Sample records for diaz forero ave

  1. E. 7th Ave. E. 6th Ave.

    E-print Network

    Howat, Ian M.

    E. 7th Ave. E. 6th Ave. CourtlandAve. SectionAlley FrancesPl. E. 6th Ave. E. 6th Ave.E. 6th Ave. SummitSt. N.4thSt. IndianolaAve. IndianolaAve. IndianolaAve.IndianolaAve. IndianolaAve. E. 13th Ave. E. 15th Ave. E. 17th Ave. E. 16th Ave. E. Woodru Ave. E. 17th Ave. E. 18th Ave. Frambes Ave. N

  2. University Ave SE University Ave W

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    University Ave SE University Ave W Service Layer Credits: Sources: Esri, DeLorme, NAVTEQ, USGS, Intermap, i UV55 ")280 University Ave. Ramp Major Access Routes University Ave. Ramp §¨¦35W §¨¦94 ")280 Date: 5/30/2014 #12;, , , , , , , ""A TCF Bank Stadium Access Routes University Ave. Ramp University Ave SE Service

  3. 32. 1700 BLOCK OF JEFFERSON AVE. 172125 JEFFERSON AVE., DOUGAN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. 1700 BLOCK OF JEFFERSON AVE. 1721-25 JEFFERSON AVE., DOUGAN BUILDING (1891), PICKLES & SUTTON, ARCHITECTS. 1735 JEFFERSON AVE., MOFFITT & TOWNE COMPANY BUILDING (1910). - Union Depot Area Study, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

  4. 1. DELAWARE AVE. (right, looking north) AND WASHINGTON AVE. SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. DELAWARE AVE. (right, looking north) AND WASHINGTON AVE. SHOWING GLORIA DEI CHURCH (note steeple) - Independence National Historical Park, Walnut, Sixth, Chestnut & Second Streets, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  5. Electrospray Emitters For Diffusion Vacuum Pumps Pablo Diaz Gomez Maqueo, Paulo C. Lozano

    E-print Network

    Electrospray Emitters For Diffusion Vacuum Pumps Pablo Diaz Gomez Maqueo, Paulo C. Lozano June 2011 SSL # 12-11 #12;#12;Electrospray Emitters For Diffusion Vacuum Pumps Pablo Diaz Gomez Maqueo, Paulo C of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 1 #12;2 #12

  6. W. FIFTH AVE. RADIATION LAB

    E-print Network

    Ohta, Shigemi

    . WEAVER DR. PRINCETON AVE.WEST PRINCETON AVE. LABORATORY ENTRANCE TO L.I. EXPRESSWAY RENAISSANCERD. 725 630 I7 Shipping & Receiving 98 I8 Site Maintenance 326 F9 Superconducting Magnet Division 902 G5

  7. Cameron Ave. Franklin St.

    E-print Network

    Whitton, Mary C.

    Residence Halls Student Life UNC Hospitals UNC Operations Visitor Attractions Construction Buildings April. Club 9 11 13 18 Franklin St. Cameron Ave. Libraries Visitor Maps for the University of North Carolina Management Services 18 Women's Center Library (Carolina) Mary Turner Lane Reading and Resource Room 215 W

  8. East Alumni Ave. Horticulture

    E-print Network

    Vetter, Frederick J.

    Hill Rd. QuarryRd. Bayberry Rd. UpperCollegeRd. R.I. RTE. 138 OldNorthRd. TO U.S. RTE. 1 R.I. RTE. 108 Beck Baseball Field Tennis KeaneyRd. TO R.I. RTE. 2 AND INTERSTATE 95 Plains Rd. West Alumni Ave) Animal Care Facility (off Rte. 138 W.) Athletic Maintenance Facility 10 (B1) Automotive Garage 3 (A2

  9. Interstate 40 Magnolia Ave

    E-print Network

    Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

    ,Fireproof storage building 691-0589 9. Old City Java Coffee 523-9817 10. Visitor Center: WDVX studio Festival Fine Art Exhibit, 128 S.Gay Str. 25.Coffee & Chocolate 327 Union Ave,688-9244 26.Mid-Town Art Market Square Garage Map not to scale. Created by Mike C.Berry @ 673-0802 21 Exit 388A Exit 387 22 Tyson

  10. North American species of Agrostocynips Diaz (Hymenoptera: Figitidae), parasitoids of Agromyzidae (Diptera): bionomics and taxonomy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Agrostocynips Diaz is redescribed, as well as two species endemic to the Nearctic: Agrostocynips diastrophi (Ashmead) and A. robusta (Ashmead). Previous to this study, only Neotropical species of Agrostocynips were well diagnosed both taxonomically and biologically. Agrostocynips belongs...

  11. STS-75 Chang-Diaz and MS Jeff Hoffman in White Room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-75 Payload Commander Franklin R. Chang-Diaz (center) and Mission Specialist Jeffrey A. Hoffman (right) prepare to enter the Space Shuttle Columbia at Launch Pad 39B with assistance from the white room closeout crew.

  12. STS-34 Mission Specialists Chang-Diaz and Baker with EVA tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-34 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Mission Specialist (MS) Franklin R. Chang-Diaz (center) and MS Ellen S. Baker (right) examine extravehicular activity (EVA) tools along with Rockwell Space Operations (RSO) technician Wayne J. Wedlake prior EVA contingency exercise (underwater simulation) in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29. Chang-Diaz and Baker will practice using the EVA tools and rehearse chores which would require manual action outside the spacecraft in the event of failure of remote systems in the WETF's 25 ft pool.

  13. Directions to Lot S108 Dan Patch Ave.

    E-print Network

    Gulliver, Robert

    #12;Directions to Lot S108 Dan Patch Ave. Randall Ave. From I-94 Eastbound 1. Exit at Snelling Ave on Randall Ave. 7. Lot S108 will be on the left. From I-94 Westbound 1. Exit at Snelling Ave. (Exit 238) 2. (State Fairgrounds Main Entrance) 4. Turn right on Underwood St. 5. Turn left on Randall Ave. 6. Lot S108

  14. From federated to aggregated search Fernando Diaz, Mounia Lalmas and Milad Shokouhi

    E-print Network

    Lalmas, Mounia

    the information in real time, and deliver a single, integrated set of search results [ ... ] will incorporate News Homepage Wikipedia Real-time results Video Twitter Structured Data #12;6 Motivation for aggregated1 From federated to aggregated search Fernando Diaz, Mounia Lalmas and Milad Shokouhi diazf

  15. A time domain analysis of PML models in J. Diaz, P. Joly

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    A time domain analysis of PML models in acoustics. J. Diaz, P. Joly INRIA Rocquencourt - Domaine de in this paper a time-domain analysis of PML's for non-advective and advective acoustics. We focus our attention authors concerning the time domain analysis for acoustic wave propagation models. Email addresses: julien

  16. Change of the Tropical Hadley Cell Since 1950 Xiao-Wei Quan, Henry F. Diaz, and Martin P. Hoerling

    E-print Network

    Quan, Xiaowei

    ), and the changes over the North Pacific involve variations in Aleutian low with teleconnections downstream over, as recorded by observations from ships sailing over the global oceans (Diaz et al. 1992, 1994

  17. BOLETIN DE AVES MARINAS LATINOAMERICANAS VOLUMEN 3j NUMERO 1

    E-print Network

    Duffy, David Cameron

    sobre Aves Marinas de CIPA ENERO 1988 David y Marfa Jose Duffy, Escuela de Ciencias Ambientales presentaciones sobre aves marinas fueron: Araya y Leighton, Aves observadas en canales fueginos a bordo de R

  18. www.ave.kth.se Rail Vehicles

    E-print Network

    Haviland, David

    www.ave.kth.se Rail Vehicles Part of the Masters program in Vehicle Engineering Master's Thesis, contact Carlos Casanueva at the Division of Rail Vehicles. Tel.: 08 790 76 52 e-mail: carlosc@kth.se #12;

  19. Single Triangle Strip and Loop on Manifolds with Boundaries Pablo Diaz-Gutierrez David Eppstein M. Gopi

    E-print Network

    Meenakshisundaram, Gopi

    Single Triangle Strip and Loop on Manifolds with Boundaries Pablo Diaz-Gutierrez David Eppstein M. Gopi Department of Computer Science, University of California, Irvine. Abstract The single triangle and end triangles on manifolds with or without boundaries. The main contributions of this paper include

  20. Astronauts Jeffrey A. Hoffman (left) and Franklin R. Chang-Diaz hold up a sign to celebrate the fact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Astronauts Jeffrey A. Hoffman (left) and Franklin R. Chang-Diaz hold up a sign to celebrate the fact that each has surpassed the 1,000-hour mark in space during the flight. The two mission specialists joined three other astronauts and an international payload specialist for 16 days of scientific research aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia.

  1. 1. GENERAL STREET VIEW LOOKING SOUTH ON CONVENT AVE. FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL STREET VIEW LOOKING SOUTH ON CONVENT AVE. FROM INTERSECTION OF SOUTH CONVENT AVE. AND WEST KENNEDY ST. - Barrio Libre, West Kennedy & West Seventeenth Streets, Meyer & Convent Avenues, Tucson, Pima County, AZ

  2. Argumentation Logic to Assist in Security Administration One Shields Ave

    E-print Network

    California at Davis, University of

    Argumentation Logic to Assist in Security Administration Jeff Rowe UC Davis One Shields Ave Davis, CA 95616 rowe@cs.ucdavis.edu Karl Levitt UC Davis One Shields Ave Davis, CA 95616 levitt@sci.brooklyn.cuny.edu Andrew Applebaum UC Davis One Shields Ave Davis, CA 95616 applebau@ucdavis.edu Sharmin Jalal UC Davis One

  3. www.ave.kth.se Rail Vehicles

    E-print Network

    Haviland, David

    www.ave.kth.se Rail Vehicles Part of the Masters program in Vehicle Engineering Master's Thesis: Validation of wheel wear calculation code Background Rail vehicle operators have a genuine concern about wheel and rail wear prediction methodologies, due to the influence of worn profiles in the cost of both

  4. GENEVIEVE SAUVE 4400 Fifth Ave, Box 190

    E-print Network

    Sauvé, Geneviève

    of organic and inorganic solar cells · Synthesis of inorganic complexes · Fabrication of optically switchableGENEVIEVE SAUVE 4400 Fifth Ave, Box 190 Pittsburgh, PA 15213 412-977-7750 (Cell) gsauve, PA 1994-1999 Research and Teaching Assistant Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

  5. GRANT AVE., FROM SOUTHEAST OF BUILDING #191 (NORTHWEST CORNER OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GRANT AVE., FROM SOUTHEAST OF BUILDING #191 (NORTHWEST CORNER OF POPE & GRANT AVENUES), LOOKING NORTH-NORTHEAST - Fort Leavenworth, Metropolitan Avenue & Seventh Street, Leavenworth, Leavenworth County, KS

  6. ATLAS DE LAS AVES EN INVIERNO Servicio de Vida Silvestre

    E-print Network

    Carrascal, Luis M.

    ATLAS DE LAS AVES EN INVIERNO EN ESPAÑA Servicio de Vida Silvestre Subdirección General de Medio Ornitología (SEO/BirdLife) Madrid, 2012 #12;94 Espacios protegidos y aves invernantes en España. ¿Existe un dos inventarios de IBA (De Juana et al., 1989; Viada, 1998), estando prevista una actualización en

  7. S. Washington Ave.Exit 6 Davidson Road

    E-print Network

    Exit 9 S. Washington Ave.Exit 6 5 1 Possumtown Road Davidson Road Bartholomew Road Brett Road Metlars Lane Stelton Road (Route 529) MetlarsLane MorrisAvenue MetlarsLane CentennialAve. River Road (Route 514) Route287 OldHoesLane DIMACS (CoRE Bldg) Frelinghuysen Road Sutphen Road = Traffic Light Exit

  8. Geophysical Logs of Selected Wells at the Diaz Chemical Superfund Site in the Village of Holley, New York, 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eckhardt, David A.V.; Anderson, J. Alton

    2010-01-01

    Geophysical logs were collected and analyzed to define the bedrock fracture patterns and flow zones penetrated by three wells at the Diaz Chemical Superfund Site in the Village of Holley in Orleans County, New York. The work was conducted in December 2009 as part of the investigation of contamination by organic compounds in the shale, mudstone, and sandstone bedrock at the Site. The geophysical logs include natural-gamma, caliper, borehole image, fluid properties, and flowmeter data. The orientation of fractures in the boreholes was inferred from the log data and summarized in stereo and tadpole plots; when possible, the transmissivity and hydraulic head was also determined for fracture zones that were observed to be hydraulically active through the flowmeter logs. The data are intended, in part, for use in the remediation of the site.

  9. BOLETIN DE AVES MARINAS LATINOAMERICANOS VOLUMEN 2j NUMERO 2

    E-print Network

    Duffy, David Cameron

    no Brasil" esta produciendo un nuevo boletin sobre las aves marinas de Brasil. El primer numero tiene Brasil SEABIRDS: FEEDING ECOLOGY AND ROLE IN MARINE ECOSYSTEMS Este nuevo libro, redactado por John

  10. BOLETIN DE AVES MARINAS LATINOAHERICANAS VOLUMKN 3; NUMERO 2

    E-print Network

    Duffy, David Cameron

    un impulso importante para los estudios de El NiBo, a nivel mundial. Como Presidente del Grupo de Brasil Resumenes de articulos de vol. 2. numero 1. 1987. o Atoba no contexte das aves aarinhas Control

  11. Enigmatic phylogeny of skuas (Aves:Stercorariidae)

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, B L; Baker, A J; Blechschmidt, K; Dittmann, D L; Furness, R W; Gerwin, J A; Helbig, A J; de Korte, J; Marshall, H D; Palma, R L; Peter, H U; Ramli, R; Siebold, I; Willcox, M S; Wilson, R H; Zink, R M

    1997-01-01

    Multiple sources of evidence show that the skuas (Aves:Stercorariidae) are a monophyletic group, closely related to gulls (Laridae. On morphological and behavioural evidence the Stercorariidae are divided into two widely divergent genera, Catharacta and Stercorarius, consistent with observed levels of nuclear and mitochondrial gene divergence. Catharacta skuas are large-bodied and with one exception breed in the Southern Hemisphere. Stercorarius skuas otherwise known as jaegers) are smaller bodied and breed exclusively in the Northern Hemisphere. Evidence from both mitochondrial and nuclear genomes and from ectoparasitic lice (Insecta:Phthiraptera) shows that the Pomarine skua, S. pomarinus, which has been recognized as being somewhat intermediate in certain morphological and behavioural characteristics, is much more closely related to species in the genus Catharacta, especially to the Northern Hemisphere-breeding Great skua, C. skua, than it is to the other two Stercorarius skuas, the Arctic skua, S. parasiticus and the Longtailed skua, S. longicaudus. Three possible explanations that might account for this discordant aspect of skua phylogeny are explored. These involve (i) the segregation of ancestral polymorphism, (ii) convergent evolution of morphology and behaviour or (iii) inter-generic hybridization. The available evidence from both nuclear and mitochondrial genomes does not exclude any of these hypotheses. Thus, resolution of this enigma of skua phylogeny awaits further work. PMID:9061968

  12. AVES.NET: The Freshwater Dinoflagellates

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Carty, Susan

    Hosted by AVES.NET, this website about Freshwater Dinoflagellates was created by Victor W. Fazio III and Dr. Susan Carty of Heidelberg College (Tiffin, Ohio). Two main attractions of this site are the Freshwater Dinoflagellate Image Archive, and the Recent Additions-Freshwater Dinoflagellate Images 2003 (from the 2003-04 winter field season). Individual Dinoflagellate image pages generally include a ventral view, dorsal view, or both, and the pages featuring species from Ohio include county distribution maps. Site visitors can email Dr. Carty for permission to use any of the images. The website also contains a List of Freshwater Dinoflagellates in Ohio, some of which link to the individual image pages. Additionally, the site offers a Review of Online Images of Freshwater Dinoflagellates including links to many other host sites, and a link to an online article by Dr. Susan Carty and Daniel E. Wujek entitled _A New Species of Peridinium and New Records of Dinoflagellates and Silica-Scaled Chrysophytes from Belize._ [NL

  13. Tendencias poblacionales recientes y distribucin de aves estepricas en las Islas Canarias orientales.

    E-print Network

    Carrascal, Luis M.

    , Corredor Sahariano, Ganga Ortega y Avutarda Hubara). ... se pretende proporcionar información relevante estimada siete años antes. · El corredor sahariano (1100 aves), la ganga ortega (1500 aves) y el alcaraván

  14. BayesianScore(BDeu) Ave. Bayesian Score Results -Child -Sample Size 500

    E-print Network

    Brown, Laura E.

    GS PC TPDA GES BayesianScore(BDeu) Ave. Bayesian Score Results - Child - Sample Size 500 Error Bars GS PC TPDA GES BayesianScore(BDeu) Ave. Bayesian Score Results - Child3 - Sample Size 500 Error Bars TPDA GES BayesianScore(BDeu) Ave. Bayesian Score Results - Child5 - Sample Size 500 Error Bars

  15. IDENTIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THE PEROXIREDOXIN GENE FAMILY IN AVES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peroxiredoxin (PRX) is a crucial antioxidant protein that protects against endogenously produced peroxides in prokaryotes to eukaryotes. To date, six different isoforms have been identified in mammals. In this study, we describe the first members of the PRX protein family to be characterized in Aves...

  16. Medical Records Service 77 Massachusetts Ave., E23-023

    E-print Network

    Polz, Martin

    Medical Records Service 77 Massachusetts Ave., E23-023 Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 Phone: 617: _____________________________________________________________________________________ I request that the following information be amended in my medical record. Please specify the date.hhs.gov/ocr/privacy/hipaa/complaints Please mail or fax this form to the Medical Records Service (see top of page) and retain a copy for your

  17. 1801 E. Cotati Ave. Rohnert Park, CA 94928

    E-print Network

    Ravikumar, B.

    1801 E. Cotati Ave. Rohnert Park, CA 94928 707 664.2682 Fax (707) 664.2613 M.A. in Psychology Depth Psychology Program Program Application for Admission to the Psychology M.A. Email: psychma@sonoma.edu www.sonoma.edu/psychology of recommendation and oral interview. 6. Completion of specified prerequisite coursework in psychology, or approved

  18. OFFICE OF DIGITAL HUMANITIES 1100 PENNSYLVANIA AVE., NW

    E-print Network

    McCombe, Bruce D.

    NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES OFFICE OF DIGITAL HUMANITIES 1100 PENNSYLVANIA AVE., NW applicants are also strongly encouraged to consult with staff members in the NEH Office of Digital Humanities WASHINGTON, D.C. 20506 ODH@NEH.GOV WWW.NEH.GOV National Endowment for the Humanities Office of Digital

  19. SKEDADDLE HUMANE WILDLIFE CONTROL 297 Brucedale Ave. East

    E-print Network

    SKEDADDLE HUMANE WILDLIFE CONTROL 297 Brucedale Ave. East Hamilton, ON L9A 1R2 1-877-222-9453 WILDLIFE TECHNICIAN Skedaddle Humane Wildlife Control, Canada's largest urban wildlife control company. Responsibilities: Inspect buildings and outside areas of property to detect signs of wildlife intrusion. Identify

  20. Transcriptomics analyses reveal global roles of the regulator AveI in Streptomyces avermitilis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Chen, Jun; Jiang, Yuqian; Zhang, Weiwen; Jiang, Weihong; Lu, Yinhua

    2009-09-01

    In our previous studies, AveI was identified as a negative regulator for avermectin biosynthesis in Streptomyces avermitilis NRRL8165, and the aveI-null mutant of NRRL8165 could produce at least 10-fold more avermectin B1a than its wild-type strain. In order to explore the regulatory mechanism by which aveI affects avermectin biosynthesis, in this study, we performed a global comparative gene expression analysis between aveI deletion mutant 8165DeltaI and its wild-type strain using NimbleGen microarrays in combination with real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR. The results showed the aveI deletion has caused global changes beyond the avermectin biosynthetic gene cluster. The aveI gene not only negatively affected expression of the avermectin biosynthetic gene cluster but also affected expression of oligomycin and filipin biosynthetic clusters. In addition, the genes involved in precursor biosyntheses for avermectin or other antibiotics, such as crotonyl-CoA reductase and methylmalonyl-CoA decarboxylase, were also upregulated in aveI mutant. Furthermore, genes in several key primary metabolic pathways, such as protein synthesis and fatty acid metabolism, were found downregulated in the mutant. These results suggested that the aveI gene may be functioning as a global regulator involved in directing carbon flux from primary to secondary metabolism. PMID:19656197

  1. The AVE/VAS 2: The 25 mb sounding data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sienkiewicz, M. E.

    1982-01-01

    The rawinsonde sounding program for the AVE/VAS II experiment is described and tabulated data at 25 mb intervals are presented. Soundings were taken at 3 hr intervals, was an 18 hour period. An additional sounding was taken at the normal synoptic observation time. The processing soundings method is discussed, estimates of the RMS errors in the data are presented, and an example of contact data is given. Termination pressures of soundings taken in the meso-beta-scale network are tabulated, as are observations of ground temperature at a depth of 2 cm.

  2. 1. VIEW OF MILL WORKER HOUSE AT 502 ASKEW AVE. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW OF MILL WORKER HOUSE AT 502 ASKEW AVE. HOUSE IS 1 1/2 STORY, 3 BAY SIDE GABLE WITH REAR KITCHEN ELL AND PORCH EXTENDING FROM FRONT. LOCKWOOD GREENE ENGINEERS BUILT THIS AND 128 OTHER NEW HOUSES FOR NEW ENGLAND SOUTHERN MILLS IN 1923-1924. THE PREEXISTING MILL VILLAGE NEEDED TO BE EXPANDED TO ACCOMODATE WORKERS FOR THEIR NEW STARK MILL IN HOGANSVILLE. THIS HOUSE WAS BUILT WITH INDOOR PLUMBING, AND ELECTRICITY AT A COST OF APPROXIMATELY $430 PER ROOM. - 502 Askew Avenue (House), 502 Askew Avenue, Hogansville, Troup County, GA

  3. The pathway-specific regulator AveR from Streptomyces avermitilis positively regulates avermectin production while it negatively affects oligomycin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jia; Zhao, Jinlei; Li, Lili; Chen, Zhi; Wen, Ying; Li, Jilun

    2010-02-01

    The function of the regulatory protein AveR in Streptomyces avermitilis was examined. An aveR deletion mutant abolished avermectin production and produced more oligomycin, and its phenotype was complemented by a single copy of the aveR gene. Removal of the C-terminal HTH domain of AveR abolished avermectin biosynthesis, indicating the importance of HTH domain for AveR function. Promoter titration and promoter probe assays suggested that the transcription of aveA1, encoding polypeptide AVES1 of avermectin PKS, was activated by AveR. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay showed that the predicted promoter regions of both the ave cluster and the olm cluster were target sites of AveR, and the DNA-binding activity of AveR was dependent on its HTH domain. RT-PCR analysis revealed that the transcriptions of ave structural genes were dependent on AveR, but that of olm structural genes and putative pathway-specific regulatory genes increased in the aveR mutants. Consistent with these observations, overexpression of aveR successfully increased avermectin production. These results indicated that aveR encodes a pathway-specific activator essential for avermectin biosynthesis and it also negatively affects oligomycin biosynthesis. PMID:20012992

  4. AVE/VAS 3: 25-mb sounding data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sienkiewicz, M. E.

    1982-01-01

    The rawinsonde sounding program for the AVE/VAS 3 experiment is described. Tabulated data are presented at 25-mb intervals for the 24 National Weather Service stations and 14 special stations participating in the experiment. Soundings were taken at 3-hr intervals, beginning at 1200 GMT on March 27, 1982, and ending at 0600 GMT on March 28, 1982 (7 sounding times). An additional sounding was taken at the National Weather Service stations at 1200 GMT on March 28, 1982, at the normal synoptic observation time. The method of processing soundings is briefly discussed, estimates of the RMS errors in the data are presented, and an example of contact data is given. Termination pressures of soundings taken in the mesos-beta-scale network are tabulated, as are observations of ground temperature at a depth of 2 cm.

  5. DEPAUL UNIVERSITY Institute for Professional Development INSTITUTE FOR PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 243 S. Wabash Ave, Room 301

    E-print Network

    Schaefer, Marcus

    S. Wabash Ave, Room 301 Chicago, IL 60604-2300 WEB DEVELOPMENT WITH JAVASCRIPT AND HTML5 Phone: (312: ________________________________ #12;WEB DEVELOPMENT WITH JAVASCRIPT AND HTML5 PROGRAM APPLICANTS: This form must be completed

  6. Nephroprotection by antifibrotic and anti-inflammatory effects of the vasopeptidase inhibitor AVE7688

    Microsoft Academic Search

    OLIVER GROSS; MARIE-LOUISE KOEPKE; BOGDAN BEIROWSKI; ECKHARD SCHULZE-LOHOFF; STEPHAN SEGERER; MANFRED WEBER

    2005-01-01

    Nephroprotection by antifibrotic and anti-inflammatory effects of the vasopeptidase inhibitor AVE7688.BackgroundChronic renal disease substantially increases the risk of cardiovascular events and death. Vasopeptidase inhibitors are known to show a strong antihypertensive effect. In the present study, we investigated the nephroprotective potential of the vasopeptidase inhibitor AVE7688 beyond its antihypertensive effects in a mouse model of progressive renal fibrosis.MethodsCOL4A3 ?\\/? mice

  7. AveBoost2: Boosting for Noisy Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oza, Nikunj C.

    2004-01-01

    AdaBoost is a well-known ensemble learning algorithm that constructs its constituent or base models in sequence. A key step in AdaBoost is constructing a distribution over the training examples to create each base model. This distribution, represented as a vector, is constructed to be orthogonal to the vector of mistakes made by the pre- vious base model in the sequence. The idea is to make the next base model's errors uncorrelated with those of the previous model. In previous work, we developed an algorithm, AveBoost, that constructed distributions orthogonal to the mistake vectors of all the previous models, and then averaged them to create the next base model s distribution. Our experiments demonstrated the superior accuracy of our approach. In this paper, we slightly revise our algorithm to allow us to obtain non-trivial theoretical results: bounds on the training error and generalization error (difference between training and test error). Our averaging process has a regularizing effect which, as expected, leads us to a worse training error bound for our algorithm than for AdaBoost but a superior generalization error bound. For this paper, we experimented with the data that we used in both as originally supplied and with added label noise-a small fraction of the data has its original label changed. Noisy data are notoriously difficult for AdaBoost to learn. Our algorithm's performance improvement over AdaBoost is even greater on the noisy data than the original data.

  8. Effects of changing irrigation practices on the ground-water hydrology of the Santa Isabel-Juana Diaz area, south central Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramos-Gines, Orlando

    1994-01-01

    Prior to 1930, the principal source of water for irrigation in the Santa Isabel-Juana Diaz area was surface water from outside the study area, which was delivered by a complex channel-pond system. Recharge from water applied to the fields, estimated to be 18.7 million of gallons per day, and discharge by ground-water flow to sea, estimated to be 17 million of gallons per day, were the major water- budget components prior to intensive development of the ground-water resources. Development of the ground-water resources after 1930 resulted in a substantial increase in irrigation, primarily furrow irrigation. The surface water supplied by the complex channel-pond system continued to be used and ground-water withdrawals increased sub- stantially. By 1966-68, ground-water recharge from irrigation water applied to the fields, estimated to be 37 million of gallons per day, and discharge by pumpage for irrigation, estimated to be 77 million of gallons per day, were the two major components of the ground-water budget. By 1987, drip irrigation had become the principal method of irrigation in the study area, and surface-water irrigation had, for the most part, been discontinued. The estimated aquifer recharge from irrigation water in 1987 was about 6.6 million of gallons per day, which occurred primarily in the remaining fields where furrow irrigation was still practiced. Although aquifer recharge had been reduced as a result of the conversion from furrow to drip irrigation, water levels in the aquifer were higher in 1987 than in 1968 because of the large reduction in ground-water withdrawals and subsequent recovery of ground-water levels.

  9. AVE 3085, a novel endothelial nitric oxide synthase enhancer, attenuates cardiac remodeling in mice through the Smad signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yili; Chen, Cong; Feng, Cong; Tang, Anli; Ma, Yuedong; He, Xin; Li, Yanhui; He, Jiangui; Dong, Yugang

    2015-03-15

    AVE 3085 is a novel endothelial nitric oxide synthase enhancer. Although AVE 3085 treatment has been shown to be effective in spontaneously restoring endothelial function in hypertensive rats, little is known about the effects and mechanisms of AVE 3085 with respect to cardiac remodeling. The present study was designed to examine the effects of AVE 3085 on cardiac remodeling and the mechanisms underlying the effects of this compound. Mice were subjected to aortic banding to induce cardiac remodeling and were then administered AVE 3085 (10 mg kg day(-1), orally) for 4 weeks. At the end of the treatment, the aortic banding-treated mice exhibited significant elevations in cardiac remodeling, characterized by an increase in left ventricular weight relative to body weight, an increase in the area of collagen deposition, an increase in the mean myocyte diameter, and increases in the gene expressions of the hypertrophic markers atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and ?-MHC. These indexes were significantly decreased in the AVE 3085-treated mice. Furthermore, AVE 3085 treatment reduced the expression and activation of the Smad signaling pathway in the aortic banding-treated mice. Our data showed that AVE 3085 attenuated cardiac remodeling, and this effect was possibly mediated through the inhibition of Smad signaling. PMID:25712222

  10. BOLETIN DE AVES MARINAS LATINOAMERICANAS [C.I.P.A. (I.C.B.P . )! P.S:G.] VOLUMEN 1 , NUMERO 1 , 1986.

    E-print Network

    Duffy, David Cameron

    Aves Acuaticas Casilla Correcs ' 3368 1000 Buenos Aires , Argentina Malcolm Coulter River EcologyBOLETIN DE AVES MARINAS LATINOAMERICANAS [C.I.P.A. (I.C.B.P . )! P.S:G.] VOLUMEN 1 , NUMERO 1 cientificos, con inter~s en el estudio ' y la conservaci6n de aves marinas en Jt.rn~rica Latina. Sera publicad

  11. DISTANCE FROM CAMPUS: 1.5 miles. 3343 E. Central Ave

    E-print Network

    .northrocksuiteshotel.com Wichita Inn North DISTANCE FROM CAMPUS: 3.5 miles. 3741 N. Rock Rd. Wichita, KS 67226 Toll-Free: (888) 910.lq.com Drury Plaza Hotel Broadview DISTANCE FROM CAMPUS: 3.5 miles. 400 W. Douglas Ave Wichita, KS 67202 Phone

  12. MAIN GATE, INTERSECTION OF 4TH AVE (200 NORTH) AND N ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MAIN GATE, INTERSECTION OF 4TH AVE (200 NORTH) AND N STREET (895 EAST), SALT LAKE CITY, UT. VIEW LOOKING EAST THROUGH MAIN CEMETERY GATE TO CEMETERY'S MAIN STREET, REPHOTOGRAPH OF HISTORIC SHIPLER PHOTO # 18276, UTAH STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY COLLECTION. - Salt Lake City Cemetery, 200 N Street, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT

  13. Rsistance au dveloppement d'Heterodera ave-nae Woll. chez diffrentes espces de Triticum

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Résistance au développement d'Heterodera ave- nae Woll. chez différentes espèces de Triticum Roger pathotypes d'Heterodera avenae de 88 lignées ou hybrides appartenant aux espè- ces Triticum monococcum, T. urartu, T. turgidum, T. timopheevi, T. aestivum, T. umbellulatum, T. variabile, a été étudié. Une grande

  14. MPEG-4 Ave stream watermarking by ST-mDM Marwen Hasnaoui, Maher Belhaj, Mihai Mitrea

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    .mitrea}@it-sudparis.eu Abstract The present paper introduces a new insertion/detection technique for MPEG-4 Ave stream protection domain peculiarities. In contrast to the state-of-the art techniques considering only binary insertion against noise addition, transcoding and geometric (StirMark) attacks is proved. The transparency

  15. Coprolite deposits reveal the diet and ecology of the extinct New Zealand megaherbivore moa (Aves, Dinornithiformes)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jamie R. Wood; Nicolas J. Rawlence; Geoffery M. Rogers; Jeremy J. Austin; Trevor H. Worthy; Alan Cooper

    2008-01-01

    The discovery in New Zealand of Late Holocene deposits of coprolites from extinct avian megaherbivores has provided a unique opportunity to gain a detailed insight into the ecology of these birds across ecologically diverse habitats. Macrofossil analysis of 116 coprolites of the giant ratite moa (Aves, Dinornithiformes) reveals a diverse diet of herbs and low shrubs in both semi-arid and

  16. DISTRIBUCI~NY ABUNDANCIA DE LAS AVES EN LA PEN~NSULAIBERICA. UNA APROXIMACI~N

    E-print Network

    Carrascal, Luis M.

    sobre su avifauna. La distribuci6n geo- grafica de las aves en Iberia es el resultado de la interacci6n asociada hacia el SW. Estos cambios paleoclimhticos han tenido una enorme trascendencia sobre la avifauna Cnfasis en identificar el carhcter inC- dito de la avifauna ibdrica y la importancia de la Penlnsula en el

  17. Angelique Diaz To Subject UPLOAD

    E-print Network

    - ing herd. 2. If selenium deficiency has been a severe problem in the herd, consider administering slow herd with 2 mil- lion IU of vitamin A if forage is apt to be deficient in vitamin A. March colostrum should come from older cows. c. Dip navel in 1% iodine. d. Give selenium-vitamin E injection

  18. Graystone Group Advertising, 2710 North Ave, Suite 200 Bridgeport, CT 06604 Phone: 8005440005 or 2035490060 Fax: 2035490061

    E-print Network

    Bolding, M. Chad

    Graystone Group Advertising, 2710 North Ave, Suite 200 Bridgeport, CT 06604 Phone: 8005440005 or 2035490060 Fax: 2035490061 Email: ads@graystoneadv.com Placing Recruitment Advertising To assist University departments with all recruitment and advertising needs, Clemson is now partnered

  19. High-speed video analysis of wing-snapping in two manakin clades (Pipridae: Aves)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kimberly S. Bostwick; Richard O. Prum

    2003-01-01

    Basic kinematic and detailed physical mechanisms of avian, non-vocal sound production are both unknown. Here, for the first time, field-generated high-speed video recordings and acoustic analyses are used to test numerous competing hypotheses of the kinematics underlying sonations, or non-vocal communicative sounds, produced by two genera of Pipridae, Manacus and Pipra (Aves). Eleven behaviorally and acoustically distinct sonations are characterized,

  20. k=10 GS PC TPDA GES Ave. Bayesian Score Results -Child -Sample Size 500

    E-print Network

    Brown, Laura E.

    SC k=10 GS PC TPDA GES Bayesian Score (BDeu) Ave. Bayesian Score Results - Child - Sample Size 500 - Sample Size 500 Error Bars = +/- Std.Dev. -130 -120 -110 -100 -90 MMHC OR1 k=5 OR1 k=10 OR1 k=20 OR2 k=5 - Child5 - Sample Size 500 Error Bars = +/- Std.Dev. -260 -240 -220 -200 -180 * MMHC OR1 k=5 OR1 k=10 OR1

  1. Phylogenetic relationships within the Laridae (Charadriiformes: Aves) inferred from mitochondrial markers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J.-M. Pons; A. Hassanin; P.-A. Crochet

    2005-01-01

    Gulls (Aves: Laridae) constitute a recent and cosmopolite family of well-studied seabirds for which a robust phylogeny is needed to perform comparative and biogeographical analyses. The present study, the first molecular phylogeny of all Larids species (N=53), is based on a combined segment of mtDNA (partial cytochrome b and control region). We discuss our phylogenetic tree in the light of

  2. Complete mitochondrial genome of the Baikal teal Anas formosa (Aves, Anseriformes, Anatidae).

    PubMed

    Ryu, Shi Hyun; Hwang, Ui Wook

    2011-08-01

    The Baikal teal Anas formosa (Aves, Anseriformes, Anatidae) is classified as "Vulnerable" on the IUCN Red List. Here, whole mitochondrial genome of A. formosa was amplified and sequenced. The total length of the Baikal teal mitochondrial genome is 16,594 bp, which consists of 13 protein-coding, 2 rRNA, 22 tRNA genes and 1 control region. The characteristics of the mitochondrial genomes were analyzed and discussed in detail. PMID:22040069

  3. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-? (PPAR-?) agonist, AVE8134, attenuates the progression of heart failure and increases survival in rats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wolfgang Linz; Paulus Wohlfart; Manuel Baader; Kristin Breitschopf; Eugen Falk; Hans-Ludwig Schäfer; Martin Gerl; Werner Kramer; Hartmut Rütten

    2009-01-01

    Aim:To investigate the efficacy of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-? (PPAR?) agonist, AVE8134, in cellular and experimental models of cardiac dysfunction and heart failure.Methods:In Sprague Dawley rats with permanent ligation of the left coronary artery (post-MI), AVE8134 was compared to the PPAR? agonist rosiglitazone and in a second study to the ACE inhibitor ramipril. In DOCA-salt sensitive rats, efficacy of AVE8134

  4. AVE8134, a novel potent PPAR? agonist, improves lipid profile and glucose metabolism in dyslipidemic mice and type 2 diabetic rats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hans Ludwig Schäfer; Wolfgang Linz; Eugen Falk; Maike Glien; Heiner Glombik; Marcus Korn; Wolfgang Wendler; Andreas W Herling; Hartmut Rütten

    2012-01-01

    Aim:AVE8134 is a structurally novel potent PPAR? agonist. The aim of this study is to investigate the efficacy of AVE8134 on lipid profile and glucose metabolism in dyslipidemic mice and type 2 diabetic rats.Methods:A cell based PPAR Gal4 transactivation assay was constructed for testing the activities of AVE8134 at 3 different PPAR isoforms in vitro. Transgenic human Apo A1 (hApo

  5. Impact evaluation of a refrigeration control system installed at Vitamilk Dairy, Incorporated under the Energy $avings Plan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. R. Brown; D. R. Dixon; G. E. Spanner

    1995-01-01

    This impact evaluation of a refrigeration control system (RCS) recently installed at Vitamilk Dairy, Inc. (Vitamilk) was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) as part of an evaluation of its Energy $avings Plan (E$P) Program. The RCS installation at Vitamilk uses microcomputer- based controls to automate refrigeration equipment previously controlled manually. This impact evaluation assessed how much electricity is

  6. Accounting for Phylogenetic Uncertainty in Biogeography: A Bayesian Approach to Dispersal-Vicariance Analysis of the Thrushes (Aves: Turdus)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JOHAN A. A. NYLANDER; URBAN OLSSON; ISABEL S ANMARTIN; Plaza de Murillo

    The phylogeny of the thrushes (Aves: Turdus) has been difficult to reconstruct due to short internal branches and lack of node support for certain parts of the tree. Reconstructing the biogeographic history of this group is further complicated by the fact that current implementations of biogeographic methods, such as dispersal-vicariance analysis (DIVA; Ronquist, 1997), require a fully resolved tree. Here,

  7. Sediments as monitors of heavy metal contamination in the Ave river basin (Portugal): multivariate analysis of data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. M. V. M Soares; R. A. R Boaventura; A. A. S. C Machado; J. C. G Esteves da Silva

    1999-01-01

    The concentrations of heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn) were determined in river sediments collected at the Ave river basin (Portugal) to obtain a general classification scenery of the pollution in this highly polluted region. Multivariate data analysis techniques of clustering, principal components and eigenvector projections were used in this classification. Five general areas with different polluting characteristics

  8. Ectoparasitismo en tiuque común Milvago chimango chimango (Vieillot, 1816) (Aves, Falconidae) en la zona de Ñuble, Chile

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julio San-Martín Órdenes; Cristina Brevis Ibáñez; Luis Rubilar Contreras; Ronald Schmäschke; Arwid Daugschies

    Ectoparasitism in the common chimango caracara Milvago chimango chimango (Vieillot, 1816) (Aves, Falconidae) in the Ñuble Area, Chile. The ectoparasites of Milvago c. chimango (Vieillot) in the Ñuble area were identified for qualitative and quantitative descriptive analyses. Three species of Phthiraptera were recorded (prevalences between parentheses): One Amblycera, Aquiligogus maculatus (Menoponidae - 100%), and two Ischnocera, Acutifrons vierai chimango (73.9

  9. The evolution dynamics of the Strigiformes in the Mediterranean islands with the description of Aegolius martae n. sp. (Aves, Strigidae)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marco Pavia

    2008-01-01

    Living and fossil owls (Aves, Strigiformes) constitute an important group for understanding the evolutionary dynamics of birds in island environments. After their different trends in island evolution, the Strigiformes can be seen as a representative of insular adaptations of birds as a whole. In fact they respond quickly to isolation with deep changes in body size, including dwarfism and gigantism,

  10. Parking/Carpooling/Busing options for Daniels Recital Hall 811 5th Ave., Seattle, WA 98101 (5th & Marion)

    E-print Network

    Parking/Carpooling/Busing options for Daniels Recital Hall 811 5th Ave., Seattle, WA 98101 (5th of Daniels Recital Hall (see page 2). Driving/Carpooling suggested parking options: OnStreet Parking: Downtown Seattle street parking is free on Sundays. Bank of America Building Parking Garage: The entrance

  11. Contributions to New Zealand's Late Quaternary avifauna. 1: Pachyplichas, a new genus of wren (Aves: Acanthisittidae), with two new species

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. R. Millener

    1988-01-01

    Pachyplichas, a new genus of New Zealand wren (Aves: Acanthisittidae) is described from subfossil remains found in Late Pleistocene-Holocene cave sediments and Holocene dune sands. Two species, readily differentiated on the basis of size, are assigned to the new genus. P. jagmi sp. nov. is known only from the North Island, and the larger P. yaldwyni sp. nov. only from

  12. Contributions to New Zealand's Late Quaternary avifauna. II: Dendroscansor decurvirostris, a new genus and species of wren (Aves: Acanthisittidae)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. R. Millener; T. H. Worthy

    1991-01-01

    Dendroscansor decurvirostris, a new and particularly distinctive New Zealand wren (Aves: Acanthisittidae), is described from subfossil remains found in Late Pleistocene - Holocene cave sediments in the north-western South Island, New Zealand. Dendroscansor, uniquely among acanthisittids, has an extraordinarily elongate, downcurved bill. This feature, and others such as its enlarged anterior cervical vertebrae and relatively short, yet not particularly robust

  13. INDEX First Name Last Name Phone Number Address City Zip In Delta PPO? 1 Jun Park (510) 839-6090 2710 Telegraph Ave Ste 250 Oakland 94612 Y

    E-print Network

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    -6090 2710 Telegraph Ave Ste 250 Oakland 94612 Y 2 Jacquelyn Williams (510) 486-1813 2522 Dana St Ste 101 Berkeley 94704 Y 3 Bill Cavalli (510) 841-4323 2522 Dana St Ste 207 Berkeley 94704 Y 4 Geo Oldenbourg Jr (510) 843-1192 2140 Shattuck Ave Ste 701 Berkeley 94704 Y 5 Daniel Mobati (510) 848-1055 2522 Dana St

  14. Population Genetic Study of Mitochondrial DNA in Roseate Spoonbill (Aves; Platalea ajaja ) Breeding Colonies from the Pantanal Wetlands, Brazil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mateus Henrique Santos; Iara Freitas Lopes; Silvia Nassif Del Lama

    2008-01-01

    Five breeding colonies of the Roseate spoonbill (Aves: Platalea ajaja) from two Brazilian wetland areas (Pantanal and Taim marshes) were sampled, and domain I of the mitochondrial DNA control\\u000a region (483 bp) was sequenced in 50 birds. The average haplotype diversity (h = 0.75, s = 0.071) and average nucleotide diversity (? = 0.004, s = 0.003) were evaluated, and nonsignificant differences\\u000a were found among the colonies studied. The

  15. Dynamics and Phylogenetic Implications of MtDNA Control Region Sequences in New World Jays (Aves: Corvidae)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthew A. Saunders; Scott V. Edwards

    2000-01-01

    .   To study the evolution of mtDNA and the intergeneric relationships of New World Jays (Aves: Corvidae), we sequenced the entire\\u000a mitochondrial DNA control region (CR) from 21 species representing all genera of New World jays, an Old World jay, crows,\\u000a and a magpie. Using maximum likelihood methods, we found that both the transition\\/transversion ratio (?) and among site rate

  16. New evidence of feathers in the Crato Formation supporting a reappraisal on the presence of Aves.

    PubMed

    Sayão, Juliana M; Saraiva, Antonio A F; Uejima, Angelica M K

    2011-03-01

    The preservation of delicate structures such as feathers is very rare in the paleontological record, due to the fragility of their components. Fossil feathers have been reported from approximately 50 deposits around the world, from the Late Jurassic to the Pleistocene. In Brazil initial findings consisted of a primary feather of a large bird found in the Tremembé Formation. Other occurrences are preserved in the Crato Formation, where several symmetrical and one single asymmetrical feather was found. Based on three new specimens and reassessing further feather occurrences we cannot confirm the presence of volant Aves in this deposit. The presence of an asymmetrical feather without barbules and hooks hints at the previous existence of a flightless animal within this deposit, possibly a flightlessness bird or a non-avian theropod. Conversely, the presence of a feather from morphotype II present in Tyrannosauroidea, Compsognathidae, Therizinosauroidea and Dromeosauridae, points to a non-theropod origin. Since there are no confirmed records of birds and other feathered archosaurs in the region to date, more evidence is required to identify the animal from which these structures originated. PMID:21437381

  17. Resolving lost herbivore community structure using coprolites of four sympatric moa species (Aves: Dinornithiformes)

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Jamie R.; Wilmshurst, Janet M.; Richardson, Sarah J.; Rawlence, Nicolas J.; Wagstaff, Steven J.; Worthy, Trevor H.; Cooper, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of extinct herbivore community structuring is essential for assessing the wider ecological impacts of Quaternary extinctions and determining appropriate taxon substitutes for rewilding. Here, we demonstrate the potential for coprolite studies to progress beyond single-species diet reconstructions to resolving community-level detail. The moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes) of New Zealand are an intensively studied group of nine extinct herbivore species, yet many details of their diets and community structuring remain unresolved. We provide unique insights into these aspects of moa biology through analyses of a multispecies coprolite assemblage from a rock overhang in a montane river valley in southern New Zealand. Using ancient DNA (aDNA), we identified 51 coprolites, which included specimens from four sympatric moa species. Pollen, plant macrofossils, and plant aDNA from the coprolites chronicle the diets and habitat preferences of these large avian herbivores during the 400 y before their extinction (?1450 AD). We use the coprolite data to develop a paleoecological niche model in which moa species were partitioned based on both habitat (forest and valley-floor herbfield) and dietary preferences, the latter reflecting allometric relationships between body size, digestive efficiency, and nutritional requirements. Broad ecological niches occupied by South Island giant moa (Dinornis robustus) and upland moa (Megalapteryx didinus) may reflect sexual segregation and seasonal variation in habitat use, respectively. Our results show that moa lack extant ecological analogs, and their extinction represents an irreplaceable loss of function from New Zealand’s terrestrial ecosystems. PMID:24082104

  18. Resolving lost herbivore community structure using coprolites of four sympatric moa species (Aves: Dinornithiformes).

