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1

Washington Ave Washington Ave  

E-print Network

Washington Ave Washington Ave I- 35 W I-35W 4th Street 3rd Street Fourth Street I-94 Riverside Avenue OakSt University Avenue HuronBlvd HarvardSt East River Pkwy West River Pkwy CedarAve Washington Washington Ave WalnutSt Essex St Fulton St PleasantSt UniversityAve OakSt 4th St ChurchSt UnionSt Ontario

Janssen, Michel

2

Low-dispersion spectroscopy of late stars with the focal reducer FoReRo2 at the 2-m telescope of the Rozhen NAO  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The paper presents analysis of FoReRo2 spectra of 17 G, K and M spectral standards and 2 variable stars that cover the range 5000-7000 A with resolution 5.224 A/pix. The FoReRo2 spectra of the spectral standards allow to derive criteria for spectral classification of late stars for the observed spectral range. The presented low-dispersion spectra of the famous stars MWC 560 and HBC 722 illustrate the possibilities and advantages of the time-saving FoReRo2 spectroscopy. It opened the possibility to obtain the first spectrum of brown dwarf, TVLM 513-46546, at Rozhen. Due to these good and hopeful results we suggest the FoReRo regime of the 2-m telescope to be used as a reserve mode for different tasks.

Dimitrov, Dinko; Kjurkchieva, Diana

3

St. Cyr AVE. Southern AVE.  

E-print Network

St. Cyr AVE. Bell AVE. Southern AVE. Baseheart RD. Goddard ST. Kathryn AVE. Anderson AVE. Buena Campus Building List for building No. 99 Student HousingStudent Housing99 LegendLegend Campus Index MapCampus Index Map CENTRAL CAMPUS NORTH CAMPUS SOUTH CAMP. CNM Yale Lomas Indian School Central Avenida Caesar

Maccabe, Barney

4

E. 7th Ave. E. 6th Ave.  

E-print Network

. E. Oakland Ave. E. Patterson Ave. E. Patterson Ave. AdamsAve. E. Maynard Ave. E. Maynard Ave. E. Alden Ave. E. Oakland Ave. Wyandotte Ave. E. Maynard Ave. Clinton St. E. Tompkins St. E. Hudson St. Wyandotte Ave. E. Oakland Ave. E. Maynard Ave. GlenmawrAve. DemingAve. MedaryAve. E. Duncan St. Findley

Howat, Ian M.

5

426 T. Garland Jr.,K. L. M. Martin, R. Diaz-Uriarte RECONSTRUCTINGANCESTRALTRAITVALUES  

E-print Network

426 T. Garland Jr.,K. L. M. Martin, R. Diaz-Uriarte RECONSTRUCTINGANCESTRALTRAITVALUES USINGSQUARED-CHANGEPARSIMONY:PLASMA OSMOLARITYAT THE ORIGINOF AMNIOTES Theodore Garland, Jr. Karen L. M. Martin Ramon Diaz-Uriarte INTRODUCTION. Martin, R. Diaz-Uriarte (for some referenczs pertaining to physiological traits, see Burggren and Bemis

Garland Jr., Theodore

6

Electrospray Emitters For Diffusion Vacuum Pumps Pablo Diaz Gomez Maqueo, Paulo C. Lozano  

E-print Network

Electrospray Emitters For Diffusion Vacuum Pumps Pablo Diaz Gomez Maqueo, Paulo C. Lozano June 2011 SSL # 12-11 #12;#12;Electrospray Emitters For Diffusion Vacuum Pumps Pablo Diaz Gomez Maqueo, Paulo C;Electrospray Emitters For Diffusion Vacuum Pumps by Pablo Diaz Gomez Maqueo Submitted to the Department

7

237 E. 17th Ave. OSU Vets  

E-print Network

Ave. 12515th Ave. 12417th Ave. 12319th Ave. 122Lane Ave. 121Oakland Ave. 120Maynard Ave. 12613th Ave. 113 13th Ave. 114 15th Ave. 115 17th Ave. 116 Lane Ave. 117 Northwood Ave. 118 Maynard Ave. 128 111 11

Howat, Ian M.

8

STS-34 Mission Specialist (MS) Chang-Diaz tests CCA prior to WETF exercises  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-34 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Mission Specialist (MS) Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, wearing extravehicular mobility unit (EMU), tests his communications carrier assembly (CCA) with the help of Rockwell Space Operations (RSO) technician Pam S. Peters (right) prior to donning his EMU helmet. These procedures are necessary for an extravehicular activity (EVA) contingency exercise (underwater simulation) in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29. Chang-Diaz stands on a platform that will lower him into the WETF's 25 ft deep pool.

1989-01-01

9

STS-46 MS Chang-Diaz floats in life raft during water egress training at JSC  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-46 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Mission Specialist (MS) Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, wearing launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), relies on a one-person life raft to get him to 'safety' during a launch emergency egress (bailout) simulation conducted in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29 pool.

1992-01-01

10

Semdrops: A Social Semantic Tagging Approach for Emerging Semantic Data Diego Torres, Alicia Diaz  

E-print Network

a combination of social web practices with semantic web technologies to enrich existing web resourcesSemdrops: A Social Semantic Tagging Approach for Emerging Semantic Data Diego Torres, Alicia Diaz.Molli}@univ-nantes.fr Abstract--This paper proposes a collective intelligence strat- egy for emerging semantic data. It presents

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

11

Manassas St. Monroe Ave.  

E-print Network

. Washington A Adams Ave. Mid-South Hospital LeBonheur Children'sMedical Center MemphisandShelby County and Marketing Department Writing, Editing TIM BULLARD, MA Design, Layout and AMBER CARTER Photography SHEILA

Cui, Yan

12

McCormickAve EasterlyParkway  

E-print Network

Ave WaringAveMcCormickAve S G arnerSt S Pugh St Pollock Road University Drive McCormickAve EasterlyParkway W C olleg e Av e W B eaver Ave W ParkAve W FosterAve S FraserSt S BurrowesSt W Nittany Ave W FairmontE C ollege Ave E B eaverAve E CalderW ay Univ ersity D rive WalnutS pring Ln EIrwinAve WaringAve Mc

Giles, C. Lee

13

Optical characterization of the 62-cm telescope at the Severo Diaz Galindo Observatory in Guadalajara  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the results of the optical characterization of the mirrors of the telescope of 62cm observatory "SEVERO DIAZ GALINDO" property of the University of Guadalajara. We use the Ronchi test and a spherometer to measure by first time, the radius of curvature for the primary and secondary mirror, the parameters of the telescope system were obtained by using the commercial software ZEMAX. We confirm that both mirrors are adequate to work in the telescope configuration and to do optical astronomy.

Nuñez, J. Manuel; de la Fuente, Eduardo; Luna, Esteban; Herrera, Joel; Velazquez, Enrique; García, Fernando; López, Eduardo; Váldez, Jorge; García, Benjamín; Martínez, Benjamín; Guisa, Gerardo; Quiroz, Fernando; Colorado, Enrique; Ochoa, José Luis; Almaguer, Jaime; Chávez, Arturo

2009-09-01

14

Franklin St. Cameron Ave.  

E-print Network

.Columbia South Rd. Man ad ium ning Country N ew East D r. W est D r. Club 9 11 13 18 Franklin St. Cameron Ave Math/Physics Library Alfred T. Brauer Library Phillips Hall Music* Library See Wilson Library - South Collections, General Manuscripts, Music, NC Collection, NCC Gallery, Photographic Archives, Rare Book

Whitton, Mary C.

15

Cameron Ave. Franklin St.  

E-print Network

Place McCorkle Pit The 15 501 US 54 NC Raleigh Rd. Cameron Ave. S. Co Franklin St. Pittsboro Recreation Bldg. Student Academic Services Bldg. Bldg. South Memorial Graham Grounds Common Y Campus Lenoir Lenoir Top of Mainstreet Lenoir Lenoir Mainstreet 1.5.0 at Bagel Alpine at Rams Head Chase Hall Starbucks

Whitton, Mary C.

16

GENESEEAVE. GENESEE AVE  

E-print Network

Drive VoigtDrive EngineersLane Geisel Librar Price Center Jacobs School of Engineering Bookstore WarrenGENESEEAVE. GENESEE AVE NORTHPOINTE DR CAMPUS POINT DR VOIGT DR GILMAN DR GILMANDR LA JOLLA SHORES DR. LA JOLLA VILLAGE DR VIAJOLLAVILLAGEDR NORTHTORREYPINESRD VOIGT DR GEISEL LIBRARY PRICE CENTER

Wang, Deli

17

Lidar detection using a dual-frequency source Rosemary Diaz, Sze-Chun Chan, and Jia-Ming Liu  

E-print Network

Lidar detection using a dual-frequency source Rosemary Diaz, Sze-Chun Chan, and Jia-Ming Liu (Doc. ID 71166); published November 22, 2006 A new technique of dual-frequency Doppler-lidar and operating conditions. © 2006 Optical Society of America OCIS codes: 120.7250, 280.3640, 280.3340. Lidar

Chan, Sze-Chun

18

Astronauts Jeffrey A. Hoffman (left) and Franklin R. Chang-Diaz hold up a sign to celebrate the fact  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Astronauts Jeffrey A. Hoffman (left) and Franklin R. Chang-Diaz hold up a sign to celebrate the fact that each has surpassed the 1,000-hour mark in space during the flight. The two mission specialists joined three other astronauts and an international payload specialist for 16 days of scientific research aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia.

1996-01-01

19

STS-111 M.S. Chang-Diaz arrives at KSC for launch  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-111 Mission Specialist Franklin Chang-Diaz is happy to be returning to KSC to prepare for launch. Mission STS-111, known as Utilization Flight 2, is carrying supplies and equipment to the International Space Station. The payload includes the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo, the Mobile Base System, which will be installed on the Mobile Transporter to complete the Canadian Mobile Servicing System, or MSS, and a replacement wrist/roll joint for Canadarm 2. The mechanical arm will then have the capability to 'inchworm' from the U.S. Lab Destiny to the MSS and travel along the truss to work sites. Also on board will be Expedition 5, traveling to the Station on Space Shuttle Endeavour as the replacement crew for Expedition 4, who will return to Earth aboard the orbiter. Launch is scheduled for May 30, 2002.

2002-01-01

20

1. Exit at Washington Ave. (Exit 17C) 2. Le at Washington Ave. S.  

E-print Network

From I-35W Southbound 1. Exit at Washington Ave. (Exit 17C) 2. Le at Washington Ave. S. 3. Con nue Straight as Washington Ave S becomes Cedar Ave 5. Le on 3rd St S. 6. For 19th Ave Ramp, turn right 17C) 2. Stay in the middle lane and follow the signs for Washington Ave./U of M/West Bank. 3

Minnesota, University of

21

VizieR Online Data Catalog: Northern Galactic OB stars vsini (Simon-Diaz+, 2014)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The spectroscopic observations considered for this study are part of the IACOB spectroscopic database of northern Galactic OB stars (last described in Simon-Diaz et al., 2011, Bull. Soc. Roy. Sci. Liege, 80, 514 and Stellar Clusters and Associations: Proc. A RIA Workshop on Gaia, eds. E. J. Alfaro Navarro, A. T. Gallego Calvente, & M. R. Zapatero Osorio, 255). This unique high-quality spectroscopic database has been compiled in the framework of the IACOB project. To date, the IACOB database comprises 1250 spectra of 153 and 97 Galactic O- and early B-type stars, respectively, observable from the Roque de los Muchachos observatory in La Palma (Spain). The spectra have a resolving power of 46000 and 23000, a typical signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) above 150, and were compiled between November 2008 and January 2013 with the high-resolution FIbre-fed Echelle Spectrograph (FIES) attached to the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT). The IACOB database has a multi-epoch character that enables investigations of the binary/multiple nature of considered stars and the temporal variations in individual objects with at least three spectra per observed target. In this study, we only used a subsample of the spectra, discarding all stars with signatures of multiplicity (which means that we only considered apparently single and SB1 stars), and only considering the spectrum with the highest S/N ratio per star. (5 data files).

Simon-Diaz, S.; Herrero, A.

2014-04-01

22

1. Exit at Washington Ave. (Exit 17C) 2. Left at Washington Ave. S.  

E-print Network

From I-35W Southbound 1. Exit at Washington Ave. (Exit 17C) 2. Left at Washington Ave. S. 3. Left at the 2nd signal to continue on Washington Ave S. 4. Continue through the signal at 19th Ave. On to 2nd St. Exit at 3rd St./U of M (Exit 17C) 2. Stay in the middle lane and follow the signs for Washington Ave

Gulliver, Robert

23

Welshpool Rd aterfordAve  

E-print Network

Welshpool Rd Braibrise Rd Bungaree Rd BUILDING 408 Brand Dr tStneK KentSt KentSt Jackson Rd t Reserve Centenary Park Reen St tSdrannatS Sleight St Taree St W arw ick St Clinton Ave HitchcockSt Bone St Building 115 Bentley Campus Kent Street, Bentley WA 6102 Telephone: 1300 00 4444 9266 4444 Extension: 4444

24

On the applicability of off-line signatures to the fuzzy vault construction Manuel R. Freire, Julian Fierrez, Marcos Martinez-Diaz, Javier Ortega-Garcia  

E-print Network

, Julian Fierrez, Marcos Martinez-Diaz, Javier Ortega-Garcia ATVS - Biometric Recognition Group Escuela- eries. 1. Introduction The goal of biometrics is to infer the identity of peo- ple based on anatomical or behavioral data (e.g., finger- print, face, signature or voice) [7]. In contrast with classical knowledge

Autonoma de Madrid, Universidad

25

15. WEST SIDE OF 1900 BLOCK, PACIFIC AVE. FROM RIGHT; ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

15. WEST SIDE OF 1900 BLOCK, PACIFIC AVE. FROM RIGHT; 1920-22 PACIFIC AVE., WIEGAL COMPANY CANDY FACTORY (1904); 1924-26 PACIFIC AVE., CAMPBELL BUILDING (DAVIS BUILDING) (1890); 1928-30 PACIFIC AVE., REESE-CRANDALL & REDMAN BUILDING, (1890); 1932-36 PACIFIC AVE., MC DONALD & SMITH BUILDING (1890); 1938-48 PACIFIC AVE., F.S. HARMON COMPANY WAREHOUSE (1908), DESIGNED BY CARL AUGUST DARMER. - Union Depot Area Study, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

26

www.ave.kth.se Rail Vehicles  

E-print Network

www.ave.kth.se Rail Vehicles Part of the Masters program in Vehicle Engineering Master's Thesis, contact Carlos Casanueva at the Division of Rail Vehicles. Tel.: 08 790 76 52 e-mail: carlosc@kth.se #12;

Haviland, David

27

1. GENERAL STREET VIEW LOOKING SOUTH ON CONVENT AVE. FROM ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. GENERAL STREET VIEW LOOKING SOUTH ON CONVENT AVE. FROM INTERSECTION OF SOUTH CONVENT AVE. AND WEST KENNEDY ST. - Barrio Libre, West Kennedy & West Seventeenth Streets, Meyer & Convent Avenues, Tucson, Pima County, AZ

28

Campus Community Police 21 Sussex Ave, Toronto  

E-print Network

Campus Community Police 21 Sussex Ave, Toronto ON M5S 1J6 Dispatch 4169782323 Urgent 4169782222 University of Toronto Campus Community Police Community Alert Wednesday January 30, 2013 The University of Toronto Campus Community Police has alerted the public to a Robbery investigation

Sokolowski, Marla

29

420 Comp & Comm Ctr Garden Ave Ext  

E-print Network

420 Comp & Comm Ctr Garden Ave Ext Ithaca, New York 14853-6601 t. 607.254.4545 e. sds? Is there an accessible toilet stall (5' x 5' clear floor space)? Is toilet seat 17 to 19 inches above floor? Is there an assistive listening system available? Does the room have movable seating to make room for a wheelchair

30

www.ave.kth.se Rail Vehicles  

E-print Network

www.ave.kth.se Rail Vehicles Part of the Masters program in Vehicle Engineering Master's Thesis: Validation of wheel wear calculation code Background Rail vehicle operators have a genuine concern about wheel and rail wear prediction methodologies, due to the influence of worn profiles in the cost of both

Haviland, David

31

Enigmatic Phylogeny of Skuas (Aves: Stercorariidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Multiple sources of evidence show that the skuas (Aves: Stercorariidae) are a monophyletic group, closely related to gulls (Laridae). On morphological and behavioural evidence the Stercorariidae are divided into two widely divergent genera, Catharacta and Stercorarius, consistent with observed levels of nuclear and mitochondrial gene divergence. Catharacta skuas are large-bodied and with one exception breed in the Southern Hemisphere. Stercorarius

B. L. Cohen; A. J. Baker; K. Blechschmidt; D. L. Dittmann; R. W. Furness; J. A. Gerwin; A. J. Helbig; J. de Korte; H. D. Marshall; R. L. Palma; H.-U. Peter; R. Ramli; I. Siebold; M. S. Willcox; R. H. Wilson; R. M. Zink

1997-01-01

32

liuGfordAve eb = eastbound  

E-print Network

@ Barclay eb 33rd@ Greenmount eb JH@ Eastern 33rd@ Greenmount wb 33rd@ Barclay wb 33rd@ Abell wb 33rdSt Greenway Chancery Rd BarclaySt TingesLn NCalvertSt tSluaPtS Gorsuch Ave Homestead St Southway Greenmount at Barclay eb 33rd at Greenmount eb Waverly Giant JH @ Eastern 33rd at Greenmount wb 33rd at Barclay wb 33rd

Dong, Xinzhong

33

Diaz Olvera L., Plat D., Pochet P. (2013), The puzzle of mobility and access to the city in sub-Saharan Africa, Journal of Transport Geography, Vol. 32, pp. 56-64.  

E-print Network

-Saharan Africa, Journal of Transport Geography, Vol. 32, pp. 56-64. The puzzle of mobility and access to the city). The situation is quite different in many countries of the South, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, where in Sub-Saharan Africa Lourdes Diaz Olvera, Didier Plat, Pascal Pochet lourdes

Boyer, Edmond

34

JACK AND PEARL RESNICK CAMPUS JACOBI MEDICAL CENTER Rhinelander Ave  

E-print Network

Faculty Parking AdditionalParking ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE OF MEDICINE JACK AND PEARL RESNICK CAMPUS 1 A U N I V E R S I T Y Albert Einstein College of Medicine #12;......................... 1225 Morris Park Ave 20. Einstein Boiler Plant............................1199 Sackett Ave. JACOBI

Yates, Andrew

35

Certhiasomus, a new genus of woodcreeper (Aves: Passeriformes: Dendrocolaptidae)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Phylogenetic analysis of the family Dendrocolaptidae (Aves: Passeriformes) indicates that the two species traditionally placed in the genus Deconychura are not sister taxa. Certhiasomus, a new genus of woodcreeper, is described for one of these species, C. stictolaemus.

Derryberry, Elizabeth; Claramunt, Santiago; Chesser, R. Terry; Aleixo, Alexandre; Cracraft, Joel; Moyle, Robert G.; Brumfield, Robb T.

2010-01-01

36

JAMES EDWARD COLGATE Department of Mechanical Engineering 2210 Asbury Ave  

E-print Network

JAMES EDWARD COLGATE Department of Mechanical Engineering 2210 Asbury Ave Northwestern University. Academic History Northwestern University, Department of Mechanical Engineering Professor, September 2002 Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering PhD, Mechanical Engineering

Bustamante, Fabián E.

37

JAMES EDWARD COLGATE Department of Mechanical Engineering 2210 Asbury Ave  

E-print Network

JAMES EDWARD COLGATE Department of Mechanical Engineering 2210 Asbury Ave Northwestern University. Academic History Northwestern University, Department of Mechanical Engineering Allen and Johnnie Breed Adjunct Professor, 2007-2010 Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering

Hartmann, Mitra J. Z.

38

Enigmatic phylogeny of skuas (Aves:Stercorariidae)  

PubMed Central

Multiple sources of evidence show that the skuas (Aves:Stercorariidae) are a monophyletic group, closely related to gulls (Laridae. On morphological and behavioural evidence the Stercorariidae are divided into two widely divergent genera, Catharacta and Stercorarius, consistent with observed levels of nuclear and mitochondrial gene divergence. Catharacta skuas are large-bodied and with one exception breed in the Southern Hemisphere. Stercorarius skuas otherwise known as jaegers) are smaller bodied and breed exclusively in the Northern Hemisphere. Evidence from both mitochondrial and nuclear genomes and from ectoparasitic lice (Insecta:Phthiraptera) shows that the Pomarine skua, S. pomarinus, which has been recognized as being somewhat intermediate in certain morphological and behavioural characteristics, is much more closely related to species in the genus Catharacta, especially to the Northern Hemisphere-breeding Great skua, C. skua, than it is to the other two Stercorarius skuas, the Arctic skua, S. parasiticus and the Longtailed skua, S. longicaudus. Three possible explanations that might account for this discordant aspect of skua phylogeny are explored. These involve (i) the segregation of ancestral polymorphism, (ii) convergent evolution of morphology and behaviour or (iii) inter-generic hybridization. The available evidence from both nuclear and mitochondrial genomes does not exclude any of these hypotheses. Thus, resolution of this enigma of skua phylogeny awaits further work. PMID:9061968

Cohen, B L; Baker, A J; Blechschmidt, K; Dittmann, D L; Furness, R W; Gerwin, J A; Helbig, A J; de Korte, J; Marshall, H D; Palma, R L; Peter, H U; Ramli, R; Siebold, I; Willcox, M S; Wilson, R H; Zink, R M

1997-01-01

39

AVES.NET: The Freshwater Dinoflagellates  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Hosted by AVES.NET, this website about Freshwater Dinoflagellates was created by Victor W. Fazio III and Dr. Susan Carty of Heidelberg College (Tiffin, Ohio). Two main attractions of this site are the Freshwater Dinoflagellate Image Archive, and the Recent Additions-Freshwater Dinoflagellate Images 2003 (from the 2003-04 winter field season). Individual Dinoflagellate image pages generally include a ventral view, dorsal view, or both, and the pages featuring species from Ohio include county distribution maps. Site visitors can email Dr. Carty for permission to use any of the images. The website also contains a List of Freshwater Dinoflagellates in Ohio, some of which link to the individual image pages. Additionally, the site offers a Review of Online Images of Freshwater Dinoflagellates including links to many other host sites, and a link to an online article by Dr. Susan Carty and Daniel E. Wujek entitled _A New Species of Peridinium and New Records of Dinoflagellates and Silica-Scaled Chrysophytes from Belize._ [NL

Carty, Susan; Fazio, Victor W. (1962-)

40

Enigmatic phylogeny of skuas (Aves:Stercorariidae)  

PubMed

Multiple sources of evidence show that the skuas (Aves:Stercorariidae) are a monophyletic group, closely related to gulls (Laridae. On morphological and behavioural evidence the Stercorariidae are divided into two widely divergent genera, Catharacta and Stercorarius, consistent with observed levels of nuclear and mitochondrial gene divergence. Catharacta skuas are large-bodied and with one exception breed in the Southern Hemisphere. Stercorarius skuas otherwise known as jaegers) are smaller bodied and breed exclusively in the Northern Hemisphere. Evidence from both mitochondrial and nuclear genomes and from ectoparasitic lice (Insecta:Phthiraptera) shows that the Pomarine skua, S. pomarinus, which has been recognized as being somewhat intermediate in certain morphological and behavioural characteristics, is much more closely related to species in the genus Catharacta, especially to the Northern Hemisphere-breeding Great skua, C. skua, than it is to the other two Stercorarius skuas, the Arctic skua, S. parasiticus and the Longtailed skua, S. longicaudus. Three possible explanations that might account for this discordant aspect of skua phylogeny are explored. These involve (i) the segregation of ancestral polymorphism, (ii) convergent evolution of morphology and behaviour or (iii) inter-generic hybridization. The available evidence from both nuclear and mitochondrial genomes does not exclude any of these hypotheses. Thus, resolution of this enigma of skua phylogeny awaits further work. PMID:9061968

Cohen, B L; Baker, A J; Blechschmidt, K; Dittmann, D L; Furness, R W; Gerwin, J A; Helbig, A J; de Korte, J; Marshall, H D; Palma, R L; Peter, H U; Ramli, R; Siebold, I; Willcox, M S; Wilson, R H; Zink, R M

1997-02-22

41

Effects of changing irrigation practices on the ground-water hydrology of the Santa Isabel-Juana Diaz area, south central Puerto Rico  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Prior to 1930, the principal source of water for irrigation in the Santa Isabel-Juana Diaz area was surface water from outside the study area, which was delivered by a complex channel-pond system. Recharge from water applied to the fields, estimated to be 18.7 million of gallons per day, and discharge by ground-water flow to sea, estimated to be 17 million of gallons per day, were the major water- budget components prior to intensive development of the ground-water resources. Development of the ground-water resources after 1930 resulted in a substantial increase in irrigation, primarily furrow irrigation. The surface water supplied by the complex channel-pond system continued to be used and ground-water withdrawals increased sub- stantially. By 1966-68, ground-water recharge from irrigation water applied to the fields, estimated to be 37 million of gallons per day, and discharge by pumpage for irrigation, estimated to be 77 million of gallons per day, were the two major components of the ground-water budget. By 1987, drip irrigation had become the principal method of irrigation in the study area, and surface-water irrigation had, for the most part, been discontinued. The estimated aquifer recharge from irrigation water in 1987 was about 6.6 million of gallons per day, which occurred primarily in the remaining fields where furrow irrigation was still practiced. Although aquifer recharge had been reduced as a result of the conversion from furrow to drip irrigation, water levels in the aquifer were higher in 1987 than in 1968 because of the large reduction in ground-water withdrawals and subsequent recovery of ground-water levels.

Ramos-Gines, Orlando

1994-01-01

42

BayesianScore(BDeu) Ave. Bayesian Score Results -Child -Sample Size 500  

E-print Network

GS PC TPDA GES BayesianScore(BDeu) Ave. Bayesian Score Results - Child - Sample Size 500 Error Bars GS PC TPDA GES BayesianScore(BDeu) Ave. Bayesian Score Results - Child3 - Sample Size 500 Error Bars TPDA GES BayesianScore(BDeu) Ave. Bayesian Score Results - Child5 - Sample Size 500 Error Bars

Brown, Laura E.

43

HR Staffing and Recruitment 6054 S Drexel Ave  

E-print Network

above): PreRecruitment Y N The department/unit prepared or updated the job description soHR Staffing and Recruitment 6054 S Drexel Ave Chicago, Illinois 60637 RECRUITMENT AND SELECTION that the requisition accurately reflects the position's current job duties, qualifications, working conditions

He, Chuan

44

Duval County Extension Office 1010 N. McDuff Ave.  

E-print Network

nd Vermicompost Make & Take Workshop $10 - June 15th Directions Take I-10 to McDuff Ave. Go north Products Compost & Vermicompost (extra $10 to make worm bin) Session 3 - Wednesday, June 20 Principles for Vermicompost Bin **Session 4 - $40 for Rain Barrel Choose the sessions you want. Please pre-register by sending

Watson, Craig A.

45

OFFICE OF DIGITAL HUMANITIES 1100 PENNSYLVANIA AVE., NW  

E-print Network

NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES OFFICE OF DIGITAL HUMANITIES 1100 PENNSYLVANIA AVE., NW WASHINGTON, D.C. 20506 ODH@NEH.GOV WWW.NEH.GOV National Endowment for the Humanities Office of Digital Humanities Narrative Section of a Successful Application This sample of the narrative portion from a grant

McCombe, Bruce D.

46

Pseudasthenes, a new genus of ovenbird (Aves: Passeriformes: Furnariidae)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Phylogenetic analysis of the family Furnariidae (Aves: Passeriformes) indicates that the genus Asthenes is polyphyletic, consisting of two groups that are not sister taxa. Pseudasthenes, a new genus of ovenbird, is described for one of these groups. The four species included in the new genus, formerly placed in Asthenes, are P. humicola, P. patagonica, P. steinbachi, and P. cactorum.

Derryberry, Elizabeth; Claramunt, Santiago; O'Quin, Kelly E.; Aleixo, Alexandre; Chesser, Terry; Remsen, J.V., Jr.; Brumfield, Robb T.

2010-01-01

47

SKEDADDLE HUMANE WILDLIFE CONTROL 297 Brucedale Ave. East  

E-print Network

-877-222-9453 WILDLIFE TECHNICIAN Skedaddle Humane Wildlife Control, Canada's largest urban wildlife control companySKEDADDLE HUMANE WILDLIFE CONTROL 297 Brucedale Ave. East Hamilton, ON L9A 1R2 1. Responsibilities: Inspect buildings and outside areas of property to detect signs of wildlife intrusion. Identify

48

AVES: A Computer Cluster System approach for INTEGRAL Scientific Analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The AVES computing system, based on an "Cluster" architecture is a fully integrated, low cost computing facility dedicated to the archiving and analysis of the INTEGRAL data. AVES is a modular system that uses the software resource manager (SLURM) and allows almost unlimited expandibility (65,536 nodes and hundreds of thousands of processors); actually is composed by 30 Personal Computers with Quad-Cores CPU able to reach the computing power of 300 Giga Flops (300x10{9} Floating point Operations Per Second), with 120 GB of RAM and 7.5 Tera Bytes (TB) of storage memory in UFS configuration plus 6 TB for users area. AVES was designed and built to solve growing problems raised from the analysis of the large data amount accumulated by the INTEGRAL mission (actually about 9 TB) and due to increase every year. The used analysis software is the OSA package, distributed by the ISDC in Geneva. This is a very complex package consisting of dozens of programs that can not be converted to parallel computing. To overcome this limitation we developed a series of programs to distribute the workload analysis on the various nodes making AVES automatically divide the analysis in N jobs sent to N cores. This solution thus produces a result similar to that obtained by the parallel computing configuration. In support of this we have developed tools that allow a flexible use of the scientific software and quality control of on-line data storing. The AVES software package is constituted by about 50 specific programs. Thus the whole computing time, compared to that provided by a Personal Computer with single processor, has been enhanced up to a factor 70.

Federici, M.; Martino, B. L.; Natalucci, L.; Umbertini, P.

49

Angelique Diaz To Subject UPLOAD  

E-print Network

of the un- derlying technology in other fields such as the defense and aerospace industries. Comprehensive and Technology, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ROC W. W. Recker Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Institute of their ability to model and analyze Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) under faster

50

AVE-SESAME 2: The 25-MB sounding data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The rawinsonde sounding program for the AVE-SESAME II experiment is described. Data at 25 mb intervals from the surface to 25 mb for the 23 National Weather Service and 19 special stations participating in the experiment are presented. Soundings were taken at 3 hr intervals beginning at 1200 GMT on April 19, 1979, and ending at 1200 GMT on April 20, 1979 (nine sounding times). The method of processing is discussed briefly, estimates of the rms errors in the data presented, an example of contact data given, reasons given for the termination of soundings below 100 mb, and soundings listed which exhibit abnormal characteristics.

Williams, S. F.; Gerhard, M. L.; Turner, R. E.

1980-01-01

51

Connecticut Native American Intertribal Urban Council Mailing address: 545 Whalley Ave New Haven, Ct. 06511  

E-print Network

Connecticut Native American Intertribal Urban Council Mailing address: 545 Whalley Ave New Haven Applicants must be Native American. All applications must be postmarked or hand delivered to 545 Whalley Ave letters of recommendation (one of which should be from a Native American, where possible) Students need

Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

52

Nuclear and Mitochondrial Genes Contain Similar Phylogenetic Signal for Pigeons and Doves (Aves: Columbiformes)  

E-print Network

Nuclear and Mitochondrial Genes Contain Similar Phylogenetic Signal for Pigeons and Doves (Aves of this assumption in the pigeons and doves (Aves: Columbiformes) by comparing phylog- enies derived from nuclear incongruence between trees derived from the two genes; so, we combined nuclear and mitochondrial data

Clayton, Dale H.

53

NASA's participation in the AVE-SESAME '79 program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center participated with its AVE (Atmospheric Variability Experiment) in a large interagency mesoscale and severe storms experiment identified herein as AVE-SESAME '79 (Atmospheric Variability Experiment-Severe Environmental Storms and Mesoscale Experiment 1979). A primary objective of NASA was to support an effort to acquire carefully edited sets of rawinsonde data during selected severe weather events for use in correlative and diagnostic studies with satellite and radar data obtained at approximately the same times. Data were acquired during six individual 24-h experiments on both the regional and storm scales over a network in the central United States that utilized approximately 20 supplemental rawinsonde sites meshed among 23 standard National Weather Service sites. Included among the six experiments are data obtained between 1200 GMT on April 10 and 1200 GMT on April 11, encompassing the formation and development period for the tornado-producing systems that devastated Wichita Falls, Texas, and other sections of Oklahoma and Texas. The other dates for which data sets are available are April 19-20 and 25-26, May 9-10 and 20-21, and June 7-8, 1979.

Hill, K.; Turner, R. E.; Wilson, G. S.

1979-01-01

54

AVE-SEASAME 5: 25-mb sounding data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The rewinsonde sounding program for the AVE-SESAME 5 experiment is described and tubulated data at 25 mb intervals are presented for the 23 National Weather Service stations and 20 special stations participating in the experiment. Soundings were taken at 3-hr intervals beginning at 1200 GMT on May 20, 1979, and ending at 1200 GMT on may 21, 1979 (nine sounding times). A tenth sounding was teken at many special stations between 2100 and 0000 GMT on May 20. The method of processing is discussed, estimates of the rms errors in the data are presented, and an example of contact data is given. Reasons are given for the termination of soundings below 100 mb, and soundings with abnormal characteristics are listed.

Sienkiewicz, M. E.; Gilchrist, L. P.; Turner, R. E.

1981-05-01

55

Vascular and neural dysfunctions in obese Zucker rats: effect of AVE7688.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to determine whether AVE7688 a drug that inhibits both angiotensin converting enzyme and neutral endopeptidase activity protects vascular and nerve functions in an animal model of metabolic syndrome. Obese Zucker rats at 20 weeks of age were treated for 12 weeks with AVE7688. Vasodilation in epineurial arterioles was measured by videomicroscopy and nerve conduction velocity was measured following electrical stimulation. Treatment with AVE7688 improved vascular relaxation in response to acetylcholine and motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity. In obese Zucker rats superoxide levels and nitrotyrosine staining were elevated in the aorta and treatment corrected both conditions. Obese Zucker rats were hypoalgesic in response to a thermal stimulus and demonstrated signs of impaired tactile response and both conditions were significantly improved with treatment. Even though obese Zucker rats are normoglycemic vascular and neural dysfunctions develop with age and can be improved by treatment with AVE7688. PMID:19536347

Davidson, Eric P; Coppey, Lawrence J; Kleinschmidt, Travis L; Oltman, Christine L; Yorek, Mark A

2009-01-01

56

Vascular and Neural Dysfunctions in Obese Zucker Rats: Effect of AVE7688  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this study was to determine whether AVE7688 a drug that inhibits both angiotensin converting enzyme and neutral endopeptidase activity protects vascular and nerve functions in an animal model of metabolic syndrome. Obese Zucker rats at 20 weeks of age were treated for 12 weeks with AVE7688. Vasodilation in epineurial arterioles was measured by videomicroscopy and nerve conduction velocity was measured following electrical stimulation. Treatment with AVE7688 improved vascular relaxation in response to acetylcholine and motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity. In obese Zucker rats superoxide levels and nitrotyrosine staining were elevated in the aorta and treatment corrected both conditions. Obese Zucker rats were hypoalgesic in response to a thermal stimulus and demonstrated signs of impaired tactile response and both conditions were significantly improved with treatment. Even though obese Zucker rats are normoglycemic vascular and neural dysfunctions develop with age and can be improved by treatment with AVE7688. PMID:19536347

Davidson, Eric P.; Coppey, Lawrence J.; Kleinschmidt, Travis L.; Oltman, Christine L.; Yorek, Mark A.

2009-01-01

57

DEPARTMENT OF EARTH & CLIMATE SCIENCES 1600 HOLLOWAY AVE, THORNTON HALL 509  

E-print Network

1 DEPARTMENT OF EARTH & CLIMATE SCIENCES 1600 HOLLOWAY AVE University's (SFSU) Department of Earth & Climate Sciences (http://tornado.sfsu.edu/) seeks candidates to teach at the undergraduate and graduate levels. The Department of Earth & Climate Sciences has 10

58

DEPAUL UNIVERSITY Institute for Professional Development INSTITUTE FOR PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 243 S. Wabash Ave, Room 301  

E-print Network

S. Wabash Ave, Room 301 Chicago, IL 60604-2300 WEB DEVELOPMENT WITH JAVASCRIPT AND HTML5 Phone: (312: ________________________________ #12;WEB DEVELOPMENT WITH JAVASCRIPT AND HTML5 PROGRAM APPLICANTS: This form must be completed

Schaefer, Marcus

59

Sonoma State University 1801 E. Cotati Ave. Rohnert Park, CA 94928  

E-print Network

campus · Concerts and theater events · JUMP (Volunteer organization) What can I do in ROHNERT PARK/ SANTASonoma State University 1801 E. Cotati Ave. · Rohnert Park, CA 94928 707-664-2742 ssali problems with classes _________ ==>==>==> TOEFL registration___________________ ==>==>==> Registration

Ravikumar, B.

60

Treatment of Zucker diabetic fatty rats with AVE7688 improves vascular and neural dysfunction  

PubMed Central

Aim Vasopeptidase inhibitors are drugs that inhibit angiotensin-converting enzyme and neutral endopeptidase (NEP). The latter is a protease that degrades vasoactive peptides and is increased in diabetes. We have previously shown that treating streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, an animal model of type 1 diabetes, with AVE7688, a vasopeptidase inhibitor, improves neurovascular and neural function. In this study, we determined the effect of treating Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats, an animal model of type 2 diabetes, with AVE7688 on vascular and neural function. Methods ZDF rats at 12 weeks of age were treated for 12 weeks with AVE7688 (500 mg/kg diet). Afterwards, vascular reactivity of epineurial arterioles of the sciatic nerve and nerve conduction velocity and blood flow was determined. Results Vascular and neural function was significantly impaired in ZDF rats compared with age-matched lean (control) rats. Treating ZDF rats with AVE7688 improved vascular relaxation to acetylcholine and calcitonin gene-related peptide in epineurial arterioles. Motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity, endoneurial blood flow and thermal nociception end-points were also improved by treatment compared with untreated ZDF rats. Superoxide and expression of NEP were increased in epineurial arterioles from ZDF rats and attenuated by treatment with AVE7688. Conclusions AVE7688 is an effective treatment for microvascular and neural disease in ZDF rats. Thus, vasopeptidase inhibitors may be an effective treatment for diabetic microvascular and neural complication in type 2 diabetes. PMID:18564175

Oltman, C. L.; Davidson, E. P.; Coppey, L. J.; Kleinschmidt, T. L.; Yorek, M. A.

2009-01-01

61

AveBoost2: Boosting for Noisy Data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

AdaBoost is a well-known ensemble learning algorithm that constructs its constituent or base models in sequence. A key step in AdaBoost is constructing a distribution over the training examples to create each base model. This distribution, represented as a vector, is constructed to be orthogonal to the vector of mistakes made by the pre- vious base model in the sequence. The idea is to make the next base model's errors uncorrelated with those of the previous model. In previous work, we developed an algorithm, AveBoost, that constructed distributions orthogonal to the mistake vectors of all the previous models, and then averaged them to create the next base model s distribution. Our experiments demonstrated the superior accuracy of our approach. In this paper, we slightly revise our algorithm to allow us to obtain non-trivial theoretical results: bounds on the training error and generalization error (difference between training and test error). Our averaging process has a regularizing effect which, as expected, leads us to a worse training error bound for our algorithm than for AdaBoost but a superior generalization error bound. For this paper, we experimented with the data that we used in both as originally supplied and with added label noise-a small fraction of the data has its original label changed. Noisy data are notoriously difficult for AdaBoost to learn. Our algorithm's performance improvement over AdaBoost is even greater on the noisy data than the original data.

Oza, Nikunj C.

2004-01-01

62

Health assessment of captive tinamids (Aves, Tinamiformes) in Brazil.  

PubMed

Ninety-five (95) captive tinamids (Aves, Tinamiformes) of species Crypturellus obsoletus (brown tinamou), Crypturellus parvirostris (small-billed tinamou), Crypturellus tataupa (Tataupa tinamou), Crypturellus undulatus (undulated tinamou), Rhynchotus rufescens (red-winged tinamou), and Tinamus solitarius (solitary tinamou) were evaluated for diseases of mandatory control in the Brazilian Poultry Health Program (PNSA). Antibodies were detected by serum agglutination test (SAT) in 4 birds for Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) and in 27 birds for Salmonella Pullorum (SP) and Salmonella Gallinarum (SG). However, by hemagglutination inhibition (HI), sera were negative to MG and Mycoplasma synoviae (MS). Bacteriology was negative for SP and SG. No antibody was detected by HI to avian paramyxovirus type 1. However, antibodies to infectious bursal disease virus were detected in 9.4% (9/95) by ELISA. Fecal parasitology and necropsy revealed Capillaria spp. in 44.2% (42/95), Eimeria rhynchoti in 42.1% (40/95), Strongyloides spp. in 100% (20/20), Ascaridia spp., and unknown sporozoa in small-billed tinamou. Ectoparasites were detected in 42.1% (40/95) by inspection, and collected for identification. The louse Strongylocotes lipogonus (Insecta: Phthiraptera) was found on all Rhynchotus rufescens. An additional four lice species were found on 14 individuals. Traumatic lesions included four individual R. rufescens (4/40, 10%) with rhinotheca fracture, one with mandible fracture and three with posttraumatic ocular lesions (3/40, 7.5%). One C. parvirostris had phalangeal loss, another had tibiotarsal joint ankylosis and another had an open wound on the foot. Results suggest that major poultry infections/ diseases may not be relevant in tinamids, and that this group of birds, as maintained within distances for biosecurity purposes, may not represent a risk to commercial poultry. Ecto- and endoparasites were common, disseminated, and varied; regular monitoring of flocks is recommended for best performance. PMID:23082518

Marques, Marcus Vinícius Romero; Ferreira Júnior, Francisco Carlos; Andery, Danielle de Assis; Fernandes, André Almeida; de Araújo, Alessandra Vitelli; de Resende, José Sérgio; Donatti, Rogério Venâncio; Martins, Nelson Rodrigo da Silva

2012-09-01

63

Pressure Contact Sounding Data for NASA's Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE 3)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The basic rawinsonde data are described at each pressure contact from the surface to sounding termination for the 41 stations participating in the AVE III measurement program that began at 0000 GMT on February 6 and ended at 1200 GMT on February 7, 1975. Soundings were taken at 3-hour intervals during a large period of the experiment from most stations within the United States east of about 105 degrees west longitude. Methods of data processing, change in reduction scheme since the AVE II pilot experiment, and data accuracy are briefly discussed. An example of contact data is presented, and microfiche cards of all the contact data are included in the appendix. The AVE III project was conducted to better understand and establish the extent of applications for meteorological satellite sensor data through correlative ground truth experiments and to provide basic experimental data for use in studies of atmospheric scales of-motion interrelationships.

Fuelberg, H. E.; Hill, C. K.; Turner, R. E.; Long, K. E.

1975-01-01

64

Reduction and error analysis of the AVE 2 pilot experiment data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The reduction techniques used to process data from the pilot experiment of the second NASA atmospheric variability experiment (AVE IIP), which was conducted during a 24 hour period beginning at 1200 GMT on May 11, 1974, and ending at 1200 GMT on May 12, 1974 are described. Each step of the data handling process is described through the presentation of computer flow charts, programs, equations, and narrative. An error analysis of the final output is presented, and results of the AVE IIP reduction process are compared with results from the National Weather Service. The AVE IIP sounding data contain more detail than National Weather Service data, but the two data sets may be used together without difficulty.

Fuelberg, H. E.

