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1

Astronaut Franklin Chang-Diaz organizes shuttle mail message  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On Discovery's aft flight deck, Astronaut Franklin R. Chang-Diaz begins to organize what was believed to be among the longest mail messages in Shuttle history. Though early Shuttle flights could brag of longer teleprinted messages, the Thermal Imaging Printing Systems's day four correspondence, most of which is out of frame here, is a record length for recent flights.

1994-01-01

2

STS-34 Mission Specialist (MS) Chang-Diaz dons EMU during WETF exercises  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-34 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Mission Specialist (MS) Franklin R. Chang-Diaz dons extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) in preparation for an extravehicular activity (EVA) contingency exercise in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29 pool. This closeup shows Chang-Diaz straightening his EMU sleeve.

1989-01-01

3

STS-75 Chang-Diaz and MS Jeff Hoffman in White Room  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-75 Payload Commander Franklin R. Chang-Diaz (center) and Mission Specialist Jeffrey A. Hoffman (right) prepare to enter the Space Shuttle Columbia at Launch Pad 39B with assistance from the white room closeout crew.

1996-01-01

4

STS-46 MS Chang-Diaz works with laptop PGSC on OV-104's middeck  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-46 Mission Specialist (MS) Franklin R. Chang-Diaz looks away from his work at the laptop payload and general support computer (PGSC) on the middeck of Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104. Chang-Diaz, wearing a headband, holds onto the airlock hatch opening to position himself in front of the computer keyboard. The treads of the interdeck access ladder are visible at the right.

1992-01-01

5

STS-111 Crew Interviews: Franklin Chang-Diaz, Mission Specialist 2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-111 Mission Specialist 2 Franklin Chang-Diaz is seen during this interview, where he gives a quick overview of the mission before answering questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. Chang-Diaz outlines his role in the mission in general, and specifically during the extravehicular activities (EVAs). He describes in great detail his duties in the three EVAs which involved preparing the Mobile Remote Servicer Base System (MBS) for installation onto the Space Station's Mobile Transporter, attaching the MBS onto the Space Station and replacing a wrist roll joint on the station's robot arm. Chang-Diaz also discusses the science experiments which are being brought on board the Space Station by the STS-111 mission. He also offers thoughts on how the International Space Station (ISS) fits into NASA's vision and how his previous space mission experience will benefit the STS-111 flight.

2002-01-01

6

STS-75 Payload Commander Franklin R. Chang-Diaz suits up  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-75 Payload Commander Franklin R. Chang-Diaz (center) chats with Johnson Space Center officials Olan Bertrand (left) and David Leestma (right) during suitup activities in the Operations and Checkout Building. Born in Costa Rica, Chang-Diaz joined NASA in 1980. He has already completed four spaceflights and logged more than 656 hours on-orbit. He and six fellow crew members will depart shortly for Launch Pad 39B, where the Space Shuttle Columbia awaits liftoff during a two-and-a-half-hour launch window opening at 3:18 p.m. EST.

1996-01-01

7

Astronaut Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, payload commander, is busy at the pilots station during operations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Astronaut Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, payload commander, is busy at the pilots station during operations to deploy the Tethered Satellite System (TSS). His five crew mates (out of frame) were also on the flight deck, of the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Columbia, during the busy deployment activities.

1996-01-01

8

Astronaut Franklin Chang-Diaz checking payload bay through aft deck window  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Astronaut Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, STS 61-C mission specialist, while checking cargo in Columbia's payload bay, turns to smile at a fellow crewman using a 35mm camera. Some of the camera gear onboard the spacecraft is affixed above the mission specialist's right shoulder.

1986-01-01

9

Optical characterization of the 62-cm telescope at the Severo Diaz Galindo Observatory in Guadalajara  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the results of the optical characterization of the mirrors of the telescope of 62cm observatory "SEVERO DIAZ GALINDO" property of the University of Guadalajara. We use the Ronchi test and a spherometer to measure by first time, the radius of curvature for the primary and secondary mirror, the parameters of the telescope system were obtained by using the commercial software ZEMAX. We confirm that both mirrors are adequate to work in the telescope configuration and to do optical astronomy.