    PubMed

    Wood, Jamie R; Wilmshurst, Janet M; Richardson, Sarah J; Rawlence, Nicolas J; Wagstaff, Steven J; Worthy, Trevor H; Cooper, Alan

    2013-10-15

    Knowledge of extinct herbivore community structuring is essential for assessing the wider ecological impacts of Quaternary extinctions and determining appropriate taxon substitutes for rewilding. Here, we demonstrate the potential for coprolite studies to progress beyond single-species diet reconstructions to resolving community-level detail. The moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes) of New Zealand are an intensively studied group of nine extinct herbivore species, yet many details of their diets and community structuring remain unresolved. We provide unique insights into these aspects of moa biology through analyses of a multispecies coprolite assemblage from a rock overhang in a montane river valley in southern New Zealand. Using ancient DNA (aDNA), we identified 51 coprolites, which included specimens from four sympatric moa species. Pollen, plant macrofossils, and plant aDNA from the coprolites chronicle the diets and habitat preferences of these large avian herbivores during the 400 y before their extinction (?1450 AD). We use the coprolite data to develop a paleoecological niche model in which moa species were partitioned based on both habitat (forest and valley-floor herbfield) and dietary preferences, the latter reflecting allometric relationships between body size, digestive efficiency, and nutritional requirements. Broad ecological niches occupied by South Island giant moa (Dinornis robustus) and upland moa (Megalapteryx didinus) may reflect sexual segregation and seasonal variation in habitat use, respectively. Our results show that moa lack extant ecological analogs, and their extinction represents an irreplaceable loss of function from New Zealand's terrestrial ecosystems. PMID:24082104

  19. Phylogenetic relationships within the Laridae (Charadriiformes: Aves) inferred from mitochondrial markers.

    PubMed

    Pons, J-M; Hassanin, A; Crochet, P-A

    2005-12-01

    Gulls (Aves: Laridae) constitute a recent and cosmopolite family of well-studied seabirds for which a robust phylogeny is needed to perform comparative and biogeographical analyses. The present study, the first molecular phylogeny of all Larids species (N=53), is based on a combined segment of mtDNA (partial cytochrome b and control region). We discuss our phylogenetic tree in the light of previous suggestions based on morphological, behavioral, and plumage characters. Although the phylogeny is not fully resolved, it highlights several robust species groups and confirms or identifies for the first time some sister relationships that had never been suggested before. The Dolphin Gull (Leucophaeus scoresbii) for instance, is identified as the sister species of the Grey Gull (Larus modestus) and the Ross's Gull (Rhodostethia rosea) forms a monophyletic group with the Little Gull (Larus minutus). Our results clearly demonstrate that the genus Larus as currently defined is not monophyletic, since current taxonomy of gulls is based on the use of convergent phenotypic characters. We propose a new systematic arrangement that better reflects their evolutionary history. PMID:16054399

  20. Molecular phylogeny of the spoonbills (Aves: Threskiornithidae) based on mitochondrial DNA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chesser, R.T.; Yeung, C.K.L.; Yao, C.-T.; Tian, X.-H.; Li, S.-H.

    2010-01-01

    Spoonbills (genus Platalea) are a small group of wading birds, generally considered to constitute the subfamily Plataleinae (Aves: Threskiornithidae). We reconstructed phylogenetic relationships among the six species of spoonbills using variation in sequences of the mitochondrial genes ND2 and cytochrome b (total 1796 bp). Topologies of phylogenetic trees reconstructed using maximum likelihood, maximum parsimony, and Bayesian analyses were virtually identical and supported monophyly of the spoonbills. Most relationships within Platalea received strong support: P. minor and P. regia were closely related sister species, P. leucorodia was sister to the minor-regia clade, and P. alba was sister to the minor-regia-leucorodia clade. Relationships of P. flavipes and P. ajaja were less well resolved: these species either formed a clade that was sister to the four-species clade, or were successive sisters to this clade. This phylogeny is consistent with ideas of relatedness derived from spoonbill morphology. Our limited sampling of the Threskiornithinae (ibises), the putative sister group to the spoonbills, indicated that this group is paraphyletic, in agreement with previous molecular data; this suggests that separation of the Threskiornithidae into subfamilies Plataleinae and Threskiornithinae may not be warranted. Copyright ?? 2010. Magnolia Press.

  1. Molecular phylogeny of the spoonbills (Aves: Threskiornithidae) based on mitochondrial DNA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chesser, R. Terry; Yeung, Carol K.L.; Yao, Cheng-Te; Tian, Xiu-Hua; Li, Shou-Hsien

    2010-01-01

    Spoonbills (genus Platalea) are a small group of wading birds, generally considered to constitute the subfamily Plataleinae (Aves: Threskiornithidae). We reconstructed phylogenetic relationships among the six species of spoonbills using variation in sequences of the mitochondrial genes ND2 and cytochrome b (total 1796 bp). Topologies of phylogenetic trees reconstructed using maximum likelihood, maximum parsimony, and Bayesian analyses were virtually identical and supported monophyly of the spoonbills. Most relationships within Platalea received strong support: P. minor and P. regia were closely related sister species, P. leucorodia was sister to the minor-regia clade, and P. alba was sister to the minor-regia-leucorodia clade. Relationships of P. flavipes and P. ajaja were less well resolved: these species either formed a clade that was sister to the four-species clade, or were successive sisters to this clade. This phylogeny is consistent with ideas of relatedness derived from spoonbill morphology. Our limited sampling of the Threskiornithinae (ibises), the putative sister group to the spoonbills, indicated that this group is paraphyletic, in agreement with previous molecular data; this suggests that separation of the Threskiornithidae into subfamilies Plataleinae and Threskiornithinae may not be warranted.

  2. Effect of deuteration on metabolism and clearance of Nerispirdine (HP184) and AVE5638.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Joseph; Derdau, Volker; Atzrodt, Jens; Zane, Patricia; Guo, Zuyu; van Horn, Robert; Czepczor, Valérie; Stoltz, Axelle; Pardon, Magalie

    2015-07-01

    Replacing hydrogen with deuterium as a means of altering ADME properties of drug molecules has recently enjoyed a renaissance, such that at least two deuterated chemical entities are currently in clinical development. Although most research in this area aims to increase the metabolic stability, and hence half-life of the active species, experience has shown that prediction of the in vivo behaviour of deuterated molecules is difficult and depends on multiple factors including the complexity of the metabolic scheme, the enzymes involved and hence the mechanism of the rate-determining step in the biotransformation. In an effort to elucidate some of these factors we examined the metabolic behaviour of two molecules from the Sanofi portfolio in a range of in vitro and in vivo systems. Although some key metabolic reactions of the acetylcholine release stimulator HP184 4 were slowed in vitro and in vivo when deuterium was present at the sites of metabolism, this did not translate to an increase in overall metabolic stability. By contrast, the tryptase inhibitor AVE5638 13 was much more metabolically stable in vitro in its deuterated form than when unlabelled. These results indicate that it could be of value to concentrate efforts in this area to molecules which are metabolised by a major pathway that involves enzymes of the amine oxidase family or other low-capacity enzyme families. PMID:25900628

  3. [Reproductive activity of Chelonia mydas (Testudines: Cheloniidae) in Isla de Aves, Venezuela (2001-2008)].

    PubMed

    Vera, Vicente; Buitrago, Joaquín

    2012-06-01

    The second major nesting-site for green turtles in the Caribbean is Isla de Aves, an island protected as a wildlife refuge since 1972, located at 650km Northeast from La Guaira, Venezuela. In this island, the nesting population monitoring started in 1972 and in a more continuous way after 1978, when a Scientific-Naval Station was established and scientific observations started. Since historical data show that female captures had severely affected population levels in this island before 1978, this study aim to describe recent reproductive activities. For this, during the nesting seasons of 2001-2002 and 2005-2008, nesting females were measured and tagged using metal flipper tags. A total of 458 nights were sampled observing 5 154 female emergences, with a maximum of 53 in a single night. Non-observed emergences were calculated fitting the temporal distribution of observed emergences to a normal curve. Total emergences estimated varied from X=637.1+/-106.6 in 2001 to X =2 853+/-42.5 in 2008 (ANOVA F(6.5df)=60.37, p<0.0001). Internesting interval in the same season was estimated in X=10.71+/-1.32 days. Clutch frequency in a nesting season was calculated as X=1.71+/-1.6 times per female and season. Estimated number of nesting females per year varied from X=373+/-12.5 females in 2001 to X=l 669+/-56.1 females in 2008 (ANOVA F 55.6df)=89.42, p<0.0001); with a positive and significant trend (r=0.842, p=0.036). Results show that nesting females numbers are increasing. We suggest that the protection of the nesting area for more than 30 years, has contributed with this population increase. PMID:23894943

  4. Angela Phillips Diaz, MBA Managing Director

    E-print Network

    Ginzel, Matthew

    officials including the first International Space Station (ISS) Crew Code of Conduct leadership positions in Washington DC including international relations at NASA international relations experience, she has held executive leadership positions

  5. A new species of Acroleptus Bourgeois (Coleoptera: Lycidae) from the Brazilian Amazonian rainforest, with a note on its homonymy with Acroleptus Cabanis (Aves).

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Vinicius S

    2015-01-01

    Acroleptus costae sp. nov. is described from the Brazilian Amazonian rainforest, raising the diversity of the formerly monotypic genus to two known species. The validity of Acroleptus Bourgeois, 1886 (Insecta) is maintained while Acroleptus Cabanis, 1861 (Aves) is considered to be an incorrect subsequent spelling. PMID:25947809

  6. Evaluación de estimadores no paramétricos de la riqueza de especies. Un ejemplo con aves en áreas verdes de la ciudad de Puebla, México

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. A. González Oreja; A. A. De la Fuente-Díaz-Ordaz; L. Hernández-Santín; D. Buzo-Franco; C. Bonache-Regidor

    2010-01-01

    Nuestro objetivo fue evaluar el desempeño de estimadores no paramétricos de la riqueza de especies con datos reales. Durante la temporada de cría de 2003 censamos las comunidades de aves en dos áreas verdes de la ciudad de Puebla (México), y obtuvimos las corres¬pondientes curvas de rarefacción, que fueron ajustadas a dos funciones de acumulación de especies no asintóticas y

  7. Effect of AVE 0991 angiotensin-(1-7) receptor agonist treatment on elemental and biomolecular content and distribution in atherosclerotic plaques of apoE-knockout mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalska, J.; Gajda, M.; Jawie?, J.; Kwiatek, W. M.; Appel, K.; Dumas, P.

    2013-12-01

    Gene-targeted apolipoprotein E-knockout (apoE-KO) mice display early and highly progressive vascular lesions containing lipid deposits and they became a reliable animal model to study atherosclerosis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of AVE 0991 angiotensin-(1-7) receptor agonist on the distribution of selected pro- and anti- inflammatory elements as well as biomolecules in atherosclerotic plaques of apoE-knockout mice. Synchrotron radiation-based X-ray fluorescence (micro-XRF) and Fourier Transform Infrared (micro-FTIR) microspectroscopies were applied. Two-month-old apoE-KO mice were fed for following four months diet supplemented with AVE 0991 (0.58 ?mol/kg b.w. per day). Histological sections of ascending aortas were analyzed spectroscopically. The distribution of P, Ca, Fe and Zn were found to correspond with histological structure of the lesion. Significantly lower contents of P, Ca, Zn and significantly higher content of Fe were observed in animals treated with AVE 0991. Biomolecular analysis showed lower lipids saturation level and lower lipid to protein ratio in AVE 0991 treated group. Protein secondary structure was studied according to the composition of amide I band (1660 cm-1) and it demonstrated higher proportion of ?-sheet structure as compared to ?-helix in both studied groups.

  8. Sensitization of Upper Airway Mechanoreceptors as a New Pharmacologic Principle to Treat Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Investigations with AVE0118 in Anesthetized Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Wirth, Klaus J.; Steinmeyer, Klaus; Ruetten, Hartmut

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Drug treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is desirable because at least 30% of patients do not tolerate continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment. The negative pressure reflex (NPR) involving superficially located mechanoreceptors in the upper airway (UA) is an important mechanism for UA patency inhibitable by topical UA anesthesia (lidocaine). The NPR may serve as a target for pharmacological intervention for a topical treatment of OSA. The objective was to determine the effect of pharmacological augmentation of the NPR on UA collapsibility. Design: We developed a model of UA collapsibility in which application of negative pressures caused UA collapses in spontaneously breathing ?-chloralose-urethane anesthetized pigs as indicated by characteristic tracheal pressure and air flow changes. Setting: N/A. Patients or Participants: N/A. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: The potassium channel blocker AVE0118 administered topically to the UA in doses of 1, 3, and 10 mg per nostril sensitized the NPR, shifting the mechanoreceptor response threshold for the genioglossus muscle to more positive pressures (P < 0.001; n = 6 per group) and dose-dependently inhibited UA collapsibility. Ten mg of AVE0118 prevented UA collapses against negative pressures of -150 mbar (P < 0.01) for > 4 h in all pigs, while in control pigs the UA collapsed at -50 mbar or less negative pressures. The effect of AVE0118 was abolished by UA lidocaine anesthesia. Acute intravenous administration of naloxone or acetazolamide was ineffective; paroxetine and mirtazepine were weakly effective and fluoxetine was moderately effective in line with reported clinical efficacy. Conclusion: Topical administration of AVE0118 to the UA is a promising pharmacologic approach for the treatment of OSA. Citation: Wirth KJ; Steinmeyer K; Ruetten H. Sensitization of upper airway mechanoreceptors as a new pharmacologic principle to treat obstructive sleep apnea: investigations with AVE0118 in anesthetized pigs. SLEEP 2013;36(5):699-708. PMID:23633752

  9. The enigmatic monotypic crab plover Dromas ardeola is closely related to pratincoles and coursers (Aves, Charadriiformes, Glareolidae)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The phylogenetic placement of the monotypic crab plover Dromasardeola (Aves, Charadriiformes) remains controversial. Phylogenetic analysis of anatomical and behavioral traits using phenetic and cladistic methods of tree inference have resulted in conflicting tree topologies, suggesting a close association of Dromas to members of different suborders and lineages within Charadriiformes. Here, we revisited the issue by applying Bayesian and parsimony methods of tree inference to 2,012 anatomical and 5,183 molecular characters to a set of 22 shorebird genera (including Turnix). Our results suggest that Bayesian analysis of anatomical characters does not resolve the phylogenetic relationship of shorebirds with strong statistical support. In contrast, Bayesian and parsimony tree inference from molecular data provided much stronger support for the phylogenetic relationships within shorebirds, and support a sister relationship of Dromas to Glareolidae (pratincoles and coursers), in agreement with previously published DNA-DNA hybridization studies. PMID:21637436

  10. Short-term optimization of the new Av?e pumping plant and three existing hydro power plants on the So?a river in Slovenia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zvonko Bregar

    2007-01-01

    In the following years a new pumping plant Av?e is going to join the existing cascade of three small-regulating-basin hydro power plants (HPPs) on the So?a river in Slovenia. The pumping plant operation will have to be synchronous to the operation of existing plants and vice versa since all four plants depend upon the same inflow and since they all

  11. Nidificação do gavião-relógio Micrastur semitorquatus (Aves: Falconidae) no Pantanal Mato-grossense: dados biométricos, dieta dos ninhegos e disputa com araras

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lucas Aguiar Carrara; Paulo de Tarso; Zuquim Antas; Regina de Souza Yabe

    Nesting of the Collared forest-falcon Micrastur semitorquatus (Aves: Falconidae) in the Pantanal, Brazil: biometry, nestling diet and competition with macaws. Data on the breeding biology of the Collared Forest-falcon Micrastur semitorquatus and nest site interactions with two macaw species in a private reserve in the Pantanal, central western Brazil, are presented. From July 2001 to December 2004 the macaws' and\\/or

  12. AVE protein expression and visceral endoderm cell behavior during anterior-posterior axis formation in mouse embryos: Asymmetry in OTX2 and DKK1 expression.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Hideharu; Shioi, Go; Aizawa, Shinichi

    2015-06-15

    The initial landmark of anterior-posterior (A-P) axis formation in mouse embryos is the distal visceral endoderm, DVE, which expresses a series of anterior genes at embryonic day 5.5 (E5.5). Subsequently, DVE cells move to the future anterior region, generating anterior visceral endoderm (AVE). Questions remain regarding how the DVE is formed and how the direction of the movement is determined. This study compares the detailed expression patterns of OTX2, HHEX, CER1, LEFTY1 and DKK1 by immunohistology and live imaging at E4.5-E6.5. At E6.5, the AVE is subdivided into four domains: most anterior (OTX2, HHEX, CER1-low/DKK1-high), anterior (OTX2, HHEX, CER1-high/DKK1-low), main (OTX2, HHEX, CER1, LEFTY1-high) and antero-lateral and posterior (OTX2, HHEX-low). The study demonstrates how this pattern is established. AVE protein expression in the DVE occurs de novo at E5.25-E5.5. Neither HHEX, LEFTY1 nor CER1 expression is asymmetric. In contrast, OTX2 expression is tilted on the future posterior side with the DKK1 expression at its proximal domain; the DVE cells move in the opposite direction of the tilt. PMID:25910836

  13. Frequency of micronuclei and of other nuclear abnormalities in erythrocytes of the grey mullet from the Mondego, Douro and Ave estuaries--Portugal.

    PubMed

    Carrola, João; Santos, Nádia; Rocha, Maria J; Fontainhas-Fernandes, António; Pardal, Miguel A; Monteiro, Rogério A F; Rocha, Eduardo

    2014-05-01

    Fish are bioindicators of water pollution, and an increased rate of their erythrocyte nuclear morphological abnormalities (ENMAs)-and particularly of erythrocyte micronuclei (EMN)-is used as a genotoxicity biomarker. Despite the potential value of ENMAs and MN, there is scarce information about fish captured in Iberian estuaries. This is the case of the Portuguese estuaries of the Mondego, Douro and Ave, suffering from different levels of environmental stress and where chemical surveys have been disclosing significant amounts of certain pollutants. So, the aim of this study was to evaluate genotoxicants impacts and infer about the exposure at those ecosystems, using the grey mullet (Mugil cephalus) as bioindicator and considering the type and frequency of nuclear abnormalities of erythrocytes as proxies of genotoxicity. Sampling of mullets was done throughout the year in the important Mondego, Douro and Ave River estuaries (centre and north-western Portugal). The fish (total n?=?242) were caught in campaigns made in spring-summer and autumn-winter, using nets or fishing rods. The sampled mullets were comparable between locations in terms of the basic biometric parameters. Blood smears were stained with Diff-Quik to assess the frequencies of six types of ENMAs and MN (given per 1,000 erythrocytes). Some basic water physicochemical parameters were recorded to search for fluctuations matching the ENMAs. Overall, the most frequent nucleus abnormality was the polymorphic type, sequentially followed by the blebbed/lobed/notched, segmented, kidney shaped, vacuolated, MN and binucleated. The total average frequency of the ENMAs ranged from 73?‰ in the Mondego to 108?‰ in the Ave. The polymorphic type was typically ?50 % of the total ENMAs, averaging about 51?‰, when considering all three estuaries. The most serious lesion-the MN-in fish from Mondego and Douro had a similar frequency (?0.38?‰), which was significantly lower than that in the Ave (0.75?‰). No significant seasonal differences existed as to the MN rates and seasonal differences existed almost only in the Douro, with the higher values in AW. In general, the pattern of ENMAs frequencies was unrelated with the water physicochemical parameters. Considering the data for both the total ENMAs and for each specific abnormality, and bearing in mind that values of MN in fish erythrocytes >0.3?‰ usually reflect pollution by genotoxicants, it is suggested that mullets were likely being chronically exposed to such compounds, even in the allegedly less polluted ecosystem (Mondego). Moreover, data supported the following pollution exposure gradient: Mondego?Ave. The scenario and inferences nicely agree with the published data from chemical monitoring. PMID:24469770

  14. Relationship between bone growth rate and the thickness of calcified cartilage in the long bones of the Galloanserae (Aves)

    PubMed Central

    Montes, L; de Margerie, E; Castanet, J; de Ricqlès, A; Cubo, J

    2005-01-01

    The histological features of mineralized tissues can be preserved for hundreds of millions of years, and are therefore important potential sources of information for reconstructing the life history traits of extinct species. Bone growth rates and the duration of the growth period have recently been estimated in fossil archosaurs from periosteal ossification (a mechanism responsible for bone diametral growth). Similarly, data on endochondral ossification (the mechanism responsible for bone longitudinal growth) may also yield information on growth duration and rate among extinct vertebrates, as long as potentially informative structures are preserved. However, in order to carry out palaeobiological estimations of growth rate and/or the duration of growth, it is first necessary to quantify in extant species the relationship between these life history traits and the histological features of endochondral ossification that are potentially preserved in the fossil record. Here we analyse the ontogenetic variation of both bone longitudinal growth rate and the thickness of the calcified cartilage in the femora of two Galloanserae (Aves) and find a significant positive relationship between these variables in both species. We discuss possible factors underlying interspecific differences in this relationship, and conclude that it could be applied with caution to draw palaeobiological inferences. PMID:15857365

  15. Osteological histology of the Pan-Alcidae (Aves, Charadriiformes): correlates of wing-propelled diving and flightlessness.

    PubMed

    Smith, N Adam; Clarke, Julia A

    2014-02-01

    Although studies of osteological morphology, gross myology, myological histology, neuroanatomy, and wing-scaling have all documented anatomical modifications associated with wing-propelled diving, the osteohistological study of this highly derived method of locomotion has been limited to penguins. Herein we present the first osteohistological study of the derived forelimbs and hind limbs of wing-propelled diving Pan-Alcidae (Aves, Charadriiformes). In addition to detailing differences between wing-propelled diving charadriiforms and nondiving charadriiforms, microstructural modifications to the humeri, ulnae and femora of extinct flightless pan-alcids are contrasted with those of volant alcids. Histological thin-sections of four species of pan-alcids (Alca torda, †Alca grandis, †Pinguinus impennis, †Mancalla cedrosensis) and one outgroup charadriiform (Stercorarius longicaudus) were compared. The forelimb bones of wing-propelled diving charadriiforms were found to have significantly thicker (?22%) cortical bone walls. Additionally, as in penguins, the forelimbs of flightless pan-alcids are found to be osteosclerotic. However, unlike the pattern documented in penguins that display thickened cortices in both forelimbs and hind limbs, the forelimb and hind limb elements of pan-alcids display contrasting microstructural morphologies with thickened forelimb cortices and relatively thinner femoral cortices. Additionally, the identification of medullary bone in the sampled †Pinguinus impennis specimen suggests that further osteohistological investigation could provide an answer to longstanding questions regarding sexual dimorphism of Great Auks. Finally, these results suggest that it is possible to discern volant from flightless wing-propelled divers from fragmentary fossil remains. PMID:24357466

  16. ConstitutionAve. CityParkAve.

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Yongcheng

    for the Arts Annex Student Recreation Center Construction Zone Construction Zone Police Department Welcome C Intramural Gym Student Recreation Center Ingersoll Hall Summit Hall Microbiology A A B B C Engineering Hartshorn Health Center Occupational Therapy Westfall Hall University Square McGraw Athletic

  17. Factors affecting germline mutations in a hypervariable microsatellite: a comparative analysis of six species of swallows (Aves: Hirundinidae).

    PubMed

    Anmarkrud, Jarl A; Kleven, Oddmund; Augustin, Jakob; Bentz, Kristofer H; Blomqvist, Donald; Fernie, Kim J; Magrath, Michael J L; Pärn, Henrik; Quinn, James S; Robertson, Raleigh J; Szép, Tibor; Tarof, Scott; Wagner, Richard H; Lifjeld, Jan T

    2011-03-15

    Microsatellites mutate frequently by replication slippage. Empirical evidence shows that the probability of such slippage mutations may increase with the length of the repeat region as well as exposure to environmental mutagens, but the mutation rate can also differ between the male and female germline. It has been hypothesized that more intense sexual selection or sperm competition can also lead to elevated mutation rates, but the empirical evidence is inconclusive. Here, we analyzed the occurrence of germline slippage mutations in the hypervariable pentanucleotide microsatellite locus HrU10 across six species of swallow (Aves: Hirundinidae). These species exhibit marked differences in the length range of the microsatellite, as well as differences in the intensity of sperm competition. We found a strong effect of microsatellite length on the probability of mutation, but no residual effect of species or their level of sperm competition when the length effect was accounted for. Neither could we detect any difference in mutation rate between tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) breeding in Hamilton Harbour, Ontario, an industrial site with previous documentation of elevated mutation rates for minisatellite DNA, and a rural reference population. However, our cross-species analysis revealed two significant patterns of sex differences in HrU10 germline mutations: (1) mutations in longer alleles occurred typically in the male germline, those in shorter alleles in the female germline, and (2) male germline mutations were more often expansions than contractions, whereas no directional bias was evident in the female germline. These results indicate some fundamental differences in male and female gametogenesis affecting the probability of slippage mutations. Our study also reflects the value of a comparative, multi-species approach for locus-specific mutation analyses, through which a wider range of influential factors can be assessed than in single-species studies. PMID:21291898

  18. New material of Longipteryx (Aves: Enantiornithes) from the Lower Cretaceous Yixian Formation of China with the first recognized avian tooth crenulations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuri; Shen, Caizhi; Liu, Sizhao; Gao, Chunling; Cheng, Xiaodong; Zhang, Fengjiao

    2015-01-01

    We report on a new specimen of Longipteryx chaoyangensis from the Lower Cretaceous Yixian Formation in Chaoyang, Liaoning Province, China. The new material preserves previously unknown tooth crenulations. This is the first recognized tooth crenulations within Aves. It not only provides new information regarding the anatomy of the Longipteryx, but also sheds new light on the trophic specialization of this genus and even this family. It was discovered from the Yixian Formation, which is older than the Longipteryx chaoyangensis bearing-Jiufotang Formation. This new discovery also expands the known stratigraphic range of Longipteryx. PMID:25947529

  19. WMU Student Financial Aid | 1903 W. Michigan Ave., Kalamazoo, MI 49008-5337 | (269) 387-6000 Updated: 02/08/2013 S:\\DOCS\\Tracking Docs\\2013-14\\Disability For Conditional Discharge.doc

    E-print Network

    de Doncker, Elise

    able to work and earn money or go to school. I am aware the federal student loans cannot be cancelled that would prohibit the student from being able to work and earn money or go to school indefinitely this form online, then print using the print button. WMU Student Financial Aid | 1903 W. Michigan Ave

  20. Massachusetts Institute of Technology > AgeLab > 77 Massachusetts Ave, E40-279, Cambridge, MA 02139 Phone: 617.253.0753 > fax: 617.258.7570 > agelab@mit.edu > agelab.mit.edu

    E-print Network

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Massachusetts Institute of Technology > AgeLab > 77 Massachusetts Ave, E40-279, Cambridge, MA 02139 potential caregivers for every person #12;2 Massachusetts Institute of Technology > AgeLab > 77, exhaustion, depression, and neglect of self-care (Family Caregiver Alliance, 2006). Family caregivers

  1. Contribution à l'étude des Microphallidae (Trematoda). LI. De cinq espèces du plongeon imbrin Gavia immer (Aves) des Etats-Unis, dont Microphallus forresteri n. sp. Pluralité vraisemblable de l'espèce Microphallus nicolli (Cable & Hunninen, 1938)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mike Kinsella; Stéphane Deblock

    1997-01-01

    The authors describe and illustrate five species of Microphallid trematodes from the intestine of Gavia immer (Aves: Gaviiformes) from the southern coast of the United States (Florida). Microphallus forresteri n. sp. is 500–700µm long with a symmetrical, regularly ovoid male papilla with a length (60 × 43 µm) close to the acetabular diameter and a broad ejaculatory canal centred along

  2. 1455 NW 107th Ave., Suite 906, Miami, Florida 33172 Phone (305) 592-8044 Fax (305-592-8315 H e l p l i n e 2 0 1 2

    E-print Network

    Florida, University of

    Helpline ·1455 NW 107th Ave., Suite 906, ·Miami, Florida ·33172 ·Phone (305) 592-8044· Fax (305th Avenue Suite 906 Miami, FL 33172 Phone: 305-592-8044 Ext. 106 Fax: 305-592-8315 Email: jwgibson Holiday Food Safety Tips 2-3 Jacquelyn Gibson Extension Faculty Family & Consumer Sciences Miami

  3. Baseline Rd. Colorado Ave.

    E-print Network

    Lineberger, W. Carl

    Factory Hourly Tours 10-3 Sat, 11-3 Sun 4600 Sleepytime Drive, Boulder http://www.banjobilly.com JUNE 12-13, 2009 JILA/CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY, UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO, BOULDER A CELEBRATION OF 40 YEARS OF ION CHEMISTRY PROGRAM AGENDA: Friday, June 12, 2009 5:00 PM to 9:00 PM: Dinner at Barney

  4. Lomas BLVD. Tucker AVE.

    E-print Network

    Maccabe, Barney

    .9 km 1.0mi/1.6km CENTRAL CAMPUS MAP Planning & Campus Development :: Space Management Office Reservoir Visitor Parking Student Health University Advisement & Enrichment Center Mesa Vista Hall Art 11 10 23 4 9 ABCD E J K L I HG F Johnson Field Tight Grove Parsons Grove Yale Park Tennis Courts

  5. Franklin St. Cameron Ave.

    E-print Network

    Doyle, Martin

    UNC Operations Visitor Attractions March 2014 Maps are for reference only and are not intended, Southern Folklife Collection and University Archives and Records Management Services 18 Women's Center. Blvd. Institute on Aging 720 Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd. Training and Development Library

  6. Franklin St. Cameron Ave.

    E-print Network

    Whitton, Mary C.

    Operations Visitor Attractions Construction Buildings April 2010 Maps provided by Engineering Information. Libraries Visitor Maps for the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill . 300 3000 Feet Classrooms Health Management Services 18 Women's Center Library (Carolina) Mary Turner Lane Reading and Resource Room 215 W

  7. Hartford Ave. Public Housing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chet Smolski

    1985-01-01

    The working class housing of the Hartford neighborhood was destroyed when the Route 6 connector was built to alleviate traffic in Olneyville Square. Low-income housing (Hartoford Park Public Housing Project seen here) was built on Corbusian principles of the Radiant City (1935). The mills behind the Atlantic Furniture Mills were demolished and the land is currently Woonasquatucket River Greenway which

  8. Author: Marcos Martinez Diaz Ingeniero de Telecomunicacion, UAM

    E-print Network

    Autonoma de Madrid, Universidad

    with two state-of-the art systems: one feature- based and another function-based. Two perspectives the verification performance, especially against skilled forgeries. Finally, a system based on fusion of the global Works and State of the Art 9 2.1 Architecture of a Dynamic Signature Verification System

  9. The Leaf Essential Oils and Taxonomy of Juniperus centrasiatica Kom., J. jarkendensis Kom., J. pseudosabina Fisch., Mey. & Ave-Lall., J. sabina L. and J. turkestanica Kom. from Central Asia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert P. Adams; A. D. Dembitsky; Sanduin Shatar

    1998-01-01

    The leaf essential oils of Juniperus centrasiatica Kom., J. jarkendensis Kom., J. pseudosabina Fisch., Mey. & Ave-Lall., J. sahina L., and J. turkestanica Kom. have been analyzed by GC\\/MS. The oils were very similar and were dominated by ?-pinene, sabinene and cedrol with moderate amounts of limonene, terpinen-4-ol and elemol. On the basis of the oils and morphological observations, it

  10. Insects found in birds' nests from Argentina. Pseudoseisura lophotes Reichenbach, 1853 and Anumbius annumbi (Vieillot, 1817) (Aves: Furnariidae), hosts of Triatoma platensis Neiva, 1913 (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Triatominae).

    PubMed

    Paola, Turienzo

    2014-01-01

    The insect fauna of the nests of Pseudoseisura lophotes (Reichenbach, 1853) (Aves: Furnariidae) from Argentina was investigated. A total of 110 species (68 identified to species, 22 identified to genus, 20 identified to family) in 40 families of 10 orders of insects was found in these nests. Triatoma platensis Neiva, 1913 (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) was found again in nests of P. lophotes, corroborating after 73 years the first observations made by Mazza in 1936. The occurrence of the insects in nests of P. lophotes is compared with the previously known insect fauna in nests of A. annumbi, Furnarius rufus (Furnariidae), and Myiopsitta monachus (Psittacidae). The insect fauna in additional nests of Anumbius annumbi from the same and/or different localities is given, and used in comparisons. The first occurrence of Cuterebridae (Diptera) in birds' nests, their pupae as the overwintering stage, and the second simultaneous infestation by two species of Philornis (Diptera: Muscidae) on the same nestlings are presented. Other simultaneous infestations of different hematophagous arthropods (Hemiptera: Cimidae; Reduviidae: Triatominae, and Acari: Argasidae) are remarked and discussed. PMID:24871037

  11. On the absence of sternal elements in Anchiornis (Paraves) and Sapeornis (Aves) and the complex early evolution of the avian sternum

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiaoting; O’Connor, Jingmai; Wang, Xiaoli; Wang, Min; Zhang, Xiaomei; Zhou, Zhonghe

    2014-01-01

    Anchiornis (Deinonychosauria: Troodontidae), the earliest known feathered dinosaur, and Sapeornis (Aves: Pygostylia), one of the basalmost Cretaceous birds, are both known from hundreds of specimens, although remarkably not one specimen preserves any sternal ossifications. We use histological analysis to confirm the absence of this element in adult specimens. Furthermore, the excellent preservation of soft-tissue structures in some specimens suggests that no chondrified sternum was present. Archaeopteryx, the oldest and most basal known bird, is known from only 10 specimens and the presence of a sternum is controversial; a chondrified sternum is widely considered to have been present. However, data from Anchiornis and Sapeornis suggest that a sternum may also have been completely absent in this important taxon, suggesting that the absence of a sternum could represent the plesiomorphic avian condition. Our discovery reveals an unexpected level of complexity in the early evolution of the avian sternum; the large amount of observable homoplasy is probably a direct result of the high degree of inherent developmental plasticity of the sternum compared with observations in other skeletal elements. PMID:25201982

  12. Stratigraphic context and paleoenvironmental significance of minor taxa (Pisces, Reptilia, Aves, Rodentia) from the late Early Pleistocene paleoanthropological site of Buia (Eritrea).

    PubMed

    Rook, L; Ghinassi, M; Carnevale, G; Delfino, M; Pavia, M; Bondioli, L; Candilio, F; Coppa, A; Martínez-Navarro, B; Medin, T; Papini, M; Zanolli, C; Libsekal, Y

    2013-01-01

    The Buia Homo site, also known as Wadi Aalad, is an East African paleoanthropological site near the village of Buia that, due to its very rich yield from the late Early Pleistocene, has been intensively investigated since 1994. In this paper, which reports on the finds of the 2010-2011 excavations, we include new fossil evidence on previously identified taxa (i.e., reptiles), as well as the very first description of the small mammal, fish and bird remains discovered. In particular, this study documents the discovery of the first African fossil of the genus Burhinus (Aves, Charadriiformes) and of the first rodent from the site. This latter is identified as a thryonomyid rodent (cane rat), a relatively common taxon in African paleoanthropological faunal assemblages. On the whole, the new occurrences documented within the Buia vertebrate assemblage confirm the occurrence of taxa characterized by strong water dependence. The paleoenvironmental characteristics of the fauna are confirmed as fully compatible with the evidence obtained through sedimentology and facies analysis, documenting the sedimentary evolution of fluvio-deltaic and lacustrine systems. PMID:23159190

  13. On the absence of sternal elements in Anchiornis (Paraves) and Sapeornis (Aves) and the complex early evolution of the avian sternum.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaoting; O'Connor, Jingmai; Wang, Xiaoli; Wang, Min; Zhang, Xiaomei; Zhou, Zhonghe

    2014-09-23

    Anchiornis (Deinonychosauria: Troodontidae), the earliest known feathered dinosaur, and Sapeornis (Aves: Pygostylia), one of the basalmost Cretaceous birds, are both known from hundreds of specimens, although remarkably not one specimen preserves any sternal ossifications. We use histological analysis to confirm the absence of this element in adult specimens. Furthermore, the excellent preservation of soft-tissue structures in some specimens suggests that no chondrified sternum was present. Archaeopteryx, the oldest and most basal known bird, is known from only 10 specimens and the presence of a sternum is controversial; a chondrified sternum is widely considered to have been present. However, data from Anchiornis and Sapeornis suggest that a sternum may also have been completely absent in this important taxon, suggesting that the absence of a sternum could represent the plesiomorphic avian condition. Our discovery reveals an unexpected level of complexity in the early evolution of the avian sternum; the large amount of observable homoplasy is probably a direct result of the high degree of inherent developmental plasticity of the sternum compared with observations in other skeletal elements. PMID:25201982

  14. Structure of the Cold Front Observed in SESAME-AVE III and its Comparison with the Hoskins-Bretherton Frontogenesis Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogura, Yoshi; Portis, Diane

    1982-12-01

    A cold front which passed through the dense network of the SESAME-AVE (Severe Environmental Storms and Mesoscale Experiment-Atmospheric Variability Experiment) on 25-26 April 1979 was investigated. Rawinsonde data collected from 23 special stations and 19 National Weather Service stations at three-hour intervals for a 24-hour period were used along with hourly surface data, radar summary charts and GOES-East satellite images. Severe storms formed along the surface front during this period. The analysis focused on the vertical circulation across the frontal surface at low levels.The major features of the cold frontal system that emerged from an analysis of this unique data set include a familiar direct vertical circulation, with moist warm air ascending just above the surface front. However, the upgliding motion was intercepted by a secondary circulation at middle levels. The analysis result was compared with model predictions of Hoskins and Bretherton (1972) as calculated by Blumen (1980). Several features of the observed front were found to agree qualitatively well with the model prediction. These include: a) Both the horizontal temperature gradient and the vertical component of vorticity have their maxima near the ground surface; b) The horizontal gradient of potential temperature is smaller in the warm air region than in the cold air region; c) The temperature inversion layer representing the frontal surface is located behind and below the axis of the maximum cyclonic relative vorticity. However, the model is found to be less successful in predicting the low-level convergence field; the observed surface convergence and cyclonic vorticity are of the same order of magnitude and concentrated in zones of approximately the same width of 300 km. The observed maximum ascending motion is located at low levels, rather than in middle levels as predicted. The subsidence in the cold air region is also much stronger than the model prediction.

  15. Molecular phylogenetics suggests a New Guinean origin and frequent episodes of founder-event speciation in the nectarivorous lories and lorikeets (Aves: Psittaciformes).

    PubMed

    Schweizer, Manuel; Wright, Timothy F; Peñalba, Joshua V; Schirtzinger, Erin E; Joseph, Leo

    2015-09-01

    The lories and lorikeets (Aves: Loriinae: Loriini) are a readily recognizable, discrete group of nectarivorous parrots confined to the Indo-Pacific region between Wallace's Line and the Pitcairn Island group in the central-east Pacific Ocean. We present the first phylogenetic analysis of all currently recognized genera in the group using two mitochondrial and five nuclear loci. Our analyses suggest a New Guinean origin for the group at about 10million years ago (95% HPD 4.8-14.8) but this origin must be interpreted within the context of that island's complicated, recent geological history. That is, the origin and early diversification of the group may have taken place as New Guinea's Central Cordillera arose and the final constituent terranes that form present-day New Guinea were accreted. The latter activity may have promoted dispersal as a key element in the group's history. We have detected several instances of dispersal out of New Guinea that we argue constitute instances of founder-event speciation. Some phenotypically cohesive genera are affirmed as monophyletic but other genera are clearly in need of taxonomic dismantlement and reclassification. We recognize Parvipsitta Mathews, 1916 for two species usually placed in Glossopsitta and we advocate transfer of Chalcopsitta cardinalis into Pseudeos Peters, 1935. Other non-monophyletic genera such as Charmosyna, Psitteuteles and, probably, Trichoglossus, require improved taxon sampling and further phylogenetic analysis before their systematics can be resolved. Cursory examination of trait mapping across the group suggests that many traits are ancestral and of little use in determining genus-level systematics. PMID:25929786

  16. Ancient DNA analyses of early archaeological sites in New Zealand reveal extreme exploitation of moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes) at all life stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskam, Charlotte L.; Allentoft, Morten E.; Walter, Richard; Scofield, R. Paul; Haile, James; Holdaway, Richard N.; Bunce, Michael; Jacomb, Chris

    2012-10-01

    The human colonisation of New Zealand in the late thirteenth century AD led to catastrophic impacts on the local biota and is among the most compelling examples of human over-exploitation of native fauna, including megafauna. Nearly half of the species in New Zealand' s pre-human avifauna are now extinct, including all nine species of large, flightless moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes). The abundance of moa in early archaeological sites demonstrates the significance of these megaherbivores in the diet of the first New Zealanders. Combining moa assemblage data, based on DNA identification of eggshell and bone, with morphological identification of bone (literature and museum catalogued specimens), we present the most comprehensive audit of moa to date from several significant 13th-15th century AD archaeological deposits across the east coast of the South Island. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was amplified from 251 of 323 (78%) eggshell fragments and 22 of 27 (88%) bone samples, and the analyses revealed the presence of four moa species: Anomalopteryx didiformis; Dinornis robustus; Emeus crassus and Euryapteryx curtus. The mtDNA, along with polymorphic microsatellite markers, enabled an estimate of the minimum number of individual eggs consumed at each site. Remarkably, in one deposit over 50 individual eggs were identified - a number that likely represents a considerable proportion of the total reproductive output of moa in the area and emphasises that human predation of all life stages of moa was intense. Molecular sexing was conducted on bones (n = 11). Contrary to previous ancient DNA studies from natural sites that consistently report an excess of female moa, we observed an excess of males (2.7:1), suggestive that males were preferential targets. This could be related to different behaviour between the two highly size-dimorphic sexes in moa. Lastly, we investigated the moa species from recovered skeletal and eggshell remains from seven Wairau Bar burials, and identified the presence of only the larger species of moa, E. curtus and D. robustus.

  17. CONGRESS AVE. CHARLIE COE GOLF

    E-print Network

    Oklahoma, University of

    FIELD 23 E E E E . . 22 23 24 VANVLEETOVAL GOULD 700 NORTH GREEK PARSONS ST BROOKS ST CRUCE ST LINDSEY ST CHAUTAUQUAAVE WILSON ST COLLEGEAVE LINDSEY ST GARFEILDST LINCOLNST WW NFD No. 3 BRANDT PARK OU DUCK POND GOOSEIS 2 DUCKISLAND OU ES LS LINDSEY STV XA SOUTH GREEK ELMAVE CATE CTR. DR ASPAVE L FIRST

  18. HWY 20 / 34 ORCHARD AVE

    E-print Network

    Escher, Christine

    Kear MCC Haw Phar LAR Bate Furm Goss Fair McNy Navy Glsn More OS Bent West Gilm Bat Gilk PSHC ClkL Dx Hall (BalE) Batcheller Hall (Bat) Bates Hall (Bate) Beef Barn (BfBn) Benton Annex (Women's Center) (Bn

  19. Tawni Voyles 1317 Branson Ave

    E-print Network

    Wright, Timothy F.

    (Melopsittacus undulatus), a small parrot with the ability to learn vocalizations throughout its entire lifespan Learning in Developing Budgerigar Parrots. Faculty for Undergraduate Neuroscience. San Diego, CA. November during Vocal Learning in Developing Budgerigar Parrots. Howard Hughes Medical Institute at New Mexico

  20. Turner Braddon NorthbourneAve

    E-print Network

    T Bruce City Bus Inter- change City Bus Inter- change 9:55a 10:55a 11:55a 12:55p 1:55p 2:55p 3:55p- change City Bus Inter- change 9:55a 10:55a 11:55a 12:55p 1:55p 2:55p 3:55p Saturday 28 August 2010 am:30a 11:30a 12:30p 1:30p 2:30p 3:30p 9:50a 10:50a 11:50a 12:50p 1:50p 2:50p 3:50p 9:55a 10:55a 11:55a

  1. E STARR AVE PINE SHADOWS

    E-print Network

    Long, Nicholas

    WETTERMARK ST E COLLEGE ST HAYTER ST BLOUNT ST LLOYD ST E CALIFORNIA ST DAVIS ST PINE ST ELM ST NPECANST (STEPHEN B. TUCKER) 18. EDUCATION BUILDING (ROBERT T. MCKIBBEN) 41. HALL 20 64. SCHOOL OF ART FILM HOUSE 87. MILLER) 88. VISITOR INFORMATION CENTER 20. FINE ARTS ANNEX 43. H.P.E. COMPLEX (LUCILLE NORTON) 66. SFA

  2. E STARR AVE PINE SHADOWS

    E-print Network

    Long, Nicholas

    WETTERMARK ST HAYTER ST BLOUNT ST LLOYD ST E CALIFORNIA ST DAVIS ST PINE ST ELM ST NPECANST NUNIVERSITYDR. HALL 17, STEEN B1 61. RUSK BUILDING A2 83. TRACK (FLETCHER GARDEN) B1 18. EDUCATION BUILDING (ROBERT T. MILLER) A2 86. DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY (POLICE) A2 21. FINE ARTS BUILDING (L. E. GRIFFITH) A2 43. H

  3. Insects found in birds' nests from Argentina: Coryphistera alaudina Burmeister, 1860 (Aves: Furnariidae), their inquiline birds and mammals, new hosts for Psammolestes coreodes Bergroth, 1911 and Triatoma platensis Neiva, 1913 (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Triatominae).