1974-01-01

65

Edited by Sarah Diaz`13 TUFTS UNIVERSITY  

E-print Network

Discipline 13 Grievance Procedure 13 Resignation/Termination 14 Subsidized Employment Programs 14 Work guidelines required by Tufts University in hiring, employing, and paying student employees. We invite for every current and prospective employee. In hiring and in subsequent relationships with employees

Dennett, Daniel

66

Consensus-Based Distributed Linear Support Vector Pedro A. Forero, Alfonso Cano, Georgios B. Giannakis  

E-print Network

sets as it is the case for existing incremental approaches. An online algorithm where data arrive or prohibited due to, for ex- ample, the size of local training data sets or privacy reasons. In the important and their communication to a centralized node is prohibited due to, for example, communication overhead or privacy reasons

Pleite, Alfonso Cano

67

Individuality in Problem Solving: String Pulling in Two Carduelis Species (Aves: Passeriformes)  

E-print Network

Individuality in Problem Solving: String Pulling in Two Carduelis Species (Aves: Passeriformes) Uta reported here was designed to study the individual peculia- rities of birds in solving a problem individually. Three groups became apparent: `inven- tors' (23% of goldfinches; 62% of siskins) solved

Indiana University

68

Department of Surgery 50 Charlton Ave E. Faculty of Health Sciences Hamilton Ontario, Canada  

E-print Network

Department of Surgery 50 Charlton Ave E. Faculty of Health Sciences Hamilton Ontario, Canada L8N 4A6 Division of Thoracic Surgery Research Group, Department Clinical Epidemiology & Biostatistics Regionalization on Outcomes in High Risk Cancer Surgery Introduction This fellowship is hosted in conjunction

Haykin, Simon

69

Zur Kenntnis einiger Furnariiden (Aves) der Küste und des westlichen Andenabhanges Perus (mit Beschreibungen neuer Subspezies)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Contribución al conocimiento de algunos furnariidos (Furnariidae, Aves) de la costa y de las vertientes occidentales andinas del Perú (con descripciones originales de nuevas subespecies), por Maria Koepcke.Estudiando el grupo de los Furnariidae en el lado occidental de los Andes peruanos hemos encontrado algunas nuevas razas geográficas; adernás hemos conseguido nuevos datos respecto a la posición sistemática, distribución geográfica y

Maria Koepcke

1965-01-01

70

A new taxon of birds (Aves) from the Early Cretaceous of Western Siberia, Russia  

Microsoft Academic Search

In recent decades numerous findings, mostly from the Early Cretaceous of China, have changed traditional conceptions about the diversity and evolution of the most ancient Aves. Findings of Mesozoic birds in Russia are extremely rare. Here we describe a new bird from the Lower Cretaceous (Barremian–Aptian, Ilekskaya Svita) Shestakovo-1 locality (southern Western Siberia, Russia), that has also yielded dinosaurs, mammals,

Evgeny N. Kurochkin; Nikita V. Zelenkov; Alexandr O. Averianov; Sergei V. Leshchinskiy

2011-01-01

71

Rsistance au dveloppement d'Heterodera ave-nae Woll. chez diffrentes espces de Triticum  

E-print Network

words : Nematode, pathotype, wheat, resistance breeding, differential host. 1. INTRODUCTION Le nématode à kystes des céréales, Heterodera ave- nae Woll., est un sérieux déprédateur des cultures de blé, d

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

72

RECOMENDAÇÕES PARA AVIFAUNA EM ATIVIDADES DE MINIMIZAR IMPACTOS À TURISMO DE OBSERVAÇÃO DE AVES  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recommendations to minimize impacts on avi- lômbia, entre outros, através do turismo de observação de aves, bir- fauna by birdwatching activities. The quick growth of birdwat- ding ou birdwatching, como é mais conhecido (Figueiredo 2003). ching tourism, a segment of ecotourism, needs to be analyzed on Entretanto, esta atividade pode também trazer alterações ambien- its benefits and resulting problems. Negative

Maria Antonietta Castro Pivatto; José Sabino; Estados Unidos da América

73

Nuclear and Mitochondrial Genes Contain Similar Phylogenetic Signal for Pigeons and Doves (Aves: Columbiformes)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Molecular systematic studies generally assume that gene trees are reasonable estimates of species trees. We tested the validity of this assumption in the pigeons and doves (Aves: Columbiformes) by comparing phylogenies derived from nuclear (?-fibrinogen intron 7) and mitochondrial (cytochrome b) genes. Trees derived from the two genes when analyzed separately contained many nodes in common. A partition homogeneity test

Kevin P. Johnson; Dale H. Clayton

2000-01-01

74

Patterns of genetic variation in the adaptive radiation of New World crossbills (Aves: Loxia )  

Microsoft Academic Search

Incipient species groups or young adaptive radiations such as crossbills (Aves: Loxia ) present the opportunity to investigate directly the processes occurring during speciation. New World crossbills include white-winged crossbills ( Loxia leucoptera ), Hispaniolan crossbills ( Loxia megaplaga ), and red crossbills ( Loxia curvirostra complex), the last of which is comprised of at least nine morphologically and vocally

THOMAS L. PARCHMAN; CRAIG W. BENKMAN; SETH C. B RITCH

2006-01-01

75

DEPAUL UNIVERSITY Institute for Professional Development INSTITUTE FOR PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 243 S. Wabash Ave, Room 301  

E-print Network

S. Wabash Ave, Room 301 Chicago, IL 60604-2300 WEB DEVELOPMENT WITH AJAX TECHNOLOGIES Phone: (312: ________________________________ #12;WEB DEVELOPMENT WITH AJAX TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM APPLICANTS: This form must be completed/ Operating System: Type of experience (e.g., on-the-job, coursework, etc.): Length of time

Schaefer, Marcus

76

Graystone Group Advertising, 2710 North Ave, Suite 200 Bridgeport, CT 06604 Phone: 8005440005 or 2035490060 Fax: 2035490061  

E-print Network

Graystone Group Advertising, 2710 North Ave, Suite 200 Bridgeport, CT 06604 Phone: 8005440005 or 2035490060 Fax: 2035490061 Email: ads@graystoneadv.com Placing Recruitment Advertising To assist University departments with all recruitment and advertising needs, Clemson is now partnered

Bolding, M. Chad

77

Atrial-selective prolongation of refractory period with AVE0118 is due principally to inhibition of sodium channel activity  

PubMed Central

AVE0118’s action to prolong effective refractory period (ERP) in atria but not ventricles is thought to be due to its inhibition of IKur. However, in non-remodeled atria, AVE0118 prolongs ERP but not action potential duration (APD70-90), which can be explained with inhibition of sodium, but not potassium channel current. ERP, APD, and the maximum rate of rise of the AP upstroke (Vmax) were measured in canine isolated coronary-perfused right atrial and in superfused ventricular tissue preparations. Whole-cell patch-clamp techniques were used to measure sodium channel current (INa) in HEK293 cells stably expressing SCN5A. AVE0118 (5–10 ?M) prolonged ERP (p<0.001), but not APD70 and decreased Vmax (by 15%, 10 ?M, p<0.05; n=10 for each). Ventricular ERP, APD90, and Vmax were not changed significantly by 10 ?M AVE0118 (all p=ns; n=7). AVE0118 effectively suppressed acetylcholine-mediated persistent atrial fibrillation (AF). AVE0118 (10 ?M) reduced peak current amplitude of SCN5A-WT current by 36.5±6.6% (p<0.01; n=7) and shifted half-inactivation voltage (V0.5) of the steady- state inactivation curve from -89.9±0.5 to -96.0±0.9 mV (p<0.01; n=7). Our data suggest that AVE0118-induced prolongation of atrial, but not ventricular ERP, is due largely to atrial- selective depression of INa, which likely contributes to the effectiveness of AVE0118 to suppress AF. PMID:22370957

Burashnikov, Alexander; Barajas-Martinez, Hector; Hu, Dan; Nof, Eyal; Blazek, Jonathan; Antzelevitch, Charles

2012-01-01

78

Food partitioning between breeding White-tailed Kites (Elanus leucurus; Aves; Accipitridae) and Barn Owls (Tyto alba; Aves; Tytonidae) in southern Brazil.  

PubMed

I examined the diet of breeding White-tailed Kites (Elanus leucurus; Aves; Accipitridae) and Barn Owls (Tyto alba; Aves; Tytonidae) in an agrarian area of southern Brazil by analyzing regurgitated prey remains. The objective was to evaluate how these raptors, which differ markedly in their hunting activity periods (owls are nocturnal and kites diurnal), share their mammalian food component. 2,087 prey consumed by Barn Owls and 1,276 by White-tailed Kites were identified. They presented a high overlap of food-niches (Piankas index was 0.98). Based on the daily activity period of their main small mammal prey, a lower overlap would be expected. The crepuscular/nocturnal Mus musculus was the main prey for the diet of breeding Barn Owls (81%) and White-tailed Kites (63%). This small exotic rodent provided 63% of the small mammal biomass ingested by owls and 44% by kites. Larger native small mammals were also considered important for the diet of kites, mainly because of their biomass contribution. Although these raptors differ markedly in their hunting activity periods, Barn Owls and White-tailed Kites are very similar predators in southern Brazil, overlapping their diets. PMID:17505751

Scheibler, D R

2007-02-01

79

Coherent light scattering by nanostructured collagen arrays in the caruncles of the Malagasy asities (Eurylaimidae : Aves)  

E-print Network

structural colours is essential to investigations of the function of these colours in avian communication and to their evolutionary history within and among clades of birds. Structural colour production mechanisms are diverse and can often be described... IN THE CARUNCLES OF THE MALAGASY ASITIES (EURYLAIMIDAE: AVES) RICHARD O. PRUM 1, *, RODOLFO TORRES 2 , CHRISTOPHER KOVACH 1 , SCOTT WILLIAMSON 1 AND STEVEN M. GOODMAN 3 1 Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, and Natural History Museum, Dyche Hall...

Prum, R. O.; Torres, Rodolfo H.; Kovach, C.; Williamson, S.; Goodman, S. M.

1999-12-01

80

k=10 GS PC TPDA GES Ave. Bayesian Score Results -Child -Sample Size 500  

E-print Network

SC k=10 GS PC TPDA GES Bayesian Score (BDeu) Ave. Bayesian Score Results - Child - Sample Size 500 - Sample Size 500 Error Bars = +/- Std.Dev. -130 -120 -110 -100 -90 MMHC OR1 k=5 OR1 k=10 OR1 k=20 OR2 k=5 - Child5 - Sample Size 500 Error Bars = +/- Std.Dev. -260 -240 -220 -200 -180 * MMHC OR1 k=5 OR1 k=10 OR1

Brown, Laura E.

81

Wardium canarisi n. sp. (Cestoda: Hymenolepididae) parasite de Arenaria melanocephala (Aves: Charadrii) d'Alaska  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors describe and illustrate Wardium canarisi n. sp. (Cestoda: Hymenolepididae), an intestinal parasite of Arenaria melanocephala (Aves: Charadrii) from Alaska, characterised by a strobila 20–40 mm long, 10 aploparaksoid hooks 19–21 m long, a short cylindrical cirrus (40 m) covered with very minute spines (0.2 m), and a short (8–18 m) and extremely narrow (1 m) copulatory vagina. These characters have no equivalent, even approximate,

Mike Kinsella; Stéphane Deblock

2000-01-01

82

The development of convective instability in relation to convective activity and synoptic systems in AVE IV  

E-print Network

Administration's fourth Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE IV). The 3- and 6-h sounding intervals allowed time changes in convective stability to be studied in areas of convective storms. A stability development equation was derived and each term... was examined to determine when and where it made a significant contribution to the development process. The usefulness of satellite data in describing stability development and the processes effecting its change also was evaluated. Of the terms...

Davis, James Gregory

2012-06-07

83

Complete mitochondrial genome of the Baikal teal Anas formosa (Aves, Anseriformes, Anatidae).  

PubMed

The Baikal teal Anas formosa (Aves, Anseriformes, Anatidae) is classified as "Vulnerable" on the IUCN Red List. Here, whole mitochondrial genome of A. formosa was amplified and sequenced. The total length of the Baikal teal mitochondrial genome is 16,594 bp, which consists of 13 protein-coding, 2 rRNA, 22 tRNA genes and 1 control region. The characteristics of the mitochondrial genomes were analyzed and discussed in detail. PMID:22040069

Ryu, Shi Hyun; Hwang, Ui Wook

2011-08-01

84

Neurogenic Contraction Induced by the Antiarrhythmic Compound, AVE 0118, in Rat Small Mesenteric Arteries.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to investigate the vasoactivity of two inhibitors of potassium ion (K(+) ) channels, a potential antiarrhythmic compound, AVE 0118, and 4-aminopyridine (4-AP). Basal and stimulated tones of rat small mesenteric arteries as well as the possible involvement of KV 1.5 ion channel in the mechanism of vascular effect induced by the compounds were analysed. The standard organ bath technique for vascular tone and immunohistochemistry for the localization of ion channels in the arterial tissue were performed. Third- or fourth-order branch of arterial segments was mounted in myographs for recording the isometric tension. AVE 0118 (10(-5)  M) and 4-AP (10(-5)  M) modulated neither the basal tone nor the contraction induced by noradrenaline but increased the contraction evoked by electrical field stimulation, sensitive to the block of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors. KV 1.5 ion channel-specific immunostaining demonstrated the presence of immunoreactive nerves, and Schwann-cell-specific (S100) immunostaining confirmed the presence of myelin sheath in rat small mesenteric arteries. The study supports an indirect, sympathetic effect of AVE 0118 similar to that of 4-AP, which is mediated, at least in part, by blocking neuronal KV 1.5 type potassium ion channels in the medio-adventitial layer of rat small mesenteric artery. PMID:24629214

Kun, Attila; Seprényi, György; Varró, András; Papp, Julius Gy; Pataricza, János

2014-10-01

85

Wardium canarisi n. sp. (Cestoda: Hymenolepididae) parasite of Arenaria melanocephala (Aves: Charadrii) of Alaska.  

PubMed

The authors describe and illustrate Wardium canarisi n. sp. (Cestoda: Hymenolepididae), an intestinal parasite of Arenaria melanocephala (Aves: Charadrii) from Alaska, characterised by a strobila 20-40 mm long, 10 aploparaksoid hooks 19-21 microm long, a short cylindrical cirrus (40 microm) covered with very minute spines (0.2 microm), and a short (8-18 microm) and extremely narrow (1 microm) copulatory vagina. These characters have no equivalent, even approximate, among the 27 species of Wardium parasitic in the Charadrii which are reviewed. The genus Debrosia Spassky, 1987 appears to be justified. PMID:10845655

Kinsella, M; Deblock, S

2000-07-01

86

Effect of Treatment of Sprague Dawley Rats with AVE7688, Enalapril, or Candoxatril on Diet-Induced Obesity.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to determine the effect of AVE7688, a drug that inhibits both angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and neutral endopeptidase (NEP) activity, on neural and vascular defects caused by diet induced obesity (DIO). Rats at 12 weeks of age were fed a standard or high fat diet with or without AVE7688 for 24 weeks. DIO rats had impaired glucose tolerance and developed sensory neuropathy. Vascular relaxation to acetylcholine and calcitonin gene-related peptide was decreased in epineurial arterioles of DIO rats. Rats fed a high fat diet containing AVE7688 did not become obese and vascular and sensory nerve dysfunction and impaired glucose tolerance were improved. DIO is associated with increased expression of NEP in epineurial arterioles. NEP degrades vasoactive peptides which may explain the decrease in neurovascular function in DIO. PMID:20847891

Davidson, Eric P; Coppey, Lawrence J; Dake, Brian; Yorek, Mark A

2011-01-01

87

Effect of Treatment of Sprague Dawley Rats with AVE7688, Enalapril, or Candoxatril on Diet-Induced Obesity  

PubMed Central

The objective of this study was to determine the effect of AVE7688, a drug that inhibits both angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and neutral endopeptidase (NEP) activity, on neural and vascular defects caused by diet induced obesity (DIO). Rats at 12 weeks of age were fed a standard or high fat diet with or without AVE7688 for 24 weeks. DIO rats had impaired glucose tolerance and developed sensory neuropathy. Vascular relaxation to acetylcholine and calcitonin gene-related peptide was decreased in epineurial arterioles of DIO rats. Rats fed a high fat diet containing AVE7688 did not become obese and vascular and sensory nerve dysfunction and impaired glucose tolerance were improved. DIO is associated with increased expression of NEP in epineurial arterioles. NEP degrades vasoactive peptides which may explain the decrease in neurovascular function in DIO. PMID:20847891

Davidson, Eric P.; Coppey, Lawrence J.; Dake, Brian; Yorek, Mark A.

2011-01-01

88

AVE3085, an enhancer of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, restores endothelial function and reduces blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Nitric oxide (NO) plays an important role in endothelial function, and impaired NO production is involved in hypertension. Therefore, compounds that regulate endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) may be of therapeutic benefit. A novel, low molecular weight compound AVE3085 is a recently developed compound with the ability to enhance eNOS transcription. The present study investigated the effects of AVE3085 in endothelial dysfunction associated with hypertension. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) were treated with AVE 3085 (10 mg·kg·day?1, orally) for 4 weeks. Isometric force measurement was performed on rings of isolated aortae in organ baths. Protein expression of eNOS, phosphorylated-eNOS and nitrotyrosine in the aortae were examined by Western blotting. mRNA for eNOS in rat aortae were examined by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). KEY RESULTS AVE3085 greatly improved endothelium-dependent relaxations in the aortae of SHRs. This functional change was accompanied by up-regulated expression of eNOS protein and mRNA, enhanced eNOS phosphorylation and decreased formation of nitrotyrosine. Furthermore, AVE3085 treatment reduced the blood pressure in SHR without affecting that of hypertensive eNOS?/? mice. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS The eNOS-transcription enhancer AVE3085 restored impaired endothelial function in a hypertensive model. The present study provides a solid basis for the potential development of eNOS-targeting drugs to restore down-regulated eNOS, as a new strategy in hypertension. PMID:21385179

Yang, Qin; Xue, Hong-Mei; Wong, Wing-Tak; Tian, Xiao-Yu; Huang, Yu; Tsui, Stephen KW; Ng, Patrick KS; Wohlfart, Paulus; Li, Huige; Xia, Ning; Tobias, Silke; Underwood, Malcolm John; He, Guo-Wei

2011-01-01

89

MapQuest Search: parking near 2536 Massachusetts Ave Nw Was... http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp?formtype=search&searc... 1 of 2 12/01/05 17:36  

E-print Network

MapQuest Search: parking near 2536 Massachusetts Ave Nw Was... http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp?formtype=search&searc... 1 of 2 12/01/05 17:36 parking near 2536 Massachusetts Ave Nw, Washington, DC 20008­3635 1) Star) 202­457­9843 #12; MapQuest Search: parking near 2536 Massachusetts Ave Nw Was... http

Whittle, Mark

90

Morris Park Ave Rhinelander Ave  

E-print Network

Albert Einstein College of Medicine ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE OF MEDICINE JACK AND PEARL RESNICK CAMPUS Building 19. Einstein Boiler Plant JACOBI MEDICAL CENTER 20. Nurses' Residence MEDICAL PARK EINSTEIN PROGRAM LOCATIONS Glass Building Ob/Gyn Private Practice

Kenny, Paraic

91

Highland Hospital Archives, Williams Health Sciences Library 1000 South Ave, Rochester, NY 14620 Finding Aid for the Highland Hospital Archives  

E-print Network

Highland Hospital Archives, Williams Health Sciences Library 1000 South Ave, Rochester, NY 14620 Finding Aid for the Highland Hospital Archives John R. Williams Sr. Collection Box 1 Correspondence Photographs Box 2 Articles, Memos, Pamphlets Book: Writings Hahnemann Hospital Collection Box 1 Hahnemann

Goldman, Steven A.

92

Hagit P. Affek Yale University, Dept. of Geology & Geophysics, 210 Whitney Ave. New Haven, CT 06520-8109  

E-print Network

change: Development and application of clumped isotopes as a paleothemperature proxy in carbonates carbon isotope composition of isoprene reflects incomplete coupling between isoprene synthesisHagit P. Affek Yale University, Dept. of Geology & Geophysics, 210 Whitney Ave. New Haven, CT 06520

93

Complete mitochondrial genome of the peregrine falcon Falco peregrinus (Aves, Falconiformes, Falconidae): genetic differences between the two individuals.  

PubMed

The peregrine falcon Falco peregrinus (Aves, Falconiformes, Falconidae) is one of the most common and widespread raptor species in the world. Here, the complete mitochondrial genome of F. peregrinus from Korea, which is one of the breeding ranges, was sequenced and characterized in detail. PMID:22409757

Ryu, Shi Hyun; Lee, Jin Hee; Hwang, Ui Wook

2012-04-01

94

Ectoparasitismo en tiuque común Milvago chimango chimango (Vieillot, 1816) (Aves, Falconidae) en la zona de Ñuble, Chile  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ectoparasitism in the common chimango caracara Milvago chimango chimango (Vieillot, 1816) (Aves, Falconidae) in the Ñuble Area, Chile. The ectoparasites of Milvago c. chimango (Vieillot) in the Ñuble area were identified for qualitative and quantitative descriptive analyses. Three species of Phthiraptera were recorded (prevalences between parentheses): One Amblycera, Aquiligogus maculatus (Menoponidae - 100%), and two Ischnocera, Acutifrons vierai chimango (73.9

Julio San-Martín Órdenes; Cristina Brevis Ibáñez; Luis Rubilar Contreras; Ronald Schmäschke; Arwid Daugschies

95

Ag Business Student professional@yahoo.com 201 Harmony Ave. Apt.#3 Ft. Collins, CO (970) 123-4567  

E-print Network

Ag Business Student professional@yahoo.com 201 Harmony Ave. Apt.#3 Ft. Collins, CO (970) 123 Science and Agricultural Business Aims Community College Loveland, CO 2007 Associates of Science RELEVANT Agriculture Environmental Policy Business Management Finance International Trade RELEVANT EXPERIENCE

96

Washington County Kit Carson County Phillips County Yuma County Sedgwick County 181 Birch Ave 251 16th  

E-print Network

Washington County Kit Carson County Phillips County Yuma County Sedgwick County 181 Birch Ave 251://goldenplains.colostate.edu Colorado State University, U.S. Department of Agriculture and Kit Carson, Phillips, Sedgwick, Washington Edgar at 970-522-3200, extension 276. Golden Plains Area Washington County #12;

97

Anna G. Stefanopoulou Mechanical Engineering Dept, University of Michigan, 1231 Beal Ave, Ann Arbor MI 48109-2121  

E-print Network

5/13/11 1 Anna G. Stefanopoulou Mechanical Engineering Dept, University of Michigan, 1231 Beal Ave, NTUA, 1991. Employment: 9/06-present Professor of Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 9/00-8/06 Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering Department, University

Stefanopoulou, Anna

98

DON P. CHAMBERS College of Marine Science, University of South Florida, 140 7th Ave S, St. Petersburg, FL 33701  

E-print Network

As Co-Author 1) Willis, J. K., D. P. Chambers, C. K. Shum, and C-Y Kuo, Global Sea Level Rise: RecentDON P. CHAMBERS College of Marine Science, University of South Florida, 140 7th Ave S, St of Marine Science, University of South Florida Sept. 2003 � Aug. 2009 Research Scientist, Center for Space

Meyers, Steven D.

99

Impact evaluation of adjustable speed drives installed at Great Western Malting Company under the Energy $avings Plan  

Microsoft Academic Search

This impact evaluation of adjustable speed drives (ASDs) that were recently installed at Great Western Malting Company (GWM) was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) as part of an evaluation of its Energy $avings Plan (E$P) Program. The project consists of four ASDs that are used to control the power to motors driving kiln exhaust fans. The ASDs are

D. R. Brown; G. E. Spanner

1994-01-01

100

Vasopeptidase Inhibitor Ilepatril (AVE7688) Prevents Obesity- and Diabetes-induced Neuropathy in C57Bl/6J Mice  

PubMed Central

Previously we demonstrated that inhibition of neutral endopeptidase (NEP), a protease that degrades vaso- and neuro-active peptides, and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) with a vasopeptidase inhibitor improves vascular and neural function in diabetic rat models. The purpose of this study was to determine whether inhibition of NEP and ACE or deletion of NEP provides protection from nerve impairment caused by diabetes or diet induced obesity (DIO). To determine the role of NEP and ACE inhibition in neuropathy related to insulin-deficient diabetes or DIO we used C57Bl/6J mice treated with AVE7688, a vasopeptidase inhibitor, or NEP deficient (?/?) mice. Mice at 12 weeks of age were fed a high fat diet for 12 weeks or were diabetic for duration of 12 weeks following a single injection of high dose streptozotocin. Both a prevention and intervention protocol was used for AVE7688 treatment. Glucose utilization was impaired in DIO C57Bl/6J and NEP ?/? mice. However, treating DIO C57Bl/6J or NEP ?/? mice with AVE7688 improved glucose tolerance. Thermal hypoalgesia and nerve conduction slowing were present in both streptozotocin-diabetic and DIO C57Bl/6J mice but not in AVE7688 treated C57Bl/6J mice or NEP ?/? mice exposed to either streptozotocin-induced diabetes or a high fat diet. Intraepidermal nerve fiber (IENF) profiles were decreased in the hindpaw of C57Bl/6J diabetic or DIO mice and this improved when the mice were treated with AVE7688. IENF profiles were not decreased in diabetic or DIO NEP (?/?) mice. These studies suggest that NEP plays a role in regulating nerve function in insulin-deficient diabetes and DIO. PMID:20849865

Coppey, Lawrence; Davidson, Eric; Lu, Bao; Gerard, Craig; Yorek, Mark

2010-01-01

101

Vasopeptidase inhibitor ilepatril (AVE7688) prevents obesity- and diabetes-induced neuropathy in C57Bl/6J mice.  

PubMed

Previously we demonstrated that inhibition of neutral endopeptidase (NEP), a protease that degrades vaso- and neuro-active peptides, and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) with a vasopeptidase inhibitor improves vascular and neural function in diabetic rat models. The purpose of this study was to determine whether inhibition of NEP and ACE or deletion of NEP provides protection from nerve impairment caused by diabetes or diet induced obesity (DIO). To determine the role of NEP and ACE inhibition in neuropathy related to insulin-deficient diabetes or DIO we used C57Bl/6J mice treated with AVE7688, a vasopeptidase inhibitor, or NEP deficient (-/-) mice. Mice at 12 weeks of age were fed a high fat diet for 12 weeks or were diabetic for duration of 12 weeks following a single injection of high dose streptozotocin. Both a prevention and intervention protocol was used for AVE7688 treatment. Glucose utilization was impaired in DIO C57Bl/6J and NEP -/- mice. However, treating DIO C57Bl/6J or NEP -/- mice with AVE7688 improved glucose tolerance. Thermal hypoalgesia and nerve conduction slowing were present in both streptozotocin-diabetic and DIO C57Bl/6J mice but not in AVE7688 treated C57Bl/6J mice or NEP -/- mice exposed to either streptozotocin-induced diabetes or a high fat diet. Intraepidermal nerve fiber (IENF) profiles were decreased in the hindpaw of C57Bl/6J diabetic or DIO mice and this improved when the mice were treated with AVE7688. IENF profiles were not decreased in diabetic or DIO NEP (-/-) mice. These studies suggest that NEP plays a role in regulating nerve function in insulin-deficient diabetes and DIO. PMID:20849865

Coppey, Lawrence; Davidson, Eric; Lu, Bao; Gerard, Craig; Yorek, Mark

2011-01-01

102

Impact evaluation of lighting retrofit projects at Boeing Commercial Airplane Group under The Energy $avings Plan  

SciTech Connect

This impact evaluation of two lighting retrofit projects that were recently installed at Boeing Commercial Airplane Group (Boeing) was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) as part of an evaluation of its Energy $avings Plan (E$P) Program. The first project was a light-fixture and lighting control retrofit, consisting of five individual measures installed in Building 40-05. The second project was a retrofit of all parking lot lighting on the site. The objective of this impact evaluation was to assess how much electrical energy is being saved at Boeing as a result of the E$P projects and to determine how much the savings cost Bonneville and the region. The impact of the project was evaluated with a combination of engineering analysis, financial analysis, interviews, and submittal reviews (Boeing`s proposals and completion reports).

Sullivan, G.P.; Oens, M.A.; Spanner, G.E.

1994-01-01

103

Data for NASA's AVE 3 experiment: 25-mb sounding data and synoptic charts. [investigation of atmospheric parameters detected from satellite data under conditions of heavy snow cover  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The atmospheric variability experiment (AVE 3) is described and tabulated rawinsonde data at 25-mb intervals from the surface to 25 mb for the 41 stations is presented. The experiment was conducted between February 6 and February 7, 1975. Brief discussions are given on methods of data processing, changes in the reduction scheme since the AVE 2 pilot experiment, and data accuracy. An example of contact data is presented as well as synoptic charts prepared from the data.

Fuelberg, H. E.; Turner, R. E.

1975-01-01

104

Bmpr1a is required for proper migration of the AVE through regulation of Dkk1 expression in the pre-streak mouse embryo  

PubMed Central

Here, we report a novel mechanism regulating migration of the anterior visceral endoderm (AVE) by BMP signaling through BMPRIA. In Bmpr1a-deficient (Bmpr-null) embryos, the AVE does not migrate at all. In embryos with an epiblast-specific deletion of Bmpr1a (Bmpr1anull/flox; Sox2Cre embryos), the AVE cells migrate randomly from the distal end of embryos, resulting in an expansion of the AVE. Dkk1, which is normally expressed in the anterior proximal visceral endoderm (PxVE), is downregulated in Bmpr-null embryos, whereas it is circumferentially expressed in Bmpr1anull/flox; Sox2Cre embryos at E5.75–6.5. These results demonstrate an association of the position of Dkk1 expressing cells with direction of the migration of AVE. In Bmpr1anull/flox; Sox2Cre embryos, a drastic decrease of WNT signaling is observed at E6.0. Addition of WNT3A to the culture of Bmpr1anull/flox; Sox2Cre embryos at E5.5 restores expression patterns of Dkk1 and Cer1. These data indicate that BMP signaling in the epiblast induces Wnt3 and Wnt3a expression to maintain WNT signaling in the VE, resulting in downregulation of Dkk1 to establish the anterior expression domain. Thus, our results suggest that BMP signaling regulates the expression patterns of Dkk1 for anterior migration of the AVE. PMID:20211162

Miura, Shigeto; Singh, Ajeet Pratap; Mishina, Yuji

2010-01-01

105

Structure and composition of the courtship phenotype in the bird of paradise Parotia lawesii (Aves: Paradisaeidae).  

PubMed

Ethology is rooted in the idea that behavior is composed of discrete units and sub-units that can be compared among taxa in a phylogenetic framework. This means that behavior, like morphology and genes, is inherently modular. Yet, the concept of modularity is not well integrated into how we envision the behavioral components of phenotype. Understanding ethological modularity, and its implications for animal phenotype organization and evolution, requires that we construct interpretive schemes that permit us to examine it. In this study, I describe the structure and composition of a complex part of the behavioral phenotype of Parotia lawesii Ramsay, 1885--a bird of paradise (Aves: Paradisaeidae) from the forests of eastern New Guinea. I use archived voucher video clips, photographic ethograms, and phenotype ontology diagrams to describe the modular units comprising courtship at various levels of integration. Results show P. lawesii to have 15 courtship and mating behaviors (11 males, 4 females) hierarchically arranged within a complex seven-level structure. At the finest level examined, male displays are comprised of 49 modular sub-units (elements) differentially employed to form more complex modular units (phases and versions) at higher-levels of integration. With its emphasis on hierarchical modularity, this study provides an important conceptual framework for understanding courtship-related phenotypic complexity and provides a solid basis for comparative study of the genus Parotia. PMID:18359213

Scholes, Edwin

2008-01-01

106

Hypodectes propus (Acarina: Hypoderatidae) in a rufous turtle dove, Streptopelia orientalis (Aves: Columbiformes), in Japan  

PubMed Central

An adult male rufous turtle dove, Streptopelia (S.) orientalis (Aves: Columbiformes), was found dead in Yorii-machi Town, Osato District 369-1217, Saitama Prefecture, Japan, and subjected to necropsy. A large number of immobile hypopi (deutonymphs) of the hypoderatid mite, Hypodectes (H.) propus (Acarina: Hypoderatidae), were found individually encapsulated subcutaneously primarily in the adipose tissue. The mites were 1.43 mm in length and 0.44 mm in width on average, and had provoked mild inflammatory reactions that predominantly manifested as foamy macrophages and lymphoplasmocytes. PCR analysis using ribosomal DNA extracted from paraffin-blocked tissues produced a 240 bp band specific for hypoderatids. Based on the morphological features (distinct coxal apodemes, especially in the anterior portion) and PCR-based findings, the hypopi were identified as H. propus. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case describing the subcutaneous mite H. propus in a rufous turtle dove, S. orientalis, in Japan. This study also highlights the use of paraffin blocks as a source of tissue DNA for molecular evaluation. PMID:23820220

El-Dakhly, Khaled Mohamed; El-Nahass, El-Shaymaa; Inui, Kosei; Sakai, Hiroki; Yanai, Tokuma

2013-01-01

107

Patterns of genetic variation in the adaptive radiation of New World crossbills (Aves: Loxia).  

PubMed

Incipient species groups or young adaptive radiations such as crossbills (Aves: Loxia) present the opportunity to investigate directly the processes occurring during speciation. New World crossbills include white-winged crossbills (Loxia leucoptera), Hispaniolan crossbills (Loxia megaplaga), and red crossbills (Loxia curvirostra complex), the last of which is comprised of at least nine morphologically and vocally differentiated forms ('call types') where divergent natural selection for specialization on different conifer resources has been strongly implicated as driving diversification. Here we use amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers to investigate patterns of genetic variation across populations, call types, and species of New World crossbills. Tree-based analyses using 440 AFLP loci reveal strongly supported clustering of the formally recognized species, but did not separate individuals from the eight call types in the red crossbill complex, consistent with recent divergence and ongoing gene flow. Analyses of genetic differentiation based on inferred allele frequency variation however, reveal subtle but significant levels of genetic differentiation among the different call types of the complex and indicate that between call-type differentiation is greater than that found among different geographic locations within call types. Interpreted in light of evidence of divergent natural selection and strong premating reproductive isolation, the observed genetic differentiation suggests restricted gene flow among sympatric call types consistent with the early stages of ecological speciation. PMID:16689904

Parchman, Thomas L; Benkman, Craig W; Britch, Seth C

2006-06-01

108

Multilocus perspectives on the monophyly and phylogeny of the order Charadriiformes (Aves)  

PubMed Central

Background The phylogeny of shorebirds (Aves: Charadriiformes) and their putative sister groups was reconstructed using approximately 5 kilobases of data from three nuclear loci and two mitochondrial genes, and compared to that based on two other nuclear loci. Results Charadriiformes represent a monophyletic group that consists of three monophyletic suborders Lari (i.e., Laridae [including Sternidae and Rynchopidae], Stercorariidae, Alcidae, Glareolidae, Dromadidae, and Turnicidae), Scolopaci (i.e., Scolopacidae [including Phalaropidae], Jacanidae, Rostratulidae, Thinocoridae, Pedionomidae), and Charadrii (i.e., Burhinidae, Chionididae, Charadriidae, Haematopodidae, Recurvirostridae, and presumably Ibidorhynchidae). The position of purported "gruiform" buttonquails within Charadriiformes is confirmed. Skimmers are most likely sister to terns alone, and plovers may be paraphyletic with respect to oystercatchers and stilts. The Egyptian Plover is not a member of the Glareolidae, but is instead relatively basal among Charadrii. None of the putative sisters of Charadriiformes were recovered as such. Conclusion Hypotheses of non-monophyly and sister relationships of shorebirds are tested by multilocus analysis. The monophyly of and interfamilial relationships among shorebirds are confirmed and refined. Lineage-specific differences in evolutionary rates are more consistent across loci in shorebirds than other birds and may contribute to the congruence of locus-specific phylogenetic estimates in shorebirds. PMID:17346347

Fain, Matthew G; Houde, Peter

2007-01-01

109

Coprolite deposits reveal the diet and ecology of the extinct New Zealand megaherbivore moa (Aves, Dinornithiformes)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The discovery in New Zealand of Late Holocene deposits of coprolites from extinct avian megaherbivores has provided a unique opportunity to gain a detailed insight into the ecology of these birds across ecologically diverse habitats. Macrofossil analysis of 116 coprolites of the giant ratite moa (Aves, Dinornithiformes) reveals a diverse diet of herbs and low shrubs in both semi-arid and high rainfall ecological zones, overturning previous models of moa as dominantly browsers of trees and shrubs. Ancient DNA analysis identified coprolites from four moa species (South Island giant moa, Dinornis robustus; upland moa, Megalapteryx didinus; heavy-footed moa, Pachyornis elephantopus and stout-legged moa, Euryapteryx gravis), revealing a larger dietary variation between habitat types than between species. The new data confirm that moa fed on a variety of endemic plant taxa with unusual growth forms previously suggested to have co-evolved with moa. Lastly, the feeding ecologies of moa are shown to be widely different to introduced mammalian herbivores.

Wood, Jamie R.; Rawlence, Nicolas J.; Rogers, Geoffery M.; Austin, Jeremy J.; Worthy, Trevor H.; Cooper, Alan

2008-12-01

110

Molecular phylogeny of the spoonbills (Aves: Threskiornithidae) based on mitochondrial DNA  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Spoonbills (genus Platalea) are a small group of wading birds, generally considered to constitute the subfamily Plataleinae (Aves: Threskiornithidae). We reconstructed phylogenetic relationships among the six species of spoonbills using variation in sequences of the mitochondrial genes ND2 and cytochrome b (total 1796 bp). Topologies of phylogenetic trees reconstructed using maximum likelihood, maximum parsimony, and Bayesian analyses were virtually identical and supported monophyly of the spoonbills. Most relationships within Platalea received strong support: P. minor and P. regia were closely related sister species, P. leucorodia was sister to the minor-regia clade, and P. alba was sister to the minor-regia-leucorodia clade. Relationships of P. flavipes and P. ajaja were less well resolved: these species either formed a clade that was sister to the four-species clade, or were successive sisters to this clade. This phylogeny is consistent with ideas of relatedness derived from spoonbill morphology. Our limited sampling of the Threskiornithinae (ibises), the putative sister group to the spoonbills, indicated that this group is paraphyletic, in agreement with previous molecular data; this suggests that separation of the Threskiornithidae into subfamilies Plataleinae and Threskiornithinae may not be warranted.

Chesser, R. Terry; Yeung, Carol K.L.; Yao, Cheng-Te; Tian, Xiu-Hua; Li, Shou-Hsien

2010-01-01

111

Molecular phylogeny of the spoonbills (Aves: Threskiornithidae) based on mitochondrial DNA  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Spoonbills (genus Platalea) are a small group of wading birds, generally considered to constitute the subfamily Plataleinae (Aves: Threskiornithidae). We reconstructed phylogenetic relationships among the six species of spoonbills using variation in sequences of the mitochondrial genes ND2 and cytochrome b (total 1796 bp). Topologies of phylogenetic trees reconstructed using maximum likelihood, maximum parsimony, and Bayesian analyses were virtually identical and supported monophyly of the spoonbills. Most relationships within Platalea received strong support: P. minor and P. regia were closely related sister species, P. leucorodia was sister to the minor-regia clade, and P. alba was sister to the minor-regia-leucorodia clade. Relationships of P. flavipes and P. ajaja were less well resolved: these species either formed a clade that was sister to the four-species clade, or were successive sisters to this clade. This phylogeny is consistent with ideas of relatedness derived from spoonbill morphology. Our limited sampling of the Threskiornithinae (ibises), the putative sister group to the spoonbills, indicated that this group is paraphyletic, in agreement with previous molecular data; this suggests that separation of the Threskiornithidae into subfamilies Plataleinae and Threskiornithinae may not be warranted. Copyright ?? 2010. Magnolia Press.

Chesser, R.T.; Yeung, C.K.L.; Yao, C.-T.; Tian, X.-H.; Li, S.-H.

2010-01-01

112

A high-precision chronology for the rapid extinction of New Zealand moa (Aves, Dinornithiformes)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Megafaunal extinction followed the prehistoric human settlement of islands across the globe, but the exact duration and dynamics of the extinction processes are difficult to determine. The New Zealand moa (Aves, Dinornithiformes) are a prime example, where, despite an extensive fossil and archaeological record, debate continues about their extinction chronology and how extinction timings varied among regions and species. We apply probabilistic sightings methods to 111 high-quality radiocarbon dates (from a pool of 653 dates) on moa remains from natural and archaeological sites to provide a high-resolution spatio-temporal chronology of moa extinction. We interpret this alongside an estimated time for the onset of hunting pressure, obtained by applying the same methods to the most reliable proxies for initial human settlement of New Zealand: coprolites of and seeds gnawed by the commensal Pacific rat (Rattus exulans). By comparing local and national extinction times, we discriminate between the point at which hunting stopped (economic extinction) and the total extinction of moa (ca 150 and 200 years after settlement, respectively). Extinction occurred contemporaneously at sites separated by hundreds of kilometres. There was little difference between the extinction times of the smallest (20-50 kg) and largest (200+ kg) moa species. Our results demonstrate how rapidly megafauna were exterminated from even large, topographically- and ecologically-diverse islands such as New Zealand, and highlight the fragility of such ecosystems in the face of human impacts.

Perry, George L. W.; Wheeler, Andrew B.; Wood, Jamie R.; Wilmshurst, Janet M.

2014-12-01

113

Resolving lost herbivore community structure using coprolites of four sympatric moa species (Aves: Dinornithiformes)  

PubMed Central

Knowledge of extinct herbivore community structuring is essential for assessing the wider ecological impacts of Quaternary extinctions and determining appropriate taxon substitutes for rewilding. Here, we demonstrate the potential for coprolite studies to progress beyond single-species diet reconstructions to resolving community-level detail. The moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes) of New Zealand are an intensively studied group of nine extinct herbivore species, yet many details of their diets and community structuring remain unresolved. We provide unique insights into these aspects of moa biology through analyses of a multispecies coprolite assemblage from a rock overhang in a montane river valley in southern New Zealand. Using ancient DNA (aDNA), we identified 51 coprolites, which included specimens from four sympatric moa species. Pollen, plant macrofossils, and plant aDNA from the coprolites chronicle the diets and habitat preferences of these large avian herbivores during the 400 y before their extinction (?1450 AD). We use the coprolite data to develop a paleoecological niche model in which moa species were partitioned based on both habitat (forest and valley-floor herbfield) and dietary preferences, the latter reflecting allometric relationships between body size, digestive efficiency, and nutritional requirements. Broad ecological niches occupied by South Island giant moa (Dinornis robustus) and upland moa (Megalapteryx didinus) may reflect sexual segregation and seasonal variation in habitat use, respectively. Our results show that moa lack extant ecological analogs, and their extinction represents an irreplaceable loss of function from New Zealand’s terrestrial ecosystems. PMID:24082104

Wood, Jamie R.; Wilmshurst, Janet M.; Richardson, Sarah J.; Rawlence, Nicolas J.; Wagstaff, Steven J.; Worthy, Trevor H.; Cooper, Alan

2013-01-01

114

Cold-hardiness in Pelecitus fulicaeatrae (Nematoda: Filarioidea), a parasite of the ankles of Fulica americana (Aves).  

PubMed

The filarioid nematode Pelecitus fulicaeatrae (Diesing, 1861) is considered cold-hardy. Adults and microfilariae became motile when placed in saline at 22 C after having been removed from thawed carcasses of their host, the American coot (Fulica americana Gmelin) (Aves: Gruiformes). Adult nematodes from 5 of 12 carcasses became active as did microfilariae from 4 of 5 carcasses. Carcasses had been frozen at an undetermined temperature below 0 C for an initial 14 days and then at -21 to -24 for 100-159 days. PMID:1738056

Bartlett, C M

1992-02-01

115

Molecular Signatures from Gene Expression Data Ramon Diaz-Uriarte  

E-print Network

1 Molecular Signatures from Gene Expression Data Ram´on D´iaz-Uriarte Abstract "Molecular . . . ; revised . . . R. D´iaz-Uriarte is at the Spanish Cancer Research Center (CNIO),Madrid, Spain. His email

Díaz-Uriarte, Ramón

116

Caracterização do microhabitat e vulnerabilidade de cinco espécies de arapaçus (Aves: Dendrocolaptidae) em um fragmento florestal do norte do estado do Paraná, sul do Brasil  

Microsoft Academic Search

Microhabitat characterization and vulnerability of five woodcreeper (Dendrocolaptidae) species in a forest fragment in northern state of Paraná, southern Brazil. Little information is available on the ecological requirements of the woodcreepers (Aves: Dendrocolaptidae), and on the causes of their tendency to disappear from forest fragments in the Neotropics. Here, we documented microhabitat selection of five syntopic species of woodcreepers in

Fabíola Poletto; Luiz dos Anjos; Edson Varga Lopes; Graziele Hernandes Volpato

2004-01-01

117

161. Anthony Skjell um, Lawrence Livermore Nati onal Laboratory, 7000 East Ave. , L-316, P. O. Box 808 Li vermore, CA94551  

E-print Network

- 15 - 161. Anthony Skjell um, Lawrence Livermore Nati onal Laboratory, 7000 East Ave. , L- 316, P n Mal l , Vancouver, Bri ti sh Col umbi a V6T 1W5, Canada 170. Udaya B. Vemul apati , Dept Laboratori es, 600 Mountai n Avenue, Murray Hi l l , NJ 07974 183. Davi d Young, Uni versi ty of Texas

Dongarra, Jack

118

Business Career Services Center | 1300 Sunnyside Ave. Rm. 125 | Lawrence, KS 66045 | (785) 864-5591 | www.business.ku.edu  

E-print Network

Business Career Services Center | 1300 Sunnyside Ave. Rm. 125 | Lawrence, KS 66045 | (785) 864-5591 | www.business.ku.edu - 1 - What Can I Do With A Major In INFORMATION SYSTEMS? This handout will provide education. You'll gain a solid foundation in the various business disciplines and gain an understanding

119

Send completed form and copy of transcript to: NOYCE Scholarship Office, Sonoma State University School of Education, 1801 E. Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, CA 94928  

E-print Network

School of Education, 1801 E. Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, CA 94928 Robert Noyce Scholarship Program for Math, Mathematics (STEM) and Economics majors and professional who might otherwise not have considered the teaching, as a current NOYCE scholar, can apply for continued funding as either a Sonoma State STEM

Ravikumar, B.

120

Variação sazonal na sociabilidade de forrageamento das garças Ardea alba (Linnaeus, 1758) e Egretta thula (Molina, 1782) (Aves: Ciconiiformes) na planície alagável do alto rio Paraná, Brasil  

Microsoft Academic Search

Seasonal variation in the foraging sociability of Great White Egret (Ardea alba) and Snowy Egret (Egretta thula) (Aves: Ciconiiformes) in the upper Paraná river floodplain, Brazil. The seasonal variation of foraging sociability of Great White Egret (Ardea alba) and Snowy Egret (Egretta thula) on the lagoons of the upper Paraná river floodplain, Brazil, was analyzed. Quarterly samplings of birds were

Márcio Rodrigo

121

Business Career Services Center | 1300 Sunnyside Ave. Rm. 125 | Lawrence, KS 66045 | (785) 864-5591 | www.business.ku.edu  

E-print Network

Business Career Services Center | 1300 Sunnyside Ave. Rm. 125 | Lawrence, KS 66045 | (785) 864-5591 | www.business.ku.edu - 1 - What Can I Do With A Major In MANAGEMENT & LEADERSHIP? This handout is that it requires you to address such a wide variety of problems - financial, material, human, legal, political

122

Effect of AVE 0991 angiotensin-(1-7) receptor agonist treatment on elemental and biomolecular content and distribution in atherosclerotic plaques of apoE-knockout mice  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Gene-targeted apolipoprotein E-knockout (apoE-KO) mice display early and highly progressive vascular lesions containing lipid deposits and they became a reliable animal model to study atherosclerosis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of AVE 0991 angiotensin-(1-7) receptor agonist on the distribution of selected pro- and anti- inflammatory elements as well as biomolecules in atherosclerotic plaques of apoE-knockout mice. Synchrotron radiation-based X-ray fluorescence (micro-XRF) and Fourier Transform Infrared (micro-FTIR) microspectroscopies were applied. Two-month-old apoE-KO mice were fed for following four months diet supplemented with AVE 0991 (0.58 ?mol/kg b.w. per day). Histological sections of ascending aortas were analyzed spectroscopically. The distribution of P, Ca, Fe and Zn were found to correspond with histological structure of the lesion. Significantly lower contents of P, Ca, Zn and significantly higher content of Fe were observed in animals treated with AVE 0991. Biomolecular analysis showed lower lipids saturation level and lower lipid to protein ratio in AVE 0991 treated group. Protein secondary structure was studied according to the composition of amide I band (1660 cm-1) and it demonstrated higher proportion of ?-sheet structure as compared to ?-helix in both studied groups.

Kowalska, J.; Gajda, M.; Jawie?, J.; Kwiatek, W. M.; Appel, K.; Dumas, P.

2013-12-01

123

School of Communication Western Michigan University 1903 West Michigan Ave. Kalamazoo, MI 49008 Phone: 269.387.3130 Fax: 269.387.3990 homepages.wmich.edu/~kritzman  

E-print Network

School of Communication · Western Michigan University · 1903 West Michigan Ave. · Kalamazoo, MI business and publishing industry. Good writing skills are essential to entry and success in this career, magazine, radio or televisionstation. What can I do with my degree? · PrintorBroadcastReporter · Managing

de Doncker, Elise

124

Darren J. Julian, Jeff Moore, and Tom Hildebrandt Arizona Game and Fish Department, Mesa Region, 7200 E University Ave, Mesa, AZ 85207  

E-print Network

created a method to use GIS software to spatially display the location of wildlife calls by animal type or problem animals Future Considerations ·Human-Wildlife Interaction Database--upgraded to categorize each, 7200 E University Ave, Mesa, AZ 85207 Abstract When wildlife and humans live in close proximity

Hall, Sharon J.

125

School of Communication Western Michigan University 1903 West Michigan Ave. Kalamazoo, MI 49008 Phone: 269.387.3130 Fax: 269.387.3990 homepages.wmich.edu/~kritzman  

E-print Network

· HumanResourceDirector · ProductionManager · HealthCareCoordinator · Mediator · Communication · Persuasion · ConflictResolution · EventPlanning · ConsultingSkills · OrganizationalAnalysis · ExternalCommunicationSchool of Communication · Western Michigan University · 1903 West Michigan Ave. · Kalamazoo, MI

de Doncker, Elise

126

Vassar College, 124 Raymond Ave, Poughkeepsie, NY 12604-0008 Ph: 845-437-5320 Fax: 845-437-5325 Email: finaid@vassar.edu  

E-print Network

to the College Board. Alternatively, you may forward a copy of the IDOC coversheet to your noncustodial parentVassar College, 124 Raymond Ave, Poughkeepsie, NY 12604-0008 Ph: 845-437-5320 Fax: 845-437-5325 Email: finaid@vassar.edu VASSAR COLLEGE 2013-2014 Spring Transfer Financial Aid Application Instructions

Smith, Marc L.

127

Vassar College, 124 Raymond Ave, Poughkeepsie, NY 12604-0008 Ph: 845-437-5320 Fax: 845-437-5325 Email: finaid@vassar.edu  

E-print Network

to the College Board. Alternatively, you may forward a copy of the IDOC coversheet to your noncustodial parentVassar College, 124 Raymond Ave, Poughkeepsie, NY 12604-0008 Ph: 845-437-5320 Fax: 845-437-5325 Email: finaid@vassar.edu VASSAR COLLEGE 2014-2015 Regular Decision Financial Aid Application

Smith, Marc L.

