teucrium polium honey on the wound healing and tensile strength in rat. Materials and Methods Thirty-six Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four equal (n= 9) treatment and control groups. Two full-thickness wounds were made over the dorsal thoracic region according to the incision and excision models. Animals were treated with topical Teucrium polium honey twice a day post surgery until complete healing was achieved. Histopathology and tensiometry were then studied. Results The wound healing process occurred faster in the incision model than excision ones (P< 0.05). Teucrium polium honey promoted wound contraction, closure time and tensile strength (P< 0.05). Histopathological study also showed relative epithelial proliferation, improved angiogenesis granulation, and fibrous connective tissue in Teucrium polium honey treated animals. Conclusion The present study demonstrates that Teucrium polium honey can accelerate wound healing as well as tensile strength in rat skin wounds. PMID:23493667

Alizadeh, Ali Mohammad; Sohanaki, Hamid; Khaniki, Mahmod; Mohaghgheghi, Mohammad Ali; Ghmami, Giti; Mosavi, Maryamsadat

2011-01-01

112

Effect of dimethylpolysiloxane liquid on the cryogenic tensile strength and thermal contraction behavior of epoxy resins  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dimethylpolysiloxane liquid was blended with diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A epoxy resin including anhydride curing agent to improve the tensile strength of the epoxy resin at 77 K without any increase in its coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE). A bifunctional polymer, silicone-modified epoxy resin (SME), was also added to the mixture as a compatibilizer. The results of UV transmittance for the blend resin showed that the incorporation of the SME could stabilize effectively spherical domains of the siloxane liquid which was immiscible with the epoxy matrix. The tensile strengths of the blend resins at both room temperature and 77 K were measured and SEM analysis for the fractured cross sections was carried out to verify the toughening behavior of the liquid droplets. The results indicated that even small amount of addition of the siloxane liquid (0.05 phr) coupled with SME (20 phr) could enhance the tensile strength at 77 K by 77.6% compared to that of the neat epoxy resin. This improvement is attributed to the fact that the solid and s droplets can disperse the localized stress and interrupt the crack propagation by cavitation mechanism followed by multiple generation of numerous micro-deformation. From the CTE measurement, the siloxane liquid has no influence on the thermal contraction behavior of the blend resin.

Yi, Jin Woo; Lee, Yu Jin; Lee, Sang Bok; Lee, Wonoh; Um, Moon Kwang

2014-05-01

113

The tensile bond strength of new and rebonded stainless steel orthodontic brackets.  

PubMed

The study investigated the effect on the tensile/peel bond strength of the variables associated with the bracket base, the enamel surface, and the type of adhesive when both new and used brackets were rebonded to a previously bonded enamel surface. The tensile/peel bond strength was firstly evaluated for three different types of stainless steel orthodontic bracket/base combinations. The cast integral base gave a significantly lower bond strength than the foil-mesh and photo-etched bases. Following debonding, a group of new brackets were bonded to the teeth using a chemically-activated or a light-cured adhesive. The old adhesive had been removed from the enamel by either a hand scaler or a tungsten-carbide bur. The rebonded new brackets demonstrated a small, but statistically significant fall in bond strength. No differences were found between the enamel preparations or the adhesives. A further group of previously debonded brackets were rebonded to the same teeth. The bracket bases were prepared by either smoothing with a green stone or heating in a bunsen flame followed by sandblasting and electropolishing. Highly significant falls in bond strength were obtained with all the bases. No significant differences were found between the two methods of bracket preparation. PMID:8500538

Regan, D; LeMasney, B; van Noort, R

1993-04-01

114

Effects of HF Treatments on Tensile Strength of Hi-Nicalon Fibers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Tensile strengths of as-received Hi-Nicalon fibers and those having a dual BN/SiC surface coating, deposited by chemical vapor deposition, have been measured at room temperature. These fibers were also treated with HF for 24 h followed by tensile strength measurements. Strengths of uncoated and BN/SiC coated Hi-Nicalon fibers extracted from celsian matrix composites, by dissolving away the matrix in HF for 24 h, were also determined. The average tensile strength of uncoated Hi-Nicalon was 3.19 +/- 0.73 GPa with a Weibull modulus of 5.41. The Hi-Nicalon/BN/SiC fibers showed an average strength of 3.04 q 0.53 GPa and Weibull modulus of 6.66. After HF treatments, the average strengths of the uncoated and BN/SiC coated Hi-Nicalon fibers were 2.69 +/- 0.67 GPa and 2.80 +/- 0.53 GPa and the Weibull moduli were 4.93 and 5.96, respectively. The BN/SiC coated fibers extracted from the celsian matrix composite exhibited a strength of 2.38 +/- 0.40 GPa and a Weibull modulus of 7.15. The strength of the uncoated Hi-Nicalon fibers in the composite was so severely degraded that they disintegrated into small fragments during extraction with HF. The uncoated fibers probably undergo mechanical surface damage during hot pressing of the composites. Also, the BN layer on the coated fibers acts as a compliant layer which protects the fibers from mechanical damage during composite processing. The elemental composition and thickness of the fiber coatings were deten-nined using scanning Auger analysis. Microstructural analyses of the fibers and the coatings were done by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Strengths of fibers calculated using average and measured fiber diameters were in good agreement. Thus, the strength of fibers can be evaluated using an average fiber diameter instead of the measured diameter of each filament.

Bansal, Narottam P.

1998-01-01

115

Tensile strength of fiber reinforced plastics at 77K irradiated by various radiation sources  

SciTech Connect

The influence of radiation damage on the mechanical properties of fiber reinforced plastics (FRPs), which are considered as candidate materials for the insulation of superconducting magnets for nuclear fusion reactors, has been investigated. Different types of FRPs (epoxies, bismaleimides; two- and three-dimensional reinforcement structures with E-, S-, or T-glass fibers) has been included in the test program. Three aspects of our present results will be discussed in detail. The first is related to an assessment of the tensile strength and its radiation dependence under the influence of strongly varying radiation conditions. The second aspect refers to low temperature ({approx}5 K) reactor irradiation of selected materials. In this case, identical sets of tensile test samples were transferred into the tensile testing machine, one without warming-up to room temperature and the other after an annealing cycle to room temperature. Finally, a comparison between the radiation response of different materials is made. It turns out that the three-dimensionally reinforced bismaleimide shows the smallest degradation of its tensile properties under all irradiation conditions.

Humer, K.; Weber, H.W. [Atominstitut der Oesterreichischen Universitaeten, Vienna (Austria); Tschegg, E.K. [Technische Univ., Vienna (Austria). Inst. fuer Angewandte und Technische Physik; Egusa, S. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; Birtcher, R.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Gerstenberg, H. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physikdepartment

1993-08-01

116

Tensile bond strength of four denture resins to porcelain teeth with different surface treatment  

PubMed Central

PURPOSE This study evaluated the bond strength between porcelain denture teeth (Bioblend 43D) and four different polymerized denture resins (Lucitone 199, Palapress, Acron MC, Triad) with and without a bonding agent and after four different types of surface treatment (polished, HF etched, sandblasted, air-abraded). MATERIALS AND METHODS Central incisor porcelain denture teeth were divided into 32 groups of 5 each. Tensile bond strength (MPa) was determined using a testing machine at crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Mean and standard deviation are listed. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA. Means were compared by Tukey-Kramer intervals at 0.05 significance level. RESULTS All surface treatment increased bond strength compared to polished surface and the highest bond strength was found with Palapress resin with etched porcelain surface (8.1 MPa). Bonding agent improved the bond strength of all denture resins to porcelain teeth. Superior bonding was found with Palapress and air-abraded porcelain (39 MPa). CONCLUSION Resins with different curing methods affect the bond strength of porcelain teeth to denture bases. Superior bonding was found with auto-polymerized resin (Palapress). Application of ceramic primer and bonding agent to porcelain teeth with and without surface treatment will improve the bond strength of all denture resins to porcelain teeth. PMID:24353880

Powers, John

2013-01-01

117

Dynamic Tensile Strength of Low Temperature Ice and Kuiper Belt Size Distributions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We model mutual gravitationally driven impact interactions in a nearly gas-free environment of the Kuiper belt (KB) and use low-temperature (< 100 K) ice dynamic strength dependent collisional out-come (accretion vs. erosion and fragmentation) models. These lead to theoretically predictable distributions of object number density, vs. mass distributions. These derived mass distributions are comparable to the now rapidly growing KB survey data. Tensional failure of single and polycrystalline ice in the temperature range from 263 to 128 K was measured for high strain rate, c.a. 104 s-1, dynamic loading conditions. Experiments, similar to Lange and Ahrens(1991)(LA), were conducted using a gas gun launched Lexan projectile. The liquid nitrogen cooled ice target approaching KB-like temperatures was partially confined, rather than using the LA confined geometry. Another set of experiments used a drop tube projectile launcher within the 263 K Caltech Ice Laboratory and at 163 K in a liquid nitrogen cooled chamber. New experiments give tensile strengths of 7.6±1.5 MPa at 263 K and 9.1±1.5 MPa at 163 K for unconfined, free of visual initial defects and measurable imperfections ice samples. The new strengths are lower than the earlier LA data ( 17 MPa). The major differences arise from ice target assembly. LA used polycrystalline ice samples confined in annular stainless steel target rings. New measurements were partially confined, in not initially contacting concentric target rings. Later shots used unconfined configurations with ice pellets affixed to aluminum foil. Circumferential confinement is known to increase the material damage threshold upon both compression and tensile loading. Previous confinement in LA is the main cause of the above discrepancy. Present tensile strengths are only a few times higher than 0.7 - 3.0 MPa summarized in Petrovic (2003) for quasistatic tension at 10-7 to 10-3 s-1 strain rate.

Ahrens, Thomas J.; Fat'yanov, O. V.; Engelhardt, H.; Fraser, W. C.

2009-09-01

118

Bulk metallic glass composite with good tensile ductility, high strength and large elastic strain limit  

PubMed Central

Bulk metallic glasses exhibit high strength and large elastic strain limit but have no tensile ductility. However, bulk metallic glass composites reinforced by in-situ dendrites possess significantly improved toughness but at the expense of high strength and large elastic strain limit. Here, we report a bulk metallic glass composite with strong strain-hardening capability and large elastic strain limit. It was found that, by plastic predeformation, the bulk metallic glass composite can exhibit both a large elastic strain limit and high strength under tension. These unique elastic mechanical properties are attributed to the reversible B2?B19? phase transformation and the plastic-predeformation-induced complicated stress state in the metallic glass matrix and the second phase. These findings are significant for the design and application of bulk metallic glass composites with excellent mechanical properties. PMID:24931632

Wu, Fu-Fa; Chan, K. C.; Jiang, Song-Shan; Chen, Shun-Hua; Wang, Gang

2014-01-01

119

Tensile strength of carbyne chains in varied chemical environments and structural lengths.  

PubMed

Carbyne and carbyne-based low-dimensional structures are promising for several applications including ultra-compact circuits and purification devices. Designing any applied carbyne-based structure requires a fundamental understanding of the mechanical strength of carbyne chains with different lengths at different temperatures and operating chemical environment. Here we use molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the strength of carbyne chains with different lengths at different temperatures. A theoretical framework based on statistical mechanics and molecular dynamics results is presented, proving a fast and insightful method for predicting the rupture force and its physical mechanism. The effect of water molecules' interaction is also studied on the mechanical properties and it is shown that both the tensile strength and rupture strain are improved by the water interaction. The results of this work can be used for designing and analyzing the robustness and reliability of various carbyne-based materials and applied devices for varies working conditions. PMID:25148690

Mirzaeifar, Reza; Qin, Zhao; Buehler, Markus J

2014-09-19

120

High Tensile Strength Amalgams for In-Space Fabrication and Repair  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Amalgams are well known for their use in dental practice as a tooth filling material. They have a number of useful attributes that include room temperature fabrication, corrosion resistance, dimensional stability, and very good compressive strength. These properties well serve dental needs but, unfortunately, amalgams have extremely poor tensile strength, a feature that severely limits other potential applications. Improved material properties (strength and temperature) of amalgams may have application to the freeform fabrication of repairs or parts that might be necessary during an extended space mission. Advantages would include, but are not limited to: the ability to produce complex parts, a minimum number of processing steps, minimum crew interaction, high yield - minimum wasted material, reduced gravity compatibility, minimum final finishing, safety, and minimum power consumption. The work presented here shows how the properties of amalgams can be improved by changing particle geometries in conjunction with novel engineering metals.

Grugel, Richard N.

2006-01-01

121

Bulk metallic glass composite with good tensile ductility, high strength and large elastic strain limit.  

PubMed

Bulk metallic glasses exhibit high strength and large elastic strain limit but have no tensile ductility. However, bulk metallic glass composites reinforced by in-situ dendrites possess significantly improved toughness but at the expense of high strength and large elastic strain limit. Here, we report a bulk metallic glass composite with strong strain-hardening capability and large elastic strain limit. It was found that, by plastic predeformation, the bulk metallic glass composite can exhibit both a large elastic strain limit and high strength under tension. These unique elastic mechanical properties are attributed to the reversible B2?B19' phase transformation and the plastic-predeformation-induced complicated stress state in the metallic glass matrix and the second phase. These findings are significant for the design and application of bulk metallic glass composites with excellent mechanical properties. PMID:24931632

Wu, Fu-Fa; Chan, K C; Jiang, Song-Shan; Chen, Shun-Hua; Wang, Gang

2014-01-01

122

Tensile and flexural strength of non-graphitic superhybrid composites: Predictions and comparisons  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Equations are presented and described which can be used to predict bounds on the tensile and flexural strengths of nongraphitic superhybrid (NGSH) composites. These equations are derived by taking into account the measured stress-strain behavior, the lamination residual stresses and the sequence of events leading to fracture. The required input for using these equations includes constituents, properties (elastic and strength), NGSH elastic properties, cure temperature, and ply stress influence coefficients. Results predicted by these equations are in reasonably good agreement with measured data for strength and for the apparent knees in the nonlinear stress-strain curve. The lower bound values are conservative compared to measured data. These equations are relatively simple and are suitable for use in the preliminary design and initial sizing of structural components made from NGSH composites.

Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.; Lark, R. F.

1979-01-01

123

The effects of laser trimming on the tensile strength and fatigue resistance properties of titanium - 6Al-4V  

E-print Network

The effect of laser trimming on the tensile strength and fatigue resistance of titanium-6% aluminum-4% vanadium specimens was investigated. Due to the nature of laser processing, the microstructure of the titanium alloy was altered in an area local...

Whitesel, Dean Adam

1994-01-01

124

Tensile and fatigue strength properties of Kevlar 29 aramid/epoxy unidirectional composites  

SciTech Connect

Static and fatigue tensile strength properties of filament wound undirectional Kevlar 29/epoxy, typical of filament wound material used in flywheel rotors, were studied. Machining techniques were developed to minimize fiber fuzzing on edges. The static modulus, normalized to 70% fiber volume fraction is 8.87 x 10/sup 6/ psi. The major Poisson's ratio is 0.37. The static composite tensile strength, normalized to 70% fiber volume fraction is 200 x 10/sup 3/ psi, corresponding to a fiber stress at failure of 286 x 10/sup 3/ psi, which is good for materials having a very high fiber volume fraction. The S-N curve for R = 0.7 was found to be quite flat. Although the techniques used in this program had previously been employed successfully to study the fatigue behavior of Kevlar 29/epoxy and Kevlar 49/epoxy unidirectional materials, we were unable to overcome the persistent problem of cohesive material failure in the tab regions. The apparent reason for this is the very low interlaminar shear strength of the filament wound material. 16 figures.

Zweben, C.

1981-07-22

125

Tensile strength of thermomechanically processed Cu-9Ni-6Sn alloys  

SciTech Connect

The tensile properties of Cu-9Ni-6Sn alloys with different swaging amounts of 64, 77, and 95 pct, either solutionized and aged (S/A), were examined as a function of aging time. It was found that the aging response of Cu-9Ni-6Sn alloys varied greatly depending on the prior solution heat treatment before aging and/or different swaging amounts. The swaged S/A Cu-9Ni-6Sn alloys showed a multistage increase in tensile strength with respect to aging time, probably due to the sequential occurrence of spinodal decomposition, formation of metastable {gamma}{center{underscore}dot} precipitates, and recrystallization. The effect of different swaging amounts, ranging from 64 to 95 pct, was minimal on the aging response of S/A specimens. The prior cold working, however, appeared to favor the spinodal strengthening, comparing unswaged and swaged S/A Cu-9Ni-6Sn alloys. In 95 pct swaged D/A Cu-9Ni-6Sn alloys, the level of hardening was much less sensitive to aging time. A complex interaction between the reduction in dislocation density, the formation of equilibrium precipitates, and the reduction of Sn content in the Sn-rich segregates during an aging process is believed to be responsible for such a lean sensitivity. The increases in tensile strength of 64 and 77 pct swaged D/A Cu-9Ni-6Sn alloys were found to be much steeper than that in the 95 pct counterparts in the early and intermediate stages of aging, which is believed to be related to the relative contribution from work hardening and precipitation hardening to the strength level of D/A specimens.

Rhu, J.C.; Kim, S.S.; Jung, Y.C.; Han, S.Z.; Kim, C.J.

1999-10-01

126

Tensile strength and disintegration of tableted silicified microcrystalline cellulose: influences of interparticle bonding.  

PubMed

The effects of some material variables (particle size and moisture content) on the tensile strength and disintegration time of tableted standard microcrystalline cellulose (MCC, Avicel) and a silicified brand (SMCC, Prosolv) were studied. Three particle size fractions were employed, after equilibration in three levels of environmental relative humidity (RH%), and the tensile strength and disintegration time were determined at different levels of total tablet porosity or packing fraction (p(f)). The MCC grade or silicification affects the moisture sorption and the packing during tapping as well as the particle deformation (yield pressure, P(y)) during tableting. There was a slight increase in the tensile strength but a marked increase in the disintegration time of Prosolv compared with Avicel in the p(f) range 0.7-0.9, which corresponds the range for pharmaceutical tablets. These increases are explained in terms of the range and magnitude of the interparticle forces developed and the interparticle separation. Despite the higher moisture content of Prosolv after equilibration compared with Avicel, compression of Prosolv results in higher P(y), in tablets of higher energy of interparticle bonding, longer interparticle separation, and extended disintegration compared with Avicel. The incorporated SiO(2) is thought to play the role of barrier or sink for the moisture sorbed, but only for RH up to 52%, which is a moisture content range less than twice that of tightly bound water. At higher RH (72%), the incorporated SiO(2) does not increase the P(y), but reduces the energy of interparticle bonding and the interparticle separation because of its probable saturation. The latter, in turn, results in more extended disintegration times due to reduced uptake of water into the tablets and to the probable reduction of water available for the deployment of the microcrystalline cellulose activity as disintegrant. PMID:12820153

Kachrimanis, Kyriakos; Nikolakakis, Ioannis; Malamataris, Stavros

2003-07-01

127

Tensile Strength and Microstructural Characterization of Uncoated and Coated HPZ Ceramic Fibers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Tensile strengths of as-received HPZ fiber and those surface coated with BN, BN/SiC, and BN/Si3N4 have been determined at room temperature using a two-parameter Weibull distribution. Nominally approx. 0.4 micron BN and 0.2 micron SiC or Si3N4 coatings were deposited on the fibers by chemical vapor deposition using a continuous reactor. The average tensile strength of uncoated HPZ fiber was 2.0 +/- 0.56 GPa (290 +/- 81 ksi) with a Weibull modulus of 4.1. For the BN coated fibers, the average strength and the Weibull modulus increased to 2.39 +/- 0.44 GPa (346 +/- 64 ksi) and 6.5, respectively. The HPZ/BN/SiC fibers showed an average strength of 2.0 +/- 0.32 GPa (290 +/- 47 ksi) and Weibull modulus of 7.3. Average strength of the fibers having a dual BN/Si3N4 surface coating degraded to 1.15 +/- 0.26 GPa (166 +/- 38 ksi) with a Weibull modulus of 5.3. The chemical composition and thickness of the fiber coatings were determined using scanning Auger analysis. Microstructural analysis of the fibers and the coatings was carried out by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. A microporous silica-rich layer approx. 200 nm thick is present on the as-received HPZ fiber surface. The BN coatings on the fibers are amorphous to partly turbostratic and contaminated with carbon and oxygen. Silicon carbide coating was crystalline whereas the silicon nitride coating was amorphous. The silicon carbide and silicon nitride coatings are non-stoichiometric, non-uniform, and granular. Within a fiber tow, the fibers on the outside had thicker and more granular coatings than those on the inside.

Bansal, Narottam P.; Wheeler, Donald R.; Dickerson, Robert M.

1996-01-01

128

Relationship between the ideal tensile strength and the friction properties of metals in contact with nonmetals and themselves  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The adhesion and friction properties of metals in contact with diamond, boron nitride, silicon carbide, manganese-zinc ferrite, and the metals themselves in vacuum was investigated. An estimate of the ideal uniaxial tensile was obtained in terms of the equilibrium surface energy, interplanar spacing of the planes perpendicular to the tensile axis, and the Young's modulus of elasticity. The coefficient of friction for metals was found to be related to the ideal tensile strength of metals. The higher the strength of the metal, the lower the coefficient of friction.

Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

1981-01-01

129

Tensile bond strength of dental adhesives bonded to simulated caries-exposed dentin.  

PubMed

This study investigated the possibility of resin bonding to carious dentin. The study was divided into two parts, to determine first whether an in vitro model for caries could be developed for testing bond strength and second whether chemical modification of the caries model dentin surface, instead of mechanical removal of the carious layer, would enhance resin bond strengths. Dentin samples were exposed to an artificial caries decalcification solution (lactic acid+nitrocellulose) for 7 days. The depth of the decalcified surface was determined by microhardness and the nature of the surfaces analyzed by use of the scanning electron microscope. After bur removal of the decalcified dentin, samples were bonded with three different dentin bonding systems and the tensile bond strengths were determined. Control specimens were prepared and bonded with no decalcification or bur preparation. These values were compared with specimens prepared by decalcification but with no mechanical removal of the decalcified surface layer before bonding. Additional decalcified samples were treated with phosphoric acid to modify the decalcified surface before dentin bond testing. Bond strengths were significantly higher (p < 0.05) for the decalcified and mechanically prepared dentin as compared with either the unmodified or the phosphoric acid modified decalcified dentin. The highest bond strengths for all systems were found for the undecalcified control group. These results suggest that it may be possible to bond to the collagenous structures remaining in carious dentin. This could lead to conservation of tooth structure and rethinking of cavity preparation design. PMID:8126672

Ehudin, D Z; Thompson, V P

1994-02-01

130

Tensile strength and creep resistance in nanocrystalline Cu, Pd and Ag  

SciTech Connect

Measurements of tensile strength and creep resistance have been made on bulk samples of nanocrystalline Cu, Pd and Ag consolidated from powders by cold compaction. Samples of Cu-Cu{sub 2}O have also been tested. Yield strength for samples with mean grains sizes of 5-80 nm and bulk densities on the order of 95% of theoretical density are increased 2--5 times over that measured in pure, annealed samples of the same composition with micrometer grain sizes. Ductility in the nanocrystalline Cu has exceeded 6% true strain, however, nanocrystalline Pd samples were much less ductile. Constant load creep tests performed at room temperature at stresses of >100 MPa indicate logarithmic creep. The mechanical properties results are interpreted to be due to grain size-related strengthening and processing flaw-related weakening. 26 refs., 2 figs.

Nieman, G.W.; Weertman, J.R. (Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (USA). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Siegel, R.W. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

1990-12-01

131

Optimization of tensile strength of ferritic/austenitic laser-welded components  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ferritic/austenitic (F/A) joints are a popular dissimilar metal combination used in many applications. F/A joints are usually produced using conventional processes. Laser beam welding (LBW) has recently been successfully used for the production of F/A joints with suitable mechanical properties. In this study, a statistical design of experiment (DOE) was used to optimize selected LBW parameters (laser power, welding speed and focus length). Taguchi approach was used for the selected factors, each having five levels (L-25; 5×3). Joint strength was determined using the notched-tensile strength (NTS) method. The results were analysed using analyses of variance (ANOVA) and the signal-to-noise ( S/ N) ratios for the optimal parameters, and then compared with the base material. The experimental results indicate that the F/A laser-welded joints are improved effectively by optimizing the input parameters using the Taguchi approach.

Anawa, E. M.; Olabi, A. G.

2008-08-01

132

[Effect of magnesium stearate on the tensile strength of tablets made with the binder Prosolv SMCC 90].  

PubMed

The present paper evaluated the tensile strength of tablets made from the dry binder Prosolv SMCC 90 and the influence of three concentrations of the lubricant magnesium stearate on the tensile strength of tablets manufactured from this material. The results were compared with the same evaluation in Avicel PH 102. The tested concentrations of the stearate were 0.4, 0.8 and 1.2%. The tablets were compressed by three press powers (3, 3.5, and 4 kN). On the basis of obtained results it can be stated that under the same press powers Prosolv SMCC 90 alone yields stronger compacts than Avicel PH 102. From the viewpoint of decreased strength of compacts by adding magnesium stearate, the dry binder Prosolv SMCC 90 is much less sensitive than Avicel PH 102. In Avicel PH 102 a marked decrease in tensile strength was recorded with an addition of 0.4%, which was not observed with Prosolv SMCC90. A more significant decrease in the strength of compacts was shown by the substance not until a stearate concentration of 0.8%. The highest employed stearate concentration of 1.2% decreases the tensile strength of tablets made from Prosolv SMCC 90 in the press powers of 3.5 and 4 kN two times less than the tensile strength of the compacts from Avicel PH 102. PMID:11910741

Muzíková, J

2002-01-01

133

Enzymatic surface erosion of high tensile strength polycarbonates based on natural phenols.  

PubMed

Surface erosion has been recognized as a valuable design tool for resorbable biomaterials within the context of drug delivery devices, surface coatings, and when precise control of strength retention is critical. Here we report on high tensile strength, aromatic-aliphatic polycarbonates based on natural phenols, tyrosol (Ty) and homovanillyl alcohol (Hva), that exhibit enzymatic surface erosion by lipase. The Young's moduli of the polymers for dry and fully hydrated samples are 1.0 to 1.2 GPa and 0.8 to 1.2 GPa, respectively. Typical characteristics of enzymatic surface erosion were confirmed for poly(tyrosol carbonate) films with concomitant mass-loss and thickness-loss at linear rates of 0.14 ± 0.01 mg cm(-2) d(-1) and 3.0 ± 0.8 ?m d(-1), respectively. The molecular weight and the mechanical properties of the residual films remained constant. Changing the ratio of Ty and Hva provided control over the glass transition temperature (T(g)) and the enzymatic surface erosion: increasing the Hva content in the polymers resulted in higher T(g) and lower enzymatic erosion rate. Polymers with more than 50 mol % Hva were stable at 37 °C in enzyme solution. Analysis on thin films using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) demonstrated that the onset temperature of the enzymatic erosion was approximately 20 °C lower than the wet T(g) for all tested polymers. This new finding demonstrates that relatively high tensile strength polycarbonates can undergo enzymatic surface erosion. Moreover, it also sheds light on the connection between T(g) and enzymatic degradation and explains why few of the high strength polymers follow an enzyme-meditated degradation pathway. PMID:24432806

Sommerfeld, Sven D; Zhang, Zheng; Costache, Marius C; Vega, Sebastián L; Kohn, Joachim

2014-03-10

134

Tensile strength of glass fiber posts submitted to different surface treatments.  

PubMed

The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the tensile strength of glass fiber posts submitted to different surface treatments. Forty-eight maxillary canines had their crowns sectioned and root canals endodontically treated. The roots were embedded in acrylic resin and distributed into 3 groups according to the surface treatment: Group I: the posts were treated with silane agent for 30 s and adhesive; Group II: the posts were cleaned with alcohol before treatment with silane agent and adhesive; Group III: the posts were submitted to conditioning with 37% phosphoric acid for 30 s before treatment with silane agent and adhesive. Each group was divided into 2 subgroups for adhesive polymerization or not before insertion into the canal: A - adhesive was not light cured and B - adhesive was light cured. All posts were cemented with Panavia F and the samples were subjected to tensile strength test in a universal testing machine at crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were submitted to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test at 5% significance level. There was statistically significant difference (p<0.01) only between group GIII-B and groups GI-A and GI-B. No significant difference was found among the other groups (p>0.05). It was concluded that the products used for cleaning the posts influenced the retention regardless of adhesive light curing. PMID:24474360

Faria, Maria Isabel A; Gomes, Érica Alves; Messias, Danielle Cristine; Silva Filho, João Manoel; Souza Filho, Celso Bernardo; Paulino, Silvana Maria

2013-01-01

135

Effect of plastic anisotropy on tensile strength of single crystals of an Ni-based superalloy  

SciTech Connect

Turbine blades are designed so that their primary orientation is within 10 to 15{degree} of the <001> axis to insure a low modulus. The secondary dendritic direction (<010> direction) is usually randomly orientated with respect to the longitudinal direction of the turbine blade. The strengths of single crystals are influenced by the crystallographic orientations not only in the tensile direction but also in the normal direction of the specimen because a single crystal possesses intrinsic plastic anisotropy. The air-cooled turbine blades, which have a complicated hollow structure, are composed of sections of various thicknesses. Therefore, the mechanical properties of each blade section will depend on plastic anisotropy and the stress state as well as stress in the longitudinal direction. In previous studies, in an experimental single crystal alloy of an Ni-based superalloy, it has been revealed that {l_brace}111{r_brace}<101>-type slip systems were activated during tensile tests. In this study, by using the experimental alloy which shows distinct active slip systems, the influence of crystallographic orientations and plastic anisotropy on the strength and ductility of single crystals of the Ni-based superalloy have been investigated on the assumption that the {l_brace}111{r_brace}<101> slip systems operate.

Kakehi, K.

1999-12-31

136

Tensile Strength and Hardness Correlations with Microscopy in Friction welded Aluminium to Copper  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Aluminium and copper are good conductors of heat and electricity, copper being the better conductor, is a costly metal indeed. On the other hand, aluminium is cheap, easily available and also has a lower density than copper. Hence, worldwide efforts are being made to partially replace copper wire. Solid state welding should be used to join aluminium to copper. This is because the use of fusion welding results in brittle phases formed in the weld interface. One of the solid state welding techniques used for joining aluminium to copper is friction welding. In this paper, an attempt has been made to join aluminium to copper by friction welding by varying the friction welding parameters, namely friction pressure, upset pressure, burn-off length and speed of rotation of the workpiece. Nine different friction welding parameter combinations were used during welding in accordance with ASTM standards and results have been reported. Tensile strength and hardness tests were carried out for each parameter combination. Optimum friction welding parameter combination was identified with respect to tensile strength. Scanning Electron Microscopy and Electron dispersive spectroanalysis were obtained to identify modes of fracture and presence of intermetallic phases for each friction welding combination with the aim to narrow down friction welding parameters that give good properties on the whole.

Satish, Rengarajan; Seshagiri Rao, Vaddi; Ananthapadmanaban, Dattaguru; Ravi, Balappa

2015-03-01

137

Theoretical investigations into the influence of the position of a breaking line on the tensile failure of flat, round, bevel-edged tablets using finite element methodology (FEM) and its practical relevance for industrial tablet strength testing.  

PubMed

Flat, round tablets may have a breaking ("score") line. Pharmacopoeial tablet breaking load tests are diametral in their design, and industrially used breaking load testers often have automatic tablet feeding systems, which position the tablets between the loading platens of the machine with the breaking lines in random orientation to the applied load. The aim of this work was to ascertain the influence of the position of the breaking line in a diametral compression test using finite element methodology (FEM) and to compare the theoretical results with practical findings using commercially produced bevel-edged, scored tablets. Breaking line test positions at an angle of 0°, 22.5°, 45°, 67.5° and 90° relative to the loading plane were studied. FEM results obtained for fully elastic and elasto-plastic tablets were fairly similar, but they highlighted large differences in stress distributions depending on the position of the breaking line. The stress values at failure were predicted to be similar for tablets tested at an angle of 45° or above, whereas at lower test angles the predicted breaking loads were up to three times larger. The stress distributions suggested that not all breaking line angles would result in clean tensile failure. Practical results, however, did not confirm the differences in the predicted breaking loads, but they confirmed differences in the way tablets broke. The results suggest that it is not advisable to convert breaking loads obtained on scored tablets into tablet tensile strength values, and comparisons between different tablets or batches should carefully consider the orientation of the breaking line with respect to the loading plane, as the failure mechanisms appear to vary. PMID:25455775

Podczeck, Fridrun; Newton, J Michael; Fromme, Paul

2014-12-30

138

Effect of pulsed current and post weld aging treatment on tensile properties of argon arc welded high strength aluminium alloy  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reveals the effect of pulsed current and post weld aging treatment on tensile properties of argon arc welded AA7075 aluminium alloy. This alloy has gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of light weight structures requiring high strength-to-weight ratio, such as transportable bridge girders, military vehicles, road tankers and railway transport systems. The preferred welding processes of high strength

V. Balasubramanian; V. Ravisankar; G. Madhusudhan Reddy

2007-01-01

139

Reinforcement of nylon 6 with functionalized silica nanoparticles for enhanced tensile strength and modulus  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Pristine and functionalized silica (SiO2) nanoparticles were dispersed into nylon 6 and drawn into filaments through melt extrusion. The loading fraction of particles in both cases was 1.0 wt%. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) studies revealed that reinforcement of pristine silica nanoparticles enhances the bond strength of each of the three basic bonds of nylon 6 namely, hydroxyl, amide, and carbonyl. As a result, the improvement over neat nylon in strength and modulus was 36% and 28% respectively, without any loss of fracture strain (80%). A silane coupling agent was then used through wet chemical treatment to functionalize silica nanoparticles. Functionalization induced an additional covalent Si-O-Si (siloxane) bond between silica particles and nylon backbone polymer while the enhancement in the basic bonds was retained. FTIR and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies confirmed the formation of the siloxane bond. This added chemical bond resulted in 76% and 55% improvement in tensile strength and modulus, and still retained 30% fracture strain. Calculation of the upper bound on Young's modulus indicates that one can reach within 5% of the bound with pristine silica particles, but it is exceeded by 15% when particles are functionalized.

Mahfuz, Hassan; Hasan, Mohammad; Dhanak, Vinod; Beamson, Graham; Stewart, Justin; Rangari, Vijaya; Wei, Xin; Khabashesku, Valery; Jeelani, Shaik

2008-11-01

140

Analysis of Ninety Degree Flexure Tests for Characterization of Composite Transverse Tensile Strength  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Finite element (FE) analysis was performed on 3-point and 4-point bending test configurations of ninety degree oriented glass-epoxy and graphite-epoxy composite beams to identify deviations from beam theory predictions. Both linear and geometric non-linear analyses were performed using the ABAQUS finite element code. The 3-point and 4-point bending specimens were first modeled with two-dimensional elements. Three-dimensional finite element models were then performed for selected 4-point bending configurations to study the stress distribution across the width of the specimens and compare the results to the stresses computed from two-dimensional plane strain and plane stress analyses and the stresses from beam theory. Stresses for all configurations were analyzed at load levels corresponding to the measured transverse tensile strength of the material.

OBrien, T. Kevin; Krueger, Ronald

2001-01-01

141

Role of additives on tensile strength of wood-plastic composite  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Wood-plastic composite (WPC) formation has been studied with simul+styrene system at various compositions of styrene with methanol as the swelling solvent. Effect of additives, e.g. multifunctional monomers (MFM) and oligomers used in very low quantity (1% v/v) on the polymer loading (PL) and tensile strength (TS) of the WPC has been elaborately investigated. Enhanced PL and TS values are observed. Inorganic co-additives like Lithium (Li +), Copper (Cu 2+) and acid (H +) and urea (U) used in combinations with additives (MFM or oligomers) have influenced the results of PL and TS in these systems. Li + ion has been a good replacement for H + ion; U has substantially enhanced the PL values with retention of the TS values of WPC. Co-additive Cu 2+ used in these system can act as a preservative and protective agent for WPC.

Khan, Mubarak A.; Ali, K. M. Idriss

142

Galactans and cellulose in flax fibres: putative contributions to the tensile strength.  

PubMed

The proton spin-spin relaxation time, T2, measured from solid-state NMR, indicates a greater rigidity for cellulose than for the adhesive matrix between the microfibrils of flax ultimate fibres. Cytochemical and biochemical analyses allow the identification of: (1) EDTA-soluble RG I-polymers in the primary walls and cell junctions of fibres; (2) long 1 --> 4-beta-D-galactan chains between primary and secondary wall layers; and (3) arabinogalactan-proteins throughout the secondary walls. These polymers in the adhesive matrix between microfibrils and/or cellulose layers ensure that cracks propagate along the matrix rather than across the fibres and play an important role in allowing flax fibres to approach the tensile strength of advanced synthetic fibres like carbon and Kevlar. PMID:9283034

Girault, R; Bert, F; Rihouey, C; Jauneau, A; Morvan, C; Jarvis, M

1997-08-01

143

Tensile bond strength of intracanal posts in primary anterior teeth: an in vitro study.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to measure in vitro; the tensile bond strength of three intracanal posts used in anterior primary teeth. A total of 45 single rooted primary anterior teeth were selected for the study and the crowns sectioned leaving 1mm above the cement-enamel junction. The roots were then assigned to three groups according the type of retention used. All roots were endodonticaly treated, a 4-mm of the canal was cleansed and a base of glass ionomer cement was put at the bottom of the prepared canal. The roots were then prepared to receive intracanal posts using a # 4137 diamond bur (KG Sorensen) used in a depth of 3-mm of the length of the canal All the prepared roots were acid etched with a 37% phosphoric acid gel for 15 seconds, rinsed, dried and the dentin adhesive Single Bond (3M) was applied. Group I received intracanal posts and cores made of composite resin (Filtek Z 250, 3M). Group II intracanal posts were made from a 0.6mm orthodontic wire bent as a Greek letter type (gamma), fixed with the Z 250 composite resin and cores were built with the same composite. Finally Group III received intracanal retention made of a fiber glass post (Fibrekor Post, Generic/Pentron) with 1.25 mm diameter, fixed with Z 250 and cores were made like the other groups. The samples were submitted to tension in a universal-testing machine (Instron, model 4444). Statistical analysis (ANOVA) revealed that there were no statistically significant differences between the groups. On the basis of the results of this in vitro study it was concluded that the type of intracanal post did not interfere with the tensile strength and the most frequent type of failure was of adhesive type, corresponding to 74% of the sample. PMID:12413170

Pithan, Silvia; Vieira, Ricardo de Sousa; Chain, Marcelo Carvalho

2002-01-01

144

Tensile strength and impact resistance properties of materials used in prosthetic check sockets, copolymer sockets, and definitive laminated sockets.  