Nuñez, J. Manuel; de La Fuente, Eduardo; Luna, Esteban; Herrera, Joel; Velazquez, Enrique; García, Fernando; López, Eduardo; Váldez, Jorge; García, Benjamín; Martínez, Benjamín; Guisa, Gerardo; Quiroz, Fernando; Colorado, Enrique; Ochoa, José Luis; Almaguer, Jaime; Chávez, Arturo

2009-09-01

10

STS-91 M.S. Franklin Chang-Diaz and Janet Kavandi participate in CEIT  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-91 Mission Specialists Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D., and Janet Kavandi, Ph.D., participate in the Crew Equipment Interface Test, or CEIT, in KSC's Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 2. During CEIT, the crew have an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads with which they'll be working on-orbit. The STS-91 crew are scheduled to launch aboard the Shuttle Discovery for the ninth and final docking with the Russian Space Station Mir from KSC's Launch Pad 39A on May 28 at 8:05 EDT.

1998-01-01

11

[Effect of gene disruption of aveD on avermectins production in Streptomyces avermitilis].  

PubMed

Recombinant plasmid pCZ2(pKC1139::475 bp aveD) was used for aveD gene disruption in Streptomyces avermitilis 76-9. The plasmid was inserted into the chromosome by homogenous recombination between partial aveD gene in the plasmid and aveD in the chromosome. Disruptants were confirmed by Southern blotting. Shaking flask experiments and HPLC analysis showed that the disruptant produced only four components, which were C5-oxo-avermectin B1a, B1b, B2a, B2b as identified by UV, IR, NMR, and MS. This revealed that both aveD and aveF were not expressed in the disruptant. This is consistent with that aveD and aveF are in a transcription unit. This paper also provided a new genetic method to obtain C5-oxo-avermectin B-producing strain. PMID:12552909

Chen, Z; Song, Y; Wen, Y; Li, J

2001-08-01

12

Astronauts Jeffrey A. Hoffman (left) and Franklin R. Chang-Diaz hold up a sign to celebrate the fact  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Astronauts Jeffrey A. Hoffman (left) and Franklin R. Chang-Diaz hold up a sign to celebrate the fact that each has surpassed the 1,000-hour mark in space during the flight. The two mission specialists joined three other astronauts and an international payload specialist for 16 days of scientific research aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia.

1996-01-01

13

STS-111 M.S. Chang-Diaz arrives at KSC for launch  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-111 Mission Specialist Franklin Chang-Diaz is happy to be returning to KSC to prepare for launch. Mission STS-111, known as Utilization Flight 2, is carrying supplies and equipment to the International Space Station. The payload includes the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo, the Mobile Base System, which will be installed on the Mobile Transporter to complete the Canadian Mobile Servicing System, or MSS, and a replacement wrist/roll joint for Canadarm 2. The mechanical arm will then have the capability to 'inchworm' from the U.S. Lab Destiny to the MSS and travel along the truss to work sites. Also on board will be Expedition 5, traveling to the Station on Space Shuttle Endeavour as the replacement crew for Expedition 4, who will return to Earth aboard the orbiter. Launch is scheduled for May 30, 2002.

2002-01-01

14

Geophysical Logs of Selected Test Wells at the Diaz Chemical Superfund Site in Holley, New York  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In June and July 2006, geophysical logs were collected and analyzed along with rock-core samples to define the bedrock stratigraphy and flow zones penetrated by four test wells at the Diaz Chemical Superfund site at Holley in eastern Orleans County, New York. The work was completed as a preliminary part of the investigation of contamination by organic compounds in the shale, mudstone, and sandstone bedrock. The geophysical logs included natural-gamma, caliper, borehole image, fluid properties, and flowmeter data. The orientation of fractures in the boreholes was inferred from the log data and summarized in stereo and tadpole plots; the transmissivity and hydraulic head was also determined for fracture zones that were observed to be hydraulically active through the flowmeter logs. The data are intended in part for use in the remediation of the site.

