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1

Statistical Shape Modeling using Morphological Representations Santiago Velasco-Forero and Jesus Angulo  

E-print Network

Statistical Shape Modeling using Morphological Representations Santiago Velasco-Forero and Jes´us.velasco / jesus.angulo@mines-paristech.fr Abstract The aim of this paper is to propose tools for statisti- cal

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

2

Asteroid spectroscopy with FoReRo2 at BNAO Rozhen --- first results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Bulgarian National Astronomical Observatory (BNAO) in Rozhen (071 Rozhen), with astrometric observations, has been already involved in the Gaia Follow-Up Network for Solar System Objects since the end of 2011. One of our aims is to develop a coordinated program of asteroid spectroscopy complementary to Gaia's observations. In this paper, the first results of asteroid spectroscopy at BNAO Rozhen are presented. In order to contribute to the compositional characterization of the main-belt asteroids, we performed low-dispersion asteroid spectroscopy with 2-Channel-Focal-Reducer Rozhen (FoReRo2) on the 2-m Ritchey-Chrétien-Coudé (RCC) telescope at BNAO. We obtained optical spectra of few MBAs using the 2-m RCC telescope equiped with the CCD VarsArray 1300B camera (pixel size 20 ? m or 0.736 arcsec/px) in the spectroscopic mode of FoReRo2 in its red channel [1]. The spectroscopic characteristics are: a low-dispersion grism Bausch & Lomb, working in the parallel beam of FoReRo2, with 300 lines/mm which gives 4.3 Å/px and 200 ? m width slit which corresponds to 2.6 arcsec. We determined spectral types of the asteroids [2] by the overall shapes of the spectra between 440 nm and 830 nm. For spectral analysis in our work, we use the public software tool M4AST [3]. It covers aspects related to taxonomy, curve matching with laboratory spectra, space weathering models, and mineralogical diagnosis. Most of the observed asteroids belong to some families and there are no published spectra. Besides their spectra, for some asteroids, best matches derived from a comparison with laboratory spectra are presented. We are planning to use a polarimetric mode of FoReRo2 and a Wollaston prism in order for the results to be confirmed by obtaining the degree of linear polarization around asteroid phase angles of 10° --- around the minimum of polarization in the phase curve, where the deviation for different taxonomic classes is best resolvable.

Vchova Bebekovska, E.; Borisov, G.; Apostolovska, G.; Donchev, Z.

2014-07-01

3

CONVERGENCE ANALYSIS OF CONSENSUS-BASED DISTRIBUTED CLUSTERING Pedro A. Forero, Alfonso Cano and Georgios B. Giannakis  

E-print Network

CONVERGENCE ANALYSIS OF CONSENSUS-BASED DISTRIBUTED CLUSTERING Pedro A. Forero, Alfonso Cano of the algorithm and its stability analysis. Index Terms-- Clustering methods, Unsupervised learn- ing, Distributed ABSTRACT This paper deals with clustering of spatially distributed data using wireless sensor networks

Pleite, Alfonso Cano

4

University Ave SE University Ave W  

E-print Network

University Ave SE University Ave W Service Layer Credits: Sources: Esri, DeLorme, NAVTEQ, USGS, Intermap, i UV55 ")280 University Ave. Ramp Major Access Routes University Ave. Ramp §¨¦35W §¨¦94 ")280 Date: 5/30/2014 #12;, , , , , , , ""A TCF Bank Stadium Access Routes University Ave. Ramp University Ave SE Service

Minnesota, University of

5

E College Ave E Beaver Ave  

E-print Network

E College Ave E Beaver Ave W College Ave W Beaver Ave We s t P a r k A v e Sparks Barnard Fraser Armsby C4 Bank of America Career Services C5 Beaver Stadium A8 Berkey Creamery B5 Biobehavioral Health D4

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

6

Manassas St. Monroe Ave.  

E-print Network

. Washington A Adams Ave. Mid-South Hospital LeBonheur Children'sMedical Center MemphisandShelby County St. DudleySt. Monroe Ave. Madison Ave. DunlapSt. HospitalSt. Je erson Ave. ManassasSt. e. ve and Marketing Department Writing, Editing TIM BULLARD, MA Design, Layout and AMBER CARTER Photography SHEILA

Cui, Yan

7

Cherry Ave. Sixth St. Garage  

E-print Network

Ave. PedestrianUnderpass Bike/PedestrianUnderpass James E Rogers Way. MountainAve. FremontAve. PTS Marriot Hotel: ........................................626-PARK · http://parking.arizona.edu Shuttle Program & Suggestions: ................................626-RIDE SunTran: ........................................................................792

Arizona, University of

8

Author: Marcos Martinez Diaz Ingeniero de Telecomunicacion, UAM  

E-print Network

Author: Marcos Mart´inez D´iaz Ingeniero de Telecomunicaci´on, UAM UNIVERSIDAD AUT´ONOMA DE MADRID ´ASTER­ A thesis submitted for the degree of M´aster en Ingenier´ia Inform´atica y de Telecomunicaci´on Telecomunicaci´on (UAM) Director: Juli´an Fi´errez Aguilar Doctor Ingeniero de Telecomunicaci´on (UPM

Autonoma de Madrid, Universidad

9

Astronaut Franklin Chang-Diaz organizes shuttle mail message  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On Discovery's aft flight deck, Astronaut Franklin R. Chang-Diaz begins to organize what was believed to be among the longest mail messages in Shuttle history. Though early Shuttle flights could brag of longer teleprinted messages, the Thermal Imaging Printing Systems's day four correspondence, most of which is out of frame here, is a record length for recent flights.

1994-01-01

10

Rescue excavations at Diaz Street Midden, Saldanha Bay, South Africa  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper documents Diaz Street Midden, a Later Stone Age site discovered during recent development of a property in Saldanha Bay, South Africa. It began accumulating some 6000 years ago but the upper deposits were destroyed prior to excavation. The small excavation yielded a spectacular silcrete-dominated lithic assemblage with an unusually high frequency and variety of retouched artefacts. Ostrich eggshell

Jayson Orton

2009-01-01

11

University Ave. UniversityAve.Exit  

E-print Network

Corp B Corp C Whse 2 Purchasing Dept. Physical Plant Office Mail Room KUCR Child Development Center Costo Hall Pierce Hall Printing and Reprographics Geology Bldg Physics Bldg Physics 2000 Orbach Library Interdisciplinary North South CDS1296.010813 N UCR Baseball Complex To CE-CERT 1084 Columbia Ave. UCR Extenion

Mills, Allen P.

12

Distance learning: empathy and culture in Junot Diaz's "Wildwood".  

PubMed

This essay discusses critical approaches to culture, difference, and empathy in health care education through a reading of Junot Diaz's "Wildwood" chapter from the 2007 novel The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao. I begin with an analysis of the way that Diaz's narrative invites readers to imagine and explore the experiences of others with subtlety and complexity. My reading of "Wildwood" illuminates its double-edged injunction to try to imagine another's perspective while recognizing the limits to-or even the impossibility of-that exercise. I draw on post-colonial theory and feminist science studies to illuminate a text that is created and interpreted in a post-colonial context-the Dominican diaspora in the United States. The essay offers a model of historical and critical analysis that health care educators can use to frame the concept of empathy in the classroom and the clinic. PMID:23996054

Garden, Rebecca

2013-12-01

13

NEWLONDONRD CLEVELAND AVE  

E-print Network

RkiNG Bookstore STaR North Lot STaR Central Lot STaR South Lot STaR South- Back Lot iSe Lab PARKING MAPINFORMATION NORTH ST PROSPECT AVE WHITE CLAY DR WILBURST TYREAVE E DELAWARE AVE WATERWORKS LA RITTER LA BEVERLY RD Hall Lot¢ Gold 9-2 Thomas McKean Hall Lot¢ Gold 10 David Hollowell Drive¢ Gold 11 Rodney Drive North

Firestone, Jeremy

14

AY C AVENUE ORCHARD AVE  

E-print Network

33RDST 12THST 13THST 15THST 16THST 26THST WESTERN WESTERN 25THST 17THST 32NDST JOHNSON JACKSON 26THST SACKETTPL. JACKSON AVE CASCADE WAY WESTERN BLVD JACKSON AVE JACKSON AVE. PARKTERRACE JEFFERSON WAY WESTERN Hinsdale Wave Reser Stadium EPA Water Labs Memorial Union Ocean. Staging West Greenhouse Entrance Station

Escher, Christine

15

EleventhAve. McIntosh Court  

E-print Network

. Gopher Ct. Antelope TwelfthAve. FifteenthAve. Stream Stream Wool Lab EleventhAve. Langford Lin eld Hall Motorcycle parking Park only in "D" (distant) designated area at College and 12th (Antelope lot, #18). YS

Maxwell, Bruce D.

16

North American species of Agrostocynips Diaz (Hymenoptera: Figitidae), parasitoids of Agromyzidae (Diptera): bionomics and taxonomy  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The genus Agrostocynips Diaz is redescribed, as well as two species endemic to the Nearctic: Agrostocynips diastrophi (Ashmead) and A. robusta (Ashmead). Previous to this study, only Neotropical species of Agrostocynips were well diagnosed both taxonomically and biologically. Agrostocynips belongs...

17

STS-75 Chang-Diaz and MS Jeff Hoffman in White Room  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-75 Payload Commander Franklin R. Chang-Diaz (center) and Mission Specialist Jeffrey A. Hoffman (right) prepare to enter the Space Shuttle Columbia at Launch Pad 39B with assistance from the white room closeout crew.

1996-01-01

18

STS-46 MS Chang-Diaz works with laptop PGSC on OV-104's middeck  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-46 Mission Specialist (MS) Franklin R. Chang-Diaz looks away from his work at the laptop payload and general support computer (PGSC) on the middeck of Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104. Chang-Diaz, wearing a headband, holds onto the airlock hatch opening to position himself in front of the computer keyboard. The treads of the interdeck access ladder are visible at the right.

1992-01-01

19

Diaz et al. 1 5-HT2B receptors are required for serotonin-selective antidepressant actions  

E-print Network

Diaz et al. 1 5-HT2B receptors are required for serotonin-selective antidepressant actions Running title: 5-HT2B receptors in antidepressant responses Silvina Laura Diaz, Stéphane Doly, Nicolas Narboux Abstract The therapeutic effects induced by serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

20

STS-111 Crew Interviews: Franklin Chang-Diaz, Mission Specialist 2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-111 Mission Specialist 2 Franklin Chang-Diaz is seen during this interview, where he gives a quick overview of the mission before answering questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. Chang-Diaz outlines his role in the mission in general, and specifically during the extravehicular activities (EVAs). He describes in great detail his duties in the three EVAs which involved preparing the Mobile Remote Servicer Base System (MBS) for installation onto the Space Station's Mobile Transporter, attaching the MBS onto the Space Station and replacing a wrist roll joint on the station's robot arm. Chang-Diaz also discusses the science experiments which are being brought on board the Space Station by the STS-111 mission. He also offers thoughts on how the International Space Station (ISS) fits into NASA's vision and how his previous space mission experience will benefit the STS-111 flight.

2002-01-01

21

STS-75 Payload Commander Franklin R. Chang-Diaz suits up  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-75 Payload Commander Franklin R. Chang-Diaz (center) chats with Johnson Space Center officials Olan Bertrand (left) and David Leestma (right) during suitup activities in the Operations and Checkout Building. Born in Costa Rica, Chang-Diaz joined NASA in 1980. He has already completed four spaceflights and logged more than 656 hours on-orbit. He and six fellow crew members will depart shortly for Launch Pad 39B, where the Space Shuttle Columbia awaits liftoff during a two-and-a-half-hour launch window opening at 3:18 p.m. EST.

1996-01-01

22

Number Needed To… $ave?  

PubMed

The 'Number Needed to Treat' (NNT) is a useful measure for estimating the number of patients that would need to receive a therapeutic intervention to avoid one of the adverse events that the treatment is designed to prevent. We explored the possibility of an adaption of NNT to estimate the 'Number Needed to $ave' (NN$) as a new, conceptual systems metric to estimate potential cost-savings to the health system from implementation of a treatment, or in this case, a program. We used the outcomes of the INSPIRED COPD Outreach ProgramTM to calculate that 26 patients would need to complete the program to avoid healthcare expenditures of $100,000, based on hospital bed days avoided. The NN$ does not translate into 'cost savings' per se, but redirection of resource expenditures for other purposes. We propose that the NN$ metric, if further developed, could help to inform system-level resource allocation decisions in a manner similar to the way that the NNT metric helps to inform individual-level treatment decisions. PMID:25662619

Rocker, Graeme M; Verma, Jennifer Y; Demmons, Jillian; Mittmann, Nicole

2015-01-01

23

Astronaut Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, payload commander, is busy at the pilots station during operations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Astronaut Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, payload commander, is busy at the pilots station during operations to deploy the Tethered Satellite System (TSS). His five crew mates (out of frame) were also on the flight deck, of the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Columbia, during the busy deployment activities.

1996-01-01

24

STS-46 MS Chang-Diaz floats in life raft during water egress training at JSC  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-46 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Mission Specialist (MS) Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, wearing launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), relies on a one-person life raft to get him to 'safety' during a launch emergency egress (bailout) simulation conducted in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29 pool.

1992-01-01

25

Surface Structure of Zeolite (MFI) Crystals Isabel Diaz,, Efrosini Kokkoli, Osamu Terasaki, and Michael Tsapatsis*,  

E-print Network

Articles Surface Structure of Zeolite (MFI) Crystals Isabel Di´az,,§ Efrosini Kokkoli, Osamu type MFI) is an important zeolite that, in addition to conventional applications such as adsorption in studies of zeolite crystal growth. The surface structure of silicalite-1 crystals with two different

Kokkoli, Efie

26

Gio Wiederhold 601 van Ness Ave. #748  

E-print Network

Gio Wiederhold 601 van Ness Ave. #748 San Francisco CA 94102 phones 415 775-8363, fax: 415 674: monthly, payment expected within 3 weeks. payments to be sent to Gio Wiederhold 601 van Ness Ave. #748 San Francisco CA 94102 #12;Gio Wiederhold 601 van Ness Ave. #748 San Francisco CA 94102 phones: 650 725

Stanford University

27

STS-111 Astronaut Chang-Diaz Performs Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The STS-111 mission, the 14th Shuttle mission to visit the International Space Station (ISS), was launched on June 5, 2002 aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavour. On board were the STS-111 and Expedition Five crew members. Astronauts Kerneth D. Cockrell, commander; Paul S. Lockhart, pilot; and mission specialists Franklin R. Chang-Diaz and Philippe Perrin were the STS-111 crew members. Expedition Five crew members included Cosmonaut Valery G. Korzun, commander; and Astronaut Peggy A. Whitson and Cosmonaut Sergei Y. Treschev, flight engineers. Three space walks enabled the STS-111 crew to accomplish the delivery and installation of the Mobile Remote Servicer Base System (MBS), an important part of the Station's Mobile Servicing System that allows the robotic arm to travel the length of the Station, which is necessary for future construction tasks. In this photograph, Astronaut Franklin R. Chang-Diaz participates in the first scheduled session of extra vehicular activity (EVA) for the STS-111 mission. During the space walk, Chang-Diaz and Perrin attached a Power and Data Grapple Fixture onto the ISS's P6 Truss, setting the stage for the future relocation of the P6. The next major task was to remove Service Module Debris Panels from Space Shuttle Endeavour's payload bay and attach them to their temporary location on Pressurized Mating Adapter 1 (PMA-1). The space walkers also removed thermal blankets to prepare the MBS for installation onto the station's Mobile Transporter (MT).

2002-01-01

28

[Jesus Lebron: an interview with the man who threw water at Reverend Ruben Diaz].  

PubMed

Jesus Lebron, a gay political activist and person living with AIDS, had a battle with the New York City Civilian Complaint Review Board (CCRB). The agency was created to monitor allegations of police brutality and discrimination against minority groups. It is made up of Asian-Americans, Latins, and gay and lesbian activists. Beginning in the winter of 1993-94, Rev. Ruben Diaz, a member of the CCRB, expressed publicly his AIDS-phobic philosophy. The Gay and Lesbian American (GLA) group sent protest letters to the CCRB demanding that Rev. Diaz be removed. No responses were received. Christopher Lynn, a board member and a gay HIV-positive lawyer, was present at the CCRB open meeting on Oct. 5, 1994. Voices and tempers were flaring and Jesus Lebron, losing control of his temper, flung a jug of water at Diaz and soaked Mr. Lynn as well. Lynn filed both civil and criminal charges, which were later dropped. The interview with Mr. Lebron elaborates on the opinions, feelings and facts which led to and followed the incident. PMID:11363217

Lebron, J

1995-01-01

29

15. WEST SIDE OF 1900 BLOCK, PACIFIC AVE. FROM RIGHT; ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

15. WEST SIDE OF 1900 BLOCK, PACIFIC AVE. FROM RIGHT; 1920-22 PACIFIC AVE., WIEGAL COMPANY CANDY FACTORY (1904); 1924-26 PACIFIC AVE., CAMPBELL BUILDING (DAVIS BUILDING) (1890); 1928-30 PACIFIC AVE., REESE-CRANDALL & REDMAN BUILDING, (1890); 1932-36 PACIFIC AVE., MC DONALD & SMITH BUILDING (1890); 1938-48 PACIFIC AVE., F.S. HARMON COMPANY WAREHOUSE (1908), DESIGNED BY CARL AUGUST DARMER. - Union Depot Area Study, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

30

Iunctus Geomatics Corp. Ave South, suite 401  

E-print Network

Iunctus Geomatics Corp. 817-4th Ave South, suite 401 Lethbridge, Alberta T1J 0P3 1-877-604-2800 www lines. #12;Iunctus Geomatics Corp. 817-4th Ave South, suite 401 Lethbridge, Alberta T1J 0P3 1 60%: Location of the shifted scene, sceneID 25692140509191706042P6 #12;Iunctus Geomatics Corp. 817

Janée, Greg

31

STS-91 M.S. Franklin Chang-Diaz and Janet Kavandi participate in CEIT  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-91 Mission Specialists Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D., and Janet Kavandi, Ph.D., participate in the Crew Equipment Interface Test, or CEIT, in KSC's Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 2. During CEIT, the crew have an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads with which they'll be working on-orbit. The STS-91 crew are scheduled to launch aboard the Shuttle Discovery for the ninth and final docking with the Russian Space Station Mir from KSC's Launch Pad 39A on May 28 at 8:05 EDT.

1998-01-01

32

STS-111 M.S. Chang-Diaz suits up for TCDT  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-111 Mission Specialist Franklin Chang-Diaz gets ready in his launch and entry suit for a simulated launch countdown at the pad. The simulation is part of STS-111 Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities for the crew and Expedition 5. The payload on the mission to the International Space Station includes the Mobile Base System, an Orbital Replacement Unit and Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo. The Expedition 5 crew is traveling on Endeavour to replace the Expedition 4 crew on the Station. Launch of Endeavour is scheduled for May 30, 2002.

2002-01-01

33

STS-111 M.S. Chang-Diaz suits up for TCDT  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-111 Mission Specialist Franklin Chang-Diaz waves during suitup, getting ready for a simulated launch countdown at the pad. The simulation is part of STS-111 Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities for the crew and Expedition 5. The payload on the mission to the International Space Station includes the Mobile Base System, an Orbital Replacement Unit and Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo. The Expedition 5 crew is traveling on Endeavour to replace the Expedition 4 crew on the Station. Launch of Endeavour is scheduled for May 30, 2002.

2002-01-01

34

Aves  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The study of the entire fossil bird collection from Laetoli, including the specimens collected by Mary Leakey (1974–1981)\\u000a and the recent ones collected by the Eyasi Plateau Paleontological Expedition (1998–2005), is presented here. The 247 bird\\u000a fossils allow the identification of 21 different taxa in 11 families (and eight orders). One fossil is from the Lower Laetolil\\u000a Beds, 229 from

Antoine Louchart

35

STS-91 Mission Specialist Chang-Diaz suits up for launch  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-91 Mission Specialist Franklin R. Chang- Diaz gets assistance from a suit technician as he dons his flight suit in the Operations and Checkout (O&C) Building. The fitting takes place prior to the crew walkout and transport to Launch Pad 39A. He is on his sixth space flight. Chang-Diaz holds a doctorate in applied plasma physics and is director of the Advanced Space Propulsion Laboratory at the University of Houston. Franklin'''s background will serve him well during the mission, since he will be primarily responsible for crew activities in support of the of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer. He will also back up Lawrence with the mideck experiments and Kavandi with SPACEHAB operations. STS-91 is scheduled to be launched on June 2 with a launch window opening around 6:10 p.m. EDT. The mission will feature the ninth and final Shuttle docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, the first Mir docking for Discovery, the first on-orbit test of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), and the first flight of the new Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank. Astronaut Andrew S. W. Thomas will return to Earth as a STS-91 crew member after living more than four months aboard Mir.

1998-01-01

36

STS-91 Mission Specialist Chang-Diaz visits KSC to participate in the TCDT  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-91 Mission Specialist Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D., arrives at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a T-38 jet. He is here to participate in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. The STS- 91 launch is targeted for June 2 with a launch window opening around 6:10 p.m. EDT. The mission will conclude Phase I of the joint U.S.-Russian International Space Station Program. Although it will be the ninth Shuttle docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, it will be the first Mir docking for the Space Shuttle orbiter Discovery. Chang-Diaz is making his sixth space flight. The STS-91 mission will also be the first flight for the new Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank. The STS-91 flight crew also includes Mission Commander Charles Precourt; Pilot Dominic Gorie; and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence; Janet Lynn Kavandi, Ph.D.; and Valery Ryumin, with the Russian Space Agency. Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will be returning to Earth with the crew after living aboard Mir since January 25, 1998.

1998-01-01

37

Single Triangle Strip and Loop on Manifolds with Boundaries Pablo Diaz-Gutierrez David Eppstein M. Gopi  

E-print Network

Single Triangle Strip and Loop on Manifolds with Boundaries Pablo Diaz-Gutierrez David Eppstein M. Gopi Department of Computer Science, University of California, Irvine. Abstract The single triangle and end triangles on manifolds with or without boundaries. The main contributions of this paper include

Meenakshisundaram, Gopi

38

Astronauts Jeffrey A. Hoffman (left) and Franklin R. Chang-Diaz hold up a sign to celebrate the fact  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Astronauts Jeffrey A. Hoffman (left) and Franklin R. Chang-Diaz hold up a sign to celebrate the fact that each has surpassed the 1,000-hour mark in space during the flight. The two mission specialists joined three other astronauts and an international payload specialist for 16 days of scientific research aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia.

1996-01-01

39

Lidar detection using a dual-frequency source Rosemary Diaz, Sze-Chun Chan, and Jia-Ming Liu  

E-print Network

Lidar detection using a dual-frequency source Rosemary Diaz, Sze-Chun Chan, and Jia-Ming Liu (Doc. ID 71166); published November 22, 2006 A new technique of dual-frequency Doppler-lidar and operating conditions. © 2006 Optical Society of America OCIS codes: 120.7250, 280.3640, 280.3340. Lidar

Chan, Sze-Chun

40

STS-111 M.S. Chang-Diaz arrives at KSC for launch  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-111 Mission Specialist Franklin Chang-Diaz is happy to be returning to KSC to prepare for launch. Mission STS-111, known as Utilization Flight 2, is carrying supplies and equipment to the International Space Station. The payload includes the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo, the Mobile Base System, which will be installed on the Mobile Transporter to complete the Canadian Mobile Servicing System, or MSS, and a replacement wrist/roll joint for Canadarm 2. The mechanical arm will then have the capability to 'inchworm' from the U.S. Lab Destiny to the MSS and travel along the truss to work sites. Also on board will be Expedition 5, traveling to the Station on Space Shuttle Endeavour as the replacement crew for Expedition 4, who will return to Earth aboard the orbiter. Launch is scheduled for May 30, 2002.

2002-01-01

41

STS-91 Mission Specialist Chang-Diaz participates in TCDT activities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-91 Mission Specialist Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D., participates in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The TCDT is a dress rehearsal for launch. STS-91 is scheduled to be launched on June 2 with a launch window opening around 6:10 p.m. EDT. The mission will feature the ninth Shuttle docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, the first Mir docking for Discovery, the conclusion of Phase I of the joint U.S.- Russian International Space Station Program, and the first flight of the new Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank. The STS-91 flight crew also includes Commander Charles Precourt; Pilot Dominic Gorie; and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence; Janet Kavandi, Ph.D.; and Valery Ryumin, with the Russian Space Agency. Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will be returning to Earth with the crew after living more than four months aboard Mir.

1998-01-01

42

Campus Community Police 21 Sussex Ave, Toronto  

E-print Network

Campus Community Police 21 Sussex Ave, Toronto ON M5S 1J6 Dispatch 4169782323 Urgent 4169782222 University of Toronto Campus Community Police Community Alert Wednesday January 30, 2013 The University of Toronto Campus Community Police has alerted the public to a Robbery investigation

Sokolowski, Marla

43

www.ave.kth.se Rail Vehicles  

E-print Network

www.ave.kth.se Rail Vehicles Part of the Masters program in Vehicle Engineering Master's Thesis: Validation of wheel wear calculation code Background Rail vehicle operators have a genuine concern about wheel and rail wear prediction methodologies, due to the influence of worn profiles in the cost of both

Haviland, David

44

Enigmatic Phylogeny of Skuas (Aves: Stercorariidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Multiple sources of evidence show that the skuas (Aves: Stercorariidae) are a monophyletic group, closely related to gulls (Laridae). On morphological and behavioural evidence the Stercorariidae are divided into two widely divergent genera, Catharacta and Stercorarius, consistent with observed levels of nuclear and mitochondrial gene divergence. Catharacta skuas are large-bodied and with one exception breed in the Southern Hemisphere. Stercorarius

B. L. Cohen; A. J. Baker; K. Blechschmidt; D. L. Dittmann; R. W. Furness; J. A. Gerwin; A. J. Helbig; J. de Korte; H. D. Marshall; R. L. Palma; H.-U. Peter; R. Ramli; I. Siebold; M. S. Willcox; R. H. Wilson; R. M. Zink

1997-01-01

45

[Micropterus salmoides (Pisces: Centrarchidae) reproduction in the Gustavo Diaz Ordaz reservoir, Sinaloa, México].  

PubMed

Micropterus salmoides is an important fish species for sport fishing activities, condition that has promoted its introduction to different reservoirs in Mexico and worldwide. With the aim to improve its fisheries management, this research dealt with some reproductive aspects of this species in the Gustavo Diaz Ordaz reservoir, where it was studied from August 2008 through March 2011. To this end, we obtained 938 specimens, with gillnets of different sizes, to determine their total length (Lt, in cm), weight (Pt, in g), sex, gonadosomatic index, condition factor, fecundity and size at first maturity. Lt and Pt ranged from 15.9 to 63 cm (37.4 +/- 78.0) and 57 to 4431 g (731.7 +/- 619.0), respectively. The Pt-Lt relationship showed a positive allometric growth, with no significant difference between males and females (F = 0.9955, p = 0.3187). The male: female ratio obtained was 1:0.83. Mass spawning lasted from December to April. Size at first maturity was 33.7 cm and average fecundity was 32294 +/- 12878.7 oocytes/female. The gonadosomatic index was low from May through November, and increased between January and March. The condition factor was high before the spawning season and decreased after the reproductive period. We recommend a fishing ban from January to March, and to allow the capture size between 33 and 40 cm. PMID:24027925

Beltrán Alvarez, Rigoberto; Sánchez Palacios, Jesús; Ramírez Lozano, Juan Pedro; Ortega Salas, Adolfo-Armando

2013-09-01

46

STS-111 M.S. Chang-Diaz suits up for launch  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-111 Mission Specialist Franklin Chang-Diaz suits up again for the second launch attempt aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on mission STS-111 to the International Space Station. This mission marks the 14th Shuttle flight to the Space Station and the third Shuttle mission this year. Mission STS-111 is the 18th flight of Endeavour and the 110th flight overall in NASA's Space Shuttle program. On mission STS-111, astronauts will deliver the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, the Mobile Base System (MBS), and the Expedition Five crew to the Space Station. During the seven days Endeavour will be docked to the Station, three spacewalks will be performed dedicated to installing MBS and the replacement wrist-roll joint on the Station's Canadarm2 robotic arm. Endeavour will also carry the Expedition 5 crew, who will replace Expedition 4 on board the Station. Expedition 4 crew members will return to Earth with the STS-111 crew. Liftoff is scheduled for 5:22 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A.

2002-01-01

47

STS-91 Mission Specialist Chang-Diaz pauses at the pad following TCDT activities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-91 Mission Specialist Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D., pauses on the 217-foot level of Launch Complex 39A after the completion of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. Behind him, the Space Shuttle Discovery is being prepared for flight. The TCDT is held at KSC prior to each Space Shuttle flight to provide crews with an opportunity to participate in simulated countdown activities. STS-91 is scheduled to be launched on June 2 with a launch window opening around 6:10 p.m. EDT. The mission will feature the ninth Shuttle docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, the first Mir docking for Discovery, the conclusion of Phase I of the joint U.S.-Russian International Space Station Program, and the first flight of the new Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank. The STS-91 flight crew also includes Commander Charles Precourt; Pilot Dominic Gorie; and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence; Janet Kavandi, Ph.D.; and Valery Ryumin, with the Russian Space Agency. Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will be returning to Earth with the crew after living more than four months aboard Mir.

1998-01-01

48

VizieR Online Data Catalog: Northern Galactic OB stars vsini (Simon-Diaz+, 2014)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The spectroscopic observations considered for this study are part of the IACOB spectroscopic database of northern Galactic OB stars (last described in Simon-Diaz et al., 2011, Bull. Soc. Roy. Sci. Liege, 80, 514 and Stellar Clusters and Associations: Proc. A RIA Workshop on Gaia, eds. E. J. Alfaro Navarro, A. T. Gallego Calvente, & M. R. Zapatero Osorio, 255). This unique high-quality spectroscopic database has been compiled in the framework of the IACOB project. To date, the IACOB database comprises 1250 spectra of 153 and 97 Galactic O- and early B-type stars, respectively, observable from the Roque de los Muchachos observatory in La Palma (Spain). The spectra have a resolving power of 46000 and 23000, a typical signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) above 150, and were compiled between November 2008 and January 2013 with the high-resolution FIbre-fed Echelle Spectrograph (FIES) attached to the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT). The IACOB database has a multi-epoch character that enables investigations of the binary/multiple nature of considered stars and the temporal variations in individual objects with at least three spectra per observed target. In this study, we only used a subsample of the spectra, discarding all stars with signatures of multiplicity (which means that we only considered apparently single and SB1 stars), and only considering the spectrum with the highest S/N ratio per star. (5 data files).

Simon-Diaz, S.; Herrero, A.

2014-04-01

49

Diaz-Calderon, A. / Towards a Unified Representation of Mechanisms for Robotic Control Software, pp. xx -yy International Journal of Advanced Robotic Systems, Volume y, Number x (200x), ISSN 1729-8806  

E-print Network

Diaz-Calderon, A. / Towards a Unified Representation of Mechanisms for Robotic Control Software, pp. xx - yy International Journal of Advanced Robotic Systems, Volume y, Number x (200x), ISSN 1729-8806 Towards a Unified Representation of Mechanisms for Robotic Control Software Antonio Diaz-Calderon, Issa A

Waliser, Duane E.

50

AVE-SESAME program for the REEDA System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The REEDA system software was modified and improved to process the AVE-SESAME severe storm data. A random access file system for the AVE storm data was designed, tested, and implemented. The AVE/SESAME software was modified to incorporate the random access file input and to interface with new graphics hardware/software now available on the REEDA system. Software was developed to graphically display the AVE/SESAME data in the convention normally used by severe storm researchers. Software was converted to AVE/SESAME software systems and interfaced with existing graphics hardware/software available on the REEDA System. Software documentation was provided for existing AVE/SESAME programs underlining functional flow charts and interacting questions. All AVE/SESAME data sets in random access format was processed to allow developed software to access the entire AVE/SESAME data base. The existing software was modified to allow for processing of different AVE/SESAME data set types including satellite surface and radar data.

Hickey, J. S.

1981-01-01

51

GRANT AVE., FROM SOUTHEAST OF BUILDING #191 (NORTHWEST CORNER OF ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

GRANT AVE., FROM SOUTHEAST OF BUILDING #191 (NORTHWEST CORNER OF POPE & GRANT AVENUES), LOOKING NORTH-NORTHEAST - Fort Leavenworth, Metropolitan Avenue & Seventh Street, Leavenworth, Leavenworth County, KS

52

DENSIDAD Y RIQUEZA DE AVES EN COMUNIDADESNIDIFICANTES DE LA PENNSULAIBRICA  

E-print Network

DENSIDAD Y RIQUEZA DE AVES EN COMUNIDADESNIDIFICANTES DE LA PENÍNSULAIB�RICA Potti, J., 1986. Densidad y riqueza de aves en comunidades nidificantes de la Península Ibérica. Misc. Zool., 10 presente estudio aborda un análisis de diversosatributos comunitarios(densidad, ri- queza, diversidad

Potti, Jaime

53

JACK AND PEARL RESNICK CAMPUS JACOBI MEDICAL CENTER Rhinelander Ave  

E-print Network

Faculty Parking AdditionalParking ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE OF MEDICINE JACK AND PEARL RESNICK CAMPUS 1 A U N I V E R S I T Y Albert Einstein College of Medicine #12;......................... 1225 Morris Park Ave 20. Einstein Boiler Plant............................1199 Sackett Ave. JACOBI

Yates, Andrew

54

manuscrit auteur, rfrence : Diaz Olvera L., Plat D., Pochet P., Sahabana M. (2009), La double vie de la moto au Sud du Sahara.  

E-print Network

de la moto au Sud du Sahara. Usages privés, offre publique, in G. Fumey, J. Varlet, P. Zembri (éds DOUBLE VIE DE LA MOTO AU SUD DU SAHARA : USAGES PRIVES, OFFRE PUBLIQUE Lourdes DIAZ OLVERA, Didier PLAT

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

55

Certhiasomus, a new genus of woodcreeper (Aves: Passeriformes: Dendrocolaptidae)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Phylogenetic analysis of the family Dendrocolaptidae (Aves: Passeriformes) indicates that the two species traditionally placed in the genus Deconychura are not sister taxa. Certhiasomus, a new genus of woodcreeper, is described for one of these species, C. stictolaemus.

Derryberry, Elizabeth; Claramunt, Santiago; Chesser, R. Terry; Aleixo, Alexandre; Cracraft, Joel; Moyle, Robert G.; Brumfield, Robb T.

2010-01-01

56

Enigmatic phylogeny of skuas (Aves:Stercorariidae)  

PubMed

Multiple sources of evidence show that the skuas (Aves:Stercorariidae) are a monophyletic group, closely related to gulls (Laridae. On morphological and behavioural evidence the Stercorariidae are divided into two widely divergent genera, Catharacta and Stercorarius, consistent with observed levels of nuclear and mitochondrial gene divergence. Catharacta skuas are large-bodied and with one exception breed in the Southern Hemisphere. Stercorarius skuas otherwise known as jaegers) are smaller bodied and breed exclusively in the Northern Hemisphere. Evidence from both mitochondrial and nuclear genomes and from ectoparasitic lice (Insecta:Phthiraptera) shows that the Pomarine skua, S. pomarinus, which has been recognized as being somewhat intermediate in certain morphological and behavioural characteristics, is much more closely related to species in the genus Catharacta, especially to the Northern Hemisphere-breeding Great skua, C. skua, than it is to the other two Stercorarius skuas, the Arctic skua, S. parasiticus and the Longtailed skua, S. longicaudus. Three possible explanations that might account for this discordant aspect of skua phylogeny are explored. These involve (i) the segregation of ancestral polymorphism, (ii) convergent evolution of morphology and behaviour or (iii) inter-generic hybridization. The available evidence from both nuclear and mitochondrial genomes does not exclude any of these hypotheses. Thus, resolution of this enigma of skua phylogeny awaits further work. PMID:9061968

Cohen, B L; Baker, A J; Blechschmidt, K; Dittmann, D L; Furness, R W; Gerwin, J A; Helbig, A J; de Korte, J; Marshall, H D; Palma, R L; Peter, H U; Ramli, R; Siebold, I; Willcox, M S; Wilson, R H; Zink, R M

1997-02-22

57

AVES.NET: The Freshwater Dinoflagellates  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Hosted by AVES.NET, this website about Freshwater Dinoflagellates was created by Victor W. Fazio III and Dr. Susan Carty of Heidelberg College (Tiffin, Ohio). Two main attractions of this site are the Freshwater Dinoflagellate Image Archive, and the Recent Additions-Freshwater Dinoflagellate Images 2003 (from the 2003-04 winter field season). Individual Dinoflagellate image pages generally include a ventral view, dorsal view, or both, and the pages featuring species from Ohio include county distribution maps. Site visitors can email Dr. Carty for permission to use any of the images. The website also contains a List of Freshwater Dinoflagellates in Ohio, some of which link to the individual image pages. Additionally, the site offers a Review of Online Images of Freshwater Dinoflagellates including links to many other host sites, and a link to an online article by Dr. Susan Carty and Daniel E. Wujek entitled _A New Species of Peridinium and New Records of Dinoflagellates and Silica-Scaled Chrysophytes from Belize._ [NL

Carty, Susan

58

Enigmatic phylogeny of skuas (Aves:Stercorariidae)  

PubMed Central

Multiple sources of evidence show that the skuas (Aves:Stercorariidae) are a monophyletic group, closely related to gulls (Laridae. On morphological and behavioural evidence the Stercorariidae are divided into two widely divergent genera, Catharacta and Stercorarius, consistent with observed levels of nuclear and mitochondrial gene divergence. Catharacta skuas are large-bodied and with one exception breed in the Southern Hemisphere. Stercorarius skuas otherwise known as jaegers) are smaller bodied and breed exclusively in the Northern Hemisphere. Evidence from both mitochondrial and nuclear genomes and from ectoparasitic lice (Insecta:Phthiraptera) shows that the Pomarine skua, S. pomarinus, which has been recognized as being somewhat intermediate in certain morphological and behavioural characteristics, is much more closely related to species in the genus Catharacta, especially to the Northern Hemisphere-breeding Great skua, C. skua, than it is to the other two Stercorarius skuas, the Arctic skua, S. parasiticus and the Longtailed skua, S. longicaudus. Three possible explanations that might account for this discordant aspect of skua phylogeny are explored. These involve (i) the segregation of ancestral polymorphism, (ii) convergent evolution of morphology and behaviour or (iii) inter-generic hybridization. The available evidence from both nuclear and mitochondrial genomes does not exclude any of these hypotheses. Thus, resolution of this enigma of skua phylogeny awaits further work. PMID:9061968

Cohen, B L; Baker, A J; Blechschmidt, K; Dittmann, D L; Furness, R W; Gerwin, J A; Helbig, A J; de Korte, J; Marshall, H D; Palma, R L; Peter, H U; Ramli, R; Siebold, I; Willcox, M S; Wilson, R H; Zink, R M

1997-01-01

59

STS-46 MS Hoffman and MS Chang-Diaz wear masks during pre-breathe on OV-104  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-46 Mission Specialist (MS) and Payload Commander (PLC) Jeffrey A. Hoffman and MS Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, wearing breathing apparatus masks, pose on the forward flight deck of Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, during pre-breathe session. With the possibility of an extravehicular activity (EVA) being added to the STS-46 agenda, the astronauts reported to this station and began the 'pre-breathe' process when problems developed during the extension of the Tethered Satellite System 1 (TSS-1). When the human body is exposed to a sudden decrease in atmospheric pressure (for instance, from the 10.2 ppsi in the crew cabin to the 4.5 ppsi of the extravehicular mobility unit (EMU)), nitrogen traces in the bloodstream will expand. This expansion can create tiny bubbles and potential for the 'bends'. In order to lessen the effect, an astronaut must 'pre-breathe' pure oxygen (the same pure oxygen he will breathe in the suit) to help 'purge' nitrogen from his bloodstream before exerting himself

1992-01-01

60

Department of Mechanical and Industrial Eng., Northeastern University, 360 Huntington Ave.,  

E-print Network

G. Sharma Department of Mechanical and Industrial Eng., Northeastern University, 360 Huntington Ave Huntington Ave., Boston, MA 02115 and Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Eng., Rutgers University, 98., Northeastern University, 360 Huntington Ave., Boston, MA 02115 S. M. Tomassone Department of Chemical

Mavroidis, Constantinos

61

1,19-seco-Avermectin Analogues from a ?aveCDE Mutant Streptomyces avermectinius Strain.  

PubMed

Three new 1,19-seco-avermectin (AVE) analogues were isolated from the ?aveCDE mutant Streptomyces avermectinius strain. Their structures were elucidated by detailed spectroscopic analysis. This is the first report of 1,19-seco-AVE analogues. In an in vitro assay these compounds displayed cytotoxicity against Saos-2, MG-63, and B16 cell lines. PMID:25611131

Sun, Peng; Zhao, Qunfei; Wu, Zhuhua; Zhang, Wen; Liu, Wen

2015-02-27

62

Factor Modeling for Advertisement Targeting 2145 Hamilton Ave  

E-print Network

Factor Modeling for Advertisement Targeting Ye Chen eBay Inc. 2145 Hamilton Ave San Jose, CA 95125 in the contexts of sponsored search (SS) and behaviorally targeted (BT) display advertising. We also approach implementation us- ing Hadoop MapReduce, the results are counterintuitive yet quite interesting. We therefore

63

Toyota Technological Institute at Chicago 6045 S. Kenwood Ave.  

E-print Network

Jinbo Xu Toyota Technological Institute at Chicago 6045 S. Kenwood Ave. Chicago, IL 60637 Email, optimization Employment and Affiliations 2012-present Associate Professor, Toyota Technological Institute at Chicago (at the University of Chicago) 2005-2012 Assistant Professor, Toyota Technological Institute

Xu, Jinbo

64

Medical Records Service 77 Massachusetts Ave., E23-023  

E-print Network

Medical Records Service 77 Massachusetts Ave., E23-023 Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 Phone: 617: _____________________________________________________________________________________ I request that the following information be amended in my medical record. Please specify the date.hhs.gov/ocr/privacy/hipaa/complaints Please mail or fax this form to the Medical Records Service (see top of page) and retain a copy for your

Polz, Martin

65

Pseudasthenes, a new genus of ovenbird (Aves: Passeriformes: Furnariidae)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Phylogenetic analysis of the family Furnariidae (Aves: Passeriformes) indicates that the genus Asthenes is polyphyletic, consisting of two groups that are not sister taxa. Pseudasthenes, a new genus of ovenbird, is described for one of these groups. The four species included in the new genus, formerly placed in Asthenes, are P. humicola, P. patagonica, P. steinbachi, and P. cactorum.

Derryberry, Elizabeth; Claramunt, Santiago; O'Quin, Kelly E.; Aleixo, Alexandre; Chesser, Terry; Remsen, J.V., Jr.; Brumfield, Robb T.

2010-01-01

66

MARIE-FRANCE BUREAU 1060 ave Bernard, app. 2  

E-print Network

MARIE-FRANCE BUREAU 1060 ave Bernard, app. 2 Montréal, Québec H2V 1V2 Rés. : (514) 214-3557 Travail : (819) 821-8000, poste 65446 marie-france.bureau@usherbrooke.ca Langues parlées et écrites : français et (Académie internationale d'orchestre de Pierre Dervaux, Saumur, France) 1985 : 2nd Prix, Concours de Musique

Spino, Claude

67

IDENTIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THE PEROXIREDOXIN GENE FAMILY IN AVES  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Peroxiredoxin (PRX) is a crucial antioxidant protein that protects against endogenously produced peroxides in prokaryotes to eukaryotes. To date, six different isoforms have been identified in mammals. In this study, we describe the first members of the PRX protein family to be characterized in Aves...

68

Diaz Olvera L., Plat D., Pochet P. (2013), The puzzle of mobility and access to the city in sub-Saharan Africa, Journal of Transport Geography, Vol. 32, pp. 56-64.  

E-print Network

in Sub-Saharan Africa Lourdes Diaz Olvera, Didier Plat, Pascal Pochet lourdes. Introduction The continuous and rapid population increase in the major cities of sub-Saharan Africa). The situation is quite different in many countries of the South, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, where

Boyer, Edmond

2013-01-01

69

Observations on the Use of Manual Signs and Gestures in the Communicative Interactions between Native Americans and Spanish Explorers of North America: The Accounts of Bernal Diaz del Castillo and Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Vaca  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The accounts of two men who participated in several Spanish-led expeditions to the New World in the early 1500s document the frequent use of manual signs and gestures in the initial interactions between European explorers and the indigenous peoples of North America. Bernal Diaz del Castillo described the events that occurred during three…

Bonvillian, John D.; Ingram, Vicky L.; McCleary, Brendan M.

2009-01-01

70

ATLAS DE LAS AVES EN INVIERNO Servicio de Vida Silvestre  

E-print Network

ATLAS DE LAS AVES EN INVIERNO EN ESPA�A Servicio de Vida Silvestre Subdirección General de Medio? INTRODUCCI�N Gracias a los elevados niveles de organización y calidad técnica alcanzados, los atlas dos atlas editados por Purroy (1997) y Martí y Del Moral (2003), que durante la última década se han

Carrascal, Luis M.

71

Ave-CPFR Working Chains on the Basis of Selection Model of Collaborative Credit-Granting Guarantee Approaches  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents AVE and CPFR concepts and their characteristics, establishes and analyzes the AVE-based CPFR working flow, and illustrates the content of the grid resource management and the mission in relation to the corresponding grid resource management system. It focuses on the working flow of the AVE-based CPFR. On this basis, it proposes the AVE-related CPFR mechanism grounded on

Tong Shu; Shou Chen; Chi Xie; Shouyang Wang; Kin Keung Lai

2010-01-01

72

East Bank locations University Ave & 12th St. SE -Sanford Hall  

E-print Network

Barker Dance Center 4th St. So - Se corner Rarig Center Washington Ave. Bridge - pedestrian enclosure Tate Lab of Physics Ford Hall Amundson Hall Elect. Eng. & Computer Sci. Moos Tower Phillips Fields SCHOLARS WALK SCHOLARS WALK 4th St.Ramp Weisman Art Museum/ Garage Washington Ave. Parking Ramp

Weiblen, George D

73

From Hwy 6, exit University Dr. and proceed west to Texas Ave.  

E-print Network

Directions From Hwy 6, exit University Dr. and proceed west to Texas Ave. Turn LEFT onto Texas Ave to let you enter, tell them that the Associate Director of PTTS, made the arrangements. If the garage which you entered (on Throckmorton St.). Walk north (to your left), cross Joe Routt on Throckmorton, go

Bermúdez, José Luis

74

Connecticut Native American Intertribal Urban Council Mailing address: 545 Whalley Ave New Haven, Ct. 06511  

E-print Network

Connecticut Native American Intertribal Urban Council Mailing address: 545 Whalley Ave New Haven Applicants must be Native American. All applications must be postmarked or hand delivered to 545 Whalley Ave letters of recommendation (one of which should be from a Native American, where possible) Students need

Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

75

The AVE/VAS 2: The 25 mb sounding data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The rawinsonde sounding program for the AVE/VAS II experiment is described and tabulated data at 25 mb intervals are presented. Soundings were taken at 3 hr intervals, was an 18 hour period. An additional sounding was taken at the normal synoptic observation time. The processing soundings method is discussed, estimates of the RMS errors in the data are presented, and an example of contact data is given. Termination pressures of soundings taken in the meso-beta-scale network are tabulated, as are observations of ground temperature at a depth of 2 cm.

Sienkiewicz, M. E.

1982-01-01

76

AVE-SESAME 6: 25-MB sounding data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The rawinsonde sounding program for the AVE-SESAME 6 experiment is described and tabulated data at 25 mb intervals from the surface to 25 mb for the 23 National Weather Service and 15 special stations participating in the experiment are presented. Soundings were taken at 3 h intervals beginning at 1200 GMT on June 7, 1979, and ending at 1200 GMT on June 8, 1979 (nine sounding times). The method of processing is discussed briefly, estimates of the rms errors in the data presented, an example of contact data given, reasons given for the termination of soundings below 100 mb, and soundings are listed which exhibit abnormal characteristics.

Sienkiewicz, M. E.; Gilchrist, L. P.; Turner, R. E.

1981-01-01

77

AVE/VAS 1: 25 mb sounding data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The rawinsonde sounding program for the AVE/VAS I (shakedown) experiment is described. Tabulated data at 25-mb intervals for the 13 special rawinsonde stations and 1 National Weather Service station participating in the experiment are presented. Soundings were taken at 1200 and 1800 GMT on February 6, 1982, and at 0000 GMT on February 7, 1982. The method of processing soundings is discussed briefly, estimates of the RMS errors in the data are presented, and an example of contact data is given. Termination pressures of soundings are tabulated, as are observations of ground temperature at a depth of 2 cm.

Sienkiewicz, M. E.

1983-01-01

78

AVE-SESAME IV: 25 mb sounding data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The rawinsonde sounding program for the AVE-SESAME 4 experiment is descirbed and tabulated data at 25 mb for the 23 National Weather Service and 20 special stations participating in the experiment are presented. Soundings were taken at 3 hr intervals beginning at 1200 GMT on May 9, 1979, and ending at 1200 GMT on May 10, 1979 (nine sounding times). The method of processing is discussed, estimates of the rms errors in the data are presented, and an example of contact data is given. Reasons are given for the termination of soundings below 100 mb, and soundings are listed which exhibit abnormal characteristics.

Sienkiewicz, M. E.; Gilchrist, L. P.; Turner, R. E.

1980-01-01

79

AVE-Sesame 3: 25-MB sounding data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The rawinsonde sounding program for the AVE-SESAME 3 experiment is described and tabulated data at 25-mb intervals from the surface to 25 mb for the 23 National Weather Service and 19 special stations participating in the experiment are presented. Soundings were taken at 3 hr intervals beginning at 1200 GMT on April 25, 1979, and ending at 1200 GMT on April 26, 1979 (nine sounding times). The method of processing is discussed briefly, estimates of the rms errors in the data presented, an example of contact data given, reasons given for the termination of soundings below 100 mb, and soundings listed which exhibit abnormal characteristics.

Williams, S. T.; Gerhard, M. L.; Gilchrist, L. P.; Turner, R. E.

1980-01-01

80

AVE-SESAME 2: The 25-MB sounding data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The rawinsonde sounding program for the AVE-SESAME II experiment is described. Data at 25 mb intervals from the surface to 25 mb for the 23 National Weather Service and 19 special stations participating in the experiment are presented. Soundings were taken at 3 hr intervals beginning at 1200 GMT on April 19, 1979, and ending at 1200 GMT on April 20, 1979 (nine sounding times). The method of processing is discussed briefly, estimates of the rms errors in the data presented, an example of contact data given, reasons given for the termination of soundings below 100 mb, and soundings listed which exhibit abnormal characteristics.

Williams, S. F.; Gerhard, M. L.; Turner, R. E.

1980-01-01

81

1. VIEW OF MILL WORKER HOUSE AT 502 ASKEW AVE. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. VIEW OF MILL WORKER HOUSE AT 502 ASKEW AVE. HOUSE IS 1 1/2 STORY, 3 BAY SIDE GABLE WITH REAR KITCHEN ELL AND PORCH EXTENDING FROM FRONT. LOCKWOOD GREENE ENGINEERS BUILT THIS AND 128 OTHER NEW HOUSES FOR NEW ENGLAND SOUTHERN MILLS IN 1923-1924. THE PREEXISTING MILL VILLAGE NEEDED TO BE EXPANDED TO ACCOMODATE WORKERS FOR THEIR NEW STARK MILL IN HOGANSVILLE. THIS HOUSE WAS BUILT WITH INDOOR PLUMBING, AND ELECTRICITY AT A COST OF APPROXIMATELY $430 PER ROOM. - 502 Askew Avenue (House), 502 Askew Avenue, Hogansville, Troup County, GA

82

Spiroketal formation and modification in avermectin biosynthesis involves a dual activity of AveC.  