PubMed

Prosthetic sockets serve as the interface between people with amputations and their prostheses. Although most materials used to make prosthetic sockets have been used for many years, knowledge of these materials' properties is limited, especially after they are subjected to fabrication processes. This study evaluated tensile and impact properties of the current state-of-the-art materials used to fabricate prosthetic check sockets, copolymer sockets, and definitive laminated sockets. Thermolyn Rigid and Orfitrans Stiff check socket materials produced significantly lower tensile strength and impact resistance than polyethylene terephthalate glycol (PETG). Copolymer socket materials exhibited greater resistance to impact forces than the check socket materials but lower tensile strengths than PETG. The heated molding processes, for the check socket and copolymer materials, reduced both tensile strength and elongation at break. Definitive laminated sockets were sorted according to fabrication techniques. Nyglass material had significantly higher elongation, indicating a more ductile material than carbon-based laminations. Carbon sockets with pigmented resin had higher tensile strength and modulus at break than nonpigmented carbon sockets. Elongation at yield and elongation at break were similar for both types of carbon-based laminations. The material properties determined in this study provide a foundation for understanding and improving the quality of prosthetic sockets using current fabrication materials and a basis for evaluating future technologies. PMID:22068374

Gerschutz, Maria J; Haynes, Michael L; Nixon, Derek M; Colvin, James M

2011-01-01

145

Correlation analysis of the variation of weld seam and tensile strength in laser welding of galvanized steel  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Many advantages of laser welding technology such as high speed and non-contact welding make the use of the technology more attractive in the automotive industry. Many studies have been conducted to search the optimal welding condition experimentally that ensure the joining quality of laser welding that relies both on welding system configuration and welding parameter specification. Both non-destructive and destructive techniques, for example, ultrasonic inspection and tensile test are widely used in practice for estimating the joining quality. Non-destructive techniques are attractive as a rapid quality testing method despite relatively low accuracy. In this paper, we examine the relationship between the variation of weld seam and tensile shear strength in the laser welding of galvanized steel in a lap joint configuration in order to investigate the potential of the variation of weld seam as a joining quality estimator. From the experimental analysis, we identify a trend in between maximum tensile shear strength and the variation of weld seam that clearly supports the fact that laser welded parts having larger variation in the weld seam usually have lower tensile strength. The discovered relationship leads us to conclude that the variation of weld seam can be used as an indirect non-destructive testing method for estimating the tensile strength of the welded parts.

Sinha, Amit Kumar; Kim, Duck Young; Ceglarek, Darek

2013-10-01

146

Effect of Ni–P Thickness on the Tensile Strength of Cu\\/Electroless Ni–P\\/Sn–3.5Ag Solder Joint  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tensile strength and fracture behavior of thermally aged Cu\\/electroless Ni-P\\/Sn-3.5Ag solder joint were investigated for three different Ni-P thicknesses (3.9, 7.3, and 9.9mum) to examine the mechanical reliability of the solder joint. The tensile testing results showed that Ni-P thickness influences the solder joint strength considerably. In the case of thin Ni-P, the tensile strength decreased with increase in aging

Aditya Kumar; Zhong Chen

2006-01-01

147

Drying time of tray adhesive for adequate tensile bond strength between polyvinylsiloxane impression and tray resin material  

PubMed Central

STATEMENT OF PROBLEM Use of custom tray and tray adhesive is clinically recommended for elastomeric impression material. However there is not clear mention of drying time of tray adhesive in achieving appropriate bonding strength of tray material and impression material. PURPOSE This study is to investigate an appropriate drying time of tray adhesives by evaluating tensile bonding strength between two types of polyvinylsiloxane impression materials and resin tray, according to various drying time intervals of tray adhesives, and with different manufacturing company combination of impression material and tray adhesive. MATERIAL AND METHODS Adhesives used in this study were Silfix (Dentsply Caulk, Milford, Del, USA) and VPS Tray Adhesive (3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany) and impression materials were Aquasil Ultra (monophase regular set, Dentsply Caulk, Milford, Del, USA) and Imprint II Garant (regular body, 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany). They were used combinations from the same manufacture and exchanged combinations of the two. The drying time was designed to air dry, 5 minutes, 10 minutes, 15 minutes, 20 minutes, and 25 minutes. Total 240 of test specimens were prepared by auto-polymerizing tray material (Instant Tray Mix, Lang, Wheeling, Il, USA) with 10 specimens in each group. The specimens were placed in the Universal Testing machine (Instron, model 3366, Instron Corp, University avenue, Nowood, MA, USA) to perform the tensile test (cross head speed 5 mm/min). The statistically efficient drying time was evaluated through ANOVA and Scheffe test. All the tests were performed at 95% confidence level. RESULTS The results revealed that at least 10 minutes is needed for Silfix-Aquasil, and 15 minutes for VPS Tray Adhesive-Imprint II, to attain an appropriate tensile bonding strength. VPS Tray Adhesive-Imprint II had a superior tensile bonding strength when compared to Silfix-Aquasil over 15 minutes. Silfix-Aquasil had a superior bonding strength to VPS Tray Adhesive-Aquasil, and VPS Tray Adhesive-Imprint II had a superior tensile bonding strength to Silfix-Imprint II at all drying periods. CONCLUSION Significant increase in tensile bonding strength with Silfix-Aquasil and VPS Tray adhesive-Imprint II combination until 10 and 15 minutes respectively. Tray adhesive-impression material combination from the same company presented higher tensile bonding strength at all drying time intervals than when using tray adhesive-impression material of different manufactures. PMID:21165257

Yi, Myong-Hee; Shim, Joon-Sung; Lee, Keun-Woo

2009-01-01

148

The tensile strength of black bear ( Ursus americanus) cortical bone is not compromised with aging despite annual periods of hibernation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Black bears (Ursus americanus) may not develop disuse osteoporosis during long periods of disuse (i.e. hibernation) because they may be able to maintain bone formation. Previously, we found that cortical bone bending strength was not compromised with age in black bears tibias, despite annual periods of disuse. Here we showed that cortical bone tensile strength (166–198MPa) also does not decrease

Kristin B. Harvey; Thomas D. Drummer; Seth W. Donahue

2005-01-01

149

Developmental Exposure to Xenoestrogens at Low Doses Alters Femur Length and Tensile Strength in Adult Mice1  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT Developmental exposure to high doses of the synthetic xenoestrogen diethylstilbestrol (DES) has been reported to alter femur length and strength in adult mice. However, it is not known if developmental exposure to low, environmentally relevant doses of xenoestrogens alters adult bone geometry and strength. In this study we investigated the effects of developmental exposure to low doses of DES, bisphenol A (BPA), or ethinyl estradiol (EE2) on bone geometry and torsional strength. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to DES, 0.1 ?g/kg/day, BPA, 10 ?g/kg/day, EE2, 0.01, 0.1, or 1.0 ?g/kg/day, or vehicle from Gestation Day 11 to Postnatal Day 12 via a mini-osmotic pump in the dam. Developmental Xenoestrogen exposure altered femoral geometry and strength, assessed in adulthood by micro-computed tomography and torsional strength analysis, respectively. Low-dose EE2, DES, or BPA increased adult femur length. Exposure to the highest dose of EE2 did not alter femur length, resulting in a nonmonotonic dose response. Exposure to EE2 and DES but not BPA decreased tensile strength. The combined effect of increased femur length and decreased tensile strength resulted in a trend toward decreased torsional ultimate strength and energy to failure. Taken together, these results suggest that exposure to developmental exposure to environmentally relevant levels of xenoestrogens may negatively impact bone length and strength in adulthood. PMID:22088916

Pelch, Katherine E.; Carleton, Stephanie M.; Phillips, Charlotte L.; Nagel, Susan C.

2011-01-01

150

Optical absorption as a sensitive monitor of tensile strength loss in thermally aged nylon 6,6  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chemical changes which take place in polymers during thermal aging often adversely affect the bulk physical properties of the material. Aging rates under ambient conditions are usually so slow as to require extremely long aging cycles to achieve measurable losses in such properties as tensile strength. Therefore, accelerated aging under more stressful conditions (e.g., higher temperatures) with Arrhenius-plot extrapolations to

1985-01-01

151

A new derivation of the tensile strength of cometary nuclei: Application to comet Shoemaker-Levy 9  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The splitting of comets as exemplified by comet Shoemaker-Levy 9, when it passed near Jupiter, is a common phenomenon. Multiple splitting is also not an uncommon occurrence. It is clear that the comet nucleus is fragile, i.e., its tensile strength is small compared with that of solid materials. We show that aggregates of sub-micron interstellar dust particles presumed to consist of a silicate core, an inner mantle of complex organic refractory molecules, and an outer mantle dominated by H2O ice (Greenberg, 1982) provide the basis for a quantitative derivation of the tensile strength of comet SL9 using molecular interactions at the contact interfaces. In fact, using a mean particle size representing interstellar dust as it would appear in its final presolar state one derives a tensile strength which describes remarkably well the multiple splitting phenomenon. This derivation of the tensile strength of a particle aggregate resulting from molecular interactions is quite general and can be applied to physical situations involving any sorts of aggregates as well as those representing comet nuclei.

Greenberg, J. Mayo; Mizutani, Hitoshi; Yamamoto, Tetsuo

1994-01-01

152

Dependence of the Tensile Strength of Pitch-Based Carbon and Para-Aramid Fibres on the Rate of Strain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Understanding the rate dependencies of the tensile strength of reinforcing fibres is a key for the understanding of the rate dependencies of the properties of the corresponding composite materials. Hence, in this study it is attempted to clarify the mechanical responses of aramid and carbon fibres at different rates of strain in the light of our previous observations of strain

H. D. Wagner; J. Aronhime; G. Marom

1990-01-01

153

Research on tensile strength characteristics of bridge deck pavement bonding layers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As the development of the traffic in the world, the bridge deck pavement is playing a more and more important role in the whole traffic system. Big span bridge has become more and more especially cement concrete bridge, therefore the bridge deck pavement bonding layers are emphasized as an important part of bridge traffic system, which can mitigate travel impact to bridge and magnify stationary or traffic amenity. The quality and durability of deck pavement bonding layer has directly effect on traffic safety, comfort, durability and investment of bridge. It represents the first line of defence against the ingress of water, road de-icing salts and aggressive chemicals. In real project, many early age damage of bridge deck pavement has become serious disease that affecting the function of bridge. During the construction of the bridge deck, many types of asphalt binders were used, such as styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS) modified asphalt, styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) modified asphalt, neoprene latex asphalt, etc. In this paper UTM-25 was used to test the tensile strength of different bridge deck pavement bonding layers with the different treatment methods to inter-surface.

Wu, Shaopeng; Han, Jun

2010-03-01

154

Root diversity in alpine plants: root length, tensile strength and plant age  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A high diversity of plant species and functional groups is hypothesised to increase the diversity of root types and their subsequent effects for soil stability. However, even basic data on root characteristics of alpine plants are very scarce. Therefore, we determined important root characteristics of 13 plant species from different functional groups, i.e. grasses, herbs and shrubs. We excavated the whole root systems of 62 plants from a machine-graded ski slope at 2625 m a.s.l. and analysed the rooting depth, the horizontal root extension, root length and diameter. Single roots of plant species were tested for tensile strength. The age of herbs and shrubs was determined by growth-ring analysis. Root characteristics varied considerably between both plant species and functional groups. The rooting depth of different species ranged from 7.2 ± 0.97 cm to 20.5 ± 2.33 cm, but was significantly larger in the herb Geum reptans (70.8 ± 10.75 cm). The woody species Salix breviserrata reached the highest horizontal root extensions (96.8 ± 25.5 cm). Most plants had their longest roots in fine diameter classes (0.5

Pohl, M.; Stroude, R.; Körner, C.; Buttler, A.; Rixen, C.

2009-04-01

155

Hydrogen Embrittlement of a 1500-MPa Tensile Strength Level Steel with an Ultrafine Elongated Grain Structure  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A deformation of a tempered martensitic structure ( i.e., tempforming) at 773 K (500 °C) was applied to a 0.6 pct C-2 pct Si-1 pct Cr steel. The hydrogen embrittlement (HE) property of the tempformed (TF) steel was investigated by a slow strain rate test (SSRT) and an accelerated atmospheric corrosion test (AACT). Hydrogen content within the samples after SSRT and AACT was measured by thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS). The tempforming at 773 K (500 °C) using multipass caliber rolling with an accumulative are reduction of 76 pct resulted in the evolution of an ultrafine elongated grain (UFEG) structure with a strong <110>//rolling direction (RD) fiber deformation texture and a dispersion of spheroidized cementite particles. The SSRT of the pre-hydrogen-charged notched specimens and the AACT demonstrated that the TF sample had superior potential for HE resistance to the conventional quenched and tempered (QT) sample at a tensile strength of 1500 MPa. The TDS analysis also indicated that the hydrogen might be mainly trapped by reversible trapping sites such as grain boundaries and dislocations in the TF sample, and the hydrogen trapping states of the TF sample were similar to those of the QT sample. The QT sample exhibited hydrogen-induced intergranular fracture along the boundaries of coarse prior-austenite grains. In contrast, the hydrogen-induced cracking occurred in association with the UFEG structure in the TF sample, leading to the higher HE resistance of the TF sample.

Nie, Yihong; Kimura, Yuuji; Inoue, Tadanobu; Yin, Fuxing; Akiyama, Eiji; Tsuzaki, Kaneaki

2012-05-01

156

Demineralization resistance and tensile bond strength of four luting agents after acid attack.  

PubMed

Resistance to acid demineralization provided by luting agents adjacent to enamel was evaluated for four different luting agents: composite resin, glass ionomer, polycarboxylate, and zinc phosphate cement. Cement solubility and enamel demineralization after acid attack at pH 3.0 were measured radiographically and calculated using computer-aided design. Tensile bond strength of a miniature crown seated on an accurately prepared preparation was evaluated after acid attack using an Instron instrument. Crown retention after 12 days was greater for the polycarboxylate (2,000 kg/m2) than the zinc phosphate cement (500 kg/m2). Crown retention for the glass ionomer (1,100 kg/m2) and composite resin luting agent (1,400 kg/m2) were similar statistically after 21 days of acid exposure. Cement washouts for zinc phosphate and polycarboxylate were similar, and were greater than either glass ionomer or composite resin luting agent. The amount of demineralization related to cements was, from greatest to least: zinc phosphate, polycarboxylate, composite resin, glass ionomer. Fluoride release was concluded to be initially effective in reducing enamel solubility in spite of cement solubility. PMID:2640123

Stannard, J G; Sornkul, E

1989-01-01

157

[Biomechanic study of the tensile strength of lyophilized and deep frozen human Achilles tendons following gamma and ethylene oxide sterilization].  

PubMed

By a failed first operation allogenic tissues, as human Achilles tendons are offered for anterior cruciate ligament replacement. The effects of freeze-drying and primary Gamma- or EO-sterilization on the mechanical properties of 62 complete and 74 bisected tendons again fresh frozen controls were investigated under axial tension. A significant decrease of tensile strength for the freeze-dried preparations of 33% for the whole and 43% for the bisected tendons were observed, while Gamma- or EO-sterilizations showed a smaller deleterious effect on the tendons. Considering only the primary mechanical strength complete freeze-dried or complete and bisected irradiated Achilles tendons show sufficient tensile strength for anterior cruciate ligament replacement. PMID:1836694

Rauch, G; Gerbersdorf, M; Dörner, P; Lengsfeld, M; Griss, P

1991-01-01

158

Root tensile strength relationships and their slope stability implications of three shrub species in the Northern Apennines (Italy)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The role of root strength is important in stabilising steep hillslopes which are seasonally affected by storm-induced shallow landslides. In the Italian Apennines, steep (25-40°) slopes underlain by mudstone are generally stable if they are covered by shrubs whose roots anchor into the soil mantle. To quantify the mechanical reinforcement of roots to soil, the root tensile breaking force and the root tensile strength of three autochthonous shrub species commonly growing on stiff clay soils of the Northern Italian Apennines, Rosa canina (L.), Inula viscosa (L.) and Spartium junceum (L.), were measured by means of field and laboratory tests. For each test approximately 150 root specimens were used. The tensile force increases with increasing root diameter following a second-order polynomial regression curve. The tensile strength decreases with increasing root diameter following a power law curve. The field in situ tensile force required to break a root is always smaller than that obtained from laboratory tests for the same root diameter, although their difference becomes negligible if the root diameter is smaller than 5 mm. The influence of root tensile strength on soil shear strength was verified based on the infinite slope stability model. The root reinforcement was calculated using the number and mean diameter of roots. The factor of safety was calculated for three different soil thickness values (0.1, 0.3, and 0.6 m) and topographic slopes between 10° and 45°. The factor of safety for the combination of 0.6 m soil thickness, slopes smaller than 30°, and vegetation of I. viscosa (L.) or S. junceum (L.) is always larger than 1. If a slope is steeper, the factor of safety may be smaller than 1 for I. viscosa (L.), although it is still larger than 1 for S. junceum (L.). In the stiff clayey areas of the Northern Italian Apennines, I. viscosa (L.) mainly colonizes fan/cone/taluses and stabilises these zones up to a topographic gradient < 30° for a soil 0.6 m thick. S. junceum (L.) colonizes not only fan/cone/taluses but also headwalls and cliffs and, for a 0.6 m thick soil, it stabilises these areas up to 45°. The effectiveness of this reinforcement, however, depends strongly on the frequency of soil and seasonal grass vegetation removal due to shallow landsliding before the entrance of the shrub species.

Tosi, Matteo

2007-07-01

159

Optical absorption as a sensitive monitor of tensile strength loss in thermally aged nylon 6,6  

SciTech Connect

Chemical changes which take place in polymers during thermal aging often adversely affect the bulk physical properties of the material. Aging rates under ambient conditions are usually so slow as to require extremely long aging cycles to achieve measurable losses in such properties as tensile strength. Therefore, accelerated aging under more stressful conditions (e.g., higher temperatures) with Arrhenius-plot extrapolations to ambient conditions is often employed. Since this scheme requires that there is no change in the predominate aging mechanism at higher temperatures, one would prefer to increase the sensitivity of aging detection so one could measure aging at lower temperatures on a reasonable time scale. We describe here the use of optical absorption spectrophotometry as a sensitive monitor of thermal aging in nylon 6,6 which correlates with tensile strength loss. 8 refs., 3 figs.

Renschler, C.L.

1985-01-01

160

Effects of curing time and end pressure on the tensile strength of finger-joined black spruce lumber  

Microsoft Academic Search

Finger-joined black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) B.S.P) specimens from eastern Canada were prepared to assess the effect of curing time and end pressure on the tensile strength of the joints. An isocyanate adhesive cured at room temperature and a feather joint configuration were used for this purpose. The joints were machined at a 18.3 m\\/min. (60 ft.\\/min) feed rate, 3500

Cecilia Bustos; Mohammad Mohammad; Roger E. Hernández; Robert Beauregard

161

Tensile and mixed-mode strength of a thin film-substrate interface under laser induced pulse loading  

Microsoft Academic Search

Laser induced stress waves are used to characterize intrinsic interfacial strength of thin films under both tensile and mixed-mode conditions. A short-duration compressive pulse induced by pulsed-laser ablation of a sacrificial layer on one side of a substrate is allowed to impinge upon a thin test film on the opposite surface. Laser-interferometric measurements of test film displacement enable calculation of

Junlan Wang; Nancy R. Sottos; Richard L. Weaver

2004-01-01

162

Experimental study on clamping effects on the tensile strength of composite plates with a bolt-filled hole  

Microsoft Academic Search

An experimental study was performed to assess the effects of clamp-up on the net-tension failure of laminated composite plates with bolt-filled holes. Graphite\\/epoxy prepreg of T800\\/3900-2 was selected for fabricating the laminates for the tests. The tensile strength and failure response of specimens with an open hole and a bolt-filled hole were evaluated. Both 100% bypass load (no bolt bearing

Y. Yan; W.-D. Wen; F.-K. Chang; P. Shyprykevich

1999-01-01

163

Evaluation of tensile strength and surface topography of orthodontic wires after infection control procedures: An in vitro study  

PubMed Central

Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate, the influence of four types of sterilization/disinfection procedures (autoclave, hot air oven, glutaraldehyde, and ultraviolet [UV] light) on the tensile strength and surface topography of three orthodontic wires (stainless steel (SS), titanium - molybdenum alloy [TMA], and cobalt chromium (CoCr)). Materials and Methods: Sample comprised of three types of 8 inches straight length segments of orthodontic wires. They were divided into three groups according to wire composition comprising of 50 samples each. Totally 50 samples of each group were then equally divided into five subgroups according to sterilization method. After sterilization and disinfection of the experimental group, surface topography was examined with scanning electron microscope (SEM) and tensile strength was tested using universal testing machine. Result: The results of this study show that the mean ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of SS wire after four sterilization procedures were similar to the control group (1845.815 ± 142.29 MPa). The mean UTS of TMA wire increases after four sterilization procedures when compared with the control group (874.107 ± 275.939 MPa). The mean UTS of CoCr wire remains same after UV light disinfection, but increases after other three sterilization procedures when compared with the control group (1449.759 ± 156.586 MPa). SEM photographs of the present study shows gross increase in pitting roughness of the surface topography of all the three types of wires after four types of sterilization. Conclusion: Orthodontists who want to offer maximum safety for their patients can sterilize orthodontic wires before placement, as it does not deteriorate the tensile strength and surface roughness of the alloys. PMID:25210383

Brindha, M.; Kumaran, N. Kurunji; Rajasigamani, K.

2014-01-01

164

Influences of process parameters on tensile strength of friction stir welded cast A319 aluminium alloy joints  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fusion welding of cast A319 (Al-Si-Cu) alloy will lead to many problems including porosity, micro-fissuring, and hot cracking.\\u000a Friction Stir Welding (FSW) can be used to weld A319 alloy without these defects. In this investigation, an attempt has been\\u000a made to study the effect of FSW process parameters on the tensile strength of A319 alloy welded joints. Joints were made

M. Jayaraman; R. Sivasubramanian; V. Balasubramanian; S. Babu

2009-01-01

165

Differences of tensile strength distribution between mechanically high-grade and low-grade Japanese larch lumber I: Effect of length on the strength of lumber  

Microsoft Academic Search

An experimental study was conducted to evaluate the effect of length on the parallel-to-grain tensile strength of Japanese\\u000a larch (Larix kaempferi, Carriere) lumber. Six hundred pieces of mechanically graded lumber were tested at gauge lengths of 60, 100, and 180 cm.\\u000a The lumber was sorted into matched groups according to the dynamic Young's modulus measured by the longitudinal vibration\\u000a method

Takashi Takeda; Takeo Hashizume

1999-01-01

166

Factors which influence tensile strength of a SiC/Ti-24Al-11Nb (at. pct) composite  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Tensile and fiber pullout tests were used in conjunction with SEM to investigate structural and processing effects on SiC fiber, a neat Ti-24Al-11Nb matrix alloy, and a composite fabricated from the two. The effects of oxygen content, fiber spacing, fiber volume fraction, fiber-matrix reaction thickness, Teflon content, and matrix powder size, appear to be smaller than the effects of variability in fiber strength. Fiber spacing did not influence radial crack formation, interfacial bond shear strength, or stress-strain behavior in the composite. The temperature dependence of composite properties was investigated over the 23-815 C range.

Brindley, P. K.; Draper, S. L.; Nathal, M. V.; Eldridge, J. I.

1990-01-01

167

Weathering effects on tensile and stress rupture strength of glass fiber reinforced vinylester and epoxy thermoset pipes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Glass fiber reinforced vinylester (GFRE) and epoxy (GFRE) pipes have been used for more than three decades to mitigate corrosion problems in oil fields, chemical and industrial plants. In these services, both GFRV and GFRE pipes are exposed to various environmental conditions. Long-term mechanical durability of these pipes after exposure to environmental conditions, which include natural weathering exposure to seasonal temperature variation, sea water, humidity and other corrosive fluids like crude oil, should be well known. Although extensive research has been undertaken, several major issues pertaining to the performance of these pipes under a number of environmental conditions still remain unresolved. The main objective of this study is to investigate the effects of natural weathering, combined natural weathering with seawater and crude oil exposure, for time periods ranging from 3 to 36 months respectively, on the tensile and stress rupture behavior of GFRV and GFRE pipes. Ring specimens are machined from GFRV and GFRE pipes and tested before and after exposure to different weathering conditions prevalent in the eastern region (Dhahran) of Saudi Arabia and present under service conditions. The natural weathering and combined natural weathering with crude oil exposure of GFRV specimens revealed increased tensile strength even after 36 months of exposure when compared with that of the as received samples. However, the combined natural weathering with seawater exposure of GFRV samples revealed better tensile behavior till 24 months of exposure, and after 36 months their tensile strength was seen to be below that of the as received GFRV samples. The stress rupture behavior of natural weather exposed GFRV samples showed an improvement after 12 months of exposure and it decreased after 24 and 36 months of exposure when compared with the as received GFRV samples. The combined natural weathering with crude oil and seawater exposure of GFRV sample revealed improved stress rupture behavior after 12 months of exposure. The as received GFRE pipe specimens revealed higher average tensile strength when compared to the as received GFRV sample, whereas the stress rupture behavior was comparatively low. The seawater exposure of the GFRE specimens resulted in drastic reduction in both tensile and stress rupture properties. Fractographic analysis was performed using an optical microscope and SEM in order to explain the possible controlling mechanisms of failure.

Nizamuddin, Syed

168

Effect of cold working and sandblasting on the microhardness, tensile strength and corrosion resistance of AISI 316L stainless steel  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The aim of this work is to investigate the effect of cold working and sandblasting on the microhardness, tensile strength and corrosion rate of AISI 316L stainless steel. The specimens were deformed from 17% to 47% and sandblasted for 20 min using SiC particles with a diameter of 500-700 ?m and an air flow with 0.6-0.7 MPa pressure. The microhardness distribution and tensile test were conducted and a measurement on the corrosion current density was done to determine the corrosion rate of the specimens. The result shows that the cold working enhances the bulk microhardness, tensile and yield strength of the specimen by the degree of deformation applied in the treatment. The sandblasting treatment increases the microhardness only at the surface of the specimen without or with a low degree of deformation. In addition, the sandblasting enhances the surface roughness. The corrosion resistance is improved by cold working, especially for the highly deformed specimen. However the follow-up sandblasting treatment reduces the corrosion resistance. In conclusion, the cold working is prominent to be used for improving the mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of AISI 316L stainless steel. Meanwhile, the sandblasting subjected to the cold worked steel is only useful for surface texturing instead of improving the mechanical properties and corrosion resistance.

Suyitno; Arifvianto, Budi; Widodo, Teguh Dwi; Mahardika, Muslim; Dewo, Punto; Salim, Urip Agus

2012-12-01

169

Influence of Specimen Preparation and Specimen Size on Composite Transverse Tensile Strength and Scatter  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The influence of specimen polishing, configuration, and size on the transverse tension strength of two glass-epoxy materials, and one carbon-epoxy material, loaded in three and four point bending was evaluated. Polishing machined edges, arid/or tension side failure surfaces, was detrimental to specimen strength characterization instead of yielding a higher, more accurate, strength as a result of removing inherent manufacture and handling flaws. Transverse tension strength was typically lower for longer span lengths due to the classical weakest link effect. However, strength was less sensitive to volume changes achieved by increasing specimen width. The Weibull scaling law typically over-predicted changes in transverse tension strengths in three point bend tests and under-predicted changes in transverse tension strengths in four point bend tests. Furthermore, the Weibull slope varied with specimen configuration, volume, and sample size. Hence, this scaling law was not adequate for predicting transverse tension strength of heterogeneous, fiber-reinforced, polymer matrix composites.

OBrien, T. Kevin; Chawan, Arun D.; DeMarco, Kevin; Paris, Isabelle

2001-01-01

170

A scaffold-enhanced light-activated surgical adhesive technique: surface selection for enhanced tensile strength in wound repair  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An ex vivo study was conducted to determine the effect of the irregularity of the scaffold surface on the tensile strength of repairs formed using our Scaffold-Enhanced Biological Adhesive (SEBA). Two different scaffold materials were investigated: (i) a synthetic biodegradable material fabricated from poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid); and (ii) a biological material, small intestinal submucosa, manufactured by Cook BioTech. The scaffolds were doped with protein solder composed of 50%(w/v) bovine serum albumin solder and 0.5mg/ml indocyanine green dye mixed in deionized water, and activated with an 808-nm diode laser. The tensile strength of repairs performed on bovine thoracic aorta, liver, spleen, small intestine and lung, using the smooth and irregular surfaces of the above scaffold-enhanced materials were measured and the time-to-failure was recorded. The tensile strength of repairs formed using the irregular surfaces of the scaffolds were consistently higher than those formed using the smooth surfaces of the scaffolds. The largest difference was observed on repairs formed on the aorta and small intestine, where the repairs were, on average, 50% stronger using the irregular versus the smooth scaffold surfaces. In addition, the time-to-failure of repairs formed using the irregular surfaces of the scaffolds were between 50% and 100% longer than that achieved using the smooth surfaces of the scaffolds. It has previously been shown that distributing or dispersing the adhesive forces over the increased surface area of the scaffold, either smooth or irregular, produces stronger repairs than albumin solder alone. The increase in the absolute strength and longevity of repairs seen in this new study when the irregular surfaces of the scaffolds are used is thought to be due to the distribution of forces between the many independent micro-adhesions provided by the irregular surfaces.

Soller, Eric C.; Hoffman, Grant T.; Heintzelman, Douglas L.; Duffy, Mark T.; Bloom, Jeffrey N.; McNally-Heintzelman, Karen M.

2004-07-01

171

Study of austenitic stainless steel welded with low alloy steel filler metal. [tensile and impact strength tests  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The tensile and impact strength properties of 316L stainless steel plate welded with low alloy steel filler metal were determined. Tests were conducted at room temperature and -100 F on standard test specimens machined from as-welded panels of various chemical compositions. No significant differences were found as the result of variations in percentage chemical composition on the impact and tensile test results. The weldments containing lower chromium and nickel as the result of dilution of parent metal from the use of the low alloy steel filler metal corroded more severely in a marine environment. The use of a protective finish, i.e., a nitrile-based paint containing aluminum powder, prevented the corrosive attack.

Burns, F. A.; Dyke, R. A., Jr.

1979-01-01

172

Relevance of impacter shape to nonvisible damage and residual tensile strength of a thick graphite/epoxy laminate  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A study was made to determine the relevance of impacter shape to nonvisible damage and tensile residual strength of a 36 mm thick graphite/epoxy motor case. The shapes of the impacters were as follows: 12.7 mm and 25.4 mm diameter hemispheres, a sharp corner, and a 6.3 mm diameter bolt-like rod. The investigation revealed that damage initiated when the contact pressure exceeded a critical level. However, the damage was not visible on the surface until an even higher pressure was exceeded. The impact energy to initiate damage or cause visible damage on the surface increased approximately with impacter diameter to the third power. The reduction in strength for nonvisible damage increased with increasing diameter, 9 and 30 percent for the 12.7 mm and 25.4 mm diameter hemispheres, respectively. The corner impacter made visible damage on the surface for even the smallest impact energy. The rod impacter acted like a punch and sliced through the composite. Even so, the critical level of pressure to initiate damage was the same for the rod and hemispherical impacters. Factors of safety for nonvisible damage increased with increasing kinetic energy of impact. The effects of impacter shape on impact force, damage size, damage visibility, and residual tensile strength were predicted quite well assuming Hertzian contact and using maximum stress criteria and a surface crack analysis.

Poe, Clarence C., Jr.

1991-01-01

173

The Value Compressive Strength and Split Tensile Strength on Concrete Mixture With Expanded Polystyrene Coated by Surfactant Span 80 as a Partial Substitution of Fine Aggregate  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The value of the density normal concrete which ranges between 2200-2400 kg/m3. Therefore the use of Expanded Polystyrene (EPS) as a subitute to fine aggregate can reduce the density of concrete. The purpose this research is to reduce the density of normal concrete but increase compressive strength of EPS concrete, with use surfactant as coating for the EPS. Variables of substitution percentage of EPS and EPS coated by surfactant are 5%,10%,15%,20%,25%. Method of concrete mix design based on SNI 03-2834-2000 "Tata Cara Pembuatan Rencana Campuran Beton Normal (Provisions for Proportioning Normal Concrete Mixture)". The result of testing, every increase percentage of EPS substitution will decrease the compressive strength around 1,74 MPa and decrease density 34,03 kg/m3. Using Surfactant as coating of EPS , compressive strength increase from the EPS's compressive strength. Average of increasing compressive strength 0,19 MPa and increase the density 20,03 kg/m3,average decrease of the tensile split strength EPS coated surfaktan is 0,84 MPa.

Hidayat, Irpan; Siauwantara, Alice

2014-03-01

174

Strength, Hardening, and Failure Observed by In Situ TEM Tensile Testing**  

PubMed Central

We present in situ transmission electron microscope tensile tests on focused ion beam fabricated single and multiple slip oriented Cu tensile samples with thicknesses in the range of 100–200 nm. Both crystal orientations fail by localized shear. While failure occurs after a few percent plastic strain and limited hardening in the single slip case, the multiple slip samples exhibit extended homogenous deformation and necking due to the activation of multiple dislocation sources in conjunction with significant hardening. The hardening behavior at 1% plastic strain is even more pronounced compared to compression samples of the same orientation due to the absence of sample taper and the interface to the compression platen. Moreover, we show for the first time that the strain rate sensitivity of such FIB prepared samples is an order of magnitude higher than that of bulk Cu. PMID:23447712

Kiener, Daniel; Kaufmann, Petra; Minor, Andrew M.

2012-01-01

175

Strength, Hardening, and Failure Observed by In Situ TEM Tensile Testing.  

PubMed

We present in situ transmission electron microscope tensile tests on focused ion beam fabricated single and multiple slip oriented Cu tensile samples with thicknesses in the range of 100-200 nm. Both crystal orientations fail by localized shear. While failure occurs after a few percent plastic strain and limited hardening in the single slip case, the multiple slip samples exhibit extended homogenous deformation and necking due to the activation of multiple dislocation sources in conjunction with significant hardening. The hardening behavior at 1% plastic strain is even more pronounced compared to compression samples of the same orientation due to the absence of sample taper and the interface to the compression platen. Moreover, we show for the first time that the strain rate sensitivity of such FIB prepared samples is an order of magnitude higher than that of bulk Cu. PMID:23447712

Kiener, Daniel; Kaufmann, Petra; Minor, Andrew M

2012-11-01

176

Development of a new method to determine dynamic tensile strength of ballistic yarns  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Since the design of new soft protections is getting intensive, the study of the dynamic behavior of ballistic yarns becomes more and more important. This paper deals with the development of a new experimental method in order to obtain some dynamic parameters by performing dynamic tensile tests. The concept is quite simple: two projectiles, linked together by the ballistic yarn we want to study, are accelerated together with the help of a gas gun. The first one flies freely while the second one is suddenly stopped. The yarn is then loaded in tensile. Several measurements are performed during each test with the help of a high speed camera. First results on a polyethylene yarn are presented here and several improvements are proposed in order to improve the accuracy of the results.

Nussbaum, J.; Faderl, N.; Nuesing, R.; Ha-Minh, C.; Boussu, F.

2012-08-01

177

The effects of damage accumulation on the tensile strength and toughness of compact bovine bone.  

PubMed

Damage accumulation in compact bovine femur subjected to uniaxial tensile loading was examined by strong light illumination effects of microcracking. Imaging was done using a high-speed camera capturing image at 200 to 1500FPS. The tensile tests were performed in a multipurpose tensile testing system with cross-head speeds ranging from 0.5 to 10mm/min which leads to strain rates of 0.0001 to 0.0012s(-1) (physiologically relevant to walking and running Hansen et al., 2008). The post-failure images were then examined in a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and effects of microstructure, strain rate, and orientation were evaluated. Correlation of the high-speed images with stress-strain curves indicated that optically visible microcracks were most likely initiated at yielding, and the specimens with dispersed microcracks exhibited a higher energy-absorption capacity compared to the specimens with coalesced local cracks. It was found that damage accumulation negatively correlates to strain rate and that transverse specimens exhibited a different failure pattern compared to the longitudinal specimens. Strain hardening and softening were found in the longitudinal and transverse specimens respectively. The microcracking in the transverse specimens instantly increased to peak after yielding compared to the gradual growth until failure in the longitudinal specimens. The average Young's modulus (21.5GPa) and ultimate stress (93.5MPa) of the specimens loaded in the longitudinal direction were more than twice that of the specimens (10.9GPa and 36.2MPa respectively) loaded in the transverse direction. The current technique has shown potential in relating damage accumulation real time in bone samples subjected to tensile loading condition. This information will be helpful in relating the role of micro damage accumulation in initiating failure and/or remodeling in bone. PMID:23337851

Zhang, Wei; Tekalur, Srinivasan Arjun; Baumann, Melissa; McCabe, Laura R

2013-03-15

178

The effects of incorporation Fe 2 O 3 nanoparticles on tensile and flexural strength of concrete  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this Paper, the split tensile and flexural stren gth together with the setting time of concrete by p artial replacement of cement with nano-phase Fe 2O3 particles has been studied. Fe 2O3 nanoparticles with the average diameter of 15 nm were used with four different contents of 0.5%, 0.1%, 1. 5% and 2.0% by weight. The results showed that

Ali Nazari; Shadi Riahi; Shirin Riahi; Seyedeh Fatemeh Shamekhi; A. Khademno

2010-01-01

179

Composition–property relationships for an experimental composite nerve guidance conduit: evaluating cytotoxicity and initial tensile strength  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this work was to examine the main (individual), combined (interaction) and second-order (quadratic) effects\\u000a of: (i) poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA), (ii) F127, and (iii) a zinc-silicate based bioactive glass, on the cytotoxicity and ultimate tensile strength\\u000a of an experimental nerve guidance conduit (NGC). The experimental plan was carried out according to a Box–Behnken design matrix.\\u000a The effects of each

S. Kehoe; X. F. Zhang; D. Boyd

2011-01-01

180

The effect of different light-curing units on tensile strength and microhardness of a composite resin.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different light-curing units on the tensile bond strength and microhardness of a composite resin (Filtek Z250 - 3M/ESPE). Conventional halogen (Curing Light 2500 - 3M/ESPE; CL) and two blue light emitting diode curing units (Ultraled - Dabi/Atlante; UL; Ultrablue IS - DMC; UB3 and UB6) were selected for this study. Different light intensities (670, 130, 300, and 600 mW/cm(2), respectively) and different curing times (20s, 40s and 60s) were evaluated. Knoop microhardness test was performed in the area corresponding to the fractured region of the specimen. A total of 12 groups (n=10) were established and the specimens were prepared using a stainless steel mold composed by two similar parts that contained a cone-shaped hole with two diameters (8.0 mm and 5.0 mm) and thickness of 1.0 mm. Next, the specimens were loaded in tensile strength until fracture in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min and a 50 kg load cell. For the microhardness test, the same matrix was used to fabricate the specimens (12 groups; n=5). Microhardness was determined on the surfaces that were not exposed to the light source, using a Shimadzu HMV-2 Microhardness Tester at a static load of 50 g for 30 seconds. Data were analyzed statistically by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p<0.05). Regarding the individual performance of the light-curing units, there was similarity in tensile strength with 20-s and 40-s exposure times and higher tensile strength when a 60-s light-activation time was used. Regarding microhardness, the halogen lamp had higher results when compared to the LED units. For all light-curing units, the variation of light-exposure time did not affect composite microhardness. However, lower irradiances needed longer light-activation times to produce similar effect as that obtained with high-irradiance light-curing sources. PMID:19089182

Franco, Eduardo Batista; dos Santos, Patrícia Aleixo; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia

2007-12-01

181

Estimation of the Tensile Strength Reduction of a Composite Laminate with a Hole  

Microsoft Academic Search

The strength problem for a body with an artificial defect in the form of a hole is considered. To solve this problem, an approach is suggested according to which the local strength of a material in the area of stress concentration is assumed to depend on the size of this area. The scale of the problem is introduced via the

S. V. Suknyov

2000-01-01

182

Tensile Strength and Microstructure of Al2O3-ZrO2 Hypo-Eutectic Fibers Studied  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Oxide eutectics offer high-temperature strength retention and creep resistance in oxidizing environments. Al2O3-ZrO2 eutectic strengths have been studied since the 1970's. Directionally solidified oxide eutectics exhibit improved resistance to slow crack growth and excellent strength retention at high temperatures up to 1400 C. Materials studied typically contain Y2O3 to metastably retain the high-temperature cubic and tetragonal polymorphs at room temperature. Al2O3-ZrO2 is of fundamental interest for creep studies because it combines a creep-resistant material, Al2O3, with a very low creep resistance material, ZrO2. Results on mechanical properties and microstructures of these materials will be used to define compositions for creep testing in future work. Substantial variations from the eutectic alumina to zirconia ratio can be tolerated without a loss in room-temperature strength. The effect of increasing Y2O3 addition on the room-temperature tensile strength of an Al2O3-ZrO2 material containing excess Al2O3 was examined at the NASA Glenn Research Center, where the materials were grown using Glenn's world-class laser growth facilities.

