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Sample records for diamondoid thiols attached

  1. Determining Orientational Structure of Diamondoid Thiols Attached to Silver Using Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Willey, T M; Lee, J I; Fabbri, J D; Wang, D; Nielsen, M; Randel, J C; Schreiner, P R; Fokin, A A; Tkachenko, B A; Fokina, N A; Dahl, J P; Carlson, R K; Terminello, L J; Melosh, N A; van Buuren, T

    2008-10-07

    Near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) is a powerful tool for determination of molecular orientation in self-assembled monolayers and other surface-attached molecules. A general framework for using NEXAFS to simultaneously determine molecular tilt and twist of rigid molecules attached to surfaces is presented. This framework is applied to self-assembled monolayers of higher diamondoid, hydrocarbon molecules with cubic-diamond-cage structures. Diamondoid monolayers chemisorbed on metal substrates are known to exhibit interesting electronic and surface properties. This work compares molecular orientation in monolayers prepared on silver substrates using two different thiol positional isomers of [121]tetramantane, and thiols derived from two different pentamantane structural isomers, [1212]pentamantane and [1(2,3)4]pentamantane. The observed differences in monolayer structure demonstrate the utility and limitations of NEXAFS spectroscopy and the framework. The results also demonstrate the ability to control diamondoid assembly, in particular the molecular orientational structure, providing a flexible platform for the modification of surface properties with this exciting new class of nanodiamond materials.

  2. Near-Edge X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy of Diamondoid Thiol Monolayers on Gold

    SciTech Connect

    Willey, T.M.; Fabbri, J.D.; Lee, J.R.I.; Schreiner, P.R.; Fokin, A.A.; Tkachenko, B.A.; Fokina, N.A.; Dahl, J.E.P.; Carlson, R.M.K.; Vance, A.L.; Yang, W.; Terminello, L.J.; Buuren, T.van; Melosh, N.A.

    2009-05-26

    Diamondoids, hydrocarbon molecules with cubic-diamond-cage structures, have unique properties with potential value for nanotechnology. The availability and ability to selectively functionalize this special class of nanodiamond materials opens new possibilities for surface modification, for high-efficiency field emitters in molecular electronics, as seed crystals for diamond growth, or as robust mechanical coatings. The properties of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of diamondoids are thus of fundamental interest for a variety of emerging applications. This paper presents the effects of thiol substitution position and polymantane order on diamondoid SAMs on gold using near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). A framework to determine both molecular tilt and twist through NEXAFS is presented and reveals highly ordered diamondoid SAMs, with the molecular orientation controlled by the thiol location. C 1s and S 2p binding energies are lower in adamantane thiol than alkane thiols on gold by 0.67 {+-} 0.05 and 0.16 {+-} 0.04 eV, respectively. These binding energies vary with diamondoid monolayer structure and thiol substitution position, consistent with different degrees of steric strain and electronic interaction with the substrate. This work demonstrates control over the assembly, in particular the orientational and electronic structure, providing a flexible design of surface properties with this exciting new class of diamond nanoparticles.

  3. Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy of Diamondoid Thiol Monolayers on Gold

    SciTech Connect

    Willey, T M; Fabbri, J; Lee, J I; Schreiner, P; Fokin, A A; Tkachenko, B A; Fokina, N A; Dahl, J; Carlson, B; Vance, A L; Yang, W; Terminello, L J; van Buuren, T; Melosh, N

    2007-11-27

    Diamondoids, hydrocarbon molecules with cubic-diamond-cage structures, have unique properties with potential value for nanotechnology. The availability and ability to selectively functionalize this special class of nanodiamond materials opens new possibilities for surface-modification, for high-efficiency field emitters in molecular electronics, as seed crystals for diamond growth, or as robust mechanical coatings. The properties of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of diamondoids are thus of fundamental interest for a variety of emerging applications. This paper presents the effects of thiol substitution position and polymantane order on diamondoid SAMs on gold using near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). A framework to determine both molecular tilt and twist through NEXAFS is presented and reveals highly ordered diamondoid SAMs, with the molecular orientation controlled by the thiol location. C 1s and S 2p binding energies are lower in adamantane thiol than alkane thiols on gold by 0.67 {+-} 0.05 eV and 0.16 {+-} 0.04 eV respectively. These binding energies vary with diamondoid monolayer structure and thiol substitution position, consistent with different amounts of steric strain and electronic interaction with the substrate. This work demonstrates control over the assembly, in particular the orientational and electronic structure, providing a flexible design of surface properties with this exciting new class of diamond clusters.

  4. Carbene-mediated self-assembly of diamondoids on metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Bibek; Meng, Sheng; Fyta, Maria

    2016-04-01

    N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHC)s are emerging as an alternative class of molecules to thiol-based self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), making carbene-based SAMs much more stable under harsh environmental conditions. In this work, we have functionalized tiny diamondoids using NHCs in order to prepare highly stable carbene-mediated diamondoid SAMs on metal substrates. Using quantum-mechanical simulations and two different configurations for the carbene-functionalized diamondoids attached on gold, silver, and platinum surfaces we were able to study in detail these materials. Specifically, we focus on the binding characteristics, stability, and adsorption of the NHC-mediated diamondoid SAMs on the metal surfaces. A preferential binding to platinum surfaces was found, while a modulation of the work function in all cases was clear. The surface morphology of all NHC-based diamondoid SAMs was revealed through simulated STM images, which show characteristic features for each surface.

  5. Investigation of diamondoid and functionalized diamondoid molecules under extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, F.; Lin, Y.; Mao, W. L.

    2013-12-01

    As the fourth most abundant element in the universe and an important energy carrier, carbon based materials have long been of considerable interests in research. Diamondoids are cage-like, ultra-stable, saturated hydrocarbons, with carbon-carbon frameworks superimposed on the diamond lattice and originally found in petroleum. The exceptional electron photoemission from thin film of diamondoids has excited interests in using these unique materials as functional elements to regulate energy flow at the nanoscale. Selective chemical functionalization further changes the electronic properties of the system and brings many more possible applications. Pressure (P), together with temperature (T), could lead to formation of novel phases of pure diamondoids and provide alternative routes for potentially synthesizing higher diamondoids. In addition, the electronic properties of functionalized diamondoids may also be enhanced with P. We have compressed pure diamondoids: the [121] tetramantane up to 20 GPa and observed a phase transition at high pressure from powder x-ray diffraction (XRD). This phase transition took place at approximately 13 GPa and completed within a short pressure range. Meanwhile, we observed only continuous changes in the CCC bending and CC stretching regions from Raman spectroscopy, suggesting that the carbon framework of the diamondoid molecules remains intact with pressure. The phase transition observed in XRD is probably due to the molecular packing rearrangement. We also discovered interesting pressure-induced electronic properties changes in newly synthesized functionalized diamondoids, particularly the Ag-adamantane-thiol, from Raman spectroscopy. First, there is an abrupt emergence of photoluminescence with ~700 nm peak emission when the crystals are compressed to 2-3 GPa, suggesting an indirect to direct band gap transition. Second, the phonon modes in the Raman spectra begin to diminish, accompanied by an increase of the baseline slope, when the

  6. Monochromatic electron photoemission from diamondoid monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Wanli; Yang, Wanli L.; Fabbri, J.D.; Willey, T.M.; Lee, J.R.I.; Dahl, J.E.; Carlson, R.M.K.; Schreiner, P.R.; Fokin, A.A.; Tkachenko, B.A.; Fokina, N.A.; Meevasana, W.; Mannella, N.; Tanaka, K.; Zhou, X.J.; van Buuren, T.; Kelly, M.A.; Hussain, Z.; Melosh, N.A.; Shen, Z.-X.

    2007-02-27

    We found monochromatic electron photoemission from large-area self-assembled monolayers of a functionalized diamondoid, [121]tetramantane-6-thiol. Photoelectron spectra of the diamondoid monolayers exhibited a peak at the low-kinetic energy threshold; up to 68percent of all emitted electrons were emitted within this single energy peak. The intensity of the emission peak is indicative of diamondoids being negative electron affinity materials. With an energy distribution width of less than 0.5 electron volts, this source of monochromatic electrons may find application in technologies such as electron microscopy, electron beam lithography, and field-emission flatpanel displays.

  7. Diamondoid monolayers as electron emitters

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Wanli; Fabbri, Jason D.; Melosh, Nicholas A.; Hussain, Zahid; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2012-04-10

    Provided are electron emitters based upon diamondoid monolayers, preferably self-assembled higher diamondoid monolayers. High intensity electron emission has been demonstrated employing such diamondoid monolayers, particularly when the monolayers are comprised of higher diamondoids. The application of such diamondoid monolayers can alter the band structure of substrates, as well as emit monochromatic electrons, and the high intensity electron emissions can also greatly improve the efficiency of field-effect electron emitters as applied to industrial and commercial applications.

  8. Diamondoid monolayers as electron emitters

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Wanli; Fabbri, Jason D.; Melosh, Nicholas A.; Hussain, Zahid; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2013-10-29

    Provided are electron emitters based upon diamondoid monolayers, preferably self-assembled higher diamondoid monolayers. High intensity electron emission has been demonstrated employing such diamondoid monolayers, particularly when the monolayers are comprised of higher diamondoids. The application of such diamondoid monolayers can alter the band structure of substrates, as well as emit monochromatic electrons, and the high intensity electron emissions can also greatly improve the efficiency of field-effect electron emitters as applied to industrial and commercial applications.

  9. Electronic structure tuning of diamondoids through functionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rander, Torbjörn; Staiger, Matthias; Richter, Robert; Zimmermann, Tobias; Landt, Lasse; Wolter, David; Dahl, Jeremy E.; Carlson, Robert M. K.; Tkachenko, Boryslav A.; Fokina, Natalie A.; Schreiner, Peter R.; Möller, Thomas; Bostedt, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the changes in electronic structures induced by chemical functionalization of the five smallest diamondoids using valence photoelectron spectroscopy. Through the variation of three parameters, namely functional group (thiol, hydroxy, and amino), host cluster size (adamantane, diamantane, triamantane, [121]tetramantane, and [1(2,3)4]pentamantane), and functionalization site (apical and medial) we are able to determine to what degree these affect the electronic structures of the overall systems. We show that unlike, for example, in the case of halobenzenes, the ionization potential does not show a linear dependence on the electronegativity of the functional group. Instead, a linear correlation exists between the HOMO-1 ionization potential and the functional group electronegativity. This is due to localization of the HOMO on the functional group and the HOMO-1 on the diamondoid cage. Density functional theory supports our interpretations.

  10. Photoluminescence of Diamondoid Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Clay, William; Sasagawa, Takao; Iwasa, Akio; Liu, Zhi; Dahl, Jeremy E.; Carlson, Robert M.K.; Kelly, Michael; Melos, Nicholas; Shen, Zhi-Xun; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Geballe Lab. /SIMES, Stanford

    2012-04-03

    The photoluminescence of diamondoids in the solid state is examined. All of the diamondoids are found to photoluminesce readily with initial excitation wavelengths ranging from 233 nm to 240 nm (5.3 eV). These excitation energies are more than 1 eV lower than any previously studied saturated hydrocarbon material. The emission is found to be heavily shifted from the absorption, with emission wavelengths of roughly 295 nm (4.2 eV) in all cases. In the dissolved state, however, no uorescence is observed for excitation wavelengths as short as 200 nm. We also discuss predictions and measurements of the quantum yield. Our predictions indicate that the maximum yield may be as high as 25%. Our measurement of one species, diamantane, gives a yield of 11%, the highest ever reported for a saturated hydrocarbon, even though it was likely not at the optimal excitation wavelength.

  11. Ultralow effective work function surfaces using diamondoid monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimha, Karthik Thimmavajjula; Ge, Chenhao; Fabbri, Jason D.; Clay, William; Tkachenko, Boryslav A.; Fokin, Andrey A.; Schreiner, Peter R.; Dahl, Jeremy E.; Carlson, Robert M. K.; Shen, Z. X.; Melosh, Nicholas A.

    2016-03-01

    Electron emission is critical for a host of modern fabrication and analysis applications including mass spectrometry, electron imaging and nanopatterning. Here, we report that monolayers of diamondoids effectively confer dramatically enhanced field emission properties to metal surfaces. We attribute the improved emission to a significant reduction of the work function rather than a geometric enhancement. This effect depends on the particular diamondoid isomer, with [121]tetramantane-2-thiol reducing gold's work function from ∼5.1 eV to 1.60 ± 0.3 eV, corresponding to an increase in current by a factor of over 13,000. This reduction in work function is the largest reported for any organic species and also the largest for any air-stable compound. This effect was not observed for sp3-hybridized alkanes, nor for smaller diamondoid molecules. The magnitude of the enhancement, molecule specificity and elimination of gold metal rearrangement precludes geometric factors as the dominant contribution. Instead, we attribute this effect to the stable radical cation of diamondoids. Our computed enhancement due to a positively charged radical cation was in agreement with the measured work functions to within ±0.3 eV, suggesting a new paradigm for low-work-function coatings based on the design of nanoparticles with stable radical cations.

  12. Towards double-functionalized small diamondoids: selective electronic band-gap tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Bibek; Fyta, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Diamondoids are nanoscale diamond-like cage structures with hydrogen terminations, which can occur in various sizes and with a diverse type of modifications. In this work, we focus on the structural alterations and the effect of doping and functionalization on the electronic properties of diamondoids, from the smallest adamantane to heptamantane. The results are based on quantum mechanical calculations. We perform a self-consistent study, starting with doping the smallest diamondoid, adamantane. Boron, nitrogen, silicon, oxygen, and phosphorus are chosen as dopants at sites which have been previously optimized and are also consistent with the literature. At a next step, an amine- and a thiol- group are separately used to functionalize the adamantane molecule. We mainly focus on a double functionalization of diamondoids up to heptamantane using both these atomic groups. The effect of isomeration in the case of tetramantane is also studied. We discuss the higher efficiency of a double-functionalization compared to doping or a single-functionalization of diamondoids in tuning the electronic properties, such as the electronic band-gap, of modified small diamondoids in view of their novel nanotechnological applications.

  13. A novel thiol-affinity micropipette tip method using zinc(II)-cyclen-attached agarose beads for enrichment of cysteine-containing molecules.

    PubMed

    Kusamoto, Hiroshi; Shiba, Akio; Koretake, Norinao; Fujioka, Haruto; Hieda, Yuhzo; Kinoshita-Kikuta, Emiko; Kinoshita, Eiji; Koike, Tohru

    2016-09-15

    Cysteine-containing biomolecules are attractive targets in the study of thiol biology. Here we introduce a novel method for the selective enrichment of thiol-containing molecules using a thiol-capture zinc(II) complex of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane (Zn(2+)-cyclen). Recognition of N-acetylcysteine amide by Zn(2+)-cyclen has been studied by potentiometric pH titration, revealing formation of a 1:1 thiolate-bound Zn(2+)-cyclen complex with a large thiolate-affinity constant of 10(6.2)M(-1) at 25°C and I=0.10M (NaCl). The Zn(2+)-bound thiolate anion is unexpectedly stable in aqueous solution at pH 7.8 under atmospheric conditions for a few days. These findings have contributed to the development of a convenient method for separation of thiol compounds by using a micropipette tip. A 200μL micropipette tip containing 10μL of hydrophilic cross-linked agarose beads attached to Zn(2+)-cyclen moieties was prepared. All steps for thiol-affinity separation (binding, washing, and eluting) are conducted using aqueous buffers at room temperature. The entire separation protocol requires less than 15min per sample. We demonstrate practical example separations of cysteine-containing molecules. This micropipette tip method would be used preferentially as an alternative to existing tools for reliable enrichment of thiol-containing molecules. PMID:27498090

  14. The fate of diamondoids in coals and sedimentary rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Z.; Moldowan, J.M.; Jarvie, D.M.; Hill, R.

    2006-12-15

    Diamondoids were detected in the extracts of a series of coals and rocks varying in maturity, lithology, source input, and depositional environment. At the same maturity level, diamondoids are generally about a magnitude more abundant in source rocks than in coals. The concentrations of diamondoids are maturity dependent. However, while diamondoids become more abundant with the increasing thermal maturity, a diminution in diamondoid concentrations is observed at the maturity value of about R{sub o} = 4.0% in both coals and rocks. The occurrence of diamantane destruction at 550{sup o}C during pyrolysis suggests that diamondoids may be eventually destroyed at high temperatures in the Earth. Here we propose three main phases of diamondoid life in nature: diamondoid generation (phase I, R{sub o} < 1.1%), diamondoid generation and enrichment (phase II, 1.1% {le} R{sub o} {le}4.0%), and diamondoid destruction (phase III, R{sub o} > 4.0%).

  15. The fate of diamondoids in coals and sedimentary rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wei, Z.; Moldowan, J.M.; Jarvie, D.M.; Hill, R.

    2006-01-01

    Diamondoids were detected in the extracts of a series of coals and rocks varying in maturity, lithology, source input, and depositional environment. At the same maturity level, diamondoids are generally about a magnitude more abundant in source rocks than in coals. The concentrations of diamondoids are maturity dependent. However, while diamondoids become more abundant with the increasing thermal maturity, a diminution in diamondoid concentrations is observed at the maturity value of about Ro = 4.0% in both coals and rocks. The occurrence of diamantane destruction at 550 ??C during pyrolysis suggests that diamondoids may be eventually destroyed at high temperatures in the Earth. Here we propose three main phases of diamondoid life in nature: diamondoid generation (phase I, Ro 4.0%). ?? 2006 Geological Society of America.

  16. Diamondoids as DNA methylation and mutation probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaraman, Ganesh; Fyta, Maria

    2014-10-01

    In a recent study we proposed derivatives of lower diamondoids as novel biosensors, as well as possible functionalisation candidates of solid-state nanopores for DNA sequencing. A qualitative analysis has shown the abilities of these molecules to distinguish among different DNA nucleobases. In this letter, we extend the analysis and consider also methylated and mutated nucleobases, often being an indication of genetic diseases. Based on the bonding characteristics of these modified nucleobases to a diamondoid derivative, as well as their electronic properties we could reveal the ability of the diamondoid to clearly distinguish the regular from the modified nucleobases. The results show a clear indication that transport properties along these molecules would give distinct current signals.

  17. Enhanced oscillatory rectification and negative differential resistance in pentamantane diamondoid-cumulene systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawfik, Sherif Abdulkader; Cui, X. Y.; Ringer, S. P.; Stampfl, C.

    2016-02-01

    We propose a new functionality for diamondoids in nanoelectronics. Based on the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism and density functional theory, we reveal that when attached to gold electrodes, the pentamantane-cumulene molecular junction exhibits large and oscillatory rectification and negative differential resistance (NDR) - depending on the number of carbon atoms in cumulene (Cn). When n is odd rectification is greatly enhanced where the rectification ratio can reach ~180 and a large negative differential resistance peak current of ~3 μA. This oscillatory behavior is well rationalised in terms of the occupancy of the carbon 2p states in Cn. Interestingly, different layers of C atoms in the pentamantane molecule have different contributions to transmission. The first and third layers of C atoms in pentamantane have a slight contribution to rectification, and the fifth and sixth layers have a stronger contribution to both rectification and NDR. Thus, our results suggest potential avenues for controlling their functions by chemically manipulating various parts of the diamondoid molecule, thus extending the applications of diamondoids in nanoscale integrated circuits.

  18. Enhanced oscillatory rectification and negative differential resistance in pentamantane diamondoid-cumulene systems.

    PubMed

    Tawfik, Sherif Abdulkader; Cui, X Y; Ringer, S P; Stampfl, C

    2016-02-14

    We propose a new functionality for diamondoids in nanoelectronics. Based on the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism and density functional theory, we reveal that when attached to gold electrodes, the pentamantane-cumulene molecular junction exhibits large and oscillatory rectification and negative differential resistance (NDR) - depending on the number of carbon atoms in cumulene (Cn). When n is odd rectification is greatly enhanced where the rectification ratio can reach ∼180 and a large negative differential resistance peak current of ∼3 μA. This oscillatory behavior is well rationalised in terms of the occupancy of the carbon 2p states in Cn. Interestingly, different layers of C atoms in the pentamantane molecule have different contributions to transmission. The first and third layers of C atoms in pentamantane have a slight contribution to rectification, and the fifth and sixth layers have a stronger contribution to both rectification and NDR. Thus, our results suggest potential avenues for controlling their functions by chemically manipulating various parts of the diamondoid molecule, thus extending the applications of diamondoids in nanoscale integrated circuits. PMID:26794415

  19. Ordered phases of encapsulated diamondoids into carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legoas, S. B.; dos Santos, R. P. B.; Troche, K. S.; Coluci, V. R.; Galvão, D. S.

    2011-08-01

    Diamondoids are hydrogen-terminated nanosized diamond fragments that are present in petroleum crude oil at low concentrations. These fragments are found as oligomers of the smallest diamondoid, adamantane (C10H16). Due to their small size, diamondoids can be encapsulated into carbon nanotubes to form linear arrangements. We have investigated the encapsulation of diamondoids into single walled carbon nanotubes with diameters between 1.0 and 2.2 nm using fully atomistic simulations. We performed classical molecular dynamics and energy minimizations calculations to determine the most stable configurations. We observed molecular ordered phases (e.g. double, triple, 4- and 5-stranded helices) for the encapsulation of adamantane, diamantane, and dihydroxy diamantane. Our results also indicate that the functionalization of diamantane with hydroxyl groups can lead to an improvement on the molecular packing factor when compared to non-functionalized compounds. Comparisons to hard-sphere models revealed differences, especially when more asymmetrical diamondoids were considered. For larger diamondoids (i.e., adamantane tetramers), we have not observed long-range ordering but only a tendency to form incomplete helical structures. Our calculations predict that thermally stable (at least up to room temperature) complex ordered phases of diamondoids can be formed through encapsulation into carbon nanotubes.

  20. Diamonds are a chemist's best friend: diamondoid chemistry beyond adamantane.

    PubMed

    Schwertfeger, Hartmut; Fokin, Andrey A; Schreiner, Peter R

    2008-01-01

    Marilyn Monroe knew that "diamonds are a girl's best friend" but, in the meantime, many chemists have realized that they are also extremely attractive objects in contemporary chemistry. The chemist's diamonds are usually quite small (herein: nanometer-sized "diamondoids") and as a result of their unique structure are unusual chemical building blocks. Since lower diamondoids (up to triamantane) have recently become available in large amounts from petroleum and higher diamondoids (starting from tetramantane) are now also accessible from crude oil new research involving them has begun to emerge. Having well-defined structures makes these cage compounds so special compared to other nanometer-scale diamonds. Selective and high-yielding synthetic approaches to the functionalization of diamondoids gives derivatives that can find applications in, for example, polymers, coating materials, drugs, and molecular electronics. PMID:18081112

  1. Azeotropic distillation process for recovery of diamondoid compounds from hydrocarbon streams

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, R.A.; Whitehurst, D.D.

    1992-08-18

    This patent describes a method for separating a diamondoid compound selected from the group consisting of adamantane, diamantane, triamantane and the alkyl substituted homologs of adamantane, diamantane, and triamantane from a hydrocarbon compound. This patent also describes a method for extracting diamondoid compounds from a hydrocarbon gas containing the same. It comprises providing a hydrocarbon gas stream containing a recoverable concentration of at least one concentration of at least one diamondoid compound; contacting the hydrocarbon gas stream with a liquid hydrocarbon solvent in which the diamondoid compound is at least partially soluble to dissolve the diamondoid compound in the liquid hydrocarbon solvent; and distilling the diamondoid-containing hydrocarbon solvent of step in the presence of water sufficient to cause an azeotrope with the diamondoid compound.

  2. Deliberate design of an acentric diamondoid metal-organic network

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Caiqin; Wang Jing; Wang Wei; Zhan Wenhong

    2011-09-15

    Reaction of 2.5-dicarboxy-1-methylpyridinium (DCMP) chloride and Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}.6H{sub 2}O in the presence of NaHCO{sub 3} in water gave an expected acentric diamondoid network [Zn(DCMP){sub 2}] with a three-fold interpenetration. With long Zn-Zn separations, very large cavities are formed within each diamondoid network with high propensity to interpenetration, which makes it show a promising non-linear optical property with SHG efficiency approximately 7 times higher than that of potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP). The design strategy of ligand through methylation of the corresponding pyrdinecarboxylic acid can be extended to other widely used carboxylic acids, more importantly, to lead to an unsymmetric bifunctional bridging ligand, which is essential for generating polar solids. - Graphical Abstract: Reaction of Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}.6H{sub 2}O with a deliberately designed unsymmetrical ligand 2.5-dicarboxy-1-methylpyridinium (DCMP) chloride and in the presence of NaHCO{sub 3} gave an expected noncentric diamondoid network [Zn(DCMP){sub 2}], which has its SHG response approximately 7 times higher than that of potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP). Highlights: > DCMP as an unsymmetrical organic ligand to design metal organic framework. > Long Zn-Zn separations and very large cavities formed. > Diamondoid network with high propensity to interpenetration formed. > Bifunctional bridging ligand was used to generate polar solids with large SHG response.

  3. The abundance and distribution of diamondoids in biodegraded oils from the San Joaquin Valley: Implications for biodegradation of diamondoids in petroleum reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wei, Z.; Moldowan, J.M.; Peters, K.E.; Wang, Y.; Xiang, W.

    2007-01-01

    The biodegradability of diamondoids was investigated using a collection of crude oil samples from the San Joaquin Valley, California, that had been biodegraded to varying extent in the reservoir. Our results show that diamondoids are subjected to biodegradation, which is selective as well as stepwise. Adamantanes are generally more susceptible to biodegradation than other diamondoids, such as diamantanes and triamantanes. We report a possible pathway for the microbial degradation of adamantane. This cage hydrocarbon possibly breaks down to a metabolic intermediate through the action of microbes at higher levels of biodegradation in petroleum reservoirs. Microbial alteration has only a minor effect on diamondoid abundance in oil at low levels of biodegradation. Our results suggest that most diamondoids (with the exception of adamantane) are resistant to biodegradation, like the polycyclic terpanes (e.g. C19-C24 tricyclic terpanes, hopanes, gammacerane, oleananes, Ts, Tm, C29 Ts), steranes and diasteranes. Microbial alteration of diamondoids has a negligible impact on the quantification of oil cracking achieved using the diamondoid-biomarker method. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The Origin of the Monochromatic Photoemission Peak in Diamondoid Monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Clay, William A.; Liu, Zhi; Yang, Wanli; Fabbri, Jason D.; Dahl, Jeremy E.; Carlson, Robert M.K.; Sun, Steven; Pianetta, Piero A.; Melosh, Nicholas; Shen, Zhi-Xun; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab. /LBNL, ALS /Chevron Petroleum Tech., Richmond /SLAC, SSRL

    2008-10-31

    Recent photoemission experiments have discovered a highly monochromatized secondary electron peak emitted from diamondoid self-assembled monolayers on metal substrates. New experimental data and simulation results are presented to show that a combination of negative electron affinity and strong electron-phonon scattering is responsible for this behavior. The simulation results are generated using a simple Monte Carlo transport algorithm. The simulated spectra contain the main spectral features of the measured ones.

  5. NMR spectral properties of the tetramantanes - nanometer-sized diamondoids.

    PubMed

    Balaban, Alexandru T; Young, Donald C; Plavec, Janez; Pečnik, Klemen; Pompe, Matevž; Dahl, Jeremy E; Carlson, Robert M K

    2015-12-01

    Tetramantanes, and all diamondoid hydrocarbons, possess carbon frameworks that are superimposable upon the cubic diamond lattice. This characteristic is invaluable in assigning their (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra because it translates into repeating structural features, such as diamond-cage isobutyl moieties with distinctively complex methine to methylene signatures in COSY and HMBC data, connected to variable, but systematic linkages of methine and quaternary carbons. In all tetramantane C22H28 isomers, diamond-lattice structures result in long-range (4)JHH, W-coupling in COSY data, except where negated by symmetry; there are two highly symmetrical and one chiral tetramantane (showing seven (4)JHH). Isobutyl-cage methines of lower diamondoids and tetramantanes are the most shielded resonances in their (13)C spectra (<29.5 ppm). The isobutyl methylenes are bonded to additional methines and at least one quaternary carbon in the tetramantanes. W-couplings between these methines and methylenes clarify spin-network interconnections and detailed surface hydrogen stereochemistry. Vicinal couplings of the isobutyl methylenes reveal positions of the quaternary carbons: HMBC data then tie the more remote spin systems together. Diamondoid (13) C NMR chemical shifts are largely determined by α and β effects, however γ-shielding effects are important in [123]tetramantane. (1)H NMR chemical shifts generally correlate with numbers of 1,3-diaxial H-H interactions. Tight van der Waals contacts within [123]tetramantane's molecular groove, however, form improper hydrogen bonds, deshielding hydrogen nuclei inside the groove, while shielding those outside, indicated by Δδ of 1.47 ppm for geminal hydrogens bonded to C-3,21. These findings should be valuable in future NMR studies of diamondoids/nanodiamonds of increasing size. PMID:26286373

  6. Ab initio structural and vibrational properties of GaAs diamondoids and nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Abdulsattar, Mudar Ahmed; Hussein, Mohammed T.; Hameed, Hadeel Ali

    2014-12-15

    Gallium arsenide diamondoids structural and vibrational properties are investigated using density functional theory at the PBE/6-31(d) level and basis including polarization functions. Variation of energy gap as these diamondoids increase in size is seen to follow confinement theory for diamondoids having nearly equiaxed dimensions. Density of energy states transforms from nearly single levels to band structure as we reach larger diamondoids. Bonds of surface hydrogen with As atoms are relatively localized and shorter than that bonded to Ga atoms. Ga-As bonds have a distribution range of values due to surface reconstruction and effect of bonding to hydrogen atoms. Experimental bulk Ga-As bond length (2.45 Å) is within this distribution range. Tetrahedral and dihedral angles approach values of bulk as we go to higher diamondoids. Optical-phonon energy of larger diamondoids stabilizes at 0.037 eV (297 cm{sup -1}) compared to experimental 0.035 eV (285.2 cm{sup -1}). Ga-As force constant reaches 1.7 mDyne/Å which is comparable to Ga-Ge force constant (1.74 mDyne/Å). Hydrogen related vibrations are nearly constant and serve as a fingerprint of GaAs diamondoids while Ga-As vibrations vary with size of diamondoids.

  7. Electronic and spectroscopic properties of Ge nanocrystals using diamondoid structures: A density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulsattar, Mudar Ahmed

    2016-04-01

    Energetically stable Ge diamondoids are used as building blocks to investigate Ge nanocrystal properties using density functional theory (DFT). Energy gap, HOMO and LUMO of Ge diamondoids vary according to confinement theory with shape fluctuations. Ge diamondoid vibrational force constants reach 2.18 mDyne/Å which is between that of bulk silicon and tin. Ge-Ge vibrational frequencies and reduced masses reach 357.47 cm‑1 and 41.93 amu, respectively, which are higher than the values of bulk Ge. Size variation of UV-Vis shows that the maximum optical peak moves from 163 nm to nearly 290 nm as the size of Ge diamondoids and molecules increases. The higher peak value approaches that of experimental Ge quantum dots at 300 nm. NMR spectra of Ge diamondoids are analyzed as a function of diamondoid sizes. Our results show that all investigated spectroscopic tools are sensitive to molecular or nanocrystals size. NMR is particularly good size indicator. Natural bond orbital (NBO) population analysis shows present diamondoid bondings differ from ideal sp3 bonding. The bonding for Ge valence orbitals is in the range (4s1.244p2.60) ‑ (4s1.274p2.73) depending on distance between Ge atom and diamondoid surface. Highest Ge diamondoids vibrational longitudinal optical (LO) mode is blue shifted with respect to experimental bulk value which is the opposite case for C and Si. H surface atom effects on electronic and vibrational properties are discussed.

  8. UV resonance Raman analysis of trishomocubane and diamondoid dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Meinke, Reinhard Thomsen, Christian; Maultzsch, Janina; Richter, Robert; Merli, Andrea; Fokin, Andrey A.; Koso, Tetyana V.; Schreiner, Peter R.; Rodionov, Vladimir N.

    2014-01-21

    We present resonance Raman measurements of crystalline trishomocubane and diamantane dimers containing a C=C double bond. Raman spectra were recorded with excitation energies between 2.33 eV and 5.42 eV. The strongest enhancement is observed for the C=C stretch vibration and a bending mode involving the two carbon atoms of the C=C bond, corresponding to the B{sub 2g} wagging mode of ethylene. This is associated with the localization of the π-HOMO and LUMO and the elongation of the C=C bond length and a pyramidalization of the two sp{sup 2}-hybridized carbon atoms at the optical excitation. The observed Raman resonance energies of the trishomocubane and diamantane dimers are significantly lower than the HOMO-LUMO gaps of the corresponding unmodified diamondoids.

  9. Theoretical Confirmation of the Experimental Raman Spectra of the Diamondoid Molecule: Cyclohexamantane (C26H30)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Steven L.; Baruah, Tunna

    2005-03-01

    Diamondoids (C4n+6H4n+12) are rigid, cage-like hydrocarbon molecules which are superimposable upon the diamond crystal structure. For n=1, we have the simplest diamondoid, adamantane C10H16. While most of the diamondoids for n<=3 have been synthesized in the lab, routes for preparing larger diamondoids for n>4 have not yet been realized. The diamondoid, cyclohexamantane (C26H30), has recently been isolated from distilled Gulf Coast petroleum.[1] While its structure has been confirmed through x-ray diffraction, mass spectroscopy, and ^1H/^13C NMR spectroscopy, its vibrational Raman spectra has only been identified through an indirect comparison with the experimental Raman spectra for adamantane and diamond. We have used density-functional theory (DFT) to calculate a Raman spectra which is in excellent agreement with the experimental Raman spectra for C26H30, thus providing direct vibrational proof of its existence.[2] ^1J. E. P. Dahl et al., Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 42, 2040 (2003). ^2S. L. Richardson, T. Baruah, M. J. Mehl, and M. R. Pederson, accepted for publication in Chem. Phys. Lett.

  10. Generation of plasmas in supercritical xenon inside microcapillaries for synthesis of diamondoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, Fumito; Ishii, Chikako; Stauss, Sven; Terashima, Kazuo

    2012-10-01

    Diamondoids are series of sp^3 hybridized carbon nanomaterials that could be applied in various fields such as pharmacy and optoelectronics. In our previous studies, higher order diamondoids were synthesized in supercritical fluid (SCF) plasmas in a batch-type reactor using adamantane (C10H16), the smallest diamondoid, as a precursor and seed. However the yield was low and the selectivity was difficult to control. We have developed a continuous flow SCF microplasma reactor that allows discharge volume and residence time to be adjusted. The electrodes consist of a tungsten wire inserted into a fused silica capillary and a sputtered silver outside of the capillary. We dissolved adamantane in supercritical xenon near critical point, and then generated DBDs inside the capillary using a nominal constant xenon flow rate of 0˜2.3 mL min-1. Micro-Raman spectra of the synthesized products show peaks that are characteristic of hydrocarbons possessing sp^3 hybridized bonds while gas-chromatography/mass spectrometry spectra indicate the synthesis of diamantane (C14H20) and possibly isomers of diamondoids consisting of up to nine cages, nonamantane. It is suggested that this type of SCF microplasma reactor might be effective not only for synthesis of diamondoids, but also other nanomaterials.

  11. Thiol biochemistry of prokaryotes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahey, Robert C.

    1986-01-01

    The present studies have shown that GSH metabolism arose in the purple bacteria and cyanobacteria where it functions to protect against oxygen toxicity. Evidence was obtained indicating that GSH metabolism was incorporated into eucaryotes via the endosymbiosis giving rise to mitochrondria and chloroplasts. Aerobic bacteria lacking GSH utilize other thiols for apparently similar functions, the thiol being coenzyme A in Gram positive bacteria and chi-glutamylcysteine in the halobacteria. The thiol biochemistry of prokaryotes is thus seen to be much more highly diversified than that of eucaryotes and much remains to be learned about this subject.

  12. Benchmark investigation of diamondoid-functionalized electrodes for nanopore DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Sivaraman, Ganesh; Amorim, Rodrigo G; Scheicher, Ralph H; Fyta, Maria

    2016-10-14

    Small diamond-like particles, diamondoids, have been shown to effectively functionalize gold electrodes in order to sense DNA units passing between the nanopore-embedded electrodes. In this work, we present a comparative study of Au(111) electrodes functionalized with different derivatives of lower diamondoids. Focus is put on the electronic and transport properties of such electrodes for different DNA nucleotides placed within the electrode gap. The functionalization promotes a specific binding to DNA leading to different properties for the system, which provides a tool set to systematically improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the electronic measurements across the electrodes. Using quantum transport calculations, we compare the effectiveness of the different functionalized electrodes in distinguishing the four DNA nucleotides. Our results point to the most effective diamondoid functionalization of gold electrodes in view of biosensing applications. PMID:27607107

  13. Chemistry of perfluorinated diamondoid compounds: Syntheses and reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, H.

    1992-01-01

    A series of novel perfluorinated diamondoid compounds has been synthesized utilizing the aerosol direct fluorination method. Aerosol direct fluorination of the hydrocarbon analogues produced directly the following perfluorinated diamondoid compounds: F-diamantane, F-adamantanone, 1-chloro-F-adamantane, 2-chloro-F-adamantane, 1,2-dichloro-F-adamantane, 1,3-dichloro-F-adamantane, 1,3,5-trichloro-F-adamantane, 1,3,5,7-tetrachloro-F-adamantane, 1-chloro-F-norbornane, F-4-oxahomoadamantan-5-one, and F-4-protoadamantanone. The first documented, 1,3-chlorine shift is observed during aerosol fluorination of 2,2-dichloroadamantane producing 2,4-dichloro-F-adamantane in addition to 2,2-dichloro-F-adamantane. Unlike some cyclic perfluoroketones, F-adamantanone was found to be nonhygroscopic but reversibly forms hemiketals with alcohols. The concentration, temperature and steic effects on the equilibrium between F-adamantanone and its hemiketals with different alcohols have been studied. UV irradiation of F-adamantanone and F-4-protoadamantanone produced the same decarbonylized compound, F-noradamantane, in near quantitative yield its first reported synthesis. 1-Lithio-F-adamantane was synthesized from the corresponding 1-hydryl-F-adamantane by metallation with methyllithium. 1-Lithio-F-adamantane can also be generated from 1-chloro-f-adamantane and tert-butyllithium or n-butyllithium. It appears that 1-lithio-F-adamantane is stable as long as no other reactive species is present. [sup 9]F NMR indicates that the reaction of 2-hydryl-F-adamantane and methyl-lithium initially gives 2-lithio-F-adamantane which rearranges to 1-lithio-F-adamantane over 2 hours. A possible mechanism is discussed. UV irradiation of F-adamantyl halides in methanol produced only radical substitution product. This provides a facile way to make hydrofluorocarbons from chlorofluorocarbons. By controlling the irradiation time, polychloro-F-adamantanes can be reduced in a stepwise manner.

  14. Plasma microreactor in supercritical xenon and its application to diamondoid synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, F.; Stauss, S.; Ishii, C.; Pai, D. Z.; Terashima, K.

    2012-10-01

    The generation of plasmas in a microreactor is demonstrated in xenon from atmospheric pressure up to supercritical conditions. Ac high voltage at a frequency of 15 kHz was applied across a 25-µm discharge gap between a tungsten wire and a fused silica micro-capillary tube in a coaxial configuration. Using this continuous flow supercritical fluid microreactor, it was possible to synthesize diamantane and other diamondoids up to nonamantane, using adamantane as a precursor and seed. It is anticipated that plasmas generated in supercritical fluid microreactors may not only allow faster fabrication of diamondoids, but also offer opportunities for the fabrication of other nanomaterials.

  15. Diamondoid-functionalized gold nanogaps as sensors for natural, mutated, and epigenetically modified DNA nucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaraman, Ganesh; Amorim, Rodrigo G.; Scheicher, Ralph H.; Fyta, Maria

    2016-05-01

    Modified tiny hydrogen-terminated diamond structures, known as diamondoids, show a high efficiency in sensing DNA molecules. These diamond cages, as recently proposed, could offer functionalization possibilities for gold junction electrodes. In this investigation, we report on diamondoid-functionalized electrodes, showing that such a device would have a high potential in sensing and sequencing DNA. The smallest diamondoid including an amine modification was chosen for the functionalization. Here, we report on the quantum tunneling signals across diamondoid-functionalized Au(111) electrodes. Our work is based on quantum-transport calculations and predicts the expected signals arising from different DNA units within the break junctions. Different gating voltages are proposed in order to tune the sensitivity of the functionalized electrodes with respect to specific nucleotides. The relation of this sensitivity to the coupling or decoupling of the electrodes is discussed. Our results also shed light on the sensing capability of such a device in distinguishing the DNA nucleotides, in their natural and mutated forms.

  16. Diamondoid-functionalized gold nanogaps as sensors for natural, mutated, and epigenetically modified DNA nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Sivaraman, Ganesh; Amorim, Rodrigo G; Scheicher, Ralph H; Fyta, Maria

    2016-05-21

    Modified tiny hydrogen-terminated diamond structures, known as diamondoids, show a high efficiency in sensing DNA molecules. These diamond cages, as recently proposed, could offer functionalization possibilities for gold junction electrodes. In this investigation, we report on diamondoid-functionalized electrodes, showing that such a device would have a high potential in sensing and sequencing DNA. The smallest diamondoid including an amine modification was chosen for the functionalization. Here, we report on the quantum tunneling signals across diamondoid-functionalized Au(111) electrodes. Our work is based on quantum-transport calculations and predicts the expected signals arising from different DNA units within the break junctions. Different gating voltages are proposed in order to tune the sensitivity of the functionalized electrodes with respect to specific nucleotides. The relation of this sensitivity to the coupling or decoupling of the electrodes is discussed. Our results also shed light on the sensing capability of such a device in distinguishing the DNA nucleotides, in their natural and mutated forms. PMID:27121677

  17. Diamondoid synthesis by nanosecond pulsed microplasmas generated in He at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauss, Sven; Shizuno, Tomoki; Oshima, Fumito; Pai, David Z.; Terashima, Kazuo

    2012-10-01

    Diamondoids are sp^3 hybridized carbon nanomaterials that possess interesting properties making them attractive for biotechnology, medicine, and opto- and nanoelectronics. So far, larger diamondoids have been synthesized using the smallest diamondoid (adamantane) as a precursor. For this electric discharges and pulsed laser plasmas generated in supercritical fluids, and hot filament chemical vapor deposition have been used, but these methods are difficult to realize or very time-consuming. We have developed a more convenient approach where diamondoids are synthesized by high-voltage nanosecond pulsed microplasmas (voltage 15 kVp-p, frequency 1 Hz, pulse width 10 ns) generated in He at atmospheric pressure using point-to-plane tungsten electrodes. Adamantane was used as a precursor, and synthesis was conducted for 10^5 pulses at gas temperatures of 297, 373 and 473 K. Energy dispersive X-ray and micro-Raman spectroscopy were conducted to determine the composition of the products, and gas chromatography - mass spectra indicated the formation of diamantane. It was found that synthesis is more efficient at room temperature than at higher temperatures, and time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy suggest that the chemical reactions take place in the afterglow.

  18. Diamondoid naphthenic acids cause in vivo genetic damage in gills and haemocytes of marine mussels.

    PubMed

    Dissanayake, Awantha; Scarlett, Alan G; Jha, Awadhesh N

    2016-04-01

    Diamondoids are polycyclic saturated hydrocarbons that possess a cage-like carbon skeleton approaching that of diamond. These 'nano-diamonds' are used in a range of industries including nanotechnologies and biomedicine. Diamondoids were thought to be highly resistant to degradation, but their presumed degradation acid products have now been found in oil sands process-affected waters (OSPW) and numerous crude oils. Recently, a diamondoid-related structure, 3-noradamantane carboxylic acid, was reported to cause genetic damage in trout hepatocytes under in vitro conditions. This particular compound has never been reported in the environment but led us to hypothesise that other more environmentally relevant diamondoid acids could also be genotoxic. We carried out in vivo exposures (3 days, semi-static) of marine mussels to two environmentally relevant diamondoid acids, 1-adamantane carboxylic acid and 3,5-dimethyladamantane carboxylic acid plus 3-noradamantane carboxylic acid with genotoxic damage assessed using the Comet assay. An initial screening test confirmed that these acids displayed varying degrees of genotoxicity to haemocytes (increased DNA damage above that of controls) when exposed in vivo to a concentration of 30 μmol L(-1). In a further test focused on 1-adamantane carboxylic acid with varying concentrations (0.6, 6 and 30 μmol L(-1)), significant (P < 0.05%) DNA damage was observed in different target cells (viz. gills and haemocytes) at 0.6 μmol L(-1). Such a level of induced genetic damage was similar to that observed following exposure to a known genotoxin, benzo(a)pyrene (exposure concentration, 0.8 μmol L(-1)). These findings may have implications for a range of worldwide industries including oil extraction, nanotechnology and biomedicine. PMID:26884235

  19. Synthesis of higher diamondoids by pulsed laser ablation plasmas in supercritical CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakahara, Sho; Stauss, Sven; Kato, Toru; Sasaki, Takehiko; Terashima, Kazuo

    2011-06-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (wavelength 532 nm; fluence 18 J/cm2; pulse width 7 ns; repetition rate 10 Hz) of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite was conducted in adamantane-dissolved supercritical CO2 with and without cyclohexane as a cosolvent. Micro-Raman spectroscopy of the products revealed the presence of hydrocarbons possessing sp3-hybridized carbons similar to diamond structures. The synthesis of diamantane and other possible diamondoids consisting of up to 12 cages was confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Furthermore, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry measurements of samples before and after pyrolysis treatment indicate the synthesis of the most compact decamantane, namely, superadamantane. It is thought that oxidant species originating from CO2 during pulsed laser ablation might lead to the selective dissociation of C-H bonds, enabling the synthesis of low H/C ratio molecules. Therefore, laser ablation in supercritical CO2 is proposed as a practical method for synthesizing diamondoids.

  20. Electroanalysis of Plant Thiols

    PubMed Central

    Supalkova, Veronika; Huska, Dalibor; Diopan, Vaclav; Hanustiak, Pavel; Zitka, Ondrej; Stejskal, Karel; Baloun, Jiri; Pikula, Jiri; Havel, Ladislav; Zehnalek, Josef; Adam, Vojtech; Trnkova, Libuse; Beklova, Miroslava; Kizek, Rene

    2007-01-01

    Due to unique physico-chemical properties of –SH moiety thiols comprise wide group of biologically important compounds. A review devoted to biological functions of glutathione and phytochelatins with literature survey of methods used to analysis of these compounds and their interactions with cadmium(II) ions and Murashige-Skoog medium is presented. For these purposes electrochemical techniques are used. Moreover, we revealed the effect of three different cadmium concentrations (0, 10 and 100 μM) on cadmium uptake and thiols content in maize plants during 192 hours long experiments using differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry to detect cadmium(II) ions and high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection to determine glutathione. Cadmium concentration determined in tissues of the plants cultivated in nutrient solution containing 10 μM Cd was very low up to 96 hours long exposition and then the concentration of Cd markedly increased. On the contrary, the addition of 100 μM Cd caused an immediate sharp increase in all maize plant parts to 96 hours Cd exposition but subsequently the Cd concentration increased more slowly. A high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection was used for glutathione determination in treated maize plants after 96 and 192 hours of treatment. The highest total content of glutathione per one plant was 6 μg (96 h, 10 μM Cd) in comparison with non-treated plant (control) where glutathione content was 1.5 μg. It can be concluded that electrochemical techniques have proved to be useful to analyse plant thiols.

  1. Synthesis and investigation of reaction mechanisms of diamondoids produced using plasmas generated inside microcapillaries in supercritical xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, Fumito; Stauss, Sven; Inose, Yoshifumi; Terashima, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    We have synthesized diamondoids using dielectric barrier discharge microplasmas generated inside a microcapillary reactor in supercritical xenon. The plasmas were generated near the critical temperature (T_{\\text{crit}} = 389.75\\,\\text{K}) and pressure (p_{\\text{crit}} = 5.84\\,\\text{MPa}) of xenon in the ranges of T/T_{\\text{crit}} = 0.964-0.983 and p/p_{\\text{crit}} = 0.998\\text-1.026 under both batch-type and continuous flow conditions with gas flow rates of 0.01-0.5 mL min-1. Micro-Raman spectra of the synthesized particles showed features characteristic of diamondoids, while gas chromatography-mass spectrometry measurements revealed that diamondoids up to undecamantane were possibly synthesized. Further, the amount of obtained diamantane was greater than those obtained using previously reported diamondoid synthesis processes that involve plasmas in supercritical fluids. This increase is attributed to the higher solubility of the supercritical medium, i.e., xenon, and the higher efficiency of the microreactor. A detailed gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis showed that higher diamondoids grow in a stepwise manner via the alternate removal of hydrogen atoms and the addition of methyl groups.

  2. Thiol Reactive Probes and Chemosensors

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hanjing; Chen, Weixuan; Cheng, Yunfeng; Hakuna, Lovemore; Strongin, Robert; Wang, Binghe

    2012-01-01

    Thiols are important molecules in the environment and in biological processes. Cysteine (Cys), homocysteine (Hcy), glutathione (GSH) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) play critical roles in a variety of physiological and pathological processes. The selective detection of thiols using reaction-based probes and sensors is very important in basic research and in disease diagnosis. This review focuses on the design of fluorescent and colorimetric probes and sensors for thiol detection. Thiol detection methods include probes and labeling agents based on nucleophilic addition and substitution, Michael addition, disulfide bond or Se-N bond cleavage, metal-sulfur interactions and more. Probes for H2S are based on nucleophilic cyclization, reduction and metal sulfide formation. Thiol probe and chemosensor design strategies and mechanism of action are discussed in this review. PMID:23202239

  3. New quinolone-based thiol-reactive lanthanide luminescent probes

    PubMed Central

    Wirpsza, Laura; Krasnoperov, Lev; Mustaev, Arkady

    2013-01-01

    Luminescent lanthanide ion complexes are distinguished by unique light emitting properties that enable both highly sensitive detection of lanthanide labels attached to biomolecules and contrast imaging of various micro objects (cells, nanoparticles, etc.). Previously, we synthesized amine-reactive cs124-based luminescent lanthanide chelates with improved brightness and metal retention. Here we report the synthesis of new thiol-reactive derivatives of the same compounds including bromoacetamido-, and maleimido- forms of cs124 and cs124CF3 fluorophores. Maleimido-compounds displayed exceptional reactivity instantaneously coupling to thiols at physiological conditions at micromolar probes concentrations. Surprisingly, they displayed strong quenching by adjacent maleimido-group, which was completely eliminated after reaction with thiols, thereby enabling their simple detection by monitoring the light emission of the reaction mixture. This reaction can be used for hyper-sensitive determination of biologically important sulphydryl compounds (e.g. glutathione, co-enzyme A, etc.) in time-resolved mode. PMID:23833545

  4. Rapid and Thiol-Specific High-Throughput Assay for Simultaneous Relative Quantification of Total Thiols, Protein Thiols, and Nonprotein Thiols in Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Thiol groups in biological molecules play a significant role in various physiological functions and pathological conditions. Thiols are divided into two major groups: protein thiols and nonprotein thiols. Numerous methods have been reported for thiol assays. Most of these methods have been developed for glutathione, the principal nonprotein thiol, despite the fact that cellular protein thiols are more abundant than glutathione. Further, these methods usually involve a process of biological sample preparation followed by a separation method, and they are time-consuming. We reported previously a series of thiol-specific fluorogenic benzofurazan sulfides. These nonfluorescent benzofurazan sulfides react rapidly and specifically with a thiol to form a strong fluorescent thiol adduct. The rapid reaction, thiol-specific and fluorogenic nature of the sulfides successfully yielded an application of one of the sulfides for relative quantitation of total thiols in live cells through fluorescence microscopy. In this work, we employed the same compound to develop the first high-throughput method for simultaneous monitoring of protein thiols, nonprotein thiols, and total thiols in cells in a 96-well plate on a fluorescence microplate reader at λex = 430 nm and λem = 520 nm, respectively. The method is rapid and sensitive, and has been validated by an HPLC thiol assay method. The method can detect thiols with cell concentrations as low as 500 cells/well. We also demonstrated that the method can readily monitor changes in cellular thiol levels. Although the method cannot provide an absolute quantification for thiols because fluorescence intensity of different thiol adducts varies, it provides an accurate measurement of relative quantification, relative to the control. The method will be a valuable tool in thiol-related biomedical/pharmaceutical research. PMID:25423115

  5. The functionalization of nanodiamonds (diamondoids) as a key parameter of their easily controlled self-assembly in micro- and nanocrystals from the vapor phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunawan, Maria A.; Poinsot, Didier; Domenichini, Bruno; Dirand, Céline; Chevalier, Sébastien; Fokin, Andrey A.; Schreiner, Peter R.; Hierso, Jean-Cyrille

    2015-01-01

    We detail herein readily accessible processes to control previously unobserved robust self-assemblies of nanodiamonds (diamondoids) in micro- and nanocrystals from their mild vapor deposition. The chemical functionalization of uniform and discernible nanodiamonds was found to be a key parameter, and depending on the type of functional group (hydroxy, fluorine, etc.) and its position on the diamondoid, the structure of the discrete deposits can vary dramatically. Thus, well-defined anisotropic structures such as rod, needle, triangle or truncated octahedron shapes can be obtained, and self-assembled edifices of sizes ranging from 20 nm to several hundred micrometers formed with conservation of a similar structure for a given diamondoid. Key thermodynamic data including sublimation enthalpy of diamondoid derivatives are reported, and the SEM of the self-assemblies coupled with EDX analyses and XRD attest the nature and purity of nanodiamond crystal deposits. This attractive method is simple and outperforms in terms of deposit quality dip-coating methods we used. This vapor phase deposition approach is expected to allow for an easy formation of diamondoid nanoobjects on different types of substrates.We detail herein readily accessible processes to control previously unobserved robust self-assemblies of nanodiamonds (diamondoids) in micro- and nanocrystals from their mild vapor deposition. The chemical functionalization of uniform and discernible nanodiamonds was found to be a key parameter, and depending on the type of functional group (hydroxy, fluorine, etc.) and its position on the diamondoid, the structure of the discrete deposits can vary dramatically. Thus, well-defined anisotropic structures such as rod, needle, triangle or truncated octahedron shapes can be obtained, and self-assembled edifices of sizes ranging from 20 nm to several hundred micrometers formed with conservation of a similar structure for a given diamondoid. Key thermodynamic data including

  6. Metal-Organic Framework Isomers with Diamondoid Networks Constructed of a Semi-Rigid Tetrahedral Linker

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Jian; Motkuri, Radha K.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; McGrail, B. Peter

    2010-10-19

    Solvothermal assembly of a semi-rigid tetrahedral carboxylate ligand tetrakis[4-(carboxyphenyl)oxamethyl]methane acid (H4X) with Cd(II) ion in different solvent systems yields three novel metal-organic framework isomers (1-3) based on different secondary building units (SBUs). Although all three frameworks have the same dia (diamondoid) topology, complex 1 and 3 are chiral and complex 2 is achiral. One of the networks, 3 shows cross-linked three-fold interpenetration of the single dia net and exhibits permanent porosities, as confirmed by BET and selective CO2 adsorption.

  7. Quantification of Thiols and Disulfides

    PubMed Central

    Winther, Jakob R.; Thorpe, Colin

    2013-01-01

    Background Disulfide bond formation is a key posttranslational modification, with implications for structure, function and stability of numerous proteins. While disulfide bond formation is a necessary and essential process for many proteins, it is deleterious and disruptive for others. Cells go to great lengths to regulate thiol-disulfide bond homeostasis, typically with several, apparently redundant, systems working in parallel. Dissecting the extent of oxidation and reduction of disulfides is an ongoing challenge due, in part, to the facility of thiol/disulfide exchange reactions. Scope of the review In the present account, we briefly survey the toolbox available to the experimentalist for the chemical determination of thiols and disulfides. We have chosen to focus on the key chemical aspects of current methodology, together with identifying potential difficulties inherent in their experimental implementation. Major conclusions While many reagents have been described for the measurement and manipulation of the redox status of thiols and disulfides, a number of these methods remain underutilized. The ability to effectively quantify changes in redox conditions in living cells presents a continuing challenge. General Significance Many unresolved questions in the metabolic interconversion of thiols and disulfides remain. For example, while pool sizes of redox pairs and their intracellular distribution are being uncovered, very little is known about the flux in thiol-disulfide exchange pathways. New tools are needed to address this important aspect of cellular metabolism. PMID:23567800

  8. Synthesis of higher diamondoids by pulsed laser ablation plasmas in supercritical CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Nakahara, Sho; Stauss, Sven; Kato, Toru; Terashima, Kazuo; Sasaki, Takehiko

    2011-06-15

    Pulsed laser ablation (wavelength 532 nm; fluence 18 J/cm{sup 2}; pulse width 7 ns; repetition rate 10 Hz) of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite was conducted in adamantane-dissolved supercritical CO{sub 2} with and without cyclohexane as a cosolvent. Micro-Raman spectroscopy of the products revealed the presence of hydrocarbons possessing sp{sup 3}-hybridized carbons similar to diamond structures. The synthesis of diamantane and other possible diamondoids consisting of up to 12 cages was confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Furthermore, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry measurements of samples before and after pyrolysis treatment indicate the synthesis of the most compact decamantane, namely, superadamantane. It is thought that oxidant species originating from CO{sub 2} during pulsed laser ablation might lead to the selective dissociation of C-H bonds, enabling the synthesis of low H/C ratio molecules. Therefore, laser ablation in supercritical CO{sub 2} is proposed as a practical method for synthesizing diamondoids.

  9. Diamondoid hydrocarbons as a molecular proxy for thermal maturity and oil cracking: Geochemical models from hydrous pyrolysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wei, Z.; Moldowan, J.M.; Zhang, S.; Hill, R.; Jarvie, D.M.; Wang, Hongfang; Song, F.; Fago, F.

    2007-01-01

    A series of isothermal hydrous pyrolysis experiments was performed on immature sedimentary rocks and peats of different lithology and organic source input to explore the generation of diamondoids during the thermal maturation of sediments. Oil generation curves indicate that peak oil yields occur between 340 and 360 ??C, followed by intense oil cracking in different samples. The biomarker maturity parameters appear to be insensitive to thermal maturation as most of the isomerization ratios of molecular biomarkers in the pyrolysates have reached their equilibrium values. Diamondoids are absent from immature peat extracts, but exist in immature sedimentary rocks in various amounts. This implies that they are not products of biosynthesis and that they may be generated during diagenesis, not just catagenesis and cracking. Most importantly, the concentrations of diamondoids are observed to increase with thermal stress, suggesting that they can be used as a molecular proxy for thermal maturity of source rocks and crude oils. Their abundance is most sensitive to thermal exposure above temperatures of 360-370 ??C (R0 = 1.3-1.5%) for the studied samples, which corresponds to the onset of intense cracking of other less stable components. Below these temperatures, diamondoids increase gradually due to competing processes of generation and dilution. Calibrations were developed between their concentrations and measured vitrinite reflectance through hydrous pyrolysis maturation of different types of rocks and peats. The geochemical models obtained from these methods may provide an alterative approach for determining thermal maturity of source rocks and crude oils, particularly in mature to highly mature Paleozoic carbonates. In addition, the extent of oil cracking was quantified using the concentrations of diamondoids in hydrous pyrolysates of rocks and peats, verifying that these hydrocarbons are valuable indicators of oil cracking in nature. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  10. Synthesis and investigation of reaction mechanisms of diamondoids obtained by dielectric barrier discharge microplasma reactors operated in adamantane - argon - methane - hydrogen mixtures at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauss, Sven; Ishii, Chikako; Pai, David Z.; Terashima, Kazuo

    2013-09-01

    Diamondoids, sp3 hybridized molecules consisting of a cage-like carbon framework with hydrogen terminations, hold promise for many applications: biotechnology, medicine, and opto- and nanoelectronics. So far, diamondoids consisting of more than four cage units have been synthesized by electric discharge and pulsed laser plasmas in supercritical fluids, but the generation of plasmas in high-pressure media is not straightforward. Here we present an alternative, continuous flow process, where diamondoids are synthesized by dielectric barrier discharges inside microreactors. The plasmas were generated at peak-to-peak voltages of 3 - 4 kV at a frequency of 10 kHz, in Ar (96 - 100%-vol) - methane (0 - 4%-vol) - hydrogen (0 - 4%-vol) mixtures, at atmospheric pressure and flow rates of 2 - 20 sccm. As a precursor we used the first diamondoid, adamantane, whose density was controlled by adjusting the reactor temperature in the range from 293 to 323 K. Gas chromatography - mass spectrometry analysis indicated the synthesis of the second diamondoid, diamantane, and the presence of alkylated adamantane derivatives suggests a stepwise reaction mechanism. We will also discuss the influence of the plasma gas composition and precursor density on the diamondoid synthesis. Grant No. 21110002, MEXT, Japan.

  11. Thiol-based redox switches.

    PubMed

    Groitl, Bastian; Jakob, Ursula

    2014-08-01

    Regulation of protein function through thiol-based redox switches plays an important role in the response and adaptation to local and global changes in the cellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Redox regulation is used by first responder proteins, such as ROS-specific transcriptional regulators, chaperones or metabolic enzymes to protect cells against mounting levels of oxidants, repair the damage and restore redox homeostasis. Redox regulation of phosphatases and kinases is used to control the activity of select eukaryotic signaling pathways, making reactive oxygen species important second messengers that regulate growth, development and differentiation. In this review we will compare different types of reversible protein thiol modifications, elaborate on their structural and functional consequences and discuss their role in oxidative stress response and ROS adaptation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Thiol-Based Redox Processes. PMID:24657586

  12. Di-heterometalation of thiol-functionalized peptide nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Tanmaya; Patra, Malay; Spiccia, Leone; Gasser, Gilles

    2013-01-01

    As a proof-of-principle, two hetero-bimetallic PNA oligomers containing a ruthenium(II) polypyridyl and a cyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl complex have been prepared by serial combination of solid-phase peptide coupling and in-solution thiol chemistry. Solid-phase N-terminus attachment of Ru(II)-polypyridyl carboxylic acid derivative, C1, onto the thiol-functionalized PNA backbone (H-a-a-g-t-c-t-g-c-linker-cys-NH2) has been performed by standard peptide coupling method. As two parallel approaches, the strong affinity of thiols for maleimide and haloacetyl group has been exploited for subsequent post-SPPS addition of cymantrene-based organometallic cores, C2 and C3. Michael-like addition and thioether ligation of thiol functionalized PNA1 (H-gly-a-a-g-t-c-t-g-c-linker-cys-NH2) and PNA2 (C1-a-a-g-t-c-t-g-c-linker-cys-NH2) to cymantrene maleimide and chloroacetyl derivatives, C2 and C3, respectively, has been performed. The synthesized ruthenium(II)-cymantrenyl PNA oligomers have been characterized by mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and IR spectroscopy. The distinct Mn-CO vibrational IR stretches, between 1,924–2,074 cm−1, have been used as markers to confirm the presence of cymantrenyl units in the PNA sequences and the purity of the HPLC-purified PNA thioethers assessed using LC-MS. PMID:23422249

  13. Electron-vibration coupling induced renormalization in the photoemission spectrum of diamondoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gali, Adam; Demján, Tamás; Vörös, Márton; Thiering, Gergő; Cannuccia, Elena; Marini, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    The development of theories and methods devoted to the accurate calculation of the electronic quasi-particle states and levels of molecules, clusters and solids is of prime importance to interpret the experimental data. These quantum systems are often modelled by using the Born-Oppenheimer approximation where the coupling between the electrons and vibrational modes is not fully taken into account, and the electrons are treated as pure quasi-particles. Here, we show that in small diamond cages, called diamondoids, the electron-vibration coupling leads to the breakdown of the electron quasi-particle picture. More importantly, we demonstrate that the strong electron-vibration coupling is essential to properly describe the overall lineshape of the experimental photoemission spectrum. This cannot be obtained by methods within Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Moreover, we deduce a link between the vibronic states found by our many-body perturbation theory approach and the well-known Jahn-Teller effect.

  14. Electron–vibration coupling induced renormalization in the photoemission spectrum of diamondoids

    PubMed Central

    Gali, Adam; Demján, Tamás; Vörös, Márton; Thiering, Gergő; Cannuccia, Elena; Marini, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The development of theories and methods devoted to the accurate calculation of the electronic quasi-particle states and levels of molecules, clusters and solids is of prime importance to interpret the experimental data. These quantum systems are often modelled by using the Born–Oppenheimer approximation where the coupling between the electrons and vibrational modes is not fully taken into account, and the electrons are treated as pure quasi-particles. Here, we show that in small diamond cages, called diamondoids, the electron–vibration coupling leads to the breakdown of the electron quasi-particle picture. More importantly, we demonstrate that the strong electron–vibration coupling is essential to properly describe the overall lineshape of the experimental photoemission spectrum. This cannot be obtained by methods within Born–Oppenheimer approximation. Moreover, we deduce a link between the vibronic states found by our many-body perturbation theory approach and the well-known Jahn–Teller effect. PMID:27103340

  15. Electron-vibration coupling induced renormalization in the photoemission spectrum of diamondoids.

    PubMed

    Gali, Adam; Demján, Tamás; Vörös, Márton; Thiering, Gergő; Cannuccia, Elena; Marini, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The development of theories and methods devoted to the accurate calculation of the electronic quasi-particle states and levels of molecules, clusters and solids is of prime importance to interpret the experimental data. These quantum systems are often modelled by using the Born-Oppenheimer approximation where the coupling between the electrons and vibrational modes is not fully taken into account, and the electrons are treated as pure quasi-particles. Here, we show that in small diamond cages, called diamondoids, the electron-vibration coupling leads to the breakdown of the electron quasi-particle picture. More importantly, we demonstrate that the strong electron-vibration coupling is essential to properly describe the overall lineshape of the experimental photoemission spectrum. This cannot be obtained by methods within Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Moreover, we deduce a link between the vibronic states found by our many-body perturbation theory approach and the well-known Jahn-Teller effect. PMID:27103340

  16. Characterization of Thiol-Ene Crosslinked PEG Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Toepke, Michael W.; Impellitteri, Nicholas A.; Theisen, Jeffrey M.

    2014-01-01

    The properties of synthetic hydrogels can be tuned to address the needs of many tissue-culture applications. This work characterizes the swelling and mechanical properties of thiol-ene crosslinked PEG hydrogels made with varying prepolymer formulations, demonstrating that hydrogels with a compressive modulus exceeding 600 kPa can be formed. The amount of peptide incorporated into the hydrogel is shown to be proportional to the amount of peptide in the prepolymer solution. Cell attachment and spreading on the surface of the peptide-functionalized hydrogels is demonstrated. Additionally, a method for bonding distinct layers of cured hydrogels is used to create a microfluidic channel. PMID:24883041

  17. Diamond surface functionalization with biomimicry - Amine surface tether and thiol moiety for electrochemical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sund, James B.; Causey, Corey P.; Wolter, Scott D.; Parker, Charles B.; Stoner, Brian R.; Toone, Eric J.; Glass, Jeffrey T.

    2014-05-01

    The surface of conducting diamond was functionalized with a terminal thiol group that is capable of binding and detecting nitrogen-oxygen species. The functionalization process employed multiple steps starting with doped diamond films grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition followed by hydrogen termination and photochemical attachment of a chemically protected amine alkene. The surface tether was deprotected to reveal the amine functionality, which enabled the tether to be extended with surface chemistry to add a terminal thiol moiety for electrochemical sensing applications. Each step of the process was validated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis.

  18. Theoretical confirmation of the experimental Raman spectra of the lower-order diamondoid molecule: cyclohexamantane (C 26H 30)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Steven L.; Baruah, Tunna; Mehl, Michael J.; Pederson, Mark R.

    2005-02-01

    The lower-order diamondoid hydrocarbon molecule, cyclohexamantane (C 26H 30), has been recently isolated from distilled Gulf Coast petroleum. While the structure of C 26H 30 has been confirmed through X-ray diffraction, mass spectroscopy, and 1H/ 13C NMR spectroscopy, its vibrational Raman spectra has only been identified through an indirect comparison with the experimental Raman spectra for adamantane and diamond. We used density-functional theory (DFT) to calculate a Raman spectra whose frequencies and relative intensities are in excellent agreement with the experimental Raman spectra for C 26H 30, thus providing direct vibrational proof of its existence.