PubMed

Avermectins (AVEs), which are widely used for the treatment of agricultural parasitic diseases, belong to a family of 6,6-spiroketal moiety-containing, macrolide natural products. AVE biosynthesis is known to employ a type I polyketide synthase (PKS) system to assemble the molecular skeleton for further functionalization. It remains unknown how and when spiroketal formation proceeds, particularly regarding the role of AveC, a unique protein in the pathway that shares no sequence homology to any enzyme of known function. Here, we report the unprecedented, dual function of AveC by correlating its activity with spiroketal formation and modification during the AVE biosynthetic process. The findings in this study were supported by characterizing extremely unstable intermediates, products and their spontaneous derivative products from the simplified chemical profile and by comparative analysis of in vitro biotransformations and in vivo complementations mediated by AveC and MeiC (the counterpart in biosynthesizing the naturally occurring, AVE-like meilingmycins). AveC catalyzes the stereospecific spiroketalization of a dihydroxy-ketone polyketide intermediate and the optional dehydration to determine the regiospecific saturation characteristics of spiroketal diversity. These reactions take place between the closures of the hexene ring and 16-membered macrolide and the formation of the hexahydrobenzofuran unit. MeiC can replace the spirocyclase activity of AveC, but it lacks the independent dehydratase activity. Elucidation of the generality and specificity of AveC-type proteins allows for the rationalization of previously published results that were not completely understood, suggesting that enzyme-mediated spiroketal formation was initially underestimated, but is, in fact, widespread in nature for the control of stereoselectivity. PMID:23294008

Sun, Peng; Zhao, Qunfei; Yu, Futao; Zhang, Hua; Wu, Zhuhua; Wang, Yinyan; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Qinglin; Liu, Wen

2013-01-30

83

Comparative sequence-structure analysis of Aves insulin  

PubMed Central

Normal blood glucose level depends on the availability of insulin and its ability to bind insulin receptor (IR) that regulates the downstream signaling pathway. Insulin sequence and blood glucose level usually vary among animals due to species specificity. The study of genetic variation of insulin, blood glucose level and diabetics symptoms development in Aves is interesting because of its optimal high blood glucose level than mammals. Therefore, it is of interest to study its evolutionary relationship with other mammals using sequence data. Hence, we compiled 32 Aves insulin from GenBank to compare its sequence-structure features with phylogeny for evolutionary inference. The analysis shows long conserved motifs (about 14 residues) for functional inference. These sequences show high leucine content (20%) with high instability index (>40). Amino acid position 11, 14, 16 and 20 are variable that may have contribution to binding to IR. We identified functionally critical variable residues in the dataset for possible genetic implication. Structural models of these sequences were developed for surface analysis towards functional representation. These data find application in the understanding of insulin function across species. PMID:25848166

Islam, Md Mirazul; Aktaruzzaman, M; Mohamed, Zahurin

2015-01-01

84

AVE-SEASAME 5: 25-mb sounding data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The rewinsonde sounding program for the AVE-SESAME 5 experiment is described and tubulated data at 25 mb intervals are presented for the 23 National Weather Service stations and 20 special stations participating in the experiment. Soundings were taken at 3-hr intervals beginning at 1200 GMT on May 20, 1979, and ending at 1200 GMT on may 21, 1979 (nine sounding times). A tenth sounding was teken at many special stations between 2100 and 0000 GMT on May 20. The method of processing is discussed, estimates of the rms errors in the data are presented, and an example of contact data is given. Reasons are given for the termination of soundings below 100 mb, and soundings with abnormal characteristics are listed.

Sienkiewicz, M. E.; Gilchrist, L. P.; Turner, R. E.

1981-01-01

85

AVE/VAS 3: 25-mb sounding data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The rawinsonde sounding program for the AVE/VAS 3 experiment is described. Tabulated data are presented at 25-mb intervals for the 24 National Weather Service stations and 14 special stations participating in the experiment. Soundings were taken at 3-hr intervals, beginning at 1200 GMT on March 27, 1982, and ending at 0600 GMT on March 28, 1982 (7 sounding times). An additional sounding was taken at the National Weather Service stations at 1200 GMT on March 28, 1982, at the normal synoptic observation time. The method of processing soundings is briefly discussed, estimates of the RMS errors in the data are presented, and an example of contact data is given. Termination pressures of soundings taken in the mesos-beta-scale network are tabulated, as are observations of ground temperature at a depth of 2 cm.

Sienkiewicz, M. E.

1982-01-01

86

The AVES adaptive optics spectrograph for the VLT: status report  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report on the status of AVES, the Adaptive-optics Visual Echelle Spectrograph proposed for the secondary port of the Nasmyth Adaptive Optics System (NAOS) recently installed at the VLT. AVES is an intermediate resolution (R ? 16,000) high-efficiency fixed- format echelle spectrograph which operates in the spectral band 500 - 1,000 nm. In addition to a high intrinsic efficiency, comparable to that of ESI at Keck II, it takes advantage of the adaptive optics correction provided by NAOS to reduce the sky and detector contribution in background-limited observations of weak sources, thus allowing a further magnitude gain with respect to comparable non-adaptive optics spectrographs. Simulations show that the instrument will be capable of reaching a magnitude V = 22.5 at S/N > 10 in two hours, two magnitudes weaker than GIRAFFE at the same resolution and 3 magnitudes weaker than the higher resolution UVES spectrograph. Imaging and coronographic functions have also been implemented in the design. We present the results of the final design study and we dicuss the technical and operational issues related to its implementation at the VLT as a visitor instrument. We also discuss the possibility of using a scaled-up non-adaptive optics version of the same design as an element of a double- or triple-arm intermediate-resolution spectrograph for the VLT. Such an option looks attractive in the context of a high-efficiency large-bandwidth (320 - 1,500 nm) spectrograph ("fast-shooter") being considered by ESO as a 2nd-generation VLT instrument.

Pallavicini, Roberto; Delabre, Bernard; Pasquini, Luca; Zerbi, Filippo M.; Bonanno, Giovanni; Comari, Maurizio; Conconi, Paolo; Mazzoleni, Ruben; Santin, Paolo; Damiani, Francesco; Di Marcantonio, Paolo; Franchini, Mariagrazia; Spano, Paolo; Bonifacio, P.; Catalano, Santo; Molaro, Paolo P.; Randich, S.; Rodono, Marcello

2003-03-01

87

DEPAUL UNIVERSITY Institute for Professional Development INSTITUTE FOR PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 243 S. Wabash Ave, Room 301  

E-print Network

S. Wabash Ave, Room 301 Chicago, IL 60604-2300 WEB DEVELOPMENT WITH JAVASCRIPT AND HTML5 Phone: (312: ________________________________ #12;WEB DEVELOPMENT WITH JAVASCRIPT AND HTML5 PROGRAM APPLICANTS: This form must be completed

Schaefer, Marcus

88

A preliminary look at AVE-SESAME 3 conducted on 25-26 April 1979  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

General weather conditions, including synoptic maps, radar reports, satellite photographs, precipitation areas and amounts, and a summary of severe weather reports are presented. These data provide researchers a preliminary look at conditions during the AVE-SESAME 3 period.

Williams, S. F.; Horvath, N.; Turner, R. E.

1980-01-01

89

DEPARTMENT OF EARTH & CLIMATE SCIENCES 1600 HOLLOWAY AVE, THORNTON HALL 509  

E-print Network

1 DEPARTMENT OF EARTH & CLIMATE SCIENCES 1600 HOLLOWAY AVE University's (SFSU) Department of Earth & Climate Sciences (http://tornado.sfsu.edu/) seeks candidates to teach at the undergraduate and graduate levels. The Department of Earth & Climate Sciences has 10

90

Tarphonomus, a new genus of ovenbird (Aves : Passeriformes : Furnariidae) from South America  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Tarphonomus, a new genus of ovenbird (Aves: Passeriformes: Furnariidae) from South America, is described. Species included in the new genus, formerly placed in Upucerthia, are T. certhioides and T. harterti.

Chesser, R.T.; Brumfield, R.T.

2007-01-01

91

Treatment of Zucker diabetic fatty rats with AVE7688 improves vascular and neural dysfunction  

PubMed Central

Aim Vasopeptidase inhibitors are drugs that inhibit angiotensin-converting enzyme and neutral endopeptidase (NEP). The latter is a protease that degrades vasoactive peptides and is increased in diabetes. We have previously shown that treating streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, an animal model of type 1 diabetes, with AVE7688, a vasopeptidase inhibitor, improves neurovascular and neural function. In this study, we determined the effect of treating Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats, an animal model of type 2 diabetes, with AVE7688 on vascular and neural function. Methods ZDF rats at 12 weeks of age were treated for 12 weeks with AVE7688 (500 mg/kg diet). Afterwards, vascular reactivity of epineurial arterioles of the sciatic nerve and nerve conduction velocity and blood flow was determined. Results Vascular and neural function was significantly impaired in ZDF rats compared with age-matched lean (control) rats. Treating ZDF rats with AVE7688 improved vascular relaxation to acetylcholine and calcitonin gene-related peptide in epineurial arterioles. Motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity, endoneurial blood flow and thermal nociception end-points were also improved by treatment compared with untreated ZDF rats. Superoxide and expression of NEP were increased in epineurial arterioles from ZDF rats and attenuated by treatment with AVE7688. Conclusions AVE7688 is an effective treatment for microvascular and neural disease in ZDF rats. Thus, vasopeptidase inhibitors may be an effective treatment for diabetic microvascular and neural complication in type 2 diabetes. PMID:18564175

Oltman, C. L.; Davidson, E. P.; Coppey, L. J.; Kleinschmidt, T. L.; Yorek, M. A.

2009-01-01

92

AveBoost2: Boosting for Noisy Data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

AdaBoost is a well-known ensemble learning algorithm that constructs its constituent or base models in sequence. A key step in AdaBoost is constructing a distribution over the training examples to create each base model. This distribution, represented as a vector, is constructed to be orthogonal to the vector of mistakes made by the pre- vious base model in the sequence. The idea is to make the next base model's errors uncorrelated with those of the previous model. In previous work, we developed an algorithm, AveBoost, that constructed distributions orthogonal to the mistake vectors of all the previous models, and then averaged them to create the next base model s distribution. Our experiments demonstrated the superior accuracy of our approach. In this paper, we slightly revise our algorithm to allow us to obtain non-trivial theoretical results: bounds on the training error and generalization error (difference between training and test error). Our averaging process has a regularizing effect which, as expected, leads us to a worse training error bound for our algorithm than for AdaBoost but a superior generalization error bound. For this paper, we experimented with the data that we used in both as originally supplied and with added label noise-a small fraction of the data has its original label changed. Noisy data are notoriously difficult for AdaBoost to learn. Our algorithm's performance improvement over AdaBoost is even greater on the noisy data than the original data.

Oza, Nikunj C.

2004-01-01

93

Effects of changing irrigation practices on the ground-water hydrology of the Santa Isabel-Juana Diaz area, south central Puerto Rico  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Prior to 1930, the principal source of water for irrigation in the Santa Isabel-Juana Diaz area was surface water from outside the study area, which was delivered by a complex channel-pond system. Recharge from water applied to the fields, estimated to be 18.7 million of gallons per day, and discharge by ground-water flow to sea, estimated to be 17 million of gallons per day, were the major water- budget components prior to intensive development of the ground-water resources. Development of the ground-water resources after 1930 resulted in a substantial increase in irrigation, primarily furrow irrigation. The surface water supplied by the complex channel-pond system continued to be used and ground-water withdrawals increased sub- stantially. By 1966-68, ground-water recharge from irrigation water applied to the fields, estimated to be 37 million of gallons per day, and discharge by pumpage for irrigation, estimated to be 77 million of gallons per day, were the two major components of the ground-water budget. By 1987, drip irrigation had become the principal method of irrigation in the study area, and surface-water irrigation had, for the most part, been discontinued. The estimated aquifer recharge from irrigation water in 1987 was about 6.6 million of gallons per day, which occurred primarily in the remaining fields where furrow irrigation was still practiced. Although aquifer recharge had been reduced as a result of the conversion from furrow to drip irrigation, water levels in the aquifer were higher in 1987 than in 1968 because of the large reduction in ground-water withdrawals and subsequent recovery of ground-water levels.

Ramos-Gines, Orlando

1994-01-01

94

IT'S NOT EASY BEING GREEN: USING MOLT AND MORPHOLOGICAL CRITERIA TO AGE AND SEX GREEN PLUMAGE MANAKINS (AVES: PIPRIDAE)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Resumen. - No es fácil ser verde: El uso de criterios morfológicos y patrones de muda para determi- nar el sexo y la edad de saltarines con plumaje verde (Aves: Pipridae). - La habilidad para determinar la edad y el sexo de aves puede contribuir con estudios que abarcan desde demografía poblacional hasta biología reproductiva. El sexo y la edad

Thomas B. Ryder; Renata Durães

2005-01-01

95

Reduction and error analysis of the AVE 2 pilot experiment data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The reduction techniques used to process data from the pilot experiment of the second NASA atmospheric variability experiment (AVE IIP), which was conducted during a 24 hour period beginning at 1200 GMT on May 11, 1974, and ending at 1200 GMT on May 12, 1974 are described. Each step of the data handling process is described through the presentation of computer flow charts, programs, equations, and narrative. An error analysis of the final output is presented, and results of the AVE IIP reduction process are compared with results from the National Weather Service. The AVE IIP sounding data contain more detail than National Weather Service data, but the two data sets may be used together without difficulty.

Fuelberg, H. E.

1974-01-01

96

Pressure Contact Sounding Data for NASA's Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE 3)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The basic rawinsonde data are described at each pressure contact from the surface to sounding termination for the 41 stations participating in the AVE III measurement program that began at 0000 GMT on February 6 and ended at 1200 GMT on February 7, 1975. Soundings were taken at 3-hour intervals during a large period of the experiment from most stations within the United States east of about 105 degrees west longitude. Methods of data processing, change in reduction scheme since the AVE II pilot experiment, and data accuracy are briefly discussed. An example of contact data is presented, and microfiche cards of all the contact data are included in the appendix. The AVE III project was conducted to better understand and establish the extent of applications for meteorological satellite sensor data through correlative ground truth experiments and to provide basic experimental data for use in studies of atmospheric scales of-motion interrelationships.

Fuelberg, H. E.; Hill, C. K.; Turner, R. E.; Long, K. E.

1975-01-01

97

Integer Circuit Evaluation is PSPACEcomplete Computer Science Department, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh,  

E-print Network

Integer Circuit Evaluation is PSPACE­complete Ke Yang Computer Science Department, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA E­mail: yangke@cmu.edu Key Words: PSPACE, Integer Circuit, Chinese Remainder Theorem Wagner [10] introduced the Integer Circuit Evaluation problem. Infor

Yang, Ke

98

DEPAUL UNIVERSITY Institute for Professional Development INSTITUTE FOR PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 243 S. Wabash Ave, Room 301  

E-print Network

S. Wabash Ave, Room 301 Chicago, IL 60604-2300 BIG DATA AND NOSQL PROGRAM Phone: (312) 362 DATA AND NOSQL PROGRAM APPLICANTS: This form must be completed and included with your application: _____________________ _____________________ _____________________ _______________ _____________________ _____________________ _____________________ _______________ 3. Describe your experience building applications with any relational database management systems

Schaefer, Marcus

99

CITY OF ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN 100 North Fifth Ave. P.O. Box 8647  

E-print Network

CITY OF ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN 100 North Fifth Ave. P.O. Box 8647 Ann Arbor, Michigan 48107, Communications Unit Manager (734) 794-6152 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CITY OF ANN ARBOR VOTER TIPS AND POLLING LOCATION INFORMATION ANN ARBOR, MI ­ October 26, 2010 ­ Tuesday, Nov. 2 is the State General Election

Shyy, Wei

100

SELECCIN DE ACACIAS PARA LA CONSTRUCCIN DE NIDOS DE AVES: UN BENEFICIO INDIRECTO DEL MUTULISMO  

E-print Network

SELECCI�N DE ACACIAS PARA LA CONSTRUCCI�N DE NIDOS DE AVES: UN BENEFICIO INDIRECTO DEL MUTULISMO caducifolio centroamericano, y comúnmente construyen sus nidos en acacias, principalmente en Acacia collinsii alimenta de las secreciones de los nectarios y los cuerpos de Belt de la de la acacia. Por su parte, la

Cuervo, Andrés

101

RECUPERO DI FAUNA SELVATICA NELLA PROVINCIA DI TRIESTE NEL TRIENNIO 1994 -1996 (MAMMALIA - AVES)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rescue of wild fauna in the Trieste Province during 1994-1996 (Mammalia - Aves). The problem regarding rescue\\/rehabilitation of wildlife tends to be more deeply felt in areas in which the anthropical impact on the environment is greatest. Records of the institutions and Associations in the Province of Trieste involved in the rescue and rehabilitation reveal that more and more animals

2003-01-01

102

A preliminary look at AVE-SESAME 4 conducted on 9-10 May 1979  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report contains information on data collected, symptotic conditions, and severe and unusual weather reported during the Atmospheric Variability Experiment Severe Environmental Storms and Mesoscale Experiment (AVE-SESAME) 4 period. The information provides researchers a look at conditions during the period.

July, M.; Turner, R. E.

1980-01-01

103

Atlas de aves: Un metodo para documentar distribucion y seguir poblaciones  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Los Atlas de Aves son proyectos nacionales o regionalies para trazar en mapas la distribucion en reproduccion de cada especie de ave. Ese procedimiento se esta usando en Europa, Australia, Nueva Zelanda, Norteamerica, y partes de Africa. El tama?o de los cuadrados varia de medio grado de latitud y Iongitud hasta 5 x 5 km. El trabajo de campo de cada proyecto exige aproxlmadamente cinco a?os, pero los aficionados pueden llevar a cabo la mayor parte del trabajo. Es posible almacenar los resultados en un computador personal. Hay muchos beneficios: (I) se presenta la distribucion corriente de las aves de la nacion, del estado, o de la Iocalidad; (2) se desarrolla nueva informacion especialmente sobre especies raras o en peligro; (3) se descubren areas que tienen una avlfauna sobresaliente o habitats raros y ayuda a su proteccion, (4) se documentan cambios de dlstribucion; (5) se pueden usar para documentar cambios de poblacion, especialmente en los tropicos donde otros metodos son mas dificiles de usar porque hay muchas especies y no hay muchos observadores calificados en la identificacion de sonidos de las aves; (6) son proyectos buenos de investigacion para estudiantes graduados; (7) los turistas y los jefes de excursiones de historia natural pueden contribuir con muchas informaciones

Robbins, C.S.; Dowell, B.A.; Dawson, D.K.

1988-01-01

104

MAIN GATE, INTERSECTION OF 4TH AVE (200 NORTH) AND N ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

MAIN GATE, INTERSECTION OF 4TH AVE (200 NORTH) AND N STREET (895 EAST), SALT LAKE CITY, UT. VIEW LOOKING EAST THROUGH MAIN CEMETERY GATE TO CEMETERY'S MAIN STREET, REPHOTOGRAPH OF HISTORIC SHIPLER PHOTO # 18276, UTAH STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY COLLECTION. - Salt Lake City Cemetery, 200 N Street, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT

105

Ying Xu Curriculum Vitae Address Tepper School of Business, 5000 Forbes Ave,  

E-print Network

/ Education Tepper School of Business, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, U.S.A Ph.D. in Operations with Strategic Collaboration of Competing Servers (with A. Scheller-Wolf). In progress Refereed ConferenceYing Xu Curriculum Vitae Ying Xu Address Tepper School of Business, 5000 Forbes Ave, Pittsburgh, PA

Sadeh, Norman M.

106

Phylogenetic relationships of the bulbuls (Aves: Pycnonotidae) based on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequence data  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bulbuls (Aves: Pycnonotidae) are a fairly speciose (ca. 130 sp.) bird family restricted to the Old World. Family limits and taxonomy have been revised substantially over the past decade, but a comprehensive molecular phylogeny for the family has not been undertaken. Using nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences, we reconstructed a well-supported phylogenetic hypothesis for the bulbuls. Three basal lineages were

Robert G. Moyle; Ben D. Marks

2006-01-01

107

Data for NASA's AVE 5 experiment: 25 mb sounding data and synoptic charts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The AVE V Experiment is described and tabulated rawinsonde data at 25-mb intervals from the surface to 25 mb for the 23 stations participating in the experiment are presented. Soundings were taken between 0000 GMT, June 11, and 1200 GMT, June 12, 1976. The methods of data processing and accuracy are briefly discussed. An example of contact data is also included.

Humbert, M. E.; Hill, K.

1977-01-01

108

Biogeographical and phylogenetic implications of an early Miocene wren (Aves: Passeriformes: Acanthisittidae) from New Zealand  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new species and genus of acanthisittid wren (Aves: Passeriformes: Acanthisittidae) is described from the Early Miocene (19–16 Ma) St Bathans Fauna from Otago, New Zealand, based on four fossil bones. The first Tertiary fossil passerine to be described from New Zealand, it is similar in size to New Zealand's smallest extant bird, the Rifleman Acanthisitta chloris. A phylogenetic analysis

Trevor H. Worthy; Suzanne J. Hand; Jacqueline M. T. Nguyen; Alan J. D. Tennyson; Jennifer P. Worthy; R. Paul Scofield; Walter E. Boles; Michael Archer

2010-01-01

109

Rsistance au dveloppement d'Heterodera ave-nae Woll. chez diffrentes espces de Triticum  

E-print Network

Résistance au développement d'Heterodera ave- nae Woll. chez différentes espèces de Triticum Roger pathotypes d'Heterodera avenae de 88 lignées ou hybrides appartenant aux espè- ces Triticum monococcum, T. urartu, T. turgidum, T. timopheevi, T. aestivum, T. umbellulatum, T. variabile, a été étudié. Une grande

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

110

Department of Surgery 50 Charlton Ave E. Faculty of Health Sciences Hamilton Ontario, Canada  

E-print Network

Department of Surgery 50 Charlton Ave E. Faculty of Health Sciences Hamilton Ontario, Canada L8N 4A6 Division of Thoracic Surgery Research Group, Department Clinical Epidemiology & Biostatistics Regionalization on Outcomes in High Risk Cancer Surgery Introduction This fellowship is hosted in conjunction

Haykin, Simon

111

Angelique Diaz To Subject UPLOAD  

E-print Network

Nanobio Interfaces 6 Theory and Modeling 7 Electron Microscopy Center 8 9 10 11 Timeline 12 1. Electronic at the nanoscale community to advance its own research programs Key Capabilities nanotubes and graphene (Atomate for example, electrons and ions, atoms and phonons, photons through movements of electrons and ions

112

TES carbon monoxide validation during two AVE campaigns using the Argus and ALIAS instruments on NASA's WB-57F  

E-print Network

Christopher R. Webster,3 and Greg Osterman3 Received 11 April 2007; revised 15 February 2008; accepted 25. R. Webster, and G. Osterman (2008), TES carbon monoxide validation during two AVE campaigns using

113

Graystone Group Advertising, 2710 North Ave, Suite 200 Bridgeport, CT 06604 Phone: 8005440005 or 2035490060 Fax: 2035490061  

E-print Network

Graystone Group Advertising, 2710 North Ave, Suite 200 Bridgeport, CT 06604 Phone: 8005440005 or 2035490060 Fax: 2035490061 Email: ads@graystoneadv.com Placing Recruitment Advertising To assist University departments with all recruitment and advertising needs, Clemson is now partnered

Bolding, M. Chad

114

Pressure contact sounding data for NASA's Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE 2). [rawinsondes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The basic rawinsonde data are described at each pressure contact from the surface to sounding termination for the 54 stations participating in the AVE 2 pilot experiment. Soundings were taken at three-hour intervals from stations within the United States east of about 105 degrees west longitude. Methods of data reduction and estimates of data accuracy are discussed. Examples of the data records produced are shown. The AVE 2 pilot experiment was conducted as part of NASA's program to better understand and establish the extent of applications for meteorological satellite sensor data through correlative ground truth experiments and to provide basic experimental data for use in studies of atmospheric scales-of-motion interrelationships.

Fuelberg, H. E.; Turner, R. E.

1975-01-01

115

Phylogenetic relationships within the Laridae (Charadriiformes: Aves) inferred from mitochondrial markers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gulls (Aves: Laridae) constitute a recent and cosmopolite family of well-studied seabirds for which a robust phylogeny is needed to perform comparative and biogeographical analyses. The present study, the first molecular phylogeny of all Larids species (N=53), is based on a combined segment of mtDNA (partial cytochrome b and control region). We discuss our phylogenetic tree in the light of

J.-M. Pons; A. Hassanin; P.-A. Crochet

2005-01-01

116

The development of convective instability in relation to convective activity and synoptic systems in AVE IV  

E-print Network

Administration's fourth Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE IV). The 3- and 6-h sounding intervals allowed time changes in convective stability to be studied in areas of convective storms. A stability development equation was derived and each term... was examined to determine when and where it made a significant contribution to the development process. The usefulness of satellite data in describing stability development and the processes effecting its change also was evaluated. Of the terms...

Davis, James Gregory

1979-01-01

117

Data for NASA's AVE 4 experiment: 25 mb sounding data and synoptic charts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The AVE IV Experiment is described and tabulated rawinsonde data at 25 mb intervals from the surface to 25 mb for the 42 stations participating in the experiment are presented. Soundings were taken between 0000 GMT, April 24, and 1,200 GMT, April 25, 1975. The methods of data processing and accuracy are briefly discussed. Synoptic charts prepared from the data are presented, as well as an example of contact data.

Fucik, N. F.; Turner, R. E.

1976-01-01

118

Data for NASA's AVE 4 experiment: 25-mb sounding data and synoptic charts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The AVE 4 Experiment is described and tabulated rawinsonde data at 25-mb intervals from the surface to 25 mb for the 42 stations participating in the experiment are presented. Soundings were taken between 0000 GMT, April 24 and 1200 GMT, April 25, 1975. The methods of data processing and accuracy are discussed. Synoptic charts prepared from the data are presented, as well as an example of contact data.

Fucik, N. F.; Turner, R. E.

1975-01-01

119

Food partitioning between breeding White-tailed Kites (Elanus leucurus; Aves; Accipitridae) and Barn Owls (Tyto alba; Aves; Tytonidae) in southern Brazil.  

PubMed

I examined the diet of breeding White-tailed Kites (Elanus leucurus; Aves; Accipitridae) and Barn Owls (Tyto alba; Aves; Tytonidae) in an agrarian area of southern Brazil by analyzing regurgitated prey remains. The objective was to evaluate how these raptors, which differ markedly in their hunting activity periods (owls are nocturnal and kites diurnal), share their mammalian food component. 2,087 prey consumed by Barn Owls and 1,276 by White-tailed Kites were identified. They presented a high overlap of food-niches (Piankas index was 0.98). Based on the daily activity period of their main small mammal prey, a lower overlap would be expected. The crepuscular/nocturnal Mus musculus was the main prey for the diet of breeding Barn Owls (81%) and White-tailed Kites (63%). This small exotic rodent provided 63% of the small mammal biomass ingested by owls and 44% by kites. Larger native small mammals were also considered important for the diet of kites, mainly because of their biomass contribution. Although these raptors differ markedly in their hunting activity periods, Barn Owls and White-tailed Kites are very similar predators in southern Brazil, overlapping their diets. PMID:17505751

Scheibler, D R

2007-02-01

120

k=10 GS PC TPDA GES Ave. Bayesian Score Results -Child -Sample Size 500  

E-print Network

-25 -24 -23 -22 -21 -20 -19 -18 -17 MMHC OR1 k=5 OR1 k=10 OR1 k=20 OR2 k=5 OR2 k=10 OR2 k=20 SC k=5 SC k=10 GS PC TPDA GES Bayesian Score (BDeu) Ave. Bayesian Score Results - Child - Sample Size 500 Error Bars = +/- Std.Dev. -80 -75 -70 -65 -60 -55 -50 MMHC OR1 k=5 OR1 k=10 OR1 k=20 OR2 k=5 OR2 k=10 OR

Brown, Laura E.

121

AVE3085, an enhancer of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, restores endothelial function and reduces blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Nitric oxide (NO) plays an important role in endothelial function, and impaired NO production is involved in hypertension. Therefore, compounds that regulate endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) may be of therapeutic benefit. A novel, low molecular weight compound AVE3085 is a recently developed compound with the ability to enhance eNOS transcription. The present study investigated the effects of AVE3085 in endothelial dysfunction associated with hypertension. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) were treated with AVE 3085 (10 mg·kg·day?1, orally) for 4 weeks. Isometric force measurement was performed on rings of isolated aortae in organ baths. Protein expression of eNOS, phosphorylated-eNOS and nitrotyrosine in the aortae were examined by Western blotting. mRNA for eNOS in rat aortae were examined by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). KEY RESULTS AVE3085 greatly improved endothelium-dependent relaxations in the aortae of SHRs. This functional change was accompanied by up-regulated expression of eNOS protein and mRNA, enhanced eNOS phosphorylation and decreased formation of nitrotyrosine. Furthermore, AVE3085 treatment reduced the blood pressure in SHR without affecting that of hypertensive eNOS?/? mice. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS The eNOS-transcription enhancer AVE3085 restored impaired endothelial function in a hypertensive model. The present study provides a solid basis for the potential development of eNOS-targeting drugs to restore down-regulated eNOS, as a new strategy in hypertension. PMID:21385179

Yang, Qin; Xue, Hong-Mei; Wong, Wing-Tak; Tian, Xiao-Yu; Huang, Yu; Tsui, Stephen KW; Ng, Patrick KS; Wohlfart, Paulus; Li, Huige; Xia, Ning; Tobias, Silke; Underwood, Malcolm John; He, Guo-Wei

2011-01-01

122

Radiological verification survey results at 14 Peck Ave., Pequannock, New Jersey (PJ001V)  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) conducted remedial action during 1993 at the Pompton Plains Railroad Spur and eight vicinity properties in the Wayne and Pequannock Townships in New Jersey as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). These properties are in the vicinity of the DOE-owned Wayne Interim Storage Site (WISS), formerly the W. R. Grace facility. The property at 14 Peck Ave., Pequannock, New Jersey is one of these vicinity properties. At the request of DOE, a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted an independent radiological verification survey at this property. The purpose of the survey, conducted between September and December 1993, was to confirm the success of the remedial actions performed to remove any radioactive materials in excess of the identified guidelines. The verification survey included surface gamma scans and gamma readings at 1 meter, beta-gamma scans, and the collection of soil and debris samples for radionuclide analysis. Results of the survey demonstrated that all radiological measurements on the property at 14 Peck Ave. were within applicable DOE guidelines. Based on the results of the remedial action data and confirmed by the verification survey data, the portions of the site that had been remediated during this action successfully meet the DOE remedial action objectives.

Rodriguez, R.E.; Johnson, C.A.

1995-05-01

123

Complete mitochondrial genome of the peregrine falcon Falco peregrinus (Aves, Falconiformes, Falconidae): genetic differences between the two individuals.  

PubMed

The peregrine falcon Falco peregrinus (Aves, Falconiformes, Falconidae) is one of the most common and widespread raptor species in the world. Here, the complete mitochondrial genome of F. peregrinus from Korea, which is one of the breeding ranges, was sequenced and characterized in detail. PMID:22409757

Ryu, Shi Hyun; Lee, Jin Hee; Hwang, Ui Wook

2012-04-01

124

JIGSAW, A PROGRAMMING ENVIRONMENT FOR JAVA IN CS1 Hendrix College, 1600 Washington Ave, Conway AR 72032  

E-print Network

JIGSAW, A PROGRAMMING ENVIRONMENT FOR JAVA IN CS1 Carl Burch Hendrix College, 1600 Washington Ave-platform programming environment designed specifically for Java-based CS1 courses. Jigsaw, as it is called, uses developed another introductory programming environment, named Jigsaw. The most notable difference between

Burch, Carl

125

U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS NORTH ATLANTIC DIVISION 302 Gen. Lee Ave., Brooklyn, NY 11252  

E-print Network

U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS ­ NORTH ATLANTIC DIVISION 302 Gen. Lee Ave., Brooklyn, NY 11252 www projects to reduce the risk of future coastal storm damage. In the Corps' North Atlantic Division to a need to secure funding, a lack of easements, or both. Of the 18 projects in the North Atlantic Division

US Army Corps of Engineers

126

Ag Business Student professional@yahoo.com 201 Harmony Ave. Apt.#3 Ft. Collins, CO (970) 123-4567  

E-print Network

Ag Business Student professional@yahoo.com 201 Harmony Ave. Apt.#3 Ft. Collins, CO (970) 123 Science and Agricultural Business Aims Community College Loveland, CO 2007 Associates of Science RELEVANT Agriculture Environmental Policy Business Management Finance International Trade RELEVANT EXPERIENCE

127

A Megafauna’s Microfauna: Gastrointestinal Parasites of New Zealand’s Extinct Moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes)  

PubMed Central

We perform the first multidisciplinary study of parasites from an extinct megafaunal clade using coprolites from the New Zealand moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes). Ancient DNA and microscopic analyses of 84 coprolites deposited by four moa species (South Island giant moa, Dinornis robustus; little bush moa, Anomalopteryx didiformis; heavy-footed moa, Pachyornis elephantopus; and upland moa, Megalapteryx didinus) reveal an array of gastrointestinal parasites including coccidians (Cryptosporidium and members of the suborder Eimeriorina), nematodes (Heterakoidea, Trichostrongylidae, Trichinellidae) and a trematode (Echinostomida). Parasite eggs were most prevalent and diverse in coprolites from lowland sites, where multiple sympatric moa species occurred and host density was therefore probably higher. Morphological and phylogenetic evidence supports a possible vicariant Gondwanan origin for some of the moa parasites. The discovery of apparently host-specific parasite taxa suggests paleoparasitological studies of megafauna coprolites may provide useful case-studies of coextinction. PMID:23451203

Wood, Jamie R.; Wilmshurst, Janet M.; Rawlence, Nicolas J.; Bonner, Karen I.; Worthy, Trevor H.; Kinsella, John M.; Cooper, Alan

2013-01-01

128

Impact evaluation of lighting retrofit projects at Boeing Commercial Airplane Group under The Energy $avings Plan  

SciTech Connect

This impact evaluation of two lighting retrofit projects that were recently installed at Boeing Commercial Airplane Group (Boeing) was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) as part of an evaluation of its Energy $avings Plan (E$P) Program. The first project was a light-fixture and lighting control retrofit, consisting of five individual measures installed in Building 40-05. The second project was a retrofit of all parking lot lighting on the site. The objective of this impact evaluation was to assess how much electrical energy is being saved at Boeing as a result of the E$P projects and to determine how much the savings cost Bonneville and the region. The impact of the project was evaluated with a combination of engineering analysis, financial analysis, interviews, and submittal reviews (Boeing`s proposals and completion reports).

Sullivan, G.P.; Oens, M.A.; Spanner, G.E.

1994-01-01

129

Morris Park Ave Rhinelander Ave  

E-print Network

Albert Einstein College of Medicine ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE OF MEDICINE JACK AND PEARL RESNICK CAMPUS Building 19. Einstein Boiler Plant JACOBI MEDICAL CENTER 20. Nurses' Residence MEDICAL PARK EINSTEIN PROGRAM LOCATIONS Glass Building Ob/Gyn Private Practice

Kenny, Paraic

130

TES Carbon Monoxide Validation during the Two AVE Campaigns using the Argus and ALIAS Instruments on NASA's WB-57F  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Aura Validation Experiment (AVE) focuses on validating Aura satellite measurements of important atmospheric trace gases using ground-based, aircraft, and balloon-borne instruments. Global satellite observations of CO from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) on the EOS Aura satellite have been ongoing since September 2004. This paper discusses CO validation experiments during the Oct-AVE (2004 Houston, Texas) and CR-AVE (2006 San Jose, Costa Rica) campaigns. The coincidences in location and time between the satellite observations and the available in situ profiles for some cases are not ideal. However, the CO distribution patterns in the two validation flight areas are shown to have very little variability in the aircraft and satellite . observations, thereby making them suitable for validation comparisons. TES CO profiles, which typically have a retrieval uncertainty of 10-20%, are compared with in situ CO measurements from NASA Ames Research Center's Argus instrument taken on board the WB-57F aircraft during Oct-AVE. TES CO retrievals during CR-AVE are compared with in situ measurements from Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Aircraft Laser Infrared Absorption Spectrometer (ALIAS) instrument as well as with the Argus instrument, both taken on board the WB-57F aircraft. During CR-AVE, the average overall difference between ALIAS and Argus CO was 4%, with the ALIAS measurement higher. During individual flights, 2-min time-averaged differences between the two in situ instruments had standard deviation of 14%. The TES averaging kernels and a priori constraint profiles for CO are applied to the in situ data for proper comparisons to account for the reduced vertical resolution and the influence of the a priori in the satellite-derived profile. In the TES sensitive pressure range, approx.700-200 hPa, the in situ profiles and TES profiles agree within 5-10%, less than the variability in CO distributions obtained by both TES and the aircraft instruments in the two regions. TES CO is slightly lower than in situ measurements in the Houston area (midlatitudes) and slightly higher than in situ CO measurements in the Costa Rica region (tropical).

Lopez, Jinena P.; Luo, Ming; Christensen, Lance E.; Loewenstein, Max; Jost, Hansjurg; Webster, Christopher R.; Osterman, Greg

2008-01-01

131

TES carbon monoxide validation during two AVE campaigns using the Argus and ALIAS instruments on NASA's WB-57F  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Aura Validation Experiment (AVE) focuses on validating Aura satellite measurements of important atmospheric trace gases using ground-based, aircraft, and balloon-borne instruments. Global satellite observations of CO from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) on the EOS Aura satellite have been ongoing since September 2004. This paper discusses CO validation experiments during the Oct-AVE (2004 Houston, Texas) and CR-AVE (2006 San Jose, Costa Rica) campaigns. The coincidences in location and time between the satellite observations and the available in situ profiles for some cases are not ideal. However, the CO distribution patterns in the two validation flight areas are shown to have very little variability in the aircraft and satellite observations, thereby making them suitable for validation comparisons. TES CO profiles, which typically have a retrieval uncertainty of 10-20%, are compared with in situ CO measurements from NASA Ames Research Center's Argus instrument taken on board the WB-57F aircraft during Oct-AVE. TES CO retrievals during CR-AVE are compared with in situ measurements from Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Aircraft Laser Infrared Absorption Spectrometer (ALIAS) instrument as well as with the Argus instrument, both taken on board the WB-57F aircraft. During CR-AVE, the average overall difference between ALIAS and Argus CO was 4%, with the ALIAS measurement higher. During individual flights, 2-min time-averaged differences between the two in situ instruments had standard deviation of 14%. The TES averaging kernels and a priori constraint profiles for CO are applied to the in situ data for proper comparisons to account for the reduced vertical resolution and the influence of the a priori in the satellite-derived profile. In the TES sensitive pressure range, ˜700-200 hPa, the in situ profiles and TES profiles agree within 5-10%, less than the variability in CO distributions obtained by both TES and the aircraft instruments in the two regions. TES CO is slightly lower than in situ measurements in the Houston area (midlatitudes) and slightly higher than in situ CO measurements in the Costa Rica region (tropical).

Lopez, Jimena P.; Luo, Ming; Christensen, Lance E.; Loewenstein, Max; Jost, Hansjürg; Webster, Christopher R.; Osterman, Greg

2008-08-01

132

Data for NASA's AVE 3 experiment: 25-mb sounding data and synoptic charts. [investigation of atmospheric parameters detected from satellite data under conditions of heavy snow cover  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The atmospheric variability experiment (AVE 3) is described and tabulated rawinsonde data at 25-mb intervals from the surface to 25 mb for the 41 stations is presented. The experiment was conducted between February 6 and February 7, 1975. Brief discussions are given on methods of data processing, changes in the reduction scheme since the AVE 2 pilot experiment, and data accuracy. An example of contact data is presented as well as synoptic charts prepared from the data.

Fuelberg, H. E.; Turner, R. E.

1975-01-01

133

Dynamics and Phylogenetic Implications of MtDNA Control Region Sequences in New World Jays (Aves: Corvidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

.   To study the evolution of mtDNA and the intergeneric relationships of New World Jays (Aves: Corvidae), we sequenced the entire\\u000a mitochondrial DNA control region (CR) from 21 species representing all genera of New World jays, an Old World jay, crows,\\u000a and a magpie. Using maximum likelihood methods, we found that both the transition\\/transversion ratio (?) and among site rate

Matthew A. Saunders; Scott V. Edwards

2000-01-01

134

A mid-Pliocene shearwater skull (Aves: Procellariidae: Puffinus) from the Taihape Mudstone, central North Island, New Zealand  

Microsoft Academic Search

A fossil skull of Puffinus sp. (Aves: Procellariidae), 85 mm long, is reported from the mid-Pliocene Taihape Mudstone (3.220–3.110 Ma; Waipipian Stage) at Mataroa, near Taihape, central North Island, New Zealand. This is the first described evidence for Puffinus in New Zealand's pre-Pleistocene fossil record. The skull belonged to a shearwater of a species close in skull size and proportions

N Henderson; BJ Gill

2010-01-01

135

Resolving lost herbivore community structure using coprolites of four sympatric moa species (Aves: Dinornithiformes)  

PubMed Central

Knowledge of extinct herbivore community structuring is essential for assessing the wider ecological impacts of Quaternary extinctions and determining appropriate taxon substitutes for rewilding. Here, we demonstrate the potential for coprolite studies to progress beyond single-species diet reconstructions to resolving community-level detail. The moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes) of New Zealand are an intensively studied group of nine extinct herbivore species, yet many details of their diets and community structuring remain unresolved. We provide unique insights into these aspects of moa biology through analyses of a multispecies coprolite assemblage from a rock overhang in a montane river valley in southern New Zealand. Using ancient DNA (aDNA), we identified 51 coprolites, which included specimens from four sympatric moa species. Pollen, plant macrofossils, and plant aDNA from the coprolites chronicle the diets and habitat preferences of these large avian herbivores during the 400 y before their extinction (?1450 AD). We use the coprolite data to develop a paleoecological niche model in which moa species were partitioned based on both habitat (forest and valley-floor herbfield) and dietary preferences, the latter reflecting allometric relationships between body size, digestive efficiency, and nutritional requirements. Broad ecological niches occupied by South Island giant moa (Dinornis robustus) and upland moa (Megalapteryx didinus) may reflect sexual segregation and seasonal variation in habitat use, respectively. Our results show that moa lack extant ecological analogs, and their extinction represents an irreplaceable loss of function from New Zealand’s terrestrial ecosystems. PMID:24082104

Wood, Jamie R.; Wilmshurst, Janet M.; Richardson, Sarah J.; Rawlence, Nicolas J.; Wagstaff, Steven J.; Worthy, Trevor H.; Cooper, Alan

2013-01-01

136

Phylogenetic relationships within the Laridae (Charadriiformes: Aves) inferred from mitochondrial markers.  

PubMed

Gulls (Aves: Laridae) constitute a recent and cosmopolite family of well-studied seabirds for which a robust phylogeny is needed to perform comparative and biogeographical analyses. The present study, the first molecular phylogeny of all Larids species (N=53), is based on a combined segment of mtDNA (partial cytochrome b and control region). We discuss our phylogenetic tree in the light of previous suggestions based on morphological, behavioral, and plumage characters. Although the phylogeny is not fully resolved, it highlights several robust species groups and confirms or identifies for the first time some sister relationships that had never been suggested before. The Dolphin Gull (Leucophaeus scoresbii) for instance, is identified as the sister species of the Grey Gull (Larus modestus) and the Ross's Gull (Rhodostethia rosea) forms a monophyletic group with the Little Gull (Larus minutus). Our results clearly demonstrate that the genus Larus as currently defined is not monophyletic, since current taxonomy of gulls is based on the use of convergent phenotypic characters. We propose a new systematic arrangement that better reflects their evolutionary history. PMID:16054399

Pons, J-M; Hassanin, A; Crochet, P-A

2005-12-01

137

A high-precision chronology for the rapid extinction of New Zealand moa (Aves, Dinornithiformes)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Megafaunal extinction followed the prehistoric human settlement of islands across the globe, but the exact duration and dynamics of the extinction processes are difficult to determine. The New Zealand moa (Aves, Dinornithiformes) are a prime example, where, despite an extensive fossil and archaeological record, debate continues about their extinction chronology and how extinction timings varied among regions and species. We apply probabilistic sightings methods to 111 high-quality radiocarbon dates (from a pool of 653 dates) on moa remains from natural and archaeological sites to provide a high-resolution spatio-temporal chronology of moa extinction. We interpret this alongside an estimated time for the onset of hunting pressure, obtained by applying the same methods to the most reliable proxies for initial human settlement of New Zealand: coprolites of and seeds gnawed by the commensal Pacific rat (Rattus exulans). By comparing local and national extinction times, we discriminate between the point at which hunting stopped (economic extinction) and the total extinction of moa (ca 150 and 200 years after settlement, respectively). Extinction occurred contemporaneously at sites separated by hundreds of kilometres. There was little difference between the extinction times of the smallest (20-50 kg) and largest (200+ kg) moa species. Our results demonstrate how rapidly megafauna were exterminated from even large, topographically- and ecologically-diverse islands such as New Zealand, and highlight the fragility of such ecosystems in the face of human impacts.

Perry, George L. W.; Wheeler, Andrew B.; Wood, Jamie R.; Wilmshurst, Janet M.

2014-12-01

138

Multilocus perspectives on the monophyly and phylogeny of the order Charadriiformes (Aves)  

PubMed Central

Background The phylogeny of shorebirds (Aves: Charadriiformes) and their putative sister groups was reconstructed using approximately 5 kilobases of data from three nuclear loci and two mitochondrial genes, and compared to that based on two other nuclear loci. Results Charadriiformes represent a monophyletic group that consists of three monophyletic suborders Lari (i.e., Laridae [including Sternidae and Rynchopidae], Stercorariidae, Alcidae, Glareolidae, Dromadidae, and Turnicidae), Scolopaci (i.e., Scolopacidae [including Phalaropidae], Jacanidae, Rostratulidae, Thinocoridae, Pedionomidae), and Charadrii (i.e., Burhinidae, Chionididae, Charadriidae, Haematopodidae, Recurvirostridae, and presumably Ibidorhynchidae). The position of purported "gruiform" buttonquails within Charadriiformes is confirmed. Skimmers are most likely sister to terns alone, and plovers may be paraphyletic with respect to oystercatchers and stilts. The Egyptian Plover is not a member of the Glareolidae, but is instead relatively basal among Charadrii. None of the putative sisters of Charadriiformes were recovered as such. Conclusion Hypotheses of non-monophyly and sister relationships of shorebirds are tested by multilocus analysis. The monophyly of and interfamilial relationships among shorebirds are confirmed and refined. Lineage-specific differences in evolutionary rates are more consistent across loci in shorebirds than other birds and may contribute to the congruence of locus-specific phylogenetic estimates in shorebirds. PMID:17346347

Fain, Matthew G; Houde, Peter

2007-01-01

139

Molecular phylogeny of the spoonbills (Aves: Threskiornithidae) based on mitochondrial DNA  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Spoonbills (genus Platalea) are a small group of wading birds, generally considered to constitute the subfamily Plataleinae (Aves: Threskiornithidae). We reconstructed phylogenetic relationships among the six species of spoonbills using variation in sequences of the mitochondrial genes ND2 and cytochrome b (total 1796 bp). Topologies of phylogenetic trees reconstructed using maximum likelihood, maximum parsimony, and Bayesian analyses were virtually identical and supported monophyly of the spoonbills. Most relationships within Platalea received strong support: P. minor and P. regia were closely related sister species, P. leucorodia was sister to the minor-regia clade, and P. alba was sister to the minor-regia-leucorodia clade. Relationships of P. flavipes and P. ajaja were less well resolved: these species either formed a clade that was sister to the four-species clade, or were successive sisters to this clade. This phylogeny is consistent with ideas of relatedness derived from spoonbill morphology. Our limited sampling of the Threskiornithinae (ibises), the putative sister group to the spoonbills, indicated that this group is paraphyletic, in agreement with previous molecular data; this suggests that separation of the Threskiornithidae into subfamilies Plataleinae and Threskiornithinae may not be warranted. Copyright ?? 2010. Magnolia Press.

Chesser, R.T.; Yeung, C.K.L.; Yao, C.-T.; Tian, X.-H.; Li, S.-H.

2010-01-01

140

Molecular phylogeny of the spoonbills (Aves: Threskiornithidae) based on mitochondrial DNA  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Spoonbills (genus Platalea) are a small group of wading birds, generally considered to constitute the subfamily Plataleinae (Aves: Threskiornithidae). We reconstructed phylogenetic relationships among the six species of spoonbills using variation in sequences of the mitochondrial genes ND2 and cytochrome b (total 1796 bp). Topologies of phylogenetic trees reconstructed using maximum likelihood, maximum parsimony, and Bayesian analyses were virtually identical and supported monophyly of the spoonbills. Most relationships within Platalea received strong support: P. minor and P. regia were closely related sister species, P. leucorodia was sister to the minor-regia clade, and P. alba was sister to the minor-regia-leucorodia clade. Relationships of P. flavipes and P. ajaja were less well resolved: these species either formed a clade that was sister to the four-species clade, or were successive sisters to this clade. This phylogeny is consistent with ideas of relatedness derived from spoonbill morphology. Our limited sampling of the Threskiornithinae (ibises), the putative sister group to the spoonbills, indicated that this group is paraphyletic, in agreement with previous molecular data; this suggests that separation of the Threskiornithidae into subfamilies Plataleinae and Threskiornithinae may not be warranted.

Chesser, R. Terry; Yeung, Carol K.L.; Yao, Cheng-Te; Tian, Xiu-Hua; Li, Shou-Hsien

2010-01-01

141

Impact evaluation of an Energy $avings Plan project at Holnam Incorporated  

SciTech Connect

This impact evaluation of four energy conservation measures (ECMs) that were recently installed at Holnam Incorporated (Holnam) was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) as part of an evaluation of its Energy $avings Plan (E$P) Program. The Program makes acquisition payments to firms that install energy conservation measures in their industrial processes. The objective of this impact evaluation was to assess how much electrical energy is being saved at Holnam as a result of the E$P and to determine how much the savings cost Bonneville and the region. The impact of the ECMs was evaluated with a combination of engineering analysis, financial analysis, site visit and interview, and review of previous program submittals (Holnam's Proposals and Completion Reports). The four ECMs were all electronic power control devices that replaced less efficient technologies for controlling power to the kiln drive motors, cooler grate drive motors, cooler fan motors, and kiln stack gas precipitators. Energy savings from this project are expected to be 1,782,000 kWh/yr or 0.20 average megawatts. On a unit production basis, this project will save 3.4 kWh/ton of cement, based on Holnam's projected average annual future production rate. The four ECMs cost a total of $248,232 to install, and Holnam received payment of $115,615 from Bonneville for the acquisition of energy savings. Program administrative costs incurred by Bonneville, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), and Seattle City Light (SCL) were estimated to be $29,362. The real levelized cost (1992 $) of these energy savings to Bonneville will be 6.2 mills/kWh over the project's expected 15-year life, and the real levelized cost (1992 $) to the region will be 14.1 mills/kWh. Based on expected ECM installation costs and energy savings benefits alone, none of the four ECMs would have been implemented by Holnam without the E$P acquisition payment.

