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1

Congestion-aware Path Selection for Tor Tao Wang, Kevin Bauer, Clara Forero, and Ian Goldberg  

E-print Network

Congestion-aware Path Selection for Tor Tao Wang, Kevin Bauer, Clara Forero, and Ian Goldberg,ciforero,iang}@cs.uwaterloo.ca ABSTRACT Tor, an anonymity network formed by volunteer nodes, uses the estimated bandwidth of the nodes degrade the network's performance, discourage Tor adoption, and consequently reduce the size of Tor

Goldberg, Ian

2

Congestion-aware Path Selection for Tor Tao Wang, Kevin Bauer, Clara Forero, and Ian Goldberg  

E-print Network

Congestion-aware Path Selection for Tor Tao Wang, Kevin Bauer, Clara Forero, and Ian Goldberg,ciforero,iang}@cs.uwaterloo.ca Abstract. Tor, an anonymity network formed by volunteer nodes, uses the estimated bandwidth of the nodes degrade the network's per- formance, discourage Tor adoption, and consequently reduce the size of Tor

Goldberg, Ian

3

Asteroid spectroscopy with FoReRo2 at BNAO Rozhen --- first results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Bulgarian National Astronomical Observatory (BNAO) in Rozhen (071 Rozhen), with astrometric observations, has been already involved in the Gaia Follow-Up Network for Solar System Objects since the end of 2011. One of our aims is to develop a coordinated program of asteroid spectroscopy complementary to Gaia's observations. In this paper, the first results of asteroid spectroscopy at BNAO Rozhen are presented. In order to contribute to the compositional characterization of the main-belt asteroids, we performed low-dispersion asteroid spectroscopy with 2-Channel-Focal-Reducer Rozhen (FoReRo2) on the 2-m Ritchey-Chrétien-Coudé (RCC) telescope at BNAO. We obtained optical spectra of few MBAs using the 2-m RCC telescope equiped with the CCD VarsArray 1300B camera (pixel size 20 ? m or 0.736 arcsec/px) in the spectroscopic mode of FoReRo2 in its red channel [1]. The spectroscopic characteristics are: a low-dispersion grism Bausch & Lomb, working in the parallel beam of FoReRo2, with 300 lines/mm which gives 4.3 Å/px and 200 ? m width slit which corresponds to 2.6 arcsec. We determined spectral types of the asteroids [2] by the overall shapes of the spectra between 440 nm and 830 nm. For spectral analysis in our work, we use the public software tool M4AST [3]. It covers aspects related to taxonomy, curve matching with laboratory spectra, space weathering models, and mineralogical diagnosis. Most of the observed asteroids belong to some families and there are no published spectra. Besides their spectra, for some asteroids, best matches derived from a comparison with laboratory spectra are presented. We are planning to use a polarimetric mode of FoReRo2 and a Wollaston prism in order for the results to be confirmed by obtaining the degree of linear polarization around asteroid phase angles of 10° --- around the minimum of polarization in the phase curve, where the deviation for different taxonomic classes is best resolvable.

Vchova Bebekovska, E.; Borisov, G.; Apostolovska, G.; Donchev, Z.

2014-07-01

4

The Northwestern University Transportation Center presents: Sergio Jara-Diaz  

E-print Network

The Northwestern University Transportation Center presents: Sergio Jara-Diaz Department of Civil Engineering Universidad de Chile Optimal Design and Pricing of Public Transport (still crazy after all design (frequency, bus size, lines structure and others), optimal pricing-subsidies and the policy

Bustamante, Fabián E.

5

Distance learning: empathy and culture in Junot Diaz's "Wildwood".  

PubMed

This essay discusses critical approaches to culture, difference, and empathy in health care education through a reading of Junot Diaz's "Wildwood" chapter from the 2007 novel The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao. I begin with an analysis of the way that Diaz's narrative invites readers to imagine and explore the experiences of others with subtlety and complexity. My reading of "Wildwood" illuminates its double-edged injunction to try to imagine another's perspective while recognizing the limits to-or even the impossibility of-that exercise. I draw on post-colonial theory and feminist science studies to illuminate a text that is created and interpreted in a post-colonial context-the Dominican diaspora in the United States. The essay offers a model of historical and critical analysis that health care educators can use to frame the concept of empathy in the classroom and the clinic. PMID:23996054

Garden, Rebecca

2013-12-01

6

Cameron Ave. Franklin St.  

E-print Network

4 15 6 3 17 16 12 14 10 1 2 5 8 7 Cameron Ave. Co Franklin St. Pittsboro Rosemary St. RaleighSt. St, Government Info., Maps Collection and Microforms Collection 4 Geological Sciences Library Mitchell Hall, Room

Whitton, Mary C.

7

W. FIFTH AVE. RADIATION LAB  

E-print Network

. WEAVER DR. PRINCETON AVE.WEST PRINCETON AVE. LABORATORY ENTRANCE TO L.I. EXPRESSWAY RENAISSANCERD. 725 630 I7 Shipping & Receiving 98 I8 Site Maintenance 326 F9 Superconducting Magnet Division 902 G5

Ohta, Shigemi

8

North American species of Agrostocynips Diaz (Hymenoptera: Figitidae), parasitoids of Agromyzidae (Diptera): bionomics and taxonomy  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The genus Agrostocynips Diaz is redescribed, as well as two species endemic to the Nearctic: Agrostocynips diastrophi (Ashmead) and A. robusta (Ashmead). Previous to this study, only Neotropical species of Agrostocynips were well diagnosed both taxonomically and biologically. Agrostocynips belongs...

9

STS-34 MS Chang-Diaz records onboard activity with 16mm camera  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-34 Mission Specialist (MS) Franklin R. Chang-Diaz records forward flight deck activity with ARRIFLEX 16mm camera onboard Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104. In the background, MS Shannon W. Lucid works at aft flight deck payload station.

1989-01-01

10

STS-75 Chang-Diaz and MS Jeff Hoffman in White Room  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-75 Payload Commander Franklin R. Chang-Diaz (center) and Mission Specialist Jeffrey A. Hoffman (right) prepare to enter the Space Shuttle Columbia at Launch Pad 39B with assistance from the white room closeout crew.

1996-01-01

11

STS-46 MS Chang-Diaz works with laptop PGSC on OV-104's middeck  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-46 Mission Specialist (MS) Franklin R. Chang-Diaz looks away from his work at the laptop payload and general support computer (PGSC) on the middeck of Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104. Chang-Diaz, wearing a headband, holds onto the airlock hatch opening to position himself in front of the computer keyboard. The treads of the interdeck access ladder are visible at the right.

1992-01-01

12

Student Service Professionals Page 459Sonoma State University 2010-2011 Catalog Carmen Diaz Misa (2001)  

E-print Network

Student Service Professionals Page 459Sonoma State University 2010-2011 Catalog Carmen Diaz Misa (2001) Financial Aid Representative B.A. 2000, Sonoma State University Michael Dominguez (2009) Intramural, Sport Club, Kids Camp Coordinator B.S. 2002 Sonoma State University M.A. 2006 Northern Arizona

Ravikumar, B.

13

Student Service Professionals Page 463Sonoma State University 2012-2013 Catalog Carmen Diaz Misa (2001)  

E-print Network

Student Service Professionals Page 463Sonoma State University 2012-2013 Catalog Carmen Diaz Misa (2001) Financial Aid Representative B.A. 2000, Sonoma State University Michael Dominguez (2009) Intramural, Sport Club, Kids Camp Coordinator B.S. 2002 Sonoma State University M.A. 2006 Northern Arizona

Ravikumar, B.

14

Page 462 Student Service Professionals Sonoma State University 2008-2010 Catalog Carmen Diaz Misa (2001)  

E-print Network

Page 462 Student Service Professionals Sonoma State University 2008-2010 Catalog Carmen Diaz Misa (2001) Financial Aid Representative B.A. 2000, Sonoma State University Aurora Duarte-Hall (2003) Project Coordinator A.A. 1997, Santa Rosa Junior College B.A. 2000, Sonoma State University Matthew Flores (2004

Ravikumar, B.

15

Page 480 Student Service Professionals Sonoma State University 2013-2014 Catalog Carmen Diaz Misa (2001)  

E-print Network

Page 480 Student Service Professionals Sonoma State University 2013-2014 Catalog Carmen Diaz Misa (2001) Financial Aid Representative B.A. 2000, Sonoma State University Michael Dominguez (2009) Intramural, Sport Club, Kids Camp Coordinator B.S. 2002, Sonoma State University M.A. 2006, Northern Arizona

Ravikumar, B.

16

Optical characterization of the 62-cm telescope at the Severo Diaz Galindo Observatory in Guadalajara  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the results of the optical characterization of the mirrors of the telescope of 62cm observatory "SEVERO DIAZ GALINDO" property of the University of Guadalajara. We use the Ronchi test and a spherometer to measure by first time, the radius of curvature for the primary and secondary mirror, the parameters of the telescope system were obtained by using the commercial software ZEMAX. We confirm that both mirrors are adequate to work in the telescope configuration and to do optical astronomy.

Nuñez, J. Manuel; de la Fuente, Eduardo; Luna, Esteban; Herrera, Joel; Velazquez, Enrique; García, Fernando; López, Eduardo; Váldez, Jorge; García, Benjamín; Martínez, Benjamín; Guisa, Gerardo; Quiroz, Fernando; Colorado, Enrique; Ochoa, José Luis; Almaguer, Jaime; Chávez, Arturo

2009-09-01

17

NASA's atmospheric variability experiments /AVE/  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A series of seven mesoscale experiments were conducted under the NASA program, Atmospheric Variability Experiments (AVE). Rawinsonde, satellite, aircraft, and ground observations were recorded during specially selected meteorological periods lasting from 1 to 3 days. Details are presented for each AVE relative to observation times, experiment size and location, and significant weather. Some research results based on the use of these AVE data are referenced. These include contributions to regional numerical prediction; relations between wind shears, instability, and thunderstorm motion and development; relations between moisture and temperature and the probability of convection; retrieval of tropospheric temperature profiles from cloud-contaminated satellite data; variation of convection intensity as a result of atmospheric variability; and effects of cloud rotation on their trajectories.

Hill, K.; Turner, R. E.

1977-01-01

18

Cherry Ave. Sixth St. Garage  

E-print Network

Ave. E. Mabel St. E. Drachman St. E. Drachman St. E. Second St. E. First St. E. Second St. Hawthorne Campus Health Res. Life El Portal Disability Resource Center USB AHS Medical Library UMC East Garage. Individuals may use the lift on the vehicles. 2. Driver is required to assist with boarding and exiting

Arizona, University of

19

NASA's AVE/VAS program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A discussion is presented concerning the Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE) which was conducted during the spring of 1982 as part of NASA's Visible and Infrared Spin-Scan Radiometer (VISSR) Atmospheric Sounder (VAS) demonstration. The AVE/VAS Ground Truth Field Experiment is examined in detail, which comprised the obtaining of rawinsonde observations during various meteorological conditions on four different days when VAS data were obtained. These experiments were performed over 24 hr periods in a mesoscale network of 24 National Weather Service rawinsonde sites and 13 NASA and NOAA special sites. The VAS, operating as a part of the GOES satellite system, was employed to provide two-dimensional cloud mapping capability during each of the AVE/VAS experiment periods. Among the goals of this AVE/VAS program, in addition to management of the acquisition and processing of the data, were to perform the research and development needed to produce data products from VAS radiances, to validate the data, and to assess the impact of the data on mesoscale meteorological forecasting and research requirements.

Hill, C. K.; Turner, R. E.

1983-01-01

20

Astronauts Jeffrey A. Hoffman (left) and Franklin R. Chang-Diaz hold up a sign to celebrate the fact  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Astronauts Jeffrey A. Hoffman (left) and Franklin R. Chang-Diaz hold up a sign to celebrate the fact that each has surpassed the 1,000-hour mark in space during the flight. The two mission specialists joined three other astronauts and an international payload specialist for 16 days of scientific research aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia.

1996-01-01

21

109 Chase Ave. 215 W. House  

E-print Network

Dr. Baity House Cheek/ Admin. Facility 107 Chase Ave. Medical 49 ACC Building Medicine 301 Chase Ave. Kuralt Dramatic Art Medicine 2000 Baity Education Administration UNC-CH ITS Trailers Isaac M Research N. Cooling HillDr. Outdoor Paul NC Gardens Botanical NC Botanical Garden Visitor Information Center Substation 545

McLaughlin, Richard M.

22

Aves  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The study of the entire fossil bird collection from Laetoli, including the specimens collected by Mary Leakey (1974–1981)\\u000a and the recent ones collected by the Eyasi Plateau Paleontological Expedition (1998–2005), is presented here. The 247 bird\\u000a fossils allow the identification of 21 different taxa in 11 families (and eight orders). One fossil is from the Lower Laetolil\\u000a Beds, 229 from

Antoine Louchart

23

17. WEST SIDE OF 2100 BLOCK OF PACIFIC AVE. FROM ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

17. WEST SIDE OF 2100 BLOCK OF PACIFIC AVE. FROM RIGHT; 2102-2106 PACIFIC AVE., MORRIS MILLER BUILDING (1906), FREDERICK HEATH, ARCHITECT; 2110 PACIFIC AVE., TACOMA DRY GOODS BUILDING (1906), FREDERICK HEATH, ARCHITECT; 2114-16 PACIFIC AVE., HUNT & MOTTET COMPANY HEADQUARTERS (1907), BULLARD & HILL, ARCHITECTS. - Union Depot Area Study, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

24

www.ave.kth.se Rail Vehicles  

E-print Network

www.ave.kth.se Rail Vehicles Part of the Masters program in Vehicle Engineering Master's Thesis, contact Carlos Casanueva at the Division of Rail Vehicles. Tel.: 08 790 76 52 e-mail: carlosc@kth.se #12;

Haviland, David

25

VizieR Online Data Catalog: Northern Galactic OB stars vsini (Simon-Diaz+, 2014)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The spectroscopic observations considered for this study are part of the IACOB spectroscopic database of northern Galactic OB stars (last described in Simon-Diaz et al., 2011, Bull. Soc. Roy. Sci. Liege, 80, 514 and Stellar Clusters and Associations: Proc. A RIA Workshop on Gaia, eds. E. J. Alfaro Navarro, A. T. Gallego Calvente, & M. R. Zapatero Osorio, 255). This unique high-quality spectroscopic database has been compiled in the framework of the IACOB project. To date, the IACOB database comprises 1250 spectra of 153 and 97 Galactic O- and early B-type stars, respectively, observable from the Roque de los Muchachos observatory in La Palma (Spain). The spectra have a resolving power of 46000 and 23000, a typical signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) above 150, and were compiled between November 2008 and January 2013 with the high-resolution FIbre-fed Echelle Spectrograph (FIES) attached to the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT). The IACOB database has a multi-epoch character that enables investigations of the binary/multiple nature of considered stars and the temporal variations in individual objects with at least three spectra per observed target. In this study, we only used a subsample of the spectra, discarding all stars with signatures of multiplicity (which means that we only considered apparently single and SB1 stars), and only considering the spectrum with the highest S/N ratio per star. (5 data files).

Simon-Diaz, S.; Herrero, A.

2014-04-01

26

[Micropterus salmoides (Pisces: Centrarchidae) reproduction in the Gustavo Diaz Ordaz reservoir, Sinaloa, México].  

PubMed

Micropterus salmoides is an important fish species for sport fishing activities, condition that has promoted its introduction to different reservoirs in Mexico and worldwide. With the aim to improve its fisheries management, this research dealt with some reproductive aspects of this species in the Gustavo Diaz Ordaz reservoir, where it was studied from August 2008 through March 2011. To this end, we obtained 938 specimens, with gillnets of different sizes, to determine their total length (Lt, in cm), weight (Pt, in g), sex, gonadosomatic index, condition factor, fecundity and size at first maturity. Lt and Pt ranged from 15.9 to 63 cm (37.4 +/- 78.0) and 57 to 4431 g (731.7 +/- 619.0), respectively. The Pt-Lt relationship showed a positive allometric growth, with no significant difference between males and females (F = 0.9955, p = 0.3187). The male: female ratio obtained was 1:0.83. Mass spawning lasted from December to April. Size at first maturity was 33.7 cm and average fecundity was 32294 +/- 12878.7 oocytes/female. The gonadosomatic index was low from May through November, and increased between January and March. The condition factor was high before the spawning season and decreased after the reproductive period. We recommend a fishing ban from January to March, and to allow the capture size between 33 and 40 cm. PMID:24027925

Beltrán Alvarez, Rigoberto; Sánchez Palacios, Jesús; Ramírez Lozano, Juan Pedro; Ortega Salas, Adolfo-Armando

2013-09-01

27

www.ave.kth.se Rail Vehicles  

E-print Network

www.ave.kth.se Rail Vehicles Part of the Masters program in Vehicle Engineering Master's Thesis: Validation of wheel wear calculation code Background Rail vehicle operators have a genuine concern about wheel and rail wear prediction methodologies, due to the influence of worn profiles in the cost of both

Haviland, David

28

Enigmatic Phylogeny of Skuas (Aves: Stercorariidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Multiple sources of evidence show that the skuas (Aves: Stercorariidae) are a monophyletic group, closely related to gulls (Laridae). On morphological and behavioural evidence the Stercorariidae are divided into two widely divergent genera, Catharacta and Stercorarius, consistent with observed levels of nuclear and mitochondrial gene divergence. Catharacta skuas are large-bodied and with one exception breed in the Southern Hemisphere. Stercorarius

B. L. Cohen; A. J. Baker; K. Blechschmidt; D. L. Dittmann; R. W. Furness; J. A. Gerwin; A. J. Helbig; J. de Korte; H. D. Marshall; R. L. Palma; H.-U. Peter; R. Ramli; I. Siebold; M. S. Willcox; R. H. Wilson; R. M. Zink

1997-01-01

29

Ave Maria: A 'Seriously Catholic' Law School.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reports on the founding of Ave Maria School of Law (Michigan), opening in 2000, which plans to integrate Catholic teachings into every course. Focus is on the school's founder, Thomas S. Monaghan, and the school's first dean, Bernard Dobranski, who suggest that the new school can avoid difficulties with tenured liberal professors and attract top…

Mangan, Katherine S.

2000-01-01

30

Shape and individual variability of the blur adaptation curve q Fuensanta A. Vera-Diaz a,b,*, Russell L. Woods a  

E-print Network

that appears normal) following adaptation was measured for each adaptation level and was used to deriveShape and individual variability of the blur adaptation curve q Fuensanta A. Vera-Diaz a 2010 Keywords: Adaptation Blur Sharpness Individual variability Enhancement a b s t r a c t We

Peli, Eli

31

Covalent Virus Layer for Mass-Based Biosensing Li-Mei C. Yang, Juan E. Diaz, Theresa M. McIntire, Gregory A. Weiss,* and Reginald M. Penner*  

E-print Network

Covalent Virus Layer for Mass-Based Biosensing Li-Mei C. Yang, Juan E. Diaz, Theresa M. Mc, California 92697-2025 M13 virus particles were covalently attached to a planar gold-coated quartz crystal produced a phage multilayer hav- ing a coverage equivalent to 6.5 close-packed monolay- ers of the virus

Weiss, Gregory A.

32

How Much Degrees Of Temperature A Warp Drive Achieves When At Superluminal Speeds?? The Analysis Of Gonzalez-Diaz Applied To The  

E-print Network

Of Gonzalez-Diaz Applied To The Natario Warp Drive Spacetime. Fernando Loup Residencia de Estudantes.([1]) The warp drive as conceived by Alcu- bierre worked with an expansion of the spacetime behindHow Much Degrees Of Temperature A Warp Drive Achieves When At Superluminal Speeds?? The Analysis

Boyer, Edmond

33

AVE-SESAME program for the REEDA System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The REEDA system software was modified and improved to process the AVE-SESAME severe storm data. A random access file system for the AVE storm data was designed, tested, and implemented. The AVE/SESAME software was modified to incorporate the random access file input and to interface with new graphics hardware/software now available on the REEDA system. Software was developed to graphically display the AVE/SESAME data in the convention normally used by severe storm researchers. Software was converted to AVE/SESAME software systems and interfaced with existing graphics hardware/software available on the REEDA System. Software documentation was provided for existing AVE/SESAME programs underlining functional flow charts and interacting questions. All AVE/SESAME data sets in random access format was processed to allow developed software to access the entire AVE/SESAME data base. The existing software was modified to allow for processing of different AVE/SESAME data set types including satellite surface and radar data.

Hickey, J. S.

1981-01-01

34

Termmetro de cuadrante 165 F ... Carne de ave, carne de ave molida  

E-print Network

cascarón 135° F ... Mantener calientes los alimentos 41° F ... Mantener fríos los alimentos Carne = res, puerco y cordero Carne de ave = pollo, pavo, pato y ganso Temperaturas recomedadas para los alimentos Utilizar un termómetro para alimentos, es la �NICA manera fiable de garantizar la seguridad de los

35

Atmospheric variability experiment /AVE II/ pilot experiment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE II) was conducted in May 1974. Rawinsonde releases were made at 54 upper-air stations in two thirds of the eastern U.S. at 3-hr intervals for a 24-hr period. Radar data were obtained from 11 stations located near the center of the observational area, and as many data as possible were collected from the Nimbus 5, NOAA 2, ATS-3, and DMSP satellites. The present paper provides an overview of the experiment and describes how the user community can obtain copies of the data.

Turner, R. E.; Scroggins, J. R.

1974-01-01

36

8. Wabash Ave. North. View of Loop and Dan Ryan ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

8. Wabash Ave. North. View of Loop and Dan Ryan Line. Curve at Van Buren St. and Wabash Ave. at center. Dan Ryan line starts at center and runs south (toward bottom of picture). Photo by Jet Lowe. - Union Elevated Railroad, Union Loop, Wells, Van Buren, Lake Streets & Wabash Avenue, Chicago, Cook County, IL

37

8159 S. Cicero Ave. (773) 582-0700  

E-print Network

2431 E. 65th St. (317) 253-8700 michigan Ann Arbor 3446 Washtenaw Ave. (734) 677-8500 Birmingham 31190. (313) 274-9600 Ferndale 22304 Woodward Ave. (248) 591-0300 Flint 3320 Miller Rd. (810) 733-8686 Grand

38

JACK AND PEARL RESNICK CAMPUS JACOBI MEDICAL CENTER Rhinelander Ave  

E-print Network

Faculty Parking AdditionalParking ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE OF MEDICINE JACK AND PEARL RESNICK CAMPUS 1 A U N I V E R S I T Y Albert Einstein College of Medicine #12;......................... 1225 Morris Park Ave 20. Einstein Boiler Plant............................1199 Sackett Ave. JACOBI

Yates, Andrew

39

STS-46 MS Hoffman and MS Chang-Diaz wear masks during pre-breathe on OV-104  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-46 Mission Specialist (MS) and Payload Commander (PLC) Jeffrey A. Hoffman and MS Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, wearing breathing apparatus masks, pose on the forward flight deck of Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, during pre-breathe session. With the possibility of an extravehicular activity (EVA) being added to the STS-46 agenda, the astronauts reported to this station and began the 'pre-breathe' process when problems developed during the extension of the Tethered Satellite System 1 (TSS-1). When the human body is exposed to a sudden decrease in atmospheric pressure (for instance, from the 10.2 ppsi in the crew cabin to the 4.5 ppsi of the extravehicular mobility unit (EMU)), nitrogen traces in the bloodstream will expand. This expansion can create tiny bubbles and potential for the 'bends'. In order to lessen the effect, an astronaut must 'pre-breathe' pure oxygen (the same pure oxygen he will breathe in the suit) to help 'purge' nitrogen from his bloodstream before exerting himself

1992-01-01

40

Certhiasomus, a new genus of woodcreeper (Aves: Passeriformes: Dendrocolaptidae)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Phylogenetic analysis of the family Dendrocolaptidae (Aves: Passeriformes) indicates that the two species traditionally placed in the genus Deconychura are not sister taxa. Certhiasomus, a new genus of woodcreeper, is described for one of these species, C. stictolaemus.

Derryberry, Elizabeth; Claramunt, Santiago; Chesser, R. Terry; Aleixo, Alexandre; Cracraft, Joel; Moyle, Robert G.; Brumfield, Robb T.

2010-01-01

41

AVES.NET: The Freshwater Dinoflagellates  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Hosted by AVES.NET, this website about Freshwater Dinoflagellates was created by Victor W. Fazio III and Dr. Susan Carty of Heidelberg College (Tiffin, Ohio). Two main attractions of this site are the Freshwater Dinoflagellate Image Archive, and the Recent Additions-Freshwater Dinoflagellate Images 2003 (from the 2003-04 winter field season). Individual Dinoflagellate image pages generally include a ventral view, dorsal view, or both, and the pages featuring species from Ohio include county distribution maps. Site visitors can email Dr. Carty for permission to use any of the images. The website also contains a List of Freshwater Dinoflagellates in Ohio, some of which link to the individual image pages. Additionally, the site offers a Review of Online Images of Freshwater Dinoflagellates including links to many other host sites, and a link to an online article by Dr. Susan Carty and Daniel E. Wujek entitled _A New Species of Peridinium and New Records of Dinoflagellates and Silica-Scaled Chrysophytes from Belize._ [NL

Carty, Susan; Fazio, Victor W. (1962-)

42

Enigmatic phylogeny of skuas (Aves:Stercorariidae)  

PubMed

Multiple sources of evidence show that the skuas (Aves:Stercorariidae) are a monophyletic group, closely related to gulls (Laridae. On morphological and behavioural evidence the Stercorariidae are divided into two widely divergent genera, Catharacta and Stercorarius, consistent with observed levels of nuclear and mitochondrial gene divergence. Catharacta skuas are large-bodied and with one exception breed in the Southern Hemisphere. Stercorarius skuas otherwise known as jaegers) are smaller bodied and breed exclusively in the Northern Hemisphere. Evidence from both mitochondrial and nuclear genomes and from ectoparasitic lice (Insecta:Phthiraptera) shows that the Pomarine skua, S. pomarinus, which has been recognized as being somewhat intermediate in certain morphological and behavioural characteristics, is much more closely related to species in the genus Catharacta, especially to the Northern Hemisphere-breeding Great skua, C. skua, than it is to the other two Stercorarius skuas, the Arctic skua, S. parasiticus and the Longtailed skua, S. longicaudus. Three possible explanations that might account for this discordant aspect of skua phylogeny are explored. These involve (i) the segregation of ancestral polymorphism, (ii) convergent evolution of morphology and behaviour or (iii) inter-generic hybridization. The available evidence from both nuclear and mitochondrial genomes does not exclude any of these hypotheses. Thus, resolution of this enigma of skua phylogeny awaits further work. PMID:9061968

Cohen, B L; Baker, A J; Blechschmidt, K; Dittmann, D L; Furness, R W; Gerwin, J A; Helbig, A J; de Korte, J; Marshall, H D; Palma, R L; Peter, H U; Ramli, R; Siebold, I; Willcox, M S; Wilson, R H; Zink, R M

1997-02-22

43

Enigmatic phylogeny of skuas (Aves:Stercorariidae)  

PubMed Central

Multiple sources of evidence show that the skuas (Aves:Stercorariidae) are a monophyletic group, closely related to gulls (Laridae. On morphological and behavioural evidence the Stercorariidae are divided into two widely divergent genera, Catharacta and Stercorarius, consistent with observed levels of nuclear and mitochondrial gene divergence. Catharacta skuas are large-bodied and with one exception breed in the Southern Hemisphere. Stercorarius skuas otherwise known as jaegers) are smaller bodied and breed exclusively in the Northern Hemisphere. Evidence from both mitochondrial and nuclear genomes and from ectoparasitic lice (Insecta:Phthiraptera) shows that the Pomarine skua, S. pomarinus, which has been recognized as being somewhat intermediate in certain morphological and behavioural characteristics, is much more closely related to species in the genus Catharacta, especially to the Northern Hemisphere-breeding Great skua, C. skua, than it is to the other two Stercorarius skuas, the Arctic skua, S. parasiticus and the Longtailed skua, S. longicaudus. Three possible explanations that might account for this discordant aspect of skua phylogeny are explored. These involve (i) the segregation of ancestral polymorphism, (ii) convergent evolution of morphology and behaviour or (iii) inter-generic hybridization. The available evidence from both nuclear and mitochondrial genomes does not exclude any of these hypotheses. Thus, resolution of this enigma of skua phylogeny awaits further work. PMID:9061968

Cohen, B L; Baker, A J; Blechschmidt, K; Dittmann, D L; Furness, R W; Gerwin, J A; Helbig, A J; de Korte, J; Marshall, H D; Palma, R L; Peter, H U; Ramli, R; Siebold, I; Willcox, M S; Wilson, R H; Zink, R M

1997-01-01

44

A preliminary look at AVE-SESAME 2 conducted on 19-20 April 1979  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Preliminary information on data collected, synoptic conditions, and severe and unusual weather reported during the AVE-SESAME 2 period is presented. The information provides researchers a preliminary look at conditions during the AVE-SESAME 2 period.

Williams, S. F.; Horvath, N.; Turner, R. E.

1980-01-01

45

AVE-SESAME 1: 25-MB sounding data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Seven atmospheric variability experiments (AVE), two atmospheric variability and severe storms experiments (AVSSE), and six atmospheric variability experiment-severe environmental storm and mesoscale experiments (AVE-SESAME) conducted by NASA are discussed. The dates, observation times, and data reports for each of the experiments for which data was processed are listed. The AVE experiments were conducted primarily to study atmospheric variability with emphasis on spatial and temporal in atmospheric structure that can be detected from soundings taken at 3 hr intervals but not seen in soundings taken at 12 hr intervals. The AVSSE experiments were conducted to study atmospheric structure and variability associated with severe storms combining both rawinsonde and aircraft data to provide information on near storm environments. The method of processing is discussed, estimates of the rms errors in the data are presented, an example of contact data is given, and soundings are listed which exhibited abnormal characteristics.

Gerhard, M. L.; Fuelberg, H. E.; Williams, S. F.; Turner, R. E.

1979-01-01

46

NASA's AVE 7 experiment: 25-mb sounding data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The AVE 7 Experiment is described and tabulated rawinsonde data at 25 mb internals from the surface to 25 mb for the 24 stations participating in the experiment are presented. Soundings were taken between 0000GMT May 2 and 1200 GMT May 3, 1978. The methods of data processing and the accuracy are briefly discussed. Selected synoptic charts prepared from the data are presented as well as an example of contact data. A tabulation of adverse weather events that occured during the AVE 7 period, including freezing temperature, snow, tornadoes, damaging winds, and flooding, is presented.

Davis, J. G.; Fuelberg, H. E.; Turner, R. E.

1978-01-01

47

BayesianScore(BDeu) Ave. Bayesian Score Results -Child -Sample Size 500  

E-print Network

GS PC TPDA GES BayesianScore(BDeu) Ave. Bayesian Score Results - Child - Sample Size 500 Error Bars GS PC TPDA GES BayesianScore(BDeu) Ave. Bayesian Score Results - Child3 - Sample Size 500 Error Bars TPDA GES BayesianScore(BDeu) Ave. Bayesian Score Results - Child5 - Sample Size 500 Error Bars

Brown, Laura E.

48

Diaz Olvera L., Plat D., Pochet P., Sahabana M. (2010), Entre contraintes et innovations, volutions de mobilit quotidienne dans les villes d'Afrique subsaharienne, Espace Populations Socits, n2, pp.  

E-print Network

Saharan African cities Lourdes Diaz Olvera, Didier Plat, Pascal Pochet, Maïdadi Sahabana lourdes.diazolvera@entpe.fr didier.plat@entpe.fr pascal.pochet@entpe.fr msahabana@louisberger.com Résumé Comment se déplaceton concerns the relative sharing in the use of a rare asset, the personal car, which allows to extend

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

49

Observations on the Use of Manual Signs and Gestures in the Communicative Interactions between Native Americans and Spanish Explorers of North America: The Accounts of Bernal Diaz del Castillo and Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Vaca  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The accounts of two men who participated in several Spanish-led expeditions to the New World in the early 1500s document the frequent use of manual signs and gestures in the initial interactions between European explorers and the indigenous peoples of North America. Bernal Diaz del Castillo described the events that occurred during three…

Bonvillian, John D.; Ingram, Vicky L.; McCleary, Brendan M.

2009-01-01

50

Posted on Wed, Jul. 14, 2004 AVE MARIA UNIVERSITY  

E-print Network

Monaghan has his way, the western Everglades will be the site of ''a spiritual military academy,'' Ave wants,'' says Monaghan. He hopes that Florida will approve his complex this month, so he can break and the preferential option for the poor? The environmental-stewardship worry is that Monaghan and his partner, Barron

Shrader-Frechette, Kristin

51

BOLETIN DE AVES MARINAS LATINOAMERICANAS VOLUMEN 2; NUMERO UNO  

E-print Network

normal. Esperamos que con 1a 11egada del invierno austral, las temperaturas bajen. Lluvias fuertes en 1a costa de Ecuador y Galapagos, y e1 sur de Brazil; aguas ca1ientes con cambios en vida marina en 1a isla--Con enfasis sobre aves acu~ticas de aguas marinas 0 dulces, esta revista tiene un nuevo redactor asociado

Duffy, David Cameron

52

Toyota Technological Institute at Chicago 6045 S. Kenwood Ave.  

E-print Network

Jinbo Xu Toyota Technological Institute at Chicago 6045 S. Kenwood Ave. Chicago, IL 60637 Email, optimization Employment and Affiliations 2012-present Associate Professor, Toyota Technological Institute at Chicago (at the University of Chicago) 2005-2012 Assistant Professor, Toyota Technological Institute

Xu, Jinbo

53

IDENTIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THE PEROXIREDOXIN GENE FAMILY IN AVES  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Peroxiredoxin (PRX) is a crucial antioxidant protein that protects against endogenously produced peroxides in prokaryotes to eukaryotes. To date, six different isoforms have been identified in mammals. In this study, we describe the first members of the PRX protein family to be characterized in Aves...

54

Pseudasthenes, a new genus of ovenbird (Aves: Passeriformes: Furnariidae)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Phylogenetic analysis of the family Furnariidae (Aves: Passeriformes) indicates that the genus Asthenes is polyphyletic, consisting of two groups that are not sister taxa. Pseudasthenes, a new genus of ovenbird, is described for one of these groups. The four species included in the new genus, formerly placed in Asthenes, are P. humicola, P. patagonica, P. steinbachi, and P. cactorum.

Derryberry, Elizabeth; Claramunt, Santiago; O'Quin, Kelly E.; Aleixo, Alexandre; Chesser, Terry; Remsen, J.V., Jr.; Brumfield, Robb T.

2010-01-01

55

AVES: A Computer Cluster System approach for INTEGRAL Scientific Analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The AVES computing system, based on an "Cluster" architecture is a fully integrated, low cost computing facility dedicated to the archiving and analysis of the INTEGRAL data. AVES is a modular system that uses the software resource manager (SLURM) and allows almost unlimited expandibility (65,536 nodes and hundreds of thousands of processors); actually is composed by 30 Personal Computers with Quad-Cores CPU able to reach the computing power of 300 Giga Flops (300x10{9} Floating point Operations Per Second), with 120 GB of RAM and 7.5 Tera Bytes (TB) of storage memory in UFS configuration plus 6 TB for users area. AVES was designed and built to solve growing problems raised from the analysis of the large data amount accumulated by the INTEGRAL mission (actually about 9 TB) and due to increase every year. The used analysis software is the OSA package, distributed by the ISDC in Geneva. This is a very complex package consisting of dozens of programs that can not be converted to parallel computing. To overcome this limitation we developed a series of programs to distribute the workload analysis on the various nodes making AVES automatically divide the analysis in N jobs sent to N cores. This solution thus produces a result similar to that obtained by the parallel computing configuration. In support of this we have developed tools that allow a flexible use of the scientific software and quality control of on-line data storing. The AVES software package is constituted by about 50 specific programs. Thus the whole computing time, compared to that provided by a Personal Computer with single processor, has been enhanced up to a factor 70.

Federici, M.; Martino, B. L.; Natalucci, L.; Umbertini, P.

56

Associative Verbal Encoding (a/v/e): A Measure of Language Performance and Its Relationship to Reading Achievement.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

After establishing reliability for an associative verbal encoding (a/v/e) test, the relationship between children's a/v/e and their reading achievement was investigated. Two hypotheses were examined: (1) a/v/e will improve with training, and (2) associated with improved a/v/e will be concomitant improvement in reading achievement. The subjects…

Mickelson, Norma Irene

57

Polar Express Cards Can Only Exit Onto 3rd Ave at the Main Entry/Exit Gate, Not on 2nd Ave gate.  

E-print Network

Polar Express Cards Can Only Exit Onto 3rd Ave at the Main Entry/Exit Gate, Not on 2nd Ave gate. Problems? If card entry doesn't work, just pull a normal parking ticket and stop in at the booth or main Parking with UAF Polar Express Cards: Basic Explanation: Use Your Polar Express Card for Entry and Exit

Wagner, Diane

58

AVE/VAS experiment: Synoptic summary and preliminary results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The AVE/VAS ground truth field experiment was conducted during the Spring of 1982 severe storms and weather research program. The experiment consisted of acquiring correlative ground truth measurements of rawinsonde data, corresponding to the time and space resolutions of VAS sounding data. The objectives of the AVE/VAS experiment are: (1) to acquire four dimensional data sets of the actual atmospheric structure down to the mesoscale; (2) to provide measurements for quantitative comparisons between ground based and VAS-derived atmospheric parameters; (3) to evaluate the impact of VAS data on diagnostic analysis of structural features and dynamical processes important to the development of mesoscale phenomena; (4) to evaluate the impact of VAS data on numerical model simulations, nowcasting, and other mesoscale forecasting systems.

Jedlovec, G. J.

1983-01-01

59

1. VIEW OF MILL WORKER HOUSE AT 502 ASKEW AVE. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. VIEW OF MILL WORKER HOUSE AT 502 ASKEW AVE. HOUSE IS 1 1/2 STORY, 3 BAY SIDE GABLE WITH REAR KITCHEN ELL AND PORCH EXTENDING FROM FRONT. LOCKWOOD GREENE ENGINEERS BUILT THIS AND 128 OTHER NEW HOUSES FOR NEW ENGLAND SOUTHERN MILLS IN 1923-1924. THE PREEXISTING MILL VILLAGE NEEDED TO BE EXPANDED TO ACCOMODATE WORKERS FOR THEIR NEW STARK MILL IN HOGANSVILLE. THIS HOUSE WAS BUILT WITH INDOOR PLUMBING, AND ELECTRICITY AT A COST OF APPROXIMATELY $430 PER ROOM. - 502 Askew Avenue (House), 502 Askew Avenue, Hogansville, Troup County, GA

60

AVE-Sesame 3: 25-MB sounding data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The rawinsonde sounding program for the AVE-SESAME 3 experiment is described and tabulated data at 25-mb intervals from the surface to 25 mb for the 23 National Weather Service and 19 special stations participating in the experiment are presented. Soundings were taken at 3 hr intervals beginning at 1200 GMT on April 25, 1979, and ending at 1200 GMT on April 26, 1979 (nine sounding times). The method of processing is discussed briefly, estimates of the rms errors in the data presented, an example of contact data given, reasons given for the termination of soundings below 100 mb, and soundings listed which exhibit abnormal characteristics.

Williams, S. T.; Gerhard, M. L.; Gilchrist, L. P.; Turner, R. E.

1980-01-01

61

AVE-SESAME 2: The 25-MB sounding data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The rawinsonde sounding program for the AVE-SESAME II experiment is described. Data at 25 mb intervals from the surface to 25 mb for the 23 National Weather Service and 19 special stations participating in the experiment are presented. Soundings were taken at 3 hr intervals beginning at 1200 GMT on April 19, 1979, and ending at 1200 GMT on April 20, 1979 (nine sounding times). The method of processing is discussed briefly, estimates of the rms errors in the data presented, an example of contact data given, reasons given for the termination of soundings below 100 mb, and soundings listed which exhibit abnormal characteristics.

Williams, S. F.; Gerhard, M. L.; Turner, R. E.

1980-01-01

62

AVE-SESAME 6: 25-MB sounding data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The rawinsonde sounding program for the AVE-SESAME 6 experiment is described and tabulated data at 25 mb intervals from the surface to 25 mb for the 23 National Weather Service and 15 special stations participating in the experiment are presented. Soundings were taken at 3 h intervals beginning at 1200 GMT on June 7, 1979, and ending at 1200 GMT on June 8, 1979 (nine sounding times). The method of processing is discussed briefly, estimates of the rms errors in the data presented, an example of contact data given, reasons given for the termination of soundings below 100 mb, and soundings are listed which exhibit abnormal characteristics.

Sienkiewicz, M. E.; Gilchrist, L. P.; Turner, R. E.

1981-01-01

63

AVE-SESAME IV: 25 mb sounding data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The rawinsonde sounding program for the AVE-SESAME 4 experiment is descirbed and tabulated data at 25 mb for the 23 National Weather Service and 20 special stations participating in the experiment are presented. Soundings were taken at 3 hr intervals beginning at 1200 GMT on May 9, 1979, and ending at 1200 GMT on May 10, 1979 (nine sounding times). The method of processing is discussed, estimates of the rms errors in the data are presented, and an example of contact data is given. Reasons are given for the termination of soundings below 100 mb, and soundings are listed which exhibit abnormal characteristics.

Sienkiewicz, M. E.; Gilchrist, L. P.; Turner, R. E.

1980-01-01

64

The AVE/VAS 2: The 25 mb sounding data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The rawinsonde sounding program for the AVE/VAS II experiment is described and tabulated data at 25 mb intervals are presented. Soundings were taken at 3 hr intervals, was an 18 hour period. An additional sounding was taken at the normal synoptic observation time. The processing soundings method is discussed, estimates of the RMS errors in the data are presented, and an example of contact data is given. Termination pressures of soundings taken in the meso-beta-scale network are tabulated, as are observations of ground temperature at a depth of 2 cm.

Sienkiewicz, M. E.

1982-01-01

65

AVE/VAS 1: 25 mb sounding data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The rawinsonde sounding program for the AVE/VAS I (shakedown) experiment is described. Tabulated data at 25-mb intervals for the 13 special rawinsonde stations and 1 National Weather Service station participating in the experiment are presented. Soundings were taken at 1200 and 1800 GMT on February 6, 1982, and at 0000 GMT on February 7, 1982. The method of processing soundings is discussed briefly, estimates of the RMS errors in the data are presented, and an example of contact data is given. Termination pressures of soundings are tabulated, as are observations of ground temperature at a depth of 2 cm.

Sienkiewicz, M. E.

1983-01-01

66

Augmented Virtual Environments (AVE): Dynamic Fusion of Imagery and 3D Models  

Microsoft Academic Search

We cr eate an Augmented Virtual Environment (AVE) by dynamic fusion of imagery with 3D models. The AVE provides a unique approach to visualize and comprehend multiple streams of temporal data and imagery (video and still im- ages) in time -critical applications. We present our methodologies and a prototype system for the rapid creation of accurate wide-area virtual real- ity

Ulrich Neumann; Suya You; Jinhui Hu; Bolan Jiang; Jong Weon Lee

2003-01-01

67

East Bank locations University Ave & 12th St. SE -Sanford Hall  

E-print Network

Barker Dance Center 4th St. So - Se corner Rarig Center Washington Ave. Bridge - pedestrian enclosure Tate Lab of Physics Ford Hall Amundson Hall Elect. Eng. & Computer Sci. Moos Tower Phillips Fields SCHOLARS WALK SCHOLARS WALK 4th St.Ramp Weisman Art Museum/ Garage Washington Ave. Parking Ramp

Weiblen, George D

68

NASA's participation in the AVE-SESAME '79 program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center participated with its AVE (Atmospheric Variability Experiment) in a large interagency mesoscale and severe storms experiment identified herein as AVE-SESAME '79 (Atmospheric Variability Experiment-Severe Environmental Storms and Mesoscale Experiment 1979). A primary objective of NASA was to support an effort to acquire carefully edited sets of rawinsonde data during selected severe weather events for use in correlative and diagnostic studies with satellite and radar data obtained at approximately the same times. Data were acquired during six individual 24-h experiments on both the regional and storm scales over a network in the central United States that utilized approximately 20 supplemental rawinsonde sites meshed among 23 standard National Weather Service sites. Included among the six experiments are data obtained between 1200 GMT on April 10 and 1200 GMT on April 11, encompassing the formation and development period for the tornado-producing systems that devastated Wichita Falls, Texas, and other sections of Oklahoma and Texas. The other dates for which data sets are available are April 19-20 and 25-26, May 9-10 and 20-21, and June 7-8, 1979.

Hill, K.; Turner, R. E.; Wilson, G. S.

1979-01-01

69

AVE/VAS 3: 25-mb sounding data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The rawinsonde sounding program for the AVE/VAS 3 experiment is described. Tabulated data are presented at 25-mb intervals for the 24 National Weather Service stations and 14 special stations participating in the experiment. Soundings were taken at 3-hr intervals, beginning at 1200 GMT on March 27, 1982, and ending at 0600 GMT on March 28, 1982 (7 sounding times). An additional sounding was taken at the National Weather Service stations at 1200 GMT on March 28, 1982, at the normal synoptic observation time. The method of processing soundings is briefly discussed, estimates of the RMS errors in the data are presented, and an example of contact data is given. Termination pressures of soundings taken in the mesos-beta-scale network are tabulated, as are observations of ground temperature at a depth of 2 cm.

Sienkiewicz, M. E.

1982-01-01

70

AVE-SEASAME 5: 25-mb sounding data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The rewinsonde sounding program for the AVE-SESAME 5 experiment is described and tubulated data at 25 mb intervals are presented for the 23 National Weather Service stations and 20 special stations participating in the experiment. Soundings were taken at 3-hr intervals beginning at 1200 GMT on May 20, 1979, and ending at 1200 GMT on may 21, 1979 (nine sounding times). A tenth sounding was teken at many special stations between 2100 and 0000 GMT on May 20. The method of processing is discussed, estimates of the rms errors in the data are presented, and an example of contact data is given. Reasons are given for the termination of soundings below 100 mb, and soundings with abnormal characteristics are listed.

Sienkiewicz, M. E.; Gilchrist, L. P.; Turner, R. E.

1981-01-01

71

The AVES adaptive optics spectrograph for the VLT: status report  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report on the status of AVES, the Adaptive-optics Visual Echelle Spectrograph proposed for the secondary port of the Nasmyth Adaptive Optics System (NAOS) recently installed at the VLT. AVES is an intermediate resolution (R ? 16,000) high-efficiency fixed- format echelle spectrograph which operates in the spectral band 500 - 1,000 nm. In addition to a high intrinsic efficiency, comparable to that of ESI at Keck II, it takes advantage of the adaptive optics correction provided by NAOS to reduce the sky and detector contribution in background-limited observations of weak sources, thus allowing a further magnitude gain with respect to comparable non-adaptive optics spectrographs. Simulations show that the instrument will be capable of reaching a magnitude V = 22.5 at S/N > 10 in two hours, two magnitudes weaker than GIRAFFE at the same resolution and 3 magnitudes weaker than the higher resolution UVES spectrograph. Imaging and coronographic functions have also been implemented in the design. We present the results of the final design study and we dicuss the technical and operational issues related to its implementation at the VLT as a visitor instrument. We also discuss the possibility of using a scaled-up non-adaptive optics version of the same design as an element of a double- or triple-arm intermediate-resolution spectrograph for the VLT. Such an option looks attractive in the context of a high-efficiency large-bandwidth (320 - 1,500 nm) spectrograph ("fast-shooter") being considered by ESO as a 2nd-generation VLT instrument.

Pallavicini, Roberto; Delabre, Bernard; Pasquini, Luca; Zerbi, Filippo M.; Bonanno, Giovanni; Comari, Maurizio; Conconi, Paolo; Mazzoleni, Ruben; Santin, Paolo; Damiani, Francesco; Di Marcantonio, Paolo; Franchini, Mariagrazia; Spano, Paolo; Bonifacio, P.; Catalano, Santo; Molaro, Paolo P.; Randich, S.; Rodono, Marcello

2003-03-01

72

Effects of changing irrigation practices on the ground-water hydrology of the Santa Isabel-Juana Diaz area, south central Puerto Rico  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Prior to 1930, the principal source of water for irrigation in the Santa Isabel-Juana Diaz area was surface water from outside the study area, which was delivered by a complex channel-pond system. Recharge from water applied to the fields, estimated to be 18.7 million of gallons per day, and discharge by ground-water flow to sea, estimated to be 17 million of gallons per day, were the major water- budget components prior to intensive development of the ground-water resources. Development of the ground-water resources after 1930 resulted in a substantial increase in irrigation, primarily furrow irrigation. The surface water supplied by the complex channel-pond system continued to be used and ground-water withdrawals increased sub- stantially. By 1966-68, ground-water recharge from irrigation water applied to the fields, estimated to be 37 million of gallons per day, and discharge by pumpage for irrigation, estimated to be 77 million of gallons per day, were the two major components of the ground-water budget. By 1987, drip irrigation had become the principal method of irrigation in the study area, and surface-water irrigation had, for the most part, been discontinued. The estimated aquifer recharge from irrigation water in 1987 was about 6.6 million of gallons per day, which occurred primarily in the remaining fields where furrow irrigation was still practiced. Although aquifer recharge had been reduced as a result of the conversion from furrow to drip irrigation, water levels in the aquifer were higher in 1987 than in 1968 because of the large reduction in ground-water withdrawals and subsequent recovery of ground-water levels.

Ramos-Gines, Orlando

1994-01-01

73

A preliminary look at AVE-SESAME 3 conducted on 25-26 April 1979  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

General weather conditions, including synoptic maps, radar reports, satellite photographs, precipitation areas and amounts, and a summary of severe weather reports are presented. These data provide researchers a preliminary look at conditions during the AVE-SESAME 3 period.

Williams, S. F.; Horvath, N.; Turner, R. E.

1980-01-01

74

Tarphonomus, a new genus of ovenbird (Aves : Passeriformes : Furnariidae) from South America  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Tarphonomus, a new genus of ovenbird (Aves: Passeriformes: Furnariidae) from South America, is described. Species included in the new genus, formerly placed in Upucerthia, are T. certhioides and T. harterti.

Chesser, R.T.; Brumfield, R.T.

2007-01-01

75

AVES: an adaptive optics visual echelle spectrograph for the VLT  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the preliminary study of a low cost, high performance spectrograph for the VLT, for observations in the V, R and I bands. This spectrograph is meant for intermediate (R equals 16,000) resolution spectroscopy of faint (sky and/or detector limited) sources, with particular emphasis on the study of solar-type (F-G) stars belonging to the nearest galaxies and to distant (or highly reddened) galactic clusters. The spectrograph is designed to use the adaptive optics (AO) systems at the VLT Telescope. Even if these AO systems will not provide diffraction limited images in the V, R and I bands, the photon concentration will still be above approximately 60% of the flux in an 0.3 arcsecond aperture for typical Paranal conditions. This makes the construction of a compact, cheap and efficient echelle spectrograph possible. AVES will outperform comparable non adaptive optic instruments by more than one magnitude for sky- and/or detector-limited observations, and it will be very suitable for observations in crowded fields.