  19. Attachment Disorganization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Judith, Ed.; George, Carol, Ed.

    Disorganized attachment relationships were first formally identified on the basis of the anomalous behavior of some infants during laboratory separations and reunions with the parent. This book presents new research and theory on the topic of attachment disorganization, an area of investigation that is of increasing importance in the study of…

  20. Diamondoid Structure in a Metal-Organic Framework of Fe4 Single-Molecule Magnets.

    PubMed

    Rigamonti, Luca; Cotton, Carri; Nava, Andrea; Lang, Heinrich; Rüffer, Tobias; Perfetti, Mauro; Sorace, Lorenzo; Barra, Anne-Laure; Lan, Yanhua; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Sessoli, Roberta; Cornia, Andrea

    2016-09-12

    A 3D metal-organic framework (MOF) having single-molecule magnet (SMM) linkers was prepared in crystalline form by using a tetrairon(III) complex functionalised with two divergent pyridyl groups, namely [Fe4 (pPy)2 (dpm)6 ] (1; H3 pPy=2-(hydroxymethyl)-2-(pyridin-4-yl)propane-1,3-diol, Hdpm=dipivaloylmethane). Reaction of 1 with silver(I) perchlorate afforded {[Fe4 (pPy)2 (dpm)6 ]2 Ag}ClO4 (2), which crystallises in a cubic face-centred lattice and exhibits two interlocked diamondoid networks. In 2, the SMMs act as linear ditopic synthons, and silver(I) ions as tetrahedral nodes coordinated by four pyridyl nitrogen atoms. The magnetic properties of 1 (S=5 and D≈-0.4 cm(-1) in the ground spin state) are largely preserved in 2, which shows slow magnetic relaxation with an anisotropy barrier of Ueff /kB =11.46(10) K in zero field and 14.25(8) K in an applied field of 1 kOe. However, crystal symmetry triggers highly noncollinear magnetic anisotropy contributions oriented at 109.47° from each other along the threefold axes of AgN4 tetrahedra, a unique scenario fully confirmed by a single-crystal cantilever torque magnetometry investigation. Magnetisation curves down to 0.03 K demonstrated the occurrence of a wide hysteresis loop when the magnetic field was swept along one of the four Ag-N bonds. By symmetry, the crystalline compound can then be persistently magnetised parallel or antiparallel to the four main diagonals of the unit cell, although the crystals have no overall second-order anisotropy. PMID:27356278

  1. Spindly attachments

    PubMed Central

    Çivril, Filiz; Musacchio, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    The attachment of chromosomes to spindle microtubules during mitosis is a delicate and intricate process on which eukaryotic cells critically depend to maintain their ploidy. In this issue of Genes & Development, Gassmann and colleagues (pp. 2385–2399 present an analysis of the recently discovered Spindly/SPDL-1 protein that casts new lights onto the attachment process and the way it relates to the control of cell cycle progression. PMID:18765786

  2. Water determination in drugs containing thiols.

    PubMed

    Sherman, F; Kuselman, I

    1999-11-15

    A new rapid analytical method is applied for water determination in alpha-Mono-thioglycerol and Captopril tablets containing thiols, and therefore, not amenable for direct Karl Fischer titration. The method is based on the consecutive titration first of thiol by a novel reagent, and then of water by a conventional K. Fischer reagent in the same sample and cell with the electrometric 'dead-stop' location of the end point in both titrations. The new reagent consists of iodine, potassium iodide and sodium acetate in non-aqueous medium. Estimated repeatability and accuracy of both water and thiol determinations are satisfactory. PMID:10547459

  3. Photoreduction of Hg(ii) and photodemethylation of methylmercury: the key role of thiol sites on dissolved organic matter.

    PubMed

    Jeremiason, Jeffrey D; Portner, Joshua C; Aiken, George R; Hiranaka, Amber J; Dvorak, Michelle T; Tran, Khuyen T; Latch, Douglas E

    2015-11-01

    This study examined the kinetics of photoreduction of Hg(ii) and photodemethylation of methylmercury (MeHg(+)) attached to, or in the presence of, dissolved organic matter (DOM). Both Hg(ii) and MeHg(+) are principally bound to reduced sulfur groups associated with DOM in many freshwater systems. We propose that a direct photolysis mechanism is plausible for reduction of Hg(ii) bound to reduced sulfur groups on DOM while an indirect mechanism is supported for photodemethylation of MeHg(+) bound to DOM. UV spectra of Hg(ii) and MeHg(+) bound to thiol containing molecules demonstrate that the Hg(ii)-S bond is capable of absorbing UV-light in the solar spectrum to a much greater extent than MeHg(+)-S bonds. Experiments with chemically distinct DOM isolates suggest that concentration of DOM matters little in the photochemistry if there are enough reduced S sites present to strongly bind MeHg(+) and Hg(ii); DOM concentration does not play a prominent role in photodemethylation other than to screen light, which was demonstrated in a field experiment in the highly colored St. Louis River where photodemethylation was not observed at depths ≥ 10 cm. Experiments with thiol ligands yielded slower photodegradation rates for MeHg(+) than in experiments with DOM and thiols; rates in the presence of DOM alone were the fastest supporting an intra-DOM mechanism. Hg(ii) photoreduction rates, however, were similar in experiments with only DOM, thiols plus DOM, or only thiols suggesting a direct photolysis mechanism. Quenching experiments also support the existence of an intra-DOM photodemethylation mechanism for MeHg(+). Utilizing the difference in photodemethylation rates measured for MeHg(+) attached to DOM or thiol ligands, the binding constant for MeHg(+) attached to thiol groups on DOM was estimated to be 10(16.7). PMID:26420634

  4. Thiol-reactivity of the fungicide maneb.

    PubMed

    Roede, James R; Jones, Dean P

    2014-01-01

    Maneb (MB) is a manganese-containing ethylene bis-dithiocarbamate fungicide that is implicated as an environmental risk factor for Parkinson's disease, especially in combination with paraquat (PQ). Dithiocarbamates inhibit aldehyde dehydrogenases, but the relationship of this to the combined toxicity of MB + PQ is unclear because PQ is an oxidant and MB activates Nrf2 and increases cellular GSH without apparent oxidative stress. The present research investigated the direct reactivity of MB with protein thiols using recombinant thioredoxin-1 (Trx1) as a model protein. The results show that MB causes stoichiometric loss of protein thiols, reversibly dimerizes the protein and inhibits its enzymatic activity. MB reacted at similar rates with low-molecular weight, thiol-containing chemicals. Together, the data suggest that MB can potentiate neurotoxicity of multiple agents by disrupting protein thiol functions in a manner analogous to that caused by oxidative stress, but without GSH depletion. PMID:24936438

  5. Evolution of thiol protective systems in prokaryotes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahey, R. C.; Newton, G. L.

    1986-01-01

    Biological thiols are essential elements in most aspects of cell function but undergo rapid oxidation to disulfides in the presence of oxygen. The evolution of systems to protect against such oxygen toxicity was essential to the emergence of aerobic life. The protection system used by eukaryotes is based upon glutathione (GSH) and GSH-dependent enzymes but many bacteria lack GSH and apparently use other mechanisms. The objective of this research is to elaborate the thiol protective mechanisms employed by prokaryotes of widely divergent evolutionary origin and to understand why GSH became the central thiol employed in essentially all higher organisms. Thiol-selective fluorescent labeling and HPLC analysis has been used to determine key monothiol components.

  6. Phospholipid/aromatic thiol hybrid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Wang, Mingming; Ferguson, Matthew; Zhan, Wei

    2015-05-12

    Gold-supported hybrid bilayers comprising phospholipids and alkanethiols have been found to be highly useful in biomembrane mimicking as well as biosensing ever since their introduction by Plant in 1993 (Plant, A. L. Langmuir 1993, 9, 2764-2767). Generalizing the mechanism (i.e., hydrophobic/hydrophobic interaction) that primarily drives bilayer formation, we report here that such a bilayer structure can also be successfully obtained when aromatic thiols are employed in place of alkanethiols. Four aromatic thiols were studied here (thiophenol, 2-naphthalene thiol, biphenyl-4-thiol, and diphenylenevinylene methanethiol), all affording reliable bilayer formation when 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine liposomes were incubated with self-assembled monolayers of these thiols. Characterization of the resultant structures, using cyclic voltammetry, impedance analysis, and atomic force microscopy, confirms the bilayer formation. Significant differences in electrochemical blocking and mechanical characteristics of these new bilayers were identified in comparison to their alkanethiol counterparts. Taking advantage of these new features, we present a new scheme for the straightforward biorecognition of a lipolytic enzyme (phospholipase A2) using these phospholipid/aromatic thiol bilayers. PMID:25896646

  7. Thiol-based redox switches in prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Hillion, Melanie; Antelmann, Haike

    2015-01-01

    Summary Bacteria encounter reactive oxygen species (ROS) as consequence of the aerobic life or as oxidative burst of activated neutrophils during infections. In addition, bacteria are exposed to other redox-active compounds including hypochloric acid (HOCl) and reactive electrophilic species (RES), such as quinones and aldehydes. These reactive species often target the thiol groups of cysteines in proteins and lead to thiol-disulfide switches in redox-sensing regulators to activate specific detoxification pathways and to restore the redox balance. Here, we review bacterial thiol-based redox sensors that specifically sense ROS, RES and HOCl via thiol-based mechanisms and regulate gene transcription in Gram-positive model bacteria and in human pathogens, such as Staphylococcus aureus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We also pay particular attention to emerging widely conserved HOCl-specific redox regulators that have been recently characterized in Escherichia coli. Different mechanisms are used to sense and respond to ROS, RES and HOCl by 1-Cys-type and 2-Cys-type thiol-based redox sensors that include versatile thiol-disulfide switches (OxyR, OhrR, HypR, YodB, NemR, RclR, Spx, RsrA/RshA) or alternative Cys-phosphorylations (SarZ, MgrA, SarA), thiol-S-alkylation (QsrR), His-oxidation (PerR) and methionine oxidation (HypT). In pathogenic bacteria, these redox-sensing regulators are often important virulence regulators and required for adapation to the host immune defense. PMID:25720121

  8. Investigation of thiol-ene and thiol-ene-methacrylate based resins as dental restorative materials

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, Neil B.; Couch, Charles L.; Schreck, Kathleen M.; Carioscia, Jacquelyn A.; Boulden, Jordan E.; Stansbury, Jeffrey W.; Bowman, Christopher N.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this work was to evaluate thiol-norbornene and thiol-ene-methacrylate systems as the resin phase of dental restorative materials and demonstrate their superior performance as compared to dimethacrylate materials. Methods Polymerization kinetics and overall functional group conversions were determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Flexural strength and modulus were determined with a 3-point flexural test. Polymerization-induced shrinkage stress was measured with a tensometer. Results Thiol-ene polymer systems were demonstrated to exhibit advantageous properties for dental restorative materials in regards to rapid curing kinetics, high conversion, and low shrinkage and stress. However, both the thiol-norbornene and thiol-allyl ether systems studied here exhibit significant reductions in flexural strength and modulus relative to BisGMA/TEGDMA. By utilizing the thiol-ene component as the reactive diluent in dimethacrylate systems, high flexural modulus and strength are achieved while dramatically reducing the polymerization shrinkage stress. The methacrylate-thiol-allyl ether and methacrylate-thiol-norbornene systems both exhibited equivalent flexural modulus (2.1 ± 0.1 GPa) and slightly reduced flexural strength (95 ± 1 and 101 ± 3 MPa, respectively) relative to BisGMA/TEGDMA (flexural modulus; 2.2 + 0.1 GPa and flexural strength; 112 ± 3 MPa). Both the methacrylate-thiol-allyl ether and methacrylate-thiol-norbornene systems exhibited dramatic reductions in shrinkage stress (1.1 ± 0.1 and 1.1 ± 0.2 MPa, respectively) relative to BisGMA/TEGDMA (2.6 ± 0.2 MPa). Significance The improved polymerization kinetics and overall functional group conversion, coupled with reductions in shrinkage stress while maintaining equivalent flexural modulus, result in a superior overall dental restorative material as compared to traditional bulk dimethacrylate resins. PMID:19781757

  9. A Three-Dimensional Dynamic Metal-Organic Framework with Fourfold Interpenetrating Diamondoid Networks and Selective Adsorption Properties.

    PubMed

    Ju, Ping; Jiang, Long; Lu, Tong-Bu

    2015-07-01

    A three-dimensional metal-organic framework (1) with fourfold interpenetrating diamondoid networks was constructed using a macrocyclic nickel(II) complex and a tetracarboxylic ligand 4,4',4″,4‴-(cyclohexane-1,2-diyibis(azanetriyl))tetrakis(methylene)tetrabenzoic acid as building blocks. Despite the fourfold interpenetration, 1 possesses one-dimensional channels that are occupied by water and CH3CN guest molecules. Once the guest molecules were removed, the framework and pores in desolvated 1 are dynamic with large adsorption hysteresis loops, which exhibit selective gas adsorption for CO2 at 195 K over N2 and H2 at 77 K and selective adsorption for methanol, ethanol, and n-propanol over isopropanol at 298 K. PMID:26083145

  10. Electronic and optical properties of pure and modified diamondoids studied by many-body perturbation theory and time-dependent density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Demján, Tamás; Vörös, Márton; Palummo, Maurizia; Gali, Adam

    2014-08-14

    Diamondoids are small diamond nanoparticles (NPs) that are built up from diamond cages. Unlike usual semiconductor NPs, their atomic structure is exactly known, thus they are ideal test-beds for benchmarking quantum chemical calculations. Their usage in spintronics and bioimaging applications requires a detailed knowledge of their electronic structure and optical properties. In this paper, we apply density functional theory (DFT) based methods to understand the electronic and optical properties of a few selected pure and modified diamondoids for which accurate experimental data exist. In particular, we use many-body perturbation theory methods, in the G0W0 and G0W0+BSE approximations, and time-dependent DFT in the adiabatic local density approximation. We find large quasiparticle gap corrections that can exceed thrice the DFT gap. The electron-hole binding energy can be as large as 4 eV but it is considerably smaller than the GW corrections and thus G0W0+BSE optical gaps are about 50% larger than the Kohn-Sham (KS) DFT gaps. We find significant differences between KS time-dependent DFT and GW+BSE optical spectra on the selected diamondoids. The calculated G0W0 quasiparticle levels agree well with the corresponding experimental vertical ionization energies. We show that nuclei dynamics in the ionization process can be significant and its contribution may reach about 0.5 eV in the adiabatic ionization energies. PMID:25134572

  11. Titration of thiol groups in non-aqueous solvents.

    PubMed

    Verma, K K

    Thiols are titrated in acetone or dimethylformamide with sodium methoxide, employing visual end-point detection with Thymol Blue, Victoria Blue, p-hydroxyazobenzene or Azo Violet. Aromatic thiols are titrated in the presence of aliphatic thiols in acetone, with Thymol Blue as indicator. PMID:18961758

  12. Distribution and abundance of organic thiols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahey, R.

    1985-01-01

    The role of glutathione (GSH) in protecting against the toxicity of oxygen and oxygen by products is well established for all eukaryotes studied except Entamoeba histolytica which lacks mitochrondria, chloroplasts, and microtubules. The GSH is not universal among prokaryotes. Entamoeba histolytica does not produce GSH or key enzymes of GSH metabolism. A general method of thiol analysis based upon fluorescent labeling with monobromobimane and HPLC separation of the resulting thiol derivatives was developed to determine the occurrence of GSH and other low molecular weight thiols in bacteria. Glutathione is the major thiol in cyanobacteria and in most bacteria closely related to the purple photosynthetic bacteria, but GSH was not found in archaebacteria, green bacteria, or GRAM positive bacteria. It suggested that glutathione metabolism was incorporated into eukaryotes at the time that mitochondria and chloroplasts were acquired by endosymbiosis. In Gram positive aerobes, coenzyme A occurs at millimolar levels and CoA disulfide reductases are identified. The CoA, rather than glutathione, may function in the oxygen detoxification processes of these organisms.

  13. Nuclear thiol redox systems in plants.

    PubMed

    Delorme-Hinoux, Valérie; Bangash, Sajid A K; Meyer, Andreas J; Reichheld, Jean-Philippe

    2016-02-01

    Thiol-disulfide redox regulation is essential for many cellular functions in plants. It has major roles in defense mechanisms, maintains the redox status of the cell and plays structural, with regulatory roles for many proteins. Although thiol-based redox regulation has been extensively studied in subcellular organelles such as chloroplasts, it has been much less studied in the nucleus. Thiol-disulfide redox regulation is dependent on the conserved redox proteins, glutathione/glutaredoxin (GRX) and thioredoxin (TRX) systems. We first focus on the functions of glutathione in the nucleus and discuss recent data concerning accumulation of glutathione in the nucleus. We also provide evidence that glutathione reduction is potentially active in the nucleus. Recent data suggests that the nucleus is enriched in specific GRX and TRX isoforms. We discuss the biochemical and molecular characteristics of these isoforms and focus on genetic evidences for their potential nuclear functions. Finally, we make an overview of the different thiol-based redox regulated proteins in the nucleus. These proteins are involved in various pathways including transcriptional regulation, metabolism and signaling. PMID:26795153

  14. A first principles study of thiol-capped Au nanoparticles: Structural, electronic, and magnetic properties as a function of thiol coverage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuadrado, R.; Puerta, J. M.; Soria, F.; Cerdá, J. I.

    2013-07-01

    We have studied the stability of thiolated Au38 nanoparticles (NPs) via density functional theory based calculations varying the coverage from 0 up to 32 molecules. Three different initial core arrangements were considered for the cluster, spherical, tubular, and bi-icosahedral, while thiol groups were attached to the cluster via the sulfur atom either as single molecules or forming more complex staple motifs. After molecular dynamics runs several metastable configurations are found at each coverage thus allowing to analyze the properties of the NPs in the form of ensemble averages. In particular, we address the structural and electronic properties as a function of the number of thiols. The study emphasizes the strong influence of the core structure on the stability of the NPs, and its interplay with the thiol coverage and adsorption geometries. The magnetic properties of the NPs have also been explored via spin-polarized calculations including spin-orbit coupling. No evidence for the existence of a robust intrinsic ferromagnetism is found in any of the structures.

  15. Microfluidic devices using thiol-ene polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bou, Simon J. M. C.; Ellis, Amanda V.

    2013-12-01

    Here, a new polymeric microfluidic platform using off-stoichiometric thiol-ene (OSTE) polymers was developed. Thiolene polymers were chosen as they afford rapid UV curing, low volume shrinkage and optical transparency for use in microfluidic devices. Three different off-stoichiometric thiol-ene polymers with 30% excess allyl, 50% excess thiol and a 90% excess thiol (OSTE Allyl-30, OSTE-50 and OSTE-90, respectively) were fabricated. Attenuated reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and solid-state cross polarisation-magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy confirmed which functional groups (thiol or allyl) were present in excess in the OSTE polymers. The polymers were shown to have a more hydrophilic surface (water contact angle of 65°+/- 3) compared to polydimethylsiloxane (water contact angle of 105° +/- 5). Testing of the mechanical properties showed the glass transition temperatures to be 15.09 °C, 43.15 °C and, 57.48 °C for OSTE-90, OSTE Allyl-30 and, OSTE-50, respectively. The storage modulus was shown to be less than 10 MPa for the OSTE-90 polymer and approximately 1750 MPa for the OSTE Allyl-30 and OSTE-50 polymers. The polymers were then utilised to fabricate microfluidic devices via soft lithography practices and devices sealed using a one-step UV lamination "click" reaction technique. Finally, gold nanoparticles were used to form gold films on the OSTE-90 and OSTE-50 polymers as potential electrodes. Atomic force microscopy and sheet resistances were used to characterise the films.

  16. The relevance of tissue thiol histochemistry to diagnostic hematopathology.

    PubMed

    Aesif, S W; Kuipers, I; DePalma, L

    2016-01-01

    Expression analyses suggest that alterations of the antioxidant state of some diffuse large B-cell lymphomas can assist prognosis; reversibly oxidized thiols may serve as a surrogate marker for identifying such cases. Little is known about the distribution of free thiols and reversibly oxidized thiols in human tissues. We developed a staining technique that enables visualization of tissue thiols in situ using bright field microscopy and validated it using gastrointestinal tissue specimens. We used our thiol staining technique to assess benign tonsillectomy and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma specimens. The gastrointestinal series revealed the presence of free thiols within epithelial cells and cells of the lamina propria. Staining for reversibly oxidized thiols was robust in gastric foveolar cells, intestinal goblet cells and the mucus they produce. Tonsillectomy specimens exhibited diffuse presence of free thiols. Staining for reversibly oxidized thiols was confined to germinal center macrophages and sinus histiocytes. Among the diffuse large B-cell lymphoma specimens, we observed strong staining for free thiols within malignant cells. By contrast to benign B-cells, the malignant cells demonstrated pronounced and diffuse staining for reversibly oxidized thiols. We demonstrated intrinsic differences between benign and malignant cells. PMID:26984510

  17. Crystal structures of two engineered thiol trypsins.

    PubMed

    McGrath, M E; Wilke, M E; Higaki, J N; Craik, C S; Fletterick, R J

    1989-11-28

    We have determined the three-dimensional structures of engineered rat trypsins which mimic the active sites of two classes of cysteine proteases. The catalytic serine was replaced with cysteine (S195C) to test the ability of sulfur to function as a nucleophile in a serine protease environment. This variant mimics the cysteine trypsin class of thiol proteases. An additional mutation of the active site aspartate to an asparagine (D102N) created the catalytic triad of the papain-type cysteine proteases. Rat trypsins S195C and D102N,S195C were solved to 2.5 and 2.0 A, respectively. The refined structures were analyzed to determine the structural basis for the 10(6)-fold loss of activity of trypsin S195C and the 10(8)-fold loss of activity of trypsin D102N,S195C, relative to rat trypsin. The active site thiols were found in a reduced state in contrast to the oxidized thiols found in previous thiol protease structures. These are the first reported structures of serine proteases with the catalytic centers of sulfhydryl proteases. Structure analysis revealed only subtle global changes in enzyme conformation. The substrate binding pocket is unaltered, and active site amino acid 102 forms hydrogen bonds to H57 and S214 as well as to the backbone amides of A56 and H57. In trypsin S195C, D102 is a hydrogen-bond acceptor for H57 which allows the other imidazole nitrogen to function as a base during catalysis. In trypsin D102N,S195C, the asparagine at position 102 is a hydrogen-bond donor to H57 which places a proton on the imidazole nitrogen proximal to the nucleophile. This tautomer of H57 is unable to act as a base in catalysis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2611228

  18. Thiol-derivatized minihepcidins retain biological activity.

    PubMed

    Fung, Eileen; Chua, Kristine; Ganz, Tomas; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Ruchala, Piotr

    2015-02-15

    Minihepcidins are small peptides that mimic biological activity of the iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin. Structurally, they contain thiol-free-cysteine residue in position 7 which is crucial for their bioactivity. Nonetheless, free sulfhydryl group is not desirable in pharmaceutical entities as it may lead to dermatological side effects. Moreover free thiol moiety is quite reactive and depending on conditions/reagents may be alkylated and/or oxidized giving various Cys-derivatives: S-alkyl cysteines, sulfoxides, sulfones, disulfides, cysteinesulfinic and cysteic acids. To limit such reactivity and maintain bioactivity of minihepcidin(s) we used thiol-protection strategy based on activated vinyl thioethers. Novel S-protected analogs of physiologically active minihepcidin PR73 were synthesized and tested in vitro showing activity comparable to parental molecule. The most active compound, PR73SH was also tested in vivo showing activity profile analogous to PR73. Collectively, our findings suggest that S-vinyl-derivatization of minihepcidin(s) may be a suitable approach in the development of physiologically active agonists of hepcidin. PMID:25599838

  19. Diamondoid synthesis in atmospheric pressure adamantane-argon-methane-hydrogen mixtures using a continuous flow plasma microreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauss, Sven; Ishii, Chikako; Pai, David Z.; Urabe, Keiichiro; Terashima, Kazuo

    2014-06-01

    Due to their small size, low-power consumption and potential for integration with other devices, microplasmas have been used increasingly for the synthesis of nanomaterials. Here, we have investigated the possibility of using dielectric barrier discharges generated in continuous flow glass microreactors for the synthesis of diamondoids, at temperatures of 300 and 320 K, and applied voltages of 3.2-4.3 kVp-p, at a frequency of 10 kHz. The microplasmas were generated in gas mixtures containing argon, methane, hydrogen and adamantane, which was used as a precursor and seed. The plasmas were monitored by optical emission spectroscopy measurements and the synthesized products were characterized by gas chromatography—mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Depending on the gas composition, the optical emission spectra contained CH and C2 bands of varying intensities. The GC-MS measurements revealed that diamantane can be synthesized by microplasmas generated at atmospheric pressure, and that the yields highly depend on the gas composition and the presence of carbon sources.

  20. Thiol/disulfide homeostasis in patients with ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Dogru, Atalay; Balkarli, Ayse; Cetin, Gozde Yildirim; Neselioglu, Salim; Erel, Ozcan; Tunc, Sevket Ercan; Sahin, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease. In many inflammatory diseases, increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines is associated with an increase in oxidative stress mediators. Thiol/disulfide homeostasis is a marker for oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to examine the dynamic thiol/disulfide homeostasis in AS. Sixty-nine patients with AS and 60 age- and sex-matched controls were included in the study. The Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) and visual analogue scale (VAS) were used to determine the disease activity. Native thiol, total thiol, and disulfide levels were measured with a novel automated method recently described by Erel and Neselioglu. The aforementioned method is also optionally manual spectrophotometric assay. The total thiol levels were significantly lower in the AS group compared with the control group (p = 0.03). When the patients were divided into active (n = 35) and inactive (n = 34) subgroups using BASDAI scores, the native plasma thiol and total thiol levels were significantly lower in the active AS patients compared to the inactive AS patients (p = 0.02, p = 0.03 respectively). There was a negative correlation between the plasma native thiol levels and VAS, BASDAI scores. Thiol/disulfide homeostasis may be used for elucidating the effects of oxidative stress in AS. Understanding the role of thiol/disulfide homeostasis in AS might provide new therapeutic intervention strategies for patients.

  1. Electronic and optical properties of pure and modified diamondoids studied by many-body perturbation theory and time-dependent density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Demján, Tamás; Vörös, Márton; Palummo, Maurizia; Gali, Adam

    2014-08-14

    Diamondoids are small diamond nanoparticles (NPs) that are built up from diamond cages. Unlike usual semiconductor NPs, their atomic structure is exactly known, thus they are ideal test-beds for benchmarking quantum chemical calculations. Their usage in spintronics and bioimaging applications requires a detailed knowledge of their electronic structure and optical properties. In this paper, we apply density functional theory (DFT) based methods to understand the electronic and optical properties of a few selected pure and modified diamondoids for which accurate experimental data exist. In particular, we use many-body perturbation theory methods, in the G{sub 0}W{sub 0} and G{sub 0}W{sub 0}+BSE approximations, and time-dependent DFT in the adiabatic local density approximation. We find large quasiparticle gap corrections that can exceed thrice the DFT gap. The electron-hole binding energy can be as large as 4 eV but it is considerably smaller than the GW corrections and thus G{sub 0}W{sub 0}+BSE optical gaps are about 50% larger than the Kohn-Sham (KS) DFT gaps. We find significant differences between KS time-dependent DFT and GW+BSE optical spectra on the selected diamondoids. The calculated G{sub 0}W{sub 0} quasiparticle levels agree well with the corresponding experimental vertical ionization energies. We show that nuclei dynamics in the ionization process can be significant and its contribution may reach about 0.5 eV in the adiabatic ionization energies.

  2. Paternal Attachment, Parenting Beliefs and Children's Attachment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Kimberly S.

    2010-01-01

    Relationships between fathers' romantic attachment style, parenting beliefs and father-child attachment security and dependence were examined in a diverse sample of 72 fathers of young children. Paternal romantic attachment style was coded based on fathers' endorsement of a particular style represented in the Hazan and Shaver Three-Category…

  3. Fabrication and bonding of thiol-ene-based microfluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikanen, Tiina M.; Lafleur, Josiane P.; Moilanen, Maria-Elisa; Zhuang, Guisheng; Jensen, Thomas G.; Kutter, Jörg P.

    2013-03-01

    In this work, the bonding strength of microchips fabricated by thiol-ene free-radical polymerization was characterized in detail by varying the monomeric thiol/allyl composition from the stoichiometric ratio (1:1) up to 100% excess of thiol (2:1) or allyl (1:2) functional groups. Four different thiol-ene to thiol-ene bonding combinations were tested by bonding: (i) two stoichiometric layers, (ii) two layers bearing complementary excess of thiols and allyls, (iii) two layers both bearing excess of thiols, or (iv) two layers both bearing excess of allyls. The results showed that the stiffness of the cross-linked polymer plays the most crucial role regarding the bonding strength. The most rigid polymer layers were obtained by using the stoichiometric composition or an excess of allyls, and thus, the bonding combinations (i) and (iv) withstood the highest pressures (up to the cut-off value of 6 bar). On the other hand, excess of thiol monomers yielded more elastic polymer layers and thus decreased the pressure tolerance for bonding combinations (ii) and (iii). By using monomers with more thiol groups (e.g. tetrathiol versus trithiol), a higher cross-linking ratio, and thus, greater stiffness was obtained. Surface characterization by infrared spectroscopy confirmed that the changes in the monomeric thiol/allyl composition were also reflected in the surface chemistry. The flexibility of being able to bond different types of thiol-enes together allows for tuning of the surface chemistry to yield the desired properties for each application. Here, a capillary electrophoresis separation is performed to demonstrate the attractive properties of stoichiometric thiol-ene microchips.

  4. Enrichment of O-GlcNAc-modified peptides using novel thiol-alkyne and thiol-disulfide exchange.

    PubMed

    Tsumoto, Hiroki; Ogasawara, Daisuke; Hashii, Noritaka; Suzuki, Takayoshi; Akimoto, Yoshihiro; Endo, Tamao; Miura, Yuri

    2015-07-01

    We have developed a selective method for the enrichment of O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc)-modified peptides, which uses a newly synthesized thiol-alkyne and a thiol-disulfide exchange. First, O-GlcNAc-modified peptides were enzymatically labeled with an azide-containing GalNAc analog. Then, the azide moiety was reacted with thiol-alkyne through a copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition. The thiol-modified peptides were enriched with thiol-reactive resin through a thiol-disulfide exchange. At least 500fmol of O-GlcNAc-modified peptides was selectively isolated from α-crystallin tryptic peptides and detected by mass spectrometry. This novel enrichment strategy could be used for O-GlcNAcome analysis of biological samples. PMID:25980911

  5. Thiol-sensitive genes of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Javor, G T

    1989-01-01

    The effect of 1-thioglycerol on the expression of genes of Escherichia coli was investigated. Pulse-labeled proteins from aerobically growing, 1-thioglycerol-treated E. coli were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and their radioactivities were compared with those of identical proteins from nontreated cells. The first 10 min of exposure to thiol stimulated the synthesis of 10% of the observed proteins and inhibited the production of 16% of the proteins. After 30 min of growth with thiol, the synthesis of 44% of the observed proteins was inhibited and synthesis of 18% of the proteins was stimulated. In general, the expression of genes of carbohydrate metabolism, amino acid metabolism, and protein biosynthesis were inhibited, while nucleic acid synthetic and repair gene expressions showed mixed responses. Synthesis of transport proteins was not affected. Transient stimulation of oxidative-stress proteins and sustained stimulation of the expressions of trxB, ompA, and ompB genes and those of several unidentified gene products were also observed. Whether these complex responses merely reflect adjustments by cellular subsystems to a suddenly reducing environment or whether they are manifestations of a reductive-stress regulon will have to await genetic analysis of this phenomenon. Images PMID:2676982

  6. Atom precise platinum-thiol crowns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Anu; Asha, K. S.; Reber, Arthur C.; Biltek, Scott R.; Pedicini, Anthony F.; Sen, Ayusman; Khanna, Shiv N.; Mandal, Sukhendu

    2015-11-01

    Ligand stabilized water soluble Pt nanoclusters were synthesized and characterized through electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Glutathione was used as the ligand, and Pt5(SG)10, and Pt6(SG)12 clusters were synthesized. Theoretical investigations found that these clusters do not possess a metal core, but rather are most stable in a ring structure. The clusters are stabilized through the thiol ligands forming a square planar structure around each Pt atom to form a ring. The structural elucidation was confirmed through UV/Vis and IR spectroscopy.Ligand stabilized water soluble Pt nanoclusters were synthesized and characterized through electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Glutathione was used as the ligand, and Pt5(SG)10, and Pt6(SG)12 clusters were synthesized. Theoretical investigations found that these clusters do not possess a metal core, but rather are most stable in a ring structure. The clusters are stabilized through the thiol ligands forming a square planar structure around each Pt atom to form a ring. The structural elucidation was confirmed through UV/Vis and IR spectroscopy. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Photograph of the separation of the nanocluster using SEC. Isotopic distribution patterns of the nanocluster overlaid with the simulated one. EDX spectrum and the TEM image of the cluster, time dependent UV-vis spectra, TGA plot, IR spectrum and XPS spectrum and additional figures. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05325k

  7. Measurement and meaning of cellular thiol:disufhide redox status.

    PubMed

    Comini, Marcelo A

    2016-01-01

    The functional group of cysteine is a thiol group (SH) that, due to its chemical reactivity, is able to undergo a wide array of modifications each with the potential to confer a different property or function to the molecule harboring this residue. Most of these modifications involve the reversible oxidation of the thiol to sulfenic acid (SOH), and disulfide, including intra- and intermolecular disulfides between polypeptides and glutathione (glutathionylation). The reversibility of these oxidations allows thiol groups to serve as versatile chemical and structural transducing elements in several low molecular mass metabolites and proteins. A plethora of cellular functions such as DNA and protein synthesis, protein secretion, cytoskeleton architecture, differentiation, apoptosis, and anti-oxidant defense, are recognized to be modulated, at certain stage, by thiol-disulfide exchange mechanisms of redox active thiol groups. All organisms are equipped with enzymatic systems composed by NADPH-dependent reductases, redoxins, and peroxidases that provide kinetic control of global thiol-redox homeostasis as well as target selectivity. These redox systems are distributed in different subcellular compartments and are not in equilibrium with each other. In consequence, measuring cellular thiol-disulfide status represents a challenge for studies aimed to obtain dynamic and spatio-temporal resolution. This review provides a summary of the methods and tools available to quantify the thiol redox status of cells. PMID:26695718

  8. Understanding and promoting attachment.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Samantha L

    2009-08-01

    Interest in early relationships has led to increased use of terms such as attachment disorder, attachment problems, and attachment therapy when describing behavioral/emotional regulation in young children. Unfortunately, such terms are vague and lead to clinical confusion and diagnostic inaccuracies. This article will introduce attachment theory, with a discussion of reactive attachment disorder and implications for treatment of children who have problems with social-emotional development. PMID:19681518

  9. Thiol specific oxidative stress response in Mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Dosanjh, Nirpjit S; Rawat, Mamta; Chung, Ji-Hae; Av-Gay, Yossef

    2005-08-01

    The cellular response of mycobacteria to thiol specific oxidative stress was studied in Mycobacterium bovis BCG cultures. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed that upon diamide treatment at least 60 proteins were upregulated. Fourteen of these proteins were identified by MALDI-MS; four proteins, AhpC, Tpx, GroEL2, and GroEL1 are functionally related to oxidative stress response; eight proteins, LeuC, LeuD, Rv0224c, Rv3029c, AsnB, Rv2971, PheA and HisH are classified as part of the bacterial intermediary metabolism and respiration pathways; protein EchA14 belong to lipid metabolism, and NrdE, belongs to the mycobacterial information pathway category. Reverse transcription followed by quantitative real time PCR in response to diamide stress demonstrated that protein expression is directly proportional to the corresponding gene transcription. PMID:16006064

  10. Lactoperoxidase haem, an iron-porphyrin thiol.

    PubMed Central

    Nichol, A W; Angel, L A; Moon, T; Clezy, P S

    1987-01-01

    The haem prosthetic group of lactoperoxidase can be prepared from the enzyme in high yield by reductive cleavage with mercaptoethanol in 8 M-urea under mild conditions. The product yields porphyrins, after removal of iron, which show visible spectroscopic properties similar to protoporphyrin but are considerably more polar. In the presence of iodoacetamide, a different product is obtained by reductive cleavage. The proton n.m.r. and mass spectra of this compound indicate that the prosthetic group of the enzyme is the iron complex of 18-mercaptomethyl-2,7,12-trimethyl-3,8-divinylporphyrin-13,17-d ipropionic acid. It is proposed that the unusual strength of binding of the prosthetic group to the apoprotein is due to formation of a disulphide bond from a cysteine residue to the porphyrin thiol. PMID:3689341

  11. From thiol to sulfonic acid: modeling the oxidation pathway of protein thiols by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    van Bergen, Laura A H; Roos, Goedele; De Proft, Frank

    2014-08-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is a natural oxidant that can oxidize protein thiols (RSH) via sulfenic acid (RSOH) and sulfinic acid (RSO2H) to sulfonic acid (RSO3H). In this paper, we study the complete anionic and neutral oxidation pathway from thiol to sulfonic acid. Reaction barriers and reaction free energies for all three oxidation steps are computed, both for the isolated substrates and for the substrates in the presence of different model ligands (CH4, H2O, NH3) mimicking the enzymatic environment. We found for all three barriers that the anionic thiolate is more reactive than the neutral thiol. However, the assistance of the environment in the neutral pathway in a solvent-assisted proton-exchange (SAPE) mechanism can lower the reaction barrier noticeably. Polar ligands can decrease the reaction barriers, whereas apolar ligands do not influence the barrier heights. The same holds for the reaction energies: they decrease (become more negative) in the presence of polar ligands whereas apolar ligands do not have an influence. The consistently negative consecutive reaction energies for the oxidation in the anionic pathway when going from thiolate over sulfenic and sulfinic acid to sulfonic acid are in agreement with biological reversibility. PMID:25036614

  12. Thiol redox requirements and substrate specificities of recombinant cytochrome c assembly systems II and III

    PubMed Central

    Richard-Fogal, Cynthia L.; Francisco, Brian San; Frawley, Elaine R.; Kranz, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    The reconstitution of biosynthetic pathways from heterologous hosts can help define the minimal genetic requirements for pathway function and facilitate detailed mechanistic studies. Each of the three pathways for the assembly of cytochrome c in nature (called systems I, II, and III) has been shown to function recombinantly in Escherichia coli, covalently attaching heme to the cysteine residues of a CXXCH motif of a c-type cytochrome. However, recombinant systems I (CcmABCDEFGH) and II (CcsBA) function in the E. coli periplasm, while recombinant system III (CCHL) attaches heme to its cognate receptor in the cytoplasm of E. coli, which makes direct comparisons between the three systems difficult. Here we show that the human CCHL (with a secretion signal) attaches heme to the human cytochrome c (with a signal sequence) in the E.coli periplasm, which is bioenergetically (p-side) analogous to the mitochondrial intermembrane space. The human CCHL is specific for the human cytochrome c, whereas recombinant system II can attach heme to multiple non-cognate c-type cytochromes (possessing the CXXCH motif.) We also show that the recombinant periplasmic systems II and III use components of the natural E.coli periplasmic DsbC/DsbD thiol-reduction pathway. PMID:21945855

  13. Four proteolytic processes of myocardium, one insensitive to thiol reactive agents and thiol protease inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Thorne, D P; Lockwood, T D

    1993-07-01

    Four distinct processes mediating protein degradation were identified in the Langendorff perfused rat heart. Hearts were biosynthetically labeled in vitro with [3H]leucine for 10 min. The subsequent release of [3H]leucine at 1.5-min intervals (2 mM nonradioactive leucine) was determined from 20 min to 8 h after labeling in rhythmically contracting hearts. Rapid turnover proteins were eliminated during the first 3 h; this degradation was not inhibited by insulin (5 nM) or isoproterenol (0.5 microM). However, the nontoxic thiol reactive agent diamide (100 microM) caused a complete inhibition of the [3H]leucine release from rapidly degraded proteins. After the elimination of rapidly degraded proteins at 3 h, the release of [3H]leucine was inhibited 35-40% by insulin (5 nM) or the lysosomal inhibitor chloroquine (30 microM), thereby defining a second vesicular process. The beta-agonist isoproterenol (0.5 microM) or the nonselective alpha-agonist naphazoline (100 microM) caused 30-35% proteolytic inhibitions, defining a third adrenergic-responsive process. The inhibitory effects of simultaneously combined insulin and chloroquine did not exceed the effect of either agent alone. However, the combined effects of insulin and isoproterenol were additive, inhibiting two-thirds of basal degradation. Beginning at 3 h after labeling a 75% proteolytic inhibition resulted from the thiol reactive agents diamide (100 microM) or N-ethylmaleimide (10 microM); the thiol protease active site inhibitor trans-epoxysuccinly-L-leucylamino-(4-quinidino)butane (50 microM) caused 65% inhibition. The 75% inhibition caused by diamide includes both the insulin-responsive and beta-adrenergic-responsive pathways. A novel fourth proteolytic process (25% of proteolysis) was thereby distinguished from the above three by its resistance to inhibition by insulin, adrenergic agonists, thiol reactive agents, or thiol protease inhibitor. Only the adrenergic-responsive process was correlated with changes in

  14. Regulation of yeast replicative life span by thiol oxidoreductases

    PubMed Central

    Hacioglu, Elise; Esmer, Isil; Fomenko, Dmitri E.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Koc, Ahmet

    2011-01-01

    Thiol-based redox reactions are involved in the regulation of a variety of biological functions, such as protection against oxidative stress, signal transduction and protein folding. Some proteins involved in redox regulation have been shown to modulate life span in organisms from yeast to mammals. To assess the role of thiol oxidoreductases in aging on a genome-wide scale, we analyzed the replicative life span of yeast cells lacking known and candidate thiol oxidoreductases. The data suggest the role of several pathways in regulation of yeast aging, including thioredoxin reduction, protein folding and degradation, peroxide reduction, PIP3 signaling, and ATP synthesis. PMID:20934449

  15. Belt attachment and system

    DOEpatents

    Schneider, Abraham D.; Davidson, Erick M.

    2016-02-02

    Disclosed herein is a belt assembly including a flexible belt with an improved belt attachment. The belt attachment includes two crossbars spaced along the length of the belt. The crossbars retain bearings that allow predetermined movement in six degrees of freedom. The crossbars are connected by a rigid body that attaches to the bearings. Implements that are attached to the rigid body are simply supported but restrained in pitching rotation.

  16. Special Attachments. Module 19.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This module on special attachments, one in a series dealing with industrial sewing machines, their attachments, and operation, covers four topics: gauges; cording attachment; zipper foot; and hemming, shirring, and binding. For each topic these components are provided: an introduction, directions, an objective, learning activities, student…

  17. Adolescent Attachment and Psychopathology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenstein, Diana S.; Horowitz, Harvey A.

    1996-01-01

    In relationships among attachment classification, psychopathology, and personality, traits were examined in a group of 60 psychiatrically hospitalized adolescents. Attachment was examined in 27 adolescent-mother pairs. Both adolescent and maternal attachment status were overwhelmingly insecure and were highly concordant. Results support a model of…

  18. Diamondoid framework solid with Sn(OCH₃)₂-tetrapyridylporphyrin linkers, CuI nodes and [CuICl₂]⁻ counter-ions.

    PubMed

    Titi, Hatem M; Goldberg, Israel

    2015-08-01

    We report on the synthesis of a new metal-organic framework (MOF) composed of Sn(OCH3)2-tetrakis(pyridin-4-yl)porphyrin linkers, Cu(+) connecting nodes and [CuCl2](-) counter-ions, namely poly[[bis(methanolato-κO)[μ5-5,10,15,20-tetrakis(pyridin-4-yl)porphyrin-κ(8)1κN(5):1'κN(10):1''κN(15):1'''κN(20):2κ(4)N(21),N(22),N(23),N(24)]copper(I)tin(II)] dichloridocuprate(I)], [CuSn(C40H24N8)(CH3O)2][CuCl2]. Its crystal structure consists of a single-framework coordination polymer of the organic ligand and the Cu(I) ions. The latter are characterized by a tetrahedral coordination geometry [with CN (coordination number) = 4], linking to the pyridyl N-atom sites of four different ligands and imparting to the positively charged polymeric assembly a diamondoid PtS-type topology. Correspondingly, every porphyrin unit is coordinated to four different Cu(I) connectors. The [CuCl2](-) anions occupy the intra-lattice voids, along with disordered molecules of the water crystallization solvent. The asymmetric unit of this structure consists of two halves of the porphyrin scaffold, located on centres of crystallographic inversion, and the Cu(+) and [CuCl2](-) ions. This report provides unique structural evidence for the formation of tetrapyridylporphyrin-based three-dimensional MOFs with a diamondoid architecture that have been observed earlier only on rare occasions. PMID:26243419

  19. Thiol Dioxygenases: Unique Families of Cupin Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, C. R.; Karplus, P. A.; Dominy, J. E.

    2011-01-01

    Proteins in the cupin superfamily have a wide range of biological functions in archaea, bacteria and eukaryotes. Although proteins in the cupin superfamily show very low overall sequence similarity, they all contain two short but partially conserved cupin sequence motifs separated by a less conserved intermotif region that varies both in length and amino acid sequence. Furthermore, these proteins all share a common architecture described as a 6-stranded β-barrel core, and this canonical cupin or “jelly roll” β-barrel is formed with cupin motif 1, the intermotif region, and cupin motif 2 each forming two of the core six β-strands in the folded protein structure. The recently obtained crystal structures of cysteine dioxygenase (CDO), with contains conserved cupin motifs, show that it has the predicted canonical cupin β-barrel fold. Although there had been no reports of CDO activity in prokaryotes, we identified a number of bacterial cupin proteins of unknown function that share low similarity with mammalian CDO and that conserve many residues in the active site pocket of CDO. Putative bacterial CDOs predicted to have CDO activity were shown to have similar substrate specificity and kinetic parameters as eukaryotic CDOs. Information gleaned from crystal structures of mammalian CDO along with sequence information for homologs shown to have CDO activity facilitated the identification of a CDO family fingerprint motif. One key feature of the CDO fingerprint motif is that the canonical metal-binding glutamate residue in cupin motif 1 is replaced by a cysteine (in mammalian CDOs) or by a glycine (bacterial CDOs). The recent report that some putative bacterial CDO homologs are actually 3-mercaptopropionate dioxygenases suggests that the CDO family may include proteins with specificities for other thiol substrates. A paralog of CDO in mammals was also identified and shown to be the other mammalian thiol dioxygenase, cysteamine dioxygenase (ADO). A tentative

  20. The reactivity of the thiol groups of calf thymus deoxyribonucleohistone

    PubMed Central

    Hyde, J.E.; Walker, I.O.

    1974-01-01

    The reactivities of the two cysteine thiol groups of calf thymus F3 histone were investigated using 5,5′-dithiobis-[2- nitrobenzoic acid], (DTNB). In isolated histone, both thiol groups were available for reaction. However, analysis of reaction profiles of native deoxyribonucleohistone, (DNH), in various solvent conditions, together with gel electrophoresis studies of DNH modified with DTNB, showed that only one of the thiol groups is normally modified by the reagent. If NaCl is present (above 1.OM) the other thiol group can also be modified. The reactivities of both groups were largely independent of the degree of DNH supercoiling and of the binding of F3 to the DNA. PMID:4472380

  1. Data on the catalytic mechanism of thiol peroxidase mimics.

    PubMed

    Zadehvakili, B; Giles, N M; Fawcett, J P; Giles, G I

    2016-09-01

    We have recently reported SAR data describing the pharmacological activity of a series of phenyl alkyl selenides and tellurides which catalyse the oxidation of thiols by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), "The design of redox active thiol peroxidase mimics: dihydrolipoic acid recognition correlates with cytotoxicity and prooxidant action" B. Zadehvakili, S.M. McNeill, J.P. Fawcett, G.I. Giles (2016) [1]. This thiol peroxidase (TPx) activity is potentially useful for a number of therapeutic applications, as it can alter the outcome of oxidative stress related pathologies and modify redox signalling. This article presents data describing the molecular changes that occur to a TPx mimic upon exposure to H2O2, and then the thiol mercaptoethanol, as characterised by UV-vis spectroscopy and HPLC retention time. PMID:27331089

  2. Salivary thiol levels and periodontal parameters assessed with a chromogenic strip.

    PubMed

    Khocht, Ahmed; Seyedain, Merriam; Hardan, Samia; Gaughan, John; Suzuki, Jon B

    2013-08-01

    Periodontitis tends to be associated with bacteria that use sulfate as an energy source and produce thiol compounds that contain sulfhydryl (-SH) groups. This study used a chromogenic thiol-detecting strip to investigate whole saliva -SH concentration (SS) in subjects with and without periodontal disease. Ninety-six subjects were enrolled; all underwent periodontal evaluations, including plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), probing depth measurements (PD), and attachment levels (AL). Subjects were divided into 3 groups: those who were periodontally healthy (n = 17), those with gingivitis (n = 54), and those with periodontitis (n = 25). Of the 96 subjects, 33% (n = 32) were cigarette smokers. A chromogenic strip was used to collect a whole saliva sample from the mouth. Color reaction was scored based on a color chart. Good-to-moderate correlations were found between SS scores and PI (r = 0.47, P = 0.0001), GI (r = 0.45, P = 0.0001), PD (r = 0.42, P = 0.0001), and AL (r = 0.30, P = 0.002). Analysis of variance showed significant differences in SS scores among the 3 study groups (P = 0.0001); post-hoc analysis showed higher SS scores in subjects with periodontitis than in those without (P = 0.05). Logistic regression, adjusting for smoking, showed the odds ratio of periodontitis increased by a factor of 12.76 for each increase of one unit of measure of SS. These results indicate that assessing whole saliva thiol levels with a chromogenic strip could be used as a screening test for periodontal diseases. PMID:23928440

  3. Neurobiology of infant attachment.

    PubMed

    Moriceau, Stephanie; Sullivan, Regina M

    2005-11-01

    A strong attachment to the caregiver is critical for survival in altricial species, including humans. While some behavioral aspects of attachment have been characterized, its neurobiology has only recently received attention. Using a mammalian imprinting model, we are assessing the neural circuitry that enables infant rats to attach quickly to a caregiver, thus enhancing survival in the nest. Specifically, the hyper-functioning noradrenergic locus coeruleus (LC) enables pups to learn rapid, robust preference for the caregiver. Conversely, a hypo-functional amygdala appears to prevent the infant from learning aversions to the caregiver. Adult LC and amygdala functional emergence correlates with sensitive period termination. This study suggests the neonatal brain is not an immature version of the adult brain but is uniquely designed to optimize attachment to the caregiver. Although human attachment may not rely on identical circuitry, the work reviewed here suggests a new conceptual framework in which to explore human attachments, particularly attachments to abusive caregivers. PMID:16252291

  4. Reversible inactivation of CO dehydrogenase with thiol compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Kreß, Oliver; Gnida, Manuel; Pelzmann, Astrid M.; Marx, Christian; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Meyer, Ortwin

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • Rather large thiols (e.g. coenzyme A) can reach the active site of CO dehydrogenase. • CO- and H{sub 2}-oxidizing activity of CO dehydrogenase is inhibited by thiols. • Inhibition by thiols was reversed by CO or upon lowering the thiol concentration. • Thiols coordinate the Cu ion in the [CuSMo(=O)OH] active site as a third ligand. - Abstract: Carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CO dehydrogenase) from Oligotropha carboxidovorans is a structurally characterized member of the molybdenum hydroxylase enzyme family. It catalyzes the oxidation of CO (CO + H{sub 2}O → CO{sub 2} + 2e{sup −} + 2H{sup +}) which proceeds at a unique [CuSMo(=O)OH] metal cluster. Because of changing activities of CO dehydrogenase, particularly in subcellular fractions, we speculated whether the enzyme would be subject to regulation by thiols (RSH). Here we establish inhibition of CO dehydrogenase by thiols and report the corresponding K{sub i}-values (mM): L-cysteine (5.2), D-cysteine (9.7), N-acetyl-L-cysteine (8.2), D,L-homocysteine (25.8), L-cysteine–glycine (2.0), dithiothreitol (4.1), coenzyme A (8.3), and 2-mercaptoethanol (9.3). Inhibition of the enzyme was reversed by CO or upon lowering the thiol concentration. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) of thiol-inhibited CO dehydrogenase revealed a bimetallic site in which the RSH coordinates to the Cu-ion as a third ligand ([Mo{sup VI}(=O)OH{sub (2)}SCu{sup I}(SR)S-Cys]) leaving the redox state of the Cu(I) and the Mo(VI) unchanged. Collectively, our findings establish a regulation of CO dehydrogenase activity by thiols in vitro. They also corroborate the hypothesis that CO interacts with the Cu-ion first. The result that thiol compounds much larger than CO can freely travel through the substrate channel leading to the bimetallic cluster challenges previous concepts involving chaperone function and is of importance for an understanding how the sulfuration step in

  5. Investigating the influence of the interface in thiol-functionalized silver-gold nanoshells over lipase activity.

    PubMed

    Kisukuri, Camila M; Macedo, Alexandra; Oliveira, Caio C S; Camargo, Pedro H C; Andrade, Leandro H

    2013-12-23

    We employed thiol-funcionalized AgAu nanoshells (AgAu NSs) as supports for the covalent attachment of lipases (BCL, Burkholderia cepacia lipase; PPL, pancreatic porcine lipase). Specifically, we were interested in investigating the effect of the nature/size of the spacer in AgAu NSs-functionalized organic thiols over the covalent attachment of lipases. The catalytic performance of AgAu-lipase systems was measured in the kinetic resolution of (R,S)-1-(phenyl)ethanol via a transesterification reaction. In comparison to free BCL, the lipase attached to AgAu NSs using a small spacer such as cysteamine or mercaptoacetic acid, with the largest spacer mercaptoundecanoic acid, had the fastest conversion rate. The recycling potential for BCL was investigated. After three reaction cycles, the enzyme activity was kept at around 90% of the initial value. The results described herein show that the size of the spacer plays an important role in optimizing lipase activities in metallic nanoshells as solid supports. PMID:24313296

  6. Quantifying Reversible Oxidation of Protein Thiols in Photosynthetic Organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slade, William O.; Werth, Emily G.; McConnell, Evan W.; Alvarez, Sophie; Hicks, Leslie M.

    2015-04-01

    Photosynthetic organisms use dynamic post-translational modifications to survive and adapt, which include reversible oxidative modifications of protein thiols that regulate protein structure, function, and activity. Efforts to quantify thiol modifications on a global scale have relied upon peptide derivatization, typically using isobaric tags such as TMT, ICAT, or iTRAQ that are more expensive, less accurate, and provide less proteome coverage than label-free approaches—suggesting the need for improved experimental designs for studies requiring maximal coverage and precision. Herein, we present the coverage and precision of resin-assisted thiol enrichment coupled to label-free quantitation for the characterization of reversible oxidative modifications on protein thiols. Using C. reinhardtii and Arabidopsis as model systems for algae and plants, we quantified 3662 and 1641 unique cysteinyl peptides, respectively, with median coefficient of variation (CV) of 13% and 16%. Further, our method is extendable for the detection of protein abundance changes and stoichiometries of cysteine oxidation. Finally, we demonstrate proof-of-principle for our method, and reveal that exogenous hydrogen peroxide treatment regulates the C. reinhardtii redox proteome by increasing or decreasing the level of oxidation of 501 or 67 peptides, respectively. As protein activity and function is controlled by oxidative modifications on protein thiols, resin-assisted thiol enrichment coupled to label-free quantitation can reveal how intracellular and environmental stimuli affect plant survival and fitness through oxidative stress.

  7. Redox Initiation of Bulk Thiol-Ene Polymerizations

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Megan A.; Jankousky, Katherine C.; Bowman, Christopher N.

    2013-01-01

    The unique formation-structure-property attributes and reaction behavior of the thiol-ene “click” reaction have been explored extensively for photochemically and thermally initiated reactions but have been much less explored for redox initiation. Therefore, the objective of this work is to characterize fully the impact of the initiation system, monomer structure, degree of functionalization, and inhibitor level on the redox-mediated thiol-ene polymerization rate and behavior. Moreover, this study confirms the ability of redox initiation to achieve full conversion of desired thiol-ene “click” products for small molecules in solution. For the multifunctional thiol-ene systems, polymerization rate was shown to be comparable to photo- and thermally initiated systems, but with the additional advantages of unlimited depth of cure and mild reaction conditions. Additionally, the network properties of the redox-initiated thiol-ene systems were on par with a photocured material formulated with identical monomers and radical initiating potential. Lastly, control over the polymerization rate and preceding induction period was garnered from the concentration of inhibitor included in the reaction mixture. The mechanism of action of quinone inhibition in redox-mediated thiol-ene polymerizations is shown to depend on both the presence of an aniline reducing agent and the concentration of inhibitor, with quinone concentrations in great excess of oxidizing agent concentrations actually leading to heightened polymerization rates when aniline is present. PMID:23565125

  8. Short communication: characterization of soluble thiols in bovine milk.

    PubMed

    Niero, G; De Marchi, M; Masi, A; Penasa, M; Cassandro, M

    2015-09-01

    Antioxidants are molecules essential for the maintenance of cell homeostasis and their intake through the diet has positive effects on human health. Among antioxidants, low-molecular-weight (LMW) thiols represent an important class of compounds. The aim of this study was to identify LMW thiols in bovine milk. A total of 96 individual milk samples from Brown Swiss, Holstein-Friesian, Alpine Grey, and Simmental cattle breeds were collected in 8 herds. The LMW thiols were extracted from the soluble fraction of milk and, following a derivatization protocol, they were separated by reverse phase HPLC and detected fluorimetrically. Six thiol species were detected and 2, glutathione (GSH) and cysteine-glycine (Cys-Gly), were identified and quantified. Regardless of the breed, the average concentration of Cys-Gly in milk was greater than that of GSH. Overall, milk from dual-purpose breeds (Simmental and Alpine Grey) was richer in LMW thiols than milk from dairy cows (Holstein-Friesian and Brown Swiss). Glutathione and Cys-Gly, closely linked metabolically, were strongly correlated. Pearson correlations of Cys-Gly with protein and casein contents were moderately low, and no relationship was found between GSH and milk chemical composition. Future research should focus on the identification of all detected LMW thiol species. PMID:26188581

  9. The Expanding Landscape of the Thiol Redox Proteome.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Carroll, Kate S; Liebler, Daniel C

    2016-01-01

    Cysteine occupies a unique place in protein chemistry. The nucleophilic thiol group allows cysteine to undergo a broad range of redox modifications beyond classical thiol-disulfide redox equilibria, including S-sulfenylation (-SOH), S-sulfinylation (-SO(2)H), S-sulfonylation (-SO(3)H), S-nitrosylation (-SNO), S-sulfhydration (-SSH), S-glutathionylation (-SSG), and others. Emerging evidence suggests that these post-translational modifications (PTM) are important in cellular redox regulation and protection against oxidative damage. Identification of protein targets of thiol redox modifications is crucial to understanding their roles in biology and disease. However, analysis of these highly labile and dynamic modifications poses challenges. Recent advances in the design of probes for thiol redox forms, together with innovative mass spectrometry based chemoproteomics methods make it possible to perform global, site-specific, and quantitative analyses of thiol redox modifications in complex proteomes. Here, we review chemical proteomic strategies used to expand the landscape of thiol redox modifications. PMID:26518762

  10. Interfacial thiol-ene photoclick reactions for forming multilayer hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Shih, Han; Fraser, Andrew K; Lin, Chien-Chi

    2013-03-13

    Interfacial visible light-mediated thiol-ene photoclick reactions were developed for preparing step-growth hydrogels with multilayer structures. The effect of a noncleavage type photoinitiator eosin-Y on visible-light-mediated thiol-ene photopolymerization was first characterized using in situ photorheometry, gel fraction, and equilibrium swelling ratio. Next, spectrophotometric properties of eosin-Y in the presence of various relevant macromer species were evaluated using ultraviolet-visible light (UV-vis) spectrometry. It was determined that eosin-Y was able to reinitiate the thiol-ene photoclick reaction, even after light exposure. Because of its small molecular weight, most eosin-Y molecules readily leached out from the hydrogels. The diffusion of residual eosin-Y from preformed hydrogels was exploited for fabricating multilayer step-growth hydrogels. Interfacial hydrogel coating was formed via the same visible-light-mediated gelation mechanism without adding fresh initiator. The thickness of the thiol-ene gel coating could be easily controlled by adjusting visible light exposure time, eosin-Y concentration initially loaded in the core gel, or macromer concentration in the coating solution. The major benefits of this interfacial thiol-ene coating system include its simplicity and cytocompatibility. The formation of thiol-ene hydrogels and coatings neither requires nor generates any cytotoxic components. This new gelation chemistry may have great utilities in controlled release of multiple sensitive growth factors and encapsulation of multiple cell types for tissue regeneration. PMID:23384151

  11. Quantifying reversible oxidation of protein thiols in photosynthetic organisms.

    PubMed

    Slade, William O; Werth, Emily G; McConnell, Evan W; Alvarez, Sophie; Hicks, Leslie M

    2015-04-01

    Photosynthetic organisms use dynamic post-translational modifications to survive and adapt, which include reversible oxidative modifications of protein thiols that regulate protein structure, function, and activity. Efforts to quantify thiol modifications on a global scale have relied upon peptide derivatization, typically using isobaric tags such as TMT, ICAT, or iTRAQ that are more expensive, less accurate, and provide less proteome coverage than label-free approaches--suggesting the need for improved experimental designs for studies requiring maximal coverage and precision. Herein, we present the coverage and precision of resin-assisted thiol enrichment coupled to label-free quantitation for the characterization of reversible oxidative modifications on protein thiols. Using C. reinhardtii and Arabidopsis as model systems for algae and plants, we quantified 3662 and 1641 unique cysteinyl peptides, respectively, with median coefficient of variation (CV) of 13% and 16%. Further, our method is extendable for the detection of protein abundance changes and stoichiometries of cysteine oxidation. Finally, we demonstrate proof-of-principle for our method, and reveal that exogenous hydrogen peroxide treatment regulates the C. reinhardtii redox proteome by increasing or decreasing the level of oxidation of 501 or 67 peptides, respectively. As protein activity and function is controlled by oxidative modifications on protein thiols, resin-assisted thiol enrichment coupled to label-free quantitation can reveal how intracellular and environmental stimuli affect plant survival and fitness through oxidative stress. PMID:25698223

  12. Masked thiol sugars: chemical behavior and synthetic applications of S-glycopyranosyl-N-monoalkyl dithiocarbamates.

    PubMed

    Megia-Fernandez, Alicia; de la Torre-Gonzalez, Diego; Parada-Aliste, Jose; Lopez-Jaramillo, Francisco Javier; Hernandez-Mateo, Fernando; Santoyo-Gonzalez, Francisco

    2014-02-01

    The chemical behavior of S-glycopyranosyl-N-monoalkyl dithiocarbamates (DTCs) as masked 1-glycosyl thiols, easily prepared by the nucleophilic displacement of 1-halo sugars with dithiocarbamate salts of primary amines, has been studied and synthetically exploited. This behavior relies on the abstraction of the proton of the carbamate functionality that allows controlled access to thiolate sugar intermediates. The basic character of the DTC salts used as reagents leads to thiolates that evolve in situ to symmetrical diglycosyldisulfides (DGDSs) when long reaction times are allowed. Alternatively, controlled unmasking of the thiolate function can be efficiently attained by treatment with an external base of isolated anomeric glycosyl DTCs, the formation of which is prevalent when using short reaction times. In this manner, a second methodology for the preparation of symmetrical DGDSs and a chemical protocol for the S-glycosylation of any electrophilic substrate are established. The applications of this last strategy for the preparation of thioglycosyl vinyl sulfones, thiodisaccharides, and S-linked homo- and heterodivalent neoglycoconjugates are described as a proof-of-concept of the great potential of the sugar DTCs in any chemical scenario in which the covalent attachment of a thiol sugar is required. The evaluation of the biological functionality of some divalent sulfurated sugar systems is also described. PMID:24282075

  13. Blade attachment assembly

    DOEpatents

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose; Delvaux, John McConnell; Miller, Diane Patricia

    2016-05-03

    An assembly and method for affixing a turbomachine rotor blade to a rotor wheel are disclosed. In an embodiment, an adaptor member is provided disposed between the blade and the rotor wheel, the adaptor member including an adaptor attachment slot that is complementary to the blade attachment member, and an adaptor attachment member that is complementary to the rotor wheel attachment slot. A coverplate is provided, having a coverplate attachment member that is complementary to the rotor wheel attachment slot, and a hook for engaging the adaptor member. When assembled, the coverplate member matingly engages with the adaptor member, and retains the blade in the adaptor member, and the assembly in the rotor wheel.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of pH tolerant and mucoadhesive (thiol-polyethylene glycol) chitosan graft polymer for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Hauptstein, Sabine; Bonengel, Sonja; Griessinger, Julia; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to generate a water-soluble thiolated chitosan to enable the permeation-enhancing effect of chitosan at pH of at least 5.5 without losing the advantages of improved mucoadhesive properties. Therefore, the thiol-bearing polyoxyethylene ligand {O-(3-carboxylpropyl)-O'-[2-[3-mercaptopropionylamino)ethyl]-polyethyleneglycol} was conjugated via amide bond formation to the amino group of chitosan. Resulting novel chitosan derivative (Chito-PEG-SH) exhibited 250 μmol free thiol groups per gram polymer. By the attachment of the thiol-bearing PEG ligand, an improvement of permeation-enhancing effect on rat intestine (2.7-fold improvement) as well as on a Caco-2 monolayer model (1.9-fold improvement) could be found. Cytotoxicity studies on Caco-2 cells revealed no change in biocompatibility. Mucoadhesion was improved 3.1-fold by the formation of disulfide bonds with mucus glycoproteins. The mucoadhesive effect of Chito-PEG-SH turned out to be similar to thiolated chitosan and more pronounced than mucoadhesive properties of unmodified chitosan. The graft polymer is soluble in water and aqueous solutions over a broad pH range. In aqueous media, the novel polymer does not precipitate at pH of 8.6 or less. According to these results, Chito-PEG-SH might show potential as auxiliary agent in oral drug delivery where its solubility even up to pH 8 is likely beneficial. PMID:24382680

  15. Low-molecular-weight thiols in plants: functional and analytical implications.

    PubMed

    Pivato, Micaela; Fabrega-Prats, Marta; Masi, Antonio

    2014-10-15

    Low-molecular-weight (LMW) thiols are a class of highly reactive compounds massively involved in the maintenance of cellular redox homeostasis. They are implicated in plant responses to almost all stress factors, as well as in the regulation of cellular metabolism. The most studied LMW thiols are glutathione and its biosynthetically related compounds (cysteine, γ-glutamylcysteine, cysteinylglycine, and phytochelatins). Other LMW thiols are described in the literature, such as thiocysteine, cysteamine, homocysteine, lipoic acid, and many species-specific volatile thiols. Here, we review the known LMW thiols in plants, briefly describing their physico-chemical properties, their relevance in post-translational protein modification, and recently-developed thiol detection methods. Current research points to a huge thiol biodiversity in plants and many species-specific and organ-specific thiols remain to be identified. Recent advances in technology should help researchers in this very challenging task, helping us to decipher the roles of thiols in plant metabolism. PMID:25057770

  16. Designed Chemical Intervention with Thiols for Prophylactic Contraception

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Ashish; Verma, Vikas; Sharma, Vikas; Kushwaha, Bhavana; Lal, Nand; Kumar, Lalit; Rawat, Tara; Dwivedi, Anil K.; Maikhuri, Jagdamba P.; Sharma, Vishnu L.; Gupta, Gopal

    2013-01-01

    Unlike somatic cells, sperm have several-fold more available-thiols that are susceptible to redox-active agents. The present study explains the mechanism behind the instant sperm-immobilizing and trichomonacidal activities of pyrrolidinium pyrrolidine-1-carbodithioate (PPC), a novel thiol agent rationally created for prophylactic contraception by minor chemical modifications of some known thiol drugs. PPC, and its three derivatives (with potential active-site blocked by alkylation), were synthesized and evaluated against live human sperm and metronidazole-susceptible and resistant Trichomonas vaginalis, in vitro. Sperm hexokinase activity was evaluated by coupled enzyme assay. PPC irreversibly immobilized 100% human sperm in ∼30 seconds and totally eliminated Trichomonas vaginalis more efficiently than nonoxynol-9 and metronidazole. It significantly inhibited (P<0.001) thiol-sensitive sperm hexokinase. However, the molecule completely lost all its biological activities once its thiol group was blocked by alkylation. PPC was subsequently formulated into a mucoadhesive vaginal film using GRaS excipients and evaluated for spermicidal and microbicidal activities (in vitro), and contraceptive efficacy in rabbits. PPC remained fully active in quick-dissolving, mucoadhesive vaginal-film formulation, and these PPC-films significantly reduced pregnancy and fertility rates in rabbits. The films released ∼90% of PPC in simulated vaginal fluid (pH 4.2) at 37°C in 5 minutes, in vitro. We have thus discovered a common target (reactive thiols) on chiefly-anaerobic, redox-sensitive cells like sperm and Trichomonas, which is susceptible to designed chemical interference for prophylactic contraception. The active thiol in PPC inactivates sperm and Trichomonas via interference with crucial sulfhydryl-disulfide based reactions, e.g. hexokinase activation in human sperm. In comparison to non-specific surfactant action of OTC spermicide nonoxynol-9, the action of thiol-active PPC

  17. Designed Chemical Intervention with Thiols for Prophylactic Contraception.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Monika; Kumar, Lokesh; Jain, Ashish; Verma, Vikas; Sharma, Vikas; Kushwaha, Bhavana; Lal, Nand; Kumar, Lalit; Rawat, Tara; Dwivedi, Anil K; Maikhuri, Jagdamba P; Sharma, Vishnu L; Gupta, Gopal

    2013-01-01

    Unlike somatic cells, sperm have several-fold more available-thiols that are susceptible to redox-active agents. The present study explains the mechanism behind the instant sperm-immobilizing and trichomonacidal activities of pyrrolidinium pyrrolidine-1-carbodithioate (PPC), a novel thiol agent rationally created for prophylactic contraception by minor chemical modifications of some known thiol drugs. PPC, and its three derivatives (with potential active-site blocked by alkylation), were synthesized and evaluated against live human sperm and metronidazole-susceptible and resistant Trichomonas vaginalis, in vitro. Sperm hexokinase activity was evaluated by coupled enzyme assay. PPC irreversibly immobilized 100% human sperm in ∼30 seconds and totally eliminated Trichomonas vaginalis more efficiently than nonoxynol-9 and metronidazole. It significantly inhibited (P<0.001) thiol-sensitive sperm hexokinase. However, the molecule completely lost all its biological activities once its thiol group was blocked by alkylation. PPC was subsequently formulated into a mucoadhesive vaginal film using GRaS excipients and evaluated for spermicidal and microbicidal activities (in vitro), and contraceptive efficacy in rabbits. PPC remained fully active in quick-dissolving, mucoadhesive vaginal-film formulation, and these PPC-films significantly reduced pregnancy and fertility rates in rabbits. The films released ∼90% of PPC in simulated vaginal fluid (pH 4.2) at 37°C in 5 minutes, in vitro. We have thus discovered a common target (reactive thiols) on chiefly-anaerobic, redox-sensitive cells like sperm and Trichomonas, which is susceptible to designed chemical interference for prophylactic contraception. The active thiol in PPC inactivates sperm and Trichomonas via interference with crucial sulfhydryl-disulfide based reactions, e.g. hexokinase activation in human sperm. In comparison to non-specific surfactant action of OTC spermicide nonoxynol-9, the action of thiol-active PPC

  18. Introduction of thiol moieties, including their thiol-ene reactions and air oxidation, onto polyelectrolyte multilayer substrates.