Brown, D.R.; Spanner, G.E.

1993-05-01

142

TOMS ozone data compared at mesoscale resolution to tropopause heights from the AVE radiosonde network and to VAS radiances over the south-central United States  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Observations from 1982 are being compared between the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), the Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE), and the VISSR Atmospheric Sounder (VAS) across Texas and Oklahoma. TOMS data show a significant ozone maximum over northeastern Texas. AVE radiosonde analysis shows tropopause heights with the highest pressure (lowest altitudes) over central Oklahoma accompanied by a mid-level jet across northern Mexico exiting above the Texas-Gulf coast. Corresponding VAS radiances show a dry slot in the middle tropopause across central Texas accompanied by a secondary slot over Oklahoma. The maxima are separated by 100 to 500 km. The impact of TOMS data on tropopause analysis is preliminarily seen as insignificant because TOMS data is not registered with respect to AVE tropopause heights.

Chesters, Dennis; Uccellini, Louis; Larko, David

1987-01-01

143

Cold-hardiness in Pelecitus fulicaeatrae (Nematoda: Filarioidea), a parasite of the ankles of Fulica americana (Aves).  

PubMed

The filarioid nematode Pelecitus fulicaeatrae (Diesing, 1861) is considered cold-hardy. Adults and microfilariae became motile when placed in saline at 22 C after having been removed from thawed carcasses of their host, the American coot (Fulica americana Gmelin) (Aves: Gruiformes). Adult nematodes from 5 of 12 carcasses became active as did microfilariae from 4 of 5 carcasses. Carcasses had been frozen at an undetermined temperature below 0 C for an initial 14 days and then at -21 to -24 for 100-159 days. PMID:1738056

Bartlett, C M

1992-02-01

144

Antonio Diaz-Calderon Jet Propulsion Laboratory  

E-print Network

@jpl.nasa.gov Alonzo Kelly The Robotics Institute Carnegie Mellon University On-Line Stability Margin and Attitude which move heavy loads, accelerate or brake aggressively, turn at speed, or operate on sloped terrain

Kelly, Alonzo

145

Angela Phillips Diaz, MBA Managing Director  

E-print Network

officials including the first International Space Station (ISS) Crew Code of Conduct leadership positions in Washington DC including international relations at NASA international relations experience, she has held executive leadership positions

Ginzel, Matthew

146

Angela Phillips Diaz, MBA Managing Director  

E-print Network

with Russian government officials including the first International Space Station various executive leadership positions in Washington DC including international-Proliferation legislation. In addition to her international relations experience, she has held

Holland, Jeffrey

147

Serologic, parasitic, and bacteriologic assessment of captive cracids (Aves: Galliformes: Cracidae) in Brazil.  

PubMed

Captive cracids (Aves: Galliformes: Cracidae), including endangered species, were studied (n = 130) for the assessment of health status, including Aburria jacutinga (black-fronted piping-guan, n = 42), Crax blumenbachii (red-knobbed curassow, n = 54), Craxfasciolata (bare-faced curassow, n = 28), and Penelope obscura (dusky-legged guan, n = 6). The exposure to Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG), Mycoplasma synoviae (MS), Salmonella pullorum (SP), Salmonella gallinarum (SG), avian paramyxovirus-1 (APMV-1), and infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) were determined by serology, and SG and SP also were evaluated by culture. Ectoparasites and endoparasites were identified using light microscopy. Sera were negative by the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test for antibodies to MG or MS, although serum was reactive to MG (32%, 42/130) by the rapid serum agglutination test (SAT). Although positive reactions (26.9%, 35/130) for SP and SG were detected by SAT, cloacal swab cultures were negative for SP and SG. IBDV antibodies were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in two dusky-legged guans (1.5%, 2/130). HI antibody titers to APMV-1 were found in 20 (15.3%) cracids, with titers ranging from 16 to 1,024. Fifty percent of birds (65/130) had ectoparasites. Lice (Menacanthus spp.) and mites (Astigmata: Analgesidae, Megninidae; Megninia spp.) were found in red-knobbed curassow; Megninia spp. also were found in bare-faced curassow, black-fronted piping-guan, and dusky-legged guan. Eleven black-fronted piping-guans presented dual parasitism by Megninia spp. and Ornithonyssus spp. Endoparasites were detected in 16.1% (21/130) of birds, and some with multiple parasites. Oocysts of coccidia and eggs of Capillaria spp. (Nematoda: Trichuroidea) were found in the feces of red-knobbed curassow. Eggs of Strongyloides spp. were found in the feces of bare-faced curassow, and eggs of Ascaridia spp., Capillaria spp., and Strongyloides spp. were found in black-fronted piping-guan. Cysts of Blastocystis spp. were found in dusky-legged guan. Antibodies to IBDV and APMV-1 indicate previous exposure. However, considering that birds were clinically normal, immune stimulation might have been from live chicken vaccine strain infections that are widely used in Brazilian poultry. The high parasitism levels indicate that a routine inspection for internal and external parasites is warranted. PMID:23505700

Marques, Marcus Vinícius Romero; Junior, Francisco Carlos Ferreira; Andery, Danielle de Assis; Fernandes, André Almeida; de Araújo, Alessandra Vitelli; de Resende, José Sérgio; Martins, Nelson Rodrigo da Silva

2013-03-01

148

Impact evaluation of an Energy $avings Plan project at Holnam Incorporated  

SciTech Connect

This impact evaluation of four energy conservation measures (ECMs) that were recently installed at Holnam Incorporated (Holnam) was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) as part of an evaluation of its Energy $avings Plan (E$P) Program. The Program makes acquisition payments to firms that install energy conservation measures in their industrial processes. The objective of this impact evaluation was to assess how much electrical energy is being saved at Holnam as a result of the E$P and to determine how much the savings cost Bonneville and the region. The impact of the ECMs was evaluated with a combination of engineering analysis, financial analysis, site visit and interview, and review of previous program submittals (Holnam`s Proposals and Completion Reports). The four ECMs were all electronic power control devices that replaced less efficient technologies for controlling power to the kiln drive motors, cooler grate drive motors, cooler fan motors, and kiln stack gas precipitators. Energy savings from this project are expected to be 1,782,000 kWh/yr or 0.20 average megawatts. On a unit production basis, this project will save 3.4 kWh/ton of cement, based on Holnam`s projected average annual future production rate. The four ECMs cost a total of $248,232 to install, and Holnam received payment of $115,615 from Bonneville for the acquisition of energy savings. Program administrative costs incurred by Bonneville, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), and Seattle City Light (SCL) were estimated to be $29,362. The real levelized cost (1992 $) of these energy savings to Bonneville will be 6.2 mills/kWh over the project`s expected 15-year life, and the real levelized cost (1992 $) to the region will be 14.1 mills/kWh. Based on expected ECM installation costs and energy savings benefits alone, none of the four ECMs would have been implemented by Holnam without the E$P acquisition payment.

Brown, D.R.; Spanner, G.E.

1993-05-01

149

University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign, 1304 W. Pennsylvania Ave., 338 AESB, Urbana, IL 61801 217.333.3570 abe.illinois.edu abe@illinois.edu  

E-print Network

University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign, 1304 W. Pennsylvania Ave., 338 AESB, Urbana, IL 61801 217.333.3570 abe.illinois.edu abe@illinois.edu Agricultural and Biological Engineering Departmental Condolences Pulling for ABE@Illinois 2013 this Saturday! The Department would like

Gilbert, Matthew

150

Using the Spanish Online Resource "Aula Virtual de Espanol" (AVE) to Promote a Blended Teaching Approach in High School Spanish Language Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study explores the effectiveness of the implementation of blended teaching (BT) by combining the Spanish online resource "Aula Virtual de Espanol" (AVE) with the face-to-face (F2F) delivery approach in second language Spanish programs in two high schools in Alberta, Canada. Findings demonstrate the effectiveness of combining the online…

Pellerin, Martine; Montes, Carlos Soler

2012-01-01

151

Adults and larvae of Skrjabinocerca canutus n. sp. (Nematoda: Acuariidae) from Calidris canutus rufa (Aves: Scolopacidae) on the southern Southwest Atlantic coast of South America  

Microsoft Academic Search

Adults and larvae of a new species of Skrjabinocerca Shikhobalova, 1930 (Nematoda: Acuarioidea) are described on the basis of light and scanning electron microscope studies. Specimens were recovered from Calidris canutus rufa Wilson (Aves: Scolopacidae) from the Southwest Atlantic coast of Uruguay. Data on the hosts, localities and main features of the four previously described species of the genus are

Julia I. Diaz; Florencia Cremonte; Graciela T. Navone; Sonia Laurenti

2005-01-01

152

Nodal signaling from the visceral endoderm is required to maintain Nodal gene expression in the epiblast and drive DVE/AVE migration.  

PubMed

In the early mouse embryo, a specialized population of extraembryonic visceral endoderm (VE) cells called the distal VE (DVE) arises at the tip of the egg cylinder stage embryo and then asymmetrically migrates to the prospective anterior, recruiting additional distal cells. Upon migration these cells, called the anterior VE (AVE), establish the anterior posterior (AP) axis by restricting gastrulation-inducing signals to the opposite pole. The Nodal-signaling pathway has been shown to have a critical role in the generation and migration of the DVE/AVE. The Nodal gene is expressed in both the VE and in the pluripotent epiblast, which gives rise to the germ layers. Previous findings have provided conflicting evidence as to the relative importance of Nodal signaling from the epiblast vs. VE for AP patterning. Here we show that conditional mutagenesis of the Nodal gene specifically within the VE leads to reduced Nodal expression levels in the epiblast and incomplete or failed DVE/AVE migration. These results support a required role for VE Nodal to maintain normal levels of expression in the epiblast, and suggest signaling from both VE and epiblast is important for DVE/AVE migration. PMID:25536399

Kumar, Amit; Lualdi, Margaret; Lyozin, George T; Sharma, Prashant; Loncarek, Jadranka; Fu, Xin-Yuan; Kuehn, Michael R

2015-04-01

153

WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF NURSING 14204 NE Salmon Creek Ave | Vancouver, WA 98686 | (360) 546-9398 | nursing.wsu.edu  

E-print Network

WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF NURSING 14204 NE Salmon Creek Ave | Vancouver, WA 98686 to Psychology, Intro to Sociology, Statistics, Chemistry, Microbiology, Anatomy & Physiology, and Nutrition/BS in another field. Otherwise, students must complete 30 quarter credits in: Roots of Contemporary Issues

Collins, Gary S.

154

Effect of AVE 0991 angiotensin-(1-7) receptor agonist treatment on elemental and biomolecular content and distribution in atherosclerotic plaques of apoE-knockout mice  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Gene-targeted apolipoprotein E-knockout (apoE-KO) mice display early and highly progressive vascular lesions containing lipid deposits and they became a reliable animal model to study atherosclerosis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of AVE 0991 angiotensin-(1-7) receptor agonist on the distribution of selected pro- and anti- inflammatory elements as well as biomolecules in atherosclerotic plaques of apoE-knockout mice. Synchrotron radiation-based X-ray fluorescence (micro-XRF) and Fourier Transform Infrared (micro-FTIR) microspectroscopies were applied. Two-month-old apoE-KO mice were fed for following four months diet supplemented with AVE 0991 (0.58 ?mol/kg b.w. per day). Histological sections of ascending aortas were analyzed spectroscopically. The distribution of P, Ca, Fe and Zn were found to correspond with histological structure of the lesion. Significantly lower contents of P, Ca, Zn and significantly higher content of Fe were observed in animals treated with AVE 0991. Biomolecular analysis showed lower lipids saturation level and lower lipid to protein ratio in AVE 0991 treated group. Protein secondary structure was studied according to the composition of amide I band (1660 cm-1) and it demonstrated higher proportion of ?-sheet structure as compared to ?-helix in both studied groups.

Kowalska, J.; Gajda, M.; Jawie?, J.; Kwiatek, W. M.; Appel, K.; Dumas, P.

2013-12-01

155

Twenty-first century advances in knowledge of the biology of moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes): a new morphological analysis and moa diagnoses revised  

Microsoft Academic Search

The iconic moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes) from New Zealand continue to attract much scientific scrutiny, as they have done since their discovery in the 1840s. Here, we review moa research since 2001 that advances our knowledge of the biology of these families; in particular, their breeding, diet and phylogenetic relationships. Then we perform a phylogenetic analysis based on morphological characters using

TH Worthy; RP Scofield

2012-01-01

156

Business Career Services Center | 1300 Sunnyside Ave. Rm. 125 | Lawrence, KS 66045 | (785) 864-5591 | www.business.ku.edu  

E-print Network

Business Career Services Center | 1300 Sunnyside Ave. Rm. 125 | Lawrence, KS 66045 | (785) 864-5591 | www.business.ku.edu - 1 - What Can I Do With A Major In INFORMATION SYSTEMS? This handout will provide education. You'll gain a solid foundation in the various business disciplines and gain an understanding

157

Sensitization of Upper Airway Mechanoreceptors as a New Pharmacologic Principle to Treat Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Investigations with AVE0118 in Anesthetized Pigs  

PubMed Central

Study Objectives: Drug treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is desirable because at least 30% of patients do not tolerate continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment. The negative pressure reflex (NPR) involving superficially located mechanoreceptors in the upper airway (UA) is an important mechanism for UA patency inhibitable by topical UA anesthesia (lidocaine). The NPR may serve as a target for pharmacological intervention for a topical treatment of OSA. The objective was to determine the effect of pharmacological augmentation of the NPR on UA collapsibility. Design: We developed a model of UA collapsibility in which application of negative pressures caused UA collapses in spontaneously breathing ?-chloralose-urethane anesthetized pigs as indicated by characteristic tracheal pressure and air flow changes. Setting: N/A. Patients or Participants: N/A. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: The potassium channel blocker AVE0118 administered topically to the UA in doses of 1, 3, and 10 mg per nostril sensitized the NPR, shifting the mechanoreceptor response threshold for the genioglossus muscle to more positive pressures (P < 0.001; n = 6 per group) and dose-dependently inhibited UA collapsibility. Ten mg of AVE0118 prevented UA collapses against negative pressures of -150 mbar (P < 0.01) for > 4 h in all pigs, while in control pigs the UA collapsed at -50 mbar or less negative pressures. The effect of AVE0118 was abolished by UA lidocaine anesthesia. Acute intravenous administration of naloxone or acetazolamide was ineffective; paroxetine and mirtazepine were weakly effective and fluoxetine was moderately effective in line with reported clinical efficacy. Conclusion: Topical administration of AVE0118 to the UA is a promising pharmacologic approach for the treatment of OSA. Citation: Wirth KJ; Steinmeyer K; Ruetten H. Sensitization of upper airway mechanoreceptors as a new pharmacologic principle to treat obstructive sleep apnea: investigations with AVE0118 in anesthetized pigs. SLEEP 2013;36(5):699-708. PMID:23633752

Wirth, Klaus J.; Steinmeyer, Klaus; Ruetten, Hartmut

2013-01-01

158

The enigmatic monotypic crab plover Dromas ardeola is closely related to pratincoles and coursers (Aves, Charadriiformes, Glareolidae)  

PubMed Central

The phylogenetic placement of the monotypic crab plover Dromasardeola (Aves, Charadriiformes) remains controversial. Phylogenetic analysis of anatomical and behavioral traits using phenetic and cladistic methods of tree inference have resulted in conflicting tree topologies, suggesting a close association of Dromas to members of different suborders and lineages within Charadriiformes. Here, we revisited the issue by applying Bayesian and parsimony methods of tree inference to 2,012 anatomical and 5,183 molecular characters to a set of 22 shorebird genera (including Turnix). Our results suggest that Bayesian analysis of anatomical characters does not resolve the phylogenetic relationship of shorebirds with strong statistical support. In contrast, Bayesian and parsimony tree inference from molecular data provided much stronger support for the phylogenetic relationships within shorebirds, and support a sister relationship of Dromas to Glareolidae (pratincoles and coursers), in agreement with previously published DNA-DNA hybridization studies. PMID:21637436

2010-01-01

159

The multi-stop aircraft routing problem  

E-print Network

Approved as to style and content by: Alberto Garcia-Diaz (Chair of Committee) Ce O. ave em ) Ta-Hsin Li (Member) ay Kuo (Head of Departement) December 1995 Major Subject: Industrial Engineering ABSTRACT The Multi-Stop Aircraft Routing Problem.... (December 1995) Salvador Garcia, B. S. , Nuevo Leon State University; M. S. , Monterrey Tech Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Alberto Garcia-Diaz We study the multi-stop aircrafi routing problem, determining the sequence of stops and the number...

Garci?a Castan?eda, Salvador

1995-01-01

160

Initial results from a mesoscale atmospheric simulation system and comparisons with the AVE-SESAME I data set. [Atmospheric Variability Experiment-Severe Environmental Storms And Mesoscale Experiment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The development of a comprehensive mesoscale atmospheric simulation system (MASS) is described in detail. The modeling system is designed for both research and real-time forecast applications. The 14-level numerical model, which has a 48 km grid mesh, can be run over most of North America and the adjacent oceanic regions. The model employs sixth-order accurate numerics, generalized similarity theory boundary-layer physics, a sophisticated cumulus parameterization scheme, and state of the art analysis and initialization techniques. Examples of model output on the synoptic and subsynoptic scales are presented for the AVE-SESAME I field experiment on 10-11 April 1979. The model output is subjectively compared to the observational analysis and the LFM II output on the synoptic scale. Subsynoptic model output is compared to analyses generated from the AVE-SESAME I data set.

Kaplan, M. L.; Zack, J. W.; Wong, V. C.; Tuccillo, J. J.

1982-01-01

161

The development of convective instability, wind shear, and vertical motion in relation to convection activity and synoptic systems in AVE 4  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Data from the Fourth Atmospheric Variability Experiment were used to investigate conditions/factors responsible for the development (local time rate-of-change) of convective instability, wind shear, and vertical motion in areas with varying degrees of convective activity. AVE IV sounding data were taken at 3 or 6 h intervals during a 36 h period on 24-25 April 1975 over approximately the eastern half of the United States. An error analysis was performed for each variable studied.

Davis, J. G.; Scoggins, J. R.

1981-01-01

162

Frequency of micronuclei and of other nuclear abnormalities in erythrocytes of the grey mullet from the Mondego, Douro and Ave estuaries--Portugal.  

PubMed

Fish are bioindicators of water pollution, and an increased rate of their erythrocyte nuclear morphological abnormalities (ENMAs)-and particularly of erythrocyte micronuclei (EMN)-is used as a genotoxicity biomarker. Despite the potential value of ENMAs and MN, there is scarce information about fish captured in Iberian estuaries. This is the case of the Portuguese estuaries of the Mondego, Douro and Ave, suffering from different levels of environmental stress and where chemical surveys have been disclosing significant amounts of certain pollutants. So, the aim of this study was to evaluate genotoxicants impacts and infer about the exposure at those ecosystems, using the grey mullet (Mugil cephalus) as bioindicator and considering the type and frequency of nuclear abnormalities of erythrocytes as proxies of genotoxicity. Sampling of mullets was done throughout the year in the important Mondego, Douro and Ave River estuaries (centre and north-western Portugal). The fish (total n?=?242) were caught in campaigns made in spring-summer and autumn-winter, using nets or fishing rods. The sampled mullets were comparable between locations in terms of the basic biometric parameters. Blood smears were stained with Diff-Quik to assess the frequencies of six types of ENMAs and MN (given per 1,000 erythrocytes). Some basic water physicochemical parameters were recorded to search for fluctuations matching the ENMAs. Overall, the most frequent nucleus abnormality was the polymorphic type, sequentially followed by the blebbed/lobed/notched, segmented, kidney shaped, vacuolated, MN and binucleated. The total average frequency of the ENMAs ranged from 73?‰ in the Mondego to 108?‰ in the Ave. The polymorphic type was typically ?50 % of the total ENMAs, averaging about 51?‰, when considering all three estuaries. The most serious lesion-the MN-in fish from Mondego and Douro had a similar frequency (?0.38?‰), which was significantly lower than that in the Ave (0.75?‰). No significant seasonal differences existed as to the MN rates and seasonal differences existed almost only in the Douro, with the higher values in AW. In general, the pattern of ENMAs frequencies was unrelated with the water physicochemical parameters. Considering the data for both the total ENMAs and for each specific abnormality, and bearing in mind that values of MN in fish erythrocytes >0.3?‰ usually reflect pollution by genotoxicants, it is suggested that mullets were likely being chronically exposed to such compounds, even in the allegedly less polluted ecosystem (Mondego). Moreover, data supported the following pollution exposure gradient: Mondego?Ave. The scenario and inferences nicely agree with the published data from chemical monitoring. PMID:24469770

Carrola, João; Santos, Nádia; Rocha, Maria J; Fontainhas-Fernandes, António; Pardal, Miguel A; Monteiro, Rogério A F; Rocha, Eduardo

2014-05-01

163

Relationship between bone growth rate and the thickness of calcified cartilage in the long bones of the Galloanserae (Aves)  

PubMed Central

The histological features of mineralized tissues can be preserved for hundreds of millions of years, and are therefore important potential sources of information for reconstructing the life history traits of extinct species. Bone growth rates and the duration of the growth period have recently been estimated in fossil archosaurs from periosteal ossification (a mechanism responsible for bone diametral growth). Similarly, data on endochondral ossification (the mechanism responsible for bone longitudinal growth) may also yield information on growth duration and rate among extinct vertebrates, as long as potentially informative structures are preserved. However, in order to carry out palaeobiological estimations of growth rate and/or the duration of growth, it is first necessary to quantify in extant species the relationship between these life history traits and the histological features of endochondral ossification that are potentially preserved in the fossil record. Here we analyse the ontogenetic variation of both bone longitudinal growth rate and the thickness of the calcified cartilage in the femora of two Galloanserae (Aves) and find a significant positive relationship between these variables in both species. We discuss possible factors underlying interspecific differences in this relationship, and conclude that it could be applied with caution to draw palaeobiological inferences. PMID:15857365

Montes, L; de Margerie, E; Castanet, J; de Ricqlès, A; Cubo, J

2005-01-01

164

The influence of sampling design on species tree inference: a new relationship for the New World chickadees (Aves: Poecile).  

PubMed

In this study, we explore the long-standing issue of how many loci are needed to infer accurate phylogenetic relationships, and whether loci with particular attributes (e.g., parsimony informativeness, variability, gene tree resolution) outperform others. To do so, we use an empirical data set consisting of the seven species of chickadees (Aves: Paridae), an analytically tractable, recently diverged group, and well-studied ecologically but lacking a nuclear phylogeny. We estimate relationships using 40 nuclear loci and mitochondrial DNA using four coalescent-based species tree inference methods (BEST, *BEAST, STEM, STELLS). Collectively, our analyses contrast with previous studies and support a sister relationship between the Black-capped and Carolina Chickadee, two superficially similar species that hybridize along a long zone of contact. Gene flow is a potential source of conflict between nuclear and mitochondrial gene trees, yet we find a significant, albeit low, signal of gene flow. Our results suggest that relatively few loci with high information content may be sufficient for estimating an accurate species tree, but that substantially more loci are necessary for accurate parameter estimation. We provide an empirical reference point for researchers designing sampling protocols with the purpose of inferring phylogenies and population parameters of closely related taxa. PMID:24111665

Harris, Rebecca B; Carling, Matthew D; Lovette, Irby J

2014-02-01

165

Impact evaluation of a refrigeration control system installed at Vitamilk Dairy, Incorporated under the Energy $avings Plan  

SciTech Connect

This impact evaluation of a refrigeration control system (RCS) recently installed at Vitamilk Dairy, Inc. (Vitamilk) was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) as part of an evaluation of its Energy $avings Plan (E$P) Program. The RCS installation at Vitamilk uses microcomputer- based controls to automate refrigeration equipment previously controlled manually. This impact evaluation assessed how much electricity is being saved at Vitamilk as a result of the E$P and to determine how much the savings cost Bonneville and the region. On a unit savings basis, this project will save 9.7 kWh/tonne (8-8 kWh/ton) of milk and ice cream produced, based on the product mix for June 1992 through May 1993, representing a 28% reduction in energy consumption. The project was installed in 1992 for a total cost of $129,330, and Vitamilk received payment of $62,974 from Bonneville in 1993 for the acquisition of energy savings. The real levelized cost of these energy savings to Bonneville is 8.5 mills/kWh (in 1993 dollars) over the project`s assumed 15-year life, and the real levelized cost to the region is 17.9 mills/kWh (in 1993 dollars), not including transmission and distribution effects. Based on the expected project installation costs and energy savings benefits, the RCS would not have been implemented by Vitamilk without the E$P acquisition payment. The expected acquisition payment reduced the estimated payback period from 7.0 to 2.8 years. Although Vitamilk would generally require an energy conservation project to have a payback period of two years or less, the slightly longer payback period was accepted in this case.

Brown, D.R.; Dixon, D.R.; Spanner, G.E.

1995-01-01

166

Diet is a major factor governing the fecal butyrate-producing community structure across Mammalia, Aves and Reptilia.  

PubMed

Butyrate-producing bacteria have an important role in maintaining host health. They are well studied in human and medically associated animal models; however, much less is known for other Vertebrata. We investigated the butyrate-producing community in hindgut-fermenting Mammalia (n=38), Aves (n=8) and Reptilia (n=8) using a gene-targeted pyrosequencing approach of the terminal genes of the main butyrate-synthesis pathways, namely butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase (but) and butyrate kinase (buk). Most animals exhibit high gene abundances, and clear diet-specific signatures were detected with but genes significantly enriched in omnivores and herbivores compared with carnivores. But dominated the butyrate-producing community in these two groups, whereas buk was more abundant in many carnivorous animals. Clustering of protein sequences (5% cutoff) of the combined communities (but and buk) placed carnivores apart from other diet groups, except for noncarnivorous Carnivora, which clustered together with carnivores. The majority of clusters (but: 5141 and buk: 2924) did not show close relation to any reference sequences from public databases (identity <90%) demonstrating a large 'unknown diversity'. Each diet group had abundant signature taxa, where buk genes linked to Clostridium perfringens dominated in carnivores and but genes associated with Ruminococcaceae bacterium D16 were specific for herbivores and omnivores. Whereas 16S rRNA gene analysis showed similar overall patterns, it was unable to reveal communities at the same depth and resolution as the functional gene-targeted approach. This study demonstrates that butyrate producers are abundant across vertebrates exhibiting great functional redundancy and that diet is the primary determinant governing the composition of the butyrate-producing guild. PMID:25343515

Vital, Marius; Gao, Jiarong; Rizzo, Mike; Harrison, Tara; Tiedje, James M

2015-01-01

167

Contribution à l'étude des Microphallidae (Trematoda). LI. De cinq espèces du plongeon imbrin Gavia immer (Aves) des Etats-Unis, dont Microphallus forresteri n. sp. Pluralité vraisemblable de l'espèce Microphallus nicolli (Cable & Hunninen, 1938)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors describe and illustrate five species of Microphallid trematodes from the intestine of Gavia immer (Aves: Gaviiformes) from the southern coast of the United States (Florida). Microphallus forresteri n. sp. is 500–700µm long with a symmetrical, regularly ovoid male papilla with a length (60 × 43 µm) close to the acetabular diameter and a broad ejaculatory canal centred along

Mike Kinsella; Stéphane Deblock

1997-01-01

168

Goodman Drive ERKENBRECHER AVE.  

E-print Network

Location S CCHMC Parking Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Gardens to MSB on 5th level Kettering Lab Complex Radiation Safety HealthProfessions BuildingWherryHall Veterans A airs Medical Center VAMC VAMC VAMC VAMC VAMC Holmes Hospital French East Building UCPhysicians Medical

Steckl, Andrew J.

169

BROAD STREET LEONARD AVE  

E-print Network

-free. This includes all tobacco products, including cigarettes, cigars, chewing tobacco and pipe smoking. Driving, cigars, chewing tobacco and pipe smoking. Driving Directions 5th Floor 915 Olentangy River Road Columbus people's lives. That's why all Medical Center locations--inside and outside--are tobacco

170

Franklin St. Cameron Ave.  

E-print Network

Center Biology* Library Couch Biology Library See Wilson Library - South Road Entrance (Location Number Library (Main Library) Walter Royal Davis Library Davis Library Data Services, GIS, Government Info., Maps

Whitton, Mary C.

171

Cameron Ave. Franklin St.  

E-print Network

Art Library Hanes Art Center Biology* Library Couch Biology Library See Wilson Library - South Road Number 17) 3 Davis Library (Main Library) Walter Royal Davis Library Davis Library Data Services, GIS

Whitton, Mary C.

172

NEWLONDONRD CLEVELAND AVE  

E-print Network

. These cameras help our department to provide an additional layer of security. To learn more about this project, visit: www.udel.edu/safety/ 2011_article_cameras.html security cameras 8.13 #12;-of-the-art surveillance cameras on campus to help keep the campus community safe.You will see surveillance cameras

Firestone, Jeremy

173

Franklin St. Cameron Ave.  

E-print Network

: Highway Safety Research Center Library Bolin Creek Center, Suites 200 & 300; 730 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. Institute on Aging 720 Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd. Training and Development Library* Library William Rand Kenan, Jr. Chemistry Library See Wilson Library - South Road Entrance (Location

Doyle, Martin

174

NEWLONDONRD CLEVELAND AVE  

E-print Network

RD ONE WAY ONE WAY ONE WAY ROSEST DALLAM RD FOREST LA CHELTENHAM RD SYPHERD DR HILLSIDERD NORTH ST Center for the Arts MUNICIPAL PARKING MUNICIPAL PARKING MUNICIPAL PARKING Bookstore STAR Health Sciences STAR Central Lot STAR South Lot STAR South- Back Lot ISE Lab Louis Redding Eliphalet Gilbert Health

Firestone, Jeremy

175

Adults and larvae of Skrjabinocerca canutus n. sp. (Nematoda: Acuariidae) from Calidris canutus rufa (Aves: Scolopacidae) on the southern Southwest Atlantic coast of South America.  

PubMed

Adults and larvae of a new species of Skrjabinocerca Shikhobalova, 1930 (Nematoda: Acuarioidea) are described on the basis of light and scanning electron microscope studies. Specimens were recovered from Calidris canutus rufa Wilson (Aves: Scolopacidae) from the Southwest Atlantic coast of Uruguay. Data on the hosts, localities and main features of the four previously described species of the genus are provided. S. canutus n. sp. can be distinguished its congeners by a combination of the following characters: non-recurrent cordons, shorter right spicule and possession of a delicate finger-like projection on the distal end of the left spicule. S. prima Shikhobalova, 1930 has a left spicule which is stilletto-shaped and sharply pointed, S. europaea Wong & Anderson, 1993 has recurrent cordons, S. americana Wong & Anderson, 1993 possesses two delicate digitiform projections on the distal end of its left spicule and S. bennetti Bartlett & Anderson, 1996 has subequal spicules. PMID:15841348

Diaz, Julia I; Cremonte, Florencia; Navone, Graciela T; Laurenti, Sonia

2005-02-01

176

Stratigraphic context and paleoenvironmental significance of minor taxa (Pisces, Reptilia, Aves, Rodentia) from the late Early Pleistocene paleoanthropological site of Buia (Eritrea).  

PubMed

The Buia Homo site, also known as Wadi Aalad, is an East African paleoanthropological site near the village of Buia that, due to its very rich yield from the late Early Pleistocene, has been intensively investigated since 1994. In this paper, which reports on the finds of the 2010-2011 excavations, we include new fossil evidence on previously identified taxa (i.e., reptiles), as well as the very first description of the small mammal, fish and bird remains discovered. In particular, this study documents the discovery of the first African fossil of the genus Burhinus (Aves, Charadriiformes) and of the first rodent from the site. This latter is identified as a thryonomyid rodent (cane rat), a relatively common taxon in African paleoanthropological faunal assemblages. On the whole, the new occurrences documented within the Buia vertebrate assemblage confirm the occurrence of taxa characterized by strong water dependence. The paleoenvironmental characteristics of the fauna are confirmed as fully compatible with the evidence obtained through sedimentology and facies analysis, documenting the sedimentary evolution of fluvio-deltaic and lacustrine systems. PMID:23159190

Rook, L; Ghinassi, M; Carnevale, G; Delfino, M; Pavia, M; Bondioli, L; Candilio, F; Coppa, A; Martínez-Navarro, B; Medin, T; Papini, M; Zanolli, C; Libsekal, Y

2013-01-01

177

Insects found in birds' nests from Argentina. Pseudoseisura lophotes Reichenbach, 1853 and Anumbius annumbi (Vieillot, 1817) (Aves: Furnariidae), hosts of Triatoma platensis Neiva, 1913 (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Triatominae).  

PubMed

The insect fauna of the nests of Pseudoseisura lophotes (Reichenbach, 1853) (Aves: Furnariidae) from Argentina was investigated. A total of 110 species (68 identified to species, 22 identified to genus, 20 identified to family) in 40 families of 10 orders of insects was found in these nests. Triatoma platensis Neiva, 1913 (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) was found again in nests of P. lophotes, corroborating after 73 years the first observations made by Mazza in 1936. The occurrence of the insects in nests of P. lophotes is compared with the previously known insect fauna in nests of A. annumbi, Furnarius rufus (Furnariidae), and Myiopsitta monachus (Psittacidae). The insect fauna in additional nests of Anumbius annumbi from the same and/or different localities is given, and used in comparisons. The first occurrence of Cuterebridae (Diptera) in birds' nests, their pupae as the overwintering stage, and the second simultaneous infestation by two species of Philornis (Diptera: Muscidae) on the same nestlings are presented. Other simultaneous infestations of different hematophagous arthropods (Hemiptera: Cimidae; Reduviidae: Triatominae, and Acari: Argasidae) are remarked and discussed. PMID:24871037

Paola, Turienzo

2014-01-01

178

On the absence of sternal elements in Anchiornis (Paraves) and Sapeornis (Aves) and the complex early evolution of the avian sternum  

PubMed Central

Anchiornis (Deinonychosauria: Troodontidae), the earliest known feathered dinosaur, and Sapeornis (Aves: Pygostylia), one of the basalmost Cretaceous birds, are both known from hundreds of specimens, although remarkably not one specimen preserves any sternal ossifications. We use histological analysis to confirm the absence of this element in adult specimens. Furthermore, the excellent preservation of soft-tissue structures in some specimens suggests that no chondrified sternum was present. Archaeopteryx, the oldest and most basal known bird, is known from only 10 specimens and the presence of a sternum is controversial; a chondrified sternum is widely considered to have been present. However, data from Anchiornis and Sapeornis suggest that a sternum may also have been completely absent in this important taxon, suggesting that the absence of a sternum could represent the plesiomorphic avian condition. Our discovery reveals an unexpected level of complexity in the early evolution of the avian sternum; the large amount of observable homoplasy is probably a direct result of the high degree of inherent developmental plasticity of the sternum compared with observations in other skeletal elements. PMID:25201982

Zheng, Xiaoting; O’Connor, Jingmai; Wang, Xiaoli; Wang, Min; Zhang, Xiaomei; Zhou, Zhonghe

2014-01-01

179

On the absence of sternal elements in Anchiornis (Paraves) and Sapeornis (Aves) and the complex early evolution of the avian sternum.  

PubMed

Anchiornis (Deinonychosauria: Troodontidae), the earliest known feathered dinosaur, and Sapeornis (Aves: Pygostylia), one of the basalmost Cretaceous birds, are both known from hundreds of specimens, although remarkably not one specimen preserves any sternal ossifications. We use histological analysis to confirm the absence of this element in adult specimens. Furthermore, the excellent preservation of soft-tissue structures in some specimens suggests that no chondrified sternum was present. Archaeopteryx, the oldest and most basal known bird, is known from only 10 specimens and the presence of a sternum is controversial; a chondrified sternum is widely considered to have been present. However, data from Anchiornis and Sapeornis suggest that a sternum may also have been completely absent in this important taxon, suggesting that the absence of a sternum could represent the plesiomorphic avian condition. Our discovery reveals an unexpected level of complexity in the early evolution of the avian sternum; the large amount of observable homoplasy is probably a direct result of the high degree of inherent developmental plasticity of the sternum compared with observations in other skeletal elements. PMID:25201982

Zheng, Xiaoting; O'Connor, Jingmai; Wang, Xiaoli; Wang, Min; Zhang, Xiaomei; Zhou, Zhonghe

2014-09-23

180

A comprehensive multilocus phylogeny of the Neotropical cotingas (Cotingidae, Aves) with a comparative evolutionary analysis of breeding system and plumage dimorphism and a revised phylogenetic classification.  

PubMed

The Neotropical cotingas (Cotingidae: Aves) are a group of passerine birds that are characterized by extreme diversity in morphology, ecology, breeding system, and behavior. Here, we present a comprehensive phylogeny of the Neotropical cotingas based on six nuclear and mitochondrial loci (?7500 bp) for a sample of 61 cotinga species in all 25 genera, and 22 species of suboscine outgroups. Our taxon sample more than doubles the number of cotinga species studied in previous analyses, and allows us to test the monophyly of the cotingas as well as their intrageneric relationships with high resolution. We analyze our genetic data using a Bayesian species tree method, and concatenated Bayesian and maximum likelihood methods, and present a highly supported phylogenetic hypothesis. We confirm the monophyly of the cotingas, and present the first phylogenetic evidence for the relationships of Phibalura flavirostris as the sister group to Ampelion and Doliornis, and the paraphyly of Lipaugus with respect to Tijuca. In addition, we resolve the diverse radiations within the Cotinga, Lipaugus, Pipreola, and Procnias genera. We find no support for Darwin's (1871) hypothesis that the increase in sexual selection associated with polygynous breeding systems drives the evolution of color dimorphism in the cotingas, at least when analyzed at a broad categorical scale. Finally, we present a new comprehensive phylogenetic classification of all cotinga species. PMID:25234241

Berv, Jacob S; Prum, Richard O

2014-12-01

181

Ancient DNA analyses of early archaeological sites in New Zealand reveal extreme exploitation of moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes) at all life stages  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The human colonisation of New Zealand in the late thirteenth century AD led to catastrophic impacts on the local biota and is among the most compelling examples of human over-exploitation of native fauna, including megafauna. Nearly half of the species in New Zealand' s pre-human avifauna are now extinct, including all nine species of large, flightless moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes). The abundance of moa in early archaeological sites demonstrates the significance of these megaherbivores in the diet of the first New Zealanders. Combining moa assemblage data, based on DNA identification of eggshell and bone, with morphological identification of bone (literature and museum catalogued specimens), we present the most comprehensive audit of moa to date from several significant 13th-15th century AD archaeological deposits across the east coast of the South Island. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was amplified from 251 of 323 (78%) eggshell fragments and 22 of 27 (88%) bone samples, and the analyses revealed the presence of four moa species: Anomalopteryx didiformis; Dinornis robustus; Emeus crassus and Euryapteryx curtus. The mtDNA, along with polymorphic microsatellite markers, enabled an estimate of the minimum number of individual eggs consumed at each site. Remarkably, in one deposit over 50 individual eggs were identified - a number that likely represents a considerable proportion of the total reproductive output of moa in the area and emphasises that human predation of all life stages of moa was intense. Molecular sexing was conducted on bones (n = 11). Contrary to previous ancient DNA studies from natural sites that consistently report an excess of female moa, we observed an excess of males (2.7:1), suggestive that males were preferential targets. This could be related to different behaviour between the two highly size-dimorphic sexes in moa. Lastly, we investigated the moa species from recovered skeletal and eggshell remains from seven Wairau Bar burials, and identified the presence of only the larger species of moa, E. curtus and D. robustus.

Oskam, Charlotte L.; Allentoft, Morten E.; Walter, Richard; Scofield, R. Paul; Haile, James; Holdaway, Richard N.; Bunce, Michael; Jacomb, Chris

2012-10-01

182

Please note that this is not a complete list of things to do and see in the area. A simple search of things to do in Palm Beach will reveal additional options. Happy exploring. 700 Rosemary Ave. West Palm Beach, FL 33401  

E-print Network

of things to do in Palm Beach will reveal additional options. Happy exploring. Palm Beach Shopping: City Place 700 Rosemary Ave. ­ West Palm Beach, FL 33401 (561) 366-1000 http://www.cityplace.com/ PGA Commons 5100 PGA Boulevard, Suite 209 ­ Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33418 (561) 630-8630 http

Fernandez, Eduardo

183

Summer Session 419 Boston Ave.  

E-print Network

to a collection agency for action, with all associated costs charged to me. I understand that I am required be dropped from my courses, my balance will be subject to late fees, and/or my balance may be submitted

Dennett, Daniel

184

Summer Session 419 Boston Ave.  

E-print Network

the first day of classes, a hold may be put on my account, I may be dropped from my courses, my balance will be subject to late fees, and/or my balance may be submitted to a collection agency for action, with all associated costs charged to me. I understand that I am required to submit payment for summer courses

Dennett, Daniel

185

HWY 20 / 34 ORCHARD AVE  

E-print Network

HCRL HAML McNy Fair Kear Bate MoPl Navy Glsn Furm Gilk More Gilm ClkL PSHC RRLA Bat DxLg HFC GbAd VRL. (ACC) A6 Austin Hall (Aust) ** C5 Avery Lodge (AvLg) C10 Azalea House (AzHs) C9 Ballard Extension Hall (BalE) B6 Batcheller Hall (Bat) B8 Bates Hall (Bate) B6 Beef Barn (BfBn) B2 Benton Annex (Women

Escher, Christine

186

HWY 20 / 34 ORCHARD AVE  

E-print Network

Kear MCC Haw Phar LAR Bate Furm Goss Fair McNy Navy Glsn More OS Bent West Gilm Bat Gilk PSHC ClkL Dx Islander Cultural Ctr. (ACC) Austin Hall (Aust) ** Avery Lodge (AvLg) Azalea House (AzHs) Ballard Extension Hall (BalE) Batcheller Hall (Bat) Bates Hall (Bate) Beef Barn (BfBn) Benton Annex (Women's Center) (Bn

Escher, Christine

187

CONGRESS AVE. CHARLIE COE GOLF  

E-print Network

PAGE CRL BROOKS ST BARRY SWITZER CENTER DECK BUS TERMINAL ASPAVE E E PRESS MEMORIAL STADIUM at OWEN PHYSICAL FITNESS CENTER MOSIER INDOOR ATHLETIC FACILITY JACOBS FIELD RHYN FIELD HOUSE NEL EL CRADFH CEC CH

Oklahoma, University of

188

[Habitat selection and metapopulation structure: a multi-year study of distribution of the Hodgson's pipit, Anthus Hodgsoni Richm. (Aves, Passeriformes)].  

PubMed

Numbers and distribution of the Hodgson's pipit (Anthus hodgson Richm.: Aves, Passeriformes) were studied in the Yenissei middle taiga region over an area of about 450 sq km. Distribution of breeding pairs was mapped on fixed study plots (up to 450 ha in total) annually during 15 years. Habitat properties were described and measured in detail on 53 4-ha homogeneous plots within the area. It is shown by means of multiple regression, an average bird abundance over these plots depends on five habitat features (R2 = 0.74) including development and accessibility of moss cover and absence of a potential competitor, the tree pipit (A. trivialis L.). Correlation with these factors ruterated every year, therefore the average bird abundance was used as an index of habitat favourability. Density deviations from the mean in years of high and low numbers appeared to be closely related to habitat favourability; in particular, the relationship can alter the sign depending on the spatial scale of population structures. Changes in abundance reversely related to favourability in adjacent habitats, according to the prediction of despotic distribution hypothesis (Fretwell, Lucas, 1970), strictly indicating dominance behaviour during selection of a breeding territory. The numbers in larger population groups occupying a patchy habitat complex changed synchronously and proportionally to their average habitat quality. This assumes another mechanism governing the distribution of individuals, requiring no local knowledge and no dominance relationships. Dynamics and distribution of individuals among population groups of different hierarchic ranks agree with investigations on establishing of individual site fixation in birds and allow splitting the process into four consecutive steps. 1. During the juvenile dispersal, birds spread around quite evenly, disregarding of habitat quality. This maintains entirety of the metapopulation and occupation of isolated habitat spots. 2. The juvenile dispersal ends with switching to a search for a nearest site containing potential breeding territories. Such a site gets imprinted as the site for next breeding. According to our data, it covers an area of a few square kilometers. 3. During the pre-breeding period, an individual chooses a territory regarding to the favourability, but dominance of old residents forces it to search around for an empty patch within the imprinted area. As a result, dominance relationships affect both breeding density in best habitats and availability of empty patches. 4. The next years, an individual keeps connection with the breeding site fixed due to site tenacity. Rising of the social status allows the individual to occupy a better territory in future. Thus, a population group proportionate to individually imprinted area, with a concentration of favourable patches in the central part, comprises an elementary structural and functional unit of a metapopulation. Its individual members share the same well-known imprinted area and the social structure in common. Its numbers are regulated by density-dependent dominance relationships. Individuals spread over such groups in proportion to their carrying capacity in density-independent manner. Groups with best habitats can be more profitable at population lows, and less densely populated ones can offer more profit at population tops. Despite this, lack of information restricts profitable movements between them. Hence each group offers the same average fitness to its members. PMID:18956571

Burski?, O V

2008-01-01

189

VizieR Online Data Catalog: Extrasolar planets. Radial velocities of eight stars (Diaz+ 2012)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The catalogue is composed of eight radial velocity timeseries, one for each target listed above. The radial velocities were obtained with the SOPHIE spectrograph at the 1.93-m telescope at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence. Addtional information for each star include the estimated uncertainty in the radial velocity, the bissector slope of the cross-correlation function, the exposure time, and the signal-to-noise ratio per pixel. (2 data files).

Diaz, R. F.; Santerne, A.; Sahlmann, J.; Hebrard, G.; Eggenberger, A.; Santos, N. C.; Moutou, C.; Arnold, L.; Boisse, I.; Bonfils, X.; Bouchy, F.; Delfosse, X.; Desort, M.; Ehrenreich, D.; Forveille, T.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Lovis, C.; Pepe, F.; Perrier, C.; Queloz; D.; Segransan, D.; Udry, S.; Vidal-Madjar, A.

2011-11-01

190

From federated to aggregated search Fernando Diaz, Mounia Lalmas and Milad Shokouhi  

E-print Network

documents each contain? How to select the collection(s) to be searched for relevant documents? How to merge result list Vertical search ­ also known as aggregated search ­ add the top-ranked results from relevant search Increasingly different types of information being available, sough and relevant e.g. news, image

Lalmas, Mounia

191

Ontology based CBR with jCOLIBRI Juan A. Recio-Garcia, Belen Diaz-Agudo,  

E-print Network

Madrid Madrid, Spain email: {jareciog,antonio.sanchez}@fdi.ucm.es, {belend, pedro}@sip.ucm.es Abstract j). Using a 2http://gaia.fdi.ucm.es/ontologies/index.html 3http://gaia.fdi.ucm.es/projects/jcolibri #12

Langseth, Helge

192

Biodiversity Regulation of Ecosystem Services Coordinating Lead Authors: Sandra Diaz, David Tilman, Joseph Fargione  

E-print Network

.5 Biodiversity, Ecosystem Services, and Human Well-being: Challenges and Opportunities by Global Change Drivers and as Factor Modifying Ecosystem Processes and Services and Human Well influences the provision of ecosystem services and therefore human well-being (high certainty). Processes

Minnesota, University of

193

Comparison of Multiple Cloud Frameworks Gregor von Laszewski, Javier Diaz, Fugang Wang, Geoffrey C. Fox  

E-print Network

as a Service (IaaS) frameworks exist. Users, developers, and administrators have to make a decision about which from the availability of a testbed on which comparisons between the IaaS frameworks can be conducted. FutureGrid aims to offer a number of IaaS including Nimbus, Eucalyptus, OpenStack, and OpenNebula. One

194

On Securing Communication From Profilers Sandra Diaz-Santiago, Debrup Chakraborty  

E-print Network

a business motive and most spam emails try to advertise a product, a web-page or a service. If the spam email is an email which is not of interest to the receiver. Everyday almost every one of us finds emails can be sent in a directed manner, i.e., if a spammer can send a specific advertisement to a user

195

Analisis filogenetico del compas flamenco Jose-Miguel Diaz-Ba~nez *  

E-print Network

An´alisis filogen´etico del comp´as flamenco Jos´e-Miguel D´iaz-B´a~nez * Giovanna Farigu caracterizaci´on internacional del flamenco es la ejecuci´on de los ritmos de palmas en los que el metro musical´etico de los cinco patrones r´itmicos en comp´as de 12/8 del flamenco usando dos distancias de comparaci

Toussaint, Godfried T.

196

El Compas Flamenco: A Phylogenetic Analysis J. Miguel Diaz-Ba~nez  

E-print Network

El Comp´as Flamenco: A Phylogenetic Analysis J. Miguel D´iaz-B´a~nez Giovanna Farigu Francisco G, 2004, pp. 61-70. Abstract The flamenco music of Andalucia in Southern Spain is characterized by hand analy- sis of the five 12/8 time metric timelines used in Flamenco music is presented using two distance

Toussaint, Godfried T.

197

New perspectives in tracing vector-borne interaction Elena Go mez-Diaz1  

E-print Network

: is the difference in isotopic composition between an animal and its diet. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA): in the ELISA method enzymes are attached to either antigen or antibody. Upon linking the enzyme to the antigen

198

Maria Elena Diaz Barriga Rodriguez me.diazb@gmail.com / md2936@caa.columbia.edu  

E-print Network

. September 2003 ­ December 2008. Privately owned institutional asset management of financial risk measurement systems for liability management. Academic history Earth. However, governments are now facing waste management problems, and are constantly

199

Page 480 Student Service Professionals Sonoma State University 2013-2014 Catalog Carmen Diaz Misa (2001)  

E-print Network

, University of Southern California Anthony Farmer (2011) Residential Life Coordinator A.S. 2005, Three Rivers, Rowan University M.S. 2007, University of North Carolina at Greensboro Donna Garbesi (2003) Elementary, Sonoma State University Julie Greathouse (2003) Coordinator for Student Academic Services B.S. 1998

Ravikumar, B.

2001-01-01

200

DIAZ-PINTO ET AL. VOL. 6 ' NO. 2 ' 11421148 ' 2012 www.acsnano.org  

E-print Network

rate or no hydrogen,12,13 and reduced hy- drogen concentration has also led14 to the improvement and eliminating the hy- drogen during the growth. This finding is important not only by shedding light on the CVD

Peng, Haibing

201

Total Synthesis of (-)-Mucocin Michael T. Crimmins,* Yan Zhang, and Frank A. Diaz  

E-print Network

shrimp toxicity (BST) assay (IC50 1.3 µg/mL), and shows remarkably selective inhibitory effects against A reported to bear a tetrahydropyran (THP) ring along with a THF ring.2 Mucocin is quite active in the brine

202

Locating an obnoxious plane J.M. Diaz-Ba~nez  

E-print Network

Universitaria Polit´ecnica, Virgen de ´Africa 7, 41011, Sevilla, SPAIN (dbanez@us.es). (University of Denver, USA (mlopez@cs.du.edu). Universitat de Girona, SPAIN (sellares@ima.udg.es). 1 #12;the input points] for a recent survey on the current state-of-art of these problems. In this paper, we deal with the maximin

Díaz-Báñez, José Miguel

203

The Class Cover Problem with Boxes J. M. Diaz-Ba~nez  

E-print Network

of Mathematics, IMFM, and Department of Mathematics, FMF, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia. Partially supported by the Slovenian Research Agency, program P1-0297. sergio.cabello@fmf.uni-lj.si. Departamento de Matem

Cabello, Sergio

204

Evolution of alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase 1 peroxisomal and mitochondrial targeting. A survey of its subcellular distribution in the livers of various representatives of the classes Mammalia, Aves and Amphibia.  