    PubMed

    Turienzo, Paola; Di Iorio, Osvaldo

    2014-01-01

    The insect fauna in nests of Coryphistera alaudina Burmeister, 1860 (Aves: Furnariidae) were studied in the provinces of Santiago del Estero, Chaco, Córdoba, and La Pampa in Argentina. A total of 7364 insect specimens comprising 77 taxa in a total of 29 families and 7 orders was found in their nests: 40 identified to species, 23 identified to genus, and 14 identified to family. Coryphistera alaudina and some of their vertebrate inquilines are new host records for the triatomine bugs Psammolestes coreodes Bergroth, 1911 and/or Triatoma platensis Neiva, 1913 (Hemiptera: Reduviidae). The insects in the nests of C. alaudina are separated by functional guilds, and their permanence time inside the nests are presented in a new manner and discussed. PMID:24943157

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Galaxy groups in the 2M++ (Diaz-Gimenez+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Gimenez, E.; Zandivarez, A.

    2015-04-01

    File tableb1 contains the 813 galaxy groups identified in the 2M++ catalogue with a FoF algorithm with an overdensity contrast of 433, and having virial masses greater than 1012 solar masses, and four or more galaxy members. File tableb2 contains information about the 4869 galaxy group members with K_2M++ apparent magnitude brighter than 12.5. (2 data files).

  5. The 1-Median and 1-Highway problem J. M. Diaz-Ba~nez

    E-print Network

    Díaz-Báñez, José Miguel

    The 1-Median and 1-Highway problem J. M. D´iaz-B´a~nez M. Korman P. P´erez-Lantero I. Ventura a single point (me- dian) and a rapid transit line (highway) are simultaneously located in order. The highway is an alternative transportation system that can be used by the clients to reduce their travel

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Fe XVI radiative rates (Diaz+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, F.; Vilkas, M. J.; Ishikawa, Y.; Beiersdorfer, P.

    2013-08-01

    Accurate theoretical energy level, lifetime, and transition probability calculations of core-excited Fe XVI were performed employing the relativistic Multireference Moller-Plesset perturbation theory. In these computations the term energies of the highly excited n<=5 states arising from the configuration 1s22sk2pm3lpnl'q, where k+m+p+q=9, l<=3 and p+q<=2 are considered, including those of the autoionizing levels with a hole-state in the L-shell. All even and odd parity states of sodium-like iron ion were included for a total of 1784 levels. Comparison of the calculated L-shell transition wavelengths with those from laboratory measurements shows excellent agreement. Therefore, our calculation may be used to predict the wavelengths of as of yet unobserved Fe XVI, such as the second strongest 2p-3d Fe XVI line, which has not been directly observed in the laboratory and which blends with one of the prominent Fe XVII lines. (2 data files).

  7. Bichromatic Discrepancy via Convex Partitions J.M. Diaz-Ba~nez

    E-print Network

    Urrutia, Jorge

    ´erez-Lantero § C. Seara ¶ J. Urrutia Abstract Let R be a set of red points and B a set of blue points on the plane Matem´aticas, Universidad Nacional Aut´onoma de M´exico, urrutia@matem.unam.mx, Partially supported

  8. On balanced 4-holes in bichromatic point sets J. M. Diaz-Ba~nez

    E-print Network

    Díaz-Báñez, José Miguel

    ´erez-Lantero¶ A. Ram´irez-Vigueras T. Sakai J. Urrutia I. Ventura November 26, 2013 Abstract1 Let S = R B. Instituto de Matem´aticas, UNAM, Mexico. Email: urrutia@matem.unam.mx. Partially supported by project MEC

  9. Bichromatic separability with two boxes: a general approach J. M. Diaz-Ba~nez

    E-print Network

    Urrutia, Jorge

    ´erez-Lantero C. Seara§ J. Urrutia¶ I. Ventura February 7, 2009 Abstract Let S be a set of n points on the plane´aticas, Universidad Nacional Aut´onoma de M´exico, urrutia@matem.unam.mx, partially sup- ported by Grant MTM2006

  10. On the Coarseness of Bicolored Point Sets , J.M. Diaz-Ba~nez

    E-print Network

    Urrutia, Jorge

    ´erez-Lantero§ , C. Seara¶ , J. Urrutia October 18, 2011 Abstract Let R be a set of red points and B a set of blue.seara@upc.edu Instituto de Matem´aticas, Universidad Nacional Aut´onoma de M´exico, urrutia@matem.unam.mx 1 #12;For

  11. Bichromatic Discrepancy via Convex Partitions J.M. Diaz-Ba~nez

    E-print Network

    Díaz-Báñez, José Miguel

    ´erez-Lantero § C. Seara ¶ J. Urrutia 21st October 2009 Abstract Let R be a set of red points and B a set of blue-01267 and DURSI 2005SGR00692 Instituto de Matem´aticas, Universidad Nacional Aut´onoma de M´exico, urrutia

  12. Covering point sets with two convex objects J. Miguel Diaz-Ba~nez

    E-print Network

    Urrutia, Jorge

    `es Jorge Urrutia§ Inma Ventura¶ Abstract Let P2n be a point set in the plane with n red and n blue points-02. §Instituto de Matem´aticas, Universidad Nacional Aut´onoma de M´exico, urrutia@matem.unam.mx. Supported

  13. Computing Shortest Heterochromatic Monotone Routes J.M. Diaz-Ba~nez1

    E-print Network

    Urrutia, Jorge

    . Oliveros3 , A. Ram´irez-Vigueras4 , J. A. Sellar`es5 , J. Urrutia6 , and I. Ventura7 1 Departamento de´onoma de M´exico, Mexico urrutia@matem.unam.mx 7 Departamento de Matem´aticas. Universidad de Huelva, Spain

  14. Poligonales heterocromaticas monotonas de minima longitud J. M. Diaz-Ba~nez

    E-print Network

    Urrutia, Jorge

    . Oliveros A. Ram´irez-Vigueras § J. A. Sellar`es ¶ J. Urrutia I. Ventura Abstract Dados n puntos en el´exico, urrutia@matem.unam.mx. Subvencionado por los proyectos MTM2006-03909 y CONACYT de M´exico, Proyecto 37540

  15. On the Coarseness of Bicolored Point Sets , J.M. Diaz-Ba~nez

    E-print Network

    Díaz-Báñez, José Miguel

    ´erez-Lantero§ , C. Seara¶ , J. Urrutia April 13, 2012 Abstract Let R be a set of red points and B a set of blue-45876. urrutia@matem.unam.mx 1 #12;Intuitively speaking, given a bicoloring {R, B} of S, R and B are well blended

  16. Maria Elena Diaz Barriga Rodriguez me.diazb@gmail.com / md2936@caa.columbia.edu

    E-print Network

    -feasibility study of a Waste to Energy plant in Uruguay. A division of the government of Uruguay hired the EEC to do a pre-feasibility study of a WTE plant in Montevideo, the capital city of Uruguay. I helped throughout the whole study but

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: z~5.7 C IV absorption systems (Diaz+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, C. G.; Koyama, Y.; Ryan-Weber, E. V.; Cooke, J.; Ouchi, M.; Shimasaku, K.; Nakata, F.

    2015-03-01

    This work is based on broad-band and narrow-band photometry obtained with Suprime-Cam on the Subaru Telescope. We use broad-band Rc, i' and z' filters covering the wavelength range ~5800-10000Å and a custom-made NB filter to detect Ly? in emission at redshift z=5.71+/-0.04 (NBC IV, ?c=8162Å, FWHM=100Å). Observations with the NBC IV, Rc and i' bands were acquired on the nights of 2011 March 07-08 and images in the z' band were obtained on 2011 March 31 and April 01. We observed two fields centred on QSOs SDSS J103027.01+052455.0 (zem=6.309, RA=10:30:27.01, DE=05:24:55.0), SDSS J113717.73+354956.9 (zem=6.01, RA=11:37:17.73, DE=35:49:56.9) (Fan et al., 2006AJ....132..117F), hereafter J1030+0524 and J1137+3549. (6 data files).

  18. DIAZ-PINTO ET AL. VOL. 6 ' NO. 2 ' 11421148 ' 2012 www.acsnano.org

    E-print Network

    Peng, Haibing

    rate or no hydrogen,12,13 and reduced hy- drogen concentration has also led14 to the improvement and eliminating the hy- drogen during the growth. This finding is important not only by shedding light on the CVD

  19. Biodiversity Regulation of Ecosystem Services Coordinating Lead Authors: Sandra Diaz, David Tilman, Joseph Fargione

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    Chapter 11 Biodiversity Regulation of Ecosystem Services Coordinating Lead Authors: Sandra Di . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300 11.2 Terrestrial Biodiversity Effects on Supporting Services . . . . . . . . . . . 301 11 on Primary Production 11.3 Terrestrial Biodiversity Effects on Regulating Services . . . . . . . . . . . 307

  20. Drosophila Katanin-60 Depolymerizes and Severs at Microtubule Defects Juan Daniel Diaz-Valencia,

    E-print Network

    Ross, Jennifer

    of MT-associated proteins that regulates MT dynamics is the MT-severing enzymes. In this work, we to growing) frequencies. These differences are due to MT-associated proteins that regulate dynamics-associated proteins is the class of MT-severing enzymes (4). MT-severing enzymes use ATP to break the MT lattice

  1. Evolution of alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase 1 peroxisomal and mitochondrial targeting. A survey of its subcellular distribution in the livers of various representatives of the classes Mammalia, Aves and Amphibia.

    PubMed

    Danpure, C J; Fryer, P; Jennings, P R; Allsop, J; Griffiths, S; Cunningham, A

    1994-08-01

    As part of a wider study on the molecular evolution of alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase 1 (AGT1) intracellular compartmentalization, we have determined the subcellular distribution of immunoreactive AGT1, using postembedding protein A-gold immunoelectron microscopy, in the livers of various members of the classes Mammalia, Aves, and Amphibia. As far as organellar distribution is concerned, three categories could be distinguished. In members of the first category (type I), all, or nearly all, of the immunoreactive AGT1 was concentrated within the peroxisomes. In the second category (type II), AGT1 was found more evenly distributed in both peroxisomes and mitochondria. In the third category (type III), AGT1 was localized mainly within the mitochondria with much lower, but widely variable, amounts in the peroxisomes. Type I animals include the human, two great apes (gorilla, orangutan), two Old World monkeys (anubis baboon, Japanese macaque), a New World monkey (white-faced Saki monkey), a lago, morph (European rabbit), a bat (Seba's short-tailed fruit bat), two caviomorph rodents (guinea pig, orange-rumped agouti), and two Australian marsupials (koala, Bennett's wallaby). Type II animals include two New World monkeys (common marmoset, cotton-top tamarin), three prosimians (brown lemur, fat-tailed dwarf lemur, pygmy slow loris), five rodents (a hybrid crested porcupine, Colombian ground squirrel, laboratory rat, laboratory mouse, golden hamster), an American marsupial (grey short-tailed opossum), and a bird (raven). Type III animals include the large tree shrew, three insectivores (common Eurasian mole, European hedgehog, house shrew), four carnivores (domestic cat, ocelot, domestic dog, polecat ferret), and an amphibian (common frog). In addition to these categories, some animals (e.g. guinea pig, common frog) possessed significant amounts of cytosolic AGT1. Whereas the subcellular distribution of AGT1 in some orders (e.g. Insectivora and Carnivora) did not appear to vary markedly between the different members, in other orders (e.g. Primates, Rodentia and Marsupialia) it fluctuated widely between the different species. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that the subcellular distribution of AGT1 has changed radically on numerous occasions during the evolution of mammals. The new observations presented in this paper are compatible with our previous demonstration of a relationship between AGT1 subcellular distribution and either present or putative ancestral dietary habit, and our previous suggestion that the molecular evolution of the AGT gene has been markedly influenced by dietary selection pressure. PMID:7813517

  2. Global diversity of freshwater birds (Aves)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Olivier Dehorter; Matthieu Guillemain

    Among the 10,000 birds species living on earth, 5% (e.g., 560) need imperatively freshwater habitat in order to satisfy at\\u000a least one of their life history traits. About 11 completed families could even disappear if their wetland habitat left. About\\u000a 10% (58) of these can be considered as endemic. Africa contains the biggest number of endemic (20) and more precisely

  3. Global diversity of freshwater birds (Aves)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Olivier Dehorter; Matthieu Guillemain

    2008-01-01

    Among the 10,000 birds species living on earth, 5% (e.g., 560) need imperatively freshwater habitat in order to satisfy at\\u000a least one of their life history traits. About 11 completed families could even disappear if their wetland habitat left. About\\u000a 10% (58) of these can be considered as endemic. Africa contains the biggest number of endemic (20) and more precisely

  4. www.ave.kth.se Rail Vehicles

    E-print Network

    Haviland, David

    which reduce noise generation seem to cause more wear. These braking systems are becoming mandatory: Modelling wheel wear caused by block brakes Background Most freight trains use block brakes, where the energy dissipation is generated with the friction between a brake block and the wheel thread

  5. 801 Stanyan 400 Parnassus Ave (ACC)

    E-print Network

    Klein, Ophir

    of Environmental Health and Safety and the Relevant Use Authorizations; all such materials must be escorted.com/ucsf_shuttles Revised 10/2013 All times are for departures. (Times are approximate) · = unscheduled stop = flag

  6. 420 Comp & Comm Ctr Garden Ave Ext

    E-print Network

    _cu@cornell.edu Deaf/HoH: via 711 Relay Check List for Planning Accessible Events Event Planning Is information about Are there accessible parking spaces near the accessible entrance? Are spaces clearly marked with the international symbol of accessibility? Are the spaces and access aisles 8 feet wide? Are the access aisles marked

  7. Nasal mites of Tyrannidae (Aves) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Mendes, M M; Mascarenhas, C S; Sinkoc, A L; Müller, G

    2014-05-01

    A total of 81 Tyraniidae birds were examined, 80 Pitangus sulphuratus (Linnaeus, 1766) (Great kiscadee), and one Machetornis rixosa (Vieilot, 1819) (Cattle tyrant), for collection of nasal mites, which were identified as Ptilonyssus spinosus (Brooks & Strandtmann, 1960) and Sternostoma longisetosae (Hyland, 1961) (Rhinonyssidae). This finding characterises the first report of P. spinosus and S. longisetosae in P. sulphuratus, and the first record of P. spinosus in M. rixosa, and expands the geographic distribution of these species. It is the first occurrence of S. longisetosae in the Neotropics, and the first citation of P. spinosus in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. PMID:25166334

  8. Kerry Donnelly Peterson 460 Division Ave

    E-print Network

    Wu, Mingshen

    with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease. Advisor: Elizabeth J. Parks, Ph.D. R.D. Dietetic Internship for Graduate, Schwarzenberg SJ, Jessurun J, Boldt MD, Parks EJ. Sources of fatty acids stored in liver and secreted via lipoproteins in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Journal of Clinical Investigation 2005

  9. OBSERVACIONES DE AVES RARAS EN ESPAÑA, 2001

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eduardo DE JUANA

    annual report of the Spanish Orni- thological Society's Rarities Committee. It considers 260 new records, relating to 108 species, with an ac- ceptance rate of 84.2 %. Highlights include a record of African Crake Crex egregia in Tenerife island (Ca- naries), first for the Western Palearctic, and a capture of Bald Ibis Geronticus eremita in the Marismas del Guadalquivir, year

  10. Vision in the peafowl (Aves: Pavo cristatus)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nathan S. Hart

    The visual sense of the Indian blue-shouldered peafowl Pavo cristatus was investigated with respect to the spectral absorption characteristics of the retinal photoreceptors, the spectral transmittance of the ocular media and the topographic distribution of cells in the retinal ganglion cell layer. Microspectrophotometry revealed a single class of rod, four spectrally distinct types of single cone and a single class

  11. OARDCEMPLOYEES'CREDITUNION 1680MadisonAve

    E-print Network

    Jones, Michelle

    Vrotney For financial institutions 2009 proved to be as bad as 2008. Losses by insurance companies both: Choose One White American Pepper Jack Provalone Monterey Cheddar Veggies: Lettuce Tomatoes Cucumbers (Research Operations) Gene Howell (Renovations Planning) AUDIT COMMITTEE Jack Bardall (Retired) Willis Leach

  12. 212 Union Ave, SE Olympia, WA 98501

    E-print Network

    on the Northwest Power & Conservation Council's (Council) recently-released report on the "Carbon Dioxide Footprint be accounted for in any scientific analysis of the current and future carbon footprint scenarios of the region affect the region's prospective carbon dioxide emissions ­ and how difficult reductions to 1990 levels

  13. MorrisAveAA WickliffeStff

    E-print Network

    Cheng, Mei-Fang

    access the predicted mes many different ways Online at nextbus.com Cell phone with tex ng PDA or mobile real me GPS tracking to monitor the posi on of each shu le and predict accurate arrival mes NEXTbus

  14. ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY 9700 S. CASS AVE.

    E-print Network

    Kemner, Ken

    1991 Advanced Photon Source: Radiological Design Considerations #12;Preface In the course of developing occupational and general public doses were also generated. Some of this information was needed to provide back with respect to the radiological aspects of the machine. It was felt that such a single document would be more

  15. LINDSEY AVE. BOYD ST.BOYD ST.

    E-print Network

    Oklahoma, University of

    Walker/Adams Mall Sutton Switzer Training Facility Oklahoma Memorial Stadium Adams Price Museum of Art Catlett Physical Science Center Debarr Annex Chem. Sarkey's Energy Center Rhyne W alkerTow er Adam s

  16. Evolution of leaf warbler songs (Aves: Phylloscopidae).

    PubMed

    Tietze, Dieter Thomas; Martens, Jochen; Fischer, Balduin S; Sun, Yue-Hua; Klussmann-Kolb, Annette; Päckert, Martin

    2015-02-01

    Songs in passerine birds are important for territory defense and mating. Speciation rates in oscine passerines are so high, due to cultural evolution, that this bird lineage makes up half of the extant bird species. Leaf warblers are a speciose Old-World passerine family of limited morphological differentiation, so that songs are even more important for species delimitation. We took 16 sonographic traits from song recordings of 80 leaf warbler taxa and correlated them with 15 potentially explanatory variables, pairwise, and in linear models. Based on a well-resolved molecular phylogeny of the same taxa, all pairwise correlations were corrected for relatedness with phylogenetically independent contrasts and phylogenetic generalized linear models were used. We found a phylogenetic signal for most song traits, but a strong one only for the duration of the longest and of the shortest element, which are presumably inherited instead of learned. Body size of a leaf warbler species is a constraint on song frequencies independent of phylogeny. At least in this study, habitat density had only marginal impact on song features, which even disappeared through phylogenetic correction. Maybe most leaf warblers avoid the deterioration through sound propagation in dense vegetation by singing from exposed perches. Latitudinal (and longitudinal) extension of the breeding ranges was correlated with most song features, especially verse duration (longer polewards and westwards) and complexity (lower polewards). Climate niche or expansion history might explain these correlations. The number of different element types per verse decreases with elevation, possibly due to fewer resources and congeneric species at higher elevations. PMID:25691998

  17. Introduction to the Aves: The Birds

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Museum of Paleontology at the University of California Berkeley (reviewed in the June 16, 1995 Scout Report) has continued to build their impressive online resource network and now offers this site on paleontology of birds. To learn more about each subject, users may click on any of the four main sections: Fossil Record, Life History & Ecology, Systematics, or Morphology. Although some bird links are under construction, the current information is instructive and contains hyperlinks to a wealth of additional information.

  18. OBSERVACIONES DE AVES RARAS EN ESPAÑA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eduardo DE JUANA

    annual report of the Spanish Orni- thological Society's Rarities Committee. It considers 321 new records pertaining to 110 species, with an ac- ceptance rate of 77.7 %. Species new to the Spanish list are Dwarf Bittern Ardeirallus sturmii (first accepted record for the Palearctic, from Gran Canaria island), Chimney Swift Chaetura pelagica(two in the Iberian pe- ninsula, year1999) and Dusky

  19. ONE WAY ONE WAY Stadium Ave.

    E-print Network

    Jiang, Wen

    AQUA MRDH WARN SMLY SHRV ERHT HARR HILLPGMD MCUT TERY PVAB CDFS HERL POUL ASTL GRS SERV BSG FOOD TMB.) Bioscience Center C8 BMED Biomedical Engineering Building D8 BRK Birck Nanotechnology Center B8 BRNG Beering

  20. Kathryn E. Muratore 4400 Massachusetts Ave NW

    E-print Network

    Lansky, Joshua

    and documentation available at http://mcb.berkeley.edu/labs/kirsch). - Cloning, expression, purification variants and assaying their substrate specificity. · Identify the chemical basis for the enzymatic effects and translation. Human Genome (CHEM-205) Introduction to the science of genetics and genomics, including

  1. Evolution of leaf warbler songs (Aves: Phylloscopidae)

    PubMed Central

    Tietze, Dieter Thomas; Martens, Jochen; Fischer, Balduin S; Sun, Yue-Hua; Klussmann-Kolb, Annette; Päckert, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Songs in passerine birds are important for territory defense and mating. Speciation rates in oscine passerines are so high, due to cultural evolution, that this bird lineage makes up half of the extant bird species. Leaf warblers are a speciose Old-World passerine family of limited morphological differentiation, so that songs are even more important for species delimitation. We took 16 sonographic traits from song recordings of 80 leaf warbler taxa and correlated them with 15 potentially explanatory variables, pairwise, and in linear models. Based on a well-resolved molecular phylogeny of the same taxa, all pairwise correlations were corrected for relatedness with phylogenetically independent contrasts and phylogenetic generalized linear models were used. We found a phylogenetic signal for most song traits, but a strong one only for the duration of the longest and of the shortest element, which are presumably inherited instead of learned. Body size of a leaf warbler species is a constraint on song frequencies independent of phylogeny. At least in this study, habitat density had only marginal impact on song features, which even disappeared through phylogenetic correction. Maybe most leaf warblers avoid the deterioration through sound propagation in dense vegetation by singing from exposed perches. Latitudinal (and longitudinal) extension of the breeding ranges was correlated with most song features, especially verse duration (longer polewards and westwards) and complexity (lower polewards). Climate niche or expansion history might explain these correlations. The number of different element types per verse decreases with elevation, possibly due to fewer resources and congeneric species at higher elevations. PMID:25691998

  2. Validity of Bartram's Painted Vulture (Aves: Cathartidae).

    PubMed

    Snyder, Noel F R; Fry, Joel T

    2013-01-01

    William Bartram described the Painted Vulture (Vultur sacra) as a new species in his 1791 book on travels in Florida and other southeastern states. However, no specimen of this bird survives, and it has not been reported by any subsequent ornithologist. Bartram's detailed description is not presently endorsed by the American Ornithologists' Union and has been widely regarded as a myth, a misdescribed King Vulture Sarcoramphus papa (Linnaeus), a misdescribed Northern Caracara Caracara cheriway (Jacquin), or a garbled mixture of species. In fact, his description bears almost no resemblance to a Northern Caracara, but it does match the King Vulture in all important respects except tail color (which is uniform dark brown in all ages and sexes of King Vultures but was white with a dark brown or black tip in Bartram's description). Most 20th century ornithologists commenting on Bartram's bird have been reluctant to accept his description because of the tail-color discrepancy. Only McAtee (1942) concluded that his description could be fully accurate as written, indicating a bird closely related to, but different from, a typical King Vulture. Paralleling Bartram's description is an apparently independent account and painting of a vulture of uncertain geographic origin by Eleazar Albin (1734). Details of Albin's description, including tail color, are very similar to those of Bartram's description. The only discrepancies are minor differences in color of softparts and tail that seem explicable as intraspecific variation. Available evidence suggests that Bartram knew nothing of Albin's description, and if so, Albin's bird provides quite persuasive support for the validity of Bartram's bird. Equally important, none of the arguments offered historically against the validity of the Painted Vulture is persuasive when examined closely. Together, these and other factors make a strong case for acceptance of Bartram's Painted Vulture as a historic resident of northern Florida and likely other adjacent regions. PMID:24698902

  3. Richard R. Gnat, AIA, LEED AP 650 Oakmont Ave., #2119 2641 West Winnemac Ave., #2

    E-print Network

    Hemmers, Oliver

    Professor Studio, Core & Elective Courses: August 2011 ­ June 2012 KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY, Manhattan - May 1989 Professional PAPPAGEORGE / HAYMES ARCHITECTS LTD, Chicago, Illinois Experience Senior Project Associate / Senior Project Designer / Senior Project Architect: Nov. 2001 - July 2006 KRUECK & SEXTON

  4. MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 761, pp. 15, 3 figs. Cryptotis meridensis. By Neal Woodman and Amelia Diaz de Pascual

    E-print Network

    Hayssen, Virginia

    , less emarginate upper dentition, and simple M3 (Woodman 2002). GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS. Cryptotis. Dentition is bulbous. Posterior borders of P4, M1, and M2 are not recessed or only slightly recessed

  5. The Berlekamp-Massey Algorithm revisited Nadia Ben Atti (*), Gema M. Diaz-Toca (y) Henri Lombardi (z)

    E-print Network

    Lombardi, Henri

    * * simplified by Massey (see [5]). The similarity of the algorithm to the extended Euclidean Algorithm * *can of the extended Euclidean Alg* *orithm given in [3], to find exactly the Berlekamp-Massey Algorithm The Berlekamp-Massey Algorithm revisited Nadia Ben Atti

  6. Min-energy Broadcast in Fixed-trajectory Mobile Ad-hoc J.M. Diaz-Ba~nez

    E-print Network

    Urrutia, Jorge

    -Monroy D. Flores-Pe~naloza M. A. Heredia J. Urrutia Abstract This paper concerns about mobile ad@ciencias.unam.mx, dflores@matem.unam.mx, marco@ciencias.unam.mx, urrutia@matem.unam.mx #12;Given a source station s S

  7. DRAFT Subpart W Quarterly Call April 3, 2013 EPA: Reid Rosnick (ORIA), Angelique Diaz (Region 8), Susan Stahle (OGC)

    E-print Network

    that there is no quality of participation by stakeholder. Sarah Fields: Mentions an open-pit uranium mine associated with a proposed heap leach facility. Asks if open-pit uranium mines will be revisited to address the need Dunn, (CCAT), Sarah Fields (Uranium Watch) Other Travis Stills (Energy Minerals Law Center), Darrell

  8. Regenerative potential of allopregnanolone Jun Ming Wang, Lifei Liu, Ronald W. Irwin, Shuhua Chen, Roberta Diaz Brinton

    E-print Network

    Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    Review Regenerative potential of allopregnanolone Jun Ming Wang, Lifei Liu, Ronald W. Irwin, Shuhua to mild to severe. Initial analyses suggest that AP may maintain the regenerative ability of the brain. Challenges of regenerative therapeutics for Alzheimer's disease

  9. Download the Campus Parking Map

    E-print Network

    Zakharov, Vladimir

    Download the Campus Parking Map to your Smartphone B C D E F 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 A E. Speedway Blvd. EAve. ParkAve. South Campus Dr. Enke Dr. EuclidAve. ParkAve. ONE WAY VineAve. CherryAve.CherryAve. WarrenAve.WarrenAve. CherryAve. MartinAve. ParkAve. MountainAve. HighlandAve. VineAve. TyndallAve.TyndallAve. Warren

  10. Hypopi (Acari: Hypoderatidae) of the wood stork (Aves: Ciconiiformes; Ciconiidae).

    PubMed

    Pence, D B; Thomas, N J

    1995-11-01

    A new species is described and additional host records are presented for 2 other species of deutonymphs of the family Hypoderatidae from the subcutaneous adipose tissues of the wood stork, Mycteria americana L. Phalacrodectes (Phalacrodectes) mycteria n. sp. appears to share affinities with species from both pelicaniform and ciconiiform hosts, but it most closely resembles P. (P.) punctatissimus (Cerný) Pence & Courtney from pelicans in idiosomal chaetotaxy, cuticular sclerotization, and posteriorly divergent, widely separated genital openings. The new species differs from this and other species of the genus by its small size, the degree of separation of the genital openings with papillae, no secondary sclerotization in the perigenital area or surrounding the genital openings, and the long filiform setae s and w on genu III. There was a mixed infection of Neottialges kutzeri Fain and N. mycteriae Pence in all of 7 wood storks examined from Florida and Georgia; P. (P.) mycteria was found in 4 of these hosts. This is the 7th species described as a deutonymph in the genus Phalacrodectes. The apparent close affinity of P. (P.) mycteria with P. (P.) punctatissimus and allied species from pelicaniform versus ciconiiform birds appears to be inconsistent with the established host-parasite relationships based on classical avian taxonomic relationships. However, this apparent affinity may be more reflective of the close relationships between the families of pelicans, ibises and spoonbills, and storks as recently proposed by DNA-DNA hybridization studies. PMID:8551516

  11. Comparative study of visual pathways in owls (Aves: Strigiformes).

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Ibáñez, Cristián; Iwaniuk, Andrew N; Lisney, Thomas J; Wylie, Douglas R

    2013-01-01

    Although they are usually regarded as nocturnal, owls exhibit a wide range of activity patterns, from strictly nocturnal, to crepuscular or cathemeral, to diurnal. Several studies have shown that these differences in the activity pattern are reflected in differences in eye morphology and retinal organization. Despite the evidence that differences in activity pattern among owl species are reflected in the peripheral visual system, there has been no attempt to correlate these differences with changes in the visual regions in the brain. In this study, we compare the relative size of nuclei in the main visual pathways in nine species of owl that exhibit a wide range of activity patterns. We found marked differences in the relative size of all visual structures among the species studied, both in the tectofugal and the thalamofugal pathway, as well in other retinorecipient nuclei, including the nucleus lentiformis mesencephali, the nucleus of the basal optic root and the nucleus geniculatus lateralis, pars ventralis. We show that the barn owl (Tyto alba), a species widely used in the study of the integration of visual and auditory processing, has reduced visual pathways compared to strigid owls. Our results also suggest there could be a trade-off between the relative size of visual pathways and auditory pathways, similar to that reported in mammals. Finally, our results show that although there is no relationship between activity pattern and the relative size of either the tectofugal or the thalamofugal pathway, there is a positive correlation between the relative size of both visual pathways and the relative number of cells in the retinal ganglion layer. PMID:23296024

  12. Eye shape and retinal topography in owls (Aves: Strigiformes).

    PubMed

    Lisney, Thomas J; Iwaniuk, Andrew N; Bandet, Mischa V; Wylie, Douglas R

    2012-01-01

    The eyes of vertebrates show adaptations to the visual environments in which they evolve. For example, eye shape is associated with activity pattern, while retinal topography is related to the symmetry or 'openness' of the habitat of a species. Although these relationships are well documented in many vertebrates including birds, the extent to which they hold true for species within the same avian order is not well understood. Owls (Strigiformes) represent an ideal group for the study of interspecific variation in the avian visual system because they are one of very few avian orders to contain species that vary in both activity pattern and habitat preference. Here, we examined interspecific variation in eye shape and retinal topography in nine species of owl. Eye shape (the ratio of corneal diameter to eye axial length) differed among species, with nocturnal species having relatively larger corneal diameters than diurnal species. All the owl species have an area of high retinal ganglion cell (RGC) density in the temporal retina and a visual streak of increased cell density extending across the central retina from temporal to nasal. However, the organization and degree of elongation of the visual streak varied considerably among species and this variation was quantified using H:V ratios. Species that live in open habitats and/or that are more diurnally active have well-defined, elongated visual streaks and high H:V ratios (3.88-2.33). In contrast, most nocturnal and/or forest-dwelling owls have a poorly defined visual streak, a more radially symmetrical arrangement of RGCs and lower H:V ratios (1.77-1.27). The results of a hierarchical cluster analysis indicate that the apparent interspecific variation is associated with activity pattern and habitat as opposed to the phylogenetic relationships among species. In seven species, the presence of a fovea was confirmed and it is suggested that all strigid owls may possess a fovea, whereas the tytonid barn owl (Tyto alba) does not. A size-frequency analysis of cell soma area indicates that a number of different RGC classes are represented in owls, including a population of large RGCs (cell soma area >150 µm(2)) that resemble the giant RGCs reported in other vertebrates. In conclusion, eye shape and retinal topography in owls vary among species and this variation is associated with different activity patterns and habitat preferences, thereby supporting similar observations in other vertebrates. PMID:22722085

  13. SHAHNOZA BOBOEVA 3030 Johnson Ave, Bronx, NY, 10463

    E-print Network

    for English language skills GLOBAL EDUCATION NEW YORK (GENY) 2010-2011 (Private business school approved-2009 OF TAJIKISTAN, FACULTY "AGROTECHNOLOGY" Khujand, Tajikistan Bachelor of Science degree in Agribusiness language, Global Education New York, New York, 2010 #12;LANGUAGES · Tajik ­ native language · English

  14. DISABILITY SERVICE 65 Southpark Ave, Glasgow, G12 8LE

    E-print Network

    Guo, Zaoyang

    that an incentive was offered: £25 Amazon gift vouchers won by five participants. #12;2 SURVEY RESULTS Question 1 Name and Question 2 Email ­ optional questions, not included for Data Protection reasons. Question 3, Veterinary & Life Sciences 19.4% College of Science & Engineering 17.2% College of Social Sciences 30

  15. Duval County Extension 1010 N. McDuff Ave.

    E-print Network

    Watson, Craig A.

    Freezing is one of the easiest, most convenient, and fastest methods of preserving foods. The extreme quality or cause food to spoil. The development of enzymes in fruits and vegetables when the product thaws. Therefore, it is imperative that food is thawed in the refrigerator

  16. 2245 MSC, 1300 University Ave Madison, WI 53706-1532

    E-print Network

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    Alberto Palloni, PhD 10:30 am Health & Resource Fair / Posters 11:15 am The Caloric Restriction Paradigm, PhD 9:45 am The March of Longevity: the Role of Genes, Behavior, Environment, and the Microbiome meals can be provided for those with serious dietary restrictions. CONTINUING EDUCATION UNITS: 0.3 CEUs

  17. A Karyological Study of Some Corvine Birds (Corvidae, Aves)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. V. Roslik; A. P. Kryukov

    2001-01-01

    Karyotypes were studied in the hooded and carrion crows, their naturally occurred hybrids, the jungle crow, the azure-winged magpie (2n= 80 in all aforementioned birds), and the magpie (2n= 82). Corvine birds of Primorskii Krai were karyotyped for the first time. In addition to the similarity in the diploid chromosome sets, corvine birds were shown to have a similar structure

  18. Hindlimb myology of the monk parakeet (Aves, Psittaciformes).

    PubMed

    Carril, Julieta; Mosto, María C; Picasso, Mariana B J; Tambussi, Claudia P

    2014-07-01

    We studied the hindlimb myology of the monk parakeet (Myiopsitta monachus). Like all parrots, it has zygodactyl feet enabling perching, climbing, hanging, moving easily among trees, and handling food. Muscles were described and weighed, and physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA) of four flexors and one extensor was calculated. In comparison to other muscles, the M. tibialis cranialis and the M. fibularis brevis show increased development and high PCSA values, and therefore, large potential force production. Also, a large proportion of muscle mass was involved in flexing the digits. We hypothesize that these muscle traits are associated with the arboreal locomotion and food manipulation habits. In the monk parakeet, the M. extensor digitorum longus sends a branch to the hallux, and the connection between the M. flexor digitorum longus and the M. flexor hallucis longus is type I (Gadow's classification). We reaffirm the presence of the M. ambiens as a plesiomorphic condition that disappears in most members of the order. Among Psittaciformes, the M. fibularis brevis is stronger and the M. fibularis weaker in arboreal species than in basal terrestrial ones (e.g., Strigops). PMID:24500894

  19. PLANT GENOMICS: The Thir dW ave

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Justin O. Borevitz; Joseph R. Ecker

    2004-01-01

    ? Abstract Completing the primary genomic,sequence,of Arabidopsis thaliana was a major milestone, being the first plant genome and only the third high-quality finished eukaryotic genome,sequence. Understanding,how,the genome,sequence,comprehen- sively encodes developmental,programs,and environmental,responses is the next major challenge for all plant genome projects. This requires fully characterizing the genes, the regulatory sequences, and their functions. We discuss several functional genomics approaches to

  20. A comprehensive multilocus assessment of sparrow (Aves: Passerellidae) relationships.

    PubMed

    Klicka, John; Keith Barker, F; Burns, Kevin J; Lanyon, Scott M; Lovette, Irby J; Chaves, Jaime A; Bryson, Robert W

    2014-08-01

    The New World sparrows (Emberizidae) are among the best known of songbird groups and have long-been recognized as one of the prominent components of the New World nine-primaried oscine assemblage. Despite receiving much attention from taxonomists over the years, and only recently using molecular methods, was a "core" sparrow clade established allowing the reconstruction of a phylogenetic hypothesis that includes the full sampling of sparrow species diversity. In this paper, we use mitochondrial DNA gene sequences from all 129 putative species of sparrow and four additional (nuclear) loci for a subset of these taxa to resolve both generic and species level relationships. Hypotheses derived from our mitochondrial (2184 base pairs) and nuclear (5705 base pairs) DNA data sets were generally in agreement with respect to clade constituency but differed somewhat with respect to among-clade relationships. Sparrow diversity is defined predominantly by eight well-supported clades that indicate a lack of monophyly for at least three currently recognized genera. Ammodramus is polyphyletic and requires the naming of two additional genera. Spizella is also polyphyletic with Tree Sparrow (Spizella arborea) as a taxonomic "outlier". Pselliophorus is embedded within a larger Atlapetes assemblage and should be merged with that group. This new hypothesis of sparrow relationships will form the basis for future comparative analyses of variation within songbirds. PMID:24792084

  1. Layer of Abnormally Cold Bottom Water over Southern Aves Ridge.

    PubMed

    Gordon, A L; Grim, P J; Langseth, M

    1966-03-25

    A thermograd record obtained over the Ayes Ridge indicated existence, at the time of observation, of a cold layer of water in the lowest 13 meters, undergoing high-frequency internal oscillations. The great discontinuity in temperature across the sedimnent-water interface and the lack of agreement with the normal temperature structure indicate that the layer was a transient feature. This abnormal condition may be related to the passage of a hurricane 3 days earlier. PMID:17730083

  2. Emily Waymire Evolution of Uganda's Biodiversity: Apes to Aves

    E-print Network

    chase baby goats while practicing their English ­ "How are yoooou- u-u-u," they sing, each syllable watched baby elephants, tree-climbing lions, and one morning, a leopard who quietly walked in front of our by bringing in tourists who would donate or buy the handicrafts they made. The revenue was enough for them all

  3. The hindlimb muscles of Rhea americana (Aves, Palaeognathae, Rheidae).

    PubMed

    Picasso, M B J

    2010-10-01

    The Greater Rhea is the largest cursorial Ratitae bird native to South America. Due to its increasing importance in farming and therefore in the sustainable use of this species, a comprehensive knowledge of their anatomy is essential. The goal of this study was to provide an anatomical description of the hindlimb muscles of Rhea americana. Six adult birds of both sexes were macroscopically studied analysing the origin and insertion of thigh and shank muscles. The thigh showed the highest number of muscles, whereas the shank showed the lowest number; this feature minimizes inertia and allows achieving high stride frequencies. The muscles of the shank showed long tendons of insertion that reduce the energetic cost during running. The major muscles responsible for extension of the hip and the ankle joints were massive and robust indicating their importance for cursorial locomotion. The pelvic limb muscles of Rhea americana resemble those of other cursorial Ratitae and their features are consistent with specialization for high-speed locomotion. PMID:20666746

  4. The evolutionary history of cockatoos (Aves: Psittaciformes: Cacatuidae)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicole E. White; Matthew J. Phillips; M. Thomas P. Gilbert; Alonzo Alfaro-Núñez; Eske Willerslev; Peter R. Mawson; Peter B. S. Spencer; Michael Bunce

    2011-01-01

    Cockatoos are the distinctive family Cacatuidae, a major lineage of the order of parrots (Psittaciformes) and distributed throughout the Australasian region of the world. However, the evolutionary history of cockatoos is not well understood. We investigated the phylogeny of cockatoos based on three mitochondrial and three nuclear DNA genes obtained from 16 of 21 species of Cacatuidae. In addition, five

  5. The evolutionary history of cockatoos (Aves: Psittaciformes: Cacatuidae).

    PubMed

    White, Nicole E; Phillips, Matthew J; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Alfaro-Núñez, Alonzo; Willerslev, Eske; Mawson, Peter R; Spencer, Peter B S; Bunce, Michael

    2011-06-01

    Cockatoos are the distinctive family Cacatuidae, a major lineage of the order of parrots (Psittaciformes) and distributed throughout the Australasian region of the world. However, the evolutionary history of cockatoos is not well understood. We investigated the phylogeny of cockatoos based on three mitochondrial and three nuclear DNA genes obtained from 16 of 21 species of Cacatuidae. In addition, five novel mitochondrial genomes were used to estimate time of divergence and our estimates indicate Cacatuidae diverged from Psittacidae approximately 40.7 million years ago (95% CI 51.6-30.3 Ma) during the Eocene. Our data shows Cacatuidae began to diversify approximately 27.9 Ma (95% CI 38.1-18.3 Ma) during the Oligocene. The early to middle Miocene (20-10 Ma) was a significant period in the evolution of modern Australian environments and vegetation, in which a transformation from mainly mesic to xeric habitats (e.g., fire-adapted sclerophyll vegetation and grasslands) occurred. We hypothesize that this environmental transformation was a driving force behind the diversification of cockatoos. A detailed multi-locus molecular phylogeny enabled us to resolve the phylogenetic placements of the Palm Cockatoo (Probosciger aterrimus), Galah (Eolophus roseicapillus), Gang-gang Cockatoo (Callocephalon fimbriatum) and Cockatiel (Nymphicus hollandicus), which have historically been difficult to place within Cacatuidae. When the molecular evidence is analysed in concert with morphology, it is clear that many of the cockatoo species' diagnostic phenotypic traits such as plumage colour, body size, wing shape and bill morphology have evolved in parallel or convergently across lineages. PMID:21419232

  6. The karyotype of the osprey, Pandion haliaetus (Aves: Falconiformes)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Ryttman; H. Tegelström; K. Fredga; J. Sondell

    1987-01-01

    The karyotype of the osprey consists of 74 chromosomes. There are no large macrochromosomes and no typical microchromosomes. Autosome No. 2 has a prominent secondary constriction in the long arm. The Z chromosome is similar in size and shape to the largest autosome, the W is a small metacentric. Among the Falconiformes, the osprey karyotype mainly resembles the karyotypes of

  7. AVES ACUATICAS DEL ESTERO LA MANZANILLA, JALISCO, MEXICO

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Salvador HERNÁNDEZ-VÁZQUEZ

    In order to determine the seasonal distribution and the importance water-associated birds in the estero La Manzanilla, Jalisco, México, monthly censuses were carried out from March of 1997 to february of 1998, except for September. A total of 4180 individuals (95.24% residents and 4.76% migratory), belonging to 45 species (29 residents and 16 migratory) of birds were recorded. The highest

  8. Aves acuáticas del estero El Salado, Puerto Vallarta, Jalisco

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fabio Germán; Cupul Magaña

    Aquatic birds of the El Salado estuary, Puerto Vallarta, Jalisco. The El Salado estuary, a unique coastal body in the region of Bahia de Banderas, Mexico is surrounded by Puerto Vallarta and under the pressure of its urban sprawl. The evaluation of its aquatic avifauna can contribute to the establishment of technical bases for the design of strategies of conservation

  9. Multiple cenozoic invasions of Africa by penguins (Aves, Sphenisciformes)

    PubMed Central

    Ksepka, Daniel T.; Thomas, Daniel B.

