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Sample records for diaz forero ave

  1. Congestion-aware Path Selection for Tor Tao Wang, Kevin Bauer, Clara Forero, and Ian Goldberg

    E-print Network

    Goldberg, Ian

    Congestion-aware Path Selection for Tor Tao Wang, Kevin Bauer, Clara Forero, and Ian Goldberg,ciforero,iang}@cs.uwaterloo.ca Abstract. Tor, an anonymity network formed by volunteer nodes, uses the estimated bandwidth of the nodes degrade the network's per- formance, discourage Tor adoption, and consequently reduce the size of Tor

  2. Congestion-aware Path Selection for Tor Tao Wang, Kevin Bauer, Clara Forero, and Ian Goldberg

    E-print Network

    Goldberg, Ian

    Congestion-aware Path Selection for Tor Tao Wang, Kevin Bauer, Clara Forero, and Ian Goldberg,ciforero,iang}@cs.uwaterloo.ca ABSTRACT Tor, an anonymity network formed by volunteer nodes, uses the estimated bandwidth of the nodes degrade the network's performance, discourage Tor adoption, and consequently reduce the size of Tor

  3. Angelique Diaz To Subject UPLOAD

    E-print Network

    EPA-5206 Angelique Diaz To cc bcc Subject UPLOAD C:\\Users\\adiaz01\\Documents\\TELECOMMUTE\\Subpart W To cc bcc Subject UPLOAD C:\\Users\\adiaz01\\Documents\\TELECOMMUTE\\Subpart W\\W WORKGROUP-5177 Angelique Diaz To cc bcc Subject UPLOAD C:\\Users\\adiaz01\\Documents\\TELECOMMUTE\\Subpart W

  4. University Ave SE University Ave W

    E-print Network

    Thomas, David D.

    University Ave SE University Ave W Service Layer Credits: Sources: Esri, DeLorme, NAVTEQ, USGS, Intermap, i UV55 ")280 University Ave. Ramp Major Access Routes University Ave. Ramp §¨¦35W §¨¦94 ")280 Date: 5/30/2014 #12;, , , , , , , ""A TCF Bank Stadium Access Routes University Ave. Ramp University Ave SE Service

  5. Diabetes Mellitus, type 1 Roxanne Diaz Caceres

    E-print Network

    Brutlag, Doug

    Diabetes Mellitus, type 1 Roxanne Diaz Caceres Prof. Brutlag - BIOC 118Q - Autumn 2010 Pro Prod as "Juvenile Diabetes" Defect in insulin secretion or action Can lead to blindness, kidney failure, heart diabetes. · A random blood glucose test can also be used to diagnose diabetes. A blood glucose level of 200

  6. 32. 1700 BLOCK OF JEFFERSON AVE. 172125 JEFFERSON AVE., DOUGAN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. 1700 BLOCK OF JEFFERSON AVE. 1721-25 JEFFERSON AVE., DOUGAN BUILDING (1891), PICKLES & SUTTON, ARCHITECTS. 1735 JEFFERSON AVE., MOFFITT & TOWNE COMPANY BUILDING (1910). - Union Depot Area Study, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

  7. UNIVERSITY AVE VANVOORHISRDVANVOORHISRD

    E-print Network

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    AVE 7THST IRWIN ST STONEGATECIR VILLAGE DR HAILEYLN CHESTNUT HILL NORTHWESTERN AVE WILLOW LN Hospital Parking Garage Chestnut Ridge Hospital Erma Byrd Biomedical Research Center Campus Support Services Chestnut Ridge Research Building 886 Chestnut Ridge Rd Annex Law Center Child Development Center

  8. Distance learning: empathy and culture in Junot Diaz's "Wildwood".

    PubMed

    Garden, Rebecca

    2013-12-01

    This essay discusses critical approaches to culture, difference, and empathy in health care education through a reading of Junot Diaz's "Wildwood" chapter from the 2007 novel The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao. I begin with an analysis of the way that Diaz's narrative invites readers to imagine and explore the experiences of others with subtlety and complexity. My reading of "Wildwood" illuminates its double-edged injunction to try to imagine another's perspective while recognizing the limits to-or even the impossibility of-that exercise. I draw on post-colonial theory and feminist science studies to illuminate a text that is created and interpreted in a post-colonial context-the Dominican diaspora in the United States. The essay offers a model of historical and critical analysis that health care educators can use to frame the concept of empathy in the classroom and the clinic. PMID:23996054

  9. HIGHLAND AVE OVERHILL ST

    E-print Network

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    FORREST AVE BAIRD ST REID ST WATERST BEECHURSTAVE USHWY119HWY119 CHESTNUTST HIGHST WALNUT ST COURT ST Boreman Hall North 652 North High Street WVU Storage & Surplus Center PRT Station Walnut St. RFL House

  10. Herbert Ave BrooklaneDr

    E-print Network

    Jenny, Bernhard

    Dr NeabeackHillDr Fairhaven Dr Gar ryann a Dr OwlPl KingsBlvd 28th 33rd Pl Honeysuckle Princess Fern w o od 13th Pl Yukon WithamDr Hilltop 55th Gerold Bell Ave Mayberry Ave Lar k Pl DairyCenter Morris Ave

  11. HIGHLAND AVE OVERHILL ST

    E-print Network

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    FORREST AVE BAIRD ST REID ST WATERST BEECHURSTAVE USHWY119HWY119 CHESTNUTST HIGHST WALNUT ST COURT ST Boreman Hall North 652 North High Street WVU Storage & Surplus Center PRT Station Walnut St. RFL House HICKO RY ST SAYERS ST TR IPLETT ST TR IPPETT ST KENTST OAK ST WALNUT ST NEW BASEBALL PARK Monongahela

  12. Lomas BLVD. Tucker AVE.

    E-print Network

    New Mexico, University of

    . Frontier AVE. Girard PL. Campus Blvd. Police (Admin.) Fire Station BuenaVista VassarDR. dical Arts Johnson / Rail Runner 25 0.6mi 1.0km Albuquerque International Sunport 2.3mi / 3.7km 40 1.2mi 1.9km 25 0.6mi 1.9 km 1.0mi/1.6km CENTRAL CAMPUS MAP Planning & Campus Development :: Space Management Office

  13. EleventhAve. McIntosh Court

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    . Gopher Ct. Antelope TwelfthAve. FifteenthAve. Stream Stream Wool Lab EleventhAve. Langford Lin eld Hall Motorcycle parking Park only in "D" (distant) designated area at College and 12th (Antelope lot, #18). YS

  14. Total Synthesis of (-)-Mucocin Michael T. Crimmins,* Yan Zhang, and Frank A. Diaz

    E-print Network

    Total Synthesis of (-)-Mucocin Michael T. Crimmins,* Yan Zhang, and Frank A. Diaz Venable and Kenan.; Gharpure, S. J.; Polosukhin, A.; Zhang, H. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2003, 125, 14702. (f) Zhu, L.; Mootoo, D. R

  15. North American species of Agrostocynips Diaz (Hymenoptera: Figitidae), parasitoids of Agromyzidae (Diptera): bionomics and taxonomy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Agrostocynips Diaz is redescribed, as well as two species endemic to the Nearctic: Agrostocynips diastrophi (Ashmead) and A. robusta (Ashmead). Previous to this study, only Neotropical species of Agrostocynips were well diagnosed both taxonomically and biologically. Agrostocynips belongs...

  16. STS-75 Payload Commander Franklin R. Chang-Diaz suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-75 Payload Commander Franklin R. Chang-Diaz (center) chats with Johnson Space Center officials Olan Bertrand (left) and David Leestma (right) during suitup activities in the Operations and Checkout Building. Born in Costa Rica, Chang-Diaz joined NASA in 1980. He has already completed four spaceflights and logged more than 656 hours on-orbit. He and six fellow crew members will depart shortly for Launch Pad 39B, where the Space Shuttle Columbia awaits liftoff during a two-and-a-half-hour launch window opening at 3:18 p.m. EST.

  17. Privacy Threats in E-Shopping (Position Paper) Jesus Diaz1

    E-print Network

    Keromytis, Angelos D.

    rejecting it. Keywords: Privacy, Online shopping, Payment systems, Purchase systems. 1 Introduction E-shopping complex, protecting privacy of consumers has become more difficult. There are multiple parties involvedPrivacy Threats in E-Shopping (Position Paper) Jesus Diaz1 , Seung Geol Choi2 , David Arroyo1

  18. [Jesus Lebron: an interview with the man who threw water at Reverend Ruben Diaz].

    PubMed

    Lebron, J

    1995-01-01

    Jesus Lebron, a gay political activist and person living with AIDS, had a battle with the New York City Civilian Complaint Review Board (CCRB). The agency was created to monitor allegations of police brutality and discrimination against minority groups. It is made up of Asian-Americans, Latins, and gay and lesbian activists. Beginning in the winter of 1993-94, Rev. Ruben Diaz, a member of the CCRB, expressed publicly his AIDS-phobic philosophy. The Gay and Lesbian American (GLA) group sent protest letters to the CCRB demanding that Rev. Diaz be removed. No responses were received. Christopher Lynn, a board member and a gay HIV-positive lawyer, was present at the CCRB open meeting on Oct. 5, 1994. Voices and tempers were flaring and Jesus Lebron, losing control of his temper, flung a jug of water at Diaz and soaked Mr. Lynn as well. Lynn filed both civil and criminal charges, which were later dropped. The interview with Mr. Lebron elaborates on the opinions, feelings and facts which led to and followed the incident. PMID:11363217

  19. 15. WEST SIDE OF 1900 BLOCK, PACIFIC AVE. FROM RIGHT; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. WEST SIDE OF 1900 BLOCK, PACIFIC AVE. FROM RIGHT; 1920-22 PACIFIC AVE., WIEGAL COMPANY CANDY FACTORY (1904); 1924-26 PACIFIC AVE., CAMPBELL BUILDING (DAVIS BUILDING) (1890); 1928-30 PACIFIC AVE., REESE-CRANDALL & REDMAN BUILDING, (1890); 1932-36 PACIFIC AVE., MC DONALD & SMITH BUILDING (1890); 1938-48 PACIFIC AVE., F.S. HARMON COMPANY WAREHOUSE (1908), DESIGNED BY CARL AUGUST DARMER. - Union Depot Area Study, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

  20. STS-91 M.S. Franklin Chang-Diaz and Janet Kavandi participate in CEIT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    STS-91 Mission Specialists Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D., and Janet Kavandi, Ph.D., participate in the Crew Equipment Interface Test, or CEIT, in KSC's Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 2. During CEIT, the crew have an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads with which they'll be working on-orbit. The STS-91 crew are scheduled to launch aboard the Shuttle Discovery for the ninth and final docking with the Russian Space Station Mir from KSC's Launch Pad 39A on May 28 at 8:05 EDT.

  1. Lidar detection using a dual-frequency source Rosemary Diaz, Sze-Chun Chan, and Jia-Ming Liu

    E-print Network

    Chan, Sze-Chun

    Lidar detection using a dual-frequency source Rosemary Diaz, Sze-Chun Chan, and Jia-Ming Liu (Doc. ID 71166); published November 22, 2006 A new technique of dual-frequency Doppler-lidar measurement is investigated. This technique is based on the use of a coherently locked, tunable, dual

  2. William C. Clark --Bibliography January 2015 Diaz Anadon, Laura, Kira Matus, Suerie Moon, Gabriel Chan, Alicia Harley, Sharmila Murthy,

    E-print Network

    Church, George M.

    William C. Clark -- Bibliography ­January 2015 Diaz Anadon, Laura, Kira Matus, Suerie Moon, Gabriel, Jennifer Stephens, Lee Vinsel, and William C. Clark. 2014. Innovation and Access to Technologies, and William C. Clark. 2014. Innovation and Access to Technologies for Sustainable Development: A Global

  3. MAT 593 History of Mathematics Spring 2010 p.1. Instructor: Associate Professor Steven P. Diaz, Carnegie 317C, x1583,

    E-print Network

    McConnell, Terry

    MAT 593 History of Mathematics Spring 2010 p.1. Instructor: Associate Professor Steven P. Diaz, Carnegie 317C, x1583, spdiaz@syr.edu. Text: A History of Mathematics An Introduction 3rd Edition by Victor a term paper on some subject in the history of mathematics. The paper must be at least 6 pages long typed

  4. Astronauts Jeffrey A. Hoffman (left) and Franklin R. Chang-Diaz hold up a sign to celebrate the fact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Astronauts Jeffrey A. Hoffman (left) and Franklin R. Chang-Diaz hold up a sign to celebrate the fact that each has surpassed the 1,000-hour mark in space during the flight. The two mission specialists joined three other astronauts and an international payload specialist for 16 days of scientific research aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia.

  5. UniversityAveUniversityAve 50th St Bu alo Springs Lake50th St

    E-print Network

    Rock, Chris

    31 ToAirport Plainview UniversityAveUniversityAve 50th St Bu alo Springs Lake50th St 66th St66th St Bu alo Springs Lake 5 Cactus Theater 6 Depot Entertainment District 7 Joyland Amusement Park 8 Legacy

  6. Geophysical Logs of Selected Test Wells at the Diaz Chemical Superfund Site in Holley, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eckhardt, David A. V.; Anderson, J. Alton

    2007-01-01

    In June and July 2006, geophysical logs were collected and analyzed along with rock-core samples to define the bedrock stratigraphy and flow zones penetrated by four test wells at the Diaz Chemical Superfund site at Holley in eastern Orleans County, New York. The work was completed as a preliminary part of the investigation of contamination by organic compounds in the shale, mudstone, and sandstone bedrock. The geophysical logs included natural-gamma, caliper, borehole image, fluid properties, and flowmeter data. The orientation of fractures in the boreholes was inferred from the log data and summarized in stereo and tadpole plots; the transmissivity and hydraulic head was also determined for fracture zones that were observed to be hydraulically active through the flowmeter logs. The data are intended in part for use in the remediation of the site.

  7. Medical Chemical Corp. 19430 Van Ness Ave.

    E-print Network

    Wikswo, John

    Medical Chemical Corp. 19430 Van Ness Ave. Torrance, CA 90501 Customer Service: Phone (310 Flammability: None Reactivity: Slight Contact: Slight Recommended safety equipment: safety goggles, lab coat Health Effects The toxicology of this compound have not been completely examined. It is presumed

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Northern Galactic OB stars vsini (Simon-Diaz+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon-Diaz, S.; Herrero, A.

    2014-04-01

    The spectroscopic observations considered for this study are part of the IACOB spectroscopic database of northern Galactic OB stars (last described in Simon-Diaz et al., 2011, Bull. Soc. Roy. Sci. Liege, 80, 514 and Stellar Clusters and Associations: Proc. A RIA Workshop on Gaia, eds. E. J. Alfaro Navarro, A. T. Gallego Calvente, & M. R. Zapatero Osorio, 255). This unique high-quality spectroscopic database has been compiled in the framework of the IACOB project. To date, the IACOB database comprises 1250 spectra of 153 and 97 Galactic O- and early B-type stars, respectively, observable from the Roque de los Muchachos observatory in La Palma (Spain). The spectra have a resolving power of 46000 and 23000, a typical signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) above 150, and were compiled between November 2008 and January 2013 with the high-resolution FIbre-fed Echelle Spectrograph (FIES) attached to the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT). The IACOB database has a multi-epoch character that enables investigations of the binary/multiple nature of considered stars and the temporal variations in individual objects with at least three spectra per observed target. In this study, we only used a subsample of the spectra, discarding all stars with signatures of multiplicity (which means that we only considered apparently single and SB1 stars), and only considering the spectrum with the highest S/N ratio per star. (5 data files).

  9. Diaz-Calderon, A. / Towards a Unified Representation of Mechanisms for Robotic Control Software, pp. xx -yy International Journal of Advanced Robotic Systems, Volume y, Number x (200x), ISSN 1729-8806

    E-print Network

    Diaz-Calderon, A. / Towards a Unified Representation of Mechanisms for Robotic Control Software, pp. xx - yy International Journal of Advanced Robotic Systems, Volume y, Number x (200x), ISSN 1729-8806 Towards a Unified Representation of Mechanisms for Robotic Control Software Antonio Diaz-Calderon, Issa A

  10. GRANT AVE., FROM SOUTHEAST OF BUILDING #191 (NORTHWEST CORNER OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GRANT AVE., FROM SOUTHEAST OF BUILDING #191 (NORTHWEST CORNER OF POPE & GRANT AVENUES), LOOKING NORTH-NORTHEAST - Fort Leavenworth, Metropolitan Avenue & Seventh Street, Leavenworth, Leavenworth County, KS

  11. AVE-SESAME program for the REEDA System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    The REEDA system software was modified and improved to process the AVE-SESAME severe storm data. A random access file system for the AVE storm data was designed, tested, and implemented. The AVE/SESAME software was modified to incorporate the random access file input and to interface with new graphics hardware/software now available on the REEDA system. Software was developed to graphically display the AVE/SESAME data in the convention normally used by severe storm researchers. Software was converted to AVE/SESAME software systems and interfaced with existing graphics hardware/software available on the REEDA System. Software documentation was provided for existing AVE/SESAME programs underlining functional flow charts and interacting questions. All AVE/SESAME data sets in random access format was processed to allow developed software to access the entire AVE/SESAME data base. The existing software was modified to allow for processing of different AVE/SESAME data set types including satellite surface and radar data.

  12. Certhiasomus, a new genus of woodcreeper (Aves: Passeriformes: Dendrocolaptidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Derryberry, Elizabeth; Claramunt, Santiago; Chesser, R. Terry; Aleixo, Alexandre; Cracraft, Joel; Moyle, Robert G.; Brumfield, Robb T.

    2010-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of the family Dendrocolaptidae (Aves: Passeriformes) indicates that the two species traditionally placed in the genus Deconychura are not sister taxa. Certhiasomus, a new genus of woodcreeper, is described for one of these species, C. stictolaemus.

  13. LOOKING NORTHEAST TOWARD NORTHERN AVE. SWING BRIDGE. BOSTON TEA PARTY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LOOKING NORTHEAST TOWARD NORTHERN AVE. SWING BRIDGE. BOSTON TEA PARTY SHIP AT ANCHOR IN FOREGROUND. - Northern Avenue Swing Bridge, Spanning Fort Point Channel at boundary between Boston & South Boston, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  14. Enigmatic phylogeny of skuas (Aves:Stercorariidae)

    PubMed

    Cohen, B L; Baker, A J; Blechschmidt, K; Dittmann, D L; Furness, R W; Gerwin, J A; Helbig, A J; de Korte, J; Marshall, H D; Palma, R L; Peter, H U; Ramli, R; Siebold, I; Willcox, M S; Wilson, R H; Zink, R M

    1997-02-22

    Multiple sources of evidence show that the skuas (Aves:Stercorariidae) are a monophyletic group, closely related to gulls (Laridae. On morphological and behavioural evidence the Stercorariidae are divided into two widely divergent genera, Catharacta and Stercorarius, consistent with observed levels of nuclear and mitochondrial gene divergence. Catharacta skuas are large-bodied and with one exception breed in the Southern Hemisphere. Stercorarius skuas otherwise known as jaegers) are smaller bodied and breed exclusively in the Northern Hemisphere. Evidence from both mitochondrial and nuclear genomes and from ectoparasitic lice (Insecta:Phthiraptera) shows that the Pomarine skua, S. pomarinus, which has been recognized as being somewhat intermediate in certain morphological and behavioural characteristics, is much more closely related to species in the genus Catharacta, especially to the Northern Hemisphere-breeding Great skua, C. skua, than it is to the other two Stercorarius skuas, the Arctic skua, S. parasiticus and the Longtailed skua, S. longicaudus. Three possible explanations that might account for this discordant aspect of skua phylogeny are explored. These involve (i) the segregation of ancestral polymorphism, (ii) convergent evolution of morphology and behaviour or (iii) inter-generic hybridization. The available evidence from both nuclear and mitochondrial genomes does not exclude any of these hypotheses. Thus, resolution of this enigma of skua phylogeny awaits further work. PMID:9061968

  15. Nuclear and Mitochondrial Genes Contain Similar Phylogenetic Signal for Pigeons and Doves (Aves: Columbiformes)

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Kevin P.

    Nuclear and Mitochondrial Genes Contain Similar Phylogenetic Signal for Pigeons and Doves (Aves of this assumption in the pigeons and doves (Aves: Columbiformes) by comparing phylog- enies derived from nuclear

  16. A preliminary look at AVE-SESAME 2 conducted on 19-20 April 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, S. F.; Horvath, N.; Turner, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    Preliminary information on data collected, synoptic conditions, and severe and unusual weather reported during the AVE-SESAME 2 period is presented. The information provides researchers a preliminary look at conditions during the AVE-SESAME 2 period.

  17. DISTRIBUCI~NY ABUNDANCIA DE LAS AVES EN LA PEN~NSULAIBERICA. UNA APROXIMACI~N

    E-print Network

    Carrascal, Luis M.

    sobre su avifauna. La distribuci6n geo- grafica de las aves en Iberia es el resultado de la interacci6n abundancia de las aves en Iberia, poniendo especial Cnfasis en 10spatrones existentes a gran escala (tanto

  18. AVE-SESAME 1: 25-MB sounding data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhard, M. L.; Fuelberg, H. E.; Williams, S. F.; Turner, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Seven atmospheric variability experiments (AVE), two atmospheric variability and severe storms experiments (AVSSE), and six atmospheric variability experiment-severe environmental storm and mesoscale experiments (AVE-SESAME) conducted by NASA are discussed. The dates, observation times, and data reports for each of the experiments for which data was processed are listed. The AVE experiments were conducted primarily to study atmospheric variability with emphasis on spatial and temporal in atmospheric structure that can be detected from soundings taken at 3 hr intervals but not seen in soundings taken at 12 hr intervals. The AVSSE experiments were conducted to study atmospheric structure and variability associated with severe storms combining both rawinsonde and aircraft data to provide information on near storm environments. The method of processing is discussed, estimates of the rms errors in the data are presented, an example of contact data is given, and soundings are listed which exhibited abnormal characteristics.

  19. STS-46 MS Hoffman and MS Chang-Diaz wear masks during pre-breathe on OV-104

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-46 Mission Specialist (MS) and Payload Commander (PLC) Jeffrey A. Hoffman and MS Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, wearing breathing apparatus masks, pose on the forward flight deck of Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, during pre-breathe session. With the possibility of an extravehicular activity (EVA) being added to the STS-46 agenda, the astronauts reported to this station and began the 'pre-breathe' process when problems developed during the extension of the Tethered Satellite System 1 (TSS-1). When the human body is exposed to a sudden decrease in atmospheric pressure (for instance, from the 10.2 ppsi in the crew cabin to the 4.5 ppsi of the extravehicular mobility unit (EMU)), nitrogen traces in the bloodstream will expand. This expansion can create tiny bubbles and potential for the 'bends'. In order to lessen the effect, an astronaut must 'pre-breathe' pure oxygen (the same pure oxygen he will breathe in the suit) to help 'purge' nitrogen from his bloodstream before exerting himself

  20. 1. 133842 PACIFIC AVE. ITALIANATE BUILDING ON LEFT IS THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. 1338-42 PACIFIC AVE. ITALIANATE BUILDING ON LEFT IS THE CITIZENS BANK AND THE IRVING BUILDING (1888-89). A HOMOGENEOUS DESIGN FOR THREE SEPERATE PROPERTY OWNERS, DESIGNED BY CARL AUGUST DARMER. - Union Depot Area Study, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

  1. BOLETIN DE AVES MARINAS LATINOAMERICANAS VOLUMEN 2; NUMERO UNO

    E-print Network

    Duffy, David Cameron

    el manejo de aves marinas y sus lugares de anidaci6n. Informes pueden ser en espanol, ingl~s, 0 publicaci6n es en ingles y los informes pueden ser traducidos por los editores. Para m~s informaci6n 0 para

  2. Pseudasthenes, a new genus of ovenbird (Aves: Passeriformes: Furnariidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Derryberry, Elizabeth; Claramunt, Santiago; O'Quin, Kelly E.; Aleixo, Alexandre; Chesser, Terry; Remsen, J.V., Jr.; Brumfield, Robb T.

    2010-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of the family Furnariidae (Aves: Passeriformes) indicates that the genus Asthenes is polyphyletic, consisting of two groups that are not sister taxa. Pseudasthenes, a new genus of ovenbird, is described for one of these groups. The four species included in the new genus, formerly placed in Asthenes, are P. humicola, P. patagonica, P. steinbachi, and P. cactorum.

  3. AVES: A Computer Cluster System approach for INTEGRAL Scientific Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federici, M.; Martino, B. L.; Natalucci, L.; Umbertini, P.

    The AVES computing system, based on an "Cluster" architecture is a fully integrated, low cost computing facility dedicated to the archiving and analysis of the INTEGRAL data. AVES is a modular system that uses the software resource manager (SLURM) and allows almost unlimited expandibility (65,536 nodes and hundreds of thousands of processors); actually is composed by 30 Personal Computers with Quad-Cores CPU able to reach the computing power of 300 Giga Flops (300x10{9} Floating point Operations Per Second), with 120 GB of RAM and 7.5 Tera Bytes (TB) of storage memory in UFS configuration plus 6 TB for users area. AVES was designed and built to solve growing problems raised from the analysis of the large data amount accumulated by the INTEGRAL mission (actually about 9 TB) and due to increase every year. The used analysis software is the OSA package, distributed by the ISDC in Geneva. This is a very complex package consisting of dozens of programs that can not be converted to parallel computing. To overcome this limitation we developed a series of programs to distribute the workload analysis on the various nodes making AVES automatically divide the analysis in N jobs sent to N cores. This solution thus produces a result similar to that obtained by the parallel computing configuration. In support of this we have developed tools that allow a flexible use of the scientific software and quality control of on-line data storing. The AVES software package is constituted by about 50 specific programs. Thus the whole computing time, compared to that provided by a Personal Computer with single processor, has been enhanced up to a factor 70.

  4. Last Name First Name Award held by CNR Start Date End Date Type AllenDiaz Barbara Russell L. Rustici Chair in Rangeland Management 7/1/2010 6/30/2015 renewed

    E-print Network

    Wildermuth, Mary C

    Last Name First Name Award held by CNR Start Date End Date Type AllenDiaz Barbara Russell L/30/2019 renewed Last Name First Name Award held by Campus Start Date End Date Type Fowlie Meredith Class of 1935

  5. WORKSHOP REPORT Fernando Diaz

    E-print Network

    Dumais, Susan

    Bay, a well-known online marketplace and show, with examples, how useful and novel commerce experiences and Shopping Abstract Marketers view user purchase behavior as moving through a purchasing funnel over time through different shopping phases during long-lasting tasks, such as shopping for goods and services while

  6. AVE-SESAME 6: 25-MB sounding data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sienkiewicz, M. E.; Gilchrist, L. P.; Turner, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    The rawinsonde sounding program for the AVE-SESAME 6 experiment is described and tabulated data at 25 mb intervals from the surface to 25 mb for the 23 National Weather Service and 15 special stations participating in the experiment are presented. Soundings were taken at 3 h intervals beginning at 1200 GMT on June 7, 1979, and ending at 1200 GMT on June 8, 1979 (nine sounding times). The method of processing is discussed briefly, estimates of the rms errors in the data presented, an example of contact data given, reasons given for the termination of soundings below 100 mb, and soundings are listed which exhibit abnormal characteristics.

  7. AVE-SESAME IV: 25 mb sounding data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sienkiewicz, M. E.; Gilchrist, L. P.; Turner, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    The rawinsonde sounding program for the AVE-SESAME 4 experiment is descirbed and tabulated data at 25 mb for the 23 National Weather Service and 20 special stations participating in the experiment are presented. Soundings were taken at 3 hr intervals beginning at 1200 GMT on May 9, 1979, and ending at 1200 GMT on May 10, 1979 (nine sounding times). The method of processing is discussed, estimates of the rms errors in the data are presented, and an example of contact data is given. Reasons are given for the termination of soundings below 100 mb, and soundings are listed which exhibit abnormal characteristics.

  8. AVE-SESAME 2: The 25-MB sounding data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, S. F.; Gerhard, M. L.; Turner, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    The rawinsonde sounding program for the AVE-SESAME II experiment is described. Data at 25 mb intervals from the surface to 25 mb for the 23 National Weather Service and 19 special stations participating in the experiment are presented. Soundings were taken at 3 hr intervals beginning at 1200 GMT on April 19, 1979, and ending at 1200 GMT on April 20, 1979 (nine sounding times). The method of processing is discussed briefly, estimates of the rms errors in the data presented, an example of contact data given, reasons given for the termination of soundings below 100 mb, and soundings listed which exhibit abnormal characteristics.

  9. 1. VIEW OF MILL WORKER HOUSE AT 502 ASKEW AVE. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW OF MILL WORKER HOUSE AT 502 ASKEW AVE. HOUSE IS 1 1/2 STORY, 3 BAY SIDE GABLE WITH REAR KITCHEN ELL AND PORCH EXTENDING FROM FRONT. LOCKWOOD GREENE ENGINEERS BUILT THIS AND 128 OTHER NEW HOUSES FOR NEW ENGLAND SOUTHERN MILLS IN 1923-1924. THE PREEXISTING MILL VILLAGE NEEDED TO BE EXPANDED TO ACCOMODATE WORKERS FOR THEIR NEW STARK MILL IN HOGANSVILLE. THIS HOUSE WAS BUILT WITH INDOOR PLUMBING, AND ELECTRICITY AT A COST OF APPROXIMATELY $430 PER ROOM. - 502 Askew Avenue (House), 502 Askew Avenue, Hogansville, Troup County, GA

  10. The AVE/VAS 2: The 25 mb sounding data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sienkiewicz, M. E.

    1982-01-01

    The rawinsonde sounding program for the AVE/VAS II experiment is described and tabulated data at 25 mb intervals are presented. Soundings were taken at 3 hr intervals, was an 18 hour period. An additional sounding was taken at the normal synoptic observation time. The processing soundings method is discussed, estimates of the RMS errors in the data are presented, and an example of contact data is given. Termination pressures of soundings taken in the meso-beta-scale network are tabulated, as are observations of ground temperature at a depth of 2 cm.

  11. AVE-Sesame 3: 25-MB sounding data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, S. T.; Gerhard, M. L.; Gilchrist, L. P.; Turner, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    The rawinsonde sounding program for the AVE-SESAME 3 experiment is described and tabulated data at 25-mb intervals from the surface to 25 mb for the 23 National Weather Service and 19 special stations participating in the experiment are presented. Soundings were taken at 3 hr intervals beginning at 1200 GMT on April 25, 1979, and ending at 1200 GMT on April 26, 1979 (nine sounding times). The method of processing is discussed briefly, estimates of the rms errors in the data presented, an example of contact data given, reasons given for the termination of soundings below 100 mb, and soundings listed which exhibit abnormal characteristics.

  12. East Bank locations University Ave & 12th St. SE -Sanford Hall

    E-print Network

    Thomas, David D.

    East Bank locations University Ave & 12th St. SE - Sanford Hall Pleasant St. SE - SE corner Scott Hall East River Parkway - SW corner Fraser Hall Harvard St. SE - SW corner Centennial Hall Oak St. SE - U of MN Bike Center Harvard St. SE - south of Rec. Ctr. pedestrian crossing 23rd Ave. & 6th St. SE

  13. NASA's participation in the AVE-SESAME '79 program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, K.; Turner, R. E.; Wilson, G. S.

    1979-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center participated with its AVE (Atmospheric Variability Experiment) in a large interagency mesoscale and severe storms experiment identified herein as AVE-SESAME '79 (Atmospheric Variability Experiment-Severe Environmental Storms and Mesoscale Experiment 1979). A primary objective of NASA was to support an effort to acquire carefully edited sets of rawinsonde data during selected severe weather events for use in correlative and diagnostic studies with satellite and radar data obtained at approximately the same times. Data were acquired during six individual 24-h experiments on both the regional and storm scales over a network in the central United States that utilized approximately 20 supplemental rawinsonde sites meshed among 23 standard National Weather Service sites. Included among the six experiments are data obtained between 1200 GMT on April 10 and 1200 GMT on April 11, encompassing the formation and development period for the tornado-producing systems that devastated Wichita Falls, Texas, and other sections of Oklahoma and Texas. The other dates for which data sets are available are April 19-20 and 25-26, May 9-10 and 20-21, and June 7-8, 1979.

  14. Comparative sequence-structure analysis of Aves insulin

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Md Mirazul; Aktaruzzaman, M; Mohamed, Zahurin

    2015-01-01

    Normal blood glucose level depends on the availability of insulin and its ability to bind insulin receptor (IR) that regulates the downstream signaling pathway. Insulin sequence and blood glucose level usually vary among animals due to species specificity. The study of genetic variation of insulin, blood glucose level and diabetics symptoms development in Aves is interesting because of its optimal high blood glucose level than mammals. Therefore, it is of interest to study its evolutionary relationship with other mammals using sequence data. Hence, we compiled 32 Aves insulin from GenBank to compare its sequence-structure features with phylogeny for evolutionary inference. The analysis shows long conserved motifs (about 14 residues) for functional inference. These sequences show high leucine content (20%) with high instability index (>40). Amino acid position 11, 14, 16 and 20 are variable that may have contribution to binding to IR. We identified functionally critical variable residues in the dataset for possible genetic implication. Structural models of these sequences were developed for surface analysis towards functional representation. These data find application in the understanding of insulin function across species. PMID:25848166

  15. AVE-SEASAME 5: 25-mb sounding data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sienkiewicz, M. E.; Gilchrist, L. P.; Turner, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    The rewinsonde sounding program for the AVE-SESAME 5 experiment is described and tubulated data at 25 mb intervals are presented for the 23 National Weather Service stations and 20 special stations participating in the experiment. Soundings were taken at 3-hr intervals beginning at 1200 GMT on May 20, 1979, and ending at 1200 GMT on may 21, 1979 (nine sounding times). A tenth sounding was teken at many special stations between 2100 and 0000 GMT on May 20. The method of processing is discussed, estimates of the rms errors in the data are presented, and an example of contact data is given. Reasons are given for the termination of soundings below 100 mb, and soundings with abnormal characteristics are listed.

  16. AVE/VAS 3: 25-mb sounding data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sienkiewicz, M. E.

    1982-01-01

    The rawinsonde sounding program for the AVE/VAS 3 experiment is described. Tabulated data are presented at 25-mb intervals for the 24 National Weather Service stations and 14 special stations participating in the experiment. Soundings were taken at 3-hr intervals, beginning at 1200 GMT on March 27, 1982, and ending at 0600 GMT on March 28, 1982 (7 sounding times). An additional sounding was taken at the National Weather Service stations at 1200 GMT on March 28, 1982, at the normal synoptic observation time. The method of processing soundings is briefly discussed, estimates of the RMS errors in the data are presented, and an example of contact data is given. Termination pressures of soundings taken in the mesos-beta-scale network are tabulated, as are observations of ground temperature at a depth of 2 cm.

  17. 46. FACING EAST FROM N.Y. AVE. AND 11th STREETS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. FACING EAST FROM N.Y. AVE. AND 11th STREETS - Convention Center Site, I Street, 900 & 1000 Block, Tenth Street, 800 & 900 Block, New York Avenue, 900 & 1000 Block, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  18. A preliminary look at AVE-SESAME 3 conducted on 25-26 April 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, S. F.; Horvath, N.; Turner, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    General weather conditions, including synoptic maps, radar reports, satellite photographs, precipitation areas and amounts, and a summary of severe weather reports are presented. These data provide researchers a preliminary look at conditions during the AVE-SESAME 3 period.

  19. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 2): GE Wiring Devices, Juana Diaz, Puerto Rico (first remedial action), September 1988. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-01

    The GE Wiring Devices site is located in Juana Diaz, Puerto Rico. The General Electric Company (G.E.) owns and operates a five-acre wiring devices plant at this site, which assembled silent mercury switches from 1957 until 1969. Approximately half a ton of mercury was discarded along with 4,000 cu yds of defective switch parts and plastic scraps in an onsite waste-fill area about 1 acre in area and 1 to 4 feet deep. Ground water in the area is used as a source of drinking water with a public supply well located approximately 1,500 feet west of the waste-fill area. Evidence indicates that contamination of the water table is occurring due to the migration of perch water through the clay layer that exists beneath the waste-fill area. Approximately 1,500 cu yds of near-surface soil south and downgradient of the waste-fill area has been contaminated by mercury as a result of previous surface runoff from the plant area. The selected remedial action for this site includes: onsite hydrometallurgical treatment of the waste-fill materials, perched water, and contaminated near-surface soil with disposal of the treatment residue in the former waste-fill area, followed by covering with a clean soil cover, and onsite treatment of the process leaching agent.

  20. AVE8062: a new combretastatin derivative vascular disrupting agent.

    PubMed

    Delmonte, Angelo; Sessa, Cristiana

    2009-10-01

    Angiogenesis has an essential role in promoting and supporting tumor growth and it is an important therapeutic target. The tumor vascular network is the result of pro-angiogenic and inhibitory factors as well as of the interaction between endothelial cells and extracellular matrix. Different antiangiogenic therapeutics have been developed to improve tumor control through vascular-targeting agents (VTA). VTAs can be divided into two groups: antiangiogenic agents and vascular-disrupting agents (VDAs). VTAs inhibit specific factors required to induce and direct the angiogenic process, with major activity against small tumor masses and at the tumor periphery, encompassing monoclonal antibodies and small molecules inhibitors of the tyrosine kinase domain of the VEGF receptor. VDAs specifically target and destroy well-established tumor vessels with ischemia and destruction of large masses with central hemorrhagic necrosis and survival of a thin peripheral tumor layer. VDAs can be divided into biologics, such as ligand-based, and small-molecule agents; this second group includes small-molecule VDAs like flavonoids, such as 5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid (DMXAA), and microtubule-destabilizing agents. In this review we will discuss the mechanism of action, as well as the preclinical and clinical results, of one of the most promising antitubulin agents: the combretastatin A4-phosphate derivative, AVE8062A. PMID:19758109

  1. Effects of changing irrigation practices on the ground-water hydrology of the Santa Isabel-Juana Diaz area, south central Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramos-Gines, Orlando

    1994-01-01

    Prior to 1930, the principal source of water for irrigation in the Santa Isabel-Juana Diaz area was surface water from outside the study area, which was delivered by a complex channel-pond system. Recharge from water applied to the fields, estimated to be 18.7 million of gallons per day, and discharge by ground-water flow to sea, estimated to be 17 million of gallons per day, were the major water- budget components prior to intensive development of the ground-water resources. Development of the ground-water resources after 1930 resulted in a substantial increase in irrigation, primarily furrow irrigation. The surface water supplied by the complex channel-pond system continued to be used and ground-water withdrawals increased sub- stantially. By 1966-68, ground-water recharge from irrigation water applied to the fields, estimated to be 37 million of gallons per day, and discharge by pumpage for irrigation, estimated to be 77 million of gallons per day, were the two major components of the ground-water budget. By 1987, drip irrigation had become the principal method of irrigation in the study area, and surface-water irrigation had, for the most part, been discontinued. The estimated aquifer recharge from irrigation water in 1987 was about 6.6 million of gallons per day, which occurred primarily in the remaining fields where furrow irrigation was still practiced. Although aquifer recharge had been reduced as a result of the conversion from furrow to drip irrigation, water levels in the aquifer were higher in 1987 than in 1968 because of the large reduction in ground-water withdrawals and subsequent recovery of ground-water levels.

  2. UNIVERSITY AVE UNIVERSITY AVE

    E-print Network

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    ) Maintenance/Repair Shop Facilities Management Building Physical Plant House Center of Sustainable Design PDC Monongahela River Dreamswork Field Women's Soccer Practice Facility Dick Dlesk Soccer Complex Mountaineer Museum Education Center EVANSDALE CROSSING Student Recreation Center Health & Education Building Mineral

  3. Reduction and error analysis of the AVE 2 pilot experiment data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuelberg, H. E.

    1974-01-01

    The reduction techniques used to process data from the pilot experiment of the second NASA atmospheric variability experiment (AVE IIP), which was conducted during a 24 hour period beginning at 1200 GMT on May 11, 1974, and ending at 1200 GMT on May 12, 1974 are described. Each step of the data handling process is described through the presentation of computer flow charts, programs, equations, and narrative. An error analysis of the final output is presented, and results of the AVE IIP reduction process are compared with results from the National Weather Service. The AVE IIP sounding data contain more detail than National Weather Service data, but the two data sets may be used together without difficulty.

  4. Pressure Contact Sounding Data for NASA's Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE 3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuelberg, H. E.; Hill, C. K.; Turner, R. E.; Long, K. E.

    1975-01-01

    The basic rawinsonde data are described at each pressure contact from the surface to sounding termination for the 41 stations participating in the AVE III measurement program that began at 0000 GMT on February 6 and ended at 1200 GMT on February 7, 1975. Soundings were taken at 3-hour intervals during a large period of the experiment from most stations within the United States east of about 105 degrees west longitude. Methods of data processing, change in reduction scheme since the AVE II pilot experiment, and data accuracy are briefly discussed. An example of contact data is presented, and microfiche cards of all the contact data are included in the appendix. The AVE III project was conducted to better understand and establish the extent of applications for meteorological satellite sensor data through correlative ground truth experiments and to provide basic experimental data for use in studies of atmospheric scales of-motion interrelationships.

  5. A preliminary look at AVE-SESAME 4 conducted on 9-10 May 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    July, M.; Turner, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    This report contains information on data collected, symptotic conditions, and severe and unusual weather reported during the Atmospheric Variability Experiment Severe Environmental Storms and Mesoscale Experiment (AVE-SESAME) 4 period. The information provides researchers a look at conditions during the period.

  6. Atlas de aves: Un metodo para documentar distribucion y seguir poblaciones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robbins, C.S.; Dowell, B.A.; Dawson, D.K.

    1988-01-01

    Los Atlas de Aves son proyectos nacionales o regionalies para trazar en mapas la distribucion en reproduccion de cada especie de ave. Ese procedimiento se esta usando en Europa, Australia, Nueva Zelanda, Norteamerica, y partes de Africa. El tama?o de los cuadrados varia de medio grado de latitud y Iongitud hasta 5 x 5 km. El trabajo de campo de cada proyecto exige aproxlmadamente cinco a?os, pero los aficionados pueden llevar a cabo la mayor parte del trabajo. Es posible almacenar los resultados en un computador personal. Hay muchos beneficios: (I) se presenta la distribucion corriente de las aves de la nacion, del estado, o de la Iocalidad; (2) se desarrolla nueva informacion especialmente sobre especies raras o en peligro; (3) se descubren areas que tienen una avlfauna sobresaliente o habitats raros y ayuda a su proteccion, (4) se documentan cambios de dlstribucion; (5) se pueden usar para documentar cambios de poblacion, especialmente en los tropicos donde otros metodos son mas dificiles de usar porque hay muchas especies y no hay muchos observadores calificados en la identificacion de sonidos de las aves; (6) son proyectos buenos de investigacion para estudiantes graduados; (7) los turistas y los jefes de excursiones de historia natural pueden contribuir con muchas informaciones

  7. MAIN GATE, INTERSECTION OF 4TH AVE (200 NORTH) AND N ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MAIN GATE, INTERSECTION OF 4TH AVE (200 NORTH) AND N STREET (895 EAST), SALT LAKE CITY, UT. VIEW LOOKING EAST THROUGH MAIN CEMETERY GATE TO CEMETERY'S MAIN STREET, REPHOTOGRAPH OF HISTORIC SHIPLER PHOTO # 18276, UTAH STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY COLLECTION. - Salt Lake City Cemetery, 200 N Street, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT

  8. S.L. AVES and R.H. JOHNSONDecember 2008 919 1. Introduction

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Richard H.

    S.L. AVES and R.H. JOHNSONDecember 2008 919 1. Introduction Diurnal variation is a prominent generates significant diurnal variations in vertical motion, diabatic heating, and circulation patterns. 2007). Others have documented a significant diurnal cy- cle of proxy variables for convective activity

  9. SELECCIN DE ACACIAS PARA LA CONSTRUCCIN DE NIDOS DE AVES: UN BENEFICIO INDIRECTO DEL MUTULISMO

    E-print Network

    Cuervo, Andrés

    SELECCIÓN DE ACACIAS PARA LA CONSTRUCCIÓN DE NIDOS DE AVES: UN BENEFICIO INDIRECTO DEL MUTULISMO caducifolio centroamericano, y comúnmente construyen sus nidos en acacias, principalmente en Acacia collinsii alimenta de las secreciones de los nectarios y los cuerpos de Belt de la de la acacia. Por su parte, la

  10. WATERSHED COUNCIL Chairman: Carl Lee Hill 2925 SW 6th Ave., Ste. 2 Coordinator: Jennifer Martin

    E-print Network

    OWYHEE WATERSHED COUNCIL Chairman: Carl Lee Hill 2925 SW 6th Ave., Ste. 2 Coordinator: Jennifer resources for the economic and environmental benefit of the Owyhee watershed. June 10, 2004 NWPCC Attn: Lynn: DRAFT OWYHEE SUBBASIN PLAN Enclosed is the dissenting opinion of the Owyhee Watershed Council intended

  11. DEPAUL UNIVERSITY Institute for Professional Development INSTITUTE FOR PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 243 S. Wabash Ave, Room 301

    E-print Network

    Schaefer, Marcus

    DEPAUL UNIVERSITY Institute for Professional Development INSTITUTE FOR PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 243 S. Wabash Ave, Room 301 Chicago, IL 60604-2300 DATA SCIENCE FOR BUSINESS PROGRAM Phone: (312) 362 you for this certificate program? Yes ____ No ____ Are you applying for enrollment in the on

  12. Graystone Group Advertising, 2710 North Ave, Suite 200 Bridgeport, CT 06604 Phone: 8005440005 or 2035490060 Fax: 2035490061

    E-print Network

    Stuart, Steven J.

    Graystone Group Advertising, 2710 North Ave, Suite 200 Bridgeport, CT 06604 Phone: 8005440005 or 2035490060 Fax: 2035490061 Email: ads@graystoneadv.com Placing Recruitment Advertising To assist University departments with all recruitment and advertising needs, Clemson is now partnered

  13. Hemodynamic Effects of the Non-Peptidic Angiotensin-(1-7) Agonist AVE0991 in Liver Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Schierwagen, Robert; Grace, Josephine; Haltenhof, Tom; Uschner, Frank E.; Strassburg, Christian P.; Sauerbruch, Tilman; Walther, Thomas; Angus, Peter W.; Trebicka, Jonel

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Although in cirrhosis with portal hypertension levels of the vasoconstrictor angiotensin II are increased, this is accompanied by increased production of angiotensin (Ang)-(1–7), the endogenous ligand of the Mas receptor (MasR), which blunts hepatic fibrosis and decreases hepatic vascular resistance. Therefore, we investigated the effects of the non-peptidic Ang-(1–7) agonist, AVE0991, in experimental cirrhosis. Methods Cirrhosis was induced by bile duct ligation (BDL) or carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) intoxication. The coloured microsphere technique assessed portal and systemic hemodynamic effects of AVE0991 in vivo. Hepatic expression of eNOS, p-eNOS, iNOS, JAK2, ROCK and p-Moesin were analyzed by western blots. Activities of ACE and ACE2 were investigated fluorometrically. Moreover, fibrosis was assessed in BDL rats receiving AVE0991. Results In vivo, AVE0991 decreased portal pressure (PP) in both rat models of cirrhosis. Importantly, systemic effects were not observed. The hepatic effects of AVE0991 were based on upregulation of vasodilating pathways involving p-eNOS and iNOS, as well as by downregulation of the vasoconstrictive pathways (ROCK, p-Moesin). Short-term treatment with AVE0991 decreased the activity of ACE2, long-term treatment did not affect hepatic fibrosis in BDL rats. Conclusions The non-peptidic agonist of Ang-(1–7), AVE0991, decreases portal pressure without influencing systemic pressure. Thus, although it does not inhibit fibrosis, AVE0991 may represent a promising new therapeutic strategy for lowering portal pressure. PMID:26406236

  14. Complete mitochondrial genome of Germain's Peacock-Pheasant Polyplectron germaini (Aves, Galliformes, Phasianidae).

    PubMed

    Omeire, Destiny; Abdin, Shaunte; Brooks, Daniel M; Miranda, Hector C

    2015-04-01

    The Germain's Peacock-Pheasant Polyplectron germaini (Aves, Galliformes, Phasianidae) is classified as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List. The complete mitochondrial genome of P. germaini is 16,699 bp, consisting of 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA, 22 tRNA genes and 1 control region. All of the 13 protein-coding genes have ATG as start codon. Eight of the 13 protein-coding genes have TAA as stop codon. PMID:24460165

  15. Data for NASA's AVE 4 experiment: 25 mb sounding data and synoptic charts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fucik, N. F.; Turner, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    The AVE IV Experiment is described and tabulated rawinsonde data at 25 mb intervals from the surface to 25 mb for the 42 stations participating in the experiment are presented. Soundings were taken between 0000 GMT, April 24, and 1,200 GMT, April 25, 1975. The methods of data processing and accuracy are briefly discussed. Synoptic charts prepared from the data are presented, as well as an example of contact data.