PubMed

As part of a wider study on the molecular evolution of alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase 1 (AGT1) intracellular compartmentalization, we have determined the subcellular distribution of immunoreactive AGT1, using postembedding protein A-gold immunoelectron microscopy, in the livers of various members of the classes Mammalia, Aves, and Amphibia. As far as organellar distribution is concerned, three categories could be distinguished. In members of the first category (type I), all, or nearly all, of the immunoreactive AGT1 was concentrated within the peroxisomes. In the second category (type II), AGT1 was found more evenly distributed in both peroxisomes and mitochondria. In the third category (type III), AGT1 was localized mainly within the mitochondria with much lower, but widely variable, amounts in the peroxisomes. Type I animals include the human, two great apes (gorilla, orangutan), two Old World monkeys (anubis baboon, Japanese macaque), a New World monkey (white-faced Saki monkey), a lago, morph (European rabbit), a bat (Seba's short-tailed fruit bat), two caviomorph rodents (guinea pig, orange-rumped agouti), and two Australian marsupials (koala, Bennett's wallaby). Type II animals include two New World monkeys (common marmoset, cotton-top tamarin), three prosimians (brown lemur, fat-tailed dwarf lemur, pygmy slow loris), five rodents (a hybrid crested porcupine, Colombian ground squirrel, laboratory rat, laboratory mouse, golden hamster), an American marsupial (grey short-tailed opossum), and a bird (raven). Type III animals include the large tree shrew, three insectivores (common Eurasian mole, European hedgehog, house shrew), four carnivores (domestic cat, ocelot, domestic dog, polecat ferret), and an amphibian (common frog). In addition to these categories, some animals (e.g. guinea pig, common frog) possessed significant amounts of cytosolic AGT1. Whereas the subcellular distribution of AGT1 in some orders (e.g. Insectivora and Carnivora) did not appear to vary markedly between the different members, in other orders (e.g. Primates, Rodentia and Marsupialia) it fluctuated widely between the different species. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that the subcellular distribution of AGT1 has changed radically on numerous occasions during the evolution of mammals. The new observations presented in this paper are compatible with our previous demonstration of a relationship between AGT1 subcellular distribution and either present or putative ancestral dietary habit, and our previous suggestion that the molecular evolution of the AGT gene has been markedly influenced by dietary selection pressure. PMID:7813517

Danpure, C J; Fryer, P; Jennings, P R; Allsop, J; Griffiths, S; Cunningham, A

1994-08-01

205

OBSERVACIONES DE AVES RARAS EN ESPAÑA, 2001  

Microsoft Academic Search

annual report of the Spanish Orni- thological Society's Rarities Committee. It considers 260 new records, relating to 108 species, with an ac- ceptance rate of 84.2 %. Highlights include a record of African Crake Crex egregia in Tenerife island (Ca- naries), first for the Western Palearctic, and a capture of Bald Ibis Geronticus eremita in the Marismas del Guadalquivir, year

Eduardo DE JUANA

206

Kathryn E. Muratore 4400 Massachusetts Ave NW  

E-print Network

and documentation available at http://mcb.berkeley.edu/labs/kirsch). - Cloning, expression, purification and translation. Human Genome (CHEM-205) Introduction to the science of genetics and genomics, including

Lansky, Joshua

207

Introduction to the Aves: The Birds  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Museum of Paleontology at the University of California Berkeley (reviewed in the June 16, 1995 Scout Report) has continued to build their impressive online resource network and now offers this site on paleontology of birds. To learn more about each subject, users may click on any of the four main sections: Fossil Record, Life History & Ecology, Systematics, or Morphology. Although some bird links are under construction, the current information is instructive and contains hyperlinks to a wealth of additional information.

208

Julia Karin Lawson 703 South Fess Ave.  

E-print Network

.com Education 1980 Ph.D in German, Indiana University, Bloomington IN 1968 M.A. in German, Indiana University, all levels. 2000-2002 Instructor, Comprehensive Language Center, Inc., a private language contractor through advanced levels. 1991 - 1999 Program Director and Instructor of ESL and German, Languages

Indiana University

209

127 Eastern Ave. Gloucester, MA 01930  

E-print Network

This course is designed for someone with no SCUBA experience. It consists of pool and classroom time, meeting down as follows: i)Pool and classroom instruction, paid to Project DEEP by the 3rd class meeting once a week for 10 weeks from 7pm - 10pm. Half of the time is spent in the pool learning to use SCUBA

Schweik, Charles M.

210

127 Eastern Ave. Gloucester, MA 01930  

E-print Network

for someone with no SCUBA experience. It consists of pool and classroom time, meeting once a week for 10 weeks)Pool and classroom instruction, paid to Project DEEP by the 3rd class meeting, = $150.00 ii)Open Water Instruction from 7pm - 10pm. Half of the time is spent in the pool learning to use SCUBA equipment, the other half

Schweik, Charles M.

211

177 Ave. Algarrobos WLV 1Apt. 2405  

E-print Network

Education August 2005-May 2008 University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez Campus Minor: Agriculture Professional Grant Program May, 2008 Introduction to Geographic Information System (GIS) University of Puerto Rico Environmental Movement (MAC)Mayagüez, Puerto Rico 2008 Workshop about organic agriculture for students

Gilbes, Fernando

212

Global diversity of freshwater birds (Aves)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Among the 10,000 birds species living on earth, 5% (e.g., 560) need imperatively freshwater habitat in order to satisfy at\\u000a least one of their life history traits. About 11 completed families could even disappear if their wetland habitat left. About\\u000a 10% (58) of these can be considered as endemic. Africa contains the biggest number of endemic (20) and more precisely

Olivier Dehorter; Matthieu Guillemain

213

Global diversity of freshwater birds (Aves)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Among the 10,000 birds species living on earth, 5% (e.g., 560) need imperatively freshwater habitat in order to satisfy at\\u000a least one of their life history traits. About 11 completed families could even disappear if their wetland habitat left. About\\u000a 10% (58) of these can be considered as endemic. Africa contains the biggest number of endemic (20) and more precisely

Olivier Dehorter; Matthieu Guillemain

2008-01-01

214

www.ave.kth.se Rail Vehicles  

E-print Network

that avoids the use of more complex systems (i.e. disk brakes), but the friction generates wear which: Block brake­wheel contact analysis Background Most freight trains use block brakes, where the vehicle is stopped by the means of friction between a brake block and the wheel tread. It is a simple method

Haviland, David

215

www.ave.kth.se Rail Vehicles  

E-print Network

. It is a simple method that avoids the use of more complex systems (i.e. disk brakes), but the friction generates: Modelling wheel wear caused by block brakes Background Most freight trains use block brakes, where the energy dissipation is generated with the friction between a brake block and the wheel thread

Haviland, David

216

420 Comp & Comm Ctr Garden Ave Ext  

E-print Network

? Are food options available for participants with dietary restrictions/allergies? Is the staff Activities If food or drinks are provided, are tables less than 34" high with all food and drinks within

217

Zoogeography of the Irenidae (Aves: Passeres)  

E-print Network

-level oscillations. Some races and even species probably have evolved since the end of the last glaciation 11,000 years ago, making insular southeast Asia a natural laboratory for the study of bird evolution. Suggestions are made for ecological, ethological...

Fautin, Daphne G.

1974-01-01

218

Cranial Osteology of Meiglyptini (Aves: Piciformes: Picidae)  

PubMed Central

The Meiglyptini comprise eight species grouped into three genera: Meiglyptes and Mulleripicus, with three species each, and Hemicircus, with two species. The aim of the present study was to describe the cranial osteology of six species and three genera of Meiglyptini and to compare them to each other, as well as with other species of woodpeckers and other bird groups. The cranial osteology varied among the investigated species, but the most markedly distinct characteristics were: (1) a frontal overhang is only observed in the middle portion of the frontale of H. concretus; (2) the Proc. zygomaticus and suprameaticus are thick and long in species of the genus Mulleripicus, but short in other species; (3) the Pes pterygoidei is relatively larger in species of the genus Mulleripicus, while it is narrow, thin and relatively smaller in species of the genus Meiglyptes and indistinct in H. concretus; (4) the bony projection of the ectethmoidale is relatively short and thin in species of Mulleripicus and more developed in H. concretus. It appears that the greatest structural complexity of the cranial osteology is associated with the birds' diet, with the frugivorous H. concretus being markedly different from the insectivorous species. PMID:22567317

Donatelli, Reginaldo José

2012-01-01

219

SEE INSET AT RIGHT CLEVELAND AVE  

E-print Network

Elliott Hall Mechanical Hall Trabant University Center Parking Garage Smith Hall Ewing Hall Purnell Hall Munroe Hall Kirkbride Hall Blue& Gold Club President's House Alfred Lerner Hall Amy du Pont Music Harrington Complex Pearson Hall Graham Hall Laurel Hall Hartshorn Hall Robinson Hall Amy Rextrew House Alison

Firestone, Jeremy

220

University of California Riverside 900 University Ave  

E-print Network

with critical thinking facilitates retention. Better retention results in better performance on examinations to legal action. Note-taking can be a critical requirement of a course. Selling or buying of notes short circuits this critical requirement and vehicle for learning. Taking one's own notes reflects a student

Mills, Allen P.

221

9700 S. Cass Ave. Argonne, IL 60439  

E-print Network

), mutagenesis, Northern blotting, yeast two-hybrid system, plant transformation, plant DNA isolation, nuclei isolation, genotyping. Protein Biochemistry and Protein Crystalization Mammalian and insect cell tissue. Jeanne Romero-Severson Isolate restrictable DNA from Red Oak to develop micro-satellites. Familiar

Kemner, Ken

222

Evolution of leaf warbler songs (Aves: Phylloscopidae)  

PubMed Central

Songs in passerine birds are important for territory defense and mating. Speciation rates in oscine passerines are so high, due to cultural evolution, that this bird lineage makes up half of the extant bird species. Leaf warblers are a speciose Old-World passerine family of limited morphological differentiation, so that songs are even more important for species delimitation. We took 16 sonographic traits from song recordings of 80 leaf warbler taxa and correlated them with 15 potentially explanatory variables, pairwise, and in linear models. Based on a well-resolved molecular phylogeny of the same taxa, all pairwise correlations were corrected for relatedness with phylogenetically independent contrasts and phylogenetic generalized linear models were used. We found a phylogenetic signal for most song traits, but a strong one only for the duration of the longest and of the shortest element, which are presumably inherited instead of learned. Body size of a leaf warbler species is a constraint on song frequencies independent of phylogeny. At least in this study, habitat density had only marginal impact on song features, which even disappeared through phylogenetic correction. Maybe most leaf warblers avoid the deterioration through sound propagation in dense vegetation by singing from exposed perches. Latitudinal (and longitudinal) extension of the breeding ranges was correlated with most song features, especially verse duration (longer polewards and westwards) and complexity (lower polewards). Climate niche or expansion history might explain these correlations. The number of different element types per verse decreases with elevation, possibly due to fewer resources and congeneric species at higher elevations. PMID:25691998

Tietze, Dieter Thomas; Martens, Jochen; Fischer, Balduin S; Sun, Yue-Hua; Klussmann-Kolb, Annette; Päckert, Martin

2015-01-01

223

Kerry Donnelly Peterson 460 Division Ave  

E-print Network

and Nutrition, University of Minnesota Awards and Honors 2012 & 2013 Nominee, UW Stout College of Education Image among Female College Undergraduate Students. Journal of the American Dietetic Association 2010) petersonke@uwstout.edu Education Ph.D. Nutrition, 2005, University of Minnesota Dissertation Title: Sources

Wu, Mingshen

224

OARDCEMPLOYEES'CREDITUNION 1680MadisonAve  

E-print Network

(Research Operations) Gene Howell (Renovations Planning) AUDIT COMMITTEE Jack Bardall (Retired) Willis Leach fails, the federal government does not guarantee that depositors will get their money back. NEW MEMBERS payment on a special purchase... use the credit union and payroll deduction to painlessly save

Jones, Michelle

225

Evolution of leaf warbler songs (Aves: Phylloscopidae).  

PubMed

Songs in passerine birds are important for territory defense and mating. Speciation rates in oscine passerines are so high, due to cultural evolution, that this bird lineage makes up half of the extant bird species. Leaf warblers are a speciose Old-World passerine family of limited morphological differentiation, so that songs are even more important for species delimitation. We took 16 sonographic traits from song recordings of 80 leaf warbler taxa and correlated them with 15 potentially explanatory variables, pairwise, and in linear models. Based on a well-resolved molecular phylogeny of the same taxa, all pairwise correlations were corrected for relatedness with phylogenetically independent contrasts and phylogenetic generalized linear models were used. We found a phylogenetic signal for most song traits, but a strong one only for the duration of the longest and of the shortest element, which are presumably inherited instead of learned. Body size of a leaf warbler species is a constraint on song frequencies independent of phylogeny. At least in this study, habitat density had only marginal impact on song features, which even disappeared through phylogenetic correction. Maybe most leaf warblers avoid the deterioration through sound propagation in dense vegetation by singing from exposed perches. Latitudinal (and longitudinal) extension of the breeding ranges was correlated with most song features, especially verse duration (longer polewards and westwards) and complexity (lower polewards). Climate niche or expansion history might explain these correlations. The number of different element types per verse decreases with elevation, possibly due to fewer resources and congeneric species at higher elevations. PMID:25691998

Tietze, Dieter Thomas; Martens, Jochen; Fischer, Balduin S; Sun, Yue-Hua; Klussmann-Kolb, Annette; Päckert, Martin

2015-02-01

226

Genome sizes of cranes (Aves: Gruiformes).  

PubMed

The DNA content of blood cell nuclei of 15 species of cranes was determined by Feulgen-DNA cytophotometry. Genome sizes agree with values reported elsewhere for several crane species analyzed by flow cytometry. Males have more DNA per cell than females in several species. A karyotype where 2n = 80 is reported for a male greater sandhill crane. PMID:17103395

Rasch, Ellen M

2006-12-01

227

OBSERVACIONES DE AVES RARAS EN ESPAÑA  

Microsoft Academic Search

annual report of the Spanish Orni- thological Society's Rarities Committee. It considers 321 new records pertaining to 110 species, with an ac- ceptance rate of 77.7 %. Species new to the Spanish list are Dwarf Bittern Ardeirallus sturmii (first accepted record for the Palearctic, from Gran Canaria island), Chimney Swift Chaetura pelagica(two in the Iberian pe- ninsula, year1999) and Dusky

Eduardo DE JUANA

228

Your Guide to 1831 SW Park Ave  

E-print Network

are hardwood. There are several different apartment styles: sleepers, full studios, one bedroom apartments (503) 725-4375 Montgomery Help Desk (503) 725-4385 Residence Life Office (503) 725-2450 RA After Hours be charged a Housing fine, as well as any and all damage costs. Farmers Market Portland Farmers Market

Latiolais, M. Paul

229

NW EVERETT AVE. W BURNSIDE ST.  

E-print Network

Jefferson/Columbia Greenway Credits The Urban Projects Workshop University of Oregon - Portland Student Nielsen - Jefferson-Columbia Greenway Faculty Professor Gerald Gast University of Oregon 70 NW Couch- Columbia Greenway". The text that follows departs from conventional urban planning jargon. Recommendations

230

Kimberly Sims 101 Western Ave. #66  

E-print Network

Osborn, Social Studies concentrator · "Black Beauty Culture, 1908-1929," Scott Rowen, History Research Assistant, the American Pageant · Assisted in updating the content of the newest edition of the textbook The American Pageant. September 2001- June 2002 Research Assistant for Professor Lizabeth Cohen

Carlini, David

231

Richard R. Gnat, AIA, LEED AP 650 Oakmont Ave., #2119 2641 West Winnemac Ave., #2  

E-print Network

Professor Studio, Core & Elective Courses: August 2011 ­ June 2012 KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY, Manhattan - May 1989 Professional PAPPAGEORGE / HAYMES ARCHITECTS LTD, Chicago, Illinois Experience Senior Project Associate / Senior Project Designer / Senior Project Architect: Nov. 2001 - July 2006 KRUECK & SEXTON

Hemmers, Oliver

232

LPV-based MR Damper Modelling Vicente A. Diaz-Salas, Ruben Morales-Menendez, Ricardo Ramirez-Mendoza  

E-print Network

´iaz-Salas is a MSc Student at Tec de Monterrey, Monterrey, Mexico. A00790521@itesm.mx R. Morales-Menendez and R. Ramirez are full profes- sors at Tec de Monterrey, Monterrey, Mexico. {rmm, ricardo.ramirez}@itesm.mx O.dugard}@gipsa-lab.grenoble-inp.fr Fig. 1. Force-velocity (F-V) map of an MR damper for different electric current inputs. II. MR DAMPER

Boyer, Edmond

233

Regenerative potential of allopregnanolone Jun Ming Wang, Lifei Liu, Ronald W. Irwin, Shuhua Chen, Roberta Diaz Brinton  

E-print Network

, to the risk of Alzheimer's disease and to progression of neurodegenerative pathology. Data from multiple investigations indicate that the decline of neurosteroids play a key role in successful aging and prevention of neurodegenerative disease Alzheimer's. Among the neurosteroids in decline during aging is allopregnanolone (AP

Brinton, Roberta Diaz

234

MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 761, pp. 15, 3 figs. Cryptotis meridensis. By Neal Woodman and Amelia Diaz de Pascual  

E-print Network

, less emarginate upper dentition, and simple M3 (Woodman 2002). GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS. Cryptotis. Dentition is bulbous. Posterior borders of P4, M1, and M2 are not recessed or only slightly recessed

Hayssen, Virginia

235

SERVICE HOURS SERVICE INTERVALS Blue Route Blackberry Gate  

E-print Network

with this sign. Leroy Leroy BlackberryGate Euclid Euclid Berkeley BART BusStop for Berkeley BART Arch Oxford­Leroy Ave Hearst Ave­Euclid Ave Oxford St.­Hearst Ave Main Berkeley BART Shattuck Ave Oxford St.­University Ave Hearst Ave­Arch St. Hearst Ave­Euclid Ave Hearst Ave­Leroy Ave Blackberry Gate­Uphill Building 65

236

AVE/VAS 5: 25-mb sounding data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The rawinsonde sounding program is described and tabulated data at 25 mb intervals for the 24 and 14 special stations participation in the experiment are presented. Soundings were taken at 3 hr intervals. The method of processing soundings is discussed briefly, estimates of the RMS errors in the data are presented, and an example of contact data is given. Termination pressures of soundings taken in the meso beta scale network are tabulated, as are observations of ground temperature at a depth of 2 cm.

Sienkiewicz, M. E.

1983-01-01

237

Phylogenetic relationships of the mockingbirds and thrashers (Aves: Mimidae).  

PubMed

The mockingbirds, thrashers and allied birds in the family Mimidae are broadly distributed across the Americas. Many aspects of their phylogenetic history are well established, but there has been no previous phylogenetic study that included all species in this radiation. Our reconstructions based on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequence markers show that an early bifurcation separated the Mimidae into two clades, the first of which includes North and Middle American taxa (Melanotis, Melanoptila, Dumetella) plus a small radiation that likely occurred largely within the West Indies (Ramphocinclus, Allenia, Margarops, Cinclocerthia). The second and larger radiation includes the Toxostoma thrasher clade, along with the monotypic Sage Thrasher (Oreoscoptes) and the phenotypically diverse and broadly distributed Mimus mockingbirds. This mockingbird group is biogeographically notable for including several lineages that colonized and diverged on isolated islands, including the Socorro Mockingbird (Mimus graysoni, formerly Mimodes) and the diverse and historically important Galapagos mockingbirds (formerly Nesomimus). Our reconstructions support a sister relationship between the Galapagos mockingbird lineage and the Bahama Mockingbird (M. gundlachi) of the West Indies, rather than the Long-tailed Mockingbird (M. longicaudatus) or other species presently found on the South American mainland. Relationships within the genus Toxostoma conflict with traditional arrangements but support a tree based on a preivous mtDNA study. For instance, the southern Mexican endemic Ocellated Thrasher (T. ocellatum) is not an isolated sister species of the Curve-billed thrasher (T. curvirostre). PMID:21867766

Lovette, Irby J; Arbogast, Brian S; Curry, Robert L; Zink, Robert M; Botero, Carlos A; Sullivan, John P; Talaba, Amanda L; Harris, Rebecca B; Rubenstein, Dustin R; Ricklefs, Robert E; Bermingham, Eldredge

2012-05-01

238

Phylogenetic relationships of the mockingbirds and thrashers (Aves: Mimidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The mockingbirds, thrashers and allied birds in the family Mimidae are broadly distributed across the Americas. Many aspects of their phylogenetic history are well established, but there has been no previous phylogenetic study that included all species in this radiation. Our reconstructions based on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequence markers show that an early bifurcation separated the Mimidae into two

Irby J. Lovette; Brian S. Arbogast; Robert L. Curry; Robert M. Zink; Carlos A. Botero; John P. Sullivan; Amanda L. Talaba; Rebecca B. Harris; Dustin R. Rubenstein; Robert E. Ricklefs; Eldredge Bermingham

239

AVES ACUATICAS DEL ESTERO LA MANZANILLA, JALISCO, MEXICO  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to determine the seasonal distribution and the importance water-associated birds in the estero La Manzanilla, Jalisco, México, monthly censuses were carried out from March of 1997 to february of 1998, except for September. A total of 4180 individuals (95.24% residents and 4.76% migratory), belonging to 45 species (29 residents and 16 migratory) of birds were recorded. The highest

Salvador HERNÁNDEZ-VÁZQUEZ

240

Hypopi (Acari: Hypoderatidae) of the wood stork (Aves: Ciconiiformes; Ciconiidae).  

PubMed

A new species is described and additional host records are presented for 2 other species of deutonymphs of the family Hypoderatidae from the subcutaneous adipose tissues of the wood stork, Mycteria americana L. Phalacrodectes (Phalacrodectes) mycteria n. sp. appears to share affinities with species from both pelicaniform and ciconiiform hosts, but it most closely resembles P. (P.) punctatissimus (Cerný) Pence & Courtney from pelicans in idiosomal chaetotaxy, cuticular sclerotization, and posteriorly divergent, widely separated genital openings. The new species differs from this and other species of the genus by its small size, the degree of separation of the genital openings with papillae, no secondary sclerotization in the perigenital area or surrounding the genital openings, and the long filiform setae s and w on genu III. There was a mixed infection of Neottialges kutzeri Fain and N. mycteriae Pence in all of 7 wood storks examined from Florida and Georgia; P. (P.) mycteria was found in 4 of these hosts. This is the 7th species described as a deutonymph in the genus Phalacrodectes. The apparent close affinity of P. (P.) mycteria with P. (P.) punctatissimus and allied species from pelicaniform versus ciconiiform birds appears to be inconsistent with the established host-parasite relationships based on classical avian taxonomic relationships. However, this apparent affinity may be more reflective of the close relationships between the families of pelicans, ibises and spoonbills, and storks as recently proposed by DNA-DNA hybridization studies. PMID:8551516

Pence, D B; Thomas, N J

1995-11-01

241

A stability analysis of AVE-4 severe weather soundings  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The stability and vertical structure of an average severe storm sounding, consisting of both thermodynamic and wind vertical profiles, were investigated to determine if they could be distinguished from an average lag sounding taken 3 to 6 hours prior to severe weather occurrence. The term average is defined here to indicate the arithmetic mean of a parameter, as a function of altitude, determined from a large number of available observations taken either close to severe weather occurrence, or else more than 3 hours before it occurs. The investigative computations were also done to help determine if a severe storm forecast or index could possibly be used or developed. These mean vertical profiles of thermodynamic and wind parameters as a function of severity of the weather, determined from manually digitized radar (MDR) categories are presented. Profile differences and stability index differences are presented along with the development of the Johnson Lag Index (JLI) which is determined entirely upon environmental vertical parameter differences between conditions 3 hours prior to severe weather, and severe weather itself.

Johnson, D. L.

1982-01-01

242

DISTRIBUCIÓN DE AVES MARINAS EN LA COSTA PATAGÓNICA ARGENTINA  

Microsoft Academic Search

A census of marine birds was conducted off the Patagonian coast of Argentina from 27-29 November 1996, on board an icebreaker. On the basis of 95 observiation periods of 10 minutes each, a total of 18 species and 2063 individual birds were recorded. Large concentrations of birds were observed between 42°-43°S and 47°-48°S, where six species (Magellanic Penguin Spheniscus magellanicus,

Diego Montalti; José L. Orgeira

1998-01-01

243

The evolutionary history of cockatoos (Aves: Psittaciformes: Cacatuidae).  

PubMed

Cockatoos are the distinctive family Cacatuidae, a major lineage of the order of parrots (Psittaciformes) and distributed throughout the Australasian region of the world. However, the evolutionary history of cockatoos is not well understood. We investigated the phylogeny of cockatoos based on three mitochondrial and three nuclear DNA genes obtained from 16 of 21 species of Cacatuidae. In addition, five novel mitochondrial genomes were used to estimate time of divergence and our estimates indicate Cacatuidae diverged from Psittacidae approximately 40.7 million years ago (95% CI 51.6-30.3 Ma) during the Eocene. Our data shows Cacatuidae began to diversify approximately 27.9 Ma (95% CI 38.1-18.3 Ma) during the Oligocene. The early to middle Miocene (20-10 Ma) was a significant period in the evolution of modern Australian environments and vegetation, in which a transformation from mainly mesic to xeric habitats (e.g., fire-adapted sclerophyll vegetation and grasslands) occurred. We hypothesize that this environmental transformation was a driving force behind the diversification of cockatoos. A detailed multi-locus molecular phylogeny enabled us to resolve the phylogenetic placements of the Palm Cockatoo (Probosciger aterrimus), Galah (Eolophus roseicapillus), Gang-gang Cockatoo (Callocephalon fimbriatum) and Cockatiel (Nymphicus hollandicus), which have historically been difficult to place within Cacatuidae. When the molecular evidence is analysed in concert with morphology, it is clear that many of the cockatoo species' diagnostic phenotypic traits such as plumage colour, body size, wing shape and bill morphology have evolved in parallel or convergently across lineages. PMID:21419232

White, Nicole E; Phillips, Matthew J; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Alfaro-Núñez, Alonzo; Willerslev, Eske; Mawson, Peter R; Spencer, Peter B S; Bunce, Michael

2011-06-01

244

Eocene Diversification of Crown Group Rails (Aves: Gruiformes: Rallidae)  

PubMed Central

Central to our understanding of the timing of bird evolution is debate about an apparent conflict between fossil and molecular data. A deep age for higher level taxa within Neoaves is evident from molecular analyses but much remains to be learned about the age of diversification in modern bird families and their evolutionary ecology. In order to better understand the timing and pattern of diversification within the family Rallidae we used a relaxed molecular clock, fossil calibrations, and complete mitochondrial genomes from a range of rallid species analysed in a Bayesian framework. The estimated time of origin of Rallidae is Eocene, about 40.5 Mya, with evidence of intrafamiliar diversification from the Late Eocene to the Miocene. This timing is older than previously suggested for crown group Rallidae, but fossil calibrations, extent of taxon sampling and substantial sequence data give it credence. We note that fossils of Eocene age tentatively assigned to Rallidae are consistent with our findings. Compared to available studies of other bird lineages, the rail clade is old and supports an inference of deep ancestry of ground-dwelling habits among Neoaves. PMID:25291147

García–R, Juan C.; Gibb, Gillian C.; Trewick, Steve A.

2014-01-01

245

$avings from thin Air: Cultivating Sensible Energy Use  

E-print Network

possible to recycle the old item along the way. · Change all your lights to compact fluorescent (CFL! Further analysis yielded the most significant culprits: As you can see, the main draws are electronics, climate control, and lighting. Electronics, while small consumers singly, add up to make an impact

Wang, Yuqing

246

Where: Asbury Church, 6101 University Ave,Where: Asbury Church, 6101 University Ave,Where: Asbury Church, 6101 University Ave,Where: Asbury Church, 6101 University Ave, Madison, WIMadison, WIMadison, WIMadison, WI  

E-print Network

! MFIS "American" Football Party! Green Bay PackersGreen Bay PackersGreen Bay PackersGreen Bay Packers vs of a "game party", and join in funerican" football, the fun of a "game party", and join in funerican" football, the fun of a "game party", and join in funerican" football, the fun of a "game party", and join

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

247

Phylogeny and classification of the Old World Emberizini (Aves, Passeriformes).  

PubMed

The phylogeny of the avian genus Emberiza and the monotypic genera Latoucheornis, Melophus and Miliaria (collectively the Old World Emberizini), as well as representatives for the New World Emberizini, the circumpolar genera Calcarius and Plectrophenax and the four other generally recognized tribes in the subfamily Emberizinae was estimated based on the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene and introns 6-7 of the nuclear ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) gene. Our results support monophyly of the Old World Emberizini, but do not corroborate a sister relationship to the New World Emberizini. Calcarius and Plectrophenax form a clade separated from the other Emberizini. This agrees with previous studies, and we recommend the use of the name Calcariini. Latoucheornis, Melophus and Miliaria are nested within Emberiza, and we therefore propose they be synonymized with Emberiza. Emberiza is divided into four main clades, whose relative positions are uncertain, although a sister relation between a clade with six African species and one comprising the rest of the species (30, all Palearctic) is most likely. Most clades agree with traditional, morphology-based, classifications. However, four sister relationships within Emberiza, three of which involve the previously recognized Latoucheornis, Melophus and Miliaria, are unpredicted, and reveal cases of strong morphological divergence. In contrast, the plumage similarity between adult male Emberiza (formerly Latoucheornis) siemsseni and the nominate subspecies of the New World Junco hyemalis is shown to be the result of parallel evolution. A further case of parallel plumage evolution, between African and Eurasian taxa, is pointed out. Two cases of discordance between the mitochondrial and nuclear data with respect to branch lengths and genetic divergences are considered to be the result of introgressive hybridization. PMID:18411062

Alström, Per; Olsson, Urban; Lei, Fumin; Wang, Hai-tao; Gao, Wei; Sundberg, Per

2008-06-01

248

[Helminth fauna Anseriformes (Aves) in the Lodz Zoological Garden].  

PubMed

In the years 1959-1990 429 birds on 30 species of Anseriformes were examined post mortem at Zoo Lód?. The helminths were found in 108 birds (25.17%) of 19 species. In infected birds there were found 4 species of trematodes: one of them, Catatropis verrucosa is in Poland new for Cygnus olor; 9 species of cestodes--7 of them are in Poland new for examined hosts; namely: Drepanidotaenia lanceolata for Dendrocygna viduata, Cygnus atratus, Branta bernicla, and Anas platyrhynchos; Microsomacanthus paracompressus for Cygnus olor; Dicranotaenia coronula for Chloephaga picta and Cairina moschata; Cloacotaenia megalops for Branta bernicla, Tschertkovilepis setigera for Cygnus olor, Anser indicus, Branta bernicla and Anas platyrhynchos; Fimbriaria fasciolaris for Cygnus olor and Chloephaga picta; Sobolevicanthus gracilis for Cygnus atratus, Chloephaga picta and Tadorna tadorna; 13 species of nematodes--7 of them are in Poland new for examined hosts, namely: Cyathostoma variegatum for Cygnus atratus, Anser indicus and Anser caerulescens; Syngamus trachea for Anser indicus; Echinuria uncinata for Anser indicus; Ganguleterakis dispar for Cgynus melanocoryphus, Cgynus olor and Anser caerulescens; Pterothominx caudinflata for Anser indicus; Amidostomum ansersis for Cygnus olor and Branta bernicla; Capillaria anatis for Anas acuta. No acanthocephalans were observed. PMID:9424942

Zuchowska, E

1997-01-01

249

Comparative study of visual pathways in owls (Aves: Strigiformes).  

PubMed

Although they are usually regarded as nocturnal, owls exhibit a wide range of activity patterns, from strictly nocturnal, to crepuscular or cathemeral, to diurnal. Several studies have shown that these differences in the activity pattern are reflected in differences in eye morphology and retinal organization. Despite the evidence that differences in activity pattern among owl species are reflected in the peripheral visual system, there has been no attempt to correlate these differences with changes in the visual regions in the brain. In this study, we compare the relative size of nuclei in the main visual pathways in nine species of owl that exhibit a wide range of activity patterns. We found marked differences in the relative size of all visual structures among the species studied, both in the tectofugal and the thalamofugal pathway, as well in other retinorecipient nuclei, including the nucleus lentiformis mesencephali, the nucleus of the basal optic root and the nucleus geniculatus lateralis, pars ventralis. We show that the barn owl (Tyto alba), a species widely used in the study of the integration of visual and auditory processing, has reduced visual pathways compared to strigid owls. Our results also suggest there could be a trade-off between the relative size of visual pathways and auditory pathways, similar to that reported in mammals. Finally, our results show that although there is no relationship between activity pattern and the relative size of either the tectofugal or the thalamofugal pathway, there is a positive correlation between the relative size of both visual pathways and the relative number of cells in the retinal ganglion layer. PMID:23296024

Gutiérrez-Ibáñez, Cristián; Iwaniuk, Andrew N; Lisney, Thomas J; Wylie, Douglas R

2013-01-01

250

Eye shape and retinal topography in owls (Aves: Strigiformes).  

PubMed

The eyes of vertebrates show adaptations to the visual environments in which they evolve. For example, eye shape is associated with activity pattern, while retinal topography is related to the symmetry or 'openness' of the habitat of a species. Although these relationships are well documented in many vertebrates including birds, the extent to which they hold true for species within the same avian order is not well understood. Owls (Strigiformes) represent an ideal group for the study of interspecific variation in the avian visual system because they are one of very few avian orders to contain species that vary in both activity pattern and habitat preference. Here, we examined interspecific variation in eye shape and retinal topography in nine species of owl. Eye shape (the ratio of corneal diameter to eye axial length) differed among species, with nocturnal species having relatively larger corneal diameters than diurnal species. All the owl species have an area of high retinal ganglion cell (RGC) density in the temporal retina and a visual streak of increased cell density extending across the central retina from temporal to nasal. However, the organization and degree of elongation of the visual streak varied considerably among species and this variation was quantified using H:V ratios. Species that live in open habitats and/or that are more diurnally active have well-defined, elongated visual streaks and high H:V ratios (3.88-2.33). In contrast, most nocturnal and/or forest-dwelling owls have a poorly defined visual streak, a more radially symmetrical arrangement of RGCs and lower H:V ratios (1.77-1.27). The results of a hierarchical cluster analysis indicate that the apparent interspecific variation is associated with activity pattern and habitat as opposed to the phylogenetic relationships among species. In seven species, the presence of a fovea was confirmed and it is suggested that all strigid owls may possess a fovea, whereas the tytonid barn owl (Tyto alba) does not. A size-frequency analysis of cell soma area indicates that a number of different RGC classes are represented in owls, including a population of large RGCs (cell soma area >150 µm(2)) that resemble the giant RGCs reported in other vertebrates. In conclusion, eye shape and retinal topography in owls vary among species and this variation is associated with different activity patterns and habitat preferences, thereby supporting similar observations in other vertebrates. PMID:22722085

Lisney, Thomas J; Iwaniuk, Andrew N; Bandet, Mischa V; Wylie, Douglas R

2012-01-01

251

AVE/VAS 4: 25-mb sounding data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The rawinsonde sounding program is described and tabulated data at 25 mb intervals for the 24 stations and 14 special stations participating in the experiment is presented. Sounding were taken at 3 hr intervals. An additional sounding was taken at the normal synoptic observation time. Some soundings were computed from raw ordinate data, while others were interpolated from significant level data.

Sienkiewicz, M. E.

1983-01-01

252

California Public Utilities Commission 505 Van Ness Ave., San Francisco  

E-print Network

consumption data for the Los Angeles Department of Water & Power; the U.S. Department of Energy discussing its of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) presenting the initial results of its current work #12;2 mapping electricity

253

Taxonomy of Greater White-fronted Geese (Aves: Anatidae)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Five subspecies of the Greater White-fronted Goose, Anser albifrons (Scopoli, 1769), have been named, all on the basis of wintering birds, and up to six subspecies have been recognized. There has been confusion over the application of some names, particularly in North America, because of lack of knowledge of the breeding ranges and type localities, and incorrect taxonomic decisions. There is one clinally varying subspecies in Eurasia, one that breeds in Greenland, and three in North America, one newly named herein.

Banks, Richard C.

2011-01-01

254

HR Staffing and Recruitment 6054 S Drexel Ave  

E-print Network

position is in a job group where the availability of qualified women or minorities is significantly greater/unit recruiting and affirmative action objectives. Check all that apply. Web Advertising: Professional of qualified women or minorities is significantly greater than their incumbency in the job group. #12;Pre

He, Chuan

255

A molecular phylogenetic analysis of the ``true thrushes'' (Aves: Turdinae)  

E-print Network

, 1910). Although most previous taxonomies have suggested a close relationship with chats (Saxicolini as diverse as babblers (Timaliinae), gnatcatchers (Polioptilinae), wrens (Troglodytidae), and dippers

Voelker, Gary

256

Phylogeny and biogeography of the core babblers (Aves: Timaliidae).  

PubMed

The avian family Timaliidae is a species rich and morphologically diverse component of African and Asian tropical forests. The morphological diversity within the family has attracted interest from ecologists and evolutionary biologists, but systematists have long suspected that this diversity might also mislead taxonomy, and recent molecular phylogenetic work has supported this hypothesis. We produced and analyzed a data set of 6 genes and almost 300 individuals to assess the evolutionary history of the family. Although phylogenetic analysis required extensive adjustment of program settings, we ultimately produced a well-resolved phylogeny for the family. The resulting phylogeny provided strong support for major subclades within the family but extensive paraphyly of genera. Only 3 genera represented by more than 3 species were monophyletic. Biogeographic reconstruction indicated a mainland Asian origin for the family and most major clades. Colonization of Africa, Sundaland, and the Philippines occurred relatively late in the family's history and was mostly unidirectional. Several putative babbler genera, such as Robsonius, Malia, Leonardina, and Micromacronus are only distantly related to the Timaliidae. PMID:22328569

Moyle, Robert G; Andersen, Michael J; Oliveros, Carl H; Steinheimer, Frank D; Reddy, Sushma

2012-07-01

257

Emily Waymire Evolution of Uganda's Biodiversity: Apes to Aves  

E-print Network

and not so long ago survived by begging for food and sleeping naked in the streets. Now, the Development, a series of traditional dances began. The older boys played big drums. With eyes closed and bodies rocking the younger boys who stomped their feet with great vigor. We watched several traditional East African dances

258

Dating the diversification of the major lineages of Passeriformes (Aves)  

PubMed Central

Background The avian Order Passeriformes is an enormously species-rich group, which comprises almost 60% of all living bird species. This diverse order is believed to have originated before the break-up of Gondwana in the late Cretaceous. However, previous molecular dating studies have relied heavily on the geological split between New Zealand and Antarctica, assumed to have occurred 85–82 Mya, for calibrating the molecular clock and might thus be circular in their argument. Results This study provides a time-scale for the evolution of the major clades of passerines using seven nuclear markers, five taxonomically well-determined passerine fossils, and an updated interpretation of the New Zealand split from Antarctica 85–52 Mya in a Bayesian relaxed-clock approach. We also assess how different interpretations of the New Zealand–Antarctica vicariance event influence our age estimates. Our results suggest that the diversification of Passeriformes began in the late Cretaceous or early Cenozoic. Removing the root calibration for the New Zealand–Antarctica vicariance event (85–52 Mya) dramatically increases the 95% credibility intervals and leads to unrealistically old age estimates. We assess the individual characteristics of the seven nuclear genes analyzed in our study. Our analyses provide estimates of divergence times for the major groups of passerines, which can be used as secondary calibration points in future molecular studies. Conclusions Our analysis takes recent paleontological and geological findings into account and provides the best estimate of the passerine evolutionary time-scale currently available. This time-scale provides a temporal framework for further biogeographical, ecological, and co-evolutionary studies of the largest bird radiation, and adds to the growing support for a Cretaceous origin of Passeriformes. PMID:24422673

2014-01-01

259

Phylogeny and biogeography of the fruit doves (Aves: Columbidae).  

PubMed

We reconstruct the phylogeny of fruit doves (genus Ptilinopus) and allies with a dense sampling that includes almost all species, based on mitochondrial and nuclear sequence data. We evaluate the most likely biogeographic scenario for the evolution of this group that colonized many islands of the Pacific Ocean. We also investigate the evolution of one of the main plumage character of fruit doves (the color of the crown), and we propose several revisions of the group's systematics. All Ptilinopus taxa formed a monophyletic group that includes two morphologically distinct genera, Alectroenas and Drepanoptila, confirming a previous result found with less species and genes. The divergence time analysis suggests that the basal divergences within Ptilinopus dated to the Early Oligocene, and the biogeographic analysis indicates that fruit doves originated most probably from the proto New Guinea region. The earliest dispersals from the New Guinea region to Oceania occurred with the colonization of New Caledonia and Fiji. A large group of Polynesian species (Central and Eastern), as well as the three taxa found in Micronesia and four species from the Guinean-Moluccan region, form the "purpuratus" clade, the largest diversification of fruit doves within Oceania, which also has a New Guinean origin. However, the eastbound colonization of fruit doves was not associated with a significant increase of their diversification rate. Overall, the Melanesian region did not act as a cradle for fruit doves, in contrast to the New Guinea region which is found as the ancestral area for several nodes within the phylogeny. PMID:24012584

Cibois, Alice; Thibault, Jean-Claude; Bonillo, Céline; Filardi, Christopher E; Watling, Dick; Pasquet, Eric

2014-01-01

260

Hindlimb myology of the monk parakeet (Aves, Psittaciformes).  

PubMed

We studied the hindlimb myology of the monk parakeet (Myiopsitta monachus). Like all parrots, it has zygodactyl feet enabling perching, climbing, hanging, moving easily among trees, and handling food. Muscles were described and weighed, and physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA) of four flexors and one extensor was calculated. In comparison to other muscles, the M. tibialis cranialis and the M. fibularis brevis show increased development and high PCSA values, and therefore, large potential force production. Also, a large proportion of muscle mass was involved in flexing the digits. We hypothesize that these muscle traits are associated with the arboreal locomotion and food manipulation habits. In the monk parakeet, the M. extensor digitorum longus sends a branch to the hallux, and the connection between the M. flexor digitorum longus and the M. flexor hallucis longus is type I (Gadow's classification). We reaffirm the presence of the M. ambiens as a plesiomorphic condition that disappears in most members of the order. Among Psittaciformes, the M. fibularis brevis is stronger and the M. fibularis weaker in arboreal species than in basal terrestrial ones (e.g., Strigops). PMID:24500894

Carril, Julieta; Mosto, María C; Picasso, Mariana B J; Tambussi, Claudia P

2014-07-01

261

A comprehensive multilocus assessment of sparrow (Aves: Passerellidae) relationships.  

PubMed

The New World sparrows (Emberizidae) are among the best known of songbird groups and have long-been recognized as one of the prominent components of the New World nine-primaried oscine assemblage. Despite receiving much attention from taxonomists over the years, and only recently using molecular methods, was a "core" sparrow clade established allowing the reconstruction of a phylogenetic hypothesis that includes the full sampling of sparrow species diversity. In this paper, we use mitochondrial DNA gene sequences from all 129 putative species of sparrow and four additional (nuclear) loci for a subset of these taxa to resolve both generic and species level relationships. Hypotheses derived from our mitochondrial (2184 base pairs) and nuclear (5705 base pairs) DNA data sets were generally in agreement with respect to clade constituency but differed somewhat with respect to among-clade relationships. Sparrow diversity is defined predominantly by eight well-supported clades that indicate a lack of monophyly for at least three currently recognized genera. Ammodramus is polyphyletic and requires the naming of two additional genera. Spizella is also polyphyletic with Tree Sparrow (Spizella arborea) as a taxonomic "outlier". Pselliophorus is embedded within a larger Atlapetes assemblage and should be merged with that group. This new hypothesis of sparrow relationships will form the basis for future comparative analyses of variation within songbirds. PMID:24792084

Klicka, John; Keith Barker, F; Burns, Kevin J; Lanyon, Scott M; Lovette, Irby J; Chaves, Jaime A; Bryson, Robert W

2014-08-01

262

Office of Alumni & Constituent Relations 900 University Ave.  

E-print Network

in Your Community and Why You Should Care ­ Professor Jan Blacher, GSOE · Environmental Implications" Difference ­ Professor Sherryl Vint, CHASS Botanic Gardens Tour Entomology Bug Petting Zoo 1:00 p.m. ­ 3:30 p Membership includes your choice of a legacy brick or diploma plaque. Visit alumni.ucr.edu for member benefits

Mills, Allen P.

263

A molecular phylogeny of the cotingas (Aves: Cotingidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The phylogenetic relationships of members of Cotingidae were investigated using >2100bp of sequence data from two nuclear introns (myoglobin intron 2 and G3PDH intron 11) and one protein-coding mitochondrial gene (cytochrome b). Strong support was found for a monophyletic clade including 23 traditional cotingid genera, corresponding to the Cotingidae sensu [Remsen, J.V. Jr., Jaramillo, A., Nores, M., Pacheco, J.F., Robbins,

Jan I. Ohlson; Richard O. Prum; Per G. P. Ericson

2007-01-01

264

OFFICE OF DIGITAL HUMANITIES 1100 PENNSYLVANIA AVE., NW  

E-print Network

, Tourism Development, N.C. Department of Commerce Tom Hanchett* Historian, Levine Museum of the New South, guide its technological development, and help us prioritize its features and functionality. The panel that other advisors will be added to this group as project development proceeds.] Catherine Bishir* Former

McCombe, Bruce D.

265

Hypopi (Acari:Hypoderatidae) from owls (Aves:Strigiformes:Strigidae).  

PubMed

Hypopi (deutonymphs) of the family Hypoderatidae were found in a barn owl, Tyto alba (Scopoli), and a burrowing owl, Speotyto cunicularia (Molina), from Texas. A redescription is provided for mature specimens of the hypopus of Tytodectes (Tytodectes) tyto Fain from the subcutaneous adipose tissues of the pelvic region in the barn owl. The hypopus of Tytodectes (Tytodectes) speotyto n. sp. is described from specimens in the subcutaneous adipose tissues of the pelvic region and in the adipose tissues of the intermuscular fasciae of the ankle in the burrowing owl. T. (T.) speotyto appears most similar in size and chaetotaxy to T. (T.) glaucidii Cerný described from the Cuban pygmy owl, Glaucidium siju (d'Orbigny), in Cuba, but differs in the presence of a spine on tibia IV, which also occurs in T. (T.) tyto. Both of the former species have the anterior apodemes of coxae I fused in a simple V and lack a sternum. They differ from T. (T.) tyto which has the anterior apodemes of coxae I fused in a Y and there is a well developed sternum. Based on the above 3 described hypopi, the hypoderatids of owls represent an assemblage of small closely related, but easily differentiated, species. The occurrence of a few specimens of Neottialges evansi Fain in the barn owl and Hypodectes (Hypodectoides) propus (Nitzsch) in the burrowing owl probably represent examples of host capture by hypopi that normally occur in cormorants and pigeons, herons or egrets, respectively. PMID:8840691

Pence, D B; Bergan, J F

1996-09-01

266

David G. Belair 1901 University Ave. Apt. 3  

E-print Network

in Pharmaceutical Engineering Graduation Date: May 2010 GPA: 3.56/4.0 WORK EXPERIENCE Graduate Research Assistant American Institute of Chemical Engineers May 2007 - Present International Society for Pharmaceutical)430-1704 OBJECTIVE To obtain an internship position utilizing background in chemical engineering as well as research

267

Esteban M Lucero 505 Sweet Ave. Las Cruces NM 88001  

E-print Network

of the endangered Kit Fox. · June-July 2012 University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus BP-ENDURE BRAiN Program-Present · Smithsonian Institute Minority Internship Award 2013 · MBRS-RISE Scholar (NIH R25GMO61222) 2011

Wright, Timothy F.

268

Dept. of Computer Science 201 N. Goodwin Ave.  

E-print Network

] Faculty Fellowship, Academy for Entrepreneurial Leadership, UIUC (2010). Awarded to only 5 faculty campus-wide. · [2009-2010] Center for Advanced Studies/Beckman Fellowship, UIUC. · [2008] Junior Xerox Award for Faculty Research, UIUC (2008). Awarded to only 4 assistant professors across all Departments

Gupta, Indranil

269

Hypopi (Acari: Hypoderatidae) of the wood stork (Aves: Ciconiiformes: Ciconiidae)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A new species is described and additional host records are presented for 2 other species of deutonymphs of the family Hypoderatidae from the subcutaneous adipose tissues of the wood stork, Mycteria americana L. Phalacrodectes (Phalacrodectes) mycteria n. sp. appears to share affinities with species from both pelicaniform and ciconiiform hosts, but it most closely resembles P. (P.) punctatissimus (?erný) Pence & Courtney from pelicans in idiosomal chaetotaxy, cutdcular sclerotization, and posteriorly divergent, widely separated genital openings. The new species differs from this and other species of the genus by its small size, the degree of separation of the genital openings with papillae, no secondary sclerotization in the perigenital area or surrounding the genital openings, and the long filiform setae s and w on genu III. There was a mixed infection of Neottialges kutzeri Fain and N. mycteriae Pence in all of 7 wood storks examined from Florida and Georgia; P. (P) mycteria was found in 4 of these hosts. This is the 7th species described as a deutonymph in the genus Phalacrodectes. The apparent close affinity of P. (P.) mycteria with P. (P.) punctatissimus and allied species from pelicaniform versus ciconiiform birds appears to be inconsistent with the established host-parasite relationships based on classical avian taxonomic relationships. However, this apparent affinity may be more reflective of the close relationships between the families of pelicans, ibises and spoonbills, and storks as recently proposed by DNA-DNA hybridization studies.

Pence, Danny B.; Thomas, N.J.

1995-01-01

270

PLANT GENOMICS: The Thir dW ave  

Microsoft Academic Search

? Abstract Completing the primary genomic,sequence,of Arabidopsis thaliana was a major milestone, being the first plant genome and only the third high-quality finished eukaryotic genome,sequence. Understanding,how,the genome,sequence,comprehen- sively encodes developmental,programs,and environmental,responses is the next major challenge for all plant genome projects. This requires fully characterizing the genes, the regulatory sequences, and their functions. We discuss several functional genomics approaches to

Justin O. Borevitz; Joseph R. Ecker

2004-01-01

271

Molecular phylogenetics and diversification of the genus Sporophila (Aves: Passeriformes).  