    2012-01-01

    Africa hosts a single breeding species of penguin today, yet the fossil record indicates that a diverse array of now-extinct taxa once inhabited southern African coastlines. Here, we show that the African penguin fauna had a complex history involving multiple dispersals and extinctions. Phylogenetic analyses and biogeographic reconstructions incorporating new fossil material indicate that, contrary to previous hypotheses, the four Early Pliocene African penguin species do not represent an endemic radiation or direct ancestors of the living Spheniscus demersus (blackfooted penguin). A minimum of three dispersals to Africa, probably assisted by the eastward-flowing Antarctic Circumpolar and South Atlantic currents, occurred during the Late Cenozoic. As regional sea-level fall eliminated islands and reduced offshore breeding areas during the Pliocene, all but one penguin lineage ended in extinction, resulting in today's depleted fauna. PMID:21900330

  10. 5000 Forbes Ave, Warner Hall 3 Floor, Pittsburgh, PA 15213

    E-print Network

    @andrew.cmu.edu Web: www.cmu.edu/oie Pennsylvania Driver's License and State ID Information for Non-US Citizens Many detailed information for non- immigrant F, J, and H visitors who wish to obtain a PA driver's license a Driver's License Center to submit the required documents and forms. For additional information: www

  11. University Health Services 910 Madison Ave, Suite 922

    E-print Network

    Cui, Yan

    b) Asthma c) Chronic bronchitis d) Emphysema e) Pneumonia f) Tuberculosis g) Silicosis h of the following symptoms of pulmonary or lung illness? a) Shortness of breath b) Shortness of breath when walking symptoms that you think may be related to lung problems #12;3 Yes No Yes No Yes No Yes No Yes No Part A

  12. Toyota Technological Institute at Chicago 6045 S. Kenwood Ave.

    E-print Network

    Xu, Jinbo

    /machine learning, high-performance computing, biology, social science, medicine, finance engineering, etc. Honors--1996 Primary research and teaching interests Bioinformatics and computational biology, machine learning learning, and some emerging data-rich areas such as computational biology. I am interested in studying

  13. Karyotypic analysis of three species of Phasianidae (Galliformes: Aves).

    PubMed

    Yadav, J S; Pachlag, S; Burra, M R; Yadav, A S

    1995-01-01

    The karyology of the partridges Francolinus francolinus asiae (2n = 70) and F. pondicerianus interpositus (2n = 68) and the Japanese quail Coturnix coturnix japonica (2n = 78) was investigated. The frequency distribution of the diploid number of chromosomes was tabulated and the most frequent number was taken to be the diploid number. All species showed a bimodal karyotype and the variation in the number of chromosomes was attributed to the macrochromosomes, although twelve macrochromosomes were present in all the species. Female heterogamety revealed that ZZ male:ZW female sex chromosome mechanism was present. The structure and behaviour of chromosomes during mitosis are described and the evolution of karyotype and cytotaxonomic considerations discussed. PMID:7671640

  14. EASTUNIVERSTIYDR. N.W.8thAVE.

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    HALL COLLEGE FOR DESIGN & SOCIAL INQUIRY COLLEGE OF ARTS & LETTERS, DOROTHY F. SCHMIDT COLLEGE BUILDING DESANTIS PAVILION DOROTHY F. SCHMIDT ARTS & HUMANITIES DOROTHY F. SCHMIDT PERFORMING ARTS CENTER DOROTHY F. SCHMIDT VISUAL ARTS CENTER ELEANOR R. BALDWIN HOUSE, PRESIDENT'S RESIDENCE ENGINEERING EAST

  15. EASTUNIVERSTIYDR. N.W.8thAVE.

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    CENTER CONTINUING EDUCATION HALL COLLEGE FOR DESIGN & SOCIAL INQUIRY COLLEGE OF ARTS & LETTERS, DOROTHY F CULTURE AND SOCIETY BUILDING DESANTIS PAVILION DOROTHY F. SCHMIDT ARTS & HUMANITIES DOROTHY F. SCHMIDT PERFORMING ARTS CENTER DOROTHY F. SCHMIDT VISUAL ARTS CENTER ELEANOR R. BALDWIN HOUSE, PRESIDENT'S RESIDENCE

  16. Duval County Extension 1010 N. McDuff Ave.

    E-print Network

    Watson, Craig A.

    . They contain trays for the food and have fans which create and distribute air flow. Conventional oven drying. Blanching also prevents the loss of color and flavor. This is a process of heating vegetables in boiling water or steam for a recommended period of time and then cooling them quickly. Some

  17. Taxonomy of Greater White-fronted Geese (Aves: Anatidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Banks, Richard C.

    2011-01-01

    Five subspecies of the Greater White-fronted Goose, Anser albifrons (Scopoli, 1769), have been named, all on the basis of wintering birds, and up to six subspecies have been recognized. There has been confusion over the application of some names, particularly in North America, because of lack of knowledge of the breeding ranges and type localities, and incorrect taxonomic decisions. There is one clinally varying subspecies in Eurasia, one that breeds in Greenland, and three in North America, one newly named herein.

  18. Eye Shape and Retinal Topography in Owls (Aves: Strigiformes)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas J. Lisney; Andrew N. Iwaniuk; Mischa V. Bandet; Douglas R. Wylie

    2012-01-01

    The eyes of vertebrates show adaptations to the visual environments in which they evolve. For example, eye shape is associated with activity pattern, while retinal topography is related to the symmetry or ‘openness’ of the habitat of a species. Although these relationships are well documented in many vertebrates including birds, the extent to which they hold true for species within

  19. Impacto de los nuevos trenes AVE sobre la movilidad

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Juan Carlos Martín; Gustavo Nombela

    2008-01-01

    Este trabajo analiza los impactos de la nueva red de alta velocidad que se está construyendo en España. A partir de la estimación de un logit multinomial se calculan elasticidades con respecto a variables fundamentales (tiempo de viaje, frecuencia y precio). Los resultados indican que las decisiones de los individuos dependen de forma importante del tiempo de viaje, por lo

  20. BIODIVERSIDAD Y CONSERVACIN DE AVES MSTER U. EN CARACTERIZACIN Y

    E-print Network

    Carrascal, Luis M.

    casos prácticos y se proporcionará a los alumnos bibliografía relevante, tanto de cariz teórico como distintos efectos identificados en los estudios ornitológicos sobre las principales formas de alteración caso para conciliar la preservación de la diversidad aviar tanto dentro de ellas, como en sus

  1. 18130 Midvale Ave. N., Suite C Shoreline, WA 98133

    E-print Network

    process being administered by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission that will likely affect the nature this opportunity to submit our proposal for the marketing of Federal Columbia River Power System power, but represents a more general concept of how federal power could be marketed to better serve the region

  2. Wellness, Productivity, and You! ave you wondered if one

    E-print Network

    Kim, Duck O.

    .com/1-drink D ownload the 2014 food and nutrition handout at EatRight.org (Search bar: "2014 Health Tips")--it has smart eating tips and time- saving food ideas to im- prove nutritional balance, create healthy-852-4392 #12;I t's a myth that only those who have "been there" can help bereaved persons suffering with grief

  3. JOSEPH A. LEDVINA 202 Goddard Ave Mobile: (702) 2814610

    E-print Network

    Orrock, John

    Conducted herpetofauna markrecapture project on the DOE Savannah River Site, monitoring reptile and answered questions · Graded exams, quizzes, worksheets, and lab reports #12; JOSEPH A. LEDVINA rattlesnakes for subsequent dietary analysis Lake Mead National Recreation Area Student Conservation

  4. $avings from thin Air: Cultivating Sensible Energy Use

    E-print Network

    Wang, Yuqing

    possible to recycle the old item along the way. · Change all your lights to compact fluorescent (CFL) if you still have incandescent bulbs around. Although there is some concern about the mercury contained

  5. University of Washington 901 Boren Ave., Suite 1100

    E-print Network

    Mullins, Dyche

    94105-0661 USA tel: 415-597-8198 fax: 415-297-9386 Job Opening: Health Information Systems Coordinator I qualified candidates for its project Strengthening Health Information Systems (HIS) Activities in Namibia-TECH Namibia The International Training and Education Center for Health (I-TECH) is a collaboration between

  6. Acetylcholinesterase in der Pars distalis von Zonotrichia leucophrys gambelii (Aves)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eberhard Haase; Donald S. Farner

    1969-01-01

    Photoperiodic stimulation of photosensitive male white-crowned sparrows, Zonotrichia leucophrys gambelii, causes the appearance of acetylcholinesterase activity in the cephalic and caudal lobes of the pars distalis. In photosensitive birds held on short daily photoperiods little or no activity can he demonstrated histochemically. The enzyme is restricted to PAS-positive cells. After attaining a maximum between 31 and 52 days after the

  7. Eocene Diversification of Crown Group Rails (Aves: Gruiformes: Rallidae)

    PubMed Central

    García–R, Juan C.; Gibb, Gillian C.; Trewick, Steve A.

    2014-01-01

    Central to our understanding of the timing of bird evolution is debate about an apparent conflict between fossil and molecular data. A deep age for higher level taxa within Neoaves is evident from molecular analyses but much remains to be learned about the age of diversification in modern bird families and their evolutionary ecology. In order to better understand the timing and pattern of diversification within the family Rallidae we used a relaxed molecular clock, fossil calibrations, and complete mitochondrial genomes from a range of rallid species analysed in a Bayesian framework. The estimated time of origin of Rallidae is Eocene, about 40.5 Mya, with evidence of intrafamiliar diversification from the Late Eocene to the Miocene. This timing is older than previously suggested for crown group Rallidae, but fossil calibrations, extent of taxon sampling and substantial sequence data give it credence. We note that fossils of Eocene age tentatively assigned to Rallidae are consistent with our findings. Compared to available studies of other bird lineages, the rail clade is old and supports an inference of deep ancestry of ground-dwelling habits among Neoaves. PMID:25291147

  8. Hypopi (Acari: Hypoderatidae) of the wood stork (Aves: Ciconiiformes: Ciconiidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pence, Danny B.; Thomas, N.J.

    1995-01-01

    A new species is described and additional host records are presented for 2 other species of deutonymphs of the family Hypoderatidae from the subcutaneous adipose tissues of the wood stork, Mycteria americana L. Phalacrodectes (Phalacrodectes) mycteria n. sp. appears to share affinities with species from both pelicaniform and ciconiiform hosts, but it most closely resembles P. (P.) punctatissimus (?erný) Pence & Courtney from pelicans in idiosomal chaetotaxy, cutdcular sclerotization, and posteriorly divergent, widely separated genital openings. The new species differs from this and other species of the genus by its small size, the degree of separation of the genital openings with papillae, no secondary sclerotization in the perigenital area or surrounding the genital openings, and the long filiform setae s and w on genu III. There was a mixed infection of Neottialges kutzeri Fain and N. mycteriae Pence in all of 7 wood storks examined from Florida and Georgia; P. (P) mycteria was found in 4 of these hosts. This is the 7th species described as a deutonymph in the genus Phalacrodectes. The apparent close affinity of P. (P.) mycteria with P. (P.) punctatissimus and allied species from pelicaniform versus ciconiiform birds appears to be inconsistent with the established host-parasite relationships based on classical avian taxonomic relationships. However, this apparent affinity may be more reflective of the close relationships between the families of pelicans, ibises and spoonbills, and storks as recently proposed by DNA-DNA hybridization studies.

  9. University Health Services 910 Madison Ave, Suite 922

    E-print Network

    Cui, Yan

    WITH THE ASSISTANCE OF THE HIRING MANAGER OR SUPERVISOR.) Section 1.0: Occupational Exposure Section 1.1: Job, or cell line Teratogenic/Carcinogenic agents Patients Physical (Laser, noise, UV, Liquid N2) other

  10. Covalent Virus Layer for Mass-Based Biosensing Li-Mei C. Yang, Juan E. Diaz, Theresa M. McIntire, Gregory A. Weiss,* and Reginald M. Penner*

    E-print Network

    Weiss, Gregory A.

    with exposure to an antibody (p-Ab) known to bind the phage particles with high affinity. Bound p-Ab was removed affinity (for example, ref 6). Second, the filamentous phage particle can serve as a "carrier, California 92697-2025 M13 virus particles were covalently attached to a planar gold-coated quartz crystal

  11. On the applicability of off-line signatures to the fuzzy vault construction Manuel R. Freire, Julian Fierrez, Marcos Martinez-Diaz, Javier Ortega-Garcia

    E-print Network

    Autonoma de Madrid, Universidad

    On the applicability of off-line signatures to the fuzzy vault construction Manuel R. Freire, the applicability of off-line handwritten signatures to the fuzzy vault construction is studied. Feature extraction summa- rize related works dealing with crypto-biometrics. Sect. 3 briefly describes of the fuzzy vault

  12. Shape and individual variability of the blur adaptation curve q Fuensanta A. Vera-Diaz a,b,*, Russell L. Woods a

    E-print Network

    Peli, Eli

    for the prescription and clinical success of optical devices as well as image enhance- ment rehabilitation options. Ó of certain ophthalmic devices, such as progressive addition lenses, multifocal contact lenses and intra ocular lenses (IOLs) used to replace th

  13. Micromagnetism in mesoscopic epitaxial Fe dot arrays Y. B. Xu, A. Hirohata, L. Lopez-Diaz, H. T. Leung, M. Tselepi, S. M. Gardiner,

    E-print Network

    Xu, Yongbing

    ­10 The epitaxial magnetic elements have a well-defined magnetocrystalline anisotropy and are much less influenced between the in-plane dipolar fields and the magnetocrystalline anisotropy field. A recent study by Stamm an opportunity to control the domain struc- ture via the competing magnetic anisotropy and dipolar fields

  14. MAT 632 Introduction to Algebra II Spring 2011. Page 1. Instructor: Associate Professor Steven P. Diaz, 317C Carnegie, x1583,

    E-print Network

    McConnell, Terry

    someone else simply copy your solution. Calculation of course grade: 3 test during the term 20% each and will count toward the grade for the course. Students are allowed to collaborate on the homework, but each in class activities. Serious sanctions can result from academic dishonesty of any sort. For more

  15. Development/Plasticity/Repair Regulation of Gephyrin Cluster Size and Inhibitory Synaptic

    E-print Network

    Alvarez, Francisco J.

    ; spinal cord; botulinum toxin; tetanus toxin; GABAA receptor; glycine receptor; recurrent inhibition of gephyrin, a key scaffold protein of the inhibitory PSD (Triller et al., 1985; Kirsch et al., 1993; Kirsch in Renshaw cells are larger than in other spinal interneurons (Gonzalez-Forero and Alvarez, 2005). The mecha

  16. Jose Vasconcelos--A Man for All the Americas. The Tinker Pamphlet Series for the Teaching of Mexican American Heritage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Hubert J.

    Due to his dissatisfaction with the Diaz government, Jose Vasconcelos joined the revolutionary leader Francisco Madero, who along with other rebel leaders, brought an end to the Diaz regime in 1911. Vasconcelos shared the successes and misfortunes that followed Diaz's overthrow. When the Madero government came to an abrupt end in 1913, Vasconcelos…

  17. A procedure for automatically linking a geographical database and a pavement attribute database 

    E-print Network

    Lehmann, Erwin August

    1996-01-01

    consecutive order number. This process continues until TEMP NODE cannot be matched. 32 TABLE 7. Congress avenue ordering example 5HMZZI}K CONGRESS AVE EEQK591IX XI22IQDE 'gl', : 02 Single Node CONGRESS AVE CONGRESS AVE CONGRESS AVE CONGRESS AVE... CONGRESS AVE CONGRESS AVE CONGRESS AVE CONGRESS AVE CONGRESS AVE 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 Single Nodes 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 CONGRESS AVE CONGRESS AVE CONGRESS AVE CONGRESS AVE 15 16 17 15 i6...

  18. vertebradosibericos.org -AVES >> Presentacin del Atlas Virtual >> Mapas de distribucin y listado de especies ATLAS VIRTUAL DE LAS AVES TERRESTRES DE ESPAA

    E-print Network

    Carrascal, Luis M.

    palumbus Paloma Torcaz 96 Coracias garrulus Carraca 48 2 Corvus corax Cuervo 48 Corvus corone Corneja Negra 48 Corvus monedula Grajilla 72 Coturnix coturnix Codorniz Común 96 3 Cuculus canorus Cuco 100

  19. vertebradosibericos.org -AVES >> Presentacin del Atlas Virtual >> Mapas de distribucin y listado de especies ATLAS VIRTUAL DE LAS AVES TERRESTRES DE ESPAA

    E-print Network

    Carrascal, Luis M.

    Paloma Zurita 36 Columba palumbus Paloma Torcaz 100 Coracias garrulus Carraca 36 2 Corvus corax Cuervo 92 Corvus corone Corneja Negra 100 Corvus monedula Grajilla 68 Coturnix coturnix Codorniz Común 96 3 Cuculus

  20. vertebradosibericos.org -AVES >> Presentacin del Atlas Virtual >> Mapas de distribucin y listado de especies ATLAS VIRTUAL DE LAS AVES TERRESTRES DE ESPAA

    E-print Network

    Carrascal, Luis M.

    16 Columba palumbus Paloma Torcaz 96 Coracias garrulus Carraca 24 2 Corvus corax Cuervo 48 Corvus corone Corneja Negra 8 Corvus monedula Grajilla 72 Coturnix coturnix Codorniz Común 88 3 Cuculus canorus

  1. vertebradosibericos.org -AVES >> Presentacin del Atlas Virtual >> Mapas de distribucin y listado de especies ATLAS VIRTUAL DE LAS AVES TERRESTRES DE ESPAA

    E-print Network

    Carrascal, Luis M.

    Hirundo rustica Golondrina Común 100 3 Jynx torquilla Torcecuello 8 3 link Lanius excubitor Alcaudón Real 96 3 Lanius senator Alcaudón Común 96 2 Locustella luscinioides Buscarla Unicolor 8 Loxia curvirostra

  2. vertebradosibericos.org -AVES >> Presentacin del Atlas Virtual >> Mapas de distribucin y listado de especies ATLAS VIRTUAL DE LAS AVES TERRESTRES DE ESPAA

    E-print Network

    Carrascal, Luis M.

    daurica Golondrina Dáurica 96 Hirundo rustica Golondrina Común 100 3 Lanius excubitor Alcaudón Real 92 3 Lanius senator Alcaudón Común 96 2 Lullula arborea Totovía 64 2 link Luscinia megarhynchos Ruiseñor Común

  3. vertebradosibericos.org -AVES >> Presentacin del Atlas Virtual >> Mapas de distribucin y listado de especies ATLAS VIRTUAL DE LAS AVES TERRESTRES DE ESPAA

    E-print Network

    Carrascal, Luis M.

    Dáurica 48 Hirundo rustica Golondrina Común 96 3 Jynx torquilla Torcecuello 20 3 link Lanius excubitor Alcaudón Real 80 3 Lanius senator Alcaudón Común 88 2 Loxia curvirostra Piquituerto Común 16 Lullula

  4. vertebradosibericos.org -AVES >> Presentacin del Atlas Virtual >> Mapas de distribucin y listado de especies ATLAS VIRTUAL DE LAS AVES TERRESTRES DE ESPAA

    E-print Network

    Carrascal, Luis M.

    torquilla Torcecuello 48 3 link Lanius collurio Alcaudón Dorsirrojo 4 3 Lanius excubitor Alcaudón Real 76 3 Lanius senator Alcaudón Común 84 2 Loxia curvirostra Piquituerto Común 28 Lullula arborea Totovía 52 2

  5. vertebradosibericos.org -AVES >> Presentacin del Atlas Virtual >> Mapas de distribucin y listado de especies ATLAS VIRTUAL DE LAS AVES TERRESTRES DE ESPAA

    E-print Network

    Carrascal, Luis M.

    Dáurica 100 Hirundo rustica Golondrina Común 100 3 Jynx torquilla Torcecuello 24 3 link Lanius excubitor Alcaudón Real 84 3 Lanius senator Alcaudón Común 96 2 Lullula arborea Totovía 48 2 link Luscinia

  6. vertebradosibericos.org -AVES >> Presentacin del Atlas Virtual >> Mapas de distribucin y listado de especies ATLAS VIRTUAL DE LAS AVES TERRESTRES DE ESPAA

    E-print Network

    Carrascal, Luis M.

    Común 80 Hirundo rustica Golondrina Común 96 3 Jynx torquilla Torcecuello 24 3 link Lanius excubitor Alcaudón Real 100 3 Lanius minor Alcaudón Chico 8 2 Lanius senator Alcaudón Común 68 2 Loxia curvirostra

  7. vertebradosibericos.org -AVES >> Presentacin del Atlas Virtual >> Mapas de distribucin y listado de especies ATLAS VIRTUAL DE LAS AVES TERRESTRES DE ESPAA

    E-print Network

    Carrascal, Luis M.

    Lanius excubitor Alcaudón Real 24 3 Lanius senator Alcaudón Común 52 2 Loxia curvirostra Piquituerto torquilla Torcecuello 52 3 link Lagopus mutus Lagópodo Alpino 12 + Lanius collurio Alcaudón Dorsirrojo 96 3

  8. vertebradosibericos.org -AVES >> Presentacin del Atlas Virtual >> Mapas de distribucin y listado de especies ATLAS VIRTUAL DE LAS AVES TERRESTRES DE ESPAA

    E-print Network

    Carrascal, Luis M.

    Lanius excubitor Alcaudón Real 4 3 Loxia curvirostra Piquituerto Común 66 Lullula arborea Totovía 45 2 torquilla Torcecuello 25 3 link Lagopus mutus Lagópodo Alpino 54 + Lanius collurio Alcaudón Dorsirrojo 62 3

  9. Aves depositadas no Centro de Triagem de Animais Silvestres do IBAMA na Paraíba: uma amostra do tráfico de aves silvestres no estado

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Isales Santos; Antônio Emanuel; Barreto Alves de Sousa; João Pessoa-PB

    2009-01-01

    Birds deposited in the Center of Triage of Wild Animals of the IBAMA in the state of Paraíba, Brazil. The traffic of wild animals became an important factor of reduction of biodiversity in Brazil, contributing with an annual withdrawal of about 38 million of wild specimen of the nature. The index of mortality of captured specimens arrives 90% due to

  10. < TO JAMBOREE RD.

    E-print Network

    Rose, Michael R.

    BisonAve. W at Bison Ave. Left on Bison Ave. into UCI Left on California Ave. Left on Theory First right into Theory at Bison Ave. Left on Bison Ave. into UCI Left on California Ave. Left on Theory First right into Theory

  11. Osteometry and systematics of the extinct New Zealand ravens (Aves: Corvidae: Corvus)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. J. Gill

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of Holocene raven bones from New Zealand show that birds from the Chatham Islands were significantly larger, on average, than those from the South Island, which were in turn significantly larger than North Island birds. Size variation on the North and South Islands appears to have been clinal in accordance with Bergmann's Rule. Three taxa are recognised: the Chatham

  12. Effects of body size on take-off flight performance in the Phasianidae (Aves).

    PubMed

    Tobalske, B W; Dial, K P

    2000-11-01

    To evaluate the mechanisms responsible for relationships between body mass and maximum take-off performance in birds, we studied four species in the Phasianidae: northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus), chukar (Alectoris chukar), ring-necked pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) and wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo). These species vary in body mass from 0.2 to 5.3 kg, and they use flight almost solely to escape predators. During take-off, all the species used a similar wingbeat style that appeared to be a vortex-ring gait with a tip reversal during the upstroke. The tip reversal is unusual for birds with rounded wings; it may offer an aerodynamic advantage during rapid acceleration. Flight anatomy generally scaled geometrically, except for average wing chord and wing area, which increased more than expected as body mass (m) increased. Pectoralis strain varied from 19.1 to 35.2 % and scaled in proportion to m(0.23). This positive scaling is not consistent with the widely held assumption that muscle strain is independent of body mass among geometrically similar species. The anatomy of the species precluded measurements of in vivo pectoralis force using the strain-gauge technique that has been employed successfully in other bird species, so we could not directly test in vivo pectoralis force-velocity relationships. However, whole-body kinematics revealed that take-off power (P(ta)), the excess power available for climbing and accelerating in flight, scaled in proportion to m(0.75) and that pectoralis mass-specific P(ta) decreased in proportion to m(-)(0.26) and was directly proportional to wingbeat frequency. These trends suggest that mass-specific pectoralis work did not vary with body mass and that pectoralis stress and strain were inversely proportional, as expected from classical force-velocity models for skeletal muscle. Our observations of P(ta) were consistent with evidence from other species engaged in escape flight and, therefore, appear to contradict evidence from studies of take-off or hovering with an added payload. PMID:11023852

  13. Molecular phylogenetic relationships of Xiphidiopicus percussus, Melanerpes, and Sphyrapicus (Aves: Picidae) based on cytochrome b sequence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lowell C. Overton; Douglas D. Rhoads

    2006-01-01

    The endemic woodpecker, Xiphidiopicus percussus, from Cuba has been postulated as the sister taxon to the Hispaniolan woodpecker (Melanerpes striatus) and its relationships to the genera Sphyrapicus and Melanerpes have been speculated. We used mitochondrial cytochrome b sequences from a collection of New World picids to investigate the phylogenetic relationships among these species using maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood approaches.

  14. A new subspecies of Chamaea fasciata (Wrentit) from Oregon (Aves: Timaliinae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Browning, M. Ralph

    1992-01-01

    Geographic variation in plumage color of Chamaea fasciata (Wrentit) from northern California and southern Oregon is related to climate. A new subspecies, Chamaea fasciata margra, is described from a disjunct population of southern interior Oregon. Colonization of C. fasciata in interior Oregon was perhaps from birds crossing coniferous forests via isolated balds of Ceonothus. Recent increases of Wrentits in interior Oregon may be in response to habitat alterations (deforestation, fires) and concurrent global warming.

  15. CV Mani Mahdinia 2642 Tuller Ave. mahdinia@berkeley.edu Home: (+98)-21-88212382

    E-print Network

    Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.

    Zip code: 94530-1441 Cell: (+1)-510-5125814 Current Status PhD candidate at University of California Berkeley under the supervision of Professor P. Marcus. http://www.me.berkeley.edu/~mahdinia/ http://cfd

  16. Complete mitochondrial genome of the Bewick's swan Cygnus columbianus bewickii (Aves, Anseriformes, Anatidae).

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Hee; Ryu, Shi Hyun; Kang, Seung-Gu; Hwang, Ui Wook

    2012-04-01

    The mitochondrial genome of Bewick's swan Cygnus columbianus bewickii was completely sequenced and then the resultant data were compared with those of the whistling swan Cygnus columbianus columbianus. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of C. c. bewickii was 16,727 bp in length and its gene arrangement pattern, gene content, and genome organization were identical to those of Cygnus species. The similarities of nucleotide and amino acid sequences between the two swans were 99.1% and 99.6%, respectively. Out of the 13 protein-coding genes and 2 rRNA genes, COIII showed the lowest nucleotide sequence similarity with 98.0%. On the other hand, in amino acid sequence similarities, both COII and ATP6 showed the lowest with 98.7% in common. The control region has the 97.8% nucleotide sequence similarity. PMID:22409756

  17. DISTRIBUCIÓN ESPACIAL DE DENSIDADES DE AVES MARINAS EN LA PLATAFORMA CONTINENTAL ARGENTINA Y OCÉANO ATLÁNTICO SUR

    Microsoft Academic Search

    José Luis Orgeira

    Spatial distribution of seabird species densities of the continental platform of Argen- tina and South Atlantic Ocean. - This paper presents spatial distributions of densities obtained from 29 seabird species during summer 1987 to 1996 at the continental plataform and South Atlantic Ocean within a scope of 35º00'S to 56º00'S and 53º00'W to 69º00'W. Five geographical areas for large feeding

  18. Brian M. Siller 913 N Linview Ave bsiller2@illinois.edu

    E-print Network

    McCall, Benjamin J.

    . Siller, and B. J. McCall, Precision Cavity Enhanced Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy, Chemical Physics cavity-enhanced laser spectrometers in the near- and mid-infrared spectral regions by combining - present Advisor: Dr. Benjamin McCall · Developed, characterized, and optimized the technique of Cavity

  19. Out of Africa? Phylogenetic relationships between Falco biarmicus and the other hierofalcons (Aves: Falconidae)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Nittinger; E. Haring; W. Pinsker; M. Wink; A. Gamauf

    2005-01-01

    The phylogeographic history of the lanner falcon (Falco biarmicus) and the phylogenetic relationships among hierofalcons (F. biarmicus, Falco cherrug, Falco jugger and Falco rusticolus) were investigated using mitochondrial (mt) DNA sequences. Of the two non-coding mt sections tested, the control region (CR) appeared more suitable as phylogenetic marker sequence compared with the pseudo control region (WCR). For the comprehensive analysis

  20. Himasthla limnodromi n. sp. (Digenea: Echinostomatidae) from the short-billed dowitcher, Limnodromus griseus (Aves: Scolopacidae).

    PubMed

    Didyk, A S; Burt, M D

    1997-12-01

    Himasthla limnodromi n. sp. is described from short-billed dowitchers, Limnodromus griseus, from the Araya Peninsula, Venezuela, and Delaware Bay, U.S.A. Himasthla limnodromi was not found in dowitchers on the breeding grounds or on the fall staging grounds in the Bay of Fundy but reappeared in dowitchers on the wintering grounds in the fall. This suggests that H. limnodromi is acquired by the birds on arrival on the wintering grounds and then gradually disappears during the birds' northward migration in the spring. The new species has a reniform collar armed with 31 spines, with 23 in a single uninterrupted row, and 4 corner spines in overlapping pairs at each end. The cirrus sac is up to 10 times longer than the length of the acetabulum and contains a long, smooth cirrus. The vitellaria always commence posterior to the posterior end of the cirrus sac in mature specimens. The testes are found in the posterior eighth of the long, filamentous body. Himasthla limnodromi n. sp. most closely resembles Himasthla alincia, but H. limnodromi is larger in size and has an unspined cirrus and smaller eggs. PMID:9406790

  1. Geographical, seasonal, and sex dynamics of Shipleya inermis (Cestoidea: Dioecocestidae) in Limnodromus griseus Gmelin (Aves: Charadriiformes).

    PubMed

    Didyk, A S; Burt, M D

    1998-10-01

    We recovered the cestode Shipleya inermis from 79 of 82 short-billed dowitchers, Limnodromus griseus Gmelin, collected at various locations and times along their migratory route. Previous studies that examined various aspects of the cestode's biology were limited to North America. Data collected from North and South America in the present study provide new information on the geographical and seasonal distribution of this cestode. Although prevalence of infection was high at all times of the year, mean abundance varied from season to season and was significantly higher during the winter months than in the summer, suggesting that most recruitment takes place on the wintering grounds. Sexually mature and gravid cestodes were recovered at all locations, indicating S. inermis is a ubiquitous parasite within the host's range. Shipleya inermis showed a marked tendency to occur in pairs of male and female strobila. Analysis of the patterns of occurrence suggests that S. inermis is a protogynous hermaphrodite that usually becomes regionally dioecious, possibly in response to some form of interaction between individuals. PMID:9794633

  2. S.L. AVES and R.H. JOHNSONDecember 2008 919 1. Introduction

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Richard H.

    , such as satellite infrared brightness temperatures (e.g., Nitta and Sekine 1994; Ohsawa et al. 2001). High, the diurnal convective behavior deviates from the typical pat- tern over open oceans. Ohsawa et al. (2001 and propagate southeastward at about 10-15 m s-1 to the central part of the northern SCS the early afternoon

  3. ARTICLE Historical biogeography and diversification within the Neotropical parrot genus Pionopsitta (Aves: Psittacidae)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Camila C. Ribas; Renato Gaban-Lima; Cristina Y. Miyaki; Joel Cracraft

    Aim We investigate spatial and temporal patterns of diversification within the Neotropical avifauna using the phylogenetic history of parrots traditionally belonging to the genus Pionopsitta Bonaparte 1854. This genus has long been of interest for those studying Neotropical biogeography and diversity, as it encompasses species that occur in most Neotropical forest areas of endemism. Location The Neotropical lowland forests in

  4. Homing performances of adult and immature Dunlins Calidris alpina (Aves Scolopacidae) displaced from their wintering area

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Baccetti; G. Cherubini; A. Magnani; L. Serra

    1995-01-01

    The existence of possible differences in homing performances between adult and juvenile Dunlins was investigated at the beginning of two wintering seasons, when 49 adults (1992) and 51 first-year birds (1993) were caught in the Lagoon of Venice and displaced to Cervia Salines. Both sites (133 km apart) are important winter resorts for the species at the Italian and Mediterranean

  5. Comparison of eye morphology and retinal topography in two species of New World vultures (Aves: Cathartidae).

    PubMed

    Lisney, Thomas J; Stecyk, Karyn; Kolominsky, Jeffrey; Graves, Gary R; Wylie, Douglas R; Iwaniuk, Andrew N

    2013-12-01

    Vultures are highly reliant on their sensory systems for the rapid detection and localization of carrion before other scavengers can exploit the resource. In this study, we compared eye morphology and retinal topography in two species of New World vultures (Cathartidae), turkey vultures (Cathartes aura), with a highly developed olfactory sense, and black vultures (Coragyps atratus), with a less developed sense of olfaction. We found that eye size relative to body mass was the same in both species, but that black vultures have larger corneas relative to eye size than turkey vultures. However, the overall retinal topography, the total number of cells in the retinal ganglion cell layer, peak and average cell densities, cell soma area frequency distributions, and the theoretical peak anatomical spatial resolving power were the same in both species. This suggests that the visual systems of these two species are similar and that vision plays an equally important role in the biology of both species, despite the apparently greater reliance on olfaction for finding carrion in turkey vultures. PMID:24249399

  6. Structure and Growth Pattern of Pseudoteeth in Pelagornis mauretanicus (Aves, Odontopterygiformes, Pelagornithidae)

    PubMed Central

    Louchart, Antoine; Sire, Jean-Yves; Mourer-Chauviré, Cécile; Geraads, Denis; Viriot, Laurent; de Buffrénil, Vivian

    2013-01-01

    The extinct Odontopterygiformes are the sole birds known to possess strong and sharp bony pseudoteeth, the shape and location of which are closely mimetic of real teeth. The structure of the pseudoteeth is investigated here in a late Pliocene/early Pleistocene species, Pelagornis mauretanicus, using X-ray microtomography and thin sections. The results are interpreted with regard to the pseudotooth mode of growth, and have implications concerning aspects of Pelagornis ecology. The larger pseudoteeth are hollow and approximately cone-shaped, and the smaller ones are rostro-caudally constricted. The walls of pseudoteeth are composed of bone tissue of the fibro-lamellar type, which is intensively remodeled by Haversian substitution. The jaw bones display the same structure as the pseudoteeth, but their vascular canals are oriented parallel to the long axis of the bones, whereas they are perpendicular to this direction in the pseudoteeth. There is no hiatus or evidence of a fusion between the pseudoteeth and the jaw bones. Two possible models for pseudotooth growth are derived from the histological data. The most plausible model is that pseudotooth growth began after the completion of jaw bone growth, as a simple local protraction of periosteal osteogenic activity. Pseudotooth development thus occurred relatively late during ontogeny. The highly vascularized structure and the relative abundance of parallel-fibered bone tissue in the pseudoteeth suggest poor mechanical capabilities. The pseudoteeth were most likely covered and protected by the hardened, keratinized rhamphotheca in the adult during life. The late development of the pseudoteeth would involve a similarly late and/or partial hardening of the rhamphotheca, as displayed by extant Anseriformes, Apterygiformes and some Charadriiformes. This would add support to the hypothesis of a close phylogenetic relationship between Odontopterygiformes and Anseriformes. The late maturation of the Pelagornis feeding apparatus, and hence the delayed capability for efficient prey catching, suggests that Pelagornis was altricial. PMID:24244680

  7. Phylogeography of the Alcippe morrisonia (Aves: Timaliidae): long population history beyond late Pleistocene glaciations

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gang; Qu, Yanhua; Yin, Zuohua; Li, Shouhsien; Liu, Naifa; Lei, Fumin

    2009-01-01

    Background The role of Pleistocene glacial oscillations in current biodiversity and distribution patterns varies with latitude, physical topology and population life history and has long been a topic of discussion. However, there had been little phylogeographical research in south China, where the geophysical complexity is associated with great biodiversity. A bird endemic in Southeast Asia, the Grey-cheeked Fulvetta, Alcippe morrisonia, has been reported to show deep genetic divergences among its seven subspecies. In the present study, we investigated the phylogeography of A. morrisonia to explore its population structure and evolutionary history, in order to gain insight into the effect of geological events on the speciation and diversity of birds endemic in south China. Results Mitochondrial genes cytochrome b (Cytb) and cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) were represented by 1236 nucleotide sites from 151 individuals from 29 localities. Phylogenetic analysis showed seven monophyletic clades congruent with the geographically separated groups, which were identified as major sources of molecular variance (90.92%) by AMOVA. TCS analysis revealed four disconnected networks, and that no haplotype was shared among the geographical groups. The common ancestor of these populations was dated to 11.6 Mya and several divergence events were estimated along the population evolutionary history. Isolation by distance was inferred by NCPA to be responsible for the current intra-population genetic pattern and gene flow among geographical groups was interrupted. A late Pleistocene demographic expansion was detected in the eastern geographical groups, while the expansion time (0.2–0.4 Mya) was earlier than the Last Glacial Maximum. Conclusion It is proposed that the complicated topology preserves high genetic diversity and ancient lineages for geographical groups of A. morrisonia in China mainland and its two major islands, and restricts gene exchange during climate oscillations. Isolation by distance seems to be an important factor of genetic structure formation within geographical populations. Although glacial influence to population fluctuation was observed in late Pleistocene, it seems that populations in eastern China were more susceptible to climate change, and all geographical groups were growing stably through the Last Glacial Maximum. Coalescence analysis suggested that the ancestor of A. morrisonia might be traced back to the late Miocene, and the current phylogeographical structure of A. morrisonia is more likely to be attributable to a series geological events than to Pleistocene glacial cycles. PMID:19558699

  8. Phylogeny of the owlet-nightjars (Aves: Aegothelidae) based on mitochondrial DNA sequence

    E-print Network

    , Hawaii National Park, HI 96718, USA Received 28 March 2002; received in revised form 29 January 2003-nightjars are secretive nocturnal birds of the South Pacific. They are relatively poorly studied and some species-nightjars are small to medium-sized nocturnal birds with wide weak bills, short legs, and upright pos- ture. Like owls

  9. Individuality in Problem Solving: String Pulling in Two Carduelis Species (Aves: Passeriformes)

    E-print Network

    Indiana University

    warbler (Teyrovsky´ 1930), in siskins (Thienemann 1933), larger parrots (Fischel 1936) and in parids), as is clearly the case for finches, tits, ravens or parrots used in string- pulling studies by earlier authors

  10. Saxicola syenitica Heuglin, 1869 (Aves: Passeriformes: Muscicapidae), an overlooked taxon of Oenanthe?

    PubMed

    Shirihai, Hadoram; Schweizer, Manuel; Kirwan, Guy M; Svensson, Lars

    2014-01-01

    The North African population of the Black Wheatear has been treated as Oenanthe leucura syenitica for over 100 years. The type of syenitica was collected by Heuglin in June 1852 near the southern Egypt/northern Sudan border, well outside the range of the sedentary Black Wheatear. Morphometric inference and genetic analyses of partial sequences of the mitochondrial gene COI demonstrate that the type specimen of syenitica is not conspecific with O. leucura, but instead is closely related to O. lugens of the Middle East and North Africa, being most similar in plumage to O. lugens warriae of the basalt deserts of north-east Jordan and southern Syria. While syenitica was not separable in the analysed part of its mitochondrial DNA from O. l. lugens and O. l. warriae, it differs in morphometrics and plumage features from the latter. The type specimen is a first-summer bird with abraded plumage as expected for June, and may thus have been collected in its breeding range. Its morphological distinctiveness implies that syenitica might be taxonomically distinct from warriae. However, as it is known only from the type and its few associated data, we propose to treat it as a subspecies inquirenda of O. lugens. As a consequence of this, and the fact that we found no genetic or morphological differences between North African populations of O. leucura and riggenbachi Hartert, 1909, the name originally applied to the population in Western Sahara, the North African population takes the oldest available name to become O. leucura riggenbachi. PMID:24872167

  11. Phylogeography and genetic structure of two Patagonian shag species (Aves: Phalacrocoracidae).

    PubMed

    Calderón, Luciano; Quintana, Flavio; Cabanne, Gustavo S; Lougheed, Stephen C; Tubaro, Pablo L

    2014-03-01

    We compared the phylogeographic and genetic structure of two sympatric shag species, Phalacrocorax magellanicus (rock shag) and Phalacrocorax atriceps (imperial shag), from Patagonia (southern South America). We used multilocus genotypes of nuclear DNA (microsatellite loci) from 324 individuals and mitochondrial DNA sequences (ATPase) from 177 individuals, to evaluate hypotheses related to the effect of physical and non-physical barriers on seabird evolution. Despite sharing many ecological traits, the focal species strongly differ in two key aspects: P. magellanicus has a strong tendency to remain at/near their breeding colonies during foraging trips and the non-breeding season, while P. atriceps exhibits the converse pattern. Both species showed similar mtDNA genetic structure, where colonies from the Atlantic Coast, Pacific Coast and Fuegian region were genetically divergent. We also found similarities in the results of Bayesian clustering analysis of microsatellites, with both species having four clusters. However population differentiation (e.g. Fst, ?st) was higher in P. magellanicus compared to P. atriceps, and average membership probabilities of individuals to specific clusters (Q-values) were also higher in the former. Phalacrocorax magellanicus has strong phylogeographic structure, consistent with the impact of Pleistocene glaciations, with diagnostic haplotypes associated with each of the three mentioned regions. The same pattern was not as evident for P. atriceps. Migration rate estimators were higher for P. atriceps than for P. magellanicus; however both species followed an n-island-like model of gene flow, this implies that dispersal occurs across the continental land mass that separates Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Our results supported the hypothesis that non-physical barriers are important drivers of the genetic and phylogeographic structure in seabirds, and also that physical barriers constitute effective but not absolute impediments to gene flow. PMID:24418531

  12. A multilocus analysis provides evidence for more than one species within Eugenes fulgens (Aves: Trochilidae).

    PubMed

    Zamudio-Beltrán, Luz E; Hernández-Baños, Blanca E

    2015-09-01

    The status of subspecies in systematic zoology is the focus of controversy. Recent studies use DNA sequences to evaluate the status of subspecies within species complexes and to recognize and delimit species. Here, we assessed the phylogenetic relationships, the taxonomic status of the proposed subspecies, and the species limits of the monotypic hummingbird genus Eugenes (E. fulgens with traditionally recognized subspecies E. f. fulgens, E. f. viridiceps, and E. f. spectabilis), using nuclear (Beta Fibrinogen BFib, Ornithine Decarboxylase ODC, and Muscle Skeletal Receptor Tyrosine Kinase MUSK) and mitochondrial (NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 ND2, NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 ND4, and Control Region CR) markers. We performed Bayesian and Bayesian Phylogenetics and Phylogeography analyses and found genetic differences between the three groups, suggesting the existence of two cryptic species (E. fulgens and E. viridiceps) and one phenotypically differentiated species (E. spectabilis). Our analyses show that the E. viridiceps and E. fulgens groups are more closely related with one another than with E. spectabilis. PMID:25982690

  13. 265 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA mit.edu/museum/programs/festival

    E-print Network

    Ishii, Hiroshi

    -Heydrich and Jason Kahn from Children's Hospital Boston explain how toys and technology help children with severe conditions like depression may give rise to acedia or "sloth" and how our brains respond to stress. Sugar

  14. A karyological study of Accipitridae (Aves: Falconiformes), with karyotypic descriptions of 16 species new to cytology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. E. M. Boer; R. P. Sinoo

    1984-01-01

    Karyotypic descriptions are given of 16 species of Accipitridae new to cytology, viz. Accipiter novaehollandiae, Aegypius monachus, Aquila rapax, Circaetus gallicus, Circus aeruginosus, C. cyaneus, C. pygargus, Geranoaetus melanoleucos, Gyps bengalensis, G. rueppellii, Haliaeetus leucogaster, H. leucorhyphus, Lophoaetus occipitalis, Necrosyrtes monachus, Stephanoaetus and Torgos tracheliotus. For reasons of comparison the karyotypes are included of 5 species that have been previously

  15. Molecular Phylogenetics and Biogeography of Tanagers in the Genus Ramphocelus(Aves)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shannon J. Hackett

    1996-01-01

    Ramphocelustanagers are distributed throughout the Neotropical lowlands. In this paper, mitochrondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence data from cytochrome b and ND2 genes are used to estimate relationships among seven of nine species of the avian genusRamphocelus.Genetic differentiation is high betweenRamphocelus passerinii passeriniiandRamphocelus passerinii costaricensis,and the two subspecies are diagnosable and distinct from one another both morphologically and genetically. Thus, elevation to

  16. Identification of Bacterial Specialists in Hosts belonging to Aves, Mammalia, and Pisces

    EPA Science Inventory

    Only a portion of bacteria found in animal guts are able to establish specific associations within animal hosts. Taxa that have formed these specialized relationships may have played a prominent role in host evolution and may also contribute significantly to current host physiolo...

  17. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite markers from the white-ruffed manakin Corapipo altera (Aves, Pipridae).

    PubMed

    Barnett, Jacob R; Stenzler, Laura M; Ruiz-Gutierrez, Viviana; Bogdanowicz, Steven M; Lovette, Irby J

    2008-01-01

    We describe 15 polymorphic microsatellite loci from the white-ruffed manakin Corapipo altera, a common understory bird of Neotropical lowland and montane evergreen forests from eastern Honduras to northwestern Colombia. These markers were developed in order to assess population structure and genetic diversity in a fragmented landscape, and to study gene flow between forest fragments. Primers were tested on a population of 159 individuals from the Coto Brus region of southwestern Costa Rica. We found between four and 23 alleles per locus, and observed heterozygosities ranging from 0.23 to 0.93. PMID:21585760

  18. Computer Networking in Japanese Education Today. AVE in Japan No. 27.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Japan Audio-Visual Education Association, Tokyo.

    The Ad Hoc Council on Educational Reform pointed out in 1987 that Japanese education must prepare for the ever-increasing information needs of the future, and in 1988, a proposal for the development of information networks was published by the Ministry of Education, Science, and Culture. This proposal recommended the utilization of a wide range of…

  19. Does behavior reflect phylogeny in swiftlets (Aves: Apodidae)? A test using cytochrome b mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, P L; Clayton, D H; Griffiths, R; Page, R D

    1996-01-01

    Swiftlets are small insectivorous birds, many of which nest in caves and are known to echolocate. Due to a lack of distinguishing morphological characters, the taxonomy of swiftlets is primarily based on the presence or absence of echolocating ability, together with nest characters. To test the reliability of these behavioral characters, we constructed an independent phylogeny using cytochrome b mitochondrial DNA sequences from swiftlets and their relatives. This phylogeny is broadly consistent with the higher classification of swifts but does not support the monophyly of swiftlets. Echolocating swiftlets (Aerodramus) and the nonecholocating "giant swiftlet" (Hydrochous gigas) group together, but the remaining nonecholocating swiftlets belonging to Collocalia are not sister taxa to these swiftlets. While echolocation may be a synapomorphy of Aerodramus (perhaps secondarily lost in Hydrochous), no character of Aerodramus nests showed a statistically significant fit to the molecular phylogeny, indicating that nest characters are not phylogenetically reliable in this group. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8692950

  20. Genetic differentiation among populations of the Roseate Spoonbill (Platalea ajaja; Aves: Pelecaniformes) in three Brazilian Wetlands.