Farmer, Serene C.; Sayir, Ali

2001-01-01

183

Effects of strain-rate and pre-fatigue on tensile properties of laser welded joint of high strength steel plates  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The impact tensile properties of laser welded butt joints of two kinds of high strength steel plates with the tensile strength level of 590 MPa and 780 MPa (denoted by HR590 and HR780, respectively), were investigated using split Hopkinson bar tensile testing apparatus. Impact tension tests for the joint specimens pre-fatigued were also carried out to examine the effect of pre-fatigue. There were no significant effects of strain-rate and pre-fatigue on the dynamic and quasi-static tensile strength of laser welded butt joints. However, the decrease in the elongation of HR780 welded joints subjected high cycle pre-fatigue was observed only at a high strain-rate. From the observation of fracture surface, it was found that the decrease in the elongation may be caused by a number of damages due to the combination of high cycle pre-fatigue and high strain-rate.

Kobayashi, H.; Daimaruya, M.; Tsuda, H.; Horikawa, K.

2006-08-01

184

Tensile strength at elevated temperature and its applicability as an accelerated testing methodology for unidirectional composites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The applicability of a macroscopic time-temperature superposition principle (TTSP) to unidirectional composite strength is discussed based on the microscopic Simultaneous Fiber-Failure (SFF) model that has been presented by Koyanagi et al. (J. Compos. Mater. 43:1901-1914, 2009a). The SFF model estimates composite strengths as functions of fiber, matrix, and interface strengths. This paper first investigates the applicability of SFF to the complicated temperature dependence of composite strengths, i.e., one composite exhibits significant temperature dependence and another does not, considering the temperature dependence of the components, which results in successful estimations for the two composite systems used in the present study. The long-term durability predicted by the SFF and that predicted by the TTSP are then compared. They typically correspond to each other in various cases; accelerated testing methodology (ATM) employing TTSP is thus proved to be valid from the micromechanical viewpoint, assuming the SFF applicability.

Koyanagi, Jun; Nakada, Masayuki; Miyano, Yasushi

2012-02-01

185

The influence of tensile fatigue damage on residual compressive strength of woven composites  

SciTech Connect

The long term mechanical fatigue of a Celion G30-500/PMR-15 woven composite system is investigated to study the interrelationship between thermo-mechanical properties, namely the thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) and the compressive strength. Residual compressive strength measurements (IITRI fixture) conducted on specimens subjected to tension-tension fatigue cycling indicate that this material property is sensitive to cracks and delaminations which form during mechanical cycling. Measured compressive strength degradation are as large as 49% for this material undergoing mechanical fatigue cycling with TEC degradation as large as 61%. Experimental results show that a correlation exists between TEC measurements and compressive strength. This correlation suggests that TEC measurements may be used as a damage evaluation technique.

Mitrovic, M.; Carman, G.P. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering Dept.

1995-12-31

186

Influence of core-finishing intervals on tensile strength of cast posts-and-cores luted with zinc phosphate cement.  

PubMed

The core finishing of cast posts-and-cores after luting is routine in dental practice. However, the effects of the vibrations produced by the rotary cutting instruments over the luting cements are not well-documented. This study evaluated the influence of the time intervals that elapsed between the cementation and the core-finishing procedures on the tensile strength of cast posts-and-cores luted with zinc phosphate cement. Forty-eight bovine incisor roots were selected, endodontically treated, and divided into four groups (n = 12): GA, control (without finishing); GB, GC, and GD, subjected to finishing at 20 minutes, 60 minutes, and 24 hours after cementation, respectively. Root canals were molded, and the resin patterns were cast in copper-aluminum alloy. Cast posts-and-cores were luted with zinc phosphate cement, and the core-finishing procedures were applied according to the groups. The tensile tests were performed at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min for all groups, 24 hours after the core-finishing procedures. The data were subjected to one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test (? = 0.05). No significant differences were observed in the tensile strengths between the control and experimental groups, regardless of the time interval that elapsed between the luting and finishing steps. Within the limitations of the present study, it was demonstrated that the core-finishing procedures and time intervals that elapsed after luting did not appear to affect the retention of cast posts-and-cores when zinc phosphate cement was used. PMID:22790502

Iglesias, Michele Andrea Lopes; Mesquita, Gabriela Campos; Pereira, Analice Giovani; Dantas, Lucas Costa de Medeiros; Raposo, Luís Henrique Araújo; Soares, Carlos José; Mota, Adérito Soares da

2012-01-01

187

Effects of environment and temperature on ceramic tensile strength–grain size relations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Overall strength (s)–grain size (G), i.e. s–G-1\\/2, relations retain the same basic two-branched character to at least 1200–1300°C. However, some polycrystalline as well as single crystal strength shifts or deviations are seen relative to each other, and especially relative to Young's moduli versus temperature for poly- and single crystals. The variety and complexity of these deviations are illustrated mainly by

R. W. RICE

1997-01-01

188

Effect of the strain rate on the tensile strength of a copper shaped-charge jet  

Microsoft Academic Search

The data on the penetration depth of a rotating shaped-charge jet were used to estimate the strength of the material of a\\u000a copper jet formed from a “low” conical linear with an apex angle of120° under the action of centrifugal forces. The estimates0.07–0.15 GPa obtained are close to the static yield point of deformed copper. The jet strength, which is

V. V. Silvestrov; N. N. Gorshkov

1997-01-01

189

Effect of laser welding on the titanium composite tensile bond strength.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to analyze the shear bond strength between commercially pure titanium, with and without laser welding, after airbone-particle abrasion (Al(2)O(3)) and 2 indirect composites. Sixty-four specimens were cast and divided into 2 groups with and without laser welding. Each group was divided in 4 subgroups, related to Al(2)O(3) grain size: A - 250 microm; B - 180 microm; C- 110 microm; and D - 50 microm. Composite rings were formed around the rods and light polymerized using UniXS unit. Specimens were invested and their shear bond strength at failure was measured with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 2.0 mm/min. Statistical analysis was carried out with ANOVA and Tukey's test (alpha=0.05). The highest bond strength means were recorded in 250 microm group without laser welding. The lowest shear bond strength means were recorded in 50 microm group with laser welding. Statistically significant differences (p<0.05) were found between all groups. In conclusion, airborne particle abrasion yielded significantly lower bond strength as the Al(2)O(3) particle size decreased. Shear bond strength decreased in the laser welded specimens. PMID:20126909

Galo, Rodrigo; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria; Rodrigues, Renata Cristina Silveira; Pagnano, Valéria de Oliveira; de Mattos, Maria da Glória Chiarello

2009-01-01

190

Effect on the tensile strength of human acellular dermis (Epiflex®) of in-vitro incubation simulating an open abdomen setting  

PubMed Central

Background The use of human acellular dermis (hAD) to close open abdomen in the treatment process of severe peritonitis might be an alternative to standard care. This paper describes an investigation of the effects of fluids simulating an open abdomen environment on the biomechanical properties of Epiflex® a cell-free human dermis transplant. Methods hAD was incubated in Ringers solution, blood, urine, upper gastrointestinal (upper GI) secretion and a peritonitis-like bacterial solution in-vitro for 3 weeks. At day 0, 7, 14 and 21 breaking strength was measured, tensile strength was calculated and standard fluorescence microscopy was performed. Results hAD incubated in all five of the five fluids showed a decrease in mean breaking strength at day 21 when compared to day 0. However, upper GI secretion was the only incubation fluid that significantly reduced the mechanical strength of Epiflex after 21days of incubation when compared to incubation in Ringer’s solution. Conclusion hAD may be a suitable material for closure of the open abdomen in the absence of upper GI leakage and pancreatic fistulae. PMID:24468201

2014-01-01

191

Rate and temperature effects on the flow stress and tensile strength of metals  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Some new and obtained earlier experimental data on the elastic precursor decay and rise times of plastic shock waves in several metals and alloys at normal and elevated temperatures are systematized. The data on precursor decay include last measurements at micron and submicron distances where realized shear stresses are comparable with their ultimate (``ideal'') values. Results of measurements have been transformed into dependences of plastic strain rate on the shear stress. It has been found the precursor decay may occur in several regimes which are characterized by different decay rates. Anomalous growth of the Hugoniot elastic limit with heating correlates with a fast decay regime and is not observed when the decay is relatively slow. An analysis of the rise times of plastic shock waves shows by order of magnitude faster plastic strain rates at corresponding shear stresses than that at the HEL. Results of measurements of the resistance to high-rate fracture (``spall strength'') show gradual increase of the later with increasing rate of tension and approaching the ``ideal'' strength in a picosecond time range. The spall strength usually decreases with heating although in less degree than the strength at low strain rates does. In general, the temperature dependences of the spall strength do not correlate with dependences of the yield stress that points on larger contribution of the fracture nucleation processes as compared to the void growth. Requirements to constitutive models for high-rate plastic deformation and fracture are formulated on the base of experimental observations.

Kanel, Gennady I.

2011-06-01

192

Residual strength of composite laminates subjected to tensile-compressive fatigue loading  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Results are presented on the measurements of the residual strengths of T300/934 graphite epoxy laminates, in tension and in compression, after the samples were exposed to tension-compression fatigue loading (R = -1). Four laminate ocnfigurations were tested: unidirectional, cross-ply, angle-ply, and quasi-isotropic. It was found that the fatigue behavior of laminates was dependent on the quasi-static strengths and the specific structure of the laminate. No direct correlation was found between remaining residual strengths and the percentage of average fatigue life. However, a correlation scheme was developed for the individual specimen under test, based on a cumulative damage model and a stiffness change of the material.

Rotem, Assa; Nelson, H. G.

1990-01-01

193

The tensile and shear bond strength of a conventional and a 4-meta self-cure acrylic resin to various surface finishes of CoCr alloy.  

PubMed

This study was designed to compare the tensile and shear bond strengths of two self-cure acrylic resins to cobalt-chromium alloy (CoCr) samples, prepared with six surface finishes. The strongest mean tensile bond strength was recorded between the 4-Meta acrylic resin and Silicoated cobalt-chromium alloy. The strongest mean shear bond strengths showed little variation between the 4-Meta acrylic resin and Silicoated, sandblasted and sandblasted/tinplated cobalt-chromium. This laboratory based study may have important implications for the future design of CoCr dentures. PMID:8603150

Barclay, C W; Williams, R

1994-09-01

194

Alternative chromophores for use in light-activated surgical adhesives: optimization of parameters for tensile strength and thermal damage profile  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The use of indocyanine green-doped albumin protein solders has been shown to vastly improve the anastomotic strength that can be achieved by laser tissue repair techniques, while at the same time minimizing collateral thermal tissue damage. However, the safety of the degradation products of the chromophore following laser irradiation is uncertain. Therefore, we studied the feasibility of using alternative chromophores in terms of temperature rise at the solder/tissue interface, the extent of thermal damage in the sourrounding tissue, and the tensile strength of repairs. Biodegradable polymer scaffolds of controlled porosity were fabricated with poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid), using a solvent-casting and particulate-leaching technique. The porous scaffold acted as a carrier to the traditional protein solder composition of serum albumin and an absorbing chromophore mixed in deionized water. Two commonly used chromophores, indocyanine green and methylene blue were investigated, as well as blue and green food colorings. Temperature rise at the solder surface and at the interface between the solder and tissue were monitored by an IR temperature monitoring system and a type-K thermocouple, respectively, and the extent of thermal damage in the underlying tissue was determined using light microscopy. As expected, temperature rise at the solder/tissue interface, and consequently the degree of collateral thermal tissue damage, was directly related to the penetration depth of the laser light in the protein solder. Optimal tensile strength of repairs was achieved by selecting a chromophore concentration that resulted in a temperature of 66 +/- 3°C at the solder/tissue interface.

Hoffman, Grant T.; Byrd, Brian D.; Soller, Eric C.; Heintzelman, Douglas L.; McNally-Heintzelman, Karen M.

2003-06-01

195

Relevance of impacter shape to nonvisible damage and residual tensile strength of a thick graphite/epoxy laminate  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A study was made to determine the relevance of impacter shape to nonvisible damage and tensile residual strength of a 36 mm (1.4 in.) thick graphite/epoxy motor case. The shapes of the impacters were as follows: 12.7 mm (0.5 in.) and 25.4 mm (1.0 in.) diameter hemispheres, a sharp corner, and a 6.3 mm (0.25 in.) diameter bolt-like rod. The investigation revealed that damage initiated when the contact pressure exceeded a critical level. However, the damage was not visible on the surface until an even higher pressure was exceeded. The damage on the surface consisted of a crater shaped like the impacter, and the damage below the surface consisted of broken fibers. The impact energy to initiate damage or cause visible damage on the surface increased approximately with impacter diameter to the third power. The reduction in strength for nonvisible damage increased with increasing diameter, 9 and 30 percent for the 12.7 mm (0.5 in.) and 25.4 mm (1.0 in.) diameter hemispheres, respectively. The corner impacter made visible damage on the surface for even the smallest impact energy. The rod impacter acted like a punch and sliced through the composite. Even so, the critical level of pressure to initiate damage was the same for the rod and hemispherical impacters. Factors of safety for nonvisible damage increased with increasing kinetic energy of impact. The effects of impacter shape on impact force, damage size, damage visibility, and residual tensile strength were predicted quite well assuming Hertzian contact and using maximum stress criteria and a surface crack analysis.

Poe, C. C., Jr.

1990-01-01

196

Tensile bond strength of indirect composites luted with three new self-adhesive resin cements to dentin  

PubMed Central

Objective The aims of this study were to evaluate the tensile bond strengths between indirect composites and dentin of 3 recently developed self-adhesive resin cements and to determine mode of failure by SEM. Material and Methods Exposed dentin surfaces of 70 mandibular third molars were used. Teeth were randomly divided into 7 groups: Group 1 (control group): direct composite resin restoration (Alert) with etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Bond 1 primer/adhesive), Group 2: indirect composite restoration (Estenia) luted with a resin cement (Cement-It) combined with the same etch-and-rinse adhesive, Group 3: direct composite resin restoration with self-etch adhesive system (Nano-Bond), Group 4: indirect composite restoration luted with the resin cement combined with the same self-etch adhesive, Groups 5-7: indirect composite restoration luted with self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem, Maxcem, and Embrace WetBond, respectively) onto the non-pretreated dentin surfaces. Tensile bond strengths of groups were tested with a universal testing machine at a constant speed of 1 mm/min using a 50 kgf load cell. Results were statistically analyzed by the Student's t-test. The failure modes of all groups were also evaluated. Results The indirect composite restorations luted with the self-adhesive resin cements (groups 5-7) showed better results compared to the other groups (p<0.05). Group 4 showed the weakest bond strength (p>0.05). The surfaces of all debonded specimens showed evidence of both adhesive and cohesive failure. Conclusion The new universal self-adhesive resins may be considered an alternative for luting indirect composite restorations onto non-pretreated dentin surfaces. PMID:21710095

TÜRKMEN, Cafer; DURKAN, Meral; C?M?LL?, Hale; ÖKSÜZ, Mustafa

2011-01-01

197

Effect of the Conservation Treatment of Historical Ceramic Tiles on the Tensile Adhesion Strength  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present work describes some preliminary results of a first attempt to study the effect of a conservation treatment on the adhesion strength of ancient ceramic tiles. Several tiles from the 16th through 20th centuries were submitted to a conservation treatment. The treatment involves the impregnation with Paraloid B-72 using a protocol widely used in most museum restoration departments. Treated

Ariana Russo; Maria Rosário Veiga; Maria Fátima Vaz; Ana Paula Carvalho

2011-01-01

198

Evaluation of a sugar based edible adhesive utilizing a tensile strength tester  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

A new method to evaluate adhesives has been developed and utilized to formulate a recently patented adhesive based on sugar and citric acid. Factors affecting adhesive performance were uncovered, such as reduced strength due to improper heating time, and an optimal curing temperature of 60oC was ac...

199

Tensile bond strength to and SEM evaluation of ground and intact enamel surfaces  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the bonding of four commercially available adhesive systems to ground and intact enamel surfaces.Methods: Extracted human teeth were used to measure the microtensile bond strength to enamel and a field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) was used to observe the bonded interface and the effect of the surface conditioning of each material.

N Kanemura; H Sano; J Tagami

1999-01-01

200

Effect of Load Rate on Ultimate Tensile Strength of Ceramic Matrix Composites at Elevated Temperatures  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The strengths of three continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic composites, including SiC/CAS-II, SiC/MAS-5 and SiC/SiC, were determined as a function of test rate in air at 1100 to 1200 C. All three composite materials exhibited a strong dependency of strength on test rate, similar to the behavior observed in many advanced monolithic ceramics at elevated temperatures. The application of the preloading technique as well as the prediction of life from one loading configuration (constant stress-rate) to another (constant stress loading) suggested that the overall macroscopic failure mechanism of the composites would be the one governed by a power-law type of damage evolution/accumulation, analogous to slow crack growth commonly observed in advanced monolithic ceramics. It was further found that constant stress-rate testing could be used as an alternative to life prediction test methodology even for composite materials, at least for short range of lifetimes and when ultimate strength is used as the failure criterion.

Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

2001-01-01

201

An Investigation of the Tensile Strength of a Composite-To-Metal Adhesive Joint  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The present study examines the feasibility of a simple concept composite-to-metal butt joint through the performance of both numerical and experimental studies. The composite part is made of glass/epoxy unidirectional layers made with the vacuum bag method. The geometry of the joint is typical for marine applications and corresponds to a low stiffness ratio. Two major parameters are investigated, namely the overlap length and the surface preparation of the steel adherent. Manufacturing of specimens and the procedure of the tensile tests are described in detail, giving hints for obtaining a better quality joint. Axial elongation and strains at various places of the joint were monitored and also numerically calculated. The tests revealed that the joint is quite effective, irrespectively of the steel surface preparation method. The failure loads are comparable and in some cases superior to other corresponding values found in the literature. The numerical models proved to adequately predict the structural response of the joint up to the loading where debonding starts.

Tsouvalis, Nicholas G.; Karatzas, Vassilios A.

2011-04-01

202

Pressure-Sensitivity and Tensile Strength of AN Elastomer at High Strain Rates  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Pressure-shear plate impact experiments have been conducted to study the mechanical response of an elastomer (polyurea) at very high strain rates: 105-106 s-1. Thin samples are cast between two hard steel plates. Longitudinal waves reverberating through the sample are used to determine the slope of the isentrope at compressive stresses greater than, say, 500 MPa—the initial pressure at impact. Shear waves measure the shearing resistance at the pressure attained after the "ring-up" of the pressure in the sample is complete. In the current work, release wave experiments and plane wave simulations are used to extend the isentrope into the tensile regime—and ultimately to failure. The previous work is also extended to determine the pressure-sensitivity of the material's shearing resistance at high shearing rates and low pressures. To achieve the latter, the impact configuration is designed so that an unloading longitudinal wave reflected from the rear surface of the target assembly arrives at the sample midway through its loading by the incident shear wave. As a result, the sample is sheared at high strain rates—at both high and low pressure—during a single experiment.

Jiao, T.; Clifton, R. J.; Grunschel, S. E.

2007-12-01

203

Ultrasonic Spot Welding of Aluminum to High-Strength Low-Alloy Steel: Microstructure, Tensile and Fatigue Properties  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The structural applications of lightweight aluminum alloys inevitably involve dissimilar welding with steels and the related durability issues. This study was aimed at evaluating the microstructural change, lap shear tensile load, and fatigue resistance of dissimilar ultrasonic spot-welded joints of aluminum-to-galvanized high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steel. Two non-uniform layers were identified in between Al and HSLA steel via SEM/EDS and XRD. One was an Al-Zn eutectic layer and the other was a thin (<2 ?m) layer of intermetallic compound (IMC) of Al and Fe in the nugget zone. The lap shear tensile testing gave a maximum load of 3.7 kN and the sample failed initially in between the Al-Zn eutectic film and Al-Fe IMC, and afterward from the region containing Al on both matching fracture surfaces. The fatigue test results showed a fatigue limit of about 0.5 kN (at 1 × 107 cycles). The maximum cyclic stress at which transition of the fatigue fracture from transverse through-thickness crack growth mode to the interfacial failure mode occurs increases with increasing energy input.

Patel, V. K.; Bhole, S. D.; Chen, D. L.

2014-04-01

204

Deformation and fracture behavior of notched and unnotched unidirectional C\\/CMg composite with Young's modulus 520 GPa and tensile strength 1 GPa  

Microsoft Academic Search

Experimental study on tensile fracture behavior of the newly developed C\\/C-Mg composite, prepared by infiltration of Mg into the pores in the C\\/C composite heat-treated at 3000°C, was carried out. The volume fraction of the filled Mg was 9–10%. The composite had a specific density 2.1, Young's modulus 520 GPa and Poisson's ratio 0.26. The average tensile strength measured for

S. Ochiai; H. Okuda; N. Suzuki; M. Tanaka; M. Hojo; E. Tsushima

2003-01-01

205

A Discrete Element Model for Predicting Shear Strength and Degradation of Rock Joint by Using Compressive and Tensile Test Data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A discrete element model is proposed to examine rock strength and failure. The model is implemented by UDEC, which is developed for this purpose. The material is represented as a collection of irregular-sized deformable particles interacting at their cohesive boundaries. The interface between two adjacent particles is viewed as a flexible contact whose constitutive law controls the material fracture and fragmentation properties. To reproduce rock anisotropy, an orthotropic cohesive law is developed for the contacts, which allows their shear and tensile behaviors to be different from each other. Using a combination of original closed-form expressions and statistical calibrations, a unique set of the contact microparameters are found based on the uniaxial/triaxial compression and Brazilian tension test data of a plaster. Applying the obtained microparameters, joint specimens, made of the same plaster, are simulated, where the comparison of the obtained results to laboratory data shows a reasonable agreement.

Kazerani, T.; Yang, Z. Y.; Zhao, J.

2012-09-01

206

Gas bubble retention and its effect on waste properties: Retention mechanisms, viscosity, and tensile and shear strengths  

SciTech Connect

Several of the underground nuclear storage tanks at Hanford have been placed on a flammable gas watch list, because the waste is either known or suspected to generate, store, and episodically release flammable gases. Because retention and episodic release of flammable gases from these tanks containing radioactive waste slurries are critical safety concerns, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is studying physical mechanisms and waste properties that contribute to the episodic gas release from these storage tanks. This study is being conducted for Westinghouse Hanford Company as part of the PNL Flammable Gas project. Previous investigations have concluded that gas bubbles are retained by the slurry or sludge that has settled at the bottom of the tanks; however, the mechanisms responsible for the retention of these bubbles are not well understood. Understanding the rheological behavior of the waste, particularly of the settled sludge, is critical to characterizing the tendency of the waste to retain gas bubbles and the dynamics of how these bubbles are released from the waste. The presence of gas bubbles is expected to affect the rheology of the sludge, specifically its viscosity and tensile and shear strengths, but essentially no literature data are available to assess the effect of bubbles. The objectives of this study were to conduct experiments and develop theories to understand better how bubbles are retained by slurries and sludges, to measure the effect of gas bubbles on the viscosity of simulated slurries, and to measure the effect of gas bubbles on the tensile and shear strengths of simulated slurries and sludges. In addition to accomplishing these objectives, this study developed correlations, based on the new experimental data, that can be used in large-scale computations of waste tank physical phenomena.

Gauglitz, P.A.; Rassat, S.D.; Powell, M.R. [and others

1995-08-01

207

Tensile and shear bond strength of hard and soft denture relining materials to the conventional heat cured acrylic denture base resin: An In-vitro study  

PubMed Central

Background: The condition of the denture bearing tissues may be adversely affected by high stress concentration during function. Chairside Denture (Hard and Soft) reliners are used to distribute forces applied to soft tissues during function. Tensile and shear bond strength has been shown to be dependent on their chemical composition. A weak bond could harbor bacteria, promote staining and delamination of the lining material. To investigate tensile and shear bond strength of 4 different commercially available denture relining materials to conventional heat cured acrylic denture base resin. Materials & Methods: 4 mm sections in the middle of 160 Acrylic cylindrical specimens (20 mm x 8 mm) were removed, packed with test materials (Mollosil, G C Reline Soft, G C Reline Hard (Kooliner) and Ufi Gel Hard and polymerized. Specimens were divided into 8 groups of 20 each. Tensile and shear bond strength to the conventional heat cured acrylic denture base resin were examined by Instron Universal Tensile Testing Machine using the equation F=N/A (F-maximum force exerted on the specimen (Newton) and A-bonding area= 50.24 mm2). One-way ANOVA was used for multiple group comparisons followed by Bonferroni Test and Hsu’s MCB for multiple pairwise comparisons to asses any significant differences between the groups. Results: The highest mean Tensile bond strength value was obtained for Ufi Gel Hard (6.49+0.08 MPa) and lowest for G C Reline Soft (0.52+0.01 MPa). The highest mean Shear bond strength value was obtained for Ufi Gel Hard (16.19+0.1 MPa) and lowest for Mollosil (0.59+0.05 MPa). The Benferroni test showed a significant difference in the mean tensile bond strength and the mean shear bond strength when the two denture soft liners were compared as well as when the two denture hard liners were compared. Hsu’s MCB implied that Ufi gel hard is better than its other closest competitors. Conclusion: The Tensile and Shear bond strength values of denture soft reliners were significantly lower than denture hard reliners. How to cite the article: Lau M, Amarnath GS, Muddugangadhar BC, Swetha MU, Das KA. Tensile and shear bond strength of hard and soft denture relining materials to the conventional heat cured acrylic denture base resin: An In-vitro study. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(2):55-61. PMID:24876703

Lau, Mayank; Amarnath, G S; Muddugangadhar, B C; Swetha, M U; Das, Kopal Anshuraj Ashok Kumar

2014-01-01

208

Ultimate tensile strength of embedded I-sections: a comparison of experimental and numerical results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Exposed baseplates together with anchor bolts are the customary method of connection of steel structures to the concrete footings. Post-Kobe studies revealed that the embedded column bases respond better to the earthquake uplift forces. The embedded column bases also, offer higher freedom in achieving the required strength, rigidity and ductility. The paper presents the results of the pullout failure of three embedded IPE140 sections, tested under different conditions. The numerical models are then, generated in Abaqus 6.10-1 software. It is concluded that, the steel profiles could be directly anchored in concrete without using anchor bolts as practiced in the exposed conventional column bases. Such embedded column bases can develop the required resistance against pullout forces at lower constructional costs.

Heristchian, Mahmoud; Pourakbar, Pouyan; Imeni, Saeed; Ramezani, M. Reza Adib

2014-12-01

209

Alternatives to ceramic brackets: the tensile bond strengths of two aesthetic brackets compared ex vivo with stainless steel foil-mesh bracket bases.  

PubMed

The mean tensile/peel bond strengths were evaluated for three types of aesthetic brackets (a ceramic-reinforced bracket and two generations of a ceramic/polycarbonate combination bracket). These were found to be significantly lower than the mean tensile/peel bond strength of a convention foil-mesh stainless steel bracket base. Failure of the ceramic-reinforced polycarbonate brackets occurred predominantly by fracture of the tie wings during testing. With the ceramic/polycarbonate combination brackets, the majority of the specimens failed due to separation of the ceramic and polycarbonate parts of the bracket. PMID:9218111

Arici, S; Regan, D

1997-05-01

210

Weibull statistical analysis of tensile strength of vascular bundle in inner layer of moso bamboo culm in molecular parasitology and vector biology.  

PubMed

Bamboo is a radial gradient variation composite material against parasitology and vector biology, but the vascular bundles in inner layer are evenly distributed. The objective is to determine the regular size pattern and Weibull statistical analysis of the vascular bundle tensile strength in inner layer of Moso bamboo. The size and shape of vascular bundles in inner layer are similar, with an average area about 0.1550 mm2. A statistical evaluation of the tensile strength of vascular bundle was conducted by means of Weibull statistics, the results show that the Weibull modulus m is 6.1121 and the accurate reliability assessment of vascular bundle is determined. PMID:25016270

Le, Cui; Wanxi, Peng; Zhengjun, Sun; Lili, Shang; Guoning, Chen

2014-07-01

211

Tensile strength and dilatational elasticity of giant sarcolemmal vesicles shed from rabbit muscle.  

PubMed Central

1. Mechanical properties of the surface membrane of skeletal muscle were determined on sarcolemmal vesicles (mean diameter, 71 microns) shed by rabbit psoas muscle swelling in 140 mM KC1 containing collagenase. 2. Vesicles were stressed by partial aspiration into parallel bore pipettes. The isotropic membrane tension so created caused an increase in membrane area which expresses itself in an elongation of the vesicle projection into the pipette. 3. For individual vesicles, a linear relationship between membrane tension and membrane area increase was found up to the point when the vesicle burst, i.e. sarcolemmal vesicles behaved as perfectly elastic structures. 4. The maximum tension sarcolemmal vesicles could sustain before bursting was 12.4 +/- 0.2 mN m-1 (median +/- 95% confidence interval), and the corresponding fractional increase in membrane area was 0.026 +/- 0.005 (median +/- 95% confidence interval). The elastic modulus of area expansion was 490 +/- 88 mN m-1 (mean +/- S.D.). 5. In conformity with cited comparable work on red blood cells and artificial lipid vesicles, the strength and area elasticity of the skeletal muscle membrane are considered properties of the fluid lipid matrix of the membrane and of the degree to which the bilayer is perturbed by lipid-protein interaction. Images Figure 2 PMID:8735704

Nichol, J A; Hutter, O F

1996-01-01

212

EFFECT OF CARBAMIDE PEROXIDE-BASED BLEACHING AGENTS CONTAINING FLUORIDE OR CALCIUM ON TENSILE STRENGTH OF HUMAN ENAMEL  

PubMed Central

Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of carbamide peroxide-based bleaching agents (CPG) containing fluoride (CF) or calcium (CCa) on the ultimate tensile strength of enamel (UTS). Method: A "cube-like" resin composite structure was built-up on the occlusal surface of twenty-two sound third molars to facilitate specimen preparation for the micro-tensile test. The restored teeth were serially sectioned in buccal-lingual direction in slices with approximate 0.7 mm thickness. Each slice was trimmed with a fine diamond bur to reduce the buccal, internal slope enamel of the cusps to a dumb-bell shape with a cross-sectional area at the "neck" of less than 0.5 mm2. The samples were randomly divided into 12 groups (n=11). The control groups were not submitted to the bleaching regimen. Specimens were treated with 10% CPG gel or with 10% CPG formulations containing CF (0.2% and 0.5%) or CCa (0.05% and 0.2%). Bleached groups received the application of the 10% CPGs for 6 hours/day at 37° C, during 14 consecutive days and were stored in artificial saliva (AS) or 100% relative humidity (RH) among each application. After bleaching, specimens were tested with the microtensile method at 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (5%). Results: No significant difference was observed between groups stored in AS or RH. Specimens treated with CF or CCa presented similar UTS as unbleached control groups. Conclusion: Either 10% CPG formulations containing CF or CCa can preserve the UTS after bleaching regimen. PMID:19089036

Giannini, Marcelo; Silva, Alessandra Peres; Cavalli, Vanessa; Leme, Adriana Franco Paes

2006-01-01

213

Unique metallic glass formability and ultra-high tensile strength in Al-Ni-Fe-Gd alloys  

SciTech Connect

The metallic glass formability of aluminum-rich Al-Ni-Fe-Gd alloys has been systematically investigated. The critical cooling rate required to form an amorphous state in this system is generally low, and comparable to that of some of the best metallic glass formers, such as Pd-Cu-Si. Amorphous ribbons up to 0.25 mm thick can easily be produced by the single-roller melt-spinning technique. Tensile strengths as high as 1280 MPa and Young's modulus of 75 GPa have been obtained. Bulk amorphous alloys with good mechanical properties are optimized in Al[sub 85]Ni[sub 6]Fe[sub 3]Gd[sub 6]. DSC and DTA studies reveal that the glass formability is unique for Al-based alloys because the reduced glass temperature T[sub rg] for Al-Ni-Fe-Gd can be as low as 0.44. This is much lower than conventional theory would suggest for easy glass forming systems. A mechanism for the unusual glass formability is suggested.

He, Y.; Poon, S.J. (Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Physics); Dougherty, G.M.; Shiflet, G.J. (Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science)

1993-02-01

214

The effects of recycling on the tensile bond strength of new and clinically used stainless steel orthodontic brackets: an in vitro study.  

PubMed

The tensile bond strength was evaluated for three different types of stainless steel orthodontic bracket/base combinations (both cast and machined integral bases, and a foil-mesh base). The cast base gave a significantly higher initial bond strength than the other two brackets. Following recycling by either chemical or thermal methods, all the bases demonstrated a significant reduction in bond strength. However, thermal recycling produced an unacceptably large reduction in the bond strength of the cast base and this method of reconditioning should be avoided with these brackets. Recycling the brackets an additional four times was found to result in a further reduction in bond strength, but this was not statistically significant. Clinically used brackets demonstrated a slightly lower, though not statistically significant, bond strength compared to unused brackets following one recycling with either the chemical or thermal method. PMID:2192762

Regan, D; van Noort, R; O'Keeffe, C

1990-05-01

215

Influence Of Holes On The In-Plane Tensile Strength And Fatigue Durability Of A NICALON(Trademark)/Si-N-C Ceramic Matrix Composite  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Effects of different sizes of holes as well as different percentages of open areas on the in-plane tensile strength and fatigue durability of the SiC/Si-N-C composite were investigated in this study. Test specimens with no holes, four different diameters of holes (1.0 to 3.2 mm), and four different open areas (20 to 35%) were machined. All mechanical testing was performed in air at a temperature of 910 C. Fatigue tests were conducted with a load ratio, R = 0.05, and a frequency of 0.33 Hz. In general, both the in-plane tensile strength of the composite and its fatigue durability decreased with an increase in the size of the hole and percentage of the open area. Reductions in the in-plane tensile strength and cyclic fatigue life of the composite were described by empirical equations with the diameter of the hole and the percent open area as the independent variables. The validity of these two empirical equations was verified with additional tensile and fatigue test data generated on the composite specimens.

Kalluri, Sreeramesh; Verrilli, Michael J.

2003-01-01

216

To evaluate and compare the effect of different Post Surface treatments on the Tensile Bond Strength between Fiber Posts and Composite Resin.  