PubMed

The evolutionary affinities within and among many groups of nine-primaried oscines remain unresolved. One such group is Sporophila, a large genus of New World tanager-finches. Our study focused particularly on clarifying the relationship between this genus and a closely related one, Oryzoborus, and on examining the phylogenetic affinities of the "capuchinos," a group of 11 Sporophila species that share a similar male plumage coloration pattern. Our phylogenetic analyses, based on 498 bp of mitochondrial DNA sequence, indicated that: (1) Oryzoborus is embedded within a well-supported clade containing all Sporophila species, which strongly suggests that both genera should be merged, (2) the species of capuchinos comprise a monophyletic group, implying that the plumage patterns common to all probably arose only once, and (3) the capuchinos clade is comprised of two sub-clades, one including two species that are distributed in northern South America and the other one containing eight species that are present south of the Amazon River. Mean sequence divergence among the southern capuchinos species was extremely low, suggesting a rapid radiation within the last half-million years that may be related to the high level of sexual selection present in the genus and might have been promoted by marine ingressions and egressions that occurred in some southern coastal regions of South America in the Late Pleistocene. PMID:15522788

Lijtmaer, Darío A; Sharpe, Nadine M M; Tubaro, Pablo L; Lougheed, Stephen C

2004-12-01

272

University Health Services 910 Madison Ave, Suite 922  

E-print Network

Services, EH&S, Police) Office/Admin. Clinical labs Hospital/Nursing School Other ____________________________________________________________________________ #12;3 If any boxes are checked in Section 1.4, continue to Section 2.0: Risk Assessment. If not proceed directly to Part B, Section 3.0: Medical History Section 2.0 Risk Assessment Section 2.1: Exposure

Cui, Yan

273

5000 Forbes Ave, Warner Hall 3 Floor, Pittsburgh, PA 15213  

E-print Network

(www.cmu.edu/hub) as RCL is permission with immigration - not CMU and not tied to payment. Note: Ph this form to your Academic Advisor. For medical reasons, see below. Student Family Name 18 units. Student placed in an improper course level. This reason may be used only once, generally

274

Chromosome banding studies in the Bateleur (Terathopius ecaudatus, Aves, Accipitridae).  

PubMed

The karyotype of the Bateleur (Terathopius ecaudatus) was studied with conventional and Ag-NOR staining, and using GTG and CBG banding. The karyotype organization is typically accipitrid, with satellites and few microchromosomes, close to the karyotypes of true vultures. PMID:9865781

Bed'Hom, B T; Darré, R; Fillon, V

1998-09-01

275

Isleria, a new genus of antwren (Aves: Passeriformes: Thamnophilidae)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A comprehensive molecular phylogenetic analysis of the family Thamnophilidae indicated that the genus Myrmotherula is not monophyletic. The clade composed of M. guttata and M. hauxwelli is only distantly related to other members of the genus and should be removed from Myrmotherula. The phenotypic distinctiveness of the clade argues against merging it with its sister group Thamnomanes and no generic name is available for the guttata-hauxwelli clade. Consequently, we describe the genus Isleria for these two species, and designate Myrmothera guttata as its type species.

Bravo, Gustavo A.; Chesser, R. Terry; Brumfield, Robb T.

2012-01-01

276

Microsatellite loci characterized in three African crane species (Gruidae, Aves).  

PubMed

Forty-three microsatellite loci originally isolated in Grus americana and G. japonensis were tested for polymorphism in the blue crane (G. paradisea). Amplified products were sequenced in the blue crane to aid in the design of blue crane-specific primers. When characterized in 20 unrelated blue crane individuals from South Africa, 14 loci were polymorphic, with each locus displaying between 2 and 7 alleles. Eight polymorphic loci were characterized in the grey-crowned crane (Balearica regulorum) and ten in the wattled crane (G. carunculatus). PMID:21564635

Meares, Kate; Dawson, Deborah A; Horsburgh, Gavin J; Glenn, Travis C; Jones, Kenneth L; Braun, Michael J; Perrin, Mike R; Taylor, Tiawanna D

2009-01-01

277

A Karyological Study of Some Corvine Birds (Corvidae, Aves)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Karyotypes were studied in the hooded and carrion crows, their naturally occurred hybrids, the jungle crow, the azure-winged magpie (2n= 80 in all aforementioned birds), and the magpie (2n= 82). Corvine birds of Primorskii Krai were karyotyped for the first time. In addition to the similarity in the diploid chromosome sets, corvine birds were shown to have a similar structure

G. V. Roslik; A. P. Kryukov

2001-01-01

278

University Health Services 910 Madison Ave, Suite 922  

E-print Network

print). 1. Today's date: 2. Your name: ________________________________________ 3. D. Your Job Title: 8. A phone number where you can be reached by the health care professional who that interferes with your job g) Coughing that produces phlegm (thick sputum) h) Coughing that wakes you early

Cui, Yan

279

SHAHNOZA BOBOEVA 3030 Johnson Ave, Bronx, NY, 10463  

E-print Network

, NY Documentation Assistant · Company website management and Russian-English translation · Jewelry farmers in improving their production and increasing profitability of small-farm enterprises throughout

280

Duval County Extension 1010 N. McDuff Ave.  

E-print Network

. They contain trays for the food and have fans which create and distribute air flow. Conventional oven drying is slower than using a food dehydrator because these ovens do not have builtin fans for air movement

Watson, Craig A.

281

To cite this document: NGUYEN Anh-Dung, SNAC Patrick, RAMIRO Victor, DIAZ Michel. How mobility increases mobile cloud computing processing capacity. In: First Symposium on Network  

E-print Network

, France LAAS/CNRS, Toulouse, France NIC Chile Research Labs, Santiago, Chile Abstract--In this paper, we. This potentially leads to the emergence of mo- bile ad-hoc networks that deliver, without any infrastructure

Mailhes, Corinne

282

von Laszewski, Diaz, et.al. Towards Cloud Deployments using FutureGrid 1 Abstract--In this document we briefly outline some  

E-print Network

-- In this document we briefly outline some differences between IaaS frameworks Eucalyptus, OpenNebula, Open tool to utilize several of the IaaS frameworks. Index Terms--cloud, grid, Nimbus, Eucalyptus, Open infrastructures suitable for us. Together IaaS and PaaS can provide potent solutions not only to business users

283

How Much Degrees Of Temperature A Warp Drive Achieves When At Superluminal Speeds?? The Analysis Of Gonzalez-Diaz Applied To The  

E-print Network

Relativity. However it suffers from a very serious drawback: In order to travel significant interstellar for interstellar space travel when compared to its Alcubierre counterpart. spacetimeshortcut@yahoo.com 1 hal of the temperature a warp drive achieves when at superluminal speeds. In order to travel significant interstellar

Boyer, Edmond

284

Covalent Virus Layer for Mass-Based Biosensing Li-Mei C. Yang, Juan E. Diaz, Theresa M. McIntire, Gregory A. Weiss,* and Reginald M. Penner*  

E-print Network

then evaluated in a phosphate buffer using a flow injection analysis system. The mass of the CVS increased) to virtually any target molecule.4 Secondary screens and selections against potentially interfering molecules

Weiss, Gregory A.

285

Integrating the Common Information Model with MDS4 I. Diaz, G. Fernandez, M.J. Martin, P. Gonzalez, J. Touri~no  

E-print Network

´alez, J. Touri~no Computer Architecture Group Department of Electronics and Systems, University of A Coru is to provide a CIM- based query service for resource management information in Grid systems. This is achieved for Grid systems. The Globus Toolkit [8], based on the Open Grid Services Ar- chitecture (OGSA) [9

Touriño, Juan

286

Using GIS for Crime Analysis  

E-print Network

.78 1963813.89 265494.99 1965007 36 266505 46. . 1963133.18 266288.02 Could you tell me anything about this data? 2405 SW 19 ST What about now? SW ST 1532 SW OAKLEY AVE 1237 SW MEDFORD AVE 1245 SW RANDOLPH AVE 3034 SW CLARK CT 1232 SW WASBURN AVE SW WA AVE... 1269 SW COLLEGE AVE 1515 SW MACVICAR AVE 1324 SW MULVANE ST 304 SW GREENWOOD AVE 1514 SW WILLOW AVE SW AVE 122 NW BROADMOOR AVE 2826 SW 19 ST 1269 SW MULVANE ST 2417 SW 17 ST 2005 SW HIGH AVE 1286 SW RANDOLPH AVE 1525 SW MEDFORD AVE 1233 SW WAYNE AVE...

Anderson, Jim

2010-11-18

287

A Structured Peer-to-Peer Method to Discover QoS Enhanced Alternate Thierry Rakotoarivelo 1,2,3  

E-print Network

,2,3 , Patrick Senac 2,3 , Aruna Seneviratne 4 , Michel Diaz 3 1 University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia diaz@laas.fr 4 National ICT Australia (NICTA), Sydney Australia aruna.seneviratne@nicta.com.au Abstract

Rakotoarivelo, Thierry

288

vertebradosibericos.org -AVES >> Presentacin del Atlas Virtual >> Mapas de distribucin y listado de especies ATLAS VIRTUAL DE LAS AVES TERRESTRES DE ESPAA  

E-print Network

Escribano Soteño 50 Erithacus rubecula Petirrojo 31 Falco naumanni Cernícalo Primilla 43 1 Falco peregrinus Halcón Peregrino 12 3 Falco tinnunculus Cernícalo Vulgar 31 3 Fringilla coelebs Pinzón Vulgar 100

Carrascal, Luis M.

289

vertebradosibericos.org -AVES >> Presentacin del Atlas Virtual >> Mapas de distribucin y listado de especies ATLAS VIRTUAL DE LAS AVES TERRESTRES DE ESPAA  

E-print Network

Paloma Zurita 36 Columba palumbus Paloma Torcaz 100 Coracias garrulus Carraca 36 2 Corvus corax Cuervo 92 Corvus corone Corneja Negra 100 Corvus monedula Grajilla 68 Coturnix coturnix Codorniz Común 96 3 Cuculus

Carrascal, Luis M.

290

vertebradosibericos.org -AVES >> Presentacin del Atlas Virtual >> Mapas de distribucin y listado de especies ATLAS VIRTUAL DE LAS AVES TERRESTRES DE ESPAA  

E-print Network

Columba palumbus Paloma Torcaz 88 Coracias garrulus Carraca 92 2 Corvus corax Cuervo 48 Corvus corone Corneja Negra 92 Corvus monedula Grajilla 96 Coturnix coturnix Codorniz Común 84 3 Cuculus canorus Cuco 92

Carrascal, Luis M.

291

vertebradosibericos.org -AVES >> Presentacin del Atlas Virtual >> Mapas de distribucin y listado de especies ATLAS VIRTUAL DE LAS AVES TERRESTRES DE ESPAA  

E-print Network

Columba palumbus Paloma Torcaz 100 Coracias garrulus Carraca 28 2 Corvus corax Cuervo 4 Corvus corone Corneja Negra 96 Corvus monedula Grajilla 48 Coturnix coturnix Codorniz Común 88 3 Cuculus canorus Cuco 72

Carrascal, Luis M.

292

vertebradosibericos.org -AVES >> Presentacin del Atlas Virtual >> Mapas de distribucin y listado de especies ATLAS VIRTUAL DE LAS AVES TERRESTRES DE ESPAA  

E-print Network

Columba palumbus Paloma Torcaz 88 Coracias garrulus Carraca 8 2 Corvus corax Cuervo 80 Corvus corone Corneja Negra 96 Corvus monedula Grajilla 84 Coturnix coturnix Codorniz Común 100 3 Cuculus canorus Cuco

Carrascal, Luis M.

293

vertebradosibericos.org -AVES >> Presentacin del Atlas Virtual >> Mapas de distribucin y listado de especies ATLAS VIRTUAL DE LAS AVES TERRESTRES DE ESPAA  

E-print Network

16 Columba palumbus Paloma Torcaz 96 Coracias garrulus Carraca 24 2 Corvus corax Cuervo 48 Corvus corone Corneja Negra 8 Corvus monedula Grajilla 72 Coturnix coturnix Codorniz Común 88 3 Cuculus canorus

Carrascal, Luis M.

294

vertebradosibericos.org -AVES >> Presentacin del Atlas Virtual >> Mapas de distribucin y listado de especies ATLAS VIRTUAL DE LAS AVES TERRESTRES DE ESPAA  

E-print Network

Paloma Zurita 6 Columba palumbus Paloma Torcaz 40 Coracias garrulus Carraca 6 2 Corvus corax Cuervo 53 Corvus monedula Grajilla 46 Coturnix coturnix Codorniz Común 46 3 Cuculus canorus Cuco 53 Cyanopica cyana

Carrascal, Luis M.

295

vertebradosibericos.org -AVES >> Presentacin del Atlas Virtual >> Mapas de distribucin y listado de especies ATLAS VIRTUAL DE LAS AVES TERRESTRES DE ESPAA  

E-print Network

corax Cuervo 40 Corvus corone Corneja Negra 60 Corvus monedula Grajilla 64 Coturnix coturnix Codorniz Columba oenas Paloma Zurita 64 Columba palumbus Paloma Torcaz 100 Coracias garrulus Carraca 52 2 Corvus

Carrascal, Luis M.

296

vertebradosibericos.org -AVES >> Presentacin del Atlas Virtual >> Mapas de distribucin y listado de especies ATLAS VIRTUAL DE LAS AVES TERRESTRES DE ESPAA  

E-print Network

Sisón 35 2 Troglodytes troglodytes Chochín 17 Turdus merula Mirlo Común 88 Tyto alba Lechuza Común 47 3 Monticola solitarius Roquero Solitario 64 3 Motacilla alba Lavandera Blanca 11 Motacilla flava Lavandera

Carrascal, Luis M.

297

vertebradosibericos.org -AVES >> Presentacin del Atlas Virtual >> Mapas de distribucin y listado de especies ATLAS VIRTUAL DE LAS AVES TERRESTRES DE ESPAA  

E-print Network

96 3 Anthus trivialis Bisbita Arbóreo 92 Apus apus Vencejo Común 96 Apus melba Vencejo Real 36 Aquila chrysaetos Aguila Real 44 3 Asio otus Búho Chico 52 Athene noctua Mochuelo Común 80 3 Bubo bubo Búho Real 56

Carrascal, Luis M.

298

vertebradosibericos.org -AVES >> Presentacin del Atlas Virtual >> Mapas de distribucin y listado de especies ATLAS VIRTUAL DE LAS AVES TERRESTRES DE ESPAA  

E-print Network

melba Vencejo Real 4 Apus pallidus Vencejo Pálido 4 Aquila adalberti Aguila Imperial Ibérica 12 1 Aquila chrysaetos Aguila Real 24 3 Asio otus Búho Chico 24 Athene noctua Mochuelo Común 64 3 Bubo bubo Búho Real 52

Carrascal, Luis M.

299

vertebradosibericos.org -AVES >> Presentacin del Atlas Virtual >> Mapas de distribucin y listado de especies ATLAS VIRTUAL DE LAS AVES TERRESTRES DE ESPAA  

E-print Network

3 Anthus trivialis Bisbita Arbóreo 12 Apus apus Vencejo Común 88 Apus melba Vencejo Real 12 Aquila chrysaetos Aguila Real 28 3 Asio flammeus Lechuza Campestre 4 3 Asio otus Búho Chico 52 Athene noctua

Carrascal, Luis M.

300

vertebradosibericos.org -AVES >> Presentacin del Atlas Virtual >> Mapas de distribucin y listado de especies ATLAS VIRTUAL DE LAS AVES TERRESTRES DE ESPAA  

E-print Network

Imperial Ibérica 4 1 Aquila chrysaetos Aguila Real 8 3 Asio otus Búho Chico 28 Athene noctua Mochuelo Común caffer Vencejo Cafre 4 Apus melba Vencejo Real 4 Apus pallidus Vencejo Pálido 4 Aquila adalberti Aguila

Carrascal, Luis M.

301

vertebradosibericos.org -AVES >> Presentacin del Atlas Virtual >> Mapas de distribucin y listado de especies ATLAS VIRTUAL DE LAS AVES TERRESTRES DE ESPAA  

E-print Network

Bisbita Arbóreo 40 Apus apus Vencejo Común 100 Aquila adalberti Aguila Imperial Ibérica 20 1 Aquila chrysaetos Aguila Real 48 3 Asio otus Búho Chico 68 Athene noctua Mochuelo Común 88 3 Bubo bubo Búho Real 60

Carrascal, Luis M.

302

vertebradosibericos.org -AVES >> Presentacin del Atlas Virtual >> Mapas de distribucin y listado de especies ATLAS VIRTUAL DE LAS AVES TERRESTRES DE ESPAA  

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Aquila chrysaetos Aguila Real 72 3 Asio otus Búho Chico 4 Athene noctua Mochuelo Común 88 3 Bubo bubo Apus melba Vencejo Real 12 Apus pallidus Vencejo Pálido 4 Aquila adalberti Aguila Imperial Ibérica 4 1

Carrascal, Luis M.

303

vertebradosibericos.org -AVES >> Presentacin del Atlas Virtual >> Mapas de distribucin y listado de especies ATLAS VIRTUAL DE LAS AVES TERRESTRES DE ESPAA  

E-print Network

adalberti Aguila Imperial Ibérica 40 1 Aquila chrysaetos Aguila Real 48 3 Asio otus Búho Chico 12 Athene 3 Apus apus Vencejo Común 100 Apus melba Vencejo Real 32 Apus pallidus Vencejo Pálido 12 Aquila

Carrascal, Luis M.

304

vertebradosibericos.org -AVES >> Presentacin del Atlas Virtual >> Mapas de distribucin y listado de especies ATLAS VIRTUAL DE LAS AVES TERRESTRES DE ESPAA  

E-print Network

Ibérica 20 1 Aquila chrysaetos Aguila Real 24 3 Asio otus Búho Chico 8 Athene noctua Mochuelo Común 88 3 Común 96 Apus melba Vencejo Real 8 Apus pallidus Vencejo Pálido 8 Aquila adalberti Aguila Imperial

Carrascal, Luis M.

305

vertebradosibericos.org -AVES >> Presentacin del Atlas Virtual >> Mapas de distribucin y listado de especies ATLAS VIRTUAL DE LAS AVES TERRESTRES DE ESPAA  

E-print Network

Imperial Ibérica 28 1 Aquila chrysaetos Aguila Real 24 3 Asio flammeus Lechuza Campestre 4 3 Asio otus Búho 2 Anthus campestris Bisbita Campestre 4 3 Apus apus Vencejo Común 96 Aquila adalberti Aguila

Carrascal, Luis M.

306

vertebradosibericos.org -AVES >> Presentacin del Atlas Virtual >> Mapas de distribucin y listado de especies ATLAS VIRTUAL DE LAS AVES TERRESTRES DE ESPAA  

E-print Network

adalberti Aguila Imperial Ibérica 8 1 Aquila chrysaetos Aguila Real 48 3 Asio otus Búho Chico 36 Athene 24 3 Apus apus Vencejo Común 96 Apus melba Vencejo Real 24 Apus pallidus Vencejo Pálido 12 Aquila

Carrascal, Luis M.

307

vertebradosibericos.org -AVES >> Presentacin del Atlas Virtual >> Mapas de distribucin y listado de especies ATLAS VIRTUAL DE LAS AVES TERRESTRES DE ESPAA  

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3 Anthus trivialis Bisbita Arbóreo 4 Apus apus Vencejo Común 100 Apus melba Vencejo Real 8 Aquila chrysaetos Aguila Real 40 3 Asio otus Búho Chico 40 Athene noctua Mochuelo Común 92 3 Bubo bubo Búho Real 32

Carrascal, Luis M.

308

vertebradosibericos.org -AVES >> Presentacin del Atlas Virtual >> Mapas de distribucin y listado de especies ATLAS VIRTUAL DE LAS AVES TERRESTRES DE ESPAA  

E-print Network

3 Anthus trivialis Bisbita Arbóreo 16 Apus apus Vencejo Común 88 Apus melba Vencejo Real 12 Aquila chrysaetos Aguila Real 44 3 Asio flammeus Lechuza Campestre 4 3 Asio otus Búho Chico 32 Athene noctua

Carrascal, Luis M.

309

vertebradosibericos.org -AVES >> Presentacin del Atlas Virtual >> Mapas de distribucin y listado de especies ATLAS VIRTUAL DE LAS AVES TERRESTRES DE ESPAA  

E-print Network

flammeus Lechuza Campestre 8 3 Asio otus Búho Chico 72 Athene noctua Mochuelo Común 100 3 Bubo bubo Búho 3 Apus apus Vencejo Común 76 Apus pallidus Vencejo Pálido 4 Aquila chrysaetos Aguila Real 36 3 Asio

Carrascal, Luis M.

310

vertebradosibericos.org -AVES >> Presentacin del Atlas Virtual >> Mapas de distribucin y listado de especies ATLAS VIRTUAL DE LAS AVES TERRESTRES DE ESPAA  

E-print Network

bubo Búho Real 16 3 Buteo buteo Busardo Ratonero 75 Caprimulgus europaeus Chotacabras Gris 8 2 torquilla Torcecuello 25 3 link Lagopus mutus Lagópodo Alpino 54 + Lanius collurio Alcaudón Dorsirrojo 62 3

Carrascal, Luis M.

311

vertebradosibericos.org -AVES >> Presentacin del Atlas Virtual >> Mapas de distribucin y listado de especies ATLAS VIRTUAL DE LAS AVES TERRESTRES DE ESPAA  

E-print Network

Mochuelo Común 24 3 Bubo bubo Búho Real 36 3 Buteo buteo Busardo Ratonero 96 Calandrella brachydactyla torquilla Torcecuello 52 3 link Lagopus mutus Lagópodo Alpino 12 + Lanius collurio Alcaudón Dorsirrojo 96 3

Carrascal, Luis M.

312

' ^ S E N T I ^Sentry&(Hip 900LindenAve.  

E-print Network

-fort Remove and discard lockout screw (back of safe dooi). Enlever et jeter ia vis (parmeau aniere de la porte locked while on display. Simply remove and discard the screw. Your safe's serial number is located safe carton out with your trash. Cut carton into pieces and discard. ^SENTRY

Kleinfeld, David

313

Records of ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) parasitizing birds (Aves) in Rhode Island, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Incidental to studies on Lyme disease in Rhode Island, a total of 531 birds represented by 68 species, was collected and examined for the presence of ticks and other ectoparasites. Of these birds, a total of 230, comprising 36 species, harbored ticks in the pre-adult stage. In all 1,174 ticks were collected. Tick burden ranged from 1 to 76 specimens

Kerwin E. Hyland; Jenifer Bernier; Daniel Markowski; Andrew MacLachlan; Zuhair Amr; Jay Pitocchelli; James Myers; Renjie Hu

2000-01-01

314

Rhodinocichla rosea Is an Emberizid (Aves; Passeriformes) Based on Mitochondrial DNA Analyses  

E-print Network

Rhodino- cichla rosea is unclear. Recent opinions are that it is either a mockingbird (family Mimidae of primitive song- birds. Soon after, it was recognized as belonging to the oscines (Hartlaub, 1853), a large, most frequently, the mockingbirds (Mimi- dae) or the tanagers (Thraupinae; Emberizidae) (e.g., Sharpe

Bermingham, Eldredge

315

Identification, Classification, and Growth of Moa Chicks (Aves: Dinornithiformes) from the Genus Euryapteryx  

PubMed Central

Background The analysis of growth in extinct organisms is difficult. The general lack of skeletal material from a range of developmental states precludes determination of growth characteristics. For New Zealand's extinct moa we have available to us a selection of rare femora at different developmental stages that have allowed a preliminary determination of the early growth of this giant flightless bird. We use a combination of femora morphometrics, ancient DNA, and isotope analysis to provide information on the identification, classification, and growth of extinct moa from the genus Euryapteryx. Results Using ancient DNA, we identify a number of moa chick bones for the species Euryapteryx curtus, Dinornis novaezealandiae, and Anomalopteryx didiformis, and the first chick bone for Pachyornis geranoides. Isotope analysis shows that ?15N levels vary between the two known size classes of Euryapteryx, with the larger size class having reduced levels of ?15N. A growth series for femora of the two size classes of Euryapteryx shows that early femora growth characteristics for both classes are almost identical. Morphometric, isotopic, and radiographic analysis of the smallest Euryapteryx bones suggests that one of these femora is from a freshly hatched moa at a very early stage of development. Conclusion Using morphometric, isotopic, and ancient DNA analyses have allowed the determination of a number of characteristics of rare moa chick femora. For Euryapteryx the analyses suggest that the smaller sized class II Euryapteryx is identical in size and growth to the extant Darwin's rhea. PMID:24923666

Huynen, Leon; Gill, Brian J.; Doyle, Anthony; Millar, Craig D.; Lambert, David M.

2014-01-01

316

Cadmium and lead in common terns ( Aves: Sterna hirundo ): Relationship between levels in parents and eggs  

Microsoft Academic Search

We analyzed cadmium and lead levels in feathers of mated pairs of common terns (Sterna hirundo) and in their eggs to determine if metal levels in eggs correlated with female levels, and whether there were intrapair and intermetal correlations. Eggs had significantly lower lead levels (89 ng g-1) and cadmium levels (4.0 ng g-1) than adult feathers (500 and 50

Joanna Burger; Michael Gochfeld

1991-01-01

317

Inter-familial relationships of the shorebirds (Aves: Charadriiformes) based on nuclear DNA sequence data  

PubMed Central

Background Phylogenetic hypotheses of higher-level relationships in the order Charadriiformes based on morphological data, partly disagree with those based on DNA-DNA hybridisation data. So far, these relationships have not been tested by analysis of DNA sequence data. Herein we utilize 1692 bp of aligned, nuclear DNA sequences obtained from 23 charadriiform species, representing 15 families. We also test earlier suggestions that bustards and sandgrouses may be nested with the charadriiforms. The data is analysed with methods based on the parsimony and maximum-likelihood criteria. Results Several novel phylogenetic relationships were recovered and strongly supported by the data, regardless of which method of analysis was employed. These include placing the gulls and allied groups as a sistergroup to the sandpiper-like birds, and not to the plover-like birds. The auks clearly belong to the clade with the gulls and allies, and are not basal to most other charadriiform birds as suggested in analyses of morphological data. Pluvialis, which has been supposed to belong to the plover family (Charadriidae), represents a basal branch that constitutes the sister taxon to a clade with plovers, oystercatchers and avocets. The thick-knees and sheathbills unexpectedly cluster together. Conclusion The DNA sequence data contains a strong phylogenetic signal that results in a well-resolved phylogenetic tree with many strongly supported internodes. Taxonomically it is the most inclusive study of shorebird families that relies on nucleotide sequences. The presented phylogenetic hypothesis provides a solid framework for analyses of macroevolution of ecological, morphological and behavioural adaptations observed within the order Charadriiformes. PMID:12875664

Ericson, Per GP; Envall, Ida; Irestedt, Martin; Norman, Janette A

2003-01-01

318

Flightlessness and phylogeny amongst endemic rails (Aves:Rallidae) of the New Zealand region.  

PubMed Central

The phylogenetic relationships of a number of flightless and volant rails have been investigated using mtDNA sequence data. The third domain of the small ribosomal subunit (12S) has been sequenced for 22 taxa, and part of the 5' end of the cytochrome-b gene has been sequenced for 12 taxa. Additional sequences were obtained from outgroup taxa, two species of jacana, sarus crane, spur-winged plover and kagu. Extinct rails were investigated using DNA extracted from subfossil bones, and in cases where fresh material could not be obtained from other extant taxa, feathers and museum skins were used as sources of DNA. Phylogenetic trees produced from these data have topologies that are, in general, consistent with data from DNA-DNA hybridization studies and recent interpretations based on morphology. Gallinula chloropus moorhen) groups basally with Fulica (coots), Amaurornis (= Megacrex) ineptus falls within the Gallirallus/Rallus group, and Gallinula (= Porphyrula) martinica is basal to Porphyrio (swamphens) and should probably be placed in that genus. Subspecies of Porphyrio porphyrio are paraphyletic with respect to Porphyrio mantelli (takahe). The Northern Hemisphere Rallus aquaticus is basal to the south-western Pacific Rallus (or Gallirallus) group. The flightless Rallus philippensis dieffenbachii is close to Rallus modestus and distinct from the volant Rallus philippensis, and is evidently a separate species. Porzana (crakes) appears to be more closely associated with Porphyrio than Rallus. Deep relationships among the rails remain poorly resolved. Rhynochetus jubatus (kagu) is closer to the cranes than the rails in this analysis. Genetic distances between flightless rails and their volant counterparts varied considerably with observed 12S sequence distances, ranging from 0.3% (Porphyrio porphyrio melanotus and P. mantelli mantelli) to 7.6% (Rallus modestus and Rallus philippensis). This may be taken as an indication of the rapidity with which flightlessness can evolve, and of the persistence of flightless taxa. Genetic data supported the notion that flightless taxa were independently derived, sometimes from similar colonizing ancestors. The morphology of flightless rails is apparently frequently dominated by evolutionary parallelism although similarity of external appearance is not an indication of the extent of genetic divergence. In some cases taxa that are genetically close are morphologically distinct from one another (e.g. Rallus (philippensis) dieffenbachii and R. modestus), whilst some morphologically similar taxa are evidently independently derived (e.g. Porphyio mantelli hochstetteri and P.m. mantelli). PMID:9163823

Trewick, S A

1997-01-01

319

A new subspecies of Chamaea fasciata (Wrentit) from Oregon (Aves: Timaliinae)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Geographic variation in plumage color of Chamaea fasciata (Wrentit) from northern California and southern Oregon is related to climate. A new subspecies, Chamaea fasciata margra, is described from a disjunct population of southern interior Oregon. Colonization of C. fasciata in interior Oregon was perhaps from birds crossing coniferous forests via isolated balds of Ceonothus. Recent increases of Wrentits in interior Oregon may be in response to habitat alterations (deforestation, fires) and concurrent global warming.

Browning, M. Ralph

1992-01-01

320

Los orígenes del Partido del Socialismo Democrático (1989-1993): el ave fénix roja en Alemania  

Microsoft Academic Search

El Partido del Socialismo Democrático (Partei des Demokratischen Sozialismus), surgido de la descomposición interna del SED (Sozialistiscbe Einbeitspartei Deutschlands), es un caso relevante de adaptación de los partidos únicos en los regímenes comunistas a la democracia plurípar-tidista. Dadas las peculiaridades de la transición en la República Democrática de Alemania, acelerada por su rápida integración en la República Federal, el SED

Ricardo Martín de la Guardia

2005-01-01

321

STUDENT NUMBER STUDENT NAME 1W02-515 PORTAGE AVE.  

E-print Network

with a letter of reference from a teacher or administrator from your home school Collegiate The HIGH SCHOOL Contact (name and phone)___________________________________________________________ I am home schooled:____________________________________________________________________ Last First Middle Home Address:___________________________________________________Postal Code

Martin, Jeff

322

Regulation of water and sodium balance in the field by Australian honeyeaters (Aves: Meliphagidae).  

PubMed

We evaluated the use of water and sodium by free-living individuals of several species of Australian honeyeaters (Acanthorhynchos superciliosus, Phylidonyris novaehollandiae, Phylidonyris nigra, Manorina flavigula, and Anthochaera carunculata). Water and Na fluxes were highly variable between species, largely reflecting differences in diet. Water fluxes ranged from approximately 300% of total body water per day in 10-g, nectarivorous A. superciliosus to approximately 45% of total body water per day, typical of a desert species, in M. flavigula, a 50-g, insectivorous, arid-zone bird. Similarly, Na fluxes ranged from nearly 60% of Na pool per day in A. superciliosus to about 25% per day in M. flavigula. Despite these different fluxes, values of regulated osmoregulatory variables, including plasma osmolality, hematocrit, plasma concentrations of Na+ and K+, and exchangeable Na pool, were relatively invariant both between species and within species at different seasons. In contrast, values of variables reflecting the operation of regulatory systems did differ between species and seasons. Urine concentrations were highest in M. flavigula and, in A. carunculata, varied seasonally (higher in summer than winter). Plasma concentrations of aldosterone were lowest in A. carunculata (5-25 pg/mL), highest in P. novaehollandiae (70-200 pg/mL), and in the latter species were higher in winter than summer. Concentrations of arginine vasotocin ranged from 5 pg/mL in A. carunculata to greater than 30 pg/mL in M. flavigula. Our data demonstrate that within the family Meliphagidae, there exists substantial variation in the fluxes of water and Na and that these relate in part to body size variation but more importantly to diet. The different fluxes between species are reflected in the values of numerous osmoregulatory variables. PMID:9548654

Goldstein, D L; Bradshaw, S D

1998-01-01

323

Evolution of seasonal ecological niches in the Passerina buntings (Aves: Cardinalidae).  

PubMed Central

The evolution of migration has long been considered complex and recent work has demonstrated additional complexity: some species follow the same ecological conditions throughout the year, whereas others 'switch niches' between breeding and wintering ranges. Hypotheses regarding the evolution of migration would generally predict niche-following as primitive, and niche-switching as derived. However, no test has, to our knowledge, yet determined the directionality of evolution of these states within a lineage. We present an analysis of phylogenetic dimensions of seasonal niches in the Passerina buntings that indicates greater evolutionary change in the niches of breeding populations than among those of wintering populations. These results are consistent with hypotheses of (i) niche conservatism (in winter, at least) across a recently speciated lineage; and (ii) the derived state of the breeding (rather than winter) ecological niches of each species. PMID:15306365

Martínez-Meyer, Enrique; Peterson, A. Townsend; Navarro-Sigüenza, Adolfo G.

2004-01-01

324

Arboviral infection in two species of wild jays (Aves: Corvidae): evidence for population impacts.  

PubMed

We examined the prevalence of antibodies to three mosquito-borne arboviruses in blue jays, Cyanocitta cristata, and Florida scrub-jays, Aphelocoma coerulescens, to identify the effects on host survival, the influence of sex and age on infection, and the temporal patterns of antibody prevalence. Blood samples from 306 blue jays and 219 Florida scrub-jays were collected at Archbold Biological Station (Lake Placid, FL) from April 1994 through December 1995. Sera were analyzed for hemagglutination-inhibition antibody to eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) and St. Louis encephalitis (SLE) viruses, and neutralizing antibodies to EEE, Highlands J (HJ), and SLE viruses. Overall, 31.4% of blue jay samples and 22.1% of scrub-jay samples had antibodies to EEE. Antibodies to HJ were detected in slightly >15% of samples in each jay species, and SLE was detected in <3% of the samples in each jay species. A single EEE virus isolation was made from the blood of an 11-d-old scrub-jay nestling. Survival of adult blue jays seropositive to EEE was significantly lower than that of seronegative birds based on resight rates, but infection did not seem to affect survival of adult or juvenile Florida scrub-jays. PMID:15061281

Garvin, Mary C; Tarvin, Keith A; Stark, Lillian M; Woolfenden, Glen E; Fitzpatrick, John W; Day, Jonathan F

2004-03-01

325

13 y 14 de noviembre de 2013 Quinta Ave Mara USB Litoral -Camur  

E-print Network

­ Prof. Luis Chacón ­ Universidad Central de Venezuela 03:15pm/03:30pm Sección de Preguntas y Respuestas Desarrollo Humano Sostenible - Prof. Zulay Tagliaferro ­ Universidad Centro Occidental Lisandro Alvarado 01 Krauter ­ Universidad Simón Bolívar 11:45am/12:00m Sección de Preguntas y Respuestas 12:00m/01:00pm Cierre

Vásquez, Carlos

326

[Advantages and limitations of interspecies associations in northern migratory sandpipers (Charadrii, Aves)].  

PubMed

Investigations were carried out at two stations of Ornithological Unit, IBPN FEB RAS, located in Nizhnekolymsk District, Yakutia, starting from May 15-20 in 1984, 1985, 1987, 1988, and 1990; at the northern coast of Pukhovoy Bay, Southern Island of Novaya Zemlya starting from June 1 in 1994; at Cape Beliy Nos, the Yugorsky Peninsula, starting from June 1 in 1995-1997. Classic associations are detected in interspecies flocks of sandpipers between the following species: the Pacific golden plover and the curlew sandpiper, the pectoral sandpiper and the long-billed dowitcher, the pectoral sandpiper and the dunlin, the grey plover and the dunlin. However, total amount of birds that form associations is not large. In species of group "A" (the grey plover, the Pacific golden plover, the pectoral sandpiper), no difference has been observed in migratory birds behavior within inter- or conspecific flocks. Species of group "B" (the dunlin, the curlew sandpiper, the long-billed dowitcher), on the contrary, change their behavior sharply depending on whether they belong to an association or not. Species of group "A" do not get any advantages when forming an association. Unlike them, species of group "B" profit from associating: a part of time spent in foraging substantially increases; more time is spent on rest and less time is spent on reconnaissance and vigilance (readiness for actions); safety of birds is enhanced. On the other hand, in species of group "B" there are also disadvantages related with associating: i.e., interspecies competition for food; foraging in suboptimal habitats which, in turn, may lead to notable increase of time spent by birds in foraging. An assumption is put forward that in species of group "B" advantages and limitations of associating cancel each other to a certain extent, and this explains rather small number of birds forming associations. PMID:25771678

Gavrilov, V V

2014-01-01

327

Evolution of seasonal ecological niches in the Passerina buntings (Aves: Cardinalidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The evolution of migration has long been considered complex and recent work has demonstrated additional complexity: some species follow the same ecological conditions throughout the year, whereas others 'switch niches' between breeding and wintering ranges. Hypotheses regarding the evolution of migration would generally predict niche-following as primitive, and niche-switching as derived. However, no test has, to our knowledge, yet determined

Enrique Martinez-Meyer; A. Townsend Peterson; Adolfo G. Navarro-Siguenza

2004-01-01

328

Two new species of flightless rails (Aves: Rallidae) from the Middle Pleistocene ''crane fauna\\  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two new species of flightless rails are described from a Pleis- tocene fauna in Bermuda that also includes an extinct crane (Grus latipes) and an extinct duck (Anas pachyscelus). The medium-sized Rallus ibycus, new species, was possibly derived from North American populations of Virginia Rail (R. limicola), but had a longer bill, much more robust legs, and reduced wings and

Storrs L. Olson; David B. Wingate

2000-01-01

329

Isolation and characterization of polymorphic microsatellite loci for the northern flicker (Colaptes auratus; Aves).  

PubMed

To investigate the mating system of northern flickers (Colaptes auratus), we developed primers for 14 microsatellite loci and screened them in 68 unrelated adults and their offspring. All markers were highly polymorphic with 9 to +36 alleles per locus. One marker was Z-chromosome linked; one marker exceeded the size standard range and could not be analysed further. We checked the other 12 markers for Mendelian inheritance in 36 broods for which the social parents were known. Seven markers showed evidence for the presence of null alleles, and three of those showed significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Markers were generally unlinked. PMID:21564764

Kuhn, Sylvia; Wiebe, Karen L; Kempenaers, Bart

2009-05-01

330

Mitochondrial DNA Variation in the Northern Flicker ( Colaptes auratus, Aves) 1  

Microsoft Academic Search

The northern flicker is a common woodpecker that inhabits open woodlands throughout North America. A narrow hybrid zone occurs along the range boundaries between the eastern yellow-shafted and western red-shafted subspecies. Mitochon- drial DNA (mtDNA) was isolated from 20 1 flickers from 27 locales, primarily along two transects that cross the hybrid zone, one across the northern United States and

William S. Moore; John H. Graham; Jef T. Price

331

The diet of nestlings of three Ardeidae species (Aves, Ciconiiformes) in the Axios Delta, Greece  

Microsoft Academic Search

The diets of the little egret (Egretta garzetta), the night heron (Nycticorax nycticorax) and the squacco heron (Ardeola ralloides) were studied by analyzing nestling regurgitations collected during five breeding seasons (1988-1990 and 1994-1995) at a heronry in the Axios Delta (Northern Greece). In total, 267 regurgitations from little egrets, 247 from night herons and 19 from squacco herons (only in

Savas Kazantzidis; Vassilis Goutner

332

Correcting the "correct" name for the Asian Brown Flycatcher (Aves: Passeriformes, Muscicapidae, Muscicapa).  

PubMed

Mlíkovský (2012) claimed that Muscicapa latirostris Raffles, 1822 was the correct name for the Asian Brown Flycatcher, and rejected its senior synonym, Muscicapa dauurica Pallas, 1811. Muscicapa dauurica is in equal or greater use today for this flycatcher, to which the references to it in Mlíkovský (2012) testify even though they are far from comprehensive. Other major references using dauurica Pallas are Sibley & Monroe (1990), Inskipp et al. (1996), Kennedy et al. (2000), Dickinson (2003), Rasmussen & Anderton (2005), Clement (2006), Wells (2007) and Mann (2008). PMID:25283921

Dickinson, Edward C; Schodde, Richard; Kullander, Sven; Crochet, Pierre André; Elliott, Andy; Kirwan, Guy M

2014-01-01

333

Differences between measured and linearly interpolated synoptic variables over a 12-h period during AVE IV  

E-print Network

variable over a time interval (at) within the 12-h interval between rawinsonde soundings 32 Differences between measured and linearly interpolated values of temperature ('C) computed over 3-, 6-, and 9-h intervals at 850 mb. 44 12 Differences between... measured and lin~arly interpolated values of mixing ratio (x 10-1 g kg ) computed over 3-, 6-, and 9-h intervals at 850 mb. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 13 Differences between observed and linearly interpolated values of geopotential height...

Dupuis, Leonard Raymond

1979-01-01

334

Flexibility along the Neck of the Neogene Terror Bird Andalgalornis steulleti (Aves Phorusrhacidae)  

PubMed Central

Background Andalgalornis steulleti from the upper Miocene–lower Pliocene (?6 million years ago) of Argentina is a medium-sized patagornithine phorusrhacid. It was a member of the predominantly South American radiation of ‘terror birds’ (Phorusrhacidae) that were apex predators throughout much of the Cenozoic. A previous biomechanical study suggests that the skull would be prepared to make sudden movements in the sagittal plane to subdue prey. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyze the flexion patterns of the neck of Andalgalornis based on the neck vertebrae morphology and biometrics. The transitional cervical vertebrae 5th and 9th clearly separate regions 1–2 and 2–3 respectively. Bifurcate neural spines are developed in the cervical vertebrae 7th to 12th suggesting the presence of a very intricate ligamentary system and of a very well developed epaxial musculature. The presence of the lig. elasticum interespinale is inferred. High neural spines of R3 suggest that this region concentrates the major stresses during downstrokes. Conclusions/Significance The musculoskeletal system of Andalgalornis seems to be prepared (1) to support a particularly big head during normal stance, and (2) to help the neck (and the head) rising after the maximum ventroflexion during a strike. The study herein is the first interpretation of the potential performance of the neck of Andalgalornis in its entirety and we considered this an important starting point to understand and reconstruct the flexion pattern of other phorusrhacids from which the neck is unknown. PMID:22662194

Tambussi, Claudia P.; de Mendoza, Ricardo; Degrange, Federico J.; Picasso, Mariana B.

2012-01-01

335

Cranial neural crest cell migration in cockatiel Nymphicus hollandicus (Aves: Psittaciformes).  

PubMed

Parrots have developed unique jaw muscles in their evolutionary history. The M. pseudomasseter, which completely covers the lateral side of the jugal bar, is regarded as a jaw muscle unique to parrots. In a previous study, I presented a hypothesis on the relevance of modifications in the regulation of cranial neural crest cell (NCC) development to the generation of this novel jaw muscle based on histological analyses (Tokita [2004] J Morphol 259:69-81). In the present study, I investigated distribution and migration patterns of cranial neural crest cells (NCCs) through parrot embryogenesis with immunohistochemical techniques to further understand the role of cranial NCCs in the evolution of the M. pseudomasseter, and to provide new information on the relative plasticity in cranial NCC migration at early stages of avian development. The basic nature of cranial NCC development was mostly conserved between chick and parrot. In both, cranial NCCs migrated from the dorsal tip of the neural tube in a ventral direction. Three major populations were identified in their cranial NCCs. Migration pathways of these cells were almost identical between chick and parrot. The principal difference was seen in the relative timing of cranial NCC migration. In the parrot, cranial NCC migration into the first pharyngeal arch was more advanced than in the chick at early stages of development. Such a temporal shift in cranial NCC migration might influence architectural patterning of parrot jaw muscles that generates new muscle like M. pseudomasseter. PMID:16342077

Tokita, Masayoshi

2006-03-01

336

Eliot-Pearson Children's School 2014 Summer Program 105 College Ave  

E-print Network

include any school, play group, religious school, or day care): Signature of Parent: _______ Current EPCS? Y / N - If NO, please fill out the back side of this form. Parent(s)/Guardian(s): _____________/______________ Relationship(s) to Child: ________________________/__________________ (please give address(es) of adults who

Dennett, Daniel

337

Saxicola syenitica Heuglin, 1869 (Aves: Passeriformes: Muscicapidae), an overlooked taxon of Oenanthe?  

PubMed

The North African population of the Black Wheatear has been treated as Oenanthe leucura syenitica for over 100 years. The type of syenitica was collected by Heuglin in June 1852 near the southern Egypt/northern Sudan border, well outside the range of the sedentary Black Wheatear. Morphometric inference and genetic analyses of partial sequences of the mitochondrial gene COI demonstrate that the type specimen of syenitica is not conspecific with O. leucura, but instead is closely related to O. lugens of the Middle East and North Africa, being most similar in plumage to O. lugens warriae of the basalt deserts of north-east Jordan and southern Syria. While syenitica was not separable in the analysed part of its mitochondrial DNA from O. l. lugens and O. l. warriae, it differs in morphometrics and plumage features from the latter. The type specimen is a first-summer bird with abraded plumage as expected for June, and may thus have been collected in its breeding range. Its morphological distinctiveness implies that syenitica might be taxonomically distinct from warriae. However, as it is known only from the type and its few associated data, we propose to treat it as a subspecies inquirenda of O. lugens. As a consequence of this, and the fact that we found no genetic or morphological differences between North African populations of O. leucura and riggenbachi Hartert, 1909, the name originally applied to the population in Western Sahara, the North African population takes the oldest available name to become O. leucura riggenbachi. PMID:24872167

Shirihai, Hadoram; Schweizer, Manuel; Kirwan, Guy M; Svensson, Lars

2014-01-01

338

Foraging behavior and diet of the vulnerable Cinereous Warbling-finch Poospiza cinerea (Aves, Emberizidae).  

PubMed

The Cinereous Warbling-finch Poospiza cinerea is a globally vulnerable Emberizidae passerine, patchily distributed and rare in the open savannah of central South America. Attributes of rare species include niche specificity such as feeding habits. To verify possible niche specialization in this species we aimed to describe its foraging habits related to substrate use, foraging and substrate height, attack maneuvers, and consumed food items. We monitored two groups at two study sites and sampled foraging events with intervals of 15 minutes. The substrates used in greater frequency were foliage and reproductive organs. Foraging and substrate height varied widely with study area. The attack maneuver adopted in greater frequency was glean. Most food items attacked were small invertebrates. Big invertebrates included Lepidoptera, Hemiptera, Coleoptera, Hymenoptera and Orthoptera. Poospiza cinerea was also recorded foraging in mixed bird flocks with seven other species. The generalist foraging behavior of the species cannot be associate to its rarity. PMID:25627591

Wischhoff, U; Marques-Santos, F; Rodrigues, M

2014-11-01

339

Identification of Bacterial Specialists in Hosts belonging to Aves, Mammalia, and Pisces  

EPA Science Inventory

Only a portion of bacteria found in animal guts are able to establish specific associations within animal hosts. Taxa that have formed these specialized relationships may have played a prominent role in host evolution and may also contribute significantly to current host physiolo...

340

Ecomorphology of eye shape and retinal topography in waterfowl (Aves: Anseriformes: Anatidae) with different foraging modes.  

PubMed

Despite the large body of literature on ecomorphological adaptations to foraging in waterfowl, little attention has been paid to their sensory systems, especially vision. Here, we compare eye shape and retinal topography across 12 species representing 4 different foraging modes. Eye shape was significantly different among foraging modes, with diving and pursuit-diving species having relatively smaller corneal diameters compared to non-diving species. This may be associated with differences in ambient light intensity while foraging or an ability to tightly constrict the pupil in divers in order to facilitate underwater vision. Retinal topography was similar across all species, consisting of an oblique visual streak, a central area of peak cell density, and no discernible fovea. Because the bill faces downwards when the head is held in the normal posture in waterfowl, the visual streak will be held horizontally, allowing the horizon to be sampled with higher visual acuity. Estimates of spatial resolving power were similar among species with only the Canada goose having a higher spatial resolution. Overall, we found no evidence of ecomorphological adaptations to different foraging modes in the retinal ganglion cell layer in waterfowl. Rather, retinal topography in these birds seems to reflect the 'openness' of their habitats. PMID:23475299

Lisney, Thomas J; Stecyk, Karyn; Kolominsky, Jeffrey; Schmidt, Brian K; Corfield, Jeremy R; Iwaniuk, Andrew N; Wylie, Douglas R

2013-05-01

341

Digeneans and cestodes parasitic in the white-faced ibis Plegadis chihi (Aves: Threskiornithidae) from Argentina.  

PubMed

Some digeneans and cestodes parasitic in a population of the white-faced ibis Plegadis chihi (Vieillot) from Buenos Aires province, Argentina, are presented. The digeneans Dietziella egregia (Dietz, 1909), Patagifer bilobus (Rudolphi, 1819), Ascocotyle (Leighia) hadra Ostrowski de Nuñez, 1992 and Posthodiplostomum nanum Dubois, 1937 from the intestine; Prosthogonimus ovatus (Rudolphi, 1803) from the cloaca; Athesmia heterolecithodes (Braun, 1899) from the bile ducts and the cestode Hymenolepis megalops (Nitzsch in Creplin, 1829) from the cloaca, were recorded. The discovery of D. egregia, P. ovatus, A. heterolecithodes and P. nanum constitute new host and/or new geographical records. Adults of A. (L.) hadra, previously described in experimental definitive hosts, are first reported from a naturally infected bird. Hymenolepis megalops, a cestode of Anseriformes is first reported from Ciconiiformes. PMID:11104147

Digiani, M C

2000-01-01

342

Evidence of taxon cycles in an Indo-Pacific passerine bird radiation (Aves: Pachycephala)  

PubMed Central

Many insular taxa possess extraordinary abilities to disperse but may differ in their abilities to diversify and compete. While some taxa are widespread across archipelagos, others have disjunct (relictual) populations. These types of taxa, exemplified in the literature by selections of unrelated taxa, have been interpreted as representing a continuum of expansions and contractions (i.e. taxon cycles). Here, we use molecular data of 35 out of 40 species of the avian genus Pachycephala (including 54 out of 66 taxa in Pachycephala pectoralis (sensu lato), to assess the spatio-temporal evolution of the group. We also include data on species distributions, morphology, habitat and elevational ranges to test a number of predictions associated with the taxon-cycle hypothesis. We demonstrate that relictual species persist on the largest and highest islands across the Indo-Pacific, whereas recent archipelago expansions resulted in colonization of all islands in a region. For co-occurring island taxa, the earliest colonists generally inhabit the interior and highest parts of an island, with little spatial overlap with later colonists. Collectively, our data support the idea that taxa continuously pass through phases of expansions and contractions (i.e. taxon cycles). PMID:24403319

Jønsson, Knud Andreas; Irestedt, Martin; Christidis, Les; Clegg, Sonya M.; Holt, Ben G.; Fjeldså, Jon

2014-01-01

343

Remarks on the name Cercomacra Sclater, 1858 (Aves: Thamnophilidae) and its type species.  