Pasquini, Luca; Delabre, Bernard; Avila, Gerardo; Bonaccini, Domenico

1998-07-01

76

Angelique Diaz To Subject UPLOAD  

E-print Network

system were investigated in detail as were the detoxification pathways. The two-electron reduction of these quinones by NAD(P)H-quinone oxidoreductase (DT-di- aphorase) was not mutagenic, whereas the one-electron automobile exhaust, cigarette smoke, and urban air particulates (1-3). Quinones are also found naturally

77

Pressure Contact Sounding Data for NASA's Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE 3)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The basic rawinsonde data are described at each pressure contact from the surface to sounding termination for the 41 stations participating in the AVE III measurement program that began at 0000 GMT on February 6 and ended at 1200 GMT on February 7, 1975. Soundings were taken at 3-hour intervals during a large period of the experiment from most stations within the United States east of about 105 degrees west longitude. Methods of data processing, change in reduction scheme since the AVE II pilot experiment, and data accuracy are briefly discussed. An example of contact data is presented, and microfiche cards of all the contact data are included in the appendix. The AVE III project was conducted to better understand and establish the extent of applications for meteorological satellite sensor data through correlative ground truth experiments and to provide basic experimental data for use in studies of atmospheric scales of-motion interrelationships.

Fuelberg, H. E.; Hill, C. K.; Turner, R. E.; Long, K. E.

1975-01-01

78

Reduction and error analysis of the AVE 2 pilot experiment data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The reduction techniques used to process data from the pilot experiment of the second NASA atmospheric variability experiment (AVE IIP), which was conducted during a 24 hour period beginning at 1200 GMT on May 11, 1974, and ending at 1200 GMT on May 12, 1974 are described. Each step of the data handling process is described through the presentation of computer flow charts, programs, equations, and narrative. An error analysis of the final output is presented, and results of the AVE IIP reduction process are compared with results from the National Weather Service. The AVE IIP sounding data contain more detail than National Weather Service data, but the two data sets may be used together without difficulty.

Fuelberg, H. E.

1974-01-01

79

Department of Surgery 50 Charlton Ave E. Faculty of Health Sciences Hamilton Ontario, Canada  

E-print Network

Department of Surgery 50 Charlton Ave E. Faculty of Health Sciences Hamilton Ontario, Canada L8N 4A6 Division of Thoracic Surgery Research Group, Department Clinical Epidemiology & Biostatistics Regionalization on Outcomes in High Risk Cancer Surgery Introduction This fellowship is hosted in conjunction

Haykin, Simon

80

Pressure contact sounding data for NASA's Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE 3)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The basic rawinsonde data are described at each pressure contact from the surface to sounding termination for the 41 stations participating in the AVE III measurement program that began at 0000 GMT on February 6 and ended at 1200 GMT on February 7, 1975. Soundings were taken at 3-hour intervals during a large period of the experiment from most stations

H. E. Fuelberg; C. K. Hill; R. E. Turner; K. E. Long

1975-01-01

81

Pressure contact sounding data for NASA's Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE 2)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The basic rawinsonde data are described at each pressure contact from the surface to sounding termination for the 54 stations participating in the AVE 2 pilot experiment. Soundings were taken at three-hour intervals from stations within the United States east of about 105 degrees west longitude. Methods of data reduction and estimates of data accuracy are discussed. Examples of the

H. E. Fuelberg; R. E. Turner

1975-01-01

82

OMI total ozone column validation with Aura-AVE CAFS observations  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we present validation results of the total ozone column data products of the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) by using airborne observations by the CCD Actinic Flux Spectrometer (CAFS) instrument. CAFS was flown during Aura Validation Experiment (AVE) campaigns organized by NASA in support of the validation of EOS-Aura satellite data products. The accuracy of individual CAFS total

M. Kroon; I. Petropavlovskikh; R. Shetter; S. Hall; K. Ullmann; J. P. Veefkind; R. D. McPeters; E. V. Browell; P. F. Levelt

2008-01-01

83

Patterns of genetic variation in the adaptive radiation of New World crossbills (Aves: Loxia )  

Microsoft Academic Search

Incipient species groups or young adaptive radiations such as crossbills (Aves: Loxia ) present the opportunity to investigate directly the processes occurring during speciation. New World crossbills include white-winged crossbills ( Loxia leucoptera ), Hispaniolan crossbills ( Loxia megaplaga ), and red crossbills ( Loxia curvirostra complex), the last of which is comprised of at least nine morphologically and vocally

THOMAS L. PARCHMAN; CRAIG W. BENKMAN; SETH C. B RITCH

2006-01-01

84

MAIN GATE, INTERSECTION OF 4TH AVE (200 NORTH) AND N ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

MAIN GATE, INTERSECTION OF 4TH AVE (200 NORTH) AND N STREET (895 EAST), SALT LAKE CITY, UT. VIEW LOOKING EAST THROUGH MAIN CEMETERY GATE TO CEMETERY'S MAIN STREET, REPHOTOGRAPH OF HISTORIC SHIPLER PHOTO # 18276, UTAH STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY COLLECTION. - Salt Lake City Cemetery, 200 N Street, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT

85

WATERSHED COUNCIL Chairman: Carl Lee Hill 2925 SW 6th Ave., Ste. 2 Coordinator: Jennifer Martin  

E-print Network

OWYHEE WATERSHED COUNCIL Chairman: Carl Lee Hill 2925 SW 6th Ave., Ste. 2 Coordinator: Jennifer resources for the economic and environmental benefit of the Owyhee watershed. June 10, 2004 NWPCC Attn: Lynn: DRAFT OWYHEE SUBBASIN PLAN Enclosed is the dissenting opinion of the Owyhee Watershed Council intended

86

SELECCIN DE ACACIAS PARA LA CONSTRUCCIN DE NIDOS DE AVES: UN BENEFICIO INDIRECTO DEL MUTULISMO  

E-print Network

SELECCI�N DE ACACIAS PARA LA CONSTRUCCI�N DE NIDOS DE AVES: UN BENEFICIO INDIRECTO DEL MUTULISMO caducifolio centroamericano, y comúnmente construyen sus nidos en acacias, principalmente en Acacia collinsii alimenta de las secreciones de los nectarios y los cuerpos de Belt de la de la acacia. Por su parte, la

Cuervo, Andrés

87

Bone damage patterns found in the avian prey remains of crested caracara Caracara plancus (Aves, Falconiformes)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The following paper presents the results of the analysis of the avian prey bones found in uneaten remains of crested caracara (Caracara plancus, Aves, Falconiformes) from La Pampa province, Argentina. Anatomical parts representation and taphonomic modifications were evaluated and compared to results of the evaluation of bone remains recovered from crested caracara’s pellets and to previous studies of other diurnal

Claudia I. Montalvo; Pedro O. Tallade; Fernando J. Fernández; Germán J. Moreira; Daniel J. Rafuse; Luciano J. M. De Santis

2011-01-01

88

Atlas de aves: Un metodo para documentar distribucion y seguir poblaciones  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Los Atlas de Aves son proyectos nacionales o regionalies para trazar en mapas la distribucion en reproduccion de cada especie de ave. Ese procedimiento se esta usando en Europa, Australia, Nueva Zelanda, Norteamerica, y partes de Africa. El tama?o de los cuadrados varia de medio grado de latitud y Iongitud hasta 5 x 5 km. El trabajo de campo de cada proyecto exige aproxlmadamente cinco a?os, pero los aficionados pueden llevar a cabo la mayor parte del trabajo. Es posible almacenar los resultados en un computador personal. Hay muchos beneficios: (I) se presenta la distribucion corriente de las aves de la nacion, del estado, o de la Iocalidad; (2) se desarrolla nueva informacion especialmente sobre especies raras o en peligro; (3) se descubren areas que tienen una avlfauna sobresaliente o habitats raros y ayuda a su proteccion, (4) se documentan cambios de dlstribucion; (5) se pueden usar para documentar cambios de poblacion, especialmente en los tropicos donde otros metodos son mas dificiles de usar porque hay muchas especies y no hay muchos observadores calificados en la identificacion de sonidos de las aves; (6) son proyectos buenos de investigacion para estudiantes graduados; (7) los turistas y los jefes de excursiones de historia natural pueden contribuir con muchas informaciones

Robbins, C.S.; Dowell, B.A.; Dawson, D.K.

1988-01-01

89

Data for NASA's AVE 5 experiment: 25 mb sounding data and synoptic charts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The AVE V Experiment is described and tabulated rawinsonde data at 25-mb intervals from the surface to 25 mb for the 23 stations participating in the experiment are presented. Soundings were taken between 0000 GMT, June 11, and 1200 GMT, June 12, 1976. The methods of data processing and accuracy are briefly discussed. An example of contact data is also included.

Humbert, M. E.; Hill, K.

1977-01-01

90

A preliminary look at AVE-SESAME 4 conducted on 9-10 May 1979  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report contains information on data collected, symptotic conditions, and severe and unusual weather reported during the Atmospheric Variability Experiment Severe Environmental Storms and Mesoscale Experiment (AVE-SESAME) 4 period. The information provides researchers a look at conditions during the period.

July, M.; Turner, R. E.

1980-01-01

91

Evolution of sexual size dimorphism in grouse and allies (Aves: Phasianidae) in relation to mating competition, fecundity  

E-print Network

Evolution of sexual size dimorphism in grouse and allies (Aves: Phasianidae) in relation to mating investigated whether these three selective processes are related to SSD evolution in grouse and allies

Figuerola, Jordi

92

Pressure contact sounding data for NASA's Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE 2). [rawinsondes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The basic rawinsonde data are described at each pressure contact from the surface to sounding termination for the 54 stations participating in the AVE 2 pilot experiment. Soundings were taken at three-hour intervals from stations within the United States east of about 105 degrees west longitude. Methods of data reduction and estimates of data accuracy are discussed. Examples of the data records produced are shown. The AVE 2 pilot experiment was conducted as part of NASA's program to better understand and establish the extent of applications for meteorological satellite sensor data through correlative ground truth experiments and to provide basic experimental data for use in studies of atmospheric scales-of-motion interrelationships.

Fuelberg, H. E.; Turner, R. E.

1975-01-01

93

Large-scale vertical motion calculations in the AVE IV Experiment. [of atmospheric wind velocity  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Using 3- and 6-h consecutive rawinsonde and surface data from NASA's AVE IV Experiment, synoptic-scale vertical motion calculations are made using an adiabatic technique and three variations of the kinematic technique. Both subjective and objective comparisons in space and time between the sign and magnitude of the computed vertical velocities and precipitation intensities are made. These comparisons are conducted to determine which method would consistently produce realistic magnitudes, patterns, and vertical profiles of vertical velocity essential to the diagnostic study of the relationship between severe convective storms and their environment in AVE IV. The kinematic method, adjusted to the adiabatic value at 100 mb, proved to produce the best overall vertical velocities.

Wilson, G. S.

1976-01-01

94

Fossils reveal an early Miocene presence of the aberrant gruiform Aves: Aptornithidae in New Zealand  

Microsoft Academic Search

A member of the New Zealand endemic family (Aves: Aptornithidae) is described from the Early Miocene St Bathans Fauna of Central\\u000a Otago, South Island, New Zealand. The new species, based on two thoracic vertebrae, is provisionally referred to the highly\\u000a distinctive Late Pleistocene–Holocene extinct genus Aptornis Mantell, 1848 (in Quart J Geol Soc Lond 4:225–238, 1848). It differs from both

Trevor H. WorthyAlan; Alan J. D. Tennyson; R. Paul Scofield

2011-01-01

95

k=10 GS PC TPDA GES Ave. Bayesian Score Results -Child -Sample Size 500  

E-print Network

SC k=10 GS PC TPDA GES Bayesian Score (BDeu) Ave. Bayesian Score Results - Child - Sample Size 500 - Sample Size 500 Error Bars = +/- Std.Dev. -130 -120 -110 -100 -90 MMHC OR1 k=5 OR1 k=10 OR1 k=20 OR2 k=5 - Child5 - Sample Size 500 Error Bars = +/- Std.Dev. -260 -240 -220 -200 -180 * MMHC OR1 k=5 OR1 k=10 OR1

Brown, Laura E.

96

Complete mitochondrial genome of the Baikal teal Anas formosa (Aves, Anseriformes, Anatidae).  

PubMed

The Baikal teal Anas formosa (Aves, Anseriformes, Anatidae) is classified as "Vulnerable" on the IUCN Red List. Here, whole mitochondrial genome of A. formosa was amplified and sequenced. The total length of the Baikal teal mitochondrial genome is 16,594 bp, which consists of 13 protein-coding, 2 rRNA, 22 tRNA genes and 1 control region. The characteristics of the mitochondrial genomes were analyzed and discussed in detail. PMID:22040069

Ryu, Shi Hyun; Hwang, Ui Wook

2011-08-01

97

Data for NASA's AVE 4 experiment: 25 mb sounding data and synoptic charts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The AVE IV Experiment is described and tabulated rawinsonde data at 25 mb intervals from the surface to 25 mb for the 42 stations participating in the experiment are presented. Soundings were taken between 0000 GMT, April 24, and 1,200 GMT, April 25, 1975. The methods of data processing and accuracy are briefly discussed. Synoptic charts prepared from the data are presented, as well as an example of contact data.

Fucik, N. F.; Turner, R. E.

1976-01-01

98

Data for NASA's AVE 4 experiment: 25-mb sounding data and synoptic charts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The AVE 4 Experiment is described and tabulated rawinsonde data at 25-mb intervals from the surface to 25 mb for the 42 stations participating in the experiment are presented. Soundings were taken between 0000 GMT, April 24 and 1200 GMT, April 25, 1975. The methods of data processing and accuracy are discussed. Synoptic charts prepared from the data are presented, as well as an example of contact data.

Fucik, N. F.; Turner, R. E.

1975-01-01

99

AVE8134, a novel potent PPAR? agonist, improves lipid profile and glucose metabolism in dyslipidemic mice and type 2 diabetic rats  

PubMed Central

Aim: AVE8134 is a structurally novel potent PPAR? agonist. The aim of this study is to investigate the efficacy of AVE8134 on lipid profile and glucose metabolism in dyslipidemic mice and type 2 diabetic rats. Methods: A cell based PPAR Gal4 transactivation assay was constructed for testing the activities of AVE8134 at 3 different PPAR isoforms in vitro. Transgenic human Apo A1 (hApo A1) mice and insulin-resistant ZDF rats were used to evaluate the effects of AVE8134 in vivo. Results: AVE8134 was a full PPAR? dominated PPAR agonist (the values of EC50 for human and rodent PPAR? receptor were 0.01 and 0.3 ?mol/L, respectively). AVE8134 was not active at PPAR? receptor. In female hApo A1 mice, AVE8134 (1–30 mg·kg?1·d?1, po for 12 d) dose-dependently lowered the plasma triglycerides, and increased the serum HDL-cholesterol, hApo A1 and mouse Apo E levels. In female ZDF rats, AVE8134 (3–30 mg·kg?1·d?1 for 2 weeks) improved insulin-sensitivity index. In pre-diabetic male ZDF rats (at the age of 7 weeks), AVE8134 (10 mg·kg?1·d?1 for 8 weeks) produced an anti-diabetic action comparable to rosiglitazone, without the PPAR? mediated adverse effects on body weight and heart weight. In male ZDF rats (at the age of 6 weeks), AVE8134 (20 mg·kg?1·d?1 for 12 weeks) increased mRNA levels of the target genes LPL and PDK4 about 20 fold in the liver, and there was no relevant effect with rosiglitazone. Conclusion: AVE8134 improves lipid profile and glucose metabolism in dyslipidemic mice and type 2 diabetic rats. PMID:22212431

Schäfer, Hans Ludwig; Linz, Wolfgang; Falk, Eugen; Glien, Maike; Glombik, Heiner; Korn, Marcus; Wendler, Wolfgang; Herling, Andreas W; Rütten, Hartmut

2012-01-01

100

AVES-IMCO: an adaptive optics visible spectrograph and imager/coronograph for NAOS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The NAOS adaptive optics system will very soon provide diffraction-limited images on the VLT, down to the visible wavelengths (0.020 arcseconds at 0.83 micron for instance). At the moment, the only instrument dedicated to NAOS is the CONICA spectro-imager, operating in the near-infrared from 1 to 5 microns. We are now proposing to ESO, in collaboration with an Italian group, the development of a visible spectrograph/imager/coronograph, AVES-IMCO (Adaptive Optics Visual Echelle Spectrograph and IMager/COronograph). We present here the general concept of the new instrument as well as its expected performances in the different modes.

Beuzit, Jean-Luc; Lagrange, A.-M.; Mouillet, D.; Chauvin, G.; Stadler, E.; Charton, J.; Lacombe, F.; AVES-IMCO Team

2001-05-01

101

Data for first NASA Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE 1). Part 1: Data tabulation. [rawindsonde data for eastern United States  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A tablulation is given of rawinsonde data for NASA's first Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE 1) conducted during the period February 19-22, 1964. Methods of data handling and processing, and estimates of error magnitudes are also given. Data taken on the AVE 1 project in 1964 enabled an analysis of a large sector of the eastern United States on a fine resolution time scale. This experiment was run in February 1964, and data were collected as a wave developed in the East Gulf on a frontal system which extended through the eastern part of the United States. The primary objective of AVE 1 was to investigate the variability of parameters in space and over time intervals of three hours, and to integrate the results into NASA programs which require this type of information. The results presented are those from one approach, and represent only a portion of the total research effort that can be accomplished.

Scoggins, J. R.; Smith, O. E.

1973-01-01

102

Comparative morphometric study of the vestibular system of the vertebrata: reptilia, aves, amphibia, and pisces.  

PubMed

Morphometric measurements were made from serial sections of the vestibular system in four classes of vertebrates: Reptilia, Aves, Amphibia, and Pisces. Representative species of reptile studied were the lizard (Gekko gecko), the common garter snake (Thamnophis sp.), and the common turtle (Chelonia sp.). The budgie (Melopsittacus undulatas), the common pigeon (Columba domestica), the yellow-bellied sapsucker (Sphyrapicus varius), and the horned owl (Bubo virginianus) were chosen as representative of the bird. For the amphibian, the leopard frog (Rana pipiens), and the mud puppy (Necturus maculatus) were chosen for study. As representative of the fish, the goldfish (Carassius auratus), the tilapia (Tilapia mossambica), the guppy (Lebistes sp.), and the sea horse (Hippocampus sp.) were used in these measurements. The morphometric data obtained were then used in estimates of the time constants in the Steinhausen equation which describes the biophysics of fluid flow in the semicircular canals. In general, the time constants (theta/II in the Steinhausen equation) of these representatives of Reptilia, Aves, and Amphibia were of magnitude similar to those reported in mammals, despite the dissimilarities in the diameters of the ducts, the duct radii of curvature, the dimensions of the cristae ampullares and the utricle, and volumes of endolymph within the vestibular system. However, the short-time constants in Pisces were larger (therefore providing a slower response) than those in other vertebrates, and were similar to that of the turtle and the mud puppy. PMID:3485883

Ramprashad, F; Landolt, J P; Money, K E; Laufer, J

1986-01-01

103

Clinical comparison between AVED patients with 744 del A mutation and Friedreich ataxia with GAA expansion in 15 Moroccan families  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fifteen Moroccan families with a phenotype resembling Friedreich Ataxia (FA) were studied. Seven families (13 patients) had the 744 del A mutation in the alpha-tocopherol transfer protein (?-TTP) gene, characteristic of ataxia with vitamin E deficiency (AVED). The other eight families (16 patients) had GAA expansions in the first intron of the frataxin gene. The clinical differences between the two

Ali Benomar; Mohammed Yahyaoui; Farid Meggouh; Ahmed Bouhouche; Mohammed Boutchich; Naima Bouslam; Abdelhaq Zaim; Michèle Schmitt; Halima Belaidi; Reda Ouazzani; Michel Koenig

2002-01-01

104

ANGELA COLLINS Ave. SE, St. Petersburg, Florida 33701. (727) 896-8626. angela.collins@myfwc.com  

E-print Network

ANGELA COLLINS 100 8th Ave. SE, St. Petersburg, Florida 33701. (727) 896-8626. angela.collins experience, diving, fishing) Quarantine and rehabilitation of marine animals PUBLICATIONS Collins, A reef fish. Fishery Bulletin 109: 232-242. Collins, A.B. and Barbieri, L.R. 2010. Behavior, Habitat

Motta, Philip J.

105

Influencia del viento en el comportamiento de búsqueda del alimento en un grupo de aves insectívoras forestales  

Microsoft Academic Search

Carrascal, L.M, 1986. Influencia del viento en el comportamiento de búsqueda del alimento en un grupo de aves insectívoras forestales. Misc. Zool., 10: 277-285. Influence of wind on the foraging behaviour of a guild of arboreal insectivorous birds.- This work was carried away in a subalpine coniferous forest in Central Spain. Wind shifts the birds to the soil and to

L. M. Carrascal

2008-01-01

106

Duval County Extension Office Program Location: 1010 N McDuff Ave, Jacksonville, FL 32254, unless noted  

E-print Network

selection, Nutrition and feeding Management of recycling chicken litter Current regulations & petition program areas: Family Life Education Money Management Nutrition, Health Agriculture / Small FarmsDuval County Extension Office Program Location: 1010 N McDuff Ave, Jacksonville, FL 32254, unless

Watson, Craig A.

107

Associative Verbal Encoding (a/v/e): A Measure of Language Performance and Its Relationship to Reading Achievement.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the assumption that language expression and reading performance are related processes. Subjects included a total of 676 nine-year-old children of heterogeneous socioeconomic status, intelligence, and achievement levels. Verbal fluency was defined as being a measure of associative verbal encoding (a/v/e), wherein children give…

Mickelson, Norma I.

108

St. Cyr AVE. Southern AVE.  

E-print Network

317 341 340 344 333 331 312 311A 341 CNM Central New Mexico Community College Student Family HousingCampus Index Map CENTRAL CAMPUS NORTH CAMPUS SOUTH CAMP. CNM Yale Lomas Indian School Central Avenida Caesar

Maccabe, Barney

109

Morris Park Ave Rhinelander Ave  

E-print Network

Albert Einstein College of Medicine ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE OF MEDICINE JACK AND PEARL RESNICK CAMPUS Building 19. Einstein Boiler Plant JACOBI MEDICAL CENTER 20. Nurses' Residence MEDICAL PARK EINSTEIN PROGRAM LOCATIONS Glass Building Ob/Gyn Private Practice

Kenny, Paraic

110

A Megafauna’s Microfauna: Gastrointestinal Parasites of New Zealand’s Extinct Moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes)  

PubMed Central

We perform the first multidisciplinary study of parasites from an extinct megafaunal clade using coprolites from the New Zealand moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes). Ancient DNA and microscopic analyses of 84 coprolites deposited by four moa species (South Island giant moa, Dinornis robustus; little bush moa, Anomalopteryx didiformis; heavy-footed moa, Pachyornis elephantopus; and upland moa, Megalapteryx didinus) reveal an array of gastrointestinal parasites including coccidians (Cryptosporidium and members of the suborder Eimeriorina), nematodes (Heterakoidea, Trichostrongylidae, Trichinellidae) and a trematode (Echinostomida). Parasite eggs were most prevalent and diverse in coprolites from lowland sites, where multiple sympatric moa species occurred and host density was therefore probably higher. Morphological and phylogenetic evidence supports a possible vicariant Gondwanan origin for some of the moa parasites. The discovery of apparently host-specific parasite taxa suggests paleoparasitological studies of megafauna coprolites may provide useful case-studies of coextinction. PMID:23451203

Wood, Jamie R.; Wilmshurst, Janet M.; Rawlence, Nicolas J.; Bonner, Karen I.; Worthy, Trevor H.; Kinsella, John M.; Cooper, Alan

2013-01-01

111

Characteristics of ageostrophic flow in the vicinity of a severe weather outbreak - AVE-SESAME I  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

GOES satellite data was used to examine the ageostrophic flow in the vicinity of severe weather outbreaks along the Red River between Texas and Oklahoma in April 1979. The observations were part of the NASA AVE-SESAME I data on atmospheric states close to severe weather conditions. The Barnes Objective Analysis Technique was employed to analyze the data on a 100 km grid. The ageostrophic wind was defined on a regional scale from satellite data on different levels of cloud wind vectors, with a height change signalling a short-wave system in a long-wave trough. The percentage of deviation of the subgeostrophic winds from the geostrophic wind was calculated, and maximum departure corresponded with the region of greatest storm development. Time cross sections of additions to the ageostrophic flow were made as a function of pressure at 100 mb intervals from 900-100 mb. The ageostrophic acceleration was consistently twice the geostrophic acceleration.

Arnold, J. E.

1982-01-01

112

TES Carbon Monoxide Validation during the Two AVE Campaigns using the Argus and ALIAS Instruments on NASA's WB-57F  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Aura Validation Experiment (AVE) focuses on validating Aura satellite measurements of important atmospheric trace gases using ground-based, aircraft, and balloon-borne instruments. Global satellite observations of CO from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) on the EOS Aura satellite have been ongoing since September 2004. This paper discusses CO validation experiments during the Oct-AVE (2004 Houston, Texas) and CR-AVE (2006 San Jose, Costa Rica) campaigns. The coincidences in location and time between the satellite observations and the available in situ profiles for some cases are not ideal. However, the CO distribution patterns in the two validation flight areas are shown to have very little variability in the aircraft and satellite . observations, thereby making them suitable for validation comparisons. TES CO profiles, which typically have a retrieval uncertainty of 10-20%, are compared with in situ CO measurements from NASA Ames Research Center's Argus instrument taken on board the WB-57F aircraft during Oct-AVE. TES CO retrievals during CR-AVE are compared with in situ measurements from Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Aircraft Laser Infrared Absorption Spectrometer (ALIAS) instrument as well as with the Argus instrument, both taken on board the WB-57F aircraft. During CR-AVE, the average overall difference between ALIAS and Argus CO was 4%, with the ALIAS measurement higher. During individual flights, 2-min time-averaged differences between the two in situ instruments had standard deviation of 14%. The TES averaging kernels and a priori constraint profiles for CO are applied to the in situ data for proper comparisons to account for the reduced vertical resolution and the influence of the a priori in the satellite-derived profile. In the TES sensitive pressure range, approx.700-200 hPa, the in situ profiles and TES profiles agree within 5-10%, less than the variability in CO distributions obtained by both TES and the aircraft instruments in the two regions. TES CO is slightly lower than in situ measurements in the Houston area (midlatitudes) and slightly higher than in situ CO measurements in the Costa Rica region (tropical).

Lopez, Jinena P.; Luo, Ming; Christensen, Lance E.; Loewenstein, Max; Jost, Hansjurg; Webster, Christopher R.; Osterman, Greg

2008-01-01

113

4202E.FowlerAve.,ALN151,Tampa,FL33620www.sa.usf.edu Emergency Contacts At-a-Glance  

E-print Network

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(813) 974-2831 Crisis Center ofTampa Bay4202E.FowlerAve.,ALN151,Tampa,FL33620·www.sa.usf.edu Emergency Contacts At-a-Glance EMERGENCY

Meyers, Steven D.

114

EOLETIN DE AVES MARINAS LATINOMAMERICANAS (e . I.p.A . (I.e.B.p.)/ P.S.G.) VOLUY.EN I , NUMERO 2. 1986  

E-print Network

sabre aves marinas:- . Tercer simposio: 1. Preliminary data on some aspects of the ecology of brown pelicans in Puerto Rl,co and the U. S. Virgin Islands . 2.Notas sobre una colonia de la gaviota chica (Ste

Duffy, David Cameron

115

Data for NASA's AVE 3 experiment: 25-mb sounding data and synoptic charts. [investigation of atmospheric parameters detected from satellite data under conditions of heavy snow cover  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The atmospheric variability experiment (AVE 3) is described and tabulated rawinsonde data at 25-mb intervals from the surface to 25 mb for the 41 stations is presented. The experiment was conducted between February 6 and February 7, 1975. Brief discussions are given on methods of data processing, changes in the reduction scheme since the AVE 2 pilot experiment, and data accuracy. An example of contact data is presented as well as synoptic charts prepared from the data.

Fuelberg, H. E.; Turner, R. E.

1975-01-01

116

Antonio Diaz-Calderon Jet Propulsion Laboratory  

E-print Network

or rollover. A methodology is presented to es- timate proximity to tipover for autonomous field robots@jpl.nasa.gov Alonzo Kelly The Robotics Institute Carnegie Mellon University On-Line Stability Margin and Attitude Estimation for Dynamic Articulating Mobile Robots Abstract Stability is an important concern for vehicles

Kelly, Alonzo

117

Angela Phillips Diaz, MBA Managing Director  

E-print Network

officials including the first International Space Station (ISS) Crew Code of Conduct leadership positions in Washington DC including international relations at NASA international relations experience, she has held executive leadership positions

Ginzel, Matthew

118

Angela Phillips Diaz, MBA Managing Director  

E-print Network

with Russian government officials including the first International Space Station various executive leadership positions in Washington DC including international-Proliferation legislation. In addition to her international relations experience, she has held

Holland, Jeffrey

119

Molecular phylogeny of the spoonbills (Aves: Threskiornithidae) based on mitochondrial DNA  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Spoonbills (genus Platalea) are a small group of wading birds, generally considered to constitute the subfamily Plataleinae (Aves: Threskiornithidae). We reconstructed phylogenetic relationships among the six species of spoonbills using variation in sequences of the mitochondrial genes ND2 and cytochrome b (total 1796 bp). Topologies of phylogenetic trees reconstructed using maximum likelihood, maximum parsimony, and Bayesian analyses were virtually identical and supported monophyly of the spoonbills. Most relationships within Platalea received strong support: P. minor and P. regia were closely related sister species, P. leucorodia was sister to the minor-regia clade, and P. alba was sister to the minor-regia-leucorodia clade. Relationships of P. flavipes and P. ajaja were less well resolved: these species either formed a clade that was sister to the four-species clade, or were successive sisters to this clade. This phylogeny is consistent with ideas of relatedness derived from spoonbill morphology. Our limited sampling of the Threskiornithinae (ibises), the putative sister group to the spoonbills, indicated that this group is paraphyletic, in agreement with previous molecular data; this suggests that separation of the Threskiornithidae into subfamilies Plataleinae and Threskiornithinae may not be warranted.

Chesser, R. Terry; Yeung, Carol K.L.; Yao, Cheng-Te; Tian, Xiu-Hua; Li, Shou-Hsien

2010-01-01

120

Molecular phylogeny of the spoonbills (Aves: Threskiornithidae) based on mitochondrial DNA  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Spoonbills (genus Platalea) are a small group of wading birds, generally considered to constitute the subfamily Plataleinae (Aves: Threskiornithidae). We reconstructed phylogenetic relationships among the six species of spoonbills using variation in sequences of the mitochondrial genes ND2 and cytochrome b (total 1796 bp). Topologies of phylogenetic trees reconstructed using maximum likelihood, maximum parsimony, and Bayesian analyses were virtually identical and supported monophyly of the spoonbills. Most relationships within Platalea received strong support: P. minor and P. regia were closely related sister species, P. leucorodia was sister to the minor-regia clade, and P. alba was sister to the minor-regia-leucorodia clade. Relationships of P. flavipes and P. ajaja were less well resolved: these species either formed a clade that was sister to the four-species clade, or were successive sisters to this clade. This phylogeny is consistent with ideas of relatedness derived from spoonbill morphology. Our limited sampling of the Threskiornithinae (ibises), the putative sister group to the spoonbills, indicated that this group is paraphyletic, in agreement with previous molecular data; this suggests that separation of the Threskiornithidae into subfamilies Plataleinae and Threskiornithinae may not be warranted. Copyright ?? 2010. Magnolia Press.

Chesser, R.T.; Yeung, C.K.L.; Yao, C.-T.; Tian, X.-H.; Li, S.-H.

2010-01-01

121

Patterns of genetic variation in the adaptive radiation of New World crossbills (Aves: Loxia).  

PubMed

Incipient species groups or young adaptive radiations such as crossbills (Aves: Loxia) present the opportunity to investigate directly the processes occurring during speciation. New World crossbills include white-winged crossbills (Loxia leucoptera), Hispaniolan crossbills (Loxia megaplaga), and red crossbills (Loxia curvirostra complex), the last of which is comprised of at least nine morphologically and vocally differentiated forms ('call types') where divergent natural selection for specialization on different conifer resources has been strongly implicated as driving diversification. Here we use amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers to investigate patterns of genetic variation across populations, call types, and species of New World crossbills. Tree-based analyses using 440 AFLP loci reveal strongly supported clustering of the formally recognized species, but did not separate individuals from the eight call types in the red crossbill complex, consistent with recent divergence and ongoing gene flow. Analyses of genetic differentiation based on inferred allele frequency variation however, reveal subtle but significant levels of genetic differentiation among the different call types of the complex and indicate that between call-type differentiation is greater than that found among different geographic locations within call types. Interpreted in light of evidence of divergent natural selection and strong premating reproductive isolation, the observed genetic differentiation suggests restricted gene flow among sympatric call types consistent with the early stages of ecological speciation. PMID:16689904

Parchman, Thomas L; Benkman, Craig W; Britch, Seth C

2006-06-01

122

Resolving lost herbivore community structure using coprolites of four sympatric moa species (Aves: Dinornithiformes)  

PubMed Central

Knowledge of extinct herbivore community structuring is essential for assessing the wider ecological impacts of Quaternary extinctions and determining appropriate taxon substitutes for rewilding. Here, we demonstrate the potential for coprolite studies to progress beyond single-species diet reconstructions to resolving community-level detail. The moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes) of New Zealand are an intensively studied group of nine extinct herbivore species, yet many details of their diets and community structuring remain unresolved. We provide unique insights into these aspects of moa biology through analyses of a multispecies coprolite assemblage from a rock overhang in a montane river valley in southern New Zealand. Using ancient DNA (aDNA), we identified 51 coprolites, which included specimens from four sympatric moa species. Pollen, plant macrofossils, and plant aDNA from the coprolites chronicle the diets and habitat preferences of these large avian herbivores during the 400 y before their extinction (?1450 AD). We use the coprolite data to develop a paleoecological niche model in which moa species were partitioned based on both habitat (forest and valley-floor herbfield) and dietary preferences, the latter reflecting allometric relationships between body size, digestive efficiency, and nutritional requirements. Broad ecological niches occupied by South Island giant moa (Dinornis robustus) and upland moa (Megalapteryx didinus) may reflect sexual segregation and seasonal variation in habitat use, respectively. Our results show that moa lack extant ecological analogs, and their extinction represents an irreplaceable loss of function from New Zealand’s terrestrial ecosystems. PMID:24082104

Wood, Jamie R.; Wilmshurst, Janet M.; Richardson, Sarah J.; Rawlence, Nicolas J.; Wagstaff, Steven J.; Worthy, Trevor H.; Cooper, Alan

2013-01-01

123

Coprolite deposits reveal the diet and ecology of the extinct New Zealand megaherbivore moa (Aves, Dinornithiformes)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The discovery in New Zealand of Late Holocene deposits of coprolites from extinct avian megaherbivores has provided a unique opportunity to gain a detailed insight into the ecology of these birds across ecologically diverse habitats. Macrofossil analysis of 116 coprolites of the giant ratite moa (Aves, Dinornithiformes) reveals a diverse diet of herbs and low shrubs in both semi-arid and high rainfall ecological zones, overturning previous models of moa as dominantly browsers of trees and shrubs. Ancient DNA analysis identified coprolites from four moa species (South Island giant moa, Dinornis robustus; upland moa, Megalapteryx didinus; heavy-footed moa, Pachyornis elephantopus and stout-legged moa, Euryapteryx gravis), revealing a larger dietary variation between habitat types than between species. The new data confirm that moa fed on a variety of endemic plant taxa with unusual growth forms previously suggested to have co-evolved with moa. Lastly, the feeding ecologies of moa are shown to be widely different to introduced mammalian herbivores.

Wood, Jamie R.; Rawlence, Nicolas J.; Rogers, Geoffery M.; Austin, Jeremy J.; Worthy, Trevor H.; Cooper, Alan

2008-12-01

124

A high-precision chronology for the rapid extinction of New Zealand moa (Aves, Dinornithiformes)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Megafaunal extinction followed the prehistoric human settlement of islands across the globe, but the exact duration and dynamics of the extinction processes are difficult to determine. The New Zealand moa (Aves, Dinornithiformes) are a prime example, where, despite an extensive fossil and archaeological record, debate continues about their extinction chronology and how extinction timings varied among regions and species. We apply probabilistic sightings methods to 111 high-quality radiocarbon dates (from a pool of 653 dates) on moa remains from natural and archaeological sites to provide a high-resolution spatio-temporal chronology of moa extinction. We interpret this alongside an estimated time for the onset of hunting pressure, obtained by applying the same methods to the most reliable proxies for initial human settlement of New Zealand: coprolites of and seeds gnawed by the commensal Pacific rat (Rattus exulans). By comparing local and national extinction times, we discriminate between the point at which hunting stopped (economic extinction) and the total extinction of moa (ca 150 and 200 years after settlement, respectively). Extinction occurred contemporaneously at sites separated by hundreds of kilometres. There was little difference between the extinction times of the smallest (20-50 kg) and largest (200+ kg) moa species. Our results demonstrate how rapidly megafauna were exterminated from even large, topographically- and ecologically-diverse islands such as New Zealand, and highlight the fragility of such ecosystems in the face of human impacts.

Perry, George L. W.; Wheeler, Andrew B.; Wood, Jamie R.; Wilmshurst, Janet M.

2014-12-01

125

A synoptic analysis of the first AVE-SESAME '79 period  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Key features of a severe convection observed during April 10-11, 1979 as part of the Atmospheric Variability Experiment-Severe Environmental Storms and Mesoscale Experiment (AVE-SESAME) are examined. Three-hourly rawinsonde readings from 23 stations were taken, and vertical motion and divergence parameters are considered. The data were converted into a 127 km grid at the surface, and at 50 mb intervals from 900 mb to 100 mb by an objective analysis scheme, while a kinematic method was used to compute vertical motion. A weak upper tropospheric short wave trough was found to propagate from New Mexico into the Texas panhandle, while a jet maximum propagated eastward. The development of a strong wind maximum over Oklahoma and Kansas was associated with a rapid increase in upper-level divergence and the development of a small-scale pressure perturbation in the Texas panhandle, as well as a low-level jet and convergence, which led to rapid changes over the Red River Valley, where stability was decreased.

Moore, J. T.; Fuelberg, H. E.

1981-01-01

126

Ex vivo pretreatment of bone marrow mononuclear cells with endothelial NO synthase enhancer AVE9488 enhances their functional activity for cell therapy  

PubMed Central

Bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMC) from patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICMP) show a reduced neovascularization capacity in vivo. NO plays an important role in neovascularization, and NO bioavailability is typically reduced in patients with ICMP. We investigated whether the impaired neovascularization capacity of ICMP patient-derived progenitor cells can be restored by pretreatment with the novel endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) transcription enhancer AVE9488 (AVE). Ex vivo pretreatment of BMC from patients with ICMP with AVE significantly increased eNOS mRNA expression by 2.1-fold (P < 0.05) and eNOS activity as assessed by ESR by >3-fold (P < 0.05). The increased eNOS expression was associated with an enhanced migratory capacity in vitro (P < 0.01) and improved neovascularization capacity of the infused BMC in an ischemic hind limb model in vivo (P < 0.001). The improvement in ischemic limb perfusion after infusion of AVE-pretreated BMC resulted in an increase in swimming time (P < 0.05). The enhancement of limb perfusion by AVE-treated BMC was abrogated by ex vivo pretreatment with the eNOS inhibitor NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester. Consistently, AVE showed no effect on the impaired migratory capacity of BMC derived from eNOS-deficient mice, documenting the specific involvement of NO. The reduced neovascularization capacity of BMC from patients with ICMP may limit their therapeutic potential in cell therapy studies. Here, we show that pharmacological enhancement of eNOS expression with AVE at least partially reverses the impaired functional activity of BMC from ICMP patients, highlighting the critical role of NO for progenitor cell function. PMID:16983080

Sasaki, Ken-ichiro; Heeschen, Christopher; Aicher, Alexandra; Ziebart, Thomas; Honold, Joerg; Urbich, Carmen; Rossig, Lothar; Koehl, Ulrike; Koyanagi, Masamichi; Mohamed, Annisuddin; Brandes, Ralf P.; Martin, Hans; Zeiher, Andreas M.; Dimmeler, Stefanie

2006-01-01

127

Impact evaluation of an Energy $avings Plan project at Holnam Incorporated  

SciTech Connect

This impact evaluation of four energy conservation measures (ECMs) that were recently installed at Holnam Incorporated (Holnam) was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) as part of an evaluation of its Energy $avings Plan (E$P) Program. The Program makes acquisition payments to firms that install energy conservation measures in their industrial processes. The objective of this impact evaluation was to assess how much electrical energy is being saved at Holnam as a result of the E$P and to determine how much the savings cost Bonneville and the region. The impact of the ECMs was evaluated with a combination of engineering analysis, financial analysis, site visit and interview, and review of previous program submittals (Holnam's Proposals and Completion Reports). The four ECMs were all electronic power control devices that replaced less efficient technologies for controlling power to the kiln drive motors, cooler grate drive motors, cooler fan motors, and kiln stack gas precipitators. Energy savings from this project are expected to be 1,782,000 kWh/yr or 0.20 average megawatts. On a unit production basis, this project will save 3.4 kWh/ton of cement, based on Holnam's projected average annual future production rate. The four ECMs cost a total of $248,232 to install, and Holnam received payment of $115,615 from Bonneville for the acquisition of energy savings. Program administrative costs incurred by Bonneville, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), and Seattle City Light (SCL) were estimated to be $29,362. The real levelized cost (1992 $) of these energy savings to Bonneville will be 6.2 mills/kWh over the project's expected 15-year life, and the real levelized cost (1992 $) to the region will be 14.1 mills/kWh. Based on expected ECM installation costs and energy savings benefits alone, none of the four ECMs would have been implemented by Holnam without the E$P acquisition payment.

Brown, D.R.; Spanner, G.E.

1993-05-01

128

[Reproductive activity of Chelonia mydas (Testudines: Cheloniidae) in Isla de Aves, Venezuela (2001-2008)].  

PubMed

The second major nesting-site for green turtles in the Caribbean is Isla de Aves, an island protected as a wildlife refuge since 1972, located at 650km Northeast from La Guaira, Venezuela. In this island, the nesting population monitoring started in 1972 and in a more continuous way after 1978, when a Scientific-Naval Station was established and scientific observations started. Since historical data show that female captures had severely affected population levels in this island before 1978, this study aim to describe recent reproductive activities. For this, during the nesting seasons of 2001-2002 and 2005-2008, nesting females were measured and tagged using metal flipper tags. A total of 458 nights were sampled observing 5 154 female emergences, with a maximum of 53 in a single night. Non-observed emergences were calculated fitting the temporal distribution of observed emergences to a normal curve. Total emergences estimated varied from X=637.1+/-106.6 in 2001 to X =2 853+/-42.5 in 2008 (ANOVA F(6.5df)=60.37, p<0.0001). Internesting interval in the same season was estimated in X=10.71+/-1.32 days. Clutch frequency in a nesting season was calculated as X=1.71+/-1.6 times per female and season. Estimated number of nesting females per year varied from X=373+/-12.5 females in 2001 to X=l 669+/-56.1 females in 2008 (ANOVA F 55.6df)=89.42, p<0.0001); with a positive and significant trend (r=0.842, p=0.036). Results show that nesting females numbers are increasing. We suggest that the protection of the nesting area for more than 30 years, has contributed with this population increase. PMID:23894943

Vera, Vicente; Buitrago, Joaquín

2012-06-01

129

Cold-hardiness in Pelecitus fulicaeatrae (Nematoda: Filarioidea), a parasite of the ankles of Fulica americana (Aves).  

PubMed

The filarioid nematode Pelecitus fulicaeatrae (Diesing, 1861) is considered cold-hardy. Adults and microfilariae became motile when placed in saline at 22 C after having been removed from thawed carcasses of their host, the American coot (Fulica americana Gmelin) (Aves: Gruiformes). Adult nematodes from 5 of 12 carcasses became active as did microfilariae from 4 of 5 carcasses. Carcasses had been frozen at an undetermined temperature below 0 C for an initial 14 days and then at -21 to -24 for 100-159 days. PMID:1738056

Bartlett, C M

1992-02-01

130

TOMS ozone data compared at mesoscale resolution to tropopause heights from the AVE radiosonde network and to VAS radiances over the south-central United States  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Observations from 1982 are being compared between the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), the Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE), and the VISSR Atmospheric Sounder (VAS) across Texas and Oklahoma. TOMS data show a significant ozone maximum over northeastern Texas. AVE radiosonde analysis shows tropopause heights with the highest pressure (lowest altitudes) over central Oklahoma accompanied by a mid-level jet across northern Mexico exiting above the Texas-Gulf coast. Corresponding VAS radiances show a dry slot in the middle tropopause across central Texas accompanied by a secondary slot over Oklahoma. The maxima are separated by 100 to 500 km. The impact of TOMS data on tropopause analysis is preliminarily seen as insignificant because TOMS data is not registered with respect to AVE tropopause heights.

Chesters, Dennis; Uccellini, Louis; Larko, David

1987-01-01

131

Relationships between convective storms and their environment in AVE IV determined from a three-dimensional subsynoptic-scale, trajectory model  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The paper describes interrelationships between synoptic-scale and convective-scale systems obtained by following individual air parcels as they traveled within the convective storm environment of AVE IV. (NASA's fourth Atmospheric Variability Experiment, AVE IV, was a 36-hour study in April 1975 of the atmospheric variability and structure in regions of convective storms.) A three-dimensional trajectory model was used to calculate parcel paths, and manually digitized radar was employed to locate convective activity of various intensities and to determine those trajectories that traversed the storm environment. Spatial and temporal interrelationships are demonstrated by reference to selected time periods of AVE IV which contain the development and movement of the squall line in which the Neosho tornado was created.

Wilson, G. S.

1977-01-01

132

Impact evaluation of an Energy $avings Plan project at Holnam Incorporated  

SciTech Connect

This impact evaluation of four energy conservation measures (ECMs) that were recently installed at Holnam Incorporated (Holnam) was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) as part of an evaluation of its Energy $avings Plan (E$P) Program. The Program makes acquisition payments to firms that install energy conservation measures in their industrial processes. The objective of this impact evaluation was to assess how much electrical energy is being saved at Holnam as a result of the E$P and to determine how much the savings cost Bonneville and the region. The impact of the ECMs was evaluated with a combination of engineering analysis, financial analysis, site visit and interview, and review of previous program submittals (Holnam`s Proposals and Completion Reports). The four ECMs were all electronic power control devices that replaced less efficient technologies for controlling power to the kiln drive motors, cooler grate drive motors, cooler fan motors, and kiln stack gas precipitators. Energy savings from this project are expected to be 1,782,000 kWh/yr or 0.20 average megawatts. On a unit production basis, this project will save 3.4 kWh/ton of cement, based on Holnam`s projected average annual future production rate. The four ECMs cost a total of $248,232 to install, and Holnam received payment of $115,615 from Bonneville for the acquisition of energy savings. Program administrative costs incurred by Bonneville, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), and Seattle City Light (SCL) were estimated to be $29,362. The real levelized cost (1992 $) of these energy savings to Bonneville will be 6.2 mills/kWh over the project`s expected 15-year life, and the real levelized cost (1992 $) to the region will be 14.1 mills/kWh. Based on expected ECM installation costs and energy savings benefits alone, none of the four ECMs would have been implemented by Holnam without the E$P acquisition payment.

Brown, D.R.; Spanner, G.E.

1993-05-01

133

Variação sazonal na sociabilidade de forrageamento das garças Ardea alba (Linnaeus, 1758) e Egretta thula (Molina, 1782) (Aves: Ciconiiformes) na planície alagável do alto rio Paraná, Brasil  

Microsoft Academic Search

Seasonal variation in the foraging sociability of Great White Egret (Ardea alba) and Snowy Egret (Egretta thula) (Aves: Ciconiiformes) in the upper Paraná river floodplain, Brazil. The seasonal variation of foraging sociability of Great White Egret (Ardea alba) and Snowy Egret (Egretta thula) on the lagoons of the upper Paraná river floodplain, Brazil, was analyzed. Quarterly samplings of birds were

Márcio Rodrigo

134

Comparison of PRE-dilatation vs Direct stenting In Coronary Treatment using the Medtronic AVE S670 Coronary Stent System (the PREDICT trial)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Current stent delivery systems make primary stenting (stent placement without predilatation) possible, but few controlled trials have been performed to evaluate the success, safety, cost saving, and potential benefit of this approach in reducing late restenosis. The Comparison of PRE-Dilatation Versus Direct Stenting In Coronary Treatment using the Medtronic AVE S670 Coronary Stent System trial was a 399-patient study comparing

Donald S Baim; Michael Flatley; Ronald Caputo; Charles O’Shaughnessy; Reginald Low; Claude Fanelli; Jeffery Popma; Peter Fitzgerald; Richard Kuntz

2001-01-01

135

Comparison of PRE-Dilatation vs Direct Stenting In Coronary Treatment Using the Medtronic AVE S670 Coronary Stent System (The PREDICT Trial)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Current stent delivery systems make primary stenting (stent placement without predilatation) possible, but few controlled trials have been performed to evaluate the success, safety, cost saving, and potential benefit of this approach in reducing late restenosis. The Comparison of PRE-Dilatation Versus Direct Stenting In Coronary Treat- ment using the Medtronic AVE S670 Coronary Stent System trial was a 399-patient study

Donald S. Baim; Michael Flatley; Ronald Caputo; Charles O'Shaughnessy; Reginald Low; Claude Fanelli; Jeffery Popma; Peter Fitzgerald; Richard Kuntz

136

WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF NURSING 14204 NE Salmon Creek Ave | Vancouver, WA 98686 | (360) 546-9398 | nursing.wsu.edu  

E-print Network

, Writing/Communication, Diversity, Humanities and Arts. (Contact the nursing academic coordinator for UCOREWASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF NURSING 14204 NE Salmon Creek Ave | Vancouver, WA 98686 | (360) 546-9398 | nursing.wsu.edu RN-BSN STEPS TO APPLY ­ WSU VANCOUVER 1. Complete Preliminary

Collins, Gary S.