Eckhardt, David A. V.; Anderson, J. Alton

2007-01-01

15

15. WEST SIDE OF 1900 BLOCK, PACIFIC AVE. FROM RIGHT; ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

15. WEST SIDE OF 1900 BLOCK, PACIFIC AVE. FROM RIGHT; 1920-22 PACIFIC AVE., WIEGAL COMPANY CANDY FACTORY (1904); 1924-26 PACIFIC AVE., CAMPBELL BUILDING (DAVIS BUILDING) (1890); 1928-30 PACIFIC AVE., REESE-CRANDALL & REDMAN BUILDING, (1890); 1932-36 PACIFIC AVE., MC DONALD & SMITH BUILDING (1890); 1938-48 PACIFIC AVE., F.S. HARMON COMPANY WAREHOUSE (1908), DESIGNED BY CARL AUGUST DARMER. - Union Depot Area Study, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

16

Health assessment for General Electric Wiring Devices, Juana Diaz, Puerto Rico, Region 2. CERCLIS No. PRD090282757. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The General Electric Wiring (GEW) Devices Site is located in Juana Diaz, Puerto Rico. Activities at the site primarily involved production of electrical devices, including switch buttons containing elemental mercury. Broken buttons, containing traces of mercury, were discarded in the waste fill at GEW over a period of 20 years. Mercury was later found to be present in the upper 2-3 feet of soil in the waste fill, and also in the surface soils to the west and south of the fill. Trichloroethylene was also used at the site and on one occasion was observed in ground water. A residential area exists a few hundred feet south of the fill area and its population and others in the general area are potentially at risk from the contaminants through exposure to ground water and contact with contaminated soils.

Not Available

1988-03-16

17

Geophysical Logs of Selected Wells at the Diaz Chemical Superfund Site in the Village of Holley, New York, 2009  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Geophysical logs were collected and analyzed to define the bedrock fracture patterns and flow zones penetrated by three wells at the Diaz Chemical Superfund Site in the Village of Holley in Orleans County, New York. The work was conducted in December 2009 as part of the investigation of contamination by organic compounds in the shale, mudstone, and sandstone bedrock at the Site. The geophysical logs include natural-gamma, caliper, borehole image, fluid properties, and flowmeter data. The orientation of fractures in the boreholes was inferred from the log data and summarized in stereo and tadpole plots; when possible, the transmissivity and hydraulic head was also determined for fracture zones that were observed to be hydraulically active through the flowmeter logs. The data are intended, in part, for use in the remediation of the site.

Eckhardt, David A.V.; Anderson, J. Alton

2010-01-01

18

STS-46 MS Hoffman and MS Chang-Diaz wear masks during pre-breathe on OV-104  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-46 Mission Specialist (MS) and Payload Commander (PLC) Jeffrey A. Hoffman and MS Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, wearing breathing apparatus masks, pose on the forward flight deck of Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, during pre-breathe session. With the possibility of an extravehicular activity (EVA) being added to the STS-46 agenda, the astronauts reported to this station and began the 'pre-breathe' process when problems developed during the extension of the Tethered Satellite System 1 (TSS-1). When the human body is exposed to a sudden decrease in atmospheric pressure (for instance, from the 10.2 ppsi in the crew cabin to the 4.5 ppsi of the extravehicular mobility unit (EMU)), nitrogen traces in the bloodstream will expand. This expansion can create tiny bubbles and potential for the 'bends'. In order to lessen the effect, an astronaut must 'pre-breathe' pure oxygen (the same pure oxygen he will breathe in the suit) to help 'purge' nitrogen from his bloodstream before exerting himself

1992-01-01

19

AVE-SESAME Program for the REEDA System.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The REEDA system software was modified and improved to process the AVE-SESAME severe storm data. A random access file system for the AVE storm data was designed, tested, and implemented. The AVE/SESAME software was modified to incorporate the random acces...

J. S. Hickey

1981-01-01

20

ANATOMIA DA SIRINGE DOS DENDROCOLAPTIDAE (AVES, PASSERIFORMES)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Syrinx anatomy of the Dendrocolaptidae (Aves, Passeriformes). The syrinx is the vocal organ of the birds and it corresponds to a modification of the apparatus respiratorius, being at most of the cases, localized at the caudal end of the trachea and the cranial portion of the bronchi. The main purpose of this paper is to describe the syrinx anatomy of

MARCOS A. RAPOSO; ELIZABETH HÖFLING; RENATO GABAN-LIMA; RENATA STOPIGLIA; PATRÍCIA FORMOZO

21

GRANT AVE., FROM SOUTHEAST OF BUILDING #191 (NORTHWEST CORNER OF ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

GRANT AVE., FROM SOUTHEAST OF BUILDING #191 (NORTHWEST CORNER OF POPE & GRANT AVENUES), LOOKING NORTH-NORTHEAST - Fort Leavenworth, Metropolitan Avenue & Seventh Street, Leavenworth, Leavenworth County, KS