    PubMed

    Madaan, Nitesh; Romriell, Naomi; Tuscano, Joshua; Schlaad, Helmut; Linford, Matthew R

    2015-12-01

    We describe the derivatization of uncross-linked and cross-linked layer-by-layer (LbL) assemblies of polyelectrolytes (polyallylamine hydrochloride and polyacrylic acid) with sulfydryl groups via Traut's reagent (2-iminothiolane). This thiolation was optimized with regards to temperature, concentration, and pH. The stability of the resulting -SH groups in the air was determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). This air oxidation has obvious implications for the use of thiol-ene reactions in materials chemistry, and there appears to be little on this topic in the literature. Three main S 2s signals were observed by XPS: at 231.5 eV (oxidized sulfur), 227.6 eV (thiol groups), and 225.4 eV (thiolate groups). Due to their rapid oxidation, we recommend that thiolated surfaces be used immediately after they are prepared. As driven by 254 nm UV light, thiol groups on polyelectrolyte multilayers react with 1,2-polybutadiene (PBd), and residual carbon-carbon double bonds on adsorbed PBd similarly react with another thiol. In the case of a fluorinated thiol, surfaces with high water contact angles (ca. 120°) are obtained. Modest exposures to light result in derivatization, while longer exposures damage the assemblies. Polyelectrolyte-thiol-PBd-thiol assemblies delaminate from their substrates when immersed for long periods of time in water. Surface silanization with an amino silane prevents this delamination and leads to stable assemblies. These assemblies withstand various stability tests. Techniques used to analyze the materials in this study include X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and contact angle goniometry. PMID:26295196

  19. Infant Feeding and Attachment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ainsworth, Mary D. Salter; Tracy, Russel L.

    This paper has two major purposes: first, to consider how infant feeding behavior may fit into attachment theory; and second, to cite some evidence to show how an infant's early interaction with his mother in the feeding situation is related to subsequent development. It was found that sucking and rooting are precursor attachment behaviors that…

  20. Attachment Theory and Mindfulness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Rose; Shapiro, Shauna; Treleaven, David

    2012-01-01

    We initiate a dialog between two central areas in the field of psychology today: attachment theory/research and mindfulness studies. The impact of the early mother-infant relationship on child development has been well established in the literature, with attachment theorists having focused on the correlation between a mother's capacity for…

  1. Attachment and Early Maltreatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egeland, Byron; Sroufe, L. Alan

    1981-01-01

    Attachment outcomes of 31 maltreatment cases (involving extreme neglect or abuse), selected from a total poverty sample of 267 high-risk mothers and their children, were compared to those of a subsample of 33 cases with a history of excellent care. Attachment was assessed when infants were 12 and 18 months old. (Author/MP)

  2. Separation and Attachment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice Sterling

    2005-01-01

    Developing secure attachments with babies gives them a very special gift--the foundation for good infant mental health! In this article, the author discusses how to develop secure attachments with babies. Babies who are in the care of others during the day often suffer from separations from their special adults. Thirteen "tips" to ensure that…

  3. The impact of thiol peroxidases on redox regulation.

    PubMed

    Flohé, Leopold

    2016-01-01

    The biology of glutathione peroxidases and peroxiredoxins is reviewed with emphasis on their role in metabolic regulation. Apart from their obvious function in balancing oxidative challenge, these thiol peroxidases are not only implicated in orchestrating the adaptive response to oxidative stress, but also in regulating signaling triggered by hormones, growth factors and cytokines. The mechanisms presently discussed comprise dampening of redox-sensitive regulatory processes by elimination of hydroperoxides, suppression of lipoxygenase activity, committing suicide to save H2O2 for signaling, direct binding to receptors or regulatory proteins in a peroxidase activity-independent manner, or acting as sensors for hydroperoxides and as transducers of oxidant signals. The various mechanistic proposals are discussed in the light of kinetic data, which unfortunately are scarce. Taking into account pivotal criteria of a meaningful regulatory circuit, kinetic plausibility and specificity, the mechanistic concepts implying a direct sensor/transducer function of the thiol peroxidases appear most appealing. With rate constants for the reaction with hydroperoxide of 10(5)-10(8) M(-1) s(-1), thiol peroxidases are qualified as kinetically preferred hydroperoxide sensors, and the ability of the oxidized enzymes to react with defined protein thiols lends specificity to the transduction process. The versatility of thiol peroxidases, however, allows multiple ways of interaction with regulatory pathways. PMID:26291534

  4. Thiol/disulfide redox states in signaling and sensing

    PubMed Central

    Go, Young-Mi; Jones, Dean P.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid advances in redox systems biology are creating new opportunities to understand complexities of human disease and contributions of environmental exposures. New understanding of thiol-disulfide systems have occurred during the past decade as a consequence of the discoveries that thiol and disulfide systems are maintained in kinetically controlled steady-states displaced from thermodynamic equilibrium, that a widely distributed family of NADPH oxidases produces oxidants that function in cell signaling, and that a family of peroxiredoxins utilize thioredoxin as a reductant to complement the well-studied glutathione antioxidant system for peroxide elimination and redox regulation. This review focuses on thiol/disulfide redox state in biologic systems and the knowledge base available to support development of integrated redox systems biology models to better understand the function and dysfunction of thiol-disulfide redox systems. In particular, central principles have emerged concerning redox compartmentalization and utility of thiol/disulfide redox measures as indicators of physiologic function. Advances in redox proteomics show that, in addition to functioning in protein active sites and cell signaling, cysteine residues also serve as redox sensors to integrate biologic functions. These advances provide a framework for translation of redox systems biology concepts to practical use in understanding and treating human disease. Biological responses to cadmium, a widespread environmental agent, are used to illustrate the utility of these advances to the understanding of complex pleiotropic toxicities. PMID:23356510

  5. Anomalous reaction of 4-chloro-7-nitrobenzofurazan with thiol compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Nitta, K; Bratcher, S C; Kronman, M J

    1979-01-01

    The kinetics of reaction of 4-chloro-7-nitrobenzofurazan with thiol groups at pH values above 5 cannot be accounted for solely on the basis of formation of a single product, the 4-thio derivative. Spectroscopic observations indicate that, in addition to the 4-thio derivative, at least two other products are formed. One of these, referred to as P1, is most likely a reversible complex of thiol compound and 4-chloro-7-nitrobenzofurazan of the Meisenheimer type. The other product, P2, which forms primarily when thiol compound is in a large excess, does not appear to result from direct reaction of thiol group and 4-chloro-7-nitrobenzofurazan, but may be a reaction of product P1 and thiol compound. The coloured product, P2, will react further with proteins, such as bovine serum albumin and Escherichia coli RNA polymerase. This reaction irreversibly destroys the catalytic activity of RNA polymerase. The implications of these observations for utilization of 4-chloro-7-nitrobenzofurazan as a protein-modifying agent are discussed. PMID:435240

  6. Thiol-Based Redox Switches and Gene Regulation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Cysteine is notable among the universal, proteinogenic amino acids for its facile redox chemistry. Cysteine thiolates are readily modified by reactive oxygen species (ROS), reactive electrophilic species (RES), and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). Although thiol switches are commonly triggered by disulfide bond formation, they can also be controlled by S-thiolation, S-alkylation, or modification by RNS. Thiol-based switches are common in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms and activate functions that detoxify reactive species and restore thiol homeostasis while repressing functions that would be deleterious if expressed under oxidizing conditions. Here, we provide an overview of the best-understood examples of thiol-based redox switches that affect gene expression. Intra- or intermolecular disulfide bond formation serves as a direct regulatory switch for several bacterial transcription factors (OxyR, OhrR/2-Cys, Spx, YodB, CrtJ, and CprK) and indirectly regulates others (the RsrA anti-σ factor and RegB sensory histidine kinase). In eukaryotes, thiol-based switches control the yeast Yap1p transcription factor, the Nrf2/Keap1 electrophile and oxidative stress response, and the Chlamydomonas NAB1 translational repressor. Collectively, these regulators reveal a remarkable range of chemical modifications exploited by Cys residues to effect changes in gene expression. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 14, 1049—1063. PMID:20626317

  7. Occurrence of low molecular weight thiols in biological systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahey, Robert C.; Newton, Gerald L.

    1983-01-01

    Bromobimane labeling and high performance chromatography analysis were applied to various species of bacteria, plant tissues, and animal tissues. The reaction between thiols and monobromobimane is studied. Chromatograms revealing peaks produced by nonthiols and thiols are analyzed and compared. It is observed that all the bacteria species contain hydrogen sulfide, and glutathione is contained in facultative and aerobic gram-negative bacteria. For the plant tissues, the data reveal that mung bean sprouts contain homoglutathione and no glutathione; alfalfa sprouts contain homoglutathione and glutathione; the pea seed, nonlegumes, and fungi contain glutathione and no homoglutathione. It is detected that the main thiol in the animal tissues is glutathione. Based on the data, it is suggested that glutathione has an essential function in higher organisms.

  8. Chemoselective Attachment of Biologically Active Proteins to Surfaces by Native Chemical Ligation

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, C L; de Yoreo, J J; Coleman, M; Camarero, J A

    2003-11-22

    The present work describes our ongoing efforts towards the creation of micro and nanoscaled ordered arrays of protein covalently attached to site-specific chemical linkers patterned by different microlithographic techniques. We present a new and efficient solid-phase approach for the synthesis of chemically modified long alkyl-thiols. These compounds can be used to introduce chemoselective reacting groups onto silicon-based surfaces. We show that these modified thiols can be used for creating nano- and micrometric chemical patterns by using different lithographic techniques. We show that these patterns can react chemoselectively with proteins which have been recombinantly modified to contain complementary chemical groups at specific positions thus resulting in the oriented attachment of the protein to the surface.

  9. Multiscale Surface-Attached Hydrogel Thin Films with Tailored Architecture.

    PubMed

    Chollet, Benjamin; Li, Mengxing; Martwong, Ekkachai; Bresson, Bruno; Fretigny, Christian; Tabeling, Patrick; Tran, Yvette

    2016-05-11

    A facile route for the fabrication of surface-attached hydrogel thin films with well-controlled chemistry and tailored architecture on wide range of thickness from nanometers to micrometers is reported. The synthesis, which consists in cross-linking and grafting the preformed and ene-reactive polymer chains through thiol-ene click chemistry, has the main advantage of being well-controlled without the addition of initiators. As thiol-ene click reaction can be selectively activated by UV-irradiation (in addition to thermal heating), micropatterned hydrogel films are easily synthesized. The versatility of our approach is illustrated by the possibility to fabricate various chemical polymer networks, like stimuli-responsive hydrogels, on various solid substrates, such as silicon wafers, glass, and gold surfaces. Another attractive feature is the development of new complex hydrogel films with targeted architecture. The fabrication of various architectures for polymer films is demonstrated: multilayer hydrogel films in which single-networks are stacked one onto the other, interpenetrating networks films with mixture of two networks in the same layer, and nanocomposite hydrogel films where nanoparticles are stably trapped inside the mesh of the network. Thanks to its simplicity and its versatility this novel approach to surface-attached hydrogel films should have a strong impact in the area of polymer coatings. PMID:27008162

  10. Micromechanical die attachment surcharge

    DOEpatents

    Filter, William F.; Hohimer, John P.

    2002-01-01

    An attachment structure is disclosed for attaching a die to a supporting substrate without the use of adhesives or solder. The attachment structure, which can be formed by micromachining, functions purely mechanically in utilizing a plurality of shaped pillars (e.g. round, square or polygonal and solid, hollow or slotted) that are formed on one of the die or supporting substrate and which can be urged into contact with various types of mating structures including other pillars, a deformable layer or a plurality of receptacles that are formed on the other of the die or supporting substrate, thereby forming a friction bond that holds the die to the supporting substrate. The attachment structure can further include an alignment structure for precise positioning of the die and supporting substrate to facilitate mounting the die to the supporting substrate. The attachment structure has applications for mounting semiconductor die containing a microelectromechanical (MEM) device, a microsensor or an integrated circuit (IC), and can be used to form a multichip module. The attachment structure is particularly useful for mounting die containing released MEM devices since these devices are fragile and can otherwise be damaged or degraded by adhesive or solder mounting.

  11. Visible light-initiated interfacial thiol-norbornene photopolymerization for forming islet surface conformal coating

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Han; Mirmira, Raghavendra G.; Lin, Chien-Chi

    2015-01-01

    A cytocompatible visible light-mediated interfacial thiol-norbornene photopolymerization scheme was developed for creating hydrogel conformal coating on pancreatic islets. The step-growth thiol-norbornene reaction affords high consistency and tunability in gel coating thickness. Furthermore, isolated islets coated with thiol-norbornene gel maintained their viability and function in vitro. PMID:26509035

  12. 40 CFR 721.10696 - Polyfluorinated alkyl thiol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Polyfluorinated alkyl thiol (generic). 721.10696 Section 721.10696 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances §...

  13. Oxidative stability of (-)-epigallocatechin gallate in the presence of thiols.

    PubMed

    Unnadkat, Nausheel R; Elias, Ryan J

    2012-10-31

    Polyphenols are attractive ingredients due to their purported health benefits, but their addition to foods is limited by their chemical instability, as they are rapidly oxidized under many conditions. This oxidation not only compromises the potential biological activity of the phenolic compound, but can also affect the chemical stability of the surrounding food matrix. Polyphenols bearing catechol or gallate groups, when oxidized to their benzoquinone forms, are strong electrophiles capable of reacting with nucleophilic thiols via 1,4-Michael addition reactions. These reactions are known to proceed in foods during processing and storage, and can profoundly affect the quality and biological efficacy of polyphenols when they are added as functional food ingredients. The stability of (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) in the presence of three thiol-containing species [cysteine (Cys), glutathione (GSH), 3-mercaptohexan-1-ol (3SH)] was followed under both neutral and acidic conditions. Both Cys and GSH increased the rate of EGCG oxidation at pH 4. At pH 7, only Cys was found to increase the rate of EGCG oxidation. On the basis of these results, the reactivity of thiols toward EGCG follows the trend: Cys > GSH > 3SH, which is consistent with observed thiol-quinone adduct formation rates. Contrary to the results observed for Cys and GSH, 3SH was observed to inhibit EGCG oxidation. PMID:23035942

  14. Hybrid Organic/Inorganic Thiol-ene-Based Photopolymerized Networks

    PubMed Central

    Schreck, Kathleen M.; Leung, Diana; Bowman, Christopher N.

    2011-01-01

    The thiol-ene reaction serves as a more oxygen tolerant alternative to traditional (meth)acrylate chemistry for forming photopolymerized networks with numerous desirable attributes including energy absorption, optical clarity, and reduced shrinkage stress. However, when utilizing commercially available monomers, many thiol-ene networks also exhibit decreases in properties such as glass transition temperature (Tg) and crosslink density. In this study, hybrid organic/inorganic thiol-ene resins incorporating silsesquioxane (SSQ) species into the photopolymerized networks were investigated as a route to improve these properties. Thiol- and ene-functionalized SSQs (SH-SSQ and allyl-SSQ, respectively) were synthesized via alkoxysilane hydrolysis/condensation chemistry, using a photopolymerizable monomer [either pentaerythriol tetrakis(3-mercaptopropionate) (PETMP) or 1,3,5-triallyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4,6(1H,3H,5H)-trione (TATATO)] as the reaction solvent. The resulting SSQ-containing solutions (SSQ-PETMP and SSQ-TATATO) were characterized, and their incorporation into photopolymerized networks was evaluated. PMID:21984847

  15. Hybrid Organic/Inorganic Thiol-ene-Based Photopolymerized Networks.

    PubMed

    Schreck, Kathleen M; Leung, Diana; Bowman, Christopher N

    2011-09-15

    The thiol-ene reaction serves as a more oxygen tolerant alternative to traditional (meth)acrylate chemistry for forming photopolymerized networks with numerous desirable attributes including energy absorption, optical clarity, and reduced shrinkage stress. However, when utilizing commercially available monomers, many thiol-ene networks also exhibit decreases in properties such as glass transition temperature (T(g)) and crosslink density. In this study, hybrid organic/inorganic thiol-ene resins incorporating silsesquioxane (SSQ) species into the photopolymerized networks were investigated as a route to improve these properties. Thiol- and ene-functionalized SSQs (SH-SSQ and allyl-SSQ, respectively) were synthesized via alkoxysilane hydrolysis/condensation chemistry, using a photopolymerizable monomer [either pentaerythriol tetrakis(3-mercaptopropionate) (PETMP) or 1,3,5-triallyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4,6(1H,3H,5H)-trione (TATATO)] as the reaction solvent. The resulting SSQ-containing solutions (SSQ-PETMP and SSQ-TATATO) were characterized, and their incorporation into photopolymerized networks was evaluated. PMID:21984847

  16. From sulfur to homoglutathione: Thiol metabolism in soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sulfur is an essential plant nutrient and is metabolized into the sulfur-containing amino acids (cysteine and methionine) and into molecules that protect plants against oxidative and environmental stresses. Although studies of thiol metabolism in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana (thale cress) h...

  17. Attachment and early maltreatment.

    PubMed

    Egeland, B; Sroufe, L A

    1981-03-01

    Attachment outcomes of 31 maltreatment cases (extreme neglect or abuse) selected from a total poverty sample of 267 high-risk mothers were compared at 12 and 18 months to a subsample of 33 cases with a history of excellent care. In accordance with the Bowlby-Ainsworth hypothesis, the maltreatment group was characterized by a low proportion of secure attachment (Ainsworth's group B) at 12 months (38% compared to 75% in the excellent care group and 55% in the remaining total sample); however, differences at 18 months were not significant. Specifically, 50% of the cases with a history of neglect were in Ainsworth's group C (anxious/resistant attachment) at 12 months, compared to usual reports of approximately 10% and compared to 21% in the total poverty sample. Patterns of attachment between 12 and 18 months remained stable for the mother-infant pairs in the excellent care group, however, 52% of the mistreated infants changed classifications. For the neglect subgroup there was considerable movement toward Ainsworth's group A (anxious/avoidant attachment) at 18 months and some movement toward group B. An examination of the case histories of mother-infant pairs indicated that changes in attachment between 12 and 18 months were related to changing life events, support from family, and out-of-home care. These findings are highly tentative as were the findings which suggested that secure attachment within the maltreatment group was associated with the presence of a supportive family member, less chaotic life-style, and, in some instances, a more robust infant. PMID:7238152

  18. Extracellular Thiol Isomerases and Their Role in Thrombus Formation

    PubMed Central

    Schulman, Sol; Bendapudi, Pavan; Sharda, Anish; Chen, Vivien; Bellido-Martin, Lola; Jasuja, Reema; Furie, Barbara C.; Flaumenhaft, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The mammalian endoplasmic reticulum (ER) houses a large family of twenty thioredoxin-like proteins of which protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) is the archetypal member. Although the PDI family is best known for its role in oxidative protein folding of secretory proteins in the ER, these thioredoxin-like proteins fulfill ever-expanding roles, both within the secretory pathway and beyond. Recent Advances: Secreted PDI family proteins have now been shown to serve a critical role in platelet thrombus formation and fibrin generation. Utilizing intravital microscopy to visualize thrombus formation in mice, we have demonstrated the presence of extracellular PDI antigen during thrombus formation following injury of the vascular wall. Inhibition of PDI abrogates thrombus formation in vivo (16, 26, 46, 55). These observations have been extended to other PDI family members, including ERp57 (39, 116, 118, 123) and ERp5 (77). The vascular thiol isomerases are those PDI family members secreted from platelets and/or endothelium (40): PDI, ERp57, ERp5, ERp72, ERp44, ERp29, and TMX3. We focus here on PDI (16, 46, 55), ERp57 (39, 116, 118, 123), and ERp5 (77), which have been implicated in thrombus formation in vivo. Critical Issues: It would appear that a system of thiol isomerase redox catalysts has been hijacked from the ER to regulate thrombus formation in the vasculature. Future Directions: How this redox system is trafficked to and regulated at the cell surface, the identity of extracellular substrates, why so many thiol isomerases are required, and which thiol isomerase functions are necessary are critical unanswered questions in understanding the role of thiol isomerases in thrombus formation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 24, 1–15. PMID:26467859

  19. Redox Active Thiol Sensors of Oxidative and Nitrosative Stress

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The reactivity of the thiol in the side chain of cysteines is exploited by bacterial regulatory proteins that sense and respond to reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Recent Advances: Charged residues and helix dipoles diminish the pKa of redox active cysteines, resulting in a thiolate that is stabilized by neighboring polar amino acids. The reaction of peroxides with thiolates generates a sulfenic acid (–SOH) intermediate that often gives rise to a reversible disulfide bond. Peroxide-induced intramolecular and intermolecular disulfides and intermolecular mixed disulfides modulate the signaling activity of members of the LysR/OxyR, MarR/OhrR, and RsrA family of transcriptional regulators. Thiol-dependent regulators also help bacteria resist the nitrosative and nitroxidative stress. −SOHs, mixed disulfides, and S-nitrosothiols are some of the post-translational modifications induced by nitrogen oxides in the thiol groups of OxyR and SsrB bacterial regulatory proteins. Sulfenylation, disulfide bond formation, S-thiolation, and S-nitrosylation are reversible modifications amenable to feedback regulation by antioxidant and antinitrosative repair systems. The structural and functional changes engaged in the thiol-dependent sensing of reactive species have been adopted by several regulators to foster bacterial virulence during exposure to products of NADPH phagocyte oxidase and inducible nitric oxide synthase. Critical Issues: Investigations with LysR/OxyR, MarR/OhrR, and RsrA family members have helped in an understanding of the mechanisms by which thiols in regulatory proteins react with reactive species, thereby activating antioxidant and antinitrosative gene expression. Future Directions: To define the determinants that provide selectivity of redox active thiolates for some reactive species but not others is an important challenge for future investigations. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 17, 1201–1214. PMID:22257022

  20. Autism and Attachment: The Attachment Q-Sort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutgers, Anna H.; Van Ijzendoorn, Marinus H.; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.; Swinkels, Sophie H. N.

    2007-01-01

    Children with autism are able to show secure attachment behaviours to their parents/caregivers. Most studies on attachment in children with autism used a (modified) Strange Situation Procedure (SSP) to examine attachment security. An advantage of the Attachment Q-Sort (AQS) over the SSP is that it can be attuned to the secure-base behaviour of…

  1. Comparative electron paramagnetic resonance investigation of reduced graphene oxide and carbon nanotubes with different chemical functionalities for quantum dot attachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Chuyen V.; Krueger, Michael; Eck, Michael; Weber, Stefan; Erdem, Emre

    2014-03-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has been applied to different chemically treated reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A narrow EPR signal is visible at g = 2.0029 in both GO and CNT-Oxide from carbon-related dangling bonds. EPR signals became broader and of lower intensity after oxygen-containing functionalities were reduced and partially transformed into thiol groups to obtain thiol-functionalized reduced GO (TrGO) and thiol-functionalized CNT (CNT-SH), respectively. Additionally, EPR investigation of CdSe quantum dot-TrGO hybrid material reveals complete quenching of the TrGO EPR signal due to direct chemical attachment and electronic coupling. Our work confirms that EPR is a suitable tool to detect spin density changes in different functionalized nanocarbon materials and can contribute to improved understanding of electronic coupling effects in nanocarbon-nanoparticle hybrid nano-composites promising for various electronic and optoelectronic applications.

  2. Superego: an attachment perspective.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Jeremy

    2011-10-01

    With the help of attachment theory and research, the paper attempts to broaden and build on classical and current views on the superego. Attachment theory's epigenetic approach and the concept of the subliminal superego are described. The superego, it is argued, is as much concerned with safety as sex. The superego is 'heir', not just to the Oedipus complex or Klein's pre-oedipal constellation, but also to the attachment relationship. Under favourable developmental conditions a 'mature superego' emerges, facilitating, in the presence of an internal secure base, maturational boundary crossings towards adult sexuality. In the light of the above, the paper reviews Lear's updating of Strachey's model of psychic change and explores the concept of transgression in relation to the 'professional superego', its development and maturation. Theoretical arguments are illustrated with clinical examples. PMID:22014367

  3. Ceramic blade attachment system

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, Gary L.

    1994-01-01

    A turbine blade having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is attached to a turbine wheel having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade. The turbine blade has a root portion having a pair of recessed portions thereon. The turbine wheel includes a plurality of openings in which the turbine blade is positioned. Each of the openings have a pair of grooves therein in which are positioned a pair of pins having a generally rectangular cross-section and a reaction surface thereon. A pair of cylindrical rollers interposed respective ones of the pair of reaction surfaces and the pair of recessed portions. The attachment system or turbine assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective attachment of a component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion to a component having a greater preestablished rate of thermal expansion.

  4. Ceramic blade attachment system

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, G.L.

    1994-12-13

    A turbine blade having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is attached to a turbine wheel having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade. The turbine blade has a root portion having a pair of recessed portions thereon. The turbine wheel includes a plurality of openings in which the turbine blade is positioned. Each of the openings have a pair of grooves therein in which are positioned a pair of pins having a generally rectangular cross-section and a reaction surface thereon. A pair of cylindrical rollers interposed respective ones of the pair of reaction surfaces and the pair of recessed portions. The attachment system or turbine assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective attachment of a component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion to a component having a greater preestablished rate of thermal expansion. 3 figures.

  5. Magnetically attached sputter targets

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, D.M.; McKernan, M.A.

    1994-02-15

    An improved method and assembly for attaching sputtering targets to cathode assemblies of sputtering systems which includes a magnetically permeable material is described. The magnetically permeable material is imbedded in a target base that is brazed, welded, or soldered to the sputter target, or is mechanically retained in the target material. Target attachment to the cathode is achieved by virtue of the permanent magnets and/or the pole pieces in the cathode assembly that create magnetic flux lines adjacent to the backing plate, which strongly attract the magnetically permeable material in the target assembly. 11 figures.

  6. Magnetically attached sputter targets

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; McKernan, Mark A.

    1994-01-01

    An improved method and assembly for attaching sputtering targets to cathode assemblies of sputtering systems which includes a magnetically permeable material. The magnetically permeable material is imbedded in a target base that is brazed, welded, or soldered to the sputter target, or is mechanically retained in the target material. Target attachment to the cathode is achieved by virtue of the permanent magnets and/or the pole pieces in the cathode assembly that create magnetic flux lines adjacent to the backing plate, which strongly attract the magnetically permeable material in the target assembly.

  7. Internal pipe attachment mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Bast, Richard M.; Chesnut, Dwayne A.; Henning, Carl D.; Lennon, Joseph P.; Pastrnak, John W.; Smith, Joseph A.

    1994-01-01

    An attachment mechanism for repairing or extending fluid carrying pipes, casings, conduits, etc. utilizing one-way motion of spring tempered fingers to provide a mechanical connection between the attachment mechanism and the pipe. The spring tempered fingers flex to permit insertion into a pipe to a desired insertion depth. The mechanical connection is accomplished by reversing the insertion motion and the mechanical leverage in the fingers forces them outwardly against the inner wall of the pipe. A seal is generated by crushing a sealing assembly by the action of setting the mechanical connection.

  8. Internal pipe attachment mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Bast, R.M.; Chesnut, D.A.; Henning, C.D.; Lennon, J.P.; Pastrnak, J.W.; Smith, J.A.

    1994-12-13

    An attachment mechanism is described for repairing or extending fluid carrying pipes, casings, conduits, etc. utilizing one-way motion of spring tempered fingers to provide a mechanical connection between the attachment mechanism and the pipe. The spring tempered fingers flex to permit insertion into a pipe to a desired insertion depth. The mechanical connection is accomplished by reversing the insertion motion and the mechanical leverage in the fingers forces them outwardly against the inner wall of the pipe. A seal is generated by crushing a sealing assembly by the action of setting the mechanical connection. 6 figures.

  9. Ladder attachment platform

    DOEpatents

    Swygert,; Richard, W [Springfield, SC

    2012-08-28

    A ladder attachment platform is provided that includes a base for attachment to a ladder that has first and second side rails and a plurality of rungs that extend between in a lateral direction. Also included is a user platform for having a user stand thereon that is carried by the base. The user platform may be positioned with respect to the ladder so that it is not located between a first plane that extends through the first side rail and is perpendicular to the lateral direction and a second plane that extends through the second side rail and is perpendicular to the lateral direction.

  10. Thiol adsorption on metal oxides: an approach for selective deposition on zinc oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Jason W.; Steeves, Diane M.; Singh, Jagdeep; Im, Jisun; Whitten, James E.

    2011-02-01

    We have previously discovered a novel, facile approach to encapsulate ZnO nanorods within thiol complexes. This approach results in a thiol uptake of 30-40% and a 400-500 nm thick thiol-Zn-thiol complex encapsulation layer surrounding ZnO nanorods. By controlling experimental parameters, it is possible to control the thiol deposition, enabling less uptake, which results in a surface monolayer instead of encapsulation. Through this approach, thiol modification of other metal oxide materials, namely TiO2, Al2O3, and MgO, has been attempted. FTIR analysis indicates that thiol adsorption occurs only on ZnO; chemisorption of thiols on other nanoparticles is not evident. Ultrahigh vacuum single crystal adsorption studies demonstrate that ZnO(0001) is also more susceptible to thiol monolayer formation, as evidenced by lack of methanethiol adsorption on TiO2(110) and MgO(0001). These results indicate that the facile thiol modification approach opens a new avenue for surface modification of multi-component metal oxide materials by enabling selective thiol modification of ZnO. This work has potential applicability for creating multiple ligand-functionalized materials, which could be useful for the design of novel multiplexing sensors and photovoltaics.

  11. Modular modification of xylan with UV-initiated thiol-ene reaction.

    PubMed

    Nurmi, Leena; Salminen, Reeta; Setälä, Harri

    2015-03-01

    Birch xylan was functionalized with various thiols through UV initiated radical thiol-ene reaction under mild conditions. Xylan was allylated through etherification with allyl glycidyl ether under alkaline conditions. The allylated xylan was then reacted with thiols containing varying functional groups: trimethylbenzyl mercaptan, dodecanethiol, thioglycolic acid, L-cysteine and cysteamine hydrochloride. The reactions were conducted under homogeneous conditions at room temperature, either in water (hydrophilic thiols) or in DMF (hydrophobic thiols). The effect of reaction parameters to the functionalization efficiency was studied, including, for example, thiol excess, thiol character, initiator amount and reaction mixture concentration. The reactions were fast and 100% conversion of allyl groups was reached in most cases, sometimes already within 10 min. Water as solvent resulted generally in faster reactions when compared to DMF, and it was possible to conduct the aqueous reaction even without added UV initiator. It was also possible to incorporate two functionalities simultaneously during one reaction into the xylan structure. PMID:25665780

  12. Attachment and Personality Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinha, Preeti; Sharan, Pratap

    2007-01-01

    Personality disorders (PDs) arise from core psychopathology of interpersonal relationships and understanding of self and others. The distorted representations of self and others, as well as unhealthy relationships that characterize persons with various PDs, indicate the possibility that persons with PDs have insecure attachment. Insecure…

  13. Functional graphene by thiol-ene click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Luong, Nguyen Dang; Sinh, Le Hoang; Johansson, Leena-Sisko; Campell, Joseph; Seppälä, Jukka

    2015-02-16

    Thiol-ene click reaction was successfully employed for chemical modification of graphene oxide (GO) by one-step synthesis. Herein, 2,2-azobis(2-methylpropionitrile) (AIBN) was used as thermal catalyst and cysteamine hydrochloride (HS-(CH2 )2 -NH2 HCl) was used as thiol-containing compound, which is incorporated to GO surface upon reaction with the C=C bonds. The hydrochloride acts as protecting group for the amine, which is finally eliminated by adding sodium hydroxide. The modified GO contains both S- and N-containing groups (NS-GO). We found that NS-GO sheets form good dispersion in water, ethanol, and ethylene glycol. These graphene dispersions can be processed into functionalized graphene film. Besides, it was demonstrated that NS-GO was proved to be an excellent host matrix for platinum nanoparticles. The developed method paves a new way for graphene modification and its functional nanocomposites. PMID:25580698

  14. Cadmium-responsive thiols in the ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus.

    PubMed

    Courbot, Mikael; Diez, Laurent; Ruotolo, Roberta; Chalot, Michel; Leroy, Pierre

    2004-12-01

    Molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the sustained metal tolerance of ectomycorrhizal fungi are largely unknown. Some of the main mechanisms involved in metal detoxification appear to involve the chelation of metal ions in the cytosol with thiol-containing compounds, such as glutathione, phytochelatins, or metallothioneins. We used an improved high-performance liquid chromatography method for the simultaneous measurement of thiol-containing compounds from cysteine and its derivatives (gamma-glutamylcysteine, glutathione) to higher-molecular-mass compounds (phytochelatins). We found that glutathione and gamma-glutamylcysteine contents increased when the ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus was exposed to cadmium. An additional compound with a 3-kDa molecular mass, most probably related to a metallothionein, increased drastically in mycelia exposed to cadmium. The relative lack of phytochelatins and the presence of a putative metallothionein suggest that ectomycorrhizal fungi may use a different means to tolerate heavy metals, such as Cd, than do their plant hosts. PMID:15574943

  15. Thiol-ene/methacrylate systems for mechanical damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNair, Olivia; Senyurt, Askim; Wei, Huanyu; Gould, Trent; Piland, Scott; Hoyle, Charles; Savin, Daniel

    2010-03-01

    Ternary thiol-ene-methacrylate (TEMA) networks as materials for mechanical energy damping are unique to the sports world. Using a photoinitiation process, TEMA systems are formed via an initial thiol-ene step-growth mechanism along with traditional radical polymerization of acrylate and ene monomers. Final networks have two-part morphologies: acrylate homopolymer sectors imbedded in a multi-component mesh. Several (TEMA) systems have been synthesized and analyzed via thermal and mechanical probing. Initial studies on these ternary systems have shown excellent properties compared to traditional ethylene vinyl alcohol (EVA) copolymers. For example, PEMA networks exhibit glass transition temperatures 33 K higher than EVA, resulting in improved damping at room temperature. This research will help develop relationships between tan delta, glass transition and their effects on mechanical energy damping for ternary (TEMA) systems.

  16. Stabilising cysteinyl thiol oxidation and nitrosation for proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Ratnayake, Shibani; Dias, Irundika H K; Lattman, Eric; Griffiths, Helen R

    2013-10-30

    Oxidation and S-nitrosylation of cysteinyl thiols (Cys-SH) to sulfenic (Cys-SOH), sulfinic (Cys-SO2H), sulfonic acids (Cys-SO3H), disulphides and S-nitrosothiols are suggested as important post-translational modifications that can activate or deactivate the function of many proteins. Non-enzymatic post-translational modifications to cysteinyl thiols have been implicated in a wide variety of physiological and pathophysiological states but have been difficult to monitor in a physiological setting because of a lack of experimental tools. The purpose of this review is to bring together the approaches that have been developed for stably trapping cysteine either in its reduced or oxidised forms for enrichment and or subsequent mass spectrometric analysis. These tools are providing insight into potential targets for post-translational modifications to cysteine modification in vivo. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Special Issue: Posttranslational Protein modifications in biology and Medicine. PMID:23796488

  17. EUV negative-resist based on thiol-yne system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirai, Masamitsu; Maki, Koichi; Okamura, Haruyuki; Kaneyama, Koji; Itani, Toshiro

    2011-04-01

    Non-conventional chemically amplified (CA) negative resist for EUV lithography was studied. We have designed negative-tone EUV resist based on thiol-yne stepwise radical reactions. OH groups of poly(4-hydroxystyrene) (PHS) were modified with functional units bearing C-C triple bond structure. Resist was formulated as a mixture of modified-PHS, multifunctional thiol compound, and photoradical generator. The present resist was developable with standard 2.38 wt% TMAH aq. solution. Photo-sensitivity of the resist was obtained on irradiation at 254 nm and 13.5 nm. The resist was highly sensitive to EUV exposure. The sensitivity and the contrast were affected by the structure of modified-PHS and process conditions.

  18. Water electrolyte promoted oxidation of functional thiol groups.

    PubMed

    Lauwers, K; Breynaert, E; Rombouts, I; Delcour, J A; Kirschhock, C E A

    2016-04-15

    The formation of disulfide bonds is of the utmost importance for a wide range of food products with gluten or globular proteins as functional agents. Here, the impact of mineral electrolyte composition of aqueous solutions on thiol oxidation kinetics was studied, using glutathione (GSH) and cysteine (CYS) as model systems. Interestingly, the oxidation rate of both compounds into their corresponding disulfides was significantly higher in common tap water than in ultrapure water. The systematic study of different electrolyte components showed that especially CaCl2 improved the oxidation rate of GSH. However, this effect was not observed for CYS, which indicated a strong impact of the local chemical environment on thiol oxidation kinetics. PMID:26675862

  19. Investigation of thiol derivatized gold nanoparticle sensors for gas analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Jared S.

    Analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air and exhaled breath by sensor array is a very useful testing technique. It can provide non-invasive, fast, inexpensive testing for many diseases. Breath analysis has been very successful in identifying cancer and other diseases by using a chemiresistor sensor or array with gold nanoparticles to detect biomarkers. Acetone is a biomarker for diabetes and having a portable testing device could help to monitor diabetic and therapeutic progress. An advantage to this testing method is it is conducted at room temperature instead of 200 degrees Celsius. 3. The objective of this research is to determine the effect of thiol derivatized gold nanoparticles based on sensor(s) detection of VOCs. The VOCs to be tested are acetone, ethanol, and a mixture of acetone and ethanol. Each chip is tested under all three VOCs and three concentration levels (0.1, 1, and 5.0 ppm). VOC samples are used to test the sensors' ability to detect and differentiate VOCs. Sensors (also referred to as a chip) are prepared using several types of thiol derivatized gold nanoparticles. The factors are: thiol compound and molar volume loading of the thiol in synthesis. The average resistance results are used to determine the VOC selectivity of the sensors tested. The results show a trend of increasing resistance as VOC concentration is increased relative to dry air; which is used as baseline for VOCs. Several sensors show a high selectivity to one or more VOCs. Overall the 57 micromoles of 4-methoxy-toluenethiol sensor shows the strongest selectivity for VOCs tested. 3. Gerfen, Kurt. 2012. Detection of Acetone in Air Using Silver Ion Exchanged ZSM-5 and Zinc Oxide Sensing Films. Master of Science thesis, University of Louisville.

  20. Trichuris suis: thiol protease activity from adult worms.

    PubMed

    Hill, D E; Sakanari, J A

    1997-01-01

    Trichuris suis, the whipworm of swine, causes anemia, weight loss, anorexia, mucohemorrhagic diarrhea, and death in heavy infections. A zinc metalloprotease has been suggested to play a role in the severe enteric pathology associated with infection and the infiltration of opportunistic bacteria into deeper tissues in the swine colon. In this study, a thiol protease from gut extracts of adult T. suis and from excretory/secretory components (E/S) of adult worms was characterized using fluorogenic peptide substrates and protein substrate gels. The protease cleaved the fluorogenic substrate Z-Phe-Arg-AMC, and this cleavage was completely inhibited by the thiol protease inhibitors E-64, leupeptin, Z-Phe-Ala-CH2F, and Z-Phe-Arg-CH2F. Gelatin substrate gels and fluorescence assays using both the gut and the stichosome extracts and E/S revealed enhanced activity when 2 mM dithiothreitol or 5 mM cysteine was included in the incubation buffer, and optimal activity was seen over a pH range of 5.5 to 8.5. Incubation of gut extracts or E/S material with inhibitors of aspartic, serine, or metalloproteases had no effect on the cleavage of Z-Phe-Arg-AMC. Thiol protease activity was found in extracts of gut tissue but not in the extracts of stichocytes of adult worms. N-terminal amino acid sequencing of the protease revealed sequence homologies with cathepsin B-like thiol protease identified from parasitic and free-living nematodes. PMID:9024202

  1. Tailored thiol-functional polyamides: synthesis and functionalization.

    PubMed

    Mommer, Stefan; Keul, Helmut; Möller, Martin

    2014-12-01

    In this article, a synthetic concept for the preparation of polyamides with functional side groups is described. First, the synthesis of a bis(thiolactone) monomer is shown in a concise three-step route from itaconic acid and DL-homocysteine thiolactone. The reactivity of the resulting bis(thiolactone) toward hexyl amine is examined. Next, the bis(thiolactone) is reacted as A,A-type monomer with different B,B-type comonomers (1,12-diaminododecane and 1,3-bis(aminopropyl)tetramethyldisiloxane). Ring opening of the thiolactones by the diamines leads to polyamides with pendant thiol groups. Using two diamines in different ratios, the properties of the resulting polyamides are tuned (thermal properties are determined) and different molecular weights are acquired. Subsequently, the thiol groups are reacted with methyl acrylate via Michael addition to functionalize the polyamides. Functionalization of thiol-functional polyamides using poly(ethylene glycol) monomethyl ether (mPEG) acrylates (Mn = 480 and 1700 g mol(-1) ) results in water-soluble amphiphilic poly-amides with molecular weights higher than 10,000 g mol(-1) . PMID:25257791

  2. Organized thiol functional groups in mesoporous core shell colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Marchena, Martin H.; Granada, Mara; Bordoni, Andrea V.; Joselevich, Maria; Troiani, Horacio; Williams, Federico J.; Wolosiuk, Alejandro

    2012-03-15

    The co-condensation in situ of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) and mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTMS) using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as a template results in the synthesis of multilayered mesoporous structured SiO{sub 2} colloids with 'onion-like' chemical environments. Thiol groups were anchored to an inner selected SiO{sub 2} porous layer in a bilayered core shell particle producing different chemical regions inside the colloidal layered structure. X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) shows a preferential anchoring of the -SH groups in the double layer shell system, while porosimetry and simple chemical modifications confirm that pores are accessible. We can envision the synthesis of interesting colloidal objects with defined chemical environments with highly controlled properties. - Graphical abstract: Mesoporous core shell SiO{sub 2} colloids with organized thiol groups. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Double shell mesoporous silica colloids templated with CTAB. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sequential deposition of mesoporous SiO{sub 2} layers with different chemistries. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer XPS shows the selective functionalization of mesoporous layers with thiol groups.

  3. Analytical detection of biological thiols in a microchip capillary channel.

    PubMed

    Chand, Rohit; Jha, Sandeep Kumar; Islam, Kamrul; Han, Dawoon; Shin, Ik-Soo; Kim, Yong-Sang

    2013-02-15

    Sulfur-containing amino acids, such as cysteine and homocysteine play crucial roles in biological systems for the diagnosis of medical states. In this regard, this paper deals with separation, aliquot and detection of amino thiols on a microchip capillary electrophoresis with electrochemical detection in an inverted double Y-shaped microchannel. Unlike the conventional capillary electrophoresis, the modified microchannel design helps in storing the separated thiols in different reservoirs for further analysis, if required; and also eliminates the need of electrodes regeneration. The device was fabricated using conventional photolithographic technique which consisted of gold microelectrodes on a soda lime glass wafer and microchannels in PDMS mold. Multiple detections were performed using in-house fabricated dual potentiostat. Based on amperometric detection, cysteine and homocysteine were analyzed in 105 s and 120 s, respectively after diverting in branched channels. Repeated experiments proved the good reproducibility of the device. The device produced a linear response for both cysteine and homocysteine in electrochemical analysis. To prove the practicality of device, we also analyzed cysteine and homocysteine in real blood samples without any pre-treatment. Upon calculation, the device showed a very low limit of detection of 0.05 μM. The modified microchip design shall find a broad range of analytical applications involving assays of thiols and other biological compounds. PMID:22940195

  4. Hierarchically Flower-like N-Doped Porous Carbon Materials Derived from an Explosive 3-Fold Interpenetrating Diamondoid Copper Metal-Organic Framework for a Supercapacitor.

    PubMed

    Li, Zuo-Xi; Zou, Kang-Yu; Zhang, Xue; Han, Tong; Yang, Ying

    2016-07-01

    A peculiar copper metal-organic framework (Cu-MOF) was synthesized by a self-assembly method, which presents a 3-fold interpenetrating diamondoid net based on the square-planar Cu(II) node. Although it exhibits a high degree of interpenetration, the Cu-MOF still exhibits a one-dimensional channel, which provides a template for constructing porous materials through the "precursor" strategy. Furthermore, the explosive ClO4(-) ion, which resided in the channel, could induce the quick decomposition of organic ingredients and release a huge amount of gas, which is beneficial for the porosity of postsynthetic materials. Significantly, we first utilize this explosive MOF to prepare a series of Cu@C composites through the calcination-thermolysis method at different temperatures, which contain copper particles exhibiting various shapes and combinations with the carbon substrate. Considering the hole-forming effect of copper particles, Cu@C composites were etched by HCl to afford a sequence of hierarchically flower-like N-doped porous carbon materials (NPCs), which retain the original morphology of the Cu-MOF. Interestingly, NPC-900, originating from the calcination of the Cu-MOF at 900 °C, exhibits a more regular flower-like morphology, the largest specific surface area, abundant porosities, and multiple nitrogen functionalities. The remarkable specific capacitances are 138 F g(-1) at 5 mV s(-1) and 149 F g(-1) at 0.5 A g(-1) for the NPC-900 electrode in a 6 M potassium hydroxide aqueous solution. Moreover, the retention of capacitance remains 86.8% (125 F g(-1)) at 1 A g(-1) over 2000 cycles, which displays good chemical stability. These findings suggest that NPC-900 can be applied as a suitable electrode for a supercapacitor. PMID:27304095

  5. Oxidation of cell surface thiol groups by contact sensitizers triggers the maturation of dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Kagatani, Saori; Sasaki, Yoshinori; Hirota, Morihiko; Mizuashi, Masato; Suzuki, Mie; Ohtani, Tomoyuki; Itagaki, Hiroshi; Aiba, Setsuya

    2010-01-01

    p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) has a crucial role in the maturation of dendritic cells (DCs) by sensitizers. Recently, it has been reported that the oxidation of cell surface thiols by an exogenous impermeant thiol oxidizer can phosphorylate p38 MAPK. In this study, we examined whether sensitizers oxidize cell surface thiols of monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs). When cell surface thiols were quantified by flow cytometry using Alexa fluor maleimide, all the sensitizers that we examined decreased cell surface thiols on MoDCs. To examine the effects of decreased cell surface thiols by sensitizers on DC maturation, we analyzed the effects of an impermeant thiol oxidizer, o-phenanthroline copper complex (CuPhen). The treatment of MoDCs with CuPhen decreased cell surface thiols, phosphorylated p38 MAPK, and induced MoDC maturation, that is, the augmentation of CD83, CD86, HLA-DR, and IL-8 mRNA, as well as the downregulation of aquaporin-3 mRNA. The augmentation of CD86 was significantly suppressed when MoDCs were pretreated with N-acetyl-L-cystein or treated with SB203580. Finally, we showed that epicutaneous application of 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene on mouse skin significantly decreased cell surface thiols of Langerhans cells in vivo. These data suggest that the oxidation of cell surface thiols has some role in triggering DC maturation by sensitizers. PMID:19641517

  6. Thermal and Mechanical Properties of Sequential and Simultaneous Thiol-Ene-Isocyanate Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNair, Olivia; Brent, Davis; Savin, Daniel

    2011-03-01

    Ternary networks containing having stoichiometrically balanced thiol /(ene+isocyanate) ranging from 0 to 20 mol% isocyanate were synthesized via sequential or simultaneous thiol/ene and thiol/isocyanate click reactions. The effects of cross-link density were studied using three thiols, GDMP (difunctional), 3T (trifunctional) and 4T (tetrafunctional) respectively. TEA catalyzes the isocyanate-thiol coupling and chain extension, while the photoinitiator DMPA initiates a radical thiol-ene crosslinking process. Real-time FTIR was used to study kinetics of both light and dark reactions utilizing thiol, ene and isocyanate peaks which appear independently. It was found that difunctional thiols and isocyanates reacted initially, forming chain extended prepolymers end-capped with thiol functionalities. Upon UV irradiation, thiol functionalized prepolymers reacted with TTT, a trifunctional ene, forming networks containing incorporated thiourethane linkages. Initial DSC results indicated higher Tgs for higher cross-linked networks; however, isocyanate content has significant effects on each system. Films were also be thermally characterized via DMA and mechanical properties measured using MTS.

  7. Fast and Selective Modification of Thiol Proteins/Peptides by N-(Phenylseleno)phthalimide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhengfang; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Hao; Harrington, Peter B.; Chen, Hao

    2012-03-01

    We previously reported that selenamide reagents such as ebselen and N-(phenylseleno)phthalimide (NPSP) can be used to selectively derivatize thiols for mass spectrometric analysis, and the introduced selenium tags are useful as they could survive or removed with collision-induced dissociation (CID). Described herein is the further study of the reactivity of various protein/peptide thiols toward NPSP and its application to derivatize thiol peptides in protein digests. With a modified protocol (i.e., dissolving NPSP in acetonitrile instead of aqueous solvent), we found that quantitative conversion of thiols can be obtained in seconds, using NPSP in a slight excess amount (NPSP:thiol of 1.1-2:1). Further investigation shows that the thiol reactivity toward NPSP reflects its chemical environment and accessibility in proteins/peptides. For instance, adjacent basic amino acid residues increase the thiol reactivity, probably because they could stabilize the thiolate form to facilitate the nucleophilic attack of thiol on NPSP. In the case of creatine phosphokinase, the native protein predominately has one thiol reacted with NPSP while all of four thiol groups of the denatured protein can be derivatized, in accordance with the corresponding protein conformation. In addition, thiol peptides in protein/peptide enzymatic digests can be quickly and effectively tagged by NPSP following tri- n-butylphosphine (TBP) reduction. Notably, all three thiols of the peptide QCCASVCSL in the insulin peptic digest can be modified simultaneously by NPSP. These results suggest a novel and selective method for protecting thiols in the bottom-up approach for protein structure analysis.

  8. Turbine nozzle attachment system

    DOEpatents

    Norton, Paul F.; Shaffer, James E.

    1995-01-01

    A nozzle guide vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The nozzle guide vane assembly includes a pair of legs extending radially outwardly from an outer shroud and a pair of mounting legs extending radially inwardly from an inner shroud. Each of the pair of legs and mounting legs have a pair of holes therein. A plurality of members attached to the gas turbine engine have a plurality of bores therein which axially align with corresponding ones of the pair of holes in the legs. A plurality of pins are positioned within the corresponding holes and bores radially positioning the nozzle guide vane assembly about a central axis of the gas turbine engine.

  9. Turbine nozzle attachment system

    DOEpatents

    Norton, P.F.; Shaffer, J.E.

    1995-10-24

    A nozzle guide vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and is attached to conventional metallic components. The nozzle guide vane assembly includes a pair of legs extending radially outwardly from an outer shroud and a pair of mounting legs extending radially inwardly from an inner shroud. Each of the pair of legs and mounting legs have a pair of holes therein. A plurality of members attached to the gas turbine engine have a plurality of bores therein which axially align with corresponding ones of the pair of holes in the legs. A plurality of pins are positioned within the corresponding holes and bores radially positioning the nozzle guide vane assembly about a central axis of the gas turbine engine. 3 figs.

  10. WP-2 attached payload accommodations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheib, Jim

    1992-01-01

    The presentation provides an overview of the current SSFP attached payload accommodations on the U.S. truss. The overview includes discussions on the four attach sites, the power architecture, thermal control, DMS provisions, and the mechanical attach mechanism. The presentation concludes with a description of a McDonnell Douglas concept for an attached payload pallet designed to take advantage of the four sites and existing SSF hardware. This presentation should provide the payload community with a basic understanding of the SSF attached payload utility ports and aid in attached payload concept development.

  11. Leadership and attachment theory.

    PubMed

    Bresnahan, Christopher G; Mitroff, Ian I

    2007-09-01

    Comments on the six articles contained in the special issue of the American Psychologist (January 2007) devoted to leadership, written by W. Bennis; S. J. Zaccaro; V. H. Vroom and A. G. Yago; B. J. Avolio; R. J. Sternberg; and R. J. Hackman and R. Wageman. The current authors opine that the inclusion of attachment theory in the study of leadership could strengthen leadership theories as a whole. PMID:17874909

  12. Adsorption of Dissolved Metals in the Berkeley Pit using Thiol-Functionalized Self-Assembled Monolayers on Mesoporous Supports (Thiol-SAMMS)

    SciTech Connect

    Betancourt, Amaury P.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2010-03-07

    The Berkeley Pit in Butte, Montana, is heavily contaminated with dissolved metals. Adsorption and extraction of these metals can be accomplished through the use of a selective adsorbent. For this research, the adsorbent used was thiol-functionalized Self-Assembled Monolayers on Mesoporous Supports (thiol-SAMMS), which was developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Thiol-SAMMS selectively binds to numerous types of dissolved metals. The objective of this research was to evaluate the loading and kinetics of aluminum, beryllium, copper, and zinc on thiol-SAMMS. For the loading tests, a series of Berkeley Pit water to thiol-SAMMS ratios (mL:g) were tested. These ratios were 1000:1, 500:1, 100:1, and 50:1. Berkeley Pit water is acidic (pH {approx} 2.5). This can affect the performance of SAMMS materials. Therefore, the effect of pH was evaluated by conducting parallel series of loading tests wherein the Berkeley Pit water was neutralized before or after addition of thiol-SAMMS, and a series of kinetics tests wherein the Berkeley Pit water was neutralized before addition of thiol-SAMMS for the first test and was not neutralized for the second test. For the kinetics tests, one Berkeley Pit water to thiol-SAMMS ratio was tested, which was 2000:1. The results of the loading and kinetics tests suggest that a significant decrease in dissolved metal concentration at Berkeley Pit could be realized through neutralization of Berkeley Pit water. Thiol-SAMMS technology has a limited application under the highly acidic conditions posed by the Berkeley Pit. However, thiol-SAMMS could provide a secondary remedial technique which would complete the remedial system and remove dissolved metals from the Berkeley Pit to below drinking water standards.

  13. Inhibition of the Vacuolar-like ATPase from Halobacterium saccharovorum by Thiol Reagents: Evidence for Different Functional Thiols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, L. I.; Stanlotter, H.; Emrich, E.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    N-Ethylmaleimide (NEM) inhibited the vacuolar-like ATPase from Halobacterium saccharovorum (K(sub i) approximately 1 mM) by modifying one or more of the thiols located on the largest of the subunit. ATP protected against inhibition and coincidentally prevented NEM binding which suggested that NEM acts at or near the catalytic site. p-Chloromercuriphenylsulfonate (PCMS) also inhibited this ATPase (K(sub i) approximately 90 microM). ATP did not protect against PCMS inhibition. Dithiothreitol (DTT) partially reversed PCMS inhibition and restored approximately half of the initial activity of 90% inhibited enzyme. DTT did not restore activity of the NEM-inhibited enzyme or the PCMS-inhibited enzyme when it was subsequently incubated with NEM. The failure of ATP to protect against PCMS inhibition and the inability of DTT to restore activity of enzyme incubated in the presence of PCMS and NEM suggests these reagents react with different thiols and that the PCMS-sensitive thiol may have a structural role.

  14. Controlling surface functionality through generation of thiol groups in a self-assembled monolayer.

    SciTech Connect

    Lud, S. Q.; Neppl, S.; Richter, G.; Bruno, P.; Gruen, D. M.; Jordan, R.; Feulner, P.; Stutzmann, M.; Garrido, J. A.; Materials Science Division; Technische Univ. Munchen

    2010-01-01

    A lithographic method to generate reactive thiol groups on functionalized synthetic diamond for biosensor and molecular electronic applications is developed. We demonstrate that ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) thin films covalently functionalized with surface-generated thiol groups allow controlled thiol-disulfide exchange surface hybridization processes. The generation of the thiol functional head groups was obtained by irradiating phenylsulfonic acid (PSA) monolayers on UNCD surfaces. The conversion of the functional headgroup of the self-assembled monolayer was verified by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS), and fluorescence microscopy. Our findings indicate the selective generation of reactive thiol surface groups. Furthermore, we demonstrate the grafting of yeast cytochrome c to the thiol-modified diamond surface and the electron transfer between protein and electrode.

  15. Attachment as an Organizational Construct

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sroufe, L. Alan; Waters, Everett

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the conflict between situational influences and stable individual differences in attachment behavior and attempts to resolve this conflict by examining the functions, outcomes, and context sensitivity of attachment behavior and the underlying behavioral control systems that organize it. (JMB)

  16. Site-dependent atomic and molecular affinities of hydrocarbons, amines and thiols on diamond nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Lin; Barnard, Amanda S.

    2016-04-01

    Like many of the useful nanomaterials being produced on the industrial scale, the surface of diamond nanoparticles includes a complicated mixture of various atomic and molecular adsorbates, attaching to the facets following synthesis. Some of these adsorbates may be functional, and adsorption is encouraged to promote applications in biotechnology and nanomedicine, but others are purely adventurous and must be removed prior to use. In order to devise more effective treatments it is advantageous to know the relative strength of the interactions of the adsorbates with the surface, and ideally how abundant they are likely to be under different conditions. In this paper we use a series of explicit electronic structure simulations to map the distribution of small hydrocarbons, amines and thiols on a 2.9 nm diamond nanoparticle, with atomic level resolution, in 3-D. We find a clear relationship between surface reconstructions, facet orientation, and the distribution of the different adsorbates; with a greater concentration expected on the (100) and (110) facets, particularly when the supersaturation in the reservoir is high. Adsorption on the (111) facets is highly unlikely, suggesting that controlled graphitization may be a useful stage in the cleaning and treatment of nanodiamonds, prior to the deliberate coating with functional adsorbates needed for drug delivery applications.

  17. Site-dependent atomic and molecular affinities of hydrocarbons, amines and thiols on diamond nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lai, Lin; Barnard, Amanda S

    2016-04-14

    Like many of the useful nanomaterials being produced on the industrial scale, the surface of diamond nanoparticles includes a complicated mixture of various atomic and molecular adsorbates, attaching to the facets following synthesis. Some of these adsorbates may be functional, and adsorption is encouraged to promote applications in biotechnology and nanomedicine, but others are purely adventurous and must be removed prior to use. In order to devise more effective treatments it is advantageous to know the relative strength of the interactions of the adsorbates with the surface, and ideally how abundant they are likely to be under different conditions. In this paper we use a series of explicit electronic structure simulations to map the distribution of small hydrocarbons, amines and thiols on a 2.9 nm diamond nanoparticle, with atomic level resolution, in 3-D. We find a clear relationship between surface reconstructions, facet orientation, and the distribution of the different adsorbates; with a greater concentration expected on the (100) and (110) facets, particularly when the supersaturation in the reservoir is high. Adsorption on the (111) facets is highly unlikely, suggesting that controlled graphitization may be a useful stage in the cleaning and treatment of nanodiamonds, prior to the deliberate coating with functional adsorbates needed for drug delivery applications. PMID:26659270

  18. Attachment Behaviors in Autistic Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigman, Marian; Ungerer, Judy A.

    1984-01-01

    Observation of 14 autistic and 14 nonautistic children of equivalent mental age revealed that autistic Ss showed evidence of attachment to their mothers. Among autistic Ss, those showing increased attachment behaviors in response to separation and reunion demonstrated more advanced symbolic play skills than those showing no attachment change.…

  19. Magnetic attachment mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harwell, William D. (Inventor); Wu, Mitchell B. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A magnetic attachment mechanism adapted for interfacing with the manipulator arm (11) of a remote manipulator system and comprising a pair of permanent magnets (31,32) of rare earth material which are arranged in a stator-rotor relationship. The rotor magnet (32), is journalled for rotation about its longitudinal axis between pole plates (35,36) of the stator magnet (31), each of which includes an adhering surface (35a,36a). In a first rotary position corresponding to the ON condition, each of the poles of the rotor magnet (32) is closely adjacent a stator magnet pole plate of like polarity whereby the respective magnet fields are additive for producing a strong magnetic field emanating from the adhering surfaces (35a,36a) for attracting a ferrous magnetic plate 20, or the like, affixed to the payload (20 or 50). When the rotor magnet (32) is rotated to a second position corresponding to the OFF condition, each of the poles of the rotor magnet (31) is disposed closely adjacent a pole plate of unlike polarity whereby the magnetic fields of the magnets are in cancelling relationship at the adhering surfaces (35a,36a) which permits the release of a payload. An actuator (51 or 70) for selectively rotating the rotor magnet (32) between the ON and OFF positions is provided for interfacing and connecting the magnetic attachment mechanism with a manipulator arm. For effecting an optimal rigidized attachment the payload is provided with guides (91,92) cooperable with guides (96,16,17) on the housing of the mechanism for directing adhering surfaces (35a,36a) of the polar plates to the ferrous plate (20).

  20. A Two-Photon Fluorescent Probe for Lysosomal Thiols in Live Cells and Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jiangli; Han, Zhichao; Kang, Yao; Peng, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Lysosome-specific fluorescent probes are exclusive to elucidate the functions of lysosomal thiols. Moreover, two-photon microscopy offers advantages of less phototoxicity, better three dimensional spatial localization, deeper penetration depth and lower self-absorption. However, such fluorescent probes for thiols are still rare. In this work, an efficient two-photon fluorophore 1,8-naphthalimide-based probe conjugating a 2,4-dinitrobenzenesulfonyl chloride and morpholine was designed and synthesized, which exhibited high selectivity and sensitivity towards lysosomal thiols by turn-on fluorescence method quantitatively and was successfully applied to the imaging of thiols in live cells and tissues by two-photon microscopy. PMID:26794434

  1. A Two-Photon Fluorescent Probe for Lysosomal Thiols in Live Cells and Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jiangli; Han, Zhichao; Kang, Yao; Peng, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Lysosome-specific fluorescent probes are exclusive to elucidate the functions of lysosomal thiols. Moreover, two-photon microscopy offers advantages of less phototoxicity, better three dimensional spatial localization, deeper penetration depth and lower self-absorption. However, such fluorescent probes for thiols are still rare. In this work, an efficient two-photon fluorophore 1,8-naphthalimide-based probe conjugating a 2,4-dinitrobenzenesulfonyl chloride and morpholine was designed and synthesized, which exhibited high selectivity and sensitivity towards lysosomal thiols by turn-on fluorescence method quantitatively and was successfully applied to the imaging of thiols in live cells and tissues by two-photon microscopy.

  2. Distributions of dissolved and particulate biogenic thiols in the subartic Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupont, Christopher L.; Moffett, James. W.; Bidigare, Robert R.; Ahner, Beth A.

    2006-12-01

    Dissolved and particulate concentrations of the biogenic thiols cysteine (Cys), arginine-cysteine (Arg-Cys), glutamine-cysteine (Gln-Cys), γ-glutamate-cysteine ( γ-Glu-Cys) and glutathione (GSH) were measured in the subartic Pacific Ocean in the summer of 2003 using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with precolumn derivatization as reported in previous work. In this study, a preconcentration protocol for the derivatized thiols was utilized to extend detection limits of dissolved thiols to picomolar levels. The measured concentrations of particulate and dissolved thiols were uncoupled, with distinctive depth profiles and large differences in the particulate to dissolved ratios between individual compounds. Glutathione was the most abundant particulate thiol whereas the most abundant dissolved thiol was γ-Glu-Cys, with concentrations as high as 15 nM. Given the relatively small pool of intracellular γ-Glu-Cys and the very low dissolved concentrations of GSH, we hypothesize that glutathione released from cells is rapidly converted to the potentially degradation resistant γ-Glu-Cys outside the cell. The relatively high concentrations of other dissolved thiols compared to particulate concentrations implies both biological exudation and slow degradation rates. Some thiols appear to vary with changes in nutrient availability but this effect is difficult to decouple from changes in community structure inferred from pigment analyses. Dissolved thiol concentrations also exceed typical metal concentrations in the subartic Pacific, supporting previous arguments that they may be important in metal speciation.

  3. The thiol pool in human plasma: The central contribution of albumin to redox processes

    PubMed Central

    Turell, Lucía; Radi, Rafael; Alvarez, Beatriz

    2013-01-01

    The plasma compartment has particular features regarding the nature and concentration of low and high molecular weight thiols and oxidized derivatives. Plasma is relatively poor in thiol-based antioxidants; thiols are in lower concentrations than in cells and mostly oxidized. The different thiol-disulfide pairs are not in equilibrium and the steady-state concentrations of total thiols as well as reduced versus oxidized ratios are maintained by kinetic barriers, including the rates of reactions and transport processes. The single thiol of human serum albumin (HSA-SH) is the most abundant plasma thiol. It is an important target for oxidants and electrophiles due to its reactivity with a wide variety of species and its relatively high concentration. A relatively stable sulfenic (HSA-SO3H) acid can be formed in albumin exposed to oxidants. Plasma increases in mixed disulfides (HSA-SSR) or in sulfinic (HSA-SO2H) and sulfonic (HSA-SO3H) acids are associated with different pathologies and may constitute biomarkers of the antioxidant role of the albumin thiol. In this work we provide a critical review of the plasma thiol pool with a focus on human serum albumin. PMID:23747983

  4. Flared tube attachment fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkire, I. D.; King, J. P., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Tubes can be flared first, then attached to valves and other flow line components, with new fitting that can be disassembled and reused. Installed fitting can be disassembled so parts can be inspected. It can be salvaged and reused without damaging flared tube; tube can be coated, tempered, or otherwise treated after it has been flared, rather than before, as was previously required. Fitting consists of threaded male portion with conical seating surface, hexagonal nut with hole larger than other diameter of flared end of tube, and split ferrule.

  5. Stability of mixed PEO-thiol SAMs for biosensing applications.

    PubMed

    Jans, Karolien; Bonroy, Kristien; De Palma, Randy; Reekmans, Gunter; Jans, Hilde; Laureyn, Wim; Smet, Mario; Borghs, Gustaaf; Maes, Guido

    2008-04-15

    The secret of a successful affinity biosensor partially hides in the chemical interface layer between the transducer system and the biological receptor molecules. Over the past decade, several methodologies for the construction of such interface layers have been developed on the basis of the deposition of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of alkanethiols on gold. Moreover, mixed SAMs of polyethylene oxide (PEO) containing thiols have been applied for the immobilization of biological receptors. Despite the intense research in the field of thiol SAMs, relatively little is known about their biosensing properties in correlation with their long-term stability. Especially the impact of the storage conditions on their biosensing characteristics has not been reported before to our knowledge. To address these issues, we prepared mixed PEO SAMs and tested their stability and biosensing performance in several storage conditions, i.e., air, N2, ethanol, phosphate buffer, and H2O. The quality of the SAMs was monitored as a function of time using various characterization techniques such as cyclic voltammetry, contact angle, grazing angle Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In addition, the impact of the different storage conditions on the biosensor properties was investigated using surface plasmon resonance. Via the latter technique, the receptor immobilization, the analyte recognition, and the nonspecific binding were extensively studied using the prostate specific antigen as a model system. Our experiments showed that very small structural differences in the SAM can have a great impact in their final biosensing properties. In addition it was shown that the mixed SAMs stored in air or N2 are very stable and retain their biosensor properties for at least 30 days, while ethanol appeared to be the worst storage medium due to partial oxidation of the thiol headgroup. In conclusion, care must be taken to avoid SAM degradation during storage

  6. Ceramic blade attachment system

    DOEpatents

    Frey, G.A.; Jimenez, O.D.

    1996-12-03

    A turbine blade having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is attached to a turbine flange having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade. The turbine flange includes a first upstanding flange and a second upstanding flange having a groove formed between them. The turbine flange further includes a recess. Each of the first and second upstanding flanges have a plurality of bores therein. A turbine blade has a first member and a second member positioned in one of the groove and the recess. Each of the first member and the second member have a plurality of bores therein. A pin is positioned in respective ones of the plurality of bores in the first and second upstanding members and the first and second members and attach the blade to the turbine flange. The pin has a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being substantially equal to the rate of thermal expansion of the blade. 4 figs.

  7. Ceramic blade attachment system

    DOEpatents

    Frey, deceased, Gary A.; Jimenez, Oscar D.

    1996-01-01

    A turbine blade having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is attached to a turbine flange having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade. The turbine flange includes a first upstanding flange and a second upstanding flange having a groove formed therebetween. The turbine flange further includes a recess. Each of the first and second upstanding flanges have a plurality of bores therein. A turbine blade has a first member and a second member positioned in one of the groove and the recess. Each of the first member and the second member have a plurality of bores therein. And, a pin is positioned in respective ones of the plurality of bores in the first and second upstanding members and the first and second members and attach the blade to the turbine flange. The pin has a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being substantially equal to the rate of thermal expansion of the blade.