PubMed Central

Background: Fiber posts are widely used for restoration of mutilated teeth that lack adequate coronal tooth structure to retain a core for definitive restoration, bond between the fiber post and composite material depends upon the chemical reaction between the post surface and the resin material used for building up the core. In attempt to maximize the resin bonding with fiber post, different post surface conditioning is advocated. Therefore the purpose of the study is to examine the interfacial strength between fiber post and composite, as core build-up material after different surface treatments of fiber posts. Materials & Methods:Twenty fiber posts were split into four groups off five each according to different surface treatments viz. Group I-(Negative Control), Group II-Silanization (Positive control), Group III-(37% Phosphoric Acid & Silanization) ,Group IV- (10% Hydrogen Peroxide and Silanization). With the preformed plastic mould, a core of dual cure composite resin around the fiber post having the uniform thickness was created. Tensile bond strength of each specimen was measured under Universal Testing Machine (UTM) at the cross head speed of 3mm/min. Results: The results achieved with 10% Hydrogen peroxide had a marked effect on micro tensile bond strength values between the tested materials. Conclusion: Immense enhancement in the silanization efficiency of quartz fiber phase was observed with different surface chemical treatment of the resin phase of fiber posts with the marked increase in the micro-tensile bond strength between fiber post and composite core. How to cite this article: Shori D, Pandey S, Kubde R, Rathod Y, Atara R, Rathi S. To evaluate and compare the effect of different Post Surface treatments on the Tensile Bond Strength between Fiber Posts and Composite Resin. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(5):27-32. PMID:24324301

Shori, Deepa; Pandey, Swapnil; Kubde, Rajesh; Rathod, Yogesh; Atara, Rahul; Rathi, Shravan

2013-01-01

217

Molecular-Level Study of the Effect of Prior Axial Compression/Torsion on the Axial-Tensile Strength of PPTA Fibers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A comprehensive all-atom molecular-level computational investigation is carried out in order to identify and quantify: (i) the effect of prior longitudinal-compressive or axial-torsional loading on the longitudinal-tensile behavior of p-phenylene terephthalamide (PPTA) fibrils/fibers; and (ii) the role various microstructural/topological defects play in affecting this behavior. Experimental and computational results available in the relevant open literature were utilized to construct various defects within the molecular-level model and to assign the concentration to these defects consistent with the values generally encountered under "prototypical" PPTA-polymer synthesis and fiber fabrication conditions. When quantifying the effect of the prior longitudinal-compressive/axial-torsional loading on the longitudinal-tensile behavior of PPTA fibrils, the stochastic nature of the size/potency of these defects was taken into account. The results obtained revealed that: (a) due to the stochastic nature of the defect type, concentration/number density and size/potency, the PPTA fibril/fiber longitudinal-tensile strength is a statistical quantity possessing a characteristic probability density function; (b) application of the prior axial compression or axial torsion to the PPTA imperfect single-crystalline fibrils degrades their longitudinal-tensile strength and only slightly modifies the associated probability density function; and (c) introduction of the fibril/fiber interfaces into the computational analyses showed that prior axial torsion can induce major changes in the material microstructure, causing significant reductions in the PPTA-fiber longitudinal-tensile strength and appreciable changes in the associated probability density function.

Grujicic, M.; Yavari, R.; Ramaswami, S.; Snipes, J. S.; Yen, C.-F.; Cheeseman, B. A.

2013-11-01

218

Ab initio study of the ideal tensile strength and mechanical stability of transition-metal disilicides M. Friak,1,2  

E-print Network

diamond,26,27 Si,27,28 Ge,27 TiN and HfC,15 iron,29­31 Mo and Nb,32 and -Si3N4.33 Some calculations have­38 and interfaces.39 The calculations of ideal tensile strength for Al,40 AlN,40,41 -Si3N4,42 c-Si3N4

Vitek, Vaclav

219

Hair Regrowth and Increased Hair Tensile Strength Using the HairMax LaserComb for Low-Level Laser Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors wished to confirm the efficacy of low level laser therapy (LLLT) using a Hair- Max LaserComb for the stimulation of hair growth and also to determine what effect LLLT with this device had on the tensile strength of hair. Thirty-five patients, 28 males and 7 fe- males, with androgenetic alopecia (AGA) underwent treatment for a six-month period. Both

John L. Satino; Michael Markou

2003-01-01

220

Computer-aided prediction of the Al 2 O 3 nanoparticles’ effects on tensile strength and percentage of water absorption of concrete specimens  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the present paper, two models based on artificial neural networks and genetic programming for predicting split tensile\\u000a strength and percentage of water absorption of concretes containing Al2O3 nanoparticles have been developed at different ages of curing. For purpose of building these models, training and testing\\u000a using experimental results for 144 specimens produced with 16 different mixture proportions were conducted.

Ali Nazari; Shadi Riahi

221

In Vitro Comparison of Compressive and Tensile Strengths ofAcrylic Resins Reinforced by Silver Nanoparticles at 2% and0.2% Concentrations  

PubMed Central

Background and aims. Polymethyl methacrylate, PMMA, is widely used in prosthodontics for fabrication of removable prostheses. This study was undertaken to investigate the effect of adding silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) to PMMA at 2% and 0.2% concentrations on compressive and tensile strengths of PMMA. Materials and methods. The silver nanoparticles were mixed with heat-cured acrylic resin in an amalgamator in two groups at 0.2 and 2 wt% of AgNPs. Eighteen 2×20×200-mm samples were prepared for tensile strength test, 12 samples containing silver nanoparticle and 6 samples for the control group. Another 18 cylindrical 25×38-mm samples were prepared for compressive strength test. Scanning electron microscopy was used to verify homogeneous distribution of particles. The powder was manually mixed with a resin monomer and then the mixture was properly blended. Before curing, the paste was packed into steel molds. After curing, the specimens were removed from the molds. One-way ANOVA was used for statistical analysis, followed by multiple comparison test (Scheffé’s test). Results. This study showed that the mean compressive strength of PMMA reinforced with AgNPs was significantly higher than that of the unmodified PMMA (P<0.05). It was not statistically different between the two groups reinforced with AgNPs. The tensile strength was not significantly different between the 0.2% group and unmodified PMMA and it de-creased significantly after incorporation of 2% AgNPs (P<0.05). Conclusion. Based on the results and the desirable effect of nanoparticles of silver on improvement of compressive strength of PMMA, use of this material with proper concentration in the palatal area of maxillary acrylic resin dentures is recommended. PMID:25587381

Ghaffari, Tahereh; Hamedirad, Fahimeh; Ezzati, Baharak

2014-01-01

222

????????????????????????????????????????????????? ?????????????????????????????? ????????????????????????????????????????????????????? Effects of carboxymethylcellulose on tensile strength, water vapor transmission rate and oil resistance of mung bean protein-based films  

Microsoft Academic Search

????????: ??????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????? ?????????? ????????????????????????????????????????????? ??????????????????????????????????????? ????? (0, 0.1, 0.3 ??? 0.5% ?????????????????????????????) ?????????????????????????? ???????????????????????????????????????????????????????? 30:70 ??????????? (?????????\\/?????? ?????????) ?????????????????????????? 85 ????????????? ???????? 25 ???? ????????????????????? ???? 225 ?????????????? ????????????????????????????? 60 ???????????? ?????????????? 10 ??????? ????????????????????????????????????? ????????????????????????????????????? 480 ??????? ??????????????????????????????????????????????????????? ????????????????????????????????? ??? ?????????????????????????????????????????? Abstract : The objective of this research was to investigate the effects of addition of carboxymethylcellulose on tensile

Nathamol Chindapan; Soonthorn Somsuai

223

Effects of pulsed Nd:YAG laser on tensile bond strength and caries resistance of human enamel.  

PubMed

This study aims to evaluate the effects of pulsed Nd:YAG laser on the tensile bond strength (TBS) of resin to human enamel and caries resistance of human enamel. A total of 201 human premolars were used in this in vitro study. A flat enamel surface greater than 4 × 4 mm in area was prepared on each specimen using a low-speed cutting machine under a water coolant. Twenty-one specimens were divided into seven groups for morphology observations with no treatment, 35% phosphoric acid etching (30 seconds), and laser irradiation (30 seconds) of pulsed Nd:YAG laser with five different laser-parameter combinations. Another 100 specimens were used for TBS testing. They were embedded in self-cured acrylic resin and randomly divided into 10 groups. After enamel surface pretreatments according to the group design, resin was applied. The TBS values were tested using a universal testing machine. The other 80 specimens were randomly divided into eight groups for acid resistance evaluation. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) results showed that the enamel surfaces treated with 1.5 W/20 Hz and 2.0 W/20 Hz showed more etching-like appearance than those with other laser-parameter combinations. The laser-parameter combinations of 1.5 W/15 Hz and 1.5 W/20 Hz were found to be efficient for the TBS test. The mean TBS value of 14.45 ± 1.67 MPa in the laser irradiated group was significantly higher than that in the untreated group (3.48 ± 0.35 MPa) but lower than that in the 35% phosphoric acid group (21.50 ± 3.02 MPa). The highest mean TBS value of 26.64 ± 5.22 MPa was identified in the combination group (laser irradiation and then acid etching). Acid resistance evaluation showed that the pulsed Nd:YAG laser was efficient in preventing enamel demineralization. The SEM results of the fractured enamel surfaces, resin/enamel interfaces, and demineralization depths were consistent with those of the TBS test and the acid resistance evaluation. Pulsed Nd:YAG laser as an enamel surface pretreatment method presents a potential clinical application, especially for the caries-susceptible population or individuals with recently bleached teeth. PMID:23919623

Wen, X; Zhang, L; Liu, R; Deng, M; Wang, Y; Liu, L; Nie, X

2014-01-01

224

An in vitro Comparative Evaluation of Micro Tensile Bond Strength of Two metal bonding Resin Cements bonded to Cobalt Chromium alloy  

PubMed Central

Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the micro tensile bond strength of two metal bonding resin cements to sandblasted cobalt chromium alloy. Materials & Methods: Eight, Cobalt chromium alloy blocks of dimensions 10x5x5 mm were cast, finished and polished. One of the faces of each alloy block measuring 5x5mm was sandblasted with 50 ?m grit alumina particles. The alloy blocks were then cleaned in an ultrasonic cleaner for 1 min and then air dried with an air stream. The Sandblasted surfaces of the two alloy blocks were bonded together with 2 different metal bonding resin systems (Panavia F Kuraray and DTK Kleber – Bredent). The samples were divided into 2 groups (n=4). Group 1- Two Co-Cr blocks were luted with Panavia cement. Group 2- Two Co-Cr blocks were luted with DTK Kleber-Bredent cement. The bonded samples were cut with a diamond saw to prepare Microtensile bars of approximately 1mm x 1mm x 6mm. Thirty bars from each group were randomly separated into 2 subgroups (n=15) and left for 3hrs (baseline) as per manufacturer's instructions while the other group was aged for 24hrs in 370C water, prior to loading to failure under tension at a cross head speed of 1mm/min. Failure modes were determined by means of stereomicroscopy (sm). Statistical analysis was performed through one way – ANOVA. Results: Significant variation in micro-tensile bond strength was observed between the two metal bonding resin systems. Conclusion: DTK showed higher mean bond strength values than Panavia F cement both at baseline and after aging. How to cite this article: Musani S, Musani I, Dugal R, Habbu N, Madanshetty P, Virani D. An in vitro Comparative Evaluation of Micro Tensile Bond Strength of Two metal bonding Resin Cements bonded to Cobalt Chromium alloy. J Int Oral Health 2013;5(5):73-8. PMID:24324308

Musani, Smita; Musani, Iqbal; Dugal, Ramandeep; Habbu, Nitin; Madanshetty, Pallavi; Virani, Danish

2013-01-01

225

Effects of surface treatments and storage times on the tensile bond strength of adhesive cements to noble and base metal alloys.  

PubMed

This work evaluated two resin cements and a glass-ionomer cement and their bond strength to gold-palladium (Au-Pd), silver-palladium (Ag-Pd), and nickel-chromium-beryllium (Ni-Cr-Be) alloys, utilizing three surface treatments over a period of six months. Eight hundred ten pieces were cast (in a button shape flat surfaces) in one of three alloys. Each alloy group was assigned to three other groups, based on the surface treatment utilized. Specimens were fabricated by bonding similar buttons in using one of three adhesive cements. The 405 pairs were thermocycled and stored in saline solution (0.9% NaCl) at 37 degrees C. The tensile bond strengths were measured in a universal testing machine after storage times of 2, 90, or 180 days. The highest mean bond strength value was obtained with the base metal alloy (10.9 +/- 8.6 MPa). In terms of surface treatment, oxidation resulted in the highest mean bond strength (13.7 +/- 7.3 MPa), followed by sandblasting (10.3 +/- 5.5 MPa) and polishing (3.0 +/- 6.4 MPa). Panavia Ex (13.2 +/- 9.3 MPa) showed significantly higher bond strengths than the other two cements, although the storage time reduced all bond strengths significantly. PMID:18348374

Burmann, Paulo Afonso; Santos, Jose Fortunato Ferreira; May, Liliana Gressler; Pereira, Joao Eduardo da Silva; Cardoso, Paulo Eduardo Capel

2008-01-01

226

Root tensile strength of grey alder and mountain maple grown on a coarse grained eco-engineered slope in the Swiss Alps related to wood anatomical features  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Steep, vegetation free slopes are a common feature in alpine areas. The material covering these slopes is prone to all kind of erosional processes, resulting in a high risk potential for population and infrastructure. This risk potential is likely to increase with the predicted change in the spatiotemporal distribution of precipitation events. A potential increase in extreme precipitation events will also result in a higher magnitude and frequency of erosional processes. In the Swiss Alps as in many other mountainous areas, there is a need to stabilize these slopes to reduce their direct or indirect hazard potential. In this regard, eco-engineering is a very promising and sustainable approach for slope stabilization. Planting trees and shrubs is a central task in eco-engineering. A developing vegetation cover will on one hand reduce the mechanical effects of rainfall by an increased interception, on the other hand, the root systems cause modifications of soil properties. Roots not only provide anchorage for the plants, they also promote soil aggregation and are able to penetrate possible shear horizons. Overall, anchorage of plants is at the same extend also stabilizing the near subsurface. When rainfall occurs, the saturated soil exerts downhill pressure to a tree or shrub. As long as the root distribution supports anchorage, the respective slope area remains stable. At this point, the tensile strength of the roots is a critical measure, because it is more likely that the supporting roots break than the entire root system being pulled out of the soil completely. As a consequence, root tensile strength is an important parameter in characterizing the soil stabilization potential of trees and shrubs. It is known that tree roots show a high variability in their anatomical structure depending on their depth below soil surface as well as their distance to the main stem. Therefore, we assume that these structural changes affect the tensile strength of every single root. In order to confirm this assumption and possibly find more important root properties which have an influence on soil stabilization, the root systems of seven trees (three grey alder, four mountain maple) were excavated and analyzed. The study site is a catchment, where shallow landslides are common. It is located in the Prättigau valley in the Eastern Swiss Alps and was eco-engineered in 1997. The substrate is coarse-grained morainic material, mean annual air temperature reaches 4.64°C, average precipitation is 1170 mm, and the altitude is about 1000 m a.s.l.. The root system of each tree was uncovered carefully by hand to keep the roots undamaged, before removal it was photographed in situ to document the root distribution. The root systems were then cut into single root pieces of about 20 cm length and the position of each sample was documented. The root samples were then hierarchically classified in several root classes. The tensile strength of more than 500 samples was determined. In addition, the values for age, diameter, and root moisture were ascertained. Since it was assumed, that the cellular structure of the roots has an influence on the tensile strength, two microscopic thin-sections were prepared from all successfully tested root samples. The microscopic analysis focused on anatomical parameters such as the size and number of vessels, their distribution as well as their conductivity. The results for the final correlation between the anatomical characteristics and the root's tensile strength are presented for both tree species.

Kink, Dimitri; Bast, Alexander; Meyer, Christine; Meier, Wolfgang; Egli, Markus; Gärtner, Holger

2014-05-01

227

Influence of solid-state interfacial reactions on the tensile strength of Cu\\/electroless Ni–P\\/Sn–3.5Ag solder joint  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tensile strength and fracture behavior of Cu\\/electroless Ni–P\\/Sn–3.5Ag (wt.% Ag) solder joint were investigated under high-temperature solid-state aging. The aging results showed that the Ni3Sn4 intermetallic phase grows at the electroless Ni–P\\/Sn–3.5Ag interface, along with the transformation of the underlying electroless Ni–P layer into Ni3P compound. However, after complete consumption of the electroless Ni–P layer, a ternary Ni–Sn–P compound also

Aditya Kumar; Zhong Chen

2006-01-01

228

Diametric gene-dosage effects as windows into neurogenetic architecture  

E-print Network

-scale phenomic study. I first review the range of gene-dosage effects on neurological phenotypesDiametric gene-dosage effects as windows into neurogenetic architecture Bernard Crespi Gene diametric changes in gene dosage influence neurological development and function? Recent studies

Crespi, Bernard J.

229

Data Qualification and Data Summary Report: Intact Rock Properties Data on Tensile Strength, Schmidt Hammer Rebound Hardness, and Rock Triaxial Creep  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a systematic review of the available data in the TDMS that are relevant to the following intact rock properties: rock tensile strength, Schmidt hammer rebound hardness, and rock triaxial creep. Relevant data are compiled from qualified and unqualified sources into the summary DTNs and these DTNs are evaluated for qualification using the method of corroborating data as defined in AP-SIII.2Q, ''Qualification of Unqualified Data''. This report also presents a summary of the compiled information in the form of descriptive statistics and recommended values that will be contained in a Reference Information Base (RIB) item prepared in accordance with AP-SIII.4Q, ''Development, Review, Online Placement, and Maintenance of Individual Reference Information Base Data Items''. The primary purpose of this report is to produce qualified sets of data that include all relevant intact rock tensile strength, Schmidt hammer rebound hardness, and rock triaxial creep testing done over the course of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). A second purpose is to provide a qualified summary (i.e., a RIB data item) of the test results using descriptive statistics. The immediate purpose of the report is to support the data needs of repository design; however, the products are designed to be appropriate for general use by the YMP. The appropriateness and limitations, if any, of the data, with respect to the intended use, are addressed in this report.

E.M. Cikanek; R.J. Blakely; T.A. Grant; L.E. Safley

2003-07-29

230

Compressive and tensile failure at high fluid pressure where preexisting fractures have cohesive strength, with application to the San Andreas fault  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In thrusting and strike-slip situations, when the maximum principal horizontal stress S1 acts nearly normal to a fault (a misoriented fault, such as the San Andreas), pore-fluid pressure > the lithostatic load, Pf > Sv, is required to reactivate movement on that fault. Pf > Sv may be achieved without causing hydraulic tensile fracturing if (1) previously existing cracks have regained cohesive strength by chemical processes, (2) subcritical crack growth has been blunted, and (3) the least principal horizontal stress S3 nearly equals Sv. Where Pf > Sv has been attained within a misaligned fault, increasing the stress difference (S1 - S3) at constant Pf > Sv will not lead to shear failure, while a decrease in (S1 - S3) can lead to shear failure of that fault. However, where the cohesive strength of material in a broad misaligned fault zone is less than that of the surrounding intact rock, increasing (S1 - S3) while Pf > Sv can result in shear failure of fractures at near optimum angles to S1, but confined within this weak fault zone. If this faulting results in the local short-lived attainment of Pf > Sv (cataclastic deformation and frictional heating overcoming dilation) and a simultaneous decrease in (S1 - S3), this combination of effects can trigger movement along the main trace of the misaligned fault. When increasing Pf results in hydraulic failure, anisotropy in tensile strength or fracture toughness resulting from foliation within faults allows fractures to propagate along the planes of weakness rather than across the foliation perpendicular to S3.

Fournier, R.O.

1996-01-01

231

Tensile bond strength of different adhesive systems to primary dentin treated by Er:YAG laser and conventional high-speed drill  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The aim of this study was to evaluate the tensile strength of different adhesive systems to primary tooth dentin prepared by high-speed drill and Er:YAG laser (2.94?m). Buccal surfaces of 38 primary canines were ground and flattened with sand paper disks (#120-600 grit) and distributed into five groups (n=15): G1: diamond bur in high-speed drill (HD)+ 35% phosphoric acid (PA)+Single Bond (SB); G2: HD+self-etching One Up Bond F (OUB);G3: Er:YAG laser (KaVo 3- LELO-FOUSP)(4Hz, 80mJ, 25,72J/cm2) (L)+PA+SB, G4: L+SB, G5: L+OUB. The inverted truncated cone samples built with Z-100 composite resin after storage in water (37°C/24h) were submitted to tensile bond strength test on Mini Instron 4442 (0.5mm/min, 500N). The data were analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey Test (p<0.05). The mean (MPa) were: G1-3.18(+/-1.24) G2-1.79(+/-0.73) G3-3.17(+/-0.44) G4-8.29(+/-1.86) G5-7.11(+/-2.07). The data analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey Test showed that Laser associated with PA+SB, SB or OUB lead to increased bonding values when compared to HD+PA+SB and HD+OUB (p=0.000), L+SB showed higher values than L+PA+SB and L+OUB (p=0.0311). Er:YAG laser radiation promoted significant increase of bond strength of different adhesive systems evaluated in the dentin of primary teeth.

Marques, Barbara A.; Navarro, Ricardo S.; Silvestre, Fellipe D.; Pinheiro, Sergio L.; Freitas, Patricia M.; Imparato, Jose Carlos P.; Oda, Margareth

2005-03-01

232

Prediction of tensile strength of friction stir welded aluminium matrix TiC p particulate reinforced composite  

Microsoft Academic Search

The usage of particulate reinforced metal matrix composite (MMC) is steadily increasing due to its properties such as high specific strength, high specific modulus and good wear resistance. Aluminium matrix composite (AMC) plays an important role to meet the above requirements. Effective utilization of AMC is based on not only its production but also on fabrication methods. Among AMCs, those

S. Gopalakrishnan; N. Murugan

2011-01-01

233

Time/Temperature Dependent Tensile Strength of SiC and Al2O3-Based Fibers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In order to understand and model the thermomechanical behavior of fiber-reinforced composites, stress-rupture, fast-fracture, and warm-up rupture studies were conducted on various advanced SiC and Al2O3-based fibers in the,temperature range from 20 to 1400 C in air as well as in inert environments. The measured stress-rupture, fast fracture, and warm-up rupture strengths were correlated into a single master time/temperature-dependent strength plot for each fiber type using thermal activation and slow crack growth theories. It is shown that these plots are useful for comparing and selecting fibers for CMC and MMC reinforcement and that, in comparison to stress rupture tests, the fast-fracture and warm-up tests can be used for rapid generation of these plots.

Yun, Hee Mann; DiCarlo, James A.

1997-01-01

234

Investigation of the C-ring test for measuring hoop tensile strength of nuclear grade ceramic composites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Silicon carbide (SiC) and silicon carbide fiber reinforced composites (SiC/SiCf) are currently being evaluated as a high temperature material for use in nuclear reactors. While methods to determine the mechanical properties of SiC/SiCf on planar test specimens are well established, mechanical testing methods for tubular SiC/SiCf are still being developed. In this study the C-ring test is evaluated for use with nuclear grade SiC/SiCf as a method of measuring hoop strength. For the samples tested in this work, hoop strengths from C-ring testing are shown to agree within 6% to those obtained using expanding plug testing and analysis shows that the expected composite behavior is observed during testing. While other techniques may give more accurate values for hoop stress, the small specimen requirements and ease of testing makes C-ring testing a valuable tool.

Jacobsen, G. M.; Stone, J. D.; Khalifa, H. E.; Deck, C. P.; Back, C. A.

2014-09-01

235

In-Situ Observations on the Fracture Mechanism of Diffusion-Alloyed Ni-Containing Powder Metal Steels and a Proposed Method for Tensile Strength Improvement  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The mechanical properties of Ni-containing powder metal (PM) steels are usually inferior to those of their wrought counterparts. The main problem is attributed to the non-uniform Ni distribution, in addition to the problems caused by porosity. The effects of this non-uniform alloying on the mechanical properties were investigated in this study using mini tensile bars that were made of diffusion-alloyed FD-0405 (Fe-4Ni-1.5Cu-0.5Mo-0.5C) powders. In-situ observations under a scanning electron microscope (SEM) were carried out during the tensile testing. The results indicated that the soft Ni-rich/C-lean area around the pore, which was identified as ferrite using electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) analysis, was responsible for the failures. By adding Cr in the form of prealloyed powders, the distribution of Ni and C became more uniform, and the Ni-rich/C-lean ferrite was replaced by bainite and martensite. After sintering at 1250 °C for 1 hour, the tensile strength of the Fe-4Ni-1.5Cr-0.2Mo-0.5C and Fe-4Ni-3Cr-0.5Mo-0.5C reached 1178 and 1323 MPa, respectively, without employing any accelerated cooling system. These properties are higher than all those reported to date in the literature for sinter-hardened PM alloys that were rapidly cooled after sintering. This significant improvement was attributed to the homogeneous alloying, particularly due to the reduction of the repelling effect between Ni and C, as was explained through the thermodynamics analysis using the Thermo-Calc program.

Wu, M. W.; Hwang, K. S.; Huang, H. S.

2007-07-01

236

Tensile strength of acrylic plastics (PPM) in the presence of a temperature gradient over the thickness of the material  

Microsoft Academic Search

Experimental values of the strength and deformation are presented for SO-95, SO-120, and SO-140 acrylic plastics (polymethyl methacrylate: plasticized, unplasticized, and copolymer) stressed in unaxial tension at v=10 mm\\/min, stationary temperature gradients of from 2.5 to 17.5 deg\\/mm over the thickness of the material, and a constant cold-face temperature of 25°C. The deformation properties under these conditions are described: in

B. I. Panshin; V. D. Kasyuk

1969-01-01

237

Mechanical Strength and Failure Characteristics of Cast Mg-9 pctAl-1 pctZn Alloys Produced by a Heated-Mold Continuous Casting Process: Tensile Properties  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The mechanical properties and failure characteristics of a cast Mg alloy (AZ91: Mg-Al8.9-Zn0.6-Mn0.2) produced by a heated-mold continuous casting process (HMC) are investigated. In a modification of the original HMC process, the cooling of the liquid alloy by direct water spray is carried out in an atmosphere of high-purity argon gas. The HMC-AZ91 alloy exhibits excellent mechanical properties (high strength and high ductility) that are about twice as high as those for the same alloy produced by conventional gravity casting. The increased material strength and ductility of the HMC sample are attributed to nanoscale and microscale microstructural characteristics. The fine grains and tiny spherical eutectic structures ( e.g., Mg17Al12 and Al6Mn) distributed randomly in the matrix of the HMC alloy result in resistance to dislocation movement, leading to high tensile strength. Basal slip on (0001) planes in the relatively organized crystal orientation of the HMC alloy, as well as grain boundary sliding through tiny spherical eutectic structures, results in high ductility. Details of the failure mechanism under static loading in the HMC alloy are also discussed using failure models.

Okayasu, Mitsuhiro; Takeuchi, Shuhei; Ohfuji, Hiroaki

2014-11-01

238

Rock tests in nonuniform fields of tensile stresses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents experimental data on the strength of samples tested for bending and diametrically compressed core-shaped samples with a central hole. The obtained strengths of the samples are compared with the strength of samples under uniaxial tension using nonlocal strength criteria. It is shown that the calculated and measured strengths of the rock samples are in good agreement with each other when using a common approach to strength evaluation based on the Neuber-Novozhilov integral fracture criterion.

Efimov, V. P.

2013-09-01

239

Simultaneous determination of the impurity and radial tensile strength of reduced glutathione tablets by a high selective NIR-PLS method  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper establishes a high-throughput and high selective method to determine the impurity named oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and radial tensile strength (RTS) of reduced glutathione (GSH) tablets based on near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy and partial least squares (PLS). In order to build and evaluate the calibration models, the NIR diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS) and transmittance spectra (TS) for 330 GSH tablets were accurately measured by using the optimized parameter values. For analyzing GSSG or RTS of GSH tablets, the NIR-DRS or NIR-TS were selected, subdivided reasonably into calibration and prediction sets, and processed appropriately with chemometric techniques. After selecting spectral sub-ranges and neglecting spectrum outliers, the PLS calibration models were built and the factor numbers were optimized. Then, the PLS models were evaluated by the root mean square errors of calibration (RMSEC), cross-validation (RMSECV) and prediction (RMSEP), and by the correlation coefficients of calibration (Rc) and prediction (Rp). The results indicate that the proposed models have good performances. It is thus clear that the NIR-PLS can simultaneously, selectively, nondestructively and rapidly analyze the GSSG and RTS of GSH tablets, although the contents of GSSG impurity were quite low while those of GSH active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) quite high. This strategy can be an important complement to the common NIR methods used in the on-line analysis of API in pharmaceutical preparations. And this work expands the NIR applications in the high-throughput and extraordinarily selective analysis.

Li, Juan; Jiang, Yue; Fan, Qi; Chen, Yang; Wu, Ruanqi

240

Effect of Stand-Off Height on Microstructure and Tensile Strength of the Cu/Sn9Zn/Cu Solder Joint  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To investigate the effect of stand-off height (SOH) on the microstructure and mechanical behavior of certain solder joints, Cu/Sn9Zn/Cu solder joints with a SOH of 100 ?m, 50 ?m, 20 ?m, and 10 ?m were prepared and studied. It was found that, as the SOH is reduced, the Zn content in the solder bulk experiences a rapid decrease due to consumption by metallurgical reaction in the reflow process; hence, the microstructure of the solder bulk is changed significantly from a Sn-Zn eutectic structure to a hypoeutectic structure. By contrast, Cu content in the solder bulk experiences a rapid increase with reducing SOH, and this leads to more dissociative intermetallic compounds (IMCs) in the solder bulk. These compositional and microstructural changes induced by reducing the SOH correlate closely with the mechanical properties of the solder joints. In our study it is found that, as SOH is reduced, the tensile strength of the solder joints decreases, the fracture path of the solder joint transfers from the solder bulk into the interface between the IMC layer and the solder bulk, and the fracture mode tends to change from ductile to brittle. These findings point to a probable way to improve the mechanical properties of miniaturized solder joints by controlling the composition and dissociative IMCs in the solder bulk.

Wu, Fengshun; Wang, Bo; Du, Bin; An, Bing; Wu, Yiping

2009-06-01

241

Can extended photoactivation time of resin-based fissure sealer materials improve ultimate tensile strength and decrease water sorption/solubility?  

PubMed Central

Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the impact of extended photoactivation time on ultimate tensile strength (UTS), water sorption (WS) and solubility (WSB) of resin-based materials used as fissure-sealants. Methods: A fissure-sealant (Fluroshield) and a flowable composite (Permaflo) polymerized for 20 and 60 seconds were tested. For UTS, 20 hourglass shaped samples were prepared representing two materials and two photoactivation time (n=5). After 24-h dry-storage, samples were tested in tension using a universal testing machine at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min (UTS was calculated in MPa). For WS and WSB, 20 disks with 5 mm diameter and 1 mm height (n=5) were prepared and volumes were calculated (mm3). They were transferred to desiccators until a constant mass was obtained (m1) and were subsequently immersed in distilled water until no alteration in mass was detected (m2). Samples were reconditioned to constant mass in desiccators (m3). WS and WSB were determined using the equations m2-m3/V and m1-m3/V, respectively. Data were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Tukey’s HSD test (P<.05). Results: There was no significant difference between materials or photoactivation times for the UTS and WS. Permaflo presented lower but negative WSB compared to Fluroshield. Conclusions: Extended photoactivation time did not improve the physical properties tested. Fluroshield presented physical properties that were similar to or better than Permaflo. PMID:23077420

Borges, Boniek Castillo Dutra; Souza-Júnior, Eduardo José; Catelan, Anderson; Paulillo, Luís Alexandre Maffei Sartini; Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio

2012-01-01

242

High-strain rate tensile characterization of graphite platelet reinforced vinyl ester based nanocomposites using split-Hopkinson pressure bar  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The dynamic response of exfoliated graphite nanoplatelet (xGnP) reinforced and carboxyl terminated butadiene nitrile (CTBN) toughened vinyl ester based nanocomposites are characterized under both dynamic tensile and compressive loading. Dynamic direct tensile tests are performed applying the reverse impact Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) technique. The specimen geometry for tensile test is parametrically optimized by Finite Element Analysis (FEA) using ANSYS Mechanical APDLRTM. Uniform stress distribution within the specimen gage length has been verified using high-speed digital photography. The on-specimen strain gage installation is substituted by a non-contact Laser Occlusion Expansion Gage (LOEG) technique for infinitesimal dynamic tensile strain measurements. Due to very low transmitted pulse signal, an alternative approach based on incident pulse is applied for obtaining the stress-time history. Indirect tensile tests are also performed combining the conventional SHPB technique with Brazilian disk test method for evaluating cylindrical disk specimens. The cylindrical disk specimen is held snugly in between two concave end fixtures attached to the incident and transmission bars. Indirect tensile stress is estimated from the SHPB pulses, and diametrical transverse tensile strain is measured using LOEG. Failure diagnosis using high-speed digital photography validates the viability of utilizing this indirect test method for characterizing the tensile properties of the candidate vinyl ester based nanocomposite system. Also, quasi-static indirect tensile response agrees with previous investigations conducted using the traditional dog-bone specimen in quasi-static direct tensile tests. Investigation of both quasi-static and dynamic indirect tensile test responses show the strain rate effect on the tensile strength and energy absorbing capacity of the candidate materials. Finally, the conventional compressive SHPB tests are performed. It is observed that both strength and energy absorbing capacity of these candidate material systems are distinctively less under dynamic tension than under compressive loading. Nano-reinforcement appears to marginally improve these properties for pure vinyl ester under dynamic tension, although it is found to be detrimental under dynamic compression.

Pramanik, Brahmananda

243

Psychosis and autism as diametrical disorders of the social brain  

E-print Network

Psychosis and autism as diametrical disorders of the social brain Bernard Crespi Killam Research-correlated, in that autism involves a general pattern of constrained overgrowth, whereas schizophrenia involves undergrowth of autistic-spectrum and psychotic-spectrum conditions. Keywords: autism, cognition, genomic conflict, genomic

Haig, David

244

Evaluation of nondestructive tensile testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The results of a series of experiments performed in the evaluation of nondestructive tensile testing of chip and wire bonds are presented. Semiconductor devices were subjected to time-temperature excursions, static-load life testing and multiple pre-stressing loads to determine the feasibility of a nondestructive tensile testing approach. The report emphasizes the importance of the breaking angle in determining the ultimate tensile strength of a wire bond, a factor not generally recognized nor implemented in such determinations.

Bowe, J. J.; Polcari, S. M.

1971-01-01

245

Optical diametric drive acceleration through action-reaction symmetry breaking  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Newton's third law of motion is one of the pillars of classical physics. This fundamental principle states that the forces two bodies exert on each other are equal and opposite. Had the resulting accelerations been oriented in the same direction, this would have instead led to a counterintuitive phenomenon, that of diametric drive. In such a hypothetical arrangement, two interacting particles constantly accelerate each other in the same direction through a violation of the action-reaction symmetry. Although in classical mechanics any realization of this process requires one of the two particles to have a negative mass and hence is strictly forbidden, it could nevertheless be feasible in periodic structures where the effective mass can also attain a negative sign. Here we report the first experimental observation of such diametric drive acceleration for pulses propagating in a nonlinear optical mesh lattice. The demonstrated reversal of action-reaction symmetry could enable altogether new possibilities for frequency conversion and pulse-steering applications.

Wimmer, Martin; Regensburger, Alois; Bersch, Christoph; Miri, Mohammad-Ali; Batz, Sascha; Onishchukov, Georgy; Christodoulides, Demetrios N.; Peschel, Ulf

2013-12-01

246

Re-examination of the Present Stress State of the Atera Fault, Central Japan, Based on the Calibrated Crustal Stress Data of Hydraulic Fracturing Test by Measuring the Tensile Strength of Rocks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To infer the activity and physical state of intraplate faults in Japan, we re-examined the crustal stress with the hydraulic fracturing test by measuring the tensile strength of rocks. The tensile strength was measured by fracturing hollow cylindrical rock samples (inner and outer radius are 25.0-25.2 mm and 55.1-101.5 mm, respectively, length is 137.0-140.1 mm) which were obtained close to the in situ stress measurement locations by pressurizing the inner hole of the sample. Confining pressure is not applied to the samples in this test. To check the reliability and accuracy of this test, we conducted similar experiments with the standard rock sample (Inada granite) whose physical property is well known. Then, we measured the tensile strength of all available core samples including the Atera fault (at Ueno, Fukuoka, and Hatajiri), the Atotsugawa fault, and the Nojima fault (at Hirabayashi, Iwaya and Kabutoyama), in central Japan, which had been obtained by the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED) by the stress measurement with the hydraulic fracturing method. The measured tensile strength data reveals that the in situ re- opening pressure, which is one of the parameters needed for the determination of the maximum in situ horizontal stress, was obviously biased. We re-estimated the re-opening pressure using the measured tensile strength and the in situ breakdown pressure, and re-calculated the in situ stress around the Atera fault. Although the past dislocation of the Atera fault has been considered to be left lateral from the geographical features around the fault, the re-estimated stress suggests that the present dislocation of the Atera fault is right lateral. And the shear stress decreases from the fault. The right lateral dislocation is also supported by the present-day horizontal crustal deformation observed by the triangular and GPS surveys by Geographical Survey Institute in Japan. Therefore, the dislocation direction of the Atera fault seems to change from left lateral to right lateral some time ago. The amount of accumulated right lateral dislocation estimated from the stress data with the dislocation model by Okada (1992) is 2.2-2.6 m. Because the current slip rate from the GPS survey is 2.1-2.3 mm/yr, the accumulation period of the dislocation becomes 960-1240 years if the slip rate is stable. This estimation suggests that during the last 1586 Tensho earthquake the Atera fault dislocated right laterally.

Yamashita, F.; Mizoguchi, K.; Fukuyama, E.; Omura, K.

2008-12-01

247

Tensile city  

E-print Network

Tensile City is a story that provides the answer to the following question: II If we were to leap forward in time and visit a city of the future, what would learn about our contemporary city ? II The story unfolds when ...

Chakkour, Mario Henri

1987-01-01

248

In-Plane Cracking Behavior and Ultimate Strength for 2D Woven and Braided Melt-Infiltrated SiC/SiC Composites Tensile Loaded in Off-Axis Fiber Directions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The tensile mechanical properties of ceramic matrix composites (CMC) in directions off the primary axes of the reinforcing fibers are important for architectural design of CMC components that are subjected to multi-axial stress states. In this study, 2D-woven melt-infiltrated (MI) SiC/SiC composite panels with balanced fiber content in the 0 degree and 90 degree directions were tensile loaded in-plane in the 0 degree direction and at 45 degree to this direction. In addition, a 2D triaxially-braided MI composite panel with balanced fiber content in the plus or minus 67 degree bias directions and reduced fiber content in the axial direction was tensile loaded perpendicular to the axial direction tows (i.e., 23 degrees from the bias fibers). Stress-strain behavior, acoustic emission, and optical microscopy were used to quantify stress-dependent matrix cracking and ultimate strength in the panels. It was observed that both off-axis loaded panels displayed higher composite onset stresses for through-thickness matrix cracking than the 2D-woven 0/90 panels loaded in the primary 0 degree direction. These improvements for off-axis cracking strength can in part be attributed to higher effective fiber fractions in the loading direction, which in turn reduces internal stresses on critical matrix flaws for a given composite stress. Also for the 0/90 panel loaded in the 45 degree direction, an improved distribution of matrix flaws existed due to the absence of fiber tows perpendicular to the loading direction. In addition, for the +67/0/-67 braided panel, the axial tows perpendicular to the loading direction were not only low in volume fraction, but were also were well separated from one another. Both off-axis oriented panels also showed relatively good ultimate tensile strength when compared to other off-axis oriented composites in the literature, both on an absolute strength basis as well as when normalized by the average fiber strength within the composites. Initial implications are discussed for constituent and architecture design to improve the directional cracking of SiC/SiC CMC components with MI matrices.