    PubMed

    Miño, Carolina Isabel; Del Lama, Silvia Nassif

    2014-08-01

    Effective population size, levels of genetic diversity, gene flow, and genetic structuring were assessed in 205 colonial Roseate spoonbills from 11 breeding colonies from north, central west, and south Brazil. Colonies and regions exhibited similar moderate levels of diversity at five microsatellite loci (mean expected heterozygosity range 0.50-0.62; allelic richness range 3.17-3.21). The central west region had the highest Ne (59). F ST values revealed low but significant genetic structuring among colonies within the north and within the south regions. Significant global genetic structuring was found between the northern and central western populations as well as between the northern and southern populations. An individual-based Bayesian clustering method inferred three population clusters. Assignment tests correctly allocated up to 64% of individuals to their source regions. Collectively, results revealed complex demographic dynamics, with ongoing gene flow on a local scale, but genetic differentiation on a broader scale. Populations in the three regions may all be conserved, but special concern should be given to central western ones, which can significantly contribute to the species' gene pool in Brazil. PMID:24737052

  1. Foraging activity of the snail kite, Rostrhamus sociabilis (Aves: Accipitridae) in wetlands of southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, F B; Amaral, H L C; Pinto, D P; Chivittz, C C; Tozetti, A M

    2013-05-01

    The snail kite (Rostrhamus sociabilis) is widely distributed in the American continent. Its specialised diet consists mostly of the gastropod mollusk Pomacea sp and its foraging strategy probably varies depending on the season, prey availability, and climate factors, which can be reflected in its semi-nomad behaviour. This study was aimed at examining the hunting strategy of the snail kite, and its association with climate factors and habitat heterogeneity. Direct observations of birds between January 2010 and March 2011 in southernmost Brazil revealed that hunting was still the predominant foraging strategy (79% of records) to capture mollusks. Despite morphological specialisations to extract mollusks from the shells, the handling time (average = 92.4 s) was twice as much the time between prey search and capture (average = 55 s). The increase in the number of mollusks ingested apparently occurs when the resting time on perches or any other substrates near the hunting sites decreases between successive unsuccessful attempts. The correlation between the number of consumed preys and the climatic variables examined was low. Regarding habitat heterogeneity, our findings suggest that birds forage preferentially in marshes with low vegetation, which may increase the access to mollusks. The hunting efficiency of the snail kite was high (76 % successful attempts) compared to those of other birds of prey. PMID:23917551

  2. Chromosome studies of 8 species of parrots of the families Cacatuidae and Psittacidae (Aves: Psittaciformes)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. W. M. Van Dongen; L. E. M. De Boer

    1984-01-01

    The karyotypes of 7 species of Psittaciformes new to cytology are described: Cacatua galerita, Calyptorhynchus magnificus and Probosciger aterrimus of the Cacatuidae, and Ara macao, A. ararauna, Amazona viridigenalis and Psittrichas fulgidens of the Psittacidae. For reasons of comparison the karyotype of Melopsittacus undulatus is also described. These karyotypes are compared to 8 psittaciform karyotypes previously recorded. There is a

  3. An improved phylogeny of the Andean tit-tyrants (Aves, Tyrannidae): More characters trump sophisticated analyses

    PubMed Central

    DuBay, Shane G.; Witt, Christopher C.

    2012-01-01

    The phylogeny of the flycatcher genus Anairetes was previously inferred using short fragments of mitochondrial DNA and parsimony and distance-based methods. The resulting topology spurred taxonomic revision and influenced understanding of Andean biogeography. More than a decade later, we revisit the phylogeny of Anairetes tit-tyrants using more mtDNA characters, seven unlinked loci (3 mitochondrial genes, 6 nuclear loci), more closely related outgroup taxa, partitioned Bayesian analyses, and two coalescent species-tree approaches (Bayesian estimation of species trees, BEST; Bayesian evolutionary analysis by sampling trees, *BEAST). Of these improvements in data and analyses, the fourfold increase in mtDNA characters was both necessary and sufficient to incur a major shift in the topology and near-complete resolution. The species-tree analyses, while theoretically preferable to concatenation or single gene approaches, yielded topologies that were compatible with mtDNA but with weaker statistical resolution at nodes. The previous results that had led to taxonomic and biogeographic reappraisal were refuted, and the current results support the resurrection of the genus Uromyias as the sister clade to Anairetes. The sister relationship between these two genera corresponds to an ecological dichotomy between a depauperate humid cloudforest clade and a diverse dry-tolerant clade that has diversified along the latitudinal axis of the Andes. The species-tree results and the concatenation results each reaffirm the primacy of mtDNA to provide phylogenetic signal for avian phylogenies at the species and subspecies level. This is due in part to the abundance of informative characters in mtDNA, and in part to its lower effective population size that causes it to more faithfully track the species tree. PMID:22525942

  4. Close karyological kinship between the reptilian suborder serpentes and the class aves

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Willy Beçak; Maria Luiza Beçak; H. R. S. Nazareth; Susumu Ohno

    1964-01-01

    In contrast to the situation found in two classes of warm-blooded vertebrates, mammals and birds, the class Reptilia is not uniform with regard to total genetic content; rather, it contains two distinct categories. The close cytological kinship between snakes and birds was revealed. Both are almost identical in total genetic content, which is about 50 per cent that of placental

  5. Sonoma State University 1801 E. Cotati Ave. Rohnert Park, CA 94928

    E-print Network

    Ravikumar, B.

    , swimming, hiking in Redwood forests · Lake Sonoma ==>==> hiking, picnicking, camping, boating · Hot air balloons, hang gliding, hot springs LIVING WITH AMERICANS Many students decide to live in an American home

  6. The diet of nestlings of three Ardeidae species (Aves, Ciconiiformes) in the Axios Delta, Greece

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Savas Kazantzidis; Vassilis Goutner

    The diets of the little egret (Egretta garzetta), the night heron (Nycticorax nycticorax) and the squacco heron (Ardeola ralloides) were studied by analyzing nestling regurgitations collected during five breeding seasons (1988-1990 and 1994-1995) at a heronry in the Axios Delta (Northern Greece). In total, 267 regurgitations from little egrets, 247 from night herons and 19 from squacco herons (only in

  7. First record of an hypopus (Acari: Hypoderatidae) from a jaeger (Aves: Charadriiformes: Stercorariidae).

    PubMed

    Pence, D B; Cole, R A

    1995-05-01

    Thalassornectes (Alcidectes) aukletae, originally described from two species of auklets (Charadriiformes: Alcidae) from maritime eastern Russia, is reported from a third species of pelagic charadriiform (Stercorariidae), the pomarine jaeger, Stercorarius pomarinus (Temminck), from Florida. The specimens from the jaeger are slightly smaller, the genital apodeme is more heavily sclerotized, paired setae gm are twice as long and there are other minor variations in the idiosomal and leg chaetotaxy. These differences are not considered sufficient to warrant taxonomic separation at the species or subspecies level from the nominate species T. (A.) aukletae. The same hypopus occurring across different families of birds is unusual in the Hypoderatidae. The diversity in hosts from several orders of birds, low intensities of infection in the two species from Africa, low prevalences in alcids from Russia, and rarity of these hypoderatids in all surveyed hosts leads us to speculate that the true host affinities of species in the genus Thalassornectes are unknown. The alternative consideration is that these are simply uncommon species that are very host specific. PMID:7616535

  8. Department of Mechanical and Industrial Eng., Northeastern University, 360 Huntington Ave.,

    E-print Network

    Mavroidis, Constantinos

    , CA 91109-8099 A. Dubey Department of Mechanical and Industrial Eng., Northeastern University, 360 tools include the development of the molecular motor direct and inverse kinematics using the protein's Denavit and Hartenberg parameters and the cor- responding homogeneous transformation matrices. Furthermore

  9. Evidence for heterochrony in the evolution of the goshawk Accipiter gentilis (Accipitridae, Aves)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jorge Cubo; Santiago Mañosa

    1999-01-01

    An analysis of the growth patterns of two close relatives of the genus Accipiter (the European sparrowhawk A. nisus and the European goshawk A. gentilis) was conducted, in order to elucidate a possible mechanism for the evolution of the ontogeny of the goshawk from that of its presumed smaller ancestor. After allowing for isometric scaling, the ontogeny of the goshawk

  10. Comparisons of host specificity in feather louse genera (Insecta: Phthiraptera: Philopteridae) parasitizing gulls (Aves: Laridae: Larus).

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Ayaka; Yao, Izumi; Johnson, Kevin P; Yoshizawa, Kazunori

    2014-06-01

    Data from gene sequences and morphological structures were collected for the gull feather lice, Saemundssonia lari, Quadraceps punctatus, and Q. ornatus, parasitizing Larus crassirostris and L. schistisagus. Saemundssonia lari was collected from both gull species, and no detectable morphological and genetic differences were found between lice collected from the two different hosts. In contrast, Q. punctatus was only collected from L. crassirostris, whereas Q. ornatus was only collected from L. schistisagus. The two Quadraceps species were genetically highly divergent, and body-size differences corresponding to the gull's body size (Harrison's rule) were also detected between them. Both Quadraceps species were collected from the interbarb of the remex or rectrix, and a match in body size between the louse and the interbarb space may be important in escape from host preening defenses. In contrast, Saemundssonia is a head louse, inhabiting the finer feathers of the head and neck, which the bird cannot preen. A close match to host body size may be less important for lice in the head microhabitat. The differences in the pattern of host-specificity between Saemundssonia and Quadraceps on the two focal host species of this study were probably due to their different microhabitat preferences. More broadly, comparisons of the gene sequences of S. lari and Q. punctatus to those from other gull hosts showed that genetically almost undifferentiated populations of both species were distributed on wide range of gull species. Frequent interspecific hybridization of gulls is one possible factor that may allow these lice to maintain gene flow across multiple host species. PMID:24882099

  11. Genyornis eggshell (Dromornithidae; Aves) from the Late Pleistocene of South Australia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. L. G. Williams

    1981-01-01

    Fossil eggshell fragments from a sand dune near Port Augusta are attributed to the extinct dromornithid, Genyornis newtoni Stirling & Zietz. Shell curvature measurements show that the eggs were larger than those of the Emu, Dromaius novaehollandiae. Radiocarbon dates indicate an age in excess of 40,680 BP. Holes pierced through some fragments are attributed to the action of predators.

  12. Shared and unshared parental investment in the precocial goldeneye (Aves: Anatidae)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    VESA RUUSILA; HANNU PÖYSÄ

    1998-01-01

    Lazarus & Inglis (Anim. Behav., 1986,34,1791–1804) introduced a model of the influence of brood size on the optimal level of parental investment and parent–offspring conflict and drew a distinction between shared and unshared types of parental investment. With respect to this division, we measured the parental costs in the goldeneye,Bucephala clangula, a precocial species with uniparental female care, in terms

  13. Shared and unshared parental investment in the precocial goldeneye (Aves: Anatidae)

    PubMed

    Ruusila; PÖYSÄ

    1998-02-01

    Lazarus & Inglis (Anim. Behav., 1986, 34, 1791-1804) introduced a model of the influence of brood size on the optimal level of parental investment and parent-offspring conflict and drew a distinction between shared and unshared types of parental investment. With respect to this division, we measured the parental costs in the goldeneye, Bucephala clangula, a precocial species with uniparental female care, in terms of time spent in vigilance and intraspecific aggression. We also compared levels of anti-predator vigilance and intraspecific aggression between females with and without broods. Females with broods spent considerably more time on both vigilance and intraspecific aggression, but anti-predator vigilance was independent of brood size. Furthermore, female behaviour was unaffected by brood reduction. Both these observations support the 'fixed-loss' model of unshared care, where the level of parental investment is predicted to be independent of brood size, since the predator is likely to take only a single offspring. In contrast, intraspecific aggression, mainly associated with defence of the brood's feeding area, increased with brood size. This supports the 'shared care' model where the level of parental investment increases with brood size, a type of care usually associated with altricial species. Copyright 1998 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. PMID:9480698

  14. East Bank locations University Ave & 12th St. SE -Sanford Hall

    E-print Network

    Weiblen, George D

    Cardiovascular/ Cancer Center Research Bldg. Variety ClubRes. Ctr. Mayo Memorial Bldg. Health Comstock HallWilkinsHall SanfordHall Heating Plant Radisson Hotel Eddy Hall VFW Cancer Res. Ctr. Masonic Memorial Hospital 1313 5th. (under const.) McGuire Translational Research Facility Lions Research Building Center for Magnetic

  15. Aves acuáticas de la Laguna de Agua Dulce y el Estero El Ermitaño, Jalisco, México

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Salvador Hernández Vázquez

    2005-01-01

    Water birds from Agua Dulce lake and El Ermitaño estuary, Jalisco, Mexico. Waterbird abundance, and seasonal and spatial distribution, were studied in two natural water pools at Jalisco, México, from December 1997 through November 1998. Maximum monthly abundance in Agua Dulce lake and El Ermitaño estuary was 86 471 birds (29 686 in Agua Dulce and 56 785 in Ermitaño),

  16. From Hwy 6, exit University Dr. and proceed west to Texas Ave.

    E-print Network

    Bermúdez, José Luis

    of your appointment at the Psychology Clinic and that a space should be reserved for you. If they refuse is truly full, you will be directed to the Central Campus Garage or other parking spaces on campus). Enter the building, walk downstairs immediately and take the elevator to the third floor. Exit

  17. * To whom correspondence should be addressed: Baxter Hemoglobin Therapeutics Inc., 2545 Central Ave. Boulder, CO 80301

    E-print Network

    Szpankowski, Wojciech

    acids (10). By definition, the sum of the molar fractions of all components is equal to 1, therefore was developed to display a relationship between proteins based on their amino acid composition. In the first solely on amino acid composition. Regardless, the modified Sammon projections can generate a unique index

  18. WEISONG SHI Department of Computer Science 5057 Woodward Ave, Suite 14102

    E-print Network

    Shi, Weisong

    on the Internet (2012-2014) #12;· College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Teaching Award 2011 · Wayne State University Career Development Chair Award 2009 · NSF CAREER Award 2007 · College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, 8/26/2013-8/23/2014, $186,401. (PI) 2. Great Lakes Protection Fund (GLPF), Real-Time Energy Impact

  19. Rampant polyphyly indicates cryptic diversity in a clade of Neotropical flycatchers (Aves: Tyrannidae)

    E-print Network

    Cuervo, Andrés

    a DNA phylogeny for a mitochondrial and a nuclear locus with a complete species sampling in Zimmerius; Álvarez Alonso & Whitney, 2001; Zimmer, Whittaker & Oren, 2001; Lane et al., 2007). Similarly, molecular

  20. Cmo expresar sus deseos sobre su cuidado y tratamiento 450 Brookline Ave.

    E-print Network

    Liu, Xiaole Shirley

    podría obtener. Se necesita la toma seria de decisiones médicas al considerar las numerosas opciones.dana-farber.org Decisiones para cuidados de salud: planificación por adelantado Usted tiene derecho a tomar las decisiones decisiones médicas por sí mismo. En Massachusetts, la persona que usted elige se denomina apoderado de

  1. Um Sistema de Pesagem de Aves por Viso Computacional EDUARDO VEGAS CONEJO

    E-print Network

    broiler weighing system based on computer vision is described. In the implementation, the weight is correlated statistically with linear measurements taken from reference points in the broiler body profile

  2. Um Sistema de Pesagem de Aves por Viso Computacional EDUARDO VEGAS CONEJO 1

    E-print Network

    broiler weighing system based on computer vision is described. In the implementation, the weight is correlated statistically with linear measurements taken from reference points in the broiler body profile

  3. Estructura de la vegetación y selección de hábitats reproductivos en aves del pastizal pampeano

    Microsoft Academic Search

    NATALIA COZZANI; SERGIO M ZALBA

    Vegetation structure and selection of reproductive habitats by Pampas grassland birds: The increasing transformation of natural grasslands into agricultural fields affects grassland birds with particular severity, as their breeding success depends strictly on these habitats. This study focuses on bird species that nest in the Ernesto Tornquist Provincial Park in the southwest of Buenos Aires province (Argentina). We conducted intensive

  4. Phylogenetic relationships of flowerpeckers (Aves: Dicaeidae): Novel insights into the evolution of a tropical passerine clade

    E-print Network

    Nyá ri, Á rpá d S.; Peterson, A. Townsend; Rice, Nathan H.; Moyle, Robert G.

    2009-12-01

    likelihood (ML), as implemented in the software PAUP*, with TBR branch-swapping and 100 random taxon-addition replicates. ModelTest 3.7 (Posada and Crandall, 1998) was used to determine the most appropriate model of sequence evolution via the Akaike...Bayes 3.1.2 (Ronquist and Huelsenbeck 2003). The concatenated dataset was partitioned by gene and codon positions for the nuclear intron and mitochondrial genes, respectively. ModelTest 3.7 (Posada and Crandall, 1998) was again used to establish the best...

  5. Spring migratory birds (Aves) extend the northern occurrence of blacklegged tick (Acari:Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Klich, M; Lankester, M W; Wu, K W

    1996-07-01

    Birds that had migrated northward across Lake Superior were captured upon reaching landfall at Thunder Cape (48 degrees 18' N, 88 degrees 56' W) at the southwestern tip of the Sibley Peninsula, northwestern Ontario, from 9 May to 9 June 1995. Twenty-one of 530 birds examined (6 of 55 species) had a total of 34 ticks; 1 blue jay, Cyanocitta cristata, had a northern fowl mite, Ornithonyssus sylviarum (Canestrini & Fanzago). Four blacklegged tick, Ixodes scapularis Say, larvae were found on an American robin, Turdus migratorius, and 2 on a chipping sparrow, Spizella passerina. This tick was not found on small mammals at Thunder Cape. Twenty-six larvae and a nymph of the rabbit tick, Haemaphysalis leporispalustris (Packard) were found on 1 American robin, 2 Swainson's thrushes, Catharus ustulatus, 1 white-throated sparrow, Zonotrichia albicollis, 1 common yellowthroat, Geothlypis trichas, 1 blue jay, and 12 chipping sparrows. A nymph of H. chordeilis (Packard) occurred on 1 chipping sparrow. Results demonstrate that northward migrating birds transport larvae of I. scapularis to areas of Ontario where the tick does not appear to have become established in small mammal populations. Spring migrants may be more involved in the dispersal of I. scapularis larvae than previously thought. Cooler temperatures and shorter seasons experienced in the more northerly, continental parts of the established distribution of this tick may extend the life cycle, resulting in a predominance of larvae rather than nymphs being acquired by northward-bound birds in early spring. Consequently, the role of spring migrating birds in the northward spread of I. scapularis and of borreliosis should be reevaluated. PMID:8699451

  6. Arboviral infection in two species of wild jays (Aves: Corvidae): evidence for population impacts.

    PubMed

    Garvin, Mary C; Tarvin, Keith A; Stark, Lillian M; Woolfenden, Glen E; Fitzpatrick, John W; Day, Jonathan F

    2004-03-01

    We examined the prevalence of antibodies to three mosquito-borne arboviruses in blue jays, Cyanocitta cristata, and Florida scrub-jays, Aphelocoma coerulescens, to identify the effects on host survival, the influence of sex and age on infection, and the temporal patterns of antibody prevalence. Blood samples from 306 blue jays and 219 Florida scrub-jays were collected at Archbold Biological Station (Lake Placid, FL) from April 1994 through December 1995. Sera were analyzed for hemagglutination-inhibition antibody to eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) and St. Louis encephalitis (SLE) viruses, and neutralizing antibodies to EEE, Highlands J (HJ), and SLE viruses. Overall, 31.4% of blue jay samples and 22.1% of scrub-jay samples had antibodies to EEE. Antibodies to HJ were detected in slightly >15% of samples in each jay species, and SLE was detected in <3% of the samples in each jay species. A single EEE virus isolation was made from the blood of an 11-d-old scrub-jay nestling. Survival of adult blue jays seropositive to EEE was significantly lower than that of seronegative birds based on resight rates, but infection did not seem to affect survival of adult or juvenile Florida scrub-jays. PMID:15061281

  7. DNA sequence data reveal a subfamily-level divergence within Thamnophilidae (Aves: Passeriformes).

    PubMed

    Bravo, Gustavo A; Remsen, J V; Whitney, Bret M; Brumfield, Robb T

    2012-10-01

    The Thamnophilidae is a diverse radiation of insectivorous passerine birds that comprises nearly 220 species and is mostly restricted to the lowlands and lower montane forests of the Neotropics. Current classification within Thamnophilidae relies primarily on morphological variation, but recent incorporation of molecular and vocal data has promoted changes at various taxonomic levels. Here we demonstrate that the genus Terenura is polyphyletic because Terenura callinota, T. humeralis, T. spodioptila, and T. sharpei are phylogenetically distant from the type species of the genus, Terenura maculata. More importantly, the former four species are not particularly closely related to any other thamnophilids and represent a clade that is sister to all other members of the family. Because no genus name is available for this previously undetected lineage in the Thamnophilidae, we describe the genus Euchrepomis for callinota, humeralis, spodioptila, and sharpei, and erect the subfamily Euchrepomidinae. We discuss the taxonomic and evolutionary significance of this divergent lineage. This study highlights the importance of taxonomic coverage and the inclusion of type taxa to redefine classifications to reflect accurately evolutionary relationships. PMID:22760026

  8. Neutron Electromagnetic Form Factors Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave.,

    E-print Network

    Neutron Electromagnetic Form Factors H. Gao Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts probing the neutron electromagnetic structure. In this talk, I review the experimental status of the neutron electromagnetic form factor studies. The recently completed Je erson Lab experiment E95

  9. Paraphyly of Cinclodes fuscus (Aves: Passeriformes: Furnariidae): Implications for taxonomy and biogeography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanin, Camilo; Cadena, Carlos Daniel; Maley, James M.; Lijtmaer, Dario A.; Tubaro, Pablo L.; Chesser, R. Terry

    2009-01-01

    The Andes are a hotspot of global avian diversity, but studies on the historical diversification of Andean birds remain relatively scarce. Evolutionary studies on avian lineages with Andean–Patagonian distributions have focused on reconstructing species-level phylogenies, whereas no detailed phylogeographic studies on widespread species have been conducted. Here, we describe phylogeographic patterns in the Bar-winged Cinclodes (Cinclodes fuscus), a widespread and common species of ovenbird (Furnariidae) that breeds from Tierra del Fuego to the northern Andes. Traditionally, C. fuscus has been considered a single species composed of nine subspecies, but its long and narrow range suggests the possibility of considerable genetic variation among populations. Sequences of two mitochondrial genes revealed three discrete and geographically coherent groups of C. fuscus, occupying the southern, central, and northern Andes. Surprisingly, phylogenetic analyses indicated that these groups were more closely related to other species of Cinclodes than to each other. Relationships of the southern and northern C. fuscus clades to other species of Cinclodes were straightforward; in combination with available information on plumage, behavioral, and vocal variation, this suggests that each should be recognized as a distinct biological species. The central Andean group was paraphyletic with respect to C. oustaleti, and relationships among these taxa and C. olrogi were poorly resolved. We suggest that the central Andean C. fuscus should also be considered a different species, pending new information to clarify species limits in this group. These new phylogenetic data, along with recently developed methods, allowed us to review the biogeography of the genus, confirming southern South America and the central Andes as important areas for the diversification of these birds.

  10. Mitochondrial phylogeography, subspecific taxonomy, and conservation genetics of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis; Aves: Gruidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rhymer, J.M.; Fain, M.G.; Austin, J.E.; Johnson, D.H.; Krajewski, C.

    2001-01-01

    Six subspecies of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) have been denoted based on perceived morphological and/or breeding locality differences among them. Three subspecies are migratory, breeding from the high arctic in North America and Siberia (lesser sandhill, G. c. canadensis), south through central Canada (Canadian sandhill, G. c. rowani) and into the northern United States (greater sandhill, G. c. tabida). A review of sandhill crane taxonomy indicates that the size variation, on the basis of which these subspecies were named, may be clinal and not diagnostic. The other three subspecies, all listed as endangered or threatened, are non-migratory, resident in Florida (G. c. pratensis), Mississippi (G. c. pulla), and Cuba (G. c. nesiotes). We used analysis of mitochondrial DNA control region (CR) sequences to determine whether haplotypes representing current subspecies show any genetic cohesion or are more consistent with a pattern of clinal variation in morphology. CR sequences indicate that only two highly divergent (5.3%) lineages of sandhill cranes occur in North America: one lineage composed only of arctic-nesting G. c. canadensis, the other of the remaining North American subspecies (we lack data on the Cuban population). The deep split between lineages is consistent with an estimated isolation of approximately 1.5 Mya (mid-Pleistocene), while the distribution of mutational changes within lineages is consistent with an hypothesis of rapid, post-Pleistocene population expansions. No other phylogeographic structuring is concordant with subspecific boundaries, however, analysis of molecular variance indicates that there is significant population genetic differentiation among all subspecies except G. c. tabida and G. c. rowani, which are indistinguishable. We suggest that recognition of the recently named G. c. rowani be abandoned.

  11. [Advantages and limitations of interspecies associations in northern migratory sandpipers (Charadrii, Aves)].

    PubMed

    Gavrilov, V V

    2014-01-01

    Investigations were carried out at two stations of Ornithological Unit, IBPN FEB RAS, located in Nizhnekolymsk District, Yakutia, starting from May 15-20 in 1984, 1985, 1987, 1988, and 1990; at the northern coast of Pukhovoy Bay, Southern Island of Novaya Zemlya starting from June 1 in 1994; at Cape Beliy Nos, the Yugorsky Peninsula, starting from June 1 in 1995-1997. Classic associations are detected in interspecies flocks of sandpipers between the following species: the Pacific golden plover and the curlew sandpiper, the pectoral sandpiper and the long-billed dowitcher, the pectoral sandpiper and the dunlin, the grey plover and the dunlin. However, total amount of birds that form associations is not large. In species of group "A" (the grey plover, the Pacific golden plover, the pectoral sandpiper), no difference has been observed in migratory birds behavior within inter- or conspecific flocks. Species of group "B" (the dunlin, the curlew sandpiper, the long-billed dowitcher), on the contrary, change their behavior sharply depending on whether they belong to an association or not. Species of group "A" do not get any advantages when forming an association. Unlike them, species of group "B" profit from associating: a part of time spent in foraging substantially increases; more time is spent on rest and less time is spent on reconnaissance and vigilance (readiness for actions); safety of birds is enhanced. On the other hand, in species of group "B" there are also disadvantages related with associating: i.e., interspecies competition for food; foraging in suboptimal habitats which, in turn, may lead to notable increase of time spent by birds in foraging. An assumption is put forward that in species of group "B" advantages and limitations of associating cancel each other to a certain extent, and this explains rather small number of birds forming associations. PMID:25771678

  12. Two new species of flightless rails (Aves: Rallidae) from the Middle Pleistocene ''crane fauna\\

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Storrs L. Olson; David B. Wingate

    2000-01-01

    Two new species of flightless rails are described from a Pleis- tocene fauna in Bermuda that also includes an extinct crane (Grus latipes) and an extinct duck (Anas pachyscelus). The medium-sized Rallus ibycus, new species, was possibly derived from North American populations of Virginia Rail (R. limicola), but had a longer bill, much more robust legs, and reduced wings and

  13. The University of O Office of Human R Ave, NEL 244

    E-print Network

    Oklahoma, University of

    not require a copy of your social security card. Former Name: Daytime Phone Number: Email Address: New Name Asp clear, legible copy of your new social security card. Our office will update your personnel file

  14. 13 y 14 de noviembre de 2013 Quinta Ave Mara USB Litoral -Camur

    E-print Network

    Vásquez, Carlos

    cara al desarrollo sostenible local. 4.- Generar alianzas estratégicas entre la USB-SDL, las:00am Sección de Preguntas y Respuestas 11:00am/11:30am Desarrollo Local Sostenible ­ Prof. Pedro Esté Desarrollo Humano Sostenible - Prof. Zulay Tagliaferro ­ Universidad Centro Occidental Lisandro Alvarado 01

  15. Mitochondrial phylogeography, subspecific taxonomy, and conservation genetics of sandhill cranes ( Grus canadensis ; Aves: Gruidae)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Judith M. Phymer; Matthew G. Fain; Jane E. Austin; Douglas H. Johnson; Carey Krajewski

    2001-01-01

    Six subspecies of sandhill cranes (Gruscanadensis) have been denoted based onperceived morphological and\\/or breedinglocality differences among them. Threesubspecies are migratory, breeding from thehigh arctic in North America and Siberia(lesser sandhill, G. c. canadensis),south through central Canada (Canadiansandhill, G. c. rowani) and into thenorthern United States (greater sandhill, G. c. tabida). A review of sandhill cranetaxonomy indicates that the size variation,

  16. Flexibility along the Neck of the Neogene Terror Bird Andalgalornis steulleti (Aves Phorusrhacidae)

    PubMed Central

    Tambussi, Claudia P.; de Mendoza, Ricardo; Degrange, Federico J.; Picasso, Mariana B.

    2012-01-01

    Background Andalgalornis steulleti from the upper Miocene–lower Pliocene (?6 million years ago) of Argentina is a medium-sized patagornithine phorusrhacid. It was a member of the predominantly South American radiation of ‘terror birds’ (Phorusrhacidae) that were apex predators throughout much of the Cenozoic. A previous biomechanical study suggests that the skull would be prepared to make sudden movements in the sagittal plane to subdue prey. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyze the flexion patterns of the neck of Andalgalornis based on the neck vertebrae morphology and biometrics. The transitional cervical vertebrae 5th and 9th clearly separate regions 1–2 and 2–3 respectively. Bifurcate neural spines are developed in the cervical vertebrae 7th to 12th suggesting the presence of a very intricate ligamentary system and of a very well developed epaxial musculature. The presence of the lig. elasticum interespinale is inferred. High neural spines of R3 suggest that this region concentrates the major stresses during downstrokes. Conclusions/Significance The musculoskeletal system of Andalgalornis seems to be prepared (1) to support a particularly big head during normal stance, and (2) to help the neck (and the head) rising after the maximum ventroflexion during a strike. The study herein is the first interpretation of the potential performance of the neck of Andalgalornis in its entirety and we considered this an important starting point to understand and reconstruct the flexion pattern of other phorusrhacids from which the neck is unknown. PMID:22662194

  17. Geographic diversification in the call repertoire of the genus Pyrrhocorax (Aves, Corvidae)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paola Laiolo; Antonio Rolando; Anne Delestrade; Augusto De Sanctis

    2001-01-01

    We analysed the call repertoires of the Red-billed Chough (Pyrrhocorax pyrrhocorax) and the Alpine Chough (Pyrrhocorax graculus) across three continents (Europe, Asia, and Africa) for intraspecific and interspecific differences in call-repertoire size and discuss the factors that could have promoted its evolution. The overall call reper - toire of the Red-billed Chough was twice as large as that of the

  18. Flightlessness and phylogeny amongst endemic rails (Aves:Rallidae) of the New Zealand region.

    PubMed Central

    Trewick, S A

    1997-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationships of a number of flightless and volant rails have been investigated using mtDNA sequence data. The third domain of the small ribosomal subunit (12S) has been sequenced for 22 taxa, and part of the 5' end of the cytochrome-b gene has been sequenced for 12 taxa. Additional sequences were obtained from outgroup taxa, two species of jacana, sarus crane, spur-winged plover and kagu. Extinct rails were investigated using DNA extracted from subfossil bones, and in cases where fresh material could not be obtained from other extant taxa, feathers and museum skins were used as sources of DNA. Phylogenetic trees produced from these data have topologies that are, in general, consistent with data from DNA-DNA hybridization studies and recent interpretations based on morphology. Gallinula chloropus moorhen) groups basally with Fulica (coots), Amaurornis (= Megacrex) ineptus falls within the Gallirallus/Rallus group, and Gallinula (= Porphyrula) martinica is basal to Porphyrio (swamphens) and should probably be placed in that genus. Subspecies of Porphyrio porphyrio are paraphyletic with respect to Porphyrio mantelli (takahe). The Northern Hemisphere Rallus aquaticus is basal to the south-western Pacific Rallus (or Gallirallus) group. The flightless Rallus philippensis dieffenbachii is close to Rallus modestus and distinct from the volant Rallus philippensis, and is evidently a separate species. Porzana (crakes) appears to be more closely associated with Porphyrio than Rallus. Deep relationships among the rails remain poorly resolved. Rhynochetus jubatus (kagu) is closer to the cranes than the rails in this analysis. Genetic distances between flightless rails and their volant counterparts varied considerably with observed 12S sequence distances, ranging from 0.3% (Porphyrio porphyrio melanotus and P. mantelli mantelli) to 7.6% (Rallus modestus and Rallus philippensis). This may be taken as an indication of the rapidity with which flightlessness can evolve, and of the persistence of flightless taxa. Genetic data supported the notion that flightless taxa were independently derived, sometimes from similar colonizing ancestors. The morphology of flightless rails is apparently frequently dominated by evolutionary parallelism although similarity of external appearance is not an indication of the extent of genetic divergence. In some cases taxa that are genetically close are morphologically distinct from one another (e.g. Rallus (philippensis) dieffenbachii and R. modestus), whilst some morphologically similar taxa are evidently independently derived (e.g. Porphyio mantelli hochstetteri and P.m. mantelli). PMID:9163823

  19. A complete multilocus species phylogeny of the tits and chickadees (Aves: Paridae).

    PubMed

    Johansson, Ulf S; Ekman, Jan; Bowie, Rauri C K; Halvarsson, Peter; Ohlson, Jan I; Price, Trevor D; Ericson, Per G P

    2013-12-01

    The avian family Paridae (tits and chickadees) contains c. 55 species distributed in the Palearctic, Nearctic, Afrotropics and Indomalaya. The group includes some of the most well-known and extensively studied avian species, and the evolutionary history, in particular the post-glacial colonization of the northern latitudes, has been comparably well-studied for several species. Yet a comprehensive phylogeny of the whole clade is lacking. Here, we present the first complete species phylogeny for the group based on sequence data from two nuclear introns and one mitochondrial gene for 67 taxa of parids. Our results strongly support the inclusion of the Fire-capped Tit (Cephalopyrus flammiceps), currently placed in the Remizidae, as the most basal member of the Paridae. The Yellow-browed Tit (Sylviparus modestus) and the Sultan Tit (Melanochlora sultanea) constitute the next two sequential branches whereas the remaining tits fall into two large clades, one of which contains the seed hoarding and nest excavating species. The indicated clades within these two groups are largely congruent with recent classifications, but with several unforeseen relationships, such as non-monophyly of the Sombre Tit (Poecile lugubris) and the Marsh Tit (Poecile palustris), as well as non-monophyly of both the African gray and the African black tits. Further, our results support a close relationship between the White-fronted Tit (Parus semilarvatus) and the varied Tit (Poecile varius) as well as a close relationship between the White-naped Tit (Parus nuchalis) and the Yellow-cheeked and Black-lored tits (Parus spilonotus and P. xanthogenys). Finally, Hume's Ground-tit (Pseudopodoces humilis) is found to be closely related to the Green-backed Tit (Parus monticolus) and the Great Tit (Parus major). We propose a new classification that is in accordance with this phylogeny. PMID:23831453

  20. Past Future Past Future Past Future Past Future Central Corridor Hiawatha Cedar Ave Northstar

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    -Story Office Building 0.2689 -0.0858 -0.8564 -2.0491*** Building Owned by Business 0.5485 0.8479 0.6086 1 businesses consistent departure from positive trend. 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% (Not auto sales/ service) Auto sales/ service (Not auto sales/ service) Auto sales/ service Neighborhood

  1. A Short History of Audiovisual Education in Japan. AVE in Japan No. 25.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Japan Audio-Visual Education Association, Tokyo.

    This brief history of audiovisual education in Japan covers (1) the utilization of slides, films, and radio prior to 1945; (2) film education activities after World War II; (3) the establishment and objectives of the Audiovisual Education Division of the Ministry of Education; (4) educational film production from 1945-1954; (5) the use of films in…

  2. Chewing lice (Phthiraptera) from Calidris fuscicollis (Aves: Scolopacidae) in Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Sâmara Nunes; Pesenti, Tatiana Cheuiche; Cirne, Maximiano Pinheiro; Müller, Gertrud

    2014-08-01

    During April and September from 2010 to 2012, 80 birds of the species Calidris fuscicollis (white-rumped sandpiper) were collected for parasitological studies in the southern coast of Rio Grande do Sul, under ICMBIO license No. 26234-1. For ectoparasite collection, the birds were first submerged in water with detergent. The parasites found were fixed in 70% alcohol, cleared in 10% potassium hydroxide and mounted in Canada balsam. Of 80 birds examined, 79% were parasitized. Actornithophilus umbrinus (47.5%), Actornithophilus lacustris (37.5%), Actornithophilus spp. (13.75%), Carduiceps zonarius (26.25%), Lunaceps incoenis (27.5%), and Lunaceps spp. (16.25%) were the species found with their respective prevalence. We record for the first time parasitism by chewing lice in Calidris fuscicollis. PMID:24742904

  3. Trichobilharzia mergi sp. nov. (Trematoda: Digenea: Schistosomatidae), a visceral schistosome of Mergus serrator (L.) (Aves: Anatidae).

    PubMed

    Kolá?ová, Libuše; Skírnisson, Karl; Ferté, Hubert; Jouet, Damien

    2013-06-01

    Parasitological investigations on red-breasted mergansers (Mergus serrator L.) in Iceland revealed digenean flukes of the family Schistosomatidae. Adult worms were detected in blood vessels of the large intestine and eggs were deposited in the mucosa and surrounded by granulomatous reactions. Traditional morphological methods showed that the flukes have very slender filiform bodies, males are equipped with a short gynaecophoric canal and both suckers and spatulate ends are present on each sex. Among characteristics of the flukes which render them morphologically distinct from other Trichobilharzia species are: i) males-well developed vesicula seminalis (v.s.) consisting of a short v.s. externa and a significantly longer (approx. 3 times) v.s. interna, unusually well developed genital papilla and localization of the first testis a relatively long distance posterior to the gynaecophoric canal; ii) eggs-small and elongated with slightly rounded poles and a short terminal spine. DNA taxonomic techniques confirmed that a new species had been identified, Trichobilharzia mergi sp. n. The sequence data were deposited in GenBank under the accession numbers JX456151 to JX456172. Comparison of the results with our previously published data on characterization of DNA of cercariae isolated from freshwater lymnaeid snails showed that larval development of T. mergi is associated with Radix balthica L. (=Radix peregra Müller, 1774;=Radix ovata Draparnaud, 1805). PMID:23501058

  4. A New Genus and Species of Buteonine Hawk from Quaternary Deposits in Bermuda (Aves: Accipitridae)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Storrs L. Olson

    2008-01-01

    Bermuteo avivorus, new genus and species, is described from rare Quaternary fossils from the island of Bermuda. Although clearly referable to the Buteoninae, its relationships within that group are difficult to assess. Considerable size variation may be attributable to sexual dimorphism associated with bird-catching behavior. It is uncertain if the species survived into the historic period. Factors contributing to the

  5. Complex species status for extinct moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes) from the genus Euryapteryx.

    PubMed

    Huynen, Leon; Lambert, David M

    2014-01-01

    The exact species status of New Zealand's extinct moa remains unknown. In particular, moa belonging to the genus Euryapteryx have been difficult to classify. We use the DNA barcoding sequence on a range of Euryapteryx samples in an attempt to resolve the species status for this genus. We obtained mitochondrial control region and the barcoding region from Cytochrome Oxidase Subunit I (COI) from a number of new moa samples and use available sequences from previous moa phylogenies and eggshell data to try and clarify the species status of Euryapteryx. Using the COI barcoding region we show that species status in Euryapteryx is complex with no clear separation between various individuals. Eggshell, soil, and bone data suggests that a Euryapteryx subspecies likely exists on New Zealand's North Island and can be characterized by a single mitochondrial control region SNP. COI divergences between Euryapteryx individuals from the south of New Zealand's South Island and those from the Far North of the North Island exceed 1.6% and are likely to represent separate species. Individuals from other areas of New Zealand were unable to be clearly separated based on COI differences possibly as a result of repeated hybridisation events. Despite the accuracy of the COI barcoding region to determine species status in birds, including that for the other moa genera, for moa from the genus Euryapteryx, COI barcoding fails to provide a clear result, possibly as a consequence of repeated hybridisation events between these moa. A single control region SNP was identified however that segregates with the two general morphological variants determined for Euryapteryx; a smaller subspecies restricted to the North Island of New Zealand, and a larger subspecies, found on both New Zealand's North and South Island. PMID:24594991

  6. Identification, Classification, and Growth of Moa Chicks (Aves: Dinornithiformes) from the Genus Euryapteryx

    PubMed Central

    Huynen, Leon; Gill, Brian J.; Doyle, Anthony; Millar, Craig D.; Lambert, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The analysis of growth in extinct organisms is difficult. The general lack of skeletal material from a range of developmental states precludes determination of growth characteristics. For New Zealand's extinct moa we have available to us a selection of rare femora at different developmental stages that have allowed a preliminary determination of the early growth of this giant flightless bird. We use a combination of femora morphometrics, ancient DNA, and isotope analysis to provide information on the identification, classification, and growth of extinct moa from the genus Euryapteryx. Results Using ancient DNA, we identify a number of moa chick bones for the species Euryapteryx curtus, Dinornis novaezealandiae, and Anomalopteryx didiformis, and the first chick bone for Pachyornis geranoides. Isotope analysis shows that ?15N levels vary between the two known size classes of Euryapteryx, with the larger size class having reduced levels of ?15N. A growth series for femora of the two size classes of Euryapteryx shows that early femora growth characteristics for both classes are almost identical. Morphometric, isotopic, and radiographic analysis of the smallest Euryapteryx bones suggests that one of these femora is from a freshly hatched moa at a very early stage of development. Conclusion Using morphometric, isotopic, and ancient DNA analyses have allowed the determination of a number of characteristics of rare moa chick femora. For Euryapteryx the analyses suggest that the smaller sized class II Euryapteryx is identical in size and growth to the extant Darwin's rhea. PMID:24923666

  7. Complex Species Status for Extinct Moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes) from the Genus Euryapteryx

    PubMed Central

    Huynen, Leon; Lambert, David M.

    2014-01-01

    The exact species status of New Zealand's extinct moa remains unknown. In particular, moa belonging to the genus Euryapteryx have been difficult to classify. We use the DNA barcoding sequence on a range of Euryapteryx samples in an attempt to resolve the species status for this genus. We obtained mitochondrial control region and the barcoding region from Cytochrome Oxidase Subunit I (COI) from a number of new moa samples and use available sequences from previous moa phylogenies and eggshell data to try and clarify the species status of Euryapteryx. Using the COI barcoding region we show that species status in Euryapteryx is complex with no clear separation between various individuals. Eggshell, soil, and bone data suggests that a Euryapteryx subspecies likely exists on New Zealand's North Island and can be characterized by a single mitochondrial control region SNP. COI divergences between Euryapteryx individuals from the south of New Zealand's South Island and those from the Far North of the North Island exceed 1.6% and are likely to represent separate species. Individuals from other areas of New Zealand were unable to be clearly separated based on COI differences possibly as a result of repeated hybridisation events. Despite the accuracy of the COI barcoding region to determine species status in birds, including that for the other moa genera, for moa from the genus Euryapteryx, COI barcoding fails to provide a clear result, possibly as a consequence of repeated hybridisation events between these moa. A single control region SNP was identified however that segregates with the two general morphological variants determined for Euryapteryx; a smaller subspecies restricted to the North Island of New Zealand, and a larger subspecies, found on both New Zealand's North and South Island. PMID:24594991

  8. Rapid diversification and secondary sympatry in Australo-Pacific kingfishers (Aves: Alcedinidae: Todiramphus)

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Michael J.; Shult, Hannah T.; Cibois, Alice; Thibault, Jean-Claude; Filardi, Christopher E.; Moyle, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Todiramphus chloris is the most widely distributed of the Pacific's ‘great speciators’. Its 50 subspecies constitute a species complex that is distributed over 16?000?km from the Red Sea to Polynesia. We present, to our knowledge, the first comprehensive molecular phylogeny of this enigmatic radiation of kingfishers. Ten Pacific Todiramphus species are embedded within the T. chloris complex, rendering it paraphyletic. Among these is a radiation of five species from the remote islands of Eastern Polynesian, as well as the widespread migratory taxon, Todiramphus sanctus. Our results offer strong support that Pacific Todiramphus, including T. chloris, underwent an extensive range expansion and diversification less than 1?Ma. Multiple instances of secondary sympatry have accumulated in this group, despite its recent origin, including on Australia and oceanic islands in Palau, Vanuatu and the Solomon Islands. Significant ecomorphological and behavioural differences exist between secondarily sympatric lineages, which suggest that pre-mating isolating mechanisms were achieved rapidly during diversification. We found evidence for complex biogeographic patterns, including a novel phylogeographic break in the eastern Solomon Islands that separates a Northern Melanesian clade from Polynesian taxa. In light of our results, we discuss systematic relationships of Todiramphus and propose an updated taxonomy. This paper contributes to our understanding of avian diversification and assembly on islands, and to the systematics of a classically polytypic species complex.