  8. Electrochemical study of thiols and disulfides using modified electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Linders, C.R.; Patriarche, G.J.; Kauffman, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    The electrochemical oxidative behavior of cysteine and several disulfides, such as cysteine, lipoic acid and disulfiram, have been investigated using a carbon paste (EPC) and a modified carbon paste (EPCM) electrode. The study has permitted the differentiation of the oxidative behavior of the thiol and of the disulfides. Modification of the carbon paste, by incorporating cobalt(II) phthalocyanine, offers interesting properties due to the electrocatalytic capability of the electrode. Using these types of electrodes the different molecules have been quantitatively determined at concentrations as low as 2.10/sup -7/ M. 14 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  9. "Oxygen Sensing" by Na,K-ATPase: These Miraculous Thiols.

    PubMed

    Bogdanova, Anna; Petrushanko, Irina Y; Hernansanz-Agustín, Pablo; Martínez-Ruiz, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Control over the Na,K-ATPase function plays a central role in adaptation of the organisms to hypoxic and anoxic conditions. As the enzyme itself does not possess O2 binding sites its "oxygen-sensitivity" is mediated by a variety of redox-sensitive modifications including S-glutathionylation, S-nitrosylation, and redox-sensitive phosphorylation. This is an overview of the current knowledge on the plethora of molecular mechanisms tuning the activity of the ATP-consuming Na,K-ATPase to the cellular metabolic activity. Recent findings suggest that oxygen-derived free radicals and H2O2, NO, and oxidized glutathione are the signaling messengers that make the Na,K-ATPase "oxygen-sensitive." This very ancient signaling pathway targeting thiols of all three subunits of the Na,K-ATPase as well as redox-sensitive kinases sustains the enzyme activity at the "optimal" level avoiding terminal ATP depletion and maintaining the transmembrane ion gradients in cells of anoxia-tolerant species. We acknowledge the complexity of the underlying processes as we characterize the sources of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species production in hypoxic cells, and identify their targets, the reactive thiol groups which, upon modification, impact the enzyme activity. Structured accordingly, this review presents a summary on (i) the sources of free radical production in hypoxic cells, (ii) localization of regulatory thiols within the Na,K-ATPase and the role reversible thiol modifications play in responses of the enzyme to a variety of stimuli (hypoxia, receptors' activation) (iii) redox-sensitive regulatory phosphorylation, and (iv) the role of fine modulation of the Na,K-ATPase function in survival success under hypoxic conditions. The co-authors attempted to cover all the contradictions and standing hypotheses in the field and propose the possible future developments in this dynamic area of research, the importance of which is hard to overestimate. Better understanding of the processes

  10. Fractionation and purification of the thiol proteinases from papaya latex.

    PubMed

    Dekeyser, P M; De Smedt, S; Demeester, J; Lauwers, A

    1994-06-01

    Three cysteine proteinases, i.e. chymopapain, papaya proteinase IV and proteinase III, were purified to homogeneity from papaya latex using a combination of ion-exchange chromatography and hydrophobic interaction chromatography. During the purification procedure, the thiol-groups of the active center were reversibly blocked as mixed disulfides with 2-thiopyridone. Homogeneity was proved electrophoretically by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-PAGE and rechromatography on a Mono S 5/5 column at pH 5.0. PMID:7952030

  11. Communication: vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption of interstellar icy thiols.

    PubMed

    Bhuin, Radha Gobinda; Sivaraman, Bhalamurugan; Lo, Jen-Iu; Sekhar, B N Raja; Cheng, Bing-Ming; Pradeep, Thalappil; Mason, Nigel John

    2014-12-21

    Following the recent identification of ethanethiol in the interstellar medium (ISM) we have carried out Vacuum UltraViolet (VUV) spectroscopy studies of ethanethiol (CH3CH2SH) from 10 K until sublimation in an ultrahigh vacuum chamber simulating astrochemical conditions. These results are compared with those of methanethiol (CH3SH), the lower order thiol also reported to be present in the ISM. VUV spectra recorded at higher temperature reveal conformational changes in the ice and phase transitions whilst evidence for dimer production is also presented. PMID:25527912

  12. Communication: Vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption of interstellar icy thiols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuin, Radha Gobinda; Sivaraman, Bhalamurugan; Lo, Jen-Iu; Sekhar, B. N. Raja; Cheng, Bing-Ming; Pradeep, Thalappil; Mason, Nigel John

    2014-12-01

    Following the recent identification of ethanethiol in the interstellar medium (ISM) we have carried out Vacuum UltraViolet (VUV) spectroscopy studies of ethanethiol (CH3CH2SH) from 10 K until sublimation in an ultrahigh vacuum chamber simulating astrochemical conditions. These results are compared with those of methanethiol (CH3SH), the lower order thiol also reported to be present in the ISM. VUV spectra recorded at higher temperature reveal conformational changes in the ice and phase transitions whilst evidence for dimer production is also presented.

  13. Study of Highly Selective and Efficient Thiol Derivatization using Selenium Reagents by Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Kehua; Zhang, Yun W.; Tang, Bo; Laskin, Julia; Roach, Patrick J.; Chen, Hao

    2010-08-15

    Biological thiols are critical physiological components and their detection often involves derivatization. This paper reports a systemic mass spectrometry (MS) investigation of the cleavage of Se-N bond by thiol to form a new Se-S bond, the new selenium chemistry for thiol labeling. Our data shows that the reaction is highly selective, rapid, reversible and efficient. For instance, among twenty amino acids, only cysteine was found to be reactive with Se-N containing reagents and the reaction takes place in seconds. By adding dithiothreitol (DTT), the newly formed Se-S bond of peptides/proteins can be reduced back to free thiol. The high selectivity and excellent reversibility of the reaction provide potential of using this chemistry for selective identification of thiol compounds or enriching and purifying thiol peptides/proteins. In addition, the derivatized thiol peptides have interesting dissociation behavior, which is tunable using different selenium reagents. For example, by introducing an adjacent nucleophilic group into the selenium reagent in the case of using ebselen, the reaction product of ebselen with glutathione (GSH) is easy to lose the selenium tag upon collision-induced dissociation (CID), which is useful to "fish out" those peptides containing free cysteine residues by precursor ion scan. By contrast, the selenium tag of N-(phenylseleno) phthalimide reagent can be stable and survive in CID process, which would be of value in pinpointing thiol location using a top-down proteomic approach. Also, the high conversion yield of the reaction allows the counting of total number of thiol in proteins. We believe that ebselen or N-(phenylseleno) phthalimide as tagging thiol-protein reagents will have important applications in both qualitative and quantitative analysis of different thiol-proteins derived from living cells by MS method.

  14. Ceramic blade attachment system

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, James E.

    1995-01-01

    A turbine blade having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is attached to a turbine wheel having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade. The turbine blade has a root portion having a first groove and a second groove therein. The turbine wheel includes a plurality of openings in which the turbine blade is positioned. Each of the openings has a first groove and a second groove therein. The space or void formed between the first grooves and the second grooves has a plurality of spherical balls positioned therein. The plurality of spherical balls has a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being equal to the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade.

  15. Ceramic blade attachment system

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, James E.

    1995-01-01

    A turbine blade having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is attached to a turbine disc having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade and forms a turbine assembly. The turbine blade has a root portion defining a pair of sides having a pair of grooves therein. The turbine assembly includes a pair of flanges between which the turbine blades are positioned. Each of the pair of flanges has a plurality of grooves defined therein. The grooves within the pair of flanges are aligned with the grooves in the blades and have a space formed therebetween. A plurality of spherical balls are positioned within the space. The plurality of spherical balls has a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being equal to the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade.

  16. Ceramic blade attachment system

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, J.E.

    1995-07-11

    A turbine blade having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is attached to a turbine disc having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade and forms a turbine assembly. The turbine blade has a root portion defining a pair of sides having a pair of grooves therein. The turbine assembly includes a pair of flanges between which the turbine blades are positioned. Each of the pair of flanges has a plurality of grooves defined therein. The grooves within the pair of flanges are aligned with the grooves in the blades and have a space formed therebetween. A plurality of spherical balls are positioned within the space. The plurality of spherical balls has a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being equal to the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade. 4 figs.

  17. Ceramic blade attachment system

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, J.E.

    1995-01-10

    A turbine blade having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is attached to a turbine wheel having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade. The turbine blade has a root portion having a first groove and a second groove therein. The turbine wheel includes a plurality of openings in which the turbine blade is positioned. Each of the openings has a first groove and a second groove therein. The space or void formed between the first grooves and the second grooves has a plurality of spherical balls positioned therein. The plurality of spherical balls has a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being equal to the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade. 4 figures.

  18. Photopolymerizable thiol-ene nanocomposite materials for holographic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, Yasuo; Hata, Eiji; Yasui, Satoru; Mitsube, Ken

    2011-06-01

    We describe an experimental investigation of the photopolymerization kinetics and volume holographic recording characteristics of silica nanoparticle-polymer nanocomposites using thiol-ene monomers capable of step-growth polymerization. We characterize the visible light curing kinetics of a thiol-ene monomer system consisting of secondary dithiol with high self-life stability and low odor and triene with rigid structure and high electron density by using real-time Fourier transform spectroscopy and photocalorimetry. In plane-wave volume holographic recording at a wavelength of 532 nm it is shown that while volume holograms recorded in the nanocomposites exhibit high transparency, their saturated refractive index modulation (Δnsat) and material sensitivity (S) are as large as 1x10-2 and 1615 cm/J, respectively. The polymerization shrinkage is reduced as low as 0.4% as a result of the late gelation in conversion. These values meet the acceptable values for holographic data storage media (i.e., 5x10-3, 500 cm/J and 0.5% for Δnsat, S and shrinkage, respectively). The improved thermal stability of volume holograms recorded in the nanocomposites is also confirmed experimentally.

  19. Electrodeposition of gold templated by patterned thiol monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    She, Zhe; Di Falco, Andrea; Hähner, Georg; Buck, Manfred

    2016-06-01

    The electrochemical deposition of Au onto Au substrates modified by self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) was studied by linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Patterned SAMs exhibiting electrochemical contrast were prepared by two different methods. One used microcontact printing (μCP) to generate a binary SAM of ω-(4‧-methyl-biphenyl-4-yl)-propane thiol (CH3-C6H4-C6H4-(CH2)3-SH, MBP3) and octadecane thiol (CH3(CH2)17SH, ODT). Templated by the SAM, a gold microelectrode structure was electrodeposited featuring a line 15 μm wide and 3 mm long. After transfer to an epoxy substrate the structure proved to be electrically conductive across the full length. The other patterning method applied electron beam lithography (EBL) where electrochemical contrast was achieved by crosslinking molecules in a single component SAM of MBP3. An electron dose above 250 mC/cm2 results in a high deposition contrast. The choice of parameters for the deposition/lift-off process is found to be more critical for Au compared to Cu studied previously. The origin of the differences and implications for nanoscale patterning are discussed.

  20. Theoretical estimation of the aqueous pKas of thiols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, Nora E.; Seybold, Paul G.

    2014-02-01

    The ionisation state of a compound is a key parameter influencing the compound's activity as a drug, metabolite, pollutant, or other active chemical agent. Sulfhydrol compounds (thiols) tend to be considerably more acidic than their hydroxyl (alcohol) analogues. In this report, quantum chemical approaches previously used for the estimation of the aqueous pKas of alcohols are applied to the estimation of the acidities of thiols. Acidity estimates obtained from the general-purpose SPARC calculational programme (S.H. Hilal, S.W. Karickhoff, and L.A. Carreira, Quant. Struct.-Act. Relat. 14, 348 (1995)) and the ACD/Labs PhysChem Suite v12 programme package are employed as benchmarks. Quantum chemical calculations were performed using both the semiempirical RM1 method and the density functional theory B3LYP/6-31+G* method. The effectiveness of the SM5.4 and SM8 solvent models in estimating the aqueous-phase acidities was also evaluated. All of the approaches examined demonstrated strong correlations with the experimental acidity values.

  1. Direct thiol-ene photocoating of polyorganosiloxane microparticles.

    PubMed

    Kuttner, Christian; Maier, Petra C; Kunert, Carmen; Schlaad, Helmut; Fery, Andreas

    2013-12-31

    This work presents the modification of polyorganosiloxane microparticles by surface-initiated thiol-ene photochemistry. By this photocoating, we prepared different core/shell particles with a polymeric shell within narrow size distributions (PDI = 0.041-0.12). As core particle, we used highly monodisperse spherical polyorganosiloxane particles prepared from (3-mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane (MPTMS) with a radius of 0.49 μm. We utilize the high surface coverage of mercaptopropyl functions to generate surface-localized radicals upon irradiation with UVA-light without additional photoinitiator. The continuous generation of radicals was followed by a dye degradation experiment (UV/vis spectroscopy). Surface-localized radicals were used as copolymer anchoring sites ("grafting-onto" deposition of different PB-b-PS diblock copolymers) and polymerization initiators ("grafting-from" polymerization of PS). Photocoated particles were characterized for their morphology (SEM, TEM), size, and size distribution (DLS). For PS-coated particles, the polymer content (up to 24% in 24 h) was controlled by the polymerization time upon UVA exposure. The coating thickness was evaluated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) using a simple analytical core/shell model. Raman spectroscopy was applied to directly follow the time-dependent consumption of thiols by photoinitiation. PMID:24320891

  2. Differential thiol-based switches jumpstart Vibrio cholerae pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi; Wang, Hui; Zhou, Zhigang; Naseer, Nawar; Xiang, Fu; Kan, Biao; Goulian, Mark; Zhu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens utilize gene expression versatility to adapt to environmental changes. Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, encounters redox potential changes when it transitions from oxygen-rich aquatic reservoirs to the oxygen-limiting human gastrointestinal tract. We previously showed that the virulence regulator AphB uses thiol-based switches to sense the anoxic host environment and transcriptionally activate the key virulence activator tcpP. Here, by performing a high-throughput transposon sequencing screen in vivo, we identified OhrR as another regulator that enables V. cholerae rapid anoxic adaptation. Like AphB, reduced OhrR binds to and regulates the tcpP promoter. OhrR and AphB displayed differential dynamics in response to redox potential changes: OhrR is reduced more rapidly than AphB. Furthermore, OhrR thiol modification is required for rapid activation of virulence and successful colonization. This reveals a mechanism whereby bacterial pathogens employ posttranslational modifications of multiple transcription factors to sense and adapt to dynamic environmental changes. PMID:26748713

  3. Regeneration of thiol-functionalized mesostructured silica adsorbents of mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arencibia, Amaya; Aguado, José; Arsuaga, Jesús M.

    2010-06-01

    The regeneration of thiol-functionalized SBA-15 adsorbents of mercury is presented in this article. The influence of temperature and pH on the adsorption process was studied. The effect due to the presence of complexing agents in aqueous solution on the desorption step was also evaluated. Hg(II) maximum adsorption capacities at different temperatures ranging from 20 °C to 60 °C were obtained and it was found that temperature does not affect the adsorption process. Mercury adsorption capacity was also determined in the presence of HNO 3 and HCl up to 3 M concentration. The comparison of the results showed that whereas hydrochloric acid exhibits an appreciable capacity to regenerate the thiol-functionalized SBA-15 adsorbent, the nitric acid results inefficient. The difference was attributed to the mercury complexing ability of chloride anion. Four complexing compounds, KBr, KSCN, (NH 2) 2CS, and HBr were tested for desorbing mercury in regeneration experiments. All agents were able to remove significant amounts of adsorbed mercury, being hydrobromic acid the complexing compound that yields the best results.

  4. Spectrophotometric Determination of Phenolic Antioxidants in the Presence of Thiols and Proteins.

    PubMed

    Avan, Aslı Neslihan; Demirci Çekiç, Sema; Uzunboy, Seda; Apak, Reşat

    2016-01-01

    Development of easy, practical, and low-cost spectrophotometric methods is required for the selective determination of phenolic antioxidants in the presence of other similar substances. As electron transfer (ET)-based total antioxidant capacity (TAC) assays generally measure the reducing ability of antioxidant compounds, thiols and phenols cannot be differentiated since they are both responsive to the probe reagent. In this study, three of the most common TAC determination methods, namely cupric ion reducing antioxidant capacity (CUPRAC), 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt/trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (ABTS/TEAC), and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), were tested for the assay of phenolics in the presence of selected thiol and protein compounds. Although the FRAP method is almost non-responsive to thiol compounds individually, surprising overoxidations with large positive deviations from additivity were observed when using this method for (phenols + thiols) mixtures. Among the tested TAC methods, CUPRAC gave the most additive results for all studied (phenol + thiol) and (phenol + protein) mixtures with minimal relative error. As ABTS/TEAC and FRAP methods gave small and large deviations, respectively, from additivity of absorbances arising from these components in mixtures, mercury(II) compounds were added to stabilize the thiol components in the form of Hg(II)-thiol complexes so as to enable selective spectrophotometric determination of phenolic components. This error compensation was most efficient for the FRAP method in testing (thiols + phenols) mixtures. PMID:27529232

  5. Spectrophotometric Determination of Phenolic Antioxidants in the Presence of Thiols and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Avan, Aslı Neslihan; Demirci Çekiç, Sema; Uzunboy, Seda; Apak, Reşat

    2016-01-01

    Development of easy, practical, and low-cost spectrophotometric methods is required for the selective determination of phenolic antioxidants in the presence of other similar substances. As electron transfer (ET)-based total antioxidant capacity (TAC) assays generally measure the reducing ability of antioxidant compounds, thiols and phenols cannot be differentiated since they are both responsive to the probe reagent. In this study, three of the most common TAC determination methods, namely cupric ion reducing antioxidant capacity (CUPRAC), 2,2′-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt/trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (ABTS/TEAC), and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), were tested for the assay of phenolics in the presence of selected thiol and protein compounds. Although the FRAP method is almost non-responsive to thiol compounds individually, surprising overoxidations with large positive deviations from additivity were observed when using this method for (phenols + thiols) mixtures. Among the tested TAC methods, CUPRAC gave the most additive results for all studied (phenol + thiol) and (phenol + protein) mixtures with minimal relative error. As ABTS/TEAC and FRAP methods gave small and large deviations, respectively, from additivity of absorbances arising from these components in mixtures, mercury(II) compounds were added to stabilize the thiol components in the form of Hg(II)-thiol complexes so as to enable selective spectrophotometric determination of phenolic components. This error compensation was most efficient for the FRAP method in testing (thiols + phenols) mixtures. PMID:27529232

  6. Charge Transport of MoS2 Supported by Thiol-Decorated Self-Assembled Monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naveh, Doron; Artel, Vlada; Kirshner, Moshe

    2015-03-01

    Intrinsic charge transport in MoS2 supported by thiols was recently reported and was attributed to passivation of sulfur vacancies and suppression of charged impurities from the dielectric substrate. In this talk we will present the transport characteristics of single layer and few-layer MoS2 on thiol-decorated self-assembled alkyl-siloxane monolayer.

  7. A chromenoquinoline-based fluorescent off-on thiol probe for bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Kand, Dnyaneshwar; Kalle, Arunasree Marasanapalli; Varma, Sreejith Jayasree; Talukdar, Pinaki

    2012-03-11

    A new chromenoquinoline-based fluorescent off-on thiol probe 2 is reported. In aqueous buffer solutions at physiological pH, the probe exhibited 223-fold enhancement in fluorescence intensity by a Michael addition of cysteine to the maleimide appended to a chromenoquinoline. Cell permeability and live cell imaging of thiols are also demonstrated. PMID:22301487

  8. Conservation of thiol-oxidative stress responses regulated by SigR orthologues in actinomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Sik; Dufour, Yann S.; Yoo, Ji Sun; Cho, Yoo-Bok; Park, Joo-Hong; Nam, Gi-Baeg; Kim, Hae Min; Lee, Kang-Lok; Donohue, Timothy J.; Roe, Jung-Hye

    2015-01-01

    Summary Numerous thiol-reactive compounds cause oxidative stress where cells counteract by activation of survival strategies regulated by thiol-based sensors. In Streptomyces coelicolor, a model actinomycete, a sigma/antisigma pair SigR/RsrA controls the response to thiol-oxidative stress. To unravel its full physiological functions, chromatin immuno-precipitation combined with sequence and transcript analyses were employed to identify 108 SigR target genes in S. coelicolor and to predict orthologous regulons across actinomycetes. In addition to reported genes for thiol homeostasis, protein degradation and ribosome modulation, 64 additional operons were identified suggesting new functions of this global regulator. We demonstrate that SigR maintains the level and activity of the housekeeping sigma factor HrdB during thiol-oxidative stress, a novel strategy for stress responses. We also found that SigR defends cells against UV and thiol-reactive damages, in which repair UvrA takes a part. Using a refined SigR-binding sequence model, SigR orthologues and their targets were predicted in 42 actinomycetes. This revealed a conserved core set of SigR targets to function for thiol homeostasis, protein quality control, possible modulation of transcription and translation, flavin-mediated redox reactions, and Fe-S delivery. The composition of the SigR regulon reveals a robust conserved physiological mechanism to deal with thiol-oxidative stress from bacteria to human. PMID:22651816

  9. Sentence-Level Attachment Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albakour, M.-Dyaa; Kruschwitz, Udo; Lucas, Simon

    Attachment prediction is the task of automatically identifying email messages that should contain an attachment. This can be useful to tackle the problem of sending out emails but forgetting to include the relevant attachment (something that happens all too often). A common Information Retrieval (IR) approach in analyzing documents such as emails is to treat the entire document as a bag of words. Here we propose a finer-grained analysis to address the problem. We aim at identifying individual sentences within an email that refer to an attachment. If we detect any such sentence, we predict that the email should have an attachment. Using part of the Enron corpus for evaluation we find that our finer-grained approach outperforms previously reported document-level attachment prediction in similar evaluation settings.

  10. Probing the thiol-gold planar interface by spin polarized tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaohang; McGill, Stephen A.; Xiong, Peng; Wang, Xiaolei; Zhao, Jianhua

    2014-04-14

    Reports of induced magnetism at thiol-gold interface have generated considerable recent interest. In these studies, the sample magnetization was generally measured by superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry which has limitation in determining surface and interface magnetism. In this work, we have fabricated planar tunnel junctions incorporating a thiol-gold interface. An observed room temperature humidity effect together with low temperature inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy confirmed the existence of a thiol-gold interface in the organic-inorganic hybrid heterostructure. Spin polarized tunneling measurements were performed to probe the spin polarization at the thiol-gold interface; however, the obtained spin polarized tunneling spectra indicate no measurable spin polarization at the thiol-gold interface.

  11. Widespread occurrence of bacterial thiol methyltransferases and the biogenic emission of methylated sulfur gases.

    PubMed Central

    Drotar, A; Burton, G A; Tavernier, J E; Fall, R

    1987-01-01

    A majority of heterotrophic bacteria isolated from soil, water, sediment, vegetation, and marine algae cultures methylated sulfide, producing methanethiol. This was demonstrated with intact cells by measuring the emission of methanethiol with a sulfur-selective chemiluminescence detector, and in cell extracts by detection of sulfide-dependent thiol methyltransferase activity. Extracts of two Pseudomonas isolates were fractionated by gel-filtration and ion-exchange chromatography, and with sulfide as the substrate a single peak of thiol methyltransferase activity was seen in each case. Extracts of several bacterial strains also contained thiol methyltransferase activity with organic thiols as substrates. Thus, S-adenosylmethionine-dependent thiol methyltransferase activities are widespread in bacteria and may contribute to biogenic emissions of methylated sulfur gases and to the production of methyl thioethers. PMID:3662509

  12. Ester-free Thiol-X Resins: New Materials with Enhanced Mechanical Behavior and Solvent Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Podgórski, Maciej; Becka, Eftalda; Chatani, Shunsuke; Claudino, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    A series of thiol-Michael and radical thiol-ene network polymers were successfully prepared from ester-free as well as ester-containing monomer formulations. Polymerization reaction rates, dynamic mechanical analysis, and solvent resistance experiments were performed and compared between compositions with varied ester loading. The incorporation of ester-free alkyl thiol, vinyl sulfone and allylic monomers significantly improved the mechanical properties when compared with commercial, mercaptopropionate-based thiol-ene or thiol-Michael networks. For polymers with no hydrolytically degradable esters, glass transition temperatures (Tg's) as high as 100 °C were achieved. Importantly, solvent resistance tests demonstrated enhanced stability of ester-free formulations over PETMP-based polymers, especially in concentrated basic solutions. Kinetic analysis showed that glassy step-growth polymers are readily formed at ambient conditions with conversions reaching 80% and higher. PMID:25893009

  13. Widespread occurrence of bacterial thiol methyltransferases and the biogenic emission of methylated sulfur gases

    SciTech Connect

    Drotar, A.; Burton, G.A. Jr.; Tavernier, J.E.; Fall, R.

    1987-07-01

    A majority of heterotrophic bacteria isolated from soil, water, sediment, vegetation, and marine algae cultures methylated sulfide, producing methanethiol. This was demonstrated (i) with intact cells by measuring the emission of methanethiol with a sulfur-selective chemiluminescence detector, and (ii) in cell extracts by detection of sulfide-dependent thiol methyltransferase activity. Extracts of two Pseudomonas isolates were fractionated by gel-filtration and ion-exchange chromatography, and with sulfide as the substrate a single peak of thiol methyltransferase activity was seen in each case. Extracts of several bacterial strains also contained thiol methyltransferase activity with organic thiols as substrates. Thus, S-adenosylmethionine-dependent thiol methyltransferase activities are widespread in bacteria and may contribute to biogenic emissions of methylated sulfur gases and to the production of methyl thioethers.

  14. Easy route to functionalize iron oxide nanoparticles via long-term stable thiol groups.

    PubMed

    Maurizi, L; Bisht, H; Bouyer, F; Millot, N

    2009-08-18

    The functionalization of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) by meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) was investigated. Under ambient conditions, the thiol groups from DMSA are not stable and do not allow a direct functionalization without storage in stringent conditions or a chemical regeneration of free thiols. In this study, we have developed a protocol based on poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) grafting of SPIO prior to DMSA anchoring. We have observed that PEG helps to increase the stability of thiol groups under ambient conditions. The thiol functionalized SPIOs were stable under physiological pH and ionic strength as determined by Ellman's essay and allowed us to graft a thiol reactive fluorescent dye: tetramethylrhodamine-5-maleimide (TMRM). PMID:19572525

  15. Relationship between total thiol status and thrombocytopenia in patients with Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Guner, Rahmet; Tasyaran, Mehmet A; Keske, Siran; Hasanoglu, Imran; Kalem, Ayse Kaya; Yapar, Derya; Gulen, Tugba Arslan; Neselioglu, Salim; Isikoglu, Semra; Erel, Ozcan

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between serum total thiol level and total oxidant status (TOS) and thrombocytopenia among patients with Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF). Eighty-three subjects and 56 controls were enrolled in the study. Thiol levels were measured with the DTNB method and TOS was measured with the Erel's method among subjects and controls. Thiol levels were lower in subjects than controls and TOS levels were higher in subjects than controls. There was a significant correlation between total thiol levels and platelet counts (r = 0.84, p < 0.0001) among subjects. Further investigations are needed into the link between total thiol level and TOS and the pathogenesis of hemorrhage in CCHF. PMID:23413704

  16. New functional materials for heavy metal sorption: “Supramolecular” attachment of thiols to mesoporous silica substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, Timothy G.; Yantasee, Wassana; Sangvanich, Thanapon; Fryxell, Glen E.; Johnson, Darren W.; Addleman, Raymond S.

    2008-10-01

    This manuscript describes the functionalization of MCM-41 with phenyl monolayers at various densities to provide a scaffolding for noncovalently bound benzylmercaptan (BM), 1,3- and 1,4-bis(mercaptomethyl)benzenes (1,3- and 1,4-BMMB, respectively) for use in heavy metal uptake from native waters.

  17. Prediction of reversibly oxidized protein cysteine thiols using protein structure properties

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Ricardo; Riddle, Megan; Woo, Jongwook; Momand, Jamil

    2008-01-01

    Protein cysteine thiols can be divided into four groups based on their reactivities: those that form permanent structural disulfide bonds, those that coordinate with metals, those that remain in the reduced state, and those that are susceptible to reversible oxidation. Physicochemical parameters of oxidation-susceptible protein thiols were organized into a database named the Balanced Oxidation Susceptible Cysteine Thiol Database (BALOSCTdb). BALOSCTdb contains 161 cysteine thiols that undergo reversible oxidation and 161 cysteine thiols that are not susceptible to oxidation. Each cysteine was represented by a set of 12 parameters, one of which was a label (1/0) to indicate whether its thiol moiety is susceptible to oxidation. A computer program (the C4.5 decision tree classifier re-implemented as the J48 classifier) segregated cysteines into oxidation-susceptible and oxidation-non-susceptible classes. The classifier selected three parameters critical for prediction of thiol oxidation susceptibility: (1) distance to the nearest cysteine sulfur atom, (2) solvent accessibility, and (3) pKa. The classifier was optimized to correctly predict 136 of the 161 cysteine thiols susceptible to oxidation. Leave-one-out cross-validation analysis showed that the percent of correctly classified cysteines was 80.1% and that 16.1% of the oxidation-susceptible cysteine thiols were incorrectly classified. The algorithm developed from these parameters, named the Cysteine Oxidation Prediction Algorithm (COPA), is presented here. COPA prediction of oxidation-susceptible sites can be utilized to locate protein cysteines susceptible to redox-mediated regulation and identify possible enzyme catalytic sites with reactive cysteine thiols. PMID:18287280

  18. Fiber Attachment Module Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agostini, Reinaldo J.

    2014-01-01

    Hollow Fiber Membrane Bioreactors (HFMB) are ideal systems for biological pretreatment of wastewater, however, optimization is still underway. The Fiber Attachment Module Experiment (FAME) allows the simultaneous testing of potential materials, treatments on these and varying inoculums. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), the material chosen for its ideal oxygen permeation properties, was treated with 1 sodium hydroxide 0.1 M ether for 18 seconds and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation oxygen plasma (OP) exposure for 1 hour. Preliminary chemistry and visual data indicate promising treatments when using OP and sodium hydroxide as treatments for PDMS fibers; however, due to the biological nature of the experiment, time is a constraint. Sodium hydroxide treatment chemistry data shows nitrification is occurring as urea and ammonia are decreasing and nitrite is increasing. A higher amount of biofilm can also be observed for this particular case. During the final two weeks of the internship x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and acridine orange (AO) cell counts will be employed for treatment effectiveness on the first batch of treatments (ether and sodium hydroxide). These same strategies will be used for the second batch of experiments due in four weeks (2nd week of August).

  19. Protein Attachment on Nanodiamonds.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chung-Lun; Lin, Cheng-Huang; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Su, Meng-Chih

    2015-07-16

    A recent advance in nanotechnology is the scale-up production of small and nonaggregated diamond nanoparticles suitable for biological applications. Using detonation nanodiamonds (NDs) with an average diameter of ∼4 nm as the adsorbents, we have studied the static attachment of three proteins (myoglobin, bovine serum albumin, and insulin) onto the nanoparticles by optical spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and dynamic light scattering, and electrophoretic zeta potential measurements. Results show that the protein surface coverage is predominantly determined by the competition between protein-protein and protein-ND interactions, giving each protein a unique and characteristic structural configuration in its own complex. Specifically, both myoglobin and bovine serum albumin show a Langmuir-type adsorption behavior, forming 1:1 complexes at saturation, whereas insulin folds into a tightly bound multimer before adsorption. The markedly different adsorption patterns appear to be independent of the protein concentration and are closely related to the affinity of the individual proteins for the NDs. The present study provides a fundamental understanding for the use of NDs as a platform for nanomedical drug delivery. PMID:25815400

  20. Electromagnetic attachment mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monford, Leo G., Jr. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An electromagnetic attachment mechanism is disclosed for use as an end effector of a remote manipulator system. A pair of electromagnets, each with a U-shaped magnetic core with a pull-in coil and two holding coils, are mounted by a spring suspension system on a base plate of the mechanism housing with end pole pieces adapted to move through openings in the base plate when the attractive force of the electromagnets is exerted on a strike plate of a grapple fixture affixed to a target object. The pole pieces are spaced by an air gap from the strike plate when the mechanism first contacts the grapple fixture. An individual control circuit and power source is provided for the pull-in coil and one holding coil of each electromagnet. A back-up control circuit connected to the two power sources and a third power source is provided for the remaining holding coils. When energized, the pull-in coils overcome the suspension system and air gap and are automatically de-energized when the pole pieces move to grapple and impose a preload force across the grapple interface. A battery backup is a redundant power source for each electromagnet in each individual control circuit and is automatically connected upon failure of the primary source. A centerline mounted camera and video monitor are used in cooperation with a target pattern on the reflective surface of the strike plate to effect targeting and alignment.

  1. Dissociative Electron Attachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arreola, Esmeralda; Esmeralda Arreola Collaboration; Leigh Hargreaves Collaboration

    Since the pioneering work of Boudiaffa et al., it has been understood that electrons, even with energies near or below the ionization threshold, are capable of initiating strand-breaks in human DNA. This discovery raised important questions for cancer treatments, since sub-ionizing electrons are known to be the most copiously produced secondary product of radiation therapy. But even to date these factors are largely excluded from dosimetry calculations. This lack of inclusion is, at least in part, certainly due to the dearth of fundamental data describing low-energy electron interactions with nucleotide molecules that form the basis of DNA. Understanding of how such slow electrons are able to damage DNA remains incomplete, but the strongly peaked nature of Boudiaffa et al.'s data gives strong hints at resonantly driven collision processes. DNA damage is therefore most likely driven by ``dissociative electron attachment'' (DEA). DEA is a rather complicated process to model due to the coupling of electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom in the molecule. At the California State University Fullerton, we are currently commissioning a new spectrometer to study dissociation channels, reaction rates and orientation effects in DEA collisions between slow electrons and nucleotide molecules. At the meeting we will present design parameters and commissioning data for this new apparatus.

  2. (Processing and targeting of the thiol protease aleurain)

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    Our goal for work during the past two years under this Grant was to characterize the barley thiol protease, aleurain, to determine if it is secreted or retained intracellularly in aleurone cells, and to begin to elucidate structural features that might control targeting of the protein to its final destination. We have shown that aleurain is synthesized as a proenzyme with two N-linked oligosaccharide chains, one high mannose-type and one complex-type. Aleurain undergoes processing to mature form by removal of an Nterminal prosegment, and is retained intracellularly; it cannot be detected among proteins secreted from aleurone cells. Treatment of aleurone cells with tunicamycin to prevent glycosylation of aleurain does not prevent processing of the unglycosylated form. The N-terminal portion of aleurain's prosegment is homologous to the comparable region in two yeast vacuolar proteases, where that region is known to contain the signal necessary for targeting the proteases to the vacuole. 18 refs., 7 figs.

  3. Attachment in Preschool Deaf Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Mark T.

    A study was designed to examine the attachment behavior of 28 preschool deaf children and their hearing mothers and compare their patterns of behavior to previous reports of normal hearing dyads, and within this sample examine the relationship between communicative ability and phase of attachment. The sample was subdivided by communication…

  4. Polysulfides Link H2S to Protein Thiol Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Greiner, Romy; Pálinkás, Zoltán; Bäsell, Katrin; Becher, Dörte; Antelmann, Haike; Nagy, Péter

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is suggested to act as a gaseous signaling molecule in a variety of physiological processes. Its molecular mechanism of action was proposed to involve protein S-sulfhydration, that is, conversion of cysteinyl thiolates (Cys-S−) to persulfides (Cys-S-S−). A central and unresolved question is how H2S—that is, a molecule with sulfur in its lowest possible oxidation state (−2)—can lead to oxidative thiol modifications. Results: Using the lipid phosphatase PTEN as a model protein, we find that the “H2S donor” sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) leads to very rapid reversible oxidation of the enzyme in vitro. We identify polysulfides formed in NaHS solutions as the oxidizing species, and present evidence that sulfane sulfur is added to the active site cysteine. Polysulfide-mediated oxidation of PTEN was induced by all “H2S donors” tested, including sodium sulfide (Na2S), gaseous H2S, and morpholin-4-ium 4-methoxyphenyl(morpholino) phosphinodithioate (GYY4137). Moreover, we show that polysulfides formed in H2S solutions readily modify PTEN inside intact cells. Innovation: Our results shed light on the previously unresolved question of how H2S leads to protein thiol oxidation, and suggest that polysulfides formed in solutions of H2S mediate this process. Conclusion: This study suggests that the effects that have been attributed to H2S in previous reports may in fact have been mediated by polysulfides. It also supports the notion that sulfane sulfur rather than sulfide is the actual in vivo agent of H2S signaling. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 1749–1765. PMID:23646934

  5. Mercury binding sites in thiol-functionalized mesostructured silica.

    PubMed

    Billinge, Simon J L; McKimmy, Emily J; Shatnawi, Mouath; Kim, HyunJeong; Petkov, Valeri; Wermeille, Didier; Pinnavaia, Thomas J

    2005-06-15

    Thiol-functionalized mesostructured silica with anhydrous compositions of (SiO(2))(1)(-)(x)()(LSiO(1.5))(x)(), where L is a mercaptopropyl group and x is the fraction of functionalized framework silicon centers, are effective trapping agents for the removal of mercuric(II) ions from water. In the present work, we investigate the mercury-binding mechanism for representative thiol-functionalized mesostructures by atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data and by Raman spectroscopy. The mesostructures with wormhole framework structures and compositions corresponding to x = 0.30 and 0.50 were prepared by direct assembly methods in the presence of a structure-directing amine porogen. PDF analyses of five mercury-loaded compositions with Hg/S ratios of 0.50-1.30 provided evidence for the bridging of thiolate sulfur atoms to two metal ion centers and the formation of chain structures on the pore surfaces. We find no evidence for Hg-O bonds and can rule out oxygen coordination of the mercury at greater than the 10% level. The relative intensities of the PDF peaks corresponding to Hg-S and Hg-Hg atomic pairs indicate that the mercury centers cluster on the functionalized surfaces by virtue of thiolate bridging, regardless of the overall mercury loading. However, the Raman results indicate that the complexation of mercury centers by thiolate depends on the mercury loading. At low mercury loadings (Hg/S < or = 0.5), the dominant species is an electrically neutral complex in which mercury most likely is tetrahedrally coordinated to bridging thiolate ligands, as in Hg(SBu(t))(2). At higher loadings (Hg/S 1.0-1.3), mercury complex cations predominate, as evidenced by the presence of charge-balancing anions (nitrate) on the surface. This cationic form of bound mercury is assigned a linear coordination to two bridging thiolate ligands. PMID:15941284

  6. Mapping Local Protein Electrostatics by EPR of pH-Sensitive Thiol-Specific Nitroxide† ¶

    PubMed Central

    Voinov, Maxim A.; Ruuge, Andres; Reznikov, Vladimir A.; Grigor’ev, Igor A.; Smirnov, Alex I.

    2013-01-01

    A first thiol-specific pH-sensitive nitroxide spin label of the imidazolidine series -methanethiosulfonic acid S-(1-oxyl-2,2,3,5,5-pentamethylimidazolidin-4-ylmethyl) ester (IMTSL) - has been synthesized and characterized. X- (9 GHz) and W-band (94 GHz) EPR spectral parameters of the new spin label in its free form and covalently attached to an amino acid cysteine and a tripeptide glutathione were studied as a function of pH and solvent polarity. pKa value of protonatable tertiary amino group of the spin label was found to be unaffected by other ionizable groups present in side chains of unstructured small peptides. The W-band EPR spectra were shown to allow for pKa determination from precise g-factor measurements. Is has been demonstrated that high accuracy of pKa determination for pH-sensitive nitroxides could be achieved regardless the frequency of measurements or the regime of spin exchange: fast at X-band and slow at W-band. IMTSL was found to react specifically with a model protein - iso-1-cytochrome c from yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae - giving EPR spectra very similar to those of the most commonly employed cysteine-specific label MTSL. CD data indicated no perturbations to the overall protein structure upon IMTSL labeling. It was found that for IMTSL, giso correlates linearly with Aiso but the slopes are different for the neutral and charged forms of the nitroxide. This finding was attributed to the solvent effects on the spin density at the oxygen atom of the N–O group and on the excitation energy of the oxygen lone-pair orbital. PMID:18426227

  7. A Study of Functional Polymer Colloids Prepared Using Thiol-Ene/Yne Click Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durham, Olivia Z.

    This project demonstrates the first instance of thiol-ene chemistry as the polymerization method for the production of polymer colloids in two-phase heterogeneous suspensions, miniemulsions, and emulsions. This work was also expanded to thiol-yne chemistry for the production of polymer particles containing increased crosslinking density. The utility of thiol-ene and thiol-yne chemistries for polymerization and polymer modification is well established in bulk systems. These reactions are considered 'click' reactions, which can be defined as processes that are both facile and simple, offering high yields with nearly 100% conversion, no side products, easy product separation, compatibility with a diverse variety of commercially available starting materials, and orthogonality with other chemistries. In addition, thiol-ene and thiol-yne chemistry follow a step-growth mechanism for the development of highly uniform polymer networks, where polymer growth is dependent on the coupling of functional groups. These step-growth polymerization systems are in stark contrast to the chain-growth mechanisms of acrylic and styrenic monomers that have dominated the field of conventional heterogeneous polymerizations. Preliminary studies evaluated the mechanism of particle production in suspension and miniemulsion systems. Monomer droplets were compared to the final polymer particles to confirm that particle growth occurred through the polymerization of monomer droplets. Additional parameters examined include homogenization energy (mechanical mixing), diluent species and concentration, and monomer content. These reactions were conducted using photoinitiation to yield particles in a matter of minutes with diameters in the size range of several microns to hundreds of microns in suspensions or submicron particles in miniemulsions. Improved control over the particle size and size distribution was examined through variation of reaction parameters. In addition, a method of seeded suspension

  8. Screening of raw coffee for thiol binding site precursors using "in bean" model roasting experiments.

    PubMed

    Müller, Christoph; Hofmann, Thomas

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of the following study was to investigate the influence of coffee roasting on the thiol-binding activity of coffee beverages, and to investigate the potential of various green bean compounds as precursors of thiol-binding sites by using promising "in bean" model roast experiments. Headspace gas chromatographic analysis on coffee brews incubated in the presence of the roasty-sulfury smelling 2-furfurylthiol for 20 min at 30 degrees C in septum-closed vessels revealed that the amounts of "free" thiol decreased drastically with increasing the roasting degree of the beans used for preparation of the brews. A half-maximal binding capacity (BC(50)) of 183 mg of 2-furfurylthiol per liter of standard coffee beverage was determined for a roasted coffee (CTN value of 67), thus demonstrating that enormous amounts of the odor-active thiol are "bound" by the coffee. Furthermore, biomimetic "in bean" precursor experiments have been performed in order to elucidate the precursor for the thiol-binding sites in the raw coffee bean. These experiments opened the possibility of studying coffee model reactions under quasi-natural roasting conditions and undoubtedly identified chlorogenic acids as well as thermal degradation products caffeic acid and quinic acid as important precursors for low-molecular-weight thiol-binding sites. In particular, when roasted in the presence of transition metal ions, chlorogenic acids and even more caffeic acid showed thiol-binding activity which was comparable to the activity measured for the authentic coffee brew. PMID:15796603

  9. Biodegradation of malodorous thiols by a Brevibacillus sp. strain isolated from a Tunisian phosphate factory.

    PubMed

    Chebbi, Alif; Mhiri, Najla; Rezgui, Fatma; Ammar, Najoua; Maalej, Amina; Sayadi, Sami; Chamkha, Mohamed

    2015-07-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and thiols (RSH) generated by the phosphate industry cause harmful effects on human health and quality of life. The present study aims to investigate and evaluate a bacterial strain CAT37 isolated from gas-washing wastewaters in terms of its properties and ability to degrade malodorous thiols. Gas-washing wastewater samples were submitted to physicochemical analyses and used for the isolation of thiol-degrading bacteria. The results from gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis revealed that the isolated strain CAT37 was able to oxidize ∼99% of each thiol, decanethiol and dodecanethiol used as sole carbon and energy sources after 30 days of incubation at 37°C. The strain CAT37 displayed a biodegradative potential on several thiols known by their toxicity and odors. The results from phylogenetic and phenotypic analysis revealed that the CAT37 isolate belonged to the genus Brevibacillus, showing the highest sequence similarity to Brevibacillus agri. Overall, the results indicated that the strain CAT37 exhibited a number of attractive biodegradation abilities against thiols and could be considered a promising candidate for industrial application in future thiol biodeodorization strategies. PMID:26085487

  10. Disulfide-Linked Dinitroxides for Monitoring Cellular Thiol Redox Status through Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Legenzov, Eric A; Sims, Stephen J; Dirda, Nathaniel D A; Rosen, Gerald M; Kao, Joseph P Y

    2015-12-01

    Intracellular thiol-disulfide redox balance is crucial to cell health, and may be a key determinant of a cancer's response to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The ability to assess intracellular thiol-disulfide balance may thus be useful not only in predicting responsiveness of cancers to therapy, but in assessing predisposition to disease. Assays of thiols in biology have relied on colorimetry or fluorimetry, both of which require UV-visible photons, which do not penetrate the body. Low-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) is an emerging magnetic imaging technique that uses radio waves, which penetrate the body well. Therefore, in combination with tailored imaging agents, EPRI affords the opportunity to image physiology within the body. In this study, we have prepared water-soluble and membrane-permeant disulfide-linked dinitroxides, at natural isotopic abundance, and with D,(15)N-substitution. Thiols such as glutathione cleave the disulfides, with simple bimolecular kinetics, to yield the monomeric nitroxide species, with distinctive changes in the EPR spectrum. Using the D,(15)N-substituted disulfide-dinitroxide and EPR spectroscopy, we have obtained quantitative estimates of accessible intracellular thiol in cultured human lymphocytes. Our estimates are in good agreement with published measurements. This suggests that in vivo EPRI of thiol-disulfide balance is feasible. Finally, we discuss the constraints on the design of probe molecules that would be useful for in vivo EPRI of thiol redox status. PMID:26523485

  11. The influence of oxidation of membrane thiol groups on lysosomal proton permeability.

    PubMed Central

    Wan, F Y; Wang, Y N; Zhang, G J

    2001-01-01

    The influence of oxidation of membrane thiol groups on lysosomal proton permeability was studied by measuring lysosomal pH with FITC-conjugated dextran, determining the membrane potential with 3,3'-dipropylthiadicarbocyanine iodide and monitoring their proton leakage with p-nitrophenol. Residual membrane thiol groups were measured with 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid). The lysosomal membrane thiol groups were modified by treatment with diamide and dithiothreitol. SDS/PAGE revealed aggregations of the membrane proteins induced by the treatment of lysosomes with diamide. The cross-linkage of proteins could be abolished by subsequent treatment with dithiothreitol, indicating that the proteins were linked via disulphide bonds. Treating the lysosomes with diamide decreased their membrane thiol groups and caused increases in lysosomal pH, membrane potential and proton leakage, which could be reversed by treatment of the lysosomes with dithiothreitol. This indicates that the lysosomal proton permeability can be increased by oxidation of the membrane thiol groups and restored to the normal level by reduction of the groups. Treatment of the lysosomes with N-ethylmaleimide reduced their membrane thiol groups but did not change the lysosomal pH or their degree of proton leakage. It suggests that protein aggregation may be an important mechanism for the increase in lysosomal proton permeability. The results raise the possibility that the proton permeability of lysosomes in vivo may be affected by the redox states of their membrane thiol groups. PMID:11716763

  12. Effect of Thiol-Binding Reagents on the Metabolism of Thiosulfate and Tetrathionate by Thiobacillus neapolitanus

    PubMed Central

    Trudinger, P. A.

    1965-01-01

    Trudinger, P. A. (Division of Plant Industry, Canberra, Australia). Effect of thiol-binding reagents on the metabolism of thiosulfate and tetrathionate by Thiobacillus neapolitanus. J. Bacteriol. 89:617–625. 1965.—Iodoacetamide, N-ethyl maleimide (NEM), p-chloromercuribenzoate (CMB), Mercurochrome, and HgCl2 inhibited the oxidation of thiosulfate to sulfate by Thiobacillus neapolitanus; tetrathionate accumulated under these conditions. High concentrations of the thiol-binding reagents lowered the rate of oxidation of thiosulfate to tetrathionate; inhibition by CMB was reversed by high concentrations of thiosulfate. Relatively low concentrations of the thiol-binding reagents completely inhibited the oxidation and anaerobic metabolism of tetrathionate. Similar reagents had no effect on a soluble thiosulfate-oxidizing enzyme. Inhibition by thiol-binding reagents was overcome by washing the bacteria with Na2S or thioethanol after their exposure to the inhibitors. Under some conditions, the addition of thiosulfate or tetrathionate to bacterial suspensions before the addition of the thiol-binding reagents prevented the inhibition of thiosulfate and tetrathionate metabolism by these reagents. Thiosulfate catalyzed a rapid chemical breakdown of NEM and reacted with iodoacetamide. A complex between thiosulfate and mercuribenzoate was demonstrated. Three types of thiol group appear to be associated with the metabolism of thiosulfate and tetrathionate; one of these types may be located at the bacterial cell membrane. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that thiols (or disulfide groups) are binding sites for the substrates. PMID:14273636

  13. Oxidation of dissolved elemental mercury by thiol compounds under anoxic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Wang; Lin, Hui; Mann, Benjamin F; Liang, Liyuan; Gu, Baohua

    2013-01-01

    Mercuric mercury, Hg(II), forms strong complexes with thiol compounds that commonly dominate Hg(II) speciation in natural freshwater. However, reactions between dissolved elemental Hg(0) and thiols are not well understood although these processes are likely to be important in determining Hg speciation and geochemical cycling in the environment. In this study, reaction rates and mechanisms between dissolved Hg(0) and a number of selected organic ligands with varying molecular structures and sulfur (S) oxidation states were determined to assess the role of these ligands in Hg(0) redox transformation. We found that all thiols caused oxidation of Hg(0) under anoxic conditions but, contrary to expectation, compounds with higher S-oxidation states (e.g., disulfide) than thiols exhibited little or no reactivity with Hg(0) at pH 7. The rate and extent of Hg(0) oxidation varied widely, with smaller aliphatic thiols showing the greatest degree of oxidation. The mechanism of the oxidation is attributed to a two-step process involving adsorption of Hg(0) to thiols followed by the charge transfer from Hg(0) to electron acceptors. These observations demonstrate a unique thiol-induced oxidation pathway of dissolved Hg(0), with important implications for the redox transformation, speciation, and bioavailability of Hg for microbial methylation in anoxic environments.

  14. Bioactivation of clopidogrel and prasugrel: factors determining the stereochemistry of the thiol metabolite double bond.

    PubMed

    Dansette, Patrick M; Levent, Dan; Hessani, Assia; Mansuy, Daniel

    2015-06-15

    The antithrombotics of the tetrahydrothienopyridine series, clopidogrel and prasugrel, are prodrugs that must be metabolized in two steps to become pharmacologically active. The first step is the formation of a thiolactone metabolite. The second step is a further oxidation with the formation of a thiolactone sulfoxide whose hydrolytic opening leads to a sulfenic acid that is eventually reduced into the corresponding active cis thiol. Very few data were available on the formation of the isomer of the active cis thiol having a trans configuration of the double bond, the most striking result in that regard being that both cis and trans thiols were formed upon the metabolism of clopidogrel by human liver microsomes in the presence of glutathione (GSH), whereas only the cis thiol was detected in the sera of patients treated with this drug. This article shows that trans thiols are also formed upon the microsomal metabolism of prasugrel or its thiolactone metabolite in the presence of GSH and that metabolites having the trans configuration of the double bond are only formed when microsomal incubations are done in the presence of thiols, such as GSH, N-acetyl-cysteine, and mercaptoethanol. Intermediate formation of thioesters resulting from the reaction of GSH with the thiolactone sulfoxide metabolite appears to be responsible for trans thiol formation. Addition of human liver cytosol to the microsomal incubations led to a dramatic decrease of the formation of the trans thiol metabolites. These data suggest that cytosolic esterases would accelerate the hydrolytic opening of thiolactone sulfoxide intermediates and disfavor the formation of thioesters resulting from the reaction of these intermediates with GSH that is responsible for trans isomer formation. This would explain why trans thiols have not been detected in the sera of patients treated with clopidogrel. PMID:25970225

  15. Determination of thiol functional groups on bacteria and natural organic matter in environmental systems

    SciTech Connect

    Anandha Rao, Balaji; Lin, Hui; Liang, Liyuan; Gu, Baohua

    2014-01-01

    Organic thiols (R-SH) are known to react and form complexes with some toxic soft metals such as mercury (Hg) in both biotic and abiotic systems. However, a clear understanding of these interactions is currently limited because quantifying thiols in environmental matrices is difficult due to their low abundance, susceptibility to oxidation, and measurement interference by non-thiol compounds in samples. Here, we report a fluorescence-labeling method using a maleimide containing probe, ThioGlo-1 (TG-1), to determine total thiols directly on bacterial cells and natural organic matter (NOM). We systematically evaluated the optimal thiol labeling conditions and interference from organic compounds such as disulfide, methionine, thiourea, and amine, and inorganic ions such as Na+, K+, Ca2+, Fe2+, Cl-, SO42-, HCO3-, and SCN-, and found that the method is highly sensitive and selective. Only relatively high levels of sulfide (S2-) and sulfite (SO32-) significantly interfere with the thiol analysis. The method was successful in determining thiols in a bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA and its mutants in a phosphate buffered saline solution. The measured value of ~2.1 104 thiols cell-1 (or ~0.07 mol g-1 wet cells) is in good agreement with that observed during reactions between Hg and PCA cells. Using the standard addition, we determined the total thiols of two reference NOM samples, the reduced Elliot soil humic acid and Suwanee River NOM, to be 3.6 and 0.7 mol g-1, respectively, consistent with those obtained based on their reactions with Hg.

  16. Thiol-norbornene photo-click hydrogels for tissue engineering applications

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chien-Chi; Ki, Chang Seok; Shih, Han

    2014-01-01

    Thiol-norbornene (thiol-ene) photo-click hydrogels have emerged as a diverse material system for tissue engineering applications. These hydrogels are cross-linked through light mediated orthogonal reactions between multi-functional norbornene-modified macromers (e.g., poly(ethylene glycol), hyaluronic acid, gelatin) and sulfhydryl-containing linkers (e.g., dithiothreitol, PEG-dithiol, bis-cysteine peptides) using low concentration of photoinitiator. The gelation of thiol-norbornene hydrogels can be initiated by long-wave UV light or visible light without additional co-initiator or co-monomer. The cross-linking and degradation behaviors of thiol-norbornene hydrogels are controlled through material selections, whereas the biophysical and biochemical properties of the gels are easily and independently tuned owing to the orthogonal reactivity between norbornene and thiol moieties. Uniquely, the cross-linking of step-growth thiol-norbornene hydrogels is not oxygen-inhibited, therefore the gelation is much faster and highly cytocompatible compared with chain-growth polymerized hydrogels using similar gelation conditions. These hydrogels have been prepared as tunable substrates for 2D cell culture, as microgels or bulk gels for affinity-based or protease-sensitive drug delivery, and as scaffolds for 3D cell culture. Reports from different laboratories have demonstrated the broad utility of thiol-norbornene hydrogels in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications, including valvular and vascular tissue engineering, liver and pancreas-related tissue engineering, neural regeneration, musculoskeletal (bone and cartilage) tissue regeneration, stem cell culture and differentiation, as well as cancer cell biology. This article provides an up-to-date overview on thiol-norbornene hydrogel cross-linking and degradation mechanisms, tunable material properties, as well as the use of thiol-norbornene hydrogels in drug delivery and tissue engineering applications. PMID

  17. Plasmachemical Double Click Thiol-ene Reactions for Wet Electrical Barrier.

    PubMed

    Fraser, R C; Carletto, A; Wilson, M; Badyal, J P S

    2016-08-24

    Click thiol-ene chemistry is demonstrated for the reaction of thiol containing molecules with surface alkene bonds during electrical discharge activation. This plasmachemical reaction mechanism is shown to be 2-fold for allyl mercaptan (an alkene and thiol group containing precursor), comprising self-cross-linked nanolayer deposition in tandem with interfacial cross-linking to the surface alkene bonds of a polyisoprene base layer. A synergistic multilayer structure is attained which displays high wet electrical barrier performance during immersion in water. PMID:27505445

  18. Thiazolidine-Protected β-Thiol Asparagine: Applications in One-Pot Ligation-Desulfurization Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Sayers, Jessica; Thompson, Robert E; Perry, Kristen J; Malins, Lara R; Payne, Richard J

    2015-10-01

    The synthesis of a β-thiol asparagine derivative bearing a novel (2,4,6-trimethoxyphenyl)thiazolidine protecting group is described. The efficient incorporation of the amino acid into the N-termini of peptides is demonstrated as well as the utility of the β-thiol asparagine moiety for rapid ligation reactions with peptide thioesters. The streamlined synthesis of native peptide products could be accomplished using a one-pot radical desulfurization of the β-thiol auxiliary following the ligation event. The utility of the amino acid is highlighted in the efficient one-pot assembly of the HIV entry inhibitor enfuvirtide. PMID:26398220

  19. Imaging disulfide dinitroxides at 250 MHz to monitor thiol redox status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elajaili, Hanan; Biller, Joshua R.; Rosen, Gerald M.; Kao, Joseph P. Y.; Tseytlin, Mark; Buchanan, Laura A.; Rinard, George A.; Quine, Richard W.; McPeak, Joseph; Shi, Yilin; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.

    2015-11-01

    Measurement of thiol-disulfide redox status is crucial for characterization of tumor physiology. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of disulfide-linked dinitroxides are readily distinguished from those of the corresponding monoradicals that are formed by cleavage of the disulfide linkage by free thiols. EPR spectra can thus be used to monitor the rate of cleavage and the thiol redox status. EPR spectra of 1H,14N- and 2H,15N-disulfide dinitroxides and the corresponding monoradicals resulting from cleavage by glutathione have been characterized at 250 MHz, 1.04 GHz, and 9 GHz and imaged by rapid-scan EPR at 250 MHz.

  20. Interaction of thiols and non-thiol {center_dot}OH scavengers in the modification of radiation-induced DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Krisch, R.E.; Ayene, I.S.; Koch, C.J.

    1995-12-31

    Oxygen has long been known to sensitize cells to the lethal effects of ionizing radiation and is widely believed to do so by the fixation of potentially reversible radical damage to cellular DNA. A number of studies have suggested that this widely observed oxygen enhancement of cell killing requires the presence of reduced thiols. Published in vitro studies of the modification of DNA damage by glutathione or other thiols have generally shown peak oxygen enhancement ratios (OERs) much higher than those observed for cell killing. However, these studies measured loss of DNA transforming activity or induction of single-strand DNA breaks (SSBs), related endpoints which are not thought to represent lethal lesions, rather than double-strand breaks (DSBs), which are generally believed to be the dominant lethal lesions from ionizing radiation. In addition, non-thiol scavengers of OH radicals were not generally present. There is also evidence that, in addition to their protective effects, some non-thiol {center_dot}OH scavengers can produce radicals which are damaging to DNA under anoxic conditions. In the present investigation, the authors have adapted a previously used in vitro model system to simultaneously investigate the effects on radiation-induced single- and double-strand DNA breaks of various combinations of glutathione and glycerol, a widely used non-thiol scavenger, in the presence and absence of oxygen.

  1. Universal precision sine bar attachment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, Franklin D. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    This invention relates to an attachment for a sine bar which can be used to perform measurements during lathe operations or other types of machining operations. The attachment can be used for setting precision angles on vises, dividing heads, rotary tables and angle plates. It can also be used in the inspection of machined parts, when close tolerances are required, and in the layout of precision hardware. The novelty of the invention is believed to reside in a specific versatile sine bar attachment for measuring a variety of angles on a number of different types of equipment.

  2. The Intergenerational Transmission of Attachment Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clubb, Richard D.; And Others

    This study examines the relationship between parent-child attachment and parental attachment styles. It is hypothesized that: (1) parental attachment styles are transmitted to the infant through parent-child and parent-parent interaction; and (2) parental attachment styles are reflected in parent-child attachment. Some research supports the idea…

  3. Everything You Want To Know about Attachment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice Sterling

    This paper discusses infant attachment, which it defines as a long-lasting emotional bond revealed when a child under stress seeks out and tries to stay close to a specific figure. The paper addresses: (1) What is attachment? Who are the pioneers in attachment theory?; (2) How do we notice attachment in action?; (3) Is attachment the only…

  4. Attachment at work and performance.

    PubMed

    Neustadt, Elizabeth A; Chamorro-Premuzic, Tomas; Furnham, Adrian

    2011-09-01

    This paper examines the relations between self-reported attachment orientation at work and personality, self-esteem, trait emotional intelligence (aka emotional self-efficacy), and independently assessed career potential and job performance. Self-report data were collected from 211 managers in an international business in the hospitality industry; independent assessments of these managers' job performance and career potential were separately obtained from the organization. A self-report measure of romantic attachment was adapted for application in the work context; a two-factor solution was found for this measure. Secure/autonomous attachment orientation at work was positively related to self-esteem, trait emotional intelligence, extraversion, agreeableness, and conscientiousness, and also to job performance. Not only was secure/autonomous attachment orientation at work statistically predictive of job performance, but the new measure also made a distinct contribution, beyond conscientiousness, to this prediction. PMID:21838647

  5. Social attachments and traumatic stress

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    The extent to which we engage with our social world has been central to our survival as a species and, accordingly, is relevant to how we cope with trauma and adversity. This review summarises current knowledge about the importance of social connections from an evolutionary perspective, as well as integrating this with a discussion of prevailing attachment theories. Experimental research supporting the potential benefit of attachments for managing adversity are presented, along with a review of how these benefits are moderated by individual differences in attachment style. The potential impact of trauma on attachment systems, and the manner in which this can compound trauma stress is discussed. Finally, a broader overview of social network analysis is introduced and it is proposed that a more sociocentric framework of trauma response would promote a fuller understanding of how social processes moderate trauma response. PMID:26996531

  6. Adult attachment and declining birthrates.

    PubMed

    Draper, Thomas W; Holman, Thomas B; White, Whitney; Grandy, Shannon

    2007-02-01

    Attachment scores for 658 young adults living in the U.S.A. were obtained using the Experiences in Close Relationships scale. The participants came from a subsample of the RELATE data set, who had also filled out the adult attachment measure. Those young adults living in Utah County, Utah, an area of the country with a higher than normal birthrate (88% members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints), also had higher than average adult attachment scores. While the methodology was not sufficient to assess causal direction nor eliminate the possibility of unidentified influences, an undiscussed psychological factor, adult attachment, may play a role in the numerical declines observed among nonimmigrant communities in the USA and Europe. PMID:17450996

  7. Electron attachment to fluorocarbon radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuman, Nicholas

    2014-10-01

    Most plasma environments contain populations of short-lived species such as radicals, the chemistry of which can have significant effects on the overall chemistry of the system. However, few experimental measurements of the kinetics of electron attachment to radicals exist due to the inherent difficulties of working with transient species. Calculations from first principles have been attempted, but are arduous and, because electron attachment is so sensitive to the specifics of the potential surface, their accuracy has not been established. Electron attachment to small fluorocarbon radicals is particularly important, as the data are needed for predictive modeling of plasma etching of semiconductor materials, a key process in the industrial fabrication of microelectronics. We have recently developed a novel flowing afterglow technique to measure several types of otherwise difficult to study plasma processes, including thermal electron attachment to radicals. Variable Electron and Neutral Density Attachment Mass Spectrometry (VENDAMS) exploits dissociative electron attachment in a weakly ionized plasma as a radical source. Here, we apply VENDAMS to a series of halofluorocarbon precursors in order to measure the kinetics of thermal electron attachment to fluorocarbon radicals. Results are presented for CF2, CF3, C2F5,C2F3,1-C3F7, 2-C3F7, and C3F5 from 300 K to 900 K. Both the magnitude and the temperature dependences of rate coefficients as well as product branching between associative and dissociative attachment are highly system specific; however, thermal attachment to all species is inefficient, never exceeding 5% of the collision rate. The data are analyzed using a recently developed kinetic modeling approach, which uses extended Vogt-Wannier theory as a starting point, accounts for dynamic effects such as coupling between the electron and nuclear motions through empirically validated functional forms, and finally uses statistical theory to determine the fate of

  8. Mercury Binding Sites in Thiol-Functionalized Mesostructured Silica

    SciTech Connect

    Billinge, Simon J.L.; McKimmey, Emily J.; Shatnawi, Mouath; Kim, HyunJeong; Petkov, Valeri; Wermeille, Didier; Pinnavaia, Thomas J.

    2010-07-13

    Thiol-functionalized mesostructured silica with anhydrous compositions of (SiO{sub 2}){sub 1-x}(LSiO{sub 1.5}){sub x}, where L is a mercaptopropyl group and x is the fraction of functionalized framework silicon centers, are effective trapping agents for the removal of mercuric(II) ions from water. In the present work, we investigate the mercury-binding mechanism for representative thiol-functionalized mesostructures by atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data and by Raman spectroscopy. The mesostructures with wormhole framework structures and compositions corresponding to x = 0.30 and 0.50 were prepared by direct assembly methods in the presence of a structure-directing amine porogen. PDF analyses of five mercury-loaded compositions with Hg/S ratios of 0.50-1.30 provided evidence for the bridging of thiolate sulfur atoms to two metal ion centers and the formation of chain structures on the pore surfaces. We find no evidence for Hg-O bonds and can rule out oxygen coordination of the mercury at greater than the 10% level. The relative intensities of the PDF peaks corresponding to Hg-S and Hg-Hg atomic pairs indicate that the mercury centers cluster on the functionalized surfaces by virtue of thiolate bridging, regardless of the overall mercury loading. However, the Raman results indicate that the complexation of mercury centers by thiolate depends on the mercury loading. At low mercury loadings (Hg/S {le} 0.5), the dominant species is an electrically neutral complex in which mercury most likely is tetrahedrally coordinated to bridging thiolate ligands, as in Hg(SBu{sup t}){sub 2}. At higher loadings (Hg/S 1.0-1.3), mercury complex cations predominate, as evidenced by the presence of charge-balancing anions (nitrate) on the surface. This cationic form of bound mercury is assigned a linear coordination to two bridging thiolate ligands.

  9. Atmospheric reactivity of alcohols, thiols and fluoroalcohols with chlorine atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzon Ruiz, Andres

    Alcohols, thiols and fluoroalcohols are volatile organic compounds (VOCs) which are emitted to the atmosphere from both natural (vegetation, oceans, volcanoes, etc.) and anthropogenic sources (fuels, solvents, wastewater, incinerators, refrigerants, etc.). These pollutants can be eliminated from the troposphere by deposition on the terrestrial surface, direct photolysis or reaction with different tropospheric oxidants. Reactions of VOCs with tropospheric oxidants are involved in the well-known atmospheric phenomenon of photochemical smog or the production of tropospheric ozone. The oxidation of these VOCs in the troposphere is mainly initiated by reaction with OH radicals during the daytime and with NO radicals at night. However, in recent years, the oxidation by chlorine atoms (Cl) has gained great importance in the study of atmospheric reactions because they may exert some influence in the boundary layer, particularly in marine and coastal environments. In general, Cl atoms are much more reactive species than OH and NO; radicals and therefore low concentrations of Cl may compete with OH and NO3 in hydrocarbon oxidation processes. The main source of tropospheric Cl atoms is believed to be the photolysis of chlorine-containing molecules generated by heterogeneous reactions of sea salt aerosols. It has also been proposed that Cl atoms, produced in the photolysis of Cl2 emitted from industrial processes, may enhance hydrocarbon oxidation rates and ozone production in urban environments. In this work, a kinetic, theoretical and mechanistic study of the reaction of several alcohols, thiols, and fluoroalcohols with Cl atoms has been carried out. Pulsed laser photolysis-fluorescence resonance (PLP-RF) technique was used for the kinetic study as a function of temperature and pressure. An environmental chamber-Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) system was also employed in the kinetic studies. Tropospheric lifetimes of these pollutants were estimated using obtained kinetic

  10. Oxidative nucleophilic strategy for synthesis of thiocyanates and trifluoromethyl sulfides from thiols.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Kazuya; Sakagami, Konomi; Miyamoto, Yumi; Jin, Xiongjie; Mizuno, Noritaka

    2014-12-01

    Thiocyanates and trifluoromethyl sulfides are important compounds and have classically been synthesized via multistep procedures together with the formation of significant amounts of byproducts. Herein, we demonstrate an oxidative nucleophilic strategy for the synthesis of thiocyanates and trifluoromethyl sulfides from thiol starting materials using nucleophilic reagents such as TMSCN and TMSCF3 (TMS = trimethylsilyl). In the presence of a 2 × 2 manganese oxide-based octahedral molecular sieve (OMS-2) and potassium fluoride (KF), various structurally diverse thiocyanates and trifluoromethyl sulfides could be synthesized in almost quantitative yields (typically >90%). The presented cyanation and trifluoromethylation reactions proceed through the OMS-2-catalyzed oxidative homocoupling of thiols to give disulfides followed by nucleophilic bond cleavage to produce the desired compounds and thiolate species (herein S-trimethylsilylated thiols). OMS-2 can catalyze oxidative homocoupling of the thiolate species, thus resulting formally in the quantitative production of thiocyanates and trifluoromethyl sulfides from thiols. PMID:25297894

  11. Performance comparison of acrylic and thiol-acrylic resins in two-photon polymerization.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lijia; Xiong, Wei; Zhou, Yushen; Liu, Ying; Huang, Xi; Li, Dawei; Baldacchini, Tommaso; Jiang, Lan; Lu, Yongfeng

    2016-06-13

    Microfabrication by two-photon polymerization is investigated using resins based on thiol-ene chemistry. In particular, resins containing different amounts of a tetrafunctional acrylic monomer and a tetrafunctional thiol molecule are used to create complex microstructures. We observe the enhancement of several characteristics of two-photon polymerization when using thiol-acrylic resins. Specifically, microfabrication is carried out using higher writing velocities and it produces stronger polymeric microstructures. Furthermore, the amount of shrinkage typically observed in the production of three-dimensional microstructures is reduced also. By means of microspectrometry, we confirm that the thiol-acrylate mixture in TPP resins promote monomer conversion inducing a higher degree of cross-linked network formation. PMID:27410383

  12. One- and two-electron oxidation of thiols: mechanisms, kinetics and biological fates.

    PubMed

    Trujillo, Madia; Alvarez, Beatriz; Radi, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    The oxidation of biothiols participates not only in the defense against oxidative damage but also in enzymatic catalytic mechanisms and signal transduction processes. Thiols are versatile reductants that react with oxidizing species by one- and two-electron mechanisms, leading to thiyl radicals and sulfenic acids, respectively. These intermediates, depending on the conditions, participate in further reactions that converge on different stable products. Through this review, we will describe the biologically relevant species that are able to perform these oxidations and we will analyze the mechanisms and kinetics of the one- and two-electron reactions. The processes undergone by typical low-molecular-weight thiols as well as the particularities of specific thiol proteins will be described, including the molecular determinants proposed to account for the extraordinary reactivities of peroxidatic thiols. Finally, the main fates of the thiyl radical and sulfenic acid intermediates will be summarized. PMID:26329537

  13. AFM-assisted fabrication of thiol SAM pattern with alternating quantified surface potential

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Thiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are widely used in many nano- and bio-technology applications. We report a new approach to create and characterize a thiol SAMs micropattern with alternating charges on a flat gold-coated substrate using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). We produced SAMs-patterns made of alternating positively charged, negatively charged, and hydrophobic-terminated thiols by an automated AFM-assisted manipulation, or nanografting. We show that these thiol patterns possess only small topographical differences as revealed by AFM, and distinguished differences in surface potential (20-50 mV), revealed by KPFM. The pattern can be helpful in the development of biosensor technologies, specifically for selective binding of biomolecules based on charge and hydrophobicity, and serve as a model for creating surfaces with quantified alternating surface potential distribution. PMID:21711703

  14. Thiol-activated serine proteinases from nymphal hemolymph of the African migratory locust, Locusta migratoria migratorioides.