128

Vassar College, 124 Raymond Ave, Poughkeepsie, NY 12604-0008 Ph: 845-437-5320 Fax: 845-437-5325 Email: finaid@vassar.edu  

E-print Network

to the College Board. Alternatively, you may forward a copy of the IDOC coversheet to your noncustodial parentVassar College, 124 Raymond Ave, Poughkeepsie, NY 12604-0008 Ph: 845-437-5320 Fax: 845-437-5325 Email: finaid@vassar.edu VASSAR COLLEGE 2014-2015 Fall Transfer Financial Aid Application Instructions

Smith, Marc L.

129

2006 DRY BEAN CANNING TRIAL, 1-9-2006 AVE. NAVY G H BLACK G H M S  

E-print Network

2006 DRY BEAN CANNING TRIAL, 1-9-2006 AVE. NAVY G H BLACK G H M S 1 VISTA 3.1 3.6 43 T-39 3.7 2.9 49 BL 00044 2.8 8 COOP 03026 2.1 2.3 50 115M-CIAT 2.4 9 Hyland T9905 4.5 3.6 51 BLACK JACK 4.7 10 GTS 544 3.3 2.5 52 BLACK VELVET 4 11 GTS 548 3.4 2.8 53 ASG 0866 3.7 12 GTS 549 3.5 3 54 ONYX 3.7 13 GTS

130

The enigmatic monotypic crab plover Dromas ardeola is closely related to pratincoles and coursers (Aves, Charadriiformes, Glareolidae)  

PubMed Central

The phylogenetic placement of the monotypic crab plover Dromasardeola (Aves, Charadriiformes) remains controversial. Phylogenetic analysis of anatomical and behavioral traits using phenetic and cladistic methods of tree inference have resulted in conflicting tree topologies, suggesting a close association of Dromas to members of different suborders and lineages within Charadriiformes. Here, we revisited the issue by applying Bayesian and parsimony methods of tree inference to 2,012 anatomical and 5,183 molecular characters to a set of 22 shorebird genera (including Turnix). Our results suggest that Bayesian analysis of anatomical characters does not resolve the phylogenetic relationship of shorebirds with strong statistical support. In contrast, Bayesian and parsimony tree inference from molecular data provided much stronger support for the phylogenetic relationships within shorebirds, and support a sister relationship of Dromas to Glareolidae (pratincoles and coursers), in agreement with previously published DNA-DNA hybridization studies. PMID:21637436

2010-01-01

131

A new species of Caryospora (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the sharp-shinned hawk, Accipiter striatus (Aves: Accipitriformes).  

PubMed

An injured juvenile sharp-shinned hawk, Accipiter striatus Vieillot, 1807 (Aves: Accipitriformes), housed and treated at the College of Veterinary Medicine Teaching Hospital at Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas, USA, was found to be passing oocysts of an undescribed species of Caryospora in its feces. Sporulated oocysts of Caryospora petersoni n. sp. were subspherical, with a bilayered wall, and they measured 43.1 × 39.8 ?m; micropyle, oocyst residuum, and polar granule were absent. Sporocysts were subspherical to spherical, 23.4 × 23.3 ?m; Stieda, substieda, and parastieda bodies were absent, but a spherical sporocyst residuum was present as a compact mass, ~15.1 ?m wide, composed of many homogeneous globules. The new species represents the first caryosporan documented from this species of hawk. PMID:23098064

McAllister, Chris T; Duszynski, Donald W; McKown, Richard D

2013-06-01

132

The influence of angiotensin-(1-7) Mas receptor agonist (AVE 0991) on mitochondrial proteome in kidneys of apoE knockout mice.  

PubMed

Excessive action of angiotensin II on mitochondria has been shown to play an important role in mitochondrial dysfunction, a common feature of atherogenesis and kidney injury. Angiotensin-(1-7)/Mas receptor axis constitutes a countermeasure to the detrimental effects of angiotensin II on AT1 receptors. The aim of the study was to assess the effects of angiotensin-(1-7) peptidomimetic AVE0991 on the kidney mitochondrial proteome in widely used animal model of atherosclerosis (apoE(-/-) mice). Proteins changed in apoE(-/-) mice belonged to the groups of antioxidant enzymes, apoptosis regulators, inflammatory factors and metabolic enzymes. Importantly, AVE0991 partially reversed atherosclerosis-related changes in apoE(-/-) mice. PMID:23988828

Suski, Maciej; Olszanecki, Rafa?; Stachowicz, Aneta; Madej, Józef; Bujak-Gi?ycka, Beata; Oko?, Krzysztof; Korbut, Ryszard

2013-12-01

133

ConstitutionAve. CityParkAve.  

E-print Network

Environmental Research Center Greenhouse Animal Sciences Morgan Library Natural Resources Lagoon Arthur Ditch Engineering Hartshorn Health Center Occupational Therapy Westfall Hall University Square McGraw Athletic Center A College Avenue Gym Field House National Center for Genetic Resources Preservation Alder Hall

Zhou, Yongcheng

134

University Ave. UniversityAve.Exit  

E-print Network

Track Facility Soccer Field Aberdeen-Inverness Residence Hall Pentland Hills Corp A Corporation Yard Corp B Corp C Whse 2 Purchasing Dept. Physical Plant Office Mail Room KUCR Child Development Center Costo Hall Pierce Hall Printing and Reprographics Geology Bldg Physics Bldg Physics 2000 Orbach Library

Mills, Allen P.

135

E College Ave E Beaver Ave  

E-print Network

WKR ARL HHD HNG FRN MOR HNZ EEE BKH MCL ROB MII ARM CDR CRG PND CHN MLR SWM SCB WTK LDY PRO SVG TSN ROB SKT SHC SCC SCB SHD SPK SDL SFB STH THR TMS TSN VIS WGR WKR WTK WHT WML WLD D O W N T O W N S TAT

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

136

A comparison between Nimbus 5 THIR and ITPR temperatures and derived winds with rawinsonde data obtained in the AVE 2 experiment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During the period of May 11 and 12, 1974, NASA conducted its second Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE II) over the eastern United States. In this time interval, two Nimbus 5 orbits crossed the AVE II area, providing a series of ITPR soundings as well as THIR data. Horizontal temperature mapping of the AVE II cloud field is examined using two grid print map scales. Implied cloud top heights are compared with maximum radar-echo top reports. In addition, shelter temperatures in areas of clear sky are compared with the surface temperatures as determined from 11.5 micrometer radiometer data of the THIR experiment. The ITPR sounding accuracy is evaluated using interpolated radiosonde temperatures at times nearly coincident with the ITPR soundings. It was found that mean differences between the two data sets were as small as 1.3 C near 500 mb and as large as 2.9 C near the tropopause. The differences between ITPR and radiosonde temperatures at constant pressure levels were sufficient to induce significant differences in the horizontal temperature gradient. Cross sections of geostrophic wind along the orbital tracks were developed using a thermal wind buildup based on the ITPR temperature data and the radiosonde temperature data. Differences between the radiosonde and ITPR geostrophic winds could be explained on the basis of differences in the ITPR and radiosonde temperature gradients.

Arnold, J. E.; Scoggins, J. R.; Fuelberg, H. E.

1976-01-01

137

Treatment of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats with AVE7688, a vasopeptidase inhibitor: effect on vascular and neural disease.  

PubMed

In epineurial arterioles, acetylcholine-mediated vascular relaxation is mediated by nitric oxide and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF), and both mechanisms are impaired by diabetes. The mediator responsible for the effect of EDHF is unknown. In epineurial arterioles, C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) has properties consistent with EDHF-like activity. Epineurial arterioles express CNP, and exogenous CNP causes a concentration-dependent vascular relaxation. In streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, CNP-mediated vascular relaxation in epineurial arterioles is decreased. Since CNP may be a regulator of vascular function, a vasopeptidase inhibitor may be an effective treatment for diabetes-induced vascular and neural disease. Vasopeptidase inhibitors inhibit ACE activity and neutral endopeptidase, which degrades natriuretic peptides. Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were treated with AVE7688 (450 mg/kg in the diet), a vasopeptidase inhibitor, for 8-10 weeks after 4 weeks of untreated diabetes. Treatment of diabetic rats corrected the diabetes-induced decrease in endoneurial blood flow, significantly improved motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity, prevented the development of hypoalgesia in the hind paw, and reduced superoxide and nitrotyrosine levels in epineurial arterioles. The diabetes-induced decrease in acetylcholine-mediated vascular relaxation by epineurial arterioles was significantly improved with treatment. These studies suggest that vasopeptidase inhibitors may be an effective approach for the treatment of diabetic vascular and neural dysfunction. PMID:17259379

Davidson, Eric P; Kleinschmidt, Travis L; Oltman, Christine L; Lund, Donald D; Yorek, Mark A

2007-02-01

138

The influence of sampling design on species tree inference: a new relationship for the New World chickadees (Aves: Poecile).  

PubMed

In this study, we explore the long-standing issue of how many loci are needed to infer accurate phylogenetic relationships, and whether loci with particular attributes (e.g., parsimony informativeness, variability, gene tree resolution) outperform others. To do so, we use an empirical data set consisting of the seven species of chickadees (Aves: Paridae), an analytically tractable, recently diverged group, and well-studied ecologically but lacking a nuclear phylogeny. We estimate relationships using 40 nuclear loci and mitochondrial DNA using four coalescent-based species tree inference methods (BEST, *BEAST, STEM, STELLS). Collectively, our analyses contrast with previous studies and support a sister relationship between the Black-capped and Carolina Chickadee, two superficially similar species that hybridize along a long zone of contact. Gene flow is a potential source of conflict between nuclear and mitochondrial gene trees, yet we find a significant, albeit low, signal of gene flow. Our results suggest that relatively few loci with high information content may be sufficient for estimating an accurate species tree, but that substantially more loci are necessary for accurate parameter estimation. We provide an empirical reference point for researchers designing sampling protocols with the purpose of inferring phylogenies and population parameters of closely related taxa. PMID:24111665

Harris, Rebecca B; Carling, Matthew D; Lovette, Irby J

2014-02-01

139

Osteological histology of the Pan-Alcidae (Aves, Charadriiformes): correlates of wing-propelled diving and flightlessness.  

PubMed

Although studies of osteological morphology, gross myology, myological histology, neuroanatomy, and wing-scaling have all documented anatomical modifications associated with wing-propelled diving, the osteohistological study of this highly derived method of locomotion has been limited to penguins. Herein we present the first osteohistological study of the derived forelimbs and hind limbs of wing-propelled diving Pan-Alcidae (Aves, Charadriiformes). In addition to detailing differences between wing-propelled diving charadriiforms and nondiving charadriiforms, microstructural modifications to the humeri, ulnae and femora of extinct flightless pan-alcids are contrasted with those of volant alcids. Histological thin-sections of four species of pan-alcids (Alca torda, †Alca grandis, †Pinguinus impennis, †Mancalla cedrosensis) and one outgroup charadriiform (Stercorarius longicaudus) were compared. The forelimb bones of wing-propelled diving charadriiforms were found to have significantly thicker (?22%) cortical bone walls. Additionally, as in penguins, the forelimbs of flightless pan-alcids are found to be osteosclerotic. However, unlike the pattern documented in penguins that display thickened cortices in both forelimbs and hind limbs, the forelimb and hind limb elements of pan-alcids display contrasting microstructural morphologies with thickened forelimb cortices and relatively thinner femoral cortices. Additionally, the identification of medullary bone in the sampled †Pinguinus impennis specimen suggests that further osteohistological investigation could provide an answer to longstanding questions regarding sexual dimorphism of Great Auks. Finally, these results suggest that it is possible to discern volant from flightless wing-propelled divers from fragmentary fossil remains. PMID:24357466

Smith, N Adam; Clarke, Julia A

2014-02-01

140

Factors affecting germline mutations in a hypervariable microsatellite: a comparative analysis of six species of swallows (Aves: Hirundinidae).  

PubMed

Microsatellites mutate frequently by replication slippage. Empirical evidence shows that the probability of such slippage mutations may increase with the length of the repeat region as well as exposure to environmental mutagens, but the mutation rate can also differ between the male and female germline. It has been hypothesized that more intense sexual selection or sperm competition can also lead to elevated mutation rates, but the empirical evidence is inconclusive. Here, we analyzed the occurrence of germline slippage mutations in the hypervariable pentanucleotide microsatellite locus HrU10 across six species of swallow (Aves: Hirundinidae). These species exhibit marked differences in the length range of the microsatellite, as well as differences in the intensity of sperm competition. We found a strong effect of microsatellite length on the probability of mutation, but no residual effect of species or their level of sperm competition when the length effect was accounted for. Neither could we detect any difference in mutation rate between tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) breeding in Hamilton Harbour, Ontario, an industrial site with previous documentation of elevated mutation rates for minisatellite DNA, and a rural reference population. However, our cross-species analysis revealed two significant patterns of sex differences in HrU10 germline mutations: (1) mutations in longer alleles occurred typically in the male germline, those in shorter alleles in the female germline, and (2) male germline mutations were more often expansions than contractions, whereas no directional bias was evident in the female germline. These results indicate some fundamental differences in male and female gametogenesis affecting the probability of slippage mutations. Our study also reflects the value of a comparative, multi-species approach for locus-specific mutation analyses, through which a wider range of influential factors can be assessed than in single-species studies. PMID:21291898

Anmarkrud, Jarl A; Kleven, Oddmund; Augustin, Jakob; Bentz, Kristofer H; Blomqvist, Donald; Fernie, Kim J; Magrath, Michael J L; Pärn, Henrik; Quinn, James S; Robertson, Raleigh J; Szép, Tibor; Tarof, Scott; Wagner, Richard H; Lifjeld, Jan T

2011-03-15

141

Impact evaluation of a slush stock chest bypass installed at Scott Paper Company under the energy $avings plan  

SciTech Connect

This impact evaluation of the bypass of a slush stock chest that was recently installed at Scott Paper Company (Scott Paper) was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) as part of an evaluation of its Energy $avings Plan (E$P) Program. The project consists of installing an adjustable speed drive, a 74.6 kW (100 hp) pump, a re-sized impeller, and piping modifications to bypass the slush stock chest and related equipment. The objective of this impact evaluation was to assess how much electrical energy is being saved at Scott Paper as a result of the E$P and to determine how much the savings cost Bonneville and the region. The impact of the project was evaluated with a combination of engineering analysis, financial analysis, interviews, and submittal reviews (Scott Paper`s proposal and completion report). Based on this impact evaluation, energy savings from this project are expected to be 763,600 kilowatt-hours/year (kWh/yr) or 0.087 average megawatts (aMW). On a per-ton basis, this project will save 4.64 kWh/ton or 39.2%. The project cost $120,098 to install, and Scott Paper received payment of $82,232 (in 1993 dollars) from Bonneville for the acquisition of energy savings. Pacific Northwest Laboratory calculated the real levelized cost of the energy savings to Bonneville as 14.2 mills/kWh (in 1993 dollars) over the project`s assumed 15-year life, and the real levelized cost to the region as 21.9 mills/kWh, not including transmission and distribution effects. The project would not have been implemented without the acquisition payment from Bonneville and therefore is not a free rider.

Oens, M.A.; Spanner, G.E.

1995-02-01

142

AVE1625, a cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist, as a co-treatment with antipsychotics for schizophrenia: improvement in cognitive function and reduction of antipsychotic-side effects in rodents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rationale  The psychotomimetic effects of cannabis are believed to be mediated via cannabinoid CB1 receptors. Furthermore, studies have\\u000a implicated CB1 receptors in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Objective  These studies investigated the effects of the CB1 receptor antagonist, AVE1625, in acute pharmacological and neurodevelopmental\\u000a models of schizophrenia. AVE1625 was administered to rodents alone or as a co-treatment with clinically used antipsychotic\\u000a drugs (APDs).

Mark D. Black; Rachel J. Stevens; Nancy Rogacki; Robert E. Featherstone; Yaw Senyah; Odessa Giardino; Beth Borowsky; Jeanne Stemmelin; Caroline Cohen; Philippe Pichat; Michal Arad; Segev Barak; Amaya De Levie; Ina Weiner; Guy Griebel; Geoffrey B. Varty

2011-01-01

143

Cameron Ave. Franklin St.  

E-print Network

RidgeRd. McCauley St. S.Columbia South Rd. Man ad ium ning lum bia Country N ew East D r. W est D r-Wettach 11 Math/Physics Library Alfred T. Brauer Library Phillips Hall Music* Library See Wilson Library Collections, General Manuscripts, Music, NC Collection, NCC Gallery, Photographic Archives, Rare Book

Whitton, Mary C.

144

East Alumni Ave. Horticulture  

E-print Network

. Soccer Lacrosse Football PlainsRd. N 5 5 5 48 9 22 83 136 14 106 127 100 13 27 47 135 41 39 58 44 128 101, aquaculture and pathology (off Rte. 108) * East Hall, physics 34 (B5) * Edwards Hall 35 (C5) * Episcopal) * Independence Hall 54 (C5) * Independence Square II, physical therapy, speech and hearing clinic 138 (E1

Vetter, Frederick J.

145

Lomas BLVD. Tucker AVE.  

E-print Network

/ Rail Runner 25 0.6mi 1.0km Albuquerque International Sunport 2.3mi / 3.7km 40 1.2mi 1.9km 25 0.6mi 1 CAMP. CNM Yale Lomas Indian School Central Avenida Caesar Chavez 25 University 2.3 mi / 3.7 km 1.2 mi 1

Maccabe, Barney

146

NEWLONDONRD CLEVELAND AVE  

E-print Network

RkiNG Bookstore STaR North Lot STaR Central Lot STaR South Lot STaR South- Back Lot iSe Lab PARKING MAPINFORMATION & 2013- 2014 4/13 No Name CaTeGoRY 1 Ice Arena¢ Red 2 Townsend Hall¢ Gold 3 General Services*¢ Gray 5

Firestone, Jeremy

147

Students preparing for a career in medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, or other health-related professions should visit the Preprofessional Advising Office at the College of Arts & Sciences, 725 Commonwealth Ave., Room B-2 (moving to  

E-print Network

PreMed PreMed Students preparing for a career in medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, or other & Sciences, 725 Commonwealth Ave., Room B-2 (moving to 100 Bay State Road, Fourth Floor, August 2012), 617 the Preprofessional Advising Office plays. Ms. Kim Voce, Ms. Jennifer Connors, Ms. Jennifer Bohland, and Dr. Glen B

Goldberg, Bennett

148

Contribution à l'étude des Microphallidae (Trematoda). LI. De cinq espèces du plongeon imbrin Gavia immer (Aves) des Etats-Unis, dont Microphallus forresteri n. sp. Pluralité vraisemblable de l'espèce Microphallus nicolli (Cable & Hunninen, 1938)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors describe and illustrate five species of Microphallid trematodes from the intestine of Gavia immer (Aves: Gaviiformes) from the southern coast of the United States (Florida). Microphallus forresteri n. sp. is 500–700µm long with a symmetrical, regularly ovoid male papilla with a length (60 × 43 µm) close to the acetabular diameter and a broad ejaculatory canal centred along

Mike Kinsella; Stéphane Deblock

1997-01-01

149

On the absence of sternal elements in Anchiornis (Paraves) and Sapeornis (Aves) and the complex early evolution of the avian sternum.  

PubMed

Anchiornis (Deinonychosauria: Troodontidae), the earliest known feathered dinosaur, and Sapeornis (Aves: Pygostylia), one of the basalmost Cretaceous birds, are both known from hundreds of specimens, although remarkably not one specimen preserves any sternal ossifications. We use histological analysis to confirm the absence of this element in adult specimens. Furthermore, the excellent preservation of soft-tissue structures in some specimens suggests that no chondrified sternum was present. Archaeopteryx, the oldest and most basal known bird, is known from only 10 specimens and the presence of a sternum is controversial; a chondrified sternum is widely considered to have been present. However, data from Anchiornis and Sapeornis suggest that a sternum may also have been completely absent in this important taxon, suggesting that the absence of a sternum could represent the plesiomorphic avian condition. Our discovery reveals an unexpected level of complexity in the early evolution of the avian sternum; the large amount of observable homoplasy is probably a direct result of the high degree of inherent developmental plasticity of the sternum compared with observations in other skeletal elements. PMID:25201982

Zheng, Xiaoting; O'Connor, Jingmai; Wang, Xiaoli; Wang, Min; Zhang, Xiaomei; Zhou, Zhonghe

2014-09-23

150

Stratigraphic context and paleoenvironmental significance of minor taxa (Pisces, Reptilia, Aves, Rodentia) from the late Early Pleistocene paleoanthropological site of Buia (Eritrea).  

PubMed

The Buia Homo site, also known as Wadi Aalad, is an East African paleoanthropological site near the village of Buia that, due to its very rich yield from the late Early Pleistocene, has been intensively investigated since 1994. In this paper, which reports on the finds of the 2010-2011 excavations, we include new fossil evidence on previously identified taxa (i.e., reptiles), as well as the very first description of the small mammal, fish and bird remains discovered. In particular, this study documents the discovery of the first African fossil of the genus Burhinus (Aves, Charadriiformes) and of the first rodent from the site. This latter is identified as a thryonomyid rodent (cane rat), a relatively common taxon in African paleoanthropological faunal assemblages. On the whole, the new occurrences documented within the Buia vertebrate assemblage confirm the occurrence of taxa characterized by strong water dependence. The paleoenvironmental characteristics of the fauna are confirmed as fully compatible with the evidence obtained through sedimentology and facies analysis, documenting the sedimentary evolution of fluvio-deltaic and lacustrine systems. PMID:23159190

Rook, L; Ghinassi, M; Carnevale, G; Delfino, M; Pavia, M; Bondioli, L; Candilio, F; Coppa, A; Martínez-Navarro, B; Medin, T; Papini, M; Zanolli, C; Libsekal, Y

2013-01-01

151

Cucolepis cincta gen.n. et sp.n. (Cestoda: Cyclophyllidea) from the squirrel cuckoo Piaya cayana lesson (Aves: Cuculiformes) from Paraguay.  

PubMed

Cucolepis gen. n. is erected as monotypic for Cucolepis cincta sp. n., a new species of cyclophyllidean cestode of the family Paruterinidae. The new species is described from the squirrel cuckoo, Piaya cayana Lesson (Aves: Cuculiformes), taken from two localities in Paraguay in 1984 and 1985. This new genus is most similar to the genus Triaenorhina Spasskii et Shumilo, 1965 in terms of the hook morphology and large epiphyseal structures extending from both the handle and guard, but differs in several aspects of the strobilar morphology, such as the shape of the cirrus sac, genital atrium, uterus and paruterine organ. The strobilar morphology of the new genus strongly resembles that of the genus Francobona Georgiev et Kornyushin, 1994, especially the shape of the cirrus sac and genital atrium, yet Francobona spp. lack, the developed epiphyseal structures observed in species of Cucolepis and Triaenorhina. Previous records and the nature of parasite-host associations between cuculiform birds and their cestode parasites are discussed. PMID:23327010

Phillips, Anna J; Mariaux, Jean; Georgiev, Boyko B

2012-12-01

152

Impact evaluation of a mill tailings thickener installed at J.R. Simplot Company`s Smoky Canyon Mine under the Energy $avings Plan  

SciTech Connect

This report describes Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s (PNL`s) evaluation of the impact of an energy conservation project completed in the fall of 1992. The project (a mill tailings thickener) was installed at J.R. Simplot Company`s (Simplot`s) Smoky Canyon Mine in Caribou County, Idaho near Afton, Wyoming. The project at Simplot is one in a continuing series of industrial energy conservation projects to have its impact evaluated by PNL. All of the projects have received or will receive acquisition payments from the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) under the Energy $avings Plan (E$P) Program. The E$P is being offered to reduce electricity consumption in the industrial sector of Bonneville`s service territory. For the Simplot project, the acquisition payment offered under the program was equal to the lesser of 10{cents}/kilowatt-hour (kWh) saved in the first year or 80% of eligible project costs, up to a limit of $250,000. The general objective of the impact evaluation was to determine how much electricity is saved by the project and at what cost to Bonneville and to the region.

Brown, D.R.; Spanner, G.E.

1995-01-01

153

Fusarisetin A: scalable total synthesis and related studies Eduardo J. E. Caro-Diaz,a  

E-print Network

is the ability of tumor cells to migrate from their tissue of origin and colonize elsewhere in the body.2 When (surgery, radiation) or by systemic therapy (chemotherapy, targeted therapy, hormonal therapy).3 However content imaging techniques permit the identification of new cancer metastasis inhibitors from libraries

Theodorakis, Emmanuel

154

Biodiversity Regulation of Ecosystem Services Coordinating Lead Authors: Sandra Diaz, David Tilman, Joseph Fargione  

E-print Network

Effects on Climate Regulation 11.4.4 Biodiversity Effects on Pollution and Human Disease Regulation 11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300 11.2 Terrestrial Biodiversity Effects on Supporting Services . . . . . . . . . . . 301 11 on Primary Production 11.3 Terrestrial Biodiversity Effects on Regulating Services . . . . . . . . . . . 307

Minnesota, University of

155

The 1-Median and 1-Highway problem J. M. Diaz-Ba~nez  

E-print Network

The 1-Median and 1-Highway problem J. M. D´iaz-B´a~nez M. Korman P. P´erez-Lantero I. Ventura a single point (me- dian) and a rapid transit line (highway) are simultaneously located in order. The highway is an alternative transportation system that can be used by the clients to reduce their travel

Díaz-Báñez, José Miguel

156

Assignment #2 Environmental Fate: Katie McKinstry and Nancy Diaz Chemical Name CAS  

E-print Network

ChV [mg/l] p-xylene 106-42-3 56 1 Therephlalic acid 100-21-0 3.2 220 Coumaryl alcohol 3690-05-9 2 0 Sediment 78 0 Air 13 0 Air 0.24 0 p-xylene Coumaryl Alcohol Medium Half-life [days] % in each medium

Iglesia, Enrique

157

Fitting by monotone orthogonal chains J.M. Diaz-Ba~nez  

E-print Network

, CO 80208, USA. Universidad de Oriente, Santiago de Cuba, Cuba. §Departament de Matem`atica Aplicada II, Universitat Polit`ecnica de Catalunya, Spain, carlos.seara@upc.edu. Sup- ported by projects MEC

Llanos, Diego R.

158

LyricText: An Animated Display of Song Lyrics Rob Diaz-Marino1  

E-print Network

://grouplab.cpsc.ucalgary.ca/papers/index.html CR Categories: 1.3.8[Computer Graphics]: Applications Keywords: music, kinetic text, information about the mood of the singer, and can give insight into their speech and voice patterns. Lyric Typography [3] has been used to set mood and direct attention in Film and Television advertising. The Kinedit

Greenberg, Saul

159

Page 480 Student Service Professionals Sonoma State University 2013-2014 Catalog Carmen Diaz Misa (2001)  

E-print Network

.S. 1995, University of California, Los Angeles Mary Gibbs (2001) Academic Records Specialist A.A., College State University Maria Hernandez (2007) Academic Records Specialist B.A. 2006, Sonoma State University

Ravikumar, B.

160

Total Synthesis of (-)-Mucocin Michael T. Crimmins,* Yan Zhang, and Frank A. Diaz  

E-print Network

of the anonnaceous acetogenin family, was isolated from the leaves of Rollinia mucosa by McLaughlin and co-workers.1.; Fatope, M. O.; Zeng, L.; Gu, Z.-M.; Zhao, G.- X.; He, K.; MacDougal, J. M.; McLaughlin, J. L. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1995, 117, 10409. (2) (a) Rupprecht, J. K.; Hui, Y. H.; McLaughlin, J. L. J. Nat. Prod. 1990, 53

161

NDimensional Reasoning Using a Tesseral Representation Frans Coenen, Bernard (Diz) Diaz, Michael Shave,  

E-print Network

­temporal reasoning system, the SPARTA (SPAtial Rea­ soning using Tesseral Addressing) system, The system is founded. 1996a). The resulting script is then passed to the SPARTA system which processes the constraints using

Atkinson, Katie

162

VizieR Online Data Catalog: Fe XVI radiative rates (Diaz+, 2013)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Accurate theoretical energy level, lifetime, and transition probability calculations of core-excited Fe XVI were performed employing the relativistic Multireference Moller-Plesset perturbation theory. In these computations the term energies of the highly excited n<=5 states arising from the configuration 1s22sk2pm3lpnl'q, where k+m+p+q=9, l<=3 and p+q<=2 are considered, including those of the autoionizing levels with a hole-state in the L-shell. All even and odd parity states of sodium-like iron ion were included for a total of 1784 levels. Comparison of the calculated L-shell transition wavelengths with those from laboratory measurements shows excellent agreement. Therefore, our calculation may be used to predict the wavelengths of as of yet unobserved Fe XVI, such as the second strongest 2p-3d Fe XVI line, which has not been directly observed in the laboratory and which blends with one of the prominent Fe XVII lines. (2 data files).

Diaz, F.; Vilkas, M. J.; Ishikawa, Y.; Beiersdorfer, P.

2013-08-01

163

From federated to aggregated search Fernando Diaz, Mounia Lalmas and Milad Shokouhi  

E-print Network

Evaluation Open Problems Bibliography Introduction What is federated search? What is aggregated search? Motivations Challenges Relationships #12;3 A classical example of federated search www.theeuropeanlibrary.org Collections to be searched One query A classical example of federated search www.theeuropeanlibrary.org Merged

Lalmas, Mounia

164

Ancient DNA analyses of early archaeological sites in New Zealand reveal extreme exploitation of moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes) at all life stages  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The human colonisation of New Zealand in the late thirteenth century AD led to catastrophic impacts on the local biota and is among the most compelling examples of human over-exploitation of native fauna, including megafauna. Nearly half of the species in New Zealand' s pre-human avifauna are now extinct, including all nine species of large, flightless moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes). The abundance of moa in early archaeological sites demonstrates the significance of these megaherbivores in the diet of the first New Zealanders. Combining moa assemblage data, based on DNA identification of eggshell and bone, with morphological identification of bone (literature and museum catalogued specimens), we present the most comprehensive audit of moa to date from several significant 13th-15th century AD archaeological deposits across the east coast of the South Island. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was amplified from 251 of 323 (78%) eggshell fragments and 22 of 27 (88%) bone samples, and the analyses revealed the presence of four moa species: Anomalopteryx didiformis; Dinornis robustus; Emeus crassus and Euryapteryx curtus. The mtDNA, along with polymorphic microsatellite markers, enabled an estimate of the minimum number of individual eggs consumed at each site. Remarkably, in one deposit over 50 individual eggs were identified - a number that likely represents a considerable proportion of the total reproductive output of moa in the area and emphasises that human predation of all life stages of moa was intense. Molecular sexing was conducted on bones (n = 11). Contrary to previous ancient DNA studies from natural sites that consistently report an excess of female moa, we observed an excess of males (2.7:1), suggestive that males were preferential targets. This could be related to different behaviour between the two highly size-dimorphic sexes in moa. Lastly, we investigated the moa species from recovered skeletal and eggshell remains from seven Wairau Bar burials, and identified the presence of only the larger species of moa, E. curtus and D. robustus.

Oskam, Charlotte L.; Allentoft, Morten E.; Walter, Richard; Scofield, R. Paul; Haile, James; Holdaway, Richard N.; Bunce, Michael; Jacomb, Chris

2012-10-01

165

Impact evaluation of an adjustable speed drive installed at Ball-InCon Glass Packaging Corporation under the Energy $avings Plan  

SciTech Connect

This impact evaluation of an adjustable speed drive that was recently installed at Ball-InCon Glass Packaging Corporation (Ball-InCon) was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) as part of an evaluation of its Energy $avings Plan (E$P) Program. The Program makes acquisition payments to firms that install energy conservation projects in their industrial processes. The objective of this impact evaluation was to assess how much electrical energy is being saved at Ball-InCon as a result of the E$P and to determine how much the savings cost Bonneville and the region. The impact of the project was evaluated with a combination of engineering analysis, financial analysis, interviews, and submittal reviews (Ball-InCon`s Abstract, Proposal, and Completion Report). The project consists of switching from inlet guide vanes to adjustable frequency drives for 10 motors that provide cooling air to glass container molds. Based on this impact evaluation, energy savings from this project are expected to be 1,711,500 kWh/yr, or about 0.20 average megawatts. On a per-ton basis, this project will save approximately 7.8 kWh/ton of glass produced. The project cost $182,834 to install, and Ball-InCon received payment of $95,581 from Bonneville for the acquisition of energy savings. The real levelized cost of these energy savings to Bonneville is 5.2 mills/kWh over the projects`s assumed 15-year life, and the levelized cost to the region is 10.7 mills/kWh in 1992 dollars, not including transmission and distribution effects. This project would not have been implemented without the acquisition payment from Bonneville, so all of the energy savings can be attributed to the E$P.

Spanner, G.E.; Sullivan, G.P.

1993-05-01

166

Tawni Voyles 1317 Branson Ave  

E-print Network

)-644-0075 EDUCATION 2009 - Present New Mexico State University Biology, Psychology B.A. Expected Graduation: December (Melopsittacus undulatus), a small parrot with the ability to learn vocalizations throughout its entire lifespan subserving vocal learning. Jan 2012 - May 2012 Cognitive Psychology Laboratory, NMSU Mentor: Dr. Justin Mac

Wright, Timothy F.

167

HWY 20 / 34 ORCHARD AVE  

E-print Network

10 F F E E D D C C B B A A o TAPS patrol extends to 53rd Street Transit & Parking Services ~ Adams Islander Cultural Ctr. (ACC) Austin Hall (Aust) ** Avery Lodge (AvLg) Azalea House (AzHs) Ballard Extension Science Building (CrpS) Dawes House (DGeo) Dearborn Hall (Dear) Dixon Lodge (DxLg) Dixon Recreation Center

Escher, Christine

168

CONGRESS AVE. CHARLIE COE GOLF  

E-print Network

. CONSTITUTION ST. 130 130A SYCAMORE COTTAGES COUNTRYCLUB APTS COUNTRY CLUB APTS C S WADSACK DR EWADSACKDR L EC WADSACK DR CWADSACKDR WC WADSACK DR WOMEN'S SOFTBALL FACILITY JENKINSAVE REAVES PARK WT T PRACTICE RANGE 15 Stanley Catlett Music Center 18 Physical Sciences Center 19 Chemistry Building 19A Chemistry Bldg

Oklahoma, University of

169

E STARR AVE PINE SHADOWS  

E-print Network

14. DEWITT NURSING BUILDING 36. HALL 14 59. PHYSICAL PLANT 82. THE MUSIC PREP HOUSE 15. EARLY CENTER) 17. EAST COLLEGE CAFETERIA 40. HALL 18, KERR 63. SAFETY OFFICE 86. UNIVERSITY HEALTH SERVICES. DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY (POLICE) 19. FERGUSON BUILDING 42. HALL (NEW TBN) 65. SCIENCE BUILDING (E. L

Long, Nicholas

170

W. FIFTH AVE. RADIATION LAB  

E-print Network

WASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITY INSTRUMENTATION 901906 750 801 701 703 815 933 912 923 925 911 938 939 902 1977 F7 G7 F7 Safety & Health Services Division 120 K5 Science Education Center 438 G6 Service Station Development & Technology Transfer 490 H7 Energy Efficiency and Conservation Division 526 L5 Energy Sciences

Ohta, Shigemi

171

Daytona Ave UniversityWay  

E-print Network

2E Daytona Hall HADNL 3D · Faculty Offices· Classrooms (101-104) · Student Center N S W E updated 08 HALRC HASRO HAIRD HAWR Ironwood Hall HAIRD 3E Learning Resource Center HALRC 3F Mesquite Hall HAMSQ 3E Palo Verde HAPV 2E Saguaro Hall HASRO 3F · Science Labs (101-102)· Gym · Administration · Lecture Rooms

172

E STARR AVE PINE SHADOWS  

E-print Network

& Food Court University Police SFA Health Services SFA Post O ce $ ATM Library Resident permits are valid. HUMAN SCIENCES BUILDING NORTH B3 67. SOCIAL WORK BUILDING A3 3. AGRICULTURE MECHANICS SHOP B1 24 (RALPH W. STEEN) B2 72. STEPHEN F. AUSTIN STATUE B2 8. AUSTIN BUILDING A2 29. HALL 7, TODD A3 51. MATH

Long, Nicholas

173

Summer Session 419 Boston Ave.  

E-print Network

communications) Gender (M/F) Primary phone number / / - - Tufts ID number Date of Birth (mm/dd/yy) Alternate you need an I-20 from Tufts? yes no Are you transferring visa sponsorship to Tufts? yes no (Sent upon-20s) Please indicate current academic status: Tufts Undergraduate Visiting Undergraduate (please

Dennett, Daniel

174

Please note that this is not a complete list of things to do and see in the area. A simple search of things to do in Palm Beach will reveal additional options. Happy exploring. 700 Rosemary Ave. West Palm Beach, FL 33401  

E-print Network

of things to do in Palm Beach will reveal additional options. Happy exploring. Palm Beach Shopping: City Place 700 Rosemary Ave. ­ West Palm Beach, FL 33401 (561) 366-1000 http://www.cityplace.com/ PGA Commons 5100 PGA Boulevard, Suite 209 ­ Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33418 (561) 630-8630 http

Fernandez, Eduardo

175

Insects found in birds' nests from Argentina: Coryphistera alaudina Burmeister, 1860 (Aves: Furnariidae), their inquiline birds and mammals, new hosts for Psammolestes coreodes Bergroth, 1911 and Triatoma platensis Neiva, 1913 (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Triatominae).  

PubMed

The insect fauna in nests of Coryphistera alaudina Burmeister, 1860 (Aves: Furnariidae) were studied in the provinces of Santiago del Estero, Chaco, Córdoba, and La Pampa in Argentina. A total of 7364 insect specimens comprising 77 taxa in a total of 29 families and 7 orders was found in their nests: 40 identified to species, 23 identified to genus, and 14 identified to family. Coryphistera alaudina and some of their vertebrate inquilines are new host records for the triatomine bugs Psammolestes coreodes Bergroth, 1911 and/or Triatoma platensis Neiva, 1913 (Hemiptera: Reduviidae). The insects in the nests of C. alaudina are separated by functional guilds, and their permanence time inside the nests are presented in a new manner and discussed. PMID:24943157

Turienzo, Paola; Di Iorio, Osvaldo

2014-01-01

176

Subpixel motion computing architecture J. Diaz, E. Ros, S. Mota, F. Pelayo and E.M. Ortigosa  

E-print Network

-end supported by an FPGA processing device, which embeds the frame grabber, optical-flow algorithm Abstract: A pipelined optical-flow processing system that works as a virtual motion sensor has been described. It is based on a field programmable gate array (FPGA) device enabling the easy change

Eduardo, Ros

177

Diaz et al. 1 5-HT2B receptors are required for serotonin-selective antidepressant actions  

E-print Network

are abolished after either genetic or pharmacologic inactivation of 5-HT2B receptors. Conversely, direct agonist in 5-HT-dependent phenotypes, including impulsivity, aggressivity and suicidality (6). Ex vivo studies

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

178

Ethyl 2-(7-oxo-3,5-diphenyl-1,4-diaze-pan-2-yl)acetate  

PubMed Central

In the title compound, C21H24N2O3, the diazepane ring adopts a chair conformation. The central diazepane ring forms dihedral angles 67.80?(7) and 72.29?(5)° with the two benzene rings. The eth­oxy­carbonyl group is disordered over two conformations with site-occupancy factors of 0.643?(5) and 0.357?(5). In the crystal, inversion dimers linked by pairs of N—H?O hydrogen bonds generate R 2 2(8) loops. PMID:22589905

Jagadeesan, G.; Sethusankar, K.; Selvakumar, P.; Thennarasu, S.; Mandal, A. B.

2012-01-01

179

Strongly correlated states of a cold atomic gas from geometric gauge fields B. Julia-Diaz1,3  

E-print Network

vortices [8]. In this Letter we focus on the generation of strongly correlated states of the atomic gasStrongly correlated states of a cold atomic gas from geometric gauge fields B. Juli´a-D´iaz1,3 , D the emergence of strongly correlated states in the presence of an artificial magnetic field. This gauge field

Dalibard, Jean

180

VizieR Online Data Catalog: Compact Groups of galaxies from 2MASX (Diaz-Gimenez+, 2012)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a photometric catalogue of compact groups of galaxies (p2MCGs) automatically extracted from the Two-Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) extended source catalogue. A total of 262 p2MCGs are identified, following the criteria defined by Hickson, of which 230 survive visual inspection (given occasional galaxy fragmentation and blends in the 2MASS parent catalogue). Only one quarter of these 230 groups were previously known compact groups (CGs). Among the 144 p2MCGs that have all their galaxies with known redshifts, 85 (59%) have four or more accordant galaxies. This v2MCG sample of velocity-filtered p2MCGs constitutes the largest sample of CGs (with N>=4) catalogued to date, with both well-defined selection criteria and velocity filtering, and is the first CG sample selected by stellar mass. It is fairly complete up to Kgroup~9 and radial velocity of ~6000km/s. (2 data files).

Diaz-Gimenez, E.; Mamon, G. A.; Pacheco, M.; Mendes de Oliveira, C.; Alonso, M. V.

2013-04-01

181

C. Diaz-Guerra, J. Piquera and C. Opagiste, Physica C 259 (1996) 121-130 Cathodoluminescence microscopy of superconducting  

E-print Network

The luminescence of different high- temperature superconductors (HTSC's) has been studied by a number of authors the spectra. This band is considered to be intrinsic to the abovementioned HTSC systems and has been

Boyer, Edmond

182

Min-energy Broadcast in Fixed-trajectory Mobile Ad-hoc J.M. Diaz-Ba~nez  

E-print Network

LAN, and satellite servicesadds movement to the stations, making necessary to extend the concept of ad the movement of the stations to rectilinear trajectories on the plane and constant velocity. This approach can be applied in settings like satellite networks [12], where the trajectories of the satellites are known

Urrutia, Jorge

183

MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 646, pp. 14, 3 figs. Tympanoctomys barrerae. By Gabriela B. Diaz, Ricardo A. Ojeda, Milton H. Gallardo,  

E-print Network

of skull (Ojeda et al., 1989) and extend posteriorly beyond occiput. Upper and lower incisors are orange. Specialized stiff hair bundles are pos- terior to upper incisors (Mares et al., 1997b). T. barrerae has op, Lihue Calel; CP, Casa de Piedra. isthodont incisors (Yepes, 1942) and euhipsodont molars. Molari- form

Hayssen, Virginia

184

Hot electron transport in suspended multilayer graphene Sungbae Lee, Nelka Wijesinghe, Carlos Diaz-Pinto, and Haibing Peng*  

E-print Network

at source-drain bias Vd=0, along with anomalies at higher Vd likely induced by optical-phonon scattering-fit logarithmic dependence of dI/dV on both the bias Vd and the temperature T. The logarithmic Vd dependence­8 Yet experimental investigation is far behind to fuel a better understanding of multilayers.3

Peng, Haibing

185

A VLSI Self-Compacting Bu er for DAMQ Communication Switches Jos e G. Delgado-Frias and Richard Diaz  

E-print Network

A VLSI Self-Compacting Bu er for DAMQ Communication Switches Jos e G. Delgado-Frias and Richard-6000 Abstract This paper describes a novel VLSI CMOS imple- mentation of a self-compacting bu er SCB data regions within the input bu er for each output channel. The proposed implementation pro- vides

Delgado-Frias, José G.

186

A Cryptographic Study of Tokenization Systems Sandra Diaz-Santiago, Lil Maria Rodriguez-Henriquez and Debrup Chakraborty  

E-print Network

requires to maintain credit card information of its clients in some form. Credit card data theft card information of its customers in some way to enable easy payments in future. Credit card data that stores credit card data needs to achieve payment card industry (PCI) compliance, which is an intricate

187

Evolution of alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase 1 peroxisomal and mitochondrial targeting. A survey of its subcellular distribution in the livers of various representatives of the classes Mammalia, Aves and Amphibia.  

PubMed

As part of a wider study on the molecular evolution of alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase 1 (AGT1) intracellular compartmentalization, we have determined the subcellular distribution of immunoreactive AGT1, using postembedding protein A-gold immunoelectron microscopy, in the livers of various members of the classes Mammalia, Aves, and Amphibia. As far as organellar distribution is concerned, three categories could be distinguished. In members of the first category (type I), all, or nearly all, of the immunoreactive AGT1 was concentrated within the peroxisomes. In the second category (type II), AGT1 was found more evenly distributed in both peroxisomes and mitochondria. In the third category (type III), AGT1 was localized mainly within the mitochondria with much lower, but widely variable, amounts in the peroxisomes. Type I animals include the human, two great apes (gorilla, orangutan), two Old World monkeys (anubis baboon, Japanese macaque), a New World monkey (white-faced Saki monkey), a lago, morph (European rabbit), a bat (Seba's short-tailed fruit bat), two caviomorph rodents (guinea pig, orange-rumped agouti), and two Australian marsupials (koala, Bennett's wallaby). Type II animals include two New World monkeys (common marmoset, cotton-top tamarin), three prosimians (brown lemur, fat-tailed dwarf lemur, pygmy slow loris), five rodents (a hybrid crested porcupine, Colombian ground squirrel, laboratory rat, laboratory mouse, golden hamster), an American marsupial (grey short-tailed opossum), and a bird (raven). Type III animals include the large tree shrew, three insectivores (common Eurasian mole, European hedgehog, house shrew), four carnivores (domestic cat, ocelot, domestic dog, polecat ferret), and an amphibian (common frog). In addition to these categories, some animals (e.g. guinea pig, common frog) possessed significant amounts of cytosolic AGT1. Whereas the subcellular distribution of AGT1 in some orders (e.g. Insectivora and Carnivora) did not appear to vary markedly between the different members, in other orders (e.g. Primates, Rodentia and Marsupialia) it fluctuated widely between the different species. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that the subcellular distribution of AGT1 has changed radically on numerous occasions during the evolution of mammals. The new observations presented in this paper are compatible with our previous demonstration of a relationship between AGT1 subcellular distribution and either present or putative ancestral dietary habit, and our previous suggestion that the molecular evolution of the AGT gene has been markedly influenced by dietary selection pressure. PMID:7813517

Danpure, C J; Fryer, P; Jennings, P R; Allsop, J; Griffiths, S; Cunningham, A

1994-08-01

188

GENEVIEVE SAUVE 4400 Fifth Ave, Box 190  

E-print Network

of organic and inorganic solar cells · Synthesis of inorganic complexes · Fabrication of optically switchable of Field-Effect Mobility in Regioregular Poly(3-hexylthiophene) Thin Film Field Effect Transistors", J. Am-effect transistors · Synthesis of conjugated polymers and of block copolymers · Fabrication and characterization

Sauvé, Geneviève

189

Interaes entre aves marinhas e Sotalia guianensis  

E-print Network

@power.ufscar.br. Rev. bras. Zooci�ncias Juiz de Fora V. 6 N�1 Jul/2004 p. 103-114 #12;104 Rev. bras. Zooci�ncias Juiz acasalamento, apresentando significativas �reas de concentra��o (CREMER, 2000). Intera��es #12;105105 Rev. bras

Simões-Lopes, Paulo César

190

Pedram Partovi 4740 Connecticut Ave. NW, #601  

E-print Network

: Popular Film and the National Imagination in Pahlavi Iran · M.A. in Islamic and Near Eastern Studies, Indian, Iranian, and Turkish). III. Grants and Fellowships · Iran Heritage Foundation (UK) Academic Grant Esfandiary, Iranian Cinema and Globalization (Bristol: Intellect, 2012) and Nacim Pak-Shiraz, Shi`i Islam

Carlini, David

191

Contact List 10406 S Maryland Ave.  