  9. Rapid diversification of falcons (Aves: Falconidae) due to expansion of open habitats in the Late Miocene.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Jérôme; Johnson, Jeff A; Mindell, David P

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how and why lineages diversify is central to understanding the origins of biological diversity. The avian family Falconidae (caracaras, forest-falcons, falcons) has an uneven distribution of species among multiple well-supported clades, and provides a useful system for testing hypotheses about diversification rate and correlation with environmental changes. We analyzed eight independent loci for 1-7 individuals from each of the 64 currently recognized Falconidae species, together with two fossil falconid temporal calibrations, to assess phylogeny, absolute divergence times and potential shifts in diversification rate. Our analyses supported similar diversification ages in the Early to Middle Miocene for the three traditional subfamilies, Herpetotherinae, Polyborinae and Falconinae. We estimated that divergences within the subfamily Falconinae began about 16mya and divergences within the most species-rich genus, Falco, including about 60% of all Falconidae species, began about 7.5mya. We found evidence for a significant increase in diversification rate at the basal phylogenetic node for the genus Falco, and the timing for this rate shift correlates generally with expansion of C4 grasslands beginning around the Miocene/Pliocene transition. Concomitantly, Falco lineages that are distributed primarily in grassland or savannah habitats, as opposed to woodlands, and exhibit migratory, as opposed to sedentary, behavior experienced a higher diversification rate. PMID:25256056

  10. Phylogeny and biogeography of Ficedula flycatchers (Aves: Muscicapidae): novel results from fresh source material.

    PubMed

    Moyle, Robert G; Hosner, Peter A; Jones, Andrew W; Outlaw, Diana C

    2015-01-01

    The avian genus Ficedula has been a model system for studying speciation, genomics, biogeography, and the evolution of migratory behavior. However, no multi-locus molecular phylogenetic hypothesis exists for the genus. We expanded taxon and character sampling over previous studies and produced a robust hypothesis of relationships for the genus. Many previous findings, such as the inclusion of Muscicapella and exclusion of Ficedula monileger from the genus, were verified, but many relationships differed compared to previous work. Some of the differences were due to increased sampling, but others were due to problematic sequence data produced from DNA extracted from historical museum specimens. The new phylogenetic hypothesis resulted in a simpler biogeographic scenario with fewer transitions between regions and fewer transitions between seasonally migratory and resident character states. Notably, all species endemic to the Philippines and Wallacea formed a clade, which included Ficedula dumetoria of the Sunda Shelf and Lesser Sundas. In addition, Ficedula hyperythra was not monophyletic; samples from Philippine populations formed a clade distantly related to a clade that comprised all other sampled populations. PMID:25307119

  11. Rapid diversification and secondary sympatry in Australo-Pacific kingfishers (Aves: Alcedinidae: Todiramphus).

    PubMed

    Andersen, Michael J; Shult, Hannah T; Cibois, Alice; Thibault, Jean-Claude; Filardi, Christopher E; Moyle, Robert G

    2015-02-01

    Todiramphus chloris is the most widely distributed of the Pacific's 'great speciators'. Its 50 subspecies constitute a species complex that is distributed over 16?000?km from the Red Sea to Polynesia. We present, to our knowledge, the first comprehensive molecular phylogeny of this enigmatic radiation of kingfishers. Ten Pacific Todiramphus species are embedded within the T. chloris complex, rendering it paraphyletic. Among these is a radiation of five species from the remote islands of Eastern Polynesian, as well as the widespread migratory taxon, Todiramphus sanctus. Our results offer strong support that Pacific Todiramphus, including T. chloris, underwent an extensive range expansion and diversification less than 1?Ma. Multiple instances of secondary sympatry have accumulated in this group, despite its recent origin, including on Australia and oceanic islands in Palau, Vanuatu and the Solomon Islands. Significant ecomorphological and behavioural differences exist between secondarily sympatric lineages, which suggest that pre-mating isolating mechanisms were achieved rapidly during diversification. We found evidence for complex biogeographic patterns, including a novel phylogeographic break in the eastern Solomon Islands that separates a Northern Melanesian clade from Polynesian taxa. In light of our results, we discuss systematic relationships of Todiramphus and propose an updated taxonomy. This paper contributes to our understanding of avian diversification and assembly on islands, and to the systematics of a classically polytypic species complex. PMID:26064600

  12. THE CHEWING LICE (PHTHIRAPTERA: AMBLYCERA, ISCHNOCERA) COLLECTED ON SOME FALCONIFORMES AND STRIGIFORMES (AVES) FROM ROMANIA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    COSTICÃ ADAM; SZILÁRD J. DARÓCZI

    The results of a six years long (2000-2006) study on the ectoparasitological material from some Falconiformes and Strigiformes species of Romanian fauna are presented; from the 12 identified chewing louse species, Colpocephalum polonum (Eichler & Z³otorzycka, 1971) is reported for the first time for the entomological fauna of Romania, and Menacanthus stramineus (Nitzsch, 1818) is reported for the first time

  13. The mousebirds (Aves: Coliiformes) from the Middle Eocene of Grube Messel (Hessen, Germany)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gerald Mayr; Dieter Stefan Peters

    1998-01-01

    The monophyly of the Coliiformes (Sandcoleidae + Coliidae) is well corroborated with the recognition of ten osteological synapomorphies.\\u000a So far, four species of coliiform birds are known from the Middle Eocene of Grube Messel (Hessen, Germany). Members of both\\u000a the Sandcoleidae and of the Coliidae have been identified.Eoglaucidium pallas\\u000a Fischer 1987, originally assigned to the Strigiformes (owls), is referred to

  14. Reverse ascertainment bias in microsatellite allelic diversity in owls (Aves, Strigiformes)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fiona E. Hogan; Raylene Cooke; Janette A. Norman

    2009-01-01

    A rich source of markers may be overlooked by screening for polymorphism in the source species only. We screened 129 microsatellite\\u000a loci isolated from the powerful owl (Ninox strenua) against two closely related species; Ninox connivens and Ninox novaeseelandiae. From the screening effort 20 polymorphic markers were isolated, including six loci which were originally discarded as they\\u000a were monomorphic in the source species.

  15. EFFECTS OF BODY SIZE ON TAKE-OFF FLIGHT PERFORMANCE IN THE PHASIANIDAE (AVES)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    BRET W. TOBALSKE; KENNETH P. DIAL

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the mechanisms responsible for relationships between body mass and maximum take-off performance in birds, we studied four species in the Phasianidae: northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus), chukar (Alectoris chukar), ring-necked pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) and wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo). These species vary in body mass from 0.2 to 5.3 kg, and they use flight almost solely to escape predators. During

  16. Los orígenes del Partido del Socialismo Democrático (1989-1993): el ave fénix roja en Alemania

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ricardo Martín de la Guardia

    2005-01-01

    El Partido del Socialismo Democrático (Partei des Demokratischen Sozialismus), surgido de la descomposición interna del SED (Sozialistiscbe Einbeitspartei Deutschlands), es un caso relevante de adaptación de los partidos únicos en los regímenes comunistas a la democracia plurípar-tidista. Dadas las peculiaridades de la transición en la República Democrática de Alemania, acelerada por su rápida integración en la República Federal, el SED

  17. Molecular markers for population genetic analyses in the family Psittacidae (Psittaciformes, Aves)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patrícia J. Faria; Cristina Y. Miyaki

    2006-01-01

    The selection of molecular markers for population studies is an important tool for biodiversity conservation. The fam- ily Psittacidae contains many endangered and vulnerable species and we tested three kinds of molecular markers for their potential use in population studies of five psitacid species: 43 hyacinth macaws (Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus), 42 blue-and-yellow macaws (Ara ararauna), 23 red-and-green macaws (Ara chloroptera), 19

  18. Molecular diversity, metabolic transformation, and evolution of carotenoid feather pigments in cotingas (Aves: Cotingidae).

    PubMed

    Prum, Richard O; LaFountain, Amy M; Berro, Julien; Stoddard, Mary Caswell; Frank, Harry A

    2012-12-01

    Carotenoid pigments were extracted from 29 feather patches from 25 species of cotingas (Cotingidae) representing all lineages of the family with carotenoid plumage coloration. Using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), mass spectrometry, chemical analysis, and ¹H-NMR, 16 different carotenoid molecules were documented in the plumages of the cotinga family. These included common dietary xanthophylls (lutein and zeaxanthin), canary xanthophylls A and B, four well known and broadly distributed avian ketocarotenoids (canthaxanthin, astaxanthin, ?-doradexanthin, and adonixanthin), rhodoxanthin, and seven 4-methoxy-ketocarotenoids. Methoxy-ketocarotenoids were found in 12 species within seven cotinga genera, including a new, previously undescribed molecule isolated from the Andean Cock-of-the-Rock Rupicola peruviana, 3'-hydroxy-3-methoxy-?,?-carotene-4-one, which we name rupicolin. The diversity of cotinga plumage carotenoid pigments is hypothesized to be derived via four metabolic pathways from lutein, zeaxanthin, ?-cryptoxanthin, and ?-carotene. All metabolic transformations within the four pathways can be described by six or seven different enzymatic reactions. Three of these reactions are shared among three precursor pathways and are responsible for eight different metabolically derived carotenoid molecules. The function of cotinga plumage carotenoid diversity was analyzed with reflectance spectrophotometry of plumage patches and a tetrahedral model of avian color visual perception. The evolutionary history of the origin of this diversity is analyzed phylogenetically. The color space analyses document that the evolutionarily derived metabolic modifications of dietary xanthophylls have resulted in the creation of distinctive orange-red and purple visual colors. PMID:22669477

  19. Isolation and characterization of polymorphic microsatellite loci for the northern flicker (Colaptes auratus; Aves).

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Sylvia; Wiebe, Karen L; Kempenaers, Bart

    2009-05-01

    To investigate the mating system of northern flickers (Colaptes auratus), we developed primers for 14 microsatellite loci and screened them in 68 unrelated adults and their offspring. All markers were highly polymorphic with 9 to +36 alleles per locus. One marker was Z-chromosome linked; one marker exceeded the size standard range and could not be analysed further. We checked the other 12 markers for Mendelian inheritance in 36 broods for which the social parents were known. Seven markers showed evidence for the presence of null alleles, and three of those showed significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Markers were generally unlinked. PMID:21564764

  20. Mitochondrial DNA Variation in the Northern Flicker ( Colaptes auratus, Aves) 1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William S. Moore; John H. Graham; Jef T. Price

    The northern flicker is a common woodpecker that inhabits open woodlands throughout North America. A narrow hybrid zone occurs along the range boundaries between the eastern yellow-shafted and western red-shafted subspecies. Mitochon- drial DNA (mtDNA) was isolated from 20 1 flickers from 27 locales, primarily along two transects that cross the hybrid zone, one across the northern United States and

  1. Comparative phylogeography of co-distributed Phrygilus species (Aves, Thraupidae) from the Central Andes.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Varas, R; González-Acuña, D; Vianna, J A

    2015-09-01

    The Neotropical ecoregion has been an important place of avian diversification where dispersal and allopatric events coupled with periods of active orogeny and climate change (Late Pliocene-Pleistocene) have shaped the biogeography of the region. In the Neotropics, avian population structure has been sculpted not only by geographical barriers, but also by non-allopatric factors such as natural selection and local adaptation. We analyzed the genetic variation of six co-distributed Phrygilus species from the Central Andes, based on mitochondrial and nuclear markers in conjunction with morphological differentiation. We examined if Phrygilus species share patterns of population structure and historical demography, and reviewed the intraspecific taxonomy in part of their geographic range. Our results showed different phylogeographic patterns between species, even among those belonging to the same phylogenetic clade. P. alaudinus, P. atriceps, and P. unicolor showed genetic differentiation mediated by allopatric mechanisms in response to specific geographic barriers; P. gayi showed sympatric lineages in northern Chile, while P. plebejus and P. fruticeti showed a single genetic group. We found no relationship between geographic range size and genetic structure. Additionally, a signature of expansion was found in three species related to the expansion of paleolakes in the Altiplano region and the drying phase of the Atacama Desert. Morphological analysis showed congruence with molecular data and intraspecific taxonomy in most species. While we detected genetic and phenotypic patterns that could be related to natural selection and local adaptation, our results indicate that allopatric events acted as a major factor in the population differentiation of Phrygilus species. PMID:25987531

  2. Semi-Detailed Bus Routing with Variation Reduction 600 W California Ave

    E-print Network

    Brayton, Robert K.

    Sunnyvale, CA 94086 1-408-215-6103 fanmo@synplicity.com Robert K. Brayton University of California 573 Cory Hall, UC Berkeley Berkeley, CA 94720 1-510-643-9801 brayton@eecs.berkeley.edu ABSTRACT A bus routing

  3. A new owl species of the genus Otus (aves: strigidae) from Lombok, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Sangster, George; King, Ben F; Verbelen, Philippe; Trainor, Colin R

    2013-01-01

    The avifauna of Indonesia is one of the richest in the world but the taxonomic status of many species remains poorly documented. The sole species of scops owl known from Lombok has long been assigned to the widespread Moluccan Scops Owl Otus magicus on the basis of superficial similarities in morphology. Field work in 2003 has shown that the territorial song of the scops owls inhabiting the foothills of Gunung Rinjani differs dramatically from that of O. magicus and is more similar to those of Rufescent Scops Owl O. rufescens and Singapore Scops Owl O. cnephaeus. Detailed comparisons of sound recordings and museum specimens with those of other scops owls in Wallacea and the Indo-Malayan region have confirmed the distinctiveness of the Lombok population. We describe Otus jolandae as a new species, the Rinjani Scops Owl. It is locally common at elevations from 25-1350 m. and occurs within Gunung Rinjani National Park. The new species is known from seven specimens collected by Alfred Everett in 1896. Otus jolandae represents the first endemic bird species from Lombok. PMID:23418422

  4. Biogeography and spatio-temporal diversification of Selenidera and Andigena toucans (Aves: Ramphastidae).

    PubMed

    Lutz, Holly L; Weckstein, Jason D; Patané, José S L; Bates, John M; Aleixo, Alexandre

    2013-12-01

    Andean uplift, Plio-Pleistocene climatic fluctuation, and river dynamics in the Amazon basin have all been implicated in the diversification of the South American avifauna. We reconstructed phylogenetic relationships in the genus Selenidera, which has served as a classic case of putative refugial speciation, and the closely related genus Andigena, to better understand the processes driving their diversification. Using mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences, we constructed a phylogeny to estimate the pattern and timing of divergence within and between seven lowland Selenidera toucanets and the five species of Andigena mountain-toucans, which together form a single clade. All phylogenetic analyses supported the monophyly of the montane genus Andigena, but indicated that the genus Selenidera is likely paraphyletic with respect to Andigena. Our time tree analysis is consistent with the orogenic uplift of the northern Andean range having initiated the divergence between Selenidera and Andigena, and that the movement and fragmentation of montane habitats in response to Pleistocene climatic oscillations likely influenced diversification within Andigena. Estimated divergence times for lowland Amazonian Selenidera did not support the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) refuge hypothesis as an important biogeographic factor for the diversification of lineages studied here. The timing of divergence within Selenidera is consistent with the hypothesis that geographic isolation of areas of endemism generated by Amazonian river dynamics during the Plio-Pleistocene contributed to Selenidera speciation and current species distributions. PMID:23831458

  5. Feather mites (Acari, Astigmata) from Azorean passerines (Aves, Passeriformes): lower species richness compared to European mainland

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Pedro; Mironov, Sergey; Sychra, Oldrich; Resendes, Roberto; Literak, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Ten passerine species were examined on three islands of the Azores (North Atlantic) during 2013 and 2014 in order to identify their feather mite assemblages. We recorded 19 feather mite species belonging to four families of the superfamily Analgoidea (Analgidae, Proctophyllodidae, Psoroptoididae and Trouessartiidae). A high prevalence of feather mite species was recorded on the majority of the examined host species. Only three passerine species (Sylvia atricapilla, Regulus regulus and Serinus canaria) presented the same full complex of mite species as commonly occurs in the plumage of their closest relatives in continental Europe. Passer domesticus presented the same limited fauna of feather mites living in the plumage as do its co-specifics in continental Europe. Carduelis carduelis bears the same feather mite species as do most of its continental populations in Europe, but it lacks one mite species occurring on this host in Egypt. Turdus merula, Pyrrhula murina and Fringilla coelebs are missing several mite species common to their continental relatives. This diminution could be explained by the founder effect, whereby a limited number of colonizing individuals did not transport the full set of feather mite species, or by the extinction of some mite species after initially having reached the Azores. The only individual of Motacilla cinerea sampled in this study presented a new host record for the mite species Trouessartia jedliczkai. PMID:25665827

  6. Niche divergence promotes rapid diversification of East African sky island white-eyes (Aves: Zosteropidae)

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Siobhan C; Prys-Jones, Robert P; Habel, Jan C; Amakobe, Bernard A; Day, Julia J

    2014-01-01

    The Eastern Afromontane biodiversity hotspot composed of highly fragmented forested highlands (sky islands) harbours exceptional diversity and endemicity, particularly within birds. To explain their elevated diversity within this region, models founded on niche conservatism have been offered, although detailed phylogeographic studies are limited to a few avian lineages. Here, we focus on the recent songbird genus Zosterops, represented by montane and lowland members, to test the roles of niche conservatism versus niche divergence in the diversification and colonization of East Africa's sky islands. The species-rich white-eyes are a typically homogeneous family with an exceptional colonizing ability, but in contrast to their diversity on oceanic islands, continental diversity is considered depauperate and has been largely neglected. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of ?140 taxa reveals extensive polyphyly among different montane populations of Z. poliogastrus. These larger endemic birds are shown to be more closely related to taxa with divergent habitat types, altitudinal distributions and dispersal abilities than they are to populations of restricted endemics that occur in neighbouring montane forest fragments. This repeated transition between lowland and highland habitats over time demonstrate that diversification of the focal group is explained by niche divergence. Our results also highlight an underestimation of diversity compared to morphological studies that has implications for their taxonomy and conservation. Molecular dating suggests that the spatially extensive African radiation arose exceptionally rapidly (1–2.5 Ma) during the fluctuating Plio-Pleistocene climate, which may have provided the primary driver for lineage diversification. PMID:24954273

  7. Phylogeny of the tree swallow genus, Tachycineta (Aves: Hirundinidae), by Bayesian analysis of mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Whittingham, Linda A; Slikas, Beth; Winkler, David W; Sheldon, Frederick H

    2002-03-01

    To set the stage for historical analyses of the ecology and behavior of tree swallows and their allies (genus Tachycineta), we reconstructed the phylogeny of the nine Tachycineta species by comparing DNA sequences of six mitochondrial genes: Cytochrome b (990 base pairs), the second subunit of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase (839 base pairs), cytochrome oxidase II (85 base pairs), ATPase 8 (158 base pairs), tRNA-lysine (73 base pairs), and tRNA-methionine (25 base pairs). The phylogeny consisted of two main clades: South and Central American species ((T. stolzmanni, T. albilinea, T. albiventris), (T. leucorrhoa, T. meyeni)), and North American and Caribbean species (T. bicolor, (T. thalassina, T. euchrysea, T. cyaneoviridis)). The genetic distances among the species suggested that Tachycineta is a relatively old group compared to other New World swallow genera. One interesting biogeographic discovery was the close relationship between Caribbean and western North American taxa. This historical connection occurs in other groups of swallows and swifts as well. To reconstruct the phylogeny, we employed Bayesian as well as traditional maximum-likelihood methods. The Bayesian approach provided probability values for trees produced from the different genes and gene combinations, as well as probabilities of branches within those trees. We compared Bayesian and maximum-likelihood bootstrap branch support and found that all branches with Bayesian probabilities > or = 95% received bootstrap support >70%. PMID:11884168

  8. Phylogeny of the Tree Swallow Genus, Tachycineta (Aves: Hirundinidae), by Bayesian Analysis of Mitochondrial DNA Sequences

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Linda A Whittingham; Beth Slikas; David W Winkler; Frederick H Sheldon

    2002-01-01

    To set the stage for historical analyses of the ecology and behavior of tree swallows and their allies (genus Tachycineta), we reconstructed the phylogeny of the nine Tachycineta species by comparing DNA sequences of six mitochondrial genes: Cytochrome b (990 base pairs), the second subunit of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase (839 base pairs), cytochrome oxidase II (85 base pairs), ATPase

  9. Jaw myology and bite force of the monk parakeet (Aves, Psittaciformes).

    PubMed

    Carril, Julieta; Degrange, Federico J; Tambussi, Claudia P

    2015-07-01

    Psittaciform birds exhibit novelties in jaw bone structure and musculature that are associated with strong bite forces. These features include an ossified arcus suborbitalis and the muscles ethmomandibularis and pseudomasseter. We analyse the jaw musculature of the monk parakeet (Myiopsitta monachus) to enable future studies aimed at understanding craniofacial development, morphology, function and evolution. We estimate bite force based on muscle dissections, physiological cross-sectional area and skull biomechanical modelling. We also compare our results with available data for other birds and traced the evolutionary origin of the three novel diagnostic traits. Our results indicate that, in Myiopsitta, (i) the arcus suborbitalis is absent and the orbit is ventrally closed by an elongate processus orbitalis and a short ligamentum suborbitale; (ii) the ethmomandibularis muscle is a conspicuous muscle with two bellies, with its origin on the anterior portion of the septum interorbitale and insertion on the medial aspect of the mandible; (iii) the pseudomasseter muscle consists of some fibers arising from the m. adductor mandibulae externus superficialis, covering the lateral surface of the arcus jugalis and attaches by an aponeurotic sheet on the processus orbitalis; (iv) a well-developed adductor mandibulae complex is present; (v) the bite force estimation relative to body mass is higher than that calculated for other non-psittaciform species; and (vi) character evolution analysis revealed that the absence of the arcus suborbitalis and the presence of the m. pseudomassseter are the ancestral conditions, and mapping is inconclusive about presence of one or two bellies of the m. ethmomandibularis. PMID:26053435

  10. Phylogeny of swallows (Aves: Hirundinidae) estimated from nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frederick H. Sheldon; Linda A. Whittingham; Robert G. Moyle; Beth Slikas; David W. Winkler

    2005-01-01

    The phylogeny of swallows was reconstructed by comparing segments of three genes, nuclear ?-fibrinogen intron 7 (?fib7), mitochondrial cytochrome b (cytb), and mitochondrial ND2, in a variety of combinations using maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods. ?fib7 was sequenced for 47 species, cytb for 74 species, and ND2 for 61 species to yield comparisons among 75 of the 84 currently recognized

  11. Bone growth marks reveal protracted growth in New Zealand kiwi (Aves, Apterygidae)

    PubMed Central

    Bourdon, Estelle; Castanet, Jacques; de Ricqlès, Armand; Scofield, Paul; Tennyson, Alan; Lamrous, Hayat; Cubo, Jorge

    2009-01-01

    The presence of bone growth marks reflecting annual rhythms in the cortical bone of non-avian tetrapods is now established as a general phenomenon. In contrast, ornithurines (the theropod group including modern birds and their closest relatives) usually grow rapidly in less than a year, such that no annual rhythms are expressed in bone cortices, except scarce growth marks restricted to the outer cortical layer. So far, cyclical growth in modern birds has been restricted to the Eocene Diatryma, the extant parrot Amazona amazonica and the extinct New Zealand (NZ) moa (Dinornithidae). Here we show the presence of lines of arrested growth in the long bones of the living NZ kiwi (Apteryx spp., Apterygidae). Kiwis take 5–6 years to reach full adult body size, which indicates a delayed maturity and a slow reproductive cycle. Protracted growth probably evolved convergently in moa and kiwi sometime since the Middle Miocene, owing to the severe climatic cooling in the southwest Pacific and the absence of mammalian predators. PMID:19515655

  12. The karyotype of the critically endangered Lear's macaw, Anodorhynchus leari Bonaparte 1856 (Aves, Psittaciformes)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Denise Monnerat Nogueira; Lucia Moreno de Souza; Beatriz Goldschmidt; Christiano Pinheiro da Silva; Denise Wilches Monsores

    2006-01-01

    We used conventional chromosomal staining to describe the karyotype of the critically endangered Lear's macaw, Anodorhynchus leari Bonaparte 1856. A diploid number of 2n = 70 and a karyotype similar to that of its congener Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus suggests that chromosomal rearrangements were not the main evolutionary mecha- nism in the genus.

  13. Speciational history of North American Haemorhous finches (Aves: Fringillidae) inferred from multilocus data.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brian Tilston; Bryson, Robert W; Chua, Vivien; Africa, Lia; Klicka, John

    2013-03-01

    We investigated species relationships and timing of speciation in North American Haemorhous finches by using a mitochondrial phylogeographic approach combined with a multilocus species tree reconstruction. Haemorhous purpureus and H. cassinii were strongly supported as sister taxa, and H. mexicanus was sister to H. purpureus+H. cassinii. Our divergence times indicated that diversification within Haemorhous occurred progressively from the Late Miocene into the Pleistocene. Our inferred pattern of speciation demonstrates the complexity of the origins of North American birds, and provides additional evidence that a single cause for speciation in closely related North American birds, such as Late Pleistocene glacial-interglacial cycles, is unlikely. PMID:23219607

  14. 776 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN OF INTEGRATED CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS, VOL. 16, NO. 7, JULY 1997 [4] M. Diaz, P. Azema, and J. M. Ayache, "Unified design of self-checking

    E-print Network

    Lin, Youn-Long Steve

    circuits," IEEE Design Test Comput., pp. 26­33, Dec. 1985. [12] A. Casimiro, M. Simoes, M. Santos, I] R. A. Parekhji, G. Venkatesh, and S. D. Sherlekar, "A methodology for designing optimal self and S. M. Reddy, "On delay fault testing in logic circuits," in Proc. IEEE Int. Test Conf., 1986, pp

  15. Attending the meeting, LR, are two sons of Castro: Antonio Castro Soto del Valle and Fidel Castro Diaz-Balart, Cuban Presidential Science Advisor; Fidel Castro Ruz; Castros wife Dalia Soto del Valle; Juan

    E-print Network

    Goodman, Robert M.

    Crisis. The aim of the conference will be to highlight the dangers of nuclear weapons and the need for more rapid disarmament. According to Robock, "We now have the same number of nuclear weapons at cities and industrial areas would produce devastating climatic and agricultural consequences." #12

  16. Search for new manganese-cobalt oxides as positive electrode materials for lithium batteries P. Strobel, J. Tillier, A. Diaz, A. Ibarra-Palos, F. Thiry and J.B. Soupart *

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Search for new manganese-cobalt oxides as positive electrode materials for lithium batteries P new mixed manganese-cobalt oxides for lithium battery positive electrode materials were obtained using material for rechargeable lithium batteries so far. Many efforts are underway to replace part or all cobalt

  17. Pochet P. (1998), Changes in urban travel behaviour of elderly people, in Ortuzar J. de D., Hensher D.A and Jara-Diaz S.R. (Eds), Travel Behaviour Research: Updating the State of Play, Oxford,

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1998-01-01

    in the evolution of the modal distribution, i.e. the individual's access to the private car, and its daily use effects, which leads to an increase in car driving after the age of sixty. The same type of analysis with the central question in the evolution of modal distribution, i.e. the access to and the use of the private car

  18. To cite this document: NGUYEN Anh-Dung, SNAC Patrick, RAMIRO Victor and DIAZ, Michel. Pervasive intelligent routing in content centric delay tolerant networks. In: The 9th IEEE

    E-print Network

    Mailhes, Corinne

    intelligent routing in content centric delay tolerant networks. In: The 9th IEEE International Conference Intelligent Routing in Content Centric Delay Tolerant Networks Anh-Dung Nguyen, Patrick S´enac, Victor Ramiro information in content centric Delay Tolerant Networks (CCDTN) also dubbed pocket switched networks. First

  19. Patterns of extinction risk and threat for marine vertebrates and habitat-forming species in the Tropical Eastern

    E-print Network

    Bermingham, Eldredge

    Chordata Aves Charadriiformes Laridae Larus californicus LC Chordata Aves Charadriiformes Laridae Larus NT Endemic Chordata Aves Charadriiformes Laridae Larus argentatus LC Chordata Aves Charadriiformes Laridae Larus atricilla LC Supplement IUCN Red List (RL) Categories and indication of regional endemism

  20. Influence of Age, Type and Fertility in Rambouillet Ewes on Fineness of Fibers, Fleece Weight, Staple Length, and Body Weight. 

    E-print Network

    Patterson, R.E.; Warwick, B.L.; Davis, S. P; Dameron, W. H.; Jones, J. M. (John McKinley)

    1944-01-01

    ................ Totals** .......... Averages**. ............. **The records for the one year old ewes have not been included in these averages. - - Did Not Lamb During Lambed During Year Year - iZll Records C Type R Type C 'Type i R Type Ave. Ave. Ave... - All Records C, TYPC B *rype C Type B Type .\\KC in years ---- - -- --- - -- - -- - Ave. Ave. Ave. Ave. Ave. No. inches No. inches No. inches No. inches No. inches ___________---- ....................................... 1" 693 2.51 71 2.27 764 2...

  1. Perceived consequences and concerns in the diffusion of Internet2 at Texas A&M University

    E-print Network

    Mendoza Diaz, Noemi Veronica

    2009-05-15

    PERCEIVED CONSEQUENCES AND CONCERNS IN THE DIFFUSION OF INTERNET2? AT TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY A Dissertation by NOEMI VERONICA MENDOZA DIAZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... NOEMI VERONICA MENDOZA DIAZ ALL RIGHTS RESERVED PERCEIVED CONSEQUENCES AND CONCERNS IN THE DIFFUSION OF INTERNET2? AT TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY A Dissertation by NOEMI VERONICA MENDOZA DIAZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate...

  2. < TO JAMBOREE RD.

    E-print Network

    Shinozuka, Masanobu

    Bison Exit at Bison Ave. Left on Bison Ave. into UCI Left on California Ave. Left on Theory First right the North Exit at Bison Ave. Left on Bison Ave. into UCI Left on California Ave. Left on Theory First right

  3. A NEW SUBSPECIES OF APOLINAR'S WREN (CISTOTHORUS APOLINARI, AVES: TROGLODYTIDAE), AN ENDANGERED COLOMBIAN ENDEMIC Una nueva subespecie de soterrey de Apolinar (Cistothorus apolinari, Aves: Troglodytidae), un endemismo colombiano en peligro

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. GARY STILES; PAULA CAYCEDO

    We describe Cistothorus apolinari hernandezi, subsp. nov. from wet páramo of the Sumapaz massif south of Bogotá, Colombia. This form differs from the nominate of the wetlands of the Cundinamarca-Boyacá Plateau in size, coloration, ecology, so- cial structure and song and appears to be isolated from it by some 1000 m of elevation and different habitat preferences. A second population

  4. A new large barn owl (Aves, Strigiformes, Tytonidae) from the Middle Pleistocene of Sicily, Italy, and its taphonomical significance Une nouvelle espèce d'effraie géante (Aves, Strigiformes, Tytonidae) du Pléistocène moyen de Sicile, Italie, et son importance taphonomique

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marco Pavia

    A new species of Tytonidae, Tyto mourerchauvireae, is described from the Sicilian cave deposits of Spinagallo, Luparello and Marasà, which have yielded a common vertebrate fossil assemblages referred to the early Middle Pleistocene. T. mourerchauvireae nov. sp. shows a pronounced increase in body size compared to other congeneric taxa. It is larger than the extant Tyto alba and the extinct

  5. Youngest reported radiocarbon age of a moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes) dated from a natural site in New Zealand

    Microsoft Academic Search

    NJ Rawlence; A Cooper

    2012-01-01

    The extinction date of the giant flightless New Zealand ratite bird, the crested moa (Pachyornis australis), is of considerable interest because the youngest verified remains are dated to the Pleistocene–Holocene transition c. 10,000 yr BP, which was characterised by severe climatic and habitat change, and are considerably earlier than the late Holocene extinctions of the other eight moa species. Analysis

  6. Description of a new species of Tylodelphys (Digenea, Diplostomidae) in the wood stork, Mycteria americana (Aves, Ciconiidae) from Argentina

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fabiana B. Drago; Lía I. Lunaschi

    2008-01-01

    During the course of a study on the endohelminth parasites of birds, specimens of an undescribed species of Tylodelphys Diesing, 1850 (Diplostomidae) were collected from the wood stork, Mycteria americana L., from Formosa Province, Argentina. Tylodelphys brevis sp. nov. can be distinguished from the other Neotropical species of this genus, T. elongata, T. americana and T. adulta, principally by the

  7. Isolation and characterization of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II B genes in the Barn owl (Aves: Tyto alba).

    PubMed

    Burri, Reto; Niculita-Hirzel, Hélène; Roulin, Alexandre; Fumagalli, Luca

    2008-09-01

    We isolated major histocompatibility complex class II B (MHCIIB) genes in the Barn owl (Tyto alba). A PCR-based approach combined with primer walking on genomic and complementary DNA as well as Southern blot analyses revealed the presence of two MHCIIB genes, both being expressed in spleen, liver, and blood. Characteristic structural features of MHCIIB genes as well as their expression and high non-synonymous substitution rates in the region involved in antigen binding suggest that both genes are functional. MHC organization in the Barn owl is simple compared to passerine species that show multiple duplications, and resembles the minimal essential MHC of chicken. PMID:18548243

  8. Microsatellite markers characterized in the barn owl (Tyto alba) and of high utility in other owls (Strigiformes: AVES).

    PubMed

    Klein, Akos; Horsburgh, Gavin J; Küpper, Clemens; Major, Agnes; Lee, Patricia L M; Hoffmann, Gyula; Mátics, Róbert; Dawson, Deborah A

    2009-11-01

    We have identified 15 polymorphic microsatellite loci for the barn owl (Tyto alba), five from testing published owl loci and 10 from testing non-owl loci, including loci known to be of high utility in passerines and shorebirds. All 15 loci were sequenced in barn owl, and new primer sets were designed for eight loci. The 15 polymorphic loci displayed two to 26 alleles in 56-58 barn owls. When tested in 10 other owl species (n?=?1-6 individuals), between four and nine loci were polymorphic per species. These loci are suitable for studies of population structure and parentage in owls. PMID:21564947

  9. Foraging behaviour of the Scale-throated Hermit Phaethornis eurynome Lesson, 1832 (Aves, Trochilidae) in Vriesea incurvata Gaudich (Bromeliaceae).

    PubMed

    Silva, B G; Piratelli, A J

    2014-05-01

    In this study we tested for density-dependent relationships between visitation rates of the Scale-throated Hermit (Phaethornis eurynome) and the plant density and flower number of the bromeliad Vriesea incurvata, by comparing plots with varying densities of this bromeliad. Eight 100 m2 plots were established at least 200 m from each other; four plots contained 10-15 individuals of V. incurvata each, whereas the other four contained 4-5 individuals each. The visitors, number of visits, behaviour (nectar thief or potential pollinator) and the height of foraging were recorded during focal observations on the plants. The number of visits of P. eurynome varied according to the local density of V. incurvata, showing that the heterogeneous distribution of this bromeliad species may promote adjustments in the pollinator populations, through resource variation at a local scale. PMID:25166315

  10. A comprehensive multilocus phylogeny for the wood-warblers and a revised classification of the Parulidae (Aves)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovette, I.J.; Perez-Eman, J. L.; Sullivan, J.P.; Banks, R.C.; Fiorentino, I.; Cordoba-Cordoba, S.; Echeverry-Galvis, M.; Barker, F.K.; Burns, K.J.; Klicka, J.; Lanyon, S.M.; Bermingham, E.

    2010-01-01

    The birds in the family Parulidae-commonly termed the New World warblers or wood-warblers-are a classic model radiation for studies of ecological and behavioral differentiation. Although the monophyly of a 'core' wood-warbler clade is well established, no phylogenetic hypothesis for this group has included a full sampling of wood-warbler species diversity. We used parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian methods to reconstruct relationships among all genera and nearly all wood-warbler species, based on a matrix of mitochondrial DNA (5840 nucleotides) and nuclear DNA (6 loci, 4602 nucleotides) characters. The resulting phylogenetic hypotheses provide a highly congruent picture of wood-warbler relationships, and indicate that the traditional generic classification of these birds recognizes many non-monophyletic groups. We recommend a revised taxonomy in which each of 14 genera (Seiurus, Helmitheros, Mniotilta, Limnothlypis, Protonotaria, Parkesia, Vermivora, Oreothlypis, Geothlypis, Setophaga, Myioborus, Cardellina, Basileuterus, Myiothlypis) corresponds to a well-supported clade; these nomenclatural changes also involve subsuming a number of well-known, traditional wood-warbler genera (Catharopeza, Dendroica, Ergaticus, Euthlypis, Leucopeza, Oporornis, Parula, Phaeothlypis, Wilsonia). We provide a summary phylogenetic hypothesis that will be broadly applicable to investigations of the historical biogeography, processes of diversification, and evolution of trait variation in this well studied avian group. ?? 2010 Elsevier Inc.

  11. Duval County Extension Office Program Location: 1010 N McDuff Ave, Jacksonville, FL 32254, unless noted

    E-print Network

    Jawitz, James W.

    - 7:30 pm Register http://jaxpubliclibrary.org/financiallyfit Teen Financial Essay Contest Win://jaxpubliclibrary.org/financiallyfit · December 21 Online submission deadline for Teen Financial Essay Contest, http with nondiscrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital

  12. Duval County Extension Office Program Location: 1010 N McDuff Ave, Jacksonville, FL 32254, unless noted

    E-print Network

    Florida, University of

    - 7:30 pm Register http://jaxpubliclibrary.org/financiallyfit/ Teen Financial Essay Contest Win://jaxpubliclibrary.org/financiallyfit/ · December 21 Online submission deadline for Teen Financial Essay Contest, http with nondiscrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital

  13. Molecular phylogenetics and biogeography of Neotropical piping guans (Aves: Galliformes): Pipile Bonaparte, 1856 is synonym of Aburria Reichenbach, 1853.

    PubMed

    Grau, Erwin T; Pereira, Sérgio Luiz; Silveira, Luís Fábio; Höfling, Elizabeth; Wajntal, Anita

    2005-06-01

    The Cracidae are Neotropical galliform birds with 11 genera currently recognized. To investigate the questioned validity of Pipile Bonaparte, 1856 and the monotypic Aburria Reichenbach, 1853 as separate genera, we gathered data from 2727 bp of mitochondrial DNA (cytochrome b, ND2 and control region) and 151 osteological characters. Our phylogenetic analyses of DNA sequences indicated that Aburria aburri is embedded within Pipile. Also, genetic distances between Aburria and any Pipile species are equivalent to the distances estimated for other congeneric cracid species, which genus status is not doubtful. Although the osteological characters do not have phylogenetic signal to solve the phylogenetic relationships at species level, five synapomorphies were found for Aburria and Pipile. Therefore, we suggest that Pipile should be merged with Aburria, which is the oldest described genus. We estimated that speciation in this group occurred in the Plio-Pleistocene, concordant with other birds, primates and rodents that have similar geographic distribution, and proposed a diversification hypothesis based on the occurrence of sea transgressions and the formation of the Amazon Lagoon. Therefore, we conclude that these palaeogeographic events may have contributed to Neotropical taxa diversification to a greater extent than previously suspected. PMID:15878132

  14. Skrjabinoclava inornatae Wong & Anderson, 1987 (Nematoda: Acuarioidea) as a sporadic parasite of the greater yellowlegs Tringa melanoleuca Gmelin (Aves: Scolopacidae)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. C. Anderson; C. M. Bartlett

    1996-01-01

    Skrjabinoclava inornatae Wong & Anderson, 1987 was found in one of five adult greater yellowlegs Tringa melanoleuca collected near Framboise, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, Canada. This is the first report of a member of the genus in this host. The infection is regarded as sporadic and a further indication that the host distribution of members of Skrjabinoclava may be determined

  15. A new coccidian, Isospora rheae sp. nov. (Apicomplexa, Eimeriidae), from Rhea americana (Aves, Rheidae) from South America

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Samira S.M.; Ederli, Nicole B.; Berto, Bruno P.; de Oliveira, Francisco C.R.

    2014-01-01

    A new species of coccidian (Protozoa: Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) obtained from rheas, Rhea americana, is reported in Brazil. Oocysts of Isospora rheae sp. nov. are spherical to subspheroidal, measuring 22.6?×?21.0?µm, and have a double and smooth wall that is approximately 1.7?µm thick. The micropyle, oocyst residuum and polar granule are absent. Sporocysts are slightly ovoid, measuring 13.9?×?9.6?µm. The Stieda body is flattened, the substieda body is pointed, irregular and wavy and the sporocyst residuum is composed of scattered granules of varying sizes. Sporozoites have an oblong refractile body and one nucleus. This is the first description of an isosporid coccidian infecting birds of the family Rheidae. PMID:25426418

  16. Two new feather mite species (Acari, Pteronyssidae) from the white-barred piculet, Picumnus cirratus (Aves, Piciformes).

    PubMed

    Hernandes, Fabio Akashi

    2012-12-01

    Two new species of the feather mite family Pteronyssidae Oudemans, 1941 are described from the white-barred piculet, Picumnus cirratus Temminck from Brazil: Pterotrogus picumni sp. n. and Ramphastobius scutatus sp. n., representing the first mites described from this host. Pterotrogus picumni sp. n. can be readily distinguished from all previous species of the simplex group by having dorsal crest on femora I and II in both sexes. This is the first representative of the genus Pterotrogus Gaud, 1981 recorded on a host of the genus Picumnus Temminck. Ramphastobius scutatus sp. n. is unique among species of the genus by having in both sexes the prodorsal and scapular shields fused into a single propodonotal shield covering all prodorsum. An updated key to known species of the genus Ramphastobius Gaud, 1981 is presented. PMID:23327012

  17. Uso de gemas de ovos de aves hiperimunizadas contra Escherichia coli suína no controle da diarréia neonatal de leitões

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andréa Machado Leal Ribeiro; Liliane Rudnik; Cláudio Wageck Canal; Lilian Ribeiro Kratz; Carolina Farias

    2005-01-01

    The effect of yolks from birds hipperimmunized birds against Escherichia coli (E. coli) pathogenic for swine on the passive immunity of newborn piglets in a producer unit of piglets was studied. It was evaluated ELISA optical density (OD) of antibodies against E. coli, body weight and the frequency of diarrhea (FcD) in 137 newborn piglets born from 25 primiparous gilts

  18. Comparative chromosome painting between chicken and spectacled owl (Pulsatrix perspicillata): implications for chromosomal evolution in the Strigidae (Aves, Strigiformes).

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, E H C; de Moura, S P; dos Anjos, L J S; Nagamachi, C Y; Pieczarka, J C; O'Brien, P C M; Ferguson-Smith, M A

    2008-01-01

    The spectacled owl (Pulsatrix perspicillata), a species found in the Neotropical region, has 76 chromosomes, with a high number of biarmed chromosomes. In order to define homologies between Gallus gallus and Pulsatrixperspicillata (Strigiformes, Strigidae), we used chromosome painting with chicken DNA probes of chromosomes 1-10 and Z and telomeric sequences. This approach allowed a comparison between Pulsatrixperspicillata and other species of Strigidae already analyzed by chromosome painting (Strix nebulosa and Bubo bubo, both with 2n = 80). The results show that centric fusions and fissions have occurred in different chromosomal pairs and are responsible for the karyotypic variation observed in this group. No interstitial telomeric sequences were found. Although the largest pair of chromosomes in P. perspicillata and Bubo bubo are submetacentric, they are homologous to different chicken chromosomes: GGA1/GGA2 in P. perspicillata and GGA2/GGA4 in B. bubo. PMID:19096211

  19. Comparative chromosome painting between chicken and spectacled owl (Pulsatrix perspicillata): implications for chromosomal evolution in the Strigidae (Aves, Strigiformes)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. H. C. de Oliveira; S. P. de Moura; L. J. S. dos Anjos; C. Y. Nagamachi; J. C. Pieczarka; P. C. M. O´Brien; M. A. Ferguson-Smith

    2008-01-01

    The spectacled owl (Pulsatrix perspicillata), a species found in the Neotropical region, has 76 chromosomes, with a high number of biarmed chromosomes. In order to define homologies between Gallus gallus and Pulsatrixperspicillata (Strigiformes, Strigidae), we used chromosome painting with chicken DNA probes of chromosomes 1–10 and Z and telomeric sequences. This approach allowed a comparison between Pulsatrixperspicillata and other species

  20. A molecular phylogeny of the nightjars (Aves: Caprimulgidae) suggests extensive conservation of primitive morphological traits across multiple lineages.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Carl; Speed, Michael; Harvey, Nicholas; Noyes, Harry A

    2007-03-01

    We report a molecular re-assessment of the classification of the nightjars which draws conclusions that are strongly at odds with the traditional, morphology-based classifications. We used maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods to compare the cytochrome b gene for 14 species from seven of the 15 genera of the Caprimulgidae and partial cytochrome b sequence data was available for a further seven species including three further genera. We found that within the Caprimulgidae there were four geographically isolated clades with bootstrap support greater than 70%. One of these clades contained just Chordeiles species, the remaining three clades each contained a mixture of genera including Caprimulgus sp. A clade of exclusively South American nightjars included the genera Caprimulgus, Uropsalis, Eleopthreptus and Hydropsalis. A clade of African and Eurasian birds included Caprimulgus and Macrodipteryx. Phalaenoptilus nuttallii and Caprimulgus vociferous formed a clade of North American birds. Two ecological factors appear to make morphological classification potentially misleading: first, the apparent retention of primitive anti-predator and foraging-related traits across genetically divergent groups; second, rapid divergence in other traits, especially those related to mating, which generate high levels of morphological divergence between species that are genetically very similar. The cytochrome b data suggests that the genus Caprimulgus is not monophyletic and is restricted to Africa and Eurasia and that Caprimulgus species from outside this area have been misclassified as a consequence of retention of primitive adaptations for crepuscular/nocturnal living. Some other genera also appear to have little support from the cytochrome b data. PMID:17123840

  1. Characterization of chromosome structures of Falconinae (Falconidae, Falconiformes, Aves) by chromosome painting and delineation of chromosome rearrangements during their differentiation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chizuko Nishida; Junko Ishijima; Ayumi Kosaka; Hideyuki Tanabe; Felix A. Habermann; Darren K. Griffin; Yoichi Matsuda

    2008-01-01

    Karyotypes of most bird species are characterized by around 2n = 80 chromosomes, comprising 7–10 pairs of large- and medium-sized\\u000a macrochromosomes including sex chromosomes and numerous morphologically indistinguishable microchromosomes. The Falconinae\\u000a of the Falconiformes has a different karyotype from the typical avian karyotype in low chromosome numbers, little size difference\\u000a between macrochromosomes and a smaller number of microchromosomes. To characterize

  2. New records and descriptions of digeneans from the Magellanic penguin Spheniscus magellanicus (Forster) (Aves: Sphenisciformes) on the coast of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Martha; Luque, José L; Scholz, Tomáš; Kostadinova, Aneta

    2013-05-01

    Five species of digeneans parasitic in the Magellanic penguin Spheniscus magellanicus (Forster) from off the Brazilian coast of the western Atlantic are reported for the first time from this host and described. These are Mesostephanus odhneri (Travassos, 1924) Lutz, 1935, Posthodiplostomum macrocotyle Dubois, 1937, Stephanoprora uruguayensis Holcman-Spector & Olagüe, 1989, Ascocotyle (Phagicola) longa Ransom, 1920 and Ascocotyle (Phagicola) sp. One other digenean, Cardiocephaloides physalis (Lutz, 1926) Sudarikov, 1959, was also recorded. The taxonomy of the species and available data on their life-cycles are commented upon in relation to the possible origins of digenean infections of the Magellanic penguin. PMID:23595494

  3. 5841 S. Maryland Ave., Rm. L035, MC 0077, Chicago, Illinois 60637 Toll Free: (888) UC GENES (888) 824 3637

    E-print Network

    Das, Soma

    , fused ribs, and abnormal nails. Typical facial features include a large head size (macrocephaly), broad forehead, eyes that are far apart (hypertelorism), small short nose, small chin, and low-set ears. Some

  4. Blood vessels and the occurrence of arteriovenous anastomoses in cephalic heat loss areas of mallards, Anas platyrhynchos (Aves)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Uffe Midtgård

    1984-01-01

    1. The blood supply to cephalic heat loss areas (nasal and oropharyngeal mucosa, bill, eyelids) was studied in mallards by using plastic corrosion casts. The structure and organization of the blood vessels, as well as the occurrence of arteriovenous anastomoses (AVAs), were examined by scanning electron microscopy of vascular casts and by paraffin sections.

