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Sample records for diarrhea experimentally induced

  1. Drug-induced diarrhea

    MedlinePlus

    Diarrhea associated with medicines ... Nearly all medicines may cause diarrhea as a side effect. The drugs listed below, however, are more likely to cause diarrhea. Laxatives are meant to cause diarrhea. ...

  2. Drug-induced diarrhea

    MedlinePlus

    Diarrhea associated with medications ... Nearly all medicines may cause diarrhea as a side effect. The drugs listed below, however, are more likely to cause diarrhea. Laxatives are meant to cause diarrhea. ...

  3. Evaluation of safety and protective effects of Potentilla fulgens root extract in experimentally induced diarrhea in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tangpu, Vareishang; Deori, Khirod; Yadav, Arun Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The roots of Potentilla fulgens Wall. ex Hook. (Rosaceae) have been used in the indigenous system of medicine in Northeast India to treat diarrhea. The aim of this study was to investigate the safety and protective effects of P. fulgens root extract in experimentally induced diarrhea in mice. Materials and Methods: The protective effects of P. fulgens root extract was investigated against experimentally induced diarrhea in mice, using four experimental models, that is the measurement of fecal output, castor oil model, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) enteropooling assay, and gastrointestinal transit test. The safety assessment of root extract was done in mice on the basis of general signs and symptoms of toxicity, food water intake and mortality of animals following their treatment with various doses of extract (100-3200 mg/kg). In addition, the serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase, serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase, cholesterol and total protein of experimental mice were also monitored to assess the toxicity of root extract. Results: In the safety assessment studies, P. fulgens root extract did not showed any visible signs of toxicity, but mortality was observed in a single animal at 3200 mg/kg dose of extract. The extract also did not showed any adverse effects on the studied serum parameters of experimental animals. In the antidiarrheal tests, administration of 800 mg/kg dose of extract to mice showed 50% protection from diarrhea evoked by castor oil. In addition, the extract also showed 29.27% reduction in PGE2-induced intestinal secretion as compared with 30.31% recorded for loperamide, a standard antidiarrheal drug. Conclusions: The results of this study indicate that P. fulgens root extract possesses significant antidiarrheal properties. Therefore, the roots of this plant can be an effective traditional medicine for protection from diarrhea. PMID:26401356

  4. Antibiotic-induced diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Vogel, L C

    1995-01-01

    Diarrhea is a common complication of antibiotic therapy and can range from mild soiling of a cast to severe and life-threatening pseudomembranous colitis. Although clindamycin is the most notorious, almost all antibiotics, particularly penicillins and cephalosporins, may also be responsible (Bartlett, 1992; Kelly, Pothoulakis, & LaMont, 1994). Because of the frequent use of these antibiotics in orthopaedic patients, antibiotic-associated enteric disease is a common problem in this population. About 15% to 25% of cases of antibiotic-associated diarrhea are caused by Clostridium difficile (Bartlett, 1992; George, 1984; Kelly et al., 1994). The majority of patients with antibiotic-associated diarrhea have no identifiable etiologic agent. Salmonella, enterotoxin-producing Clostridium perfringens (Borriello et al., 1984) and Candida albicans (Danna et al., 1991) have rarely been identified as causative agents. This article describes the role of C. difficile as an enteric pathogen and its spectrum of clinical disease, including diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of nosocomial transmission. PMID:7761131

  5. Effect of crofelemer extract on severity and consistency of experimentally induced enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli diarrhea in newborn Holstein calves.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, A G V; Stephens, L; Divers, T J; Stokol, T; Bicalho, R C

    2015-11-01

    CROF calves. Additionally, ECROF fecal dry matter after treatment cessation had a statistical tendency to be higher when compared with control calves. Together, these results suggest that enteric-coated formulation of the standardized crofelemer extract, a natural-product with antisecretory properties, can significantly increase fecal dry matter of neonatal calves with experimentally induced enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli diarrhea. More research is needed to test the efficacy of enteric-coated crofelemer on incidence and severity of secretory diarrhea on calves under natural challenge conditions. PMID:26298758

  6. Bile acids in radiation-induced diarrhea

    SciTech Connect

    Arlow, F.L.; Dekovich, A.A.; Priest, R.J.; Beher, W.T.

    1987-10-01

    Radiation-induced bowel disease manifested by debilitating diarrhea is an unfortunate consequence of therapeutic irradiation for pelvic malignancies. Although the mechanism for this diarrhea is not well understood, many believe it is the result of damage to small bowel mucosa and subsequent bile acid malabsorption. Excess amounts of bile acids, especially the dihydroxy components, are known to induce water and electrolyte secretion and increase bowel motility. We have directly measured individual and total bile acids in the stool samples of 11 patients with radiation-induced diarrhea and have found bile acids elevated two to six times normal in eight of them. Our patients with diarrhea and increased bile acids in their stools had prompt improvement when given cholestyramine. They had fewer stools and returned to a more normal life-style.

  7. Diarrhea

    MedlinePlus

    What is diarrhea? Diarrhea is loose, watery stools (bowel movements). You have diarrhea if you have loose stools three or more times in one day. Acute diarrhea is diarrhea that lasts a short time. It ...

  8. Diarrhea

    MedlinePlus

    ... to be treated differently than you would treat diarrhea in adults. Talk with your health care provider if your ... cause diarrhea , including: Some antibiotics Chemotherapy drugs for cancer Laxatives containing magnesium Diarrhea may also be caused by medical disorders, such ...

  9. Experimental infection with cytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus in mice induces megakaryopoiesis in the spleen and bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Seong, Giyong; Lee, Jin-Sol; Lee, Kyung-Hyun; Choi, Kyoung-Seong

    2016-02-01

    Here, we infected mice with cytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus 1 (cp BVDV1) by oral inoculation and investigated the effects of infection by histopathological, immunohistochemical (IHC), hematological methods. Twelve mice were infected, and samples were obtained at day 2, 5, and 9 postinfection (pi). Most of the infected mice exhibited clinical signs of illness such as reduced movement, crouching, loose feces, loss of appetite, and reduced water intake. Blood samples from six mice were positive for BVDV based on reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Blood analysis also revealed thrombocytopenia and lymphopenia. Viral antigens were detected in the spleen (12/12), bone marrow (12/12), and/or mesenteric lymph nodes (4/12) of all infected mice by IHC analysis. The spleens showed significant histopathological changes including (i) substantially increased numbers of megakaryocytes, (ii) lymphocyte depletion, and (iii) hemorrhages. The bone marrow also had an increased number of megakaryocytes, although this increase was not as strong as it was in the spleen. Severe lymphoid depletion was observed in the mesenteric lymph nodes. Viral infections were present in the lymphocytes but not detected in megakaryocytes of the spleen, bone marrow, or mesenteric lymph nodes. These results suggest that the increased numbers of megakaryocytes may be a direct result of BVDV infection. BVDV infection in mice following oral inoculation of cp BVDV1 leads to megakaryopoiesis in the spleen and bone marrow to replenish the platelets. PMID:26526150

  10. Experimental infection with non-cytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus 1 in mice induces inflammatory cell infiltration in the spleen.

    PubMed

    Han, Yu-Jung; Kwon, Young-Je; Lee, Kyung-Hyun; Choi, Eun-Jin; Choi, Kyoung-Seong

    2016-09-01

    Previously, our study showed that oral inoculation of mice with cytopathic (cp) bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) led to lymphocyte depletion and increased numbers of megakaryocytes in the spleen as well as thrombocytopenia and lymphopenia. In the present study, to investigate the possible differences in the detection of viral antigen, histopathological lesions, and hematologic changes between non-cytopathic (ncp) BVDV1 and cp BVDV1, mice were orally administered low and high doses of ncp BVDV1 and were necropsied at days 0, 2, 5, and 9 postinfection (pi). None of the ncp BVDV1-infected mice exhibited clinical signs of illness, unlike those infected with cp BVDV1. Statistically significant thrombocytopenia was observed during ncp BVDV1 infection, and lymphopenia was found only in mice infected with a high dose at day 9 pi. Interestingly, ncp BVDV1 infection increased the numbers of basophils, eosinophils, neutrophils, and monocytes in some infected mice. Viral antigen was detected in the lymphocytes of the spleen, mesenteric lymph nodes, Peyer's patches, and bone marrow by immunohistochemistry. Lymphoid depletion was evident in the mesenteric lymph nodes of mice infected with a high dose and also found in the Peyer's patches of some infected mice. Infiltration of inflammatory cells, including neutrophils and monocytes, and an increased number of megakaryocytes were seen in the spleen. These results suggest that the distribution of viral antigens is not associated with the presence of histopathological lesions. Inflammatory cell infiltration was observed in the spleens as a result of viral replication and may be attributable to the host reaction to ncp BVDV1 infection. Together, these findings support the possibility that mice can be used as an animal model for BVDV infection. PMID:27376375

  11. Diarrhea

    MedlinePlus

    ... certain medicines, food intolerances and diseases that affect the stomach, small intestine or colon. In many cases, ... child has diarrhea, do not hesitate to call the doctor for advice. Diarrhea can be dangerous in ...

  12. Diarrhea

    MedlinePlus

    ... to replace lost fluids Do not offer plain water to infants — it doesn't contain enough sodium and other minerals. Avoid apple juice and other sweet drinks because they may make diarrhea worse. Seek Medical ...

  13. Diarrhea

    MedlinePlus

    ... such as fruit juices, sports drinks, caffeine-free soft drinks, and broths. Children with diarrhea should be given ... from street vendors Travelers can drink bottled water, soft drinks, and hot drinks such as coffee or tea. ...

  14. Comparison of efficacy of sulbactam: ampicillin to ampicillin and saline for treatment of experimentally induced Escherichia coli diarrhea in neonatal calves.

    PubMed Central

    Lofstedt, J; Miller, L; Duizer, G; Daley, J

    1996-01-01

    A study was conducted to compare the efficacy of sulbactam: ampicillin (SAMP) (3.3:6.6 mg/kg body weight (BW), IM, q24 h) to that of ampicillin trihydrate (AMP) (6 mg/kg BW, IM, q24 h) and 0.9% saline (SAL) (3 mL IM, q24 h) for the treatment of diarrhea in calves induced by oral inoculation with Escherichia coli strain B44 (O9:K30:K99:H-). Treatment was initiated when severe diarrhea was noted (T0) and continued for at least 3 d; or for 24 h after clinical signs resolved; or for a maximum duration of 7 d. Starting at T0, calves were examined twice daily: appetite; rectal temperature (TEMP); and fecal consistency (FECAL), mental status (ATTD), eye position (EYE), and skin elasticity (SKIN) scores were recorded. Feces collected at T0 were submitted for bacteriology, electron microscopy, and parasitology. A complete blood count was performed at T0 and T3 (24 h after third treatment). Severely dehydrated, depressed, and anorexic calves were euthanized and considered mortalities. Cause of death was determined by post mortem examination. A total of 30 calves were included in the study. Three calves were excluded from final analysis. E. coli strain B44 was cultured from feces of all calves at T0. At T2 (24 h after second treatment) mean TEMP of SAMP calves was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than mean TEMP of SAL calves; EYE and SKIN scores of SAMP calves were significantly lower (P < alpha beta = 0.025) than those of SAL and AMP calves; and ATTD and FECAL scores of SAMP calves were significantly lower (P < alpha beta = 0.025) than in SAL calves. At T3, SAMP calves had significantly lower (P < 0.05) mean hematocrit than SAL calves and lower mean total plasma protein concentration than AMP and SAL calves. Mean fibrinogen concentration in SAMP calves at T3 was significantly lower (P < 0.05) than that of calves receiving either SAL or AMP. The number of surviving SAMP calves (10/10) was significantly higher (P < alpha beta = 0.025) than the number of surviving SAL calves (2

  15. Expression of type I interferon-induced antiviral state and pro-apoptosis markers during experimental infection with low or high virulence bovine viral diarrhea virus in beef calves.

    PubMed

    Palomares, Roberto A; Walz, Heather G; Brock, Kenny V

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the mRNA expression of host genes involved in type-I interferon-induced antiviral state (IFN-α, IFN-β, Mx-1, PKR, OAS-1 and ISG-15), and apoptosis (caspase-3, -8, and -9), after experimental infection of beef calves with low or high virulence noncytopathic (ncp) bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) strains. Thirty BVDV-naïve, clinically normal calves were randomly assigned to three groups. Calves were intranasally inoculated with low (LV; n=10, strain SD-1) or high (HV; n=10, strain 1373) virulence ncp BVDV or BVDV-free cell culture medium (Control, n=10). Quantitative RT-PCR was used to determine the target gene expression in tracheo-bronchial lymph nodes and spleen 5 days after infection. Interferon-α and -β mRNA levels were up-regulated in tracheo-bronchial lymph nodes (P<0.05) in the HV group, but not in the LV group, compared with the control group. There was an up-regulation of type I interferon-induced genes in spleen and tracheo-bronchial lymph nodes of HV and LV groups, compared with the control group (P<0.01). mRNA levels of OAS-1 and ISG-15 were significantly higher in LV than HV calves (P<0.05). A significant up-regulation of caspase-8 and -9 was observed in tracheo-bronchial lymph nodes in the LV group (P=0.01), but not in the HV group. In conclusion, experimental infection with either high or low virulence BVDV strains induced a significant expression of the type I interferon-induced genes in beef calves. There was a differential expression of some interferon-induced genes (OAS-1 and ISG-15) and pro-apoptosis markers based on BVDV virulence and genotype. PMID:23458997

  16. Therapeutic Targeting of CPT-11 Induced Diarrhea: A Case for Prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Swami, Umang; Goel, Sanjay; Mani, Sridhar

    2014-01-01

    CPT-11 (irinotecan), a DNA topoisomerase I inhibitor is one of the main treatments for colorectal cancer. The main dose limiting toxicities are neutropenia and late onset diarrhea. Though neutropenia is manageable, CPT-11 induced diarrhea is frequently severe, resulting in hospitalizations, dose reductions or omissions leading to ineffective treatment administration. Many potential agents have been tested in preclinical and clinical studies to prevent or ameliorate CPT-11 induced late onset diarrhea. It is predicted that prophylaxis of CPT-11 induced diarrhea will reduce sub-therapeutic dosing as well as hospitalizations and will eventually lead to dose escalations resulting in better response rates. This article reviews various experimental agents and strategies employed to prevent this debilitating toxicity. Covered topics include schedule/dose modification, intestinal alkalization, structural/chemical modification, genetic testing, anti-diarrheal therapies, transporter (ABCB1, ABCC2, BCRP2) inhibitors, enzyme (β-glucuronidase, UGT1A1, CYP3A4, carboxylesterase, COX-2) inducers and inhibitors, probiotics, antibiotics, adsorbing agents, cytokine and growth factor activators and inhibitors and other miscellaneous agents. PMID:23597015

  17. Diarrhea in lambs experimentally infected with Cryptosporidium isolated from calves.

    PubMed

    Tzipori, S; Angus, K W; Gray, E W; Campbell, I; Allan, F

    1981-08-01

    Two to 5 days after oral inoculation with Cryptosporidium obtained from infected calves, 7 newborn specific-pathogen-free lambs became depressed and anorectic and developed diarrhea. Four moribund lambs were killed within 3 days after onset of illness, and the 3 other lambs died after protracted intermittent diarrhea and reduced milk intake, which lasted up to 14 days. The small and large intestines were heavily infected with Cryptosporidium, with the terminal portion of the ileum being the most severely affected. Histologic examination revealed villous atrophy, with considerable fusion and epithelial cross-bridging between villi. Lambs infected at 5 to 20 days of age had less severe clinical signs of disease, with intermittent diarrhea, reduced milk intake, and growth retardation. Lambs infected at 30 days of age became infected with the organism, but did not develop clinical signs of disease or growth retardation. PMID:7294476

  18. A reliable, practical, and economical protocol for inducing diarrhea and severe dehydration in the neonatal calf.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, P G; Constable, P D; Morin, D E; Drackley, J K; Foreman, J H; Thurmon, J C

    1998-01-01

    Fifteen healthy, colostrum-fed, male dairy calves, aged 2 to 7 d were used in a study to develop a diarrhea protocol for neonatal calves that is reliable, practical, and economical. After instrumentation and recording baseline data, diarrhea and dehydration were induced by administering milk replacer [16.5 mL/kg of body weight (BW), PO], sucrose (2 g/kg in a 20% aqueous solution, p.o.), spironolactone and hydrochlorothiazide (1 mg/kg, PO) every 8 h, and furosemide (2 mg/kg, i.m., q6h). Calves were administered sucrose and diuretic agents for 48 h to induce diarrhea and severe dehydration. Clinical changes after 48 h were severe watery diarrhea, severe depression, and marked dehydration (mean, 14% BW loss). Cardiac output, stroke volume, mean central venous pressure, plasma volume, thiocyanate space, blood pH and bicarbonate concentration, base excess, serum chloride concentration, and fetlock temperature were decreased. Plasma lactate concentration, hematocrit, and serum potassium, creatinine, phosphorus, total protein and albumin concentrations were increased. This non-infectious calf diarrhea protocol has a 100% response rate, while providing a consistent and predictable hypovolemic state with diarrhea that reflects most of the clinicopathologic changes observed in osmotic/maldigestive diarrhea caused by infection with rotavirus, coronavirus or cryptosporidia. Limitations of the protocol, when compared to infectious diarrhea models, include failure to induce a severe metabolic acidosis, absence of hyponatremia, renal instead of enteric loss of chloride, renal as well as enteric loss of free water, absence of profound clinical depression and suspected differences in the morphologic and functional effect on intestinal epithelium. Despite these differences, the sucrose/diuretic protocol should be useful in the initial screening of new treatment modalities for calf diarrhea. To confirm their efficacy, the most effective treatment methods should then be examined in

  19. Intrajejunal infusion of 2-monoacylglycerol reduced food intake without inducing diarrhea in rats.

    PubMed

    Okuma, Chihiro; Ohta, Takeshi; Ito, Makoto; Tadaki, Hironobu; Oda, Tomohiro; Kume, Shinichi; Nishiu, Jun; Kakutani, Makoto

    2016-02-01

    Some nutrients, such as carbohydrate, fat and protein, are known to stimulate satiety. However, the effect of sn-2-monoacylglycerol (2-MG), one of the digestive products of triglycerides, on food intake is still unclear. In the present study, the effects of 2-MG on food intake and diarrhea were evaluated and compared with long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) in rats by intrajejunal infusion. Intrajejunal infusion of 2-MG reduced food intake. In addition, 2-MG did not induce diarrhea at the condition that it comparably reduced food intake as compared with LCFA. These results suggest that 2-MG stimulates satiety without inducing diarrhea, different from LCFA. PMID:26883454

  20. Experimental infection of mice with bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    PubMed

    Seong, Giyong; Oem, Jae-Ku; Lee, Kyung-Hyun; Choi, Kyoung-Seong

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to test the ability of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) to infect mice. Two mice each were either mock infected or inoculated with one of three BVDV strains by the intraperitoneal (IP) (n = 8) or intranasal (IN) (n = 8) route. All mice were euthanized at day 7 postinfection (p.i.). None of the infected mice exhibited any clinical signs of illness; however, the tissues harvested after BVDV challenge showed significant histopathological changes. Blood samples from five mice that were injected IP and one mouse that was inoculated IN were positive for BVDV by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used to assess the presence of viral antigen in the organs of mice infected with three BVDV strains. In IP-injected mice, BVDV antigen was detected in the spleen (5/6), mesenteric lymph nodes (4/6), lymphatic tissue of the lung (3/6), lung (1/6), and stomach (1/6) of the infected mice; however, it was not detected in the liver (0/6) or kidney (0/6). In IN-inoculated mice, BVDV antigen was detected in the lung and mesenteric lymph nodes of one BVDV-infected mouse but was not detected in other tissues. The results of this study suggest that the spleen is the most reliable tissue for BVDV antigen detection using IHC in the IP-injected group. Our study demonstrates that mice can be infected by BVDV. This is the first report of BVDV infection in mice. PMID:25850760

  1. Evaluation of experimental vaccines for bovine viral diarrhea in bovines, ovines and guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Fernández, F; Costantini, V; Barrandeguy, M; Parreño, V; Schiappacassi, G; Maliandi, F; Leunda, M; Odeón, A

    2009-01-01

    The bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infection control should be based on elimination of persistently infected animals and on immunization through vaccination, to prevent fetal infection. However, the efficacy of inactivated BVDV vaccines is variable due to its low immunogenicity. This study evaluated the humoral immune response against homologous and heterologous strains of 7 inactivated BVDV vaccines, in bovines and two experimental models (ovine and guinea pig) which might be used to test candidate vaccines. Vaccines formulated with BVDV Singer, Oregon, NADL, and multivalent, induced seroconversion in the three animal models studied, reaching antibody titres higher than 2. Vaccine containing 125C -genotype 2- only induced a low antibody response in ovine, while VS-115 NCP vaccine was not immunogenic. Furthermore, bovine sera at 60 dpv presented homologous as well as heterologous antibody response, indicating a high degree of cross-reactivity among the strains studied. However, when bovine sera were tested against the Argentine field strain 00-693, they showed the lowest levels of cross-reactivity, suggesting the need of continued surveillance to identify and characterize emerging field BVDV strains. Finally, optimal correlations between bovine-ovine and bovine-guinea pig models were observed, indicating that two alternative species could replace bovines when testing the immunogenicity of BVDV candidate vaccines. PMID:19623897

  2. Pathogenicity of an Indian isolate of bovine viral diarrhea virus 1b in experimentally infected calves.

    PubMed

    Galav, V; Mishra, N; Dubey, R; Rajukumar, K; Pitale, S S; Shrivastav, A B; Pradhan, H K

    2007-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the pathogenicity of an Indian bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) 1b isolate in 7-9-months-old male calves. Infected (four) and control (two) calves were bled at three days interval for hematological, virological and serological studies until day 27. All infected calves developed respiratory illness, biphasic pyrexia, mild diarrhea, leucopenia and mild thrombocytopenia. Viraemia was demonstrated between 3 and 15dpi and the infected calves seroconverted by 15dpi. Prominent kidney lesions were endothelial cell swelling, proliferation of mesangial cells and podocytes leading to glomerular space obliteration. Degeneration and desquamation of cells lining seminiferous tubules were observed in two infected calves. Consolidation of lungs with interstitial pneumonia, mild gastroenteritis and systemic spread were also evident. It was concluded that Indian BVDV isolate induced moderate clinical disease in calves and glomerulonephritis resulting from acute BVDV infection was observed for the first time. PMID:17383693

  3. Virulent Properties of Russian Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Strains in Experimentally Infected Calves.

    PubMed

    Glotov, Alexander G; Glotova, Tatyana I; Koteneva, Svetlana V; Semenova, Olga V; Sergeev, Alexander A; Titova, Ksenya A; Morozova, Anastasia A; Sergeev, Artemiy A

    2016-01-01

    The results of experimental study of three noncytopathic and two cytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) strains isolated from cattle in the Siberian region and belonging to the type 1 (subtypes 1a, 1b, and 1d) have been presented. All investigated strains caused the development of infectious process in the seronegative 4-6-month-old calves after aerosol challenge with the dose of 6 log10 TCID50. The greatest virulence had noncytopathic strain and cytopathic strain related to the subtypes 1d and 1b, respectively. All strains in infected calves caused some signs of moderate acute respiratory disease and diarrhea: depression 3-5 days postinfection (p.i.), refusal to food, severe hyperthermia to 41.9°С, serous exudate discharges from the nasal cavity and eyes, transient diarrhea with blood, leukopenia (up to 2700 cells/mm(3)), and macroscopic changes in the respiratory organs and intestine. The infected animals recovered from 12 to 15 days p.i. and in 90% cases formed humoral immune response 25 days p.i. (antibody titers to BVDV: 1 : 4-1 : 16). Our results confirmed the presence of virulent BVDV1 strains and showed the need for researches on the molecular epidemiology of the disease, development of more effective diagnostic systems, and optimization of control programs with use of vaccines. PMID:27190687

  4. Virulent Properties of Russian Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Strains in Experimentally Infected Calves

    PubMed Central

    Koteneva, Svetlana V.; Semenova, Olga V.; Sergeev, Alexander A.; Titova, Ksenya A.; Morozova, Anastasia A.

    2016-01-01

    The results of experimental study of three noncytopathic and two cytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) strains isolated from cattle in the Siberian region and belonging to the type 1 (subtypes 1a, 1b, and 1d) have been presented. All investigated strains caused the development of infectious process in the seronegative 4–6-month-old calves after aerosol challenge with the dose of 6 log10 TCID50. The greatest virulence had noncytopathic strain and cytopathic strain related to the subtypes 1d and 1b, respectively. All strains in infected calves caused some signs of moderate acute respiratory disease and diarrhea: depression 3–5 days postinfection (p.i.), refusal to food, severe hyperthermia to 41.9°С, serous exudate discharges from the nasal cavity and eyes, transient diarrhea with blood, leukopenia (up to 2700 cells/mm3), and macroscopic changes in the respiratory organs and intestine. The infected animals recovered from 12 to 15 days p.i. and in 90% cases formed humoral immune response 25 days p.i. (antibody titers to BVDV: 1 : 4–1 : 16). Our results confirmed the presence of virulent BVDV1 strains and showed the need for researches on the molecular epidemiology of the disease, development of more effective diagnostic systems, and optimization of control programs with use of vaccines. PMID:27190687

  5. Prostaglandin E2-induced diarrhea in mice: importance of colonic secretion.

    PubMed

    Rivière, P J; Farmer, S C; Burks, T F; Porreca, F

    1991-02-01

    The present study has investigated the basis for induction of diarrhea by prostaglandin (PG)E2 in mice. When given i.p., PGE2 induced a dose- and time-dependent diarrhea; the shortest post-treatment time for diarrhea onset was approximately 7 min, at a PGE2 dose of 200 micrograms/kg. At this dose, PGE2 also produced accumulation of fluid in the small intestine and in the colon (enteropooling). The enteropooling reached its maximum by 9 min and did not decrease until approximately 11 min (i.e., 2 to 4 min after the mean time for diarrhea onset). PGE2 treatment altered neither gastric emptying nor gastrointestinal propulsion, but strongly enhanced the expulsion of a glass bead from the colon (i.e., decreased the time to bead expulsion). The shortest time to expulsion of the glass bead was observed at 200 micrograms/kg i.p. The induction of diarrhea by PGE2 was unaffected by cecectomy, or sham-cecectomy, but the dose-response curve for time to onset of diarrhea by i.p. PGE2 was displaced to the right in animals with ligations of the ileo-ceco-colonic (ICC) junctions. The intraluminal fluid accumulation in the colon, evaluated in mice with ICC ligations, was increased by PGE2 administration within 2 min and remained greater than in vehicle-treated animals until the onset of diarrhea. The stimulation of colonic bead expulsion produced by i.p. PGE2 in control mice was not observed in animals with acute ICC ligations, even at i.p. doses up to 800 micrograms/kg.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1993994

  6. Chemotherapy-induced diarrhea: pathophysiology, frequency and guideline-based management

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Alexander; Voigt, Wieland; Jordan, Karin

    2010-01-01

    Diarrhea is one of the main drawbacks for cancer patients. Possible etiologies could be radiotherapy, chemotherapeutic agents, decreased physical performance, graft versus host disease and infections. Chemotherapy-induced diarrhea (CID) is a common problem, especially in patients with advanced cancer. The incidence of CID has been reported to be as high as 50–80% of treated patients (≥30% CTC grade 3–5), especially with 5-fluorouracil bolus or some combination therapies of irinotecan and fluoropyrimidines (IFL, XELIRI). Regardless of the molecular targeted approach of tyrosine kinase inhibitors and antibodies, diarrhea is a common side effect in up to 60% of patients with up to 10% having severe diarrhea. Furthermore, the underlying pathophysiology is still under investigation. Despite the number of clinical trials evaluating therapeutic or prophylactic measures in CID, there are just three drugs recommended in current guidelines: loperamide, deodorized tincture of opium and octreotide. Newer strategies and more effective agents are being developed to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with CID. Recent research focusing on the prophylactic use of antibiotics, budesonide, probiotics or activated charcoal still have to define the role of these drugs in the routine clinical setting. Whereas therapeutic management and clinical work-up of patients presenting with diarrhea after chemotherapy are rather well defined, prediction and prevention of CID is an evolving field. Current research focuses on establishing predictive factors for CID like uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase-1A1 polymorphisms for irinotecan or dihydropyrimidine-dehydrogenase insufficiency for fluoropyrimidines. PMID:21789126

  7. Evaluation of bacteriophages for prevention and treatment of diarrhea due to experimental enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli O149 infection of pigs.

    PubMed

    Jamalludeen, Nidham; Johnson, Roger P; Shewen, Patricia E; Gyles, Carlton L

    2009-04-14

    The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of selected phages individually and in combination in prevention and treatment of diarrhea due to experimental O149:H10:F4 enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) in weaned pigs. For prophylaxis, the phages were administered orally shortly after challenge, and for therapeutic use, were given 24h after challenge, following the onset of diarrhea. The parameters used to assess outcomes were weight change, duration of diarrhea, severity of diarrhea, composite diarrhea score, and extent of shedding of the challenge ETEC over 6 days. Six phages that were tested individually in a prophylactic mode were effective as determined by a significant change in each of the parameters, although the phages were not present at titres greater than 10(3)PFU/g of feces. A modified protocol involving pre-treatment of the pigs with florfenicol and oral administration of sodium bicarbonate prior to the ETEC challenge and phage administration resulted in high levels of phages in the feces. Using this protocol, a combination of three phages that was tested in the prophylactic mode significantly reduced the severity of diarrhea and the composite diarrhea score. A mixture of two phages given therapeutically significantly improved each of the outcome parameters, without perturbation of the total fecal E. coli flora. Enumeration of phages in feces after treatment indicated that the phages were replicating to high titres in the intestinal tract of ETEC infected pigs within 1-2 days before declining progressively. These findings indicate that the selected phages were effective in moderating the course of experimental O149:H10:F4 ETEC diarrhea in weaned pigs when given prophylactically or therapeutically. PMID:19058927

  8. Calcium polycarbophil, a water absorbing polymer, increases bowel movement and prevents sennoside-induced diarrhea in dogs.

    PubMed

    Saito, T; Yamada, T; Iwanaga, Y; Morikawa, K; Nagata, O; Kato, H; Mizumoto, A; Itoh, Z

    2000-07-01

    The effects of calcium polycarbophil (CP), a water-absorbing polymer, on bowel movement were examined in comparison with known laxatives and anti-diarrheal agents in dogs, a species that resembles humans for stool output. CP increased stool frequency, fecal water content and fecal weight in a dose-dependent manner, but did not induce diarrhea. Sennoside and carboxymethylcellulose sodium (CMC-Na) increased fecal water content and induced diarrhea at lower doses than that which enhanced stool frequency. Trimebutine decreased stool frequency, fecal weight and fecal water content, resulting in inhibition rather than stimulation of defecation. In sennoside-induced diarrhea, loperamide and CP improved stool consistency and this was accompanied by reduced fecal moisture and frequency of diarrhea. In contrast, CMC-Na aggravated stool consistency with increased fecal water content and frequency of diarrhea, and trimebutine had little noticeable effect apart from reducing fecal weight. Our results show that CP has both laxative and anti-diarrheal effects in dogs and differed from conventional laxatives and anti-diarrheal agents. CP may be a suitable agent for treatment of idiopathic constipation, secretory diarrhea and irritable bowel syndrome with alternating constipation and diarrhea and with either predominating in terms of less side effects such as diarrhea or constipation. PMID:10952069

  9. Correlation between Diarrhea Severity and Oocyst Count via Quantitative PCR or Fluorescence Microscopy in Experimental Cryptosporidiosis in Calves

    PubMed Central

    Operario, Darwin J.; Bristol, Lauren S.; Liotta, Janice; Nydam, Daryl V.; Houpt, Eric R.

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium is an important diarrhea-associated pathogen, however the correlation between parasite burden and diarrhea severity remains unclear. We studied this relationship in 10 experimentally infected calves using immunofluorescence microscopy and real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) (N = 124 fecal samples). The qPCR data were corrected for extraction/amplification efficiency and gene copy number to generate parasite counts. The qPCR and microscopic oocyst quantities exhibited significant correlation (R2 = 0.33, P < 0.05), however qPCR had increased sensitivity. Upon comparison with diarrhea severity scores (from 0 to 3), a PCR-based count of ≥ 2.6 × 105 parasites or an immunofluorescence microscopy count of ≥ 4.5 × 104 oocysts were discriminatory predictors of moderate-to-severe diarrhea (versus no-to-mild diarrhea), with accuracies and predictive values of 72–82%. In summary, a quantitative approach for Cryptosporidium can refine predictive power for diarrhea and appears useful for distinguishing clinical cryptosporidiosis versus subclinical infection. PMID:25371182

  10. 5-Fluorouracil Induces Diarrhea with Changes in the Expression of Inflammatory Cytokines and Aquaporins in Mouse Intestines

    PubMed Central

    Sagara, Atsunobu; Matsumoto, Kenjiro; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Sato, Ken; Nishizaki, Maiko; Shoji, Tetsuro; Horie, Syunji; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2013-01-01

    Although the mechanisms of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced diarrhea remain unclear, accumulating evidence has indicated that changes in the mucosal immune system and aquaporins (AQPs) may play a role in its pathogenesis. Therefore, we investigated the possible changes in the gene expression of inflammatory cytokines and AQPs in the intestines of mice with 5-FU-induced diarrhea. In the present study, the expressions of mRNAs that encode inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, Il-17A and IL-22, were significantly increased throughout the entire colon of mice that exhibited diarrhea following 5-FU administration. In contrast, the gene expression of IFNγ was upregulated only in the distal colon. These increases were significantly reduced by the administration of etanercept. However, 5-FU-induced diarrhea was not recovered by etanercept. On the other hand, the genes for AQPs 4 and 8 were markedly present in the colon, and these expressions in the intestines were significantly decreased by treatment with 5-FU. These decreases were not reversed by etanercept. These findings suggest TNF-α neutralization had no effect on the acutely 5-FU-induced diarrhea and impaired AQPs but reduced dramatically several inflammatory cytokines. PMID:23382968

  11. Development of a human rotavirus induced diarrhea model in Chinese mini-pigs

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jin-Tao; Wei, Jing; Guo, Hong-Xia; Han, Jiang-Bo; Ye, Nan; He, Hai-Yang; Yu, Tian-Tian; Wu, Yu-Zhang

    2016-01-01

    AIM To establish a new animal model for the research of human rotavirus (HRV) infection, its pathogenesis and immunity and evaluation of potential vaccines. METHODS 5-d, 30-d and 60-d-old Chinese mini-pigs, Guizhou and Bamma, were inoculated with a single oral dose of attenuated strain Wa, G1, G3 of HRV, and PBS (control), respectively, and fecal samples of pigs from 0 to 7 d post infection (DPI) were collected individually. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect HRV antigen in feces. The HRV was tested by real-time PCR (RT-PCR). The sections of the intestinal tissue were stained with hematoxylin and eosin to observe the morphologic variation by microscopy. Immunofluorescence was used to determine the HRV in intestinal tissue. HRV particles in cells of the ileum were observed by electron micrography. RESULTS When inoculated with HRV, mini-pigs younger than 30 d developed diarrhea in an age-dependent manner and shed HRV antigen of the same inoculum, as demonstrated by RT-PCR. Histopathological changes were observed in HRV inoculated mini-pigs including small intestinal cell tumefaction and necrosis. HRV that was distributed in the small intestine was restricted to the top part of the villi on the internal wall of the ileum, which was observed by immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. Virus particles were observed in Golgi like follicles in HRV-infected neonatal mini-pigs. Guizhou mini-pigs were more sensitive to HRV than Bamma with respect to RV antigen shedding and clinical diarrhea. CONCLUSION These results indicate that we have established a mini-pig model of HRV induced diarrhea. Our findings are useful for the understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of HRV infection. PMID:27610023

  12. Reproduction of Mucohaemorrhagic Diarrhea and Colitis Indistinguishable from Swine Dysentery following Experimental Inoculation with “Brachyspira hampsonii” Strain 30446

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Joseph E.; Costa, Matheus O.; Hill, Janet E.; Kittrell, Heather E.; Fernando, Champika; Huang, Yanyun; O’Connor, Brendan; Harding, John C. S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Mucohaemorrhagic diarrhea caused by Brachyspira hyodysenteriae, swine dysentery, is a severe production limiting disease of swine. Recently, pigs in western Canada with clinical signs indistinguishable from swine dysentery were observed. Despite the presence of spirochetes on fecal smears, recognized Brachyspira spp. including B. hyodysenteriae could not be identified. A phylogenetically distinct Brachyspira, called “B. hampsonii” strain 30446, however was isolated. The purpose of this study was to experimentally reproduce mucohaemorrhagic colitis and characterize strain 30446 shedding following inoculation. Methods and Findings Eighteen 13-week-old pigs were randomly assigned to inoculation (n = 12) or control (n = 6) groups in each of two trials. In trial 1, pigs were inoculated with a tissue homogenate collected from clinically affected field cases. In trial 2, pigs were inoculated with a pure broth culture of strain 30446. In both trials, mucohaemorrhagic diarrhea was significantly more common in inoculated pigs than controls, all of which remained healthy. In animals with mucohaemorrhagic diarrhea, significantly more spirochetes were observed on Gram stained fecal smears, and higher numbers of strain 30446 genome equivalents were detected by quantitative PCR (qPCR). Strain 30446 was cultured from colon and/or feces of all affected but no control animals at necropsy. Conclusions “Brachyspira hampsonii” strain 30446 causes mucohaemorrhagic diarrhea in pigs following a 4–9 day incubation period. Fecal shedding was detectable by day 4 post inoculation, and rarely preceded the onset of mucoid or haemorrhagic diarrhea by more than 2 days. Culture and 30446-specific qPCR are reliable methods of detection of this organism in feces and tissues of diarrheic pigs. The emergence of a novel Brachyspira spp., such as “B. hampsonii”, creates diagnostic challenges including higher risk of false negative diagnostic tests. We therefore recommend

  13. Bovine viral diarrhea virus cyclically impairs long bone trabecular modeling in experimental persistently infected fetuses.

    PubMed

    Webb, B T; Norrdin, R W; Smirnova, N P; Van Campen, H; Weiner, C M; Antoniazzi, A Q; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, H; Hansen, T R

    2012-11-01

    Persistent infection (PI) with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) has been associated with osteopetrosis and other long bone lesions, most commonly characterized as transverse zones of unmodeled metaphyseal trabeculae in fetuses and calves. This study was undertaken to characterize the morphogenesis of fetal long bone lesions. Forty-six BVDV-naïve pregnant Hereford heifers of approximately 18 months of age were inoculated with noncytopathic BVDV type 2 containing media or media alone on day 75 of gestation to produce PI and control fetuses, respectively, which were collected via cesarean section on days 82, 89, 97, 192, and 245 of gestation. Radiographic and histomorphometric abnormalities were first detected on day 192, at which age PI fetal long bone metaphyses contained focal densities (4 of 7 fetuses) and multiple alternating transverse radiodense bands (3 of 7 fetuses). Day 245 fetuses were similarly affected. Histomorphometric analysis of proximal tibial metaphyses from day 192 fetuses revealed transverse zones with increased calcified cartilage core (Cg.V/BV, %) and trabecular bone (BV/TV, %) volumes in regions corresponding to radiodense bands (P < .05). Numbers of tartrate resistant acid phosphatase positive osteoclasts (N.Oc/BS, #/mm(2)) and bone perimeter occupied (Oc.S/BS, %) were both decreased (P < .05). Mineralizing surface (MS/BS, %), a measure of tissue level bone formation activity, was reduced in PI fetuses (P < .05). It is concluded that PI with BVDV induces cyclic abnormal trabecular modeling, which is secondary to reduced numbers of osteoclasts. The factors responsible for these temporal changes are unknown but may be related to the time required for osteoclast differentiation from precursor cells. PMID:22362966

  14. Experimental infection of pregnant goats with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) 1 or 2.

    PubMed

    Passler, Thomas; Riddell, Kay P; Edmondson, Misty A; Chamorro, Manuel F; Neill, John D; Brodersen, Bruce W; Walz, Heather L; Galik, Patricia K; Zhang, Yijing; Walz, Paul H

    2014-01-01

    Infections with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) of the genus pestivirus, family Flaviviridae, are not limited to cattle but occur in various artiodactyls. Persistently infected (PI) cattle are the main source of BVDV. Persistent infections also occur in heterologous hosts such as sheep and deer. BVDV infections of goats commonly result in reproductive disease, but viable PI goats are rare. Using 2 BVDV isolates, previously demonstrated to cause PI cattle and white-tailed deer, this study evaluated the outcome of experimental infection of pregnant goats. Pregnant goats (5 goats/group) were intranasally inoculated with BVDV 1b AU526 (group 1) or BVDV 2 PA131 (group 2) at approximately 25-35 days of gestation. The outcome of infection varied considerably between groups. In group 1, only 3 does became viremic, and 1 doe gave birth to a stillborn fetus and a viable PI kid, which appeared healthy and shed BVDV continuously. In group 2, all does became viremic, 4/5 does aborted, and 1 doe gave birth to a non-viable PI kid. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated BVDV antigen in tissues of evaluated fetuses, with similar distribution but reduced intensity as compared to cattle. The genetic sequence of inoculated viruses was compared to those from PI kids and their dam. Most nucleotide changes in group 1 were present during the dam's acute infection. In group 2, a similar number of mutations resulted from fetal infection as from maternal acute infection. Results demonstrated that BVDV may cause reproductive disease but may also be maintained in goats. PMID:24708266

  15. Experimental infection of pregnant goats with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) 1 or 2

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Infections with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) of the genus pestivirus, family Flaviviridae, are not limited to cattle but occur in various artiodactyls. Persistently infected (PI) cattle are the main source of BVDV. Persistent infections also occur in heterologous hosts such as sheep and deer. BVDV infections of goats commonly result in reproductive disease, but viable PI goats are rare. Using 2 BVDV isolates, previously demonstrated to cause PI cattle and white-tailed deer, this study evaluated the outcome of experimental infection of pregnant goats. Pregnant goats (5 goats/group) were intranasally inoculated with BVDV 1b AU526 (group 1) or BVDV 2 PA131 (group 2) at approximately 25–35 days of gestation. The outcome of infection varied considerably between groups. In group 1, only 3 does became viremic, and 1 doe gave birth to a stillborn fetus and a viable PI kid, which appeared healthy and shed BVDV continuously. In group 2, all does became viremic, 4/5 does aborted, and 1 doe gave birth to a non-viable PI kid. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated BVDV antigen in tissues of evaluated fetuses, with similar distribution but reduced intensity as compared to cattle. The genetic sequence of inoculated viruses was compared to those from PI kids and their dam. Most nucleotide changes in group 1 were present during the dam’s acute infection. In group 2, a similar number of mutations resulted from fetal infection as from maternal acute infection. Results demonstrated that BVDV may cause reproductive disease but may also be maintained in goats. PMID:24708266

  16. Experimental infection of pregnant goats with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV)1 or 2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infections with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) of the genus pestivirus, family Flaviviridae, are not limited to cattle but occur in various artiodactyls. Persistently infected (PI) cattle are the main source of BVDV. Persistent infections also occur in heterologous hosts such as sheep and deer. ...

  17. Human milk oligosaccharides shorten rotavirus-induced diarrhea and modulate piglet mucosal immunity and colonic microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Li, Min; Monaco, Marcia H; Wang, Mei; Comstock, Sarah S; Kuhlenschmidt, Theresa B; Fahey Jr, George C; Miller, Michael J; Kuhlenschmidt, Mark S; Donovan, Sharon M

    2014-01-01

    The impact of human milk oligosaccharides (HMO) on mucosal immunity, gut microbiota and response to rotavirus (RV) infection was investigated in the piglet model. Newborn piglets were fed with formula alone (FF) or formula supplemented with 4 g l−1 HMO (HMO) or a prebiotic mixture of 9:1 short-chain galactooligosaccharides (3.6 g l−1) and long-chain fructooligosaccharides (0.4 g l−1) (PRE) (n=19–21 per group) for 15 days. Piglets (n=7–8) in each dietary group were orally infected with porcine rotavirus (RV) OSU strain on d10, and stool consistency was assessed daily. Blood, small intestine and colonic contents were collected at day 15. Serum RV-specific antibody concentrations, intestinal histomorphology, RV non-structural protein-4 (NSP4) and cytokine mRNA expression were assessed. Colonic content pH, dry matter (DM) and short-chain fatty acid concentrations were measured. Ascending colonic microbiota was analyzed by 16S rRNA gene v1-3 region pyrosequencing. HMO- and PRE-fed groups had shorter duration of diarrhea than FF piglets. Infection changed intestinal histomorphology, increased serum RV-specific antibody response and intestinal RV NSP4 expression, and modulated ileal cytokine expression. HMO enhanced T helper type 1 (interferon-gamma) and anti-inflammatory (interleukin-10) cytokines in the ileum, while prebiotics promoted RV-specific immunoglobulin M response to the infection. RV infection and HMO supplementation altered intraluminal environment and gut microbiota. HMO increased pH and lowered DM of colonic contents and enhanced the abundance of unclassified Lachnospiraceae, which contains numerous butyrate-producing bacteria. In conclusion, HMO and prebiotics did not prevent the onset of RV infection but reduced the duration of RV-induced diarrhea in piglets, in part, by modulating colonic microbiota and immune response to RV infection. PMID:24522264

  18. Egg yolk IgY: protection against rotavirus induced diarrhea and modulatory effect on the systemic and mucosal antibody responses in newborn calves.

    PubMed

    Vega, C; Bok, M; Chacana, P; Saif, L; Fernandez, F; Parreño, V

    2011-08-15

    Bovine rotavirus (BRV) is an important cause of diarrhea in newborn calves. Local passive immunity is the most efficient protective strategy to control the disease. IgY technology (the use of chicken egg yolk immunoglobulins) is an economic and practical alternative to prevent BRV diarrhea in dairy calves. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protection and immunomodulation induced by the oral administration of egg yolk enriched in BRV specific IgY to experimentally BRV infected calves. All calves in groups Gp 1, 2 and 3 received control colostrum (CC; BRV virus neutralization Ab titer - VN=65,536; ELISA BRV IgG(1)=16,384) prior to gut closure. After gut closure, calves received milk supplemented with 6% BRV-immune egg yolk [(Gp 1) VN=2048; ELISA IgY Ab titer=4096] or non-immune control egg yolk [(Gp 2) VN<4; ELISA IgY Ab titer<4] twice a day, for 14 days. Calves receiving CC only or colostrum deprived calves (CD) fed antibody (Ab) free milk served as controls (Gp 3 and 4, respectively). Calves were inoculated with 10(5.85)focus forming units (FFU) of virulent BRV IND at 2 days of age. Control calves (Gp 3 and 4) and calves fed control IgY (Gp 2) were infected and developed severe diarrhea. Around 80% calves in Gp 1 (IgY 4096) were infected, but they showed 80% (4/5) protection against BRV diarrhea. Bovine RV-specific IgY Ab were detected in the feces of calves in Gp 1, indicating that avian antibodies (Abs) remained intact after passage through the gastrointestinal tract. At post infection day 21, the duodenum was the major site of BRV specific antibody secreting cells (ASC) in all experimental groups. Mucosal ASC responses of all isotypes were significantly higher in the IgY treated groups, independently of the specificity of the treatment, indicating that egg yolk components modulated the immune response against BRV infection at the mucosal level. These results indicate that supplementing newborn calves' diets for the first 14 days of life with egg yolk

  19. Diarrhea (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... traveler's diarrhea. They occur from eating food or drinking water contaminated with organisms like bacteria and parasites. Medications can also cause diarrhea, especially antibiotics, laxatives containing magnesium, and chemotherapy for cancer treatment.

  20. Effect of Lianshu preparation on lipopolysaccharide-induced diarrhea in rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Wan, Rong; Xu, Xuan-Fu; Wang, Xing-Peng; Yang, Wen-Juan; Xia, Yu-Jing; Liu, Hua; Yan, Qian-Lin; Yan, De-Xin; Guo, Chuan-Yong

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of Lianshu preparation on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced diarrhea in rats. METHODS: A diarrhea model was established in Sprague Dawley rats via injection of 1 mL of 30 mg/kg LPS. A total of 40 rats were randomly divided into normal group, LPS group, LPS + Lianshu group, LPS + berberine group (n = 10 in each group). Their intestinal mucosal barrier and frequency of diarrhea were observed. Levels of glucose, serum Na+, K+, Cl- and hematocrit, plasma nitrogen monoxide (NO), diamine oxidase (DAO), and D (-)-lactate were measured. The number of IgA+ plasma cells in small intestine was detected and SIgA levels in the intestinal fluid were measured. The antipyretic activity of Lianshu preparation in rats was evaluated using Brewer’s yeast-induced pyrexia (10 mL/kg of 20% aqueous suspension). Acetaminophen (250 mg/kg, intragastric administration, bid) was used as a standard drug for comparison. Temperature was recorded 1 h before and 6 h after Brewer’s yeast injection. Finally, small intestinal transmission in mice treated with Lianshu was detected after intraperitoneal injection of methyl prostigmin (2 mg/kg). Atropine (10 g/kg) was used as a control. The ink content in intestine was determined and the total length of intestine was measured. RESULTS: The frequency of diarrhea was higher in LPS group than in LPS + Lianshu group and LPS + berberine group (36.70 ± 5.23 vs 28.50 ± 4.06 and 32.70 ± 9.30 respectively, P < 0.01), and lower in LPS + Lianshu group than in LPS + berberine group (P = 0.03). The levels of Na+, glucose, Cl-, K+ were significantly lower in LPS + Lianshu group than in LPS + berberine group (140.35 ± 3.19 mmol/L vs 131.99 ± 4.86 mmol/L, 8.49 ± 1.84 mmol/L vs 6.54 ± 2.30 mmol/L, 106.29 ± 4.41 mmol/L vs 102.5 ± 1.39 mmol/L, 5.08 ± 0.66 mmol/L vs 4.32 ± 0.62 mmol/L respectively, P < 0.05). The level of hematocrit was lower in LPS + Lianshu group than in LPS + berberine group (0.50% ± 0.07% vs 0.59% ± 0

  1. Moderation of lactulose-induced diarrhea by psyllium: effects on motility and fermentation.

    PubMed

    Washington, N; Harris, M; Mussellwhite, A; Spiller, R C

    1998-02-01

    Psyllium has been reported to inhibit lactulose-induced colonic mass movements and to benefit patients with irritable bowel syndrome, improving both constipation and diarrhea. Our aim was to define how psyllium modified the whole-gut transit of a radiolabeled lactulose-containing test meal by using gamma scintigraphy. Eight subjects participated in a randomized crossover study comparing gastric emptying and small bowel and colonic transit after consumption of 20 mL lactulose three times daily with or without 3.5 g psyllium three times daily. Psyllium significantly delayed gastric emptying: the time to 50% emptying increased from a control value of 69 +/- 9 to 87 +/- 11 min (mean +/- SEM; P < 0.05, n = 8). Small bowel transit was unaltered. However, progression through the colon was delayed with an increase in the percentage of the dose at 24 h in the ascending (control group: 2 +/- 3%, psyllium group: 11 +/- 8%; P < 0.02) and transverse colon (control group: 5 +/- 12%, psyllium group: 21 +/- 14%) with correspondingly less in the descending colon. Although the time for 50% of the isotope to reach the colon was not significantly different with psyllium, psyllium significantly delayed the rise in breath-hydrogen concentrations, which reached 50% of their peak at 217 +/- 34 min compared with control values of 155 +/- 27 min (P < 0.05). Psyllium delays gastric emptying, probably by increasing meal viscosity, and reduces the acceleration of colon transit, possibly by delaying the production of gaseous fermentation products. PMID:9459381

  2. Failure of lactose-restricted diets to prevent radiation-induced diarrhea in patients undergoing whole pelvis irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Stryker, J.A.; Bartholomew, M.

    1986-05-01

    Sixty-four patients were randomized prior to pelvic radiotherapy into one of three dietary groups: the control group maintained a regular diet except that they drank at least 480 cc of milk daily; the lactose-restricted group was placed on a lactose-restricted diet; and the lactase group drank at least 480 cc of milk with lactase enzyme added to hydrolyze 90% of the lactose. The patients kept records of their stool frequency and the number of diphenoxylate tablets required to control their diarrhea during a 5 week course of standard whole pelvis irradiation. The data does not support the concept that one of the mechanisms of radiation-induced diarrhea associated with pelvic irradiation is a reduction the ability of the intestine to hydrolyze ingested lactose due to the effect of the radiation on the small intestine. There was not a significant difference in stool frequency or diphenoxylate usage among the dietary groups.

  3. Altered Expression and Localization of Ion Transporters Contribute to Diarrhea in Mice With Salmonella-Induced Enteritis

    PubMed Central

    MARCHELLETTA, RONALD R.; GAREAU, MELANIE G.; MCCOLE, DECLAN F.; OKAMOTO, SHARON; ROEL, ELISE; KLINKENBERG, RACHEL; GUINEY, DONALD G.; FIERER, JOSHUA; BARRETT, KIM E.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is an enteropathogen that causes self-limiting diarrhea in healthy individuals, but poses a significant health threat to vulnerable populations. Our understanding of the pathogenesis of Salmonella-induced diarrhea has been hampered by the lack of a suitable mouse model. After a dose of oral kanamycin, Salmonella-infected congenic BALB/c.D2NrampG169 mice, which carry a wild-type Nramp1 gene, develop clear manifestations of diarrhea. We used this model to elucidate the pathophysiology of Salmonella-induced diarrhea. METHODS BALB /c.D2NrampG169 mice were treated with kanamycin and then infected with wild-type or mutant Salmonella by oral gavage. Colon tissues were isolated and Ussing chambers, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, immunoblot, and confocal microscopy analyses were used to study function and expression of ion transporters and cell proliferation. RESULTS Studies with Ussing chambers demonstrated reduced basal and/or adenosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate–mediated electrogenic ion transport in infected colonic tissues, attributable to changes in chloride or sodium transport, depending on the segment studied. The effects of infection were mediated, at least in part, by effector proteins secreted by the bacterial Salmonella pathogenicity island 1– and Salmonella pathogenicity island-2–encoded virulence systems. Infected tissue showed reduced expression of the chloride–bicarbonate exchanger down-regulated in adenoma in surface colonic epithelial cells. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator was internalized in colonic crypt epithelial cells without a change in overall expression levels. Confocal analyses, densitometry, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed that expression of epithelial sodium channel β was reduced in distal colons of Salmonella-infected mice. The changes in transporter expression, localization, and/or function were accompanied by crypt

  4. Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus Infection Induced the Unbalance of Gut Microbiota in Piglets.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuyun; Zhao, Lele; Zhai, Zhengxiao; Zhao, Wenjing; Ding, Jinmei; Dai, Ronghua; Sun, Tao; Meng, He

    2015-12-01

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED) is a devastating disease in livestock industry. Most of the previous studies related to the PED were focused on the pathology and etiology of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV). A little was known regarding the status of gut microbiota after piglets infected by PEDV. In this study, aided by metagenome sequencing technology, gut microbiota profiles in feces of viral diarrhea (VD) and viral control (VC) piglets were investigated. The results showed that the abundance of four dominant phyla (Fusobacteria, Actinobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, and Proteobacteria) in feces was affected greatly by porcine epidemic diarrhea. Especially, the abundance of Fusobacteria was higher in VD piglets (36%) than in VC piglets (5%). On the contrary, the Verrucomicrobia was detected in lower distribution proportion in VD piglets (around 0%) than in VC piglets (20%). Furthermore, 25 genera were significantly different between VC and VD piglets at the genus level. Among the 25 genera, Leptotrichia belonging to Fusobacteria was remarkably lower in VC piglets than in VD piglets. Akkermansia belonging to Verrucomicrobia was higher in VC piglets than in VD piglets. Our findings implicated that the gut microbiota associated with PED significantly provided an insight into the pathology and physiology of PED. PMID:26319658

  5. Pharmacologic Agents for Chronic Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chronic diarrhea is usually associated with a number of non-infectious causes. When definitive treatment is unavailable, symptomatic drug therapy is indicated. Pharmacologic agents for chronic diarrhea include loperamide, 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists, diosmectite, cholestyramine, probiotics, antispasmodics, rifaximin, and anti-inflammatory agents. Loperamide, a synthetic opiate agonist, decreases peristaltic activity and inhibits secretion, resulting in the reduction of fluid and electrolyte loss and an increase in stool consistency. Cholestyramine is a bile acid sequestrant that is generally considered as the first-line treatment for bile acid diarrhea. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists have significant benefits in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with diarrhea. Ramosetron improves stool consistency as well as global IBS symptoms. Probiotics may have a role in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. However, data on the role of probiotics in the treatment of chronic diarrhea are lacking. Diosmectite, an absorbent, can be used for the treatment of chronic functional diarrhea, radiation-induced diarrhea, and chemotherapy-induced diarrhea. Antispasmodics including alverine citrate, mebeverine, otilonium bromide, and pinaverium bromide are used for relieving diarrheal symptoms and abdominal pain. Rifaximin can be effective for chronic diarrhea associated with IBS and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Budesonide is effective in both lymphocytic colitis and collagenous colitis. The efficacy of mesalazine in microscopic colitis is weak or remains uncertain. Considering their mechanisms of action, these agents should be prescribed properly. PMID:26576135

  6. Pharmacologic Agents for Chronic Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang Jae

    2015-10-01

    Chronic diarrhea is usually associated with a number of non-infectious causes. When definitive treatment is unavailable, symptomatic drug therapy is indicated. Pharmacologic agents for chronic diarrhea include loperamide, 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists, diosmectite, cholestyramine, probiotics, antispasmodics, rifaximin, and anti-inflammatory agents. Loperamide, a synthetic opiate agonist, decreases peristaltic activity and inhibits secretion, resulting in the reduction of fluid and electrolyte loss and an increase in stool consistency. Cholestyramine is a bile acid sequestrant that is generally considered as the first-line treatment for bile acid diarrhea. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists have significant benefits in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with diarrhea. Ramosetron improves stool consistency as well as global IBS symptoms. Probiotics may have a role in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. However, data on the role of probiotics in the treatment of chronic diarrhea are lacking. Diosmectite, an absorbent, can be used for the treatment of chronic functional diarrhea, radiation-induced diarrhea, and chemotherapy-induced diarrhea. Antispasmodics including alverine citrate, mebeverine, otilonium bromide, and pinaverium bromide are used for relieving diarrheal symptoms and abdominal pain. Rifaximin can be effective for chronic diarrhea associated with IBS and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Budesonide is effective in both lymphocytic colitis and collagenous colitis. The efficacy of mesalazine in microscopic colitis is weak or remains uncertain. Considering their mechanisms of action, these agents should be prescribed properly. PMID:26576135

  7. [Persistent diarrhea

    PubMed

    Andrade, J A; Moreira, C; Fagundes Neto, U

    2000-07-01

    INTRODUCTION: Persistent diarrhea has high impact on infantile morbidity and mortality rates in developing countries. Several studies have shown that 3 to 20% of acute diarrheal episodes in children under 5 years of age become persistent. DEFINITION: Persistent diarrhea is defined as an episode that lasts more than 14 days. ETIOLOGY: The most important agents isolated in persistent diarrhea are: Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), Salmonella, Enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), Klebisiella and Cryptosporidium. CLINICAL ASPECTS: In general, the clinical characteristics of patients with persistent diarrhea do not change with the pathogenic agent. Persistent diarrhea seems to represent the final result of a several insults a infant suffers that predisposes to a more severe episode of diarrhea due to a combination of host factors and high rates of enviromental contamination. Therefore, efforts should be made to promptly treat all episodes of diarrhea with apropriate follow-up. THERAPY: The aim of the treatment is to restore hydroelectrolytic deficits and to replace losses until the diarrheal ceases. It is possible in the majority of the cases, using oral rehydration therapy and erly an appropriate type of diet. PREVENTION: It is imperative that management strategies also focus on preventive aspects. The most effective diarrheal prevention strategy in young infants worldwide is promotion of exclusive breast feeding. PMID:14676915

  8. Acute diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Barr, Wendy; Smith, Andrew

    2014-02-01

    Acute diarrhea in adults is a common problem encountered by family physicians. The most common etiology is viral gastroenteritis, a self-limited disease. Increases in travel, comorbidities, and foodborne illness lead to more bacteria-related cases of acute diarrhea. A history and physical examination evaluating for risk factors and signs of inflammatory diarrhea and/or severe dehydration can direct any needed testing and treatment. Most patients do not require laboratory workup, and routine stool cultures are not recommended. Treatment focuses on preventing and treating dehydration. Diagnostic investigation should be reserved for patients with severe dehydration or illness, persistent fever, bloody stool, or immunosuppression, and for cases of suspected nosocomial infection or outbreak. Oral rehydration therapy with early refeeding is the preferred treatment for dehydration. Antimotility agents should be avoided in patients with bloody diarrhea, but loperamide/simethicone may improve symptoms in patients with watery diarrhea. Probiotic use may shorten the duration of illness. When used appropriately, antibiotics are effective in the treatment of shigellosis, campylobacteriosis, Clostridium difficile, traveler's diarrhea, and protozoal infections. Prevention of acute diarrhea is promoted through adequate hand washing, safe food preparation, access to clean water, and vaccinations. PMID:24506120

  9. A bovine viral diarrhea virus type 1a strain in China: isolation, identification, and experimental infection in calves

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is one of the most important pathogens in cattle. Previously, BVDV sub-genotypes of 1b, 1c, 1d, and 1 m were detected in China. However, isolation of BVDV type 1a from cattle has not been reported in China. In 2010, twenty nasal swabs and blood samples were collected from the cattle suspected BVDV infection in Henan province, China. A BVDV isolate was isolated using cell culture, and the pathogenesis of the virus isolate was studied. Methods Virus isolation was performed on MDBK cells. The virus identification was conducted by RT-PCR, neutralization test and immunofluorescence assay. In order to determine the genotype of the newly isolated virus, the 5′ un-translated region (5′UTR) of the virus isolate was cloned, sequenced and phylogenetically analyzed. To evaluate the virulence of the virus isolate, four BVDV sero-negative calves were intranasally inoculated with the virus suspension. Rectal temperatures and clinical signs were recorded daily. Blood samples were analyzed for changes in white blood cell counts, and tissue samples were taken for histopathology analysis. Results A new isolate of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), named HN01, was isolated from the nasal swabs using MDBK cell culture. The HN01 strain caused cytopathic effect (CPE) in MDBK cell cultures after two passages. The virus specifically reacted to BVDV1-specific monoclonal antibody in an immunofluorescence assay. A fragment of 288 bp of genome from this isolate was amplified by the RT-PCR. Phylogenetic analysis of 5′UTR indicated that the virus was BVDV 1a. In the pathogenesis study, four calves experimentally infected with the BVDV strain developed depression, cough and other clinical signs. Calves showed high temperature over 40°C, and white blood cell counts dropped more than 40%. Conclusions A new subgenotype 1a strain of BVDV was firstly isolated from dairy cattle in China. The experimental infection showed that the virus was

  10. Diarrhea - overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... intolerance (which causes problems after drinking milk and eating other dairy products) Malabsorption syndromes Less common causes of diarrhea include: Carcinoid syndrome Disorders of the nerves that supply the intestines Removal ...

  11. [Drugs and diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Haschke, Manuel

    2014-09-01

    Drug induced diarrhea is a frequent adverse event. The pathophysiological mechanisms include intraluminal accumulation of osmotically active substances, increased secretion or impaired resorption of gastrointestinal fluids, stimulation of gastrointestinal motility, or inflammation of gastrointestinal mucosa. For many drugs, however, the causative mechanism is unknown. A careful drug history, including non-prescription drugs and additives that frequently cause diarrhea, is essential for the identification of potential causative substances. The clinical course of drug-induced diarrhea in many cases is mild and self-limited. In severe cases fluid-and electrolyte substitution, symptomatic and in certain cases specific therapy can be necessary. Symptomatic treatment primarily includes opioids and intraluminal adsorbents. In special cases octreotide or scopolamine can be used. PMID:25154693

  12. Prevention of irinotecan (CPT-11)-induced diarrhea by oral alkalization combined with control of defecation in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Y; Kobayashi, K; Akiyama, Y; Soma, T; Handa, S; Kudoh, S; Kudo, K

    2001-04-15

    It has been reported that 7-ethyl-10-[4-(1-piperidino)-1-piperidino]carbonyloxy-camptothecin (CPT-11) and its active metabolite, 7-ethyl-10-hydroxy-camptothecin (SN-38), have absorption characteristics of weakly basic drugs, suggesting that alkalization of the intestinal lumen might reduce reabsorption and its attendant side effects. Furthermore, stasis of stools containing these compounds is thought to induce damage to the intestinal mucosa. The prevention of CPT-11-induced side effects by oral alkalization (OA) combined with control of defecation (CD) was estimated in a case-control study of lung cancer patients. Coinciding with day 1 of CPT-11 infusion and for 4 days thereafter, OA and CD were practiced utilizing orally administered sodium bicarbonate, magnesium oxide, basic water and ursodeoxycholic acid. OA involved the daily use of all four therapeutics, and CD required doses of up to 4.0 g/day of magnesium oxide and 2 L/day of excess basic water. From three ongoing prospective phase I/II studies, we selected 37 consecutive patients who were treated with CPT-11 in combination with cisplatin in the presence of OA and CD (group B). Thirty-two control subjects who were matched to the background characteristics of the case patients were treated with the same regimen in the absence of OA and CD (group A). Toxicities induced by the CPT-11/cisplatin combination were evaluated and analyzed in group A and group B in a case-control format. The use of OA and CD resulted in significantly higher stool pH (p < 0.0001), while reducing the incidence of delayed diarrhea (> or = grade 2: group A 32.3% versus group B 9.4%; p = 0.005), nausea (p = 0.0001), vomiting (p = 0.001) and myelotoxicity, especially granulocytopenia (p = 0.03) and lymphocytopenia (p = 0.034). In addition, dose intensification was well tolerated in patients receiving OA and CD, allowing dose escalation from 35.6 +/- 6.0 to 39.9 +/- 5.6 mg/m(2)/week (p < 0.001). Tumor response rates for non-small cell lung

  13. Compartmentalized Accumulation of cAMP near Complexes of Multidrug Resistance Protein 4 (MRP4) and Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Contributes to Drug-induced Diarrhea*

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Changsuk; Zhang, Weiqiang; Ren, Aixia; Arora, Kavisha; Sinha, Chandrima; Yarlagadda, Sunitha; Woodrooffe, Koryse; Schuetz, John D.; Valasani, Koteswara Rao; de Jonge, Hugo R.; Shanmukhappa, Shiva Kumar; Shata, Mohamed Tarek M.; Buddington, Randal K.; Parthasarathi, Kaushik; Naren, Anjaparavanda P.

    2015-01-01

    Diarrhea is one of the most common adverse side effects observed in ∼7% of individuals consuming Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs. The mechanism of how these drugs alter fluid secretion in the gut and induce diarrhea is not clearly understood. Several drugs are either substrates or inhibitors of multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4), such as the anti-colon cancer drug irinotecan and an anti-retroviral used to treat HIV infection, 3′-azido-3′-deoxythymidine (AZT). These drugs activate cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-mediated fluid secretion by inhibiting MRP4-mediated cAMP efflux. Binding of drugs to MRP4 augments the formation of MRP4-CFTR-containing macromolecular complexes that is mediated via scaffolding protein PDZK1. Importantly, HIV patients on AZT treatment demonstrate augmented MRP4-CFTR complex formation in the colon, which defines a novel paradigm of drug-induced diarrhea. PMID:25762723

  14. Diarrhea in infants

    MedlinePlus

    When your infant has diarrhea; When your baby has diarrhea; BRAT diet; Diarrhea in children ... Children who have diarrhea may have less energy, dry eyes, or a dry, sticky mouth. They may also not wet their diaper as ...

  15. Use of three-dimensional accelerometers to evaluate behavioral changes in cattle experimentally infected with bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    PubMed

    Bayne, Jenna E; Walz, Paul H; Passler, Thomas; White, Brad J; Theurer, Miles E; van Santen, Edzard

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the use of 3-D accelerometers to evaluate behavioral changes in cattle experimentally infected with a low-virulent strain of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV). ANIMALS 20 beef steers (mean weight, 238 kg). PROCEDURES Calves were allocated to a BVDV (n = 10) or control (10) group. On day 0, calves in the BVDV group were inoculated with a low-virulent strain of BVDV (4 × 10(6) TCID50, intranasally), and calves in the control group were sham inoculated with BVDV-free medium (4 mL; intranasally). An accelerometer was affixed to the right hind limb of each calf on day -7 to record activity (lying, walking, and standing) continuously until 35 days after inoculation. Baseline was defined as days -7 to -1. Blood samples were collected at predetermined times for CBC, serum biochemical analysis, virus isolation, and determination of anti-BVDV antibody titers. RESULTS All calves in the BVDV group developed viremia and anti-BVDV antibodies but developed only subclinical or mild disease. Calves in the control group did not develop viremia or anti-BVDV antibodies. Mean time allocated to each activity did not differ significantly between the BVDV and control groups on any day except day 8, when calves in the BVDV group spent less time standing than the calves in the control group. Following inoculation, calves in both groups tended to spend more time lying and less time walking and standing than they did during baseline. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that behavioral data obtained by accelerometers could not distinguish calves subclinically infected with BVDV from healthy control calves. However, subtle changes in the behavior of the BVDV-infected calves were detected and warrant further investigation. PMID:27227496

  16. Recent advances and new perspectives in targeting CFTR for therapy of cystic fibrosis and enterotoxin-induced secretory diarrheas

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiqiang; Fujii, Naoaki; Naren, Anjaparavanda P

    2012-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a cAMP-regulated chloride channel localized primarily at the apical surfaces of epithelial cells lining airway, gut and exocrine glands, where it is responsible for transepithelial salt and water transport. Several human diseases are associated with an altered channel function of CFTR. Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by the loss or dysfunction of CFTR-channel activity resulting from the mutations on the gene; whereas enterotoxin-induced secretory diarrheas are caused by the hyperactivation of CFTR channel function. CFTR is a validated target for drug development to treat these diseases. Significant progress has been made in developing CFTR modulator therapy by means of high-throughput screening followed by hit-to-lead optimization. Several oral administrated investigational drugs are currently being evaluated in clinical trials for CF. Also importantly, new ideas and methodologies are emerging. Targeting CFTR-containing macromolecular complexes is one such novel approach. PMID:22393940

  17. An Outbreak of Late-Term Abortions, Premature Births, and Congenital Deformities Associated with a Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus 1 Subtype b that Induces Thrombocytopenia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) genotype 1 subtype b caused an outbreak of premature births, late term abortions, brachygnathism, growth retardation, brain deformities and rare other skeletal deformities in Holstein calves born to first calf heifers on one dairy. Experimental challenge of three,...

  18. Acute phase response elicited by experimental bovine diarrhea virus (BVDV) infection is associated with decreased vitamin D and E status of vitamin-replete preruminant calves.

    PubMed

    Nonnecke, B J; McGill, J L; Ridpath, J F; Sacco, R E; Lippolis, J D; Reinhardt, T A

    2014-09-01

    Studies in young animals have shown an association between vitamin deficiencies and increased risk of infectious disease; however, there is a paucity of information regarding the effect of acute infection on the vitamin status of the vitamin-replete neonate. To characterize the effects of acute infection on vitamin D and E status of the neonate, 6 vitamin-replete preruminant Holstein bull calves were experimentally infected with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV; strain BVDV2-1373). Six mock-inoculated calves served as controls. Sustained pyrexia, leukopenia, and asynchronous increases in serum haptoglobin and serum amyloid A characterized the response of calves to infection with BVDV. Infection was also associated with increased serum IFN-γ, IL-2, and IL-6 concentrations. During the last 8 d of the 14-d postinoculation period, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and α-tocopherol concentrations in infected calves decreased by 51 and 82%, respectively. The observed inverse association between vitamin D and E status and serum amyloid A in infected calves suggests that the infection-induced acute phase response contributed to the reduced vitamin status of these animals. Additional studies are necessary to determine if the negative effect of infection on status are unique to this specific infection model or is representative of preruminant calf's response to acute infection. Studies are also needed to characterize mechanisms underlying infection-related changes in vitamin D and E status and to determine whether additional vitamin D or E supplementation during an acute infection diminishes disease severity and duration in the young animal. PMID:25022687

  19. Bovine viral diarrhea virus type 2-induced meningoencephalitis in a heifer.

    PubMed

    Blas-Machado, U; Saliki, J T; Duffy, J C; Caseltine, S L

    2004-03-01

    The brain from a 15-month-old, black female Angus, with a 48-hour history of central nervous system disease, was submitted to the Oklahoma Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory. Microscopic findings consisted of acute, multifocal meningoencephalitis, with neuronal degeneration and necrosis and gliosis. Viral isolation yielded noncytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV). Virus genotyping classified the virus as BVDV type 2. Immunohistochemical labeling for BVDV antigens with BVD MAb 3.12F1 clone was prominent in the cytoplasm of neurons, glial cells, ependymal epithelium, perivascular macrophages and spindle cells, smooth muscle cells, and intravascular monocytes of the cerebrum and brain stem. Laboratory results support that tissue alterations occurred as a result of BVDV type 2 infection. In the absence of other clinical signs related to BVDV infection and using the microscopic and laboratory evidence presented, we propose that the BVDV type 2 isolated from this case may represent a neurovirulent strain of the virus. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of brain lesions and neuronal viral antigen localization in BVDV genotype 2 viral infection, acquired either congenitally or postnatally. PMID:15017036

  20. Effects of Probiotic Lactobacillus Casei DN-114 001 in Prevention of Radiation-Induced Diarrhea: Results From Multicenter, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Nutritional Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Giralt, Jordi Regadera, Jose Perez; Verges, Ramona; Romero, Jesus; Fuente, Isabel de la; Biete, Albert; Villoria, Jesus; Cobo, Jose Maria; Guarner, Francisco

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To determine whether a probiotic drink containing Lactobacillus casei DN-114 001 reduces the incidence of radiation-induced diarrhea in patients with gynecologic cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients who were undergoing pelvic radiotherapy (45-50 Gy, conventional fractionation) for either cervical carcinoma (radiotherapy and weekly cisplatin) or endometrial adenocarcinoma (postoperative radiotherapy) were randomly assigned to a probiotic drink or placebo, in a double-blind fashion. The probiotic drink consisted of liquid yogurt containing L. casei DN-114 001 at 10{sup 8} CFU/g. The patients recorded the daily the number of bowel movements and scored the stool consistency using the Bristol scale. Diarrhea was graded weekly according the Common Toxicity Criteria system. The primary endpoint was to reduce the incidence of diarrhea, defined by a Common Toxicity Criteria Grade of 2 or greater or the need for loperamide. Results: A total of 85 patients were enrolled. Grade 2 or greater diarrhea and/or the use of loperamide was observed in 24 of 41 patients in the placebo group and 30 of 44 in the probiotic group (p = 0.568). No differences were found in the median time to the presentation of the primary endpoint. Probiotic intervention had a significant effect on stool consistency (p = 0.04). The median time for patients to present with Bristol scale stools of Type 6 or greater was 14 days for patients receiving the probiotic drink vs. 10 days for those receiving placebo. Conclusion: Nutritional intervention with the probiotic drink containing L. casei DN-114 001 does not reduce the incidence of radiation-induced diarrhea as defined by a Common Toxicity Criteria Grade 2 or greater. However, it had a significant effect on stool consistency as measured by the Bristol scale.

  1. Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) co-infection induced chlamydial persistence/stress does not require viral replication

    PubMed Central

    Schoborg, Robert V.; Borel, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Chlamydiae may exist at the site of infection in an alternative replicative form, called the aberrant body (AB). ABs are produced during a viable but non-infectious developmental state termed “persistence” or “chlamydial stress.” As persistent/stressed chlamydiae: (i) may contribute to chronic inflammation observed in diseases like trachoma; and (ii) are more resistant to current anti-chlamydial drugs of choice, it is critical to better understand this developmental stage. We previously demonstrated that porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) co-infection induced Chlamydia pecorum persistence/stress in culture. One critical characteristic of persistence/stress is that the chlamydiae remain viable and can reenter the normal developmental cycle when the stressor is removed. Thus, we hypothesized that PEDV-induced persistence would be reversible if viral replication was inhibited. Therefore, we performed time course experiments in which Vero cells were C. pecorum/PEDV infected in the presence of cycloheximide (CHX), which inhibits viral but not chlamydial protein synthesis. CHX-exposure inhibited PEDV replication, but did not inhibit induction of C. pecorum persistence at 24 h post-PEDV infection, as indicated by AB formation and reduced production of infectious EBs. Interestingly, production of infectious EBs resumed when CHX-exposed, co-infected cells were incubated 48–72 h post-PEDV co-infection. These data demonstrate that PEDV co-infection-induced chlamydial persistence/stress is reversible and suggest that this induction (i) does not require viral replication in host cells; and (ii) does not require de novo host or viral protein synthesis. These data also suggest that viral binding and/or entry may be required for this effect. Because the PEDV host cell receptor (CD13 or aminopeptidase N) stimulates cellular signaling pathways in the absence of PEDV infection, we suspect that PEDV co-infection might alter CD13 function and induce the chlamydiae to

  2. Traveler's Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Giddings, Stanley L; Stevens, A Michal; Leung, Daniel T

    2016-03-01

    Traveler's diarrhea (TD) is the most common travel-related illness, and it can have a significant impact on the traveler. Pretravel consultation provides an excellent opportunity for the clinician to counsel the traveler and discuss strategies such as food and water hygiene, vaccinations, and medications for prophylaxis or self-treatment that may decrease the incidence and impact of TD. Postinfectious sequelae, such as postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome, reactive arthritis, and Guillain-Barre syndrome, may develop weeks or months after return. PMID:26900116

  3. Diarrhea in infants

    MedlinePlus

    Diarrhea - babies ... Diarrhea in babies usually does not last long. Most often, it is caused by a virus and ... on its own. Your baby could also have diarrhea with: A change in your baby's diet or ...