137

Business Career Services Center | 1300 Sunnyside Ave. Rm. 125 | Lawrence, KS 66045 | (785) 864-5591 | www.business.ku.edu  

E-print Network

Business Career Services Center | 1300 Sunnyside Ave. Rm. 125 | Lawrence, KS 66045 | (785) 864-5591 | www.business.ku.edu - 1 - What Can I Do With A Major In SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT? What is Supply Chain in the area, especially in the capture and use of information. Electronic commerce is one example of the use

138

1300 York Ave, Box 149, New York, NY 10065 Tel: 2127464745 Fax: 2127468922 www.med.cornell.edu/ctsc CTSC Summer Intensive Clinical/Translational Research  

E-print Network

1300 York Ave, Box 149, New York, NY 10065 · Tel: 2127464745 · Fax: 2127468922 · www.med.cornell.edu requirement (http://weill.cornell.edu/education/curriculum/fourth/adv_bio.html). Duration The program, or Permanent Resident. Mentors must be from WCMC or a CTSC Partner Institution (visit http://www.med.cornell.edu

Chen, Tsuhan

139

Effect of AVE 0991 angiotensin-(1-7) receptor agonist treatment on elemental and biomolecular content and distribution in atherosclerotic plaques of apoE-knockout mice  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Gene-targeted apolipoprotein E-knockout (apoE-KO) mice display early and highly progressive vascular lesions containing lipid deposits and they became a reliable animal model to study atherosclerosis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of AVE 0991 angiotensin-(1-7) receptor agonist on the distribution of selected pro- and anti- inflammatory elements as well as biomolecules in atherosclerotic plaques of apoE-knockout mice. Synchrotron radiation-based X-ray fluorescence (micro-XRF) and Fourier Transform Infrared (micro-FTIR) microspectroscopies were applied. Two-month-old apoE-KO mice were fed for following four months diet supplemented with AVE 0991 (0.58 ?mol/kg b.w. per day). Histological sections of ascending aortas were analyzed spectroscopically. The distribution of P, Ca, Fe and Zn were found to correspond with histological structure of the lesion. Significantly lower contents of P, Ca, Zn and significantly higher content of Fe were observed in animals treated with AVE 0991. Biomolecular analysis showed lower lipids saturation level and lower lipid to protein ratio in AVE 0991 treated group. Protein secondary structure was studied according to the composition of amide I band (1660 cm-1) and it demonstrated higher proportion of ?-sheet structure as compared to ?-helix in both studied groups.

Kowalska, J.; Gajda, M.; Jawie?, J.; Kwiatek, W. M.; Appel, K.; Dumas, P.

2013-12-01

140

161. Anthony Skjell um, Lawrence Livermore Nati onal Laboratory, 7000 East Ave. , L-316, P. O. Box 808 Li vermore, CA94551  

E-print Network

- 15 - 161. Anthony Skjell um, Lawrence Livermore Nati onal Laboratory, 7000 East Ave. , L- 316, P n Mal l , Vancouver, Bri ti sh Col umbi a V6T 1W5, Canada 170. Udaya B. Vemul apati , Dept cal Mathemati cs Group, Lawrence Li vermore Laboratory, Li vermore, CA94550 148. Donal d J. Rose

Dongarra, Jack

141

Using the Spanish Online Resource "Aula Virtual de Espanol" (AVE) to Promote a Blended Teaching Approach in High School Spanish Language Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study explores the effectiveness of the implementation of blended teaching (BT) by combining the Spanish online resource "Aula Virtual de Espanol" (AVE) with the face-to-face (F2F) delivery approach in second language Spanish programs in two high schools in Alberta, Canada. Findings demonstrate the effectiveness of combining the online…

Pellerin, Martine; Montes, Carlos Soler

2012-01-01

142

Sensitization of Upper Airway Mechanoreceptors as a New Pharmacologic Principle to Treat Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Investigations with AVE0118 in Anesthetized Pigs  

PubMed Central

Study Objectives: Drug treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is desirable because at least 30% of patients do not tolerate continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment. The negative pressure reflex (NPR) involving superficially located mechanoreceptors in the upper airway (UA) is an important mechanism for UA patency inhibitable by topical UA anesthesia (lidocaine). The NPR may serve as a target for pharmacological intervention for a topical treatment of OSA. The objective was to determine the effect of pharmacological augmentation of the NPR on UA collapsibility. Design: We developed a model of UA collapsibility in which application of negative pressures caused UA collapses in spontaneously breathing ?-chloralose-urethane anesthetized pigs as indicated by characteristic tracheal pressure and air flow changes. Setting: N/A. Patients or Participants: N/A. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: The potassium channel blocker AVE0118 administered topically to the UA in doses of 1, 3, and 10 mg per nostril sensitized the NPR, shifting the mechanoreceptor response threshold for the genioglossus muscle to more positive pressures (P < 0.001; n = 6 per group) and dose-dependently inhibited UA collapsibility. Ten mg of AVE0118 prevented UA collapses against negative pressures of -150 mbar (P < 0.01) for > 4 h in all pigs, while in control pigs the UA collapsed at -50 mbar or less negative pressures. The effect of AVE0118 was abolished by UA lidocaine anesthesia. Acute intravenous administration of naloxone or acetazolamide was ineffective; paroxetine and mirtazepine were weakly effective and fluoxetine was moderately effective in line with reported clinical efficacy. Conclusion: Topical administration of AVE0118 to the UA is a promising pharmacologic approach for the treatment of OSA. Citation: Wirth KJ; Steinmeyer K; Ruetten H. Sensitization of upper airway mechanoreceptors as a new pharmacologic principle to treat obstructive sleep apnea: investigations with AVE0118 in anesthetized pigs. SLEEP 2013;36(5):699-708. PMID:23633752

Wirth, Klaus J.; Steinmeyer, Klaus; Ruetten, Hartmut

2013-01-01

143

Meso beta-scale thunderstorm/environment interactions during AVE-SESAME V (20-21 May 1979)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The atmospheric variability in a convective area was examined with data from the AVE-SESAME V experiment. Temperature increases were observed in the upper troposphere during storm development, coupled with cooling near the surface and in the lower stratosphere. A mesohigh was detected at 200 mb over the convected area, and upper level winds increased speed north of the area. Wind velocity decreases occurred at the 200 mb level, reaching a 50 percent decrease, during the 3 hr period coinciding with most storms, and a simultaneous increase (doubling) was found in the wind speeds at the 400 mb level. Other phenomena present after the storms began included low-level convergence, upper level divergence, and ascending motion.

Fuelberg, H. E.; Printy, M. F.

1983-01-01

144

Numerical simulations of the subsynoptic features associated with the AVE-SESAME I case. I - The preconvective environment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The extensive diagnostic calculations made possible by the AVE-SESAME I database are used in combination with numerical simulations from the Mesoscale Atmospheric Simulation System (MASS) model to examine the dynamics of the meso-alpha-scale features during the preconvective period from 1130 to 2030 UTC on April 10, 1979. The version of the MASS model used in this investigation is presented, and an overview of the general synoptic conditions present at the time of model initialization is presented along with the data used to initialize the model. The dynamical processes present in the numerical simulations are presented and compared with analyses of the observational data from this and other investigations of this case. The relative importance of the adiabatic and diabatic processes in creating and then initiating the release of the convective instability is discussed.

Zack, John W.; Kaplan, Michael L.

1987-01-01

145

Students preparing for a career in medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, or other health-related professions should visit the Preprofessional Advising Office at the College of Arts & Sciences, 725 Commonwealth Ave., Room B-2 (moving to  

E-print Network

by the American Dental Education Association, 1625 Massachusetts Ave., N.W., Washington, DC 20036 (www, you should consult the text entitled, Medical School Admission Requirements (Association of American Admission Requirements is published by the Association of American Veterinary Medic

Goldberg, Bennett

146

P-gp activity is a critical resistance factor against AVE9633 and DM4 cytotoxicity in leukaemia cell lines, but not a major mechanism of chemoresistance in cells from acute myeloid leukaemia patients  

PubMed Central

Background AVE9633 is a new immunoconjugate comprising a humanized monoclonal antibody, anti-CD33 antigen, linked through a disulfide bond to the maytansine derivative DM4, a cytotoxic agent and potent tubulin inhibitor. It is undergoing a phase I clinical trial. Chemoresistance to anti-mitotic agents has been shown to be related, in part, to overexpression of ABC proteins. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential roles of P-gp, MRP1 and BCRP in cytotoxicity in AVE9633-induced acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Methods This study used AML cell lines expressing different levels of P-gp, MRP1 or BCRP proteins and twenty-five samples from AML patients. Expression and functionality of the transporter protein were analyzed by flow cytometry. The cytotoxicity of the drug was evaluated by MTT and apoptosis assays. Results P-gp activity, but not MRP1 and BCRP, attenuated AVE9633 and DM4 cytotoxicity in myeloid cell lines. Zosuquidar, a potent specific P-gp inhibitor, restored the sensitivity of cells expressing P-gp to both AVE9633 and DM4. However, the data from AML patients show that 10/25 samples of AML cells (40%) were resistant to AVE9633 or DM4 (IC50 > 500 nM), and this was not related to P-gp activity (p-Value: 0.7). Zosuquidar also failed to re-establish drug sensitivity. Furthermore, this resistance was not correlated with CD33 expression (p-Value: 0.6) in those cells. Conclusion P-gp activity is not a crucial mechanism of chemoresistance to AVE9633. For patients whose resistance to conventional anthracycline AML regimens is related to ABC protein expression, a combination with AVE9633 could be beneficial. Other mechanisms such as microtubule alteration could play an important role in chemoresistance to AVE9633. PMID:19549303

2009-01-01

147

A comparison between Nimbus 5 THIR and ITPR temperatures and derived winds with rawinsonde data obtained in the AVE II experiment. [Temperature-Humidity Infrared Radiometer and Infrared Temperature Profile Radiometer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During the second Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE II), atmospheric temperature profiles were computed from Nimbus 5 data, which comprised ITPR, NEMS, and SCR measurements. Rawinsonde data were obtained from NWS stations in the AVE II network and processed for each pressure contact; the soundings closest in space and time were interpolated to the Nimbus 5 sounding points for comparison purposes. Cross sections of thermal and geostrophic winds were computed from satellite-derived cross sections of temperature along the Nimbus orbital track.

Arnold, J. E.; Scoggins, J. R.; Fuelberg, H. E.

1977-01-01

148

The influence of angiotensin-(1-7) Mas receptor agonist (AVE 0991) on mitochondrial proteome in kidneys of apoE knockout mice.  

PubMed

Excessive action of angiotensin II on mitochondria has been shown to play an important role in mitochondrial dysfunction, a common feature of atherogenesis and kidney injury. Angiotensin-(1-7)/Mas receptor axis constitutes a countermeasure to the detrimental effects of angiotensin II on AT1 receptors. The aim of the study was to assess the effects of angiotensin-(1-7) peptidomimetic AVE0991 on the kidney mitochondrial proteome in widely used animal model of atherosclerosis (apoE(-/-) mice). Proteins changed in apoE(-/-) mice belonged to the groups of antioxidant enzymes, apoptosis regulators, inflammatory factors and metabolic enzymes. Importantly, AVE0991 partially reversed atherosclerosis-related changes in apoE(-/-) mice. PMID:23988828

Suski, Maciej; Olszanecki, Rafa?; Stachowicz, Aneta; Madej, Józef; Bujak-Gi?ycka, Beata; Oko?, Krzysztof; Korbut, Ryszard

2013-12-01

149

Initial results from a mesoscale atmospheric simulation system and comparisons with the AVE-SESAME I data set. [Atmospheric Variability Experiment-Severe Environmental Storms And Mesoscale Experiment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The development of a comprehensive mesoscale atmospheric simulation system (MASS) is described in detail. The modeling system is designed for both research and real-time forecast applications. The 14-level numerical model, which has a 48 km grid mesh, can be run over most of North America and the adjacent oceanic regions. The model employs sixth-order accurate numerics, generalized similarity theory boundary-layer physics, a sophisticated cumulus parameterization scheme, and state of the art analysis and initialization techniques. Examples of model output on the synoptic and subsynoptic scales are presented for the AVE-SESAME I field experiment on 10-11 April 1979. The model output is subjectively compared to the observational analysis and the LFM II output on the synoptic scale. Subsynoptic model output is compared to analyses generated from the AVE-SESAME I data set.

Kaplan, M. L.; Zack, J. W.; Wong, V. C.; Tuccillo, J. J.

1982-01-01

150

The development of convective instability, wind shear, and vertical motion in relation to convection activity and synoptic systems in AVE 4  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Data from the Fourth Atmospheric Variability Experiment were used to investigate conditions/factors responsible for the development (local time rate-of-change) of convective instability, wind shear, and vertical motion in areas with varying degrees of convective activity. AVE IV sounding data were taken at 3 or 6 h intervals during a 36 h period on 24-25 April 1975 over approximately the eastern half of the United States. An error analysis was performed for each variable studied.

Davis, J. G.; Scoggins, J. R.

1981-01-01

151

A comparison between Nimbus 5 THIR and ITPR temperatures and derived winds with rawinsonde data obtained in the AVE 2 experiment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During the period of May 11 and 12, 1974, NASA conducted its second Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE II) over the eastern United States. In this time interval, two Nimbus 5 orbits crossed the AVE II area, providing a series of ITPR soundings as well as THIR data. Horizontal temperature mapping of the AVE II cloud field is examined using two grid print map scales. Implied cloud top heights are compared with maximum radar-echo top reports. In addition, shelter temperatures in areas of clear sky are compared with the surface temperatures as determined from 11.5 micrometer radiometer data of the THIR experiment. The ITPR sounding accuracy is evaluated using interpolated radiosonde temperatures at times nearly coincident with the ITPR soundings. It was found that mean differences between the two data sets were as small as 1.3 C near 500 mb and as large as 2.9 C near the tropopause. The differences between ITPR and radiosonde temperatures at constant pressure levels were sufficient to induce significant differences in the horizontal temperature gradient. Cross sections of geostrophic wind along the orbital tracks were developed using a thermal wind buildup based on the ITPR temperature data and the radiosonde temperature data. Differences between the radiosonde and ITPR geostrophic winds could be explained on the basis of differences in the ITPR and radiosonde temperature gradients.

Arnold, J. E.; Scoggins, J. R.; Fuelberg, H. E.

1976-01-01

152

Relationship between bone growth rate and the thickness of calcified cartilage in the long bones of the Galloanserae (Aves)  

PubMed Central

The histological features of mineralized tissues can be preserved for hundreds of millions of years, and are therefore important potential sources of information for reconstructing the life history traits of extinct species. Bone growth rates and the duration of the growth period have recently been estimated in fossil archosaurs from periosteal ossification (a mechanism responsible for bone diametral growth). Similarly, data on endochondral ossification (the mechanism responsible for bone longitudinal growth) may also yield information on growth duration and rate among extinct vertebrates, as long as potentially informative structures are preserved. However, in order to carry out palaeobiological estimations of growth rate and/or the duration of growth, it is first necessary to quantify in extant species the relationship between these life history traits and the histological features of endochondral ossification that are potentially preserved in the fossil record. Here we analyse the ontogenetic variation of both bone longitudinal growth rate and the thickness of the calcified cartilage in the femora of two Galloanserae (Aves) and find a significant positive relationship between these variables in both species. We discuss possible factors underlying interspecific differences in this relationship, and conclude that it could be applied with caution to draw palaeobiological inferences. PMID:15857365

Montes, L; de Margerie, E; Castanet, J; de Ricqlès, A; Cubo, J

2005-01-01

153

Contracaecum multipapillatum (Nematoda: Anisakidae) from Egretta alba (Aves: Ardeidae) and comments on other species of this genus in Argentina.  

PubMed

During a parasitological survey of aquatic birds in Mar Chiquita coastal lagoon (Buenos Aires province, Argentina), specimens of Contracaecum Raillet & Henry, 1912 sp. were found in the esophagus and stomach of the great egret Egretta alba (Gmelin, 1789) (Aves: Ardeidae). The nematodes were identified as Contracaecum multipapillatum (Drasche, 1882) on the basis of the following features: ratio of ventricular appendage length to esophagus length, ratio of intestinal caecum length to esophagus length, spicule lengths, number and arrangement of postcloacal papillae (3-4 pairs of adanal papillae, 1 double pair, and a subterminal group of 2 subventral and 3 sublateral pairs). A complete description of the adult specimens of C. multipapillatum is given in the present paper, together with a discussion regarding the validity of other species of Contracaecum reported from Argentina. Contracaecum philomultipapillatum Labriola and Suriano, 1996 is reduced to a junior synonym of C. multipapillatum, and Contracaecum longicaecum Schuurmans Sterkhoven, 1952 is considered a species inquirenda. A revision of Contracaecum spheniscus Boero and Led, 1970 based on appropriate material is necessary. PMID:10958460

Navone, G T; Etchegoin, J A; Cremonte, F

2000-08-01

154

Petrophysical evidence for the nature of vertical permeability barriers: Temple Ave. Fault, Wilmington Oil Field, Long Beach, California  

SciTech Connect

The Temple Avenue fault is a north-trending east-dipping normal fault that dissects the north flank of the Wilmington anticline in the Wilmington Oil field. The fault involves sediments of the Repetto Formation (lower Pliocene) and the Puente Formation (upper Miocene). Oil/water contact structural maps indicate that the fault acts as a permeability barrier. Well B-756-I was drilled across the Temple Ave. fault in the Repetto Formation. The throw of the fault in this well ranges from 15 to 17 meters (50 to 56 feet). The Repetto Formation is composed of interbeded sands and shales. Sixty five samples were collected from and around the fault zone. Preliminary XRD analysis of bulk and clay fractions show that authigenic clay minerals (<2 [mu]m) represent between 1 to 2% of the sediments. Clay minerals are mostly smectite (5-7%) and a Fe-illite (15-30%); chlorite and kaolinite are also present. The authigenic illite content appears to increase around the fault zone. Diagenetic conversion of Ca-rich feldspars to smectite is suggested by an inverse correlation of their abundances. Calcite is present in the majority of the samples (4-8%), but a significant increase in the carbonate content (14-16%) occurs along the fault. Ongoing SEM and isotope analysis will aid in the determination of the origin and nature of the changes in the mineralogy that contribute to form a permeability barrier.

Camacho, H.; Sample, J.C. (California State Univ., Long Beach, CA (United States))

1996-01-01

155

Petrophysical evidence for the nature of vertical permeability barriers: Temple Ave. Fault, Wilmington Oil Field, Long Beach, California  

SciTech Connect

The Temple Avenue fault is a north-trending east-dipping normal fault that dissects the north flank of the Wilmington anticline in the Wilmington Oil field. The fault involves sediments of the Repetto Formation (lower Pliocene) and the Puente Formation (upper Miocene). Oil/water contact structural maps indicate that the fault acts as a permeability barrier. Well B-756-I was drilled across the Temple Ave. fault in the Repetto Formation. The throw of the fault in this well ranges from 15 to 17 meters (50 to 56 feet). The Repetto Formation is composed of interbeded sands and shales. Sixty five samples were collected from and around the fault zone. Preliminary XRD analysis of bulk and clay fractions show that authigenic clay minerals (<2 {mu}m) represent between 1 to 2% of the sediments. Clay minerals are mostly smectite (5-7%) and a Fe-illite (15-30%); chlorite and kaolinite are also present. The authigenic illite content appears to increase around the fault zone. Diagenetic conversion of Ca-rich feldspars to smectite is suggested by an inverse correlation of their abundances. Calcite is present in the majority of the samples (4-8%), but a significant increase in the carbonate content (14-16%) occurs along the fault. Ongoing SEM and isotope analysis will aid in the determination of the origin and nature of the changes in the mineralogy that contribute to form a permeability barrier.

Camacho, H.; Sample, J.C. [California State Univ., Long Beach, CA (United States)

1996-12-31

156

Semen collection and artificial insemination in the common piping guan (Pipile cumanensis cumanensis): potential applications for Cracidae (Aves: Galliformes).  

PubMed

The common piping guan (Pipile cumanensis cumanensis) is serving as a model for assisted reproductive techniques (ARTs) in Cracidae (Aves: Galliformes). Manual collection methods used in domestic birds and other exotics were modified to optimize quality and quantity of fresh semen samples. In addition, a method to subjectively assess semen quality on the basis of its color, clarity, and consistency was developed to serve as a tool when laboratory equipment is not available. In a species where only two eggs per clutch is typical, predictability of the date of the first egg is critical to ensure adequate inseminations before oviposition. An increase in both the distance between the female's pubic bones and degree of abdominal swelling indicated optimal time to initiate artificial insemination (AI) and allowed the number of semen samples used to fertilize the first egg in the clutch to be minimized while ensuring its fertility. In three separate AI trials, a total of four fertile eggs were produced, a first for cracids. Two of the four fertile eggs hatched successfully, and the chicks' parentages were confirmed using DNA fingerprinting. This study represents the first published account of the use of ARTs in Cracidae and forms the basis for future developments (e.g., AI of frozen-thawed semen) aimed at optimizing genetic management of cracids in ex situ breeding programs. PMID:15732585

DeMatteo, Karen E; Karagiannis, Kate L; Asa, Cheryl S; Macek, Michael S; Snyder, Timothy L; Tieber, Anne M; Parker, Patricia G

2004-12-01

157

Osteological histology of the Pan-Alcidae (Aves, Charadriiformes): correlates of wing-propelled diving and flightlessness.  

PubMed

Although studies of osteological morphology, gross myology, myological histology, neuroanatomy, and wing-scaling have all documented anatomical modifications associated with wing-propelled diving, the osteohistological study of this highly derived method of locomotion has been limited to penguins. Herein we present the first osteohistological study of the derived forelimbs and hind limbs of wing-propelled diving Pan-Alcidae (Aves, Charadriiformes). In addition to detailing differences between wing-propelled diving charadriiforms and nondiving charadriiforms, microstructural modifications to the humeri, ulnae and femora of extinct flightless pan-alcids are contrasted with those of volant alcids. Histological thin-sections of four species of pan-alcids (Alca torda, †Alca grandis, †Pinguinus impennis, †Mancalla cedrosensis) and one outgroup charadriiform (Stercorarius longicaudus) were compared. The forelimb bones of wing-propelled diving charadriiforms were found to have significantly thicker (?22%) cortical bone walls. Additionally, as in penguins, the forelimbs of flightless pan-alcids are found to be osteosclerotic. However, unlike the pattern documented in penguins that display thickened cortices in both forelimbs and hind limbs, the forelimb and hind limb elements of pan-alcids display contrasting microstructural morphologies with thickened forelimb cortices and relatively thinner femoral cortices. Additionally, the identification of medullary bone in the sampled †Pinguinus impennis specimen suggests that further osteohistological investigation could provide an answer to longstanding questions regarding sexual dimorphism of Great Auks. Finally, these results suggest that it is possible to discern volant from flightless wing-propelled divers from fragmentary fossil remains. PMID:24357466

Smith, N Adam; Clarke, Julia A

2014-02-01

158

Impact evaluation of a refrigeration control system installed at Vitamilk Dairy, Incorporated under the Energy $avings Plan  

SciTech Connect

This impact evaluation of a refrigeration control system (RCS) recently installed at Vitamilk Dairy, Inc. (Vitamilk) was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) as part of an evaluation of its Energy $avings Plan (E$P) Program. The RCS installation at Vitamilk uses microcomputer- based controls to automate refrigeration equipment previously controlled manually. This impact evaluation assessed how much electricity is being saved at Vitamilk as a result of the E$P and to determine how much the savings cost Bonneville and the region. On a unit savings basis, this project will save 9.7 kWh/tonne (8-8 kWh/ton) of milk and ice cream produced, based on the product mix for June 1992 through May 1993, representing a 28% reduction in energy consumption. The project was installed in 1992 for a total cost of $129,330, and Vitamilk received payment of $62,974 from Bonneville in 1993 for the acquisition of energy savings. The real levelized cost of these energy savings to Bonneville is 8.5 mills/kWh (in 1993 dollars) over the project`s assumed 15-year life, and the real levelized cost to the region is 17.9 mills/kWh (in 1993 dollars), not including transmission and distribution effects. Based on the expected project installation costs and energy savings benefits, the RCS would not have been implemented by Vitamilk without the E$P acquisition payment. The expected acquisition payment reduced the estimated payback period from 7.0 to 2.8 years. Although Vitamilk would generally require an energy conservation project to have a payback period of two years or less, the slightly longer payback period was accepted in this case.

Brown, D.R.; Dixon, D.R.; Spanner, G.E.

1995-01-01

159

Factors affecting germline mutations in a hypervariable microsatellite: a comparative analysis of six species of swallows (Aves: Hirundinidae).  

PubMed

Microsatellites mutate frequently by replication slippage. Empirical evidence shows that the probability of such slippage mutations may increase with the length of the repeat region as well as exposure to environmental mutagens, but the mutation rate can also differ between the male and female germline. It has been hypothesized that more intense sexual selection or sperm competition can also lead to elevated mutation rates, but the empirical evidence is inconclusive. Here, we analyzed the occurrence of germline slippage mutations in the hypervariable pentanucleotide microsatellite locus HrU10 across six species of swallow (Aves: Hirundinidae). These species exhibit marked differences in the length range of the microsatellite, as well as differences in the intensity of sperm competition. We found a strong effect of microsatellite length on the probability of mutation, but no residual effect of species or their level of sperm competition when the length effect was accounted for. Neither could we detect any difference in mutation rate between tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) breeding in Hamilton Harbour, Ontario, an industrial site with previous documentation of elevated mutation rates for minisatellite DNA, and a rural reference population. However, our cross-species analysis revealed two significant patterns of sex differences in HrU10 germline mutations: (1) mutations in longer alleles occurred typically in the male germline, those in shorter alleles in the female germline, and (2) male germline mutations were more often expansions than contractions, whereas no directional bias was evident in the female germline. These results indicate some fundamental differences in male and female gametogenesis affecting the probability of slippage mutations. Our study also reflects the value of a comparative, multi-species approach for locus-specific mutation analyses, through which a wider range of influential factors can be assessed than in single-species studies. PMID:21291898

Anmarkrud, Jarl A; Kleven, Oddmund; Augustin, Jakob; Bentz, Kristofer H; Blomqvist, Donald; Fernie, Kim J; Magrath, Michael J L; Pärn, Henrik; Quinn, James S; Robertson, Raleigh J; Szép, Tibor; Tarof, Scott; Wagner, Richard H; Lifjeld, Jan T

2011-03-15

160

NEWLONDONRD CLEVELAND AVE  

E-print Network

Wolf Hall Student Services Bldg Du pont HallGore Hall Hullihen Hall mitchell Hall morris Library & 2013- 2014 4/13 No Name CaTeGoRY 1 Ice Arena¢ Red 2 Townsend Hall¢ Gold 3 General Services*¢ Gray 5 Gold 7 Conference Center Lot*¢ Red/Gold 8 Christiana Towers (8-W*,8-NE, 8-SE)¢ Gold 9-1 James Smith

Firestone, Jeremy

161

NEWLONDONRD CLEVELAND AVE  

E-print Network

. These cameras help our department to provide an additional layer of security. To learn more about this project, visit: www.udel.edu/safety/ 2011_article_cameras.html security cameras 8.13 #12;-of-the-art surveillance cameras on campus to help keep the campus community safe.You will see surveillance cameras

Firestone, Jeremy

162

CHALMERS ST. MATHEWS AVE.  

E-print Network

Jerusalem Restaurant Illini Union Ballroom23 Serendipity Espresso Royale Café Jamba Juice Chick-fil-A Mc World Pizza10 Evo Cafe11 Legends12 The Clybourne13 Firehaus Restaurant and Bar Woori Jib Korean Restaurant The Cookie Jar Chipotle14 Noodles & Company Home Town Pantry15 Jimmy John's Gourmet Sandwiches

Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

163

Ohlone Ave. 1125 Jackson  

E-print Network

Buchanan Street StreetSt. commercial businesses University Village 1125 Jackson St. Albany, CA 94706 510EndWay LotW4 LibertyShipWay GoodingWay JacksonSt. 10 th Street 8th Street 6th Street lot W 7 Kinkead Way Kulath Street Harrison St. skateboard park U.S. Postal Service sorting facility 10th Street 9th Street

Silver, Whendee

164

MIT: $avings through cogeneration  

SciTech Connect

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology has installed an `inside-the-fence` cogeneration plant as a way of controlling costs for their increasing electric power and steam requirements. The cogeneration system fits neatly on one side of the campus power plant, with the GT10A gas turbine in an enclosure. The generator is located on one end, the HRSG to the side. On the instrument/control side, the gas turbine is equipped with a Westinghouse DCS control system. A Horriba emission monitoring system keeps track of pollution. Power in excess of the 22 MW produced by the gas turbine-generator must be purchased from the local utility. As requirements rise in future years, this could become more common, which may lead MIT, in 4-5 years, to convert to a combined cycle system. The steam-generating capabilities of the HRSG are adequate for the addition of a 10-MW backpressure steam turbine, should they make this decision. 3 figs.

Barker, T.

1995-11-01

165

Reading: Ave Atque Vale.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although basic literacy will continue to be necessary for survival, mass communications and information technology are bringing about an inevitable and lamentable decline in reading for pleasure and in the love of literature for its own sake. (TE)

Donovan, Ann

1984-01-01

166

FRAGILE CYCLES CH. BONATTI AND L. J. DIAZ  

E-print Network

FRAGILE CYCLES CH. BONATTI AND L. J. D´IAZ Abstract. We study diffeomorphisms f. Such a cycle is called fragile if there is no diffeomorphism close to f with a robust cycle associated (S2 �S1), r 1, that consists of diffeomorphisms with fragile heterodimensional cycles. Our

Díaz, Lorenzo J.

167

Scientific Objectives and Design Study of an Adaptive Optics Visual Echelle Spectrograph and Imager Coronograph (AVES-IMCO) for the NAOS Visitor Focus at the VLT  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the scientific case for an Adaptive Optics Visual Echelle Spectrograph and Imager Coronograph (AVES-IMCO) that we propose as a visitor instrument for the secondary port of NAOS at the VLT. We show that such an instrument would be ideal for intermediate resolution (R=16,000) spectroscopy of faint sky-limited objects down to a magnitude of V=24.0 and will complement very effectively the near-IR imaging capabilities of CONICA. We present examples of science programmes that could be carried out with such an instrument and which cannot be addressed with existing VLT instruments. We also report on the result of a two-year design study of the instrument, with specific reference to its use as parallel instrument of NAOS.

Pallavicini, Roberto; Zerbi, Filippo; Beuzit, Jean-Luc; Bonanno, Giovanni; Bonifacio, Piercarlo; Comari, Maurizio; Conconi, Paolo; Delabre, Bernard; Franchini, Mariagrazia; Marcantonio, Paolo Di; Lagrange, Anne-Marie; Mazzoleni, Ruben; Molaro, Paolo; Pasquini, Luca; Santin, Paolo

168

A kinetic energy study of the meso beta-scale storm environment during AVE-SESAME 5 (20-21 May 1979)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Kinetic energy of the near storm environment was analyzed by meso beta scale data. It was found that horizontal winds in the 400 to 150 mb layer strengthen rapidly north of the developing convection. Peak values then decrease such that the maximum disappears 6 h later. Southeast of the storms, wind speeds above 300 mb decrease nearly 50% during the 3 h period of most intense thunderstorm activity. When the convection dissipates, wind patterns return to prestorm conditions. The mesoscale storm environment of AVE-SESAME 5 is characterized by large values of cross contour generation of kinetic energy, transfers of energy to nonresolvable scales of motion, and horizontal flux divergence. These processes are maximized within the upper troposphere and are greatest during times of strongest convection. It is shown that patterns agree with observed weather features. The southeast area of the network is examined to determine causes for vertical wind variations.

Printy, M. F.; Fuelberg, H. E.

1984-01-01

169

An analysis of the AVE-SESAME I period using statistical structure and correlation functions. [Atmospheric Variability Experiment-Severe Environmental Storm and Mesoscale Experiment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Structure and correlation functions are used to describe atmospheric variability during the 10-11 April day of AVE-SESAME 1979 that coincided with the Red River Valley tornado outbreak. The special mesoscale rawinsonde data are employed in calculations involving temperature, geopotential height, horizontal wind speed and mixing ratio. Functional analyses are performed in both the lower and upper troposphere for the composite 24 h experiment period and at individual 3 h observation times. Results show that mesoscale features are prominent during the composite period. Fields of mixing ratio and horizontal wind speed exhibit the greatest amounts of small-scale variance, whereas temperature and geopotential height contain the least. Results for the nine individual times show that small-scale variance is greatest during the convective outbreak. The functions also are used to estimate random errors in the rawinsonde data. Finally, sensitivity analyses are presented to quantify confidence limits of the structure functions.

Fuelberg, H. E.; Meyer, P. J.

1984-01-01

170

P-gp activity is a critical resistance factor against AVE9633 and DM4 cytotoxicity in leukaemia cell lines, but not a major mechanism of chemoresistance in cells from acute myeloid leukaemia patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: AVE9633 is a new immunoconjugate comprising a humanized monoclonal antibody, anti-CD33 antigen, linked through a disulfide bond to the maytansine derivative DM4, a cytotoxic agent and potent tubulin inhibitor. It is undergoing a phase I clinical trial. Chemoresistance to anti-mitotic agents has been shown to be related, in part, to overexpression of ABC proteins. The aim of the present

Ruoping Tang; Simy Cohen; Jean-Yves Perrot; Anne-Marie Faussat; Claudia Zuany-Amorim; Zora Marjanovic; Hamid Morjani; Fanny Fava; Elise Corre; Ollivier Legrand; Jean-Pierre Marie

2009-01-01

171

Karyotype morphology suggests that the Nyctibius griseus (Gmelin, 1789) carries an ancestral ZW-chromosome pair to the order Caprimulgiformes (Aves)  

PubMed Central

Abstract Studies of karyotypes have been revealing important information on the taxonomic relationships and evolutionary patterns in various groups of birds. However, the order Caprimulgiformes is one of the least known in terms of its cytotaxonomy. So far, there are no cytogenetic data in the literature on birds belonging to 3 of 5 families of this order -Nyctibiidae, Steatornithidae and Aegothelidae. For this reason, the aim of our study was to describe the karyotype of Nyctibius griseus (Gmelin, 1789) (Aves, Nyctibiidae, Caprimulgiformes) and contribute with new data that could help to clarify the evolutionary relationships in this group. Bone marrow was cultured directly to obtain material for the chromosome study. C-banding was used to visualize the constitutive heterochromatin and Ag-NOR-banding to reveal nucleolus organizer regions. The diploid number observed was 2n=86±. Using sequential Giemsa/C-banding staining, we determined that the W chromosome was entirely C-band positive with the two most prominent markers in the interstitial and distal regions of the long arm. The nucleolus organizer regions showed a typical location in a pair of microchromosomes that exhibited Ag-NOR.The results obtained for Nyctibius griseus suggest that, of all the species studied in the references cited, it has the most ancestral sex chromosome composition of the order Caprimulgiformes. PMID:24260678

Nieto, Leonardo Martin; Kretschmer, Rafael; Ledesma, Mario Angel; Garnero, Analía Del Valle; Gunski, Ricardo José

2012-01-01

172

Insects found in birds' nests from Argentina. Pseudoseisura lophotes Reichenbach, 1853 and Anumbius annumbi (Vieillot, 1817) (Aves: Furnariidae), hosts of Triatoma platensis Neiva, 1913 (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Triatominae).  

PubMed

The insect fauna of the nests of Pseudoseisura lophotes (Reichenbach, 1853) (Aves: Furnariidae) from Argentina was investigated. A total of 110 species (68 identified to species, 22 identified to genus, 20 identified to family) in 40 families of 10 orders of insects was found in these nests. Triatoma platensis Neiva, 1913 (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) was found again in nests of P. lophotes, corroborating after 73 years the first observations made by Mazza in 1936. The occurrence of the insects in nests of P. lophotes is compared with the previously known insect fauna in nests of A. annumbi, Furnarius rufus (Furnariidae), and Myiopsitta monachus (Psittacidae). The insect fauna in additional nests of Anumbius annumbi from the same and/or different localities is given, and used in comparisons. The first occurrence of Cuterebridae (Diptera) in birds' nests, their pupae as the overwintering stage, and the second simultaneous infestation by two species of Philornis (Diptera: Muscidae) on the same nestlings are presented. Other simultaneous infestations of different hematophagous arthropods (Hemiptera: Cimidae; Reduviidae: Triatominae, and Acari: Argasidae) are remarked and discussed. PMID:24871037

Paola, Turienzo

2014-01-01

173

Stratigraphic context and paleoenvironmental significance of minor taxa (Pisces, Reptilia, Aves, Rodentia) from the late Early Pleistocene paleoanthropological site of Buia (Eritrea).  

PubMed

The Buia Homo site, also known as Wadi Aalad, is an East African paleoanthropological site near the village of Buia that, due to its very rich yield from the late Early Pleistocene, has been intensively investigated since 1994. In this paper, which reports on the finds of the 2010-2011 excavations, we include new fossil evidence on previously identified taxa (i.e., reptiles), as well as the very first description of the small mammal, fish and bird remains discovered. In particular, this study documents the discovery of the first African fossil of the genus Burhinus (Aves, Charadriiformes) and of the first rodent from the site. This latter is identified as a thryonomyid rodent (cane rat), a relatively common taxon in African paleoanthropological faunal assemblages. On the whole, the new occurrences documented within the Buia vertebrate assemblage confirm the occurrence of taxa characterized by strong water dependence. The paleoenvironmental characteristics of the fauna are confirmed as fully compatible with the evidence obtained through sedimentology and facies analysis, documenting the sedimentary evolution of fluvio-deltaic and lacustrine systems. PMID:23159190

Rook, L; Ghinassi, M; Carnevale, G; Delfino, M; Pavia, M; Bondioli, L; Candilio, F; Coppa, A; Martínez-Navarro, B; Medin, T; Papini, M; Zanolli, C; Libsekal, Y

2013-01-01

174

On the absence of sternal elements in Anchiornis (Paraves) and Sapeornis (Aves) and the complex early evolution of the avian sternum.  

PubMed

Anchiornis (Deinonychosauria: Troodontidae), the earliest known feathered dinosaur, and Sapeornis (Aves: Pygostylia), one of the basalmost Cretaceous birds, are both known from hundreds of specimens, although remarkably not one specimen preserves any sternal ossifications. We use histological analysis to confirm the absence of this element in adult specimens. Furthermore, the excellent preservation of soft-tissue structures in some specimens suggests that no chondrified sternum was present. Archaeopteryx, the oldest and most basal known bird, is known from only 10 specimens and the presence of a sternum is controversial; a chondrified sternum is widely considered to have been present. However, data from Anchiornis and Sapeornis suggest that a sternum may also have been completely absent in this important taxon, suggesting that the absence of a sternum could represent the plesiomorphic avian condition. Our discovery reveals an unexpected level of complexity in the early evolution of the avian sternum; the large amount of observable homoplasy is probably a direct result of the high degree of inherent developmental plasticity of the sternum compared with observations in other skeletal elements. PMID:25201982

Zheng, Xiaoting; O'Connor, Jingmai; Wang, Xiaoli; Wang, Min; Zhang, Xiaomei; Zhou, Zhonghe

2014-09-23

175

Ancient DNA analyses of early archaeological sites in New Zealand reveal extreme exploitation of moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes) at all life stages  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The human colonisation of New Zealand in the late thirteenth century AD led to catastrophic impacts on the local biota and is among the most compelling examples of human over-exploitation of native fauna, including megafauna. Nearly half of the species in New Zealand' s pre-human avifauna are now extinct, including all nine species of large, flightless moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes). The abundance of moa in early archaeological sites demonstrates the significance of these megaherbivores in the diet of the first New Zealanders. Combining moa assemblage data, based on DNA identification of eggshell and bone, with morphological identification of bone (literature and museum catalogued specimens), we present the most comprehensive audit of moa to date from several significant 13th-15th century AD archaeological deposits across the east coast of the South Island. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was amplified from 251 of 323 (78%) eggshell fragments and 22 of 27 (88%) bone samples, and the analyses revealed the presence of four moa species: Anomalopteryx didiformis; Dinornis robustus; Emeus crassus and Euryapteryx curtus. The mtDNA, along with polymorphic microsatellite markers, enabled an estimate of the minimum number of individual eggs consumed at each site. Remarkably, in one deposit over 50 individual eggs were identified - a number that likely represents a considerable proportion of the total reproductive output of moa in the area and emphasises that human predation of all life stages of moa was intense. Molecular sexing was conducted on bones (n = 11). Contrary to previous ancient DNA studies from natural sites that consistently report an excess of female moa, we observed an excess of males (2.7:1), suggestive that males were preferential targets. This could be related to different behaviour between the two highly size-dimorphic sexes in moa. Lastly, we investigated the moa species from recovered skeletal and eggshell remains from seven Wairau Bar burials, and identified the presence of only the larger species of moa, E. curtus and D. robustus.

Oskam, Charlotte L.; Allentoft, Morten E.; Walter, Richard; Scofield, R. Paul; Haile, James; Holdaway, Richard N.; Bunce, Michael; Jacomb, Chris

2012-10-01

176

CONGRESS AVE. CHARLIE COE GOLF  

E-print Network

JEFFERSON HOUSE DORM COLLUMS COMMISSARY 203 73 Asp Avenue Parking Facility AH MFPH 50 50A THE UNIVERSITY. Annex 20 Monnet Hall 21 Oklahoma Memorial Union 21A OMU Parking Center 22 Engineering Laboratory 23 Engineering Laboratory 38 Goddard Health Center 39 Jim Thorpe Multicultural Center 40 Evans Hall 41 Buchanan

Oklahoma, University of

177

Welshpool Rd aterfordAve  

E-print Network

Coulson St Lem on St Gannaway St Arm strong Rd Armstrong Rd W ald on St Dalton Pl Talg aCl Aragon W ay that the information contained in this publication is correct at the time of publication (2012), however, information

178

Reid Rosnick/DC/USEPA/US 07/06/2010 09:15 AM  

E-print Network

/DC/USEPA/US 07/08/2010 09:19 AM To Charlie Garlow cc Angelique Diaz bcc Subject Re: Cameco - - Are you guys Pennsylvania Ave., NW Washington, DC 20460 202.343.9563 rosnick.reid@epa.gov Charlie Garlow 07/08/2010 09:10:04 AMThen I will keep them coming, when I g... From: Charlie Garlow/DC/USEPA/US To: Reid Rosnick

179

Please note that this is not a complete list of things to do and see in the area. A simple search of things to do in Palm Beach will reveal additional options. Happy exploring. 700 Rosemary Ave. West Palm Beach, FL 33401  

E-print Network

of things to do in Palm Beach will reveal additional options. Happy exploring. Palm Beach Shopping: City Place 700 Rosemary Ave. ­ West Palm Beach, FL 33401 (561) 366-1000 http://www.cityplace.com/ PGA Commons 5100 PGA Boulevard, Suite 209 ­ Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33418 (561) 630-8630 http

Fernandez, Eduardo

180

Insects found in birds' nests from Argentina: Coryphistera alaudina Burmeister, 1860 (Aves: Furnariidae), their inquiline birds and mammals, new hosts for Psammolestes coreodes Bergroth, 1911 and Triatoma platensis Neiva, 1913 (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Triatominae).  

PubMed

The insect fauna in nests of Coryphistera alaudina Burmeister, 1860 (Aves: Furnariidae) were studied in the provinces of Santiago del Estero, Chaco, Córdoba, and La Pampa in Argentina. A total of 7364 insect specimens comprising 77 taxa in a total of 29 families and 7 orders was found in their nests: 40 identified to species, 23 identified to genus, and 14 identified to family. Coryphistera alaudina and some of their vertebrate inquilines are new host records for the triatomine bugs Psammolestes coreodes Bergroth, 1911 and/or Triatoma platensis Neiva, 1913 (Hemiptera: Reduviidae). The insects in the nests of C. alaudina are separated by functional guilds, and their permanence time inside the nests are presented in a new manner and discussed. PMID:24943157

Turienzo, Paola; Di Iorio, Osvaldo

2014-01-01

181

Dual-frequency multifunction lidar Rosemary Diaz*, Sze-Chun Chan, Jia-Ming Liu  

E-print Network

to atmospheric turbulence. Early laser ranging systems used pulsed laser sources. These systems measure the round/s and range measurements of 7.95 km with 2% accuracy. Keywords: Laser remote sensing, velocimetry, Doppler-trip time of flight of a laser pulse reflecting off of a distant target. These systems are widely used

Chan, Sze-Chun

182

Biodiversity Regulation of Ecosystem Services Coordinating Lead Authors: Sandra Diaz, David Tilman, Joseph Fargione  

E-print Network

Chapter 11 Biodiversity Regulation of Ecosystem Services Coordinating Lead Authors: Sandra Di . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300 11.2 Terrestrial Biodiversity Effects on Supporting Services . . . . . . . . . . . 301 11 on Primary Production 11.3 Terrestrial Biodiversity Effects on Regulating Services . . . . . . . . . . . 307

Minnesota, University of

183

Surface Structure of Zeolite (MFI) Crystals Isabel Diaz,, Efrosini Kokkoli, Osamu Terasaki, and Michael Tsapatsis*,  

E-print Network

Articles Surface Structure of Zeolite (MFI) Crystals Isabel Di´az,,§ Efrosini Kokkoli, Osamu type MFI) is an important zeolite that, in addition to conventional applications such as adsorption in studies of zeolite crystal growth. The surface structure of silicalite-1 crystals with two different

Kokkoli, Efie

184

Sphaeronycteris toxophyllum (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae) S. RUBI ANGULO, JHONY A. RIOS, AND M. MO NICA DIAZ  

E-print Network

,000 m in elevation and has been captured in secondary rain forest, cloud forest, deciduous forest, and open areas. The International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources conservation in adults than in juveniles. This bat is endemic to tropical South America and present in Venezuela, Peru

Hayssen, Virginia

185

426 T. Garland Jr.,K. L. M. Martin, R. Diaz-Uriarte RECONSTRUCTINGANCESTRALTRAITVALUES  

E-print Network

purposes, the phenotypic trait we consider is plasma osmolarity, which previous (nonphylogenetic) studies.g., freshurater versus saltwater). We have compiled from the literature osmolarity data for a total of 172 of reproduction inany form reserved. 425 #12;Ancestral Amniote Plasma Osmolarity 427 428 T. GarlandJr., K. L. M

Garland Jr., Theodore

186

From federated to aggregated search Fernando Diaz, Mounia Lalmas and Milad Shokouhi  

E-print Network

, with a focus on hidden web collections Collections not easily crawlable (and often should not) Access to up, wiki, video, audio, blog, map, tweet Search engine allows accessing these through so-called verticals

Lalmas, Mounia

187

The 1-Median and 1-Highway problem J. M. Diaz-Ba~nez  

E-print Network

The 1-Median and 1-Highway problem J. M. D´iaz-B´a~nez M. Korman P. P´erez-Lantero I. Ventura a single point (me- dian) and a rapid transit line (highway) are simultaneously located in order. The highway is an alternative transportation system that can be used by the clients to reduce their travel

Díaz-Báñez, José Miguel

188

Review of ENSO modulation See also: Diaz & Markgraf (2000), esp. chapter by Kleeman & Power  

E-print Network

2004); Yeh & Kirtman (JGRO 2004); Fang et al. (GRL 2008); Sun & Yu (JC 2009); Vecchi & Wittenberg 1997); Power & Smith (GRL 2007); Yeh et al. (Nature 2009); Lee & McPhaden (GRL 2010) #12;Review of ENSO? Sun (JC 2003); Sun & Liu (Science 1996); Sun & Zhang (GRL 2006) ENSO modulation links to extratropical

Wittenberg, Andrew

189

Evolution of leaf warbler songs (Aves: Phylloscopidae)  

PubMed Central

Songs in passerine birds are important for territory defense and mating. Speciation rates in oscine passerines are so high, due to cultural evolution, that this bird lineage makes up half of the extant bird species. Leaf warblers are a speciose Old-World passerine family of limited morphological differentiation, so that songs are even more important for species delimitation. We took 16 sonographic traits from song recordings of 80 leaf warbler taxa and correlated them with 15 potentially explanatory variables, pairwise, and in linear models. Based on a well-resolved molecular phylogeny of the same taxa, all pairwise correlations were corrected for relatedness with phylogenetically independent contrasts and phylogenetic generalized linear models were used. We found a phylogenetic signal for most song traits, but a strong one only for the duration of the longest and of the shortest element, which are presumably inherited instead of learned. Body size of a leaf warbler species is a constraint on song frequencies independent of phylogeny. At least in this study, habitat density had only marginal impact on song features, which even disappeared through phylogenetic correction. Maybe most leaf warblers avoid the deterioration through sound propagation in dense vegetation by singing from exposed perches. Latitudinal (and longitudinal) extension of the breeding ranges was correlated with most song features, especially verse duration (longer polewards and westwards) and complexity (lower polewards). Climate niche or expansion history might explain these correlations. The number of different element types per verse decreases with elevation, possibly due to fewer resources and congeneric species at higher elevations. PMID:25691998

Tietze, Dieter Thomas; Martens, Jochen; Fischer, Balduin S; Sun, Yue-Hua; Klussmann-Kolb, Annette; Päckert, Martin

2015-01-01

190

University of California Riverside 900 University Ave  

E-print Network

with critical thinking facilitates retention. Better retention results in better performance on examinations to legal action. Note-taking can be a critical requirement of a course. Selling or buying of notes short circuits this critical requirement and vehicle for learning. Taking one's own notes reflects a student

Mills, Allen P.

191

NW EVERETT AVE. W BURNSIDE ST.  

E-print Network

Contributors Adam Lawler, Brett Olds - West Burnside Street Samantha Gatzke, AJ Handly - Stadium District Eric Samantha Gatzke, A.J. Handley, Adam Lawler, Eric Nielsen, Brett Olds This monograph summarizes observations

192

SIZE AND LOCOMOTION IN TERATORNS (AVES: TERATORNITHIDAE)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The extinct family Teratornithidae contains the world's largest known flying birds. A new method of determining body weights of extinct birds, based on the size of their tibiotarsi, facilitates the estimation of the wing dimensions of these giant birds. An analysis of the bones of the teratorn wing shows that they closely resemble those of condors, suggesting that teratorns flew

KENNETH E. CAMPBELL; EDUARDO P. TONNI

193

Vision in the peafowl (Aves: Pavo cristatus)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The visual sense of the Indian blue-shouldered peafowl Pavo cristatus was investigated with respect to the spectral absorption characteristics of the retinal photoreceptors, the spectral transmittance of the ocular media and the topographic distribution of cells in the retinal ganglion cell layer. Microspectrophotometry revealed a single class of rod, four spectrally distinct types of single cone and a single class

Nathan S. Hart

194

EAST 18TH AVE (limited vehicle access)  

E-print Network

sleeping bags or wash tents. A minimum $10 fee will be assessed to each item determined to require cleaning Students and OP Co-op Members ONLY! Co-op Membership Costs: $20/year for UO faculty, sta and alumni $25

195

www.ave.kth.se Rail Vehicles  

E-print Network

which reduce noise generation seem to cause more wear. These braking systems are becoming mandatory: Modelling wheel wear caused by block brakes Background Most freight trains use block brakes, where the energy dissipation is generated with the friction between a brake block and the wheel thread

Haviland, David

196

Vision in the peafowl (Aves: Pavo cristatus).  