    PubMed

    Hanzon, Jacob; Smirnoff, Patricia; Applebaum, Shalom W; Mattoo, Autar K; Birk, Yehudith

    2003-02-01

    Two unique serine proteinase isoenzymes (LmHP-1 and LmHP-2) were isolated from the hemolymph of African migratory locust (Locusta migratoria migratorioides) nymphs. Both have a molecular mass of about 23 kDa and are activated by thiol-reducing agents. PMSF abolishes enzymes activity only after thiol activation, while the cysteine proteinase inhibitors E-64, iodoacetamide, and heavy metals fail to inhibit the thiol-activated enzymes. The N-terminal sequence was determined for the more-abundant LmHP-2 isoenzyme. It exhibits partial homology to that of other insect serine proteinases and similar substrate specificity and inhibition by the synthetic and protein trypsin inhibitors pABA, TLCK, BBI, and STI. The locust trypsins LmHP-1 and LmHP-2 constitute a new category of serine proteases wherein the active site of the enzyme is exposed by thiol activation without cleavage of peptide bonds. PMID:12559979

  15. Controlling Topological Entanglement in Engineered Protein Hydrogels with a Variety of Thiol Coupling Chemistries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Shengchang; Olsen, Bradley

    2014-05-01

    Topological entanglements between polymer chains are achieved in associating protein hydrogels through the synthesis of high molecular weight proteins via chain extension using a variety of thiol coupling chemistries, including disulfide formation, thiol-maleimide, thiol-bromomaleimide and thiol-ene. Coupling of cysteines via disulfide formation results in the most pronounced entanglement effect in hydrogels, while other chemistries provide versatile means of changing the extent of entanglement, achieving faster chain extension, and providing a facile method of controlling the network hierarchy and incorporating stimuli responsivities. The addition of trifunctional coupling agents causes incomplete crosslinking and introduces branching architecture to the protein molecules. The high-frequency plateau modulus and the entanglement plateau modulus can be tuned by changing the ratio of difunctional chain extender to the trifunctional branching unit. Therefore, these chain extension reactions show promise in delicately controlling the relaxation and mechanical properties of engineered protein hydrogels in ways that complement their design through genetic engineering.

  16. Mass Spectrometry in Studies of Protein Thiol Chemistry and Signaling: Opportunities and Caveats

    PubMed Central

    Devarie Baez, Nelmi O.; Reisz, Julie A.; Furdui, Cristina M.

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has become a powerful and widely utilized tool in the investigation of protein thiol chemistry, biochemistry, and biology. Very early biochemical studies of metabolic enzymes have brought to light the broad spectrum of reactivity profiles that distinguish cysteine thiols with functions in catalysis and protein stability from other cysteine residues in proteins. The development of MS methods for the analysis of proteins using electrospray ionization (ESI) or matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) coupled with the emergence of high-resolution mass analyzers have been instrumental in advancing studies of thiol modifications, both in single proteins and within the cellular context. This article reviews MS instrumentation and methods of analysis employed in investigations of thiols and their reactivity toward a range of small biomolecules. A selected number of studies are detailed to highlight the advantages brought about by the MS technologies along with the caveats associated with these analyses. PMID:25261734

  17. Controlling topological entanglement in engineered protein hydrogels with a variety of thiol coupling chemistries

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shengchang; Olsen, Bradley D.

    2014-01-01

    Topological entanglements between polymer chains are achieved in associating protein hydrogels through the synthesis of high molecular weight proteins via chain extension using a variety of thiol coupling chemistries, including disulfide formation, thiol-maleimide, thiol-bromomaleimide and thiol-ene. Coupling of cysteines via disulfide formation results in the most pronounced entanglement effect in hydrogels, while other chemistries provide versatile means of changing the extent of entanglement, achieving faster chain extension, and providing a facile method of controlling the network hierarchy and incorporating stimuli responsivities. The addition of trifunctional coupling agents causes incomplete crosslinking and introduces branching architecture to the protein molecules. The high-frequency plateau modulus and the entanglement plateau modulus can be tuned by changing the ratio of difunctional chain extender to the trifunctional branching unit. Therefore, these chain extension reactions show promise in delicately controlling the relaxation and mechanical properties of engineered protein hydrogels in ways that complement their design through genetic engineering. PMID:24860800

  18. Novel pyrazoline-based fluorescent probe for detecting thiols and its application in cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rong-Rong; Zhang, Jin-Feng; Wang, Sheng-Qing; Cheng, Yan-Long; Miao, Jun-Ying; Zhao, Bao-Xiang

    2015-02-01

    A new compound, N-(4-(1,5-diphenyl-4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazol-3-yl)phenyl)-acrylamide (probe L), was designed and synthesized as a highly sensitive and selective fluorescent probe for recognizing and detecting thiol from other amino acids. On being mixed with thiol in buffered DMSO:HEPES = 1:1 solution at pH 7.4, the probe exhibited the blue emission at 474 nm. This probe is very sensitive and displayed a linear fluorescence off-on response to thiol. The fluorescence emission of the probe is pH independent in the physiological pH range. Living cell imaging of HeLa cells confirmed its cell permeability and its ability to selectively detect thiol in cells. The structure of the probe was characterized by IR, NMR and HRMS spectroscopy analysis.

  19. Protection against ionising radiation and synergism with thiols by zinc aspartate.

    PubMed

    Floersheim, G L; Floersheim, P

    1986-06-01

    Pre-treatment with zinc aspartate protected mice against the lethal effects of radiation and raised the LD50 from 8 Gy to 12.2 Gy. Zinc chloride and zinc sulphate were clearly less active. The radioprotective effect of zinc aspartate was equivalent to cysteamine and slightly inferior to S,2-aminoethylisothiourea (AET). Zinc aspartate displayed a similar therapeutic index to the thiols but could be applied at an earlier time before irradiation. Synergistic effects occurred with the combined administration of zinc aspartate and thiols. By giving zinc aspartate with cysteamine, the LD50 was increased to 13.25 Gy and, by combining it in the optimal protocol with AET, to 17.3 Gy. The radioprotection by zinc and its synergism with thiols is explained by the stabilisation of thiols through the formation of zinc complexes. PMID:3518853

  20. Magnetic adsorbent of Fe3O4@SiO2 core-shell nanoparticles modified with thiol group for chloroauric ion adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roto, Roto; Yusran, Yusran; Kuncaka, Agus

    2016-07-01

    The magnetic adsorbent of Fe3O4@SiO2 core-shell nanoparticles modified with thiol group was synthesized for chloroauric ([AuCl4]-) adsorption. The Fe3O4 nanoparticles were prepared by co-precipitation method under mechanical stirring and coated with SiO2 by acid hydrolysis of Na2SiO3 under N2 purging. The coating of Fe3O4 nanoparticles with SiO2 prevents particles' agglomeration by forming Fe3O4 Fe3O4 Fe3O4@SiO2 core-shell and avoids dissolution of the Fe3O4 core in the acidic medium. The coated Fe3O4 particle was modified with a thiol group using 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane via silanization reaction. The results suggest that SiO2-coated Fe3O4 particles have a size of 10-20 nm. The FTIR and EDX data indicate that the thiol groups are successfully attached to the surface of the nanoparticles. The [AuCl4]- ion adsorption by the Fe3O4@SiO2 core-shell nanoparticles followed Langmuir isotherm model with a maximum adsorption capacity of 115 mg/g and free energy (ΔG°) of 24.8 kJ/mol. The thiourea solution can be used to desorb most of the adsorbed [AuCl4]- ion. The adsorption using magnetic compounds provides easy access to the separation for both preparation and recovery.

  1. Degradable thiol-acrylate hydrogels as tunable matrices for three-dimensional hepatic culture.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yiting; Lin, Chien-Chi

    2014-11-01

    A degradable poly(ethylene glycol)-diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogel system was developed using simple macromer formulations and visible light initiated thiol-acrylate photopolymerization. In addition to PEGDA, other components in this gelation system include eosin-Y as a photo-sensitizer, bi-functional thiol (dithiothreitol, DTT) as a dual-purpose co-initiator and cross-linker, and N-vinylpyrrolidone (NVP) as a co-monomer. Gelation was achieved through a mixed-mode step-chain growth polymerization mechanism under bright visible light exposure. Increasing photo-sensitizer or NVP concentrations accelerated photo-crosslinking and increased final gel stiffness. Increasing bi-functional thiol content in the prepolymer solution only increased gel stiffness to some degree. As the concentration of thiol surpassed certain range, thiol-mediated chain-transfer events caused thiol-acrylate gels to form with lower degree of cross-linking. Pendant peptide, such as integrin ligand RGDS, was more effectively immobilized in the network via a thiol-acrylate reaction (using thiol-bearing peptide Ac-CRGDS. Underline indicates cross-linkable motif) than through homo-polymerization of acrylated peptide (e.g., acryl-RGDS). The incorporation of pendant peptide comes with the expense of a lower degree of gel cross-linking, which was rectified by increasing co-monomer NVP content. Without the use of any readily degradable macromer, these visible light initiated mixed-mode cross-linked hydrogels degraded hydrolytically due to the formation of thiol-ether-ester bonds following thiol-acrylate reactions. An exponential growth relationship was identified between the hydrolytic degradation rate and bifunctional thiol content in the prepolymer solution. Finally, we evaluated the cytocompatibility of these mixed-mode cross-linked degradable hydrogels using in situ encapsulation of hepatocellular carcinoma Huh7 cells. Encapsulated Huh7 cells remained alive and proliferated as time to form cell clusters

  2. 10 CFR 75.15 - Facility attachments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Accounting and Control for Facilities § 75.15 Facility attachments. (a) The Facility Attachment or... under Article 39(b) of the main text of the Safeguards Agreement, do not have Facility Attachments...

  3. Immediate stabilization of human blood for delayed quantification of endogenous thiols and disulfides.

    PubMed

    Giustarini, Daniela; Galvagni, Federico; Orlandini, Maurizio; Fanti, Paolo; Rossi, Ranieri

    2016-04-15

    Endogenous thiols undergo rapid and reversible oxidation to disulfides when exposed to oxidants and are, therefore, suitable biomarkers of oxidative stress. However, accurate analysis of thiols in blood is frequently compromised by their artifactual oxidation during sample manipulation, which spuriously elevates the disulfide levels. Here, we describe a validated pre-analytical procedure that prevents both artifactual oxidation of thiols during sample manipulation and their oxidative decay for months in biosamples that are stored at -80°C. Addition of N-ethylmaleimide to blood samples from healthy donors was used to stabilize whole blood, red blood cells, platelets and plasma disulfides, whereas addition of citrate buffer followed by dilution of plasma with H2O was used to stabilize plasma thiols. The concentrations of thiols and disulfides were stable in all biosamples for at least 6 months when analyzed by UV/Vis HPLC at regular intervals. Only 3 ml of blood were needed to perform the analyses of thiols and disulfides in the different blood fractions. This pre-analytical procedure is reliable for use in both animal and human prospective studies. Its ease of implementation makes the method suitable for application to multicenter studies where blood samples are collected by different sites and personnel and are shipped to specific specialized laboratories. PMID:26896310

  4. Yeast genes required for conversion of grape precursors to varietal thiols in wine.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Margarita; Gardner, Richard C

    2015-08-01

    Three varietal thiols are important for the tropical fruit aromas of Sauvignon blanc: 4-mercapto-4-methylpentan-2-one (4MMP), 3-mercaptohexanol (3MH) and its acetylated derivative 3-mercaptohexyl acetate (3MHA). These thiols are produced by yeast during fermentation from precursors in grape juice. Here we identify genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that are required for the transport and cleavage of two thiol precursors: cysteine-4MMP and glutathione-3MH. A full-length copy of IRC7 is absolutely required for the cleavage of both precursors in the tested strains; the deleted form of the enzyme found in most yeast strains is incapable of converting these compounds into detectable thiols. By using strains that overexpress full-length IRC7, we further show that the glutathione transporter OPT1 and the transpeptidase CIS2 are also required for conversion of glut-3MH to its varietal thiol. No transporter for cys-4MMP was identified: a strain deleted for all nine known cysteine transport genes was still capable of converting cys-4MMP to its varietal thiol, and was also able to take up cysteine at high concentrations. Based on these results, we conclude that cysteine and glutathione precursors make a relatively minor contribution to 3MH production from most grape juices. PMID:26038341

  5. “Turn-on” fluorescence probe integrated polymer nanoparticles for sensing biological thiol molecules

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Chung Yen; Tan, Si Yu; Lu, Yunpeng; Bai, Linyi; Li, Menghuan; Li, Peizhou; Zhang, Quan; Selvan, Subramanian Tamil; Zhao, Yanli

    2014-01-01

    A “turn-on” thiol-responsive fluorescence probe was synthesized and integrated into polymeric nanoparticles for sensing intracellular thiols. There is a photo-induced electron transfer process in the off state of the probe, and this process is terminated upon the reaction with thiol compounds. Configuration interaction singles (CIS) calculation was performed to confirm the mechanism of this process. A series of sensing studies were carried out, showing that the probe-integrated nanoparticles were highly selective towards biological thiol compounds over non-thiolated amino acids. Kinetic studies were also performed to investigate the relative reaction rate between the probe and the thiolated amino acids. Subsequently, the Gibbs free energy of the reactions was explored by means of the electrochemical method. Finally, the detection system was employed for sensing intracellular thiols in cancer cells, and the sensing selectivity could be further enhanced with the use of a cancer cell-targeting ligand in the nanoparticles. This development paves a path for the sensing and detection of biological thiols, serving as a potential diagnostic tool in the future. PMID:25394758

  6. Purification, Characterization, and Effect of Thiol Compounds on Activity of the Erwinia carotovora L-Asparaginase

    PubMed Central

    Warangkar, Suchita C.; Khobragade, Chandrahas N.

    2010-01-01

    L-asparaginase was extracted from Erwinia carotovora and purified by ammonium sulfate fractionation (60–70%), Sephadex G-100, CM cellulose, and DEAE sephadex chromatography. The apparent Mr of enzyme under nondenaturing and denaturing conditions was 150 kDa and 37 ± 0.5 kDa, respectively. L-asparaginase activity was studied in presence of thiols, namely, L-cystine (Cys), L-methionine (Met), N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), and reduced glutathione (GSH). Kinetic parameters in presence of thiols (10–400 μM) showed an increase in Vmax values (2000, 2223, 2380, 2500, and control 1666.7 μmoles mg−1min−1) and a decrease in Km values (0.086, 0.076, 0.062, 0.055 and control 0.098 mM) indicating nonessential mode of activation. KA values displayed propensity to bind thiols. A decrease in Vmax/Km ratio in concentration plots showed inverse relationship between free thiol groups (NAC and GSH) and bound thiol group (Cys and Met). Enzyme activity was enhanced in presence of thiol protecting reagents like dithiothreitol (DTT), 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME), and GSH, but inhibited by p-chloromercurybenzoate (PCMB) and iodoacetamide (IA). PMID:21048860

  7. Interfacial thiol-ene photo-click reactions for forming multilayer hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Han; Fraser, Andrew K.; Lin, Chien-Chi

    2014-01-01

    Interfacial visible light-mediated thiol-ene photo-click reactions were developed for preparing step-growth hydrogels with multilayer structures. The effect of a non-cleavage type photoinitiator eosin-Y on visible light-mediated thiol-ene photopolymerization was first characterized using in situ photo-rheometry, gel fraction, and equilibrium swelling ratio. Next, spectrophotometric properties of eosin-Y in the presence of various relevant macromer species were evaluated using UV/Vis spectrometry. It was determined that eosin-Y was able to re-initiate thiol-ene photo-click reaction even after light exposure. Due to its small molecular weight, most eosin-Y molecules readily leached out from the hydrogels. The diffusion of residual eosin-Y from pre-formed hydrogels was exploited for fabricating multilayer step-growth hydrogels. Interfacial hydrogel coating was formed via the same visible light-mediated gelation mechanism without adding fresh initiator. The thickness of the thiol-ene gel coating could be easily controlled by adjusting visible light exposure time, eosin-Y concentration initially loaded in the core gel, or macromer concentration in the coating solution. The major benefits of this interfacial thiol-ene coating system include its simplicity and cytocompatibility. The formation of thiol-ene hydrogels and coatings neither requires nor generates any cytotoxic components. This new gelation chemistry may have great utilities in controlled release of multiple sensitive growth factors and encapsulation of multiple cell types for tissue regeneration. PMID:23384151

  8. Conjugation of Microcystins with Thiols Is Reversible: Base-Catalyzed Deconjugation for Chemical Analysis.

    PubMed

    Miles, Christopher O; Sandvik, Morten; Nonga, Hezron E; Ballot, Andreas; Wilkins, Alistair L; Rise, Frode; Jaabaek, J Atle H; Loader, Jared I

    2016-05-16

    Microcystins are potent cyclic heptapeptide toxins found in many freshwater cyanobacteria. Most microcystins contain an α,β-unsaturated amide that can react with thiol-containing amino acids, peptides, and proteins in vivo and in vitro. While soluble conjugates formed from small peptides can be extracted and analyzed directly by LC-MS, microcystins conjugated to proteins are analyzed after oxidative cleavage of their Adda side chains, but information on which microcystin analogues were present is lost. Observations during the development of thiol-derivatization-based LC-MS methods for microcystin analysis indicated that the reaction of thiols with microcystins was reversible. The kinetics of deconjugation was investigated with mercaptoethanol as a model thiol to identify suitable reaction conditions. A range of microcystins conjugated to mercaptoethanol, methanethiol, cysteine, and glutathione were then successfully deconjugated, demonstrating the feasibility of releasing conjugated forms of microcystins for chemical analysis. Reagents for removing the released thiols or for trapping the released microcystins increased the reaction rate. Optimization of methodologies based on this reaction should increase the method's utility for measuring free and conjugated microcystins. The results also indicate that thiol-conjugated microcystins slowly release free microcystins, even at neutral pH, with consequences for assessment of toxin exposure, metabolism, and trophic transfer. A range of other common natural and environmental toxins, such as deoxynivalenol and acrylamide, also contain α,β-unsaturated carbonyl groups and can be expected to behave in a similar manner. PMID:26999366

  9. Oxidative stress and decreased thiol level in patients with migraine: cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Eren, Yasemin; Dirik, Ebru; Neşelioğlu, Salim; Erel, Özcan

    2015-12-01

    Although migraine is a neurological disorder known since long, its physiopathology remains unclear. Recent studies suggest that migraine is associated with oxidative stress; however, they report divergent results. The aim of the present study was to evaluate total antioxidant status (TAS), total oxidant status (TOS), oxidative stress index (OSI), and serum thiol level in migraine patients with or without aura. The study group consisted of 141 migraine patients. The control group included 70 healthy subjects. TAS, TOS, OSI were evaluated using a method developed by Erel. Serum thiol level was measured using the Hu method. No difference was found in TAS, TOS, OSI between the patients and controls. The level of thiol was significantly lower in patients than in controls. Negative correlations were detected between thiol level and Migraine Disability Assessment score in patients. Although TAS, TOS, and OSI were similar to those of the control group, serum thiol level, an important marker of antioxidant capacity, was significantly lower in migraines compared with controls, and caused more serious disability. Novel treatment approaches may be developed based on these data, and compounds containing thiol, such as alpha lipoic acid and N-acetyl cysteine, may be used in prophylaxis. PMID:25595415

  10. Thiol passivation of MWIR type II superlattice photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salihoglu, O.; Muti, A.; Aydinli, A.

    2013-06-01

    Poor passivation on photodetectors can result in catastrophic failure of the device. Abrupt termination of mesa side walls during pixel definition generates dangling bonds that lead to inversion layers and surface traps leading to surface leakage currents that short circuit diode action. Good passivation, therefore, is critical in the fabrication of high performance devices. Silicondioxide has been the main stay of passivation for commercial photodetectors, deposited at high temperatures and high RF powers using plasma deposition techniques. In photodetectors based on III-V compounds, sulphur passivation has been shown to replace oxygen and saturate the dangling bonds. Despite its effectiveness, it degrades over time. More effort is required to create passivation layers which eliminate surface leakage current. In this work, we propose the use of sulphur based octadecanethiol (ODT), CH3(CH2)17SH, as a passivation layer for the InAs/GaSb superlattice photodetectors that acts as a self assembled monolayer (SAM). ODT SAMs consist of a chain of 18 carbon atoms with a sulphur atom at its head. ODT Thiol coating is a simple process that consist of dipping the sample into the solution for a prescribed time. Excellent electrical performance of diodes tested confirm the effectiveness of the sulphur head stabilized by the intermolecular interaction due to van der Walls forces between the long chains of ODT SAM which results in highly stable ultrathin hydrocarbon layers without long term degradation.

  11. Biothiol Xenon MRI Sensor Based on Thiol-Addition Reaction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shengjun; Jiang, Weiping; Ren, Lili; Yuan, Yaping; Zhang, Bin; Luo, Qing; Guo, Qianni; Bouchard, Louis-S; Liu, Maili; Zhou, Xin

    2016-06-01

    Biothiols such as cysteine (Cys), homocysteine (Hcy), and glutathione (GSH) play an important role in regulating the vital functions of living organisms. Knowledge of their biodistribution in real-time could help diagnose a variety of conditions. However, existing methods of biothiol detection are invasive and require assays. Herein we report a molecular biosensor for biothiol detection using the nuclear spin resonance of (129)Xe. The (129)Xe biosensor consists of a cryptophane cage encapsulating a xenon atom and an acrylate group. The latter serves as a reactive site to covalently bond biothiols through a thiol-addition reaction. The biosensor enables discrimination of Cys from Hcy and GSH through the chemical shift and average reaction rate. This biosensor can be detected at a concentration of 10 μM in a single scan and it has been applied to detect biothiols in bovine serum solution. Our results indicate that this biosensor is a promising tool for the real-time imaging of biothiol distributions. PMID:27128102

  12. Thiols, recA induction and radiosensitivity in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Naslund, M; Anderstam, B; Granath, F; Ehrenberg, L

    1996-01-01

    Induction by gamma-radiation, UV radiation or hydroxyurea of RecA gene product synthesis in Escherichia coli, monitored as beta-D-galactosidase in recA-lacZ fusion strains, was shown to be inhibited if 2-mercaptoethylamine (MEA) was added before treatment with the inducing agents. If cysteine (Cys) at low concentrations was added at the same time as MEA it counteracted the action of MEA. The effect of MEA may be described as a competitive inhibition of an inducing or conducting effect of Cys. In E. coli GE499 (uvrA+), complete inhibition by 30-mmol dm-3 MEA of recA induction was associated with about five times higher radio-resistence. Both of these effects of MEA were completely reversed by 0.3-mmol dm-3 Cys. As shown in parallel experiments with E. coli GE500 (uvrA-), these effects of MEA and Cys were shown to be independent of excision-repair proficiency. Treatment of bacteria with MEA and/or Cys was shown not to lead to increased intracellular concentrations of these thiols. Instead, treatment with them appeared to provoke conspicuous increases in glutathione levels, which are, however, probably not directly involved in the studied action of MEA and Cys. PMID:8601760

  13. Cytokinin Determines Thiol-Mediated Arsenic Tolerance and Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Thotegowdanapalya C; Castrillo, Gabriel; Navarro, Cristina; Zarco-Fernández, Sonia; Ramireddy, Eswarayya; Mateo, Cristian; Zamarreño, Angel M; Paz-Ares, Javier; Muñoz, Riansares; García-Mina, Jose M; Hernández, Luis E; Schmülling, Thomas; Leyva, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    The presence of arsenic in soil and water is a constant threat to plant growth in many regions of the world. Phytohormones act in the integration of growth control and stress response, but their role in plant responses to arsenic remains to be elucidated. Here, we show that arsenate [As(V)], the most prevalent arsenic chemical species in nature, causes severe depletion of endogenous cytokinins (CKs) in the model plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We found that CK signaling mutants and transgenic plants with reduced endogenous CK levels showed an As(V)-tolerant phenotype. Our data indicate that in CK-depleted plants exposed to As(V), transcript levels of As(V)/phosphate-transporters were similar or even higher than in wild-type plants. In contrast, CK depletion provoked the coordinated activation of As(V) tolerance mechanisms, leading to the accumulation of thiol compounds such as phytochelatins and glutathione, which are essential for arsenic sequestration. Transgenic CK-deficient Arabidopsis and tobacco lines show a marked increase in arsenic accumulation. Our findings indicate that CK is an important regulatory factor in plant adaptation to arsenic stress. PMID:27208271

  14. Processing and targeting of the thiol protease aleurain: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    This study addresses the processing and targeting of the thiol protease aleurain in monocots. A probe derived from the aleurain cDNA specific for the 5'-most 400 bp (a region encoding the first 140 amino acids of the preprotein hybridized to at least 3 separate elements in the barley genome; only one represented the aleurain gene. In contrast, a probe specific for the remaining 2/23 of the cDNA (representing the protease domain) hybridized to only a single copy sequence. To know if this pattern pertained in other, closely related, monocots, we probed Southern blots of genomic DNA from maize, rye, oats, sorghum, and pearl millet with each probe. In each instance except for maize DNA, the 5' domain probe hybridizes to several fragments in addition to those identified by the protease domain probe. Presumable the darkest hybridization in each represents the fragment carrying the sequences homologous to barley aleurain. The fragments from a given restriction enzyme identified by the protease domain probe in sorghum, millet, and maize, were indistinguishable in size indicating that the gene sequences, as well as flanking DNA, are so well conserved among the group that the location of the hexanucleotide sequences have not diverged. (3 refs., 3 figs.)

  15. Automated computational screening of the thiol reactivity of substituted alkenes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jennifer M; Rowley, Christopher N

    2015-08-01

    Electrophilic olefins can react with the S-H moiety of cysteine side chains. The formation of a covalent adduct through this mechanism can result in the inhibition of an enzyme. The reactivity of an olefin towards cysteine depends on its functional groups. In this study, 325 reactions of thiol-Michael-type additions to olefins were modeled using density functional theory. All combinations of ethenes with hydrogen, methyl ester, amide, and cyano substituents were included. An automated workflow was developed to perform the construction, conformation search, minimization, and calculation of molecular properties for the reactant, carbanion intermediate, and thioether products for a model reaction of the addition of methanethiol to the electrophile. Known cysteine-reactive electrophiles present in the database were predicted to react exergonically with methanethiol through a carbanion with a stability in the 30-40 kcal mol(-1) range. 13 other compounds in our database that are also present in the PubChem database have similar properties. Natural bond orbital parameters were computed and regression analysis was used to determine the relationship between properties of the olefin electronic structure and the product and intermediate stability. The stability of the intermediates is very sensitive to electronic effects on the carbon where the anionic charge is centered. The stability of the products is more sensitive to steric factors. PMID:26159564

  16. Adsorption kinetic process of thiol ligands on gold nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hao; Yang, Lina; Jiang, Yong; Huang, Yuanyuan; Sun, Zhihu; Zhang, Jing; Hu, Tiandou; Pan, Zhiyun; Pan, Guoqiang; Yao, Tao; Bian, Qing; Wei, Shiqiang

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the kinetic mechanism during ligand adsorption on gold nanocrystals is important for designing and fine-tuning their properties and implications. Here, we report a kinetic study on the adsorption process of dodecanethiol ligands on Au nanocrystals of 3.3 nm by an in situ time-resolved X-ray absorption fine structure technique. A two-step process of dodecanethiol adsorption on Au NC surfaces is proposed based on the obtained ligand coverage, which shows a quick increase from 0 to 0.40 within the first 20 min, followed by a much slower increase to the limiting value of 0.94. In-depth analysis suggests that the first stage involves the quick adsorption of dodecanethiol to the corner and edge sites of Au NCs surfaces, leading to remarkable surface Au-Au bond length relaxation (from 2.79 to 2.81 Å) and pronounced gold-to-ligand charge transfer. The second step that corresponds to the much slower adsorption process to the surface facets could be described by the Langmuir kinetics equation with an adsorption rate constant of 0.0132 min(-1) and an initial coverage of 0.41, in good agreement with the initially preferable adsorption of thiols to the most favorable sites. PMID:24122096

  17. Modification of crystalline silicon and diamond surfaces for the attachment of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strother, Todd Cory

    2001-07-01

    Hydrogen-terminated Si(111) surfaces are first modified by attachment of oligodeoxynucleotides, and characterized with respect to DNA surface density, chemical stability, and DNA hybridization binding specificity. Surface functionalization employs the reaction of o-unsaturated alkyl esters with the Si(111) surface using UV irradiation. Cleavage of the ester using potassium tert-butoxide yields a carboxyl-modified surface, which serves as a substrate for the attachment of DNA by means of an electrostatically adsorbed layer of polylysine and attachment of thiol modified DNA using a heterobifunctional cross-linker. The resultant DNA-modified surfaces are shown to exhibit excellent specificity and chemical stability under the conditions of DNA hybridization. The second approach is a more direct method of attaching oligonucleotides to silicon. UV light mediates the reaction of t-butyloxycarbonyl (t-BOC) protected o-unsaturated aminoalkane (10-aminodec-1-ene) with hydrogenterminated silicon (001). Removal of the t-BOC protecting group yields an aminodecane-modified silicon surface. The resultant amino groups can be coupled to thiol-modified oligodeoxyribonucleotides using a heterobifunctional crosslinker, permitting the preparation of DNA arrays. Two methods for controlling the surface density of oligodeoxyribonucleotides were explored: in the first, binary mixtures of 10-aminodec-1 ene and dodecene were utilized in the initial UV-mediated coupling reaction; a linear relationship was found between the mole fraction of aminodecene and the density of DNA hybridization sites. In the second, only a portion of the t-BOC protecting groups was removed from the surface by limiting the time allowed for the deprotection reaction. The final surface explored uses a UV-mediated reaction of alkenes to hydrogenterminated diamond. Polycrystalline diamond thin films are hydrogen terminated using a hydrogen plasma and are subjected to UV light in the presence of 1-alkenes. A

  18. Small-scale polymer structures enabled by thiol-ene copolymer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasprzak, Scott Edward

    2009-12-01

    The research described herein is aimed at exploring the thermomechanical properties of thiol-ene polymers in bulk form, investigating the ability of thiol-ene polymers to behave desirably as photolithographic media, and providing the first characterization of the mechanical properties of two-photon stereolithography-produced polymer structures. The thiol-ene polymerization reaction itself is well-characterized and described in the literature, but the thermomechanical properties of thiol-ene and thiol-ene/acrylate polymers still require more rigorous study. Understanding the behavior of thiol-ene networks is a crucial step towards their expanded use in bulk form, and particularly in specialized applications such as shape memory devices. Additionally, the thiol-ene polymerization reaction mechanism exhibits unique properties which make these polymers well suited to photolithography, overcoming the typical dichotomy of current materials which either exhibit excellent photolithographic behavior or have controllable properties. Finally, before two-photon stereolithography can create mechanisms and devices which can serve any mechanically functional role, the mechanical properties of the polymers they produce must be quantitatively characterized, which is complicated by the extremely small scale at which these structures are produced. As such, mechanical characterization to date has been strictly qualitative. Fourier transfer infrared spectroscopy revealed functional group conversion information and sol-fraction testing revealed the presence of unconverted monomer and impurities, while dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and tensile testing revealed the thermomechanical responses of the systems. Nanoindentation was employed to characterize the mechanical properties of micrometer-scale polymer structures produced by two-photon stereolithography. Optical and electron microscopy were exploited to provide both quantitative and qualitative evaluations of thiol-ene/acrylate and

  19. Size-controlled silver nanoparticles stabilized on thiol-functionalized MIL-53(Al) frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xinquan; Liu, Min; Zhang, Anfeng; Hu, Shen; Song, Chunshan; Zhang, Guoliang; Guo, Xinwen

    2015-05-01

    A postsynthetic modification method was used to prepare thiol-functionalized metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) by the amidation of mercaptoacetic acid with the amine group, which is present in the frameworks of NH2-MIL-53(Al). By doing this, the thiol group has been successfully grafted on the MOF, which perfectly combined the highly developed pore structures of the MOF with the strong coordination ability of the thiol group. The resulting thiol-functionalized MIL-53(Al) showed a significantly high adsorption capacity for heavy metal ions like Ag+ (182.8 mg g-1). Even more importantly, these grafted thiol groups can be used as anchoring groups for stabilizing metal nanoparticles (NPs) with controllable sizes. Taking silver as an example, monodispersed Ag NPs encapsulated in the cages of MIL-53(Al) have been prepared by using a two-step procedure. In addition, the particle size of the Ag NPs was adjustable to some extent by controlling the initial loading amount. The average size of the smallest Ag NPs is 3.9 +/- 0.9 nm, which is hard to obtain for Ag NPs because of their strong tendency to aggregate.A postsynthetic modification method was used to prepare thiol-functionalized metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) by the amidation of mercaptoacetic acid with the amine group, which is present in the frameworks of NH2-MIL-53(Al). By doing this, the thiol group has been successfully grafted on the MOF, which perfectly combined the highly developed pore structures of the MOF with the strong coordination ability of the thiol group. The resulting thiol-functionalized MIL-53(Al) showed a significantly high adsorption capacity for heavy metal ions like Ag+ (182.8 mg g-1). Even more importantly, these grafted thiol groups can be used as anchoring groups for stabilizing metal nanoparticles (NPs) with controllable sizes. Taking silver as an example, monodispersed Ag NPs encapsulated in the cages of MIL-53(Al) have been prepared by using a two-step procedure. In addition, the particle

  20. A Study of Functional Polymer Colloids Prepared Using Thiol-Ene/Yne Click Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durham, Olivia Z.

    This project demonstrates the first instance of thiol-ene chemistry as the polymerization method for the production of polymer colloids in two-phase heterogeneous suspensions, miniemulsions, and emulsions. This work was also expanded to thiol-yne chemistry for the production of polymer particles containing increased crosslinking density. The utility of thiol-ene and thiol-yne chemistries for polymerization and polymer modification is well established in bulk systems. These reactions are considered 'click' reactions, which can be defined as processes that are both facile and simple, offering high yields with nearly 100% conversion, no side products, easy product separation, compatibility with a diverse variety of commercially available starting materials, and orthogonality with other chemistries. In addition, thiol-ene and thiol-yne chemistry follow a step-growth mechanism for the development of highly uniform polymer networks, where polymer growth is dependent on the coupling of functional groups. These step-growth polymerization systems are in stark contrast to the chain-growth mechanisms of acrylic and styrenic monomers that have dominated the field of conventional heterogeneous polymerizations. Preliminary studies evaluated the mechanism of particle production in suspension and miniemulsion systems. Monomer droplets were compared to the final polymer particles to confirm that particle growth occurred through the polymerization of monomer droplets. Additional parameters examined include homogenization energy (mechanical mixing), diluent species and concentration, and monomer content. These reactions were conducted using photoinitiation to yield particles in a matter of minutes with diameters in the size range of several microns to hundreds of microns in suspensions or submicron particles in miniemulsions. Improved control over the particle size and size distribution was examined through variation of reaction parameters. In addition, a method of seeded suspension

  1. Partner attachment and interpersonal characteristics.

    PubMed

    Kilmann, Peter R; Finch, Holmes; Parnell, Michele M; Downer, Jason T

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated partner attachment and interpersonal characteristics in 134 nonclinical couples in long-term marriages. Irrespective of gender, spouses with greater anxiety over abandonment or discomfort with closeness endorsed dysfunctional relationship beliefs to a greater extent. On the anxiety over abandonment dimension, husbands with higher scores were rated less aggressive, less controlling, and more rebellious, whereas wives with higher scores were rated more dependent, more self-critical, and less competitive. Husbands higher on discomfort with closeness were rated less cooperative and responsible and were rated more aggressive and rebellious. Matched secure couples reported lower marital dissatisfaction than matched insecure or mismatched couples. Future research should contrast samples of nonclinical and clinical couples by marital duration to identify specific partner behaviors that are likely to foster marital dissatisfaction within particular attachment pairings. The authors' findings suggest the importance of marital therapists being attuned to the attachment-related beliefs and interpersonal styles uniquely operating within each couple. PMID:23252639

  2. Synthesis of alkenyl sulfides through the iron-catalyzed cross-coupling reaction of vinyl halides with thiols.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yun-Yung; Wang, Yu-Jen; Lin, Che-Hung; Cheng, Jun-Hao; Lee, Chin-Fa

    2012-07-20

    We report here the iron-catalyzed cross-coupling reaction of alkyl vinyl halides with thiols. While many works are devoted to the coupling of thiols with alkyl vinyl iodides, interestingly, the known S-vinylation of vinyl bromides and chlorides is limited to 1-(2-bromovinyl)benzene and 1-(2-chlorovinyl)benzene. Investigation on the coupling reaction of challenging alkyl vinyl bromides and chlorides with thiols is rare. Since the coupling of 1-(2-bromovinyl)benzene and 1-(2-chlorovinyl)benzene with thiols can be performed in the absence of any catalyst, here we focus on the coupling of thiols with alkyl vinyl halides. This system is generally reactive for alkyl vinyl iodides and bromides to provide the products in good yields. 1-(Chloromethylidene)-4-tert-butyl-cyclohexane was also coupled with thiols, giving the targets in moderate yields. PMID:22708836

  3. Synthesis of a thiol-β-cyclodextrin, a potential agent for controlling enzymatic browning in fruits and vegetables.

    PubMed

    Manta, Carmen; Peralta-Altier, Gabriela; Gioia, Larissa; Méndez, María F; Seoane, Gustavo; Ovsejevi, Karen

    2013-11-27

    A thiol-β-cyclodextrin was synthesized by a simple and environmentally friendly three-step method comprising epoxy activation of β-cyclodextrin, thiosulfate-mediated oxirane opening, and further reduction of the S-alkyl thiosulfate to a thiol group. The final step was optimized by using thiopropyl-agarose, a solid phase reducing agent with many advantages over soluble ones. β-Cyclodextrin thiolation was confirmed by titration with a thiol-reactive reagent, NMR studies, and MALDI-TOF/TOF. Thiolated cyclodextrin had an average value of one thiol group per molecule. Thiol-β-cyclodextrin proved to be an excellent agent for controlling polyphenol oxidase activity. This copper-containing enzyme is responsible for browning in fruits and vegetables. Under the same conditions, thiol-β-cyclodextrin generated a reductive microenvironment that increased the antibrowning effect on Red Delicious apples compared to unmodified β-cyclodextrin. PMID:24215568

  4. An injectable thiol-acrylate poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogel for sustained release of methylprednisolone sodium succinate.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Christopher D; O'Shea, Timothy M; Siegwart, Daniel J; Calo, Eliezer; Anderson, Daniel G; Reynolds, Francis M; Thomas, John A; Slotkin, Jonathan R; Woodard, Eric J; Langer, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Clinically available injectable hydrogels face technical challenges associated with swelling after injection and toxicity from unreacted constituents that impede their performance as surgical biomaterials. To overcome these challenges, we developed a system where chemical gelation was controlled by a conjugate Michael addition between thiol and acrylate in aqueous media, with 97% monomer conversion and 6 wt.% sol fraction. The hydrogel exhibited syneresis on equilibration, reducing to 59.7% of its initial volume. It had mechanical properties similar to soft human tissue with an elastic modulus of 189.8 kPa. Furthermore, a mesh size of 6.9 nm resulted in sustained release of methylprednisolone sodium succinate with a loading efficiency of 2 mg/mL. Functionalization with 50 μg/mL of an oligolysine peptide resulted in attachment of freshly isolated murine mesenchymal stem cells. The rational design of the physical, chemical and biological properties of the hydrogel makes it a potentially promising candidate for injectable applications. PMID:20880573

  5. An injectable thiol-acrylate poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogel for sustained release of methylprednisolone sodium succinate

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, Christopher D.; O’Shea, Timothy M.; Siegwart, Daniel J.; Calo, Eliezer; Anderson, Daniel G.; Reynolds, Francis M.; Thomas, John A.; Slotkin, Jonathan R.; Woodard, Eric J.; Langer, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Clinically available injectable hydrogels face technical challenges associated with swelling after injection and toxicity from unreacted constituents that impede their performance as surgical biomaterials. To overcome these challenges, we developed a system where chemical gelation was controlled by a conjugate Michael addition between thiol and acrylate in aqueous media, with 97% monomer conversion and 6 wt.% sol fraction. The hydrogel exhibited syneresis on equilibration, reducing to 59.7% of its initial volume. It had mechanical properties similar to soft human tissue with an elastic modulus of 189.8 kPa. Furthermore, a mesh size of 6.9 nm resulted in sustained release of methylprednisolone sodium succinate with a loading efficiency of 2 mg/mL. Functionalization with 50 µg/mL of an oligolysine peptide resulted in attachment of freshly isolated murine mesenchymal stem cells. The rational design of the physical, chemical and biological properties of the hydrogel makes it a potentially promising candidate for injectable applications. PMID:20880573

  6. Covalent thiol adducts arising from reactive intermediates of cocaine biotransformation.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Kevin J; DeCaprio, Anthony P

    2013-11-18

    Exposure to cocaine results in the depletion of hepatocellular glutathione and macromolecular protein binding in humans. Such cocaine-induced responses have generally been attributed to oxidative stress and reactive metabolites resulting from oxidative activation of the cocaine tropane nitrogen. However, little conclusive data exists on the mechanistic pathways leading to protein modification or the structure and specificity of cocaine-derived adduction products. We now report a previously uncharacterized route of cocaine bioactivation leading to the covalent adduction of biological thiols, including cysteine and glutathione. Incubation of cocaine with biological nucleophiles in an in vitro biotransformation system containing human liver microsomes identified a monooxygenase-mediated event leading to the oxidation of, and subsequent sulfhydryl addition to, the cocaine aryl moiety. Adduct structures were confirmed using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution, high mass accuracy mass spectrometry. Examination of assays containing transgenic bactosomes expressing single human cytochrome P450 isoforms determined the role of P450s 1A2, 2C19, and 2D6 in the oxidation process resulting in adduct formation. P450-catalyzed aryl epoxide formation and subsequent attack by free nucleophilic moieties is consistent with the resulting adduct structures, mechanisms of formation, and the empirical observation of multiple structural and stereo isomers. Analogous adduction mechanisms were maintained across all sulfhydryl-containing nucleophile models examined; N-acetylcysteine, glutathione, and a synthetic cysteine-containing hexapeptide. Predictive in silico calculations of molecular reactivity and electrophilicity/nucleophilicity were compared to the results of in vitro assay incubations in order to better understand the adduction process using the principles of hard and soft acid and base (HSAB) theory. This study elucidated a novel metabolic

  7. Attached-growth biological reactor

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, D.J.; Heiland, W.K.

    1991-12-16

    An attached growth biological reactor for the growth and harvesting of filamentous fungi has been developed. The reactor contains a rigid cylinder which is partially submerged and rotated in a biological medium containing nutrients for fungal growth and which has been inoculated with a filamentous fungal medium. The filamentous fungi attaches itself to and grows upon the cylinder wherein it is removed by use of a doctoring blade. The reactor can be operated in a continuous mode by continuously supplying oxygen and nutrients to the reactor.

  8. Thiol-Ene functionalized siloxanes for use as elastomeric dental impression materials

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Megan A.; Jankousky, Katherine C.; Bowman, Christopher N.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Thiol- and allyl-functionalized siloxane oligomers are synthesized and evaluated for use as a radical-mediated, rapid set elastomeric dental impression material. Thiol-ene siloxane formulations are crosslinked using a redox-initiated polymerization scheme, and the mechanical properties of the thiol-ene network are manipulated through the incorporation of varying degrees of plasticizer and kaolin filler. Formulations with medium and light body consistencies are further evaluated for their ability to accurately replicate features on both the gross and microscopic levels. We hypothesize that thiol-ene functionalized siloxane systems will exhibit faster setting times and greater detail reproduction than commercially available polyvinylsiloxane (PVS) materials of comparable consistencies. Methods Thiol-ene functionalized siloxane mixtures formulated with varying levels of redox initiators, plasticizer, and kaolin filler are made and evaluated for their polymerization speed (FTIR), consistency (ISO4823.9.2), and surface energy (goniometer). Feature replication is evaluated quantitatively by SEM. The Tg, storage modulus, and creep behavior are determined by DMA. Results Increasing redox initiation rate increases the polymerization rate but at high levels also limits working time. Combining 0.86 wt% oxidizing agent with up to 5 wt% plasticizer gave a working time of 3 min and a setting time of 2 min. The selected medium and light body thiol-ene formulations also achieved greater qualitative detail reproduction than the commercial material and reproduced micrometer patterns with 98% accuracy. Significance Improving detail reproduction and setting speed is a primary focus of dental impression material design and synthesis. Radical-mediated polymerizations, particularly thiol-ene reactions, are recognized for their speed, reduced shrinkage, and ‘click’ nature. PMID:24553250

  9. Attachment Processes in Eating Disorder and Depression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole-Detke, Holland; Kobak, Roger

    1996-01-01

    Examines the relationship between attachment strategies and symptom reporting among college women (N=61). The Adult Attachment Interview (AAI) was administered and interview transcripts were rated with the Attachment Interview Q-Sort. Findings support the hypothesis that secondary or defensive attachment strategies predispose individuals toward…

  10. Thiol groups controls on arsenite binding by organic matter: new experimental and modeling evidence.

    PubMed

    Catrouillet, Charlotte; Davranche, Mélanie; Dia, Aline; Bouhnik-Le Coz, Martine; Pédrot, Mathieu; Marsac, Rémi; Gruau, Gérard

    2015-12-15

    Although it has been suggested that several mechanisms can describe the direct binding of As(III) to organic matter (OM), more recently, the thiol functional group of humic acid (HA) was shown to be an important potential binding site for As(III). Isotherm experiments on As(III) sorption to HAs, that have either been grafted with thiol or not, were thus conducted to investigate the preferential As(III) binding sites. There was a low level of binding of As(III) to HA, which was strongly dependent on the abundance of the thiols. Experimental datasets were used to develop a new model (the modified PHREEQC-Model VI), which defines HA as a group of discrete carboxylic, phenolic and thiol sites. Protonation/deprotonation constants were determined for each group of sites (pKA=4.28±0.03; ΔpKA=2.13±0.10; pKB=7.11±0.26; ΔpKB=3.52±0.49; pKS=5.82±0.052; ΔpKS=6.12±0.12 for the carboxylic, phenolic and thiols sites, respectively) from HAs that were either grafted with thiol or not. The pKS value corresponds to that of single thiol-containing organic ligands. Two binding models were tested: the Mono model, which considered that As(III) is bound to the HA thiol site as monodentate complexes, and the Tri model, which considered that As(III) is bound as tridentate complexes. A simulation of the available literature datasets was used to validate the Mono model, with logKMS=2.91±0.04, i.e. the monodentate hypothesis. This study highlighted the importance of thiol groups in OM reactivity and, notably, determined the As(III) concentration bound to OM (considering that Fe is lacking or at least negligible) and was used to develop a model that is able to determine the As(III) concentrations bound to OM. PMID:26348657

  11. Visible light cured thiol-vinyl hydrogels with tunable degradation for 3D cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yiting; Shih, Han; Muňoz, Zachary; Kemp, Arika; Lin, Chien-Chi

    2013-01-01

    We report here a synthetically simple yet highly tunable and diverse visible light mediated thiol-vinyl gelation system for fabricating cell-instructive hydrogels. Gelation was achieved via a mixed-mode step-and-chain-growth photopolymerization using functionalized 4-arm poly(ethylene glycol) as backbone macromer, eosin-Y as photosensitizer, and di-thiol containing molecule as dual purpose co-initiator/cross-linker. N-vinylpyrrolidone (NVP) was used to accelerate gelation kinetics and to adjust the stiffness of the hydrogels. Visible light (wavelength: 400–700nm) was used to initiate rapid gelation (gel points: ~20 seconds) that reached completion within a few minutes. The major differences between current thiol-vinyl gelation and prior visible light mediated photopolymerization are that: (1) the co-initiator triethanolamine (TEOA) used in the previous systems was replaced with multifunctional thiols and (2) mixed-mode polymerized gels contain less network heterogeneity. The gelation kinetics and gel properties at the same PEG macromer concentration could be tuned by changing the identity of vinyl groups and di-thiol cross-linkers, as well as concentration of cross-linker and NVP. Specifically, acrylate-modified PEG afforded the fastest gelation rate, followed by acrylamide and methacrylate-functionalized PEG. Increasing NVP concentration also accelerated gelation and led to a higher network cross-linking density. Further, increasing di-thiol peptide concentration in the gel formulation increased hydrogel swelling and decreased gel stiffness. Due to the formation of thiol-ether-ester bonds following thiol-acrylate reaction, the gels degraded hydrolytically following a pseudo first order degradation kinetics. Degradation rate was controlled by adjusting thiol or NVP content in the polymer precursor solution. The cytocompatibility and utility of this hydrogel system were evaluated using in situ encapsulation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). Encapsulated h

  12. Selective Adsorption of Thiols Using Gold Nanoparticles Supported on Metal Oxides.

    PubMed

    Sui, Ruohong; Lesage, Kevin L; Carefoot, Sarah K; Fürstenhaupt, Tobias; Rose, Chelsea J; Marriott, Robert A

    2016-09-13

    Selective capture of thiols from a synthetic hydrogen sulfide containing mixture using supported nanogold materials has been explored for the potential removal of thiols from sour gas production fluids. In this research, TiO2-, Al2O3-, SiO2-, and ZnO-supported gold nanoparticles have been studied for their usage as regeneratable adsorbents to capture CH3SH, C2H5SH, and i-C3H7SH. Au/TiO2 and Au/Al2O3 showed promising properties for removing the thiols efficiently from a gas-phase mixture; however, Au/Al2O3 did catalyze some undesirable side reactions, e.g., carbonyl sulfide formation. It was found that a mild temperature of T = 200 °C was sufficient for regeneration of either Au/TiO2 or Au/Al2O3 adsorbent. The metal oxide mesopores played an important role for accommodating gold particles and chemisorption of the thiols, where smaller pore sizes were found to inhibit the agglomeration/growth of gold particles. The nature of thiol adsorption and the impact of multiple adsorption-desorption cycles on the adsorbents have been studied using electron microscopy, XPS, XRD, GC, and physi/chemiadsorption analyses. PMID:27552141

  13. Simultaneous assessment of endogenous thiol compounds by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yao; Yao, Tong; Guo, Xiucai; Peng, Ying; Zheng, Jiang

    2016-09-01

    Biological thiol compounds are very important molecules that participate in various physiological events. Alteration in levels of endogenous thiols has been suggested as a biomarker of early stage of pathological changes. We reported a chemical derivatization- and LC-MS/MS-based approach to simultaneously determine thiol compounds including glutathione (GSH), cysteine (Cys), N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), homocysteine (Hcy), and cysteinylglycine (CysGly) in biological samples. Thiol-containing samples were derivatized with monobromobimane (mBrB) at room temperature, followed by LC-MS/MS analysis. Assessment of the analytes with baseline separation was completed within 10min, using a gradient elution on a C18 reversed-phase column. Excellent linearity was observed for all analytes over their concentration ranges of 1-400μM. The lowest limits of detection (S/N=3) in a range from 0.31fmol (for NAC) to 4.98fmol (for CysGly) were achieved. The results indicate that this approach was sensitive, selective, and well suited for high-throughput quantitative determination of the biological thiols. PMID:27442797

  14. Serum Thiols as a Biomarker of Disease Activity in Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Lalwani, Pritesh; de Souza, Giselle Katiane Bonfim Bacelar; de Lima, Domingos Savio Nunes; Passos, Luiz Fernando Souza; Boechat, Antonio Luiz; Lima, Emerson Silva

    2015-01-01

    Lupus Nephritis (LN) develops in more than half of the Systemic Lupus Erythematous (SLE) patients. However, lack of reliable, specific biomarkers for LN hampers clinical management of patients and impedes development of new therapeutics. The goal of this study was to investigate whether oxidative stress biomarkers in patients with SLE is predictive of renal pathology. Serum biochemical and oxidative stress markers were measured in patients with inactive lupus, active lupus with and without nephritis and compared to healthy control group. To assess the predictive performance of biomarkers, Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed and cut-offs were used to identify SLE patients with nephritis. We observed an increased oxidative stress response in all SLE patients compared to healthy controls. Among the several biomarkers tested, serum thiols had a significant inverse association with SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI). Interestingly, thiols were able too aptly differentiate between SLE patients with and without renal pathology, and serum thiol levels were not affected by immunosuppressive drug therapy. The decreased thiols in SLE correlated significantly with serum creatinine and serum C3 levels. Further retrospective evaluation using serum creatinine or C3 levels in combination with thiol’s cutoff values from ROC analysis, we could positively predict chronicity of renal pathology in SLE patients. In summary, serum thiols emerge as an inexpensive and reliable indicator of LN, which may not only help in early identification of renal pathology but also aid in the therapeutic management of the disease, in developing countries with resource poor settings. PMID:25799079

  15. Proteinase from germinating bean cotyledons. Evidence for involvement of a thiol group in catalysis.

    PubMed

    Csoma, C; Polgár, L

    1984-09-15

    To degrade storage proteins germinating seeds synthesize proteinases de novo that can be inhibited by thiol-blocking reagents [Baumgartner & Chrispeels (1977) Eur. J. Biochem. 77, 223-233]. We have elaborated a procedure for isolation of such a proteinase from the cotyledons of Phaseolus vulgaris. The purification procedure involved fractionation of the cotyledon homogenate with acetone and with (NH4)2SO4 and successive chromatographies on DEAE-cellulose, activated thiol-Sepharose Sepharose and Sephacryl S-200. The purified enzyme has an Mr of 23,400, proved to be highly specific for the asparagine side chain and blocking of its thiol group resulted in loss of the catalytic activity. The chemical properties of the thiol group of the bean enzyme were investigated by acylation with t-butyloxycarbonyl-L-asparagine p-nitro-phenyl ester and by alkylations with iodoacetamide and iodoacetate. Deviations from normal pH-rate profile were observed, which indicated that the thiol group is not a simple functional group, but constitutes a part of an interactive system at the active site. The pKa value for acylation and the magnitude of the rate constant for alkylation with iodoacetate revealed that the bean proteinase possesses some properties not shared by papain and the other cysteine proteinases studied to date. PMID:6385962

  16. Characterization of photopolymerizable nanoparticle-(thiol-ene) polymer composites for volume holographic recording at 404 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawana, Masaru; Takahashi, Jun-ichiro; Yasui, Satoru; Tomita, Yasuo

    2014-05-01

    We report on volume holographic recording in thiol-ene based nanoparticle-polymer composites (NPCs) at a wavelength of 404 nm by using a highly coherent blue diode laser. We study the photopolymerization dynamics of two types of thiol-ene based NPCs doped with different blue-sensitive initiator/sensitizer systems (Darocur ® TPO and Irgacure ® 784/BzO2) at various doping concentrations. We also characterize a volume holographic grating recorded in these two types of thiol-ene based NPCs. Such material characterization includes the refractive index modulation, the material recording sensitivity and polymerization shrinkage. It is shown that Darocur R _ TPO provides larger refractive index modulation and higher material recording sensitivity than those with Irgacure ® 784/BzO2 but these two blue-sensitive initiator/sensitizer systems amount to meeting the requirements of the refractive index modulation and the material recording sensitivity for holographic data storage. However, it is found that shrinkage reduction of a volume grating recorded in these two types of thiol-ene based NPCs at 404 nm is not as effective as the same thiol-ene based NPC doped with Irgacure ® 784/BzO2 at 532 nm.

  17. Cell surface thiol isomerases may explain the platelet-selective action of S-nitrosoglutathione.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fang; Gordge, Michael P

    2011-10-30

    S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) at low concentration inhibits platelet aggregation without causing vasodilation, suggesting platelet-selective nitric oxide delivery. The mechanism of this selectivity is unknown, but may involve cell surface thiol isomerases, in particular protein disulphide isomerase (csPDI) (EC 5.3.4.1). We have now compared csPDI expression and activity on platelets, endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, and the dependence on thiol reductase activity of these cell types for NO uptake from GSNO. csPDI expression was measured by flow cytometry and its reductase activity using the pseudosubstrate dieosin glutathione disulphide. This activity assay was adapted and validated for 96-well plate format. Flow cytometry revealed csPDI on all three cell types, but percentage positivity of expression was higher on platelets than on vascular cells. Consistent with this, thiol isomerase-related reductase activity was higher on platelets (P<0.01), and cellular activation (with either phorbol myristate acetate or ionomycin) increased csPDI activity on both platelets and smooth muscle cells, but not on endothelium. Intracellular NO delivery from GSNO was greater in platelets than in vascular cells (P<0.002), and was more sensitive to thiol isomerase inhibition using phenylarsine oxide (P<0.05). Increased surface thiol isomerase activity on platelets, compared with cells of the vascular wall, may explain the platelet-selective actions of GSNO and help define its antithrombotic potential. PMID:21642008

  18. Pore surface engineering in a zirconium metal–organic framework via thiol-ene reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gui, Bo; Hu, Guiping; Zhou, Tailin; Wang, Cheng

    2015-03-15

    A porous olefin-functionalized Zr(IV)-based metal–organic framework, denoted as UiO-68-allyl, has been constructed. Our results clearly demonstrated that the surface of UiO-68-allyl could be decorated with organic molecule (ethanethiol) via thiol-ene reaction. More importantly, the crystallinity of the framework were maintained during the post-synthetic modification process. However, the microporosity of the framework is retained but the surface area decreased, due to the grafting of ethylthio groups into the pores. From our studies, we can conclude that the strategy of post-synthetic modification of UiO-68-allyl via thiol-ene reaction may be general. Furthermore, we may anchor other desired functional group onto the pore walls in Zr-MOFs via thiol-ene reaction, enabling more potential applications. - graphical abstract: In this manuscript, we reported the post-synthetic modification of an olefin-functionalized Zr(IV)-based metal–organic framework via thiol-ene reaction. - Highlights: • A porous olefin-functionalized Zr(IV)-based metal–organic framework has been constructed. • The surface of olefin-functionalized Zr-MOF could be decorated with organic molecules via thiol-ene reaction. • The crystallinity and permanent porosity of the framework were maintained during the post-synthetic modification process.

  19. The synthesis of novel hybrid thiol-functionalized nano-structured SBA-15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Van Duc; Phuong Dang, Tuyet; Khieu Dinh, Quang; Phu Nguyen, Huu; Vu, Anh Tuan

    2010-09-01

    Mesoporous thiol-functionalized SBA-15 has been directly synthesized by co-condensation of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTMS) with triblock copolymer P123 as-structure-directing agent under hydrothermal conditions. Surfactant removal was performed by Soxhlet ethanol extraction. These materials have been characterized by powder x-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption/desorption (BET model), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermal analysis, infrared spectroscopy (IR) and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The main parameters, such as the initial molar ratio of MPTMS to TEOS, the time of adding MPTMS to synthesized gel and the Soxhlet ethanol extraction on the thiol functionalized SBA-15 with high thiol content and highly ordered hexagonal mesostructure, were investigated and evaluated. The adsorption capacity of the thiol-functionalized and non-functionalized SBA-15 materials for Pb2+ ion from aqueous solution was tested. It was found that the Pb2+ adsorption capacity of the thiol functionalized SBA-15 is three times higher than that of non-functionalized SBA-15.

  20. Relationship between Extracellular Low-Molecular-Weight Thiols and Mercury Species in Natural Lake Periphytic Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, Maxime; Planas, Dolors; Amyot, Marc

    2015-07-01

    The uptake of mercury by microorganisms is a key step in the production of methylmercury, a biomagnifiable toxin. Mercury complexation by low-molecular-weight (LMW) thiols can affect its bioavailability and thus the production of methylmercury. Freshwater biofilms were sampled in the summer using artificial Teflon substrates submerged for over a year to allow natural community colonization in the littoral zone of a Boreal Shield lake. Inside biofilms, concentrations of different extracellular thiol species (thioglycolic acid, l-cysteine-l-glycine, cysteine, and glutathione) were up to 3 orders of magnitude greater than in the surrounding water column, potentially more readily controlling mercury speciation than in the water column. All biofilm thiols except thioglycolic acid were highly correlated to chlorophyll a, likely indicating an algal origin. Extracellular total mercury represented 3 ± 1% of all biofilm mercury and was preferentially found in the capsular fraction. Levels of LMW thiols of presumed algal origins were highly correlated with total mercury in the mobile colloidal fraction of biofilms. We propose that periphytic phototrophic microorganisms such as algae likely affect the bioavailability of mercury through the exudation of LMW thiols, and thus they may play a key role in the production of methylmercury in biofilms. PMID:26011687

  1. Thiol-disulfide exchange in peptides derived from human growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekhar, Saradha; Epling, Daniel E; Sophocleous, Andreas M; Topp, Elizabeth M

    2014-04-01

    Disulfide bonds stabilize proteins by cross-linking distant regions into a compact three-dimensional structure. They can also participate in hydrolytic and oxidative pathways to form nonnative disulfide bonds and other reactive species. Such covalent modifications can contribute to protein aggregation. Here, we present experimental data for the mechanism of thiol-disulfide exchange in tryptic peptides derived from human growth hormone in aqueous solution. Reaction kinetics was monitored to investigate the effect of pH (6.0-10.0), temperature (4-50°C), oxidation suppressants [ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and N2 sparging], and peptide secondary structure (amide cyclized vs. open form). The concentrations of free thiol containing peptides, scrambled disulfides, and native disulfide-linked peptides generated via thiol-disulfide exchange and oxidation reactions were determined using reverse-phase HPLC and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Concentration versus time data were fitted to a mathematical model using nonlinear least squares regression analysis. At all pH values, the model was able to fit the data with R(2) ≥ 0.95. Excluding oxidation suppressants (EDTA and N2 sparging) resulted in an increase in the formation of scrambled disulfides via oxidative pathways but did not influence the intrinsic rate of thiol-disulfide exchange. In addition, peptide secondary structure was found to influence the rate of thiol-disulfide exchange. PMID:24549831

  2. Comparative electron paramagnetic resonance investigation of reduced graphene oxide and carbon nanotubes with different chemical functionalities for quantum dot attachment

    SciTech Connect

    Pham, Chuyen V.; Krueger, Michael E-mail: emre.erdem@physchem.uni-freiburg.de; Eck, Michael; Weber, Stefan; Erdem, Emre E-mail: emre.erdem@physchem.uni-freiburg.de

    2014-03-31

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has been applied to different chemically treated reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A narrow EPR signal is visible at g = 2.0029 in both GO and CNT-Oxide from carbon-related dangling bonds. EPR signals became broader and of lower intensity after oxygen-containing functionalities were reduced and partially transformed into thiol groups to obtain thiol-functionalized reduced GO (TrGO) and thiol-functionalized CNT (CNT-SH), respectively. Additionally, EPR investigation of CdSe quantum dot-TrGO hybrid material reveals complete quenching of the TrGO EPR signal due to direct chemical attachment and electronic coupling. Our work confirms that EPR is a suitable tool to detect spin density changes in different functionalized nanocarbon materials and can contribute to improved understanding of electronic coupling effects in nanocarbon-nanoparticle hybrid nano-composites promising for various electronic and optoelectronic applications.

  3. Redox regulation of Rac1 by thiol oxidation.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, G Aaron; Mitchell, Lauren E; Arrington, Megan E; Gunawardena, Harsha P; DeCristo, Molly J; Loeser, Richard F; Chen, Xian; Cox, Adrienne D; Campbell, Sharon L

    2015-02-01

    The Rac1 GTPase is an essential and ubiquitous protein that signals through numerous pathways to control critical cellular processes, including cell growth, morphology, and motility. Rac1 deletion is embryonic lethal, and its dysregulation or mutation can promote cancer, arthritis, cardiovascular disease, and neurological disorders. Rac1 activity is highly regulated by modulatory proteins and posttranslational modifications. Whereas much attention has been devoted to guanine nucleotide exchange factors that act on Rac1 to promote GTP loading and Rac1 activation, cellular oxidants may also regulate Rac1 activation by promoting guanine nucleotide exchange. Herein, we show that Rac1 contains a redox-sensitive cysteine (Cys(18)) that can be selectively oxidized at physiological pH because of its lowered pKa. Consistent with these observations, we show that Rac1 is glutathiolated in primary chondrocytes. Oxidation of Cys(18) by glutathione greatly perturbs Rac1 guanine nucleotide binding and promotes nucleotide exchange. As aspartate substitutions have been previously used to mimic cysteine oxidation, we characterized the biochemical properties of Rac1(C18D). We also evaluated Rac1(C18S) as a redox-insensitive variant and found that it retains structural and biochemical properties similar to those of Rac1(WT) but is resistant to thiol oxidation. In addition, Rac1(C18D), but not Rac1(C18S), shows greatly enhanced nucleotide exchange, similar to that observed for Rac1 oxidation by glutathione. We employed Rac1(C18D) in cell-based studies to assess whether this fast-cycling variant, which mimics Rac1 oxidation by glutathione, affects Rac1 activity and function. Expression of Rac1(C18D) in Swiss 3T3 cells showed greatly enhanced GTP-bound Rac1 relative to Rac1(WT) and the redox-insensitive Rac1(C18S) variant. Moreover, expression of Rac1(C18D) in HEK-293T cells greatly promoted lamellipodia formation. Our results suggest that Rac1 oxidation at Cys(18) is a novel

  4. Thinking of attachments reduces noradrenergic stress response.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Richard A; Chan, Lilian

    2015-10-01

    Although there is much evidence that activating mental representations of attachments figure is beneficial for psychological health and can reduce stress response, no research has directly investigated whether attachment activation can ameliorate hormonal stress response. This study investigated whether activating an attachment figure or a non-attachment figure following administration of a socially evaluated cold pressor test to elicit stress impacted on glucocorticoid and noradrenergic response. Participants (N = 61) provided baseline salivary samples, underwent a cold pressor test, then imagined an attachment or non-attachment figure, and finally provided subsequent saliva samples. Participants who imagined a non-attachment figure had greater noradrenergic response following the stressor than those who imagined an attachment figure. These findings highlight that activating attachment representations can ameliorate the immediate noradrenergic stress response. PMID:26115145

  5. UV-Induced Tetrazole-Thiol Reaction for Polymer Conjugation and Surface Functionalization.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wenqian; Li, Linxian; Yang, Chengwu; Welle, Alexander; Trapp, Oliver; Levkin, Pavel A

    2015-07-20

    A UV-induced 1,3-dipolar nucleophilic addition of tetrazoles to thiols is described. Under UV irradiation the reaction proceeds rapidly at room temperature, with high yields, without a catalyst, and in both polar protic and aprotic solvents, including water. This UV-induced tetrazole-thiol reaction was successfully applied for the synthesis of small molecules, protein modification, and rapid and facile polymer-polymer conjugation. The reaction has also been demonstrated for the formation of micropatterns by site-selective surface functionalization. Superhydrophobic-hydrophilic micropatterns were successfully created by sequential modifications of a tetrazole-modified porous polymer surface with hydrophobic and hydrophilic thiols. A biotin-functionalized surface could be fabricated in aqueous solutions under long-wavelength UV irradiation. PMID:26059870

  6. Immobilization of Ag-deposited Au nanoprisms by thiol-coupling and oil-coating methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Yuta; Hayakawa, Tomokatsu

    2016-01-01

    We have demonstrated the immobilization of Ag-deposited Au (Au@Ag) nanoprisms on glass substrates by two different methods: self-assembly on a thiol-modified glass (thiol-coupling method) and evaporation of the Au@Ag nanoprism colloidal solution in silicone oil (oil-coating method). In the thiol-coupling method, the Au@Ag nanoprisms were well dispersed and accumulated on the substrates as single or stacked layers. On the other hand, the oil-coating method allowed Au@Ag nanoprisms to accumulate as multilayers without excessive agglomeration. The multilayers of Au@Ag nanoprisms were subjected to surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), and a very low concentration (2.1 × 10-5 M) of rhodamine 6G molecules was sensitively detected.