  4. Confirmation that “Brachyspira hampsonii” clade I (Canadian strain 30599) causes mucohemorrhagic diarrhea and colitis in experimentally infected pigs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background “Brachyspira hampsonii”, discovered in North America in 2010 associated with dysentery-like illness, is an economically relevant swine pathogen resulting in decreased feed efficiency and increased morbidity, mortality and medication usage. “B. hampsonii” clade II strain 30446 has been shown to be causally associated with mucohemorrhagic diarrhea and colitis. Our objectives were to determine if “Brachyspira hampsonii” clade I strain 30599 is pathogenic to pigs, and to evaluate the relative diagnostic performance of three ante mortem sampling methodologies (direct PCR on feces, PCR on rectal GenoTube Livestock swabs, Brachyspira culture from rectal swabs). Five-week old pigs were intragastrically inoculated thrice with 108 genomic equivalents "B. hampsonii" (n = 12), or served as sham controls (n = 6). Feces were sampled and consistency assessed daily. Necropsies were performed 24 h after peak clinical signs. Results One pig died due to unrelated illness. Nine of 11 inoculated pigs, but no controls, developed mucoid or mucohemorrhagic diarrhea (MHD). Characteristic lesions of swine dysentery were observed in large intestine. “B. hampsonii” strain 30599 DNA was detected by qPCR in feces of all inoculated pigs for up to 6 days prior to the onset of MHD. The organism was isolated from the feces and colons of pigs demonstrating MHD, but not from controls. B. intermedia was isolated from inoculated pigs without MHD, and from 5 of 6 controls. Conclusions We conclude that “Brachyspira hampsonii” clade I strain 30599 is pathogenic and causes mucohemorrhagic diarrhea and colitis in susceptible pigs. Moreover, the three sampling methodologies performed similarly. GenoTube Livestock, a forensic swab designed to preserve DNA during shipping is a useful tool especially in settings where timely transport of diagnostic samples is challenging. PMID:24917084

  5. St. John's wort attenuates irinotecan-induced diarrhea via down-regulation of intestinal pro-inflammatory cytokines and inhibition of intestinal epithelial apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Zeping; Yang Xiaoxia; Chan Suiyung; Xu Anlong; Duan Wei; Zhu Yizhun; Sheu, F.-S.; Boelsterli, Urs Alex; Chan, Eli; Zhang Qiang; Wang, J.-C.; Ee, Pui Lai Rachel; Koh, H.L.; Huang Min; Zhou Shufeng . E-mail: phazsf@nus.edu.sg

    2006-10-15

    Diarrhea is a common dose-limiting toxicity associated with cancer chemotherapy, in particular for drugs such as irinotecan (CPT-11), 5-fluouracil, oxaliplatin, capecitabine and raltitrexed. St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum, SJW) has anti-inflammatory activity, and our preliminary study in the rat and a pilot study in cancer patients found that treatment of SJW alleviated irinotecan-induced diarrhea. In the present study, we investigated whether SJW modulated various pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukins (IL-1{beta}, IL-2, IL-6), interferon (IFN-{gamma}) and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) and intestinal epithelium apoptosis in rats. The rats were treated with irinotecan at 60 mg/kg for 4 days in combination with oral SJW or SJW-free control vehicle at 400 mg/kg for 8 days. Diarrhea, tissue damage, body weight loss, various cytokines including IL-1{beta}, IL-2, IL-6, IFN-{gamma} and TNF-{alpha} and intestinal epithelial apoptosis were monitored over 11 days. Our studies demonstrated that combined SJW markedly reduced CPT-11-induced diarrhea and intestinal lesions. The production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1{beta}, IFN-{gamma} and TNF-{alpha} was significantly up-regulated in intestine. In the mean time, combined SJW significantly suppressed the intestinal epithelial apoptosis induced by CPT-11 over days 5-11. In particular, combination of SJW significantly inhibited the expression of TNF-{alpha} mRNA in the intestine over days 5-11. In conclusion, inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokines and intestinal epithelium apoptosis partly explained the protective effect of SJW against the intestinal toxicities induced by irinotecan. Further studies are warranted to explore the potential for STW as an agent in combination with chemotherapeutic drugs to lower their dose-limiting toxicities.

  6. [A case-control study of prevention of irinotecan-induced diarrhea: the reducing side effects of irinotecan by oral alkalization combined with control of defecation].

    PubMed

    Takeda, Yuichiro; Kobayashi, Kunihiko; Akiyama, Yoshiko; Soma, Tomoyuki; Handa, Satoko; Kudoh, Shouji; Kudo, Koichiro

    2002-07-01

    Irinotecan and its active metabolite, SN-38, were reported to have the absorption characteristics of weakly basic drugs. Moreover, stasis of these compounds is thought to induce damage to the intestinal mucous membrane. The purpose of this report was to examine whether oral alkalization (OA) combined with control of defecation (CD) might prevent irinotecan-induced side effects. From day one of irinotecan infusion to day four, OA & CD were practiced using orally administered sodium bicarbonate, magnesium oxide, basic water, and ursodeoxycholic acid. Thirty-two lung cancer patients were treated with irinotecan in combination with cisplatin in the absence of OA & CD (Group A). Thirty-seven patients matched for background characteristics were treated with the same regimen in the presence of OA & CD (Group B). Group B had a reduced incidence of delayed diarrhea (Grade 2 < or = Group A 32.3% vs. Group B 9.4%), nausea, vomiting, and myelotoxicity, especially granulocytopenia compared with Group A. In addition, dose intensification was well-tolerated in Group B. Tumor response rates for non-small cell lung cancer were 59.3% (16/27 patients) in Group B against 38.5% (10/26 patients) in Group A. OA & CD appears to reduce the irinotecan-induced side effects, especially delayed diarrhea. Risk factors statistically associated with delayed diarrhea include advanced age and the use of irinotecan without OA & CD. PMID:12145998

  7. Beneficial effects of sucralphate in radiation induced diarrhea. An open randomized study in gynecological cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Henriksson, R; Arevärn, M; Franzén, L; Persson, H; Stendahl, U

    1990-01-01

    In an open randomized study including 51 consecutive patients with gynaecological malignancies sucralphate was daily administered to patients receiving pelvic irradiation. Sucralphate, an aluminium hydroxide complex of sulphated sucrose used in the treatment of gastric ulcer, seems to be of value in preventing radiation-induced bowel discomfort. The most objective parameter, frequency of diarrhoea was almost 50% less in the sucralphate groups as compared to the controls. The patients receiving sucralphate in general displayed only minor alterations in bowel habits even at the end of the radiation treatment. The number of patients requiring symptomatic therapy with loperamide were markedly lower in the sucralphate group. Subjective discomfort such as nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite were also less common. A reduction in acute reactions to irradiation increases the possibility of carrying through planned treatment and avoids unfavourable intermissions, and thus curing the patient with cancer in the pelvis by means of radiotherapy. PMID:2245814

  8. Clinical response and immunomodulation following experimental challenge of calves with type 2 noncytopathogenic bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    PubMed

    Archambault, D; Béliveau, C; Couture, Y; Carman, S

    2000-01-01

    Eight calves between 16 and 18 weeks of age that were seronegative to bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), bovine leucosis virus and bovine immunodeficiency-like virus were infected (day 0) intranasally with the type 2 noncytopathogenic Canadian 24515 field isolate of BVDV in order to evaluate the effect of BVDV infection on certain clinical, hematological and immunological parameters. All virus-exposed animals developed fever and showed a significant (P < 0.05, 0.01 or 0.001) drop in the number of circulating leucocytes (neutrophils, lymphocytes and monocytes) by day 3 or 5 post-exposure (PE), which continued to the end of the experiment at day 12 PE. BVDV was consistently isolated from the peripheral blood buffy coat cells from day 5 PE, and also from selected tissues (spleen, thymus, mesenteric and submaxillary lymph nodes, small intestine, lungs and thyroid gland) that were collected at the time of euthanasia of the animals at day 12 PE. Diminished significant (P < 0.05) percentages of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) expressing at their surface either B7 and MHC II molecules were observed in virus-exposed calves at days 7, 10 and/or 12 PE, when compared to virus-nonexposed control calves (n = 5). However, no changes in the percentages of PBMCs expressing either B4 or MHC I molecules were observed throughout the experiment. Finally, a significant (P < 0.05 or 0.01) enhanced phagocytic capability of the PBMCs, as analyzed by flow cytometry, was observed in virus-exposed animals at days 3, 5, 7, 10 and 12 PE, when compared to control calves. These results demonstrated the virulence of the 24515 isolate of BVDV in 4 to 4.5 month-old calves, and suggest that type 2 BVDV infection in calves is associated with dysregulation of certain immunological functions. PMID:10779200

  9. Lesions and distribution of viral antigen following an experimental infection of young seronegative calves with virulent bovine virus diarrhea virus-type II.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, J A; West, K H; Cortese, V S; Myers, S L; Carman, S; Martin, K M; Haines, D M

    1998-01-01

    During the past several years, acute infections with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) have been causally linked to hemorrhagic and acute mucosal disease-like syndromes with high mortality. The majority of BVDVs isolated in such cases have been classified as type II on the basis of genetic and antigenic characteristics. It was our objective to examine clinical disease, lesions and potential sites of viral replication, following experimental BVDV type II infection in young calves. On approximately day 35 after birth, calves that had received BVDV-antibody-negative colostrum were infected by intranasal inoculation of 5 x 10(5) TCID50 of BVDV type II isolate 24,515 in 5 mL of tissue culture fluid (2.5 mL/nostril). Calves were monitored twice daily for signs of clinical disease. Approximately 48-72 h after infection, all calves developed transient pyrexia (39.4-40.5 degrees C) and leukopenia. Beginning on approximately day 7 after infection, all calves developed watery diarrhea, pyrexia (40.5-41.6 degrees C), marked leukopenia (> or = 75% drop from preinoculation values), variable thrombocytopenia, and moderate to severe depression. Calves were euthanized on days 10, 11, or 12 after infection due to severe disease. Gross and histological lesions consisted of multifocal bronchointerstitial pneumonia (involving 10%-25% of affected lungs), bone marrow hypoplasia and necrosis, and minimal erosive lesions in the alimentary tract. Immunohistochemical staining for BVDV revealed widespread viral antigen usually within epithelial cells, smooth muscle cells and mononuclear phagocytes in multiple organs, including lung, Peyer's patches, gastric mucosa, thymus, adrenal gland, spleen, lymph nodes, bone marrow, and skin. This BVDV type II isolate caused rapidly progressive, severe multisystemic disease in seronegative calves that was associated with widespread distribution of viral antigen and few gross or histological inflammatory lesions. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3

  10. Evaluation of Three Experimental Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Killed Vaccines Adjuvanted with Combinations of QuilA Cholesterol and Dimethyldioctadecylammonium (DDA) Bromide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infections cause respiratory, reproductive, and enteric disease in cattle. Vaccination raises herd resistance and then limits the spread of bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) among cattle. The goal of this research was to evaluate new adjuvants, consisting of c...

  11. Threshold for transitory diarrhea induced by ingestion of xylitol and lactitol in young male and female adults.

    PubMed

    Oku, Tsuneyuki; Nakamura, Sadako

    2007-02-01

    The ingestion of a sufficiently large amount of non-digestible and/or non-absorbable sugar substitutes causes overt diarrhea. The objective is to estimate the non-effective dosage that does not cause transitory diarrhea for xylitol, lactitol, and erythritol in healthy subjects. Twenty-seven males and 28 females gave informed and written consent to participate, were selected, and participated in the study. The oral dose levels of xylitol were 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 g, while those of lactitol were 10, 20, 30, and 40 g. Those of erythritol were 20, 30, 40 and 50 g. The test substance was ingested in 150 mL of water 2-3 h after a meal. The ingestion order progressed from the smallest to larger amounts, and stopped at the dose that caused diarrhea, or at the largest dose level to be set up. The non-effective dose level of xylitol was 0.37 g/kg B.W. for males and 0.42 g/kg B.W. for females. That of lactitol was 0.25 g/kg B.W. for males and 0.34 g/kg B.W. for females, and that of erythritol was 0.46 g/kg B.W. for males and 0.68 g/kg B.W. for females. These results appear reasonable, because xylitol is poorly absorbed from the small intestine, and the absorption rate is less than that of erythritol, while lactitol is not hydrolyzed. Non-digestible and/or non-absorbable sugar alcohols and oligosaccharides with beneficial health effects inevitably cause overt diarrhea. The estimation of the non-effective dose level of these sugar substitutes is essential and important to produce processed foods that the consumer can use safely and with confidence. PMID:17484374

  12. When your child has diarrhea

    MedlinePlus

    Diarrhea is the passage of loose or watery stools. For some children, diarrhea is mild and will go away within a ... The stomach flu is a common cause of diarrhea. Medical treatments, such as antibiotics and some cancer ...

  13. Quillaja brasiliensis saponins induce robust humoral and cellular responses in a bovine viral diarrhea virus vaccine in mice.

    PubMed

    Cibulski, Samuel Paulo; Silveira, Fernando; Mourglia-Ettlin, Gustavo; Teixeira, Thais Fumaco; dos Santos, Helton Fernandes; Yendo, Anna Carolina; de Costa, Fernanda; Fett-Neto, Arthur Germano; Gosmann, Grace; Roehe, Paulo Michel

    2016-04-01

    A saponin fraction extracted from Quillaja brasiliensis leaves (QB-90) and a semi-purified aqueous extract (AE) were evaluated as adjuvants in a bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) vaccine in mice. Animals were immunized on days 0 and 14 with antigen plus either QB-90 or AE or an oil-adjuvanted vaccine. Two-weeks after boosting, antibodies were measured by ELISA; cellular immunity was evaluated by DTH, lymphoproliferation, cytokine release and single cell IFN-γ production. Serum anti-BVDV IgG, IgG1 and IgG2b were significantly increased in QB-90- and AE-adjuvanted vaccines. A robust DTH response, increased splenocyte proliferation, Th1-type cytokines and enhanced production of IFN-γ by CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes were detected in mice that received QB-90-adjuvanted vaccine. The AE-adjuvanted preparation stimulated humoral responses but not cellular immune responses. These findings reveal that QB-90 is capable of stimulating both cellular and humoral immune responses when used as adjuvant. PMID:27012913

  14. Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Experimental Live Virus (BVDV1b and BVDV2b) Vaccines in Cattle: Immunogenicity Studies with Antibody Response to Multiple BVDV Subgenotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) are a diverse group of viruses causing infection and diseases in cattle worldwide. There are two major types of BVDV, BVDV1 and BVDV2. There are currently reported 12 different BVDV1 subgenotypes (BVDV1a-BVDV1l) and two BVDV2 subgenotypes (BVDV2a and BVDV2b)....

  15. Effects of lactadherin on plasma D-lactic acid and small intestinal MUC2 and claudin-1 expression levels in rats with rotavirus-induced diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    XU, RUI; LEI, YI-HUI; SHI, JUN; ZHOU, YI-JUN; CHEN, YING-WEI; HE, ZHEN-JUAN

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of lactadherin on plasma D-lactic acid and small intestinal mucin (MUC) 2 and claudin-1 expression levels in rats with diarrhea induced by rotavirus (RV) infection. A total of 75 seven-day-old healthy Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into the following five groups: Control (C), RV infection (RVI), lactadherin before rotavirus infection (LBRI), lactadherin after rotavirus infection (LARI), and blank (B). On day 4 of artificial feeding, the rats in groups RVI, LBRI and LARI were intragastric administered 1×106 PFU RV; whereas the rats in groups C and B were intragastrically administered an equal volume of maintenance solution from the RV supernatant and normal saline, respectively. In the LBRI and LARI groups, rats received daily intragastric administration of 0.25 mg lactadherin for three days prior to and following infection with RV, respectively. The course of diarrheal symptoms was observed in each group and samples were collected on days 1, 4, and 7 post-infection in order to determine the mucosal morphology, plasma D-lactic acid levels and the expression levels of MUC2 and the intracellular junction protein, claudin-1, in the small intestine. On day 4 post-infection, the rats in group RVI demonstrated severely damaged small intestines and typical diarrheal characteristics, as detected by light microscopy; whereas rats in groups LBRI and LARI demonstrated intact small intestinal villi with partial vacuolation of epithelial cells and changes in the position of their nuclei. Electron microscopy demonstrated that the rats in the RVI group had sparse, shortened, disordered intestinal microvilli and widened intercellular junctions; whereas those in groups LBRI and LARI had long intestinal microvilli sparser compared with groups B and C and slightly widened intercellular junctions. Plasma D-lactic acid levels were increased in groups RVI, LBRI and LARI, as compared with groups B and C, and the

  16. Chronic Diarrhea in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... IBS. The most common symptoms of IBS are abdominal pain or discomfort, often reported as cramping, along with ... fructose. Symptoms of hereditary fructose intolerance may include abdominal pain, vomiting, and diarrhea. This disorder can also damage ...

  17. Gastrointestinal Infections and Diarrhea

    MedlinePlus

    ... in and drinking water from contaminated streams or lakes can lead to an infection and chronic diarrhea. ... or camping, never drink from streams, springs, or lakes unless local health authorities have certified the water ...

  18. Electroporation enhances immune responses and protection induced by a bovine viral diarrhea virus DNA vaccine in newborn calves with maternal antibodies.

    PubMed

    van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, Sylvia; Lawman, Zoe; Wilson, Don; Luxembourg, Alain; Ellefsen, Barry; van den Hurk, Jan V; Hannaman, Drew

    2010-09-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is one of the major pathogens in cattle. In this study, newborn calves with maternal antibodies were vaccinated with a BVDV DNA vaccine, either by conventional intramuscular (IM) injection or with the TriGrid™ Delivery System for IM delivery (TDS-IM). The calves vaccinated with the TDS-IM developed more rapidly and effectively BVDV-specific humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in the presence of maternal antibodies. Overall, the immune responses induced by delivery with the TDS-IM remained stronger than those elicited by conventional IM injection of the BVDV DNA vaccine. Accordingly, electroporation-mediated delivery of the BVDV DNA vaccine resulted in close to complete protection from clinical signs of disease, while conventional IM administration did not fully prevent morbidity and mortality following challenge with BVDV-2. These results demonstrate the TDS-IM to be effective as a delivery system for a BVDV DNA vaccine in newborn calves in the presence of maternal antibodies, which supports the potential of electroporation as a delivery method for prophylactic DNA vaccines. PMID:20670907

  19. [Diarrhea in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Truninger, Kaspar

    2014-09-01

    The causes of acute and chronic diarrheal disorders and their underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms are common at all ages. The impact of diarrhea, however, may be more pronounced in the elderly due to various causes, such as age-related structural and functional intestinal changes, concomittant illnesses, consume of preventive and therapeutic drugs, impaired sense of hunger and thirst, compromised nutrition and hydration to withstand the effect of diarrhea, more frequent hospital admissions and courses of antibiotics, and more subtle clinical presentation than in younger patients. These aspects have to be considered when investigating and treating diarrhea of older patients. Diarrhea may have a devastating effect on quality of life in the elderly and above all, fecal incontinence is a common consequence. In elderly institutionalized persons, fecal impaction in the rectum with liquid stool leaking around the hard, dry fecal mass is often associated with fecal incontinence. In this article, general aspects of diarrhea in the elderly, clostridium difficile infection, ischemic colitis, microscopic colitis and incontinence due to fecal impaction are discussed. PMID:25154690

  20. The bovine viral diarrhea virus E2 protein formulated with a novel adjuvant induces strong, balanced immune responses and provides protection from viral challenge in cattle.

    PubMed

    Snider, Marlene; Garg, Ravendra; Brownlie, Robert; van den Hurk, Jan V; van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, Sylvia

    2014-11-28

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is still one of the most serious pathogens in cattle, meriting the development of improved vaccines. Recently, we developed a new adjuvant consisting of poly[di(sodium carboxylatoethylphenoxy)]-phosphazene (PCEP), either CpG ODN or poly(I:C), and an immune defense regulator (IDR) peptide. As this adjuvant has been shown to mediate the induction of robust, balanced immune responses, it was evaluated in an E2 subunit vaccine against BVDV in lambs and calves. The BVDV type 2 E2 protein was produced at high levels in a mammalian expression system and purified. When formulated with either CpG ODN or poly(I:C), together with IDR and PCEP, the E2 protein elicited high antibody titers and production of IFN-γ secreting cells in lambs. As the immune responses were stronger when poly(I:C) was used, the E2 protein with poly(I:C), IDR and PCEP was subsequently tested in cattle. Robust virus neutralizing antibodies as well as cell-mediated immune responses, including CD8(+) cytotoxic T cell (CTL) responses, were induced. The fact that CTL responses were demonstrated in calves vaccinated with an E2 protein subunit vaccine indicates that this adjuvant formulation promotes cross-presentation. Furthermore, upon challenge with a high dose of virulent BVDV-2, the vaccinated calves showed almost no temperature response, weight loss, leukopenia or virus replication, in contrast to the control animals, which had severe clinical disease. These data suggest that this E2 subunit formulation induces significant protection from BVDV-2 challenge, and thus is a promising BVDV vaccine candidate; in addition, the adjuvant platform has applications in bovine vaccines in general. PMID:25454860

  1. Milk supplemented with immune colostrum: protection against rotavirus diarrhea and modulatory effect on the systemic and mucosal antibody responses in calves experimentally challenged with bovine rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Parreño, V; Marcoppido, G; Vega, C; Garaicoechea, L; Rodriguez, D; Saif, L; Fernández, F

    2010-07-01

    Group A bovine rotavirus (BRV) is the major cause of neonatal calf diarrhea worldwide. As a preventive strategy, we evaluated the protection and immunomodulation in two groups of BRV-inoculated calves. All calves received control colostrum (CC; VN=65,536; IgG(1)=16,384) prior to gut closure followed by the milk supplemented with immune colostrum (VN=1,048,576; IgG(1)=262,144), twice a day, for 14 days. Calves received milk supplemented with 0.8% immune colostrum [(Gp 1) VN=16,384; IgG(1)=4096] or milk supplemented with 0.4% immune colostrum [(Gp 2) VN=1024; IgG(1)=1024]. Calves receiving CC or colostrum deprived calves (CD) fed antibody (Ab) free milk served as controls (Gp 3 and 4). Calves were inoculated with virulent BRV IND at 2 days of age. Group 1 calves (milk IgG(1) 4096) showed 80% protection against BRV diarrhea and significantly reduced virus shedding. At 21 post-inoculation days (PID), the antibody secreting cell (ASC) responses of Gp 1 calves were limited mainly to duodenal and jejunal lamina propria (LP) with limited or no responses in systemic sites (spleen and PBL) and mesenteric lymph nodes. The profile of serum and fecal Ab responses as well as the ASC responses was also modulated by the presence of passive IgG(1) Abs and probably other colostrum components, toward higher titers of IgA Ab in serum and feces and a greater number of IgA ASC in the proximal intestine, reflecting positive modulation by colostrum toward this isotype associated with optimal protection of the intestinal mucosa. After challenge, at PID 21, all calves in Gp 1 and 2 were fully protected against diarrhea and only 1 of 5 calves in Gp 1 shed virus asymptomatically, indicating that the passive Ab treatment for 14 days was effective in protecting most of the animals after a first and a second virus exposure. The final outcome was a positive modulation of the mucosal immune responses and a high protection rate against diarrhea and virus shedding during the period of peak

  2. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Diarrhea

    MedlinePlus

    ... ational C ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National ... before taking medicine for diarrhea. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Diarrhea These foods and drinks may help if ...

  3. Experimental Contact Lens to Prevent Glaucoma-Induced Blindness

    MedlinePlus

    ... Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page An Experimental Contact Lens to Prevent Glaucoma-Induced Blindness By Sharon Reynolds Posted January 23, 2014 An experimental contact lens design releases a glaucoma medicine at a ...

  4. Effect of Lactobacillus Strains on Intestinal Microflora and Mucosa Immunity in Escherichia coli O157:H7-Induced Diarrhea in Mice.

    PubMed

    Bian, Xin; Wang, Ting-Ting; Xu, Min; Evivie, Smith Etareri; Luo, Guang-Wen; Liang, Hong-Zhang; Yu, Shang-Fu; Huo, Gui-Cheng

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated the effects of KLDS 1.8701 and AD1 administrations by gavage on intestinal microflora and mucosal immunity in diarrhea mice infected by Escherichia coli O157:H7 compared to normal mice. The levels of E. coli, Enterobacteria, and Enterococcus decreased significantly (P < 0.05), while viable counts of Lactobacilli and Bifidobacterium increased in diarrhea mice. Moreover, KLDS 1.8701 and AD1 improved secretion of secretory immunoglobulin A and enhanced the levels of interferon-γ and interleukin. Results indicate that KLDS 1.8701 and AD1 could effectively alleviate diarrhea in mice via modulation of intestinal microflora and improve the function of immune system. The study on the effect of KLDS1.8701 and AD1 supplementation in human flora-associated animal models was recommended. PMID:27025726

  5. BOVINE VIRAL DIARRHEA VIRUSES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is an umbrella term for two species of viruses, BVDV1 and BVDV2, within the Pestivirus genus of the Flavivirus family. BVDV viruses are further subclassified as cytopathic and noncytopathic based on their activity in cultured epithelial cells. Noncytopathic BVDV p...

  6. Traveler's diarrhea diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... J. Martin, MD, MPH, ABIM Board Certified in Internal Medicine and Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Atlanta, GA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Diarrhea Traveler's Health Browse the Encyclopedia A. ...

  7. Bovine viral diarrhea viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infections with bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) result in significant economic losses for beef and dairy producers worldwide. BVDV is actually an umbrella term for two species of viruses, BVDV1 and BVDV2, within the Pestivirus genus of the Flavivirus family. While denoted as a bovine pathogen...

  8. Acute and persistent diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Grimwood, Keith; Forbes, David A

    2009-12-01

    Socially disadvantaged Indigenous infants and children living in western industrialized countries experience high rates of infectious diarrhea, no more so than Aboriginal children from remote and rural regions of Northern Australia. Diarrheal disease, poor nutrition, and intestinal enteropathy reflect household crowding, inadequate water and poor sanitation and hygiene. Acute episodes of watery diarrhea are often best managed by oral glucose-electrolyte solutions with continuation of breastfeeding and early reintroduction of feeding. Selective use of lactose-free milk formula, short-term zinc supplementation and antibiotics may be necessary for ill children with poor nutrition, persistent symptoms, or dysentery. Education, high standards of environmental hygiene, breastfeeding, and immunization with newly licensed rotavirus vaccines are all needed to reduce the unacceptably high burden of diarrheal disease encountered in young children from Indigenous communities. PMID:19962025

  9. Experimental evaluation of earthquake induced relay chattering

    SciTech Connect

    Bandyopadhyay, K.; Hofmayer, C.; Shteyngart, S.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental evaluation of relay performance under vibratory environments is discussed in this paper. Single frequency excitation was used for most tests. Limited tests were performed with random multifrequency inputs. The capacity of each relay was established based on a two-millisecond chatter criterion. The experimental techniques are described and the effects of parameters in controlling the relay capacity levels are illustrated with test data. A wide variation of the capacity levels was observed due to the influence of parameters related to the design of the relay and nature of the input motion. 3 refs., 15 figs.

  10. [Trial chemoprophylaxis of traveler's diarrhea using nifuroxazide].

    PubMed

    Bourée, P; Kouchner, G

    1986-06-01

    Traveler's diarrhea is a very common condition that affects approximately 12 million subjects each year. This disorder is benign but nevertheless interferes with the traveler's plans in 40% of cases. Several drugs have been used for prophylaxis, in association with appropriate precautions concerning food and drink. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and cyclines are effective but may induce adverse effects. Nifuroxazide in a dose of 400 mg each day throughout the trip has proved effective. Tolerance was outstanding with no adverse effects. PMID:3534765

  11. Neural correlates of experimentally induced flow experiences.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Martin; Keller, Johannes; Hoenig, Klaus; Waller, Christiane; Grön, Georg

    2014-02-01

    Flow refers to a positive, activity-associated, subjective experience under conditions of a perceived fit between skills and task demands. Using functional magnetic resonance perfusion imaging, we investigated the neural correlates of flow in a sample of 27 human subjects. Experimentally, in the flow condition participants worked on mental arithmetic tasks at challenging task difficulty which was automatically and continuously adjusted to individuals' skill level. Experimental settings of "boredom" and "overload" served as comparison conditions. The experience of flow was associated with relative increases in neural activity in the left anterior inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and the left putamen. Relative decreases in neural activity were observed in the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and the amygdala (AMY). Subjective ratings of the flow experience were significantly associated with changes in neural activity in the IFG, AMY, and, with trend towards significance, in the MPFC. We conclude that neural activity changes in these brain regions reflect psychological processes that map on the characteristic features of flow: coding of increased outcome probability (putamen), deeper sense of cognitive control (IFG), decreased self-referential processing (MPFC), and decreased negative arousal (AMY). PMID:23959200

  12. Experimental and analytical investigation of flow through rocket pump inducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshminarayana, B.

    1974-01-01

    The characteristics of a rocket pump inducer are discussed. The effect of the pumping requirements on the blade configuration is analyzed. The effects of viscosity on blade design were determined by tests of a four bladed inducer operated in air at a flow coefficient of 0.065. The fluid properties were measured at the exit of the inducer using conventional and hot wire probes. The experimental results and the method of predicting the outlet tangential velocity and head rise are discussed.

  13. An experimental model of colitis induced by dextran sulfate sodium from acute progresses to chronicity in C57BL/6: correlation between conditions of mice and the environment

    PubMed Central

    Taghipour, Niloofar; Molaei, Mahsa; Mosaffa, Nariman; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Asadzadeh Aghdaei, Hamid; Anissian, Ali; Azimzadeh, Pedram; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To induce acute colitis progresses to chronicity in C57BL/6 mice by dextran sulfate sodium. Background: Murine models are essential tools to understand IBD pathogenesis. Among different types of chemically induced colitis models, the dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis model is the most common model of IBD, due to its simplicity. Patients and methods: Male C57BL/6 mice 6–8 weeks old, were collected and matched by age with controls. C57BL/6 mice treated with 2 cycles of 3.5% DSS for 4 days and 4 days of pure water between each cycle. After that, mice were sacrificed and the entire colon was removed. Small sections of the colon were fixed in formaldehyde, embedded in paraffin and sectioned with a microtome. Sections were stained with hematoxylin eosin to analyses the degree of inflammation. Results: After the first cycle oral administration of DSS, mice with severe and visible rectal bleeding and diarrhea entered into the acute phase. After day 4-5, bleeding and diarrhea were improved and mice entered into the chronic phase with peak levels of weight loss. Macroscopically, the inflammation was predominantly located in the distal colon. Microscopically, examination of the distal colon sections showed a decrease number of goblet cells, loss of crypts, signs of surface epithelial regeneration and moderate to severe infiltration of inflammatory cells in the mucosa. Conclusion: In order to achieve an experimental colitis model, our protocol is recommended for future therapies in IBD experimental modeling. PMID:26744614

  14. Acute Diarrhea in Children.

    PubMed

    Radlović, Nedeljko; Leković, Zoran; Vuletić, Biljana; Radlović, Vladimir; Simić, Dušica

    2015-01-01

    Acute diarrhea (AD) is the most frequent gastroenterological disorder, and the main cause of dehydration in childhood. It is manifested by a sudden occurrence of three or more watery or loose stools per day lasting for seven to 10 days, 14 days at most. It mainly occurs in children until five years of age and particularly in neonates in the second half-year and children until the age of three years. Its primary causes are gastrointestinal infections, viral and bacterial, and more rarely alimentary intoxications and other factors. As dehydration and negative nutritive balance are the main complications of AD, it is clear that the compensation of lost body fluids and adequate diet form the basis of the child's treatment. Other therapeutic measures, except antipyretics in high febrility, antiparasitic drugs for intestinal lambliasis, anti-amebiasis and probiotics are rarely necessary. This primarily regards uncritical use of antibiotics and intestinal antiseptics in the therapy of bacterial diarrhea.The use of antiemetics, antidiarrhetics and spasmolytics is unnecessary and potentially risky, so that it is not recommended for children with AD. PMID:26946776

  15. Mast cell chymase in experimentally induced psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Suttle, Mireille-Maria; Harvima, Ilkka T

    2016-06-01

    Mast cell chymase can have a pro-inflammatory or an immunosuppressive function in psoriasis, but the outcome may depend on the level of chymase activity. Therefore, mast cells showing chymase activity (Chyact ) and immunoreactivity (Chyprot ) were studied during the Köbner reaction (0 days, 2 h, 1 day, 3 days and 7 days) of psoriasis induced by the tape-stripping technique. Also, the effect of recombinant human chymase (rh-chymase) or human LAD2 mast cells (LAD2) on the (3) H-thymidine uptake of psoriatic peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or total T cells was studied. The Chyact /Chyprot ratio tended to be higher in all time-point biopsies in the Köbner-negative (n = 10) than -positive (n = 8) group (P = 0.073), although chymase activity decreased significantly at 2 h to 1 day only in the Köbner-negative group. rh-chymase (0.05-0.5 μg/mL) stimulated to a varying extent PBMC in eight out of nine cultures, but in all cultures 5 μg/mL rh-chymase turned the stimulation towards inhibition. The effect of rh-chymase on T cells varied from stimulation to inhibition, but in 11 of 15 cultures rh-chymase, at least at 5 μg/mL, produced a change to inhibition. In co-cultures, LAD2 inhibited PBMC in the absence of soybean trypsin inhibitor (SBTI). In the presence of SBTI, LAD2 stimulated PBMC in the majority of seven cultures. In summary, the psoriatic immunopathogenesis may be promoted at low, but controlled at high, activity status of chymase. PMID:26703925

  16. Zinc treatment ameliorates diarrhea and intestinal inflammation in undernourished rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background WHO guidelines recommend zinc supplementation as a key adjunct therapy for childhood diarrhea in developing countries, however zinc’s anti-diarrheal effects remain only partially understood. Recently, it has been recognized that low-grade inflammation may influence stunting. In this study, we examined whether oral zinc supplementation could improve weight, intestinal inflammation, and diarrhea in undernourished weanling rats. Methods Rats were undernourished using a northeastern Brazil regional diet (RBD) for two weeks, followed by oral gavage with a saturated lactose solution (30 g/kg) in the last 7 days to induce osmotic diarrhea. Animals were checked for diarrhea daily after lactose intake. Blood was drawn in order to measure serum zinc levels by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Rats were euthanized to harvest jejunal tissue for histology and cytokine profiles by ELISA. In a subset of animals, spleen samples were harvested under aseptic conditions to quantify bacterial translocation. Results Oral zinc supplementation increased serum zinc levels following lactose-induced osmotic diarrhea. In undernourished rats, zinc improved weight gain following osmotic diarrhea and significantly reduced diarrheal scores by the third day of lactose intake (p < 0.05), with improved jejunum histology (p < 0.0001). Zinc supplementation diminished bacterial translocation only in lactose-challenged undernourished rats (p = 0.03) compared with the untreated challenged controls and reduced intestinal IL-1β and TNF-α cytokines to control levels. Conclusion Altogether our findings provide novel mechanisms of zinc action in the setting of diarrhea and undernutrition and support the use of zinc to prevent the vicious cycle of malnutrition and diarrhea. PMID:25095704

  17. Experimental background due to particle induced gas desorption in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang,S.Y.; Trbojevic, D.

    2008-08-10

    Beam-gas collision created experimental background, i.e., singles, has affected heavy ion and polarized proton operations in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The gas molecules in interaction region are mainly caused by the electron induced gas desorption. and the electrons are produced from the beam induced electron multipacting, or called electron cloud. The background has a dependence on the usual electron cloud related parameters, such as the bunch intensity, bunch spacing, and the solenoid field. With the RHIC upgrade plan, the experimental background may become a luminosity limiting factor. Mitigations are discussed.

  18. Weanling diarrhea: a case report.

    PubMed

    Solomons, N W; Molina, S; Bulux, J

    1990-05-01

    This case report describes a 14-month-old Guatemalan boy suffering from diarrhea and malnutrition. He had been healthy and experienced normal growth until weaning, which began at six months of age. Introduction of semisolid foods at this time was accompanied by bouts of diarrhea and a reduced growth rate. After admission to hospital at 14 months of age, he was found to have protein-energy malnutrition of the edematous type (kwashiorkor) and to be infected with Giardia lamblia. Therapy with metronidazole and a high-protein diet resulted in satisfactory weight gain and cessation of the diarrhea. PMID:2370970

  19. Experimentally induced otitis and audiogenic seizure in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Niaussat, M M

    1977-04-15

    Audiogenic seizures can be induced in genetically non-susceptible 17-day-old mice (Rb/3 strain) with various results. Priming only induces 9% of seizures, auditory insulation 3,8%, while experimental otitis leads to 79%. The hypothesis concerning disuse supersensitivity subsequent to acoustic deprivation was not confirmed by the experiment. However, modification of acoustic transmission at middle ear level induced by otitis or ear physical damage during the maturation period, exposes the upper nervous centers to intense stimulation to which the reaction is a recruiting response. PMID:862735

  20. Bile Acid diarrhea: prevalence, pathogenesis, and therapy.

    PubMed

    Camilleri, Michael

    2015-05-23

    Bile acid diarrhea (BAD) is usually seen in patients with ileal Crohn's disease or ileal resection. However, 25% to 50% of patients with functional diarrhea or diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) also have evidence of BAD. It is estimated that 1% of the population may have BAD. The causes of BAD include a deficiency in fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF-19), a hormone produced in enterocytes that regulates hepatic bile acid (BA) synthesis. Other potential causes include genetic variations that affect the proteins involved in BA enterohepatic circulation and synthesis or in the TGR5 receptor that mediates the actions of BA in colonic secretion and motility. BAs enhance mucosal permeability, induce water and electrolyte secretion, and accelerate colonic transit partly by stimulating propulsive high-amplitude colonic contractions. There is an increased proportion of primary BAs in the stool of patients with IBS-D, and some changes in the fecal microbiome have been described. There are several methods of diagnosing BAD, such as (75)selenium homotaurocholic acid test retention, serum C4, FGF-19, and fecal BA measurement; presently, therapeutic trials with BA sequestrants are most commonly used for diagnosis. Management involves the use of BA sequestrants including cholestyramine, colestipol, and colesevelam. FXR agonists such as obeticholic acid constitute a promising new approach to treating BAD. PMID:25918262

  1. Bile Acid Diarrhea: Prevalence, Pathogenesis, and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Camilleri, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Bile acid diarrhea (BAD) is usually seen in patients with ileal Crohn’s disease or ileal resection. However, 25% to 50% of patients with functional diarrhea or diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) also have evidence of BAD. It is estimated that 1% of the population may have BAD. The causes of BAD include a deficiency in fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF-19), a hormone produced in enterocytes that regulates hepatic bile acid (BA) synthesis. Other potential causes include genetic variations that affect the proteins involved in BA enterohepatic circulation and synthesis or in the TGR5 receptor that mediates the actions of BA in colonic secretion and motility. BAs enhance mucosal permeability, induce water and electrolyte secretion, and accelerate colonic transit partly by stimulating propulsive high-amplitude colonic contractions. There is an increased proportion of primary BAs in the stool of patients with IBS-D, and some changes in the fecal microbiome have been described. There are several methods of diagnosing BAD, such as 75selenium homotaurocholic acid test retention, serum C4, FGF-19, and fecal BA measurement; presently, therapeutic trials with BA sequestrants are most commonly used for diagnosis. Management involves the use of BA sequestrants including cholestyramine, colestipol, and colesevelam. FXR agonists such as obeticholic acid constitute a promising new approach to treating BAD. PMID:25918262

  2. Analysis of mRNA expression for genes associated with regulatory T lymphocytes (CD25, FoxP3, CTLA4, and IDO) after experimental infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus of low or high virulence in beef calves.

    PubMed

    Palomares, Roberto A; Hurley, David J; Woolums, Amelia R; Parrish, Jacqueline E; Brock, Kenny V

    2014-12-01

    Immunosuppression caused by bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) has been associated with lymphocyte depletion, leukopenia and impairment of leukocyte function; however, no work has been done on the relationship between BVDV and regulatory T lymphocytes (Tregs). The objective of this study was to compare the mRNA expression of genes associated with Tregs (CD25, FoxP3, CTLA4, and IDO), after experimental infection of beef calves with low (LV) or high (HV) virulence BVDV. Thirty BVDV-naïve calves were randomly assigned to three groups. Calves were intra-nasally inoculated with LV (n=10, strain SD-1) or HV (n=10, strain 1373) BVDV or BVDV-free cell culture medium (control, n=10). Quantitative RT-PCR was used to determine the expression of target genes in tracheo-bronchial lymph nodes and spleen on day 5 post-infection. The mRNA expression of CD25 was up-regulated in tracheo-bronchial lymph nodes of LV (P<0.05), but not in HV compared to the control group. The expression of FoxP3 and CTLA4 was not increased in tracheo-bronchial lymph nodes of either of the BVDV-inoculated groups. A dramatic up-regulation of IDO mRNA was observed in tracheo-bronchial lymph nodes of LV (P<0.05), but not HV compared to the control calves. In conclusion, experimental infection with BVDV did not provide evidence of Treg activation based on expression of FoxP3 and CTL4. Differential expression of CD25 and IDO mRNA on day 5 post-infection with HV or LV BVDV might reflect temporal differences in transcription occurring during the immune response elicited by these viral strains, or differences in viral infectivity of the host cells. PMID:25456194

  3. PHARMACOLOGIC TREATMENT OF HYPERALGESIA EXPERIMENTALLY INDUCED BY NUCLEUS PULPOSUS

    PubMed Central

    de Souza Grava, André Luiz; Ferrari, Luiz Fernando; Parada, Carlos Amílcar; Defino, Helton Luiz Aparecido

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of anti-inflammatory drugs (dexamethasone, indomethacin, atenolol and indomethacin plus atenolol) and analgesic drugs (morphine) on hyperalgesia experimentally induced by the nucleus pulposus (NP) in contact with the L5 dorsal root ganglion (DRG). Methods: Thirty male Wistar rats of weights ranging from 220 to 250 g were used in the study. Hyperalgesia was induced by means of a fragment of NP removed from the sacrococcygeal region that was placed in contact with the L5 dorsal root ganglion. The 30 animals were divided into experimental groups according to the drug used. The drugs were administered for two weeks after the surgical procedure to induce hyperalgesia. Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia was evaluated using the paw pressure test, von Frey electronic test and Hargreaves test, over a seven-week period. Results: The greatest reduction of hyperalgesia was observed in the group of animals treated with morphine, followed by dexamethasone, indomethacin and atenolol. Reductions in hyperalgesia were observed after drug administration ceased, except for the group of animals treated with morphine, in which there was an increase in hyperalgesia after discontinuation of the treatment. Conclusion: Hyperalgesia induced by NP contact with the DRG can be reduced through administration of anti-inflammatory and analgesic drugs, but a greater reduction was observed with the administration of dexamethasone. PMID:27026966

  4. Hafnia alvei, a probable cause of diarrhea in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Albert, M J; Alam, K; Islam, M; Montanaro, J; Rahaman, A S; Haider, K; Hossain, M A; Kibriya, A K; Tzipori, S

    1991-01-01

    Hafnia alvei, a member of the family Enterobacteriaceae, was the only species of bacteria cultured from the stool of a 9-month-old child who was admitted with a 3-day history of watery diarrhea. The isolated strain of H. alvei failed to produce heat-labile or heat-stable enterotoxins or Shiga-like toxin I or II and did not invade HeLa cells, nor did it cause keratoconjunctivitis (determined by the Sereny test) in a guinea pig's eye. The strain, however, induced diarrhea in 8 of 12 adult rabbits with removable intestinal ties (removable intestinal tie-adult rabbit diarrhea [RITARD] assay) and in 1 of 2 orally fed animals. No diarrhea could be induced with Escherichia coli K-12 in eight RITARD assay rabbits and three orally fed rabbits, respectively. Microscopic examination of affected animals revealed moderate inflammatory cellular infiltration of the intestinal mucosa, in which bacterial attachment to the surface epithelium and loss of the microvillus border were evident in the ileum and colon. Electron microscopy demonstrated cellular modifications of the apical surface, with cupping or pedestal formation and increased terminal web density at sites of bacterial "attachment-effacement," a well-known characteristic and mechanism of diarrhea of enteropathogenic E. coli. Identical lesions were also induced by H. alvei in rabbit ileal loops, which ruled out naturally occurring rabbit enteropathogenic E. coli strains, which are known to produce similar lesions. It is concluded that at least some strains of H. alvei have the potential to cause diarrhea and that attachment-effacement is a virulence characteristic shared by bacteria other than E. coli. Images PMID:2004829

  5. Elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema: insights from experimental models.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Mariana A; Rocco, Patricia R M

    2011-12-01

    Several distinct stimuli can be used to reproduce histological and functional features of human emphysema, a leading cause of disability and death. Since cigarette smoke is the main cause of emphysema in humans, experimental researches have attempted to reproduce this situation. However, this is an expensive and cumbersome method of emphysema induction, and simpler, more efficacious alternatives have been sought. Among these approaches, elastolytic enzymes have been widely used to reproduce some characteristics of human cigarette smoke-induced disease, such as: augmentation of airspaces, inflammatory cell influx into the lungs, and systemic inflammation. Nevertheless, the use of elastase-induced emphysema models is still controversial, since the disease pathways involved in elastase induction may differ from those occurring in smoke-induced emphysema. This indicates that the choice of an emphysema model may impact the results of new therapies or drugs being tested. The aim of this review is to compare the mechanisms of disease induction in smoke and elastase emphysema models, to describe the differences among various elastase models, and to establish the advantages and disadvantages of elastase-induced emphysema models. More studies are required to shed light on the mechanisms of elastase-induced emphysema. PMID:22159348

  6. Treatment of horses with chronic diarrhea: immunologic status.

    PubMed

    Targowski, S P

    1976-01-01

    All chronically diarrheal horses given (orally) 2 series of treatments with normal horse serum recovered in 2 to 4 weeks. However, mild diarrhea sometimes persisted several months in the group of horses with severe diarrhea. Weight gains were approximately 35% in horses with severe diarrhea and approximately 10% in horses with mild diarrhea. Serum specimens from 12 diarrheal and 20 normal horses were examined for immunoglobulins by single radial immunodiffusion technique. Concentration of immunoglobulin A in serum of diarrheal horses was approximately 50% lower than that in serum of normal horses. By contrast, there was more immunoglobulin G in serum of diarrheal horses than in serum of normal horses. Phytohemagglutinin (PHA-M) responsiveness of blood lymphocytes showed transient suppression during the stage of severe diarrhea. The regaining of PHA-M responsiveness of lymphocytes was observed simultaneously with the recovery process. However, the responsiveness of lymphocytes in recovered horses remained markedly lower than that in normal horses. Allergic reactions in diarrheal and normal horses were studied by observing dermal response to injections of saline extracts from some of the horse feeds. A delayed hypersensitivity reaction to streptokinase-streptodornase and PHA-M was also studied. Allergic reactions to these extracts were not induced in either diarrheal or normal horses; however, inflammatory response to the extracts was approximately 50% greater in normal than in diarrheal horses. Response to intradermal injection of either streptokinase-streptodornase or PHA-M was significantly greater in normal horses than in diarrheal horses. PMID:1247193

  7. Colestipol hydrochloride prophylaxis of diarrhea during pelvic radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Stryker, J.A.; Chung, C.K.; Layser, J.D.

    1983-02-01

    Thirty-three patients were randomized prior to pelvic radiotherapy to receive the bile acid-sequestering resin colestipol hydrochloride, 5 grams qid, during the entire time of their therapy or diphenoxylate hydrochloride and atropine sulfate 2.5-20 mg per day (control) if they experienced diarrhea. The colestipol patients also took diphenoxylate if they had diarrhea. The patients in the colestipol group often experienced nausea, vomiting, and abdominal cramps and 8 were forced to discontinue the drug. There was no difference in the weekly stool frequency between the colestipol and the control patients but the colestipol patients who took at least 50% of the prescribed dose required fewer diphenoxylate tablets than the controls. The data suggest that colestipol hydrochloride is not of value in preventing radiation-induced diarrhea because of the side effects associated with the drug, but the theory on which the use of bile acid-sequestering agents is based may be correct.

  8. Experimentally induced rodent models of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Shahidul; Wilson, Rachel Dorothy

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes is one of the major global public health problems and is gradually getting worse particularly in developing nations where 95% of patients are suffering from type 2 diabetes (T2D). Animal models in diabetes research are very common where rodents are the best choice of use due to being smaller in size, easy to handle, omnivorous in nature, and non-wild tranquil behavior. Normally rodent models are classified into two major classes namely: (1) genetic or spontaneously induced models and (2) non-genetic or experimentally induced models. Non-genetic models are more popular compared to genetic models due to lower cost, wider availability, easier to induce diabetes, and of course easier to maintain compared to genetic models. A number of non-genetic models have been developed in last three decades for diabetes research including adult alloxan/streptozotocin (STZ) models, partial pancreatectomy model, high-fat (HF) diet-fed models, fructose-fed models, HF diet-fed STZ models, nicotinamide-STZ models, monosodium-glutamate (MSG) induced models, and intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) models. A T2D model should have the all major pathogenesis of the disease usually found in humans; however, none of the above-mentioned models are without limitations. This chapter comparatively evaluates most of the experimentally induced rodent models of T2D with their limitations, advantages, disadvantages, and criticality of development in order to help diabetes research groups to more appropriately select the animal models to work on their specific research question. PMID:22893406

  9. The effect of experimentally-induced subacromial pain on proprioception.

    PubMed

    Sole, Gisela; Osborne, Hamish; Wassinger, Craig

    2015-02-01

    Shoulder injuries may be associated with proprioceptive deficits, however, it is unknown whether these changes are due to the experience of pain, tissue damage, or a combination of these. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of experimentally-induced sub-acromial pain on proprioceptive variables. Sub-acromial pain was induced via hypertonic saline injection in 20 healthy participants. Passive joint replication (PJR) and threshold to detection of movement direction (TTDMD) were assessed with a Biodex System 3 Pro isokinetic dynamometer for baseline control, experimental pain and recovery control conditions with a starting position of 60° shoulder abduction. The target angle for PJR was 60° external rotation, starting from 40°. TTDMD was tested from a position of 20° external rotation. Repeated measures ANOVAs were used to determine differences between PJR absolute and variable errors and TTDMD for the control and experimental conditions. Pain was elicited with a median 7 on the Numeric Pain Rating Scale. TTDMD was significantly decreased for the experimental pain condition compared to baseline and recovery conditions (≈30%, P = 0.003). No significant differences were found for absolute (P = 0.152) and variable (P = 0.514) error for PJR. Movement sense was enhanced for the experimental sub-acromial pain condition, which may reflect protective effects of the central nervous system in response to the pain. Where decreased passive proprioception is observed in shoulders with injuries, these may be due to a combination of peripheral tissue injury and neural adaptations that differ from those due to acute pain. PMID:25261091

  10. The Day Care Center Diarrhea Dilemma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickering, Larry K.

    1986-01-01

    Prevention and control of diarrhea in day care settings depends on: maintenance of hygienic standards; disease surveillance; adhering to a policy for exclusion of children with diarrhea; and education of staff. When diarrhea afflicts several children, isolating together can stop the spread of disease without interrupting normal operation. (KH)

  11. Immediate effects of chocolate on experimentally induced mood states.

    PubMed

    Macht, Michael; Mueller, Jochen

    2007-11-01

    In this work two hypotheses were tested: (1) that eating a piece of chocolate immediately affects negative, but not positive or neutral mood, and (2) that this effect is due to palatability. Experiment 1 (48 normal-weight and healthy women and men) examined the effects of eating a piece of chocolate and drinking water on negative, positive and neutral mood states induced by film clips. Eating chocolate reduced negative mood compared to drinking water, whereas no or only marginal effects were found on neutral and positive moods. Experiment 2 (113 normal-weight and healthy women and men) compared effects of eating palatable and unpalatable chocolate on negative mood, and examined the duration of chocolate-induced mood change. Negative mood was improved after eating palatable chocolate as compared to unpalatable chocolate or nothing. This effect was short lived, i.e., it disappeared after 3 min. In both experiments, chocolate-induced mood improvement was associated with emotional eating. The present studies demonstrate that eating a small amount of sweet food improves an experimentally induced negative mood state immediately and selectively and that this effect of chocolate is due to palatability. It is hypothesized that immediate mood effects of palatable food contribute to the habit of eating to cope with stress. PMID:17597253

  12. Ichnocarpus frutescens Ameliorates Experimentally Induced Convulsion in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Narendra Kumar; Laloo, Damiki; Garabadu, Debapriya; Singh, Tryambak Deo; Singh, Virendra Pratap

    2014-01-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the anticonvulsant activity and probable mechanism of action of the methanol root extract from I. frutescens (MEIF) using different experimental animal models. Anticonvulsant activity of the single dose of MEIF (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg, p.o.) was evaluated in maximal electroshock- (MES-), pentylenetetrazole- (PTZ-), and isoniazid- (INH-) induced convulsions models in rats. The levels of γ-amino butyric acid (GABA), glutamate, GABA-transaminase (GABA-T) activity and oxidative stress markers were measured in pretreated rat's brain homogenate to corroborate the mechanism of observed anticonvulsant activity. MEIF (200–400 mg/kg, p.o.) protected the animals in all the behavioral models used. Pretreatment of MEIF (200–400 mg/kg, p.o.) and diazepam (1.0 mg/kg, i.p.) to the animals in INH-induced convulsion model showed 100% and 80% protection, respectively, as well as significant restoration of GABA and glutamate level in the rat's brain. MEIF and vigabatrin (50 mg/kg, i.p.) reduced the PTZ-induced increase in the activity of GABA-T (46%) in the brain. Further, MEIF reversed the PTZ-induced increase in lipid peroxidase (LPO) and decrease in reduced glutathione (GSH), catalase (CAT), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities. The findings of this study validate the anticonvulsant activity of I. frutescens. PMID:27379268

  13. [Rotavirus and other viruses of diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Bajolet, O; Chippaux-Hyppolite, C

    1998-01-01

    Rotaviruses represent 80% of recognized viral etiologies and 140 million cases of diarrhea per year. They strike young children with similar frequency throughout the world, but the mortality rate is high in developing countries only, with some 870,000 deaths per year (WHO, 1997). Rotaviruses belong to the family of Reoviridae; they are segmented bicatenary RNA viruses, which explains their genetic variability, the presence of mixed infections, the establishment for some time already of a molecular epidemiology by electrophore types. The viruses are "naked" and thus resistant to the outside environment; their massive elimination, 10(8) to 10(10)viral particles per gram of faeces, begins with the first day of diarrhea. They are found in used water and can also be concentrated by shellfish; the environment thus constitutes a notable reservoir for the virus. Oral-faecal transmission is facilitated by deficient sanitary conditions. The 11 fragments of the genome each codify for 1 viral protein; 2 surface proteins, VP4 and VP7, bring about the formation of neutralizing antibodies, which are important for the protection and determination of different serotypes. A non structural protein--NSP4--would seem to intervene in the cytopathogenic effect and may act as a veritable viral enterotoxine. Numerous animal species are infected by rotaviruses which are district from the human ones. The pathology as it affects animals is of economic importance and of interest as an experimental and vaccinal model. Between human and animal rotaviruses there can be genetic rematchings and the VP6 protein is an antigen common to the group. The description of the other viruses responsible for diarrhea has benefited from widespread use of electronic microscopes from the very first years of study of rotaviruses. These other viruses belong to 6 different types: adenovirus, calcivirus, astrovirus, Norwalk agent and related viruses, coronavirus, enterovirus. They therefore have a structural and

  14. Diarrhea in chronic inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Wenzl, Heimo H

    2012-09-01

    Diarrhea is a common clinical feature of inflammatory bowel diseases and may be accompanied by abdominal pain, urgency, and fecal incontinence. The pathophysiology of diarrhea in these diseases is complex, but defective absorption of salt and water by the inflamed bowel is the most important mechanism involved. In addition to inflammation secondary to the disease, diarrhea may arise from a variety of other conditions. It is important to differentiate the pathophysiologic mechanisms involved in the diarrhea in the individual patient to provide the appropriate therapy. This article reviews microscopic colitis, ulcerative colitis, and Crohn's disease, focusing on diarrhea. PMID:22917170

  15. Experimental analysis of radiation- and streaming-induced microparticle acoustophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Massimiliano; Marin, Alvaro; Kähler, Christian J.; Augustsson, Per; Laurell, Thomas; Muller, Peter B.; Barnkob, Rune; Bruus, Henrik

    2012-11-01

    We present an experimental analysis of the acoustophoretic motion of microparticles suspended in a liquid-filled acoustofluidic microchannel. This analysis intends to provide an experimental validation and support to very recent numerical and analytical models of radiation- and streaming-induced microparticle acoustophoresis (see Muller et al., Lab Chip 12, in press, 2012). For the experiments, we used a suspension of water and spherical polystyrene particles in a straight microchannel with rectangular cross section, actuated in its 1.94-MHz resonance by means of a piezoelectric transducer. The particles were labeled with a fluorescent dye and their motion was observed using an epifluorescent microscope. For the analysis, the Astigmatism Particle Tracking Velocimetry (APTV) technique was used to measure the three-dimensional trajectories and velocities of the particles with high precision and resolution (Cierpka et al., Meas Sci Technol 22, 2011). The experiments were performed for different particle sizes, ranging from 0.5- μm particles, dominated by the Stokes drag force induced by the acoustic streaming of the flow, to 5- μm particles, dominated by the acoustic radiation force. The results agree well with the analytical and numerical predictions.

  16. Experimental microembolism induces localized neuritic pathology in guinea pig cerebrum

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian-Ming; Cai, Yan; Liu, Fei; Yang, La; Hu, Xia; Patrylo, Peter R.; Cai, Huaibin; Luo, Xue-Gang; Xiao, Dong; Yan, Xiao-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Microbleeds are a common finding in aged human brains. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), neuritic plaques composed of β-amyloid (Aβ) deposits and dystrophic neurites occur frequently around cerebral vasculature, raising a compelling question as to whether, and if so, how, microvascular abnormality and amyloid/neuritic pathology might be causally related. Here we used a guinea pig model of cerebral microembolism to explore a potential inductive effect of vascular injury on neuritic and amyloid pathogenesis. Brains were examined 7-30 days after experimental microvascular embolization occupying ~0.5% of total cortical area. Compared to sham-operated controls, glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoreactivity was increased in the embolized cerebrum, evidently around intracortical vasculature. Swollen/sprouting neurites exhibiting increased reactivity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase, parvalbumin, vesicular glutamate transporter 1 and choline acetyltransferase appeared locally in the embolized brains in proximity to intracortical vasculature. The embolization-induced swollen/sprouting neurites were also robustly immunoreactive for β-amyloid precursor protein and β-secretase-1, the substrate and initiating enzyme for Aβ genesis. These experimental data suggest that microvascular injury can induce multisystem neuritic pathology associated with an enhanced amyloidogenic potential in wild-type mammalian brain. PMID:25871402

  17. Experimental microembolism induces localized neuritic pathology in guinea pig cerebrum.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Ming; Cai, Yan; Liu, Fei; Yang, La; Hu, Xia; Patrylo, Peter R; Cai, Huaibin; Luo, Xue-Gang; Xiao, Dong; Yan, Xiao-Xin

    2015-05-10

    Microbleeds are a common finding in aged human brains. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), neuritic plaques composed of β-amyloid (Aβ) deposits and dystrophic neurites occur frequently around cerebral vasculature, raising a compelling question as to whether, and if so, how, microvascular abnormality and amyloid/neuritic pathology might be causally related. Here we used a guinea pig model of cerebral microembolism to explore a potential inductive effect of vascular injury on neuritic and amyloid pathogenesis. Brains were examined 7-30 days after experimental microvascular embolization occupying ~0.5% of total cortical area. Compared to sham-operated controls, glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoreactivity was increased in the embolized cerebrum, evidently around intracortical vasculature. Swollen/sprouting neurites exhibiting increased reactivity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase, parvalbumin, vesicular glutamate transporter 1 and choline acetyltransferase appeared locally in the embolized brains in proximity to intracortical vasculature. The embolization-induced swollen/sprouting neurites were also robustly immunoreactive for β-amyloid precursor protein and β-secretase-1, the substrate and initiating enzyme for Aβ genesis. These experimental data suggest that microvascular injury can induce multisystem neuritic pathology associated with an enhanced amyloidogenic potential in wild-type mammalian brain. PMID:25871402

  18. The influence of experimentally induced pain on shoulder muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Diederichsen, Louise Pyndt; Winther, Annika; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul; Krogsgaard, Michael R; Nørregaard, Jesper

    2009-04-01

    Muscle function is altered in painful shoulder conditions. However, the influence of shoulder pain on muscle coordination of the shoulder has not been fully clarified. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of experimentally induced shoulder pain on shoulder muscle function. Eleven healthy men (range 22-27 years), with no history of shoulder or cervical problems, were included in the study. Pain was induced by 5% hypertonic saline injections into the supraspinatus muscle or subacromially. Seated in a shoulder machine, subjects performed standardized concentric abduction (0 degrees -105 degrees) at a speed of approximately 120 degrees/s, controlled by a metronome. During abduction, electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded by intramuscular wire electrodes inserted in two deeply located shoulder muscles and by surface-electrodes over six superficially located shoulder muscles. EMG was recorded before pain, during pain and after pain had subsided and pain intensity was continuously scored on a visual analog scale (VAS). During abduction, experimentally induced pain in the supraspinatus muscle caused a significant decrease in activity of the anterior deltoid, upper trapezius and the infraspinatus and an increase in activity of lower trapezius and latissimus dorsi muscles. Following subacromial injection a significantly increased muscle activity was seen in the lower trapezius, the serratus anterior and the latissimus dorsi muscles. In conclusion, this study shows that acute pain both subacromially and in the supraspinatus muscle modulates coordination of the shoulder muscles during voluntary movements. During painful conditions, an increased activity was detected in the antagonist (latissimus), which support the idea that localized pain affects muscle activation in a way that protects the painful structure. Further, the changes in muscle activity following subacromial pain induction tend to expand the subacromial space and thereby decrease the load

  19. In vivo Expression of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase in Experimentally Induced Neurologic Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koprowski, Hilary; Zheng, Yong Mu; Heber-Katz, Ellen; Fraser, Nigel; Rorke, Lucy; Fu, Zhen Fang; Hanlon, Cathleen; Dietzschold, Bernhard

    1993-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA in the brain tissue of rats and mice under the following experimental conditions: in rats infected with borna disease virus and rabies virus, in mice infected with herpes simplex virus, and in rats after the induction of experimental allergic encephalitis. The results showed that iNOS mRNA, normally nondetectable in the brain, was present in animals after viral infection or after induction of experimental allergic encephalitis. The induction of iNOS mRNA coincided with the severity of clinical signs and in some cases with the presence of inflammatory cells in the brain. The results indicate that nitric oxide produced by cells induced by iNOS may be the toxic factor accounting for cell damage and this may open the door to approaches to the study of the pathogenesis of neurological diseases.

  20. Experimental diabetes in neonatal mice induces early peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Ariza, L; Pagès, G; García-Lareu, B; Cobianchi, S; Otaegui, P J; Ruberte, J; Chillón, M; Navarro, X; Bosch, A

    2014-08-22

    Animal models of diabetes do not reach the severity of human diabetic neuropathy but relatively mild neurophysiological deficits and minor morphometric changes. The lack of degenerative neuropathy in diabetic rodent models seems to be a consequence of the shorter length of the axons or the shorter animal life span. Diabetes-induced demyelination needs many weeks or even months before it can be evident by morphometrical analysis. In mice myelination of the peripheral nervous system starts at the prenatal period and it is complete several days after birth. Here we induced experimental diabetes to neonatal mice and we evaluated its effect on the peripheral nerve 4 and 8 weeks after diabetes induction. Neurophysiological values showed a decline in sensory nerve conduction velocity at both time-points. Morphometrical analysis of the tibial nerve demonstrated a decrease in the number of myelinated fibers, fiber size and myelin thickness at both time-points studied. Moreover, aldose reductase and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activities were increased even if the amount of the enzyme was not affected. Thus, type 1 diabetes in newborn mice induces early peripheral neuropathy and may be a good model to assay pharmacological or gene therapy strategies to treat diabetic neuropathy. PMID:24846610

  1. Comparison of endogenous and radiolabeled bile acid excretion in patients with idiopathic chronic diarrhea

    SciTech Connect

    Schiller, L.R.; Bilhartz, L.E.; Santa Ana, C.A. )

    1990-04-01

    Fecal recovery of radioactivity after ingestion of a bolus of radiolabeled bile acid is abnormally high in most patients with idiopathic chronic diarrhea. To evaluate the significance of this malabsorption, concurrent fecal excretion of both exogenous radiolabeled bile acid and endogenous (unlabeled) bile acid were measured in patients with idiopathic chronic diarrhea. Subjects received a 2.5-microCi oral dose of taurocholic acid labeled with 14C in the 24th position of the steroid moiety. Endogenous bile acid excretion was measured by a hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase assay on a concurrent 72-h stool collection. Both radiolabeled and endogenous bile acid excretion were abnormally high in most patients with chronic diarrhea compared with normal subjects, even when equivoluminous diarrhea was induced in normal subjects by ingestion of osmotically active solutions. The correlation between radiolabeled and endogenous bile acid excretion was good. However, neither radiolabeled nor endogenous bile acid excretion was as abnormal as is typically seen in patients with ileal resection, and none of these diarrhea patients responded to treatment with cholestyramine with stool weights less than 200 g. These results suggest (a) that this radiolabeled bile acid excretion test accurately reflects excess endogenous bile acid excretion; (b) that excess endogenous bile acid excretion is not caused by diarrhea per se; (c) that spontaneously occurring idiopathic chronic diarrhea is often associated with increased endogenous bile acid excretion; and (d) that bile acid malabsorption is not likely to be the primary cause of diarrhea in most of these patients.

  2. Mechanisms of blast induced brain injuries, experimental studies in rats.

    PubMed

    Risling, M; Plantman, S; Angeria, M; Rostami, E; Bellander, B-M; Kirkegaard, M; Arborelius, U; Davidsson, J

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBI) potentially induced by blast waves from detonations result in significant diagnostic problems. It may be assumed that several mechanisms contribute to the injury. This study is an attempt to characterize the presumed components of the blast induced TBI. Our experimental models include a blast tube in which an anesthetized rat can be exposed to controlled detonations of explosives that result in a pressure wave with a magnitude between 130 and 260 kPa. In this model, the animal is fixed with a metal net to avoid head acceleration forces. The second model is a controlled penetration of a 2mm thick needle. In the third model the animal is subjected to a high-speed sagittal rotation angular acceleration. Immunohistochemical labeling for amyloid precursor protein revealed signs of diffuse axonal injury (DAI) in the penetration and rotation models. Signs of punctuate inflammation were observed after focal and rotation injury. Exposure in the blast tube did not induce DAI or detectable cell death, but functional changes. Affymetrix Gene arrays showed changes in the expression in a large number of gene families including cell death, inflammation and neurotransmitters in the hippocampus after both acceleration and penetration injuries. Exposure to the primary blast wave induced limited shifts in gene expression in the hippocampus. The most interesting findings were a downregulation of genes involved in neurogenesis and synaptic transmission. These experiments indicate that rotational acceleration may be a critical factor for DAI and other acute changes after blast TBI. The further exploration of the mechanisms of blast TBI will have to include a search for long-term effects. PMID:20493951

  3. Numerical and Experimental Investigations of Tsunami-Induced Sediment Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Y.; Xiao, H.

    2007-05-01

    As demonstrated by the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami, high intensity wave runup and drawdown can mobilize substantial amount of sediment deposits. The resulting erosion and scour damage can undermine building foundations, roadways, sea walls, embankments, and may even lead to eventual collapse of the coastal structure. However, most previous models ignore the effect of tsunami-induced sediment transport and scour due to the complex physics and multiple scaling issues. In this work, a numerical model is presented for the simulation of solitary waves over a uniform sloped movable bed. The depth averaged nonlinear shallow water equations (SWEs) are used to model long waves, the wave profile gradient method is used to detect wave breaking, and the effect of energy-dissipation due to wave breaking is captured as a bore collapse. The effect of sediment transport is modeled via a passive scalar and is fully coupled with the SWEs to form a complete system. New forms of the erosion and deposition fluxes are introduced to account for the effect of the flow velocity, particle fall velocity, wave profile, and pore pressure gradient. The model is validated by comparing the numerical solutions to the measured bed changes obtained from the cross-shore sediment transport experiment under breaking solitary waves conducted by (Kobayashi & Lawrence 2004). To further validate the numerical model, two sets of experimental studies are planned for 2007. The first experimental study focuses on the effect of enhanced transport due to pore pressure gradients, and will be conducted at the 30-ft long flume in the hydraulics lab at the University of Hawaii using multiple grain sizes. The second experimental study focuses on tsunami-induced sediment transport, and will be conducted at the 160-ft long tsunami wave basin at Oregon State University using fine Oregon beach sand with D50=0.20mm. The experimental setups are shown, and scaling issues for the two movable bed physical models are discussed

  4. Diarrhea caused by carbohydrate malabsorption.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Heinz F; Hammer, Johann

    2012-09-01

    This article will focus on the role of the colon in the pathogenesis of diarrhea in carbohydrate malabsorption or physiologically incomplete absorption of carbohydrates, and on the most common manifestation of carbohydrate malabsorption, lactose malabsorption. In addition, incomplete fructose absorption, the role of carbohydrate malabsorption in other malabsorptive diseases, and congenital defects that lead to malabsorption will be covered. The article concludes with a section on diagnostic tools to evaluate carbohydrate malabsorption. PMID:22917167

  5. [Antidiarrheal drugs for chronic diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Vohmann, B; Hoffmann, J C

    2013-11-01

    Chronic diarrhea can be caused by multiple disease entities. Basic diagnostic tests are required in order to administer specific therapies whenever possible. If no specific treatment can be used, a symptomatic management should be initiated in order to prevent massive electrolyte- and water losses. Substances that can be used are loperamide, cholestyramine, bulking agents, probiotics, anticholinergic agents and in severe cases opioids. If used properly these agents can be prescribed longterm with an acceptable side effect profile. PMID:24163167

  6. Foraminiferal survival after long term experimentally induced anoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langlet, D.; Geslin, E.; Baal, C.; Metzger, E.; Lejzerowicz, F.; Riedel, B.; Zuschin, M.; Pawlowski, J.; Stachowitsch, M.; Jorissen, F. J.

    2013-06-01

    Anoxia has been successfully induced in four benthic chambers installed on the Northern Adriatic seafloor from 1 week to 10 months. To accurately determine whether benthic foraminifera can survive experimentally induced prolonged anoxia, the CellTrackerGreen method has been applied. Numerous individuals have been found living at all sampling times and at all sampling depths, showing that benthic foraminifera can survive up to 10 months of anoxia with co-occurring hydrogen sulphides. However, foraminiferal standing stocks decrease with sampling time in an irregular way. A large difference in standing stock between two cores samples in initial conditions indicates the presence of a large spatial heterogeneity of the foraminiferal faunas. An unexpected increase in standing stocks after 1 month is tentatively interpreted as a reaction to increased food availability due to the massive mortality of infaunal macrofaunal organisms. After this, standing stocks decrease again in a core sampled after 2 months of anoxia, to attain a minimum in the cores sampled after 10 months. We speculate that the trend of overall decrease of standing stocks is not due to the adverse effects of anoxia and hydrogen sulphides, but rather due to a continuous diminution of labile organic matter.

  7. Observational Study of Travelers' Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Meuris

    1995-03-01

    Background: European air travelers returning from Algeria, Egypt, Mexico, Morocco, and Tunisia were interviewed about their experience of travelers' diseases upon arrival in Brussels. Diarrhea was mentioned by 37% of the adults and 27% of the children. These subjects were questioned about the types of measures taken, type and duration of drug treatment (if any), and about duration of diarrhea and side effects experienced. Methods: Final analysis was performed based on 2160 interviews. The largest proportion of diarrhea was reported in the age group 15-24 years (46%). Results: The majority of the 2160 subjects had opted for drug treatment (81%): 927 subjects for loperamide alone, 235 for loperamide in combination with nifuroxazide, and 178 for nifuroxazide alone. Other drugs had been used less frequently. The median time to recovery was 2.4 days with loperamide compared to 3.2 days with nifuroxazide and to 3.4 days for the no-treatment group. Conclusions: A stratification of the results by severity of the diarrhea suggests a rank of antidiarrheal potency as follows: loperamide > nifuroxazide > no-drug treatment. The side effect with the highest incidence was constipation (2.4% with loperamide). (J Travel Med 2:11-15, 1995) Travelers' diarrhea is usually defined as the passage of at least three unformed stools per day or any number of such stools when accompanied by fever, abdominal cramping, or vomiting. The definition may be broadened to include more trivial bowel disturbance.1,2 The duration of this self-limited disease generally is 3 to 5 days. Medical intervention aims at shortening the duration of disease, thus allowing the sufferer to resume his or her usual activities at an early stage. A shortened period of recovery to physical well-being has obvious favorable economic implications if the traveler is on business and may help the maintenance of a desired level of quality of life while a traveler is on holiday. An observational study of various medical

  8. Some infectious causes of diarrhea in young farm animals.

    PubMed Central

    Holland, R E

    1990-01-01

    Escherichia coli, rotaviruses, and Cryptosporidium parvum are discussed in this review as they relate to enteric disease in calves, lambs, and pigs. These microorganisms are frequently incriminated as causative agents in diarrheas among neonatal food animals, and in some cases different strains or serotypes of the same organism cause diarrhea in humans. E. coli causes diarrhea by mechanisms that include production of heat-labile or heat-stable enterotoxins and synthesis of potent cytotoxins, and some strains cause diarrhea by yet undetermined mechanisms. Rotaviruses and C. parvum induce various degrees of villous atrophy. Rotaviruses infect and replicate within the cytoplasm of enterocytes, whereas C. parvum resides in an intracellular, extracytoplasmic location. E. coli, rotavirus, and C. parvum infections are of concern to producers, veterinarians, and public health officials. These agents are a major cause of economic loss to the producer because of costs associated with therapy, reduced performance, and high morbidity and mortality rates. Moreover, diarrheic animals may harbor, incubate, and act as a source to healthy animals and humans of some of these agents. Images PMID:2224836

  9. Pentamidine-induced dysglycaemia: experimental models in the rat.

    PubMed

    Assan, R; Assan, D; Delaby, J; Debussche, X; Toublanc, M

    1993-01-01

    In order to analyse further the pathophysiology of pentamidine effects on blood glucose regulation, the following experimental models were established in rats: impairment of the renal function, bile duct ligation, inhibition of the P450 cytochrome enzyme system. In otherwise intact rats, 7.5 mg/day pentamidine was well tolerated whereas doses of 15 mg/day induced severe, relapsing and eventually lethal hypoglycaemia within a few days. Induction of a renal insufficiency of graded severity by treatment with gentamycin, subtotal nephrectomy and total bilateral nephrectomy resulted in repetitive, severe (sometimes lethal) hypoglycaemia, alternating with hyperglycaemia, glucosuria and ketonuria in pentamidine-treated rats (7.5 mg/d). No long-standing insulin-dependent diabetes was observed. In the dysglycemic animals, plasma insulin levels were inappropriate to the concomitant glycaemia; no stimulation was obtained by i.v. glucose. Glucagon levels were higher than normal, suppressible by i.v. glucose, responsive to IV arginine and to hypoglycaemia. Dysglycemic events were more frequent and marked in the rats with the most severe renal functional derangement. They were more frequent in the rats treated with pentamidine mesylate than in those treated with the isethionate salt. Control uremic rats (free of pentamidine) remained euglycaemic. The islets of Langerhans displayed severe vascular congestion and degranulation and necrosis of the B cells, while the non B cells (and particularly the A cells) were intact. Exocrine pancreatitis was occasionally observed in the most severely uremic rats. In contrast with uremic rats, neither surgical ligation of choledocus, nor treatment by P450 cytochrome inhibitors (particularly ketoconazole) precipitated dysglycaemia in the pentamidine-treated rats. These experimental data: 1) strengthen the concept of inappropriate insulin release from pentamidine-lesioned islet B cells due to pentamidine accumulation; 2) indicate a predominant

  10. The Effects of Experimentally Induced Adelphophagy in Gastropod Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Olaf; Collin, Rachel; Carrillo-Baltodano, Allan

    2014-01-01

    Adelphophagy, development where embryos grow large by consuming morphologically distinct nutritive embryos or their own normal siblings is widespread but uncommon among animal phyla. Among invertebrates it is particularly common in some families of marine gastropods and segmented worms, but rare or unknown in other closely related families. In calyptraeid gastropods phylogenetic analysis indicates that adelphophagy has arisen at least 9 times from species with planktotrophic larval development. This pattern of frequent parallel evolution of adelphophagy suggests that the embryos of planktotrophic species might be predisposed to evolve adelphophagy. Here we used embryos of three species of planktotrophic calyptraeids, one from each of three major genera in the family (Bostrycapulus, Crucibulum, and Crepidula), to answer the following 3 questions: (1) Can embryos of species with planktotrophic development benefit, in terms of pre-hatching growth, from the ingestion of yolk and tissue from experimentally damaged siblings? (2) Does ingestion of this material from damaged siblings increase variation in pre-hatching size? and (3) Does this experimentally induced adelphophagy alter the allometry between the velum and the shell, increasing morphological similarity to embryos of normally adelphophagic species? We found an overall increase in shell length and velum diameter when embryos feed on damaged siblings within their capsules. There was no detectable increase in variation in shell length or velum diameter, or changes in allometry. The overall effect of our treatment was small compared to the embryonic growth observed in naturally adelphophagic development. However each embryo in our experiment probably consumed less than one sibling on average, whereas natural adelphophages often each consume 10–30 or more siblings. These results suggest that the ability to consume, assimilate, and benefit from yolk and tissue of their siblings is widespread across calyptraeids

  11. 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide induced experimental oral carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kanojia, Deepak; Vaidya, Milind M

    2006-08-01

    Human oral cancer is the sixth largest group of malignancies worldwide and single largest group of malignancies in the Indian subcontinent. Seventy percent of premalignant cancers appear from premalignant lesions. Only 8-10% of these lesions finally turn into malignancy. The appearance of these premalignant lesions is one distinct feature of human oral cancer. At present there is dearth of biomarkers to identify which of these lesions will turn into malignancy. Regional lymph node metastasis and locoregional recurrence are the major factors responsible for the limited survival of patients with oral cancer. Paucity of early diagnostic and prognostic markers is one of the contributory factors for higher mortality rates. Cancer is a multistep process and because of constrain in availability of human tissues from multiple stages of oral carcinogenesis including normal tissues, animal models are being widely used, aiming for the development of diagnostic and prognostic markers. A number of chemical carcinogens like coal tar, 20 methyl cholanthrene (20MC), 9,10-dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene (DMBA) and 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO) have been used in experimental oral carcinogenesis. However, 4NQO is the preferred carcinogen apart from DMBA in the development of experimental oral carcinogenesis. 4NQO is a water soluble carcinogen, which induces tumors predominantly in the oral cavity. It produces all the stages of oral carcinogenesis and several lines of evidences suggest that similar histological as well as molecular changes are observed in the human system. In the present review an attempt has been made to collate the information available on mechanisms of action of 4NQO, studies carried out for the development of biomarkers and chemopreventives agents using 4NQO animal models. PMID:16448841

  12. Erythropoietin is a hypoxia inducible factor-induced protective molecule in experimental autoimmune neuritis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Bangwei; Jiang, Man; Yang, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Xiong, Jian; Schluesener, Hermann J; Zhang, Zhiren; Wu, Yuzhang

    2013-08-01

    Experimental autoimmune neuritis (EAN), an autoantigen-specific T-cell-mediated disease model for human demyelinating inflammatory disease of the peripheral nervous system, is characterized by self-limitation. Here we investigated the regulation and contribution of erythropoietin (EPO) in EAN self-limitation. In EAN sciatic nerves, hypoxia, and protein and mRNA levels of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α), HIF-2α, EPO and EPO receptor (EPOR) were induced in parallel at disease peak phase but reduced at recovery periods. Further, the deactivation of HIF reduced EAN-induced EPO/EPOR upregulation in EAN, suggesting the central contribution of HIF to EPO/EPOR induction. The deactivation of EPOR signalling exacerbated EAN progression, implying that endogenous EPO contributed to EAN recovery. Exogenous EPO treatment greatly improved EAN recovery. In addition, EPO was shown to promote Schwann cell survival and myelin production. In EAN, EPO treatment inhibited lymphocyte proliferation and altered helper T cell differentiation by inducing increase of Foxp3(+)/CD4(+) regulatory T cells and decrease of IFN-γ(+)/CD4(+) Th1 cells. Furthermore, EPO inhibited inflammatory macrophage activation and promoted its phagocytic activity. In summary, our data demonstrated that EPO was induced in EAN by HIF and contributed to EAN recovery, and endogenous and exogenous EPO could effectively suppress EAN by attenuating inflammation and exerting direct cell protection, indicating that EPO contributes to the self-recovery of EAN and could be a potent candidate for treatment of autoimmune neuropathies. PMID:23603807

  13. The Cell Nucleus in Physiological and Experimentally Induced Hypometabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malatesta, M.