  16. Stop Fee Pick-up Place Bus Leaves By Stop 1 $50 Island City Wal-mart Supercenter, 11619 Island Ave 7:45 AM

    E-print Network

    Tullos, Desiree

    Stop Fee Pick-up Place Bus Leaves By Stop 1 $50 Island City Wal-mart Supercenter, 11619 Island Ave Pendleton Sinclair, 313 SE Nye, Exit 210 5:30 PM Stop 6 Island City Wal-mart Supercenter, 11619 Island Ave 6

  17. Comparative morphometric study of the vestibular system of the vertebrata: reptilia, aves, amphibia, and pisces.

    PubMed

    Ramprashad, F; Landolt, J P; Money, K E; Laufer, J

    1986-01-01

    Morphometric measurements were made from serial sections of the vestibular system in four classes of vertebrates: Reptilia, Aves, Amphibia, and Pisces. Representative species of reptile studied were the lizard (Gekko gecko), the common garter snake (Thamnophis sp.), and the common turtle (Chelonia sp.). The budgie (Melopsittacus undulatas), the common pigeon (Columba domestica), the yellow-bellied sapsucker (Sphyrapicus varius), and the horned owl (Bubo virginianus) were chosen as representative of the bird. For the amphibian, the leopard frog (Rana pipiens), and the mud puppy (Necturus maculatus) were chosen for study. As representative of the fish, the goldfish (Carassius auratus), the tilapia (Tilapia mossambica), the guppy (Lebistes sp.), and the sea horse (Hippocampus sp.) were used in these measurements. The morphometric data obtained were then used in estimates of the time constants in the Steinhausen equation which describes the biophysics of fluid flow in the semicircular canals. In general, the time constants (theta/II in the Steinhausen equation) of these representatives of Reptilia, Aves, and Amphibia were of magnitude similar to those reported in mammals, despite the dissimilarities in the diameters of the ducts, the duct radii of curvature, the dimensions of the cristae ampullares and the utricle, and volumes of endolymph within the vestibular system. However, the short-time constants in Pisces were larger (therefore providing a slower response) than those in other vertebrates, and were similar to that of the turtle and the mud puppy. PMID:3485883

  18. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-? (PPAR-?) agonist, AVE8134, attenuates the progression of heart failure and increases survival in rats

    PubMed Central

    Linz, Wolfgang; Wohlfart, Paulus; Baader, Manuel; Breitschopf, Kristin; Falk, Eugen; Schäfer, Hans-Ludwig; Gerl, Martin; Kramer, Werner; Rütten, Hartmut

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the efficacy of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-? (PPAR?) agonist, AVE8134, in cellular and experimental models of cardiac dysfunction and heart failure. Methods: In Sprague Dawley rats with permanent ligation of the left coronary artery (post-MI), AVE8134 was compared to the PPAR? agonist rosiglitazone and in a second study to the ACE inhibitor ramipril. In DOCA-salt sensitive rats, efficacy of AVE8134 on cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis was investigated. Finally, AVE8134 was administered to old spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) at a non-blood pressure lowering dose with survival as endpoint. In cellular models, we studied AVE8134 on hypertrophy in rat cardiomyocytes, nitric oxide signaling in human endothelial cells (HUVEC) and LDL-uptake in human MonoMac-6 cells. Results: In post-MI rats, AVE8134 dose-dependently improved cardiac output, myocardial contractility and relaxation and reduced lung and left ventricular weight and fibrosis. In contrast, rosiglitazone exacerbated cardiac dysfunction. Treatment at AVE8134 decreased plasma proBNP and arginine and increased plasma citrulline and urinary NOx/creatinine ratio. In DOCA rats, AVE8134 prevented development of high blood pressure, myocardial hypertrophy and cardiac fibrosis, and ameliorated endothelial dysfunction. Compound treatment increased cardiac protein expression and phosphorylation of eNOS. In old SHR, treatment with a low dose of AVE8134 improved cardiac and vascular function and increased life expectancy without lowering blood pressure. AVE8134 reduced phenylephrine-induced hypertrophy in adult rat cardiomyocytes. In HUVEC, Ser-1177-eNOS phosphorylation but not eNOS expression was increased. In monocytes, AVE8134 increased the expression of CD36 and the macrophage scavenger receptor 1, resulting in enhanced uptake of oxidized LDL. Conclusion: The PPAR? agonist AVE8134 prevents post-MI myocardial hypertrophy, fibrosis and cardiac dysfunction. AVE8134 has beneficial effects against hypertension-induced organ damages, resulting in decreased mortality. The compound exerts its protective properties by a direct effect on cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, but also indirectly via monocyte signaling and increased endothelial NO production. PMID:19503102

  19. Thermal Analysis on Hex Placement Patterns of the Gemini Primary Gemini Telescopes Project, 950 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson AZ 85719

    E-print Network

    Incorporated, Science & Technology Division Corning, NY 14831 ABSTRACT Ultra Low Expansion (ULE) TM material, the variation of CTE and CTE gradients may effect the optical quality. A mathematical thermal model was employed Telescopes Project, 950 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson AZ 85719 W. R. Powell Corning Incorporated, Science

  20. Thermal Analysis on Hex Placement Patterns of the Gemini Primary Gemini Telescopes Project, 950 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson AZ 85719

    E-print Network

    Incorporated, Science & Technology Division Corning, NY 14831 ABSTRACT Ultra Low Expansion (ULE)TM material, the variation of CTE and CTE gradients may effect the optical quality. A mathematical thermal model was employed Telescopes Project, 950 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson AZ 85719 W. R. Powell Corning Incorporated, Science

  1. Michael W. Cole (mwcole@mwcole.net) CV March 11, 2015 1 Michael W. Cole 197 University Ave.

    E-print Network

    Cole, Michael W.

    Michael W. Cole (mwcole@mwcole.net) ­ CV ­ March 11, 2015 1 Michael W. Cole 197 University Ave. Newark, NJ 07102 Phone: (314) 632-6536 E-mail: mwcole@mwcole.net Web: www.colelab.org Education 2009, with the interdisciplinary backgrounds, deep knowledge in chosen disciplines, and technical, professional, and personal

  2. Nicole Campbell WSU Vancouver Library 14204 NE Salmon Creek Ave, Vancouver WA 98686 360-546-9687

    E-print Network

    of the Library's website, managing the authentication system, and maintaining access to databases, electronic as part of the Library's systems team. · Teach instruction sessions and workshops on libraryNicole Campbell WSU Vancouver Library 14204 NE Salmon Creek Ave, Vancouver WA 98686 360

  3. 500 University Ave., Rochester, NY 14607-1484 Tel: 585-276-8949 clothesline@mag.rochester.edu

    E-print Network

    by June 1 and mail to Memorial Art Gallery, Attention: Stefanie Schwingle, 500 University Ave, Rochester ___________ Contact: # of Performers: Cell Phone: (for contact purposes on day of performance) Yes, we would like@mag.rochester.edu On the web: clothesline.rochester.edu CALLING ALL PERFORMERS! The Memorial Art Gallery's Clothesline Festival

  4. University Ave. Spring eld Ave.

    E-print Network

    Gao, Grace Xingxin

    Mechanical Engineering Lab 19 Micro and Nanotechnology Lab 20 National Center for Supercomputing Applications Superconductivity Center 29 Talbot Lab 30 Transportation Building 31 New Electrical & Computer Engineering Building

  5. Morris Park Ave Rhinelander Ave

    E-print Network

    Bukauskas, Feliksas

    Albert Einstein College of Medicine ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE OF MEDICINE JACK AND PEARL RESNICK CAMPUS Building 19. Einstein Boiler Plant JACOBI MEDICAL CENTER 20. Nurses' Residence MEDICAL PARK EINSTEIN PROGRAM LOCATIONS Glass Building Ob/Gyn Private Practice

  6. Characteristics of ageostrophic flow in the vicinity of a severe weather outbreak - AVE-SESAME I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    GOES satellite data was used to examine the ageostrophic flow in the vicinity of severe weather outbreaks along the Red River between Texas and Oklahoma in April 1979. The observations were part of the NASA AVE-SESAME I data on atmospheric states close to severe weather conditions. The Barnes Objective Analysis Technique was employed to analyze the data on a 100 km grid. The ageostrophic wind was defined on a regional scale from satellite data on different levels of cloud wind vectors, with a height change signalling a short-wave system in a long-wave trough. The percentage of deviation of the subgeostrophic winds from the geostrophic wind was calculated, and maximum departure corresponded with the region of greatest storm development. Time cross sections of additions to the ageostrophic flow were made as a function of pressure at 100 mb intervals from 900-100 mb. The ageostrophic acceleration was consistently twice the geostrophic acceleration.

  7. Impact evaluation of lighting retrofit projects at Boeing Commercial Airplane Group under The Energy $avings Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, G.P.; Oens, M.A.; Spanner, G.E.

    1994-01-01

    This impact evaluation of two lighting retrofit projects that were recently installed at Boeing Commercial Airplane Group (Boeing) was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) as part of an evaluation of its Energy $avings Plan (E$P) Program. The first project was a light-fixture and lighting control retrofit, consisting of five individual measures installed in Building 40-05. The second project was a retrofit of all parking lot lighting on the site. The objective of this impact evaluation was to assess how much electrical energy is being saved at Boeing as a result of the E$P projects and to determine how much the savings cost Bonneville and the region. The impact of the project was evaluated with a combination of engineering analysis, financial analysis, interviews, and submittal reviews (Boeing`s proposals and completion reports).

  8. A Megafauna’s Microfauna: Gastrointestinal Parasites of New Zealand’s Extinct Moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes)

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Jamie R.; Wilmshurst, Janet M.; Rawlence, Nicolas J.; Bonner, Karen I.; Worthy, Trevor H.; Kinsella, John M.; Cooper, Alan

    2013-01-01

    We perform the first multidisciplinary study of parasites from an extinct megafaunal clade using coprolites from the New Zealand moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes). Ancient DNA and microscopic analyses of 84 coprolites deposited by four moa species (South Island giant moa, Dinornis robustus; little bush moa, Anomalopteryx didiformis; heavy-footed moa, Pachyornis elephantopus; and upland moa, Megalapteryx didinus) reveal an array of gastrointestinal parasites including coccidians (Cryptosporidium and members of the suborder Eimeriorina), nematodes (Heterakoidea, Trichostrongylidae, Trichinellidae) and a trematode (Echinostomida). Parasite eggs were most prevalent and diverse in coprolites from lowland sites, where multiple sympatric moa species occurred and host density was therefore probably higher. Morphological and phylogenetic evidence supports a possible vicariant Gondwanan origin for some of the moa parasites. The discovery of apparently host-specific parasite taxa suggests paleoparasitological studies of megafauna coprolites may provide useful case-studies of coextinction. PMID:23451203

  9. TES Carbon Monoxide Validation during the Two AVE Campaigns using the Argus and ALIAS Instruments on NASA's WB-57F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, Jinena P.; Luo, Ming; Christensen, Lance E.; Loewenstein, Max; Jost, Hansjurg; Webster, Christopher R.; Osterman, Greg

    2008-01-01

    The Aura Validation Experiment (AVE) focuses on validating Aura satellite measurements of important atmospheric trace gases using ground-based, aircraft, and balloon-borne instruments. Global satellite observations of CO from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) on the EOS Aura satellite have been ongoing since September 2004. This paper discusses CO validation experiments during the Oct-AVE (2004 Houston, Texas) and CR-AVE (2006 San Jose, Costa Rica) campaigns. The coincidences in location and time between the satellite observations and the available in situ profiles for some cases are not ideal. However, the CO distribution patterns in the two validation flight areas are shown to have very little variability in the aircraft and satellite . observations, thereby making them suitable for validation comparisons. TES CO profiles, which typically have a retrieval uncertainty of 10-20%, are compared with in situ CO measurements from NASA Ames Research Center's Argus instrument taken on board the WB-57F aircraft during Oct-AVE. TES CO retrievals during CR-AVE are compared with in situ measurements from Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Aircraft Laser Infrared Absorption Spectrometer (ALIAS) instrument as well as with the Argus instrument, both taken on board the WB-57F aircraft. During CR-AVE, the average overall difference between ALIAS and Argus CO was 4%, with the ALIAS measurement higher. During individual flights, 2-min time-averaged differences between the two in situ instruments had standard deviation of 14%. The TES averaging kernels and a priori constraint profiles for CO are applied to the in situ data for proper comparisons to account for the reduced vertical resolution and the influence of the a priori in the satellite-derived profile. In the TES sensitive pressure range, approx.700-200 hPa, the in situ profiles and TES profiles agree within 5-10%, less than the variability in CO distributions obtained by both TES and the aircraft instruments in the two regions. TES CO is slightly lower than in situ measurements in the Houston area (midlatitudes) and slightly higher than in situ CO measurements in the Costa Rica region (tropical).

  10. BOLETIN DE AVES MARINAS LATINOAMERICANAS [C.I.P.A. (I.C.B.P . )! P.S:G.] VOLUMEN 1 , NUMERO 1 , 1986.

    E-print Network

    Duffy, David Cameron

    projectos , y cualquier otra informaci6n que pueda ser de interes. Una versi6n del mismo, en ingles , sera, Quito , Ecuador. Texto en Espanal e Ingles . Contiene sels capitulos dedicados a l as aves marinas de

  11. Data for NASA's AVE 3 experiment: 25-mb sounding data and synoptic charts. [investigation of atmospheric parameters detected from satellite data under conditions of heavy snow cover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuelberg, H. E.; Turner, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    The atmospheric variability experiment (AVE 3) is described and tabulated rawinsonde data at 25-mb intervals from the surface to 25 mb for the 41 stations is presented. The experiment was conducted between February 6 and February 7, 1975. Brief discussions are given on methods of data processing, changes in the reduction scheme since the AVE 2 pilot experiment, and data accuracy. An example of contact data is presented as well as synoptic charts prepared from the data.

  12. 2006 DRY BEAN CANNING TRIAL, 1-9-2006 AVE. NAVY G H BLACK G H M S

    E-print Network

    2006 DRY BEAN CANNING TRIAL, 1-9-2006 AVE. NAVY G H BLACK G H M S 1 VISTA 3.1 3.6 43 T-39 3.7 2.4 101 C05653 4 X 35 ALBION 3.9 102 HS-C10 4.4 X 103 HS-C11 2.9 X PINTO S 64 OTHELLO 5.7 LIGHT Red KIDNEY

  13. A comprehensive multilocus phylogeny for the wood-warblers and a revised classification of the Parulidae (Aves)

    E-print Network

    Burns, Kevin J.

    of the Parulidae (Aves) Irby J. Lovette a, , Jorge L. Pérez-Emán b , John P. Sullivan a , Richard C. Banks c , Isabella Fiorentino a , Sergio Córdoba-Córdoba a,1 , María Echeverry-Galvis a,1 , F. Keith Barker d , Kevin Research Institute, Balboa, Panama a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 2 March 2010 Revised 22

  14. A high-precision chronology for the rapid extinction of New Zealand moa (Aves, Dinornithiformes)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, George L. W.; Wheeler, Andrew B.; Wood, Jamie R.; Wilmshurst, Janet M.

    2014-12-01

    Megafaunal extinction followed the prehistoric human settlement of islands across the globe, but the exact duration and dynamics of the extinction processes are difficult to determine. The New Zealand moa (Aves, Dinornithiformes) are a prime example, where, despite an extensive fossil and archaeological record, debate continues about their extinction chronology and how extinction timings varied among regions and species. We apply probabilistic sightings methods to 111 high-quality radiocarbon dates (from a pool of 653 dates) on moa remains from natural and archaeological sites to provide a high-resolution spatio-temporal chronology of moa extinction. We interpret this alongside an estimated time for the onset of hunting pressure, obtained by applying the same methods to the most reliable proxies for initial human settlement of New Zealand: coprolites of and seeds gnawed by the commensal Pacific rat (Rattus exulans). By comparing local and national extinction times, we discriminate between the point at which hunting stopped (economic extinction) and the total extinction of moa (ca 150 and 200 years after settlement, respectively). Extinction occurred contemporaneously at sites separated by hundreds of kilometres. There was little difference between the extinction times of the smallest (20-50 kg) and largest (200+ kg) moa species. Our results demonstrate how rapidly megafauna were exterminated from even large, topographically- and ecologically-diverse islands such as New Zealand, and highlight the fragility of such ecosystems in the face of human impacts.

  15. A synoptic analysis of the first AVE-SESAME '79 period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, J. T.; Fuelberg, H. E.

    1981-01-01

    Key features of a severe convection observed during April 10-11, 1979 as part of the Atmospheric Variability Experiment-Severe Environmental Storms and Mesoscale Experiment (AVE-SESAME) are examined. Three-hourly rawinsonde readings from 23 stations were taken, and vertical motion and divergence parameters are considered. The data were converted into a 127 km grid at the surface, and at 50 mb intervals from 900 mb to 100 mb by an objective analysis scheme, while a kinematic method was used to compute vertical motion. A weak upper tropospheric short wave trough was found to propagate from New Mexico into the Texas panhandle, while a jet maximum propagated eastward. The development of a strong wind maximum over Oklahoma and Kansas was associated with a rapid increase in upper-level divergence and the development of a small-scale pressure perturbation in the Texas panhandle, as well as a low-level jet and convergence, which led to rapid changes over the Red River Valley, where stability was decreased.

  16. Unexpected divergence and lack of divergence revealed in continental Asian Cyornis flycatchers (Aves: Muscicapidae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Xiaoyang; Huang, Yuan; Olsson, Urban; Martinez, Jonathan; Alström, Per; Lei, Fumin

    2016-01-01

    The flycatcher genus Cyornis (Aves: Muscicapidae) comprises 25 species with Oriental distributions. Their relationships are poorly known. We analyzed the phylogenetic relationships of 70 individuals from 12 species and several subspecies of Cyornis based on three mitochondrial genes and five nuclear introns, with special focus on Chinese and Vietnamese populations of the monotypic C. hainanus and polytypic C. rubeculoides. We found no support for inclusion of C. concretus in Cyornis. Deep divergences were observed among different subspecies of C. banyumas and C. rubeculoides. C. rubeculoides glaucicomans was also shown to have a highly distinctive song, and we propose that it is treated as a distinctive Chinese endemic species, C. glaucicomans. In contrast, the south Vietnamese C. rubeculoides klossi, which has a disjunct distribution from the other subspecies of C. rubeculoides, along with a recently discovered population in Guangdong Province (China) with several plumage features reminiscent of C. r. klossi, were indistinguishable in all loci analyzed from the phenotypically markedly different C. hainanus. More research is needed to elucidate the reasons for this unexpected pattern. PMID:26358612

  17. Resolving lost herbivore community structure using coprolites of four sympatric moa species (Aves: Dinornithiformes)

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Jamie R.; Wilmshurst, Janet M.; Richardson, Sarah J.; Rawlence, Nicolas J.; Wagstaff, Steven J.; Worthy, Trevor H.; Cooper, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of extinct herbivore community structuring is essential for assessing the wider ecological impacts of Quaternary extinctions and determining appropriate taxon substitutes for rewilding. Here, we demonstrate the potential for coprolite studies to progress beyond single-species diet reconstructions to resolving community-level detail. The moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes) of New Zealand are an intensively studied group of nine extinct herbivore species, yet many details of their diets and community structuring remain unresolved. We provide unique insights into these aspects of moa biology through analyses of a multispecies coprolite assemblage from a rock overhang in a montane river valley in southern New Zealand. Using ancient DNA (aDNA), we identified 51 coprolites, which included specimens from four sympatric moa species. Pollen, plant macrofossils, and plant aDNA from the coprolites chronicle the diets and habitat preferences of these large avian herbivores during the 400 y before their extinction (?1450 AD). We use the coprolite data to develop a paleoecological niche model in which moa species were partitioned based on both habitat (forest and valley-floor herbfield) and dietary preferences, the latter reflecting allometric relationships between body size, digestive efficiency, and nutritional requirements. Broad ecological niches occupied by South Island giant moa (Dinornis robustus) and upland moa (Megalapteryx didinus) may reflect sexual segregation and seasonal variation in habitat use, respectively. Our results show that moa lack extant ecological analogs, and their extinction represents an irreplaceable loss of function from New Zealand’s terrestrial ecosystems. PMID:24082104

  18. A molecular phylogeny of Pacific honeyeaters (Aves: Meliphagidae) reveals extensive paraphyly and an isolated Polynesian radiation.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Michael J; Naikatini, Alivereti; Moyle, Robert G

    2014-02-01

    We investigated the molecular phylogenetic placement of 14 species of Pacific island honeyeaters (Aves: Meliphagidae) in the broader context of an existing family-level phylogeny. We examined the evolutionary history of Pacific honeyeater lineages to assess the accuracy of current taxonomies and to evaluate their biogeographic history. We compare these biogeographic patterns to other Pacific birds to identify emergent patterns across lineages. We found strong support for a previously unknown endemic radiation in central Polynesia, which comprises five genera: Meliarchus, Guadalcanaria, Gymnomyza, Xanthotis, and Foulehaio. Conversely, other Pacific lineages were found to be strongly allied with continental radiations (e.g., Philemon eichhorni, P. cockerelli, and Lichmera incana). Our results necessitated taxonomic changes, both at the generic level (e.g., Xanthotis, Melidectes/Vosea, and Glycifohia/Gliciphila) and regarding species limits within polytypic species. Here, we discuss species limits in Foulehaio and Gymnomyza and recommend elevating three nominal subspecies of Foulehaio to species status, each of which forms well-differentiated clades. PMID:24315868

  19. Coprolite deposits reveal the diet and ecology of the extinct New Zealand megaherbivore moa (Aves, Dinornithiformes)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Jamie R.; Rawlence, Nicolas J.; Rogers, Geoffery M.; Austin, Jeremy J.; Worthy, Trevor H.; Cooper, Alan

    2008-12-01

    The discovery in New Zealand of Late Holocene deposits of coprolites from extinct avian megaherbivores has provided a unique opportunity to gain a detailed insight into the ecology of these birds across ecologically diverse habitats. Macrofossil analysis of 116 coprolites of the giant ratite moa (Aves, Dinornithiformes) reveals a diverse diet of herbs and low shrubs in both semi-arid and high rainfall ecological zones, overturning previous models of moa as dominantly browsers of trees and shrubs. Ancient DNA analysis identified coprolites from four moa species (South Island giant moa, Dinornis robustus; upland moa, Megalapteryx didinus; heavy-footed moa, Pachyornis elephantopus and stout-legged moa, Euryapteryx gravis), revealing a larger dietary variation between habitat types than between species. The new data confirm that moa fed on a variety of endemic plant taxa with unusual growth forms previously suggested to have co-evolved with moa. Lastly, the feeding ecologies of moa are shown to be widely different to introduced mammalian herbivores.

  20. Molecular phylogeny of the spoonbills (Aves: Threskiornithidae) based on mitochondrial DNA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chesser, R. Terry; Yeung, Carol K.L.; Yao, Cheng-Te; Tian, Xiu-Hua; Li, Shou-Hsien

    2010-01-01

    Spoonbills (genus Platalea) are a small group of wading birds, generally considered to constitute the subfamily Plataleinae (Aves: Threskiornithidae). We reconstructed phylogenetic relationships among the six species of spoonbills using variation in sequences of the mitochondrial genes ND2 and cytochrome b (total 1796 bp). Topologies of phylogenetic trees reconstructed using maximum likelihood, maximum parsimony, and Bayesian analyses were virtually identical and supported monophyly of the spoonbills. Most relationships within Platalea received strong support: P. minor and P. regia were closely related sister species, P. leucorodia was sister to the minor-regia clade, and P. alba was sister to the minor-regia-leucorodia clade. Relationships of P. flavipes and P. ajaja were less well resolved: these species either formed a clade that was sister to the four-species clade, or were successive sisters to this clade. This phylogeny is consistent with ideas of relatedness derived from spoonbill morphology. Our limited sampling of the Threskiornithinae (ibises), the putative sister group to the spoonbills, indicated that this group is paraphyletic, in agreement with previous molecular data; this suggests that separation of the Threskiornithidae into subfamilies Plataleinae and Threskiornithinae may not be warranted.

  1. Molecular phylogeny of the spoonbills (Aves: Threskiornithidae) based on mitochondrial DNA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chesser, R.T.; Yeung, C.K.L.; Yao, C.-T.; Tian, X.-H.; Li, S.-H.

    2010-01-01

    Spoonbills (genus Platalea) are a small group of wading birds, generally considered to constitute the subfamily Plataleinae (Aves: Threskiornithidae). We reconstructed phylogenetic relationships among the six species of spoonbills using variation in sequences of the mitochondrial genes ND2 and cytochrome b (total 1796 bp). Topologies of phylogenetic trees reconstructed using maximum likelihood, maximum parsimony, and Bayesian analyses were virtually identical and supported monophyly of the spoonbills. Most relationships within Platalea received strong support: P. minor and P. regia were closely related sister species, P. leucorodia was sister to the minor-regia clade, and P. alba was sister to the minor-regia-leucorodia clade. Relationships of P. flavipes and P. ajaja were less well resolved: these species either formed a clade that was sister to the four-species clade, or were successive sisters to this clade. This phylogeny is consistent with ideas of relatedness derived from spoonbill morphology. Our limited sampling of the Threskiornithinae (ibises), the putative sister group to the spoonbills, indicated that this group is paraphyletic, in agreement with previous molecular data; this suggests that separation of the Threskiornithidae into subfamilies Plataleinae and Threskiornithinae may not be warranted. Copyright ?? 2010. Magnolia Press.

  2. Effect of deuteration on metabolism and clearance of Nerispirdine (HP184) and AVE5638.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Joseph; Derdau, Volker; Atzrodt, Jens; Zane, Patricia; Guo, Zuyu; van Horn, Robert; Czepczor, Valérie; Stoltz, Axelle; Pardon, Magalie

    2015-07-01

    Replacing hydrogen with deuterium as a means of altering ADME properties of drug molecules has recently enjoyed a renaissance, such that at least two deuterated chemical entities are currently in clinical development. Although most research in this area aims to increase the metabolic stability, and hence half-life of the active species, experience has shown that prediction of the in vivo behaviour of deuterated molecules is difficult and depends on multiple factors including the complexity of the metabolic scheme, the enzymes involved and hence the mechanism of the rate-determining step in the biotransformation. In an effort to elucidate some of these factors we examined the metabolic behaviour of two molecules from the Sanofi portfolio in a range of in vitro and in vivo systems. Although some key metabolic reactions of the acetylcholine release stimulator HP184 4 were slowed in vitro and in vivo when deuterium was present at the sites of metabolism, this did not translate to an increase in overall metabolic stability. By contrast, the tryptase inhibitor AVE5638 13 was much more metabolically stable in vitro in its deuterated form than when unlabelled. These results indicate that it could be of value to concentrate efforts in this area to molecules which are metabolised by a major pathway that involves enzymes of the amine oxidase family or other low-capacity enzyme families. PMID:25900628

  3. Embodying animals: Body-part compatibility in mammalian, reptile and aves classes.

    PubMed

    Pacione, Sandra M; Welsh, Timothy N

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine how humans code homologous body parts of nonhuman mammal, reptilian, and aves animals with respect to the representation of the human body. To this end, participants completed body-part compatibility tasks in which responses were executed to colored targets that were superimposed over the upper limbs, lower limbs or head of different animals in different postures. In Experiment 1, the images were of meekats and lizards in bipedal and quadrupedal postures. In Experiment 2, the images were of a human, a penguin, and an owl in a bipedal posture with upper limbs stretched out. Overall, the results revealed that the limbs of nonhuman mammals (meerkat and human) were consistently mapped onto the homologous human body parts only when the mammals were in a bipedal posture. Specifically, body-part compatibility effects emerged for the human and the meerkat in a bipedal posture, but not the meerkat in the quadrupedal posture. Further, consistent body-part compatibility effects were not observed for the lizard in the quadrupedal posture or for the lizard, penguin, or owl in a bipedal posture. The pattern of results suggests that the human bipedal body representation may distinguish taxonomical classes and is most highly engaged when viewing homologous body parts of mammalian animals. PMID:26233729

  4. Impact evaluation of an Energy $avings Plan project at Holnam Incorporated

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.R.; Spanner, G.E.

    1993-05-01

    This impact evaluation of four energy conservation measures (ECMs) that were recently installed at Holnam Incorporated (Holnam) was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) as part of an evaluation of its Energy $avings Plan (E$P) Program. The Program makes acquisition payments to firms that install energy conservation measures in their industrial processes. The objective of this impact evaluation was to assess how much electrical energy is being saved at Holnam as a result of the E$P and to determine how much the savings cost Bonneville and the region. The impact of the ECMs was evaluated with a combination of engineering analysis, financial analysis, site visit and interview, and review of previous program submittals (Holnam's Proposals and Completion Reports). The four ECMs were all electronic power control devices that replaced less efficient technologies for controlling power to the kiln drive motors, cooler grate drive motors, cooler fan motors, and kiln stack gas precipitators. Energy savings from this project are expected to be 1,782,000 kWh/yr or 0.20 average megawatts. On a unit production basis, this project will save 3.4 kWh/ton of cement, based on Holnam's projected average annual future production rate. The four ECMs cost a total of $248,232 to install, and Holnam received payment of $115,615 from Bonneville for the acquisition of energy savings. Program administrative costs incurred by Bonneville, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), and Seattle City Light (SCL) were estimated to be $29,362. The real levelized cost (1992 $) of these energy savings to Bonneville will be 6.2 mills/kWh over the project's expected 15-year life, and the real levelized cost (1992 $) to the region will be 14.1 mills/kWh. Based on expected ECM installation costs and energy savings benefits alone, none of the four ECMs would have been implemented by Holnam without the E$P acquisition payment.

  5. Diaz-Guilera Vega-Redondo

    E-print Network

    Newman, Mark

    Prada Dasgupta Nishikawa Forrest Balthrop Leicht Rho Onnela Chakraborti Kanto Jarisaramaki Rosenblum Bassler the bibliographies of two review articles, by M. Newman (SIAM Review 2003) and by S. Boccaletti et al. (Physics Re

  6. Impact evaluation of an Energy $avings Plan project at Holnam Incorporated

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.R.; Spanner, G.E.

    1993-05-01

    This impact evaluation of four energy conservation measures (ECMs) that were recently installed at Holnam Incorporated (Holnam) was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) as part of an evaluation of its Energy $avings Plan (E$P) Program. The Program makes acquisition payments to firms that install energy conservation measures in their industrial processes. The objective of this impact evaluation was to assess how much electrical energy is being saved at Holnam as a result of the E$P and to determine how much the savings cost Bonneville and the region. The impact of the ECMs was evaluated with a combination of engineering analysis, financial analysis, site visit and interview, and review of previous program submittals (Holnam`s Proposals and Completion Reports). The four ECMs were all electronic power control devices that replaced less efficient technologies for controlling power to the kiln drive motors, cooler grate drive motors, cooler fan motors, and kiln stack gas precipitators. Energy savings from this project are expected to be 1,782,000 kWh/yr or 0.20 average megawatts. On a unit production basis, this project will save 3.4 kWh/ton of cement, based on Holnam`s projected average annual future production rate. The four ECMs cost a total of $248,232 to install, and Holnam received payment of $115,615 from Bonneville for the acquisition of energy savings. Program administrative costs incurred by Bonneville, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), and Seattle City Light (SCL) were estimated to be $29,362. The real levelized cost (1992 $) of these energy savings to Bonneville will be 6.2 mills/kWh over the project`s expected 15-year life, and the real levelized cost (1992 $) to the region will be 14.1 mills/kWh. Based on expected ECM installation costs and energy savings benefits alone, none of the four ECMs would have been implemented by Holnam without the E$P acquisition payment.

  7. Serologic, parasitic, and bacteriologic assessment of captive cracids (Aves: Galliformes: Cracidae) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Marques, Marcus Vinícius Romero; Junior, Francisco Carlos Ferreira; Andery, Danielle de Assis; Fernandes, André Almeida; de Araújo, Alessandra Vitelli; de Resende, José Sérgio; Martins, Nelson Rodrigo da Silva

    2013-03-01

    Captive cracids (Aves: Galliformes: Cracidae), including endangered species, were studied (n = 130) for the assessment of health status, including Aburria jacutinga (black-fronted piping-guan, n = 42), Crax blumenbachii (red-knobbed curassow, n = 54), Craxfasciolata (bare-faced curassow, n = 28), and Penelope obscura (dusky-legged guan, n = 6). The exposure to Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG), Mycoplasma synoviae (MS), Salmonella pullorum (SP), Salmonella gallinarum (SG), avian paramyxovirus-1 (APMV-1), and infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) were determined by serology, and SG and SP also were evaluated by culture. Ectoparasites and endoparasites were identified using light microscopy. Sera were negative by the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test for antibodies to MG or MS, although serum was reactive to MG (32%, 42/130) by the rapid serum agglutination test (SAT). Although positive reactions (26.9%, 35/130) for SP and SG were detected by SAT, cloacal swab cultures were negative for SP and SG. IBDV antibodies were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in two dusky-legged guans (1.5%, 2/130). HI antibody titers to APMV-1 were found in 20 (15.3%) cracids, with titers ranging from 16 to 1,024. Fifty percent of birds (65/130) had ectoparasites. Lice (Menacanthus spp.) and mites (Astigmata: Analgesidae, Megninidae; Megninia spp.) were found in red-knobbed curassow; Megninia spp. also were found in bare-faced curassow, black-fronted piping-guan, and dusky-legged guan. Eleven black-fronted piping-guans presented dual parasitism by Megninia spp. and Ornithonyssus spp. Endoparasites were detected in 16.1% (21/130) of birds, and some with multiple parasites. Oocysts of coccidia and eggs of Capillaria spp. (Nematoda: Trichuroidea) were found in the feces of red-knobbed curassow. Eggs of Strongyloides spp. were found in the feces of bare-faced curassow, and eggs of Ascaridia spp., Capillaria spp., and Strongyloides spp. were found in black-fronted piping-guan. Cysts of Blastocystis spp. were found in dusky-legged guan. Antibodies to IBDV and APMV-1 indicate previous exposure. However, considering that birds were clinically normal, immune stimulation might have been from live chicken vaccine strain infections that are widely used in Brazilian poultry. The high parasitism levels indicate that a routine inspection for internal and external parasites is warranted. PMID:23505700

  8. Effect of AVE 0991 angiotensin-(1-7) receptor agonist treatment on elemental and biomolecular content and distribution in atherosclerotic plaques of apoE-knockout mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalska, J.; Gajda, M.; Jawie?, J.; Kwiatek, W. M.; Appel, K.; Dumas, P.

    2013-12-01

    Gene-targeted apolipoprotein E-knockout (apoE-KO) mice display early and highly progressive vascular lesions containing lipid deposits and they became a reliable animal model to study atherosclerosis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of AVE 0991 angiotensin-(1-7) receptor agonist on the distribution of selected pro- and anti- inflammatory elements as well as biomolecules in atherosclerotic plaques of apoE-knockout mice. Synchrotron radiation-based X-ray fluorescence (micro-XRF) and Fourier Transform Infrared (micro-FTIR) microspectroscopies were applied. Two-month-old apoE-KO mice were fed for following four months diet supplemented with AVE 0991 (0.58 ?mol/kg b.w. per day). Histological sections of ascending aortas were analyzed spectroscopically. The distribution of P, Ca, Fe and Zn were found to correspond with histological structure of the lesion. Significantly lower contents of P, Ca, Zn and significantly higher content of Fe were observed in animals treated with AVE 0991. Biomolecular analysis showed lower lipids saturation level and lower lipid to protein ratio in AVE 0991 treated group. Protein secondary structure was studied according to the composition of amide I band (1660 cm-1) and it demonstrated higher proportion of ?-sheet structure as compared to ?-helix in both studied groups.

  9. PROJECT NAME: MEMPHIS AVE. DAM (EPWU Dam #4-TX07017) 1. Provide the name of all non-Federal interests planning to act as the sponsor, including

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    PROJECT NAME: MEMPHIS AVE. DAM (EPWU Dam #4-TX07017) 1. Provide the name of all non. The purpose for the feasibility study is to determine the need to update/upgrade the dam in order to assist (NFIP), which allows for flood insurance discounts to local residents. #12;Image 1: Dam location

  10. PROJECT NAME: TREMONT AVE. DAM (EPWUDam #7-TX07020) 1. Provide the name of all non-Federal interests planning to act as the sponsor, including

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    PROJECT NAME: TREMONT AVE. DAM (EPWUDam #7- TX07020) 1. Provide the name of all non. The purpose for the feasibility study is to determine the need to update/upgrade the dam in order to assist (NFIP), which allows for flood insurance discounts to local residents. #12;Image 1: Dam location

  11. PROJECT NAME: MOREHEAD AVE. DAM (EPWU Dam #2-TX07015) 1. Provide the name of all non-Federal interests planning to act as the sponsor, including

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    PROJECT NAME: MOREHEAD AVE. DAM (EPWU Dam #2- TX07015) 1. Provide the name of all non. The purpose for the feasibility study is to determine the need to update/upgrade the dam in order to assist (NFIP), which allows for flood insurance discounts to local residents. #12;Image 1: Dam location

  12. PROJECT NAME: MURCHISON AVE. DAM (EPWUDam #8--TX07021) 1. Provide the name of all non-Federal interests planning to act as the sponsor, including

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    PROJECT NAME: MURCHISON AVE. DAM (EPWUDam #8--TX07021) 1. Provide the name of all non. The purpose for the feasibility study is to determine the need to update/upgrade the dam in order to assist (NFIP), which allows for flood insurance discounts to local residents. #12;Image 1: Dam location

  13. PROJECT NAME: NASHVILLE AVE. DAM (EPWU Dam #3-1. Provide the name of all non-Federal interests planning to act as the sponsor, including

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    PROJECT NAME: NASHVILLE AVE. DAM (EPWU Dam #3- TX07016) 1. Provide the name of all non. The purpose for the feasibility study is to determine the need to update/upgrade the dam in order to assist;Image 1: Dam location and affected community areas l.egend lmoiReiJii

  14. The effect of AVE 0991, nebivolol and doxycycline on inflammatory mediators in an apoE-knockout mouse model of atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Jawien, Jacek; Toton-Zuranska, Justyna; Kus, Katarzyna; Pawlowska, Malgorzata; Olszanecki, Rafal; Korbut, Ryszard

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background The aim of this study was to investigate whether the 3 different substances that can decrease the development of atherosclerosis – nebivolol, AVE 0991 and doxycycline – could at the same time diminish the level of inflammatory indicators interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-12 (IL-12), serum amyloid A (SAA), and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1). Material/Methods Forty 8-week-old female apoE–knockout mice on the C57BL/6J background were divided into 4 groups and put on chow diet for 4 months. Three experimental groups received the same diet as a control group, mixed with AVE 0991 at a dose 0.58 ?mol per kg of body weight per day, nebivolol at a dose 2.0 ?mol per kg of body weight per day, and doxycycline at a dose 1.5 mg per kg of body weight per day. At the age of 6 months, the mice were sacrificed. Results All inflammatory indicators (MCP-1, IL-6, IL-12 and SAA) were diminished by AVE 0991. There was also a tendency to lower MCP-1, IL-6, IL-12 and SAA levels by nebivolol and doxycycline; however, it did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions Of the 3 presented substances, only AVE 0991 was able to diminish the rise of inflammatory markers. Therefore, drug manipulations in the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone axis seem to be the most promising in the future treatment of atherogenesis. PMID:23018345

  15. Using the Spanish Online Resource "Aula Virtual de Espanol" (AVE) to Promote a Blended Teaching Approach in High School Spanish Language Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pellerin, Martine; Montes, Carlos Soler

    2012-01-01

    The study explores the effectiveness of the implementation of blended teaching (BT) by combining the Spanish online resource "Aula Virtual de Espanol" (AVE) with the face-to-face (F2F) delivery approach in second language Spanish programs in two high schools in Alberta, Canada. Findings demonstrate the effectiveness of combining the online…

  16. Prof. Dr. Yong P. Chen Short CV (2-page) 10/15/2015 Address: Purdue University, 525 Northwestern Ave, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907

    E-print Network

    Chen, Yong P.

    Ave, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 Email: yongchen@purdue.edu Phone: (765) 494-0947 Web: http://www.physics.purdue.edu/quantum Fellow and Graduate Teaching Assistant 09/1997-07/1999 c. Research areas: Experimental condensed matter physics & nanoscience (graphene/2D materials, topological insulators, 2D electrons/quantum Hall physics

  17. Numerical simulations of the subsynoptic features associated with the AVE-SESAME I case. I - The preconvective environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zack, John W.; Kaplan, Michael L.

    1987-01-01

    The extensive diagnostic calculations made possible by the AVE-SESAME I database are used in combination with numerical simulations from the Mesoscale Atmospheric Simulation System (MASS) model to examine the dynamics of the meso-alpha-scale features during the preconvective period from 1130 to 2030 UTC on April 10, 1979. The version of the MASS model used in this investigation is presented, and an overview of the general synoptic conditions present at the time of model initialization is presented along with the data used to initialize the model. The dynamical processes present in the numerical simulations are presented and compared with analyses of the observational data from this and other investigations of this case. The relative importance of the adiabatic and diabatic processes in creating and then initiating the release of the convective instability is discussed.

  18. Meso beta-scale thunderstorm/environment interactions during AVE-SESAME V (20-21 May 1979)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuelberg, H. E.; Printy, M. F.

    1983-01-01

    The atmospheric variability in a convective area was examined with data from the AVE-SESAME V experiment. Temperature increases were observed in the upper troposphere during storm development, coupled with cooling near the surface and in the lower stratosphere. A mesohigh was detected at 200 mb over the convected area, and upper level winds increased speed north of the area. Wind velocity decreases occurred at the 200 mb level, reaching a 50 percent decrease, during the 3 hr period coinciding with most storms, and a simultaneous increase (doubling) was found in the wind speeds at the 400 mb level. Other phenomena present after the storms began included low-level convergence, upper level divergence, and ascending motion.

  19. The enigmatic monotypic crab plover Dromas ardeola is closely related to pratincoles and coursers (Aves, Charadriiformes, Glareolidae).

    PubMed

    Pereira, Sergio L; Baker, Allan J

    2010-07-01

    The phylogenetic placement of the monotypic crab plover Dromasardeola (Aves, Charadriiformes) remains controversial. Phylogenetic analysis of anatomical and behavioral traits using phenetic and cladistic methods of tree inference have resulted in conflicting tree topologies, suggesting a close association of Dromas to members of different suborders and lineages within Charadriiformes. Here, we revisited the issue by applying Bayesian and parsimony methods of tree inference to 2,012 anatomical and 5,183 molecular characters to a set of 22 shorebird genera (including Turnix). Our results suggest that Bayesian analysis of anatomical characters does not resolve the phylogenetic relationship of shorebirds with strong statistical support. In contrast, Bayesian and parsimony tree inference from molecular data provided much stronger support for the phylogenetic relationships within shorebirds, and support a sister relationship of Dromas to Glareolidae (pratincoles and coursers), in agreement with previously published DNA-DNA hybridization studies. PMID:21637436

  20. SMALL GENERATORS OF THE IDEAL CLASS GROUP KARIM BELABAS, FRANCISCO DIAZ Y DIAZ, AND EDUARDO FRIEDMAN

    E-print Network

    Belabas, Karim

    . Let Tmin = Tmin(K) 1 be the minimal value of T such that the primes in B(Tmin) generate C K, and let tmin(K) := Tmin(K)/(log K)2 . Assuming the Generalized Riemann Hypothesis (GRH), Bach [Ba] showed tmin 12. In fact, he even showed that for large discriminants, tmin 0. Still under GRH

  1. Initial results from a mesoscale atmospheric simulation system and comparisons with the AVE-SESAME I data set. [Atmospheric Variability Experiment-Severe Environmental Storms And Mesoscale Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, M. L.; Zack, J. W.; Wong, V. C.; Tuccillo, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    The development of a comprehensive mesoscale atmospheric simulation system (MASS) is described in detail. The modeling system is designed for both research and real-time forecast applications. The 14-level numerical model, which has a 48 km grid mesh, can be run over most of North America and the adjacent oceanic regions. The model employs sixth-order accurate numerics, generalized similarity theory boundary-layer physics, a sophisticated cumulus parameterization scheme, and state of the art analysis and initialization techniques. Examples of model output on the synoptic and subsynoptic scales are presented for the AVE-SESAME I field experiment on 10-11 April 1979. The model output is subjectively compared to the observational analysis and the LFM II output on the synoptic scale. Subsynoptic model output is compared to analyses generated from the AVE-SESAME I data set.

  2. The development of convective instability, wind shear, and vertical motion in relation to convection activity and synoptic systems in AVE 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. G.; Scoggins, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    Data from the Fourth Atmospheric Variability Experiment were used to investigate conditions/factors responsible for the development (local time rate-of-change) of convective instability, wind shear, and vertical motion in areas with varying degrees of convective activity. AVE IV sounding data were taken at 3 or 6 h intervals during a 36 h period on 24-25 April 1975 over approximately the eastern half of the United States. An error analysis was performed for each variable studied.

  3. Two new mite species of the subfamily Harpirhynchinae Dubinin, 1957 (Acariformes: Harpirhynchidae), parasites of the passerine birds (Aves: Passeriformes) in Australia and South Asia.

    PubMed

    Bochkov, Andre V; Klompen, Hans

    2015-09-01

    Two new mite species of the subfamily Harpirhynchinae Dubinin, 1957 (Acariformes: Harpirhynchidae) are described from passerine birds (Aves: Passeriformes): Harpirhynchoides artamus n. sp. from Artamus fuscus Vieillot (Artamidae) from an unknown locality in South Asia and Neharpyrhynchus domrowi n. sp. from three host species of the family Meliphagidae, Acanthorhynchus tenuirostris (Latham) (type-host) from Australia (New South Walles), Ptiloprora perstriata (De Vis) and Myzomela rosenbergii Schlegel from Papua New Guinea. PMID:26249519

  4. AVE protein expression and visceral endoderm cell behavior during anterior-posterior axis formation in mouse embryos: Asymmetry in OTX2 and DKK1 expression.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Hideharu; Shioi, Go; Aizawa, Shinichi

    2015-06-15

    The initial landmark of anterior-posterior (A-P) axis formation in mouse embryos is the distal visceral endoderm, DVE, which expresses a series of anterior genes at embryonic day 5.5 (E5.5). Subsequently, DVE cells move to the future anterior region, generating anterior visceral endoderm (AVE). Questions remain regarding how the DVE is formed and how the direction of the movement is determined. This study compares the detailed expression patterns of OTX2, HHEX, CER1, LEFTY1 and DKK1 by immunohistology and live imaging at E4.5-E6.5. At E6.5, the AVE is subdivided into four domains: most anterior (OTX2, HHEX, CER1-low/DKK1-high), anterior (OTX2, HHEX, CER1-high/DKK1-low), main (OTX2, HHEX, CER1, LEFTY1-high) and antero-lateral and posterior (OTX2, HHEX-low). The study demonstrates how this pattern is established. AVE protein expression in the DVE occurs de novo at E5.25-E5.5. Neither HHEX, LEFTY1 nor CER1 expression is asymmetric. In contrast, OTX2 expression is tilted on the future posterior side with the DKK1 expression at its proximal domain; the DVE cells move in the opposite direction of the tilt. PMID:25910836

  5. Frequency of micronuclei and of other nuclear abnormalities in erythrocytes of the grey mullet from the Mondego, Douro and Ave estuaries--Portugal.

    PubMed

    Carrola, João; Santos, Nádia; Rocha, Maria J; Fontainhas-Fernandes, António; Pardal, Miguel A; Monteiro, Rogério A F; Rocha, Eduardo

    2014-05-01

    Fish are bioindicators of water pollution, and an increased rate of their erythrocyte nuclear morphological abnormalities (ENMAs)-and particularly of erythrocyte micronuclei (EMN)-is used as a genotoxicity biomarker. Despite the potential value of ENMAs and MN, there is scarce information about fish captured in Iberian estuaries. This is the case of the Portuguese estuaries of the Mondego, Douro and Ave, suffering from different levels of environmental stress and where chemical surveys have been disclosing significant amounts of certain pollutants. So, the aim of this study was to evaluate genotoxicants impacts and infer about the exposure at those ecosystems, using the grey mullet (Mugil cephalus) as bioindicator and considering the type and frequency of nuclear abnormalities of erythrocytes as proxies of genotoxicity. Sampling of mullets was done throughout the year in the important Mondego, Douro and Ave River estuaries (centre and north-western Portugal). The fish (total n?=?242) were caught in campaigns made in spring-summer and autumn-winter, using nets or fishing rods. The sampled mullets were comparable between locations in terms of the basic biometric parameters. Blood smears were stained with Diff-Quik to assess the frequencies of six types of ENMAs and MN (given per 1,000 erythrocytes). Some basic water physicochemical parameters were recorded to search for fluctuations matching the ENMAs. Overall, the most frequent nucleus abnormality was the polymorphic type, sequentially followed by the blebbed/lobed/notched, segmented, kidney shaped, vacuolated, MN and binucleated. The total average frequency of the ENMAs ranged from 73?‰ in the Mondego to 108?‰ in the Ave. The polymorphic type was typically ?50 % of the total ENMAs, averaging about 51?‰, when considering all three estuaries. The most serious lesion-the MN-in fish from Mondego and Douro had a similar frequency (?0.38?‰), which was significantly lower than that in the Ave (0.75?‰). No significant seasonal differences existed as to the MN rates and seasonal differences existed almost only in the Douro, with the higher values in AW. In general, the pattern of ENMAs frequencies was unrelated with the water physicochemical parameters. Considering the data for both the total ENMAs and for each specific abnormality, and bearing in mind that values of MN in fish erythrocytes >0.3?‰ usually reflect pollution by genotoxicants, it is suggested that mullets were likely being chronically exposed to such compounds, even in the allegedly less polluted ecosystem (Mondego). Moreover, data supported the following pollution exposure gradient: Mondego?Ave. The scenario and inferences nicely agree with the published data from chemical monitoring. PMID:24469770

  6. AVE4454B – a Novel Sodium-Hydrogen Exchanger Isoform-1 Inhibitor – Compared less Effective than Cariporide for Resuscitation from Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Jeejabai; Kolarova, Julieta D.; Ayoub, Iyad M.; Gazmuri, Raúl J.

    2013-01-01

    We compared the efficacy of the novel sodium-hydrogen exchanger (NHE-1) inhibitor AVE4454B with cariporide for resuscitation from ventricular fibrillation (VF) assessing effects on left ventricular myocardial distensibility during chest compression, myocardial function after return of spontaneous circulation, and survival. Three groups of ten rats each were subjected to 10 minutes of untreated VF and resuscitation attempted by providing chest compression for up to 8 minutes with the depth of compression adjusted to attain an aortic diastolic pressure between 26 and 28 mmHg (to secure a coronary perfusion pressure above 20 mmHg), followed by electrical shocks. Rats received AVE4454B (1 mg/kg), cariporide (1 mg/kg), or vehicle control immediately before chest compression. We observed that NHE-1 inhibition preserved left ventricular myocardial distensibility during chest compression evidenced by less depth of compression required to attain the target aortic diastolic pressure corresponding to (mean ± SD) 14.1 ± 1.1 mm in the AVE4454B group (p < 0.001 vs control), 15.0 ± 1.4 mm in the cariporide group (p < 0.01 vs control), and 17.0 ± 1.2 mm in controls. When the depth of compression was related to the coronary perfusion pressure generated (CPP/Depth ratio) – an index of left ventricular distensibility – only cariporide group attained statistical significance. Post-resuscitation, both compounds ameliorated myocardial dysfunction evidenced by lesser reductions in mean aortic pressure and +dP/dtmax and earlier normalization of left ventricular end-diastolic pressure increases. This effect was associated with improved survival corresponding to 55% in the AVE4454B group (NS) and 70% in the cariporide group (p < 0.01 vs control by Gehan-Breslow analysis). There was an inverse correlation between plasma cytochrome c and indices of left ventricular function at post-resuscitation 240 minutes suggesting that NHE-1 inhibition exerts beneficial effects in part by attenuating mitochondrial injury. We conclude that cariporide is more effective than AVE4454B for resuscitation from cardiac arrest given its more prominent effect on preserving left ventricular myocardial distensibility and promoting survival. PMID:21256459

  7. Microsatellite usefulness is independent of phylogenetic distance in Tyrant flycatchers (Aves: Tyrannidae): a test using two globally threatened species.

    PubMed

    Mahler, B; Schneider, A R R; Di Giacomo, A S; Di Giacomo, A G; Reboreda, J C; Tiedemann, R

    2013-01-01

    Tyrant flycatchers (Aves: Tyrannidae) are endemic to the New World, and many species of this group are threatened or near-threatened at the global level. The aim of this study was to test the 18 microsatellite markers that have been published for other Tyrant flycatchers in the Strange-tailed Tyrant (Alectrurus risora) and the Sharp-tailed Tyrant (Culicivora caudacuta), two endemic species of southern South American grasslands that are classified as vulnerable. We also analyzed the usefulness of loci in relation to phylogenetic distance to the source species. Amplification success was high in both species (77 to 83%) and did not differ between the more closely and more distantly related species to the source species. Polymorphism success was also similar for both species, with 9 and 8 loci being polymorphic, respectively. An increased phylogenetic distance thus does not gradually lead to allelic or locus dropouts, implying that in Tyrant flycatchers, the published loci are useful independent of species relatedness. PMID:24065652

  8. University Ave. UniversityAve.Exit

    E-print Network

    . AvocadoDr. 60 215 P1 P60 P50 P50 P4 P30/V30 P6/V6 AP AP AP AP AP AP AP APAP AP AP AP AP AP AP AP AP AP AP AP P31 P23 P26/ V26 P19 P24 P22 P21 P23 P28 P29 P20 P15 P13 P41 V10 P11 P9 P8 P3 P7 P25 P5 P22 Corp B Corp C Whse 2 Purchasing Dept. Physical Plant Office Mail Room KUCR Child Development Center

  9. ConstitutionAve. CityParkAve.

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Yongcheng

    Prospect Road Surplus Property Warehouse Book Storage Facility Center Avenue to Ropes Course, NRRC, and VTH WhitcombStreet Hilton Location Lake Street Garage alley Home Mgt. House Meldrum Street Myrtle Street

  10. Impact evaluation of a refrigeration control system installed at Vitamilk Dairy, Incorporated under the Energy $avings Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.R.; Dixon, D.R.; Spanner, G.E.