PubMed

A recent molecular phylogeny of Cercomacra Sclater, 1858 found the genus to be polyphyletic (Tello et al. 2014). Two non-sister clades in putative Cercomacra were uncovered: Cercomacra sensu stricto, including Cercomacra manu Fitzpatrick & Willard, 1990, C. brasiliana Hellmayr, 1905, C. cinerascens (Sclater, 1857), C. melanaria (Ménétries, 1835), C. ferdinandi Snethlage, 1928, C. carbonaria Sclater & Salvin, 1873 and C. nigricans Sclater, 1858; and Cercomacroides Tello & Raposo, 2014, including Cercomacroides nigrescens (Cabanis & Heine, 1859), C. laeta (Todd, 1920), C. parkeri (Graves, 1997), C. tyrannina (Sclater, 1855) and C. serva (Sclater, 1858). This split required a prior re-examination of the apparently difficult facts surrounding the name of the type species of Cercomacra to ensure that the appropriate group would retain that name leaving the balance to the new genus-group name, Cercomacroides. The findings of that re-examination are nomenclatural rather than taxonomic and are complex enough to deserve a historical explanation, which is presented here. In summary, Hellmayr (1905) was correct in clarifying the identity of the type species chosen by Sclater (1890), but he did not suggest any nomenclatural action to fix the misidentified type species. Subsequent information provided by Cory & Hellmayr (1924) regarding the type specimen of Cercomacra brasiliana was incorrect, and the holotype is not in St. Petersburg as they implied.  PMID:25661931

Raposo, Marcos A; Tello, José G; Dickinson, Edward C; Brito, Guilherme R R

2015-01-01

344

Mitochondrial phylogeography, subspecific taxonomy, and conservation genetics of sandhill cranes ( Grus canadensis ; Aves: Gruidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Six subspecies of sandhill cranes (Gruscanadensis) have been denoted based onperceived morphological and\\/or breedinglocality differences among them. Threesubspecies are migratory, breeding from thehigh arctic in North America and Siberia(lesser sandhill, G. c. canadensis),south through central Canada (Canadiansandhill, G. c. rowani) and into thenorthern United States (greater sandhill, G. c. tabida). A review of sandhill cranetaxonomy indicates that the size variation,

Judith M. Phymer; Matthew G. Fain; Jane E. Austin; Douglas H. Johnson; Carey Krajewski

2001-01-01

345

Isolation driven divergence: speciation in a widespread North American songbird (Aves: Certhiidae)  

PubMed Central

Lineage, or true “species,” trees may differ from gene trees because of stochastic processes in molecular evolution leading to gene-tree heterogeneity. Problems with inferring species trees due to excessive incomplete lineage sorting may be exacerbated in lineages with rapid diversification or recent divergences necessitating the use of multiple loci and individuals. Many recent multilocus studies that investigate divergence times identify lineage splitting to be more recent than single locus studies, forcing the revision of biogeographic scenarios driving divergence. Here we use 21 nuclear loci from regional populations to reevaluate hypotheses identified in an mtDNA phylogeographic study of the Brown Creeper (Certhia americana), as well as identify processes driving divergence. Nuclear phylogeographic analyses identified hierarchical genetic structure, supporting a basal split at roughly 32°N latitude, splitting northern and southern populations, with mixed patterns of genealogical concordance and discordance between datasets within the major lineages. Coalescent-based analyses identify isolation, with little to no gene flow, as the primary driver of divergence between lineages. Recent isolation appears to have caused genetic bottlenecks in populations in the Sierra Madre Oriental and coastal mountain ranges of California, which may be targets for conservation concerns. PMID:21933295

Manthey, Joseph D.; Klicka, John; Spellman, Garth M.

2011-01-01

346

Does behavior reflect phylogeny in swiftlets (Aves: Apodidae)? A test using cytochrome b mitochondrial DNA sequences.  

PubMed Central

Swiftlets are small insectivorous birds, many of which nest in caves and are known to echolocate. Due to a lack of distinguishing morphological characters, the taxonomy of swiftlets is primarily based on the presence or absence of echolocating ability, together with nest characters. To test the reliability of these behavioral characters, we constructed an independent phylogeny using cytochrome b mitochondrial DNA sequences from swiftlets and their relatives. This phylogeny is broadly consistent with the higher classification of swifts but does not support the monophyly of swiftlets. Echolocating swiftlets (Aerodramus) and the nonecholocating "giant swiftlet" (Hydrochous gigas) group together, but the remaining nonecholocating swiftlets belonging to Collocalia are not sister taxa to these swiftlets. While echolocation may be a synapomorphy of Aerodramus (perhaps secondarily lost in Hydrochous), no character of Aerodramus nests showed a statistically significant fit to the molecular phylogeny, indicating that nest characters are not phylogenetically reliable in this group. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8692950

Lee, P L; Clayton, D H; Griffiths, R; Page, R D

1996-01-01

347

Complete mitochondrial genome of the Bewick's swan Cygnus columbianus bewickii (Aves, Anseriformes, Anatidae).  

PubMed

The mitochondrial genome of Bewick's swan Cygnus columbianus bewickii was completely sequenced and then the resultant data were compared with those of the whistling swan Cygnus columbianus columbianus. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of C. c. bewickii was 16,727 bp in length and its gene arrangement pattern, gene content, and genome organization were identical to those of Cygnus species. The similarities of nucleotide and amino acid sequences between the two swans were 99.1% and 99.6%, respectively. Out of the 13 protein-coding genes and 2 rRNA genes, COIII showed the lowest nucleotide sequence similarity with 98.0%. On the other hand, in amino acid sequence similarities, both COII and ATP6 showed the lowest with 98.7% in common. The control region has the 97.8% nucleotide sequence similarity. PMID:22409756

Lee, Jin Hee; Ryu, Shi Hyun; Kang, Seung-Gu; Hwang, Ui Wook

2012-04-01

348

Dispersion of the horned grebe Podiceps auritus (L.) (Aves) on Lake Myvatn, Iceland, in late summer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Studies on habitat selection by waterbirds usually describe large-scale distribution of populations or species but the dispersion within lakes is an understudied aspect. Detailed mapping of horned grebes (Podiceps auritus (L.)) on the North Basin of Lake Myvatn, Iceland, was carried out in late summer 2000 in order to compare their dispersion with water depth and submerged vegetation. Depth and

Thorkell Lindberg Thórarinsson; Árni Einarsson

2004-01-01

349

Niche divergence promotes rapid diversification of East African sky island white-eyes (Aves: Zosteropidae).  

PubMed

The Eastern Afromontane biodiversity hotspot composed of highly fragmented forested highlands (sky islands) harbours exceptional diversity and endemicity, particularly within birds. To explain their elevated diversity within this region, models founded on niche conservatism have been offered, although detailed phylogeographic studies are limited to a few avian lineages. Here, we focus on the recent songbird genus Zosterops, represented by montane and lowland members, to test the roles of niche conservatism versus niche divergence in the diversification and colonization of East Africa's sky islands. The species-rich white-eyes are a typically homogeneous family with an exceptional colonizing ability, but in contrast to their diversity on oceanic islands, continental diversity is considered depauperate and has been largely neglected. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of ~140 taxa reveals extensive polyphyly among different montane populations of Z. poliogastrus. These larger endemic birds are shown to be more closely related to taxa with divergent habitat types, altitudinal distributions and dispersal abilities than they are to populations of restricted endemics that occur in neighbouring montane forest fragments. This repeated transition between lowland and highland habitats over time demonstrate that diversification of the focal group is explained by niche divergence. Our results also highlight an underestimation of diversity compared to morphological studies that has implications for their taxonomy and conservation. Molecular dating suggests that the spatially extensive African radiation arose exceptionally rapidly (1-2.5 Ma) during the fluctuating Plio-Pleistocene climate, which may have provided the primary driver for lineage diversification. PMID:24954273

Cox, Siobhan C; Prys-Jones, Robert P; Habel, Jan C; Amakobe, Bernard A; Day, Julia J

2014-08-01

350

Phylogeny of swallows (Aves: Hirundinidae) estimated from nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences  

Microsoft Academic Search

The phylogeny of swallows was reconstructed by comparing segments of three genes, nuclear ?-fibrinogen intron 7 (?fib7), mitochondrial cytochrome b (cytb), and mitochondrial ND2, in a variety of combinations using maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods. ?fib7 was sequenced for 47 species, cytb for 74 species, and ND2 for 61 species to yield comparisons among 75 of the 84 currently recognized

Frederick H. Sheldon; Linda A. Whittingham; Robert G. Moyle; Beth Slikas; David W. Winkler

2005-01-01

351

Phylogeography and genetic structure of two Patagonian shag species (Aves: Phalacrocoracidae).  

PubMed

We compared the phylogeographic and genetic structure of two sympatric shag species, Phalacrocorax magellanicus (rock shag) and Phalacrocorax atriceps (imperial shag), from Patagonia (southern South America). We used multilocus genotypes of nuclear DNA (microsatellite loci) from 324 individuals and mitochondrial DNA sequences (ATPase) from 177 individuals, to evaluate hypotheses related to the effect of physical and non-physical barriers on seabird evolution. Despite sharing many ecological traits, the focal species strongly differ in two key aspects: P. magellanicus has a strong tendency to remain at/near their breeding colonies during foraging trips and the non-breeding season, while P. atriceps exhibits the converse pattern. Both species showed similar mtDNA genetic structure, where colonies from the Atlantic Coast, Pacific Coast and Fuegian region were genetically divergent. We also found similarities in the results of Bayesian clustering analysis of microsatellites, with both species having four clusters. However population differentiation (e.g. Fst, ?st) was higher in P. magellanicus compared to P. atriceps, and average membership probabilities of individuals to specific clusters (Q-values) were also higher in the former. Phalacrocorax magellanicus has strong phylogeographic structure, consistent with the impact of Pleistocene glaciations, with diagnostic haplotypes associated with each of the three mentioned regions. The same pattern was not as evident for P. atriceps. Migration rate estimators were higher for P. atriceps than for P. magellanicus; however both species followed an n-island-like model of gene flow, this implies that dispersal occurs across the continental land mass that separates Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Our results supported the hypothesis that non-physical barriers are important drivers of the genetic and phylogeographic structure in seabirds, and also that physical barriers constitute effective but not absolute impediments to gene flow. PMID:24418531

Calderón, Luciano; Quintana, Flavio; Cabanne, Gustavo S; Lougheed, Stephen C; Tubaro, Pablo L

2014-03-01

352

137 Reber Building Home Address Pennsylvania State University 1320A Oak Ridge Ave  

E-print Network

Pennsylvania State University, Propulsion Engineering Research Center Aug 2007­ July 2009 Investigated sooting State University, NucE 309 Analytical Techniques for Nuclear Concepts Fall 2014 Teaching this junior level course, which is an introduction to many of the analytical techniques used in the nuclear

Thole, Karen A.

353

PRIMARY RESEARCH PAPER Patterns of prey use by lesser scaup Aythya affinis (Aves)  

E-print Network

availability may be reduced during spring migration. Analysis of fish diets showed that black bullhead Ameiurus melas and yellow perch Perca flavescens had the highest diet overlap with lesser scaup at 94% and 92

354

Effects of body size on take-off flight performance in the Phasianidae (Aves).  

PubMed

To evaluate the mechanisms responsible for relationships between body mass and maximum take-off performance in birds, we studied four species in the Phasianidae: northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus), chukar (Alectoris chukar), ring-necked pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) and wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo). These species vary in body mass from 0.2 to 5.3 kg, and they use flight almost solely to escape predators. During take-off, all the species used a similar wingbeat style that appeared to be a vortex-ring gait with a tip reversal during the upstroke. The tip reversal is unusual for birds with rounded wings; it may offer an aerodynamic advantage during rapid acceleration. Flight anatomy generally scaled geometrically, except for average wing chord and wing area, which increased more than expected as body mass (m) increased. Pectoralis strain varied from 19.1 to 35.2 % and scaled in proportion to m(0.23). This positive scaling is not consistent with the widely held assumption that muscle strain is independent of body mass among geometrically similar species. The anatomy of the species precluded measurements of in vivo pectoralis force using the strain-gauge technique that has been employed successfully in other bird species, so we could not directly test in vivo pectoralis force-velocity relationships. However, whole-body kinematics revealed that take-off power (P(ta)), the excess power available for climbing and accelerating in flight, scaled in proportion to m(0.75) and that pectoralis mass-specific P(ta) decreased in proportion to m(-)(0.26) and was directly proportional to wingbeat frequency. These trends suggest that mass-specific pectoralis work did not vary with body mass and that pectoralis stress and strain were inversely proportional, as expected from classical force-velocity models for skeletal muscle. Our observations of P(ta) were consistent with evidence from other species engaged in escape flight and, therefore, appear to contradict evidence from studies of take-off or hovering with an added payload. PMID:11023852

Tobalske, B W; Dial, K P

2000-11-01

355

EFFECTS OF BODY SIZE ON TAKE-OFF FLIGHT PERFORMANCE IN THE PHASIANIDAE (AVES)  

Microsoft Academic Search

To evaluate the mechanisms responsible for relationships between body mass and maximum take-off performance in birds, we studied four species in the Phasianidae: northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus), chukar (Alectoris chukar), ring-necked pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) and wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo). These species vary in body mass from 0.2 to 5.3 kg, and they use flight almost solely to escape predators. During

BRET W. TOBALSKE; KENNETH P. DIAL

2000-01-01

356

Phylogenetic relationships of flowerpeckers (Aves: Dicaeidae): Novel insights into the evolution of a tropical passerine clade  

E-print Network

;429296#7;Philippines, Luzon, Kalinga#7;GQ145325#7;GQ145283#7;GQ145241#7;#7;Dicaeum agile *#7;WFVZ#7;41288#7;Malaysia, Sabah, Tawau#7;GQ145348#7;GQ145306#7;GQ145264#7;#7;Dicaeum aureolimbatum#7;AMNH#7;DOT 12599#7;Indonesia, Sulawesi, Poso#7;GQ145330#7;GQ145288#7;GQ..., Sulawesi, Poso#7;GQ145331#7;GQ145289#7;GQ145247#7;#7;Dicaeum chrysorrheum#7;USNM#7;B06156#7;Myanmar, Sagaing#7;GQ145319#7;GQ145277#7;GQ145235#7;#7;Dicaeum concolor#7;KUNHM#7;10365#7;China, Guangxi, Shinwandashan Nature Preserve#7;GQ145339#7;GQ145297#7;GQ...

Nyá ri, Á rpá d S.; Peterson, A. Townsend; Rice, Nathan H.; Moyle, Robert G.

2009-12-01

357

Phylogeny of Passerida (Aves: Passeriformes) based on nuclear and mitochondrial sequence data  

Microsoft Academic Search

Passerida is a monophyletic group of oscine passerines that includes almost 3500 species (about 36%) of all bird species in the world. The current understanding of higher-level relationships within Passerida is based on DNA–DNA hybridizations [C.G. Sibley, J.E. Ahlquist, Phylogeny and Classification of Birds, 1990, Yale University Press, New Haven, CT]. Our results are based on analyses of 3130 aligned

Per G. P. Ericson; Ulf S. Johansson

2003-01-01

358

Phylogeny of Passerida (Aves: Passeriformes) based on nuclear and mitochondrial sequence data.  

PubMed

Passerida is a monophyletic group of oscine passerines that includes almost 3500 species (about 36%) of all bird species in the world. The current understanding of higher-level relationships within Passerida is based on DNA-DNA hybridizations [C.G. Sibley, J.E. Ahlquist, Phylogeny and Classification of Birds, 1990, Yale University Press, New Haven, CT]. Our results are based on analyses of 3130 aligned nucleotide sequence data obtained from 48 ingroup and 13 outgroup genera. Three nuclear genes were sequenced: c-myc (498-510 bp), RAG-1 (930 bp), and myoglobin (693-722 bp), as well one mitochondrial gene; cytochrome b (879 bp). The data were analysed by parsimony, maximum-likelihood, and Bayesian inference. The African rockfowl and rockjumper are found to constitute the deepest branch within Passerida, but relationships among the other taxa are poorly resolved--only four major clades receive statistical support. One clade corresponds to Passeroidea of [C.G. Sibley, B.L. Monroe, Distribution and Taxonomy of Birds of the World, 1990, Yale University Press, New Haven, CT] and includes, e.g., flowerpeckers, sunbirds, accentors, weavers, estrilds, wagtails, finches, and sparrows. Starlings, mockingbirds, thrushes, Old World flycatchers, and dippers also group together in a clade corresponding to Muscicapoidea of Sibley and Monroe [op. cit.]. Monophyly of their Sylvioidea could not be corroborated--these taxa falls either into a clade with wrens, gnatcatchers, and nuthatches, or one with, e.g., warblers, bulbuls, babblers, and white-eyes. The tits, penduline tits, and waxwings belong to Passerida but have no close relatives among the taxa studied herein. PMID:12967614

Ericson, Per G P; Johansson, Ulf S

2003-10-01

359

Comparative phyloclimatic analysis and evolution of ecological niches in the scimitar babblers (Aves: Timaliidae: Pomatorhinus).  

PubMed

We present the first extensive and integrative analysis of niche evolution based on climatic variables and a dated molecular phylogeny of a heterogeneous avian group of Southeast Asian scimitar babblers of the genus Pomatorhinus. The four main clades of scimitar babblers have species that co-occur in similar areas across southern Asia but some have diverged at different timeframes, with the most recently evolved clade harboring the highest number of species. Ecological niche models and analysis of contributing variables within a phylogenetic framework indicate instances of convergent evolution of members of different clades onto similar ecological parameter space, as well as divergent evolution of members from within clades. Pomatorhinus species from different clades occupying Himalayan foothills show convergence towards similar climatic tolerances, whereas within a clade, allopatric sister-species occurring in the Himalayas have diverged to occupy different climatic parameter spaces. Comparisons of climatic tolerances of Himalayan foothills taxa with species distributed further south in Assam/Burma and Burma/Thailand indicate convergence towards similar parameter spaces in several climatic variables. Niche overlap was observed to be lower among species of the youngest clade (ruficollis) and higher among species of older clades (ferruginosus). Analysis of accumulation of ecological disparity through time indicates rapid divergence within recent time frames. As a result, Himalayan taxa originating at different temporal scales within the four main scimitar babbler clades have differentiated ecologically only in recently diverged taxa. Our study suggests that the repeated orogenic and climatic fluctuations of the Pliocene and Pleistocene within mainland Southeast Asia served as an important ecological speciation driver within scimitar babblers, by providing opportunities for rapid geographic expansion and filling of novel environmental niches. PMID:23405183

Nyári, Árpád S; Reddy, Sushma

2013-01-01

360

Comparative Phyloclimatic Analysis and Evolution of Ecological Niches in the Scimitar Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae: Pomatorhinus)  

PubMed Central

We present the first extensive and integrative analysis of niche evolution based on climatic variables and a dated molecular phylogeny of a heterogeneous avian group of Southeast Asian scimitar babblers of the genus Pomatorhinus. The four main clades of scimitar babblers have species that co-occur in similar areas across southern Asia but some have diverged at different timeframes, with the most recently evolved clade harboring the highest number of species. Ecological niche models and analysis of contributing variables within a phylogenetic framework indicate instances of convergent evolution of members of different clades onto similar ecological parameter space, as well as divergent evolution of members from within clades. Pomatorhinus species from different clades occupying Himalayan foothills show convergence towards similar climatic tolerances, whereas within a clade, allopatric sister-species occurring in the Himalayas have diverged to occupy different climatic parameter spaces. Comparisons of climatic tolerances of Himalayan foothills taxa with species distributed further south in Assam/Burma and Burma/Thailand indicate convergence towards similar parameter spaces in several climatic variables. Niche overlap was observed to be lower among species of the youngest clade (ruficollis) and higher among species of older clades (ferruginosus). Analysis of accumulation of ecological disparity through time indicates rapid divergence within recent time frames. As a result, Himalayan taxa originating at different temporal scales within the four main scimitar babbler clades have differentiated ecologically only in recently diverged taxa. Our study suggests that the repeated orogenic and climatic fluctuations of the Pliocene and Pleistocene within mainland Southeast Asia served as an important ecological speciation driver within scimitar babblers, by providing opportunities for rapid geographic expansion and filling of novel environmental niches. PMID:23405183

Nyári, Árpád S.; Reddy, Sushma

2013-01-01

361

On Davainea minuta Cohn: 1901 (Cestoda, Cyclophyllidea) and its variation in North American Recurvirostridae (Aves)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Davainea minuta Cohn, 1901, widely distributed and found in a number of Charadriiformes is reviewed and its synonymy with D. himantopodis Johnston, 1911 sustained. Himantaurus minuta (Cohn) Spasskaya et Spasskii 1971, is considered a synonym since shed, gravid proglottides continue to grow with subsequent breakdown of uterus and formation of egg-capsules. D. minuta is recorded for the first time from

D. R. R. Burt; M. D. B. Burt

1984-01-01

362

Morphological variation in the Cinnamon Tanager Schistochlamys ruficapillus Aves: Thraupidae).  

PubMed

The Cinnamon Tanager Schistochlamys ruficapillus inhabits semi-open grassy country, primarily in Brazil south of Amazonia. Three subspecies are currently recognized, one of which, S. r. sicki, is poorly known and endemic to the central Brazilian savannas (Cerrado). This paper analyses individual and geographic variation in this species on the basis of body measurements and plumage coloration. Larger birds are usually found farther south and at higher elevations, while smaller birds are found farther north and at lower elevations, as predicted by Bergmann's rule. Nevertheless, some unexpectedly small individuals (referable to S. r. sicki) can be found in central Brazil. Individual and geographical variation in plumage coloration is substantial, but it is not closely tied to variation in body size. Therefore, given the large number of specimens intermediate between the three subspecies, we propose to consider the Cinnamon Tanager a monotypic but highly variable species. The recognition of three subspecies by previous taxonomists was due to small sample sizes associated with large gaps in sampling.  PMID:25544233

Lopes, Leonardo Esteves; Gonzaga, Luiz Pedreira

2014-01-01

363

Tissue specific isozyme expression in three species of icterinae (Aves: Emberizidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tissue specific banding patterns were examined for ten enzyme systems in three species of the subfamily Icterinae, family Emberizidae — Quiscalus quiscula, Agelaius phoeniceus and Molothrus ater. Ten tissues were compared. Generally, tissue specific patterns observed were remarkedly similar as compared to other taxa, across the three species over all enzyme systems examined, indicating low levels of divergence in regulatory

S. C. Lougheed; T. A. Drysdale

1986-01-01

364

Albert E. Giorgi Don Chapman Consultants, Inc.. 7981 J68th Ave. NE  

E-print Network

-type chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, in John Day Reservoir on the Columbia River Both stream-type and ocean-type chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, are found in the Co- lumbia River system. Ocean

365

Phylogeography of the Alcippe morrisonia (Aves: Timaliidae): long population history beyond late Pleistocene glaciations  

PubMed Central

Background The role of Pleistocene glacial oscillations in current biodiversity and distribution patterns varies with latitude, physical topology and population life history and has long been a topic of discussion. However, there had been little phylogeographical research in south China, where the geophysical complexity is associated with great biodiversity. A bird endemic in Southeast Asia, the Grey-cheeked Fulvetta, Alcippe morrisonia, has been reported to show deep genetic divergences among its seven subspecies. In the present study, we investigated the phylogeography of A. morrisonia to explore its population structure and evolutionary history, in order to gain insight into the effect of geological events on the speciation and diversity of birds endemic in south China. Results Mitochondrial genes cytochrome b (Cytb) and cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) were represented by 1236 nucleotide sites from 151 individuals from 29 localities. Phylogenetic analysis showed seven monophyletic clades congruent with the geographically separated groups, which were identified as major sources of molecular variance (90.92%) by AMOVA. TCS analysis revealed four disconnected networks, and that no haplotype was shared among the geographical groups. The common ancestor of these populations was dated to 11.6 Mya and several divergence events were estimated along the population evolutionary history. Isolation by distance was inferred by NCPA to be responsible for the current intra-population genetic pattern and gene flow among geographical groups was interrupted. A late Pleistocene demographic expansion was detected in the eastern geographical groups, while the expansion time (0.2–0.4 Mya) was earlier than the Last Glacial Maximum. Conclusion It is proposed that the complicated topology preserves high genetic diversity and ancient lineages for geographical groups of A. morrisonia in China mainland and its two major islands, and restricts gene exchange during climate oscillations. Isolation by distance seems to be an important factor of genetic structure formation within geographical populations. Although glacial influence to population fluctuation was observed in late Pleistocene, it seems that populations in eastern China were more susceptible to climate change, and all geographical groups were growing stably through the Last Glacial Maximum. Coalescence analysis suggested that the ancestor of A. morrisonia might be traced back to the late Miocene, and the current phylogeographical structure of A. morrisonia is more likely to be attributable to a series geological events than to Pleistocene glacial cycles. PMID:19558699

Song, Gang; Qu, Yanhua; Yin, Zuohua; Li, Shouhsien; Liu, Naifa; Lei, Fumin

2009-01-01

366

Waves of genomic hitchhikers shed light on the evolution of gamebirds (Aves: Galliformes)  

PubMed Central

Background The phylogenetic tree of Galliformes (gamebirds, including megapodes, currassows, guinea fowl, New and Old World quails, chicken, pheasants, grouse, and turkeys) has been considerably remodeled over the last decades as new data and analytical methods became available. Analyzing presence/absence patterns of retroposed elements avoids the problems of homoplastic characters inherent in other methodologies. In gamebirds, chicken repeats 1 (CR1) are the most prevalent retroposed elements, but little is known about the activity of their various subtypes over time. Ascertaining the fixation patterns of CR1 elements would help unravel the phylogeny of gamebirds and other poorly resolved avian clades. Results We analyzed 1,978 nested CR1 elements and developed a multidimensional approach taking advantage of their transposition in transposition character (TinT) to characterize the fixation patterns of all 22 known chicken CR1 subtypes. The presence/absence patterns of those elements that were active at different periods of gamebird evolution provided evidence for a clade (Cracidae + (Numididae + (Odontophoridae + Phasianidae))) not including Megapodiidae; and for Rollulus as the sister taxon of the other analyzed Phasianidae. Genomic trace sequences of the turkey genome further demonstrated that the endangered African Congo Peafowl (Afropavo congensis) is the sister taxon of the Asian Peafowl (Pavo), rejecting other predominantly morphology-based groupings, and that phasianids are monophyletic, including the sister taxa Tetraoninae and Meleagridinae. Conclusion The TinT information concerning relative fixation times of CR1 subtypes enabled us to efficiently investigate gamebird phylogeny and to reconstruct an unambiguous tree topology. This method should provide a useful tool for investigations in other taxonomic groups as well. PMID:17925025

Kriegs, Jan Ole; Matzke, Andreas; Churakov, Gennady; Kuritzin, Andrej; Mayr, Gerald; Brosius, Jürgen; Schmitz, Jürgen

2007-01-01

367

The species of Saemundssonia (Insecta: Phthiraptera: Philopteridae) from skuas (Aves: Stercorariidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three species of Saemundssonia Timmermann, 1936 parasitic on skuas are recognised as valid: Saemundssonia (Saemundssonia) cephalus (Denny, 1842) on Stercorarius parasiticus; S. (S.)inexspectata Timmermann, 1951 on Stercorarius longicaudus; and S. (S.)euryrhyncha (Giebel, 1874) on Stercorarius pomarinus as well as on all species of Catharacta. The name Saemundssonia stresemanni Timmermann, 1949 is proposed as a junior synonym of S. (S.)euryrhyncha. Measurements

Ricardo L. Palma

2000-01-01

368

First record of an hypopus (Acari: Hypoderatidae) from a jaeger (Aves: Charadriiformes: Stercorariidae).  

PubMed

Thalassornectes (Alcidectes) aukletae, originally described from two species of auklets (Charadriiformes: Alcidae) from maritime eastern Russia, is reported from a third species of pelagic charadriiform (Stercorariidae), the pomarine jaeger, Stercorarius pomarinus (Temminck), from Florida. The specimens from the jaeger are slightly smaller, the genital apodeme is more heavily sclerotized, paired setae gm are twice as long and there are other minor variations in the idiosomal and leg chaetotaxy. These differences are not considered sufficient to warrant taxonomic separation at the species or subspecies level from the nominate species T. (A.) aukletae. The same hypopus occurring across different families of birds is unusual in the Hypoderatidae. The diversity in hosts from several orders of birds, low intensities of infection in the two species from Africa, low prevalences in alcids from Russia, and rarity of these hypoderatids in all surveyed hosts leads us to speculate that the true host affinities of species in the genus Thalassornectes are unknown. The alternative consideration is that these are simply uncommon species that are very host specific. PMID:7616535

Pence, D B; Cole, R A

1995-05-01

369

Molecular markers for population genetic analyses in the family Psittacidae (Psittaciformes, Aves)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The selection of molecular markers for population studies is an important tool for biodiversity conservation. The fam- ily Psittacidae contains many endangered and vulnerable species and we tested three kinds of molecular markers for their potential use in population studies of five psitacid species: 43 hyacinth macaws (Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus), 42 blue-and-yellow macaws (Ara ararauna), 23 red-and-green macaws (Ara chloroptera), 19

Patrícia J. Faria; Cristina Y. Miyaki

2006-01-01

370

Feather mites (Acari, Astigmata) from Azorean passerines (Aves, Passeriformes): lower species richness compared to European mainland  

PubMed Central

Ten passerine species were examined on three islands of the Azores (North Atlantic) during 2013 and 2014 in order to identify their feather mite assemblages. We recorded 19 feather mite species belonging to four families of the superfamily Analgoidea (Analgidae, Proctophyllodidae, Psoroptoididae and Trouessartiidae). A high prevalence of feather mite species was recorded on the majority of the examined host species. Only three passerine species (Sylvia atricapilla, Regulus regulus and Serinus canaria) presented the same full complex of mite species as commonly occurs in the plumage of their closest relatives in continental Europe. Passer domesticus presented the same limited fauna of feather mites living in the plumage as do its co-specifics in continental Europe. Carduelis carduelis bears the same feather mite species as do most of its continental populations in Europe, but it lacks one mite species occurring on this host in Egypt. Turdus merula, Pyrrhula murina and Fringilla coelebs are missing several mite species common to their continental relatives. This diminution could be explained by the founder effect, whereby a limited number of colonizing individuals did not transport the full set of feather mite species, or by the extinction of some mite species after initially having reached the Azores. The only individual of Motacilla cinerea sampled in this study presented a new host record for the mite species Trouessartia jedliczkai. PMID:25665827

Rodrigues, Pedro; Mironov, Sergey; Sychra, Oldrich; Resendes, Roberto; Literak, Ivan

2015-01-01

371

NATURAL AND INDUCED MAGNETIZATION IN THE BOBOLINK, DOLICHONYX ORYZIVORUS (AVES: ICTERIDAE)  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY The magnetic characteristics of the heads from 28 bobolinks (Icteridae: Dolichonyx oryzivorus (L.)) were analysed using remanence magnetometers. The natural remanent magnetization of 12 freshly preserved heads averaged 3-20xl0~ 7

ROBERT C. BEASON; WILLIAM J. BRENNAN

372

Niche divergence promotes rapid diversification of East African sky island white-eyes (Aves: Zosteropidae)  

PubMed Central

The Eastern Afromontane biodiversity hotspot composed of highly fragmented forested highlands (sky islands) harbours exceptional diversity and endemicity, particularly within birds. To explain their elevated diversity within this region, models founded on niche conservatism have been offered, although detailed phylogeographic studies are limited to a few avian lineages. Here, we focus on the recent songbird genus Zosterops, represented by montane and lowland members, to test the roles of niche conservatism versus niche divergence in the diversification and colonization of East Africa's sky islands. The species-rich white-eyes are a typically homogeneous family with an exceptional colonizing ability, but in contrast to their diversity on oceanic islands, continental diversity is considered depauperate and has been largely neglected. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of ?140 taxa reveals extensive polyphyly among different montane populations of Z. poliogastrus. These larger endemic birds are shown to be more closely related to taxa with divergent habitat types, altitudinal distributions and dispersal abilities than they are to populations of restricted endemics that occur in neighbouring montane forest fragments. This repeated transition between lowland and highland habitats over time demonstrate that diversification of the focal group is explained by niche divergence. Our results also highlight an underestimation of diversity compared to morphological studies that has implications for their taxonomy and conservation. Molecular dating suggests that the spatially extensive African radiation arose exceptionally rapidly (1–2.5 Ma) during the fluctuating Plio-Pleistocene climate, which may have provided the primary driver for lineage diversification. PMID:24954273

Cox, Siobhan C; Prys-Jones, Robert P; Habel, Jan C; Amakobe, Bernard A; Day, Julia J

2014-01-01

373

A New Owl Species of the Genus Otus (Aves: Strigidae) from Lombok, Indonesia  

PubMed Central

The avifauna of Indonesia is one of the richest in the world but the taxonomic status of many species remains poorly documented. The sole species of scops owl known from Lombok has long been assigned to the widespread Moluccan Scops Owl Otus magicus on the basis of superficial similarities in morphology. Field work in 2003 has shown that the territorial song of the scops owls inhabiting the foothills of Gunung Rinjani differs dramatically from that of O. magicus and is more similar to those of Rufescent Scops Owl O. rufescens and Singapore Scops Owl O. cnephaeus. Detailed comparisons of sound recordings and museum specimens with those of other scops owls in Wallacea and the Indo-Malayan region have confirmed the distinctiveness of the Lombok population. We describe Otus jolandae as a new species, the Rinjani Scops Owl. It is locally common at elevations from 25–1350 m. and occurs within Gunung Rinjani National Park. The new species is known from seven specimens collected by Alfred Everett in 1896. Otus jolandae represents the first endemic bird species from Lombok. PMID:23418422

Sangster, George; King, Ben F.; Verbelen, Philippe; Trainor, Colin R.

2013-01-01

374

Understanding the decline and extinction of monarchs (Aves) in Polynesian Islands  

Microsoft Academic Search

Understanding the decline and extinction of species has become critical to conservation biology. The five monarch species of the genus Pomarea, endemic to the southeastern Pacific, are all listed as threatened. Introduced mammals and birds are believed to be responsible for their rarefaction. We analyzed the historical and current distribution of monarchs and introduced animals and found no relation between

Jean-Claude Thibault; Jean-Louis Martin; Aura Penloup; Jean-Yves Meyer

2002-01-01

375

Structure and Growth Pattern of Pseudoteeth in Pelagornis mauretanicus (Aves, Odontopterygiformes, Pelagornithidae)  

PubMed Central

The extinct Odontopterygiformes are the sole birds known to possess strong and sharp bony pseudoteeth, the shape and location of which are closely mimetic of real teeth. The structure of the pseudoteeth is investigated here in a late Pliocene/early Pleistocene species, Pelagornis mauretanicus, using X-ray microtomography and thin sections. The results are interpreted with regard to the pseudotooth mode of growth, and have implications concerning aspects of Pelagornis ecology. The larger pseudoteeth are hollow and approximately cone-shaped, and the smaller ones are rostro-caudally constricted. The walls of pseudoteeth are composed of bone tissue of the fibro-lamellar type, which is intensively remodeled by Haversian substitution. The jaw bones display the same structure as the pseudoteeth, but their vascular canals are oriented parallel to the long axis of the bones, whereas they are perpendicular to this direction in the pseudoteeth. There is no hiatus or evidence of a fusion between the pseudoteeth and the jaw bones. Two possible models for pseudotooth growth are derived from the histological data. The most plausible model is that pseudotooth growth began after the completion of jaw bone growth, as a simple local protraction of periosteal osteogenic activity. Pseudotooth development thus occurred relatively late during ontogeny. The highly vascularized structure and the relative abundance of parallel-fibered bone tissue in the pseudoteeth suggest poor mechanical capabilities. The pseudoteeth were most likely covered and protected by the hardened, keratinized rhamphotheca in the adult during life. The late development of the pseudoteeth would involve a similarly late and/or partial hardening of the rhamphotheca, as displayed by extant Anseriformes, Apterygiformes and some Charadriiformes. This would add support to the hypothesis of a close phylogenetic relationship between Odontopterygiformes and Anseriformes. The late maturation of the Pelagornis feeding apparatus, and hence the delayed capability for efficient prey catching, suggests that Pelagornis was altricial. PMID:24244680

Louchart, Antoine; Sire, Jean-Yves; Mourer-Chauviré, Cécile; Geraads, Denis; Viriot, Laurent; de Buffrénil, Vivian

2013-01-01

376

Multilocus phylogeny and biogeography of the New World Pheucticus grosbeaks (Aves: Cardinalidae).  

PubMed

Using a multilocus approach, we investigated the tempo and pattern of diversification in a widely distributed New World songbird, the cardinalid genus Pheucticus. Each of the three geographic groups recovered (North American, Middle American, and South American) was comprised of a pair of currently recognized species, and four, three, and three geographically and genetically distinct phylogeographic lineages respectively. Diversification within Pheucticus appears to have occurred at a relatively constant pace throughout the Pleistocene and evenly across a broad latitudinal distribution. The Isthmus of Panama completion and Pleistocene glacial cycles both appear to have played prominent roles in the diversification of this group. PMID:23769955

Pulgarín-R, Paulo C; Smith, Brian Tilston; Bryson, Robert W; Spellman, Garth M; Klicka, John

2013-12-01

377

Isolation-driven divergence: speciation in a widespread North American songbird (Aves: Certhiidae).  

PubMed

Lineage, or true 'species', trees may differ from gene trees because of stochastic processes in molecular evolution leading to gene-tree heterogeneity. Problems with inferring species trees because of excessive incomplete lineage sorting may be exacerbated in lineages with rapid diversification or recent divergences necessitating the use of multiple loci and individuals. Many recent multilocus studies that investigate divergence times identify lineage splitting to be more recent than single-locus studies, forcing the revision of biogeographic scenarios driving divergence. Here, we use 21 nuclear loci from regional populations to re-evaluate hypotheses identified in an mtDNA phylogeographic study of the Brown Creeper (Certhia americana), as well as identify processes driving divergence. Nuclear phylogeographic analyses identified hierarchical genetic structure, supporting a basal split at approximately 32°N latitude, splitting northern and southern populations, with mixed patterns of genealogical concordance and discordance between data sets within the major lineages. Coalescent-based analyses identify isolation, with little to no gene flow, as the primary driver of divergence between lineages. Recent isolation appears to have caused genetic bottlenecks in populations in the Sierra Madre Oriental and coastal mountain ranges of California, which may be targets for conservation concerns. PMID:21933295

Manthey, Joseph D; Klicka, John; Spellman, Garth M

2011-10-01

378

44 Teele Ave, Somerville, MA 02144 Global Development And Environment Institute  

E-print Network

their librarians to order pluralist or alternative books 2) Where change will/can take place: 2.a) From within science, etc. 2.c) Create parallel but "alternative" economics departments, e.g., Political Economy 3) Focus on people who will be teaching economics in future; grad students, beginning teachers 3.a) note

Dennett, Daniel

379

Waldorf Schools as Communities of Practice for AVE and Social Sustainability  

Microsoft Academic Search

Communities of practice are characterized by an ability to generate social or cultural capital, not necessarily through formal\\u000a educational provision but through informal learning, individual transformation, and cultural change arising from the collective\\u000a involvement of like-minded people in a process, association, organization, or event, often based in practice. The associated\\u000a theory of situated learning also suggests that for adults learning

Tom Stehlik

380

Characterization of 38 microsatellite loci in the European blackbird, Turdus merula (Turdidae, AVES).  

PubMed

We characterized 38 microsatellite loci in the European blackbird, Turdus merula. Thirty-seven loci were identified by testing 242 loci that had been originally isolated in other avian species. One additional locus was isolated from a European blackbird genomic library. All loci were characterized in 20-29 blackbirds from a population in the Czech Republic and displayed between two and 16 alleles, with observed heterozygosity ranging from 0.04 to 1.00. Thirty-seven loci could be assigned a chromosome location in the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) genome based on sequence homology. PMID:21564948

Simeoni, Michelle; Dawson, Deborah A; Gentle, Louise K; Coiffait, Lisette; Wolff, Kirsten; Evans, Karl L; Gaston, Kevin J; Hatchwell, Ben J

2009-11-01

381

A classification of the grouse (Aves: Tetraoninae) based on mitochondrial DNA sequences  

Microsoft Academic Search

We propose a new classification of the grouse that brings their taxonomy into agreement with our molecular phylogenetic studies. Our analyses provide, for the first time, a robust estimate of the evolutionary history of these birds. These analyses are based on aligned sequences of 3,809 basepairs of five complete mitochondrial genes. Our classification does not require novel genera and gen-

R. J. Gutiérrez; George F. Barrowclough; Jeffrey G. Groth

382

Out of Africa? Phylogenetic relationships between Falco biarmicus and the other hierofalcons (Aves: Falconidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The phylogeographic history of the lanner falcon (Falco biarmicus) and the phylogenetic relationships among hierofalcons (F. biarmicus, Falco cherrug, Falco jugger and Falco rusticolus) were investigated using mitochondrial (mt) DNA sequences. Of the two non-coding mt sections tested, the control region (CR) appeared more suitable as phylogenetic marker sequence compared with the pseudo control region (WCR). For the comprehensive analysis

F. Nittinger; E. Haring; W. Pinsker; M. Wink; A. Gamauf

2005-01-01

383

Genetic differentiation and phylogeography of gulls in the Larus cachinnans-fuscus group (Aves: Charadriiformes).  

PubMed

We studied mitochondrial genetic differentiation among nine taxa of large gulls of the Larus cachinnans-fuscus group, which form part of the circumpolar Herring Gull complex. Our primary interest was to see if there were unrecognized gene flow barriers, to what extent mitochondrial genetic population structure conformed to current taxonomic boundaries, and what it might reveal about possible differences in population history. Sequences (430 nucleotides) of the hypervariable control region I (HVR-I) were obtained from 580 individuals and proved highly informative within this recently diverged group of birds. Contrary to current classification, a basal split was revealed between an Atlantic-Mediterranean clade (atlantis, michahellis, armenicus) and a NW Palearctic-Central Asian clade (cachinnans, barabensis, mongolicus, fuscus-group). There was almost no mitochondrial gene flow between these two groups, although they are in geographical contact in two areas (eastern North Atlantic, Black Sea). Within each of the two major groups, there was strong phylogeographic structure with gene flow barriers between some neighbouring taxa (e.g. cachinanns vs. barabensis), but also a case of poor genetic differentiation between phenotypically distinct forms (barabensis vs. heuglini). At the subspecies level, current taxonomy corresponded well to molecular genetic structure: over 80% of the molecular genetic variance was partitioned among six (groups of) taxa. This is in sharp contrast to previous studies using allozymes and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers, which seemed to indicate extensive nuclear gene flow. Within-taxon haplotype phylogenies and mismatch distributions revealed contrasting demographic histories: cachinnans (Ponto-Caspian region) and atlantis (NE Atlantic) represent ancient lineages with large long-term population sizes, inland forms stem from very recent colonization events (barabensis, mongolicus) or passed through a population bottleneck (armenicus). PMID:11742547

Liebers, D; Helbig, A J; de Knijff, P

2001-10-01

384

Genetic differentiation and phylogeography of gulls in the Larus cachinnans—fuscus group (Aves: Charadriiformes)  

Microsoft Academic Search

We studied mitochondrial genetic differentiation among nine taxa of large gulls of the Larus cachinnans—fuscus group, which form part of the circumpolar Herring Gull complex. Our primary interest was to see if there were unrecognized gene flow barriers, to what extent mitochondrial genetic population structure conformed to current taxonomic boundaries, and what it might reveal about possible differences in population

D. LIEBERS; A. J. HELBIG; P. DE KNIJFF

2001-01-01

385

LAS AVES DE LAS ISLAS LOBOS DE AFUERA (PERÚ) EN LA PRIMAVERA DE 2004  

Microsoft Academic Search

Birds of the Lobos de Afuera islands (Peru) in spring of 2004. - In November 2004, the birds of the Lobos de Afuera islands (06°55'S, 80°42'W), 93 km off the northern coast of Peru were studied. Additional observations were made in September 2003 and August 2005. A total of seventeen species and eleven families were identified. Eight species were breeding:

Judith Figueroa; Marcelo Stucchi

386

Trois Nadejdolepis Spasskii & Spasskaya, 1954 (Cestoda: Hymenolepididae) parasites de Charadrii (Aves) du Bélize  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three Nadejdolepis from Belize, Central America, represent new geographical records (1) Nadejdolepis paranitidulans (Golikova, 1959) (rostellar hooks 40-44 m long) from Charadrius alexandrinus; (2) N. arenariae (Cabot, 1969) n. comb. (rostellar hooks 89 m long) from Arenaria interpres; and (3) N. litoralis (Webster, 1947) (rostellar hooks 81–85 m long) from Calidris fuscicollis (new host record). Additional descriptions, illustrations and information pertaining to these

Stéphane Deblock; Albert G. Canaris

2000-01-01

387

[Three Nadejdolepis Spasskii & Spasskaya, 1954 (Cestoda: Hymenolepididae) parasites of Charadrii (Aves) of Belize].  

PubMed

Three Nadejdolepis from Belize, Central America, represent new geographical records (1) Nadejdolepis paranitidulans (Golikova, 1959) (rostellar hooks 40-44 microm long) from Charadrius alexandrinus; (2) N. arenariae (Cabot, 1969) n. comb. (rostellar hooks 89 microm long) from Arenaria interpres; and (3) N. litoralis (Webster, 1947) (rostellar hooks 81-85 microm long) from Calidris fuscicollis (new host record). Additional descriptions, illustrations and information pertaining to these species are included. In addition, N. saguei Rysavy. 1967 is considered a synonym of N. litoralis (Webster, 1947). N. morenoi Rysavy, 1967 (rostral hooks 80 microm long) needs to be redescribed to confirm its validity. Two species of Nadejdolepis are transferred to the genus Microsomacanthus Lopez-Neyra, 1942 because their rostellar hooks are more diorchoid than nitiduloid, becoming M. cambrensis (Davies, 1939) comb. and M. alaskensis (Deblock & Rausch, 1967) n. comb. PMID:11071154

Deblock, S; Canaris, A G

2000-11-01

388

Chewing lice (Phthiraptera) from Calidris fuscicollis (Aves: Scolopacidae) in Southern Brazil.  

PubMed

During April and September from 2010 to 2012, 80 birds of the species Calidris fuscicollis (white-rumped sandpiper) were collected for parasitological studies in the southern coast of Rio Grande do Sul, under ICMBIO license No. 26234-1. For ectoparasite collection, the birds were first submerged in water with detergent. The parasites found were fixed in 70% alcohol, cleared in 10% potassium hydroxide and mounted in Canada balsam. Of 80 birds examined, 79% were parasitized. Actornithophilus umbrinus (47.5%), Actornithophilus lacustris (37.5%), Actornithophilus spp. (13.75%), Carduiceps zonarius (26.25%), Lunaceps incoenis (27.5%), and Lunaceps spp. (16.25%) were the species found with their respective prevalence. We record for the first time parasitism by chewing lice in Calidris fuscicollis. PMID:24742904

Gomes, Sâmara Nunes; Pesenti, Tatiana Cheuiche; Cirne, Maximiano Pinheiro; Müller, Gertrud

2014-08-01

389

Evidence for heterochrony in the evolution of the goshawk Accipiter gentilis (Accipitridae, Aves)  

Microsoft Academic Search

An analysis of the growth patterns of two close relatives of the genus Accipiter (the European sparrowhawk A. nisus and the European goshawk A. gentilis) was conducted, in order to elucidate a possible mechanism for the evolution of the ontogeny of the goshawk from that of its presumed smaller ancestor. After allowing for isometric scaling, the ontogeny of the goshawk

Jorge Cubo; Santiago Mañosa

1999-01-01

390

A molecular phylogeny of New Zealand's Petroica (Aves: Petroicidae) species based on mitochondrial DNA sequences.  

PubMed

The New Zealand robin (Petroica australis), tomtit (P. macrocephala), and Chatham Island black robin (P. traversi) are members of the Petroicidae family of Australo-Papuan robins, found throughout Australasia and the western Pacific. In the nearly 200 years since the New Zealand members of Petroicidae were first described, the division of species, subspecies, and even genera has undergone many changes. In this study, we investigate whether molecular phylogenies based on mitochondrial DNA sequences support current taxonomic classifications based on morphology. Petroica traversi, P. australis, and P. macrocephala form distinct clades in phylogenetic trees constructed from Cytochrome b and control region sequences, however the position of the black robin is at odds with the morphological and behavioral data. The black robin does not appear to be a derivative of the New Zealand robin, instead it groups strongly with the tomtit, indicating that lineage sorting and/or introgressive hybridization may have occurred. There is some evidence to support the hypothesis that two invasions of Petroica from Australia have occurred, however additional data from Australian Petroica taxa are required to confirm this. Control region sequences confirm a deep split between the North and South Island P. australis lineages, but suggest a recent radiation of P. macrocephala. PMID:16750641

Miller, Hilary C; Lambert, David M

2006-09-01

391

Rampant polyphyly indicates cryptic diversity in a clade of Neotropical flycatchers (Aves: Tyrannidae)  

E-print Network

species diversity masked by erroneous taxonomic treatments that are frequently based on morphological data to a doubling of Zimmerius species-level diversity compared to taxonomic treatments conducted before 2001 Society, 2013, 108, 889­900 889 #12;in mistletoe feeding. Rheindt et al. (2008a) presented a phylogeny

Cuervo, Andrés

392

Taxonomic revision and phylogenetic analysis of the flightless Mancallinae (Aves, Pan-Alcidae)  

PubMed Central

Abstract Although flightless alcids from the Miocene and Pliocene of the eastern Pacific Ocean have been known for over 100 years, there is no detailed evaluation of diversity and systematic placement of these taxa. This is the first combined analysis of morphological and molecular data to include all extant alcids, the recently extinct Great Auk Pinguinus impennis, the mancalline auks, and a large outgroup sampling of 29 additional non-alcid charadriiforms. Based on the systematic placement of Mancallinae outside of crown clade Alcidae, the clade name Pan-Alcidae is proposed to include all known alcids. An extensive review of the Mancallinae fossil record resulted in taxonomic revision of the clade, and identification of three new species. In addition to positing the first hypothesis of inter-relationships between Mancallinae species, phylogenetic results support placement of Mancallinae as the sister taxon to all other Alcidae, indicating that flightlessness evolved at least twice in the alcid lineage. Convergent osteological characteristics of Mancallinae, the flightless Great Auk, and Spheniscidae are summarized, and implications of Mancallinae diversity, radiation, and extinction in the context of paleoclimatic changes are discussed. PMID:21594108

Smith, Neil Adam

2011-01-01

393

Helminth parasites of the European starling (Sturnus vulgaris) (Aves, Sturnidae), an invasive bird in Argentina.  

PubMed

The aim of this work is to contribute to the knowledge of gastrointestinal parasites of the European starling Sturnus vulgaris, an invasive bird from Argentina. Seventy-six birds were collected during the spring of 2007 and were examined for helminths. Six parasite species were found: one trematoda of the Echinostoma revolutum "group," four nematodes (Synhimantus nasuta, Microtetrameres sp., Pterothominx exilis, and Ornithocapillaria ovopunctata), and one acanthocephalan (Plagiorhynchus cylindraceus). All species found have been recorded in Eurasia and/or North America previously, although present reports enlarge their geographical distribution. As expected in an invasive host, the parasite community shows much lower species richness (n?=?6) than those observed in their native area (79 and 35 in the Eurasia and North America, respectively). PMID:24804922

Valente, Romina; Ibañez, Lucía Mariel; Lorenti, Eliana; Fiorini, Vanina Dafne; Montalti, Diego; Diaz, Julia Inés

2014-07-01

394

Phylogenetic relationships of the mockingbirds and thrashers (Aves: Mimidae) Irby J. Lovette a,  

E-print Network

. Louis, 8001 Natural Bridge Rd., St. Louis, MO 63121, USA h Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute have some of the most extensive song repertoires known in all birds (e.g., Kroodsma and Parker, 1977

Rubenstein, Dustin R.

395

2 Phylogenetic relationships of the mockingbirds and thrashers (Aves: Mimidae) 3 Irby J. Lovette a,  

E-print Network

of Biology, University of Missouri at St. Louis, 8001 Natural Bridge Rd., St. Louis, MO 63121, USA 13 h song repertoires known in all birds 61 (e.g., Kroodsma and Parker, 1977; Derrickson, 1987; Read and 62

Botero, Carlos A.

396

Evolution of the melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) in Boobies and Gannets (Aves, Suliformes).  