    The main problem for manned space mission is, at present, represented by the mass penalty associated to the human presence. An efficient approach could be the induction of a hypometabolic stasis in the astronauts, thus drastically reducing the physical and psychological requirements of the crew. On the other hand, in the wild, a reduction in resource consumptions physiologi- cally occurs in certain animals which periodically enter hibernation, a hypometabolic state in which both the energy need and energy offer are kept at a minimum. During the last twelve years, we have been studying different tissues of hibernating dormice, with the aim of analyzing their features during the euthermia -hibernation-arousal cycle as well as getting insight into the mechanisms allowing adaptation to hypometabolism. We paid particular attention to the cell nucleus, as it is the site of chief metabolic functions, such as DNA replication and RNA transcription. Our observations revealed no significant modification in the basic features of cell nuclei during hibernation; however, the cell nuclei of hibernating dormice showed unusual nuclear bodies containing molecules involved in RNA pathways. Therefore, we supposed that they could represent storage/assembly sites of several factors for processing some RNA which could be slowly synthesised during hibernation and rapidly and abundantly released in early arousal in order to meet the increased metabolic needs of the cell. The nucleolus also underwent structural and molecular modifications during hibernation, maybe to continue important nucleolar functions, or, alternatively, permit a most efficient reactivation upon arousal. On the basis of the observations made in vivo , we recently tried to experimentally induce a reversible hypometabolic state in in vitro models, using cell lines derived from hibernating and non-hibernating species. By administering the synthetic opioid DADLE, we could significantly reduce both RNA transcrip- tion and

  14. Gut microbial dysbiosis may predict diarrhea and fatigue in patients undergoing pelvic cancer radiotherapy: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aiping; Ling, Zongxin; Yang, Zhixiang; Kiela, Pawel R; Wang, Tao; Wang, Cheng; Cao, Le; Geng, Fang; Shen, Mingqiang; Ran, Xinze; Su, Yongping; Cheng, Tianmin; Wang, Junping

    2015-01-01

    Fatigue and diarrhea are the most frequent adverse effects of pelvic radiotherapy, while their etiologies are largely unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate the correlations between fatigue, diarrhea, and alterations in gut microbiota induced by pelvic radiotherapy. During the 5-week treatment of pelvic radiotherapy in 11 cancer patients, the general fatigue score significantly increased and was more prominent in the patients with diarrhea. The fatigue score was closely correlated with the decrease of serum citrulline (an indicator of the functional enterocyte mass) and the increases of systemic inflammatory proteins, including haptoglobin, orosomuoid, α1-antitrypsin and TNF-α. Serum level of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was also elevated, especially in the patients with diarrhea indicating epithelial barrier breach and endotoxemia. Pyrosequencing analysis of 16S rRNA gene revealed that microbial diversity, richness, and the Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio were significantly altered prior to radiotherapy in patients who later developed diarrhea. Pelvic radiotherapy induced further changes in fecal microbial ecology, some of which were specific to the patients with or without diarrhea. Our results indicate that gut microbial dysbiosis prior to radiation therapy may be exploited to predict development of diarrhea and to guide preventive treatment options. Radiation-induced dysbiosis may contribute to pelvic radiation disease, including mucositis, diarrhea, systemic inflammatory response, and pelvic radiotherapy-associated fatigue in cancer patients. PMID:25955845

  15. Expression of Serotonin Receptors in the Colonic Tissue of Chronic Diarrhea Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Tong; Qiu, Juanjuan; Wan, Jiajia; Wang, Fengyun; Tang, Xudong; Guo, Huishu

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: This study aimed to investigate the difference among the expression of serotonin receptors (5-HT3, 5-HT4, and 5-HT7 receptors) in colonic tissue of chronic diarrhea rats. Materials and Methods: A rat model of chronic diarrhea was established by lactose diet. The expression of 5-HT3, 5-HT4, and 5-HT7 receptors in the colonic tissue was detected using immunohistochemistry, real-time PCR and Western blotting techniques. Results: There is no significant difference on the protein expression of 5-HT3 receptor between the normal group and the chronic diarrhea model group. The mRNA expression of 5-HT3 receptor in the chronic diarrhea model group was significantly lower than that in the normal group (n = 10; P < 0.01). The protein and mRNA expression of 5-HT4 receptor in the chronic diarrhea model group were significantly higher than those in the normal group (n = 10; P < 0.05, P < 0.01). On the contrary, the protein and mRNA expressions of 5-HT7 receptor in the chronic diarrhea model group were significantly decreased compared with the normal group (n = 10; P < 0.01, P < 0.01). Conclusions: The results suggested the receptors of 5-HT4 and 5-HT7 may be involved in inducing diarrhea by lactose diet. PMID:27184643

  16. Confabulation versus experimentally induced false memories in Korsakoff patients.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, Ilse; d'Ydewalle, Géry

    2010-09-01

    The present study focuses on both the clinical symptom of confabulation and experimentally induced false memories in patients suffering from Korsakoff's syndrome. Despite the vast amount of case studies of confabulating patients and studies investigating false memories in the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) paradigm, the nature of Korsakoff patients' confabulatory behaviour and its association with DRM false memories have been rarely examined. Hence, the first aim of the present study was to evaluate confabulatory responses in a large sample of chronic Korsakoff patients and matched controls by means of the Dalla Barba Confabulation Battery. Second, the association between (provoked) confabulation and the patients' DRM false recognition performance was investigated. Korsakoff patients mainly confabulated in response to questions about episodic memory and questions to which the answer was unknown. A positive association was obtained between confabulation and the tendency to accept unstudied distractor words as being old in the DRM paradigm. On the other hand, there was a negative association between confabulation and false recognition of critical lures. The latter could be attributed to the importance of strategic retrieval at delayed memory testing. PMID:19930792

  17. Standardised Models for Inducing Experimental Peritoneal Adhesions in Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kraemer, Bernhard; Wallwiener, Christian; Rajab, Taufiek K.; Brochhausen, Christoph; Wallwiener, Markus; Rothmund, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Animal models for adhesion induction are heterogeneous and often poorly described. We compare and discuss different models to induce peritoneal adhesions in a randomized, experimental in vivo animal study with 72 female Wistar rats. Six different standardized techniques for peritoneal trauma were used: brushing of peritoneal sidewall and uterine horns (group 1), brushing of parietal peritoneum only (group 2), sharp excision of parietal peritoneum closed with interrupted sutures (group 3), ischemic buttons by grasping the parietal peritoneum and ligating the base with Vicryl suture (group 4), bipolar electrocoagulation of the peritoneum (group 5), and traumatisation by electrocoagulation followed by closure of the resulting peritoneal defect using Vicryl sutures (group 6). Upon second look, there were significant differences in the adhesion incidence between the groups (P < 0.01). Analysis of the fraction of adhesions showed that groups 2 (0%) and 5 (4%) were significantly less than the other groups (P < 0.01). Furthermore, group 6 (69%) was significantly higher than group 1 (48%) (P < 0.05) and group 4 (47%) (P < 0.05). There was no difference between group 3 (60%) and group 6 (P = 0.2). From a clinical viewpoint, comparison of different electrocoagulation modes and pharmaceutical adhesion barriers is possible with standardised models. PMID:24809049

  18. Regulation of Adenosine Deaminase on Induced Mouse Experimental Autoimmune Uveitis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Dongchun; Zuo, Aijun; Zhao, Ronglan; Shao, Hui; Kaplan, Henry J; Sun, Deming

    2016-03-15

    Adenosine is an important regulator of the immune response, and adenosine deaminase (ADA) inhibits this regulatory effect by converting adenosine into functionally inactive molecules. Studies showed that adenosine receptor agonists can be anti- or proinflammatory. Clarification of the mechanisms that cause these opposing effects should provide a better guide for therapeutic intervention. In this study, we investigated the effect of ADA on the development of experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) induced by immunizing EAU-prone mice with a known uveitogenic peptide, IRBP1-20. Our results showed that the effective time to administer a single dose of ADA to suppress induction of EAU was 8-14 d postimmunization, shortly before EAU expression; however, ADA treatment at other time points exacerbated disease. ADA preferentially inhibited Th17 responses, and this effect was γδ T cell dependent. Our results demonstrated that the existing immune status strongly influences the anti- or proinflammatory effects of ADA. Our observations should help to improve the design of ADA- and adenosine receptor-targeted therapies. PMID:26856700

  19. Albendazole therapy for experimentally induced Paragonimus kellicotti infection in cats.

    PubMed

    Dubey, J P; Hoover, E A; Stromberg, P C; Toussant, M J

    1978-06-01

    The effect of albendazole therapy was studied in 6 cats with pulmonary paragonimiasis induced by experimental inoculation of metacercariae (25/cat) of Paragonimus kellicotti. At 76 to 101 days after they were inoculated, 5 cats were administered an oral aqueous suspension of albendazole in 2 divided doses totaling 20 mg (2 cats), 50 mg (1 cat), or 100 mg (2 cats)/kg of body weight each day for 14 to 21 days. The 6th cat (control) was not administered albendazole. Nine days after cats were given the 50- and 100-mg/kg dosages, Paragonimus ova were not seen in the feces of 3 cats. There was marked reduction in ova production in the feces of the 2 cats administered 20 mg/kg of albendazole. Live flukes were not recovered from the lungs of 3 cats necropsied 4 or 5 weeks after dosing with 50 or 100 mg/kg, but the lungs of the 2 cats administered 20 mg of albendazole/kg yielded 9 and 7 apparently viable flukes. Seventeen live flukes were recovered from the control cat not treated with albendazole. In 4 noninoculated normal cats administered 20 mg (1 cat), 100 mg (1 cat), and 200 mg (2 cats) of albendazole/kg of body weight each day for 14 days, there were no gross or microscopic lesions attributable to the drug. PMID:666077

  20. Diarrhea

    MedlinePlus

    ... 800-227-2345 Home Learn About Cancer Stay Healthy Find Support & Treatment Explore Research Get Involved Find Local ACS ... window. Print Share Save Saved this Article Close Push escape to close saved articles window. ...

  1. Diarrhea

    MedlinePlus

    ... decisions about when and where they should receive healthcare. Unfortunately, most people lack the medical knowledge needed to make these decisions safely. FreeMD.com is powered by a computer program that performs symptom triage. The goal of ...

  2. Diarrhea

    MedlinePlus

    ... doses at 2, 4, and 6 months of age. Rotarix is given in two doses. The first dose is given when the baby is 6 weeks old, and the second is given at least 4 weeks later but before the baby is 24 weeks old. To learn more about rotavirus vaccines, talk with your child’s ...

  3. Diarrhea

    MedlinePlus

    ... products? Yes Your symptoms may be caused by LACTOSE INTOLERANCE. People who have this condition have trouble digesting ... other dairy products. If you think you have lactose intolerance, talk to your doctor. He or she may ...

  4. Diarrhea

    MedlinePlus

    ... problem for people traveling to developing countries in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Caribbean. Visitors to ... Get Email Updates Twitter Facebook Follow Us Privacy Policy | Freedom of Information Act | Accessibility | Disclaimers | Copyright | Sitemap | ...

  5. New Developments in Traveler's Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    de la Cabada Bauche, Javier

    2011-01-01

    Traveler's diarrhea (TD) is a crucial area for research, as it affects millions of tourists each year and creates a large economic burden. More than 60% of TD cases are caused by a variety of bacterial enteropathogens: diarrhea-producing Escherichia coli, Shigella, Campylobacter, Salmonella, Aeromonas, Plesiomonas, and noncholera Vibrios. Noroviruses are also an important cause of morbidity among travelers. Recent studies have identified host genetic risk factors associated with susceptibility to pathogen-specific TD. Prevention strategies should be emphasized, as all individuals with TD experience approximately 24 hours of disability and 5-10% experience chronic functional bowel disease. Poorly absorbed rifaximin provides protection for trips lasting 2 weeks or less. TD vaccines are also currently in development. All individuals planning trips to developing regions should be armed with 1 of the 3 agents that have shown efficacy for self-treatment of TD: ciprofloxacin (or levofloxacin), rifaximin, or azithromycin, depending upon the location of the trip. Although global epidemiologic changes in etiologic agents as well as antibiotic resistance patterns have been better understood recently, changes should be expected during the next decade due to new prevention and treatment approaches. PMID:21475415

  6. Diarrhea - what to ask your doctor - child

    MedlinePlus

    What to ask your doctor about diarrhea - child; Loose stools - what to ask your doctor - child ... FOODS What foods can make my child's diarrhea worse? How should I prepare the foods for my child? If my child is still breastfeeding or bottle feeding, do I ...

  7. Chronic intractable diarrhea caused by gastrointestinal mastocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hyungil; Byeon, Jeong-Sik; Woo, Chang Gok; Hong, Seung-Mo; Chang, Kiju; So, Hoonsub; Kwak, Minseob; Kim, Wan Soo; Lee, Jeong-Mi; Yang, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Kyung-Jo; Ye, Byong Duk; Myung, Seung-Jae; Yang, Suk-Kyun

    2016-01-01

    As mast cells have been highlighted in the pathogenesis of diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome, a new term "mastocytic enterocolitis" was suggested by Jakate and colleagues to describe an increase in mucosal mast cells in patients with chronic intractable diarrhea and favorable response to treatment with antihistamines. Although it is not an established disease entity, two cases have been reported in the English medical literature. Here, for the first time in Asia, we report another case of chronic intractable diarrhea caused by gastrointestinal mastocytosis. The patient was a 70-year-old male with chronic intractable diarrhea for 3 months; the cause of the diarrhea remained obscure even after exhaustive evaluation. However, biopsy specimens from the jejunum were found to have increased mast cell infiltration, and the patient was successfully treated with antihistamines. PMID:27433151

  8. Chronic intractable diarrhea caused by gastrointestinal mastocytosis.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hyungil; Park, Sang Hyoung; Byeon, Jeong-Sik; Woo, Chang Gok; Hong, Seung-Mo; Chang, Kiju; So, Hoonsub; Kwak, Minseob; Kim, Wan Soo; Lee, Jeong-Mi; Yang, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Kyung-Jo; Ye, Byong Duk; Myung, Seung-Jae; Yang, Suk-Kyun

    2016-07-01

    As mast cells have been highlighted in the pathogenesis of diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome, a new term "mastocytic enterocolitis" was suggested by Jakate and colleagues to describe an increase in mucosal mast cells in patients with chronic intractable diarrhea and favorable response to treatment with antihistamines. Although it is not an established disease entity, two cases have been reported in the English medical literature. Here, for the first time in Asia, we report another case of chronic intractable diarrhea caused by gastrointestinal mastocytosis. The patient was a 70-year-old male with chronic intractable diarrhea for 3 months; the cause of the diarrhea remained obscure even after exhaustive evaluation. However, biopsy specimens from the jejunum were found to have increased mast cell infiltration, and the patient was successfully treated with antihistamines. PMID:27433151

  9. Anticoccidial effect of mananoligosacharide against experimentally induced coccidiosis in broiler.

    PubMed

    Chand, Naila; Faheem, Hassan; Khan, Rifat Ullah; Qureshi, Muhammad Subhan; Alhidary, Ibrahim A; Abudabos, Alaeldein M

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to find the effect of mananoligosacharide (MOS) in comparison with amprolium hydrochloride on performance and integrity of gut in experimentally induced coccidiosis in broiler. A total of 300, day-old male broiler chickens (Ross 308) was randomly allocated to four treatments. Each group was further divided into five replicates of 15 birds each. Group A was kept as control; group B was contaminated with Eimeria tenella, while groups C and D were infected with E. tenella and treated with MOS (0.8 g/kg feed) and anticoccidial drug, amprolium hydrochloride (12 g/100 l water), respectively. The results showed that weight gain, feed intake, and feed conversion ratio (FCR) were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in infected + MOS-treated group compared to the other groups. The result of oocyte per gram (OPG) was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in the group infected with coccidiosis during 5th, 7th, 10th, and 12th day post infection (dpi). Furthermore, the OPG was significantly lower (P < 0.05) in infected groups treated with MOS and amprolium at the studied periods (5, 7, and 10 dpi). At 12 dpi, the infected group treated with MOS showed significantly lower OPG compared to the other groups suggesting the effectiveness of MOS in comparison to amprolium. The result of pinpoint hemorrhages, thickness of cecal wall, bloody fecal contents, and mucoid contents in the cecum were significant highly (P < 0.05) in birds fed with infected oocytes. It was also noted that the differences were not significant in these parameters between amprolium and MOS-treated birds showing the effectiveness of the prebiotic agent. It was concluded from the results of the present study that MOS improved growth performance and reversed the lesions of E. tenella. PMID:27068898

  10. Experimental validation of a numerical model for subway induced vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S.; Degrande, G.; Lombaert, G.

    2009-04-01

    This paper presents the experimental validation of a coupled periodic finite element-boundary element model for the prediction of subway induced vibrations. The model fully accounts for the dynamic interaction between the train, the track, the tunnel and the soil. The periodicity or invariance of the tunnel and the soil in the longitudinal direction is exploited using the Floquet transformation, which allows for an efficient formulation in the frequency-wavenumber domain. A general analytical formulation is used to compute the response of three-dimensional invariant or periodic media that are excited by moving loads. The numerical model is validated by means of several experiments that have been performed at a site in Regent's Park on the Bakerloo line of London Underground. Vibration measurements have been performed on the axle boxes of the train, on the rail, the tunnel invert and the tunnel wall, and in the free field, both at the surface and at a depth of 15 m. Prior to these vibration measurements, the dynamic soil characteristics and the track characteristics have been determined. The Bakerloo line tunnel of London Underground has been modelled using the coupled periodic finite element-boundary element approach and free field vibrations due to the passage of a train at different speeds have been predicted and compared to the measurements. The correspondence between the predicted and measured response in the tunnel is reasonably good, although some differences are observed in the free field. The discrepancies are explained on the basis of various uncertainties involved in the problem. The variation in the response with train speed is similar for the measurements as well as the predictions. This study demonstrates the applicability of the coupled periodic finite element-boundary element model to make realistic predictions of the vibrations from underground railways.

  11. Current Progress in Developing Subunit Vaccines against Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli-Associated Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiping; Sack, David A

    2015-09-01

    Diarrhea continues to be a leading cause of death in children <5 years of age, and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is the most common bacterial cause of children's diarrhea. Currently, there are no available vaccines against ETEC-associated diarrhea. Whole-cell vaccine candidates have been under development but require further improvements because they provide inadequate protection and produce unwanted adverse effects. Meanwhile, a newer approach using polypeptide or subunit vaccine candidates focusing on ETEC colonization factor antigens (CFAs) and enterotoxins, the major virulence determinants of ETEC diarrhea, shows substantial promise. A conservative CFA/I adhesin tip antigen and a CFA MEFA (multiepitope fusion antigen) were shown to induce cross-reactive antiadhesin antibodies that protected against adherence by multiple important CFAs. Genetic fusion of toxoids derived from ETEC heat-labile toxin (LT) and heat-stable toxin (STa) induced antibodies neutralizing both enterotoxins. Moreover, CFA-toxoid MEFA polypeptides, generated by fusing CFA MEFA to an STa-LT toxoid fusion, induced antiadhesin antibodies that broadly inhibited adherence of the seven most important ETEC CFAs associated with about 80% of the diarrhea cases caused by ETEC strains with known CFAs. This same antigen preparation also induced antitoxin antibodies that neutralized both toxins that are associated with all cases of ETEC diarrhea. Results from these studies suggest that polypeptide or subunit vaccines have the potential to effectively protect against ETEC diarrhea. In addition, novel adhesins and mucin proteases have been investigated as potential alternatives or, more likely, additional antigens for ETEC subunit vaccine development. PMID:26135975

  12. Current Progress in Developing Subunit Vaccines against Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli-Associated Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Sack, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Diarrhea continues to be a leading cause of death in children <5 years of age, and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is the most common bacterial cause of children's diarrhea. Currently, there are no available vaccines against ETEC-associated diarrhea. Whole-cell vaccine candidates have been under development but require further improvements because they provide inadequate protection and produce unwanted adverse effects. Meanwhile, a newer approach using polypeptide or subunit vaccine candidates focusing on ETEC colonization factor antigens (CFAs) and enterotoxins, the major virulence determinants of ETEC diarrhea, shows substantial promise. A conservative CFA/I adhesin tip antigen and a CFA MEFA (multiepitope fusion antigen) were shown to induce cross-reactive antiadhesin antibodies that protected against adherence by multiple important CFAs. Genetic fusion of toxoids derived from ETEC heat-labile toxin (LT) and heat-stable toxin (STa) induced antibodies neutralizing both enterotoxins. Moreover, CFA-toxoid MEFA polypeptides, generated by fusing CFA MEFA to an STa-LT toxoid fusion, induced antiadhesin antibodies that broadly inhibited adherence of the seven most important ETEC CFAs associated with about 80% of the diarrhea cases caused by ETEC strains with known CFAs. This same antigen preparation also induced antitoxin antibodies that neutralized both toxins that are associated with all cases of ETEC diarrhea. Results from these studies suggest that polypeptide or subunit vaccines have the potential to effectively protect against ETEC diarrhea. In addition, novel adhesins and mucin proteases have been investigated as potential alternatives or, more likely, additional antigens for ETEC subunit vaccine development. PMID:26135975

  13. Diarrhea complicating enteral feeding after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Benya, R; Damle, P; Mobarhan, S

    1990-03-01

    In this case report we present in detail the complex nature of enteral feeding, diarrhea, hypoalbuminemia, and edema in a critically ill patient. We also discuss the use of a peptide-elemental formula in this patient, who suffered continuous diarrhea for 15 weeks after liver transplantation. Use of this formula was associated with cessation of the diarrhea and permitted adequate nutritional delivery. After 26 weeks of mechanical pulmonary ventilation, extubation was possible. This case illustrates the ineffectiveness of parenteral albumin infusions for treatment of enteral edema and demonstrates the restoration of normal intestinal absorptive capacity when ultrafiltration was instituted and the patient's generalized edematous state was corrected. PMID:2106103

  14. Coordinated epithelial NHE3 inhibition and barrier dysfunction are required for TNF-mediated diarrhea in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Clayburgh, Daniel R.; Musch, Mark W.; Leitges, Michael; Fu, Yang-Xin; Turner, Jerrold R.

    2006-01-01

    Acute T cell–mediated diarrhea is associated with increased mucosal expression of proinflammatory cytokines, including the TNF superfamily members TNF and LIGHT. While we have previously shown that epithelial barrier dysfunction induced by myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) is required for the development of diarrhea, MLCK inhibition does not completely restore water absorption. In contrast, although TNF-neutralizing antibodies completely restore water absorption after systemic T cell activation, barrier function is only partially corrected. This suggests that, while barrier dysfunction is critical, other processes must be involved in T cell–mediated diarrhea. To define these processes in vivo, we asked whether individual cytokines might regulate different events in T cell–mediated diarrhea. Both TNF and LIGHT caused MLCK-dependent barrier dysfunction. However, while TNF caused diarrhea, LIGHT enhanced intestinal water absorption. Moreover, TNF, but not LIGHT, inhibited Na+ absorption due to TNF-induced internalization of the brush border Na+/H+ exchanger NHE3. LIGHT did not cause NHE3 internalization. PKCα activation by TNF was responsible for NHE3 internalization, and pharmacological or genetic PKCα inhibition prevented NHE3 internalization, Na+ malabsorption, and diarrhea despite continued barrier dysfunction. These data demonstrate the necessity of coordinated Na+ malabsorption and barrier dysfunction in TNF-induced diarrhea and provide insight into mechanisms of intestinal water transport. PMID:17016558

  15. Probiotics and Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea and Clostridium difficile Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surawicz, Christina M.

    Diarrhea is a common side effect of antibiotics. Antibiotics can cause diarrhea in 5-25% of individuals who take them but its occurrence is unpredictable. Diarrhea due to antibiotics is called antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD). Diarrhea may be mild and resolve when antibiotics are discontinued, or it may be more severe. The most severe form of AAD is caused by overgrowth of Clostridium difficile which can cause severe diarrhea, colitis, pseudomembranous colitis, or even fatal toxic megacolon. Rates of diarrhea vary with the specific antibiotic as well as with the individual susceptibility.

  16. Hepatoprotective effect of acetone semicarbazone on Ehrlich ascites carcinoma induced carcinogenesis in experimental mice

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Farhadul; Ali, Shaikh Mohummad Mohsin; Khanam, Jahan Ara

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the hepatoprotective effect of acetone semicarbazone (ASC) in vivo in normal and Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) bearing male Swiss albino mice. Methods Drug-induced changes in biochemical and behavioral parameters at dose of 2.0 mg/kg body weight for 14 d and nullifying the toxicity induced by EAC cells were studied. The histopathology studies of the protective effects of ASC on vital organs were also assessed. Results The administration of ASC made insignificant changes in body weight and behavioral (salivation, diarrhea, muscular numbness) changes during treatment period due to minor toxicity were minimized after the treatment in normal mice. The biochemical parameters, including serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase, glutamate oxaloactate transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, serum glucose, cholesterol, urea, triglyceride and billirubin changed modestly in normal mice receiving ASC. Though the treatment continued, these values gradually decreased to normal level after the treatment. In EAC bearing mice, the toxic effects due to EAC cells in all cases were nullified by treatment with the ASC. Significant abnormalities were not detected in histology of the various organs of the normal mice treated with ASC. Conclusions ASC can, therefore, be considered safe in formulating novel anticancer drug, as it exhibits strong protective effect against EAC cell bearing mice. PMID:23593588

  17. Antidiarrheal Medicines: OTC Relief for Diarrhea

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a symptom of an infection caused by bacteria or parasites, antidiarrheal medicines can actually make the ... keeps your body from getting rid of the bacteria or parasite that is causing the diarrhea. Talk ...

  18. [Medication in infectious acute diarrhea in children].

    PubMed

    Cézard, J-P; Bellaiche, M; Viala, J; Hugot, J-P

    2007-10-01

    Acute infectious diarrhea in children remain still a frequent cause of morbidity. 50 % of them are due to rotavirus. Oral rehydration therapy and early realimentation have drastically reduced their mortality and morbidity. Beside oral or eventually IV rehydration therapy no medication has proven its efficacy based on the main HMO criteria (reduction of over 30 % of the stool output) except racecadotril and loperamide which is contre-indicated for the last one in children less than 2 years old. Other medications such as silicates or some probiotics have shown efficacy on diarrhea duration or stool consistency but not on stool output. They have so no formal indication in infectious diarrhea and should be considered as "comfort" treatment. Antibiotics, beside their indication in shigella, cholera and amibiasis could be used in invasive diarrhea in some debilating conditions or infants less than 3 months. PMID:17961811

  19. What I Need to Know about Diarrhea

    MedlinePlus

    ... areas of the world such as Latin America, Africa, and southern Asia. Traveler’s diarrhea is caused by ... Get Email Updates Twitter Facebook Follow Us Privacy Policy | Freedom of Information Act | Accessibility | Disclaimers | Copyright | Sitemap | ...

  20. Diarrhea - what to ask your doctor - child

    MedlinePlus

    What to ask your doctor about diarrhea - child; Loose stools - what to ask your doctor - child ... still breastfeeding or bottle feeding, do I need to stop? Should I water down my child's formula? ...

  1. Management of children with prolonged diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Giannattasio, Antonietta; Guarino, Alfredo; Lo Vecchio, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged diarrhea is usually defined as acute-onset diarrhea lasting 7 days or more, but less than 14 days. Its trend has been declining in recent years because of improvement in the management of acute diarrhea, which represents the ideal strategy to prevent prolonged diarrhea. The pathogenesis of prolonged diarrhea is multifactorial and essentially based on persistent mucosal damage due to specific infections or sequential infections with different pathogens, host-related factors including micronutrient and/or vitamin deficiency, undernutrition and immunodeficiency, high mucosal permeability due to previous infectious processes and nutrient deficiency with consequential malabsorption, and microbiota disruption. Infections seem to play a major role in causing prolonged diarrhea in both developing and developed areas. However, single etiologic pathogens have not been identified, and the pattern of agents varies according to settings, host risk factors, and previous use of antibiotics and other drugs. The management of prolonged diarrhea is complex. Because of the wide etiologic spectrum, diagnostic algorithms should take into consideration the age of the patient, clinical and epidemiological factors, and the nutritional status and should always include a search for enteric pathogens. Often, expensive laboratory evaluations are of little benefit in guiding therapy, and an empirical approach may be effective in the majority of cases. The presence or absence of weight loss is crucial for driving the initial management of prolonged diarrhea. If there is no weight loss, generally there is no need for further evaluation. If weight loss is present, empiric anti-infectious therapy or elimination diet may be considered once specific etiologies have been excluded. PMID:26962439

  2. Management of children with prolonged diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Giannattasio, Antonietta; Guarino, Alfredo; Lo Vecchio, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged diarrhea is usually defined as acute-onset diarrhea lasting 7 days or more, but less than 14 days. Its trend has been declining in recent years because of improvement in the management of acute diarrhea, which represents the ideal strategy to prevent prolonged diarrhea. The pathogenesis of prolonged diarrhea is multifactorial and essentially based on persistent mucosal damage due to specific infections or sequential infections with different pathogens, host-related factors including micronutrient and/or vitamin deficiency, undernutrition and immunodeficiency, high mucosal permeability due to previous infectious processes and nutrient deficiency with consequential malabsorption, and microbiota disruption. Infections seem to play a major role in causing prolonged diarrhea in both developing and developed areas. However, single etiologic pathogens have not been identified, and the pattern of agents varies according to settings, host risk factors, and previous use of antibiotics and other drugs. The management of prolonged diarrhea is complex. Because of the wide etiologic spectrum, diagnostic algorithms should take into consideration the age of the patient, clinical and epidemiological factors, and the nutritional status and should always include a search for enteric pathogens. Often, expensive laboratory evaluations are of little benefit in guiding therapy, and an empirical approach may be effective in the majority of cases. The presence or absence of weight loss is crucial for driving the initial management of prolonged diarrhea. If there is no weight loss, generally there is no need for further evaluation. If weight loss is present, empiric anti-infectious therapy or elimination diet may be considered once specific etiologies have been excluded. PMID:26962439

  3. The Fecal Microbiome in Cats with Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Suchodolski, Jan S.; Foster, Mary L.; Sohail, Muhammad U.; Leutenegger, Christian; Queen, Erica V.; Steiner, Jörg M.; Marks, Stanley L.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that microbes play an important role in the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal (GI) diseases in various animal species, but only limited data is available about the microbiome in cats with GI disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the fecal microbiome in cats with diarrhea. Fecal samples were obtained from healthy cats (n = 21) and cats with acute (n = 19) or chronic diarrhea (n = 29) and analyzed by sequencing of 16S rRNA genes, and PICRUSt was used to predict the functional gene content of the microbiome. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) effect size (LEfSe) revealed significant differences in bacterial groups between healthy cats and cats with diarrhea. The order Burkholderiales, the families Enterobacteriaceae, and the genera Streptococcus and Collinsella were significantly increased in diarrheic cats. In contrast the order Campylobacterales, the family Bacteroidaceae, and the genera Megamonas, Helicobacter, and Roseburia were significantly increased in healthy cats. Phylum Bacteroidetes was significantly decreased in cats with chronic diarrhea (>21 days duration), while the class Erysipelotrichi and the genus Lactobacillus were significantly decreased in cats with acute diarrhea. The observed changes in bacterial groups were accompanied by significant differences in functional gene contents: metabolism of fatty acids, biosynthesis of glycosphingolipids, metabolism of biotin, metabolism of tryptophan, and ascorbate and aldarate metabolism, were all significantly (p<0.001) altered in cats with diarrhea. In conclusion, significant differences in the fecal microbiomes between healthy cats and cats with diarrhea were identified. This dysbiosis was accompanied by changes in bacterial functional gene categories. Future studies are warranted to evaluate if these microbial changes correlate with changes in fecal concentrations of microbial metabolites in cats with diarrhea for the identification of potential diagnostic or therapeutic

  4. COMPARISON OF METHODS FOR EVALUATION OF EXPERIMENTALLY INDUCED EMPHYSEMA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four methods to quantify induced emphysema, in a manner economically applicable to large numbers of animals, are compared by correlation analyses. Lung tissue used was from rats pretreated intratracheally with elastase or saline prior to exposure to air or (NH4)2SO4 or NH4NO3 aer...

  5. Induced thermoluminescence study of experimentally shock-loaded oligoclase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivliev, A. I.; Kashkarov, L. L.; Badjukov, D. D.

    1993-01-01

    Artificially induced thermoluminescence (TL) in oligoclase samples which were shock-loaded up to 27 GPa was measured. The essential increase of the TL sensitivity in relation to the total gamma-ray irradiation dose was observed only in samples at the 27 GPa pressure. This result can be explained by the initiation of additional radiation damages in the shocked oligoclace crystal lattice.

  6. Experimentally induced muscle pain induces hypoalgesia in heterotopic deep tissues, but not in homotopic deep tissues.

    PubMed

    Graven-Nielsen, T; Babenko, V; Svensson, P; Arendt-Nielsen, L

    1998-03-23

    The ability of muscle pain to generate somatosensory sensibility changes is controversial. Thus, in the present study, tonic infusion of hypertonic saline (5%, 7.1 ml administered over 15 min) into the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle was used as an experimental model to induce local and referred pain. The sensibility to high-intensity pressure stimuli applied to the local pain area, referred pain area and an arm was assessed in 14 healthy volunteers. Infusion of isotonic (0.9%) saline into the other leg served as control. The subject continuously scored the pain intensity on an electronic visual analogue scale (VAS). Pressure pain threshold (PPT) was determined on the TA muscle (2 cm and 10 cm from the infusion site), at the frontal aspect of the ankle (area of referred pain) and on the arm. To minimise the skin component of the PPT, the skin covering the assessment sites was anaesthetised with an anaesthetic creme. The PPTs were obtained before and after cutaneous analgesia, 1 min and 10 min after infusion start and 10 min after the pain had disappeared. Infusion of hypertonic saline caused significantly (P<0. 05) higher VAS scores than infusion of isotonic saline. A significant (P<0.04) increase of the PPT (i.e., decreased sensibility) was found at the ankle and on the arm during muscle pain compared to the control condition. No significant differences in PPTs on the TA muscle were found during saline-induced muscle pain compared to the infusion of isotonic saline. The decrease in deep sensibility at the heterotopic sites (referred pain area and arm), but not at homotopic sites (TA muscle), probably reflected the phenomenon of diffuse noxious inhibitory control (DNIC). The inhibitory mechanism during muscle pain was shown to be effective for the deep tissue sensibility in healthy subjects. Thus, a pathologically disturbed inhibitory mechanism may result in widespread deep hyperalgesia in muscle pain patients. PMID:9518613

  7. Clinical and experimental experiences of graft-induced dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Lane, Emma L

    2011-01-01

    Clinical trials evaluating transplantation of fetal tissue for the treatment of Parkinson's disease identified the unexpected side effect of abnormal movements in the 'off'l-DOPA state. Termed graft-induced dyskinesia (GID), various hypotheses have been put forward as to their cause but unfortunately the significant differences in clinical trial protocols and lack of a truly representative animal model has hindered the search for a conclusive basis for their appearance. Likely causative factors have been identified through careful examination of patient data and the use of amphetamine-induced dyskinesia in a rodent model of Parkinson's disease. New trials being planned in Europe hope to avoid GID, whilst maximizing on the functional benefit that can be afforded by this treatment approach but questions still remain as to the underlying mechanism. PMID:21907087

  8. Experimental Feedback Control of Flow Induced Cavity Tones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, Randolph H.; Kegerise, Michael A.; Cox, David E.; Gibbs, Gary P.

    2002-01-01

    An experimental study of the application of discrete-time, linear quadratic control design methods to the cavity tone problem is described. State space models of the dynamics from a synthetic jet actuator at the leading edge of the cavity to two pressure sensors in the cavity were computed from experimental data. Variations in model order, control order, control bandwidth, and properties of a Kalman state estimator were studied. Feedback control reduced the levels of multiple cavity tones at Mach 0.275, 0.35, and 0.45. Closed loop performance was often limited by excitation of sidebands of cavity tones, and creation of new tones in the spectrum. State space models were useful for explaining some of these limitations, but were not able to account for non-linear dynamics, such as interactions between tones at different frequencies.

  9. Comparison of methods for evaluation of experimentally induced emphysema

    SciTech Connect

    Busch, R.H.; Buschbom, R.L.; Smith, L.G.

    1984-04-01

    Four methods to quantify induced emphysema, in a manner economically applicable to large numbers of animals, are compared by correlation analyses. Lung tissue used was from rats pretreated intratracheally with elastase or saline prior to exposure to air or (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ or NH/sub 4/NO/sub 3/ aerosols. The most sensitive quantitative evaluation was from mean chord length (MCL) measurements on scanning electron micrographs (SEM). Four-corner and parallel-line grids provided similar results, and reducing sample size to one selected field per lobe yielded a high degree of reliability for MCL measurements. Alveolar-pore perimeter and area (also measured on SEM photographs) were increased by induced emphysema, but were not reliable indicators for degree of pulmonary involvement. Both subjective score (grading the degree of emphysema) and percentage-area-affected determinations indicated the presence of emphysema, but with less sensitivity than MCL measurements. However, these two subgross methods (performed with a dissecting microscope) provided valuable information on the distribution of pulmonary lesions; emphysema was induced in a nonuniform but consistent and progressive pattern in the two lobes of the lung studied. 23 studied.

  10. Experimental study of microwave-induced thermoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Ryan T.

    Microwave-Induced Thermoacoustic Imaging (TAI) is a noninvasive hybrid modality which improves contrast by using thermoelastic wave generation induced by microwave absorption. Ultrasonography is widely used in medical practice as a low-cost alternative and supplement to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Although ultrasonography has relatively high image resolution (depending on the ultrasonic wavelength at diagnostic frequencies), it suffers from low image contrast of soft tissues. In this work samples are irradiated with sub-microsecond electromagnetic pulses inducing acoustic waves in the sample that are then detected with an unfocused transducer. The advantage of this hybrid modality is the ability to take advantage of the microwave absorption coefficients which provide high contrast in tissue samples. This in combination with the superior spatial resolution of ultrasound waves is important to providing a low-cost alternative to MRI and early breast cancer detection methods. This work describes the implementation of a thermoacoustic experiment using a 5 kW peak power microwave source.

  11. Corilagin Attenuates Aerosol Bleomycin-Induced Experimental Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zheng; Guo, Qiong-Ya; Zhang, Xiao-Ju; Li, Xiao; Li, Wen-Ting; Ma, Xi-Tao; Ma, Li-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressing lethal disease with few clinically effective therapies. Corilagin is a tannin derivative which shows anti-inflammatory and antifibrotics properties and is potentiated in treating IPF. Here, we investigated the effect of corilagin on lung injury following bleomycin exposure in an animal model of pulmonary fibrosis. Corilagin abrogated bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis as assessed by H&E; Masson’s trichrome staining and lung hydroxyproline content in lung tissue. Corilagin reduced the number of apoptotic lung cells and prevented lung epithelial cells from membrane breakdown, effluence of lamellar bodies and thickening of the respiratory membrane. Bleomycin exposure induced expression of MDA, IKKα, phosphorylated IKKα (p-IKKα), NF-κB P65, TNF-α and IL-1β, and reduced I-κB expression in mice lung tissue or in BALF. These changes were reversed by high-dose corilagin (100 mg/kg i.p) more dramatically than by low dose (10 mg/kg i.p). Last, corilagin inhibits TGF-β1 production and α-SMA expression in lung tissue samples. Taken together, these findings confirmed that corilagin attenuates bleomycin-induced epithelial injury and fibrosis via inactivation of oxidative stress, proinflammatory cytokine release and NF-κB and TGF-β1 signaling. Corilagin may serve as a promising therapeutic agent for pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:24886817

  12. Controlling Rotavirus-associated diarrhea: Could single-domain antibody fragments make the difference?

    PubMed

    Maffey, Lucia; Vega, Celina G; Parreño, Viviana; Garaicoechea, Lorena

    2015-01-01

    Group A Rotavirus (RVA) remains a leading cause of severe diarrhea and child mortality. The variable domain of camelid heavy chain antibodies (VHH) display potent antigen-binding capacity, have low production costs and are suitable for oral therapies. Two sets of anti-RVA VHHs have been developed: ARP1-ARP3; 2KD1-3B2. Here, we explore the potential of both sets as a prevention strategy complementary to vaccination and a treatment option against RVA-associated diarrhea in endangered populations. Both sets have been expressed in multiple production systems, showing extensive neutralizing capacity against strains of RVA in vitro. They were also tested in the neonatal mouse model with various degrees of success in preventing or treating RVA-induced diarrhea. Interestingly, mitigation of the symptoms was also achieved with freeze-dried ARP1, so that it could be applied in areas where cold chains are difficult to maintain. 3B2 was tested in a pre-clinical trial involving gnotobiotic piglets where it conferred complete protection against RVA-induced diarrhea. ARP1 was used in the first clinical trial for anti-RVA VHHs, successfully reducing stool output in infants with RVA diarrhea, with no detected side effects. PMID:26654700

  13. Probiotics for Infectious Diarrhea and Traveler's Diarrhea - What Do We Really Know?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibberd, Patricia L.

    Worldwide, diarrhea is the sixth leading cause of premature death (Lopez et al., 2006), accounting for more than two million deaths each year. The majority of the burden is borne in lower and middle income countries, and in children under age 5 (Kosek et al., 2003). Even in the United States where there is easy access to “safe” food and water, there are an estimated 211-375 million episodes of acute diarrhea each year, resulting in 900,000 hospitalizations and 6,000 deaths (Herikstad et al., 2002; Mead et al., 1999). While mortality from diarrhea has decreased over the last 30 years, the incidence and morbidity associated with diarrhea has not improved (Kosek et al., 2003). During the same time period an ever increasing number of enteric pathogens as well as non-infectious conditions have been recognized as causes of acute diarrhea (Guerrant et al., 2001).

  14. A Multiepitope Fusion Antigen Elicits Neutralizing Antibodies against Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and Homologous Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hashish, Emad A.; Zhang, Chengxian; Ruan, Xiaosai; Knudsen, David E.; Chase, Christopher C.; Isaacson, Richard E.; Zhou, Guoqiang

    2013-01-01

    Diarrhea is one of the most important bovine diseases. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) and bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) are the major causes of diarrhea in calves and cattle. ETEC expressing K99 (F5) fimbriae and heat-stable type Ia (STa) toxin are the leading bacteria causing calf diarrhea, and BVDV causes diarrhea and other clinical illnesses in cattle of all ages. It is reported that maternal immunization with K99 fimbrial antigens provides passive protection to calves against K99 fimbrial ETEC and that BVDV major structural protein E2 elicits antibodies neutralizing against BVDV viral infection. Vaccines inducing anti-K99 and anti-STa immunity would protect calves more effectively against ETEC diarrhea, and those also inducing anti-E2 neutralizing antibodies would protect calves and cattle against diarrhea caused by both ETEC and BVDV. In this study, we used the ETEC K99 major subunit FanC as a backbone, genetically embedded the STa toxoid STaP12F and the most-antigenic B-cell epitope and T-cell epitope predicted from the BVDV E2 glycoprotein into FanC for the multivalent antigen FanC-STa-E2, and examined immunogenicity of this multivalent antigen to assess vaccine potential against bovine diarrhea. Mice intraperitoneally (i.p.) immunized with this multivalent antigen developed anti-K99, anti-STa, and anti-BVDV antibodies. Moreover, elicited antibodies showed neutralization activities, as they inhibited adherence of K99 fimbrial E. coli, neutralized STa toxin, and prevented homologous BVDV viral infection in vitro. Results from this study suggest that this multiepitope fusion antigen can potentially be developed as a vaccine for broad protection against bovine diarrhea and that the multiepitope fusion strategy may be generally applied for multivalent vaccine development against heterogeneous pathogens. PMID:23697572

  15. A multiepitope fusion antigen elicits neutralizing antibodies against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and homologous bovine viral diarrhea virus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hashish, Emad A; Zhang, Chengxian; Ruan, Xiaosai; Knudsen, David E; Chase, Christopher C; Isaacson, Richard E; Zhou, Guoqiang; Zhang, Weiping

    2013-07-01

    Diarrhea is one of the most important bovine diseases. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) and bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) are the major causes of diarrhea in calves and cattle. ETEC expressing K99 (F5) fimbriae and heat-stable type Ia (STa) toxin are the leading bacteria causing calf diarrhea, and BVDV causes diarrhea and other clinical illnesses in cattle of all ages. It is reported that maternal immunization with K99 fimbrial antigens provides passive protection to calves against K99 fimbrial ETEC and that BVDV major structural protein E2 elicits antibodies neutralizing against BVDV viral infection. Vaccines inducing anti-K99 and anti-STa immunity would protect calves more effectively against ETEC diarrhea, and those also inducing anti-E2 neutralizing antibodies would protect calves and cattle against diarrhea caused by both ETEC and BVDV. In this study, we used the ETEC K99 major subunit FanC as a backbone, genetically embedded the STa toxoid STaP12F and the most-antigenic B-cell epitope and T-cell epitope predicted from the BVDV E2 glycoprotein into FanC for the multivalent antigen FanC-STa-E2, and examined immunogenicity of this multivalent antigen to assess vaccine potential against bovine diarrhea. Mice intraperitoneally (i.p.) immunized with this multivalent antigen developed anti-K99, anti-STa, and anti-BVDV antibodies. Moreover, elicited antibodies showed neutralization activities, as they inhibited adherence of K99 fimbrial E. coli, neutralized STa toxin, and prevented homologous BVDV viral infection in vitro. Results from this study suggest that this multiepitope fusion antigen can potentially be developed as a vaccine for broad protection against bovine diarrhea and that the multiepitope fusion strategy may be generally applied for multivalent vaccine development against heterogeneous pathogens. PMID:23697572

  16. Experimental Feedback Control of Flow Induced Cavity Tones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, Randolph H.; Kegerise, Michael A.; Cox, David E.; Gibbs, Gary P.

    2005-01-01

    Discrete-time, linear quadratic methods were used to design feedback controllers for reducing tones generated by flow over a cavity. The dynamics of a synthetic jet actuator mounted at the leading edge of the cavity as observed by two microphones in the cavity were modeled over a broad frequency range using state space models computed from experimental data. Variations in closed loop performance as a function of model order, control order, control bandwidth, and state estimator design were studied using a cavity in the Probe Calibration Tunnel at NASA Langley. The controller successfully reduced the levels of multiple cavity tones at the tested flow speeds of Mach 0.275, 0.35, and 0.45. In some cases, the closed loop results were limited by excitation of sidebands of the cavity tones, or the creation of new tones at frequencies away from the cavity tones. Nonetheless, the results validate the combination of optimal control and experimentally-generated state space models, and suggest this approach may be useful for other flow control problems. The models were not able to account for non-linear dynamics, such as interactions between tones at different frequencies.

  17. Experimental distinction of Autler-Townes splitting from electromagnetically induced transparency using coupled mechanical oscillators system

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jingliang; Yang, Hujiang; Wang, Chuan; Xu, Kun; Xiao, Jinghua

    2016-01-01

    Here we experimentally demonstrated the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) and Autler-Townes splitting (ATS) effects in mechanical coupled pendulums. The analogue of EIT and ATS has been studied in mechanical systems and the intrinsic physics between these two phenomena are also been discussed. Exploiting the Akaike Information Criterion, we discern the ATS effect from EIT effect in our experimental results. PMID:26751738

  18. An Attempt to Reverse Performance Deficits Associated With Depression and Experimentally Induced Helplessness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilpatrick-Tabak, Blair; Roth, Susan

    1978-01-01

    The learned helplessness model of depression predicts that any effective treatment for reactive depression should also reverse performance deficits associated with experimentally induced helplessness, and vice versa. This study tests that prediction with college students who were exposed to experimental manipulations designed to induce…

  19. Experimental distinction of Autler-Townes splitting from electromagnetically induced transparency using coupled mechanical oscillators system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jingliang; Yang, Hujiang; Wang, Chuan; Xu, Kun; Xiao, Jinghua

    2016-01-01

    Here we experimentally demonstrated the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) and Autler-Townes splitting (ATS) effects in mechanical coupled pendulums. The analogue of EIT and ATS has been studied in mechanical systems and the intrinsic physics between these two phenomena are also been discussed. Exploiting the Akaike Information Criterion, we discern the ATS effect from EIT effect in our experimental results.

  20. Chronic diarrhea: causes, presentation, and management.

    PubMed

    Mehta, D I; Lebenthal, E; Blecker, U

    1996-01-01

    Important inroads are being made into understanding the pathophysiology of diarrhea. Clear understanding of key mechanisms should suggest new approaches to combat disease. Exciting developments are occurring in terms of super-ORS solutions, particularly with the promise of short chained glucose polymers and glutamine. Perhaps the most important development is the prospect of a good rotavirus vaccine being available before the end of the decade. Chronic diarrhea seems to be on the increase globally, probably because of the success of ORS. The mechanisms that lead to mucosal injury are elusive, and therapy still largely supportive and empiric. Celiac disease continues to be a puzzle, because of the uncomfortable feeling that a majority of cases may be missed because of atypical presentations. The successful use of long term parenteral nutrition has allowed survival and better characterization of cases that otherwise would have perished as 'lethal protracted diarrhea'. Microvillus inclusion disease may be the commonest congenital secretory diarrhea. The role of the recently reported high prevalence of glucoamlase deficiency may be important. Lastly, attention to micronutrients, particularly low vitamin A and probably zinc may prove to be important in prevention and amelioration of diarrhea and growth failure. PMID:10832466

  1. Chronic diarrhea in infancy and childhood.

    PubMed

    Mehta, D I; Blecker, U

    1998-09-01

    Important inroads are being made into understanding the pathophysiology of acute diarrhea. Clear understanding of key mechanisms should suggest new approaches to combat disease. Exciting developments are occurring in terms of super-ORS solutions, particularly with the promise of short-chained glucose polymers and glutamine. Perhaps the most important development is the prospect of a good rotavirus vaccine being available before the end of the decade. Chronic diarrhea seems to be on the increase globally, probably because of the success of ORS. The mechanisms that lead to mucosal injury are elusive and therapy is still largely supportive and empiric. Celiac disease continues to be a puzzle, not least because of the uncomfortable feeling that a majority of cases may be being missed because of atypical presentations. The successful use of long-term parenteral nutrition has allowed survival and better characterization of cases that otherwise would have perished as "lethal protracted diarrhea". Microvillus inclusion disease may be the most common congenital secretory diarrhea. The role of the recently reported high prevalence of glucoamylase deficiency may be important. Lastly attention to micronutrients, particularly low vitamin A and probably zinc, may prove to be important in prevention and amelioration of diarrhea and growth failure. PMID:9785754

  2. Effects of flunarizine on experimentally-induced convulsions in animals.

    PubMed

    Drago, F; Valerio, C; Clementi, G; Scapagnini, U

    1986-01-01

    D,L-allylglycine-induced seizures in rats were antagonized by flunarizine and other antiepileptic drugs. In this respect, the spectrum of flunarizine appears to be similar to that of diphenylhydantoin. A behavioral analysis of the effects of various drugs on amygdaloid kindled rats showed that flunarizine exerts anticonvulsive effects in this model with an ED50 of 42.8 mg/kg. Furthermore, flunarizine (1, 5, 25 and 50 mg/kg i.p.) reduced seizure parameters in rats injected with strychnine or pentetrazol. In this case, flunarizine reduced seizure intensity and increased the percentage of survival. In another study on genetically epileptic beagles, flunarizine significantly affected the REM and deep slow-wave sleep latencies. PMID:3609879

  3. Experimental Studies of Laser-Induced Breakdown in Transparent Dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, C W

    2003-09-23

    The mechanisms by which transparent dielectrics damage when exposed to high power laser radiation has been of scientific and technological interest since the invention of the laser. In this work, a set of three experiments are presented which provide insight into the damage initiation mechanisms and the processes involved in laser-induced damage. Using an OPO (optical parametric oscillator) laser, we have measured the damage thresholds of deuterated potassium dihydrogen phosphate (DKDP) from the near ultraviolet into the visible. Distinct steps, whose width is of order K{sub b}T, are observed in the damage threshold at photon energies associated with the number of photons (3{yields}2 or 4{yields}3) needed to promote a ground state electron across the energy gap. The wavelength dependence of the damage threshold suggests that a primary mechanism for damage initiation in DKDP is a multi-photon process in which the order is reduced through excited defect state absorption. In-situ fluorescence microscopy, in conjunction with theoretical calculations by Liu et al., has been used to establish that hydrogen displacement defects are potentially responsible for the reduction in the multi-photon cross-section. During the damage process, the material absorbs energy from the laser pulse and produces an ionized region that gives rise to broadband emission. By performing a time-resolved investigation of this emission, we demonstrate both that it is blackbody in nature, and we provide the first direct measurement of the localized temperature during and following laser damage initiation for various optical materials. For excitation using nanosecond laser pulses, the plasma, when confined in the bulk, is in thermal equilibrium with the lattice. These results allow for a detailed characterization of temperature, pressure, and electron densities occurring during laser-induced damage.

  4. Experimental diet-induced atherosclerosis in Quaker parrots (Myiopsitta monachus).

    PubMed

    Beaufrère, H; Nevarez, J G; Wakamatsu, N; Clubb, S; Cray, C; Tully, T N

    2013-11-01

    Spontaneous atherosclerosis is common in psittaciformes, and clinical signs associated with flow-limiting stenosis are encountered in pet birds. Nevertheless, a psittacine model of atherosclerosis has not been developed for research investigations. Sixteen captive-bred Quaker parrots (Myiopsitta monachus) were used in this study. While 4 control birds were fed a maintenance diet, 12 other birds were fed an atherogenic diet composed of 1% cholesterol controlling for a calorie-to-protein ratio for periods ranging from 2 to 8 months. The birds were euthanized at the end of their respective food trial period. Histopathology, transmission electron microscopy, and cholesterol measurement were performed on the ascending aorta and brachiocephalic and pulmonary arteries. Plasma lipoproteins, cholesterol, and triglycerides were also measured on a monthly basis. Significant atherosclerotic lesions were induced within 2 months and advanced atherosclerotic lesions within 4 to 6 months. The advanced lesions were histologically similar to naturally occurring lesions identified in the same parrot species with a lipid core and a fibrous cap. Ultrastructurally, there were extracellular lipid, foam cell, and endothelial changes. Arterial cholesterol content increased linearly over time. Plasma cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) significantly increased over time by an average of 5- and 15-fold, respectively, with a shift from high-density lipoprotein to LDL as the main plasma lipoprotein. Quaker parrots also exhibited high plasma cholesteryl ester transfer protein activity that increased, although not significantly, over time. This experiment demonstrates that in Quaker parrots fed 1% cholesterol, advanced atherosclerosis can be induced relatively quickly, and lesions resemble those found in other avian models and humans. PMID:23696447

  5. Hypolipidemic effect of gypenosides in experimentally induced hypercholesterolemic rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To investigate the anti-hyperlipidemic effect of gynosaponins (GPs) in hyperlipidemic rats induced by high lipid diet. Methods Animal model of hyperlipidemia was established by high-fat and high-cholesterol diet. Rats were randomly divided into 6 groups, except the normal and model groups, rats in GPs groups were daily administered intragastrically with GPs (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg), and rats in simvastatin group were daily administered intragastrically with simvastatin (10 mg/kg). It was measured that the contents of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), malondialdehyde (MDA), total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) in the serum, TG and TC in the liver during this experiment, respectively. The left lobe of liver was observed by histopathological staining, and the immunohistochemical staining was used to observe the effects on the effect of GPs on liver functions. Results Compared with the model group, GPs groups could remarkably decrease the content of lipids, GSH-Px, SOD, CAT and MDA in the serum and TC and TG in the liver of the hyperlipidemic rats. The pathomorphological results of hepatic tissue showed that fatty degeneration and inflammatory reaction of GPs groups were lightened compared with the model group. Conclusions The results show that GPs has good effects on the treatment of hyperlipidemia induced by high lipid diet in rats. The possible anti-hyperlipidemia mechanism maybe those GPs can regulate the disorder of lipid metabolism as well as ameliorate hepatic function. PMID:24160562

  6. Histochemical changes in the testes of lead induced experimental rats.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, A R; Rao, R V; Gautam, A K

    1986-01-01

    The experiments were performed on mature male rats divided in five groups, one control and four experimental in which the animals received 1 mg, 2 mg, 4 mg and 6 mg/kg body weight lead acetate intraperitoneally respectively, over a period of 30 days. ALA-D and lead was estimated in the blood by the use of atomic absorption spectrophotometer and ATP-ase, AMP-ase, Alk-ase were histochemically localized. Significant increase in blood and testis of lead levels along with decrease of ALA-D levels were observed. Changes in the testicular tissue were encountered. Other details concerned with the damage of the testicular tissue are discussed. PMID:3030829

  7. Dietary oregano essential oil alleviates experimentally induced coccidiosis in broilers.

    PubMed

    Mohiti-Asli, M; Ghanaatparast-Rashti, M

    2015-06-15

    An experiment was conducted to determine the effects of oregano essential oil on growth performance and coccidiosis prevention in mild challenged broilers. A total of 250 1-d-old chicks were used in a completely randomized design with 5 treatments and 5 replicates with 10 birds in each replication. Experimental treatments included: (1) negative control (NC; unchallenged), (2) positive control (PC; challenged with sporulated oocysts of Eimeria), (3) PC fed 200 ppm Diclazuril in diet, (4) PC fed 300 ppm oregano oil in diet, and (5) PC fed 500 ppm oregano oil in diet. At 22 d of age, all the experimental groups except for NC were challenged with 50-fold dose of Livacox T as a trivalent live attenuated coccidiosis vaccine. On d 28, two birds were slaughtered and intestinal coccidiosis lesions were scored 0-4. Moreover, dropping was scored in the scale of 0-3, and oocysts per gram feces (OPG) were measured. Oregano oil at either supplementation rate increased body weight gain (P=0.039) and improved feed conversion ratio (P=0.010) from d 22 to 28, when compared with PC group. Using 500 ppm oregano oil in challenged broilers diet increased European efficiency factor than PC group (P=0.020). Moreover, challenged broilers fed 500 ppm oregano oil or Diclazuril in diets displayed lower coccidiosis lesions scores in upper (P=0.003) and middle (P=0.018) regions of intestine than PC group, with the effect being similar to unchallenged birds. In general, challenged birds fed 500 ppm oregano oil or Diclazuril in diets had lower OPG (P=0.001), dropping scores (P=0.001), litter scores (P=0.001), and pH of litter (P=0.001) than PC group. It could be concluded that supplementation of oregano oil at the dose of 500 ppm in diet may have beneficial effect on prevention of coccidiosis in broilers. PMID:25864115

  8. Advances in understanding of bile acid diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Camilleri, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids (BA) are actively reabsorbed in the terminal ileum by the apical Na+-dependent bile salt transporter. This review addresses the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of BA diarrhea (BAD). BAD is typically caused by ileal resection or disease; 25–33% of patients with chronic functional diarrhea or irritable bowel syndrome-diarrhea (IBS-D) have BAD, possibly from deficiency in the ileal hormone, FGF-19, which normally provides feedback inhibition of BA synthesis. Diagnosis of BAD is typically based on reduced BA retention of radiolabeled BA (75SeHCAT), increased BA synthesis (serum C4) or increased fecal BA loss. In clinical practice, diagnosis is often based on response to BA sequestrants (e.g., cholestyramine or colesevelam). Diagnostic tests for BA malabsorption (BAM) need to be used more extensively in clinical practice. In the future, farnesoid X receptor agonists that stimulate ileal production of FGF-19 may be alternative treatments of BAD. PMID:24410472

  9. Advances in understanding of bile acid diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Camilleri, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids (BA) are actively reabsorbed in the terminal ileum by the apical Na(+)-dependent bile salt transporter. This review addresses the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of BA diarrhea (BAD). BAD is typically caused by ileal resection or disease; 25-33% of patients with chronic functional diarrhea or irritable bowel syndrome-diarrhea (IBS-D) have BAD, possibly from deficiency in the ileal hormone, FGF-19, which normally provides feedback inhibition of BA synthesis. Diagnosis of BAD is typically based on reduced BA retention of radiolabeled BA ((75)SeHCAT), increased BA synthesis (serum C4) or increased fecal BA loss. In clinical practice, diagnosis is often based on response to BA sequestrants (e.g., cholestyramine or colesevelam). Diagnostic tests for BA malabsorption (BAM) need to be used more extensively in clinical practice. In the future, farnesoid X receptor agonists that stimulate ileal production of FGF-19 may be alternative treatments of BAD. PMID:24410472

  10. Hospitalizations for diarrhea in Quebec children from 1985 to 1998: Estimates of rotavirus-associated diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Buigues, René-Pierre; Duval, Bernard; Rochette, Louis; Boulianne, Nicole; Douville-Fradet, Monique; Déry, Pierre; De Serres, Gaston

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To characterize the incidence and duration of hospitalization due to diarrhea and to assess the proportion of hospitalizations that are attributed to rotavirus-associated diarrhea. DESIGN: Retrospective study of hospitalization data. SETTING: Hospitals located in Quebec. POPULATION STUDIED: Children from one to 59 months of age who were discharged from hospital from April 1, 1985 to March 31, 1998. MAIN RESULTS: There were 63,827 hospitalizations for diarrhea over the study period, for an average of 4910 hospitalizations/year. The epidemic curve showed a periodicity with regular alternation of high and low annual peaks. The number of hospitalizations for rotavirus-associated diarrhea was estimated according to three different methods. The estimates varied between 1353 and 1849 hospitalizations due to rotavirus-associated diarrhea/year over the 13-year period, with good agreement between the results of the three methods for a one-month to five years of age incidence of 320 hospitalizations for rotavirus-associated diarrhea/100,000 children. The average duration of hospital stay decreased from 5.2 days in 1985 to 3.3 days in 1998. CONCLUSIONS: The present article shows the importance of diarrhea hospitalizations among children and the alternating peak-year periodicity. PMID:18159396

  11. Experimental treatment of antipsychotic-induced movement disorders

    PubMed Central

    Shireen, Erum

    2016-01-01

    Antipsychotic drugs are extensively prescribed for the treatment of schizophrenia and other related psychiatric disorders. These drugs produced their action by blocking dopamine (DA) receptors, and these receptors are widely present throughout the brain. Therefore, extended antipsychotic use also leads to severe extrapyramidal side effects. The short-term effects include parkinsonism and the later appearing tardive dyskinesia. Currently available treatments for these disorders are mostly symptomatic and insufficient, and are often linked with a number of detrimental side effects. Antipsychotic-drug-induced tardive dyskinesia prompted researchers to explore novel drugs with fewer undesirable extrapyramidal side effects. Preclinical studies suggest a role of 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin)-1A and 2A/2C receptors in the modulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission and motivating a search for better therapeutic strategies for schizophrenia and related disorders. In addition, adjunctive treatment with antioxidants such as vitamin E, red rice bran oil, and curcumin in the early phases of illness may prevent additional oxidative injury, and thus improve and prevent further possible worsening of related neurological and behavioral deficits in schizophrenia. This review explains the role of serotonergic receptors and oxidative stress, with the aim of providing principles for prospect development of compounds to improve therapeutic effects of antischizophrenic drugs. PMID:27540314

  12. Chemically induced skin carcinogenesis: Updates in experimental models (Review).

    PubMed

    Neagu, Monica; Caruntu, Constantin; Constantin, Carolina; Boda, Daniel; Zurac, Sabina; Spandidos, Demetrios A; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M

    2016-05-01

    Skin cancer is one of the most common malignancies affecting humans worldwide, and its incidence is rapidly increasing. The study of skin carcinogenesis is of major interest for both scientific research and clinical practice and the use of in vivo systems may facilitate the investigation of early alterations in the skin and of the mechanisms involved, and may also lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies for skin cancer. This review outlines several aspects regarding the skin toxicity testing domain in mouse models of chemically induced skin carcinogenesis. There are important strain differences in view of the histological type, development and clinical evolution of the skin tumor, differences reported decades ago and confirmed by our hands‑on experience. Using mouse models in preclinical testing is important due to the fact that, at the molecular level, common mechanisms with human cutaneous tumorigenesis are depicted. These animal models resemble human skin cancer development, in that genetic changes caused by carcinogens and pro‑inflammatory cytokines, and simultaneous inflammation sustained by pro‑inflammatory cytokines and chemokines favor tumor progression. Drugs and environmental conditions can be tested using these animal models. keeping in mind the differences between human and rodent skin physiology. PMID:26986013

  13. Experimental treatment of antipsychotic-induced movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Shireen, Erum

    2016-01-01

    Antipsychotic drugs are extensively prescribed for the treatment of schizophrenia and other related psychiatric disorders. These drugs produced their action by blocking dopamine (DA) receptors, and these receptors are widely present throughout the brain. Therefore, extended antipsychotic use also leads to severe extrapyramidal side effects. The short-term effects include parkinsonism and the later appearing tardive dyskinesia. Currently available treatments for these disorders are mostly symptomatic and insufficient, and are often linked with a number of detrimental side effects. Antipsychotic-drug-induced tardive dyskinesia prompted researchers to explore novel drugs with fewer undesirable extrapyramidal side effects. Preclinical studies suggest a role of 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin)-1A and 2A/2C receptors in the modulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission and motivating a search for better therapeutic strategies for schizophrenia and related disorders. In addition, adjunctive treatment with antioxidants such as vitamin E, red rice bran oil, and curcumin in the early phases of illness may prevent additional oxidative injury, and thus improve and prevent further possible worsening of related neurological and behavioral deficits in schizophrenia. This review explains the role of serotonergic receptors and oxidative stress, with the aim of providing principles for prospect development of compounds to improve therapeutic effects of antischizophrenic drugs. PMID:27540314

  14. Experimentally induced metamorphosis in axolotls reduces regenerative rate and fidelity

    PubMed Central

    Stier, Adrian C.; Michonneau, François; Smith, Matthew D.; Pasch, Bret; Maden, Malcolm

    2014-01-01

    Abstract While most tetrapods are unable to regenerate severed body parts, amphibians display a remarkable ability to regenerate an array of structures. Frogs can regenerate appendages as larva, but they lose this ability around metamorphosis. In contrast, salamanders regenerate appendages as larva, juveniles, and adults. However, the extent to which fundamental traits (e.g., metamorphosis, body size, aging, etc.) restrict regenerative ability remains contentious. Here we utilize the ability of normally paedomorphic adult axolotls (Ambystoma mexicanum) to undergo induced metamorphosis by thyroxine exposure to test how metamorphosis and body size affects regeneration in age‐matched paedomorphic and metamorphic individuals. We show that body size does not affect regeneration in adult axolotls, but metamorphosis causes a twofold reduction in regeneration rate, and lead to carpal and digit malformations. Furthermore, we find evidence that metamorphic blastemal cells may take longer to traverse the cell cycle and display a lower proliferative rate. This study identifies the axolotl as a powerful system to study how metamorphosis restricts regeneration independently of developmental stage, body size, and age; and more broadly how metamorphosis affects tissue‐specific changes.

  15. Flagella-induced immunity against experimental cholera in adult rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Yancey, R J; Willis, D L; Berry, L J

    1979-01-01

    The adult rabbit ligated ileal loop model was used to evaluate the prophylactic potential of a crude flagellar (CF) vaccine produced from the classical. Inaba strain CA401. A greater than 1,000-fold increase in the challenge inoculum was required to induce an intestinal fluid response in actively immunized adult rabbits equivalent to that produced in unimmunized animals. Similar protection was afforded against challenge with classical and El Tor biotypes of both Inaba and Ogawa serotypes. Highly virulent 35S-labeled vibrios were inhibited in their ability to associated with the intestinal mucosa of CF-immunized rabbits. The protection conferred by CF immunization was found to be superior to that of a commercial bivalent vaccine and also to that of glutaraldehyde-treated cholera toxoid. The critical immunogenic component of CF appears to be a flagella-derived protein. The immunogenicity of CF was destroyed by heat treatment, and absorption of CF-immune serum with aflagellated mutant vibrios did not diminish its ability to confer a high level of passive protection. The intestinal protection of CF-immunized rabbits was completely reversed by the introduction of both goat anti-rabbit immunoglobulins A and G, but by neither alone. PMID:478635

  16. Chemically induced skin carcinogenesis: Updates in experimental models (Review)

    PubMed Central

    NEAGU, MONICA; CARUNTU, CONSTANTIN; CONSTANTIN, CAROLINA; BODA, DANIEL; ZURAC, SABINA; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.; TSATSAKIS, ARISTIDIS M.

    2016-01-01

    Skin cancer is one of the most common malignancies affecting humans worldwide, and its incidence is rapidly increasing. The study of skin carcinogenesis is of major interest for both scientific research and clinical practice and the use of in vivo systems may facilitate the investigation of early alterations in the skin and of the mechanisms involved, and may also lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies for skin cancer. This review outlines several aspects regarding the skin toxicity testing domain in mouse models of chemically induced skin carcinogenesis. There are important strain differences in view of the histological type, development and clinical evolution of the skin tumor, differences reported decades ago and confirmed by our hands-on experience. Using mouse models in preclinical testing is important due to the fact that, at the molecular level, common mechanisms with human cutaneous tumorigenesis are depicted. These animal models resemble human skin cancer development, in that genetic changes caused by carcinogens and pro-inflammatory cytokines, and simultaneous inflammation sustained by pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines favor tumor progression. Drugs and environmental conditions can be tested using these animal models. keeping in mind the differences between human and rodent skin physiology. PMID:26986013

  17. Epithelial impedance analysis in experimentally induced colon cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, R J; Joseph, R; Kaplan, D; Juncosa, R D; Pempinello, C; Asbun, H; Sedwitz, M M

    1987-01-01

    Epithelial impedance analysis was used to measure the alterations in resistance of the large bowel in a murine model of large bowel cancer. The technique was able to resolve the epithelial resistance from the total resistance of the bowel wall. A progressive decrease in resistance of the bowel epithelium occurs during carcinogenesis induced with dimethyhydrazine. About a 21% decrease in epithelial resistance from 22.0 +/- 1.3 omega.cm-2 to 17.5 +/- 1.1 omega cm-2 (p less than 0.025) was observed after 20 wk of carcinogen administration. The sensitivity of the technique in detecting altered epithelial resistance in premalignant bowel mucosa was improved by examining the impedance profile in a sodium-free Ringer's solution where the epithelium of control colons had a resistance of 24.4 +/- 1.8 omega.cm-2 compared with 19.0 +/- 1.1 omega.cm-2 (p less than 0.02) in colons from animals treated for only 4 wk with the carcinogen. Epithelial impedance analysis would seem to be a sensitive technique capable of identifying changes in the electrical properties or the large bowel early in disease states. PMID:3427187

  18. Experimentally induced photosensitization in cattle with Cooperia pedunculata.

    PubMed

    Casteel, S W; Rowe, L D; Bailey, E M; Fiske, R A; Bridges, C W

    1988-04-01

    Photosensitization was induced in 2 Charolais heifers following administration of a mixture of air-dried, ground, green (75%) and dead (25%) leaves of the south Texas forb, Cooperia pedunculata, and subsequent exposure to sunlight. Plant material used in this study was collected from a pasture where natural cases of primary bovine photosensitization were occurring. Signs of photosensitization were observed in one heifer after 2 doses of plant material--10 g/kg on day 1 and 5 g/kg on day 2. Continued administration of plant material at 5 g/kg/d on days 3, 4, 7, 8, and 9 resulted in severe signs and lesions of photosensitization and death on day 23. A second heifer developed signs of mild photosensitization following administration of plant material at 1.7 g/kg/d for 4 days. This heifer recovered by day 18. Clinical and pathologic findings of this trial were consistent with the primary form of photosensitization observed in natural cases seen in cattle of south Texas exposed to this plant. PMID:3381477

  19. Experimental Investigation of Cavitation Induced Feedline Instability from an Orifice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hitt, Matthew A.; Lineberry, David M.; Ahuja, Vineet; Frederick, Robert A,

    2012-01-01

    This paper details the results of an experimental investigation into the cavitation instabilities created by a circular orifice conducted at the University of Alabama in Huntsville Propulsion Research Center. This experiment was conducted in concert with a computational simulation to serve as a reference point for the simulation. Testing was conducted using liquid nitrogen as a cryogenic propellant simulant. A 1.06 cm diameter thin orifice with a rounded inlet was tested in an approximately 1.25 kg/s flow with inlet pressures ranging from 504.1 kPa to 829.3 kPa. Pressure fluctuations generated by the orifice were measured using a high frequency pressure sensor located 0.64 tube diameters downstream of the orifice. Fast Fourier Transforms were performed on the high frequency data to determine the instability frequency. Shedding resulted in a primary frequency with a cavitation related subharmonic frequency. For this experiment, the cavitation instability ranged from 153 Hz to 275 Hz. Additionally, the strength of the cavitation occur red as a function of cavitation number. At lower cavitation numbers, the strength of the cavitation instability ranged from 2.4 % to 7 % of the inlet pressure. However, at higher cavitation numbers, the strength of the cavitation instability ranged from 0.6 % to 1 % of the inlet pressure.