Morscher, Gregory N.; Yun, Hee Mann; DiCarlo, James A.

2007-01-01

249

A Study of the Effect of Tool Pin Profiles on Tensile Strength of Welded Joints Produced Using Friction Stir Welding Process  

Microsoft Academic Search

Friction Stir Welding (FSW) has evolved into a process focused on joining of arc-weldable (5xxx and 6xxx) and which are difficult to weld (2xxx and 7xxx) aluminium alloys. The method described in this paper for the prediction of tensile properties and optimization can eliminate the need for performing experiments on the basis of conventional trial and error method. The present

C. N. Suresha; B. M. Rajaprakash; Sarala Upadhya

2011-01-01

250

In-Situ Observations on the Fracture Mechanism of Diffusion-Alloyed Ni-Containing Powder Metal Steels and a Proposed Method for Tensile Strength Improvement  

Microsoft Academic Search

The mechanical properties of Ni-containing powder metal (PM) steels are usually inferior to those of their wrought counterparts.\\u000a The main problem is attributed to the non-uniform Ni distribution, in addition to the problems caused by porosity. The effects\\u000a of this non-uniform alloying on the mechanical properties were investigated in this study using mini tensile bars that were\\u000a made of diffusion-alloyed

M. W. Wu; K. S. Hwang; H. S. Huang

2007-01-01

251

In-Situ Observations on the Fracture Mechanism of Diffusion-Alloyed Ni-Containing Powder Metal Steels and a Proposed Method for Tensile Strength Improvement  

Microsoft Academic Search

The mechanical properties of Ni-containing powder metal (PM) steels are usually inferior to those of their wrought counterparts. The main problem is attributed to the non-uniform Ni distribution, in addition to the problems caused by porosity. The effects of this non-uniform alloying on the mechanical properties were investigated in this study using mini tensile bars that were made of diffusion-alloyed

M. W. Wu; K. S. Hwang; H. S. Huang

2007-01-01

252

Structure of the Space of Diametrically Complete Sets in a Minkowski Space  

E-print Network

Structure of the Space of Diametrically Complete Sets in a Minkowski Space Jos´e Pedro Moreno and Rolf Schneider Abstract We study the structure of the space of diametrically complete sets in a finite di- mensional normed space. In contrast to the Euclidean case, this space is in general not convex

Schneider, Rolf

253

Revisiting the Recommended Geometry for the Diametrally Compressed Ceramic C-Ring Specimen  

SciTech Connect

A study conducted several years ago found that a stated allowable width/thickness (b/t) ratio in ASTM C1323 (Standard Test Method for Ultimate Strength of Advanced Ceramics with Diametrally Compressed C-Ring Specimens at Ambient Temperature) could ultimately cause the prediction of a non-conservative probability of survival when the measured C-ring strength was scaled to a different size. Because of that problem, this study sought to reevaluate the stress state and geometry of the C-ring specimen and suggest changes to ASTM C1323 that would resolve that issue. Elasticity, mechanics of materials, and finite element solutions were revisited with the C ring geometry. To avoid the introduction of more than 2% error, it was determined that the C ring width/thickness (b/t) ratio should range between 1-3 and that its inner radius/outer radius (ri/ro) ratio should range between 0.50-0.95. ASTM C1323 presently allows for b/t to be as large as 4 so that ratio should be reduced to 3.

Jadaan, Osama M. [University of Wisconsin, Platteville; Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL

2009-04-01

254

Investigation of strength of a hybrid adhesive anchor system used in precast concrete welded repair applications subjected to tensile and eccentric shear loading  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A common precast industry repair for missing or misplaced connection plates is the use of an adhesive anchor system to fasten repair plates to precast members. Typically, the repair plate will experience elevated temperatures during the welding of the loose erection plate to the repair plate. Limited testing and theoretical data are currently available to provide design guidelines on how the elevated temperatures induced by welding affect the behavior and capacity of the adhesive anchoring systems. This dissertation outlines bond tests, eccentric shear tests, and a temperature investigation performed using a hybrid adhesive system in precast concrete repair applications. In addition, limited bond strength testing data using a high strength two-part epoxy adhesive is also included. The overall aim of this work is to provide test data and guidance to the industry and design professionals when designing adhesive anchoring systems for repair applications exposed to welding.

Eilers, Michael Glenn

255

Time/temperature dependent tensile strength of SiC and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-based fibers  

SciTech Connect

In order to understand and model the thermomechanical behavior of fiber-reinforced composites, stress-rupture, fast-fracture, and warm-up rupture studies were conducted on various advanced SiC and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-based fibers in the temperature range from 20 to 1400 C in air as well as in inert environments. The measured stress-rupture, fast fracture, and warm-up rupture strengths were correlated into a single master time/temperature-dependent strength plot for each fiber type using thermal activation and slow crack growth theories. It is shown that these plots are useful for comparing and selecting fibers for CMC and MMC reinforcement and that, in comparison to stress rupture tests, the fast-fracture and warm-up tests can be used for rapid generation of these plots.

Yun, Hee Mann; DiCarlo, J.A. [NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH (United States)

1996-12-31

256

Direct lentiviral-cyclooxygenase 2 application to the tendon-bone interface promotes osteointegration and enhances return of the pull-out tensile strength of the tendon graft in a rat model of biceps tenodesis.  

PubMed

This study sought to determine if direct application of the lentiviral (LV)-cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) vector to the tendon-bone interface would promote osteointegration of the tendon graft in a rat model of biceps tenodesis. The LV-COX2 gene transfer strategy was chosen for investigation because a similar COX2 gene transfer strategy promoted bony bridging of the fracture gap during bone repair, which involves similar histologic transitions that occur in osteointegration. Briefly, a 1.14-mm diameter tunnel was drilled in the mid-groove of the humerus of adult Fischer 344 rats. The LV-COX2 or ?gal control vector was applied directly into the bone tunnel and onto the end of the tendon graft, which was then pulled into the bone tunnel. A poly-L-lactide pin was press-fitted into the tunnel as interference fixation. Animals were sacrificed at 3, 5, or 8 weeks for histology analysis of osteointegration. The LV-COX2 gene transfer strategy enhanced neo-chondrogenesis at the tendon-bone interface but with only marginal effect on de novo bone formation. The tendon-bone interface of the LV-COX2-treated tenodesis showed the well-defined tendon-to-fibrocartilage-to-bone histologic transitions that are indicative of osteointegration of the tendon graft. The LV-COX2 in vivo gene transfer strategy also significantly enhanced angiogenesis at the tendon-bone interface. To determine if the increased osteointegration was translated into an improved pull-out mechanical strength property, the pull-out tensile strength of the LV-COX2-treated tendon grafts was determined with a pull-out mechanical testing assay. The LV-COX2 strategy yielded a significant improvement in the return of the pull-out strength of the tendon graft after 8 weeks. In conclusion, the COX2-based in vivo gene transfer strategy enhanced angiogenesis, osteointegration and improved return of the pull-out strength of the tendon graft. Thus, this strategy has great potential to be developed into an effective therapy to promote tendon-to-bone healing after tenodesis or related surgeries. PMID:24848992

Rundle, Charles H; Chen, Shin-Tai; Coen, Michael J; Wergedal, Jon E; Stiffel, Virginia; Lau, Kin-Hing William

2014-01-01

257

Evolution of microstructure and tensile strength of rapidly solidified Al-4.7 pct Zn-2.5 pct Mg-0.2 pct Zr-X wt pct Mn alloys  

SciTech Connect

Analytical transmission electron microscopy and thermal analysis of as-extruded Al-4.7 pct Zn-2.5 pct Mg-0.2 pct Zr-X wt pct Mn alloys, with Mn contents ranging from 0.5 to 2.5 wt pct, were carried out to elucidate the microstructural change and accompanying mechanical properties during subsequent heat treatments. The as-extruded alloy was fabricated from rapidly solidified powder and consisted of a fine, metastable manganese dispersoid and the ternary eutectic T phase (Al{sub 2}Mg{sub 3}Zn{sub 3}). Solution heat treatment resulted in the formation of the stable Al{sub 6}Mn phase and complete dissolution of the T phase. Formation of stable Al{sub 6}Mn was made by two routes: by phase transition from metastable Mn dispersoids which already existed, and from the supersaturated solid solution by homogeneous nucleation. The density of the Al{sub 6}Mn phase increased with the addition of manganese, while the shape and average size remained unchanged. A significant increase in the hardness was observed to coincide with the formation of the Al{sub 6}Mn phase. Similarly, the tensile strength increased further after the aging treatment, and the increment was constant over the content of Mn in the alloy, which was explained by the contribution from the same amount of precipitates, MgZn{sub 2}. Results of thermal analysis indicated that the dissolution of the T phase started near 180 C and that formation of Al{sub 6}Mn occurred at about 400 C, suggesting that further enhancement of strength is possible with the modification of the heat-treatment schedule.

Chang, J.; Moon, I. [Korea Inst. of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Div. of Metals; Choi, C. [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering

1998-07-01

258

Effect of the strain-induced melt activation (SIMA) process on the tensile properties of a new developed super high strength aluminum alloy modified by Al-5Ti-1B grain refiner  

SciTech Connect

In this study, the effect of Al-5Ti-1B grain refiners and modified strain-induced melt activation process on an Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy was studied. The optimum level of Ti was found to be 0.1 wt.%. The specimens subjected to deformation ratio of 40% (at 300 Degree-Sign C) and various heat treatment times (10-40 min) and temperature (550-600 Degree-Sign C) regimes were characterized in this study. Reheating condition to obtain a fine globular microstructure was optimized. Microstructural examinations were conducted by optical and scanning electron microscopy coupled with an energy dispersive spectrometry. The optimum temperature and time in strain-induced melt activation process are 575 Degree-Sign C and 20 min, respectively. T6 heat treatment including quenching to room temperature and aging at 120 Degree-Sign C for 24 h was employed to reach to the maximum strength. Significant improvements in mechanical properties were obtained with the addition of grain refiner combined with T6 heat treatment. After the T6 heat treatment, the average tensile strength increased from 283 MPa to 587 and 332 MPa to 617 for samples refined with 2 wt.% Al-5Ti-1B before and after strain-induced melt activation process and extrusion process, respectively. Ultimate strength of Ti-refined specimens without SIMA process has a lower value than globular microstructure specimens after SIMA and extrusion process. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of Al-5Ti-1B on the aluminum alloy produced by SIMA process was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al-5Ti-1B is an effective in reducing the grain and reagent fine microstructure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reheating condition to obtain a fine globular microstructure was optimized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The optimum temperature and time in SIMA process are 575 Degree-Sign C and 20 min respectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UTS of globular structure specimens have a more value than Ti-refined specimens.

Haghparast, Amin [School of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [School of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nourimotlagh, Masoud [Young Researchers Club, Dareshahr Branch, Islamic Azad university (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Young Researchers Club, Dareshahr Branch, Islamic Azad university (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Alipour, Mohammad, E-mail: Alipourmo@ut.ac.ir [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-09-15

259

Isotropic tensile strength of molecular glasses  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relationship between the bulk density and pressure of configurations corresponding to local minima on the potential energy surface of molecular models of ethane, n-pentane, and cyclopentane (the equation of state of their energy landscape) has been explored. Like simpler, atomic fluids, these systems exhibit a limiting bulk density below which minimum energy configurations are no longer spatially homogeneous, but

Marcel Utz; Pablo G. Debenedetti; Frank H. Stillinger

2001-01-01

260

A comparison of pressure compaction and diametral compression tests for determining granule strengths  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lightning strikes can cause structural damage, ignite flammable materials, and produce circuit malfunctions in missiles, aircraft, and ground systems. Lightning arrestor connectors (LAC's) are used to divert harmful lightning energy away from these systems by providing less destructive breakdown paths. Ceramic granules in the size range of 150-200 micrometers are used in LAC's to provide physical and electrical separation of

S. J. Glass; C. Newton

1994-01-01

261

An open-end burst test method to obtain uniaxial hoop tensile properties of fuel cladding in a hot cell  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The hoop stress-hoop strain relationship of fuel cladding is one of the essential input parameters for safety analysis of fuel rods. The three objectives of this paper were: to propose a burst test method for open-end tube specimens with the uniaxial hoop stress condition; to develop the necessary in-cell high temperature open-end burst (OEB) techniques to implement the method; and to determine the optimum specimen length for the proposed OEB test method. Silicone oil was selected as the pressurization medium, and it was sealed inside the specimens not by welding but by O-rings so that no axial tensile stress was induced in the specimens. The specimens with combined end plugs and O-rings were successfully assembled by manipulators in a hot cell, and a high temperature (?350 °C), high pressure (?100 MPa) seal was achieved. The optimum specimen length was determined by using ductile and embrittled tubes with various lengths of 30-60 mm and was found to be around 45 mm for typical BWR fuel rods. During the OEB test, internal pressure and diametral expansion were monitored to obtain the basic mechanical performance properties of the fuel cladding such as yield stress, ultimate strength, as well as the true hoop stress-hoop strain curve.

Nakatsuka, Masafumi; Aita, Makoto; Sakamoto, Kan; Higuchi, Toru

2013-03-01

262

Are the Autism and Positive Schizotypy Spectra Diametrically Opposed in Empathizing and Systemizing?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Crespi and Badcock's (Behaviour Brain Sci 31: 241-261, 2008) novel theory, which presents autism and positive schizophrenia as diametrical opposites on a cognitive continuum, has received mixed support in the literature to date. The current study aimed to further assess the validity of this theory by investigating predictions in relation to…

Russell-Smith, Suzanna N.; Bayliss, Donna M.; Maybery, Murray T.; Tomkinson, Rosy L.

2013-01-01

263

Unbalanced magnetic forces in permanent magnet brushless machines with diametrically asymmetric phase windings  

Microsoft Academic Search

A general analytical model, formulated in 2-D polar coordinates, is developed to predict the unbalanced magnetic force which results in permanent magnet brushless AC and DC machines having a diametrically asymmetric disposition of slots and phase windings. It is shown that the unbalanced magnetic force can be significant in machines having a fractional ratio of slot number to pole number,

D. Ishak; Z. Q. Zhu; D. Howe

2005-01-01

264

Unbalanced Magnetic Forces in Permanent-Magnet Brushless Machines With Diametrically Asymmetric Phase Windings  

Microsoft Academic Search

A general analytical model, formulated in 2-D polar coordinates, is developed to predict the unbalanced magnetic force, which results in permanent-magnet brushless ac and dc machines having a diametrically asymmetric disposition of slots and phase windings. It is shown that the unbalanced magnetic force can be significant in machines having a fractional ratio of slot number to pole number, particularly

Z. Q. Zhu; Dahaman Ishak; David Howe; Chen Jintao

2007-01-01

265

Tensile Properties of GRCop-84  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This is a chapter in the final report on GRCop-84 for the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Second Generation/Project Constellation Program. It contains information on the tensile properties of GRCop-84. GRCop-84 (Cu-8 at.% Cr-4 at.% Nb) was produced by extrusion and Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIPing). Some of the extrusions were rolled to plate and sheet while other extrusions were drawn into tubing. The material was further subjected to various heat treatments corresponding to annealing, anticipated typical brazing conditions, an end-of-life condition and various elevated temperature exposures to attempt to improve creep resistance. As anticipated, cold work increased strength while decreasing ductility. Annealing at 600 C (1112 F) and higher temperatures was effective. An exposure for 100 h at 500 C (932 F) resulted in an increase in strength rather than the anticipated decrease. High temperature simulated-braze cycles and thermal exposures lowered the strength of GRCop-84, but the deceases were small compared to precipitation strengthened copper alloys. It was observed that the excess Cr could form large precipitates that lower the reduction in area though it appears a minimum amount is required. Overall, GRCop-84 exhibits good stability of its tensile properties, which makes it an excellent candidate for rocket engine liners and many other high temperature applications.

Ellis, David L.; Loewenthal, William S.; Yun, Hee-Man

2012-01-01

266

Tensile properties of nanoclay reinforced epoxy composites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Kinetic epoxy resin was filled with nanoclay to increase tensile properties of the composite for civil and structural. This project manufactured samples with different percentages by weight of nanoclay in the composites in steps of 1 wt %, which were then post-cured in an oven. The samples were then subjected to tensile tests. The results showed that the composite with 3 wt % of nanoclay produced the highest yield and tensile strengths. However, the Young's modulus increased with increasing nanoparticulate loading. It is hoped that the discussion and results in this work would not only contribute towards the further development of nanoclay reinforced epoxy composites with enhanced material properties, but also provide useful information for the studies of fracture toughness, tensile properties and flexural properties of other composites.

Ku, H.; Trada, Mohan

2013-08-01

267

Tensile-property characterization of thermally aged cast stainless steels  

SciTech Connect

The effect of thermal aging on tensile properties of cast stainless steels during service in light water reactors has been evaluated. Tensile data for several experimental and commercial heats of cast stainless steels are presented. Thermal aging increases the tensile strength of these steels. The high-C Mo-bearing CF-8M steels are more susceptible to thermal aging than the Mo-free CF-3 or CF-8 steels. A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting the change in tensile flow and yield stresses and engineering stress-vs.-strain curve of cast stainless steel as a function of time and temperature of service. The tensile properties of aged cast stainless steel are estimated from known material information, i.e., chemical composition and the initial tensile strength of the steel. The correlations described in this report may be used for assessing thermal embrittlement of cast stainless steel components.

Michaud, W.F.; Toben, P.T.; Soppet, W.K.; Chopra, O.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1994-02-01

268

Computer-based estimation and compensation of diametral errors in CNC turning of cantilever bars  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper aims to introduce a computer-based estimation and compensation method for diametral errors in cantilever bar turning\\u000a without additional hardware requirements. In the error estimation method, the error characteristics of workpieces are determined\\u000a experimentally depending on cutting speed, depth of cut, feed rate, workpiece diameter, length from the chuck and the geometric\\u000a error sum of CNC lathe. An Artificial

Eyüp Sabri Topal; Can Ço?un

269

Tensile Mechanical Properties of Swine Cortical Mandibular Bone  

PubMed Central

Temporary orthodontic mini implants serve as anchorage devices in orthodontic treatments. Often, they are inserted in the jaw bones, between the roots of the teeth. The stability of the mini implants within the bone is one of the major factors affecting their success and, consequently, that of the orthodontic treatment. Bone mechanical properties are important for implant stability. The aim of this study was to determine the tensile properties of the alveolar and basal mandible bones in a swine model. The diametral compression test was employed to study the properties in two orthogonal directions: mesio-distal and occluso-gingival. Small cylindrical cortical bone specimens (2.6 mm diameter, 1.5 mm thickness) were obtained from 7 mandibles using a trephine drill. The sites included different locations (anterior and posterior) and aspects (buccal and lingual) for a total of 16 specimens from each mandible. The load-displacement curves were continuously monitored while loading half of the specimens in the oclluso-gingival direction and half in the mesio-distal direction. The stiffness was calculated from the linear portion of the curve. The mesio-distal direction was 31% stiffer than the occluso-gingival direction. The basal bone was 40% stiffer than the alveolar bone. The posterior zone was 46% stiffer than the anterior zone. The lingual aspect was stiffer than the buccal aspect. Although bone specimens do not behave as brittle materials, the diametral compression test can be adequately used for determining tensile behavior when only small bone specimens can be obtained. In conclusion, to obtain maximal orthodontic mini implant stability, the force components on the implants should be oriented mostly in the mesio-distal direction. PMID:25463971

Brosh, Tamar; Rozitsky, Doron; Geron, Silvia; Pilo, Raphael

2014-01-01

270

Tensile properties of textile composites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The importance of textile composite materials in aerospace structural applications has been gaining momentum in recent years. With a view to better understand the suitability of these materials in aerospace applications, an experimental program was undertaken to assess the mechanical properties of these materials. Specifically, the braided textile preforms were infiltrated with suitable polymeric matrices leading to the fabrication of composite test coupons. Evaluation of the tensile properties and the analyses of the results in the form of strength moduli, Poisson's ratio, etc., for the braided composites are presented. Based on our past experience with the textile coupons, the fabrication techniques have been modified (by incorporating glass microballoons in the matrix and/or by stabilizing the braid angle along the length of the specimen with axial fibers) to achieve enhanced mechanical properties of the textile composites. This paper outlines the preliminary experimental results obtained from testing these composites.

Avva, V. Sarma; Sadler, Robert L.; Lyon, Malcolm

1992-01-01

271

Effect of Strain Rate on Tensile Properties of Carbon Fiber Epoxy-Impregnated Bundle Composite  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The tensile tests for high tensile strength polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based (T1000GB) carbon fiber epoxy-impregnated bundle composite at various strain rates ranging from 3.33 × 10-5 to 6.0 × 102 s-1 (various crosshead speeds ranging from 8.33 × 10-7 to 1.5 × 101 m/s) were investigated. The statistical distributions of the tensile strength were also evaluated. The results clearly demonstrated that the tensile strength of bundle composite slightly increased with an increase in the strain rate (crosshead speed) and the Weibull modulus of tensile strength for the bundle composite decreased with an increase in the strain rate (crosshead speed), there is a linear relation between the Weibull modulus and the average tensile strength on log-log scale.

Naito, Kimiyoshi

2014-03-01

272

Tensile behavior of cement-based composites with random discontinuous steel fibers  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, the tensile properties of cement-based composites containing random discontinuous steel fibers are reported. Direct tensile tests were performed to study the effects of fiber length (hence fiber aspect ratio), interfacial bonding, and processing conditions on composite properties. Composite tensile strength and ductility are highlighted and discussed.

Li, V.C.; Wu, H.C.; Maalej, M.; Mishra, D.K. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Hashida, Toshiyuki [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Research Inst. for Fracture Technology

1996-01-01

273

Strength of Rewelded Inconel 718  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Inconel 718, nickel-based alloy used extensively for high-temperature structural service, welded repeatedly without detriment to its strength. According to NASA report, tests show 12 repairs on same weld joint do not adversely affect ultimate tensile strenth, yield strength, fatigue strength, metallurgical grain structures, or ability of weld joint to respond to post weld heat treatments.

Bayless, E.; Lovoy, C. V.; Mcllwain, M. C.; Munafo, P.

1982-01-01

274

Improve the Strength of PLA/HA Composite Through the Use of Surface Initiated Polymerization and Phosphonic Acid Coupling Agent  

PubMed Central

Bioresorbable composite made from degradable polymers, e.g., polylactide (PLA), and bioactive calcium phosphates, e.g., hydroxyapatite (HA), are clinically desirable for bone fixation, repair and tissue engineering because they do not need to be removed by surgery after the bone heals. However, preparation of PLA/HA composite from non-modified HA usually results in mechanical strength reductions due to a weak interface between PLA and HA. In this study, a calcium-phosphate/phosphonate hybrid shell was developed to introduce a greater amount of reactive hydroxyl groups onto the HA particles. Then, PLA was successfully grafted on HA by surface-initiated polymerization through the non-ionic surface hydroxyl groups. Thermogravimetric analysis indiated that the amount of grafted PLA on HA can be up to 7 %, which is about 50 % greater than that from the literature. PLA grafted HA shows significantly different pH dependent ?-potential and particle size profiles from those of uncoated HA. By combining the phosphonic acid coupling agent and surface initiated polymerization, PLA could directly link to HA through covalent bond so that the interfacial interaction in the PLA/HA composite can be significantly improved. The diametral tensile strength of PLA/HA composite prepared from PLA-grafted HA was found to be over twice that of the composite prepared from the non-modified HA. Moreover, the tensile strength of the improved composite was 23 % higher than that of PLA alone. By varying additional variables, this approach has the potential to produce bioresorbable composites with improved mechanical properties that are in the range of natural bones, and can have wide applications for bone fixation and repair in load-bearing areas. PMID:22399838

Wang, Tongxin; Chow, Laurence C.; Frukhtbeyn, Stanislav A.; Ting, Andy Hai; Dong, Quanxiao; Yang, Mingshu; Mitchell, James W.

2012-01-01

275

Tensile properties of titanium electrolytically charged with hydrogen  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, and elongation were studied for annealed titanium electrolytically charged with hydrogen. The hydrogen was present as a surface hydride layer. These tensile properties were generally lower for uncharged titanium than for titanium with a continuous surface hydride; they were greater for uncharged titanium than for titanium with an assumed discontinuous surface hydride. We suggest that the interface between titanium and titanium hydride is weak. And the hydride does not necessarily impair strength and ductility of annealed titanium. The possibility that oxygen and/or nitrogen can embrittle titanium hydride is discussed.

Smith, R. J.; Otterson, D. A.

1971-01-01

276

Effects of Coating and Diametric Load on Fiber Bragg Gratings as Cryogenic Temperature Sensors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Cryogenic temperature sensing was demonstrated using pressurized fiber Bragg gratings (PFBGs) with polymer coating of various thicknesses. The PFBG was obtained by applying a small diametric load to a regular fiber Bragg grating (FBG). The Bragg wavelengths of FBGs and PFBG were measured at temperatures from 295 K to 4.2 K. The temperature sensitivities of the FBGs were increased by the polymer coating. A physical model was developed to relate the Bragg wavelength shifts to the thermal expansion coefficients, Young's moduli, and thicknesses of the coating polymers. When a diametric load of no more than 15 N was applied to a FBG, a pressure-induced transition occurred at 200 K during the cooling cycle. The pressure induced transition yielded PFBG temperature sensitivities three times greater than conventional FBGs for temperatures ranging from 80 to 200 K, and ten times greater than conventional fibers for temperatures below 80 K. PFBGs were found to produce an increased Bragg wavelength shift of 2.2 nm compared to conventional FBGs over the temperature range of 4.2 to 300 K. This effect was independent of coating thickness and attributed to the change of the fiber thermo-optic coefficient.

Wu, meng-Chou; Pater, Ruth H.; DeHaven, Stanton L.

2008-01-01

277

Tensile Properties of Under-Matched Weld Joints for 950 MPa Steel.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In welding of 950 MPa-class high tensile strength steel, preheating is crucial in order to avoid cold cracks, which, however, eventually increases welding deformations. One way to decrease welding deformations is lowering preheating temperature by using under-matched weld metal. Toyota and others clarify that although breaking elongation can decrease due to plastic constraint effect under certain conditions, static tensile of under-matched weld joints is comparable to that of base metal. However, there has still been no report about joint static tensile of under-matched weld joints applied to 950 MPa-class high tensile strength steel. In this study, we aim to research tensile strength and fatigue strength of under-matched weld joints applied to 950 MPa-class high tensile steel.

Yamamoto, Kouji; Arakawa, Toshiaki; Akazawa, Nobuki; Yamamoto, Kousei; Matsuo, Hiroki; Nakagara, Kiyoyuki; Suita, Yoshikazu

278

Tensile and compressive properties of flax fibres for natural fibre reinforced composites  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mechanical properties of standard decorticated and hand isolated flax bast fibres were determined in tension as well as in compression. The tensile strength of technical fibre bundles was found to depend strongly on the clamping length. The tensile strength of elementary flax fibres was found to range between 1500 MPa and 1800 MPa, depending on the isolation procedure. The compressive

H. L. Bos; M. J. A. Van Den Oever; O. C. J. J. Peters

2002-01-01

279

Strength enhancement process for prealloyed powder superalloys  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A technique involving superplastic processing and high pressure autoclaving was applied to a nickel base prealloyed powder alloy. Tensile strengths as high as 2865 MN/sq m at 480 C were obtained with as-superplastically deformed material. Appropriate treatments yielding materials with high temperature tensile and stress rupture strengths were also devised.

Waters, W. J.; Freche, J. C.

1977-01-01

280

The Effect of Reprocessing on the Tensile Properties of Composites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study, waste cotton fabric reinforced polymer matrix composite material has been manufactured by a custom made recycling extruder. Composites with different reinforcement ratios as 12,5%wt ( 12,5%wtRPE ) and 25%wt ( 25%wtRPE ) were tested for their mechanical properties such as tensile strength and young's modulus. The material was then granulated down to the size enough to be used in the extrusion process in order to observe the effects of reprocessing. Reprocessing leads to improve Tensile Strength of composite materials and slows down the reduction of tensile strength of polyethylene. It was observed that composite materials were highly affected by the fiber orientation and acts as anisotropic material under the load.

Bodur, Mehmet Safa; Bakkal, Mustafa; Berkalp, Omer Berk; Sadikoglu, Telem Gok

2011-01-01

281

The Principles of Strength and Fatigue in Optical Fibers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tensile strength is defined as the applied stress (tensile load per unit cross-sectional area) recorded at the instant of rupture for a test specimen. Historically, attempts to catalogue and report the intrinsic strength of glass were frustrated by considerable dispersion in the acquired measurement data. In addition to large variability, typical strength values were found to be one, two or

J. Carr; S. Saikkonen

1986-01-01

282

Column strength of magnesium alloy AM-57S  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Tests were made to determine the column strength of extruded magnesium alloy AM-57S. Column specimens were tested with round ends and with flat ends. It was found that the compressive properties should be used in computations for column strengths rather than the tensile properties because the compressive yield strength was approximately one-half the tensile yield strength. A formula for the column strength of magnesium alloy AM-57S is given.

Holt, M

1942-01-01

283

Tensile and creep properties of titanium-vanadium, titanium-molybdenum, and titanium-niobium alloys  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Tensile and creep properties of experimental beta-titanium alloys were determined. Titanium-vanadium alloys had substantially greater tensile and creep strength than the titanium-niobium and titanium-molybdenum alloys tested. Specific tensile strengths of several titanium-vanadium-aluminum-silicon alloys were equivalent or superior to those of commercial titanium alloys to temperatures of 650 C. The Ti-50V-3Al-1Si alloy had the best balance of tensile strength, creep strength, and metallurgical stability. Its 500 C creep strength was far superior to that of a widely used commercial titanium alloy, Ti-6Al-4V, and almost equivalent to that of newly developed commercial titanium alloys.

Gray, H. R.

1975-01-01

284

Tensile Fracture of Ductile Materials. M.S. Thesis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

For brittle materials, circular voids play an important role relative to fracture, intensifing both tensile and compressive stresses. A maximum intensified tensile stress failure criterion applies quite well to brittle materials. An attempt was made to explore the possibility of extending the approach to the tensile fracture of ductile materials. The three dimensional voids that exist in reality are modelled by circular holes in sheet metal. Mathematical relationships are sought between the shape and size of the hole, after the material is plastically deformed, and the amount of deformation induced. Then, the effect of hole shape, size and orientation on the mechanical properties is considered experimentally. The presence of the voids does not affect the ultimate tensile strength of the ductile materials because plastic flow wipes out the stress intensification caused by them. However, the shape and orientation of the defect is found to play an important role in affecting the strain at fracture.

Pai, D. M.

1984-01-01

285

Tensile properties of welded helium charged 304L stainless steel  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The room-temperature tensile properties of helium-containing 304L stainless steel subjected to thermal cycles simulating fusion welding conditions have been measured. Helium was introduced into tensile specimens by tritium charging, and aged to generate 526 appm 3He by radioactive decay. The specimens were then vacuum annealed to remove the tritium. The helium-charged samples were subjected to transient thermal cycles simulating those occurring in the heat affected zone of a gas tungsten arc weld. Peak temperatures above 1073 K caused severe ductility losses, fracture mode changes (from ductile transgranular rupture to ductile intergranular fracture), and losses in ultimate tensile strength. These effects are attributed to helium redistribution and void growth on the grain boundary. Subsequently, grain boundary failure occurs during tensile testing because of the large quantity of trapped helium on the boundary.

Robinson, S. L.

1988-05-01

286

Tunable Tensile Ductility in Metallic Glasses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Widespread adoption of metallic glasses (MGs) in applications motivated by high strength and elasticity combined with plastic-like processing has been stymied by their lack of tensile ductility. One emerging strategy to couple the attractive properties of MGs with resistance to failure by shear localization is to employ sub-micron sample or feature length scales, although conflicting results shroud an atomistic understanding of the responsible mechanisms in uncertainty. Here, we report in situ deformation experiments of directly moulded Pt57.5Cu14.7Ni5.3P22.5 MG nanowires, which show tunable tensile ductility. Initially brittle as-moulded nanowires can be coerced to a distinct glassy state upon irradiation with Ga+ ions, leading to tensile ductility and quasi-homogeneous plastic flow. This behaviour is reversible and the glass returns to a brittle state upon subsequent annealing. Our results suggest a novel mechanism for homogenous plastic flow in nano-scaled MGs and strategies for circumventing the poor damage tolerance that has long plagued MGs.

Magagnosc, D. J.; Ehrbar, R.; Kumar, G.; He, M. R.; Schroers, J.; Gianola, D. S.

2013-01-01

287

Tensile ductility and necking of metallic glass  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Metallic glasses have a very high strength, hardness and elastic limit. However, they rarely show tensile ductility at room temperature and are considered quasi-brittle materials. Although these amorphous metals are capable of shear flow, severe plastic instability sets in at the onset of plastic deformation, which seems to be exclusively localized in extremely narrow shear bands ~10nm in thickness. Using in situ tensile tests in a transmission electron microscope, we demonstrate radically different deformation behaviour for monolithic metallic-glass samples with dimensions of the order of 100nm. Large tensile ductility in the range of 23-45% was observed, including significant uniform elongation and extensive necking or stable growth of the shear offset. This large plasticity in small-volume metallic-glass samples did not result from the branching/deflection of shear bands or nanocrystallization. These observations suggest that metallic glasses can plastically deform in a manner similar to their crystalline counterparts, via homogeneous and inhomogeneous flow without catastrophic failure. The sample-size effect discovered has implications for the application of metallic glasses in thin films and micro-devices, as well as for understanding the fundamental mechanical response of amorphous metals.

Guo, H.; Yan, P. F.; Wang, Y. B.; Tan, J.; Zhang, Z. F.; Sui, M. L.; Ma, E.

2007-10-01

288

Tensile ductility and necking of metallic glass.  

PubMed

Metallic glasses have a very high strength, hardness and elastic limit. However, they rarely show tensile ductility at room temperature and are considered quasi-brittle materials. Although these amorphous metals are capable of shear flow, severe plastic instability sets in at the onset of plastic deformation, which seems to be exclusively localized in extremely narrow shear bands approximately 10 nm in thickness. Using in situ tensile tests in a transmission electron microscope, we demonstrate radically different deformation behaviour for monolithic metallic-glass samples with dimensions of the order of 100 nm. Large tensile ductility in the range of 23-45% was observed, including significant uniform elongation and extensive necking or stable growth of the shear offset. This large plasticity in small-volume metallic-glass samples did not result from the branching/deflection of shear bands or nanocrystallization. These observations suggest that metallic glasses can plastically deform in a manner similar to their crystalline counterparts, via homogeneous and inhomogeneous flow without catastrophic failure. The sample-size effect discovered has implications for the application of metallic glasses in thin films and micro-devices, as well as for understanding the fundamental mechanical response of amorphous metals. PMID:17704779

Guo, H; Yan, P F; Wang, Y B; Tan, J; Zhang, Z F; Sui, M L; Ma, E

2007-10-01

289

Tensile creep behavior of polycrystalline alumina fibers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Tensile creep studies were conducted on polycrystalline Nextel 610 and Fiber FP alumina fibers with grain sizes of 100 and 300 nm, respectively. Test conditions were temperatures from 800 to 1050 C and stresses from 60 to 1000 MPa. For both fibers, only a small primary creep portion occurred followed by steady-state creep. The stress exponents for steady-state creep of Nextel 610 and Fiber FP were found to be about 3 and 1, respectively. At lower temperatures, below 1000 C, the finer grained Nextel 610 had a much higher 0.2 percent creep strength for 100 hr than the Fiber FP; while at higher temperatures, Nextel 610 had a comparable creep strength to the Fiber FP. The stress and grain size dependencies suggest Nextel 610 and Fiber FP creep rates are due to grain boundary sliding controlled by interface reaction and Nabarro-Herring mechanisms, respectively.

Yun, H. M.; Goldsby, J. C.

1993-01-01

290

Tensile behaviour of magnesia carbon refractories N. Schmitt a,  

E-print Network

to ¯ake failures reducing the lining time-life.1 Hasselman's classical criteria2 and Finite Element Ana, it is shown by ®nite element analysis of the beam, that the M.O.R. over- estimates the tensile strength undergo high temperature during the steel- making process. Thermal shock occurring during the ®rst heating

291

Tensile behavior of bulk nanostructured and ultrafine grained aluminum alloys  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the present study, data on tensile behavior of bulk nanostructured aluminum alloys processed via consolidation of mechanically milled powders and severe plastic deformation are analyzed. High strength and low strain hardening were observed in bulk nanostructured and ultrafine-grained Al alloys. The ductility of aluminum alloys decreases with decreasing grain size. The high amount of intercrystalline components may have an

B. Q. Han; F. A. Mohamed; E. J. Lavernia

2003-01-01

292

Tensile fatigue properties of fibre Bragg grating optical fibre sensors  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents an experimental study into the tensile strength and fatigue properties of uncoated optical glass fibres containing Bragg grating (FBG) sensors. The protective polymer coating of the optical fibres must be removed by chemical or mechanical stripping methods to produce the Bragg gratings in the fibre core. This paper investigates the effects of chemical or mechanical stripping on

J. Ang; H. C. H. Li; I. Herszberg; M. K. Bannister; A. P. Mouritz

2010-01-01

293

Fracture strength of polysilicon at stress concentrations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mechanical design of MEMS requires the ability to predict the strength of load-carrying components with stress concentrations. The majority of these microdevices are made of brittle materials such as polysilicon, which exhibit higher fracture strengths when smaller volumes or areas are involved. A review of the literature shows that the fracture strength of polysilicon increases as tensile specimens get smaller.

Jörg Bagdahn; O. Jadaan

2003-01-01

294

Tensile properties of carbon nanotube reinforced aluminum nanocomposite fabricated by plasma spray forming  

Microsoft Academic Search

Uniaxial tensile tests were performed on plasma spray formed (PSF) Al–Si alloy reinforced with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The addition of CNTs leads to 78% increase in the elastic modulus of the composite. There was a marginal increase in the tensile strength of CNT reinforced composite with degradation in strain to failure by 46%. The computed critical pullout length of

T. Laha; Y. Chen; D. Lahiri; A. Agarwal

2009-01-01

295

Tensile testing of nylon and Kevlar parachute materials under Federal specified temperature and relative humidity conditions  

SciTech Connect

A small 10-ft x 12-ft temperature and relative humidity controlled room for tensile testing of parachute materials is presented. Tensile tests of nylon and Kevlar parachute materials indicate there is a negligible change in break strength of test samples soaked in the controlled environment vs samples soaked in ambient conditions.