PubMed

The melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) has been linked to intraspecific variation of melanin-based plumage color in several unrelated bird species. However, its involvement in interspecific variation has far less evidence. The Sulidae is a family in the Suliformes composed of 10 species of pelagic seabirds, distributed in 3 genera. There is significant variation in the amount and distribution of melanin pigments among species in the family Sulidae, and 2 species, the brown booby (Sula leucogaster) and the red-footed booby (S. sula), present plumage polymorphisms, with the latter being considered one of the most plumage polymorphic birds. We performed a survey of the MC1R evolution in 68 individuals representing all 9 species in the Sulidae, except the Abbott's booby, to determine the role played by this locus in explaining the melanic variation observed in the Sulidae. We found the amino acid substitution R112H to be in full concordance with the plumage color observed in the brown booby, which shows a unique phaeomelanin-dominant coloration. Furthermore, all amino acid residues known to be important for function at the MC1R were completely conserved in the Sulidae, except for the previously described V85M and H207R substitutions among the 2 red-footed booby's color morphs. A total of 14 substitutions were inferred from estimated ancestral nodes throughout the Sulidae phylogeny. Finally, we found evidence that the MC1R is under strong purifying selection in all Sulid species. This study provides additional evidence of the potential involvement of the MC1R in melanin-based plumage variation at the interspecific level. PMID:22351934

Baião, Patricia C; Parker, Patricia G

2012-01-01

397

Funktionelle Eigenschaften der Hörbahn im Feld L des Neostriatum caudale des Staren ( Sturnus vulgaris L., Aves)  

Microsoft Academic Search

1.Unit responses to and potentials evoked by acoustic stimuli were recorded from the Neostriatum of curarized birds. Computer-aided analysis methods (averaging, peristimulus-time histogram, interval histogram) are specified.2.Characteristic values and characteristic curves for unit responses are examined and compared: characteristic intensity curves, tuning curves, characteristic frequencies, and the width of response areas or their separate segments.3.The shortest latency of all single

Hans-Joachim Leppelsack

1974-01-01

398

Phylogeny of the owlet-nightjars (Aves: Aegothelidae) based on mitochondrial DNA sequence  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The avian family Aegothelidae (Owlet-nightjars) comprises nine extant species and one extinct species, all of which are currently classified in a single genus, Aegotheles. Owlet-nightjars are secretive nocturnal birds of the South Pacific. They are relatively poorly studied and some species are known from only a few specimens. Furthermore, their confusing morphological variation has made it difficult to cluster existing specimens unambiguously into hierarchical taxonomic units. Here we sample all extant owlet-nightjar species and all but three currently recognized subspecies. We use DNA extracted primarily from museum specimens to obtain mitochondrial gene sequences and construct a molecular phylogeny. Our phylogeny suggests that most species are reciprocally monophyletic, however A. albertisi appears paraphyletic. Our data also suggest splitting A. bennettii into two species and splitting A. insignis and A. tatei as suggested in another recent paper. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

Dumbacher, J.P.; Pratt, T.K.; Fleischer, R.C.

2003-01-01

399

mAkING wAVES IN THE wOrlD  

E-print Network

on wave energy. He is in no doubt about why he was chosen. `Alan Wells was Head of School. He had his eye on me because while I was an undergraduate I also had my own powerboat-building business. Apart from instead of with oscillating water columns driving an air turbine. So we looked at doing away with all

Paxton, Anthony T.

400

Status, ecology, and conservation of the Himalayan griffon Gyps himalayensis (Aves, Accipitridae) in the Tibetan plateau.  

PubMed

The dramatic population crashes of 3 species of Gyps vulture have raised concerns about the status of their lesser-known congeners. Among these is the Himalayan griffon, G. himalayensis, an iconic vulture of the Tibetan plateau. The continued existence of this scavenger has not only ecological but also cultural implications because of their unique role in the centuries-old sky burial tradition that is followed by nearly 5 million Tibetan people. A lack of baseline information of the Himalayan griffon limits our ability to take conservation measures. The presented data, which were collected during 1996 and 2004 to 2007, indicate that this species is still widespread throughout the plateau and has not experienced a major population decline, likely as a result of protection by Tibetan Buddhism and limited disturbances from human activities largely due to the remoteness of the plateau. Both site and road counts showed that open meadow habitats had the highest griffon abundance, followed by alpine shrub and forest habitats. Estimates based on road transect counts showed that 229,339 Himalayan griffons (+/- 40,447) occupy the 2.5 million km2 Tibetan plateau. In contrast, the maximum carrying capacity of the plateau, on the basis of the total biomass of potential food resources, is 507,996 griffons, with meadow habitats accounting for about 76% of the total population. Griffons depend largely on livestock carcasses for food and forage in groups averaging 5.5 (range 1-100) individuals. Domestic yaks provide about 64% of the griffons' diet, while wild ungulates and human corpses provide 1% and 2%, respectively. Compared with its lowland congeners, this, the only high-elevation Gyps species, had both low population density and small group size, a likely response to the harsh environmental conditions. Although griffon abundance appears relatively stable in their fairly pristine environment, precautionary measures, including investigation of threats, monitoring of population dynamics, and establishment of modern conservation consciousness among Tibetan Buddhists, should be carried out to ensure that this abundance continues. PMID:19580034

Lu, Xin; Ke, Dianhua; Zeng, Xianhai; Gong, Guohong; Ci, Ren

2009-05-01

401

Speciational history of North American Haemorhous finches (Aves: Fringillidae) inferred from multilocus data.  

PubMed

We investigated species relationships and timing of speciation in North American Haemorhous finches by using a mitochondrial phylogeographic approach combined with a multilocus species tree reconstruction. Haemorhous purpureus and H. cassinii were strongly supported as sister taxa, and H. mexicanus was sister to H. purpureus+H. cassinii. Our divergence times indicated that diversification within Haemorhous occurred progressively from the Late Miocene into the Pleistocene. Our inferred pattern of speciation demonstrates the complexity of the origins of North American birds, and provides additional evidence that a single cause for speciation in closely related North American birds, such as Late Pleistocene glacial-interglacial cycles, is unlikely. PMID:23219607

Smith, Brian Tilston; Bryson, Robert W; Chua, Vivien; Africa, Lia; Klicka, John

2013-03-01

402

Tendencias poblacionales recientes y distribucin de aves estepricas en las Islas Canarias orientales.  

E-print Network

. · Por tanto, sería muy conveniente disponer de datos muy cercanos en el tiempo, y representativos de un;AMBIENTES MUESTREADOS formaciones con influencia humana #12;500 m METODO DE CENSO transectos line

Carrascal, Luis M.

403

XIAOYUN LIU 750 Whitney Ave. Apt B5, New Haven, CT 06511  

E-print Network

in progress) Indiana University, Department of Chemistry 2003-2008 Advisor: Prof. David E. Clemmer · Examined, Clemmer DE, Zhong G, Nelson DE. (2010) Identification of Chlamydia trachomatis outer membrane proteins by differential proteomics. J. Bacteriol., 192, 2852-2860. 7. Liu X, Miller BR, Rebec GV, Clemmer DE. (2007

Clemmer, David E.

404

Redescription of Alcedinectes alcyon (Acari:Hypoderatidae) from the belted kingfisher (Aves:Coraciiformes; Alcedinidae).  

PubMed

Alcedinectes alcyon (Boyd) is redescribed based on specimens collected from its belted kingfisher, Megaceryle alcyon (L.), type host in Florida. This species differs from A. cerylei Fain by the chaetotaxy of tarsus III. A. alcyon has a long stout apical seta that tapers to a curved tip resembling that seen on tarsus III of the genus Tytodectes (Ispidectes) Fain. The equivalent seta in A. cerylei is a stout spine. There are other minor differences between these species in the pattern of idiosomal sclerotization and leg chaetotaxy. The chaetotaxy and solenidiotaxy of legs I and II in Alcedinectes closely resemble that of Amazonectes psittaci Fain & Vercammen-Grandjean from parrots (Psittaciformes), whereas the morphology and chaetotaxy of the idiosoma resemble that of Tytonectes (Ispidectes) spp. which also occurs in kingfishers (Coraciiformes). The long stout seta that tapers to a curved tip on tarsus III in A. alcyon also links the genus Alcedinectes with Tytodectes (Ispidectes). PMID:8840683

Pence, D B; Gray, P N

1996-09-01

405

A molecular phylogeny of kingfishers (Aves: Alcedinidae) with insights into early biogeographic history  

E-print Network

DOT6181 AMNH Bolivia C. amazona Amazon Kingfi sher DOT2317 AMNH Bolivia Megaceryle (Ceryle) maxima Giant Kingfi sher 396319 FMNH Gabon M. (C.) torquata Ringed Kingfi sher DOT8781 AMNH Venezuela M. (C.) alcyon Belted Kingfi sher DOT10476 AMNH California... with the limitations imposed by incom- plete taxon sampling, the current data clearly support or refute several proposed generic allocations. Inclusion of the New World species alcyon and torquatus within Megaceryle (Woodall 2001, Dickinson 2003), rather than...

Moyle, Robert G.

2006-04-01

406

An improved phylogeny of the Andean tit-tyrants (Aves, Tyrannidae): more characters trump sophisticated analyses.  

PubMed

The phylogeny of the flycatcher genus Anairetes was previously inferred using short fragments of mitochondrial DNA and parsimony and distance-based methods. The resulting topology spurred taxonomic revision and influenced understanding of Andean biogeography. More than a decade later, we revisit the phylogeny of Anairetes tit-tyrants using more mtDNA characters, seven unlinked loci (three mitochondrial genes, six nuclear loci), more closely related outgroup taxa, partitioned Bayesian analyses, and two coalescent species-tree approaches (Bayesian estimation of species trees, BEST; Bayesian evolutionary analysis by sampling trees, (*)BEAST). Of these improvements in data and analyses, the fourfold increase in mtDNA characters was both necessary and sufficient to incur a major shift in the topology and near-complete resolution. The species-tree analyses, while theoretically preferable to concatenation or single gene approaches, yielded topologies that were compatible with mtDNA but with weaker statistical resolution at nodes. The previous results that had led to taxonomic and biogeographic reappraisal were refuted, and the current results support the resurrection of the genus Uromyias as the sister clade to Anairetes. The sister relationship between these two genera corresponds to an ecological dichotomy between a depauperate humid cloud forest clade and a diverse dry-tolerant clade that has diversified along the latitudinal axis of the Andes. The species-tree results and the concatenation results each reaffirm the primacy of mtDNA to provide phylogenetic signal for avian phylogenies at the species and subspecies level. This is due in part to the abundance of informative characters in mtDNA, and in part to its lower effective population size that causes it to more faithfully track the species tree. PMID:22525942

Dubay, Shane G; Witt, Christopher C

2012-08-01

407

Geographical, seasonal, and sex dynamics of Shipleya inermis (Cestoidea: Dioecocestidae) in Limnodromus griseus Gmelin (Aves: Charadriiformes).  

PubMed

We recovered the cestode Shipleya inermis from 79 of 82 short-billed dowitchers, Limnodromus griseus Gmelin, collected at various locations and times along their migratory route. Previous studies that examined various aspects of the cestode's biology were limited to North America. Data collected from North and South America in the present study provide new information on the geographical and seasonal distribution of this cestode. Although prevalence of infection was high at all times of the year, mean abundance varied from season to season and was significantly higher during the winter months than in the summer, suggesting that most recruitment takes place on the wintering grounds. Sexually mature and gravid cestodes were recovered at all locations, indicating S. inermis is a ubiquitous parasite within the host's range. Shipleya inermis showed a marked tendency to occur in pairs of male and female strobila. Analysis of the patterns of occurrence suggests that S. inermis is a protogynous hermaphrodite that usually becomes regionally dioecious, possibly in response to some form of interaction between individuals. PMID:9794633

Didyk, A S; Burt, M D

1998-10-01

408

Himasthla limnodromi n. sp. (Digenea: Echinostomatidae) from the short-billed dowitcher, Limnodromus griseus (Aves: Scolopacidae).  

PubMed

Himasthla limnodromi n. sp. is described from short-billed dowitchers, Limnodromus griseus, from the Araya Peninsula, Venezuela, and Delaware Bay, U.S.A. Himasthla limnodromi was not found in dowitchers on the breeding grounds or on the fall staging grounds in the Bay of Fundy but reappeared in dowitchers on the wintering grounds in the fall. This suggests that H. limnodromi is acquired by the birds on arrival on the wintering grounds and then gradually disappears during the birds' northward migration in the spring. The new species has a reniform collar armed with 31 spines, with 23 in a single uninterrupted row, and 4 corner spines in overlapping pairs at each end. The cirrus sac is up to 10 times longer than the length of the acetabulum and contains a long, smooth cirrus. The vitellaria always commence posterior to the posterior end of the cirrus sac in mature specimens. The testes are found in the posterior eighth of the long, filamentous body. Himasthla limnodromi n. sp. most closely resembles Himasthla alincia, but H. limnodromi is larger in size and has an unspined cirrus and smaller eggs. PMID:9406790

Didyk, A S; Burt, M D

1997-12-01

409

Spring migratory birds (Aves) extend the northern occurrence of blacklegged tick (Acari:Ixodidae).  

PubMed

Birds that had migrated northward across Lake Superior were captured upon reaching landfall at Thunder Cape (48 degrees 18' N, 88 degrees 56' W) at the southwestern tip of the Sibley Peninsula, northwestern Ontario, from 9 May to 9 June 1995. Twenty-one of 530 birds examined (6 of 55 species) had a total of 34 ticks; 1 blue jay, Cyanocitta cristata, had a northern fowl mite, Ornithonyssus sylviarum (Canestrini & Fanzago). Four blacklegged tick, Ixodes scapularis Say, larvae were found on an American robin, Turdus migratorius, and 2 on a chipping sparrow, Spizella passerina. This tick was not found on small mammals at Thunder Cape. Twenty-six larvae and a nymph of the rabbit tick, Haemaphysalis leporispalustris (Packard) were found on 1 American robin, 2 Swainson's thrushes, Catharus ustulatus, 1 white-throated sparrow, Zonotrichia albicollis, 1 common yellowthroat, Geothlypis trichas, 1 blue jay, and 12 chipping sparrows. A nymph of H. chordeilis (Packard) occurred on 1 chipping sparrow. Results demonstrate that northward migrating birds transport larvae of I. scapularis to areas of Ontario where the tick does not appear to have become established in small mammal populations. Spring migrants may be more involved in the dispersal of I. scapularis larvae than previously thought. Cooler temperatures and shorter seasons experienced in the more northerly, continental parts of the established distribution of this tick may extend the life cycle, resulting in a predominance of larvae rather than nymphs being acquired by northward-bound birds in early spring. Consequently, the role of spring migrating birds in the northward spread of I. scapularis and of borreliosis should be reevaluated. PMID:8699451

Klich, M; Lankester, M W; Wu, K W

1996-07-01

410

Morphology of the antebrachial musculature of the American kestrel, Falco sparverius (Aves)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The antebrachial musculature of the American kestrel (Falco sparverius) is described. This fills a gap in the avian morphology literature, and provides a reference for future comparative, functional and systematic studies. A table of synonyms-homologs is provided for each muscle as a reference frame for over 100 years of avian anatomical literature.

Ron A. Meyers

1996-01-01

411

The 25-MB sounding data and synoptic charts for NASA's AVE 2 pilot experiment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Rawinsonde data were tabulated at 25-mb intervals from the surface to 25 mb for the 54 stations participating in the atmospheric variability experiment 2 Pilot Experiment which began at 12 Greenwich mean time on May 11 and ended at 12 Greenwich mean time on May 12, 1974. Soundings were made at 3 hour intervals. Methods of processing and data accuracy are discussed, and synoptic charts prepared from the data are presented. The area covered by the sounding stations is the eastern United States east of approximately 105 deg west longitude.

Scoggins, J. R.; Turner, R. E.

1975-01-01

412

Differences between measured and linearly interpolated synoptic variables over a 12-h period during AVE 4  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Results of analyses revealed that nonlinear changes or differences formed centers or systems, that were mesosynoptic in nature. These systems correlated well in space with upper level short waves, frontal zones, and radar observed convection, and were very systematic in time and space. Many of the centers of differences were well established in the vertical, extending up to the tropopause. Statistical analysis showed that on the average nonlinear changes were larger in convective areas than nonconvective regions. Errors often exceeding 100 percent were made by assuming variables to change linearly through a 12-h period in areas of thunderstorms, indicating that these nonlinear changes are important in the development of severe weather. Linear changes, however, accounted for more and more of an observed change as the time interval (within the 12-h interpolation period) increased, implying that the accuracy of linear interpolation increased over larger time intervals.

Dupuis, L. R.; Scoggins, J. R.

1979-01-01

413

James B. Bushnell University of California Energy Institute 111 Dale Ave.  

E-print Network

- Associate Editor, Utilities Policy, 1998-2001. Referee for: American Economic Review, Annals of Operations & Energy Economics, Review of Economics and Statistics, Review of Industrial Organization Legislative

Kammen, Daniel M.

414

AVES: A high performance computer cluster array for the INTEGRAL satellite scientific data analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper we describe a new computing system array, designed, built and now used at the Space Astrophysics and Planetary Institute (IAPS) in Rome, Italy, for the INTEGRAL Space Observatory scientific data analysis. This new system has become necessary in order to reduce the processing time of the INTEGRAL data accumulated during the more than 9 years of in-orbit operation. In order to fulfill the scientific data analysis requirements with a moderately limited investment the starting approach has been to use a `cluster' array of commercial quad-CPU computers, featuring the extremely large scientific and calibration data archive on line.

Federici, Memmo; Martino, Bruno Luigi; Ubertini, Pietro

2012-07-01

415

Cadmium and lead in common terns (Aves: Sterna hirundo): Relationship between levels in parents and eggs.  

PubMed

We analyzed cadmium and lead levels in feathers of mated pairs of common terns (Sterna hirundo) and in their eggs to determine if metal levels in eggs correlated with female levels, and whether there were intrapair and intermetal correlations. Eggs had significantly lower lead levels (89 ng g(-1)) and cadmium levels (4.0 ng g(-1)) than adult feathers (500 and 50 ng g(-1) respectively). Adult females had higher metal levels than males. Cadmium and lead levels were correlated across families for females, males and eggs. Lead, but not cadmium, levels were correlated in females and their eggs. PMID:24241937

Burger, J; Gochfeld, M

1991-03-01

416

BIBLIOGRAFÍA COMENTADA SOBRE LOS ANÁLISIS DE EGAGRÓPILAS DE AVES RAPACES EN ARGENTINA  

Microsoft Academic Search

s. - Annotated bibliography on raptor pellets analyses in Argentina. - We compiled an annotated bibliography on raptor pellets analyses in Argentina. It includes, from 1961 to 2000, 142 papers, 9 theses, and 48 published abstracts concerning 13 raptor species, with comments on methodology, natural history, and main points of interest. Tyto alba was the main source for Argentinean analyses,

Ulyses F. J. Pardiñas; Sebastián Cirignoli

417

Mitochondrial phylogeography, subspecific taxonomy, and conservation genetics of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis; Aves: Gruidae)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Six subspecies of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) have been denoted based on perceived morphological and/or breeding locality differences among them. Three subspecies are migratory, breeding from the high arctic in North America and Siberia (lesser sandhill, G. c. canadensis), south through central Canada (Canadian sandhill, G. c. rowani) and into the northern United States (greater sandhill, G. c. tabida). A review of sandhill crane taxonomy indicates that the size variation, on the basis of which these subspecies were named, may be clinal and not diagnostic. The other three subspecies, all listed as endangered or threatened, are non-migratory, resident in Florida (G. c. pratensis), Mississippi (G. c. pulla), and Cuba (G. c. nesiotes). We used analysis of mitochondrial DNA control region (CR) sequences to determine whether haplotypes representing current subspecies show any genetic cohesion or are more consistent with a pattern of clinal variation in morphology. CR sequences indicate that only two highly divergent (5.3%) lineages of sandhill cranes occur in North America: one lineage composed only of arctic-nesting G. c. canadensis, the other of the remaining North American subspecies (we lack data on the Cuban population). The deep split between lineages is consistent with an estimated isolation of approximately 1.5 Mya (mid-Pleistocene), while the distribution of mutational changes within lineages is consistent with an hypothesis of rapid, post-Pleistocene population expansions. No other phylogeographic structuring is concordant with subspecific boundaries, however, analysis of molecular variance indicates that there is significant population genetic differentiation among all subspecies except G. c. tabida and G. c. rowani, which are indistinguishable. We suggest that recognition of the recently named G. c. rowani be abandoned.

Rhymer, J.M.; Fain, M.G.; Austin, J.E.; Johnson, D.H.; Krajewski, C.

2001-01-01

418

A Pelican Tarsometatarsus (Aves: Pelecanidae) from the Latest Pliocene Siwaliks of India  

PubMed Central

We report a new fossil specimen of a pelican from the Tatrot Formation of the Siwalik Hills, India. It likely represents Pelecanus sivalensis Davies, 1880, the smaller of the two previously published species from the Siwalik Group stratigraphic sequence. This complete tarsometatarsus is the first fossil bone of a pelican collected in India for over 100 years. It is from the latest Pliocene (?2.6 Ma), and is the youngest pelican fossil from the region. The new specimen exhibits a derived distoplantar ‘slant’ to the plantar margin of the medial crest of the hypotarsus, and a combination of features related to the morphology of the hypotarsus, the distal foramen, trochleae, and overall size that allow further differentiation from known tarsometatarsi of fossil and extant pelicans, including the three species of extant pelicans that occur in India (Pelecanus crispus, P. onocrotalus, and P. philippensis). It is of appropriate size for Pelecanus sivalensis, which to date has been known only by fragments of other skeletal elements of the wing, leg, and shoulder girdle. Thus, the observation that this tarsometatarsus is morphologically distinct from those of known pelicans provides further support for the distinctiveness of at least one extinct species of pelican from the Siwalik Group sediments. While the morphology of the tarsometatarsus allows for separation from other taxa known from tarsometatarsi, we found no clear shared derived states to place this taxon with any confidence in a phylogenetic context relative to any other pelican species, or even determine if it is part of the crown group of Pelecanidae. However, published molecular data are consistent with an origin of the crown clade prior to the Pleistocene, suggesting (along with one morphological character) the possibility that this species belongs to the Old World clade of pelican species. PMID:25365300

Stidham, Thomas A.; Krishan, Kewal; Singh, Bahadur; Ghosh, Abhik; Patnaik, Rajeev

2014-01-01

419

Rapid diversification of falcons (Aves: Falconidae) due to expansion of open habitats in the Late Miocene.  

PubMed

Understanding how and why lineages diversify is central to understanding the origins of biological diversity. The avian family Falconidae (caracaras, forest-falcons, falcons) has an uneven distribution of species among multiple well-supported clades, and provides a useful system for testing hypotheses about diversification rate and correlation with environmental changes. We analyzed eight independent loci for 1-7 individuals from each of the 64 currently recognized Falconidae species, together with two fossil falconid temporal calibrations, to assess phylogeny, absolute divergence times and potential shifts in diversification rate. Our analyses supported similar diversification ages in the Early to Middle Miocene for the three traditional subfamilies, Herpetotherinae, Polyborinae and Falconinae. We estimated that divergences within the subfamily Falconinae began about 16mya and divergences within the most species-rich genus, Falco, including about 60% of all Falconidae species, began about 7.5mya. We found evidence for a significant increase in diversification rate at the basal phylogenetic node for the genus Falco, and the timing for this rate shift correlates generally with expansion of C4 grasslands beginning around the Miocene/Pliocene transition. Concomitantly, Falco lineages that are distributed primarily in grassland or savannah habitats, as opposed to woodlands, and exhibit migratory, as opposed to sedentary, behavior experienced a higher diversification rate. PMID:25256056

Fuchs, Jérôme; Johnson, Jeff A; Mindell, David P

2015-01-01

420

Trichobilharzia mergi sp. nov. (Trematoda: Digenea: Schistosomatidae), a visceral schistosome of Mergus serrator (L.) (Aves: Anatidae).  

PubMed

Parasitological investigations on red-breasted mergansers (Mergus serrator L.) in Iceland revealed digenean flukes of the family Schistosomatidae. Adult worms were detected in blood vessels of the large intestine and eggs were deposited in the mucosa and surrounded by granulomatous reactions. Traditional morphological methods showed that the flukes have very slender filiform bodies, males are equipped with a short gynaecophoric canal and both suckers and spatulate ends are present on each sex. Among characteristics of the flukes which render them morphologically distinct from other Trichobilharzia species are: i) males-well developed vesicula seminalis (v.s.) consisting of a short v.s. externa and a significantly longer (approx. 3 times) v.s. interna, unusually well developed genital papilla and localization of the first testis a relatively long distance posterior to the gynaecophoric canal; ii) eggs-small and elongated with slightly rounded poles and a short terminal spine. DNA taxonomic techniques confirmed that a new species had been identified, Trichobilharzia mergi sp. n. The sequence data were deposited in GenBank under the accession numbers JX456151 to JX456172. Comparison of the results with our previously published data on characterization of DNA of cercariae isolated from freshwater lymnaeid snails showed that larval development of T. mergi is associated with Radix balthica L. (=Radix peregra Müller, 1774;=Radix ovata Draparnaud, 1805). PMID:23501058

Kolá?ová, Libuše; Skírnisson, Karl; Ferté, Hubert; Jouet, Damien

2013-06-01

421

DNA hybridization evidence for the principal lineages of hummingbirds (Aves:Trochilidae).  

PubMed

The spectacular evolutionary radiation of hummingbirds (Trochilidae) has served as a model system for many biological studies. To begin to provide a historical context for these investigations, we generated a complete matrix of DNA hybridization distances among 26 hummingbirds and an outgroup swift (Chaetura pelagica) to determine the principal hummingbird lineages. FITCH topologies estimated from symmetrized delta TmH-C values and subjected to various validation methods (bootstrapping, weighted jackknifing, branch length significance) indicated a fundamental split between hermit (Eutoxeres aquila, Threnetes ruckeri; Phaethornithinae) and nonhermit (Trochilinae) hummingbirds, and provided strong support for six principal nonhermit clades with the following branching order: (1) a predominantly lowland group comprising caribs (Eulampis holosericeus) and relatives (Androdon aequatorialis and Heliothryx barroti) with violet-ears (Colibri coruscans) and relatives (Doryfera ludovicae); (2) an Andean-associated clade of highly polytypic taxa (Eriocnemis, Heliodoxa, and Coeligena); (3) a second endemic Andean clade (Oreotrochilus chimborazo, Aglaiocercus coelestis, and Lesbia victoriae) paired with thorntails (Popelairia conversii); (4) emeralds and relatives (Chlorostilbon mellisugus, Amazilia tzacatl, Thalurania colombica, Orthorhyncus cristatus and Campylopterus villaviscensio); (5) mountain-gems (Lampornis clemenciae and Eugenes fulgens); and (6) tiny bee-like forms (Archilochus colubris, Myrtis fanny, Acestrura mulsant, and Philodice mitchellii). Corresponding analyses on a matrix of unsymmetrized delta values gave similar support for these relationships except that the branching order of the two Andean clades (2, 3 above) was unresolved. In general, subsidiary relationships were consistent and well supported by both matrices, sometimes revealing surprising associations between forms that differ dramatically in plumage and bill morphology. Our results also reveal some basic aspects of hummingbird ecologic and morphologic evolution. For example, most of the diverse endemic Andean assemblage apparently comprises two genetically divergent clades, whereas the majority of North American hummingbirds belong a single third clade. Genetic distances separating some morphologically distinct genera (Oreotrochilus, Aglaiocercus, Lesbia; Myrtis, Acestrura, Philodice) were no greater than among congeneric (Coeligena) species, indicating that, in hummingbirds, morphological divergence does not necessarily reflect level of genetic divergence. PMID:9066799

Bleiweiss, R; Kirsch, J A; Matheus, J C

1997-03-01

422

Audiovisual Education at the Local Level: Chiba Prefecture. AVE in Japan No. 28.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This collection of three essays examines the use of audiovisual instruction in Chiba Prefecture, east of Tokyo. In the first example, a closed circuit video system combined with overhead projectors was used to increase student motivation in a junior high school. In the second example, films, radio, television, slides, and videotaped materials were…

Japan Audio-Visual Education Association, Tokyo.

423

A remarkable new species of small falcon from the Quaternary of Cuba (Aves: Falconidae: Falco)  

Microsoft Academic Search

An enigmatic small falcon. Falco kurochkini, new species, is de- scribed from postcranial bones from several Quaternary sites in western and central Cuba. It was approximately intermediate in size between F. sparverius and F. columbarius but had proportionately longer and more slender leg ele- ments than any living species of Falco. It is hypothesized that F. kurochkini may have been

William Suárez; Storrs L. Olson

2001-01-01

424

Phylogeny and evolutionary history of Old World suboscine birds (Aves: Eurylaimides)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Molecular and morphological data were used to derive a phylogenetic hypothesis for the Eurylaimides, an Old World bird group now known to be distributed pantropically, and to investigate the evolution and biogeography of the group. Phylogenetic results indicated that the Eurylaimides consist of two monophyletic groups, the pittas (Pittidae) and the broadbills (Eurylaimidae sensu lato), and that the broadbills consist of two highly divergent clades, one containing the sister genera Smithornis and Calyptomena, the other containing Pseudocalyptomena graueri, Sapayoa aenigma, the asity genera Philepitta and Neodrepanis, and five Asian genera. Our results indicate that over a ~10 million year time span in the early Tertiary, the Eurylaimides came to inhabit widely disjunct tropical regions and evolved disparate morphology, diet, and breeding behavior. Biogeographically, although a southern origin for the lineage is likely, time estimates for major lineage splitting do not correspond to Gondwanan vicariance events, and the biogeographic history of the crown clade is better explained by Laurasian climatic and geological processes. In particular, the timing and phylogenetic pattern suggest a likely Laurasian origin for the sole New World representative of the group, Sapayoa aenigma.

Moyle, R.G.; Chesser, R.T.; Prum, R.O.; Schikler, P.; Cracraft, J.

2006-01-01

425

Biogeography and spatio-temporal diversification of Selenidera and Andigena toucans (Aves: Ramphastidae).  

PubMed

Andean uplift, Plio-Pleistocene climatic fluctuation, and river dynamics in the Amazon basin have all been implicated in the diversification of the South American avifauna. We reconstructed phylogenetic relationships in the genus Selenidera, which has served as a classic case of putative refugial speciation, and the closely related genus Andigena, to better understand the processes driving their diversification. Using mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences, we constructed a phylogeny to estimate the pattern and timing of divergence within and between seven lowland Selenidera toucanets and the five species of Andigena mountain-toucans, which together form a single clade. All phylogenetic analyses supported the monophyly of the montane genus Andigena, but indicated that the genus Selenidera is likely paraphyletic with respect to Andigena. Our time tree analysis is consistent with the orogenic uplift of the northern Andean range having initiated the divergence between Selenidera and Andigena, and that the movement and fragmentation of montane habitats in response to Pleistocene climatic oscillations likely influenced diversification within Andigena. Estimated divergence times for lowland Amazonian Selenidera did not support the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) refuge hypothesis as an important biogeographic factor for the diversification of lineages studied here. The timing of divergence within Selenidera is consistent with the hypothesis that geographic isolation of areas of endemism generated by Amazonian river dynamics during the Plio-Pleistocene contributed to Selenidera speciation and current species distributions. PMID:23831458

Lutz, Holly L; Weckstein, Jason D; Patané, José S L; Bates, John M; Aleixo, Alexandre

2013-12-01

426

A new Isospora sp. from Carduelis tristis (Aves: Fringillidae) from Ontario, Canada.  

PubMed

Isospora gryphoni n. sp. is described from oocysts found in the feces of the American goldfinch, Carduelis tristis, from Guelph, Ontario, Canada. The oocysts are spherical to subspherical, with a double-layered, smooth, colorless oocyst wall, 29.2 x 30.7 microm (25-33 x 28-34; n = 30) with 2-4 rice-grain-shaped polar bodies; no micropyle or residuum. Sporocysts are ovoid, 22.2 x 13.4 microm (15-25 x 12-14.5; n = 30) with a small Stieda body, indistinct substiedal body, and prominent sporocyst residuum. Sporozoites are vermiform, each with a large refractile body at the posterior end. Forty-nine of 52 (94%) wild-caught adult C. tristis and 1 juvenile bird (minimum 12 days old) were excreting oocysts of I. gryphoni. None of 36 nestlings (maximum 10 days old) was excreting oocysts. Fecal encrustations from 7 of 10 used nests were found to contain oocysts of I. gryphoni. PMID:9488354

Olson, V A; Gissing, G J; Barta, J R; Middleton, A L

1998-02-01

427

Complex Species Status for Extinct Moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes) from the Genus Euryapteryx  

PubMed Central

The exact species status of New Zealand's extinct moa remains unknown. In particular, moa belonging to the genus Euryapteryx have been difficult to classify. We use the DNA barcoding sequence on a range of Euryapteryx samples in an attempt to resolve the species status for this genus. We obtained mitochondrial control region and the barcoding region from Cytochrome Oxidase Subunit I (COI) from a number of new moa samples and use available sequences from previous moa phylogenies and eggshell data to try and clarify the species status of Euryapteryx. Using the COI barcoding region we show that species status in Euryapteryx is complex with no clear separation between various individuals. Eggshell, soil, and bone data suggests that a Euryapteryx subspecies likely exists on New Zealand's North Island and can be characterized by a single mitochondrial control region SNP. COI divergences between Euryapteryx individuals from the south of New Zealand's South Island and those from the Far North of the North Island exceed 1.6% and are likely to represent separate species. Individuals from other areas of New Zealand were unable to be clearly separated based on COI differences possibly as a result of repeated hybridisation events. Despite the accuracy of the COI barcoding region to determine species status in birds, including that for the other moa genera, for moa from the genus Euryapteryx, COI barcoding fails to provide a clear result, possibly as a consequence of repeated hybridisation events between these moa. A single control region SNP was identified however that segregates with the two general morphological variants determined for Euryapteryx; a smaller subspecies restricted to the North Island of New Zealand, and a larger subspecies, found on both New Zealand's North and South Island. PMID:24594991

Huynen, Leon; Lambert, David M.

2014-01-01

428

Waves of genomic hitchhikers shed light on the evolution of gamebirds (Aves: Galliformes)  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The phylogenetic tree of Galliformes (gamebirds, including megapodes, currassows, guinea fowl, New and Old World quails, chicken, pheasants, grouse, and turkeys) has been considerably remodeled over the last decades as new data and analytical methods became available. Analyzing presence\\/absence patterns of retroposed elements avoids the problems of homoplastic characters inherent in other methodologies. In gamebirds, chicken repeats 1 (CR1)

Jan Ole Kriegs; Andreas Matzke; Gennady Churakov; Andrej Kuritzin; Gerald Mayr; Jürgen Brosius; Jürgen Schmitz

2007-01-01

429

Bone growth marks reveal protracted growth in New Zealand kiwi (Aves, Apterygidae).  

PubMed

The presence of bone growth marks reflecting annual rhythms in the cortical bone of non-avian tetrapods is now established as a general phenomenon. In contrast, ornithurines (the theropod group including modern birds and their closest relatives) usually grow rapidly in less than a year, such that no annual rhythms are expressed in bone cortices, except scarce growth marks restricted to the outer cortical layer. So far, cyclical growth in modern birds has been restricted to the Eocene Diatryma, the extant parrot Amazona amazonica and the extinct New Zealand (NZ) moa (Dinornithidae). Here we show the presence of lines of arrested growth in the long bones of the living NZ kiwi (Apteryx spp., Apterygidae). Kiwis take 5-6 years to reach full adult body size, which indicates a delayed maturity and a slow reproductive cycle. Protracted growth probably evolved convergently in moa and kiwi sometime since the Middle Miocene, owing to the severe climatic cooling in the southwest Pacific and the absence of mammalian predators. PMID:19515655

Bourdon, Estelle; Castanet, Jacques; de Ricqlès, Armand; Scofield, Paul; Tennyson, Alan; Lamrous, Hayat; Cubo, Jorge

2009-10-23

430

A New Genus and Species of Buteonine Hawk from Quaternary Deposits in Bermuda (Aves: Accipitridae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bermuteo avivorus, new genus and species, is described from rare Quaternary fossils from the island of Bermuda. Although clearly referable to the Buteoninae, its relationships within that group are difficult to assess. Considerable size variation may be attributable to sexual dimorphism associated with bird-catching behavior. It is uncertain if the species survived into the historic period. Factors contributing to the

Storrs L. Olson

2008-01-01

431

Phylogeny and biogeography of Ficedula flycatchers (Aves: Muscicapidae): novel results from fresh source material.  

PubMed

The avian genus Ficedula has been a model system for studying speciation, genomics, biogeography, and the evolution of migratory behavior. However, no multi-locus molecular phylogenetic hypothesis exists for the genus. We expanded taxon and character sampling over previous studies and produced a robust hypothesis of relationships for the genus. Many previous findings, such as the inclusion of Muscicapella and exclusion of Ficedula monileger from the genus, were verified, but many relationships differed compared to previous work. Some of the differences were due to increased sampling, but others were due to problematic sequence data produced from DNA extracted from historical museum specimens. The new phylogenetic hypothesis resulted in a simpler biogeographic scenario with fewer transitions between regions and fewer transitions between seasonally migratory and resident character states. Notably, all species endemic to the Philippines and Wallacea formed a clade, which included Ficedula dumetoria of the Sunda Shelf and Lesser Sundas. In addition, Ficedula hyperythra was not monophyletic; samples from Philippine populations formed a clade distantly related to a clade that comprised all other sampled populations. PMID:25307119

Moyle, Robert G; Hosner, Peter A; Jones, Andrew W; Outlaw, Diana C

2015-01-01

432

Phylogeny of "core Gruiformes" (Aves: Grues) and resolution of the Limpkin-Sungrebe problem.  

PubMed

Opinions on the systematic relationships of birds in the avian order Gruiformes have been as diverse as the families included within it. Despite ongoing debate over monophyly of the order and relationships among its various members, recent opinion has converged on the monophyly of a "core" group of five families classified as the suborder Grues: the rails (Rallidae), the cranes (Gruidae), the Limpkin (Aramidae), the trumpeters (Psophiidae), and the finfoots (Heliornithidae). We present DNA sequence data from four mitochondrial (cytochrome b, 12S rRNA, Valine tRNA, and 16S rRNA) and three nuclear loci (intron 7 of beta-fibrinogen, intron 5 of alcohol dehydrogenase-I, and introns 3 through 5 of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) to test previous hypotheses of interfamilial relationships within Grues, with particular attention to the enigmatic family Heliornithidae. Separate and combined analyses of these gene sequences confirm the monophyly of Grues as a whole, and of the five families individually, including all three species of Heliornithidae. The preferred topology unambiguously supports relationships among four of the five families, with only the position of Psophiidae remaining equivocal. Bayesian "relaxed-clock" dating methods suggest that the divergences of the three heliornithid species occurred in the mid-Tertiary, suggesting that their present disjunct pantropical distribution is a result of early- to mid-Tertiary dispersal. PMID:17419074

Fain, Matthew G; Krajewski, Carey; Houde, Peter

2007-05-01

433

Comparative mechanics of filter feeding in Anas platyrhynchos, Anas clypeata and Aythya fuligula (Aves, Anseriformes)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The straining of seeds ranging in size from 0.01 to 4.6 mm was investigated in the filtering mechanisms of three anseriform species, Anas platyrhynchos, Anas clypeata, and Aythya fuligala. The morphology of the filtering mechanisms was studied by dissection and from microsections. The kinematic work envelope of the beaks was measured by stereotactic manipulation. The actual beak kinematics were analyzed

J. G. M. Kooloos; A. R. Kraaijeveld; G. E. J. Langenbach; G. A. Zweers

1989-01-01

434

Molecular phylogenetic relationships of Xiphidiopicus percussus, Melanerpes, and Sphyrapicus (Aves: Picidae) based on cytochrome b sequence  

Microsoft Academic Search

The endemic woodpecker, Xiphidiopicus percussus, from Cuba has been postulated as the sister taxon to the Hispaniolan woodpecker (Melanerpes striatus) and its relationships to the genera Sphyrapicus and Melanerpes have been speculated. We used mitochondrial cytochrome b sequences from a collection of New World picids to investigate the phylogenetic relationships among these species using maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood approaches.

Lowell C. Overton; Douglas D. Rhoads

2006-01-01

435

Feather mites (Acari, Astigmata) from Azorean passerines (Aves, Passeriformes): lower species richness compared to European mainland.  

PubMed

Ten passerine species were examined on three islands of the Azores (North Atlantic) during 2013 and 2014 in order to identify their feather mite assemblages. We recorded 19 feather mite species belonging to four families of the superfamily Analgoidea (Analgidae, Proctophyllodidae, Psoroptoididae and Trouessartiidae). A high prevalence of feather mite species was recorded on the majority of the examined host species. Only three passerine species (Sylvia atricapilla, Regulus regulus and Serinus canaria) presented the same full complex of mite species as commonly occurs in the plumage of their closest relatives in continental Europe. Passer domesticus presented the same limited fauna of feather mites living in the plumage as do its co-specifics in continental Europe. Carduelis carduelis bears the same feather mite species as do most of its continental populations in Europe, but it lacks one mite species occurring on this host in Egypt. Turdus merula, Pyrrhula murina and Fringilla coelebs are missing several mite species common to their continental relatives. This diminution could be explained by the founder effect, whereby a limited number of colonizing individuals did not transport the full set of feather mite species, or by the extinction of some mite species after initially having reached the Azores. The only individual of Motacilla cinerea sampled in this study presented a new host record for the mite species Trouessartia jedliczkai. PMID:25665827

Rodrigues, Pedro; Mironov, Sergey; Sychra, Oldrich; Resendes, Roberto; Literak, Ivan

2015-01-01

436

Page 1 of 21 School of Education, One Shields Ave., Davis, CA, 95616  

E-print Network

Report: EEG asymmetry, symptoms and the modifier model of autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. Hileman, C., Henderson, H. A., Mundy, P. C., Newell, L., & Jaime, M. (in press). Developmental

Nguyen, Danh

437

An improved phylogeny of the Andean tit-tyrants (Aves, Tyrannidae): More characters trump sophisticated analyses  

PubMed Central

The phylogeny of the flycatcher genus Anairetes was previously inferred using short fragments of mitochondrial DNA and parsimony and distance-based methods. The resulting topology spurred taxonomic revision and influenced understanding of Andean biogeography. More than a decade later, we revisit the phylogeny of Anairetes tit-tyrants using more mtDNA characters, seven unlinked loci (3 mitochondrial genes, 6 nuclear loci), more closely related outgroup taxa, partitioned Bayesian analyses, and two coalescent species-tree approaches (Bayesian estimation of species trees, BEST; Bayesian evolutionary analysis by sampling trees, *BEAST). Of these improvements in data and analyses, the fourfold increase in mtDNA characters was both necessary and sufficient to incur a major shift in the topology and near-complete resolution. The species-tree analyses, while theoretically preferable to concatenation or single gene approaches, yielded topologies that were compatible with mtDNA but with weaker statistical resolution at nodes. The previous results that had led to taxonomic and biogeographic reappraisal were refuted, and the current results support the resurrection of the genus Uromyias as the sister clade to Anairetes. The sister relationship between these two genera corresponds to an ecological dichotomy between a depauperate humid cloudforest clade and a diverse dry-tolerant clade that has diversified along the latitudinal axis of the Andes. The species-tree results and the concatenation results each reaffirm the primacy of mtDNA to provide phylogenetic signal for avian phylogenies at the species and subspecies level. This is due in part to the abundance of informative characters in mtDNA, and in part to its lower effective population size that causes it to more faithfully track the species tree. PMID:22525942

DuBay, Shane G.; Witt, Christopher C.

2012-01-01

438

[Three new Nadejdolepis Spasskii & Sasskaya, 1954 (Cestoda: Hymenolepididae) parasites of Charadrii (Aves) from Tasmania].  

PubMed

Three species of Nadejdcolepis from Tasmania, Australia, are described and illustrated. N. burgessi n. sp., a parasite of Charadrius ruficapillus, is 4-6 mm long, with rostellar nitiduloid hooks 63-66 microm long, a short evaginated cirrus 13-16 microm long with a short collar of thin spines 1 microm long, a narrow and tubular sclerotinoid vagina 40-50 long and 3-4 microm in diameter with a little ampulla 3-5 microm in diameter at the proximal end, and a membranous atrial segment with smooth, short (1 microm) and compact spines which are sometimes difficult to observe. N. smithi n. sp., a parasite of 40-50 long and 3-4 microm in diameter with a little ampulla 3-5 microm in diameter at the proximal end, and a membranous atrial segment with smooth, short (1 microm) and compact spines which are sometimes difficult to observe. N. smithi n. sp., a parasite of C. ruficapillus and Arenaria interpres, is 2-3.5 mm long, with rostellar nitiduloid hooks 90-98 microm long, a short evaginated cirrus (13 x 6.5 microm) with a short collar of thin 'bristles' of decreasing length (2-3 microm) and prolonged by a short and thin stylet, a sclerotinoid and conical vagina of 20 x 6 microm, with an ovoid ampulla 6-7 x 4-9 at its slender end, and a membranous atrial segment like that of the preceding species. N. kinsellai n. sp., a parasite of C. ruficapillus is 25-40(?) mm long, with rostellar nitiduloid hooks 89-93 microm long, a fusiform genital atrium 100 x 30 microm long with a very narrow pore, and a very long narrow cirrus-sac, which is cylindrical (not fusiform), has its aporal extremity lying in the preceding proglottis and has a slender uninterrupted wall without helicoid fibres. The poral extremity of the cirrus-sac is fastened by a long transverse muscle. An evaginated cirrus was not observed. The invaginated ejaculatory canal has two successive types of spines: a subterminal short portion (20-25 microm) with thick spines, followed by a long portion (100-120 microm) with numerous thin and compact 'bristles' 5 microm long. There is a very long convoluted spermatic duct (400-500 microm). The membranous tubular vagina is long (400-450 microm), thick-walled but not muscular and convoluted anterior to the distal part of the cirrus-sac; a chitinoid chamber, copulatory segment and sphincter are absent. Nadejdolepis species parasitic in Charadrii are reviewed. None of the species previously reported presents anatomical features similar to the three new species. N. kinsellai has morphological characters which differ in detail from other species in the genus. Hymenolepis (Hymenolepis) mudderbugtenensis Deblock & Rosé, 1962 is transferred to the genus Nadejdolepis. PMID:11303538

Deblock, S; Canaris, A G

2001-03-01

439

[Microphallidae (Digenea) from southern Africa, parasites of Charadrii (Aves). Second note].  

PubMed

The authors present new geographical and diagnostic information for microphallids (Trematoda: Digenea) from the coast of Namibia (southern Africa): Maritrema eroliae Yamaguti, 1939 from Charadrius marginatus Vieillot; Odhneria odhneri Travassos, 1921 from Arenaria interpres L.; Microphallus bilobatus Cable, Connor & Balling, 1960 from C. marginatus; and Levinseniella propinqua Jägerskiöld, 1907 from C. marginatus and A. interpres. These are new geographical and host records. The position and variability of the phallus (male copulatory organ) in M. bilobatus from Namibia and in the type-species from the Caribbean Sea are compared and illustrated. The genital atria of L. propinqua from Namibia and from Marcus Island (southwest Cape Province, Southern Africa) are illustrated and compared. This species appears to be cosmopolitan. PMID:14755173

Deblock, Stéphane; Canaris, Albert G; Kinsella, John M

2004-02-01

440

Spectroscopic confirmation and additional photometry of the very bright nova M31N 2015-01a  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report the ongoing increase of the optical brightness of Nova M31 2015-01a (ATel #6911, ATel #6924). Four 900s spectra were obtained on Jan 16.8 UT with the FoReRo2 focal reducer at the 2 m RCC telescope.

Kurtenkov, A.; Ovcharov, E.; Nedialkov, P.; Kostov, A.; Bachev, R.; Dimitrova, R. V. Munoz; Popov, V.; Valcheva, A.

2015-01-01

441

Genetics, local environment and health as factors in uencing plasma carotenoids in wild American  

E-print Network

kestrels (Falco sparverius) G. R. Bortolotti,1* J. L. Tella,1,2 M. G. Forero,1 R. D. Dawson1,3 and J. J kestrels (Falco sparverius). Plasma concentrations of siblings at the time of £edging showed a high degree

Bortolotti, Gary R.

442

To cite this document: NGUYEN Anh-Dung, SNAC Patrick, RAMIRO Victor and DIAZ, Michel. Pervasive intelligent routing in content centric delay tolerant networks. In: The 9th IEEE  

E-print Network

/University of Toulouse, Toulouse, France LAAS/CNRS, Toulouse, France NIC Chile Research Labs, Santiago, Chile Abstract cloud", in complement and independently of the traditional communication infrastructure and services

Mailhes, Corinne

443

Search for new manganese-cobalt oxides as positive electrode materials for lithium batteries P. Strobel, J. Tillier, A. Diaz, A. Ibarra-Palos, F. Thiry and J.B. Soupart *  

E-print Network

Search for new manganese-cobalt oxides as positive electrode materials for lithium batteries P new mixed manganese-cobalt oxides for lithium battery positive electrode materials were obtained using by cheaper and environmentally friendlier elements. Manganese is one of the most attractive alternates

Boyer, Edmond

444

This document is a preprint of the final paper: C. Li, T. Dragicevic, N. L. Diaz, J. C. Vasquez, and J. M. Guerrero, "Voltage Scheduling Droop Control for State-of-Charge Balance of Distributed  

E-print Network

quality of the DC microgrid. For one thing, the availability of the renewable energy source Storage in DC Microgrids," in Proc. IEEE International Energy Conference (EnergyCon'14), 2014. Voltage Scheduling Droop Control for State-of- Charge Balance of Distributed Energy Storage in DC Microgrids Chendan

Vasquez, Juan Carlos

445

Attending the meeting, LR, are two sons of Castro: Antonio Castro Soto del Valle and Fidel Castro Diaz-Balart, Cuban Presidential Science Advisor; Fidel Castro Ruz; Castros wife Dalia Soto del Valle; Juan  

E-print Network

at cities and industrial areas would produce devastating climatic and agricultural consequences." #12 Crisis. The aim of the conference will be to highlight the dangers of nuclear weapons and the need leader in the food and food ingredients industries with over 25 years experience in building

Goodman, Robert M.

446

eSGA: E. coli synthetic genetic array analysis Gareth Butland1,2,7,8, Mohan Babu1,8, J Javier Diaz-Mejia1,3, Fedyshyn Bohdana1, Sadhna Phanse1,  

E-print Network

, Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster, but have not been reported previously for prokaryotes. Here functional redundancy occurs in prokaryotes as well. Indeed, only 303 genes had been identified as essential of epistasis have been documen- ted in E. coli and other prokaryotes9. However, the extent of functional cross

Cai, Long

447

Connect to the Twin Ports Community Chinese Dragon 723-4036  

E-print Network

S. 27 th Ave W. Fitgers 600 E. Superior St Giant Panda Buffet 215 N. Central Ave Grandma's 522 S. Lake Ave Mexico Lindo 600 E. Superior St Osaka 5155 Burning Tree Plaza Old Chicago 327 S. Lake Ave Red

Netoff, Theoden

448

Diversification of the tropical Pacific avifauna  

E-print Network

. The focal taxa were: Ceyx lepidus (Aves: Alcedinidae), Pachycephala pectoralis (Aves: Pachycephalidae), and Todiramphus chloris (Aves: Alcedinidae). In chapter 3, I examined the systematic relationships of 14 species of Pacific honeyeaters (Aves...