  20. Toxin-Induced Experimental Models of Learning and Memory Impairment.

    PubMed

    More, Sandeep Vasant; Kumar, Hemant; Cho, Duk-Yeon; Yun, Yo-Sep; Choi, Dong-Kug

    2016-01-01

    Animal models for learning and memory have significantly contributed to novel strategies for drug development and hence are an imperative part in the assessment of therapeutics. Learning and memory involve different stages including acquisition, consolidation, and retrieval and each stage can be characterized using specific toxin. Recent studies have postulated the molecular basis of these processes and have also demonstrated many signaling molecules that are involved in several stages of memory. Most insights into learning and memory impairment and to develop a novel compound stems from the investigations performed in experimental models, especially those produced by neurotoxins models. Several toxins have been utilized based on their mechanism of action for learning and memory impairment such as scopolamine, streptozotocin, quinolinic acid, and domoic acid. Further, some toxins like 6-hydroxy dopamine (6-OHDA), 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) and amyloid-β are known to cause specific learning and memory impairment which imitate the disease pathology of Parkinson's disease dementia and Alzheimer's disease dementia. Apart from these toxins, several other toxins come under a miscellaneous category like an environmental pollutant, snake venoms, botulinum, and lipopolysaccharide. This review will focus on the various classes of neurotoxin models for learning and memory impairment with their specific mechanism of action that could assist the process of drug discovery and development for dementia and cognitive disorders. PMID:27598124

  1. Experimental particle acceleration by water evaporation induced by shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scolamacchia, T.; Alatorre Ibarguengoitia, M.; Scheu, B.; Dingwell, D. B.; Cimarelli, C.

    2010-12-01

    Shock waves are commonly generated during volcanic eruptions. They induce sudden changes in pressure and temperature causing phase changes. Nevertheless, their effects on flowfield properties are not well understood. Here we investigate the role of gas expansion generated by shock wave propagation in the acceleration of ash particles. We used a shock tube facility consisting of a high-pressure (HP) steel autoclave (450 mm long, 28 mm in internal diameter), pressurized with Ar gas, and a low-pressure tank at atmospheric conditions (LP). A copper diaphragm separated the HP autoclave from a 180 mm tube (PVC or acrylic glass) at ambient P, with the same internal diameter of the HP reservoir. Around the tube, a 30 cm-high acrylic glass cylinder, with the same section of the LP tank (40 cm), allowed the observation of the processes occurring downstream from the nozzle throat, and was large enough to act as an unconfined volume in which the initial diffracting shock and gas jet expand. All experiments were performed at Pres/Pamb ratios of 150:1. Two ambient conditions were used: dry air and air saturated with steam. Carbon fibers and glass spheres in a size range between 150 and 210 μm, were placed on a metal wire at the exit of the PVC tube. The sudden decompression of the Ar gas, due to the failure of the diaphragm, generated an initial air shock wave. A high-speed camera recorded the processes between the first 100 μsec and several ms after the diaphragm failure at frame rates ranging between 30,000 and 50,000 fps. In the experiments with ambient air saturated with steam, the high-speed camera allowed to visualize the condensation front associated with the initial air shock; a maximum velocity of 788 m/s was recorded, which decreases to 524 m/s at distance of 0.5 ±0.2 cm, 1.1 ms after the diaphragm rupture. The condensation front preceded the Ar jet front exhausting from the reservoir, by 0.2-0.5 ms. In all experiments particles velocities following the initial

  2. Experimental investigation of the flow induced by artificial cilia.

    PubMed

    Hussong, J; Schorr, N; Belardi, J; Prucker, O; Rühe, J; Westerweel, J

    2011-06-21

    The fluid transport produced by rectangular shaped, magnetically actuated artificial cilia of 70 μm length and 20 μm width was determined by means of phase-locked Micro Particle Image Velocimetry (μPIV) measurements in a closed microfluidic chamber. The phase-averaged flow produced by the artificial cilia reached up to 130 μm s(-1) with an actuation cycle frequency of 10 Hz. Analysis of the measured flow data indicate that the present system is capable of achieving volume flow rates of V[combining dot above](cilia) = 14 ± 4 μl min(-1) in a micro channel of 0.5 × 5 mm(2) cross-sectional area when no back pressure is built up. This corresponds to an effective pressure gradient of 6 ± 1 Pa m(-1), which equals a pressure difference of 0.6 ± 0.1 mPa over a distance of 100 μm between two rows of cilia. These results were derived analytically from the measured velocity profile by treating the cilia as a thin boundary layer. While the cilia produce phase-averaged velocities of the order of O(10(2)μm s(-1)), time-resolved measurements showed that the flow field reverses two times during one actuation cycle inducing instantaneous velocities of up to approximately 2 mm s(-1). This shows that the flow field is dominated by fluid oscillations and flow rates are expected to increase if the beating motion of the cilia is further improved. PMID:21614349

  3. Predictions of Experimentally Observed Stochastic Ground Vibrations Induced by Blasting

    PubMed Central

    Kostić, Srđan; Perc, Matjaž; Vasović, Nebojša; Trajković, Slobodan

    2013-01-01

    In the present paper, we investigate the blast induced ground motion recorded at the limestone quarry “Suva Vrela” near Kosjerić, which is located in the western part of Serbia. We examine the recorded signals by means of surrogate data methods and a determinism test, in order to determine whether the recorded ground velocity is stochastic or deterministic in nature. Longitudinal, transversal and the vertical ground motion component are analyzed at three monitoring points that are located at different distances from the blasting source. The analysis reveals that the recordings belong to a class of stationary linear stochastic processes with Gaussian inputs, which could be distorted by a monotonic, instantaneous, time-independent nonlinear function. Low determinism factors obtained with the determinism test further confirm the stochastic nature of the recordings. Guided by the outcome of time series analysis, we propose an improved prediction model for the peak particle velocity based on a neural network. We show that, while conventional predictors fail to provide acceptable prediction accuracy, the neural network model with four main blast parameters as input, namely total charge, maximum charge per delay, distance from the blasting source to the measuring point, and hole depth, delivers significantly more accurate predictions that may be applicable on site. We also perform a sensitivity analysis, which reveals that the distance from the blasting source has the strongest influence on the final value of the peak particle velocity. This is in full agreement with previous observations and theory, thus additionally validating our methodology and main conclusions. PMID:24358140

  4. Generation of hydroxyl radicals during ascites experimentally induced in broilers.

    PubMed

    Arab, H A; Jamshidi, R; Rassouli, A; Shams, G; Hassanzadeh, M H

    2006-04-01

    Increased metabolic rates, pulmonary hypertension and cardiac dysfunction are the most important features of the ascites syndrome in broiler chickens. However, the mechanism of cell injury causing the pathogenesis of the syndrome is not clearly understood. Our study aimed to examine the generation of hydroxyl radicals (OH*) in broiler chickens experiencing ascites. The hundred and fifty 1-d-old chickens were purchased from a local hatchery and reared in an open poultry house for 46 d. They were divided at random into three groups and ascites was induced in two groups by exposing them to low temperature or administration of triiodothyronine (T(3)). The third group served as control and was reared normally. Haematological, biochemical and pathological tests were used to determine the incidence of ascites: including total red blood cell (RBC), packed cell volume (PCV), release of alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST) and ratio of right ventricular weight to total ventricular weight (RV/TV). A salicylate hydroxylation method was used to examine the generation of hydroxyl radicals (OH*) in treated groups. TWo hydroxylated salicylic acid metabolites, 2,3- and 2,5-dihydroxy benzoic acid (2,3- and 2,5-DHBA), were measured by HPLC to detect the generation of OH*. An ascites syndrome was observed in T(3) and low-temperature treated groups, as shown by necropsy changes and increases in f RBC, PCV, ALT, AST and the ratio of RV/TV. Concentrations of 2,3- and 2,5-DHBA were increased in groups experiencing ascites compared to control group. It is suggested that reactive oxygen species that is OH* ions, may be involved in the pathogenesis of the ascites syndrome in broiler chickens. PMID:16641033

  5. Role of the Enteric Nervous System in the Fluid and Electrolyte Secretion of Rotavirus Diarrhea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundgren, Ove; Peregrin, Attila Timar; Persson, Kjell; Kordasti, Shirin; Uhnoo, Ingrid; Svensson, Lennart

    2000-01-01

    The mechanism underlying the intestinal fluid loss in rotavirus diarrhea, which often afflicts children in developing countries, is not known. One hypothesis is that the rotavirus evokes intestinal fluid and electrolyte secretion by activation of the nervous system in the intestinal wall, the enteric nervous system (ENS). Four different drugs that inhibit ENS functions were used to obtain experimental evidence for this hypothesis in mice in vitro and in vivo. The involvement of the ENS in rotavirus diarrhea indicates potential sites of action for drugs in the treatment of the disease.

  6. Immune Cells and Molecular Networks in Experimentally Induced Pulpitis.

    PubMed

    Renard, E; Gaudin, A; Bienvenu, G; Amiaud, J; Farges, J C; Cuturi, M C; Moreau, A; Alliot-Licht, B

    2016-02-01

    Dental pulp is a dynamic tissue able to resist external irritation during tooth decay by using immunocompetent cells involved in innate and adaptive responses. To better understand the immune response of pulp toward gram-negative bacteria, we analyzed biological mediators and immunocompetent cells in rat incisor pulp experimentally inflamed by either lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or saline solution (phosphate-buffered saline [PBS]). Untreated teeth were used as control. Expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, chemokine ligands, growth factors, and enzymes were evaluated at the transcript level, and the recruitment of the different leukocytes in pulp was measured by fluorescence-activated cell-sorting analysis after 3 h, 9 h, and 3 d post-PBS or post-LPS treatment. After 3 d, injured rat incisors showed pulp wound healing and production of reparative dentin in both LPS and PBS conditions, testifying to the reversible pulpitis status of this model. IL6, IL1-β, TNF-α, CCL2, CXCL1, CXCL2, MMP9, and iNOS gene expression were significantly upregulated after 3 h of LPS stimulation as compared with PBS. The immunoregulatory cytokine IL10 was also upregulated after 3 h, suggesting that LPS stimulates not only inflammation but also immunoregulation. Fluorescence-activated cell-sorting analysis revealed a significant, rapid, and transient increase in leukocyte levels 9 h after PBS and LPS stimulation. The quantity of dendritic cells was significantly upregulated with LPS versus PBS. Interestingly, we identified a myeloid-derived suppressor cell-enriched cell population in noninjured rodent incisor dental pulp. The percentage of this population, known to regulate immune response, was higher 9 h after inflammation triggered with PBS and LPS as compared with the control. Taken together, these data offer a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the regulation of dental pulp immunity that may be elicited by gram-negative bacteria. PMID:26472753

  7. Diarrhea due to Cryptosporidium infection in artificially reared lambs.

    PubMed Central

    Tzipori, S; Angus, K W; Campbell, I; Clerihew, L W

    1981-01-01

    Severe diarrhea which lasted 7 to 12 days occurred in 40 of 48 artificially reared lambs within 5 to 12 days of birth, and 16 of them died. Of 16 diarrheic fecal samples examined, 10 contained Cryptosporidium oocysts and 1 contained rotavirus, but no other known enteropathogen was detected. Upon histological examination, cryptosporidia were found in the ilea of three affected lambs, and in one of them, villous atrophy and fusion, with epithelial cross-bridging between villi, were present in distal small intestine. Diarrhea was induced in two specific pathogen-free lambs by oral inoculation with fecal homogenate containing Cryptosporidium oocysts. Both the small and large intestines became infected with the organism, and associated lesions included stunting, fusion, and deformities of villi in the distal small intestine, with replacement of columnar enterocytes by immature cuboidal cells. Subclinical infections were induced in newborn specific pathogen-free mice and rats. Judged by these data, the lamb-derived Cryptosporidium sp. is similar to those recovered from calves, deer, and humans. Images PMID:7263849

  8. Altered cGMP dynamics at the plasma membrane contribute to diarrhea in ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Arora, Kavisha; Sinha, Chandrima; Zhang, Weiqiang; Moon, Chang Suk; Ren, Aixia; Yarlagadda, Sunitha; Dostmann, Wolfgang R; Adebiyi, Adebowale; Haberman, Yael; Denson, Lee A; Wang, Xusheng; Naren, Anjaparavanda P

    2015-10-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) belongs to inflammatory bowel disorders, a group of gastrointestinal disorders that can produce serious recurring diarrhea in affected patients. The mechanism for UC- and inflammatory bowel disorder-associated diarrhea is not well understood. The cystic fibrosis transmembrane-conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel plays an important role in fluid and water transport across the intestinal mucosa. CFTR channel function is regulated in a compartmentalized manner through the formation of CFTR-containing macromolecular complexes at the plasma membrane. In this study, we demonstrate the involvement of a novel macromolecular signaling pathway that causes diarrhea in UC. We found that a nitric oxide-producing enzyme, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), is overexpressed under the plasma membrane and generates compartmentalized cGMP in gut epithelia in UC. The scaffolding protein Na(+)/H(+) exchanger regulatory factor 2 (NHERF2) bridges iNOS with CFTR, forming CFTR-NHERF2-iNOS macromolecular complexes that potentiate CFTR channel function via the nitric oxide-cGMP pathway under inflammatory conditions both in vitro and in vivo. Potential disruption of these complexes in Nherf2(-/-) mice may render them more resistant to CFTR-mediated secretory diarrhea than Nherf2(+/+) mice in murine colitis models. Our study provides insight into the mechanism of pathophysiologic occurrence of diarrhea in UC and suggests that targeting CFTR and CFTR-containing macromolecular complexes will ameliorate diarrheal symptoms and improve conditions associated with inflammatory bowel disorders. PMID:26261085

  9. Diarrhea - what to ask your health care provider - adult

    MedlinePlus

    What to ask your health care provider about diarrhea - adult; Loose stools - what to ask your health ... medicines, vitamins, herbs, or supplements I take cause diarrhea? Should I stop taking any of them? What ...

  10. Addicts Using Diarrhea Drug Imodium to Get High

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158685.html Addicts Using Diarrhea Drug Imodium to Get High Trend is increasing ... Vicodin, some addicts are now turning to the diarrhea drug Imodium for a high, researchers say. This ...

  11. Experimental demonstration of population inversion driven by retroreflection-induced bichromatic adiabatic passage

    SciTech Connect

    Conde, Alvaro Peralta; Yatsenko, Leonid P.; Klein, Jens; Oberst, Martin; Halfmann, Thomas

    2005-11-15

    We present experimental data to demonstrate coherently driven population inversion by retroreflection-induced bichromatic adiabatic passage in metastable helium atoms. Complete and robust population transfer from an initial to a target state is induced by coherent interaction of the atoms in a supersonic beam with two counterpropagating and temporally delayed laser pulses of different intensities. The radiation fields intersect the atomic beam slightly tilted away from normal incidence, thereby inducing Doppler shifts of the atomic resonance between the initial and the target state. Thus the laser pulses produce a bichromatic field in the rest frame of each atom, which induces complete coherent population transfer by an adiabatic passage process.

  12. Zinc: Role in the management of diarrhea and cholera

    PubMed Central

    Qadir, M Imran; Arshad, Arfa; Ahmad, Bashir

    2013-01-01

    Diarrhea and cholera are major health problems. Vibrio cholera, the causative agent of cholera, infects the small intestine, resulting in vomiting, massive watery diarrhea and dehydration. Reduced water and electrolyte absorption is also due to zinc deficiency. Zinc has an important role in recovery from the disease. The combination of zinc with cholera vaccine and oral rehydration solutions has a positive impact on cholera and diarrhea. It has led to a decrease in the mortality and morbidity associated with diarrhea. PMID:24303485

  13. Nutritional Management of Acute Diarrhea in Infants and Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council, Washington, DC. Food and Nutrition Board.

    Written primarily for health professionals advising on programs and policy related to nutrition and diarrhea therapy, this report is aimed at management of diarrhea in less-developed countries, but its information and technical insights are relevant to an understanding of diarrhea and its management throughout the world. Technical in orientation…

  14. Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus: Global Status

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite the success of regional bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) eradication programs, infections with this diverse group of viruses remain a source of economic loss for producers worldwide. There is a wide range of variation among BVDV results in differences in genotype (BVDV1 and BVDV2), biot...

  15. Bovine viral diarrhea virus: biosecurity and control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper discusses the recommended procedures involved in setting up biosecurity and control programs designed to limit bovine viral diarrhea virus infections in beef cattle operations. For the purpose of these discussions, a working definition of a biosecurity plan was considered to be an organiz...

  16. Review: Management of postprandial diarrhea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Money, Mary E; Camilleri, Michael

    2012-06-01

    Unexpected, urgent, sometimes painful bowel movements after eating are common complaints among adults. Without a clear etiology, if pain is present and resolves with the movements, this is usually labeled "irritable bowel syndrome-diarrhea" based solely on symptoms. If this symptom-based approach is applied exclusively, it may lead physicians not to consider treatable conditions: celiac disease, or maldigestion due to bile acid malabsorption, pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, or an a-glucosidase (sucrase, glucoamylase, maltase, or isomaltase) deficiency. These conditions can be misdiagnosed as irritable bowel syndrome-diarrhea (or functional diarrhea, if pain is not present). Limited testing is currently available to confirm these conditions (antibody screens for celiac disease; fecal fat as a surrogate marker for pancreatic function). Therefore, empirical treatment with alpha amylase, pancreatic enzymes, or a bile acid-binding agent may simultaneously treat these patients and serve as a surrogate diagnostic test. This review will summarize the current evidence for bile acid malabsorption, and deficiencies of pancreatic enzymes or a-glucosidases as potential causes for postprandial diarrhea, and provide an algorithm for treatment options. PMID:22624684

  17. Molecular biology of bovine viral diarrhea virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) are arguably the most important viral pathogen of ruminants worldwide and can cause severe economic loss. Clinical symptoms of the disease caused by BVDV range from subclinical to severe acute hemorrhagic syndrome, with the severity of disease being strain depend...

  18. Refractory diarrhea: A paraneoplastic syndrome of neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Han, Wei; Wang, Huan-Min

    2015-07-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is the most common extracranial solid tumor in children. Diarrheal NB is quite rare and is not easy to diagnose in the early stage. Six cases of diarrheal NB in our hospital treated from 1996 to 2006 were retrospectively analyzed, including characteristics such as electrolyte imbalance, pathologic features, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) immunohistochemical staining results, treatment, and prognosis. All patients were boys with 3-8 loose or watery stools each day and routine fecal tests were normal. Abdominal tumors were identified by B-ultrasound. Drugs were ineffective. Three patients underwent surgery, and the remaining three patients received surgery and chemotherapy. Diarrhea stopped after treatment in five patients. Two patients died due to intractable hypokalemia. The tumor was located in the adrenal gland in four patients, in the upper retroperitoneum in one patient, and in the presacral area in one patient. Pathologic findings were NB and ganglioneuroblastoma. Five patients were at clinical stage I-II, and one was at stage III. Four patients survived (followed-up for 6 mo to 4 years). Immunohistochemical staining for VIP was positive. Refractory diarrhea is a paraneoplastic syndrome of NB and is rare. Patients aged 1-3 years who present with chronic intractable diarrhea should be followed closely. Intractable diarrhea, hypokalemia, and dysplasia are the initial clinical manifestations. Increased VIP is characteristic of this disease. Potassium supplementation plays a vital role in the treatment procedure, especially preoperatively. The prognosis of diarrheal NB is good following appropriate treatment. PMID:26167095

  19. [Diarrhea from the infectologist's point of view].

    PubMed

    Nemes, Zsuzsanna

    2009-02-22

    Gastroenteritis is a nonspecific term for various pathologic states of the gastrointestinal tract. Gastroenteritis causing pathogens are the second leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In the developed countries diarrhea is the most common reason for missing work, while in the developing world, it is a leading cause of death. Internationally, the mortality rate is 5-10 million deaths each year. "Traveller's diarrhea" is a polyetiologic common health problem of international travellers which affects travellers generally for days, but it can result in chronic postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome as well. Infectious agents usually cause acute gastroenteritis either by adherence of the intestinal mucosa, or by mucosal invasion, enterotoxin production, and/or cytotoxin production. The incubation period can often suggest the cause of etiology. When symptoms occur within 6 hours of eating, ingestion of preformed toxin of S. aureus or Bacillus cereus should be suspected. The incidence of hypervirulent C. difficile associated colitis is an emerging problem as a healthcare system associated infection. While infectious agents do not commonly cause chronic diarrhea, those that do include C. difficile, Giardia lamblia, Entamoeba histolytica, Cryptosporidium, Aeromonas and Yersinia . Amoebiasis is the second to malaria as a protozoal cause of death. Infection with HIV is also a common cause of diarrhea. PMID:19218145

  20. Diarrhea Management Training in Early Childhood Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winnail, Scott D.; Artz, Lynn M.; Geiger, Brian F.; Petri, Cynthia J.; Bailey, Rebecca; Mason, J.W.

    2001-01-01

    Addresses the health of young children and how to safely and effectively care for children with diarrhea in the home and in early child care settings. Discusses specific intervention and program activities, including specially designed materials for mixing homemade oral rehydration usage. (Author/SD)

  1. Travelers' diarrhea: Risk reduction and management.

    PubMed

    Moore, Karen S

    2015-11-15

    Travelers' diarrhea is a common complaint for patients traveling abroad. Onset of illness, symptoms experienced, and the duration of symptoms are greatly impacted by the causative agent. This article explores the causes, prevention recommendations, and treatment methodologies recommended for this common condition. PMID:26474195

  2. Use of bacitracin in the prevention and treatment of experimentally-induced idiopathic colitis in horses.

    PubMed Central

    Staempfli, H R; Prescott, J F; Carman, R J; McCutcheon, L J

    1992-01-01

    Ten healthy ponies from a single herd were found by repeated fecal culture to be free of Salmonella species and Clostridium cadaveris. In a preliminary study, four ponies administered a single oral dose of 10 mg/kg lincomycin did not develop idiopathic colitis when the drug was administered alone. Four other ponies were administered 10 mg/kg lincomycin by stomach tube together with 0.45 L of colonic content from a horse with idiopathic colitis induced earlier by lincomycin alone. Two of the four ponies were treated with 25 g oral zinc bacitracin premix (110 g/kg active ingredient) 24 h later. Forty-two hours after inoculation the two untreated ponies had severe signs of idiopathic colitis and were euthanized. Postmortem findings were typical of idiopathic colitis. The two treated ponies had milder illness but the more severely affected was also euthanized; the other was retreated at 42 h with bacitracin pre-mix and again 12 h later. Its illness and diarrhea resolved over the next 24 h. Clostridium cadaveris was isolated in large numbers from the cecum of the euthanized ponies and their cecal content contained mouse lethal and guinea pig dermonecrotic, but not cytotoxic, activity. Enterotoxins of Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium difficile could not be demonstrated. No toxin could be demonstrated in culture supernatants of C. cadaveris or in supernatants of cecal contents treated with ethanol prior to culturing in anaerobically incubated broth. No Salmonella spp. were isolated. A further two ponies were administered 10 mg/kg lincomycin orally with 0.45 L colonic content from a horse with idiopathic colitis, as described.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1423060

  3. HIV/AIDS-Associated Opportunistic Protozoal Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Agholi, Mahmoud; Motazedian, Mohammad Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has altered both the epidemiology and outcome of enteric opportunistic parasitic infections. This study was done to determine the prevalence and species/genotypes of intestinal coccidian and microsporidial infections among HIV/AIDS patients with diarrhea and/or a history of diarrhea alternately with an asymptomatic interval, and their association with CD4 T cell count. This cross-sectional study was done from May 2010 to May 2011 in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, South of Iran. A blood sample was obtained from HIV-positive patients for a CD4 T cell count upon enrollment. Sociodemographic data and a history of diarrhea were collected by interviewing 356 consecutive participants (273 males and 83 females). Whenever possible more than a fecal sample was collected from all the participants and examined for parasites using direct, physiological saline solution ethyl acetate, an acid-fast trichrome stain, nested polymerase chain reaction, and sequencing techniques for the detection, confirmation, and genotyping of Cryptosporidium spp., Cyclospora cayetanensis, Isospora belli, and intestinal microsporidia (Enterocytozoon bieneusi). The most common opportunistic and nonopportunistic pathogens were Cryptosporidium spp. (C. parvum and C. andersoni), E. bieneusi, Giardia lamblia, Sarcocystis spp., and Blastocystis homonis affecting 34, 8, 23, 1, and 14 patients, respectively. C. cayetanensis, I. belli, Enterobius vermicularis, and Hymenolepis nana were observed in few patients. A CD4 count <200 cells/μl was significantly associated with the presence of opportunistic parasites and diarrhea (p<0.05). Opportunistic intestinal parasites should be suspected in any HIV/AIDS patient with chronic diarrhea. Tropical epidemic nonopportunistic enteric parasitic infections among such patients should not be neglected in Iran. PMID:22873400

  4. Entamoeba moshkovskii Is Associated With Diarrhea in Infants and Causes Diarrhea and Colitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shimokawa, Chikako; Kabir, Mamun; Taniuchi, Mami; Mondal, Dinesh; Kobayashi, Seiki; Ali, Ibne Karim M.; Sobuz, Shihab U.; Senba, Masachika; Houpt, Eric; Haque, Rashidul; Petri, William A.; Hamano, Shinjiro

    2012-01-01

    Background.Entamoeba moshkovskii is prevalent in developing countries and morphologically indistinguishable from pathogenic Entamoeba histolytica and nonpathogenic Entamoeba dispar. It is not known if E. moshkovskii is pathogenic. Methods.Mice were intracecally challenged with the trophozoites of each Entamoeba spp. to test the ability to cause diarrhea, and infants in Bangladesh were prospectively observed to see if newly acquired E. moshkovskii infection was associated with diarrhea. Results.E. moshkovskii and E. histolytica caused diarrhea and weight loss in susceptible mice. E. dispar infected none of the mouse strains tested. In Mirpur, Dhaka, Bangladesh, E. moshkovskii, E. histolytica, and E. dispar were identified in 42 (2.95%), 66 (4.63%), and 5 (0.35%), respectively, of 1426 diarrheal episodes in 385 children followed prospectively from birth to one year of age. Diarrhea occurred temporally with acquisition of a new E. moshkovskii infection: in the 2 months preceding E. moshkvskii-associated diarrhea, 86% (36 of 42) of monthly surveillance stool samples were negative for E. moshkovskii. Conclusions.E. moshkovskii was found to be pathogenic in mice. In children, the acquisition of E. moshkovskii infection was associated with diarrhea. These data are consistent with E. moshkovskii causing disease, indicating that it is important to reexamine its pathogenicity. PMID:22723640

  5. Experimental gastric ulcers induced by immobilization and electric shock of rats and their pharmacotherapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zabrodin, O. N.

    1980-01-01

    The mechanism of development of experimental gastric ulcers, induced in rats by combined immobilization and electric shock, was analyzed pharmacologically with peripheral neurotropic agents. It is concluded that: (1) The most marked preventive effect in the development of the experimentally induced gastric ulcers was displayed by agents capable of blocking the ascending activation system of the reticular formation. (2) Sympathetic fibers, which disrupt the trophism of the gastric wall, form the efferent portion of the reflex arc. (3) Gastric secretion does not appear to be the primary cause of ulceration.

  6. Antisecretory and antimotility activity of Aconitum heterophyllum and its significance in treatment of diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Satyendra K.; Jain, Divya; Patel, Dinesh K.; Sahu, Alakh N.; Hemalatha, Siva

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The roots of the plant Aconitum heterophyllum (EAH) are traditionally used for curing hysteria, throat infection, dyspepsia, abdominal pain, diabetes, and diarrhea. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to determine the mechanism involved in the anti-diarrheal activity of roots of A. heterophyllum. Materials and Methods: Ant-diarrheal activity of ethanol extract at 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg p.o. was evaluated using fecal excretion and castor oil-induced diarrhea models, while optimized dose, that is, 100 mg/kg p.o. was further subjected to small intestinal transit, intestinal fluids accumulation, PGE2-induced enteropooling and gastric emptying test. To elucidate the probable mechanism, various biochemical parameters and Na+, K+ concentration in intestinal fluids were also determined. Further, antibacterial activity of extract along with its standardization using aconitine as a marker with the help of HPLC was carried out. Results: The results depicted a significant (P < 0.05) reduction in normal fecal output at 100 and 200 mg/kg p.o. of extract after 5th and 7th h of treatment. Castor oil-induced diarrhea model demonstrated a ceiling effect at 100 mg/kg p.o. with a protection of 60.185% from diarrhea. EAH at 100 mg/kg p.o. also showed significant activity in small intestinal transit, fluid accumulation, and PGE2-induced enteropooling models, which also restored the altered biochemical parameters and prevented Na+ and K+ loss. The extract with 0.0833% w/w of aconitine depicted a potential antibacterial activity of extract against microbes implicated in diarrhea. Conclusion: The study concluded antisecretory and antimotility effect of A. heterophyllum, which mediates through nitric oxide path way. PMID:24550590

  7. Nutrient induced type 2 and chemical induced type 1 experimental diabetes differently modulate gastric GLP-1 receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Olga; Broide, Efrat; Ben-Yehudah, Gilad; Cantrell, Dror; Shirin, Haim; Rapoport, Micha J

    2015-01-01

    T2DM patients demonstrate reduced GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) expression in their gastric glands. Whether induced T2DM and T1DM differently affect the gastric GLP-1R expression is not known. This study assessed extrapancreatic GLP-1R system in glandular stomach of rodents with different types of experimental diabetes. T2DM and T1DM were induced in Psammomys obesus (PO) by high-energy (HE) diet and by streptozotocin (STZ) in Sprague Dawly (SD) rats, respectively. GLP-1R expression was determined in glandular stomach by RT PCR and immunohistomorphological analysis. The mRNA expression and cellular association of the GLP-1R in principal glands were similar in control PO and SD rats. However, nutrient and chemical induced diabetes resulted in opposite alterations of glandular GLP-1R expression. Diabetic PO demonstrated increased GLP-1R mRNA expression, intensity of cellular GLP-1R immunostaining, and frequency of GLP-1R positive cells in the neck area of principal glands compared with controls. In contrast, SD diabetic rats demonstrated decreased GLP-1 mRNA, cellular GLP-1R immunoreactivity, and frequency of GLP-1R immunoreactive cells in the neck area compared with controls. In conclusion, nutrient and chemical induced experimental diabetes result in distinct opposite alterations of GLP-1R expression in glandular stomach. These results suggest that induced T1DM and T2DM may differently modulate GLP-1R system in enteropancreatic axis. PMID:25893200

  8. Experimental coronary sclerosis induced by immobilization of rabbits: A new model of arteriosclerosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyavokin, V. V.; Tjawokin, W. W.

    1980-01-01

    A new method for producing arteriosclerosis with coronary insufficiency in rabbits by means of immobilization is described and discussed. The experimentally induced atherosclerosis develops due to hypodynamics imposed by the reduced muscular activity without overloading with exogenous cholesterol. The atherosclerosis and coronary insufficiency are associated. With variations in the duration and extent of immobilization, coronary insufficiency alone or with atherosclerosis can be produced.

  9. Clinical trial evaluating cholestyramine to prevent diarrhea in patients maintained on low-fat diets during pelvic radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chary, S.; Thomson, D.H.

    1984-10-01

    A prospective randomized trial to determine the value of a low fat diet with or without cholestyramine in the treatment of acute intestinal complications of pelvic irradiation is presented. A total of 35 patients receiving pelvic irradiation were entered in the study and all patients had received a 40 gm fat diet. The group was then randomized to receive either placebo (17 patients) or cholestyramine (18 patients). Diarrhea occurred in six out of 16 evaluable patients in the control group and only one of the 17 evaluable patients in the cholestyramine group. The frequency of diarrhea and the diarrhea scale remained high in the placebo group in the entire observation period. Statistical analysis had revealed better diarrhea control in the cholestyramine group. In this report mechanism by which diarrhea occurs following pelvic irradiation is discussed. The adverse effects associated with the use of cholestyramine have been presented. It was concluded that cholestyramine is effective in preventing acute diarrhea induced by pelvic irradiation in patients receiving a low fat diet but is associated with side effects.

  10. Modulation of celecoxib- and streptozotocin-induced experimental dementia of Alzheimer's disease by pitavastatin and donepezil.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Bhupesh; Singh, Nirmal; Singh, Manjeet

    2008-03-01

    Present study was designed to investigate modulation of experimental dementia by Pitavastatin and donepezil. Learning and memory of the swiss albino mice were studied on Morris water-maze. Celecoxib orally (p.o.)/Streptozotocin (STZ) intracerebroventricular administrations were used to induce experimental dementia. Brain acetyl cholinesterase activity was measured by EllMann's method to assess cholinergic activity of the brain. Brain thio barbituric acid reactive species (TBARS) levels and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels were measured by Ohokawa's and Beutler's method respectively, to assess total oxidative stress in brain. Total serum cholesterol level was measured by Allain's method. Celecoxib/STZ treatments produced a significant loss of learning and memory. Pitavastatin/Donepezil successfully attenuated this Celecoxib/STZ induced dementia. Higher levels of brain acetyl-cholinesterase (AChE) activity, TBARS and lower level of GSH were observed in Celecoxib/STZ treated animals, which were significantly attenuated by Donepezil. Pitavastatin also attenuated the Celecoxib/STZ induced high levels of TBARS & low levels of GSH without effecting AChE activity and total serum cholesterol levels. Celecoxib induced dementia noted in the present study may be attributed to its stimulatory effect on amyloid beta-42, brain AChE activity, and oxidative stress. Sub-diabetogenic STZ induced memory deficits closely related to Alzheimer's disease. Reversal of Celecoxib/STZ induced memory deficits by Pitavastatin may be due to its antioxidative, anti beta amyloid aggregatory property, and by Donepezil, due to its anticholinesterase and neuroprotective actions. PMID:18208924

  11. Probiotics for Prevention and Treatment of Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Guarino, Alfredo; Guandalini, Stefano; Lo Vecchio, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Probiotics are increasingly used for prevention and treatment of diarrhea more in children than in adults. Given the broad spectrum of diarrhea, this review focuses on the main etiologies: acute gastroenteritis, antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD), and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). For each, we reviewed randomized controlled trials, meta-analyses, and guidelines. For acute gastroenteritis we found 12 guidelines: 5 recommended probiotics and 7 did not. However, the guidelines containing positive recommendations provided proof of evidence from clinical trials and meta-analyses. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and Saccharomyces boulardii had the most compelling evidence of efficacy as they reduced the duration of the disease by 1 day. For AAD 4 meta-analyses were found, reporting variable efficacy of probiotics in preventing diarrhea, based on the setting, patient's age, and antibiotics. The most effective strains were LGG and S. boulardii. For NEC, we found 3 randomized controlled trials, 5 meta-analyses, and 4 position papers. Probiotics reduced the risk of NEC enterocolitis and mortality in preterm babies. Guidelines did not support a routine use of probiotics and asked for further data for such sensitive implications. In conclusion, there is strong and solid proof of efficacy of probiotics as active treatment of gastroenteritis in addition to rehydration. There is solid evidence that probiotics have some efficacy in prevention of AAD, but the number needed to treat is an issue. For both etiologies LGG and S. boulardii have the strongest evidence. In NEC the indications are more debated, yet on the basis of available data and their implications, probiotics should be carefully considered. PMID:26447963

  12. Management of acute diarrhea in emergency room.

    PubMed

    Dekate, Parag; Jayashree, M; Singhi, Sunit C

    2013-03-01

    Acute diarrhea is the second leading cause of under-five mortality in India. It is defined as the passage of frequent watery stools (>3/24 h). Recent change in consistency of stools is more important than frequency. Acute diarrhea is caused by variety of viral, bacterial and parasitic agents. The common ones are: Rotavirus, E. coli, Shigella, Cholera, and Salmonella. Campylobacter jejuni, Giardia and E. histolytica are also not uncommon. The most important concern in management of acute diarrhea in Emergency room (ER) is fluid and electrolyte imbalances and treatment of underlying infection, wherever applicable. It includes, initial stabilization (identification and treatment of shock), assessment of hydration and rehydration therapy, recognition and treatment of electrolyte imbalance, and use of appropriate antimicrobials wherever indicated. For assessment of hydration clinical signs are generally reliable; however, in severely malnourished children sunken eyes and skin turgor are unreliable. Oral Rehydration Therapy is the cornerstone of management of dehydration. Intravenous fluids are not routinely recommended except in cases of persistent vomiting and/or shock. Majority of cases can be managed in ER and at home. Hospitalization is indicated in infants <3 mo, children with severe dehydration, severe malnutrition, toxic look, persistent vomiting and suspected surgical abdomen. Supplementations with zinc and probiotics have been shown to reduce severity and duration of diarrhea; however evidence does not support the use of antisecretary, antimotility and binding agents. Education of parents about hand hygiene, safe weaning and safe drinking water etc., can help in reducing incidence of this important health problem in the country. PMID:23192407

  13. Diarrhea - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... please enable JavaScript. Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) French (français) Hindi (हिन्दी) Japanese (日本語) Korean (한국어) Russian (Русский) ... Diarrhée - français (French) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Hindi (हिन्दी) Diarrhea हिन्दी (Hindi) Bilingual PDF ...

  14. Antidiarrheal potential of standardized extract of Rhododendron arboreum Smith flowers in experimental animals

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Neeraj; Singh, Anil P.; Gupta, Amresh; Sahu, P.K.; Rao, Ch V.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate standardized ethyl acetate fraction of Rhododendron arboreum (EFRA) flowers for antidiarrheal activity in experimental animals. Materials and Methods: A simple sensitive high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) method was used for the determination of hyperin in EFRA. The standardized fraction was investigated for castor oil, magnesium sulfate-induced diarrhea, measurement of gastrointestinal transit using charcoal and castor oil-induced enteropooling. Results: The concentration of hyperin in flowers of R. arboreum was found to be 0.148% by HPTLC. Oral administration of EFRA at 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg exhibited dose-dependent and significant (P<0.05-0.001) antidiarrheal potential in castor oil and magnesium sulfate-induced diarrhea. EFRA at doses of 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg also produced significant (P<0.05-0.001) dose-dependent reduction in propulsive movement in castor oil-induced gastrointestinal transit using charcoal meal in rats. EFRA was found to possess an antienteropooling in castor oil-induced experimental animals by reducing both weight and volume of intestinal content significantly. Conclusion: These findings demonstrate that standardized ethyl acetate fraction of R. arboreum flowers has potent antidiarrheal activity thus justifying its traditional use in diarrhea and have great potential as a source for natural health products. PMID:22144775

  15. Gene Therapy Induces Antigen-Specific Tolerance in Experimental Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jirholt, Pernilla; Turesson, Olof; Wing, Kajsa; Holmdahl, Rikard; Kihlberg, Jan; Stern, Anna; Mårtensson, Inga-Lill; Henningsson, Louise; Gustafsson, Kenth; Gjertsson, Inger

    2016-01-01

    Here, we investigate induction of immunological tolerance by lentiviral based gene therapy in a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis, collagen II-induced arthritis (CIA). Targeting the expression of the collagen type II (CII) to antigen presenting cells (APCs) induced antigen-specific tolerance, where only 5% of the mice developed arthritis as compared with 95% of the control mice. In the CII-tolerized mice, the proportion of Tregs as well as mRNA expression of SOCS1 (suppressors of cytokine signaling 1) increased at day 3 after CII immunization. Transfer of B cells or non-B cell APC, as well as T cells, from tolerized to naïve mice all mediated a certain degree of tolerance. Thus, sustainable tolerance is established very early during the course of arthritis and is mediated by both B and non-B cells as APCs. This novel approach for inducing tolerance to disease specific antigens can be used for studying tolerance mechanisms, not only in CIA but also in other autoimmune diseases. PMID:27159398

  16. Diarrhea at the Hajj and Umrah.

    PubMed

    Gautret, Philippe; Benkouiten, Samir; Sridhar, Shruti; Al-Tawfiq, Jaffar A; Memish, Ziad A

    2015-01-01

    This systematic review aims to summarize the incidence and etiology of diarrheal illness among pilgrims attending the Hajj and Umrah. Gastroenteritis and diarrhea have been potential threats during previous Hajj pilgrimages. The last cases of Hajj related cholera were reported in 1989. Currently, respiratory tract infections account for the majority of health problems during the Hajj. This shift in epidemiology reflects the improvement of sanitary conditions in Saudi Arabia in general, and at religious sites in particular. Nevertheless, gastrointestinal diseases, food-poisoning outbreaks, and diarrhea continue to occur among pilgrims. Available studies about diarrhea among Hajj pilgrims indicate a mean prevalence of 2% with the highest prevalence of 23% among a group of French pilgrims in 2013. There is an obvious lack of information about the etiology of diarrheal disease at the Hajj. Further studies addressing this issue in hospitalized patients as well as prospective cohort studies would be of interest. During the Hajj, hand washing is regularly carried out by pilgrims under a ritual purification, often called ablution. We recommend implementation of effective hand hygiene practices focusing on the regular use of alcohol-based hand rubs, as they require less time than traditional hand washing, act more rapidly, and contribute to sustained improvement in compliance associated with decreased infection rates. PMID:25765485

  17. Four different synthetic peptides of proteolipid protein induce a distinct antibody response in MP4-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Recks, Mascha S; Grether, Nicolai B; van der Broeck, Franziska; Ganscher, Alla; Wagner, Nicole; Henke, Erik; Ergün, Süleyman; Schroeter, Michael; Kuerten, Stefanie

    2015-07-01

    Here we studied the autoantibody specificity elicited by proteolipid protein (PLP) in MP4-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a mouse model of multiple sclerosis (MS). In C57BL/6 (B6) mice, antibodies were induced by immunization with one of the two extracellular and by the intracellular PLP domain. Antibodies against extracellular PLP were myelin-reactive in oligodendrocyte cultures and induced mild spinal cord demyelination upon transfer into B cell-deficient J(H)T mice. Remarkably, also antibodies against intracellular PLP showed binding to intact oligodendrocytes and were capable of inducing myelin pathology upon transfer into J(H)T mice. In MP4-immunized mice peptide-specific T(H)1/T(H)17 responses were mainly directed against the extracellular PLP domains, but also involved the intracellular epitopes. These data suggest that both extracellular and intracellular epitopes of PLP contribute to the pathogenesis of MP4-induced EAE already in the setting of intact myelin. It remains to be elucidated if this concept also applies to MS itself. PMID:25959684

  18. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: Equivalent properties of single event burnout induced by different sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shi-Yu; Cao, Zhou; Da, Dao-An; Xue, Yu-Xiong

    2009-05-01

    The experimental results of single event burnout induced by heavy ions and 252Cf fission fragments in power MOSFET devices have been investigated. It is concluded that the characteristics of single event burnout induced by 252Cf fission fragments is consistent to that in heavy ions. The power MOSFET in the “turn-off" state is more susceptible to single event burnout than it is in the “turn-on" state. The thresholds of the drain-source voltage for single event burnout induced by 173 MeV bromine ions and 252Cf fission fragments are close to each other, and the burnout cross section is sensitive to variation of the drain-source voltage above the threshold of single event burnout. In addition, the current waveforms of single event burnouts induced by different sources are similar. Different power MOSFET devices may have different probabilities for the occurrence of single event burnout.

  19. Modeling Chemotherapy-Induced Hair Loss: From Experimental Propositions toward Clinical Reality.

    PubMed

    Botchkarev, Vladimir A; Sharov, Andrey A

    2016-03-01

    Chemotherapy-induced hair loss is one of the most devastating side effects of cancer treatment. To study the effects of chemotherapeutic agents on the hair follicle, a number of experimental models have been proposed. Yoon et al. report that transplantation of human scalp hair follicles onto chemotherapy-treated immunodeficient mice serves as an excellent in vivo model for chemotherapy-induced hair loss. Yoon et al. demonstrate that (i) the response of human hair follicles grafted onto immunodeficient mice to cyclophosphamide resembles the key features of the chemotherapy-induced hair loss seen in patients with cancer and (ii) this human in vivo model for chemotherapy-induced hair loss is closer to clinical reality than to any earlier models. Undoubtedly, this model will serve as a valuable tool for analyses of the mechanisms that underlie this devastating side effect of anti-cancer therapy. PMID:26902124

  20. Peripheral site of action of levodropropizine in experimentally-induced cough: role of sensory neuropeptides.

    PubMed

    Lavezzo, A; Melillo, G; Clavenna, G; Omini, C

    1992-06-01

    The mechanism of action of levodropropizine has been investigated in different models of experimentally-induced cough in guinea-pigs. In particular it has been demonstrated that the antitussive drug has a peripheral site of action by injecting the drug intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.). In these experiments levodropropizine (40 micrograms/50 microliters i.c.v.) did not prevent electrically-induced cough. On the other hand, codeine (5 micrograms/50 microliters i.c.v.) markedly prevented coughing. A difference in the potency ratio of levodropropizine and codeine has been demonstrated in capsaicin-induced cough; after oral administration, codeine was about two to three times more potent than levodropropizine. However, after aerosol administration the two compounds were equipotent. These data might suggest a peripheral site of action for levodropropizine which is related to sensory neuropeptides. Further support for the role of sensory neuropeptides in the mechanism of action of levodropropizine comes from the results obtained in capsaicin-desensitized animals. In this experimental model levodropropizine failed to prevent the vagally elicited cough in neuropeptide-depleted animals, whereas codeine did not differentiate between control and capsaicin-treated animals. In conclusion, our results support the suggestion that levodropropizine has a peripheral site of action. In addition, the interference with the sensory neuropeptide system may explain, at least in part, its activity in experimentally-induced cough. PMID:1611233

  1. Anti-rotaviral effects of Glycyrrhiza uralensis extract in piglets with rotavirus diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Since rotavirus is one of the leading pathogens that cause severe gastroenteritis and represents a serious threat to human and animal health, researchers have been searching for cheap, safe, and effective anti-rotaviral drugs. There is a widespread of interest in using natural products as antiviral agents, and among them, licorice derived from Glycyrrhiza spp. has exerted antiviral properties against several viruses. In this study, anti-rotaviral efficacy of Glycyrrhiza uralensis extract (GUE) as an effective and cheaper remedy without side-effects was evaluated in colostrums-deprived piglets after induction of rotavirus diarrhea. Methods Colostrums-deprived piglets were inoculated with porcine rotavirus K85 (G5P[7]) strain. On the onset of diarrhea, piglets were treated with different concentration of GUE. To evaluate the antiviral efficacy of GUE, fecal consistency score, fecal virus shedding and histological changes of the small intestine, mRNA expression levels of inflammation-related cytokines (IL8, IL10, IFN-β, IFN-γ and TNF-α), signaling molecules (p38 and JNK), and transcription factor (NFκB) in the small intestine and spleen were determined. Results Among the dosages (100-400 mg/ml) administrated to animals, 400 mg/ml of GUE cured diarrhea, and markedly improved small intestinal lesion score and fecal virus shedding. mRNA expression levels of inflammation-related cytokines (IL8, IL10, IFN-β, IFN-γ and TNF-α), signaling molecules (p38 and JNK), and transcription factor (NFκB) in the small intestine and spleen were markedly increased in animals with RVA-induced diarrhea, but dose- dependently decreased in GUE treated animals after RVA-induced diarrhea. Conclusions GUE cures rotaviral enteritis by coordinating antiviral and anti-inflammatory effects. Therapy of this herbal medicine can be a viable medication for curing rotaviral enteritis in animals and humans. PMID:23244491

  2. Consuming Transgenic Goats' Milk Containing the Antimicrobial Protein Lysozyme Helps Resolve Diarrhea in Young Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Caitlin A.; Garas Klobas, Lydia C.; Maga, Elizabeth A.; Murray, James D.

    2013-01-01

    Childhood diarrhea is a significant problem in many developing countries and E. coli is a main causative agent of diarrhea in young children. Lysozyme is an antimicrobial protein highly expressed in human milk, but not ruminant milk, and is thought to help protect breastfeeding children against diarrheal diseases. We hypothesized that consumption of milk from transgenic goats which produce human lysozyme (hLZ-milk) in their milk would accelerate recovery from bacterial-induced diarrhea. Young pigs were used as a model for children and infected with enterotoxigenic E. coli. Once clinical signs of diarrhea developed, pigs were fed hLZ-milk or non-transgenic control goat milk three times a day for two days. Clinical observations and complete blood counts (CBC) were performed. Animals were euthanized and samples collected to assess differences in histology, cytokine expression and bacterial translocation into the mesenteric lymph node. Pigs consuming hLZ-milk recovered from clinical signs of infection faster than pigs consuming control milk, with significantly improved fecal consistency (p = 0.0190) and activity level (p = 0.0350). The CBC analysis showed circulating monocytes (p = 0.0413), neutrophils (p = 0.0219), and lymphocytes (p = 0.0222) returned faster to pre-infection proportions in hLZ-milk fed pigs, while control-fed pigs had significantly higher hematocrit (p = 0.027), indicating continuing dehydration. In the ileum, pigs fed hLZ-milk had significantly lower expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-8 (p = 0.0271), longer intestinal villi (p<0.0001), deeper crypts (p = 0.0053), and a thinner lamina propria (p = 0.0004). These data demonstrate that consumption of hLZ-milk helped pigs recover from infection faster, making hLZ-milk an effective treatment of E. coli-induced diarrhea. PMID:23516474

  3. Protective effect of ketoconazole against experimentally induced gastric ulcers in rats.

    PubMed

    Al Moutaery, Ahmed R

    2003-01-01

    Recent studies suggest the critical role of inflammatory mediators in the genesis and healing of gastric ulcers. Ketoconazole a commonly used anti-fungal agent has a potent immunomodulatory action. The present investigation was undertaken to study the effect of ketoconazole on chemically and stress induced gastric ulcers in rats. Experimental gastric lesions in rats were induced by water immersion restraint stress, indomethacin and ethanol. Acid secretion studies were undertaken in pylorus ligated rats with and without ketoconazole. The level of myeloperoxidase (marker of neutrophil activity) non-protein sulfhydryl compounds and gastric wall mucus were measured after ethanol induced gastric lesions. Ketoconazole treatment resulted in significant protection against stress; indomethacin and ethanol induced gastric lesions in rats. Ketoconazole also dose dependently attenuated ethanol induced increase in myeloperoxidase activity and protected gastric mucosa against ethanol-induced depletion of non-protein sulfhydryl. These findings point towards the mediation of neutrophils and sulfhydryl compounds in ketoconazole induced cytoprotection. In conclusion, this study clearly shows anti-acid secretory, anti-ulcer and cytoprotective activity of ketoconazole. PMID:15686104

  4. Experimental Branch Retinal Vein Occlusion Induces Upstream Pericyte Loss and Vascular Destabilization

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Elisa; Raoul, William; Calippe, Bertrand; Sahel, José-Alain; Guillonneau, Xavier; Paques, Michel; Sennlaub, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Aims Branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) leads to extensive vascular remodeling and is important cause of visual impairment. Although the vascular morphological changes following experimental vein occlusion have been described in a variety of models using angiography, the underlying cellular events are ill defined. Methods and Results We here show that laser-induced experimental BRVO in mice leads to a wave of TUNEL-positive endothelial cell (EC) apoptosis in the upstream vascular network associated with a transient edema and hemorrhages. Subsequently, we observe an induction of EC proliferation within the dilated vein and capillaries, detected by EdU incorporation, and the edema resolves. However, the pericytes of the upstream capillaries are severely reduced, which was associated with continuing EC apoptosis and proliferation. The vascular remodeling was associated with increased expression of TGFβ, TSP-1, but also FGF2 expression. Exposure of the experimental animals to hypoxia, when pericyte (PC) dropout had occurred, led to a dramatic increase in endothelial cell proliferation, confirming the vascular instability induced by the experimental BRVO. Conclusion Experimental BRVO leads to acute endothelial cells apoptosis and increased permeability. Subsequently the upstream vascular network remains destabilized, characterized by pericyte dropout, un-physiologically high endothelial cells turnover and sensitivity to hypoxia. These early changes might pave the way for capillary loss and subsequent chronic ischemia and edema that characterize the late stage disease. PMID:26208283

  5. Prevalence of Iron Deficiency and Anemia among Young Children with Acute Diarrhea in Bhaktapur, Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Chandyo, Ram K.; Ulak, Manjeswori; Adhikari, Ramesh K.; Sommerfelt, Halvor; Strand, Tor A.

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is still common in children under five years of age and may impair their growth and cognitive development. Diarrhea is the second most common reason for seeking medical care for young children in Nepal. However, neither screening programs nor effective preventive measures for anemia and iron deficiencies are in place among children with diarrhea in many developing countries. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency and explore their associations with clinical, socioeconomic, and anthropometric parameters in Nepalese children. This was a cross-sectional study based on 1232 children, six to 35 months old, with acute diarrhea participating in a zinc supplementation trial. The mean (SD) hemoglobin was 11.2 g/dL (1.2). Anemia was found in 493 children (40%); this estimate increased to 641 (52%) when we adjusted for the altitude of the study area (hemoglobin <11.3 g/dL). One in every three children had depleted iron stores and 198 (16%) of the children had both depleted iron stores and anemia, indicating iron deficiency anemia. The prevalence of anemia among children presenting with acute diarrhea was high but the degree of severity was mainly mild or moderate. Iron deficiency explained less than half of the total anemia, indicating other nutritional deficiencies inducing anemia might be common in this population. PMID:27417782

  6. An overview of calf diarrhea - infectious etiology, diagnosis, and intervention

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yong-il

    2014-01-01

    Calf diarrhea is a commonly reported disease in young animals, and still a major cause of productivity and economic loss to cattle producers worldwide. In the report of the 2007 National Animal Health Monitoring System for U.S. dairy, half of the deaths among unweaned calves was attributed to diarrhea. Multiple pathogens are known or postulated to cause or contribute to calf diarrhea development. Other factors including both the environment and management practices influence disease severity or outcomes. The multifactorial nature of calf diarrhea makes this disease hard to control effectively in modern cow-calf operations. The purpose of this review is to provide a better understanding of a) the ecology and pathogenesis of well-known and potential bovine enteric pathogens implicated in calf diarrhea, b) describe diagnostic tests used to detect various enteric pathogens along with their pros and cons, and c) propose improved intervention strategies for treating calf diarrhea. PMID:24378583

  7. Gastroprotective effect of minocycline in experimentally induced gastric ulcers in rats.

    PubMed

    Asmari, Abdulrahman Al; Omani, Saud Al; Otaibi, Malfi Al; Abdulaaly, Abdul-Aziz Al; Elfaki, Ibrahim; Yahya, Khalid Al; Arshaduddin, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Minocycline (MCN), a semi-synthetic tetracycline derivative possesses pleiotropic effects and provides protection against a number of disease models. However its effect on gastric ulcers has not been studied. The present investigation was undertaken, to study the gastro-protective potential of MCN in experimentally induced gastric ulcers in rats. MCN (10, 30, 100 mg/Kg) was tested for gastric secretion and antiulcer activity in different groups of Wistar rats. Gastric secretion and acidity studies were performed in pylorus ligated rats while indices of gastric ulcers were measured in ethanol (1 ml-100%) and indomethacin (30 mg/kg), induced gastric ulcers. Histological changes and the levels of gastric wall mucus, malondialdehyde (MDA), non-protein sulfhydryl (NP-SH), and myeloperoxidase (MPO), were used to assess ethanol induced gastric mucosal injuries. Exposure of rats to ulcerogens resulted in gastric mucosal injury and a significant increase in the indices of ulcer. MCN conferred a protective effect against ethanol, and indomethacin induced gastric mucosal injuries. Treatment with MCN, resulted in a significant decrease in the amount of gastric secretion, and total acidity and significantly (P<0.001), reduced the gastric lesions induced by ethanol and indomethacin. MCN also significantly attenuated the ethanol induced reduction in the levels of gastric wall mucus, and NP-SH (P<0.001). The histological changes and the increased MDA and MPO activity were also significantly (P<0.001) inhibited by MCN. Minocycline showed significant antiulcer and gastroprotective activity against experimentally induced gastric ulcers. The gastroprotective effects of minocycline may be due to its anti-secretory, antioxidant and anti inflammatory action. PMID:24753752

  8. Gastroprotective effect of minocycline in experimentally induced gastric ulcers in rats

    PubMed Central

    Asmari, Abdulrahman Al; Omani, Saud Al; Otaibi, Malfi Al; Abdulaaly, Abdul-Aziz Al; Elfaki, Ibrahim; Yahya, Khalid Al; Arshaduddin, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Minocycline (MCN), a semi-synthetic tetracycline derivative possesses pleiotropic effects and provides protection against a number of disease models. However its effect on gastric ulcers has not been studied. The present investigation was undertaken, to study the gastro-protective potential of MCN in experimentally induced gastric ulcers in rats. MCN (10, 30, 100 mg/Kg) was tested for gastric secretion and antiulcer activity in different groups of Wistar rats. Gastric secretion and acidity studies were performed in pylorus ligated rats while indices of gastric ulcers were measured in ethanol (1 ml-100%) and indomethacin (30 mg/kg), induced gastric ulcers. Histological changes and the levels of gastric wall mucus, malondialdehyde (MDA), non-protein sulfhydryl (NP-SH), and myeloperoxidase (MPO), were used to assess ethanol induced gastric mucosal injuries. Exposure of rats to ulcerogens resulted in gastric mucosal injury and a significant increase in the indices of ulcer. MCN conferred a protective effect against ethanol, and indomethacin induced gastric mucosal injuries. Treatment with MCN, resulted in a significant decrease in the amount of gastric secretion, and total acidity and significantly (P<0.001), reduced the gastric lesions induced by ethanol and indomethacin. MCN also significantly attenuated the ethanol induced reduction in the levels of gastric wall mucus, and NP-SH (P<0.001). The histological changes and the increased MDA and MPO activity were also significantly (P<0.001) inhibited by MCN. Minocycline showed significant antiulcer and gastroprotective activity against experimentally induced gastric ulcers. The gastroprotective effects of minocycline may be due to its anti-secretory, antioxidant and anti inflammatory action. PMID:24753752

  9. Syndromic diarrhea/Tricho-hepato-enteric syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Syndromic diarrhea/Tricho-hepato-enteric syndrome (SD/THE) is a rare and severe bowel disorder caused by mutation in SKIV2L or in TTC37, 2 genes encoding subunits of the putative human SKI complex. The estimated prevalence is 1/1,000,000 births and the transmission is autosomal recessive. The classical form is characterized by 5 clinical signs: intractable diarrhea of infancy beginning in the first month of life, usually leading to failure to thrive and requiring parenteral nutrition; facial dysmorphism characterised by prominent forehead and cheeks, broad nasal root and hypertelorism; hair abnormalities described as woolly and easily removable; immune disorders resulting from defective antibody production; intrauterine growth restriction. The aetiology is a defect in TTC37, a TPR containing protein, or in the RNA helicase SKIV2L, both constituting the putative human ski complex. The ski complex is a heterotetrameric cofactor of the cytoplasmic RNA exosome which ensures aberrants mRNAs decay. The diagnosis SD/THE is initially based on clinical findings and confirmed by direct sequencing of TTC37 and SKIV2L. Differential diagnosis with the other causes of intractable diarrhea is easily performed by pathologic investigations. During their clinical course, most of the children require parenteral nutrition and often immunoglobulin supplementation. With time, some of them can be weaned off parenteral nutrition and immunoglobulin supplementation. The prognosis depends on the management and is largely related to the occurrence of parenteral nutrition complications or infections. Even with optimal management, most of the children seem to experience failure to thrive and final short stature. Mild mental retardation is observed in half of the cases. Abstract in French Les diarrhées syndromiques ou syndrome tricho-hepato-enterique (SD/THE) sont un syndrome rare et sévère dont l’incidence est estimée à 1 cas pour 1 million de naissances et la transmission

  10. The effect of various drugs on experimentally induced ulcers in immobilized rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, H.

    1978-01-01

    Experiments related to the importance of functional disorders in the central nervous system in connection with stomach diseases were performed on Wistar rats. Assuming that severe mental strains may be triggering factors for such disorders, testing of the effects of different drugs on experimentally induced ulcers in these rats was done. The immobilization method described by Bonfils was used. Particular importance was placed on the sex related difference which appeared.

  11. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Serotypes and Endemic Diarrhea in Infants

    PubMed Central

    Toledo, M. Regina F.; Alvariza, M. do Carmo B.; Murahovschi, Jayme; Ramos, Sonia R. T. S.; Trabulsi, Luiz R.

    1983-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli serotypes were searched for in feces of 550 children with endemic diarrhea and in 129 controls, in São Paulo, in 1978 and 1979; serotypes O111ab:H−, O111ab:H2, and O119:H6 were significantly associated with diarrhea in children 0 to 5 months old and were the most frequent agents of diarrhea in this age group as compared with enterotoxigenic and enteroinvasive E. coli, Salmonella sp., Shigella sp., and Yersinia enterocolitica. It is concluded that various enteropathogenic E. coli serotypes may be agents of endemic infantile diarrhea. PMID:6339384

  12. An enzyme-linked immuno focus assay for rapid detection and enumeration, and a newborn mouse model for human non-polio enteroviruses associated with acute diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Rao, C Durga; Reddy, Harikrishna; Naidu, Jagadish R; Raghavendra, A; Radhika, N S; Karande, Anjali

    2015-11-01

    We have recently reported significant association of non-polio enteroviruses (NPEVs) with acute and persistent diarrhea (18-21% of total diarrheal cases), and non-diarrheal Increased Frequency of Bowel Movements (IFoBM-ND) (about 29% of the NPEV infections) in children and that the NPEV-associated diarrhea was as significant as rotavirus diarrhea. However, their diarrhea-causing potential is yet to be demonstrated in an animal model system. Since the determination of virus titers by the traditional plaque assay takes 4-7 days, there is a need for development of a rapid method for virus titer determination to facilitate active clinical research on enterovirus-associated diarrhea. The goal of this study is to develop a cell-based rapid detection and enumeration method and to demonstrate the diarrhea-inducing potential of purified and characterized non-polio enteroviruses, which were isolated from diarrheic children. Here we describe generation of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against purified strains belonging to different serotypes, and development of an enzyme-linked immuno focus assay (ELIFA) for detection and enumeration of live NPEV particles in clinical and purified virus samples, and a newborn mouse model for NPEV diarrhea. Plaque-purified NPVEs, belonging to different serotypes, isolated from children with diarrhea, were grown in cell culture and purified by isopycnic CsCl density gradient centrifugation. By ELIFA, NPEVs could be detected and enumerated within 12h post-infection. Our results demonstrated that Coxsackievirus B1 (CVB1) and CVB5 strains, isolated from diarrheic children, induced severe diarrhea in orally-inoculated 9-12 day-old mouse pups, fulfilling Koch's postulates. The methods described here would facilitate studies on NPEV-associated gastrointestinal disease. PMID:26300372

  13. Gallic acid attenuates dextran sulfate sodium-induced experimental colitis in BALB/c mice

    PubMed Central

    Pandurangan, Ashok Kumar; Mohebali, Nooshin; Norhaizan, Mohd Esa; Looi, Chung Yeng

    2015-01-01

    Gallic acid (GA) is a polyhydroxy phenolic compound that has been detected in various natural products, such as green tea, strawberries, grapes, bananas, and many other fruits. In inflammatory bowel disease, inflammation is promoted by oxidative stress. GA is a strong antioxidant; thus, we evaluated the cytoprotective and anti-inflammatory role of GA in a dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced mouse colitis model. Experimental acute colitis was induced in male BALB/c mice by administering 2.5% DSS in the drinking water for 7 days. The disease activity index; colon weight/length ratio; histopathological analysis; mRNA expressions of IL-21 and IL-23; and protein expression of nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) were compared between the control and experimental mice. The colonic content of malondialdehyde and the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase activity were examined as parameters of the redox state. We determined that GA significantly attenuated the disease activity index and colon shortening, and reduced the histopathological evidence of injury. GA also significantly (P<0.05) reduced the expressions of IL-21 and IL-23. Furthermore, GA activates/upregulates the expression of Nrf2 and its downstream targets, including UDP-GT and NQO1, in DSS-induced mice. The findings of this study demonstrate the protective effect of GA on experimental colitis, which is probably due to an antioxidant nature of GA. PMID:26251571

  14. Experimental pathology of local tissue damage induced by Bothrops asper snake venom.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, José María; Rucavado, Alexandra; Chaves, Fernando; Díaz, Cecilia; Escalante, Teresa

    2009-12-01

    Envenomations by Bothrops asper are often associated with complex and severe local pathological manifestations, including edema, blistering, dermonecrosis, myonecrosis and hemorrhage. The pathogenesis of these alterations has been investigated at the experimental level. These effects are mostly the consequence of the direct action of zinc-dependent metalloproteinases (SVMPs) and myotoxic phospholipases A(2) (PLA(2)s). SVMPs induce hemorrhage, blistering, dermonecrosis and general extracellular matrix degradation, whereas PLA(2)s induce myonecrosis and also affect lymphatic vessels. In addition, the prominent vascular alterations leading to hemorrhage and edema may contribute to ischemia and further tissue necrosis. The mechanisms of action of SVMPs and PLA(2)s are discussed in detail in this review. Venom-induced tissue damage plays also a role in promoting bacterial infection. A prominent inflammatory reaction develops as a consequence of these local pathological alterations, with the synthesis and release of abundant mediators, resulting in edema and pain. However, whether inflammatory cells and mediators contribute to further tissue damage is not clear at present. Muscle tissue regeneration after venom-induced pathological effects is often impaired, thus resulting in permanent tissue loss and dysfunction. SVMP-induced microvessel damage is likely to be responsible of this poor regenerative outcome. Antivenoms are only partially effective in the neutralization of B. asper-induced local effects, and the search for novel toxin inhibitors represents a potential avenue for improving the treatment of this serious aspect of snakebite envenomation. PMID:19303033

  15. The effect of cannabinoids on dinitrofluorobenzene-induced experimental asthma in mice.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Turgut Emrah; Kaya, Yesim; Durlu-Kandilci, Nezahat Tugba; Onder, Sevgen; Sahin-Erdemli, Inci

    2016-09-01

    Cannabinoids have anti-inflammatory effects and can produce bronchodilation in the airways. We have investigated the effects of cannabinoids on tracheal hyperreactivity and airway inflammation in dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB)-induced experimental non-atopic asthma in mice. 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)-induced contraction response was enhanced while carbachol- and electrical field stimulation-induced contractions, and isoprenaline-induced relaxation responses were remained unchanged in DNFB group. The increased 5-HT-induced contractions were inhibited by incubation with either atropine or tetrodotoxin. DNFB application resulted in increased macrophage number in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). In vivo ACEA (CB1 agonist) treatment prevented the increase in 5-HT contractions, while JWH133 (CB2 agonist) had no effect. However, neither ACEA nor JWH133 prevented the increase in macrophage number in BALF. In vitro ACEA incubation also inhibited the increase in 5-HT contraction in DNFB group. These results show that cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist can prevent tracheal hyperreactivity to 5-HT in DNFB-induced non-atopic asthma in mice. PMID:27216000

  16. Analytical and experimental study of flow phenomena in noncavitating rocket pump inducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshminarayana, B.

    1981-01-01

    The flow processes in rocket pump inducers are summarized. The experimental investigations were carried out with air as the test medium. The major characteristics features of the rocket pump inducers are low flow coefficient (0.05 to 0.2) large stagger angle (70 deg to 85 deg) and high solidity blades of little or no camber. The investigations are concerned with the effect of viscosity not the effects of cavitation. Flow visualization, conventional and hot wire probe measurement inside and at the exit of the blade passage, were the analytical methods used. The experiment was carried out using four three and two bladed inducers with cambered blades. Both the passage and the exit flow were measured. The basic research and boundary layer investigation was carried out using a helical flat plate (of some dimensions as the inducer blades tested), and flat plate helical inducer (four bladed). Detailed mean and turbulence flow field inside the passage as well as the exit of the rotor were derived from these measurement. The boundary layer, endwall, and other passage data reveal extremely complex nature of the flow, with major effects of viscosity present across the entire passage. Several analyses were carried out to predict the flow field in inducers. These included an approximate analysis, the shear pumping analysis, and a numerical solution of exact viscous equations with approximate modeling for the viscous terms.

  17. Effect of Manilkara hexandra (Roxb.) Dubard against experimentally-induced gastric ulcers.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mamta B; Goswami, S S; Santani, D D

    2004-10-01

    Effects of the flavonoid rich fraction of the stem bark of Manilkara hexandra (Roxb.) Dubard, have been studied on ethanol, ethanol-indomethacin and pylorus ligated gastric ulcers in experimental animals. Oral administration of the ethyl acetate extract (extract A3) inhibited the formation of gastric lesions induced by ethanol in a dose dependent manner. The protective effect of extract A3 against ethanol induced gastric lesions was not abolished by pretreatment with indomethacin (10 mg kg(-1)). Further, extract A3 inhibited increase in vascular permeability due to ethanol administration. Extent of lipid peroxidation was significantly reduced in animals treated with extract. Extract A3 also inhibited the formation of gastric ulcers induced by pylorus ligation, when administered both orally and intraperitoneally. Moreover, pretreatment with extract A3 increased mucus production and glycoprotein content, which was evident from the rise in mucin activity and TC: PR ratio. PMID:15551386

  18. Effects of nabumetone and dipyrone on experimentally induced gastric ulcers in rats.

    PubMed

    Yıldırım, Engin; Sağıroğlu, Oya; Kılıç, Fatma S; Erol, Kevser

    2013-04-01

    Nabumetone and dipyrone are non-acidic, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Both of them are known to have weak inhibitory effects of cyclooxygenases. Gastric side effects represent the most common adverse drug effects of the widely used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The gastric effects of these drugs may be comparable in experimental ulcer models. In the present study, the gastric ulcerogenic activity of nabumetone and dipyrone were investigated on stress- and diethyldithiocarbamate-induced experimental ulcer models by determining the ulcer index and gastric mucus secretion in rats. It was found that diethyldithiocarbamate increased both ulcer index and mucus secretion. Nabumetone inhibited dose-dependently the increase of diethyldithiocarbamate-induced mucus secretion. Dipyrone inhibited both stress- and diethyldithiocarbamate-induced ulcer index and mucus secretion. Nabumetone inhibited stress-induced ulcer index at 25-mg/kg dose but stimulated dose-dependently mucus secretion. These effects may be attributed to their non-acidic structures and weak inhibitory effects on gastric mucosal cyclooxygenases. PMID:23129452

  19. Effect of ranitidine on healing of experimentally induced gastric ulcers in ponies.

    PubMed

    MacAllister, C G; Sangiah, S

    1993-07-01

    Thirty young ponies were examined endoscopically for evidence of gastric ulceration. Seven ponies had noninduced gastric ulcers present at the initial examination and were eliminated from the study. In an attempt to induce gastric ulcers experimentally, flunixin meglumine (1.1 mg/kg of body weight, IM, q 8 h) was administered for 7 days to the 23 ponies with endoscopically normal gastric mucosa. During the 7 days of flunixin administration, 11 ponies developed gastric ulcers that were appropriate for study. The 11 ponies were randomly allotted to 2 groups. Group-A (n = 5) and group-B (n = 6) ponies received ranitidine (4.4 mg/kg, PO, q 8 h) and corn syrup, respectively, until ulcers healed or for a maximum of 40 days. General anesthesia was induced every 3 to 5 days for visual evaluation of ulcer healing by use of a video endoscope. The earliest complete healing of gastric lesions observed in a corn syrup-treated pony was at 17 days. At 40 days, 3 of 5 and 3 of 6 ponies of the ranitidine and corn syrup-treated groups, respectively, had healed ulcers. Results of this study indicate that: noninduced gastric ulcers may be common in young ponies, flunixin meglumine may be effective in inducing gastric ulcers for gastric healing studies in young ponies, and ranitidine (4.4 mg/kg, q 8 h) is not significantly effective in accelerating healing of experimentally induced gastric ulcers in ponies under conditions of this study. PMID:8368605

  20. Duration of Analgesia Induced by Acupuncture-Like TENS on Experimental Heat Pain

    PubMed Central

    Brochu, Marilyne; Dupuis-Michaud, Cynthia; Pagé, Catherine; Popovic, Draga; Simard, Marie-Eve

    2013-01-01

    Background. Acupuncture-like TENS (AL-TENS) is a treatment modality that can be used to temporarily reduce pain. However, there is no clear data in the literature regarding the specific duration of analgesia induced by AL-TENS. Objectives. To describe and quantify the duration and magnitude of AL-TENS analgesia on experimental heat pain in healthy subjects and verify if the duration or magnitude of analgesia induced by the AL-TENS was influenced by the duration of the application of the AL-TENS (15 versus 30 minutes). Methods. A repeated-measures, intrasubject randomized experimental design was used, where each participant was his/her own control. 22 healthy volunteers underwent heat pain stimulations with a contact thermode before (pretest) and after (posttest) AL-TENS application (15 and 30 minutes). Outcome measures included subjective pain during AL-TENS, duration, and magnitude of AL-TENS-induced analgesia. Results. Survival analysis showed that the median duration of AL-TENS analgesia was 10 minutes following the application of either 15 or 30 minutes of AL-TENS. The magnitude of analgesia following either application was comparable at all points in time (P values > 0.05) and ranged between −20% and −36% pain reduction. Conclusion. Only half of the participants still had heat-pain analgesia induced by the AL-TENS at 15 minutes postapplication. PMID:27335882

  1. Ambient particulate matter induces an exacerbation of airway inflammation in experimental asthma: role of interleukin-33

    PubMed Central

    Shadie, A M; Herbert, C; Kumar, R K

    2014-01-01

    High levels of ambient environmental particulate matter (PM10 i.e. < 10 μm median aerodynamic diameter) have been linked to acute exacerbations of asthma. We examined the effects of delivering a single dose of Sydney PM10 by intranasal instillation to BALB/c mice that had been sensitized to ovalbumin and challenged repeatedly with a low (≈3 mg/m3) mass concentration of aerosolized ovalbumin for 4 weeks. Responses were compared to animals administered carbon black as a negative control, or a moderate (≈30 mg/m3) concentration of ovalbumin to simulate an allergen-induced acute exacerbation of airway inflammation. Delivery of PM10 to mice, in which experimental mild chronic asthma had previously been established, elicited characteristic features of enhanced allergic inflammation of the airways, including eosinophil and neutrophil recruitment, similar to that in the allergen-induced exacerbation. In parallel, there was increased expression of mRNA for interleukin (IL)-33 in airway tissues and an increased concentration of IL-33 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Administration of a monoclonal neutralizing anti-mouse IL-33 antibody prior to delivery of particulates significantly suppressed the inflammatory response induced by Sydney PM10, as well as the levels of associated proinflammatory cytokines in lavage fluid. We conclude that IL-33 plays a key role in driving airway inflammation in this novel experimental model of an acute exacerbation of chronic allergic asthma induced by exposure to PM10. PMID:24730559

  2. Opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH): a real clinical problem or just an experimental phenomenon?

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, Elon; Suzan, Erica; Pud, Dorit

    2015-03-01

    Although opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH) is mentioned as a potential cause of opioid dose escalation without adequate analgesia, true evidence in support of this notion is relatively limited. Most studies conducted in the context of acute and experimental pain, which seemingly demonstrated evidence for OIH, actually might have measured other phenomena such as acute opioid withdrawal or tolerance. OIH studies in patients with chronic pain have used various experimental pain models (such as cold pain tolerance or heat pain intensity). Therefore, the fact that they have yielded inconsistent results is hard to interpret. Thus far, with the exception of a few clinical case reports on OIH in patients with cancer pain and one prospective study in patients with chronic neuropathic pain, evidence for OIH in patients with chronic or cancer-related pain is lacking. Whether experimental pain models are necessary for establishing the clinical diagnosis of OIH, and which specific model is preferred, are yet to be determined. PMID:25128284

  3. Experimental and theoretical characterization of deep penetration welding threshold induced by 1-μm laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, J. L.; He, Y.; Wu, S. K.; Huang, T.; Xiao, R. S.

    2015-12-01

    The deep penetration-welding threshold (DPWT) is the critical value that describes the welding mode transition from the thermal conduction to the deep penetration. The objective of this research is to clarify the DPWT induced by the lasers with wavelength of 1 μm (1-μm laser), based on experimental observation and theoretical analysis. The experimental results indicated that the DPWT was the ratio between laser power and laser spot diameter (P/d) rather than laser power density (P/S). The evaporation threshold was smaller than the DPWT, while the jump threshold of the evaporated mass flux in the molten pool surface was consistent with the DPWT. Based on the force balance between the evaporation recoil pressure and the surface tension pressure at the gas-liquid interface of the molten pool as well as the temperature field, we developed a self-focusing model, which further confirmed the experimental results.

  4. Inflammation-induced pain sensitization in men and women: does sex matter in experimental endotoxemia?

    PubMed

    Wegner, Alexander; Elsenbruch, Sigrid; Rebernik, Laura; Roderigo, Till; Engelbrecht, Elisa; Jäger, Marcus; Engler, Harald; Schedlowski, Manfred; Benson, Sven

    2015-10-01

    A role of the innate immune system is increasingly recognized as a mechanism contributing to pain sensitization. Experimental administration of the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) constitutes a model to study inflammation-induced pain sensitization, but all existing human evidence comes from male participants. We assessed visceral and musculoskeletal pain sensitivity after low-dose LPS administration in healthy men and women to test the hypothesis that women show greater LPS-induced hyperalgesia compared with men. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study, healthy men (n = 20) and healthy women using oral contraceptives (n = 20) received an intravenous injection of 0.4 ng/kg body weight LPS or placebo. Pain sensitivity was assessed with established visceral and musculoskeletal pain models (ie, rectal pain thresholds; pressure pain thresholds for different muscle groups), together with a heartbeat perception (interoceptive accuracy) task. Plasma cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6) were measured along with state anxiety at baseline and up to 6-hour postinjection. Lipopolysaccharide application led to significant increases in plasma cytokines and state anxiety and decreased interoceptive awareness in men and women (P < 0.001, condition effects), with more pronounced LPS-induced cytokine increases in women (P < 0.05, interaction effects). Although both rectal and pressure pain thresholds were significantly decreased in the LPS condition (all P < 0.05, condition effect), no sex differences in endotoxin-induced sensitization were observed. In summary, LPS-induced systemic immune activation leads to visceral and musculoskeletal hyperalgesia, irrespective of biological sex. These findings support the broad applicability of experimental endotoxin administration as a translational preclinical model of inflammation-induced pain sensitization in both sexes. PMID:26058036

  5. Diarrhea & Child Care: Controlling Diarrhea in Out-of-Home Child Care. NCEDL Spotlights, No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Churchill, Robin B.; Pickering, Larry K.