E-print Network

made by African-Americans to America's labor history. At our facility this celebration begins with the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, as we educate the public about their legacy and contributions. Patrick architects and students. The association, well known and respected in the design industry, consists

He, Chuan

192

North Hall 150 700 N. Greenwood Ave.  

E-print Network

S E R I E S Higher Education's Role in the Information Age The economy of the Information Age, Educational Studies WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11 | NOON LOCAL TO GLOBAL FA C U LT Y R E S E A R C H E X C E L L E N C E faculty, students and administrators, higher education institutions are impacting economic development

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

193

MorrisAveAA WickliffeStff  

E-print Network

access the predicted mes many different ways Online at nextbus.com Cell phone with tex ng PDA or mobile real me GPS tracking to monitor the posi on of each shu le and predict accurate arrival mes NEXTbus

Cheng, Mei-Fang

194

AVE/VAS experiment: Ground truth network  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The visible/infrared spin scan radiometer (VISSR) atmospheric sounder (VAS) rawinsonde field program is discussed. Specific items covered include: planning, personnel requirements and training, operational requirement and procedures, sounding times and dates, methods of data processing, data inventory, and status of data processing.

Scoggins, J. R.

1983-01-01

195

9700 S. Cass Ave. Argonne, IL 60439  

E-print Network

, every semester from 1986 to 1990 SKILLS Molecular Biology and Genetics Microbial cell culture, bacteria transformation, DNA cloning techniques, library screening, interaction cloning, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), mutagenesis, Northern blotting, yeast two-hybrid system, plant transformation, plant DNA isolation, nuclei

Kemner, Ken

196

NW EVERETT AVE. W BURNSIDE ST.  

E-print Network

Urban Design Prep Gerry Gast #12;Contents 3 4 13 22 Introduction West Burnside Street Stadium District Street Portland, OR 97209 #12;3 Goose Hollow Urban Design Study residents has been neglected. Older-WEN FIELD SW17THAVE. Goose Hollow Urban Design Study The Urban Projects Workshop University of Oregon

197

1701 Pennsylvania Ave. NW Washington, DC 20006  

E-print Network

could push consumers to substitute to less environmentally-friendly materials, such as metals, concrete to more quickly adopt good forest management practices and produce more environmentally-friendly wood means that FSC may incentivize the harvesting of wood in more environmentally risky locations

198

OBSERVACIONES DE AVES RARAS EN ESPAÑA, 2001  

Microsoft Academic Search

annual report of the Spanish Orni- thological Society's Rarities Committee. It considers 260 new records, relating to 108 species, with an ac- ceptance rate of 84.2 %. Highlights include a record of African Crake Crex egregia in Tenerife island (Ca- naries), first for the Western Palearctic, and a capture of Bald Ibis Geronticus eremita in the Marismas del Guadalquivir, year

Eduardo DE JUANA

199

109 Chase Ave. 215 W. House  

E-print Network

Natatorium Pinetum UNC Hospital Kenan Center Alumni Union SRC Graham Plant Love House and 620 Park Place Baity Hill Fordham Berryhill South APCF- Annex East Patient Chiller Support Center NC Women's and Children's Health Residence Hickerson Mason Farm Craige McColl Center Taylor Ernie Stadium Public Safety Development Center

McLaughlin, Richard M.

200

801 Stanyan 400 Parnassus Ave (ACC)  

E-print Network

visit our web site at: Parcel Service Intercampus mail may be sent via the UCSF Intercampus Shuttle on the shuttle by a responsible laboratory employee. No parcel larger than 16" long, 10" wide, and 7" deep may

Klein, Ophir

201

Cranial Osteology of Meiglyptini (Aves: Piciformes: Picidae)  

PubMed Central

The Meiglyptini comprise eight species grouped into three genera: Meiglyptes and Mulleripicus, with three species each, and Hemicircus, with two species. The aim of the present study was to describe the cranial osteology of six species and three genera of Meiglyptini and to compare them to each other, as well as with other species of woodpeckers and other bird groups. The cranial osteology varied among the investigated species, but the most markedly distinct characteristics were: (1) a frontal overhang is only observed in the middle portion of the frontale of H. concretus; (2) the Proc. zygomaticus and suprameaticus are thick and long in species of the genus Mulleripicus, but short in other species; (3) the Pes pterygoidei is relatively larger in species of the genus Mulleripicus, while it is narrow, thin and relatively smaller in species of the genus Meiglyptes and indistinct in H. concretus; (4) the bony projection of the ectethmoidale is relatively short and thin in species of Mulleripicus and more developed in H. concretus. It appears that the greatest structural complexity of the cranial osteology is associated with the birds' diet, with the frugivorous H. concretus being markedly different from the insectivorous species. PMID:22567317

Donatelli, Reginaldo José

2012-01-01

202

OARDCEMPLOYEES'CREDITUNION 1680MadisonAve  

E-print Network

need more money saved by other members. It's a balancing act and in order to be profitable we need your open end that you may add onto and closed end that you must pay off before borrowing more money. Open and drop it in the slot in the door, mail it to us or fax it to 202- 3558. How do they decide if a member

Jones, Michelle

203

OBSERVACIONES DE AVES RARAS EN ESPAÑA  

Microsoft Academic Search

annual report of the Spanish Orni- thological Society's Rarities Committee. It considers 321 new records pertaining to 110 species, with an ac- ceptance rate of 77.7 %. Species new to the Spanish list are Dwarf Bittern Ardeirallus sturmii (first accepted record for the Palearctic, from Gran Canaria island), Chimney Swift Chaetura pelagica(two in the Iberian pe- ninsula, year1999) and Dusky

Eduardo DE JUANA

204

Julia Karin Lawson 703 South Fess Ave.  

E-print Network

.com Education 1980 Ph.D in German, Indiana University, Bloomington IN 1968 M.A. in German, Indiana University, all levels. 2000-2002 Instructor, Comprehensive Language Center, Inc., a private language contractor through advanced levels. 1991 - 1999 Program Director and Instructor of ESL and German, Languages

Indiana University

205

Global diversity of freshwater birds (Aves)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Among the 10,000 birds species living on earth, 5% (e.g., 560) need imperatively freshwater habitat in order to satisfy at\\u000a least one of their life history traits. About 11 completed families could even disappear if their wetland habitat left. About\\u000a 10% (58) of these can be considered as endemic. Africa contains the biggest number of endemic (20) and more precisely

Olivier Dehorter; Matthieu Guillemain

206

Global diversity of freshwater birds (Aves)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Among the 10,000 birds species living on earth, 5% (e.g., 560) need imperatively freshwater habitat in order to satisfy at\\u000a least one of their life history traits. About 11 completed families could even disappear if their wetland habitat left. About\\u000a 10% (58) of these can be considered as endemic. Africa contains the biggest number of endemic (20) and more precisely

Olivier Dehorter; Matthieu Guillemain

2008-01-01

207

Human Resources Ave W Suite #302  

E-print Network

this in both places. Name Change: reason for change ___________________ Former name. Please see next page for further details. Marriage Certificate or License Changed Driver's License to make benefit changes as a result of marriage, divorce, legal separation, or annulment. Contact either

Nelson, Tim

208

Kimberly Sims 101 Western Ave. #66  

E-print Network

Osborn, Social Studies concentrator · "Black Beauty Culture, 1908-1929," Scott Rowen, History Research Assistant, the American Pageant · Assisted in updating the content of the newest edition of the textbook The American Pageant. September 2001- June 2002 Research Assistant for Professor Lizabeth Cohen

Carlini, David

209

212 Union Ave, SE Olympia, WA 98501  

E-print Network

). More fossil fuel helped meet the demands of economic growth, since the region's hydropower system lost by states in the region, while this paper shows the statistical weakness in choosing "snapshot" data to set

210

Acuaria paraguayensis n. sp. from Sirystes sibilator (Aves: Tyrannidae) in Paraguay and a redescription of A. mamillaris (Molin, 1860) from Cyanocorax cayanus (Corvidae) in Brazil, with a key to the species of Acuaria Bremser, 1811 (Nematoda: Acuariidae) in the New World.  

PubMed

Acuaria paraguayensis n. sp. is described on the basis of specimens from Sirystes sibilator (Vieillot) (Aves: Passeriformes, Tyrannidae) in Paraguay. In addition, A. mamillaris (Molin, 1860) from Cyanocorax cayanus (L.) (Corvidae) in Brazil is redescribed on the basis of its type-series from the collection of the Naturhistorisches Museum, Vienna. A review of the species of Acuaria Bremser, 1811 in the New World is presented. Currently, 16 species belong to this genus, which are mostly parasitic in passeriform birds (one record in piciform birds). An identification key to the species of Acuaria occurring in the New World is presented. Acuaria multispinosa (Vigueras, 1938) originally described from Botaurus lentiginosus (Rackett) (Ardeidae) in Cuba, also known from various herons (Ciconiiformes, Ardeidae) in southern states of the USA, does not correspond to the generic diagnosis of Acuaria and is considered a species incertae sedis. Acuaria gracilis var. sturni Boyd, 1951 is elevated to full species rank as Acuaria sturni Boyd, 1951. PMID:22139009

Mutafchiev, Yasen; Mariaux, Jean; Georgiev, Boyko B

2012-01-01

211

TESSERAL SPATIOTEMPORAL REASONING FOR MULTIDIMENSIONAL DATA F.P.Coenen, B. Beattie, T.J.M.BenchCapon, B.M.Diaz and M.J.R.Shave  

E-print Network

into a demonstration spatio­temporal reasoning system, the SPARTA (SPAtial Reasoning using Tesseral Addressing) system scenarios. The paper gives a detailed description of the representation and an overview of the SPARTA N

Atkinson, Katie

212

Shape and individual variability of the blur adaptation curve q Fuensanta A. Vera-Diaz a,b,*, Russell L. Woods a  

E-print Network

of certain ophthalmic devices, such as progressive addition lenses, multifocal contact lenses and intra,b,*, Russell L. Woods a , Eli Peli a a Schepens Eye Research Institute, Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard ocular lenses (IOLs) used to replace th

Peli, Eli

213

Nature-Inspired Total Synthesis of (-)-Fusarisetin A Jing Xu, Eduardo J. E. Caro-Diaz, Lynnie Trzoss, and Emmanuel A. Theodorakis*  

E-print Network

for biological evaluation. Isolated from the soil fungus Fusarium sp. FN080326, fusarisetin A (1) (Figure 1) has is the primary cause of death of cancer patients.2 Thus, the chemical and biological investigation of fusarisetin that would involve formation of stabilized radical 3 (Figure 1). Radical cyclization at the pendant alkene

Theodorakis, Emmanuel

214

Behav Ecol Sociobiol (2004) 55:278285 DOI 10.1007/s00265-003-0679-z  

E-print Network

and through extrapair mating. We examined settlement patterns, divorce and breeding dispersal in a sedentary kites Milvus migrans, Forero et al. 1999). In contrast, in sedentary species competition for breeding

215

University Health Services 910 Madison Ave, Suite 922  

E-print Network

" or "no"). 1. Do you currently smoke tobacco, or have you smoked tobacco in the last month? 2 with other people at an ordinary pace on level ground: d) Have to stop for breath when walking at your own

Cui, Yan

216

California Public Utilities Commission 505 Van Ness Ave., San Francisco  

E-print Network

's knowledge-based society depends on high-quality, up-to-date information. California's increasingly and the impacts of programs that aim to help them grow. For policymakers, quantifying impacts is essential

217

Eocene Diversification of Crown Group Rails (Aves: Gruiformes: Rallidae)  

PubMed Central

Central to our understanding of the timing of bird evolution is debate about an apparent conflict between fossil and molecular data. A deep age for higher level taxa within Neoaves is evident from molecular analyses but much remains to be learned about the age of diversification in modern bird families and their evolutionary ecology. In order to better understand the timing and pattern of diversification within the family Rallidae we used a relaxed molecular clock, fossil calibrations, and complete mitochondrial genomes from a range of rallid species analysed in a Bayesian framework. The estimated time of origin of Rallidae is Eocene, about 40.5 Mya, with evidence of intrafamiliar diversification from the Late Eocene to the Miocene. This timing is older than previously suggested for crown group Rallidae, but fossil calibrations, extent of taxon sampling and substantial sequence data give it credence. We note that fossils of Eocene age tentatively assigned to Rallidae are consistent with our findings. Compared to available studies of other bird lineages, the rail clade is old and supports an inference of deep ancestry of ground-dwelling habits among Neoaves. PMID:25291147

Garcia-R, Juan C.; Gibb, Gillian C.; Trewick, Steve A.

2014-01-01

218

EASTUNIVERSTIYDR. N.W.8thAVE.  

E-print Network

. HENDERSON, SOCCER FIELDS ALEXANDER D. HENDERSON, MEDIA CENTER ARENA ATHLETIC FIELD HOUSE ATHLETIC FIELD HALL COLLEGE FOR DESIGN & SOCIAL INQUIRY COLLEGE OF ARTS & LETTERS, DOROTHY F. SCHMIDT COLLEGE BUILDING DESANTIS PAVILION DOROTHY F. SCHMIDT ARTS & HUMANITIES DOROTHY F. SCHMIDT PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

Fernandez, Eduardo

219

A Karyological Study of Some Corvine Birds (Corvidae, Aves)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Karyotypes were studied in the hooded and carrion crows, their naturally occurred hybrids, the jungle crow, the azure-winged magpie (2n= 80 in all aforementioned birds), and the magpie (2n= 82). Corvine birds of Primorskii Krai were karyotyped for the first time. In addition to the similarity in the diploid chromosome sets, corvine birds were shown to have a similar structure

G. V. Roslik; A. P. Kryukov

2001-01-01

220

AVE/VAS 4: 25-mb sounding data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The rawinsonde sounding program is described and tabulated data at 25 mb intervals for the 24 stations and 14 special stations participating in the experiment is presented. Sounding were taken at 3 hr intervals. An additional sounding was taken at the normal synoptic observation time. Some soundings were computed from raw ordinate data, while others were interpolated from significant level data.

Sienkiewicz, M. E.

1983-01-01

221

Taxonomy of Greater White-fronted Geese (Aves: Anatidae)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Five subspecies of the Greater White-fronted Goose, Anser albifrons (Scopoli, 1769), have been named, all on the basis of wintering birds, and up to six subspecies have been recognized. There has been confusion over the application of some names, particularly in North America, because of lack of knowledge of the breeding ranges and type localities, and incorrect taxonomic decisions. There is one clinally varying subspecies in Eurasia, one that breeds in Greenland, and three in North America, one newly named herein.

Banks, Richard C.

2011-01-01

222

EASTUNIVERSTIYDR. N.W.8thAVE.  

E-print Network

FIELD HOUSE ATHLETIC FIELD HOUSE WEST B.P.W. SCHOLARSHIP HOUSE BARRY KAYE HALL BASEBALL STADIUM 16 LOT 1 Palm Beach Plaza Track Pool POOL PALM BEACH STATE COLLEGE PALM BEACH STATE COLLEGE N.W.8th BEACH STATE COLLEGE PALM BEACH STATE COLLEGE DR. LOT 21 LOT 4 TC-67B FAUBLVD. FAUBLVD. FAU BLVD. FAUBLVD

Fernandez, Eduardo

223

Reappraisal of Dinornis (Aves: Dinornithiformes) species—a morphometric analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Examination of Dinornis crania revealed three forms distinguishable by their shape, in particular, by the combination of the characters: temporal width – postorbital width ratio, presence or absence of tuberosities laterad of the occipital crest, relative development of the mamillar tuberosities, shape of the basisphenoid plate, shape of the occipital condyle, and shape of the pterygoid. Statistical analyses of cranial

T. H. Worthy

1994-01-01

224

Comparative study of visual pathways in owls (Aves: Strigiformes).  

PubMed

Although they are usually regarded as nocturnal, owls exhibit a wide range of activity patterns, from strictly nocturnal, to crepuscular or cathemeral, to diurnal. Several studies have shown that these differences in the activity pattern are reflected in differences in eye morphology and retinal organization. Despite the evidence that differences in activity pattern among owl species are reflected in the peripheral visual system, there has been no attempt to correlate these differences with changes in the visual regions in the brain. In this study, we compare the relative size of nuclei in the main visual pathways in nine species of owl that exhibit a wide range of activity patterns. We found marked differences in the relative size of all visual structures among the species studied, both in the tectofugal and the thalamofugal pathway, as well in other retinorecipient nuclei, including the nucleus lentiformis mesencephali, the nucleus of the basal optic root and the nucleus geniculatus lateralis, pars ventralis. We show that the barn owl (Tyto alba), a species widely used in the study of the integration of visual and auditory processing, has reduced visual pathways compared to strigid owls. Our results also suggest there could be a trade-off between the relative size of visual pathways and auditory pathways, similar to that reported in mammals. Finally, our results show that although there is no relationship between activity pattern and the relative size of either the tectofugal or the thalamofugal pathway, there is a positive correlation between the relative size of both visual pathways and the relative number of cells in the retinal ganglion layer. PMID:23296024

Gutiérrez-Ibáñez, Cristián; Iwaniuk, Andrew N; Lisney, Thomas J; Wylie, Douglas R

2013-01-01

225

Eye shape and retinal topography in owls (Aves: Strigiformes).  

PubMed

The eyes of vertebrates show adaptations to the visual environments in which they evolve. For example, eye shape is associated with activity pattern, while retinal topography is related to the symmetry or 'openness' of the habitat of a species. Although these relationships are well documented in many vertebrates including birds, the extent to which they hold true for species within the same avian order is not well understood. Owls (Strigiformes) represent an ideal group for the study of interspecific variation in the avian visual system because they are one of very few avian orders to contain species that vary in both activity pattern and habitat preference. Here, we examined interspecific variation in eye shape and retinal topography in nine species of owl. Eye shape (the ratio of corneal diameter to eye axial length) differed among species, with nocturnal species having relatively larger corneal diameters than diurnal species. All the owl species have an area of high retinal ganglion cell (RGC) density in the temporal retina and a visual streak of increased cell density extending across the central retina from temporal to nasal. However, the organization and degree of elongation of the visual streak varied considerably among species and this variation was quantified using H:V ratios. Species that live in open habitats and/or that are more diurnally active have well-defined, elongated visual streaks and high H:V ratios (3.88-2.33). In contrast, most nocturnal and/or forest-dwelling owls have a poorly defined visual streak, a more radially symmetrical arrangement of RGCs and lower H:V ratios (1.77-1.27). The results of a hierarchical cluster analysis indicate that the apparent interspecific variation is associated with activity pattern and habitat as opposed to the phylogenetic relationships among species. In seven species, the presence of a fovea was confirmed and it is suggested that all strigid owls may possess a fovea, whereas the tytonid barn owl (Tyto alba) does not. A size-frequency analysis of cell soma area indicates that a number of different RGC classes are represented in owls, including a population of large RGCs (cell soma area >150 µm(2)) that resemble the giant RGCs reported in other vertebrates. In conclusion, eye shape and retinal topography in owls vary among species and this variation is associated with different activity patterns and habitat preferences, thereby supporting similar observations in other vertebrates. PMID:22722085

Lisney, Thomas J; Iwaniuk, Andrew N; Bandet, Mischa V; Wylie, Douglas R

2012-01-01

226

BOLETIN DE AVES MARINAS LATINOAMERICANAS VOLUMEN 3; NUMERO 3  

E-print Network

ambientes coster-os (lagunas, planicies, fangosas, laderas coster-as y manglares) del Norte de America del legal de pichones de pel icanos, util izacion de lagunas para cultivo de camarones, actividad mi 1i tar. R. Bowman, National Audubon Society, Research Department, 11.5 Indian Mound Trail, Tavernier FL

Duffy, David Cameron

227

Posted on Wed, Jul. 14, 2004 AVE MARIA UNIVERSITY  

E-print Network

to build. The scientific-consensus position, articulated in the January U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, outreach programs and economic vitality to a poor region. Five miles north of the proposed AMU, Immokalee is home to thousands of low-wage immigrant farmworkers. Like a #12;developing-country neighborhood

Shrader-Frechette, Kristin

228

AVE/VAS 5: 25-mb sounding data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The rawinsonde sounding program is described and tabulated data at 25 mb intervals for the 24 and 14 special stations participation in the experiment are presented. Soundings were taken at 3 hr intervals. The method of processing soundings is discussed briefly, estimates of the RMS errors in the data are presented, and an example of contact data is given. Termination pressures of soundings taken in the meso beta scale network are tabulated, as are observations of ground temperature at a depth of 2 cm.

Sienkiewicz, M. E.

1983-01-01

229

Hypopi (Acari: Hypoderatidae) of the wood stork (Aves: Ciconiiformes: Ciconiidae)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A new species is described and additional host records are presented for 2 other species of deutonymphs of the family Hypoderatidae from the subcutaneous adipose tissues of the wood stork, Mycteria americana L. Phalacrodectes (Phalacrodectes) mycteria n. sp. appears to share affinities with species from both pelicaniform and ciconiiform hosts, but it most closely resembles P. (P.) punctatissimus (?erný) Pence & Courtney from pelicans in idiosomal chaetotaxy, cutdcular sclerotization, and posteriorly divergent, widely separated genital openings. The new species differs from this and other species of the genus by its small size, the degree of separation of the genital openings with papillae, no secondary sclerotization in the perigenital area or surrounding the genital openings, and the long filiform setae s and w on genu III. There was a mixed infection of Neottialges kutzeri Fain and N. mycteriae Pence in all of 7 wood storks examined from Florida and Georgia; P. (P) mycteria was found in 4 of these hosts. This is the 7th species described as a deutonymph in the genus Phalacrodectes. The apparent close affinity of P. (P.) mycteria with P. (P.) punctatissimus and allied species from pelicaniform versus ciconiiform birds appears to be inconsistent with the established host-parasite relationships based on classical avian taxonomic relationships. However, this apparent affinity may be more reflective of the close relationships between the families of pelicans, ibises and spoonbills, and storks as recently proposed by DNA-DNA hybridization studies.

Pence, D.B.; Thomas, N.J.

1995-01-01

230

Where: Asbury Church, 6101 University Ave,Where: Asbury Church, 6101 University Ave,Where: Asbury Church, 6101 University Ave,Where: Asbury Church, 6101 University Ave, Madison, WIMadison, WIMadison, WIMadison, WI  

E-print Network

, on a giant screen TV. Learn about "AmLearn about "AmLearn about "AmLearn about "American" football, the fun!""Touchback!""Touchback!""Touchback!" "Punt!""Punt!""Punt!""Punt!" Would you like to watch an "American" Football gameWould you like to watch an "American" Football gameWould you like to watch an "American" Football gameWould you like to watch

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

231

[Helminth fauna Anseriformes (Aves) in the Lodz Zoological Garden].  

PubMed

In the years 1959-1990 429 birds on 30 species of Anseriformes were examined post mortem at Zoo Lód?. The helminths were found in 108 birds (25.17%) of 19 species. In infected birds there were found 4 species of trematodes: one of them, Catatropis verrucosa is in Poland new for Cygnus olor; 9 species of cestodes--7 of them are in Poland new for examined hosts; namely: Drepanidotaenia lanceolata for Dendrocygna viduata, Cygnus atratus, Branta bernicla, and Anas platyrhynchos; Microsomacanthus paracompressus for Cygnus olor; Dicranotaenia coronula for Chloephaga picta and Cairina moschata; Cloacotaenia megalops for Branta bernicla, Tschertkovilepis setigera for Cygnus olor, Anser indicus, Branta bernicla and Anas platyrhynchos; Fimbriaria fasciolaris for Cygnus olor and Chloephaga picta; Sobolevicanthus gracilis for Cygnus atratus, Chloephaga picta and Tadorna tadorna; 13 species of nematodes--7 of them are in Poland new for examined hosts, namely: Cyathostoma variegatum for Cygnus atratus, Anser indicus and Anser caerulescens; Syngamus trachea for Anser indicus; Echinuria uncinata for Anser indicus; Ganguleterakis dispar for Cgynus melanocoryphus, Cgynus olor and Anser caerulescens; Pterothominx caudinflata for Anser indicus; Amidostomum ansersis for Cygnus olor and Branta bernicla; Capillaria anatis for Anas acuta. No acanthocephalans were observed. PMID:9424942

Zuchowska, E

1997-01-01

232

A molecular phylogeny of the cotingas (Aves: Cotingidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The phylogenetic relationships of members of Cotingidae were investigated using >2100bp of sequence data from two nuclear introns (myoglobin intron 2 and G3PDH intron 11) and one protein-coding mitochondrial gene (cytochrome b). Strong support was found for a monophyletic clade including 23 traditional cotingid genera, corresponding to the Cotingidae sensu [Remsen, J.V. Jr., Jaramillo, A., Nores, M., Pacheco, J.F., Robbins,

Jan I. Ohlson; Richard O. Prum; Per G. P. Ericson

2007-01-01

233

Esteban M Lucero 505 Sweet Ave. Las Cruces NM 88001  

E-print Network

@nmsu.edu EDUCATION New Mexico State University 2008-Present Bachelor of Science, Biology, expected May 2014 Animal Communications project presentation, December 2012. · E. Lucero, J. Kressin, B. Milligan; Environmental Forensics: Variables Influencing Isolation and purity of wood DNA. 3rd Annual Rise Mid

Wright, Timothy F.

234

2245 MSC, 1300 University Ave Madison, WI 53706-1532  

E-print Network

to Adult Children with Serious Mental Illness: Patterns of Vulnerability & Resiliency Jan Steven Greenberg: � Senior Living Options � Social & Educational Programs � Volunteer Opportunities � Legal & Legislative � Fitness & Nutrition � Hearing & Vision Loss Resources � Osteoporosis Screening � Blood Pressure Testing

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

235

Duval County Extension 1010 N. McDuff Ave.  

E-print Network

Freezing is one of the easiest, most convenient, and fastest methods of preserving foods. The extreme not grow at 0° F. Therefore, freezing provides a safe alternative to pressure canning. Foods can lose moisture during freezing. This is called freezer burn and the food surface has a grainy, brownish area

Watson, Craig A.

236

Genética de populações e relações de parentesco em Ciconiiformes (Aves).  

E-print Network

??Estudos de genética de populações e de parentesco genético foram desenvolvidos em colhereiro (Platalea ajaja), cabeça-seca (Mycteria americana) e garça-branca-grande (Ardea alba egretta), de colônias… (more)

Carolina Isabel Miño

2010-01-01

237

Wellness, Productivity, and You! ave you wondered if one  

E-print Network

.com/1-drink D ownload the 2014 food and nutrition handout at EatRight.org (Search bar: "2014 Health Tips")--it has smart eating tips and time- saving food ideas to im- prove nutritional balance, create healthy snacks for kids, plan meals better, and feel less confused about food. Did you know that families

Kim, Duck O.

238

Acetylcholinesterase in der Pars distalis von Zonotrichia leucophrys gambelii (Aves)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Photoperiodic stimulation of photosensitive male white-crowned sparrows, Zonotrichia leucophrys gambelii, causes the appearance of acetylcholinesterase activity in the cephalic and caudal lobes of the pars distalis. In photosensitive birds held on short daily photoperiods little or no activity can he demonstrated histochemically. The enzyme is restricted to PAS-positive cells. After attaining a maximum between 31 and 52 days after the

Eberhard Haase; Donald S. Farner

1969-01-01

239

Duval County Extension 1010 N. McDuff Ave.  

E-print Network

9043878902 Dry Foods Safely Jackie Schrader, 4H/FCS Agent III and Melanie Thomas, FCS Agent I Drying is one of the oldest methods of food preservation. It is simple, safe and easy. Drying removes. This will eventually cause mold. Most foods can be dried indoors using modern food dehydrators, countertop

Watson, Craig A.

240

Experimental assessment of problem solving by Milvago chimango (Aves: Falconiformes)  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report a preliminary assessment of problem solving as an estimate of behavioural innovation and learning ability of a generalist\\u000a and abundant raptor, Milvago chimango, under controlled conditions in aviaries. Experimental tests consisted in presentation of a Plexiglas box with four lids\\u000a leading to isolated pieces of meat. We recorded time to first contact with the box and time from

Laura Marina Biondi; Maria Susana Bó; Aldo Iván Vassallo

2008-01-01

241

Geometric morphometrics of the skull of Tinamidae (Aves, Palaeognathae).  

PubMed

The Tinamidae comprise exclusively Neotropical palaegnathous birds, with homogeneous body morphology and no sexual dimorphism. The goal of this work was to explore the variation in skull morphology between taxa and its possible correspondence with features such as diet or gender using geometric morphometric tools. Eleven landmarks were analyzed in 53 skulls of 4 genera that inhabit grasslands: Nothoprocta, Eudromia, Nothura and Rhynchotus. Intrageneric and intergeneric variability was analyzed. The genera studied here can be distinguished based on the geometric shape of their skull, with prenarial region length and neurocranium shape as the most outstanding features. In the genus Eudromia, males and females could be differentiated, while in the genus Nothoprocta, the species differentiated according to their trophic habits. This study allows establishing that genera and, in some cases, the gender of the Tinamidae can be differentiated based on cranial shape. PMID:21115291

Degrange, Federico J; Picasso, Mariana B J

2010-12-01

242

Hindlimb myology of the monk parakeet (Aves, Psittaciformes).  

PubMed

We studied the hindlimb myology of the monk parakeet (Myiopsitta monachus). Like all parrots, it has zygodactyl feet enabling perching, climbing, hanging, moving easily among trees, and handling food. Muscles were described and weighed, and physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA) of four flexors and one extensor was calculated. In comparison to other muscles, the M. tibialis cranialis and the M. fibularis brevis show increased development and high PCSA values, and therefore, large potential force production. Also, a large proportion of muscle mass was involved in flexing the digits. We hypothesize that these muscle traits are associated with the arboreal locomotion and food manipulation habits. In the monk parakeet, the M. extensor digitorum longus sends a branch to the hallux, and the connection between the M. flexor digitorum longus and the M. flexor hallucis longus is type I (Gadow's classification). We reaffirm the presence of the M. ambiens as a plesiomorphic condition that disappears in most members of the order. Among Psittaciformes, the M. fibularis brevis is stronger and the M. fibularis weaker in arboreal species than in basal terrestrial ones (e.g., Strigops). PMID:24500894

Carril, Julieta; Mosto, María C; Picasso, Mariana B J; Tambussi, Claudia P

2014-07-01

243

The hindlimb muscles of Rhea americana (Aves, Palaeognathae, Rheidae).  

PubMed

The Greater Rhea is the largest cursorial Ratitae bird native to South America. Due to its increasing importance in farming and therefore in the sustainable use of this species, a comprehensive knowledge of their anatomy is essential. The goal of this study was to provide an anatomical description of the hindlimb muscles of Rhea americana. Six adult birds of both sexes were macroscopically studied analysing the origin and insertion of thigh and shank muscles. The thigh showed the highest number of muscles, whereas the shank showed the lowest number; this feature minimizes inertia and allows achieving high stride frequencies. The muscles of the shank showed long tendons of insertion that reduce the energetic cost during running. The major muscles responsible for extension of the hip and the ankle joints were massive and robust indicating their importance for cursorial locomotion. The pelvic limb muscles of Rhea americana resemble those of other cursorial Ratitae and their features are consistent with specialization for high-speed locomotion. PMID:20666746

Picasso, M B J

2010-10-01

244

The evolutionary history of cockatoos (Aves: Psittaciformes: Cacatuidae).  

PubMed

Cockatoos are the distinctive family Cacatuidae, a major lineage of the order of parrots (Psittaciformes) and distributed throughout the Australasian region of the world. However, the evolutionary history of cockatoos is not well understood. We investigated the phylogeny of cockatoos based on three mitochondrial and three nuclear DNA genes obtained from 16 of 21 species of Cacatuidae. In addition, five novel mitochondrial genomes were used to estimate time of divergence and our estimates indicate Cacatuidae diverged from Psittacidae approximately 40.7 million years ago (95% CI 51.6-30.3 Ma) during the Eocene. Our data shows Cacatuidae began to diversify approximately 27.9 Ma (95% CI 38.1-18.3 Ma) during the Oligocene. The early to middle Miocene (20-10 Ma) was a significant period in the evolution of modern Australian environments and vegetation, in which a transformation from mainly mesic to xeric habitats (e.g., fire-adapted sclerophyll vegetation and grasslands) occurred. We hypothesize that this environmental transformation was a driving force behind the diversification of cockatoos. A detailed multi-locus molecular phylogeny enabled us to resolve the phylogenetic placements of the Palm Cockatoo (Probosciger aterrimus), Galah (Eolophus roseicapillus), Gang-gang Cockatoo (Callocephalon fimbriatum) and Cockatiel (Nymphicus hollandicus), which have historically been difficult to place within Cacatuidae. When the molecular evidence is analysed in concert with morphology, it is clear that many of the cockatoo species' diagnostic phenotypic traits such as plumage colour, body size, wing shape and bill morphology have evolved in parallel or convergently across lineages. PMID:21419232

White, Nicole E; Phillips, Matthew J; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Alfaro-Núñez, Alonzo; Willerslev, Eske; Mawson, Peter R; Spencer, Peter B S; Bunce, Michael

2011-06-01

245

OBSERVACIONES DE AVES RARAS EN ESPAÑA, AÑO 1998  

Microsoft Academic Search

report of the Spanish Ornitological Society's Rarities Committee. It presents 163 new records relating to 82 species, with an acceptance rate of 74,2 %. Species new to the Spanish list are Red-flanked Bluetail Tarsiger cyanurus and Isabelline Shrike Lanius isabellinus, and for the Canary islands list, Franklin's Gull Larus pipixcan and Laughing Dove Streptopelia senegalensis (birds of unknown origin). Species

246

Parrots in a nutshell: The fossil record of Psittaciformes (Aves)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Parrots (traditional order Psittaciformes) are one of the most instantly recognizable groups of modern birds. Their relatively large heads, squat necks and broad, curved bills help to make parrots so easily identifiable. However, the few early fossil parrots that have been discovered to date (Lower Eocene), do not necessarily possess this “parrot-like” cranial morphology. Even more surprisingly, early psittaciforms have

David M. Waterhouse

2006-01-01

247

David G. Belair 1901 University Ave. Apt. 3  

E-print Network

in Pharmaceutical Engineering Graduation Date: May 2010 GPA: 3.56/4.0 WORK EXPERIENCE Graduate Research Assistant American Institute of Chemical Engineers May 2007 - Present International Society for Pharmaceutical)430-1704 OBJECTIVE To obtain an internship position utilizing background in chemical engineering as well as research

248

SHAHNOZA BOBOEVA 3030 Johnson Ave, Bronx, NY, 10463  

E-print Network

2011 New York State Psychiatric Institute New York, NY Documentation Assistant · English, NY Documentation Assistant · Company website management and Russian-English translation · Jewelry officers, including teaching, preparation of presentations and creation of brochures in Russian and Tajik

249

Phylogeny and classification of the Old World Emberizini (Aves, Passeriformes).  

PubMed

The phylogeny of the avian genus Emberiza and the monotypic genera Latoucheornis, Melophus and Miliaria (collectively the Old World Emberizini), as well as representatives for the New World Emberizini, the circumpolar genera Calcarius and Plectrophenax and the four other generally recognized tribes in the subfamily Emberizinae was estimated based on the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene and introns 6-7 of the nuclear ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) gene. Our results support monophyly of the Old World Emberizini, but do not corroborate a sister relationship to the New World Emberizini. Calcarius and Plectrophenax form a clade separated from the other Emberizini. This agrees with previous studies, and we recommend the use of the name Calcariini. Latoucheornis, Melophus and Miliaria are nested within Emberiza, and we therefore propose they be synonymized with Emberiza. Emberiza is divided into four main clades, whose relative positions are uncertain, although a sister relation between a clade with six African species and one comprising the rest of the species (30, all Palearctic) is most likely. Most clades agree with traditional, morphology-based, classifications. However, four sister relationships within Emberiza, three of which involve the previously recognized Latoucheornis, Melophus and Miliaria, are unpredicted, and reveal cases of strong morphological divergence. In contrast, the plumage similarity between adult male Emberiza (formerly Latoucheornis) siemsseni and the nominate subspecies of the New World Junco hyemalis is shown to be the result of parallel evolution. A further case of parallel plumage evolution, between African and Eurasian taxa, is pointed out. Two cases of discordance between the mitochondrial and nuclear data with respect to branch lengths and genetic divergences are considered to be the result of introgressive hybridization. PMID:18411062

Alström, Per; Olsson, Urban; Lei, Fumin; Wang, Hai-tao; Gao, Wei; Sundberg, Per

2008-06-01

250

The karyotype of the osprey, Pandion haliaetus (Aves: Falconiformes)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The karyotype of the osprey consists of 74 chromosomes. There are no large macrochromosomes and no typical microchromosomes. Autosome No. 2 has a prominent secondary constriction in the long arm. The Z chromosome is similar in size and shape to the largest autosome, the W is a small metacentric. Among the Falconiformes, the osprey karyotype mainly resembles the karyotypes of

H. Ryttman; H. Tegelström; K. Fredga; J. Sondell

1987-01-01

251

A compilation of studies from Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Five methods for obtaining the sign of vertical motion at various levels in the atmosphere were investigated to determine which gave the best explanation for areas of rain and no-rain in the southeastern United States during the period February 19-22, 1964. The methods used were the terrain-induced vertical motion, the kinematic method including the terrain effect, the adiabatic method, the omega equation, and the vorticity equation combined with Dines' Compensation Principle. Stability and moisture availability were considered but not as extensively as vertical motion. Values of vertical motion obtained by the kinetic method, including orographic lifting produced the best agreement with the observed areas. When terms in the omega equation were added through use of constant multipliers, results comparable to the adiabatic method were obtained. Without this addition large uncertainties occurred. Maps showing areas where terms of the omega equation would indicate positive vertical motion did not correlate well with the observed rainfall patterns.

Scoggins, J. R.; Fuelberg, H. E.; Carlson, R. D.; Phelps, R. W.; Bellue, D. G.

1973-01-01

252

Eocene diversification of crown group rails (aves: gruiformes: rallidae).  

PubMed

Central to our understanding of the timing of bird evolution is debate about an apparent conflict between fossil and molecular data. A deep age for higher level taxa within Neoaves is evident from molecular analyses but much remains to be learned about the age of diversification in modern bird families and their evolutionary ecology. In order to better understand the timing and pattern of diversification within the family Rallidae we used a relaxed molecular clock, fossil calibrations, and complete mitochondrial genomes from a range of rallid species analysed in a Bayesian framework. The estimated time of origin of Rallidae is Eocene, about 40.5 Mya, with evidence of intrafamiliar diversification from the Late Eocene to the Miocene. This timing is older than previously suggested for crown group Rallidae, but fossil calibrations, extent of taxon sampling and substantial sequence data give it credence. We note that fossils of Eocene age tentatively assigned to Rallidae are consistent with our findings. Compared to available studies of other bird lineages, the rail clade is old and supports an inference of deep ancestry of ground-dwelling habits among Neoaves. PMID:25291147

García-R, Juan C; Gibb, Gillian C; Trewick, Steve A

2014-01-01

253

Emily Waymire Evolution of Uganda's Biodiversity: Apes to Aves  

E-print Network

watched baby elephants, tree-climbing lions, and one morning, a leopard who quietly walked in front of our, including one exhilarating morning among wild mountain gorillas. But every afternoon, as we wove our way

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Search for new manganese-cobalt oxides as positive electrode materials for lithium batteries P. Strobel, J. Tillier, A. Diaz, A. Ibarra-Palos, F. Thiry and J.B. Soupart *  

E-print Network

Search for new manganese-cobalt oxides as positive electrode materials for lithium batteries P new mixed manganese-cobalt oxides for lithium battery positive electrode materials were obtained using material for rechargeable lithium batteries so far. Many efforts are underway to replace part or all cobalt

Boyer, Edmond

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Attending the meeting, LR, are two sons of Castro: Antonio Castro Soto del Valle and Fidel Castro Diaz-Balart, Cuban Presidential Science Advisor; Fidel Castro Ruz; Castros wife Dalia Soto del Valle; Juan  

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), and ConAgra (VP/general manager). Additionally, as CEO he managed two successful food companies, both;2 Michael duBois New Director of Rutgers Food Innovation Center Michael duBois has been appointed Director of the Rutgers Food Innovation Center (FIC), which is located in Bridgeton, NJ. DuBois is a globally respected

Goodman, Robert M.

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Pochet P. (1998), Changes in urban travel behaviour of elderly people, in Ortuzar J. de D., Hensher D.A and Jara-Diaz S.R. (Eds), Travel Behaviour Research: Updating the State of Play, Oxford,  

E-print Network

Pochet P. (1998), Changes in urban travel behaviour of elderly people, in Ortuzar J. de D., Hensher, Pergamon, pp. 299-316. Changes in urban travel behaviour of elderly people Pascal Pochet ABSTRACT in the mobility of the elderly using diachronic data obtained from household surveys carried out in the seventies

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

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Effects of Branch Length Errors on the Performance of Phylogenetically Independent Contrasts  

E-print Network

, These results extend those reported in Diaz-Uriarte and Garland (1996;Syst. Biol.45:2747),and show that, even model of character evolution (Diaz-Uriarte and Gar- land, 1996).Nevertheless, our knowledge of IC are (Diaz-Uriarte and Garland, 1996; Martins and Hansen, 1996):(1)a correct pl~ylogenetic topology

Garland Jr., Theodore

258

Jose Vasconcelos--A Man for All the Americas. The Tinker Pamphlet Series for the Teaching of Mexican American Heritage.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Due to his dissatisfaction with the Diaz government, Jose Vasconcelos joined the revolutionary leader Francisco Madero, who along with other rebel leaders, brought an end to the Diaz regime in 1911. Vasconcelos shared the successes and misfortunes that followed Diaz's overthrow. When the Madero government came to an abrupt end in 1913, Vasconcelos…

Miller, Hubert J.

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Hirundo rustica Golondrina Común 100 3 Jynx torquilla Torcecuello 8 3 link Lanius excubitor Alcaudón Real pennatus Aguililla Calzada 96 3 Hippolais polyglotta Zarcero Común 60 Hirundo daurica Golondrina Dáurica 96

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Dáurica 40 Hirundo rustica Golondrina Común 100 3 Lanius excubitor Alcaudón Real 72 3 Lanius senator Hieraaetus pennatus Aguililla Calzada 16 3 Hippolais polyglotta Zarcero Común 16 Hirundo daurica Golondrina

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daurica Golondrina Dáurica 92 Hirundo rustica Golondrina Común 100 3 Jynx torquilla Torcecuello 40 3 link Aguililla Calzada 68 3 Hippolais pallida Zarcero Pálido 36 3 Hippolais polyglotta Zarcero Común 92 Hirundo

Carrascal, Luis M.

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Dáurica 100 Hirundo rustica Golondrina Común 93 3 Lanius excubitor Alcaudón Real 75 3 Lanius senator Hieraaetus pennatus Aguililla Calzada 75 3 Hippolais polyglotta Zarcero Común 75 Hirundo daurica Golondrina

Carrascal, Luis M.

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daurica Golondrina Dáurica 96 Hirundo rustica Golondrina Común 100 3 Lanius excubitor Alcaudón Real 92 3-azor Perdicera 36 3 Hieraaetus pennatus Aguililla Calzada 84 3 Hippolais polyglotta Zarcero Común 24 Hirundo

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daurica Golondrina Dáurica 68 Hirundo rustica Golondrina Común 100 3 Jynx torquilla Torcecuello 4 3 link-azor Perdicera 4 3 Hieraaetus pennatus Aguililla Calzada 28 3 Hippolais polyglotta Zarcero Común 52 Hirundo

Carrascal, Luis M.

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Aguililla Calzada 96 3 Hippolais polyglotta Zarcero Común 100 Hirundo daurica Golondrina Dáurica 60 Hirundo rustica Golondrina Común 100 3 Jynx torquilla Torcecuello 40 3 link Lanius collurio Alcaudón Dorsirrojo 32

Carrascal, Luis M.

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Dáurica 100 Hirundo rustica Golondrina Común 100 3 Jynx torquilla Torcecuello 24 3 link Lanius excubitor Hieraaetus pennatus Aguililla Calzada 68 3 Hippolais polyglotta Zarcero Común 56 Hirundo daurica Golondrina

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Dáurica 76 Hirundo rustica Golondrina Común 100 3 Jynx torquilla Torcecuello 4 3 link Lanius excubitor Hieraaetus pennatus Aguililla Calzada 28 3 Hippolais polyglotta Zarcero Común 52 Hirundo daurica Golondrina

Carrascal, Luis M.

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Dáurica 48 Hirundo rustica Golondrina Común 96 3 Jynx torquilla Torcecuello 20 3 link Lanius excubitor Hippolais pallida Zarcero Pálido 12 3 Hippolais polyglotta Zarcero Común 60 Hirundo daurica Golondrina

Carrascal, Luis M.

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juncidis Buitrón 76 Clamator glandarius Críalo 28 Coccothraustes coccothraustes Picogordo 8 Columba livia / domestica Paloma Bravía / Doméstica 60 Columba palumbus Paloma Torcaz 44 Corvus corax Cuervo 56 Corvus

Carrascal, Luis M.

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flammeus Lechuza Campestre 8 3 Asio otus B�ho Chico 72 Athene noctua Mochuelo Com�n 100 3 Bubo bubo B 3 Apus apus Vencejo Com�n 76 Apus pallidus Vencejo P�lido 4 Aquila chrysaetos Aguila Real 36 3 Asio

Carrascal, Luis M.

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Imperial Ibérica 4 1 Aquila chrysaetos Aguila Real 8 3 Asio otus Búho Chico 28 Athene noctua Mochuelo Común caffer Vencejo Cafre 4 Apus melba Vencejo Real 4 Apus pallidus Vencejo Pálido 4 Aquila adalberti Aguila

Carrascal, Luis M.

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Sisón 35 2 Troglodytes troglodytes Chochín 17 Turdus merula Mirlo Común 88 Tyto alba Lechuza Común 47 3 Monticola solitarius Roquero Solitario 64 3 Motacilla alba Lavandera Blanca 11 Motacilla flava Lavandera

Carrascal, Luis M.

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13 1 Falco peregrinus Halcón Peregrino 20 3 Falco subbuteo Alcotán Europeo 33 Falco tinnunculus Rabilargo 40 Delichon urbica Avión Común 60 Erithacus rubecula Petirrojo 6 Falco naumanni Cernícalo Primilla

Carrascal, Luis M.

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Primilla 8 1 Falco peregrinus Halcón Peregrino 40 3 Falco subbuteo Alcotán Europeo 32 Falco tinnunculus Emberiza hortulana Escribano Hortelano 32 2 Erithacus rubecula Petirrojo 40 Falco naumanni Cernícalo

Carrascal, Luis M.

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Petirrojo 40 Falco naumanni Cernícalo Primilla 56 1 Falco peregrinus Halcón Peregrino 8 3 Falco subbuteo Alcotán Europeo 4 Falco tinnunculus Cernícalo Vulgar 100 3 Ficedula hypoleuca Papamoscas Cerrojillo 16

Carrascal, Luis M.

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Cernícalo Primilla 8 1 Falco peregrinus Halcón Peregrino 64 3 Falco subbuteo Alcotán Europeo 40 Falco Soteño 100 Emberiza hortulana Escribano Hortelano 24 2 Erithacus rubecula Petirrojo 68 Falco naumanni

Carrascal, Luis M.

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Escribano Soteño 36 Erithacus rubecula Petirrojo 40 Falco naumanni Cernícalo Primilla 28 1 Falco peregrinus Halcón Peregrino 24 3 Falco subbuteo Alcotán Europeo 8 Falco tinnunculus Cernícalo Vulgar 80 3 Ficedula

Carrascal, Luis M.