    1995-01-01

    This impact evaluation of a refrigeration control system (RCS) recently installed at Vitamilk Dairy, Inc. (Vitamilk) was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) as part of an evaluation of its Energy $avings Plan (E$P) Program. The RCS installation at Vitamilk uses microcomputer- based controls to automate refrigeration equipment previously controlled manually. This impact evaluation assessed how much electricity is being saved at Vitamilk as a result of the E$P and to determine how much the savings cost Bonneville and the region. On a unit savings basis, this project will save 9.7 kWh/tonne (8-8 kWh/ton) of milk and ice cream produced, based on the product mix for June 1992 through May 1993, representing a 28% reduction in energy consumption. The project was installed in 1992 for a total cost of $129,330, and Vitamilk received payment of $62,974 from Bonneville in 1993 for the acquisition of energy savings. The real levelized cost of these energy savings to Bonneville is 8.5 mills/kWh (in 1993 dollars) over the project`s assumed 15-year life, and the real levelized cost to the region is 17.9 mills/kWh (in 1993 dollars), not including transmission and distribution effects. Based on the expected project installation costs and energy savings benefits, the RCS would not have been implemented by Vitamilk without the E$P acquisition payment. The expected acquisition payment reduced the estimated payback period from 7.0 to 2.8 years. Although Vitamilk would generally require an energy conservation project to have a payback period of two years or less, the slightly longer payback period was accepted in this case.

  11. Impact evaluation of a slush stock chest bypass installed at Scott Paper Company under the energy $avings plan

    SciTech Connect

    Oens, M.A.; Spanner, G.E.

    1995-02-01

    This impact evaluation of the bypass of a slush stock chest that was recently installed at Scott Paper Company (Scott Paper) was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) as part of an evaluation of its Energy $avings Plan (E$P) Program. The project consists of installing an adjustable speed drive, a 74.6 kW (100 hp) pump, a re-sized impeller, and piping modifications to bypass the slush stock chest and related equipment. The objective of this impact evaluation was to assess how much electrical energy is being saved at Scott Paper as a result of the E$P and to determine how much the savings cost Bonneville and the region. The impact of the project was evaluated with a combination of engineering analysis, financial analysis, interviews, and submittal reviews (Scott Paper`s proposal and completion report). Based on this impact evaluation, energy savings from this project are expected to be 763,600 kilowatt-hours/year (kWh/yr) or 0.087 average megawatts (aMW). On a per-ton basis, this project will save 4.64 kWh/ton or 39.2%. The project cost $120,098 to install, and Scott Paper received payment of $82,232 (in 1993 dollars) from Bonneville for the acquisition of energy savings. Pacific Northwest Laboratory calculated the real levelized cost of the energy savings to Bonneville as 14.2 mills/kWh (in 1993 dollars) over the project`s assumed 15-year life, and the real levelized cost to the region as 21.9 mills/kWh, not including transmission and distribution effects. The project would not have been implemented without the acquisition payment from Bonneville and therefore is not a free rider.

  12. Diet is a major factor governing the fecal butyrate-producing community structure across Mammalia, Aves and Reptilia.

    PubMed

    Vital, Marius; Gao, Jiarong; Rizzo, Mike; Harrison, Tara; Tiedje, James M

    2015-04-01

    Butyrate-producing bacteria have an important role in maintaining host health. They are well studied in human and medically associated animal models; however, much less is known for other Vertebrata. We investigated the butyrate-producing community in hindgut-fermenting Mammalia (n = 38), Aves (n = 8) and Reptilia (n = 8) using a gene-targeted pyrosequencing approach of the terminal genes of the main butyrate-synthesis pathways, namely butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase (but) and butyrate kinase (buk). Most animals exhibit high gene abundances, and clear diet-specific signatures were detected with but genes significantly enriched in omnivores and herbivores compared with carnivores. But dominated the butyrate-producing community in these two groups, whereas buk was more abundant in many carnivorous animals. Clustering of protein sequences (5% cutoff) of the combined communities (but and buk) placed carnivores apart from other diet groups, except for noncarnivorous Carnivora, which clustered together with carnivores. The majority of clusters (but: 5141 and buk: 2924) did not show close relation to any reference sequences from public databases (identity <90%) demonstrating a large 'unknown diversity'. Each diet group had abundant signature taxa, where buk genes linked to Clostridium perfringens dominated in carnivores and but genes associated with Ruminococcaceae bacterium D16 were specific for herbivores and omnivores. Whereas 16S rRNA gene analysis showed similar overall patterns, it was unable to reveal communities at the same depth and resolution as the functional gene-targeted approach. This study demonstrates that butyrate producers are abundant across vertebrates exhibiting great functional redundancy and that diet is the primary determinant governing the composition of the butyrate-producing guild. PMID:25343515

  13. Baseline Rd. Colorado Ave.

    E-print Network

    Lineberger, W. Carl

    ://boulderbikesmith.com/BSBikes.html SATURDAY MORNING ACTIVITIES INFORMATION 8:00 AM TO 10:00 AM OTHER BOULDER ATTRACTIONS Celestial Seasonings://www.banjobilly.com JUNE 12-13, 2009 JILA/CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY, UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO, BOULDER A CELEBRATION OF 40 YEARS OF ION CHEMISTRY PROGRAM AGENDA: Friday, June 12, 2009 5:00 PM to 9:00 PM: Dinner at Barney

  14. UNIVERSITY AVE AUDITORIUMLISTER

    E-print Network

    MacMillan, Andrew

    Gift Shop Bank Machines Pediatric Pre-Admission (Surgical Clinic) Medical Outpatient Unit 1C3 Pediatric Stollery Children's Clinics Entrance Otolaryngology & Multidisciplinary Pain Centre 1E2/4 Pediatric1 Dental Clinic 2C1 Cardiology Clinics 2C2 2C3 Surgery Clinics 2D1 Medicine Clinics 2E1 Metabolic

  15. East Alumni Ave. Horticulture

    E-print Network

    Vetter, Frederick J.

    Wolf Anatomy Laboratory 127 (A4) * Dining Services Distribution Center, purchasing 103 (A1) East Farm 41 (A6) * Fire Station 42 (B7) * Fogarty Health Science Building, pharmacy 43 (D5) Food Science (D6) Housing Maintenance 122 (B2) Housing Storage 123 (B2) ** Human Resource Administration 70 (C4

  16. MIT: $avings through cogeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, T.

    1995-11-01

    The Massachusetts Institute of Technology has installed an `inside-the-fence` cogeneration plant as a way of controlling costs for their increasing electric power and steam requirements. The cogeneration system fits neatly on one side of the campus power plant, with the GT10A gas turbine in an enclosure. The generator is located on one end, the HRSG to the side. On the instrument/control side, the gas turbine is equipped with a Westinghouse DCS control system. A Horriba emission monitoring system keeps track of pollution. Power in excess of the 22 MW produced by the gas turbine-generator must be purchased from the local utility. As requirements rise in future years, this could become more common, which may lead MIT, in 4-5 years, to convert to a combined cycle system. The steam-generating capabilities of the HRSG are adequate for the addition of a 10-MW backpressure steam turbine, should they make this decision. 3 figs.

  17. 2015 APPLICATION FORM FOR 100 SCHOLARS U G Berkeley Summer Sessions | 1995 University Ave., Suite 130, Berkeley, CA 94704 | Fax: 510.664.9825 | E-mail: summer@berkeley.edu

    E-print Network

    Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    for Future Degree Enrolling for Job Advancement Enrolling for Personal Enrichment NoYes Have you received2015 APPLICATION FORM FOR 100 SCHOLARS U G Berkeley Summer Sessions | 1995 University Ave., Suite is conditional on compliance with University policies, and may be revoked at the discretion of the Dean of Summer

  18. A review of the mite subfamily Harpirhynchinae (Acariformes: Harpirhynchidae)-parasites of New World birds (Aves: Neognathae).

    PubMed

    Bochkov, Andre V; Oconnor, Barry M; Klompen, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Mites of the subfamily Harpirhynchinae (Acariformes: Cheyletoidea: Harpirhynchidae) associated with neognathous birds (Aves: Neognathae) in the New World are revised. In all, 68 species in 8 genera are recorded. Among them, 27 new species and 1 new genus are described as new for science: Harpyrhynchoides gallowayi Bochkov, OConnor and Klompen sp. nov. from Columba livia (Columbiformes: Columbidae) from Canada (Manitoba), H. zenaida Bochkov, OConnor and Klompen sp. nov. from Zenaida macroura (Columbiformes: Columbidae) from USA (Michigan), H. calidris Bochkov, OConnor and Klompen sp. nov. from Calidris minutilla (Charadriiformes: Scolopacidae) from USA (Kansas), H. actitis Bochkov, OConnor and Klompen sp. nov. from Actitis macularius (Charadriiformes: Scolopacidae) from Canada (British Columbia), H. charadrius Bochkov, OConnor and Klompen sp. nov. from Charadrius vociferus (Charadriiformes: Charadriidae) from USA (Texas), H. pluvialis Bochkov, OConnor and Klompen sp. nov. from Pluvialis dominica (Charadriiformes: Charadriidae) from USA (Ohio), H. bubulcus Bochkov, OConnor and Klompen sp. nov. from Bubulcus ibis (Pelecaniformes: Ardeidae) from USA (Florida), H. ixobrychus Bochkov, OConnor and Klompen sp. nov. from Ixobrychus exilis (Pelecaniformes: Ardeidae) from USA (Michigan), H. puffinus Mertins sp. nov. from Puffinus gravis (Procellariformes: Procellariidae) from USA (Florida), H. megascops Bochkov, OConnor and Klompen sp. nov. from Megascops asio (Strigiformes: Strigidae) from USA (Michigan), H. athene Bochkov, OConnor and Klompen sp. nov. from Athene canicularia (Strigiformes: Strigidae) from USA (Texas), H. coccyzus Bochkov, OConnor and Klompen sp. nov. from Coccyzus americanus (Cuculiformes: Cuculidae) from USA (Michigan), H. crotophaga Bochkov, OConnor and Klompen sp. nov. from Crotophaga ani (Cuculiformes: Cuculidae) from Suriname; Crassacarus Bochkov, OConnor and Klompen, gen. nov.: Crassacarus alexfaini Bochkov, OConnor and Klompen sp. nov. (type of genus) from Cardinalis cardinalis (type host) from USA (Michigan), Passerina ciris (unknown locality in North America) (Passeriformes: Cardinalidae), and Setophaga petechia (Passeriformes: Parulidae) from USA (Michigan), C. tinae Bochkov, OConnor and Klompen sp. nov. from Carduelis tristis (Passeriformes: Fringillidae) from USA (Wyoming), C. fritschi Bochkov, OConnor and Klompen sp. nov. from Bombycilla cedrorum (Passeriformes: Bombycillidae) from USA (Michigan), C. sialia Bochkov, OConnor and Klompen sp. nov. from Sialia currucoides (Passeriformes: Turdidae) from USA (Wyoming), C. melanerpes Bochkov, OConnor and Klompen sp. nov. from Melanerpes formicivorus (Piciformes: Picidae) from USA (Kansas); Neharpyrhynchus turdus Bochkov, OConnor and Klompen sp. nov. from Turdus migratorius (Passeriformes: Turdidae) from USA (Michigan), N. campylorhynchus Bochkov, OConnor and Klompen sp. nov. from Campylorhynchus brunneicapillus (Passeriformes: Troglodytidae) from USA (unknown locality), N. spizella Bochkov, OConnor and Klompen sp. nov. from Spizella passerina (Passeriformes: Emberizidae) from USA (various localities), N. quiscalus Bochkov, OConnor and Klompen sp. nov. from Quiscalus quiscula (Passeriformes: Icteridae) from USA (Michigan), N. agelaius Bochkov, OConnor and Klompen sp. nov. from Agelaius phoeniceus (Passeriformes: Icteridae) from USA (Michigan), N. bombycilla Bochkov, OConnor and Klompen sp. nov. Bombycilla cedrorum (Passeriformes: Bombycillidae) from USA (Michigan), N. vireo Bochkov, OConnor and Klompen sp. nov. from Vireo olivaceus (Passeriformes: Vireonidae) from USA (Florida), N. picidarum Bochkov, OConnor and Klompen sp. nov. from Colaptes auratus (type host), Melanerpes formicivorus, Melanerpes uropygidialis, and Picoides pubescens (Piciformes: Picidae) from USA (various localities); Perharpyrhynchus charadrius Bochkov, OConnor and Klompen sp. nov. from Charadrius vociferus (Charadriiformes: Charadriidae) from USA (Michigan). Harpyrhynchoides oenae lamorali (Fain, 1972) syn. nov. is synonymized with Harpyrhynchoides oenae (Fain, 1972). Harpirhynchoides a

  19. An analysis of the AVE-SESAME I period using statistical structure and correlation functions. [Atmospheric Variability Experiment-Severe Environmental Storm and Mesoscale Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuelberg, H. E.; Meyer, P. J.

    1984-01-01

    Structure and correlation functions are used to describe atmospheric variability during the 10-11 April day of AVE-SESAME 1979 that coincided with the Red River Valley tornado outbreak. The special mesoscale rawinsonde data are employed in calculations involving temperature, geopotential height, horizontal wind speed and mixing ratio. Functional analyses are performed in both the lower and upper troposphere for the composite 24 h experiment period and at individual 3 h observation times. Results show that mesoscale features are prominent during the composite period. Fields of mixing ratio and horizontal wind speed exhibit the greatest amounts of small-scale variance, whereas temperature and geopotential height contain the least. Results for the nine individual times show that small-scale variance is greatest during the convective outbreak. The functions also are used to estimate random errors in the rawinsonde data. Finally, sensitivity analyses are presented to quantify confidence limits of the structure functions.

  20. A kinetic energy study of the meso beta-scale storm environment during AVE-SESAME 5 (20-21 May 1979)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Printy, M. F.; Fuelberg, H. E.

    1984-01-01

    Kinetic energy of the near storm environment was analyzed by meso beta scale data. It was found that horizontal winds in the 400 to 150 mb layer strengthen rapidly north of the developing convection. Peak values then decrease such that the maximum disappears 6 h later. Southeast of the storms, wind speeds above 300 mb decrease nearly 50% during the 3 h period of most intense thunderstorm activity. When the convection dissipates, wind patterns return to prestorm conditions. The mesoscale storm environment of AVE-SESAME 5 is characterized by large values of cross contour generation of kinetic energy, transfers of energy to nonresolvable scales of motion, and horizontal flux divergence. These processes are maximized within the upper troposphere and are greatest during times of strongest convection. It is shown that patterns agree with observed weather features. The southeast area of the network is examined to determine causes for vertical wind variations.

  1. A new look at the holotype and type locality of Setopagis maculosa (Todd, 1920) Aves: Caprimulgidae), with remarks on its systematic relationships.

    PubMed

    Costa, Thiago V V; Ingels, Johan; Cavarzere, Vagner; Silveira, Luís Fábio

    2015-01-01

    Setopagis maculosa (Todd, 1920) (Aves: Caprimulgidae) was described based on a single male specimen collected by Samuel Milton Klages in French Guiana, northeastern South America. Since then, no new specimens have been collected nor have any reliable records been made, and the validity of the species has been questioned. A detailed analysis of the holotype reveals that it has unique and distinctive morphological traits that support the validity and taxonomic status of the species, which is provisionally placed in Setopagis. We present new information on the type locality at the time of its collection, which may shed some light on the habitat preferences of the species, and we provide details on its plumage that have been largely overlooked and that will be important for future field identification. PMID:26623597

  2. Molecular Signatures from Gene Expression Data Ramon Diaz-Uriarte

    E-print Network

    Díaz-Uriarte, Ramón

    1 Molecular Signatures from Gene Expression Data Ram´on D´iaz-Uriarte Abstract "Molecular "MOLECULAR SIGNATURES" or "gene-expression signatures" are a key feature in many studies that use microarray data in cancer research [1]­[5]. In p. 375 [6] refer to signatures as "(...) genes

  3. Cucolepis cincta gen.n. et sp.n. (Cestoda: Cyclophyllidea) from the squirrel cuckoo Piaya cayana lesson (Aves: Cuculiformes) from Paraguay.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Anna J; Mariaux, Jean; Georgiev, Boyko B

    2012-12-01

    Cucolepis gen. n. is erected as monotypic for Cucolepis cincta sp. n., a new species of cyclophyllidean cestode of the family Paruterinidae. The new species is described from the squirrel cuckoo, Piaya cayana Lesson (Aves: Cuculiformes), taken from two localities in Paraguay in 1984 and 1985. This new genus is most similar to the genus Triaenorhina Spasskii et Shumilo, 1965 in terms of the hook morphology and large epiphyseal structures extending from both the handle and guard, but differs in several aspects of the strobilar morphology, such as the shape of the cirrus sac, genital atrium, uterus and paruterine organ. The strobilar morphology of the new genus strongly resembles that of the genus Francobona Georgiev et Kornyushin, 1994, especially the shape of the cirrus sac and genital atrium, yet Francobona spp. lack, the developed epiphyseal structures observed in species of Cucolepis and Triaenorhina. Previous records and the nature of parasite-host associations between cuculiform birds and their cestode parasites are discussed. PMID:23327010

  4. On the absence of sternal elements in Anchiornis (Paraves) and Sapeornis (Aves) and the complex early evolution of the avian sternum

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiaoting; O’Connor, Jingmai; Wang, Xiaoli; Wang, Min; Zhang, Xiaomei; Zhou, Zhonghe

    2014-01-01

    Anchiornis (Deinonychosauria: Troodontidae), the earliest known feathered dinosaur, and Sapeornis (Aves: Pygostylia), one of the basalmost Cretaceous birds, are both known from hundreds of specimens, although remarkably not one specimen preserves any sternal ossifications. We use histological analysis to confirm the absence of this element in adult specimens. Furthermore, the excellent preservation of soft-tissue structures in some specimens suggests that no chondrified sternum was present. Archaeopteryx, the oldest and most basal known bird, is known from only 10 specimens and the presence of a sternum is controversial; a chondrified sternum is widely considered to have been present. However, data from Anchiornis and Sapeornis suggest that a sternum may also have been completely absent in this important taxon, suggesting that the absence of a sternum could represent the plesiomorphic avian condition. Our discovery reveals an unexpected level of complexity in the early evolution of the avian sternum; the large amount of observable homoplasy is probably a direct result of the high degree of inherent developmental plasticity of the sternum compared with observations in other skeletal elements. PMID:25201982

  5. Multilocus analysis of honeyeaters (Aves: Meliphagidae) highlights spatio-temporal heterogeneity in the influence of biogeographic barriers in the Australian monsoonal zone.

    PubMed

    Toon, A; Hughes, J M; Joseph, L

    2010-07-01

    Multilocus studies in phylogenetics and comparative phylogeography have the power to explore a broader spectrum of evolutionary questions than either discipline has alone. To examine the origins of sympatry in a group of closely related birds of mostly mesic eucalypt woodlands in Australia, we reconstructed the relationships among species of Entomyzon and Melithreptus honeyeaters (Aves: Passeriformes: Meliphagidae) using a mitochondrial marker, ND2, and six non-coding nuclear loci (total 4719 base pairs). By sampling across the geographical range of each species, we studied not only their phylogenetic relationships to each other but also the spatial distribution of their genetic diversity. We tested several biogeographic hypotheses concerning the role of Pleistocene environmental change in Australia. Phylogenetic gene trees support the current understanding of E. cyanotis as the sister to Melithreptus. Non-monophyly of M. lunatus in Australia's southern temperate woodlands highlights the need for a revision of systematics within Melithreptus. Phylogeographic analysis of the three northern species in Australia's monsoon tropics, M. gularis, M. albogularis and E. cyanotis, suggests that the roles of the Carpentarian and Torresian Barriers in shaping geographic structure in each of the species have been more complex and temporally dynamic than earlier morphology-based arguments of vicariance had suggested. We discuss their roles as ecological filters as well as barriers. PMID:20609078

  6. A comprehensive multilocus phylogeny of the Neotropical cotingas (Cotingidae, Aves) with a comparative evolutionary analysis of breeding system and plumage dimorphism and a revised phylogenetic classification.

    PubMed

    Berv, Jacob S; Prum, Richard O

    2014-12-01

    The Neotropical cotingas (Cotingidae: Aves) are a group of passerine birds that are characterized by extreme diversity in morphology, ecology, breeding system, and behavior. Here, we present a comprehensive phylogeny of the Neotropical cotingas based on six nuclear and mitochondrial loci (?7500 bp) for a sample of 61 cotinga species in all 25 genera, and 22 species of suboscine outgroups. Our taxon sample more than doubles the number of cotinga species studied in previous analyses, and allows us to test the monophyly of the cotingas as well as their intrageneric relationships with high resolution. We analyze our genetic data using a Bayesian species tree method, and concatenated Bayesian and maximum likelihood methods, and present a highly supported phylogenetic hypothesis. We confirm the monophyly of the cotingas, and present the first phylogenetic evidence for the relationships of Phibalura flavirostris as the sister group to Ampelion and Doliornis, and the paraphyly of Lipaugus with respect to Tijuca. In addition, we resolve the diverse radiations within the Cotinga, Lipaugus, Pipreola, and Procnias genera. We find no support for Darwin's (1871) hypothesis that the increase in sexual selection associated with polygynous breeding systems drives the evolution of color dimorphism in the cotingas, at least when analyzed at a broad categorical scale. Finally, we present a new comprehensive phylogenetic classification of all cotinga species. PMID:25234241

  7. The vascular disrupting agent ombrabulin (AVE8062) enhances the efficacy of standard therapies in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma xenograft models.

    PubMed

    Clémenson, Céline; Jouannot, Erwan; Merino-Trigo, Ana; Rubin-Carrez, Chantal; Deutsch, Eric

    2013-04-01

    Targeting tumor vasculature is an emerging strategy in cancer treatment. Promising results have been shown in preclinical studies when vascular disrupting agents (VDAs) are used in combination with other anticancer therapies. Because radiation therapy with concurrent cisplatin or cetuximab has become standard treatment for patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), we investigated whether the VDA ombrabulin (AVE8062) could improve the antitumor activity of radiation plus cisplatin and radiation plus cetuximab combinations. HNSCC HEP2 or FaDu tumor bearing mice were treated with ombrabulin, cisplatin, cetuximab, local radiation therapy or combinations of these treatments. Ombrabulin attenuated tumor growth of HEP2 and FaDu xenografts compared to control tumors. A more pronounced tumor growth delay and tumor regression were induced when ombrabulin was added to local irradiation, cisplatin or cetuximab in FaDu tumors compared to single agent treatments. Finally, triple agent therapies combining ombrabulin, irradiation, and either cisplatin or cetuximab were more effective than double combination treatment regimens and increased tumor growth delay in both HEP2 and FaDu tumor models. Of note, complete tumor regression was achieved in FaDu tumor model for the triple combination including platinum. Immunohistochemistry on FaDu tumors demonstrated a specificity of ombrabulin towards intratumoral vessels, in contrast to peritumoral vasculature. Our results provide a rationale for the use of ombrabulin in combination with two standard treatment regimens that are concurrent cisplatin-based chemoradiation and cetuximab plus ionizing radiation therapies, for the treatment of HNSCC. PMID:22810221

  8. Molecular phylogenetics suggests a New Guinean origin and frequent episodes of founder-event speciation in the nectarivorous lories and lorikeets (Aves: Psittaciformes).

    PubMed

    Schweizer, Manuel; Wright, Timothy F; Peñalba, Joshua V; Schirtzinger, Erin E; Joseph, Leo

    2015-09-01

    The lories and lorikeets (Aves: Loriinae: Loriini) are a readily recognizable, discrete group of nectarivorous parrots confined to the Indo-Pacific region between Wallace's Line and the Pitcairn Island group in the central-east Pacific Ocean. We present the first phylogenetic analysis of all currently recognized genera in the group using two mitochondrial and five nuclear loci. Our analyses suggest a New Guinean origin for the group at about 10million years ago (95% HPD 4.8-14.8) but this origin must be interpreted within the context of that island's complicated, recent geological history. That is, the origin and early diversification of the group may have taken place as New Guinea's Central Cordillera arose and the final constituent terranes that form present-day New Guinea were accreted. The latter activity may have promoted dispersal as a key element in the group's history. We have detected several instances of dispersal out of New Guinea that we argue constitute instances of founder-event speciation. Some phenotypically cohesive genera are affirmed as monophyletic but other genera are clearly in need of taxonomic dismantlement and reclassification. We recognize Parvipsitta Mathews, 1916 for two species usually placed in Glossopsitta and we advocate transfer of Chalcopsitta cardinalis into Pseudeos Peters, 1935. Other non-monophyletic genera such as Charmosyna, Psitteuteles and, probably, Trichoglossus, require improved taxon sampling and further phylogenetic analysis before their systematics can be resolved. Cursory examination of trait mapping across the group suggests that many traits are ancestral and of little use in determining genus-level systematics. PMID:25929786

  9. Ancient DNA analyses of early archaeological sites in New Zealand reveal extreme exploitation of moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes) at all life stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskam, Charlotte L.; Allentoft, Morten E.; Walter, Richard; Scofield, R. Paul; Haile, James; Holdaway, Richard N.; Bunce, Michael; Jacomb, Chris

    2012-10-01

    The human colonisation of New Zealand in the late thirteenth century AD led to catastrophic impacts on the local biota and is among the most compelling examples of human over-exploitation of native fauna, including megafauna. Nearly half of the species in New Zealand' s pre-human avifauna are now extinct, including all nine species of large, flightless moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes). The abundance of moa in early archaeological sites demonstrates the significance of these megaherbivores in the diet of the first New Zealanders. Combining moa assemblage data, based on DNA identification of eggshell and bone, with morphological identification of bone (literature and museum catalogued specimens), we present the most comprehensive audit of moa to date from several significant 13th-15th century AD archaeological deposits across the east coast of the South Island. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was amplified from 251 of 323 (78%) eggshell fragments and 22 of 27 (88%) bone samples, and the analyses revealed the presence of four moa species: Anomalopteryx didiformis; Dinornis robustus; Emeus crassus and Euryapteryx curtus. The mtDNA, along with polymorphic microsatellite markers, enabled an estimate of the minimum number of individual eggs consumed at each site. Remarkably, in one deposit over 50 individual eggs were identified - a number that likely represents a considerable proportion of the total reproductive output of moa in the area and emphasises that human predation of all life stages of moa was intense. Molecular sexing was conducted on bones (n = 11). Contrary to previous ancient DNA studies from natural sites that consistently report an excess of female moa, we observed an excess of males (2.7:1), suggestive that males were preferential targets. This could be related to different behaviour between the two highly size-dimorphic sexes in moa. Lastly, we investigated the moa species from recovered skeletal and eggshell remains from seven Wairau Bar burials, and identified the presence of only the larger species of moa, E. curtus and D. robustus.

  10. Impact evaluation of an adjustable speed drive installed at Ball-InCon Glass Packaging Corporation under the Energy $avings Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Spanner, G.E.; Sullivan, G.P.

    1993-05-01

    This impact evaluation of an adjustable speed drive that was recently installed at Ball-InCon Glass Packaging Corporation (Ball-InCon) was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) as part of an evaluation of its Energy $avings Plan (E$P) Program. The Program makes acquisition payments to firms that install energy conservation projects in their industrial processes. The objective of this impact evaluation was to assess how much electrical energy is being saved at Ball-InCon as a result of the E$P and to determine how much the savings cost Bonneville and the region. The impact of the project was evaluated with a combination of engineering analysis, financial analysis, interviews, and submittal reviews (Ball-InCon`s Abstract, Proposal, and Completion Report). The project consists of switching from inlet guide vanes to adjustable frequency drives for 10 motors that provide cooling air to glass container molds. Based on this impact evaluation, energy savings from this project are expected to be 1,711,500 kWh/yr, or about 0.20 average megawatts. On a per-ton basis, this project will save approximately 7.8 kWh/ton of glass produced. The project cost $182,834 to install, and Ball-InCon received payment of $95,581 from Bonneville for the acquisition of energy savings. The real levelized cost of these energy savings to Bonneville is 5.2 mills/kWh over the projects`s assumed 15-year life, and the levelized cost to the region is 10.7 mills/kWh in 1992 dollars, not including transmission and distribution effects. This project would not have been implemented without the acquisition payment from Bonneville, so all of the energy savings can be attributed to the E$P.

  11. HWY 20 / 34 ORCHARD AVE

    E-print Network

    Escher, Christine

    (FSSt) D8 Fairbanks Hall (Fair) C6 Farm Services (FmSv) B1 Finley Hall (Finl) D7 Forest Entomology Lab (WGrn) B3 Forest Sciences Lab (FSL) C3 Foundation Building (Fund) F2 Furman Hall (Furm) C8 Gilbert Hall Hilton Garden Inn (HGI) F6 Hinsdale Wave Research Lab (HWRL) C2 Hogg Animal Metabolism Lab B2

  12. ORIENTATION EAST 11TH AVE

    E-print Network

    Artificial Turf Field Urban Farm Sheldon Clinical Services Onyx Bridge Millrace Studios Willcox Artificial Turf Field Bean West Douglass Lokey Laboratories FRANKLIN BLVD Ford Alumni Center Spiller Peterson EastFenton Lawrence Computing Artificial Turf Field Chapman Bean East Stafford Cascade Artificial Turf Field

  13. at the Fair COMMONWEALTH AVE

    E-print Network

    Ciocan-Fontanine, Ionut

    ,200 "blue ribbon" kids exhibit livestock during the State Fair's first four days. Extension is the major.m. Gabbert Raptor Center Don't miss The Raptor Center at the State Fair! Learn about eagles, owls, hawks questions along with experts from our statewide Research and Out- reach Centers. Interactive displays

  14. Maria Elena Diaz Barriga Rodriguez me.diazb@gmail.com / md2936@caa.columbia.edu

    E-print Network

    of financial risk measurement systems for liability management. Academic history Earth America and the Caribbean". Produced for the InterAmerican Development Bank (IDB, and developed the financial analysis. - Participated as speaker in the 19th Annual North

  15. Dual-frequency multifunction lidar Rosemary Diaz*, Sze-Chun Chan, Jia-Ming Liu

    E-print Network

    Chan, Sze-Chun

    coherence length. Ranging is accomplished by extracting the time-of-flight information carried/s and range measurements of 7.95 km with 2% accuracy. Keywords: Laser remote sensing, velocimetry, Doppler lidar, ranging 1. INTRODUCTION Lidar detection has been widely used since the 1970s. Applications

  16. From federated to aggregated search Fernando Diaz, Mounia Lalmas and Milad Shokouhi

    E-print Network

    Lalmas, Mounia

    Evaluation Open Problems Bibliography Introduction What is federated search? What is aggregated search? Motivations Challenges Relationships #12;3 A classical example of federated search www.theeuropeanlibrary.org Collections to be searched One query A classical example of federated search www.theeuropeanlibrary.org Merged

  17. On Securing Communication From Profilers Sandra Diaz-Santiago, Debrup Chakraborty

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    a business motive and most spam emails try to advertise a product, a web-page or a service. If the spam service providers perform a procedure called deep packet inspection on all traffic to detect malware etc., but this technique has been used to generate user profiles from the information contents of the packets received

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: z~5.7 C IV absorption systems (Diaz+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, C. G.; Koyama, Y.; Ryan-Weber, E. V.; Cooke, J.; Ouchi, M.; Shimasaku, K.; Nakata, F.

    2015-03-01

    This work is based on broad-band and narrow-band photometry obtained with Suprime-Cam on the Subaru Telescope. We use broad-band Rc, i' and z' filters covering the wavelength range ~5800-10000Å and a custom-made NB filter to detect Ly? in emission at redshift z=5.71+/-0.04 (NBC IV, ?c=8162Å, FWHM=100Å). Observations with the NBC IV, Rc and i' bands were acquired on the nights of 2011 March 07-08 and images in the z' band were obtained on 2011 March 31 and April 01. We observed two fields centred on QSOs SDSS J103027.01+052455.0 (zem=6.309, RA=10:30:27.01, DE=05:24:55.0), SDSS J113717.73+354956.9 (zem=6.01, RA=11:37:17.73, DE=35:49:56.9) (Fan et al., 2006AJ....132..117F), hereafter J1030+0524 and J1137+3549. (6 data files).

  19. Correction for Diaz, Paragonimiasis Acquired in the United States: Native and Nonnative Species.

    PubMed

    Diaz, James H

    2015-10-01

    Volume 26, no. 3, p. 493–504, 2013. Page 497: The snail shown in Fig. 8 is not a slender walker snail (Pomatiopsis lapidaria), as indicated in the legend of the figure, but rather a sharp hornsnail (Pleurocera acuta). The correct image (that of the slender walker snail, Pomatiopsis lapidaria; courtesy of Steve Cringan, photographer) is shown below. PMID:26354825

  20. Electrospray Emitters For Diffusion Vacuum Pumps Pablo Diaz Gomez Maqueo, Paulo C. Lozano

    E-print Network

    on the applicability of powder compression molding for the fabrication of emitter arrays. Powder compression molding consists in manufacturing the emitter array out of a plastic - metallic powder feedstock. It consists on 4 steps: (1) Mixing of feedstock, (2) Compression molding, (3) Debinding and (4) Sintering. Initial

  1. Biodiversity Regulation of Ecosystem Services Coordinating Lead Authors: Sandra Diaz, David Tilman, Joseph Fargione

    E-print Network

    Thomas, David D.

    Chapter 11 Biodiversity Regulation of Ecosystem Services Coordinating Lead Authors: Sandra Di . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300 11.2 Terrestrial Biodiversity Effects on Supporting Services . . . . . . . . . . . 301 11 on Primary Production 11.3 Terrestrial Biodiversity Effects on Regulating Services . . . . . . . . . . . 307

  2. Fusarisetin A: scalable total synthesis and related studies Eduardo J. E. Caro-Diaz,a

    E-print Network

    Theodorakis, Emmanuel

    in MDA-MB-231 cells, a particularly aggressive breast cancer cell line. Specifically, 1 was found that this compound is able to inhibit different types of cell migration. Moreover, the C5 epimer of (+)-1 was also these lines, metastasis is considered as the ``last frontier'' in cancer management for which, to

  3. 426 T. Garland Jr.,K. L. M. Martin, R. Diaz-Uriarte RECONSTRUCTINGANCESTRALTRAITVALUES

    E-print Network

    Saltzman, Wendy

    ? Moreover, how, exactly, should one go about making an inference regarding extinct organisms? Most simply Biologists oficn wonder about the behavioral or physiological characteristics of extinct organisms. Were dinosaurs endothermic? How well could Archaeopteryxfly? Unfortunately, fossil information pertaining

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Fe XVI radiative rates (Diaz+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, F.; Vilkas, M. J.; Ishikawa, Y.; Beiersdorfer, P.

    2013-08-01

    Accurate theoretical energy level, lifetime, and transition probability calculations of core-excited Fe XVI were performed employing the relativistic Multireference Moller-Plesset perturbation theory. In these computations the term energies of the highly excited n<=5 states arising from the configuration 1s22sk2pm3lpnl'q, where k+m+p+q=9, l<=3 and p+q<=2 are considered, including those of the autoionizing levels with a hole-state in the L-shell. All even and odd parity states of sodium-like iron ion were included for a total of 1784 levels. Comparison of the calculated L-shell transition wavelengths with those from laboratory measurements shows excellent agreement. Therefore, our calculation may be used to predict the wavelengths of as of yet unobserved Fe XVI, such as the second strongest 2p-3d Fe XVI line, which has not been directly observed in the laboratory and which blends with one of the prominent Fe XVII lines. (2 data files).

  5. DIAZ-PINTO ET AL. VOL. 6 ' NO. 2 ' 11421148 ' 2012 www.acsnano.org

    E-print Network

    Peng, Haibing

    rate or no hydrogen,12,13 and reduced hy- drogen concentration has also led14 to the improvement and eliminating the hy- drogen during the growth. This finding is important not only by shedding light on the CVD

  6. Laura Daz Anadn, CV page 1 LAURA DIAZ ANADON CURRICULUM VIT

    E-print Network

    , 2003-2006 UK Engineering and Physical Science Research Council Scholarship, 2003-2006 Undergraduate of the Board, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, June 2013- Faculty Associate, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, September 2013- Associate Director, Science Technology and Public

  7. LyricText: An Animated Display of Song Lyrics Rob Diaz-Marino1

    E-print Network

    Greenberg, Saul

    -time visualization of song lyrics, intended for applications such as Karaoke. By visualizing vocal properties. Applications such as Karaoke utilize a "bouncing ball" or changing text color to synchronize lyric presentation

  8. Evolution of alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase 1 peroxisomal and mitochondrial targeting. A survey of its subcellular distribution in the livers of various representatives of the classes Mammalia, Aves and Amphibia.

    PubMed

    Danpure, C J; Fryer, P; Jennings, P R; Allsop, J; Griffiths, S; Cunningham, A

    1994-08-01

    As part of a wider study on the molecular evolution of alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase 1 (AGT1) intracellular compartmentalization, we have determined the subcellular distribution of immunoreactive AGT1, using postembedding protein A-gold immunoelectron microscopy, in the livers of various members of the classes Mammalia, Aves, and Amphibia. As far as organellar distribution is concerned, three categories could be distinguished. In members of the first category (type I), all, or nearly all, of the immunoreactive AGT1 was concentrated within the peroxisomes. In the second category (type II), AGT1 was found more evenly distributed in both peroxisomes and mitochondria. In the third category (type III), AGT1 was localized mainly within the mitochondria with much lower, but widely variable, amounts in the peroxisomes. Type I animals include the human, two great apes (gorilla, orangutan), two Old World monkeys (anubis baboon, Japanese macaque), a New World monkey (white-faced Saki monkey), a lago, morph (European rabbit), a bat (Seba's short-tailed fruit bat), two caviomorph rodents (guinea pig, orange-rumped agouti), and two Australian marsupials (koala, Bennett's wallaby). Type II animals include two New World monkeys (common marmoset, cotton-top tamarin), three prosimians (brown lemur, fat-tailed dwarf lemur, pygmy slow loris), five rodents (a hybrid crested porcupine, Colombian ground squirrel, laboratory rat, laboratory mouse, golden hamster), an American marsupial (grey short-tailed opossum), and a bird (raven). Type III animals include the large tree shrew, three insectivores (common Eurasian mole, European hedgehog, house shrew), four carnivores (domestic cat, ocelot, domestic dog, polecat ferret), and an amphibian (common frog). In addition to these categories, some animals (e.g. guinea pig, common frog) possessed significant amounts of cytosolic AGT1. Whereas the subcellular distribution of AGT1 in some orders (e.g. Insectivora and Carnivora) did not appear to vary markedly between the different members, in other orders (e.g. Primates, Rodentia and Marsupialia) it fluctuated widely between the different species. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that the subcellular distribution of AGT1 has changed radically on numerous occasions during the evolution of mammals. The new observations presented in this paper are compatible with our previous demonstration of a relationship between AGT1 subcellular distribution and either present or putative ancestral dietary habit, and our previous suggestion that the molecular evolution of the AGT gene has been markedly influenced by dietary selection pressure. PMID:7813517

  9. 75 Piedmont Ave NE Atlanta, GA 30303

    E-print Network

    Frantz, Kyle J.

    subject to availability of space and without regard to race, religion, color, age, disability, national for Corvias in administering this Agreement and the assignment of housing space to Residents. This Agreement OF LICENSE FOR USE OF SPACE Provider agrees to furnish Resident with housing space in accordance

  10. Tyler J. Brummer 1913 S. Rouse Ave.

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Thesis: Non-native species distributions in space and time: integrating ecological theory and predictive associated with seed transport studies. Analyzed data and co-wrote two grant proposals (Awarded $18,000 from Seed Plant ID, Soil Remediation, Habitat Inventory, Agrostology, GIS, Ecology Weed Ecology

  11. Plan Administration Ltd. 580 Hazard Ave.

    E-print Network

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    :__________________________________________ Present Name is:____________________________________________ Date of Qualifying Event, with intent to defraud or knowing that he is facilitating a fraud against an insurer, submits an application to "SUBMIT" you must read and agree to the terms of eSignature SUBMIT #12;

  12. ONE WAY ONE WAY Stadium Ave.

    E-print Network

    Pittendrigh, Barry

    AQUA MRDH WARN SMLY SHRV ERHT HARR HILLPGMD MCUT TERY PVAB CDFS HERL POUL ASTL GRS SERV BSG FOOD TMB.) Bioscience Center C8 BMED Biomedical Engineering Building D8 BRK Birck Nanotechnology Center B8 BRNG Beering

  13. 212 Union Ave, SE Olympia, WA 98501

    E-print Network

    of the hydropower system of the Pacific Northwest ­ zero emissions of greenhouse gasses ­ as well as, for instance). More fossil fuel helped meet the demands of economic growth, since the region's hydropower system lost capacity, energy and operational characteristics by conservation and renewables, particularly given

  14. 177 Ave. Algarrobos WLV 1Apt. 2405

    E-print Network

    Gilbes, Fernando

    Sciences, Psychology Concentration August 1988- May 2001 Elemental, Intermediate and High School camp, Public Housing Luis Llorens Torres, San Juan, Puerto Rico 2007 International Clean Up Day: "Scuba camp, ComunidadShangai, San Juan,Puerto Rico 2005 Workshop about organic agriculture, Bosque del Pueblo

  15. Validity of Bartram's Painted Vulture (Aves: Cathartidae).

    PubMed

    Snyder, Noel F R; Fry, Joel T

    2013-01-01

    William Bartram described the Painted Vulture (Vultur sacra) as a new species in his 1791 book on travels in Florida and other southeastern states. However, no specimen of this bird survives, and it has not been reported by any subsequent ornithologist. Bartram's detailed description is not presently endorsed by the American Ornithologists' Union and has been widely regarded as a myth, a misdescribed King Vulture Sarcoramphus papa (Linnaeus), a misdescribed Northern Caracara Caracara cheriway (Jacquin), or a garbled mixture of species. In fact, his description bears almost no resemblance to a Northern Caracara, but it does match the King Vulture in all important respects except tail color (which is uniform dark brown in all ages and sexes of King Vultures but was white with a dark brown or black tip in Bartram's description). Most 20th century ornithologists commenting on Bartram's bird have been reluctant to accept his description because of the tail-color discrepancy. Only McAtee (1942) concluded that his description could be fully accurate as written, indicating a bird closely related to, but different from, a typical King Vulture. Paralleling Bartram's description is an apparently independent account and painting of a vulture of uncertain geographic origin by Eleazar Albin (1734). Details of Albin's description, including tail color, are very similar to those of Bartram's description. The only discrepancies are minor differences in color of softparts and tail that seem explicable as intraspecific variation. Available evidence suggests that Bartram knew nothing of Albin's description, and if so, Albin's bird provides quite persuasive support for the validity of Bartram's bird. Equally important, none of the arguments offered historically against the validity of the Painted Vulture is persuasive when examined closely. Together, these and other factors make a strong case for acceptance of Bartram's Painted Vulture as a historic resident of northern Florida and likely other adjacent regions. PMID:24698902

  16. Phylogeny and comparative phylogeography of Sclerurus (Aves

    E-print Network

    Cuervo, Andrés

    Rouge, USA, 3 PCAC Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazo^nia, Manaus, Brazil *Correspondence Departamento de Gene´tica e Biologia Evolutiva, Instituto de Biocie^ncias, Universidade de Sa~o Paulo, Brazil (e.g. Nicaragua Depression, Isthmus of Panama, Andean Cordillera, great rivers of Amazonia

  17. Kerry Donnelly Peterson 460 Division Ave

    E-print Network

    Wu, Mingshen

    , University of Minnesota Medical School May 2006- January 2007 Program Coordinator, Department of Food Science with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease. Advisor: Elizabeth J. Parks, Ph.D. R.D. Dietetic Internship for Graduate Vorland, CJ and Peterson KD. Contribution of dietary fat to high-density lipoprotein triglyceride during

  18. 127 Eastern Ave Gloucester MA 01930

    E-print Network

    Schweik, Charles M.

    resorts for their deeper dives and it is a prerequisite for further training. 1. Prerequisite SCUBA to a variety of dives. You'll experience shore diving, boat, night, deep, and wreck diving, a total of 9 dives are scheduled for: September 26, 27, October 3, 4. Students should be prepared to dive October 10, 11

  19. 127 Eastern Ave. Gloucester, MA 01930

    E-print Network

    Schweik, Charles M.

    is spent in the classroom. An optional weekend of diving in the ocean, leading to NAUI Scuba Diver for someone with no SCUBA experience. It consists of pool and classroom time, meeting once a week for 10 weeks from 7pm - 10pm. Half of the time is spent in the pool learning to use SCUBA equipment, the other half

  20. University of California Riverside 900 University Ave

    E-print Network

    " students to post their class notes online and to promote the availability of the notes to their classmates and posting the availability of notes for sale on iLearn are both violations of University policy, which may have serious effects on your academic career. The unauthorized sale of classroom notes is also

  1. Vision in the peafowl (Aves: Pavo cristatus).

    PubMed

    Hart, Nathan S

    2002-12-01

    The visual sense of the Indian blue-shouldered peafowl Pavo cristatus was investigated with respect to the spectral absorption characteristics of the retinal photoreceptors, the spectral transmittance of the ocular media and the topographic distribution of cells in the retinal ganglion cell layer. Microspectrophotometry revealed a single class of rod, four spectrally distinct types of single cone and a single class of double cone. In the case of the single cone types, which contained visual pigments with wavelengths of maximum absorbance (lambda(max)) at 424, 458, 505 and 567 nm, spectral filtering by the ocular media and the different cone oil droplets with which each visual pigment is associated gives predicted peak spectral sensitivities of 432, 477, 537 and 605 nm, respectively. Topographic analysis of retinal ganglion cell distribution revealed a large central area of increased cell density (at peak, 35,609 cells mm(-2)) with a poorly defined visual streak extending nasally. The peafowl has a calculated maximum spatial resolution (visual acuity) in the lateral visual field of 20.6 cycles degrees(-1). These properties of the peafowl eye are discussed with respect to its visual ecology and are compared with those of other closely related species. PMID:12432014

  2. Kimberly Sims 101 Western Ave. #66

    E-print Network

    Carlini, David

    Wesley Davis and the Pittsburgh Coke Mission 1894-1914." Awards 2002-2003 Center for American Political Instructor, IvyTown.com As an online tutor for the website www.IvyTown.com, I provide one-on- one writing

  3. Evolution of leaf warbler songs (Aves: Phylloscopidae)

    PubMed Central

    Tietze, Dieter Thomas; Martens, Jochen; Fischer, Balduin S; Sun, Yue-Hua; Klussmann-Kolb, Annette; Päckert, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Songs in passerine birds are important for territory defense and mating. Speciation rates in oscine passerines are so high, due to cultural evolution, that this bird lineage makes up half of the extant bird species. Leaf warblers are a speciose Old-World passerine family of limited morphological differentiation, so that songs are even more important for species delimitation. We took 16 sonographic traits from song recordings of 80 leaf warbler taxa and correlated them with 15 potentially explanatory variables, pairwise, and in linear models. Based on a well-resolved molecular phylogeny of the same taxa, all pairwise correlations were corrected for relatedness with phylogenetically independent contrasts and phylogenetic generalized linear models were used. We found a phylogenetic signal for most song traits, but a strong one only for the duration of the longest and of the shortest element, which are presumably inherited instead of learned. Body size of a leaf warbler species is a constraint on song frequencies independent of phylogeny. At least in this study, habitat density had only marginal impact on song features, which even disappeared through phylogenetic correction. Maybe most leaf warblers avoid the deterioration through sound propagation in dense vegetation by singing from exposed perches. Latitudinal (and longitudinal) extension of the breeding ranges was correlated with most song features, especially verse duration (longer polewards and westwards) and complexity (lower polewards). Climate niche or expansion history might explain these correlations. The number of different element types per verse decreases with elevation, possibly due to fewer resources and congeneric species at higher elevations. PMID:25691998

  4. NW EVERETT AVE. W BURNSIDE ST.

    E-print Network

    -WEN FIELD SW17THAVE. Goose Hollow Urban Design Study The Urban Projects Workshop University of Oregon - Portland Urban Architecture Program GOOSE HOLLOW Urban Design Proposal Arthur Handly November 7, 2012 Street Portland, OR 97209 #12;3 Goose Hollow Urban Design Study residents has been neglected. Older

  5. Leslie Roche, Lorien Jasny, Mark Lubell, Bethany Cutts, Emily Kachergis, Justin Derner, Valerie Eviner, Kenneth Tate

    E-print Network

    Tate, Kenneth

    , Theresa Becchetti, Josh Davy, Julie Fenzel, Larry Forero, Morgan Doran, Dustin Flavell, John Harper, Roger Ingram, Jeremy James, Royce Larsen, Stephanie Larson, David, Lewis, David Lile, Missy Merrill Service SFREC Adaptive Grazing Management Advisory Team (California) Ranchers & Ranch Managers Audubon

  6. Subpart W Quarterly Call January 3, 2013 EPA: Reid Rosnick (ORIA), Angelique Diaz (Region 8), Susan Stahle (OGC)

    E-print Network

    Minerals Law Center) Industry Oscar Paulson (Kennecott), Katie Sweeney (National Mining Association), John Cash (Ur- Energy), Mike Thomas (?), John McCarthy (?), Bill Carney (Uranium One), Mike Griffin (Strata

  7. Progesterone receptors: Form and function in brain Roberta Diaz Brinton a,b,*, Richard F. Thompson b,c,d

    E-print Network

    Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    that progesterone has multiple non-reproductive functions in the central nervous system to regulate cognition, mood progesterone regulation of reproductive behaviors and estrogen-inducible responses as well as effects, such as progesterone (P4), extend well beyond reproduction. Multiple regions within the central nervous system (CNS

  8. Regenerative potential of allopregnanolone Jun Ming Wang, Lifei Liu, Ronald W. Irwin, Shuhua Chen, Roberta Diaz Brinton

    E-print Network

    Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    Review Regenerative potential of allopregnanolone Jun Ming Wang, Lifei Liu, Ronald W. Irwin, Shuhua to mild to severe. Initial analyses suggest that AP may maintain the regenerative ability of the brain. Challenges of regenerative therapeutics for Alzheimer's disease

  9. MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 646, pp. 14, 3 figs. Tympanoctomys barrerae. By Gabriela B. Diaz, Ricardo A. Ojeda, Milton H. Gallardo,

    E-print Network

    Hayssen, Virginia

    ), skin and skull of adult male collected in April 1939, is housed in the Museum of Comparative Zoology to that of O. mimax, but skull is shorter and smaller. Distinctive features of the skull (Fig. 2) of T of skull (Ojeda et al., 1989) and extend posteriorly beyond occiput. Upper and lower incisors are orange

  10. Objets compacts et mati`ere dense Silvano Bonazzola, Brandon Carter, Jean-Louis Cornou, Joaquin Diaz,

    E-print Network

    Gourgoulhon, Eric

    ,LIGO) ´Etoiles `a neutrons [Bejger, Gondek-Rosi´nska, Gourgoulhon, Haensel, Taniguchi & Zdunik, A&A 431, 297 (2005)] ´Etoiles de quarks ´etranges [Limousin, Gondek-Rosi´nska & Gourgoulhon, PRD 71, 064012 (2005

  11. MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 761, pp. 15, 3 figs. Cryptotis meridensis. By Neal Woodman and Amelia Diaz de Pascual

    E-print Network

    Hayssen, Virginia

    , less emarginate upper dentition, and simple M3 (Woodman 2002). GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS. Cryptotis. Dentition is bulbous. Posterior borders of P4, M1, and M2 are not recessed or only slightly recessed

  12. A Cryptographic Study of Tokenization Systems Sandra Diaz-Santiago, Lil Maria Rodriguez-Henriquez and Debrup Chakraborty

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    ´iguez-Henr´iquez and Debrup Chakraborty Department of Computer Science, CINVESTAV-IPN, Av. IPN 2508 San Pedro Zacatenco@computacion.cs.cinvestav.mx,lrodriguez@computacion.cs.cinvestav.mx, debrup@cs.cinvestav.mx Abstract. Payments through cards have become very popular in today's world. All

  13. Dynamic Strategies for Target-Site Search by DNA-Binding Proteins Mario A. Diaz de la Rosa,

    E-print Network

    Spakowitz, Andrew J.

    and Biophysics Program, Stanford University, Stanford, California ABSTRACT Gene regulatory proteins find's DNA. Gene expression is mediated through the direct interaction between transcrip- tion factors-molecule manipulation and fluorescence (4) and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (5­12). Hopping events

  14. Updated 4/20141 5000 Forbes Ave, Warner Hall 3

    E-print Network

    application. Find the form at: www.uscis.gov. Two "passport" photos (http://travel.state.gov/passport and check in an envelope and attach carefully to the front of the I-765 (do not staple photos!). Passport date page of your passport. A copy of the most recent F-1 visa page in your passport (even if expired

  15. Toyota Technological Institute at Chicago 6045 S. Kenwood Ave.

    E-print Network

    Sosnick, Tobin R.