    This report, the fourth in the National Center for Early Development and Learning's (NCEDL) "Spotlights" series, is based on excerpts from a paper presented during a "Research into Practice in Infant/Toddler Care" synthesis conference in fall 1997. The report addresses controlling diarrhea in out-of-home child care. The report notes that the rate…

  6. Bovine viral diarrhea virus: global status.

    PubMed

    Ridpath, Julia F

    2010-03-01

    Despite the success of regional bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) eradication programs, infections remain a source of economic loss for producers. The wide variation among BVDV results in differences in genotype, biotype, virulence, and types of infections. BVDV infect a range of domestic and wild ruminants. Clinical presentation varies depending on strain of virus, species of host, immune status of host, reproductive status of host, age of host, and concurrent infections. Recent advances in BVDV research and diagnostics have led to the development of regional eradication/control programs, the most efficacious of which focus on biosecurity, surveillance, and control. PMID:20117546

  7. Impact of Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea on Performance of Growing Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Julio; Sarradell, Javier; Morrison, Robert; Perez, Andres

    2015-01-01

    The impact of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDv) infection on the US pork industry has mainly been attributed to the mortality that it causes in suckling piglets, and, consequently, much effort has been invested in the quantification of its effect in sow farms. However, no information on the performance of surviving pigs that were exposed to the PEDv as piglets is available. Here, a retrospective cohort study to evaluate the impact of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDv) infection on growing pigs’ performance, as indicated by mortality, average daily gain (ADG), average daily feed intake (ADFI), and feed conversion ratio (FCR) was performed using production records from weaned pigs in nursery and wean-to-finish sites from sow farms that became PEDv-infected between May 2013 and June 2014. Production records from the first batch of growing pigs weaned in infected flows after the PEDv outbreak (“infected batches”) were compared with those from pigs weaned within the previous 14 to 120 days (“control batches”). Performance records from infected and control batches, paired by flow, were compared using non-parametric paired tests. Mortality, ADG and FCR were significantly different in PEDv-positive (infected) compared with PEDv-negative (control) batches, with a mean increase of mortality and FCR of 11% and 0.5, respectively, and a decrease of ADG of 0.16 lb/day. Our results demonstrate a poorer performance of growing pigs weaned after a PEDv outbreak compared with those weaned within the previous 14-120 days, suggesting that in addition to the mortality induced by PEDv in suckling pigs, the disease also impairs the performance of surviving pig. These findings help to quantify the impact of PEDv infection in the US and, ultimately, contribute to efforts to quantify the cost-effectiveness of disease prevention and control measures. PMID:25768287

  8. Studies of the prevalence and significance of radiolabeled bile acid malabsorption in a group of patients with idiopathic chronic diarrhea

    SciTech Connect

    Schiller, L.R.; Hogan, R.B.; Morawski, S.G.; Santa Ana, C.A.; Bern, M.J.; Norgaard, R.P.; Bo-Linn, G.W.; Fordtran, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    We studied radiolabeled fecal bile acid excretion in 11 normal subjects and 17 patients with idiopathic chronic diarrhea for three major purposes: to establish normal values for this test in the presence of increased stool volumes (induced in normal subjects by ingestion of poorly absorbable solutions); to test for bile acid malabsorption in the patients and to correlate this with an independent test of ileal function, the Schilling test; and to compare the results of the bile acid excretion test with the subsequent effect of a bile acid binding agent (cholestyramine) on stool weight. In normal subjects fecal excretion of the radiolabel was increased with increasing stool volumes. As a group, patients with idiopathic chronic diarrhea excreted radiolabeled bile acid more rapidly than normal subjects with induced diarrhea (t1/2 56 +/- 8 vs. 236 +/- 60 h, respectively, p less than 0.005). There was a statistically significant positive correlation between t1/2 of radiolabeled bile acid and Schilling test results in these patients. Although 14 of 17 patients absorbed labeled taurocholic acid less well than any of the normal subjects with comparable volumes of induced diarrhea, cholestyramine had no statistically significant effect on stool weight in the patient group, and in none of the patients was stool weight reduced to within the normal range. In summary, most patients with idiopathic chronic diarrhea have bile acid malabsorption (as measured by fecal excretion of labeled bile acid), but they do not respond to cholestyramine therapy with a significant reduction in stool weight. Although the significance of these findings was not clearly established, the most likely interpretation is that bile acid malabsorption is a manifestation of an underlying intestinal motility or absorptive defect rather than the primary cause of diarrhea.

  9. Effects of everolimus on a rat model of cerulein-induced experimental acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Özkardeş, Alper Bilal; Bozkurt, Birkan; Dumlu, Ersin Gürkan; Tokaç, Mehmet; Yazgan, Aylin Kılıç; Ergin, Merve; Erel, Özcan; Kılıç, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the biochemical and histopathological effects of everolimus in an experimental rat model of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of everolimus on blood biochemical parameters and tissue histopathology in an experimental rat model of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. Material and Methods: In 30 Wistar albino rats (male; 240–260 g), acute pancreatitis was induced by an intraperitoneal injection of cerulein (50 μg/kg) administered twice in 2 h. They were equally divided into the following three groups: 0.9% isotonic solution (Group 1; control), everolimus once (Group 2), and everolimus twice (Group 3) by oral gavage after cerulein injection. Thirty hours after the induction of pancreatitis, blood samples were collected by direct intracardiac puncture, rats were sacrificed, and pancreatic tissue samples were obtained. Results: Biochemical analyses of the blood samples showed statistically significant difference in red blood cell count as well as hemoglobin, hematocrit, urea, and alanine transaminase levels among the study groups (p<0.05 in all). Everolimus proved to significantly increase red blood cell count in a dose-independent manner. Hemoglobin and hematocrit levels significantly increased only after treatment with one dose of everolimus. Urea level was significantly different between the Groups 2 and 3; however, no change was observed in both groups when compared with the control. Alanine transaminase level significantly decreased only after treatment with two doses of everolimus. Histopathological analyses revealed that everolimus significantly decreased inflammation and perivascular infiltrate in a dose-dependent manner (35% in Group 2, 75% in Group 3; p=0.048). Conclusion: Treatment with two doses of everolimus improved some biochemical and histopathological parameters of experimental rat models of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis and implied the specific inhibition of

  10. Protective effect of leaves of Raphinus sativus Linn on experimentally induced gastric ulcers in rats.

    PubMed

    Devaraj, V C; Gopala Krishna, B; Viswanatha, G L; Satya Prasad, V; Vinay Babu, S N

    2011-07-01

    Raphinus sativus Linn (Cruciferae) commonly known as 'Radish' is a multipurpose herb cultivated in different parts of the world for its edible roots and leaves. The present study was aimed to evaluate the antiulcer activity of leaf extracts of R. sativus Linn on acetic acid induced chronic gastric ulcer and pylorus ligation induced gastric ulcer in rats. The acute oral toxicity study revealed that all the extracts were safe up to 2000 mg/kg per oral dose; hence one-tenth of this dose was selected for evaluation of antiulcer activity. In acetic acid induced gastric ulcer models, the ERS, CRS, EARS and AQRS have offered significant protection against acetic acid induced ulcers when compared to control group. While in pylorus ligation induced ulcer model the ERS, EARS and AQRS showed significant protection by decreasing the ulcer index, total acidity and free acidity. In conclusion the leaf extracts of R. sativus Linn are found to possess antiulcer property in the experimental animal models of gastric ulcers, which is consistent with the literature report in the folk medicine. PMID:23960756

  11. Effects of Guchang Capsule on Dextran Sulphate Sodium-Induced Experimental Ulcerative Colitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Baoshan; Liu, Tong; Wang, Xiaohong; Zheng, Xin; Wang, Hong; Ma, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Guchang capsule (GC) is a Chinese materia medica standardized product extracted from 15 Chinese traditional medical herbs and it has been clinically used in the treatment of intestinal disease. In this study, in order to extend the research of GC in intestinal disease, we were aiming to evaluate potential effects of GC on dextran sulphate sodium- (DSS-) induced murine experimental colitis and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. GC treatment attenuated DSS-induced body weight loss and reduced the mortality. Moreover, GC treatment prevented DSS-induced colonic pathological damage; meanwhile it inhibited proinflammatory cytokines production in colon tissues. In vitro, GC significantly reduced LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokines production via inhibiting the activation of NF-κB in macrophage cells, and the expressions of several long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) which were reported in regulating NF-κB signaling pathway were obviously affected by adding GC into culture medium. In conclusion, our data suggested that administration of GC exhibits therapeutic effects on DSS-induced colitis partially through regulating the expression of NF-κB related lncRNAs in infiltrating immune cells. PMID:27313642

  12. Experimental rat model for alcohol-induced osteonecrosis of the femoral head

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Shunichiro; Nagoya, Satoshi; Tateda, Kenji; Katada, Ryuichi; Mizuo, Keisuke; Watanabe, Satoshi; Yamashita, Toshihiko; Matsumoto, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol-induced osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) is observed in alcohol abusers and patients with alcoholic fatty liver disease. It has been reported that Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signalling plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic fatty liver disease. We previously reported a corticosteroid-induced ONFH rat model, and suggested that TLR4 signalling contributes to the pathogenesis of ONFH. Thus, it is thought that the pathogenesis of alcohol-induced ONFH is probably similar to that of corticosteroid-induced ONFH. The aim of this study was to develop a new animal model for alcohol-induced ONFH and to evaluate the relationship between the pro-inflammatory response via TLRs and the development of ONFH in rats. Male Wistar rats were fed a Lieber–DeCarli liquid diet containing 5% ethanol (experimental group) or dextran (control group) for 1–24 weeks. Histopathological and biochemical analyses were performed. Feeding the ethanol-containing liquid diet resulted in the development of ONFH with hepatic steatosis, hepatic dysfunction and hyperlipidaemia, whereas feeding the dextran-containing diet did not cause ONFH. However, we could not recognize any relationship between the pro-inflammatory response via TLR4 and the development of alcohol-induced ONFH. Thus in this study we have developed a new rat model for alcohol-induced ONFH based on the feeding of an ethanol liquid diet. ONFH was observed within seven days from the start of feeding with 5% ethanol-containing liquid diet. Although this was linked to hepatic steatosis, a TLR4 association was not a feature of this model. PMID:24020403

  13. Management of the Returning Traveler with Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Abstract: Traveler's diarrhea (TD) strikes 20—60% of travelers visiting developing countries. It occurs shortly after the return and can be distinguished into two categories: acute and persistent TD. Acute TD, mostly caused by bacterial and viral pathogens, is usually mild and self-limited, and deserves empirical symptomatic and/or antibiotic therapy in selected cases. Fluoroquinolones are progressively superseded in this indication by azithromycin, a well tolerated macrolide active against most bacteria responsible for TD, including the quinolone-resistant species of Campylobacter jejuni that are now pervasive, especially in Southeast Asia and India. Persistent TD in the returning traveler is much rarer than its acute counterpart and may be associated with three types of causes. Persistent infections, among which Giardia and possibly Entamoeba predominate, account for a significant proportion of cases. Postinfectious processes represent a second cause and comprise temporary lactose malabsorption and postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome, now considered a major cause of persistent TD. Finally, apparently unrelated chronic diseases causing diarrhea are occasionally unmasked by TD and represent a third type of persistent TD, among which the well established case of incident inflammatory bowel disease poses intriguing pathogenesis questions. This review discusses recent advances in the field and provides practical recommendations for the management of TD in adult, immunocompetent returning travelers. PMID:21180583

  14. Interferon-inducible protein-10 is highly expressed in rats with experimental nephrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Chiarri, M.; Ortiz, A.; González-Cuadrado, S.; Serón, D.; Emancipator, S. N.; Hamilton, T. A.; Barat, A.; Plaza, J. J.; González, E.; Egido, J.

    1996-01-01

    Interferon-inducible protein (IP)-10 is a small glycoprotein member of a family of chemotactic cytokines structurally related to interleukin-8. We have recently described the induction of IP-10 mRNA in mouse mesangial cells stimulated with lipopolysacharide, interferon-gamma, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. To further evaluate a possible role for this chemokine in renal injury, we have studied IP-10 in an experimental model of nephrosis induced in rats by adriamycin. High levels of glomerular IP-10 mRNA expression and glomerular and tubulointerstitial IP-10 protein were seen on day 21, coinciding with maximal proteinuria, glomerular tumor necrosis factor mRNA expression, and interstitial cellular infiltrates. Maintenance on a low protein diet not only delayed the appearance of proteinuria and interstitial cellular infiltrate but also decreased glomerular IP-10 mRNA expression. Isolated normal glomeruli and cultured glomerular epithelial and mesangial cells from normal rats expressed IP-10 mRNA upon stimulation with 100 U/ml interferon or 1 microgram/ml lipopolysaccharide for 3 hours. IP-10 mRNA expression was also inducible by lipopolysaccharide and cytokines in NRK 49F renal interstitial fibroblasts and, to a lesser extent, in NRK 52E tubular epithelial cells. Furthermore, IP-10 protein was inducible in murine mesangial cells. We conclude that IP-10 is highly inducible in vitro and in vivo in resident glomerular and tubulointerstitial cells. IP-10 may participate in the modulation of renal damage in experimental nephrosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:8546219

  15. Experimental investigations on flow induced vibration of an externally excited flexible plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purohit, Ashish; Darpe, Ashish K.; Singh, S. P.

    2016-06-01

    Flow-induced vibration of a harmonically actuated flexible plate in the wake of an upstream bluff body is experimentally investigated. The experiments are performed in an open-ended wind tunnel. A flexible plate trailing a bluff body is under fluid induced excitation due to the flowing fluid. The additional external excitation to the trailing plate is applied using an electro-magnetic exciter. The frequency and amplitude of the external harmonic excitation are selected as variable parameters in the experiments and their effect on the plate vibration and is investigated. To know the nature of acoustic pressure wave generated from the vibrating system, near-field acoustic pressure is also measured. A laser vibrometer, a pressure microphone and a high-speed camera are employed to measure the plate vibration, pressure signal, and instantaneous images of the plate motion respectively. The results obtained indicate that the dynamics of the plate is influenced by both the flow-induced excitation and external harmonic excitation. When frequency of the two excitations is close enough, a large vibration level and a high tonal sound pressure are observed. At higher amplitude of external excitation, the frequency component corresponding to the flow-induced excitation is found to reduce significantly in the frequency spectrum of the vibration signal. It is observed that, for certain range of excitation frequency, the plate vibration first reduces, reaches a minimum value and then increases with increase in the level of external excitation. A fair qualitative agreement of the experimental results with numerical simulation result of the past study has been noted. In addition to the experiments, the role of phase difference between the flow-induced excitation generated from the front obstacle and externally applied harmonic excitation is investigated through numerical simulations. The result obtained reveals that the final steady state vibration of the coupled system is

  16. Effects of experimentally-induced maternal hypothyroidism on crucial offspring rat brain enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Koromilas, Christos; Liapi, Charis; Zarros, Apostolos; Stolakis, Vasileios; Tsagianni, Anastasia; Skandali, Nikolina; Al-Humadi, Hussam; Tsakiris, Stylianos

    2014-06-01

    Hypothyroidism is known to exert significant structural and functional changes to the developing central nervous system, and can lead to the establishment of serious mental retardation and neurological problems. The aim of the present study was to shed more light on the effects of gestational and/or lactational maternal exposure to propylthiouracil-induced experimental hypothyroidism on crucial brain enzyme activities of Wistar rat offspring, at two time-points of their lives: at birth (day-1) and at 21 days of age (end of lactation). Under all studied experimental conditions, offspring brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was found to be significantly decreased due to maternal hypothyroidism, in contrast to the two studied adenosinetriphosphatase (Na(+),K(+)-ATPase and Mg(2+)-ATPase) activities that were only found to be significantly altered right after birth (increased and decreased, respectively, following an exposure to gestational maternal hypothyroidism) and were restored to control levels by the end of lactation. As our findings regarding the pattern of effects that maternal hypothyroidism has on the above-mentioned crucial offspring brain enzyme activities are compared to those reported in the literature, several differences are revealed that could be attributed to both the mode of the experimental simulation approach followed as well as to the time-frames examined. These findings could provide the basis for a debate on the need of a more consistent experimental approach to hypothyroidism during neurodevelopment as well as for a further evaluation of the herein presented and discussed neurochemical (and, ultimately, neurodevelopmental) effects of experimentally-induced maternal hypothyroidism, in a brain region-specific manner. PMID:24632022

  17. Histophathologic and Immunohistochemical Findings in Two White-tail Deer Fawns Persistently Infected with Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is an important pathogen of domestic cattle. Serological, experimental and individual case studies have explored the presence and pathogenesis of the virus in wild ungulates; however there remain large gaps in knowledge regarding BVDV infection in non-bovine speci...

  18. The effect of topical metronidazole therapy on experimentally-induced periodontitis in the beagle dog.

    PubMed

    Klinge, B; Kuvatanasuhati, J; Attström, R; Kalfas, S; Edwardsson, S

    1992-10-01

    The present study was performed to assess the effect of topical metronidazole therapy on ligature-induced periodontitis in beagle dogs. 6 beagle dogs with experimentally-induced periodontitis on the mandibular 2nd, 3rd and 4th premolars were treated with metronidazole 10% dental paste 2 x daily for 4 weeks in an open placebo-controlled study using a split-mouth design. Recordings of probing pocket depth, bleeding on probing and gingival index were performed before commencement of treatment and repeated weekly during the 4-weeks treatment period. Concurrently, samples for microbiological analysis were collected from 2 of the dogs. The results demonstrated that probing pocket depth, bleeding on probing and gingival index had improved significantly in the metronidazole-treated side compared with the placebo-treated side. Black pigmented Bacteroides spp. and Spirochetes, present in all samples before treatment, were eliminated from the metronidazole-treated side after the 1st week of treatment and throughout the treatment period, whereas they were present in all samples from the placebo-treated side. The result of the present study demonstrates that topical application of metronidazole in a dental paste, improves the clinical features of the experimentally-induced periodontitis and eliminates some of the micro-organisms associated with the disease. PMID:1447390

  19. Effects of aescin on testicular repairment in rats with experimentally induced varicocele.

    PubMed

    Tian, R H; Ma, M; Zhu, Y; Yang, S; Wang, Z Q; Zhang, Z S; Wan, C F; Li, P; Liu, Y F; Wang, J L; Liu, Y; Yang, H; Zhang, Z Z; Liu, L H; Gong, Y H; Li, F H; Hu, H L; He, Z P; Huang, Y R; Li, Z

    2014-06-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of aescin treatment in a rodent model treated with an experimentally induced varicocele. Experimental varicocele was induced by partial ligation of the left renal vein of rats. Aescin administration was performed daily for 4 weeks after the varicocele induction. Seven weeks later, a contrast-enhanced ultrasound was performed of the rats' testis to assess testicular blood flow. The animals were sacrificed, and H&E staining was then used to evaluate testicular pathological changes and polymorphonuclear leucocytes density. Cauda epididymal sperm counts and motility were evaluated. Blood was collected for the measurement of follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinising hormone and testosterone. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound showed that there were significant decreases in testicular blood flow in the aescin-treated groups compared with those in control varicocele group. Testicular oedema was detected in those rats treated with a varicocele but without aescin, while no oedema was found in the experimental group. H&E staining showed dysfunctional spermatogenesis in both cohorts; however, polymorphonuclear leucocytes density was significantly reduced in aescin-treated groups. There was an increase in sperm counts of the aescin-treated groups. Our study demonstrated that aescin could exert therapeutical effects on reversal of testicular lesions in varicocele rats. PMID:23682825

  20. The effect of experimentally induced sedentariness on mood and psychobiological responses to mental stress

    PubMed Central

    Endrighi, Romano; Steptoe, Andrew; Hamer, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests a link between sedentary behaviours and depressive symptoms. Mechanisms underlying this relationship are not understood, but inflammatory processes may be involved. Autonomic and inflammatory responses to stress may be heightened in sedentary individuals contributing to risk, but no study has experimentally investigated this. Aims To examine the effect of sedentary time on mood and stress responses using an experimental design. Method Forty-three individuals were assigned to a free-living sedentary condition and to a control condition (usual activity) in a cross-over, randomised fashion and were tested in a psychophysiology laboratory after spending 2 weeks in each condition. Participants completed mood questionnaires (General Health Questionnaire and Profile of Mood States) and wore a motion sensor for 4 weeks. Results Sedentary time increased by an average of 32 min/day (P = 0.01) during the experimental condition compared with control. Being sedentary resulted in increases in negative mood independent of changes in moderate to vigorous physical activity (ΔGHQ = 6.23, ΔPOMS = 2.80). Mood disturbances were associated with greater stress-induced inflammatory interleukin-6 (IL-6) responses (β = 0.37). Conclusions Two weeks of exposure to greater free-living sedentary time resulted in mood disturbances independent of reduction in physical activity. Stress-induced IL-6 responses were associated with changes in mood. PMID:26294364

  1. Experimental study to explore the 8Be-induced nuclear reaction via the Trojan horse method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Qun-Gang; Li, Cheng-Bo; Zhou, Shu-Hua; Irgaziev, Bakhadir; Fu, Yuan-Yong; Spitaleri, Claudio; La Cognata, Marco; Zhou, Jing; Meng, Qiu-Ying; Lamia, Livio; Lattuada, Marcello

    2016-03-01

    To explore a possible indirect method for 8Be induced astrophysical reactions, the 8Be=(8Be+n ) cluster structure has been studied via the Trojan horse method. For the first time a 8Be nucleus having an ultrashort lifetime is studied by the Trojan horse method and a 9Be nucleus in the ground state is used for this purpose. The 9Be nucleus is assumed to have a (8Be+n ) cluster structure and used as a Trojan horse nucleus. The 8Be nucleus acts as a participant, while the neutron is a spectator to the virtual 8Be+d →α +6Li reaction via the 3-body reaction 8Be+d →α +6Li+n . The experimental neutron momentum distribution inside 9Be has been reconstructed. The agreement between the experimental momentum distribution and the theoretical one indicates that a (8Be+n ) cluster structure inside 9Be is very likely. Therefore, the experimental study of 8Be induced reactions, for example, the measurement of the 8Be+α →12C reaction proceeding through the Hoyle state, is possible.

  2. Effect of somatosensory amplification and trait anxiety on experimentally induced orthodontic pain.

    PubMed

    Cioffi, Iacopo; Michelotti, Ambrosina; Perrotta, Stefania; Chiodini, Paolo; Ohrbach, Richard

    2016-04-01

    The perception of pain varies considerably across individuals and is affected by psychological traits. This study aimed to investigate the combined effects of somatosensory amplification and trait anxiety on orthodontic pain. Five-hundred and five adults completed the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and the Somatosensory Amplification Scale (SSAS). Individuals with combined STAI and SSAS scores below the 20th percentile (LASA group: five men and 12 women; mean age ± SD = 22.4 ± 1.3 yr) or above the 80th percentile (HASA group: 13 men and seven women; mean age ± SD = 23.7 ± 1.0 yr) were selected and filled in the Oral Behaviors Checklist (OBC). Orthodontic separators were placed for 5 d in order to induce experimental pain. Visual analog scales (VAS) were administered to collect ratings for occlusal discomfort, pain, and perceived stress. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were measured. A mixed regression model was used to evaluate pain and discomfort ratings over the 5-d duration of the study. At baseline, the LASA group had statistically significantly higher PPT values for the masseter muscle than did the HASA group. During the experimental procedure, the HASA group had statistically significantly higher discomfort and pain. A significant difference in pain ratings during the 5 d of the study was found for subjects in the HASA group. Higher OBC values were statistically significantly positively associated with pain. Somatosensory amplification and trait anxiety substantially affect experimentally induced orthodontic pain. PMID:26918812

  3. Rifaximin for the treatment of acute infectious diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Hong, Kyoung Sup; Kim, Joo Sung

    2011-07-01

    Rifaximin is a nonabsorbable rifamycin derivative with an excellent safety profile and a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity against a variety of enteropathogens causing acute infectious diarrhea. After oral ingestion, its bioavailability is known to be less than 0.4%, and it has a low potential for significant drug interactions. In the treatment of travelers' diarrhea caused by noninvasive diarrheagenic Escherichia coli, it has been demonstrated that rifaximin significantly shortens the duration of diarrhea and has an efficacy similar to that of ciprofloxacin. Moreover, according to two randomized placebo-controlled trials, prophylactic treatment with rifaximin reduced the risk of developing travelers' diarrhea by more than 50% compared with the placebo group. For the treatment of acute diarrhea unrelated to travel, a short course of rifaximin significantly reduced the duration of diarrhea, and its overall efficacy was comparable to that of ciprofloxacin. The discrepancy between the in vitro and in vivoantimicrobial activities of rifaximin, however, and the clinical implication of the rapid appearance of bacterial resistance, must be further elucidated. In conclusion, this gut-selective antibiotic seems to be a promising option for the treatment of acute infectious diarrhea secondary to noninvasive E. coli and also appears to be effective in chemoprophylaxis for travelers' diarrhea. PMID:21765867

  4. Rifaximin for the treatment of acute infectious diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Kyoung Sup; Kim, Joo Sung

    2011-01-01

    Rifaximin is a nonabsorbable rifamycin derivative with an excellent safety profile and a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity against a variety of enteropathogens causing acute infectious diarrhea. After oral ingestion, its bioavailability is known to be less than 0.4%, and it has a low potential for significant drug interactions. In the treatment of travelers’ diarrhea caused by noninvasive diarrheagenic Escherichia coli, it has been demonstrated that rifaximin significantly shortens the duration of diarrhea and has an efficacy similar to that of ciprofloxacin. Moreover, according to two randomized placebo-controlled trials, prophylactic treatment with rifaximin reduced the risk of developing travelers’ diarrhea by more than 50% compared with the placebo group. For the treatment of acute diarrhea unrelated to travel, a short course of rifaximin significantly reduced the duration of diarrhea, and its overall efficacy was comparable to that of ciprofloxacin. The discrepancy between the in vitro and in vivoantimicrobial activities of rifaximin, however, and the clinical implication of the rapid appearance of bacterial resistance, must be further elucidated. In conclusion, this gut-selective antibiotic seems to be a promising option for the treatment of acute infectious diarrhea secondary to noninvasive E. coli and also appears to be effective in chemoprophylaxis for travelers’ diarrhea. PMID:21765867

  5. Immunochromatography-based Diagnosis of Rotavirus Infection in Acute Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Vashishtha, Vipin M; Thacker, Sandeep; Namjoshi, Gajanan Sudhir

    2016-07-01

    Documentation of rotavirus diarrhea in a rural, resource-poor setting is a difficult task. We analyzed stool samples of 103 children admitted for acute diarrhea in a pediatric hospital in Bijnor, UP, India, using a simple bedside immunochromatography kit. Rotavirus infection was detected in 47 out of total of 103 children (45.6%). PMID:27508549

  6. Bovine viral diarrhea virus modulations of monocyte derived macrophages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is a single stranded, positive sense RNA virus and is the causative agent of bovine viral diarrhea (BVD). Disease can range from persistently infected (PI) animals displaying no clinical symptoms of disease to an acute, severe disease. Presently, limited studies ha...

  7. Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Modulation of Monocyte Derived Macrophage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV) is a single stranded, positive sense virus of the Flaviviridae family and is the causative agent of the disease known as Bovine Viral Diarrhea (BVD). Disease can range from persistently infected (PI) animals displaying no clinical symptoms of disease to an acute, s...

  8. The knowledge of intensive care professionals about diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Lordani, Cláudia Regina Felicetti; Eckert, Raquel Goreti; Tozetto, Altevir Garcia; Lordani, Tarcísio Vitor Augusto; Duarte, Péricles Almeida Delfino

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the opinions and practices of intensive care professionals with regard to diarrhea in critically ill patients. Methods A multicenter cross-sectional study was conducted among health care professionals working at three adult intensive care units. Participants responded individually to a self-administered questionnaire about their length of work experience in intensive care; the definition, characterization, and causes of diarrhea; types of records in the patient's medical record; and training received. Results A total of 78 professionals participated in this study, of whom 59.0% were nurse technicians, 25.7% were nurses, and 15.3% were physicians; 77.0% of them had worked in intensive care for over 1 year. Only 37.2% had received training on this topic. Half of the interviewees defined diarrhea as "liquid and/or pasty stools" regardless of frequency, while the other 50.0% defined diarrhea based on the increased number of daily bowel movements. The majority of them mentioned diet as the main cause of diarrhea, followed by "use of medications" (p<0.001). Distinct nutritional practices were observed among the analyzed professionals regarding episodes of diarrhea, such as discontinuing, maintaining, or reducing the volume of enteral nutrition; physicians reported that they do not routinely communicate the problem to other professionals (for example, to a nutritionist) and do not routinely record and quantify diarrhea events in patients' medical records. Conclusion Different opinions and practices were observed in intensive care professionals with regard to diarrhea. PMID:25295825

  9. Overview of the causes of chronic diarrhea in children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The major causes and the prevalence of chronic diarrhea differ between developed and developing countries. In the developing world, chronic diarrhea is typically associated with serial enteric infections and malnutrition; it is manifested by a chronic enteropathy, with impaired mucosal healing, and ...

  10. The first case of porcine epidemic diarrhea in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Ojkic, Davor; Hazlett, Murray; Fairles, Jim; Marom, Anna; Slavic, Durda; Maxie, Grant; Alexandersen, Soren; Pasick, John; Alsop, Janet; Burlatschenko, Sue

    2015-01-01

    In January, 2014, increased mortality was reported in piglets with acute diarrhea on an Ontario farm. Villus atrophy in affected piglets was confined to the small intestine. Samples of colon content were PCR-positive for porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV). Other laboratory tests did not detect significant pathogens, confirming this was the first case of PED in Canada. PMID:25694663

  11. Paricalcitol may improve oxidative DNA damage on experimental amikacin-induced nephrotoxicity model.

    PubMed

    Bulut, Gulay; Basbugan, Yildiray; Ari, Elif; Erten, Remzi; Bektas, Havva; Alp, Hamit Hakan; Bayram, Irfan

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the possible protective effect of paricalcitol on experimental amikacin-induced nephrotoxicity model in rats. Wistar albino rats (n = 32) were allocated into four equal groups of eight each, the control (Group C), paricalcitol (Group P), amikacin-induced nephrotoxicity (Group A), and paricalcitol-treated amikacin-induced nephrotoxicity (Group A + P) groups. Paricalcitol was given intra-peritoneally at a dose of 0.4 μg/kg/d for 5 consecutive days prior to induction of amikacin-induced nephrotoxicity. Intra-peritoneal amikacin (1.2 g/kg) was used to induce nephrotoxicity at day 4. Renal function parameters, oxidative stress biomarkers, oxidative DNA damage (8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine/deoxyguanosine ratio), kidney histology, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) immunoexpression were determined. Group A + P had lower mean fractional sodium excretion (p < 0.001) as well as higher creatinine clearance (p = 0.026) than the amikacin group (Group A). Renal tissue malondialdehyde levels (p = 0.035) and serum 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine/deoxyguanosine ratio (8-OHdG/dG ratio) (p < 0.001) were significantly lower; superoxide dismutase (p = 0.024) and glutathione peroxidase (p = 0.007) activities of renal tissue were significantly higher in group A + P than in group A. The mean scores of tubular necrosis (p = 0.024), proteinaceous casts (p = 0.038), medullary congestion (p = 0.035), and VEGF immunoexpression (p = 0.018) were also lower in group A + P when compared with group A. This study demonstrates the protective effect of paricalcitol in the prevention of amikacin-induced nephrotoxicity in an experimental model. Furthermore, it is the first study to demonstrate that paricalcitol improves oxidative DNA damage in an experimental acute kidney injury model. PMID:26983906

  12. High protective efficacy of rice bran against human rotavirus diarrhea via enhancing probiotic growth, gut barrier function, and innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xingdong; Twitchell, Erica; Li, Guohua; Wen, Ke; Weiss, Mariah; Kocher, Jacob; Lei, Shaohua; Ramesh, Ashwin; Ryan, Elizabeth P; Yuan, Lijuan

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we showed that rice bran (RB) was able to reduce human rotavirus (HRV) diarrhea in gnotobiotic pigs. Here, we investigated its effect on the growth of diarrhea-reducing probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and Escherichia coli Nissle (EcN), and the resulting effects on HRV diarrhea, gut epithelial health, permeability and innate immune responses during virulent HRV challenge. On 3, 5, and 7 days of age pigs were inoculated with 2 × 10(4) colony-forming-units LGG+EcN to initiate colonization. Daily RB supplementation (replacing 10% calorie intake) was started at 5 days of age and continued until euthanasia. A subset of pigs in each group was challenged orally with 10(5) focus-forming-units of virulent HRV at 33 days of age. RB completely prevented HRV diarrhea in LGG+EcN colonized pigs. RB significantly promoted the growth of both probiotic strains in the gut (~5 logs) and increased the body-weight-gain at 4-5 weeks of age compared to non-RB group. After HRV challenge, RB-fed pigs had significantly lower ileal mitotic index and villus width, and significantly increased intestinal IFN-γ and total IgA levels compared to non-RB group. Therefore, RB plus LGG+EcN colonization may represent a highly effective therapeutic approach against HRV and potentially a variety of other diarrhea-inducing enteric pathogens. PMID:26459937

  13. High protective efficacy of rice bran against human rotavirus diarrhea via enhancing probiotic growth, gut barrier function, and innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xingdong; Twitchell, Erica; Li, Guohua; Wen, Ke; Weiss, Mariah; Kocher, Jacob; Lei, Shaohua; Ramesh, Ashwin; Ryan, Elizabeth P.; Yuan, Lijuan

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we showed that rice bran (RB) was able to reduce human rotavirus (HRV) diarrhea in gnotobiotic pigs. Here, we investigated its effect on the growth of diarrhea-reducing probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and Escherichia coli Nissle (EcN), and the resulting effects on HRV diarrhea, gut epithelial health, permeability and innate immune responses during virulent HRV challenge. On 3, 5, and 7 days of age pigs were inoculated with 2 × 104 colony-forming-units LGG+EcN to initiate colonization. Daily RB supplementation (replacing 10% calorie intake) was started at 5 days of age and continued until euthanasia. A subset of pigs in each group was challenged orally with 105 focus-forming-units of virulent HRV at 33 days of age. RB completely prevented HRV diarrhea in LGG+EcN colonized pigs. RB significantly promoted the growth of both probiotic strains in the gut (~5 logs) and increased the body-weight-gain at 4–5 weeks of age compared to non-RB group. After HRV challenge, RB-fed pigs had significantly lower ileal mitotic index and villus width, and significantly increased intestinal IFN-γ and total IgA levels compared to non-RB group. Therefore, RB plus LGG+EcN colonization may represent a highly effective therapeutic approach against HRV and potentially a variety of other diarrhea-inducing enteric pathogens. PMID:26459937

  14. Catechin averts experimental diabetes mellitus-induced vascular endothelial structural and functional abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Pooja; Khanna, Deepa; Balakumar, Pitchai

    2014-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with an induction of vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED), an initial event that could lead to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and hypertension. Previous studies showed that catechin, a key component of green tea, possesses vascular beneficial effects. We investigated the effect of catechin hydrate in diabetes mellitus-induced experimental vascular endothelial abnormalities (VEA). Streptozotocin (50 mg/kg, i.p., once) administration to rats produced diabetes mellitus, which subsequently induced VEA in 8 weeks by markedly attenuating acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation in the isolated aortic ring preparation, decreasing aortic and serum nitrite/nitrate concentrations and impairing aortic endothelial integrity. These abnormalities in diabetic rats were accompanied with elevated aortic superoxide anion generation and serum lipid peroxidation in addition to hyperglycemia. Catechin hydrate treatment (50 mg/kg/day p.o., 3 weeks) markedly prevented diabetes mellitus-induced VEA and vascular oxidative stress. Intriguingly, in vitro incubation of L-NAME (100 μM), an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, or Wortmannin (100 nM), a selective inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), markedly prevented catechin hydrate-induced improvement in acetylcholine-provoked endothelium-dependent relaxation in the diabetic rat aorta. Moreover, catechin hydrate treatment considerably reduced the elevated level of serum glucose in diabetic rats. In conclusion, catechin hydrate treatment prevents diabetes mellitus-induced VED through the activation of endothelial PI3K signal and subsequent activation of eNOS and generation of nitric oxide. In addition, reduction in high glucose, vascular oxidative stress, and lipid peroxidation might additionally contribute to catechin hydrate-associated prevention of diabetic VEA. PMID:24048981

  15. Oral Administration of Ginseng Ameliorates Cyclosporine-Induced Pancreatic Injury in an Experimental Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sun Woo; Doh, Kyoung Chan; Jin, Long; Piao, Shang Guo; Heo, Seong Beom; Zheng, Yu Fen; Bae, Soo Kyung; Chung, Byung Ha; Yang, Chul Woo

    2013-01-01

    Background This study was performed to investigate whether ginseng has a protective effect in an experimental mouse model of cyclosporine-induced pancreatic injury. Methods Mice were treated with cyclosporine (30 mg/kg/day, subcutaneously) and Korean red ginseng extract (0.2 or 0.4 g/kg/day, oral gavage) for 4 weeks while on a 0.01% salt diet. The effect of ginseng on cyclosporine-induced pancreatic islet dysfunction was investigated by an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test and measurements of serum insulin level, β cell area, macrophage infiltration, and apoptosis. Using an in vitro model, we further examined the effect of ginseng on a cyclosporine-treated insulin-secreting cell line. Oxidative stress was measured by the concentration of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine in serum, tissue sections, and culture media. Results Four weeks of cyclosporine treatment increased blood glucose levels and decreased insulin levels, but cotreatment with ginseng ameliorated the cyclosporine-induced glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Pancreatic β cell area was also greater with ginseng cotreatment compared with cyclosporine monotherapy. The production of proinflammatory molecules, such as induced nitric oxide synthase and cytokines, and the level of apoptotic cell death also decreased in pancreatic β cell with ginseng treatment. Consistent with the in vivo results, the in vitro study showed that the addition of ginseng protected against cyclosporine-induced cytotoxicity, inflammation, and apoptotic cell death. These in vivo and in vitro changes were accompanied by decreases in the levels of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine in pancreatic β cell in tissue section, serum, and culture media during cotreatment of ginseng with cyclosporine. Conclusions The results of our in vivo and in vitro studies demonstrate that ginseng has a protective effect against cyclosporine-induced pancreatic β cell injury via reducing oxidative stress. PMID:24009697

  16. Antidiarrhoeal activity of leaf extract of celosia argentea in experimentally induced diarrhoea in rats.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Praveen; Vidyasagar, Gali; Singh, Sunder; Ghule, Santosh; Kumar, Bimlesh

    2010-01-01

    In order to scientifically apprise some of the anecdotal, folkloric, ethno medical uses of celosia argentea, the present study was undertaken to examine the antidiarrhoeal properties of alcoholic extract of leaves of Celosia argentea on diarrhoea by using different experimental models. Anti-diarrhoeal effect was evaluated by castor oil induced diarrhoea, charcoal meal test and PGE(2) induced diarrhoea. Loperamide (2 mg/kg) and atropine (0.1mg/kg) were used as standard drugs. Extract was used in 100 and 200 mg/kg dose. It produced dose related anti-diarrhoeal effect. Results suggest that it may act centrally and may inhibit the PGE(2) to give anti-diarrhoeal effects. Result of charcoal meal test also suggests its anti-muscarinic activity. PMID:22247831

  17. The antioxidant response induced by Lonicera caerulaea berry extracts in animals bearing experimental solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Gruia, Maria Iuliana; Oprea, Eliza; Gruia, Ion; Negoita, Valentina; Farcasanu, Ileana Cornelia

    2008-01-01

    Lonicera caerulea is a species of bush native to the Kamchatka Peninsula (Russian Far East) whose berries have been extensively studied due to their potential high antioxidant activity. The aim of our work was to investigate the in vivo effects of the antioxidant action of Lonicera caerulea berry extracts on the dynamics of experimentally-induced tumors. Our data showed that aqueous Lonicera caerulaea extracts reduced the tumor volume when administered continuously during the tumor growth and development stages, but augmented the tumor growth when the administration of extracts started three weeks before tumor grafting. Prolonged administration of Lonicera caerulaea berry extracts induced the antioxidant defense mechanism in the tumor tissues, while surprisingly amplifying the peripheral oxidative stress. PMID:18560338

  18. Boehmeria nivea Attenuates the Development of Dextran Sulfate Sodium-Induced Experimental Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Eun Ju; Sung, Mi Jeong; Yang, Hye Jeong; Kim, Myung Sunny; Hwang, Jin-Taek

    2014-01-01

    We examined the therapeutic effect of an ethanol extract derived from Boehmeria nivea (Linn.) Gaudich in a mouse model of experimental colitis. Treatment with 70% ethanol extract derived from B. nivea (EBN) at a dose of 100, 200, or 500 mg/(kg·d) improved colon shortening, body weight, the disease activity index (DAI), and histopathological score of DSS-induced colitis mice. DSS significantly increased the levels of cyclooxygenase-(COX-) 2 in colon tissue relative to that of the untreated control group. EBN administered at 100, 200, or 500 mg/(kg·d) reduced COX-2 levels in the DSS-treated mice. In addition, EBN decreased the DSS-induced secretion of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) and chemokine monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1). Taken together, these data suggest that B. nivea extract is effective in preventing colitis. PMID:25045208

  19. Protective effects of Punica granatum in experimentally-induced gastric ulcers.

    PubMed

    Alam, Mohd Sarfaraz; Alam, Mohd Aftab; Ahmad, Sayeed; Najmi, Abul Kalam; Asif, Mohd; Jahangir, Tamanna

    2010-11-01

    In the present investigation standardized aqueous methanolic extract of Punica (AMP) was used for its possible ulcer protective activity in wistar rats against different experimental models. Preliminary phytochemical screening of AMP reveals the presence of saponin, tannins, and flavonoids, which may be responsible for its activity. HPTLC finger prints of AMP showed the presence of 12 spots at different (retention factor) rf values. Oral administration of AMP (490 and 980 mg/kg bw) significantly reduced the ulcer lesion index produced by alcohol, indomethacin, and aspirin, at both doses in rats. Further, in pylorus-ligated rats AMP significantly reduces the ulcer lesions, gastric volume, and total acidity. It prevents the ulceration by increasing the pH and mucus secretion in pylorus ligated rats. The present study shows the anti-ulcer activity of AMP in experimentally-induced gastric ulcers. PMID:20846023

  20. Activity of "nonspecific pancreatic carboxylesterase" in rat serum in experimentally induced acute pancreatitis (preliminary results).

    PubMed

    Kálmán, A; Kálmán, Z; Velösy, G; Vargha, G; Vargha, G; Papp, M

    1989-01-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain more information on the serum level of "nonspecific pancreatic carboxylesterase" (PCE) in experimentally induced acute pancreatitis in rats. The effects of caerulein stimulation, hepatic duct ligation, bile-pancreatic duct ligation or the effect of retrograde injection of saline, 5% taurocholate and sunflower oil were investigated. The activity of PCE and amylase was measured in the serum, pancreatic tissue, pancreatic juice and ascitic fluid. The changes in PCE activity were greater (both in directions to increase or decrease) than that of amylase, produced by different experimental procedures. The results confirm the thesis that the serum activity of PCE is a more sensitive diagnostic method than that of amylase to detect the inflammatory process in the pancreas or the effect of obstruction of the pancreatic duct. PMID:2480696

  1. A combined experimental and numerical investigation of roughness induced supersonic boundary layer transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yunfei; Liu, Wei; Xu, Dan; Gang, Dundian; Yi, Shihe

    2016-01-01

    The effect of surface roughness on boundary layer transition is of great importance to hypersonic vehicles. In this paper, both experimental and numerical methods are used to investigate the laminar-turbulent transition of a Mach 3 flat-plate boundary layer induced by isolated roughness element. Good agreements are achieved between experimental data and high-order numerical simulations. It is observed that, with increasing height of roughness, the transition tends to move forward. Two different types of transition mechanisms are found according to the height of the roughness elements. For the smallest roughness height of h=1 mm, the shear layer instability in the wake region appears to be the leading mechanism for transition to turbulence. For two larger roughness elements of h=2 mm and h=4 mm, strong unsteadiness is developed from the upstream separation zone and transition is immediately accomplished, which indicates that the absolute instability in upstream separation zone dominates the transition.

  2. The Effects of Experimentally Induced Low Back Pain on Spine Rotational Stiffness and Local Dynamic Stability.

    PubMed

    Ross, Gwyneth B; Mavor, Matthew; Brown, Stephen H M; Graham, Ryan B

    2015-09-01

    Local dynamic stability, quantified using the maximum finite-time Lyapunov exponent (λ max), and the muscular contributions to spine rotational stiffness can provide pertinent information regarding the neuromuscular control of the spine during movement tasks. The primary goal of the present study was to assess if experimental capsaicin-induced low back pain (LBP) affects spine stability and the neuromuscular control of repetitive trunk movements in a group of healthy participants with no history of LBP. Fourteen healthy males were recruited for this investigation. Each participant was asked to complete three trials (baseline, in pain, and recovery) of 35 cycles of a repetitive trunk flexion/extension task at a rate of 0.25 Hz. Local dynamic stability and the muscular contributions to lumbar spine rotational stiffness were significantly impaired during the LBP trial compared to the baseline trial (p < 0.05); however, there was a trend for these measures to recover after a 1 h rest. This study provides evidence that capsaicin can effectively induce LBP, thereby altering spine rotational stiffness and local dynamic stability. Future research should directly compare the effects capsaicin-induced LBP and intramuscular/intraligamentous induced LBP on these same variables. PMID:25663629

  3. Nigella sativa amliorates inflammation and demyelination in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis-induced Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Noor, Neveen A; Fahmy, Heba M; Mohammed, Faten F; Elsayed, Anwar A; Radwan, Nasr M

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the major, immune-mediated, demyelinating neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a well-established animal model of MS. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective and ameliorative effects of N. sativa seeds (2.8 g/kg body weight) in EAE-induced Wistar rats. EAE-induced rats were divided into: 1- EAE-induced rats (“EAE” group). 2- “N. sativa + EAE” group received daily oral administration of N. sativa 2 weeks prior EAE induction until the end of the experiment. 3- “EAE + N. sativa” group received daily oral administration of N. sativa after the appearance of first clinical signs until the end of the experiment. All animals were decapitated at the 28th day post EAE-induction. EAE was investigated using histopathological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural examinations in addition to determination of some oxidative stress parameters in the cerebellum and medulla. N. sativa suppressed inflammation observed in EAE-induced rats. In addition, N. sativa enhanced remyelination in the cerebellum. Moreover, N. sativa reduced the expression of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF β1). N. sativa seeds could provide a promising agent effective in both the protection and treatment of EAE. PMID:26261504

  4. Bromocriptine induces parapoptosis as the main type of cell death responsible for experimental pituitary tumor shrinkage

    SciTech Connect

    Palmeri, Claudia Mariela Petiti, Juan Pablo; Valle Sosa, Liliana del; Gutierrez, Silvina; Paul, Ana Lucia de; Mukdsi, Jorge Humberto; Torres, Alicia Ines

    2009-10-01

    Bromocriptine (Bc) produces pituitary tumoral mass regression which induces the cellular death that was classically described as apoptosis. However, recent works have related that other mechanisms of cell death could also be involved in the maintenance of physiological and pathological pituitary homeostasis. The aim of this study was to evaluate and characterize the different types of cell death in the involution induced by Bc in experimental rat pituitary tumors. The current study demonstrated that Bc induced an effective regression of estrogen induced pituitary tumors by a mechanism identified as parapoptosis. This alternative cell death was ultrastructurally recognized by extensive cytoplasmic vacuolization and an increased cell electron density, represented around 25% of the total pituitary cells counted. Furthermore, the results obtained from biochemical assays did not correspond to the criteria of apoptosis or necrosis. We also investigated the participation of p38, ERK1/2 and PKC{delta} in the parapoptotic pathway. An important observation was the significant increase in phosphorylated forms of these MAPKs, the holoenzyme and catalytic fragments of PKC{delta} in nuclear fractions after Bc administration compared to control and estrogen treated rats. Furthermore, the immunolocalization at ultrastructural level of these kinases showed a similar distribution pattern, with a prevalent localization at nuclear level in lactotrophs from Bc treated rats. In summary, we determined that parapoptosis is the predominant cell death type involved in the regression of pituitary tumors in response to Bc treatment, and may cause the activation of PKC{delta}, ERK1/2 and p38.

  5. A proposal for the experimental detection of CSL induced random walk

    PubMed Central

    Bera, Sayantani; Motwani, Bhawna; Singh, Tejinder P.; Ulbricht, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    Continuous Spontaneous Localization (CSL) is one possible explanation for dynamically induced collapse of the wave-function during a quantum measurement. The collapse is mediated by a stochastic non-linear modification of the Schrödinger equation. A consequence of the CSL mechanism is an extremely tiny violation of energy-momentum conservation, which can, in principle, be detected in the laboratory via the random diffusion of a particle induced by the stochastic collapse mechanism. In a paper in 2003, Collett and Pearle investigated the translational CSL diffusion of a sphere, and the rotational CSL diffusion of a disc, and showed that this effect dominates over the ambient environmental noise at low temperatures and extremely low pressures (about ten-thousandth of a pico-Torr). In the present paper, we revisit their analysis and argue that this stringent condition on pressure can be relaxed, and that the CSL effect can be seen at the pressure of about a pico-Torr. A similar analysis is provided for diffusion produced by gravity-induced decoherence, where the effect is typically much weaker than CSL. We also discuss the CSL induced random displacement of a quantum oscillator. Lastly, we propose possible experimental set-ups justifying that CSL diffusion is indeed measurable with the current technology. PMID:25563619

  6. Nigella sativa amliorates inflammation and demyelination in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis-induced Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Noor, Neveen A; Fahmy, Heba M; Mohammed, Faten F; Elsayed, Anwar A; Radwan, Nasr M

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the major, immune-mediated, demyelinating neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a well-established animal model of MS. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective and ameliorative effects of N. sativa seeds (2.8 g/kg body weight) in EAE-induced Wistar rats. EAE-induced rats were divided into: 1- EAE-induced rats ("EAE" group). 2- "N. sativa + EAE" group received daily oral administration of N. sativa 2 weeks prior EAE induction until the end of the experiment. 3- "EAE + N. sativa" group received daily oral administration of N. sativa after the appearance of first clinical signs until the end of the experiment. All animals were decapitated at the 28th day post EAE-induction. EAE was investigated using histopathological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural examinations in addition to determination of some oxidative stress parameters in the cerebellum and medulla. N. sativa suppressed inflammation observed in EAE-induced rats. In addition, N. sativa enhanced remyelination in the cerebellum. Moreover, N. sativa reduced the expression of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF β1). N. sativa seeds could provide a promising agent effective in both the protection and treatment of EAE. PMID:26261504

  7. Ameliorative potential of fluoxetine/raloxifene combination on experimentally induced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kabel, Ahmed M; Elkhoely, Abeer A

    2016-04-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common types of malignancies in females worldwide. Targeting the estrogen receptors alone with raloxifene (RAL) reduces the incidence of estrogen receptor positive tumors. Fluoxetine (FLX) is one of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors that was proven to have anticancer properties. Our aim was to detect the effects of RAL/FLX combination on experimentally induced breast cancer. Eighty female Wistar rats were divided into four equal groups: 7,12-Dimethyl Benzanthracene (DMBA) induced breast cancer group, DMBA+RAL, DMBA+FLX and DMBA+RAL+FLX. Tumor volume, tissue malondialdehyde (MDA), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 6 (IL-6) and transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-β1) were determined in the tumor tissues. Parts of the tumor were subjected to histopathological examination. RAL or FLX alone or in combination induced significant increase in tumor CAT and SOD with significant decrease in tumor volume, tissue MDA, TNF-α, IL-6 and TGF-β1 and alleviated the histopathological and immunohistochemical changes compared to DMBA group. In conclusion, RAL/FLX combination had a better effect than each of RAL or FLX alone against DMBA-induced breast cancer in rats which may represent a new therapeutic modality for management of breast cancer. PMID:26881735

  8. Experimental febrile seizures induce age-dependent structural plasticity and improve memory in mice.

    PubMed

    Tao, K; Ichikawa, J; Matsuki, N; Ikegaya, Y; Koyama, R

    2016-03-24

    Population-based studies have demonstrated that children with a history of febrile seizure (FS) perform better than age-matched controls at hippocampus-dependent memory tasks. Here, we report that FSs induce two distinct structural reorganizations in the hippocampus and bidirectionally modify future learning abilities in an age-dependent manner. Compared with age-matched controls, adult mice that had experienced experimental FSs induced by hyperthermia (HT) on postnatal day 14 (P14-HT) performed better in a cognitive task that requires dentate granule cells (DGCs). The enhanced memory performance correlated with an FS-induced persistent increase in the density of large mossy fiber terminals (LMTs) of the DGCs. The memory enhancement was not observed in mice that had experienced HT-induced seizures at P11 which exhibited abnormally located DGCs in addition to the increased LMT density. The ectopic DGCs of the P11-HT mice were abolished by the diuretic bumetanide, and this pharmacological treatment unveiled the masked memory enhancement. Thus, this work provides a novel basis for age-dependent structural plasticity in which FSs influence future brain function. PMID:26794590

  9. A proposal for the experimental detection of CSL induced random walk.

    PubMed

    Bera, Sayantani; Motwani, Bhawna; Singh, Tejinder P; Ulbricht, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    Continuous Spontaneous Localization (CSL) is one possible explanation for dynamically induced collapse of the wave-function during a quantum measurement. The collapse is mediated by a stochastic non-linear modification of the Schrödinger equation. A consequence of the CSL mechanism is an extremely tiny violation of energy-momentum conservation, which can, in principle, be detected in the laboratory via the random diffusion of a particle induced by the stochastic collapse mechanism. In a paper in 2003, Collett and Pearle investigated the translational CSL diffusion of a sphere, and the rotational CSL diffusion of a disc, and showed that this effect dominates over the ambient environmental noise at low temperatures and extremely low pressures (about ten-thousandth of a pico-Torr). In the present paper, we revisit their analysis and argue that this stringent condition on pressure can be relaxed, and that the CSL effect can be seen at the pressure of about a pico-Torr. A similar analysis is provided for diffusion produced by gravity-induced decoherence, where the effect is typically much weaker than CSL. We also discuss the CSL induced random displacement of a quantum oscillator. Lastly, we propose possible experimental set-ups justifying that CSL diffusion is indeed measurable with the current technology. PMID:25563619

  10. A proposal for the experimental detection of CSL induced random walk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Sayantani; Motwani, Bhawna; Singh, Tejinder P.; Ulbricht, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    Continuous Spontaneous Localization (CSL) is one possible explanation for dynamically induced collapse of the wave-function during a quantum measurement. The collapse is mediated by a stochastic non-linear modification of the Schrödinger equation. A consequence of the CSL mechanism is an extremely tiny violation of energy-momentum conservation, which can, in principle, be detected in the laboratory via the random diffusion of a particle induced by the stochastic collapse mechanism. In a paper in 2003, Collett and Pearle investigated the translational CSL diffusion of a sphere, and the rotational CSL diffusion of a disc, and showed that this effect dominates over the ambient environmental noise at low temperatures and extremely low pressures (about ten-thousandth of a pico-Torr). In the present paper, we revisit their analysis and argue that this stringent condition on pressure can be relaxed, and that the CSL effect can be seen at the pressure of about a pico-Torr. A similar analysis is provided for diffusion produced by gravity-induced decoherence, where the effect is typically much weaker than CSL. We also discuss the CSL induced random displacement of a quantum oscillator. Lastly, we propose possible experimental set-ups justifying that CSL diffusion is indeed measurable with the current technology.

  11. Experimental Study of a Single-Coil Induced-Electromotive-Force Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, Clarence W.; Cuddihy, William F.

    1961-01-01

    An experimental study was made of a single-coil induced-electromotive-force plasma accelerator which used a capacitor discharge for the driving force. A strong shock was observed from the first pulse with a velocity of 10(exp 6) centimeters per second. This shock was followed by three or four discharges which produced plasmoids moving at about 5 x 10(exp 6) centimeters per second. The efficiency of the accelerator was estimated to be about 3 percent in the production of the high-velocity plasmoids. Suggestions are made for the improvement of this type of accelerator.

  12. Experimental Study of the Cross Sections of {alpha}-Particle Induced Reactions on 209Bi

    SciTech Connect

    Hermanne, A.; Tarkanyi, F.; Takacs, S.; Szucs, Z.

    2005-05-24

    Alpha particle induced reactions for generation of 211At used in therapeutic nuclear medicine and possible contaminants were investigated with the stacked foil activation technique on natural bismuth targets up to E{alpha}=39 MeV. Excitation functions for the reactions 209Bi({alpha},2n)211At, 209Bi({alpha},3n)210At, 209Bi({alpha},x) 210Po obtained from direct alpha emission measurements and gamma spectra from decay products are compared with earlier literature values. Thick target yields have been deduced from the experimental cross sections.

  13. Shikonin Inhibits Intestinal Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels and Prevents Rotaviral Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu; Yu, Bo; Yang, Hong; Ma, Tonghui

    2016-01-01

    Secretory diarrhea remains a global health burden and causes major mortality in children. There have been some focuses on antidiarrheal therapies that may reduce fluid losses and intestinal motility in diarrheal diseases. In the present study, we identified shikonin as an inhibitor of TMEM16A chloride channel activity using cell-based fluorescent-quenching assay. The IC50 value of shikonin was 6.5 μM. Short-circuit current measurements demonstrated that shikonin inhibited Eact-induced Cl(-) current in a dose-dependent manner, with IC50 value of 1.5 μM. Short-circuit current measurement showed that shikonin exhibited inhibitory effect against CCh-induced Cl(-) currents in mouse colonic epithelia but did not affect cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration as well as the other major enterocyte chloride channel conductance regulator. Characterization study found that shikonin inhibited basolateral K(+) channel activity without affecting Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activities. In vivo studies revealed that shikonin significantly delayed intestinal motility in mice and reduced stool water content in a neonatal mice model of rotaviral diarrhea without affecting the viral infection process in vivo. Taken together, the results suggested that shikonin inhibited enterocyte calcium-activated chloride channels, the inhibitory effect was partially through inhbition of basolateral K(+) channel activity, and shikonin could be a lead compound in the treatment of rotaviral secretory diarrhea. PMID:27601995

  14. Shikonin Inhibits Intestinal Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels and Prevents Rotaviral Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yu; Yu, Bo; Yang, Hong; Ma, Tonghui

    2016-01-01

    Secretory diarrhea remains a global health burden and causes major mortality in children. There have been some focuses on antidiarrheal therapies that may reduce fluid losses and intestinal motility in diarrheal diseases. In the present study, we identified shikonin as an inhibitor of TMEM16A chloride channel activity using cell-based fluorescent-quenching assay. The IC50 value of shikonin was 6.5 μM. Short-circuit current measurements demonstrated that shikonin inhibited Eact-induced Cl- current in a dose-dependent manner, with IC50 value of 1.5 μM. Short-circuit current measurement showed that shikonin exhibited inhibitory effect against CCh-induced Cl- currents in mouse colonic epithelia but did not affect cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration as well as the other major enterocyte chloride channel conductance regulator. Characterization study found that shikonin inhibited basolateral K+ channel activity without affecting Na+/K+-ATPase activities. In vivo studies revealed that shikonin significantly delayed intestinal motility in mice and reduced stool water content in a neonatal mice model of rotaviral diarrhea without affecting the viral infection process in vivo. Taken together, the results suggested that shikonin inhibited enterocyte calcium-activated chloride channels, the inhibitory effect was partially through inhbition of basolateral K+ channel activity, and shikonin could be a lead compound in the treatment of rotaviral secretory diarrhea. PMID:27601995

  15. [Antibiotic associated diarrhea and Clostridium difficile associated diarrhea in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Van Dessel, C; Flamaing, J; Hiele, M

    2005-12-01

    Antibiotic associated diarrhea (AAD) is a common complication when antibiotics are used and is frequent in the elderly. It has an impact on the length of hospital stay and increases the comorbidity. Together with the type of antibiotic that is given, the length of antibiotical treatment and the combination of antibiotics is more predictive for the evolution of diarrhea when compared to the total given dose. Mostly AAD is benign, but an infection with C. difficile should always be excluded. C. difficile-enterocolitis is frequent among residents in nursing homes and in hospitalised patients. The clinical presentation varies from asymptomatic colonisation tot severe debilitating disease. A rapid diagnosis can be performed by detection of C. difficile toxin by an enzyme-linked immunoassay. Oral metronidazole and oral vancomycine are equally effective in the therapy. In relapsing infection an extended tapering regimen is sometimes necessary. PMID:16398159

  16. A Computational and Experimental Study of Nonlinear Aspects of Induced Drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Stephen C.

    1996-01-01

    performance of the split-tip wing was also investigated by wing tunnel experiments. Induced drag was determined from force measurements by subtracting the estimated viscous drag, and from an analytical drag-decomposition method using a wake survey. The experimental results confirm the computational prediction.

  17. [Management of acute diarrhea in children].

    PubMed

    Van Trieu, Thanh; De Pontual, Loïc

    2013-01-01

    Diarrhea in childhood is very frequent (two episodes/year/children less of 5 years), rarely fatale (mostly mild) and not requiring additional exploration. But it can justify a hospitalization in case of dehydration (delay of care) or risk of dehydration. It is mainly of viral origin (rotavirus +++) and it has for main complication dehydration. Diagnosis and evaluation of the dehydration, in percentage of loss of weight, must be fast and lead (drive) to a premature correction of hypovolumic shock (or to an accurate fluid management). Main treatment is oral rehydration solutions (ORS), which considerably upset the morbi-mortality, associated with a premature refeeding. Breast-feeding must not be interrupted. Symptomatic treatments and especially antibiotics are not recommended. In case of failure of the rehydration by ORS, alternative is nasogastric tube or intraveinous infusion. Prevention includes essentially the respect of hygienic rules and antirotavirus vaccine. PMID:23265760

  18. TNF-α Involvement in Insulin Resistance Induced by Experimental Scorpion Envenomation

    PubMed Central

    Ait-Lounis, Aouatef; Laraba-Djebari, Fatima

    2012-01-01

    Background Scorpion venom induces systemic inflammation characterized by an increase in cytokine release and chemokine production. There have been few experimental studies assessing the effects of scorpion venom on adipose tissue function in vivo. Methodology/Principal Findings To study the adipose tissue inflammation (ATI) induced by Androctonus australis hector (Aah) venom and to assess possible mechanisms of ATI, mice (n = 6, aged 1 month) were injected with Aah (0.45 mg/kg), toxic fraction of Aah (FTox-G50; 0.2 mg/kg) or saline solution (control). Inflammatory responses were evaluated by ELISA and cell sorting analyses in adipose tissue 45 minutes and 24 hours after injection. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to assess the regulation of genes implicated in glucose uptake. The titers of selected inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α) were also determined in sera and in insulin target tissues. The serum concentration of IL-1β rose 45 minutes after envenomation and returned to basal level after 24 hours. The pathophysiological effects of the venom after 24 hours mainly involved M1-proinflammatory macrophage infiltration in adipose tissue combined with high titers of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α. Indeed, TNF-α was strongly induced in both adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. We studied the effects of Aah venom on genes implicated in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. Insulin induced a significant increase in the expression of the mRNAs for hexokinase 2 and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase in both skeletal muscle and adipose tissue in control mice; this upregulation was completely abolished after 24 hours in mice envenomed with Aah or FTox-G50. Conclusions/Significance Our findings suggest that Aah venom induces insulin resistance by mechanisms involving TNF-α-dependent Map4k4 kinase activation in the adipose tissue. PMID:22816003

  19. RNase L contributes to experimentally induced type I diabetes onset in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Chun; Yi, Xin; Zipris, Danny; Liu, Hongli; Zhang, Lin; Zheng, Qiaoyun; Krishnamurthy, Malathi; Jin, Ge; Zhou, Aimin

    2014-01-01

    The cause of type I diabetes continues to be a focus of investigation. Studies have revealed that interferon (IFN)-α in pancreatic islets after viral infection or treatment with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), a mimic of viral infection, is associated with the onset of type I diabetes. However, how IFN-α contributes to the onset of type I diabetes is obscure. In this study, we found that 2-5A dependent RNase L (RNase L), an IFN-α-inducible enzyme that functions in the antiviral and antiproliferative activities of IFN, played an important role in dsRNA-induced onset of type I diabetes. By using RNase L deficient, rat insulin promoter (RIP)-B7.1 transgenic mice which are more vulnerable to environmental harmful factors such as viral infection, we demonstrated that deficiency of RNase L in mice resulted in a significant delay of diabetes onset induced by polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C), a type of synthetic dsRNA, and streptozotocin (STZ), a drug which can artificially induce type I-like diabetes in experimental animals. Immunohistochemical staining showed that the population of infiltrated CD8+ T-cells was remarkably reduced in the islets of RNase L deficient mice, suggesting that RNase L may contribute to type I diabetes onset through regulating immune responses. Furthermore, RNase L was responsible for the expression of certain proinflammatory genes in the pancreas in induced conditions. Our findings provide new insight into the molecular mechanism underlying β-cells destruction and may suggest novel therapeutic strategies for treatment and prevention of the disease based on the selective regulation and inhibition of RNase L. PMID:25287058

  20. [Characterization of an experimental model of monosodium- glutamate-induced convulsions in the amphibian Bufo spp].

    PubMed

    Alfaro, F; Blas, O; Gutiérrez-Padilla, R; Feria-Velasco, A

    1990-01-01

    In previous reports, Feria-Velasco et al. characterized an experimental model of convulsions in rats induced by monosodium glutamate (MSG) with evaluation of the motor behavior and neurochemical parameters. In the present work, MSG injected in toads (Bufo spp) reproduced the model of convulsions with some peculiarities. The electrocorticographic recordings in toads after MSG injection were similar to those obtained in rats after administration of convulsant agents. Most of the toads injected with MSG (81.8%) showed convulsions preceded by an episode of stereotyped movements and signs of hyperexcitability. Latency for convulsions and frequency of convulsive episodes were similar to what has been reported in rats injected with MSG. However, the duration of convulsive period was larger than that seen in rats, and no deaths were recorded in toads. The peculiar feature of amphibia regarding their cerebral structures and their blood-brain barrier (BBB) make the amphibian model, an interesting and valuable one in studying experimentally induced convulsions, as well as the role of BBB in these phenomena. PMID:1669233

  1. Experimental investigation of flow induced dust acoustic shock waves in a complex plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, S.; Bandyopadhyay, P.; Sen, A.

    2016-08-01

    We report on experimental observations of flow induced large amplitude dust-acoustic shock waves in a complex plasma. The experiments have been carried out in a Π shaped direct current glow discharge experimental device using kaolin particles as the dust component in a background of Argon plasma. A strong supersonic flow of the dust fluid is induced by adjusting the pumping speed and neutral gas flow into the device. An isolated copper wire mounted on the cathode acts as a potential barrier to the flow of dust particles. A sudden change in the gas flow rate is used to trigger the onset of high velocity dust acoustic shocks whose dynamics are captured by fast video pictures of the evolving structures. The physical characteristics of these shocks are delineated through a parametric scan of their dynamical properties over a range of flow speeds and potential hill heights. The observed evolution of the shock waves and their propagation characteristics are found to compare well with model numerical results based on a modified Korteweg-de-Vries-Burgers type equation.

  2. Brugia malayi abundant larval transcript 2 protein treatment attenuates experimentally-induced colitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Vishal; Amdare, Nitin; Yadav, Ravi Shankar; Tarnekar, Aaditya; Goswami, Kalyan; Reddy, Maryada Venkata Rami

    2015-11-01

    Helminths are known to modulate host's immunity by suppressing host protective pro-inflammatory responses. Such immunomodulatory effects have been experimentally shown to have therapeutic implications in immune mediated disorders. In the present study, we have explored a filarial protein i.e. Brugia malayi recombinant abundant larval transcript 2 (rBmALT2) for its therapeutic effect in dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) induced colitis in mouse model. The immunomodulatory activity of rBmALT-2 was initially confirmed by demonstrating that it suppressed the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced nitric oxide synthesis and down-regulated the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in vitro by peritoneal exudate cells of mice. Treatment with rBmALT2 reduced severity of colitis associated with significant reduction in weight loss, disease activity, colon damage, mucosal edema and histopathological score including myeloperoxidase activity in colon tissues. rBmALT2 was comparatively more effective in attenuation of colitis when used in the preventive mode than when used for curative purpose. The therapeutic effect of rBmALT2 was found to be associated with downregulation of IFN-γ, IL-6, IL-17 and upregulation of IL-10 cytokines. These results provide strong experimental evidence that BmALT2 could be a potential alternative therapeutic agent in colitis. PMID:26669016

  3. Experimental Gingivitis Induces Systemic Inflammatory Markers in Young Healthy Individuals: A Single-Subject Interventional Study

    PubMed Central

    Luchtefeld, Maren; Heuer, Wieland; Schuett, Harald; Divchev, Dimitar; Scherer, Ralph; Schmitz-Streit, Ruth; Langfeldt, Daniela; Stumpp, Nico; Staufenbiel, Ingmar

    2013-01-01

    Objectives We here investigated whether experimental gingivitis enhances systemic markers of inflammation which are also known as surrogate markers of atherosclerotic plaque development. Background Gingivitis is a low-level oral infection induced by bacterial deposits with a high prevalence within Western populations. A potential link between the more severe oral disease periodontitis and cardiovascular disease has already been shown. Methods 37 non-smoking young volunteers with no inflammatory disease or any cardiovascular risk factors participated in this single-subject interventional study with an intra-individual control. Intentionally experimental oral inflammation was induced by the interruption of oral hygiene for 21 days, followed by a 21-days resolving phase after reinitiation of oral hygiene. Primary outcome measures at baseline, day 21 and 42 were concentrations of hsCRP, IL-6, and MCP-1, as well as adhesion capacity and oxLDL uptake of isolated blood monocytes. Results The partial cessation of oral hygiene procedures was followed by the significant increase of gingival bleeding (34.0%, P<0.0001). This local inflammation was associated with a systemic increase in hsCRP (0.24 mg/L, P = 0.038), IL-6 (12.52 ng/L, P = 0.0002) and MCP-1 (9.10 ng/l, P = 0.124) in peripheral blood samples between baseline and day 21, which decreased at day 42. Monocytes showed an enhanced adherence to endothelial cells and increased foam cell formation after oxLDL uptake (P<0.050) at day 21 of gingivitis. Conclusions Bacterial-induced gingival low-level inflammation induced a systemic increase in inflammatory markers. Dental hygiene almost completely reversed this experimental inflammatory process, suggesting that appropriate dental prophylaxis may also limit systemic markers of inflammation in subjects with natural gingivitis. International Clinical Trials Register Platform of the World Health Organization, registry number: DRKS00003366, URL: http

  4. Optimal control of diarrhea transmission in a flood evacuation zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erwina, N.; Aldila, D.; Soewono, E.

    2014-03-01

    Evacuation of residents and diarrhea disease outbreak in evacuation zone have become serious problem that frequently happened during flood periods. Limited clean water supply and infrastructure in evacuation zone contribute to a critical spread of diarrhea. Transmission of diarrhea disease can be reduced by controlling clean water supply and treating diarrhea patients properly. These treatments require significant amount of budget, which may not be fulfilled in the fields. In his paper, transmission of diarrhea disease in evacuation zone using SIRS model is presented as control optimum problem with clean water supply and rate of treated patients as input controls. Existence and stability of equilibrium points and sensitivity analysis are investigated analytically for constant input controls. Optimum clean water supply and rate of treatment are found using optimum control technique. Optimal results for transmission of diarrhea and the corresponding controls during the period of observation are simulated numerically. The optimum result shows that transmission of diarrhea disease can be controlled with proper combination of water supply and rate of treatment within allowable budget.

  5. Experimental tonic hand pain modulates the corticospinal plasticity induced by a subsequent hand deafferentation.

    PubMed

    Mavromatis, N; Gagné, M; Voisin, J I A V; Reilly, K T; Mercier, C

    2016-08-25

    Sensorimotor reorganization is believed to play an important role in the development and maintenance of phantom limb pain, but pain itself might modulate sensorimotor plasticity induced by deafferentation. Clinical and basic research support this idea, as pain prior to amputation increases the risk of developing post-amputation pain. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of experimental tonic cutaneous hand pain on the plasticity induced by temporary ischemic hand deafferentation. Sixteen healthy subjects participated in two experimental sessions (Pain, No Pain) in which transcranial magnetic stimulation was used to assess corticospinal excitability in two forearm muscles (flexor carpi radialis and flexor digitorum superficialis) before (T0, T10, T20, and T40) and after (T60 and T75) inflation of a cuff around the wrist. The cuff was inflated at T45 in both sessions and in the Pain session capsaicin cream was applied on the dorsum of the hand at T5. Corticospinal excitability was significantly greater during the Post-inflation phase (p=0.002) and increased similarly in both muscles (p=0.861). Importantly, the excitability increase in the Post-inflation phase was greater for the Pain than the No-Pain condition (p=0.006). Post-hoc analyses revealed a significant difference between the two conditions during the Post-inflation phase (p=0.030) but no difference during the Pre-inflation phase (p=0.601). In other words, the corticospinal facilitation was greater when pain was present prior to cuff inflation. These results indicate that pain can modulate the plasticity induced by another event, and could partially explain the sensorimotor reorganization often reported in chronic pain populations. PMID:27291642

  6. Assessing potential abiotic and biotic complications of crayfish-induced gravel transport in experimental streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Statzner, Bernhard; Peltret, Odile

    2006-03-01

    Biogeomorphology adds the element "biological dynamics" (of populations or communities) to chemical and physical geomorphic factors and thus complicates the framework of geomorphic processes. Such biological complications of the animal-induced transport of solids in streams should be particularly important in crayfish, as crayfish affect this transport through their overall activity and intraspecific aggression levels, which could be modified by shelter availability or the establishment of dominance hierarchies among individuals not knowing each other. Using experimental streams, we tested these hypotheses by measuring how shelter availability or residential crayfish group invasion by unknown individuals affected the impact of the crayfish Orconectes limosus on the (i) transport of gravel at baseflow (during 12 experimental days); (ii) sediment surface characteristics (after 12 days); and (iii) critical shear stress causing incipient gravel motion during simulated floods (after 12 days). The two potentially important factors shelter availability or residential group invasion negligibly affected the crayfish impact on gravel sediments, suggesting that habitat unfamiliarity (a third potentially important factor affecting crayfish activity) should increase the crayfish-induced sediment transport. Because habitat unfamiliarity is associated with sporadic long-distance migrations of a few crayfish individuals, this third factor should play a minor role in real streams, where crayfish biomass should be a key factor in relations with crayfish effects on sediments. Therefore, we combined the results of this study with those of previous crayfish experiments to assess how crayfish biomass could serve in modelling the gravel transport. Crayfish biomass explained 47% of the variability in the baseflow gravel transport and, in combination with the coefficient of variation of the bed elevation and algal cover, 72% of the variability in the critical gravel shear stress. These

  7. Strong protection induced by an experimental DIVA subunit vaccine against bluetongue virus serotype 8 in cattle.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jenna; Hägglund, Sara; Bréard, Emmanuel; Riou, Mickaël; Zohari, Siamak; Comtet, Loic; Olofson, Ann-Sophie; Gélineau, Robert; Martin, Guillaume; Elvander, Marianne; Blomqvist, Gunilla; Zientara, Stéphan; Valarcher, Jean Francois

    2014-11-20

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) infections in ruminants pose a permanent agricultural threat since new serotypes are constantly emerging in new locations. Clinical disease is mainly observed in sheep, but cattle were unusually affected during an outbreak of BTV seroype 8 (BTV-8) in Europe. We previously developed an experimental vaccine based on recombinant viral protein 2 (VP2) of BTV-8 and non-structural proteins 1 (NS1) and NS2 of BTV-2, mixed with an immunostimulating complex (ISCOM)-matrix adjuvant. We demonstrated that bovine immune responses induced by this vaccine were as good or superior to those induced by a classic commercial inactivated vaccine. In this study, we evaluated the protective efficacy of the experimental vaccine in cattle and, based on the detection of VP7 antibodies, assessed its DIVA compliancy following virus challenge. Two groups of BTV-seronegative calves were subcutaneously immunized twice at a 3-week interval with the subunit vaccine (n=6) or with adjuvant alone (n=6). Following BTV-8 challenge 3 weeks after second immunization, controls developed viremia and fever associated with other mild clinical signs of bluetongue disease, whereas vaccinated animals were clinically and virologically protected. The vaccine-induced protection was likely mediated by high virus-neutralizing antibody titers directed against VP2 and perhaps by cellular responses to NS1 and NS2. T lymphocyte responses were cross-reactive between BTV-2 and BTV-8, suggesting that NS1 and NS2 may provide the basis of an adaptable vaccine that can be varied by using VP2 of different serotypes. The detection of different levels of VP7 antibodies in vaccinated animals and controls after challenge suggested a compliancy between the vaccine and the DIVA companion test. This BTV subunit vaccine is a promising candidate that should be further evaluated and developed to protect against different serotypes. PMID:25312275

  8. Time-Dependent Progression of Demyelination and Axonal Pathology in MP4-Induced Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Stormanns, Eva R.; Recks, Mascha S.; Kuerten, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS) characterized by inflammation, demyelination and axonal pathology. Myelin basic protein/proteolipid protein (MBP-PLP) fusion protein MP4 is capable of inducing chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in susceptible mouse strains mirroring diverse histopathological and immunological hallmarks of MS. Limited availability of human tissue underscores the importance of animal models to study the pathology of MS. Methods Twenty-two female C57BL/6 (B6) mice were immunized with MP4 and the clinical development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was observed. Methylene blue-stained semi-thin and ultra-thin sections of the lumbar spinal cord were assessed at the peak of acute EAE, three months (chronic EAE) and six months after onset of EAE (long-term EAE). The extent of lesional area and inflammation were analyzed in semi-thin sections on a light microscopic level. The magnitude of demyelination and axonal damage were determined using electron microscopy. Emphasis was put on the ventrolateral tract (VLT) of the spinal cord. Results B6 mice demonstrated increasing demyelination and severe axonal pathology in the course of MP4-induced EAE. In addition, mitochondrial swelling and a decrease in the nearest neighbor neurofilament distance (NNND) as early signs of axonal damage were evident with the onset of EAE. In semi-thin sections we observed the maximum of lesional area in the chronic state of EAE while inflammation was found to a similar extent in acute and chronic EAE. In contrast to the well-established myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) model, disease stages of MP4-induced EAE could not be distinguished by assessing the extent of parenchymal edema or the grade of inflammation. Conclusions Our results complement our previous ultrastructural studies of B6 EAE models and suggest that B6 mice immunized with different antigens constitute

  9. Numerical and experimental studies of drying and shrinkage induced microcracking in concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankovic, D.