PubMed

The visual sense of the Indian blue-shouldered peafowl Pavo cristatus was investigated with respect to the spectral absorption characteristics of the retinal photoreceptors, the spectral transmittance of the ocular media and the topographic distribution of cells in the retinal ganglion cell layer. Microspectrophotometry revealed a single class of rod, four spectrally distinct types of single cone and a single class of double cone. In the case of the single cone types, which contained visual pigments with wavelengths of maximum absorbance (lambda(max)) at 424, 458, 505 and 567 nm, spectral filtering by the ocular media and the different cone oil droplets with which each visual pigment is associated gives predicted peak spectral sensitivities of 432, 477, 537 and 605 nm, respectively. Topographic analysis of retinal ganglion cell distribution revealed a large central area of increased cell density (at peak, 35,609 cells mm(-2)) with a poorly defined visual streak extending nasally. The peafowl has a calculated maximum spatial resolution (visual acuity) in the lateral visual field of 20.6 cycles degrees(-1). These properties of the peafowl eye are discussed with respect to its visual ecology and are compared with those of other closely related species. PMID:12432014

Hart, Nathan S

2002-12-01

197

212 Union Ave, SE Olympia, WA 98501  

E-print Network

, the GHG impacts during low water years when the hydro system is curtailed and thermal resources percent (from approximately 44 million tons to 59 million tons using a simulated 2005 average water year flexibility over the same time period and a nuclear power plant was retired. Under the Council's Fifth Power

198

Karyological heterogeneity in the Falconiformes (aves)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  Chromosome studies in 4 families of Falconiformes, Cathartidae, Falconidae, Sagittariidae and Accipitridae showed that the\\u000a karyological variety in this order is much wider than in any other avian order, which underlines the heterogeneous character\\u000a of the group. Of the 4 families only the Cathartidae show karyological similarities with other avian groups (Gruiformes, Ciconiiformes),\\u000a while the karyotypes of the Accipitridae are

L. E. M. de Boer

1975-01-01

199

Global diversity of freshwater birds (Aves)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Among the 10,000 birds species living on earth, 5% (e.g., 560) need imperatively freshwater habitat in order to satisfy at\\u000a least one of their life history traits. About 11 completed families could even disappear if their wetland habitat left. About\\u000a 10% (58) of these can be considered as endemic. Africa contains the biggest number of endemic (20) and more precisely

Olivier Dehorter; Matthieu Guillemain

2008-01-01

200

Global diversity of freshwater birds (Aves)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Among the 10,000 birds species living on earth, 5% (e.g., 560) need imperatively freshwater habitat in order to satisfy at\\u000a least one of their life history traits. About 11 completed families could even disappear if their wetland habitat left. About\\u000a 10% (58) of these can be considered as endemic. Africa contains the biggest number of endemic (20) and more precisely

Olivier Dehorter; Matthieu Guillemain

201

Validity of Bartram's Painted Vulture (Aves: Cathartidae).  

PubMed

William Bartram described the Painted Vulture (Vultur sacra) as a new species in his 1791 book on travels in Florida and other southeastern states. However, no specimen of this bird survives, and it has not been reported by any subsequent ornithologist. Bartram's detailed description is not presently endorsed by the American Ornithologists' Union and has been widely regarded as a myth, a misdescribed King Vulture Sarcoramphus papa (Linnaeus), a misdescribed Northern Caracara Caracara cheriway (Jacquin), or a garbled mixture of species. In fact, his description bears almost no resemblance to a Northern Caracara, but it does match the King Vulture in all important respects except tail color (which is uniform dark brown in all ages and sexes of King Vultures but was white with a dark brown or black tip in Bartram's description). Most 20th century ornithologists commenting on Bartram's bird have been reluctant to accept his description because of the tail-color discrepancy. Only McAtee (1942) concluded that his description could be fully accurate as written, indicating a bird closely related to, but different from, a typical King Vulture. Paralleling Bartram's description is an apparently independent account and painting of a vulture of uncertain geographic origin by Eleazar Albin (1734). Details of Albin's description, including tail color, are very similar to those of Bartram's description. The only discrepancies are minor differences in color of softparts and tail that seem explicable as intraspecific variation. Available evidence suggests that Bartram knew nothing of Albin's description, and if so, Albin's bird provides quite persuasive support for the validity of Bartram's bird. Equally important, none of the arguments offered historically against the validity of the Painted Vulture is persuasive when examined closely. Together, these and other factors make a strong case for acceptance of Bartram's Painted Vulture as a historic resident of northern Florida and likely other adjacent regions. PMID:24698902

Snyder, Noel F R; Fry, Joel T

2013-01-01

202

420 Comp & Comm Ctr Garden Ave Ext  

E-print Network

clearly identified and accessible? Do fire and emergency alarms have both audible and visual signals to the accessible entrance? Is there an automatic door or is pull force on door five pounds or less? Public Areas? Is there an assistive listening system available? Does the room have movable seating to make room for a wheelchair

203

Pedram Partovi 4740 Connecticut Ave. NW, #601  

E-print Network

Studies 45: 3 (2012): 439­447. · "Girls' Dormitory: Women's Islam and Iranian Horror, ,, in Visual, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (May 2009). · "Girls' Dormitory: Iranian Horror and Women's Islam: Popular Film and the National Imagination in Pahlavi Iran · M.A. in Islamic and Near Eastern Studies

Carlini, David

204

Kimberly Sims 101 Western Ave. #66  

E-print Network

Osborn, Social Studies concentrator · "Black Beauty Culture, 1908-1929," Scott Rowen, History Research Assistant, the American Pageant · Assisted in updating the content of the newest edition of the textbook The American Pageant. September 2001- June 2002 Research Assistant for Professor Lizabeth Cohen

Carlini, David

205

127 Eastern Ave. Gloucester, MA 01930  

E-print Network

training and experience in warm water. 4. Certification Week long course leads to NAUI Advanced Scuba Diver: Mask Regulator w/pressure gauge Snorkel Fins Buoyancy Compensator Wetsuit Note: Project DEEP regulators

Schweik, Charles M.

206

127 Eastern Ave Gloucester MA 01930  

E-print Network

it is required by most resorts for their deeper dives and it is a prerequisite for further training. 1. c) Students supply Mask, Fins, Snorkel, and Wetsuit. 4. General Conditions a) Course cost = $225

Schweik, Charles M.

207

127 Eastern Ave Gloucester MA 01930  

E-print Network

it is required by most resorts for their deeper dives and it is a prerequisite for further training. 1 supply Mask, Fins, Snorkel, and Wetsuit. 4. General Conditions a) Course cost = $225.00 To be paid

Schweik, Charles M.

208

127 Eastern Ave Gloucester MA 01930  

E-print Network

resorts for their deeper dives and it is a prerequisite for further training. 1. Prerequisite SCUBA, weight belts, cyalume sticks, dive lights, tanks and a two dive boat charter. c) Students supply Mask

Schweik, Charles M.

209

127 Eastern Ave Gloucester MA 01930  

E-print Network

training. 1. Prerequisite SCUBA certification from any agency. (NAUI, PADI, YMCA, SSI, etc.) 2. Meeting Two. c) Students supply Mask, Fins, Snorkel, and Wetsuit. 4. General Conditions a) Course cost = $225

Schweik, Charles M.

210

127 Eastern Ave Gloucester MA 01930  

E-print Network

resorts for their deeper dives and it is a prerequisite for further training. 1. Prerequisite SCUBA Mask, Fins, Snorkel, and Wetsuit. 4. General Conditions a) Course cost = $225.00 To be paid to Project

Schweik, Charles M.

211

Introduction to the Aves: The Birds  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Museum of Paleontology at the University of California Berkeley (reviewed in the June 16, 1995 Scout Report) has continued to build their impressive online resource network and now offers this site on paleontology of birds. To learn more about each subject, users may click on any of the four main sections: Fossil Record, Life History & Ecology, Systematics, or Morphology. Although some bird links are under construction, the current information is instructive and contains hyperlinks to a wealth of additional information.

212

AVE/VAS experiment: Ground truth network  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The visible/infrared spin scan radiometer (VISSR) atmospheric sounder (VAS) rawinsonde field program is discussed. Specific items covered include: planning, personnel requirements and training, operational requirement and procedures, sounding times and dates, methods of data processing, data inventory, and status of data processing.

Scoggins, J. R.

1983-01-01

213

MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 761, pp. 15, 3 figs. Cryptotis meridensis. By Neal Woodman and Amelia Diaz de Pascual  

E-print Network

, less emarginate upper dentition, and simple M3 (Woodman 2002). GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS. Cryptotis. Dentition is bulbous. Posterior borders of P4, M1, and M2 are not recessed or only slightly recessed

Hayssen, Virginia

214

Subpixel motion computing architecture J. Diaz, E. Ros, S. Mota, F. Pelayo and E.M. Ortigosa  

E-print Network

-end supported by an FPGA processing device, which embeds the frame grabber, optical-flow algorithm Abstract: A pipelined optical-flow processing system that works as a virtual motion sensor has been described. It is based on a field programmable gate array (FPGA) device enabling the easy change

Eduardo, Ros

215

LPV-based MR Damper Modelling Vicente A. Diaz-Salas, Ruben Morales-Menendez, Ricardo Ramirez-Mendoza  

E-print Network

to velocity with a variable damping factor by using intelligent materials: Magneto-Rheological fluid. However Parameter Varying (LPV) models for Magneto-Rheological (MR) dampers is presented. Several experimental

Boyer, Edmond

216

Ethyl 2-(7-oxo-3,5-diphenyl-1,4-diaze­pan-2-yl)acetate  

PubMed Central

In the title compound, C21H24N2O3, the diazepane ring adopts a chair conformation. The central diazepane ring forms dihedral angles 67.80?(7) and 72.29?(5)° with the two benzene rings. The eth­oxy­carbonyl group is disordered over two conformations with site-occupancy factors of 0.643?(5) and 0.357?(5). In the crystal, inversion dimers linked by pairs of N—H?O hydrogen bonds generate R 2 2(8) loops. PMID:22589905

Jagadeesan, G.; Sethusankar, K.; Selvakumar, P.; Thennarasu, S.; Mandal, A. B.

2012-01-01

217

Regenerative potential of allopregnanolone Jun Ming Wang, Lifei Liu, Ronald W. Irwin, Shuhua Chen, Roberta Diaz Brinton  

E-print Network

. Further, Alzheimer's disease (AD) victims exhibit an even greater reduction in plasma and brain levels September 2007 The neuroendocrine status of the brain has been linked to the quality of the aging process, a metabolite of progesterone, which is reduced in the serum, plasma and brain of aged vs. young subjects

Brinton, Roberta Diaz

218

A Cryptographic Study of Tokenization Systems Sandra Diaz-Santiago, Lil Maria Rodriguez-Henriquez and Debrup Chakraborty  

E-print Network

". The token resembles the credit/debit card number but is in no way related to it. This solution relieves in some countries. Traditionally credit card numbers have been used as a primary identifier in many #12;As the standard reference key, credit card numbers are stored in billing, order management

219

[Helminth fauna Anseriformes (Aves) in the Lodz Zoological Garden].  

PubMed

In the years 1959-1990 429 birds on 30 species of Anseriformes were examined post mortem at Zoo Lód?. The helminths were found in 108 birds (25.17%) of 19 species. In infected birds there were found 4 species of trematodes: one of them, Catatropis verrucosa is in Poland new for Cygnus olor; 9 species of cestodes--7 of them are in Poland new for examined hosts; namely: Drepanidotaenia lanceolata for Dendrocygna viduata, Cygnus atratus, Branta bernicla, and Anas platyrhynchos; Microsomacanthus paracompressus for Cygnus olor; Dicranotaenia coronula for Chloephaga picta and Cairina moschata; Cloacotaenia megalops for Branta bernicla, Tschertkovilepis setigera for Cygnus olor, Anser indicus, Branta bernicla and Anas platyrhynchos; Fimbriaria fasciolaris for Cygnus olor and Chloephaga picta; Sobolevicanthus gracilis for Cygnus atratus, Chloephaga picta and Tadorna tadorna; 13 species of nematodes--7 of them are in Poland new for examined hosts, namely: Cyathostoma variegatum for Cygnus atratus, Anser indicus and Anser caerulescens; Syngamus trachea for Anser indicus; Echinuria uncinata for Anser indicus; Ganguleterakis dispar for Cgynus melanocoryphus, Cgynus olor and Anser caerulescens; Pterothominx caudinflata for Anser indicus; Amidostomum ansersis for Cygnus olor and Branta bernicla; Capillaria anatis for Anas acuta. No acanthocephalans were observed. PMID:9424942

Zuchowska, E

1997-01-01

220

A Karyological Study of Some Corvine Birds (Corvidae, Aves)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Karyotypes were studied in the hooded and carrion crows, their naturally occurred hybrids, the jungle crow, the azure-winged magpie (2n= 80 in all aforementioned birds), and the magpie (2n= 82). Corvine birds of Primorskii Krai were karyotyped for the first time. In addition to the similarity in the diploid chromosome sets, corvine birds were shown to have a similar structure

G. V. Roslik; A. P. Kryukov

2001-01-01

221

Eocene Diversification of Crown Group Rails (Aves: Gruiformes: Rallidae)  

PubMed Central

Central to our understanding of the timing of bird evolution is debate about an apparent conflict between fossil and molecular data. A deep age for higher level taxa within Neoaves is evident from molecular analyses but much remains to be learned about the age of diversification in modern bird families and their evolutionary ecology. In order to better understand the timing and pattern of diversification within the family Rallidae we used a relaxed molecular clock, fossil calibrations, and complete mitochondrial genomes from a range of rallid species analysed in a Bayesian framework. The estimated time of origin of Rallidae is Eocene, about 40.5 Mya, with evidence of intrafamiliar diversification from the Late Eocene to the Miocene. This timing is older than previously suggested for crown group Rallidae, but fossil calibrations, extent of taxon sampling and substantial sequence data give it credence. We note that fossils of Eocene age tentatively assigned to Rallidae are consistent with our findings. Compared to available studies of other bird lineages, the rail clade is old and supports an inference of deep ancestry of ground-dwelling habits among Neoaves. PMID:25291147

García–R, Juan C.; Gibb, Gillian C.; Trewick, Steve A.

2014-01-01

222

Chris Bresee 1250 Columbia Ave, Chicago, IL 60626  

E-print Network

experiments involving eye tracking, reaction time, and EEG monitoring, and I designed, built, and carried out is this: how does sensory input give rise to perception, and how plastic is this process student in Dr. Satoru Suzuki's Visual Perception, Neuroscience, and Cognition lab. I assisted in many

Hartmann, Mitra J. Z.

223

S. Washington Ave.Exit 6 Davidson Road  

E-print Network

Easton Avenue, Rte 527, New Brunswick/South Bound Brook Exit 9 River Road, Rte 514, Bound BrookNewBrunswick. Rte1andtheNJturnpike LandingLaneBridge Exit 5 Exit 10 Easton Avenue (Route 527) Raritan River Holiday

224

Office of Alumni & Constituent Relations 900 University Ave.  

E-print Network

for the whole family, interactive college booths, photo booths, caricature artists, live music from KUCR Membership includes your choice of a legacy brick or diploma plaque. Visit alumni.ucr.edu for member benefits of Education Annual Homecoming Reception Saturday, November 16, 2013 9:30 a.m. ­ 11:00 a.m. Alumni Association

Mills, Allen P.

225

Electromyographic studies of the syrinx in parrots (Aves, Psittacidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The vocal organ (syrinx) of a bird may contain either extrinsic muscles alone or both extrinsic and intrinsic muscles. The former arise and insert on the trachea and affect the syrinx only indirectly; the latter also arise on the trachea but insert directly on syringeal elements. It is widely supposed that syringeal muscles can affect modulations of the sounds the

A. S. Gaunt; S. L. L. Gaunt

1985-01-01

226

Hindlimb myology of the monk parakeet (Aves, Psittaciformes).  

PubMed

We studied the hindlimb myology of the monk parakeet (Myiopsitta monachus). Like all parrots, it has zygodactyl feet enabling perching, climbing, hanging, moving easily among trees, and handling food. Muscles were described and weighed, and physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA) of four flexors and one extensor was calculated. In comparison to other muscles, the M. tibialis cranialis and the M. fibularis brevis show increased development and high PCSA values, and therefore, large potential force production. Also, a large proportion of muscle mass was involved in flexing the digits. We hypothesize that these muscle traits are associated with the arboreal locomotion and food manipulation habits. In the monk parakeet, the M. extensor digitorum longus sends a branch to the hallux, and the connection between the M. flexor digitorum longus and the M. flexor hallucis longus is type I (Gadow's classification). We reaffirm the presence of the M. ambiens as a plesiomorphic condition that disappears in most members of the order. Among Psittaciformes, the M. fibularis brevis is stronger and the M. fibularis weaker in arboreal species than in basal terrestrial ones (e.g., Strigops). PMID:24500894

Carril, Julieta; Mosto, María C; Picasso, Mariana B J; Tambussi, Claudia P

2014-07-01

227

Genética de populações e relações de parentesco em Ciconiiformes (Aves).  

E-print Network

??Estudos de genética de populações e de parentesco genético foram desenvolvidos em colhereiro (Platalea ajaja), cabeça-seca (Mycteria americana) e garça-branca-grande (Ardea alba egretta), de colônias… (more)

Carolina Isabel Miño

2010-01-01

228

$avings from thin Air: Cultivating Sensible Energy Use  

E-print Network

"modes on electronics, but there's more: · Check to see if all of your products comply with the latest ENERGY STAR products generally save you at least 30% on the electric bill for that product. In some cases it is even that a replacement laptop battery for a laptop can cost roughly $100 and is expected to reach its rated cycle limit

Wang, Yuqing

229

AVE/VAS 4: 25-mb sounding data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The rawinsonde sounding program is described and tabulated data at 25 mb intervals for the 24 stations and 14 special stations participating in the experiment is presented. Sounding were taken at 3 hr intervals. An additional sounding was taken at the normal synoptic observation time. Some soundings were computed from raw ordinate data, while others were interpolated from significant level data.

Sienkiewicz, M. E.

1983-01-01

230

YOUNG H. CHO Contact: 10125 De Soto Ave #20  

E-print Network

professor position in Applied Research Laboratory at Washington University to conduct research in a large DoD-track position offer from Iowa State University so that I can see my research work become a deployable state at Washington University, my growing interest in wireless, low- power, and reconfigurable systems research led

Cho, Young Hyun

231

Wellness, Productivity, and You! ave you wondered if one  

E-print Network

. The study focused primarily on "buzzed driv- ers" who had a measurable blood alcohol content that was below: There is no safe limit of alcohol consumption before getting behind the wheel. Now you know. Press Release: bitly")--it has smart eating tips and time- saving food ideas to im- prove nutritional balance, create healthy

Kim, Duck O.

232

250 Mrak Hall One Shields Ave. Davis, CA 95616  

E-print Network

withdraw, go on filing fee, PELP, etc. As with other stipends paid to international students, these one-time payments for a student, you will be required to create a separate distribution line for each payment Chair Date

California at Davis, University of

233

Phylogeny and classification of the Old World Emberizini (Aves, Passeriformes).  

PubMed

The phylogeny of the avian genus Emberiza and the monotypic genera Latoucheornis, Melophus and Miliaria (collectively the Old World Emberizini), as well as representatives for the New World Emberizini, the circumpolar genera Calcarius and Plectrophenax and the four other generally recognized tribes in the subfamily Emberizinae was estimated based on the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene and introns 6-7 of the nuclear ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) gene. Our results support monophyly of the Old World Emberizini, but do not corroborate a sister relationship to the New World Emberizini. Calcarius and Plectrophenax form a clade separated from the other Emberizini. This agrees with previous studies, and we recommend the use of the name Calcariini. Latoucheornis, Melophus and Miliaria are nested within Emberiza, and we therefore propose they be synonymized with Emberiza. Emberiza is divided into four main clades, whose relative positions are uncertain, although a sister relation between a clade with six African species and one comprising the rest of the species (30, all Palearctic) is most likely. Most clades agree with traditional, morphology-based, classifications. However, four sister relationships within Emberiza, three of which involve the previously recognized Latoucheornis, Melophus and Miliaria, are unpredicted, and reveal cases of strong morphological divergence. In contrast, the plumage similarity between adult male Emberiza (formerly Latoucheornis) siemsseni and the nominate subspecies of the New World Junco hyemalis is shown to be the result of parallel evolution. A further case of parallel plumage evolution, between African and Eurasian taxa, is pointed out. Two cases of discordance between the mitochondrial and nuclear data with respect to branch lengths and genetic divergences are considered to be the result of introgressive hybridization. PMID:18411062

Alström, Per; Olsson, Urban; Lei, Fumin; Wang, Hai-tao; Gao, Wei; Sundberg, Per

2008-06-01

234

XinHai Rd. Sec.3 Golden rain Ave.  

E-print Network

Horticultural Farm Dept. of Geosciences Bldg. 2, College of Management Bldg. 1, College of Management Dept NTU convention center Law Library Wan-Cai Hall Astronomy-Mathematics Bldg. Dept. of Mathematics Library Dept. of Chemistry Library 6 Institute of Oceanography Library Institute of Atomic

Wu, Yih-Min

235

Duval County Extension Office 1010 N. McDuff Ave.  

E-print Network

- Friday, June 15 A Florida-Friendly yard...what is it? Keeping a Garden Calendar Organic Gardening Come join us for Camp Florida-Friendly Four sessions of in-depth gardening information offered 13 Butterfly Gardening Hummingbirds Native Plants Myth-busting Perceptions of Trees Session 2

Watson, Craig A.

236

Duval County Extension 1010 N. McDuff Ave.  

E-print Network

whites (cooked) Gelatin Fruit jelly Fried foods Icings made from egg whites Sour cream Macaroni loss of color, vitamins, and flavor. To inactivate enzymes in vegetables, a process called such as ascorbic acid (vitamin C). Citric acid, lemon juice or sugar syrup can be used, but these do not prevent

Watson, Craig A.

237

Multiple cenozoic invasions of Africa by penguins (Aves, Sphenisciformes).  

PubMed

Africa hosts a single breeding species of penguin today, yet the fossil record indicates that a diverse array of now-extinct taxa once inhabited southern African coastlines. Here, we show that the African penguin fauna had a complex history involving multiple dispersals and extinctions. Phylogenetic analyses and biogeographic reconstructions incorporating new fossil material indicate that, contrary to previous hypotheses, the four Early Pliocene African penguin species do not represent an endemic radiation or direct ancestors of the living Spheniscus demersus (blackfooted penguin). A minimum of three dispersals to Africa, probably assisted by the eastward-flowing Antarctic Circumpolar and South Atlantic currents, occurred during the Late Cenozoic. As regional sea-level fall eliminated islands and reduced offshore breeding areas during the Pliocene, all but one penguin lineage ended in extinction, resulting in today's depleted fauna. PMID:21900330

Ksepka, Daniel T; Thomas, Daniel B

2012-03-01

238

Hypopi (Acari:Hypoderatidae) from owls (Aves:Strigiformes:Strigidae).  

PubMed

Hypopi (deutonymphs) of the family Hypoderatidae were found in a barn owl, Tyto alba (Scopoli), and a burrowing owl, Speotyto cunicularia (Molina), from Texas. A redescription is provided for mature specimens of the hypopus of Tytodectes (Tytodectes) tyto Fain from the subcutaneous adipose tissues of the pelvic region in the barn owl. The hypopus of Tytodectes (Tytodectes) speotyto n. sp. is described from specimens in the subcutaneous adipose tissues of the pelvic region and in the adipose tissues of the intermuscular fasciae of the ankle in the burrowing owl. T. (T.) speotyto appears most similar in size and chaetotaxy to T. (T.) glaucidii Cerný described from the Cuban pygmy owl, Glaucidium siju (d'Orbigny), in Cuba, but differs in the presence of a spine on tibia IV, which also occurs in T. (T.) tyto. Both of the former species have the anterior apodemes of coxae I fused in a simple V and lack a sternum. They differ from T. (T.) tyto which has the anterior apodemes of coxae I fused in a Y and there is a well developed sternum. Based on the above 3 described hypopi, the hypoderatids of owls represent an assemblage of small closely related, but easily differentiated, species. The occurrence of a few specimens of Neottialges evansi Fain in the barn owl and Hypodectes (Hypodectoides) propus (Nitzsch) in the burrowing owl probably represent examples of host capture by hypopi that normally occur in cormorants and pigeons, herons or egrets, respectively. PMID:8840691

Pence, D B; Bergan, J F

1996-09-01

239

Wellness, Productivity, and You! ave you wondered if one  

E-print Network

, depending on your body weight. Findings showed that buzzed drivers were 46 percent more likely than non and be a supportive and "in tune" coworker. Grief is a natural, normal reaction to a serious loss of any kind

Alpay, S. Pamir

240

Experimental assessment of problem solving by Milvago chimango (Aves: Falconiformes)  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report a preliminary assessment of problem solving as an estimate of behavioural innovation and learning ability of a generalist\\u000a and abundant raptor, Milvago chimango, under controlled conditions in aviaries. Experimental tests consisted in presentation of a Plexiglas box with four lids\\u000a leading to isolated pieces of meat. We recorded time to first contact with the box and time from

Laura Marina Biondi; Maria Susana Bó; Aldo Iván Vassallo

2008-01-01

241

The karyotype of the osprey, Pandion haliaetus (Aves: Falconiformes)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The karyotype of the osprey consists of 74 chromosomes. There are no large macrochromosomes and no typical microchromosomes. Autosome No. 2 has a prominent secondary constriction in the long arm. The Z chromosome is similar in size and shape to the largest autosome, the W is a small metacentric. Among the Falconiformes, the osprey karyotype mainly resembles the karyotypes of

H. Ryttman; H. Tegelström; K. Fredga; J. Sondell

1987-01-01

242

Valor energético do óleo ácido de soja para aves  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of soybean acid oil as energy source in poultry nutrition, has been limited by its uncertain metabolizable energy value. The objective of this work was to determine the effect of bird age and methodology on the metabolizable energy of commercial soybean acid oil. First and second trials were conducted using total collection excreta methodology with chicks of 12

Paulo Donato Castellane

2005-01-01

243

A comprehensive molecular phylogeny for the hornbills (Aves: Bucerotidae).  

PubMed

The hornbills comprise a group of morphologically and behaviorally distinct Palaeotropical bird species that feature prominently in studies of ecology and conservation biology. Although the monophyly of hornbills is well established, previous phylogenetic hypotheses were based solely on mtDNA and limited sampling of species diversity. We used parsimony, maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods to reconstruct relationships among all 61 extant hornbill species, based on nuclear and mtDNA gene sequences extracted largely from historical samples. The resulting phylogenetic trees closely match vocal variation across the family but conflict with current taxonomic treatments. In particular, they highlight a new arrangement for the six major clades of hornbills and reveal that three groups traditionally treated as genera (Tockus, Aceros, Penelopides) are non-monophyletic. In addition, two other genera (Anthracoceros, Ocyceros) were non-monophyletic in the mtDNA gene tree. Our findings resolve some longstanding problems in hornbill systematics, including the placement of 'Penelopides exharatus' (embedded in Aceros) and 'Tockus hartlaubi' (sister to Tropicranus albocristatus). We also confirm that an Asiatic lineage (Berenicornis) is sister to a trio of Afrotropical genera (Tropicranus [including 'Tockus hartlaubi'], Ceratogymna, Bycanistes). We present a summary phylogeny as a robust basis for further studies of hornbill ecology, evolution and historical biogeography. PMID:23438388

Gonzalez, Juan-Carlos T; Sheldon, Ben C; Collar, Nigel J; Tobias, Joseph A

2013-05-01

244

Esteban M Lucero 505 Sweet Ave. Las Cruces NM 88001  

E-print Network

and Science Museum · March 2012 Volunteer judge Southwestern New Mexico Regional Science and Engineering Fair@nmsu.edu EDUCATION New Mexico State University 2008-Present Bachelor of Science, Biology, expected May 2014 Principle Investigator: Dr. Tim Wright Project Title: The influence of social environment on FoxP2

Wright, Timothy F.

245

Acetylcholinesterase in der Pars distalis von Zonotrichia leucophrys gambelii (Aves)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Photoperiodic stimulation of photosensitive male white-crowned sparrows, Zonotrichia leucophrys gambelii, causes the appearance of acetylcholinesterase activity in the cephalic and caudal lobes of the pars distalis. In photosensitive birds held on short daily photoperiods little or no activity can he demonstrated histochemically. The enzyme is restricted to PAS-positive cells. After attaining a maximum between 31 and 52 days after the

Eberhard Haase; Donald S. Farner

1969-01-01

246

A molecular phylogeny of the cotingas (Aves: Cotingidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The phylogenetic relationships of members of Cotingidae were investigated using >2100bp of sequence data from two nuclear introns (myoglobin intron 2 and G3PDH intron 11) and one protein-coding mitochondrial gene (cytochrome b). Strong support was found for a monophyletic clade including 23 traditional cotingid genera, corresponding to the Cotingidae sensu [Remsen, J.V. Jr., Jaramillo, A., Nores, M., Pacheco, J.F., Robbins,

Jan I. Ohlson; Richard O. Prum; Per G. P. Ericson

2007-01-01

247

SHAHNOZA BOBOEVA 3030 Johnson Ave, Bronx, NY, 10463  

E-print Network

and Applied Science New York, NY MS in Earth and Environmental Engineering Relevant coursework: Energy sources 2011 New York State Psychiatric Institute New York, NY Documentation Assistant · English-Russian documents translation A.T.R. JEWELRY, INC. 2010-2012 (Commercial jewelry design and manufacture) New York

248

A comprehensive multilocus assessment of sparrow (Aves: Passerellidae) relationships.  

PubMed

The New World sparrows (Emberizidae) are among the best known of songbird groups and have long-been recognized as one of the prominent components of the New World nine-primaried oscine assemblage. Despite receiving much attention from taxonomists over the years, and only recently using molecular methods, was a "core" sparrow clade established allowing the reconstruction of a phylogenetic hypothesis that includes the full sampling of sparrow species diversity. In this paper, we use mitochondrial DNA gene sequences from all 129 putative species of sparrow and four additional (nuclear) loci for a subset of these taxa to resolve both generic and species level relationships. Hypotheses derived from our mitochondrial (2184 base pairs) and nuclear (5705 base pairs) DNA data sets were generally in agreement with respect to clade constituency but differed somewhat with respect to among-clade relationships. Sparrow diversity is defined predominantly by eight well-supported clades that indicate a lack of monophyly for at least three currently recognized genera. Ammodramus is polyphyletic and requires the naming of two additional genera. Spizella is also polyphyletic with Tree Sparrow (Spizella arborea) as a taxonomic "outlier". Pselliophorus is embedded within a larger Atlapetes assemblage and should be merged with that group. This new hypothesis of sparrow relationships will form the basis for future comparative analyses of variation within songbirds. PMID:24792084

Klicka, John; Keith Barker, F; Burns, Kevin J; Lanyon, Scott M; Lovette, Irby J; Chaves, Jaime A; Bryson, Robert W

2014-08-01

249

2245 MSC, 1300 University Ave Madison, WI 53706-1532  

E-print Network

· Fitness & Nutrition · Hearing & Vision Loss Resources · Osteoporosis Screening · Blood Pressure Testing Community · Navigating the Journey of Aging Guide · Midwest Home Care · Oak Park Place · Oakwood Lutheran

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

250

A molecular phylogeny of the cotingas (Aves: Cotingidae).  

PubMed

The phylogenetic relationships of members of Cotingidae were investigated using >2100 bp of sequence data from two nuclear introns (myoglobin intron 2 and G3PDH intron 11) and one protein-coding mitochondrial gene (cytochrome b). Strong support was found for a monophyletic clade including 23 traditional cotingid genera, corresponding to the Cotingidae sensu [Remsen, J.V. Jr., Jaramillo, A., Nores, M., Pacheco, J.F., Robbins, M.B., Schulenberg, T.S., Stiles, F.G., da Silva, J.M.C., Stotz, D.F., Zimmer, K.J., 2005. Version 2005-11-15. A classification of the bird species of South America. American Ornithologists' Union. ]. Neither Oxyruncus nor any of the genera in Tityrinae sensu [Prum, R.O, Lanyon, W.E., 1989. Monophyly and phylogeny of the Schiffornis group (Tyrannoidea). Condor 91, 444-461.] are members of Cotingidae. Within Cotingidae a polytomy of four well-supported clades was recovered: (1) the fruiteaters Pipreola and Ampelioides; (2) the Ampelion group, including Phytotoma; (3) Rupicola and Phoenicircus; and (4) the 'core cotingas' consisting of the remainder of the Cotingas (e.g. fruitcrows, Cotinga, Procnias, Lipaugus, and Carpodectes), with Snowornis in a basal position. The separation of Snowornis from Lipaugus [Prum, R.O, Lanyon, W.E., 1989. Monophyly and phylogeny of the Schiffornis group (Tyrannoidea). Condor 91, 444-461.] was strongly supported, as were the close relationships between Gymnoderus and Conioptilon, and between Tijuca and Lipaugus. However, basal relationships among 'core cotinga' clades were not resolved. PMID:16876441

Ohlson, Jan I; Prum, Richard O; Ericson, Per G P

2007-01-01

251

University Health Services 910 Madison Ave, Suite 922  

E-print Network

of the following cardiovascular or heart problems? a. Heart attack b. Stroke c. Angina d. Heart failure e. Swelling. Have you ever had any of the following conditions? a) Seizures (fits) b) Diabetes (sugar disease) c in your legs or feet (not caused by walking) f. Heart arrhythmia (heart beating irregularly) g. High blood

Cui, Yan

252

Dating the diversification of the major lineages of Passeriformes (Aves)  

PubMed Central

Background The avian Order Passeriformes is an enormously species-rich group, which comprises almost 60% of all living bird species. This diverse order is believed to have originated before the break-up of Gondwana in the late Cretaceous. However, previous molecular dating studies have relied heavily on the geological split between New Zealand and Antarctica, assumed to have occurred 85–82 Mya, for calibrating the molecular clock and might thus be circular in their argument. Results This study provides a time-scale for the evolution of the major clades of passerines using seven nuclear markers, five taxonomically well-determined passerine fossils, and an updated interpretation of the New Zealand split from Antarctica 85–52 Mya in a Bayesian relaxed-clock approach. We also assess how different interpretations of the New Zealand–Antarctica vicariance event influence our age estimates. Our results suggest that the diversification of Passeriformes began in the late Cretaceous or early Cenozoic. Removing the root calibration for the New Zealand–Antarctica vicariance event (85–52 Mya) dramatically increases the 95% credibility intervals and leads to unrealistically old age estimates. We assess the individual characteristics of the seven nuclear genes analyzed in our study. Our analyses provide estimates of divergence times for the major groups of passerines, which can be used as secondary calibration points in future molecular studies. Conclusions Our analysis takes recent paleontological and geological findings into account and provides the best estimate of the passerine evolutionary time-scale currently available. This time-scale provides a temporal framework for further biogeographical, ecological, and co-evolutionary studies of the largest bird radiation, and adds to the growing support for a Cretaceous origin of Passeriformes. PMID:24422673

2014-01-01

253

University Health Services 910 Madison Ave, Suite 922  

E-print Network

. Cat feces should be avoided as well. Gloves should be worn when working in areas that may contact with toxoplasma- infected animals, especially cats to prevent congenital Toxoplasma - infection be contaminated with cat feces. Thorough hand washing after handling any potential source of infection

Cui, Yan

254

University Health Services 910 Madison Ave, Suite 922  

E-print Network

to the skin), and asthma (less common). Some allergies can be severe and life threatening. Cats, rabbits. To help prevent development of animal allergies certain procedures should be followed. Always work in well

Cui, Yan

255

Karyotypic analysis of three species of Phasianidae (Galliformes: Aves).  

PubMed

The karyology of the partridges Francolinus francolinus asiae (2n = 70) and F. pondicerianus interpositus (2n = 68) and the Japanese quail Coturnix coturnix japonica (2n = 78) was investigated. The frequency distribution of the diploid number of chromosomes was tabulated and the most frequent number was taken to be the diploid number. All species showed a bimodal karyotype and the variation in the number of chromosomes was attributed to the macrochromosomes, although twelve macrochromosomes were present in all the species. Female heterogamety revealed that ZZ male:ZW female sex chromosome mechanism was present. The structure and behaviour of chromosomes during mitosis are described and the evolution of karyotype and cytotaxonomic considerations discussed. PMID:7671640

Yadav, J S; Pachlag, S; Burra, M R; Yadav, A S

1995-01-01

256

The Wellness Center 365 Fifth Ave. New York, NY 10016  

E-print Network

.817.1602 wellness@gc.cuny.edu www.tinyurl.com/gcwellness Table of Contents Student Health Services · Health Workshops and Special Events *A note on costs Laboratory fees as well as screening costs with the emergency. #12;Phone Numbers Student Health Services 212-817-7020 Security 212-817-7777 Useful Links http://web.gc.cuny.edu/wellness/health

Dennehy, John

257

AVE/VAS 5: 25-mb sounding data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The rawinsonde sounding program is described and tabulated data at 25 mb intervals for the 24 and 14 special stations participation in the experiment are presented. Soundings were taken at 3 hr intervals. The method of processing soundings is discussed briefly, estimates of the RMS errors in the data are presented, and an example of contact data is given. Termination pressures of soundings taken in the meso beta scale network are tabulated, as are observations of ground temperature at a depth of 2 cm.

Sienkiewicz, M. E.

1983-01-01

258

A stability analysis of AVE-4 severe weather soundings  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The stability and vertical structure of an average severe storm sounding, consisting of both thermodynamic and wind vertical profiles, were investigated to determine if they could be distinguished from an average lag sounding taken 3 to 6 hours prior to severe weather occurrence. The term average is defined here to indicate the arithmetic mean of a parameter, as a function of altitude, determined from a large number of available observations taken either close to severe weather occurrence, or else more than 3 hours before it occurs. The investigative computations were also done to help determine if a severe storm forecast or index could possibly be used or developed. These mean vertical profiles of thermodynamic and wind parameters as a function of severity of the weather, determined from manually digitized radar (MDR) categories are presented. Profile differences and stability index differences are presented along with the development of the Johnson Lag Index (JLI) which is determined entirely upon environmental vertical parameter differences between conditions 3 hours prior to severe weather, and severe weather itself.

Johnson, D. L.

1982-01-01

259

A compilation of studies from Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Five methods for obtaining the sign of vertical motion at various levels in the atmosphere were investigated to determine which gave the best explanation for areas of rain and no-rain in the southeastern United States during the period February 19-22, 1964. The methods used were the terrain-induced vertical motion, the kinematic method including the terrain effect, the adiabatic method, the omega equation, and the vorticity equation combined with Dines' Compensation Principle. Stability and moisture availability were considered but not as extensively as vertical motion. Values of vertical motion obtained by the kinetic method, including orographic lifting produced the best agreement with the observed areas. When terms in the omega equation were added through use of constant multipliers, results comparable to the adiabatic method were obtained. Without this addition large uncertainties occurred. Maps showing areas where terms of the omega equation would indicate positive vertical motion did not correlate well with the observed rainfall patterns.

Scoggins, J. R.; Fuelberg, H. E.; Carlson, R. D.; Phelps, R. W.; Bellue, D. G.

1973-01-01

260

Hypopi (Acari: Hypoderatidae) of the wood stork (Aves: Ciconiiformes: Ciconiidae)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A new species is described and additional host records are presented for 2 other species of deutonymphs of the family Hypoderatidae from the subcutaneous adipose tissues of the wood stork, Mycteria americana L. Phalacrodectes (Phalacrodectes) mycteria n. sp. appears to share affinities with species from both pelicaniform and ciconiiform hosts, but it most closely resembles P. (P.) punctatissimus (?erný) Pence & Courtney from pelicans in idiosomal chaetotaxy, cutdcular sclerotization, and posteriorly divergent, widely separated genital openings. The new species differs from this and other species of the genus by its small size, the degree of separation of the genital openings with papillae, no secondary sclerotization in the perigenital area or surrounding the genital openings, and the long filiform setae s and w on genu III. There was a mixed infection of Neottialges kutzeri Fain and N. mycteriae Pence in all of 7 wood storks examined from Florida and Georgia; P. (P) mycteria was found in 4 of these hosts. This is the 7th species described as a deutonymph in the genus Phalacrodectes. The apparent close affinity of P. (P.) mycteria with P. (P.) punctatissimus and allied species from pelicaniform versus ciconiiform birds appears to be inconsistent with the established host-parasite relationships based on classical avian taxonomic relationships. However, this apparent affinity may be more reflective of the close relationships between the families of pelicans, ibises and spoonbills, and storks as recently proposed by DNA-DNA hybridization studies.

Pence, D.B.; Thomas, N.J.

1995-01-01

261

Taxonomy of Greater White-fronted Geese (Aves: Anatidae)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Five subspecies of the Greater White-fronted Goose, Anser albifrons (Scopoli, 1769), have been named, all on the basis of wintering birds, and up to six subspecies have been recognized. There has been confusion over the application of some names, particularly in North America, because of lack of knowledge of the breeding ranges and type localities, and incorrect taxonomic decisions. There is one clinally varying subspecies in Eurasia, one that breeds in Greenland, and three in North America, one newly named herein.

Banks, Richard C.

2011-01-01

262

Isleria, a new genus of antwren (Aves: Passeriformes: Thamnophilidae)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A comprehensive molecular phylogenetic analysis of the family Thamnophilidae indicated that the genus Myrmotherula is not monophyletic. The clade composed of M. guttata and M. hauxwelli is only distantly related to other members of the genus and should be removed from Myrmotherula. The phenotypic distinctiveness of the clade argues against merging it with its sister group Thamnomanes and no generic name is available for the guttata-hauxwelli clade. Consequently, we describe the genus Isleria for these two species, and designate Myrmothera guttata as its type species.

Bravo, Gustavo A.; Chesser, R. Terry; Brumfield, Robb T.

2012-01-01

263

Foraging decisions, patch use, and seasonality in egrets (Aves: ciconiiformes)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Feeding snowy (Egretta thula) and great (Casmerodius albus) egrets were observed during 2 breeding seasons in coastal New Jersey and 2 brief winter periods in northeast Florida (USA). A number of tests based on assumptions of foraging models, predictions from foraging theory, and earlier empirical tests concerning time allocation and movement in foraging patches was made. Few of the expectations based on foraging theory and/or assumptions were supported by the empirical evidence. Snowy egrets fed with greater intensity and efficiency during the breeding season (when young were being fed) than during winter. They also showed some tendency to leave patches when their capture rate declined, and they spent more time foraging in patches when other birds were present nearby. Great egrets showed few of these tendencies, although they did leave patches when their intercapture intervals increased. Satiation differences had some influence on feeding rates in snowy egrets, but only at the end of feeding bouts. Some individuals of both species revisited areas in patches that had recently been exploited, and success rates were usually higher after the 2nd visit. Apparently, for predators of active prey, short-term changes in resource availability ('resource depression') may be more important than resource depletion, a common assumption in most optimal foraging theory models.

Erwin, R.M.

1985-01-01

264

Integrating the Common Information Model with MDS4 I. Diaz, G. Fernandez, M.J. Martin, P. Gonzalez, J. Touri~no  

E-print Network

representation that allows intra- and inter-Grid inter- operability. Among them, the Common Information ModelIntegrating the Common Information Model with MDS4 I. D´iaz, G. Fern´andez, M.J. Mart´in, P. Gonz are an abstract representation of software and hardware aspects of these resources, a common and struc- tured

Touriño, Juan

265

Articles dans des revues internationales ou nationales avec comit de (ACL07-1) Abdenur, F.; Bonatti, C.; Crovisier, S.; Diaz, L. J.; Wen, L. " Periodic points and  

E-print Network

Année 2007 Articles dans des revues internationales ou nationales avec comité de lecture (ACL07", 12 Ergodic Theory Dynam. Systems : 27 : 1-22. 2007 (ACL07-2) Aloulou, W.; Arnal, D.; Chatbouri, R. " Cohomologie de Chevalley des graphes vectoriels", Pacific J. Math. 229 : 257-292. 2007 (ACL07-3) Aloulou, W

Herrmann, Samuel

266

Micromagnetism in mesoscopic epitaxial Fe dot arrays Y. B. Xu, A. Hirohata, L. Lopez-Diaz, H. T. Leung, M. Tselepi, S. M. Gardiner,  

E-print Network

anisotropy, in this film as shown by in situ magneto-optical Kerr effect measurements. The film to be considered. In this article, we highlight the effect of the diameter and separation, as well on GaAs 100 at room temperature.13 The cubic anisotropy is dominant, but with the presence of a uniaxial

Xu, Yongbing

267

16. Hansen, M., Flatt, T., and Aguilaniu, H. (2013). Reproduction, fat metabolism, and life span  

E-print Network

Biology by Leyva-Diaz et al. [4] provides insights into this important question by demonstrating protein FLRT3. The study by Leyva-Diaz et al. [4] builds on previous work from Bielle et al. [8], which

Lowery, Laura Anne

268

76 FR 12408 - Notice of Intent to Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at Ellington Field Airport...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...addition, one copy of any comments submitted to the FAA must be mailed or delivered to Mr. Mario C. Diaz, Aviation Director, at the following address: Mr. Mario C. Diaz, Aviation Director, Houston Airport System, 16930 John F. Kennedy...

2011-03-07

269

SERVICE HOURS SERVICE INTERVALS Blue Route Blackberry Gate  

E-print Network

with this sign. Leroy Leroy BlackberryGate Euclid Euclid Berkeley BART BusStop for Berkeley BART Arch Oxford­Leroy Ave Hearst Ave­Euclid Ave Oxford St.­Hearst Ave Main Berkeley BART Shattuck Ave Oxford St.­University Ave Hearst Ave­Arch St. Hearst Ave­Euclid Ave Hearst Ave­Leroy Ave Blackberry Gate­Uphill Building 65

270

vertebradosibericos.org -AVES >> Presentacin del Atlas Virtual >> Mapas de distribucin y listado de especies ATLAS VIRTUAL DE LAS AVES TERRESTRES DE ESPAA  

E-print Network

Torcecuello 76 3 link Lanius excubitor Alcaudón Real 80 3 Lanius senator Alcaudón Común 100 2 Loxia curvirostra Piquituerto Común 84 Lullula arborea Totovía 92 2 link Luscinia megarhynchos Ruiseñor Común 100

Carrascal, Luis M.

271

vertebradosibericos.org -AVES >> Presentacin del Atlas Virtual >> Mapas de distribucin y listado de especies ATLAS VIRTUAL DE LAS AVES TERRESTRES DE ESPAA  

E-print Network

aeruginosus Aguilucho Lagunero Occidental 4 Circus cyaneus Aguilucho Pálido 8 3 Circus pygargus Aguilucho Cigüeña Blanca 76 2 Ciconia nigra Cigüeña Negra 76 3 Circaetus gallicus Culebrera Europea 72 3 Circus

Carrascal, Luis M.

272

Documento vinculado a vertebradosibericos.org -AVES y Atlas Virtual de Aves Terrestres de Espaa BIOGEOGRAFA ECOLGICA DE LA AVIFAUNA TERRESTRE ESPAOLA  

E-print Network

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 19.51 Formaciones arbustivas IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 5.66 Form. arboladas abiertas IIIIIII 1 distribución a gran escala en la Península Ibérica. Tiene marcadas preferencias por zonas montañosas, con menor gradientes climáticos y de uso de suelo zonas llanas

Carrascal, Luis M.

273

vertebradosibericos.org -AVES >> Presentacin del Atlas Virtual >> Mapas de distribucin y listado de especies ATLAS VIRTUAL DE LAS AVES TERRESTRES DE ESPAA  

E-print Network

Dáurica 100 Hirundo rustica Golondrina Común 100 3 Jynx torquilla Torcecuello 24 3 link Lanius excubitor Alcaudón Real 84 3 Lanius senator Alcaudón Común 96 2 Lullula arborea Totovía 48 2 link Luscinia

Carrascal, Luis M.

274

vertebradosibericos.org -AVES >> Presentacin del Atlas Virtual >> Mapas de distribucin y listado de especies ATLAS VIRTUAL DE LAS AVES TERRESTRES DE ESPAA  

E-print Network

Alcaudón Dorsirrojo 76 3 Lanius excubitor Alcaudón Real 56 3 Lanius senator Alcaudón Común 80 2 Loxia 92 Hirundo rustica Golondrina Común 100 3 Jynx torquilla Torcecuello 84 3 link Lanius collurio

Carrascal, Luis M.

275

vertebradosibericos.org -AVES >> Presentacin del Atlas Virtual >> Mapas de distribucin y listado de especies ATLAS VIRTUAL DE LAS AVES TERRESTRES DE ESPAA  

E-print Network

rustica Golondrina Común 88 3 Jynx torquilla Torcecuello 56 3 link Lanius excubitor Alcaudón Real 84 3 Lanius senator Alcaudón Común 52 2 Loxia curvirostra Piquituerto Común 24 Lullula arborea Totovía 32 2

Carrascal, Luis M.

276

vertebradosibericos.org -AVES >> Presentacin del Atlas Virtual >> Mapas de distribucin y listado de especies ATLAS VIRTUAL DE LAS AVES TERRESTRES DE ESPAA  

E-print Network

Hirundo rustica Golondrina Común 100 3 Jynx torquilla Torcecuello 8 3 link Lanius excubitor Alcaudón Real 96 3 Lanius senator Alcaudón Común 96 2 Locustella luscinioides Buscarla Unicolor 8 Loxia curvirostra

Carrascal, Luis M.

277

vertebradosibericos.org -AVES >> Presentacin del Atlas Virtual >> Mapas de distribucin y listado de especies ATLAS VIRTUAL DE LAS AVES TERRESTRES DE ESPAA  

E-print Network

daurica Golondrina Dáurica 96 Hirundo rustica Golondrina Común 100 3 Lanius excubitor Alcaudón Real 92 3 Lanius senator Alcaudón Común 96 2 Lullula arborea Totovía 64 2 link Luscinia megarhynchos Ruiseñor Común

Carrascal, Luis M.

278

vertebradosibericos.org -AVES >> Presentacin del Atlas Virtual >> Mapas de distribucin y listado de especies ATLAS VIRTUAL DE LAS AVES TERRESTRES DE ESPAA  

E-print Network

Lanius excubitor Alcaudón Real 4 3 Loxia curvirostra Piquituerto Común 66 Lullula arborea Totovía 45 2 torquilla Torcecuello 25 3 link Lagopus mutus Lagópodo Alpino 54 + Lanius collurio Alcaudón Dorsirrojo 62 3

Carrascal, Luis M.

279

vertebradosibericos.org -AVES >> Presentacin del Atlas Virtual >> Mapas de distribucin y listado de especies ATLAS VIRTUAL DE LAS AVES TERRESTRES DE ESPAA  

E-print Network

Dáurica 48 Hirundo rustica Golondrina Común 96 3 Jynx torquilla Torcecuello 20 3 link Lanius excubitor Alcaudón Real 80 3 Lanius senator Alcaudón Común 88 2 Loxia curvirostra Piquituerto Común 16 Lullula

Carrascal, Luis M.

280

Genetics, local environment and health as factors in uencing plasma carotenoids in wild American  

E-print Network

kestrels (Falco sparverius) G. R. Bortolotti,1* J. L. Tella,1,2 M. G. Forero,1 R. D. Dawson1,3 and J. J kestrels (Falco sparverius). Plasma concentrations of siblings at the time of £edging showed a high degree

Bortolotti, Gary R.