    , Optimization, Big Data, Bioinformatics and Computational Biology Personal Statement My research lies in the interface of combinatorial and numerical optimization, statistical machine learning, and some emerging data Assistant Professor, University of Waterloo Primary research and teaching interests Machine Learning

  16. THE SEISMOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA 400 Evelyn Ave., Suite 201

    E-print Network

    Bjarnason, Ingi

    SYSTEM BY INGI TH. BJARNASON,PATIENCECOWIE, MARKH. ANDERS, LEONARDOSEEBER, ANDCHRISTOPHERH. SCHOLZ thicker than normal oceanic crust (Bjarnason et al., 1993). The crustal thicken- ing is due to a hot spot

  17. Eocene Diversification of Crown Group Rails (Aves: Gruiformes: Rallidae)

    PubMed Central

    García–R, Juan C.; Gibb, Gillian C.; Trewick, Steve A.

    2014-01-01

    Central to our understanding of the timing of bird evolution is debate about an apparent conflict between fossil and molecular data. A deep age for higher level taxa within Neoaves is evident from molecular analyses but much remains to be learned about the age of diversification in modern bird families and their evolutionary ecology. In order to better understand the timing and pattern of diversification within the family Rallidae we used a relaxed molecular clock, fossil calibrations, and complete mitochondrial genomes from a range of rallid species analysed in a Bayesian framework. The estimated time of origin of Rallidae is Eocene, about 40.5 Mya, with evidence of intrafamiliar diversification from the Late Eocene to the Miocene. This timing is older than previously suggested for crown group Rallidae, but fossil calibrations, extent of taxon sampling and substantial sequence data give it credence. We note that fossils of Eocene age tentatively assigned to Rallidae are consistent with our findings. Compared to available studies of other bird lineages, the rail clade is old and supports an inference of deep ancestry of ground-dwelling habits among Neoaves. PMID:25291147

  18. YOUNG H. CHO Contact: 10125 De Soto Ave #20

    E-print Network

    Cho, Young Hyun

    ://www.oasysresearch.com/main.html youngcho@isi.edu young@oasysresearch.com Statement of Research Interests 1. Introduction I believe a balanced view of research to formulate and publish high impact novel ideas that also led to successful in both converging technologies gives me the advantage in pursuing novel and high impact research

  19. Comparative study of visual pathways in owls (Aves: Strigiformes).

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Ibáñez, Cristián; Iwaniuk, Andrew N; Lisney, Thomas J; Wylie, Douglas R

    2013-01-01

    Although they are usually regarded as nocturnal, owls exhibit a wide range of activity patterns, from strictly nocturnal, to crepuscular or cathemeral, to diurnal. Several studies have shown that these differences in the activity pattern are reflected in differences in eye morphology and retinal organization. Despite the evidence that differences in activity pattern among owl species are reflected in the peripheral visual system, there has been no attempt to correlate these differences with changes in the visual regions in the brain. In this study, we compare the relative size of nuclei in the main visual pathways in nine species of owl that exhibit a wide range of activity patterns. We found marked differences in the relative size of all visual structures among the species studied, both in the tectofugal and the thalamofugal pathway, as well in other retinorecipient nuclei, including the nucleus lentiformis mesencephali, the nucleus of the basal optic root and the nucleus geniculatus lateralis, pars ventralis. We show that the barn owl (Tyto alba), a species widely used in the study of the integration of visual and auditory processing, has reduced visual pathways compared to strigid owls. Our results also suggest there could be a trade-off between the relative size of visual pathways and auditory pathways, similar to that reported in mammals. Finally, our results show that although there is no relationship between activity pattern and the relative size of either the tectofugal or the thalamofugal pathway, there is a positive correlation between the relative size of both visual pathways and the relative number of cells in the retinal ganglion layer. PMID:23296024

  20. Eye shape and retinal topography in owls (Aves: Strigiformes).

    PubMed

    Lisney, Thomas J; Iwaniuk, Andrew N; Bandet, Mischa V; Wylie, Douglas R

    2012-01-01

    The eyes of vertebrates show adaptations to the visual environments in which they evolve. For example, eye shape is associated with activity pattern, while retinal topography is related to the symmetry or 'openness' of the habitat of a species. Although these relationships are well documented in many vertebrates including birds, the extent to which they hold true for species within the same avian order is not well understood. Owls (Strigiformes) represent an ideal group for the study of interspecific variation in the avian visual system because they are one of very few avian orders to contain species that vary in both activity pattern and habitat preference. Here, we examined interspecific variation in eye shape and retinal topography in nine species of owl. Eye shape (the ratio of corneal diameter to eye axial length) differed among species, with nocturnal species having relatively larger corneal diameters than diurnal species. All the owl species have an area of high retinal ganglion cell (RGC) density in the temporal retina and a visual streak of increased cell density extending across the central retina from temporal to nasal. However, the organization and degree of elongation of the visual streak varied considerably among species and this variation was quantified using H:V ratios. Species that live in open habitats and/or that are more diurnally active have well-defined, elongated visual streaks and high H:V ratios (3.88-2.33). In contrast, most nocturnal and/or forest-dwelling owls have a poorly defined visual streak, a more radially symmetrical arrangement of RGCs and lower H:V ratios (1.77-1.27). The results of a hierarchical cluster analysis indicate that the apparent interspecific variation is associated with activity pattern and habitat as opposed to the phylogenetic relationships among species. In seven species, the presence of a fovea was confirmed and it is suggested that all strigid owls may possess a fovea, whereas the tytonid barn owl (Tyto alba) does not. A size-frequency analysis of cell soma area indicates that a number of different RGC classes are represented in owls, including a population of large RGCs (cell soma area >150 µm(2)) that resemble the giant RGCs reported in other vertebrates. In conclusion, eye shape and retinal topography in owls vary among species and this variation is associated with different activity patterns and habitat preferences, thereby supporting similar observations in other vertebrates. PMID:22722085

  1. Rev. Dr. ROBERT E. SALT 334 21st Ave. W.

    E-print Network

    Wu, Mingshen

    . Ordained Interfaith Minister, January, 1999. 1987 Ph.D. Child Development and Family Studies, Purdue-Adolescent Sons. 1982 M.S. Child Development and Family Relations, School of Human Development, University-264. Salt, Robert (1992) "Wrestling with Love" Journal of Men's Studies, Vol 1 (2), November. Salt, Robert

  2. Rev. Dr. ROBERT E. SALT 334 21st Ave. W.

    E-print Network

    Horak, Matthew

    Seminary, New York City, New York. Ordained Interfaith Minister, January, 1999. 1987 Ph.D. Child of Reciprocal Touch Between Fathers and Pre-Adolescent Sons. 1982 M.S. Child Development and Family Relations with Love" Journal of Men's Studies, Vol 1 (2), November. Salt, Robert (1992) "Twenty Third Annual NCFR

  3. Težave pri prevajanju svetniških imen

    E-print Network

    Štavbar, Simona

    2015-01-01

    , and on the Internet. Due to the complexity of this topic, it is necessary to stress the importance of knowledge and the consistency necessary for this kind of translation, and to encourage further research....

  4. Foraging decisions, patch use, and seasonality in egrets (Aves: ciconiiformes)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erwin, R.M.

    1985-01-01

    Feeding snowy (Egretta thula) and great (Casmerodius albus) egrets were observed during 2 breeding seasons in coastal New Jersey and 2 brief winter periods in northeast Florida (USA). A number of tests based on assumptions of foraging models, predictions from foraging theory, and earlier empirical tests concerning time allocation and movement in foraging patches was made. Few of the expectations based on foraging theory and/or assumptions were supported by the empirical evidence. Snowy egrets fed with greater intensity and efficiency during the breeding season (when young were being fed) than during winter. They also showed some tendency to leave patches when their capture rate declined, and they spent more time foraging in patches when other birds were present nearby. Great egrets showed few of these tendencies, although they did leave patches when their intercapture intervals increased. Satiation differences had some influence on feeding rates in snowy egrets, but only at the end of feeding bouts. Some individuals of both species revisited areas in patches that had recently been exploited, and success rates were usually higher after the 2nd visit. Apparently, for predators of active prey, short-term changes in resource availability ('resource depression') may be more important than resource depletion, a common assumption in most optimal foraging theory models.

  5. Kerry M. Walsh 4202 E. Fowler Ave, BSN 3220

    E-print Network

    Jank, Wolfgang

    . · Improved overseas quality process by implementing mandatory factory evaluations and quality qualification@usf.edu Professional Profile · Over 20 years of experience managing a variety of product sourcing responsibilities · Instructor - USF Tampa ­ International Marketing, Promotions Management, Professional Selling

  6. A compilation of studies from Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scoggins, J. R.; Fuelberg, H. E.; Carlson, R. D.; Phelps, R. W.; Bellue, D. G.

    1973-01-01

    Five methods for obtaining the sign of vertical motion at various levels in the atmosphere were investigated to determine which gave the best explanation for areas of rain and no-rain in the southeastern United States during the period February 19-22, 1964. The methods used were the terrain-induced vertical motion, the kinematic method including the terrain effect, the adiabatic method, the omega equation, and the vorticity equation combined with Dines' Compensation Principle. Stability and moisture availability were considered but not as extensively as vertical motion. Values of vertical motion obtained by the kinetic method, including orographic lifting produced the best agreement with the observed areas. When terms in the omega equation were added through use of constant multipliers, results comparable to the adiabatic method were obtained. Without this addition large uncertainties occurred. Maps showing areas where terms of the omega equation would indicate positive vertical motion did not correlate well with the observed rainfall patterns.

  7. Dating the diversification of the major lineages of Passeriformes (Aves)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The avian Order Passeriformes is an enormously species-rich group, which comprises almost 60% of all living bird species. This diverse order is believed to have originated before the break-up of Gondwana in the late Cretaceous. However, previous molecular dating studies have relied heavily on the geological split between New Zealand and Antarctica, assumed to have occurred 85–82 Mya, for calibrating the molecular clock and might thus be circular in their argument. Results This study provides a time-scale for the evolution of the major clades of passerines using seven nuclear markers, five taxonomically well-determined passerine fossils, and an updated interpretation of the New Zealand split from Antarctica 85–52 Mya in a Bayesian relaxed-clock approach. We also assess how different interpretations of the New Zealand–Antarctica vicariance event influence our age estimates. Our results suggest that the diversification of Passeriformes began in the late Cretaceous or early Cenozoic. Removing the root calibration for the New Zealand–Antarctica vicariance event (85–52 Mya) dramatically increases the 95% credibility intervals and leads to unrealistically old age estimates. We assess the individual characteristics of the seven nuclear genes analyzed in our study. Our analyses provide estimates of divergence times for the major groups of passerines, which can be used as secondary calibration points in future molecular studies. Conclusions Our analysis takes recent paleontological and geological findings into account and provides the best estimate of the passerine evolutionary time-scale currently available. This time-scale provides a temporal framework for further biogeographical, ecological, and co-evolutionary studies of the largest bird radiation, and adds to the growing support for a Cretaceous origin of Passeriformes. PMID:24422673

  8. Feather mites of Calidris fuscicollis (Aves: Scolopacidae) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Gomes, S N; Pesenti, T C; Cirne, M P; Müller, G

    2015-11-01

    During the period 2010-2012, eighty individuals of Calidris fuscicollis (Vieillot, 1819) were collected on the southern coast of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, with the objective of determining the presence of feather mites. Of the 80 birds examined, 32.5% were infested by mites, identified as Avenzoaria calidridis (Oudemans, 1904) (Avenzoariidae) (31.25%), Montchadskiana securicata (Megnin & Trouessart 1884) (Pterolichidae) (22.5%) and Alloptes limosae (Dubinin, 1951) (Alloptidae) (6.25%). This is the first report of feather mites on Calidris fuscicollis in Brazil. PMID:26675921

  9. The evolutionary history of cockatoos (Aves: Psittaciformes: Cacatuidae).

    PubMed

    White, Nicole E; Phillips, Matthew J; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Alfaro-Núñez, Alonzo; Willerslev, Eske; Mawson, Peter R; Spencer, Peter B S; Bunce, Michael

    2011-06-01

    Cockatoos are the distinctive family Cacatuidae, a major lineage of the order of parrots (Psittaciformes) and distributed throughout the Australasian region of the world. However, the evolutionary history of cockatoos is not well understood. We investigated the phylogeny of cockatoos based on three mitochondrial and three nuclear DNA genes obtained from 16 of 21 species of Cacatuidae. In addition, five novel mitochondrial genomes were used to estimate time of divergence and our estimates indicate Cacatuidae diverged from Psittacidae approximately 40.7 million years ago (95% CI 51.6-30.3 Ma) during the Eocene. Our data shows Cacatuidae began to diversify approximately 27.9 Ma (95% CI 38.1-18.3 Ma) during the Oligocene. The early to middle Miocene (20-10 Ma) was a significant period in the evolution of modern Australian environments and vegetation, in which a transformation from mainly mesic to xeric habitats (e.g., fire-adapted sclerophyll vegetation and grasslands) occurred. We hypothesize that this environmental transformation was a driving force behind the diversification of cockatoos. A detailed multi-locus molecular phylogeny enabled us to resolve the phylogenetic placements of the Palm Cockatoo (Probosciger aterrimus), Galah (Eolophus roseicapillus), Gang-gang Cockatoo (Callocephalon fimbriatum) and Cockatiel (Nymphicus hollandicus), which have historically been difficult to place within Cacatuidae. When the molecular evidence is analysed in concert with morphology, it is clear that many of the cockatoo species' diagnostic phenotypic traits such as plumage colour, body size, wing shape and bill morphology have evolved in parallel or convergently across lineages. PMID:21419232

  10. The complete mitochondrial genome of Garrulax cineraceus (Aves, Passeriformes, Timaliidae).

    PubMed

    Xue, Hui; Zhang, Huabin; Li, Yongmin; Wu, Xiaoyou; Yan, Peng; Wu, Xiao-Bing

    2016-01-01

    The complete sequence of the mitochondrial DNA genome from Garrulax cineraceus was determined using the polymerase chain reaction method. The genome (17,800?bp in length) contained 37 genes (13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes and 22 tRNA genes) and 2 control regions (D-loop) at two different locations of mitogenome, which is similar to the typical mtDNA of vertebrates. All the protein-coding genes in G. cineraceus were distributed on the H-strand, except for the ND6 subunit gene and eight tRNA genes which were encoded on the L-strand. PMID:24450725

  11. AVE/VAS 4: 25-mb sounding data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sienkiewicz, M. E.

    1983-01-01

    The rawinsonde sounding program is described and tabulated data at 25 mb intervals for the 24 stations and 14 special stations participating in the experiment is presented. Sounding were taken at 3 hr intervals. An additional sounding was taken at the normal synoptic observation time. Some soundings were computed from raw ordinate data, while others were interpolated from significant level data.

  12. Esteban M Lucero 505 Sweet Ave. Las Cruces NM 88001

    E-print Network

    Wright, Timothy F.

    @nmsu.edu EDUCATION New Mexico State University 2008-Present Bachelor of Science, Biology, expected May 2014 Internship. Principle Investigator: Dr. Kristin Artinger Project Title: The role Prdm1 plays in cranial nerve; Environmental Forensics: Variables Influencing Isolation and purity of wood DNA. 3rd Annual Rise Mid-Summer

  13. Hypopi (Acari: Hypoderatidae) of the wood stork (Aves: Ciconiiformes: Ciconiidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pence, Danny B.; Thomas, N.J.

    1995-01-01

    A new species is described and additional host records are presented for 2 other species of deutonymphs of the family Hypoderatidae from the subcutaneous adipose tissues of the wood stork, Mycteria americana L. Phalacrodectes (Phalacrodectes) mycteria n. sp. appears to share affinities with species from both pelicaniform and ciconiiform hosts, but it most closely resembles P. (P.) punctatissimus (?erný) Pence & Courtney from pelicans in idiosomal chaetotaxy, cutdcular sclerotization, and posteriorly divergent, widely separated genital openings. The new species differs from this and other species of the genus by its small size, the degree of separation of the genital openings with papillae, no secondary sclerotization in the perigenital area or surrounding the genital openings, and the long filiform setae s and w on genu III. There was a mixed infection of Neottialges kutzeri Fain and N. mycteriae Pence in all of 7 wood storks examined from Florida and Georgia; P. (P) mycteria was found in 4 of these hosts. This is the 7th species described as a deutonymph in the genus Phalacrodectes. The apparent close affinity of P. (P.) mycteria with P. (P.) punctatissimus and allied species from pelicaniform versus ciconiiform birds appears to be inconsistent with the established host-parasite relationships based on classical avian taxonomic relationships. However, this apparent affinity may be more reflective of the close relationships between the families of pelicans, ibises and spoonbills, and storks as recently proposed by DNA-DNA hybridization studies.

  14. A supermatrix phylogeny of corvoid passerine birds (Aves: Corvides).

    PubMed

    Jønsson, Knud Andreas; Fabre, Pierre-Henri; Kennedy, Jonathan D; Holt, Ben G; Borregaard, Michael K; Rahbek, Carsten; Fjeldså, Jon

    2016-01-01

    The Corvides (previously referred to as the core Corvoidea) are a morphologically diverse clade of passerine birds comprising nearly 800 species. The group originated some 30 million years ago in the proto-Papuan archipelago, to the north of Australia, from where lineages have dispersed and colonized all of the world's major continental and insular landmasses (except Antarctica). During the last decade multiple species-level phylogenies have been generated for individual corvoid families and more recently the inter-familial relationships have been resolved, based on phylogenetic analyses using multiple nuclear loci. In the current study we analyse eight nuclear and four mitochondrial loci to generate a dated phylogeny for the majority of corvoid species. This phylogeny includes 667 out of 780 species (85.5%), 141 out of 143 genera (98.6%) and all 31 currently recognized families, thus providing a baseline for comprehensive macroecological, macroevolutionary and biogeographical analyses. Using this phylogeny we assess the temporal consistency of the current taxonomic classification of families and genera. By adopting an approach that enforces temporal consistency by causing the fewest possible taxonomic changes to currently recognized families and genera, we find the current familial classification to be largely temporally consistent, whereas that of genera is not. PMID:26327328

  15. Will A. Overholt 388 Oakland Ave SE, Atlanta, GA 30312

    E-print Network

    Storici, Francesca

    and physical science to Malawian students] Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL Research Assistant groundwater and subsurface sediments"] AWARDS AND FELLOWSHIPS National Science Foundation Graduate Research Scholar Award Spring 2010 [Given to the top 10 graduation seniors] John Mark Caffrey Scholarship Fall 2009

  16. Taxonomy of Greater White-fronted Geese (Aves: Anatidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Banks, Richard C.

    2011-01-01

    Five subspecies of the Greater White-fronted Goose, Anser albifrons (Scopoli, 1769), have been named, all on the basis of wintering birds, and up to six subspecies have been recognized. There has been confusion over the application of some names, particularly in North America, because of lack of knowledge of the breeding ranges and type localities, and incorrect taxonomic decisions. There is one clinally varying subspecies in Eurasia, one that breeds in Greenland, and three in North America, one newly named herein.

  17. 4911 Central Ave Richmond, CA 94804 RMP Steering Committee

    E-print Network

    of Monitoring Contingency and Undesignated Reserve Funds up to the budgeted amount. 12:55 Phil Trowbridge Lester pages 25-37 Desired outcome: Informed committee 12:40 Lawrence Leung Phil Trowbridge 4. Decision

  18. Chris Bresee 1250 Columbia Ave, Chicago, IL 60626

    E-print Network

    MacIver, Malcolm A.

    ;31(13):4886-95. Electroporation-Mediated Gene Transfer to the Developing Mouse Inner Ear. J. Brigande, S. Gubbels, D. Woessner, J and motor control. PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE: Graduate School work (Northwestern University): 2011 - present a pilot experiment to asses the effect of virtual manipulation of novel 3- d objects on memory. 2010

  19. David G. Belair 1901 University Ave. Apt. 3

    E-print Network

    ribbons, milled granules, and tablets to determine tensile strength and porosity for comparison Engineering October 2008 ­ Present Volunteer Cary Home for Children, Lafayette, IN August 2006 ­ May 2007

  20. Bone histology in extant and fossil penguins (Aves: Sphenisciformes).

    PubMed

    Ksepka, Daniel T; Werning, Sarah; Sclafani, Michelle; Boles, Zachary M

    2015-11-01

    Substantial changes in bone histology accompany the secondary adaptation to life in the water. This transition is well documented in several lineages of mammals and non-avian reptiles, but has received relatively little attention in birds. This study presents new observations on the long bone microstructure of penguins, based on histological sections from two extant taxa (Spheniscus and Aptenodytes) and eight fossil specimens belonging to stem lineages (†Palaeospheniscus and several indeterminate Eocene taxa). High bone density in penguins results from compaction of the internal cortical tissues, and thus penguin bones are best considered osteosclerotic rather than pachyostotic. Although the oldest specimens sampled in this study represent stages of penguin evolution that occurred at least 25 million years after the loss of flight, major differences in humeral structure were observed between these Eocene stem taxa and extant taxa. This indicates that the modification of flipper bone microstructure continued long after the initial loss of flight in penguins. It is proposed that two key transitions occurred during the shift from the typical hollow avian humerus to the dense osteosclerotic humerus in penguins. First, a reduction of the medullary cavity occurred due to a decrease in the amount of perimedullary osteoclastic activity. Second, a more solid cortex was achieved by compaction. In extant penguins and †Palaeospheniscus, most of the inner cortex is formed by rapid osteogenesis, resulting an initial latticework of woven-fibered bone. Subsequently, open spaces are filled by slower, centripetal deposition of parallel-fibered bone. Eocene stem penguins formed the initial latticework, but the subsequent round of compaction was less complete, and thus open spaces remained in the adult bone. In contrast to the humerus, hindlimb bones from Eocene stem penguins had smaller medullary cavities and thus higher compactness values compared with extant taxa. Although cortical lines of arrested growth have been observed in extant penguins, none was observed in any of the current sampled specimens. Therefore, it is likely that even these 'giant' penguin taxa completed their growth cycle without a major pause in bone deposition, implying that they did not undergo a prolonged fasting interval before reaching adult size. PMID:26360700

  1. Effective: Saturday, November 15 (MD Football vs Michigan State) For more information visit transportation.umd.edu or call (301) 314-2255

    E-print Network

    Zeng, Ning

    Seminole St Berwyn Rd Roanoke Pl 48thAve 48thAve 48thPl 48thPl 48thAve 49thAve 49thAve49thAve 49thAve 49thDr IKEA Way 48thAve 48thpL 50thPl 51stAve OsageSt 48thAve RhodeIslandAve Pierce Ave Chapel Dr RossboroughAve RhodeIslandAve RhodeIslandAve RhodeIslandAve RhodeIslandAve RhodeIslandAve RhodeIslandAve Princeton

  2. MAT 121 Probability and Statistics for the Liberal Arts I, Fall 2010, p. 1 (Tu-Th) Instructor: Associate Professor Steven P. Diaz, 317C Carnegie, x1583

    E-print Network

    McConnell, Terry

    . It is also a good idea to try the statistical literacy and critical thinking, chapter quick quiz, and review Core: The sequence MAT 121 ­ MAT 122 can be used to satisfy the quantitative skills requirement on a scale of 0­100. Your computer labs will also be graded on a scale of 0-100. Your overall score

  3. MAT 122-100 Probability and Statistics for the Liberal Arts II, Spring 2011, p. 1 Instructor: Associate Professor Steven P. Diaz, 317C Carnegie, x1583,

    E-print Network

    McConnell, Terry

    problems for each section. It is also a good idea to try the statistical literacy and critical thinking skills requirement of the liberal arts core in the College of Arts and Sciences. Texts: Elementary exam and the final exam will be graded on a scale of 0­100. Your recitations will also be graded

  4. MAT 122-100 Probability and Statistics for the Liberal Arts II, Spring 2014, p. 1 Instructor: Associate Professor Steven P. Diaz, 317C Carnegie, x1583,

    E-print Network

    McConnell, Terry

    literacy and critical thinking, chapter quick quiz, and review exercises at the end of each chapter. Exams skills requirement of the liberal arts core in the College of Arts and Sciences. Texts: Elementary on a scale of 0­100. Your recitations will also be graded on a scale of 0- 100. Your overall score

  5. MAT 121-400 Probability and Statistics for the Liberal Arts I, Fall 2012, p. 1 Instructor: Associate Professor Steven P. Diaz, 317C Carnegie, x1583,

    E-print Network

    McConnell, Terry

    to try the statistical literacy and critical thinking, chapter quick quiz, and review exercises Arts Core: The sequence MAT 121 ­ MAT 122 can be used to satisfy the quantitative skills requirement exam will be graded on a scale of 0­100. Your computer labs will also be graded on a scale of 0

  6. MAT 121 Probability and Statistics for the Liberal Arts I, Fall 2010, p. 1 (UC) Course Supervisor: Associate Professor Steven P. Diaz, 317C Carnegie, x1583.

    E-print Network

    McConnell, Terry

    to try the statistical literacy and critical thinking, chapter quick quiz, and review exercises skills requirement of the liberal arts core in the College of Arts and Sciences. Texts: Elementary on a scale of 0­100. Your computer labs will also be graded on a scale of 0-100. Your overall score

  7. MAT 121 Probability and Statistics for the Liberal Arts I, Fall 2012, p. 1 (UC) Course Supervisor: Associate Professor Steven P. Diaz, 317C Carnegie, x1583.

    E-print Network

    McConnell, Terry

    to try the statistical literacy and critical thinking, chapter quick quiz, and review exercises skills requirement of the liberal arts core in the College of Arts and Sciences. Texts: Elementary exam will be graded on a scale of 0­100. Your computer labs will also be graded on a scale of 0

  8. MAT 121 Probability and Statistics for the Liberal Arts I, Spring 2010, p. 1 Instructor: Associate Professor Steven P. Diaz, 317C Carnegie, x1583

    E-print Network

    McConnell, Terry

    literacy and critical thinking, chapter quick quiz, and review exercises at the end of each chapter. Exams the quantitative skills requirement of the liberal arts core in the College of Arts and Sciences. Texts: Elementary of Course Grade: Each midterm exam and the final exam will be graded on a scale of 0­100. Your computer labs

  9. Conflicting Values: Spirituality and Wilderness at Mt. Shasta1 Maria Fernandez-Gimenez Lynn Huntsinger Catherine Phillips Barbara AIIen-Diaz2

    E-print Network

    on scientific understanding of the natural world. Aldo Leopold described the land ethic as an ecological on a scientific understanding of ecology (Leopold 1949). Forest Service guidelines for wilderness man- agement

  10. Micromagnetism in mesoscopic epitaxial Fe dot arrays Y. B. Xu, A. Hirohata, L. Lopez-Diaz, H. T. Leung, M. Tselepi, S. M. Gardiner,

    E-print Network

    Xu, Yongbing

    . Leung, M. Tselepi, S. M. Gardiner, W. Y. Lee, and J. A. C. Blanda) Cavendish Laboratory, University Henri Ravera, 92220 Bagneux, France The domain structures of epitaxial Fe 20 nm /GaAs 100 circular dot

  11. H.F. Diaz and R.S. Bradley (eds.), The Hadley Circulation: Present, Past and Future, 121152. 2005 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands

    E-print Network

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    bands. The ocean's effect on tropical convection and hence the rising branch of the Hadley circulation- standing the coupled ocean-atmospheric dynamics that govern the rising branch of the Hadley circulation-SEA INTERACTION, AND THE RISING BRANCH OF THE HADLEY CIRCULATION Shang-Ping Xie International Pacific Research

  12. The biogeography and filtering of woody plant functional diversity in

    E-print Network

    Wright, Ian

    . Kerkhoff6 , Brad Boyle2 , Michael D. Weiser7 , James J. Elser8 , William F. Fagan9 , Jimena Forero14 , Oliver L. Phillips11 , Charles A. Price15 , Peter B. Reich16 , Carlos A. Quesada11 , James C grid cells are more or less functionally d

  13. Research Profiles AT MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY

    E-print Network

    Feeny, Brian

    Alejandro Diaz transfer, thermodynamics, biomedical engineering, internal combustion engines, turbomachinery Materials 20 aleJandRo diaz Radial Turbomachinery 22 abRaham engeda Understanding and Using Vibration 24

  14. Produced by Communications and Public Affairs 2010 Regents of the University of California Davis Castro

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    n e l lNaturalArea University House Way Shattuck Ave Walnut St LeRoy Ave Euclid Ave La Loma Ave FranciscoSt DelawareSt HearstAve BerkeleyWay UniversityAve Henry St Walnut St Shattuck Ave Shattuck Ave Koshland Hall Genetics and Plant Biology Mulford Hall Morgan Hall Tolman Hall 1925 Walnut St Insectary

  15. Observatory Capital One Field

    E-print Network

    Lathrop, Daniel P.

    Rd Pontiac St Quebec St Berwyn Rd Ruatan St Seminole St Berwyn Rd Roanoke Pl 48thAve 48thAve 48thAve AutovilleDr Autoville 48thAve 48thpL 50thPl 51stAve OsageSt 48thAve RhodeIslandAve Pierce Ave Chapel Dr Rd YaleAve PrincetonAve RhodeIslandAve RhodeIslandAve RhodeIslandAve PrincetonAve Dickinson

  16. Saxicola syenitica Heuglin, 1869 (Aves: Passeriformes: Muscicapidae), an overlooked taxon of Oenanthe?

    PubMed

    Shirihai, Hadoram; Schweizer, Manuel; Kirwan, Guy M; Svensson, Lars

    2014-01-01

    The North African population of the Black Wheatear has been treated as Oenanthe leucura syenitica for over 100 years. The type of syenitica was collected by Heuglin in June 1852 near the southern Egypt/northern Sudan border, well outside the range of the sedentary Black Wheatear. Morphometric inference and genetic analyses of partial sequences of the mitochondrial gene COI demonstrate that the type specimen of syenitica is not conspecific with O. leucura, but instead is closely related to O. lugens of the Middle East and North Africa, being most similar in plumage to O. lugens warriae of the basalt deserts of north-east Jordan and southern Syria. While syenitica was not separable in the analysed part of its mitochondrial DNA from O. l. lugens and O. l. warriae, it differs in morphometrics and plumage features from the latter. The type specimen is a first-summer bird with abraded plumage as expected for June, and may thus have been collected in its breeding range. Its morphological distinctiveness implies that syenitica might be taxonomically distinct from warriae. However, as it is known only from the type and its few associated data, we propose to treat it as a subspecies inquirenda of O. lugens. As a consequence of this, and the fact that we found no genetic or morphological differences between North African populations of O. leucura and riggenbachi Hartert, 1909, the name originally applied to the population in Western Sahara, the North African population takes the oldest available name to become O. leucura riggenbachi. PMID:24872167

  17. Current Position: Senior Research Fellow, Vegetable IPM Address: 219 Hodson Hall, 1980 Folwell Ave.

    E-print Network

    -1574. Burkness, E. C., and W. D. Hutchison. 2009. Implementing reduced-risk IPM in fresh-market cabbage: Influence of sampling parameters, and validation of binomial sequential sampling plans for the cabbage pest management in fresh-market cabbage: improved net returns via scouting and timing of effective

  18. Rapid diversification of falcons (Aves: Falconidae) due to expansion of open habitats in the Late Miocene.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Jérôme; Johnson, Jeff A; Mindell, David P

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how and why lineages diversify is central to understanding the origins of biological diversity. The avian family Falconidae (caracaras, forest-falcons, falcons) has an uneven distribution of species among multiple well-supported clades, and provides a useful system for testing hypotheses about diversification rate and correlation with environmental changes. We analyzed eight independent loci for 1-7 individuals from each of the 64 currently recognized Falconidae species, together with two fossil falconid temporal calibrations, to assess phylogeny, absolute divergence times and potential shifts in diversification rate. Our analyses supported similar diversification ages in the Early to Middle Miocene for the three traditional subfamilies, Herpetotherinae, Polyborinae and Falconinae. We estimated that divergences within the subfamily Falconinae began about 16mya and divergences within the most species-rich genus, Falco, including about 60% of all Falconidae species, began about 7.5mya. We found evidence for a significant increase in diversification rate at the basal phylogenetic node for the genus Falco, and the timing for this rate shift correlates generally with expansion of C4 grasslands beginning around the Miocene/Pliocene transition. Concomitantly, Falco lineages that are distributed primarily in grassland or savannah habitats, as opposed to woodlands, and exhibit migratory, as opposed to sedentary, behavior experienced a higher diversification rate. PMID:25256056

  19. Systematics and distribution of the giant fossil barn owls of the West Indies (Aves: Strigiformes: Tytonidae).

    PubMed

    Suárez, William; Olson, Storrs L

    2015-01-01

    After reviewing the systematics and distribution of the extinct West Indian taxa of Tytonidae (Tyto) larger than the living barn owl Tyto alba (Scopoli), we reached the following conclusions: (1) the species T. ostologa Wetmore (1922) is the only giant barn owl known so far from Hispaniola; (2) T. pollens Wetmore (1937) was a somewhat larger and even more robust representative of T. ostologa known from the Great Bahama Bank and Cuba; (3) the very rare species T. riveroi Arredondo (1972b) is here synonymized with T. pollens; (4) the smallest taxon of these giant barn owls is T. noeli Arredondo (1972a), which is widespread and abundant in Quaternary deposits of Cuba and is here reported for the first time from two cave deposits in Jamaica; (5) the only large barn owl named so far from the Lesser Antilles is T. neddi Steadman & Hilgartner (1999), which is here synonymized with T. noeli; (6) a new taxon from Cuba, T. cravesae new species, which in size approached the linear dimensions of T. ostologa, is named and described herein. PMID:26624114

  20. Molecular systematics of the new world screech-owls (Megascops: Aves, Strigidae): biogeographic and taxonomic implications.

    PubMed

    Dantas, Sidnei M; Weckstein, Jason D; Bates, John M; Krabbe, Niels K; Cadena, Carlos Daniel; Robbins, Mark B; Valderrama, Eugenio; Aleixo, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Megascops screech-owls are endemic to the New World and range from southern Canada to the southern cone of South America. The 22 currently recognized Megascops species occupy a wide range of habitats and elevations, from desert to humid montane forest, and from sea level to the Andean tree line. Species and subspecies diagnoses of Megascops are notoriously difficult due to subtle plumage differences among taxa with frequent plumage polymorphism. Using three mitochondrial and three nuclear genes we estimated a phylogeny for all but one Megascops species. Phylogenies were estimated with Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian Inference, and a Bayesian chronogram was reconstructed to assess the spatio-temporal context of Megascops diversification. Megascops was paraphyletic in the recovered tree topologies if the Puerto Rican endemic M. nudipes is included in the genus. However, the remaining taxa are monophyletic and form three major clades: (1) M. choliba, M. koepckeae, M. albogularis, M. clarkii, and M. trichopsis; (2) M. petersoni, M. marshalli, M. hoyi, M. ingens, and M. colombianus; and (3) M. asio, M. kennicottii, M. cooperi, M. barbarus, M. sanctaecatarinae, M. roboratus, M. watsonii, M. atricapilla, M. guatemalae, and M. vermiculatus. Megascops watsonii is paraphyletic with some individuals more closely related to M. atricapilla than to other members in that polytypic species. Also, allopatric populations of some other Megascops species were highly divergent, with levels of genetic differentiation greater than between some recognized species-pairs. Diversification within the genus is hypothesized to have taken place during the last 8 million years, with a likely origin in Central America. The genus later expanded over much of the Americas and then diversified via multiple dispersal events from the Andes into the Neotropical lowlands. PMID:26456003

  1. Phylogeography of the Alcippe morrisonia (Aves: Timaliidae): long population history beyond late Pleistocene glaciations

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gang; Qu, Yanhua; Yin, Zuohua; Li, Shouhsien; Liu, Naifa; Lei, Fumin

    2009-01-01

    Background The role of Pleistocene glacial oscillations in current biodiversity and distribution patterns varies with latitude, physical topology and population life history and has long been a topic of discussion. However, there had been little phylogeographical research in south China, where the geophysical complexity is associated with great biodiversity. A bird endemic in Southeast Asia, the Grey-cheeked Fulvetta, Alcippe morrisonia, has been reported to show deep genetic divergences among its seven subspecies. In the present study, we investigated the phylogeography of A. morrisonia to explore its population structure and evolutionary history, in order to gain insight into the effect of geological events on the speciation and diversity of birds endemic in south China. Results Mitochondrial genes cytochrome b (Cytb) and cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) were represented by 1236 nucleotide sites from 151 individuals from 29 localities. Phylogenetic analysis showed seven monophyletic clades congruent with the geographically separated groups, which were identified as major sources of molecular variance (90.92%) by AMOVA. TCS analysis revealed four disconnected networks, and that no haplotype was shared among the geographical groups. The common ancestor of these populations was dated to 11.6 Mya and several divergence events were estimated along the population evolutionary history. Isolation by distance was inferred by NCPA to be responsible for the current intra-population genetic pattern and gene flow among geographical groups was interrupted. A late Pleistocene demographic expansion was detected in the eastern geographical groups, while the expansion time (0.2–0.4 Mya) was earlier than the Last Glacial Maximum. Conclusion It is proposed that the complicated topology preserves high genetic diversity and ancient lineages for geographical groups of A. morrisonia in China mainland and its two major islands, and restricts gene exchange during climate oscillations. Isolation by distance seems to be an important factor of genetic structure formation within geographical populations. Although glacial influence to population fluctuation was observed in late Pleistocene, it seems that populations in eastern China were more susceptible to climate change, and all geographical groups were growing stably through the Last Glacial Maximum. Coalescence analysis suggested that the ancestor of A. morrisonia might be traced back to the late Miocene, and the current phylogeographical structure of A. morrisonia is more likely to be attributable to a series geological events than to Pleistocene glacial cycles. PMID:19558699

  2. The 25-MB sounding data and synoptic charts for NASA's AVE 2 pilot experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scoggins, J. R.; Turner, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    Rawinsonde data were tabulated at 25-mb intervals from the surface to 25 mb for the 54 stations participating in the atmospheric variability experiment 2 Pilot Experiment which began at 12 Greenwich mean time on May 11 and ended at 12 Greenwich mean time on May 12, 1974. Soundings were made at 3 hour intervals. Methods of processing and data accuracy are discussed, and synoptic charts prepared from the data are presented. The area covered by the sounding stations is the eastern United States east of approximately 105 deg west longitude.

  3. A preliminary look at AVE-SESAME 5 conducted on 20-21 May 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    July, M.; Turner, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Information on data collected, synoptic conditions, and severe and unusual weather reported during the period are presented. Records of the synoptic conditions include synoptic charts, radar charts, satellite photographs, and rainfall observations.

  4. The structure and dynamics of mesoscale systems influencing severe thunderstorm development during AVE/SESAME 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, G. S.

    1982-01-01

    Relationships between meso-beta scale systems and thunderstorm formation were examined as part of the NASA atmospheric variability experiment/severe environmental storms and mesoscale experiment 1979. The McIdas program was employed for meso-beta scale analyses of atmospheric structure and dynamics in kinematic computations of the Abilene Triangle on a grid mesh of 100 km for station spacing of 275 km. Mesoscale short wave systems were detected imbedded and propagating cyclonically around upper-level vortex circulation and creating environmental conditions conducive to thunderstorm development. TIROS-N and GOES satellite data served to connect the systems with two convective storms which developed. The necessity to use spaceborne instrumentation carried on the Shuttle or on free-flying satellites for enhancing the data-base on storm development is noted.

  5. Evidence of taxon cycles in an Indo-Pacific passerine bird radiation (Aves: Pachycephala)

    PubMed Central

    Jønsson, Knud Andreas; Irestedt, Martin; Christidis, Les; Clegg, Sonya M.; Holt, Ben G.; Fjeldså, Jon

    2014-01-01

    Many insular taxa possess extraordinary abilities to disperse but may differ in their abilities to diversify and compete. While some taxa are widespread across archipelagos, others have disjunct (relictual) populations. These types of taxa, exemplified in the literature by selections of unrelated taxa, have been interpreted as representing a continuum of expansions and contractions (i.e. taxon cycles). Here, we use molecular data of 35 out of 40 species of the avian genus Pachycephala (including 54 out of 66 taxa in Pachycephala pectoralis (sensu lato), to assess the spatio-temporal evolution of the group. We also include data on species distributions, morphology, habitat and elevational ranges to test a number of predictions associated with the taxon-cycle hypothesis. We demonstrate that relictual species persist on the largest and highest islands across the Indo-Pacific, whereas recent archipelago expansions resulted in colonization of all islands in a region. For co-occurring island taxa, the earliest colonists generally inhabit the interior and highest parts of an island, with little spatial overlap with later colonists. Collectively, our data support the idea that taxa continuously pass through phases of expansions and contractions (i.e. taxon cycles). PMID:24403319

  6. Identification of Bacterial Specialists in Hosts belonging to Aves, Mammalia, and Pisces

    EPA Science Inventory

    Only a portion of bacteria found in animal guts are able to establish specific associations within animal hosts. Taxa that have formed these specialized relationships may have played a prominent role in host evolution and may also contribute significantly to current host physiolo...

  7. Structure and Growth Pattern of Pseudoteeth in Pelagornis mauretanicus (Aves, Odontopterygiformes, Pelagornithidae)

    PubMed Central

    Louchart, Antoine; Sire, Jean-Yves; Mourer-Chauviré, Cécile; Geraads, Denis; Viriot, Laurent; de Buffrénil, Vivian

    2013-01-01

    The extinct Odontopterygiformes are the sole birds known to possess strong and sharp bony pseudoteeth, the shape and location of which are closely mimetic of real teeth. The structure of the pseudoteeth is investigated here in a late Pliocene/early Pleistocene species, Pelagornis mauretanicus, using X-ray microtomography and thin sections. The results are interpreted with regard to the pseudotooth mode of growth, and have implications concerning aspects of Pelagornis ecology. The larger pseudoteeth are hollow and approximately cone-shaped, and the smaller ones are rostro-caudally constricted. The walls of pseudoteeth are composed of bone tissue of the fibro-lamellar type, which is intensively remodeled by Haversian substitution. The jaw bones display the same structure as the pseudoteeth, but their vascular canals are oriented parallel to the long axis of the bones, whereas they are perpendicular to this direction in the pseudoteeth. There is no hiatus or evidence of a fusion between the pseudoteeth and the jaw bones. Two possible models for pseudotooth growth are derived from the histological data. The most plausible model is that pseudotooth growth began after the completion of jaw bone growth, as a simple local protraction of periosteal osteogenic activity. Pseudotooth development thus occurred relatively late during ontogeny. The highly vascularized structure and the relative abundance of parallel-fibered bone tissue in the pseudoteeth suggest poor mechanical capabilities. The pseudoteeth were most likely covered and protected by the hardened, keratinized rhamphotheca in the adult during life. The late development of the pseudoteeth would involve a similarly late and/or partial hardening of the rhamphotheca, as displayed by extant Anseriformes, Apterygiformes and some Charadriiformes. This would add support to the hypothesis of a close phylogenetic relationship between Odontopterygiformes and Anseriformes. The late maturation of the Pelagornis feeding apparatus, and hence the delayed capability for efficient prey catching, suggests that Pelagornis was altricial. PMID:24244680

  8. Phylogenetic relationships of flowerpeckers (Aves: Dicaeidae): Novel insights into the evolution of a tropical passerine clade

    E-print Network

    Nyá ri, Á rpá d S.; Peterson, A. Townsend; Rice, Nathan H.; Moyle, Robert G.

    2009-12-01

    of birds (Clode and O’Brian 2001, Schulte et al. 2003). Our phylogenetic framework indicates that almost all members of Clade A (Fig. 2) presently occur in the Indo-Malayan region, without crossing Wallace’s Line. The single exception is D. agile... and Sugarbirds of the World. Yale University Press. Chesser, R. T. 1999. Molecular systematics of the rhinocryptid genus Pteroptochos. / Condor 101, 439 - 446. Clode, D., O’Brien, R. 2001. Why Wallace drew the line: A re-analysis of Wallace’s bird collections...

  9. A molecular phylogeny of kingfishers (Aves: Alcedinidae) with insights into early biogeographic history

    E-print Network

    Moyle, Robert G.

    2006-04-01

    in the family. This basal arrangement, and support for many relationships within the three subfamilies, allows discussion of biogeographic issues. The Australian region and Pacific islands display the highest diversity of kingfishers, but this diversity is not a...

  10. Integer Circuit Evaluation is PSPACEcomplete Computer Science Department, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh,

    E-print Network

    Yang, Ke

    Integer Circuit Evaluation is PSPACE­complete Ke Yang Computer Science Department, Carnegie Mellon Circuit, Chinese Remainder Theorem Wagner [10] introduced the Integer Circuit Evaluation problem. Infor­ mally, the problem concerns a circuit that takes singleton sets, each con­ taining one integer

  11. Guillermo Jaimes 2710 McGee Ave. Berkeley, CA 94703 Cell 213-268-9455

    E-print Network

    Silver, Whendee

    D, Guillermo worked with nonprofits and government agencies and academic insitituions to address environmental - Beijing, China (2006-2007) UCLA Department of Urban Planning Fellowship (2006) US Dept. of Education

  12. A complete multilocus species phylogeny of the tits and chickadees (Aves: Paridae).

    PubMed

    Johansson, Ulf S; Ekman, Jan; Bowie, Rauri C K; Halvarsson, Peter; Ohlson, Jan I; Price, Trevor D; Ericson, Per G P

    2013-12-01

    The avian family Paridae (tits and chickadees) contains c. 55 species distributed in the Palearctic, Nearctic, Afrotropics and Indomalaya. The group includes some of the most well-known and extensively studied avian species, and the evolutionary history, in particular the post-glacial colonization of the northern latitudes, has been comparably well-studied for several species. Yet a comprehensive phylogeny of the whole clade is lacking. Here, we present the first complete species phylogeny for the group based on sequence data from two nuclear introns and one mitochondrial gene for 67 taxa of parids. Our results strongly support the inclusion of the Fire-capped Tit (Cephalopyrus flammiceps), currently placed in the Remizidae, as the most basal member of the Paridae. The Yellow-browed Tit (Sylviparus modestus) and the Sultan Tit (Melanochlora sultanea) constitute the next two sequential branches whereas the remaining tits fall into two large clades, one of which contains the seed hoarding and nest excavating species. The indicated clades within these two groups are largely congruent with recent classifications, but with several unforeseen relationships, such as non-monophyly of the Sombre Tit (Poecile lugubris) and the Marsh Tit (Poecile palustris), as well as non-monophyly of both the African gray and the African black tits. Further, our results support a close relationship between the White-fronted Tit (Parus semilarvatus) and the varied Tit (Poecile varius) as well as a close relationship between the White-naped Tit (Parus nuchalis) and the Yellow-cheeked and Black-lored tits (Parus spilonotus and P. xanthogenys). Finally, Hume's Ground-tit (Pseudopodoces humilis) is found to be closely related to the Green-backed Tit (Parus monticolus) and the Great Tit (Parus major). We propose a new classification that is in accordance with this phylogeny. PMID:23831453

  13. Five new extinct species of rails (Aves: Gruiformes: Rallidae) from the Macaronesian Islands (North Atlantic Ocean).

    PubMed

    Alcover, Josep Antoni; Pieper, Harald; Pereira, Fernando; Rando, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Five new species of recently extinct rails from two Macaronesian archipelagoes (Madeira and Azores) are described. All the species are smaller in size than their presumed ancestor, the European rail Rallus aquaticus. Two species inhabited the Madeira archipelago: (1) Rallus lowei n. sp., the stouter of the species described herein, was a flightless rail with a robust tarsometatarsus and reduced wings that lived on Madeira Island; (2) Rallus adolfocaesaris n. sp., a flightless and more gracile species than its Madeiran counterpart, inhabited Porto Santo. So far, six Azorean islands have been paleontologically explored, and the remains of fossil rails have been found on all of them. Here we formally describe the best-preserved remains from three islands (Pico, São Miguel and São Jorge): (1) Rallus montivagorum n. sp., a rail smaller than R. aquaticus with a somewhat reduced flying capability, inhabited Pico; (2) Rallus carvaoensis n. sp., a small flightless rail with short and stout legs and a bill apparently more curved than in R. aquaticus, was restricted to São Miguel; (3) Rallus minutus n. sp., a very small (approaching Atlantisia rogersi in size) flightless rail with a shortened robust tarsometatarsus, lived in São Jorge. We note also the presence of rail fossils on three other Azorean islands (Terceira, Graciosa and Santa Maria). In addition, we describe an extraordinarily complete fossil of an unnamed Rallus preserved in silica from the locality of Algar do Carvão on Terceira. PMID:26701473

  14. A new species of Woodcock (Aves: Scolopacidae: Scolopax) from Hispaniola, West Indies.

    PubMed

    Takano, Oona M; Steadman, David W

    2015-01-01

    Several hundred late Holocene fossils from Trouing Jean Paul, a cave in Massif de la Selle, Haiti, represent an extinct species of woodcock (Scolopax brachycarpa, new species). Scolopax brachycarpa is known from most major skeletal elements; although volant, its carpometacarpus was very short relative to its humerus. The only other species of Scolopax from the West Indies is the extinct and presumably closely related S. anthonyi of Puerto Rico, which also had a relatively short carpometacarpus compared to continental congeners. Both Scolopax brachycarpa and S. anthonyi share more osteological characters with the Eurasian S. rusticola than with the North American S. minor. PMID:26624342

  15. New feather mite species of the family pteronyssidae (Astigmata: Analgoidea) from South African passerines (Aves: Passeriformes).

    PubMed

    Mironov, S V; Kopij, G

    2000-01-01

    Four new species of feather mites belonging to three different genera of the family Pteronyssidae are described from passerine birds of South Africa: Pteroherpus africanus sp. n. from the garden bulbul Pycnonotus barbatus (Desfontaines) (Pycnonotidae), Pteroherpus cysticolae sp. n. from the wing-snapped cisticola Cisticola ayresii Hartlaub (Sylviidae), Pteronyssoides promeropis sp. n. from the Gurney's sugarbird Promerops gurneyi Verreaux (Promeropidae), and Sturnotrogus creatophorae sp. n. from the wattled starling Creatophora cinerea Menschen (Sturnidae). A brief review of recent publications on the taxonomy of the family Pteronyssidae is given. PMID:11151958

  16. Marshes as “Mountain Tops”: Genetic Analyses of the Critically Endangered São Paulo Marsh Antwren (Aves: Thamnophilidae)

    PubMed Central

    de Camargo, Crisley; Gibbs, H. Lisle; Costa, Mariellen C.; Del-Rio, Glaucia; Silveira, Luís F.