  7. Characterization of volume holographic recording in photopolymerizable nanoparticle-(thiol-ene) polymer composites at 404 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawana, Masaru; Takahashi, Jun-ichiro; Yasui, Satoru; Tomita, Yasuo

    2015-02-01

    We report on the photopolymerization dynamics and the volume holographic recording properties of a thiol-ene based nanoparticle-polymer composite (NPC) doped with a blue-sensitive photoinitiator, Darocur® TPO, by using a highly coherent blue diode laser operating at a wavelength of 404 nm. Our study indicates that volume gratings recorded in the NPC amount to meeting the material requirements of refractive index modulation and material recording sensitivity for holographic data storage media. It is also found that polymerization shrinkage of recorded NPC gratings is higher than that of the same thiol-ene based NPC with a green (523 nm)-sensitive photoinitiator, Irgacure® 784/BzO2. We attribute such a difference in shrinkage to the photopolymerization dynamics at these recording wavelengths. We show that this shrinkage increase at 404 nm can be mitigated to some extent by controlling the thiol-ene stoichiometry in the NPC.

  8. Competitive reduction of perferrylmyoglobin radicals by protein thiols and plant phenols.

    PubMed

    Jongberg, Sisse; Lund, Marianne N; Skibsted, Leif H; Davies, Michael J

    2014-11-19

    Radical transfer from perferrylmyoglobin to other target species (myofibrillar proteins, MPI) and bovine serum albumin (BSA), extracts from green tea (GTE), maté (ME), and rosemary (RE), and three phenolic compounds, catechin, caffeic acid, and carnosic acid) was investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to determine the concentrations of plant extracts required to protect against protein oxidation. Blocking of MPI thiol groups by N-ethylmaleimide was found to reduce the rate of reaction of MPI with perferrylmyoglobin radicals, signifying the importance of protein thiols as radical scavengers. GTE had the highest phenolic content of the three extracts and was most effective as a radical scavenger. IC50 values indicated that the molar ratio between phenols in plant extract and MPI thiols needs to be >15 in order to obtain efficient protection against protein-to-protein radical transfer in meat. Caffeic acid was found most effective among the plant phenols. PMID:25343706

  9. Cellular recovery of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity and thiol status after exposure to hydroperoxides

    SciTech Connect

    Brodie, A.E.; Reed, D.J. )

    1990-01-01

    The activity of the thiol-dependent enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD), in vertebrate cells, was modulated by a change in the intracellular thiol:disulfide redox status. Human lung carcinoma cells (A549) were incubated with 1-120 mM H2O2, 1-120 mM t-butyl hydroperoxide, 1-6 mM ethacrynic acid, or 0.1-10 mM N-ethylmaleimide for 5 min. Loss of reduced protein thiols, as measured by binding of the thiol reagent iodoacetic acid to GPD, and loss of GPD enzymatic activity occurred in a dose-dependent manner. Incubation of the cells, following oxidative treatment, in saline for 30 min or with 20 mM dithiothreitol (DTT) partially reversed both changes in GPD. The enzymatic recovery of GPD activity was observed either without addition of thiols to the medium or by incubation of a sonicated cell mixture with 2 mM cysteine, cystine, cysteamine, or glutathione (GSH); GSSG had no effect. Treatment of cells with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) to decrease cellular GSH by varying amounts caused a dose-related increase in sensitivity of GPD activity to inactivation by H2O2 and decreased cellular ability for subsequent recovery. GPD responded in a similar fashion with oxidative treatment of another lung carcinoma cell line (A427) as well as normal lung tissue from human and rat. These findings indicate that the cellular thiol redox status can be important in determining GPD enzymatic activity.

  10. Production of Thiol Species From An Exponential Growth Diatom Under Copper Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, D.; Shafer, M. M.; Karner, D. A.; Armstrong, D. E.; Schauer, J.

    2003-12-01

    The intracellar induction of phytochelatins is a well documented response of eukaryotic microorganisms to aqueous metal exposure. The extracellular release of thiolic compounds from algal species has been observed; and in some cases, this release can contribute a significant fraction of the uncharacterized metal-complexing ligands. Glutathione (GSH) or cysteine is among the detectable thiols excreted. A quantitative assessment of the excretion of thiols from algae cells into growth media is needed to assess the significance of biogenic-thiols as a source of strong ligands in natural waters and as a "forgotten" route in sulfur biogeochemical cycle. Unbuffered growth media (e.g., without adding complexing ligand such as EDTA) have only rarely been used to study the possible release of metal-complexing ligands from algal species, and the ligand titration techniques used varied considerably. The majority of culture studies have applied metal-buffered media. A direct comparison of released ligands under buffered and unbuffered conditions is lacking, partially due to the inherent difficulties of the titration methods applied. Using HPLC with fluorescence detection of thiol-monobromobimane derivatives, we were able to follow the dynamic change of GSH released in both media types during algal growth: (1) the cell quotas for thiols and pigments varied (mostly decreases) with growth time. Therefore, pigment-normalized cellular thiol concentrations were more or less conservative. (2) GSH was released into both the EDTA-buffered and -unbuffered growth media at similar concentrations. (3) at similar available Cu concentrations, EDTA possibly enhanced, rather than hindered, the release of GSH.

  11. Stretching of BDT-gold molecular junctions: thiol or thiolate termination?

    PubMed

    Souza, Amaury de Melo; Rungger, Ivan; Pontes, Renato Borges; Rocha, Alexandre Reily; da Silva, Antônio José Roque; Schwingenschlöegl, Udo; Sanvito, Stefano

    2014-11-01

    It is often assumed that the hydrogen atoms in the thiol groups of a benzene-1,4-dithiol dissociate when Au-benzene-1,4-dithiol-Au junctions are formed. We demonstrate, by stability and transport property calculations, that this assumption cannot be made. We show that the dissociative adsorption of methanethiol and benzene-1,4-dithiol molecules on a flat Au(111) surface is energetically unfavorable and that the activation barrier for this reaction is as high as 1 eV. For the molecule in the junction, our results show, for all electrode geometries studied, that the thiol junctions are energetically more stable than their thiolate counterparts. Due to the fact that density functional theory (DFT) within the local density approximation (LDA) underestimates the energy difference between the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital and the highest occupied molecular orbital by several electron-volts, and that it does not capture the renormalization of the energy levels due to the image charge effect, the conductance of the Au-benzene-1,4-dithiol-Au junctions is overestimated. After taking into account corrections due to image charge effects by means of constrained-DFT calculations and electrostatic classical models, we apply a scissor operator to correct the DFT energy level positions, and calculate the transport properties of the thiol and thiolate molecular junctions as a function of the electrode separation. For the thiol junctions, we show that the conductance decreases as the electrode separation increases, whereas the opposite trend is found for the thiolate junctions. Both behaviors have been observed in experiments, therefore pointing to the possible coexistence of both thiol and thiolate junctions. Moreover, the corrected conductance values, for both thiol and thiolate, are up to two orders of magnitude smaller than those calculated with DFT-LDA. This brings the theoretical results in quantitatively good agreement with experimental data. PMID:25347152

  12. Stretching of BDT-gold molecular junctions: thiol or thiolate termination?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Amaury De Melo; Rungger, Ivan; Pontes, Renato Borges; Rocha, Alexandre Reily; da Silva, Antônio José Roque; Schwingenschlöegl, Udo; Sanvito, Stefano

    2014-11-01

    It is often assumed that the hydrogen atoms in the thiol groups of a benzene-1,4-dithiol dissociate when Au-benzene-1,4-dithiol-Au junctions are formed. We demonstrate, by stability and transport property calculations, that this assumption cannot be made. We show that the dissociative adsorption of methanethiol and benzene-1,4-dithiol molecules on a flat Au(111) surface is energetically unfavorable and that the activation barrier for this reaction is as high as 1 eV. For the molecule in the junction, our results show, for all electrode geometries studied, that the thiol junctions are energetically more stable than their thiolate counterparts. Due to the fact that density functional theory (DFT) within the local density approximation (LDA) underestimates the energy difference between the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital and the highest occupied molecular orbital by several electron-volts, and that it does not capture the renormalization of the energy levels due to the image charge effect, the conductance of the Au-benzene-1,4-dithiol-Au junctions is overestimated. After taking into account corrections due to image charge effects by means of constrained-DFT calculations and electrostatic classical models, we apply a scissor operator to correct the DFT energy level positions, and calculate the transport properties of the thiol and thiolate molecular junctions as a function of the electrode separation. For the thiol junctions, we show that the conductance decreases as the electrode separation increases, whereas the opposite trend is found for the thiolate junctions. Both behaviors have been observed in experiments, therefore pointing to the possible coexistence of both thiol and thiolate junctions. Moreover, the corrected conductance values, for both thiol and thiolate, are up to two orders of magnitude smaller than those calculated with DFT-LDA. This brings the theoretical results in quantitatively good agreement with experimental data.

  13. Metabolic coupling of two small-molecule thiols programs the biosynthesis of lincomycin A.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qunfei; Wang, Min; Xu, Dongxiao; Zhang, Qinglin; Liu, Wen

    2015-02-01

    Low-molecular-mass thiols in organisms are well known for their redox-relevant role in protection against various endogenous and exogenous stresses. In eukaryotes and Gram-negative bacteria, the primary thiol is glutathione (GSH), a cysteinyl-containing tripeptide. In contrast, mycothiol (MSH), a cysteinyl pseudo-disaccharide, is dominant in Gram-positive actinobacteria, including antibiotic-producing actinomycetes and pathogenic mycobacteria. MSH is equivalent to GSH, either as a cofactor or as a substrate, in numerous biochemical processes, most of which have not been characterized, largely due to the dearth of information concerning MSH-dependent proteins. Actinomycetes are able to produce another thiol, ergothioneine (EGT), a histidine betaine derivative that is widely assimilated by plants and animals for variable physiological activities. The involvement of EGT in enzymatic reactions, however, lacks any precedent. Here we report that the unprecedented coupling of two bacterial thiols, MSH and EGT, has a constructive role in the biosynthesis of lincomycin A, a sulfur-containing lincosamide (C8 sugar) antibiotic that has been widely used for half a century to treat Gram-positive bacterial infections. EGT acts as a carrier to template the molecular assembly, and MSH is the sulfur donor for lincomycin maturation after thiol exchange. These thiols function through two unusual S-glycosylations that program lincosamide transfer, activation and modification, providing the first paradigm for EGT-associated biochemical processes and for the poorly understood MSH-dependent biotransformations, a newly described model that is potentially common in the incorporation of sulfur, an element essential for life and ubiquitous in living systems. PMID:25607359

  14. Reactions of oxidatively activated arylamines with thiols: reaction mechanisms and biologic implications. An overview.

    PubMed Central

    Eyer, P

    1994-01-01

    Aromatic amines belong to a group of compounds that exert their toxic effects usually after oxidative biotransformation, primarily in the liver. In addition, aromatic amines also undergo extrahepatic activation to yield free arylaminyl radicals. The reactive intermediates are potential promutagens and procarcinogens, and responsible for target tissue toxicity. Since thiols react with these intermediates at high rates, it is of interest to know the underlying reaction mechanisms and the toxicologic implications. Phenoxyl radicals from aminophenols and aminyl radicals from phenylenediamines quickly disproportionate to quinone imines and quinone diimines. Depending on the structure, Michael addition or reduction reactions with thiols may prevail. Products of sequential oxidation/addition reactions (e.g., S-conjugates of aminophenols) are occasionally more toxic than the parent compounds because of their higher autoxidizability and their accumulation in the kidney. Even after covalent binding of quinone imines to protein SH groups, the resulting thioethers are able to autoxidize. The quinoid thioethers can then cross-link the protein by addition to neighboring nucleophiles. The reactions of nitrosoarenes with thiols yield a so-called "semimercaptal" from which various branching reactions detach, depending on substituents. Compounds with strong pi-donors, like 4-nitrosophenetol, give a resonance-stabilized N-(thiol-S-yl)-arylamine cation that may lead to bicyclic products, thioethers, and DNA adducts. Examples of toxicologic implications of the interactions of nitroso compounds with thiols are given for nitrosoimidazoles, heterocyclic nitroso compounds from protein pyrolysates, and nitrosoarenes. These data indicate that interactions of activated arylamines with thiols may not be regarded exclusively as detoxication reactions. PMID:7889834

  15. Domain Walls with Strings Attached

    SciTech Connect

    Shmakova, Marina

    2001-08-20

    We have constructed a bulk and brane action of IIA theory which describes a pair of BPS domain walls on S{sub 1}/Z{sub 2}, with strings attached. The walls are given by two orientifold O8-planes with coincident D8-branes and F1-D0-strings are stretched between the walls. This static configuration satisfies all matching conditions for the string and domain wall sources and has 1/4 of unbroken supersymmetry.

  16. Synthesis of Non-linear Protein Dimers through a Genetically Encoded Thiol-ene Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Kolbus, Jessica; Chou, Chungjung; Liu, Jihe; Deiters, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Site-specific incorporation of bioorthogonal unnatural amino acids into proteins provides a useful tool for the installation of specific functionalities that will allow for the labeling of proteins with virtually any probe. We demonstrate the genetic encoding of a set of alkene lysines using the orthogonal PylRS/PylTCUA pair in Escherichia coli. The installed double bond functionality was then applied in a photoinitiated thiol-ene reaction of the protein with a fluorescent thiol-bearing probe, as well as a cysteine residue of a second protein, showing the applicability of this approach in the formation of heterogeneous non-linear fused proteins. PMID:25181502

  17. XAFS study on structural order in highly monodispersed thiol-stabilized Au nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y.; Liu, W.; Yang, L.; Huang, T.; Jiang, Y.; Yao, T.; Wei, S.

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the influence of thiol on nanoparticle size and structure is essential for the fundamental and applied researches. Here, using x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy, we investigate the structural order of Au nanoparticles (NPs) in the protection of thiol ligands with different contents. We found that besides protecting Au NPs against aggregation and growth, thiolates can effectively eliminate the dangling bonds of unsaturated Au atoms, and thus increase the structural order. This work enriches our knowledge of Au-S interface interaction and guides the way towards preparing size-controllable nanoparticles with specific physical/chemical properties.

  18. Thiol-catalyzed formation of lactate and glycerate from glyceraldehyde. [significance in molecular evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, A. L.

    1983-01-01

    The rate of lactate formation from glyceraldehyde, catalyzed by N-acetyl-cysteine at ambient temperature in aqueous sodium phosphate (pH 7.0), is more rapid at higher sodium phosphate concentrations and remains essentially the same in the presence and absence of oxygen. The dramatic increase in the rate of glycerate formation that is brought about by this thiol, N-acetylcysteine, is accompanied by commensurate decreases in the rates of glycolate and formate production. It is suggested that the thiol-dependent formation of lactate and glycerate occurs by way of their respective thioesters. Attention is given to the significance of these reactions in the context of molecular evolution.

  19. Straightforward synthesis of deuterated precursors to demonstrate the biogenesis of aromatic thiols in wine.

    PubMed

    Roland, Aurélie; Schneider, Rémi; Razungles, Alain; Le Guernevé, Christine; Cavelier, Florine

    2010-10-13

    Straightforward synthesis of labeled S-3-(hexan-1-ol)-glutathione and S-4-(4-methylpentan-2-one)-glutathione has been developed through a conjugate addition optimization study. Sauvignon blanc fermentation experiments with the [(2)H(10)] S-4-(4-methylpentan-2-one)-glutathione used as a tracer released the corresponding deuterated thiol, thus proving the direct relationship with the 4-mercapto-4-methylpentan-2-one under enological conditions. The conversion yield of such transformation was estimated to be close to 0.3%, opening an avenue for additional study on varietal thiol biogenesis. PMID:20825191

  20. Thiol activated prodrugs of sulfur dioxide (SO2) as MRSA inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pardeshi, Kundansingh A; Malwal, Satish R; Banerjee, Ankita; Lahiri, Surobhi; Rangarajan, Radha; Chakrapani, Harinath

    2015-07-01

    Drug resistant infections are becoming common worldwide and new strategies for drug development are necessary. Here, we report the synthesis and evaluation of 2,4-dinitrophenylsulfonamides, which are donors of sulfur dioxide (SO2), a reactive sulfur species, as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) inhibitors. N-(3-Methoxyphenyl)-2,4-dinitro-N-(prop-2-yn-1-yl)benzenesulfonamide (5e) was found to have excellent in vitro MRSA inhibitory potency. This compound is cell permeable and treatment of MRSA cells with 5e depleted intracellular thiols and enhanced oxidative species both results consistent with a mechanism involving thiol activation to produce SO2. PMID:25981687

  1. Attachment in integrative neuroscientific perspective.

    PubMed

    Hruby, Radovan; Hasto, Jozef; Minarik, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Attachment theory is a very influential general concept of human social and emotional development, which emphasizes the role of early mother-infant interactions for infant's adaptive behavioural and stress copying strategies, personality organization and mental health. Individuals with disrupted development of secure attachment to mother/primary caregiver are at higher risk of developing mental disorders. This theory consists of the complex developmental psycho-neurobiological model of attachment and emerges from principles of psychoanalysis, evolutionary biology, cognitive-developmental psychology, ethology, physiology and control systems theory. The progress of modern neuroscience enables interpretation of neurobiological aspects of the theory as multi-level neural interactions and functional development of important neural structures, effects of neuromediattors, hormones and essential neurobiological processes including emotional, cognitive, social interactions and the special key role of mentalizing. It has multiple neurobiological, neuroendocrine, neurophysiological, ethological, genetic, developmental, psychological, psychotherapeutic and neuropsychiatric consequences and is a prototype of complex neuroscientific concept as interpretation of modern integrated neuroscience. PMID:21552202

  2. Volume holographic recording in photopolymerizable nanocomposite materials based on radical-mediated thiol-yne step-growth polymerizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsube, Ken; Nishimura, Yuki; Takayama, Shingo; Nagaya, Kohta; Tomita, Yasuo

    2013-05-01

    We propose the use of radical-mediated thiol-yne step-growth photopolymerizations for volume holographic recording in NPC films to overcome the drawback of low crosslinking densities but retain the advantage of low shrinkage in the thiol-ene photopolymerizations. The thiol-yne photopolymerization mechanism is different from the thiol-ene photopolymeriztions in the sense that each alkyne functional group can react consecutively with two thiol functional groups. We show that thiol-yne based NPC films dispersed with silica nanoparticles give the saturated refractive index change as large as 0.008 and the material recording sensitivity as high as 2005 cm/J at a wavelength of 532 nm, larger than the minimum acceptable values of 0.005 and 500 cm/J, respectively, for holographic data storage. We also show that the shrinkage of a recorded hologram can be as low as that of thiol-ene based NPC films and that the thermal stability is improved better. In addition, we demonstrate digital data page recording in thiol-yne based NPC films, showing a low symbol error rate and a high signal-to-noise ratio to be 2.8×10-4 and 8, respectively.

  3. Evaluation of thiol Raman activities and pKa values using internally referenced Ramanbased pH titration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwandaratne, Nuwanthi

    Thiols are one of the most important classes of chemicals used broadly in organic synthesis, biological chemistry, and nanosciences. Thiol pKa values are key indicators of thiol reactivity and functionality. This study is an internally-referenced Raman-based pH titration method that enables reliable quantification of thiol pKa values for both mono- and di-thiols in water. The degree of thiol ionization is monitored directly using the peak intensity of the S-H stretching feature relative to an internal reference peak as a function of solution pH. The thiol pKa values and Raman activity relative to its internal reference were then determined by curve-fitting the experimental data with equations derived on the basis of the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation. Using this Raman titration method, first and second thiol pKa values for 1,2-benzenedithol in water were determined for the first time. This method is convenient to implement and its underlying theory is easy to follow.

  4. "Grafting to" of RAFTed Responsive Polymers to Glass Substrates by Thiol-Ene and Critical Comparison to Thiol-Gold Coupling.

    PubMed

    Biggs, Caroline I; Walker, Marc; Gibson, Matthew I

    2016-08-01

    Surface-grafted polymers have been widely applied to modulate biological interfaces and introduce additional functionality. Polymers derived from reversible addition-fragmentation transfer (RAFT) polymerization have a masked thiol at the ω-chain end providing an anchor point for conjugation and in particular displays high affinity for gold surfaces (both flat and particulate). In this work, we report the direct grafting of RAFTed polymers by a "thiol-ene click" (Michael addition) onto glass substrates rather than gold, which provides a more versatile surface for subsequent array-based applications but retains the simplicity. The immobilization of two thermoresponsive polymers are studied here, poly[oligo(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate] (pOEGMA) and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAM). Using a range of surface analysis techniques the grafting efficiency was compared to thiol-gold and was quantitatively compared to the gold alternative using quartz crystal microbalance. It is shown that this method gives easy access to grafted polymer surfaces with pNIPAM resulting in significantly increased surface coverage compared to pOEGMA. The nonfouling (protein resistance) character of these surfaces is also demonstrated. PMID:27409356

  5. Evaluation of a dithiocarbamate derivative as a model of thiol oxidative stress in H9c2 rat cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jiashu; Potter, Ashley; Xie, Wei; Lynch, Christophina; Seefeldt, Teresa

    2014-05-01

    Thiol redox state (TRS) refers to the balance between reduced thiols and their corresponding disulfides and is mainly reflected by the ratio of reduced and oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG). A decrease in GSH/GSSG, which reflects a state of thiol oxidative stress, as well as thiol modifications such as S-glutathionylation, has been shown to have important implications in a variety of cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, research models for inducing thiol oxidative stress are important tools for studying the pathophysiology of these disease states as well as examining the impact of pharmacological interventions on thiol pathways. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of a dithiocarbamate derivative, 2-acetylamino-3-[4-(2-acetylamino-2-carboxyethylsulfanylthiocarbonylamino)phenylthiocarbamoylsulfanyl]propionic acid (2-AAPA), as a pharmacological model of thiol oxidative stress by examining the extent of thiol modifications induced in H9c2 rat cardiomyocytes and its impact on cellular functions. The extent of thiol oxidative stress produced by 2-AAPA was also compared to other models of oxidative stress including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), diamide, buthionine sulfoximine, and N,N׳-bis(2-chloroethyl)-N-nitroso-urea. Results indicated that 2-AAPA effectively inhibited glutathione reductase and thioredoxin reductase activities and decreased the GSH/GSSG ratio by causing a significant accumulation of GSSG. 2-AAPA also increased the formation of protein disulfides as well as S-glutathionylation. The alteration in TRS led to a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome c, and increase in reactive oxygen species production. Compared to other models, 2-AAPA is more potent at creating a state of thiol oxidative stress with lower cytotoxicity, higher specificity, and more pharmacological relevance, and could be utilized as a research tool to study TRS-related normal and abnormal biochemical processes in cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24607690

  6. The Orientations of Large Aspect-Ratio Coiled-Coil Proteins Attached to Gold Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jae-Byum; Kim, Yong Ho; Thompson, Evan; No, Young Hyun; Kim, Nam Hyeong; Arrieta, Jose; Manfrinato, Vitor R; Keating, Amy E; Berggren, Karl K

    2016-03-01

    Methods for patterning biomolecules on a substrate at the single molecule level have been studied as a route to sensors with single-molecular sensitivity or as a way to probe biological phenomena at the single-molecule level. However, the arrangement and orientation of single biomolecules on substrates has been less investigated. Here, the arrangement and orientation of two rod-like coiled-coil proteins, cortexillin and tropomyosin, around patterned gold nanostructures is examined. The high aspect ratio of the coiled coils makes it possible to study their orientations and to pursue a strategy of protein orientation via two-point attachment. The proteins are anchored to the surfaces using thiol groups, and the number of cysteine residues in tropomyosin is varied to test how this variation affects the structure and arrangement of the surface-attached proteins. Molecular dynamics studies are used to interpret the observed positional distributions. Based on initial studies of protein attachment to gold post structures, two 31-nm-long tropomyosin molecules are aligned between the two sidewalls of a trench with a width of 68 nm. Because the approach presented in this study uses one of twenty natural amino acids, this method provides a convenient way to pattern biomolecules on substrates using standard chemistry. PMID:26799936

  7. After Love: Attachment Styles and Grief Themes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pistole, M. Carole

    1996-01-01

    Examines the association of attachment organization and recalled grief responses following the dissolution of a romantic relationship. Data based on college students' (N=118) responses resulted in four interpretable grief themes. Preoccupied attachment predicted self-reproach, fearful attachment predicted partner blame, whereas both fearful and…

  8. Oxytocin enhances the experience of attachment security.

    PubMed

    Buchheim, Anna; Heinrichs, Markus; George, Carol; Pokorny, Dan; Koops, Eva; Henningsen, Peter; O'Connor, Mary-Frances; Gündel, Harald

    2009-10-01

    Repeated interactions between infant and caregiver result in either secure or insecure relationship attachment patterns, and insecure attachment may affect individual emotion-regulation and health. Given that oxytocin enhances social approach behavior in animals and humans, we hypothesized that oxytocin might also promote the subjective experience of attachment security in humans. Within a 3-week interval, 26 healthy male students classified with an insecure attachment pattern were invited twice to an experimental session. At the beginning of each experiment, a single dose of oxytocin or placebo was administered intranasally, using a double-blind, placebo-controlled within-subject design. In both conditions, subjects completed an attachment task based on the Adult Attachment Projective Picture System (AAP). Thirty-two AAP picture system presentations depicted attachment-related events (e.g. illness, solitude, separation, and loss), and were each accompanied by four prototypical phrases representing one secure and three insecure attachment categories. In the oxytocin condition, a significant proportion of these insecure subjects (N=18; 69%) increased in their rankings of the AAP prototypical "secure attachment" phrases and decreased in overall ranking of the "insecure attachment" phrases. In particular, there was a significant decrease in the number of subjects ranking the pictures with "insecure-preoccupied" phrases from the placebo to the oxytocin condition. We find that a single dose of intranasally administered oxytocin is sufficient to induce a significant increase in the experience of attachment security in insecurely attached adults. PMID:19457618

  9. Attachment in Deaf Mothers and Their Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leigh, Irene W.; Brice, Patrick J.; Meadow-Orlans, Kathryn

    2004-01-01

    In attachment research, there has been a growing interest in how adults conceptualize their relationships with their own parents as well as in the transmission of attachment status from parent to child and the variables that influence that transmission. The primary goal of the present study was to examine the transmission of attachment from deaf…

  10. Genetic and Environmental Influence on Attachment Disorganization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spangler, Gottfried; Johann, Monika; Ronai, Zsolt; Zimmermann, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Background: Empirical studies demonstrate that maternal sensitivity is associated with attachment security in infancy, while maternal frightening/frightened behavior is related to attachment disorganization. However, attachment disorganization is also predicted by individual dispositions in infancy. Indeed, recent studies indicate a link between…

  11. Attachment in Middle Childhood: Progress and Prospects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosmans, Guy; Kerns, Kathryn A.

    2015-01-01

    Contrary to the substantial amount of research on infant, preschool, adolescent, and adult attachment, middle childhood has long been neglected by the international attachment research community. In the past two decades, however, there has been a steep increase in research focusing on middle childhood attachment. This article provides an overview…

  12. Attachment Representation of Institutionalized Children in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsurada, Emiko

    2007-01-01

    This exploratory study represents one of the first attachment investigations of Japanese children who have been institutionalized. Mental representation of attachment was assessed using George and Solomon's (1990, 1996, 2000) Attachment Doll Play Classification System of the Bretherton et al. (1990) doll play story stems. Participants were 32…

  13. Adolescents' Attachment and Coping with Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Michelle S.; Medway, Frederic J.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined how high school students cope with stress as a function of their attachment style. Data were gathered from 75 adolescent-parent pairs in Texas and included measures of attachment, coping style, life stress, and whom the respondent would turn to in times of stress. Adolescents' attachment security was positively related to…

  14. Attachment: Building Secure Relationships in Early Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Linda

    2003-01-01

    Attachment describes the unique human ability to form lasting relationships with others, and to maintain these relationships over time and distance. Research into attachment has shown that children have the potential to form many attachment relationships, and that each relationship can contribute to the child's growing sense of self. This booklet…

  15. Thiol-based antioxidants elicit mitochondrial oxidation via respiratory complex III

    PubMed Central

    Beaudoin, Jessica N.; Ponnuraj, Nagendraprabhu; DiLiberto, Stephen J.; Hanafin, William P.; Kenis, Paul J. A.; Gaskins, H. Rex

    2015-01-01

    Excessive oxidation is widely accepted as a precursor to deleterious cellular function. On the other hand, an awareness of the role of reductive stress as a similar pathological insult is emerging. Here we report early dynamic changes in compartmentalized glutathione (GSH) redox potentials in living cells in response to exogenously supplied thiol-based antioxidants. Noninvasive monitoring of intracellular thiol-disulfide exchange via a genetically encoded biosensor targeted to cytosol and mitochondria revealed unexpectedly rapid oxidation of the mitochondrial matrix in response to GSH ethyl ester or N-acetyl-l-cysteine. Oxidation of the probe occurred within seconds in a concentration-dependent manner and was attenuated with the membrane-permeable ROS scavenger tiron. In contrast, the cytosolic sensor did not respond to similar treatments. Surprisingly, the immediate mitochondrial oxidation was not abrogated by depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential or inhibition of mitochondrial GSH uptake. After detection of elevated levels of mitochondrial ROS, we systematically inhibited multisubunit protein complexes of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and determined that respiratory complex III is a downstream target of thiol-based compounds. Disabling complex III with myxothiazol completely blocked matrix oxidation induced with GSH ethyl ester or N-acetyl-l-cysteine. Our findings provide new evidence of a functional link between exogenous thiol-containing antioxidants and mitochondrial respiration. PMID:25994788

  16. Passivation of copper surfaces for selective-area ALD using a thiol self-assembled monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Färm, Elina; Vehkamäki, Marko; Ritala, Mikko; Leskelä, Markku

    2012-07-01

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of 1-dodecanethiol (CH3(CH2)11SH) were prepared from the vapor phase and used as a passivation layer for selective-area ALD. Thiol SAMs have commonly been prepared by immersing the substrates into a solution containing alkyl thiols. Formation of SAMs from the vapor phase, however, has advantages compared to liquid phase preparation. Passivation of surface can be done as a part of the ALD process forming a SAM first and then continuing with the common ALD process. SAMs can also be applied to three-dimensional structures relying on chemical selectivity of the thiol SAM formation. For example in the copper damascene process the thiol SAMs should form only on the copper surface but not on the insulators. In this study, the SAMs were prepared by placing the substrate and the alkylthiol to the reaction chamber and heating the system to the temperature of 73 °C. Preparation time varied from 0.5 to 24 h. Passivation properties of SAMs were tested with ALD iridium and polyimide processes. Iridium was deposited at 250  ° C for 500 cycles and polyimide at 160  ° C for 20 cycles.

  17. Synthesis and Microstructural Investigations of Organometallic Pd(II) Thiol-Gold Nanoparticles Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    In this work the synthesis and characterization of gold nanoparticles functionalized by a novel thiol-organometallic complex containing Pd(II) centers is presented. Pd(II) thiol,trans, trans-[dithiolate-dibis(tributylphosphine)dipalladium(II)-4,4′-diethynylbiphenyl] was synthesized and linked to Au nanoparticles by the chemical reduction of a metal salt precursor. The new hybrid made of organometallic Pd(II) thiol-gold nanoparticles, shows through a single S bridge a direct link between Pd(II) and Au nanoparticles. The size-control of the Au nanoparticles (diameter range 2–10 nm) was achieved by choosing the suitable AuCl4−/thiol molar ratio. The size, strain, shape, and crystalline structure of these functionalized nanoparticles were determined by a full-pattern X-ray powder diffraction analysis, high-resolution TEM, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Photoluminescence spectroscopy measurements of the hybrid system show emission peaks at 418 and 440 nm. The hybrid was exposed to gaseous NOxwith the aim to evaluate the suitability for applications in sensor devices; XPS measurements permitted to ascertain and investigate the hybrid –gas interaction. PMID:21350592

  18. TOXICOLOGICAL HIGHLIGHT (REDOX REDUX: A CLOSER LOOK AT CONCEPTAL LOW MOLECULAR WEIGHT THIOLS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Glutathione (GSH) is present as the most abundant low molecular weight thiol (LMWT) in virtually all mitochondria-bearing eucaryotic cells, often at millimolar concentrations (Meister, 1988). Functions of GSH include roles in DNA and protein synthesis, maintenance of cell membra...

  19. Proteomic signatures uncover thiol-specific electrophile resistance mechanisms in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Antelmann, Haike; Hecker, Michael; Zuber, Peter

    2008-02-01

    Proteomic and transcriptomics signatures are powerful tools for visualizing global changes in gene expression in bacterial cells after exposure to stress, starvation or toxic compounds. Based on the global expression profile and the dissection into specific regulons, this knowledge can be used to predict the mode of action for novel antimicrobial compounds. This review summarizes our recent progress of proteomic signatures in the model bacterium for low-GC Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis in response to the antimicrobial compounds phenol, catechol, salicylic acid, 2-methylhydroquinone (2-MHQ) and 6-brom-2-vinyl-chroman-4-on (chromanon). Catechol, 2-MHQ and diamide displayed a common mode of action, as revealed by the induction of the thiol-specific oxidative stress response. In addition, multiple dioxygenases/glyoxalases, azoreductases and nitroreductases were induced by thiol-reactive compounds that are regulated by two novel thiol-specific regulators, YodB and MhqR (YkvE), both of which contribute to electrophile resistance in B. subtilis. These novel thiol-stress-responsive mechanisms are highly conserved among Gram-positive bacteria and are thought to have evolved to detoxify quinone-like electrophiles. PMID:18282125

  20. Factors influencing the oxidation of cysteamine and other thiols: implications for hyperthermic sensitization and radiation protection

    SciTech Connect

    Biaglow, J.E.; Issels, R.W.; Gerweck, L.E.; Varnes, M.E.; Jacobson, B.; Mittchell, J.B.; Russo, A.

    1984-11-01

    Some of the factors influencing the oxygen uptake and peroxide formation for cysteamine (MEA) and other thiols in serum-supplemented modified McCoy's 5A, a well-known medium used to cultivate a variety of cells in vitro, have been studied. The oxidation of MEA and cysteine in modified McCoy's 5A has been compared with that in Ham's F-12, MEM, and phosphate-buffered saline. The ability to produce peroxide is dependent upon the temperature, the concentration of thiol, the presence of copper ions, and pH of the medium. Catalase also reduces the oxygen uptake for all thiols. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) was found to stimulate the oxygen uptake in the case of MEA and cysteine, but had little or no effect with DTT and glutathione. The combined presence of SOD and catalase resulted in less inhibition of oxygen uptake than that obtained by catalase alone. Alkaline pH was found to enhance the oxidation of cysteine and MEA. The results indicate that many problems may arise when thiols are added to various media. A major consideration is concerned with the production of peroxide, superoxide, and reduced trace metal intermediates. The presence of these intermediates may result in the production of hydroxyl radical intermediates as well as the eventual oxygen depletion from the medium.

  1. Synthesis of low molecular weight thiols in response to Cd exposure in Thlaspi caerulescens.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Allica, J; Garbisu, C; Becerril, J M; Barrutia, O; García-Plazaola, J I; Zhao, F J; Mcgrath, S P

    2006-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the accumulation of phytochelatins (PCs) and other low molecular weight (LMW) thiols in response to Cd exposure in two contrasting ecotypes differing in Cd accumulation. Using a root elongation test, we found that the highly accumulating ecotype Ganges was more tolerant to Cd than the low Cd-accumulation ecotype Prayon. L-buthionine-(S,R)-sulphoximine (BSO), a potent inhibitor of the gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase gamma-ECS) (an enzyme involved in the PC biosynthetic pathway), increased the Cd sensitivity of Prayon, but had no effect on Ganges. Although PC accumulation increased in response to Cd exposure, no significant differences were observed between the two ecotypes. Cd exposure induced a dose-dependent accumulation of both Cys and a still unidentified LMW thiol in roots of both ecotypes. Root accumulation of Cys and this thiol was higher in Ganges than in Prayon; the ecotypic differences were more pronounced when the plants were treated with BSO. These findings suggest that PCs do not contribute to the Cd hypertolerance displayed by the Ganges ecotype of Thlaspi caerulescens, whereas Cys and other LMW thiols might be involved. PMID:17080963

  2. An electrophoretic profiling method for thiol-rich phytochelatins and metallothioneins.

    PubMed

    Fan, Teresa W M; Lane, Andrew N; Higashi, Richard M

    2004-01-01

    Thiol-rich peptides such as phytochelatins (PCs) and metallothioneins (MTs) are important cellular chelating agents which function in metal detoxification and/or homeostasis. The variations in molecular sizes and lack of chromophores of these peptides make their analysis difficult. This paper reports an electrophoresis-based method for a broad screen of thiol-rich peptides and proteins. The method uses the thiol-selective fluorescent tag, monobromobimane, coupled with Tricine--sodium dodecyl sulphate--urea polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis for a sensitive determination of both PCs and MTs. Results for PCs were confirmed by two-dimensional NMR and HPLC-tandem MS analyses. Sample throughput is substantially improved over chromatography-based methods through parallel sample analysis in 1 h of electrophoretic separation. The method is versatile in that peptides ranging from glutathione to large proteins can be analysed by simple modification(s) of the extraction and electrophoretic conditions, and the nature of the method supports serendipitous detection of unexpected or novel thiol metabolites. PMID:15202602

  3. Coumarins give misleading absorbance with Ellman's reagent suggestive of thiol conjugates.

    PubMed

    Berlich, Maik; Menge, Sieglinde; Bruns, Ina; Schmidt, Juergen; Schneider, Bernd; Krauss, Gerd-Joachim

    2002-03-01

    In the course of a screening for phytochelatins in cadmium-exposed bryophytes in the terrestrial mosses Polytrichum formosum and Atrichum undulatum we detected compounds with absorption properties and retention times similar to phytochelatins when applying the commonly used standard method RP-HPLC and post-column derivatization with thiol-specific DTNB (Ellman) reagent. Moreover, as with phytochelatins known in other plants, the concentrations of these compounds increased slightly after Cd stress. The concentration of the precursor glutathione (gamma-ECG), however, increased in the presence of Cd. In order to verify the identity of these putative phytochelatins we performed LC-ESI-MS analyses as well as 1H NMR on extracts from P. formosum and A. undulatum. Spectroscopic investigations indicated that the detected compounds were neither phytochelatins nor other thiol compounds. From the results of HPLC-1H NMR and mass spectrometry we concluded that at least one of these substances was a coumarin, probably a 5,8-dihydroxy-7-methoxycoumarin-5-beta-glucopyranoside, which has already been described for A. undulatum and P. formosum. The results of our investigations prove that under the basic pH conditions essential for the Ellman test for thiol compounds, coumarins show comparable UV/VIS absorption properties. Therefore, a positive post-column Ellman reaction cannot unambiguously prove the presence of thiol-containing compounds in plants. PMID:11996355

  4. Quantitative interpretation of the transition voltages in gold-poly(phenylene) thiol-gold molecular junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Kunlin; Bai, Meilin; Hou, Shimin; Sanvito, Stefano

    2013-11-21

    The transition voltage of three different asymmetric Au/poly(phenylene) thiol/Au molecular junctions in which the central molecule is either benzene thiol, biphenyl thiol, or terphenyl thiol is investigated by first-principles quantum transport simulations. For all the junctions, the calculated transition voltage at positive polarity is in quantitative agreement with the experimental values and shows weak dependence on alterations of the Au-phenyl contact. When compared to the strong coupling at the Au-S contact, which dominates the alignment of various molecular orbitals with respect to the electrode Fermi level, the coupling at the Au-phenyl contact produces only a weak perturbation. Therefore, variations of the Au-phenyl contact can only have a minor influence on the transition voltage. These findings not only provide an explanation to the uniformity in the transition voltages found for π-conjugated molecules measured with different experimental methods, but also demonstrate the advantage of transition voltage spectroscopy as a tool for determining the positions of molecular levels in molecular devices.

  5. Development of ionic gels using thiol-based monomers in ionic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Kumkum; Naga, Naofumi; Kawakami, Masaru; Furukawa, Hidemitsu

    2016-04-01

    Ionic gels (IGs) using ionic liquids (ILs) can propose diverse applications in the field of optics, sensors and separation have opened wide prospects in materials science. ILs have attracted remarkable interest for gel polymer electrolytes and batteries based on their useful properties such as non-volatility, non-flammability, a wide electrochemical window, high thermal stability and a high ionic conductivity. The formation of gel in IL media makes it possible to immobilize ILs within organic or inorganic matrices and to take advantage of their unique properties in the solid state, thus eliminating some shortcomings related to shaping and risk of leakage. In this work for the first time we used multifunctional thiol monomers having uniform structure and good compatibility with the IL of our interest. Therefore we focused on developing thiol monomer-based IGs using multifunctional thiol monomers and acrylate crosslinkers utilizing thiol-ene reaction between monomer and crosslinking molecules in an IL medium and characterize their physico-chemical properties like thermal, conductive, mechanical properties etc.. This work has been focused mainly to improve the mechanical strength of IGs and make prospects of IGs in tribology and lubricants.

  6. GC/MS DETERMINATION OF 1-P-MENTHEN-8-THIOL IN GRAPEFRUIT JUICE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    P-menthene-8-thiol is a very potent aroma compound found in grapefruit juice. It currently is not measured commercially because it is present in only trace quantities and due to the fact that it requires an expensive specialized detector. However, in this report, it is shown that utilizing a stand...

  7. Thiol-based antioxidants elicit mitochondrial oxidation via respiratory complex III.

    PubMed

    Kolossov, Vladimir L; Beaudoin, Jessica N; Ponnuraj, Nagendraprabhu; DiLiberto, Stephen J; Hanafin, William P; Kenis, Paul J A; Gaskins, H Rex

    2015-07-15

    Excessive oxidation is widely accepted as a precursor to deleterious cellular function. On the other hand, an awareness of the role of reductive stress as a similar pathological insult is emerging. Here we report early dynamic changes in compartmentalized glutathione (GSH) redox potentials in living cells in response to exogenously supplied thiol-based antioxidants. Noninvasive monitoring of intracellular thiol-disulfide exchange via a genetically encoded biosensor targeted to cytosol and mitochondria revealed unexpectedly rapid oxidation of the mitochondrial matrix in response to GSH ethyl ester or N-acetyl-l-cysteine. Oxidation of the probe occurred within seconds in a concentration-dependent manner and was attenuated with the membrane-permeable ROS scavenger tiron. In contrast, the cytosolic sensor did not respond to similar treatments. Surprisingly, the immediate mitochondrial oxidation was not abrogated by depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential or inhibition of mitochondrial GSH uptake. After detection of elevated levels of mitochondrial ROS, we systematically inhibited multisubunit protein complexes of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and determined that respiratory complex III is a downstream target of thiol-based compounds. Disabling complex III with myxothiazol completely blocked matrix oxidation induced with GSH ethyl ester or N-acetyl-l-cysteine. Our findings provide new evidence of a functional link between exogenous thiol-containing antioxidants and mitochondrial respiration. PMID:25994788

  8. Determination of Protein Thiol Reduction Potential by Isotope Labeling and Intact Mass Measurement.

    PubMed

    Thurlow, Sophie E; Kilgour, David P; Campopiano, Dominic J; Mackay, C Logan; Langridge-Smith, Pat R R; Clarke, David J; Campbell, Colin J

    2016-03-01

    Oxidation/reduction of thiol residues in proteins is an important type of post-translational modification that is implicated in regulating a range of biological processes. The nature of the modification makes it possible to define a quantifiable electrochemical potential (E(⊕)) for oxidation/reduction that allows cysteine-containing proteins to be ranked based on their propensity to be oxidized. Measuring oxidation of cysteine residues in proteins is difficult using standard electrochemical methods, but top-down mass spectrometry recently has been shown to enable the quantification of E(⊕) for thiol oxidations. In this paper, we demonstrate that mass spectrometry of intact proteins can be used in combination with an isotopic labeling strategy and an automated data analysis algorithm to measure E(⊕) for the thiols in both E. coli Thioredoxin 1 and human Thioredoxin 1. Our methodology relies on accurate mass measurement of proteins using liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (LC-MS) analyses and does not necessarily require top-down fragmentation. In addition to analyzing homogeneous protein samples, we also demonstrate that our methodology can be used to determine thiol E(⊕) measurements in samples that contain mixtures of proteins. Thus, the combination of experimential methodology and data analysis regime has the potential to make such measurements in a high-throughput manner and in a manner that is more accessible to a broad community of protein scientists. PMID:26881737

  9. Thiol-Ene Induced Diphosphonic Acid Functionalization of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Rutledge, Ryan D.; Warner, Cynthia L.; Pittman, Jonathan W.; Addleman, Raymond S.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Warner, Marvin G.

    2010-07-20

    Multi-functional organic molecules represent an interesting challenge for nanoparticle functionalization due to the potential for undesirable interactions between the substrate material and the variable functionalities, making it difficult to control the final orientation of the ligand. In the present study, UV-induced thiol-ene click chemistry has been utilized as a means of directed functionalization of bifunctional ligands on an iron oxide nanoparticle surface. Allyl diphosphonic acid ligand was covalently deposited on the surface of thiol-presenting iron oxide nanoparticles via the formation of a UV-induced thioether. This method of thiol-ene click chemistry offers a set of reaction conditions capable of controlling the ligand deposition and circumventing the natural affinity exhibited by the phosphonic acid moiety for the iron oxide surface. These claims are supported via a multimodal characterization platform which includes thermogravimetric analysis, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and metal contact analysis and are consistent with a properly oriented, highly active ligand on the nanoparticle surface. These experiments suggest thiol-ene click chemistry as both a practical and generally applicable strategy for the directed deposition of multi-functional ligands on metal oxide nanoparticle surfaces.

  10. Nanoparticles under the light: click functionalization by photochemical thiol-yne reaction, towards double click functionalization.

    PubMed

    Demay-Drouhard, Paul; Nehlig, Emilie; Hardouin, Julie; Motte, Laurence; Guénin, Erwann

    2013-06-24

    A light click away: The first application of the thiol-yne reaction to nanoparticle functionalization is described (see figure). This metal-free click chemistry approach is compatible with the addition of various molecules at the surface and can be combined with CuAAC methodology to perform chemoselective double functionalization. PMID:23744751

  11. Entamoeba thiol-based redox metabolism: A potential target for drug development.

    PubMed

    Jeelani, Ghulam; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Amebiasis is an intestinal infection widespread throughout the world caused by the human pathogen Entamoeba histolytica. Metronidazole has been a drug of choice against amebiasis for decades despite its low efficacy against asymptomatic cyst carriers and emergence of resistance in other protozoa with similar anaerobic metabolism. Therefore, identification and characterization of specific targets is urgently needed to design new therapeutics for improved treatment against amebiasis. Toward this goal, thiol-dependent redox metabolism is of particular interest. The thiol-dependent redox metabolism in E. histolytica consists of proteins including peroxiredoxin, rubrerythrin, Fe-superoxide dismutase, flavodiiron proteins, NADPH: flavin oxidoreductase, and amino acids including l-cysteine, S-methyl-l-cysteine, and thioprolines (thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acids). E. histolytica completely lacks glutathione and its metabolism, and l-cysteine is the major intracellular low molecular mass thiol. Moreover, this parasite possesses a functional thioredoxin system consisting of thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase, which is a ubiquitous oxidoreductase system with antioxidant and redox regulatory roles. In this review, we summarize and highlight the thiol-based redox metabolism and its control mechanisms in E. histolytica, in particular, the features of the system unique to E. histolytica, and its potential use for drug development against amebiasis. PMID:26775086

  12. Mercury and non-protein thiol compounds in the seagrass Posidonia oceanica.

    PubMed

    Ferrat, Lila; Gnassia-Barelli, Mauricette; Pergent-Martini, Christine; Roméo, Michèle

    2003-01-01

    Mercury concentrations, non-protein thiol levels and the enzyme activities of glutathione-S-transferase (GST) were measured in the blades and sheaths of the marine phanerogam Posidonia oceanica. The seagrass was collected in January and June and at three sites: the Bay of Rosignano (Italy) known for its mercury contamination, the north of the Lérins islands (Bay of Cannes, France), the Bay of Tonnara (Corsica, France). The two latter sites are considered as free of any known industrial inputs. Mercury concentrations and GST activities in both tissues were always higher in samples from Rosignano, particularly in June. Non-protein thiol levels were significantly higher in the blades than in the sheaths of P. oceanica from Tonnara and Lérins. In contrast, at Rosignano, the sheaths presented a significantly higher non-protein thiol concentration than the blades, particularly in June. Levels in the sheaths appeared to increase with the degree of pollution. Western Blot performed on sheaths of P. oceanica collected in June at Rosignano and Lérins revealed a characteristic band of GSTs at 31 kDa, proving the presence of the GST enzyme in this tissue. Mercury seemed to exert an influence upon non-protein thiol metabolism, including GST induction, in P. oceanica collected from the NW Mediterranean. PMID:12524027

  13. Photogenerated Lectin Sensors Produced by Thiol-Ene/Yne Photo-Click Chemistry in Aqueous Solution

    PubMed Central

    Norberg, Oscar; Lee, Irene H.; Aastrup, Teodor; Yan, Mingdi; Ramström, Olof

    2012-01-01

    The photoinitiated radical reactions between thiols and alkenes/alkynes (thiol-ene and thiol-yne chemistry) have been applied to a functionalization methodology to produce carbohydrate-presenting surfaces for analyses of biomolecular interactions. Polymer-coated quartz surfaces were functionalized with alkenes or alkynes in a straightforward photochemical procedure utilizing perfluorophenylazide (PFPA) chemistry. The alkene/alkyne surfaces were subsequently allowed to react with carbohydrate thiols in water under UV-irradiation. The reaction can be carried out in a drop of water directly on the surface without photoinitiator and any disulfide side products were easily washed away after the functionalization process. The resulting carbohydrate-presenting surfaces were evaluated in real-time studies of protein-carbohydrate interactions using a quartz crystal microbalance flow-through system with recurring injections of selected lectins with intermediate regeneration steps using low pH buffer. The resulting methodology proved fast, efficient and scalable to high-throughput analysis formats, and the produced surfaces showed significant protein binding with expected selectivities of the lectins used in the study. PMID:22341757

  14. Aroma extraction dilution analysis of Sauternes wines. Key role of polyfunctional thiols.

    PubMed

    Bailly, Sabine; Jerkovic, Vesna; Marchand-Brynaert, Jacqueline; Collin, Sonia

    2006-09-20

    The aim of the present work was to investigate Sauternes wine aromas. In all wine extracts, polyfunctional thiols were revealed to have a huge impact. A very strong bacon-petroleum odor emerged at RI = 845 from a CP-Sil5-CB column. Two thiols proved to participate in this perception: 3-methyl-3-sulfanylbutanal and 2-methylfuran-3-thiol. A strong synergetic effect was evidenced between the two compounds. The former, never mentioned before in wines, and not found in the musts of this study, is most probably synthesized during fermentation. 3-Methylbut-2-ene-1-thiol, 3-sulfanylpropyl acetate, 3-sulfanylhexan-1-ol, and 3-sulfanylheptanal also contribute to the global aromas of Sauternes wines. Among other key odorants, the presence of a varietal aroma (alpha-terpineol), sotolon, fermentation alcohols (3-methylbutan-1-ol and 2-phenylethanol) and esters (ethyl butyrate, ethyl hexanoate, and ethyl isovalerate), carbonyls (trans-non-2-enal and beta-damascenone), and wood flavors (guaiacol, vanillin, eugenol, beta-methyl-gamma-octalactone, and Furaneol) is worth stressing. PMID:16968087

  15. A general iodine-mediated synthesis of primary sulfonamides from thiols and aqueous ammonia.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jian-Bo; Wu, Xiao-Feng

    2016-08-01

    A general and efficient methodology for preparing primary sulfonamides has been developed. In the presence of iodine as the catalyst and TBHP (70% in water) as the oxidant, a wide range of primary sulfonamides were prepared from the corresponding thiols and aqueous ammonia in moderate to good yields. PMID:27375278

  16. Investigations of thiol-modified phenol derivatives for the use in thiol–ene photopolymerizations

    PubMed Central

    Reinelt, Sebastian; Tabatabai, Monir; Fischer, Urs Karl; Moszner, Norbert; Utterodt, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Summary Thiol–ene photopolymerizations gain a growing interest in academic research. Coatings and dental restoratives are interesting applications for thiol–ene photopolymerizations due to their unique features. In most studies the relative flexible and hydrophilic ester derivative, namely pentaerythritoltetra(3-mercaptopropionate) (PETMP), is investigated as the thiol component. Thus, in the present study we are encouraged to investigate the performance of more hydrophobic ester-free thiol-modified bis- and trisphenol derivatives in thiol–ene photopolymerizations. For this, six different thiol-modified bis- and trisphenol derivatives exhibiting four to six thiol groups are synthesized via the radical addition of thioacetic acid to suitable allyl-modified precursors and subsequent hydrolysis. Compared to PETMP better flexural strength and modulus of elasticity are achievable in thiol–ene photopolymerizations employing 1,3,5-triallyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4,6-trione (TATATO) as the ene derivative. Especially, after storage in water, the flexural strength and modulus of elasticity is twice as high compared to the PETMP reference system. PMID:25161731

  17. Multiple shape memory polymers based on laminates formed from thiol-click chemistry based polymerizations.

    PubMed

    Podgórski, M; Wang, C; Bowman, C N

    2015-09-14

    This investigation details the formation of polymer network trilayer laminates formed by thiol-X click chemistries, and their subsequent implementation and evaluation for quadruple shape memory behavior. Thiol-Michael addition and thiol-isocyanate-based crosslinking reactions were employed to fabricate each of the laminate's layers with independent control of the chemistry and properties of each layer and outstanding interlayer adhesion and stability. The characteristic features of step-growth thiol-X reactions, such as excellent network uniformity and narrow thermal transitions as well as their stoichiometric nature, enabled fabrication of trilayer laminates with three distinctly different glass transition temperatures grouped within a narrow range of 100 °C. Through variations in the layer thicknesses, a step-wise modulus drop as a function of temperature was achieved. This behavior allowed multi-step programming and the demonstration and quantification of quadruple shape memory performance. As is critical for this performance, the interface connecting the layers was evaluated in stoichiometric as well as off-stoichiometric systems. It was shown that the laminated structures exhibit strong interfacial binding and hardly suffer any delamination during cyclic material testing and deformation. PMID:26234205

  18. Determination of low molecular weight thiols using monobromobimane fluorescent labeling and high-performance liquid chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahey, Robert C.; Newton, Gerald L.

    1988-01-01

    Methods are described for the preparation and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of monobromobimane derivatives of low molecular weight thiols in extracts of biological samples. Typical problems encountered in the development and application of these methods are discussed. Analysis of mung bean extract is used as an example.

  19. Thimerosal Exposure and the Role of Sulfation Chemistry and Thiol Availability in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Janet K.; Haley, Boyd E.; Geier, David A.; Sykes, Lisa K.; King, Paul G.; Geier, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurological disorder in which a significant number of the children experience a developmental regression characterized by a loss of previously acquired skills and abilities. Typically reported are losses of verbal, nonverbal, and social abilities. Several recent studies suggest that children diagnosed with an ASD have abnormal sulfation chemistry, limited thiol availability, and decreased glutathione (GSH) reserve capacity, resulting in a compromised oxidation/reduction (redox) and detoxification capacity. Research indicates that the availability of thiols, particularly GSH, can influence the effects of thimerosal (TM) and other mercury (Hg) compounds. TM is an organomercurial compound (49.55% Hg by weight) that has been, and continues to be, used as a preservative in many childhood vaccines, particularly in developing countries. Thiol-modulating mechanisms affecting the cytotoxicity of TM have been identified. Importantly, the emergence of ASD symptoms post-6 months of age temporally follows the administration of many childhood vaccines. The purpose of the present critical review is provide mechanistic insight regarding how limited thiol availability, abnormal sulfation chemistry, and decreased GSH reserve capacity in children with an ASD could make them more susceptible to the toxic effects of TM routinely administered as part of mandated childhood immunization schedules. PMID:23965928

  20. Thimerosal exposure and the role of sulfation chemistry and thiol availability in autism.

    PubMed

    Kern, Janet K; Haley, Boyd E; Geier, David A; Sykes, Lisa K; King, Paul G; Geier, Mark R

    2013-08-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurological disorder in which a significant number of the children experience a developmental regression characterized by a loss of previously acquired skills and abilities. Typically reported are losses of verbal, nonverbal, and social abilities. Several recent studies suggest that children diagnosed with an ASD have abnormal sulfation chemistry, limited thiol availability, and decreased glutathione (GSH) reserve capacity, resulting in a compromised oxidation/reduction (redox) and detoxification capacity. Research indicates that the availability of thiols, particularly GSH, can influence the effects of thimerosal (TM) and other mercury (Hg) compounds. TM is an organomercurial compound (49.55% Hg by weight) that has been, and continues to be, used as a preservative in many childhood vaccines, particularly in developing countries. Thiol-modulating mechanisms affecting the cytotoxicity of TM have been identified. Importantly, the emergence of ASD symptoms post-6 months of age temporally follows the administration of many childhood vaccines. The purpose of the present critical review is provide mechanistic insight regarding how limited thiol availability, abnormal sulfation chemistry, and decreased GSH reserve capacity in children with an ASD could make them more susceptible to the toxic effects of TM routinely administered as part of mandated childhood immunization schedules. PMID:23965928

  1. MERCURY(II) ADSORPTION FROM WASTEWATERS USING A THIOL FUNCTIONAL ADSORBENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The removal of mercury(II) from wastewaters (coal-fired utility plant scrubber solutions) using a thiol functional organoceramic composite (SOL-AD-IV) is investigated. A simulant is employed as a surrogate to demonstrate the removal of mercury from real waste solutions. Equilibri...

  2. Sytematic Study of the Adsorption of Thiol Molecules on Noble-Metal Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barron, H.; Hidalgo, F.; Fernandez-Seivane, L.; Noguez, C.; Lopez-Lozano, X.

    2012-03-01

    The study of the interaction between nanoparticles and different types of ligands has been intensively investigated in the last years due to the potential contribution of their properties to the nanotechnology device design. These properties have opened new research fields like plasmonics, with interesting applications in optics, electronics, biophysics, medicine, pharmacology and materials science. Self-assembly monolayers have been thoroughly studied at experimental and theoretical level on extended (111) gold and silver surfaces. However, nanoparticle and molecule properties after the adsorption are still not well understood due to the different factors involved in this process such as the adsorption sites, size and element type of the nanoparticle. In this work we have performed a systematic study of the adsorption of methyl-thiol molecules on Au55 and Ag55 clusters through density functional theory calculations with the SIESTA code. Different adsorption modes of the methyl-thiol molecule on Au55 and Ag55 were considered. In general, for both type of nanoparticles, the methyl-thiol molecule prefers to be adsorbed on the Bridge sites. These results provide valuable information of the structural and electronic properties of methyl-thiol passivated Au and Ag nanoparticles.

  3. Thiols as biomarkers of heavy metal tolerance in the aquatic macrophytes of Middle Urals, Russia.

    PubMed

    Borisova, Galina; Chukina, Nadezda; Maleva, Maria; Kumar, Adarsh; Prasad, M N V

    2016-10-01

    Aquatic macrophytes, viz. Sagittaria sagittifolia L., Lemna gibba L., Elodea canadensis Michx., Batrachium trichophyllum (Chaix.) Bosch., Ceratophyllum demersum L. and Potamogeton sp. (P. perfoliatus L., P. alpinus Balb., P. crispus L., P. berchtoldii Fieber, P. friesii Rupr., P. pectinatus L.) were collected from 11 sites for determining their metal accumulation and thiols content. Cu(2+), Ni(2+), Mn(2+), Zn(2+), and Fe(3+) exceeded maximum permissible concentrations in chosen sites. Significant transfer of metals from water to leaves is observed in the order of Ni(2+) < Cu(2+) < Zn(2+) < Fe(3+) < Mn(2+). The maximum variation of bioconcentration factor was noticed for manganese. The accumulation of heavy metals in leaves was correlated with non-protein and protein thiols, confirming their important role in metal tolerance. The largest contribution was provided by Cu(2+) (on the average r = 0.88, p < 0.05), which obviously can be explained as an important role of these ions in thiols synthesis. Increased synthesis of thiols in the leaves allows the usage of SH-containing compounds as biomarkers of metal tolerance. Considering accumulation of metals and tolerance, B. trichophyllum, C. demersum and L. gibba are the most suitable species for phytoremediation of highly multimetal contamination, while E. canadensis and some species of Potamageton are suitable for moderately metal-polluted sites. PMID:27167595

  4. Split ring containment attachment device

    DOEpatents

    Sammel, Alfred G.

    1996-01-01

    A containment attachment device 10 for operatively connecting a glovebag 200 to plastic sheeting 100 covering hazardous material. The device 10 includes an inner split ring member 20 connected on one end 22 to a middle ring member 30 wherein the free end 21 of the split ring member 20 is inserted through a slit 101 in the plastic sheeting 100 to captively engage a generally circular portion of the plastic sheeting 100. A collar potion 41 having an outer ring portion 42 is provided with fastening means 51 for securing the device 10 together wherein the glovebag 200 is operatively connected to the collar portion 41.

  5. Preferred Attachment in Affiliation Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloznelis, Mindaugas; Götze, Friedrich

    2014-08-01

    Vertices of an affiliation network are linked to attributes and two vertices are declared adjacent whenever they share a common attribute. For example, two customers of an internet shop (or video-sharing website) are called adjacent if they have purchased (or downloaded) the same or similar items. Assuming that each newly arrived customer is linked preferentially to already popular items we obtain a preferred attachment affiliation network that evolves in time. We show that the fraction of customers having neighbours scales as for large . Here is the ratio between the two intensities: intensity of the flow of customers and that of the newly arriving items.

  6. DNA attachment to support structures

    DOEpatents

    Balhorn, Rodney L.; Barry, Christopher H.

    2002-01-01

    Microscopic beads or other structures are attached to nucleic acids (DNA) using a terminal transferase. The transferase adds labeled dideoxy nucleotide bases to the ends of linear strands of DNA. The labels, such as the antigens digoxigenin and biotin, bind to the antibody compounds or other appropriate complementary ligands, which are bound to the microscopic beads or other support structures. The method does not require the synthesis of a synthetic oligonucleotide probe. The method can be used to tag or label DNA even when the DNA has an unknown sequence, has blunt ends, or is a very large fragment (e.g., >500 kilobase pairs).

  7. Transdermal thiol-acrylate polyethylene glycol hydrogel synthesis using near infrared light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Solchan; Lee, Hwangjae; Kim, Hyung-Seok; Kim, Min-Gon; Lee, Luke P.; Lee, Jae Young

    2016-07-01

    Light-induced polymerization has been widely applied for hydrogel synthesis, which conventionally involves the use of ultraviolet or visible light to activate a photoinitiator for polymerization. However, with these light sources, transdermal gelation is not efficient and feasible due to their substantial interactions with biological systems, and thus a high power is required. In this study, we used biocompatible and tissue-penetrating near infrared (NIR) light to remotely trigger a thiol-acrylate reaction for efficient in vivo gelation with good controllability. Our gelation system includes gold nanorods as a photothermal agent, a thermal initiator, diacrylate polyethylene glycol (PEG), and thiolated PEG. Irradiation with a low-power NIR laser (0.3 W cm-2) could induce gelation via a mixed-mode reaction with a small increase in temperature (~5 °C) under the optimized conditions. We also achieved successful transdermal gelation via the NIR-assisted photothermal thiol-acryl reactions. This new type of NIR-assisted thiol-acrylate polymerization provides new opportunities for in situ hydrogel formation for injectable hydrogels and delivery of drugs/cells for various biomedical applications.Light-induced polymerization has been widely applied for hydrogel synthesis, which conventionally involves the use of ultraviolet or visible light to activate a photoinitiator for polymerization. However, with these light sources, transdermal gelation is not efficient and feasible due to their substantial interactions with biological systems, and thus a high power is required. In this study, we used biocompatible and tissue-penetrating near infrared (NIR) light to remotely trigger a thiol-acrylate reaction for efficient in vivo gelation with good controllability. Our gelation system includes gold nanorods as a photothermal agent, a thermal initiator, diacrylate polyethylene glycol (PEG), and thiolated PEG. Irradiation with a low-power NIR laser (0.3 W cm-2) could induce gelation

  8. Thiol-vinyl systems as shape memory polymers and novel two-stage reactive polymer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Devatha P.

    2011-12-01

    The focus of this research was to formulate, characterize and tailor the reaction methodologies and material properties of thiol-vinyl systems to develop novel polymer platforms for a range of engineering applications. Thiol-ene photopolymers were demonstrated to exhibit several advantageous characteristics for shape memory polymer systems for a range of biomedical applications. The thiol-ene shape memory polymer systems were tough and flexible as compared to the acrylic control systems with glass transition temperatures between 30 and 40 °C; ideal for actuation at body temperature. The thiol-ene polymers also exhibited excellent shape fixity and a rapid and distinct shape memory actuation response along with free strain recoveries of greater than 96% and constrained stress recoveries of 100%. Additionally, two-stage reactive thiol-acrylate systems were engineered as a polymer platform technology enabling two independent sets of polymer processing and material properties. There are distinct advantages to designing polymer systems that afford two distinct sets of material properties -- an intermediate polymer that would enable optimum handling and processing of the material (stage 1), while maintaining the ability to tune in different, final properties that enable the optimal functioning of the polymeric material (stage 2). To demonstrate the range of applicability of the two-stage reactive systems, three specific applications were demonstrated; shape memory polymers, lithographic impression materials, and optical materials. The thiol-acrylate reactions exhibit a wide range of application versatility due to the range of available thiol and acrylate monomers as well as reaction mechanisms such as Michael Addition reactions and free radical polymerizations. By designing a series of non-stoichiometeric thiol-acrylate systems, a polymer network is initially formed via a base catalyzed 'click' Michael addition reaction. This self-limiting reaction results in a Stage 1

  9. Acetate- and thiol-capped monodisperse ruthenium nanoparticles: XPS, XAS, and HRTEM studies.

    PubMed

    Chakroune, Nassira; Viau, Guillaume; Ammar, Souad; Poul, Laurence; Veautier, Delphine; Chehimi, Mohamed M; Mangeney, Claire; Villain, Françoise; Fiévet, Fernand

    2005-07-19

    Monodisperse ruthenium nanoparticles were prepared by reduction of RuCl3 in 1,2-propanediol. The mean particle size was controlled by appropriate choice of the reduction temperature and the acetate ion concentration. Colloidal solutions in toluene were obtained by coating the metal particles with dodecanethiol. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES and EXAFS for the Ru K-absorption edge) were performed on particles of two different diameters, 2 and 4 nm, and in different environments, polyol/acetate or thiol. For particles stored in polyol/acetate XPS studies revealed superficial oxidation limited to one monolayer and a surface coating containing mostly acetate ions. Analysis of the EXAFS spectra showed both oxygen and ruthenium atoms around the ruthenium atoms with a Ru-Ru coordination number N smaller than the bulk value, as expected for fine particles. In the case of 2 nm acetate-capped particles N is consistent with particles made up of a metallic core and an oxidized monolayer. For 2 nm thiol-coated particles, a Ru-S bond was evidenced by XPS and XAS. For the 4 nm particles XANES and XPS studies showed that most of the ruthenium atoms are in the zerovalent state. Nevertheless, in both cases, when capped with thiol, the Ru-Ru coordination number inferred from EXAFS is much smaller than for particles of the same size stored in polyol. This is attributed to a structural disorganization of the particles by thiol chemisorption. HRTEM studies confirm the marked dependence of the structural properties of the ruthenium particles on their chemical environment; they show the acetate-coated particles to be single crystals, whereas the thiol-coated particles appear to be polycrystalline. PMID:16008388

  10. Monochloramine Impairs Caspase-3 Through Thiol Oxidation and Zn2+ Release

    PubMed Central

    Kohler, Jonathan E.; Mathew, Jeff; Tai, Kaniza; Blass, Amy L.; Kelly, Edward; Soybel, David I.