281

Spectroscopic confirmation and additional photometry of the very bright nova M31N 2015-01a  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report the ongoing increase of the optical brightness of Nova M31 2015-01a (ATel #6911, ATel #6924). Four 900s spectra were obtained on Jan 16.8 UT with the FoReRo2 focal reducer at the 2 m RCC telescope.

Kurtenkov, A.; Ovcharov, E.; Nedialkov, P.; Kostov, A.; Bachev, R.; Dimitrova, R. V. Munoz; Popov, V.; Valcheva, A.

2015-01-01

282

Homing performances of adult and immature Dunlins Calidris alpina (Aves Scolopacidae) displaced from their wintering area  

Microsoft Academic Search

The existence of possible differences in homing performances between adult and juvenile Dunlins was investigated at the beginning of two wintering seasons, when 49 adults (1992) and 51 first-year birds (1993) were caught in the Lagoon of Venice and displaced to Cervia Salines. Both sites (133 km apart) are important winter resorts for the species at the Italian and Mediterranean

N. Baccetti; G. Cherubini; A. Magnani; L. Serra

1995-01-01

283

Aves Aquáticas da Lagoa da Pampulha: Seleção de hábitats e atividade diurna  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wading birds at Lagoa da Pampulha: Habitat selection and diurnal activity. The wading bird communities in lacunar systems are mainly structured based on the availability and distribution of feeding resources and appropriate conditions for their reproduction and establishment. As a result, in a given habitat, each species selects, according to the possibilities of its behavioral repertoire, the best way to

Flávio E. Pimenta; João C. P. Drummond; Ana C. Lima

284

Trichobilharzia mergi sp. nov. (Trematoda: Digenea: Schistosomatidae), a visceral schistosome of Mergus serrator (L.) (Aves: Anatidae).  

PubMed

Parasitological investigations on red-breasted mergansers (Mergus serrator L.) in Iceland revealed digenean flukes of the family Schistosomatidae. Adult worms were detected in blood vessels of the large intestine and eggs were deposited in the mucosa and surrounded by granulomatous reactions. Traditional morphological methods showed that the flukes have very slender filiform bodies, males are equipped with a short gynaecophoric canal and both suckers and spatulate ends are present on each sex. Among characteristics of the flukes which render them morphologically distinct from other Trichobilharzia species are: i) males-well developed vesicula seminalis (v.s.) consisting of a short v.s. externa and a significantly longer (approx. 3 times) v.s. interna, unusually well developed genital papilla and localization of the first testis a relatively long distance posterior to the gynaecophoric canal; ii) eggs-small and elongated with slightly rounded poles and a short terminal spine. DNA taxonomic techniques confirmed that a new species had been identified, Trichobilharzia mergi sp. n. The sequence data were deposited in GenBank under the accession numbers JX456151 to JX456172. Comparison of the results with our previously published data on characterization of DNA of cercariae isolated from freshwater lymnaeid snails showed that larval development of T. mergi is associated with Radix balthica L. (=Radix peregra Müller, 1774;=Radix ovata Draparnaud, 1805). PMID:23501058

Kolá?ová, Libuše; Skírnisson, Karl; Ferté, Hubert; Jouet, Damien

2013-06-01

285

Comparison of eye morphology and retinal topography in two species of New World vultures (Aves: Cathartidae).  

PubMed

Vultures are highly reliant on their sensory systems for the rapid detection and localization of carrion before other scavengers can exploit the resource. In this study, we compared eye morphology and retinal topography in two species of New World vultures (Cathartidae), turkey vultures (Cathartes aura), with a highly developed olfactory sense, and black vultures (Coragyps atratus), with a less developed sense of olfaction. We found that eye size relative to body mass was the same in both species, but that black vultures have larger corneas relative to eye size than turkey vultures. However, the overall retinal topography, the total number of cells in the retinal ganglion cell layer, peak and average cell densities, cell soma area frequency distributions, and the theoretical peak anatomical spatial resolving power were the same in both species. This suggests that the visual systems of these two species are similar and that vision plays an equally important role in the biology of both species, despite the apparently greater reliance on olfaction for finding carrion in turkey vultures. PMID:24249399

Lisney, Thomas J; Stecyk, Karyn; Kolominsky, Jeffrey; Graves, Gary R; Wylie, Douglas R; Iwaniuk, Andrew N

2013-12-01

286

Helminth parasites of the American avocet Recurvirostra americana (Aves), from the Salt Lake basin, Utah.  

PubMed

Five species of cestodes and 1 species of trematode, for a total of 4,770 (chi- =79.5) helminths, were obtained from 60 American avocets, Recurvirostra americana, collected from July to September 1985 and 1986 in the Salt Lake basin, Utah. The most prevalent parasite was the cestode Diplophallus coili (95%). It occurred in mature pairs 90% of the time. All species of helminths showed a contagious distribution except for mature D. coili, which had a uniform distribution. This uniform distribution, which is unusual for species of helminths, has been observed for at least 4 species of large tapeworms in the recurvirostrids. The helminth community consisted of 3 specialists, 1 generalist, and 2 of uncertain status. The same specialists have been reported also in R. americana from Texas, Colorado, and Manitoba, Canada. PMID:8437049

Hinojos, J G; Campbell, B K; Canaris, A G

1993-02-01

287

Bone growth marks reveal protracted growth in New Zealand kiwi (Aves, Apterygidae)  

PubMed Central

The presence of bone growth marks reflecting annual rhythms in the cortical bone of non-avian tetrapods is now established as a general phenomenon. In contrast, ornithurines (the theropod group including modern birds and their closest relatives) usually grow rapidly in less than a year, such that no annual rhythms are expressed in bone cortices, except scarce growth marks restricted to the outer cortical layer. So far, cyclical growth in modern birds has been restricted to the Eocene Diatryma, the extant parrot Amazona amazonica and the extinct New Zealand (NZ) moa (Dinornithidae). Here we show the presence of lines of arrested growth in the long bones of the living NZ kiwi (Apteryx spp., Apterygidae). Kiwis take 5–6 years to reach full adult body size, which indicates a delayed maturity and a slow reproductive cycle. Protracted growth probably evolved convergently in moa and kiwi sometime since the Middle Miocene, owing to the severe climatic cooling in the southwest Pacific and the absence of mammalian predators. PMID:19515655

Bourdon, Estelle; Castanet, Jacques; de Ricqlès, Armand; Scofield, Paul; Tennyson, Alan; Lamrous, Hayat; Cubo, Jorge

2009-01-01

288

Mitochondrial DNA Variation in the Northern Flicker ( Colaptes auratus, Aves) 1  

Microsoft Academic Search

The northern flicker is a common woodpecker that inhabits open woodlands throughout North America. A narrow hybrid zone occurs along the range boundaries between the eastern yellow-shafted and western red-shafted subspecies. Mitochon- drial DNA (mtDNA) was isolated from 20 1 flickers from 27 locales, primarily along two transects that cross the hybrid zone, one across the northern United States and

William S. Moore; John H. Graham; Jef T. Price

289

Isolation and characterization of polymorphic microsatellite loci for the northern flicker (Colaptes auratus; Aves).  

PubMed

To investigate the mating system of northern flickers (Colaptes auratus), we developed primers for 14 microsatellite loci and screened them in 68 unrelated adults and their offspring. All markers were highly polymorphic with 9 to +36 alleles per locus. One marker was Z-chromosome linked; one marker exceeded the size standard range and could not be analysed further. We checked the other 12 markers for Mendelian inheritance in 36 broods for which the social parents were known. Seven markers showed evidence for the presence of null alleles, and three of those showed significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Markers were generally unlinked. PMID:21564764

Kuhn, Sylvia; Wiebe, Karen L; Kempenaers, Bart

2009-05-01

290

Phylogeny of the tree swallow genus, Tachycineta (Aves: Hirundinidae), by Bayesian analysis of mitochondrial DNA sequences.  

PubMed

To set the stage for historical analyses of the ecology and behavior of tree swallows and their allies (genus Tachycineta), we reconstructed the phylogeny of the nine Tachycineta species by comparing DNA sequences of six mitochondrial genes: Cytochrome b (990 base pairs), the second subunit of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase (839 base pairs), cytochrome oxidase II (85 base pairs), ATPase 8 (158 base pairs), tRNA-lysine (73 base pairs), and tRNA-methionine (25 base pairs). The phylogeny consisted of two main clades: South and Central American species ((T. stolzmanni, T. albilinea, T. albiventris), (T. leucorrhoa, T. meyeni)), and North American and Caribbean species (T. bicolor, (T. thalassina, T. euchrysea, T. cyaneoviridis)). The genetic distances among the species suggested that Tachycineta is a relatively old group compared to other New World swallow genera. One interesting biogeographic discovery was the close relationship between Caribbean and western North American taxa. This historical connection occurs in other groups of swallows and swifts as well. To reconstruct the phylogeny, we employed Bayesian as well as traditional maximum-likelihood methods. The Bayesian approach provided probability values for trees produced from the different genes and gene combinations, as well as probabilities of branches within those trees. We compared Bayesian and maximum-likelihood bootstrap branch support and found that all branches with Bayesian probabilities > or = 95% received bootstrap support >70%. PMID:11884168

Whittingham, Linda A; Slikas, Beth; Winkler, David W; Sheldon, Frederick H

2002-03-01

291

Phylogeny of the Tree Swallow Genus, Tachycineta (Aves: Hirundinidae), by Bayesian Analysis of Mitochondrial DNA Sequences  

Microsoft Academic Search

To set the stage for historical analyses of the ecology and behavior of tree swallows and their allies (genus Tachycineta), we reconstructed the phylogeny of the nine Tachycineta species by comparing DNA sequences of six mitochondrial genes: Cytochrome b (990 base pairs), the second subunit of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase (839 base pairs), cytochrome oxidase II (85 base pairs), ATPase

Linda A Whittingham; Beth Slikas; David W Winkler; Frederick H Sheldon

2002-01-01

292

Isolation driven divergence: speciation in a widespread North American songbird (Aves: Certhiidae)  

PubMed Central

Lineage, or true “species,” trees may differ from gene trees because of stochastic processes in molecular evolution leading to gene-tree heterogeneity. Problems with inferring species trees due to excessive incomplete lineage sorting may be exacerbated in lineages with rapid diversification or recent divergences necessitating the use of multiple loci and individuals. Many recent multilocus studies that investigate divergence times identify lineage splitting to be more recent than single locus studies, forcing the revision of biogeographic scenarios driving divergence. Here we use 21 nuclear loci from regional populations to reevaluate hypotheses identified in an mtDNA phylogeographic study of the Brown Creeper (Certhia americana), as well as identify processes driving divergence. Nuclear phylogeographic analyses identified hierarchical genetic structure, supporting a basal split at roughly 32°N latitude, splitting northern and southern populations, with mixed patterns of genealogical concordance and discordance between datasets within the major lineages. Coalescent-based analyses identify isolation, with little to no gene flow, as the primary driver of divergence between lineages. Recent isolation appears to have caused genetic bottlenecks in populations in the Sierra Madre Oriental and coastal mountain ranges of California, which may be targets for conservation concerns. PMID:21933295

Manthey, Joseph D.; Klicka, John; Spellman, Garth M.

2011-01-01

293

ccmarasco@gmail.com 615.423.6302 5200 Georgia Ave, Nashville, TN 37209  

E-print Network

the Retention of Endothelial Cells Bachelor of Science in Engineering, May 2004 Valparaiso University, Valparaiso, IN Majors: Mechanical Engineering, Biochemistry Dean's List, 2001-2004 Phi Lambda Epsilon

Wikswo, John

294

Out of Africa? Phylogenetic relationships between Falco biarmicus and the other hierofalcons (Aves: Falconidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The phylogeographic history of the lanner falcon (Falco biarmicus) and the phylogenetic relationships among hierofalcons (F. biarmicus, Falco cherrug, Falco jugger and Falco rusticolus) were investigated using mitochondrial (mt) DNA sequences. Of the two non-coding mt sections tested, the control region (CR) appeared more suitable as phylogenetic marker sequence compared with the pseudo control region (WCR). For the comprehensive analysis

F. Nittinger; E. Haring; W. Pinsker; M. Wink; A. Gamauf

2005-01-01

295

STUDENT NUMBER STUDENT NAME 1W02-515 PORTAGE AVE.  

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card if you are currently in school. (not a photocopy) Students intending to graduate from)__________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Home Phone:____________________________Business Phone)__________________________________________________________________________________________ Home Phone:____________________________Business Phone

Martin, Jeff

296

STUDENT NUMBER STUDENT NAME 1W02-515 PORTAGE AVE.  

E-print Network

card if you are currently in school.( not a photocopy) Students intending to graduate from)____________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Home Phone:____________________________Business Phone Phone:____________________________Business Phone

Martin, Jeff

297

Flightlessness and phylogeny amongst endemic rails (Aves:Rallidae) of the New Zealand region.  

PubMed Central

The phylogenetic relationships of a number of flightless and volant rails have been investigated using mtDNA sequence data. The third domain of the small ribosomal subunit (12S) has been sequenced for 22 taxa, and part of the 5' end of the cytochrome-b gene has been sequenced for 12 taxa. Additional sequences were obtained from outgroup taxa, two species of jacana, sarus crane, spur-winged plover and kagu. Extinct rails were investigated using DNA extracted from subfossil bones, and in cases where fresh material could not be obtained from other extant taxa, feathers and museum skins were used as sources of DNA. Phylogenetic trees produced from these data have topologies that are, in general, consistent with data from DNA-DNA hybridization studies and recent interpretations based on morphology. Gallinula chloropus moorhen) groups basally with Fulica (coots), Amaurornis (= Megacrex) ineptus falls within the Gallirallus/Rallus group, and Gallinula (= Porphyrula) martinica is basal to Porphyrio (swamphens) and should probably be placed in that genus. Subspecies of Porphyrio porphyrio are paraphyletic with respect to Porphyrio mantelli (takahe). The Northern Hemisphere Rallus aquaticus is basal to the south-western Pacific Rallus (or Gallirallus) group. The flightless Rallus philippensis dieffenbachii is close to Rallus modestus and distinct from the volant Rallus philippensis, and is evidently a separate species. Porzana (crakes) appears to be more closely associated with Porphyrio than Rallus. Deep relationships among the rails remain poorly resolved. Rhynochetus jubatus (kagu) is closer to the cranes than the rails in this analysis. Genetic distances between flightless rails and their volant counterparts varied considerably with observed 12S sequence distances, ranging from 0.3% (Porphyrio porphyrio melanotus and P. mantelli mantelli) to 7.6% (Rallus modestus and Rallus philippensis). This may be taken as an indication of the rapidity with which flightlessness can evolve, and of the persistence of flightless taxa. Genetic data supported the notion that flightless taxa were independently derived, sometimes from similar colonizing ancestors. The morphology of flightless rails is apparently frequently dominated by evolutionary parallelism although similarity of external appearance is not an indication of the extent of genetic divergence. In some cases taxa that are genetically close are morphologically distinct from one another (e.g. Rallus (philippensis) dieffenbachii and R. modestus), whilst some morphologically similar taxa are evidently independently derived (e.g. Porphyio mantelli hochstetteri and P.m. mantelli). PMID:9163823

Trewick, S A

1997-01-01

298

Notes on the osteology and phylogenetic affinities of the Oligocene Diomedeoididae (Aves, Procellariiformes)  

Microsoft Academic Search

New specimens of the procellariiform taxon Diomedeoididae are reported from the early Oligocene (Rupelian) deposits of Wiesloch-Frauenweiler in southern Germany. Two skeletons belong to Diomedeoides brodkorbi, whereas isolated legs of larger indi- viduals are tentatively assigned to D. lipsiensis, a species which has not yet been re- ported from the locality. The fossils allow the recognition of some previously unknown

Gerald Mayr

2009-01-01

299

Estructura de la vegetación y selección de hábitats reproductivos en aves del pastizal pampeano  

Microsoft Academic Search

Vegetation structure and selection of reproductive habitats by Pampas grassland birds: The increasing transformation of natural grasslands into agricultural fields affects grassland birds with particular severity, as their breeding success depends strictly on these habitats. This study focuses on bird species that nest in the Ernesto Tornquist Provincial Park in the southwest of Buenos Aires province (Argentina). We conducted intensive

NATALIA COZZANI; SERGIO M ZALBA

300

Tissue specific isozyme expression in three species of icterinae (Aves: Emberizidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tissue specific banding patterns were examined for ten enzyme systems in three species of the subfamily Icterinae, family Emberizidae — Quiscalus quiscula, Agelaius phoeniceus and Molothrus ater. Ten tissues were compared. Generally, tissue specific patterns observed were remarkedly similar as compared to other taxa, across the three species over all enzyme systems examined, indicating low levels of divergence in regulatory

S. C. Lougheed; T. A. Drysdale

1986-01-01

301

Contrasting genetic structuring between colonies of the World’s smallest penguin, Eudyptula minor (Aves: Spheniscidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Little Penguin, Eudyptula minor, is a seabird that nests in colonies throughout New Zealand and southern Australia. Individuals from different colonies in\\u000a southeast Australia differ significantly in morphology and ecology, suggesting that some genetic structuring may exist among\\u000a colonies. In contrast, the marking of individuals with flipper bands has revealed some, albeit infrequent, movement between\\u000a colonies. To determine the

Rebecca L. Overeem; Christopher M. Austin; Peter Dann; Christopher P. Burridge

2008-01-01

302

Correcting the "correct" name for the Asian Brown Flycatcher (Aves: Passeriformes, Muscicapidae, Muscicapa).  

PubMed

Mlíkovský (2012) claimed that Muscicapa latirostris Raffles, 1822 was the correct name for the Asian Brown Flycatcher, and rejected its senior synonym, Muscicapa dauurica Pallas, 1811. Muscicapa dauurica is in equal or greater use today for this flycatcher, to which the references to it in Mlíkovský (2012) testify even though they are far from comprehensive. Other major references using dauurica Pallas are Sibley & Monroe (1990), Inskipp et al. (1996), Kennedy et al. (2000), Dickinson (2003), Rasmussen & Anderton (2005), Clement (2006), Wells (2007) and Mann (2008). PMID:25283921

Dickinson, Edward C; Schodde, Richard; Kullander, Sven; Crochet, Pierre André; Elliott, Andy; Kirwan, Guy M

2014-01-01

303

Helminth parasites of the European starling (Sturnus vulgaris) (Aves, Sturnidae), an invasive bird in Argentina.  

PubMed

The aim of this work is to contribute to the knowledge of gastrointestinal parasites of the European starling Sturnus vulgaris, an invasive bird from Argentina. Seventy-six birds were collected during the spring of 2007 and were examined for helminths. Six parasite species were found: one trematoda of the Echinostoma revolutum "group," four nematodes (Synhimantus nasuta, Microtetrameres sp., Pterothominx exilis, and Ornithocapillaria ovopunctata), and one acanthocephalan (Plagiorhynchus cylindraceus). All species found have been recorded in Eurasia and/or North America previously, although present reports enlarge their geographical distribution. As expected in an invasive host, the parasite community shows much lower species richness (n?=?6) than those observed in their native area (79 and 35 in the Eurasia and North America, respectively). PMID:24804922

Valente, Romina; Ibañez, Lucía Mariel; Lorenti, Eliana; Fiorini, Vanina Dafne; Montalti, Diego; Diaz, Julia Inés

2014-07-01

304

The choice of foraging methods of the Brown Dipper, Cinclus pallasii (Aves: Cinclidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Brown Dipper,Cinclus pallasii, forages for large prey by diving deeply among submerged rocks, and for small prey in shallow water by wading and pecking\\u000a on the bottom. Foraging by diving entailed a higher energy cost but resulted in taking larger prey than foraging by wading-and-pecking.\\u000a Foraging by diving was seldom observed from May to October, but increased from December

Kazuhiro Eguchi

1990-01-01

305

Randy S. Daughters, Ph.D. CURRICULUM VITAE 309 Central Ave  

E-print Network

2012 Development of labs based on regeneration and stem cells for course at UST Medical Geology lab College, MN Fall 2010 NIH Post-doctoral Fellow, Stem Cell Institute, University of Minnesota, MN 2008 and molecular neuroscience course using stem cell cultures to look at neurogenesis Neurodevelopmental lab module

Wu, Mingshen

306

A New Species of Hanging-Parrot (Aves: Psittacidae: Loriculus) from Camiguin Island, Philippines  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new species of Hanging-Parrot or Colasisi, Loriculus, is described from a series of 23 specimens (19 males, 4 females) collected in the 1960s on Camiguin Island, Camiguin Province, Philippines, at elevations between 300 and 1350 m. The new species lacks sexual dimorphism in plumage coloration, which distinguishes it from all other members of the L. philippensis group and all

Jose G. Tello; Jacob F. Degner; John M. Bates; David E. Willard

2006-01-01

307

Annual testicular cycle of blossomheaded parakeet, Psittacula cyanocephala (Aves, Psittacidae), under natural environmental conditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Histophysiological studies of the annual testicular events in an Indian Psittaciform bird, blossomheaded parakeet Psittacula cyanocephala, under natural environmental conditions revealed that the bird is a seasonal breeder with a single peak in a year. Active spermatogenesis takes place only during February and March, but maximum seasonal maturation of the Leydig cells occurs at least one month before the onset

Saumen Kumar Maitra

1986-01-01

308

Feeding ecology of Ara ararauna (Aves, Psittacidae) at firebreaks in western Cerrado, Brazil  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study aimed to identify food items of the Blue-and-yellow Macaw (Ara ararauna) flocks foraging at firebreaks in western Cerrado, Brazil. Also, I discuss ecological aspects of macaw feeding activities at firebreaks. Two 3,500ha portions of Emas National Park were selected for observations. The sites were mosaics of woodland savanna and shrubby grassland, crossed and bordered by firebreaks and adjacent

Dárius Pukenis Tubelis

2009-01-01

309

ARTICLE Historical biogeography and diversification within the Neotropical parrot genus Pionopsitta (Aves: Psittacidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aim We investigate spatial and temporal patterns of diversification within the Neotropical avifauna using the phylogenetic history of parrots traditionally belonging to the genus Pionopsitta Bonaparte 1854. This genus has long been of interest for those studying Neotropical biogeography and diversity, as it encompasses species that occur in most Neotropical forest areas of endemism. Location The Neotropical lowland forests in

Camila C. Ribas; Renato Gaban-Lima; Cristina Y. Miyaki; Joel Cracraft

310

Lorilichus , a new genus of feather mites (Acarina, Pterolichidae) from lories and lorikeets (Aves, Psittacidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lorilichus n. g. (Pterolichidae, Pterolichinae) is restricted to the Indo-Australian parrots of the family Loriidae. Assigned to this new genus are Pterolichus (Pseudalloptes) species described by Trouessart in 1884, namely, lobiger (type-species), delibativentris, discifer, cultriventris, emargiventris and securiventris. The first three named species are illustrated and two new species, parvifolius and grandifolius, are described: the five species are from Lorius

Warren T. Atyeo; J. Gaud

1991-01-01

311

TENDENCIAS POBLACIONALES DEL NANDAYUS NENDAY (VIEILLOT) (AVES: PSITTACIDAE) EN EL BAJO CHACO PARAGUAYO  

Microsoft Academic Search

Density and size of nanday parrot ( Nandayus nenday) flocks was studied in three localities of the Wet Chaco from July, 1994 to June, 1995. Density was calculated by means of a modification of the Fixed Radius Circular Plot method. Size end density of the flocks varied in accordance with reproductive seasonality different environments. A mean density of 0,18 ±

CRISTINA MORALES; CARMEN VITALE

312

COMPARATIVE ANATOMY OF THE SYRINX IN THE TRIBE ARINI (AVES: PSITTACIDAE)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The syrinx is the organ responsible for producing the vast majority of bird sounds. Because its anatomy varies greatly among bird taxa, prior knowledge of variations is extremely important to studies of functional anatomy and phylogenetic systematics. With the aim of accessing and describing morphological variation in birds of the tribe Arini, this paper presents the findings of a comparative

Renato Gaban-Lima; Elizabeth Höfling

313

Chromosome studies of 8 species of parrots of the families Cacatuidae and Psittacidae (Aves: Psittaciformes)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The karyotypes of 7 species of Psittaciformes new to cytology are described: Cacatua galerita, Calyptorhynchus magnificus and Probosciger aterrimus of the Cacatuidae, and Ara macao, A. ararauna, Amazona viridigenalis and Psittrichas fulgidens of the Psittacidae. For reasons of comparison the karyotype of Melopsittacus undulatus is also described. These karyotypes are compared to 8 psittaciform karyotypes previously recorded. There is a

M. W. M. Van Dongen; L. E. M. De Boer

1984-01-01

314

STUDENT NUMBER STUDENT NAME 1W02-515 PORTAGE AVE.  

E-print Network

-refundable application fee. (Payable the first time you apply only) Applicants for Mature Status must also provide proof of date of birth. Applicants for Accelerated Status must also complete a UW Accelerated Application

Martin, Jeff

315

Mitochondrial phylogeography, subspecific taxonomy, and conservation genetics of sandhill cranes ( Grus canadensis ; Aves: Gruidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Six subspecies of sandhill cranes (Gruscanadensis) have been denoted based onperceived morphological and\\/or breedinglocality differences among them. Threesubspecies are migratory, breeding from thehigh arctic in North America and Siberia(lesser sandhill, G. c. canadensis),south through central Canada (Canadiansandhill, G. c. rowani) and into thenorthern United States (greater sandhill, G. c. tabida). A review of sandhill cranetaxonomy indicates that the size variation,

Judith M. Phymer; Matthew G. Fain; Jane E. Austin; Douglas H. Johnson; Carey Krajewski

2001-01-01

316

[Three new Nadejdolepis Spasskii & Sasskaya, 1954 (Cestoda: Hymenolepididae) parasites of Charadrii (Aves) from Tasmania].  

PubMed

Three species of Nadejdcolepis from Tasmania, Australia, are described and illustrated. N. burgessi n. sp., a parasite of Charadrius ruficapillus, is 4-6 mm long, with rostellar nitiduloid hooks 63-66 microm long, a short evaginated cirrus 13-16 microm long with a short collar of thin spines 1 microm long, a narrow and tubular sclerotinoid vagina 40-50 long and 3-4 microm in diameter with a little ampulla 3-5 microm in diameter at the proximal end, and a membranous atrial segment with smooth, short (1 microm) and compact spines which are sometimes difficult to observe. N. smithi n. sp., a parasite of 40-50 long and 3-4 microm in diameter with a little ampulla 3-5 microm in diameter at the proximal end, and a membranous atrial segment with smooth, short (1 microm) and compact spines which are sometimes difficult to observe. N. smithi n. sp., a parasite of C. ruficapillus and Arenaria interpres, is 2-3.5 mm long, with rostellar nitiduloid hooks 90-98 microm long, a short evaginated cirrus (13 x 6.5 microm) with a short collar of thin 'bristles' of decreasing length (2-3 microm) and prolonged by a short and thin stylet, a sclerotinoid and conical vagina of 20 x 6 microm, with an ovoid ampulla 6-7 x 4-9 at its slender end, and a membranous atrial segment like that of the preceding species. N. kinsellai n. sp., a parasite of C. ruficapillus is 25-40(?) mm long, with rostellar nitiduloid hooks 89-93 microm long, a fusiform genital atrium 100 x 30 microm long with a very narrow pore, and a very long narrow cirrus-sac, which is cylindrical (not fusiform), has its aporal extremity lying in the preceding proglottis and has a slender uninterrupted wall without helicoid fibres. The poral extremity of the cirrus-sac is fastened by a long transverse muscle. An evaginated cirrus was not observed. The invaginated ejaculatory canal has two successive types of spines: a subterminal short portion (20-25 microm) with thick spines, followed by a long portion (100-120 microm) with numerous thin and compact 'bristles' 5 microm long. There is a very long convoluted spermatic duct (400-500 microm). The membranous tubular vagina is long (400-450 microm), thick-walled but not muscular and convoluted anterior to the distal part of the cirrus-sac; a chitinoid chamber, copulatory segment and sphincter are absent. Nadejdolepis species parasitic in Charadrii are reviewed. None of the species previously reported presents anatomical features similar to the three new species. N. kinsellai has morphological characters which differ in detail from other species in the genus. Hymenolepis (Hymenolepis) mudderbugtenensis Deblock & Rosé, 1962 is transferred to the genus Nadejdolepis. PMID:11303538

Deblock, S; Canaris, A G

2001-03-01

317

Impact evaluation of an Energy $avings Plan project at Lenroc Company/Moorman Manufacturing  

SciTech Connect

This impact evaluation of an energy conservation measure (ECM) that was recently installed at Lenroc Company/Moorman Manufacturing (Lenroc/Moorman) was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) as part of an evaluation of its Energy Savings Plan (ESP) Program. The Program makes acquisition payments to firms that install energy conservation measures in their industrial processes. The objective of this impact evaluation was to assess how much electrical energy is being saved at Lenroc/Moorman as a result of the ESP and to determine how much the savings cost Bonneville and the region. The impact of the ECM was evaluated with a combination of engineering analysis, financial analysis, interviews, and submittal reviews (Lenroc/Moorman`s Abstract, Proposal, and Completion Report). The ECM itself consists of installing two heat exchangers to recover waste heat from a process water line to preheat incoming process air. The air and water are used in a proprietary process to produce biuret, a cattle feed supplement derived from urea. Energy savings resulting from this ECM are expected to be 339,400 kWh/yr. On a per ton basis, this ECM will save 56.6 kWh/ton of biuret. The ECM cost $15,754 to install, and Lenroc/Moorman received payments of $9452 from Bonneville and $3933 from Grant County PUD for the acquisition of energy savings for a net cost to Lenroc/Moorman of $2369. Without the acquisition payments from Bonneville and Grant County PUD, this ECM would not have been implemented. The levelized cost of these energy savings to Bonneville will be 2.3 mills/kWh over the ECM`s expected 15-year life, and the levelized cost to the region will be 4.0 mills/kWh.

Spanner, G.E.; Daellenbach, K.K.

1992-02-01

318

Impact evaluation of an Energy $avings Plan project at Lenroc Company/Moorman Manufacturing  

SciTech Connect

This impact evaluation of an energy conservation measure (ECM) that was recently installed at Lenroc Company/Moorman Manufacturing (Lenroc/Moorman) was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) as part of an evaluation of its Energy Savings Plan (ESP) Program. The Program makes acquisition payments to firms that install energy conservation measures in their industrial processes. The objective of this impact evaluation was to assess how much electrical energy is being saved at Lenroc/Moorman as a result of the ESP and to determine how much the savings cost Bonneville and the region. The impact of the ECM was evaluated with a combination of engineering analysis, financial analysis, interviews, and submittal reviews (Lenroc/Moorman's Abstract, Proposal, and Completion Report). The ECM itself consists of installing two heat exchangers to recover waste heat from a process water line to preheat incoming process air. The air and water are used in a proprietary process to produce biuret, a cattle feed supplement derived from urea. Energy savings resulting from this ECM are expected to be 339,400 kWh/yr. On a per ton basis, this ECM will save 56.6 kWh/ton of biuret. The ECM cost $15,754 to install, and Lenroc/Moorman received payments of $9452 from Bonneville and $3933 from Grant County PUD for the acquisition of energy savings for a net cost to Lenroc/Moorman of $2369. Without the acquisition payments from Bonneville and Grant County PUD, this ECM would not have been implemented. The levelized cost of these energy savings to Bonneville will be 2.3 mills/kWh over the ECM's expected 15-year life, and the levelized cost to the region will be 4.0 mills/kWh.

Spanner, G.E.; Daellenbach, K.K.

1992-02-01

319

An improved phylogeny of the Andean tit-tyrants (Aves, Tyrannidae): More characters trump sophisticated analyses  

PubMed Central

The phylogeny of the flycatcher genus Anairetes was previously inferred using short fragments of mitochondrial DNA and parsimony and distance-based methods. The resulting topology spurred taxonomic revision and influenced understanding of Andean biogeography. More than a decade later, we revisit the phylogeny of Anairetes tit-tyrants using more mtDNA characters, seven unlinked loci (3 mitochondrial genes, 6 nuclear loci), more closely related outgroup taxa, partitioned Bayesian analyses, and two coalescent species-tree approaches (Bayesian estimation of species trees, BEST; Bayesian evolutionary analysis by sampling trees, *BEAST). Of these improvements in data and analyses, the fourfold increase in mtDNA characters was both necessary and sufficient to incur a major shift in the topology and near-complete resolution. The species-tree analyses, while theoretically preferable to concatenation or single gene approaches, yielded topologies that were compatible with mtDNA but with weaker statistical resolution at nodes. The previous results that had led to taxonomic and biogeographic reappraisal were refuted, and the current results support the resurrection of the genus Uromyias as the sister clade to Anairetes. The sister relationship between these two genera corresponds to an ecological dichotomy between a depauperate humid cloudforest clade and a diverse dry-tolerant clade that has diversified along the latitudinal axis of the Andes. The species-tree results and the concatenation results each reaffirm the primacy of mtDNA to provide phylogenetic signal for avian phylogenies at the species and subspecies level. This is due in part to the abundance of informative characters in mtDNA, and in part to its lower effective population size that causes it to more faithfully track the species tree. PMID:22525942

DuBay, Shane G.; Witt, Christopher C.

2012-01-01

320

Waves of genomic hitchhikers shed light on the evolution of gamebirds (Aves: Galliformes)  

PubMed Central

Background The phylogenetic tree of Galliformes (gamebirds, including megapodes, currassows, guinea fowl, New and Old World quails, chicken, pheasants, grouse, and turkeys) has been considerably remodeled over the last decades as new data and analytical methods became available. Analyzing presence/absence patterns of retroposed elements avoids the problems of homoplastic characters inherent in other methodologies. In gamebirds, chicken repeats 1 (CR1) are the most prevalent retroposed elements, but little is known about the activity of their various subtypes over time. Ascertaining the fixation patterns of CR1 elements would help unravel the phylogeny of gamebirds and other poorly resolved avian clades. Results We analyzed 1,978 nested CR1 elements and developed a multidimensional approach taking advantage of their transposition in transposition character (TinT) to characterize the fixation patterns of all 22 known chicken CR1 subtypes. The presence/absence patterns of those elements that were active at different periods of gamebird evolution provided evidence for a clade (Cracidae + (Numididae + (Odontophoridae + Phasianidae))) not including Megapodiidae; and for Rollulus as the sister taxon of the other analyzed Phasianidae. Genomic trace sequences of the turkey genome further demonstrated that the endangered African Congo Peafowl (Afropavo congensis) is the sister taxon of the Asian Peafowl (Pavo), rejecting other predominantly morphology-based groupings, and that phasianids are monophyletic, including the sister taxa Tetraoninae and Meleagridinae. Conclusion The TinT information concerning relative fixation times of CR1 subtypes enabled us to efficiently investigate gamebird phylogeny and to reconstruct an unambiguous tree topology. This method should provide a useful tool for investigations in other taxonomic groups as well. PMID:17925025

Kriegs, Jan Ole; Matzke, Andreas; Churakov, Gennady; Kuritzin, Andrej; Mayr, Gerald; Brosius, Jürgen; Schmitz, Jürgen

2007-01-01

321

Kinematic and aerodynamic parameters in tethered flying siskins ( Carduelis spinus , Passeres, Aves)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Stationary flight of siskins (Carduelis spinus) was achieved by tethering them in a harness of yarn strands fastened to a metal rod (Fig. 1). The wing-beat frequency and the wing-stroke angles were recorded by miniature movement detectors, i.e. small sensing coils glued on the armwings. Kinematic parameters were also recorded cinematographically. The aerodynamic parameters, lift and thrust, of the

Martin Woike; Michael Gewecke

1978-01-01

322

Individuality in Problem Solving: String Pulling in Two Carduelis Species (Aves: Passeriformes)  

E-print Network

warbler (Teyrovsky´ 1930), in siskins (Thienemann 1933), larger parrots (Fischel 1936) and in parids. Goldfinches Carduelis carduelis and siskins C. spinus were tested with the string-pulling task: sitting reach the food. Fifty-two goldfinches and 29 siskins raised under controlled condi- tions were tested

Indiana University

323

Molecular characterization of haemosporidian parasites from kites of the genus Milvus (Aves: Accipitridae).  

PubMed

Despite the ecological significance and appeal of birds of prey, many aspects of their biology remain poorly known, including the diversity of parasites infecting them in the wild. We studied the diversity and prevalence of haemosporidian parasites infecting the two species of kites of the genus Milvus, aiming to describe the phylogenetic relationships among them and with other haemosporidians, as well as their distribution in the two host species. Black kites, Milvus migrans, harboured a more diverse community of parasites, including three haplotypes of each of the three genera Plasmodium, Haemoproteus and Leucocytozoon, which also occurred at a higher prevalence than in red kites. In red kites, Milvus milvus only three haplotypes of Leucocytozoon were found. Kite parasites were not closely related to one another nor were they kite-specific: their diversity spanned various branches of the haemosporidian phylogenetic tree, and their closest relatives were found in other species (including various avian orders), although some Leucocytozoon and Haemoproteus haplotypes clustered within apparently raptor-specific parasite clades. Remarkably, Plasmodium spp. and Haemoproteus spp. infected adult black kites only, an observation which supports the hypothesis that they are transmitted at the African wintering grounds, while Leucocytozoon spp. is putatively transmitted only in Europe. Intercontinental migration of the black kite might explain the divergence of parasite diversity between these two sister species. PMID:23376529

Pérez-Rodríguez, Antón; de la Puente, Javier; Onrubia, Alejandro; Pérez-Tris, Javier

2013-04-01

324

Descripción del comportamiento de aves costeras durante un eclipse total de sol  

Microsoft Academic Search

Résumé The number and behaviour of marine and terrestrial birds were recorded during the solar eclipse of 11 July 1991, at La Paz, Baja California Sur (Mexico) using a mangrove community as an observation point. The data were associated to penumbra and umbra periods. Twenty-two species belonging to 11 families were present in the mangrove community; 86% were marine birds,

Renato A. Mendoza-Salgado; Carlos H. Lechuga-Devéze; Edgar S. Amador-Silva; Ricardo Jiménez-Aguado; Gregorio Sánchez-Oropeza; Sebastián Villasante; Golfo de California

2002-01-01

325

Structure and growth pattern of pseudoteeth in Pelagornis mauretanicus (Aves, Odontopterygiformes, Pelagornithidae).  

PubMed

The extinct Odontopterygiformes are the sole birds known to possess strong and sharp bony pseudoteeth, the shape and location of which are closely mimetic of real teeth. The structure of the pseudoteeth is investigated here in a late Pliocene/early Pleistocene species, Pelagornis mauretanicus, using X-ray microtomography and thin sections. The results are interpreted with regard to the pseudotooth mode of growth, and have implications concerning aspects of Pelagornis ecology. The larger pseudoteeth are hollow and approximately cone-shaped, and the smaller ones are rostro-caudally constricted. The walls of pseudoteeth are composed of bone tissue of the fibro-lamellar type, which is intensively remodeled by Haversian substitution. The jaw bones display the same structure as the pseudoteeth, but their vascular canals are oriented parallel to the long axis of the bones, whereas they are perpendicular to this direction in the pseudoteeth. There is no hiatus or evidence of a fusion between the pseudoteeth and the jaw bones. Two possible models for pseudotooth growth are derived from the histological data. The most plausible model is that pseudotooth growth began after the completion of jaw bone growth, as a simple local protraction of periosteal osteogenic activity. Pseudotooth development thus occurred relatively late during ontogeny. The highly vascularized structure and the relative abundance of parallel-fibered bone tissue in the pseudoteeth suggest poor mechanical capabilities. The pseudoteeth were most likely covered and protected by the hardened, keratinized rhamphotheca in the adult during life. The late development of the pseudoteeth would involve a similarly late and/or partial hardening of the rhamphotheca, as displayed by extant Anseriformes, Apterygiformes and some Charadriiformes. This would add support to the hypothesis of a close phylogenetic relationship between Odontopterygiformes and Anseriformes. The late maturation of the Pelagornis feeding apparatus, and hence the delayed capability for efficient prey catching, suggests that Pelagornis was altricial. PMID:24244680

Louchart, Antoine; Sire, Jean-Yves; Mourer-Chauviré, Cécile; Geraads, Denis; Viriot, Laurent; de Buffrénil, Vivian

2013-01-01

326

Himasthla limnodromi n. sp. (Digenea: Echinostomatidae) from the short-billed dowitcher, Limnodromus griseus (Aves: Scolopacidae).  

PubMed

Himasthla limnodromi n. sp. is described from short-billed dowitchers, Limnodromus griseus, from the Araya Peninsula, Venezuela, and Delaware Bay, U.S.A. Himasthla limnodromi was not found in dowitchers on the breeding grounds or on the fall staging grounds in the Bay of Fundy but reappeared in dowitchers on the wintering grounds in the fall. This suggests that H. limnodromi is acquired by the birds on arrival on the wintering grounds and then gradually disappears during the birds' northward migration in the spring. The new species has a reniform collar armed with 31 spines, with 23 in a single uninterrupted row, and 4 corner spines in overlapping pairs at each end. The cirrus sac is up to 10 times longer than the length of the acetabulum and contains a long, smooth cirrus. The vitellaria always commence posterior to the posterior end of the cirrus sac in mature specimens. The testes are found in the posterior eighth of the long, filamentous body. Himasthla limnodromi n. sp. most closely resembles Himasthla alincia, but H. limnodromi is larger in size and has an unspined cirrus and smaller eggs. PMID:9406790

Didyk, A S; Burt, M D

1997-12-01

327

Geographical, seasonal, and sex dynamics of Shipleya inermis (Cestoidea: Dioecocestidae) in Limnodromus griseus Gmelin (Aves: Charadriiformes).  

PubMed

We recovered the cestode Shipleya inermis from 79 of 82 short-billed dowitchers, Limnodromus griseus Gmelin, collected at various locations and times along their migratory route. Previous studies that examined various aspects of the cestode's biology were limited to North America. Data collected from North and South America in the present study provide new information on the geographical and seasonal distribution of this cestode. Although prevalence of infection was high at all times of the year, mean abundance varied from season to season and was significantly higher during the winter months than in the summer, suggesting that most recruitment takes place on the wintering grounds. Sexually mature and gravid cestodes were recovered at all locations, indicating S. inermis is a ubiquitous parasite within the host's range. Shipleya inermis showed a marked tendency to occur in pairs of male and female strobila. Analysis of the patterns of occurrence suggests that S. inermis is a protogynous hermaphrodite that usually becomes regionally dioecious, possibly in response to some form of interaction between individuals. PMID:9794633

Didyk, A S; Burt, M D

1998-10-01

328

Nomenclatural corrections, neotype designation and new subspecies description in the genus Suiriri (Aves: Passeriformes: Tyrannidae).  

PubMed

Zimmer et al. (2001) documented two morphological and vocal forms within what was then known as Suiriri suiriri affinis, and described the short-billed form as Suiriri islerorum. However, studies of the Burmeister type material held at the Natural History Collections of the Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Germany, revealed the types of Suiriri s. affinis (Burmeister, 1856) to be the same taxon as Suiriri islerorum, which name therefore becomes a junior synonym. No published name is available for the long-billed form. A new name is therefore introduced by an original description in accordance with the International code on zoological nomenclature. The original type material of S. s. bahiae (Berlepsch, 1893) is confirmed to be lost; a neotype is designated. PMID:24872051

Kirwan, Guy M; Steinheimer, Frank D; Raposo, Marcos A; Zimmer, Kevin J

2014-01-01

329

Multiple gene sequences resolve phylogenetic relationships in the shorebird suborder Scolopaci (Aves: Charadriiformes).  

PubMed

Shorebirds (Charadriiformes) are a diverse assemblage of species renowned for their variation in behavior, morphology, and life-history traits, but comparative studies of trait variation remain limited by the lack of a well-supported phylogeny based on DNA sequences. In this study we build upon previous shorebird phylogenies to construct the first sequence-based species-level phylogeny for the Scolopaci, one of three shorebird suborders. We sampled 84 species in the Scolopaci, and collected data for five genes (one nuclear and four mitochondrial) via PCR and sequencing or from GenBank. The phylogeny was estimated using Bayesian inference on a partitioned dataset of 6365 aligned base pairs, and was well-supported except for the radiations within Tringa and Calidris. The shanks and phalaropes are sister to the snipes, woodcocks and dowitchers, which in turn are sister to the sandpipers. The godwits and curlews are successive sister-groups to these clades, and the morphologically disparate taxa (jacanas, painted snipes, seedsnipes, and the Plains-wanderer) are the basal sister-group in the Scolopaci. We show that Tringa, Gallinago, and Calidris are paraphyletic assemblages, and thus are in need of taxonomic revision. The clade of Calidridine sandpipers has very short internal branches indicative of a relatively recent rapid radiation, and will require a gene tree/species tree approach to resolve relationships among species. PMID:22491071

Gibson, Rosemary; Baker, Allan

2012-07-01

330

Morphology of the antebrachial musculature of the American kestrel, Falco sparverius (Aves)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The antebrachial musculature of the American kestrel (Falco sparverius) is described. This fills a gap in the avian morphology literature, and provides a reference for future comparative, functional and systematic studies. A table of synonyms-homologs is provided for each muscle as a reference frame for over 100 years of avian anatomical literature.

Ron A. Meyers

1996-01-01

331

Funktionelle Eigenschaften der Hörbahn im Feld L des Neostriatum caudale des Staren ( Sturnus vulgaris L., Aves)  

Microsoft Academic Search

1.Unit responses to and potentials evoked by acoustic stimuli were recorded from the Neostriatum of curarized birds. Computer-aided analysis methods (averaging, peristimulus-time histogram, interval histogram) are specified.2.Characteristic values and characteristic curves for unit responses are examined and compared: characteristic intensity curves, tuning curves, characteristic frequencies, and the width of response areas or their separate segments.3.The shortest latency of all single

Hans-Joachim Leppelsack

1974-01-01

332

Dean's Report from DC (Nov 2011) 1: Federal Science Funding PerspecAve  

E-print Network

,797 1,699 1,766 Earth System Missions 705 900 887 NPOESS 82 16 16 #12;DoD Program FY10 Final FY11 Final Research 544 577 597 587 University Research 99 113 133 113 6.2 Applied Research 719 784 784 824 Ocean WarDean's Report from DC (Nov 2011) 1: Federal Science Funding Perspec

Wang, Yuqing

333

A new subspecies of Chamaea fasciata (Wrentit) from Oregon (Aves: Timaliinae)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Geographic variation in plumage color of Chamaea fasciata (Wrentit) from northern California and southern Oregon is related to climate. A new subspecies, Chamaea fasciata margra, is described from a disjunct population of southern interior Oregon. Colonization of C. fasciata in interior Oregon was perhaps from birds crossing coniferous forests via isolated balds of Ceonothus. Recent increases of Wrentits in interior Oregon may be in response to habitat alterations (deforestation, fires) and concurrent global warming.

Browning, M. Ralph

1992-01-01

334

Speciational history of North American Haemorhous finches (Aves: Fringillidae) inferred from multilocus data.  

PubMed

We investigated species relationships and timing of speciation in North American Haemorhous finches by using a mitochondrial phylogeographic approach combined with a multilocus species tree reconstruction. Haemorhous purpureus and H. cassinii were strongly supported as sister taxa, and H. mexicanus was sister to H. purpureus+H. cassinii. Our divergence times indicated that diversification within Haemorhous occurred progressively from the Late Miocene into the Pleistocene. Our inferred pattern of speciation demonstrates the complexity of the origins of North American birds, and provides additional evidence that a single cause for speciation in closely related North American birds, such as Late Pleistocene glacial-interglacial cycles, is unlikely. PMID:23219607

Smith, Brian Tilston; Bryson, Robert W; Chua, Vivien; Africa, Lia; Klicka, John

2013-03-01

335

A molecular phylogeny of kingfishers (Aves: Alcedinidae) with insights into early biogeographic history  

E-print Network

, Woodall 2001), with terrestrial feeders assigned to Ceyx and aquatic feeders assigned to Alcedo. Unfortunately, terrestrial and aquatic species are not clearly delimited. Thus, some authors have added other genera (e.g. Corythornis) for species... DOT6181 AMNH Bolivia C. amazona Amazon Kingfi sher DOT2317 AMNH Bolivia Megaceryle (Ceryle) maxima Giant Kingfi sher 396319 FMNH Gabon M. (C.) torquata Ringed Kingfi sher DOT8781 AMNH Venezuela M. (C.) alcyon Belted Kingfi sher DOT10476 AMNH California...

Moyle, Robert G.

2006-04-01

336

Subulura halli (Ascaridida: Subuluridae) from the endangered great bustard Otis tarda Linnaeus (Aves: Gruiformes) in China.  

PubMed

Subulurid nematodes identified as Subulura halli Barreto, 1918 were collected from the endangered bird Otis tarda Linnaeus (Gruiformes: Otididae) in China. A detailed redescription of the hitherto poorly known species is presented using both light and, for the first time, scanning electron microscopy. Previously unreported and erroneous morphological features of taxonomic significance are revealed. This species can be readily distinguished from its congeners by the relatively long oesophagus (1.47-1.92 mm long, representing 10.6-16.9% of body length), the number and arrangement of male caudal papillae (11 pairs in total, arranged as five pairs of precloacal and six pairs of postcloacal papillae), the equal length of spicules (1.35-1.52 mm long, representing 10.7-13.7% of body length) and the presence of a small medioventral, precloacal papilla in the male. PMID:24684055

Du, Li-Qiang; Xu, Zhen; Li, Shun-Cai; Li, Liang

2014-02-01

337

Inter-familial relationships of the shorebirds (Aves: Charadriiformes) based on nuclear DNA sequence data  

PubMed Central

Background Phylogenetic hypotheses of higher-level relationships in the order Charadriiformes based on morphological data, partly disagree with those based on DNA-DNA hybridisation data. So far, these relationships have not been tested by analysis of DNA sequence data. Herein we utilize 1692 bp of aligned, nuclear DNA sequences obtained from 23 charadriiform species, representing 15 families. We also test earlier suggestions that bustards and sandgrouses may be nested with the charadriiforms. The data is analysed with methods based on the parsimony and maximum-likelihood criteria. Results Several novel phylogenetic relationships were recovered and strongly supported by the data, regardless of which method of analysis was employed. These include placing the gulls and allied groups as a sistergroup to the sandpiper-like birds, and not to the plover-like birds. The auks clearly belong to the clade with the gulls and allies, and are not basal to most other charadriiform birds as suggested in analyses of morphological data. Pluvialis, which has been supposed to belong to the plover family (Charadriidae), represents a basal branch that constitutes the sister taxon to a clade with plovers, oystercatchers and avocets. The thick-knees and sheathbills unexpectedly cluster together. Conclusion The DNA sequence data contains a strong phylogenetic signal that results in a well-resolved phylogenetic tree with many strongly supported internodes. Taxonomically it is the most inclusive study of shorebird families that relies on nucleotide sequences. The presented phylogenetic hypothesis provides a solid framework for analyses of macroevolution of ecological, morphological and behavioural adaptations observed within the order Charadriiformes. PMID:12875664

Ericson, Per GP; Envall, Ida; Irestedt, Martin; Norman, Janette A

2003-01-01

338

3249 S. Oak Park Ave., Berwyn, IL 60402 MacNeal Hospital  

E-print Network

OR if there was a positive TB skin test, there must be documentation of a negative chest x-ray. If a rotator has a positive TB skin test and a positive chest x-ray, that rotator must meet with Dr. Mark Levin to discuss

Alford, Simon

339

Identification, Classification, and Growth of Moa Chicks (Aves: Dinornithiformes) from the Genus Euryapteryx  

PubMed Central

Background The analysis of growth in extinct organisms is difficult. The general lack of skeletal material from a range of developmental states precludes determination of growth characteristics. For New Zealand's extinct moa we have available to us a selection of rare femora at different developmental stages that have allowed a preliminary determination of the early growth of this giant flightless bird. We use a combination of femora morphometrics, ancient DNA, and isotope analysis to provide information on the identification, classification, and growth of extinct moa from the genus Euryapteryx. Results Using ancient DNA, we identify a number of moa chick bones for the species Euryapteryx curtus, Dinornis novaezealandiae, and Anomalopteryx didiformis, and the first chick bone for Pachyornis geranoides. Isotope analysis shows that ?15N levels vary between the two known size classes of Euryapteryx, with the larger size class having reduced levels of ?15N. A growth series for femora of the two size classes of Euryapteryx shows that early femora growth characteristics for both classes are almost identical. Morphometric, isotopic, and radiographic analysis of the smallest Euryapteryx bones suggests that one of these femora is from a freshly hatched moa at a very early stage of development. Conclusion Using morphometric, isotopic, and ancient DNA analyses have allowed the determination of a number of characteristics of rare moa chick femora. For Euryapteryx the analyses suggest that the smaller sized class II Euryapteryx is identical in size and growth to the extant Darwin's rhea. PMID:24923666

Huynen, Leon; Gill, Brian J.; Doyle, Anthony; Millar, Craig D.; Lambert, David M.