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naumanni Cernícalo Primilla 48 1 Falco peregrinus Halcón Peregrino 4 3 Falco subbuteo Alcotán Europeo 40 Escribano Soteño 48 Emberiza hortulana Escribano Hortelano 28 2 Erithacus rubecula Petirrojo 52 Falco Falco tinnunculus Cernícalo Vulgar 92 3 Ficedula hypoleuca Papamoscas Cerrojillo 12 Fringilla coelebs

Carrascal, Luis M.

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Falco peregrinus Halcón Peregrino 36 3 Falco subbuteo Alcotán Europeo 40 Falco tinnunculus Cernícalo Emberiza cirlus Escribano Soteño 76 Erithacus rubecula Petirrojo 52 Falco naumanni Cernícalo Primilla 48 1

Carrascal, Luis M.

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Erithacus rubecula Petirrojo 91 Falco peregrinus Halcón Peregrino 50 3 Falco subbuteo Alcotán Europeo 8 Falco tinnunculus Cernícalo Vulgar 83 3 Fringilla coelebs Pinzón Vulgar 95 Garrulus glandarius Arrendajo

Carrascal, Luis M.

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Cernícalo Primilla 56 1 Falco peregrinus Halcón Peregrino 4 3 Falco subbuteo Alcotán Europeo 16 Falco 3 Emberiza cirlus Escribano Soteño 12 Emberiza schoeniclus Escribano Palustre 20 + Falco naumanni

Carrascal, Luis M.

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rubecula Petirrojo 16 Falco naumanni Cernícalo Primilla 24 1 Falco peregrinus Halcón Peregrino 16 3 Falco subbuteo Alcotán Europeo 76 Falco tinnunculus Cernícalo Vulgar 100 3 Fringilla coelebs Pinzón Vulgar 36

Carrascal, Luis M.

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aeruginosus Aguilucho Lagunero Occidental 4 Circus cyaneus Aguilucho Pálido 8 3 Circus pygargus Aguilucho Cigüeña Blanca 76 2 Ciconia nigra Cigüeña Negra 76 3 Circaetus gallicus Culebrera Europea 72 3 Circus

Carrascal, Luis M.

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Europea 60 3 Circus aeruginosus Aguilucho Lagunero Occidental 24 Circus cyaneus Aguilucho Pálido 12 3 Circus pygargus Aguilucho Cenizo 92 Cisticola juncidis Buitrón 64 Clamator glandarius Críalo 60

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Lagunero Occidental 4 Circus cyaneus Aguilucho Pálido 4 3 Circus pygargus Aguilucho Cenizo 52 Cisticola ciconia Cigüeña Blanca 52 2 Circaetus gallicus Culebrera Europea 56 3 Circus aeruginosus Aguilucho

Carrascal, Luis M.

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Lagunero Occidental 28 Circus cyaneus Aguilucho Pálido 8 3 Circus pygargus Aguilucho Cenizo 60 Cisticola Ciconia ciconia Cigüeña Blanca 8 2 Circaetus gallicus Culebrera Europea 16 3 Circus aeruginosus Aguilucho

Carrascal, Luis M.

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Lagunero Occidental 8 Circus cyaneus Aguilucho Pálido 12 3 Circus pygargus Aguilucho Cenizo 24 Cisticola Cinclus cinclus Mirlo Acuático 48 Circaetus gallicus Culebrera Europea 84 3 Circus aeruginosus Aguilucho

Carrascal, Luis M.

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Circaetus gallicus Culebrera Europea 52 3 Circus aeruginosus Aguilucho Lagunero Occidental 12 Circus cyaneus Aguilucho Pálido 12 3 Circus pygargus Aguilucho Cenizo 40 Cisticola juncidis Buitrón 52 Clamator glandarius

Carrascal, Luis M.

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Culebrera Europea 56 3 Circus aeruginosus Aguilucho Lagunero Occidental 48 Circus cyaneus Aguilucho Pálido 12 3 Circus pygargus Aguilucho Cenizo 20 Cisticola juncidis Buitrón 56 Clamator glandarius Críalo 28

Carrascal, Luis M.

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aeruginosus Aguilucho Lagunero Occidental 8 Circus cyaneus Aguilucho Pálido 68 3 Circus pygargus Aguilucho Cigüeña Blanca 24 2 Cinclus cinclus Mirlo Acuático 32 Circaetus gallicus Culebrera Europea 88 3 Circus

Carrascal, Luis M.

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Europea 76 3 Circus aeruginosus Aguilucho Lagunero Occidental 80 Circus cyaneus Aguilucho Pálido 24 3 Circus pygargus Aguilucho Cenizo 88 Cisticola juncidis Buitrón 84 Clamator glandarius Críalo 64 Columba

Carrascal, Luis M.

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Genetics, local environment and health as factors in uencing plasma carotenoids in wild American  

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kestrels (Falco sparverius) G. R. Bortolotti,1* J. L. Tella,1,2 M. G. Forero,1 R. D. Dawson1,3 and J. J kestrels (Falco sparverius). Plasma concentrations of siblings at the time of £edging showed a high degree

Bortolotti, Gary R.

293

UC ANR Publication XXXXX 03/2011 DRAFT 1 Managing Smutgrass  

E-print Network

, but is most problematic in pastures in the southern and western United States. Because smutgrass Counties Larry Forero, Livestock Farm Advisor, UCCE Shasta County Glenn Nader, Livestock and Natural Resources, UCCE Butte, Sutter, Yuba Counties Joe DiTomaso, Weed Specialist, Dept. of Plant Sciences, UC

California at Davis, University of

294

Phytogeography of the Kaieteur Falls, Potaro Plateau, Guyana: floral  

E-print Network

in the terrain and climate of many ancient habitats, to Pleistocene climatic changes which contributed to recent important roles in producing present-day phytogeographical patterns (Forero & Gentry, 1988). Dispersal nuts). All of these factors must be considered when seeking to understand the distribution patterns

Mathis, Wayne N.

295

Ecology, 93(1), 2012, pp. 191205 2012 by the Ecological Society of America  

E-print Network

� A URIARTE,1,5 JAMES S. CLARK,2 JESS K. ZIMMERMAN,3 LIZA S. COMITA,1 JIMENA FORERO-MONTA ~NA,3 AND JILL.g., treefall gaps, fire, wind) impede competitive exclusion (Vander- meer et al. 1996, Uriarte et al. 2009

Uriarte, Maria

296

DNA Hybridization Evidence for the Principal Lineages of Hummingbirds (Aves: Trochilidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The spectacular evolutionary radiation of hummingbirds (Trochilidae) has served as a model system for many biological studies. To begin to provide a historical context for these investigations, we generated a complete matrix of DNA hybridization distances among 26 hummingbirds and an outgroup swift (Chaeturu pelagica) to determine the principal hummingbird lineages. FITCH topologies estimated from symmetrized AT,H-C values and subjected

Robert Bleiweiss; John A. W. Kirsch; Juan Carlos Matheus

297

On Davainea minuta Cohn: 1901 (Cestoda, Cyclophyllidea) and its variation in North American Recurvirostridae (Aves)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Davainea minuta Cohn, 1901, widely distributed and found in a number of Charadriiformes is reviewed and its synonymy with D. himantopodis Johnston, 1911 sustained. Himantaurus minuta (Cohn) Spasskaya et Spasskii 1971, is considered a synonym since shed, gravid proglottides continue to grow with subsequent breakdown of uterus and formation of egg-capsules. D. minuta is recorded for the first time from

D. R. R. Burt; M. D. B. Burt

1984-01-01

298

Molecular phylogenetic relationships of Xiphidiopicus percussus, Melanerpes, and Sphyrapicus (Aves: Picidae) based on cytochrome b sequence  

Microsoft Academic Search

The endemic woodpecker, Xiphidiopicus percussus, from Cuba has been postulated as the sister taxon to the Hispaniolan woodpecker (Melanerpes striatus) and its relationships to the genera Sphyrapicus and Melanerpes have been speculated. We used mitochondrial cytochrome b sequences from a collection of New World picids to investigate the phylogenetic relationships among these species using maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood approaches.

Lowell C. Overton; Douglas D. Rhoads

2006-01-01

299

A new owl species of the genus Otus (aves: strigidae) from Lombok, Indonesia.  

PubMed

The avifauna of Indonesia is one of the richest in the world but the taxonomic status of many species remains poorly documented. The sole species of scops owl known from Lombok has long been assigned to the widespread Moluccan Scops Owl Otus magicus on the basis of superficial similarities in morphology. Field work in 2003 has shown that the territorial song of the scops owls inhabiting the foothills of Gunung Rinjani differs dramatically from that of O. magicus and is more similar to those of Rufescent Scops Owl O. rufescens and Singapore Scops Owl O. cnephaeus. Detailed comparisons of sound recordings and museum specimens with those of other scops owls in Wallacea and the Indo-Malayan region have confirmed the distinctiveness of the Lombok population. We describe Otus jolandae as a new species, the Rinjani Scops Owl. It is locally common at elevations from 25-1350 m. and occurs within Gunung Rinjani National Park. The new species is known from seven specimens collected by Alfred Everett in 1896. Otus jolandae represents the first endemic bird species from Lombok. PMID:23418422

Sangster, George; King, Ben F; Verbelen, Philippe; Trainor, Colin R

2013-01-01

300

Phylogenetic relationships of flowerpeckers (Aves: Dicaeidae): Novel insights into the evolution of a tropical passerine clade  

E-print Network

placement of Prionochilus (Iddi et al. 2006). Most flowerpeckers are sexually dichromatic, have stouter bills than sunbirds, and display a broad variety of tongue structures (Cheke et al. 2001). Their diet is a mix of small fruits and insects... ignipectum#7;ZMUC#7;116133#7;Philippine Islands, Luzon, Isabela#7;GQ145346#7;GQ145304#7;GQ145262#7;#7;Dicaeum melanoxanthum#7;AMNH#7;DOT 5717#7;Nepal, Malde#7;GQ145312#7;GQ145270#7;GQ145228#7;#7;Dicaeum monticolum#7;KUNHM#7;17745#7;Malaysia, Sabah, 58 km SSE...

Nyá ri, Á rpá d S.; Peterson, A. Townsend; Rice, Nathan H.; Moyle, Robert G.

2009-12-01

301

Redescription of Alcedinectes alcyon (Acari:Hypoderatidae) from the belted kingfisher (Aves:Coraciiformes; Alcedinidae).  

PubMed

Alcedinectes alcyon (Boyd) is redescribed based on specimens collected from its belted kingfisher, Megaceryle alcyon (L.), type host in Florida. This species differs from A. cerylei Fain by the chaetotaxy of tarsus III. A. alcyon has a long stout apical seta that tapers to a curved tip resembling that seen on tarsus III of the genus Tytodectes (Ispidectes) Fain. The equivalent seta in A. cerylei is a stout spine. There are other minor differences between these species in the pattern of idiosomal sclerotization and leg chaetotaxy. The chaetotaxy and solenidiotaxy of legs I and II in Alcedinectes closely resemble that of Amazonectes psittaci Fain & Vercammen-Grandjean from parrots (Psittaciformes), whereas the morphology and chaetotaxy of the idiosoma resemble that of Tytonectes (Ispidectes) spp. which also occurs in kingfishers (Coraciiformes). The long stout seta that tapers to a curved tip on tarsus III in A. alcyon also links the genus Alcedinectes with Tytodectes (Ispidectes). PMID:8840683

Pence, D B; Gray, P N

1996-09-01

302

Morphology of the antebrachial musculature of the American kestrel, Falco sparverius (Aves)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The antebrachial musculature of the American kestrel (Falco sparverius) is described. This fills a gap in the avian morphology literature, and provides a reference for future comparative, functional and systematic studies. A table of synonyms-homologs is provided for each muscle as a reference frame for over 100 years of avian anatomical literature.

Ron A. Meyers

1996-01-01

303

Isolation driven divergence: speciation in a widespread North American songbird (Aves: Certhiidae)  

PubMed Central

Lineage, or true “species,” trees may differ from gene trees because of stochastic processes in molecular evolution leading to gene-tree heterogeneity. Problems with inferring species trees due to excessive incomplete lineage sorting may be exacerbated in lineages with rapid diversification or recent divergences necessitating the use of multiple loci and individuals. Many recent multilocus studies that investigate divergence times identify lineage splitting to be more recent than single locus studies, forcing the revision of biogeographic scenarios driving divergence. Here we use 21 nuclear loci from regional populations to reevaluate hypotheses identified in an mtDNA phylogeographic study of the Brown Creeper (Certhia americana), as well as identify processes driving divergence. Nuclear phylogeographic analyses identified hierarchical genetic structure, supporting a basal split at roughly 32°N latitude, splitting northern and southern populations, with mixed patterns of genealogical concordance and discordance between datasets within the major lineages. Coalescent-based analyses identify isolation, with little to no gene flow, as the primary driver of divergence between lineages. Recent isolation appears to have caused genetic bottlenecks in populations in the Sierra Madre Oriental and coastal mountain ranges of California, which may be targets for conservation concerns. PMID:21933295

Manthey, Joseph D.; Klicka, John; Spellman, Garth M.

2011-01-01

304

Cmo expresar sus deseos sobre su cuidado y tratamiento 450 Brookline Ave.  

E-print Network

para cuidados de salud? Los avances de la medicina moderna han salvado vidas y mejorado la calidad de.dana-farber.org Decisiones para cuidados de salud: planificación por adelantado Usted tiene derecho a tomar las decisiones para sus propios cuidados de salud. Sin embargo, una enfermedad o un accidente grave podría impedir que

Liu, Xiaole Shirley

305

EFFECTS OF BODY SIZE ON TAKE-OFF FLIGHT PERFORMANCE IN THE PHASIANIDAE (AVES)  

Microsoft Academic Search

To evaluate the mechanisms responsible for relationships between body mass and maximum take-off performance in birds, we studied four species in the Phasianidae: northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus), chukar (Alectoris chukar), ring-necked pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) and wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo). These species vary in body mass from 0.2 to 5.3 kg, and they use flight almost solely to escape predators. During

BRET W. TOBALSKE; KENNETH P. DIAL

2000-01-01

306

Curriculum Vitae of ROBERT ERTSEY, M.Sc. HOME ADDRESS: 234 Stillings Ave  

E-print Network

. Englesberg(1983) Alanine resistant mutants of Chinese Hamster Ovary cells, CHO-K1, producing increases. Englesberg (1984) Recessive 2-(Methylamino)-Isobutyrate (MeAIB) resistant mutant of CHO Cells (CHO-K1. Ertsey and M.C. Williams (1986) Glucocorticoids and thyroid hormones stimulate biochemical

Bejerano, Gill

307

Comparative mechanics of filter feeding in Anas platyrhynchos, Anas clypeata and Aythya fuligula (Aves, Anseriformes)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The straining of seeds ranging in size from 0.01 to 4.6 mm was investigated in the filtering mechanisms of three anseriform species, Anas platyrhynchos, Anas clypeata, and Aythya fuligala. The morphology of the filtering mechanisms was studied by dissection and from microsections. The kinematic work envelope of the beaks was measured by stereotactic manipulation. The actual beak kinematics were analyzed

J. G. M. Kooloos; A. R. Kraaijeveld; G. E. J. Langenbach; G. A. Zweers

1989-01-01

308

A molecular phylogeny of New Zealand's Petroica (Aves: Petroicidae) species based on mitochondrial DNA sequences.  

PubMed

The New Zealand robin (Petroica australis), tomtit (P. macrocephala), and Chatham Island black robin (P. traversi) are members of the Petroicidae family of Australo-Papuan robins, found throughout Australasia and the western Pacific. In the nearly 200 years since the New Zealand members of Petroicidae were first described, the division of species, subspecies, and even genera has undergone many changes. In this study, we investigate whether molecular phylogenies based on mitochondrial DNA sequences support current taxonomic classifications based on morphology. Petroica traversi, P. australis, and P. macrocephala form distinct clades in phylogenetic trees constructed from Cytochrome b and control region sequences, however the position of the black robin is at odds with the morphological and behavioral data. The black robin does not appear to be a derivative of the New Zealand robin, instead it groups strongly with the tomtit, indicating that lineage sorting and/or introgressive hybridization may have occurred. There is some evidence to support the hypothesis that two invasions of Petroica from Australia have occurred, however additional data from Australian Petroica taxa are required to confirm this. Control region sequences confirm a deep split between the North and South Island P. australis lineages, but suggest a recent radiation of P. macrocephala. PMID:16750641

Miller, Hilary C; Lambert, David M

2006-09-01

309

Evolution in Australasian Mangrove Forests: Multilocus Phylogenetic Analysis of the Gerygone Warblers (Aves: Acanthizidae)  

PubMed Central

The mangrove forests of Australasia have many endemic bird species but their evolution and radiation in those habitats has been little studied. One genus with several mangrove specialist species is Gerygone (Passeriformes: Acanthizidae). The phylogeny of the Acanthizidae is reasonably well understood but limited taxon sampling for Gerygone has constrained understanding of its evolution and historical biogeography in mangroves. Here we report on a phylogenetic analysis of Gerygone based on comprehensive taxon sampling and a multilocus dataset of thirteen loci spread across the avian genome (eleven nuclear and two mitochondrial loci). Since Gerygone includes three species restricted to Australia's coastal mangrove forests, we particularly sought to understand the biogeography of their evolution in that ecosystem. Analyses of individual loci, as well as of a concatenated dataset drawn from previous molecular studies indicates that the genus as currently defined is not monophyletic, and that the Grey Gerygone (G. cinerea) from New Guinea should be transferred to the genus Acanthiza. The multilocus approach has permitted the nuanced view of the group's evolution into mangrove ecosystems having occurred on multiple occasions, in three non-overlapping time frames, most likely first by the G. magnirostris lineage, and subsequently followed by those of G. tenebrosa and G. levigaster. PMID:22363748

Nyari, Arpad S.; Joseph, Leo

2012-01-01

310

Effects of body size on take-off flight performance in the Phasianidae (Aves).  

PubMed

To evaluate the mechanisms responsible for relationships between body mass and maximum take-off performance in birds, we studied four species in the Phasianidae: northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus), chukar (Alectoris chukar), ring-necked pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) and wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo). These species vary in body mass from 0.2 to 5.3 kg, and they use flight almost solely to escape predators. During take-off, all the species used a similar wingbeat style that appeared to be a vortex-ring gait with a tip reversal during the upstroke. The tip reversal is unusual for birds with rounded wings; it may offer an aerodynamic advantage during rapid acceleration. Flight anatomy generally scaled geometrically, except for average wing chord and wing area, which increased more than expected as body mass (m) increased. Pectoralis strain varied from 19.1 to 35.2 % and scaled in proportion to m(0.23). This positive scaling is not consistent with the widely held assumption that muscle strain is independent of body mass among geometrically similar species. The anatomy of the species precluded measurements of in vivo pectoralis force using the strain-gauge technique that has been employed successfully in other bird species, so we could not directly test in vivo pectoralis force-velocity relationships. However, whole-body kinematics revealed that take-off power (P(ta)), the excess power available for climbing and accelerating in flight, scaled in proportion to m(0.75) and that pectoralis mass-specific P(ta) decreased in proportion to m(-)(0.26) and was directly proportional to wingbeat frequency. These trends suggest that mass-specific pectoralis work did not vary with body mass and that pectoralis stress and strain were inversely proportional, as expected from classical force-velocity models for skeletal muscle. Our observations of P(ta) were consistent with evidence from other species engaged in escape flight and, therefore, appear to contradict evidence from studies of take-off or hovering with an added payload. PMID:11023852

Tobalske, B W; Dial, K P

2000-11-01

311

Complete mitochondrial genome of the Bewick's swan Cygnus columbianus bewickii (Aves, Anseriformes, Anatidae).  

PubMed

The mitochondrial genome of Bewick's swan Cygnus columbianus bewickii was completely sequenced and then the resultant data were compared with those of the whistling swan Cygnus columbianus columbianus. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of C. c. bewickii was 16,727 bp in length and its gene arrangement pattern, gene content, and genome organization were identical to those of Cygnus species. The similarities of nucleotide and amino acid sequences between the two swans were 99.1% and 99.6%, respectively. Out of the 13 protein-coding genes and 2 rRNA genes, COIII showed the lowest nucleotide sequence similarity with 98.0%. On the other hand, in amino acid sequence similarities, both COII and ATP6 showed the lowest with 98.7% in common. The control region has the 97.8% nucleotide sequence similarity. PMID:22409756

Lee, Jin Hee; Ryu, Shi Hyun; Kang, Seung-Gu; Hwang, Ui Wook

2012-04-01

312

A classification of the grouse (Aves: Tetraoninae) based on mitochondrial DNA sequences  

Microsoft Academic Search

We propose a new classification of the grouse that brings their taxonomy into agreement with our molecular phylogenetic studies. Our analyses provide, for the first time, a robust estimate of the evolutionary history of these birds. These analyses are based on aligned sequences of 3,809 basepairs of five complete mitochondrial genes. Our classification does not require novel genera and gen-

R. J. Gutiérrez; George F. Barrowclough; Jeffrey G. Groth

313

Paraphyly of Cinclodes fuscus (Aves: Passeriformes: Furnariidae): Implications for taxonomy and biogeography  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Andes are a hotspot of global avian diversity, but studies on the historical diversification of Andean birds remain relatively scarce. Evolutionary studies on avian lineages with Andean–Patagonian distributions have focused on reconstructing species-level phylogenies, whereas no detailed phylogeographic studies on widespread species have been conducted. Here, we describe phylogeographic patterns in the Bar-winged Cinclodes (Cinclodes fuscus), a widespread and common species of ovenbird (Furnariidae) that breeds from Tierra del Fuego to the northern Andes. Traditionally, C. fuscus has been considered a single species composed of nine subspecies, but its long and narrow range suggests the possibility of considerable genetic variation among populations. Sequences of two mitochondrial genes revealed three discrete and geographically coherent groups of C. fuscus, occupying the southern, central, and northern Andes. Surprisingly, phylogenetic analyses indicated that these groups were more closely related to other species of Cinclodes than to each other. Relationships of the southern and northern C. fuscus clades to other species of Cinclodes were straightforward; in combination with available information on plumage, behavioral, and vocal variation, this suggests that each should be recognized as a distinct biological species. The central Andean group was paraphyletic with respect to C. oustaleti, and relationships among these taxa and C. olrogi were poorly resolved. We suggest that the central Andean C. fuscus should also be considered a different species, pending new information to clarify species limits in this group. These new phylogenetic data, along with recently developed methods, allowed us to review the biogeography of the genus, confirming southern South America and the central Andes as important areas for the diversification of these birds.

Sanin, Camilo; Cadena, Carlos Daniel; Maley, James M.; Lijtmaer, Dario A.; Tubaro, Pablo L.; Chesser, R. Terry

2009-01-01

314

A pelican tarsometatarsus (aves: pelecanidae) from the latest pliocene siwaliks of India.  

PubMed

We report a new fossil specimen of a pelican from the Tatrot Formation of the Siwalik Hills, India. It likely represents Pelecanus sivalensis Davies, 1880, the smaller of the two previously published species from the Siwalik Group stratigraphic sequence. This complete tarsometatarsus is the first fossil bone of a pelican collected in India for over 100 years. It is from the latest Pliocene (?2.6 Ma), and is the youngest pelican fossil from the region. The new specimen exhibits a derived distoplantar 'slant' to the plantar margin of the medial crest of the hypotarsus, and a combination of features related to the morphology of the hypotarsus, the distal foramen, trochleae, and overall size that allow further differentiation from known tarsometatarsi of fossil and extant pelicans, including the three species of extant pelicans that occur in India (Pelecanus crispus, P. onocrotalus, and P. philippensis). It is of appropriate size for Pelecanus sivalensis, which to date has been known only by fragments of other skeletal elements of the wing, leg, and shoulder girdle. Thus, the observation that this tarsometatarsus is morphologically distinct from those of known pelicans provides further support for the distinctiveness of at least one extinct species of pelican from the Siwalik Group sediments. While the morphology of the tarsometatarsus allows for separation from other taxa known from tarsometatarsi, we found no clear shared derived states to place this taxon with any confidence in a phylogenetic context relative to any other pelican species, or even determine if it is part of the crown group of Pelecanidae. However, published molecular data are consistent with an origin of the crown clade prior to the Pleistocene, suggesting (along with one morphological character) the possibility that this species belongs to the Old World clade of pelican species. PMID:25365300

Stidham, Thomas A; Krishan, Kewal; Singh, Bahadur; Ghosh, Abhik; Patnaik, Rajeev

2014-01-01

315

Bone growth marks reveal protracted growth in New Zealand kiwi (Aves, Apterygidae)  

PubMed Central

The presence of bone growth marks reflecting annual rhythms in the cortical bone of non-avian tetrapods is now established as a general phenomenon. In contrast, ornithurines (the theropod group including modern birds and their closest relatives) usually grow rapidly in less than a year, such that no annual rhythms are expressed in bone cortices, except scarce growth marks restricted to the outer cortical layer. So far, cyclical growth in modern birds has been restricted to the Eocene Diatryma, the extant parrot Amazona amazonica and the extinct New Zealand (NZ) moa (Dinornithidae). Here we show the presence of lines of arrested growth in the long bones of the living NZ kiwi (Apteryx spp., Apterygidae). Kiwis take 5–6 years to reach full adult body size, which indicates a delayed maturity and a slow reproductive cycle. Protracted growth probably evolved convergently in moa and kiwi sometime since the Middle Miocene, owing to the severe climatic cooling in the southwest Pacific and the absence of mammalian predators. PMID:19515655

Bourdon, Estelle; Castanet, Jacques; de Ricqlès, Armand; Scofield, Paul; Tennyson, Alan; Lamrous, Hayat; Cubo, Jorge

2009-01-01

316

Saxicola syenitica Heuglin, 1869 (Aves: Passeriformes: Muscicapidae), an overlooked taxon of Oenanthe?  

PubMed

The North African population of the Black Wheatear has been treated as Oenanthe leucura syenitica for over 100 years. The type of syenitica was collected by Heuglin in June 1852 near the southern Egypt/northern Sudan border, well outside the range of the sedentary Black Wheatear. Morphometric inference and genetic analyses of partial sequences of the mitochondrial gene COI demonstrate that the type specimen of syenitica is not conspecific with O. leucura, but instead is closely related to O. lugens of the Middle East and North Africa, being most similar in plumage to O. lugens warriae of the basalt deserts of north-east Jordan and southern Syria. While syenitica was not separable in the analysed part of its mitochondrial DNA from O. l. lugens and O. l. warriae, it differs in morphometrics and plumage features from the latter. The type specimen is a first-summer bird with abraded plumage as expected for June, and may thus have been collected in its breeding range. Its morphological distinctiveness implies that syenitica might be taxonomically distinct from warriae. However, as it is known only from the type and its few associated data, we propose to treat it as a subspecies inquirenda of O. lugens. As a consequence of this, and the fact that we found no genetic or morphological differences between North African populations of O. leucura and riggenbachi Hartert, 1909, the name originally applied to the population in Western Sahara, the North African population takes the oldest available name to become O. leucura riggenbachi. PMID:24872167

Shirihai, Hadoram; Schweizer, Manuel; Kirwan, Guy M; Svensson, Lars

2014-01-01

317

Paraliga charadrii n. sp. (Cestoda: Dilepididae) from the semipalmated plover, Charadrius semipalmatus Bonaparte (Aves: Charadriiformes).  

PubMed

Paraliga charadrii n. sp. (Dilepididae) is described from the small intestine of the semipalmated plover Charadrius semipalmatus (Charadriidae) collected from the Bay of Fundy, New Brunswick, Canada. The new species is distinguished from the type species Paraliga oophorae (Belopolskaya, 1971) Belopolskaya and Kulachkova, 1973, by having 2 identical rows of rostellar hooks and fewer testes and from the more similar Paraliga celermaturus (Deblock and Rosé, 1962) Bona, 1994, by its shorter and less robust rostellar hooks (18-19 microm vs. 24-26 microm). This is the first record of a species of Paraliga in the New World. Paraliga charadrii n. sp. was present in semipalmated plovers collected on their breeding grounds in Manitoba, on staging grounds in the Bay of Fundy, during southward migration, on wintering grounds in Venezuela, and on spring staging grounds at Delaware Bay, during northward migration, suggesting that transmission is ubiquitous. PMID:9714219

Didyk, A S; Burt, M D

1998-08-01

318

BIBLIOGRAFÍA COMENTADA SOBRE LOS ANÁLISIS DE EGAGRÓPILAS DE AVES RAPACES EN ARGENTINA  

Microsoft Academic Search

s. - Annotated bibliography on raptor pellets analyses in Argentina. - We compiled an annotated bibliography on raptor pellets analyses in Argentina. It includes, from 1961 to 2000, 142 papers, 9 theses, and 48 published abstracts concerning 13 raptor species, with comments on methodology, natural history, and main points of interest. Tyto alba was the main source for Argentinean analyses,

Ulyses F. J. Pardiñas; Sebastián Cirignoli

319

Guillermo Jaimes 2710 McGee Ave. Berkeley, CA 94703 Cell 213-268-9455  

E-print Network

and Long Beach to determine their exposure to air pollution. TEACHING EXPERIENCE University of California funded air pollution and birth outcomes study. Recruited and interviewed 91 pregnant women throughout LA � Los Angeles, CA Field Research Manager (01. 2008 � 07. 2011) Managed California Air Resource Board

Silver, Whendee

320

A New Genus and Species of Buteonine Hawk from Quaternary Deposits in Bermuda (Aves: Accipitridae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bermuteo avivorus, new genus and species, is described from rare Quaternary fossils from the island of Bermuda. Although clearly referable to the Buteoninae, its relationships within that group are difficult to assess. Considerable size variation may be attributable to sexual dimorphism associated with bird-catching behavior. It is uncertain if the species survived into the historic period. Factors contributing to the

Storrs L. Olson

2008-01-01

321

A new subspecies of Chamaea fasciata (Wrentit) from Oregon (Aves: Timaliinae)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Geographic variation in plumage color of Chamaea fasciata (Wrentit) from northern California and southern Oregon is related to climate. A new subspecies, Chamaea fasciata margra, is described from a disjunct population of southern interior Oregon. Colonization of C. fasciata in interior Oregon was perhaps from birds crossing coniferous forests via isolated balds of Ceonothus. Recent increases of Wrentits in interior Oregon may be in response to habitat alterations (deforestation, fires) and concurrent global warming.

Browning, M. Ralph

1992-01-01

322

Morphological and microsatellite differentiation in Melospiza melodia (Aves) at a microgeographic scale.  

PubMed

Geographical variation in microsatellite allele frequencies and morphology were compared for five subspecies of Melospiza melodia (song sparrow; M. m. samuelis, M. m. maxillaris, M. m. pusillula, M. m. gouldii, and M. m. heermanni) in 14 populations in the San Francisco Bay region to (a) assess divergence based on these estimates and (b) test the hypothesis that drift is responsible for morphological and genetic divergence. Morphological differentiation between subspecies was high despite low differentiation at microsatellite loci, indicating high gene flow and large effective population sizes. Low concordance of morphological and genetic estimates of divergence suggests that selection or phenotypic plasticity in morphology has caused morphological differentiation among the subspecies. PMID:14635909

Chan, Y; Arcese, P

2003-09-01

323

WATERSHED COUNCIL Chairman: Carl Lee Hill 2925 SW 6th Ave., Ste. 2 Coordinator: Jennifer Martin  

E-print Network

as possible. Lacking the integrity and credibility which flows from accuracy, such data has lead to a faulty does not reach a high level of quality and accuracy, a complaint filed under that Act would endanger

324

Phylogeny of the Tree Swallow Genus, Tachycineta (Aves: Hirundinidae), by Bayesian Analysis of Mitochondrial DNA Sequences  

Microsoft Academic Search

To set the stage for historical analyses of the ecology and behavior of tree swallows and their allies (genus Tachycineta), we reconstructed the phylogeny of the nine Tachycineta species by comparing DNA sequences of six mitochondrial genes: Cytochrome b (990 base pairs), the second subunit of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase (839 base pairs), cytochrome oxidase II (85 base pairs), ATPase

Linda A Whittingham; Beth Slikas; David W Winkler; Frederick H Sheldon

2002-01-01

325

Phylogeny of the tree swallow genus, Tachycineta (Aves: Hirundinidae), by Bayesian analysis of mitochondrial DNA sequences.  

PubMed

To set the stage for historical analyses of the ecology and behavior of tree swallows and their allies (genus Tachycineta), we reconstructed the phylogeny of the nine Tachycineta species by comparing DNA sequences of six mitochondrial genes: Cytochrome b (990 base pairs), the second subunit of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase (839 base pairs), cytochrome oxidase II (85 base pairs), ATPase 8 (158 base pairs), tRNA-lysine (73 base pairs), and tRNA-methionine (25 base pairs). The phylogeny consisted of two main clades: South and Central American species ((T. stolzmanni, T. albilinea, T. albiventris), (T. leucorrhoa, T. meyeni)), and North American and Caribbean species (T. bicolor, (T. thalassina, T. euchrysea, T. cyaneoviridis)). The genetic distances among the species suggested that Tachycineta is a relatively old group compared to other New World swallow genera. One interesting biogeographic discovery was the close relationship between Caribbean and western North American taxa. This historical connection occurs in other groups of swallows and swifts as well. To reconstruct the phylogeny, we employed Bayesian as well as traditional maximum-likelihood methods. The Bayesian approach provided probability values for trees produced from the different genes and gene combinations, as well as probabilities of branches within those trees. We compared Bayesian and maximum-likelihood bootstrap branch support and found that all branches with Bayesian probabilities > or = 95% received bootstrap support >70%. PMID:11884168

Whittingham, Linda A; Slikas, Beth; Winkler, David W; Sheldon, Frederick H

2002-03-01

326

Trois Nadejdolepis Spasskii & Spasskaya, 1954 (Cestoda: Hymenolepididae) parasites de Charadrii (Aves) du Bélize  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three Nadejdolepis from Belize, Central America, represent new geographical records (1) Nadejdolepis paranitidulans (Golikova, 1959) (rostellar hooks 40-44 m long) from Charadrius alexandrinus; (2) N. arenariae (Cabot, 1969) n. comb. (rostellar hooks 89 m long) from Arenaria interpres; and (3) N. litoralis (Webster, 1947) (rostellar hooks 81–85 m long) from Calidris fuscicollis (new host record). Additional descriptions, illustrations and information pertaining to these

Stéphane Deblock; Albert G. Canaris

2000-01-01

327

[Three new Nadejdolepis Spasskii & Sasskaya, 1954 (Cestoda: Hymenolepididae) parasites of Charadrii (Aves) from Tasmania].  

PubMed

Three species of Nadejdcolepis from Tasmania, Australia, are described and illustrated. N. burgessi n. sp., a parasite of Charadrius ruficapillus, is 4-6 mm long, with rostellar nitiduloid hooks 63-66 microm long, a short evaginated cirrus 13-16 microm long with a short collar of thin spines 1 microm long, a narrow and tubular sclerotinoid vagina 40-50 long and 3-4 microm in diameter with a little ampulla 3-5 microm in diameter at the proximal end, and a membranous atrial segment with smooth, short (1 microm) and compact spines which are sometimes difficult to observe. N. smithi n. sp., a parasite of 40-50 long and 3-4 microm in diameter with a little ampulla 3-5 microm in diameter at the proximal end, and a membranous atrial segment with smooth, short (1 microm) and compact spines which are sometimes difficult to observe. N. smithi n. sp., a parasite of C. ruficapillus and Arenaria interpres, is 2-3.5 mm long, with rostellar nitiduloid hooks 90-98 microm long, a short evaginated cirrus (13 x 6.5 microm) with a short collar of thin 'bristles' of decreasing length (2-3 microm) and prolonged by a short and thin stylet, a sclerotinoid and conical vagina of 20 x 6 microm, with an ovoid ampulla 6-7 x 4-9 at its slender end, and a membranous atrial segment like that of the preceding species. N. kinsellai n. sp., a parasite of C. ruficapillus is 25-40(?) mm long, with rostellar nitiduloid hooks 89-93 microm long, a fusiform genital atrium 100 x 30 microm long with a very narrow pore, and a very long narrow cirrus-sac, which is cylindrical (not fusiform), has its aporal extremity lying in the preceding proglottis and has a slender uninterrupted wall without helicoid fibres. The poral extremity of the cirrus-sac is fastened by a long transverse muscle. An evaginated cirrus was not observed. The invaginated ejaculatory canal has two successive types of spines: a subterminal short portion (20-25 microm) with thick spines, followed by a long portion (100-120 microm) with numerous thin and compact 'bristles' 5 microm long. There is a very long convoluted spermatic duct (400-500 microm). The membranous tubular vagina is long (400-450 microm), thick-walled but not muscular and convoluted anterior to the distal part of the cirrus-sac; a chitinoid chamber, copulatory segment and sphincter are absent. Nadejdolepis species parasitic in Charadrii are reviewed. None of the species previously reported presents anatomical features similar to the three new species. N. kinsellai has morphological characters which differ in detail from other species in the genus. Hymenolepis (Hymenolepis) mudderbugtenensis Deblock & Rosé, 1962 is transferred to the genus Nadejdolepis. PMID:11303538

Deblock, S; Canaris, A G

2001-03-01

328

[Three Nadejdolepis Spasskii & Spasskaya, 1954 (Cestoda: Hymenolepididae) parasites of Charadrii (Aves) of Belize].  

PubMed

Three Nadejdolepis from Belize, Central America, represent new geographical records (1) Nadejdolepis paranitidulans (Golikova, 1959) (rostellar hooks 40-44 microm long) from Charadrius alexandrinus; (2) N. arenariae (Cabot, 1969) n. comb. (rostellar hooks 89 microm long) from Arenaria interpres; and (3) N. litoralis (Webster, 1947) (rostellar hooks 81-85 microm long) from Calidris fuscicollis (new host record). Additional descriptions, illustrations and information pertaining to these species are included. In addition, N. saguei Rysavy. 1967 is considered a synonym of N. litoralis (Webster, 1947). N. morenoi Rysavy, 1967 (rostral hooks 80 microm long) needs to be redescribed to confirm its validity. Two species of Nadejdolepis are transferred to the genus Microsomacanthus Lopez-Neyra, 1942 because their rostellar hooks are more diorchoid than nitiduloid, becoming M. cambrensis (Davies, 1939) comb. and M. alaskensis (Deblock & Rausch, 1967) n. comb. PMID:11071154

Deblock, S; Canaris, A G

2000-11-01

329

[Microphallidae (Digenea) from southern Africa, parasites of Charadrii (Aves). Second note].  

PubMed

The authors present new geographical and diagnostic information for microphallids (Trematoda: Digenea) from the coast of Namibia (southern Africa): Maritrema eroliae Yamaguti, 1939 from Charadrius marginatus Vieillot; Odhneria odhneri Travassos, 1921 from Arenaria interpres L.; Microphallus bilobatus Cable, Connor & Balling, 1960 from C. marginatus; and Levinseniella propinqua Jägerskiöld, 1907 from C. marginatus and A. interpres. These are new geographical and host records. The position and variability of the phallus (male copulatory organ) in M. bilobatus from Namibia and in the type-species from the Caribbean Sea are compared and illustrated. The genital atria of L. propinqua from Namibia and from Marcus Island (southwest Cape Province, Southern Africa) are illustrated and compared. This species appears to be cosmopolitan. PMID:14755173

Deblock, Stéphane; Canaris, Albert G; Kinsella, John M

2004-02-01

330

Inter-familial relationships of the shorebirds (Aves: Charadriiformes) based on nuclear DNA sequence data  

PubMed Central

Background Phylogenetic hypotheses of higher-level relationships in the order Charadriiformes based on morphological data, partly disagree with those based on DNA-DNA hybridisation data. So far, these relationships have not been tested by analysis of DNA sequence data. Herein we utilize 1692 bp of aligned, nuclear DNA sequences obtained from 23 charadriiform species, representing 15 families. We also test earlier suggestions that bustards and sandgrouses may be nested with the charadriiforms. The data is analysed with methods based on the parsimony and maximum-likelihood criteria. Results Several novel phylogenetic relationships were recovered and strongly supported by the data, regardless of which method of analysis was employed. These include placing the gulls and allied groups as a sistergroup to the sandpiper-like birds, and not to the plover-like birds. The auks clearly belong to the clade with the gulls and allies, and are not basal to most other charadriiform birds as suggested in analyses of morphological data. Pluvialis, which has been supposed to belong to the plover family (Charadriidae), represents a basal branch that constitutes the sister taxon to a clade with plovers, oystercatchers and avocets. The thick-knees and sheathbills unexpectedly cluster together. Conclusion The DNA sequence data contains a strong phylogenetic signal that results in a well-resolved phylogenetic tree with many strongly supported internodes. Taxonomically it is the most inclusive study of shorebird families that relies on nucleotide sequences. The presented phylogenetic hypothesis provides a solid framework for analyses of macroevolution of ecological, morphological and behavioural adaptations observed within the order Charadriiformes. PMID:12875664

Ericson, Per GP; Envall, Ida; Irestedt, Martin; Norman, Janette A

2003-01-01

331

Subulura halli (Ascaridida: Subuluridae) from the endangered great bustard Otis tarda Linnaeus (Aves: Gruiformes) in China.  

PubMed

Subulurid nematodes identified as Subulura halli Barreto, 1918 were collected from the endangered bird Otis tarda Linnaeus (Gruiformes: Otididae) in China. A detailed redescription of the hitherto poorly known species is presented using both light and, for the first time, scanning electron microscopy. Previously unreported and erroneous morphological features of taxonomic significance are revealed. This species can be readily distinguished from its congeners by the relatively long oesophagus (1.47-1.92 mm long, representing 10.6-16.9% of body length), the number and arrangement of male caudal papillae (11 pairs in total, arranged as five pairs of precloacal and six pairs of postcloacal papillae), the equal length of spicules (1.35-1.52 mm long, representing 10.7-13.7% of body length) and the presence of a small medioventral, precloacal papilla in the male. PMID:24684055

Du, Li-Qiang; Xu, Zhen; Li, Shun-Cai; Li, Liang

2014-02-01

332

Digeneans and cestodes parasitic in the white-faced ibis Plegadis chihi (Aves: Threskiornithidae) from Argentina.  

PubMed

Some digeneans and cestodes parasitic in a population of the white-faced ibis Plegadis chihi (Vieillot) from Buenos Aires province, Argentina, are presented. The digeneans Dietziella egregia (Dietz, 1909), Patagifer bilobus (Rudolphi, 1819), Ascocotyle (Leighia) hadra Ostrowski de Nuñez, 1992 and Posthodiplostomum nanum Dubois, 1937 from the intestine; Prosthogonimus ovatus (Rudolphi, 1803) from the cloaca; Athesmia heterolecithodes (Braun, 1899) from the bile ducts and the cestode Hymenolepis megalops (Nitzsch in Creplin, 1829) from the cloaca, were recorded. The discovery of D. egregia, P. ovatus, A. heterolecithodes and P. nanum constitute new host and/or new geographical records. Adults of A. (L.) hadra, previously described in experimental definitive hosts, are first reported from a naturally infected bird. Hymenolepis megalops, a cestode of Anseriformes is first reported from Ciconiiformes. PMID:11104147

Digiani, M C

2000-01-01

333

Tissue specific isozyme expression in three species of icterinae (Aves: Emberizidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tissue specific banding patterns were examined for ten enzyme systems in three species of the subfamily Icterinae, family Emberizidae — Quiscalus quiscula, Agelaius phoeniceus and Molothrus ater. Ten tissues were compared. Generally, tissue specific patterns observed were remarkedly similar as compared to other taxa, across the three species over all enzyme systems examined, indicating low levels of divergence in regulatory

S. C. Lougheed; T. A. Drysdale

1986-01-01

334

")F P Gr ah a m 10 9 C ha se Ave.  

E-print Network

an ville Tow er s Sou th 21 5 W. Ho us e Ann ex Me d. Dec k Hos pita l 13 01 Ma so n Fa rm R d. Tar rs ah am Ma so n Fa rm R d. Chille r 13 07 Cra ige Jam e s KouryNatatorium Pine tum UNC Ho spit al Alum

Lieb, Jason

335

MOLECULAR SYSTEMATICS AND BIOGEOGRAPHY OF ANTILLEAN THRASHERS, TREMBLERS, AND MOCKINGBIRDS (AVES: MIMIDAE)  

Microsoft Academic Search

We constructed phylogenetic hypotheses for Greater and Lesser Antillean Mimidae, including five endemic species of tremblers and thrashers that represent the best plausible example of an avian radiation within the Lesser Antilles. Phylogenetic relation- ships were inferred from analysis of 3,491 base pairs (bp) of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and roughly 780 bp of the nuclear-encoded myoglobin gene. We used a

Jeffrey S. Hunt; Eldredge Bermingham; Robert E. Ricklefs

2001-01-01

336

Records of ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) parasitizing birds (Aves) in Rhode Island, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Incidental to studies on Lyme disease in Rhode Island, a total of 531 birds represented by 68 species, was collected and examined for the presence of ticks and other ectoparasites. Of these birds, a total of 230, comprising 36 species, harbored ticks in the pre-adult stage. In all 1,174 ticks were collected. Tick burden ranged from 1 to 76 specimens

Kerwin E. Hyland; Jenifer Bernier; Daniel Markowski; Andrew MacLachlan; Zuhair Amr; Jay Pitocchelli; James Myers; Renjie Hu

2000-01-01

337

Comparisons of host specificity in feather louse genera (Insecta: Phthiraptera: Philopteridae) parasitizing gulls (Aves: Laridae: Larus).  

PubMed

Data from gene sequences and morphological structures were collected for the gull feather lice, Saemundssonia lari, Quadraceps punctatus, and Q. ornatus, parasitizing Larus crassirostris and L. schistisagus. Saemundssonia lari was collected from both gull species, and no detectable morphological and genetic differences were found between lice collected from the two different hosts. In contrast, Q. punctatus was only collected from L. crassirostris, whereas Q. ornatus was only collected from L. schistisagus. The two Quadraceps species were genetically highly divergent, and body-size differences corresponding to the gull's body size (Harrison's rule) were also detected between them. Both Quadraceps species were collected from the interbarb of the remex or rectrix, and a match in body size between the louse and the interbarb space may be important in escape from host preening defenses. In contrast, Saemundssonia is a head louse, inhabiting the finer feathers of the head and neck, which the bird cannot preen. A close match to host body size may be less important for lice in the head microhabitat. The differences in the pattern of host-specificity between Saemundssonia and Quadraceps on the two focal host species of this study were probably due to their different microhabitat preferences. More broadly, comparisons of the gene sequences of S. lari and Q. punctatus to those from other gull hosts showed that genetically almost undifferentiated populations of both species were distributed on wide range of gull species. Frequent interspecific hybridization of gulls is one possible factor that may allow these lice to maintain gene flow across multiple host species. PMID:24882099

Yamagishi, Ayaka; Yao, Izumi; Johnson, Kevin P; Yoshizawa, Kazunori

2014-06-01

338

Molecular diversity, metabolic transformation, and evolution of carotenoid feather pigments in cotingas (Aves: Cotingidae).  