    2015-01-01

    Small populations of endangered species can be impacted by genetic processes such as drift and inbreeding that reduce population viability. As such, conservation genetic analyses that assess population levels of genetic variation and levels of gene flow can provide important information for managing threatened species. The São Paulo Marsh Antwren (Formicivora paludicola) is a recently-described and critically endangered bird from São Paulo State (Brazil) whose total estimated population is around 250–300 individuals, distributed in only 15 isolated marshes around São Paulo metropolitan region. We used microsatellite DNA markers to estimate the population genetic characteristics of the three largest remaining populations of this species all within 60 km of each other. We detected a high and significant genetic structure between all populations (overall FST = 0.103) which is comparable to the highest levels of differentiation ever documented for birds, (e.g., endangered birds found in isolated populations on the tops of African mountains), but also evidence for first-generation immigrants, likely from small local unsampled populations. Effective population sizes were small (between 28.8–99.9 individuals) yet there are high levels of genetic variability within populations and no evidence for inbreeding. Conservation implications of this work are that the high levels of genetic structure suggests that translocations between populations need to be carefully considered in light of possible local adaptation and that remaining populations of these birds should be managed as conservation units that contain both main populations studied here but also small outlying populations which may be a source of immigrants. PMID:26447791

  17. Jaw myology and bite force of the monk parakeet (Aves, Psittaciformes).

    PubMed

    Carril, Julieta; Degrange, Federico J; Tambussi, Claudia P

    2015-07-01

    Psittaciform birds exhibit novelties in jaw bone structure and musculature that are associated with strong bite forces. These features include an ossified arcus suborbitalis and the muscles ethmomandibularis and pseudomasseter. We analyse the jaw musculature of the monk parakeet (Myiopsitta monachus) to enable future studies aimed at understanding craniofacial development, morphology, function and evolution. We estimate bite force based on muscle dissections, physiological cross-sectional area and skull biomechanical modelling. We also compare our results with available data for other birds and traced the evolutionary origin of the three novel diagnostic traits. Our results indicate that, in Myiopsitta, (i) the arcus suborbitalis is absent and the orbit is ventrally closed by an elongate processus orbitalis and a short ligamentum suborbitale; (ii) the ethmomandibularis muscle is a conspicuous muscle with two bellies, with its origin on the anterior portion of the septum interorbitale and insertion on the medial aspect of the mandible; (iii) the pseudomasseter muscle consists of some fibers arising from the m. adductor mandibulae externus superficialis, covering the lateral surface of the arcus jugalis and attaches by an aponeurotic sheet on the processus orbitalis; (iv) a well-developed adductor mandibulae complex is present; (v) the bite force estimation relative to body mass is higher than that calculated for other non-psittaciform species; and (vi) character evolution analysis revealed that the absence of the arcus suborbitalis and the presence of the m. pseudomassseter are the ancestral conditions, and mapping is inconclusive about presence of one or two bellies of the m. ethmomandibularis. PMID:26053435

  18. Old Adobe House, Soscol Ave., Napa. S U M M E R 2 0 0 8

    E-print Network

    for the future of local watersheds. Historical ecology can help set priorities for restoring natural functions the local landscape has changed through time and help us develop strategies to improve its health, and land use. We georeference early maps and aerial photography in a geographic information system (GIS

  19. A Pelican Tarsometatarsus (Aves: Pelecanidae) from the Latest Pliocene Siwaliks of India

    PubMed Central

    Stidham, Thomas A.; Krishan, Kewal; Singh, Bahadur; Ghosh, Abhik; Patnaik, Rajeev

    2014-01-01

    We report a new fossil specimen of a pelican from the Tatrot Formation of the Siwalik Hills, India. It likely represents Pelecanus sivalensis Davies, 1880, the smaller of the two previously published species from the Siwalik Group stratigraphic sequence. This complete tarsometatarsus is the first fossil bone of a pelican collected in India for over 100 years. It is from the latest Pliocene (?2.6 Ma), and is the youngest pelican fossil from the region. The new specimen exhibits a derived distoplantar ‘slant’ to the plantar margin of the medial crest of the hypotarsus, and a combination of features related to the morphology of the hypotarsus, the distal foramen, trochleae, and overall size that allow further differentiation from known tarsometatarsi of fossil and extant pelicans, including the three species of extant pelicans that occur in India (Pelecanus crispus, P. onocrotalus, and P. philippensis). It is of appropriate size for Pelecanus sivalensis, which to date has been known only by fragments of other skeletal elements of the wing, leg, and shoulder girdle. Thus, the observation that this tarsometatarsus is morphologically distinct from those of known pelicans provides further support for the distinctiveness of at least one extinct species of pelican from the Siwalik Group sediments. While the morphology of the tarsometatarsus allows for separation from other taxa known from tarsometatarsi, we found no clear shared derived states to place this taxon with any confidence in a phylogenetic context relative to any other pelican species, or even determine if it is part of the crown group of Pelecanidae. However, published molecular data are consistent with an origin of the crown clade prior to the Pleistocene, suggesting (along with one morphological character) the possibility that this species belongs to the Old World clade of pelican species. PMID:25365300

  20. Taxonomic status and biology of the Cuban blackhawk, Buteogallus anthracinus gundlachii (AVES: Accipitridae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiley, J.W.; Garrido, O.H.

    2005-01-01

    We reevaluate the taxonomic status of the Cuban population of the Common Black-Hawk (Buteogallus anthracinus) based on our examination of additional specimens, nests, eggs, and voice data. Buteogallus a. gundlachii is smaller than mainland populations of anthracinus and differs from mainland birds in plumage coloration and pattern. The common (alarm) call of gundlachii is a series of three or four notes, differing from that of mainland anthracinus, whose call consists of 9-24 notes. In the Isla de Pinos, Cuba, we observed gundlachii eating two species of land crabs (71.4%), centipedes (7.1%), lizards (10.7%), mammals (7.1%), and a bird (3.6%). We consider Buteogallus gundlachii Cabanis 1854 (1855), the Cuban Black-Hawk, to be a full species, endemic to Cuba, Isla de Pinos, and many of the cays of the Cuban Archipelago. ?? 2005 The Raptor Research Foundation, Inc.

  1. Expressing your wishes regarding your care and treatment 450 Brookline Ave.

    E-print Network

    Liu, Xiaole Shirley

    choices best suit you. And it may help spark a conversation with your loved ones about your values about the care they would (or would not) want if seriously ill, have no close relatives, or who might

  2. Comparative Phyloclimatic Analysis and Evolution of Ecological Niches in the Scimitar Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae: Pomatorhinus)

    PubMed Central

    Nyári, Árpád S.; Reddy, Sushma

    2013-01-01

    We present the first extensive and integrative analysis of niche evolution based on climatic variables and a dated molecular phylogeny of a heterogeneous avian group of Southeast Asian scimitar babblers of the genus Pomatorhinus. The four main clades of scimitar babblers have species that co-occur in similar areas across southern Asia but some have diverged at different timeframes, with the most recently evolved clade harboring the highest number of species. Ecological niche models and analysis of contributing variables within a phylogenetic framework indicate instances of convergent evolution of members of different clades onto similar ecological parameter space, as well as divergent evolution of members from within clades. Pomatorhinus species from different clades occupying Himalayan foothills show convergence towards similar climatic tolerances, whereas within a clade, allopatric sister-species occurring in the Himalayas have diverged to occupy different climatic parameter spaces. Comparisons of climatic tolerances of Himalayan foothills taxa with species distributed further south in Assam/Burma and Burma/Thailand indicate convergence towards similar parameter spaces in several climatic variables. Niche overlap was observed to be lower among species of the youngest clade (ruficollis) and higher among species of older clades (ferruginosus). Analysis of accumulation of ecological disparity through time indicates rapid divergence within recent time frames. As a result, Himalayan taxa originating at different temporal scales within the four main scimitar babbler clades have differentiated ecologically only in recently diverged taxa. Our study suggests that the repeated orogenic and climatic fluctuations of the Pliocene and Pleistocene within mainland Southeast Asia served as an important ecological speciation driver within scimitar babblers, by providing opportunities for rapid geographic expansion and filling of novel environmental niches. PMID:23405183

  3. Evolution in Australasian Mangrove Forests: Multilocus Phylogenetic Analysis of the Gerygone Warblers (Aves: Acanthizidae)

    PubMed Central

    Nyári, Árpád S.; Joseph, Leo

    2012-01-01

    The mangrove forests of Australasia have many endemic bird species but their evolution and radiation in those habitats has been little studied. One genus with several mangrove specialist species is Gerygone (Passeriformes: Acanthizidae). The phylogeny of the Acanthizidae is reasonably well understood but limited taxon sampling for Gerygone has constrained understanding of its evolution and historical biogeography in mangroves. Here we report on a phylogenetic analysis of Gerygone based on comprehensive taxon sampling and a multilocus dataset of thirteen loci spread across the avian genome (eleven nuclear and two mitochondrial loci). Since Gerygone includes three species restricted to Australia's coastal mangrove forests, we particularly sought to understand the biogeography of their evolution in that ecosystem. Analyses of individual loci, as well as of a concatenated dataset drawn from previous molecular studies indicates that the genus as currently defined is not monophyletic, and that the Grey Gerygone (G. cinerea) from New Guinea should be transferred to the genus Acanthiza. The multilocus approach has permitted the nuanced view of the group's evolution into mangrove ecosystems having occurred on multiple occasions, in three non-overlapping time frames, most likely first by the G. magnirostris lineage, and subsequently followed by those of G. tenebrosa and G. levigaster. PMID:22363748

  4. Rapid diversification and secondary sympatry in Australo-Pacific kingfishers (Aves: Alcedinidae: Todiramphus).

    PubMed

    Andersen, Michael J; Shult, Hannah T; Cibois, Alice; Thibault, Jean-Claude; Filardi, Christopher E; Moyle, Robert G

    2015-02-01

    Todiramphus chloris is the most widely distributed of the Pacific's 'great speciators'. Its 50 subspecies constitute a species complex that is distributed over 16?000?km from the Red Sea to Polynesia. We present, to our knowledge, the first comprehensive molecular phylogeny of this enigmatic radiation of kingfishers. Ten Pacific Todiramphus species are embedded within the T. chloris complex, rendering it paraphyletic. Among these is a radiation of five species from the remote islands of Eastern Polynesian, as well as the widespread migratory taxon, Todiramphus sanctus. Our results offer strong support that Pacific Todiramphus, including T. chloris, underwent an extensive range expansion and diversification less than 1?Ma. Multiple instances of secondary sympatry have accumulated in this group, despite its recent origin, including on Australia and oceanic islands in Palau, Vanuatu and the Solomon Islands. Significant ecomorphological and behavioural differences exist between secondarily sympatric lineages, which suggest that pre-mating isolating mechanisms were achieved rapidly during diversification. We found evidence for complex biogeographic patterns, including a novel phylogeographic break in the eastern Solomon Islands that separates a Northern Melanesian clade from Polynesian taxa. In light of our results, we discuss systematic relationships of Todiramphus and propose an updated taxonomy. This paper contributes to our understanding of avian diversification and assembly on islands, and to the systematics of a classically polytypic species complex. PMID:26064600

  5. Comparative phylogeography of co-distributed Phrygilus species (Aves, Thraupidae) from the Central Andes.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Varas, R; González-Acuña, D; Vianna, J A

    2015-09-01

    The Neotropical ecoregion has been an important place of avian diversification where dispersal and allopatric events coupled with periods of active orogeny and climate change (Late Pliocene-Pleistocene) have shaped the biogeography of the region. In the Neotropics, avian population structure has been sculpted not only by geographical barriers, but also by non-allopatric factors such as natural selection and local adaptation. We analyzed the genetic variation of six co-distributed Phrygilus species from the Central Andes, based on mitochondrial and nuclear markers in conjunction with morphological differentiation. We examined if Phrygilus species share patterns of population structure and historical demography, and reviewed the intraspecific taxonomy in part of their geographic range. Our results showed different phylogeographic patterns between species, even among those belonging to the same phylogenetic clade. P. alaudinus, P. atriceps, and P. unicolor showed genetic differentiation mediated by allopatric mechanisms in response to specific geographic barriers; P. gayi showed sympatric lineages in northern Chile, while P. plebejus and P. fruticeti showed a single genetic group. We found no relationship between geographic range size and genetic structure. Additionally, a signature of expansion was found in three species related to the expansion of paleolakes in the Altiplano region and the drying phase of the Atacama Desert. Morphological analysis showed congruence with molecular data and intraspecific taxonomy in most species. While we detected genetic and phenotypic patterns that could be related to natural selection and local adaptation, our results indicate that allopatric events acted as a major factor in the population differentiation of Phrygilus species. PMID:25987531

  6. Bradley University Student Health Center 819 N. Glenwood Ave Markin Center, Peoria, IL 61625

    E-print Network

    Nanyes, Ollie

    records concerning any mental health and developmental disabilities, alcohol and drug abuse records specify___________________________________) _____ Mental Health Records _____ Alcohol and Drug Abuse

  7. Flightlessness and phylogeny amongst endemic rails (Aves:Rallidae) of the New Zealand region.

    PubMed

    Trewick, S A

    1997-04-29

    The phylogenetic relationships of a number of flightless and volant rails have been investigated using mtDNA sequence data. The third domain of the small ribosomal subunit (12S) has been sequenced for 22 taxa, and part of the 5' end of the cytochrome-b gene has been sequenced for 12 taxa. Additional sequences were obtained from outgroup taxa, two species of jacana, sarus crane, spur-winged plover and kagu. Extinct rails were investigated using DNA extracted from subfossil bones, and in cases where fresh material could not be obtained from other extant taxa, feathers and museum skins were used as sources of DNA. Phylogenetic trees produced from these data have topologies that are, in general, consistent with data from DNA-DNA hybridization studies and recent interpretations based on morphology. Gallinula chloropus moorhen) groups basally with Fulica (coots), Amaurornis (= Megacrex) ineptus falls within the Gallirallus/Rallus group, and Gallinula (= Porphyrula) martinica is basal to Porphyrio (swamphens) and should probably be placed in that genus. Subspecies of Porphyrio porphyrio are paraphyletic with respect to Porphyrio mantelli (takahe). The Northern Hemisphere Rallus aquaticus is basal to the south-western Pacific Rallus (or Gallirallus) group. The flightless Rallus philippensis dieffenbachii is close to Rallus modestus and distinct from the volant Rallus philippensis, and is evidently a separate species. Porzana (crakes) appears to be more closely associated with Porphyrio than Rallus. Deep relationships among the rails remain poorly resolved. Rhynochetus jubatus (kagu) is closer to the cranes than the rails in this analysis. Genetic distances between flightless rails and their volant counterparts varied considerably with observed 12S sequence distances, ranging from 0.3% (Porphyrio porphyrio melanotus and P. mantelli mantelli) to 7.6% (Rallus modestus and Rallus philippensis). This may be taken as an indication of the rapidity with which flightlessness can evolve, and of the persistence of flightless taxa. Genetic data supported the notion that flightless taxa were independently derived, sometimes from similar colonizing ancestors. The morphology of flightless rails is apparently frequently dominated by evolutionary parallelism although similarity of external appearance is not an indication of the extent of genetic divergence. In some cases taxa that are genetically close are morphologically distinct from one another (e.g. Rallus (philippensis) dieffenbachii and R. modestus), whilst some morphologically similar taxa are evidently independently derived (e.g. Porphyio mantelli hochstetteri and P.m. mantelli). PMID:9163823

  8. [Advantages and limitations of interspecies associations in northern migratory sandpipers (Charadrii, Aves)].

    PubMed

    Gavrilov, V V

    2014-01-01

    Investigations were carried out at two stations of Ornithological Unit, IBPN FEB RAS, located in Nizhnekolymsk District, Yakutia, starting from May 15-20 in 1984, 1985, 1987, 1988, and 1990; at the northern coast of Pukhovoy Bay, Southern Island of Novaya Zemlya starting from June 1 in 1994; at Cape Beliy Nos, the Yugorsky Peninsula, starting from June 1 in 1995-1997. Classic associations are detected in interspecies flocks of sandpipers between the following species: the Pacific golden plover and the curlew sandpiper, the pectoral sandpiper and the long-billed dowitcher, the pectoral sandpiper and the dunlin, the grey plover and the dunlin. However, total amount of birds that form associations is not large. In species of group "A" (the grey plover, the Pacific golden plover, the pectoral sandpiper), no difference has been observed in migratory birds behavior within inter- or conspecific flocks. Species of group "B" (the dunlin, the curlew sandpiper, the long-billed dowitcher), on the contrary, change their behavior sharply depending on whether they belong to an association or not. Species of group "A" do not get any advantages when forming an association. Unlike them, species of group "B" profit from associating: a part of time spent in foraging substantially increases; more time is spent on rest and less time is spent on reconnaissance and vigilance (readiness for actions); safety of birds is enhanced. On the other hand, in species of group "B" there are also disadvantages related with associating: i.e., interspecies competition for food; foraging in suboptimal habitats which, in turn, may lead to notable increase of time spent by birds in foraging. An assumption is put forward that in species of group "B" advantages and limitations of associating cancel each other to a certain extent, and this explains rather small number of birds forming associations. PMID:25771678

  9. Paraliga charadrii n. sp. (Cestoda: Dilepididae) from the semipalmated plover, Charadrius semipalmatus Bonaparte (Aves: Charadriiformes).

    PubMed

    Didyk, A S; Burt, M D

    1998-08-01

    Paraliga charadrii n. sp. (Dilepididae) is described from the small intestine of the semipalmated plover Charadrius semipalmatus (Charadriidae) collected from the Bay of Fundy, New Brunswick, Canada. The new species is distinguished from the type species Paraliga oophorae (Belopolskaya, 1971) Belopolskaya and Kulachkova, 1973, by having 2 identical rows of rostellar hooks and fewer testes and from the more similar Paraliga celermaturus (Deblock and Rosé, 1962) Bona, 1994, by its shorter and less robust rostellar hooks (18-19 microm vs. 24-26 microm). This is the first record of a species of Paraliga in the New World. Paraliga charadrii n. sp. was present in semipalmated plovers collected on their breeding grounds in Manitoba, on staging grounds in the Bay of Fundy, during southward migration, on wintering grounds in Venezuela, and on spring staging grounds at Delaware Bay, during northward migration, suggesting that transmission is ubiquitous. PMID:9714219

  10. A new subspecies of Chamaea fasciata (Wrentit) from Oregon (Aves: Timaliinae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Browning, M. Ralph

    1992-01-01

    Geographic variation in plumage color of Chamaea fasciata (Wrentit) from northern California and southern Oregon is related to climate. A new subspecies, Chamaea fasciata margra, is described from a disjunct population of southern interior Oregon. Colonization of C. fasciata in interior Oregon was perhaps from birds crossing coniferous forests via isolated balds of Ceonothus. Recent increases of Wrentits in interior Oregon may be in response to habitat alterations (deforestation, fires) and concurrent global warming.

  11. Gastrointestinal and external parasites of Enicognathus ferrugineus and Enicognathus leptorhynchus (Aves, Psittacidae) in Chile.

    PubMed

    Valdebenito, José Osvaldo; Moreno, Lucila; Landaeta-Aqueveque, Carlos; Kinsella, John Mike; Mironov, Sergey; Cicchino, Armando; Troncoso, Ignacio; González-Acuña, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    Parasite species are important components of biodiversity, as they provide valuable information about host health, evolutionary relationships, population structures, trophic interactions, the existence of environmental stresses, and climatic conditions. With the aim of describing the parasites associated with parrots of the genus Enicognathus Gray 1840 from central Chile, thirteen austral parakeets, Enicognathus ferrugineus, and five slender-billed parakeets, E. leptorhynchus, were examined between September 2007 and March 2014. The prevalence of ectoparasites and endoparasites was 88.9% and 22.2%, respectively. On eleven of the E. ferrugineus (84.6%) analyzed, and on all of the E. leptorhynchus analyzed (100%), five feather mite species (Pararalichus hastifolia, Genoprotolichus major, Protonyssus sp., Fainalges sp., and Eurydiscalges sp.) were collected. On ten E. ferrugineus (76.9%) and two E. leptorhynchus (40%), the chewing lice Heteromenopon macrurum, Psittacobrossus patagoni, and Paragoniocotes enicognathidis were collected. The nematode Capillaria plagiaticia was collected from three E. ferrugineus (23.1%), and the nematode Ascaridia hermaphrodita was found in one E. leptorhynchus (20%). The presence of C. plagiaticia, Protonyssus sp., Fainalges sp., and Eurydiscalges sp. from the two Enicognathus spp. are new records for Chile and represent new parasite-host associations. PMID:26648008

  12. Audiovisual Equipment in Educational Facilities Today. AVE in Japan No. 29.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Japan Audiovisual Information Center for International Service, Tokyo.

    This report summarizes a 1989 update of a 1986 survey on the diffusion and utilization of audiovisual media and equipment in Japan. A comparison of the two reveals the advancements in types of audiovisual equipment available to schools and social education facilities in Japan which have developed in only 3 years. An outline of the equipment…

  13. ave you ever wondered why music generated by computers and drum machines sometimes sounds

    E-print Network

    unnatural? One reason is the absence of small im- perfections that are part of every human activity to give it a more human feel, a procedure sometimes called humanizing. But the precise nature of the deviations made by humans playing complex rhythms has only recently been explored. Are the variations

  14. Rapid diversification and secondary sympatry in Australo-Pacific kingfishers (Aves: Alcedinidae: Todiramphus)

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Michael J.; Shult, Hannah T.; Cibois, Alice; Thibault, Jean-Claude; Filardi, Christopher E.; Moyle, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Todiramphus chloris is the most widely distributed of the Pacific's ‘great speciators’. Its 50 subspecies constitute a species complex that is distributed over 16?000?km from the Red Sea to Polynesia. We present, to our knowledge, the first comprehensive molecular phylogeny of this enigmatic radiation of kingfishers. Ten Pacific Todiramphus species are embedded within the T. chloris complex, rendering it paraphyletic. Among these is a radiation of five species from the remote islands of Eastern Polynesian, as well as the widespread migratory taxon, Todiramphus sanctus. Our results offer strong support that Pacific Todiramphus, including T. chloris, underwent an extensive range expansion and diversification less than 1?Ma. Multiple instances of secondary sympatry have accumulated in this group, despite its recent origin, including on Australia and oceanic islands in Palau, Vanuatu and the Solomon Islands. Significant ecomorphological and behavioural differences exist between secondarily sympatric lineages, which suggest that pre-mating isolating mechanisms were achieved rapidly during diversification. We found evidence for complex biogeographic patterns, including a novel phylogeographic break in the eastern Solomon Islands that separates a Northern Melanesian clade from Polynesian taxa. In light of our results, we discuss systematic relationships of Todiramphus and propose an updated taxonomy. This paper contributes to our understanding of avian diversification and assembly on islands, and to the systematics of a classically polytypic species complex. PMID:26064600

  15. Regulation of water and sodium balance in the field by Australian honeyeaters (Aves: Meliphagidae).

    PubMed

    Goldstein, D L; Bradshaw, S D

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated the use of water and sodium by free-living individuals of several species of Australian honeyeaters (Acanthorhynchos superciliosus, Phylidonyris novaehollandiae, Phylidonyris nigra, Manorina flavigula, and Anthochaera carunculata). Water and Na fluxes were highly variable between species, largely reflecting differences in diet. Water fluxes ranged from approximately 300% of total body water per day in 10-g, nectarivorous A. superciliosus to approximately 45% of total body water per day, typical of a desert species, in M. flavigula, a 50-g, insectivorous, arid-zone bird. Similarly, Na fluxes ranged from nearly 60% of Na pool per day in A. superciliosus to about 25% per day in M. flavigula. Despite these different fluxes, values of regulated osmoregulatory variables, including plasma osmolality, hematocrit, plasma concentrations of Na+ and K+, and exchangeable Na pool, were relatively invariant both between species and within species at different seasons. In contrast, values of variables reflecting the operation of regulatory systems did differ between species and seasons. Urine concentrations were highest in M. flavigula and, in A. carunculata, varied seasonally (higher in summer than winter). Plasma concentrations of aldosterone were lowest in A. carunculata (5-25 pg/mL), highest in P. novaehollandiae (70-200 pg/mL), and in the latter species were higher in winter than summer. Concentrations of arginine vasotocin ranged from 5 pg/mL in A. carunculata to greater than 30 pg/mL in M. flavigula. Our data demonstrate that within the family Meliphagidae, there exists substantial variation in the fluxes of water and Na and that these relate in part to body size variation but more importantly to diet. The different fluxes between species are reflected in the values of numerous osmoregulatory variables. PMID:9548654

  16. Rapid diversification and secondary sympatry in Australo-Pacific kingfishers (Aves: Alcedinidae: Todiramphus)

    E-print Network

    Andersen, Michael J.; Shult, Hannah T.; Cibois, Alice; Thibault, Jean-Claude; Filardi, Christopher E.; Moyle, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Todiramphus chloris is the most widely distributed of the Pacific's ‘great speciators’. Its 50 subspecies constitute a species complex that is distributed over 16?000?km from the Red Sea to Polynesia. We present, to our ...

  17. Evolution in Australasian Mangrove Forests: Multilocus Phylogenetic Analysis of the Gerygone Warblers (Aves: Acanthizidae)

    E-print Network

    Nyá ri, Á rpá d S.; Joseph, Leo

    2012-02-14

    . Li C, Ort?´ G, Zhao J (2010) The phylogenetic placement of sinipercid fishes (‘Perciformes) revealed by 11 nuclear loci. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 56: 1096–1104. 19. Toon A, Hughes J, Joseph L (2010) Multilocus analysis of honeyeaters... and Evolution 27: 570–580. 36. Weir JT, Schluter D (2008) Calibrating the avian molecular clock. Molecular Ecology 17: 2321–2328. 37. Norman JA, Rheindt FE, Rowe DL, Christidis L (2007) Speciation dynamics in the Australo-Papuan Meliphaga honeyeaters. Molecular...

  18. A redescription of Lithornis vulturinus (Aves, Palaeognathae) from the Early Eocene Fur Formation of Denmark.

    PubMed

    Bourdon, Estelle; Lindow, Bent

    2015-01-01

    The extinct Lithornithidae include several genera and species of flying palaeognathous birds of controversial affinities known from the Early Paleogene of North America and Europe. An almost complete, articulated skeleton from the Early Eocene marine deposits of the Fur Formation (Denmark) was recently assigned to Lithornis vulturinus Owen, 1840. This study provides a detailed redescription and comparison of this three-dimensionally preserved specimen (MGUH 26770), which is one of the best preserved representatives of the Lithornithidae yet known. We suggest that some new features might be diagnostic of Lithornis vulturinus, including a pterygoid fossa shallower than in other species of Lithornis and the presence of a small caudal process on the os palatinum. We propose that Lithornis nasi (Harrison, 1984) is a junior synonym of Lithornis vulturinus and we interpret minor differences in size and shape among the specimens as intraspecific variation. To date, Lithornis vulturinus is known with certainty from the latest Paleocene-earliest Eocene to Early Eocene of the North Sea Basin (Ølst, Fur and London Clay Formations). Among the four species of the genus Lithornis, the possibility that Lithornis plebius Houde, 1988 (Early Eocene of Wyoming) is conspecific with either Lithornis vulturinus or Lithornis promiscuus Houde, 1988 (Early Eocene of Wyoming) is discussed. The presence of closely related species of Lithornis on either side of the North Atlantic in the Early Eocene reflects the existence of a high-latitude land connection between Europe and North America at that time. PMID:26624382

  19. Phylogeny and evolutionary history of old world suboscine birds (aves: Eurylaimides)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moyle, R.G.; Chesser, R.T.; Prum, R.O.; Schikler, P.; Cracraft, J.

    2006-01-01

    Molecular and morphological data were used to derive a phylogenetic hypothesis for the Eurylaimides, an Old World bird group now known to be distributed pantropically, and to investigate the evolution and biogeography of the group. Phylogenetic results indicated that the Eurylaimides consist of two monophyletic groups, the pittas (Pittidae) and the broadbills (Eurylaimidae sensu lato), and that the broadbills consist of two highly divergent clades, one containing the sister genera Smithornis and Calyptomena, the other containing Pseudocalyptomena graueri, Sapuyou aenigma, the asity genera Philepitta and Neoclrepanis, and five Asian genera. Our results indicate that over a ???10 million year time span in the early Tertiary, the Eurylaimides came to inhabit widely disjunct tropical regions and evolved disparate morphology, diet, and breeding behavior. Biogeographically, although a southern origin for the lineage is likely, time estimates for major lineage splitting do not correspond to Gondwanan vicariance events, and the biogeographic history of the crown clade is better explained by Laurasian climatic and geological processes. In particular, the timing and phylogenetic pattern suggest a likely Laurasian origin for the sole New World representative of the group, Sapayoa aenigina. Copyright ??American Museum of Natural History 2006.

  20. Phylogeny and evolutionary history of Old World suboscine birds (Aves: Eurylaimides)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moyle, R.G.; Chesser, R.T.; Prum, R.O.; Schikler, P.; Cracraft, J.

    2006-01-01

    Molecular and morphological data were used to derive a phylogenetic hypothesis for the Eurylaimides, an Old World bird group now known to be distributed pantropically, and to investigate the evolution and biogeography of the group. Phylogenetic results indicated that the Eurylaimides consist of two monophyletic groups, the pittas (Pittidae) and the broadbills (Eurylaimidae sensu lato), and that the broadbills consist of two highly divergent clades, one containing the sister genera Smithornis and Calyptomena, the other containing Pseudocalyptomena graueri, Sapayoa aenigma, the asity genera Philepitta and Neodrepanis, and five Asian genera. Our results indicate that over a ~10 million year time span in the early Tertiary, the Eurylaimides came to inhabit widely disjunct tropical regions and evolved disparate morphology, diet, and breeding behavior. Biogeographically, although a southern origin for the lineage is likely, time estimates for major lineage splitting do not correspond to Gondwanan vicariance events, and the biogeographic history of the crown clade is better explained by Laurasian climatic and geological processes. In particular, the timing and phylogenetic pattern suggest a likely Laurasian origin for the sole New World representative of the group, Sapayoa aenigma.

  1. Comparison of eye morphology and retinal topography in two species of New World vultures (Aves: Cathartidae).

    PubMed

    Lisney, Thomas J; Stecyk, Karyn; Kolominsky, Jeffrey; Graves, Gary R; Wylie, Douglas R; Iwaniuk, Andrew N

    2013-12-01

    Vultures are highly reliant on their sensory systems for the rapid detection and localization of carrion before other scavengers can exploit the resource. In this study, we compared eye morphology and retinal topography in two species of New World vultures (Cathartidae), turkey vultures (Cathartes aura), with a highly developed olfactory sense, and black vultures (Coragyps atratus), with a less developed sense of olfaction. We found that eye size relative to body mass was the same in both species, but that black vultures have larger corneas relative to eye size than turkey vultures. However, the overall retinal topography, the total number of cells in the retinal ganglion cell layer, peak and average cell densities, cell soma area frequency distributions, and the theoretical peak anatomical spatial resolving power were the same in both species. This suggests that the visual systems of these two species are similar and that vision plays an equally important role in the biology of both species, despite the apparently greater reliance on olfaction for finding carrion in turkey vultures. PMID:24249399

  2. Patterns of divergence in the olive sunbird Cyanomitra olivacea (Aves: Nectariniidae) across the African

    E-print Network

    Sehgal, Ravinder

    the African rainforest­savanna ecotone THOMAS B. SMITH1,2 *, HENRI A. THOMASSEN2,3 , ADAM H. FREEDMAN1, Institute of the Environment and Sustainability, La Kretz Hall, Suite 300, University of California, Los..835 In the debate over modes of vertebrate diversification in tropical rainforests, two competing hypotheses

  3. A New Owl Species of the Genus Otus (Aves: Strigidae) from Lombok, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Sangster, George; King, Ben F.; Verbelen, Philippe; Trainor, Colin R.

    2013-01-01

    The avifauna of Indonesia is one of the richest in the world but the taxonomic status of many species remains poorly documented. The sole species of scops owl known from Lombok has long been assigned to the widespread Moluccan Scops Owl Otus magicus on the basis of superficial similarities in morphology. Field work in 2003 has shown that the territorial song of the scops owls inhabiting the foothills of Gunung Rinjani differs dramatically from that of O. magicus and is more similar to those of Rufescent Scops Owl O. rufescens and Singapore Scops Owl O. cnephaeus. Detailed comparisons of sound recordings and museum specimens with those of other scops owls in Wallacea and the Indo-Malayan region have confirmed the distinctiveness of the Lombok population. We describe Otus jolandae as a new species, the Rinjani Scops Owl. It is locally common at elevations from 25–1350 m. and occurs within Gunung Rinjani National Park. The new species is known from seven specimens collected by Alfred Everett in 1896. Otus jolandae represents the first endemic bird species from Lombok. PMID:23418422

  4. Development of the Superaltricial Monk Parakeet (Aves, Psittaciformes): Embryo Staging, Growth, and Heterochronies.

    PubMed

    Carril, Julieta; Tambussi, Claudia P

    2015-11-01

    Knowledge about the embryonic stages of birds is important in answering many questions about development and evolution. We give the first description of 41 embryological stages of the monk parakeet (Myiopsitta monachus) on the basis of external morphology and comparison with the chicken. We also provide measurements of some external morphological characters (i.e. body mass, crown-rump, beak, forelimb, and third toe lengths) and perform comparisons with other precocial and altricial birds with the aim of identifying heterochronous developmental features. The following differences in the development of characters in the monk parakeet when compared with other birds were found: (1) delay of the feathers primordia, (2) wing buds initially greater than leg buds, (3) forelimbs and hindlimbs with similar relative size, (4) retroversion of the toe IV, (5) ventral curvature of the upper jaw, (6) positive regressions between stages and beak length with acceleration and higher values and III toe lengths with deceleration and lower values in the monk parakeet compared to the chicken. The growth pattern of the monk paraket Myiopsitta monachus could be influenced by some heterochronic processes like post-displacement, acceleration and/or deceleration. Results of this research allow the standard identification of stages in different species of parrots, recognize similarities and differences between precocial (the chicken) and altricial species (Myiopsitta), and provide planning data for future studies. Anat Rec, 298:1836-1847, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26267228

  5. Remarks on the name Cercomacra Sclater, 1858 (Aves: Thamnophilidae) and its type species.

    PubMed

    Raposo, Marcos A; Tello, José G; Dickinson, Edward C; Brito, Guilherme R R

    2015-01-01

    A recent molecular phylogeny of Cercomacra Sclater, 1858 found the genus to be polyphyletic (Tello et al. 2014). Two non-sister clades in putative Cercomacra were uncovered: Cercomacra sensu stricto, including Cercomacra manu Fitzpatrick & Willard, 1990, C. brasiliana Hellmayr, 1905, C. cinerascens (Sclater, 1857), C. melanaria (Ménétries, 1835), C. ferdinandi Snethlage, 1928, C. carbonaria Sclater & Salvin, 1873 and C. nigricans Sclater, 1858; and Cercomacroides Tello & Raposo, 2014, including Cercomacroides nigrescens (Cabanis & Heine, 1859), C. laeta (Todd, 1920), C. parkeri (Graves, 1997), C. tyrannina (Sclater, 1855) and C. serva (Sclater, 1858). This split required a prior re-examination of the apparently difficult facts surrounding the name of the type species of Cercomacra to ensure that the appropriate group would retain that name leaving the balance to the new genus-group name, Cercomacroides. The findings of that re-examination are nomenclatural rather than taxonomic and are complex enough to deserve a historical explanation, which is presented here. In summary, Hellmayr (1905) was correct in clarifying the identity of the type species chosen by Sclater (1890), but he did not suggest any nomenclatural action to fix the misidentified type species. Subsequent information provided by Cory & Hellmayr (1924) regarding the type specimen of Cercomacra brasiliana was incorrect, and the holotype is not in St. Petersburg as they implied.  PMID:25661931

  6. Phylogeny and phylogenetic classification of the antbirds, ovenbirds, woodcreepers, and allies (Aves: Passeriformes: Infraorder Furnariides)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moyle, R.G.; Chesser, R.T.; Brumfield, R.T.; Tello, J.G.; Marchese, D.J.; Cracraft, J.

    2009-01-01

    The infraorder Furnariides is a diverse group of suboscine passerine birds comprising a substantial component of the Neotropical avifauna. The included species encompass a broad array of morphologies and behaviours, making them appealing for evolutionary studies, but the size of the group (ca. 600 species) has limited well-sampled higher-level phylogenetic studies. Using DNA sequence data from the nuclear RAG-1 and RAG-2 exons, we undertook a phylogenetic analysis of the Furnariides sampling 124 (more than 88%) of the genera. Basal relationships among family-level taxa differed depending on phylogenetic method, but all topologies had little nodal support, mirroring the results from earlier studies in which discerning relationships at the base of the radiation was also difficult. In contrast, branch support for family-rank taxa and for many relationships within those clades was generally high. Our results support the Melanopareidae and Grallariidae as distinct from the Rhinocryptidae and Formicariidae, respectively. Within the Furnariides our data contradict some recent phylogenetic hypotheses and suggest that further study is needed to resolve these discrepancies. Of the few genera represented by multiple species, several were not monophyletic, indicating that additional systematic work remains within furnariine families and must include dense taxon sampling. We use this study as a basis for proposing a new phylogenetic classification for the group and in the process erect new family-group names for clades having high branch support across methods. ?? 2009 The Willi Hennig Society.

  7. DNA hybridization evidence for the principal lineages of hummingbirds (Aves:Trochilidae).

    PubMed

    Bleiweiss, R; Kirsch, J A; Matheus, J C

    1997-03-01

    The spectacular evolutionary radiation of hummingbirds (Trochilidae) has served as a model system for many biological studies. To begin to provide a historical context for these investigations, we generated a complete matrix of DNA hybridization distances among 26 hummingbirds and an outgroup swift (Chaetura pelagica) to determine the principal hummingbird lineages. FITCH topologies estimated from symmetrized delta TmH-C values and subjected to various validation methods (bootstrapping, weighted jackknifing, branch length significance) indicated a fundamental split between hermit (Eutoxeres aquila, Threnetes ruckeri; Phaethornithinae) and nonhermit (Trochilinae) hummingbirds, and provided strong support for six principal nonhermit clades with the following branching order: (1) a predominantly lowland group comprising caribs (Eulampis holosericeus) and relatives (Androdon aequatorialis and Heliothryx barroti) with violet-ears (Colibri coruscans) and relatives (Doryfera ludovicae); (2) an Andean-associated clade of highly polytypic taxa (Eriocnemis, Heliodoxa, and Coeligena); (3) a second endemic Andean clade (Oreotrochilus chimborazo, Aglaiocercus coelestis, and Lesbia victoriae) paired with thorntails (Popelairia conversii); (4) emeralds and relatives (Chlorostilbon mellisugus, Amazilia tzacatl, Thalurania colombica, Orthorhyncus cristatus and Campylopterus villaviscensio); (5) mountain-gems (Lampornis clemenciae and Eugenes fulgens); and (6) tiny bee-like forms (Archilochus colubris, Myrtis fanny, Acestrura mulsant, and Philodice mitchellii). Corresponding analyses on a matrix of unsymmetrized delta values gave similar support for these relationships except that the branching order of the two Andean clades (2, 3 above) was unresolved. In general, subsidiary relationships were consistent and well supported by both matrices, sometimes revealing surprising associations between forms that differ dramatically in plumage and bill morphology. Our results also reveal some basic aspects of hummingbird ecologic and morphologic evolution. For example, most of the diverse endemic Andean assemblage apparently comprises two genetically divergent clades, whereas the majority of North American hummingbirds belong a single third clade. Genetic distances separating some morphologically distinct genera (Oreotrochilus, Aglaiocercus, Lesbia; Myrtis, Acestrura, Philodice) were no greater than among congeneric (Coeligena) species, indicating that, in hummingbirds, morphological divergence does not necessarily reflect level of genetic divergence. PMID:9066799

  8. Inter-familial relationships of the shorebirds (Aves: Charadriiformes) based on nuclear DNA sequence data

    PubMed Central

    Ericson, Per GP; Envall, Ida; Irestedt, Martin; Norman, Janette A

    2003-01-01

    Background Phylogenetic hypotheses of higher-level relationships in the order Charadriiformes based on morphological data, partly disagree with those based on DNA-DNA hybridisation data. So far, these relationships have not been tested by analysis of DNA sequence data. Herein we utilize 1692 bp of aligned, nuclear DNA sequences obtained from 23 charadriiform species, representing 15 families. We also test earlier suggestions that bustards and sandgrouses may be nested with the charadriiforms. The data is analysed with methods based on the parsimony and maximum-likelihood criteria. Results Several novel phylogenetic relationships were recovered and strongly supported by the data, regardless of which method of analysis was employed. These include placing the gulls and allied groups as a sistergroup to the sandpiper-like birds, and not to the plover-like birds. The auks clearly belong to the clade with the gulls and allies, and are not basal to most other charadriiform birds as suggested in analyses of morphological data. Pluvialis, which has been supposed to belong to the plover family (Charadriidae), represents a basal branch that constitutes the sister taxon to a clade with plovers, oystercatchers and avocets. The thick-knees and sheathbills unexpectedly cluster together. Conclusion The DNA sequence data contains a strong phylogenetic signal that results in a well-resolved phylogenetic tree with many strongly supported internodes. Taxonomically it is the most inclusive study of shorebird families that relies on nucleotide sequences. The presented phylogenetic hypothesis provides a solid framework for analyses of macroevolution of ecological, morphological and behavioural adaptations observed within the order Charadriiformes. PMID:12875664

  9. Evolution of seasonal ecological niches in the Passerina buntings (Aves: Cardinalidae).

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Meyer, Enrique; Peterson, A. Townsend; Navarro-Sigüenza, Adolfo G.

    2004-01-01

    The evolution of migration has long been considered complex and recent work has demonstrated additional complexity: some species follow the same ecological conditions throughout the year, whereas others 'switch niches' between breeding and wintering ranges. Hypotheses regarding the evolution of migration would generally predict niche-following as primitive, and niche-switching as derived. However, no test has, to our knowledge, yet determined the directionality of evolution of these states within a lineage. We present an analysis of phylogenetic dimensions of seasonal niches in the Passerina buntings that indicates greater evolutionary change in the niches of breeding populations than among those of wintering populations. These results are consistent with hypotheses of (i) niche conservatism (in winter, at least) across a recently speciated lineage; and (ii) the derived state of the breeding (rather than winter) ecological niches of each species. PMID:15306365

  10. [Three Nadejdolepis Spasskii & Spasskaya, 1954 (Cestoda: Hymenolepididae) parasites of Charadrii (Aves) of Belize].

    PubMed

    Deblock, S; Canaris, A G

    2000-11-01

    Three Nadejdolepis from Belize, Central America, represent new geographical records (1) Nadejdolepis paranitidulans (Golikova, 1959) (rostellar hooks 40-44 microm long) from Charadrius alexandrinus; (2) N. arenariae (Cabot, 1969) n. comb. (rostellar hooks 89 microm long) from Arenaria interpres; and (3) N. litoralis (Webster, 1947) (rostellar hooks 81-85 microm long) from Calidris fuscicollis (new host record). Additional descriptions, illustrations and information pertaining to these species are included. In addition, N. saguei Rysavy. 1967 is considered a synonym of N. litoralis (Webster, 1947). N. morenoi Rysavy, 1967 (rostral hooks 80 microm long) needs to be redescribed to confirm its validity. Two species of Nadejdolepis are transferred to the genus Microsomacanthus Lopez-Neyra, 1942 because their rostellar hooks are more diorchoid than nitiduloid, becoming M. cambrensis (Davies, 1939) comb. and M. alaskensis (Deblock & Rausch, 1967) n. comb. PMID:11071154

  11. Phylogenetic relationship of Pucrasia (Aves: Galliformes) based on complete mitochondrial genome sequences.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zuhao; Ke, Dianhua

    2015-12-01

    The taxonomic status of the avian genus Pucrasia is controversial and unstable. To demonstrate the phylogenetic relationships of Pucrasia, the complete mitochondrial genome of 19 genera in Phasianidae were analyzed. The genetic distance between Pucrasia and other genus ranged from 0.124 (Tetraophasis) to 0.170 (Arborophila). Maximum likelihood method, neighbor-joining method and minimum-evolution method were used to construct molecular phylogenetic trees. The phylogenetic trees grouped all the genera into a monophyletic cluster. Pucrasia, Tragopan, Tetraophasis and Lophophorus were closely related genera, which were consistent with the shape and behavior. Calibrated rates of molecular evolution suggested that their divergent time was late Pliocene between Pucrasia and other genus. Pucrasia was shown to be pheasant genus based on morphological traits and complete mitochondrial genome. The origin of Pucrasia might have been influenced by the uplift of Himalayan and Pleistocene climate fluctuations. PMID:24409915

  12. Phylogeny of the owlet-nightjars (Aves: Aegothelidae) based on mitochondrial DNA sequence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dumbacher, J.P.; Pratt, T.K.; Fleischer, R.C.

    2003-01-01

    The avian family Aegothelidae (Owlet-nightjars) comprises nine extant species and one extinct species, all of which are currently classified in a single genus, Aegotheles. Owlet-nightjars are secretive nocturnal birds of the South Pacific. They are relatively poorly studied and some species are known from only a few specimens. Furthermore, their confusing morphological variation has made it difficult to cluster existing specimens unambiguously into hierarchical taxonomic units. Here we sample all extant owlet-nightjar species and all but three currently recognized subspecies. We use DNA extracted primarily from museum specimens to obtain mitochondrial gene sequences and construct a molecular phylogeny. Our phylogeny suggests that most species are reciprocally monophyletic, however A. albertisi appears paraphyletic. Our data also suggest splitting A. bennettii into two species and splitting A. insignis and A. tatei as suggested in another recent paper. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  13. Coherent light scattering by nanostructured collagen arrays in the caruncles of the Malagasy asities (Eurylaimidae : Aves)

    E-print Network

    Prum, Richard O.; Torres, Rodolfo H.; Kovach, C.; Williamson, S.; Goodman, S. M.

    1999-12-01

    spectra with prominent, peak hues between 403 and 528 nm, Dark blue Neodrepanis tissues had substantial reflectance in the near ultraviolet (320-400 nm), which is visible to birds but not to humans, providing the first evidence of ultraviolet skin colours...

  14. ALFRED P. SLOAN FOUNDATION 630 FI F TH AVE N U E

    E-print Network

    brightest rising stars of this generation of scholars," says Dr. Paul L. Joskow, President of the Alfred P working on the Census of Marine Life, the award program will be expanded to include fellowships in ocean

  15. Helminth parasites of the European starling (Sturnus vulgaris) (Aves, Sturnidae), an invasive bird in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Valente, Romina; Ibañez, Lucía Mariel; Lorenti, Eliana; Fiorini, Vanina Dafne; Montalti, Diego; Diaz, Julia Inés

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this work is to contribute to the knowledge of gastrointestinal parasites of the European starling Sturnus vulgaris, an invasive bird from Argentina. Seventy-six birds were collected during the spring of 2007 and were examined for helminths. Six parasite species were found: one trematoda of the Echinostoma revolutum "group," four nematodes (Synhimantus nasuta, Microtetrameres sp., Pterothominx exilis, and Ornithocapillaria ovopunctata), and one acanthocephalan (Plagiorhynchus cylindraceus). All species found have been recorded in Eurasia and/or North America previously, although present reports enlarge their geographical distribution. As expected in an invasive host, the parasite community shows much lower species richness (n?=?6) than those observed in their native area (79 and 35 in the Eurasia and North America, respectively). PMID:24804922

  16. November 18, 2004 PO Box 480 2720 Sumner Ave. Aberdeen, WA 98520-0109

    E-print Network

    /Cost Ratio defined as (Present Value All Benefits)/(Present Value of all Costs). This definition incorporates. To be a fair analysis, non-energy benefits to the customer would certainly need to be included. This approach

  17. A comprehensive phylogeny of birds (Aves) using targeted next-generation DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Prum, Richard O; Berv, Jacob S; Dornburg, Alex; Field, Daniel J; Townsend, Jeffrey P; Lemmon, Emily Moriarty; Lemmon, Alan R

    2015-10-22

    Although reconstruction of the phylogeny of living birds has progressed tremendously in the last decade, the evolutionary history of Neoaves--a clade that encompasses nearly all living bird species--remains the greatest unresolved challenge in dinosaur systematics. Here we investigate avian phylogeny with an unprecedented scale of data: >390,000 bases of genomic sequence data from each of 198 species of living birds, representing all major avian lineages, and two crocodilian outgroups. Sequence data were collected using anchored hybrid enrichment, yielding 259 nuclear loci with an average length of 1,523 bases for a total data set of over 7.8 × 10(7) bases. Bayesian and maximum likelihood analyses yielded highly supported and nearly identical phylogenetic trees for all major avian lineages. Five major clades form successive sister groups to the rest of Neoaves: (1) a clade including nightjars, other caprimulgiforms, swifts, and hummingbirds; (2) a clade uniting cuckoos, bustards, and turacos with pigeons, mesites, and sandgrouse; (3) cranes and their relatives; (4) a comprehensive waterbird clade, including all diving, wading, and shorebirds; and (5) a comprehensive landbird clade with the enigmatic hoatzin (Opisthocomus hoazin) as the sister group to the rest. Neither of the two main, recently proposed Neoavian clades--Columbea and Passerea--were supported as monophyletic. The results of our divergence time analyses are congruent with the palaeontological record, supporting a major radiation of crown birds in the wake of the Cretaceous-Palaeogene (K-Pg) mass extinction. PMID:26444237

  18. Subulura halli (Ascaridida: Subuluridae) from the endangered great bustard Otis tarda Linnaeus (Aves: Gruiformes) in China.