  5. Corresp. Author: Matthew Goupell, University of Wisconsin Madison, 565 Waisman Center, 1500 Highland Ave, Madison, Wisconsin. Conference on

    E-print Network

    Litovsky, Ruth

    front-back discrimination (see poster C39). To localize sounds in vertical planes, the identification-Vocoded Stimuli in the Median Plane Matthew J. Goupell1,2 , Bernhard Laback1 , and Piotr Majdak1 1) Acoustics of responses with polar response angle greater than ±90° from polar target angle Polar error: root

  6. New species of the feather mite genus Protolichus Trouessart, 1884 (Astigmata, Pterolichidae) from lories and lorikeets (Aves: Psittaciformes).

    PubMed

    Mironov, Sergey V; Ehrnsberger, Rainer; Dabert, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Five new species of the feather mite genus Protolichus Trouessart, 1884 (Astigmata, Pterolichidae) are described from parrots of the subfamily Loriinae (Psittaciformes: Psittacidae): Protolichus ornatus sp. n. from Trichoglossus ornatus (Linnaeus, 1758), P. lorinus sp. n. from Lorius lory (Linnaeus, 1758), P. placentis sp. n. from Charmosyna placentis (Temminck, 1835), P. pulchellae sp. n. from C. pulchella (Gray GR, 1859), and P. rubiginosus sp. n. from T. rubiginosus (Bonaparte, 1850). Protolichus ornatus belongs to the brachiatus species group; the other new species belong to the crassior species group. PMID:24871411

  7. Losses of mammals (Mammalia) and birds (Aves) on roads in the Slovak part of the Danube Basin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Hell; R. Plavý; J. Slame?ka; J. Gašparík

    2005-01-01

    Mortality of mammals and birds due to traffic accidents was monitored in the Slovak part of the Danube Basin from September 2000 to December 2002. Monitored road length was 32 km. The route was inspected by vehicle or on foot 709 times (total of 22,677 km inspected). A total of 3,009 animal carcasses were found. Of these, 45.5% were mammals and 54.5%

  8. Diversidad de aves y mamíferos en zonas donde anida Rhynchopsitta pachyrhyncha, en el municipio de Madera, Chihuahua, México

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marco A. Sánchez-Mateo; Ricardo Soto Cruz; Toucha Lebgue Keleng

    The diversity of birds and mammals species was determined in the nesting area of the Tick Billed Parrot (Rynchopsitta Pachyrhyncha) in the Sierra Madre Occidental in the public land El Ejido 5 millas or Santuario Madera, near Ciudad Madera, Chihuahua, from the middle of the month of July until the beginnings of September 2006. We used Sherman traps, and direct

  9. Phylogenetic Analysis of Pelecaniformes (Aves) Based on Osteological Data: Implications for Waterbird Phylogeny and Fossil Calibration Studies

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Nathan D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Debate regarding the monophyly and relationships of the avian order Pelecaniformes represents a classic example of discord between morphological and molecular estimates of phylogeny. This lack of consensus hampers interpretation of the group's fossil record, which has major implications for understanding patterns of character evolution (e.g., the evolution of wing-propelled diving) and temporal diversification (e.g., the origins of modern families). Relationships of the Pelecaniformes were inferred through parsimony analyses of an osteological dataset encompassing 59 taxa and 464 characters. The relationships of the Plotopteridae, an extinct family of wing-propelled divers, and several other fossil pelecaniforms (Limnofregata, Prophaethon, Lithoptila, ?Borvocarbo stoeffelensis) were also assessed. The antiquity of these taxa and their purported status as stem members of extant families makes them valuable for studies of higher-level avian diversification. Methodology/Principal Findings Pelecaniform monophyly is not recovered, with Phaethontidae recovered as distantly related to all other pelecaniforms, which are supported as a monophyletic Steganopodes. Some anatomical partitions of the dataset possess different phylogenetic signals, and partitioned analyses reveal that these discrepancies are localized outside of Steganopodes, and primarily due to a few labile taxa. The Plotopteridae are recovered as the sister taxon to Phalacrocoracoidea, and the relationships of other fossil pelecaniforms representing key calibration points are well supported, including Limnofregata (sister taxon to Fregatidae), Prophaethon and Lithoptila (successive sister taxa to Phaethontidae), and ?Borvocarbo stoeffelensis (sister taxon to Phalacrocoracidae). These relationships are invariant when ‘backbone’ constraints based on recent avian phylogenies are imposed. Conclusions/Significance Relationships of extant pelecaniforms inferred from morphology are more congruent with molecular phylogenies than previously assumed, though notable conflicts remain. The phylogenetic position of the Plotopteridae implies that wing-propelled diving evolved independently in plotopterids and penguins, representing a remarkable case of convergent evolution. Despite robust support for the placement of fossil taxa representing key calibration points, the successive outgroup relationships of several “stem fossil + crown family” clades are variable and poorly supported across recent studies of avian phylogeny. Thus, the impact these fossils have on inferred patterns of temporal diversification depends heavily on the resolution of deep nodes in avian phylogeny. PMID:20976229

  10. NUEVOS REGISTROS DE AVES EN LA PARTE ALTA DE LA SERRANA DE LAS QUINCHAS, MAGDALENA MEDIO, COLOMBIA

    E-print Network

    Cuervo, Andrés

    mexicanus, Cyphorhinus phaeocephalus, Coryphospingus pileatus y Cacicus cela. Adicionalmente registramos: Herpetotheres cachinnans, Chaetura brachyura, Dryocopus lineatus y Myrmeciza laemosticta; y conrmamos la, Cyphorhinus phaeocephalus, Coryphospingus pileatus and Cacicus cela. In addition, we reported four species

  11. ORIENTAO PARA COLETA, PREPARO E TRANSPORTE DE TECIDOS DE AVES PARA COLEES (utilizao potencial em sistemtica molecular)

    E-print Network

    Eizirik, Eduardo

    em sistemática molecular) (versão 0.9) Helena Mata helenamata@pucrs.br [Dr. Sandro L. Bonatto pesquisas em colaboração com o Dr. Sandro L. Bonatto no Centro de Biologia Genômica e Molecular da PUCRS. Qualquer dúvida entre em contato nos endereços acima. Os tubos e o etanol podem ser requisitados ao Dr

  12. Testosterone affects reproductive success by influencing extra-pair fertilizations in male dark-eyed juncos (Aves: Junco hyemalis)

    PubMed Central

    Raouf, S. A.; Parker, P. G.; Ketterson, E. D.; Jr, V. Nolan; Ziegenfus, C.

    1997-01-01

    Monogamous male birds typically allocate less effort to courtship and more to parental behaviour than males of polygynous species. The seasonal pattern of testosterone (T) secretion varies accordingly. Monogamous males exhibit a spring peak in plasma T followed by lower levels during the parental phase, while males of polygynous species continue to court females and maintain T at higher levels. To determine whether testosterone underlies the trade-off between mating and parental effort, we treated male dark-eyed juncos (Junco hyemalis) with exogenous T and compared the reproductive success (RS) of T-treated males (T-males) to that of controls. T-males had lower apparent annual RS than controls, probably because elevated T reduced parental care. Nevertheless, annual genetic RS of the treatment groups was similar because (i) T-males suffered fewer losses in genetic RS due to extra-pair fertilizations (EPFs), and (ii) T-males gained more genetic RS through their own EPFs. This is the first hormonal manipulation of an avian phenotype shown to have influenced male RS through EPFs. Together with other studies, it suggests that testosterone may have mediated the evolution of inter- and intraspecific differences in allocation of reproductive effort to mate attraction and parental care.

  13. Anna G. Stefanopoulou Mechanical Engineering Dept, University of Michigan, 1231 Beal Ave, Ann Arbor MI 48109-2121

    E-print Network

    Stefanopoulou, Anna

    Science, University of Michigan, 1994. M.S. Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering, University of Michigan, 1992 Diploma Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering, National Technical University of Athens

  14. Polyphyly of the hawk genera Leucopternis and Buteogallus (Aves, Accipitridae): multiple habitat shifts during the Neotropical buteonine diversification

    PubMed Central

    do Amaral, Fabio S Raposo; Miller, Matthew J; Silveira, Luís Fábio; Bermingham, Eldredge; Wajntal, Anita

    2006-01-01

    Background The family Accipitridae (hawks, eagles and Old World vultures) represents a large radiation of predatory birds with an almost global distribution, although most species of this family occur in the Neotropics. Despite great morphological and ecological diversity, the evolutionary relationships in the family have been poorly explored at all taxonomic levels. Using sequences from four mitochondrial genes (12S, ATP8, ATP6, and ND6), we reconstructed the phylogeny of the Neotropical forest hawk genus Leucopternis and most of the allied genera of Neotropical buteonines. Our goals were to infer the evolutionary relationships among species of Leucopternis, estimate their relationships to other buteonine genera, evaluate the phylogenetic significance of the white and black plumage patterns common to most Leucopternis species, and assess general patterns of diversification of the group with respect to species' affiliations with Neotropical regions and habitats. Results Our molecular phylogeny for the genus Leucopternis and its allies disagrees sharply with traditional taxonomic arrangements for the group, and we present new hypotheses of relationships for a number of species. The mtDNA phylogenetic trees derived from analysis of the combined data posit a polyphyletic relationship among species of Leucopternis, Buteogallus and Buteo. Three highly supported clades containing Leucopternis species were recovered in our phylogenetic reconstructions. The first clade consisted of the sister pairs L. lacernulatus and Buteogallus meridionalis, and Buteogallus urubitinga and Harpyhaliaetus coronatus, in addition to L. schistaceus and L. plumbeus. The second clade included the sister pair Leucopternis albicollis and L. occidentalis as well as L. polionotus. The third lineage comprised the sister pair L. melanops and L. kuhli, in addition to L. semiplumbeus and Buteo buteo. According to our results, the white and black plumage patterns have evolved at least twice in the group. Furthermore, species found to the east and west of the Andes (cis-Andean and trans-Andean, respectively) are not reciprocally monophyletic, nor are forest and non-forest species. Conclusion The polyphyly of Leucopternis, Buteogallus and Buteo establishes a lack of concordance of current Accipitridae taxonomy with the mtDNA phylogeny for the group, and points to the need for further phylogenetic analysis at all taxonomic levels in the family as also suggested by other recent analyses. Habitat shifts, as well as cis- and trans-Andean disjunctions, took place more than once during buteonine diversification in the Neotropical region. Overemphasis of the black and white plumage patterns has led to questionable conclusions regarding the relationships of Leucopternis species, and suggests more generally that plumage characters should be used with considerable caution in the taxonomic evaluation of the Accipitridae. PMID:16464261

  15. Polyphyly of the hawk genera Leucopternis and Buteogallus (Aves, Accipitridae): multiple habitat shifts during the Neotropical buteonine diversification

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fabio S Raposo do Amaral; Matthew J Miller; Luís Fábio Silveira; Eldredge Bermingham; Anita Wajntal

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The family Accipitridae (hawks, eagles and Old World vultures) represents a large radiation of predatory birds with an almost global distribution, although most species of this family occur in the Neotropics. Despite great morphological and ecological diversity, the evolutionary relationships in the family have been poorly explored at all taxonomic levels. Using sequences from four mitochondrial genes (12S, ATP8,

  16. Laura J. Rooney, PhD, MS 1930 N. Cambridge Ave laura_j_rooney@yahoo.com

    E-print Network

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    for a diverse population of students in an urban campus environment; Participating in campus-wide health management, sexual and reproductive health and disease prevention and management. Examples include managing-318-4916 April 11, 2014 Sarah Van Orman, MD Executive Director, University Health Services University

  17. Characterization of the transcriptome of an ecologically important avian species, the Vinous-throated Parrotbill Paradoxornis webbianus bulomachus (Paradoxornithidae; Aves)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Adaptive divergence driven by environmental heterogeneity has long been a fascinating topic in ecology and evolutionary biology. The study of the genetic basis of adaptive divergence has, however, been greatly hampered by a lack of genomic information. The recent development of transcriptome sequencing provides an unprecedented opportunity to generate large amounts of genomic data for detailed investigations of the genetics of adaptive divergence in non-model organisms. Herein, we used the Illumina sequencing platform to sequence the transcriptome of brain and liver tissues from a single individual of the Vinous-throated Parrotbill, Paradoxornis webbianus bulomachus, an ecologically important avian species in Taiwan with a wide elevational range of sea level to 3100 m. Results Our 10.1 Gbp of sequences were first assembled based on Zebra Finch (Taeniopygia guttata) and chicken (Gallus gallus) RNA references. The remaining reads were then de novo assembled. After filtering out contigs with low coverage (<10X), we retained 67,791 of 487,336 contigs, which covered approximately 5.3% of the P. w. bulomachus genome. Of 7,779 contigs retained for a top-hit species distribution analysis, the majority (about 86%) were matched to known Zebra Finch and chicken transcripts. We also annotated 6,365 contigs to gene ontology (GO) terms: in total, 122 GO-slim terms were assigned, including biological process (41%), molecular function (32%), and cellular component (27%). Many potential genetic markers for future adaptive genomic studies were also identified: 8,589 single nucleotide polymorphisms, 1,344 simple sequence repeats and 109 candidate genes that might be involved in elevational or climate adaptation. Conclusions Our study shows that transcriptome data can serve as a rich genetic resource, even for a single run of short-read sequencing from a single individual of a non-model species. This is the first study providing transcriptomic information for species in the avian superfamily Sylvioidea, which comprises more than 1,000 species. Our data can be used to study adaptive divergence in heterogeneous environments and investigate other important ecological and evolutionary questions in parrotbills from different populations and even in other species in the Sylvioidea. PMID:22530590

  18. Richard J. Wurtman, MD Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, 77Mass Ave.,

    E-print Network

    Wurtman, Richard

    synaptogenesis is maximal, relatively large amounts of all three nutrients are provided in bioavailable forms (e levels enough to promote optimal synaptogenesis. In Alzheimer's disease (AD) the need for extra

  19. The Lanius excubitor (Aves, Passeriformes) conundrum--Taxonomic dilemma when molecular and non-molecular data tell different stories.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Urban; Alström, Per; Svensson, Lars; Aliabadian, Mansour; Sundberg, Per

    2010-05-01

    The phylogeny of 18 taxa in the Lanius excubitor complex, and the related species L. sphenocercus, L. ludovicianus and L. somalicus, was estimated based on the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene and the non-coding D-loop (in total approximately 1.3 kb). According to the mitochondrial gene tree, Lanius excubitor s.l. is non-monophyletic, with some of its subspecies being more closely related to L. sphenocercus, L. ludovicianus, and L. somalicus. Also the division of the L. excubitor complex into a northern (L. excubitor) and a southern (L. meridionalis) species, as has been proposed based on morphological and ecological similarity and geographical distributions, is not compatible with the mitochondrial tree. Overall, genetic divergences among the ingroup taxa are small, indicating a recent radiation. A tree based on the nuclear ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) introns 6-7 is unresolved with respect to the ingroup, but provides strong support for a clade containing the Lanius excubitor complex, L. sphenocercus, L. ludovicianus and L. somalicus. We discuss the incongruence between the current taxonomy and the mitochondrial gene tree, and conclude that based on the latter the Lanius excubitor complex may be treated as at least six species, L. borealis, L. elegans, L. excubitor, L. lahtora, L. meridionalis, and L. uncinatus, but that other taxonomic treatments are also possible. However, uncertainty regarding to which extent the mitochondrial gene tree reflects the species phylogeny prevents us from recommending taxonomic change without further investigation. This study highlights the possible danger of relying on a single molecular marker, such as mitochondrial DNA, in taxonomic revisions and phylogenetic inference. PMID:19925872

  20. The Lanius excubitor (Aves, Passeriformes) conundrum—Taxonomic dilemma when molecular and non-molecular data tell different stories

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Urban Olsson; Per Alström; Lars Svensson; Mansour Aliabadian; Per Sundberg

    2010-01-01

    The phylogeny of 18 taxa in the Lanius excubitor complex, and the related species L. sphenocercus, L. ludovicianus and L. somalicus, was estimated based on the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene and the non-coding D-loop (in total ?1.3kb). According to the mitochondrial gene tree, Lanius excubitor s.l. is non-monophyletic, with some of its subspecies being more closely related to L. sphenocercus,

  1. A Late Miocene Accipitrid (Aves: Accipitriformes) from Nebraska and Its Implications for the Divergence of Old World Vultures

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zihui; Feduccia, Alan; James, Helen F.

    2012-01-01

    Background Old World vultures are likely polyphyletic, representing two subfamilies, the Aegypiinae and Gypaetinae, and some genera of the latter may be of independent origin. Evidence concerning the origin, as well as the timing of the divergence of each subfamily and even genera of the Gypaetinae has been elusive. Methodology/Principal Findings Compared with the Old World, the New World has an unexpectedly diverse and rich fossil component of Old World vultures. Here we describe a new accipitriform bird, Anchigyps voorhiesi gen. et sp. nov., from the Ash Hollow Formation (Upper Clarendonian, Late Miocene) of Nebraska. It represents a form close in morphology to the Old World vultures. Characteristics of its wing bones suggest it was less specialized for soaring than modern vultures. It was likely an opportunistic predator or scavenger having a grasping foot and a mandible morphologically similar to modern carrion-feeding birds. Conclusions/Significance The new fossil reported here is intermediate in morphology between the bulk of accipitrids and the Old World gypaetine vultures, representing a basal lineage of Accipitridae trending towards the vulturine habit, and of its Late Miocene age suggests the divergence of true gypaetine vultures, may have occurred during or slightly before the Miocene. PMID:23152811

  2. New information on the anatomy of the Chinese Early Cretaceous Bohaiornithidae (Aves: Enantiornithes) from a subadult specimen of Zhouornis hani

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuguang; O’Connor, Jingmai; Di, Liu; Qingjin, Meng; Sigurdsen, Trond

    2014-01-01

    Enantiornithines are the most diverse avian clade in the Cretaceous. However, morphological specializations indicative of specific ecological roles are not well known for this clade. Here we report on an exquisitely well-preserved specimen from the Lower Cretaceous Jehol Group of northeastern China, which pedal morphology is suggestive of a unique ecological specialization within Enantiornithes. The morphology of the new specimen is largely indistinguishable from that of the holotype of the bohaiornithid enantiornithine Zhouornis hani, albeit the latter is somewhat larger. The new specimen provides important and previously unknown details of the skull of Zhouornis hani, which add to the limited knowledge about the cranial anatomy and evolution of enantiornithines. The information offered by the new specimen also augments our understanding of the postcranial morphology of bohaiornithid enantiornithines, a clade that has been only recently recognized. With the description of this specimen, Zhouornis hani becomes one of the most anatomically complete known enantiornithine species, which will facilitate future morphological studies. PMID:24918031

  3. Distribución de aves acuáticas en las lagunas de oxidación de la ciudad de La Paz, Baja California Sur, México

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elvia Margarita Zamora-Orozco; Roberto Carmona; Georgina Brabata

    2007-01-01

    Distribution of aquatic birds in oxidation lagoons of La Paz city in South Baja California, Mexico. Taxonomic composition, spatial and temporal distribution of aquatic birds in oxidation lagoons ( LO) of La Paz city in south Baja California, Mexico, were determined during 24 censuses realized in two-week intervals (April\\/98-March\\/99). There are five lagoons of 5 Ha each and 17 ha

  4. RIQUEZA Y DIVERSIDAD DE ESPECIES DE AVES EN UNA SELVA MEDIANA SUBPERENNIFOLIA EN EL CENTRO DE VERACRUZ, MÉXICO

    Microsoft Academic Search

    José Cruz; BOJORGES BAÑOS; Lauro LÓPEZ-MATA

    We report the richness and diversity of bird species in three different areas (pasture, regenerating forest and mature forest) in Semievergreen forest from central Veracruz, Mexico. Out of the 171 bird species observed, 45% are abundant, 35% are scarce, and 35% rare; 112 species are permanent residents and 59 migratory species. In the regenerating forest 126 species were observed, as

  5. DNA evidence for a Paleocene origin of the Alcidae (Aves: Charadriiformes) in the Pacific and multiple dispersals across northern oceans.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Sergio L; Baker, Allan J

    2008-02-01

    The Alcidae is a group of marine, wing-propelled diving birds known as auks that are distributed along the coasts of the northern oceans. It has been suggested that auks originated in the Pacific coastal shores as early as the Miocene, and dispersed to the Atlantic either through the Arctic coasts of Eurasia and North America (northern dispersal route), or through upwelling zones in the coastal areas of California to Florida (southern dispersal route), before the closure of the Isthmus of Panama in the Pliocene. These hypotheses have not been tested formally because proposed phylogenies failed to recover fully bifurcating, well-supported phylogenetic relationships among and within genera. We therefore constructed a large data set of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences for 21 of the 23 species of extant auks. We also included sequences from two other extant and one extinct species retrieved from GenBank. Our analyses recovered a well-supported phylogenetic hypothesis among and within genera. Aethia is the only genus for which we could not obtain strong support for species relationships, probably due to incomplete lineage sorting. By applying a Bayesian method of molecular dating that allows for rate variation across lineages and genes, we showed that auks became an independent lineage in the Early Paleocene and radiated gradually from the Early Eocene to the Quaternary. Reconstruction of ancestral areas strongly suggests that auks originated in the Pacific during the Paleocene. The southern dispersal route seems to have favored the subsequent colonization of the northern Atlantic Ocean during the Eocene and Oligocene. The northern route across the Arctic Ocean was probably only used more recently after the opening of the Norwegian Sea in the Middle Miocene and the opening of the Bering Strait in the Late Miocene. We postulate that the ancestors of auks lived in a warmer world than that currently occupied by auks, and became gradually adapted to feeding in cool marine currents with high biomass productivity. Hence, warmer tropical waters are now a barrier for the dispersal of auks into the Southern Hemisphere, as it is for penguins in the opposite direction. PMID:18178108

  6. Duval County Extension Office Program Location: 1010 N McDuff Ave, Jacksonville, FL 32254, unless noted

    E-print Network

    Watson, Craig A.

    Health & Nutrition Promises November 1, 12:30 - 1:30 pm Register: http://bit.ly/FHCCost 5 Simple Steps to Seasonal Savings November 13, 12:30 - 1:30 pm Register: http://bit.ly/ssss2103 What's Your Money 904-255-7450 Educational program areas: Family Life Education Money Management Nutrition, Health

  7. FIRST RECORD OF ALCATAENIA LARINA LARINA (CESTODA: DILEPIDIDAE) IN ATLANTIC PUFFINS (AVES, ALCIDAE, FRATERCULA ARCTICA) FROM NEWFOUNDLAND, CANADA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The tapeworm Alcataenia larina (Cestoda: Cyclophyllidea: Dilepididae) is a parasite of gulls (Laridae) with a Holarctic distribution. Two subspecies A. l. pacifica and A. l. larina are recognized, with the former occurring in the North Pacific basin and the latter in the North Atlantic. Alcids serve...

  8. Evolution of sexual size dimorphism in grouse and allies (Aves: Phasianidae) in relation to mating competition, fecundity

    E-print Network

    Figuerola, Jordi

    differential strength and / or direction of selection pressures acting on male and female body sizes (reviewed L O G Y 1895 Keywords: clutch size; egg size; fecundity; lek polygyny; niche segregation; Rensch between SSD and male display agility, nor did resource division influence SSD. Although clutch mass

  9. A distinctive new subspecies of Scytalopusgriseicollis (Aves, Passeriformes, Rhinocryptidae) from the northern Eastern Cordillera of Colombia and Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Avendaño, Jorge Enrique; Donegan, Thomas M

    2015-01-01

    We describe a new subspecies of Pale-bellied Tapaculo Scytalopusgriseicollis from the northern Eastern Cordillera of Colombia and Venezuela. This form differs diagnosably in plumage from described subspecies Scytalopusgriseicollisgriseicollis and Scytalopusgriseicollisgilesi and from the latter in tail length. It is also differentiated non-diagnosably in voice from both these populations. Ecological niche modelling analysis suggests that the new subspecies is restricted to the Andean montane forest and páramo north of both the arid Chicamocha valley and the Sierra Nevada del Cocuy. PMID:26085800

  10. A new genus and two new species of feather lice (Phthiraptera: Ischnocera: Philopteridae) from New Zealand endemic passerines (Aves: Passeriformes).

    PubMed

    Valim, Michel P; Palma, Ricardo L

    2015-01-01

    The first descriptions of New Zealand endemic feather lice belonging to the Brueelia-complex (Phthiraptera: Ischnocera: Philopteridae) are given. The new genus Melibrueelia and new species M. novaeseelandiae are described, illustrated and compared with morphologically close taxa within the complex. The type host of M. novaeseelandiae is the tui, Prosthemadera novaeseelandiae (Gmelin, 1788), and an additional host is the bellbird, Anthornis melanura (Sparrman, 1786) (Passeriformes: Meliphagidae), both endemic to New Zealand. Also, the new species Brueelia callaeincola is described and illustrated from four endemic bird species belonging to two endemic genera and an endemic family: Philesturnus carunculatus (Gmelin, 1789) (the type host), Ph. rufusater (Lesson, 1828), Callaeas cinerea (Gmelin, 1788) and C. wilsoni (Bonaparte, 1851) (Passeriformes: Callaeidae). Brief discussions on possible evolutionary histories of the new taxa are included. PMID:25781798

  11. Calamicoptes anatidus sp. nov., a new quill wall mite (Acari: Laminosioptidae) from the Greater Scaup Aythya marila (L.) (Aves: Anseriformes).

    PubMed

    Skoracki, Maciej; Kavetska, Katarzyna; Ozminski, Micha?; Zawierucha, Krzysztof

    2014-09-01

    Calamicoptes anatidus sp. nov., a new species of rarely found parasitic mites of the family Laminosioptidae (Acari: Astigmata) is described from quill walls of wing covert feathers of Aythya marila Linnaeus (Anseriformes: Anatidae) captured in Poland. This is the first record of the family Laminosioptidae on birds of the order Anseriformes and the first record of this mite family in the fauna of Poland. Females of the new species are most similar to those of C. arenariae Lombert, Gaud et Lukoschus, 1984 and differ from them by the presence of the pygidial shield, which covers dorsal and ventro-lateral parts of the opisthosoma, and by having setae c2 and d2 short and subequal in length, and setae se and cp not reaching the metapodonotal shield. PMID:25119356

  12. Extraordinary MHC class II B diversity in a non-passerine, wild bird: the Eurasian Coot Fulica atra (Aves: Rallidae)

    PubMed Central

    Alcaide, Miguel; Muñoz, Joaquin; Martínez-de la Puente, Josué; Soriguer, Ramón; Figuerola, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) hosts the most polymorphic genes ever described in vertebrates. The MHC triggers the adaptive branch of the immune response, and its extraordinary variability is considered an evolutionary consequence of pathogen pressure. The last few years have witnessed the characterization of the MHC multigene family in a large diversity of bird species, unraveling important differences in its polymorphism, complexity, and evolution. Here, we characterize the first MHC class II B sequences isolated from a Rallidae species, the Eurasian Coot Fulica atra. A next-generation sequencing approach revealed up to 265 alleles that translated into 251 different amino acid sequences (? chain, exon 2) in 902 individuals. Bayesian inference identified up to 19 codons within the presumptive peptide-binding region showing pervasive evidence of positive, diversifying selection. Our analyses also detected a significant excess of high-frequency segregating sites (average Tajima's D = 2.36, P < 0.05), indicative of balancing selection. We found one to six different alleles per individual, consistent with the occurrence of at least three MHC class II B gene duplicates. However, the genotypes comprised of three alleles were by far the most abundant in the population investigated (49.4%), followed by those with two (29.6%) and four (17.5%) alleles. We suggest that these proportions are in agreement with the segregation of MHC haplotypes differing in gene copy number. The most widespread segregating haplotypes, according to our findings, would contain one single gene or two genes. The MHC class II of the Eurasian Coot is a valuable system to investigate the evolutionary implications of gene copy variation and extensive variability, the greatest ever found, to the best of our knowledge, in a wild population of a non-passerine bird. PMID:24683452

  13. DENSITY AND BREEDING BIOLOGY OF THE BARN OWL TYTO ALBA (AVES, TYTONIDAE) ON THE TROPICAL ISLAND OF MAYOTTE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JAN STEVENS; MICHEL LOUETTE; MARC HERREMANS

    1999-01-01

    Tyto alba is widely distributed on Mayotte, an island group of 374 km 2 in the Comoro archipelago. The species was studied in August 1996 (dry season) and December 1997\\/January 1998 (wet season). Territorial response was high in December\\/January, and there were fledged young in August, indicating that breeding starts in the wet season and young fledge during the dry

  14. Testing founder effect speciation: Divergence population genetics of the Spoonbills Platalea regia and Pl. minor (Threskiornithidae, Aves)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yeung, Carol K.L.; Tsai, Pi-Wen; Chesser, R. Terry; Lin, Rong-Chien; Yao, Cheng-Te; Tian, Xiu-Hua; Li, Shou-Hsien

    2011-01-01

    Although founder effect speciation has been a popular theoretical model for the speciation of geographically isolated taxa, its empirical importance has remained difficult to evaluate due to the intractability of past demography, which in a founder effect speciation scenario would involve a speciational bottleneck in the emergent species and the complete cessation of gene flow following divergence. Using regression-weighted approximate Bayesian computation, we tested the validity of these two fundamental conditions of founder effect speciation in a pair of sister species with disjunct distributions: the royal spoonbill Platalea regia in Australasia and the black-faced spoonbill Pl. minor in eastern Asia. When compared with genetic polymorphism observed at 20 nuclear loci in the two species, simulations showed that the founder effect speciation model had an extremely low posterior probability (1.55 × 10-8) of producing the extant genetic pattern. In contrast, speciation models that allowed for postdivergence gene flow were much more probable (posterior probabilities were 0.37 and 0.50 for the bottleneck with gene flow and the gene flow models, respectively) and postdivergence gene flow persisted for a considerable period of time (more than 80% of the divergence history in both models) following initial divergence (median = 197,000 generations, 95% credible interval [CI]: 50,000-478,000, for the bottleneck with gene flow model; and 186,000 generations, 95% CI: 45,000-477,000, for the gene flow model). Furthermore, the estimated population size reduction in Pl. regia to 7,000 individuals (median, 95% CI: 487-12,000, according to the bottleneck with gene flow model) was unlikely to have been severe enough to be considered a bottleneck. Therefore, these results do not support founder effect speciation in Pl. regia but indicate instead that the divergence between Pl. regia and Pl. minor was probably driven by selection despite continuous gene flow. In this light, we discuss the potential importance of evolutionarily labile traits with significant fitness consequences, such as migratory behavior and habitat preference, in facilitating divergence of the spoonbills.

  15. Rallinyssus sorae sp. n. (Acari: Dermanyssidae: rhinonyssinae) from the nasal passages of the sora, Porzana carolina (Aves: Rallidae).

    PubMed

    Pence, D B; Young, V E

    1979-10-01

    Rallinyssus sorae sp. n. is described from the nasal turbinates of the sora, Porzana carolina, collected in Maryland and Ohio. The new species is most similar to Rallinyssus verheyeni Fain but differs in number of setae on the female ventral opisthosoma, structure of the fixed and movable digits of the male and female chelicerae, chaetotaxy of legs I to IV, and presence of a sternal plate in the male. The taxonomy and host-parasite relationships of the various species of Rallinyssus are discussed. PMID:512771

  16. Extreme axial equalization and wide distribution of recombination nodules in the primitive ZW pair of Rhea americana (Aves, Ratitae)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. I. Pigozzi; A. J. Solari

    1997-01-01

    Pachytene oocytes from the ratite bird Rhea americana were used for synaptonemal complex analysis with a surface spreading technique and phosphotungstic acid staining. The ZW bivalent is slightly smaller than the fourth autosomal bivalent and clearly shows unequal W and Z axes only in 27% of the bivalents. Most of the ZW pairs are completely adjusted and thus the W

  17. Reconstruction and in vivo analysis of the extinct tbx5 gene from ancient wingless moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The forelimb-specific gene tbx5 is highly conserved and essential for the development of forelimbs in zebrafish, mice, and humans. Amongst birds, a single order, Dinornithiformes, comprising the extinct wingless moa of New Zealand, are unique in having no skeletal evidence of forelimb-like structures. Results To determine the sequence of tbx5 in moa, we used a range of PCR-based techniques on ancient DNA to retrieve all nine tbx5 exons and splice sites from the giant moa, Dinornis. Moa Tbx5 is identical to chicken Tbx5 in being able to activate the downstream promotors of fgf10 and ANF. In addition we show that missexpression of moa tbx5 in the hindlimb of chicken embryos results in the formation of forelimb features, suggesting that Tbx5 was fully functional in wingless moa. An alternatively spliced exon 1 for tbx5 that is expressed specifically in the forelimb region was shown to be almost identical between moa and ostrich, suggesting that, as well as being fully functional, tbx5 is likely to have been expressed normally in moa since divergence from their flighted ancestors, approximately 60 mya. Conclusions The results suggests that, as in mice, moa tbx5 is necessary for the induction of forelimbs, but is not sufficient for their outgrowth. Moa Tbx5 may have played an important role in the development of moa’s remnant forelimb girdle, and may be required for the formation of this structure. Our results further show that genetic changes affecting genes other than tbx5 must be responsible for the complete loss of forelimbs in moa. PMID:24885927

  18. Functional-morphological and biochemical correlations of the keratinized structures in the African Grey Parrot, Psittacus erithacus (Aves)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dominique G. Homberger; Alan H. Brush

    1986-01-01

    Keratinized structures from the African Grey Parrot (feather, down, claw, scale, rhamphotheca, soft lingual epithelium, and lingual nail) were compard by combining biochemical and functional-morphological approaches. At the molecular level, the keratinized structures of Psittacus erithacus are organized essentially like those of other avian species. Correlations were established (or verified) between the mechanical properties of the tissues and the molecular

  19. A new large barn owl (Aves, Strigiformes, Tytonidae) from the Middle Pleistocene of Sicily, Italy, and its taphonomical significance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marco Pavia

    2004-01-01

    A new species of Tytonidae, Tyto mourerchauvireae, is described from the Sicilian cave deposits of Spinagallo, Luparello and Marasà, which have yielded a common vertebrate fossil assemblages referred to the early Middle Pleistocene. T. mourerchauvireae nov. sp. shows a pronounced increase in body size compared to other congeneric taxa. It is larger than the extant Tyto alba and the extinct

  20. The first fossil owls (Aves: Strigiformes) from the Paleogene of Asia and a review of the fossil record of Strigiformes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. N. Kurochkin; G. J. Dyke

    2011-01-01

    The fossil record of owls (Strigiformes) is one of the most extensive among the neornithine birds, yet at the same time largely\\u000a restricted geographically to Europe and North America. Various fossil owls are known from the Paleocene (ca. 60 Ma) to Recent.\\u000a Here we present the first taxonomic description of new species of Paleogene owls from Asia, two new taxa

  1. A small loon and a new species of large owl from the Rupelian of Belgium (Aves: Gaviiformes, Strigiformes)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gerald Mayr

    2009-01-01

    The early Oligocene Boom Formation in Bel- gium yielded many avian remains from the Rupelian unit- stratotype, most of which have remained unstudied so far. Here, I describe a small loon (Gaviiformes) and a new spe- cies of large owl (Strigiformes) that are represented by associated bones of a single individual each. The loon, of which wing and pectoral girdle

  2. A phylogenetic analysis of the Gruiformes (Aves) based on morphological characters, with an emphasis on the rails (Rallidae)

    PubMed Central

    C.Livezey, B.

    1998-01-01

    The order Gruiformes, for which even familial composition remains controversial, is perhaps the least well understood avian order from a phylogenetic perspective. The history of the systematics of the order is presented, and the ecological and biogeographic characteristics of its members are summarized. Using cladistic techniques, phylogenetic relationships among fossil and modern genera of the Gruiformes were estimated based on 381 primarily osteological characters; relationships among modern species of Grues (Psophiidae, Aramidae, Gruidae, Heliornithidae and Rallidae) were assessed based on these characters augmented by 189 characters of the definitive integument. A strict consensus tree for 20,000 shortest trees compiled for the matrix of gruiform genera (length = 967, CI = 0.517) revealed a number of nodes common to the solution set, many of which were robust to bootstrapping and had substantial support (Bremer) indices. Robust nodes included those supporting: a sister relationship between the Pedionomidae and Turnicidae; monophyly of the Gruiformes exclusive of the Pedionomidae and Turnicidae; a sister relationship between the Cariamidae and Phorusrhacoidea; a sister relationship between a clade comprising Eurypyga and Messelornis and one comprising Rhynochetos and Aptornis; monophyly of the Grues (Psophiidae, Aramidae, Gruidae, Heliornithidae and Rallidae); monophyly of a clade (Gruoidea) comprising (in order of increasingly close relationship) Psophia, Aramus, Balearica and other Gruidae, with monophyly of each member in this series confirmed; a sister relationship between the Heliornithidae and Rallidae; and monophyly of the Rallidae exclusive of Himantornis. Autapomorphic divergence was comparatively high for Pedionomus, Eurypyga, Psophia, Himantornis and Fulica; extreme autapomorphy, much of which is unique for the order, characterized the extinct, flightless Aptornis. In the species-level analysis of modern Grues, special efforts were made to limit the analytical impacts of homoplasy related to flightlessness in a number of rallid lineages. A strict consensus tree of 20,000 shortest trees compiled (length = 1232, CI = 0.463) confirmed the interfamilial relationships resolved in the ordinal analysis and established a number of other, variably supported groups within the Rallidae. Groupings within the Rallidae included: monophyly of Rallidae exclusive of Himantornis and a clade comprising Porphyrio (including Notornis) and Porphyrula; a poorly resolved, basal group of genera including Gymnocrex, Habroptila, Eulabeornis, Aramides, Canirallus and Mentocrex; an intermediate grade comprising Anurolimnas, Amaurolimnas, and Rougetius; monophyly of two major subdivisions of remaining rallids, one comprising Rallina (paraphyletic), Rallicula, and Sarothrura, and the other comprising the apparently paraphyletic 'long-billed' rails (e.g. Pardirallus, Cyanolimnas, Rallus, Gallirallus and Cabalus and a variably resolved clade comprising 'crakes' (e.g. Atlantisia, Laterallus and Porzana, waterhens (Amaurornis), moorhens (Gallinula and allied genera) and coots (Fulica). Relationships among 'crakes' remain poorly resolved; Laterallus may be paraphyletic, and Porzana is evidently polyphyletic and poses substantial challenges for reconciliation with current taxonomy. Relationships among the species of waterhens, moorhens and coots, however, were comparatively well resolved, and exhaustive, fine-scale analyses of several genera (Grus, Porphyrio, Aramides, Rallus, Laterallus and Fulica) and species complexes (Porphyrio porphyrio -group,Gallirallus philippensis -group and Fulica americana -group) revealed additional topological likelihoods. Many nodes shared by a majority of the shortest trees under equal weighting were common to all shortest trees found following one or two iterations of successive weighting of characters. Provisional placements of selected subfossil rallids (e.g. Diaphorapteryx, Aphanapteryx and Capellirallus ) were based on separate heuristic searches using the strict consensus tree for modern rallids as a backb

  3. Biogeography of speciation of two sister species of neotropical amazona (Aves, Psittaciformes) based on mitochondrial sequence data.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Amanda V; Rivera, Luis O; Martinez, Jaime; Prestes, Nêmora P; Caparroz, Renato

    2014-01-01

    Coalescent theory provides powerful models for population genetic inference and is now increasingly important in estimates of divergence times and speciation research. We use molecular data and methods based on coalescent theory to investigate whether genetic evidence supports the hypothesis of A. pretrei and A. tucumana as separate species and whether genetic data allow us to assess which allopatric model seems to better explain the diversification process in these taxa. We sampled 13 A. tucumana from two provinces in northern Argentina and 28 A. pretrei from nine localities of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. A 491 bp segment of the mitochondrial gene cytochrome c oxidase I was evaluated using the haplotype network and phylogenetic methods. The divergence time and other demographic quantities were estimated using the isolation and migration model based on coalescent theory. The network and phylogenetic reconstructions showed similar results, supporting reciprocal monophyly for these two taxa. The divergence time of lineage separation was estimated to be approximately 1.3 million years ago, which corresponds to the lower Pleistocene. Our results enforce the current taxonomic status for these two Amazon species. They also support that A. pretrei and A. tucumana diverged with little or no gene flow approximately 1.3 million years ago, most likely after the establishment of a small population in the Southern Yungas forest by dispersion of a few founders from the A. pretrei ancestral population. This process may have been favored by habitat corridors formed in hot and humid periods of the Quaternary. Considering that these two species are considered threatened, the results were evaluated for their implications for the conservation of these two species. PMID:25251765

  4. Thalassornectes dendrocygnae new species (Acari:Hypoderatidae) from the black-bellied whistling-duck (Aves:Anseriformes; Dendrocygnidae).

    PubMed

    Pence, D B; Bergan, J F

    1996-05-01

    A new species of hypoderatid deutonymph is described from the subcutaneous adipose tissues of the black-bellied whistling-duck, Dendrocygna autumnalis (L.), from Texas. Thalassornectes dendrocygnae n. sp. is most similar to thalassornectes rwandae Fain from the white-backed duck, Thalassornis leuconotos Eyton, in Africa. The new species is distinguished by a complete genital apodeme, the interrupted pattern of midventral cuticular sclerotization between coxal fields II and III, the dense cuticular sclerotization of the posterior idiosoma, and the long filiform seta d5, which is longer than the other idiosomal setae. In T. rwandae, the anterior and posterior parts of the genital sclerite are separated in the middle, the pattern of midventral cuticular sclerotization is continuous in the midventer, there is no dense sclerotization in the posterior idiosoma, and seta d5 is not figured (broken or absent?). There also are minor differences in chaetotaxy and solenidiotaxy of legs I and III of these 2 species. T. dendrocygnae is only the 2nd species of hypoderatid described from the host order Anseriformes. The 2 Thalassornectes spp. are described exclusively from each of the 2 genera in the host family Dendrocygnidae, respectively. Reevaluation of the suite of characters used to differentiate subgenera in the genus Thalassornectes indicates that Thalassornectes Fain, Rallidectes Fain, and Alcidectes Pence & Hoberg should be considered invalid. PMID:8667396

  5. Genetic evaluation of the mating system in the blue-and-yellow macaw (Ara ararauna, Aves, Psittacidae) by DNA fingerprinting

    PubMed Central

    Caparroz, Renato; Miyaki, Cristina Y.; Baker, Allan J.

    2011-01-01

    More than 90% of birds are socially monogamous, although genetic studies indicate that many are often not sexually monogamous. In the present study, DNA fingerprinting was used to estimate the genetic relationships between nestlings belonging to the same broods to evaluate the mating system in the socially monogamous macaw, Ara ararauna. We found that in 10 of 11 broods investigated, the nestlings showed genetic similarity levels congruent with values expected among full-sibs, suggesting that they shared the same parents. However, in one brood, the low genetic similarity observed between nestlings could be a result of intraspecific brood parasitism, intraspecific nest competition or extra-pair paternity. These results, along with available behavioral and life-history data, imply that the blue-and-yellow macaw is not only socially, but also genetically monogamous. However, the occurrence of eventual cases of extra-pair paternity cannot be excluded. PMID:21637560

  6. 740 MIX AVE. #204; HAMDEN, CT 06514; USA +1 (413) 522 8810; MATTHEW.HERDIECH@YALE.EDU

    E-print Network

    Haller, Gary L.

    spectroscopy (ISS) Piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) Summer 2007 Yale University, CRISP Summer Research) X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) X-ray diffraction Sputter deposition via magnetron sputtering Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) Ion scattering

  7. High prevalence of haemosporidian parasites infection in southern grey shrike Lanius meridionalis (Laniidae, Aves) from agricultural areas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Casanueva; M. Fernández; M. Ángeles Rojo; F. Campos

    2012-01-01

    We present the first data on prevalence of haematozoa in Southern grey shrikes Lanius meridionalis (Temminck) in agricultural areas of western Spain. A fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene of the parasite was amplified, using a nested PCR assay from blood sample. Of the 81 shrikes analysed, 65.4% showed infection with Haemoproteus (Kruse, 1890) while neither Leucocytozoon (Berestneff, 1904)

  8. Full mitochondrial genome sequences of two endemic Philippine hornbill species (Aves: Bucerotidae) provide evidence for pervasive mitochondrial DNA recombination

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Svenja Sammler; Christoph Bleidorn; Ralph Tiedemann

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although nowaday it is broadly accepted that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) may undergo recombination, the frequency of such recombination remains controversial. Its estimation is not straightforward, as recombination under homoplasmy (i.e., among identical mt genomes) is likely to be overlooked. In species with tandem duplications of large mtDNA fragments the detection of recombination can be facilitated, as it can lead

  9. A new eimerian species (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the blue-fronted Amazon parrot Amazona aestiva L. (Aves: Psittacidae) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Hofstatter, P G; Guaraldo, A M A

    2011-12-01

    The Neotropical psittacine species Amazona aestiva, commonly known as the blue-fronted Amazon, is one of the most common and best-known psittacine birds kept as a pet worldwide. However, very little is known about the diseases or parasites of these birds. In this study, we describe a new species, Eimeria aestivae, associated with these parrots. The new species is characterized by: ovoid smooth oocysts (n ?=? 60), 36.8 (33.2-41.5) × 23.7 (21.7-25.7) µm, length/width ratio ?=? 1.55; polar granule present; ellipsoidal sporocysts (n ?=? 25), 19.8 (17.5-21.6) × 9.3 (8.3-9.9) µm; Stieda, sub-Stieda body, and sporocyst residuum present. Sporozoites (n ?=? 20), 2 per sporocyst, elongate and curved, 17.6 (15.8-19.2) × 3.8 (3.2-4.8) µm; each with 2 refractile bodies. The oocysts of the other 2 eimerian species described for Amazona are larger than those of the presented species, but they all seem to be closely related because of some similarities among them. PMID:21612420

  10. A subsynoptic-scale kinetic energy study of the Red River Valley tornado outbreak (AVE-SESAME 1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedlovec, G. J.; Fuelberg, H. E.