22

AVE-SESAME program for the REEDA System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The REEDA system software was modified and improved to process the AVE-SESAME severe storm data. A random access file system for the AVE storm data was designed, tested, and implemented. The AVE/SESAME software was modified to incorporate the random access file input and to interface with new graphics hardware/software now available on the REEDA system. Software was developed to graphically display the AVE/SESAME data in the convention normally used by severe storm researchers. Software was converted to AVE/SESAME software systems and interfaced with existing graphics hardware/software available on the REEDA System. Software documentation was provided for existing AVE/SESAME programs underlining functional flow charts and interacting questions. All AVE/SESAME data sets in random access format was processed to allow developed software to access the entire AVE/SESAME data base. The existing software was modified to allow for processing of different AVE/SESAME data set types including satellite surface and radar data.

Hickey, J. S.

1981-01-01

23

8. Wabash Ave. North. View of Loop and Dan Ryan ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

8. Wabash Ave. North. View of Loop and Dan Ryan Line. Curve at Van Buren St. and Wabash Ave. at center. Dan Ryan line starts at center and runs south (toward bottom of picture). Photo by Jet Lowe. - Union Elevated Railroad, Union Loop, Wells, Van Buren, Lake Streets & Wabash Avenue, Chicago, Cook County, IL

24

View of twofamily house at 520522 Rison Ave., NE, originally ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View of two-family house at 520-522 Rison Ave., NE, originally occupied by workers in nearby mills. Note original asbestos shingle roof - 520-522 Rison Avenue, Northeast (House), Huntsville, Madison County, AL

25

Certhiasomus, a new genus of woodcreeper (Aves: Passeriformes: Dendrocolaptidae)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Phylogenetic analysis of the family Dendrocolaptidae (Aves: Passeriformes) indicates that the two species traditionally placed in the genus Deconychura are not sister taxa. Certhiasomus, a new genus of woodcreeper, is described for one of these species, C. stictolaemus.

Derryberry, Elizabeth; Claramunt, Santiago; Chesser, R. Terry; Aleixo, Alexandre; Cracraft, Joel; Moyle, Robert G.; Brumfield, Robb T.

2010-01-01

26

4. 150105 PACIFIC AVE. SPRAGUE BUILDING (1889). THIS BUILDING SERVED ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

4. 1501-05 PACIFIC AVE. SPRAGUE BUILDING (1889). THIS BUILDING SERVED AS A MODEL FOR MOST OF THE 'JOBBERS' (FOODSTUFF WHOLESALERS) BUILDING IN TACOMA. - Union Depot Area Study, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

27

Enigmatic phylogeny of skuas (Aves:Stercorariidae)  

PubMed Central

Multiple sources of evidence show that the skuas (Aves:Stercorariidae) are a monophyletic group, closely related to gulls (Laridae. On morphological and behavioural evidence the Stercorariidae are divided into two widely divergent genera, Catharacta and Stercorarius, consistent with observed levels of nuclear and mitochondrial gene divergence. Catharacta skuas are large-bodied and with one exception breed in the Southern Hemisphere. Stercorarius skuas otherwise known as jaegers) are smaller bodied and breed exclusively in the Northern Hemisphere. Evidence from both mitochondrial and nuclear genomes and from ectoparasitic lice (Insecta:Phthiraptera) shows that the Pomarine skua, S. pomarinus, which has been recognized as being somewhat intermediate in certain morphological and behavioural characteristics, is much more closely related to species in the genus Catharacta, especially to the Northern Hemisphere-breeding Great skua, C. skua, than it is to the other two Stercorarius skuas, the Arctic skua, S. parasiticus and the Longtailed skua, S. longicaudus. Three possible explanations that might account for this discordant aspect of skua phylogeny are explored. These involve (i) the segregation of ancestral polymorphism, (ii) convergent evolution of morphology and behaviour or (iii) inter-generic hybridization. The available evidence from both nuclear and mitochondrial genomes does not exclude any of these hypotheses. Thus, resolution of this enigma of skua phylogeny awaits further work.