PubMed

Carotenoid pigments were extracted from 29 feather patches from 25 species of cotingas (Cotingidae) representing all lineages of the family with carotenoid plumage coloration. Using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), mass spectrometry, chemical analysis, and ¹H-NMR, 16 different carotenoid molecules were documented in the plumages of the cotinga family. These included common dietary xanthophylls (lutein and zeaxanthin), canary xanthophylls A and B, four well known and broadly distributed avian ketocarotenoids (canthaxanthin, astaxanthin, ?-doradexanthin, and adonixanthin), rhodoxanthin, and seven 4-methoxy-ketocarotenoids. Methoxy-ketocarotenoids were found in 12 species within seven cotinga genera, including a new, previously undescribed molecule isolated from the Andean Cock-of-the-Rock Rupicola peruviana, 3'-hydroxy-3-methoxy-?,?-carotene-4-one, which we name rupicolin. The diversity of cotinga plumage carotenoid pigments is hypothesized to be derived via four metabolic pathways from lutein, zeaxanthin, ?-cryptoxanthin, and ?-carotene. All metabolic transformations within the four pathways can be described by six or seven different enzymatic reactions. Three of these reactions are shared among three precursor pathways and are responsible for eight different metabolically derived carotenoid molecules. The function of cotinga plumage carotenoid diversity was analyzed with reflectance spectrophotometry of plumage patches and a tetrahedral model of avian color visual perception. The evolutionary history of the origin of this diversity is analyzed phylogenetically. The color space analyses document that the evolutionarily derived metabolic modifications of dietary xanthophylls have resulted in the creation of distinctive orange-red and purple visual colors. PMID:22669477

Prum, Richard O; LaFountain, Amy M; Berro, Julien; Stoddard, Mary Caswell; Frank, Harry A

2012-12-01

339

Sexual selection and the evolution of mechanical sound production in manakins (Aves: Pipridae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

I surveyed and described modulated, non-vocal, mechanical sounds of the lek-breeding Neotropical manakins (Pipridae). Variation among manakin species in mechanical sound production, repertoire size, acoustic structure, associated feather specialization, and mechanical sound production mechanisms were analysed comparatively in the context of a phylogenetic hypothesis for the family. Mechanical sound production has probably evolved five or six times independently and been

RICHARD O. PRUM

1998-01-01

340

Population recovery of the threatened endemic Rodrigues fody ( Foudia flavicans) (Aves, Ploceidae) following reforestation  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1999, we intensively surveyed all suitable habitat on the Mascarene Island of Rodrigues and mapped 334 territories of the threatened endemic Rodrigues fody (Foudia flavicans). In addition, we recorded 58 unpaired males, 85 juveniles, and 100 grey-brown-plumaged birds, for a minimum estimated population size of 911 birds. This represents a near 100-fold increase in population size since 1968, which

Andrew J Impey; Isabelle M Côté; Carl G Jones

2002-01-01

341

Phylogeny and phylogenetic classification of the antbirds, ovenbirds, woodcreepers, and allies (Aves: Passeriformes: infraorder Furnariides)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The infraorder Furnariides is a diverse group of suboscine passerine birds comprising a substantial component of the Neotropical avifauna. The included species encompass a broad array of morphologies and behaviours, making them appealing for evolutionary studies, but the size of the group (ca. 600 species) has limited well-sampled higher-level phylogenetic studies. Using DNA sequence data from the nuclear RAG-1 and

Robert G. Moyle; R. Terry Chesser; Robb T. Brumfield; Jose G. Tello; Daniel J. Marchese; Joel Cracraft

2009-01-01

342

Data for NASA's AVE 6 experiment: 25-mb sounding data and synoptic charts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Atmospheric Variability Experiments 6 experiment is described, and tabulated rawinsonde data at 25-mb intervals from the surface to 25 mb for the 22 stations participating in the experiment is presented. Soundings were taken between 0000 GMT 27 May and 1200 GMT 28 May 1977. The methods of data processing and their accuracy are briefly discussed. Synoptic charts prepared from the data are presented together with an example of contact data.

Dupuis, L. R.; Hill, K.

1977-01-01

343

Comparison of eye morphology and retinal topography in two species of New World vultures (Aves: Cathartidae).  

PubMed

Vultures are highly reliant on their sensory systems for the rapid detection and localization of carrion before other scavengers can exploit the resource. In this study, we compared eye morphology and retinal topography in two species of New World vultures (Cathartidae), turkey vultures (Cathartes aura), with a highly developed olfactory sense, and black vultures (Coragyps atratus), with a less developed sense of olfaction. We found that eye size relative to body mass was the same in both species, but that black vultures have larger corneas relative to eye size than turkey vultures. However, the overall retinal topography, the total number of cells in the retinal ganglion cell layer, peak and average cell densities, cell soma area frequency distributions, and the theoretical peak anatomical spatial resolving power were the same in both species. This suggests that the visual systems of these two species are similar and that vision plays an equally important role in the biology of both species, despite the apparently greater reliance on olfaction for finding carrion in turkey vultures. PMID:24249399

Lisney, Thomas J; Stecyk, Karyn; Kolominsky, Jeffrey; Graves, Gary R; Wylie, Douglas R; Iwaniuk, Andrew N

2013-12-01

344

Phylogeography of the Alcippe morrisonia (Aves: Timaliidae): long population history beyond late Pleistocene glaciations  

PubMed Central

Background The role of Pleistocene glacial oscillations in current biodiversity and distribution patterns varies with latitude, physical topology and population life history and has long been a topic of discussion. However, there had been little phylogeographical research in south China, where the geophysical complexity is associated with great biodiversity. A bird endemic in Southeast Asia, the Grey-cheeked Fulvetta, Alcippe morrisonia, has been reported to show deep genetic divergences among its seven subspecies. In the present study, we investigated the phylogeography of A. morrisonia to explore its population structure and evolutionary history, in order to gain insight into the effect of geological events on the speciation and diversity of birds endemic in south China. Results Mitochondrial genes cytochrome b (Cytb) and cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) were represented by 1236 nucleotide sites from 151 individuals from 29 localities. Phylogenetic analysis showed seven monophyletic clades congruent with the geographically separated groups, which were identified as major sources of molecular variance (90.92%) by AMOVA. TCS analysis revealed four disconnected networks, and that no haplotype was shared among the geographical groups. The common ancestor of these populations was dated to 11.6 Mya and several divergence events were estimated along the population evolutionary history. Isolation by distance was inferred by NCPA to be responsible for the current intra-population genetic pattern and gene flow among geographical groups was interrupted. A late Pleistocene demographic expansion was detected in the eastern geographical groups, while the expansion time (0.2–0.4 Mya) was earlier than the Last Glacial Maximum. Conclusion It is proposed that the complicated topology preserves high genetic diversity and ancient lineages for geographical groups of A. morrisonia in China mainland and its two major islands, and restricts gene exchange during climate oscillations. Isolation by distance seems to be an important factor of genetic structure formation within geographical populations. Although glacial influence to population fluctuation was observed in late Pleistocene, it seems that populations in eastern China were more susceptible to climate change, and all geographical groups were growing stably through the Last Glacial Maximum. Coalescence analysis suggested that the ancestor of A. morrisonia might be traced back to the late Miocene, and the current phylogeographical structure of A. morrisonia is more likely to be attributable to a series geological events than to Pleistocene glacial cycles. PMID:19558699

Song, Gang; Qu, Yanhua; Yin, Zuohua; Li, Shouhsien; Liu, Naifa; Lei, Fumin

2009-01-01

345

Dispersion of the horned grebe Podiceps auritus (L.) (Aves) on Lake Myvatn, Iceland, in late summer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Studies on habitat selection by waterbirds usually describe large-scale distribution of populations or species but the dispersion within lakes is an understudied aspect. Detailed mapping of horned grebes (Podiceps auritus (L.)) on the North Basin of Lake Myvatn, Iceland, was carried out in late summer 2000 in order to compare their dispersion with water depth and submerged vegetation. Depth and

Thorkell Lindberg Thórarinsson; Árni Einarsson

2004-01-01

346

ave you ever wondered why music generated by computers and drum machines sometimes sounds  

E-print Network

- sets are typically small, perhaps 10­20 ms. That's less than the time it takes for a dragonfly to flap. It is as if the human brain has an enduring memory for those deviations. The phenomenon is not limited to the tem- poral

347

Genetic differentiation and phylogeography of gulls in the Larus cachinnans—fuscus group (Aves: Charadriiformes)  

Microsoft Academic Search

We studied mitochondrial genetic differentiation among nine taxa of large gulls of the Larus cachinnans—fuscus group, which form part of the circumpolar Herring Gull complex. Our primary interest was to see if there were unrecognized gene flow barriers, to what extent mitochondrial genetic population structure conformed to current taxonomic boundaries, and what it might reveal about possible differences in population

D. LIEBERS; A. J. HELBIG; P. DE KNIJFF

2001-01-01

348

Genetic differentiation and phylogeography of gulls in the Larus cachinnans-fuscus group (Aves: Charadriiformes).  

PubMed

We studied mitochondrial genetic differentiation among nine taxa of large gulls of the Larus cachinnans-fuscus group, which form part of the circumpolar Herring Gull complex. Our primary interest was to see if there were unrecognized gene flow barriers, to what extent mitochondrial genetic population structure conformed to current taxonomic boundaries, and what it might reveal about possible differences in population history. Sequences (430 nucleotides) of the hypervariable control region I (HVR-I) were obtained from 580 individuals and proved highly informative within this recently diverged group of birds. Contrary to current classification, a basal split was revealed between an Atlantic-Mediterranean clade (atlantis, michahellis, armenicus) and a NW Palearctic-Central Asian clade (cachinnans, barabensis, mongolicus, fuscus-group). There was almost no mitochondrial gene flow between these two groups, although they are in geographical contact in two areas (eastern North Atlantic, Black Sea). Within each of the two major groups, there was strong phylogeographic structure with gene flow barriers between some neighbouring taxa (e.g. cachinanns vs. barabensis), but also a case of poor genetic differentiation between phenotypically distinct forms (barabensis vs. heuglini). At the subspecies level, current taxonomy corresponded well to molecular genetic structure: over 80% of the molecular genetic variance was partitioned among six (groups of) taxa. This is in sharp contrast to previous studies using allozymes and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers, which seemed to indicate extensive nuclear gene flow. Within-taxon haplotype phylogenies and mismatch distributions revealed contrasting demographic histories: cachinnans (Ponto-Caspian region) and atlantis (NE Atlantic) represent ancient lineages with large long-term population sizes, inland forms stem from very recent colonization events (barabensis, mongolicus) or passed through a population bottleneck (armenicus). PMID:11742547

Liebers, D; Helbig, A J; de Knijff, P

2001-10-01

349

LAS AVES DE LAS ISLAS LOBOS DE AFUERA (PERÚ) EN LA PRIMAVERA DE 2004  

Microsoft Academic Search

Birds of the Lobos de Afuera islands (Peru) in spring of 2004. - In November 2004, the birds of the Lobos de Afuera islands (06°55'S, 80°42'W), 93 km off the northern coast of Peru were studied. Additional observations were made in September 2003 and August 2005. A total of seventeen species and eleven families were identified. Eight species were breeding:

Judith Figueroa; Marcelo Stucchi

350

Oswaldotrema nacinovici gen. nov. sp. nov. (Digenea: Philophthalmidae) from Numenius phaeopus (Aves: Scolopacidae) in Brazil.  

PubMed

A new genus, Oswaldotrema gen. nov. is proposed. Oswaldotrema nacinovici sp. nov. is descibed from Numenius phaeopus Latham, 1790. Differentiation from the other related genera, namely Philophthalmus, Pygorchis, Proctobium, Parorchis, Echinostephila, Cloacitrema, Pittacium, Ophthalmotrema, Skrjabinovermis and Paratrema, was based on morphological characters, mainly on those referring to the body surface, body shape, head, esophagus, pharynx, acetabulum, vitellaria, vitelline reservoir and seminal vesicle. PMID:10800187

Muniz-Pereira, L C; Pinto, R M

2000-01-01

351

PRIMARY RESEARCH PAPER Patterns of prey use by lesser scaup Aythya affinis (Aves)  

E-print Network

availability may be reduced during spring migration. Analysis of fish diets showed that black bullhead Ameiurus melas and yellow perch Perca flavescens had the highest diet overlap with lesser scaup at 94% and 92

352

Trichobilharzia mergi sp. nov. (Trematoda: Digenea: Schistosomatidae), a visceral schistosome of Mergus serrator (L.) (Aves: Anatidae).  

PubMed

Parasitological investigations on red-breasted mergansers (Mergus serrator L.) in Iceland revealed digenean flukes of the family Schistosomatidae. Adult worms were detected in blood vessels of the large intestine and eggs were deposited in the mucosa and surrounded by granulomatous reactions. Traditional morphological methods showed that the flukes have very slender filiform bodies, males are equipped with a short gynaecophoric canal and both suckers and spatulate ends are present on each sex. Among characteristics of the flukes which render them morphologically distinct from other Trichobilharzia species are: i) males-well developed vesicula seminalis (v.s.) consisting of a short v.s. externa and a significantly longer (approx. 3 times) v.s. interna, unusually well developed genital papilla and localization of the first testis a relatively long distance posterior to the gynaecophoric canal; ii) eggs-small and elongated with slightly rounded poles and a short terminal spine. DNA taxonomic techniques confirmed that a new species had been identified, Trichobilharzia mergi sp. n. The sequence data were deposited in GenBank under the accession numbers JX456151 to JX456172. Comparison of the results with our previously published data on characterization of DNA of cercariae isolated from freshwater lymnaeid snails showed that larval development of T. mergi is associated with Radix balthica L. (=Radix peregra Müller, 1774;=Radix ovata Draparnaud, 1805). PMID:23501058

Kolá?ová, Libuše; Skírnisson, Karl; Ferté, Hubert; Jouet, Damien

2013-06-01

353

Curriculum Vitae Qihui Chen 217H, Ruttan Hall, 1994 Buford Ave, St Paul, MN 55108  

E-print Network

2003 PUBLICATIONS Journal Articles 2009. "Urban Land Intensive Utilization: An Analysis Based Intensive Utilization". China Land. 2004(11):1-7. (with Jian Lin and Jingyao Jin.) [In Chinese] Book Chapters 2008. Standard for Evaluation of Saving and Intensive Use of Construction Land. Beijing: China

Levinson, David M.

354

Feather mites (Astigmata: Psoroptidia) parasitising the rock ptarmigan Lagopus muta (Montin) (Aves: Galliformes) in Iceland.  

PubMed

Four new species of feather mites are described from the Icelandic rock ptarmigan Lagopus muta islandorum (Faber) in Iceland. These are Metamicrolichus islandicus n. sp., Myialges borealis n. sp. (Epidermoptidae), Strelkoviacarus holoaspis n. sp. (Analgidae) and Tetraolichus lagopi n. sp. (Pterolichidae). This is the first report on feather mites associated with the Icelandic rock ptarmigan. Brief comments on the systematics and biology of corresponding feather mite genera are given. For two species, originally described in Pterolichus Robin, 1868 (Pterolichidae), new combinations are proposed, i.e. Tetraolichus gaudi (Cerný, 1971) n. comb. and T. microdiscus (Trouessart, 1887) n. comb. PMID:20157794

Mironov, Sergey V; Skirnisson, Karl; Thorarinsdottir, Solrun Th; Nielsen, Olafur K

2010-03-01

355

A Pelican Tarsometatarsus (Aves: Pelecanidae) from the Latest Pliocene Siwaliks of India  

PubMed Central

We report a new fossil specimen of a pelican from the Tatrot Formation of the Siwalik Hills, India. It likely represents Pelecanus sivalensis Davies, 1880, the smaller of the two previously published species from the Siwalik Group stratigraphic sequence. This complete tarsometatarsus is the first fossil bone of a pelican collected in India for over 100 years. It is from the latest Pliocene (?2.6 Ma), and is the youngest pelican fossil from the region. The new specimen exhibits a derived distoplantar ‘slant’ to the plantar margin of the medial crest of the hypotarsus, and a combination of features related to the morphology of the hypotarsus, the distal foramen, trochleae, and overall size that allow further differentiation from known tarsometatarsi of fossil and extant pelicans, including the three species of extant pelicans that occur in India (Pelecanus crispus, P. onocrotalus, and P. philippensis). It is of appropriate size for Pelecanus sivalensis, which to date has been known only by fragments of other skeletal elements of the wing, leg, and shoulder girdle. Thus, the observation that this tarsometatarsus is morphologically distinct from those of known pelicans provides further support for the distinctiveness of at least one extinct species of pelican from the Siwalik Group sediments. While the morphology of the tarsometatarsus allows for separation from other taxa known from tarsometatarsi, we found no clear shared derived states to place this taxon with any confidence in a phylogenetic context relative to any other pelican species, or even determine if it is part of the crown group of Pelecanidae. However, published molecular data are consistent with an origin of the crown clade prior to the Pleistocene, suggesting (along with one morphological character) the possibility that this species belongs to the Old World clade of pelican species. PMID:25365300

Stidham, Thomas A.; Krishan, Kewal; Singh, Bahadur; Ghosh, Abhik; Patnaik, Rajeev

2014-01-01

356

Helminth parasites of the western sandpiper, Calidris mauri (Aves), from El Paso and Hudspeth counties, Texas.  

PubMed

Fifty western sandpipers, Calidris mauri, from El Paso and Hudspeth counties, Texas, were collected and examined for helminth parasites. Fifty-three helminths (means abundance = 1.06, SD = 2.31) consisting of 4 cestode and 1 nematode species were collected. The helminth community showed low species richness (5), low diversity and evenness (0.05, 0.14), low concentration for dominance (0.19), and all species were contagiously distributed. There were no clearly identifiable core species. PMID:1919931

Canaris, A G; Munir, N T

1991-10-01

357

Out of Africa? Phylogenetic relationships between Falco biarmicus and the other hierofalcons (Aves: Falconidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The phylogeographic history of the lanner falcon (Falco biarmicus) and the phylogenetic relationships among hierofalcons (F. biarmicus, Falco cherrug, Falco jugger and Falco rusticolus) were investigated using mitochondrial (mt) DNA sequences. Of the two non-coding mt sections tested, the control region (CR) appeared more suitable as phylogenetic marker sequence compared with the pseudo control region (WCR). For the comprehensive analysis

F. Nittinger; E. Haring; W. Pinsker; M. Wink; A. Gamauf

2005-01-01

358

The structure and probable mechanism of evolutionary formation of the foot in piciform birds (Aves: Piciformes)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The foot structure of piciform and coraciiform birds is examined in detail. Certain similarity in foot structure between woodpeckers\\u000a and woodhoopoes is shown and provides the basis for the model of the evolutionary formation of the zygodactyl foot. It is\\u000a shown that African mousebirds and the Madagascan Leptosomus discolor are probably the closest relatives of piciforms. A brief review of

N. V. Zelenkov

2007-01-01

359

Volume 16, Number 1, Spring 2006 19 1. 861 Keeler Ave., Berkeley, CA 94708; ecvellinga@  

E-print Network

of the sticky cap surface, then to Suillus by several authors (e.g. Smith and Thiers 1964 and 1971), and spent Paxillus: the weird brown colors on the cap, the juiciness, the discoloration, the shape of the spores, and death is the result. The Herbarium of Fungi at Denver Botanic Gardens contains a second Colorado

California at Berkeley, University of

360

Cadmium and lead in common terns (Aves: Sterna hirundo): Relationship between levels in parents and eggs.  

PubMed

We analyzed cadmium and lead levels in feathers of mated pairs of common terns (Sterna hirundo) and in their eggs to determine if metal levels in eggs correlated with female levels, and whether there were intrapair and intermetal correlations. Eggs had significantly lower lead levels (89 ng g(-1)) and cadmium levels (4.0 ng g(-1)) than adult feathers (500 and 50 ng g(-1) respectively). Adult females had higher metal levels than males. Cadmium and lead levels were correlated across families for females, males and eggs. Lead, but not cadmium, levels were correlated in females and their eggs. PMID:24241937

Burger, J; Gochfeld, M

1991-03-01

361

Cadmium and lead in common terns ( Aves: Sterna hirundo ): Relationship between levels in parents and eggs  

Microsoft Academic Search

We analyzed cadmium and lead levels in feathers of mated pairs of common terns (Sterna hirundo) and in their eggs to determine if metal levels in eggs correlated with female levels, and whether there were intrapair and intermetal correlations. Eggs had significantly lower lead levels (89 ng g-1) and cadmium levels (4.0 ng g-1) than adult feathers (500 and 50

Joanna Burger; Michael Gochfeld

1991-01-01

362

Foraging activity of the snail kite, Rostrhamus sociabilis (Aves: Accipitridae) in wetlands of southern Brazil.  

PubMed

The snail kite (Rostrhamus sociabilis) is widely distributed in the American continent. Its specialised diet consists mostly of the gastropod mollusk Pomacea sp and its foraging strategy probably varies depending on the season, prey availability, and climate factors, which can be reflected in its semi-nomad behaviour. This study was aimed at examining the hunting strategy of the snail kite, and its association with climate factors and habitat heterogeneity. Direct observations of birds between January 2010 and March 2011 in southernmost Brazil revealed that hunting was still the predominant foraging strategy (79% of records) to capture mollusks. Despite morphological specialisations to extract mollusks from the shells, the handling time (average = 92.4 s) was twice as much the time between prey search and capture (average = 55 s). The increase in the number of mollusks ingested apparently occurs when the resting time on perches or any other substrates near the hunting sites decreases between successive unsuccessful attempts. The correlation between the number of consumed preys and the climatic variables examined was low. Regarding habitat heterogeneity, our findings suggest that birds forage preferentially in marshes with low vegetation, which may increase the access to mollusks. The hunting efficiency of the snail kite was high (76 % successful attempts) compared to those of other birds of prey. PMID:23917551

Bergmann, F B; Amaral, H L C; Pinto, D P; Chivittz, C C; Tozetti, A M

2013-05-01

363

First report of an hypopus (Acari: Hypoderatidae) from a jaeger (Aves: Charadriiformes: Stercorariidae)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Thalassornectes (Alcidectes) aukletae, originally described from two species of auklets (Charadriiformes: Alcidae) from maritime eastern Russia, is reported from a third species of pelagic charadriiform (Stercorariidae), the pomarine jaeger, Stercorarius poinarinus (Temminck), from Florida. The specimens from the jaeger are slightly smaller, the genital apodeme is more heavily sclerotized, paired setae gm are twice as long and there are other minor variations in the idiosomal and leg chaetotaxy. These differences are not considered sufficient to warrant taxonomic separation at the species or subspecies level from the nominate species T. (A.) aukletae. The same hypopus occurring across different families of birds is unusual in the Hypoderatidae. The diversity in hosts from several orders of birds, low intensities of infection in the two species from Africa, low prevalences in alcids from Russia, and rarity of these hypoderatids in all surveyed hosts leads us to speculate that the true host affinities of species in the genus Thalassornectes are unknown. The alternative consideration is that these are simply uncommon species that are very host specific.

Pence, D.B.; Cole, R.A.

1995-01-01

364

Helminth parasites of the American avocet Recurvirostra americana (Aves), from the Salt Lake basin, Utah.  

PubMed

Five species of cestodes and 1 species of trematode, for a total of 4,770 (chi- =79.5) helminths, were obtained from 60 American avocets, Recurvirostra americana, collected from July to September 1985 and 1986 in the Salt Lake basin, Utah. The most prevalent parasite was the cestode Diplophallus coili (95%). It occurred in mature pairs 90% of the time. All species of helminths showed a contagious distribution except for mature D. coili, which had a uniform distribution. This uniform distribution, which is unusual for species of helminths, has been observed for at least 4 species of large tapeworms in the recurvirostrids. The helminth community consisted of 3 specialists, 1 generalist, and 2 of uncertain status. The same specialists have been reported also in R. americana from Texas, Colorado, and Manitoba, Canada. PMID:8437049

Hinojos, J G; Campbell, B K; Canaris, A G

1993-02-01

365

First record of an hypopus (Acari: Hypoderatidae) from a jaeger (Aves: Charadriiformes: Stercorariidae).  

PubMed

Thalassornectes (Alcidectes) aukletae, originally described from two species of auklets (Charadriiformes: Alcidae) from maritime eastern Russia, is reported from a third species of pelagic charadriiform (Stercorariidae), the pomarine jaeger, Stercorarius pomarinus (Temminck), from Florida. The specimens from the jaeger are slightly smaller, the genital apodeme is more heavily sclerotized, paired setae gm are twice as long and there are other minor variations in the idiosomal and leg chaetotaxy. These differences are not considered sufficient to warrant taxonomic separation at the species or subspecies level from the nominate species T. (A.) aukletae. The same hypopus occurring across different families of birds is unusual in the Hypoderatidae. The diversity in hosts from several orders of birds, low intensities of infection in the two species from Africa, low prevalences in alcids from Russia, and rarity of these hypoderatids in all surveyed hosts leads us to speculate that the true host affinities of species in the genus Thalassornectes are unknown. The alternative consideration is that these are simply uncommon species that are very host specific. PMID:7616535

Pence, D B; Cole, R A

1995-05-01

366

Comparative Phyloclimatic Analysis and Evolution of Ecological Niches in the Scimitar Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae: Pomatorhinus)  

PubMed Central

We present the first extensive and integrative analysis of niche evolution based on climatic variables and a dated molecular phylogeny of a heterogeneous avian group of Southeast Asian scimitar babblers of the genus Pomatorhinus. The four main clades of scimitar babblers have species that co-occur in similar areas across southern Asia but some have diverged at different timeframes, with the most recently evolved clade harboring the highest number of species. Ecological niche models and analysis of contributing variables within a phylogenetic framework indicate instances of convergent evolution of members of different clades onto similar ecological parameter space, as well as divergent evolution of members from within clades. Pomatorhinus species from different clades occupying Himalayan foothills show convergence towards similar climatic tolerances, whereas within a clade, allopatric sister-species occurring in the Himalayas have diverged to occupy different climatic parameter spaces. Comparisons of climatic tolerances of Himalayan foothills taxa with species distributed further south in Assam/Burma and Burma/Thailand indicate convergence towards similar parameter spaces in several climatic variables. Niche overlap was observed to be lower among species of the youngest clade (ruficollis) and higher among species of older clades (ferruginosus). Analysis of accumulation of ecological disparity through time indicates rapid divergence within recent time frames. As a result, Himalayan taxa originating at different temporal scales within the four main scimitar babbler clades have differentiated ecologically only in recently diverged taxa. Our study suggests that the repeated orogenic and climatic fluctuations of the Pliocene and Pleistocene within mainland Southeast Asia served as an important ecological speciation driver within scimitar babblers, by providing opportunities for rapid geographic expansion and filling of novel environmental niches. PMID:23405183

Nyari, Arpad S.; Reddy, Sushma

2013-01-01

367

265 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA mit.edu/museum/programs/festival  

E-print Network

and Economics. Hell hath no fury like a kid playing video games. Psychiatrists Joseph Gonzalez-Heydrich and Jason Kahn from Children's Hospital Boston explain how toys and technology help children with severe

Ishii, Hiroshi

368

INFORMACIÓN SOBRE LA DISTRIBUCIÓN DE ALGUNAS ESPECIES DE AVES DE ECUADOR  

Microsoft Academic Search

New records or confirmation of recently reported distributional range extensions or altitudinal movements are given or 14 species of birds from Ecuador: Cairina moschata, Netta erythrophthalma, Leucopternis semiplumbeus, Forpus coelestis, Crotophaga sulcirostris, Eriocnemis mosquera, Furnarius cinnamomeus, Pseudocolaptes boissonneautii, Phlegopsis nigromaculata, Querula purpurata, Cyclarhis gujanensis, Progne subis, Haplospiza rustica y Carduelis olivacea. The new records and their releva nce to the

Diego F. Cisneros-Heredia

369

A complete multilocus species phylogeny of the tits and chickadees (Aves: Paridae).  

PubMed

The avian family Paridae (tits and chickadees) contains c. 55 species distributed in the Palearctic, Nearctic, Afrotropics and Indomalaya. The group includes some of the most well-known and extensively studied avian species, and the evolutionary history, in particular the post-glacial colonization of the northern latitudes, has been comparably well-studied for several species. Yet a comprehensive phylogeny of the whole clade is lacking. Here, we present the first complete species phylogeny for the group based on sequence data from two nuclear introns and one mitochondrial gene for 67 taxa of parids. Our results strongly support the inclusion of the Fire-capped Tit (Cephalopyrus flammiceps), currently placed in the Remizidae, as the most basal member of the Paridae. The Yellow-browed Tit (Sylviparus modestus) and the Sultan Tit (Melanochlora sultanea) constitute the next two sequential branches whereas the remaining tits fall into two large clades, one of which contains the seed hoarding and nest excavating species. The indicated clades within these two groups are largely congruent with recent classifications, but with several unforeseen relationships, such as non-monophyly of the Sombre Tit (Poecile lugubris) and the Marsh Tit (Poecile palustris), as well as non-monophyly of both the African gray and the African black tits. Further, our results support a close relationship between the White-fronted Tit (Parus semilarvatus) and the varied Tit (Poecile varius) as well as a close relationship between the White-naped Tit (Parus nuchalis) and the Yellow-cheeked and Black-lored tits (Parus spilonotus and P. xanthogenys). Finally, Hume's Ground-tit (Pseudopodoces humilis) is found to be closely related to the Green-backed Tit (Parus monticolus) and the Great Tit (Parus major). We propose a new classification that is in accordance with this phylogeny. PMID:23831453

Johansson, Ulf S; Ekman, Jan; Bowie, Rauri C K; Halvarsson, Peter; Ohlson, Jan I; Price, Trevor D; Ericson, Per G P

2013-12-01

370

Phylogeny of the owlet-nightjars (Aves: Aegothelidae) based on mitochondrial DNA sequence  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The avian family Aegothelidae (Owlet-nightjars) comprises nine extant species and one extinct species, all of which are currently classified in a single genus, Aegotheles. Owlet-nightjars are secretive nocturnal birds of the South Pacific. They are relatively poorly studied and some species are known from only a few specimens. Furthermore, their confusing morphological variation has made it difficult to cluster existing specimens unambiguously into hierarchical taxonomic units. Here we sample all extant owlet-nightjar species and all but three currently recognized subspecies. We use DNA extracted primarily from museum specimens to obtain mitochondrial gene sequences and construct a molecular phylogeny. Our phylogeny suggests that most species are reciprocally monophyletic, however A. albertisi appears paraphyletic. Our data also suggest splitting A. bennettii into two species and splitting A. insignis and A. tatei as suggested in another recent paper. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

Dumbacher, J.P.; Pratt, T.K.; Fleischer, R.C.

2003-01-01

371

Geographic diversification in the call repertoire of the genus Pyrrhocorax (Aves, Corvidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

We analysed the call repertoires of the Red-billed Chough (Pyrrhocorax pyrrhocorax) and the Alpine Chough (Pyrrhocorax graculus) across three continents (Europe, Asia, and Africa) for intraspecific and interspecific differences in call-repertoire size and discuss the factors that could have promoted its evolution. The overall call reper - toire of the Red-billed Chough was twice as large as that of the

Paola Laiolo; Antonio Rolando; Anne Delestrade; Augusto De Sanctis

2001-01-01

372

Speciational history of North American Haemorhous finches (Aves: Fringillidae) inferred from multilocus data.  

PubMed

We investigated species relationships and timing of speciation in North American Haemorhous finches by using a mitochondrial phylogeographic approach combined with a multilocus species tree reconstruction. Haemorhous purpureus and H. cassinii were strongly supported as sister taxa, and H. mexicanus was sister to H. purpureus+H. cassinii. Our divergence times indicated that diversification within Haemorhous occurred progressively from the Late Miocene into the Pleistocene. Our inferred pattern of speciation demonstrates the complexity of the origins of North American birds, and provides additional evidence that a single cause for speciation in closely related North American birds, such as Late Pleistocene glacial-interglacial cycles, is unlikely. PMID:23219607

Smith, Brian Tilston; Bryson, Robert W; Chua, Vivien; Africa, Lia; Klicka, John

2013-03-01

373

New molecular evidence supports the species status of Kaempfer’s Woodpecker (Aves, Picidae)  

PubMed Central

Kaempfer’s Woodpecker (Celeus obrieni) is the only species of the genus Celeus endemic to Brazil. The description of this taxon as a subspecies of the Rufous-headed Woodpecker (Celeus spectabilis) was based on a single specimen. While C. obrieni and C. spectabilis are now considered separate species based on morphological and limited molecular evidence, no study has critically tested the reciprocal monophyly and degree of evolutionary independence between these taxa with several specimens. Herein, fragments of the mitochondrial and nuclear DNA of three recently-collected specimens of C. obrieni were analyzed to evaluate the degree of evolutionary differentiation of this taxon with respect to C. spectabilis. The results confirm the reciprocal monophyly between the specimens of C. obrieni and C. spectabilis. The genetic divergence values for the two taxa also support their classification as independent species, given that they are greater than the values recorded among other closely-related but separate species of the same genus. Estimates of the divergence time between C. obrieni and C. spectabilis indicate that cladogenesis occurred in the mid-Pleistocene, during a period of major climatic fluctuations and landscape change, consistent with the hypothesis of a corridor of open bamboo dominated forests and woodland stretching. PMID:23885201

de Sousa Azevedo, Lorena; Aleixo, Alexandre; Santos, Marcos Pérsio Dantas; Sampaio, Iracilda; Schneider, Horacio; Vallinoto, Marcelo; do Rêgo, Péricles Sena

2013-01-01

374

Phylogeny and evolutionary history of old world suboscine birds (aves: Eurylaimides)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Molecular and morphological data were used to derive a phylogenetic hypothesis for the Eurylaimides, an Old World bird group now known to be distributed pantropically, and to investigate the evolution and biogeography of the group. Phylogenetic results indicated that the Eurylaimides consist of two monophyletic groups, the pittas (Pittidae) and the broadbills (Eurylaimidae sensu lato), and that the broadbills consist of two highly divergent clades, one containing the sister genera Smithornis and Calyptomena, the other containing Pseudocalyptomena graueri, Sapuyou aenigma, the asity genera Philepitta and Neoclrepanis, and five Asian genera. Our results indicate that over a ???10 million year time span in the early Tertiary, the Eurylaimides came to inhabit widely disjunct tropical regions and evolved disparate morphology, diet, and breeding behavior. Biogeographically, although a southern origin for the lineage is likely, time estimates for major lineage splitting do not correspond to Gondwanan vicariance events, and the biogeographic history of the crown clade is better explained by Laurasian climatic and geological processes. In particular, the timing and phylogenetic pattern suggest a likely Laurasian origin for the sole New World representative of the group, Sapayoa aenigina. Copyright ??American Museum of Natural History 2006.

Moyle, R.G.; Chesser, R.T.; Prum, R.O.; Schikler, P.; Cracraft, J.

2006-01-01

375

Phylogeny and evolutionary history of Old World suboscine birds (Aves: Eurylaimides)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Molecular and morphological data were used to derive a phylogenetic hypothesis for the Eurylaimides, an Old World bird group now known to be distributed pantropically, and to investigate the evolution and biogeography of the group. Phylogenetic results indicated that the Eurylaimides consist of two monophyletic groups, the pittas (Pittidae) and the broadbills (Eurylaimidae sensu lato), and that the broadbills consist of two highly divergent clades, one containing the sister genera Smithornis and Calyptomena, the other containing Pseudocalyptomena graueri, Sapayoa aenigma, the asity genera Philepitta and Neodrepanis, and five Asian genera. Our results indicate that over a ~10 million year time span in the early Tertiary, the Eurylaimides came to inhabit widely disjunct tropical regions and evolved disparate morphology, diet, and breeding behavior. Biogeographically, although a southern origin for the lineage is likely, time estimates for major lineage splitting do not correspond to Gondwanan vicariance events, and the biogeographic history of the crown clade is better explained by Laurasian climatic and geological processes. In particular, the timing and phylogenetic pattern suggest a likely Laurasian origin for the sole New World representative of the group, Sapayoa aenigma.

Moyle, R.G.; Chesser, R.T.; Prum, R.O.; Schikler, P.; Cracraft, J.

2006-01-01

376

Nesting distributions of Galápagos boobies (Aves: Sulidae): an apparent case of amensalism  

Microsoft Academic Search

Blue-footed boobies (Sula nebouxii) in the Galápagos Islands nest at coastal sites such as cliff edges if Nazca boobies (S. granti) are absent. However, if sympatric with nesting Nazca boobies, they nest nearby, but farther inland, in areas with little topographical relief. Nazca boobies nest at the coastal sites whether blue-footed boobies are present or not. The segregated nesting pattern

Howard M. Townsend; Kathryn P. Huyvaert; Peter J. Hodum; David J. Anderson

2002-01-01

377

Phylogeny and Evolution of the Sulidae (Aves: Pelecaniformes): A Test of Alternative Modes of Speciation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although the allopatric model of speciation is widely accepted, it does not provide a satisfactory explanation for many evolutionary phenomena. Several alternative models exist, but they remain largely untested for vertebrate animals. In the present paper, a molecular phylogeny was used to test competing models of speciation in a seabird family, the Sulidae. A segment including 807 base pairs of

V. L. Friesen; D. J. Anderson

1997-01-01

378

Phylogeny and evolution of the Sulidae (Aves:Pelecaniformes): a test of alternative modes of speciation.  

PubMed

Although the allopatric model of speciation is widely accepted, it does not provide a satisfactory explanation for many evolutionary phenomena. Several alternative models exist, but they remain largely untested for vertebrate animals. In the present paper, a molecular phylogeny was used to test competing models of speciation in a seabird family, the Sulidae. A segment including 807 base pairs of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene was sequenced from all extant sulid species, and phylogenetic methods were used to test model-specific predictions regarding tree topologies, distributions of sister taxa, timing of vicariant events, and comparative biology. Both the neighbor-joining and parsimony analyses placed sequences of gannets (Morus spp.) and boobies of the genus Sula in separate, monophyletic lineages. Sequences of Cape (M. capensis) and Australasian (M. serrator) gannets clustered together, and the sequence of Abbott's booby (Papasula abbotti) was basal to those of the gannets. Sequences of blue-footed (S. nebouxii) and Peruvian (S. variegata) boobies were sisters and formed a monophyletic group with the masked booby (S. dactylatra). The red-footed booby (S. sula) sequence was the most divergent of the Sula boobies. All relationships received strong support from standard-error tests and bootstrap analysis. Substitution rates were similar to those suggested for mammals and suggested that most lineages arose within the last 3 million years. Lineage divergence events for which the mode of speciation could be deduced did not fit the predictions of either allopatric or sympatric models, but apparently involved either peripatric or parapatric processes. PMID:9126567

Friesen, V L; Anderson, D J

1997-04-01

379

Albert E. Giorgi Don Chapman Consultants, Inc.. 7981 J68th Ave. NE  

E-print Network

-type chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, in John Day Reservoir on the Columbia River Both stream-type and ocean-type chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, are found in the Co- lumbia River system. Ocean

380

Evolution in Australasian Mangrove Forests: Multilocus Phylogenetic Analysis of the Gerygone Warblers (Aves: Acanthizidae)  

E-print Network

The mangrove forests of Australasia have many endemic bird species but their evolution and radiation in those habitats has been little studied. One genus with several mangrove specialist species is Gerygone (Passeriformes: Acanthizidae...

Nyá ri, Á rpá d S.; Joseph, Leo

2012-02-14

381

The automating skeletal and muscular mechanisms of the avian wing (Aves)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The avian wing possesses the ability to synchronize flexion or extension of the elbow and wrist joints automatically. Skeletal and muscular mechanisms are involved in generating this phenomenon. The “drawing-parallels” action of the radius and ulna coordinates the movements of the forearm with the carpus. Movement of the radius along the length of the forearm isnot dependent on the shape

R. J. Vazquez

1994-01-01

382

ave you ever experienced a phenom-enon called dj vu? An event from the  

E-print Network

are mysterious and unclear. No matter how complicated the processes in our brains may be, déjà vu can have of the force do not alwaysproduceequaleffects.Theirintention was to study the `thermalization' of the sys- tem. To understand why this is so unexpected, con- sider this rough analogy: if we heat a piece of ironfromoneend

Akhmediev, Nail

383

Aves Aquáticas da Lagoa da Pampulha: Seleção de hábitats e atividade diurna  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wading birds at Lagoa da Pampulha: Habitat selection and diurnal activity. The wading bird communities in lacunar systems are mainly structured based on the availability and distribution of feeding resources and appropriate conditions for their reproduction and establishment. As a result, in a given habitat, each species selects, according to the possibilities of its behavioral repertoire, the best way to

Flávio E. Pimenta; João C. P. Drummond; Ana C. Lima

384

Nucleolar organizer regions in Sittasomus griseicapillus and Lepidocolaptes angustirostris (Aves, Dendrocolaptidae): Evidence of a chromosome inversion.  

PubMed

Cytogenetic studies in birds are still scarce compared to other vertebrates. Woodcreepers (Dendrocolaptidae) are part of a highly specialized group within the Suboscines of the New World. They are forest birds exclusive to the Neotropical region and similar to woodpeckers, at a comparable evolutionary stage. This paper describes for the first time the karyotypes of the Olivaceous and the Narrow-billed Woodcreeper using conventional staining with Giemsa and silver nitrate staining of the nucleolar organizer regions (Ag-NORs). Metaphases were obtained by fibular bone marrow culture. The chromosome number of the Olivaceous Woodcreeper was 2n = 82 and of the Narrow-billed Woodcreeper, 2n = 82. Ag-NORs in the largest macrochromosome pair and evidence of a chromosome inversion are described herein for the first time for this group. PMID:23569410

de Oliveira Barbosa, Marcelo; da Silva, Rubens Rodrigues; de Sena Correia, Vanessa Carolina; Dos Santos, Luana Pereira; Garnero, Analía Del Valle; Gunski, Ricardo José

2013-03-01

385

Flightlessness and phylogeny amongst endemic rails (Aves:Rallidae) of the New Zealand region.  

PubMed Central

The phylogenetic relationships of a number of flightless and volant rails have been investigated using mtDNA sequence data. The third domain of the small ribosomal subunit (12S) has been sequenced for 22 taxa, and part of the 5' end of the cytochrome-b gene has been sequenced for 12 taxa. Additional sequences were obtained from outgroup taxa, two species of jacana, sarus crane, spur-winged plover and kagu. Extinct rails were investigated using DNA extracted from subfossil bones, and in cases where fresh material could not be obtained from other extant taxa, feathers and museum skins were used as sources of DNA. Phylogenetic trees produced from these data have topologies that are, in general, consistent with data from DNA-DNA hybridization studies and recent interpretations based on morphology. Gallinula chloropus moorhen) groups basally with Fulica (coots), Amaurornis (= Megacrex) ineptus falls within the Gallirallus/Rallus group, and Gallinula (= Porphyrula) martinica is basal to Porphyrio (swamphens) and should probably be placed in that genus. Subspecies of Porphyrio porphyrio are paraphyletic with respect to Porphyrio mantelli (takahe). The Northern Hemisphere Rallus aquaticus is basal to the south-western Pacific Rallus (or Gallirallus) group. The flightless Rallus philippensis dieffenbachii is close to Rallus modestus and distinct from the volant Rallus philippensis, and is evidently a separate species. Porzana (crakes) appears to be more closely associated with Porphyrio than Rallus. Deep relationships among the rails remain poorly resolved. Rhynochetus jubatus (kagu) is closer to the cranes than the rails in this analysis. Genetic distances between flightless rails and their volant counterparts varied considerably with observed 12S sequence distances, ranging from 0.3% (Porphyrio porphyrio melanotus and P. mantelli mantelli) to 7.6% (Rallus modestus and Rallus philippensis). This may be taken as an indication of the rapidity with which flightlessness can evolve, and of the persistence of flightless taxa. Genetic data supported the notion that flightless taxa were independently derived, sometimes from similar colonizing ancestors. The morphology of flightless rails is apparently frequently dominated by evolutionary parallelism although similarity of external appearance is not an indication of the extent of genetic divergence. In some cases taxa that are genetically close are morphologically distinct from one another (e.g. Rallus (philippensis) dieffenbachii and R. modestus), whilst some morphologically similar taxa are evidently independently derived (e.g. Porphyio mantelli hochstetteri and P.m. mantelli). PMID:9163823

Trewick, S A

1997-01-01

386

A remarkable new species of small falcon from the Quaternary of Cuba (Aves: Falconidae: Falco)  

Microsoft Academic Search

An enigmatic small falcon. Falco kurochkini, new species, is de- scribed from postcranial bones from several Quaternary sites in western and central Cuba. It was approximately intermediate in size between F. sparverius and F. columbarius but had proportionately longer and more slender leg ele- ments than any living species of Falco. It is hypothesized that F. kurochkini may have been

William Suárez; Storrs L. Olson

2001-01-01

387

DNA hybridization evidence for the principal lineages of hummingbirds (Aves:Trochilidae).  

PubMed

The spectacular evolutionary radiation of hummingbirds (Trochilidae) has served as a model system for many biological studies. To begin to provide a historical context for these investigations, we generated a complete matrix of DNA hybridization distances among 26 hummingbirds and an outgroup swift (Chaetura pelagica) to determine the principal hummingbird lineages. FITCH topologies estimated from symmetrized delta TmH-C values and subjected to various validation methods (bootstrapping, weighted jackknifing, branch length significance) indicated a fundamental split between hermit (Eutoxeres aquila, Threnetes ruckeri; Phaethornithinae) and nonhermit (Trochilinae) hummingbirds, and provided strong support for six principal nonhermit clades with the following branching order: (1) a predominantly lowland group comprising caribs (Eulampis holosericeus) and relatives (Androdon aequatorialis and Heliothryx barroti) with violet-ears (Colibri coruscans) and relatives (Doryfera ludovicae); (2) an Andean-associated clade of highly polytypic taxa (Eriocnemis, Heliodoxa, and Coeligena); (3) a second endemic Andean clade (Oreotrochilus chimborazo, Aglaiocercus coelestis, and Lesbia victoriae) paired with thorntails (Popelairia conversii); (4) emeralds and relatives (Chlorostilbon mellisugus, Amazilia tzacatl, Thalurania colombica, Orthorhyncus cristatus and Campylopterus villaviscensio); (5) mountain-gems (Lampornis clemenciae and Eugenes fulgens); and (6) tiny bee-like forms (Archilochus colubris, Myrtis fanny, Acestrura mulsant, and Philodice mitchellii). Corresponding analyses on a matrix of unsymmetrized delta values gave similar support for these relationships except that the branching order of the two Andean clades (2, 3 above) was unresolved. In general, subsidiary relationships were consistent and well supported by both matrices, sometimes revealing surprising associations between forms that differ dramatically in plumage and bill morphology. Our results also reveal some basic aspects of hummingbird ecologic and morphologic evolution. For example, most of the diverse endemic Andean assemblage apparently comprises two genetically divergent clades, whereas the majority of North American hummingbirds belong a single third clade. Genetic distances separating some morphologically distinct genera (Oreotrochilus, Aglaiocercus, Lesbia; Myrtis, Acestrura, Philodice) were no greater than among congeneric (Coeligena) species, indicating that, in hummingbirds, morphological divergence does not necessarily reflect level of genetic divergence. PMID:9066799

Bleiweiss, R; Kirsch, J A; Matheus, J C

1997-03-01

388

Differences between measured and linearly interpolated synoptic variables over a 12-h period during AVE 4  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Results of analyses revealed that nonlinear changes or differences formed centers or systems, that were mesosynoptic in nature. These systems correlated well in space with upper level short waves, frontal zones, and radar observed convection, and were very systematic in time and space. Many of the centers of differences were well established in the vertical, extending up to the tropopause. Statistical analysis showed that on the average nonlinear changes were larger in convective areas than nonconvective regions. Errors often exceeding 100 percent were made by assuming variables to change linearly through a 12-h period in areas of thunderstorms, indicating that these nonlinear changes are important in the development of severe weather. Linear changes, however, accounted for more and more of an observed change as the time interval (within the 12-h interpolation period) increased, implying that the accuracy of linear interpolation increased over larger time intervals.

Dupuis, L. R.; Scoggins, J. R.