    PubMed

    Du, Li-Qiang; Xu, Zhen; Li, Shun-Cai; Li, Liang

    2014-02-01

    Subulurid nematodes identified as Subulura halli Barreto, 1918 were collected from the endangered bird Otis tarda Linnaeus (Gruiformes: Otididae) in China. A detailed redescription of the hitherto poorly known species is presented using both light and, for the first time, scanning electron microscopy. Previously unreported and erroneous morphological features of taxonomic significance are revealed. This species can be readily distinguished from its congeners by the relatively long oesophagus (1.47-1.92 mm long, representing 10.6-16.9% of body length), the number and arrangement of male caudal papillae (11 pairs in total, arranged as five pairs of precloacal and six pairs of postcloacal papillae), the equal length of spicules (1.35-1.52 mm long, representing 10.7-13.7% of body length) and the presence of a small medioventral, precloacal papilla in the male. PMID:24684055

  19. Niche divergence promotes rapid diversification of East African sky island white-eyes (Aves: Zosteropidae)

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Siobhan C; Prys-Jones, Robert P; Habel, Jan C; Amakobe, Bernard A; Day, Julia J

    2014-01-01

    The Eastern Afromontane biodiversity hotspot composed of highly fragmented forested highlands (sky islands) harbours exceptional diversity and endemicity, particularly within birds. To explain their elevated diversity within this region, models founded on niche conservatism have been offered, although detailed phylogeographic studies are limited to a few avian lineages. Here, we focus on the recent songbird genus Zosterops, represented by montane and lowland members, to test the roles of niche conservatism versus niche divergence in the diversification and colonization of East Africa's sky islands. The species-rich white-eyes are a typically homogeneous family with an exceptional colonizing ability, but in contrast to their diversity on oceanic islands, continental diversity is considered depauperate and has been largely neglected. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of ?140 taxa reveals extensive polyphyly among different montane populations of Z. poliogastrus. These larger endemic birds are shown to be more closely related to taxa with divergent habitat types, altitudinal distributions and dispersal abilities than they are to populations of restricted endemics that occur in neighbouring montane forest fragments. This repeated transition between lowland and highland habitats over time demonstrate that diversification of the focal group is explained by niche divergence. Our results also highlight an underestimation of diversity compared to morphological studies that has implications for their taxonomy and conservation. Molecular dating suggests that the spatially extensive African radiation arose exceptionally rapidly (1–2.5 Ma) during the fluctuating Plio-Pleistocene climate, which may have provided the primary driver for lineage diversification. PMID:24954273

  20. A multilocus analysis provides evidence for more than one species within Eugenes fulgens (Aves: Trochilidae).

    PubMed

    Zamudio-Beltrán, Luz E; Hernández-Baños, Blanca E

    2015-09-01

    The status of subspecies in systematic zoology is the focus of controversy. Recent studies use DNA sequences to evaluate the status of subspecies within species complexes and to recognize and delimit species. Here, we assessed the phylogenetic relationships, the taxonomic status of the proposed subspecies, and the species limits of the monotypic hummingbird genus Eugenes (E. fulgens with traditionally recognized subspecies E. f. fulgens, E. f. viridiceps, and E. f. spectabilis), using nuclear (Beta Fibrinogen BFib, Ornithine Decarboxylase ODC, and Muscle Skeletal Receptor Tyrosine Kinase MUSK) and mitochondrial (NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 ND2, NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 ND4, and Control Region CR) markers. We performed Bayesian and Bayesian Phylogenetics and Phylogeography analyses and found genetic differences between the three groups, suggesting the existence of two cryptic species (E. fulgens and E. viridiceps) and one phenotypically differentiated species (E. spectabilis). Our analyses show that the E. viridiceps and E. fulgens groups are more closely related with one another than with E. spectabilis. PMID:25982690

  1. Identification, Classification, and Growth of Moa Chicks (Aves: Dinornithiformes) from the Genus Euryapteryx

    PubMed Central

    Huynen, Leon; Gill, Brian J.; Doyle, Anthony; Millar, Craig D.; Lambert, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The analysis of growth in extinct organisms is difficult. The general lack of skeletal material from a range of developmental states precludes determination of growth characteristics. For New Zealand's extinct moa we have available to us a selection of rare femora at different developmental stages that have allowed a preliminary determination of the early growth of this giant flightless bird. We use a combination of femora morphometrics, ancient DNA, and isotope analysis to provide information on the identification, classification, and growth of extinct moa from the genus Euryapteryx. Results Using ancient DNA, we identify a number of moa chick bones for the species Euryapteryx curtus, Dinornis novaezealandiae, and Anomalopteryx didiformis, and the first chick bone for Pachyornis geranoides. Isotope analysis shows that ?15N levels vary between the two known size classes of Euryapteryx, with the larger size class having reduced levels of ?15N. A growth series for femora of the two size classes of Euryapteryx shows that early femora growth characteristics for both classes are almost identical. Morphometric, isotopic, and radiographic analysis of the smallest Euryapteryx bones suggests that one of these femora is from a freshly hatched moa at a very early stage of development. Conclusion Using morphometric, isotopic, and ancient DNA analyses have allowed the determination of a number of characteristics of rare moa chick femora. For Euryapteryx the analyses suggest that the smaller sized class II Euryapteryx is identical in size and growth to the extant Darwin's rhea. PMID:24923666

  2. Marine debris ingestion by Magellanic penguins, Spheniscus magellanicus (Aves: Sphenisciformes), from the Brazilian coastal zone.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Martha L; Braga, Karina M; Luque, José L

    2011-10-01

    Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus) are non-breeding winter visitors to the Brazilian coast. In 2008 and 2010, plastic items and other marine debris were found in the stomachs and intestines of 15% of 175 dead penguins collected in the Lagos Region of the state of Rio de Janeiro. One bird had its stomach perforated by a plastic straw, which may have caused its death. There are few records of penguins ingesting plastic litter, but previous studies have found similar levels of debris ingestion among Magellanic penguins stranded on the Brazilian coast (35.8% of 397 birds). The high incidence of marine debris in this species in Brazil may result at least in part from the predominance of juveniles reaching these waters, as juvenile penguins may have a broader diet than adults. It is unclear to what extent plastic ingestion affects the mortality rate in this species and whether the incidence in stranded birds reflects that in the entire population. The present study addresses the increasing impact of plastic debris on marine life. PMID:21864861

  3. First report of an hypopus (Acari: Hypoderatidae) from a jaeger (Aves: Charadriiformes: Stercorariidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pence, Danny B.; Cole, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    Thalassornectes (Alcidectes) aukletae, originally described from two species of auklets (Charadriiformes: Alcidae) from maritime eastern Russia, is reported from a third species of pelagic charadriiform (Stercorariidae), the pomarine jaeger, Stercorarius poinarinus (Temminck), from Florida. The specimens from the jaeger are slightly smaller, the genital apodeme is more heavily sclerotized, paired setae gm are twice as long and there are other minor variations in the idiosomal and leg chaetotaxy. These differences are not considered sufficient to warrant taxonomic separation at the species or subspecies level from the nominate species T. (A.) aukletae. The same hypopus occurring across different families of birds is unusual in the Hypoderatidae. The diversity in hosts from several orders of birds, low intensities of infection in the two species from Africa, low prevalences in alcids from Russia, and rarity of these hypoderatids in all surveyed hosts leads us to speculate that the true host affinities of species in the genus Thalassornectes are unknown. The alternative consideration is that these are simply uncommon species that are very host specific.

  4. Biogeography and spatio-temporal diversification of Selenidera and Andigena toucans (Aves: Ramphastidae).

    PubMed

    Lutz, Holly L; Weckstein, Jason D; Patané, José S L; Bates, John M; Aleixo, Alexandre

    2013-12-01

    Andean uplift, Plio-Pleistocene climatic fluctuation, and river dynamics in the Amazon basin have all been implicated in the diversification of the South American avifauna. We reconstructed phylogenetic relationships in the genus Selenidera, which has served as a classic case of putative refugial speciation, and the closely related genus Andigena, to better understand the processes driving their diversification. Using mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences, we constructed a phylogeny to estimate the pattern and timing of divergence within and between seven lowland Selenidera toucanets and the five species of Andigena mountain-toucans, which together form a single clade. All phylogenetic analyses supported the monophyly of the montane genus Andigena, but indicated that the genus Selenidera is likely paraphyletic with respect to Andigena. Our time tree analysis is consistent with the orogenic uplift of the northern Andean range having initiated the divergence between Selenidera and Andigena, and that the movement and fragmentation of montane habitats in response to Pleistocene climatic oscillations likely influenced diversification within Andigena. Estimated divergence times for lowland Amazonian Selenidera did not support the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) refuge hypothesis as an important biogeographic factor for the diversification of lineages studied here. The timing of divergence within Selenidera is consistent with the hypothesis that geographic isolation of areas of endemism generated by Amazonian river dynamics during the Plio-Pleistocene contributed to Selenidera speciation and current species distributions. PMID:23831458

  5. Does behavior reflect phylogeny in swiftlets (Aves: Apodidae)? A test using cytochrome b mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, P L; Clayton, D H; Griffiths, R; Page, R D

    1996-01-01

    Swiftlets are small insectivorous birds, many of which nest in caves and are known to echolocate. Due to a lack of distinguishing morphological characters, the taxonomy of swiftlets is primarily based on the presence or absence of echolocating ability, together with nest characters. To test the reliability of these behavioral characters, we constructed an independent phylogeny using cytochrome b mitochondrial DNA sequences from swiftlets and their relatives. This phylogeny is broadly consistent with the higher classification of swifts but does not support the monophyly of swiftlets. Echolocating swiftlets (Aerodramus) and the nonecholocating "giant swiftlet" (Hydrochous gigas) group together, but the remaining nonecholocating swiftlets belonging to Collocalia are not sister taxa to these swiftlets. While echolocation may be a synapomorphy of Aerodramus (perhaps secondarily lost in Hydrochous), no character of Aerodramus nests showed a statistically significant fit to the molecular phylogeny, indicating that nest characters are not phylogenetically reliable in this group. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8692950

  6. Predicting the distribution of four species of raptors (Aves: Accipitridae) in southern

    E-print Network

    Seoane, Javier

    Milvus migrans (Boddaert, 1783). Location Andalusia, southern Spain. Methods Generalized linear models, habitat models, Buteo buteo, Circaetus gallicus, Hieraaetus pennatus, Milvus migrans, Accipitridae, road

  7. Mitochondrial phylogeography, subspecific taxonomy, and conservation genetics of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis; Aves: Gruidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rhymer, J.M.; Fain, M.G.; Austin, J.E.; Johnson, D.H.; Krajewski, C.

    2001-01-01

    Six subspecies of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) have been denoted based on perceived morphological and/or breeding locality differences among them. Three subspecies are migratory, breeding from the high arctic in North America and Siberia (lesser sandhill, G. c. canadensis), south through central Canada (Canadian sandhill, G. c. rowani) and into the northern United States (greater sandhill, G. c. tabida). A review of sandhill crane taxonomy indicates that the size variation, on the basis of which these subspecies were named, may be clinal and not diagnostic. The other three subspecies, all listed as endangered or threatened, are non-migratory, resident in Florida (G. c. pratensis), Mississippi (G. c. pulla), and Cuba (G. c. nesiotes). We used analysis of mitochondrial DNA control region (CR) sequences to determine whether haplotypes representing current subspecies show any genetic cohesion or are more consistent with a pattern of clinal variation in morphology. CR sequences indicate that only two highly divergent (5.3%) lineages of sandhill cranes occur in North America: one lineage composed only of arctic-nesting G. c. canadensis, the other of the remaining North American subspecies (we lack data on the Cuban population). The deep split between lineages is consistent with an estimated isolation of approximately 1.5 Mya (mid-Pleistocene), while the distribution of mutational changes within lineages is consistent with an hypothesis of rapid, post-Pleistocene population expansions. No other phylogeographic structuring is concordant with subspecific boundaries, however, analysis of molecular variance indicates that there is significant population genetic differentiation among all subspecies except G. c. tabida and G. c. rowani, which are indistinguishable. We suggest that recognition of the recently named G. c. rowani be abandoned.

  8. Paraphyly of Cinclodes fuscus (Aves: Passeriformes: Furnariidae): Implications for taxonomy and biogeography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanin, Camilo; Cadena, Carlos Daniel; Maley, James M.; Lijtmaer, Dario A.; Tubaro, Pablo L.; Chesser, R. Terry

    2009-01-01

    The Andes are a hotspot of global avian diversity, but studies on the historical diversification of Andean birds remain relatively scarce. Evolutionary studies on avian lineages with Andean–Patagonian distributions have focused on reconstructing species-level phylogenies, whereas no detailed phylogeographic studies on widespread species have been conducted. Here, we describe phylogeographic patterns in the Bar-winged Cinclodes (Cinclodes fuscus), a widespread and common species of ovenbird (Furnariidae) that breeds from Tierra del Fuego to the northern Andes. Traditionally, C. fuscus has been considered a single species composed of nine subspecies, but its long and narrow range suggests the possibility of considerable genetic variation among populations. Sequences of two mitochondrial genes revealed three discrete and geographically coherent groups of C. fuscus, occupying the southern, central, and northern Andes. Surprisingly, phylogenetic analyses indicated that these groups were more closely related to other species of Cinclodes than to each other. Relationships of the southern and northern C. fuscus clades to other species of Cinclodes were straightforward; in combination with available information on plumage, behavioral, and vocal variation, this suggests that each should be recognized as a distinct biological species. The central Andean group was paraphyletic with respect to C. oustaleti, and relationships among these taxa and C. olrogi were poorly resolved. We suggest that the central Andean C. fuscus should also be considered a different species, pending new information to clarify species limits in this group. These new phylogenetic data, along with recently developed methods, allowed us to review the biogeography of the genus, confirming southern South America and the central Andes as important areas for the diversification of these birds.

  9. Feather mites (Acari, Astigmata) from Azorean passerines (Aves, Passeriformes): lower species richness compared to European mainland

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Pedro; Mironov, Sergey; Sychra, Oldrich; Resendes, Roberto; Literak, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Ten passerine species were examined on three islands of the Azores (North Atlantic) during 2013 and 2014 in order to identify their feather mite assemblages. We recorded 19 feather mite species belonging to four families of the superfamily Analgoidea (Analgidae, Proctophyllodidae, Psoroptoididae and Trouessartiidae). A high prevalence of feather mite species was recorded on the majority of the examined host species. Only three passerine species (Sylvia atricapilla, Regulus regulus and Serinus canaria) presented the same full complex of mite species as commonly occurs in the plumage of their closest relatives in continental Europe. Passer domesticus presented the same limited fauna of feather mites living in the plumage as do its co-specifics in continental Europe. Carduelis carduelis bears the same feather mite species as do most of its continental populations in Europe, but it lacks one mite species occurring on this host in Egypt. Turdus merula, Pyrrhula murina and Fringilla coelebs are missing several mite species common to their continental relatives. This diminution could be explained by the founder effect, whereby a limited number of colonizing individuals did not transport the full set of feather mite species, or by the extinction of some mite species after initially having reached the Azores. The only individual of Motacilla cinerea sampled in this study presented a new host record for the mite species Trouessartia jedliczkai. PMID:25665827

  10. ccmarasco@gmail.com 615.423.6302 5200 Georgia Ave, Nashville, TN 37209

    E-print Network

    Wikswo, John

    -Level View of Cocaine Addiction: The Interconnection of the Immune and Nervous Systems, Experimental Biology-Column Solid Phase Extraction Apparatus for the Online Collection and Preparation of Continuously Flowing, John A. McLean. Development of a Platform for Online Analysis of the Metabolic Footprint, 4th Annual

  11. Feather mites (Acari, Astigmata) from Azorean passerines (Aves, Passeriformes): lower species richness compared to European mainland.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Pedro; Mironov, Sergey; Sychra, Oldrich; Resendes, Roberto; Literak, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Ten passerine species were examined on three islands of the Azores (North Atlantic) during 2013 and 2014 in order to identify their feather mite assemblages. We recorded 19 feather mite species belonging to four families of the superfamily Analgoidea (Analgidae, Proctophyllodidae, Psoroptoididae and Trouessartiidae). A high prevalence of feather mite species was recorded on the majority of the examined host species. Only three passerine species (Sylvia atricapilla, Regulus regulus and Serinus canaria) presented the same full complex of mite species as commonly occurs in the plumage of their closest relatives in continental Europe. Passer domesticus presented the same limited fauna of feather mites living in the plumage as do its co-specifics in continental Europe. Carduelis carduelis bears the same feather mite species as do most of its continental populations in Europe, but it lacks one mite species occurring on this host in Egypt. Turdus merula, Pyrrhula murina and Fringilla coelebs are missing several mite species common to their continental relatives. This diminution could be explained by the founder effect, whereby a limited number of colonizing individuals did not transport the full set of feather mite species, or by the extinction of some mite species after initially having reached the Azores. The only individual of Motacilla cinerea sampled in this study presented a new host record for the mite species Trouessartia jedliczkai. PMID:25665827

  12. Carotenoid-based bill coloration functions as a social, not sexual, signal in songbirds (Aves: Passeriformes).

    PubMed

    Dey, C J; Valcu, M; Kempenaers, B; Dale, J

    2015-01-01

    Many animals use coloration to communicate with other individuals. Although the signalling role of avian plumage colour is relatively well studied, there has been much less research on coloration in avian bare parts. However, bare parts could be highly informative signals as they can show rapid changes in coloration. We measured bill colour (a ubiquitous bare part) in over 1600 passerine species and tested whether interspecific variation in carotenoid-based coloration is consistent with signalling to potential mates or signalling to potential rivals in a competitive context. Our results suggest that carotenoid bill coloration primarily evolved as a signal of dominance, as this type of coloration is more common in species that live in social groups in the nonbreeding season, and species that nest in colonies; two socio-ecological conditions that promote frequent agonistic interactions with numerous and/or unfamiliar individuals. Additionally, our study suggests that carotenoid bill coloration is independent of the intensity of past sexual selection, as it is not related to either sexual dichromatism or sexual size dimorphism. These results pose a significant challenge to the conventional view that carotenoid-based avian coloration has evolved as a developmentally costly, condition-dependent sexual signal. We also suggest that bare part ornamentation may often signal different information than plumage ornaments. PMID:25430614

  13. Albert E. Giorgi Don Chapman Consultants, Inc.. 7981 J68th Ave. NE

    E-print Network

    R. Miller Benjamin P. Sandford Northwest Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Fisheries Service mortality of downstream migrant juvenile salmonids is associated with passage through the turbines strategies to augment instream flows to provide improved passage conditions for juvenile salmonids during

  14. Breeding system evolution influenced the geographic expansion and diversification of the core Corvoidea (Aves: Passeriformes).

    PubMed

    Marki, Petter Z; Fabre, Pierre-Henri; Jønsson, Knud A; Rahbek, Carsten; Fjeldså, Jon; Kennedy, Jonathan D

    2015-07-01

    Birds vary greatly in their life-history strategies, including their breeding systems, which range from brood parasitism to a system with multiple nonbreeding helpers at the nest. By far the most common arrangement, however, is where both parents participate in raising the young. The traits associated with parental care have been suggested to affect dispersal propensity and lineage diversification, but to date tests of this potential relationship at broad temporal and spatial scales have been limited. Here, using data from a globally distributed group of corvoid birds in concordance with state-dependent speciation and extinction models, we suggest that pair breeding is associated with elevated speciation rates. Estimates of transition between breeding systems imply that cooperative lineages frequently evolve biparental care, whereas pair breeders rarely become cooperative. We further highlight that these groups have differences in their spatial distributions, with pair breeders overrepresented on islands, and cooperative breeders mainly found on continents. Finally, we find that speciation rates appear to be significantly higher on islands compared to continents. These results imply that the transition from cooperative breeding to pair breeding was likely a significant contributing factor facilitating dispersal across tropical archipelagos, and subsequent world-wide phylogenetic expansion among the core Corvoidea. PMID:26095612

  15. Taxonomic revision and phylogenetic analysis of the flightless Mancallinae (Aves, Pan-Alcidae)

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Neil Adam

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Although flightless alcids from the Miocene and Pliocene of the eastern Pacific Ocean have been known for over 100 years, there is no detailed evaluation of diversity and systematic placement of these taxa. This is the first combined analysis of morphological and molecular data to include all extant alcids, the recently extinct Great Auk Pinguinus impennis, the mancalline auks, and a large outgroup sampling of 29 additional non-alcid charadriiforms. Based on the systematic placement of Mancallinae outside of crown clade Alcidae, the clade name Pan-Alcidae is proposed to include all known alcids. An extensive review of the Mancallinae fossil record resulted in taxonomic revision of the clade, and identification of three new species. In addition to positing the first hypothesis of inter-relationships between Mancallinae species, phylogenetic results support placement of Mancallinae as the sister taxon to all other Alcidae, indicating that flightlessness evolved at least twice in the alcid lineage. Convergent osteological characteristics of Mancallinae, the flightless Great Auk, and Spheniscidae are summarized, and implications of Mancallinae diversity, radiation, and extinction in the context of paleoclimatic changes are discussed. PMID:21594108

  16. Correcting the "correct" name for the Asian Brown Flycatcher (Aves: Passeriformes, Muscicapidae, Muscicapa).

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Edward C; Schodde, Richard; Kullander, Sven; Crochet, Pierre André; Elliott, Andy; Kirwan, Guy M

    2014-01-01

    Mlíkovský (2012) claimed that Muscicapa latirostris Raffles, 1822 was the correct name for the Asian Brown Flycatcher, and rejected its senior synonym, Muscicapa dauurica Pallas, 1811. Muscicapa dauurica is in equal or greater use today for this flycatcher, to which the references to it in Mlíkovský (2012) testify even though they are far from comprehensive. Other major references using dauurica Pallas are Sibley & Monroe (1990), Inskipp et al. (1996), Kennedy et al. (2000), Dickinson (2003), Rasmussen & Anderton (2005), Clement (2006), Wells (2007) and Mann (2008). PMID:25283921

  17. An improved phylogeny of the Andean tit-tyrants (Aves, Tyrannidae): More characters trump sophisticated analyses

    PubMed Central

    DuBay, Shane G.; Witt, Christopher C.

    2012-01-01

    The phylogeny of the flycatcher genus Anairetes was previously inferred using short fragments of mitochondrial DNA and parsimony and distance-based methods. The resulting topology spurred taxonomic revision and influenced understanding of Andean biogeography. More than a decade later, we revisit the phylogeny of Anairetes tit-tyrants using more mtDNA characters, seven unlinked loci (3 mitochondrial genes, 6 nuclear loci), more closely related outgroup taxa, partitioned Bayesian analyses, and two coalescent species-tree approaches (Bayesian estimation of species trees, BEST; Bayesian evolutionary analysis by sampling trees, *BEAST). Of these improvements in data and analyses, the fourfold increase in mtDNA characters was both necessary and sufficient to incur a major shift in the topology and near-complete resolution. The species-tree analyses, while theoretically preferable to concatenation or single gene approaches, yielded topologies that were compatible with mtDNA but with weaker statistical resolution at nodes. The previous results that had led to taxonomic and biogeographic reappraisal were refuted, and the current results support the resurrection of the genus Uromyias as the sister clade to Anairetes. The sister relationship between these two genera corresponds to an ecological dichotomy between a depauperate humid cloudforest clade and a diverse dry-tolerant clade that has diversified along the latitudinal axis of the Andes. The species-tree results and the concatenation results each reaffirm the primacy of mtDNA to provide phylogenetic signal for avian phylogenies at the species and subspecies level. This is due in part to the abundance of informative characters in mtDNA, and in part to its lower effective population size that causes it to more faithfully track the species tree. PMID:22525942

  18. The Mitochondrial Genomes of Aquila fasciata and Buteo lagopus (Aves, Accipitriformes): Sequence, Structure and Phylogenetic Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Lan; Chen, Juan; Wang, Ping; Ren, Qiongqiong; Yuan, Jian; Qian, Chaoju; Hua, Xinghong; Guo, Zhichun; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Jianke; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Qin; Ding, Hengwu; Bi, De; Zhang, Zongmeng; Wang, Qingqing; Chen, Dongsheng; Kan, Xianzhao

    2015-01-01

    The family Accipitridae is one of the largest groups of non-passerine birds, including 68 genera and 243 species globally distributed. In the present study, we determined the complete mitochondrial sequences of two species of accipitrid, namely Aquila fasciata and Buteo lagopus, and conducted a comparative mitogenome analysis across the family. The mitogenome length of A. fasciata and B. lagopus are 18,513 and 18,559 bp with an A + T content of 54.2% and 55.0%, respectively. For both the two accipitrid birds mtDNAs, obvious positive AT-skew and negative GC-skew biases were detected for all 12 PCGs encoded by the H strand, whereas the reverse was found in MT-ND6 encoded by the L strand. One extra nucleotide‘C’is present at the position 174 of MT-ND3 gene of A. fasciata, which is not observed at that of B. lagopus. Six conserved sequence boxes in the Domain II, named boxes F, E, D, C, CSBa, and CSBb, respectively, were recognized in the CRs of A. fasciata and B. lagopus. Rates and patterns of mitochondrial gene evolution within Accipitridae were also estimated. The highest dN/dS was detected for the MT-ATP8 gene (0.32493) among Accipitridae, while the lowest for the MT-CO1 gene (0.01415). Mitophylogenetic analysis supported the robust monophyly of Accipitriformes, and Cathartidae was basal to the balance of the order. Moreover, we performed phylogenetic analyses using two other data sets (two mitochondrial loci, and combined nuclear and mitochondrial loci). Our results indicate that the subfamily Aquilinae and all currently polytypic genera of this subfamily are monophyletic. These two novel mtDNA data will be useful in refining the phylogenetic relationships and evolutionary processes of Accipitriformes. PMID:26295156

  19. Performing Arts Engineering Library

    E-print Network

    AVE ELLISTO N PL 29TH AVE N FAIRFAX AVE 32ND AVE S WEDGEWOOD AVE LOVE CIR 18THAVES 31STAVEN 16THAVES 252A 19TH AVE CHILD CARE 276 BASEBALL BLEACHERS 252B TAB 258 1808 EDGEHILL 263 1107 18TH AVE 264 TRACK GODCHAUX NURSING ANNEX 131 VILLAGE APARTMENTS 205B MEDICAL CHILD CARE 213 2135 BLAKEMORE 216 2146 BELCOURT

  20. Common Name Street Address Guide

    E-print Network

    Stowell, Michael

    FOLSOM ST 1425 FOLSOM ST 1475 FOLSOM ST 1475 FOLSOM ST 1710 EUCLID AVE 1679 EUCLID AVE 985 18TH ST 1755 EUCLID AVE 1035 BROADWAY 990 18TH ST 1020 BROADWAY 1440 CENTRAL CAMPUS MALL 985 18TH ST 1020 18TH ST 1340 CAMPUS MALL 1710 EUCLID AVE 1679 EUCLID AVE 1700 CENTRAL CAMPUS MALL 1710 EUCLID AVE 1679 EUCLID AVE 1679

  1. MAT 122-100 Probability and Statistics for the Liberal Arts II, Fall 2014, p. 1 Instructor: Professor Steven P. Diaz, 317C Carnegie, x1583, spdiaz@syr.edu,

    E-print Network

    McConnell, Terry

    to try the statistical literacy and critical thinking, chapter quick quiz, and review exercises and the Liberal Arts Core: The sequence MAT 121 ­ MAT 122 can be used to satisfy the quantitative skills of Course Grade: Each midterm exam and the final exam will be graded on a scale of 0­100. Your recitations

  2. MAT 122-100 Probability and Statistics for the Liberal Arts II, Spring 2015, p. 1 Instructor: Professor Steven P. Diaz, 317C Carnegie, x1583, spdiaz@syr.edu,

    E-print Network

    McConnell, Terry

    to try the statistical literacy and critical thinking, chapter quick quiz, and review exercises and the Liberal Arts Core: The sequence MAT 121 ­ MAT 122 can be used to satisfy the quantitative skills to be dropped. Calculation of Course Grade: Each midterm exam and the final exam will be graded on a scale of 0

  3. Optical (R and H-alpha) nova candidate in M31 and H-alpha confirmation of the probable nova 2015-09a

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovcharov, E.; Kurtenkov, A.; Bozhilov, V.; Valcheva, A.; Nedialkov, P.; Kostov, A.

    2015-09-01

    We report the discovery of a probable nova located at RA(2000) = 00h42m14.49s, Dec(2000) = +41d17'34.24", which is 336.3" West and 85.7" North of the center of M31. The images are obtained with the 2m RCC telescope, equipped with focal reducer FoReRo2 at NAO Rozhen, Bulgaria.

  4. Diversification of the tropical Pacific avifauna

    E-print Network

    Andersen, Michael J.

    2013-12-31

    . The focal taxa were: Ceyx lepidus (Aves: Alcedinidae), Pachycephala pectoralis (Aves: Pachycephalidae), and Todiramphus chloris (Aves: Alcedinidae). In chapter 3, I examined the systematic relationships of 14 species of Pacific honeyeaters (Aves...

  5. UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS 525 N. Garland Ave. $ Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 $ (479)575-4078 $ (479)575-8793 (FAX)

    E-print Network

    Capogna, Luca

    )575-8793 (FAX) Pat Walker Health Center - (PWHC) Division of Student Affairs AUTHORIZATION FOR TREATMENT chronic medical problems? (Asthma, diabetes, epilepsy, etc/or treatment if necessary by the University of Arkansas - Pat Walker Health Center professional staff

  6. Duval County Extension Office Program Location: 1010 N McDuff Ave, Jacksonville, FL 32254, unless noted

    E-print Network

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    ! https://www.facebook.com/DuvalCountyAgriculture?fref=ts https://www.facebook.com/ DuvalCountyFamilyandConsumerSciences https://www.facebook.com/DuvalCounty4H July 2015 Educational program areas: Family Life Education Money

  7. Microsatellite markers characterized in the barn owl (Tyto alba) and of high utility in other owls (Strigiformes: AVES).

    PubMed

    Klein, Akos; Horsburgh, Gavin J; Küpper, Clemens; Major, Agnes; Lee, Patricia L M; Hoffmann, Gyula; Mátics, Róbert; Dawson, Deborah A

    2009-11-01

    We have identified 15 polymorphic microsatellite loci for the barn owl (Tyto alba), five from testing published owl loci and 10 from testing non-owl loci, including loci known to be of high utility in passerines and shorebirds. All 15 loci were sequenced in barn owl, and new primer sets were designed for eight loci. The 15 polymorphic loci displayed two to 26 alleles in 56-58 barn owls. When tested in 10 other owl species (n?=?1-6 individuals), between four and nine loci were polymorphic per species. These loci are suitable for studies of population structure and parentage in owls. PMID:21564947

  8. Isolation and characterization of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II B genes in the Barn owl (Aves: Tyto alba).

    PubMed

    Burri, Reto; Niculita-Hirzel, Hélène; Roulin, Alexandre; Fumagalli, Luca

    2008-09-01

    We isolated major histocompatibility complex class II B (MHCIIB) genes in the Barn owl (Tyto alba). A PCR-based approach combined with primer walking on genomic and complementary DNA as well as Southern blot analyses revealed the presence of two MHCIIB genes, both being expressed in spleen, liver, and blood. Characteristic structural features of MHCIIB genes as well as their expression and high non-synonymous substitution rates in the region involved in antigen binding suggest that both genes are functional. MHC organization in the Barn owl is simple compared to passerine species that show multiple duplications, and resembles the minimal essential MHC of chicken. PMID:18548243

  9. 9 Hillhouse Ave, Room M10 New Haven, CT 06511 Jay R. Werber jay.werber@yale.edu

    E-print Network

    Haller, Gary L.

    ) custom, automated filling station, and 2) disposable bag assembly designed to fit the filling station. Performed Factory Acceptance Testing and evaluated system filling performance. Developed a stringent

  10. houjn0620@gmail.com 1915 Maple Ave APT 123 (217)-778-0620 Evanston IL 61820

    E-print Network

    Bustamante, Fabián E.

    for Android mobile apps Designed the user interface design for several sections. University Dining Hall, Matlab, Latex, SQL Microsoft Office: Word, PowerPoint, Excel, Visio PROJECTS & ACTIVITIES Chartered

  11. Investigations of severe/tornadic thunderstorm development and evolution based on satellite and AVE/SESAME/VAS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonderhaar, T. H.; Purdom, J. F. W.

    1985-01-01

    Development of cloud relative tracking for severe thunderstorm identification and the beginning of the development of mesoscale airmass characteristics based on vertical atmospheric sounding data were accomplished.

  12. UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS 525 N. Garland Ave. Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 (479)575-4078 (479)575-8793 (FAX)

    E-print Network

    Capogna, Luca

    requested to be released include information relating to sexually transmitted disease, AIDS, or HIV, alcohol-disclosed by the designated recipient and the information may no longer by protected by Federal privacy laws and regulations allowed by law, such as the cost of any supplies, labor of copying, postage, or other expenses incurred

  13. Aspects of the ecology of Penelope superciliaris temminck, 1815 (Aves: Cracidae) in the Araripe National Forest, Ceará, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Thel, T N; Teixeira, P H R; Lyra-Neves, R M; Telino-Júnior, W R; Ferreira, J M R; Azevedo-Júnior, S M

    2015-11-01

    Guans are large frugivorous birds that inhabit Neotropical forests and play a fundamental role in seed dispersal and forest regeneration. Despite their ecological importance, the natural populations of these birds are increasingly threatened by deforestation and hunting pressure. The present study was conducted in the Araripe National Forest, Ceará (Brazil), with the objective of estimating population parameters (density and total population size) in the Rusty-margined Guan (Penelope superciliaris) and the White-browed Guan (Penelope jacucaca), as well as providing data on their feeding ecology, including seasonal variation and fruit morphology. The study was based on the monthly collection of data between November, 2011, and October, 2012. Population parameters were estimated using line transect surveys, while feeding ecology was studied by direct observation, and the collection of plant and fecal samples. The estimated population density of P. superciliaris was 19.17 individuals/km2 (CV=13.98%), with a mean of 0.13 sightings per 10 km walked. Penelope jacucaca was not encountered during the surveys. A total of 14 plant species were recorded in the diet of P. superciliaris, 12 by direct observation, and two from fecal samples. Fruit diameter varied from 6.3±1.35 mm (Miconia albicans) to 29.9±1.7 mm (Psidium sp.). Yellow was the most frequent fruit color (41.6%, n=5), with two species each (16.6%) providing black, green, and red fruits. Fleshy fruits of the baccate (50.0%, n=6) and drupe (33.3%, n=4) types were the most consumed. The data on population parameters and feeding ecology collected in the present study provide an important database for the development of effective management strategies by environmental agencies for the conservation of the populations of the two guan species. PMID:26628224

  14. Foraging behaviour of the Scale-throated Hermit Phaethornis eurynome Lesson, 1832 (Aves, Trochilidae) in Vriesea incurvata Gaudich (Bromeliaceae).

    PubMed

    Silva, B G; Piratelli, A J

    2014-05-01

    In this study we tested for density-dependent relationships between visitation rates of the Scale-throated Hermit (Phaethornis eurynome) and the plant density and flower number of the bromeliad Vriesea incurvata, by comparing plots with varying densities of this bromeliad. Eight 100 m2 plots were established at least 200 m from each other; four plots contained 10-15 individuals of V. incurvata each, whereas the other four contained 4-5 individuals each. The visitors, number of visits, behaviour (nectar thief or potential pollinator) and the height of foraging were recorded during focal observations on the plants. The number of visits of P. eurynome varied according to the local density of V. incurvata, showing that the heterogeneous distribution of this bromeliad species may promote adjustments in the pollinator populations, through resource variation at a local scale. PMID:25166315

  15. Joseph E. Mohr, Ph.D. 4202 E. Fowler Ave. BSN3116 Tampa, FL 33620 Cell 727.421.9236

    E-print Network

    Jank, Wolfgang

    amount of this cost of funds advantage. Presented SWFA 2012 Are CFO's Smarter than Analysts? (with Gaole correlated except for the turnover of CFO's. Greater analyst coverage is correlated with lower CFO turnover implying that analysts are not effective corporate governance monitors for CFO's. Further, we find

  16. Testing founder effect speciation: Divergence population genetics of the Spoonbills Platalea regia and Pl. minor (Threskiornithidae, Aves)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yeung, Carol K.L.; Tsai, Pi-Wen; Chesser, R. Terry; Lin, Rong-Chien; Yao, Cheng-Te; Tian, Xiu-Hua; Li, Shou-Hsien

    2011-01-01

    Although founder effect speciation has been a popular theoretical model for the speciation of geographically isolated taxa, its empirical importance has remained difficult to evaluate due to the intractability of past demography, which in a founder effect speciation scenario would involve a speciational bottleneck in the emergent species and the complete cessation of gene flow following divergence. Using regression-weighted approximate Bayesian computation, we tested the validity of these two fundamental conditions of founder effect speciation in a pair of sister species with disjunct distributions: the royal spoonbill Platalea regia in Australasia and the black-faced spoonbill Pl. minor in eastern Asia. When compared with genetic polymorphism observed at 20 nuclear loci in the two species, simulations showed that the founder effect speciation model had an extremely low posterior probability (1.55 × 10-8) of producing the extant genetic pattern. In contrast, speciation models that allowed for postdivergence gene flow were much more probable (posterior probabilities were 0.37 and 0.50 for the bottleneck with gene flow and the gene flow models, respectively) and postdivergence gene flow persisted for a considerable period of time (more than 80% of the divergence history in both models) following initial divergence (median = 197,000 generations, 95% credible interval [CI]: 50,000-478,000, for the bottleneck with gene flow model; and 186,000 generations, 95% CI: 45,000-477,000, for the gene flow model). Furthermore, the estimated population size reduction in Pl. regia to 7,000 individuals (median, 95% CI: 487-12,000, according to the bottleneck with gene flow model) was unlikely to have been severe enough to be considered a bottleneck. Therefore, these results do not support founder effect speciation in Pl. regia but indicate instead that the divergence between Pl. regia and Pl. minor was probably driven by selection despite continuous gene flow. In this light, we discuss the potential importance of evolutionarily labile traits with significant fitness consequences, such as migratory behavior and habitat preference, in facilitating divergence of the spoonbills.

  17. Investigations of severe/tornadic thunderstorm development and evolution based on satellite and AVE/SESAME/VAS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonderhaar, T. H.; Purdom, J. F. W.

    1984-01-01

    The use of rapid scan satellite imagery to investigate the local environment of severe thunderstorms is discussed. Mesoscale cloud tracking and vertical wind shear as it affects thunderstorm relative flow are mentioned. The role of pre-existing low level cloud cover in the outbreak of tornadoes was investigated. Applying visible atmospheric sounding imagery to mesoscale phenomena is also addressed.

  18. Genetic evaluation of the mating system in the blue-and-yellow macaw (Ara ararauna, Aves, Psittacidae) by DNA fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Caparroz, Renato; Miyaki, Cristina Y; Baker, Allan J

    2011-01-01

    More than 90% of birds are socially monogamous, although genetic studies indicate that many are often not sexually monogamous. In the present study, DNA fingerprinting was used to estimate the genetic relationships between nestlings belonging to the same broods to evaluate the mating system in the socially monogamous macaw, Ara ararauna. We found that in 10 of 11 broods investigated, the nestlings showed genetic similarity levels congruent with values expected among full-sibs, suggesting that they shared the same parents. However, in one brood, the low genetic similarity observed between nestlings could be a result of intraspecific brood parasitism, intraspecific nest competition or extra-pair paternity. These results, along with available behavioral and life-history data, imply that the blue-and-yellow macaw is not only socially, but also genetically monogamous. However, the occurrence of eventual cases of extra-pair paternity cannot be excluded. PMID:21637560

  19. Phylogeography of the Variable Dwarf-Kingfisher Ceyx lepidus (Aves: Alcedinidae) Inferred from Mitochondrial and Nuclear DNA Sequences

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Michael J.; Oliveros, Carl Hirang; Filardi, Christopher E.; Moyle, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    We reconstructed the phylogeographic relationships of the Variable Dwarf-Kingfisher (Ceyx lepidus) using DNA sequence data. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian analysis methods were used to reconstruct trees from a multilocus data set of all 15 named...

  20. A distinctive new subspecies of Scytalopus griseicollis (Aves, Passeriformes, Rhinocryptidae) from the northern Eastern Cordillera of Colombia and Venezuela

    PubMed Central

    Avendaño, Jorge Enrique; Donegan, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We describe a new subspecies of Pale-bellied Tapaculo Scytalopus griseicollis from the northern Eastern Cordillera of Colombia and Venezuela. This form differs diagnosably in plumage from described subspecies Scytalopus griseicollis griseicollis and Scytalopus griseicollis gilesi and from the latter in tail length. It is also differentiated non-diagnosably in voice from both these populations. Ecological niche modelling analysis suggests that the new subspecies is restricted to the Andean montane forest and páramo north of both the arid Chicamocha valley and the Sierra Nevada del Cocuy. PMID:26085800

  1. Phylogenetic Analysis of Pelecaniformes (Aves) Based on Osteological Data: Implications for Waterbird Phylogeny and Fossil Calibration Studies

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Nathan D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Debate regarding the monophyly and relationships of the avian order Pelecaniformes represents a classic example of discord between morphological and molecular estimates of phylogeny. This lack of consensus hampers interpretation of the group's fossil record, which has major implications for understanding patterns of character evolution (e.g., the evolution of wing-propelled diving) and temporal diversification (e.g., the origins of modern families). Relationships of the Pelecaniformes were inferred through parsimony analyses of an osteological dataset encompassing 59 taxa and 464 characters. The relationships of the Plotopteridae, an extinct family of wing-propelled divers, and several other fossil pelecaniforms (Limnofregata, Prophaethon, Lithoptila, ?Borvocarbo stoeffelensis) were also assessed. The antiquity of these taxa and their purported status as stem members of extant families makes them valuable for studies of higher-level avian diversification. Methodology/Principal Findings Pelecaniform monophyly is not recovered, with Phaethontidae recovered as distantly related to all other pelecaniforms, which are supported as a monophyletic Steganopodes. Some anatomical partitions of the dataset possess different phylogenetic signals, and partitioned analyses reveal that these discrepancies are localized outside of Steganopodes, and primarily due to a few labile taxa. The Plotopteridae are recovered as the sister taxon to Phalacrocoracoidea, and the relationships of other fossil pelecaniforms representing key calibration points are well supported, including Limnofregata (sister taxon to Fregatidae), Prophaethon and Lithoptila (successive sister taxa to Phaethontidae), and ?Borvocarbo stoeffelensis (sister taxon to Phalacrocoracidae). These relationships are invariant when ‘backbone’ constraints based on recent avian phylogenies are imposed. Conclusions/Significance Relationships of extant pelecaniforms inferred from morphology are more congruent with molecular phylogenies than previously assumed, though notable conflicts remain. The phylogenetic position of the Plotopteridae implies that wing-propelled diving evolved independently in plotopterids and penguins, representing a remarkable case of convergent evolution. Despite robust support for the placement of fossil taxa representing key calibration points, the successive outgroup relationships of several “stem fossil + crown family” clades are variable and poorly supported across recent studies of avian phylogeny. Thus, the impact these fossils have on inferred patterns of temporal diversification depends heavily on the resolution of deep nodes in avian phylogeny. PMID:20976229

  2. CracidMex1: a comprehensive database of global occurrences of cracids (Aves, Galliformes) with distribution in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Pinilla-Buitrago, Gonzalo; Martínez-Morales, Miguel Angel; González-García, Fernando; Enríquez, Paula L.; Rangel-Salazar, José Luis; Romero, Carlos Alberto Guichard; Navarro-Sigüenza, Adolfo G.; Monterrubio-Rico, Tiberio César; Escalona-Segura, Griselda

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Cracids are among the most vulnerable groups of Neotropical birds. Almost half of the species of this family are included in a conservation risk category. Twelve taxa occur in Mexico, six of which are considered at risk at national level and two are globally endangered. Therefore, it is imperative that high quality, comprehensive, and high-resolution spatial data on the occurrence of these taxa are made available as a valuable tool in the process of defining appropriate management strategies for conservation at a local and global level. We constructed the CracidMex1 database by collating global records of all cracid taxa that occur in Mexico from available electronic databases, museum specimens, publications, “grey literature”, and unpublished records. We generated a database with 23,896 clean, validated, and standardized geographic records. Database quality control was an iterative process that commenced with the consolidation and elimination of duplicate records, followed by the geo-referencing of records when necessary, and their taxonomic and geographic validation using GIS tools and expert knowledge. We followed the geo-referencing protocol proposed by the Mexican National Commission for the Use and Conservation of Biodiversity. We could not estimate the geographic coordinates of 981 records due to inconsistencies or lack of sufficient information in the description of the locality. Given that current records for most of the taxa have some degree of distributional bias, with redundancies at different spatial scales, the CracidMex1 database has allowed us to detect areas where more sampling effort is required to have a better representation of the global spatial occurrence of these cracids. We also found that particular attention needs to be given to taxa identification in those areas where congeners or conspecifics co-occur in order to avoid taxonomic uncertainty. The construction of the CracidMex1 database represents the first comprehensive research effort to compile current, available global geographic records for a group of cracids. The database can now be improved by continuous revision and addition of new records. The CracidMex1 database will provide high quality input data that could be used to generate species distribution models, to assess temporal changes in species distributions, to identify priority areas for research and conservation, and in the definition of management strategies for this bird group. This compilation exercise could be replicated for other cracid groups or regions to attain a better knowledge of the global occurrences of the species in this vulnerable bird family. PMID:25061374

  3. A Late Miocene Accipitrid (Aves: Accipitriformes) from Nebraska and Its Implications for the Divergence of Old World Vultures

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zihui; Feduccia, Alan; James, Helen F.

    2012-01-01

    Background Old World vultures are likely polyphyletic, representing two subfamilies, the Aegypiinae and Gypaetinae, and some genera of the latter may be of independent origin. Evidence concerning the origin, as well as the timing of the divergence of each subfamily and even genera of the Gypaetinae has been elusive. Methodology/Principal Findings Compared with the Old World, the New World has an unexpectedly diverse and rich fossil component of Old World vultures. Here we describe a new accipitriform bird, Anchigyps voorhiesi gen. et sp. nov., from the Ash Hollow Formation (Upper Clarendonian, Late Miocene) of Nebraska. It represents a form close in morphology to the Old World vultures. Characteristics of its wing bones suggest it was less specialized for soaring than modern vultures. It was likely an opportunistic predator or scavenger having a grasping foot and a mandible morphologically similar to modern carrion-feeding birds. Conclusions/Significance The new fossil reported here is intermediate in morphology between the bulk of accipitrids and the Old World gypaetine vultures, representing a basal lineage of Accipitridae trending towards the vulturine habit, and of its Late Miocene age suggests the divergence of true gypaetine vultures, may have occurred during or slightly before the Miocene. PMID:23152811

  4. Speciation on Oceanic Islands: Rapid Adaptive Divergence vs. Cryptic Speciation in a Guadalupe Island Songbird (Aves: Junco)

    PubMed Central

    Aleixandre, Pau; Hernández Montoya, Julio; Milá, Borja

    2013-01-01

    The evolutionary divergence of island populations, and in particular the tempo and relative importance of neutral and selective factors, is of central interest to the study of speciation. The rate of phenotypic evolution upon island colonization can vary greatly among taxa, and cases of convergent evolution can further confound the inference of correct evolutionary histories. Given the potential lability of phenotypic characters, molecular dating of insular lineages analyzed in a phylogenetic framework provides a critical tool to test hypotheses of phenotypic divergence since colonization. The Guadalupe junco is the only insular form of the polymorphic dark-eyed junco (Junco hyemalis), and shares eye and plumage color with continental morphs, yet presents an enlarged bill and reduced body size. Here we use variation in mtDNA sequence, morphological traits and song variables to test whether the Guadalupe junco evolved rapidly following a recent colonization by a mainland form of the dark-eyed junco, or instead represents a well-differentiated “cryptic” lineage adapted to the insular environment through long-term isolation, with plumage coloration a result of evolutionary convergence. We found high mtDNA divergence of the island lineage with respect to both continental J. hyemalis and J. phaeonotus, representing a history of isolation of about 600,000 years. The island lineage was also significantly differentiated in morphological and male song variables. Moreover, and contrary to predictions regarding diversity loss on small oceanic islands, we document relatively high levels of both haplotypic and song-unit diversity on Guadalupe Island despite long-term isolation in a very small geographic area. In contrast to prevailing taxonomy, the Guadalupe junco is an old, well-differentiated evolutionary lineage, whose similarity to mainland juncos in plumage and eye color is due to evolutionary convergence. Our findings confirm the role of remote islands in driving divergence and speciation, but also their potential role as repositories of ancestral diversity. PMID:23675466

  5. Latitudinal gradients in abundance, and the causes of rarity in the tropics: a test using Australian honeyeaters (Aves: Meliphagidae).

    PubMed

    Symonds, Matthew R E; Christidis, Les; Johnson, Christopher N

    2006-09-01

    Several studies have uncovered interspecific latitudinal gradients in abundance (population density) such that tropical species tend to be, on average, less abundant than species at higher latitudes. The causes of this relationship remain poorly studied, in contrast to the relative wealth of literature examining the relationship to latitude of other variables such as range size and body mass. We used a cross-species phylogenetic comparative approach and a spatial approach to examine three potential determining factors (distribution, reproductive output and climate) that might explain why abundance correlates with latitude, using data from 54 species of honeyeaters (Meliphagidae) in woodland environments in eastern Australia. There is a strong positive correlation between mean abundance and latitude in these birds. Reproductive output (clutch size) was positively linked to both abundance and latitude, but partial correlation analysis revealed that clutch size is not related to abundance once the effects of latitude are removed. A subsequent multiple regression model that also considered range size, clutch size and body mass showed that latitude is the only strong predictor of abundance in honeyeaters. In the separate spatial analysis, the climatic variables that we considered (temperature, rainfall and seasonality) were all strongly linked to latitude, but none served as a better predictor of abundance than latitude per se, either individually or collectively. The most intriguing result of our analyses was that the cross-species latitudinal pattern in abundance was not evident within species. This suggests an intrinsic cause of the pattern of 'rarity in the tropics' in Australian honeyeaters. We suggest that evolutionary age may provide a key to understanding patterns of abundance in these birds. PMID:16736183

  6. The spatio-temporal colonization and diversification across the Indo-Pacific by a ‘great speciator’ (Aves, Erythropitta erythrogaster)

    PubMed Central

    Irestedt, Martin; Fabre, Pierre-Henri; Batalha-Filho, Henrique; Jønsson, Knud A.; Roselaar, Cees S.; Sangster, George; Ericson, Per G. P.

    2013-01-01

    The Indo-Pacific region has arguably been the most important area for the formulation of theories about biogeography and speciation, but modern studies of the tempo, mode and magnitude of diversification across this region are scarce. We study the biogeographic history and characterize levels of diversification in the wide-ranging passerine bird Erythropitta erythrogaster using molecular, phylogeographic and population genetics methods, as well as morphometric and plumage analyses. Our results suggest that E. erythrogaster colonized the Indo-Pacific during the Pleistocene in an eastward direction following a stepping stone pathway, and that sea-level fluctuations during the Pleistocene may have promoted gene flow only locally. A molecular species delimitation test suggests that several allopatric island populations of E. erythrogaster may be regarded as species. Most of these putative new species are further characterized by diagnostic differences in plumage. Our study reconfirms the E. erythrogaster complex as a ‘great speciator’: it represents a complex of up to 17 allopatrically distributed, reciprocally monophyletic and/or morphologically diagnosable species that originated during the Pleistocene. Our results support the view that observed latitudinal gradients of genetic divergence among avian sister species may have been affected by incomplete knowledge of taxonomic limits in tropical bird species. PMID:23554394

  7. MATTHEW T. MULLARKEY, PH.D. 4202 E Fowler Ave, CIS1040, Tampa, FL 33620-7800

    E-print Network

    Jank, Wolfgang

    embedded social networks: Inter- organizational social network information systems (IO SNIS), Proceedings) 813.974.6749 (Fax) mmullarkey@usf.edu EDUCATION Ph.D., Business Administration (Information Systems) 1993 Moore Business School, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC MS, Systems Management

  8. Higher-order phylogeny of modern birds (Theropoda, Aves: Neornithes) based on comparative anatomy. II. Analysis and discussion.