    2009-01-01

    Background Caspase-3, a pro-apoptotic enzyme, represents a class of proteins in which the active site contains reduced thiol (S-H) groups and is modulated by heavy metal cations such as Zn2+. We explored the effects of the thiol oxidant monochloramine (NH2Cl) on caspase-3 activity within cells of isolated rabbit gastric glands. In addition, we tested the hypothesis that NH2Cl-induced alterations of caspase-3 activity are modulated by oxidant-induced accumulation of Zn2+ within the cytoplasm. Materials and Methods Isolated gastric glands were prepared from rabbit mucosa by collagenase digestion. Caspase-3 activity was measured colorimetrically in suspensions of healthy rabbit gastric glands, following exposure to various concentrations of NH2Cl with or without the zinc chelator TPEN for 1 hour, and re-equilibration in Ringer's solution for 5 hours. Conversion of procaspase 3 to active caspase-3 was monitored by Western blot. Results Monochloramine inhibited caspase-3 activity in a dose dependent fashion. At concentrations of NH2Cl up to 100μM, these effects were prevented if TPEN was given concurrently and were partly reversed if TPEN was given one hour later. Caspase-3 activity was preserved by concurrent treatment with a thiol-reducing agent, dithiothreitol (DTT). Conclusions At pathologically relevant concentrations, NH2Cl impairs caspase-3 activity through oxidation of its thiol groups. Independently from its thiol oxidant effects on the enzyme, NH2Cl-induced accumulation of Zn2+ in the cytoplasm is sufficient to restrain endogenous caspase-3 activity. Our studies suggest that some bacterially generated oxidants such as NH2Cl impair host pathways of apoptosis through release of Zn2+ from endogenous pools. PMID:19118843

  11. In vivo depletion of free thiols does not account for nitroglycerin-induced tolerance: a thiol-nitrate interaction hypothesis as an alternative explanation for nitroglycerin activity and tolerance.

    PubMed

    Haj-Yehia, A I; Benet, L Z

    1996-09-01

    The present study investigates the effects of thiol-depleting/ modifying agents on the activity of and tolerance to nitroglycerin (GTN), sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP) in an in vivo rat model. Rats were treated with either vehicle (control), GTN (before and after induction of tolerance), diethyl maleate (a thiol-depleting agent) or N-ethylmaleimide (a thiol-modifying agent). The effects of GTN, SNP and SNAP on vascular cyclic GMP levels were investigated before and after each treatment. In addition, plasma and tissue thiol concentrations were measured in the same tissues as used for the determination of cyclic GMP in aorta and inferior vena cava after single and serial i.v. bolus doses of each drug. Depletion of free thiols (glutathione and cysteine) was not found to accompany tolerance development in GTN-treated tolerant rats or to significantly enhance tolerance development or augment its magnitude in diethyl maleate-treated rats. When rats were pretreated with a low single dose of N-ethylmaleimide, where no significant changes in vascular free thiols were observed, significant reduction in GTN- and SNP-induced, but not SNAP-induced, vascular cyclic GMP production was obtained. Considering the differential effects of diethyl maleate (mainly free thiol depletion) and N-ethylmaleimide (mainly proteinous thiol-alkylation) on vascular thiols, these results indicate that depletion of sulfhydryl groups other than those from free glutathione and cysteine seems to be involved in the mechanisms defining GTN and SNP (but not SNAP) action and tolerance. Here we propose that SNAP may act either directly by nitrosation of the heme moiety of the enzyme or via an S-enzyme-S-drug transnitrosation reaction, whereas GTN and SNP actions are mediated by the formation of S-nitrosothiol on the enzyme itself, rather than by activation of the enzyme by free S-nitrosothiols. PMID:8819515

  12. Methane production by attached film

    DOEpatents

    Jewell, William J.

    1981-01-01

    A method for purifying wastewater of biodegradable organics by converting the organics to methane and carbon dioxide gases is disclosed, characterized by the use of an anaerobic attached film expanded bed reactor for the reaction process. Dilute organic waste material is initially seeded with a heterogeneous anaerobic bacteria population including a methane-producing bacteria. The seeded organic waste material is introduced into the bottom of the expanded bed reactor which includes a particulate support media coated with a polysaccharide film. A low-velocity upward flow of the organic waste material is established through the bed during which the attached bacterial film reacts with the organic material to produce methane and carbon dioxide gases, purified water, and a small amount of residual effluent material. The residual effluent material is filtered by the film as it flows upwardly through the reactor bed. In a preferred embodiment, partially treated effluent material is recycled from the top of the bed to the bottom of the bed for further treatment. The methane and carbon dioxide gases are then separated from the residual effluent material and purified water.

  13. Attachment in romantic relationships and somatization.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Eva; Sattel, Heribert; Gündel, Harald; Henningsen, Peter; Kruse, Johannes

    2015-02-01

    Adult attachment representations have been considered to play a role in the development and treatment of somatizing behavior. In this study, the associations between the two attachment dimensions avoidance and anxiety and dimensions of psychopathology (somatization, depression, and general anxiety) were explored. The sample consists of 202 outpatients diagnosed with a somatoform disorder. Data were collected via self-report measures. A path analysis shows that the two attachment dimensions are not directly associated with somatization. There are, however, significant indirect associations between attachment and somatization mediated by depression and general anxiety, which are more pronounced for attachment anxiety than for attachment avoidance. The findings reveal that a low level of attachment security in romantic relationships, especially an anxious stance toward the partner, comes along with poor mental health, which in turn is related to a preoccupation with somatic complaints. Implications for the treatment of somatizing patients are discussed. PMID:25594785

  14. Determination of thiol metabolites in human urine by stable isotope labeling in combination with pseudo-targeted mass spectrometry analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ping; Qi, Chu-Bo; Zhu, Quan-Fei; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2016-02-01

    Precursor ion scan and multiple reaction monitoring scan (MRM) are two typical scan modes in mass spectrometry analysis. Here, we developed a strategy by combining stable isotope labeling (IL) with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) under double precursor ion scan (DPI) and MRM for analysis of thiols in 5 types of human cancer urine. Firstly, the IL-LC-DPI-MS method was applied for non-targeted profiling of thiols from cancer samples. Compared to traditional full scan mode, the DPI method significantly improved identification selectivity and accuracy. 103 thiol candidates were discovered in all cancers and 6 thiols were identified by their standards. It is worth noting that pantetheine, for the first time, was identified in human urine. Secondly, the IL-LC-MRM-MS method was developed for relative quantification of thiols in cancers compared to healthy controls. All the MRM transitions of light and heavy labeled thiols were acquired from urines by using DPI method. Compared to DPI method, the sensitivity of MRM improved by 2.1-11.3 folds. In addition, the concentration of homocysteine, γ-glutamylcysteine and pantetheine enhanced more than two folds in cancer patients compared to healthy controls. Taken together, the method demonstrated to be a promising strategy for identification and comprehensive quantification of thiols in human urines.

  15. The design of redox active thiol peroxidase mimics: Dihydrolipoic acid recognition correlates with cytotoxicity and prooxidant action.

    PubMed

    Zadehvakili, B; McNeill, S M; Fawcett, J P; Giles, G I

    2016-03-15

    Redox active molecules containing organoselenium or organotellurium groups catalyse the oxidation of cellular thiols by hydrogen peroxide and are currently being developed as therapeutic agents. Potentially these synthetic thiol peroxidase (TPx) mimics can protect cells from oxidative stress by catalysing the reduction of reactive oxygen species by the cellular thiol glutathione, an activity which mimics the function of the antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase. Alternatively they can act as prooxidants by catalysing the oxidation of essential thiol species within the cell. However the structure-activity relationships which determine the choice of thiol substrate, and hence the overall antioxidant or prooxidant outcome of drug administration, remain unknown. We report the first study that relates the pharmacological properties of TPx mimics with their solubility and catalytic activity using different thiol substrates. We used a series of structurally related compounds PhMCnH2n+1 (M=Se, Te; n=4-7) and investigated their ability to catalyse the oxidation of the cellular thiols glutathione and dihydrolipoic acid by hydrogen peroxide. The resulting rate constants (kobs) were then related to compound cytotoxicity and antioxidant versus prooxidant action in A549 cancer cells. The results show that the dihydrolipoic acid kobs values correlate with both cytotoxicity and prooxidant function. This enabled us to define a relationship, IC50=10+280e(-5(DHLA) (kobs)), which allows the prediction of TPx mimic cytotoxicity. In contrast, hydrophobicity and glutathione kobs were unrelated to the compounds' redox pharmacology. PMID:26801688

  16. Determination of thiol metabolites in human urine by stable isotope labeling in combination with pseudo-targeted mass spectrometry analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ping; Qi, Chu-Bo; Zhu, Quan-Fei; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2016-01-01

    Precursor ion scan and multiple reaction monitoring scan (MRM) are two typical scan modes in mass spectrometry analysis. Here, we developed a strategy by combining stable isotope labeling (IL) with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) under double precursor ion scan (DPI) and MRM for analysis of thiols in 5 types of human cancer urine. Firstly, the IL-LC-DPI-MS method was applied for non-targeted profiling of thiols from cancer samples. Compared to traditional full scan mode, the DPI method significantly improved identification selectivity and accuracy. 103 thiol candidates were discovered in all cancers and 6 thiols were identified by their standards. It is worth noting that pantetheine, for the first time, was identified in human urine. Secondly, the IL-LC-MRM-MS method was developed for relative quantification of thiols in cancers compared to healthy controls. All the MRM transitions of light and heavy labeled thiols were acquired from urines by using DPI method. Compared to DPI method, the sensitivity of MRM improved by 2.1–11.3 folds. In addition, the concentration of homocysteine, γ-glutamylcysteine and pantetheine enhanced more than two folds in cancer patients compared to healthy controls. Taken together, the method demonstrated to be a promising strategy for identification and comprehensive quantification of thiols in human urines. PMID:26888486

  17. Chromenoquinoline-based thiol probes: a study on the quencher position for controlling fluorescent Off-On characteristics.

    PubMed

    Kand, Dnyaneshwar; Kalle, Arunasree Marasanapalli; Talukdar, Pinaki

    2013-02-13

    The design, synthesis and thiol sensing ability of chromenoquinoline-based fluorescent probes 4, 5 and 6 and are reported here. The relative position of the maleimide moiety was varied along the chromenoquinoline fluorophore to decrease the background fluorescence. Lower background fluorescence in probes 4 and 6 was rationalized by the smaller k(r)/k(nr) values compared to that of probe 5. An intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) mechanism was proposed for quenching and the extent was dependent on the position of the maleimide quencher. Fluorescent Off-On characteristics were evaluated by theoretical calculations. All probes were selective only towards thiol containing amino acids. Thiol sensing by probes 4 and 6 were much better compared to 5. Probe 4 displayed a better fluorescence response for less hindered thiol (185-, 223- and 156-fold for Hcy, Cys and GSH, respectively), while for probe 6, a higher enhancement in fluorescence was observed with more hindered thiols (180-, 205- and 245-fold for Hcy, Cys and GSH, respectively). The better response to bulkier thiol, GSH by probe 6 was attributed to the steric crowding at the C-4 position and bulkiness of the GSH group which force the succinimide unit to be in a nearly orthogonal conformation. This spatial arrangement was important in reducing the fluorescence quenching ability of the succinimide moiety. The application of probes 4, 5 and 6 was demonstrated by naked eye detection thiols using a 96-well plate system as well as by live-cell imaging. PMID:23364761

  18. Reaction Mechanisms of Metals with Hydrogen Sulfide and Thiols in Model Wine. Part 1: Copper-Catalyzed Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Kreitman, Gal Y; Danilewicz, John C; Jeffery, David W; Elias, Ryan J

    2016-05-25

    Sulfidic off-odors as a result of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and low-molecular-weight thiols are commonly encountered in wine production. These odors are usually removed by the process of Cu(II) fining, a process that remains poorly understood. The present study aims to elucidate the underlying mechanisms by which Cu(II) interacts with H2S and thiol compounds (RSH) under wine-like conditions. Copper complex formation was monitored along with H2S, thiol, oxygen, and acetaldehyde concentrations after the addition of Cu(II) (50 or 100 μM) to air-saturated model wine solutions containing H2S, cysteine, 6-sulfanylhexan-1-ol, or 3-sulfanylhexan-1-ol (300 μM each). The presence of H2S and thiols in excess to Cu(II) led to the rapid formation of ∼1.4:1 H2S/Cu and ∼2:1 thiol/Cu complexes, resulting in the oxidation of H2S and thiols and reduction of Cu(II) to Cu(I), which reacted with oxygen. H2S was observed to initially oxidize rather than form insoluble copper sulfide. The proposed reaction mechanisms provide insight into the extent to which H2S can be selectively removed in the presence of thiols in wine. PMID:27133282

  19. Mitochondrial thiol modification by a targeted electrophile inhibits metabolism in breast adenocarcinoma cells by inhibiting enzyme activity and protein levels

    PubMed Central

    Smith, M. Ryan; Vayalil, Praveen K.; Zhou, Fen; Benavides, Gloria A.; Beggs, Reena R.; Golzarian, Hafez; Nijampatnam, Bhavitavya; Oliver, Patsy G.; Smith, Robin A.J.; Murphy, Michael P.; Velu, Sadanandan E.; Landar, Aimee

    2016-01-01

    Many cancer cells follow an aberrant metabolic program to maintain energy for rapid cell proliferation. Metabolic reprogramming often involves the upregulation of glutaminolysis to generate reducing equivalents for the electron transport chain and amino acids for protein synthesis. Critical enzymes involved in metabolism possess a reactive thiolate group, which can be modified by certain oxidants. In the current study, we show that modification of mitochondrial protein thiols by a model compound, iodobutyl triphenylphosphonium (IBTP), decreased mitochondrial metabolism and ATP in MDA-MB 231 (MB231) breast adenocarcinoma cells up to 6 days after an initial 24 h treatment. Mitochondrial thiol modification also depressed oxygen consumption rates (OCR) in a dose-dependent manner to a greater extent than a non-thiol modifying analog, suggesting that thiol reactivity is an important factor in the inhibition of cancer cell metabolism. In non-tumorigenic MCF-10A cells, IBTP also decreased OCR; however the extracellular acidification rate was significantly increased at all but the highest concentration (10 µM) of IBTP indicating that thiol modification can have significantly different effects on bioenergetics in tumorigenic versus non-tumorigenic cells. ATP and other adenonucleotide levels were also decreased by thiol modification up to 6 days post-treatment, indicating a decreased overall energetic state in MB231 cells. Cellular proliferation of MB231 cells was also inhibited up to 6 days post-treatment with little change to cell viability. Targeted metabolomic analyses revealed that thiol modification caused depletion of both Krebs cycle and glutaminolysis intermediates. Further experiments revealed that the activity of the Krebs cycle enzyme, aconitase, was attenuated in response to thiol modification. Additionally, the inhibition of glutaminolysis corresponded to decreased glutaminase C (GAC) protein levels, although other protein levels were unaffected. This study

  20. Mitochondrial thiol modification by a targeted electrophile inhibits metabolism in breast adenocarcinoma cells by inhibiting enzyme activity and protein levels.

    PubMed

    Smith, M Ryan; Vayalil, Praveen K; Zhou, Fen; Benavides, Gloria A; Beggs, Reena R; Golzarian, Hafez; Nijampatnam, Bhavitavya; Oliver, Patsy G; Smith, Robin A J; Murphy, Michael P; Velu, Sadanandan E; Landar, Aimee

    2016-08-01

    Many cancer cells follow an aberrant metabolic program to maintain energy for rapid cell proliferation. Metabolic reprogramming often involves the upregulation of glutaminolysis to generate reducing equivalents for the electron transport chain and amino acids for protein synthesis. Critical enzymes involved in metabolism possess a reactive thiolate group, which can be modified by certain oxidants. In the current study, we show that modification of mitochondrial protein thiols by a model compound, iodobutyl triphenylphosphonium (IBTP), decreased mitochondrial metabolism and ATP in MDA-MB 231 (MB231) breast adenocarcinoma cells up to 6 days after an initial 24h treatment. Mitochondrial thiol modification also depressed oxygen consumption rates (OCR) in a dose-dependent manner to a greater extent than a non-thiol modifying analog, suggesting that thiol reactivity is an important factor in the inhibition of cancer cell metabolism. In non-tumorigenic MCF-10A cells, IBTP also decreased OCR; however the extracellular acidification rate was significantly increased at all but the highest concentration (10µM) of IBTP indicating that thiol modification can have significantly different effects on bioenergetics in tumorigenic versus non-tumorigenic cells. ATP and other adenonucleotide levels were also decreased by thiol modification up to 6 days post-treatment, indicating a decreased overall energetic state in MB231 cells. Cellular proliferation of MB231 cells was also inhibited up to 6 days post-treatment with little change to cell viability. Targeted metabolomic analyses revealed that thiol modification caused depletion of both Krebs cycle and glutaminolysis intermediates. Further experiments revealed that the activity of the Krebs cycle enzyme, aconitase, was attenuated in response to thiol modification. Additionally, the inhibition of glutaminolysis corresponded to decreased glutaminase C (GAC) protein levels, although other protein levels were unaffected. This study

  1. Role of copper and ceruloplasmin in oxidative mutagenesis induced by the gluthathione-{gamma}-glutamyl transpeptidase system and by other thiols

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, A.A.; Glass, G.A.

    1997-10-01

    Glutathione is activated to a mutagen by {gamma}-glutamyl transpeptidase. Other thiols, such as cysteine, penicillamine, cysteine ethylester, and cysteinylglycine, are direct mutagens in the Ames Salmonella mutagenicity test. Thiol mutagenesis is oxidative in nature and involves H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and possibly hydroxyl radicals. Transition metals are crucial for thiol autoxidation. The role of copper and ceruloplasmin (CP) in thiol-dependent mutagenesis was studied in Salmonella typhimurium strain TA 102. Cu and CP at low concentrations enhanced thiol-dependent mutagenesis in the presence, but not in the absence, and added Fe. The degree of enhancement depended on the type of thiol. At high Cu or CP concentrations, thiol mutagenesis was inhibited. Cu also decreased the mutagenicity of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Cu- and CP-enhanced mutagenesis were inhibited by radical scavengers, catalase, and peroxidase but not by superoxide dismutase. The effects of Cu and CP on thiol-dependent mutagenesis were similar to their effects on thiol-driven lipid peroxidation. The results indicate that the role of Cu and CP in the enhancement of thiol mutagenesis is the facilitation of the transfer of electrons from a thiol to iron, rather than in catalysis of the Fenton reaction. 34 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Benzofuroxan as a thiol-specific reactivity probe. Kinetics of its reactions with papain, ficin, bromelain and low-molecular-weight thiols.

    PubMed Central

    Shipton, M; Brocklehurst, K

    1977-01-01

    1. The characteristics of benzofuroxan (benzofurazan 1-oxide, benzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole N-oxide) that relate to its application as a reactivity probe for the study of environments of thiol groups are discussed. 2. To establish a kinetic and mechanistic basis for its use as a probe, a kinetic study of its reaction with 2-mercaptoethanol was carried out. 3. This reaction appears to proceed by a rate-determining attack of the thiolate ion on one of the electrophilic centres of benzofuroxan (possibly C-6) to provide a low steady-state concentration of an intermediate adduct; rapid reaction of this adduct with a second molecule of thiol gives the disulphide and o-benzoquinone dioxime. 4. The effects of the different types of environment that proteins can provide on the kinetic characteristics of reactions of thiol groups with benzofuroxan are delineated. 5. Benzofuroxan was used as a thiolspecific reactivity probe to investigate the active centres of papain (EC 3.4.22.2), ficin (EC 3.4.22.3) and bromelain (EC 3.4.22.4). The results support the concept that the active centres of all three enzymes either contain a nucleophilic thiolate ion whose formation is characterized by a pKa of 3-4 and whose reaction with an electrophile can be assisted by interaction of a site of high electron density in the electrophile with active-centre imidazolium ion of pKa 8-9, or can provide such ions by protonic redistribution in enzyme-reagent or enzyme-substrate complexes. PMID:23765

  3. Temperament and attachment: one construct or two?

    PubMed

    Mangelsdorf, S C; Frosch, C A

    1999-01-01

    In this chapter we described the constructs of temperament and attachment and have discussed similarities and differences between the two. We addressed the issue of whether temperament contributes to overall attachment security or to the specific type of attachment that children display. We conclude that although temperament may influence the type of secure and insecure attachment relationship children form with their parent, temperament alone will not determine if a child is classified as securely or insecurely attached. We presented evidence suggesting that certain dimensions of temperament, specifically negative emotionality, may be associated with infants' behavior during the Strange Situation, such as proneness-to-distress during separations. However, we noted that these temperament dimensions do not predict overall security of attachment. It is likely that although no single temperament characteristic, such as proneness-to-distress, in and of itself determines overall attachment security, it is possible that a constellation of temperament characteristics may be more strongly related to attachment security. The examination of constellations of temperament characteristics may be particularly useful for furthering our understanding of individual differences within attachment classifications. Such an approach may elucidate the reasons why infants are classified into one subgroup of secure, insecure-avoidant, or insecure-resistant attachment versus another subgroup. Furthermore, we suggest that the collection of findings regarding temperament and attachment not only underscores the importance of a transactional approach to early social-emotional development, but emphasizes that temperament and attachment can make unique and interactive contributions to children's social-emotional functioning. That is, the goodness-of-fit between infant and parent characteristics may best predict security of attachment. Although child characteristics clearly contribute to the

  4. Sine-Bar Attachment For Machine Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, Franklin D.

    1988-01-01

    Sine-bar attachment for collets, spindles, and chucks helps machinists set up quickly for precise angular cuts that require greater precision than provided by graduations of machine tools. Machinist uses attachment to index head, carriage of milling machine or lathe relative to table or turning axis of tool. Attachment accurate to 1 minute or arc depending on length of sine bar and precision of gauge blocks in setup. Attachment installs quickly and easily on almost any type of lathe or mill. Requires no special clamps or fixtures, and eliminates many trial-and-error measurements. More stable than improvised setups and not jarred out of position readily.

  5. Attachment fixation of the overdenture: part II.

    PubMed

    Mensor, M C

    1978-01-01

    Many attachment systems of the bar or stud type increase the stability of an overdenture. When selecting an attachment it is essential to consider the skill of the dentist-laboratory team as well as the dexterity of the patient and to use the easiest system that will still improve stabilization. Generally simplicity in design, ease of maintenance, and minimum leverage should be paramount considerations in selection. Use of a guide such as the EM Gauge and of the EM Attachment Selector significantly reduces the confusion in selecting attachments and increases the working armamentarium for stabilizing an overdenture. PMID:340660

  6. Oxytocin enhances the experience of attachment security

    PubMed Central

    Buchheim, Anna; Heinrichs, Markus; George, Carol; Pokorny, Dan; Koops, Eva; Henningsen, Peter; O’Connor, Mary-Frances; Gundel, Harald

    2011-01-01

    Summary Repeated interactions between infant and caregiver result in either secure or insecure relationship attachment patterns, and insecure attachment may affect individual emotion-regulation and health. Given that oxytocin enhances social approach behavior in animals and humans, we hypothesized that oxytocin might also promote the experience of attachment security in humans. Within a 3-week interval 26 healthy male students classified with an insecure attachment pattern were invited twice to an experimental session. Within each session, a single dose of oxytocin or placebo was administered, using a double-blind, placebo-controlled within-subject design. In both conditions, subjects completed an attachment task based on the Adult Attachment Projective Picture System (AAP). Thirty-two AAP picture system presentations depicted attachment-related events (e.g. illness, solitude, separation, loss), and were each accompanied by four prototypical phrases representing one secure and three insecure attachment categories. In the oxytocin condition, a significant proportion of these insecure subjects (N = 18; 69%) changed their rankings of “secure attachment” phrases towards the more appropriate for the AAP picture presentation, and the same subjects decreased in overall rating of the “insecure attachment” phrases. In particular, there was a significant decrease in the number of subjects ranking the pictures with “insecure-preoccupied” phrases from the placebo to the oxytocin condition. We find that a single dose of intranasally administered oxytocin is sufficient to induce a significant increase in the experience of attachment security in adults classified previously as insecure. PMID:19457618

  7. The compromise of dynamic disulfide/thiol homeostasis as a biomarker of oxidative stress in trichloroethylene exposure.

    PubMed

    Bal, C; Büyükşekerci, M; Koca, C; Ağış, E R; Erdoğan, S; Baran, P; Gündüzöz, M; Yilmaz, Öh

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate disulfide/thiol homeostasis in trichloroethylene (TCE) exposure. The study was carried out in 30 nonsmoker TCE-exposed workers with a variety of occupations. Additionally, 30 healthy nonsmoker volunteers were recruited as the control group. TCE exposure was determined by measuring urinary trichloroacetic acid (TCA) concentration. Median urinary TCA levels of exposed workers (20.5 mg/L) were significantly higher than control subjects (5 mg/L). Thiol and disulfide concentrations were determined using a novel automated method. Disulfide/thiol ratio was significantly higher in the exposed group (p < 0.001). Thiol/disulfide homeostasis was found to be disturbed in TCE-exposed workers. We predict that in TCE-exposed workers this disturbance can be a therapeutic target, and the efficiency of the treatment can easily be monitored by the novel method we used. PMID:26429930

  8. Odorant Screening and Quantitation of Thiols in Carmenere Red Wine by Gas Chromatography-Olfactometry and Stable Isotope Dilution Assays.

    PubMed

    Pavez, Carolina; Agosin, Eduardo; Steinhaus, Martin

    2016-05-01

    The sensory impact of thiols in Vitis vinifera 'Carmenere' red wines was evaluated. For this purpose, aroma extract dilution analysis was applied to the thiols isolated from a Carmenere red wine by affinity chromatography with a mercurated agarose gel. Results revealed the presence of four odorants, identified as 2-furanylmethanethiol, 3-sulfanylhexyl acetate, 3-sulfanyl-1-hexanol, and 2-methyl-3-sulfanyl-1-butanol, with the latter being described here for the first time in Carmenere red wines. Quantitation of the four thiols in the Carmenere wine screened by aroma extract dilution analysis and in three additional Carmenere wines by stable isotope dilution assays resulted in concentrations above the respective orthonasal odor detection threshold values. Triangle tests applied to wine model solutions with and without the addition of the four thiols showed significant differences, thus suggesting that the compounds do have the potential to influence the overall aroma of red wine. PMID:27070203

  9. Real-time assays for monitoring the influence of sulfide and sulfane sulfur species on protein thiol redox states.

    PubMed

    Greiner, Romy; Dick, Tobias P

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is known to induce persulfidation of protein thiols. However, the process of H2S-induced persulfidation is not fully understood as it requires an additional oxidant. There are several mechanistic possibilities and it is of interest to determine which pathway is kinetically most relevant. Here, we detail in vitro assays for the real-time monitoring of thiol redox states in two model proteins with oxidizable cysteines, PTEN, and roGFP2. These allow kinetic measurements of the response of defined protein thiols (or disulfides) to sulfide and sulfane sulfur species. The combination of these assays with cold cyanolysis reveals the role of intermediary sulfane sulfur species in H2S-induced protein thiol oxidation. PMID:25747475

  10. Functionalization of Two-Dimensional MoS2 : On the Reaction Between MoS2 and Organic Thiols.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Berner, Nina C; Backes, Claudia; Duesberg, Georg S; McDonald, Aidan R

    2016-05-01

    Two-dimensional layered transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have attracted great interest owing to their unique properties and a wide array of potential applications. However, due to their inert nature, pristine TMDs are very challenging to functionalize. We demonstrate a general route to functionalize exfoliated 2H-MoS2 with cysteine. Critically, MoS2 was found to be facilitating the oxidation of the thiol cysteine to the disulfide cystine during functionalization. The resulting cystine was physisorbed on MoS2 rather than coordinated as a thiol (cysteine) filling S-vacancies in the 2H-MoS2 surface, as originally conceived. These observations were found to be true for other organic thiols and indeed other TMDs. Our findings suggest that functionalization of two-dimensional MoS2 using organic thiols may not yield covalently or datively tethered functionalities, rather, in this instance, they yield physisorbed disulfides that are easily removed. PMID:27038093

  11. Diverse redox-active molecules bearing O-, S-, or Se-terminated tethers for attachment to silicon in studies of molecular information storage.

    PubMed

    Balakumar, Arumugham; Lysenko, Andrey B; Carcel, Carole; Malinovskii, Vladimir L; Gryko, Daniel T; Schweikart, Karl-Heinz; Loewe, Robert S; Yasseri, Amir A; Liu, Zhiming; Bocian, David F; Lindsey, Jonathan S

    2004-03-01

    A molecular approach to information storage employs redox-active molecules tethered to an electroactive surface. Attachment of the molecules to electroactive surfaces requires control over the nature of the tether (linker and surface attachment group). We have synthesized a collection of redox-active molecules bearing different linkers and surface anchor groups in free or protected form (hydroxy, mercapto, S-acetylthio, and Se-acetylseleno) for attachment to surfaces such as silicon, germanium, and gold. The molecules exhibit a number of cationic oxidation states, including one (ferrocene), two [zinc(II)porphyrin], three [cobalt(II)porphyrin], or four (lanthanide triple-decker sandwich compound). Electrochemical studies of monolayers of a variety of the redox-active molecules attached to Si(100) electrodes indicate that molecules exhibit a regular mode of attachment (via a Si-X bond, X = O, S, or Se), relatively homogeneous surface organization, and robust reversible electrochemical behavior. The acetyl protecting group undergoes cleavage during the surface deposition process, enabling attachment to silicon via thio or seleno groups without handling free thiols or selenols. PMID:14986994

  12. Field effect on digestive ripening of thiol-capped gold nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Meng-Lin; Peng, J. S.; Lee, Sanboh; Yang, Fuqian

    2014-02-07

    We studied the digestive ripening of thiol-capped gold nanoparticles under simultaneous action of electric field and reflux heating in a silicone oil bath at 130 °C, using transmission electron microscopy. Observation revealed that a polydispersed gold nanoparticle system reached the state of nearly monodispersity under the action of an electric field and the thiol-capped gold nanoparticles carried negative charges. The electric field caused the increase of the particle size for the nearly monodispersed gold nanoparticle system. The self-assembly of the nearly monodisperse gold nanoparticles under the action of an electric field of a high field intensity was observed. The gold nanoparticles tended to form self-assembled nanostructures of six-fold symmetry. This study provides a new route for system engineering to control the particle size of metallic nanoparticles by electric field and digestive ripening.

  13. Activation mechanism of thiol protease precursor from broiler chicken specific Staphylococcus aureus strain CH-91.

    PubMed

    Wladyka, Benedykt; Dubin, Grzegorz; Dubin, Adam

    2011-01-10

    Staphylococcus aureus strain CH-91 isolated from chicken dermatitis lesions produces large quantities of thiol protease implicated in disease formation. Observed overproduction requires efficient activation of the protease precursor which mechanism is studied here in detail. Wild type and mutant precursor forms are expressed in E. coli to test different hypotheses on the activation process. It is demonstrated that wild type precursor undergoes rapid autocatalytic processing whereas proteolytically inactive catalytic triad cysteine mutant (C(249)A) of the precursor is stable, but can be processed by minute quantities of active protease. It is concluded that limited intramolecular proteolysis is mainly responsible for efficient activation but, a positive feedback loop also contributes to the process. Both activation pathways allow efficient production of mature extracellular thiol protease, a putative virulence factor specific for avian strains of S. aureus. PMID:20598816

  14. Labeling thiols on proteins, living cells, and tissues with enhanced emission induced by FRET.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yue; Wang, Xijun; Mei, Bin; Zhang, Dongxin; Tang, Anming; An, Linna; He, Xiaoxiao; Jiang, Jun; Liang, Gaolin

    2013-01-01

    Using N-(2-Aminoethyl)maleimide-cysteine(StBu) (Mal-Cys) as a medium, protein thiols were converted into N-terminal cysteines. After a biocompatible condensation reaction between the N-terminal cysteine and fluorescent probe 2-cyanobenzothiazole-Gly-Gly-Gly-fluorescein isothiocyanate (CBT-GGG-FITC), a new fluorogenic structure Luciferin-GGG-FITC was obtained. The latter exhibits near one order of magnitude (7 folds) enhanced fluorescence emission compared to the precursor moiety due to fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) effect between the newly formed luciferin structure and the FITC motif. Theoretical investigations revealed the underlying mechanism that satisfactorily explained the experimental results. With this method, enhanced fluorescence imaging of thiols on proteins, outer membranes of living cells, translocation of membrane proteins, and endothelial cell layers of small arteries was successfully achieved. PMID:24343586

  15. Inhibition of a biological sulfide oxidation under haloalkaline conditions by thiols and diorgano polysulfanes.

    PubMed

    Roman, Pawel; Lipińska, Joanna; Bijmans, Martijn F M; Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Keesman, Karel J; Janssen, Albert J H

    2016-09-15

    A novel approach has been developed for the simultaneous description of reaction kinetics to describe the formation of polysulfide and sulfate anions from the biological oxidation of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) using a quick, sulfide-dependent respiration test. Next to H2S, thiols are commonly present in sour gas streams. We investigated the inhibition mode and the corresponding inhibition constants of six thiols and the corresponding diorgano polysulfanes on the biological oxidation of H2S. A linear relationship was found between the calculated IC50 values and the lipophilicity of the inhibitors. Moreover, a mathematical model was proposed to estimate the biomass activity in the absence and presence of sulfurous inhibitors. The biomass used in the respiration tests originated from a full-scale biodesulfurization reactor. A microbial community analysis of this biomass revealed that two groups of microorganism are abundant, viz. Ectothiorhodospiraceae and Piscirickettsiaceae. PMID:27295619

  16. Reactive superhydrophobic surface and its photoinduced disulfide-ene and thiol-ene (bio)functionalization.

    PubMed

    Li, Junsheng; Li, Linxian; Du, Xin; Feng, Wenqian; Welle, Alexander; Trapp, Oliver; Grunze, Michael; Hirtz, Michael; Levkin, Pavel A

    2015-01-14

    Reactive superhydrophobic surfaces are highly promising for biotechnological, analytical, sensor, or diagnostic applications but are difficult to realize due to their chemical inertness. In this communication, we report on a photoactive, inscribable, nonwettable, and transparent surface (PAINTS), prepared by polycondensation of trichlorovinylsilane to form thin transparent reactive porous nanofilament on a solid substrate. The PAINTS shows superhydrophobicity and can be conveniently functionalized with the photoclick thiol-ene reaction. In addition, we show for the first time that the PAINTS bearing vinyl groups can be easily modified with disulfides under UV irradiation. The effect of superhydrophobicity of PAINTS on the formation of high-resolution surface patterns has been investigated. The developed reactive superhydrophobic coating can find applications for surface biofunctionalization using abundant thiol or disulfide bearing biomolecules, such as peptides, proteins, or antibodies. PMID:25486338

  17. The Basics of Thiols and Cysteines in Redox Biology and Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Leslie B.

    2014-01-01

    Cysteine is one of the least abundant amino acids, yet it is frequently found as a highly conserved residue within functional (regulatory, catalytic or binding) sites in proteins. It is the unique chemistry of the thiol or thiolate group of cysteine that imparts functional sites with their specialized properties (e.g., nucleophilicity, high affinity metal binding, and/or ability to form disulfide bonds). Highlighted in this review are some of the basic biophysical and biochemical properties of cysteine groups and the equations that apply to them, particularly with respect to pKa and redox potential. Also summarized are the types of low molecular weight thiols present in high concentrations in most cells, as well as the ways in which modifications of cysteinyl residues can impart or regulate molecular functions important to cellular processes including signal transduction. PMID:25433365

  18. Enantioselective syntheses and sensory properties of 2-methyl-tetrahydrofuran-3-thiol acetates.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yifeng; Shao, Junqiang; Yang, Shaoxiang; Sun, Baoguo; Liu, Yongguo; Ning, Ting; Tian, Hongyu

    2015-01-21

    The enantioselective synthesis of four stereoisomers of 2-methyl-tetrahydrofuran-3-thiol acetate was achieved. The two enantiomers of the important intermediate cis-2-methyl-3-hydroxy-tetrahydrofuran were obtained by Sharpless asymmetric dihydroxylation (AD), whereas the two enantiomers of trans-2-methyl-3-hydroxy-tetrahydrofuran were derived from the corresponding optically active cis-isomers by Mitsunobu reaction. Each stereoisomer of 2-methyl-3-hydroxy-tetrahydrofuran went through mesylation and nucleophilic substitution to afford the corresponding product with specific configuration. (2R,3S)- and (2R,3R)-2-methyl-tetrahydrofuran-3-thiol acetate were obtained in 80% ee, whereas the (2S,3R)- and (2S,3S)-isomers were in 62% ee. The odor properties of the synthesized four stereoisomers were evaluated by gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O), which revealed perceptible differences among stereoisomers both in odor features and in intensities. PMID:25560460

  19. The thiol proteinases from the latex of Carica papaya L. I. Fractionation, purification and preliminary characterization.

    PubMed

    Dubois, T; Jacquet, A; Schnek, A G; Looze, Y

    1988-08-01

    Three thiol proteinases, namely papain, chymopapain and proteinase omega were purified to homogeneity from the latex of Carica papaya L. During the purification procedure, the thiol function of the cysteinyl residues were protected either as mixed disulfides with cysteamine or 2-thiopyridone or as S-sulphenylthiosulfate derivative or after blocking with p-chloromercuribenzoic acid. In marked contrast with earlier publications, chymopapain also was found to be a monothiol proteinase as papain and proteinase omega. The active sites of chymopapain and proteinase omega could not be distinguished from that of papain neither by the analysis of the pH dependence of kcat/Km nor by the examination of the pH dependence of the fluorescence emission spectra. PMID:3214554

  20. Thiol Modification of Psyllium Husk Mucilage and Evaluation of Its Mucoadhesive Applications

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Meenakshi

    2013-01-01

    Thiol functionalization of psyllium was carried out to enhance its mucoadhesive potential. Thiolation of psyllium was achieved by esterification with thioglycolic acid. Thiolation was observed to change the surface morphology of psyllium from fibrous to granular and result in a slight increase in the crystallinity and swelling. Thiolated psyllium was found to contain 3.282 m moles of thiol groups/g of the polymer. Mucoadhesive applications of thiolated psylium were explored by formulating gels using metronidazole as the model drug. On comparative evaluation thiolated psyllium gels showed 3-fold higher mucoadhesive strength than the psyllium gels as determined by modified physical balance using chicken buccal pouch. The results of in vitro release study revealed that thiolated psyllium gels provided a prolonged release of metronidazole. Further, the psyllium and thiolated psyllium gels were found to release the drug following first-order kinetics by combination of polymer relaxation and diffusion through the matrix. PMID:24348147

  1. Thiol modification of psyllium husk mucilage and evaluation of its mucoadhesive applications.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Meenakshi; Ahuja, Munish

    2013-01-01

    Thiol functionalization of psyllium was carried out to enhance its mucoadhesive potential. Thiolation of psyllium was achieved by esterification with thioglycolic acid. Thiolation was observed to change the surface morphology of psyllium from fibrous to granular and result in a slight increase in the crystallinity and swelling. Thiolated psyllium was found to contain 3.282 m moles of thiol groups/g of the polymer. Mucoadhesive applications of thiolated psylium were explored by formulating gels using metronidazole as the model drug. On comparative evaluation thiolated psyllium gels showed 3-fold higher mucoadhesive strength than the psyllium gels as determined by modified physical balance using chicken buccal pouch. The results of in vitro release study revealed that thiolated psyllium gels provided a prolonged release of metronidazole. Further, the psyllium and thiolated psyllium gels were found to release the drug following first-order kinetics by combination of polymer relaxation and diffusion through the matrix. PMID:24348147

  2. Eucalyptus tolerance mechanisms to lanthanum and cerium: subcellular distribution, antioxidant system and thiol pools.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yichang; Zhang, Shirong; Li, Sen; Xu, Xiaoxun; Jia, Yongxia; Gong, Guoshu

    2014-12-01

    Guanglin 9 (Eucalyptus grandis × Eucalyptus urophlla) and Eucalyptus grandis 5 are two eucalyptus species which have been found to grow normally in soils contaminated with lanthanum and cerium, but the tolerance mechanisms are not clear yet. In this study, a pot experiment was conducted to investigate the tolerance mechanisms of the eucalyptus to lanthanum and cerium. Cell walls stored 45.40-63.44% of the metals under lanthanum or cerium stress. Peroxidase and catalase activities enhanced with increasing soil La or Ce concentrations up to 200 mg kg(-1), while there were no obvious changes in glutathione and ascorbate concentrations. Non-protein thiols concentrations increased with increasing treatment levels up to 200 mg kg(-1), and then decreased. Phytochelatins concentrations continued to increase under La or Ce stress. Therefore, the two eucalyptus species are La and Ce tolerant plants, and the tolerance mechanisms include cell wall deposition, antioxidant system response, and thiol compound synthesis. PMID:25303462

  3. Thiol- and biotin-labeled probes for oligonucleotide quartz crystal microbalance biosensors of microalga alexandrium minutum.

    PubMed

    Lazerges, Mathieu; Perrot, Hubert; Rabehagasoa, Niriniony; Compère, Chantal

    2012-01-01

    Two quartz crystal microbalance oligonucleotide biosensors of a toxic microalga gene sequence (Alexandrium Minutum) have been designed. Grafting on a gold surface of 20-base thiol- or biotin-labeled probe, and selective hybridization with the complementary 20-base target, have been monitored in situ with a 27 MHz quartz crystal microbalance under controlled hydrodynamic conditions. The frequency of the set up is stable to within a few hertz, corresponding to the nanogram scale, for three hour experiments. DNA recognition by the two biosensors is efficient and selective. Hybridization kinetic curves indicate that the biosensor designed with the thiol-labeled probe is more sensitive, and that the biosensor designed with the biotin-labeled probe has a shorter time response and a higher hybridization efficiency. PMID:25585927

  4. Thiol- and Biotin-Labeled Probes for Oligonucleotide Quartz Crystal Microbalance Biosensors of Microalga Alexandrium Minutum

    PubMed Central

    Lazerges, Mathieu; Perrot, Hubert; Rabehagasoa, Niriniony; Compère, Chantal

    2012-01-01

    Two quartz crystal microbalance oligonucleotide biosensors of a toxic microalga gene sequence (Alexandrium Minutum) have been designed. Grafting on a gold surface of 20-base thiol- or biotin-labeled probe, and selective hybridization with the complementary 20-base target, have been monitored in situ with a 27 MHz quartz crystal microbalance under controlled hydrodynamic conditions. The frequency of the set up is stable to within a few hertz, corresponding to the nanogram scale, for three hour experiments. DNA recognition by the two biosensors is efficient and selective. Hybridization kinetic curves indicate that the biosensor designed with the thiol-labeled probe is more sensitive, and that the biosensor designed with the biotin-labeled probe has a shorter time response and a higher hybridization efficiency. PMID:25585927

  5. Modification of porous silicon rugate filters through thiol-yne photochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Soeriyadi, Alexander H. Zhu, Ying Gooding, J. Justin; Reece, Peter

    2014-02-24

    Porous silicon (PSi) has a considerable potential as biosensor platform. In particular, the ability to modify the surface chemistry of porous silicon is of interest. Here we present a generic method to modify the surface of porous silicon through thiol-yne photochemistry initiated by a radical initiator. Firstly, a freshly etched porous silicon substrate is modified through thermal hydrosilylation with 1,8-nonadiyne to passivate the surface and introduce alkyne functionalities. The alkyne functional surface could then be further reacted with thiol species in the presence of a radical initiator and UV light. Functionalization of the PSi rugate filter is followed with optical reflectivity measurements as well as high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)

  6. Synthesis and characterization of thiol-functionalized polymer as binder in conductive ink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jungmin; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2011-04-01

    The technology of electrical printing has received industrial and scientific attention due to wide variety of application such as sensors, radio frequency identification cards (RFIDs), flexible display, and flexible solar cell. Especially a roll to roll gravure printing technique has been useful for mass production of electrical products. For the more high quality of conductive ink, the compatibility of organic binder and inorganic filler is very important. In this study, Thiol-functionalized polymer and core-shell conductive nanoparticles were used as the binder and filler. The thiol moieties in binder contribute to functionality of the synthesized polymer. Also, the conductivity and viscosity of synthesized ink and compatibility of filler with binder were characterized in various conditions.

  7. Thiol reagents are substrates for the ADP-ribosyltransferase activity of pertussis toxin.

    PubMed

    Lobban, M D; van Heyningen, S

    1988-06-20

    Thiols such as cysteine and dithiothreitol are substrates for the ADP-ribosyltransferase activity of pertussis toxin. When cysteine was incubated with NAD+ and toxin at pH 7.5, a product containing ADP-ribose and cysteine (presumably ADP-ribosylcysteine) was isolated by high-performance liquid chromatography, and characterized by its composition and release of AMP with phosphodiesterase. Cysteine has a Km of 105 mM at saturating NAD+ concentration. The ability of thiols to act as a substrate is one explanation for the very high concentrations (250 mM or greater) that have been observed to enhance the apparent NAD glycohydrolase activity of the toxin. PMID:3133246

  8. Labeling Thiols on Proteins, Living Cells, and Tissues with Enhanced Emission Induced by FRET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yue; Wang, Xijun; Mei, Bin; Zhang, Dongxin; Tang, Anming; An, Linna; He, Xiaoxiao; Jiang, Jun; Liang, Gaolin

    2013-12-01

    Using N-(2-Aminoethyl)maleimide-cysteine(StBu) (Mal-Cys) as a medium, protein thiols were converted into N-terminal cysteines. After a biocompatible condensation reaction between the N-terminal cysteine and fluorescent probe 2-cyanobenzothiazole-Gly-Gly-Gly-fluorescein isothiocyanate (CBT-GGG-FITC), a new fluorogenic structure Luciferin-GGG-FITC was obtained. The latter exhibits near one order of magnitude (7 folds) enhanced fluorescence emission compared to the precursor moiety due to fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) effect between the newly formed luciferin structure and the FITC motif. Theoretical investigations revealed the underlying mechanism that satisfactorily explained the experimental results. With this method, enhanced fluorescence imaging of thiols on proteins, outer membranes of living cells, translocation of membrane proteins, and endothelial cell layers of small arteries was successfully achieved.

  9. Highly stretchable thermoset fibers and nonwovens using thiol-ene photopolymerization.

    PubMed

    Shanmuganathan, Kadhiravan; Elliot, Steven M; Lane, Austin P; Ellison, Christopher J

    2014-08-27

    In this report, we describe the preparation and characterization of a new class of thermoset fibers with high elongation and elastic recovery. Integrating UV-activated thiol-ene photopolymerization and electrospinning, we demonstrate an environmentally friendly single step approach to convert small monomeric precursor molecules into highly elastic fibers and nonwoven mats. The fibers were derived by in situ photopolymerization of a trifunctional vinyl ether monomer and a tetrafunctional thiol. Although thermosets often offer good chemical and thermal stability, these fibers also have a high average elongation at break of 62%. The elastomeric nature of these vinyl-ether based fibers can be partly attributed to their subambient Tg and partly to the cross-link density, monomer structure, and resulting network homogeneity. Nonwoven mats of these fibers were also stretchable and exhibited a much higher elongation at break of about 85%. These thermoset stretchable fibers could have potential applications as textile, biomedical, hot chemical filtration, and composite materials. PMID:25075754

  10. Plasma protein thiolation index (PTI) as a biomarker of thiol-specific oxidative stress in haemodialyzed patients.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Graziano; Reggiani, Francesco; Podestà, Manuel A; Garavaglia, Maria Lisa; Portinaro, Nicola M; Milzani, Aldo; Badalamenti, Salvatore; Dalle-Donne, Isabella

    2015-12-01

    The role of oxidative stress in patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD), which occurs at significantly higher levels than in the general population, is often underestimated in clinical practice. Emerging evidence highlights the strong correlation of oxidative stress with chronic inflammation and cardiovascular disease, which are highly prevalent in most patients on maintenance haemodialysis (HD) and are a major risk factor for mortality in this population. In this study, total plasma thiols and plasma S-thiolated proteins were measured in patients with ESRD, before and after a regular HD session, and compared to age-matched healthy subjects. We found a significant decrease in the level of total plasma thiols and, conversely, a significant increase in the level of S-thiolated proteins in these patients. In most patients, post-HD plasma level of total thiols did not differ from the one in healthy subjects, whereas plasma level of S-thiolated proteins was lower in HD patients than in age-matched healthy controls. This suggests that a single HD session restores plasma thiol redox status and re-establishes the antioxidant capacity of plasma thiols. Additionally, we determined protein thiolation index (PTI), i.e., the molar ratio between the sum of all low molecular mass thiols bound to S-thiolated plasma proteins and protein free cysteinyl residues. Patients with ESRD had a significantly higher PTI compared to age-matched healthy subjects and HD was associated with a decrease in PTI to normal, or lower than normal, levels. Although this study is limited in size, our results suggest that PTI is a useful indicator of thiol-specific oxidative stress in patients with ESRD on maintenance HD. This study also emphasizes that PTI determination is a cheap and simple tool suitable for large-scale clinical studies that could be used for routine screening of thiol-specific oxidative stress. PMID:26453922

  11. Adaptive aneuploidy protects against thiol peroxidase deficiency by increasing respiration via key mitochondrial proteins.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Alaattin; Gerashchenko, Maxim V; Seim, Inge; Labarre, Jean; Toledano, Michel B; Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2015-08-25

    Aerobic respiration is a fundamental energy-generating process; however, there is cost associated with living in an oxygen-rich environment, because partially reduced oxygen species can damage cellular components. Organisms evolved enzymes that alleviate this damage and protect the intracellular milieu, most notably thiol peroxidases, which are abundant and conserved enzymes that mediate hydrogen peroxide signaling and act as the first line of defense against oxidants in nearly all living organisms. Deletion of all eight thiol peroxidase genes in yeast (∆8 strain) is not lethal, but results in slow growth and a high mutation rate. Here we characterized mechanisms that allow yeast cells to survive under conditions of thiol peroxidase deficiency. Two independent ∆8 strains increased mitochondrial content, altered mitochondrial distribution, and became dependent on respiration for growth but they were not hypersensitive to H2O2. In addition, both strains independently acquired a second copy of chromosome XI and increased expression of genes encoded by it. Survival of ∆8 cells was dependent on mitochondrial cytochrome-c peroxidase (CCP1) and UTH1, present on chromosome XI. Coexpression of these genes in ∆8 cells led to the elimination of the extra copy of chromosome XI and improved cell growth, whereas deletion of either gene was lethal. Thus, thiol peroxidase deficiency requires dosage compensation of CCP1 and UTH1 via chromosome XI aneuploidy, wherein these proteins support hydroperoxide removal with the reducing equivalents generated by the electron transport chain. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence of adaptive aneuploidy counteracting oxidative stress. PMID:26261310

  12. Charge dependence of ligand release and monolayer stability of gold nanoparticles by biogenic thiols.

    PubMed

    Chompoosor, Apiwat; Han, Gang; Rotello, Vincent M

    2008-07-01

    The effect of surface charge on the stability of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to the biogenic thiols glutathione (GSH), dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA), and cysteine was quantified. It was observed that the rate of release of fluorescein-tagged ligand was determined by the surface charge of the AuNPs, with cationic particles much more labile than anionic analogues. This ability to tune stability is significant for the design of both delivery vehicles and intracellular probes. PMID:18553895

  13. Immobilization of enzymes via microcontact printing and thiol-ene click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Buhl, Moritz; Vonhören, Benjamin; Ravoo, Bart Jan

    2015-06-17

    This Communication describes a bioconjugation method for the generation of enzyme microarrays on surfaces using photochemical thiol-ene chemistry in combination with microcontact printing. Glucose oxidase and lactase were readily immobilized (i.e., printing time 2 min) on alkene terminated self-assembled monolayers on glass as demonstrated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, the activity of both immobilized enzymes was confirmed in single enzyme as well as cascade transformations. PMID:26030726

  14. The effect of a thiol-containing organic molecule on molybdenum adsorption onto pyrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, Carla; Wishard, Anthony; Brenner, Ryan; Sobel, Marisa; Mizelle, Jack; Kim, Alex; Meyer, Drew A.; Morford, Jennifer L.

    2016-02-01

    The effect of a small thiol-containing organic molecule on the adsorption of Mo to pyrite was investigated through the use of equilibration experiments with molybdate (MoO42-), tetrathiomolybdate (MoS42-), and 2-mercaptopropionic acid (2MPA). MoO42-, MoS42-, and 2MPA individually adsorb to pyrite through the formation of specific interactions with the mineral surface. In select combination experiments, 2MPA effectively out-competes MoO42- for pyrite surface sites, which is indicative of the relatively weaker MoO42--pyrite interactions. Results suggest that the presence of 2MPA on the pyrite surface would inhibit MoO42- access to catalytic mineral surface sites for the transformation of MoO42- to MoS42-. In contrast, thiols are not expected to be an obstacle to Mo uptake once the "switch point", or the critical H2S concentration required for the formation of MoS42-, has been surpassed. This is due to the stronger adsorption of MoS42- to the pyrite surface. EXAFS results support weak specific interactions with little change to the MoO42- environment upon adsorption to pyrite. In contrast, larger changes to the Mo-S internuclear distances during MoS42- adsorption to pyrite support a more substantial structural change upon adsorption. MoS42- is able to bind to both the pyrite surface and a thiol-containing organic molecule to form a ternary structure on the pyrite surface, and may provide for a molecular-level connection between Mo and thiol-containing organic molecules. Mo(VI) is reduced to Mo(IV) during MoS42- adsorption to pyrite as a result of ligand-induced reduction, thereby confirming that the thiolated form of Mo is necessary for Mo reduction.

  15. Direct recognition and quantification by voltammetry of thiol/thioamide mixes in seawater.

    PubMed

    Laglera, Luis M; Tovar-Sánchez, Antonio

    2012-01-30

    Thiols and thioamides form part of the pool of reduced sulfur substances (RSS) that modify the health of aquatic ecosystems acting as radical scavengers and heavy metal ligands. Their concentrations could be easily determined in seawater by cathodic stripping voltammetry (CSV) were it not be for the coalescence of their responses in a single peak. Here, we modified the traditional CSV method of RSS analysis to allow individual recognition and quantification in thiol/thioamide mixes. Glutathione, cysteine, thiourea and thioacetamide in UV digested seawater were repeatedly analyzed shifting the deposition potential (E(dep)) in the range +0.07 to -0.4V at high resolution. The representation of peak height (i(p)) and peak potential (E(p)) vs E(dep) resulted in different and distinctive profiles for each substance that allowed the selection of adequate E(dep) ranges for their separate quantification. Copper saturation modified thiol profiles and cancelled the response of thioamides. The vs E(dep) profiles explained the nature of the different thiols and thioamides present in the sample and permitted their individual quantification with excellent accuracy. The utility of the method was put to test with seawater modified with natural unknown RSS from pore waters and Posidonia oceanica exudates. Although both samples gave similar CSV signals, the vs E(dep) profiles unveiled completely different electrochemical behaviors incompatible with a similar nature. Based on those profiles we hypothesized that pore waters released a glutathione/thiourea mix and that one or several unidentified RSS formed part of P. oceanica exudates. The analytical scheme proposed here opens a new door to the use of direct voltammetry in the qualitative and quantitative determination of RSS in natural waters. PMID:22284523

  16. Thiol dosing of ZnO single crystals and nanorods: Surface chemistry and photoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Jagdeep; Im, Jisun; Watters, Evan J.; Whitten, James E.; Soares, Jason W.; Steeves, Diane M.

    2013-03-01

    Adsorption of thiols on ZnO(0001) and ZnO nanorods has been investigated using X-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopies (XPS and UPS). Ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) dosing of sputter-cleaned ZnO(0001) with methanethiol (MT), 1-dodecanethiol (DDT), and 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTMS) leads to S2p peaks with a binding energy of 163.3 eV. Similar results for MPTMS are obtained for sputter-cleaned ZnO(0001) that is pre-dosed with water to form hydroxyl groups. In all cases, the absence of a free thiol S2p peak at 164.2 eV indicates that bonding to the surface occurs via the thiol end of the molecule. A DDT-dosed ZnO(0001) sample stored for 10 days in UHV and heated to temperatures as high as 150 °C exhibits minimal changes in its S/Zn atomic ratio, confirming chemisorption and the presence of a strong bond to the surface. UPS shows that MT adsorption on sputtered ZnO(0001) leads to a 0.7 eV increase in work function and perturbation of the MT molecular orbitals, again consistent with chemisorption. Dry ZnO nanorods have been exposed to MT while monitoring their photoluminescence. XPS and Raman spectroscopy confirm thiol adsorption. Relative to dry ZnO, adsorption causes a decrease in intensity of the visible emission peak, but the UV peak remains unchanged. These results indicate that Znsbnd S bond formation quenches radiative decay to the valence band from defect states, possibly by methanethiolate adsorption filling oxygen vacancies.

  17. Facile fabrication of redox-responsive thiol-containing drug delivery system via RAFT polymerization.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Yuanyuan; Su, Yue; Peng, Yu; Wang, Dali; Deng, Hongping; Xi, Xiaodong; Zhu, Xinyuan; Lu, Yunfeng

    2014-04-14

    A novel kind of redox-responsive polymeric drug delivery system has been designed and prepared successfully through the coupling of the multithiol branched polymers and thiol-containing drugs. The branched poly((S-(4-vinyl) benzyl S'-propyltrithiocarbonate)-co-(poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate)) (poly(VBPT-co-PEGMA)) was synthesized by one-pot reaction via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) copolymerization. Subsequently, the hydrophobic thiol-containing anticancer drug 6-mercaptopurine (MP) was conjugated to poly(VBPT-co-PEGMA) by thiol-disulfide exchange reaction, resulting in the formation of poly(VBPT-co-PEGMA)-S-S-MP conjugate. Due to its amphiphilicity, poly(VBPT-co-PEGMA)-S-S-MP conjugate self-assembled into amphiphilic micelles in aqueous solution. Under a reductive environment, the disassembly of polymeric micelles resulted in the MP release. Flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) measurements demonstrated that the poly(VBPT-co-PEGMA)-S-S-MP micelles could be taken up by Raji cells (a Burkitt lymphoma cell line). The viability of the Raji cells incubated with the glutathione (GSH) mediated poly(VBPT-co-PEGMA)-S-S-MP micelles was investigated by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay. The experimental results showed that the viability of the glutathione monoester (GSH-OEt) pretreated cells was lower than that without pretreatment, while the viability of the buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) pretreated cells was higher than that without pretreatment. The poly(VBPT-co-PEGMA)-S-S-MP micelles could induce the apoptosis of Raji cells, and the apoptosis behavior was dose-dependent. This redox-responsive polymer-drug conjugate provides a promising platform for the delivery of thiol-containing biological molecules. PMID:24598057

  18. Thiol-ene and H-phosphonate-ene reactions for lipid modifications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The addition of H-E (E= -SR, -P(O)(OR)2 or -P(O)R2) to the carbon-carbon double bonds in lipids is a way to create new materials: lubricants, additives, polymers. In the current chapter, the radical addition of thiols (E= SR) and H-phosphonates (E= P(O)(OR)2) will be reviewed in detail. The kinetics...

  19. Thiol-disulfide organization in alliin lyase (alliinase) from garlic (Allium sativum)

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Lev; Shin, Irina; Shimon, Linda J W; Miron, Talia; Wilchek, Meir; Mirelman, David; Frolow, Felix; Rabinkov, Aharon

    2009-01-01

    Alliinase, an enzyme found in garlic, catalyzes the synthesis of the well-known chemically and therapeutically active compound allicin (diallyl thiosulfinate). The enzyme is a homodimeric glycoprotein that belongs to the fold-type I family of pyridoxal-5′-phosphate-dependent enzymes. There are 10 cysteine residues per alliinase monomer, eight of which form four disulfide bridges and two are free thiols. Cys368 and Cys376 form a S—S bridge located near the C-terminal and plays an important role in maintaining both the rigidity of the catalytic domain and the substrate-cofactor relative orientation. We demonstrated here that the chemical modification of allinase with the colored —SH reagent N-(4-dimethylamino-3,5-dinitrophenyl) maleimide yielded chromophore-bearing peptides and showed that the Cys220 and Cys350 thiol groups are accesible in solution. Moreover, electron paramagnetic resonance kinetic measurements using disulfide containing a stable nitroxyl biradical showed that the accessibilities of the two —SH groups in Cys220 and Cys350 differ. Neither enzyme activity nor protein structure (measured by circular dichroism) were affected by the chemical modification of the free thiols, indicating that alliinase activity does not require free —SH groups. This allowed the oriented conjugation of alliinase, via the —SH groups, with low- or high-molecular-weight molecules as we showed here. Modification of the alliinase thiols with biotin and their subsequent binding to immobilized streptavidin enabled the efficient enzymatic production of allicin. PMID:19177363

  20. Dinitrosyl iron complexes with thiol-containing ligands as a "working form" of endogenous nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Vanin, Anatoly F

    2016-04-01

    The material presented herein is an overview of the results obtained by our research team during the many years' study of biological activities and occurrence of dinitrosyl iron complexes (DNIC) with thiol-containing ligands in human and animal organisms. With regard to their dose dependence and vast diversity of biological activities, DNIC are similar to the system of endogenous NO, one of the most universal regulators of biological processes. The role of biologically active components in DNIC is played by their iron-dinitrosyl fragments, [Fe(NO)2], endowed with the ability to generate neutral NO molecules and nitrosonium ions (NO(+)). Their release is effected by heme-and thiol-containing proteins, which fulfill the function of biological targets and acceptors of NO and NO(+). Beneficial regulatory effects of DNIC on physiological and metabolic processes are numerous and diverse and include, among other things, lowering of arterial pressure and accelerated healing of skin wounds. In the course of fast decomposition of their Fe(NO)2 fragments (e.g., in the presence of iron chelators), DNIC produce adverse (cytotoxic) effects, which can best be exemplified by their ability to suppress the development of experimental endometriosis in animals. In animal tissues, DNIC with thiol-containing ligands are predominantly represented by the binuclear form, which, contrary to mononuclear DNIC detectable by the 2.03 signal, is EPR-silent. The ample body of evidence on biological activities and occurrence of DNIC gained so far clearly demonstrates that in human and animal organisms DNIC with thiol-containing ligands represent a "working form" of the system of endogenous NO responsible for its accumulation and stabilization in animal tissues as well as its further transfer to its biological targets. PMID:26820635

  1. Soft metal thiol chemistry is not involved in the transport of arsenite by the Ars pump.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y; Dey, S; Rosen, B P

    1996-01-01

    The single cysteine in the ArsB protein subunit of the arsenite resistance pump was changed to serine and alanine residues. Resistance in cells expressing the two mutant arsB genes was the same as in the wild type, and the serine substitution had no effect on the arsenite transport properties. These results eliminate possible thiol chemistry in translocation. Thus, the pump uses soft metal chemistry for metalloactivation and nonmetal chemistry for oxyanion transport. PMID:8550532

  2. Biliprotein maturation: the chromophore attachment

    PubMed Central

    Scheer, H; Zhao, K-H

    2008-01-01

    Biliproteins are a widespread group of brilliantly coloured photoreceptors characterized by linear tetrapyrrolic chromophores, bilins, which are covalently bound to the apoproteins via relatively stable thioether bonds. Covalent binding stabilizes the chromoproteins and is mandatory for phycobilisome assembly; and, it is also important in biliprotein applications such as fluorescence labelling. Covalent binding has, on the other hand, also considerably hindered biliprotein research because autocatalytic chromophore additions are rare, and information on enzymatic addition by lyases was limited to a single example, an EF-type lyase attaching phycocyanobilin to cysteine-α84 of C-phycocyanin. The discovery of new activities for the latter lyases, and of new types of lyases, have reinvigorated research activities in the subject. So far, work has mainly concentrated on cyanobacterial phycobiliproteins. Methodological advances in the process, however, as well as the finding of often large numbers of homologues, opens new possibilities for research on the subsequent assembly/disassembly of the phycobilisome in cyanobacteria and red algae, on the assembly and organization of the cryptophyte light-harvesting system, on applications in basic research such as protein folding, and on the use of phycobiliproteins for labelling. PMID:18284595

  3. Smartphone attachment for stethoscope recording.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    With the ubiquity of smartphones and the rising technology of 3D printing, novel devices can be developed that leverage the "computer in your pocket" and rapid prototyping technologies toward scientific, medical, engineering, and creative purposes. This paper describes such a device: a simple 3D-printed extension for Apple's iPhone that allows the sound from an off-the-shelf acoustic stethoscope to be recorded using the phone's built-in microphone. The attachment's digital 3D files can be easily shared, modified for similar phones and devices capable of recording audio, and in combination with 3D printing technology allow for fabrication of a durable device without need for an entire factory of expensive and specialized machining tools. It is hoped that by releasing this device as an open source set of printable files that can be downloaded and reproduced cheaply, others can make use of these developments where access to cost-prohibitive, specialized medical instruments are not available. Coupled with specialized smartphone software ("apps"), more sophisticated and automated diagnostics may also be possible on-site. PMID:25626549

  4. Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane-Containing Thiol-ene Fibers with Tunable Thermal and Mechanical Properties.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yichen; Ha, Heonjoo; Shanmuganathan, Kadhiravan; Ellison, Christopher J

    2016-05-01

    Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS) are versatile inorganic-organic hybrid building blocks that have potential applications as reinforcement nanofillers, thermal stabilizers, and catalyst supports for metal nanoparticles. However, fabrication of fibrous materials with high POSS content has been a challenge because of the aggregation and solubility limits of POSS units. In this paper, we describe a robust and environmentally friendly fabrication approach of inorganic-organic hybrid POSS fibers by integrating UV initiated thiol-ene polymerization and centrifugal fiber spinning. The use of monomeric liquids in this approach not only reduces the consumption of heat energy and solvent, but it also promotes homogeneous mixing of organic and inorganic components that allows integration of large amount of POSS (up to 80 wt %) into the polymer network. The POSS containing thiol-ene fibers exhibited enhanced thermomechanical properties compared to purely organic analogs as revealed by substantial increases in residual weight and a factor of 4 increase in modulus after thermal treatment at 1000 °C. This simple fabrication approach combined with the tunability in fiber properties afforded by tailoring monomer composition make POSS containing thiol-ene fibers attractive candidates for catalyst supports and filtration media, particularly in high-temperature and harsh environments. PMID:27057758

  5. Development of simple thiol-reactive liposome formulations, one-step analysis and physicochemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Kaourma, E; Hatziantoniou, S; Georgopoulos, A; Kolocouris, A; Demetzos, C

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this study was to synthesize simple thiol-reactive conjugates from maleimide and lipoamines (stearylamine or oleylamine) and to develop a simple, fast and low-cost method for the preparation of lyophilized general-purpose thiol-reactive liposomes. A formulation of egg phosphatidylcholine-dipalmitoylphoshatidylglycerol (9:0.1 molar ratio) was developed and characterized. Freeze-drying methodology was established to produce a stock of liposomes and the physicochemical characteristics of the reconstituted liposomes were compared with those of the initial preparation. The physicochemical properties (size and zeta potential) of the new liposomal formulations were studied. High-performance thin-layer chromatography coupled to a flame ionization detector was applied for one-step analysis of the liposomal components and for determining the maleimide-lipoamine conjugates phospholipid molar ratio. The differences concerning the incorporation efficiency of the synthetic conjugates into liposomes were discussed on the basis of their conformational properties. The small difference in structure between the two thiol-reactive conjugates (i.e., the C18 alkyl chain double bond) causes a considerable difference in phospholipids packing of the resulting lipidic bilayers of the liposomes; the conformational bending of conjugate maleimide-oleylamine may contribute to the final architecture of liposomes. PMID:15831216

  6. Requirements for heme and thiols for the nonenzymatic modification of nitrotyrosine

    PubMed Central

    Balabanli, Barbaros; Kamisaki, Yoshinori; Martin, Emil; Murad, Ferid

    1999-01-01

    Peroxynitrite-dependent formation of nitrotyrosine has been associated with inactivation of various enzymes and proteins possessing functionally important tyrosines. We have previously reported an enzymatic activity modifying the nitrotyrosine residues in nitrated proteins. Here we are describing a nonenzymatic reduction of nitrotyrosine to aminotyrosine, which depends on heme and thiols. Various heme-containing proteins can mediate the reaction, although the reaction also is catalyzed by heme. The reaction is most effective when vicinal thiols are used as reducing agents, although ascorbic acid also can replace thiols with lesser efficiency. The reaction could be inhibited by (z)-1-[2-(2-aminoethyl)-N-(2-ammonioethyl)amino]diazen-1-ium-1, but not other tested NO donors. HPLC with electrochemical detection analysis of the reaction identified aminotyrosine as the only reaction product. The reduction of nitrotyrosine was most effective at a pH close to physiological and was markedly decreased in acidic conditions. Various nitrophenol compounds also were modified in this reaction. Understanding the mechanism of this reaction could help define the enzymatic modification of nitrotyrosine-containing proteins. Furthermore, this also could assist in understanding the role of nitrotyrosine formation and reversal in the regulation of various proteins containing nitrotyrosine. It also could help define the role of nitric oxide and other reactive species in various disease states. PMID:10557286

  7. Thiol-containing degradable poly(thiourethane-urethane)s for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Eglin, David; Griffon, Stéphane; Alini, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    Poly(thiourethane-urethane)s with varying amounts of sulphur were synthesised by a two-step polycondensation consisting of the sequential addition of 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate and bis(2-mercaptoethyl) ether in a poly(epsilon-caprolactone) diol solution. Polymers prepared had high weight-average molecular weight and typical microdomains separation, as shown by size-exclusion chromatography and thermal analysis. Polymer surfaces were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. The quantification of thiol groups at the surface was assessed using a fluorescent assay. Thiol concentration ranged between 7 and 14 nmol/cm, and was directly related to the amount of sulphur introduced in the polymerization and the macromolecule chains orientation at the surfaces. A preliminary in vitro degradation study and a proliferation assay were performed. The poly(thiourethane-urethane)s may have important applications as biodegradable and biocompatible materials for cartilage and bone tissue engineering. The surface thiol groups add the prospect of further functionalization. This is an important benefit compared to biodegradable poly(urethane)s that usually present low biological activity. PMID:20233504

  8. Synthesis of thiol-functionalized spent grain as a novel adsorbent for divalent metal ions.

    PubMed

    Chai, Liyuan; Li, Qingzhu; Zhu, Yonghua; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Wang, Qingwei; Wang, Yunyan; Yang, Zhihui

    2010-08-01

    Spent grain (SG) was functionalized with thioglycolic acid in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) medium using sodium bisulfate monohydrate (NaHSO(4).H(2)O) as a catalyst, followed by treatment with sodium sulfide nonahydrate (Na(2)S.9H(2)O). Characterization of thiol-functionalized spent grain (TFSG) was performed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. These analytical results revealed the emergence of S-H and C=O groups after the chemical modification, indicating that thiol groups were successfully grafted onto TFSG. As compared with SG, TFSG showed significant improvement in terms of metal loading capacity. Typically, adsorption capacity for Zn(2+) was increased from 125.76 mg g(-1) of SG to 227.37 mg g(-1) of TFSG, which was confirmed by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis. This increase may be attributed to both the formation of ester linkage and the grafting of thiol groups onto TFSG. The experimental results indicate that TFSG is a promising adsorbent for removal heavy metals from contaminated water. PMID:20338755

  9. Investigation into the Effect of Molds in Grasses on Their Content of Low Molecular Mass Thiols

    PubMed Central

    Skladanka, Jiri; Adam, Vojtech; Zitka, Ondrej; Krystofova, Olga; Beklova, Miroslava; Kizek, Rene; Havlicek, Zdenek; Slama, Petr; Nawrath, Adam

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of molds on levels of low molecular mass thiols in grasses. For this purpose, the three grass species Lolium perenne, Festulolium pabulare and Festulolium braunii were cultivated and sampled during four months, from June to September. The same species were also grown under controlled conditions. High-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection was used for quantification of cysteine, reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) glutathione, and phytochelatins (PC2, PC3, PC4 and PC5). Data were statistically processed and analyzed. Thiols were present in all examined grass species. The effect of fungicide treatments applied under field conditions on the content of the evaluated thiols was shown to be insignificant. Species influenced (p < 0.05) PC3 and GSSG content. F. pabulare, an intergeneric hybrid of drought- and fungi-resistant Festuca arundinacea, was comparable in PC3 content with L. perenne and F. braunii under field conditions. Under controlled conditions, however, F. pabulare had higher (p < 0.05) PC3 content than did L. perenne and F. braunii. Under field conditions, differences between the evaluated species were recorded only in GSSG content, but only sampling in June was significant. F. pabulare had higher (p < 0.05) GSSG content in June than did L. perenne and F. braunii. PMID:23202817

  10. Purification and characterization of thiols in an arsenic hyperaccumulator under arsenic exposure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weihua; Cai, Yong

    2003-12-15

    Pteris vittata (Chinese brake fern) is the first reported arsenic hyperaccumulator. To investigate the arsenic tolerance mechanism in this plant, reversed-phase HPLC with postcolumn derivatization was used to analyze the thiols induced under arsenic exposure. A major thiol in the plant leaflets was found to be responsive to arsenic exposure. The arsenic-induced compound was purified on a large scale by combining covalent chromatography and preparative reversed-phase HPLC. About 2 mg of this compound was isolated from 1 kg of fresh leaflets. The purified arsenic-induced compound was characterized using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. A molecular ion (M + 1) of 540 and fragments were obtained, which indicated that the arsenic-induced thiol was a phytochelatin with two subunits (PC(2)). Compared to the classical methods for purification of phytochelatins, this new method is more specific, simple, and rapid and is suitable for purification of PCs in a large scale as well as sample preparation for mass spectrometry analysis. PMID:14670068

  11. DNA repair by thiols in air shows two radicals make a double-strand break

    SciTech Connect

    Milligan, J.R.; Ng J.Y.Y.; Wu, C.C.L.