    2007-12-01

    The aim of this research is to investigate moisture flow in cement paste and Interface Transition Zone, around aggregate, as well as associated shrinkage induced strains, and subsequent microcracking. Two coupled methods are used: numerical simulations and experiments. The moisture flow is numerically simulated by Lattice Gas Automata, while drying experiments are performed in Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (ESEM) in order to determine drying deformations and shrinkage coefficient. The moisture movement simulation by Lattice Gas Automata, a type of cellular automata, involves different drying collision rules, which results in different density (moisture content) at each node. Special attention is given to the effect of the presence of aggregate particles on the moisture flow in concrete, which are considered rigid obstacles. The shrinkage deformation is considered a linear function of the moisture content if the relative humidity, RH does not exceed 40%. The calculated moisture gradient from the numerical analysis and an assumed shrinkage coefficient are used to calculate drying shrinkage induced strains and stresses using the basic equations. To determine the drying shrinkage coefficient for the RH range 100% to 20%, new experimental techniques of drying in ESEM are used. Small paste samples are cast in a specially developed mould with 2 mm thickness and afterwards carefully grounded and polished to a thickness of required 1 mm. The used variables in the tests are: various cement types, w/c ratio, sample age and curing conditions. Drying shrinkage displacements and strains are determined in order to calculate the drying shrinkage coefficient. These experimentally obtained values of the coefficient are compared with the literature data and used in numerical simulations of shrinkage induced strains, stresses and cracking in drying concrete.

  10. Numerical and experimental investigation of natural flow-induced vibrations of flexible hydrofoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Eun Jung; Akcabay, Deniz Tolga; Lelong, Alexandra; Astolfi, Jacques Andre; Young, Yin Lu

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this work is to present combined numerical and experimental studies of natural flow-induced vibrations of flexible hydrofoils. The focus is on identifying the dependence of the foil's vibration frequencies and damping characteristics on the inflow velocity, angle of attack, and solid-to-fluid added mass ratio. Experimental results are shown for a cantilevered polyacetate (POM) hydrofoil tested in the cavitation tunnel at the French Naval Academy Research Institute (IRENav). The foil is observed to primarily behave as a chordwise rigid body and undergoes spanwise bending and twisting deformations, and the flow is observed to be effectively two-dimensional (2D) because of the strong lift retention at the free tip caused by a small gap with a thickness less than the wall boundary layer. Hence, the viscous fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model is formulated by coupling a 2D unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) model with a two degree-of-freedom (2-DOF) model representing the spanwise tip bending and twisting deformations. Good agreements were observed between viscous FSI predictions and experimental measurements of natural flow-induced vibrations in fully turbulent and attached flow conditions. The foil vibrations were found to be dominated by the natural frequencies in absence of large scale vortex shedding due to flow separation. The natural frequencies and fluid damping coefficients were found to vary with velocity, angle of attack, and solid-to-fluid added mass ratio. In addition, the numerical results showed that the in-water to in-air natural frequency ratios decreased rapidly, and the fluid damping coefficients increased rapidly, as the solid-to-fluid added mass ratio decreases. Uncoupled mode (UM) linear potential theory was found to significantly over-predict the fluid damping for cases of lightweight flexible hydrofoils, and this over-prediction increased with higher velocity and lower solid-to-fluid added mass ratio.

  11. Kainic Acid-Induced Excitotoxicity Experimental Model: Protective Merits of Natural Products and Plant Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Mohd Sairazi, Nur Shafika; Sirajudeen, K. N. S.; Asari, Mohd Asnizam; Muzaimi, Mustapha; Mummedy, Swamy; Sulaiman, Siti Amrah

    2015-01-01

    Excitotoxicity is well recognized as a major pathological process of neuronal death in neurodegenerative diseases involving the central nervous system (CNS). In the animal models of neurodegeneration, excitotoxicity is commonly induced experimentally by chemical convulsants, particularly kainic acid (KA). KA-induced excitotoxicity in rodent models has been shown to result in seizures, behavioral changes, oxidative stress, glial activation, inflammatory mediator production, endoplasmic reticulum stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and selective neurodegeneration in the brain upon KA administration. Recently, there is an emerging trend to search for natural sources to combat against excitotoxicity-associated neurodegenerative diseases. Natural products and plant extracts had attracted a considerable amount of attention because of their reported beneficial effects on the CNS, particularly their neuroprotective effect against excitotoxicity. They provide significant reduction and/or protection against the development and progression of acute and chronic neurodegeneration. This indicates that natural products and plants extracts may be useful in protecting against excitotoxicity-associated neurodegeneration. Thus, targeting of multiple pathways simultaneously may be the strategy to maximize the neuroprotection effect. This review summarizes the mechanisms involved in KA-induced excitotoxicity and attempts to collate the various researches related to the protective effect of natural products and plant extracts in the KA model of neurodegeneration. PMID:26793262

  12. An experimental setup to characterize MR switched gradient-induced potentials.

    PubMed

    Fokapu, Odette; El-Tatar, Aziz

    2013-06-01

    We have developed an experimental setup as an in vitro research tool for studying the contamination of electrophysiological signals (EPS) by MRI environment; particularly, when due to the switched gradient-induced potentials. The system is composed of: 1) a MRI compatible module for the transmission of the EPS into the MRI tunnel, 2) a gelatin-based tissue-mimicking phantom, placed inside the tunnel, in which EPS is injected, 3) a detection module composed of a five input channel MRI compatible transmitter placed inside the tunnel, allowing an on-site pre-amplification of the bio-potentials and their transmission, via an optical fiber cable, to a four filtered output per channel receiver (350 Hz, 160 Hz, 80 Hz, and 40 Hz, for a total of 20 channels) placed in the control room, and 4) a signal processing algorithm used to analyze the generated induced potentials. A set of tests were performed to validate the electronic performances of the setup. We also present in this work an interesting application of the setup, i.e., the acquisition and analysis of the induced potentials with respect of the slice orientation for a given MRI sequence. Significant modifications of the time and frequency characteristics were observed with respect to axial, coronal or sagittal orientations. PMID:23853335

  13. [Protective effects of S-adenosylmethionine against CCl4 - and ethanol-induced experimental hepatic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Zhang, F; Gu, J-X; Zou, X-P; Zhuge, Y-Z

    2016-01-01

    In this study the effects of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) on experimental hepatic fibrotic rats induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4)) and ethanol and the relevant potential mechanisms were explored. Hepatic fibrotic rat models were established with CCl(4) diluted in olive oil being drunk with 10% ethanol in water. SAM was used both for prevention and treatment. Histological evaluation was carried out by hematoxylin-eosin (HE) and Masson staining of hepatic samples. Serum biochemical assays showed that alanine aminotransferase (ALT) was increased and albumin (ALB) was decreased by CCl(4) and ethanol, and both effects were suppressed by preventing and treating use of SAM. The model control rats got significantly higher scores in fatty degeneration, lobular inflammation, and hepatocyte ballooning. A significant improvement was observed in the SAM-prevented rats and SAM-treated rats, which was consistent with the change of fibrosis scoring in each group. Smad3 was induced by CCl(4) and ethanol in the model control group, which was significantly down regulated by SAM. SAM reduced both total Smad3 and phospho-Smad3 in vitro. SAM had a protective effect on hepatic fibrosis in rats induced by CCl(4) combined with ethanol and the down-regulation of activity and expression of Smad3 were involved in the potential mechanisms. PMID:27239849

  14. Evaluation of anti-urolithiatic activity of Pashanabhedadi Ghrita against experimentally induced renal calculi in rats

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sanjay Kumar; Baghel, Madhav Singh; Bhuyan, Chaturbhuja; Ravishankar, B.; Ashok, B. K.; Patil, Panchakshari D.

    2012-01-01

    Population in an industrialized world is afflicted by urinary stone disease. Kidney stones are common in all kinds of urolithiasis. One distinguished formulation mentioned by Sushruta for management of Ashmari (urolithiasis) is Pashanabhedadi Ghrita (PBG), which is in clinical practice since centuries. Validation of drug is the requirement of time through the experimental study. In this study, trial of PBG has been made against ammonium oxalate rich diet and gentamicin injection induced renal calculi in albino rats. The calculi were induced by gentamicin injection and ammonium oxalate rich diet. Test drug was administered concomitantly in the dose of 900 mg/kg for 15 consecutive days. Rats were sacrificed on the 16th day. Parameters like kidney weight, serum biochemical, kidney tissue and histopathology of kidney were studied. Concomitant treatment of PBG attenuates blood biochemical parameters non-significantly, where as it significantly attenuated lipid peroxidation and enhanced glutathione and glutathione peroxidase activities. It also decreased crystal deposition markedly into the renal tubules in number as well as size and prevented damage to the renal tubules. The findings showed that PBG is having significant anti-urolithiatic activities against ammonium oxalate rich diet plus gentamicine injection induced urolithiasis in rats. PMID:23723654

  15. Experimental Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Induces Blunted Vasoconstriction and Functional Changes in the Rat Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Tufiño, Cecilia; Villanueva-López, Cleva; Ibarra-Barajas, Maximiliano; Bracho-Valdés, Ismael; Bobadilla-Lugo, Rosa Amalia

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic conditions increase vascular reactivity to angiotensin II in several studies but there are scarce reports on cardiovascular effects of hypercaloric diet (HD) induced gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), so the objective of this work was to determine the effects of HD induced GDM on vascular responses. Angiotensin II as well as phenylephrine induced vascular contraction was tested in isolated aorta rings with and without endothelium from rats fed for 7 weeks (4 before and 3 weeks during pregnancy) with standard (SD) or hypercaloric (HD) diet. Also, protein expression of AT1R, AT2R, COX-1, COX-2, NOS-1, and NOS-3 and plasma glucose, insulin, and angiotensin II levels were measured. GDM impaired vasoconstrictor response (P < 0.05 versus SD) in intact (e+) but not in endothelium-free (e−) vessels. Losartan reduced GDM but not SD e− vasoconstriction (P < 0.01 versus SD). AT1R, AT2R, and COX-1 and COX-2 protein expression were significantly increased in GDM vessels (P < 0.05 versus SD). Results suggest an increased participation of endothelium vasodilator mediators, probably prostaglandins, as well as of AT2 vasodilator receptors as a compensatory mechanism for vasoconstrictor changes generated by experimental GDM. Considering the short term of rat pregnancy findings can reflect early stage GDM adaptations. PMID:25610861

  16. Interleukin 1-induced augmentation of experimental metastases from a human melanoma in nude mice

    SciTech Connect

    Giavazzi, R.; Garofalo, A.; Bani, M.R.; Abbate, M.; Ghezzi, P.; Boraschi, D.; Mantovani, A.; Dejana, E. )

    1990-08-01

    This study has examined the effect of the cytokine interleukin 1 (IL-1) on metastasis formation by the human melanoma A375M in nude mice. We have found that human recombinant IL-1 beta (a single injection greater than 0.01 micrograms per mouse i.v. given before tumor cells) induced an augmentation of experimental lung metastases from the A375M tumor cells in nude mice. This effect was rapidly induced and reversible within 24 h after IL-1 injection. A similar effect was induced by human recombinant IL-1 alpha and human recombinant tumor necrosis factor, but not by human recombinant interleukin 6. 5-(125I)odo-2'-deoxyuridine-radiolabeled A375M tumor cells injected i.v. remained at a higher level in the lungs of nude mice receiving IL-1 than in control mice. In addition, IL-1 injected 1 h, but not 24 h, after tumor cells enhanced lung colonization as well, thus suggesting an effect of IL-1 on the vascular transit of tumor cells. These findings may explain the observation of enhanced secondary localization of tumor cells at inflammatory sites and suggest that modulation of secondary spread should be carefully considered when assessing the ability of this cytokine to complement cytoreductive therapies.

  17. Fumigaclavine C ameliorates dextran sulfate sodium-induced murine experimental colitis via NLRP3 inflammasome inhibition.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wenjie; Hu, Shasha; Elgehama, Ahmed; Shao, Fenli; Ren, Ren; Liu, Wen; Zhang, Wenjing; Wang, Xinlei; Tan, Renxiang; Xu, Qiang; Sun, Yang; Jiao, Ruihua

    2015-10-01

    In the present study, the effect of Fumigaclavine C, a fungal metabolite, on murine experimental colitis induced by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) and its possible mechanism were examined in vivo and vitro. Oral administration of Fumigaclavine C dose-dependently attenuated the loss of body weight and shortening of colon length induced by DSS. The disease activity index, histopathologic scores of musco was also significantly reduced by Fumigaclavine C treatment. Protein and mRNA levels of DSS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines in colon, including TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-17A, were markedly suppressed by Fumigaclavine C. At the same time, decreased activation of caspase-1 in peritoneal macrophages was detected in Fumigaclavine C -treated mice which suggested that the NLRP3 inflammasome activation was suppressed. Furthermore, in the LPS plus ATP cell model, we found that Fumigaclavine C dose-dependent inhibited IL-1β release and caspase-1 activation. Taken together, our results demonstrate the ability of Fumigaclavine C to inhibit NLRP3 inflammasome activation and give some evidence for its potential use in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:26320672

  18. Toxoplasma gondii Upregulates Interleukin-12 To Prevent Plasmodium berghei-Induced Experimental Cerebral Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Settles, Erik W.; Moser, Lindsey A.; Harris, Tajie H.

    2014-01-01

    A chronic infection with the parasite Toxoplasma gondii has previously been shown to protect mice against subsequent viral, bacterial, or protozoal infections. Here we have shown that a chronic T. gondii infection can prevent Plasmodium berghei ANKA-induced experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) in C57BL/6 mice. Treatment with soluble T. gondii antigens (STAg) reduced parasite sequestration and T cell infiltration in the brains of P. berghei-infected mice. Administration of STAg also preserved blood-brain barrier function, reduced ECM symptoms, and significantly decreased mortality. STAg treatment 24 h post-P. berghei infection led to a rapid increase in serum levels of interleukin 12 (IL-12) and gamma interferon (IFN-γ). By 5 days after P. berghei infection, STAg-treated mice had reduced IFN-γ levels compared to those of mock-treated mice, suggesting that reductions in IFN-γ at the time of ECM onset protected against lethality. Using IL-10- and IL-12βR-deficient mice, we found that STAg-induced protection from ECM is IL-10 independent but IL-12 dependent. Treatment of P. berghei-infected mice with recombinant IL-12 significantly decreased parasitemia and mortality. These data suggest that IL-12, either induced by STAg or injected as a recombinant protein, mediates protection from ECM-associated pathology potentially through early induction of IFN-γ and reduction in parasitemia. These results highlight the importance of early IL-12 induction in protection against ECM. PMID:24396042

  19. Analytical and Experimental Characterization of Gravity Induced Deformations In Subscale Gossamer Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, John D.; Blandino, Joseph R.; McEvoy, Kiley C.

    2004-01-01

    The development of gossamer space structures such as solar sails and sunshields presents many challenges due to their large size and extreme flexibility. The post-deployment structural geometry exhibited during ground testing may significantly depart from the in-space configuration due to the presence of gravity-induced deformations (gravity sag) of lightly preloaded membranes. This paper describes a study carried out to characterize gravity sag in two subscale gossamer structures: a single quadrant from a 2 m, 4 quadrant square solar sail and a 1.7 m membrane layer from a multi-layer sunshield The behavior of the test articles was studied over a range of preloads and in several orientations with respect to gravity. An experimental study was carried out to measure the global surface profiles using photogrammetry, and nonlinear finite element analysis was used to predict the behavior of the test articles. Comparison of measured and predicted surface profiles shows that the finite dement analysis qualitatively predicts deformed shapes comparable to those observed in the laboratory. Quantitatively, finite element analysis predictions for peak gravity-induced deformations in both test articles were within 10% of measured values. Results from this study provide increased insight into gravity sag behavior in gossamer structures, and demonstrates the potential to analytically predict gravity-induced deformations to within reasonable accuracy.

  20. Aloe vera gel protects liver from oxidative stress-induced damage in experimental rat model.

    PubMed

    Nahar, Taslima; Uddin, Borhan; Hossain, Shahdat; Sikder, Abdul Mannan; Ahmed, Sohel

    2013-01-01

    Aloe vera is a semi-tropical plant of Liliaceae family which has a wide range of applications in traditional medicine. In the present study, we sought to investigate the heptaoprotective potential of Aloe vera gel as a diet supplement. To achieve this goal, we have designed in vitro and in vivo experimental models of chemical-induced liver damage using male Sprague-Dawley rat. In the in vitro model, its effect was evaluated on Fenton's reaction-induced liver lipid peroxidation. Co-incubation with gel significantly reduced the generation of liver lipid peroxide (LPO). Next, to see the similar effect in vivo, gel was orally administered to rats once daily for 21 successive days. Following 1 hour of the last administration of gel, rats were treated with intra-peritoneal injection of CCl4. Dietary gel showed significant hepatoprotection against CCl4-induced damage as evident by restoration of liver LPO, serum transaminases, alkaline phosphatase, and total bilirubin towards near normal. The beneficial effects were pronounced with the doses used (400 and 800 mg/kg body weight). Besides, we did not observe any significant drop in serum albumin, globulin as well as total protein levels of gel-administered rats. Histopathology of the liver tissue further supported the biochemical findings confirming the hepatoprotective potential of dietary gel. PMID:23652643

  1. Effects of Schizolobium parahyba Extract on Experimental Bothrops Venom-Induced Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Martines, Monique Silva; Mendes, Mirian M.; Shimizu, Maria H. M.; Melo Rodrigues, Veridiana; de Castro, Isac; Filho, Sebastião R. Ferreira; Malheiros, Denise M. A. C.; Yu, Luis; Burdmann, Emmanuel A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Venom-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent complication of Bothrops snakebite with relevant morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of Schizolobium parahyba (SP) extract, a natural medicine with presumed anti-Bothrops venom effects, in an experimental model of Bothrops jararaca venom (BV)-induced AKI. Methodology Groups of 8 to 10 rats received infusions of 0.9% saline (control, C), SP 2 mg/kg, BV 0.25 mg/kg and BV immediately followed by SP (treatment, T) in the doses already described. After the respective infusions, animals were assessed for their glomerular filtration rate (GFR, inulin clearance), renal blood flow (RBF, Doppler), blood pressure (BP, intra-arterial transducer), renal vascular resistance (RVR), urinary osmolality (UO, freezing point), urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA]), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, kinetic method), hematocrit (Hct, microhematocrit), fibrinogen (Fi, Klauss modified) and blinded renal histology (acute tubular necrosis score). Principal Findings BV caused significant decreases in GFR, RBF, UO, HcT and Fi; significant increases in RVR, NGAL and LDH; and acute tubular necrosis. SP did not prevent these changes; instead, it caused a significant decrease in GFR when used alone. Conclusion SP administered simultaneously with BV, in an approximate 10∶1 concentration, did not prevent BV-induced AKI, hemolysis and fibrinogen consumption. SP used alone caused a decrease in GFR. PMID:24551041

  2. Diet shifts and population dynamics of estuarine foraminifera during ecosystem recovery after experimentally induced hypoxia crises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouwer, G. M.; Duijnstee, I. A. P.; Hazeleger, J. H.; Rossi, F.; Lourens, L. J.; Middelburg, J. J.; Wolthers, M.

    2016-03-01

    This study shows foraminiferal dynamics after experimentally induced hypoxia within the wider context of ecosystem recovery. 13C-labeled bicarbonate and glucose were added to the sediments to examine foraminiferal diet shifts during ecosystem recovery and test-size measurements were used to deduce population dynamics. Hypoxia-treated and undisturbed patches were compared to distinguish natural (seasonal) fluctuations from hypoxia-induced responses. The effect of timing of disturbance and duration of recovery were investigated. The foraminiferal diets and population dynamics showed higher fluctuations in the recovering patches compared to the controls. The foraminiferal diet and population structure of Haynesina germanica and Ammonia beccarii responded differentially and generally inversely to progressive stages of ecosystem recovery. Tracer inferred diet estimates in April and June and the two distinctly visible cohorts in the test-size distribution, discussed to reflect reproduction in June, strongly suggest that the ample availability of diatoms during the first month of ecosystem recovery after the winter hypoxia was likely profitable to A. beccarii. Enhanced reproduction itself was strongly linked to the subsequent dietary shift to bacteria. The distribution of the test dimensions of H. germanica indicated that this species had less fluctuation in population structure during ecosystem recovery but possibly reproduced in response to the induced winter hypoxia. Bacteria seemed to consistently contribute more to the diet of H. germanica than diatoms. For the diet and test-size distribution of both species, the timing of disturbance seemed to have a higher impact than the duration of the subsequent recovery period.

  3. Evaluation of anti-urolithiatic activity of Pashanabhedadi Ghrita against experimentally induced renal calculi in rats.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sanjay Kumar; Baghel, Madhav Singh; Bhuyan, Chaturbhuja; Ravishankar, B; Ashok, B K; Patil, Panchakshari D

    2012-07-01

    Population in an industrialized world is afflicted by urinary stone disease. Kidney stones are common in all kinds of urolithiasis. One distinguished formulation mentioned by Sushruta for management of Ashmari (urolithiasis) is Pashanabhedadi Ghrita (PBG), which is in clinical practice since centuries. Validation of drug is the requirement of time through the experimental study. In this study, trial of PBG has been made against ammonium oxalate rich diet and gentamicin injection induced renal calculi in albino rats. The calculi were induced by gentamicin injection and ammonium oxalate rich diet. Test drug was administered concomitantly in the dose of 900 mg/kg for 15 consecutive days. Rats were sacrificed on the 16(th) day. Parameters like kidney weight, serum biochemical, kidney tissue and histopathology of kidney were studied. Concomitant treatment of PBG attenuates blood biochemical parameters non-significantly, where as it significantly attenuated lipid peroxidation and enhanced glutathione and glutathione peroxidase activities. It also decreased crystal deposition markedly into the renal tubules in number as well as size and prevented damage to the renal tubules. The findings showed that PBG is having significant anti-urolithiatic activities against ammonium oxalate rich diet plus gentamicine injection induced urolithiasis in rats. PMID:23723654

  4. Acute experimentally induced neck pain does not affect fatigability of the peripheral biceps brachii muscle.

    PubMed

    Hung, Laurie Y; Maracle, Emmalee; Srbely, John Z; Brown, Stephen H M

    2014-10-01

    Evidence has shown that upper limb muscles peripheral to the cervical spine, such as the biceps brachii, can demonstrate functional deficits in the presence of chronic neck pain. However, few studies have examined how neck pain can affect the fatigability of upper limb muscles; therefore we were motivated to investigate the effects of acutely induced neuropathic neck pain on the fatigability of the biceps brachii muscle during isometric contraction to exhaustion. Topical capsaicin was used to induce neck pain in 11 healthy male participants. Surface EMG signals were recorded from the biceps brachii during an isometric elbow flexion fatigue task in which participants held a weight equivalent to 30% of their MVC until exhaustion. Two experimental sessions, one placebo and one capsaicin, were conducted separated by two days. EMG mean power frequency and average normalized activation values were calculated over the course of the fatigue task. In the presence of pain, there was no statistically significant effect on EMG parameters during fatigue of the biceps brachii. These results demonstrate that acutely induced neuropathic neck pain does not affect the fatigability, under the tested conditions, of the biceps brachii. PMID:24718930

  5. Spectroscopic evaluation of painted layer structural changes induced by gamma radiation in experimental models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manea, Mihaela M.; Moise, Ioan V.; Virgolici, Marian; Negut, Constantin D.; Barbu, Olimpia-Hinamatsuri; Cutrubinis, Mihalis; Fugaru, Viorel; Stanculescu, Ioana R.; Ponta, Corneliu C.

    2012-02-01

    The degradation of cultural heritage objects by insects and microorganisms is an important issue for conservators, art specialists and humankind in general. Gamma irradiation is an efficient method of polychrome wooden artifacts disinfestation. Color changes and other modifications in the physical chemical properties of materials induced by gamma irradiation are feared by cultural heritage responsible committees and they have to be evaluated objectively and precisely. In this paper FTIR and FT-Raman spectroscopy methods were used to investigate the structural changes in some experimental models of tempera paint layers on wood following 11 kGy gamma irradiation at two dose rates. Radiation chemistry depends on the particular pigment, matrix formed by protein, resin (in case of varnished samples) and water presence. For the majority of painted layer in experimental models very small spectral variations were observed. Small changes in the FTIR spectra were observed for the raw sienna experimental model: for the higher dose rate the egg yolk protein oxidation peaks and the CH stretching bands due to lipids degradation products increased.

  6. Radiating plasma species density distribution in EUV-induced plasma in argon: a spatiotemporal experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Horst, R. M.; Beckers, J.; Osorio, E. A.; van de Ven, T. H. M.; Banine, V. Y.

    2015-12-01

    In this contribution we experimentally study temporally and spatially resolved radiating plasma species density distribution in plasma induced by irradiating a low pressure argon gas with high energy photons with a wavelength of 13.5 nm, i.e. extreme ultraviolet (EUV). This is done by recording the optical emission spatially and temporally resolved by an iCCD camera as a function of the argon gas pressure. Our experimental results show that the emission intensity, i.e. density of radiating plasma species, depends quadratically on the gas pressure. The linear term is due to photoionization and simultaneous excitation by EUV photons, the quadratic term due to electron impact excitation by electrons generated by photoionization. The decay of radiating plasma species can be divided into two phases. At time scales shorter than 10 μs (first phase), the decay is governed by radiative decay of radiating plasma species. At longer time scales (second phase, >10 μs), the decay is dominated by diffusion and subsequent de-excitation at the wall. The experimental decay and expansion during this phase corresponds well with a simplified diffusion model. In order to gain more insight in this exotic type of plasma, we compare the electron density from previous measurements with the results obtained here.

  7. Effects of Experimental Sarcocystis neurona-Induced Infection on Immunity in an Equine Model

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, S. Rochelle; Ellison, Siobhan P.; Dascanio, John J.; Lindsay, David S.; Gogal, Robert M.; Werre, Stephen R.; Surendran, Naveen; Breen, Meghan E.; Heid, Bettina M.; Andrews, Frank M.; Buechner-Maxwell, Virginia A.; Witonsky, Sharon G.

    2014-01-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is the most common cause of Equine Protozoal Myeloencephalitis (EPM), affecting 0.5–1% horses in the United States during their lifetimes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the equine immune responses in an experimentally induced Sarcocystis neurona infection model. Neurologic parameters were recorded prior to and throughout the 70-day study by blinded investigators. Recombinant SnSAG1 ELISA for serum and CSF were used to confirm and track disease progression. All experimentally infected horses displayed neurologic signs after infection. Neutrophils, monocytes, and lymphocytes from infected horses displayed significantly delayed apoptosis at some time points. Cell proliferation was significantly increased in S. neurona-infected horses when stimulated nonspecifically with PMA/I but significantly decreased when stimulated with S. neurona compared to controls. Collectively, our results suggest that horses experimentally infected with S. neurona manifest impaired antigen specific response to S. neurona, which could be a function of altered antigen presentation, lack of antigen recognition, or both. PMID:26464923

  8. Effects of Experimental Sarcocystis neurona-Induced Infection on Immunity in an Equine Model.

    PubMed

    Lewis, S Rochelle; Ellison, Siobhan P; Dascanio, John J; Lindsay, David S; Gogal, Robert M; Werre, Stephen R; Surendran, Naveen; Breen, Meghan E; Heid, Bettina M; Andrews, Frank M; Buechner-Maxwell, Virginia A; Witonsky, Sharon G

    2014-01-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is the most common cause of Equine Protozoal Myeloencephalitis (EPM), affecting 0.5-1% horses in the United States during their lifetimes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the equine immune responses in an experimentally induced Sarcocystis neurona infection model. Neurologic parameters were recorded prior to and throughout the 70-day study by blinded investigators. Recombinant SnSAG1 ELISA for serum and CSF were used to confirm and track disease progression. All experimentally infected horses displayed neurologic signs after infection. Neutrophils, monocytes, and lymphocytes from infected horses displayed significantly delayed apoptosis at some time points. Cell proliferation was significantly increased in S. neurona-infected horses when stimulated nonspecifically with PMA/I but significantly decreased when stimulated with S. neurona compared to controls. Collectively, our results suggest that horses experimentally infected with S. neurona manifest impaired antigen specific response to S. neurona, which could be a function of altered antigen presentation, lack of antigen recognition, or both. PMID:26464923

  9. Numerical and experimental studies of coupling-induced phase shift in resonator and interferometric integrated optics devices.

    PubMed

    Tobing, L Y M; Tjahjana, L; Darmawan, S; Zhang, D H

    2012-02-27

    Coupling induced effects are higher order effects inherent in waveguide evanescent coupling that are known to spectrally distort optical performances of integrated optics devices formed by coupled resonators. We present both numerical and experimental studies of coupling-induced phase shift in various basic integrated optics devices. Rigorous finite difference time domain simulations and systematic experimental characterizations of different basic structures were conducted for more accurate parameter extraction, where it can be observed that coupling induced wave vector may change sign at the increasing gap separation. The devices characterized in this work were fabricated by CMOS-process 193 nm Deep UV (DUV) lithography in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology. PMID:22418385

  10. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Induce Organ Damage during Experimental and Clinical Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Daniele Carvalho; Sônego, Fabiane; Castanheira, Fernanda Vargas e Silva; Melo, Paulo Henrique; Scortegagna, Gabriela Trentin; Silva, Rangel Leal; Barroso-Sousa, Romualdo; Souto, Fabrício Oliveira; Pazin-Filho, Antonio; Figueiredo, Florencio; Alves-Filho, José Carlos; Cunha, Fernando Queiróz

    2016-01-01

    Organ dysfunction is a major concern in sepsis pathophysiology and contributes to its high mortality rate. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) have been implicated in endothelial damage and take part in the pathogenesis of organ dysfunction in several conditions. NETs also have an important role in counteracting invading microorganisms during infection. The aim of this study was to evaluate systemic NETs formation, their participation in host bacterial clearance and their contribution to organ dysfunction in sepsis. C57Bl/6 mice were subjected to endotoxic shock or a polymicrobial sepsis model induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). The involvement of cf-DNA/NETs in the physiopathology of sepsis was evaluated through NETs degradation by rhDNase. This treatment was also associated with a broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment (ertapenem) in mice after CLP. CLP or endotoxin administration induced a significant increase in the serum concentrations of NETs. The increase in CLP-induced NETs was sustained over a period of 3 to 24 h after surgery in mice and was not inhibited by the antibiotic treatment. Systemic rhDNase treatment reduced serum NETs and increased the bacterial load in non-antibiotic-treated septic mice. rhDNase plus antibiotics attenuated sepsis-induced organ damage and improved the survival rate. The correlation between the presence of NETs in peripheral blood and organ dysfunction was evaluated in 31 septic patients. Higher cf-DNA concentrations were detected in septic patients in comparison with healthy controls, and levels were correlated with sepsis severity and organ dysfunction. In conclusion, cf-DNA/NETs are formed during sepsis and are associated with sepsis severity. In the experimental setting, the degradation of NETs by rhDNase attenuates organ damage only when combined with antibiotics, confirming that NETs take part in sepsis pathogenesis. Altogether, our results suggest that NETs are important for host bacterial control and are

  11. Correlation Between Stereoacuity and Experimentally Induced Graded Monocular and Binocular Astigmatism

    PubMed Central

    Puthran, Neelam; Gagal, Bhavna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Stereopsis, the highest grade of binocular single vision, is affected by various factors, such as mis-alignment of visual axes, refractive errors especially anisometropia and astigmatism, both of which may result in amblyopia. There are very few studies in literature regarding the relationship between stereoacuity and refractive errors, especially astigmatism. Aim The present study was conducted to determine the correlation between stereoacuity and experimentally induced graded astigmatism in emmetropes. Materials and Methods A randomized study was conducted on 2000 individuals of either gender, between the ages of 8-35 years, at tertiary care centre attached to a medical college during the period of August 2012 to August 2014, All subjects were emmetropic with normal binocular single vision. Participants were randomly divided into four groups of 500 individuals each. Two groups were subjected to induced myopic astigmatism, either uni-ocularly or binocularly, using + 1.0 D and + 2.0 D cylinders at varying axes i.e., 450, 900 and 1800. Similarily, the remaining two groups were subjected to induced hypermetropic astigmatism, using - 1.0 D and - 2.0D cylinders at varying axes i.e. 450, 900 and 1800. Near stereoacuity was determined by the Titmus Fly Stereo Test, both before and after induction of astigmatism. Statistical analysis was done using paired t-test and ANOVA. Results The mean stereoacuity in emmetropes was 28.81±4.97 seconds of arc. There was a decrease in stereoacuity with increase in dioptric power of astigmatism (p<0.001). Oblique astigmatism reduced the stereoacuity maximally, while stereoacuity was least affected at 180o axis. Hypermetropic astigmatism caused more deterioration in stereoacuity than myopic astigmatism. A gross reduction in stereoacuity was noted in induced monocular astigmatism as against binocular astigmatism. Conclusion This study suggests that stereoacuity is significantly affected by even minor degrees of monocular or

  12. Spontaneous and experimental glycoprotein storage disease of goats induced by Ipomoea carnea subsp fistulosa (Convolvulaceae).

    PubMed

    Armién, A G; Tokarnia, C H; Peixoto, P Vargas; Frese, K

    2007-03-01

    Spontaneous and experimental poisoning with the swainsonine-containing and calystegine-containing plant Ipomoea carnea subsp fistulosa is described. Three of 8 goats presenting with emaciation, weakness, symmetrical ataxia, posterior paresis, proprioceptive deficits, abnormal posture, abnormal postural reaction, and muscle hypertonia were necropsied. I fistulosa was suspected to be the cause of the neurologic disease in all cases. An experiment was conducted to confirm the diagnosis using 12 goats and diets containing 3 different concentrations of the plant. All goats fed I fistulosa developed neurological signs that were similar to those observed in the spontaneous intoxication. Muscle atrophy and pallor were the only macroscopic changes observed in spontaneous and in experimental intoxication. Histological lesions of spontaneous and experimental animals were similar. The most prominent lesion was cytoplasmic vacuolation in neurons of the central and the autonomous nervous system, pancreatic acinar cells, hepatocytes, Kupffer cells, follicular epithelial cells of the thyroid gland, and macrophages of the lymphatic tissues. Neuronal necrosis, axonal spheroids formation, and astrogliosis were additionally observed in the brain. Ultrastructurally, the cytoplasmic vacuoles consisted of distended lysosomes surrounded by a single-layered membrane. Nonreduced end-rests or sequence of alpha-Man, alpha-Glc, beta(1-4)-GlcNAc, and NeuNAc on lysosomal membrane were revealed by lectin histochemistry. Samples of plants used in the experimental trial contained swainsonine and calystegine and their intermediary derivate. We conclude that I fistulosa induces a glycoprotein storage disease primarily based on the inhibition of the lysosomal alpha-mannosidase by the alkaloid swainsonine. PMID:17317794

  13. Differences in virulence between two noncytopathic bovine viral diarrhea viruses in calves.

    PubMed

    Bolin, S R; Ridpath, J F

    1992-11-01

    A noncytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), BVDV-890, isolated from a yearling heifer that died with extensive internal hemorrhages, was compared for virulence in calves with noncytopathic BVDV-TGAN, isolated from an apparently healthy persistently infected calf. After challenge exposure with BVDV-890, nonimmune calves (n = 7) developed fever > 40 C, diarrhea, leukopenia, lymphopenia, neutropenia, and thrombocytopenia. Most calves (n = 6) died or were euthanatized by 19 days after challenge exposure. Challenge exposure with BVDV-890 did not induce disease in 2 calves that had congenital persistent infection with BVDV or in 3 calves that had neutralizing antibody titer > 4 against BVDV-890. After challenge exposure with BVDV-TGAN, nonimmune calves (n = 7) developed fever > 40 C and, rarely, diarrhea or lymphopenia. All of those calves survived challenge exposure. The average maximal titer of BVDV-890 isolated from serum was 1,000 times that of BVDV-TGAN. In calves infected with BVDV-890, the average maximal percentages of lymphocytes and platelets associated with virus were greater than those found in calves infected with BVDV-TGAN. Additional findings of epidemiologic significance were prolonged shedding of virus and delayed production of viral-neutralizing antibody in 1 calf challenge-exposed with BVDV-890. Also, after production of neutralizing antibody, mutant virus that was refractory to neutralization was isolated from calves challenge-exposed with BVDV-TGAN. PMID:1334641

  14. Serum immunoglobulin, dermal response, and lymphocyte transformation studies in horses with chronic diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Targowski, S P

    1975-07-01

    Serum specimens from 12 sick and 20 normal horses were examined for levels of different classes of immunoglobulin (Ig) by a single radial immunodiffusion. The level of IgA in the sera of sick horses was about 50% lower than in the sera of normal horses. By contrast, the level of serum IgG was higher in sick than in normal horses. Phytohemagglutinin (PHA) responsiveness of blood lymphocytes showed transient suppression during the stage of severe diarrhea. The regaining of PHA responsiveness of lymphocytes was observed simultaneously with the recovery process. However, the responsiveness of lymphocytes in recovered horses was still markedly lower than in normal horses. Allergic reactions in sick and normal horses were studied by observing dermal response to the injections of saline extracts from some of the horse feeds. A delayed hypersensitivity reaction to streptokinase-streptodornase and PHA was also studied. The allergic reactions to these extracts were not induced in either sick or normal horses; however, inflammatory response to the extracts was about 50% greater in normal than sick horses. Response to the intradermal injection, either streptokinase-streptodornase or PHA, was significantly greater in normal horses than sick horses. These findings are discussed with respect to the pathogenesis of chronic diarrhea and the complexity of immunodeficiency demonstrated in this disease. The possibility that transient defects of cell-mediated immunity may predispose to chronic diarrhea is proposed. PMID:806535

  15. Therapeutics Insight with Inclusive Immunopharmacology Explication of Human Rotavirus A for the Treatment of Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Mohammad Uzzal; Hashem, Abu; Keya, Chaman Ara; Salimullah, Md.

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe infant and childhood diarrhea worldwide, and the morbidity and mortality rate is going to be outnumbered in developing countries like Bangladesh. To mitigate this substantial burden of disease, new therapeutics such as vaccine and drug are swiftly required against rotavirus. The present therapeutics insight study was performed with comprehensive immunoinformatics and pharmacoinformatics approach. T and B-cell epitopes were assessed in the conserved region of outer capsid protein VP4 among the highly reviewed strains from different countries including Bangladesh. The results suggest that epitope SU1 (TLKNLNDNY) could be an ideal candidate among the predicted five epitopes for both T and B-cell epitopes for the development of universal vaccine against rotavirus. This research also suggests five novel drug compounds from medicinal plant Rhizophora mucronata Lamk. for better therapeutics strategies against rotavirus diarrhea based on 3D structure building, pharmacophore, ADMET, and QSAR properties. The exact mode of action between drug compounds and target protein VP4 were revealed by molecular docking analysis. Drug likeness and oral bioavailability further confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed drugs against rotavirus diarrhea. This study might be implemented for experimental validation to facilitate the novel vaccine and drug design. PMID:27445802

  16. Macleaya cordata Extract Decreased Diarrhea Score and Enhanced Intestinal Barrier Function in Growing Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jun; Martínez, Yordan; Bin, Peng; Duraipandiyan, Veeramuthu; Yin, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    Macleaya cordata extract is of great scientific and practical interest to researchers, due to its antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory responses within experimental animals. This study was designed to determine the diarrhea score and innate immunity of growing piglets after they had received Macleaya cordata extract supplements. A total of 240 growing pigs were randomly assigned to one of three dietary treatments, with 8 replicates per treatment and 10 piglets per replicate. All pigs received a basal diet containing similar amounts of nutrients. The three treatments were a control (no additive), an antibiotic (200 mg/kg colistin), and the Macleaya cordata extract supplement group (40 mg/kg Macleaya cordata extract). The diarrhea score was calculated after D 28. The jejunal samples were obtained from five piglets selected randomly from each treatment on D 28. In comparison with the control group, the dietary Macleaya cordata extract and colistin group demonstrated a substantially decreased diarrhea score. The introduction of Macleaya cordata extract supplements to the diet significantly increased volumes of ZO-1 and claudin-1, particularly in comparison with the pigs in the control group (P < 0.05). The findings indicate that Macleaya cordata extract does enhance intestinal barrier function in growing piglets and that it could be used as a viable substitute for antibiotics. PMID:27525260

  17. Pharmacologic Comparison of Clinical Neutral Endopeptidase Inhibitors in a Rat Model of Acute Secretory Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Prinsen, Michael J.; Oliva, Jonathan; Campbell, Mary A.; Arnett, Stacy D.; Tajfirouz, Deena; Ruminski, Peter G.; Yu, Ying; Bond, Brian R.; Ji, Yuhua; Neckermann, Georg; Choy, Robert K. M.; de Hostos, Eugenio; Meyers, Marvin J.

    2016-01-01

    Racecadotril (acetorphan) is a neutral endopeptidase (NEP) inhibitor with known antidiarrheal activity in animals and humans; however, in humans, it suffers from shortcomings that might be improved with newer drugs in this class that have progressed to the clinic for nonenteric disease indications. To identify potentially superior NEP inhibitors with immediate clinical utility for diarrhea treatment, we compared their efficacy and pharmacologic properties in a rat intestinal hypersecretion model. Racecadotril and seven other clinical-stage inhibitors of NEP were obtained or synthesized. Enzyme potency and specificity were compared using purified peptidases. Compounds were orally administered to rats before administration of castor oil to induce diarrhea. Stool weight was recorded over 4 hours. To assess other pharmacologic properties, select compounds were orally administered to normal or castor oil–treated rats, blood and tissue samples collected at multiple time points, and active compound concentrations determined by mass spectroscopy. NEP enzyme activity was measured in tissue homogenates. Three previously untested clinical NEP inhibitors delayed diarrhea onset and reduced total stool output, with little or no effect on intestinal motility assessed by the charcoal meal test. Each was shown to be a potent, highly specific inhibitor of NEP. Each exhibited greater suppression of NEP activity in intestinal and nonintestinal tissues than did racecadotril and sustained this inhibition longer. These results suggest that newer clinical-stage NEP inhibitors originally developed for other indications may be directly repositioned for treatment of acute secretory diarrhea and offer advantages over racecadotril, such as less frequent dosing and potentially improved efficacy. PMID:26907621

  18. Pharmacologic Comparison of Clinical Neutral Endopeptidase Inhibitors in a Rat Model of Acute Secretory Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Griggs, David W; Prinsen, Michael J; Oliva, Jonathan; Campbell, Mary A; Arnett, Stacy D; Tajfirouz, Deena; Ruminski, Peter G; Yu, Ying; Bond, Brian R; Ji, Yuhua; Neckermann, Georg; Choy, Robert K M; de Hostos, Eugenio; Meyers, Marvin J

    2016-05-01

    Racecadotril (acetorphan) is a neutral endopeptidase (NEP) inhibitor with known antidiarrheal activity in animals and humans; however, in humans, it suffers from shortcomings that might be improved with newer drugs in this class that have progressed to the clinic for nonenteric disease indications. To identify potentially superior NEP inhibitors with immediate clinical utility for diarrhea treatment, we compared their efficacy and pharmacologic properties in a rat intestinal hypersecretion model. Racecadotril and seven other clinical-stage inhibitors of NEP were obtained or synthesized. Enzyme potency and specificity were compared using purified peptidases. Compounds were orally administered to rats before administration of castor oil to induce diarrhea. Stool weight was recorded over 4 hours. To assess other pharmacologic properties, select compounds were orally administered to normal or castor oil-treated rats, blood and tissue samples collected at multiple time points, and active compound concentrations determined by mass spectroscopy. NEP enzyme activity was measured in tissue homogenates. Three previously untested clinical NEP inhibitors delayed diarrhea onset and reduced total stool output, with little or no effect on intestinal motility assessed by the charcoal meal test. Each was shown to be a potent, highly specific inhibitor of NEP. Each exhibited greater suppression of NEP activity in intestinal and nonintestinal tissues than did racecadotril and sustained this inhibition longer. These results suggest that newer clinical-stage NEP inhibitors originally developed for other indications may be directly repositioned for treatment of acute secretory diarrhea and offer advantages over racecadotril, such as less frequent dosing and potentially improved efficacy. PMID:26907621

  19. Experimental study of the water jet induced by underwater electrical discharge in a narrow rectangular tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koita, T.; Zhu, Y.; Sun, M.

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports an experimental investigation on the effects of explosion depth and tube width on the water jet induced by an underwater electrical discharge in a narrow rectangular tube. The water jet formation and bubble structure were evaluated from the images recorded by a high-speed video camera. Two typical patterns of jet formation and four general patterns of bubble implosion were observed, depending on the explosion depth and tube width. The velocity of the water jet was calculated from the recorded images. The jet velocity was observed to depend on not only the explosion depth and energy, but also on the tube width. We proposed an empirical formula defining the water jet velocity in the tube as a function of the tube width and explosion depth and energy.

  20. Evaluation of some coagulation parameters in hepatic coccidiosis experimentally induced with Eimeria stiedai in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Cam, Y; Cetin, E; Iça, A; Atalay, O; Cetin, N

    2006-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate some coagulation parameters in hepatic coccidiosis experimentally induced with Eimeria stiedai in rabbits. Fourteen healthy New Zealand rabbits were equally divided into two groups. One group received no treatment, the other group was orally inoculated with 40 000 sporulated oocysts of E. stiedai in a 1 ml inoculum using a catheter. At day 24 after inoculation, blood samples were collected into sodium citrate-containing tubes to evaluate some coagulation parameters. Although statistically not significant, infected rabbits had prolonged prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time compared with rabbits in the control group. A significant reduction (P < 0.05) was observed in the level of fibrinogen of infected rabbits compared with that of the controls. A slight decrease in thrombocyte counts of infected rabbits was not statistically significant. PMID:16629990

  1. Effect of insulin-induced hypoglycaemia on the central nervous system: evidence from experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Jensen, V F H; Bøgh, I B; Lykkesfeldt, J

    2014-03-01

    Insulin-induced hypoglycaemia (IIH) is a major acute complication in type 1 as well as in type 2 diabetes, particularly during intensive insulin therapy. The brain plays a central role in the counter-regulatory response by eliciting parasympathetic and sympathetic hormone responses to restore normoglycaemia. Brain glucose concentrations, being approximately 15-20% of the blood glucose concentration in humans, are rigorously maintained during hypoglycaemia through adaptions such as increased cerebral glucose transport, decreased cerebral glucose utilisation and, possibly, by using central nervous system glycogen as a glucose reserve. However, during sustained hypoglycaemia, the brain cannot maintain a sufficient glucose influx and, as the cerebral hypoglycaemia becomes severe, electroencephalogram changes, oxidative stress and regional neuronal death ensues. With particular focus on evidence from experimental studies on nondiabetic IIH, this review outlines the central mechanisms behind the counter-regulatory response to IIH, as well as cerebral adaption to avoid sequelae of cerebral neuroglycopaenia, including seizures and coma. PMID:24428753

  2. High-intensity laser therapy during chronic degenerative tenosynovitis experimentally induced in broiler chickens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortuna, Damiano; Rossi, Giacomo; Bilotta, Teresa W.; Zati, Allesandro; Gazzotti, Valeria; Venturini, Antonio; Pinna, Stefania; Serra, Christian; Masotti, Leonardo

    2002-10-01

    The aims of this study was the safety and the efficacy of High Intensity Laser Therapy (HILT) on chronic degenerative tenosynovitis. We have effectuated the histological evaluation and seroassay (C reactive protein) on 18 chickens affect by chronic degenerative tenosynovitis experimentally induced. We have been employed a Nd:YAG laser pulsed wave; all irradiated subjects received the same total energy (270 Joule) with a fluence of 7,7 J/cm2 and intensity of 10,7 W/cm2. The histological findings revealed a distinct reduction of the mineralization of the choral matrix, the anti-inflammatory effect of the laser, the hyperplasia of the synoviocytes and ectasia of the lymphatic vessels.

  3. The use of airborne imaging spectrometer data to determine experimentally induced variation in coniferous canopy chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanberg, Nancy A.; Matson, Pamela A.

    1987-01-01

    It was experimentally determined whether induced differences in forest canopy chemical composition can be detected using data from the Airborne Imaging Spectrometer (AIS). Treatments were applied to an even-aged forest of Douglas fir trees. Work to date has stressed wet chemical analysis of foilage samples and correction of AIS data. Plot treatments were successful in providing a range of foliar N2 concentrations. Much time was spent investigating and correcting problems with the raw AIS data. Initial problems with groups of drop out lines in the AIS data were traced to the tape recorder and the tape drive. Custom adjustment of the tape drive led to recovery of most missing lines. Remaining individual drop out lines were replaced using average of adjacent lines. Application of a notch filter to the Fourier transform of the image in each band satisfactorily removed vertical striping. The aspect ratio was corrected by resampling the image in the line direction using nearest neighbor interpolation.

  4. An explanation for experimental observations of harmonic cyclotron emission induced by fast ions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.R.; Horton, W.; Van Dam, J.W.

    1993-09-01

    An explanation, supported by numerical simulations and analytical theory, is given for the harmonic cyclotron emission induced by fast ions in tokamak plasmas - particular, for the emission observed at low harmonics in deuterium-deuterium md deuterium-tritium experiments in the Joint European Tokamak. We show that the first proton harmonic is one of the highest spectral peaks whereas the first alpha is weak. We also compare the relative spectral amplitudes of different harmonics. Our results axe consistent with the experimental observations. The simulations verify that the instabilities are caused by a weak relativistic mass effect. Simulation that a nonuniform magnetic field leads to no appreciable change in the growth and saturation amplitude of the waves.

  5. An experimental investigation of vortex-induced vibration with nonlinear restoring forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackowski, A. W.; Williamson, C. H. K.

    2013-08-01

    We experimentally examine the amplitude of a bluff body undergoing vortex-induced vibration (VIV) supported by linear and various nonlinear structural forces. This investigation is made possible by our Cyber-Physical Fluid Dynamics force-feedback technique; using it, we can impose arbitrary nonlinear restoring forces on a circular cylinder in our water channel. For the range of nonlinearities examined, detailed analysis allows one to understand and predict the response of the nonlinear structural system using knowledge of a standard, linear VIV system. We also present a case study examining the potential of nonlinear springs to aid in a VIV-based energy harvesting device. Appropriate choices of the spring's nonlinearity allow the hypothetical energy harvester to operate at high performance over a much larger range of Reynolds number than a standard system.

  6. Anti-arthritic effect of eugenol on collagen-induced arthritis experimental model.

    PubMed

    Grespan, Renata; Paludo, Marcia; Lemos, Henrique de Paula; Barbosa, Carmem Patrícia; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar Aparecida; Dalalio, Marcia Machado de Oliveira; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to test the efficacy of eugenol, a compound obtained from the essential oil of cloves (Syzygium aromaticum) in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), a well characterized murine model of rheumatoid arthritis. Macroscopic clinical evidence of CIA manifests first as periarticular erythema and edema in the hind paws. Treatment with eugenol starting at the onset of arthritis (day 25) ameliorated these clinical signs of CIA. Furthermore, eugenol inhibited mononuclear cell infiltration into the knee joints of arthritic mice and also lowered the levels of cytokines (tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ and tumor growth factor (TGF)-β) within the ankle joints. Eugenol treatment did not affect the in vitro cell viability as assessed using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Therefore, eugenol ameliorates experimental arthritis and could be useful as a beneficial supplement in treating human arthritis. PMID:23037170

  7. Experimental investigation of a supersonic swept ramp injector using laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartfield, Roy J.; Hollo, Steven D.; Mcdaniel, James C.

    1990-01-01

    Planar measurements of injectant mole fraction and temperature have been conducted in a nonreacting supersonic combustor configured with underexpanded injection in the base of a swept ramp. The temperature measurements were conducted with a Mach 2 test section inlet in streamwise planes perpendicular to the test section wall on which the ramp was mounted. Injection concentration measurements, conducted in cross flow planes with both Mach 2 and Mach 2.9 free stream conditions, dramatically illustrate the domination of the mixing process by streamwise vorticity generated by the ramp. These measurements, conducted using a nonintrusive optical technique (laser-induced iodine fluorescence), provide an accurate and extensive experimental data base for the validation of computation fluid dynamic codes for the calculation of highly three-dimensional supersonic combustor flow fields.

  8. Nanolesions induced by heavy ions in human tissues: Experimental and theoretical studies

    PubMed Central

    Bleicher, Marcus; Burigo, Lucas; Herrlitz, Maren; Krämer, Michael; Mishustin, Igor; Müller, Iris; Natale, Francesco; Pshenichnov, Igor; Schramm, Stefan; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela; Wälzlein, Cathrin

    2012-01-01

    Summary The biological effects of energetic heavy ions are attracting increasing interest for their applications in cancer therapy and protection against space radiation. The cascade of events leading to cell death or late effects starts from stochastic energy deposition on the nanometer scale and the corresponding lesions in biological molecules, primarily DNA. We have developed experimental techniques to visualize DNA nanolesions induced by heavy ions. Nanolesions appear in cells as “streaks” which can be visualized by using different DNA repair markers. We have studied the kinetics of repair of these “streaks” also with respect to the chromatin conformation. Initial steps in the modeling of the energy deposition patterns at the micrometer and nanometer scale were made with MCHIT and TRAX models, respectively. PMID:23019551

  9. Modulation of diabetes-mellitus-induced male reproductive dysfunctions in experimental animal models with medicinal plants

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Gyan Chand; Jangir, Ram Niwas

    2014-01-01

    Today diabetes mellitus has emerged as a major healthcare problem throughout the world. It has recently broken the age barrier and has been diagnosed in younger people also. Sustained hyperglycemia is associated with many complications including male reproductive dysfunctions and infertility. Numerous medicinal plants have been used for the management of the diabetes mellitus in various traditional system of medicine and in folklore worldwide as they are a rich source of bioactive phytoconstituents, which lower blood glucose level and/or also act as antioxidants resulting in the amelioration of oxidative-stress-induced diabetic complications. The present review describes the ameliorative effects of medicinal plants or their products, especially on male reproductive dysfunctions, in experimental diabetic animal models. PMID:25125884

  10. Scoliosis in rats with experimentally-induced hemiparkinsonism: dependence upon striatal dopamine denervation.

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-Marschitz, M; Utsumi, H; Ungerstedt, U

    1990-01-01

    Rats suffering from experimental hemiparkinsonism induced by a unilateral injection of 6-hydroxydopamine into the left area ventralis tegmenti showed a strong ipsilateral deviation and scoliosis-like skeletal deformity. The rats often showed single rotatory curves affecting the thoracic and lumbar regions, although cases with multiple curves were also found. The severity of the scoliosis was closely related to a decrease in extracellular striatal dopamine measured with microdialysis and to the development of postsynaptic dopamine receptor supersensitivity, functionally evaluated with rotational behaviour elicited with apomorphine. Indeed, rats with the strongest dopamine depletion (greater than 95%) and the strongest rotational responses showed the sharpest spinal deviation and skeletal deformity. These findings agree with the clinical observations that scoliosis occurs in patients with Parkinson's disease and its direction is correlated with the side of the major signs and symptoms of parkinsonism. Images PMID:2303830

  11. Experimental studies of collective excitations of a BEC in light-induced gauge fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuan-Hsun; Niffenegger, Robert; Blasing, David; Olson, Abraham; Chen, Yong P.

    2015-05-01

    We present our experimental studies of collective modes including spin dipole mode and scissors mode of a 87Rb Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in the presence of Raman light-induced gauge fields and synthetic spin-orbit coupling (SOC). By Raman dressing the mf spin states within the F =1 manifold, we engineer atoms' energy-momentum dispersion to create synthetic SOC, and spin dependent synthetic electric and magnetic fields. We have used spin dependent synthetic electric fields to make two BECs with different spins oscillate and collide in the optical trap. We have studied the effects of SOC on both the momentum damping and thermalization behaviors of the BECs when undergoing such spin dipole oscillations. We have also used spatially dependent synthetic electric fields to excite the scissors mode, which has been used as a probe for superfluidity. We have investigated the effects of the synthetic gauge fields and SOC on the measured scissors mode.

  12. Efficacy and safety of albendazole against experimentally induced Fasciola hepatica infections in goats.

    PubMed

    Foreyt, W J

    1988-01-01

    Forty 8-week-old goats were allocated to five groups of equal size to determine the optimal dosage of albendazole against experimentally induced 14-week-old Fasciola hepatica infections. Albendazole suspension given orally at 5.0, 7.5, 10.0 and 15 mg kg-1 of body weight was 73.3, 88.2, 88.3 and 95.9% effective, respectively, when compared to untreated controls. Mean number of F. hepatica in the untreated control goats was 75.4. No signs of toxicity were observed. When albendazole was given to eight, 8-week-old goats orally at 75 mg kg-1 (five times the optimal dosage), no signs of toxicity were observed. PMID:3347986

  13. Prevalence of Providencia strains among children with diarrhea in Japan.

    PubMed

    Shima, Ayaka; Hinenoya, Atsushi; Asakura, Masahiro; Nagita, Akira; Yamasaki, Shinji

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the prevalence of Providencia spp. strains among children with diarrhea in Japan. We developed a Providencia genus-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method, and the specificity and sensitivity was evaluated to be 100% with various bacterial strains including 7 genera and 13 species. Five of 345 samples (1.4%) were positive by PCR using a Providencia genus-specific primer targeting the 16S rRNA gene. The single species Providencia rettgeri was isolated from 4 stool samples of children with diarrhea. The prevalence of Providencia spp. in children with diarrhea in Japan is lower than that previously reported for Japanese travelers abroad with diarrhea. PMID:23183210

  14. Prevention and Self-Treatment of Traveler's Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Diemert, David J.

    2006-01-01

    Of the millions who travel from the industrialized world to developing countries every year, between 20% and 50% will develop at least one episode of diarrhea, making it the most common medical ailment afflicting travelers. Although usually a mild illness, traveler's diarrhea can result in significant morbidity and hardship overseas. Precautions can be taken to minimize the risk of developing traveler's diarrhea, either through avoidance of potentially contaminated food or drink or through various prophylactic measures, including both nonpharmacological and antimicrobial strategies. If diarrhea does develop despite the precautions taken, effective treatment—usually a combination of an antibiotic and an antimotility agent—can be brought by the traveler and initiated as soon as symptoms develop. In the future, vaccines—several of which are in the advanced stages of clinical testing—may be added to the list of prophylactic measures. PMID:16847088

  15. Nonantimicrobial agents in the prevention and treatment of traveler's diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Ericsson, Charles D

    2005-12-01

    Among the nonantimicrobial agents that are available and useful for the prevention of traveler's diarrhea are bismuth subsalicylate-containing preparations, which can provide a rate of protection of up to 65% when taken 4 times daily. In one study, the probiotic Lactobacillus GG was found to provide 49% protection against traveler's diarrhea, but results with this agent and other probiotics have been highly variable and geographically inconsistent. Tannin albuminate plus ethacridine lactate provided 36% protection, but it is not widely available. Among the nonantimicrobial agents that are available and useful for the treatment of traveler's diarrhea are bismuth subsalicylate-containing preparations, which reduce the passage of loose stools by 16%-18%. The antisecretory and antimotility agent loperamide reduces the passage of loose stools by approximately 50% and has been especially useful, in combination with antimicrobial agents, in reducing the total duration of posttreatment diarrhea to a matter of hours. PMID:16267719

  16. Association of Campylobacter upsaliensis with Persistent Bloody Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Couturier, Brianne A.; Hale, DeVon C.

    2012-01-01

    Campylobacter upsaliensis is a zoonotic, emerging pathogen that is not readily recovered in traditional stool culture. This case represents the first report of persistent bloody diarrhea with C. upsaliensis that was confirmed by filtration culture, PCR, and sequencing. PMID:22915607

  17. Autoantibody profile in the experimental model of scleroderma induced by type V human collagen

    PubMed Central

    Callado, Maria R M; Viana, Vilma S T; Vendramini, Margarete B G; Leon, Elaine P; Bueno, Cleonice; Velosa, Ana P P; Teodoro, Walcy R; Yoshinari, Natalino H

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the humoral autoimmune response in the experimental model of systemic sclerosis (SSc) induced by human type V collagen (huCol V). New Zealand rabbits were immunized with huCol V in Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) and boosted twice with 15 days intervals with huCol V in Freund's incomplete adjuvant. Control groups included animals injected only with FCA or bovine serum albumin. Bleeding was done at days 0, 30, 75 and 120. Tissue specimens were obtained for histopathological investigation. Serological analysis included detection of antibodies against huCol V and anti-topoisomerase I (Anti-Scl70) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, antinuclear antibodies (ANA) by indirect immunofluorescence, and rheumatoid factor (RF) by a latex agglutination test. Target antigens were characterized by immunoblot. Histological analysis revealed extracellular matrix remodeling with fibrosis and vasculitis. Anti-Scl70 and ANA were detected as early as 30 days in all huCol V animals. The universal ANA staining pattern was Golgi-like. This serum reactivity was not abolished by previous absorption with huCol V. Characterization of the target antigen by immunoblot revealed two major protein fractions of 175 000 and 220 000 MW. Similarly to ANA, there was a gradual increase of reactivity throughout the immunization and also it was not abolished by preincubation of serum samples with huCol V. RF testing was negative in hyperimmune sera. Conclusion: The production of autoantibodies, including anti-Scl70, a serological marker for SSc associated with histopathological alterations, validates huCol V induced-experimental model and brings out its potential for understanding the pathophysiology of SSc. PMID:17442023

  18. Angiopoietin-2 enhances survival in experimental sepsis induced by multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Tzepi, Ira-Maria; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J; Carrer, Dionyssia-Pinelopi; Tsaganos, Thomas; Claus, Ralf A; Vaki, Ilia; Pelekanou, Aimilia; Kotsaki, Antigone; Tziortzioti, Vassiliki; Topouzis, Stavros; Bauer, Michael; Papapetropoulos, Andreas

    2012-11-01

    Levels of circulating angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) increase in sepsis, raising the possibility that Ang-2 acts as a modulator in the sepsis cascade. To investigate this, experimental sepsis was induced in male C57BL6 mice by a multidrug-resistant isolate of Pseudomonas aeruginosa; survival was determined along with neutrophil tissue infiltration and release of proinflammatory cytokines. Survival was significantly increased either by pretreatment with recombinant Ang-2 2 h before or treatment with recombinant Ang-2 30 min after bacterial challenge. Likewise, Ang-2 pretreatment protected against sepsis-related death elicited by Escherichia coli; however, Ang-2 failed to provide protection in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-challenged mice. The survival advantage of Ang-2 in response to P. aeruginosa challenge was lost in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-deficient mice or neutropenic mice. Infiltration of the liver by neutrophils was elevated in the Ang-2 group compared with saline-treated animals. Serum TNF-α levels were reduced by Ang-2, whereas those of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10 remained unchanged. This was accompanied by lower release of TNF-α by stimulated splenocytes. When applied to U937 cells in vitro, heat-killed P. aeruginosa induced the secretion of IL-6 and TNF-α; low levels of exogenous TNF-α synergized with P. aeruginosa. This synergistic effect was abolished after the addition of Ang-2. These results put in evidence a striking protective role of Ang-2 in experimental sepsis evoked by a multidrug-resistant isolate of P. aeruginosa attributed to modulation of TNF-α production and changes in neutrophil migration. The protective role of Ang-2 is shown when whole microorganisms are used and not LPS, suggesting complex interactions with the host immune response. PMID:22859861

  19. Experimental Neuromyelitis Optica Induces a Type I Interferon Signature in the Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Nathalie; Zeka, Bleranda; Schanda, Kathrin; Fujihara, Kazuo; Illes, Zsolt; Dahle, Charlotte; Reindl, Markus; Lassmann, Hans; Bradl, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an acute inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS) which predominantly affects spinal cord and optic nerves. Most patients harbor pathogenic autoantibodies, the so-called NMO-IgGs, which are directed against the water channel aquaporin 4 (AQP4) on astrocytes. When these antibodies gain access to the CNS, they mediate astrocyte destruction by complement-dependent and by antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. In contrast to multiple sclerosis (MS) patients who benefit from therapies involving type I interferons (I-IFN), NMO patients typically do not profit from such treatments. How is I-IFN involved in NMO pathogenesis? To address this question, we made gene expression profiles of spinal cords from Lewis rat models of experimental neuromyelitis optica (ENMO) and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We found an upregulation of I-IFN signature genes in EAE spinal cords, and a further upregulation of these genes in ENMO. To learn whether the local I-IFN signature is harmful or beneficial, we induced ENMO by transfer of CNS antigen-specific T cells and NMO-IgG, and treated the animals with I-IFN at the very onset of clinical symptoms, when the blood-brain barrier was open. With this treatment regimen, we could amplify possible effects of the I-IFN induced genes on the transmigration of infiltrating cells through the blood brain barrier, and on lesion formation and expansion, but could avoid effects of I-IFN on the differentiation of pathogenic T and B cells in the lymph nodes. We observed that I-IFN treated ENMO rats had spinal cord lesions with fewer T cells, macrophages/activated microglia and activated neutrophils, and less astrocyte damage than their vehicle treated counterparts, suggesting beneficial effects of I-IFN. PMID:26990978

  20. Bacillus cereus Induces Permeability of the Blood Ocular Barrier During Experimental Endophthalmitis

    PubMed Central

    Moyer, A. L.; Ramadan, R. T.; Novosad, B.; Astley, R.; Callegan, M. C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine to what extent blood retina barrier (BRB) permeability occurred during experimental Bacillus cereus endophthalmitis and whether tight junction alterations were involved in permeability. Methods Mice were intravitreally injected with 100 CFU B. cereus and eyes were analyzed at specific times postinfection for permeability to fibrin and albumin, quantitation of intraocular plasma constituent leakage, production of inflammatory cytokines, and alterations in tight junction protein localization and expression at the level of the RPE. Results B. cereus-induced leakage of albumin and fibrin into the aqueous and vitreous humor by 8 h postinfection. BRB permeability occurred as early as 4 h and increased 13.30-fold compared to uninfected controls by 8 h. Production of proinflammatory cytokines IL-6, MIP-1α, IL-1β, and KC increased over the course of infection. In the retina, ZO-1 disruption begins by 4 h, followed by decreasing occludin and ZO-1 expression at 4 and 8 h, respectively. Tubulin condensation and RPE65 degradation occurred by 12 h. A quorum sensing mutant B. cereus strain caused BRB permeability comparable to that of wild-type B. cereus. Both wild-type and mutant B. cereus sterile supernatants induced blood ocular barrier permeability similarly to that of wild-type infection. Conclusions These results indicate that BRB permeability occurs during the early stages of experimental B. cereus endophthalmitis, beginning as early as 4 h postinfection. Disruption of tight junctions at the level of the RPE may contribute to barrier breakdown. Quorum-sensing dependent factors may not significantly contribute to BRB permeability. PMID:19264886

  1. Experimental Neuromyelitis Optica Induces a Type I Interferon Signature in the Spinal Cord.

    PubMed

    Oji, Satoru; Nicolussi, Eva-Maria; Kaufmann, Nathalie; Zeka, Bleranda; Schanda, Kathrin; Fujihara, Kazuo; Illes, Zsolt; Dahle, Charlotte; Reindl, Markus; Lassmann, Hans; Bradl, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an acute inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS) which predominantly affects spinal cord and optic nerves. Most patients harbor pathogenic autoantibodies, the so-called NMO-IgGs, which are directed against the water channel aquaporin 4 (AQP4) on astrocytes. When these antibodies gain access to the CNS, they mediate astrocyte destruction by complement-dependent and by antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. In contrast to multiple sclerosis (MS) patients who benefit from therapies involving type I interferons (I-IFN), NMO patients typically do not profit from such treatments. How is I-IFN involved in NMO pathogenesis? To address this question, we made gene expression profiles of spinal cords from Lewis rat models of experimental neuromyelitis optica (ENMO) and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We found an upregulation of I-IFN signature genes in EAE spinal cords, and a further upregulation of these genes in ENMO. To learn whether the local I-IFN signature is harmful or beneficial, we induced ENMO by transfer of CNS antigen-specific T cells and NMO-IgG, and treated the animals with I-IFN at the very onset of clinical symptoms, when the blood-brain barrier was open. With this treatment regimen, we could amplify possible effects of the I-IFN induced genes on the transmigration of infiltrating cells through the blood brain barrier, and on lesion formation and expansion, but could avoid effects of I-IFN on the differentiation of pathogenic T and B cells in the lymph nodes. We observed that I-IFN treated ENMO rats had spinal cord lesions with fewer T cells, macrophages/activated microglia and activated neutrophils, and less astrocyte damage than their vehicle treated counterparts, suggesting beneficial effects of I-IFN. PMID:26990978

  2. [Chronic Salmonella typhimurium diarrhea in an immunocompetent patient].

    PubMed

    Mellado-Ferreiro, M; Jarne-Betrán, V; Arteaga-Mazuelas, M; Abínzano-Guillén, M L

    2016-01-01

    Chronic diarrhea caused by infection in immunocompetent patients is an infrequent condition in developed countries, although certain pathogens,generally parasites (Giardia lamblia, Isospora belli,Cryptosporidium, Cyclospora, Strongyloides, Ameba,Trichuris and Schistosoma) and some bacteria (Aeromonas,Plesiomonas, Campylobacter, Clostridium difficile, Salmonella or Mycobacterium tuberculosis)can cause persistent diarrhea.We present the case of a patient who showed Salmonella typhimurium in his stool culture and recovered following treatment with levofloxacin for 7 days. PMID:27125610

  3. Diarrhea in U.S. troops deployed to Thailand.

    PubMed

    Echeverria, P; Jackson, L R; Hoge, C W; Arness, M K; Dunnavant, G R; Larsen, R R

    1993-12-01

    Ninety-five (28%) of 333 U.S. military personnel deployed to Ubonratchathani, Thailand, for 1 month in February 1993 developed diarrhea. Campylobacter jejuni was identified in 6 (25%), attaching and effacing Escherichia coli was identified in 3 (13%), nontyphoidal Salmonella spp. were identified in 2 (8%), and rotavirus was identified in 1 (4%) of 24 persons who had diarrhea and submitted specimens. PMID:8308137

  4. Rectal Mechano-sensory Function in Patients with Carcinoid Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Gregersen, Tine; Brock, Christina; Haase, Anne-Mette; Laurberg, Søren; Drewes, Asbjørn M; Grønbæk, Henning; Krogh, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims In patients with neuroendocrine tumors, excessive production of serotonin and other amines may cause the carcinoid syndrome, which is mainly characterized by diarrhea and flushing. Little is known about the pathophysiology of carcinoid diarrhea. In several other groups of patients, diarrhea may be associated with rectal hypersensitivity and increased rectal tone. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to compare rectal sensitivity and compliance in patients with carcinoid diarrhea and in healthy subjects. Methods Twelve patients (6 males, aged 54–78 years, median 65 years), with carcinoid diarrhea and 19 healthy subjects (7 males, aged 50–78 years, median 61 years) were included. Rectal mechanical and heat stimulation was used for assessment of rectal mechano-sensory properties. Results Overall, 5.3% higher temperatures were needed to elicit sensory responses in patients with carcinoid diarrhea than in healthy subjects (P = 0.015). Posthoc analyses revealed that the sensory threshold to heat was 48.1 ± 3.1°C in patients vs 44.7 ± 4.7°C in healthy subjects (P = 0.041). In contrast, patients and healthy subjects showed no overall differences in rectal sensory response to mechanical distension (P = 0.731) or rectal compliance (P = 0.990). Conclusions Patients with carcinoid diarrhea have higher sensory thresholds to heat stimulation in comparison to healthy subjects, but normal rectal sensation to mechanical distension and normal compliance. Therefore, treatment of carcinoid diarrhea should aim at prolonging gastrointestinal transit and decreasing secretion, rather than modifying rectal mechano-sensory function. PMID:26690884

  5. Extract of Sesbania grandiflora Ameliorates Hyperglycemia in High Fat Diet-Streptozotocin Induced Experimental Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Panigrahi, Ghanshyam; Panda, Chhayakanta; Patra, Arjun

    2016-01-01

    Background. Sesbania grandiflora has been traditionally used as antidiabetic, antioxidant, antipyretic, and expectorant and in the management of various ailments. Materials and Methods. The study evaluates the antidiabetic activity of methanolic extract of Sesbania grandiflora (MESG) in type 2 diabetic rats induced by low dose streptozotocine and high fat diet. Diabetic rats were given vehicle, MESG (200 and 400 mg/kg, p.o.), and the standard drug, metformin (10 mg/kg), for 28 days. During the experimental period, body weight, abdominal girth, food intake, fasting serum glucose, urine analyses were measured. Insulin tolerance test was carried out on 25th day of drug treatment period. Serum analyses for lipid profile and SGOT and SGPT and serums creatinine, urea, protein, SOD, and MDA were also carried out. At the end of the experiment, animals were euthanized, the liver and pancreas were immediately dissected out, and the ratio of pancreas to body weight and hepatic glycogen were calculated. Results. MESG (200 and 400 mg/kg, p.o.) induced significant reduction (P < 0.05) of raised blood glucose levels in diabetic rats and also restored other parameters to normal level. Conclusion. Therefore, it is concluded that MESG has potential antihyperglycemic and antihyperlipemic activities and alleviate insulin resistance conditions. PMID:27313954

  6. Plasmepsin 4-Deficient Plasmodium berghei Are Virulence Attenuated and Induce Protective Immunity against Experimental Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Spaccapelo, Roberta; Janse, Chris J.; Caterbi, Sara; Franke-Fayard, Blandine; Bonilla, J. Alfredo; Syphard, Luke M.; Di Cristina, Manlio; Dottorini, Tania; Savarino, Andrea; Cassone, Antonio; Bistoni, Francesco; Waters, Andrew P.; Dame, John B.; Crisanti, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Plasmodium parasites lacking plasmepsin 4 (PM4), an aspartic protease that functions in the lysosomal compartment and contributes to hemoglobin digestion, have only a modest decrease in the asexual blood-stage growth rate; however, PM4 deficiency in the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium berghei results in significantly less virulence than that for the parental parasite. P. berghei Δpm4 parasites failed to induce experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) in ECM-susceptible mice, and ECM-resistant mice were able to clear infections. Furthermore, after a single infection, all convalescent mice were protected against subsequent parasite challenge for at least 1 year. Real-time in vivo parasite imaging and splenectomy experiments demonstrated that protective immunity acted through antibody-mediated parasite clearance in the spleen. This work demonstrates, for the first time, that a single Plasmodium gene disruption can generate virulence-attenuated parasites that do not induce cerebral complications and, moreover, are able to stimulate strong protective immunity against subsequent challenge with wild-type parasites. Parasite blood-stage attenuation should help identify protective immune responses against malaria, unravel parasite-derived factors involved in malarial pathologies, such as cerebral malaria, and potentially pave the way for blood-stage whole organism vaccines. PMID:20019192

  7. Foraminiferal survival after long-term in situ experimentally induced anoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langlet, D.; Geslin, E.; Baal, C.; Metzger, E.; Lejzerowicz, F.; Riedel, B.; Zuschin, M.; Pawlowski, J.; Stachowitsch, M.; Jorissen, F. J.