2014-01-01

340

A karyological study of Accipitridae (Aves: Falconiformes), with karyotypic descriptions of 16 species new to cytology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Karyotypic descriptions are given of 16 species of Accipitridae new to cytology, viz. Accipiter novaehollandiae, Aegypius monachus, Aquila rapax, Circaetus gallicus, Circus aeruginosus, C. cyaneus, C. pygargus, Geranoaetus melanoleucos, Gyps bengalensis, G. rueppellii, Haliaeetus leucogaster, H. leucorhyphus, Lophoaetus occipitalis, Necrosyrtes monachus, Stephanoaetus and Torgos tracheliotus. For reasons of comparison the karyotypes are included of 5 species that have been previously

L. E. M. Boer; R. P. Sinoo

1984-01-01

341

Prey selection by nesting House Martins Delichon urbica Linné, 1758 (Aves: Hirundinidae) in Algiers suburbs (Algeria).  

PubMed

The diet of the House Martin Delichon urbica was analyzed in a suburban area in Pins maritimes, northeast of Algiers (Algeria). The diet was determined by analyzing 120 faecal samples collected from a breeding colony between April and September 2007. Insects were the most numerous prey types (99.86%). Hymenopterans were the dominant preys (56.99%), followed by Coleopterans (20.14%), Homopterans (14.22%), Heteropterans (5.45%), and Dipterans (3.10%). Division of the prey items into families demonstrated that the highest relative frequency was large Hymenopterans in the family Formicidae (54.0%). The dominant species in the diet was Tetramorium biskrensis, which comprised 32.6% of the diet. It was followed by Camponotus barbaricus (6.9%) and Monomorium salomonis (5.6%). Comparison between diet and availability of preys using the Savage index showed that T. biskrensis, Crematogaster scutelaris, Pheidole pallidula, Diptera sp. unident. and Aphidae sp. unident. were positively selected by D. urbica. PMID:24439551

Merzouki, Youcef; Souttou, Karim; Sekour, Makhlouf; Daoudi-Hacini, Samia; Doumandji, Salaheddine

2014-01-01

342

Marine debris ingestion by Magellanic penguins, Spheniscus magellanicus (Aves: Sphenisciformes), from the Brazilian coastal zone.  

PubMed

Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus) are non-breeding winter visitors to the Brazilian coast. In 2008 and 2010, plastic items and other marine debris were found in the stomachs and intestines of 15% of 175 dead penguins collected in the Lagos Region of the state of Rio de Janeiro. One bird had its stomach perforated by a plastic straw, which may have caused its death. There are few records of penguins ingesting plastic litter, but previous studies have found similar levels of debris ingestion among Magellanic penguins stranded on the Brazilian coast (35.8% of 397 birds). The high incidence of marine debris in this species in Brazil may result at least in part from the predominance of juveniles reaching these waters, as juvenile penguins may have a broader diet than adults. It is unclear to what extent plastic ingestion affects the mortality rate in this species and whether the incidence in stranded birds reflects that in the entire population. The present study addresses the increasing impact of plastic debris on marine life. PMID:21864861

Brandão, Martha L; Braga, Karina M; Luque, José L

2011-10-01

343

DNA hybridization evidence for the principal lineages of hummingbirds (Aves:Trochilidae).  

PubMed

The spectacular evolutionary radiation of hummingbirds (Trochilidae) has served as a model system for many biological studies. To begin to provide a historical context for these investigations, we generated a complete matrix of DNA hybridization distances among 26 hummingbirds and an outgroup swift (Chaetura pelagica) to determine the principal hummingbird lineages. FITCH topologies estimated from symmetrized delta TmH-C values and subjected to various validation methods (bootstrapping, weighted jackknifing, branch length significance) indicated a fundamental split between hermit (Eutoxeres aquila, Threnetes ruckeri; Phaethornithinae) and nonhermit (Trochilinae) hummingbirds, and provided strong support for six principal nonhermit clades with the following branching order: (1) a predominantly lowland group comprising caribs (Eulampis holosericeus) and relatives (Androdon aequatorialis and Heliothryx barroti) with violet-ears (Colibri coruscans) and relatives (Doryfera ludovicae); (2) an Andean-associated clade of highly polytypic taxa (Eriocnemis, Heliodoxa, and Coeligena); (3) a second endemic Andean clade (Oreotrochilus chimborazo, Aglaiocercus coelestis, and Lesbia victoriae) paired with thorntails (Popelairia conversii); (4) emeralds and relatives (Chlorostilbon mellisugus, Amazilia tzacatl, Thalurania colombica, Orthorhyncus cristatus and Campylopterus villaviscensio); (5) mountain-gems (Lampornis clemenciae and Eugenes fulgens); and (6) tiny bee-like forms (Archilochus colubris, Myrtis fanny, Acestrura mulsant, and Philodice mitchellii). Corresponding analyses on a matrix of unsymmetrized delta values gave similar support for these relationships except that the branching order of the two Andean clades (2, 3 above) was unresolved. In general, subsidiary relationships were consistent and well supported by both matrices, sometimes revealing surprising associations between forms that differ dramatically in plumage and bill morphology. Our results also reveal some basic aspects of hummingbird ecologic and morphologic evolution. For example, most of the diverse endemic Andean assemblage apparently comprises two genetically divergent clades, whereas the majority of North American hummingbirds belong a single third clade. Genetic distances separating some morphologically distinct genera (Oreotrochilus, Aglaiocercus, Lesbia; Myrtis, Acestrura, Philodice) were no greater than among congeneric (Coeligena) species, indicating that, in hummingbirds, morphological divergence does not necessarily reflect level of genetic divergence. PMID:9066799

Bleiweiss, R; Kirsch, J A; Matheus, J C

1997-03-01

344

DNA Hybridization Evidence for the Principal Lineages of Hummingbirds (Aves: Trochilidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The spectacular evolutionary radiation of hummingbirds (Trochilidae) has served as a model system for many biological studies. To begin to provide a historical context for these investigations, we generated a complete matrix of DNA hybridization distances among 26 hummingbirds and an outgroup swift (Chaeturu pelagica) to determine the principal hummingbird lineages. FITCH topologies estimated from symmetrized AT,H-C values and subjected

Robert Bleiweiss; John A. W. Kirsch; Juan Carlos Matheus

345

580 NACHES AVE SW, SUITE 100 RENTON, WASHINGTON 98057 PHONE (425) 7385205 FAX (425) 9882144  

E-print Network

................................................................................. 9 #12;Page 3 of 9 Section I INTRODUCTION The Council adopted the proposed Central GOA Rockfish implementing Amendment 88, the Rockfish Program, became effective on December 27, 2011. The CGOA Rockfish and the allocation of QS The CGOA Rockfish Program takes over the management of three primary rockfish species

346

INFORMACIÓN SOBRE LA DISTRIBUCIÓN DE ALGUNAS ESPECIES DE AVES DE ECUADOR  

Microsoft Academic Search

New records or confirmation of recently reported distributional range extensions or altitudinal movements are given or 14 species of birds from Ecuador: Cairina moschata, Netta erythrophthalma, Leucopternis semiplumbeus, Forpus coelestis, Crotophaga sulcirostris, Eriocnemis mosquera, Furnarius cinnamomeus, Pseudocolaptes boissonneautii, Phlegopsis nigromaculata, Querula purpurata, Cyclarhis gujanensis, Progne subis, Haplospiza rustica y Carduelis olivacea. The new records and their releva nce to the

Diego F. Cisneros-Heredia

347

Persistent organochlorine residues in livers of six species of Ciconiiformes (aves) from Spain.  

PubMed

Liver samples of 42 birds belonging to 6 species of Ciconiiformes (grey heron (n = 17), little egret (n = 12), cattle egret (n = 1), glossy ibis (n = 1), little bittern (n = 1), and white stork (n = 10)), collected from two different zones of Spain (Ebro Delta and Madrid) in 1992-1997, were analyzed for organochlorine pesticides and PCBs. SigmaPCBs (sum of concentrations of individual congeners), p,p'-DDE, HCB, gamma-HCH, and heptachlor epoxide were the most prevalent residues detected in all samples (occurrence > 95%). There were no statistically significant differences in organochlorine levels between grey herons and little egrets, while levels of SigmaPCBs, p,p'-DDE, HCB, gamma-HCH, and heptachlor were significantly lower for white storks. These results could be explained by the different habitat of these species, aquatic in the Ebro Delta (grey herons, little egrets) and dry in Madrid (white stork), and their diverse feeding habits. PMID:16785174

Piqué, E; Mateo, R; Fernández-Fernández, D; Guitart, R

2006-01-01

348

137 Reber Building Home Address Pennsylvania State University 1320A Oak Ridge Ave  

E-print Network

plants. Undergraduate Researcher Rowan University, Glassboro, NJ, Pollution Prevention & Sustainability. Developed a spreadsheet to calculate gaseous emissions (CO, NOx, SOx, and other pollutants) for new cement State University, NucE 309 Analytical Techniques for Nuclear Concepts Fall 2014 Teaching this junior

Thole, Karen A.

349

Feather mites (Acari, Astigmata) from Azorean passerines (Aves, Passeriformes): lower species richness compared to European mainland  

PubMed Central

Ten passerine species were examined on three islands of the Azores (North Atlantic) during 2013 and 2014 in order to identify their feather mite assemblages. We recorded 19 feather mite species belonging to four families of the superfamily Analgoidea (Analgidae, Proctophyllodidae, Psoroptoididae and Trouessartiidae). A high prevalence of feather mite species was recorded on the majority of the examined host species. Only three passerine species (Sylvia atricapilla, Regulus regulus and Serinus canaria) presented the same full complex of mite species as commonly occurs in the plumage of their closest relatives in continental Europe. Passer domesticus presented the same limited fauna of feather mites living in the plumage as do its co-specifics in continental Europe. Carduelis carduelis bears the same feather mite species as do most of its continental populations in Europe, but it lacks one mite species occurring on this host in Egypt. Turdus merula, Pyrrhula murina and Fringilla coelebs are missing several mite species common to their continental relatives. This diminution could be explained by the founder effect, whereby a limited number of colonizing individuals did not transport the full set of feather mite species, or by the extinction of some mite species after initially having reached the Azores. The only individual of Motacilla cinerea sampled in this study presented a new host record for the mite species Trouessartia jedliczkai. PMID:25665827

Rodrigues, Pedro; Mironov, Sergey; Sychra, Oldrich; Resendes, Roberto; Literak, Ivan

2015-01-01

350

S.L. AVES and R.H. JOHNSONDecember 2008 919 1. Introduction  

E-print Network

feature of the Asian monsoon system. Past studies of the region have noted that the Tibetan Plateau-resolution studies of convection over South- east Asia portray a convoluted pattern of the diur- nal phase of maximum et al. (1981) examined convective behavior off the northern coast of Borneo using Journal

Johnson, Richard H.

351

Digeneans and cestodes parasitic in the white-faced ibis Plegadis chihi (Aves: Threskiornithidae) from Argentina.  

PubMed

Some digeneans and cestodes parasitic in a population of the white-faced ibis Plegadis chihi (Vieillot) from Buenos Aires province, Argentina, are presented. The digeneans Dietziella egregia (Dietz, 1909), Patagifer bilobus (Rudolphi, 1819), Ascocotyle (Leighia) hadra Ostrowski de Nuñez, 1992 and Posthodiplostomum nanum Dubois, 1937 from the intestine; Prosthogonimus ovatus (Rudolphi, 1803) from the cloaca; Athesmia heterolecithodes (Braun, 1899) from the bile ducts and the cestode Hymenolepis megalops (Nitzsch in Creplin, 1829) from the cloaca, were recorded. The discovery of D. egregia, P. ovatus, A. heterolecithodes and P. nanum constitute new host and/or new geographical records. Adults of A. (L.) hadra, previously described in experimental definitive hosts, are first reported from a naturally infected bird. Hymenolepis megalops, a cestode of Anseriformes is first reported from Ciconiiformes. PMID:11104147

Digiani, M C

2000-01-01

352

Molecular phylogeny of the genus Buteo (Aves: Accipitridae) based on mitochondrial marker sequences  

Microsoft Academic Search

DNA sequences of the mitochondrial nd6 gene and the non-repetitive part of the pseudo-control region (?CR) were isolated from 101 individuals to analyze the phylogenetic relationships among all buzzards of the genus Buteo and other buteonine genera. Comparisons of the two marker sequences indicate that the ?CR evolved two times faster than the nd6 gene. The ?CR proved to be

Martin J. Riesing; Luise Kruckenhauser; Anita Gamauf; Elisabeth Haring

2003-01-01

353

Helminth parasites of the western sandpiper, Calidris mauri (Aves), from El Paso and Hudspeth counties, Texas.  

PubMed

Fifty western sandpipers, Calidris mauri, from El Paso and Hudspeth counties, Texas, were collected and examined for helminth parasites. Fifty-three helminths (means abundance = 1.06, SD = 2.31) consisting of 4 cestode and 1 nematode species were collected. The helminth community showed low species richness (5), low diversity and evenness (0.05, 0.14), low concentration for dominance (0.19), and all species were contagiously distributed. There were no clearly identifiable core species. PMID:1919931

Canaris, A G; Munir, N T

1991-10-01

354

A species tree for the Australo-Papuan Fairy-wrens and allies (Aves: Maluridae).  

PubMed

We explored the efficacy of species tree methods at the family level in birds, using the Australo-Papuan Fairy-wrens (Passeriformes: Maluridae) as a model system. Fairy-wrens of the genus Malurus are known for high intensities of sexual selection, resulting in some cases in rapid speciation. This history suggests that incomplete lineage sorting (ILS) of neutrally evolving loci could be substantial, a situation that could compromise traditional methods of combining loci in phylogenetic analysis. Using 18 molecular markers (5 anonymous loci, 7 exons, 5 introns, and 1 mitochondrial DNA locus), we show that gene tree monophyly across species could be rejected for 16 of 18 loci, suggesting substantial ILS at the family level in these birds. Using the software Concaterpillar, we also detect three statistically distinct clusters of gene trees among the 18 loci. Despite substantial variation in gene trees, species trees constructed using four different species tree estimation methods (BEST, BUCKy, and STAR) were generally well supported and similar to each other and to the concatenation tree, with a few mild discordances at nodes that could be explained by rapid and recent speciation events. By contrast, minimizing deep coalescences produced a species tree that was topologically more divergent from those of the other methods as measured by multidimensional scaling of trees. Additionally, gene and species trees were topologically more similar in the BEST analysis, presumably because of the species tree prior employed in BEST which appropriately assumes that gene trees are correlated with each other and with the species tree. Among the 18 loci, we also discovered 102 independent indel markers, which also proved phylogenetically informative, primarily among genera, and displayed a ?4-fold bias towards deletions. As suggested in earlier work, the grasswrens (Amytornis) are sister to the rest of the family and the emu-wrens (Stipiturus) are sister to fairy-wrens (Malurus, Clytomyias). Our study shows that ILS is common at the family level in birds yet, despite this, species tree methods converge on broadly similar results for this family. PMID:21978990

Lee, June Y; Joseph, Leo; Edwards, Scott V

2012-03-01

355

New genus and three new species of quill mites (Acari: Syringophilidae: Picobiinae) parasitising puffbirds (Aves: Piciformes).  

PubMed

Abstract: Three new species, belonging to the newly proposed genus Pseudopicobia gen. n., inhabiting body quill feathers of puff-birds (Piciformes: Bucconidae), are described: P nonnula sp. n. from Nonnula frontalis (Sclater) in Colombia, P malacoptila sp. n. from Malacoptila panamensis Lafresnaye in Colombia and P hapaloptila sp. n. from Hapaloptila castanea (Verreaux) in Ecuador. The new genus differs from morphologically similar genus Picobia Heller, 1878 by the absence of the genital setae, absence of the genital lobes, solenidia phiI represented by microsetae, and by the presence of setiform solenidia sigma I. Syringophilid mites are recorded from birds of this family for the first time. PMID:23136804

Skoracki, Maciej; Scibek, Katarzyna; Sikora, Bozena

2012-09-01

356

265 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA mit.edu/museum/programs/festival  

E-print Network

Envy Greed Wrath Pride Sloth Lust Judith Wurtman, former director of the Program in Women's Health conditions like depression may give rise to acedia or "sloth" and how our brains respond to stress. Sugar

Ishii, Hiroshi

357

Saxicola syenitica Heuglin, 1869 (Aves: Passeriformes: Muscicapidae), an overlooked taxon of Oenanthe?  

PubMed

The North African population of the Black Wheatear has been treated as Oenanthe leucura syenitica for over 100 years. The type of syenitica was collected by Heuglin in June 1852 near the southern Egypt/northern Sudan border, well outside the range of the sedentary Black Wheatear. Morphometric inference and genetic analyses of partial sequences of the mitochondrial gene COI demonstrate that the type specimen of syenitica is not conspecific with O. leucura, but instead is closely related to O. lugens of the Middle East and North Africa, being most similar in plumage to O. lugens warriae of the basalt deserts of north-east Jordan and southern Syria. While syenitica was not separable in the analysed part of its mitochondrial DNA from O. l. lugens and O. l. warriae, it differs in morphometrics and plumage features from the latter. The type specimen is a first-summer bird with abraded plumage as expected for June, and may thus have been collected in its breeding range. Its morphological distinctiveness implies that syenitica might be taxonomically distinct from warriae. However, as it is known only from the type and its few associated data, we propose to treat it as a subspecies inquirenda of O. lugens. As a consequence of this, and the fact that we found no genetic or morphological differences between North African populations of O. leucura and riggenbachi Hartert, 1909, the name originally applied to the population in Western Sahara, the North African population takes the oldest available name to become O. leucura riggenbachi. PMID:24872167

Shirihai, Hadoram; Schweizer, Manuel; Kirwan, Guy M; Svensson, Lars

2014-01-01

358

Phylogeography and genetic structure of two Patagonian shag species (Aves: Phalacrocoracidae).  

PubMed

We compared the phylogeographic and genetic structure of two sympatric shag species, Phalacrocorax magellanicus (rock shag) and Phalacrocorax atriceps (imperial shag), from Patagonia (southern South America). We used multilocus genotypes of nuclear DNA (microsatellite loci) from 324 individuals and mitochondrial DNA sequences (ATPase) from 177 individuals, to evaluate hypotheses related to the effect of physical and non-physical barriers on seabird evolution. Despite sharing many ecological traits, the focal species strongly differ in two key aspects: P. magellanicus has a strong tendency to remain at/near their breeding colonies during foraging trips and the non-breeding season, while P. atriceps exhibits the converse pattern. Both species showed similar mtDNA genetic structure, where colonies from the Atlantic Coast, Pacific Coast and Fuegian region were genetically divergent. We also found similarities in the results of Bayesian clustering analysis of microsatellites, with both species having four clusters. However population differentiation (e.g. Fst, ?st) was higher in P. magellanicus compared to P. atriceps, and average membership probabilities of individuals to specific clusters (Q-values) were also higher in the former. Phalacrocorax magellanicus has strong phylogeographic structure, consistent with the impact of Pleistocene glaciations, with diagnostic haplotypes associated with each of the three mentioned regions. The same pattern was not as evident for P. atriceps. Migration rate estimators were higher for P. atriceps than for P. magellanicus; however both species followed an n-island-like model of gene flow, this implies that dispersal occurs across the continental land mass that separates Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Our results supported the hypothesis that non-physical barriers are important drivers of the genetic and phylogeographic structure in seabirds, and also that physical barriers constitute effective but not absolute impediments to gene flow. PMID:24418531

Calderón, Luciano; Quintana, Flavio; Cabanne, Gustavo S; Lougheed, Stephen C; Tubaro, Pablo L

2014-03-01

359

DEPARTMENT OF EARTH & CLIMATE SCIENCES 1600 HOLLOWAY AVE, THORNTON HALL 509  

E-print Network

such as coastal sedimentology, sedimentation and tectonics, environmental sedimentology, or the sedimentary record in teaching--with teaching interests or experience in the broad field of sedimentology--and will be expected

360

Molecular systematics and evolution of the Synallaxis ruficapilla complex (Aves: Furnariidae) in the Atlantic Forest.  

PubMed

The Neotropical Synallaxis ruficapilla complex is endemic to the Atlantic Forest and is comprised of three species: S. ruficapilla, S. whitneyi, and S. infuscata. This group is closely related to the Synallaxis moesta complex that occurs in the Andes, Tepuis, and Guianan shield. Here we used mitochondrial and nuclear gene sequences to infer the phylogeny and the time of diversification of the S. ruficapilla and S. moesta complexes. We also included samples of an undescribed population of Synallaxis that resembles other populations of the S. ruficapilla complex. Our results showed that different geographical lineages within the S. ruficapilla complex are reciprocally monophyletic, but the northern form (S. infuscata) grouped with an Andean taxon. This suggests that at least two lineages of this group independently colonized the Atlantic Forest. Specimens of the undescribed population formed a monophyletic clade with deep divergence. Estimated diversification dates were within the late Pliocene to Pleistocene (2.75-0.16 million of years ago). This suggests that at this time there was a higher connectivity between habitats in the rugged landscapes of the circum-Amazonian bioregions. The observed Pleistocene diversification within the Atlantic Forest is congruent in space and time with studies of other co-distributed organisms, and may be associated with climate changes and tectonic activity during this period. PMID:23340003

Batalha-Filho, Henrique; Irestedt, Martin; Fjeldså, Jon; Ericson, Per G P; Silveira, Luis F; Miyaki, Cristina Y

2013-04-01

361

A New Genus and Species of Buteonine Hawk from Quaternary Deposits in Bermuda (Aves: Accipitridae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bermuteo avivorus, new genus and species, is described from rare Quaternary fossils from the island of Bermuda. Although clearly referable to the Buteoninae, its relationships within that group are difficult to assess. Considerable size variation may be attributable to sexual dimorphism associated with bird-catching behavior. It is uncertain if the species survived into the historic period. Factors contributing to the

Storrs L. Olson

2008-01-01

362

' ^ S E N T I ^Sentry&(Hip 900LindenAve.  

E-print Network

delle infonmazionj seguenti. #12;IMPORTANT OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS MODE D'EMPLOI IMPORTANT #12;Models not in use, - Utilize the bolt-down feature described in this manual, - Conceal the safe, if possible the safe open difficult, - Do not share the combination. Do not write the combination on or near the safe

Kleinfeld, David

363

Volume 16, Number 1, Spring 2006 19 1. 861 Keeler Ave., Berkeley, CA 94708; ecvellinga@  

E-print Network

.net 2. 720 Macon Street, Aurora, CO 80010; bad391@msn.com 3. Denver Botanic Gardens, 909 York Street, Denver, CO 80206 4. Denver Botanic Gardens, 909 York Street, Denver, CO 80206; evensonv, and death is the result. The Herbarium of Fungi at Denver Botanic Gardens contains a second Colorado

California at Berkeley, University of

364

Comparative mechanics of filter feeding in Anas platyrhynchos, Anas clypeata and Aythya fuligula (Aves, Anseriformes)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The straining of seeds ranging in size from 0.01 to 4.6 mm was investigated in the filtering mechanisms of three anseriform species, Anas platyrhynchos, Anas clypeata, and Aythya fuligala. The morphology of the filtering mechanisms was studied by dissection and from microsections. The kinematic work envelope of the beaks was measured by stereotactic manipulation. The actual beak kinematics were analyzed

J. G. M. Kooloos; A. R. Kraaijeveld; G. E. J. Langenbach; G. A. Zweers

1989-01-01

365

Carotenoid-based bill coloration functions as a social, not sexual, signal in songbirds (Aves: Passeriformes).  

PubMed

Many animals use coloration to communicate with other individuals. Although the signalling role of avian plumage colour is relatively well studied, there has been much less research on coloration in avian bare parts. However, bare parts could be highly informative signals as they can show rapid changes in coloration. We measured bill colour (a ubiquitous bare part) in over 1600 passerine species and tested whether interspecific variation in carotenoid-based coloration is consistent with signalling to potential mates or signalling to potential rivals in a competitive context. Our results suggest that carotenoid bill coloration primarily evolved as a signal of dominance, as this type of coloration is more common in species that live in social groups in the nonbreeding season, and species that nest in colonies; two socio-ecological conditions that promote frequent agonistic interactions with numerous and/or unfamiliar individuals. Additionally, our study suggests that carotenoid bill coloration is independent of the intensity of past sexual selection, as it is not related to either sexual dichromatism or sexual size dimorphism. These results pose a significant challenge to the conventional view that carotenoid-based avian coloration has evolved as a developmentally costly, condition-dependent sexual signal. We also suggest that bare part ornamentation may often signal different information than plumage ornaments. PMID:25430614

Dey, C J; Valcu, M; Kempenaers, B; Dale, J

2015-01-01

366

ALFRED P. SLOAN FOUNDATION 630 FI F TH AVE N U E  

E-print Network

and universities in the U.S. and Canada, this year's fellows represent an extraordinarily broad range of research@sloan.org Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Honors Promising Young Scholars 118 Researchers Receive Sloan Research outstanding researchers as recipients of the prestigious Sloan Research Fellowships for 2011. Awarded annually

367

Department of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan 2534 C.C. Little, 1100 North University Ave  

E-print Network

and seawater 18 O, AGU Fall Meeting, abstract pp32A-02. J Zhou, C. Poulsen, D. Pollard and T. White (2008 O with a global ocean-atmosphere general circulation model, AGU Fall meeting, abstract pp03-10539. J) National Scholarship (Grade 1) 2003 (China) Journal Publications & Conference Abstracts J Zhou, C. Poulsen

Poulsen, Chris J.

368

Close karyological kinship between the reptilian suborder serpentes and the class aves  

Microsoft Academic Search

In contrast to the situation found in two classes of warm-blooded vertebrates, mammals and birds, the class Reptilia is not uniform with regard to total genetic content; rather, it contains two distinct categories. The close cytological kinship between snakes and birds was revealed. Both are almost identical in total genetic content, which is about 50 per cent that of placental

Willy Beçak; Maria Luiza Beçak; H. R. S. Nazareth; Susumu Ohno

1964-01-01

369

Impact evaluation of an energy {dollar_sign}avings plan project at Elf Atochem North America  

SciTech Connect

This impact evaluation of an energy conservation measure (ECM) that was recently installed at Elf Atochem North America (Atochem) was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) as part of an evaluation of its Energy savings Plan (E$P) Program. The Program makes acquisition payments to firms that install energy conservation measures in their industrial processes. The objective of this impact evaluation was to assess how much electrical energy is being saved at Atochem as a result of the E$P and to determine how much the savings cost Bonneville and the region. The impact of the ECM was evaluated with a combination of engineering analysis, financial analysis, site visit and interview, review of previous program submittals and review of process evaluation results from 1989. The ECM itself consists of adding anode area to each of the sodium chlorate (chlorate) cells at Atochem`s Tacoma facility. Increasing the anode area reduces the current density, which reduces cell resistance at the same current, thus reducing energy consumption at the same chlorate production rate. Energy savings resulting from this ECM are expected to average about 24,000,000 kWh/yr or about 1000 kWh/ton of chlorate produced. The net cost of the ECM was $1,410,400, and Atochem received a payment of $212,500 from Bonneville for the acquisition of energy savings. The levelized cost of these energy savings to Bonneville will be 0.7 mills/kWh over the ECM`s expected 15-year life, and the levelized cost to the region will be 5.7 mills/kWh. Bonneville`s offer to pay Atochem $212,500 via the E$P Program was viewed by Atochem management as a big incentive that made a difference.

Brown, D.R.; Spanner, G.E.

1992-08-01

370

Impact evaluation of an energy dollar sign avings plan project at Elf Atochem North America  

SciTech Connect

This impact evaluation of an energy conservation measure (ECM) that was recently installed at Elf Atochem North America (Atochem) was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) as part of an evaluation of its Energy savings Plan (E$P) Program. The Program makes acquisition payments to firms that install energy conservation measures in their industrial processes. The objective of this impact evaluation was to assess how much electrical energy is being saved at Atochem as a result of the E$P and to determine how much the savings cost Bonneville and the region. The impact of the ECM was evaluated with a combination of engineering analysis, financial analysis, site visit and interview, review of previous program submittals and review of process evaluation results from 1989. The ECM itself consists of adding anode area to each of the sodium chlorate (chlorate) cells at Atochem's Tacoma facility. Increasing the anode area reduces the current density, which reduces cell resistance at the same current, thus reducing energy consumption at the same chlorate production rate. Energy savings resulting from this ECM are expected to average about 24,000,000 kWh/yr or about 1000 kWh/ton of chlorate produced. The net cost of the ECM was $1,410,400, and Atochem received a payment of $212,500 from Bonneville for the acquisition of energy savings. The levelized cost of these energy savings to Bonneville will be 0.7 mills/kWh over the ECM's expected 15-year life, and the levelized cost to the region will be 5.7 mills/kWh. Bonneville's offer to pay Atochem $212,500 via the E$P Program was viewed by Atochem management as a big incentive that made a difference.

Brown, D.R.; Spanner, G.E.

1992-08-01

371

Evolution of seasonal ecological niches in the Passerina buntings (Aves: Cardinalidae).  

PubMed Central

The evolution of migration has long been considered complex and recent work has demonstrated additional complexity: some species follow the same ecological conditions throughout the year, whereas others 'switch niches' between breeding and wintering ranges. Hypotheses regarding the evolution of migration would generally predict niche-following as primitive, and niche-switching as derived. However, no test has, to our knowledge, yet determined the directionality of evolution of these states within a lineage. We present an analysis of phylogenetic dimensions of seasonal niches in the Passerina buntings that indicates greater evolutionary change in the niches of breeding populations than among those of wintering populations. These results are consistent with hypotheses of (i) niche conservatism (in winter, at least) across a recently speciated lineage; and (ii) the derived state of the breeding (rather than winter) ecological niches of each species. PMID:15306365

Martínez-Meyer, Enrique; Peterson, A. Townsend; Navarro-Sigüenza, Adolfo G.

2004-01-01

372

Past Future Past Future Past Future Past Future Central Corridor Hiawatha Cedar Ave Northstar  

E-print Network

-Story Office Building 0.2689 -0.0858 -0.8564 -2.0491*** Building Owned by Business 0.5485 0.8479 0.6086 1 businesses consistent departure from positive trend. 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% (Not auto sales/ service) Auto sales/ service (Not auto sales/ service) Auto sales/ service Neighborhood

Minnesota, University of

373

Complex species status for extinct moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes) from the genus Euryapteryx.  

PubMed

The exact species status of New Zealand's extinct moa remains unknown. In particular, moa belonging to the genus Euryapteryx have been difficult to classify. We use the DNA barcoding sequence on a range of Euryapteryx samples in an attempt to resolve the species status for this genus. We obtained mitochondrial control region and the barcoding region from Cytochrome Oxidase Subunit I (COI) from a number of new moa samples and use available sequences from previous moa phylogenies and eggshell data to try and clarify the species status of Euryapteryx. Using the COI barcoding region we show that species status in Euryapteryx is complex with no clear separation between various individuals. Eggshell, soil, and bone data suggests that a Euryapteryx subspecies likely exists on New Zealand's North Island and can be characterized by a single mitochondrial control region SNP. COI divergences between Euryapteryx individuals from the south of New Zealand's South Island and those from the Far North of the North Island exceed 1.6% and are likely to represent separate species. Individuals from other areas of New Zealand were unable to be clearly separated based on COI differences possibly as a result of repeated hybridisation events. Despite the accuracy of the COI barcoding region to determine species status in birds, including that for the other moa genera, for moa from the genus Euryapteryx, COI barcoding fails to provide a clear result, possibly as a consequence of repeated hybridisation events between these moa. A single control region SNP was identified however that segregates with the two general morphological variants determined for Euryapteryx; a smaller subspecies restricted to the North Island of New Zealand, and a larger subspecies, found on both New Zealand's North and South Island. PMID:24594991

Huynen, Leon; Lambert, David M

2014-01-01

374

Complex Species Status for Extinct Moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes) from the Genus Euryapteryx  

PubMed Central

The exact species status of New Zealand's extinct moa remains unknown. In particular, moa belonging to the genus Euryapteryx have been difficult to classify. We use the DNA barcoding sequence on a range of Euryapteryx samples in an attempt to resolve the species status for this genus. We obtained mitochondrial control region and the barcoding region from Cytochrome Oxidase Subunit I (COI) from a number of new moa samples and use available sequences from previous moa phylogenies and eggshell data to try and clarify the species status of Euryapteryx. Using the COI barcoding region we show that species status in Euryapteryx is complex with no clear separation between various individuals. Eggshell, soil, and bone data suggests that a Euryapteryx subspecies likely exists on New Zealand's North Island and can be characterized by a single mitochondrial control region SNP. COI divergences between Euryapteryx individuals from the south of New Zealand's South Island and those from the Far North of the North Island exceed 1.6% and are likely to represent separate species. Individuals from other areas of New Zealand were unable to be clearly separated based on COI differences possibly as a result of repeated hybridisation events. Despite the accuracy of the COI barcoding region to determine species status in birds, including that for the other moa genera, for moa from the genus Euryapteryx, COI barcoding fails to provide a clear result, possibly as a consequence of repeated hybridisation events between these moa. A single control region SNP was identified however that segregates with the two general morphological variants determined for Euryapteryx; a smaller subspecies restricted to the North Island of New Zealand, and a larger subspecies, found on both New Zealand's North and South Island. PMID:24594991

Huynen, Leon; Lambert, David M.

2014-01-01

375

The species of Saemundssonia (Insecta: Phthiraptera: Philopteridae) from skuas (Aves: Stercorariidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three species of Saemundssonia Timmermann, 1936 parasitic on skuas are recognised as valid: Saemundssonia (Saemundssonia) cephalus (Denny, 1842) on Stercorarius parasiticus; S. (S.)inexspectata Timmermann, 1951 on Stercorarius longicaudus; and S. (S.)euryrhyncha (Giebel, 1874) on Stercorarius pomarinus as well as on all species of Catharacta. The name Saemundssonia stresemanni Timmermann, 1949 is proposed as a junior synonym of S. (S.)euryrhyncha. Measurements

Ricardo L. Palma

2000-01-01

376

A pelican tarsometatarsus (Aves: Pelecanidae) from the latest Pliocene Siwaliks of India.  

PubMed

We report a new fossil specimen of a pelican from the Tatrot Formation of the Siwalik Hills, India. It likely represents Pelecanus sivalensis Davies, 1880, the smaller of the two previously published species from the Siwalik Group stratigraphic sequence. This complete tarsometatarsus is the first fossil bone of a pelican collected in India for over 100 years. It is from the latest Pliocene (?2.6 Ma), and is the youngest pelican fossil from the region. The new specimen exhibits a derived distoplantar 'slant' to the plantar margin of the medial crest of the hypotarsus, and a combination of features related to the morphology of the hypotarsus, the distal foramen, trochleae, and overall size that allow further differentiation from known tarsometatarsi of fossil and extant pelicans, including the three species of extant pelicans that occur in India (Pelecanus crispus, P. onocrotalus, and P. philippensis). It is of appropriate size for Pelecanus sivalensis, which to date has been known only by fragments of other skeletal elements of the wing, leg, and shoulder girdle. Thus, the observation that this tarsometatarsus is morphologically distinct from those of known pelicans provides further support for the distinctiveness of at least one extinct species of pelican from the Siwalik Group sediments. While the morphology of the tarsometatarsus allows for separation from other taxa known from tarsometatarsi, we found no clear shared derived states to place this taxon with any confidence in a phylogenetic context relative to any other pelican species, or even determine if it is part of the crown group of Pelecanidae. However, published molecular data are consistent with an origin of the crown clade prior to the Pleistocene, suggesting (along with one morphological character) the possibility that this species belongs to the Old World clade of pelican species. PMID:25365300

Stidham, Thomas A; Krishan, Kewal; Singh, Bahadur; Ghosh, Abhik; Patnaik, Rajeev

2014-01-01

377

James B. Bushnell University of California Energy Institute 111 Dale Ave.  

E-print Network

and Regulatory Testimony California Senate Energy, Utilities, and Communications Committee hearing on AB 32 Implementation and Cap-and-Trade (5/08) California Senate Energy, Utilities, and Communications Committee hearing) and California Energy Commission (CEC) En-Banc Hearing on Electric Sector Point of Regulation in a Cap and Trade

Kammen, Daniel M.

378

Neutron Electromagnetic Form Factors Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave.,  

E-print Network

Neutron Electromagnetic Form Factors H. Gao Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts probing the neutron electromagnetic structure. In this talk, I review the experimental status of the neutron electromagnetic form factor studies. The recently completed Je erson Lab experiment E95

379

Rapid diversification of falcons (Aves: Falconidae) due to expansion of open habitats in the Late Miocene.  

PubMed

Understanding how and why lineages diversify is central to understanding the origins of biological diversity. The avian family Falconidae (caracaras, forest-falcons, falcons) has an uneven distribution of species among multiple well-supported clades, and provides a useful system for testing hypotheses about diversification rate and correlation with environmental changes. We analyzed eight independent loci for 1-7 individuals from each of the 64 currently recognized Falconidae species, together with two fossil falconid temporal calibrations, to assess phylogeny, absolute divergence times and potential shifts in diversification rate. Our analyses supported similar diversification ages in the Early to Middle Miocene for the three traditional subfamilies, Herpetotherinae, Polyborinae and Falconinae. We estimated that divergences within the subfamily Falconinae began about 16mya and divergences within the most species-rich genus, Falco, including about 60% of all Falconidae species, began about 7.5mya. We found evidence for a significant increase in diversification rate at the basal phylogenetic node for the genus Falco, and the timing for this rate shift correlates generally with expansion of C4 grasslands beginning around the Miocene/Pliocene transition. Concomitantly, Falco lineages that are distributed primarily in grassland or savannah habitats, as opposed to woodlands, and exhibit migratory, as opposed to sedentary, behavior experienced a higher diversification rate. PMID:25256056

Fuchs, Jérôme; Johnson, Jeff A; Mindell, David P

2015-01-01

380

Population recovery of the threatened endemic Rodrigues fody ( Foudia flavicans) (Aves, Ploceidae) following reforestation  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1999, we intensively surveyed all suitable habitat on the Mascarene Island of Rodrigues and mapped 334 territories of the threatened endemic Rodrigues fody (Foudia flavicans). In addition, we recorded 58 unpaired males, 85 juveniles, and 100 grey-brown-plumaged birds, for a minimum estimated population size of 911 birds. This represents a near 100-fold increase in population size since 1968, which

Andrew J Impey; Isabelle M Côté; Carl G Jones

2002-01-01

381

Remarks on the name Cercomacra Sclater, 1858 (Aves: Thamnophilidae) and its type species.  

PubMed

A recent molecular phylogeny of Cercomacra Sclater, 1858 found the genus to be polyphyletic (Tello et al. 2014). Two non-sister clades in putative Cercomacra were uncovered: Cercomacra sensu stricto, including Cercomacra manu Fitzpatrick & Willard, 1990, C. brasiliana Hellmayr, 1905, C. cinerascens (Sclater, 1857), C. melanaria (Ménétries, 1835), C. ferdinandi Snethlage, 1928, C. carbonaria Sclater & Salvin, 1873 and C. nigricans Sclater, 1858; and Cercomacroides Tello & Raposo, 2014, including Cercomacroides nigrescens (Cabanis & Heine, 1859), C. laeta (Todd, 1920), C. parkeri (Graves, 1997), C. tyrannina (Sclater, 1855) and C. serva (Sclater, 1858). This split required a prior re-examination of the apparently difficult facts surrounding the name of the type species of Cercomacra to ensure that the appropriate group would retain that name leaving the balance to the new genus-group name, Cercomacroides. The findings of that re-examination are nomenclatural rather than taxonomic and are complex enough to deserve a historical explanation, which is presented here. In summary, Hellmayr (1905) was correct in clarifying the identity of the type species chosen by Sclater (1890), but he did not suggest any nomenclatural action to fix the misidentified type species. Subsequent information provided by Cory & Hellmayr (1924) regarding the type specimen of Cercomacra brasiliana was incorrect, and the holotype is not in St. Petersburg as they implied.  PMID:25661931

Raposo, Marcos A; Tello, José G; Dickinson, Edward C; Brito, Guilherme R R

2015-01-01

382

Identification of Bacterial Specialists in Hosts belonging to Aves, Mammalia, and Pisces  

EPA Science Inventory

Only a portion of bacteria found in animal guts are able to establish specific associations within animal hosts. Taxa that have formed these specialized relationships may have played a prominent role in host evolution and may also contribute significantly to current host physiolo...

383

Evolution in Australasian Mangrove Forests: Multilocus Phylogenetic Analysis of the Gerygone Warblers (Aves: Acanthizidae)  

PubMed Central

The mangrove forests of Australasia have many endemic bird species but their evolution and radiation in those habitats has been little studied. One genus with several mangrove specialist species is Gerygone (Passeriformes: Acanthizidae). The phylogeny of the Acanthizidae is reasonably well understood but limited taxon sampling for Gerygone has constrained understanding of its evolution and historical biogeography in mangroves. Here we report on a phylogenetic analysis of Gerygone based on comprehensive taxon sampling and a multilocus dataset of thirteen loci spread across the avian genome (eleven nuclear and two mitochondrial loci). Since Gerygone includes three species restricted to Australia's coastal mangrove forests, we particularly sought to understand the biogeography of their evolution in that ecosystem. Analyses of individual loci, as well as of a concatenated dataset drawn from previous molecular studies indicates that the genus as currently defined is not monophyletic, and that the Grey Gerygone (G. cinerea) from New Guinea should be transferred to the genus Acanthiza. The multilocus approach has permitted the nuanced view of the group's evolution into mangrove ecosystems having occurred on multiple occasions, in three non-overlapping time frames, most likely first by the G. magnirostris lineage, and subsequently followed by those of G. tenebrosa and G. levigaster. PMID:22363748

Nyári, Árpád S.; Joseph, Leo

2012-01-01

384

NATURAL AND INDUCED MAGNETIZATION IN THE BOBOLINK, DOLICHONYX ORYZIVORUS (AVES: ICTERIDAE)  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY The magnetic characteristics of the heads from 28 bobolinks (Icteridae: Dolichonyx oryzivorus (L.)) were analysed using remanence magnetometers. The natural remanent magnetization of 12 freshly preserved heads averaged 3-20xl0~ 7

ROBERT C. BEASON; WILLIAM J. BRENNAN

385

A HAMERKOP FROM THE EARLY PLIOCENE OF SOUTH AFRICA (AVES: SCOPIDAE)  

Microsoft Academic Search

T^o bones from early Pliocene deposits at Langebaanweg, south- western Cape Province, South Africa, constitute the first fossil record of the family Scopidae. These are described as a new species, Scopus xenopus, that was larger than the living Hamerkop, S. umbretta, and that had a foot structure possibly indicating that the fossil species was better adapted for swimming. The Hamerkop,

Storrs L. Olson

386

A preliminary look at AVE-SESAME 5 conducted on 20-21 May 1979  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Information on data collected, synoptic conditions, and severe and unusual weather reported during the period are presented. Records of the synoptic conditions include synoptic charts, radar charts, satellite photographs, and rainfall observations.

July, M.; Turner, R. E.

1981-01-01

387

Phylogeny and phylogenetic classification of the antbirds, ovenbirds, woodcreepers, and allies (Aves: Passeriformes: Infraorder Furnariides)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The infraorder Furnariides is a diverse group of suboscine passerine birds comprising a substantial component of the Neotropical avifauna. The included species encompass a broad array of morphologies and behaviours, making them appealing for evolutionary studies, but the size of the group (ca. 600 species) has limited well-sampled higher-level phylogenetic studies. Using DNA sequence data from the nuclear RAG-1 and RAG-2 exons, we undertook a phylogenetic analysis of the Furnariides sampling 124 (more than 88%) of the genera. Basal relationships among family-level taxa differed depending on phylogenetic method, but all topologies had little nodal support, mirroring the results from earlier studies in which discerning relationships at the base of the radiation was also difficult. In contrast, branch support for family-rank taxa and for many relationships within those clades was generally high. Our results support the Melanopareidae and Grallariidae as distinct from the Rhinocryptidae and Formicariidae, respectively. Within the Furnariides our data contradict some recent phylogenetic hypotheses and suggest that further study is needed to resolve these discrepancies. Of the few genera represented by multiple species, several were not monophyletic, indicating that additional systematic work remains within furnariine families and must include dense taxon sampling. We use this study as a basis for proposing a new phylogenetic classification for the group and in the process erect new family-group names for clades having high branch support across methods. ?? 2009 The Willi Hennig Society.

Moyle, R.G.; Chesser, R.T.; Brumfield, R.T.; Tello, J.G.; Marchese, D.J.; Cracraft, J.

2009-01-01

388

First report of an hypopus (Acari: Hypoderatidae) from a jaeger (Aves: Charadriiformes: Stercorariidae)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Thalassornectes (Alcidectes) aukletae, originally described from two species of auklets (Charadriiformes: Alcidae) from maritime eastern Russia, is reported from a third species of pelagic charadriiform (Stercorariidae), the pomarine jaeger, Stercorarius poinarinus (Temminck), from Florida. The specimens from the jaeger are slightly smaller, the genital apodeme is more heavily sclerotized, paired setae gm are twice as long and there are other minor variations in the idiosomal and leg chaetotaxy. These differences are not considered sufficient to warrant taxonomic separation at the species or subspecies level from the nominate species T. (A.) aukletae. The same hypopus occurring across different families of birds is unusual in the Hypoderatidae. The diversity in hosts from several orders of birds, low intensities of infection in the two species from Africa, low prevalences in alcids from Russia, and rarity of these hypoderatids in all surveyed hosts leads us to speculate that the true host affinities of species in the genus Thalassornectes are unknown. The alternative consideration is that these are simply uncommon species that are very host specific.

Pence, D.B.; Cole, R.A.

1995-01-01

389

Paraphyly of Cinclodes fuscus (Aves: Passeriformes: Furnariidae): Implications for taxonomy and biogeography  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Andes are a hotspot of global avian diversity, but studies on the historical diversification of Andean birds remain relatively scarce. Evolutionary studies on avian lineages with Andean–Patagonian distributions have focused on reconstructing species-level phylogenies, whereas no detailed phylogeographic studies on widespread species have been conducted. Here, we describe phylogeographic patterns in the Bar-winged Cinclodes (Cinclodes fuscus), a widespread and common species of ovenbird (Furnariidae) that breeds from Tierra del Fuego to the northern Andes. Traditionally, C. fuscus has been considered a single species composed of nine subspecies, but its long and narrow range suggests the possibility of considerable genetic variation among populations. Sequences of two mitochondrial genes revealed three discrete and geographically coherent groups of C. fuscus, occupying the southern, central, and northern Andes. Surprisingly, phylogenetic analyses indicated that these groups were more closely related to other species of Cinclodes than to each other. Relationships of the southern and northern C. fuscus clades to other species of Cinclodes were straightforward; in combination with available information on plumage, behavioral, and vocal variation, this suggests that each should be recognized as a distinct biological species. The central Andean group was paraphyletic with respect to C. oustaleti, and relationships among these taxa and C. olrogi were poorly resolved. We suggest that the central Andean C. fuscus should also be considered a different species, pending new information to clarify species limits in this group. These new phylogenetic data, along with recently developed methods, allowed us to review the biogeography of the genus, confirming southern South America and the central Andes as important areas for the diversification of these birds.

Sanin, Camilo; Cadena, Carlos Daniel; Maley, James M.; Lijtmaer, Dario A.; Tubaro, Pablo L.; Chesser, R. Terry

2009-01-01

390

Geostrophic transport variability along the Aves Ridge in the eastern Caribbean Sea during 1985-1986  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Data from five cruises during 1985-1986 along 63.55°W, across the eastern Caribbean Sea, are examined for seasonal variability of gcostrophic transport. A biannual maximum transport signal appears to correspond to that measured in the Florida Straits as well as to variations in the regional wind stress curl. Similar seasonal variations in the properties of water masses, entering the eastern margin of the basin and concentrated through the passages of the Lesser Antilles, are also indicated. A permanent system of strong westward flowing streams, interspersed by weaker eastward flowing streams, is shown to exist.

Morrison, John M.; Smith, Orson P.

1990-01-01

391

Phylogeny and evolutionary history of old world suboscine birds (aves: Eurylaimides)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Molecular and morphological data were used to derive a phylogenetic hypothesis for the Eurylaimides, an Old World bird group now known to be distributed pantropically, and to investigate the evolution and biogeography of the group. Phylogenetic results indicated that the Eurylaimides consist of two monophyletic groups, the pittas (Pittidae) and the broadbills (Eurylaimidae sensu lato), and that the broadbills consist of two highly divergent clades, one containing the sister genera Smithornis and Calyptomena, the other containing Pseudocalyptomena graueri, Sapuyou aenigma, the asity genera Philepitta and Neoclrepanis, and five Asian genera. Our results indicate that over a ???10 million year time span in the early Tertiary, the Eurylaimides came to inhabit widely disjunct tropical regions and evolved disparate morphology, diet, and breeding behavior. Biogeographically, although a southern origin for the lineage is likely, time estimates for major lineage splitting do not correspond to Gondwanan vicariance events, and the biogeographic history of the crown clade is better explained by Laurasian climatic and geological processes. In particular, the timing and phylogenetic pattern suggest a likely Laurasian origin for the sole New World representative of the group, Sapayoa aenigina. Copyright ??American Museum of Natural History 2006.