Botner, W.T.

1980-01-01

296

Research on shear strength of galvannealed coatings  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lap shear test can be generally performed by two kinds of methods. However, the shear strengths measured in both methods (bare and compound sample) may be quite different, which results in some influence on evaluating powdering of galvannealed coating. Samples in uniaxial tensile test are modified to measure their yield stress. The stress–strain curves in tensile test are compared with

Chun Xu; Z. Q. Lin; S. H. Li; W. G. Zhang

2007-01-01

297

Tensile Testing: A Simple Introduction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Tensile testing may be used to decide, say, which steel to use in various constructions. Analogous testing can be done simply in the classroom using plasticine and helps to introduce pupils to the various properties studied in materials science.

Carr, Martin

2006-01-01

298

Theoretical nonlinear response of complex single crystal under multi-axial tensile loading  

E-print Network

-axial tensile loading. The results reveal a complex nonlinear and loading-path dependent behavior with evolving anisotropy for the HAP crystal. Further, we have introduced a failure envelope index to quantify the strength behavior for comparison of similar...

Misra, Anil; Ching, W. Y.

2013-03-19

299

Manufacturing of Plutonium Tensile Specimens  

SciTech Connect

Details workflow conducted to manufacture high density alpha Plutonium tensile specimens to support Los Alamos National Laboratory's science campaigns. Introduces topics including the metallurgical challenge of Plutonium and the use of high performance super-computing to drive design. Addresses the utilization of Abaqus finite element analysis, programmable computer numerical controlled (CNC) machining, as well as glove box ergonomics and safety in order to design a process that will yield high quality Plutonium tensile specimens.

Knapp, Cameron M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-01

300

High strength oxidation resistant alpha titanium alloy  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes alpha titanium alloys containing aluminum, hafnium and/or tantalum has been found to have improved creep and tensile strengths as well as oxidtion resistance at temperature up to about 700{degrees}C without embrittlement.

Gigliotti, F.X. Jr.; Rowe, R.G.; Wasielewski, G.E.

1990-03-06

301

DETERMINATION OF OPTIMUM TENSILE STRENGTH OF GEOGRID REINFORCED EMBANKMENT  

Microsoft Academic Search

Soil-reinforcement interaction is a key issue in the design of geogrid-reinforced soil structures. Therefore, it is important to analyze the interaction mechanism between the soil and geogrid reinforcement. A multi-layered geogrid-reinforced embankment with steep slope was proposed for this study. This embankment was reinforced by five layers of biaxial geogrids. According to the stability of reinforced earth structures and the

Paravita S. WULANDARI; Daniel TJANDRA

302

Tensile strengths of problem shales and clays. Master's thesis  

SciTech Connect

The greatest single expense faced by oil companies involved in the exploration for crude oil is that of drilling wells. The most abundant rock drilled is shale. Some of these shales cause wellbore stability problems during the drilling process. These can range from slow rate of penetration and high torque up to stuck pipe and hole abandonment. The mechanical integrity of the shale must be known when the shalers are subjected to drilling fluids to develop an effective drilling plan.

Rechner, F.J.

1990-01-01

303

Impairment of Strength of Quartz Glass through Wetting by Liquids  

Microsoft Academic Search

IN a recent communication1, Radd and Oertle attributed the impairment of the tensile strength of glass fibre fabrics to a chemical solution process. Recently I have measured the tensile strength of quartz-glass rods immersed in various liquids. The rods, which were supplied by the Amersil Quartz Division of Engelhardt Industries, Inc., were selected for a uniform diameter of 1 mm.

K. H. Hiller

1960-01-01

304

Tensile-strained germanium microdisks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We show that a strong tensile strain can be applied to germanium microdisks using silicon nitride stressors. The transferred strain allows one to control the direct band gap emission that is shifted from 1550 nm up to 2000 nm, corresponding to a biaxial tensile strain around 1%. Both Fabry-Perot and whispering gallery modes are evidenced by room temperature photoluminescence measurements. Quality factors up to 1350 and limited by free carrier absorption of the doped layer are observed for the whispering gallery modes. We discuss the strain profile in the microdisks as a function of the disk geometry. These tensile-strained microdisks are promising candidates to achieve Ge laser emission in compact microresonators.

Ghrib, A.; El Kurdi, M.; de Kersauson, M.; Prost, M.; Sauvage, S.; Checoury, X.; Beaudoin, G.; Sagnes, I.; Boucaud, P.

2013-06-01

305

Tensile and shear behavior of undermatched welded joints  

SciTech Connect

Large-scale specimens were made from HSLA-100 steel plate (690 MPa minimum yield strength) featuring groove welds with varying strength ranging from overmatched to significantly undermatched. Tensile tests with transverse groove welds demonstrated that moderately undermatched joints (15% or less) can achieve strength and ductility as good as the overmatched welds. Severely undermatched joints (> 25%) provide full strength, but only limited ductility. The constraint in the large-scale specimens, as in the actual structures, increases the load capacity of the undermatched joints. Unlike the large-scale specimens, conventional flat-strap cross-weld tension specimens cut from the same undermatched welds fail prematurely due to lack of constraint. Shear tests showed that undermatched groove welds do not affect shear strength and ductility. The test results could be reasonably simulated using small-strain elastoplastic finite-element analysis.

Ferrel, M.; Dexter, R.J. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States)

1995-12-31

306

Extreme strength observed in limpet teeth  

PubMed Central

The teeth of limpets exploit distinctive composite nanostructures consisting of high volume fractions of reinforcing goethite nanofibres within a softer protein phase to provide mechanical integrity when rasping over rock surfaces during feeding. The tensile strength of discrete volumes of limpet tooth material measured using in situ atomic force microscopy was found to range from 3.0 to 6.5 GPa and was independent of sample size. These observations highlight an absolute material tensile strength that is the highest recorded for a biological material, outperforming the high strength of spider silk currently considered to be the strongest natural material, and approaching values comparable to those of the strongest man-made fibres. This considerable tensile strength of limpet teeth is attributed to a high mineral volume fraction of reinforcing goethite nanofibres with diameters below a defect-controlled critical size, suggesting that natural design in limpet teeth is optimized towards theoretical strength limits. PMID:25694539

Barber, Asa H.; Lu, Dun; Pugno, Nicola M.

2015-01-01

307

Extreme strength observed in limpet teeth.  

PubMed

The teeth of limpets exploit distinctive composite nanostructures consisting of high volume fractions of reinforcing goethite nanofibres within a softer protein phase to provide mechanical integrity when rasping over rock surfaces during feeding. The tensile strength of discrete volumes of limpet tooth material measured using in situ atomic force microscopy was found to range from 3.0 to 6.5 GPa and was independent of sample size. These observations highlight an absolute material tensile strength that is the highest recorded for a biological material, outperforming the high strength of spider silk currently considered to be the strongest natural material, and approaching values comparable to those of the strongest man-made fibres. This considerable tensile strength of limpet teeth is attributed to a high mineral volume fraction of reinforcing goethite nanofibres with diameters below a defect-controlled critical size, suggesting that natural design in limpet teeth is optimized towards theoretical strength limits. PMID:25694539

Barber, Asa H; Lu, Dun; Pugno, Nicola M

2015-04-01

308

Biocomposites from abaca strands and polypropylene. Part I: Evaluation of the tensile properties.  

PubMed

In this paper, abaca strands were used as reinforcement of polypropylene matrix and their tensile mechanical properties were studied. It was found relevant increments on the tensile properties of the abaca strand-PP composites despite the lack of good adhesion at fiber-matrix interface. Afterwards, it was stated the influence of using maleated polypropylene (MAPP) as compatibilizer to promote the interaction between abaca strands and polypropylene. The intrinsic mechanical properties of the reinforcement were evaluated and used for modeling both the tensile strength and elastic modulus of the composites. For these cases, the compatibility factor for the ultimate tensile strength was deduced from the modified rule of mixtures. Additionally, the experimental fiber orientation coefficient was measured, allowing determining the interfacial shear strengths of the composites and the critical fiber length of the abaca strand reinforcement. The mechanical improvement was compared to that obtained for fiberglass-reinforced PP composites and evaluated under an economical and technical point of view. PMID:19700312

Vilaseca, Fabiola; Valadez-Gonzalez, Alex; Herrera-Franco, Pedro J; Pèlach, M Angels; López, Joan Pere; Mutjé, Pere

2010-01-01

309

Tensile Behavior of Al2o3/feal + B and Al2o3/fecraly Composites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The feasibility of Al2O3/FeAl + B and Al2O3/FeCrAlY composites for high-temperature applications was assessed. The major emphasis was on tensile behavior of both the monolithics and composites from 298 to 1100 K. However, the study also included determining the chemical compatibility of the composites, measuring the interfacial shear strengths, and investigating the effect of processing on the strength of the single-crystal Al2O3 fibers. The interfacial shear strengths were low for Al203/FeAl + B and moderate to high for Al203/FeCrAlY. The difference in interfacial bond strengths between the two systems affected the tensile behavior of the composites. The strength of the Al203 fiber was significantly degraded after composite processing for both composite systems and resulted in poor composite tensile properties. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS) values of the composites could generally be predicted with either rule of mixtures (ROM) calculations or existing models when using the strength of the etched-out fiber. The Al2O3/FeAl + B composite system was determined to be unfeasible due to poor interfacial shear strengths and a large mismatch in coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE). Development of the Al2O3/FeCrAlY system would require an effective diffusion barrier to minimize the fiber strength degradation during processing and elevated temperature service.

Draper, S. L.; Eldridge, J. I.; Aiken, B. J. M.

1995-01-01

310

Cryogenic Temperature-Gradient Foam/Substrate Tensile Tester  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The figure shows a fixture for measuring the tensile strength of the bond between an aluminum substrate and a thermally insulating polymeric foam. The specimen is meant to be representative of insulating foam on an aluminum tank that holds a cryogenic liquid. Prior to the development of this fixture, tensile tests of this type were performed on foam/substrate specimens immersed in cryogenic fluids. Because the specimens were cooled to cryogenic temperatures throughout their thicknesses, they tended to become brittle and to fracture at loads below true bond tensile strengths. The present fixture is equipped to provide a thermal gradient from cryogenic temperature at the foam/substrate interface to room temperature on the opposite foam surface. The fixture includes an upper aluminum block at room temperature and a lower aluminum block cooled to -423 F (approx. -253 C) by use of liquid helium. In preparation for a test, the metal outer surface (the lower surface) of a foam/substrate specimen is bonded to the lower block and the foam outer surface (the upper surface) of the specimen is bonded to the upper block. In comparison with the through-the-thickness cooling of immersion testing, the cryogenic-to-room-temperature thermal gradient that exists during testing on this fixture is a more realistic approximation of the operational thermal condition of sprayed insulating foam on a tank of cryogenic liquid. Hence, tensile tests performed on this fixture provide more accurate indications of operational bond tensile strengths. In addition, the introduction of the present fixture reduces the cost of testing by reducing the amount of cryogenic liquid consumed and the time needed to cool a specimen.

Vailhe, Christophe

2003-01-01

311

Experimental measurement of the frequency shifts of degenerate thickness-shear modes in a rotated Y-cut quartz resonator subject to diametrical forces.  

PubMed

We report the first experimental measurement of the stress-induced frequency shifts of degenerate thicknessshear modes in a rotated Y-cut quartz resonator. Two distinct but nominally degenerate modes shifted toward higher frequencies at different rates and merged into a single mode as diametrical forces were applied gradually. The single mode split into the two distinctive modes progressively as the diametrical forces were released. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with previous theoretical results and may provide an insight into mode-coupling phenomena as a possible cause of frequency jumps in quartz resonators. PMID:25768821

Bao, Yuanye; Zhang, Haifeng; Kosinski, John

2015-03-01

312

The Cryogenic Tensile Properties of an Extruded Aluminum-Beryllium Alloy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Basic mechanical properties; i.e., ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, percent elongation, and elastic modulus, were obtained for the aluminum-beryllium alloy, AlBeMet162, at cryogenic (-195.5 C (-320 F) and -252.8 C (-423 F)) temperatures. The material evaluated was purchased to the requirements of SAE-AMS7912, "Aluminum-Beryllium Alloy, Extrusions."

Gamwell, W. R.

2002-01-01

313

Shear instabilities in perfect bcc crystals during simulated tensile tests  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This work demonstrates a simple but efficient way as to how to determine the existence of shear instabilities in ideal bcc crystals under uniaxial loading. The theoretical tensile strengths are derived from calculated values of the theoretical shear strength and their dependence on the superimposed normal stress. The presented procedure enables us to avoid complicated and time-consuming analyses of elastic stability of crystals. Results of first-principles simulations of coupled shear and tensile deformations for the two most frequent slip systems ({110}<111> and {112}<111>) in six ideal cubic crystals are used to evaluate the uniaxial tensile strengths in three low-index crystallographic directions (<100>, <110>, and <111>) by assuming a shear instability in the weakest shear system. While instabilities occurring under <100> tension are mostly related to the shear in the {112} plane, those occurring during loading in the other two directions are associated with {110} planes. The results are consistent with those predicted by available elastic analyses. The weakest tendency to fail by shear is predicted for uniaxial tension along <100>. This is consistent with the occurrence of {100} cleavage planes in bcc metals.

?erný, M.; Šesták, P.; Pokluda, J.; Šob, M.

2013-01-01

314

Tensile & impact behaviour of natural fibre-reinforced composite materials  

SciTech Connect

Short abaca fiber reinforced composite materials are fabricated and investigated for short term performance. Abaca plants which grow in abundance in Asia contain fibers that are inexpensive but underutilized. This study attempts to utilize the abaca fibers for composite material structure as a possible alternative to timber products in building applications. The composite material is fabricated using the hand lay-up method under varying fiber length and fiber volume fraction. The fibers are impregnated with a mixture of resins which cures at room temperature. A fabricating facility is designed to accommodate fabrication of lamina. Tensile and impact properties are determined in relation to the length and volume fraction of the fiber. For a given fiber length, the tensile and impact strength increase as the volume fraction increases up to a limiting value. And for a given fiber volume fraction, the tensile strength increases but the impact strength decreases as the fiber length increases. This behavior of abaca fiber-reinforced composite lamina will help in optimizing the design parameter in random composite panels.

Tobias, B.C. [Victoria Univ. of Technology, Footscray (Australia). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1993-12-31

315

In situ EBSD during tensile test of aluminum AA3003 sheet.  

PubMed

Miniature tensile-test specimens of soft-annealed, weakly textured AA3003 aluminum sheet in 0.9 mm thickness were deformed until fracture inside a scanning electron microscope. Tensile strength measured by the miniature tensile test stage agreed well with the tensile strength by regular tensile testing. Strain over the microscope field of view was determined from changes in positions of constituent particles. Slip lines were visible in secondary electron images already at 0.3% strain; activity from secondary slip systems became apparent at 2% strain. Orientation rotation behavior of the tensile load axis with respect to the crystallographic axes agreed well with previously reported trends for other aluminum alloys. Start of the fracture and tensile crack propagation were documented in secondary electron images. The region of fracture nucleation included and was surrounded by many grains that possessed high Schmid factors at zero strain. Crystal lattice rotation angles in the grains surrounding the initial fracture zone were higher than average while rotations inside the initial fracture zone were lower than average for strains from zero to 31%. The orientation rotation behavior of the tensile load axes of the grains around the fracture zone deviated from the average behavior in this material. PMID:24314927

Kahl, Sören; Peng, Ru Lin; Calmunger, Mattias; Olsson, Björn; Johansson, Sten

2014-03-01

316

Mechanical tensile testing of titanium 15-3-3-3 and Kevlar 49 at cryogenic temperatures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Titanium 15-3-3-3 and Kevlar 49 are highly desired materials for structural components in cryogenic applications due to their low thermal conductivity at low temperatures. Previous tests have indicated that titanium 15-3-3-3 becomes increasingly brittle as the temperature decreases. Furthermore, little is known regarding the mechanical properties of Kevlar 49 at low temperatures, most specifically its Young's modulus. This testing investigates the mechanical properties of both materials at cryogenic temperatures through cryogenic mechanical tensile testing to failure. The elongation, ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, and break strength of both materials are provided and analyzed here.

James, B. L.; Martinez, R. M.; Shirron, P.; Tuttle, J.; Galassi, N. M.; McGuinness, D. S.; Puckett, D.; Francis, J. J.; Flom, Y.

2012-06-01

317

Carbon fibre compressive strength and its dependence on structure and morphology  

Microsoft Academic Search

The axial compressive strength of carbon fibres varies with the fibre tensile modulus and precursor material. While the development of tensile modulus and strength in carbon fibres has been the subject of numerous investigations, increasing attention is now being paid to the fibre and the composite compressive strength. In the present investigation, pitch- and PAN-based carbon fibres with wide-ranging moduli

S. Kumar; D. P. Anderson; A. S. Crasto

1993-01-01

318

Tensile behavior of unnotched and notched tungsten-copper laminar composites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Relations were studied between the tensile strengths of unnotched and of notched, and elastic moduli of unnotched laminar sheet or foil composites and the amounts of reinforcement. Tungsten was used as the reinforcement and copper as the matrix, and the tests were run at room temperature. Three thicknesses of tungsten (i.e., 0.00254, 0.0127, and 0.0254 cm (0.001, 0.005, and 0.010 in) were used and the nominal volume fraction of tungsten was varied from about 0.05 to 0.95. It was found that the tensile strength of the unnotched specimens could be related to the amount of reinforcement, as could the elastic moduli, and that these values could be predicted by use of the rule of mixtures. The tensile strengths of the notched laminar composites could be predicted by use of the rule of mixtures using strengths for notched constituents, provided notch effects did not predominate.

Hoffman, C. A.

1976-01-01

319

Change in tensile properties of neoprene and nitrile gloves after repeated exposures to acetone and thermal decontamination.  

PubMed

This study investigated the change in tensile properties of neoprene and nitrile gloves after repeated cycles of exposure to acetone, followed by thermal decontamination. The glove was exposed to acetone (outer surface in contact with chemical), subjected to thermal decontamination, and tested for the tensile strength and the ultimate elongation. Thermal decontamination was carried out inside an oven for 16 hours at 100 degrees C. The exposure/decontamination procedure was repeated for a maximum of 10 cycles. For neoprene versus acetone, the mean tensile strength consistently decreased after each exposure/decontamination cycle. Multiple comparisons indicated that the mean tensile strengths between the new swatches and each exposure/decontamination group were significantly different (p < 0.05). The loss of either tensile strength or ultimate elongation was less than 23% compared with new swatches after four exposure/decontamination cycles. Swatches with out acetone exposure were then cycled through the oven in the same manner. It was found that both the heat used for thermal decontamination and acetone exposure significantly affected the tensile strength and ultimate elongation. For nitrile gloves exposed to acetone, the mean tensile strength remained virtually unchanged (p > 0.05). The mean tensile strength for the new swatches was 37.1 MPa and the mean tensile strength after nine exposure/decontamination cycles was 36.0 MPa, with a loss less than 3%. The largest single cycle loss for ultimate elongation occurred during the first exposure/decontamination cycle for both glove materials. In our previous study, decisions regarding the effectiveness of the decontamination process were based on having no discernible change in the breakthrough time and steady-state permeation rate. The results of this study indicate that the effectiveness of the decontamination process cannot be based on permeation parameters alone but must also take into account the change in physical properties. PMID:16276643

Gao, Pengfei; Tomasovic, Beth

2005-11-01

320

Development of High Specific Strength Envelope Materials  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Progress in materials technology has produced a much more durable synthetic fabric envelope for the non-rigid airship. Flexible materials are required to form airship envelopes, ballonets, load curtains, gas bags and covering rigid structures. Polybenzoxazole fiber (Zylon) and polyalirate fiber (Vectran) show high specific tensile strength, so that we developed membrane using these high specific tensile strength fibers as a load carrier. The main material developed is a Zylon or Vectran load carrier sealed internally with a polyurethane bonded inner gas retention film (EVOH). The external surface provides weather protecting with, for instance, a titanium oxide integrated polyurethane or Tedlar film. The mechanical test results show that tensile strength 1,000 N/cm is attained with weight less than 230g/m2. In addition to the mechanical properties, temperature dependence of the joint strength and solar absorptivity and emissivity of the surface are measured.?

Komatsu, Keiji; Sano, Masa-Aki; Kakuta, Yoshiaki

321

Manual for LDEF tensile tests  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

One of the experiments aboard the NASA Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) consists of a tray of approximately one hundred tensile specimens of several candidate space structure composite materials. During the LDEF flight the materials will be subjected to the space environment and to possible contamination during launch and recovery. Tensile tests of representative samples were made before the LDEF flight to obtain baseline data. Similar tests will be made on control specimens stored on earth for the length of the LDEF flight and on recovered flight specimens. This manual codifies the details of testing, data acquisition, and handling used in obtaining the baseline data so that the same procedures and equipment will be used on the subsequent tests.

Witte, W. G., Jr.

1985-01-01

322

Preparation and tensile properties of amorphous Fe 78Si 9B 13\\/nano-Ni laminated composite  

Microsoft Academic Search

Amorphous Fe78Si9B13\\/nano-Ni laminated composite was prepared by electrodeposition method. The tensile properties of laminated composite at room temperature were examined. The laminated composite exhibits a very high tensile strength and reasonable tensile elongation. This is attributed to a good bonding between amorphous Fe78Si9B13 layer and nano-Ni layers. The amorphous layer can deform in conformity with Ni layers and be significantly

X. F. Li; K. F. Zhang; G. F. Wang

2007-01-01

323

Tensile properties in the oriented blends of high-density polyethylene and isotactic polypropylene obtained by dynamic packing injection molding  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article, tensile properties have been discussed in terms of phase morphology, crystallinity and molecular orientation in the HDPE\\/iPP blends, prepared via dynamic packing injection molding, with aid of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) as well as two dimensional X-ray scattering (2D WAXS). For the un-oriented blends, the tensile properties (tensile strength and modulus) are mainly

Bing Na; Ke Wang; Qin Zhang; Rongni Du; Qiang Fu

2005-01-01

324

The use of the maturity concept in evaluating development of concrete pullout strength  

E-print Network

. 2 . Maturity relationships could also be established with: (a) splitting tensile strength; and (b) modulus of elasticrty. Lew and Reichard (16) investigated strength properties of concrete at early ages by using the maturity concept . Maturity... relationships were established with: (a) compressive strength; ( b) splitting tensile strength; ( c) bonding strength of reinforcement and concrete; and (d) modulus of elasticity. The following conclusion was reached from the results of the investigation...

Dilly, Ronald Lee

1981-01-01

325

Insights into the effects of tensile and compressive loadings on human femur bone  

PubMed Central

Background: Fragile fractures are most likely manifestations of fatigue damage that develop under repetitive loading conditions. Numerous microcracks disperse throughout the bone with the tensile and compressive loads. In this study, tensile and compressive load tests are performed on specimens of both the genders within 19 to 83 years of age and the failure strength is estimated. Materials and Methods: Fifty five human femur cortical samples are tested. They are divided into various age groups ranging from 19-83 years. Mechanical tests are performed on an Instron 3366 universal testing machine, according to American Society for Testing and Materials International (ASTM) standards. Results: The results show that stress induced in the bone tissue depends on age and gender. It is observed that both tensile and compression strengths reduces as age advances. Compressive strength is more than tensile strength in both the genders. Conclusion: The compression and tensile strength of human femur cortical bone is estimated for both male and female subjecting in the age group of 19-83 years. The fracture toughness increases till 35 years in male and 30 years in female and reduces there after. Mechanical properties of bone are age and gender dependent. PMID:24800190

Havaldar, Raviraj; Pilli, S. C.; Putti, B. B.

2014-01-01

326

Tensile and fatigue properties of 17-4 PH stainless steel at high temperatures  

Microsoft Academic Search

The tensile and high-cycle fatigue properties for 17-4 PH* stainless steels in three different conditions were investigated\\u000a at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 400 C. Results indicated that the yield strength and fatigue strength for\\u000a the three conditions at a given temperature took the following order: condition H900 > condition A> condition H1150. The yield\\u000a strength of each condition

Jui-Hung Wu; Chih-Kuang Lin

2002-01-01

327

A Tensile Deformation Model for In-situ Dendrite/Metallic Glass Matrix Composites  

PubMed Central

In-situ dendrite/metallic glass matrix composites (MGMCs) with a composition of Ti46Zr20V12Cu5Be17 exhibit ultimate tensile strength of 1510?MPa and fracture strain of about 7.6%. A tensile deformation model is established, based on the five-stage classification: (1) elastic-elastic, (2) elastic-plastic, (3) plastic-plastic (yield platform), (4) plastic-plastic (work hardening), and (5) plastic-plastic (softening) stages, analogous to the tensile behavior of common carbon steels. The constitutive relations strongly elucidate the tensile deformation mechanism. In parallel, the simulation results by a finite-element method (FEM) are in good agreement with the experimental findings and theoretical calculations. The present study gives a mathematical model to clarify the work-hardening behavior of dendrites and softening of the amorphous matrix. Furthermore, the model can be employed to simulate the tensile behavior of in-situ dendrite/MGMCs. PMID:24085187

Qiao, J. W.; Zhang, T.; Yang, F. Q.; Liaw, P. K.; Pauly, S.; Xu, B. S.

2013-01-01

328

A tensile deformation model for in-situ dendrite/metallic glass matrix composites.  

PubMed

In-situ dendrite/metallic glass matrix composites (MGMCs) with a composition of Ti??Zr??V??Cu?Be?? exhibit ultimate tensile strength of 1510 MPa and fracture strain of about 7.6%. A tensile deformation model is established, based on the five-stage classification: (1) elastic-elastic, (2) elastic-plastic, (3) plastic-plastic (yield platform), (4) plastic-plastic (work hardening), and (5) plastic-plastic (softening) stages, analogous to the tensile behavior of common carbon steels. The constitutive relations strongly elucidate the tensile deformation mechanism. In parallel, the simulation results by a finite-element method (FEM) are in good agreement with the experimental findings and theoretical calculations. The present study gives a mathematical model to clarify the work-hardening behavior of dendrites and softening of the amorphous matrix. Furthermore, the model can be employed to simulate the tensile behavior of in-situ dendrite/MGMCs. PMID:24085187

Qiao, J W; Zhang, T; Yang, F Q; Liaw, P K; Pauly, S; Xu, B S

2013-01-01

329

Changes in boron fiber strength due to surface removal by chemical etching  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The effects of chemical etching on the tensile strength of commercial boron/tungsten fibers were investigated. Fibers with as-received diameters of 203, 143, and 100 micrometers were etched to diameters as small as 43 micrometers. The etching generally resulted in increasing fiber tensile strength with decreasing fiber diameter. And for the 203 micrometer fibers there was an accompanying significant decrease in the coefficient of variation of the tensile strength for diameters down to 89 micrometers. Heat treating these fibers above 1,173 K in a vacuum caused a marked decrease in the average tensile strength of at least 80 percent. But after the fibers were etched, their strengths exceeded the as-received strengths. The tensile strength behavior is explained in terms of etching effects on surface flaws and the residual stress pattern of the as-received fibers.

Smith, R. J.

1976-01-01

330

The Flexural Strength of Aramid Fiber Composites  

Microsoft Academic Search

An analysis is presented for the strength in three-point flexural loading of a rectangular unidirectional composite beam reinforced with Keviar®1 49 aramid fibers. The material behavior is assumed to be linearly elastic in tension and elastic-perfectly plastic in compression. The statistical effects of volume and stress distribution on tensile strength are included in the model. The predicted strength agrees reasonably

Carl Zweben

1978-01-01

331

Strength of porcelain fused to titanium beams  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purposes of this study were to measure strengths of layered porcelain fused to titanium beams, determine failure modes, and investigate the porcelain-titanium interface. A three-point flexural test and formulas derived especially for this purpose were used. The strength of layered porcelain-ceramic beams was limited by the cohesive tensile or compressive strengths of the porcelain, not by the porcelaintitanium interfacial

Shane N. White; Ly Ho; Angelo A. Caputo; Edward Goo

1996-01-01

332

Fatigue strength of socket welded pipe joint  

SciTech Connect

Fully reversed four point bending fatigue tests were carried out on small diameter socket welded joints made of carbon steels. Experimental parameters were pipe diameter, thicknesses of pipe and socket wall, throat depth and shape of fillet welds, slip-on and diametral gaps in the socket welding, lack of penetration at the root of fillet welds, and peening of fillet welds. In most cases a fatigue crack started from the root of the fillet, but in the case of higher stress amplitude, it tended to start from the toe of fillet. The standard socket welded joint for a pipe with a 50 mm nominal diameter showed a relatively low fatigue strength of 46 MPa in stress amplitude at the 10{sup 7} cycles failure life. This value corresponds to about 1/5 of that for the smoothed base metal specimens in axial fatigue. The fatigue strength decreased with increasing pipe diameter, and increased with increasing thickness of the pipe and socket wall. The effects of throat depth and shape of fillet welds on fatigue strength were not significant. Contrary to expectation, the fatigue strength of a socket welded joint without slip-on gap is Higher than that of the joint with a normal gap. A lack of penetration at the root deleteriously reduced fatigue strength, showing 14 MPa in stress amplitude at the 10{sup 7} cycles failure life for the 50 mm diameter socket joint.

Higuchi, Makoto [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries, Yokohama (Japan). Research Inst.; Hayashi, Makoto [Hitachi Ltd. (Japan). Mechanical Research Inst.; Yamauchi, Takayoshi [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Takasago (Japan). Takasago Research Inst.; Iida, Kunihiro [Shibaura Inst. of Technology, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Sato, Masanobu [Japan Power Engineering and Inspection Corp., Tokyo (Japan). Welding Engineering Dept.

1995-12-01

333

The tensile behavior of carbon fibers at high temperatures up to 2400 °C  

Microsoft Academic Search

The tensile behavior of four different brands of carbon fibers (a rayon-based, a PAN-based, and 2 pitch-based fibers) has been investigated at various temperatures up to 2400 °C. The tests were carried out using an original fiber testing apparatus. Various mechanical properties including strength and Young's modulus, as well as Weibull statistical parameters were extracted from test data. Typical tensile

Cédric Sauder; Jacques Lamon; René Pailler

2004-01-01

334

Apple Strength Issues  

SciTech Connect

Strength of the apple parts has been noticed to decrease, especially those installed by the new induction heating system since the LEP campaign started. Fig. 1 shows the ultimate tensile strength (UTS), yield strength (YS), and elongation of the installed or installation-simulated apples on various systems. One can clearly see the mean values of UTS and YS of the post-LEP parts decreased by about 8 ksi and 6 ksi respectively from those of the pre-LEP parts. The slight increase in elongation seen in Fig.1 can be understood from the weak inverse relationship between the strength and elongation in metals. Fig.2 shows the weak correlation between the YS and elongation of the parts listed in Fig. 1. Strength data listed in Figure 1 were re-plotted as histograms in Figs. 3 and 4. Figs. 3a and 4a show histograms of all UTS and YS data. Figs. 3b and 4b shows histograms of pre-LEP data and Figs. 3c and 4c of post-LEP data. Data on statistical scatter of tensile strengths have been rarely published by material suppliers. Instead, only the minimum 'guaranteed' strength data are typically presented. An example of strength distribution of aluminum 7075-T6 sheet material, listed in Fig. 5, show that its scatter width of both UTS and YS for a single sheet can be about 6 ksi and for multi-lot scatter can be as large as 11 ksi even though the sheets have been produced through well-controlled manufacturing process. By approximating the histograms shown in Figs. 3 and 4 by a Gaussian or similar type of distribution curves, one can plausibly see the strength reductions in the later or more recent apples. The pre-LEP data in Figs. 3b and 4b show wider scatter than the post-LEP data in Figs. 3c and 4c and seem to follow the binomial distribution of strength indicating that the apples might have been made from two different lots of material, either from two different vendors or from two different melts of perhaps slightly different chemical composition by a single vendor. The post-LEP apples seem to have been from a single batch of material. The pre-LEP apples of the weak strength and the post-LEP apples with even weaker strength could have been made of the same batch of material, and the small strength differential might be due to the difference in the induction heating system. If the pre-LEP apples with the lower strength and the post LEP apples are made from the same batch of material, their combined scatter of strength data would be wider and can be understood as a result of the additional processing steps of stress relief and induction heating as discussed.

Syn, C

2009-12-22

335

Establishing Correlations for Predicting Tensile Properties Based on the Shear Punch Test and Vickers Microhardness data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A series of mechanical tests was performed on a matrix of pressure vessel alloys to establish correlations between shear punch tests (SPT), microhardness (Hv), and tensile data. The purpose is to estimate tensile properties from SPT and Hv data. Small specimen testing is central to characterization of irradiation-induced changes in alloys used for nuclear applications. SPT have the potential for estimating tensile yield and ultimate strengths, strain hardening and ductility data, by using TEM disks, for example. Additional insight into SPT was gained by performing finite element analysis (FEA) simulations.

Milot, Timothy S.

336

Probabilistic simulation of uncertainties in composite uniaxial strengths  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Probabilistic composite micromechanics methods are developed that simulate uncertainties in unidirectional fiber composite strengths. These methods are in the form of computational procedures using composite mechanics with Monte Carlo simulation. The variables for which uncertainties are accounted include constituent strengths and their respective scatter. A graphite/epoxy unidirectional composite (ply) is studied to illustrate the procedure and its effectiveness to formally estimate the probable scatter in the composite uniaxial strengths. The results show that ply longitudinal tensile and compressive, transverse compressive and intralaminar shear strengths are not sensitive to single fiber anomalies (breaks, intergacial disbonds, matrix microcracks); however, the ply transverse tensile strength is.

Chamis, C. C.; Stock, T. A.

1990-01-01

337

Study on ARALL failure behavior under tensile loading  

SciTech Connect

This paper studies the failure behavior of ARALL (Aramid Aluminum Laminate) under tensile loading by means of acoustic emission (AE), optical metallography (OM) and scanning electronic microscope (SEM), and analyzes the fracture appearance of ARALL and its fracture characteristics. The damage models of ARALL are concluded in this paper. The results show that ARALL will yield under tensile loading, and its strength will decrease as the content of resin increases. During fracture process, AE amplitude distribution curves show that there are three obvious peaks, which respectively correspond to separation of the interface between fibers and resin, local delamination damage and fracture of a small quantity of fibers, and delamination damage of large area and final fracture of a large numbers of fibers. Dynamic damage and fracture process of ARALL can be detected by AE.

Yan Hai; Ren Rongzhen; Tao Chunhu; Li Hongyun [Inst. of Aeronautical Materials, Beijing (China)] [Inst. of Aeronautical Materials, Beijing (China)

1996-12-15

338

The role of defects in the tensile properties of silicene  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Effects of vacancies and Stone-Wales defects on the mechanical properties of silicene are investigated through molecular dynamic finite element method with Tersoff potential. Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio and uniaxial tensile stress-strain curves are considered in the armchair and zigzag directions. It is found that pristine and lowly defective silicene sheets exhibit almost the same elastic nature up to fracture points. However, a single defect weakens significantly the silicene sheet, resulting in a considerable reduction in the fracture strength. One 2-atom vacancy in the sheet's center reduces 18-20 % in fracture stress and 33-35 % in fracture strain. The weakening effects of Stone-Wales defects vary with the tensile direction and the orientation of these defects.

Le, Minh-Quy; Nguyen, Danh-Truong

2015-03-01

339

The postirradiation tensile properties and microstructure of several vanadium alloys  

SciTech Connect

Tensile specimens of V-15Cr-5Ti, Vanstar-7, V-3Ti-1si, and V-20Ti were irradiated at 420)degrees)C in FFTF-MOTA to a damage level of 82 dpa. Helium was preimplanted to levels up to 480 appm in selected specimens using a modified tritium trick. Irradiation hardening was the dominant effect influencing the postirradiation tensile properties, and it markedly increased the yield strength and reduced the total elogation. The V-15Cr-5Ti alloy was very sensitive to helium embrittlement, but Vanstar-7 and V-3Ti-1Si were only slightly affected. Without helium, negligible swelling (<1%) were measured in V-3Ti-1Si and V-20Ti. Preimplanted helium increased swelling in V-3Ti-1Si by increasing cavity nucleation. 11 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

Braski, D.N.

1988-01-01

340

Tensile Properties and Fracture Behavior of Different Carbon Nanotube-Grafted Polyacrylonitrile-Based Carbon Fibers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The tensile properties and fracture behavior of different carbon nanotube (CNT)-grafted polyacrylonitrile-based (T1000GB) single carbon fibers were investigated. Grafting of CNTs was achieved via chemical vapor deposition (CVD). When Fe(C5H5)2 (also applied via CVD) was used as the catalyst, the tensile strength and Weibull modulus of the carbon fibers were improved, possibly due to the growth of dense CNT networks on the carbon fibers, which may have led to a reduction in the number of strength-limiting defects. Separately, at lower concentrations of an Fe(NO3)3·9H2O catalyst in ethanol, which was applied via dipping, the tensile strength of CNT-grafted fibers was nearly identical to that of the as-received fibers, although the Weibull modulus was higher. For higher concentrations of the Fe(NO3)3·9H2O catalyst, however, the tensile strength and the Weibull modulus were lower than those for the as-received material. Although the density of the CNT network increased with the concentration of the Fe(NO3)3·9H2O catalyst in the ethanol solution, heating of the ethanolic Fe(NO3)3·9H2O catalyst solution generated nitric acid (HNO3) due to decomposition, which damaged the fiber surfaces, resulting in an increase in the number of flaws and consequently a reduction in the tensile strength. Therefore, the tensile strength and Weibull modulus of CNT-grafted carbon fibers vary due to the combination of these effects and as a function of the catalyst concentration.