    PubMed

    Livezey, Bradley C; Zusi, Richard L

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, avian systematics has been characterized by a diminished reliance on morphological cladistics of modern taxa, intensive palaeornithogical research stimulated by new discoveries and an inundation by analyses based on DNA sequences. Unfortunately, in contrast to significant insights into basal origins, the broad picture of neornithine phylogeny remains largely unresolved. Morphological studies have emphasized characters of use in palaeontological contexts. Molecular studies, following disillusionment with the pioneering, but non-cladistic, work of Sibley and Ahlquist, have differed markedly from each other and from morphological works in both methods and findings. Consequently, at the turn of the millennium, points of robust agreement among schools concerning higher-order neornithine phylogeny have been limited to the two basalmost and several mid-level, primary groups. This paper describes a phylogenetic (cladistic) analysis of 150 taxa of Neornithes, including exemplars from all non-passeriform families, and subordinal representatives of Passeriformes. Thirty-five outgroup taxa encompassing Crocodylia, predominately theropod Dinosauria, and selected Mesozoic birds were used to root the trees. Based on study of specimens and the literature, 2954 morphological characters were defined; these characters have been described in a companion work, approximately one-third of which were multistate (i.e. comprised at least three states), and states within more than one-half of these multistate characters were ordered for analysis. Complete heuristic searches using 10 000 random-addition replicates recovered a total solution set of 97 well-resolved, most-parsimonious trees (MPTs). The set of MPTs was confirmed by an expanded heuristic search based on 10 000 random-addition replicates and a full ratchet-augmented exploration to ascertain global optima. A strict consensus tree of MPTs included only six trichotomies, i.e. nodes differing topologically among MPTs. Bootstrapping (based on 10 000 replicates) percentages and ratchet-minimized support (Bremer) indices indicated most nodes to be robust. Several fossil Neornithes (e.g. Dinornithiformes, Aepyornithiformes) were placed within the ingroup a posteriori either through unconstrained, heursitic searches based on the complete matrix augmented by these taxa separately or using backbone-constraints. Analysis confirmed the topology among outgroup Theropoda and achieved robust resolution at virtually all levels of the Neornithes. Findings included monophyly of the palaeognathous birds, comprising the sister taxa Tinamiformes and ratites, respectively, and the Anseriformes and Galliformes as monophyletic sister-groups, together forming the sister-group to other Neornithes exclusive of the Palaeognathae (Neoaves). Noteworthy inferences include: (i) the sister-group to remaining Neoaves comprises a diversity of marine and wading birds; (ii) Podicipedidae are the sister-group of Gaviidae, and not closely related to the Phoenicopteridae, as recently suggested; (iii) the traditional Pelecaniformes, including the shoebill (Balaeniceps rex) as sister-taxon to other members, are monophyletic; (iv) traditional Ciconiiformes are monophyletic; (v) Strigiformes and Falconiformes are sister-groups; (vi) Cathartidae is the sister-group of the remaining Falconiformes; (vii) Ralliformes (Rallidae and Heliornithidae) are the sister-group to the monophyletic Charadriiformes, with the traditionally composed Gruiformes and Turniciformes (Turnicidae and Mesitornithidae) sequentially paraphyletic to the entire foregoing clade; (viii) Opisthocomus hoazin is the sister-taxon to the Cuculiformes (including the Musophagidae); (ix) traditional Caprimulgiformes are monophyletic and the sister-group of the Apodiformes; (x) Trogoniformes are the sister-group of Coliiformes; (xi) Coraciiformes, Piciformes and Passeriformes are mutually monophyletic and closely related; and (xii) the Galbulae are retained within the Piciformes. Unresolved portions of the Neornithes (nodes having more than one most-parsi

  9. A taxonomic review of Aramides cajaneus (Aves, Gruiformes, Rallidae) with notes on morphological variation in other species of the genus

    PubMed Central

    Marcondes, Rafael Sobral; Silveira, Luís Fábio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The taxonomy of the polytypic and wide-ranging Gray-necked Wood-rail, Aramides cajaneus is reviewed, based on external morphology and voice. Throughout its distribution, there is extensive plumage variation, much of it taxonomically uninformative. However, through three informative plumage characters, as well as morphometric and vocal variation, three phylogenetic species were identified within what is today known as Aramides cajaneus, all of which already had available names: Aramides albiventris Lawrence, 1868, from southern Mexico to northeastern Costa Rica, Aramides cajaneus (Statius Müller, 1776) (sensu stricto), from southwestern Costa Rica to Argentina, and Aramides avicenniae Stotz, 1992, from a small section of the coast of southeastern Brazil. Aramides albiventris presents extensive plumage variation, but with no geographic structure. The song of Aramides cajaneus and Aramides avicenniae is strikingly and completely different from the song of Aramides albiventris. A previously unnoticed parapatric pattern of distribution of Aramides cajaneus and its congener Aramides saracura in southeastern Brazil is described, and we clarify that the name Aramides plumbeicollis, included in the synonymy of Aramides albiventris, was first made available in 1892, rather than in 1888 as is widely referred. In addition, plumage variation in Aramides ypecaha, Aramides wolfi, and Aramides mangle is discussed. PMID:25987874

  10. The type specimens, type localities and nomenclature of Sarcoramphus vultures (Aves: Cathartidae), with a note on their speciation.

    PubMed

    Mlíkovský, Ji?í

    2015-01-01

    A nomenclatural review of Sarcoramphus vultures resulted in the following: The genus Sarcoramphus was described by Duméril in 1805 rather than 1806. Vultur papa Linnaeus, 1758, is the type of Sarcoramphus by subsequent monotypy (Froriep in Duméril 1806), not by Vigors's (1825) designation. The type of the genus Gypagus Vieillot, 1816, is, by monotypy, Vultur gryphus Linnaeus, 1758, not Vultur papa Linnaeus, 1758. Due to this, Gypagus is a junior objective synonym of Vultur Linnaeus, 1758. Gyparchus was created by Gloger (1841) as a new genus for Vultur papa Linnaeus, 1758, not as an emendation of Gypagus Vieillot, 1816. Vultur papa Linnaeus, 1758 was found to be possibly based on syntypes from two different taxa and a lectotype is here designated. The author of Vultur sacer is Zimmermann (in Bartram 1793), not Cassin (1853). Possible speciation events in the genus Sarcoramphus are also discussed. PMID:25781112

  11. Polyphyly of the hawk genera Leucopternis and Buteogallus (Aves, Accipitridae): multiple habitat shifts during the Neotropical buteonine diversification

    PubMed Central

    do Amaral, Fabio S Raposo; Miller, Matthew J; Silveira, Luís Fábio; Bermingham, Eldredge; Wajntal, Anita

    2006-01-01

    Background The family Accipitridae (hawks, eagles and Old World vultures) represents a large radiation of predatory birds with an almost global distribution, although most species of this family occur in the Neotropics. Despite great morphological and ecological diversity, the evolutionary relationships in the family have been poorly explored at all taxonomic levels. Using sequences from four mitochondrial genes (12S, ATP8, ATP6, and ND6), we reconstructed the phylogeny of the Neotropical forest hawk genus Leucopternis and most of the allied genera of Neotropical buteonines. Our goals were to infer the evolutionary relationships among species of Leucopternis, estimate their relationships to other buteonine genera, evaluate the phylogenetic significance of the white and black plumage patterns common to most Leucopternis species, and assess general patterns of diversification of the group with respect to species' affiliations with Neotropical regions and habitats. Results Our molecular phylogeny for the genus Leucopternis and its allies disagrees sharply with traditional taxonomic arrangements for the group, and we present new hypotheses of relationships for a number of species. The mtDNA phylogenetic trees derived from analysis of the combined data posit a polyphyletic relationship among species of Leucopternis, Buteogallus and Buteo. Three highly supported clades containing Leucopternis species were recovered in our phylogenetic reconstructions. The first clade consisted of the sister pairs L. lacernulatus and Buteogallus meridionalis, and Buteogallus urubitinga and Harpyhaliaetus coronatus, in addition to L. schistaceus and L. plumbeus. The second clade included the sister pair Leucopternis albicollis and L. occidentalis as well as L. polionotus. The third lineage comprised the sister pair L. melanops and L. kuhli, in addition to L. semiplumbeus and Buteo buteo. According to our results, the white and black plumage patterns have evolved at least twice in the group. Furthermore, species found to the east and west of the Andes (cis-Andean and trans-Andean, respectively) are not reciprocally monophyletic, nor are forest and non-forest species. Conclusion The polyphyly of Leucopternis, Buteogallus and Buteo establishes a lack of concordance of current Accipitridae taxonomy with the mtDNA phylogeny for the group, and points to the need for further phylogenetic analysis at all taxonomic levels in the family as also suggested by other recent analyses. Habitat shifts, as well as cis- and trans-Andean disjunctions, took place more than once during buteonine diversification in the Neotropical region. Overemphasis of the black and white plumage patterns has led to questionable conclusions regarding the relationships of Leucopternis species, and suggests more generally that plumage characters should be used with considerable caution in the taxonomic evaluation of the Accipitridae. PMID:16464261

  12. A phylogenetic analysis of the Gruiformes (Aves) based on morphological characters, with an emphasis on the rails (Rallidae)

    PubMed Central

    C.Livezey, B.

    1998-01-01

    The order Gruiformes, for which even familial composition remains controversial, is perhaps the least well understood avian order from a phylogenetic perspective. The history of the systematics of the order is presented, and the ecological and biogeographic characteristics of its members are summarized. Using cladistic techniques, phylogenetic relationships among fossil and modern genera of the Gruiformes were estimated based on 381 primarily osteological characters; relationships among modern species of Grues (Psophiidae, Aramidae, Gruidae, Heliornithidae and Rallidae) were assessed based on these characters augmented by 189 characters of the definitive integument. A strict consensus tree for 20,000 shortest trees compiled for the matrix of gruiform genera (length = 967, CI = 0.517) revealed a number of nodes common to the solution set, many of which were robust to bootstrapping and had substantial support (Bremer) indices. Robust nodes included those supporting: a sister relationship between the Pedionomidae and Turnicidae; monophyly of the Gruiformes exclusive of the Pedionomidae and Turnicidae; a sister relationship between the Cariamidae and Phorusrhacoidea; a sister relationship between a clade comprising Eurypyga and Messelornis and one comprising Rhynochetos and Aptornis; monophyly of the Grues (Psophiidae, Aramidae, Gruidae, Heliornithidae and Rallidae); monophyly of a clade (Gruoidea) comprising (in order of increasingly close relationship) Psophia, Aramus, Balearica and other Gruidae, with monophyly of each member in this series confirmed; a sister relationship between the Heliornithidae and Rallidae; and monophyly of the Rallidae exclusive of Himantornis. Autapomorphic divergence was comparatively high for Pedionomus, Eurypyga, Psophia, Himantornis and Fulica; extreme autapomorphy, much of which is unique for the order, characterized the extinct, flightless Aptornis. In the species-level analysis of modern Grues, special efforts were made to limit the analytical impacts of homoplasy related to flightlessness in a number of rallid lineages. A strict consensus tree of 20,000 shortest trees compiled (length = 1232, CI = 0.463) confirmed the interfamilial relationships resolved in the ordinal analysis and established a number of other, variably supported groups within the Rallidae. Groupings within the Rallidae included: monophyly of Rallidae exclusive of Himantornis and a clade comprising Porphyrio (including Notornis) and Porphyrula; a poorly resolved, basal group of genera including Gymnocrex, Habroptila, Eulabeornis, Aramides, Canirallus and Mentocrex; an intermediate grade comprising Anurolimnas, Amaurolimnas, and Rougetius; monophyly of two major subdivisions of remaining rallids, one comprising Rallina (paraphyletic), Rallicula, and Sarothrura, and the other comprising the apparently paraphyletic 'long-billed' rails (e.g. Pardirallus, Cyanolimnas, Rallus, Gallirallus and Cabalus and a variably resolved clade comprising 'crakes' (e.g. Atlantisia, Laterallus and Porzana, waterhens (Amaurornis), moorhens (Gallinula and allied genera) and coots (Fulica). Relationships among 'crakes' remain poorly resolved; Laterallus may be paraphyletic, and Porzana is evidently polyphyletic and poses substantial challenges for reconciliation with current taxonomy. Relationships among the species of waterhens, moorhens and coots, however, were comparatively well resolved, and exhaustive, fine-scale analyses of several genera (Grus, Porphyrio, Aramides, Rallus, Laterallus and Fulica) and species complexes (Porphyrio porphyrio -group,Gallirallus philippensis -group and Fulica americana -group) revealed additional topological likelihoods. Many nodes shared by a majority of the shortest trees under equal weighting were common to all shortest trees found following one or two iterations of successive weighting of characters. Provisional placements of selected subfossil rallids (e.g. Diaphorapteryx, Aphanapteryx and Capellirallus ) were based on separate heuristic searches using the strict consensus tree for modern rallids as a backb

  13. Hagit P. Affek Yale University, Dept. of Geology & Geophysics, 210 Whitney Ave. New Haven, CT 06520-8109

    E-print Network

    in urban air, car exhaust and human breath. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 70, 1-12. · Ghosh P., Adkins J in urban air in the Los Angeles basin, California, between 1972 and 2003. Journal of Geophysical research and Planetary Sciences. Host: John Eiler Research interests Isotope geochemistry in studying global climate

  14. The feather mites of nightjars (Aves: Caprimulgidae), with descriptions of two new species from Brazil (Acari: Xolalgidae, Gabuciniidae).

    PubMed

    Hernandes, Fabio Akashi

    2014-04-01

    Two new species of feather mites are described from nightjars (Caprimulgiformes: Caprimulgidae) of Brazil: Hartingiella neotropica sp. n. (Xolalgidae) described from Hydropsalis parvula (Gould) and Paragabucinia brasiliensis sp. n. (Gabuciniidae) from H. albicollis (Gmelin). The former differs from the type species by having, in males, the anterior projections on epimerites III towards setae 3b and the adanal shield bearing setae ps3 present; in both sexes, a pair of small sclerites situated posterior to setae se have flat suprategumental processes. Paragabucinia brasiliensis sp. n. differs from P. petitoti (Gaud et Mouchet, 1959) by the smaller size of the incisions in the internal margins of opisthosomal lobes of males. These mites are the first representatives of corresponding genera described from the Neotropical region. The genus Hartingiella Gaud, 1980 was previously known solely from its type species. Keys to males and females of the genus Paragabucinia Gaud et Atyeo, 1975 are presented. In addition, all previous records of feather mites associated with birds of the order Caprimulgiformes of the world are summarised. PMID:24822323

  15. A distinctive new subspecies of Scytalopusgriseicollis (Aves, Passeriformes, Rhinocryptidae) from the northern Eastern Cordillera of Colombia and Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Avendaño, Jorge Enrique; Donegan, Thomas M

    2015-01-01

    We describe a new subspecies of Pale-bellied Tapaculo Scytalopusgriseicollis from the northern Eastern Cordillera of Colombia and Venezuela. This form differs diagnosably in plumage from described subspecies Scytalopusgriseicollisgriseicollis and Scytalopusgriseicollisgilesi and from the latter in tail length. It is also differentiated non-diagnosably in voice from both these populations. Ecological niche modelling analysis suggests that the new subspecies is restricted to the Andean montane forest and páramo north of both the arid Chicamocha valley and the Sierra Nevada del Cocuy. PMID:26085800

  16. The Staurotypus Turtles and Aves Share the Same Origin of Sex Chromosomes but Evolved Different Types of Heterogametic Sex Determination

    PubMed Central

    Kawagoshi, Taiki; Uno, Yoshinobu; Nishida, Chizuko; Matsuda, Yoichi

    2014-01-01

    Reptiles have a wide diversity of sex-determining mechanisms and types of sex chromosomes. Turtles exhibit temperature-dependent sex determination and genotypic sex determination, with male heterogametic (XX/XY) and female heterogametic (ZZ/ZW) sex chromosomes. Identification of sex chromosomes in many turtle species and their comparative genomic analysis are of great significance to understand the evolutionary processes of sex determination and sex chromosome differentiation in Testudines. The Mexican giant musk turtle (Staurotypus triporcatus, Kinosternidae, Testudines) and the giant musk turtle (Staurotypus salvinii) have heteromorphic XY sex chromosomes with a low degree of morphological differentiation; however, their origin and linkage group are still unknown. Cross-species chromosome painting with chromosome-specific DNA from Chinese soft-shelled turtle (Pelodiscus sinensis) revealed that the X and Y chromosomes of S. triporcatus have homology with P. sinensis chromosome 6, which corresponds to the chicken Z chromosome. We cloned cDNA fragments of S. triporcatus homologs of 16 chicken Z-linked genes and mapped them to S. triporcatus and S. salvinii chromosomes using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Sixteen genes were localized to the X and Y long arms in the same order in both species. The orders were also almost the same as those of the ostrich (Struthio camelus) Z chromosome, which retains the primitive state of the avian ancestral Z chromosome. These results strongly suggest that the X and Y chromosomes of Staurotypus turtles are at a very early stage of sex chromosome differentiation, and that these chromosomes and the avian ZW chromosomes share the same origin. Nonetheless, the turtles and birds acquired different systems of heterogametic sex determination during their evolution. PMID:25121779

  17. Reconstruction and in vivo analysis of the extinct tbx5 gene from ancient wingless moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The forelimb-specific gene tbx5 is highly conserved and essential for the development of forelimbs in zebrafish, mice, and humans. Amongst birds, a single order, Dinornithiformes, comprising the extinct wingless moa of New Zealand, are unique in having no skeletal evidence of forelimb-like structures. Results To determine the sequence of tbx5 in moa, we used a range of PCR-based techniques on ancient DNA to retrieve all nine tbx5 exons and splice sites from the giant moa, Dinornis. Moa Tbx5 is identical to chicken Tbx5 in being able to activate the downstream promotors of fgf10 and ANF. In addition we show that missexpression of moa tbx5 in the hindlimb of chicken embryos results in the formation of forelimb features, suggesting that Tbx5 was fully functional in wingless moa. An alternatively spliced exon 1 for tbx5 that is expressed specifically in the forelimb region was shown to be almost identical between moa and ostrich, suggesting that, as well as being fully functional, tbx5 is likely to have been expressed normally in moa since divergence from their flighted ancestors, approximately 60 mya. Conclusions The results suggests that, as in mice, moa tbx5 is necessary for the induction of forelimbs, but is not sufficient for their outgrowth. Moa Tbx5 may have played an important role in the development of moa’s remnant forelimb girdle, and may be required for the formation of this structure. Our results further show that genetic changes affecting genes other than tbx5 must be responsible for the complete loss of forelimbs in moa. PMID:24885927

  18. Pelvic limb musculature in the emu Dromaius novaehollandiae (Aves: Struthioniformes: Dromaiidae): adaptations to high-speed running.

    PubMed

    Patak, A E; Baldwin, J

    1998-10-01

    Emus provide an excellent opportunity for studying sustained high-speed running by a bird. Their pelvic limb musculature is described in detail and morphological features characteristic of a cursorial lifestyle are identified. Several anatomical features of the pelvic limb reflect the emus' ability for sustained running at high speeds: (1) emus have a reduced number of toes and associated muscles, (2) emus are unique among birds in having a M. gastrocnemius, the most powerful muscle in the shank, that has four muscle bellies, not the usual three, and (3) contribution to total body mass of the pelvic limb muscles of emus is similar to that of the flight muscles of flying birds, whereas the pelvic limb muscles of flying birds constitute a much smaller proportion of total body mass. Generally, the pelvic limb musculature of emus resembles that of other ratites with the notable exception of M. gastrocnemius. The presence and arrangement of four muscle bellies may increase the effectiveness of M. gastrocnemius and other muscles during cursorial locomotion by moving the limb in a cranio-caudal rather than a latero-medial plane. PMID:9768501

  19. Križi in težave rojenih govorcev slovenš?ine s kolokacijami v angleš?ini

    E-print Network

    Vrbinc, Marjeta

    2005-01-01

    podro?ju kolokacij, kadar rojeni govorci slovenš?ine prevajajo iz slovenš?ine v angleš?ino. Študija je bila izvedena med študenti angleš?ine, ki so bili pred prevajanjem seznanjeni s kolokacijskimi omejitvami. Predstavljena je analiza napak skupaj...

  20. Richard J. Wurtman, MD Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, 77Mass Ave.,

    E-print Network

    Wurtman, Richard

    on brain levels of three key nutrients - uridine., the omega-3 fatty acid DHA, and choline. Given together.g., uridine in the UMP of mothers' milk and infant formulas). However in adults the uridine in foods, mostly present at RNA, is not bioavailable, and no food has ever been shown to elevate plasma uridine levels

  1. Comparative chromosome painting between chicken and spectacled owl (Pulsatrix perspicillata): implications for chromosomal evolution in the Strigidae (Aves, Strigiformes).

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, E H C; de Moura, S P; dos Anjos, L J S; Nagamachi, C Y; Pieczarka, J C; O'Brien, P C M; Ferguson-Smith, M A

    2008-01-01

    The spectacled owl (Pulsatrix perspicillata), a species found in the Neotropical region, has 76 chromosomes, with a high number of biarmed chromosomes. In order to define homologies between Gallus gallus and Pulsatrixperspicillata (Strigiformes, Strigidae), we used chromosome painting with chicken DNA probes of chromosomes 1-10 and Z and telomeric sequences. This approach allowed a comparison between Pulsatrixperspicillata and other species of Strigidae already analyzed by chromosome painting (Strix nebulosa and Bubo bubo, both with 2n = 80). The results show that centric fusions and fissions have occurred in different chromosomal pairs and are responsible for the karyotypic variation observed in this group. No interstitial telomeric sequences were found. Although the largest pair of chromosomes in P. perspicillata and Bubo bubo are submetacentric, they are homologous to different chicken chromosomes: GGA1/GGA2 in P. perspicillata and GGA2/GGA4 in B. bubo. PMID:19096211

  2. Genetic evaluation of the mating system in the blue-and-yellow macaw (Ara ararauna, Aves, Psittacidae) by DNA fingerprinting

    PubMed Central

    Caparroz, Renato; Miyaki, Cristina Y.; Baker, Allan J.

    2011-01-01

    More than 90% of birds are socially monogamous, although genetic studies indicate that many are often not sexually monogamous. In the present study, DNA fingerprinting was used to estimate the genetic relationships between nestlings belonging to the same broods to evaluate the mating system in the socially monogamous macaw, Ara ararauna. We found that in 10 of 11 broods investigated, the nestlings showed genetic similarity levels congruent with values expected among full-sibs, suggesting that they shared the same parents. However, in one brood, the low genetic similarity observed between nestlings could be a result of intraspecific brood parasitism, intraspecific nest competition or extra-pair paternity. These results, along with available behavioral and life-history data, imply that the blue-and-yellow macaw is not only socially, but also genetically monogamous. However, the occurrence of eventual cases of extra-pair paternity cannot be excluded. PMID:21637560

  3. Higher-order phylogeny of modern birds (Theropoda, Aves: Neornithes) based on comparative anatomy. II. Analysis and discussion

    PubMed Central

    LIVEZEY, BRADLEY C; ZUSI, RICHARD L

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, avian systematics has been characterized by a diminished reliance on morphological cladistics of modern taxa, intensive palaeornithogical research stimulated by new discoveries and an inundation by analyses based on DNA sequences. Unfortunately, in contrast to significant insights into basal origins, the broad picture of neornithine phylogeny remains largely unresolved. Morphological studies have emphasized characters of use in palaeontological contexts. Molecular studies, following disillusionment with the pioneering, but non-cladistic, work of Sibley and Ahlquist, have differed markedly from each other and from morphological works in both methods and findings. Consequently, at the turn of the millennium, points of robust agreement among schools concerning higher-order neornithine phylogeny have been limited to the two basalmost and several mid-level, primary groups. This paper describes a phylogenetic (cladistic) analysis of 150 taxa of Neornithes, including exemplars from all non-passeriform families, and subordinal representatives of Passeriformes. Thirty-five outgroup taxa encompassing Crocodylia, predominately theropod Dinosauria, and selected Mesozoic birds were used to root the trees. Based on study of specimens and the literature, 2954 morphological characters were defined; these characters have been described in a companion work, approximately one-third of which were multistate (i.e. comprised at least three states), and states within more than one-half of these multistate characters were ordered for analysis. Complete heuristic searches using 10 000 random-addition replicates recovered a total solution set of 97 well-resolved, most-parsimonious trees (MPTs). The set of MPTs was confirmed by an expanded heuristic search based on 10 000 random-addition replicates and a full ratchet-augmented exploration to ascertain global optima. A strict consensus tree of MPTs included only six trichotomies, i.e. nodes differing topologically among MPTs. Bootstrapping (based on 10 000 replicates) percentages and ratchet-minimized support (Bremer) indices indicated most nodes to be robust. Several fossil Neornithes (e.g. Dinornithiformes, Aepyornithiformes) were placed within the ingroup a posteriori either through unconstrained, heursitic searches based on the complete matrix augmented by these taxa separately or using backbone-constraints. Analysis confirmed the topology among outgroup Theropoda and achieved robust resolution at virtually all levels of the Neornithes. Findings included monophyly of the palaeognathous birds, comprising the sister taxa Tinamiformes and ratites, respectively, and the Anseriformes and Galliformes as monophyletic sister-groups, together forming the sister-group to other Neornithes exclusive of the Palaeognathae (Neoaves). Noteworthy inferences include: (i) the sister-group to remaining Neoaves comprises a diversity of marine and wading birds; (ii) Podicipedidae are the sister-group of Gaviidae, and not closely related to the Phoenicopteridae, as recently suggested; (iii) the traditional Pelecaniformes, including the shoebill (Balaeniceps rex) as sister-taxon to other members, are monophyletic; (iv) traditional Ciconiiformes are monophyletic; (v) Strigiformes and Falconiformes are sister-groups; (vi) Cathartidae is the sister-group of the remaining Falconiformes; (vii) Ralliformes (Rallidae and Heliornithidae) are the sister-group to the monophyletic Charadriiformes, with the traditionally composed Gruiformes and Turniciformes (Turnicidae and Mesitornithidae) sequentially paraphyletic to the entire foregoing clade; (viii) Opisthocomus hoazin is the sister-taxon to the Cuculiformes (including the Musophagidae); (ix) traditional Caprimulgiformes are monophyletic and the sister-group of the Apodiformes; (x) Trogoniformes are the sister-group of Coliiformes; (xi) Coraciiformes, Piciformes and Passeriformes are mutually monophyletic and closely related; and (xii) the Galbulae are retained within the Piciformes. Unresolved portions of the Neornithes (nodes having more than one most-parsi

  4. Humberto Jaramillo 9 Hillhouse Ave, Mason Lab 306 humberto.jaramillo@yale.edu New Haven, CT 06520

    E-print Network

    Elimelech, Menachem

    Research Interests Desalination and water purification, forward and reverse osmosis, thin-film composite for forward osmosis." University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL Advisor: Timothy J. Strathmann

  5. Fossil evidence of wing shape in a stem relative of swifts and hummingbirds (Aves, Pan-Apodiformes)

    PubMed Central

    Ksepka, Daniel T.; Clarke, Julia A.; Nesbitt, Sterling J.; Kulp, Felicia B.; Grande, Lance

    2013-01-01

    A feathered specimen of a new species of Eocypselus from the Early Eocene Green River Formation of Wyoming provides insight into the wing morphology and ecology in an early part of the lineage leading to extant swifts and hummingbirds. Combined phylogenetic analysis of morphological and molecular data supports placement of Eocypselus outside the crown radiation of Apodiformes. The new specimen is the first described fossil of Pan-Apodiformes from the pre-Pleistocene of North America and the only reported stem taxon with informative feather preservation. Wing morphology of Eocypselus rowei sp. nov. is intermediate between the short wings of hummingbirds and the hyper-elongated wings of extant swifts, and shows neither modifications for the continuous gliding used by swifts nor modifications for the hovering flight style used by hummingbirds. Elongate hindlimb elements, particularly the pedal phalanges, also support stronger perching capabilities than are present in Apodiformes. The new species is the smallest bird yet described from the Green River Formation, and supports the hypothesis that a decrease in body size preceded flight specializations in Pan-Apodiformes. The specimen also provides the first instance of melanosome morphology preserved in association with skeletal remains from the Green River Formation. PMID:23760643

  6. FIRST RECORD OF ALCATAENIA LARINA LARINA (CESTODA: DILEPIDIDAE) IN ATLANTIC PUFFINS (AVES, ALCIDAE, FRATERCULA ARCTICA) FROM NEWFOUNDLAND, CANADA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The tapeworm Alcataenia larina (Cestoda: Cyclophyllidea: Dilepididae) is a parasite of gulls (Laridae) with a Holarctic distribution. Two subspecies A. l. pacifica and A. l. larina are recognized, with the former occurring in the North Pacific basin and the latter in the North Atlantic. Alcids serve...

  7. A comprehensive multilocus phylogeny for the wood-warblers and a revised classification of the Parulidae (Aves)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovette, I.J.; Perez-Eman, J. L.; Sullivan, J.P.; Banks, R.C.; Fiorentino, I.; Cordoba-Cordoba, S.; Echeverry-Galvis, M.; Barker, F.K.; Burns, K.J.; Klicka, J.; Lanyon, S.M.; Bermingham, E.

    2010-01-01

    The birds in the family Parulidae-commonly termed the New World warblers or wood-warblers-are a classic model radiation for studies of ecological and behavioral differentiation. Although the monophyly of a 'core' wood-warbler clade is well established, no phylogenetic hypothesis for this group has included a full sampling of wood-warbler species diversity. We used parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian methods to reconstruct relationships among all genera and nearly all wood-warbler species, based on a matrix of mitochondrial DNA (5840 nucleotides) and nuclear DNA (6 loci, 4602 nucleotides) characters. The resulting phylogenetic hypotheses provide a highly congruent picture of wood-warbler relationships, and indicate that the traditional generic classification of these birds recognizes many non-monophyletic groups. We recommend a revised taxonomy in which each of 14 genera (Seiurus, Helmitheros, Mniotilta, Limnothlypis, Protonotaria, Parkesia, Vermivora, Oreothlypis, Geothlypis, Setophaga, Myioborus, Cardellina, Basileuterus, Myiothlypis) corresponds to a well-supported clade; these nomenclatural changes also involve subsuming a number of well-known, traditional wood-warbler genera (Catharopeza, Dendroica, Ergaticus, Euthlypis, Leucopeza, Oporornis, Parula, Phaeothlypis, Wilsonia). We provide a summary phylogenetic hypothesis that will be broadly applicable to investigations of the historical biogeography, processes of diversification, and evolution of trait variation in this well studied avian group. ?? 2010 Elsevier Inc.

  8. ELIZABETH A. OPPE 1511 UNIVERSITY AVE. MORGANTOWN, WV 26505 elizabethoppe@yahoo.com 304.266.5730

    E-print Network

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Emphasizing the Community's Perspective ­ Reporting the Results". New York City, NY (2002) "Strategies for Addressing Student Resistance to Intercultural Communication: A Roundtable Discussion". New York City, NY Communication Classroom". New York City, NY (2002) "Service Learning: Discovering Effective Communication

  9. A subsynoptic-scale kinetic energy study of the Red River Valley tornado outbreak (AVE-SESAME 1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedlovec, G. J.; Fuelberg, H. E.

    1981-01-01

    The subsynoptis-scale kinetic energy balance during the Red River Valley tornado outbreak is presented in order to diagnose storm environment interactions. Area-time averaged energetics indicate that horizontal flux convergence provides the major energy source to the region, while cross contour flow provides the greatest sink. Maximum energy variability is found in the upper levels in association with jet stream activity. Area averaged energetics at individual observation times show that the energy balance near times of maximum storm activity differs considerably from that of the remaining periods. The local kinetic energy balance over Oklahoma during the formation of a limited jet streak receives special attention. Cross contour production of energy is the dominant local source for jet development. Intense convection producing the Red River Valley tornadoes may have contributed to this local development by modifying the surrounding environment.

  10. Anna G. Stefanopoulou Mechanical Engineering Dept, University of Michigan, 1231 Beal Ave, Ann Arbor MI 48109-2121

    E-print Network

    Stefanopoulou, Anna

    Science, University of Michigan, 1994. M.S. Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering, University of Michigan, 1992 Diploma Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering, National Technical University of Athens

  11. CracidMex1: a comprehensive database of global occurrences of cracids (Aves, Galliformes) with distribution in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Pinilla-Buitrago, Gonzalo; Martínez-Morales, Miguel Angel; González-García, Fernando; Enríquez, Paula L; Rangel-Salazar, José Luis; Romero, Carlos Alberto Guichard; Navarro-Sigüenza, Adolfo G; Monterrubio-Rico, Tiberio César; Escalona-Segura, Griselda

    2014-01-01

    Cracids are among the most vulnerable groups of Neotropical birds. Almost half of the species of this family are included in a conservation risk category. Twelve taxa occur in Mexico, six of which are considered at risk at national level and two are globally endangered. Therefore, it is imperative that high quality, comprehensive, and high-resolution spatial data on the occurrence of these taxa are made available as a valuable tool in the process of defining appropriate management strategies for conservation at a local and global level. We constructed the CracidMex1 database by collating global records of all cracid taxa that occur in Mexico from available electronic databases, museum specimens, publications, "grey literature", and unpublished records. We generated a database with 23,896 clean, validated, and standardized geographic records. Database quality control was an iterative process that commenced with the consolidation and elimination of duplicate records, followed by the geo-referencing of records when necessary, and their taxonomic and geographic validation using GIS tools and expert knowledge. We followed the geo-referencing protocol proposed by the Mexican National Commission for the Use and Conservation of Biodiversity. We could not estimate the geographic coordinates of 981 records due to inconsistencies or lack of sufficient information in the description of the locality. Given that current records for most of the taxa have some degree of distributional bias, with redundancies at different spatial scales, the CracidMex1 database has allowed us to detect areas where more sampling effort is required to have a better representation of the global spatial occurrence of these cracids. We also found that particular attention needs to be given to taxa identification in those areas where congeners or conspecifics co-occur in order to avoid taxonomic uncertainty. The construction of the CracidMex1 database represents the first comprehensive research effort to compile current, available global geographic records for a group of cracids. The database can now be improved by continuous revision and addition of new records. The CracidMex1 database will provide high quality input data that could be used to generate species distribution models, to assess temporal changes in species distributions, to identify priority areas for research and conservation, and in the definition of management strategies for this bird group. This compilation exercise could be replicated for other cracid groups or regions to attain a better knowledge of the global occurrences of the species in this vulnerable bird family. PMID:25061374

  12. Two new quill mite species of the family Syringophilidae (Acari: Prostigmata) parasitising the house sparrow Passer domesticus (L.) (Aves: Passeriformes).

    PubMed

    Skoracki, Maciej; Sikora, Bozena

    2014-01-01

    Two new quill mite species of the family Syringophilidae, Picobia passeri sp. nov. and Krantziaulonastus dubinini sp. nov., are described from quills of the body feathers of the house sparrow Passer domesticus (L.) (Passeriformes: Passeridae) from the European part of Russia. PMID:24870896

  13. ORIENTAO PARA COLETA, PREPARO E TRANSPORTE DE TECIDOS DE AVES PARA COLEES (utilizao potencial em sistemtica molecular)

    E-print Network

    Eizirik, Eduardo

    , slbonatto@pucrs.br, Coordenador] Centro de Biologia Genômica e Molecular e Laboratório de Ornitologia MCT da pesquisas em colaboração com o Dr. Sandro L. Bonatto no Centro de Biologia Genômica e Molecular da PUCRS em sistemática molecular) (versão 0.9) Helena Mata helenamata@pucrs.br [Dr. Sandro L. Bonatto

  14. A multi-locus phylogeny suggests an ancient hybridization event between Campephilus and melanerpine woodpeckers (Aves: Picidae).

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Jérôme; Pons, Jean-Marc; Liu, Liang; Ericson, Per G P; Couloux, Arnaud; Pasquet, Eric

    2013-06-01

    The ever increasing number of analysed loci in phylogenetics has not only allowed resolution of some parts of the Tree of Life but has also highlighted parts of the tree where incongruent signals among loci were detected. Previous molecular studies suggested conflicting relationships for the New World genus Campephilus, being either associated to the Megapicini or Dendropocini. Yet, the limited number of analysed loci and the use of the concatenation approach to reconstruct the phylogeny prevented the disentanglement of lineage sorting and introgression as causal explanation of this topological conflict. We sequenced four mitochondrial, nine autosomal and three Z-linked loci and used a method that incorporates population level processes into the phylogenetic framework to understand which process (lineage sorting of genetic polymorphism or hybridization/introgression) best explains this conflict. Our analyses revealed that the autosomal FGB intron-7 and to a lesser extent the Z-linked loci have a different phylogenetic history from the mitochondrial loci and some other nuclear loci we analysed. We suggest that this conflicting pattern is the result of introgression consecutive to a hybridization event at the time when members of the Campephilus and melanerpine (Melanerpes and Sphyrapicus) lineages colonized the New World. The case of Campephilus highlights that the mitochondrial genome does not always carry the 'wrong' phylogenetic signal after a past hybridization event. Indeed, we here emphasise that the signature of such event can also be detected in the nuclear genome. With the ongoing increase in the number of loci analysed in phylogenetic studies, it is very likely that further cases will be discovered. Our current results indicate that (1) the genus Campephilus is related to the Asian genera Blythipicus, Chrysocolaptes and Reinwardtipicus, in accordance with morphological data and (2) that the nuclear genome of Campephilus is likely the mixture of two unrelated lineages. Yet, further work with a denser sampling of loci is necessary to evaluate the extant of the Sphyrapicus/Melanerpes lineage nuclear genome that introgressed into the Campephilus genome. PMID:23485917

  15. A multi-locus phylogeny suggests an ancient hybridization event between Campephilus and melanerpine woodpeckers (Aves: Picidae)

    E-print Network

    , Arnaud Couloux g , Eric Pasquet a,b a UMR7205 «Origine, Structure et Evolution de la Biodiversité», Département Systématique et Evolution, Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle, 55 Rue Buffon, 75005 Paris that the mitochondrial genome does not always carry the `wrong' phylogenetic signal after a past hybridization event

  16. Polyphyly of Hylophilus and a new genus for the Tawny-crowned Greenlet
    (Aves: Passeriformes: Vireonidae).

    PubMed

    Slager, David L; Klicka, John

    2014-01-01

    Once a catch-all taxon for various small, greenish passerines (Sclater 1881), today the genus Hylophilus Temminck contains 15 species of Neotropical greenlets in the avian family Vireonidae (Clements et al. 2013). Although Hylophilus species do share some common anatomical proportions and plumage features (Baird 1866; Ridgway 1904), some striking and concordant differences in habitat, voice, and iris color led Ridgely and Tudor (1989) to posit that the genus might contain sufficient diversity to warrant splitting into multiple genera. PMID:25543778

  17. A taxonomic review of Aramidescajaneus (Aves, Gruiformes, Rallidae) with notes on morphological variation in other species of the genus.

    PubMed

    Marcondes, Rafael Sobral; Silveira, Luís Fábio

    2015-01-01

    The taxonomy of the polytypic and wide-ranging Gray-necked Wood-rail, Aramidescajaneus is reviewed, based on external morphology and voice. Throughout its distribution, there is extensive plumage variation, much of it taxonomically uninformative. However, through three informative plumage characters, as well as morphometric and vocal variation, three phylogenetic species were identified within what is today known as Aramidescajaneus, all of which already had available names: Aramidesalbiventris Lawrence, 1868, from southern Mexico to northeastern Costa Rica, Aramidescajaneus (Statius Müller, 1776) (sensu stricto), from southwestern Costa Rica to Argentina, and Aramidesavicenniae Stotz, 1992, from a small section of the coast of southeastern Brazil. Aramidesalbiventris presents extensive plumage variation, but with no geographic structure. The song of Aramidescajaneus and Aramidesavicenniae is strikingly and completely different from the song of Aramidesalbiventris. A previously unnoticed parapatric pattern of distribution of Aramidescajaneus and its congener Aramidessaracura in southeastern Brazil is described, and we clarify that the name Aramidesplumbeicollis, included in the synonymy of Aramidesalbiventris, was first made available in 1892, rather than in 1888 as is widely referred. In addition, plumage variation in Aramidesypecaha, Aramideswolfi, and Aramidesmangle is discussed. PMID:25987874

  18. Janice Nadler Northwestern University School of Law 357 E. Chicago Ave., Chicago, IL 60611 (312) 503-3228

    E-print Network

    Amaral, Luis A.N.

    .) THE CONSTITUTION AND THE FUTURE OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE IN AMERICA, Cambridge Univ. Press (2013) Blaming as a Social), in PUBLIC OPINION AND CONSTITUTIONAL CONTROVERSY, N. Persily, J. Citrin & P. Egan (eds.), pp. 287, 83 TEXAS LAW REVIEW 1399-1441 (2005). Testing the Focal Po

  19. Ossification sequence of the common tern (Sterna hirundo) and its implications for the interrelationships of the Lari (Aves, Charadriiformes).

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Erin E; Harrison, Luke B

    2008-09-01

    The hypotheses of relationships within Lari (gulls) are highly unstable, and depend on whether morphological or molecular data are examined. Developmental sequence data are thought to contain phylogenetic information, but have never been applied to the problem of avian systematics. In this article, we describe the ossification sequence of the Common Tern (Sterna hirundo), and compare the pattern observed to published descriptions of other Charadriiformes, specifically the Great Skua (Stercorariidae) and various species of gulls (Laridae). We use changes in ossification sequence to elucidate the relationship between these three taxa, using both qualitative and systematic approaches. The first analysis of the ossification sequence data does not support a close relationship between Stercorariidae and Laridae, as has been proposed in some morphological analyses; however it was unable to differentiate between a Laridae-Sternidae sister-group relationship or a Sternidae-Stercorariidae sister-group relationship. The second analysis was unable to differentiate between any topology, including a polytomy, for these taxa. These results highlight the potential for use of ossification sequence data in an evolutionary context but caution that analyses are highly dependent on sequence resolution and the taxonomic level of the data set. PMID:18570230

  20. A molecular genetic time scale demonstrates Cretaceous origins and multiple diversification rate shifts within the order Galliformes (Aves).

    PubMed

    Stein, R Will; Brown, Joseph W; Mooers, Arne Ø

    2015-11-01

    The phylogeny of Galliformes (landfowl) has been studied extensively; however, the associated chronologies have been criticized recently due to misplaced or misidentified fossil calibrations. As a consequence, it is unclear whether any crown-group lineages arose in the Cretaceous and survived the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg; 65.5Ma) mass extinction. Using Bayesian phylogenetic inference on an alignment spanning 14,539bp of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequence data, four fossil calibrations, and a combination of uncorrelated lognormally distributed relaxed-clock and strict-clock models, we inferred a time-calibrated molecular phylogeny for 225 of the 291 extant Galliform taxa. These analyses suggest that crown Galliformes diversified in the Cretaceous and that three-stem lineages survived the K-Pg mass extinction. Ideally, characterizing the tempo and mode of diversification involves a taxonomically complete phylogenetic hypothesis. We used simple constraint structures to incorporate 66 data-deficient taxa and inferred the first taxon-complete phylogenetic hypothesis for the Galliformes. Diversification analyses conducted on 10,000 timetrees sampled from the posterior distribution of candidate trees show that the evolutionary history of the Galliformes is best explained by a rate-shift model including 1-3 clade-specific increases in diversification rate. We further show that the tempo and mode of diversification in the Galliformes conforms to a three-pulse model, with three-stem lineages arising in the Cretaceous and inter and intrafamilial diversification occurring after the K-Pg mass extinction, in the Paleocene-Eocene (65.5-33.9Ma) or in association with the Eocene-Oligocene transition (33.9Ma). PMID:26140861

  1. Lineage diversification and morphological evolution in a large-scale continental radiation: The neotropical ovenbirds and woodcreepers (Aves: Furnariidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Derryberry, Elizabeth P.; Claramunt, Santiago; Derryberry, Graham; Chesser, R. Terry; Cracraft, Joel; Aleixo, Alexandre; Pérez-Emán, Jorge; Remsen, J.V., Jr.; Brumfield, Robb T.

    2011-01-01

    Patterns of diversification in species-rich clades provide insight into the processes that generate biological diversity. We tested different models of lineage and phenotypic diversification in an exceptional continental radiation, the ovenbird family Furnariidae, using the most complete species-level phylogenetic hypothesis produced to date for a major avian clade (97% of 293 species). We found that the Furnariidae exhibit nearly constant rates of lineage accumulation but show evidence of constrained morphological evolution. This pattern of sustained high rates of speciation despite limitations on phenotypic evolution contrasts with the results of most previous studies of evolutionary radiations, which have found a pattern of decelerating diversity-dependent lineage accumulation coupled with decelerating or constrained phenotypic evolution. Our results suggest that lineage accumulation in tropical continental radiations may not be as limited by ecological opportunities as in temperate or island radiations. More studies examining patterns of both lineage and phenotypic diversification are needed to understand the often complex tempo and mode of evolutionary radiations on continents.

  2. Lineage diversification and morphological evolution in a large-scale continental radiation: The neotropical ovenbirds and woodcreepers (aves: furnariidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Derryberry, E.P.; Claramunt, S.; Derryberry, G.; Chesser, R.T.; Cracraft, J.; Aleixo, A.; Perez-Eman, J.; Remsen, J.V.; Brumfield, R.T.

    2011-01-01

    Patterns of diversification in species-rich clades provide insight into the processes that generate biological diversity. We tested different models of lineage and phenotypic diversification in an exceptional continental radiation, the ovenbird family Furnariidae, using the most complete species-level phylogenetic hypothesis produced to date for a major avian clade (97% of 293 species). We found that the Furnariidae exhibit nearly constant rates of lineage accumulation but show evidence of constrained morphological evolution. This pattern of sustained high rates of speciation despite limitations on phenotypic evolution contrasts with the results of most previous studies of evolutionary radiations, which have found a pattern of decelerating diversity-dependent lineage accumulation coupled with decelerating or constrained phenotypic evolution. Our results suggest that lineage accumulation in tropical continental radiations may not be as limited by ecological opportunities as in temperate or island radiations. More studies examining patterns of both lineage and phenotypic diversification are needed to understand the often complex tempo and mode of evolutionary radiations on continents. ?? 2011 The Author(s). Evolution ?? 2011 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  3. 740 MIX AVE. #204; HAMDEN, CT 06514; USA +1 (413) 522 8810; MATTHEW.HERDIECH@YALE.EDU

    E-print Network

    Haller, Gary L.

    spectroscopy (ISS) Piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) Summer 2007 Yale University, CRISP Summer Research epitaxy (MBE) Reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) Low-energy electron diffraction (LEED Sputter deposition via magnetron sputtering Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) Ion scattering

  4. BUSINESS MEETING REPORT ACM SIGIR Annual Business Meeting 2014

    E-print Network

    Kamps, Jaap

    , to ensures continued high quality and reputation of SIGIR and its sponsored conferences (with new sponsored, Fernando Diaz (outgoing June and December issue SIGIR Forum editors), Ben Carterette (incoming fall issue SIGIR Forum editor), Claudia Hauff (SIG-IRList editor) Shlomo Geva and Fernando Diaz (outgoing

  5. White Paper on Factors of Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, Ivatury; Stadler, John; Kramer-White, Jule; Piascik, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Following the Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAIB) Report, the "Diaz Team" identified CAIB Report elements with Agency-wide applicability. The "Diaz Report", A Renewed Commitment To Excellence, generated an action to "Review current policies and waivers on safety factors". This document addresses this action.

  6. A review of the book: "Turing's Cathedral: The origins of the digital universe", George Dyson (Pantheon Books, 2012).

    E-print Network

    Diaz, Josep

    A review of the book: "Turing's Cathedral: The origins of the digital universe", George Dyson (Pantheon Books, 2012). Josep D´iaz. LSI, UPC. (diaz@lsi.upc.edu) 1. Introduction The title of this book is very appropriated for the year 2012, the centenary of the birth of Alan Turing. The gist of the book

  7. Multi-period optimization of pavement management systems 

    E-print Network

    Yoo, Jaewook

    2004-09-30

    for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved as to style and content by: Alberto Garcia-Diaz (Chair of Committee) César O. Malavé....S., Hanyang University, Korea; M.S., Hanyang University, Korea Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Alberto Garcia-Diaz The purpose of this research is to develop a model and solution methodology for selecting and scheduling timely and cost...

  8. Summary of ICTP activities in support of science in

    E-print Network

    on female visitors not available before 2001. 0 2 7 11 14 17 23 2018 15 18 2426 59 4143 54 46 54 4646 54 57 Alicia Diaz Ambassador of Cuba to Italy 2005-2010 Science and Technology Counsellor Visited ICTP article shared with Misael Diaz "Applications of Innovative Technology for Understanding

  9. Observatory Capital One Field

    E-print Network

    Lathrop, Daniel P.

    Melbourne Pl Lakeland Rd Pontiac St Quebec St Berwyn Rd Ruatan St Seminole St Berwyn Rd Roanoke Pl 48ththAve RhodeIslandAve Pierce Ave Chapel Dr Rossborough Ln GreenhouseRd Knox Rd Knox Rd Knox Rd Harvard Guilford Rd RossburgDr Lehigh Rd Lehigh Rd College Ave College Ave Norwich Rd YaleAve PrincetonAve RhodeIsland

  10. Wardenburg Dr rDllerekcoC

    E-print Network

    St Pl BellaVista Ln Pennsylvania Ave College Ave 7thSt 7thSt 6thSt College Ave Madison Euclid Ave Euclid Connecting Route (ask driver for transfer location)SKIP 27thWay Euclid Ave Free parking. Free bus. Twenty

  11. E.SpeedwayBlvd. E.UniversityBlvd.

    E-print Network

    Ave. TyndallAve.TyndallAve. WarrenAve. Bike/PedestrianUnderpass Bike/PedestrianUnderpass Second Tyndall Ave. Garage Visitor& Permit Parking SixthSt.Garage Highland Garage Visitor& PermitParking Entrance......Mohave 8........GilaHall 9........MaricopaHall 10......YumaHall 11......Harshbarger,JohnW. 12......Mines

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: 2MASS J22560844+5954299 spectra (Kjurkchieva+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjurkchieva, D.; Khruzina, T.; Dimitrov, D.; Groebel, R.; Ibryamov, S.; Nikolov, G.

    2015-11-01

    The spectral observations of 2MASS J22560844+5954299 were carried by the 2m RCC telescope equipped with the focal reducer FoReRo 2 and grism with 720-lines/mm. The resolution of the spectra is 2pix or 2.7Å; and they cover the range 5600-7000Å. Most of the spectra have a S/N of 16-22 excluding those at the eclipse where the S/N value is around 7. The spectra were reduced using IRAF packages for bias subtraction, flat-fielding, cosmic ray removal, and one-dimensional spectrum extraction. (2 data files).

  13. 40 CFR 81.350 - Wisconsin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...follows X North: Green Bay West: W. Mason St. and Ashland Ave., along Ashland...to Bylsby St., then to Green Bay South: W. Mason St. and Ashland Ave., east along Mason to Irwin Ave. East: W. Mason St.,...

  14. 40 CFR 81.350 - Wisconsin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...follows XNorth: Green Bay West: W. Mason St. and Ashland Ave., along Ashland...to Bylsby St., then to Green BaySouth: W. Mason St. and Ashland Ave., east along Mason to Irwin Ave. East: W. Mason St.,...

  15. 40 CFR 81.350 - Wisconsin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...follows XNorth: Green Bay West: W. Mason St. and Ashland Ave., along Ashland...to Bylsby St., then to Green BaySouth: W. Mason St. and Ashland Ave., east along Mason to Irwin Ave. East: W. Mason St.,...

  16. 40 CFR 81.350 - Wisconsin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...follows X North: Green Bay West: W. Mason St. and Ashland Ave., along Ashland...to Bylsby St., then to Green Bay South: W. Mason St. and Ashland Ave., east along Mason to Irwin Ave. East: W. Mason St.,...

  17. CODS: Evolving Data Efficiently and Scalably in Column Oriented Databases

    E-print Network

    Chen, Yi

    GrantAve Jones Shorthand 425 GrantAve Roberts Light Cleaning 747 IndustrialWay Ellis Alchemy 747Ave Employee Skill Jones Typing Jones Shorthand Roberts Light Cleaning Ellis Alchemy Jones Whittling Ellis

  18. 40 CFR 725.190 - Notice of commencement of manufacture or import.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428,...

  19. 40 CFR 725.60 - Withdrawal of submission by the submitter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428,...

  20. 40 CFR 720.102 - Notice of commencement of manufacture or import.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428,...

  1. 40 CFR 720.102 - Notice of commencement of manufacture or import.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428,...

  2. 40 CFR 725.60 - Withdrawal of submission by the submitter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428,...

  3. 40 CFR 725.54 - Suspension of the review period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428,...

  4. 40 CFR 725.60 - Withdrawal of submission by the submitter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428,...

  5. 40 CFR 720.75 - Notice review period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428,...

  6. 40 CFR 725.190 - Notice of commencement of manufacture or import.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428,...

  7. 40 CFR 720.40 - General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428,...

  8. 40 CFR 720.102 - Notice of commencement of manufacture or import.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428,...

  9. 40 CFR 720.40 - General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428,...

  10. 40 CFR 725.60 - Withdrawal of submission by the submitter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428,...

  11. 40 CFR 725.54 - Suspension of the review period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428,...