    2013-11-01

    Anoxia was successfully induced in four benthic chambers installed at 24 m depth on the northern Adriatic seafloor from 9 days to 10 months. To accurately determine whether benthic foraminifera can survive experimentally induced prolonged anoxia, the CellTrackerTM Green method was applied and calcareous and agglutinated foraminifera were analyzed. Numerous individuals were found living at all sampling times and at all sampling depths (to 5 cm), supported by a ribosomal RNA analysis that revealed that certain benthic foraminifera were active after 10 months of anoxia. The results show that benthic foraminifera can survive up to 10 months of anoxia with co-occurring hydrogen sulfides. However, foraminiferal standing stocks decrease with sampling time in an irregular manner. A large difference in standing stock between two cores sampled under initial conditions indicates the presence of a large spatial heterogeneity of the foraminiferal faunas. An unexpected increase in standing stocks after one month is tentatively interpreted as a reaction to increased food availability due to the massive mortality of infaunal macrofaunal organisms. After this, standing stocks decrease again in cores sampled after 2 months of anoxia to then attain a minimum in the cores sampled after 10 months. We speculate that the trend of overall decrease of standing stocks is not due to the adverse effects of anoxia and hydrogen sulfides but rather due to a continuous diminution of labile organic matter.

  8. Extract of Sesbania grandiflora Ameliorates Hyperglycemia in High Fat Diet-Streptozotocin Induced Experimental Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Panigrahi, Ghanshyam; Panda, Chhayakanta; Patra, Arjun

    2016-01-01

    Background. Sesbania grandiflora has been traditionally used as antidiabetic, antioxidant, antipyretic, and expectorant and in the management of various ailments. Materials and Methods. The study evaluates the antidiabetic activity of methanolic extract of Sesbania grandiflora (MESG) in type 2 diabetic rats induced by low dose streptozotocine and high fat diet. Diabetic rats were given vehicle, MESG (200 and 400 mg/kg, p.o.), and the standard drug, metformin (10 mg/kg), for 28 days. During the experimental period, body weight, abdominal girth, food intake, fasting serum glucose, urine analyses were measured. Insulin tolerance test was carried out on 25th day of drug treatment period. Serum analyses for lipid profile and SGOT and SGPT and serums creatinine, urea, protein, SOD, and MDA were also carried out. At the end of the experiment, animals were euthanized, the liver and pancreas were immediately dissected out, and the ratio of pancreas to body weight and hepatic glycogen were calculated. Results. MESG (200 and 400 mg/kg, p.o.) induced significant reduction (P < 0.05) of raised blood glucose levels in diabetic rats and also restored other parameters to normal level. Conclusion. Therefore, it is concluded that MESG has potential antihyperglycemic and antihyperlipemic activities and alleviate insulin resistance conditions. PMID:27313954

  9. Low-Dose IL-2 Induces Regulatory T Cell-Mediated Control of Experimental Food Allergy.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Benjamin; Vigneron, James; Levacher, Béatrice; Vazquez, Thomas; Pitoiset, Fabien; Brimaud, Faustine; Churlaud, Guillaume; Klatzmann, David; Bellier, Bertrand

    2016-07-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are pivotal for maintenance of immune self-tolerance and also regulate immune responses to exogenous Ags, including allergens. Both decreased Treg number and function have been reported in allergic patients, offering new therapeutic perspectives. We previously demonstrated that Tregs can be selectively expanded and activated by low doses of IL-2 (ld-IL-2) inducing immunoregulation without immunosuppression and established its protective effect in autoimmune diseases. In this study, we evaluated the ability of ld-IL-2 to control allergy in an experimental model of food allergy. Ld-IL-2 induced Treg expansion and activation that elicited protection against clinical manifestations of food allergy in two mouse models with OVA and peanut. This clinical effect was lost in Treg-depleted mice, demonstrating the major contribution of Tregs in ld-IL-2 efficacy. Mechanistic studies further indicated that protection from allergy could be explained by a Treg-dependent local modification of the Th1/Th2 balance and an inhibition of mast cell recruitment and activation. Preventive and therapeutic effects of ld-IL-2 were observed over a 7-mo-period, highlighting its long-term efficacy. This study demonstrated that ld-IL-2 is efficient to prevent and to treat allergic immune responses, and thus represents a promising therapeutic strategy for managing allergic diseases. PMID:27259854

  10. Experimental Protoporphyria: Effect of Bile Acids on Liver Damage Induced by Griseofulvin

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, María del Carmen; Ruspini, Silvina Fernanda; Afonso, Susana Graciela; Meiss, Roberto; Buzaleh, Ana Maria

    2015-01-01

    The effect of bile acids administration to an experimental mice model of Protoporphyria produced by griseofulvin (Gris) was investigated. The aim was to assess whether porphyrin excretion could be accelerated by bile acids treatment in an attempt to diminish liver damage induced by Gris. Liver damage markers, heme metabolism, and oxidative stress parameters were analyzed in mice treated with Gris and deoxycholic (DXA), dehydrocholic (DHA), chenodeoxycholic, or ursodeoxycholic (URSO). The administration of Gris alone increased the activities of glutathione reductase (GRed), superoxide dismutase (SOD), alkaline phosphatase (AP), gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), and glutathione-S-transferase (GST), as well as total porphyrins, glutathione (GSH), and cytochrome P450 (CYP) levels in liver. Among the bile acids studied, DXA and DHA increased PROTO IX excretion, DXA also abolished the action of Gris, reducing lipid peroxidation and hepatic GSH and CYP levels, and the activities of GGT, AP, SOD, and GST returned to control values. However, porphyrin accumulation was not prevented by URSO; instead this bile acid reduced ALA-S and the antioxidant defense enzymes system activities. In conclusion, we postulate that DXA acid would be more effective to prevent liver damage induced by Gris. PMID:25945334

  11. Critical role of activation induced cytidine deaminase in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yonglian; Peng, Ivan; Senger, Kate; Hamidzadeh, Kajal; Reichelt, Mike; Baca, Miriam; Yeh, Ronald; Lorenzo, Maria N; Sebrell, Andrew; Dela Cruz, Christopher; Tam, Lucinda; Corpuz, Racquel; Wu, Jiansheng; Sai, Tao; Roose-Girma, Merone; Warming, Søren; Balazs, Mercedesz; Gonzalez, Lino C; Caplazi, Patrick; Martin, Flavius; Devoss, Jason; Zarrin, Ali A

    2013-03-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a neurodegenerative autoimmune disorder caused by chronic inflammation and demyelination within the central nervous system (CNS). Clinical studies in MS patients have demonstrated efficacy with B cell targeted therapies such as anti-CD20. However, the exact role that B cells play in the disease process is unclear. Activation Induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is an essential enzyme for the processes of antibody affinity maturation and isotype switching. To evaluate the impact of affinity maturation and isotype switching, we have interrogated the effect of AID-deficiency in an animal model of MS. Here, we show that the severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) induced by the extracellular domain of human myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG1-125) is significantly reduced in Aicda deficient mice, which, unlike wild-type mice, lack serum IgG to myelin associated antigens. MOG specific T cell responses are comparable between wild-type and Aicda knockout mice suggesting an active role for antigen experienced B cells. Thus affinity maturation and/or class switching are critical processes in the pathogenesis of EAE. PMID:23167594

  12. Critical role of activation induced cytidine deaminase in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a neurodegenerative autoimmune disorder caused by chronic inflammation and demyelination within the central nervous system (CNS). Clinical studies in MS patients have demonstrated efficacy with B cell targeted therapies such as anti-CD20. However, the exact role that B cells play in the disease process is unclear. Activation Induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is an essential enzyme for the processes of antibody affinity maturation and isotype switching. To evaluate the impact of affinity maturation and isotype switching, we have interrogated the effect of AID-deficiency in an animal model of MS. Here, we show that the severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) induced by the extracellular domain of human myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG1-125) is significantly reduced in Aicda deficient mice, which, unlike wild-type mice, lack serum IgG to myelin associated antigens. MOG specific T cell responses are comparable between wild-type and Aicda knockout mice suggesting an active role for antigen experienced B cells. Thus affinity maturation and/or class switching are critical processes in the pathogenesis of EAE. PMID:23167594

  13. Exploring the electron density in plasma induced by EUV radiation: I. Experimental study in hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Horst, R. M.; Beckers, J.; Osorio, E. A.; Astakhov, D. I.; Goedheer, W. J.; Lee, C. J.; Ivanov, V. V.; Krivtsum, V. M.; Koshelev, K. N.; Lopaev, D. V.; Bijkerk, F.; Banine, V. Y.

    2016-04-01

    Plasmas induced by EUV radiation are unique since they are created without the need of any discharge. Moreover, it is essential to characterize these plasmas to understand and predict their long term impact on highly delicate optics in EUV lithography tools. In this paper we study plasmas induced by 13.5 nm EUV radiation in hydrogen gas. The electron density is measured temporally resolved using a non-invasive technique known as microwave cavity resonance spectroscopy. The influence of the EUV pulse energy and gas pressure on the temporal evolution of the electron density has been explored over a parameter range relevant for industry. Our experimental results show that the maximum electron density is in the order of 1014 m-3 and depends linearly on the EUV pulse energy. Furthermore, the maximum electron density depends quadratically on the pressure; the linear term is caused by photoionization and the quadratic term by subsequent electron impact ionization. The decay of the plasma is governed by ambipolar diffusion and, hence, becomes slower at elevated pressures. Similarities and differences of the same processes in argon are highlighted in this paper.

  14. Effects of losartan on experimental varicocele-induced testicular germ cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Bolat, D; Oltulu, F; Uysal, A; Kose, T; Gunlusoy, B; Yigitturk, G; Turk, N S; Turan, T

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the potential protective effects of losartan on varicocele-induced germ cell apoptosis, 24 adult male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into three groups: a sham operation was performed in SHAM group, and experimental left varicocele was created in VAR and VAR + LOS groups. Additionally, in VAR + LOS group, losartan was administered for 30 days starting on the day of surgery. At the end of 30 days, all animals were sacrificed and left orchiectomy was performed. Testicular injury and spermatogenesis were evaluated according to Johnsen scoring system. To assess the nitrosative stress, immunohistochemical staining for endothelial nitric oxide synthase was used and evaluated by H-score and apoptotic index (AI) of germ cells was analysed by TUNEL method. A significant decrease in the mean Johnsen score (JS) was observed in VAR group compared with SHAM (p < .001). The mean H-score and AI were significantly higher in VAR group compared with SHAM (p < .001). After losartan administration, mean JS was significantly increased (p < .001) and mean H-score and AI were significantly decreased compared with VAR group (p < .001 and .01, respectively). Findings of this suggest that losartan acts as a potent protective agent against varicocele-induced germ cell apoptosis. PMID:27373273

  15. Prevention of chemically induced diabetes mellitus in experimental animals by virgin argan oil.

    PubMed

    Bellahcen, Said; Mekhfi, Hassane; Ziyyat, Abderrahim; Legssyer, Abdelkhaleq; Hakkou, Abdelkader; Aziz, Mohammed; Bnouham, Mohamed

    2012-02-01

    The argan tree plays an important socioeconomic and ecologic role in South Morocco. Moreover, there is much evidence for the beneficial effects of virgin argan oil (VAO) on human health. Thus, this study investigated whether administering VAO to rats can prevent the development of diabetes. VAO extracted by a traditional method from the almonds of Argania spinosa (2 mL/kg) was administered orally (for 7 consecutive days) to rats before and during intraperitoneal alloxan administration (75 mg/kg for 5 consecutive days). An alloxan diabetic-induced untreated group and treated by table oil were used as control groups. Body mass, blood glucose and hepatic glycogen were evaluated. In the present study, subchronic treatment with VAO at a dose of 2 mL/kg, before the experimental induction of diabetes, prevented the body mass loss, induced a significant reduction of blood glucose and a significant increase of hepatic glycogen level (p < 0.001) compared with the untreated diabetic group. In conclusion, the present study shows that argan oil should be further investigated in a human study to clarify its possible role in reducing weight loss in diabetics, and even in inhibiting the development or progression of diabetes. This antidiabetic effect could be due to the richness of VAO in tocopherols, phenolic compounds and unsaturated fatty acids. PMID:21584872

  16. Antistressor activity of Ocimum sanctum (Tulsi) against experimentally induced oxidative stress in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Jyoti, S; Satendra, S; Sushma, S; Anjana, T; Shashi, S

    2007-01-01

    Fresh leaves of Ocimum sanctum (O. sanctum) were evaluated for antistress activity against experimentally induced oxidative stress in albino rabbits. Animals of the test group received supplementation of 2 g fresh leaves of O. sanctum per rabbit for 30 days. Anemic hypoxia was induced chemically by injecting the rabbits with 15 mg sodium nitrite per 100 g body weight intraperitoneally. Results indicated that O. sanctum administration blunted the changes in cardiorespiratory (BP, HR, RR) parameters in response to stress. A significant (p < 0.01) decrease in blood sugar level was observed after 30 days of dietary supplementation of O. sanctum leaves. Significant increase (p < 0.05) in the levels of enzymatic (superoxide dismutase) and nonenzymatic (reduced glutathione) antioxidants was observed in the test group after the treatment with O. sanctum. Oxidative stress led to a lesser depletion of reduced glutathione (28.80%) and plasma superoxide dismutase (23.04%) in O. sanctum-treated rabbits. The results of this study suggest that the potential antistressor activity of O. sanctum is partly attributable to its antioxidant properties. PMID:17922070

  17. Role of vascular endothelial growth factor signaling in Schistosoma-induced experimental pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract There is significant evidence that Th2 (T helper 2)-mediated inflammation supports the pathogenesis of both human and experimental animal models of pulmonary hypertension (PH). A key immune regulator is vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which is produced by Th2 inflammation and can itself contribute to Th2 pulmonary responses. In this study, we interrogated the role of VEGF signaling in a murine model of schistosomiasis-induced PH with a phenotype of significant intrapulmonary Th2 inflammation, vascular remodeling, and elevated right ventricular pressures. We found that VEGF receptor blockade partially suppressed the levels of the Th2 inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13 in both the lung and the liver after Schistosoma mansoni exposure and suppressed pulmonary vascular remodeling. These findings suggest that VEGF positively contributes to schistosomiasis-induced vascular inflammation and remodeling, and they also provide evidence for a VEGF-dependent signaling pathway necessary for pulmonary vascular remodeling and inflammation in this model. PMID:25006448

  18. Experimental peritonitis induced by oral administration of indomethacin in Mongolian gerbils

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin-Uk

    2006-01-01

    The possibility of inducing peritoneal inflammation in three murine species (gerbils, rats and mice) via the oral administration of indomethacin was investigated with the overall aim of developing an experimental animal model for human peritonitis. Gerbils given high doses of indomethacin at a rate of 30 mg and 40 mg/kg body weight showed swelling of the abdomen, depression and dyspnea within 4 days after the treatment. The severity of the clinical symptoms increased with time. The animals were confirmed as having developed peritonitis based on the pathological features including inflammation of the peritoneum, and fibrinous adhesion of the abdominal organs in the abdominal cavity. The severity of peritonitis increased with increasing dose of indomethacin, and was not related to the gender of the animal. On the other hand, peritoneal inflammation did not develop in the rats and mice even at high doses. Therefore, the administration of 30 mg/kg body weight of indomethacin is an effective and simple method of inducing peritonitis in 5-week-old Mongolian gerbils. The animal peritonitis model used in this study can be used as an effective tool for examining potential therapeutic compounds for preventing peritoneal damage during peritonitis, and provide insight into the pathophysiology of peritonitis. PMID:16645338

  19. Antitussive effect of naringin on experimentally induced cough in Guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Gao, Sen; Li, Peibo; Yang, Hongliang; Fang, Siqi; Su, Weiwei

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism of action of naringin has been investigated in different models of experimentally induced cough in guinea pigs. In contrast to codeine phosphate (6 mg/kg, intravenous administration [i. v.]), naringin (15, 30, and 60 mg/kg, i. v.) had no central antitussive effect on cough elicited by electrical stimulation of the superior laryngeal nerve. Naringin (0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 µmol) could not prevent the cough reflex induced by stimulation of the trachea after intracerebroventricular injection (i. c. v.), while codeine phosphate (0.5 µmol) was highly effective. Further characterizing the peripheral mechanism of naringin, we found that its effect (50 mg/kg, i. v.) was not affected by the depletion of sensory neuropeptides, whereas levodropropizine (10 mg/kg, i. v.) lost its capacity to prevent cough in the capsaicin-desensitized guinea pig. Furthermore, pretreatment with glibenclamide (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal [i. p.]) significantly reduced the antitussive effect of pinacidil (5 mg/kg, subcutaneous [s. c.]), but could not antagonize the antitussive effect of naringin (30 mg/kg, s. c.). Our present results suggest that naringin is not a central antitussive drug. And naringin does not exert its peripheral antitussive effect through either the sensory neuropeptides system or the modulation of ATP-sensitive K (+) channels. PMID:20645246

  20. Tauroursodeoxycholate improves 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid-induced experimental acute ulcerative colitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; He, Jiao; Suo, Yuan; Zheng, Zongwei; Wang, Jingjing; Lv, Le; Huo, Chuanchuan; Wang, Ziye; Li, Jing; Sun, Wenji; Zhang, Yongmin

    2016-07-01

    Ulcerative colitis is a chronic nonspecific inflammatory disease of unknown cause. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effect of tauroursodeoxycholate in 2, 4, 6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid-induced experimental colitis in mice. After the induction of colitis for 24h, the mice were administrated orally with tauroursodeoxycholate (20, 40 and 60mg/kg) and sulfasalazine (500mg/kg) by gavage for 7 consecutive days. The inhibition effects were evaluated by the body of weight change, survival rate, macroscopical and histological evaluations. Besides, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, interleukin (IL)-1β, interferon (IFN)-γ and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in colon tissue were also determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Treatment with different doses of tauroursodeoxycholate (20, 40 and 60mg/kg) significantly improved the body weight change, decreased the macroscopic and histopathological scores. Compared with the model group, the accumulation of MPO activity, the colonic tissue levels of IL-1β, IFN-γ and TNF-α were significantly reduced in the tauroursodeoxycholate treated groups. Moreover, tauroursodeoxycholate assuaged the symptoms of colitis. These results suggested that tauroursodeoxycholate has an anti-inflammatory effect in TNBS-induced ulcerative colitis in mice. PMID:27179450

  1. Induced current electrical impedance tomography system: experimental results and numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Zlochiver, Sharon; Radai, M Michal; Abboud, Shimon; Rosenfeld, Moshe; Dong, Xiu-Zhen; Liu, Rui-Gang; You, Fu-Sheng; Xiang, Hai-Yan; Shi, Xue-Tao

    2004-02-01

    In electrical impedance tomography (EIT), measurements of developed surface potentials due to applied currents are used for the reconstruction of the conductivity distribution. Practical implementation of EIT systems is known to be problematic due to the high sensitivity to noise of such systems, leading to a poor imaging quality. In the present study, the performance of an induced current EIT (ICEIT) system, where eddy current is applied using magnetic induction, was studied by comparing the voltage measurements to simulated data, and examining the imaging quality with respect to simulated reconstructions for several phantom configurations. A 3-coil, 32-electrode ICEIT system was built, and an iterative modified Newton-Raphson algorithm was developed for the solution of the inverse problem. The RMS norm between the simulated and the experimental voltages was found to be 0.08 +/- 0.05 mV (<3%). Two regularization methods were implemented and compared: the Marquardt regularization and the Laplacian regularization (a bounded second-derivative regularization). While the Laplacian regularization method was found to be preferred for simulated data, it resulted in distinctive spatial artifacts for measured data. The experimental reconstructed images were found to be indicative of the angular positioning of the conductivity perturbations, though the radial sensitivity was low, especially when using the Marquardt regularization method. PMID:15005319

  2. Application of metabonomics on an experimental model of fibrosis and cirrhosis induced by thioacetamide in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Constantinou, Maria A.; Theocharis, Stamatios E.; Mikros, Emmanuel . E-mail: mikros@pharm.uoa.gr

    2007-01-01

    Metabonomics has already been used to discriminate different pathological states in biological fields. The metabolic profiles of chronic experimental fibrosis and cirrhosis induction in rats were investigated using {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy of liver extracts and serum combined with pattern recognition techniques. Rats were continuously administered with thioacetamide (TAA) in the drinking water (300 mg TAA/L), and sacrificed on 1st, 2nd, and 3rd month of treatment. {sup 1}H NMR spectra of aqueous and lipid liver extracts, together with serum were subjected to Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Liver portions were also subjected to histopathological examination and biochemical determination of malondialdehyde (MDA). Liver fibrosis and cirrhosis were progressively induced in TAA-treated rats, verified by the histopathological examination and the alterations of MDA levels. TAA administration revealed a number of changes in the {sup 1}H NMR spectra compared to control samples. The performance of PCA in liver extracts and serum, discriminated the control samples from the fibrotic and cirrhotic ones. Metabolic alterations revealed in NMR spectra during experimental liver fibrosis and cirrhosis induction, characterize the stage of fibrosis and could be illustrated by subsequent PCA of the spectra. Additionally, the PCA plots of the serum samples presented marked clustering during fibrosis progression and could be extended in clinical diagnosis for the management of cirrhotic patients.

  3. Experimentally Induced Pulpal Lesion and Substance P Expression: Effect of Ketoprofen—A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Abbate, Gian Marco; Sacerdote, Paola; Amodeo, Giada; Mangano, Alessandro; Levrini, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate substance P (SP) and the effect of ketoprofen administration, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), on SP in the pulp of upper third molars with experimentally induced pulpal lesion. Materials and Methods. A sample of 20 young systemically healthy adults of both sexes, nonsmokers, with a healthy upper third molar to extract for orthodontic purposes, was selected. Prior to the procedure, an inflammatory process was generated by mechanical exposure of the pulp. After 15 minutes, the pulp was collected using a sterile barbed broach. SP levels were determined by using a commercially available enzyme immunoassay (ELISA) kit. The subjects were randomly divided into two groups: group 1 received a dose of ketoprofen 30 minutes prior to the experimental procedure. The subjects of group 2 did not receive any kind of drug administration. The patients were asked to complete a diary on the postoperative pain. Results. No statistically significant difference could be detected in SP expression between the two groups. In group 1, pain manifestation was significantly delayed in comparison with group 2. Conclusions. Preventive administration of ketoprofen did not significantly affect the pulpal levels of SP but resulted in a significantly postponed manifestation of pain after extraction. PMID:27034673

  4. Naturally occurring and experimentally induced castor bean (Ricinus communis) poisoning in ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jensen, W.I.; Allen, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    Castor bean (Ricinus communis) poisoning accounted for the death of several thousand ducks in the Texas panhandle in the fall and winter months of 1969-1971. Signs of intoxication resembled those of botulism, except for mucoid, blood-tinged excreta. The most common lesions were severe fatty change in the liver, widely distributed internal petechial hemorrhages or ecchymoses, and catarrhal enteritis. Nearly intact castor beans were found in the stomach of one duck during field necropsy. Fragments of seed coat resembling castor bean were found in the stomachs of 10 of 14 ducks examined in the laboratory. Clinical signs and postmortem lesions observed in wild ducks were induced experimentally in mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) by force-feeding intact castor beans. Toxicity titrations were erratic, but the LD50 appeared to be between three and four seeds. The mouse toxicity test, used to detect Clostridium botulinum toxin in the blood serum of intoxicated ducks, was negative in every case. Hemagglutination and precipitin tests generally failed to detect castor bean in extracts of excreta or intestinal contents of experimentally intoxicated ducks.

  5. Acid-induced changes in DOC quality in an experimental whole-lake manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Donahue, W.F.; Schindler, D.W.; Page, S.J.; Stainton, M.P.

    1998-10-01

    Fluorescence analyses of archived water samples were used to typify dissolved organic carbon (DOC) quality in experimentally acidified lakes and reference lakes at the Experimental Lakes Area, in northwestern Ontario. Carbon-specific DOC fluorescence (CSF) during peak acidification was 40--50% of that for a high-DOC reference lake and similar to a low-DOC reference lake. Reference lakes showed similar but smaller decreases in CSF during several years of prolonged drought in the late 1980s. During the 1990s, recovery from acidification resulted in increased CSF, whereas reference lakes remained unchanged during the same time period. In addition to causing decreased [DOC], acidification causes changes in fluorescence-peak geometry that indicate a switch in DOC quality from allochthonous to autochthonous-like during acidification. The acid-induced change in DOC quality was likely due to increased chemical oxidation or precipitation of the UV-absorbent aromatic portions of allochthonous DOC molecules, leaving more UV-transparent aliphatic chains. The change in the nature of DOC following acidification and drought may have an important role in physical, biological, and chemical processes within these lakes. With recovery from acidification, DOC quality has also recovered.

  6. Experimental investigation of flow-induced vibration interference between two circular cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assi, G. R. S.; Meneghini, J. R.; Aranha, J. A. P.; Bearman, P. W.; Casaprima, E.

    2006-08-01

    This paper presents experimental results concerning flow-induced oscillations of circular cylinders arranged in tandem. New measurements on the dynamic response oscillations of an isolated cylinder and flow interference of two cylinders are shown. Preliminary flow visualization employing a PIV system is also shown. The models are mounted on an elastic base fitted with flexor blades and instrumented with strain gauges. The base is fixed on the test-section of a water channel facility. The flexor blades possess a low-damping characteristic (ζ≃0.008 0.0109) and they are free to oscillate only in the cross-flow direction. The Reynolds number of the experiments is from 3000 to 13000, and reduced velocities, based on natural frequency in still water, vary up to 12. The interference phenomenon on VIV is investigated by conducting experiments in which the upstream cylinder is maintained fixed and the downstream one is mounted on the elastic base. The results for an isolated cylinder are in accordance with other measurements found in the literature for m≃2 and 8. For the tandem arrangement and m≃2, the trailing cylinder oscillation presents what previous researchers have termed interference galloping behaviour for a centre-to-centre gap spacing ranging from 2D to 5.6D. These initial results validate the experimental set-up and lead the way for future work, including tandem, staggered and side-by-side arrangements with the two cylinders free to move.

  7. Prediction of Symptom Change in Placebo Versus No-Treatment Group in Experimentally Induced Motion Sickness.

    PubMed

    Horing, Bjoern; Weimer, Katja; Muth, Eric R; Enck, Paul

    2015-09-01

    The long-standing question of who responds to placebo and who does not is of great theoretical and clinical relevance and has received increasing attention in recent years. We therefore performed a post hoc analysis of one of our previously published studies on placebo responses (PRs). In the analysis, fourteen potential predictors for the PR on experimentally induced motion sickness in 32 healthy volunteers were explored using moderated multiple regression. Generalized self-efficacy, generalized self, internal locus of control and cognitive flexibility were significantly associated with symptom improvement in the placebo group, as compared to the untreated control group. Notably, the directions of the associations were such that the "unfavorable" side of the constructs (e.g. low self-efficacy) predicted a higher PR. Instead, the "favorable" side predicted symptom improvement in the control group. Results fit well with prior research into psychological influences on motion sickness. Although PRs in motion sickness are not well established, it is suggested to include the identified constructs in future research involving motion sickness-related symptoms such as nausea and vertigo. Concerning PRs in general, the results may have implications for clinical as well as experimental research on other symptoms and disorders, such as pain or depression. PMID:25912825

  8. Experimentally Induced Pulpal Lesion and Substance P Expression: Effect of Ketoprofen-A Preliminary Study.

    PubMed

    Abbate, Gian Marco; Sacerdote, Paola; Amodeo, Giada; Mangano, Alessandro; Levrini, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate substance P (SP) and the effect of ketoprofen administration, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), on SP in the pulp of upper third molars with experimentally induced pulpal lesion. Materials and Methods. A sample of 20 young systemically healthy adults of both sexes, nonsmokers, with a healthy upper third molar to extract for orthodontic purposes, was selected. Prior to the procedure, an inflammatory process was generated by mechanical exposure of the pulp. After 15 minutes, the pulp was collected using a sterile barbed broach. SP levels were determined by using a commercially available enzyme immunoassay (ELISA) kit. The subjects were randomly divided into two groups: group 1 received a dose of ketoprofen 30 minutes prior to the experimental procedure. The subjects of group 2 did not receive any kind of drug administration. The patients were asked to complete a diary on the postoperative pain. Results. No statistically significant difference could be detected in SP expression between the two groups. In group 1, pain manifestation was significantly delayed in comparison with group 2. Conclusions. Preventive administration of ketoprofen did not significantly affect the pulpal levels of SP but resulted in a significantly postponed manifestation of pain after extraction. PMID:27034673

  9. Experimentally induced life-history evolution in a killifish in response to the introduction of guppies.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Matthew R; Reznick, David N

    2011-04-01

    Life-history theory predicts that increased predation on juvenile age/size-classes favors delayed maturation and decreased reproductive investment. Although this theory has received correlative support, experimental tests in nature are rare. In 1976 and 1981, guppies (Poecilia reticulata) were transplanted into localities that previously only contained a killifish, Rivulus hartii. This situation presents an opportunity to experimentally test this life-history prediction because guppies prey upon young Rivulus. We evaluated the response to selection in Rivulus by measuring phenotypic and genotypic divergence between introduction and upstream "control" localities that lack guppies. Contrary to expectations, Rivulus from the introduction sites evolved earlier maturation and increased reproductive investment within 25 years. Such evolutionary changes parallel previous investigations on natural communities of Rivulus, but do not comply with predictions of age/size-specific theory. Guppies also caused reduced densities and increased growth rates of Rivulus, which are hypothesized indirect effects of predation. Additional life-history theories show that changes in density and growth can interact with predator-induced mortality to alter the predicted trajectory of evolution. We discuss how these latter frameworks improve the fit between theory and evolution in Rivulus. PMID:21062280

  10. Modeling and experimental verification of thermally induced residual stress in RF-MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somà, Aurelio; Mubasher Saleem, Muhammad

    2015-05-01

    Electrostatically actuated radio frequency microelectromechanical systems (RF-MEMS) generally consist of microcantilevers and clamped-clamped microbeams. The presence of residual stress in these microstructures affects the static and dynamic behavior of the device. In this study, nonlinear finite element method (FEM) modeling and the experimental validation of residual stress induced in the clamped-clamped microbeams and the symmetric toggle RF-MEMS switch (STS) is presented. The formation of residual stress due to plastic deformation during the thermal loading-unloading cycle in the plasma etching step of the microfabrication process is explained and modeled using the Bauschinger effect. The difference between the designed and the measured natural frequency and pull-in voltage values for the clamped-clamped microbeams is explained by the presence of the nonhomogenous tensile residual stress. For the STS switch specimens, three-dimensional (3D) FEM models are developed and the initial deflection at zero bias voltage, observed during the optical profile measurements, is explained by the residual stress developed during the plasma etching step. The simulated residual stress due to the plastic deformation is included in the STS models to obtain the switch pull-in voltage. At the end of the simulation process, a good correspondence is obtained between the FEM model results and the experimental measurements for both the clamped-clamped microbeams and the STS switch specimens.

  11. Experimentally-induced Increases in Early Gesture Lead to Increases in Spoken Vocabulary

    PubMed Central

    LeBarton, Eve Sauer; Goldin-Meadow, Susan; Raudenbush, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Differences in vocabulary that children bring with them to school can be traced back to the gestures they produce at 1;2, which, in turn, can be traced back to the gestures their parents produce at the same age (Rowe & Goldin-Meadow, 2009b). We ask here whether child gesture can be experimentally increased and, if so, whether the increases lead to increases in spoken vocabulary. Fifteen children aged 1;5 participated in an 8-week at-home intervention study (6 weekly training sessions plus follow-up 2 weeks later) in which all were exposed to object words, but only some were told to point at the named objects. Before each training session and at follow-up, children interacted naturally with caregivers to establish a baseline against which changes in communication were measured. Children who were told to gesture increased the number of gesture meanings they conveyed, not only during training but also during interactions with caregivers. These experimentally-induced increases in gesture led to larger spoken repertoires at follow-up. PMID:26120283

  12. Inability of two topical treatments to influence the course of experimentally induced dermatophytosis in cats.

    PubMed

    DeBoer, D J; Moriello, K A

    1995-07-01

    An experimental model of dermatophytosis was used to compare the efficacy of 2 topical antifungal treatments against Microsporum canis infection in cats. Infection was established in 24 cats by topical application of 10(5) M canis macroconidia to the skin of the lateral part of the abdomen under an occlusive bandage. Three groups of 6 cats each then were treated twice weekly for 18 weeks with chlorhexidine shampoo and dip, detergent shampoo vehicle only, or glyceryl monolaurate shampoo. Six cats were left untreated as controls. The experimentally induced infections strongly resembled naturally developing infections of moderate to severe nature. Signs of infection peaked in severity at 5 weeks after inoculation, then gradually resolved over 7 to 16 additional weeks. Dermatophytes were consistently isolated on culture for at least 8 weeks of treatment. Mycologic cure (defined as lack of dermatophyte isolation on 3 successive weekly cultures) was attained in 8 cats at the end of 18 weeks of treatment. Infections appeared to resolve at equivalent rates in all groups of cats, including controls. Consistent or meaningful significant differences in variables such as lesion size, clinical sign score, or total infection score were not found between treated and control groups. Our study revealed that this topical treatment regimen with chlorhexidine or glyceryl monolaurate is ineffective against M canis infection in cats. PMID:7601693

  13. Innate immune response in experimentally induced bovine intramammary infection with Staphylococcus simulans and S. epidermidis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) are in several countries the most common bacteria isolated in subclinical mastitis. To investigate the innate immune response of cows to infections with two common mastitis-causing CNS species, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus simulans, experimental intramammary infection was induced in eight cows using a crossover design. The milk somatic cell count (SCC), N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAGase) activity, milk amyloid A (MAA), serum amyloid A (SAA) and proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) were determined at several time points before and after challenge. All cows became infected and showed mild to moderate clinical signs of mastitis. The spontaneous elimination rate of the 16 infections was 31.3%, with no difference between species. Infections triggered a local cytokine response in the experimental udder quarters, but cytokines were not detected in the uninfected control quarters or in systemic circulation. The innate local immune response for S. simulans was slightly stronger, with significantly higher concentrations of IL-1β and IL-8. The IL-8 response could be divided into early, delayed, or combined types of response. The CNS species or persistency of infection was not associated with the type of IL-8 response. No significant differences were seen between spontaneously eliminated or persistent infections. PMID:21414189

  14. Intestinal parasitic diarrhea among children in Baghdad--Iraq.

    PubMed

    AL-Kubaisy, Waqar; AL-Talib, Hassanain; Al-khateeb, Alyaa; Shanshal, Mohammad Mazin

    2014-09-01

    Parasitic diarrhea among children is a significant health problem worldwide. This cross sectional study described the burden of parasitic diarrhea among children. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the impact of risk factors on the parasitic diarrhea, and to determine the parasitic profile among children in Baghdad-Iraq, during the period extending from September 2003 to June 2004. A total number of 2033 cases were included in the study. The estimated prevalence rate of parasitic diarrhea was 22%. We identified the following major diarrhea determinants were large households size, residential location, water source, low socioeconomic status, and low parent education. Giardia lamblia was found to be the most prevalent parasite with an infection rate of 45.54% followed by Entamoeba histolytica 23.44%, Enterobius vermicularis 12.7%, Hymenolepis nana 9.82%, Trichuris trichiura 5.4%, and Ascaris lumbricoides 2.2%. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that poor sanitation, inadequate environmental conditions, and low socioeconomic status are the main determining factors that predispose children to parasitic diarrhea. Mass deworming programs are recommended for school children, as this population is easily accessible. PMID:25382477

  15. [Diagnostic workup and therapy of infectious diarrhea. Current standards].

    PubMed

    Stallmach, A; Hagel, S; Lohse, A W

    2015-12-01

    Infectious diarrhea is very common; its severity ranges from uncomplicated, self-limiting courses to potentially life-threatening disease. A rapid diagnostic workup providing detailed information on the suspected pathogen should be performed only in patients at risk, analyzing one single stool sample for Salmonella, Shigella, Campylobacter, and Norovirus. In the presence of risk factors, such as a history of antibiotic exposure within the last 3 months, testing for Clostridium difficile should be performed. Immunocompetent patients do not require specific antibiotic therapy. Exceptions exist in patients with severe comorbidities, immunodeficiency, fever/SIRS, and in patients with Shigella or C. difficile infection. Empirical antibiotic treatment should be considered in patients with fever and/or bloody diarrhea and in patients at risk. In patients with traveler's diarrhea, microbiological diagnosis is required only in patients with fever, bloody diarrhea, prolonged course of disease (more than 5 days), severe clinical course with hypotension or dehydration, and during outbreaks. In these patients one single fecal sample should be collected for stool cultures of Campylobacter, Shigella, and Salmonella, as well as microscopic examination for amoebiasis and Giardiasis. The main therapeutic measure for infectious diarrhea is sufficient oral rehydration. As in community-acquired diarrhea, azithromycin or ciprofloxacin are recommended-taking into account local antimicrobial resistance in the country of travel and possible side effects. PMID:26573083

  16. Persistent diarrhea in Vietnamese children: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Ngan, P K; Khanh, N G; Tuong, C V; Quy, P P; Anh, D N; Thuy, H T

    1992-09-01

    The clinical and laboratory features of persistent diarrhea were investigated in 83 children under 3 years of age who were treated in the Gastroenterology Division of the Institute for the Protection of Children's Health, Hanoi, from August 1988 to August 1989. The number of cases of diarrhea was highest in the children aged 4-5 months. The mean age of the children studies was 6.6 +or- 3.4 months. The ratio of males to females was 2.6 and mean age of 1st episode of diarrhea was 4.3 +or- 3.4 months; persistent diarrhea was more common in children under 6 months of age than in older children. Persistent diarrhea occurred in the 1st diarrheal episode in 66.5% of cases. Recent nonenteric infections were found in 30% of the study group. Of the 83 children studies, 36% had stool specimens positive for enteric pathogens; 24% had enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli isolated, 8% had enteropathogenic E. coli, 5% rotavirus, 6% Candida, and 4% Giardia lamblia. The duration of diarrhea was longer in children who received antibiotics than in those who did not (p 0.01). PMID:12286020

  17. Experimental optic neuritis induced by the microinjection of lipopolysaccharide into the optic nerve.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Marcos L; Dorfman, Damián; Sande, Pablo H; Rosenstein, Ruth E

    2015-04-01

    Optic neuritis (ON) is a condition involving primary inflammation, demyelination, and axonal injury in the optic nerve which leads to retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss, and visual dysfunction. We investigated the ability of a single microinjection of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) directly into the optic nerve to induce functional and structural alterations compatible with ON. For this purpose, optic nerves from male Wistar rats remained intact or were injected with vehicle or LPS. The effect of LPS was evaluated at several time points post-injection in terms of: i) visual pathway and retinal function (visual evoked potentials (VEPs) and electroretinograms, (ERGs), respectively), ii) anterograde transport from the retina to its projection areas, iii) consensual pupil light reflex (PLR), iv) optic nerve histology, v) microglia/macrophage reactivity (by Iba-1- and ED1-immunostaining), vi) astrocyte reactivity (by glial fibrillary acid protein-immunostaining), vii) axon number (by toluidine blue staining), vii) demyelination (by myelin basic protein immunoreactivity and luxol fast blue staining), viii) optic nerve ultrastructure, and ix) RGC number (by Brn3a immunoreactivity). LPS induced a significant and persistent decrease in VEP amplitude and PLR, without changes in the ERG. In addition, LPS induced a deficit in anterograde transport, and an early inflammatory response consisting in an increased cellularity, and Iba-1 and ED1-immunoreactivity in the optic nerve, which were followed by changes in axonal density, astrocytosis, demyelination, and axon and RGC loss. These results suggest that the microinjection of LPS into the optic nerve may serve as a new experimental model of primary ON. PMID:25687552

  18. Computational and experimental analysis of TMS-induced electric field vectors critical to neuronal activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krieg, Todd D.; Salinas, Felipe S.; Narayana, Shalini; Fox, Peter T.; Mogul, David J.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) represents a powerful technique to noninvasively modulate cortical neurophysiology in the brain. However, the relationship between the magnetic fields created by TMS coils and neuronal activation in the cortex is still not well-understood, making predictable cortical activation by TMS difficult to achieve. Our goal in this study was to investigate the relationship between induced electric fields and cortical activation measured by blood flow response. Particularly, we sought to discover the E-field characteristics that lead to cortical activation. Approach. Subject-specific finite element models (FEMs) of the head and brain were constructed for each of six subjects using magnetic resonance image scans. Positron emission tomography (PET) measured each subject’s cortical response to image-guided robotically-positioned TMS to the primary motor cortex. FEM models that employed the given coil position, orientation, and stimulus intensity in experimental applications of TMS were used to calculate the electric field (E-field) vectors within a region of interest for each subject. TMS-induced E-fields were analyzed to better understand what vector components led to regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) responses recorded by PET. Main results. This study found that decomposing the E-field into orthogonal vector components based on the cortical surface geometry (and hence, cortical neuron directions) led to significant differences between the regions of cortex that were active and nonactive. Specifically, active regions had significantly higher E-field components in the normal inward direction (i.e., parallel to pyramidal neurons in the dendrite-to-axon orientation) and in the tangential direction (i.e., parallel to interneurons) at high gradient. In contrast, nonactive regions had higher E-field vectors in the outward normal direction suggesting inhibitory responses. Significance. These results provide critical new

  19. Experimental infection with equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) induces chorioretinal lesions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Equine herpesvirus myeloencephalitis (EHM) remains one of the most devastating manifestations of equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) infection but our understanding of its pathogenesis remains rudimentary, partly because of a lack of adequate experimental models. EHV-1 infection of the ocular vasculature may offer an alternative model as EHV-1-induced chorioretinopathy appears to occur in a significant number of horses, and the pathogenesis of EHM and ocular EHV-1 may be similar. To investigate the potential of ocular EHV-1 as a model for EHM, and to determine the frequency of ocular EHV-1, our goal was to study: (1) Dissemination of virus following acute infection, (2) Development and frequency of ocular lesions following infection, and (3) Utility of a GFP-expressing virus for localization of the virus in vivo. Viral antigen could be detected following acute infection in ocular tissues and the central nervous system (experiment 1). Furthermore, EHV-1 infection resulted in multifocal choroidal lesions in 90% (experiment 2) and 50% (experiment 3) of experimentally infected horses, however ocular lesions did not appear in vivo until between 3 weeks and 3 months post-infection. Taken together, the timing of the appearance of lesions and their ophthalmoscopic features suggest that their pathogenesis may involve ischemic injury to the chorioretina following viremic delivery of virus to the eye, mirroring the vascular events that result in EHM. In summary, we show that the frequency of ocular EHV-1 is 50-90% following experimental infection making this model attractive for testing future vaccines or therapeutics in an immunologically relevant age group. PMID:24308772

  20. Experimental and Numerical Study of Laser-Induced Forward Transfer Printing of Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Matthew S.

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is an emerging high-resolution printing technique, which can deposit a wide range of fluid materials without a nozzle. In this process, a pulsed laser initiates the highly directed expulsion of fluid from a thin donor ink film onto a confined region of an acceptor substrate. Despite being validated as a versatile technique for printing devices, the fundamental mechanisms of the deposition process are still not fully understood. Further investigation of the laser-induced ejection dynamics is necessary in order to motivate new ways in which to optimize and control the printing process. Additionally, the LIFT configuration presents a unique laboratory in which to study novel regimes of fluid dynamics. This thesis presents an in-depth study of the LIFT printing process using a balance of experimental measurement and computational modeling. In the first part, time-resolved imaging is used to investigate the mechanisms responsible for the laser-induced ejection of ink. Fluid ejections driven by a rapidly expanding gas cavity within the ink film are observed and analyzed within the context of similar work on cavitation bubble formation, revealing that the unique geometry and size scale of LIFT invokes novel flow behavior. An alternative mechanism is also observed in which the fluid is ejected by the rapid formation of blister on a polymer layer adjacent to the ink film. The dynamics of the blister expansion and associated ink ejection are analyzed as a function of system properties and processing parameters. In the second part, a computational model of the blister-actuated ejection process is developed and used to study the novel regime of free-surface jetting from thin liquid films. The model is first validated against experimental results. It is then used to develop a fundamental understanding of the ejection process as well as conduct a detailed parametric study on the influence of system parameters on printing performance. These

  1. The effect of spinal manipulative therapy on experimentally induced pain: a systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although there is evidence that spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) can reduce pain, the mechanisms involved are not well established. There is a need to review the scientific literature to establish the evidence-base for the reduction of pain following SMT. Objectives To determine if SMT can reduce experimentally induced pain, and if so, if the effect is i) only at the level of the treated spinal segment, ii) broader but in the same general region as SMT is performed, or iii) systemic. Design A systematic critical literature review. Methods A systematic search was performed for experimental studies on healthy volunteers and people without chronic syndromes, in which the immediate effect of SMT was tested. Articles selected were reviewed blindly by two authors. A summary quality score was calculated to indicate level of manuscript quality. Outcome was considered positive if the pain-reducing effect was statistically significant. Separate evidence tables were constructed with information relevant to each research question. Results were interpreted taking into account their manuscript quality. Results Twenty-two articles were included, describing 43 experiments, primarily on pain produced by pressure (n = 27) or temperature (n = 9). Their quality was generally moderate. A hypoalgesic effect was shown in 19/27 experiments on pressure pain, produced by pressure in 3/9 on pain produced by temperature and in 6/7 tests on pain induced by other measures. Second pain provoked by temperature seems to respond to SMT but not first pain. Most studies revealed a local or regional hypoalgesic effect whereas a systematic effect was unclear. Manipulation of a “restricted motion segment” (“manipulable lesion”) seemed not to be essential to analgesia. In relation to outcome, there was no discernible difference between studies with higher vs. lower quality scores. Conclusions These results indicate that SMT has a direct local/regional hypoalgesic effect on

  2. Electroacupuncture-Induced Attenuation of Experimental Epilepsy: A Comparative Evaluation of Acupoints and Stimulation Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Xuezhi; Shen, Xueyong; Xia, Ying

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of electroacupuncture (EA) on epilepsy remains to be verified because of previous controversies that might be due to the complexity of the effects induced by different acupoints and stimulation approaches adopted. Therefore, we investigated the effects of EA on epilepsy to determine the specific acupoints and optimal stimulation parameters in this work. Experimental epilepsy was induced by injecting kainic acid to the lateral cerebral ventricle of adult male SD rats. EA with a low-frequency (10 Hz/1 mA) or high-frequency (100 Hz/1 mA) current was applied to the epileptic model for 30 minutes starting at 0.5 hour after the injection. Four pairs of acupoints were tested, that is, Shuigou (DU26) + Dazhui (DU14), Jinsuo (DU8) + Yaoqi (EXB9), Neiguan (PC6) + Quchi (LI11), and Fenglong (ST40) + Yongquan (KI1). We found that (1) low- or high-frequency EA at different acupoints reduced epileptic seizures (P < 0.05 versus the control) with an exception of low-frequency EA at Neiguan (PC6) and Quchi (LI11); (2) low-frequency EA induced a better effect at Fenglong (ST40) plus Yongquan (KI1) than that of the other acupoints (P < 0.05); (3) there is no significant difference in the effects of high-frequency EA at these acupoints; and (4) the high-frequency EA elicited a greater effect than that of low-frequency EA in all groups (P < 0.05), with an exception at Jinsuo (DU8) + Yaoqi (EXB9). The EA-induced attenuation appeared 1–1.5 hours after EA with no appreciable effect in the first hour after EA in either the EEG or the behavioral tests. We conclude that EA attenuation of epileptic seizures is dependent on the stimulation parameters and acupoints and that the delay in appearance of the EA effect could be a reflection of the time required by the EA signal to regulate neural function in the central nervous system. PMID:23589718

  3. Systematic experimental study on a highly efficient terahertz source based on two-color laser-induced air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Jun; Fan, Wen-Hui; Chen, Xu

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, highly efficient terahertz radiation generated by two-color femtosecond laser-induced air plasma is reported. A number of variables that can obviously influence terahertz generation and detection have been investigated systematically. The dependence on experimental parameters, including pulse energy, the rotation angle of beta-barium boron oxide (BBO) crystal, the distance between BBO crystal and laser-induced plasma, focal length, chopper frequency, and detection angle are presented, and the optimal values of these parameters have also been obtained experimentally. Finally, a highly efficient terahertz source has been achieved and can be utilized to carry out further investigation on terahertz sensing, spectroscopy, and imaging.

  4. Experimental and predicted cavitation performance of an 80.6 deg helical inducer in high temperature water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovich, G.

    1972-01-01

    The cavitating performance of a stainless steel 80.6 degree flat-plate helical inducer was investigated in water over a range of liquid temperatures and flow coefficients. A semi-empirical prediction method was used to compare predicted values of required net positive suction head in water with experimental values obtained in water. Good agreement was obtained between predicted and experimental data in water. The required net positive suction head in water decreased with increasing temperature and increased with flow coefficient, similar to that observed for a like inducer in liquid hydrogen.

  5. Expectation-induced placebo responses fail to accelerate wound healing in healthy volunteers: results from a prospective controlled experimental trial.

    PubMed

    Vits, Sabine; Dissemond, Joachim; Schadendorf, Dirk; Kriegler, Lisa; Körber, Andreas; Schedlowski, Manfred; Cesko, Elvir

    2015-12-01

    Placebo responses have been shown to affect the symptomatology of skin diseases. However, expectation-induced placebo effects on wound healing processes have not been investigated yet. We analysed whether subjects' expectation of receiving an active drug accelerates the healing process of experimentally induced wounds. In 22 healthy men (experimental group, n = 11; control group, n = 11) wounds were induced by ablative laser on both thighs. Using a deceptive paradigm, participants in the experimental group were informed that an innovative 'wound gel' was applied on one of the two wounds, whereas a 'non-active gel' was applied on the wound of the other thigh. In fact, both gels were identical hydrogels without any active components. A control group was informed to receive a non-active gel on both wounds. Progress in wound healing was documented via planimetry on days 1, 4 and 7 after wound induction. From day 9 onwards wound inspections were performed daily accompanied by a change of the dressing and a new application of the gel. No significant differences could be observed with regard to duration or process of wound healing, either by intraindividual or by interindividual comparisons. These data document no expectation-induced placebo effect on the healing process of experimentally induced wounds in healthy volunteers. PMID:24373522

  6. Changes in the Swine Gut Microbiota in Response to Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Infection

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Hyeon-Woo; Kim, Myun Soo; Lee, Jong-Soo; Kim, Hongik; Park, Soo-Je

    2015-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract of mammals is a complex ecosystem with distinct environments and comprises hundreds of different types of bacterial cells. The gut microbiota may play a critical role in the gut health of the host. We herein attempted to identify a microbiota shift that may be affected by porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED). We observed significant differences in microbiota between the control and PED virus (PEDV)-infected groups at both the phylum and genus level. Most commensal bacteria (i.e. Psychrobacter, Prevotella, and Faecalibacterium) in the healthy gastrointestinal tract were decreased due to dysbiosis induced by PEDV infection. PMID:26212519

  7. Diagnostic Yields in Solid Organ Transplant Recipients Admitted With Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Echenique, Ignacio A.; Penugonda, Sudhir; Stosor, Valentina; Ison, Michael G.; Angarone, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Although diarrhea is a frequent complaint among solid organ transplant recipients, the contribution of infectious etiologies remains incompletely defined. We sought to define the etiologies of diarrhea and the yields of testing at our institution. Methods. We performed a retrospective analysis over an 18-month period of hospitalized solid organ transplant recipients. We stratified diarrhea by community onset vs hospital onset of diarrhea. Results. We identified 422 admissions (representing 314 unique patients) with community-onset diarrhea, and 112 admissions (representing 102 unique patients) with hospital-onset diarrhea. The majority of community- and hospital-onset diarrheal episodes had no identified etiology (60.9% and 75.9%, respectively; P = .03), yet were also self-limited (91% and 91%, respectively; P = .894). Thereafter, the most frequently encountered infectious etiologies were Clostridium difficile infection (13.3% and 11.8%, respectively), norovirus enteritis (8.2% and 3%), cytomegalovirus disease or colitis (6.3% and 2.7%), and bacterial enterocolitis (0.9% and 0%) (P = .03). In aggregate, these entities represented 93.7% and 90.5% of the identified infectious etiologies, respectively. Protozoan causes were rarely seen. Coinfection, or the simultaneous detection of ≥2 pathogens, occurred in 8 (1.9%) and 2 (1.8%) community- and hospital-onset diarrheal admissions, respectively (P = .99). Conclusions. In solid organ transplant recipients who presented at our institution with diarrhea, approximately one-third had infectious etiologies identified, consisting predominantly of C. difficile, norovirus, cytomegalovirus, and bacterial enterocolitis. Other infectious etiologies were rare. PMID:25371488

  8. Schistosoma mansoni Tegument (Smteg) Induces IL-10 and Modulates Experimental Airway Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies have demonstrated that S. mansoni infection and inoculation of the parasite eggs and antigens are able to modulate airways inflammation induced by OVA in mice. This modulation was associated to an enhanced production of interleukin-10 and to an increased number of regulatory T cells. The S. mansoni schistosomulum is the first stage to come into contact with the host immune system and its tegument represents the host-parasite interface. The schistosomula tegument (Smteg) has never been studied in the context of modulation of inflammatory disorders, although immune evasion mechanisms take place in this phase of infection to guarantee the persistence of the parasite in the host. Methodology and Principal Findings The aim of this study was to evaluate the Smteg ability to modulate inflammation in an experimental airway inflammation model induced by OVA and to characterize the immune factors involved in this modulation. To achieve the objective, BALB/c mice were sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA) and then challenged with OVA aerosol after Smteg intraperitoneal inoculation. Protein extravasation and inflammatory cells were assessed in bronchoalveolar lavage and IgE levels were measured in serum. Additionally, lungs were excised for histopathological analyses, cytokine measurement and characterization of the cell populations. Inoculation with Smteg led to a reduction in the protein levels in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and eosinophils in both BAL and lung tissue. In the lung tissue there was a reduction in inflammatory cells and collagen deposition as well as in IL-5, IL-13, IL-25 and CCL11 levels. Additionally, a decrease in specific anti-OVA IgE levels was observed. The reduction observed in these inflammatory parameters was associated with increased levels of IL-10 in lung tissues. Furthermore, Smteg/asthma mice showed high percentage of CD11b+F4/80+IL-10+ and CD11c+CD11b+IL-10+ cells in lungs. Conclusion Taken together, these findings

  9. A new experimental model of acid- and endotoxin-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Puig, F; Herrero, R; Guillamat-Prats, R; Gómez, M N; Tijero, J; Chimenti, L; Stelmakh, O; Blanch, L; Serrano-Mollar, A; Matthay, M A; Artigas, A

    2016-08-01

    The majority of the animal models of acute lung injury (ALI) are focused on the acute phase. This limits the studies of the mechanisms involved in later phases and the effects of long-term treatments. Thus the goal of this study was to develop an experimental ALI model of aspiration pneumonia, in which diffuse alveolar damage continues for 72 h. Rats were intratracheally instilled with one dose of HCl (0.1 mol/l) followed by another instillation of one dose of LPS (0, 10, 20, 30, or 40 μg/g body weight) 2 h later, which models aspiration of gastric contents that progresses to secondary lung injury from bacteria or bacterial products. The rats were euthanized at 24, 48, and 72 h after the last instillation. The results showed that HCl and LPS at all doses caused activation of inflammatory responses, increased protein permeability and apoptosis, and induced mild hypoxemia in rat lungs at 24 h postinstillation. However, this lung damage was present at 72 h only in rats receiving HCl and LPS at the doses of 30 and 40 μg/g body wt. Mortality (∼50%) occurred in the first 48 h and only in the rats treated with HCl and LPS at the highest dose (40 μg/g body wt). In conclusion, intratracheal instillation of HCl followed by LPS at the dose of 30 μg/g body wt results in severe diffuse alveolar damage that continues at least 72 h. This rat model of aspiration pneumonia-induced ALI will be useful for testing long-term effects of new therapeutic strategies in ALI. PMID:27317688

  10. Anti-Thymocyte Globulin Induces Neoangiogenesis and Preserves Cardiac Function after Experimental Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenauer, Michael; Mildner, Michael; Werba, Gregor; Beer, Lucian; Hoetzenecker, Konrad; Baumgartner, Andrea; Hasun, Matthias; Nickl, Stefanie; Mitterbauer, Andreas; Zimmermann, Matthias; Gyöngyösi, Mariann; Podesser, Bruno Karl; Klepetko, Walter; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) followed by ventricular remodeling is the major cause of congestive heart failure and death in western world countries. Objective Of relevance are reports showing that infusion of apoptotic leucocytes or anti-lymphocyte serum after AMI reduces myocardial necrosis and preserves cardiac function. In order to corroborate this therapeutic mechanism, the utilization of an immunosuppressive agent with a comparable mechanism, such as anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) was evaluated in this study. Methods and Results AMI was induced in rats by ligation of the left anterior descending artery. Initially after the onset of ischemia, rabbit ATG (10 mg/rat) was injected intravenously. In vitro and in vivo experiments showed that ATG induced a pronounced release of pro-angiogenic and chemotactic factors. Moreover, paracrine factors released from ATG co-incubated cell cultures conferred a down-regulation of p53 in cardiac myocytes. Rats that were injected with ATG evidenced higher numbers of CD68+ macrophages in the ischemic myocardium. Animals injected with ATG evidenced less myocardial necrosis, showed a significant reduction of infarct dimension and an improvement of post-AMI remodeling after six weeks (infarct dimension 24.9% vs. 11.4%, p<0.01). Moreover, a higher vessel density in the peri-infarct region indicated a better collateralization in rats that were injected with ATG. Conclusions These data indicate that ATG, a therapeutic agent successfully applied in clinical transplant immunology, triggered cardioprotective effects after AMI that salvaged ischemic myocardium by down-regulation of p53. This might have raised the resistance against apoptotic cell death during ischemia. The combination of these mechanisms seems to be causative for improved cardiac function and less ventricular remodeling after experimental AMI. PMID:23284885

  11. Electromagnetically induced absorption in detuned stub waveguides: a simple analytical and experimental model.

    PubMed

    Mouadili, A; Boudouti, E H El; Soltani, A; Talbi, A; Djafari-Rouhani, B; Akjouj, A; Haddadi, K

    2014-12-17

    We give an analytical and experimental demonstration of a classical analogue of the electromagnetic induced absorption (EIA) in a simple photonic device consisting of two stubs of lengths d1 and d2 grafted at the same site along a waveguide. By detuning the lengths of the two stubs (i.e. δ = d(2) - d(1)) we show that: (i) the amplitudes of the electromagnetic waves in the two stubs can be written following the two resonators model where each stub plays the role of a radiative resonator with low Q factor. The destructive interference between the waves in the two stubs may give rise to a sharp resonance peak with high Q factor in the transmission as well as in the absorption. (ii) The transmission coefficient around the resonance induced by the stubs can be written following a Fano-like form. In particular, we give an explicit expression of the position, width and Fano parameter of the resonances as a function of δ. (iii) By taking into account the loss in the waveguides, we show that at the transmission resonance, the transmission (reflection) increases (decreases) as a function of δ. Whereas the absorption goes through a maximum around 0.5 for a threshold value δth which depends on the attenuation in the system and then falls to zero. (iv) We give a comparison between the phase of the determinant of the scattering matrix, the so-called Friedel phase and the phase of the transmission amplitude. (v) The effect of the boundary conditions at the end of the resonators on the EIA resonance is also discussed. The analytical results are obtained by means of the Green's function method, whereas the experiments are carried out using coaxial cables in the radio-frequency regime. These results should have important consequences for designing integrated devices such as narrow-frequency optical or microwave filters and high-speed switches. PMID:25406973

  12. Intrinsic and induced regulation of the age-associated onset of spontaneous experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Podojil, Joseph R; Luo, Xunrong; Miller, Stephen D

    2008-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis is characterized by perivascular CNS infiltration of myelin-specific CD4(+) T cells and activated mononuclear cells. TCR transgenic mice on the SJL background specific for proteolipid protein (PLP)(139-151) develop a high incidence of spontaneous experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (sEAE). We examined the intrinsic mechanisms regulating onset and severity of sEAE. CD4(+) T cells isolated from the cervical lymph nodes, but not spleens, of diseased 5B6 transgenic mice are hyperactivated when compared with age-matched healthy mice and produce both IFN-gamma and IL-17, indicating that the cervical lymph node is the initial peripheral activation site. The age-associated development of sEAE correlates with a decline in both the functional capacity of natural regulatory T cells (nTregs) and in PLP(139-151)-induced IL-10 production and a concomitant increase in IL-17 production. Anti-CD25-induced inactivation of nTregs increased the incidence and severity of sEAE. Conversely, induction of peripheral tolerance via the i.v. injection of PLP(139-151)-pulsed, ethylcarbodiimide-fixed APCs (PLP(139-151)-SP) inhibited the development of clinical disease concomitant with increased production of IL-10 and conversion of Foxp3(+) Tregs from CD4(+)CD25(-) progenitors. These data indicate that heterogeneous populations of Tregs regulate onset of sEAE, and that induction of peripheral tolerance can be exploited to prevent/treat spontaneous autoimmune disease. PMID:18802066

  13. Human mesenchymal stem cells attenuate experimental bronchopulmonary dysplasia induced by perinatal inflammation and hyperoxia

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Hsiu-Chu; Li, Yuan-Tsung; Chen, Chung-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background: Systemic maternal inflammation and neonatal hyperoxia arrest alveolarization in neonates. The aims were to test whether human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) reduce lung inflammation and improve lung development in perinatal inflammation- and hyperoxia-induced experimental bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Methods: Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were intraperitoneally injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 0.5 mg/kg/day) on Gestational Days 20 and 21. Human MSCs (3×105 and 1×106 cells) in 0.03 ml normal saline (NS) were administered intratracheally on Postnatal Day 5. Pups were reared in room air (RA) or an oxygen-enriched atmosphere (O2) from Postnatal Days 1 to 14, and six study groups were obtained: LPS+RA+NS, LPS+RA+MSC (3×105 cells), LPS+RA+MSC (1×106 cells), LPS+O2+NS, LPS+O2+MSC (3×105 cells), and LPS+O2+MSC (1×106 cells). The lungs were excised for cytokine, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) expression, and histological analyses on Postnatal Day 14. Results: Body weight was significantly lower in rats reared in hyperoxia than in those reared in RA. The LPS+O2+NS group exhibited a significantly higher mean linear intercept (MLI) and collagen density and a significantly lower vascular density than the LPS+RA+NS group did. Administering MSC to hyperoxia-exposed rats improved MLI and vascular density and reduced tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 levels and collagen density to normoxic levels. This improvement in lung development and fibrosis was accompanied by an increase and decrease in lung VEGF and CTGF expression, respectively. Conclusion: Human MSCs attenuated perinatal inflammation- and hyperoxia-induced defective alveolarization and angiogenesis and reduced lung fibrosis, likely through increased VEGF and decreased CTGF expression. PMID:27158330

  14. Chemopreventive effect of sinapic acid on 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced experimental rat colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Balaji, C; Muthukumaran, J; Nalini, N

    2014-12-01

    Sinapic acid (SA) is a naturally occurring phenolic acid found in various herbal plants which is attributed with numerous pharmacological properties. This study was aimed to investigate the chemopreventive effect of SA on 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced rat colon carcinogenesis. Rats were treated with DMH injections (20 mg kg(-1) bodyweight (b.w.) subcutaneously once a week for the first 4 consecutive weeks and SA (20, 40 and 80 mg kg(-1) b.w.) post orally for 16 weeks. At the end of the 16-week experimental period, all the rats were killed, and the tissues were evaluated biochemically. Our results reveal that DMH alone treatment decreased the levels/activities of lipid peroxidation by-products such as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, conjugated dienes and antioxidants such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase and reduced glutathione in the intestine and colonic tissues which were reversed on supplementation with SA. Moreover, the activities of drug-metabolizing enzymes of phase I (cytochrome P450 and P4502E1) were enhanced and those of phase II (glutathione-S-transferase, DT-diaphorase and uridine diphosphate glucuronosyl transferase) were diminished in the liver and colonic mucosa of DMH alone-treated rats and were reversed on supplementation with SA. All the above changes were supported by the histopathological observations of the rat liver and colon. These findings suggest that SA at the dose of 40 mg kg(-1) b.w. was the most effective dose against DMH-induced colon carcinogenesis, and thus, SA could be used as a potential chemopreventive agent. PMID:24532707

  15. Effect of a lipid-rich emollient containing ceramide 3 in experimentally induced skin barrier dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kucharekova, M; Schalkwijk, J; Van De Kerkhof, P C M; Van De Valk, P G M

    2002-06-01

    In the present study we compared the effect of a ceramide 3-containing emollient (Locobase(R) Repair) with a control emollient (vaselinum album/cremor lanette ana) and untreated damaged skin using clinical, bioengineering and immunohistochemical methods in two different models of experimentally induced skin barrier dysfunction. In model A (n = 13) skin barrier dysfunction was inflicted at three investigation sites by tape stripping. In model B (n = 13) the volunteers were patch tested at three investigation sites with sodium dodecyl sulphate (0.2%) for 4 h a day for 4 consecutive days. The investigation sites were treated once a day with the above-mentioned agents. Irritant reaction was assessed daily by erythema scoring and measurements of transepidermal water loss (TEWL). After 5D, punch biopsies were taken from all sites. Immunohistochemical assessment was carried out with respect to epidermal proliferation, epidermal differentiation and Langerhans cells. Tape stripping resulted in an erythematous reaction and an increase of TEWL associated with up-regulation of cycling cells, involucrin and expression of cytokeratin 16. At day 4, ceramide 3-containing emollient significantly decreased (p < 0.03) the erythema score, TEWL and cycling cells in comparison with the untreated site. Repetitive exposure to SDS induced a variable degree of erythema, gradual increase of TEWL, an increase of cycling cells, and up-regulation of involucrin, E-FABP and SKALP. The treatment with the control emollient significantly prevented erythema, increase of TEWL and cycling cells at day 4 compared to the untreated site. In summary, the present study demonstrated that both tested emollients improve skin barrier in different conditions compared to the untreated skin. There is some indication that formulations containing skin-related lipids might be of benefit in barrier disruption following tape stripping. Different models and clinical trials are needed to establish the usefulness in

  16. Amelioration of Cisplatin-Induced Experimental Peripheral Neuropathy by a Small Molecule Targeting p75NTR

    PubMed Central

    Friesland, Amy; Weng, Zhiying; Duenas, Maria; Massa, Stephen M.; Longo, Frank M.; Lu, Qun

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin is an effective and widely used first-line chemotherapeutic drug for treating cancers. However, many patients sustain cisplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN), often leading to a reduction in drug dosages or complete cessation of treatment altogether. Therefore, it is important to understand cisplatin mechanisms in peripheral nerve tissue mediating its toxicity and identify signaling pathways for potential intervention. Rho GTPase activation is increased following trauma in several models of neuronal injury. Thus, we investigated whether components of the Rho signaling pathway represent important neuroprotective targets with the potential to ameliorate CIPN and thereby optimize current chemotherapy treatment regimens. We have developed a novel CIPN model in the mouse. Using this model and primary neuronal culture, we determined whether LM11A-31, a small-molecule, orally bioavailable ligand of the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), can modulate Rho GTPase signaling and reduce CIPN. Von Frey filament analysis of sural nerve function showed that LM11A-31 treatment prevented decreases in peripheral nerve sensation seen with cisplatin treatment. Morphometric analysis of harvested sural nerves revealed that cisplatin-induced abnormal nerve fiber morphology and the decreases in fiber area were alleviated with concurrent LM11A-31 treatment. Cisplatin treatment increased RhoA activity accompanied by the reduced tyrosine phosphorylation of SHP-2, which was reversed by LM11A-31. LM11A-31 also countered the effects of calpeptin, which activated RhoA by inhibiting SHP-2 tyrosine phosphatase. Therefore, suppression of RhoA signaling by LM11A-31 that blocks proNGF binding to p75NTR or activates SHP-2 tyrosine phosphatase downstream of NGF receptor enhances neuroprotection in experimental CIPN in mouse model. PMID:25277379

  17. Tracking anti-fibrotic pathways of nilotinib and imatinib in experimentally induced liver fibrosis: an insight.

    PubMed

    Shiha, Gamal E; Abu-Elsaad, Nashwa M; Zalata, Khaled R; Ibrahim, Tarek M

    2014-10-01

    The tyrosine kinase inhibitors imatinib and nilotinib have been suggested to have promising antifibrotic activity in experimental models of liver fibrosis. The aim of the present study was to investigate new pathways underlying this beneficial effect. Hepatic injury was induced in male Wistar rats by intraperitoneal injection of CCl4 for 12 weeks. During the last 8 weeks of treatment, rats were also injected daily intraperitoneally with 20 mg/kg imatinib or 20, 10 or 5 mg/kg nilotinib. At the end of treatment, effects on fibrosis were assessed by measuring serum fibrotic markers and profibrogenic cytokines, as well as by histopathological examination. Possible anti-inflammatory effects were estimated by measuring levels of inflammatory cytokines in liver tissue. Liver expression of α-smooth muscle actin, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 antibodies and platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ) was evaluated by immunohistochemical staining techniques. Nilotinib (5 and 10 mg/kg) significantly (P < 0.05) decreased all serum fibrotic markers measured, but 20 mg/kg of either nilotinib or imatinib had limited effects. At all doses tested, nilotinib significantly (P < 0.05) decreased the CCl4 -induced increases in tissue inflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, 5 and 10 mg/kg nilotinib significantly decreased TGF-β1 levels and tissue expression of its antibody, as well expression of PDGFRβ. In conclusion, low doses (5 and 10 but not 20 mg/kg) of nilotinib, rather than imatinib, can control hepatic fibrosis by regulating levels of proinflammatory cytokines, primarily interleukin (IL)-1 and IL-6. Nilotinib also controls the signalling pathways of profibrogenic cytokines by lowering TGF-β1 levels and decreasing expression of PDGFRβ. PMID:25115651

  18. Gastroprotective Efficacy and Safety Evaluation of Scoparone Derivatives on Experimentally Induced Gastric Lesions in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Son, Dong Ju; Lee, Gyung Rak; Oh, Sungil; Lee, Sung Eun; Choi, Won Sik

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the gastroprotective efficacy of synthesized scoparone derivatives on experimentally induced gastritis and their toxicological safety. Six scoparone derivatives were synthesized and screened for gastroprotective activities against HCl/ethanol- and indomethacin-induced gastric ulcers in rats. Among these compounds, 5,6,7-trimethoxycoumarin and 6,7,8-trimethoxycoumarin were found to have gastroprotective activity greater than the standard drug rebamipide; 6-methoxy-7,8-methylenedioxycoumarin, 6-methoxy-7,8-(1-methoxy)-methylenedioxycoumarin, 6,7-methylenedioxycoumarin, and 6,7-(1-methoxy)-methylenedioxycoumarin were found to be equipotent or less potent that of rebamipide. Pharmacological studies suggest that the presence of a methoxy group at position C-5 or C-8 of the scoparone’s phenyl ring significantly improves gastroprotective activity, whereas the presence of a dioxolane ring at C-6, C-7, or C-8 was found to have decreased activity. In order to assess toxicological safety, two of the potent gastroprotective scoparone derivatives—5,6,7-trimethoxycoumarin and 6,7,8-trimethoxycoumarin—were examined for their acute toxicity in mice as well as their effect on cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme activity. These two compounds showed low acute oral toxicity in adult male and female mice, and caused minimal changes to CYP3A4 and CYP2C9 enzyme activity. These results indicate that compared to other scoparone derivatives, 5,6,7-trimethoxycoumarin and 6,7,8-trimethoxycoumarin can improve gastroprotective effects, and they have low toxicity and minimal effects on drug-metabolizing enzymes. PMID:25781220

  19. Cellular Mechanisms and Behavioral Outcomes in Blast-Induced Neurotrauma: Comparing Experimental Setups.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Zachary S; Hubbard, W Brad; VandeVord, Pamela J

    2016-01-01

    Blast-induced neurotrauma (BINT) has increased in incidence over the past decades and can result in cognitive issues that have debilitating consequences. The exact primary and secondary mechanisms of injury have not been elucidated and appearance of cellular injury can vary based on many factors, such as blast overpressure magnitude and duration. Many methodologies to study blast neurotrauma have been employed, ranging from open-field explosives to experimental shock tubes for producing free-field blast waves. While there are benefits to the various methods, certain specifications need to be accounted for in order to properly examine BINT. Primary cell injury mechanisms, occurring as a direct result of the blast wave, have been identified in several studies and include cerebral vascular damage, blood-brain barrier disruption, axonal injury, and cytoskeletal damage. Secondary cell injury mechanisms, triggered subsequent to the initial insult, result in the activation of several molecular cascades and can include, but are not limited to, neuroinflammation and oxidative stress. The collective result of these secondary injuries can lead to functional deficits. Behavioral measures examining motor function, anxiety traits, and cognition/memory problems have been utilized to determine the level of injury severity. While cellular injury mechanisms have been identified following blast exposure, the various experimental models present both concurrent and conflicting results. Furthermore, the temporal response and progression of pathology after blast exposure have yet to be detailed and remain unclear due to limited resemblance of methodologies. This chapter summarizes the current state of blast neuropathology and emphasizes the need for a standardized preclinical model of blast neurotrauma. PMID:27604716

  20. System dynamic instabilities induced by sliding contact: A numerical analysis with experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunetti, J.; Massi, F.; Saulot, A.; Renouf, M.; D`Ambrogio, W.

    2015-06-01

    Mechanical systems present several contact surfaces between deformable bodies. The contact interface can be either static (joints) or in sliding (active interfaces). The sliding interfaces can have several roles and according to their application they can be developed either for maximizing the friction coefficient and the energy dissipation (e.g. brakes) or rather to allow the relative displacement at joints with a maximum efficiency. In both cases the coupling between system and local contact dynamics can bring to system dynamics instabilities (e.g. brake squeal or squeaking of hip prostheses). This results in unstable vibrations of the system, induced by the oscillation of the contact forces. In the literature, a large number of works deal with such kind of instabilities and are mainly focused on applied problems such as brake squeal noise. This paper shows a more general numerical analysis of a simple system constituted by two bodies in sliding contact: a rigid cylinder rotating inside a deformable one. The parametrical Complex Eigenvalue Analysis and the transient numerical simulations show how the friction forces can give rise to in-plane dynamic instabilities due to the interaction between two system modes, even for such a simple system characterized by one deformable body. Results from transient simulations highlight the key role of realistic values of the material damping to have convergence of the model and, consequently, reliable physical results. To this aim an experimental estimation of the material damping has been carried out. Moreover, the simplicity of the system allows for a deeper analysis of the contact instability and a balance of the energy flux among friction, system vibrations and damping. The numerical results have been validated by comparison with experimental ones, obtained by a specific test bench developed to reproduce and analyze the contact friction instabilities.