Naito, Kimiyoshi

2014-11-01

341

Tensile Properties of Hydrogels and of Snake Skin  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Stimulus-responsive or 'smart' gels are of potential interest as sensors and actuators, in industrial separations, and as permeable delivery systems. In most applications, a certain degree of mechanical strength and toughness will be required, yet the large-strain behavior of gels has not been widely reported. Some exceptions include work on gelatin and other food gels, some characterization of soft gels applicable for in-vitro cell growth studies, and toughness determinations on commercial contact lens materials. In general, it can be anticipated that the gel stiffness will increase with increasing degree of crosslinking, but the tensile strength may go through a maximum. Gel properties can be tailored by varying not only the degree of crosslinking, but also the polymer concentration and the nature of the polymer backbone (e.g. its stiffness or solubility). Polypeptides provide an especially interesting case, where secondary structure affects trends in moduli and conformational transitions may accompany phase changes. A few papers on the tensile properties of responsive gels have begun to appear. The responsive hydrogel chosen for the present study, crosslinked hydroxypropylcellulose, shrinks over a rather narrow temperature range near 44 C. Some vertebrate skin is also subject to substantial strain. Among reptiles, the morphologies of the skin and scales show wide variations. Bauer et al. described the mechanical properties and histology of gecko skin; longitudinal tensile properties of snake skin were examined by Jayne with reference to locomotion. The present measurements focus on adaptations related to feeding, including the response of the skin to circumferential tension. Tensile properties will be related to interspecific and regional variation in skin structure and folding.

Hinkley, Jeffrey A.; Savitzky, Alan H.; Rivera, Gabriel; Gehrke, Stevin H.

2002-01-01

342

Static and Dynamic Flexural Strength Anisotropy of Barre Granite  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Granite exhibits anisotropy due to pre-existing microcracks under tectonic loadings; and the mechanical property anisotropy such as flexural/tensile strength is vital to many rock engineering applications. In this paper, Barre Granite is studied to understand the flexural strength anisotropy under a wide range of loading rates using newly proposed semi-circular bend tests. Static tests are conducted with a MTS hydraulic servo-control testing machine and dynamic tests with a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) system. Six samples groups are fabricated with respect to the three principle directions of Barre granite. Pulse shaping technique is used in all dynamic SHPB tests to facilitate dynamic stress equilibrium. Finite element method is utilized to build up equations calculating the flexural tensile strength. For samples in the same orientation group, a loading rate dependence of the flexural tensile strength is observed. The measured flexural tensile strength is higher than the tensile strength measured using Brazilian disc method at given loading rate and this scenario has been rationalized using a non-local failure theory. The flexural tensile strength anisotropy features obvious dependence on the loading rates, the higher the loading rate, the less the anisotropy and this phenomenon may be explained considering the interaction of the preferentially oriented microcracks.

Dai, F.; Xia, K.; Zuo, J. P.; Zhang, R.; Xu, N. W.

2013-11-01

343

Micro-tensile testing system  

DOEpatents

A micro-tensile testing system providing a stand-alone test platform for testing and reporting physical or engineering properties of test samples of materials having thicknesses of approximately between 0.002 inch and 0.030 inch, including, for example, LiGA engineered materials. The testing system is able to perform a variety of static, dynamic, and cyclic tests. The testing system includes a rigid frame and adjustable gripping supports to minimize measurement errors due to deflection or bending under load; serrated grips for securing the extremely small test sample; high-speed laser scan micrometers for obtaining accurate results; and test software for controlling the testing procedure and reporting results.

Wenski, Edward G. (Lenexa, KS)

2007-07-17

344

Micro-tensile testing system  

DOEpatents

A micro-tensile testing system providing a stand-alone test platform for testing and reporting physical or engineering properties of test samples of materials having thicknesses of approximately between 0.002 inch and 0.030 inch, including, for example, LiGA engineered materials. The testing system is able to perform a variety of static, dynamic, and cyclic tests. The testing system includes a rigid frame and adjustable gripping supports to minimize measurement errors due to deflection or bending under load; serrated grips for securing the extremely small test sample; high-speed laser scan micrometers for obtaining accurate results; and test software for controlling the testing procedure and reporting results.

Wenski, Edward G.

2006-01-10

345

Micro-tensile testing system  

DOEpatents

A micro-tensile testing system providing a stand-alone test platform for testing and reporting physical or engineering properties of test samples of materials having thicknesses of approximately between 0.002 inch and 0.030 inch, including, for example, LiGA engineered materials. The testing system is able to perform a variety of static, dynamic, and cyclic tests. The testing system includes a rigid frame and adjustable gripping supports to minimize measurement errors due to deflection or bending under load; serrated grips for securing the extremely small test sample; high-speed laser scan micrometers for obtaining accurate results; and test software for controlling the testing procedure and reporting results.

Wenski, Edward G. (Lenexa, KS)

2007-08-21

346

Microstructure-Tensile Properties Correlation for the Ti-6Al-4V Titanium Alloy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Finding the quantitative microstructure-tensile properties correlations is the key to achieve performance optimization for various materials. However, it is extremely difficult due to their non-linear and highly interactive interrelations. In the present investigation, the lamellar microstructure features-tensile properties correlations of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy are studied using an error back-propagation artificial neural network (ANN-BP) model. Forty-eight thermomechanical treatments were conducted to prepare the Ti-6Al-4V alloy with different lamellar microstructure features. In the proposed model, the input variables are microstructure features including the ? platelet thickness, colony size, and ? grain size, which were extracted using Image Pro Plus software. The output variables are the tensile properties, including ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, elongation, and reduction of area. Fourteen hidden-layer neurons which can make ANN-BP model present the most excellent performance were applied. The training results show that all the relative errors between the predicted and experimental values are within 6%, which means that the trained ANN-BP model is capable of providing precise prediction of the tensile properties for Ti-6Al-4V alloy. Based on the corresponding relations between the tensile properties predicted by ANN-BP model and the lamellar microstructure features, it can be found that the yield strength decreases with increasing ? platelet thickness continuously. However, the ? platelet thickness exerts influence on the elongation in a more complicated way. In addition, for a given ? platelet thickness, the yield strength and the elongation both increase with decreasing ? grain size and colony size. In general, the ? grain size and colony size play a more important role in affecting the tensile properties of Ti-6Al-4V alloy than the ? platelet thickness.

Shi, Xiaohui; Zeng, Weidong; Sun, Yu; Han, Yuanfei; Zhao, Yongqing; Guo, Ping

2015-04-01

347

Microstructure-Tensile Properties Correlation for the Ti-6Al-4V Titanium Alloy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Finding the quantitative microstructure-tensile properties correlations is the key to achieve performance optimization for various materials. However, it is extremely difficult due to their non-linear and highly interactive interrelations. In the present investigation, the lamellar microstructure features-tensile properties correlations of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy are studied using an error back-propagation artificial neural network (ANN-BP) model. Forty-eight thermomechanical treatments were conducted to prepare the Ti-6Al-4V alloy with different lamellar microstructure features. In the proposed model, the input variables are microstructure features including the ? platelet thickness, colony size, and ? grain size, which were extracted using Image Pro Plus software. The output variables are the tensile properties, including ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, elongation, and reduction of area. Fourteen hidden-layer neurons which can make ANN-BP model present the most excellent performance were applied. The training results show that all the relative errors between the predicted and experimental values are within 6%, which means that the trained ANN-BP model is capable of providing precise prediction of the tensile properties for Ti-6Al-4V alloy. Based on the corresponding relations between the tensile properties predicted by ANN-BP model and the lamellar microstructure features, it can be found that the yield strength decreases with increasing ? platelet thickness continuously. However, the ? platelet thickness exerts influence on the elongation in a more complicated way. In addition, for a given ? platelet thickness, the yield strength and the elongation both increase with decreasing ? grain size and colony size. In general, the ? grain size and colony size play a more important role in affecting the tensile properties of Ti-6Al-4V alloy than the ? platelet thickness.

Shi, Xiaohui; Zeng, Weidong; Sun, Yu; Han, Yuanfei; Zhao, Yongqing; Guo, Ping

2015-02-01

348

Notched Strength Allowables and Inplane Shear Strength of AS4/VRM-34 Textile Laminates  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Notched and unnotched strength allowables were developed for a textile composite to provide input data to analytical structural models based on the Pultruded Rod Stiffened Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) concept. Filled-hole tensile strength, filled-hole compressive strength, and inplane shear strength along stitch lines have been measured. The material system evaluated in this study is based on warp-knitted preforms of AS4 carbon fibers and VRM-34 epoxy resin, which have been processed via resin infusion and oven curing. All specimens were tested in as-fabricated (dry) condition. Filled-hole strengths were evaluated with and without through-thickness stitching. The effects of scaling on filled-hole tensile strength were evaluated by testing specimens in two widths, but with identical width / hole-diameter ratios. Inplane shear specimens were stitched in two configurations, and two specimen thicknesses were tested for each stitch configuration.

Grenoble, Ray W.; Johnston, William M.

2013-01-01

349

Process design of high-strength bolt of fully pearlitic high-carbon steel  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, fully pearlitic high-carbon steel, known as a higher delayed fracture strength material, with an ultimate tensile strength of 1410MPa was used for manufacturing a high-strength M8 bolt. Softening behavior was observed by a compression test of the material. The tensile strength of the material was measured after application of several drawings. On the basis of these test

Hyun-Chul Lee; Young-Gwan Jin; You-Hwan Lee; Il-Heon Son; Duk-Lak Lee; Yong-Taek Im

2010-01-01

350

A Novel Ni-Containing Powder Metallurgy Steel with Ultrahigh Impact, Fatigue, and Tensile Properties  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The impact toughness of powder metallurgy (PM) steel is typically inferior, and it is further impaired when the microstructure is strengthened. To formulate a versatile PM steel with superior impact, fatigue, and tensile properties, the influences of various microstructures, including ferrite, pearlite, bainite, and Ni-rich areas, were identified. The correlations between impact toughness with other mechanical properties were also studied. The results demonstrated that ferrite provides more resistance to impact loading than Ni-rich martensite, followed by bainite and pearlite. However, Ni-rich martensite presents the highest transverse rupture strength (TRS), fatigue strength, tensile strength, and hardness, followed by bainite, pearlite, and ferrite. With 74 pct Ni-rich martensite and 14 pct bainite, Fe-3Cr-0.5Mo-4Ni-0.5C steel achieves the optimal combination of impact energy (39 J), TRS (2170 MPa), bending fatigue strength at 2 × 106 cycles (770 MPa), tensile strength (1323 MPa), and apparent hardness (38 HRC). The impact energy of Fe-3Cr-0.5Mo-4Ni-0.5C steel is twice as high as those of the ordinary high-strength PM steels. These findings demonstrate that a high-strength PM steel with high-toughness can be produced by optimized alloy design and microstructure.

Wu, Ming-Wei; Shu, Guo-Jiun; Chang, Shih-Ying; Lin, Bing-Hao

2014-08-01

351

Diametrically opposite methylome-transcriptome relationships in high- and low-CpG promoter genes in postmitotic neural rat tissue  

PubMed Central

DNA methylation can control some CpG-poor genes but unbiased studies have not found a consistent genome-wide association with gene activity outside of CpG islands or shores possibly due to use of cell lines or limited bioinformatics analyses. We performed reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS) of rat dorsal root ganglia encompassing postmitotic primary sensory neurons (n = 5, r > 0.99; orthogonal validation p < 10?19). The rat genome suggested a dichotomy of genes previously reported in other mammals: low CpG content (< 3.2%) promoter (LCP) genes and high CpG content (? 3.2%) promoter (HCP) genes. A genome-wide integrated methylome-transcriptome analysis showed that LCP genes were markedly hypermethylated when repressed, and hypomethylated when active with a 40% difference in a broad region at the 5? of the transcription start site (p < 10?87 for -6000 bp to -2000 bp, p < 10?73 for -2000 bp to +2000 bp, no difference in gene body p = 0.42). HCP genes had minimal TSS-associated methylation regardless of transcription status, but gene body methylation appeared to be lost in repressed HCP genes. Therefore, diametrically opposite methylome-transcriptome associations characterize LCP and HCP genes in postmitotic neural tissue in vivo. PMID:22415013

Hartung, Theresa; Zhang, Lu; Kanwar, Rahul; Khrebtukova, Irina; Reinhardt, Matthias; Wang, Cheng; Therneau, Terry M.; Banck, Michaela S.; Schroth, Gary P.; Beutler, Andreas S.

2012-01-01

352

Diametral strain of fast reactor MOX fuel pins with austenitic stainless steel cladding irradiated to high burnup  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The C3M irradiation test, which was conducted in the experimental fast reactor, "Joyo", demonstrated that mixed oxide (MOX) fuel pins with austenitic steel cladding could attain a peak pellet burnup of about 130 GWd/t safely. The test fuel assembly consisted of 61 fuel pins, whose design specifications were similar to those of driver fuel pins of a prototype fast breeder reactor, "Monju". The irradiated fuel pins exhibited diametral strain due to cladding void swelling and irradiation creep. The cladding irradiation creep strain were due to the pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) as well as the internal gas pressure. From the fuel pin ceramographs and 137Cs gamma scanning, it was found that the PCMI was associated with the pellet swelling which was enhanced by the rim structure formation or by cesium uranate formation. The PCMI due to cesium uranate, which occurred near the top of the MOX fuel column, significantly affected cladding hoop stress and thermal creep, and the latter effect tended to increase the cumulative damage fraction (CDF) of the cladding though the CDF indicated that the cladding still had some margin to failure due to the creep damage.

Uwaba, Tomoyuki; Ito, Masahiro; Maeda, Koji

2011-09-01

353

Impact Tensile Properties of YAG Laser Welded Butt Joints Made by Different Steel Sheets for Vehicles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The tensile properties of YAG laser welded butt joints using different high strength steel sheets with a tensile strength of 270 MPa, 590 MPa and 980 MPa (denoted HR270, HR590 and HR980, respectively) were investigated at static and dynamic rates, together with the three kinds of laser welded joints made by the same steel sheets. The impact tensile tests were performed by using the vertical type of split Hopkinson tension bar apparatus, while the static tensile tests were carried out using a universal testing machine INSTRON5586. The impact tensile strengths were significantly increased in comparison with the static ones due to the effect of strain rate, which might be the contribution of the part of HR270 base metal. And in both of static and impact tests, the fracture strains of HR270-HR590 joint, HR270-HR980 joint and HR590-HR980 joint were about one half of the fracture strains observed in the same steel welded joints of HR270-HR270, HR270-HR270 and HR590-HR590, respectively.

Takahashi, Y.; Daimaruya, M.; Kobayashi, H.; Tsuda, H.; Fujiki, H.

354

Effect of particle size and volume fraction on tensile properties of fly ash/polyurea composites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fly ash, which consists of hollow particles with porous shells, was introduced into polyurea elastomer. A one-step method was chosen to fabricate pure polyurea and the polyurea matrix for the composites based on Isonate® 2143L (diisocyanate) and Versalink® P-1000 (diamine). Scanning electron microscopy was used to observe the fracture surfaces of the composites. Particle size and volume fraction were varied to study their effects on the tensile properties of the composites. The tensile properties of the pure polyurea and fly ash/polyurea (FA/PU) composites were tested using an Instron load frame with a 1 kN Interface model 1500ASK-200 load cell. Results showed that fly ash particles were distributed homogeneously in the polyurea matrix, and all of the composites displayed rubber-like tensile behavior similar to that of pure polyurea. The tensile strength of the composites was influenced by both the fly ash size and the volume fraction. Compared to the largest particle size or the highest volume fraction, an increase in tensile strength was achieved by reducing particle size and/or volume fraction. The strain at break of the composites also increased by using fine particles. In addition, the composites filled with 20% fly ash became softer. These samples showed lower plateau strength and larger strain at break than the other composites.

Qiao, Jing; Schaaf, Kristin; Amirkhizi, Alireza V.; Nemat-Nasser, Siavouche

2010-04-01

355

Tensile properties of SiC/aluminum filamentary composites - Thermal degradation effects  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Aluminium metal matrix composites with a low cost fiber, e.g. SiC, provide for an attractive combination of high elastic modulus and longitudinal strengths coupled with a low density. SiC (volume fraction 0.55)-aluminum (6061) systems have been studied in order to optimize fiber composite strength and processing parameters. A comparison of two SiC/aluminum composites produced by AVCO and DWA is provided. Fiber properties are shown to alter composite tensile properties and fracture morphology. The room temperature tensile strengths appear to be insensitive to thermal exposures at 500 C up to 150 h. The elastic modulus of the composites also appears to be stable up to 400 C, however variations in the loss modulus are apparent. The fracture morphology reflects the quality of the interfacial bond, fiber strengths and fiber processing.

Skinner, A.; Koczak, M. J.; Lawley, A.

1982-01-01

356

Dynamic-tensile-extrusion response of fluoropolymers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The quasistatic and dynamic response of two fluoropolymers--polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polychlorotrifluoroethylene (PCTFE)--have been extensively characterized. The two polymers exhibit significantly different failure behavior under tensile loading at moderate strain rates. Polytetrafluoroethylene resists formation of a neck and exhibits significant strain hardening. Independent of temperature or strain rate, PTFE sustains true strains to failure of approximately 1.5. Polychlorotrifluoroethylene, on the other hand, consistently necks at true strains of approximately 0.05. Here we investigate the influence of this propensity to neck or not between PCTFE and PTFE on their response under Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion. Similar to the Taylor Impact Rod, Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion is a strongly integrated test, probing a wide range of strain rates and stress states. The results of the Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion technique are compared with two classic techniques. Both polymers have been investigated using Tensile Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar.

Brown, Eric N.; Gray, George T., III; Trujillo, Carl P.

2009-06-01

357

Size Scaling of Tensile Failure Stress in a Soda-Lime-Silicate Float Glass  

Microsoft Academic Search

The (tensile) strength-size scaling of a float soda-lime silicate glass was studied using biaxial flexure and Hertzian ring crack initiation testing. The examined Weibull effective areas spanned ~ 0.4 to 48,000 mm2. Both the air- and tin-sides were tested. The air side was stronger than the tin side as others have observed; however, the differences in their characteristic strengths decreased

Andrew A Wereszczak; Timothy Philip Kirkland; Meredith E Ragan; Kevin T Strong; Hua-Tay Lin; P Patel

2010-01-01

358

Internal stress and yield strength of copper films on substrates  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Internal stress and yield strength of pure copper films on substrates were characterized by x-ray diffraction and thermal-cycle substrate curvature methods. The internal stress was of tension and decreased with increasing working-gas (argon) pressure and increased with increasing film thickness. Tensile yield strength of copper films on steel substrate was reciprocal to the film thickness. Similarly, the compressive yield strength depended strongly on the film thickness: the thinner the film thickness, the larger the compressive yield strength.

Zhang, Jian-Min; Zhang, Yan; Xu, Ke-Wei

2005-05-01

359

IMPACT STRENGTH OF GLASS AND GLASS CERAMIC  

SciTech Connect

Strength of glass and glass ceramic was measured with a bar impact technique. High-speed movies show regions of tensile and compressive failure. The borosilicate glass had a compressive strength of at least 2.2 GPa, and the glass ceramic at least 4 GPa. However, the BSG was much stronger in tension than GC. In ballistic tests, the BSG was the superior armor.

Bless, S.; Tolman, J. [Institute for Advanced Technology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78759 (United States)

2009-12-28

360

High-Hot-Strength Ceramic Fibers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Continuous fibers consisting of laminae of alumina and yttrium aluminum garnet offer exceptionally high strength, resistance to creep, and chemical stability at high temperatures. These fibers exceed tensile strength of sapphire fibers. Leading candidates for reinforcement of intermetallic-matrix composites in exhaust nozzles of developmental high-speed civil transport aircraft engines. Other applications are in aerospace, automotive, chemical-process, and power-generation industries.

Sayir, Ali; Matson, Lawrence E.

1994-01-01

361

Vol. 79, No. 2, 2002 261 Tensile Properties of Extruded Corn Protein  

E-print Network

Vol. 79, No. 2, 2002 261 Tensile Properties of Extruded Corn Protein Low-Density Polyethylene Films. 79(2):261­264 The strength of films extruded from powder blends of corn zein or corn gluten meal (CGM focused on the production of solvent- cast films. Corn and wheat protein (Aydt et al 1991; Herald et al

362

Composites: Part B 44 (2013) 584591 584 Tensile Properties of Carbon Nanofiber Reinforced Multiscale Syntactic Foams  

E-print Network

that the presence of CNFs leads to increased values of strength and modulus in syntactic foams containing 50 vol.% microballoons compared to unreinforced syntactic foams. The specific tensile modulus of all CNF reinforced foams without decreasing the particle packing limit in the material structure. Among different

Gupta, Nikhil

363

Microstructures and tensile properties of AZ31 magnesium alloy by continuous extrusion forming process  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study is to investigate the possibility of continuous extrusion forming (Conform process) of AZ31 magnesium alloy. The results indicate that continuous extrusion forming can refine the structure, improve the degree of the structure homogeneity and change the crystal orientation of basal plane and hence enhance the ductility but decrease tensile strength at room temperature. The fracture

Hui Zhang; Qiqi Yan; Luoxing Li

2008-01-01

364

In situ tensile and creep testing of lithiated silicon nanowires  

SciTech Connect

We present experimental results for uniaxial tensile and creep testing of fully lithiated silicon nanowires. A reduction in the elastic modulus is observed when silicon nanowires are alloyed with lithium and plastic deformation becomes possible when the wires are saturated with lithium. Creep testing was performed at fixed force levels above and below the tensile strength of the material. A linear dependence of the strain-rate on the applied stress was evident below the yield stress of the alloy, indicating viscous deformation behavior. The observed inverse exponential relationship between wire radius and strain rate below the yield stress indicates that material transport was controlled by diffusion. At stress levels approaching the yield strength of fully lithiated silicon, power-law creep appears to govern the strain-rate dependence on stress. These results have direct implications on the cycling conditions, rate-capabilities, and charge capacity of silicon and should prove useful for the design and construction of future silicon-based electrodes.

Boles, Steven T.; Kraft, Oliver [Institute for Applied Materials, KIT, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)] [Institute for Applied Materials, KIT, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Thompson, Carl V. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Mönig, Reiner [Institute for Applied Materials, KIT, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany) [Institute for Applied Materials, KIT, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Helmholtz Institute Ulm for Electrochemical Energy Storage (HIU), 89069 Ulm (Germany)

2013-12-23

365

Tensile Fracture of Welded Polymer Interfaces: Miscibility, Entanglements and Crazing  

E-print Network

Large-scale molecular simulations are performed to investigate tensile failure of polymer interfaces as a function of welding time $t$. Changes in the tensile stress, mode of failure and interfacial fracture energy $G_I$ are correlated to changes in the interfacial entanglements as determined from Primitive Path Analysis. Bulk polymers fail through craze formation, followed by craze breakdown through chain scission. At small $t$ welded interfaces are not strong enough to support craze formation and fail at small strains through chain pullout at the interface. Once chains have formed an average of about one entanglement across the interface, a stable craze is formed throughout the sample. The failure stress of the craze rises with welding time and the mode of craze breakdown changes from chain pullout to chain scission as the interface approaches bulk strength. The interfacial fracture energy $G_I$ is calculated by coupling the simulation results to a continuum fracture mechanics model. As in experiment, $G_I$ increases as $t^{1/2}$ before saturating at the average bulk fracture energy $G_b$. As in previous simulations of shear strength, saturation coincides with the recovery of the bulk entanglement density. Before saturation, $G_I$ is proportional to the areal density of interfacial entanglements. Immiscibiltiy limits interdiffusion and thus suppresses entanglements at the interface. Even small degrees of immisciblity reduce interfacial entanglements enough that failure occurs by chain pullout and $G_I \\ll G_b$.

Ting Ge; Gary S. Grest; Mark O. Robbins

2014-10-07

366

Ultra-high-strength boron fibers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Boron-on-tungsten fibers with tensile strength and strain-to-failure values increased by fifty percent over commercial grades are produced by controlled chemical-etching process. Improved fibers have potential applications as lightweight composites in ground vehicles, spacecraft, and rotors for energy storage.

Behrendt, D. R.; Dicarlo, J. A.; Grimes, H. H.; Smith, R. J.

1978-01-01

367

Testing white line strength in the dairy cow.  

PubMed

The tensile strength of 576 pieces of white line horn collected over 6 mo from 14 dairy cows restricted to parity 1 or 2 was tested. None of the cows had ever been lame. Seven cows were randomly assigned to receive 20 mg/d biotin supplementation, and 7 were not supplemented. Hoof horn samples were taken from zones 2 and 3 (the more proximal and distal sites of the abaxial white line) of the medial and lateral claws of both hind feet on d 1 and on 5 further occasions over 6 mo. The samples were analyzed at 100% water saturation. Hoof slivers were notched to ensure that tensile strength was measured specifically across the white line region. The tensile stress at failure was measured in MPa and was adjusted for the cross-sectional area of the notch site. Data were analyzed in a multilevel model, which accounted for the repeated measures within cows. All other variables were entered as fixed effects. In the final model, there was considerable variation in strength over time. Tensile strength was significantly higher in medial compared with lateral claws, and zone 2 was significantly stronger than zone 3. Where the white line was visibly damaged the tensile strength was low. Biotin supplementation did not affect the tensile strength of the white line. Results of this study indicate that damage to the white line impairs its tensile strength and that in horn with no visible abnormality the white line is weaker in the lateral hind claw than the medial and in zone 3 compared with zone 2. The biomechanical strength was lowest at zone 3 of the lateral hind claw, which is the most common site of white line disease lameness in cattle. PMID:15375047

Collis, V J; Green, L E; Blowey, R W; Packington, A J; Bonser, R H C

2004-09-01

368

Dynamic-Tensile Response of Fluoropolymers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The current work applies the recently developed Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion (Dyn-Ten-Ext) technique to polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polychlorotrifluoroethylene (PCTFE). Similar to the Taylor Impact Rod, Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion is a strongly integrated test, probing a wide range of strain rates and stress states. However, the stress state is primarily tensile enabling investigation of dynamic tensile failure modes. Here we investigate the influence of this propensity to neck or not between PCTFE and PTFE on their response under dynamic tensile extrusion loading. The results of the Dyn-Ten-Ext technique are compared with two classic techniques. Both polymers have been investigated using Tensile Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar. The quasistatic and dynamic responses of both fluoropolymers have been extensively characterized. The two polymers exhibit significantly different failure behavior under tensile loading at moderate strain rates. Polytetrafluoroethylene resists formation of a neck and exhibits significant strain hardening. Independent of temperature or strain rate, PTFE sustains true strains to failure of approximately 1.5. Polychlorotrifluoroethylene, on the other hand, consistently necks at true strains of approximately 0.05.

Brown, E. N.; Trujillo, C. P.; Gray, G. T.

2009-12-01

369

Dynamic-tensile-extrusion response of fluoropolymers  

SciTech Connect

The current work applies the recently developed Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion (Dyn-Ten-Ext) technique to polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polychlorotrifluoroethylene (PCTFE). Similar to the Taylor Impact Rod, Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion is a strongly integrated test, probing a wide range of strain rates and stress states. However, the stress state is primarily tensile enabling investigation of dynamic tensile failure modes. Here we investigate the influence of this propensity to neck or not between PCTFE and PTFE on their response under dynamic tensile extrusion loading. The results of the Dyn-Ten-Ext technique are compared with two classic techniques. Both polymers have been investigated using Tensile Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar. The quasistatic and dynamic responses of both fluoro-polymers have been extensively characterized. The two polymers exhibit significantly different failure behavior under tensile loading at moderate strain rates. Polytetrafluoroethylene resists formation of a neck and exhibits significant strain hardening. Independent of temperature or strain rate, PTFE sustains true strains to failure of approximately 1.5. Polychlorotrifluoroethylene, on the other hand, consistently necks at true strains of approximately 0.05.

Brown, Eric N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Trujillo, Carl P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gray, George T [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01

370

Wedge tension test of a high-strength bolt of fully pearlitic high-carbon steel  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using a wedge tension test for service and safety reasons, this study determines the fracture location of a previously developed high-strength M8 bolt with a tensile strength of 1600MPa. The strength distributions of the manufactured bolt are examined in compression and microhardness tests to ensure a better understanding of the experimental results of the wedge tension test. The strength variations

Hyun-Chul Lee; Young-Gwan Jin; Sun-Kwang Hwang; Ki-Ho Jung; Yong-Taek Im

2011-01-01

371

Strength Training  

MedlinePLUS

... comfortably perform the exercise for 8 to 15 repetitions. Before you begin any type of strength training ... added weight. Perform three sets of 8-15 repetitions (or reps) of each exercise, starting out with ...

372

Effect of Thermal Exposure on the Tensile Properties of Aluminum Alloys for Elevated Temperature Service  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Tensile properties were evaluated for four aluminum alloys that are candidates for airframe applications on high speed transport aircraft. These alloys included the Al-Cu-Mg-Ag alloys C415 and C416 and the Al-Cu-Li-Mg-Ag alloys RX818 and ML377. The Al-Cu-Mg alloys CM001, which was used on the Concorde SST, and 1143, which was modified from the alloy used on the TU144 Russian supersonic aircraft, were tested for comparison. The alloys were subjected to thermal exposure at 200 F, 225 F and 275 F for times up to 30,000 hours. Tensile tests were performed on thermally-exposed and as-received material at -65 F, room temperature, 200 F, 225 F and 275 F. All four candidate alloys showed significant tensile property improvements over CM001 and 1143. Room temperature yield strengths of the candidate alloys were at least 20% greater than for CM001 and 1143, for both the as-received and thermally-exposed conditions. The strength levels of alloy RX818 were the highest of all materials investigated, and were 5-10% higher than for ML377, C415 and C416 for the as-received condition and after 5,000 hours thermal exposure. RX818 was removed from this study after 5,000 hours exposure due to poor fracture toughness performance observed in a parallel study. After 30,000 hours exposure at 200 F and 225 F, the alloys C415, C416 and ML377 showed minor decreases in yield strength, tensile strength and elongation when compared to the as-received properties. Reductions in tensile strength from the as-received values were up to 25% for alloys C415, C416 and ML377 after 15,000 hours exposure at 275 F.

Edahl, Robert A., Jr.; Domack, Marcia

2004-01-01

373

Application of Gurson–Tvergaard–Needleman Constitutive Model to the Tensile Behavior of Reinforcing Bars with Corrosion Pits  

PubMed Central

Based on meso-damage mechanics and finite element analysis, the aim of this paper is to describe the feasibility of the Gurson–Tvergaard–Needleman (GTN) constitutive model in describing the tensile behavior of corroded reinforcing bars. The orthogonal test results showed that different fracture pattern and the related damage evolution process can be simulated by choosing different material parameters of GTN constitutive model. Compared with failure parameters, the two constitutive parameters are significant factors affecting the tensile strength. Both the nominal yield and ultimate tensile strength decrease markedly with the increase of constitutive parameters. Combining with the latest data and trial-and-error method, the suitable material parameters of GTN constitutive model were adopted to simulate the tensile behavior of corroded reinforcing bars in concrete under carbonation environment attack. The numerical predictions can not only agree very well with experimental measurements, but also simplify the finite element modeling process. PMID:23342140

Xu, Yidong; Qian, Chunxiang

2013-01-01

374

Application of Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman constitutive model to the tensile behavior of reinforcing bars with corrosion pits.  

PubMed

Based on meso-damage mechanics and finite element analysis, the aim of this paper is to describe the feasibility of the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) constitutive model in describing the tensile behavior of corroded reinforcing bars. The orthogonal test results showed that different fracture pattern and the related damage evolution process can be simulated by choosing different material parameters of GTN constitutive model. Compared with failure parameters, the two constitutive parameters are significant factors affecting the tensile strength. Both the nominal yield and ultimate tensile strength decrease markedly with the increase of constitutive parameters. Combining with the latest data and trial-and-error method, the suitable material parameters of GTN constitutive model were adopted to simulate the tensile behavior of corroded reinforcing bars in concrete under carbonation environment attack. The numerical predictions can not only agree very well with experimental measurements, but also simplify the finite element modeling process. PMID:23342140

Xu, Yidong; Qian, Chunxiang

2013-01-01

375

Tensile specimen in MTS testing machine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

L2000-256: Close up of tensile specimen in MTS testing machine. Back to back one inch gauge length axial extensometers attached to specimen for strain measurement (specimen is 2219 aluminum). Photographed in building 1205.

2000-01-01

376

Tensile specimen in MTS testing machine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Overall view of tensile specimen in MTS testing machine. Back to back one inch gauge length axial extensometers attached to specimen for strain measurement (specimen is 2219 aluminum). Photographed in building 1205.

2000-01-01

377

High temperature tensile testing of ceramic composites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The various components of a high temperature tensile testing system are evaluated. The objective is the high temperature tensile testing of SiC fiber reinforced reaction bonded Si3N4 specimens at test temperatures up to 1650 C (3000 F). Testing is to be conducted in inert gases and air. Gripping fixtures, specimen configurations, furnaces, optical strain measuring systems, and temperature measurement techniques are reviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of the various techniques are also noted.

Gyekenyesi, John Z.; Hemann, John H.

1988-01-01

378

Leached components from dental composites in oral simulating fluids and the resultant composite strengths.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to analyse the leached moieties of dental composites after storage in ethanol and organic acids of plaque and further evaluate the resultant effect on the diametral tensile strength (DTS) of the composites. Three commercial composites were used: Bis-GMA-based Z100, Bis-GMA/UDMA-based Heliomolar, and Bis-MPEPP-based Marathon One. The solutions used were: 99.9% acetic acid, 99% propionic acid and 75% ethanol. Specimens (4 mm diam. x 2 mm thick) were stored at 37 degrees C in 3 mL of solution for up to 30 days. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry was used to characterize the leached moieties and DTS of the specimens after immersion was evaluated. Data were analysed using ANOVA and Tukey LSD test. The eluted substances were not all the same in different solutions and composites but mostly increased with immersion time, and included diluents (TEGDMA and decamethacrylate) and some additives, such as an ultra-violet stabilizer (TINUVINP), plasticizers (dicyclohexyl phthalate and bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate), initiator (triphenyl stibine), coupling agent (gamma-methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane), and phenyl benzoate. The chief polymerizing monomers were not found. More kinds of components were found in the acetic acid and ethanol groups studied. The fewest kinds and quantities of leached moieties were found for Bis-GMA specimens and then Bis-GMA/UDMA ones, most of which are diluent agents. Bis-MPEPP specimens leached the most substances, which were composed mostly of a short phenyl group chain structure. The BisGMA composite showed the highest DTS (54.8 +/- 5.7 MPa), which was not greatly affected by the length of storage. Bis-GMA/UDMA (36.2 +/- 6.8 MPa) and Bis-MPEPP (26.1 +/- 4.5 MPa) composites were significantly reduced (P < 0.05) after 30 days storage in the ethanol (35-50%), in the propionic acid (25-30%), and in the acetic acid (40-60%). Irreversible processes such as the leaching of components occur in fluids simulating an oral environment, which may contribute to irreversible material degradation, especially for non-Bis-GMA-based composites. PMID:9781860

Lee, S Y; Huang, H M; Lin, C Y; Shih, Y H

1998-08-01

379

Notch tensile properties of laser-surface-annealed 17-4 PH stainless steel in hydrogen-related environments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Slow displacement rate tensile tests were performed to determine the notched tensile strength (NTS) of 17-4 PH stainless steel with various microstructures in hydrogen-related environments. Solution-annealed (SA), peak-aged (H900), over-aged (H1025), and laser-annealed (LA) specimens were included in the study. Based on the results of NTS in air, the NTS loss in both gaseous hydrogen and H2S-saturated solution was used

L. W. Tsay; W. C. Lee; R. K. Shiue; J. K. Wu

2002-01-01

380

Influence of Prepackaged Polymer-Modified Mortar as a Modifier on Strength of Concrete  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study introduce a new trend of utilising Prepackaged Polymer-Modified Mortar (PPMM) as a modifier to ordinary concrete for producing Polymer-Modified Concrete (PMC). The experimental study articulates the strength development of proposed polymer-modified concrete. A range of quantities of PPMM, as 5 to 50%, were mixed with ordinary concrete of 30 N mmG2 characteristic strength to produce polymer-modified concrete and to evaluate for compressive strength, tensile strength, density and workability. The material behaviour in terms of compressive strength and tensile strength, together with density and slump was investigated by casting and testing cubes of 100 mm size, cylinders 100 mm dia and 200 mm height. This Preliminary study shows that compressive strength and tensile strength is improved significantly by inclusion of various quantities as percentages of PPMM to ordinary concrete and curing regime as specified by JIS. PPMM dosages of 5 to 20% resulted considerably higher compressive and tensile strength than that of ordinary concrete, on the other hand further increase in percentage of PPMM gave less strengths. Results demonstrated more prominent percentage increase in tensile strength than compressive strength of produced polymer-modified concrete. Polymer-mod fied concrete mixes with all percentage dosages of PPMM were found cohesive and workable.

Saand, Abdullah; Ismail, Mohammad; Radin Sumadi, Salihuddin

381

Size Scaling of Tensile Failure Stress in a Soda-Lime-Silicate Float Glass  

SciTech Connect

The (tensile) strength-size scaling of a float soda-lime silicate glass was studied using biaxial flexure and Hertzian ring crack initiation testing. The examined Weibull effective areas spanned ~ 0.4 to 48,000 mm2. Both the air- and tin-sides were tested. The air side was stronger than the tin side as others have observed; however, the differences in their characteristic strengths decreased with decreasing effective area, and their strengths converged for effective areas smaller than ~ 100 mm2. The failure stress at the smallest effective area examined for the tin-side was ~ 500% greater than that at the largest effective area while that difference was ~ 250% for the air- side. A Weibull modulus change at ~ 100 mm2 suggests different strength-limiting flaw types were dominant below and above that effective area. These results reinforce the importance to interpret and use tensile strength of glass in context to how much of its area is being tensile stressed.

Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL; Kirkland, Timothy Philip [ORNL; Ragan, Meredith E [ORNL; Strong, Kevin T [ORNL; Lin, Hua-Tay [ORNL; Patel, P [U.S. Army research Laboratory, Adelphi, MD

2010-01-01

382

The intrinsic tensile behavior of the matrix of bovine articular cartilage and its variation with age.  