Andersen, Michael J.

2013-12-31

449

PARKWAY HOTEL Clayton-Taylor  

E-print Network

Blvd. TaylorAve. Duncan Ave. Forest Park Parkway Newstead EuclidAve. EuclidAve. McKinley Substation CSRB Substation 4444 Substation TowerGrove Duncan Ave. Forest Park Parkway Newstead Parkview Boyle Parkview PlaceLink Children's Place EuclidAve. Newstead Forest Park Parkway Mid-CampusSubstation Stix School William Solae 71

Grant, Gregory

450

Primeros registros de helmintos parásitos en Fulica ardesiaca (Aves: Rallidae) para el Perú : Pantanos de Villa - Lima First record of helminth parasites in Fulica ardesiaca (Aves: Rallidae) from Peru: Pantanos de Villa - Lima  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two trematodes and one cestode of Fulica ardesiaca from Pantanos de Villa, Lima, Peru are registered at first time. Total of 698 parasites were counted, 529 individuals of Notocotylus pacifera, 149 individuals of Psilostomum sp. and 20 individuals of Diorchis Americana. This work is the first report in F. ardesiaca from Peru; while Psilostomum sp. and D. americana are first

Gisella Guillén; Elizabeth Morales

451

Distributed Discovery and Management of Alternate Internet Paths with Enhanced  

E-print Network

: Président : Maximilian OTT Directeur de thèse : Michel DIAZ Co-Directeurs : Aruna SENEVIRATNE Patrick S�NAC would like to thank my advisors Patrick Sénac, Aruna Seneviratne and Michel Diaz for their trust in me

Rakotoarivelo, Thierry

452

White Paper on Factors of Safety  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Following the Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAIB) Report, the "Diaz Team" identified CAIB Report elements with Agency-wide applicability. The "Diaz Report", A Renewed Commitment To Excellence, generated an action to "Review current policies and waivers on safety factors". This document addresses this action.

Raju, Ivatury; Stadler, John; Kramer-White, Jule; Piascik, Robert

2012-01-01

453

Solving a Class of Time-Dependent Combinatorial Optimization Problems with Abstraction, Transformation and Simulated Annealing  

E-print Network

, Transformation and Simulated Annealing by Rigoberto Diaz, B.B.A., M.B.A. Submitted in partial fulfillment with Abstraction, Transformation and Simulated Annealing by Rigoberto Diaz, B.B.A, M.B.A Submitted in partial is dedicated to efficient solutions to a class of real-world combinatorial optimization problems whose event

Tao, Lixin

454

LSUHSC-NO Academy for the Advancement of Educational Scholarship Member Profile  

E-print Network

toxicology. Dr. Diaz currently serves as Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine in the School Bachelor of Science, Doctor of Medicine, Master of Health Administration, Diploma in Tropical Medicine, Master of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, and Doctor of Public Hea Dr. Diaz is board

455

The effect of hypoxia on sex hormones in an African cichlid Pseudocrenilabrus multicolor victoriae  

E-print Network

The effect of hypoxia on sex hormones in an African cichlid Pseudocrenilabrus multicolor victoriae on sex hormones in the mouth brooding African cichlid Pseudocrenilabrus multicolor victoriae. Non and led to an increase in the prevalence of anoxic (no oxygen) `dead zones' (Diaz, 2001; Diaz

Chapman, Lauren J.

456

Patterns and processes of diversification in a widespread and ecologically diverse avian group, the buteonine hawks (Aves, Accipitridae).  

PubMed

Buteonine hawks represent one of the most diverse groups in the Accipitridae, with 58 species distributed in a variety of habitats on almost all continents. Variations in migratory behavior, remarkable dispersal capability, and unusual diversity in Central and South America make buteonine hawks an excellent model for studies in avian evolution. To evaluate the history of their global radiation, we used an integrative approach that coupled estimation of the phylogeny using a large sequence database (based on 6411 bp of mitochondrial markers and one nuclear intron from 54 species), divergence time estimates, and ancestral state reconstructions. Our findings suggest that Neotropical buteonines resulted from a long evolutionary process that began in the Miocene and extended to the Pleistocene. Colonization of the Nearctic, and eventually the Old World, occurred from South America, promoted by the evolution of seasonal movements and development of land bridges. Migratory behavior evolved several times and may have contributed not only to colonization of the Holarctic, but also derivation of insular species. In the Neotropics, diversification of the buteonines included four disjunction events across the Andes. Adaptation of monophyletic taxa to wet environments occurred more than once, and some relationships indicate an evolutionary connection among mangroves, coastal and várzea environments. On the other hand, groups occupying the same biome, forest, or open vegetation habitats are not monophyletic. Refuges or sea-level changes or a combination of both was responsible for recent speciation in Amazonian taxa. In view of the lack of concordance between phylogeny and classification, we propose numerous taxonomic changes. PMID:19635577

do Amaral, Fábio Raposo; Sheldon, Frederick H; Gamauf, Anita; Haring, Elisabeth; Riesing, Martin; Silveira, Luís F; Wajntal, Anita

2009-12-01

457

Richard J. Wurtman, MD Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, 77Mass Ave.,  

E-print Network

1 OPINION Richard J. Wurtman, MD Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Brain COMBINATION THAT CAN AFFECT SYNAPSE FORMATION Abstract Brain neurons form synapses throughout the life span on brain levels of three key nutrients - uridine., the omega-3 fatty acid DHA, and choline. Given together

Wurtman, Richard

458

Anna G. Stefanopoulou Mechanical Engineering Dept, University of Michigan, 1231 Beal Ave, Ann Arbor MI 48109-2121  

E-print Network

, Ann Arbor MI 48109-2121 TEL: +1 (734) 615-8461, annastef@umich.edu Education: Ph.D. Electrical of Michigan, Ann Arbor 9/00-8/06 Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 1/98-6/00 Assistant Professor of Mechanical and Environmental Eng, Univ of California

Stefanopoulou, Anna

459

Higher-order phylogeny of modern birds (Theropoda, Aves: Neornithes) based on comparative anatomy. II. Analysis and discussion  

PubMed Central

In recent years, avian systematics has been characterized by a diminished reliance on morphological cladistics of modern taxa, intensive palaeornithogical research stimulated by new discoveries and an inundation by analyses based on DNA sequences. Unfortunately, in contrast to significant insights into basal origins, the broad picture of neornithine phylogeny remains largely unresolved. Morphological studies have emphasized characters of use in palaeontological contexts. Molecular studies, following disillusionment with the pioneering, but non-cladistic, work of Sibley and Ahlquist, have differed markedly from each other and from morphological works in both methods and findings. Consequently, at the turn of the millennium, points of robust agreement among schools concerning higher-order neornithine phylogeny have been limited to the two basalmost and several mid-level, primary groups. This paper describes a phylogenetic (cladistic) analysis of 150 taxa of Neornithes, including exemplars from all non-passeriform families, and subordinal representatives of Passeriformes. Thirty-five outgroup taxa encompassing Crocodylia, predominately theropod Dinosauria, and selected Mesozoic birds were used to root the trees. Based on study of specimens and the literature, 2954 morphological characters were defined; these characters have been described in a companion work, approximately one-third of which were multistate (i.e. comprised at least three states), and states within more than one-half of these multistate characters were ordered for analysis. Complete heuristic searches using 10 000 random-addition replicates recovered a total solution set of 97 well-resolved, most-parsimonious trees (MPTs). The set of MPTs was confirmed by an expanded heuristic search based on 10 000 random-addition replicates and a full ratchet-augmented exploration to ascertain global optima. A strict consensus tree of MPTs included only six trichotomies, i.e. nodes differing topologically among MPTs. Bootstrapping (based on 10 000 replicates) percentages and ratchet-minimized support (Bremer) indices indicated most nodes to be robust. Several fossil Neornithes (e.g. Dinornithiformes, Aepyornithiformes) were placed within the ingroup a posteriori either through unconstrained, heursitic searches based on the complete matrix augmented by these taxa separately or using backbone-constraints. Analysis confirmed the topology among outgroup Theropoda and achieved robust resolution at virtually all levels of the Neornithes. Findings included monophyly of the palaeognathous birds, comprising the sister taxa Tinamiformes and ratites, respectively, and the Anseriformes and Galliformes as monophyletic sister-groups, together forming the sister-group to other Neornithes exclusive of the Palaeognathae (Neoaves). Noteworthy inferences include: (i) the sister-group to remaining Neoaves comprises a diversity of marine and wading birds; (ii) Podicipedidae are the sister-group of Gaviidae, and not closely related to the Phoenicopteridae, as recently suggested; (iii) the traditional Pelecaniformes, including the shoebill (Balaeniceps rex) as sister-taxon to other members, are monophyletic; (iv) traditional Ciconiiformes are monophyletic; (v) Strigiformes and Falconiformes are sister-groups; (vi) Cathartidae is the sister-group of the remaining Falconiformes; (vii) Ralliformes (Rallidae and Heliornithidae) are the sister-group to the monophyletic Charadriiformes, with the traditionally composed Gruiformes and Turniciformes (Turnicidae and Mesitornithidae) sequentially paraphyletic to the entire foregoing clade; (viii) Opisthocomus hoazin is the sister-taxon to the Cuculiformes (including the Musophagidae); (ix) traditional Caprimulgiformes are monophyletic and the sister-group of the Apodiformes; (x) Trogoniformes are the sister-group of Coliiformes; (xi) Coraciiformes, Piciformes and Passeriformes are mutually monophyletic and closely related; and (xii) the Galbulae are retained within the Piciformes. Unresolved portions of the Neornithes (nodes having more than one most-parsi

LIVEZEY, BRADLEY C; ZUSI, RICHARD L

2007-01-01

460

Aromatase expression in the brain of the ruffed grouse (Bonasa umbellus) and comparisons with other galliform birds (Aves, Galliformes).  

PubMed

The enzyme aromatase is important for regulating sexual and aggressive behaviors during the reproductive season, including many aspects of courtship. In birds, aromatase is expressed at high levels in a number of different brain regions. Although this expression does vary among species, the extent to which the distribution of aromatase positive cells reflects species differences in courtship and other behaviors is not well established. Here, we examine the distribution of aromatase immunoreactive (ARO) neurons in the brain of a species with a unique courtship display, the ruffed grouse (Bonasa umbellus). Unlike most other galliforms, male ruffed grouse do not vocalize as part of their courtship and instead use their wings to create a non-vocal auditory signal to attract females. Because aromatase is involved in courtship behaviors in several bird species, including other galliforms, we hypothesized that aromatase distribution in the ruffed grouse would differ from that of other galliforms. We used an antibody raised against quail aromatase to examine aromatase immunoreactivity in the ruffed grouse, the closely related spruce grouse (Falcipennis canadensis) and the Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica). In all three species, ARO neurons were identified in the medial preoptic nucleus, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and the nucleus ventromedialis hypothalami. Both grouse species had ARO neurons in two regions of the telencephalon, the hyperpallium, and entopallium, and the ruffed grouse also in field L. ARO neurons were only found in one region in the telencephalon of the Japanese quail, the septum. In general, breeding male ruffed grouse had significantly more ARO neurons and those neurons were larger than that of both the non-breeding male and female ruffed grouse. Aromatase expression in the telencephalon of the ruffed grouse suggests that steroid hormones might modulate responses to visual and acoustic stimuli, but how this relates to species differences in courtship displays and co-expression with estrogenic receptors is yet to be determined. PMID:23266340

Corfield, Jeremy R; Harada, Nobuhiro; Iwaniuk, Andrew N

2013-01-01

461

Extreme axial equalization and wide distribution of recombination nodules in the primitive ZW pair of Rhea americana (Aves, Ratitae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pachytene oocytes from the ratite bird Rhea americana were used for synaptonemal complex analysis with a surface spreading technique and phosphotungstic acid staining. The ZW bivalent is slightly smaller than the fourth autosomal bivalent and clearly shows unequal W and Z axes only in 27% of the bivalents. Most of the ZW pairs are completely adjusted and thus the W

M. I. Pigozzi; A. J. Solari

1997-01-01

462

Description of a new species of Tylodelphys (Digenea, Diplostomidae) in the wood stork, Mycteria americana (Aves, Ciconiidae) from Argentina  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the course of a study on the endohelminth parasites of birds, specimens of an undescribed species of Tylodelphys Diesing, 1850 (Diplostomidae) were collected from the wood stork, Mycteria americana L., from Formosa Province, Argentina. Tylodelphys brevis sp. nov. can be distinguished from the other Neotropical species of this genus, T. elongata, T. americana and T. adulta, principally by the

Fabiana B. Drago; Lía I. Lunaschi

2008-01-01

463

Biogeography of Speciation of Two Sister Species of Neotropical Amazona (Aves, Psittaciformes) Based on Mitochondrial Sequence Data  

PubMed Central

Coalescent theory provides powerful models for population genetic inference and is now increasingly important in estimates of divergence times and speciation research. We use molecular data and methods based on coalescent theory to investigate whether genetic evidence supports the hypothesis of A. pretrei and A. tucumana as separate species and whether genetic data allow us to assess which allopatric model seems to better explain the diversification process in these taxa. We sampled 13 A. tucumana from two provinces in northern Argentina and 28 A. pretrei from nine localities of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. A 491 bp segment of the mitochondrial gene cytochrome c oxidase I was evaluated using the haplotype network and phylogenetic methods. The divergence time and other demographic quantities were estimated using the isolation and migration model based on coalescent theory. The network and phylogenetic reconstructions showed similar results, supporting reciprocal monophyly for these two taxa. The divergence time of lineage separation was estimated to be approximately 1.3 million years ago, which corresponds to the lower Pleistocene. Our results enforce the current taxonomic status for these two Amazon species. They also support that A. pretrei and A. tucumana diverged with little or no gene flow approximately 1.3 million years ago, most likely after the establishment of a small population in the Southern Yungas forest by dispersion of a few founders from the A. pretrei ancestral population. This process may have been favored by habitat corridors formed in hot and humid periods of the Quaternary. Considering that these two species are considered threatened, the results were evaluated for their implications for the conservation of these two species. PMID:25251765

Rocha, Amanda V.; Rivera, Luis O.; Martinez, Jaime; Prestes, Nêmora P.; Caparroz, Renato

2014-01-01

464

Morphological variation in Plagiorchis noblei Park 1936 (Trematoda: Plagiorchiidae) from Tyrannus tyrannus and T. verticalis (Aves: Tyrannidae).  

PubMed

Specimens of Plagiorchis noblei from Tyrannus tyrannus and T. verticalis, were analyzed for morphological differences using multivariate techniques. Hotelling's T2-test showed a highly significant difference (P less than 0.001) between the two parasite populations. A stepwise discriminant analysis selected pharynx and testis as the characters that best separated the two populations, and correctly classified 69% of the specimens as to their host species. Plagiorchis gonzalchavezi was determined to be a junior subjective synonym of P. noblei. PMID:7189212

MacKenzie, D I; McKenzie, C E

1980-02-01

465

Isolation, characterization and chromosome locations of polymorphic black-billed magpie Pica pica (Corvidae, AVES) microsatellite loci.  

PubMed

One-hundred and two unique loci were isolated from a microsatellite-enriched black-billed magpie Pica pica genomic library. Sixteen of these new loci, along with 148 existing microsatellite passerine loci, were tested for polymorphism in four unrelated black-billed magpies. We identified a total of 43 unique polymorphic loci (10 and 33 respectively) that we characterized in 24 unrelated individuals from a population in Guadix, Spain. The putative chromosomal locations of loci polymorphic in black-billed magpie were assigned based on the location of their orthologues in the assembled zebra finch and chicken genomes. PMID:21564946

Martín-Gálvez, David; Dawson, Deborah A; Horsburgh, Gavin J; Burke, Terry

2009-11-01

466

VARIACIÓN EN LA COMPOSICIÓN DE LAS COMUNIDADES DE AVES DE SOTOBOSQUE DE DOS BOSQUES EN EL NORTE DE VENEZUELA  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to compare the composition and structure of two understory bird communities and their possible relationships, mist-net samples of avifauna were taken weekly in two forest types: a deciduous for- est and a gallery forest, during 11 months in north-central Venezuela. Both samples were somewhat similar (Sorensen Index = 54), showing a high monthly variability of its similarity index

Carlos Verea; Alberto Fernández-Badillo; Alecio Solorzano

467

Rapid parallel evolution of aberrant traits in the diversification of the Gulf of Guinea white-eyes (Aves, Zosteropidae).  

PubMed

Archipelago-endemic bird radiations are familiar to evolutionary biologists as key illustrations of evolutionary patterns. However, such radiations are in fact rare events. White-eyes (Zosteropidae) are birds with an exceptionally high colonization and speciation potential; they have colonized more islands globally than any other passerine group and include the most species-rich bird genus. The multiplication of white-eye island endemics has been consistently attributed to independent colonizations from the mainland; the white-eyes of the Gulf of Guinea archipelago had been seen as a classic case, spanning as great a breadth of phenotypic diversity as the family worldwide. Contrary to this hypothesis, our molecular phylogenetic analysis places the Gulf of Guinea white-eyes in just two radiations, one grouping all five oceanic island taxa and the other grouping continental island and land-bridge taxa. Numerous 'aberrant' phenotypes (traditionally grouped in the genus Speirops) have evolved independently over a short space of time from nonaberrant (Zosterops) phenotypes; the most phenotypically divergent species have separated as recently as 0.22 Ma. These radiations rival those of Darwin's finches and the Hawaiian honeycreepers in terms of the extent of adaptive radiation per unit time, both in terms of species numbers and in terms of phenotypic diversity. Tempo and patterns of morphological divergence are strongly supportive of an adaptive radiation in the oceanic islands driven by ecological interactions between sympatric white-eyes. Here, very rapid phenotypic evolution mainly affected taxa derived from the youngest wave of colonization, in accordance with the model of asymmetric divergence owing to resource competition in sympatry. PMID:21599770

Melo, Martim; Warren, Ben H; Jones, Peter J

2011-12-01

468

Contribution to the study of the diet of four owl species (Aves, Strigiformes) from mainland and island areas of Greece  

Microsoft Academic Search

The diets of the Barn Owl (Tyto alba), Little Owl (Athene noctua), Long-eared Owl (Asio otus) and Eagle Owl (Bubo bubo) were studied through analysis of pellets collected at 13 different continental areas and islands of Greece. The most important prey of the Barn Owl was mammals (mainly Microtus, Mus, Apodemus, Rat- tus and Crocidura), although birds and amphibians were

Haralambos Alivizatos; Vassilis Goutner; Stamatis Zogaris

469

Demonstration of calcium transport markers in the ceca of owls (Aves: Strigiformes), with remarks on basic ceca structure  

Microsoft Academic Search

Based on sensitive immunohistochemical methods, the ceca of three owl species (Tyto alba, Strix aluco, Asio otus) were studied for the presence of important Ca-transport proteins [Ca-channel (?2-subunit), calbindin D-28K, vitamin D3 receptor) and one mitochondrial energy marker (succinate dehydrogenase (subunit A)]. Additionally, some information is given\\u000a on basic ceca morphology, general histology, and goblet cells. The results obtained demonstrated

Wilfried Meyer; Anna Nora Hellmann; Norbert Kummerfeld

2009-01-01

470

New species of the feather mite genus Protolichus Trouessart, 1884 (Astigmata, Pterolichidae) from lories and lorikeets (Aves: Psittaciformes).  

PubMed

Five new species of the feather mite genus Protolichus Trouessart, 1884 (Astigmata, Pterolichidae) are described from parrots of the subfamily Loriinae (Psittaciformes: Psittacidae): Protolichus ornatus sp. n. from Trichoglossus ornatus (Linnaeus, 1758), P. lorinus sp. n. from Lorius lory (Linnaeus, 1758), P. placentis sp. n. from Charmosyna placentis (Temminck, 1835), P. pulchellae sp. n. from C. pulchella (Gray GR, 1859), and P. rubiginosus sp. n. from T. rubiginosus (Bonaparte, 1850). Protolichus ornatus belongs to the brachiatus species group; the other new species belong to the crassior species group. PMID:24871411

Mironov, Sergey V; Ehrnsberger, Rainer; Dabert, Jacek

2014-01-01

471

A re-evaluation of phylogenetic relationships within reed warblers (Aves: Acrocephalidae) based on eight molecular loci and ISSR profiles.  

PubMed

Acrocephalidae is the most monomorphic family among passerines and has seen a long history of different classifications and successive revisions. In this study, we evaluated the phylogenetic relationships among 35 species of Acrocephalidae based on DNA sequences from five nuclear loci (MB, ODC, LDH, FIB5 and RAG-1), three mitochondrial genes (CYB, ND2 and COI) and genomic fingerprinting with ISSR-PCR. We could improve the resolution of phylogenetic relationships among many species, but despite the use of 6280 nucleotides, some deep-level relationships remain enigmatic. Lack of nodal support at some branches may be the result of rapid radiation. The last common ancestor of this family dated for the Middle Miocene (14 MYA). In agreement with previous studies, we recovered the major clades of Acrocephalus, Iduna (except I. aedon), Hippolais, Nesillas and Calamonastides. We accept the current taxonomic position of Calamonastides gracilirostris as a monotypic genus and the inclusion of Iduna natalensis and I. similis within Iduna but phylogenetic analyses based on mitochondrial and nuclear genes as well as ISSR profiles did not support the position of I. aedon in Iduna. Therefore, we resurrect the former genus Phragamaticola for this species in order to avoid paraphyletic clades. PMID:24910156

Arbabi, Tayebeh; Gonzalez, Javier; Wink, Michael

2014-09-01

472

Phylogeography of the Variable Dwarf-Kingfisher Ceyx lepidus (Aves: Alcedinidae) Inferred from Mitochondrial and Nuclear DNA Sequences  

E-print Network

. Roberson. ????. The Clements Checklist of Birds of the World, version ?.?. [Online.] Available at www.birds. cornell.edu/clementschecklist/downloadable-clements-checklist. Collar, N. J. ????. Species limits in some Philippine birds including the Greater... Flameback Chrysocolaptes lucidus. Forktail ??:??–??. Darriba, D., G. L. Taboada, R. Doallo, and D. Posada. ????. jModelTest ?: More models, new heuristics and parallel comput- ing. Nature Methods ?:???. de Queiroz, K. ????. The general lineage concept...

Anderson, Michael J.; Oliveros, Carl Hirang; Filardi, Christopher E.; Moyle, Robert G.

2013-01-01

473

FIRST RECORD OF ALCATAENIA LARINA LARINA (CESTODA: DILEPIDIDAE) IN ATLANTIC PUFFINS (AVES, ALCIDAE, FRATERCULA ARCTICA) FROM NEWFOUNDLAND, CANADA  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The tapeworm Alcataenia larina (Cestoda: Cyclophyllidea: Dilepididae) is a parasite of gulls (Laridae) with a Holarctic distribution. Two subspecies A. l. pacifica and A. l. larina are recognized, with the former occurring in the North Pacific basin and the latter in the North Atlantic. Alcids serve...

474

New information on the anatomy of the Chinese Early Cretaceous Bohaiornithidae (Aves: Enantiornithes) from a subadult specimen of Zhouornis hani  

PubMed Central

Enantiornithines are the most diverse avian clade in the Cretaceous. However, morphological specializations indicative of specific ecological roles are not well known for this clade. Here we report on an exquisitely well-preserved specimen from the Lower Cretaceous Jehol Group of northeastern China, which pedal morphology is suggestive of a unique ecological specialization within Enantiornithes. The morphology of the new specimen is largely indistinguishable from that of the holotype of the bohaiornithid enantiornithine Zhouornis hani, albeit the latter is somewhat larger. The new specimen provides important and previously unknown details of the skull of Zhouornis hani, which add to the limited knowledge about the cranial anatomy and evolution of enantiornithines. The information offered by the new specimen also augments our understanding of the postcranial morphology of bohaiornithid enantiornithines, a clade that has been only recently recognized. With the description of this specimen, Zhouornis hani becomes one of the most anatomically complete known enantiornithine species, which will facilitate future morphological studies. PMID:24918031

Zhang, Yuguang; O’Connor, Jingmai; Di, Liu; Qingjin, Meng; Sigurdsen, Trond

2014-01-01

475

A subsynoptic-scale kinetic energy study of the Red River Valley tornado outbreak (AVE-SESAME 1)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The subsynoptis-scale kinetic energy balance during the Red River Valley tornado outbreak is presented in order to diagnose storm environment interactions. Area-time averaged energetics indicate that horizontal flux convergence provides the major energy source to the region, while cross contour flow provides the greatest sink. Maximum energy variability is found in the upper levels in association with jet stream activity. Area averaged energetics at individual observation times show that the energy balance near times of maximum storm activity differs considerably from that of the remaining periods. The local kinetic energy balance over Oklahoma during the formation of a limited jet streak receives special attention. Cross contour production of energy is the dominant local source for jet development. Intense convection producing the Red River Valley tornadoes may have contributed to this local development by modifying the surrounding environment.

Jedlovec, G. J.; Fuelberg, H. E.

1981-01-01

476

Conspecific brood parasitism in the white-faced ibis Plegadis chihi (Aves: Pelecaniformes) revealed by microsatellites' based kinship-reconstruction.  

PubMed

The white-faced ibis Plegadis chihi Vieillot, 1817 (Pelecaniformes: Threskiornithidae) is a socially monogamous colonially breeding bird in which behavioral and ecological observations suggest the occurrence of conspecific brood parasitism (CBP). We inferred aspects of the genetic mating system of P. chihi in nature, using a genetic approach in the absence of parental information. We used five heterologous microsatellite loci and a multiple-step methodological approach to infer kinship patterns among 104 pairs of nestlings sampled inside 80 nests in a breeding colony from southern Brazil. The estimated effective population size was 69 white-faced ibises (95% CI: 50-98), enough to ensure long-term population survival. Kinship patterns were identified for 38% of the analyzed pairs: 60% of the diagnosed pairs were identified as full-siblings, 2.5% as half-siblings and 37.5% as unrelated individuals. CBP could explain the presence of unrelated nestlings within broods, in agreement with available non-genetic evidence. The presence of half-siblings within broods could indicate extra-pair paternity. Results suggest that a non-strictly monogamous genetic mating system may be present in the white-faced ibis. This study is the first molecular approach to better characterize the reproductive behavior of P. chihi in the wild. Our findings set the stage for further research to investigate the possible causes and consequences of alternative reproductive strategies in this species. PMID:23554386

de Castro e Souza, Andiara Silos Moraes; Del Lama, Silvia Nassif; Miño, Carolina Isabel

2013-06-01

477

Fagotipificación de aislamientos de Salmonella enteritidis obtenidos de aves en México Phage typing of Salmonella enteritidis strains isolated from poultry  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous research in México has demonstrated the presence of Salmonella enteritidis (SE) in commercial poultry. Uncooked eggs\\/ egg products are a major source of SE infection in humans. The purpose of this research was to phage type Mexican poultry SE isolates. Seventy three serotype-confirmed isolates were used. Fourteen isolates were identified as phage type 4, while 29 corresponded to phage

Arturo Mancera Martínez; Jesús Vázquez Navarrete; Assad Heneidi Zeckua

478

Speciation on oceanic islands: rapid adaptive divergence vs. cryptic speciation in a Guadalupe Island songbird (Aves: Junco).  

PubMed

The evolutionary divergence of island populations, and in particular the tempo and relative importance of neutral and selective factors, is of central interest to the study of speciation. The rate of phenotypic evolution upon island colonization can vary greatly among taxa, and cases of convergent evolution can further confound the inference of correct evolutionary histories. Given the potential lability of phenotypic characters, molecular dating of insular lineages analyzed in a phylogenetic framework provides a critical tool to test hypotheses of phenotypic divergence since colonization. The Guadalupe junco is the only insular form of the polymorphic dark-eyed junco (Junco hyemalis), and shares eye and plumage color with continental morphs, yet presents an enlarged bill and reduced body size. Here we use variation in mtDNA sequence, morphological traits and song variables to test whether the Guadalupe junco evolved rapidly following a recent colonization by a mainland form of the dark-eyed junco, or instead represents a well-differentiated "cryptic" lineage adapted to the insular environment through long-term isolation, with plumage coloration a result of evolutionary convergence. We found high mtDNA divergence of the island lineage with respect to both continental J. hyemalis and J. phaeonotus, representing a history of isolation of about 600,000 years. The island lineage was also significantly differentiated in morphological and male song variables. Moreover, and contrary to predictions regarding diversity loss on small oceanic islands, we document relatively high levels of both haplotypic and song-unit diversity on Guadalupe Island despite long-term isolation in a very small geographic area. In contrast to prevailing taxonomy, the Guadalupe junco is an old, well-differentiated evolutionary lineage, whose similarity to mainland juncos in plumage and eye color is due to evolutionary convergence. Our findings confirm the role of remote islands in driving divergence and speciation, but also their potential role as repositories of ancestral diversity. PMID:23675466

Aleixandre, Pau; Hernández Montoya, Julio; Milá, Borja

2013-01-01

479

Testosterone Affects Reproductive Success by Influencing Extra-Pair Fertilizations in Male Dark-Eyed Juncos (Aves: Junco hyemalis)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Monogamous male birds typically allocate less effort to courtship and more to parental behaviour than males of polygynous species. The seasonal pattern of testosterone (T) secretion varies accordingly. Monogamous males exhibit a spring peak in plasma T followed by lower levels during the parental phase, while males of polygynous species continue to court females and maintain T at higher levels.

Samrrah A. Raouf; Patricia G. Parker; Ellen D. Ketterson; Val Nolan; Charles Ziegenfus

1997-01-01

480

CracidMex1: a comprehensive database of global occurrences of cracids (Aves, Galliformes) with distribution in Mexico.  

PubMed

Cracids are among the most vulnerable groups of Neotropical birds. Almost half of the species of this family are included in a conservation risk category. Twelve taxa occur in Mexico, six of which are considered at risk at national level and two are globally endangered. Therefore, it is imperative that high quality, comprehensive, and high-resolution spatial data on the occurrence of these taxa are made available as a valuable tool in the process of defining appropriate management strategies for conservation at a local and global level. We constructed the CracidMex1 database by collating global records of all cracid taxa that occur in Mexico from available electronic databases, museum specimens, publications, "grey literature", and unpublished records. We generated a database with 23,896 clean, validated, and standardized geographic records. Database quality control was an iterative process that commenced with the consolidation and elimination of duplicate records, followed by the geo-referencing of records when necessary, and their taxonomic and geographic validation using GIS tools and expert knowledge. We followed the geo-referencing protocol proposed by the Mexican National Commission for the Use and Conservation of Biodiversity. We could not estimate the geographic coordinates of 981 records due to inconsistencies or lack of sufficient information in the description of the locality. Given that current records for most of the taxa have some degree of distributional bias, with redundancies at different spatial scales, the CracidMex1 database has allowed us to detect areas where more sampling effort is required to have a better representation of the global spatial occurrence of these cracids. We also found that particular attention needs to be given to taxa identification in those areas where congeners or conspecifics co-occur in order to avoid taxonomic uncertainty. The construction of the CracidMex1 database represents the first comprehensive research effort to compile current, available global geographic records for a group of cracids. The database can now be improved by continuous revision and addition of new records. The CracidMex1 database will provide high quality input data that could be used to generate species distribution models, to assess temporal changes in species distributions, to identify priority areas for research and conservation, and in the definition of management strategies for this bird group. This compilation exercise could be replicated for other cracid groups or regions to attain a better knowledge of the global occurrences of the species in this vulnerable bird family. PMID:25061374

Pinilla-Buitrago, Gonzalo; Martínez-Morales, Miguel Angel; González-García, Fernando; Enríquez, Paula L; Rangel-Salazar, José Luis; Romero, Carlos Alberto Guichard; Navarro-Sigüenza, Adolfo G; Monterrubio-Rico, Tiberio César; Escalona-Segura, Griselda

2014-01-01

481

Isolation and characterization of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II B genes in the Barn owl (Aves: Tyto alba).  

PubMed

We isolated major histocompatibility complex class II B (MHCIIB) genes in the Barn owl (Tyto alba). A PCR-based approach combined with primer walking on genomic and complementary DNA as well as Southern blot analyses revealed the presence of two MHCIIB genes, both being expressed in spleen, liver, and blood. Characteristic structural features of MHCIIB genes as well as their expression and high non-synonymous substitution rates in the region involved in antigen binding suggest that both genes are functional. MHC organization in the Barn owl is simple compared to passerine species that show multiple duplications, and resembles the minimal essential MHC of chicken. PMID:18548243

Burri, Reto; Niculita-Hirzel, Hélène; Roulin, Alexandre; Fumagalli, Luca

2008-09-01

482

Microsatellite markers characterized in the barn owl (Tyto alba) and of high utility in other owls (Strigiformes: AVES).  

PubMed

We have identified 15 polymorphic microsatellite loci for the barn owl (Tyto alba), five from testing published owl loci and 10 from testing non-owl loci, including loci known to be of high utility in passerines and shorebirds. All 15 loci were sequenced in barn owl, and new primer sets were designed for eight loci. The 15 polymorphic loci displayed two to 26 alleles in 56-58 barn owls. When tested in 10 other owl species (n?=?1-6 individuals), between four and nine loci were polymorphic per species. These loci are suitable for studies of population structure and parentage in owls. PMID:21564947

Klein, Akos; Horsburgh, Gavin J; Küpper, Clemens; Major, Agnes; Lee, Patricia L M; Hoffmann, Gyula; Mátics, Róbert; Dawson, Deborah A

2009-11-01

483

Seasonal and age-related changes in blood parasite prevalence in Dark-eyed Juncos (Junco hyemalis, Aves, Passeriformes).  

PubMed

We determined seasonal changes in blood parasite infections in a free-living population of Dark-eyed Juncos (Junco hyemalis) breeding in interior Alaska (65 degrees N; 148 degrees W). The common parasites found in blood smears were Leucocytozoon fringillinarum (56%), Trypanosoma avium (33%), and Haemoproteus fringillae (9%). In males, parasite prevalences were relatively high at arrival on breeding grounds and increased during the breeding season. Intensity of infection with Leucocytozoon also increased between spring and summer, and then decreased at the time of migration (September). This decrease did not occur in adult females. Elevated prevalences during the breeding season probably reflected the addition of new cases via vector activity to positive status resulting from spring relapse. We observed neither an association between parasite species nor a consistent relationship between parasite intensity and body condition. To further study relationships between reproductive system activity and parasite infections, we compared prevalences in adult males that were undergoing their first cycle of gonadal development and regression (males in their second calendar year, or SY) with those of older males (males in their third or more calendar year, i.e., after-second-year males or ASY). Circulating testosterone concentrations declined in both groups between arrival on breeding grounds (end of April-early May) and the end of the reproductive period (July), and they were higher in May in ASY than in SY males. At the peak of the breeding season (June), ASY males also had a higher parasite prevalence than SY males. This difference may have resulted from immunosuppressive effects of gonadal hormones and/or from behavioral differences between SY and ASY males such that older males were exposed to more insect vectors than younger males. . PMID:11351333

Deviche, P; Greiner, E C; Manteca, X

2001-06-01

484

The Top-Awarded Reports: The First Contest of Internet Application to Educational Activities in Japan. AVE in Japan.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet presents two activities that received awards in the First Contest of Internet Application to Educational Activities in Japan. The first paper describes CHaTNet (Children Homes and Teachers Network) at the Tamagawa Gakuen school, winner of the Prime Minister's Award. CHaTNet is a network of 4,500 participants, including parents,…

Japan Audiovisual Information Center for International Service, Tokyo.

485

Petasiger islandicus n. sp. (Digenea: Echinostomatidae) in the horned grebe Podiceps auritus (L.) (Aves: Podicipedidae) from Iceland  

Microsoft Academic Search

Petasiger islandicus n. sp. is described and figured from a demographically isolated popula- tion of the horned grebe Podiceps auritus auritus (L.) in Lake Myvatn (Iceland). This new species belongs to the group of species with 19 collar spines which possess a large elongate-oval cirrus-sac, well- developed pars prostatica and massive bulb-like cirrus. Within this group, P. islandicus appears most

Aneta Kostadinova; Karl Skirnisson

2007-01-01

486

Petasiger islandicus n. sp. (Digenea: Echinostomatidae) in the horned grebe Podiceps auritus (L.) (Aves: Podicipedidae) from Iceland.  

PubMed

Petasiger islandicus n. sp. is described and figured from a demographically isolated population of the horned grebe Podiceps auritus auritus (L.) in Lake Mývatn (Iceland). This new species belongs to the group of species with 19 collar spines which possess a large elongate-oval cirrus-sac, well-developed pars prostatica and massive bulb-like cirrus. Within this group, P. islandicus appears most similar to P. oschmarini Kostadinova & Gibson, 1998, a form with similar body dimensions described from the same host, but differs in having a larger head collar, collar spines, oral sucker, pharynx, testes and sucker-width ratio, and a smaller cirrus-sac, cirrus and eggs. Two Nearctic species resemble P. islandicus in general morphology but differ as follows: P. pseudoneocomense Bravo-Hollis, 1969 has a larger body and collar width, notably shorter collar spines, smaller testes and sucker-width ratio, and a shorter but much wider cirrus-sac which is also smaller relative to the ventral sucker and almost entirely anterior to it; and P. caribbensis Nassi, 1980 has a smaller body, shorter collar spines and a seminal vesicle which is small in relation to the cirrus-sac, vitelline fields reaching anteriorly to the level of the genital pore and the intestinal bifurcation is located more anteriorly. PMID:17896189

Kostadinova, Aneta; Skirnisson, Karl

2007-11-01

487

Phylogenetic Analysis of Pelecaniformes (Aves) Based on Osteological Data: Implications for Waterbird Phylogeny and Fossil Calibration Studies  

PubMed Central

Background Debate regarding the monophyly and relationships of the avian order Pelecaniformes represents a classic example of discord between morphological and molecular estimates of phylogeny. This lack of consensus hampers interpretation of the group's fossil record, which has major implications for understanding patterns of character evolution (e.g., the evolution of wing-propelled diving) and temporal diversification (e.g., the origins of modern families). Relationships of the Pelecaniformes were inferred through parsimony analyses of an osteological dataset encompassing 59 taxa and 464 characters. The relationships of the Plotopteridae, an extinct family of wing-propelled divers, and several other fossil pelecaniforms (Limnofregata, Prophaethon, Lithoptila, ?Borvocarbo stoeffelensis) were also assessed. The antiquity of these taxa and their purported status as stem members of extant families makes them valuable for studies of higher-level avian diversification. Methodology/Principal Findings Pelecaniform monophyly is not recovered, with Phaethontidae recovered as distantly related to all other pelecaniforms, which are supported as a monophyletic Steganopodes. Some anatomical partitions of the dataset possess different phylogenetic signals, and partitioned analyses reveal that these discrepancies are localized outside of Steganopodes, and primarily due to a few labile taxa. The Plotopteridae are recovered as the sister taxon to Phalacrocoracoidea, and the relationships of other fossil pelecaniforms representing key calibration points are well supported, including Limnofregata (sister taxon to Fregatidae), Prophaethon and Lithoptila (successive sister taxa to Phaethontidae), and ?Borvocarbo stoeffelensis (sister taxon to Phalacrocoracidae). These relationships are invariant when ‘backbone’ constraints based on recent avian phylogenies are imposed. Conclusions/Significance Relationships of extant pelecaniforms inferred from morphology are more congruent with molecular phylogenies than previously assumed, though notable conflicts remain. The phylogenetic position of the Plotopteridae implies that wing-propelled diving evolved independently in plotopterids and penguins, representing a remarkable case of convergent evolution. Despite robust support for the placement of fossil taxa representing key calibration points, the successive outgroup relationships of several “stem fossil + crown family” clades are variable and poorly supported across recent studies of avian phylogeny. Thus, the impact these fossils have on inferred patterns of temporal diversification depends heavily on the resolution of deep nodes in avian phylogeny. PMID:20976229

Smith, Nathan D.

2010-01-01

488

A distinctive avian assemblage (Aves: Passeriformes) in Western Darién, Panama is uncovered through a disease surveillance program.  

PubMed

Basic knowledge about the distribution of flora and fauna is lacking for most tropical areas. Improving our knowledge of the tropical biota will help address contemporary global problems, including emerging tropical diseases. Less appreciated is the role that applied studies can have in improving our understanding of basic biological patterns and processes in the tropics. Here, I describe a novel avifauna assemblage uncovered in Western Darién province in the Republic of Panama that was uncovered during a vector-borne disease surveillance program. I compared the passerine bird species composition at 16 sites using records from recent ornithological expeditions sponsored by the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Central and Eastern Panama. Based on the results of a Mantel test, geographic distance did not correlate with pairwise distinctiveness of sites. instead, based on an index of distinctiveness modified from the Chao-Jaccard index, most sites were more or less similarly distinctive, with one site, Aruza Abajo, significantly more distinctive than the rest. I found that the distinctiveness of this site was due not only to the presence of several rare and range-restricted taxa, but also to the absence of taxa that are common elsewhere. This finding provides more evidence of high species composition turnover (beta-diversity) in the Panamanian biota, which appears to be driven by a combination of soil and climate differences over narrow distances. PMID:25102652

Miller, Matthew J

2014-06-01

489

PRELIMINARY DATA ON THE FOOD STRUCTURE OF THE SAND MARTIN NESTLINGS (RIPARIA RIPARIA L. 1758) (AVES: HIRUNDINIDAE) IN SOUTHERN ROMANIA  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper presents some preliminary data on the food structure of the Sand Martin nestlings (Riparia riparia L., 1758) during the three months of the breeding season: May, June and July. Our researches were made in two colonies from the Argeº River, 3 km downstream the dam from Mihãileºti. We used the method of the analysis of the faeces eliminated

GABRIEL CHI; TRAIAN MANOLE

490

Natural born indicators: Great cormorant Phalacrocorax carbo (Aves: Phalacrocoracidae) as monitors of river discharge influence on estuarine ichthyofauna  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ecological traits of piscivorous marine birds have been acknowledged to reflect ecosystem changes. We used the great cormorant as our indicator species in the Minho estuary (NW-Iberian Peninsula, Europe) to assess the temporal variation of their diet and the factors that could influence that variation. Pellets were collected in a night roost, located centrally in the estuary, during two consecutive wintering periods (2005-2006 and 2006-2007). The great cormorant population showed a high degree of feeding plasticity and most of the variation in cormorants' diet was attributed to river discharge fluctuations. Overall, during periods of increased river discharge, marine and marine opportunistic species disappeared from diet, whereas freshwater species increased. The cormorants in this study were using a roost in the middle of the estuary, so they were facing a changing food base over time, in accordance to variation in river discharges. The birds did not keep their diet constant but rather took what became locally available, notwithstanding their broad foraging range. Therefore, we suggest that great cormorants may be considered good samplers of local ichthyofauna and thus, temporal variation in the local prey can be followed by analyzing cormorants' diet.

Dias, Ester; Morais, Pedro; Leopold, Mardik; Campos, Joana; Antunes, Carlos

2012-10-01

491

Evolutionary concepts meet the neck of penguins (Aves: Sphenisciformes), towards a "survival strategy" for evo-devo.  

PubMed

Evolutionary developmental biology (or evo-devo) is the scientific connectivity that allowed a more comprehensive and practical completeness in the contemporary conceptualisation of evolution. The links between genetics, developmental mechanics and evolution led to a better understanding of evolutionary mechanisms. An analysis of evolutionary concepts such as homology, homeoses, constraints, novelties, modularity, and selection is given through the recurring example of the variations identified in the modular repartition of the cervical vertebrae in extant and fossil penguins. The inclusion of this study about penguins in the evolutionary system also involves a reflection on the current state and the future of evo-devo. Three principles of assessment and method, applicable to many natural and conceptual scales, are introduced to define a "survival strategy" for evo-devo. The above-mentioned principles are intended to strengthen and continue the connectivity induced de facto. These current and future investigation challenges are discussed and connected to three main naturalist names related directly to the conceptualisation of evolution: Charles Darwin, Étienne Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire, and Lamarck. PMID:22890499

Guinard, Geoffrey

2012-12-01

492

Patterns of prey use by lesser scaup Aythya affinis (Aves) and diet overlap with fishes during spring migration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent decline in the lesser scaup Aythya affinis population has been linked to changes in wetland conditions along their spring migration routes. In particular, the use of\\u000a amphipod prey by lesser scaup has declined in many regions of the upper Midwest U.S.A. and has been linked to expanded fisheries,\\u000a although empirical data on diet overlap are lacking. To explore patterns

Kimberly A. Strand; Steven R. Chipps; Sharon N. Kahara; Kenneth F. Higgins; Spencer Vaa

2008-01-01

493

The Staurotypus Turtles and Aves Share the Same Origin of Sex Chromosomes but Evolved Different Types of Heterogametic Sex Determination  

PubMed Central

Reptiles have a wide diversity of sex-determining mechanisms and types of sex chromosomes. Turtles exhibit temperature-dependent sex determination and genotypic sex determination, with male heterogametic (XX/XY) and female heterogametic (ZZ/ZW) sex chromosomes. Identification of sex chromosomes in many turtle species and their comparative genomic analysis are of great significance to understand the evolutionary processes of sex determination and sex chromosome differentiation in Testudines. The Mexican giant musk turtle (Staurotypus triporcatus, Kinosternidae, Testudines) and the giant musk turtle (Staurotypus salvinii) have heteromorphic XY sex chromosomes with a low degree of morphological differentiation; however, their origin and linkage group are still unknown. Cross-species chromosome painting with chromosome-specific DNA from Chinese soft-shelled turtle (Pelodiscus sinensis) revealed that the X and Y chromosomes of S. triporcatus have homology with P. sinensis chromosome 6, which corresponds to the chicken Z chromosome. We cloned cDNA fragments of S. triporcatus homologs of 16 chicken Z-linked genes and mapped them to S. triporcatus and S. salvinii chromosomes using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Sixteen genes were localized to the X and Y long arms in the same order in both species. The orders were also almost the same as those of the ostrich (Struthio camelus) Z chromosome, which retains the primitive state of the avian ancestral Z chromosome. These results strongly suggest that the X and Y chromosomes of Staurotypus turtles are at a very early stage of sex chromosome differentiation, and that these chromosomes and the avian ZW chromosomes share the same origin. Nonetheless, the turtles and birds acquired different systems of heterogametic sex determination during their evolution. PMID:25121779

Kawagoshi, Taiki; Uno, Yoshinobu; Nishida, Chizuko; Matsuda, Yoichi

2014-01-01

494

Duval County Extension Office Program Location: 1010 N McDuff Ave, Jacksonville, FL 32254, unless noted  

E-print Network

Model Rocketry Public Speaking Relationship Smarts! On My Own Financial Simulation YUM (Youth Active Improve your diet through nutrition education, food demonstrations, food buying & food safety Free lfigart@coj.net for more info Get Financially Fit @ Your Library What's Your Money Personality

Florida, University of

495

Molecular systematics and diversification of the Asian scimitar babblers (Timaliidae, Aves) based on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences.  

PubMed

The Asian scimitar babblers, including the genus Pomatorhinus and Xiphirhynchus, are a small group of babblers characterized by long down-curved bills and a distribution throughout East and Southeast Asia. To infer the molecular phylogeny of this group and their divergence time, we examined sequences of multiple fragments including two entire mitochondrial genes and four nuclear introns (4352 bp in total) from multiple samples of eight of the nine recognized species of Asian scimitar babblers. The phylogeny resulting from the concatenated multi-locus dataset suggests that Pomatorhinus is paraphyletic. Due to its paraphyly, we propose dividing the traditional genus Pomatorhinus into two morphologically and genetically diagnosable genera: Pomatorhinus and Erythrogenys. Results of the molecular dating based on the conventional mitochondrial DNA divergence rate indicates that the diversification of these babblers is likely congruent with the historical climatic events. Our findings shed light on the diversification of avian species in southern Asia, a poorly studied biodiversity hotspot. PMID:20937399

Dong, Feng; Li, Shou-Hsien; Yang, Xiao-jun

2010-12-01

496

Mamíferos terrestres e aves da Terra Indígena Sapukai (Aldeia Guarani do Bracui), Angra dos Reis, RJ, Brasil  

Microsoft Academic Search

Terrestrial mammals and birds of Sapukai Indigenous Area (Aldeia Guarani do Bracui), Angra dos Reis, RJ, Brazil. Species composition and distribution in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest are still poorly known, although the area has been studied by naturalists since the 16th century. The Serra do Mar region between the states of São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro concentrates one of

André A. Cunha; Henrique Rajão

497

Diversidad de aves y mamíferos en zonas donde anida Rhynchopsitta pachyrhyncha, en el municipio de Madera, Chihuahua, México  

Microsoft Academic Search

The diversity of birds and mammals species was determined in the nesting area of the Tick Billed Parrot (Rynchopsitta Pachyrhyncha) in the Sierra Madre Occidental in the public land El Ejido 5 millas or Santuario Madera, near Ciudad Madera, Chihuahua, from the middle of the month of July until the beginnings of September 2006. We used Sherman traps, and direct

Marco A. Sánchez-Mateo; Ricardo Soto Cruz; Toucha Lebgue Keleng

498

Duval County Extension Office Program Location: 1010 N McDuff Ave, Jacksonville, FL 32254, unless noted  

E-print Network

with budgeting and credit concerns. Learn the process to become a volunteer financial coach. Register: mckinney Nutrition, Health Agriculture / Small Farms Florida Friendly Landscaping Natural Resources Commercial

Florida, University of

499

A Late Miocene Accipitrid (Aves: Accipitriformes) from Nebraska and Its Implications for the Divergence of Old World Vultures  

PubMed Central

Background Old World vultures are likely polyphyletic, representing two subfamilies, the Aegypiinae and Gypaetinae, and some genera of the latter may be of independent origin. Evidence concerning the origin, as well as the timing of the divergence of each subfamily and even genera of the Gypaetinae has been elusive. Methodology/Principal Findings Compared with the Old World, the New World has an unexpectedly diverse and rich fossil component of Old World vultures. Here we describe a new accipitriform bird, Anchigyps voorhiesi gen. et sp. nov., from the Ash Hollow Formation (Upper Clarendonian, Late Miocene) of Nebraska. It represents a form close in morphology to the Old World vultures. Characteristics of its wing bones suggest it was less specialized for soaring than modern vultures. It was likely an opportunistic predator or scavenger having a grasping foot and a mandible morphologically similar to modern carrion-feeding birds. Conclusions/Significance The new fossil reported here is intermediate in morphology between the bulk of accipitrids and the Old World gypaetine vultures, representing a basal lineage of Accipitridae trending towards the vulturine habit, and of its Late Miocene age suggests the divergence of true gypaetine vultures, may have occurred during or slightly before the Miocene. PMID:23152811

Zhang, Zihui; Feduccia, Alan; James, Helen F.

2012-01-01

500

Foraging behaviour of the Scale-throated Hermit Phaethornis eurynome Lesson, 1832 (Aves, Trochilidae) in Vriesea incurvata Gaudich (Bromeliaceae).  

PubMed

In this study we tested for density-dependent relationships between visitation rates of the Scale-throated Hermit (Phaethornis eurynome) and the plant density and flower number of the bromeliad Vriesea incurvata, by comparing plots with varying densities of this bromeliad. Eight 100 m2 plots were established at least 200 m from each other; four plots contained 10-15 individuals of V. incurvata each, whereas the other four contained 4-5 individuals each. The visitors, number of visits, behaviour (nectar thief or potential pollinator) and the height of foraging were recorded during focal observations on the plants. The number of visits of P. eurynome varied according to the local density of V. incurvata, showing that the heterogeneous distribution of this bromeliad species may promote adjustments in the pollinator populations, through resource variation at a local scale. PMID:25166315

Silva, B G; Piratelli, A J

2014-05-01