  12. 40 CFR 720.102 - Notice of commencement of manufacture or import.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428,...

  13. 40 CFR 700.17 - Addresses for the Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Protection Agency, EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave. NW., Washington, DC 20004...EPA West Bldg.,Rm. 3334, 1301 Constitution Ave. NW., Washington, DC 20460-0001...EPA East Bldg., Rm. 6428, 1201 Constitution Ave. NW., Washington, DC....

  14. 40 CFR 720.75 - Notice review period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428,...

  15. 40 CFR 700.17 - Addresses for the Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Protection Agency, EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave. NW., Washington, DC 20004...EPA West Bldg., Rm. 3334, 1301 Constitution Ave. NW., Washington, DC 20460-0001...EPA East Bldg., Rm. 6428, 1201 Constitution Ave. NW., Washington, DC....

  16. 40 CFR 720.75 - Notice review period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428,...

  17. 43 CFR Appendix A to Part 2 - Department of the Interior FOIA and Public Affairs Contacts, and Reading Rooms

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... FOIA OfficerMS-116, SIB 1951 Constitution Ave., NW. Washington, DC 20240... FOIA OfficerMS-130, SIB 1951 Constitution Ave., NW. Washington, DC 20240...CommunicationsMS-262, SIB 1951 Constitution Ave., NW. Washington, DC...

  18. 40 CFR 720.75 - Notice review period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428,...

  19. 40 CFR 725.190 - Notice of commencement of manufacture or import.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428,...

  20. 40 CFR 725.54 - Suspension of the review period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428,...

  1. 40 CFR 720.40 - General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428,...

  2. 29 CFR 24.110 - Decision and orders of the Administrative Review Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...U.S. Department of Labor, 200 Constitution Ave., NW., Washington...U.S. Department of Labor, 200 Constitution Ave., NW., N 2716, Washington...U.S. Department of Labor, 200 Constitution Ave., NW., N 2716,...

  3. 40 CFR 720.40 - General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428,...

  4. 40 CFR 725.190 - Notice of commencement of manufacture or import.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428,...

  5. 40 CFR 725.54 - Suspension of the review period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington...Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428,...

  6. Latin Way Dorm Haskell Hall

    E-print Network

    Dennett, Daniel

    Hall Pearson Hall Latin Way Dorm Haskell Hall TiltonHall POWDER HOUSE BLVD. LewisHall TEELE AVE. WHITFIELD RD Tilton Hall POWDER HOUSE BLVD. Lewis HallTEELE AVE. WHITFIELD RD. Hodgdon Hall Metcalf Hall TALBOT AVE

  7. 75 FR 55738 - Tehama County Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-14

    ... Coordinator, 825 N. Humboldt Ave., Willows, CA 95988. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Randy Jero, Committee Coordinator, USDA, Mendocino National Forest, Grindstone Ranger District, 825 N. Humboldt Ave., Willows,...

  8. 75 FR 18146 - Tehama County Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-09

    .... Humboldt Ave., Willows, CA 95988. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Randy Jero, Committee Coordinator, USDA, Mendocino National Forest, Grindstone Ranger District, 825 N. Humboldt Ave., Willows, CA 95988. (530)...

  9. 75 FR 33576 - Tehama County Resource Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-14

    .... Humboldt Ave., Willows, CA 95988. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Randy Jero, Committee Coordinator, USDA, Mendocino National Forest, Grindstone Ranger District, 825 N. Humboldt Ave., Willows, CA 95988. (530)...

  10. 76 FR 12317 - Tehama County Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-07

    .... Humboldt Ave., Willows, CA 95988. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Randy Jero, Committee Coordinator, USDA, Mendocino National Forest, Grindstone Ranger District, 825 N. Humboldt Ave, Willows, CA 95988. (530)...

  11. 75 FR 9574 - Tehama County Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-03

    .... Humboldt Ave., Willows, CA 95988. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Randy Jero, Committee Coordinator, USDA, Mendocino National Forest, Grindstone Ranger District, 825 N. Humboldt Ave, Willows, CA 95988. (530)...

  12. 75 FR 51238 - Tehama County Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-19

    .... Humboldt Ave., Willows, CA 95988. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Randy Jero, Committee Coordinator, USDA, Mendocino National Forest, Grindstone Ranger District, 825 N. Humboldt Ave., Willows, CA 95988. (530)...

  13. 75 FR 14128 - Approval for Manufacturing Authority, Foreign-Trade Zone 7, CooperVision Caribbean Corporation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-24

    ... public comment has been given in the Federal Register (74 FR 31912, 7-6-2009) and the application has... Corporation (Contact Lenses), Juana Diaz, Puerto Rico Pursuant to its authority under the Foreign-Trade...

  14. 77 FR 76625 - Unblocking of Specially Designated Nationals and Blocked Persons Pursuant to Executive Order 12978

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-28

    ...c/o INVERSIONES EL PROGRESO S.A., Cartagena, Colombia; c/o INVERSIONES LAMARC S.A., Cartagena, Colombia; Carrera 4 No. 4-139, Cartagena, Colombia; Cedula No. 73085554 (Colombia) (individual) [SDNT]. 2. DIAZ CHACON,...

  15. Subpart W Stakeholders Conference Call July 11, 2013

    E-print Network

    , Angelique Diaz Environmental Groups: Sharyn Cunningham, CCAT; Sarah Fields, Uranium Watch; Jennifer Thurston, INFORM Uranium Industry/Other: Oscar Paulson, Kennecott; Mike Griffin, Strata; Dawn Coleman, Uranerz; Josh Leftwich, Cameco; Katie Sweeney, National Mining Association; Darryl Liles, SENES UPDATE Reid

  16. An Analysis of the Impacts of British Transport Reforms on Transit Integration in the Metropolitan Areas

    E-print Network

    Rivasplata, Charles Richard

    2006-01-01

    Simpson, B.J. , 1994. Urban Public Transport Today, London:public transport integration in the Americas, in Diaz and Jamet, eds. , Urbanpublic transport integration: lessons for Santiago, in Freeman and Jamet, eds. , Urban

  17. Gaze3D: Framework for Gaze Analysis on 3D Reconstructed Scenes Thomas Booth

    E-print Network

    Bailey, Reynold J.

    in a wide range of settings including driving [Sodhi et al. 2002], sports [Chajka et al. 2006], geology research and applications is also gaining traction [Yeo et al. 2012; Diaz et al. 2013; Booth et al. 2013

  18. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR A search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of germanium-76

    E-print Network

    , Oak Ridge, Tennessee Fred Bertrand, Greg Capps, Ren Cooper, Kim Jeskie, David Radford, Robert Varner, Jonathan Diaz, Peter J. Doe, Greg Harper, Robert Johnson, Andreas Knecht, Michael Marino, Mike Miller

  19. Research Report Estrogen receptor and differentially regulate intracellular

    E-print Network

    Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    Research Report Estrogen receptor and differentially regulate intracellular Ca2+ dynamics leading to ERK phosphorylation and estrogen neuroprotection in hippocampal neurons Liqin Zhao, Roberta Diaz July 2007 Our previous analyses indicated that both estrogen receptor (ER) subtypes, ER and ER

  20. Welcome Fall 2007

    E-print Network

    Diaz Moore, Keith

    2007-08-15

    Keith Diaz Moore, Chair of the University of Kansas School of Architecture, introduces the new KU Archcast, welcomes students for the fall 2007 semester and announces some accomplishments of faculty and students as well ...

  1. Financial Highlights + Endowment Report

    E-print Network

    Chandy, John A.

    . Desroches '82 Trayvonn a. Diaz* Cameron Faustman* '82 Drew a. Figdor '83 albert J. Foreman '95 Mark E '07h robert i. Sherman '79 Mark C. Sinatro '88 robert J. Skinner '93 Frank M. Torti* Daniel D. Toscano

  2. Official Approved Minutes UT DALLAS STAFF COUNCIL MEETING MINUTES

    E-print Network

    O'Toole, Alice J.

    , Claudia Tatum, Letitia Andrews, Sandra Mitchell, Theresa Diaz, Linda Heard, Shereada Harrell, Raul Mills, Mike Mogg, DeAnn Rose, Alice Salazar, Lydia Selvidge, Janie Shipman, Rikk Terhune, Rich Williams

  3. REVISTA DE LA FACULTAD DE ODONTOLOGIAUNIVERSIDAD DE BUENOS AIRES

    E-print Network

    Cortiñas, Guillermo

    Editorial Asesores Técnicos Lic. Graciela M. PANTANIDA Lic. Julio A. DIAZ Ing. Horacio ESPINO Ana CASADOUMEC Lic. en Economía Walter C.E. BITAR Subsecretario de Hacienda y Administración Od. Julio BELLO

  4. 75 FR 14128 - Approval for Manufacturing Authority, Foreign-Trade Zone 7, CooperVision Caribbean Corporation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-24

    ...Board [Order No. 1669] Approval for Manufacturing Authority, Foreign-Trade Zone 7, CooperVision Caribbean Corporation (Contact Lenses), Juana Diaz, Puerto Rico Pursuant to its authority under the Foreign-Trade Zones Act of June 18, 1934, as...

  5. Diphenhydramine and Pregnancy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... References: Anderka M, Mitchell AA, Louik C, Werler MM, Hernandez-Diaz S, Rasmussen SA, and the National Birth ... Obstet Gynecol 175:1376-7, 1996 Chiavegatto S, Bernardi MM, de-Souza-Spinosa H: Effects of prenatal diphenhydramine ...

  6. Sediments can be important in regulating stream water P concentrations, and this has implications for establishing

    E-print Network

    David, Mark B.

    concentrations at low discharge. Relationships between Benthic Sediments andWater Column Phosphorus in Illinois nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) additions to surface waters (Diaz, 2001). These nutrients can cause phosphatase activity; BLS, Black Slough; DDW, distilled- deionized water; DRP,

  7. I3P Overview - Duration: 6 minutes, 21 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    Deborah Diaz, the NASA's Deputy Chief Information Officer, talks about the Information Technology Infrastructure Integration Program (I3P). I3P is NASA's initiative to provide Agency-wide managemen...

  8. Facts about Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 2008;199:237.e1-9. Margulis AV, Mitchell AA, Gilboa SM, Werler MM, Glynn RJ, Hernandez-Diaz S, ... e7. Werler MM, Ahrens KA, Bosco JL, Michell AA, Anderka MT, Gilboa SM, Holmes LB, National Birth ...

  9. 78 FR 36635 - Unblocking of Specially Designated Nationals and Blocked Persons Pursuant to Executive Order 12978

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ...2449885 (Colombia); Passport 2449885 (Colombia) (individual) [SDNT]. 2. VASQUEZ DIAZ, Augusto de Jesus, c/o FLORIDA SOCCER CLUB S.A., Medellin, Colombia; POB Colombia; Cedula No. 3333064 (Colombia) (individual) [SDNT]. Dated:...

  10. Einfuhrungsveranstaltung Themen fur Labor-, Bachelor-und Masterarbeiten

    E-print Network

    Nejdl, Wolfgang

    ;Ernesto Diaz-Aviles Big Data Visualization from Social Media Streams (Master/Bachelor) Violence Detection in Social Media (Laborprojekt oder Bachelor-/Masterarbeit) Kontakt: alrifai@L3S.de FG Wissensbasierte

  11. The Determinants of Homeonwership in Presence of Shocks Experienced by Mexican Households 

    E-print Network

    Lopez Cabrera, Jesus Antonio 1977-

    2012-11-05

    ; Hood 1999; Yates 2000; Green and Hendershott 2001; Fisher and Jaffe 2003; Quigley and Raphael 2004; Diaz Pedroza and Martinez Atilano 2005; Olsen 2007; Cadena Minotta, Ramos Chalen, and Pazmi?o Medina 2010; Lopez Silva et al. 2011). 8 Studies...; Hood 1999; Yates 2000; Green and Hendershott 2001; Fisher and Jaffe 2003; Quigley and Raphael 2004; Diaz Pedroza and Martinez Atilano 2005; Olsen 2007; Cadena Minotta, Ramos Chalen, and Pazmi?o Medina 2010; Lopez Silva et al. 2011). From the applied...

  12. Good Teachers (the Movie You Will Never See)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillard, Colleen

    2012-01-01

    It began with a trip to the cinema to see Cameron Diaz in her new comedy, "Bad Teacher." It was a bad choice. Not a great flick, but as a parody of bad employees, in terms of things that can get one fired--drugs, alcohol , cheating, foul language, inappropriate sexual behavior--Diaz slams pedal to the metal. She nips out of airline booze bottles…

  13. Cost minimization in multi?commodity multi?mode generalized networks with time windows 

    E-print Network

    Chen, Ping-Shun

    2007-04-25

    Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Chair of Committee, Alberto Garcia-Diaz Committee Members, César O. Malavé.... (December 2005) Ping-Shun Chen, B.S., National Chiao Tung University, Taiwan; M.S., National Chiao Tung University, Taiwan Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Alberto Garcia-Diaz The purpose of this research is to develop a heuristic algorithm...

  14. On the Promotion System of the Utilization and Application of Educational Media in Regions Responding to the Changing Society. AVE in Japan No. 36.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Japan Audio-Visual Education Association, Tokyo.

    This booklet contains the report of the Educational Media Sub-Committee (Japan) on a new way of distributing a media-based learning system in regional communities. Highlights of the report include: (1) new movements in the utilization of educational media, including basic tendencies in the establishment of educational media, trends of educational…

  15. cao2@purdue.edu (765) 299-8760 Rm G57, Purdue University, 525 Northwestern Ave., West Lafayette, IN, 47907

    E-print Network

    Chen, Yong P.

    -Nano Game Competition, 2008 Hosted by Network for Computational Nanotechnology and nanoHUB.org Publications Sep. 1998 - Jun. 2006 Physics Department, University of Science and Technology of China (USTC), Hefei, China Technical Skills Film synthesis and treatment: graphene exfoliation, CVD, PECVD, ALD, plasma

  16. Towards completion of the early Eocene aviary: A new bird group from the Messel oil shale (Aves, Eopachypterygidae, fam. nov.).

    PubMed

    Mayr, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    A new avian species is described from the early Eocene Messel fossil site in Germany. Eopachypteryx praeterita, gen. et sp. nov. is a small bird and exhibits a characteristic morphology with a short and robust beak, a distinctively shaped coracoid, stout humerus, robust pectoral girdle skeleton, and short hindlimbs. Although similarities to the Paleogene Eocuculus as well as to some extant telluravian and strisorine taxa are noted, the phylogenetic affinities of the new species are unresolved. To account for the fact that the new species is clearly distinguished from any of the known fossil or extant avian taxa, it is here assigned to the new taxon Eopachypterygidae, fam. nov.. Eopachypteryx praeterita is represented by three partial skeletons. A further partial skeleton from Messel belongs to a second, unnamed species, which is tentatively referred to Eopachypteryx. PMID:26623896

  17. Tall Whitetop Eradication and Native Plant Community Restoration Shannon Peters, RTI and Ph.D. Candidate UC Berkeley, 360 Monte Vista Ave., Oakland, CA 94611

    E-print Network

    .005), a "noxious weed" is "any species of plant which is, or is likely to be, detrimental or destructive of their noxious weed list. It is a native of southeastern Europe and southwestern Asia and probably came of noxious weeds that have infested 17 million acres of public rangelands in the Western United States

  18. 125 Paterson Ave. Little Falls, NJ 07424 973.256.1333 Fax 973.256.8088 www.Paper-Clip.com Copyright 2007

    E-print Network

    Hutcheon, James M.

    of many Social Host Liability Laws, throwing a party for underage students where alcohol is served underage students to drink at a party the parent hosted. Three students died in a drunk-driving acci- dent after the party. Social host liability laws hold adults who serve or provide alcohol to underage people

  19. 161. Anthony Skjell um, Lawrence Livermore Nati onal Laboratory, 7000 East Ave. , L-316, P. O. Box 808 Li vermore, CA94551

    E-print Network

    Dongarra, Jack

    , 69364 Lyon cedex 07, France 167. Hank Van der Vorst, Dept. of Techn. Mathemati cs and Computer Sci ence versi ty of Namur, FUNOP, 61 rue de Bruxel l es, B-Namur, Bel gi um 166. Bernard Tourancheau, LIP, ENS-Lyon Rockmont Ci rcl e Boul der, CO80303 180. Mary F. Wheel er, Ri ce Uni versi ty, Department of Mathemati cal

  20. The geographic scale of diversification on islands: genetic and morphological divergence at a very small spatial scale in the Mascarene grey white-eye (Aves: Zosterops borbonicus)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Oceanic islands provide unique scenarios for studying the roles of geography and ecology in driving population divergence and speciation. Assessing the relative importance of selective and neutral factors in driving population divergence is central to understanding how such divergence may lead to speciation in small oceanic islands, where opportunities for gene flow and population mixing are potentially high. Here we report a case of genetic and morphological structure in the Mascarene grey white-eye (Zosterops borbonicus) a species that shows a striking, geographically structured plumage polymorphism on the topographically and ecologically complex island of Réunion, yet is monotypic on the relatively uniform neighbouring island of Mauritius. Results Analysis of 276 AFLP loci in 197 individuals revealed prolonged independent evolution of Réunion and Mauritius populations, which is congruent with previous mtDNA assessments. Furthermore, populations on Réunion showed significant differentiation into three main genetic groups separating lowland from highland areas despite the small geographic distances involved. Genetic differentiation along the altitudinal gradient is consistent with morphometric analysis of fitness-related traits. Birds in the highlands were larger, yet had relatively smaller beaks than in the lowlands, suggesting the role of selection in shaping morphology and restricting gene flow along the gradient. No genetic differentiation between plumage morphs was detected in neutral markers, suggesting that plumage differences are of recent origin. Conclusions Our results suggest a dual role of vicariance and natural selection in differentiating populations of a passerine bird in an oceanic island at very small spatial scales. We propose a combination of past microallopatry driven by volcanic activity and selection-constrained dispersal along steep ecological gradients to explain the striking levels of population structure found within the island, although the possibility that genetic differences evolved in situ along the gradient cannot be ruled out at present. The lack of congruence between genetic groups and plumage morphs suggests that the latter are of recent origin and likely due to social or sexual selection acting on few loci. The presence of sharp and stable contact zones between plumage morphs suggests that they could be on independent evolutionary trajectories, yet whether or not they represent incipient species will require further research to directly assess the degree of reproductive isolation among them. PMID:20504327

  1. From here, it's possible. 1802 Hartford Ave. | Lubbock, Texas 79409-0004 | Main Number 806.742.3791 | Financial Aid 806.742.3990 x 307

    E-print Network

    Rock, Chris

    School of Law ©Copyright 2006, Texas Tech University System Editor Sue Hancock Jones Graphic Design Laine Markham Hartsfield Design, Lubbock, Texas Photos Neal Hinkle, Sue Jones, Omar Villa, Artie Limmer, Joey Law Curriculum 29 Practical Skills Programs 34 Research Facilities & Intellectual Growth 40 Career

  2. Macroscopic lesions of the ventriculus of Rhea americana , Linnaeus, 1758 (Aves: Rheidae) naturally infected by Sicarius uncinipenis (Molin, 1860) (Nematoda: Habronematidae).

    PubMed

    Ederli, N B; de Oliveira, F C R

    2014-12-01

    There are few studies concerning the parasites of rheas. However, parasitism is the major cause of the limited success in captive breeding of these birds. Deletrocephalus dimidiatus, Deletrocephalus cesarpintoi, Paradeletrocephalus minor, and Sicarius uncinipenis are the most prevalent nematode species affecting these birds, but the lesions caused by these parasites have not been previously reported. Four adult rheas were necropsied to determine the presence or absence of gross lesions within the gastrointestinal tract, associated with parasitic infection. Two rheas parasitized by S. uncinipenis had ulcers on the koilin layer or had parasites penetrating this layer, resulting in widespread necrosis and hemorrhagic areas, whereas the 2 nonparasitized birds did not present lesions. The degree of injury was proportional to the parasitic load found in the birds. Thus, high parasitic loads can result in necrosis of the ventriculus, which may contribute to the death of birds, resulting in economic losses in the rural production of these birds. PMID:25001213

  3. Molecular phylogeny and diversification of a widespread Neotropical rainforest bird group: The Buff-throated Woodcreeper complex, Xiphorhynchus guttatus/susurrans (Aves: Dendrocolaptidae).

    PubMed

    Rocha, Tainá C; Sequeira, Fernando; Aleixo, Alexandre; Rêgo, Péricles S; Sampaio, Iracilda; Schneider, Horacio; Vallinoto, Marcelo

    2015-04-01

    The genus Xiphorhynchus is a species rich avian group widely distributed in Neotropical forests of Central and South America. Although recent molecular studies have improved our understanding of the spatial patterns of genetic diversity in some species of this genus, most are still poorly known, including their taxonomy. Here, we address the historical diversification and phylogenetic relationships of the X. guttatus/susurrans complex, using data from two mitochondrial (cyt b and ND2) and one nuclear (?-fibint7) genes. Phylogenetic relationships were inferred with both gene trees and a Bayesian-based species tree under a coalescent framework (?BEAST). With exception of the nuclear ?-fibint7 gene that produced an unresolved tree, both mtDNA and the species tree showed a similar topology and were congruent in recovering five main clades with high statistical support. These clades, however, are not fully concordant with traditional delimitation of some X. guttatus subspecies, since X. g. polystictus, X. g. guttatus, and X. g. connectens are not supported as distinct clades. Interestingly, these three taxa are more closely related to the mostly trans-Andean X. susurrans than the other southern and western Amazonian subspecies of X. guttatus, which constitutes a paraphyletic species. Timing estimates based on the species tree indicated that diversification in X. guttatus occurred between the end of the Pliocene and early Pleistocene, likely associated with the formation of the modern Amazon River and its main southern tributaries (Xingu, Tocantins, and Madeira), in addition to climate-induced changes in the distribution of rainforest biomes. Our study supports with an enlarged dataset a previous proposal for recognizing at least three species level taxa in the X. guttatus/susurrans complex: X. susurrans, X. guttatus, and X. guttatoides. PMID:25683049

  4. ave you ever heard of meat-eating plants? Just like many animal species, some plant species are carnivorous--that is, they consume insects and

    E-print Network

    Georgia, University of

    , depending on the kind of plant. After animals such as flies, grasshoppers, and spiders are trapped, a poolave you ever heard of meat-eating plants? Just like many animal species, some plant species and minerals for growth. Instead of actually eating insects, carnivorous plants trap them by various means

  5. Department of Entomology, University of California, 900 University Ave, Riverside, CA 92521, USA Center for Invasive Species Research, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521, USA

    E-print Network

    Hoddle, Mark S.

    in parasitoid longevity or fecundity between plant species. Buckwheat increased the percentage of female A pests and with corresponding reductions in damaging spider mite and leafhopper populations in grapes

  6. Effects of food processing and fibre content on the digestibility, energy intake and biochemical parameters of Blue-and-gold macaws (Ara ararauna L. - Aves, Psittacidae).

    PubMed

    Veloso, R R; Sakomura, N K; Kawauchi, I M; Malheiros, E B; Carciofi, A C

    2014-04-01

    Considering the increased incidence of obesity and metabolic diseases in caged psittacines, the effect of fibre and food processing was evaluated in the Blue-and-gold macaw. Four food formulations (0%, 7%, 14% and 21% of sugarcane fibre) processed by pelleting or extrusion were studied, resulting in eight diets. To study digestibility, 48 macaws housed in pairs in cages was used in a block design. Subsequently, diets containing 0% or 21% sugarcane fibre, pelleted or extrude was fed for 4 months to evaluate energy intake and blood metabolites. A 2 × 2 × 2 (two fibre levels, two food processing methods and two genders) factorial arrangement with subplots (beginning and end) was used. When differences were detected in anova's F test, data were submitted to polynomial contrasts in the first experiment and to orthogonal contrasts in the second experiment (p < 0.05). Fibre addition reduced protein, fat and energy (p < 0.001) digestibility in both food processing. Pelleted foods presented higher dry matter digestibility and food metabolisable energy (ME) than the extruded ones (p < 0.05). Fibre addition or the type of processing did not change ME ingestion (p > 0.05). The macaws gained body weight (p < 0.05) regardless of the diet (p > 0.05), but females fed with the high-fibre diets did not gain weight (p > 0.05), suggesting a low food ME (12.5 kJ/g).The substitution of the original diet (sunflower seeds, fruits and cooked maize) by the experimental foods decreased the basal (12-h fast) concentrations of glucose, cholesterol and triglycerides (p < 0.001). The consumption of pelleted diets reduced serum glucose and cholesterol (p < 0.05). Results suggest that the pelleted diets were more beneficial and can be used to reduce blood metabolites related to metabolic disorders that are commonly observed in macaws. PMID:23627662

  7. Coccidia of New World psittaciform birds (Aves: Psittaciformes): Eimeria ararae n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the blue-and-yellow macaw Ara ararauna (Linnaeus).

    PubMed

    do Bomfim Lopes, Bruno; Berto, Bruno Pereira; de Carvalho Balthazar, Lianna Maria; Coelho, Cleide Domingues; Neves, Daniel Medeiros; Lopes, Carlos Wilson Gomes

    2014-06-01

    In the New World, the avian order Psittaciformes comprises 142 species, yet to date only 3 (2%) of the species have been examined for coccidia, and from these only four species of Eimeria Schneider, 1875 have been described. In this study, a new coccidian species (Protozoa: Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) obtained from the blue-and-yellow macaw Ara ararauna (Linnaeus) is reported from Brazil. Oöcysts of Eimeria ararae n. sp. are ovoidal, measure 28.7 × 20.2 ?m and have a smooth, bi-layered wall c.1.1 ?m thick. Both micropyle and oöcyst residuum are absent, but polar granules are present. Sporocysts are ovoidal and measure 17.0 × 8.3 µm, with knob-like, prominent Stieda body and sporocyst residuum is composed of granules; sub-Stieda body is absent. Sporozoites are vermiform with one refractile body and a nucleus. This is the fifth description of an eimerid coccidian infecting a New World psittaciform bird. PMID:24832188

  8. DNA sequence analysis to guide the release of blue-and-yellow macaws (Ara ararauna, Psittaciformes, Aves) from the illegal trade back into the wild.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Gislaine A; Caparroz, Renato

    2013-03-01

    The illegal wildlife trade is one of the major threats to Brazil's biodiversity. Approximately 80 % of illegally captured animals are birds, and 4 % of those are parrots. Although many seized birds do not survive, those that are recovered may be returned to the wild. The release of seized individuals into the wild should be conducted with caution, as local populations may suffer adverse effects if genetically different individuals are introduced. In this study, we evaluated the genetic relationships between 13 illegally captured blue-and-yellow macaws selected for release in northeastern Goiás, Brazil, and previously studied Brazilian macaw populations. We identified the seized macaws that were genetically similar to those from northwestern Goiás and that were therefore most suitable for release in that area. The genetic relationship was evaluated by sequence analysis of 403 bp of mitochondrial DNA control region. Relationships between mitochondrial haplotypes were computed via a median-joining network. Only six of the seized macaws were closely related to the macaws of northeastern Goiás, indicating that those macaws were potential candidates for release in that area. However, the release of these birds should follow all technical recommendations required by the Brazilian environmental authorities. PMID:23184047

  9. SINGLE STAGE EVAPORATION OF SOLAR CONDENSATE DUST TO MAKE CAIS. D. S. Ebel and L. , Department of the Geophysical Sciences, 5734 South Ellis Ave., 1

    E-print Network

    -, aluminum-rich inclusions (CAI). Real CAIs, however, crystallized spinel and melilite during non-isothermal- tions of the residues which result from isothermal evaporation of CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 (CMAS) liquids evaporating non-isothermally [2]. Zoning records the balance between increased stability of Mg-, Si

  10. A New Species of Pengornithidae (Aves: Enantiornithes) from the Lower Cretaceous of China Suggests a Specialized Scansorial Habitat Previously Unknown in Early Birds

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Han; O’Connor, Jingmai K.; Zhou, Zhonghe

    2015-01-01

    We describe a new enantiornithine bird, Parapengornis eurycaudatus gen. et sp. nov. from the Lower Cretaceous Jiufotang Formation of Liaoning, China. Although morphologically similar to previously described pengornithids Pengornis houi, Pengornis IVPP V18632, and Eopengornis martini, morphological differences indicate it represents a new taxon of the Pengornithidae. Based on new information from this specimen we reassign IVPP V18632 to Parapengornis sp. The well preserved pygostyle of the new specimen elucidates the morphology of this element for the clade, which is unique in pengornithids among Mesozoic birds. Similarities with modern scansores such as woodpeckers may indicate a specialized vertical climbing and clinging behavior that has not previously been inferred for early birds. The new specimen preserves a pair of fully pennaceous rachis-dominated feathers like those in the holotype of Eopengornis martini; together with the unique morphology of the pygostyle, this discovery lends evidence to early hypotheses that rachis-dominated feathers may have had a functional significance. This discovery adds to the diversity of ecological niches occupied by enantiornithines and if correct reveals are remarkable amount of locomotive differentiation among Enantiornithes. PMID:26039693

  11. Phylogenetics of a recent radiation in the mallards and allies (Aves: Anas): inferences from a genomic transect and the multispecies coalescent.

    PubMed

    Lavretsky, Philip; McCracken, Kevin G; Peters, Jeffrey L

    2014-01-01

    Reconstructing species trees by incorporating information from many independent gene trees reduces the confounding influence of stochastic lineage sorting. Such analyses are particularly important for taxa that share polymorphisms due to incomplete lineage sorting or introgressive hybridization. We investigated phylogenetic relationships among 14 closely related taxa from the mallard (Anas spp.) complex using the multispecies coalescent and 20 nuclear loci sampled from a genomic transect. We also examined how treating recombining loci and hybridizing species influences results by partitioning the data using various protocols. In general, topologies were similar among the various species trees, with major clades consistently composed of the same taxa. However, relationships among these clades and among taxa within clades changed among partitioned data sets. Posterior support generally decreased when filtering for recombination, whereas excluding mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) increased posterior support for taxa known to hybridize with them. Furthermore, branch lengths decreased substantially for recombination-filtered data. Finally, concordance between nuclear and morphometric topologies conflicted with those in the mitochondrial tree, particularly with regard to the placement of the Hawaiian duck (A. wyvilliana), Philippine duck (A. luzonica), and two spot-billed ducks (A. zonorhyncha and A. poecilorhyncha). These results demonstrate the importance of maximizing sequence length and taxon sampling when inferring taxonomic relationships that are confounded by extensive allele sharing. PMID:23994490

  12. 125 Paterson Ave. Little Falls, NJ 07424 973.256.1333 Fax 973.256.8088 www.Paper-Clip.com Copyright 2007

    E-print Network

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed

    statistics that confirm today's teen popula- tion is intentionally abusing pre- scription and over/OTC) medicines is now so prevalent it is "normalized" among teens. I Nearly one in five teens report abusing many teens have a false sense of security about the abuse of Rx/OTC medicines: I Two in five teens

  13. University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign, 1304 W. Pennsylvania Ave., 338 AESB, Urbana, IL 61801 217.333.3570 abe.illinois.edu abe@illinois.edu

    E-print Network

    Lee, Tonghun

    217.333.3570 abe.illinois.edu abe@illinois.edu Agricultural and Biological Engineering The BULLETIN August 7, 2013 "The mission of the Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering is to integrate life and engineering for enhancement of complex living systems." ABE Values, Vision and Mission

  14. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1304 W. Pennsylvania Ave., 338 AESB, Urbana, IL 61801 217.333.3570 abe.illinois.edu abe@illinois.edu

    E-print Network

    Lee, Tonghun

    passed her MS defense on June 24, 2014. Her thesis was titled "An Agent-Based Model to Simulate Virus-Based Biocontrol of the Soybean Cyst Nematode, Heterodera Glycines." Matthew Harper, who successfully passed his MS

  15. The Florida Panther's Last Stand (806 words; file: t-tribune-ave-maria) When taxpayers approved $ 8 billion to restore Eastern Everglades, decades of poorly

    E-print Network

    Shrader-Frechette, Kristin

    . But western Floridians may not have learned from their eastern neighbors' mistakes. The same dangerous animal of Florida, sacred to the Seminole Indians. The US Fish and Wildlife Service says the panther must

  16. Population genetic structure of the blue-fronted Amazon (Amazona aestiva, Psittacidae: Aves) based on nuclear microsatellite loci: implications for conservation.

    PubMed

    Leite, K C E; Seixas, G H F; Berkunsky, I; Collevatti, R G; Caparroz, R

    2008-01-01

    The blue-fronted Amazon (Amazona aestiva) is a widely distributed Neotropical parrot and one of the most captured parrots in nature to supply the illegal trade of wild animals. The objectives of the present study were to analyze the genetic structure of A. aestiva to identify management units and support conservation planning and to verified if A. aestiva populations have undergone a recent bottleneck due to habitat loss and capture for the pet trade. The genetic structure was accessed by analyzing six microsatellite loci in 74 individuals of A. aestiva, including samples from the two subspecies (A. a. aestiva and A. a. xanthopteryx), from five populations: four in Brazil and one in Argentina. A significant genetic differentiation (theta = 0.007, p = 0.005) could be detected only between the most distant populations, Tocantins and Argentina, localized at the northeast and southwest limits of the sample sites, respectively. There was no evidence of inbreeding within or between populations, suggesting random mating among individuals. These results suggest a clinal distribution of genetic variability, as observed for variation in plumage color of the two A. aestiva subspecies. Bottleneck analysis did not show a recent reduction in population size. Thus, for the management and conservation of the species, the populations from Argentina and Tocantins should be considered as different management units, and the other populations from the center of the geographical distribution as another management unit. PMID:18949701

  17. * Correspondence to: Anna Stefanopoulou, Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Michigan, G058 Lay Auto Lab, 1231, Beal Ave., Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2121, U.S.A.

    E-print Network

    Stefanopoulou, Anna

    that it exhibits unstable open-loop behaviour with a signi"cant delay in the feedback loop. The instability valve timing is necessarily a compromise of combustion stability, fuel economy and maximum torque fuel economy bene"ts [4}6]. In conven- tional gasoline engines, the largest amount of throttling

  18. Geographic isolation drives divergence of uncorrelated genetic and song variation in the Ruddy-capped Nightingale-Thrush (Catharus frantzii; Aves: Turdidae).

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Ramírez, Marco F; Andersen, Michael J; Zaldívar-Riverón, Alejandro; Ornelas, Juan Francisco; Navarro-Sigüenza, Adolfo G

    2016-01-01

    Montane barriers influence the evolutionary history of lineages by promoting isolation of populations. The effects of these historical processes are evident in patterns of differentiation among extant populations, which are often expressed as genetic and behavioral variation between populations. We investigated the effects of geographic barriers on the evolutionary history of a Mesoamerican bird by studying patterns of genetic and vocal variation in the Ruddy-capped Nightingale-Thrush (Turdidae: Catharus frantzii), a non-migratory oscine bird that inhabits montane forests from central Mexico to Panama. We reconstructed the phylogeographic history and estimated divergence times between populations using Bayesian and maximum likelihood methods. We found strong support for the existence of four mitochondrial lineages of C. frantzii corresponding to isolated mountain ranges: Sierra Madre Oriental; Sierra Madre del Sur; the highlands of Chiapas, Guatemala, and El Salvador; and the Talamanca Cordillera. Vocal features in C. frantzii were highly variable among the four observed clades, but vocal variation and genetic variation were uncorrelated. Song variation in C. frantzii suggests that sexual selection and cultural drift could be important factors driving song differentiation in C. frantzii. PMID:26302950

  19. DESCRIPTION: point of load converter 20050 SW 112th Ave. Tualatin, Oregon 97062 phonephone 503.612.2300 faxfax 503.612.2382

    E-print Network

    Berns, Hans-Gerd

    - temperature conditions. V-Infinity's world class automated manufacturing methods, together with an extensive temperature range, -40C to +85C * cost efficient open frame design * programmable output voltage via external standard footprint Wide ambient temperature range, -40C to +85C Cost efficient open frame design

  20. 125 Paterson Ave. Little Falls, NJ 07424 973.256.1333 Fax 973.256.8088 www.Paper-Clip.com Copyright 2007

    E-print Network

    Hutcheon, James M.

    decision for you, and your student. The Pros and Cons of Cars on Campus If your student lives on campus- er when others choose to drink and to loan out their cars You'll also want to check out campus in off-campus efforts, from community theatre to volunteer fire- fighting, increase Cons I

  1. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1304 W. Pennsylvania Ave., 338 AESB, Urbana, IL 61801 217.333.3570 abe.illinois.edu abe@illinois.edu

    E-print Network

    Lee, Tonghun

    life and engineering for enhancement of complex living systems." ABE Values, Vision and Mission Weekly requested Cost is $12 per person, includes drink and tip Reservations required to attend Reservation graduation December 23, 2013 Degree conferral date December 23, 2013 Campus offices closed for the Holiday

  2. New insights on the rarity of the vulnerable Cinereous Warbling-finch (Aves, Emberizidae) based on density, home range, and habitat selection.

    PubMed

    Marques-Santos, F; Wischhoff, U; Rodrigues, M

    2014-11-01

    The Cinereous Warbling-finch Poospiza cinerea (Emberizidae) is a Neotropical grassland bird considered rare, with population declining due to habitat loss and classified as vulnerable. However, the species conspicuously remains in several degraded areas, suggesting that it may be favored by these environments. Studies which focus on this species were inexistent until 2012, making questionable any statement about its threaten status. Here we analyzed population density, home range, and habitat selection of two groups of P. cinerea at independent sites that differ in human impact levels. Density was estimated by counting and mapping birds. Kernel density and minimum convex polygon were used to estimate home ranges. Habitat selection was inferred from use and availability of every habitat identified within the home range boundaries. One group positively selected urban tree vegetation, despite the availability of natural habitats in its home range. Based on a review on the literature and our findings, we assume that it is unlikely that P. cinerea is rare owing to habitat degradation, as previously thought. Nevertheless, this species was always recorded around native Cerrado vegetation and thus habitat modification may still threaten this species at some level. It is suggested that this species might be a woodland edge species, but future studies are necessary to confirm this assumption. PMID:25627588

  3. Crianza Practica de Aves (Practical Poultry Raising). Appropriate Technologies for Development. Peace Corps Information Collection & Exchange Manual Series [No.] M-34.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Kenneth M.

    Written in Spanish, this manual is designed to provide development workers with the information and tools needed to begin or to improve poultry production. Covered in the individual chapters are the following topics: the nature and scope of poultry production, assessment of local poultry selections, basic information about chickens, country…

  4. Molecular phylogeny of Carduelinae (Aves, Passeriformes, Fringillidae) proves polyphyletic origin of the genera Serinus and Carduelis and suggests redefined generic limits.

    PubMed

    Nguembock, Billy; Fjeldså, Jon; Couloux, Arnaud; Pasquet, Eric

    2009-05-01

    Relationships of the 133 species of the subfamily Carduelinae (Fringillidae) are poorly resolved. For a more robust phylogenetic resolution, we sequenced two mitochondrial protein-coding genes (ATPase 6 and ND3), two nuclear introns (myoglobin intron 2 and transforming growth factor-beta2 intron 5) and one nuclear protein-coding gene (c-mos) from 50 cardueline taxa representing especially the large genera Serinus and Carduelis. A total of 2934bp obtained was subjected to maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference. Three of the five loci, as well as the combined dataset recovered the monophyly of the basal placement of Fringilla in the monophyletic Fringillidae, and the monophyly of the Carduelinae. While relationships within this group are moderately resolved by some individual gene trees (myoglobin and c-mos loci), high nodal support is provided in other individual gene trees and the combined tree. Among the well resolved terminal cardueline groups, Linurgus, Loxia and Pyrrhula are found to be monophyletic while genera Carpodacus, Carduelis and Serinus appear para- or polyphyletic. Within Serinus and Carduelis, the obtained phylogenetic structure corresponds well with the subdivisions suggested by H.E. Wolters, based on traditional methods. Thus, we support his generic subdivision (Ochrospiza, Dendrospiza and Crithagra for Serinus, and Chloris, Spinus, Sporagra, Pseudomitris, Acanthis and Linaria for Carduelis). Otherwise, we notice several cases of significant genetic divergence within traditional species suggesting incipient speciation in Linurgus olivaceus, Loxia curvirostra, Serinus mozambicus and Serinus burtoni. Some of these cases need a further phylogeographical study with a denser geographical sampling but for the case the most noteworthy, that of Serinus burtoni, we suggest a taxonomic change in this study. PMID:19027082

  5. Multilocus phylogeography of the Wedge-billed Woodcreeper Glyphorynchus spirurus (Aves, Furnariidae) in lowland Amazonia: widespread cryptic diversity and paraphyly reveal a complex diversification pattern.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Alexandre M; Gonzalez, Javier; Wink, Michael; Aleixo, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Amazonian rivers function as important barriers to dispersal of Amazonian birds. Studying population genetics of lineages separated by rivers may help us to uncover the dynamics of biological diversification in the Amazon. We reconstructed the phylogeography of the Wedge-billed Woodcreeper, Glyphorynchus spirurus (Furnariidae) in the Amazon basin. Sampling included 134 individuals from 63 sites distributed in eight Amazonian areas of endemism separated by major Amazonian rivers. Nucleotide sequences were generated for five genes: two mtDNA genes (1047 bp for cyt b and 1002 bp for ND2) and three nuclear genes (647 bp from the sex-linked gene ACO, 319 bp from the intron of G3PDH, and 619 bp from intron 2 of MYO). In addition, 37 individuals were randomly selected from the Rondônia and Inambari areas of endemism for genomic fingerprinting, using five ISSR primers. Our results reveal allopatric and well-supported lineages within G. spirurus with high levels of genetic differentiation (p-distances 0.9-6.3%) across opposite banks of major Amazonian rivers. The multilocus phylogenetic reconstructions obtained reveal several incongruences with current subspecies taxonomy. Within currently recognized subspecies, we found high levels of both paraphyly and genetic differentiation, indicating deep divergences and strong isolation consistent with species-level differences. ISSR fingerprinting supports the existence of genetically differentiated populations on opposite sides of the Madeira River. Molecular dating suggests an initial vicariation event isolating populations from the Guiana center of endemism during the Late Miocene/Early Pliocene, while more recent events subdivided Brazilian Shield populations during the Lower Pleistocene. PMID:23063588

  6. 125 Paterson Ave. Little Falls, NJ 07424 973.256.1333 Fax 973.256.8088 www.Paper-Clip.com Copyright 2007

    E-print Network

    Hutcheon, James M.

    Identify the talents and abilities you have observed in your student and share them. I Encourage your consid- ered a career in teaching. She met with her advisor and found out what she needs to do to make of changing your major now? Education Biology Poli Sci #12;

  7. Molecular phylogeny of South American screech owls of the Otus atricapillus complex (Aves: Strigidae) inferred from nucleotide sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene.

    PubMed

    Heidrich, P; König, C; Wink, M

    1995-01-01

    The cytochrome b gene of 6 South American screech owls of the genus Otus (O. choliba, O. atricapillus, O. usta, O. sanctaecatarinae, O. guatemalae, and O. hoyi) and two Old World species (Otus scops and Otus leucotis) was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and partially sequenced (300 nucleotides). Otus atricapillus, O. guatemalae, O. hoyi and O. sanctaecatarinae which are morphologically very similar, have been treated as belonging to a single species. A. atricapillus (Sibley and Monroe, 1990). Nucleotide sequences differ substantially between these taxa (6.3 to 8.8% nucleotide substitutions) indicating that they represent well established and distinct species which had been implicated already from ecological and bioacoustical analyses (König, 1991, 1994). The importance of vocal and ecological characters for the taxonomy of nocturnal birds is thus confirmed by our molecular analysis. Phylogenetic relationships were reconstructed between Old and New World owls using character state ("maximum parsimony"; PAUP 3.1.1) and distance matrix methods (neighbour-joining; MEGA). PMID:7766262

  8. 125 Paterson Ave. Little Falls, NJ 07424 973.256.1333 Fax 973.256.8088 www.Paper-Clip.com Copyright 2007

    E-print Network

    Hutcheon, James M.

    and perspectives. It's all part of being a growing, engaged human being. Agree to Disagree Y Face and your student may not always see eye-to-eye on certain things. Politics, diversity, religion're listening by maintaining eye contact, keeping an open posture and reflecting back some of the things he

  9. 125 Paterson Ave. Little Falls, NJ 07424 973.256.1333 Fax 973.256.8088 www.Paper-Clip.com Copyright 2007

    E-print Network

    Hutcheon, James M.

    for this pivotal transition and the implications of a changing family environment. 5. When Your Kid Goes to College. A Parent's Guide to Sex, Drugs, and Flunking Out: Answers to the Questions Your College Student Doesn

  10. The feather mites of the hoatzin Opisthocomus hoazin (Müller) (Aves: Opisthocomiformes), with the description of two new genera and six new species (Acari: Analgoidea, Pterolichoidea).

    PubMed

    Hernandes, Fabio A; Mironov, Sergey V

    2015-01-01

    Six new species and two new genera of feather mites are described from the hoatzin Opisthocomus hoazin (Müller) (Opisthocomiformes: Opisthocomidae) in Brazil: Gymnolichus lacrimosus sp. n., G. latihumeralis sp. n. (Xolalgidae), Temnalges hoazin sp. n., T. atelodiscus sp. n. (Psoroptoididae), Ciganalichus boasfilhoi gen. n., sp. n., and Hoazinacarus anisosetus gen. n., sp. n. (Pterolichidae). Illustrations of two previously known species, Opisthocomacarus umbellifer (Trouessart, 1899) and Stakyonemus hystrix (Trouessart, 1899) are provided. We show that the hoatzin bears a much richer feather mite fauna than previously thought and presently includes eight mite species from three families: Xolalgidae, Psoroptoididae (Analgoidea) and Pterolichidae (Pterolichoidea). They represent two morpho-ecological groups: (1) mites inhabiting the wing and tail feathers, and (2) mites living in downy and body contour feathers. We hypothesize that these mites represent a native feather mite fauna of the hoatzin, inherited from its ancestors and existing on this bird for a long time. The controversial and unresolved relationships of this bird with other bird taxa are briefly discussed in the light of the new acarofauna discovered. PMID:26624451

  11. 125 Paterson Ave. Little Falls, NJ 07424 973.256.1333 Fax 973.256.8088 www.Paper-Clip.com Copyright 2007

    E-print Network

    Hutcheon, James M.

    's college educational records even if you are paying the bills unless your child gives you written schedules. While coun- seling and medical records are not covered by FERPA, almost every state has laws or alcohol? Under FERPA a college MAY, without the stu- dent's permission, release certain information to par

  12. 125 Paterson Ave. Little Falls, NJ 07424 973.256.1333 Fax 973.256.8088 www.Paper-Clip.com Copyright 2007

    E-print Network

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed

    dream job" has a very dif- ferent tone--it uses the "I" voice and speaks directly to a real-life concern I becoming a victim of sexual assault or date rape I being hit, pushed or assaulted I being insulted

  13. 125 Paterson Ave. Little Falls, NJ 07424 973.256.1333 Fax 973.256.8088 www.Paper-Clip.com Copyright 2007

    E-print Network

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed

    like they have to "drink up" to meet peer standards. Yet, the real story is that many students don't choose to drink or they drink responsibly. It's important for students to know the real deal so they can easy for someone to slip a colorless, odorless "date rape drug" into the drink. Walking around

  14. Cryptic speciation in the white-shouldered antshrike (Thamnophilus aethiops, Aves - Thamnophilidae): the tale of a transcontinental radiation across rivers in lowland Amazonia and the northeastern Atlantic Forest.

    PubMed

    Thom, Gregory; Aleixo, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    The growing knowledge on paleogeography and the recent applications of molecular biology and phylogeography to the study of the Amazonian biota have provided a framework for testing competing hypotheses of biotic diversification in this region. Here, we reconstruct the spatio-temporal context of diversification of a widespread understory polytypic Amazonian bird species (Thamnophilus aethiops) and contrast it with different hypotheses of diversification and the taxonomy currently practiced in the group. Sequences of mtDNA (cytochrome b and ND2) and nuclear (?-fibrinogen introns 5 and 7 and the Z-liked Musk4) genes, adding up to 4093bp of 89 individuals covering the Amazonian, Andean, and Atlantic Forest populations of T. aethiops were analyzed. Phylogenetic and population genetics analyses revealed ten reciprocally monophyletic and genetically isolated or nearly-isolated lineages in T. aethiops, highlighting several inconsistencies between taxonomy and evolutionary history in this group. Our data suggest that the diversification of T. aethiops started in the Andean highlands, and then proceeded into the Amazonian lowlands probably after the consolidation of the modern Amazonian drainage. The main cladogenetic events in T. aethiops may be related to the formation and structuring of large Amazonian rivers during the Late Miocene-Early Pleistocene, coinciding with the dates proposed for other lineages of Amazonian organisms. Population genetics data do not support climatic fluctuations as a major source of diversification in T. aethiops. Even though not entirely concordant with paleobiogeographic models derived from phylogenies of other vertebrate lineages, our results support a prominent role for rivers as major drivers of diversification in Amazonia, while underscoring that different diversification scenarios are probably related to the distinct evolutionary origins of groups being compared. PMID:25291073

  15. 125 Paterson Ave. Little Falls, NJ 07424 973.256.1333 Fax 973.256.8088 www.Paper-Clip.com Copyright 2007

    E-print Network

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed

    --or if that minor kills or injures someone else. Keep in mind that the laws often extend to include parents who, nothing is completely in their control because, as you well know, students can find access to other--but there is no way the parents can control

  16. Mxico es central para cualquier esfuerzo de conservacin dirigido a las aves migratorias nerticas, osea las que se reproducen al norte de Mxico e inviernan

    E-print Network

    Hutto, Richard

    , osea las que se reproducen al norte de México e inviernan al sur de sus áreas reproductivas. Más mientras se avanza más al sur son cada vez menos las especies neárticas invernantes. Hay atributos son exclusivos al occiden- te de México. Abajo se describen estos atributos, para lo cual el enfoque

  17. mail: 1821 2nd Ave Apt 3S New York, NY 10128 cell: (207) 415-4321 e-mail: lillianpinehancock@gmail.com

    E-print Network

    Edwards, Erika J.

    students) per semester Summer 2008 Sustainable Farming Internship, Spannocchia Foundation, Sienna, Italy in Biological Sciences - Thesis Title: Unraveling the Role of Mitochondria in Red Algal Parasite Evolution 2004-2008 Trinity College, Hartford, CT. Bachelors of Science in Biology, faculty honors Fall 2007 Duke University

  18. Model analysis: Representing and assessing the dynamics of student learning Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, 174 West 18th Ave., Columbus, Ohio 43210, USA

    E-print Network

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    . As a result of extensive qualitative research, standardized multiple-choice tests such as Force Concept Inventory and Force- Motion Concept Evaluation tests provide instructors tools to probe their students as "at- tractive distracters."5,6 The impact of these exams can be both revealing and powerful. Faculty

  19. University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign, 1304 W. Pennsylvania Ave., 338 AESB, Urbana, IL 61801 217.333.3570 abe.illinois.edu abe@illinois.edu

    E-print Network

    Lee, Tonghun

    and Department of Agricultural & Biological Engineering to reunite, socialize, and celebrate the past and future, you can also paste h ps://ecommerce.aces.illinois.edu/ Illini_Pullers/ into your browser. Congratula

  20. 400 MARYLAND AVE., S.W., WASHINGTON, DC 20202-1100 The Department of Education's mission is to promote student achievement and preparation for global competitiveness

    E-print Network

    Farritor, Shane

    of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. § 2000c), which prohibits public school districts and colleges from and ensuring equal access. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION OFFICE FOR CIVIL RIGHTS THE ASSISTANT. The U.S. Department of Education and its Office for Civil Rights (OCR) believe that providing all