PubMed

To study the age dependence of the uniaxial tensile behavior of bovine articular cartilage, 216 specimens of articular cartilage from the patellofemoral joint were grouped into two age categories: those from joints with growth plates present (open physes) and those from joints without growth plates (no physes). We prepared standard, dumbbell-shaped test specimens from the three ultrastructural zones of the tissue: the superficial tangential zone, the middle zone, and the deep zone. As was done in the early works of Kempson et al. and of Woo et all., we prepared specimens whose long axes were either parallel or perpendicular to the axis of the local split line on the joint surface. In these tensile tests we observed a profound difference between the two age groups in terms of the variations in the tensile properties related to the depth below the surface. With increasing distance from the articular surface, the tensile strength and stiffness increased in the open-physis group and decreased in the no-physis group. Directional dependence of the tensile response was manifested by increased stiffness and strength of the samples oriented parallel to the split-line axis when compared with the samples oriented perpendicular to it. Distortion of the initially flat, straight-sided portion of the gauge section was observed in most of the 216 specimens immediately after the application of tensile strains. This effect casts serious doubts on all previous measurements of cross-sectional dimensional changes. At present, we believe that this distortion occurs because articular cartilage is an inhomogeneous, layered material. We also observed that cartilage exudes substantial amounts of its interstitial fluid when the applied tensile strain becomes large. These two effects create serious problems in assessing the true volumetric changes and the material properties of cartilage specimens during uniaxial tension experiments. PMID:7430196

Roth, V; Mow, V C

1980-10-01

383

Tensile behavior and microstructure of the helium and hydrogen implanted 12% Cr-steel MANET  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Tensile specimens of the tempered martensitic 12% Cr-steel MANET have been homogeneously implanted with 500 appm helium and/or 500 appm hydrogen between 80 and 500°C to investigate synergistic effects of helium, hydrogen and irradiation damage. No difference was found between He-implanted specimens and specimens simultaneously implanted with helium and hydrogen. The implantation-induced hardening decreases with increasing temperature and changes into softening above 450°C. The remaining total elongation was found to still be 2% below 400°C. However, in the temperature region of dynamic strain aging near 300°C, yield strength is close to ultimate strength, and uniform elongation drops from 3 to 0.3%. Hydrogen concentrations of 500 appm are found to modify neither strength nor ductility above 100°C. The fracture mode of hydrogen and/or helium implanted specimens remained always ductile and transgranular. The observed microstructural changes are correlated with the tensile properties.

Bae, K. K.; Ehrlich, K.; Möslang, A.

1992-09-01

384

Effects of myrrh on the strength of suture materials: an in vitro study.  

PubMed

The present in vitro study sought to determine the effects of myrrh-containing solutions on common suture materials used in periodontal surgery. Three commonly used suture materials (silk, polyglactin 910, polytetrafluoroethylene) were immersed in four thermostatically controlled experimental media to simulate daily oral rinsing activity, namely -artificial saliva, normal saline solution with 0.2% Commiphora myrrh, full-concentration (100%) Commiphora myrrh oil, and a myrrh-containing commercial mouthwash. Tensile strength was measured at the end of each day using an Instron tensile testing machine. Silk sutures were susceptible to tensile strength loss when exposed to 0.2% myrrh solution once daily for 5 days. Myrrh-containing commercial mouthwash had no effect on tensile strength, but all three suture materials lost tensile strength when exposed to 100% myrrh oil. For patients that routinely use myrrh mouthwashes postoperatively, findings of this study suggested that silk sutures might not be the optimal material choice. PMID:25736257

Alshehri, Mohammed A; Baskaradoss, Jagan Kumar; Geevarghese, Amrita; Ramakrishnaiah, Ravikumar; Tatakis, Dimitris N

2015-04-01

385

Implementation of dynamic strength models into 2D hydrocodes: Applications for atmospheric breakup and impact cratering  

Microsoft Academic Search

A statistical model of a tensile strength is implemented into the SALE-2D hydrocode. The well-tested 2D code has been modified to handle multi-material problems and strength effects. The key element of the model is the Grady-Kipp-Melosh kinetic model of tensile strength, adopted to hydrocode calculations. The resulting numerical algorithm allows to estimate general features of the atmospheric breakup of meteoroids

B. A. Ivanov; D. Deniem; G. Neukum

1997-01-01

386

Effect of Pre-Loading with Tensile Stress on Laboratory UCS of a Synthetic Rock  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Amongst various index properties used by rock engineers, the uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) is probably the most widely used property of intact rocks. In the field, in situ stresses are always present, and, when samples are extracted from such rocks, the stresses are released. These specimens, when tested in the laboratory, may give low strength values in comparison to what would have been obtained without stress removal. It is difficult to exactly follow the stress path of coring of rock in a natural stress environment; an indirect way of simulating effect of stress removal has been adopted in this study. Specimens of a synthetic rock have been subjected to pre-loading with tensile stress, and qualitative assessment of the reduction in the laboratory UCS of the rock has been made. To induce tensile stresses, conventional Brazilian test apparatus was modified. The results indicate that if pre-loading tensile stress exceeds about half of the Brazilian tensile strength, stress removal has substantial effect on the UCS and conservative results may be expected from laboratory tests on rock specimens.

Singh, Mahendra; Lakshmi, Vijaya; Yudhbir; Srivastava, L. P.

2015-01-01

387

Tensile Properties of Polyimide Composites Incorporating Carbon Nanotubes-Grafted and Polyimide-Coated Carbon Fibers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The tensile properties and fracture behavior of polyimide composite bundles incorporating carbon nanotubes-grafted (CNT-grafted) and polyimide-coated (PI-coated) high-tensile-strength polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based (T1000GB), and high-modulus pitch-based (K13D) carbon fibers were investigated. The CNT were grown on the surface of the carbon fibers by chemical vapor deposition. The pyromellitic dianhydride/4,4'-oxydianiline PI nanolayer coating was deposited on the surface of the carbon fiber by high-temperature vapor deposition polymerization. The results clearly demonstrate that CNT grafting and PI coating were effective for improving the Weibull modulus of T1000GB PAN-based and K13D pitch-based carbon fiber bundle composites. In addition, the average tensile strength of the PI-coated T1000GB carbon fiber bundle composites was also higher than that of the as-received carbon fiber bundle composites, while the average tensile strength of the CNT-grafted T1000GB, K13D, and the PI-coated K13D carbon fiber bundle composites was similar to that of the as-received carbon fiber bundle composites.

Naito, Kimiyoshi

2014-09-01

388

Elevated-temperature tensile and creep properties of several ferritic stainless steels  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The elevated-temperature mechanical properties of several ferritic stainless steels were determined. The alloys evaluated included Armco 18SR, GE 1541, and NASA-18T-A. Tensile and creep strength properties at 1073 and 1273 K and residual room temperature tensile properties after creep testing were measured. In addition, 1273 K tensile and creep tests and residual property testing were conducted with Armco 18SR and GE 1541 which were exposed for 200 hours to a severe oxidizing environment in automotive thermal reactors. Aside from the residual tensile properties for Armco 18SR, prior exposure did not affect the mechanical properties of either alloy. The 1273 K creep strength parallel to the sheet-rolling direction was similar for all three alloys. At 1073 K, NASA-18T-A had better creep strength than either Armco 18SR or GE 1541. NASA-18T-A possesses better residual properties after creep testing than either Armco 18SR or Ge 1541.

Whittenberger, J. D.

1977-01-01

389

Strength Scaling in Fiber Composites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A research program was initiated to study and isolate the factors responsible for scale effects in the tensile strength of graphite/epoxy composite laminates. Four layups were chosen with appropriate stacking sequences so as to highlight individual and interacting failure modes. Four scale sizes were selected for investigation including full scale size, 3/4, 2/4, and 1/4, with n = to 4, 3, 2, and 1, respectively. The full scale specimen sizes was 32 piles thick as compared to 24, 16, and 8 piles for the 3/4, 2/4, and 1/4 specimen sizes respectively. Results were obtained in the form of tensile strength, stress-strain curves and damage development. Problems associated with strength degradation with increasing specimen sizes are isolated and discussed. Inconsistencies associated with strain measurements were also identified. Enhanced x ray radiography was employed for damage evaluation, following step loading. It was shown that fiber dominated layups were less sensitive to scaling effects compared to the matrix dominated layups.

Kellas, Sotiris; Morton, John

1990-01-01

390

Spaghetti Strength  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity on page 7 of the PDF, learners explore how engineers characterize building materials. Learners test the strength of spaghetti and determine how the number of spaghetti strands affects the strength of a bundle of spaghetti. Use this activity to chemical bonds, mechanical testing, and engineering. Note: The pasta strands can be dipped in water and stuck together to more closely mimic the layers within a piece of plywood. More information about this can be found at the top of page 7, directly underneath the cartoon image. Safety note: Do not eat or drink any of the materials in this activity.

American Chemical Society

2011-01-01

391

Tensile strain-rate sensitivity of tungsten/niobium composites at 1300 to 1600 K  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The tensile behavior of continuous tungsten fiber reinforced niobium composites (W/Nb), fabricated by an arc-spray process, was studied in the 1300 to 1600 K temperature range. The tensile properties of the fiber and matrix components as well as of the composites were measured and were compared to rule of mixtures (ROM) predictions. The deviation from the ROM was found to depend upon the chemistry of the tungsten alloy fibers, with positive deviations for ST300/Nb (i.e., stronger composite strength than the ROM) and negative or zero deviations for 218/Nb.

Yun, H. M.; Titran, R. H.

1992-01-01

392

Tensile Behavior of Tungsten/Niobium Composites at 1300 to 1600 K  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The tensile behavior of continuous tungsten fiber reinforced niobium composites (W/Nb), fabricated by an arc-spray process, was studied in the 1300 to 1600 K temperature range. The tensile properties of the fiber and matrix components as well as of the composites were measured and were compared to rule of mixtures (ROM) predictions. The deviation from the ROM was found to depend upon the chemistry of the tungsten alloy fibers, with positive deviations for ST300/Nb (i.e., stronger composite strength than the ROM) and negative or zero deviations for 218/Nb.

Yun, Hee Mann; Titran, Robert H.

1989-01-01

393

Multi-scale investigation of tensile creep of ultra-high performance concrete for bridge applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC) is relatively a new generation of concretes optimized at the nano and micro-scales to provide superior mechanical and durability properties compared to conventional and high performance concretes. Improvements in UHPC are achieved through: limiting the water-to-cementitious materials ratio (i.e., w/cm ? 0.20), optimizing particle packing, eliminating coarse aggregate, using specialized materials, and implementing high temperature and high pressure curing regimes. In addition, and randomly dispersed and short fibers are typically added to enhance the material's tensile and flexural strength, ductility, and toughness. There is a specific interest in using UHPC for precast prestressed bridge girders because it has the potential to reduce maintenance costs associated with steel and conventional concrete girders, replace functionally obsolete or structurally deficient steel girders without increasing the weight or the depth of the girder, and increase bridge durability to between 75 and 100 years. UHPC girder construction differs from that of conventional reinforced concrete in that UHPC may not need transverse reinforcement due to the high tensile and shear strengths of the material. Before bridge designers specify such girders without using shear reinforcement, the long-term tensile performance of the material must be characterized. This multi-scale study provided new data and understanding of the long-term tensile performance of UHPC by assessing the effect of thermal treatment, fiber content, and stress level on the tensile creep in a large-scale study, and by characterizing the fiber-cementitious matrix interface at different curing regimes through nanoindentation and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in a nano/micro-scale study. Tensile creep of UHPC was more sensitive to investigated parameters than tensile strength. Thermal treatment decreased tensile creep by about 60% after 1 year. Results suggested the possibility of achieving satisfactory microstructural refinement at the same temperature input despite the maximum temperature applied. For the first time, the presence of a 10 microm (394 micro inch) wide porous fiber-cementitious matrix interface was demonstrated by nanoindentation and SEM for non-thermally treated UHPC only. Tensile creep at 90 days increased by 64% and 46% upon eliminating fibers for thermally and non-thermally treated UHPC, respectively. Increases in creep upon reducing the fiber content suggested that fibers carry part of the sustained load and thus reduce creep. Tensile creep strain was proportional to the stress applied up to 60% of the ultimate strength. No tensile creep failure occurred for a period of 1 year for pre-cracked UHPC under stress level of 40%. Also, no tensile creep failure occurred for a period of 90 days under stress level of 60%. Tensile creep failure occurred at stress levels of 70% and 80%. This study showed that fibers cannot be accounted for as shear reinforcement in lieu of stirrups unless micro-defect-free fiber-matrix interface is achieved.

Garas Yanni, Victor Youssef

394

VALIDITY OF THE HIGH-TENSILE-STRENG TH BOLT FOR THE SOFT ROCK WITH LARGE CROSS SECTIONAL TUNNEL  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper reports the experiential result about the applications of the high tensile strength bolts as a countermeasure for the displacement, considered about the denaturalization of the large cross sectional tunnel in mudstone layer. In Kanaya Tunnel of the New Tomei Expressway, the soft rock section appeared where we cannot restrain support denaturizi ng and internal displacement by materials of the standard design. Then fore, we adopted the high tensile strength bolts (748kN) replacing with of the standard design, and improved the support proof for stress. As the result, we got possible to control the displacement and execute the work safety and economi cally. We compared the analysis result (FEM) by the limited element method with the measure result on the spot, and inspected the supportability effect of the higt tensile strength bolts.

Yagi, Hiroshi; Tamamura, Kouji; Uneda, Atsushi; Domon, Tsuyoshi; Nishimura, Kazuo

395

High Technique for T-Peel Strength Enhancement of Al/AFRP Hybrid Composite  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The interlaminar peel strength of Al/AFRP (Aluminum alloy/Aramid Fiber Reinforced Plastic) hybrid composite is affected by the adhesive strength between the Al alloy layer and the aramid fiber layer. The study of the tensile strength and the T-peel strength of the Al/AFRP should be accomplished first. Therefore, this study focused on the effect of the resin mixture ratio as the Al/AFRP on the tensile strength and T-peel strength. In conclusions, the resin mixture ratio by equivalence ratio of equal to <1:1> of Al/AFRP-I and the resin mixture ratio by equivalence ratio of equal to <1:1:0.2> of Al/AFRP-II showed the highest ultimate tensile strength. After the T-peel test, it is found that the T-peel strength of Al/AFRP-II is approximately 1.5 times higher than that of Al/AFRP-I. Reviewing the characteristics of the tensile and T-peel strengths, the resin mixture ratio <1:1:0.2> of Al/AFRP-II showed the highest tensile strength and T-peel strength.

Kim, Cheol-Woong; Oh, Dong-Joon

396

Study of the tensile properties of living skin equivalents.  

PubMed

The living skin equivalent is one of the more advanced clinical applications in the field of tissue engineering. It is a promising therapeutic option for burn victims and a strong potential for manifold in vitro experiments. However, researchers have encountered major drawbacks in the reconstruction of the dermal layer. Peripheral anchorage of the dermal equivalent component has been a valuable solution to many of these problems. In this work, we have carried out the mechanical analysis of skin equivalent models, based on this dermal anchoring technique, with a study of their biaxial tensile properties. Differences between models were related to the origin of collagen, either bovine or human, and on the culture techniques: immersion or at the air-liquid interface. The study was accomplished in vitro using 25.4-mm-diameter disk-shaped specimens with an indentation test. In appropriate wet condition, the specimens were punctured with a spherical tip at a quasi-static rate. We measured the load applied against the tip vs deflection up to the breaking point. Our results show that skin equivalents presented a typical exponential load-deflection relationship. All skin equivalents presented large extensibility up to 1.41 expressed in a ratio of deflection vs specimen's radius. The maximum tensile strength (0.871-1.169 Newton) and energy calculations (3.75-6.432 N.mm) was offered by living skin equivalent, made with human types I and III collagens, cultured at the air-liquid interface. In these conditions, our results suggest the tensile properties of living skin equivalents were enhanced due to the development of well stratified stratum corneum. PMID:8785505

Lafrance, H; Yahia, L; Germain, L; Guillot, M; Auger, F A

1995-01-01

397

High temperature tensile deformation behavior of Grade 92 steel  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Candidate structural materials for advanced reactors need to have superior high temperature strength and creep-rupture properties among other characteristics. The ferritic-martensitic Grade 92 steel (Fe-9Cr-2W-0.5Mo, wt.%) is considered such a candidate structural material. Tensile tests were performed at temperatures of 600, 650 and 700 °C in the strain rate range of 10-5-10-3 s-1. After analyzing the tensile results using the Bird-Mukherjee-Dorn (BMD) equation, a stress exponent of about 9.5 and an activation energy of about 646 kJ/mol were obtained. In the light of high values of the stress exponent and activation energy, the threshold stress concept was used to elucidate the operating high temperature deformation mechanism. As a result of this modification, the true activation energy and stress exponent of the high temperature deformation in Grade 92 steel were found to be about 245 kJ/mol and 5, respectively. Thus, the dominant high temperature deformation mechanism was identified as the high temperature climb of edge dislocations and the appropriate constitutive equation was developed.

Alsagabi, Sultan; Shrestha, Triratna; Charit, Indrajit

2014-10-01

398

Lifetimes of fiber composites under sustained tensile loading  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Results are presented for a study intended to summarize lifetime data on several fiber/epoxy composite materials subjected to sustained uniaxial tensile loading, to report preliminary results of an accelerated test method for predicting the life of simple composites, and to describe related work in progress on pressure vessels and other filament-wound structures. The lifetime performance of the tested composites was compared by plotting the percent of ultimate strength (applied fiber stress normalized with respect to fiber failure stress in a composite) versus lifetime. In terms of performance in long-term tensile applications, the tested composites are ranked in the following order: graphite/epoxy, Be wire/epoxy, Aramid/epoxy, and S-glass/epoxy. The accelerated test using temperature and stress to simulate the passage of time proves to be encouraging, at least in the case of the Aramid/epoxy composite. The potential of a statistical analysis based on Weibull distribution analyses or a power law relationship is demonstrated.

Chiao, T. T.; Sherry, R. J.; Chiao, C. C.

1977-01-01

399

Tensile and stress-rupture behavior of hafnium carbide dispersed molybdenum and tungsten base alloy wires  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The tensile strain rate sensitivity and the stress-rupture strength of Mo-base and W-base alloy wires, 380 microns in diameter, were determined over the temperature range from 1200 K to 1600 K. Three molybdenum alloy wires; Mo + 1.1w/o hafnium carbide (MoHfC), Mo + 25w/o W + 1.1w/o hafnium carbide (MoHfC+25W) and Mo + 45w/o W + 1.1w/o hafnium carbide (MoHfC+45W), and a W + 0.4w/o hafnium carbide (WHfC) tungsten alloy wire were evaluated. The tensile strength of all wires studied was found to have a positive strain rate sensitivity. The strain rate dependency increased with increasing temperature and is associated with grain broadening of the initial fibrous structures. The hafnium carbide dispersed W-base and Mo-base alloys have superior tensile and stress-rupture properties than those without HfC. On a density compensated basis the MoHfC wires exhibit superior tensile and stress-rupture strengths to the WHfC wires up to approximately 1400 K. Addition of tungsten in the Mo-alloy wires was found to increase the long-term stress rupture strength at temperatures above 1400 K. Theoretical calculations indicate that the strength and ductility advantage of the HfC dispersed alloy wires is due to the resistance to recrystallization imparted by the dispersoid.

Yun, Hee Mann; Titran, Robert H.

1993-01-01

400

A new concept for the determination of tensile properties of nanofilms and materials via nanoindentation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Here we present a new concept to determine tensile properties of nanofilms and materials via nanoindentation. The proposed methodology utilizes a conical or truncated conical indenter and requires the fabrication of an upwardly obtruded well shaped tube from the substrate. The downward stroke of the indenter along the centreline of the tube mainly produces tensile hoop stress in the upper region of the tube where the nanofilm exists. In the present work, the feasibility of the proposed method has been demonstrated through finite element analysis, as the first stage of a longer project on the topic. It has been demonstrated that Young's modulus and the yield strength of the nanofilm can be suitably determined in tensile mode from the load-stroke relation.

Kim, Jong-Bong; Yoo, Yo-Han; Shin, Hyunho

2005-09-01

401

Superior Tensile Ductility in Bulk Metallic Glass with Gradient Amorphous Structure  

PubMed Central

Over centuries, structural glasses have been deemed as a strong yet inherently ‘brittle’ material due to their lack of tensile ductility. However, here we report bulk metallic glasses exhibiting both a high strength of ~2?GPa and an unprecedented tensile elongation of 2–4% at room temperature. Our experiments have demonstrated that intense structural evolution can be triggered in theses glasses by the carefully controlled surface mechanical attrition treatment, leading to the formation of gradient amorphous microstructures across the sample thickness. As a result, the engineered amorphous microstructures effectively promote multiple shear banding while delay cavitation in the bulk metallic glass, thus resulting in superior tensile ductility. The outcome of our research uncovers an unusual work-hardening mechanism in monolithic bulk metallic glasses and demonstrates a promising yet low-cost strategy suitable for producing large-sized, ultra-strong and stretchable structural glasses. PMID:24755683

Wang, Q.; Yang, Y.; Jiang, H.; Liu, C. T.; Ruan, H. H.; Lu, J.

2014-01-01

402

Superior Tensile Ductility in Bulk Metallic Glass with Gradient Amorphous Structure  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Over centuries, structural glasses have been deemed as a strong yet inherently `brittle' material due to their lack of tensile ductility. However, here we report bulk metallic glasses exhibiting both a high strength of ~2 GPa and an unprecedented tensile elongation of 2-4% at room temperature. Our experiments have demonstrated that intense structural evolution can be triggered in theses glasses by the carefully controlled surface mechanical attrition treatment, leading to the formation of gradient amorphous microstructures across the sample thickness. As a result, the engineered amorphous microstructures effectively promote multiple shear banding while delay cavitation in the bulk metallic glass, thus resulting in superior tensile ductility. The outcome of our research uncovers an unusual work-hardening mechanism in monolithic bulk metallic glasses and demonstrates a promising yet low-cost strategy suitable for producing large-sized, ultra-strong and stretchable structural glasses.

Wang, Q.; Yang, Y.; Jiang, H.; Liu, C. T.; Ruan, H. H.; Lu, J.

2014-04-01

403

Tensile stress-strain behavior of graphite/epoxy laminates  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The tensile stress-strain behavior of a variety of graphite/epoxy laminates was examined. Longitudinal and transverse specimens from eleven different layups were monotonically loaded in tension to failure. Ultimate strength, ultimate strain, and strss-strain curves wee obtained from four replicate tests in each case. Polynominal equations were fitted by the method of least squares to the stress-strain data to determine average curves. Values of Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio, derived from polynomial coefficients, were compared with laminate analysis results. While the polynomials appeared to accurately fit the stress-strain data in most cases, the use of polynomial coefficients to calculate elastic moduli appeared to be of questionable value in cases involving sharp changes in the slope of the stress-strain data or extensive scatter.

Garber, D. P.

1982-01-01

404

Lifetimes of fiber composites under sustained tensile loading  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A description is presented of the test techniques which have been used to apply sustained uniaxial tensile loading to fiber/epoxy composites. The fiber types used include S-glass, aramid, graphite, and beryllium wire. The applied load vs lifetime data for four composite materials are presented in graphs. Attention is given to a statistical analysis of data, a performance comparison of various composites, the age effect on the strength of composites, the applicability of the lifetime data to complex composites, and aspects of accelerated test method development. It is found that the lifetime of a composite under a sustained load varies widely. Depending on the composite system, the minimum life typically differs from the maximum life by a factor of 100 to 1000. It is in this connection recommended that a use of average life data should be avoided in serious design calculations.

Chiao, T. T.; Sherry, R. J.; Chiao, C. C.

1977-01-01

405

Tensile-strained germanium microdisk electroluminescence.  

PubMed

We report room temperature electroluminescence of tensile-strained germanium microdisks. The strain is transferred into the microdisks using silicon nitride stressors. Carrier injection is achieved with Schottky contacts on n-type doped germanium. We show that a biaxial tensile-strain up to 0.72% can be transferred by optimizing the carrier injection profile. The transferred strain is measured by the electroluminescence spectral red-shift and compared to finite element modeling. We discuss the impact of this strain level to achieve population inversion in germanium. PMID:25836888

Prost, M; El Kurdi, M; Ghrib, A; Sauvage, S; Checoury, X; Zerounian, N; Aniel, F; Beaudoin, G; Sagnes, I; Boeuf, F; Boucaud, P

2015-03-01

406

Strength loss in kraft pulping  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Unbleached kraft pulps from two U.S. mills were 21% and 26% weaker than comparable laboratory pulps from the same chip sources, when assessed as the tear index at a tensile index of 70 kN.m/kg. The phenomena involved were clarified by characterizing the differences between the mill and laboratory pulps in terms of fundamental fiber properties. All of the strength loss could be explained by a reduction in intrinsic fiber strength of 9% to 11%, as estimated from wet zero-span tensile tests and fiber length distributions. Most of the effects of different fiber shape and length were isolated by PFI mill refining and decrilling, respectively. The higher fiber coarseness of mill pulps was a factor in their maximum density and bond strength, but changes in these variables were analogous to those of laboratory pups due to similar swelling. Specific bond strength, determined from a wet pressing experiment, was similar in mill and laboratory pulps. Neither carbohydrate composition nor crystalline structure, assessed through x-ray diffraction analysis, were significant factors in the observed fiber strength differences. The mill pulps were not more heterogeneous than the laboratory pulps, within the resolution of a fractionation experiment. The number of weak points in each pulp was assessed through analysis of the amount of fiber cutting during PFI mill refining and treatments with potassium superoxide or cellulase. The results suggested that the chemistry of kraft pulping preferentially weaken short, slender fibers, while mechanical stresses during the hot discharge of batch digesters mainly affect long, thick fibers. The greater number of weak points in the long-fiber fractions of mill pulps is probably associated with their lower wet zero-span tensile indices. Automated optical detection of major singularities with a prototype instrument suggested that only the weak points induced by mechanical stress could be detected by local variations in birefringence. In contrast, chemically damaged short, slender fibers were not optically active. Strong chemical attack during superoxide treatment appeared to affect all fibers, but the effect of fiber cutting was partially offset by a preferential dissolution of short fibers and fines. A simple model of weak point formation by combinations of mechanical stress and localized chemical attack was sufficient to explain all the experimental results.

Iribarne, Jose

407

Tensile and Charpy impact properties of irradiated reduced-activation ferritic steels  

SciTech Connect

Tensile tests were conducted on 8 reduced-activation Cr-W steels after irradiation to 15-17 and 26-29 dpa, and Charpy impact tests were conducted on steels irradiated to 26-29 dpa. Irradiation was in Fast Flux Test Facility at 365 C on steels containing 2.25-12% Cr, varying amounts of W, V, and Ta, and 0.1%C. Previously, tensile specimens were irradiated to 6-8 dpa and Charpy specimens to 6-8, 15- 17, and 20-24 dpa. Tensile and Charpy specimens were also thermally aged to 20,000 h at 365 C. Thermal aging had little effect on tensile properties or ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT), but several steels showed a slight increase in upper-shelf energy (USE). After 7 dpa, strength increased (hardened) and then remained relatively unchanged through 26-29 dpa (ie, strength saturated with fluence). Post-irradiation Charpy impact tests after 26-29 dpa showed that the loss of impact toughness (increased DBTT, decreased USE) remained relatively unchanged from the values after 20-24 dpa, which had been relatively unchanged from the earlier irradiations. As before, the two 9Cr steels had the most irradiation resistance.

Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.

1996-10-01

408

Tensile behavior of tungsten and tungsten-alloy wires from 1300 to 1600 K  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The tensile behavior of a 200-micrometer-diameter tungsten lamp (218CS-W), tungsten + 1.0 atomic percent (a/o) thoria (ST300-W), and tungsten + 0.4 a/o hafnium carbide (WHfC) wires was determined over the temperature range 1300 t0 1600 K at strain rates of 3.3 X 10 to the -2 to 3.3 X 10 to the -5/sec. Although most tests were conducted on as-drawn materials, one series of tests was undertaken on ST300-W wires in four different conditions: as-drawn and vacuum-annealed at 1535 K for 1 hr, with and without electroplating. Whereas heat treatment had no effect on tensile properties, electropolishing significantly increased both the proportional limit and ductility, but not the ultimate tensile strength. Comparison of the behavior of the three alloys indicates that the HfC-dispersed material possesses superior tensile properties. Theoretical calculations indicate that the strength/ductility advantage of WHfC is due to the resistance to recrystallization imparted by the dispersoid.

Hee, Man Yun

1988-01-01

409

Effects of Sample Geometry and Loading Rate onTensile Ductility of TRIP800 Steel  

SciTech Connect

The effects of sample geometry and loading rate on the tensile ductility of a commercial grade Transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steel are examined in this paper. Quasistatic tensile tests were performed for the 1.2mm gauge TRIP800 steel sheets with two geometries: sub-sized ASTM E-8 and a custom designed miniature tensile sample. Sample geometry effects on post-uniform elongation are discussed together with other experimental data reported in the open literature. Further discussions on the effects of sample geometry are cast in the context of mesh-size dependent ductility in finite element-based engineering simulations. The quasi-static tensile curve for the miniature sample is then compared with the split Hopkinson bar results at the loading rates of 1700-S-1 and 2650-S-1 with the same sample design. In contrary to the typical strain rate sensitivity results for mild steel where the dynamic strength increase at high strain rate usually occurs at the price of ductility reduction, our results show that the TRIP800 under examination has positive strain rate sensitivity on both strength and ductility. Images of the deformation process captured by high speed camera together with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) near the fracture zone are also used to elucidate the different deformation modes at different loading rates.

Sun, Xin; Soulami, Ayoub; Choi, Kyoo Sil; Guzman, O.; Chen, Weinong W.

2012-04-15

410

Atomistic Studies on Tensile Mechanics of BN Nanotubes in the Presence of Defects  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are of immense importance due to their many interesting functional features, notably biocompatibility and piezoelectricity and dominant mechanical strength as compared to carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The reliable implementation of these structures in an application is inherently related to its mechanical characteristics under external loads. The presence of defects in these structures severely affects the tensile properties. The effect of presence of point, line and Stone-Wales (SW) defects on the tensile behavior of BNNTs is systematically investigated by applying reactive force fields in molecular dynamics (MD) framework. Reactive force fields effectively describe the bond breaking and bond forming mechanism for BNNTs that are important for a practical situation. The Young's modulus of single-walled (10,0) BNNTs of length 100 nm has been found to be nearly 1.098 TPa, in good agreement with the available reports. The presence of defects has been shown to significantly reduce the tensile strength of the tube, while the number and separation of the defects effectively contribute to the percentage reduction. In addition, the effect of tube diameter and also the initial temperature are observed to strongly influence the tensile characteristics of BNNTs, indicating increased auxetic behavior than CNTs.

Sarma, J. V. N.; Chowdhury, Rajib; Jayaganthan, R.; Scarpa, F.

2014-03-01

411

Influence of thermo-mechanical treatment on the tensile properties of a modified 14Cr-15Ni stainless steel  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The titanium modified 14Cr-15Ni austenitic stainless steel is used as clad and wrapper material for fast breeder nuclear reactor. Thermo-mechanical treatments consisting of solution annealing at two different temperatures of 1273 and 1373 K followed by cold-work and thermal ageing have been imparted to the steel to tailor its microstructure for enhancing strength. Tensile tests have been carried out on the thermo-mechanically treated steel at nominal strain rate of 1.6 × 10-4 s-1 over a temperature range of 298-1073 K. The yield stress and the ultimate tensile strength of the steel increased with increase in solution treatment temperature and this has been attributed to the fine and higher density of Ti(C,N) precipitate. Tensile flow behaviour of the steel has been analysed using Ludwigson and Voce constitutive equations. The steel heat treated at higher solution temperature exhibited earlier onset of cross slip during tensile deformation. The rate of recovery at higher test temperatures was also influenced by variations in solution heat treatment temperature. In addition, dynamic recrystallization during tensile deformation at higher temperatures was profound for steel solution heat-treated at lower temperature. The differences in flow behaviour and softening mechanisms during tensile testing of the steel after different heat treated conditions have been attributed to the nature of Ti(C,N) precipitation.

Vijayanand, V. D.; Laha, K.; Parameswaran, P.; Nandagopal, M.; Panneer Selvi, S.; Mathew, M. D.

2014-10-01

412

Mechanical Testing of TR-55 Rubber Thermally Aged Under Tensile Strain  

SciTech Connect

TR-55 rubber specimens were previously subjected to an aging process consisting of the application of a tensile strain of approximately 67%, 100%, 133%, or 167% elongation for 4, 8, 12, or 16 h at either 250 C or room temperature. Control specimens at the same temperatures/durations were not subjected to tensile strain. The specimens were allowed to recover at room temperature without external stimuli for over 100 days before tensile testing. A single dog bone was cut from each specimen and a stress-strain curve was obtained. The elastic modulus of each specimen was calculated. Specimens aged under tensile strain exhibited rubber-like behavior dependent on the aging elongation and duration. This behavior was not evident in the unstrained controls. For the unstrained controls, exposure to 250 C resulted in an increase in modulus relative to the unheated material independent of the heating duration. The tensile strain applied during the aging process caused a reduction in modulus relative to the controls; lower moduli were observed for the shorter aging durations. Slippage of the specimens in the grips prevented determination of ultimate strength, as all specimens either slipped completely out of the grip before failure or failed at the original grip edge after slipping.

Small IV, W; Alviso, C T; Wilson, T S; Chinn, S C; Maxwell, R S

2009-03-10

413

Static tensile and tensile creep testing of four boron nitride coated ceramic fibers at elevated temperatures  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Six types of uncoated ceramic fibers were static tensile and tensile creep tested at various elevated temperatures. Three types of boron nitride coated fibers were also tested. Room temperature static tensile tests were initially performed on all fibers, at gage lengths of 1, 2, and 4 inches, to determine the magnitude of end effects from the gripping system used. Tests at one elevated temperature, at gage lengths of 8 and 10 inches, were also conducted, to determine end effects at elevated temperatures. Fiber cross sectional shapes and areas were determined using scanning electron microscopy. Creep testing was typically performed for 4 hours, in an air atmosphere.

Coguill, Scott L.; Adams, Donald F.; Zimmerman, Richard S.

1989-01-01

414

Tensile and creep rupture properties of (16) uncoated and (2) coated engineering alloys at elevated temperatures  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Sixteen test materials were supplied by NASA-Lewis Research Center as wrought bar or cast remelt stock. The cast remelt stock was cast into test blanks with two such materials being also evaluated after Jocoat coating was applied. Mechanical properties evaluated included tensile, modulus of elasticity, Poisson's Ratio, creep properties and creep rupture strength. Tests were conducted at temperatures applicable to the service temperature of the various alloys. This range extended from room temperature to 1000 C.

Fritz, L. J.; Koster, W. P.

1977-01-01

415

Tensile properties of 0.05 to 0.20 Pct C TRIP steels  

Microsoft Academic Search

The uniaxial tensile properties of a series of TRIP steels of varying carbon contents and processing histories were determined\\u000a over a wide range of test temperatures. The yield strengths at room temperature varied both with the deformation temperature\\u000a (over the range 250 to 550C) and with the carbon content (0.05 to 0.20 pct). Possible reasons for these variations are advanced.

G. R. Chanani; V. F. Zackay; Earl R. Parker

1971-01-01

416

Effects of interphase conditions on the tensile and fatigue properties of short-fiber reinforced rubber  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of the amount of nylon-66 short-fiber and its bonding to a chloroprene rubber were studied. The following results were obtained: (a) The tensile strength of short-fiber reinforced rubber (SFRR) exhibits a dilution effect in each interphase. It was found that the interphase conditions have an important effect on the dilution ratio and the critical fiber content. The specimen

S. R. Ryu; D. J. Lee

2003-01-01

417

Tensile properties of cellulose acetate butyrate composites reinforced with bacterial cellulose  

Microsoft Academic Search

Composites of cellulose acetate butyrate reinforced with cellulose sheets synthesised by Gluconacetobacter xylinus were produced by solvent evaporation casting. The composites contained 10% and 32% volume cellulose, and showed a Young’s modulus of 3.2 and 5.8 GPa, and a strength of 52.6 and 128.9 MPa, respectively, in tensile tests. Stress–strain curves showed bi-phasic material characteristics, with an initial linear behaviour,

Wolfgang Gindl; Jozef Keckes

2004-01-01

418

Effect of filler loading of nickel zinc ferrite on the tensile properties of PLA nanocomposites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The mechanical strength of magnetic polymer nanocomposite (MPNC) of nickel zinc (NiZn) ferrite nanoparticles incorporated with polylactic acid (PLA) and liquid natural rubber (LNR) as compatibilizer is reported. The matrix was prepared from PLA and LNR in the ratio of 90:10. The MPNC were prepared at constant mixing temperature at 180°C, mixing time of 15 min. and mixing speed of 100 rpm. In order to achieve a good dispersion of NiZn ferrite in the matrix, firstly an ultrasonic treatment had been employed to mix the LNR and NiZn ferrite for 1 hour. The MPNC of PLA/LNR/NiZn ferrite then were prepared via Thermo Haake internal mixer using melt-blending method from different filler loading from 1-5 wt% NiZn ferrite. The result of tensile tests showed that as the filler loading increases the tensile strength also increases until an optimum value of filler loading was reached. The Young's modulus, tensile strength and elongation at break have also increased. The study proves that NiZn ferrite is excellent reinforcement filler in PLA matrix. Scanning electron micrograph (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) were meant to show the homogeneity dispersion of nanoparticles within the matrix and to confirm the elemental composition of NiZn ferrites-PLA/LNR nanocomposites respectively.

Shahdan, Dalila; Ahmad, Sahrim Hj

2013-05-01

419

Tensile properties of nicalon fiber-reinforced carbon following aerospace turbine engine testing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The durability of coated Nicalon silicon carbide fiber-reinforced carbon (SiC/C) as the flap and seal exhaust nozzle components in a military aerospace turbine engine was studied. Test specimens machined from both a flap and a seal component were tested for residual strength following extended ground engine testing on a General Electric F414 afterburning turbofan engine. Although small amounts of damage to the protective exterior coating were identified on each component following engine testing, the tensile strengths were equal to the as-fabricated tensile strength of the material. Differences in strength between the two components and variability within the data sets could be traced back to the fabrication process using witness coupon test data from the manufacturer. It was also observed that test specimens machined transversely across the flap and seal components were stronger than those machined along the length. The excellent retained strength of the coated SiC/C material after extended exposure to the severe environment in the afterburner exhaust section of an aerospace turbofan engine has resulted in this material being selected as the baseline material for the F414 exhaust nozzle system.

Pierce, J. L.; Zawada, L. P.; Srinivasan, R.

2003-06-01

420

Reliability models for finger joint strength and stiffness properties in Douglas-fir visual laminating grades  

E-print Network

Laminating Grades. (May 1988) Allan Gerard Bur k, B. S. , Kansas State University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Donald A. Bender Finger joint tensile strength and stiffness wer e modeled for three visual laminating grades of Douglas-fir lumber. Accur.... This approach preserved the statistical distributions of finger joint stiffness and tensile strength, as well as the correlation between the two. A model was also developed to simulate the length of boards in glued laminated beams, thus simulating finger...

Burk, Allan Gerard

1988-01-01