Moyle, R.G.; Chesser, R.T.; Prum, R.O.; Schikler, P.; Cracraft, J.

2006-01-01

392

Osteological evidence for sister group relationship between pseudo-toothed birds (Aves: Odontopterygiformes) and waterfowls (Anseriformes)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The phylogenetic affinities of the extinct pseudo-toothed birds have remained controversial. Some authors noted that they resemble both pelicans and allies (Pelecaniformes) and tube-nosed birds (Procellariiformes), but assigned them to a distinct taxon, the Odontopterygiformes. In most recent studies, the pseudo-toothed birds are referred to the family Pelagornithidae inside the Pelecaniformes. Here, I perform a cladistic analysis with five taxa of the pseudo-toothed birds including two undescribed new species from the Early Tertiary of Morocco. The present hypothesis strongly supports a sister group relationship of pseudo-toothed birds (Odontopterygiformes) and waterfowls (Anseriformes). The Odontoanserae (Odontopterygiformes plus Anseriformes) are the sister group of Neoaves. The placement of the landfowls (Galliformes) as the sister taxon of all other neognathous birds does not support the consensus view that the Galloanserae (Galliformes plus Anseriformes) are monophyletic.

Bourdon, Estelle

2005-12-01

393

AVES: A high performance computer cluster array for the INTEGRAL satellite scientific data analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper we describe a new computing system array, designed, built and now used at the Space Astrophysics and Planetary Institute (IAPS) in Rome, Italy, for the INTEGRAL Space Observatory scientific data analysis. This new system has become necessary in order to reduce the processing time of the INTEGRAL data accumulated during the more than 9 years of in-orbit operation. In order to fulfill the scientific data analysis requirements with a moderately limited investment the starting approach has been to use a `cluster' array of commercial quad-CPU computers, featuring the extremely large scientific and calibration data archive on line.

Federici, Memmo; Martino, Bruno Luigi; Ubertini, Pietro

2012-07-01

394

Phylogeny of the owlet-nightjars (Aves: Aegothelidae) based on mitochondrial DNA sequence  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The avian family Aegothelidae (Owlet-nightjars) comprises nine extant species and one extinct species, all of which are currently classified in a single genus, Aegotheles. Owlet-nightjars are secretive nocturnal birds of the South Pacific. They are relatively poorly studied and some species are known from only a few specimens. Furthermore, their confusing morphological variation has made it difficult to cluster existing specimens unambiguously into hierarchical taxonomic units. Here we sample all extant owlet-nightjar species and all but three currently recognized subspecies. We use DNA extracted primarily from museum specimens to obtain mitochondrial gene sequences and construct a molecular phylogeny. Our phylogeny suggests that most species are reciprocally monophyletic, however A. albertisi appears paraphyletic. Our data also suggest splitting A. bennettii into two species and splitting A. insignis and A. tatei as suggested in another recent paper. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

Dumbacher, J.P.; Pratt, T.K.; Fleischer, R.C.

2003-01-01

395

Data for NASA's AVE 6 experiment: 25-mb sounding data and synoptic charts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Atmospheric Variability Experiments 6 experiment is described, and tabulated rawinsonde data at 25-mb intervals from the surface to 25 mb for the 22 stations participating in the experiment is presented. Soundings were taken between 0000 GMT 27 May and 1200 GMT 28 May 1977. The methods of data processing and their accuracy are briefly discussed. Synoptic charts prepared from the data are presented together with an example of contact data.

Dupuis, L. R.; Hill, K.

1977-01-01

396

Data for NASA's AVE 2 pilot experiment. Part 1: 25-mb sounding data and synoptic charts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Tabulated rawinsonde data at 25-mb intervals from surface to 25 mb is presented for the 54 stations participating in the Atmospheric Variability Experiment 11 pilot experiment which began at 12 GMT on May 11, 1974, and ended at 12 GMT on May 12, 1974. Soundings were made at 3 hour intervals. A brief discussion is included on methods of processing and data accuracy, and synoptic charts prepared from the the data are presented. The area covered by the sounding stations is the eastern United States, east of approximately 105 deg west longitude.

Scoggins, J. R.; Turner, R. E.

1974-01-01

397

The structure and dynamics of mesoscale systems influencing severe thunderstorm development during AVE/SESAME 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Relationships between meso-beta scale systems and thunderstorm formation were examined as part of the NASA atmospheric variability experiment/severe environmental storms and mesoscale experiment 1979. The McIdas program was employed for meso-beta scale analyses of atmospheric structure and dynamics in kinematic computations of the Abilene Triangle on a grid mesh of 100 km for station spacing of 275 km. Mesoscale short wave systems were detected imbedded and propagating cyclonically around upper-level vortex circulation and creating environmental conditions conducive to thunderstorm development. TIROS-N and GOES satellite data served to connect the systems with two convective storms which developed. The necessity to use spaceborne instrumentation carried on the Shuttle or on free-flying satellites for enhancing the data-base on storm development is noted.

Wilson, G. S.

1982-01-01

398

Mitochondrial phylogeography, subspecific taxonomy, and conservation genetics of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis; Aves: Gruidae)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Six subspecies of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) have been denoted based on perceived morphological and/or breeding locality differences among them. Three subspecies are migratory, breeding from the high arctic in North America and Siberia (lesser sandhill, G. c. canadensis), south through central Canada (Canadian sandhill, G. c. rowani) and into the northern United States (greater sandhill, G. c. tabida). A review of sandhill crane taxonomy indicates that the size variation, on the basis of which these subspecies were named, may be clinal and not diagnostic. The other three subspecies, all listed as endangered or threatened, are non-migratory, resident in Florida (G. c. pratensis), Mississippi (G. c. pulla), and Cuba (G. c. nesiotes). We used analysis of mitochondrial DNA control region (CR) sequences to determine whether haplotypes representing current subspecies show any genetic cohesion or are more consistent with a pattern of clinal variation in morphology. CR sequences indicate that only two highly divergent (5.3%) lineages of sandhill cranes occur in North America: one lineage composed only of arctic-nesting G. c. canadensis, the other of the remaining North American subspecies (we lack data on the Cuban population). The deep split between lineages is consistent with an estimated isolation of approximately 1.5 Mya (mid-Pleistocene), while the distribution of mutational changes within lineages is consistent with an hypothesis of rapid, post-Pleistocene population expansions. No other phylogeographic structuring is concordant with subspecific boundaries, however, analysis of molecular variance indicates that there is significant population genetic differentiation among all subspecies except G. c. tabida and G. c. rowani, which are indistinguishable. We suggest that recognition of the recently named G. c. rowani be abandoned.

Rhymer, J.M.; Fain, M.G.; Austin, J.E.; Johnson, D.H.; Krajewski, C.

2001-01-01

399

The 25-MB sounding data and synoptic charts for NASA's AVE 2 pilot experiment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Rawinsonde data were tabulated at 25-mb intervals from the surface to 25 mb for the 54 stations participating in the atmospheric variability experiment 2 Pilot Experiment which began at 12 Greenwich mean time on May 11 and ended at 12 Greenwich mean time on May 12, 1974. Soundings were made at 3 hour intervals. Methods of processing and data accuracy are discussed, and synoptic charts prepared from the data are presented. The area covered by the sounding stations is the eastern United States east of approximately 105 deg west longitude.

Scoggins, J. R.; Turner, R. E.

1975-01-01

400

Phylogeny and evolutionary history of Old World suboscine birds (Aves: Eurylaimides)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Molecular and morphological data were used to derive a phylogenetic hypothesis for the Eurylaimides, an Old World bird group now known to be distributed pantropically, and to investigate the evolution and biogeography of the group. Phylogenetic results indicated that the Eurylaimides consist of two monophyletic groups, the pittas (Pittidae) and the broadbills (Eurylaimidae sensu lato), and that the broadbills consist of two highly divergent clades, one containing the sister genera Smithornis and Calyptomena, the other containing Pseudocalyptomena graueri, Sapayoa aenigma, the asity genera Philepitta and Neodrepanis, and five Asian genera. Our results indicate that over a ~10 million year time span in the early Tertiary, the Eurylaimides came to inhabit widely disjunct tropical regions and evolved disparate morphology, diet, and breeding behavior. Biogeographically, although a southern origin for the lineage is likely, time estimates for major lineage splitting do not correspond to Gondwanan vicariance events, and the biogeographic history of the crown clade is better explained by Laurasian climatic and geological processes. In particular, the timing and phylogenetic pattern suggest a likely Laurasian origin for the sole New World representative of the group, Sapayoa aenigma.

Moyle, R.G.; Chesser, R.T.; Prum, R.O.; Schikler, P.; Cracraft, J.

2006-01-01

401

Differences between measured and linearly interpolated synoptic variables over a 12-h period during AVE 4  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Results of analyses revealed that nonlinear changes or differences formed centers or systems, that were mesosynoptic in nature. These systems correlated well in space with upper level short waves, frontal zones, and radar observed convection, and were very systematic in time and space. Many of the centers of differences were well established in the vertical, extending up to the tropopause. Statistical analysis showed that on the average nonlinear changes were larger in convective areas than nonconvective regions. Errors often exceeding 100 percent were made by assuming variables to change linearly through a 12-h period in areas of thunderstorms, indicating that these nonlinear changes are important in the development of severe weather. Linear changes, however, accounted for more and more of an observed change as the time interval (within the 12-h interpolation period) increased, implying that the accuracy of linear interpolation increased over larger time intervals.

Dupuis, L. R.; Scoggins, J. R.

1979-01-01

402

Taxonomic status and biology of the Cuban blackhawk, Buteogallus anthracinus gundlachii (AVES: Accipitridae)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We reevaluate the taxonomic status of the Cuban population of the Common Black-Hawk (Buteogallus anthracinus) based on our examination of additional specimens, nests, eggs, and voice data. Buteogallus a. gundlachii is smaller than mainland populations of anthracinus and differs from mainland birds in plumage coloration and pattern. The common (alarm) call of gundlachii is a series of three or four notes, differing from that of mainland anthracinus, whose call consists of 9-24 notes. In the Isla de Pinos, Cuba, we observed gundlachii eating two species of land crabs (71.4%), centipedes (7.1%), lizards (10.7%), mammals (7.1%), and a bird (3.6%). We consider Buteogallus gundlachii Cabanis 1854 (1855), the Cuban Black-Hawk, to be a full species, endemic to Cuba, Isla de Pinos, and many of the cays of the Cuban Archipelago. ?? 2005 The Raptor Research Foundation, Inc.

Wiley, J.W.; Garrido, O.H.

2005-01-01

403

eSGA: E. coli synthetic genetic array analysis Gareth Butland1,2,7,8, Mohan Babu1,8, J Javier Diaz-Mejia1,3, Fedyshyn Bohdana1, Sadhna Phanse1,  

E-print Network

, Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster, but have not been reported previously for prokaryotes. Here functional redundancy occurs in prokaryotes as well. Indeed, only 303 genes had been identified as essential of epistasis have been documen- ted in E. coli and other prokaryotes9. However, the extent of functional cross

Cai, Long

404

Diaz-Calderon, A. / Towards a Unified Representation of Mechanisms for Robotic Control Software, pp. xx -yy International Journal of Advanced Robotic Systems, Volume y, Number x (200x), ISSN 1729-8806  

E-print Network

manipulator, wheeled mechanisms, kinematics, dynamics. 1. Introduction The work presented in this paper of mathematical models of kinematics/dynamics, geometric information and control system parameters of a variety for mechanism modeling and analysis. The modeling software covers mobility mechanisms, robotic arms, rover masts

Waliser, Duane E.

405

Davis Castro StrawberryCreekNort  

E-print Network

P P P P P P P Mather Redwood Grove Californian North American Meso- American Garden of Old Roses College Ave Regent St Hillegass Ave Benvenue Ave College Ave Etna St Piedmont Ave Warring St DerbyAve ChanningWay HasteSt DwightWay BlakeSt Piedmont Ave Warring St Warring St Prospect St DwightWay Fernwald Rd

Doudna, Jennifer A.

406

Wardenburg Dr rDllerekcoC  

E-print Network

BellaVista Ln Pennsylvania Ave College Ave 7thSt 7thSt 6thSt College Ave Madison Euclid Ave Euclid Ave Connecting Route (ask driver for transfer location)SKIP 27thWay Euclid Ave Free parking. Free bus. Twenty

Stowell, Michael

407

White Paper on Factors of Safety  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Following the Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAIB) Report, the "Diaz Team" identified CAIB Report elements with Agency-wide applicability. The "Diaz Report", A Renewed Commitment To Excellence, generated an action to "Review current policies and waivers on safety factors". This document addresses this action.

Raju, Ivatury; Stadler, John; Kramer-White, Jule; Piascik, Robert

2012-01-01

408

The Superintendent as Change Leader  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the authors present Edwin Diaz, superintendent of California's Gilroy Unified School District and discuss the common challenges and strategies among those education leaders who take on--and succeed at--the role of change agent and reformer. When Edwin Diaz became superintendent of California's Gilroy Unified School District in…

Portis, Carrie; Garcia, Mary W.

2007-01-01

409

Einfuhrungsveranstaltung Themen fur Labor-, Bachelor-und Masterarbeiten  

E-print Network

in Social Media (Laborprojekt oder Bachelor-/Masterarbeit) Kontakt: alrifai@L3S.de FG Wissensbasierte;Ernesto Diaz-Aviles Big Data Visualization from Social Media Streams (Master/Bachelor) Violence Detection Mining Competition in Kaggle (Labor Web-Technologien) Kontakt: diaz@L3S.de FG Wissensbasierte Systeme

Nejdl, Wolfgang

410

Ecological Impacts: Oceans Under-studied Oceans  

E-print Network

;Global hypoxic zones Diaz & Rosenberg, 2008 #12;Growing numbers of dead zones Diaz & Rosenberg, 2008 #12 in creating hypoxic zones) Algae can be toxic ­ causing massive fish kills, as well as affecting birds Exercise Exercise 30 Sec Air 12HourSurvivalRate (percent) 0 20 40 60 80 100 Ferguson and Tufts 1992 CJFAS

Schweik, Charles M.

411

Primeros registros de helmintos parásitos en Fulica ardesiaca (Aves: Rallidae) para el Perú : Pantanos de Villa - Lima First record of helminth parasites in Fulica ardesiaca (Aves: Rallidae) from Peru: Pantanos de Villa - Lima  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two trematodes and one cestode of Fulica ardesiaca from Pantanos de Villa, Lima, Peru are registered at first time. Total of 698 parasites were counted, 529 individuals of Notocotylus pacifera, 149 individuals of Psilostomum sp. and 20 individuals of Diorchis Americana. This work is the first report in F. ardesiaca from Peru; while Psilostomum sp. and D. americana are first

Gisella Guillén; Elizabeth Morales

412

A assembléia de aves de áreas úmidas em dois sistemas de cultivo de arroz irrigado no extremo sul do Brasil  

Microsoft Academic Search

The wetland bird assemblage in two irrigated rice fields in southern Brazil. Seventeen wetland bird counts were conducted from November 1998 to March 1999 in two 52 ha rice paddies using no-tillage and \\

Rafael A. Dias; Maria Inês Burger

413

Petasiger islandicus n. sp. (Digenea: Echinostomatidae) in the horned grebe Podiceps auritus (L.) (Aves: Podicipedidae) from Iceland.  

PubMed

Petasiger islandicus n. sp. is described and figured from a demographically isolated population of the horned grebe Podiceps auritus auritus (L.) in Lake Mývatn (Iceland). This new species belongs to the group of species with 19 collar spines which possess a large elongate-oval cirrus-sac, well-developed pars prostatica and massive bulb-like cirrus. Within this group, P. islandicus appears most similar to P. oschmarini Kostadinova & Gibson, 1998, a form with similar body dimensions described from the same host, but differs in having a larger head collar, collar spines, oral sucker, pharynx, testes and sucker-width ratio, and a smaller cirrus-sac, cirrus and eggs. Two Nearctic species resemble P. islandicus in general morphology but differ as follows: P. pseudoneocomense Bravo-Hollis, 1969 has a larger body and collar width, notably shorter collar spines, smaller testes and sucker-width ratio, and a shorter but much wider cirrus-sac which is also smaller relative to the ventral sucker and almost entirely anterior to it; and P. caribbensis Nassi, 1980 has a smaller body, shorter collar spines and a seminal vesicle which is small in relation to the cirrus-sac, vitelline fields reaching anteriorly to the level of the genital pore and the intestinal bifurcation is located more anteriorly. PMID:17896189

Kostadinova, Aneta; Skirnisson, Karl

2007-11-01

414

Petasiger islandicus n. sp. (Digenea: Echinostomatidae) in the horned grebe Podiceps auritus (L.) (Aves: Podicipedidae) from Iceland  

Microsoft Academic Search

Petasiger islandicus n. sp. is described and figured from a demographically isolated popula- tion of the horned grebe Podiceps auritus auritus (L.) in Lake Myvatn (Iceland). This new species belongs to the group of species with 19 collar spines which possess a large elongate-oval cirrus-sac, well- developed pars prostatica and massive bulb-like cirrus. Within this group, P. islandicus appears most

Aneta Kostadinova; Karl Skirnisson

2007-01-01

415

Cestode communities in non-breeding populations of four grebe species (Aves: Podicipedidae) from the Bulgarian Black Sea coast.  

PubMed

Cestode communities in Podiceps cristatus, P. grisegena, P. nigricollis and Tachybaptus ruficollis during their migrations and overwintering are studied at the Bulgarian Black Sea coast. The infracommunities exhibit high richness, abundance and dominance, and low diversity and similarity. The component communities have a similar taxonomic structure at the levels higher than species, a small number of core species and a high portion of grebe specialists in the richness and abundance. The comparison with cestode communities in grebes from Canada (Stock & Holmes, 1987) reveals several differences and similarities. The higher richness and abundance of the infracommunities in Canada are explained by the constant conditions of breeding habitats enhancing higher transmission rates. At the component community level, there is a significant difference between the two species lists. The degree of parasite exchange among the grebe species in Bulgaria is lower. Several characters of cestode component communities in grebes do not depend on either historical factors or different habitats. These are the similar patterns of the taxonomic structure at the levels higher than species, almost the same list of generalists, the participation of specialists of anatids, and the leading role of grebe specialists in the structure. PMID:10511974

Vasileva, G P; Georgiev, B B

1999-09-01

416

Redescription of Decorataria decorata (Spirurida, Acuariidae) based on nematodes from Podiceps cristatus and P. grisegena (Aves, Podicipediformes) from Bulgaria  

Microsoft Academic Search

Decorataria decorata (Cram, 1927) is redescribed on the basis of light-microscopy and SEM observations on specimens collected from the stomach\\u000a of Podiceps cristatus and P. grisegena from Bulgaria. The SEM study revealed the presence of a porebearing field on each pseudolabium and a pair of spines (one\\u000a dorsal and one ventral) situated between bases of the cordons. The deirids are

Yasen Mutafchiev; Boyko B. Georgiev

2008-01-01

417

Two new quill mite species of the family Syringophilidae (Acari: Prostigmata) parasitising the house sparrow Passer domesticus (L.) (Aves: Passeriformes).  

PubMed

Two new quill mite species of the family Syringophilidae, Picobia passeri sp. nov. and Krantziaulonastus dubinini sp. nov., are described from quills of the body feathers of the house sparrow Passer domesticus (L.) (Passeriformes: Passeridae) from the European part of Russia. PMID:24870896

Skoracki, Maciej; Sikora, Bozena

2014-01-01

418

RIQUEZA Y DIVERSIDAD DE ESPECIES DE AVES EN UNA SELVA MEDIANA SUBPERENNIFOLIA EN EL CENTRO DE VERACRUZ, MÉXICO  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report the richness and diversity of bird species in three different areas (pasture, regenerating forest and mature forest) in Semievergreen forest from central Veracruz, Mexico. Out of the 171 bird species observed, 45% are abundant, 35% are scarce, and 35% rare; 112 species are permanent residents and 59 migratory species. In the regenerating forest 126 species were observed, as

José Cruz; BOJORGES BAÑOS; Lauro LÓPEZ-MATA

419

Characterization of chromosome structures of Falconinae (Falconidae, Falconiformes, Aves) by chromosome painting and delineation of chromosome rearrangements during their differentiation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Karyotypes of most bird species are characterized by around 2n = 80 chromosomes, comprising 7–10 pairs of large- and medium-sized\\u000a macrochromosomes including sex chromosomes and numerous morphologically indistinguishable microchromosomes. The Falconinae\\u000a of the Falconiformes has a different karyotype from the typical avian karyotype in low chromosome numbers, little size difference\\u000a between macrochromosomes and a smaller number of microchromosomes. To characterize

Chizuko Nishida; Junko Ishijima; Ayumi Kosaka; Hideyuki Tanabe; Felix A. Habermann; Darren K. Griffin; Yoichi Matsuda

2008-01-01

420

Duval County Extension Office Program Location: 1010 N McDuff Ave, Jacksonville, FL 32254, unless noted  

E-print Network

- 7:30 pm Register http://jaxpubliclibrary.org/financiallyfit/ Teen Financial Essay Contest Win://jaxpubliclibrary.org/financiallyfit/ · December 21 Online submission deadline for Teen Financial Essay Contest, http with nondiscrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital

Florida, University of

421

Duval County Extension Office Program Location: 1010 N McDuff Ave, Jacksonville, FL 32254, unless noted  

E-print Network

- 7:30 pm Register http://jaxpubliclibrary.org/financiallyfit Teen Financial Essay Contest Win://jaxpubliclibrary.org/financiallyfit · December 21 Online submission deadline for Teen Financial Essay Contest, http with nondiscrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital

Jawitz, James W.

422

~ ISPRC, Boston College, Lynch School of Education, Campion 318, 140 Commonwealth Ave., Chestnut Hill, MA 02467 ~ CALL FOR PROPOSALS  

E-print Network

Health ·Racism ·Assessment and Treatment ·Prevention ·Trauma ·Discrimination ·Public Health ·Public White people--beginning early in childhood-- are socialized to believe that if they enjoy benefits

Huang, Jianyu

423

Latitudinal gradients in abundance, and the causes of rarity in the tropics: a test using Australian honeyeaters (Aves: Meliphagidae).  

PubMed

Several studies have uncovered interspecific latitudinal gradients in abundance (population density) such that tropical species tend to be, on average, less abundant than species at higher latitudes. The causes of this relationship remain poorly studied, in contrast to the relative wealth of literature examining the relationship to latitude of other variables such as range size and body mass. We used a cross-species phylogenetic comparative approach and a spatial approach to examine three potential determining factors (distribution, reproductive output and climate) that might explain why abundance correlates with latitude, using data from 54 species of honeyeaters (Meliphagidae) in woodland environments in eastern Australia. There is a strong positive correlation between mean abundance and latitude in these birds. Reproductive output (clutch size) was positively linked to both abundance and latitude, but partial correlation analysis revealed that clutch size is not related to abundance once the effects of latitude are removed. A subsequent multiple regression model that also considered range size, clutch size and body mass showed that latitude is the only strong predictor of abundance in honeyeaters. In the separate spatial analysis, the climatic variables that we considered (temperature, rainfall and seasonality) were all strongly linked to latitude, but none served as a better predictor of abundance than latitude per se, either individually or collectively. The most intriguing result of our analyses was that the cross-species latitudinal pattern in abundance was not evident within species. This suggests an intrinsic cause of the pattern of 'rarity in the tropics' in Australian honeyeaters. We suggest that evolutionary age may provide a key to understanding patterns of abundance in these birds. PMID:16736183

Symonds, Matthew R E; Christidis, Les; Johnson, Christopher N

2006-09-01

424

ROEDORES EN LA DIETA DE DOS AVES RAPACES NOCTURNAS (BUBO VIRGINIANUS Y TYTO ALBA) EN EL NORESTE DE DURANGO, MÉXICO  

Microsoft Academic Search

We studied the diet of two species of owls, and assessed the rodents communities and their relative densities from March 1996 through February 1997 in the Mapimí Biosphere Reserve, Durango, México: Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus) and Barn Owl (Tyto alba). The objectives were to understand the predator-prey relationships by comparing the availability and use of rodents by these owls.

Elizabeth E. ARAGÓN; Benjamín CASTILLO; Alfredo GARZA

425

A Review of the Australian Fossil Storks of the Genus Ciconia (Aves: Ciconiidae), With the Description of a New Species  

Microsoft Academic Search

Only a single species of stork, the Black-necked Stork Ephippiorhynchus (= Xenorhynchus) asiaticus, occurs in Australia today, and is known from several fossil localities from the Early Pliocene. Two species of smaller fossil storks are also known, one previously named and one described here. The former, found in the Darling Downs, southeastern Queensland, was named Xenorhynchus nanus De Vis, 1888.

WALTER E. BOLES

2005-01-01

426

Phylogeography of the Variable Dwarf-Kingfisher Ceyx lepidus (Aves: Alcedinidae) Inferred from Mitochondrial and Nuclear DNA Sequences  

E-print Network

- plars for ornithologists and biogeographers studying evolutionary processes that lead to geographic partitioning of biological diver- sity on islands (Mayr and Diamond ????). The Variable Dwarf-Kingfisher (Ceyx lepidus) is another widespread.... melanurus based on plumage characters. More recently, studies using molecular recognized subspecies (Fry et al. ????, Woodall ????, Clements et al. ????). Indeed, within its more limited distribution, C. lepi- dus is nearly as diverse as the more...

Anderson, Michael J.; Oliveros, Carl Hirang; Filardi, Christopher E.; Moyle, Robert G.

2013-01-01

427

Calamicoptes anatidus sp. nov., a new quill wall mite (Acari: Laminosioptidae) from the Greater Scaup Aythya marila (L.) (Aves: Anseriformes).  

PubMed

Calamicoptes anatidus sp. nov., a new species of rarely found parasitic mites of the family Laminosioptidae (Acari: Astigmata) is described from quill walls of wing covert feathers of Aythya marila Linnaeus (Anseriformes: Anatidae) captured in Poland. This is the first record of the family Laminosioptidae on birds of the order Anseriformes and the first record of this mite family in the fauna of Poland. Females of the new species are most similar to those of C. arenariae Lombert, Gaud et Lukoschus, 1984 and differ from them by the presence of the pygidial shield, which covers dorsal and ventro-lateral parts of the opisthosoma, and by having setae c2 and d2 short and subequal in length, and setae se and cp not reaching the metapodonotal shield. PMID:25119356

Skoracki, Maciej; Kavetska, Katarzyna; Ozminski, Micha?; Zawierucha, Krzysztof

2014-09-01

428

Evolutionary concepts meet the neck of penguins (Aves: Sphenisciformes), towards a "survival strategy" for evo-devo.  

PubMed

Evolutionary developmental biology (or evo-devo) is the scientific connectivity that allowed a more comprehensive and practical completeness in the contemporary conceptualisation of evolution. The links between genetics, developmental mechanics and evolution led to a better understanding of evolutionary mechanisms. An analysis of evolutionary concepts such as homology, homeoses, constraints, novelties, modularity, and selection is given through the recurring example of the variations identified in the modular repartition of the cervical vertebrae in extant and fossil penguins. The inclusion of this study about penguins in the evolutionary system also involves a reflection on the current state and the future of evo-devo. Three principles of assessment and method, applicable to many natural and conceptual scales, are introduced to define a "survival strategy" for evo-devo. The above-mentioned principles are intended to strengthen and continue the connectivity induced de facto. These current and future investigation challenges are discussed and connected to three main naturalist names related directly to the conceptualisation of evolution: Charles Darwin, Étienne Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire, and Lamarck. PMID:22890499

Guinard, Geoffrey

2012-12-01

429

A comprehensive multilocus phylogeny for the wood-warblers and a revised classification of the Parulidae (Aves)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The birds in the family Parulidae-commonly termed the New World warblers or wood-warblers-are a classic model radiation for studies of ecological and behavioral differentiation. Although the monophyly of a 'core' wood-warbler clade is well established, no phylogenetic hypothesis for this group has included a full sampling of wood-warbler species diversity. We used parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian methods to reconstruct relationships among all genera and nearly all wood-warbler species, based on a matrix of mitochondrial DNA (5840 nucleotides) and nuclear DNA (6 loci, 4602 nucleotides) characters. The resulting phylogenetic hypotheses provide a highly congruent picture of wood-warbler relationships, and indicate that the traditional generic classification of these birds recognizes many non-monophyletic groups. We recommend a revised taxonomy in which each of 14 genera (Seiurus, Helmitheros, Mniotilta, Limnothlypis, Protonotaria, Parkesia, Vermivora, Oreothlypis, Geothlypis, Setophaga, Myioborus, Cardellina, Basileuterus, Myiothlypis) corresponds to a well-supported clade; these nomenclatural changes also involve subsuming a number of well-known, traditional wood-warbler genera (Catharopeza, Dendroica, Ergaticus, Euthlypis, Leucopeza, Oporornis, Parula, Phaeothlypis, Wilsonia). We provide a summary phylogenetic hypothesis that will be broadly applicable to investigations of the historical biogeography, processes of diversification, and evolution of trait variation in this well studied avian group. ?? 2010 Elsevier Inc.

Lovette, I.J.; Perez-Eman, J. L.; Sullivan, J.P.; Banks, R.C.; Fiorentino, I.; Cordoba-Cordoba, S.; Echeverry-Galvis, M.; Barker, F.K.; Burns, K.J.; Klicka, J.; Lanyon, S.M.; Bermingham, E.

2010-01-01

430

Two new species of the feather mite genus Analloptes (Trouessart, 1885) Acariformes: Astigmata: Xolalgidae) from passerines (Aves: Passeriformes) in Brazil.  

PubMed

Two new feather mite species of the genus Analloptes Trouessart, 1885 (Acariformes: Xolalgidae) are described from suboscine passerines (Passeriformes) in Brazil: Analloptes giganteus sp. n. from Conopophaga lineata (Wied) (Conopophagidae) and A. cnemotricci sp. n. from Cnemotriccus fuscatus (Wied) (Tyrannidae). These are the first Analloptes species described from passerine hosts. Within the genus Analloptes, the two described species constitute a distinct species group characterized by the presence of setae ve and c1 in both sexes and by having the paragenital apodeme free from coxal structures in males. PMID:25544285

Mironov, Sergey; Hernandes, Fabio Akashi

2014-01-01

431

Full mitochondrial genome sequences of two endemic Philippine hornbill species (Aves: Bucerotidae) provide evidence for pervasive mitochondrial DNA recombination  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Although nowaday it is broadly accepted that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) may undergo recombination, the frequency of such recombination remains controversial. Its estimation is not straightforward, as recombination under homoplasmy (i.e., among identical mt genomes) is likely to be overlooked. In species with tandem duplications of large mtDNA fragments the detection of recombination can be facilitated, as it can lead

Svenja Sammler; Christoph Bleidorn; Ralph Tiedemann

2011-01-01

432

Full mitochondrial genome sequences of two endemic Philippine hornbill species (Aves: Bucerotidae) provide evidence for pervasive mitochondrial DNA recombination  

PubMed Central

Background Although nowaday it is broadly accepted that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) may undergo recombination, the frequency of such recombination remains controversial. Its estimation is not straightforward, as recombination under homoplasmy (i.e., among identical mt genomes) is likely to be overlooked. In species with tandem duplications of large mtDNA fragments the detection of recombination can be facilitated, as it can lead to gene conversion among duplicates. Although the mechanisms for concerted evolution in mtDNA are not fully understood yet, recombination rates have been estimated from "one per speciation event" down to 850 years or even "during every replication cycle". Results Here we present the first complete mt genome of the avian family Bucerotidae, i.e., that of two Philippine hornbills, Aceros waldeni and Penelopides panini. The mt genomes are characterized by a tandemly duplicated region encompassing part of cytochrome b, 3 tRNAs, NADH6, and the control region. The duplicated fragments are identical to each other except for a short section in domain I and for the length of repeat motifs in domain III of the control region. Due to the heteroplasmy with regard to the number of these repeat motifs, there is some size variation in both genomes; with around 21,657 bp (A. waldeni) and 22,737 bp (P. panini), they significantly exceed the hitherto longest known avian mt genomes, that of the albatrosses. We discovered concerted evolution between the duplicated fragments within individuals. The existence of differences between individuals in coding genes as well as in the control region, which are maintained between duplicates, indicates that recombination apparently occurs frequently, i.e., in every generation. Conclusions The homogenised duplicates are interspersed by a short fragment which shows no sign of recombination. We hypothesize that this region corresponds to the so-called Replication Fork Barrier (RFB), which has been described from the chicken mitochondrial genome. As this RFB is supposed to halt replication, it offers a potential mechanistic explanation for frequent recombination in mitochondrial genomes. PMID:21235758

2011-01-01

433

High prevalence of haemosporidian parasites infection in southern grey shrike Lanius meridionalis (Laniidae, Aves) from agricultural areas  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present the first data on prevalence of haematozoa in Southern grey shrikes Lanius meridionalis (Temminck) in agricultural areas of western Spain. A fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene of the parasite was amplified, using a nested PCR assay from blood sample. Of the 81 shrikes analysed, 65.4% showed infection with Haemoproteus (Kruse, 1890) while neither Leucocytozoon (Berestneff, 1904)

P. Casanueva; M. Fernández; M. Ángeles Rojo; F. Campos

2012-01-01

434

Comparative tissue distribution of heavy metals in house sparrow (Passer domesticus, Aves) in polluted and reference sites in Turkey.  

PubMed

Bioindicators are useful for environmental monitoring in ecosystems with pollution loads. We compared concentrations of selected 10 metals in 42 samples of House Sparrow in a polluted by thermal power plant and reference sites. We found mean tissue concentrations of some metals to be significantly higher in sparrows from the polluted area when compared to tissues from the reference site. In liver mean concentrations of Cu (35.85 ± 17.22 mg kg(-1)) and Zn (101.76 ± 26.38 mg kg(-1)) were significantly higher and concentration of Ni (0.43 ± 0.49 mg kg(-1)) were significantly lower in sparrows from the polluted area (p<0.05). The concentration of Cu was significantly higher in muscle and liver at the polluted site. Gender did not seem to influence residue levels, of the elements studied, among sparrows with the exception of kidney cobalt concentrations; which were higher in female sparrows than in males (p<0.05, t=-2.409). PMID:21785879

Albayrak, Tamer; Mor, Firdevs

2011-10-01

435

A re-evaluation of phylogenetic relationships within reed warblers (Aves: Acrocephalidae) based on eight molecular loci and ISSR profiles.  

PubMed

Acrocephalidae is the most monomorphic family among passerines and has seen a long history of different classifications and successive revisions. In this study, we evaluated the phylogenetic relationships among 35 species of Acrocephalidae based on DNA sequences from five nuclear loci (MB, ODC, LDH, FIB5 and RAG-1), three mitochondrial genes (CYB, ND2 and COI) and genomic fingerprinting with ISSR-PCR. We could improve the resolution of phylogenetic relationships among many species, but despite the use of 6280 nucleotides, some deep-level relationships remain enigmatic. Lack of nodal support at some branches may be the result of rapid radiation. The last common ancestor of this family dated for the Middle Miocene (14 MYA). In agreement with previous studies, we recovered the major clades of Acrocephalus, Iduna (except I. aedon), Hippolais, Nesillas and Calamonastides. We accept the current taxonomic position of Calamonastides gracilirostris as a monotypic genus and the inclusion of Iduna natalensis and I. similis within Iduna but phylogenetic analyses based on mitochondrial and nuclear genes as well as ISSR profiles did not support the position of I. aedon in Iduna. Therefore, we resurrect the former genus Phragamaticola for this species in order to avoid paraphyletic clades. PMID:24910156

Arbabi, Tayebeh; Gonzalez, Javier; Wink, Michael

2014-09-01

436

Anna G. Stefanopoulou Mechanical Engineering Dept, University of Michigan, 1231 Beal Ave, Ann Arbor MI 48109-2121  

E-print Network

Science, University of Michigan, 1994. M.S. Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering, University of Michigan, 1992 Diploma Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering, National Technical University of Athens

Stefanopoulou, Anna

437

Impact of Forpus xanthopterygius (Spix, 1824) (Aves, Psittacidae) on flowers of Handroanthus serratifolius (Vahl.) S. O. Grose (Bignoniaceae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Handroanthus serratifolius produces flowers during the dry season in the Cerrado biome, and it may be an important food source to some bird species. For Psittacidae species, like Forpus xanthopterygius, flowers are important in their diet. This study intended to characterize the behavior of F. xanthopterygius and evaluate the damage to the flowering and in the reproduction of H. serratifolius.

A. D. Oliveira; C. A. Borges; G. Ribeiro; J. Tavares

2009-01-01

438

New species of the feather mite genus Protolichus Trouessart, 1884 (Astigmata, Pterolichidae) from lories and lorikeets (Aves: Psittaciformes).  

PubMed

Five new species of the feather mite genus Protolichus Trouessart, 1884 (Astigmata, Pterolichidae) are described from parrots of the subfamily Loriinae (Psittaciformes: Psittacidae): Protolichus ornatus sp. n. from Trichoglossus ornatus (Linnaeus, 1758), P. lorinus sp. n. from Lorius lory (Linnaeus, 1758), P. placentis sp. n. from Charmosyna placentis (Temminck, 1835), P. pulchellae sp. n. from C. pulchella (Gray GR, 1859), and P. rubiginosus sp. n. from T. rubiginosus (Bonaparte, 1850). Protolichus ornatus belongs to the brachiatus species group; the other new species belong to the crassior species group. PMID:24871411

Mironov, Sergey V; Ehrnsberger, Rainer; Dabert, Jacek

2014-01-01

439

Species in the genus Rhytidelasma Gaud (Acarina: Pterolichidae) from the Green Conure, Aratinga holochlora (Sclater) (Aves: Psittacidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three species in the genus Rhytidelasma Gaud (Pterolichoidea: Pterolichidae) are known from the Green Conure, Aratinga holochlora (Sclater): R. cornigera n. sp., R. urophila n. sp. and R. mesomexicana Atyeo et al. The new species are described, and the microhabitat(s) for each species discussed.

W. T. Atyeo; T. M. Pérez

1988-01-01

440

Nymphs of the feather mite genus Distigmesikya Atyeo et al. (Acarina, Pterolichidae) from New World parrots (Aves, Psittacidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Scanning electron micrographs illustrate bizarre idiosomal modifications of nymphs of Distigmesikya Atyeo et al. (Pterolichoidea, Pterolichidae) from New World parrots. The dorsal, lateral and sublateral teguments are spinose, and most dorsal idiosomal setae are large and bi- or trifurcate.

Warren T. Atyeo; Tilia M. Pérez

1987-01-01

441

Aralichus porrectus (Mégnin & Trouessart) and related feather mite species (Acarina, Pterolichidae) from parrots of the genus Brotogeris Vigors (Aves, Psittacidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

A species complex of the large genus Aralichus Gaud (Pterolichoidea, Pterolichidae) is restricted to Central and South American parrots of the genus Brotogeris Vigors. Aralichus porrectus (Mégnin & Trouessart) from Brotogeris jugularis (Müller) is redescribed, and five new species are described: A. chrysopteri from B. chrysopterus (L.), A. cyanopterae from B. cyanoptera (Salvadori), A. crassisetosus and A. sanctithomae from B.

Warren T. Atyeo

1989-01-01

442

New information on the anatomy of the Chinese Early Cretaceous Bohaiornithidae (Aves: Enantiornithes) from a subadult specimen of Zhouornis hani.  

PubMed

Enantiornithines are the most diverse avian clade in the Cretaceous. However, morphological specializations indicative of specific ecological roles are not well known for this clade. Here we report on an exquisitely well-preserved specimen from the Lower Cretaceous Jehol Group of northeastern China, which pedal morphology is suggestive of a unique ecological specialization within Enantiornithes. The morphology of the new specimen is largely indistinguishable from that of the holotype of the bohaiornithid enantiornithine Zhouornis hani, albeit the latter is somewhat larger. The new specimen provides important and previously unknown details of the skull of Zhouornis hani, which add to the limited knowledge about the cranial anatomy and evolution of enantiornithines. The information offered by the new specimen also augments our understanding of the postcranial morphology of bohaiornithid enantiornithines, a clade that has been only recently recognized. With the description of this specimen, Zhouornis hani becomes one of the most anatomically complete known enantiornithine species, which will facilitate future morphological studies. PMID:24918031

Zhang, Yuguang; O'Connor, Jingmai; Di, Liu; Qingjin, Meng; Sigurdsen, Trond; Chiappe, Luis M

2014-01-01

443

Polyphyly of the hawk genera Leucopternis and Buteogallus (Aves, Accipitridae): multiple habitat shifts during the Neotropical buteonine diversification  

PubMed Central

Background The family Accipitridae (hawks, eagles and Old World vultures) represents a large radiation of predatory birds with an almost global distribution, although most species of this family occur in the Neotropics. Despite great morphological and ecological diversity, the evolutionary relationships in the family have been poorly explored at all taxonomic levels. Using sequences from four mitochondrial genes (12S, ATP8, ATP6, and ND6), we reconstructed the phylogeny of the Neotropical forest hawk genus Leucopternis and most of the allied genera of Neotropical buteonines. Our goals were to infer the evolutionary relationships among species of Leucopternis, estimate their relationships to other buteonine genera, evaluate the phylogenetic significance of the white and black plumage patterns common to most Leucopternis species, and assess general patterns of diversification of the group with respect to species' affiliations with Neotropical regions and habitats. Results Our molecular phylogeny for the genus Leucopternis and its allies disagrees sharply with traditional taxonomic arrangements for the group, and we present new hypotheses of relationships for a number of species. The mtDNA phylogenetic trees derived from analysis of the combined data posit a polyphyletic relationship among species of Leucopternis, Buteogallus and Buteo. Three highly supported clades containing Leucopternis species were recovered in our phylogenetic reconstructions. The first clade consisted of the sister pairs L. lacernulatus and Buteogallus meridionalis, and Buteogallus urubitinga and Harpyhaliaetus coronatus, in addition to L. schistaceus and L. plumbeus. The second clade included the sister pair Leucopternis albicollis and L. occidentalis as well as L. polionotus. The third lineage comprised the sister pair L. melanops and L. kuhli, in addition to L. semiplumbeus and Buteo buteo. According to our results, the white and black plumage patterns have evolved at least twice in the group. Furthermore, species found to the east and west of the Andes (cis-Andean and trans-Andean, respectively) are not reciprocally monophyletic, nor are forest and non-forest species. Conclusion The polyphyly of Leucopternis, Buteogallus and Buteo establishes a lack of concordance of current Accipitridae taxonomy with the mtDNA phylogeny for the group, and points to the need for further phylogenetic analysis at all taxonomic levels in the family as also suggested by other recent analyses. Habitat shifts, as well as cis- and trans-Andean disjunctions, took place more than once during buteonine diversification in the Neotropical region. Overemphasis of the black and white plumage patterns has led to questionable conclusions regarding the relationships of Leucopternis species, and suggests more generally that plumage characters should be used with considerable caution in the taxonomic evaluation of the Accipitridae. PMID:16464261

do Amaral, Fabio S Raposo; Miller, Matthew J; Silveira, Luís Fábio; Bermingham, Eldredge; Wajntal, Anita

2006-01-01

444

Aromatase expression in the brain of the ruffed grouse (Bonasa umbellus) and comparisons with other galliform birds (Aves, Galliformes).  

PubMed

The enzyme aromatase is important for regulating sexual and aggressive behaviors during the reproductive season, including many aspects of courtship. In birds, aromatase is expressed at high levels in a number of different brain regions. Although this expression does vary among species, the extent to which the distribution of aromatase positive cells reflects species differences in courtship and other behaviors is not well established. Here, we examine the distribution of aromatase immunoreactive (ARO) neurons in the brain of a species with a unique courtship display, the ruffed grouse (Bonasa umbellus). Unlike most other galliforms, male ruffed grouse do not vocalize as part of their courtship and instead use their wings to create a non-vocal auditory signal to attract females. Because aromatase is involved in courtship behaviors in several bird species, including other galliforms, we hypothesized that aromatase distribution in the ruffed grouse would differ from that of other galliforms. We used an antibody raised against quail aromatase to examine aromatase immunoreactivity in the ruffed grouse, the closely related spruce grouse (Falcipennis canadensis) and the Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica). In all three species, ARO neurons were identified in the medial preoptic nucleus, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and the nucleus ventromedialis hypothalami. Both grouse species had ARO neurons in two regions of the telencephalon, the hyperpallium, and entopallium, and the ruffed grouse also in field L. ARO neurons were only found in one region in the telencephalon of the Japanese quail, the septum. In general, breeding male ruffed grouse had significantly more ARO neurons and those neurons were larger than that of both the non-breeding male and female ruffed grouse. Aromatase expression in the telencephalon of the ruffed grouse suggests that steroid hormones might modulate responses to visual and acoustic stimuli, but how this relates to species differences in courtship displays and co-expression with estrogenic receptors is yet to be determined. PMID:23266340

Corfield, Jeremy R; Harada, Nobuhiro; Iwaniuk, Andrew N

2013-01-01

445

Petrophysical evidence for the nature of vertical permeability barriers: Temple Ave. Fault, Wilmington Oil Field, Long Beach, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Temple Avenue fault is a north-trending east-dipping normal fault that dissects the north flank of the Wilmington anticline in the Wilmington Oil field. The fault involves sediments of the Repetto Formation (lower Pliocene) and the Puente Formation (upper Miocene). Oil\\/water contact structural maps indicate that the fault acts as a permeability barrier. Well B-756-I was drilled across the Temple

H. Camacho; J. C. Sample

1996-01-01

446

Richard J. Wurtman, MD Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, 77Mass Ave.,  

E-print Network

levels enough to promote optimal synaptogenesis. In Alzheimer's disease (AD) the need for extra monophosphate [UMP]; Alzheimer's disease; neurodegenerative diseases 1. Introduction The recognition Alzheimer's disease [5], a mixture containing the three nutrients plus others that enhance their efficacy

Wurtman, Richard

447

Morphology of the shoulder musculature of the American kestrel, Falco sparverius (Aves), with implications for gliding flight  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary The shoulder morphology of the American kestrel,Falco sparverius, was dissected with an emphasis on the morphological requirements for gliding flight. Kestrels are being used as a model for the study of gliding flight in a non-specialized gliding bird. The kestrel forelimb is relatively generalized in its construction, and does not appear to have any remarkable specializations for gliding. However,

Ron A. Meyers

1992-01-01

448

5841 S. Maryland Ave., Rm. L035, MC 0077, Chicago, Illinois 60637 Toll Free: (888) UC GENES (888) 824 3637  

E-print Network

for Wilson disease? Wilson disease (WD) is caused by a change in someone's DNA. People with WD can have liver to three main types of symptoms: · Liver problems­jaundice, hepatitis, cirrhosis, enlarged liver problems­depression, mood changes, personality changes, and psychosis Kayser-Fleischer rings are copper

Das, Soma

449

Phylogeographical evidence of gene flow among Common Crossbill (Loxia curvirostra, Aves, Fringillidae) populations at the continental level  

Microsoft Academic Search

Common Crossbill subspecies have been described according to morphological traits, vocalizations and geographical distribution. In this study, we have tried to determine whether the subspecies correspond to clear-cut mitochondrial DNA lineages, by sequencing 717 bp of the control region from individuals taken at several sampling locations in North America and the Western Palaearctic. We find 22 haplotypes from the 37

Sophie Questiau; Ludovic Gielly; Michel Clouet; Pierre Taberlet

1999-01-01

450

Phylogeographical evidence of gene flow among common crossbill (Loxia curvirostra, aves, fringillidae) populations at the continental level  

PubMed

Common Crossbill subspecies have been described according to morphological traits, vocalizations and geographical distribution. In this study, we have tried to determine whether the subspecies correspond to clear-cut mitochondrial DNA lineages, by sequencing 717 bp of the control region from individuals taken at several sampling locations in North America and the Western Palaearctic. We find 22 haplotypes from the 37 sampled individuals with a mean divergence of 0.0118 +/- 0.0069 (mean +/- SD). We find a mixing of the mitochondrial haplotypes at the continental level among the different types or subspecies previously described. Morphological differentiation (in bill size and shape essentially) shows the possibility of rapid local adaptation to fluctuating resources (coniferous seeds), without necessarily promoting the development of reproductive barriers between morphs. PMID:10469208

Questiau; Gielly; Clouet; Taberlet

1999-08-01

451

Global Programs and Strategy Alliance 100 University International Center 331 -17th Ave SE Minneapolis, MN 55414  

E-print Network

/12 International Travel Risk Assessment & Advisory Committee Dean's Endorsement Form Students: This form. Student's Name Student ID # Anticipated Travel Dates MM/DD/YYYY - MM/DD/YYYY College/School Major-mandated application to travel to a country on the U.S. Department of State's Travel Warning list. More details at http://global.umn.edu/travel

Amin, S. Massoud

452

Higher-order phylogeny of modern birds (Theropoda, Aves: Neornithes) based on comparative anatomy. II. Analysis and discussion  

PubMed Central

In recent years, avian systematics has been characterized by a diminished reliance on morphological cladistics of modern taxa, intensive palaeornithogical research stimulated by new discoveries and an inundation by analyses based on DNA sequences. Unfortunately, in contrast to significant insights into basal origins, the broad picture of neornithine phylogeny remains largely unresolved. Morphological studies have emphasized characters of use in palaeontological contexts. Molecular studies, following disillusionment with the pioneering, but non-cladistic, work of Sibley and Ahlquist, have differed markedly from each other and from morphological works in both methods and findings. Consequently, at the turn of the millennium, points of robust agreement among schools concerning higher-order neornithine phylogeny have been limited to the two basalmost and several mid-level, primary groups. This paper describes a phylogenetic (cladistic) analysis of 150 taxa of Neornithes, including exemplars from all non-passeriform families, and subordinal representatives of Passeriformes. Thirty-five outgroup taxa encompassing Crocodylia, predominately theropod Dinosauria, and selected Mesozoic birds were used to root the trees. Based on study of specimens and the literature, 2954 morphological characters were defined; these characters have been described in a companion work, approximately one-third of which were multistate (i.e. comprised at least three states), and states within more than one-half of these multistate characters were ordered for analysis. Complete heuristic searches using 10 000 random-addition replicates recovered a total solution set of 97 well-resolved, most-parsimonious trees (MPTs). The set of MPTs was confirmed by an expanded heuristic search based on 10 000 random-addition replicates and a full ratchet-augmented exploration to ascertain global optima. A strict consensus tree of MPTs included only six trichotomies, i.e. nodes differing topologically among MPTs. Bootstrapping (based on 10 000 replicates) percentages and ratchet-minimized support (Bremer) indices indicated most nodes to be robust. Several fossil Neornithes (e.g. Dinornithiformes, Aepyornithiformes) were placed within the ingroup a posteriori either through unconstrained, heursitic searches based on the complete matrix augmented by these taxa separately or using backbone-constraints. Analysis confirmed the topology among outgroup Theropoda and achieved robust resolution at virtually all levels of the Neornithes. Findings included monophyly of the palaeognathous birds, comprising the sister taxa Tinamiformes and ratites, respectively, and the Anseriformes and Galliformes as monophyletic sister-groups, together forming the sister-group to other Neornithes exclusive of the Palaeognathae (Neoaves). Noteworthy inferences include: (i) the sister-group to remaining Neoaves comprises a diversity of marine and wading birds; (ii) Podicipedidae are the sister-group of Gaviidae, and not closely related to the Phoenicopteridae, as recently suggested; (iii) the traditional Pelecaniformes, including the shoebill (Balaeniceps rex) as sister-taxon to other members, are monophyletic; (iv) traditional Ciconiiformes are monophyletic; (v) Strigiformes and Falconiformes are sister-groups; (vi) Cathartidae is the sister-group of the remaining Falconiformes; (vii) Ralliformes (Rallidae and Heliornithidae) are the sister-group to the monophyletic Charadriiformes, with the traditionally composed Gruiformes and Turniciformes (Turnicidae and Mesitornithidae) sequentially paraphyletic to the entire foregoing clade; (viii) Opisthocomus hoazin is the sister-taxon to the Cuculiformes (including the Musophagidae); (ix) traditional Caprimulgiformes are monophyletic and the sister-group of the Apodiformes; (x) Trogoniformes are the sister-group of Coliiformes; (xi) Coraciiformes, Piciformes and Passeriformes are mutually monophyletic and closely related; and (xii) the Galbulae are retained within the Piciformes. Unresolved portions of the Neornithes (nodes having more than one most-parsi

LIVEZEY, BRADLEY C; ZUSI, RICHARD L

2007-01-01

453

Seasonal and age-related changes in blood parasite prevalence in dark-eyed juncos (Junco hyemalis, Aves, Passeriformes)  

Microsoft Academic Search

We determined seasonal changes in blood parasite infections in a free-living popu- lation of Dark-eyed Juncos (Junco hyemalis) breeding in interior Alaska (65 °N; 148 °W). The common parasites found in blood smears were Leucocytozoon fringillinarum (56%), Trypanosoma avium (33%), and Haemoproteus fringillae (9%). In males, parasite prevalences were relatively high at arrival on breeding grounds and increased during the

Pierre Deviche; Ellis C. Greiner; Xavier Manteca

2001-01-01

454

Seasonal and age-related changes in blood parasite prevalence in Dark-eyed Juncos (Junco hyemalis, Aves, Passeriformes).  