1979-01-01

389

Estructura de la vegetación y selección de hábitats reproductivos en aves del pastizal pampeano  

Microsoft Academic Search

Vegetation structure and selection of reproductive habitats by Pampas grassland birds: The increasing transformation of natural grasslands into agricultural fields affects grassland birds with particular severity, as their breeding success depends strictly on these habitats. This study focuses on bird species that nest in the Ernesto Tornquist Provincial Park in the southwest of Buenos Aires province (Argentina). We conducted intensive

NATALIA COZZANI; SERGIO M ZALBA

390

Phylogenetic Relationships Within the Alcidae (Charadriiformes: Aves) Inferred from Total Molecular Evidence  

Microsoft Academic Search

and puffins. The two murres (genus Uris) were sister taxa, and the black guillemot (Cepphus grylle) was basal to the other guillemots. The Asian subspecies of the marbled murrelet (Bruchyrumphus marmorutus per&x) was the most divergent brachyramphine mm-relet, and two distinct lineages occurred within the synthliboramphine mm-relets. Cassin's auklet (Ptychorumphus uleuticus) and the rhinoceros auklet were basal to the other

V. L. Friesen; A. J. Baker; J. F. Piatt

391

Shared and unshared parental investment in the precocial goldeneye (Aves: Anatidae)  

PubMed

Lazarus & Inglis (Anim. Behav., 1986, 34, 1791-1804) introduced a model of the influence of brood size on the optimal level of parental investment and parent-offspring conflict and drew a distinction between shared and unshared types of parental investment. With respect to this division, we measured the parental costs in the goldeneye, Bucephala clangula, a precocial species with uniparental female care, in terms of time spent in vigilance and intraspecific aggression. We also compared levels of anti-predator vigilance and intraspecific aggression between females with and without broods. Females with broods spent considerably more time on both vigilance and intraspecific aggression, but anti-predator vigilance was independent of brood size. Furthermore, female behaviour was unaffected by brood reduction. Both these observations support the 'fixed-loss' model of unshared care, where the level of parental investment is predicted to be independent of brood size, since the predator is likely to take only a single offspring. In contrast, intraspecific aggression, mainly associated with defence of the brood's feeding area, increased with brood size. This supports the 'shared care' model where the level of parental investment increases with brood size, a type of care usually associated with altricial species. Copyright 1998 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. PMID:9480698

Ruusila; PÖYSÄ

1998-02-01

392

Shared and unshared parental investment in the precocial goldeneye (Aves: Anatidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lazarus & Inglis (Anim. Behav., 1986,34,1791–1804) introduced a model of the influence of brood size on the optimal level of parental investment and parent–offspring conflict and drew a distinction between shared and unshared types of parental investment. With respect to this division, we measured the parental costs in the goldeneye,Bucephala clangula, a precocial species with uniparental female care, in terms

VESA RUUSILA; HANNU PÖYSÄ

1998-01-01

393

Niche divergence promotes rapid diversification of East African sky island white-eyes (Aves: Zosteropidae).  

PubMed

The Eastern Afromontane biodiversity hotspot composed of highly fragmented forested highlands (sky islands) harbours exceptional diversity and endemicity, particularly within birds. To explain their elevated diversity within this region, models founded on niche conservatism have been offered, although detailed phylogeographic studies are limited to a few avian lineages. Here, we focus on the recent songbird genus Zosterops, represented by montane and lowland members, to test the roles of niche conservatism versus niche divergence in the diversification and colonization of East Africa's sky islands. The species-rich white-eyes are a typically homogeneous family with an exceptional colonizing ability, but in contrast to their diversity on oceanic islands, continental diversity is considered depauperate and has been largely neglected. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of ~140 taxa reveals extensive polyphyly among different montane populations of Z. poliogastrus. These larger endemic birds are shown to be more closely related to taxa with divergent habitat types, altitudinal distributions and dispersal abilities than they are to populations of restricted endemics that occur in neighbouring montane forest fragments. This repeated transition between lowland and highland habitats over time demonstrate that diversification of the focal group is explained by niche divergence. Our results also highlight an underestimation of diversity compared to morphological studies that has implications for their taxonomy and conservation. Molecular dating suggests that the spatially extensive African radiation arose exceptionally rapidly (1-2.5 Ma) during the fluctuating Plio-Pleistocene climate, which may have provided the primary driver for lineage diversification. PMID:24954273

Cox, Siobhan C; Prys-Jones, Robert P; Habel, Jan C; Amakobe, Bernard A; Day, Julia J

2014-08-01

394

Mitochondrial phylogeography, subspecific taxonomy, and conservation genetics of sandhill cranes ( Grus canadensis ; Aves: Gruidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Six subspecies of sandhill cranes (Gruscanadensis) have been denoted based onperceived morphological and\\/or breedinglocality differences among them. Threesubspecies are migratory, breeding from thehigh arctic in North America and Siberia(lesser sandhill, G. c. canadensis),south through central Canada (Canadiansandhill, G. c. rowani) and into thenorthern United States (greater sandhill, G. c. tabida). A review of sandhill cranetaxonomy indicates that the size variation,

Judith M. Phymer; Matthew G. Fain; Jane E. Austin; Douglas H. Johnson; Carey Krajewski

2001-01-01

395

Genyornis eggshell (Dromornithidae; Aves) from the Late Pleistocene of South Australia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fossil eggshell fragments from a sand dune near Port Augusta are attributed to the extinct dromornithid, Genyornis newtoni Stirling & Zietz. Shell curvature measurements show that the eggs were larger than those of the Emu, Dromaius novaehollandiae. Radiocarbon dates indicate an age in excess of 40,680 BP. Holes pierced through some fragments are attributed to the action of predators.

D. L. G. Williams

1981-01-01

396

Virtual reconstructions of the endocranial cavity of Rhea americana (Aves, Palaeognathae): postnatal anatomical changes.  

PubMed

We examined the external anatomy of the endocast of the Greater Rhea (Rhea americana, Palaeognathae), during 3 main stages of its postnatal life, and compared it with information available on other palaeognathous birds. Series of scans with spiral computed tomographies were obtained from 3 skulls of different ages (chick, juvenile and adult) of R. americana; digital 3-dimensional reconstruction was performed and brain volumes were calculated from the models obtained. Qualitative assessment of the brain anatomy of R. americana indicates a conical and ventrally located bulbus olfactorius, laterally expanded hemispherium telencephali, well-developed eminentia sagittalis, and conspicuous cerebellum and tectum mesencephali. Anatomy of the chick brain was markedly different: less lateral expansion of the hemispherium telencephali, and lesser development of the eminentia sagittalis and auricula cerebelli. Little change between chicks and adults was observed in some brain regions such as the tectum mesencephali, while the eminentia sagittalis showed great increase in size. The large size of the eminentia sagittalis coupled with its increasing development during ontogeny could reflect its importance for visual processing functions and the way these improve during growth. Finally, the brain of R. americana is similar to that of Struthio and Dromaius, but differs from that of the Tinamidae and of Apteryx, allowing recognition of 3 distinct brain morphologies among the Palaeognathae. PMID:21042004

Picasso, Mariana B J; Tambussi, Claudia P; Degrange, Federico J

2010-01-01

397

Evolution of seasonal ecological niches in the Passerina buntings (Aves: Cardinalidae).  

PubMed Central

The evolution of migration has long been considered complex and recent work has demonstrated additional complexity: some species follow the same ecological conditions throughout the year, whereas others 'switch niches' between breeding and wintering ranges. Hypotheses regarding the evolution of migration would generally predict niche-following as primitive, and niche-switching as derived. However, no test has, to our knowledge, yet determined the directionality of evolution of these states within a lineage. We present an analysis of phylogenetic dimensions of seasonal niches in the Passerina buntings that indicates greater evolutionary change in the niches of breeding populations than among those of wintering populations. These results are consistent with hypotheses of (i) niche conservatism (in winter, at least) across a recently speciated lineage; and (ii) the derived state of the breeding (rather than winter) ecological niches of each species. PMID:15306365

Martinez-Meyer, Enrique; Peterson, A. Townsend; Navarro-Siguenza, Adolfo G.

2004-01-01

398

Differences between measured and linearly interpolated synoptic variables over a 12-h period during AVE IV  

E-print Network

to the production, propagation, and dissipation of atmospheric phenomena associated with squall lines. Such processes could be more accurately defined through the use of 6-h measurements. Deficiencies in observed data in thunderstorm areas also were pointed out... zonal throughout the experiment. Two short waves moved through the zonal flow which generated severe weather in the form of two squall lines. At 1200 GMT on April 25 moderately strong thunderstorms formed in the Ohio Valley in conjunction...

Dupuis, Leonard Raymond

2012-06-07

399

Does behavior reflect phylogeny in swiftlets (Aves: Apodidae)? A test using cytochrome b mitochondrial DNA sequences.  

PubMed Central

Swiftlets are small insectivorous birds, many of which nest in caves and are known to echolocate. Due to a lack of distinguishing morphological characters, the taxonomy of swiftlets is primarily based on the presence or absence of echolocating ability, together with nest characters. To test the reliability of these behavioral characters, we constructed an independent phylogeny using cytochrome b mitochondrial DNA sequences from swiftlets and their relatives. This phylogeny is broadly consistent with the higher classification of swifts but does not support the monophyly of swiftlets. Echolocating swiftlets (Aerodramus) and the nonecholocating "giant swiftlet" (Hydrochous gigas) group together, but the remaining nonecholocating swiftlets belonging to Collocalia are not sister taxa to these swiftlets. While echolocation may be a synapomorphy of Aerodramus (perhaps secondarily lost in Hydrochous), no character of Aerodramus nests showed a statistically significant fit to the molecular phylogeny, indicating that nest characters are not phylogenetically reliable in this group. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8692950

Lee, P L; Clayton, D H; Griffiths, R; Page, R D

1996-01-01

400

Two new species of flightless rails (Aves: Rallidae) from the Middle Pleistocene ''crane fauna\\  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two new species of flightless rails are described from a Pleis- tocene fauna in Bermuda that also includes an extinct crane (Grus latipes) and an extinct duck (Anas pachyscelus). The medium-sized Rallus ibycus, new species, was possibly derived from North American populations of Virginia Rail (R. limicola), but had a longer bill, much more robust legs, and reduced wings and

Storrs L. Olson; David B. Wingate

2000-01-01

401

WEISONG SHI Department of Computer Science 5057 Woodward Ave, Suite 14102  

E-print Network

on the Internet (2012-2014) #12;· College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Teaching Award 2011 · Wayne State University Career Development Chair Award 2009 · NSF CAREER Award 2007 · College of Liberal Arts and Sciences GRANTS AND CONTRACTS External Grants and Contracts Total: $5.7M; Shi's share: $1.8M 1. NSF IPA Assignment

Shi, Weisong

402

Isolation-driven divergence: speciation in a widespread North American songbird (Aves: Certhiidae).  

PubMed

Lineage, or true 'species', trees may differ from gene trees because of stochastic processes in molecular evolution leading to gene-tree heterogeneity. Problems with inferring species trees because of excessive incomplete lineage sorting may be exacerbated in lineages with rapid diversification or recent divergences necessitating the use of multiple loci and individuals. Many recent multilocus studies that investigate divergence times identify lineage splitting to be more recent than single-locus studies, forcing the revision of biogeographic scenarios driving divergence. Here, we use 21 nuclear loci from regional populations to re-evaluate hypotheses identified in an mtDNA phylogeographic study of the Brown Creeper (Certhia americana), as well as identify processes driving divergence. Nuclear phylogeographic analyses identified hierarchical genetic structure, supporting a basal split at approximately 32°N latitude, splitting northern and southern populations, with mixed patterns of genealogical concordance and discordance between data sets within the major lineages. Coalescent-based analyses identify isolation, with little to no gene flow, as the primary driver of divergence between lineages. Recent isolation appears to have caused genetic bottlenecks in populations in the Sierra Madre Oriental and coastal mountain ranges of California, which may be targets for conservation concerns. PMID:21933295

Manthey, Joseph D; Klicka, John; Spellman, Garth M

2011-10-01

403

Helminth parasites of the European starling (Sturnus vulgaris) (Aves, Sturnidae), an invasive bird in Argentina.  

PubMed

The aim of this work is to contribute to the knowledge of gastrointestinal parasites of the European starling Sturnus vulgaris, an invasive bird from Argentina. Seventy-six birds were collected during the spring of 2007 and were examined for helminths. Six parasite species were found: one trematoda of the Echinostoma revolutum "group," four nematodes (Synhimantus nasuta, Microtetrameres sp., Pterothominx exilis, and Ornithocapillaria ovopunctata), and one acanthocephalan (Plagiorhynchus cylindraceus). All species found have been recorded in Eurasia and/or North America previously, although present reports enlarge their geographical distribution. As expected in an invasive host, the parasite community shows much lower species richness (n?=?6) than those observed in their native area (79 and 35 in the Eurasia and North America, respectively). PMID:24804922

Valente, Romina; Ibañez, Lucía Mariel; Lorenti, Eliana; Fiorini, Vanina Dafne; Montalti, Diego; Diaz, Julia Inés

2014-07-01

404

Funktionelle Eigenschaften der Hörbahn im Feld L des Neostriatum caudale des Staren ( Sturnus vulgaris L., Aves)  

Microsoft Academic Search

1.Unit responses to and potentials evoked by acoustic stimuli were recorded from the Neostriatum of curarized birds. Computer-aided analysis methods (averaging, peristimulus-time histogram, interval histogram) are specified.2.Characteristic values and characteristic curves for unit responses are examined and compared: characteristic intensity curves, tuning curves, characteristic frequencies, and the width of response areas or their separate segments.3.The shortest latency of all single

Hans-Joachim Leppelsack

1974-01-01

405

Postnatal growth of the great cormorant Phalacrocorax carbo sinensis (Aves: Phalacrocoracidae) in northeastern Mediterranean wetlands  

Microsoft Academic Search

Postnatal growth of nestling great cormorants Phalacrocorax carbo sinensis was studied at two northeastern Mediterranean wetlands, the Lakes Kerkini and Mikri Prespa, northern Greece. A method for constructing growth curves from only two visits to bird colonies was used. Logistic growth parameters re-calculated from the logarithmic equation fitted well to the actual growth data of initial-final measurements of body mass,

V. Liordos; V. Goutner

2012-01-01

406

The spacingTime Continuum Inaugural Whyte Ave Edition April 8, 2013 | By Kurt Borth  

E-print Network

with a moustachioed brass band circa 1907 lounging outside of the building where you drink your coffee and check your set shows the evolution of the South Edmonton Post Office building and its neighbours, which now of the Raymond Hotel and the South Edmonton Post Office in background. Image from the City of Edmonton Archives

Machel, Hans

407

Microscopic and ultrastructural anatomy of the trachea and bronchi of Melopsittacus undulatus (Aves, Psittaciformes)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The normal microscopic pattern and ultrastructure of the lower trachea and the primary and secondary bronchi of the budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus) are described. The trachea is lined by mucociliary pseudostratified columnar epithelium with simple acinar mucous glands; epithelium in primary and secondary bronchi becomes progressively lower and less pseudostratified, and mucous cells less aggregated. The wall structure shows a parallel

Jerome H. Smith; Judy L. Meier; Cheryl Lampke; Pamela J. G. Neill; Edith Box

1987-01-01

408

Comparative phyloclimatic analysis and evolution of ecological niches in the scimitar babblers (Aves: Timaliidae: Pomatorhinus).  

PubMed

We present the first extensive and integrative analysis of niche evolution based on climatic variables and a dated molecular phylogeny of a heterogeneous avian group of Southeast Asian scimitar babblers of the genus Pomatorhinus. The four main clades of scimitar babblers have species that co-occur in similar areas across southern Asia but some have diverged at different timeframes, with the most recently evolved clade harboring the highest number of species. Ecological niche models and analysis of contributing variables within a phylogenetic framework indicate instances of convergent evolution of members of different clades onto similar ecological parameter space, as well as divergent evolution of members from within clades. Pomatorhinus species from different clades occupying Himalayan foothills show convergence towards similar climatic tolerances, whereas within a clade, allopatric sister-species occurring in the Himalayas have diverged to occupy different climatic parameter spaces. Comparisons of climatic tolerances of Himalayan foothills taxa with species distributed further south in Assam/Burma and Burma/Thailand indicate convergence towards similar parameter spaces in several climatic variables. Niche overlap was observed to be lower among species of the youngest clade (ruficollis) and higher among species of older clades (ferruginosus). Analysis of accumulation of ecological disparity through time indicates rapid divergence within recent time frames. As a result, Himalayan taxa originating at different temporal scales within the four main scimitar babbler clades have differentiated ecologically only in recently diverged taxa. Our study suggests that the repeated orogenic and climatic fluctuations of the Pliocene and Pleistocene within mainland Southeast Asia served as an important ecological speciation driver within scimitar babblers, by providing opportunities for rapid geographic expansion and filling of novel environmental niches. PMID:23405183

Nyári, Árpád S; Reddy, Sushma

2013-01-01

409

Valores de Composição Química e Energética de Alguns Alimentos para Aves1  

Microsoft Academic Search

The experiment was carried out to determine the chemical and the energetic values of eight feedstuffs (corn grain, corn pre-cooked I and II, canola meal, spray-dried plasma, poultry by-product meal, glucose and corn starch) for birds. To determine the apparent metabolizable energy (AME) and nitrogen corrected apparent (AMEn) values, the traditional method of total excreta collection was used, with 400

Priscila DAgostini; Paulo Cezar Gomes; Luiz Fernando; Teixeira Albino; Horacio Santiago Rostagno; Luciano Moraes Sá

410

Close karyological kinship between the reptilian suborder serpentes and the class aves  

Microsoft Academic Search

In contrast to the situation found in two classes of warm-blooded vertebrates, mammals and birds, the class Reptilia is not uniform with regard to total genetic content; rather, it contains two distinct categories. The close cytological kinship between snakes and birds was revealed. Both are almost identical in total genetic content, which is about 50 per cent that of placental

Willy Beçak; Maria Luiza Beçak; H. R. S. Nazareth; Susumu Ohno

1964-01-01

411

A karyological study of Accipitridae (Aves: Falconiformes), with karyotypic descriptions of 16 species new to cytology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Karyotypic descriptions are given of 16 species of Accipitridae new to cytology, viz. Accipiter novaehollandiae, Aegypius monachus, Aquila rapax, Circaetus gallicus, Circus aeruginosus, C. cyaneus, C. pygargus, Geranoaetus melanoleucos, Gyps bengalensis, G. rueppellii, Haliaeetus leucogaster, H. leucorhyphus, Lophoaetus occipitalis, Necrosyrtes monachus, Stephanoaetus and Torgos tracheliotus. For reasons of comparison the karyotypes are included of 5 species that have been previously

L. E. M. Boer; R. P. Sinoo

1984-01-01

412

Taxonomic revision and phylogenetic analysis of the flightless Mancallinae (Aves, Pan-Alcidae)  

PubMed Central

Abstract Although flightless alcids from the Miocene and Pliocene of the eastern Pacific Ocean have been known for over 100 years, there is no detailed evaluation of diversity and systematic placement of these taxa. This is the first combined analysis of morphological and molecular data to include all extant alcids, the recently extinct Great Auk Pinguinus impennis, the mancalline auks, and a large outgroup sampling of 29 additional non-alcid charadriiforms. Based on the systematic placement of Mancallinae outside of crown clade Alcidae, the clade name Pan-Alcidae is proposed to include all known alcids. An extensive review of the Mancallinae fossil record resulted in taxonomic revision of the clade, and identification of three new species. In addition to positing the first hypothesis of inter-relationships between Mancallinae species, phylogenetic results support placement of Mancallinae as the sister taxon to all other Alcidae, indicating that flightlessness evolved at least twice in the alcid lineage. Convergent osteological characteristics of Mancallinae, the flightless Great Auk, and Spheniscidae are summarized, and implications of Mancallinae diversity, radiation, and extinction in the context of paleoclimatic changes are discussed. PMID:21594108

Smith, Neil Adam

2011-01-01

413

Identification, Classification, and Growth of Moa Chicks (Aves: Dinornithiformes) from the Genus Euryapteryx  

PubMed Central

Background The analysis of growth in extinct organisms is difficult. The general lack of skeletal material from a range of developmental states precludes determination of growth characteristics. For New Zealand's extinct moa we have available to us a selection of rare femora at different developmental stages that have allowed a preliminary determination of the early growth of this giant flightless bird. We use a combination of femora morphometrics, ancient DNA, and isotope analysis to provide information on the identification, classification, and growth of extinct moa from the genus Euryapteryx. Results Using ancient DNA, we identify a number of moa chick bones for the species Euryapteryx curtus, Dinornis novaezealandiae, and Anomalopteryx didiformis, and the first chick bone for Pachyornis geranoides. Isotope analysis shows that ?15N levels vary between the two known size classes of Euryapteryx, with the larger size class having reduced levels of ?15N. A growth series for femora of the two size classes of Euryapteryx shows that early femora growth characteristics for both classes are almost identical. Morphometric, isotopic, and radiographic analysis of the smallest Euryapteryx bones suggests that one of these femora is from a freshly hatched moa at a very early stage of development. Conclusion Using morphometric, isotopic, and ancient DNA analyses have allowed the determination of a number of characteristics of rare moa chick femora. For Euryapteryx the analyses suggest that the smaller sized class II Euryapteryx is identical in size and growth to the extant Darwin's rhea. PMID:24923666

Huynen, Leon; Gill, Brian J.; Doyle, Anthony; Millar, Craig D.; Lambert, David M.

2014-01-01

414

Waves of genomic hitchhikers shed light on the evolution of gamebirds (Aves: Galliformes)  

PubMed Central

Background The phylogenetic tree of Galliformes (gamebirds, including megapodes, currassows, guinea fowl, New and Old World quails, chicken, pheasants, grouse, and turkeys) has been considerably remodeled over the last decades as new data and analytical methods became available. Analyzing presence/absence patterns of retroposed elements avoids the problems of homoplastic characters inherent in other methodologies. In gamebirds, chicken repeats 1 (CR1) are the most prevalent retroposed elements, but little is known about the activity of their various subtypes over time. Ascertaining the fixation patterns of CR1 elements would help unravel the phylogeny of gamebirds and other poorly resolved avian clades. Results We analyzed 1,978 nested CR1 elements and developed a multidimensional approach taking advantage of their transposition in transposition character (TinT) to characterize the fixation patterns of all 22 known chicken CR1 subtypes. The presence/absence patterns of those elements that were active at different periods of gamebird evolution provided evidence for a clade (Cracidae + (Numididae + (Odontophoridae + Phasianidae))) not including Megapodiidae; and for Rollulus as the sister taxon of the other analyzed Phasianidae. Genomic trace sequences of the turkey genome further demonstrated that the endangered African Congo Peafowl (Afropavo congensis) is the sister taxon of the Asian Peafowl (Pavo), rejecting other predominantly morphology-based groupings, and that phasianids are monophyletic, including the sister taxa Tetraoninae and Meleagridinae. Conclusion The TinT information concerning relative fixation times of CR1 subtypes enabled us to efficiently investigate gamebird phylogeny and to reconstruct an unambiguous tree topology. This method should provide a useful tool for investigations in other taxonomic groups as well. PMID:17925025

Kriegs, Jan Ole; Matzke, Andreas; Churakov, Gennady; Kuritzin, Andrej; Mayr, Gerald; Brosius, Jurgen; Schmitz, Jurgen

2007-01-01

415

Molecular phylogeny of the genus Buteo (Aves: Accipitridae) based on mitochondrial marker sequences  

Microsoft Academic Search

DNA sequences of the mitochondrial nd6 gene and the non-repetitive part of the pseudo-control region (?CR) were isolated from 101 individuals to analyze the phylogenetic relationships among all buzzards of the genus Buteo and other buteonine genera. Comparisons of the two marker sequences indicate that the ?CR evolved two times faster than the nd6 gene. The ?CR proved to be

Martin J. Riesing; Luise Kruckenhauser; Anita Gamauf; Elisabeth Haring

2003-01-01

416

Taxonomic status and biology of the Cuban blackhawk, Buteogallus anthracinus gundlachii (AVES: Accipitridae)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We reevaluate the taxonomic status of the Cuban population of the Common Black-Hawk (Buteogallus anthracinus) based on our examination of additional specimens, nests, eggs, and voice data. Buteogallus a. gundlachii is smaller than mainland populations of anthracinus and differs from mainland birds in plumage coloration and pattern. The common (alarm) call of gundlachii is a series of three or four notes, differing from that of mainland anthracinus, whose call consists of 9-24 notes. In the Isla de Pinos, Cuba, we observed gundlachii eating two species of land crabs (71.4%), centipedes (7.1%), lizards (10.7%), mammals (7.1%), and a bird (3.6%). We consider Buteogallus gundlachii Cabanis 1854 (1855), the Cuban Black-Hawk, to be a full species, endemic to Cuba, Isla de Pinos, and many of the cays of the Cuban Archipelago. ?? 2005 The Raptor Research Foundation, Inc.

Wiley, J. W.; Garrido, O. H.

2005-01-01

417

Evidence for heterochrony in the evolution of the goshawk Accipiter gentilis (Accipitridae, Aves)  

Microsoft Academic Search

An analysis of the growth patterns of two close relatives of the genus Accipiter (the European sparrowhawk A. nisus and the European goshawk A. gentilis) was conducted, in order to elucidate a possible mechanism for the evolution of the ontogeny of the goshawk from that of its presumed smaller ancestor. After allowing for isometric scaling, the ontogeny of the goshawk

Jorge Cubo; Santiago Mañosa

1999-01-01

418

Status, ecology, and conservation of the Himalayan griffon Gyps himalayensis (Aves, Accipitridae) in the Tibetan plateau.  

PubMed

The dramatic population crashes of 3 species of Gyps vulture have raised concerns about the status of their lesser-known congeners. Among these is the Himalayan griffon, G. himalayensis, an iconic vulture of the Tibetan plateau. The continued existence of this scavenger has not only ecological but also cultural implications because of their unique role in the centuries-old sky burial tradition that is followed by nearly 5 million Tibetan people. A lack of baseline information of the Himalayan griffon limits our ability to take conservation measures. The presented data, which were collected during 1996 and 2004 to 2007, indicate that this species is still widespread throughout the plateau and has not experienced a major population decline, likely as a result of protection by Tibetan Buddhism and limited disturbances from human activities largely due to the remoteness of the plateau. Both site and road counts showed that open meadow habitats had the highest griffon abundance, followed by alpine shrub and forest habitats. Estimates based on road transect counts showed that 229,339 Himalayan griffons (+/- 40,447) occupy the 2.5 million km2 Tibetan plateau. In contrast, the maximum carrying capacity of the plateau, on the basis of the total biomass of potential food resources, is 507,996 griffons, with meadow habitats accounting for about 76% of the total population. Griffons depend largely on livestock carcasses for food and forage in groups averaging 5.5 (range 1-100) individuals. Domestic yaks provide about 64% of the griffons' diet, while wild ungulates and human corpses provide 1% and 2%, respectively. Compared with its lowland congeners, this, the only high-elevation Gyps species, had both low population density and small group size, a likely response to the harsh environmental conditions. Although griffon abundance appears relatively stable in their fairly pristine environment, precautionary measures, including investigation of threats, monitoring of population dynamics, and establishment of modern conservation consciousness among Tibetan Buddhists, should be carried out to ensure that this abundance continues. PMID:19580034

Lu, Xin; Ke, Dianhua; Zeng, Xianhai; Gong, Guohong; Ci, Ren

2009-05-01

419

The diet of nestlings of three Ardeidae species (Aves, Ciconiiformes) in the Axios Delta, Greece  

Microsoft Academic Search

The diets of the little egret (Egretta garzetta), the night heron (Nycticorax nycticorax) and the squacco heron (Ardeola ralloides) were studied by analyzing nestling regurgitations collected during five breeding seasons (1988-1990 and 1994-1995) at a heronry in the Axios Delta (Northern Greece). In total, 267 regurgitations from little egrets, 247 from night herons and 19 from squacco herons (only in

Savas Kazantzidis; Vassilis Goutner

420

The species of Saemundssonia (Insecta: Phthiraptera: Philopteridae) from skuas (Aves: Stercorariidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three species of Saemundssonia Timmermann, 1936 parasitic on skuas are recognised as valid: Saemundssonia (Saemundssonia) cephalus (Denny, 1842) on Stercorarius parasiticus; S. (S.)inexspectata Timmermann, 1951 on Stercorarius longicaudus; and S. (S.)euryrhyncha (Giebel, 1874) on Stercorarius pomarinus as well as on all species of Catharacta. The name Saemundssonia stresemanni Timmermann, 1949 is proposed as a junior synonym of S. (S.)euryrhyncha. Measurements

Ricardo L. Palma

2000-01-01

421

XIAOYUN LIU 750 Whitney Ave. Apt B5, New Haven, CT 06511  

E-print Network

in a mouse model of Huntington's disease (JPR 2007) · Analyzed the plasma proteome using LC-ion mobility) Protein expression in the striatum and cortex regions of the brain for a mouse model of Huntington's disease. J. Proteome Res., 6, 3134-3142. 8. Liu X, Valentine SJ, Plasencia MD, Trimpin S, Naylor S

Clemmer, David E.

422

Isolation and characterization of polymorphic microsatellite loci for the northern flicker (Colaptes auratus; Aves).  

PubMed

To investigate the mating system of northern flickers (Colaptes auratus), we developed primers for 14 microsatellite loci and screened them in 68 unrelated adults and their offspring. All markers were highly polymorphic with 9 to +36 alleles per locus. One marker was Z-chromosome linked; one marker exceeded the size standard range and could not be analysed further. We checked the other 12 markers for Mendelian inheritance in 36 broods for which the social parents were known. Seven markers showed evidence for the presence of null alleles, and three of those showed significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Markers were generally unlinked. PMID:21564764

Kuhn, Sylvia; Wiebe, Karen L; Kempenaers, Bart

2009-05-01

423

Mitochondrial DNA Variation in the Northern Flicker ( Colaptes auratus, Aves) 1  

Microsoft Academic Search

The northern flicker is a common woodpecker that inhabits open woodlands throughout North America. A narrow hybrid zone occurs along the range boundaries between the eastern yellow-shafted and western red-shafted subspecies. Mitochon- drial DNA (mtDNA) was isolated from 20 1 flickers from 27 locales, primarily along two transects that cross the hybrid zone, one across the northern United States and

William S. Moore; John H. Graham; Jef T. Price

424

Correcting the "correct" name for the Asian Brown Flycatcher (Aves: Passeriformes, Muscicapidae, Muscicapa).  

PubMed

Mlíkovský (2012) claimed that Muscicapa latirostris Raffles, 1822 was the correct name for the Asian Brown Flycatcher, and rejected its senior synonym, Muscicapa dauurica Pallas, 1811. Muscicapa dauurica is in equal or greater use today for this flycatcher, to which the references to it in Mlíkovský (2012) testify even though they are far from comprehensive. Other major references using dauurica Pallas are Sibley & Monroe (1990), Inskipp et al. (1996), Kennedy et al. (2000), Dickinson (2003), Rasmussen & Anderton (2005), Clement (2006), Wells (2007) and Mann (2008). PMID:25283921

Dickinson, Edward C; Schodde, Richard; Kullander, Sven; Crochet, Pierre André; Elliott, Andy; Kirwan, Guy M

2014-01-01

425

Spring migratory birds (Aves) extend the northern occurrence of blacklegged tick (Acari:Ixodidae).  

PubMed

Birds that had migrated northward across Lake Superior were captured upon reaching landfall at Thunder Cape (48 degrees 18' N, 88 degrees 56' W) at the southwestern tip of the Sibley Peninsula, northwestern Ontario, from 9 May to 9 June 1995. Twenty-one of 530 birds examined (6 of 55 species) had a total of 34 ticks; 1 blue jay, Cyanocitta cristata, had a northern fowl mite, Ornithonyssus sylviarum (Canestrini & Fanzago). Four blacklegged tick, Ixodes scapularis Say, larvae were found on an American robin, Turdus migratorius, and 2 on a chipping sparrow, Spizella passerina. This tick was not found on small mammals at Thunder Cape. Twenty-six larvae and a nymph of the rabbit tick, Haemaphysalis leporispalustris (Packard) were found on 1 American robin, 2 Swainson's thrushes, Catharus ustulatus, 1 white-throated sparrow, Zonotrichia albicollis, 1 common yellowthroat, Geothlypis trichas, 1 blue jay, and 12 chipping sparrows. A nymph of H. chordeilis (Packard) occurred on 1 chipping sparrow. Results demonstrate that northward migrating birds transport larvae of I. scapularis to areas of Ontario where the tick does not appear to have become established in small mammal populations. Spring migrants may be more involved in the dispersal of I. scapularis larvae than previously thought. Cooler temperatures and shorter seasons experienced in the more northerly, continental parts of the established distribution of this tick may extend the life cycle, resulting in a predominance of larvae rather than nymphs being acquired by northward-bound birds in early spring. Consequently, the role of spring migrating birds in the northward spread of I. scapularis and of borreliosis should be reevaluated. PMID:8699451

Klich, M; Lankester, M W; Wu, K W

1996-07-01

426

Intraspecific rearrangement of duplicated mitochondrial control regions in the Luzon Tarictic Hornbill Penelopides manillae (Aves: Bucerotidae).  

PubMed

Philippine hornbills of the genera Aceros and Penelopides (Bucerotidae) are known to possess a large tandemly duplicated fragment in their mitochondrial genome, whose paralogous parts largely evolve in concert. In the present study, we surveyed the two distinguishable duplicated control regions in several individuals of the Luzon Tarictic Hornbill Penelopides manillae, compare their characteristics within and across individuals, and report on an intraspecific mitochondrial gene rearrangement found in one single specimen, i.e., an interchange between the two control regions. To our knowledge, this is the first observation of two distinct mitochondrial genome rearrangements within a bird species. We briefly discuss a possible evolutionary mechanism responsible for this pattern, and highlight potential implications for the application of control region sequences as a marker in population genetics and phylogeography. PMID:24141642

Sammler, Svenja; Ketmaier, Valerio; Havenstein, Katja; Tiedemann, Ralph

2013-12-01

427

From Hwy 6, exit University Dr. and proceed west to Texas Ave.  

E-print Network

of your appointment at the Psychology Clinic and that a space should be reserved for you. If they refuse is truly full, you will be directed to the Central Campus Garage or other parking spaces on campus / click: University Center Parking Garage Type / click: Psychology Building (TAMU Building 0463; 515 Coke

Bermúdez, José Luis

428

Perceived consequences and concerns in the diffusion of Internet2 at Texas A&M University  

E-print Network

PERCEIVED CONSEQUENCES AND CONCERNS IN THE DIFFUSION OF INTERNET2? AT TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY A Dissertation by NOEMI VERONICA MENDOZA DIAZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... NOEMI VERONICA MENDOZA DIAZ ALL RIGHTS RESERVED PERCEIVED CONSEQUENCES AND CONCERNS IN THE DIFFUSION OF INTERNET2? AT TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY A Dissertation by NOEMI VERONICA MENDOZA DIAZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate...

Mendoza Diaz, Noemi Veronica

2009-05-15

429

The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR A search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of germanium-76  

E-print Network

Rielage, Larry Rodriguez, Michael Ronquest, Harry Salazar, David Steele North Carolina State University, Jonathan Diaz, Peter J. Doe, Greg Harper, Robert Johnson, Andreas Knecht, Michael Marino, Mike Miller

430

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8  

E-print Network

Hospital Gold Ave. Gold Ave. Gold Ave. N KNME-TV CNG Station Carrie Tingley Hospital University)................................................................................................................................. F-4 African American Studies (56

New Mexico, University of

431

Hip-Hop Culture as a Tool for Human Rights and Social Change Specialization: Building Social Capital, Safer Cities, Education and Media Reform Martha Diaz is a mother, community organizer, educator, media producer, archivist, social entrepreneur, and the founder and president of the Hip-Hop Association (H  

Microsoft Academic Search

2 A). She is an award- winning leader who has been dedicated to elevating and innovating local communities through the power of Hip-Hop culture for over 15 years. Her impact can be traced to her early days as a young apprentice for the late Ted Demme, producer and director of the influential television show Yo! MTV Raps. Through her own

MARTHA DIAZ

432

Spanish Translation of the Children's Hope Scale Using Quantitative Methods for Verifying Semantic Equivalence  

E-print Network

and Harvest of Hope Leadership Academy, Topeka public schools district, National Latino Psychological Association, Washburn University- Spanish Department, Mickey Waxman, Luz marina Torres, German Torres Forero, Ana Vargas, Arnoldo Alegria, and especial thanks...-speaking children between the ages of 8 and 17 from different school districts across Kansas. Human Subjects approval was obtained from the Institutional review Board at the University of Kansas prior to data collection. The total of participants in the study...

Frehe-Torres, Victoria Elena

2010-02-23

433

Connect to the Twin Ports Community Chinese Dragon 723-4036  

E-print Network

S. 27 th Ave W. Fitgers 600 E. Superior St Giant Panda Buffet 215 N. Central Ave Grandma's 522 S. Lake Ave Mexico Lindo 600 E. Superior St Osaka 5155 Burning Tree Plaza Old Chicago 327 S. Lake Ave Red

Netoff, Theoden

434

For additional information about the minor,please contact OSU-Tulsa Advisement Services, North Hall 130, or call  

E-print Network

3453 ­ Aviation/Aerospace Security Issues AVED 3463 ­ Aerospace Maintenance and Safety AVED 3473 ­ OSHA 4113 ­ Aviation Safety AVED 4433 ­ Airport Safety Inspections AVED 4943 ­ Basic Aircraft Accident

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

435

Primeros registros de helmintos parásitos en Fulica ardesiaca (Aves: Rallidae) para el Perú : Pantanos de Villa - Lima First record of helminth parasites in Fulica ardesiaca (Aves: Rallidae) from Peru: Pantanos de Villa - Lima  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two trematodes and one cestode of Fulica ardesiaca from Pantanos de Villa, Lima, Peru are registered at first time. Total of 698 parasites were counted, 529 individuals of Notocotylus pacifera, 149 individuals of Psilostomum sp. and 20 individuals of Diorchis Americana. This work is the first report in F. ardesiaca from Peru; while Psilostomum sp. and D. americana are first

Gisella Guillén; Elizabeth Morales

436

Metazoan parasites of Himantopus mexicanus Muller (Aves) from southwestern Texas, with a checklist of helminth parasites from North America.  

PubMed

Nineteen species of helminths were recovered from 34 of 35 black-necked stilts, Himantopus mexicanus Muller, collected from the Fort Bliss ponds, El Paso County, Texas. New host records are marked with an. The species identified were: Acoleus vaginatus, Davainea himantopodis, Diplophallus polymorphus, Eurycestus avoceti, Hymenolepis himantopodis, Hymenolepis sp. 1, Infula macrophallus, Coacitrema michiganensis, Cyclocoelum lanceolatum, Notocotylus sp., Parastrigea mexicanus, Tanaisia fedtschenkoi, Capillaria sp., C. anatis, C. contorta, C. mergi, Chevreuxia americana, Eustronglydes mergorum, and Splendidofilaria sp. Six species of mallophagan lice and 1 species of nasal mite, Rhinonyssus himantopus, were recovered. Helminths showed little concentration for dominance (0.09), were not very evenly distributed (0.49 +/- 0.08) nor very diverse (0.73 +/- 0.14), and most species were highly aggregated. The helminth community consisted of an unusually large number of core species (10). Three large species of tapeworms exhibited mostly paired infections, were mutually exclusive, and were negatively associated (-1). PMID:3357123

Hinojos, J G; Canaris, A G

1988-04-01

437

Phylogeography of the Variable Dwarf-Kingfisher Ceyx lepidus (Aves: Alcedinidae) Inferred from Mitochondrial and Nuclear DNA Sequences  

E-print Network

, they considered Ceyx lepidus dispar, C. l. FIG. 1. Map showing the distribution of the 15 subspecies of Ceyx lepidus in the Philippines, Wallacea, New Guinea, and Melanesia. Inset panel de- picts the distribution of closely related Philippine endemic species C...- ples have associated museum study-skin vouchers. For taxa with no available tissue samples, DNA was extracted from toepads of museum study skins (Table ?) in lab space separate from other Ceyx tissue extractions to minimize contamination risk (Mundy...

Anderson, Michael J.; Oliveros, Carl Hirang; Filardi, Christopher E.; Moyle, Robert G.

2013-01-01

438

Morphology of the shoulder musculature of the American kestrel, Falco sparverius (Aves), with implications for gliding flight  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary The shoulder morphology of the American kestrel,Falco sparverius, was dissected with an emphasis on the morphological requirements for gliding flight. Kestrels are being used as a model for the study of gliding flight in a non-specialized gliding bird. The kestrel forelimb is relatively generalized in its construction, and does not appear to have any remarkable specializations for gliding. However,

Ron A. Meyers

1992-01-01

439

~ ISPRC, Boston College, Lynch School of Education, Campion 318, 140 Commonwealth Ave., Chestnut Hill, MA 02467 ~ CALL FOR PROPOSALS  

E-print Network

and Culture and Violence Sponsored by the Institute for the Study and Promotion of Race and Culture Boston from a pragmatic, scholarly, or grassroots focus through its Diversity Challenge conference. The theme of Diversity Challenge 2012 is What to Do About Race and Culture and Violence Areas of Emphasis: ·Abuse

Huang, Jianyu

440

Humberto Jaramillo 9 Hillhouse Ave, Mason Lab 306 humberto.jaramillo@yale.edu New Haven, CT 06520  

E-print Network

Research Interests Desalination and water purification, forward and reverse osmosis, thin-film composite University Academic Excellence Award, 2011 Maria & Louis Caballero Scholarship, 2010-2012 Leadership, Service and Environmental Engineering June 2013- Present Project: "Surface modification of thin-film composite membranes

Elimelech, Menachem

441

Evolutionary concepts meet the neck of penguins (Aves: Sphenisciformes), towards a "survival strategy" for evo-devo.  

PubMed

Evolutionary developmental biology (or evo-devo) is the scientific connectivity that allowed a more comprehensive and practical completeness in the contemporary conceptualisation of evolution. The links between genetics, developmental mechanics and evolution led to a better understanding of evolutionary mechanisms. An analysis of evolutionary concepts such as homology, homeoses, constraints, novelties, modularity, and selection is given through the recurring example of the variations identified in the modular repartition of the cervical vertebrae in extant and fossil penguins. The inclusion of this study about penguins in the evolutionary system also involves a reflection on the current state and the future of evo-devo. Three principles of assessment and method, applicable to many natural and conceptual scales, are introduced to define a "survival strategy" for evo-devo. The above-mentioned principles are intended to strengthen and continue the connectivity induced de facto. These current and future investigation challenges are discussed and connected to three main naturalist names related directly to the conceptualisation of evolution: Charles Darwin, Étienne Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire, and Lamarck. PMID:22890499

Guinard, Geoffrey

2012-12-01

442

A revision of the fossil genus Miocepphus and other Miocene Alcidae (Aves: Charadriiformes) of the Western North Atlantic Ocean  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study reviews and describes all known fossils of Alcidae from the Miocene of the western North Atlantic. Because the majority of alcid fossils recovered from Miocene sediments are allied with the genus Miocepphus Wetmore, 1940, the genus is revised here. Three new species of Miocepphus are described: Miocepphus bohaskai and Miocepphus blowi from the Early to Late Miocene, and

Erik Wijnker; Storrs L. Olson

2009-01-01

443

Duval County Extension Office Program Location: 1010 N McDuff Ave, Jacksonville, FL 32254, unless noted  

E-print Network

Active Improve your diet through nutrition education, food demonstrations, food buying & food safety Free with Becky 4-H At-Large Meeting December 17, 6 pm Bring canned goods for the Ronald McDonald House * Make://jaxpubliclibrary.org/financiallyfit/ The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide

Florida, University of

444

Duval County Extension Office Program Location: 1010 N McDuff Ave, Jacksonville, FL 32254, unless noted  

E-print Network

Active Improve your diet through nutrition education, food demonstrations, food buying & food safety Free with Becky 4-H At-Large Meeting December 17, 6 pm Bring canned goods for the Ronald McDonald House * Make://jaxpubliclibrary.org/financiallyfit The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide

Jawitz, James W.

445

A Late Miocene Accipitrid (Aves: Accipitriformes) from Nebraska and Its Implications for the Divergence of Old World Vultures  

PubMed Central

Background Old World vultures are likely polyphyletic, representing two subfamilies, the Aegypiinae and Gypaetinae, and some genera of the latter may be of independent origin. Evidence concerning the origin, as well as the timing of the divergence of each subfamily and even genera of the Gypaetinae has been elusive. Methodology/Principal Findings Compared with the Old World, the New World has an unexpectedly diverse and rich fossil component of Old World vultures. Here we describe a new accipitriform bird, Anchigyps voorhiesi gen. et sp. nov., from the Ash Hollow Formation (Upper Clarendonian, Late Miocene) of Nebraska. It represents a form close in morphology to the Old World vultures. Characteristics of its wing bones suggest it was less specialized for soaring than modern vultures. It was likely an opportunistic predator or scavenger having a grasping foot and a mandible morphologically similar to modern carrion-feeding birds. Conclusions/Significance The new fossil reported here is intermediate in morphology between the bulk of accipitrids and the Old World gypaetine vultures, representing a basal lineage of Accipitridae trending towards the vulturine habit, and of its Late Miocene age suggests the divergence of true gypaetine vultures, may have occurred during or slightly before the Miocene. PMID:23152811

Zhang, Zihui; Feduccia, Alan; James, Helen F.

2012-01-01

446

28 | NewScientist | 5 August 2006 www.newscientist.com fredbAveNdAm/miNdeNpictureS  

E-print Network

on an disaster in the making Paradiselost The oceans are taking up so much carbon dioxide that water chemistry absorbed about a third of all the fossil-fuel carbon released into the atmosphere since the beginning that the animals'respiration had increased the carbon dioxide concentration in the jars, which had been sealed

Zachos, James

447

Blood vessels and the occurrence of arteriovenous anastomoses in cephalic heat loss areas of mallards, Anas platyrhynchos (Aves)  

Microsoft Academic Search

1. The blood supply to cephalic heat loss areas (nasal and oropharyngeal mucosa, bill, eyelids) was studied in mallards by using plastic corrosion casts. The structure and organization of the blood vessels, as well as the occurrence of arteriovenous anastomoses (AVAs), were examined by scanning electron microscopy of vascular casts and by paraffin sections.

Uffe Midtgård

1984-01-01

448

5841 S. Maryland Ave., Rm. L035, MC 0077, Chicago, Illinois 60637 Toll Free: (888) UC GENES (888) 824 3637  

E-print Network

signs of the disorder. How does RS run in families? RS can be inherited in an autosomal recessive no testing available for DRS. Individuals with mutations in ROR2 have autosomal recessive RS (RRS or autosomal dominant pattern. Autosomal dominant RS (DRS) is the most common form, but there is currently

Das, Soma

449

Foraging behaviour of the Scale-throated Hermit Phaethornis eurynome Lesson, 1832 (Aves, Trochilidae) in Vriesea incurvata Gaudich (Bromeliaceae).  

PubMed

In this study we tested for density-dependent relationships between visitation rates of the Scale-throated Hermit (Phaethornis eurynome) and the plant density and flower number of the bromeliad Vriesea incurvata, by comparing plots with varying densities of this bromeliad. Eight 100 m2 plots were established at least 200 m from each other; four plots contained 10-15 individuals of V. incurvata each, whereas the other four contained 4-5 individuals each. The visitors, number of visits, behaviour (nectar thief or potential pollinator) and the height of foraging were recorded during focal observations on the plants. The number of visits of P. eurynome varied according to the local density of V. incurvata, showing that the heterogeneous distribution of this bromeliad species may promote adjustments in the pollinator populations, through resource variation at a local scale. PMID:25166315

Silva, Bg; Piratelli, Aj

2014-05-01

450

Myoglobin levels and mATPase activity in pectoral muscles of spruce and ruffed grouse (Aves: Tetraoninae).  