    1995-09-01

    Using agarose gel electrophoresis, we have measured the yields of DNA single- and double-strand breaks (SSBs and DSBs) for plasmid DNA {gamma}-irradiated in aerobic aqueous solution. The presence during irradiation of either of the thiols cysteamine or N-(2-thioethyl)-1,3-diaminopropane (WR-1065) resulted in a concentration-dependent decrease in the yield of SSBs and a much greater decrease in the yield of DSBs. This large differential protective effect was not produced by thioethers or an alcohol of structural similarity to the two thiols, suggesting that repair of DSB radical precursors by thiols is more efficient than for SSB precursors. These observations suggest the existence of a diradical intermediate in the formation of DSBs. The results argue against a major contribution by a single radical mechanism involving interstrand radical transfer via hydrogen abstraction by a peroxyl intermediate, since the half-life of this radical transfer reaction appears to be significantly greater than the lifetime of the intermediate. 35 refs., 7 figs.

  12. Orthogonal site-specific protein modification by engineering reversible thiol protection mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J. Jefferson; Conrad, David W.; Cuneo, Matthew J.; Hellinga, Homme W.

    2005-01-01

    Covalent modification is an important strategy for introducing new functions into proteins. As engineered proteins become more sophisticated, it is often desirable to introduce multiple, modifications involving several different functionalities in a site-specific manner. Such orthogonal labeling schemes require independent labeling of differentially reactive nucleophilic amino acid side chains. We have developed two protein-mediated protection schemes that permit independent labeling of multiple thiols. These schemes exploit metal coordination or disulfide bond formation to reversibly protect cysteines in a Cys2His2 zinc finger domain. We constructed a variety of N- and C-terminal fusions of these domains with maltose-binding protein, which were labeled with two or three different fluorophores. Multiple modifications were made by reacting an unprotected cysteine in MBP first, deprotecting the zinc finger, and then reacting the zinc finger cysteines. The fusion proteins were orthogonally labeled with two different fluorophores, which exhibited intramolecular fluorescene resonance energy transfer (FRET). These conjugates showed up to a threefold ratiometric change in emission intensities in response to maltose binding. We also demonstrated that the metal- and redox-mediated protection methods can be combined to produce triple independent modifications, and prepared a protein labeled with three different fluorophores that exhibited a FRET relay. Finally, labeled glucose-binding protein was covalently patterned on glass slides using thiol-mediated immobilization chemistries. Together, these experiments demonstrated that reversible thiol protection schemes provide a rapid, straightforward method for producing multiple, site-specific modifications. PMID:15576565

  13. Establishment of a derivatization method to quantify thiol function in sulfur-containing plasma polymer films.

    PubMed

    Thiry, Damien; Francq, Remy; Cossement, Damien; Guerin, David; Vuillaume, Dominique; Snyders, Rony

    2013-10-29

    Thiol-supported surfaces draw more and more interest in numerous fields of applications from biotechnology to catalysis. Among the various strategies to generate such surfaces, the plasma polymerization of a thiol-containing molecule appears to be one of the ideal candidates. Nevertheless, considering such an approach, a careful characterization of the material surface chemistry is necessary. In this work, an original chemical derivatization method aiming to quantitatively probe the -SH functions in plasma polymers was established using N-ethylmaleimide as a labeling molecule. The method was qualitatively and quantitatively validated on self-assembled monolayers of 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane exhibiting a -SH-terminated group used as "model" surface. For a quantitative determination of the -SH content in propanethiol plasma polymers, the kinetics of the reaction was investigated. The latter is described as a two-step mechanism, namely a fast surface reaction followed by a diffusion-limited one. The density of -SH groups deduced from the derivatization method (~4%) is in good agreement with typical values measured in some other plasma polymer families. The whole set of our data opens up new possibilities for optimizing the -SH content in thiol-based plasma polymer films. PMID:24066612

  14. DECREASED S-NITROSATION OF PEPTIDE THIOLS IN THE MEMBRANE INTERIOR

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Andrekopoulos, Christopher; Xu, Yingkai; Joseph, Joy; Hogg, Neil; Feix, Jimmy; Kalyanaraman, B.

    2009-01-01

    It has been proposed that autoxidation of nitric oxide (·NO) stimulates S-nitrosation of thiols located in the hydrophobic milieu. We tested whether thiols located in hydrophobic membranes undergo enhanced S-nitrosation in the presence of ·NO/O2. Transmembrane cysteinyl peptides, C4 (AcNH-KKACALA(LA)6KK-CONH2); C8 (AcNH-KKALALACALA(LA)3KK-CONH2), were incorporated into dilauroylphosphatidylcholine (DLPC) bilayers; their location in the membrane was determined by EPR spin labeling. The peptides, C8 and C4, and GSH (300 μM) were treated with a ·NO donor, DEA-NONOate, and nitrosothiol formation determined under different O2 levels. Surprisingly, the more hydrophobic cysteinyl peptide, C8, did not yield any S-nitrosated product compared to GSH in the aqueous phase or C4 peptide in the liposomes in the presence of ·NO/O2. This data suggests that thiols located deeply in the hydrophobic core of the membrane may be less likely to undergo S-nitrosation in the presence of ·NO/O2. PMID:19573593

  15. THE CRITICAL ROLE OF THE CELLULAR THIOL HOMEOSTASIS IN CADMIUM PERTURBATION OF THE LUNG EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yinzhi; Chen, Lijun; Gao, Song; Toselli, Paul; Stone, Phillip; Li, Wande

    2009-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) inhalation can result in emphysema. Cd exposure of rat lung fibroblasts (RFL6) enhanced levels of metal scavenging thiols, e.g., metallothionein (MT) and glutathione (GSH), and the heavy chain of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS), a key enzyme for GSH biosynthesis, concomitant with downregulation of lysyl oxidase (LO), a copper-dependent enzyme for crosslinking collagen and elastin in the extracellular matrix (ECM). Cd downregulation of LO in treated cells was closely accompanied by suppression of synthesis of collagen, a major structure component of the lung ECM. Using rats intratracheally instilled with cadmium chloride (30 μg, once a week) as an animal model, we further demonstrated that although 2-week Cd instillation induced a non-significant change in the lung LO activity and collagen synthesis, 4- and 6-week Cd instillation resulted in a steady decrease in the lung LO and collagen expression. The lung MT and total GSH levels were both upregulated upon the long-term Cd exposure. Emphysematous lesions were generated in lungs of 6-week Cd-dosed rats. Increases of cellular thiols by transfection of cells with MT-II expression vectors or treatment of cells with GSH monoethyl ester, a GSH delivery system, markedly inhibited LO mRNA levels and catalytic activities in the cell model. Thus, Cd upregulation of cellular thiols may be a critical cellular event facilitating downregulation of LO, a potential mechanism for Cd-induced emphysema. PMID:19879314

  16. Photoinduced Cross-Linking of Dynamic Poly(disulfide) Films via Thiol Oxidative Coupling.

    PubMed

    Feillée, Noémi; Chemtob, Abraham; Ley, Christian; Croutxé-Barghorn, Céline; Allonas, Xavier; Ponche, Arnaud; Le Nouen, Didier; Majjad, Hicham; Jacomine, Léandro

    2016-01-01

    Initially developed as an elastomer with an excellent record of barrier and chemical resistance properties, poly(disulfide) has experienced a revival linked to the dynamic nature of the S-S covalent bond. A novel photobase-catalyzed oxidative polymerization of multifunctional thiols to poly(disulfide) network is reported. Based solely on air oxidation, the single-step process is triggered by the photodecarboxylation of a xanthone acetic acid liberating a strong bicyclic guanidine base. Starting with a 1 μm thick film based on trithiol poly(ethylene oxide) oligomer, the UV-mediated oxidation of thiols to disulfides occurs in a matter of minutes both selectively, i.e., without overoxidation, and quantitatively as assessed by a range of spectroscopic techniques. Thiolate formation and film thickness determine the reaction rates and yield. Spatial control of the photopolymerization serves to generate robust micropatterns, while the reductive cleavage of S-S bridges allows the recycling of 40% of the initial thiol groups. PMID:26502361

  17. Building thiol and metal-thiolate functions into coordination nets: Clues from a simple molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jun; Yang, Chen; Xu, Zhengtao; Zeller, Matthias; Hunter, Allen D.; Lin, Jianhua

    2009-07-01

    The simple and easy-to-prepare bifunctional molecule 2,5-dimercapto-1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid (H 4DMBD) interacts with the increasingly harder metal ions of Cu +, Pb 2+ and Eu 3+ to form the coordination networks of Cu 6(DMBD) 3(en) 4(Hen) 6 ( 1), Pb 2(DMBD)(en) 2 ( 2) and Eu 2(H 2DMBD) 3(DEF) 4 ( 3), where the carboxyl and thiol groups bind with distinct preference to the hard and soft metal ions, respectively. Notably, 1 features uncoordinated carboxylate groups and Cu 3 cluster units integrated via the thiolate groups into an extended network with significant interaction between the metal centers and the organic molecules; 2 features a 2D coordination net based on the mercapto and carboxylic groups all bonded to the Pb 2+ ions; 3 features free-standing thiol groups inside the channels of a metal-carboxylate-based network. This study illustrates the rich solid state structural features and potential functions offered by the carboxyl-thiol combination.

  18. [Mono- and Binuclear Dinitrosyl Iron Complexes with Thiol-containing Ligands in Various Biosystems].

    PubMed

    Vanin, A F; Mikoyan, V D; Kubrina, L N; Borodulin, R R; Burgova, E N

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that dinitrosyl iron complexes with thiol-containing ligands, bound with modified bovine serum albumin with high amount of thiol groups, appeared in baker yeast or in animal tissues in the presence of exogenous or endogenous nitric oxide, respectively, are represented predominantly by EPR-silent binuclear form. This form can be transformed into EPR-active mononuclear form of dinitrosyl iron complexes with an increase in pH to basic values, into EPR-active form of mononuclear iron nitrosyl complexes in case of bielectronic recovery of the binuclear form of dinitrosyl iron complexes or under the action of dithiocarbamate derivatives. The latter induced the transformation of dinitrosyl iron complexes into EPR-active mononitrosyl iron complexes with dithiocarbamates. A significant amount of binuclear dinitrosyl iron complexes with thiol-containing ligands in living systems and identical biological activity of these complexes and endogenous nitric oxide systems allow of considering endogenous binuclear dinitrosyl iron complexes as a "working form" of endogenous nitric oxide recognized now as a universal regulator of biological processes. PMID:26394474

  19. Fabrication of PEG-carboxymethylcellulose hydrogel by thiol-norbornene photo-click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sora; Park, Young Hwan; Ki, Chang Seok

    2016-02-01

    Both poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) are biocompatible polymers, which have been widely utilized in biomedical fields. In this study, we demonstrated the fabrication of pH-sensitive PEG-CMC hydrogels based on thiol-norbornene photo-click reaction and characterized their properties, such as swelling ratio, stiffness, degradation, and protein drug release. For the hydrogel fabrication, tetra-arm PEG and CMC were functionalized with norbornene groups and thiol groups, respectively. The hydrogels fabricated with varying concentration (0-3%) of CMCSH and a fixed concentration (4%) of PEG4NB by orthogonal step-growth photopolymerization showed high gel fractions (∼0.85). The presence of CMCSH in hydrogel did not affected gel point (∼4 s) but significantly prolonged completion time of gelation. Swelling ratios of PEG-CMC increased from ∼32 to ∼60 and the shear elastic modulus decreased from ∼3000 to ∼600 Pa with an increase of CMCSH content (0-3%). PEG-CMC hydrogel containing more CMCSH not only underwent slower hydrolytic bulk degradation but also showed a slower BSA release in acidic condition. These results indicate thiol-norbornene PEG-CMC hydrogel has potential as pH-sensitive protein drug carrier. PMID:26616448

  20. Nonenzymatic formation of 'energy-rich' lactoyl and glyceroyl thioesters from glyceraldehyde and a thiol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, A. L.

    1984-01-01

    The energy rich thioester, N-acetyl-S-lactoylcysteine, is formed under anaerobic conditions from glyceraldehyde and N-acetylcysteine at ambient temperature in aqueous solutions of sodium phosphate (pH 7.0). The conversion occurs at a rate of about 0.4 percent per day in reactions with 10 millimoles (mM) glyceraldehyde, 40 mM thiol, and 500 mM sodium phosphate (pH 7.0). Thioester formation proceeds at an estimated efficiency of 76 percent. The formation of lactoyl thioester most likely occurs by the phosphate catalyzed dehydration of glyceraldehyde to give pyruvaldehyde, which combines with thiol to form a hemithioacetal that rearranges to the thioester. A second energy rich thioester, N-acetyl-S-glyceroylcysteine, is also produced from glyceraldehyde when these reactions are carried out in the presence of oxygen and to a limited extent in the absence of oxygen. In the presence of oxygen, the formation of glyceroyl thioester continues until the thiol disappears completely by oxidation. The significance of these reactions to the energetics of the origin of life is discussed.

  1. Improvement of aromatic thiol release through the selection of yeasts with increased β-lyase activity.

    PubMed

    Belda, Ignacio; Ruiz, Javier; Navascués, Eva; Marquina, Domingo; Santos, Antonio

    2016-05-16

    The development of a selective medium for the rapid differentiation of yeast species with increased aromatic thiol release activity has been achieved. The selective medium was based on the addition of S-methyl-l-cysteine (SMC) as β-lyase substrate. In this study, a panel of 245 strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains was tested for their ability to grow on YCB-SMC medium. Yeast strains with an increased β-lyase activity grew rapidly because of their ability to release ammonium from SMC in comparison to others, and allowed for the easy isolation and differentiation of yeasts with promising properties in oenology, or another field, for aromatic thiol release. The selective medium was also helpful for the discrimination between those S. cerevisiae strains, which present a common 38-bp deletion in the IRC7 sequence (present in around 88% of the wild strains tested and are likely to be less functional for 4-mercapto-4-methylpentan-2-one (4MMP) production), and those S. cerevisiae strains homozygous for the full-length IRC7 allele. The medium was also helpful for the selection of non-Saccharomyces yeasts with increased β-lyase activity. Based on the same medium, a highly sensitive, reproducible and non-expensive GC-MS method for the evaluation of the potential volatile thiol release by different yeast isolates was developed. PMID:26971012

  2. Transdermal thiol-acrylate polyethylene glycol hydrogel synthesis using near infrared light.

    PubMed

    Chung, Solchan; Lee, Hwangjae; Kim, Hyung-Seok; Kim, Min-Gon; Lee, Luke P; Lee, Jae Young

    2016-08-01

    Light-induced polymerization has been widely applied for hydrogel synthesis, which conventionally involves the use of ultraviolet or visible light to activate a photoinitiator for polymerization. However, with these light sources, transdermal gelation is not efficient and feasible due to their substantial interactions with biological systems, and thus a high power is required. In this study, we used biocompatible and tissue-penetrating near infrared (NIR) light to remotely trigger a thiol-acrylate reaction for efficient in vivo gelation with good controllability. Our gelation system includes gold nanorods as a photothermal agent, a thermal initiator, diacrylate polyethylene glycol (PEG), and thiolated PEG. Irradiation with a low-power NIR laser (0.3 W cm(-2)) could induce gelation via a mixed-mode reaction with a small increase in temperature (∼5 °C) under the optimized conditions. We also achieved successful transdermal gelation via the NIR-assisted photothermal thiol-acryl reactions. This new type of NIR-assisted thiol-acrylate polymerization provides new opportunities for in situ hydrogel formation for injectable hydrogels and delivery of drugs/cells for various biomedical applications. PMID:27389611

  3. Comparison of metallothionein gene expression and nonprotein thiols in ten Arabidopsis ecotypes. Correlation with copper tolerance.

    PubMed

    Murphy, A; Taiz, L

    1995-11-01

    Seedlings of 10 Arabidopsis ecotypes were compared with respect to copper tolerance, expression of two metallothionein genes (MT1 and MT2), and nonprotein thiol levels. MT1 was uniformly expressed in all treatments, and MT2 was copper inducible in all 10 ecotypes. MT1 and MT2 mRNA levels were compared with various growth parameters for the 10 ecotypes in the presence of 40 microM Cu2+. The best correlation (R = 0.99) was obtained between MT2 mRNA and the rate of root extension. MT2 mRNA levels also paralleled the recovery phase following inhibition by copper. Induction of MT2 mRNA was initiated at copper concentrations below the threshold for growth inhibition. In cross-induction experiments, Ag+, Cd2+, Zn2+, Ni2+, and heat shock all induced significant levels of MT2 gene expression, whereas Al3+ and salicylic acid did not. The correlation between copper tolerance and nonprotein thiol levels in the 10 ecotypes was not statistically significant. However, 2 ecotypes, Ws and Enkheim, previously shown to exhibit an acclimation response, had the highest levels of nonprotein thiols. We conclude that MT2 gene expression may be the primary determinant of ecotypic differences in the copper tolerance of nonpretreated Arabidopsis seedlings. PMID:8552721

  4. Nonenzymatic formation of energy-rich lactoyl and glyceroyl thioesters from glyceraldehyde and a thiol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, A. L.

    1983-01-01

    The energy rich thioester, N-acetyl-S-lactoylcysteine, is formed under anaerobic conditions from glyceraldehyde and N-acetylcysteine at ambient temperature in aqueous solutions of sodium phosphate (pH 7.0). The conversion occurs at a rate of about 0.4% per day in reactions with 10 millimoles (mM) glyceraldehyde, 10 mM thiol, and 500 mM sodium phosphate (pH 7.0). Thioester formation proceeds at an estimated efficiency of 76%. The formation of lactoyl thioester most likely occurs by the phosphate catalyzed dehydration of glyceraldehyde to give pyruvaldehyde, which combines with thiol to form a hemithioacetal that rearranges to the thioester. A second energy rich thioester, N-acetyl-S-glyceroylcysteine, is also produced from glyceraldehyde when these reactions are carried out in the presence of oxygen and to a limited extent in the absence of oxygen. In the presence of oxygen the formation of glyceroyl thioester continues until the thiol disappears completely by oxidation. The significance of these reactions to the energetics of the origin of life is discussed.

  5. Rapid approach to biobased telechelics through two one-pot thiol-ene click reactions.

    PubMed

    Lluch, Cristina; Ronda, Joan C; Galià, Marina; Lligadas, Gerard; Cádiz, Virginia

    2010-06-14

    The application of environmentally friendly thiol-ene chemistry to the preparation of biobased telechelics is presented in this work. This methodology is based on two one-pot photoinitiated thiol-ene click processes: step-growth polymerization using a 3,6-dioxa-1,8-octanedithiol and end-group postpolymerization modification with three functional thiols: 2-mercaptoethanol, 3-mercaptopropionic acid, and 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane. We applied this approach to a potentially 100% biomass-derived monomer, allyl ester of 10-undecenoic acid (UDA). To show the generality and scope of this methodology, a series of well-defined telechelics with molecular weight ranging from 1000-3000 g/mol and hydroxyl, carboxyl, or trimethoxysilyl groups at the polymer terminus were prepared. An exhaustive (1)H NMR and MALDI-TOF MS analyses demonstrates the highly end-group fidelity of this methodology being an interesting procedure for the accelerated preparation of telechelics derived from divinyl monomers. UDA-based thelechelic diol prepared using this methodology was reacted with 4,4'-methylenebis(phenylisocyanate) and 1,4-butanediol as the chain extender to obtain multiblock poly(ester urethane). PMID:20462176

  6. Resin-assisted enrichment of thiols as a general strategy for proteomic profiling of cysteine-based reversible modifications

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jia; Gaffrey, Matthew J.; Su, Dian; Liu, Tao; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Weijun

    2013-12-12

    Reversible modifications on cysteine thiols play a significant role in redox signaling and regulation. A number of reversible redox modifications, including disulfide formation, S-nitrosylation, and S-glutathionylation, have been recognized for their significance in various physiological and pathological processes. Here we describe in detail a resin-assisted thiol-affinity enrichment protocol for both biochemical and proteomics applications. This protocol serves as a general approach for specific isolation of thiol-containing proteins or peptides derived from reversible redox-modified proteins. This approach utilizes thiol-affinity resins to directly capture thiol-containing proteins or peptides through a disulfide exchange reaction followed by on-resin protein digestion and on-resin multiplexed isobaric labeling to facilitate LC-MS/MS based quantitative site-specific analysis of redox modifications. The overall approach requires a much simpler workflow with increased specificity compared to the commonly used biotin switch technique. By coupling different selective reduction strategies, the resin-assisted approach provides the researcher with a useful tool capable of enriching different types of reversible modifications on protein thiols. Procedures for selective enrichment and analyses of S-nitrosylation and total reversible cysteine oxidation are presented to demonstrate the utility of this general strategy.

  7. Proteome-wide Light/Dark Modulation of Thiol Oxidation in Cyanobacteria Revealed by Quantitative Site-specific Redox Proteomics*

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jia; Nguyen, Amelia Y.; Dai, Ziyu; Su, Dian; Gaffrey, Matthew J.; Moore, Ronald J.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Smith, Richard D.; Koppenaal, David W.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Qian, Wei-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Reversible protein thiol oxidation is an essential regulatory mechanism of photosynthesis, metabolism, and gene expression in photosynthetic organisms. Herein, we present proteome-wide quantitative and site-specific profiling of in vivo thiol oxidation modulated by light/dark in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, an oxygenic photosynthetic prokaryote, using a resin-assisted thiol enrichment approach. Our proteomic approach integrates resin-assisted enrichment with isobaric tandem mass tag labeling to enable site-specific and quantitative measurements of reversibly oxidized thiols. The redox dynamics of ∼2,100 Cys-sites from 1,060 proteins under light, dark, and 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (a photosystem II inhibitor) conditions were quantified. In addition to relative quantification, the stoichiometry or percentage of oxidation (reversibly oxidized/total thiols) for ∼1,350 Cys-sites was also quantified. The overall results revealed broad changes in thiol oxidation in many key biological processes, including photosynthetic electron transport, carbon fixation, and glycolysis. Moreover, the redox sensitivity along with the stoichiometric data enabled prediction of potential functional Cys-sites for proteins of interest. The functional significance of redox-sensitive Cys-sites in NADP-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, peroxiredoxin (AhpC/TSA family protein Sll1621), and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase was further confirmed with site-specific mutagenesis and biochemical studies. Together, our findings provide significant insights into the broad redox regulation of photosynthetic organisms. PMID:25118246

  8. Proteome-wide light/dark modulation of thiol oxidation in cyanobacteria revealed by quantitative site-specific redox proteomics.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jia; Nguyen, Amelia Y; Dai, Ziyu; Su, Dian; Gaffrey, Matthew J; Moore, Ronald J; Jacobs, Jon M; Monroe, Matthew E; Smith, Richard D; Koppenaal, David W; Pakrasi, Himadri B; Qian, Wei-Jun

    2014-12-01

    Reversible protein thiol oxidation is an essential regulatory mechanism of photosynthesis, metabolism, and gene expression in photosynthetic organisms. Herein, we present proteome-wide quantitative and site-specific profiling of in vivo thiol oxidation modulated by light/dark in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, an oxygenic photosynthetic prokaryote, using a resin-assisted thiol enrichment approach. Our proteomic approach integrates resin-assisted enrichment with isobaric tandem mass tag labeling to enable site-specific and quantitative measurements of reversibly oxidized thiols. The redox dynamics of ∼2,100 Cys-sites from 1,060 proteins under light, dark, and 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (a photosystem II inhibitor) conditions were quantified. In addition to relative quantification, the stoichiometry or percentage of oxidation (reversibly oxidized/total thiols) for ∼1,350 Cys-sites was also quantified. The overall results revealed broad changes in thiol oxidation in many key biological processes, including photosynthetic electron transport, carbon fixation, and glycolysis. Moreover, the redox sensitivity along with the stoichiometric data enabled prediction of potential functional Cys-sites for proteins of interest. The functional significance of redox-sensitive Cys-sites in NADP-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, peroxiredoxin (AhpC/TSA family protein Sll1621), and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase was further confirmed with site-specific mutagenesis and biochemical studies. Together, our findings provide significant insights into the broad redox regulation of photosynthetic organisms. PMID:25118246

  9. General method to identify and enrich vicinal thiol proteins present in intact cells in the oxidized, disulfide state.

    PubMed

    Gitler, C; Zarmi, B; Kalef, E

    1997-10-01

    Some 5% of the soluble proteins of L1210 murine leukemia lymphoblasts contain surface vicinal thiols (Kalef, E., Walfish, P. G., and Gitler, C. (1993) Anal. Biochem. 212, 325-334). Redox dithiol to intraprotein disulfide conversion could regulate the cellular function of these proteins. A general method is presented to identify and enrich vicinal thiol proteins existing in cells in their oxidized, disulfide state. The method is based on the in situ blockage by cell permeable N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) of readily accessible cellular protein sulfhydryls. Following removal of the excess NEM, disulfide-containing proteins were identified by reduction with DTT and specific labeling with N-iodoacetyl-[125I]-3-iodotyrosine. The vicinal thiol proteins formed could also be enriched, prior to labeling with [125I]IAIT, by their selective binding to Sepha-rose-aminohexanoyl-4-aminophenylarsine oxide. Exponentially growing L1210 lymphoblasts contain more than 20 proteins with thiols in the oxidized, disulfide state. The majority derive from vicinal thiol proteins. The fraction oxidized, in some proteins, represents almost the totality of the protein present in the cell. Exposure of lymphoblasts to diamide increases the number and concentration of proteins with intraprotein disulfides. This method allows sensitive direct identification of vicinal thiol proteins that participate in redox regulation and those that are targets to oxidative stress conditions. PMID:9324940

  10. A new turn-on chemosensor for bio-thiols based on the nanoaggregates of a tetraphenylethene-coumarin fluorophore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Xiaoding; Zhao, Zujin; Hong, Yuning; Dong, Chao; Min, Xuehong; Zhuang, Yuan; Xu, Xuemei; Jia, Yongmei; Xia, Fan; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2014-11-01

    In this work, a tetraphenylethene-coumarin hybrid fluorophore (TPE-Cou) that contains a Schiff base form is designed and synthesized. A combination of plentiful optical properties and chemical reactivity towards thiols allows TPE-Cou to work as an excellent turn-on probe of thiols with a wide linear range, revealing the great potential of this dye as a quantitative fluorescence indicator. By means of NMR and optical spectrum analyses, a mechanistic picture at the molecular level has been drawn to illustrate how this dye works as a bio-thiol-sensitive fluorescent probe.In this work, a tetraphenylethene-coumarin hybrid fluorophore (TPE-Cou) that contains a Schiff base form is designed and synthesized. A combination of plentiful optical properties and chemical reactivity towards thiols allows TPE-Cou to work as an excellent turn-on probe of thiols with a wide linear range, revealing the great potential of this dye as a quantitative fluorescence indicator. By means of NMR and optical spectrum analyses, a mechanistic picture at the molecular level has been drawn to illustrate how this dye works as a bio-thiol-sensitive fluorescent probe. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of the experimental procedure and analytical data are provided. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr04593a

  11. Attachment and the Child in School. Part I: Attachment Theory and the 'Dependent' Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geddes, Heather

    2003-01-01

    This article uses the framework of attachment theory to describe a behavior pattern, the anxious resistant/ambivalent attachment pattern. Examples from educational practice illustrate the condition. Possible intervention approaches are suggested. (Contains references.) (Author/DB)

  12. Controlling the Reactivity of Bifunctional Ligands: Carboxylate-Bridged Nonheme Diiron(II) Complexes Bearing Free Thiol Groups.

    PubMed

    Pal, Nabhendu; Majumdar, Amit

    2016-03-21

    Carboxylate-bridged nonheme diiron(II) complexes, bearing free functional groups in general, and free thiol groups in particular, were sought. While the addition of sodium γ-hydroxybutyrate into a mixture of Fe(BF4)2·6H2O, HN-Et-HPTB, and Et3N afforded the complex [Fe2(N-Et-HPTB)(μ-O2C-(CH2)3-OH)](BF4)2 (2) (where N-Et-HPTB is the anion of N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-(1-ethylbenzimidazolyl))-2-hydroxy-1,3-diaminopropane), a similar, straightforward process could not be used for the synthesis of diiron(II) complexes with free thiol groups. In order to circumvent this problem, a new class of thiolate bridged diiron(II) complexes, [Fe2(N-Et-HPTB)(μ-SR(1))](BF4)2 (R(1) = Me (1a), Et (1b), (t)Bu (1c), Ph (1d)) was synthesized. Selective proton exchange reactions of one representative compound, 1b, with reagents of the type HS-R(2)-COOH yielded the target compounds, [Fe2(N-Et-HPTB)(μ-O2C-R(2)-SH)](BF4)2 (R(2) = C6H4 (3a), CH2CH2 (3b), CH2(CH2)5CH2 (3c)). Redox properties of the complexes 3a-3c were studied in comparison with the complex, [Fe2(N-Et-HPTB)(μ-O2CMe)](BF4)2 (5). Reaction of (Cp2Fe)(BF4) with 1b yielded [Fe(II)2(N-Et-HPTB)(DMF)3](BF4)3·DMF (4) (when crystallized from DMF/diethyl ether), which might indicate the formation of a transient ethanethiolate bridged {Fe(II)Fe(III)} species, followed by a rapid internal redox reaction to generate diethyldisulfide and the solvent coordinated diiron(II) complex, 4. This possibility was supported by a comparative cyclic voltammetric study of 1a-1c and 4. Prospects of the complexes of the type 3a-3c as potential building blocks for the synthesis of nonheme diiron(II) complexes covalently attached with other redox active metals has been substantiated by the synthesis of the complexes, [Fe2(N-EtHPTB)(μ-O2C-R(2)-S)Cu(Me3TACN)](BF4)2 (R = p-C6H4 (7a), CH2CH2 (7b)). All the compounds were characterized by a combination of single-crystal X-ray structure determinations and/or elemental analysis. PMID:26959857

  13. Control of Cell Attachment and Spreading on Poly(acrylamide) Brushes with Varied Grafting Density.

    PubMed

    Lilge, Inga; Schönherr, Holger

    2016-01-26

    To achieve spatial control of fibroblast cell attachment and spreading on a biocompatible polymer coating, the effect of poly(acrylamide) (PAAm) brushes with varied grafting density was investigated. The synthesis of the brushes was performed by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP). Gold substrates were modified with binary self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of an initiator and 16-mercaptohexadecanoic acid (MHDA) as an "inert" thiol to initiate the ATRP of AAm. By using different mixtures for the binary SAMs, a series of polymer brushes with varied grafting densities were prepared. The fractional coverage of surface bound initiator was determined by grazing incidence Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), and contact angle measurements. A linear relationship between the Br/S ratio determined by XPS and ToF-SIMS versus the fraction of initiator on the surface determined by water contact angle measurements was observed. The varied initiation concentration on the gold substrates yielded PAAm brushes with different thicknesses, indicating a transition from mushroom to brush regimes with increasing grafting density. Thereby we achieved exquisite control of the degree of cell adhesion. Cell attachment experiments with NIH 3T3 fibroblast cells revealed cell spreading on PAAm brushes with low grafting densities (initiator fractional coverage <0.2) as well as a complete passivation by polymer brushes with higher grafting densities. PMID:26771447

  14. Genetic and Environmental Influences on Adolescent Attachment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fearon, Pasco; Shmueli-Goetz, Yael; Viding, Essi; Fonagy, Peter; Plomin, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Background: Twin studies consistently point to limited genetic influence on attachment security in the infancy period, but no study has examined whether this remains the case in later development. This study presents the findings from a twin study examining the relative importance of genetic and environmental influences on attachment in…

  15. Attachment in Chronically Underweight Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valenzuela, Marta

    1990-01-01

    Assessed mother-infant attachment in a low-income population in Chile. Underweight children and children with adequate weight were classified as secure or anxious by means of the Ainsworth Strange Situation. Underweight children showed more anxious attachment, and anxious children showed the most serious weight deficits. (BC)

  16. Relation of attachment style with marital conflict.

    PubMed

    Besharat, Mohammad Ali

    2003-06-01

    During the last decade attachment theory has been used as a framework for understanding how adult relationships function. Attachment theory should focus exploration of whether attachment history might be related to later marital conflicts. The aim of this paper was to examine the relationship of attachment styles with marital conflicts. Subjects were 20 couples who entered couples therapy for their marital conflict and a sample of 20 university student couples. All answered the Adult Attachment Inventory and the Golombok-Rust Inventory of Marital State. The university couples described themselves as more securely attached to their partners than the married couples. The Anxious and Avoidant styles were associated with greater problems in the marital relationship. Secure, Anxious, and Avoidant attachment styles seemed to be associated with the quality of marital relationships. Couples who exhibited a Secure attachment style tended to be involved in relationships characterized by greater interdependence, trust, commitment, and satisfaction whereas those with insecure styles tended to be characterized by more problems. PMID:12931932

  17. Attachment Parenting: A Style That Works.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sears, William

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the benefits of attachment parenting, which emphasizes parental commitment, a low-stress pregnancy, childbirth preparation, breast-feeding with child-led weaning, prompt response to the baby's crying, flexible sleeping arrangements, close-knit father-mother-baby functioning, and the avoidance of detachment parenting. Attachment parenting…

  18. Separation-individuation theory and attachment theory.

    PubMed

    Blum, Harold P

    2004-01-01

    Separation-individuation and attachment theories are compared and assessed in the context of psychoanalytic developmental theory and their application to clinical work. As introduced by Margaret Mahler and John Bowlby, respectively, both theories were initially regarded as diverging from traditional views. Separation-individuation theory, though it has had to be corrected in important respects, and attachment theory, despite certain limitations, have nonetheless enriched psychoanalytic thought. Without attachment an infant would die, and with severely insecure attachment is at greater risk for serious disorders. Development depends on continued attachment to a responsive and responsible caregiver. Continued attachment to the primary object was regarded by Mahler as as intrinsic to the process of separation-individuation. Attachment theory does not account for the essential development of separateness, and separation-individuation is important for the promotion of autonomy, independence, and identity. Salient historical and theoretical issues are addressed, including the renewed interest in attachment theory and the related decline of interest in separation-individuation theory. PMID:15222460

  19. Attachment and Socioemotional Problems in Middle Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Ellen; Lecompte, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we will evaluate the evidence concerning links between attachment and behavior problems in the middle childhood period. We will first provide a general introduction to the question of attachment and maladaptation in the middle childhood period, and then examine the recent empirical evidence with respect to both externalizing and…

  20. 21 CFR 872.3165 - Precision attachment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Precision attachment. 872.3165 Section 872.3165 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3165 Precision attachment. (a) Identification....

  1. Attachment and Dependency in Developmental Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sroufe, L. Alan; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Distinguishes between attachment (the relationship between infant and caregiver) and dependency (the reliance of the child on adults for nurturance, attention, or assistance). Assesses preschool children with varying attachment histories and suggests that the roots of overdependency lie in the quality of the early infant-caregiver relationship.…

  2. Attachment Theory Applied to Juvenile Sex Offending.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodrow, Kenneth K.; Lim, Mee-Gaik

    1998-01-01

    Attachment theory is applied to identify systemic patterns encouraging juveniles to commit sexual offenses. The role of the helping system in perpetuating offenses is reviewed. The priority of family integrity and the role of professionals in breaking cycles of abuse and repairing earlier destructive emotional attachments are discussed. (EMK)

  3. Adolescent Self-Esteem, Attachment and Loneliness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dhal, Anubha; Bhatia, Sangeeta; Sharma, Vidhi; Gupta, Priyanka

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To assess self-esteem, loneliness and attachment styles among adolescents and examine their association with each other and with age and gender. Method: Adolescents (55 males and 55 females) from a public school in Delhi, aged 10-13 years were administered Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory (School Form), Attachment Scale and UCLA…

  4. Parent-Child Attachment and Emotion Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brumariu, Laura E.

    2015-01-01

    Given the centrality of both parent-child attachment and emotion regulation in children's development and adjustment, it is important to evaluate the relations between these constructs. This article discusses conceptual and empirical links between attachment and emotion regulation in middle childhood, highlights progress and challenges in the…

  5. Attachment, Temperament, and Preschool Children's Peer Acceptance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szewczyk-Sokolowski, Margaret; Bost, Kelly K.; Wainwright, Ada B.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the relations between preschool children's attachment security, temperament, and peer acceptance. Ninety-eight preschool children and their mothers were recruited through childcare centers in the southeast. Mothers and their children participated in two two-hour home observations. Attachment security was assessed using the…

  6. Breast cancer screening: the role of attachment.

    PubMed

    Tuck, Natalie L; Consedine, Nathan S

    2015-01-01

    Attachment style is the dispositional way in which a person relates to others, and differences in attachment characteristics may offer insight into why many women do not adhere to breast screening guidelines. While mammograms involve contact with medical professionals, breast self-examination (BSE) does not, and may be preferable for women who dislike interpersonal vulnerability. As such, differences in the attachment characteristics that predict mammography versus BSE utilisation may indicate whether attachment related motivations are relevant to both interpersonal examinations and independent self-care behaviours. The current report examined how attachment dimensions predicted the frequency of mammography and BSE in a sample of 1204 ethnically diverse women from Brooklyn, New York. Participants completed measures of mammography and BSE frequency, and attachment, together with demographic, health care context and emotional predictors of screening. Multiple regressions showed that attachment dimensions predicted both mammography and BSE screening even when controlling for established predictors and emotion relevant variables. As hypothesised, fearful avoidance predicted fewer mammograms and BSEs, while preoccupation predicted more frequent BSEs. Consistent with some prior work in male cancer screening, greater attachment security also predicted fewer mammograms while degree of dismissiveness was not associated with screening frequencies. Understanding the psychosocial predictors of screening may help identify low screeners, and guide the development of targeted interventions that are better suited to the interpersonal preferences of older women. PMID:25192017

  7. An Attachment Perspective on Anger among Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konishi, Chiaki; Hymel, Shelley

    2014-01-01

    Extending John Bowlby's hypothesis that dysfunctional anger is a predictable outcome of insecure attachments to parents, this study investigated the relationship between current parent-adolescent attachment and both the experience and expression of anger. Participants included 776 students (379 boys and 397 girls) in grades 8-12. As predicted…

  8. Attachment, Psychotherapy, and Assessment: A Commentary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eagle, Morris N.

    2006-01-01

    This article, a commentary, discusses questions and issues generated by 7 articles (see records EJ750759, EJ750761, EJ750764, EJ750765, EJ750767, EJ750768, and EJ750769) on the relationship between attachment theory and research, and psychotherapy and clinical assessment. The issues include the following: attachment-based therapeutic…

  9. Community Attachment in a Rural Region.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goudy, Willis J.

    1990-01-01

    Reviews two models of community-attachment, linear-development and systematic models, using data on social ties and local sentiments from survey respondents in Iowa communities. Linear-development variables (population size and density) relate weakly to community attachment. Systematic variables (residence length, income, and age) relate more…

  10. Attachment Representations and Time Perspective in Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laghi, Fiorenzo; D'Alessio, Maria; Pallini, Susanna; Baiocco, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between attachment to parents and peers, time perspective and psychological adjustment in adolescence. 2,665 adolescents (M age = 17.03 years, SD = 1.48) completed self-report measures about parent and peer attachment, time perspective, sympathy and self-determination. Subjects were divided into four groups…

  11. Childhood Attachment and Adult Attachment in Incarcerated Adult Male Sex Offenders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smallbone, Stephen W.; Dadds, Mark R.

    1998-01-01

    Forty-eight incarcerated sex offenders were compared with 16 property offenders and 16 nonoffenders on self-report measures of childhood maternal and paternal attachment and adult attachment. Results suggest that insecure childhood attachments may be related to offending behavior generally and that certain combinations of childhood attachment…

  12. Attachment and Autism: Parental Attachment Representations and Relational Behaviors in the Parent-Child Dyad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seskin, Lynn; Feliciano, Eileen; Tippy, Gil; Yedloutschnig, Ruby; Sossin, K. Mark; Yasik, Anastasia

    2010-01-01

    While attachment research has demonstrated that parents' internal working models of attachment relationships tend to be transmitted to their children, affecting children's developmental trajectories, this study specifically examines associations between adult attachment status and observable parent, child, and dyadic behaviors among children with…

  13. Adult Attachment, Culturally Adjusted Attachment, and Interpersonal Difficulties of Taiwanese Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Chia-Chih DC; Scalise, Dominick A.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the applicability of Western adult attachment perspectives to interpersonal difficulties experienced by individuals with indigenous Chinese cultural backgrounds. A total of 275 Taiwanese university students completed self-report surveys of adult attachment, ideal attachment, and interpersonal problems. Culturally adjusted…

  14. Adult Attachment as a Risk Factor for Intimate Partner Violence : The "Mispairing" of Partners' Attachment Styles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doumas, Diana M.; Pearson, Christine L.; Elgin, Jenna E.; McKinley, Lisa L.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between intimate partner violence and adult attachment in a sample of 70 couples. The attachment style of each partner and the interaction of the partners' attachment styles were examined as predictors of intimate partner violence. Additional analyses were conducted to examine violence reciprocity and to…

  15. Attachment and children's biased attentional processing: evidence for the exclusion of attachment-related information.

    PubMed

    Vandevivere, Eva; Braet, Caroline; Bosmans, Guy; Mueller, Sven C; De Raedt, Rudi

    2014-01-01

    Research in both infants and adults demonstrated that attachment expectations are associated with the attentional processing of attachment-related information. However, this research suffered from methodological issues and has not been validated across ages. Employing a more ecologically valid paradigm to measure attentional processes by virtue of eye tracking, the current study tested the defensive exclusion hypothesis in late childhood. According to this hypothesis, insecurely attached children are assumed to defensively exclude attachment-related information. We hypothesized that securely attached children process attachment- related neutral and emotional information in a more open manner compared to insecurely attached children. Sixty-two children (59.7% girls, 8-12 years) completed two different tasks, while eye movements were recorded: task one presented an array of neutral faces including mother and unfamiliar women and task two presented the same with happy and angry faces. Results indicated that more securely attached children looked longer at mother's face regardless of the emotional expression. Also, they tend to have more maintained attention to mother's neutral face. Furthermore, more attachment avoidance was related to a reduced total viewing time of mother's neutral, happy, and angry face. Attachment anxiety was not consistently related to the processing of mother's face. Findings support the theoretical assumption that securely attached children have an open manner of processing all attachment-related information. PMID:25061662

  16. Metal oxyanion stabilization of the rat glucocorticoid receptor is independent of thiols.

    PubMed

    Modarress, K J; Cavanaugh, A H; Chakraborti, P K; Simons, S S

    1994-10-14

    The ability of sodium molybdate, both to stabilize the steroid binding activity of glucocorticoid receptors and to prevent the activation of receptor-steroid complexes to a DNA binding species, has long been thought to involve thiols. Two receptor thiols in particular, Cys-656 and Cys-661 of rat receptors, have been suspected. The requirements for the action of molybdate, as well as two other metal oxyanions (tungstate and vanadate) known to exert the same effects as molybdate, have now been examined with receptors in which these thiols, or a third cysteine in the steroid binding cavity (Cys-640), have been mutated to serine. No mutation prevented any metal oxyanion from either stabilizing steroid-free receptors or blocking the activation of complexes for binding to nonspecific or specific DNA sequences. Thus, Cys-640, Cys-656, and Cys-661 are not required for any of the effects of molybdate, tungstate, or vanadate with rat glucocorticoid receptors. Studies with hybrid receptors, and with a 16-kDa steroid binding core fragment containing only 3 cysteines at positions 640, 656, and 661, indicated that no cysteine of the rat receptor was needed to maintain responsiveness to molybdate. Even when all of the thiol groups in crude cytosol were blocked by reaction with excess methyl methanethiol-sulfonate, each metal oxyanion was still able to stabilize the steroid binding of receptors. These results argue that molybdate, tungstate, and vanadate each interact with the receptor or an associated nonreceptor protein(s) in a manner that does not require thiols. An indirect mechanism of molybdate action was evaluated in light of the recent report that the whole cell actions are mediated by increased levels of intracellular cGMP. Under cell-free conditions, however, the effects of molybdate could not be reproduced by cGMP derivatives. Evidence consistent with a direct effect was that molybdate, tungstate, or vanadate each modified the kinetics of proteolysis of wild type

  17. Attachment to spextrophotometers for measuring scattering patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Fsel'son, M.P.; Krikum, A.Z.; Sivyakov, Y.A.; Spivak, R.Y.

    1986-02-01

    The authors have developed a simple attachment to the Shimadsu MPS 50L spectrophotometer for measuring scattering patterns. The attachment is mounted directly at the cuvette section of the spectrophotometer. The radiation detector of the attachment is formed by an FR1-4 photoresistor disposed on the vertical section of a gamma-shaped bar adapted to be inclined by plus or minus 90 degrees with respect to the direction of the radiation beam. When the attachment is used, its radiation detector is connected into the measuring circuit of the spectrophotometer in place of the spectrophotometer's detector. When the spectrophotometer alone is used the detector of the attachment is moved out of the beam and the detector of the spectrophotometer proper is inserted into the measuring circuit.

  18. Attachment of Agrobacterium to plant surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Matthysse, Ann G.

    2014-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens binds to the surfaces of inanimate objects, plants, and fungi. These bacteria are excellent colonizers of root surfaces. In addition, they also bind to soil particles and to the surface of artificial or man-made substances, such as polyesters and plastics. The mechanisms of attachment to these different surfaces have not been completely elucidated. At least two types of binding have been described unipolarpolysaccharide-dependent polar attachment and unipolar polysaccharide-independent attachment (both polar and lateral). The genes encoding the enzymes for the production of the former are located on the circular chromosome, while the genes involved in the latter have not been identified. The expression of both of these types of attachment is regulated in response to environmental signals. However, the signals to which they respond differ so that the two types of attachment are not necessarily expressed coordinately. PMID:24926300

  19. The Antimicrobial Activity of Porphyrin Attached Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Lesley

    2008-03-01

    We are interested in testing the antimicrobial activity of a porphyrin that is attached to a polymer. The porphyrin (5-(4-carboxyphenyl)-10,15,20-tris-(4-pryridyl)) was synthesized from methyl 4-formyl benzoate, 4-pyridinecarboxaldehyde, and pyrrole and attached to a copolymer of polystyrene/poly(vinyl benzyl chloride), which was synthesized by free radical polymerization. The antimicrobial activity of the polymer-attached porphyrin was then determined for gram-negative E. Coli grown to 0.80 OD. In this procedure, glass slides were coated with polymer-attached porphyrin via dip-coating, and the E. Coli bacteria were plated in Luria Broth media. The plates were subsequently exposed to light overnight before they were incubated as porphyrins act as photo-sensitizers when irradiated with light. The polymer-attached porphyrin did exhibit antimicrobial activity and parameters that affect its efficiency will be discussed.

  20. Attachment to groups: theory and measurement.

    PubMed

    Smith, E R; Murphy, J; Coats, S

    1999-07-01

    Aspects of people's identification with groups may be understood by borrowing theoretical ideas and measurement strategies from research on attachment in close relationships. People have mental models of the self as a group member and of groups as sources of identity and esteem. These models affect thoughts, emotions, and behaviors related to group membership. Three studies show that two dimensions of attachment to groups, attachment anxiety and avoidance, can be assessed with good reliability, validity, and over-time stability. These factors are distinct from relationship attachment and from other measures of group identification. Group attachment predicts several important outcomes, including emotions concerning the group, time and activities shared with a group, social support, collective self-esteem, and ways of resolving conflict. This conceptualization provides new insights into the nature of people's psychological ties to groups. PMID:10434410

  1. Continuous monitoring of bacterial attachment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koeing, D. W.; Mishra, S. K.; Pierson, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    A major concern with the Space Station Freedom (SSF) water supply system is the control of longterm microbial contamination and biofilm development in the water storage and distribution systems. These biofilms have the potential for harboring pathogens as well as microbial strains containing resistance factors that could negatively influence crew health. The proposed means for disinfecting the water system on SSF (iodine) may encourage the selection of resistant strains. In fact, biofilm bacteria were observed in water lines from the Space Shuttle Columbia (OV-102); therefore, an alternative remediation method is required to disinfect spacecraft water lines. A thorough understanding of colonization events and the physiological parameters that will influence bacteria adhesion is required. The limiting factor for development of this technology is the ability to continuously monitor adhesion events and the effects of biocides on sessile bacteria. Methods were developed to allow bacterial adhesion and subsequent biocidal treatment to be monitored continuously. This technique couples automated image analysis with a continuous flow of a bacterial suspension through an optical flow cell. A strain of Pseudomonas cepacia isolated from the water supply of the Space Shuttle Discovery (OV-103) during STS-39 was grown in a nitrogen-limited continuous culture. This culture was challenged continuously with iodine during growth, and the adhesion characteristics of this strain was measure with regard to flow rate. Various biocides (ozone, hypochlorite, and iodine) were added to the flow stream to evaluate how well each chemical removed the bacteria. After biocide treatment, a fresh bacterial suspension was introduced into the flow cell, and the attachment rate was evaluated on the previously treated surface. This secondary fouling was again treated with biocide to determine the efficacy of multiple batch chemical treatments in removing biofilm.

  2. Environmental and genetic influences on early attachment

    PubMed Central

    Gervai, Judit

    2009-01-01

    Attachment theory predicts and subsequent empirical research has amply demonstrated that individual variations in patterns of early attachment behaviour are primarily influenced by differences in sensitive responsiveness of caregivers. However, meta-analyses have shown that parenting behaviour accounts for about one third of the variance in attachment security or disorganisation. The exclusively environmental explanation has been challenged by results demonstrating some, albeit inconclusive, evidence of the effect of infant temperament. In this paper, after reviewing briefly the well-demonstrated familial and wider environmental influences, the evidence is reviewed for genetic and gene-environment interaction effects on developing early attachment relationships. Studies investigating the interaction of genes of monoamine neurotransmission with parenting environment in the course of early relationship development suggest that children's differential susceptibility to the rearing environment depends partly on genetic differences. In addition to the overview of environmental and genetic contributions to infant attachment, and especially to disorganised attachment relevant to mental health issues, the few existing studies of gene-attachment interaction effects on development of childhood behavioural problems are also reviewed. A short account of the most important methodological problems to be overcome in molecular genetic studies of psychological and psychiatric phenotypes is also given. Finally, animal research focusing on brain-structural aspects related to early care and the new, conceptually important direction of studying environmental programming of early development through epigenetic modification of gene functioning is examined in brief. PMID:19732441

  3. [Mechanical studies on dental magnetic attachments].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, S

    1993-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the force distribution when using magnetic attachments in removable partial denture. The experimental magnetic attachments used in this study consisted of Nd-Fe-B magnets covered with permendur yokes and permendur keepers. The magnetic parts were attached to the experimental plate which was made of a titanium plate and an acrylic resin base, while the keepers were attached to the abutment teeth. The retentive force was measured by pulling the experimental plate vertically and diagonally with a tensile testing machine. In addition, the three-dimensional stress distribution of the abutment was analyzed by the finite element method when the magnetic attachment was removed. The results were as follows: 1. The maximum retentive force of the plate was influenced by the total of the attractive force, while the minimum force was by the number and arrangement of the attachments. 2. In almost all cases, the magnetic attachments worked most effectively when their attractive force was the same for each other. 3. When the pulling force was vertically applied to the abutment, the maximum stress arose in the alveolar bone around the root tip, and, when the force was laterally applied, the maximum stress arose on the axis of the 1/3 upper portion of the root. PMID:8482913

  4. Preschool teacher attachment and attention skills.

    PubMed

    Commodari, Elena

    2013-01-01

    Attention underlies and energizes all cognitive and behavioral activities. Many studies showed that the quality of child attachment (both to parental and non parental figures) influences cognitive functions and attention. This study aimed to investigate the relationships among attachment to preschool teachers and attention in a sample of preschoolers. In particular, the study analyzed whether child attachment security to preschool teachers influences the different aspects of their attention skills. In addition, gender- and age-related differences in attention and teacher attachment were explored. Research was conducted using two standardized instruments: the Attention and Concentration Battery, and the Attachment Q Sort. Participants were 279 children (147 male, 132 female) who attended two preschools in a town in Southern Italy. Descriptive analyses, t-tests analyses, and correlation and regression analyses were carried out. Findings highlighted several interesting points concerning the relationships that occur among attachment to preschool teachers and attention. Children with secure attachments presented higher reaction time and better auditory, visual, and visual spatial selectivity and maintenance. PMID:24386619

  5. LmTDRM database: a comprehensive database on thiol metabolic gene/gene products in Listeria monocytogenes EGDe.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, Vanishree; Gopal, Shubha

    2014-01-01

    There are a number of databases on the Listeria species and about their genome. However, these databases do not specifically address a set of network that is important in defence mechanism of the bacteria. Listeria monocytogenes EGDe is a well-established intracellular model organism to study host pathogenicity because of its versatility in the host environment. Here, we have focused on thiol disulphide redox metabolic network proteins, specifically in L. monocytogenes EGDe. The thiol redox metabolism is involved in oxidative stress mechanism and is found in all living cells. It functions to maintain the thiol disulphide balance required for protein folding by providing reducing power. Nevertheless, they are involved in the reversible oxidation of thiol groups in biomolecules by creating disulphide bonds; therefore, the term thiol disulphide redox metabolism (TDRM). TDRM network genes play an important role in oxidative stress mechanism and during host–pathogen interaction. Therefore, it is essential to have detailed information on these proteins with regard to other bacteria and its genome analysis to understand the presence of tRNA, transposons, and insertion elements for horizontal gene transfer. LmTDRM database is a new comprehensive web-based database on thiol proteins and their functions. It includes: Description, Search, TDRM analysis, and genome viewer. The quality of these data has been evaluated before they were aggregated to produce a final representation. The web interface allows for various queries to understand the protein function and their annotation with respect to their relationship with other bacteria. LmTDRM is a major step towards the development of databases on thiol disulphide redox proteins; it would definitely help researchers to understand the mechanism of these proteins and their interaction. Database URL: www.lmtdrm.com. PMID:25228549

  6. Tandem Mass Spectrometric Characterization of Thiol Peptides Modified by the Chemoselective Cationic Sulfhydryl Reagent (4-Iodobutyl)Triphenylphosphonium—. Effects of a Cationic Thiol Derivatization on Peptide Fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Zhang, Jie; Arbogast, Brian; Maier, Claudia S.

    2011-10-01

    Fixed charge chemical modifications on peptides and proteins can impact fragmentation behaviors in tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). In this study, we employed a thiol-specific cationic alkylation reagent, (4-iodobutyl)triphenylphosphonium (IBTP), to selectively modify cysteine thiol groups in mitochondrial proteome samples. Tandem mass spectrometric characteristics of butyltriphenylphosphonium (BTP)-modified peptides were evaluated by comparison to their carbamidomethylated (CAM) analogues using a quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-TOF) instrument under low energy collision-induced dissociation (CID) conditions. Introduction of the fixed charge modification resulted in the observation of peptide and fragment (bn and yn) ions with higher charge states than those observed for CAM-modified analogues. The charged BTP moiety had a significant effect on the neighboring amide bond fragmentation products. A decrease in relative abundances of the product ions at the corresponding cleavage sites was observed compared with those from the CAM-modified derivatives. This effect was particularly noticeable when an Xxx-Pro bond was in the vicinity of a BTP group. We hypothesized that the presence of a phosphonium moiety will reduce the tendency for protonation of the proximal amide bonds in the peptide backbone. Indeed, calculations indicated that proton affinities of backbone amide bonds close to the modified cysteine residues were generally 20-50 kcal/mol lower for BTP-modified peptides than for the unmodified or CAM-modified analogues with the sequence motif -Ala-Cys-Alan-Ala2-, -Ala-Cys-Alan-Pro-Ala-, and -Ala-Pro-Alan-Cys-Ala-, n = 0-3.

  7. Attachment of Agrobacteria to Grape Cells †

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Xin-An; Goodman, R. N.

    1993-01-01

    The presence of the Ti plasmid favorably influences the attachment of agrobacteria to grape callus cells, especially during the early stages of a 2-h incubation. Agrobacterium strains attached to a similar extent to both the crown gall-resistant cultivar (Catawba), Vitis labruscana, and the crown gall-susceptible cultivar (Chancellor), Vitis sp. Attachment of the virulent strain to grape callus cells is blocked by the avirulent strain HLB-2 in both the tissue culture cell suspension and the seedling root systems. PMID:16349016

  8. Nuclear reactor fuel rod attachment system

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1980-09-17

    A reusable system is described for removably attaching a nuclear reactor fuel rod to a support member. A locking cap is secured to the fuel rod and a locking strip is fastened to the support member. The locking cap has two opposing fingers shaped to form a socket having a body portion. The locking strip has an extension shaped to rigidly attach to the socket's body portion. The locking cap's fingers are resiliently deflectable. For attachment, the locking cap is longitudinally pushed onto the locking strip causing the extension to temporarily deflect open the fingers to engage the socket's body portion. For removal, the process is reversed.

  9. Praziquantel inhibits Schistosoma mansoni attachment in vitro.

    PubMed

    da-Silva, S P; Noel, F

    1990-01-01

    Male adult Schistosoma mansoni worms were placed in a glass dish containing Tyrode solution and observed for 15 min after addition of praziquantel (0.01 to 1 microM). Praziquantel promoted a concentration- and time-dependent inhibition of sucker-mediated attachment of the worm. Attachment inhibition was correlated with shortening of the parasite. We propose that the rapid and total inhibition of worm attachment observed in vitro with 1 microM praziquantel indicates that therapeutic concentrations of this drug should promote a rapid hepatic shift, in vivo, which may facilitate host tissue reaction. PMID:2101049

  10. Adult Attachment and the Effects on Romantic Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Barbara J.

    This paper reviews the current research on the nature of relationships from an attachment theory perspective. It begins with a review of attachment theory and states that an understanding of adult attachment is crucial for an understanding of the effects of attachment styles on relationships. It addresses the effect that each attachment style has…

  11. Give Them Roots, Then Let Them Fly: Understanding Attachment Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKelvey, Carole A., Ed.

    This book describes attachment theory, presents the attachment therapy program in place at the Evergreen Attachment Center at Evergreen, Colorado, and examines the implications of attachment therapy. The chapters are: (1) "An Overview" (Carole A. McKelvey, John Alston); (2) "Attachment Theory and Assessment" (Michael Orlans, Terry Levy); (3)…

  12. Oriented Attachment of Cytochrome P450 2C9 to a Self-Assembled Monolayer on a Gold Electrode as a Biosensor Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Elizabeth Ann

    Cytochrome P450s (CYPs) are a family of enzymes implicated in the metabolism of drugs in the body. Consequently, P450 reactions are of high interest to the pharmaceutical industry, where lead compounds in drug development are screened as potential substrates of CYPs. The P450 reaction involves electron transfer to an iron heme via NADPH and the electron transfer partner enzyme P450 reductase (CPR). By immobilizing CYPs on an electrode however, NADPH and CPR are potentially no longer needed and the immobilized CYP can act as a biosensor by accepting electrons directly from the electrode. Such a biosensor could be used as an initial screening tool for CYP reactivity of pharmaceuticals in development. In this study, the drug-metabolizing enzyme CYP 2C9 was immobilized to a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on a gold electrode in three different orientations to investigate the effect that orientation has on the direct electrochemistry of CYP and to evaluate oriented attachment of CYP to an electrode as a biosensor design. Three attachment methods were investigated: random attachment via amine coupling to a carboxy-terminated SAM, oriented attachment via C-terminal His-tag coupling to a Ni-NTA-functionalized SAM, and oriented attachment via maleimide/thiol coupling to a maleimide-functionalized SAM. Three 2C9 mutants (R125C, R132C, and K432C) were developed with a single cysteine mutation at the binding site for CPR on the side of the enzyme closest to the heme; attachment of these mutants to a gold electrode via maleimide/thiol coupling would orient the enzyme such that electron transfer occurs on the electrode in the same orientation that it does in vivo with CPR. Therefore, we expected oriented attachment via maleimide/thiol coupling to produce the most electroactive CYP biosensor. Electrochemical analysis and surface characterization of the SAMs on gold electrodes confirmed that electron transfer occurs through the SAMs, and activity assays of the 2C9 electrodes

  13. Magnetically Attached Multifunction Maintenance Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Joffe, Benjamin

    2005-01-01

    A versatile mobile telerobot, denoted the magnetically attached multifunction maintenance rover (MAGMER), has been proposed for use in the inspection and maintenance of the surfaces of ships, tanks containing petrochemicals, and other large ferromagnetic structures. As its name suggests, this robot would utilize magnetic attraction to adhere to a structure. As it moved along the surface of the structure, the MAGMER would perform tasks that could include close-up visual inspection by use of video cameras, various sensors, and/or removal of paint by water-jet blasting, laser heating, or induction heating. The water-jet nozzles would be mounted coaxially within compressed-air-powered venturi nozzles that would collect the paint debris dislodged by the jets. The MAGMER would be deployed, powered, and controlled from a truck, to which it would be connected by hoses for water, compressed air, and collection of debris and by cables for electric power and communication (see Figure 1). The operation of the MAGMER on a typical large structure would necessitate the use of long cables and hoses, which can be heavy. To reduce the load of the hoses and cables on the MAGMER and thereby ensure its ability to adhere to vertical and overhanging surfaces, the hoses and cables would be paid out through telescopic booms that would be parts of a MAGMER support system. The MAGMER would move by use of four motorized, steerable wheels, each of which would be mounted in an assembly that would include permanent magnets and four pole pieces (see Figure 2). The wheels would protrude from between the pole pieces by only about 3 mm, so that the gap between the pole pieces and the ferromagnetic surface would be just large enough to permit motion along the surface but not so large as to reduce the magnetic attraction excessively. In addition to the wheel assemblies, the MAGMER would include magnetic adherence enhancement fixtures, which would comprise arrays of permanent magnets and pole pieces

  14. Quinone-induced protein modifications: Kinetic preference for reaction of 1,2-benzoquinones with thiol groups in proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuting; Jongberg, Sisse; Andersen, Mogens L; Davies, Michael J; Lund, Marianne N

    2016-08-01

    Oxidation of polyphenols to quinones serves as an antioxidative mechanism, but the resulting quinones may induce damage to proteins as they react through a Michael addition with nucleophilic groups, such as thiols and amines to give protein adducts. In this study, rate constants for the reaction of 4-methylbenzoquinone (4MBQ) with proteins, thiol and amine compounds were determined under pseudo first-order conditions by UV-vis stopped-flow spectrophotometry. The chemical structures of the adducts were identified by LC-ESI-MS/MS. Proteins with free thiols were rapidly modified by 4MBQ with apparent second order rate constants, k2 of (3.1±0.2)×10(4)M(-1)s(-1) for bovine serum albumin (BSA) and (4.8±0.2)×10(3)M(-1)s(-1) for human serum albumin at pH 7.0. These values are at least 12-fold greater than that for α-lactalbumin (4.0±0.2)×10(2)M(-1)s(-1), which does not contain any free thiols. Reaction of Cys-34 of BSA with N-ethylmaleimide reduced the thiol concentration by ~59%, which resulted in a decrease in k2 by a similar percentage, consistent with rapid adduction at Cys-34. Reaction of 4MBQ with amines (Gly, Nα-acetyl-l-Lys, Nε-acetyl-l-Lys and l-Lys) and the guanidine group of Nα-acetyl-l-Arg was at least 5×10(5) slower than with low-molecular-mass thiols (l-Cys, Nα-acetyl-l-Cys, glutathione). The thiol-quinone interactions formed colorless thiol-phenol products via an intermediate adduct, while the amine-quinone interactions generated colored amine-quinone products that require oxygen involvement. These data provide strong evidence for rapid modification of protein thiols by quinone species which may be of considerable significance for biological and food systems. PMID:27212016

  15. Clinical evaluation of mandibular implant overdentures via Locator implant attachment and Locator bar attachment

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Yong-Ho; Bae, Eun-Bin; Kim, Jung-Woo; Lee, So-Hyoun; Jeong, Chang-Mo; Jeon, Young-Chan

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical findings and patient satisfaction on implant overdenture designed with Locator implant attachment or Locator bar attachment in mandibular edentulous patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS Implant survival rate, marginal bone loss, probing depth, peri-implant inflammation, bleeding, plaque, calculus, complications, and satisfaction were evaluated on sixteen patients who were treated with mandibular overdenture and have used it for at least 1 year (Locator implant attachment: n=8, Locator bar attachment: n=8). RESULTS Marginal bone loss, probing depth, plaque index of the Locator bar attachment group were significantly lower than the Locator implant attachment group (P<.05). There was no significant difference on bleeding, peri-implant inflammation, and patient satisfaction between the two denture types (P>.05). The replacement of the attachment components was the most common complication in both groups. Although there was no correlation between marginal bone loss and plaque index, a significant correlation was found between marginal bone loss and probing depth. CONCLUSION The Locator bar attachment group indicates lesser marginal bone loss and need for maintenance, as compared with the Locator implant attachment group. This may be due to the splinting effect among implants rather than the types of Locator attachment. PMID:27555901

  16. 49 CFR 179.100-16 - Attachments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... shear strength of the bracket-to-reinforcing pad weld must not exceed 85 percent of the ultimate shear strength of the reinforcing pad-to-tank weld. (b) Attachments not otherwise specified shall be applied...

  17. 49 CFR 179.100-16 - Attachments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... shear strength of the bracket-to-reinforcing pad weld must not exceed 85 percent of the ultimate shear strength of the reinforcing pad-to-tank weld. (b) Attachments not otherwise specified shall be applied...

  18. 49 CFR 179.100-16 - Attachments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ultimate shear strength of the bracket-to-reinforcing pad weld must not exceed 85 percent of the ultimate shear strength of the reinforcing pad-to-tank weld. (b) Attachments not otherwise specified shall be applied by approved means....

  19. 49 CFR 179.100-16 - Attachments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... shear strength of the bracket-to-reinforcing pad weld must not exceed 85 percent of the ultimate shear strength of the reinforcing pad-to-tank weld. (b) Attachments not otherwise specified shall be applied...

  20. 49 CFR 179.100-16 - Attachments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... shear strength of the bracket-to-reinforcing pad weld must not exceed 85 percent of the ultimate shear strength of the reinforcing pad-to-tank weld. (b) Attachments not otherwise specified shall be applied...