PubMed

We determined seasonal changes in blood parasite infections in a free-living population of Dark-eyed Juncos (Junco hyemalis) breeding in interior Alaska (65 degrees N; 148 degrees W). The common parasites found in blood smears were Leucocytozoon fringillinarum (56%), Trypanosoma avium (33%), and Haemoproteus fringillae (9%). In males, parasite prevalences were relatively high at arrival on breeding grounds and increased during the breeding season. Intensity of infection with Leucocytozoon also increased between spring and summer, and then decreased at the time of migration (September). This decrease did not occur in adult females. Elevated prevalences during the breeding season probably reflected the addition of new cases via vector activity to positive status resulting from spring relapse. We observed neither an association between parasite species nor a consistent relationship between parasite intensity and body condition. To further study relationships between reproductive system activity and parasite infections, we compared prevalences in adult males that were undergoing their first cycle of gonadal development and regression (males in their second calendar year, or SY) with those of older males (males in their third or more calendar year, i.e., after-second-year males or ASY). Circulating testosterone concentrations declined in both groups between arrival on breeding grounds (end of April-early May) and the end of the reproductive period (July), and they were higher in May in ASY than in SY males. At the peak of the breeding season (June), ASY males also had a higher parasite prevalence than SY males. This difference may have resulted from immunosuppressive effects of gonadal hormones and/or from behavioral differences between SY and ASY males such that older males were exposed to more insect vectors than younger males. . PMID:11351333

Deviche, P; Greiner, E C; Manteca, X

2001-06-01

455

Testosterone Affects Reproductive Success by Influencing Extra-Pair Fertilizations in Male Dark-Eyed Juncos (Aves: Junco hyemalis)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Monogamous male birds typically allocate less effort to courtship and more to parental behaviour than males of polygynous species. The seasonal pattern of testosterone (T) secretion varies accordingly. Monogamous males exhibit a spring peak in plasma T followed by lower levels during the parental phase, while males of polygynous species continue to court females and maintain T at higher levels.

Samrrah A. Raouf; Patricia G. Parker; Ellen D. Ketterson; Val Nolan; Charles Ziegenfus

1997-01-01

456

Speciation on oceanic islands: rapid adaptive divergence vs. cryptic speciation in a Guadalupe Island songbird (Aves: Junco).  

PubMed

The evolutionary divergence of island populations, and in particular the tempo and relative importance of neutral and selective factors, is of central interest to the study of speciation. The rate of phenotypic evolution upon island colonization can vary greatly among taxa, and cases of convergent evolution can further confound the inference of correct evolutionary histories. Given the potential lability of phenotypic characters, molecular dating of insular lineages analyzed in a phylogenetic framework provides a critical tool to test hypotheses of phenotypic divergence since colonization. The Guadalupe junco is the only insular form of the polymorphic dark-eyed junco (Junco hyemalis), and shares eye and plumage color with continental morphs, yet presents an enlarged bill and reduced body size. Here we use variation in mtDNA sequence, morphological traits and song variables to test whether the Guadalupe junco evolved rapidly following a recent colonization by a mainland form of the dark-eyed junco, or instead represents a well-differentiated "cryptic" lineage adapted to the insular environment through long-term isolation, with plumage coloration a result of evolutionary convergence. We found high mtDNA divergence of the island lineage with respect to both continental J. hyemalis and J. phaeonotus, representing a history of isolation of about 600,000 years. The island lineage was also significantly differentiated in morphological and male song variables. Moreover, and contrary to predictions regarding diversity loss on small oceanic islands, we document relatively high levels of both haplotypic and song-unit diversity on Guadalupe Island despite long-term isolation in a very small geographic area. In contrast to prevailing taxonomy, the Guadalupe junco is an old, well-differentiated evolutionary lineage, whose similarity to mainland juncos in plumage and eye color is due to evolutionary convergence. Our findings confirm the role of remote islands in driving divergence and speciation, but also their potential role as repositories of ancestral diversity. PMID:23675466

Aleixandre, Pau; Hernández Montoya, Julio; Milá, Borja

2013-01-01

457

Waisman Early Childhood Program Meteors Summer 2014 Program Mailing Address: WECP Meteors, 1500 Highland Ave, Madison WI 53705  

E-print Network

Waisman Early Childhood Program Meteors Summer 2014 Program Mailing Address: WECP Meteors, 1500 children to our Summer Meteor Program. Please help us by providing the following information: Does your fees are due the first of each month. Office ­ Date Received: L: Meteors/Application #12;

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

458

Duval County Extension Office Program Location: 1010 N McDuff Ave, Jacksonville, FL 32254, unless noted  

E-print Network

in Duval County Contact GSchmidt@coj.net for more information Organic Techniques for Vegetable Gardening Organic Techniques for Vegetable Gardening, 6 7 pm, Beaches Emergency Assistance Ministry (BEAM), 850 6 Mandarin Branch Library Register: http://www.jaxpubliclibrary.org/parenting Garden Fest Art in the Garden

Watson, Craig A.

459

Duval County Extension Office Program Location: 1010 N McDuff Ave, Jacksonville, FL 32254, unless noted  

E-print Network

your favorite cook need? This fabulous cookbook features Florida commodities in favorite recipes from Understanding MyPlate) & Health Rocks! December 3 Home & Community Educators' Council Meeting 10 am

Watson, Craig A.

460

DNA evidence for a Paleocene origin of the Alcidae (Aves: Charadriiformes) in the Pacific and multiple dispersals across northern oceans  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Alcidae is a group of marine, wing-propelled diving birds known as auks that are distributed along the coasts of the northern oceans. It has been suggested that auks originated in the Pacific coastal shores as early as the Miocene, and dispersed to the Atlantic either through the Arctic coasts of Eurasia and North America (northern dispersal route), or through

Sergio L. Pereira; Allan J. Baker

2008-01-01

461

Genetic evaluation of the mating system in the blue-and-yellow macaw (Ara ararauna, Aves, Psittacidae) by DNA fingerprinting  

PubMed Central

More than 90% of birds are socially monogamous, although genetic studies indicate that many are often not sexually monogamous. In the present study, DNA fingerprinting was used to estimate the genetic relationships between nestlings belonging to the same broods to evaluate the mating system in the socially monogamous macaw, Ara ararauna. We found that in 10 of 11 broods investigated, the nestlings showed genetic similarity levels congruent with values expected among full-sibs, suggesting that they shared the same parents. However, in one brood, the low genetic similarity observed between nestlings could be a result of intraspecific brood parasitism, intraspecific nest competition or extra-pair paternity. These results, along with available behavioral and life-history data, imply that the blue-and-yellow macaw is not only socially, but also genetically monogamous. However, the occurrence of eventual cases of extra-pair paternity cannot be excluded. PMID:21637560

Caparroz, Renato; Miyaki, Cristina Y.; Baker, Allan J.

2011-01-01

462

Phylogenetic relationships among Synallaxini spinetails (Aves: Furnariidae) reveal a new biogeographic pattern across the Amazon and Paraná river basins.  

PubMed

Relationships among genera in the tribe Synallaxini have proved difficult to resolve. In this study, I investigate relationships among Synallaxis, Certhiaxis and Schoeniophylax using DNA sequences from the mitochondrion and three nuclear regions. I implemented novel primers and protocols for amplifying and sequencing autosomal and sex-linked introns in Furnariidae that resolved basal relationships in the Synallaxini with strong support. Synallaxis propinqua is sister to Schoeniophylax phryganophilus, and together they form a clade with Certhiaxis. The results are robust to analytical approaches when all genomic regions are analyzed jointly (parsimony, maximum likelihood, and species-tree analysis) and the same basal relationships are recovered by most genomic regions when analyzed separately. A sister relationship between S. propinqua, an Amazonian river island specialist, and S. phryganophilus, from the Paraná River basin region, reveals a new biogeographic pattern shared by at least other four pairs of taxa with similar distributions and ecologies. Estimates of divergence times for these five pairs span from the late Miocene to the Pleistocene. Identification of the historical events that produced this pattern is difficult and further advances will require additional studies of the taxa involved and a better understanding of the recent environmental history of South America. A new classification is proposed for the Synallaxini, including the description of a new genus for S. propinqua. PMID:24867462

Claramunt, Santiago

2014-09-01

463

Parking/Carpooling/Busing options for Daniels Recital Hall 811 5th Ave., Seattle, WA 98101 (5th & Marion)  

E-print Network

this garage closes at 7pm on Sunday. Going by Bus: You can park your car at the UW Campus central garage to the map. street map of downtown seattle wa and daniels recital hall - Google Maps http://maps.google

464

NUEVOS REGISTROS DE AVES EN LA PARTE ALTA DE LA SERRANA DE LAS QUINCHAS, MAGDALENA MEDIO, COLOMBIA  

E-print Network

mexicanus, Cyphorhinus phaeocephalus, Coryphospingus pileatus y Cacicus cela. Adicionalmente registramos: Herpetotheres cachinnans, Chaetura brachyura, Dryocopus lineatus y Myrmeciza laemosticta; y conrmamos la, Cyphorhinus phaeocephalus, Coryphospingus pileatus and Cacicus cela. In addition, we reported four species

Cuervo, Andrés

465

The somatic chromosome complements of 16 species of falconiformes (Aves) and the karyological relationships of the order  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using short term leucocyte culture techniques, the somatic chromosome complements of 16 species of diurnal birds of prey, belonging to four different families of the order Falconiformes were studied. The karyotypes are described and illustrated, and of some species idiograms are presented. In accordance with the family classification, four karyologically different groups can be distinguished in the Falconiformes: (1) Cathartidae,

LEOBERT E. M. DE BOER; Accepted July

1990-01-01

466

Fossil evidence of wing shape in a stem relative of swifts and hummingbirds (Aves, Pan-Apodiformes)  

PubMed Central

A feathered specimen of a new species of Eocypselus from the Early Eocene Green River Formation of Wyoming provides insight into the wing morphology and ecology in an early part of the lineage leading to extant swifts and hummingbirds. Combined phylogenetic analysis of morphological and molecular data supports placement of Eocypselus outside the crown radiation of Apodiformes. The new specimen is the first described fossil of Pan-Apodiformes from the pre-Pleistocene of North America and the only reported stem taxon with informative feather preservation. Wing morphology of Eocypselus rowei sp. nov. is intermediate between the short wings of hummingbirds and the hyper-elongated wings of extant swifts, and shows neither modifications for the continuous gliding used by swifts nor modifications for the hovering flight style used by hummingbirds. Elongate hindlimb elements, particularly the pedal phalanges, also support stronger perching capabilities than are present in Apodiformes. The new species is the smallest bird yet described from the Green River Formation, and supports the hypothesis that a decrease in body size preceded flight specializations in Pan-Apodiformes. The specimen also provides the first instance of melanosome morphology preserved in association with skeletal remains from the Green River Formation. PMID:23760643

Ksepka, Daniel T.; Clarke, Julia A.; Nesbitt, Sterling J.; Kulp, Felicia B.; Grande, Lance

2013-01-01

467

Rallinyssus sorae sp. n. (Acari: Dermanyssidae: rhinonyssinae) from the nasal passages of the sora, Porzana carolina (Aves: Rallidae).  

PubMed

Rallinyssus sorae sp. n. is described from the nasal turbinates of the sora, Porzana carolina, collected in Maryland and Ohio. The new species is most similar to Rallinyssus verheyeni Fain but differs in number of setae on the female ventral opisthosoma, structure of the fixed and movable digits of the male and female chelicerae, chaetotaxy of legs I to IV, and presence of a sternal plate in the male. The taxonomy and host-parasite relationships of the various species of Rallinyssus are discussed. PMID:512771

Pence, D B; Young, V E

1979-10-01

468

Phylogenetic Analysis of Pelecaniformes (Aves) Based on Osteological Data: Implications for Waterbird Phylogeny and Fossil Calibration Studies  

PubMed Central

Background Debate regarding the monophyly and relationships of the avian order Pelecaniformes represents a classic example of discord between morphological and molecular estimates of phylogeny. This lack of consensus hampers interpretation of the group's fossil record, which has major implications for understanding patterns of character evolution (e.g., the evolution of wing-propelled diving) and temporal diversification (e.g., the origins of modern families). Relationships of the Pelecaniformes were inferred through parsimony analyses of an osteological dataset encompassing 59 taxa and 464 characters. The relationships of the Plotopteridae, an extinct family of wing-propelled divers, and several other fossil pelecaniforms (Limnofregata, Prophaethon, Lithoptila, ?Borvocarbo stoeffelensis) were also assessed. The antiquity of these taxa and their purported status as stem members of extant families makes them valuable for studies of higher-level avian diversification. Methodology/Principal Findings Pelecaniform monophyly is not recovered, with Phaethontidae recovered as distantly related to all other pelecaniforms, which are supported as a monophyletic Steganopodes. Some anatomical partitions of the dataset possess different phylogenetic signals, and partitioned analyses reveal that these discrepancies are localized outside of Steganopodes, and primarily due to a few labile taxa. The Plotopteridae are recovered as the sister taxon to Phalacrocoracoidea, and the relationships of other fossil pelecaniforms representing key calibration points are well supported, including Limnofregata (sister taxon to Fregatidae), Prophaethon and Lithoptila (successive sister taxa to Phaethontidae), and ?Borvocarbo stoeffelensis (sister taxon to Phalacrocoracidae). These relationships are invariant when ‘backbone’ constraints based on recent avian phylogenies are imposed. Conclusions/Significance Relationships of extant pelecaniforms inferred from morphology are more congruent with molecular phylogenies than previously assumed, though notable conflicts remain. The phylogenetic position of the Plotopteridae implies that wing-propelled diving evolved independently in plotopterids and penguins, representing a remarkable case of convergent evolution. Despite robust support for the placement of fossil taxa representing key calibration points, the successive outgroup relationships of several “stem fossil + crown family” clades are variable and poorly supported across recent studies of avian phylogeny. Thus, the impact these fossils have on inferred patterns of temporal diversification depends heavily on the resolution of deep nodes in avian phylogeny. PMID:20976229

Smith, Nathan D.

2010-01-01

469

Some Platyhelminths inhabiting white-throated sparrows, Zonotrichia albicollis (Aves: Emberizidae: Emberizinae), from Algonquin Park, Ontario, Canada.  

PubMed

Twenty-two of 26 white-throated sparrows, Zonotrichia albicollis, from Algonquin Park, Ontario, Canada, hosted 1 or 2 species of platyhelminths. One species of cestode and 3 of digeneans were collected. Anonchotaenia quiscali inhabited 50% of the sparrows. This is the third report of A. quiscali; Z. albicollis is a new host. Brachylecithum nanum inhabited 43%, Zonorchis alveyi 15%, and Prosthogonimus macrorchis 8% of the sparrows examined. Ontario is a new geographic distribution record from all 4 parasite species. The proportion of hosts infected with 2 species was not significantly different from expected based on single species prevalences, indicating that there is no competitive interaction among these species of parasites for access to the avian hosts. PMID:8331482

Brooks, D R; Hoberg, E P; Houtman, A

1993-08-01

470

Characterization of the transcriptome of an ecologically important avian species, the Vinous-throated Parrotbill Paradoxornis webbianus bulomachus (Paradoxornithidae; Aves)  

PubMed Central

Background Adaptive divergence driven by environmental heterogeneity has long been a fascinating topic in ecology and evolutionary biology. The study of the genetic basis of adaptive divergence has, however, been greatly hampered by a lack of genomic information. The recent development of transcriptome sequencing provides an unprecedented opportunity to generate large amounts of genomic data for detailed investigations of the genetics of adaptive divergence in non-model organisms. Herein, we used the Illumina sequencing platform to sequence the transcriptome of brain and liver tissues from a single individual of the Vinous-throated Parrotbill, Paradoxornis webbianus bulomachus, an ecologically important avian species in Taiwan with a wide elevational range of sea level to 3100 m. Results Our 10.1 Gbp of sequences were first assembled based on Zebra Finch (Taeniopygia guttata) and chicken (Gallus gallus) RNA references. The remaining reads were then de novo assembled. After filtering out contigs with low coverage (<10X), we retained 67,791 of 487,336 contigs, which covered approximately 5.3% of the P. w. bulomachus genome. Of 7,779 contigs retained for a top-hit species distribution analysis, the majority (about 86%) were matched to known Zebra Finch and chicken transcripts. We also annotated 6,365 contigs to gene ontology (GO) terms: in total, 122 GO-slim terms were assigned, including biological process (41%), molecular function (32%), and cellular component (27%). Many potential genetic markers for future adaptive genomic studies were also identified: 8,589 single nucleotide polymorphisms, 1,344 simple sequence repeats and 109 candidate genes that might be involved in elevational or climate adaptation. Conclusions Our study shows that transcriptome data can serve as a rich genetic resource, even for a single run of short-read sequencing from a single individual of a non-model species. This is the first study providing transcriptomic information for species in the avian superfamily Sylvioidea, which comprises more than 1,000 species. Our data can be used to study adaptive divergence in heterogeneous environments and investigate other important ecological and evolutionary questions in parrotbills from different populations and even in other species in the Sylvioidea. PMID:22530590

2012-01-01

471

Conspecific brood parasitism in the white-faced ibis Plegadis chihi (Aves: Pelecaniformes) revealed by microsatellites' based kinship-reconstruction.  

PubMed

The white-faced ibis Plegadis chihi Vieillot, 1817 (Pelecaniformes: Threskiornithidae) is a socially monogamous colonially breeding bird in which behavioral and ecological observations suggest the occurrence of conspecific brood parasitism (CBP). We inferred aspects of the genetic mating system of P. chihi in nature, using a genetic approach in the absence of parental information. We used five heterologous microsatellite loci and a multiple-step methodological approach to infer kinship patterns among 104 pairs of nestlings sampled inside 80 nests in a breeding colony from southern Brazil. The estimated effective population size was 69 white-faced ibises (95% CI: 50-98), enough to ensure long-term population survival. Kinship patterns were identified for 38% of the analyzed pairs: 60% of the diagnosed pairs were identified as full-siblings, 2.5% as half-siblings and 37.5% as unrelated individuals. CBP could explain the presence of unrelated nestlings within broods, in agreement with available non-genetic evidence. The presence of half-siblings within broods could indicate extra-pair paternity. Results suggest that a non-strictly monogamous genetic mating system may be present in the white-faced ibis. This study is the first molecular approach to better characterize the reproductive behavior of P. chihi in the wild. Our findings set the stage for further research to investigate the possible causes and consequences of alternative reproductive strategies in this species. PMID:23554386

de Castro e Souza, Andiara Silos Moraes; Del Lama, Silvia Nassif; Miño, Carolina Isabel

2013-06-01

472

Polyphyly of the hawk genera Leucopternis and Buteogallus (Aves, Accipitridae): multiple habitat shifts during the Neotropical buteonine diversification  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The family Accipitridae (hawks, eagles and Old World vultures) represents a large radiation of predatory birds with an almost global distribution, although most species of this family occur in the Neotropics. Despite great morphological and ecological diversity, the evolutionary relationships in the family have been poorly explored at all taxonomic levels. Using sequences from four mitochondrial genes (12S, ATP8,

Fabio S Raposo do Amaral; Matthew J Miller; Luís Fábio Silveira; Eldredge Bermingham; Anita Wajntal

2006-01-01

473

Duval County Extension Office Program Location: 1010 N McDuff Ave, Jacksonville, FL 32254, unless noted  

E-print Network

Start Math for Every Age - Childcare Training, 9 - 11:30 am, CEUs available, Register: http-Musical - Childcare Training, 6:30 - 8:30 pm, CEUs available, Register: http://extension.psu.edu/cyttap Compost - Childcare Training, 6:30 - 8:30 pm, CEUs available, Register: http://extension.psu.edu/cyttap 4-H At Large

Jawitz, James W.

474

Duval County Extension Office Program Location: 1010 N McDuff Ave, Jacksonville, FL 32254, unless noted  

E-print Network

- Program is Free Call Becky to register CEUs - 1 ISA, 1 FNGLA, 1 L&O, 1 LCLM, 1 LL&O, 1 Pvt, and 1 O, and 2 CORE CEUs Optional LCLM or LL&O exam to follow More events on page 2 Salsa Canning Classes August $15 annual fee if CEUs needed Register http://extension.psu.edu/cyttap 4-H Expo - Learn about 4-H

Florida, University of

475

Duval County Extension Office Program Location: 1010 N McDuff Ave, Jacksonville, FL 32254, unless noted  

E-print Network

- Program is Free Call Becky to register CEUs include 1 ISA, FNGLA, LL&O, LCLM, O&T, Pvt, AGT, ROW, D&R, LUF://extension.psu.edu/cyttap Free for childcare professionals working in Clay or Duval counties * CEUs available THE JACKSONVILLE St, Second Floor 6 8 pm, Register: (904) 3552090 Certified Pest Control Operator Training, CEUs

Watson, Craig A.

476

A NEW GENUS AND SPECIES OF EMBERIZINE FINCH FROM PLEISTOCENE CAVE DEPOSITS IN PUERTO RICO (AVES: PASSERIFORMES)  

E-print Network

ABSTRACT—Pedinorhis stvrpsarcanoi, an enigmatic new genus and species of emberizine finch, is known from four cave deposits of probable Wisconsinan age in central Puerto Rico. The most distinctive feature of this bird is the broad, flat ridge of the rostrum. Pedinorhis represents a group unknown in the Antilles and, although of uncertain affinities, somewhat resembles the mainland genera Athpetes and Pipilo. The disappearance of Pedinorhis may be related to the postglacial loss of arid, savanna-like habitats that caused the extinction, or contraction in range, of many xerophilous vertebrates in the West Indies.

Storrs L. Olson; Mary C. Mckitrick

477

ENSAMBLE DE AVES EN ZONAS CON DIFERENTE GRADO DE URBANIZACIÓN EN LA CIUDAD DE BAHÍA BLANCA (BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fragmentation and vegetation changes are processes related to urbanization with an important incidence on birds. In this work we analize the bird assemblage variations along an urban gradient in Bahía Blanca city, Buenos Aires. Twenty transects were established, 100 metres long and 12 metres wide, in the micro-centre, macro-centre and the periphery of the city. Two samples a week were

Paola Germain; Yannina Cuevas; Cristina Sanhueza; F. Rodrigo Tizón; Alejandro Loydi; Ana Elena de Villalobos; Georgina Zapperi; Belén Vázquez; Gabriel Pompozzi; María Julia

2008-01-01

478

Laura J. Rooney, PhD, MS 1930 N. Cambridge Ave laura_j_rooney@yahoo.com  

E-print Network

such as high-risk alcohol and drug use and student safety in the community (Carolina Community Coalition management, sexual and reproductive health and disease prevention and management. Examples include managing

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

479

New records and descriptions of digeneans from the Magellanic penguin Spheniscus magellanicus (Forster) (Aves: Sphenisciformes) on the coast of Brazil.  

PubMed

Five species of digeneans parasitic in the Magellanic penguin Spheniscus magellanicus (Forster) from off the Brazilian coast of the western Atlantic are reported for the first time from this host and described. These are Mesostephanus odhneri (Travassos, 1924) Lutz, 1935, Posthodiplostomum macrocotyle Dubois, 1937, Stephanoprora uruguayensis Holcman-Spector & Olagüe, 1989, Ascocotyle (Phagicola) longa Ransom, 1920 and Ascocotyle (Phagicola) sp. One other digenean, Cardiocephaloides physalis (Lutz, 1926) Sudarikov, 1959, was also recorded. The taxonomy of the species and available data on their life-cycles are commented upon in relation to the possible origins of digenean infections of the Magellanic penguin. PMID:23595494

Brandão, Martha; Luque, José L; Scholz, Tomáš; Kostadinova, Aneta

2013-05-01

480

Paramaritremopsis solielangi n. sp. and Microphallus kinsellai n. sp. (Digenea: Microphallidae) parasites of Charadrii (Aves) of Belize (Central America).  

PubMed

The authors describe and illustrate two trematodes from Belize (Central America): Paramaritremopsis solielangi n. sp. from the small intestine of Arenaria interpres is characterised by a body length of 478 microm, two short and pre-acetabular caeca, part of the uterus in close association with the cirrus-sac and left caecum, vitelline glands in the shape of a horseshoe, a short pre-ovarian cirrus-sac containing a long, cylindrical, voluminous and unarmed cirrus (size when evaginated: 150 x 20-30 microm) and Microphallus kinsellai n. sp. from the caeca of Actitis macularia characterised by a body length of 370 microm and a phallus which is 30 microm in diameter and asymmetrical (basically a pad with a moderately developed accessory lobe) and a straight ejaculatory canal. Levinseniella carteretensis is another microphallid recovered from Arenaria interpres. The term of "phallus" is proposed to name the male copulatory organ which characterizes the Microphallinae. PMID:10966220

Canaris, A G; Deblock, S

2000-10-01

481

The Lanius excubitor (Aves, Passeriformes) conundrum—Taxonomic dilemma when molecular and non-molecular data tell different stories  

Microsoft Academic Search

The phylogeny of 18 taxa in the Lanius excubitor complex, and the related species L. sphenocercus, L. ludovicianus and L. somalicus, was estimated based on the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene and the non-coding D-loop (in total ?1.3kb). According to the mitochondrial gene tree, Lanius excubitor s.l. is non-monophyletic, with some of its subspecies being more closely related to L. sphenocercus,

Urban Olsson; Per Alström; Lars Svensson; Mansour Aliabadian; Per Sundberg

2010-01-01

482

The Lanius excubitor (Aves, Passeriformes) conundrum--Taxonomic dilemma when molecular and non-molecular data tell different stories.  

PubMed

The phylogeny of 18 taxa in the Lanius excubitor complex, and the related species L. sphenocercus, L. ludovicianus and L. somalicus, was estimated based on the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene and the non-coding D-loop (in total approximately 1.3 kb). According to the mitochondrial gene tree, Lanius excubitor s.l. is non-monophyletic, with some of its subspecies being more closely related to L. sphenocercus, L. ludovicianus, and L. somalicus. Also the division of the L. excubitor complex into a northern (L. excubitor) and a southern (L. meridionalis) species, as has been proposed based on morphological and ecological similarity and geographical distributions, is not compatible with the mitochondrial tree. Overall, genetic divergences among the ingroup taxa are small, indicating a recent radiation. A tree based on the nuclear ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) introns 6-7 is unresolved with respect to the ingroup, but provides strong support for a clade containing the Lanius excubitor complex, L. sphenocercus, L. ludovicianus and L. somalicus. We discuss the incongruence between the current taxonomy and the mitochondrial gene tree, and conclude that based on the latter the Lanius excubitor complex may be treated as at least six species, L. borealis, L. elegans, L. excubitor, L. lahtora, L. meridionalis, and L. uncinatus, but that other taxonomic treatments are also possible. However, uncertainty regarding to which extent the mitochondrial gene tree reflects the species phylogeny prevents us from recommending taxonomic change without further investigation. This study highlights the possible danger of relying on a single molecular marker, such as mitochondrial DNA, in taxonomic revisions and phylogenetic inference. PMID:19925872

Olsson, Urban; Alström, Per; Svensson, Lars; Aliabadian, Mansour; Sundberg, Per

2010-05-01

483

Reconstruction and in vivo analysis of the extinct tbx5 gene from ancient wingless moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes)  

PubMed Central

Background The forelimb-specific gene tbx5 is highly conserved and essential for the development of forelimbs in zebrafish, mice, and humans. Amongst birds, a single order, Dinornithiformes, comprising the extinct wingless moa of New Zealand, are unique in having no skeletal evidence of forelimb-like structures. Results To determine the sequence of tbx5 in moa, we used a range of PCR-based techniques on ancient DNA to retrieve all nine tbx5 exons and splice sites from the giant moa, Dinornis. Moa Tbx5 is identical to chicken Tbx5 in being able to activate the downstream promotors of fgf10 and ANF. In addition we show that missexpression of moa tbx5 in the hindlimb of chicken embryos results in the formation of forelimb features, suggesting that Tbx5 was fully functional in wingless moa. An alternatively spliced exon 1 for tbx5 that is expressed specifically in the forelimb region was shown to be almost identical between moa and ostrich, suggesting that, as well as being fully functional, tbx5 is likely to have been expressed normally in moa since divergence from their flighted ancestors, approximately 60 mya. Conclusions The results suggests that, as in mice, moa tbx5 is necessary for the induction of forelimbs, but is not sufficient for their outgrowth. Moa Tbx5 may have played an important role in the development of moa’s remnant forelimb girdle, and may be required for the formation of this structure. Our results further show that genetic changes affecting genes other than tbx5 must be responsible for the complete loss of forelimbs in moa. PMID:24885927

2014-01-01

484

New information on the anatomy of the Chinese Early Cretaceous Bohaiornithidae (Aves: Enantiornithes) from a subadult specimen of Zhouornis hani  

PubMed Central

Enantiornithines are the most diverse avian clade in the Cretaceous. However, morphological specializations indicative of specific ecological roles are not well known for this clade. Here we report on an exquisitely well-preserved specimen from the Lower Cretaceous Jehol Group of northeastern China, which pedal morphology is suggestive of a unique ecological specialization within Enantiornithes. The morphology of the new specimen is largely indistinguishable from that of the holotype of the bohaiornithid enantiornithine Zhouornis hani, albeit the latter is somewhat larger. The new specimen provides important and previously unknown details of the skull of Zhouornis hani, which add to the limited knowledge about the cranial anatomy and evolution of enantiornithines. The information offered by the new specimen also augments our understanding of the postcranial morphology of bohaiornithid enantiornithines, a clade that has been only recently recognized. With the description of this specimen, Zhouornis hani becomes one of the most anatomically complete known enantiornithine species, which will facilitate future morphological studies. PMID:24918031

Zhang, Yuguang; O’Connor, Jingmai; Di, Liu; Qingjin, Meng; Sigurdsen, Trond

2014-01-01

485

The Staurotypus turtles and aves share the same origin of sex chromosomes but evolved different types of heterogametic sex determination.  

PubMed

Reptiles have a wide diversity of sex-determining mechanisms and types of sex chromosomes. Turtles exhibit temperature-dependent sex determination and genotypic sex determination, with male heterogametic (XX/XY) and female heterogametic (ZZ/ZW) sex chromosomes. Identification of sex chromosomes in many turtle species and their comparative genomic analysis are of great significance to understand the evolutionary processes of sex determination and sex chromosome differentiation in Testudines. The Mexican giant musk turtle (Staurotypus triporcatus, Kinosternidae, Testudines) and the giant musk turtle (Staurotypus salvinii) have heteromorphic XY sex chromosomes with a low degree of morphological differentiation; however, their origin and linkage group are still unknown. Cross-species chromosome painting with chromosome-specific DNA from Chinese soft-shelled turtle (Pelodiscus sinensis) revealed that the X and Y chromosomes of S. triporcatus have homology with P. sinensis chromosome 6, which corresponds to the chicken Z chromosome. We cloned cDNA fragments of S. triporcatus homologs of 16 chicken Z-linked genes and mapped them to S. triporcatus and S. salvinii chromosomes using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Sixteen genes were localized to the X and Y long arms in the same order in both species. The orders were also almost the same as those of the ostrich (Struthio camelus) Z chromosome, which retains the primitive state of the avian ancestral Z chromosome. These results strongly suggest that the X and Y chromosomes of Staurotypus turtles are at a very early stage of sex chromosome differentiation, and that these chromosomes and the avian ZW chromosomes share the same origin. Nonetheless, the turtles and birds acquired different systems of heterogametic sex determination during their evolution. PMID:25121779

Kawagoshi, Taiki; Uno, Yoshinobu; Nishida, Chizuko; Matsuda, Yoichi

2014-01-01

486

28 | NewScientist | 5 August 2006 www.newscientist.com fredbAveNdAm/miNdeNpictureS  

E-print Network

author of a report on ocean acidification released last month. CO2 forms carbonic acid when it dissolves that the phrase "ocean acidification"appeared in the scientific literature for the first time. The potential habit ­ ocean acidification ­ has only begun to be researched in the last few years. Its impact could

Zachos, James

487

A phylogenetic analysis of the Gruiformes (Aves) based on morphological characters, with an emphasis on the rails (Rallidae)  

PubMed Central

The order Gruiformes, for which even familial composition remains controversial, is perhaps the least well understood avian order from a phylogenetic perspective. The history of the systematics of the order is presented, and the ecological and biogeographic characteristics of its members are summarized. Using cladistic techniques, phylogenetic relationships among fossil and modern genera of the Gruiformes were estimated based on 381 primarily osteological characters; relationships among modern species of Grues (Psophiidae, Aramidae, Gruidae, Heliornithidae and Rallidae) were assessed based on these characters augmented by 189 characters of the definitive integument. A strict consensus tree for 20,000 shortest trees compiled for the matrix of gruiform genera (length = 967, CI = 0.517) revealed a number of nodes common to the solution set, many of which were robust to bootstrapping and had substantial support (Bremer) indices. Robust nodes included those supporting: a sister relationship between the Pedionomidae and Turnicidae; monophyly of the Gruiformes exclusive of the Pedionomidae and Turnicidae; a sister relationship between the Cariamidae and Phorusrhacoidea; a sister relationship between a clade comprising Eurypyga and Messelornis and one comprising Rhynochetos and Aptornis; monophyly of the Grues (Psophiidae, Aramidae, Gruidae, Heliornithidae and Rallidae); monophyly of a clade (Gruoidea) comprising (in order of increasingly close relationship) Psophia, Aramus, Balearica and other Gruidae, with monophyly of each member in this series confirmed; a sister relationship between the Heliornithidae and Rallidae; and monophyly of the Rallidae exclusive of Himantornis. Autapomorphic divergence was comparatively high for Pedionomus, Eurypyga, Psophia, Himantornis and Fulica; extreme autapomorphy, much of which is unique for the order, characterized the extinct, flightless Aptornis. In the species-level analysis of modern Grues, special efforts were made to limit the analytical impacts of homoplasy related to flightlessness in a number of rallid lineages. A strict consensus tree of 20,000 shortest trees compiled (length = 1232, CI = 0.463) confirmed the interfamilial relationships resolved in the ordinal analysis and established a number of other, variably supported groups within the Rallidae. Groupings within the Rallidae included: monophyly of Rallidae exclusive of Himantornis and a clade comprising Porphyrio (including Notornis) and Porphyrula; a poorly resolved, basal group of genera including Gymnocrex, Habroptila, Eulabeornis, Aramides, Canirallus and Mentocrex; an intermediate grade comprising Anurolimnas, Amaurolimnas, and Rougetius; monophyly of two major subdivisions of remaining rallids, one comprising Rallina (paraphyletic), Rallicula, and Sarothrura, and the other comprising the apparently paraphyletic 'long-billed' rails (e.g. Pardirallus, Cyanolimnas, Rallus, Gallirallus and Cabalus and a variably resolved clade comprising 'crakes' (e.g. Atlantisia, Laterallus and Porzana, waterhens (Amaurornis), moorhens (Gallinula and allied genera) and coots (Fulica). Relationships among 'crakes' remain poorly resolved; Laterallus may be paraphyletic, and Porzana is evidently polyphyletic and poses substantial challenges for reconciliation with current taxonomy. Relationships among the species of waterhens, moorhens and coots, however, were comparatively well resolved, and exhaustive, fine-scale analyses of several genera (Grus, Porphyrio, Aramides, Rallus, Laterallus and Fulica) and species complexes (Porphyrio porphyrio -group,Gallirallus philippensis -group and Fulica americana -group) revealed additional topological likelihoods. Many nodes shared by a majority of the shortest trees under equal weighting were common to all shortest trees found following one or two iterations of successive weighting of characters. Provisional placements of selected subfossil rallids (e.g. Diaphorapteryx, Aphanapteryx and Capellirallus ) were based on separate heuristic searches using the strict consensus tree for modern rallids as a backb

C.Livezey, B.

1998-01-01

488

Extraordinary MHC class II B diversity in a non-passerine, wild bird: the Eurasian Coot Fulica atra (Aves: Rallidae).  

PubMed

The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) hosts the most polymorphic genes ever described in vertebrates. The MHC triggers the adaptive branch of the immune response, and its extraordinary variability is considered an evolutionary consequence of pathogen pressure. The last few years have witnessed the characterization of the MHC multigene family in a large diversity of bird species, unraveling important differences in its polymorphism, complexity, and evolution. Here, we characterize the first MHC class II B sequences isolated from a Rallidae species, the Eurasian Coot Fulica atra. A next-generation sequencing approach revealed up to 265 alleles that translated into 251 different amino acid sequences (? chain, exon 2) in 902 individuals. Bayesian inference identified up to 19 codons within the presumptive peptide-binding region showing pervasive evidence of positive, diversifying selection. Our analyses also detected a significant excess of high-frequency segregating sites (average Tajima's D = 2.36, P < 0.05), indicative of balancing selection. We found one to six different alleles per individual, consistent with the occurrence of at least three MHC class II B gene duplicates. However, the genotypes comprised of three alleles were by far the most abundant in the population investigated (49.4%), followed by those with two (29.6%) and four (17.5%) alleles. We suggest that these proportions are in agreement with the segregation of MHC haplotypes differing in gene copy number. The most widespread segregating haplotypes, according to our findings, would contain one single gene or two genes. The MHC class II of the Eurasian Coot is a valuable system to investigate the evolutionary implications of gene copy variation and extensive variability, the greatest ever found, to the best of our knowledge, in a wild population of a non-passerine bird. PMID:24683452

Alcaide, Miguel; Muñoz, Joaquin; Martínez-de la Puente, Josué; Soriguer, Ramón; Figuerola, Jordi

2014-03-01

489

Impact evaluation of an induction furnace replacement under the Energy $avings Plan at Mackenzie Specialty Castings, Incorporated  

SciTech Connect

This impact evaluation of an induction furnace replacement that was recently installed at Mackenzie Specialty Castings, Incorporated (Mackenzie Castings) was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) as part of an evaluation of its Energy Savings Plan (ESP) Program. The project consists of replacing old power supplies and induction furnace with new, more efficient supplies and equipment. The objective of this impact evaluation was to assess how much electrical energy is being saved at Mackenzie Castings as a result of the ESP and to determine how much the savings cost Bonneville and the region. The impact of the project was evaluated with a combination of engineering analysis, financial analysis, interviews, and submittal reviews (Mackenzie Castings`s proposal and completion report). Based on this impact evaluation, energy savings from this project are expected to be 425,257 kWh/yr at minimum annual production, 647,037 kWh/yr at typical annual production, and 1,294,074 kWh/yr at maximum annual production, or 0.05, 0.07, and 0.15 average megawatts, respectively. On a per-ton basis, this project will save 608 kWh/ton or 31% at minimum production and 431 kWh/ton or 39% at typical and maximum production. The project cost $277,110 to install, and Mackenzie Castings received payment of $102,551 (in 1993 dollars) from Bonneville for acquisition of the energy savings. The real levelized cost of these energy savings to Bonneville is 22.9 mills/kWh at minimum production, 15.1 mills/kWh typical production, and 7.5 mills/kWh at maximum production (in 1993 dollars) over the project`s assumed 15-year life. The real levelized cost to the region is 59.1 mills/kWh at minimum production, 38.8 mills/kWh at typical production, and 19.4 mills/kWh at maximum production in 1993 dollars, not including transmission and distribution effects.

Oens, M.A.; Spanner, G.E.

1994-04-01

490

A Late Miocene Accipitrid (Aves: Accipitriformes) from Nebraska and Its Implications for the Divergence of Old World Vultures  

PubMed Central

Background Old World vultures are likely polyphyletic, representing two subfamilies, the Aegypiinae and Gypaetinae, and some genera of the latter may be of independent origin. Evidence concerning the origin, as well as the timing of the divergence of each subfamily and even genera of the Gypaetinae has been elusive. Methodology/Principal Findings Compared with the Old World, the New World has an unexpectedly diverse and rich fossil component of Old World vultures. Here we describe a new accipitriform bird, Anchigyps voorhiesi gen. et sp. nov., from the Ash Hollow Formation (Upper Clarendonian, Late Miocene) of Nebraska. It represents a form close in morphology to the Old World vultures. Characteristics of its wing bones suggest it was less specialized for soaring than modern vultures. It was likely an opportunistic predator or scavenger having a grasping foot and a mandible morphologically similar to modern carrion-feeding birds. Conclusions/Significance The new fossil reported here is intermediate in morphology between the bulk of accipitrids and the Old World gypaetine vultures, representing a basal lineage of Accipitridae trending towards the vulturine habit, and of its Late Miocene age suggests the divergence of true gypaetine vultures, may have occurred during or slightly before the Miocene. PMID:23152811

Zhang, Zihui; Feduccia, Alan; James, Helen F.

2012-01-01

491

La Pérdida de los Humedales: Cómo se ven afectadas las Comunidades de Aves?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The issue-focused, peer-reviewed article describes how wetland bird populations are stressed due to: devastating habitat loss throughout the world, human intervention, such as agricultural expansion, other factors, such as invasive species and climate change, and lack of research data to improve management practices.

Robert Fletcher (University of Montana; )

2003-10-01

492

Educational Practices in an Age of Information Innovation: Audiovisual Education Prize Winning Papers in 1998. AVE in Japan No. 38.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet contains two papers that won the 1998 Audiovisual Education Prize of the Japan Audio-Visual Education Association. "Nurturing the Ability To Live in an Advanced Information Network Society: Making the Most Effective Use of Networking" reports on a study of 7th grade students in Okazaki City (Japan). The focus was on an 8-month…

Japan Audiovisual Information Center for International Service, Tokyo.

493

A subsynoptic-scale kinetic energy study of the Red River Valley tornado outbreak (AVE-SESAME 1)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The subsynoptis-scale kinetic energy balance during the Red River Valley tornado outbreak is presented in order to diagnose storm environment interactions. Area-time averaged energetics indicate that horizontal flux convergence provides the major energy source to the region, while cross contour flow provides the greatest sink. Maximum energy variability is found in the upper levels in association with jet stream activity. Area averaged energetics at individual observation times show that the energy balance near times of maximum storm activity differs considerably from that of the remaining periods. The local kinetic energy balance over Oklahoma during the formation of a limited jet streak receives special attention. Cross contour production of energy is the dominant local source for jet development. Intense convection producing the Red River Valley tornadoes may have contributed to this local development by modifying the surrounding environment.

Jedlovec, G. J.; Fuelberg, H. E.

1981-01-01

494

Natural born indicators: Great cormorant Phalacrocorax carbo (Aves: Phalacrocoracidae) as monitors of river discharge influence on estuarine ichthyofauna  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ecological traits of piscivorous marine birds have been acknowledged to reflect ecosystem changes. We used the great cormorant as our indicator species in the Minho estuary (NW-Iberian Peninsula, Europe) to assess the temporal variation of their diet and the factors that could influence that variation. Pellets were collected in a night roost, located centrally in the estuary, during two consecutive wintering periods (2005-2006 and 2006-2007). The great cormorant population showed a high degree of feeding plasticity and most of the variation in cormorants' diet was attributed to river discharge fluctuations. Overall, during periods of increased river discharge, marine and marine opportunistic species disappeared from diet, whereas freshwater species increased. The cormorants in this study were using a roost in the middle of the estuary, so they were facing a changing food base over time, in accordance to variation in river discharges. The birds did not keep their diet constant but rather took what became locally available, notwithstanding their broad foraging range. Therefore, we suggest that great cormorants may be considered good samplers of local ichthyofauna and thus, temporal variation in the local prey can be followed by analyzing cormorants' diet.

Dias, Ester; Morais, Pedro; Leopold, Mardik; Campos, Joana; Antunes, Carlos

2012-10-01

495

Food supply for waders (Aves: Charadrii) in an estuarine area in the Bay of Cádiz (SW Iberian Peninsula)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We studied the composition, density, size distribution and biomass of the food supply for waders in an estuarine area in the Bay of Cádiz (SW Iberian Peninsula), in winter (January-February) and in the pre-migratory period (late March). The estuarine area comprises an intertidal mudflat and an adjacent salina or salt-pan. On the intertidal mudflat, the biomass was 53 and 37 g AFDW .m -2in winter and the pre-migratory period, respectively. The main food source on mudflat was the polychaete Nereis diversicolor (44-54 % of the total biomass). On the other hand, the biomass in the salina was comparatively very poor, ranging from 0.008 to 0.079 g AFDW .m -2in winter and ranging from 0.011 to 0.09 g AFDW in late March. The main source of food in the salina was the crustacean Artemia. The total biomass on the mudflat during the pre-migratory period was 1.4 times lower than in February. This depletion could be caused by wader predation, mainly by Nereis diversicolor consumption. Although the potential food on the mudflats could allow high intertidal densities of waders, the availability of high tide foraging areas in the salina seems to contribute to the maintenance of these high intertidal densities.

Masero, José A.; Pérez-González, Maite; Basadre, Marta; Otero-Saavedra, Mónica

1999-07-01

496

Lineage diversification and morphological evolution in a large-scale continental radiation: The neotropical ovenbirds and woodcreepers (aves: furnariidae)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Patterns of diversification in species-rich clades provide insight into the processes that generate biological diversity. We tested different models of lineage and phenotypic diversification in an exceptional continental radiation, the ovenbird family Furnariidae, using the most complete species-level phylogenetic hypothesis produced to date for a major avian clade (97% of 293 species). We found that the Furnariidae exhibit nearly constant rates of lineage accumulation but show evidence of constrained morphological evolution. This pattern of sustained high rates of speciation despite limitations on phenotypic evolution contrasts with the results of most previous studies of evolutionary radiations, which have found a pattern of decelerating diversity-dependent lineage accumulation coupled with decelerating or constrained phenotypic evolution. Our results suggest that lineage accumulation in tropical continental radiations may not be as limited by ecological opportunities as in temperate or island radiations. More studies examining patterns of both lineage and phenotypic diversification are needed to understand the often complex tempo and mode of evolutionary radiations on continents. ?? 2011 The Author(s). Evolution ?? 2011 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

Derryberry, E.P.; Claramunt, S.; Derryberry, G.; Chesser, R.T.; Cracraft, J.; Aleixo, A.; Perez-Eman, J.; Remsen, J.V.; Brumfield, R.T.

2011-01-01

497

Investigations of severe/tornadic thunderstorm development and evolution based on satellite and AVE/SESAME/VAS data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Development of cloud relative tracking for severe thunderstorm identification and the beginning of the development of mesoscale airmass characteristics based on vertical atmospheric sounding data were accomplished.

Vonderhaar, T. H.; Purdom, J. F. W.

1985-01-01

498

Verification of mesoscale objective analyses of VAS and rawinsonde data using the March 1982 AVE/VAS special network data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Various combinations of VAS (Visible and Infrared Spin Scan Radiometer Atmospheric Sounder) data, conventional rawinsonde data, and gridded data from the National Weather Service's (NWS) global analysis, were used in successive-correction and variational objective-analysis procedures. Analyses are produced for 0000 GMT 7 March 1982, when the VAS sounding distribution was not greatly limited by the existence of cloud cover. The successive-correction (SC) procedure was used with VAS data alone, rawinsonde data alone, and both VAS and rawinsonde data. Variational techniques were applied in three ways. Each of these techniques was discussed.

Doyle, James D.; Warner, Thomas T.

1987-01-01

499

Lineage diversification and morphological evolution in a large-scale continental radiation: The neotropical ovenbirds and woodcreepers (Aves: Furnariidae)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Patterns of diversification in species-rich clades provide insight into the processes that generate biological diversity. We tested different models of lineage and phenotypic diversification in an exceptional continental radiation, the ovenbird family Furnariidae, using the most complete species-level phylogenetic hypothesis produced to date for a major avian clade (97% of 293 species). We found that the Furnariidae exhibit nearly constant rates of lineage accumulation but show evidence of constrained morphological evolution. This pattern of sustained high rates of speciation despite limitations on phenotypic evolution contrasts with the results of most previous studies of evolutionary radiations, which have found a pattern of decelerating diversity-dependent lineage accumulation coupled with decelerating or constrained phenotypic evolution. Our results suggest that lineage accumulation in tropical continental radiations may not be as limited by ecological opportunities as in temperate or island radiations. More studies examining patterns of both lineage and phenotypic diversification are needed to understand the often complex tempo and mode of evolutionary radiations on continents.

Derryberry, Elizabeth P.; Claramunt, Santiago; Derryberry, Graham; Chesser, R. Terry; Cracraft, Joel; Aleixo, Alexandre; Pérez-Emán, Jorge; Remsen, J.V., Jr.; Brumfield, Robb T.

2011-01-01

500

Investigations of severe/tornadic thunderstorm development and evolution based on satellite and AVE/SESAME/VAS data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The use of rapid scan satellite imagery to investigate the local environment of severe thunderstorms is discussed. Mesoscale cloud tracking and vertical wind shear as it affects thunderstorm relative flow are mentioned. The role of pre-existing low level cloud cover in the outbreak of tornadoes was investigated. Applying visible atmospheric sounding imagery to mesoscale phenomena is also addressed.

Vonderhaar, T. H.; Purdom, J. F. W.

1984-01-01