  1. Parameters Optimization of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Experimental Setup for the Case with Beam Expander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Zhang, Lei; Fan, Juanjuan; Li, Yufang; Gong, Yao; Dong, Lei; Ma, Weiguang; Yin, Wangbao; Jia, Suotang

    2015-11-01

    Improvement of measurement precision and repeatability is one of the issues currently faced by the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique, which is expected to be capable of precise and accurate quantitative analysis. It was found that there was great potential to improve the signal quality and repeatability by reducing the laser beam divergence angle using a suitable beam expander (BE). In the present work, the influences of several experimental parameters for the case with BE are studied in order to optimize the analytical performances: the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and the relative standard deviation (RSD). We demonstrate that by selecting the optimal experimental parameters, the BE-included LIBS setup can give higher SNR and lower RSD values of the line intensity normalized by the whole spectrum area. For validation purposes, support vector machine (SVM) regression combined with principal component analysis (PCA) was used to establish a calibration model to realize the quantitative analysis of the ash content. Good agreement has been found between the laboratory measurement results from the LIBS method and those from the traditional method. The measurement accuracy presented here for ash content analysis is estimated to be 0.31%, while the average relative error is 2.36%. supported by the 973 Program of China (No. 2012CB921603), National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61475093, 61127017, 61178009, 61108030, 61378047, 61275213, 61475093, and 61205216), the National Key Technology R&D Program of China (No. 2013BAC14B01), the Shanxi Natural Science Foundation (Nos. 2013021004-1 and 2012021022-1), the Shanxi Scholarship Council of China (Nos. 2013-011 and 2013-01), and the Program for the Outstanding Innovative Teams of Higher Learning Institutions of Shanxi, China

  2. Effect of pioglitazone, quercetin and hydroxy citric acid on extracellular matrix components in experimentally induced non-alcoholic steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Surapaneni Krishna; Veeraraghavan, Vishnu Priya; Jainu, Mallika

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), is an important component of Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) spectrum, which progresses to the end stage liver disease, if not diagnosed and treated properly. The disproportionate production of pro- and anti-inflammatory adipokines secreted from fat contributes to the pathogenesis of NASH. In this study, the comparative effect of pioglitazone, quercetin and hydroxy citric acid on extracellular matrix (ECM) component levels were studied in experimentally induced NASH. Materials and Methods: The experimental protocol consists of using 48 male Wister rats, which were divided into 8 groups. The levels of hyaluronic acid, leptin and adiponectin were monitored in experimental NASH. Results: The experimental NASH rats treated with pioglitazone showed significant decrease in the levels of hyaluronic acid and significant increase in adiponectin levels when compared to experimentally induced NASH group, but did not show any effect on the levels of leptin. Contrary to these two drugs, viz. pioglitazone and hydroxy citric acid, the group treated with quercetin showed significant decrease in the levels of hyaluronic acid and leptin and significant decrease in adiponectin levels compared with that of experimentally induced NASH NASH group, offering maximum protection against NASH. Conclusion: Considering our findings, it could be concluded that quercetin may offer maximum protection against NASH by significantly increasing the levels of adiponectin, when compared to pioglitazone and hydroxy citric acid. PMID:26557974

  3. Pyridopyrimidine derivatives as inhibitors of cyclic nucleotide synthesis: Application for treatment of diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Kots, Alexander Y.; Choi, Byung-Kwon; Estrella-Jimenez, Maria E.; Warren, Cirle A.; Gilbertson, Scott R.; Guerrant, Richard L.; Murad, Ferid

    2008-01-01

    Acute secretory diarrhea induced by infection with enterotoxigenic strains of Escherichia coli involves binding of stable toxin (STa) to its receptor on the intestinal brush border, guanylyl cyclase type C (GC-C). Intracellular cGMP is elevated, inducing increase in chloride efflux and subsequent accumulation of fluid in the intestinal lumen. We have screened a library of compounds and identified a pyridopyrimidine derivatives {5-(3-bromophenyl)-1,3-dimethyl-5,11-dihydro-1H-indeno[2′,1′:5,6]pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidine-2,4,6-trione; BPIPP} as an inhibitor of GC-C that can suppress STa-stimulated cGMP accumulation by decreasing GC-C activation in intact T84 human colorectal carcinoma cells. BPIPP inhibited stimulation of guanylyl cyclases, including types A and B and soluble isoform in various cells. BPIPP suppressed stimulation of adenylyl cyclase and significantly decreased the activities of adenylyl cyclase toxin of Bordetella pertussis and edema toxin of Bacillus anthracis. The effects of BPIPP on cyclic nucleotide synthesis were observed only in intact cells. The mechanism of BPIPP-dependent inhibition appears to be complex and indirect, possibly associated with phospholipase C and tyrosine-specific phosphorylation. BPIPP inhibited chloride-ion transport stimulated by activation of guanylyl or adenylyl cyclases and suppressed STa-induced fluid accumulation in an in vivo rabbit intestinal loop model. Thus, BPIPP may be a promising lead compound for treatment of diarrhea and other diseases. PMID:18559851

  4. The efficacy of a sulphated polysaccharide fraction from Hypnea musciformis against diarrhea in rodents.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Nayara A; Barros, Francisco Clark N; Araújo, Thiago S L; Costa, Douglas S; Souza, Luan Kelves M; Sousa, Francisca Beatriz M; Leódido, Ana Carolina M; Pacífico, Dvison M; de Araújo, Simone; Bezerra, Francisco F; Freitas, Ana Lúcia P; Medeiros, Jand Venes R

    2016-05-01

    Seaweeds are sources of diverse bioactive compounds, such as sulphated polysaccharides. This study was designed to evaluate the chemical composition and anti-diarrheal activity of a fraction of sulphated polysaccharide (PLS) obtained from the red seaweed Hypnea musciformis in different animal models, and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. PLS was obtained by aqueous extraction, with a yield of 31.8% of the seaweed dry weight. The total carbohydrate content accounted for 99% of the sample. The sulfate content of the polysaccharide was 5.08% and the percentage of carbon was 25.98%. Pretreatment with all doses of PLS inhibited castor oil-induced diarrhea, with reduction of the total amount of stool, diarrheal stools, and the severity of diarrhea. PLS (90 mg/Kg) decreased castor oil- and PGE2-induced enteropooling. In addition, PLS (90 mg/Kg) increased the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity in the small intestine and reduced gastrointestinal transit, possibly via activation of cholinergic receptors. Interestingly, the cholera toxin-induced fluid secretion and Cl(-) ion levels decreased in the intestinal contents of the animals pretreated with PLS (90 mg/kg), probably via reduction of toxin-GM1 receptor binding. In conclusion, PLS exerts anti-diarrheal activity by increasing Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity, inhibiting gastrointestinal motility, and blocking the toxin-GM1 receptor binding. PMID:26879913

  5. Experimental study on impact-induced seismic wave propagating through quartz sand simulating asteroid regolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsue, Kazuma; Arakawa, Masahiko; Yasui, Minami; Matsumoto, Rie; Tsujido, Sayaka; Takano, Shota; Hasegawa, Sunao

    2015-08-01

    Introduction: Recent spacecraft surveys clarified that asteroid surfaces were covered with regolith made of boulders and pebbles such as that found on the asteroid Itokawa. It was also found that surface morphologies of asteroids formed on the regolith layer were modified. For example, the high-resolution images of the asteroid Eros revealed the evidence of the downslope movement of the regolith layer, then it could cause the degradation and the erasure of small impact crater. One possible process to explain these observations is the regolith layer collapse caused by seismic vibration after projectile impacts. The impact-induced seismic wave might be an important physical process affecting the morphology change of regolith layer on asteroid surfaces. Therefore, it is significant for us to know the relationship between the impact energy and the impact-induced seismic wave. So in this study, we carried out impact cratering experiments in order to observe the seismic wave propagating through the target far from the impact crater.Experimental method: Impact cratering experiments were conducted by using a single stage vertical gas gun set at Kobe Univ and a two-stage vertical gas gun set at ISAS. We used quartz sands with the particle diameter of 500μm, and the bulk density of 1.48g/cm3. The projectile was a ball made of polycarbonate with the diameter of 4.75mm and aluminum, titan, zirconia, stainless steel, cupper, tungsten carbide projectile with the diameter of 2mm. These projectiles were launched at the impact velocity from 0.2 to 7km/s. The target was set in a vacuum chamber evacuated below 10 Pa. We measured the seismic wave by using a piezoelectric uniaxial accelerometer.Result: The impact-induced seismic wave was measured to show a large single peak and found to attenuate with the propagation distance. The maximum acceleration of the seismic wave was recognized to have a good relationship with the normalized distance x/R, where x is the propagation distance

  6. Investigation of the indulgence cycles hypothesis of suppression on experimentally induced visual intrusions in dysphoria.

    PubMed

    Williams, Alishia D; Moulds, Michelle L

    2007-11-01

    Within the thought control literature, Wegner [(1989). White bears and other unwanted thoughts: Suppression, obsession, and the psychology of mental control. New York, NY, USA: Penguin Press.] referred to the combined initial suppression and expression phases of thought control as an indulgence cycle which results in the rebound effect typically observed in suppression studies. According to Ironic Process Theory [Wegner, (1994). Ironic processes of mental control. Psychological Review, 101, 34-52.], this rebound leads to further attempts to suppress that are difficult due to the target thought's hyperaccessibility, resulting in a secondary rebound effect owing to a positive feedback system of indulgence cycles. The current study investigated (i) the effects of repeated suppression and opportunities for expression by using a method to index the frequency, duration, and associated levels of distress of an experimentally induced visual intrusion, and (ii) whether any observed effects were differentially linked to depressive symptomatology in an analogue sample of low and high dysphoric participants. Results supported a secondary rebound effect in those participants most successful at suppressing target intrusions. The findings offer an important extension to the emerging literature on the management of intrusive memories in depression. PMID:17692285

  7. Experimental study on the onset of cavitation induced by an impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyama, Akihito; Kurihara, Chihiro; Tagawa, Yoshiyuki

    2015-11-01

    We study reasonable expression for predicting the onset of cavitation induced by an impact experimentally. A liquid-filled test tube is dropped and impacts a floor, followed by the emergence of cavitation bubbles inside a liquid. As floor materials, a metal and a resin are chosen. As a wetting liquid, gas-saturated silicone oil was used. Experiments are conducted at room temperature. The condition for cavitation occurrence for a resin floor cannot be described by the typical velocity measured by high-speed imaging, temporal resolution and spatial resolution of which are respectively O(10) μs and O(100) μm. We investigate sudden acceleration at the impact using an accelerometer. Its temporal resolution is O(1) ns, much smaller than that of high-speed imaging. The time history of acceleration for the resin floor is more moderate and peak acceleration is smaller than that for the metal floor. Based on these findings, we discuss the reasonable description of the criterion for the onset of cavitation bubbles, applicable for various floors. JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 26709007.

  8. Blockade of Extracellular ATP Effect by Oxidized ATP Effectively Mitigated Induced Mouse Experimental Autoimmune Uveitis (EAU)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ronglan; Liang, Dongchun; Sun, Deming

    2016-01-01

    Various pathological conditions are accompanied by ATP release from the intracellular to the extracellular compartment. Extracellular ATP (eATP) functions as a signaling molecule by activating purinergic P2 purine receptors. The key P2 receptor involved in inflammation was identified as P2X7R. Recent studies have shown that P2X7R signaling is required to trigger the Th1/Th17 immune response, and oxidized ATP (oxATP) effectively blocks P2X7R activation. In this study we investigated the effect of oxATP on mouse experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU). Our results demonstrated that induced EAU in B6 mice was almost completely abolished by the administration of small doses of oxATP, and the Th17 response, but not the Th1 response, was significantly weakened in the treated mice. Mechanistic studies showed that the therapeutic effects involve the functional change of a number of immune cells, including dendritic cells (DCs), T cells, and regulatory T cells. OxATP not only directly inhibits the T cell response; it also suppresses T cell activation by altering the function of DCs and Foxp3+ T cell. Our results demonstrated that inhibition of P2X7R activation effectively exempts excessive autoimmune inflammation, which may indicate a possible therapeutic use in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:27196432

  9. Illusions and Delusions: Relating Experimentally-Induced False Memories to Anomalous Experiences and Ideas

    PubMed Central

    Corlett, Philip R.; Simons, Jon S.; Pigott, Jennifer S.; Gardner, Jennifer M.; Murray, Graham K.; Krystal, John H.; Fletcher, Paul C.

    2009-01-01

    The salience hypothesis of psychosis rests on a simple but profound observation that subtle alterations in the way that we perceive and experience stimuli have important consequences for how important these stimuli become for us, how much they draw our attention, how they embed themselves in our memory and, ultimately, how they shape our beliefs. We put forward the idea that a classical memory illusion – the Deese–Roediger–McDermott (DRM) effect – offers a useful way of exploring processes related to such aberrant belief formation. The illusion occurs when, as a consequence of its relationship to previous stimuli, a stimulus that has not previously been presented is falsely remembered. Such illusory familiarity is thought to be generated by the surprising fluency with which the stimulus is processed. In this respect, the illusion relates directly to the salience hypothesis and may share common cognitive underpinnings with aberrations of perception and attribution that are found in psychosis. In this paper, we explore the theoretical importance of this experimentally-induced illusion in relation to the salience model of psychosis. We present data showing that, in healthy volunteers, the illusion relates directly to self reported anomalies of experience and magical thinking. We discuss this finding in terms of the salience hypothesis and of a broader Bayesian framework of perception and cognition which emphasizes the salience both of predictable and unpredictable experiences. PMID:19956402

  10. Numerical and experimental study of the thermal stress of silicon induced by a millisecond laser

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xi; Qin Yuan; Wang Bin; Zhang Liang; Shen Zhonghua; Lu Jian; Ni Xiaowu

    2011-07-20

    A spatial axisymmetric finite element model of single-crystal silicon irradiated by a 1064 nm millisecond laser is used to investigate the thermal stress damage induced by a millisecond laser. The transient temperature field and the thermal stress field for 2 ms laser irradiation with a laser fluence of 254 J/cm{sup 2} are obtained. The numerical simulation results indicate that the hoop stresses along the r axis on the front surface are compressive stress within the laser spot and convert to tensile stress outside the laser spot, while the radial stresses along the r axis on the front surface and on the z axis are compressive stress. The temperature of the irradiated center is the highest temperature obtained, yet the stress is not always highest during laser irradiation. At the end of the laser irradiation, the maximal hoop stress is located at r=0.5 mm and the maximal radial stress is located at r=0.76 mm. The temperature measurement experiments are performed by IR pyrometer. The numerical result of the temperature field is consistent with the experimental result. The damage morphologies of silicon under the action of a 254 J/cm{sup 2} laser are inspected by optical microscope. The cracks are observed initiating at r=0.5 mm and extending along the radial direction.

  11. A Protective Role of Arecoline Hydrobromide in Experimentally Induced Male Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Indraneel; Das, Joydeep; Maiti, Biswaranjan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Arecoline, the most potent and abundant alkaloid of betel nut, causes elevation of serum testosterone and androgen receptor expression in rat prostate, in addition to increase in serum insulin levels in rats, leading to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes-like conditions. This study investigated the role of arecoline on the reproductive status of experimentally induced type 1 diabetic rats. Methods. Changes in the cellular architecture were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. Blood glucose, serum insulin, testosterone, FSH, and LH were assayed. Fructose content of the coagulating gland and sialic acid content of the seminal vesicles were also analyzed. Results. Arecoline treatment for 10 days at a dose of 10 mg/kg of body weight markedly facilitated β-cell regeneration and reversed testicular and sex accessory dysfunctions by increasing the levels of serum insulin and gonadotropins in type 1 diabetic rats. Critical genes related to β-cell regeneration, such as pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 (pdx-1) and glucose transporter 2 (GLUT-2), were found to be activated by arecoline at the protein level. Conclusion. It can thus be suggested that arecoline is effective in ameliorating the detrimental effects caused by insulin deficiency on gonadal and male sex accessories in rats with type 1 diabetes. PMID:25695047

  12. Mitigation of DMBA-induced mammary carcinoma in experimental rats by antiangiogenic property of Kalpaamruthaa.

    PubMed

    Sathish, Sivaprakasam; Shanthi, Palanivelu; Sachdanandam, Panchanatham

    2011-06-01

    Extra cellular matrix (ECM) and basement membrane (BM) are important layers that regulate cell structure, cell migration, and cellular proliferation. Degradation of both ECM and BM mediated by proteases favors the tumor invasion and promotes angiogenesis. Female Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 180 ± 10 g were categorized into 6 groups. Group-1 animals served as vehicle control. Group-2 to Group-4 animals were administered with 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (25 mg/rat dissolved in olive oil, orally) on day 1 of experimental period to induce mammary carcinoma. (After 90 days, mammary carcinoma was confirmed by histopathological examination). Group-3 and Group-4 rats were subsequently treated with Semecarpus anacardium nut milk extract (SA) and Kalpaamruthaa (KA), respectively. Group-5 and Group-6 animals served as drug control for SA and KA, respectively. Pro-angiogenic factors like proteases, cyclooxygenase-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor were elevated in tumor-bearing animals and decreased in SA- and KA-supplemented rats. Increased levels of these angiogenic factors in tumor-bearing rats indicate the progression of mammary tumor. The decreased levels of these angiogenic in SA- and KA-treated rats may be due to the ameliorative effect of phenolic compounds such as flavonoids, tannins, and other compounds present in the drug. PMID:22432686

  13. Use of laparoscopy for diagnosing experimentally induced acute pancreatitis in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-wook; Oh, Ye-in; Choi, Ji-hye; Kim, Dae-yong

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis of acute pancreatitis in dogs remains a significant challenge despite the development of advanced diagnostic methodologies. Visual inspection and pancreas biopsy using laparoscopy are generally considered to be procedures free of complications when conducted on healthy animals. However, the usefulness of laparoscopy for diagnosing acute pancreatitis has not been assessed. In the present study, the efficacy of laparoscopy for diagnosing acute pancreatitis in dogs was evaluated in animals with experimentally induced acute pancreatitis. Gross appearance of the pancreatic area was examined by laparoscopy to survey for the presence of edema, adhesions, effusion, pseudocysts, hemorrhage, and fat necrosis. Laparoscopic biopsy was performed and the histopathologic results were compared to those of pancreatic samples obtained during necropsy. The correlation between laparoscopy and histopathologic findings of the pancreas was evaluated. The presence of adhesions, effusion, and hemorrhage in the pancreatic area observed by laparoscopy significantly correlated with the histopathologic results (p < 0.05). There was no significant relationship between the histopathologic and laparoscopic biopsy findings. Results of this study suggested that laparoscopic evaluation of gross lesions has clinical significance although the laparoscopic biopsy technique has some limitations. This method combined with additional diagnostic tools can be effective for diagnosing acute pancreatitis in dogs. PMID:24962411

  14. Experimental investigation of ultraviolet laser induced plasma density and temperature evolution in air

    SciTech Connect

    Thiyagarajan, Magesh; Scharer, John

    2008-07-01

    We present measurements and analysis of laser induced plasma neutral densities and temperatures in dry air by focusing 200 mJ, 10 MW high power, 193 nm ultraviolet ArF (argon fluoride) laser radiation to a 30 {mu}m radius spot size. We examine these properties that result from multiphoton and collisional cascade processes for pressures ranging from 40 Torr to 5 atm. A laser shadowgraphy diagnostic technique is used to obtain the plasma electron temperature just after the shock front and this is compared with optical emission spectroscopic measurements of nitrogen rotational and vibrational temperatures. Two-color laser interferometry is employed to measure time resolved spatial electron and neutral density decay in initial local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and non-LTE conditions. The radiating species and thermodynamic characteristics of the plasma are analyzed by means of optical emission spectroscopy (OES) supported by SPECAIR, a special OES program for air constituent plasmas. Core plasma rotational and vibrational temperatures are obtained from the emission spectra from the N{sub 2}C-B(2+) transitions by matching the experimental spectrum results with the SPECAIR simulation results and the results are compared with the electron temperature just behind the shock wave. The plasma density decay measurements are compared with a simplified electron density decay model that illustrates the dominant three-and two-body recombination terms with good correlation.

  15. Experimental investigation of ultraviolet laser induced plasma density and temperature evolution in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiyagarajan, Magesh; Scharer, John

    2008-07-01

    We present measurements and analysis of laser induced plasma neutral densities and temperatures in dry air by focusing 200 mJ, 10 MW high power, 193 nm ultraviolet ArF (argon fluoride) laser radiation to a 30 μm radius spot size. We examine these properties that result from multiphoton and collisional cascade processes for pressures ranging from 40 Torr to 5 atm. A laser shadowgraphy diagnostic technique is used to obtain the plasma electron temperature just after the shock front and this is compared with optical emission spectroscopic measurements of nitrogen rotational and vibrational temperatures. Two-color laser interferometry is employed to measure time resolved spatial electron and neutral density decay in initial local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and non-LTE conditions. The radiating species and thermodynamic characteristics of the plasma are analyzed by means of optical emission spectroscopy (OES) supported by SPECAIR, a special OES program for air constituent plasmas. Core plasma rotational and vibrational temperatures are obtained from the emission spectra from the N2C-B(2+) transitions by matching the experimental spectrum results with the SPECAIR simulation results and the results are compared with the electron temperature just behind the shock wave. The plasma density decay measurements are compared with a simplified electron density decay model that illustrates the dominant three-and two-body recombination terms with good correlation.

  16. Induced Cannibalism in Experimental Populations of the Forensic Indicator Chrysomya putoria Wiedemann (Diptera: Calliphoridae).

    PubMed

    Botteon, V W; Fernandes, F S; Godoy, W A C

    2016-04-01

    We analyzed the behavior of third-instars of Chrysomya putoria as potential cannibals in experimental populations. Cannibalism rates were evaluated in three settings observed for 3, 6, 9, and 24 h, placing injured and uninjured larvae of C. putoria together. Our data heavily support that C. putoria larvae behave as cannibals when induced by a wound in another larva, and also after starving for 24 h. The probability of cannibalism increased as a function of time, both in no-choice and in choice experiments evidencing that time is a determining factor for cannibalism induction in C. putoria. However, the treatment combining injured with uninjured larvae showed the highest probability of cannibalism. These results suggest that C. putoria larvae may cannibalize under scarcity of food over long time or the presence of injured larvae. This study is useful to understand the behavior of C. putoria feeding on ephemeral substrates such as carrion or corpses and brings relevant and significant contribution to population ecology of blowflies and also forensic entomology. PMID:26698866

  17. Experimental setup and first measurement of DNA damage induced along and around an antiproton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavanagh, J. N.; Currell, F. J.; Timson, D. J.; Holzscheiter, M. H.; Bassler, N.; Herrmann, R.; Prise, K. M.; Schettino, G.

    2010-10-01

    Radiotherapy employs ionizing radiation to induce lethal DNA lesions in cancer cells while minimizing damage to healthy tissues. Due to their pattern of energy deposition, better therapeutic outcomes can, in theory, be achieved with ions compared to photons. Antiprotons have been proposed to offer a further enhancement due to their annihilation at the end of the path. The work presented here aimed to establish and validate an experimental procedure for the quantification of plasmid and genomic DNA damage resulting from antiproton exposure. Immunocytochemistry was used to assess DNA damage in directly and indirectly exposed human fibroblasts irradiated in both plateau and Bragg peak regions of a 126 MeV antiproton beam at CERN. Cells were stained post irradiation with an anti- γ-H2AX antibody. Quantification of the γ-H2AX foci-dose relationship is consistent with a linear increase in the Bragg peak region. A qualitative analysis of the foci detected in the Bragg peak and plateau region indicates significant differences highlighting the different severity of DNA lesions produced along the particle path. Irradiation of desalted plasmid DNA with 5 Gy antiprotons at the Bragg peak resulted in a significant portion of linear plasmid in the resultant solution.

  18. Experimental evidence for drought induced alternative stable states of soil moisture

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, David. A.; Jones, Scott B.; Lebron, Inma; Reinsch, Sabine; Domínguez, María T.; Smith, Andrew R.; Jones, Davey L.; Marshall, Miles R.; Emmett, Bridget A.

    2016-01-01

    Ecosystems may exhibit alternative stable states (ASS) in response to environmental change. Modelling and observational data broadly support the theory of ASS, however evidence from manipulation experiments supporting this theory is limited. Here, we provide long-term manipulation and observation data supporting the existence of drought induced alternative stable soil moisture states (irreversible soil wetting) in upland Atlantic heath, dominated by Calluna vulgaris (L.) Hull. Manipulated repeated moderate summer drought, and intense natural summer drought both lowered resilience resulting in shifts in soil moisture dynamics. The repeated moderate summer drought decreased winter soil moisture retention by ~10%. However, intense summer drought, superimposed on the experiment, that began in 2003 and peaked in 2005 caused an unexpected erosion of resilience and a shift to an ASS; both for the experimental drought manipulation and control plots, impairing the soil from rewetting in winter. Measurements outside plots, with vegetation removal, showed no evidence of moisture shifts. Further independent evidence supports our findings from historical soil moisture monitoring at a long-term upland hydrological observatory. The results herald the need for a new paradigm regarding our understanding of soil structure, hydraulics and climate interaction. PMID:26804897

  19. Modeling and simulation of organophosphate-induced neurotoxicity: Prediction and validation by experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Greget, Renaud; Dadak, Selma; Barbier, Laure; Lauga, Fabien; Linossier-Pierre, Sandra; Pernot, Fabien; Legendre, Arnaud; Ambert, Nicolas; Bouteiller, Jean-Marie; Dorandeu, Frédéric; Bischoff, Serge; Baudry, Michel; Fagni, Laurent; Moussaoui, Saliha

    2016-05-01

    Exposure to organophosphorus (OP) compounds, either pesticides or chemical warfare agents, represents a major health problem. As potent irreversible inhibitors of cholinesterase, OP may induce seizures, as in status epilepticus, and occasionally brain lesions. Although these compounds are extremely toxic agents, the search for novel antidotes remains extremely limited. In silico modeling constitutes a useful tool to identify pharmacological targets and to develop efficient therapeutic strategies. In the present work, we developed a new in silico simulator in order to predict the neurotoxicity of irreversible inhibitors of acetyl- and/or butyrylcholinesterase (ChE) as well as the potential neuroprotection provided by antagonists of cholinergic muscarinic and glutamate N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. The simulator reproduced firing of CA1 hippocampal neurons triggered by exposure to paraoxon (POX), as found in patch-clamp recordings in in vitro mouse hippocampal slices. In the case of POX intoxication, it predicted a preventing action of the muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine sulfate, as well as a synergistic action with the non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist memantine. These in silico predictions relative to beneficial effects of atropine sulfate combined with memantine were recapitulated experimentally in an in vivo model of POX in adult male Swiss mice using electroencephalic (EEG) recordings. Thus, our simulator is a new powerful tool to identify protective therapeutic strategies against OP central effects, by screening various combinations of muscarinic and NMDA receptor antagonists. PMID:27108687

  20. Experimental characterization of fire-induced response of rigid polyurethane foam

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.Y.; Gill, W.; Moore, J.W.; Hobbs, M.L.; Gritzo, L.A.; Moya, J.L.

    1995-12-31

    Reported is the result of an experimental investigation of fire-induced response of a 96 kg/m{sup 3} closed cell rigid polyurethane foam. The specimen is 0.37 m in diameter, and 152 mm thick, placed in a cylindrical test vessel. The fire condition is simulated by heating the bottom of the test vessel to 1283 K using a radiant heat source. Real-time x-ray shows that the degradation process involves the progression of a charring front into the virgin material. The charred region has a regular and graded structure consisting of a packed bubble outer layer and successive layers of thin shells. The layer-to-layer permeability appears to be poor. There are indications that gas vents laterally. The shell-like structure might be the result of lateral venting. Although the foam degradation process is quite complicated, the in-depth temperature responses in the uncharted foam appear to be consistent with steady state ablation. The measured temperature responses are well represented by the exponential distribution for steady state ablation. An estimate of the thermal diffusivity of the foam is obtained from the ablation model. The experiment is part of a more comprehensive program to develop material response models of foams and encapsulants.

  1. Experimental evidence for drought induced alternative stable states of soil moisture.

    PubMed

    Robinson, David A; Jones, Scott B; Lebron, Inma; Reinsch, Sabine; Domínguez, María T; Smith, Andrew R; Jones, Davey L; Marshall, Miles R; Emmett, Bridget A

    2016-01-01

    Ecosystems may exhibit alternative stable states (ASS) in response to environmental change. Modelling and observational data broadly support the theory of ASS, however evidence from manipulation experiments supporting this theory is limited. Here, we provide long-term manipulation and observation data supporting the existence of drought induced alternative stable soil moisture states (irreversible soil wetting) in upland Atlantic heath, dominated by Calluna vulgaris (L.) Hull. Manipulated repeated moderate summer drought, and intense natural summer drought both lowered resilience resulting in shifts in soil moisture dynamics. The repeated moderate summer drought decreased winter soil moisture retention by ~10%. However, intense summer drought, superimposed on the experiment, that began in 2003 and peaked in 2005 caused an unexpected erosion of resilience and a shift to an ASS; both for the experimental drought manipulation and control plots, impairing the soil from rewetting in winter. Measurements outside plots, with vegetation removal, showed no evidence of moisture shifts. Further independent evidence supports our findings from historical soil moisture monitoring at a long-term upland hydrological observatory. The results herald the need for a new paradigm regarding our understanding of soil structure, hydraulics and climate interaction. PMID:26804897

  2. Experimental evidence for drought induced alternative stable states of soil moisture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, David. A.; Jones, Scott B.; Lebron, Inma; Reinsch, Sabine; Domínguez, María T.; Smith, Andrew R.; Jones, Davey L.; Marshall, Miles R.; Emmett, Bridget A.

    2016-01-01

    Ecosystems may exhibit alternative stable states (ASS) in response to environmental change. Modelling and observational data broadly support the theory of ASS, however evidence from manipulation experiments supporting this theory is limited. Here, we provide long-term manipulation and observation data supporting the existence of drought induced alternative stable soil moisture states (irreversible soil wetting) in upland Atlantic heath, dominated by Calluna vulgaris (L.) Hull. Manipulated repeated moderate summer drought, and intense natural summer drought both lowered resilience resulting in shifts in soil moisture dynamics. The repeated moderate summer drought decreased winter soil moisture retention by ~10%. However, intense summer drought, superimposed on the experiment, that began in 2003 and peaked in 2005 caused an unexpected erosion of resilience and a shift to an ASS; both for the experimental drought manipulation and control plots, impairing the soil from rewetting in winter. Measurements outside plots, with vegetation removal, showed no evidence of moisture shifts. Further independent evidence supports our findings from historical soil moisture monitoring at a long-term upland hydrological observatory. The results herald the need for a new paradigm regarding our understanding of soil structure, hydraulics and climate interaction.

  3. Hazard of CO₂ laser-induced airway fire in laryngeal surgery: experimental data of contributing factors.

    PubMed

    Stuermer, Konrad Johannes; Ayachi, Stefan; Gostian, Antoniu-O; Beutner, Dirk; Hüttenbrink, Karl-Bernd

    2013-09-01

    In carbon dioxide (CO2) laser surgery of the larynx, the potentially dangerous combination of laser-induced heat in an oxygen-enriched atmosphere typically occurs when jet ventilation is used or due to an insufficiently blocked endotracheal tube. Until now, no limitations for safe oxygen concentrations or laser intervals have been established. The aim of this study was to investigate and quantify the factors that may contribute to an airway fire in laryngeal laser surgery. Fat, muscle and cartilage were irradiated with a CO2 laser at 2, 4, 6 and 8 W in five different oxygen concentrations with and without smoke exhaustion. The time to ignition was recorded for each different experimental setup. Fat burnt fastest, followed by cartilage and muscle. The elevation of laser energy or oxygen concentration reduced the time to inflammation of any tissue. The elevation of oxygen by 10 % increases the risk of inflammation more than the elevation of laser power by 2 W. Under smoke exhaustion, inflammation and burning occurred delayed or were even inhibited at lower oxygen concentrations. Lasing in more than 50 % oxygen is comparatively dangerous and can cause airway fire in less than 5 s, especially when laser energies of more than 5 W are applied. In equal or lower than 50 % oxygen, an irradiation interval of 5 s can be considered a comparatively safe time limit to prevent inflammation in laryngeal laser surgery. Smoke exhaustion should always be applied. PMID:23636479

  4. An Experimental Study of Roughness-Induced Instabilities in a Supersonic Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kegerise, Michael A.; King, Rudolph A.; Choudhari, Meelan; Li, Fei; Norris, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Progress on an experimental study of laminar-to-turbulent transition induced by an isolated roughness element in a supersonic laminar boundary layer is reported in this paper. Here, the primary focus is on the effects of roughness planform shape on the instability and transition characteristics. Four different roughness planform shapes were considered (a diamond, a circle, a right triangle, and a 45 degree fence) and the height and width of each one was held fixed so that a consistent frontal area was presented to the oncoming boundary layer. The nominal roughness Reynolds number was 462 and the ratio of the roughness height to the boundary layer thickness was 0.48. Detailed flow- field surveys in the wake of each geometry were performed via hot-wire anemometry. High- and low-speed streaks were observed in the wake of each roughness geometry, and the modified mean flow associated with these streak structures was found to support a single dominant convective instability mode. For the symmetric planform shapes - the diamond and circular planforms - the instability characteristics (mode shapes, growth rates, and frequencies) were found to be similar. For the asymmetric planform shapes - the right-triangle and 45 degree fence planforms - the mode shapes were asymmetrically distributed about the roughness-wake centerline. The instability growth rates for the asymmetric planforms were lower than those for the symmetric planforms and therefore, transition onset was delayed relative to the symmetric planforms.

  5. Experimental investigation on vortex-induced vibration of steel catenary riser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yu-ting; Mao, Hai-ying; Guo, Hai-yan; Liu, Qing-hai; Li, Xiao-min

    2015-10-01

    Steel catenary riser (SCR) is the transmission device between the seabed and the floating production facilities. As developments move into deeper water, the fatigue life of the riser can become critical to the whole production system, especially due to the vortex-induced vibration (VIV), which is the key factor to operational longevity. As a result, experimental investigation about VIV of the riser was performed in a large plane pool which is 60 m long, 36 m wide and 6.5 m deep. Experiments were developed to study the influence of current speed and seabed on VIV of SCR. The results show that amplitudes of strain and response frequencies increase with the current speed both in cross-flow (CF) and in-line (IL). When the current speed is high, multi-mode response is observed in the VIV motion. The amplitudes of strain in IL direction are not much smaller than those in CF direction. The seabed has influence on the response frequencies of riser and the positions of damage for riser.

  6. Experimental Study of Overtopping Induced Landslide Dam Break Flow and Two Layer Two Phase Mixture Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Duan, J. G.; Zhong, D.; Zhang, H.

    2013-12-01

    A series of experiments were conducted to investigate flood flow generated by the failure of landslide dams due to overtopping. These experiments aim to quantify the influences of inflow discharge, downstream slope, width of dam crest, dam height, and dam material on the flood flow. Images from high-speed cameras are used to determine the profiles of dam body and flow discharge during the failure processes. Results showed that the water level in the upstream reservoir and the erosion of dam body are the dominant factors affecting the downstream flood flow. A physical-based model is established to calculate the arriving time and the peak discharge of dam break flow using two phase mixture model. Both analytical and numerical solutions were derived for the model. The modelling results were verified using data from this and several other laboratory experimental datasets. The agreement between the calculated and measured data showed the applicability of the proposed model for predicting the peak discharge of overtopping induced dam break flow.

  7. Multimerized T cell epitopes protect from experimental autoimmune diabetes by inducing dominant tolerance.

    PubMed

    Piaggio, Eliane; Mars, Lennart T; Cassan, Cécile; Cabarrocas, Julie; Hofstätter, Maria; Desbois, Sabine; Bergereau, Emilie; Rötzschke, Olaf; Falk, Kirsten; Liblau, Roland S

    2007-05-29

    Immunotherapy by using multimerized self-peptides has demonstrated a clear protective effect on experimental models of autoimmune diseases. However, the mechanisms involved remain ill-defined. Here we have evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of multimerized self-peptides at the effector phase of autoimmune diabetes and examined their mechanisms of action. Diabetes was induced in rat insulin promoter-hemagglutinin (HA) mice expressing HA in pancreatic beta-cells by adoptive transfer of HA(110-119)-specific T helper 1 cells. Complete protection was provided by low doses of the HA 4-mer consisting of four covalently linked linear HA(107-119) peptides. In vivo, the 4-mer appeared to act directly on the pathogenic HA-specific T helper 1 cells and indirectly by activation/recruitment of lymphocytes with regulatory properties so that mice became resistant to a second transfer of diabetogenic T cells. This effect was associated with a recruitment of Foxp3(+) CD4 T cells around islets. Moreover, we show that dominant protection from autoimmunity was transferable by spleen cells, and that development of this regulatory population was crucially dependent on the lymphocytes from treated rat insulin promoter-HA mice. Thus, immunotherapy using multimerized epitopes emerges as a promising strategy in view of the current identification of self-epitopes that are major targets of the pathogenic CD4 T cell response in autoimmune diseases. PMID:17517665

  8. Multimerized T cell epitopes protect from experimental autoimmune diabetes by inducing dominant tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Piaggio, Eliane; Mars, Lennart T.; Cassan, Cécile; Cabarrocas, Julie; Hofstätter, Maria; Desbois, Sabine; Bergereau, Emilie; Rötzschke, Olaf; Falk, Kirsten; Liblau, Roland S.

    2007-01-01

    Immunotherapy by using multimerized self-peptides has demonstrated a clear protective effect on experimental models of autoimmune diseases. However, the mechanisms involved remain ill-defined. Here we have evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of multimerized self-peptides at the effector phase of autoimmune diabetes and examined their mechanisms of action. Diabetes was induced in rat insulin promoter-hemagglutinin (HA) mice expressing HA in pancreatic β-cells by adoptive transfer of HA110–119-specific T helper 1 cells. Complete protection was provided by low doses of the HA 4-mer consisting of four covalently linked linear HA107–119 peptides. In vivo, the 4-mer appeared to act directly on the pathogenic HA-specific T helper 1 cells and indirectly by activation/recruitment of lymphocytes with regulatory properties so that mice became resistant to a second transfer of diabetogenic T cells. This effect was associated with a recruitment of Foxp3+ CD4 T cells around islets. Moreover, we show that dominant protection from autoimmunity was transferable by spleen cells, and that development of this regulatory population was crucially dependent on the lymphocytes from treated rat insulin promoter-HA mice. Thus, immunotherapy using multimerized epitopes emerges as a promising strategy in view of the current identification of self-epitopes that are major targets of the pathogenic CD4 T cell response in autoimmune diseases. PMID:17517665

  9. [A study of epidermal alterations induced by PCDF on experimental carcinogenesis].

    PubMed

    Hirose, R; Hori, M; Toyoshima, H; Shukuwa, T; Udono, M; Yoshida, H

    1991-05-01

    An effect of 2,3,4,7,8-pentachlorodibenzofuran (PCDF) as a promoter on a course of experimental skin carcinogenesis in mice by chemicals 20-methylcholanthrene (MC) has been proved by our previous studies. Details of ultrastructural epidermal alterations induced by MC and PCDF were observed and an attempt to differentiate benign tumor from malignant one in which a combined application of MC and PCDF on mice skin resulted was done electron microscopically. Four significant findings as follows were detected. First of all even the epidermal cells without tumor had some atypicality. Secondly both of benign tumor and normal-appeared skin without tumor had giant and round-shaped keratohyalin granules (KHGs) which show a tendency of less keratinization. Thirdly cytoplasmic projections of epidermal cells increased in number and sparse tonofilaments scattered in the cytoplasm of benign tumor. This is also an appearance of mucous metaplasia of keratinocytes as well as the form of KHGs mentioned above. Finally benign tumor had thick horny cells including numerous lipid droplets, and that is a sign of acceleration of epidermal turn over. Since epidermal cells have little chance to be exposed to carcinogens when they quickly keratinize, they rarely form a cancer. When epidermal cells have such tendency as less keratinization or more keratinization, they are supposed to be less sensitive to any stimuli of carcinogens, and consequently they incline to be benign tumor instead of malignant one. PMID:1916594

  10. Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea in an ocelot (Leopardus pardalis).

    PubMed

    Silva, Rodrigo Otávio Silveira; D'elia, Mirella Lauria; de Magalhães Soares, Danielle Ferreira; Cavalcanti, Álvaro Roberto; Leal, Rodrigo Costa; Cavalcanti, Guilherme; Pereira, Pedro Lúcio Lithg; Lobato, Francisco Carlos Faria

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study is to report a case of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea in an ocelot (Leopardus pardalis) in the state of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. The animal, a 24-month-old male, was referred to the Centro de Reabilitação de Animais Silvestres (CRAS) with a history of having been run over and tibia and fibula fractures. After a surgery to repair the fractures, the ocelot underwent antibiotic therapy with two doses of sodium cefovecin, during which he presented with diarrhea. A stool sample was positive for A/B toxins by a cytotoxicity assay, and a toxigenic strain of C. difficile was isolated. No other enteropathogens were detected. The association between the history, clinical signs and laboratory exams confirmed the diagnosis of C. difficile-associated diarrhea. The present report confirms C. difficile as a potential pathogen for wild felids and suggests that the C. difficile-associated diarrhea should be considered in diarrhea cases, especially when the clinical signs began after antimicrobial use. PMID:23467074

  11. Protective effects of D-002 on experimentally induced gastroesophageal reflux in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zamora, Zullyt; Molina, Vivian; Mas, Rosa; Ravelo, Yazmin; Perez, Yohany; Oyarzabal, Ambar

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of beeswax alcohols (D-002) on the esophageal damage induced by gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in rats. METHODS: Sixty male rats were randomized into six groups (10 rats/group): a negative control and five groups with experimentally induced GER: a positive vehicle control, three treated with D-002 (25, 100 and 200 mg/kg, respectively), and one with omeprazole 10 mg/kg. All treatments were given by gastric gavage. One hour after dosing, GER was produced by simultaneous ligation of the pyloric end and the forestomach. Esophageal lesions index (ELI), gastric secretion volume and acidity, and esophageal malondialdehyde (MDA) and sulfhydryl (SH) group concentrations were measured. Statistical significance was considered at P < 0.05. RESULTS: As compared to the negative control, the positive control group exhibited increased ELI (5.2 ± 0.33 vs 0 ± 0, P = 0.0003), gastric secretion volume (2.69 ± 0.09 vs 0.1 ± 0.0, P = 0.0003) and acidity (238 ± 19.37 vs 120.0 ± 5.77, P = 0.001), and esophageal concentrations of MDA (2.56 ± 0.1 vs 1.76 ± 0.28, P = 0.001) and SH groups (1.02 ± 0.05 vs 0.56 ± 0.08, P = 0.0003). D-002 (25, 100 and 200 mg/kg) reduced ELI (3.36 ± 0.31, 2.90 ± 0.46 and 2.8 ± 0.23, respectively) vs the positive control (5.2 ± 0.33) (P = 0.004; P = 0.002; P = 0.001, respectively). There were no significant changes in acidity with D-002 treatment, and only the highest dose reduced the volume of the gastric secretion (1.92 ± 0.25) vs the positive control (2.69 ± 0.09, P = 0.013). D-002 (25, 100 and 200 mg/kg) lowered the esophageal MDA (2.05 ± 0.16, 1.98 ± 0.22 and 1.93 ± 0.22, respectively) (P = 0.01; P = 0.03; P = 0.03, respectively) and SH group concentration (0.87 ± 0.06, 0.79 ± 0.08 and 0.77 ± 0.06, respectively) (P = 0.04; P = 0.04; P = 0.02) vs the positive control (2.56 ± 0.10 and 1.02 ± 0.05, respectively). Omeprazole decreased ELI (2.54 ± 0.47), gastric secretion volume (1.97 ± 0.14) and acidity

  12. Heat-induced evaporation in the shallow subsurface: Experimental and modeling investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smits, K. M.; Cihan, A.; Sakaki, T.; Illangasekare, T. H.

    2009-12-01

    The simultaneous movement of liquid water, water vapor and heat in the shallow subsurface below the land-atmosphere interface plays a critical role in determining the mass and energy fluxes between the soil surface and the atmosphere in many agricultural and engineering practices. In arid and semiarid regions, temperature gradients can be very large and the transfer of water due to temperature fluctuations and evaporative conditions may have a significant effect on soil water distributions. Although it is widely recognized that liquid water, water vapor and heat are closely coupled, their mutual interactions are rarely considered in most soil water modeling efforts or in practical application. The validation of numerical models that are designed to capture these processes is difficult due to the inherent complexities of the problem and the scarcity of laboratory data with accurately known hydraulic and thermal parameters, thus limiting the testing and refinement of heat and water transfer theory. In this work, we first developed a long column apparatus equipped with a network of recent sensor technologies. Data were then generated under well-controlled transient heat boundary conditions with a goal of validating the coupled heat-mass transport model and assessing fundamental processes. The objectives of this work were to (1) develop an experimental setup in order to generate precision data (2) develop and implement a fully coupled numerical model to solve for heat, liquid water and water vapor flux (3) determine the key model parameters and processes in order to find the simplest mathematical relationship that best describes the experimental system. For this experimental investigation, very uniform sand was used to minimize particle segregation during packing and achieve as uniform packing as possible. Water saturation, capillary pressure, temperature, relative humidity and column weight were continuously monitored. Evaporation was induced at the soil surface by

  13. Clostridium difficile associated infection, diarrhea and colitis

    PubMed Central

    Hookman, Perry; Barkin, Jamie S

    2009-01-01

    A new, hypervirulent strain of Clostridium difficile, called NAP1/BI/027, has been implicated in C. difficile outbreaks associated with increased morbidity and mortality since the early 2000s. The epidemic strain is resistant to fluoroquinolones in vitro, which was infrequent prior to 2001. The name of this strain reflects its characteristics, demonstrated by different typing methods: pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (NAP1), restriction endonuclease analysis (BI) and polymerase chain reaction (027). In 2004 and 2005, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) emphasized that the risk of C. difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) is increased, not only by the usual factors, including antibiotic exposure, but also gastrointestinal surgery/manipulation, prolonged length of stay in a healthcare setting, serious underlying illness, immune-compromising conditions, and aging. Patients on proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have an elevated risk, as do peripartum women and heart transplant recipients. Before 2002, toxic megacolon in C. difficile-associated colitis (CDAC), was rare, but its incidence has increased dramatically. Up to two-thirds of hospitalized patients may be infected with C. difficile. Asymptomatic carriers admitted to healthcare facilities can transmit the organism to other susceptible patients, thereby becoming vectors. Fulminant colitis is reported more frequently during outbreaks of C. difficile infection in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). C. difficile infection with IBD carries a higher mortality than without underlying IBD. This article reviews the latest information on C. difficile infection, including presentation, vulnerable hosts and choice of antibiotics, alternative therapies, and probiotics and immunotherapy. We review contact precautions for patients with known or suspected C. difficile-associated disease. Healthcare institutions require accurate and rapid diagnosis for early detection of possible outbreaks, to initiate

  14. Congenital Sodium Diarrhea: A Form of Intractable Diarrhea, With a Link to Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Janecke, Andreas R; Heinz-Erian, Peter; Müller, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Congenital diarrheal disorders (CDDs) represent a group of challenging clinical conditions for pediatricians because of the severity of the presentation and the broad range of possible differential diagnoses. CDDs arise from alterations in the transport of nutrients and electrolytes across the intestinal mucosa, from enterocyte and enteroendocrine cell differentiation and/or polarization defects, and from the modulation of the intestinal immune response. Advances were made recently in deciphering the etiology and pathophysiology of one of these disorders, congenital sodium diarrhea (CSD). CSD refers to an intractable diarrhea of intrauterine onset with high fecal sodium loss. CSD is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. A syndromic form of CSD features choanal and intestinal atresias as well as recurrent corneal erosions. Small bowel histology frequently detects an epithelial "tufting" dysplasia. It is autosomal recessively inherited, and caused by SPINT2 mutations. The nonsyndromic form of CSD can be caused by dominant activating mutations in GUCY2C, encoding intestinal receptor guanylate cyclase C (GC-C), and by autosomal recessive SLC9A3 loss-of-function mutations. SLC9A3 encodes Na/H antiporter 3, the major intestinal brush border Na/H exchanger, and a downstream target of GC-C. A number of patients with GUCY2C and SLC9A3 mutations developed inflammatory bowel disease. Both the number of recognized CDD forms as well as the number of underlying disease genes are gradually increasing. Knowledge of these CDD genes enables noninvasive, next-generation gene panel-based testing to facilitate an early diagnosis in CDD. Primary Na/H antiporter 3 and GC-C malfunction is implicated as a predisposition for inflammatory bowel disease in subset of patients. PMID:26835907

  15. Analytical and experimental study of mean flow and turbulence characteristics inside the passages of an axial flow inducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorton, C. A.; Lakshminarayana, B.

    1974-01-01

    The effort conducted to gather additional understanding of the complex inviscid and viscid effects existing within the passages of a three-bladed axial flow inducer operating at a flow coefficient of 0.065 is summarized. The experimental investigations included determination of the blade static pressure and blade limiting streamline angle distributions, and measurement of the three components of mean velocity, turbulence intensities and turbulence stresses at locations inside the inducer blade passage utilizing a rotating three-sensor hotwire probe. Applicable equations were derived for the hotwire data reduction analysis and solved numerically to obtain the appropriate flow parameters. Analytical investigations were conducted to predict the three-dimensional inviscid flow in the inducer by numerically solving the exact equations of motion, and to approximately predict the three-dimensional viscid flow by incorporating the dominant viscous terms into the exact equations. The analytical results are compared with the experimental measurements and design values where appropriate.

  16. Tritrichomonas foetus: a new agent of feline diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Tolbert, Mary Katherine; Gookin, Jody

    2009-08-01

    Tritrichomonas foetus is a single-celled, flagellated protozoal parasite that colonizes the feline colon and distal ileum. Infected cats may be asymptomatic or may have clinical signs that include malodorous large bowel diarrhea. T. foetus infection is common in, but not limited to, high-density populations of young, purebred cats. Testing for this parasite is still not routine at most veterinary clinics, and T. foetus is often misdiagnosed as Giardia spp. T. foetus-specific tests (fecal culture and polymerase chain reaction) should be considered in cats with large bowel diarrhea, especially those in which traditional diagnostics and treatments for other causes of feline large bowel diarrhea have failed to reach a clinical resolution. Recognition of this newly emerging disease and appropriate sample handling are critical for the detection and treatment of feline trichomoniasis. PMID:19866444

  17. Intestinal secretory mechanisms in irritable bowel syndrome-diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Camilleri, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Although diarrhea is the predominant bowel dysfunction in as many as one-third of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), it is unclear whether there is a specific disorder of intestinal fluid or electrolyte secretion in IBS. Diarrhea is generally considered a result of accelerated colonic transit in patients with IBS. Although a primary secretory diathesis has not been well-documented in patients with IBS with diarrhea (IBS-D), several mechanisms that could potentially contribute to intestinal secretion have been reported. Some of these mechanisms also influence motor and secretory dysfunctions that contribute to the pathophysiology of IBS-D. We review the evidence supporting secretion in IBS-D caused by peptides and amines produced by enteroendocrine cells or submucosal neurons, enterocyte secretory processes, and intraluminal factors (bile acids and short-chain fatty acids). Understanding these mechanisms and developing clinical methods for their identification could improve management of patients with IBS-D. PMID:25041862

  18. Detection of parasites in children with chronic diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Maçin, Salih; Kaya, Filiz; Çağdaş, Deniz; Hizarcioglu-Gulsen, Hayriye; Saltik-Temizel, Inci Nur; Tezcan, İlhan; Demir, Hülya; Ergüven, Sibel; Akyön, Yakut

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of intestinal parasites in patients with chronic diarrhea and clarify the importance of these parasitic pathogens in such cases. A total of 60 pediatric patients with chronic diarrhea between June 2012 and October 2014 were enrolled in the study. Out of 60 stool samples, five were positive for Giardia lamblia, two, Dientamoeba fragilis, and one, Blastocystis hominis. One stool sample was positive for Entamoeba hartmanni and B. hominis, another one was positive for G. lamblia and B. hominis, another, G. lamblia and E. hartmanni and one sample was positive for Enterobius vermicularis, D. fragilis and B. hominis together. Parasitic infection, which decreases quality of life and increases susceptibility to other infections, should not be neglected, particularly in patients with chronic diarrhea. Accurate diagnosis decreases morbidity and mortality in patients with parasite infection. PMID:27322863

  19. Multicentric Castleman's Disease in a Child Revealed by Chronic Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Benmiloud, Sarra; Chaouki, Sana; Atmani, Samir; Hida, Moustapha

    2015-01-01

    Multicentric Castleman's disease is a rare benign and unexplained lymphoproliferative disorder that is extremely uncommon in children. It presents with fever, systemic symptoms, generalized lymphadenopathy, and laboratory markers of inflammation. Its treatment is not standardized and its prognosis is poor. We report a novel case of multicentric Castleman's disease in a 13-year-old girl who had presented with chronic diarrhea as the only initial presenting symptom. The diagnosis of celiac or inflammatory bowel diseases was suspected, but two and a half years later, the diagnosis of multicentric Castleman's disease was brought following the appearance of abdominal mass whose biopsy revealed Castleman's disease in the plasma cell form. The outcome was favorable after treatment by corticosteroid, chemotherapy, and surgery. The occurrence of diarrhea as the initial symptom of multicentric Castleman's disease without lymph node involvement is very rare. This case report underlines the diagnostic difficulties and the long interval between onset and diagnosis when diarrhea occurs first. PMID:25737793

  20. Experimental Study on the Vortex-Induced Vibration of Towed Pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HONG, S.; CHOI, Y. R.; PARK, J.-B.; PARK, Y.-K.; KIM, Y.-H.

    2002-01-01

    We experimentally attempted to understand the vibration characteristics of a flexible pipe excited by vortex shedding. This has been extensively studied in the previous decades (for example, see Sarpkaya 1979 Journal of Applied Mechanics46, 241-258; Price et al. 1989 Eighth International Conference on Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering, The Hague-March 19 -23, 447-454; Yoerger et al. 1991 Journal of Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering, Transaction of Engineers113, 117-127; Grosenbaugh et al. 1991Journal of Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering, Transaction of Engineers113 , 199-204; Brika and Laneville 1992 Journal of Fluid Mechanics250, 481-508; Chakrabarti et al. 1993 Ocean Engineering20, 135-162; Jong 1983 Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Ocean Engineering, M. I. T.; Kimet al. 1986 Journal of Energy Resources Technology, Transactions of American Society of Mechanical Engineers108, 77-83). However, there are still areas that need more study. One of them is the relation between spatial characteristics of a flow-induced vibrating pipe, such as its length, the distribution of wave number, and frequency responses. A non-linear mechanism between the responses of in-line and cross-flow directions is also an area of interest, if the pipe is relatively long so that structural modal density is reasonably high. In order to investigate such areas, two kinds of instrumented pipe were designed. The instrumented pipes, of which the lengths are equally 6 m, are wound with rubber and silicon tape in different ways, having different vortex-shedding conditions. One has uniform cross-section of diameter of 26·7 mm, and the other has equally spaced four sub-sections, which are composed of different diameters of 75·9, 61·1, 45·6 and 26·7 mm. Both pipes are towed in a water tank (200 m×16 m×7 m) so that they experienced different vortex-shedding excitations. Various measures were obtained from the towing experiment, including frequency responses, the time

  1. Experimental animal models for studies on the mechanisms of blast-induced neurotrauma.

    PubMed

    Risling, Mårten; Davidsson, Johan

    2012-01-01

    A blast injury is a complex type of physical trauma resulting from the detonation of explosive compounds and has become an important issue due to the use of improvised explosive devices (IED) in current military conflicts. Blast-induced neurotrauma (BINT) is a major concern in contemporary military medicine and includes a variety of injuries that range from mild to lethal. Extreme forces and their complex propagation characterize BINT. Modern body protection and the development of armored military vehicles can be assumed to have changed the outcome of BINT. Primary blast injuries are caused by overpressure waves whereas secondary, tertiary, and quaternary blast injuries can have more varied origins such as the impact of fragments, abnormal movements, or heat. The characteristics of the blast wave can be assumed to be significantly different in open field detonations compared to explosions in a confined space, such an armored vehicle. Important parameters include peak pressure, duration, and shape of the pulse. Reflections from walls and armor can make the prediction of effects in individual cases very complex. Epidemiological data do not contain information of the comparative importance of the different blast mechanisms. It is therefore important to generate data in carefully designed animal models. Such models can be selective reproductions of a primary blast, penetrating injuries from fragments, acceleration movements, or combinations of such mechanisms. It is of crucial importance that the physical parameters of the employed models are well characterized so that the experiments can be reproduced in different laboratory settings. Ideally, pressure recordings should be calibrated by using the same equipment in several laboratories. With carefully designed models and thoroughly evaluated animal data it should be possible to achieve a translation of data between animal and clinical data. Imaging and computer simulation represent a possible link between experiments

  2. The influence of age and genetics on natural resistance to experimentally induced feline infectious peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Niels C; Liu, Hongwei; Gandolfi, Barbara; Lyons, Leslie A

    2014-11-15

    Naturally occurring feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is usually fatal, giving the impression that immunity to the FIP virus (FIPV) is extremely poor. This impression may be incorrect, because not all cats experimentally exposed to FIPV develop FIP. There is also a belief that the incidence of FIP may be affected by a number of host, virus, and environmental cofactors. However, the contribution of these cofactors to immunity and disease incidence has not been determined. The present study followed 111 random-bred specific pathogen free (SPF) cats that were obtained from a single research breeding colony and experimentally infected with FIPV. The cats were from several studies conducted over the past 5 years, and as a result, some of them had prior exposure to feline enteric coronavirus (FECV) or avirulent FIPVs. The cats were housed under optimized conditions of nutrition, husbandry, and quarantine to eliminate most of the cofactors implicated in FIPV infection outcome and were uniformly challenge exposed to the same field strain of serotype 1 FIPV. Forty of the 111 (36%) cats survived their initial challenge exposure to a Type I cat-passaged field strains of FIPV. Six of these 40 survivors succumbed to FIP to a second or third challenge exposure, suggesting that immunity was not always sustained. Exposure to non-FIP-inducing feline coronaviruses prior to challenge with virulent FIPV did not significantly affect FIP incidence but did accelerate the disease course in some cats. There were no significant differences in FIP incidence between males and females, but resistance increased significantly between 6 months and 1 or more years of age. Genetic testing was done on 107 of the 111 infected cats. Multidimensional scaling (MDS) segregated the 107 cats into three distinct families based primarily on a common sire(s), and resistant and susceptible cats were equally distributed within each family. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on 73 cats that died of FIP

  3. Experimental investigation of flow-induced vibration on isolated and tandem circular cylinders fitted with strakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korkischko, I.; Meneghini, J. R.

    2010-05-01

    The effect of varying the geometric parameters of helical strakes on vortex-induced vibration (VIV) is investigated in this paper. The degree of oscillation attenuation or even suppression is analysed for isolated circular cylinder cases. How a cylinder fitted with strakes behaves when immersed in the wake of another cylinder in tandem arrangement is also investigated and these results are compared to those with a single straked cylinder. The experimental tests are conducted at a circulating water channel facility and the cylindrical models are mounted on a low-damping air bearing elastic base with one degree-of-freedom, restricted to oscillate in the transverse direction to the channel flow. Three strake pitches (p) and heights (h) are tested: p=5, 10, 15d, and h=0.1, 0.2, 0.25d. The mass ratio is 1.8 for all models. The Reynolds number range is from 1000 to 10 000, and the reduced velocity varies up to 21. The cases with h=0.1d strakes reduce the amplitude response when compared to the isolated plain cylinder, however the oscillation still persists. On the other hand, the cases with h=0.2, 0.25d strakes almost completely suppress VIV. Spanwise vorticity fields, obtained through stereoscopic digital particle image velocimetry (SDPIV), show an alternating vortex wake for the p=10d and h=0.1d straked cylinder. The p=10d and h=0.2d cylinder wake has separated shear layers with constant width and no roll-up close to the body. The strakes do not increase the magnitude of the out-of-plane velocity compared to the isolated plain cylinder. However, they deflect the flow in the out-of-plane direction in a controlled way, which can prevent the vortex shedding correlation along the span. In order to investigate the wake interference effect on the strake efficiency, an experimental arrangement with two cylinders in tandem is employed. The centre-to-centre distance for the tandem arrangement varies from 2 to 6. When the downstream p=10d and h=0.2d cylinder is immersed in the

  4. Experimental Animal Models for Studies on the Mechanisms of Blast-Induced Neurotrauma

    PubMed Central

    Risling, Mårten; Davidsson, Johan

    2012-01-01

    A blast injury is a complex type of physical trauma resulting from the detonation of explosive compounds and has become an important issue due to the use of improvised explosive devices (IED) in current military conflicts. Blast-induced neurotrauma (BINT) is a major concern in contemporary military medicine and includes a variety of injuries that range from mild to lethal. Extreme forces and their complex propagation characterize BINT. Modern body protection and the development of armored military vehicles can be assumed to have changed the outcome of BINT. Primary blast injuries are caused by overpressure waves whereas secondary, tertiary, and quaternary blast injuries can have more varied origins such as the impact of fragments, abnormal movements, or heat. The characteristics of the blast wave can be assumed to be significantly different in open field detonations compared to explosions in a confined space, such an armored vehicle. Important parameters include peak pressure, duration, and shape of the pulse. Reflections from walls and armor can make the prediction of effects in individual cases very complex. Epidemiological data do not contain information of the comparative importance of the different blast mechanisms. It is therefore important to generate data in carefully designed animal models. Such models can be selective reproductions of a primary blast, penetrating injuries from fragments, acceleration movements, or combinations of such mechanisms. It is of crucial importance that the physical parameters of the employed models are well characterized so that the experiments can be reproduced in different laboratory settings. Ideally, pressure recordings should be calibrated by using the same equipment in several laboratories. With carefully designed models and thoroughly evaluated animal data it should be possible to achieve a translation of data between animal and clinical data. Imaging and computer simulation represent a possible link between experiments

  5. CT and MRI of experimentally induced mesenteric ischemia in a porcine model

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, H.M.; Seggewib, C.; Weghaus, P.; Kamp, M.; Guenther, R.W.

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to assess the value of CT and MRI for the detection of bowel wall changes in experimentally induced mesenteric ischemia. In 18 female pigs. a percutaneous embolization of the superior mesenteric artery was performed with buthyl-2-cyanoacrylate and Lipoidal (1:1) (experimental group). In six animals, only diagnostic imaging and histologic evaluation were performed (control group). CT was carried out 3, 6, and 12 h after occlusion. Incremental CT (1 s scan time, 5 mm slice thickness, 7 mm increment, 120 kV/290 mAs) and spiral CT (slice thickness 5 mm, pitch 1.5, 120 kV/165 mA) were performed pre and post contrast injection (Somatom Plus/ Siemens). Serial CT was carried out after intravenous contrast injection (I ml/kg, 2 ml/s). MRI (Magnetom 1.5 T: Siemens) was performed with T1 (pre and post 0.01 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA; Magnevist; Schering. Germany), T2, and proton density images in axial orientation. Slice thickness was 3 mm and slice gap 1 mm. Additionally, a T1-weighted GE sequence was obtained in dynamic technique (before and 30, 60, and 90 s after contrast agent injection) with a slice thickness of 5 mm. Biometrical monitoring included blood pressure, heart frequency, blood cell count, electrolyte status, blood gas analysis, and determination of serum lactate. Image evaluation included morphological analysis and determination of the enhancement pattern. Histological specimens were obtained and analyzed according to the Chiu classification. The histologic workup of the specimen 3, 6, and 12 h after vascular occlusion revealed an average Chiu state 3, 4, and 5. On CT, the bowel wall had a thickness of 4.7 mm on average in the ischemic segments. There was a significant difference from the control group. Free intraperitoneal fluid and intramural gas were seen after 12 h of ischemia in 80%. In ischemic bowel segments, no mural enhancement was seen. Normal segments and the bowel of the control animals showed an enhancement of 34 HU on average.

  6. Comparison of stability of viral nucleic acid in different tissues and under different conditions in samples collected from fetuses infected with bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate diagnosis of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) induced reproductive disease is important to herd health management and BVDV control programs. Diagnosing BVDV, by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), as a cause of reproductive disease may be problematic because viral nucleic acid may be degrade...

  7. Analytical and experimental study of mean flow and turbulence characteristics inside the passages of an axial flow inducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorton, C. A.; Lakshminarayana, B.

    1980-01-01

    The inviscid and viscid effects existing within the passages of a three bladed axial flow inducer operating at a flow coefficient of 0.065 are investigated. The blade static pressure and blade limiting streamline angle distributions were determined and the three components of mean velocity, turbulence intensities, and turbulence stresses were measured at locations inside the inducer blade passage utilizing a rotating three sensor hotwire probe. Applicable equations were derived for the hotwire data reduction analysis and solved numerically to obtain the appropriate flow parameters. The three dimensional inviscid flow in the inducer was predicted by numerically solving the exact equations of motion, and the three dimensional viscid flow was predicted by incorporating the dominant viscous terms into the exact equations. The analytical results are compared with the experimental measurements and design values where appropriate. Radial velocities are found to be of the same order as axial velocities within the inducer passage, confirming the highly three dimensional characteristic of inducer flow. Total relative velocity distribution indicate a substantial velocity deficiency near the tip at mid-passage which expands significantly as the flow proceeds toward the inducer trailing edge. High turbulence intensities and turbulence stresses are concentrated within this core region. Considerable wake diffusion occurs immediately downstream of the inducer trailing edge to decay this loss core. Evidence of boundary layer interactions, blade blockage effects, radially inward flows, annulus wall effects, and backflows are all found to exist within the long, narrow passages of the inducer.

  8. Infectious Diarrhea: Norovirus and Clostridium difficile in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    White, Mary B; Rajagopalan, Shobita; Yoshikawa, Thomas T

    2016-08-01

    Norovirus infection usually results in acute gastroenteritis, often with incapacitating nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. It is highly contagious and resistant to eradication with alcohol-based hand sanitizer. Appropriate preventative and infection control measures can mitigate the morbidity and mortality associated with norovirus infection. Clostridium difficile infection is the leading cause of health care-associated diarrhea in the United States. Antibiotic use is by far the most common risk factor for C difficile colonization and infection. Appropriate preventive measures and judicious use of antibiotics can help mitigate the morbidity and mortality associated with C difficile infection. PMID:27394020

  9. Combination treatment of lycopene and hesperidin protect experimentally induced ulcer in laboratory rats

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Dilpesh; Katti, Neha

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Lycopene, a carotenoid and hesperidin, a flavonoid are naturally occurring in vegetables and fruits. Synergistic effect of a combination of carotenoid and flavonoid has been reported due to its antioxidant activity. Therefore, the present study was aimed to evaluate the protective effect of this combination on pylorus ligation induced ulcers in rats. Materials and Methods: Thirty Wistar albino rats were divided into five groups (n = 6). Rats were fasted for 24 h before pylorus ligation. After 24 h of fasting the rats were treated with hesperidin (100 mg/kg) and lycopene (2 mg/kg) and their combination 1h prior to surgery. After an hour under ether anesthesia pylorus ligation was performed, after 5 h the animals were sacrificed, stomach was dissected, and gastric contents were collected and measured. Total acidity and pH of gastric content was estimated. Ulcer index was calculated, and macroscopic examination of the stomach was carried out. Results: The sham operated rats showed a significant increase in pH, volume of gastric content and total acidity and ulcer index. The rats pretreated with lycopene and hesperidin showed significant improvement in the ulcer conditions. However, rats treated with a combination of lycopene and hesperidin showed more significant restoration of gastric function as compared to sham operated rats. Moreover, a significant difference was also noted in rats treated with a combination as compared to lycopene and hesperidin treatment alone. Conclusion: Thus experimentally the combination was seen to treat ulcers by anti-secretory, neutralizing, cytoprotective and mainly due to its antioxidant property. PMID:26401402

  10. Computational and experimental study of flow-induced vibration of the SSME main injector post

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.S.; Jendrzejczyk, J.A.; Wambsganss, M.W.

    1986-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) liquid-oxygen (LOX) posts are subjected to high-velocity turbulent flow from the transfer ducts. In a preliminary assessment of the vibration problem, it was determined that the two potential excitation mechanisms for LOX post vibration are fluidelastic instability and turbulent buffeting. A fundamental study is being conducted to understand the problem and to develop techniques to avoid detrimental vibrational effects with the objective of improving engine life. This paper summarizes the results of an analytical model for fluidelastic instability and test results for turbulent buffeting of a tube array in crossflow. A general theory of fluidelastic instability for a tube array in crossflow is presented. Various techniques to obtain the motion-dependent fluid-force coefficients are discussed and the general instability characteristics are summarized. The theory is also used to evaluate the results of other mathematical models for crossflow-induced instability. The fluid excitation forces acting on a tube array are presented as a function of Reynolds number, incoming flow conditions, and tube location in an array. The experimental data show the general characteristics of flow across a tube array. As the flow passes through each row of tubes, the fluid is subjected to resistance, the effect of which is to convert some of the fluid pressure energy to turbulent energy. In the first few rows, the transformation of energy occurs in a somewhat orderly manner. As the flow reaches the interior tubes, unsteadiness of the flow increases and, usually, a randomness of the flow and its pressure fluctuation exists in the flow field.

  11. Kinetic impairment of haemopoietic stem cells in experimentally induced leukemia and aplastic anemia: an inverse correlation.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sumanta; Basak, Pratima; Das, Madhurima; Das, Prosun; Pereira, Jacintha Archana; Dutta, Ranjan Kumar; Chaklader, Malay; Chaudhuri, Samaresh; Law, Sujata

    2009-01-01

    The production of blood cells from bone marrow (BM) hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) is regulated by a number of cytokines and growth factors that influence cell survival; differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis in health and supposedly, such mechanisms are deregulated in diseased conditions. As far as cellular kinetics is concerned HSCs are relatively quiescent in adults, have the ability to replicate symmetrically and asymmetrically and predictably exhibit multi-lineage hematopoietic reconstitution potential. HSC drive hematopoiesis and homeostasis by contracting and expanding the pool of hematopoietic cells in the bone marrow. In mouse they can be identified immunophenotypically as Sca1+ c-kit cells. In aplastic anemia a drastic decline in the marrow efficacy to produce mature blood cells leads to bone marrow failure. In contrast, in leukemia hyper stimulated marrow leads to deregulated differentiation of immature hematopoietic stem cells with increased self-proliferation potential. In our experimental set up, we induced aplastic anemia by injecting busulfan and cyclophosphamide and leukemia by N-N' ethylnitrosourea intraperitoneally in inbred swiss albino mice. Indeed, HSCs and haematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) are vulnerable target for such disease oriented dysregulation which bears close correlation with the bone marrow microenvironmental damage. The present study aims at evaluating the possible mechanism(s) of deregulation in the bone marrow physiology with special reference to HSC surface receptor expression, cellular granularity, cell cycle status and overall marrow architecture. The investigations made so far revealed an interesting correlation between disease initiation and specific cytokinetic involvement of HSC in the BM microenvironment with particular reference to leukemia and aplastic anemia. PMID:20232602

  12. Experimental study of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability induced by a Mach 3 shock wave

    SciTech Connect

    BP Puranik; JG Oakley; MH Anderson; R Bonaazza

    2003-11-12

    OAK-B135 An experimental investigation of a shock-induced interfacial instability (Richtmyer-Meshkov instability) is undertaken in an effort to study temporal evolution of interfacial perturbations in the late stages of development. The experiments are performed in a vertical shock tube with a square cross-section. A membraneless interface is prepared by retracting a sinusoidally shaped metal plate initially separating carbon dioxide from air, with both gases initially at atmospheric pressure. With carbon dioxide above the plate, the Rayleigh-Taylor instability commences as the plate is retracted and the amplitude of the initial sinusoidal perturbation imposed on the interface begins to grow. The interface is accelerated by a strong shock wave (M=3.08) while its shape is still sinusoidal and before the Kelvin-Helmhotz instability distorts it into the well known mushroom-like structures; its initial amplitude to wavelength ratio is large enough that the interface evolution enters its nonlinear stage very shortly after shock acceleration. The pre-shock evolution of the interface due to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and the post-shock evolution of the interface due to the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability are visualized using planar Mie scattering. The pre-shock evolution of the interface is carried out in an independent set of experiments. The initial conditions for the Richtmyer-Meshkov experiment are determined from the pre-shock Rayleigh-Taylor growth. One image of the post-shock interface is obtained per experiment and image sequences, showing the post-shock evolution of the interface, are constructed from several experiments. The growth rate of the perturbation amplitude is measured and compared with two recent analytical models of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability.

  13. Experimental study of vortex-induced vibrations of a tethered cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. K.; Su, B. Y.; Tan, S. K.

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of the motions, forces and flow patterns of a positively buoyant tethered cylinder (m*<1) in uniform flow undergoing vortex-induced vibration (VIV). The flow fields have been measured using digital Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique, in conjunction with a piezoelectric load cell for direct measurement of drag and lift forces acting on the tethered cylinder. The effects of varying mass ratio and Reynolds number over the range 0.61≤m*≤0.92 and 4000≤Re≤12 000 are examined. Results of a fixed (or stationary) cylinder at the same Reynolds numbers are provided to serve as the benchmark reference. The peak amplitude of oscillation, θmax/θD, generally increases with Re and deceases with m*. Similar to previous studies, the results reveal the existence of a critical mass ratio mcrit*≈0.7, below which large-amplitude oscillations would take place when Re is high enough, with the largest peak amplitude of θmax/θD=0.9 observed for the case of m*=0.61 and Re=12 000. Thus two distinct states of oscillation are categorized, namely, the small- and large-amplitude oscillation states. The distinction between the two states is also vivid in the mean and root-mean-square (r.m.s.) force coefficients (including C, CD‧ and CL‧). The frequency of vortex shedding (fV) from the tethered cylinder is always synchronized with the cylinder's oscillation frequency (fosc), regardless of the oscillation state. A time series of instantaneous vorticity fields illustrate that vortex shedding from the tethered cylinder undergoing VIV maintains the 2S mode, but at an inclined angle to the free stream, which is most obvious in the large-amplitude oscillation state. This leads to an asymmetry in the shear layers separated from opposite sides of the cylinder, as shown by the distribution of ensemble-averaged Reynolds stress.

  14. Psychological and cortisol reactivity to experimentally induced stress in adults with ADHD.

    PubMed

    Raz, Sivan; Leykin, Dmitry

    2015-10-01

    Individuals with ADHD suffer from increased vulnerability to environmental and mental stressors and may be at increased risk for chronic stress in everyday life. The Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA) axis is a critical physiological system that mediates responses to stress. The present study seeks to examine test performance, test anxiety, self-reported psychological stress and cortisol reactivity to mental-cognitive stress in adults with ADHD when compared with healthy controls. Stress was induced by an arithmetic ability test. Psychological stress was assessed repeatedly throughout the experimental session. Salivary cortisol, an indicator of the HPA axis function, was evaluated immediately upon arrival, as well as 1 min and 20 min post-test completion. Results revealed higher levels of test anxiety and poorer performance on the test in the ADHD group. The ADHD and control groups showed no difference in base-line levels of subjective stress and in subjective stress levels 20 min after the test. In contrast, individuals with ADHD reported significantly higher levels of stress at the test anticipation phase and 1 min post-test completion. Cortisol response to stress differed according to group: in the ADHD group, 20 min post-test cortisol levels were significantly higher than base-line cortisol levels. This was not evident in the control group. These results suggest greater activation of the HPA axis in response to stress in adults with ADHD when compared with healthy controls. Adults with ADHD do not differ from controls in basal levels of subjective stress and cortisol, but do have stronger psychophysiological reactions in response to stressful challenges. The present findings are among the first to demonstrate significant alterations in cortisol reactivity to stress in adults with ADHD. PMID:26107579

  15. The effects of experimentally induced hyperthyroidism on the diving physiology of harbor seals (Phoca vitulina)

    PubMed Central

    Weingartner, Gundula M.; Thornton, Sheila J.; Andrews, Russel D.; Enstipp, Manfred R.; Barts, Agnieszka D.; Hochachka, Peter W.

    2012-01-01

    Many phocid seals are expert divers that remain submerged longer than expected based on estimates of oxygen storage and utilization. This discrepancy is most likely due to an overestimation of diving metabolic rate. During diving, a selective redistribution of blood flow occurs, which may result in reduced metabolism in the hypoperfused tissues and a possible decline in whole-body metabolism to below the resting level (hypometabolism). Thyroid hormones are crucial in regulation of energy metabolism in vertebrates and therefore their control might be an important part of achieving a hypometabolic state during diving. To investigate the effect of thyroid hormones on diving physiology of phocid seals, we measured oxygen consumption, heart rate, and post-dive lactate concentrations in five harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) conducting 5 min dives on command, in both euthyroid and experimentally induced hyperthyroid states. Oxygen consumption during diving was significantly reduced (by 25%) in both euthyroid and hyperthyroid states, confirming that metabolic rate during diving falls below resting levels. Hyperthyroidism increased oxygen consumption (by 7–8%) when resting in water and during diving, compared with the euthyroid state, illustrating the marked effect of thyroid hormones on metabolic rate. Consequently, post-dive lactate concentrations were significantly increased in the hyperthyroid state, suggesting that the greater oxygen consumption rates forced seals to make increased use of anaerobic metabolic pathways. During diving, hyperthyroid seals also exhibited a more profound decline in heart rate than seals in the euthyroid state, indicating that these seals were pushed toward their aerobic limit and required a more pronounced cardiovascular response. Our results demonstrate the powerful role of thyroid hormones in metabolic regulation and support the hypothesis that thyroid hormones play a role in modulating the at-sea metabolism of phocid seals. PMID:23060807

  16. Autophagy deficiency in myeloid cells increases susceptibility to obesity-induced diabetes and experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hae-Youn; Kim, Jinyoung; Quan, Wenying; Lee, June-Chul; Kim, Min-Soo; Kim, Seok-Hyung; Bae, Jin-Woo; Hur, Kyu Yeon; Lee, Myung-Shik

    2016-08-01

    Autophagy, which is critical for the proper turnover of organelles such as endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, affects diverse aspects of metabolism, and its dysregulation has been incriminated in various metabolic disorders. However, the role of autophagy of myeloid cells in adipose tissue inflammation and type 2 diabetes has not been addressed. We produced mice with myeloid cell-specific deletion of Atg7 (autophagy-related 7), an essential autophagy gene (Atg7 conditional knockout [cKO] mice). While Atg7 cKO mice were metabolically indistinguishable from control mice, they developed diabetes when bred to ob/w mice (Atg7 cKO-ob/ob mice), accompanied by increases in the crown-like structure, inflammatory cytokine expression and inflammasome activation in adipose tissue. Mφs (macrophages) from Atg7 cKO mice showed significantly higher interleukin 1 β release and inflammasome activation in response to a palmitic acid plus lipopolysaccharide combination. Moreover, a decrease in the NAD(+):NADH ratio and increase in intracellular ROS content after treatment with palmitic acid in combination with lipopolysaccharide were more pronounced in Mφs from Atg7 cKO mice, suggesting that mitochondrial dysfunction in autophagy-deficient Mφs leads to an increase in lipid-induced inflammasome and metabolic deterioration in Atg7 cKO-ob/ob mice. Atg7 cKO mice were more susceptible to experimental colitis, accompanied by increased colonic cytokine expression, T helper 1 skewing and systemic bacterial invasion. These results suggest that autophagy of Mφs is important for the control of inflammasome activation in response to metabolic or extrinsic stress, and autophagy deficiency in Mφs may contribute to the progression of metabolic syndrome associated with lipid injury and colitis. PMID:27337687

  17. A new modified animal model of myosin-induced experimental autoimmune myositis enhanced by defibrase

    PubMed Central

    Wen-Jing, Luo; Hong-Hua, Li; Xiang-Hui, Lu; Jie-Xiao, Liu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We investigated the effect of defibrase (a proteolytic enzyme extraction of Agkistrodon halys venom) on experimental autoimmune myositis (EAM) in guinea pigs and explored the option of using a modified pig model of EAM to enhance the study of this disease. Material and methods Guinea pigs were divided into 3 groups: group A (control group) was immunized with complete Freund adjuvant (CFA), then received 6 injections of saline weekly; group B (EAM group) was immunized wit