    1981-01-01

    The subsynoptis-scale kinetic energy balance during the Red River Valley tornado outbreak is presented in order to diagnose storm environment interactions. Area-time averaged energetics indicate that horizontal flux convergence provides the major energy source to the region, while cross contour flow provides the greatest sink. Maximum energy variability is found in the upper levels in association with jet stream activity. Area averaged energetics at individual observation times show that the energy balance near times of maximum storm activity differs considerably from that of the remaining periods. The local kinetic energy balance over Oklahoma during the formation of a limited jet streak receives special attention. Cross contour production of energy is the dominant local source for jet development. Intense convection producing the Red River Valley tornadoes may have contributed to this local development by modifying the surrounding environment.

  11. DNA evidence for a Paleocene origin of the Alcidae (Aves: Charadriiformes) in the Pacific and multiple dispersals across northern oceans

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sergio L. Pereira; Allan J. Baker

    2008-01-01

    The Alcidae is a group of marine, wing-propelled diving birds known as auks that are distributed along the coasts of the northern oceans. It has been suggested that auks originated in the Pacific coastal shores as early as the Miocene, and dispersed to the Atlantic either through the Arctic coasts of Eurasia and North America (northern dispersal route), or through

  12. Biogeography of Speciation of Two Sister Species of Neotropical Amazona (Aves, Psittaciformes) Based on Mitochondrial Sequence Data

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Amanda V.; Rivera, Luis O.; Martinez, Jaime; Prestes, Nêmora P.; Caparroz, Renato

    2014-01-01

    Coalescent theory provides powerful models for population genetic inference and is now increasingly important in estimates of divergence times and speciation research. We use molecular data and methods based on coalescent theory to investigate whether genetic evidence supports the hypothesis of A. pretrei and A. tucumana as separate species and whether genetic data allow us to assess which allopatric model seems to better explain the diversification process in these taxa. We sampled 13 A. tucumana from two provinces in northern Argentina and 28 A. pretrei from nine localities of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. A 491 bp segment of the mitochondrial gene cytochrome c oxidase I was evaluated using the haplotype network and phylogenetic methods. The divergence time and other demographic quantities were estimated using the isolation and migration model based on coalescent theory. The network and phylogenetic reconstructions showed similar results, supporting reciprocal monophyly for these two taxa. The divergence time of lineage separation was estimated to be approximately 1.3 million years ago, which corresponds to the lower Pleistocene. Our results enforce the current taxonomic status for these two Amazon species. They also support that A. pretrei and A. tucumana diverged with little or no gene flow approximately 1.3 million years ago, most likely after the establishment of a small population in the Southern Yungas forest by dispersion of a few founders from the A. pretrei ancestral population. This process may have been favored by habitat corridors formed in hot and humid periods of the Quaternary. Considering that these two species are considered threatened, the results were evaluated for their implications for the conservation of these two species. PMID:25251765

  13. A distinctive avian assemblage (Aves: Passeriformes) in Western Darién, Panama is uncovered through a disease surveillance program.

    PubMed

    Miller, Matthew J

    2014-06-01

    Basic knowledge about the distribution of flora and fauna is lacking for most tropical areas. Improving our knowledge of the tropical biota will help address contemporary global problems, including emerging tropical diseases. Less appreciated is the role that applied studies can have in improving our understanding of basic biological patterns and processes in the tropics. Here, I describe a novel avifauna assemblage uncovered in Western Darién province in the Republic of Panama that was uncovered during a vector-borne disease surveillance program. I compared the passerine bird species composition at 16 sites using records from recent ornithological expeditions sponsored by the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Central and Eastern Panama. Based on the results of a Mantel test, geographic distance did not correlate with pairwise distinctiveness of sites. instead, based on an index of distinctiveness modified from the Chao-Jaccard index, most sites were more or less similarly distinctive, with one site, Aruza Abajo, significantly more distinctive than the rest. I found that the distinctiveness of this site was due not only to the presence of several rare and range-restricted taxa, but also to the absence of taxa that are common elsewhere. This finding provides more evidence of high species composition turnover (beta-diversity) in the Panamanian biota, which appears to be driven by a combination of soil and climate differences over narrow distances. PMID:25102652

  14. El origen de la ornitologa y su desarrollo reciente estn cimentados en las colecciones cientcas de aves (Parkes

    E-print Network

    Cuervo, Andrés

    síntesis monográcas sobre la avifauna colombiana (i.e., Chapman 1917, Meyer de Schauensee 1948-1952, Hilty para reconocer que muchos aspectos sobre la avifauna colombiana aún están por descubrir. Si el

  15. Study of GABA A receptors on the sleep-like behavior in Coturnix japonica (Temminck Schlegel, 1849) (Galliformes: Aves)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patrícia Almeida Polo; André Souza Mecawi; Marco Antonio Pires Camilo Lapa; Wellington Silva Côrtes; Luis Carlos Reis

    2009-01-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the influence of GABAA signaling on sleep-like behaviors through systemic administration of bicuculline and picrotoxin (GABAA antagonists) and thiopental (an allosterical modulator). A thiopental (20 mg\\/kg) injection increased the eye closure frequency\\u000a compared to the control group. The birds quickly became sleepy with a low frequency of early behavioral stages, such as rapid

  16. PRELIMINARY DATA ON THE FOOD STRUCTURE OF THE SAND MARTIN NESTLINGS (RIPARIA RIPARIA L. 1758) (AVES: HIRUNDINIDAE) IN SOUTHERN ROMANIA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    GABRIEL CHI; TRAIAN MANOLE

    The paper presents some preliminary data on the food structure of the Sand Martin nestlings (Riparia riparia L., 1758) during the three months of the breeding season: May, June and July. Our researches were made in two colonies from the Argeº River, 3 km downstream the dam from Mihãileºti. We used the method of the analysis of the faeces eliminated

  17. A distinctive new subspecies of Scytalopus griseicollis (Aves, Passeriformes, Rhinocryptidae) from the northern Eastern Cordillera of Colombia and Venezuela

    PubMed Central

    Avendaño, Jorge Enrique; Donegan, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We describe a new subspecies of Pale-bellied Tapaculo Scytalopus griseicollis from the northern Eastern Cordillera of Colombia and Venezuela. This form differs diagnosably in plumage from described subspecies Scytalopus griseicollis griseicollis and Scytalopus griseicollis gilesi and from the latter in tail length. It is also differentiated non-diagnosably in voice from both these populations. Ecological niche modelling analysis suggests that the new subspecies is restricted to the Andean montane forest and páramo north of both the arid Chicamocha valley and the Sierra Nevada del Cocuy.

  18. Methodology to Achieve Safety and Energy Savings in Laboratory Buildings 

    E-print Network

    Odajima, T.; Numanaka, S.

    2008-01-01

    , is installed. Figure 1 Face Velocity Table 1 Codes and regulations for face velocity Figure 2 Comparison of Air Change Rate Face velocity Face velocityCode Ave. : ??????????????? (O ccupational Safety & H ealth Adm inistration) Ave.... ??????????????? (National Fire Protection Association ) Ave. ???????????????( The Scientific Equipment and Furniture Association ) Ave. ???????????????? (American National Standards Institute)???? (American Industrial H ygiene Association ) Ave. ?????????????????(American...

  19. Chase Field Civic Space

    E-print Network

    Shumway, John

    Chase Field Patriots Square Park Civic Space Park 1stAve. 2ndAve. 3rdAve. 4thAve. Fillmore St St Jefferson St Jefferson St Adams St Madison St Jackson St Van Buren St CentralAve. 1stStreet 2nd Preparatory Academy AMC 24 Theatres Heritage Square Phoenix Family Museum Arizona Science Center Herberger

  20. 40 CFR 720.75 - Notice review period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428,...

  1. 40 CFR 725.54 - Suspension of the review period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428,...

  2. 40 CFR 723.50 - Chemical substances manufactured in quantities of 10,000 kilograms or less per year, and chemical...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428,...

  3. 40 CFR 700.17 - Addresses for the Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Protection Agency, EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave. NW., Washington, DC 20004...EPA West Bldg.,Rm. 3334, 1301 Constitution Ave. NW., Washington, DC 20460-0001...EPA East Bldg., Rm. 6428, 1201 Constitution Ave. NW., Washington, DC....

  4. 40 CFR 725.60 - Withdrawal of submission by the submitter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428,...

  5. 40 CFR 725.190 - Notice of commencement of manufacture or import.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428,...

  6. 40 CFR 725.190 - Notice of commencement of manufacture or import.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428,...

  7. 40 CFR 720.102 - Notice of commencement of manufacture or import.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428,...

  8. 40 CFR 720.40 - General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428,...

  9. 40 CFR 720.102 - Notice of commencement of manufacture or import.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428,...

  10. 40 CFR 725.190 - Notice of commencement of manufacture or import.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428,...

  11. 40 CFR 723.50 - Chemical substances manufactured in quantities of 10,000 kilograms or less per year, and chemical...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428,...

  12. 40 CFR 725.54 - Suspension of the review period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428,...

  13. 29 CFR 24.110 - Decision and orders of the Administrative Review Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...U.S. Department of Labor, 200 Constitution Ave., NW., Washington...U.S. Department of Labor, 200 Constitution Ave., NW., N 2716, Washington...U.S. Department of Labor, 200 Constitution Ave., NW., N 2716,...

  14. 40 CFR 720.75 - Notice review period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428,...

  15. 40 CFR 720.102 - Notice of commencement of manufacture or import.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428,...

  16. 40 CFR 725.54 - Suspension of the review period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428,...

  17. 40 CFR 700.17 - Addresses for the Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Protection Agency, EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave. NW., Washington, DC 20004...EPA West Bldg., Rm. 3334, 1301 Constitution Ave. NW., Washington, DC 20460-0001...EPA East Bldg., Rm. 6428, 1201 Constitution Ave. NW., Washington, DC....

  18. 40 CFR 725.60 - Withdrawal of submission by the submitter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428,...

  19. 40 CFR 720.40 - General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428,...

  20. 40 CFR 723.50 - Chemical substances manufactured in quantities of 10,000 kilograms or less per year, and chemical...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428,...

  1. 40 CFR 725.190 - Notice of commencement of manufacture or import.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428,...

  2. 40 CFR 725.60 - Withdrawal of submission by the submitter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428,...

  3. 40 CFR 720.102 - Notice of commencement of manufacture or import.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428,...

  4. 40 CFR 720.75 - Notice review period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428,...

  5. 40 CFR 720.40 - General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428,...

  6. 40 CFR 725.60 - Withdrawal of submission by the submitter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428,...

  7. 40 CFR 720.40 - General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428,...

  8. 40 CFR 725.54 - Suspension of the review period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428,...

  9. Downregulation of IRF4 induces lytic reactivation of KSHV in primary effusion lymphoma cells?

    PubMed Central

    Forero, Adriana; McCormick, Kevin D.; Jenkins, Frank J.; Sarkar, Saumendra N.

    2014-01-01

    Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), associated with the latent infection by KSHV, constitutively expresses interferon-regulatory factor 4 (IRF4). We recently showed that IRF4 differentially regulates expression of cellular interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) and viral genes (Forero et al., 2013). Here, using inducible IRF4 knockdown, we demonstrate that IRF4 silencing results in enhanced transcription of KSHV replication transactivator RTA. As a result viral transcription is increased leading to virus reactivation. Taken together, our results show that IRF4 helps maintain the balance between latency and KSHV reactivation in PEL cells. PMID:24928034

  10. PARALLEL SESSIONS Missouri -Pacific Wabash -Cannonball Texas Special Colorado Special

    E-print Network

    Bohner, Martin

    allocation strategy for the fire ant (Solenopsis invicta) over multiple seasons CARRIE DIAZ EATON: Ecological of life science majors at California State University Los Angeles URZSULA LEDZEWICZ: Controling tumor

  11. http://registrar.ucsc.edu/catalog/programs-courses/faculty/index.html[8/14/2014 10:35:13 AM] ABOUT CALENDAR FEES ENROLLMENT RECORDS

    E-print Network

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    , mental health, food, China May N. Diaz, Emerita Shelly Errington Globalization of folk art, visual. Caldwell Poverty and public health; welfare, charity, and assistance; food and consumption; gardens, nature New Mexico, origins of food production, pastoralists, zooarchaeology, history of archaeology

  12. Natural enemies and mortality factors of the coffee leafminer Leucoptera coffeella (Guerin-Meneville) (Lepidoptera: Lyonetiidae) in Chiapas, Mexico

    E-print Network

    Lomeli-Flores, Refugio

    2009-05-15

    my friends and colleagues at the Bernal Lab: Andrea Joyce, James Butler, Veronica Manriquez, Rodrigo Diaz, Aldo Gardea, Brad Hopkins, Melissa Layton, and especially Pat and Alan Gillogly for their help, support and friendship. I would like to say...

  13. Natural enemies and mortality factors of the coffee leafminer Leucoptera coffeella (Guerin-Meneville) (Lepidoptera: Lyonetiidae) in Chiapas, Mexico

    E-print Network

    Lomeli-Flores, Refugio

    2008-10-10

    my friends and colleagues at the Bernal Lab: Andrea Joyce, James Butler, Veronica Manriquez, Rodrigo Diaz, Aldo Gardea, Brad Hopkins, Melissa Layton, and especially Pat and Alan Gillogly for their help, support and friendship. I would like to say...

  14. RELACIN DE POSIBLES DIRECTORES DE TESIS O TRABAJOS FIN DE MSTER NOMBRE Vinculacin EPS

    E-print Network

    Autonoma de Madrid, Universidad

    Castillo, Silvia Teresita (1) permanente Aguilar Morales, Antonio (1) permanente Aguirre Maeso, Carlos, Angel de (1) temporal Cobos Pérez, Ruth (1) permanente Colas Pasamontes, Jose (1,2) permanente Diaz

  15. Generation of cultural map of 81 societies with economic zones superimposed

    E-print Network

    Marro, Joaquín

    . Basañez, J. Diaz-Medrano, L. Halman and R. Luijkx, Human Beliefs and Values (Siglo XXI Editores, Mexico, lattice models are fundamental in the study of criticality and nonequilib- rium phase transitions (NPT

  16. 75 FR 14128 - Approval for Manufacturing Authority, Foreign-Trade Zone 7, CooperVision Caribbean Corporation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-24

    ...Board [Order No. 1669] Approval for Manufacturing Authority, Foreign-Trade Zone 7, CooperVision Caribbean Corporation (Contact Lenses), Juana Diaz, Puerto Rico Pursuant to its authority under the Foreign-Trade Zones Act of June 18, 1934, as...

  17. FCPyS Directorio 2012 Castaeda Sabido Fernando Director

    E-print Network

    Islas, León

    Hernández Santiago Horacio Unidad Jurídica 1092 56229470 56229470 1700 Bodek Stavenhagen Claudia Secretaria@hotmail.com Centro de Educación Continua carmina.gonzalez@hotmail.com 55243161 rosazm@unam.mx guillermo_diaz@mail.politicas.una

  18. Material and methods Only males are designated as type material of the

    E-print Network

    Ribera, Ignacio

    Material and methods Only males are designated as type material of the new species, as although to be indistin- guishable (J. A. Diaz Pazos, pers. comm.). Some type material of species which following the revi

  19. Ann. For. Sci. 64 (2007) 2130 21 c INRA, EDP Sciences, 2007

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    2007-01-01

    ) in spatially heterogeneous infected seed orchards Raquel D´IAZ, Rafael ZAS, Josefa FERN]. The cherry leaf spot fungus is spread by two different kinds of spores [11]. The fungus overwinters in fallen

  20. 75 FR 51523 - Notice of Meeting of the Transit Rail Advisory Committee for Safety (TRACS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-20

    ...discharge its responsibilities. The TRACS members are: William Bates, United Transportation Union Bernadette Bridges, Maryland Transit...Utilities Commission Diane Davidson, Oak Ridge National Laboratory Joe Diaz, Hilsborough Area Regional Transit Authority James...

  1. Group representation theory Bernoulli center Lausanne January--March 2005 January February March

    E-print Network

    Thévenaz, Jacques

    Chlouveraki Chuang Corran De Visscher some period Diaz Digne Donkin Douglass Eaton Erdmann Fayers Flores Fong Lusztig Lyle some period Magaard Malle Marion Mathas Matrapu some period Mazza McNinch Michel Miyachi Ming

  2. Group representation theory -Bernoulli center -Lausanne JanuaryMarch 2005 January February March

    E-print Network

    Thévenaz, Jacques

    Corran De Visscher some period Diaz Digne Donkin Douglass Eaton Erdmann Fayers Flores Fong Frey Geck Magaard Malle Marion Mathas Matrapu some period Mazza McNinch Michel Miyachi Ming Morales J. some months

  3. E S P A O L V A L E N C I E N G L I S H Instituto Universitario de Investigacin Informtica

    E-print Network

    Escolano, Francisco

    SUAU PEREZ, PABLO TOMAS DIAZ, DAVID TORRES MEDINA, FERNANDO TORTOSA GRAU, LEANDRO TRUJILLO MONDEJAR, JUAN CARLOS VAZQUEZ PEREZ, SONIA VERDU MAS, JOSE LUIS VICEDO GONZALEZ, JOSE LUIS VICENT FRANCES, JOSE

  4. 2014OCCUPATIONAL & ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE SYMPOSIUM

    E-print Network

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    Endowment Occupational Hearing Loss: Practical Approaches to Evaluation and Management Rodney C. Diaz, MD UC Health System Prevention of Infectious Disease in Health Care Workers Craig F. Conlon, MD, PhD Kaiser

  5. 78 FR 36635 - Unblocking of Specially Designated Nationals and Blocked Persons Pursuant to Executive Order 12978

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ...2449885 (Colombia); Passport 2449885 (Colombia) (individual) [SDNT]. 2. VASQUEZ DIAZ, Augusto de Jesus, c/o FLORIDA SOCCER CLUB S.A., Medellin, Colombia; POB Colombia; Cedula No. 3333064 (Colombia) (individual) [SDNT]. Dated:...

  6. The Asia-to-America Influx of Avian Influenza Wild Bird Hosts Is Large Kevin WinkerA

    E-print Network

    Winker, Kevin

    principales grupos hospedadores de influenza aviar, muestra que 33 especies de aves acua´ticas (Anatide) 46 esta regio´n (ave acua´ticas, costeras y gaviotas), parece probable que miles de aves infectadas con these into dynamic models. RESUMEN. La movilizacio´n de aves silvestres hospedadoras del virus de la influenza de

  7. El Paso, Texas 1 

    E-print Network

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    . Sproston,1946 " " abbreviata ACANTHIS Ave s, Moll. Acanthis brevirostris (Aves) Plagiorchis elegans " " skrjabini Acanthis cannabina (Aves) Leucochloridium macrostomum ACANTHOBRAMA Pisce s Acanthobrama terrae - sanctae Dactylogyrus acanthobramae.... Sogandare Bernal & Hutton, 1959 ACANTHURUS Pisces,Aves, Rept. , Col. , Acanth. Acanthurus sp. (Pisces) Ancyrocephalus teuthis eilaticu Acanthurus bahianus (Pisces) Dichadena acuta Acanthurus bahianus (continued) Hysterolecitha rosea Macradena...

  8. J. Field Ornithol. 79(1):102110, 2008 DOI: 10.1111/j.1557-9263.2008.00151.x Evaluating two new methods for capturing large

    E-print Network

    Gawlik, Dale E.

    utilizada para capturar aves acu´aticas y terrestres. Las ventajas principales de esta trampa son que puede´etodos para capturar aves grandes en anegados La investigaci´on con aves de ´areas anegadas muchas veces envuelve el capturar las aves para tomarles medidas morfom´etricas o para colocarles aparatos utilizados en

  9. Jefferson Way Washington Way

    E-print Network

    Tullos, Desiree

    Highway 20 / 34 Orchard Ave. Harrison Ave. Monroe Ave. 15thStreet Oak Creek 13thStreet Washington Ave Coliseum Reser Stadium Indoor Practice Facility Magruder Pole Vet Barn LARC Vet Lab Dryden Oak Creek Bldg Gilmore Hovland Ag Life ScienceNash Sackett Strand Ag Heckart Cauthorn Covell DearbornGA Shepard Roger

  10. Helpful Minneapolis/St. Paul Websites City Pages: http://www.citypages.com/calendar/

    E-print Network

    Dahlberg, E. Dan

    the cities #12;Places to see in Minneapolis The Chain of Lakes (Cedar, Isles, Calhoun, and Harriet) Bordertown Coffee: 315 16th Ave SE #12;Stadium Village Dining 1) Coffman Student Union: 300 Washington Ave: Coffee Shop. 600 Washington Ave SE 3) Jamba Juice: Smoothies. Harvard St and Washington Ave SE 4

  11. A new species of Syncuaria Gilbert, 1927 (Nematoda: Acuarioidea: Acuariidae) in the wood stork, Mycteria americana L. (Aves: Ciconiiformes: Ciconiidae) from the Area de Conservacion Guanacaste, Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Luping; Brooks, Daniel R; Causey, Douglas

    2003-10-01

    Syncuaria mycteriae n. sp. (Nematoda: Acuarioidea) was collected under the lining of the gizzard of a wood stork, Mycteria americana L., from the Area de Conservacion Guanacaste, Costa Rica. The new species can be distinguished from all known species of Syncuaria by having irregular dotted ornamentations on the caudal alae of males, a complex distal end of the left spicule comprising 3 protuberances, and a spicule ratio of 1:9.3. Preliminary phylogenetic analysis of 11 Syncuaria spp. based on 9 morphological characters produced 2 equally parsimonious cladograms with a consistency index of 85%, differing only in the placement of S. hargilae. The phylogenetic analysis suggests that the new species is the sister species of S. leptoptili, whose male members have a single protuberance on the left spicule. Furthermore, the analysis suggests that the plesiomorphic host group for the genus is Ciconiiformes, specifically Ciconiidae (host for 5 species), with 2 species occurring in Threskiornithidae (also Ciconiiformes), possibly as a result of cospeciation, and 2 species each occurring in Pelecaniformes and Podicipediformes, resulting from 4 episodes of speciation by host switching. PMID:14627152

  12. 2910 BEDFORD AVE. BROOKLYN, NEW YORK 11210. TELEPHONE (718) 951-4785. FAX (718) 951-4778 WILLIAM D. FORD FEDERAL DIRECT GRADUATE PLUS LOAN PROGRAM

    E-print Network

    Rosen, Jay

    . FORD FEDERAL DIRECT GRADUATE PLUS LOAN PROGRAM The Following requirements must be met before submitting a Graduate Plus Loan Request: ***If we receive a Graduate Plus Loan Request with one of these requirements the Graduate Plus Loan is Requested: Must sign a Master Promissory Note (MPN) at Studentloans.Gov Office

  13. Complete this form online, then print using the print button. WMU Student Financial Aid | 1903 W. Michigan Ave., Kalamazoo, MI 49008-5337 | (269) 387-6000

    E-print Network

    de Doncker, Elise

    and earn money or go to school. I am aware the federal student loans cannot be cancelled at a later time that would prohibit the student from being able to work and earn money or go to school indefinitelyComplete this form online, then print using the print button. WMU Student Financial Aid | 1903 W

  14. Complete this form online, then print using the print button. WMU Student Financial Aid | 1903 W. Michigan Ave., Kalamazoo, MI 49008-5337 | (269) 387-6000

    E-print Network

    de Doncker, Elise

    prohibit me from being able to work and earn money or go to school. I am aware the federal student loans that would prohibit the student from being able to work and earn money or go to school indefinitelyComplete this form online, then print using the print button. WMU Student Financial Aid | 1903 W

  15. Mallinson Institute for Science Education 1903 W. Michigan Ave. Kalamazoo, MI 49008-5444 phone: 269-387-4951 email: charles.henderson@wmich.edu Project Directors

    E-print Network

    Henderson, Charles

    reviewing and aligning the research literatures and perspectives of the Science Education Research (SER the Facilitating Change symposium. The research questions that guided this initial review of the literature are, Boulder R. Sam Larson Kaiser-Permanente and Regis University Preliminary Categorization of Literature

  16. Correspondence: Email: dcconner@cmu.edu; WWW: http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~dcconner; Address: David Conner, Robotics Institute, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15213

    E-print Network

    Zhu, Zhigang

    for navigation of a differentially steered 3-wheeled autonomous vehicle David C. Conner* , Philip R. Kedrowski Virginia Tech is currently developing a new autonomous vehicle as a research platform. This vehicle: Sensor fusion, vector field histogram, autonomous vehicles, mobile robots 1. INTRODUCTION The Autonomous

  17. 400 MARYLAND AVE., S.W., WASHINGTON, DC 20202-1100 The Department of Education's mission is to promote student achievement and preparation for global competitiveness

    E-print Network

    Logan, David

    sexual acts perpetrated against a person's will or where a person is incapable of giving consent due or attempted sexual assault while in college.3 The report also found that approximately 6.1 percent of male students with an educational environment free from discrimination is extremely important. The sexual

  18. INFLUÊNCIA DO TIPO DE VEGETAÇÃO NAS POPULAÇÕES DE AVES EM UMA FLORESTA IMPLANTADA DE Pinus spp, NA REGIÃO DE AGUDOS, SP

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alvaro Fernando de Almeida

    O. D. C. 156:174.7 Pinus spp SUMMARY The author studied a bird community through the capture marking and recapture in a man made Pinus forest. The populations were compared in the internal natural vegetations, in the man made Pinus and native species forests and in the external («cerrado»). The birds penetration in the man made forests is discussed according to

  19. Ascending Direction: East Segment Code and Milepost: 003200 000.560 200 Feet West of Yellowstone Ave, Pocatello (Maple Street) Volumes and Percent of Daily Traffic

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sunday Monday

    2009-01-01

    Hour Volume % of day Volume % of day Volume % of day Volume % of day Volume % of day Volume % of day Volume % of day Volume % of day Volume % of day Volume % of day 0:00 26 1.6% 14 0.3% 15 0.4% 14 0.3% 23 0.6% 16 0.4% 25 0.9% 16 0.4% 26 1.2%

  20. Business Career Services Center | 1300 Sunnyside Ave. Rm. 125 | Lawrence, KS 66045 | (785) 864-5591 | www.business.ku.edu

    E-print Network

    is that it requires you to address such a wide variety of problems - financial, material, human, legal, political Managers Benefits Administrator Branch Manager Budget Analyst Contract Administrator Credit Manager Manufacturing Construction Transportation Finance Government Education Utilities Health care Wholesale

  1. Well-preserved new skeleton of the Middle Eocene Messelastur substantiates sister group relationship between Messelasturidae and Halcyornithidae (Aves, ?Pan-Psittaciformes)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gerald Mayr

    2011-01-01

    A virtually uncrushed skeleton of Messelastur gratulator from the Middle Eocene of Messel (Germany) is described, which for the first time preserves the feet of this poorly known avian species. The new fossil corroborates a close relationship between Messelastur and the early Eocene Tynskya eocaena, from which M. gratulator differs in its more raptor-like feet. The specimen further shows that

  2. 1455 NW 107th Ave., Suite 906, Miami, Florida 33172 Phone (305) 592-8044 Fax (305-592-8315 June 2 0 1 2

    E-print Network

    Watson, Craig A.

    Faculty Family & Consumer Sciences 4-H Appreciation Award Ceremony 9 Kathie Roberts 4-H Extension Faculty insurance policies and make copies. Take Note of Our New Office Location Family & Consumer Science Program & Consumer Sciences MyPlate has a Birthday! 6 How To Eat Healthy This Summer 7 Monica Dawkins Extension

  3. A new species and five new records of chewing lice (Insecta: Phthiraptera: Ischnocera) from an isolated population of the solitary tinamou Tinamus solitarius (Aves: Tinamiformes).

    PubMed

    Valim, Michel P; Silveira, Luís F

    2014-01-01

    We report the first records of chewing lice from an isolated population of the solitary tinamou (formerly known as Tinamus solitarius pernambucensis Berla, 1946) in the Pernambuco Centre of Endemism (PCE), Brazil. All louse records previously published from the solitary tinamou came from the populations south of the São Francisco River, formerly known as Tinamus solitarius solitarius (Vieillot, 1819). Five known species of the family Heptapsogasteridae were identified from the northern population of this host: Heptarthrogaster grandis Carriker, 1936; Ornicholax alienus (Giebel, 1874); Pterocotes solitarius Guimarães & Lane, 1937; Rhopaloceras oniscus (Nitzsch [in Giebel], 1866); and Strongylocotes wernecki Guimarães & Lane, 1937. Also, the new species Heptagoniodes guimaraesi is described and illustrated from the northern population of this host, and a key for identification of all the species of Heptagoniodes Carriker, 1936 is included. The discovery of H. guimaraesi is the first Brazilian example of a bird ectoparasite represented by two different species of the same genus living on two distinct populations of the same host species. Records of eight louse species and 31 new localities from the southern population of the solitary tinamou in Brazil are given, and an updated list of all the chewing lice known from both host populations [subspecies] is included. PMID:25081764

  4. When: Sat., Nov. 8, 2008 Time: 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Place: Waisman Center, Auditorium, 1500 Highland Ave, Madison

    E-print Network

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    : _____________________________________ _____________________________________ Telephone: ____________ Email: _________________ I need a vegetarian lunch: ____ Registration Fees (please: Parent Educator Individual with ASD Medical Professional Student Other ______________ Tax Deductible donation to ASGM (Thank you!) _$______ Total Enclosed: __$__________ A DAY WITH THE EXPERTS 2008

  5. Complete this form online, then print using the print button. WMU Student Financial Aid | 1903 W. Michigan Ave., Kalamazoo, MI 49008-5337 | (269) 387-6000

    E-print Network

    de Doncker, Elise

    to question #2. If you did initial, go to question #4. 2. Have you successfully completed an acceptable drug-rehabilitation and have completed the program, then go to question #4. *An acceptable drug rehabilitation program must: 2/11/2013 S:\\DOCS\\Tracking Docs\\2013-14\\Drug Conviction Verification.doc Drug Conviction

  6. The suite is equipped with a high pressure homogenizer (Aves-tin) which will allow the disruption of dissimilar samples with a

    E-print Network

    Strynadka, Natalie

    is equipped with one large-scale fermentation system (70-L stainless steel bioreactor). A steam generator) and Pichia (100 psi). The installed cooler of the equipment, con- nected to tap water, keeps the temperature equipped with individual methanol (MeOH) detectors and sensors from Raven Biotech Inc. and pumps

  7. Ecological aspects of helminth fauna of Magellanic penguins, Spheniscus magellanicus (aves: Spheniscidae), from the Northern Coast of the State of São Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rezende, G C; Baldassin, P; Gallo, H; Silva, R J

    2013-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the helminth fauna found in the Magellanic penguin, Spheniscus magellanicus, relating parasite population and community ecological parameters to life aspects of the host species. The study involved 237 specimens of S. magellanicus taken from the northern shore of the state of São Paulo (23° 46' S, 45° 57' W) and southern shore of the state of Rio de Janeiro (23° 02' S, 44° 13' W), Brazil. The following helminth fauna were found: the nematode Contracaecum pelagicum (core species), found in the stomach; the digenetic Cardiocephaloides physalis and the cestode Tetrabothrius lutzi (satellite species), both collected from the initial portion of the small intestine. Comparisons using the Shannon Diversity Index revealed that the parasite community in juvenile penguins is less diverse in the migratory season than the breeding season. Parasitological studies on penguins and other migratory animals provide important information on species during the time in which they remain pelagic and constitute a useful tool for the acquisition of data that is difficult to obtain through other means, thereby favoring the conservation of the species. PMID:23644789

  8. Phylogenetics of a recent radiation in the mallards and allies (Aves: Anas): inferences from a genomic transect and the multispecies coalescent.

    PubMed

    Lavretsky, Philip; McCracken, Kevin G; Peters, Jeffrey L

    2014-01-01

    Reconstructing species trees by incorporating information from many independent gene trees reduces the confounding influence of stochastic lineage sorting. Such analyses are particularly important for taxa that share polymorphisms due to incomplete lineage sorting or introgressive hybridization. We investigated phylogenetic relationships among 14 closely related taxa from the mallard (Anas spp.) complex using the multispecies coalescent and 20 nuclear loci sampled from a genomic transect. We also examined how treating recombining loci and hybridizing species influences results by partitioning the data using various protocols. In general, topologies were similar among the various species trees, with major clades consistently composed of the same taxa. However, relationships among these clades and among taxa within clades changed among partitioned data sets. Posterior support generally decreased when filtering for recombination, whereas excluding mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) increased posterior support for taxa known to hybridize with them. Furthermore, branch lengths decreased substantially for recombination-filtered data. Finally, concordance between nuclear and morphometric topologies conflicted with those in the mitochondrial tree, particularly with regard to the placement of the Hawaiian duck (A. wyvilliana), Philippine duck (A. luzonica), and two spot-billed ducks (A. zonorhyncha and A. poecilorhyncha). These results demonstrate the importance of maximizing sequence length and taxon sampling when inferring taxonomic relationships that are confounded by extensive allele sharing. PMID:23994490

  9. University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign, 1304 W. Pennsylvania Ave., 338 AESB, Urbana, IL 61801 217.333.3570 abe.illinois.edu abe@illinois.edu

    E-print Network

    Gilbert, Matthew

    and Division Leader, Soil and Water Resources Engineering; Asst. Dean of Research, ACES. Congratula ons Environmental Design Compe on First Place University of Illinois Fountain Wars Team Prasanta Kalita, Advisor ons to all! Fountain Wars Design Team #12;Important Dates to Remember August 10, 2013 IL 4H Founda

  10. Tall Whitetop Eradication and Native Plant Community Restoration Shannon Peters, RTI and Ph.D. Candidate UC Berkeley, 360 Monte Vista Ave., Oakland, CA 94611

    E-print Network

    Bruns, Tom

    with mycorrhiza (hyphae and spores), and activated charcoal (neutralizes the herbicide). In this effort, a one) and Treated (mycorrhiza + activated charcoal) 2 Herbicide treatments ­ Treated with Plateau and untreated

  11. Cryptic speciation in the white-shouldered antshrike (Thamnophilus aethiops, Aves - Thamnophilidae): the tale of a transcontinental radiation across rivers in lowland Amazonia and the northeastern Atlantic Forest.

    PubMed

    Thom, Gregory; Aleixo, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    The growing knowledge on paleogeography and the recent applications of molecular biology and phylogeography to the study of the Amazonian biota have provided a framework for testing competing hypotheses of biotic diversification in this region. Here, we reconstruct the spatio-temporal context of diversification of a widespread understory polytypic Amazonian bird species (Thamnophilus aethiops) and contrast it with different hypotheses of diversification and the taxonomy currently practiced in the group. Sequences of mtDNA (cytochrome b and ND2) and nuclear (?-fibrinogen introns 5 and 7 and the Z-liked Musk4) genes, adding up to 4093bp of 89 individuals covering the Amazonian, Andean, and Atlantic Forest populations of T. aethiops were analyzed. Phylogenetic and population genetics analyses revealed ten reciprocally monophyletic and genetically isolated or nearly-isolated lineages in T. aethiops, highlighting several inconsistencies between taxonomy and evolutionary history in this group. Our data suggest that the diversification of T. aethiops started in the Andean highlands, and then proceeded into the Amazonian lowlands probably after the consolidation of the modern Amazonian drainage. The main cladogenetic events in T. aethiops may be related to the formation and structuring of large Amazonian rivers during the Late Miocene-Early Pleistocene, coinciding with the dates proposed for other lineages of Amazonian organisms. Population genetics data do not support climatic fluctuations as a major source of diversification in T. aethiops. Even though not entirely concordant with paleobiogeographic models derived from phylogenies of other vertebrate lineages, our results support a prominent role for rivers as major drivers of diversification in Amazonia, while underscoring that different diversification scenarios are probably related to the distinct evolutionary origins of groups being compared. PMID:25291073

  12. Crianza Practica de Aves (Practical Poultry Raising). Appropriate Technologies for Development. Peace Corps Information Collection & Exchange Manual Series [No.] M-34.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Kenneth M.

    Written in Spanish, this manual is designed to provide development workers with the information and tools needed to begin or to improve poultry production. Covered in the individual chapters are the following topics: the nature and scope of poultry production, assessment of local poultry selections, basic information about chickens, country…

  13. 216 THE GREAT LAKES ENTOMOLOGIST Vol. 46 Nos. 3 -4 Dept. of Entomology, University of Minnesota, 1980 Folwell Ave., St. Paul, MN 55108.

    E-print Network

    Aukema, Brian

    , Seymour et al. 2010). Cold stress can often limit the distribution of insect species (Denlinger and Lee-intolerant) or mortality may even occur before freezing (i.e., chill- intolerant) (Sømme 1982, Bale 1987, Denlinger and Lee

  14. Effects of food processing and fibre content on the digestibility, energy intake and biochemical parameters of Blue-and-gold macaws (Ara ararauna L. - Aves, Psittacidae).

    PubMed

    Veloso, R R; Sakomura, N K; Kawauchi, I M; Malheiros, E B; Carciofi, A C

    2014-04-01

    Considering the increased incidence of obesity and metabolic diseases in caged psittacines, the effect of fibre and food processing was evaluated in the Blue-and-gold macaw. Four food formulations (0%, 7%, 14% and 21% of sugarcane fibre) processed by pelleting or extrusion were studied, resulting in eight diets. To study digestibility, 48 macaws housed in pairs in cages was used in a block design. Subsequently, diets containing 0% or 21% sugarcane fibre, pelleted or extrude was fed for 4 months to evaluate energy intake and blood metabolites. A 2 × 2 × 2 (two fibre levels, two food processing methods and two genders) factorial arrangement with subplots (beginning and end) was used. When differences were detected in anova's F test, data were submitted to polynomial contrasts in the first experiment and to orthogonal contrasts in the second experiment (p < 0.05). Fibre addition reduced protein, fat and energy (p < 0.001) digestibility in both food processing. Pelleted foods presented higher dry matter digestibility and food metabolisable energy (ME) than the extruded ones (p < 0.05). Fibre addition or the type of processing did not change ME ingestion (p > 0.05). The macaws gained body weight (p < 0.05) regardless of the diet (p > 0.05), but females fed with the high-fibre diets did not gain weight (p > 0.05), suggesting a low food ME (12.5 kJ/g).The substitution of the original diet (sunflower seeds, fruits and cooked maize) by the experimental foods decreased the basal (12-h fast) concentrations of glucose, cholesterol and triglycerides (p < 0.001). The consumption of pelleted diets reduced serum glucose and cholesterol (p < 0.05). Results suggest that the pelleted diets were more beneficial and can be used to reduce blood metabolites related to metabolic disorders that are commonly observed in macaws. PMID:23627662

  15. Coccidia of New World psittaciform birds (Aves: Psittaciformes): Eimeria ararae n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the blue-and-yellow macaw Ara ararauna (Linnaeus).

    PubMed

    do Bomfim Lopes, Bruno; Berto, Bruno Pereira; de Carvalho Balthazar, Lianna Maria; Coelho, Cleide Domingues; Neves, Daniel Medeiros; Lopes, Carlos Wilson Gomes

    2014-06-01

    In the New World, the avian order Psittaciformes comprises 142 species, yet to date only 3 (2%) of the species have been examined for coccidia, and from these only four species of Eimeria Schneider, 1875 have been described. In this study, a new coccidian species (Protozoa: Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) obtained from the blue-and-yellow macaw Ara ararauna (Linnaeus) is reported from Brazil. Oöcysts of Eimeria ararae n. sp. are ovoidal, measure 28.7 × 20.2 ?m and have a smooth, bi-layered wall c.1.1 ?m thick. Both micropyle and oöcyst residuum are absent, but polar granules are present. Sporocysts are ovoidal and measure 17.0 × 8.3 µm, with knob-like, prominent Stieda body and sporocyst residuum is composed of granules; sub-Stieda body is absent. Sporozoites are vermiform with one refractile body and a nucleus. This is the fifth description of an eimerid coccidian infecting a New World psittaciform bird. PMID:24832188

  16. Molecular phylogeny and diversification of a widespread Neotropical rainforest bird group: The Buff-throated Woodcreeper complex, Xiphorhynchus guttatus/susurrans (Aves: Dendrocolaptidae).

    PubMed

    Rocha, Tainá C; Sequeira, Fernando; Aleixo, Alexandre; Rêgo, Péricles S; Sampaio, Iracilda; Schneider, Horacio; Vallinoto, Marcelo

    2015-04-01

    The genus Xiphorhynchus is a species rich avian group widely distributed in Neotropical forests of Central and South America. Although recent molecular studies have improved our understanding of the spatial patterns of genetic diversity in some species of this genus, most are still poorly known, including their taxonomy. Here, we address the historical diversification and phylogenetic relationships of the X. guttatus/susurrans complex, using data from two mitochondrial (cyt b and ND2) and one nuclear (?-fibint7) genes. Phylogenetic relationships were inferred with both gene trees and a Bayesian-based species tree under a coalescent framework (?BEAST). With exception of the nuclear ?-fibint7 gene that produced an unresolved tree, both mtDNA and the species tree showed a similar topology and were congruent in recovering five main clades with high statistical support. These clades, however, are not fully concordant with traditional delimitation of some X. guttatus subspecies, since X. g. polystictus, X. g. guttatus, and X. g. connectens are not supported as distinct clades. Interestingly, these three taxa are more closely related to the mostly trans-Andean X. susurrans than the other southern and western Amazonian subspecies of X. guttatus, which constitutes a paraphyletic species. Timing estimates based on the species tree indicated that diversification in X. guttatus occurred between the end of the Pliocene and early Pleistocene, likely associated with the formation of the modern Amazon River and its main southern tributaries (Xingu, Tocantins, and Madeira), in addition to climate-induced changes in the distribution of rainforest biomes. Our study supports with an enlarged dataset a previous proposal for recognizing at least three species level taxa in the X. guttatus/susurrans complex: X. susurrans, X. guttatus, and X. guttatoides. PMID:25683049

  17. Non-monophyly and deep genetic differentiation across low-elevation barriers in a Neotropical montane bird (Basileuterus tristriatus; Aves: Parulidae)

    E-print Network

    Cuervo, Andrés

    : Andes Geographic barriers Montane forest Phylogeography Serranía de San Lucas Three-striped Warbler a b s t r a c t Most widespread birds of Neotropical cloud forests exhibit phenotypic variation of a clade of Myiothlypis warblers. Geographic boundaries among clades were clearly related to lowland gaps

  18. Diet of the Fuscous Flycatcher Cnemotriccus fuscatus (Wied, 1831) - Aves, Tyrannidae - in three habitats of the northern Pantanal, Mato Grosso, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Gaiotti, M G; Pinho, J B

    2013-11-01

    The Fuscous Flycatcher (Cnemotriccus fuscatus) is a medium-sized Tyrannidae widespread in South America. Despite its large distribution, there have been very few studies on its diet, especially in different habitats. This study presents data on diet variation in three habitats in the Pantanal wetlands in the state of Mato Grosso, Brazil. The specimens were captured through a mist-netting programme between February 2000 and May 2010, in the Retiro Novo Farm, in the Poconé municipality. Birds were captured in three vegetation types: Landizal, Cambarazal and Cordilheira. Tartar emetic was used to obtain the regurgitation samples identified at order level. We captured 61 individuals (21, 26 and 14 in the above described habitats, respectively). Diet of C. fuscatus differed between the three habitats. Ants and beetles were the most relevant prey items either in numerical frequency (NF) or in frequency of occurrence (OF), in terms of the overall diet (NF = 27.34% and 37.89%; OF = 36.06% and 75.4%, respectively). However, in Cordilheira, seeds and beetles dominated the NF (21.8% and 38.1%, respectively) and OF (28.5% and 85.7%, respectively). Cnemotriccus fuscatus was found to have an omnivorous diet, although in Cambarazal, individuals preyed exclusively on arthropods. The present study provides an important contribution to the knowledge of the diet of a poorly studied Neotropical bird. PMID:24789401

  19. 91 Claremont Ave, 7th Floor Mail Code 3365 New York NY 10027 Tel 212-854-2479 ishr@columbia.edu HISTORICAL DIALOGUE ON CHAM ISSUES

    E-print Network

    Qian, Ning

    @columbia.edu HISTORICAL DIALOGUE ON CHAM ISSUES Background The Program on Peace-building and Rights at Columbia University's Institute for the Study of Human Rights organized a "Dialogue on Cham Issues." Participants identified areas perspectives of about 1,000 words commenting on the following statement: "Cham-Albanians suffered internment

  20. 2910 BEDFORD AVE. BROOKLYN, NEW YORK 11210. TELEPHONE (718) 951-4785. FAX (718) 951-4778 WILLIAM D. FORD FEDERAL DIRECT PARENT PLUS LOAN PROGRAM

    E-print Network

    Rosen, Jay

    . FORD FEDERAL DIRECT PARENT PLUS LOAN PROGRAM The Following requirements must be met before submitting a Parent Plus Loan Request: ***If we receive a Parent Plus Loan Request with one of these requirements applied for both subsidized and unsubsidized loans before submitting a Parent Plus Loan After the Parent