PubMed

Myoglobin concentration and myosin ATPase activity were measured in the pectoral muscle of wild spruce grouse (Dendragapus canadensis) and ruffed grouse (Bonasa umbellus), together with the weight of the Mm. pectoralis, supracoracoideus and heart. mATPase activities were similar in both species, but spruce grouse contained 15 times more myoglobin in the pectoralis muscle and the heart was three times heavier than that of the ruffed grouse. The relative mass of the flight muscles and wing loading were similar between species. Characteristics of the pectoral muscle of both grouse species reflect adaptations to predation and advertising displays. The glycolytic nature of the ruffed grouse pectoral muscle and small heart size is an adaptation to a sedentary existence within a small home range. The more oxidative pectoral muscle of spruce grouse together with its larger heart are adaptations to seasonal dispersals requiring more sustained flight. PMID:2859952

Thomas, V G

1985-01-01

451

Phylogeographical evidence of gene flow among Common Crossbill (Loxia curvirostra, Aves, Fringillidae) populations at the continental level  

Microsoft Academic Search

Common Crossbill subspecies have been described according to morphological traits, vocalizations and geographical distribution. In this study, we have tried to determine whether the subspecies correspond to clear-cut mitochondrial DNA lineages, by sequencing 717 bp of the control region from individuals taken at several sampling locations in North America and the Western Palaearctic. We find 22 haplotypes from the 37

Sophie Questiau; Ludovic Gielly; Michel Clouet; Pierre Taberlet

1999-01-01

452

Phylogeographical evidence of gene flow among common crossbill (Loxia curvirostra, aves, fringillidae) populations at the continental level  

PubMed

Common Crossbill subspecies have been described according to morphological traits, vocalizations and geographical distribution. In this study, we have tried to determine whether the subspecies correspond to clear-cut mitochondrial DNA lineages, by sequencing 717 bp of the control region from individuals taken at several sampling locations in North America and the Western Palaearctic. We find 22 haplotypes from the 37 sampled individuals with a mean divergence of 0.0118 +/- 0.0069 (mean +/- SD). We find a mixing of the mitochondrial haplotypes at the continental level among the different types or subspecies previously described. Morphological differentiation (in bill size and shape essentially) shows the possibility of rapid local adaptation to fluctuating resources (coniferous seeds), without necessarily promoting the development of reproductive barriers between morphs. PMID:10469208

Questiau; Gielly; Clouet; Taberlet

1999-08-01

453

A assembléia de aves de áreas úmidas em dois sistemas de cultivo de arroz irrigado no extremo sul do Brasil  

Microsoft Academic Search

The wetland bird assemblage in two irrigated rice fields in southern Brazil. Seventeen wetland bird counts were conducted from November 1998 to March 1999 in two 52 ha rice paddies using no-tillage and \\

Rafael A. Dias; Maria Inês Burger

454

ROEDORES EN LA DIETA DE DOS AVES RAPACES NOCTURNAS (BUBO VIRGINIANUS Y TYTO ALBA) EN EL NORESTE DE DURANGO, MÉXICO  

Microsoft Academic Search

We studied the diet of two species of owls, and assessed the rodents communities and their relative densities from March 1996 through February 1997 in the Mapimí Biosphere Reserve, Durango, México: Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus) and Barn Owl (Tyto alba). The objectives were to understand the predator-prey relationships by comparing the availability and use of rodents by these owls.

Elizabeth E. ARAGÓN; Benjamín CASTILLO; Alfredo GARZA

455

Calamicoptes anatidus sp. nov., a new quill wall mite (Acari: Laminosioptidae) from the Greater Scaup Aythya marila (L.) (Aves: Anseriformes).  

PubMed

Calamicoptes anatidus sp. nov., a new species of rarely found parasitic mites of the family Laminosioptidae (Acari: Astigmata) is described from quill walls of wing covert feathers of Aythya marila Linnaeus (Anseriformes: Anatidae) captured in Poland. This is the first record of the family Laminosioptidae on birds of the order Anseriformes and the first record of this mite family in the fauna of Poland. Females of the new species are most similar to those of C. arenariae Lombert, Gaud et Lukoschus, 1984 and differ from them by the presence of the pygidial shield, which covers dorsal and ventro-lateral parts of the opisthosoma, and by having setae c2 and d2 short and subequal in length, and setae se and cp not reaching the metapodonotal shield. PMID:25119356

Skoracki, Maciej; Kavetska, Katarzyna; Ozminski, Micha?; Zawierucha, Krzysztof

2014-09-01

456

Paramaritremopsis solielangi n. sp. and Microphallus kinsellai n. sp. (Digenea: Microphallidae) parasites of Charadrii (Aves) of Belize (Central America).  

PubMed

The authors describe and illustrate two trematodes from Belize (Central America): Paramaritremopsis solielangi n. sp. from the small intestine of Arenaria interpres is characterised by a body length of 478 microm, two short and pre-acetabular caeca, part of the uterus in close association with the cirrus-sac and left caecum, vitelline glands in the shape of a horseshoe, a short pre-ovarian cirrus-sac containing a long, cylindrical, voluminous and unarmed cirrus (size when evaginated: 150 x 20-30 microm) and Microphallus kinsellai n. sp. from the caeca of Actitis macularia characterised by a body length of 370 microm and a phallus which is 30 microm in diameter and asymmetrical (basically a pad with a moderately developed accessory lobe) and a straight ejaculatory canal. Levinseniella carteretensis is another microphallid recovered from Arenaria interpres. The term of "phallus" is proposed to name the male copulatory organ which characterizes the Microphallinae. PMID:10966220

Canaris, A G; Deblock, S

2000-10-01

457

Paramaritremopsis solielangi n. sp. et Microphallus kinsellai n. sp. (Digenea: Microphallidae) parasites de Charadrii (Aves) du Bélize (Amérique centrale)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors describe and illustrate two trematodes from Belize (Central America): Paramaritremopsis solielangi n. sp. from the small intestine of Arenaria interpres is characterised by a body length of 478 m, two short and pre-acetabular caeca, part of the uterus in close association with the cirrus-sac and left caecum, vitelline glands in the shape of a horseshoe, a short pre-ovarian cirrus-sac

Albert G. Canaris; Stéphane Deblock

2000-01-01

458

Conspecific brood parasitism in the white-faced ibis Plegadis chihi (Aves: Pelecaniformes) revealed by microsatellites' based kinship-reconstruction.  

PubMed

The white-faced ibis Plegadis chihi Vieillot, 1817 (Pelecaniformes: Threskiornithidae) is a socially monogamous colonially breeding bird in which behavioral and ecological observations suggest the occurrence of conspecific brood parasitism (CBP). We inferred aspects of the genetic mating system of P. chihi in nature, using a genetic approach in the absence of parental information. We used five heterologous microsatellite loci and a multiple-step methodological approach to infer kinship patterns among 104 pairs of nestlings sampled inside 80 nests in a breeding colony from southern Brazil. The estimated effective population size was 69 white-faced ibises (95% CI: 50-98), enough to ensure long-term population survival. Kinship patterns were identified for 38% of the analyzed pairs: 60% of the diagnosed pairs were identified as full-siblings, 2.5% as half-siblings and 37.5% as unrelated individuals. CBP could explain the presence of unrelated nestlings within broods, in agreement with available non-genetic evidence. The presence of half-siblings within broods could indicate extra-pair paternity. Results suggest that a non-strictly monogamous genetic mating system may be present in the white-faced ibis. This study is the first molecular approach to better characterize the reproductive behavior of P. chihi in the wild. Our findings set the stage for further research to investigate the possible causes and consequences of alternative reproductive strategies in this species. PMID:23554386

de Castro e Souza, Andiara Silos Moraes; Del Lama, Silvia Nassif; Miño, Carolina Isabel

2013-06-01

459

Investigations of severe/tornadic thunderstorm development and evolution based on satellite and AVE/SESAME/VAS data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The use of rapid scan satellite imagery to investigate the local environment of severe thunderstorms is discussed. Mesoscale cloud tracking and vertical wind shear as it affects thunderstorm relative flow are mentioned. The role of pre-existing low level cloud cover in the outbreak of tornadoes was investigated. Applying visible atmospheric sounding imagery to mesoscale phenomena is also addressed.

Vonderhaar, T. H.; Purdom, J. F. W.

1984-01-01

460

Microsatellite markers characterized in the barn owl (Tyto alba) and of high utility in other owls (Strigiformes: AVES).  

PubMed

We have identified 15 polymorphic microsatellite loci for the barn owl (Tyto alba), five from testing published owl loci and 10 from testing non-owl loci, including loci known to be of high utility in passerines and shorebirds. All 15 loci were sequenced in barn owl, and new primer sets were designed for eight loci. The 15 polymorphic loci displayed two to 26 alleles in 56-58 barn owls. When tested in 10 other owl species (n?=?1-6 individuals), between four and nine loci were polymorphic per species. These loci are suitable for studies of population structure and parentage in owls. PMID:21564947

Klein, Akos; Horsburgh, Gavin J; Küpper, Clemens; Major, Agnes; Lee, Patricia L M; Hoffmann, Gyula; Mátics, Róbert; Dawson, Deborah A

2009-11-01

461

Isolation and characterization of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II B genes in the Barn owl (Aves: Tyto alba).  

PubMed

We isolated major histocompatibility complex class II B (MHCIIB) genes in the Barn owl (Tyto alba). A PCR-based approach combined with primer walking on genomic and complementary DNA as well as Southern blot analyses revealed the presence of two MHCIIB genes, both being expressed in spleen, liver, and blood. Characteristic structural features of MHCIIB genes as well as their expression and high non-synonymous substitution rates in the region involved in antigen binding suggest that both genes are functional. MHC organization in the Barn owl is simple compared to passerine species that show multiple duplications, and resembles the minimal essential MHC of chicken. PMID:18548243

Burri, Reto; Niculita-Hirzel, Hélène; Roulin, Alexandre; Fumagalli, Luca

2008-09-01

462

Fossil evidence of wing shape in a stem relative of swifts and hummingbirds (Aves, Pan-Apodiformes).  

PubMed

A feathered specimen of a new species of Eocypselus from the Early Eocene Green River Formation of Wyoming provides insight into the wing morphology and ecology in an early part of the lineage leading to extant swifts and hummingbirds. Combined phylogenetic analysis of morphological and molecular data supports placement of Eocypselus outside the crown radiation of Apodiformes. The new specimen is the first described fossil of Pan-Apodiformes from the pre-Pleistocene of North America and the only reported stem taxon with informative feather preservation. Wing morphology of Eocypselus rowei sp. nov. is intermediate between the short wings of hummingbirds and the hyper-elongated wings of extant swifts, and shows neither modifications for the continuous gliding used by swifts nor modifications for the hovering flight style used by hummingbirds. Elongate hindlimb elements, particularly the pedal phalanges, also support stronger perching capabilities than are present in Apodiformes. The new species is the smallest bird yet described from the Green River Formation, and supports the hypothesis that a decrease in body size preceded flight specializations in Pan-Apodiformes. The specimen also provides the first instance of melanosome morphology preserved in association with skeletal remains from the Green River Formation. PMID:23760643

Ksepka, Daniel T; Clarke, Julia A; Nesbitt, Sterling J; Kulp, Felicia B; Grande, Lance

2013-06-22

463

Comparative chromosome painting between chicken and spectacled owl (Pulsatrix perspicillata): implications for chromosomal evolution in the Strigidae (Aves, Strigiformes)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The spectacled owl (Pulsatrix perspicillata), a species found in the Neotropical region, has 76 chromosomes, with a high number of biarmed chromosomes. In order to define homologies between Gallus gallus and Pulsatrixperspicillata (Strigiformes, Strigidae), we used chromosome painting with chicken DNA probes of chromosomes 1–10 and Z and telomeric sequences. This approach allowed a comparison between Pulsatrixperspicillata and other species

E. H. C. de Oliveira; S. P. de Moura; L. J. S. dos Anjos; C. Y. Nagamachi; J. C. Pieczarka; P. C. M. O´Brien; M. A. Ferguson-Smith

2008-01-01

464

Comparative chromosome painting between chicken and spectacled owl (Pulsatrix perspicillata): implications for chromosomal evolution in the Strigidae (Aves, Strigiformes).  

PubMed

The spectacled owl (Pulsatrix perspicillata), a species found in the Neotropical region, has 76 chromosomes, with a high number of biarmed chromosomes. In order to define homologies between Gallus gallus and Pulsatrixperspicillata (Strigiformes, Strigidae), we used chromosome painting with chicken DNA probes of chromosomes 1-10 and Z and telomeric sequences. This approach allowed a comparison between Pulsatrixperspicillata and other species of Strigidae already analyzed by chromosome painting (Strix nebulosa and Bubo bubo, both with 2n = 80). The results show that centric fusions and fissions have occurred in different chromosomal pairs and are responsible for the karyotypic variation observed in this group. No interstitial telomeric sequences were found. Although the largest pair of chromosomes in P. perspicillata and Bubo bubo are submetacentric, they are homologous to different chicken chromosomes: GGA1/GGA2 in P. perspicillata and GGA2/GGA4 in B. bubo. PMID:19096211

de Oliveira, E H C; de Moura, S P; dos Anjos, L J S; Nagamachi, C Y; Pieczarka, J C; O'Brien, P C M; Ferguson-Smith, M A

2008-01-01

465

Rapid parallel evolution of aberrant traits in the diversification of the Gulf of Guinea white-eyes (Aves, Zosteropidae).  

PubMed

Archipelago-endemic bird radiations are familiar to evolutionary biologists as key illustrations of evolutionary patterns. However, such radiations are in fact rare events. White-eyes (Zosteropidae) are birds with an exceptionally high colonization and speciation potential; they have colonized more islands globally than any other passerine group and include the most species-rich bird genus. The multiplication of white-eye island endemics has been consistently attributed to independent colonizations from the mainland; the white-eyes of the Gulf of Guinea archipelago had been seen as a classic case, spanning as great a breadth of phenotypic diversity as the family worldwide. Contrary to this hypothesis, our molecular phylogenetic analysis places the Gulf of Guinea white-eyes in just two radiations, one grouping all five oceanic island taxa and the other grouping continental island and land-bridge taxa. Numerous 'aberrant' phenotypes (traditionally grouped in the genus Speirops) have evolved independently over a short space of time from nonaberrant (Zosterops) phenotypes; the most phenotypically divergent species have separated as recently as 0.22 Ma. These radiations rival those of Darwin's finches and the Hawaiian honeycreepers in terms of the extent of adaptive radiation per unit time, both in terms of species numbers and in terms of phenotypic diversity. Tempo and patterns of morphological divergence are strongly supportive of an adaptive radiation in the oceanic islands driven by ecological interactions between sympatric white-eyes. Here, very rapid phenotypic evolution mainly affected taxa derived from the youngest wave of colonization, in accordance with the model of asymmetric divergence owing to resource competition in sympatry. PMID:21599770

Melo, Martim; Warren, Ben H; Jones, Peter J

2011-12-01

466

Diversidad de aves y mamíferos en zonas donde anida Rhynchopsitta pachyrhyncha, en el municipio de Madera, Chihuahua, México  

Microsoft Academic Search

The diversity of birds and mammals species was determined in the nesting area of the Tick Billed Parrot (Rynchopsitta Pachyrhyncha) in the Sierra Madre Occidental in the public land El Ejido 5 millas or Santuario Madera, near Ciudad Madera, Chihuahua, from the middle of the month of July until the beginnings of September 2006. We used Sherman traps, and direct

Marco A. Sánchez-Mateo; Ricardo Soto Cruz; Toucha Lebgue Keleng

467

Karyotype and C-banding pattern of the domestic geese Anser anser populations (Aves: Anatidae) in Egypt.  

PubMed

The karyotype and C-banding pattern of domestic Greylag geese Anser anser anser populations collected from five localities in El Minia, Egypt, that have either whitish grey or white feather color patterns were described. All populations have a diploid number of 2n= 80 chromosomes. Of the 80 chromosomes, 10 pairs, including ZW chromosomes, were macrochromosomes and the remaining 30 pairs were microchromosomes. Slight variation in the size of macrochromosomes was observed amongst populations. However, obvious variation of C-banding distribution was found and attributed to variation of euchromatin content and its correlation with chromosome size and arrangement of constitutive heterochromatin. Nevertheless, significant variation in the mean number of C-heterochromatin blocks in microchromosomes was attributed to either transformation of heterochromatin into euchromatin and vice versa or to involvement of structural chromosomal aberrations during karyotype evolution. The present results show that A. anser populations common in Egypt could be distinguished from those of A. anser and A. cygnoides occurring elsewhere in Europe and Asiaviavariability in chromosome morphology of pairs nos. 2, 3 and 4. PMID:24745149

Shahin, Adel A Basyouny; Ata, Abdel Tawab Mohammed; Shnaf, Anwaar S Mohammed Abu

2014-01-01

468

ACOUSTICAL DISTORTIONS IN CAPACITANCE HYDROPHONES AND THE EFFECT OF DIAPHRAGMS IN MEASUREMENTS OF SHOCK W AVE PULSES  

Microsoft Academic Search

The shock wave pulse measured by means of a membrane PVDF hydrophone was com- pared with the pulse obtained by means of the capacitance hydrophone showing distortions in the pulse trailing edge. The mechanism of distortions in the capacitance hydrophone was explained and confirmed by experiments as caused by transverse waves generated on the surface of the hydrophone's metal plate

L. FILIPCZYÑSKI; J. ETIENNE; T. KUJAWSKA; J. WÓJCIK; B. ZIENKIEWICZ

1998-01-01

469

Isolation and characterization of macaroni penguin (Eudyptes chrysolophus) microsatellite loci and their utility in other penguin species (Spheniscidae, AVES).  

PubMed

We report the characterization of 25 microsatellite loci isolated from the macaroni penguin (Eudyptes chrysolophus). Thirteen loci were arranged into four multiplex sets for future genetic studies of macaroni penguin populations. All 25 loci were tested separately in each of four other penguin species [Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae), chinstrap penguin (Pygoscelis antarctica), gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua) and king penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus)]. Between eight and 12 loci were polymorphic per species. These loci are expected to be useful for studies of population genetic structure in a range of penguin species. PMID:21564950

Ahmed, Sophia; Hart, Tom; Dawson, Deborah A; Horsburgh, Gavin J; Trathan, Philip N; Rogers, Alex D

2009-11-01

470

Polyphyly of the hawk genera Leucopternis and Buteogallus (Aves, Accipitridae): multiple habitat shifts during the Neotropical buteonine diversification  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The family Accipitridae (hawks, eagles and Old World vultures) represents a large radiation of predatory birds with an almost global distribution, although most species of this family occur in the Neotropics. Despite great morphological and ecological diversity, the evolutionary relationships in the family have been poorly explored at all taxonomic levels. Using sequences from four mitochondrial genes (12S, ATP8,

Fabio S Raposo do Amaral; Matthew J Miller; Luís Fábio Silveira; Eldredge Bermingham; Anita Wajntal

2006-01-01

471

Polyphyly of the hawk genera Leucopternis and Buteogallus (Aves, Accipitridae): multiple habitat shifts during the Neotropical buteonine diversification  

PubMed Central

Background The family Accipitridae (hawks, eagles and Old World vultures) represents a large radiation of predatory birds with an almost global distribution, although most species of this family occur in the Neotropics. Despite great morphological and ecological diversity, the evolutionary relationships in the family have been poorly explored at all taxonomic levels. Using sequences from four mitochondrial genes (12S, ATP8, ATP6, and ND6), we reconstructed the phylogeny of the Neotropical forest hawk genus Leucopternis and most of the allied genera of Neotropical buteonines. Our goals were to infer the evolutionary relationships among species of Leucopternis, estimate their relationships to other buteonine genera, evaluate the phylogenetic significance of the white and black plumage patterns common to most Leucopternis species, and assess general patterns of diversification of the group with respect to species' affiliations with Neotropical regions and habitats. Results Our molecular phylogeny for the genus Leucopternis and its allies disagrees sharply with traditional taxonomic arrangements for the group, and we present new hypotheses of relationships for a number of species. The mtDNA phylogenetic trees derived from analysis of the combined data posit a polyphyletic relationship among species of Leucopternis, Buteogallus and Buteo. Three highly supported clades containing Leucopternis species were recovered in our phylogenetic reconstructions. The first clade consisted of the sister pairs L. lacernulatus and Buteogallus meridionalis, and Buteogallus urubitinga and Harpyhaliaetus coronatus, in addition to L. schistaceus and L. plumbeus. The second clade included the sister pair Leucopternis albicollis and L. occidentalis as well as L. polionotus. The third lineage comprised the sister pair L. melanops and L. kuhli, in addition to L. semiplumbeus and Buteo buteo. According to our results, the white and black plumage patterns have evolved at least twice in the group. Furthermore, species found to the east and west of the Andes (cis-Andean and trans-Andean, respectively) are not reciprocally monophyletic, nor are forest and non-forest species. Conclusion The polyphyly of Leucopternis, Buteogallus and Buteo establishes a lack of concordance of current Accipitridae taxonomy with the mtDNA phylogeny for the group, and points to the need for further phylogenetic analysis at all taxonomic levels in the family as also suggested by other recent analyses. Habitat shifts, as well as cis- and trans-Andean disjunctions, took place more than once during buteonine diversification in the Neotropical region. Overemphasis of the black and white plumage patterns has led to questionable conclusions regarding the relationships of Leucopternis species, and suggests more generally that plumage characters should be used with considerable caution in the taxonomic evaluation of the Accipitridae. PMID:16464261

do Amaral, Fabio S Raposo; Miller, Matthew J; Silveira, Luís Fábio; Bermingham, Eldredge; Wajntal, Anita

2006-01-01

472

Patterns of prey use by lesser scaup Aythya affinis (Aves) and diet overlap with fishes during spring migration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent decline in the lesser scaup Aythya affinis population has been linked to changes in wetland conditions along their spring migration routes. In particular, the use of\\u000a amphipod prey by lesser scaup has declined in many regions of the upper Midwest U.S.A. and has been linked to expanded fisheries,\\u000a although empirical data on diet overlap are lacking. To explore patterns

Kimberly A. Strand; Steven R. Chipps; Sharon N. Kahara; Kenneth F. Higgins; Spencer Vaa

2008-01-01

473

Cestode communities in non-breeding populations of four grebe species (Aves: Podicipedidae) from the Bulgarian Black Sea coast.  

PubMed

Cestode communities in Podiceps cristatus, P. grisegena, P. nigricollis and Tachybaptus ruficollis during their migrations and overwintering are studied at the Bulgarian Black Sea coast. The infracommunities exhibit high richness, abundance and dominance, and low diversity and similarity. The component communities have a similar taxonomic structure at the levels higher than species, a small number of core species and a high portion of grebe specialists in the richness and abundance. The comparison with cestode communities in grebes from Canada (Stock & Holmes, 1987) reveals several differences and similarities. The higher richness and abundance of the infracommunities in Canada are explained by the constant conditions of breeding habitats enhancing higher transmission rates. At the component community level, there is a significant difference between the two species lists. The degree of parasite exchange among the grebe species in Bulgaria is lower. Several characters of cestode component communities in grebes do not depend on either historical factors or different habitats. These are the similar patterns of the taxonomic structure at the levels higher than species, almost the same list of generalists, the participation of specialists of anatids, and the leading role of grebe specialists in the structure. PMID:10511974

Vasileva, G P; Georgiev, B B

1999-09-01

474

Uso de gemas de ovos de aves hiperimunizadas contra Escherichia coli suína no controle da diarréia neonatal de leitões  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of yolks from birds hipperimmunized birds against Escherichia coli (E. coli) pathogenic for swine on the passive immunity of newborn piglets in a producer unit of piglets was studied. It was evaluated ELISA optical density (OD) of antibodies against E. coli, body weight and the frequency of diarrhea (FcD) in 137 newborn piglets born from 25 primiparous gilts

Andréa Machado Leal Ribeiro; Liliane Rudnik; Cláudio Wageck Canal; Lilian Ribeiro Kratz; Carolina Farias

2005-01-01

475

Morphologic identification of a new Sarcocystis sp. in the common moorhen (Gallinula chloropus ) (Aves: Gruiformes: Rallidae) from Brolos Lake, Egypt.  

PubMed

Sarcocystis species are among the most common and widespread protozoan parasites of mammals and birds. The current study provides the first record of infection with Sarcocystis species in the common moorhens from Brolos Lake, KafrElsheikh province, Egypt. Morphology of the parasite cysts was described using light and transmission electron microscopy. Out of 25 examined birds, sarcocysts were found in neck, thigh, and legs muscles of two birds. The cysts were microscopic and measured 150-650 ?m in length×45-185 ?m in width. Histologically, the sarcocyst wall appeared striated and characterized by the presence of radial spines. Ultrastructurally, it measured 2-4.5 ?m in thickness and had irregularly shaped crowded finger-like villar protrusions that measured 1.5-4 ?m in length and up to 0.4-2 ?m in width with the presence of dense electron ground substance of 200-750 nm thick. Several septa derived from the ground substance were present and divided the cyst into compartments containing both bradyzoites and metrocytes. The bradyzoites were banana-shaped and measured 6-12 × 1-2 ?m with centrally or posteriorly located nuclei. The ultrastructural features of the cyst wall belonged to type 10 cyst wall according the classification of Dubey et al. (1989) and Dubey and Odening (2001). PMID:24233409

El-Morsey, Ahmed; El-Seify, Mahmoud; Desouky, Abdel-Razik Y; Abdel-Aziz, Mohamed M; Sakai, Hiroki; Yanai, Tokuma

2014-01-01

476

Skrjabinoclava inornatae Wong & Anderson, 1987 (Nematoda: Acuarioidea) as a sporadic parasite of the greater yellowlegs Tringa melanoleuca Gmelin (Aves: Scolopacidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Skrjabinoclava inornatae Wong & Anderson, 1987 was found in one of five adult greater yellowlegs Tringa melanoleuca collected near Framboise, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, Canada. This is the first report of a member of the genus in this host. The infection is regarded as sporadic and a further indication that the host distribution of members of Skrjabinoclava may be determined

R. C. Anderson; C. M. Bartlett

1996-01-01

477

Two new species of Brueelia K?ler, 1936 (Ischnocera, Philopteridae) parasitic on Neotropical trogons (Aves, Trogoniformes)  

PubMed Central

Abstract Two new species of Brueelia are described and illustrated. These new species and their type hosts are: Brueelia sueta ex Pharomachrus pavoninus (Spix, 1824), the Pavonine Quetzal and Brueelia cicchinoi ex Trogon viridis Linnaeus, the White-tailed Trogon. Both new species differ from the only Brueelia described on Trogon mexicanus by many morphological features, including those present in the male genitalia and female vulvar margin. Partial sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) gene for these two new species differ from one another by 13.6% uncorrected p-distance. Whereas Brueelia cicchinoi is only 0.3% divergent from previously published COI sequences identified as Brueelia sp. from the Mexican Trogon melanocephalus Gould, 1936 and Trogon massena Gould, 1938. We also found Brueelia cicchinoi on Trogon melanurus, Trogon collaris and Pharomachrus pavoninus. Thus Brueelia cicchinoi is found on multiple trogoniform hosts across an extremely large geographic distribution and has one of the largest number of host associations among Brueelia species. PMID:21998549

Valim, Michel P.; Weckstein, Jason D.

2011-01-01

478

A subsynoptic-scale kinetic energy study of the Red River Valley tornado outbreak (AVE-SESAME 1)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The subsynoptis-scale kinetic energy balance during the Red River Valley tornado outbreak is presented in order to diagnose storm environment interactions. Area-time averaged energetics indicate that horizontal flux convergence provides the major energy source to the region, while cross contour flow provides the greatest sink. Maximum energy variability is found in the upper levels in association with jet stream activity. Area averaged energetics at individual observation times show that the energy balance near times of maximum storm activity differs considerably from that of the remaining periods. The local kinetic energy balance over Oklahoma during the formation of a limited jet streak receives special attention. Cross contour production of energy is the dominant local source for jet development. Intense convection producing the Red River Valley tornadoes may have contributed to this local development by modifying the surrounding environment.

Jedlovec, G. J.; Fuelberg, H. E.

1981-01-01

479

Rev. 12/13 This version supersedes any earlier revisions. GS-501 250 Mrak Hall One Shields Ave.  

E-print Network

if the student transfers to Economics.) Each year, all U.S. citizens, permanent residents, and immigrants and Transportation http://manuals.ucdavis.edu/ppm/contents.htm#300. CALIFORNIA RESIDENCY FOR PURPOSES OF TUITION U.S be found at http://registrar.ucdavis.edu/tuition/residence/index.cfm. Students who are not U.S. citizens

California at Davis, University of

480

Ossification sequence of the common tern (Sterna hirundo) and its implications for the interrelationships of the Lari (Aves, Charadriiformes).  

PubMed

The hypotheses of relationships within Lari (gulls) are highly unstable, and depend on whether morphological or molecular data are examined. Developmental sequence data are thought to contain phylogenetic information, but have never been applied to the problem of avian systematics. In this article, we describe the ossification sequence of the Common Tern (Sterna hirundo), and compare the pattern observed to published descriptions of other Charadriiformes, specifically the Great Skua (Stercorariidae) and various species of gulls (Laridae). We use changes in ossification sequence to elucidate the relationship between these three taxa, using both qualitative and systematic approaches. The first analysis of the ossification sequence data does not support a close relationship between Stercorariidae and Laridae, as has been proposed in some morphological analyses; however it was unable to differentiate between a Laridae-Sternidae sister-group relationship or a Sternidae-Stercorariidae sister-group relationship. The second analysis was unable to differentiate between any topology, including a polytomy, for these taxa. These results highlight the potential for use of ossification sequence data in an evolutionary context but caution that analyses are highly dependent on sequence resolution and the taxonomic level of the data set. PMID:18570230

Maxwell, Erin E; Harrison, Luke B

2008-09-01

481

Duval County Extension Office Program Location: 1010 N McDuff Ave, Jacksonville, FL 32254, unless noted  

E-print Network

Children Family Treasures: Creating Strong Families Co-Parenting: Working Together for a Healthy Family youth (5 -18 yrs old) Game show based off of Minute to Win It! Call Gaye to register Master Gardener@coj.net Free Nutrition Classes for families with children At Florida Blue-River City Marketplace Tuesdays @ 11

Jawitz, James W.

482

Michael W. Cole (mwcole@mwcole.net) CV May 6, 2014 1 Michael W. Cole 197 University Ave.  

E-print Network

, NJ 07102 Phone: (314) 632-6536 E-mail: mwcole@mwcole.net Web: www.colelab.org Education 2009 engineering and web development for Apple, Inc. Honors and Awards 2012 Faculty of 1000, Associate Faculty backgrounds, deep knowledge in chosen disciplines, and technical, professional, and personal skills to become

Cole, Michael W.

483

Duval County Extension Office Program Location: 1010 N McDuff Ave, Jacksonville, FL 32254, unless noted  

E-print Network

in starting a 4-H club in your area? Join us and become a certified leader Email Gaye to register at GSchmidt 18, 7 - 8:30 pm Murray Hill Branch 3 Keys to Successful Saving January 7, 6 - 7:30 pm Southeast program at your location, call 904-255-7450 Educational program areas: Family Life Education Money

Watson, Craig A.

484

Sally Student 1120 Vermont Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90007 (213) 740 -9677 sallys@usc.edu www.sallystudent.com  

E-print Network

behavior-driven development to detect bugs on the front-end of product Deliver test-driven development and Engineering Los Angeles, CA Active Member Fall 2012 Refine leadership and develop professional skills Office, Adobe Photoshop, Maya, and Unix Interests: avid sports fan, consulting, technology, user

Zhou, Chongwu

485

Characterization of chromosome structures of Falconinae (Falconidae, Falconiformes, Aves) by chromosome painting and delineation of chromosome rearrangements during their differentiation.  

PubMed

Karyotypes of most bird species are characterized by around 2n = 80 chromosomes, comprising 7-10 pairs of large- and medium-sized macrochromosomes including sex chromosomes and numerous morphologically indistinguishable microchromosomes. The Falconinae of the Falconiformes has a different karyotype from the typical avian karyotype in low chromosome numbers, little size difference between macrochromosomes and a smaller number of microchromosomes. To characterize chromosome structures of Falconinae and to delineate the chromosome rearrangements that occurred in this subfamily, we conducted comparative chromosome painting with chicken chromosomes 1-9 and Z probes and microchromosome-specific probes, and chromosome mapping of the 18S-28S rRNA genes and telomeric (TTAGGG)( n ) sequences for common kestrel (Falco tinnunculus) (2n = 52), peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus) (2n = 50) and merlin (Falco columbarius) (2n = 40). F. tinnunculus had the highest number of chromosomes and was considered to retain the ancestral karyotype of Falconinae; one and six centric fusions might have occurred in macrochromosomes of F. peregrinus and F. columbarius, respectively. Tandem fusions of microchromosomes to macrochromosomes and between microchromosomes were also frequently observed, and chromosomal locations of the rRNA genes ranged from two to seven pairs of chromosomes. These karyotypic features of Falconinae were relatively different from those of Accipitridae, indicating that the drastic chromosome rearrangements occurred independently in the lineages of Accipitridae and Falconinae. PMID:18293111

Nishida, Chizuko; Ishijima, Junko; Kosaka, Ayumi; Tanabe, Hideyuki; Habermann, Felix A; Griffin, Darren K; Matsuda, Yoichi

2008-01-01

486

Characterization of chromosome structures of Falconinae (Falconidae, Falconiformes, Aves) by chromosome painting and delineation of chromosome rearrangements during their differentiation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Karyotypes of most bird species are characterized by around 2n = 80 chromosomes, comprising 7–10 pairs of large- and medium-sized\\u000a macrochromosomes including sex chromosomes and numerous morphologically indistinguishable microchromosomes. The Falconinae\\u000a of the Falconiformes has a different karyotype from the typical avian karyotype in low chromosome numbers, little size difference\\u000a between macrochromosomes and a smaller number of microchromosomes. To characterize

Chizuko Nishida; Junko Ishijima; Ayumi Kosaka; Hideyuki Tanabe; Felix A. Habermann; Darren K. Griffin; Yoichi Matsuda

2008-01-01

487

9 Hillhouse Ave, Room M10 New Haven, CT 06511 Jay R. Werber jay.werber@yale.edu  

E-print Network

Jan to Aug 2008 Created and cultured mammalian cell lines to analyze an alternative DNA vector properties of CO2 / organic solvent binary systems TEACHING EXPERIENCE Citizen Schools ­ Volunteer teacher of weekly after-school class in ope

Elimelech, Menachem

488

A new coccidian, Isospora rheae sp. nov. (Apicomplexa, Eimeriidae), from Rhea americana (Aves, Rheidae) from South America  

PubMed Central

A new species of coccidian (Protozoa: Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) obtained from rheas, Rhea americana, is reported in Brazil. Oocysts of Isospora rheae sp. nov. are spherical to subspheroidal, measuring 22.6?×?21.0?µm, and have a double and smooth wall that is approximately 1.7?µm thick. The micropyle, oocyst residuum and polar granule are absent. Sporocysts are slightly ovoid, measuring 13.9?×?9.6?µm. The Stieda body is flattened, the substieda body is pointed, irregular and wavy and the sporocyst residuum is composed of scattered granules of varying sizes. Sporozoites have an oblong refractile body and one nucleus. This is the first description of an isosporid coccidian infecting birds of the family Rheidae.

Gallo, Samira S.M.; Ederli, Nicole B.; Berto, Bruno P.; de Oliveira, Francisco C.R.

2014-01-01

489

The first fossil owls (Aves: Strigiformes) from the Paleogene of Asia and a review of the fossil record of Strigiformes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The fossil record of owls (Strigiformes) is one of the most extensive among the neornithine birds, yet at the same time largely\\u000a restricted geographically to Europe and North America. Various fossil owls are known from the Paleocene (ca. 60 Ma) to Recent.\\u000a Here we present the first taxonomic description of new species of Paleogene owls from Asia, two new taxa

E. N. Kurochkin; G. J. Dyke

2011-01-01

490

Full mitochondrial genome sequences of two endemic Philippine hornbill species (Aves: Bucerotidae) provide evidence for pervasive mitochondrial DNA recombination  

PubMed Central

Background Although nowaday it is broadly accepted that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) may undergo recombination, the frequency of such recombination remains controversial. Its estimation is not straightforward, as recombination under homoplasmy (i.e., among identical mt genomes) is likely to be overlooked. In species with tandem duplications of large mtDNA fragments the detection of recombination can be facilitated, as it can lead to gene conversion among duplicates. Although the mechanisms for concerted evolution in mtDNA are not fully understood yet, recombination rates have been estimated from "one per speciation event" down to 850 years or even "during every replication cycle". Results Here we present the first complete mt genome of the avian family Bucerotidae, i.e., that of two Philippine hornbills, Aceros waldeni and Penelopides panini. The mt genomes are characterized by a tandemly duplicated region encompassing part of cytochrome b, 3 tRNAs, NADH6, and the control region. The duplicated fragments are identical to each other except for a short section in domain I and for the length of repeat motifs in domain III of the control region. Due to the heteroplasmy with regard to the number of these repeat motifs, there is some size variation in both genomes; with around 21,657 bp (A. waldeni) and 22,737 bp (P. panini), they significantly exceed the hitherto longest known avian mt genomes, that of the albatrosses. We discovered concerted evolution between the duplicated fragments within individuals. The existence of differences between individuals in coding genes as well as in the control region, which are maintained between duplicates, indicates that recombination apparently occurs frequently, i.e., in every generation. Conclusions The homogenised duplicates are interspersed by a short fragment which shows no sign of recombination. We hypothesize that this region corresponds to the so-called Replication Fork Barrier (RFB), which has been described from the chicken mitochondrial genome. As this RFB is supposed to halt replication, it offers a potential mechanistic explanation for frequent recombination in mitochondrial genomes. PMID:21235758

2011-01-01

491

High prevalence of haemosporidian parasites infection in southern grey shrike Lanius meridionalis (Laniidae, Aves) from agricultural areas  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present the first data on prevalence of haematozoa in Southern grey shrikes Lanius meridionalis (Temminck) in agricultural areas of western Spain. A fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene of the parasite was amplified, using a nested PCR assay from blood sample. Of the 81 shrikes analysed, 65.4% showed infection with Haemoproteus (Kruse, 1890) while neither Leucocytozoon (Berestneff, 1904)

P. Casanueva; M. Fernández; M. Ángeles Rojo; F. Campos

2012-01-01

492

The Lanius excubitor (Aves, Passeriformes) conundrum—Taxonomic dilemma when molecular and non-molecular data tell different stories  

Microsoft Academic Search

The phylogeny of 18 taxa in the Lanius excubitor complex, and the related species L. sphenocercus, L. ludovicianus and L. somalicus, was estimated based on the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene and the non-coding D-loop (in total ?1.3kb). According to the mitochondrial gene tree, Lanius excubitor s.l. is non-monophyletic, with some of its subspecies being more closely related to L. sphenocercus,

Urban Olsson; Per Alström; Lars Svensson; Mansour Aliabadian; Per Sundberg

2010-01-01

493

Full mitochondrial genome sequences of two endemic Philippine hornbill species (Aves: Bucerotidae) provide evidence for pervasive mitochondrial DNA recombination  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Although nowaday it is broadly accepted that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) may undergo recombination, the frequency of such recombination remains controversial. Its estimation is not straightforward, as recombination under homoplasmy (i.e., among identical mt genomes) is likely to be overlooked. In species with tandem duplications of large mtDNA fragments the detection of recombination can be facilitated, as it can lead

Svenja Sammler; Christoph Bleidorn; Ralph Tiedemann

2011-01-01

494

The Lanius excubitor (Aves, Passeriformes) conundrum--Taxonomic dilemma when molecular and non-molecular data tell different stories.  

PubMed

The phylogeny of 18 taxa in the Lanius excubitor complex, and the related species L. sphenocercus, L. ludovicianus and L. somalicus, was estimated based on the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene and the non-coding D-loop (in total approximately 1.3 kb). According to the mitochondrial gene tree, Lanius excubitor s.l. is non-monophyletic, with some of its subspecies being more closely related to L. sphenocercus, L. ludovicianus, and L. somalicus. Also the division of the L. excubitor complex into a northern (L. excubitor) and a southern (L. meridionalis) species, as has been proposed based on morphological and ecological similarity and geographical distributions, is not compatible with the mitochondrial tree. Overall, genetic divergences among the ingroup taxa are small, indicating a recent radiation. A tree based on the nuclear ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) introns 6-7 is unresolved with respect to the ingroup, but provides strong support for a clade containing the Lanius excubitor complex, L. sphenocercus, L. ludovicianus and L. somalicus. We discuss the incongruence between the current taxonomy and the mitochondrial gene tree, and conclude that based on the latter the Lanius excubitor complex may be treated as at least six species, L. borealis, L. elegans, L. excubitor, L. lahtora, L. meridionalis, and L. uncinatus, but that other taxonomic treatments are also possible. However, uncertainty regarding to which extent the mitochondrial gene tree reflects the species phylogeny prevents us from recommending taxonomic change without further investigation. This study highlights the possible danger of relying on a single molecular marker, such as mitochondrial DNA, in taxonomic revisions and phylogenetic inference. PMID:19925872

Olsson, Urban; Alström, Per; Svensson, Lars; Aliabadian, Mansour; Sundberg, Per

2010-05-01

495

Lineage diversification and morphological evolution in a large-scale continental radiation: The neotropical ovenbirds and woodcreepers (Aves: Furnariidae)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Patterns of diversification in species-rich clades provide insight into the processes that generate biological diversity. We tested different models of lineage and phenotypic diversification in an exceptional continental radiation, the ovenbird family Furnariidae, using the most complete species-level phylogenetic hypothesis produced to date for a major avian clade (97% of 293 species). We found that the Furnariidae exhibit nearly constant rates of lineage accumulation but show evidence of constrained morphological evolution. This pattern of sustained high rates of speciation despite limitations on phenotypic evolution contrasts with the results of most previous studies of evolutionary radiations, which have found a pattern of decelerating diversity-dependent lineage accumulation coupled with decelerating or constrained phenotypic evolution. Our results suggest that lineage accumulation in tropical continental radiations may not be as limited by ecological opportunities as in temperate or island radiations. More studies examining patterns of both lineage and phenotypic diversification are needed to understand the often complex tempo and mode of evolutionary radiations on continents.

Derryberry, Elizabeth P.; Claramunt, Santiago; Derryberry, Graham; Chesser, R. Terry; Cracraft, Joel; Aleixo, Alexandre; Pérez-Emán, Jorge; Remsen, J.V., Jr.; Brumfield, Robb T.

2011-01-01

496

Lineage diversification and morphological evolution in a large-scale continental radiation: The neotropical ovenbirds and woodcreepers (aves: furnariidae)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Patterns of diversification in species-rich clades provide insight into the processes that generate biological diversity. We tested different models of lineage and phenotypic diversification in an exceptional continental radiation, the ovenbird family Furnariidae, using the most complete species-level phylogenetic hypothesis produced to date for a major avian clade (97% of 293 species). We found that the Furnariidae exhibit nearly constant rates of lineage accumulation but show evidence of constrained morphological evolution. This pattern of sustained high rates of speciation despite limitations on phenotypic evolution contrasts with the results of most previous studies of evolutionary radiations, which have found a pattern of decelerating diversity-dependent lineage accumulation coupled with decelerating or constrained phenotypic evolution. Our results suggest that lineage accumulation in tropical continental radiations may not be as limited by ecological opportunities as in temperate or island radiations. More studies examining patterns of both lineage and phenotypic diversification are needed to understand the often complex tempo and mode of evolutionary radiations on continents. ?? 2011 The Author(s). Evolution ?? 2011 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

Derryberry, E.P.; Claramunt, S.; Derryberry, G.; Chesser, R.T.; Cracraft, J.; Aleixo, A.; Perez-Eman, J.; Remsen, J.V.; Brumfield, R.T.

2011-01-01

497

Ancient differentiation in the single-island avian radiation of endemic Hispaniolan chat-tanagers (Aves: Calyptophilus).  

PubMed

The simple geographic structure of island systems often makes them tractable for studies of the patterns and processes of biological diversification. The Calyptophilus chat-tanagers of Hispaniola are of general evolutionary interest because their multiple lineages might have arisen on a single island, of conservation concern because several isolated populations are nearly extinct, and taxonomically ambiguous because they have been variously lumped or split into one to four species. To explore the context of diversification of the seven extant Calyptophilus populations, we conducted a multilocus coalescent analysis based on sequences of mitochondrial ND2 and three nuclear intron loci. We then compared patterns of phylogeographic genetic variation with the morphological differences that distinguish these populations. Mitochondrial haplotypes formed two reciprocally monophyletic groups separated by a large magnitude of nucleotide divergence. Intron structure largely paralleled the geographic grouping pattern of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), but these groups were only reciprocally monophyletic at one of the three introns. Also, the magnitude of between-group divergence was much lower in the introns than mtDNA genealogies. Multilocus coalescent analyses inferred a nonzero divergence time between these two major geographic groups, but suggested that they have experienced a low level of gene flow. All four markers showed substantial allele sharing within each of the two groups, demonstrating that many now separated montane populations do not have long histories of isolation. Considered in concert, our multilocus phylogeographic reconstructions support the recognition of two species within the Calyptophilus complex, and raise the possibility that these taxa differentiated prior to the fusion of the two palaeo-islands that form present-day Hispaniola. PMID:17845436

Townsend, Andrea K; Rimmer, Christopher C; Latta, Steven C; Lovette, Irby J

2007-09-01

498

First Record of Alcataenia larina larina (Cestoda: Dilepididae) in Atlantic Puffins (Aves, Alcidae, Fratercula arctica) from Newfoundland, Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

The tapeworm Alcataenia larina (Cestoda: Cyclophyllidea: Dilepididae) is a parasite of gulls (Laridae) with a Holarctic distribution in oceanic and littoral habitats. Two subspecies Alcataenia larina pacifica and Alcataenia larina larina are recognized with the former occurring in the North Pacific basin and the latter in the North Atlantic. Alcids serve as incidental hosts for both species and infec- tions

Sabir B. Muzaffar; Eric P. Hoberg; Ian L. Jones

2007-01-01

499

La Pérdida de los Humedales: Cómo se ven afectadas las Comunidades de Aves?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The issue-focused, peer-reviewed article describes how wetland bird populations are stressed due to: devastating habitat loss throughout the world, human intervention, such as agricultural expansion, other factors, such as invasive species and climate change, and lack of research data to improve management practices.

Robert Fletcher (University of Montana;)

2003-10-01

500

Reconstruction and in vivo analysis of the extinct tbx5 gene from ancient wingless moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes)  

PubMed Central

Background The forelimb-specific gene tbx5 is highly conserved and essential for the development of forelimbs in zebrafish, mice, and humans. Amongst birds, a single order, Dinornithiformes, comprising the extinct wingless moa of New Zealand, are unique in having no skeletal evidence of forelimb-like structures. Results To determine the sequence of tbx5 in moa, we used a range of PCR-based techniques on ancient DNA to retrieve all nine tbx5 exons and splice sites from the giant moa, Dinornis. Moa Tbx5 is identical to chicken Tbx5 in being able to activate the downstream promotors of fgf10 and ANF. In addition we show that missexpression of moa tbx5 in the hindlimb of chicken embryos results in the formation of forelimb features, suggesting that Tbx5 was fully functional in wingless moa. An alternatively spliced exon 1 for tbx5 that is expressed specifically in the forelimb region was shown to be almost identical between moa and ostrich, suggesting that, as well as being fully functional, tbx5 is likely to have been expressed normally in moa since divergence from their flighted ancestors, approximately 60 mya. Conclusions The results suggests that, as in mice, moa tbx5 is necessary for the induction of forelimbs, but is not sufficient for their outgrowth. Moa Tbx5 may have played an important role in the development of moa’s remnant forelimb girdle, and may be required for the formation of this structure. Our results further show that genetic changes affecting genes other than tbx5 must be responsible for the complete loss of forelimbs in moa. PMID:24885927

2014-01-01