Cohen, B L; Baker, A J; Blechschmidt, K; Dittmann, D L; Furness, R W; Gerwin, J A; Helbig, A J; de Korte, J; Marshall, H D; Palma, R L; Peter, H U; Ramli, R; Siebold, I; Willcox, M S; Wilson, R H; Zink, R M

1997-01-01

28

AVES.NET: The Freshwater Dinoflagellates  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Hosted by AVES.NET, this website about Freshwater Dinoflagellates was created by Victor W. Fazio III and Dr. Susan Carty of Heidelberg College (Tiffin, Ohio). Two main attractions of this site are the Freshwater Dinoflagellate Image Archive, and the Recent Additions-Freshwater Dinoflagellate Images 2003 (from the 2003-04 winter field season). Individual Dinoflagellate image pages generally include a ventral view, dorsal view, or both, and the pages featuring species from Ohio include county distribution maps. Site visitors can email Dr. Carty for permission to use any of the images. The website also contains a List of Freshwater Dinoflagellates in Ohio, some of which link to the individual image pages. Additionally, the site offers a Review of Online Images of Freshwater Dinoflagellates including links to many other host sites, and a link to an online article by Dr. Susan Carty and Daniel E. Wujek entitled _A New Species of Peridinium and New Records of Dinoflagellates and Silica-Scaled Chrysophytes from Belize._ [NL

Carty, Susan; Fazio, Victor W. (1962-)

29

Effects of changing irrigation practices on the ground-water hydrology of the Santa Isabel-Juana Diaz area, south central Puerto Rico  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Prior to 1930, the principal source of water for irrigation in the Santa Isabel-Juana Diaz area was surface water from outside the study area, which was delivered by a complex channel-pond system. Recharge from water applied to the fields, estimated to be 18.7 million of gallons per day, and discharge by ground-water flow to sea, estimated to be 17 million of gallons per day, were the major water- budget components prior to intensive development of the ground-water resources. Development of the ground-water resources after 1930 resulted in a substantial increase in irrigation, primarily furrow irrigation. The surface water supplied by the complex channel-pond system continued to be used and ground-water withdrawals increased sub- stantially. By 1966-68, ground-water recharge from irrigation water applied to the fields, estimated to be 37 million of gallons per day, and discharge by pumpage for irrigation, estimated to be 77 million of gallons per day, were the two major components of the ground-water budget. By 1987, drip irrigation had become the principal method of irrigation in the study area, and surface-water irrigation had, for the most part, been discontinued. The estimated aquifer recharge from irrigation water in 1987 was about 6.6 million of gallons per day, which occurred primarily in the remaining fields where furrow irrigation was still practiced. Although aquifer recharge had been reduced as a result of the conversion from furrow to drip irrigation, water levels in the aquifer were higher in 1987 than in 1968 because of the large reduction in ground-water withdrawals and subsequent recovery of ground-water levels.

Ramos-Gines, Orlando

1994-01-01

30

AVE-SESAME 1: 25-MB sounding data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Seven atmospheric variability experiments (AVE), two atmospheric variability and severe storms experiments (AVSSE), and six atmospheric variability experiment-severe environmental storm and mesoscale experiments (AVE-SESAME) conducted by NASA are discussed. The dates, observation times, and data reports for each of the experiments for which data was processed are listed. The AVE experiments were conducted primarily to study atmospheric variability with emphasis on spatial and temporal in atmospheric structure that can be detected from soundings taken at 3 hr intervals but not seen in soundings taken at 12 hr intervals. The AVSSE experiments were conducted to study atmospheric structure and variability associated with severe storms combining both rawinsonde and aircraft data to provide information on near storm environments. The method of processing is discussed, estimates of the rms errors in the data are presented, an example of contact data is given, and soundings are listed which exhibited abnormal characteristics.

Gerhard, M. L.; Fuelberg, H. E.; Williams, S. F.; Turner, R. E.

1979-01-01

31

A preliminary look at AVE-SESAME 2 conducted on 19-20 April 1979  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Preliminary information on data collected, synoptic conditions, and severe and unusual weather reported during the AVE-SESAME 2 period is presented. The information provides researchers a preliminary look at conditions during the AVE-SESAME 2 period.

Williams, S. F.; Horvath, N.; Turner, R. E.

1980-01-01

32

An Analysis of Motivation for Front Collaboration of AVE-based CPFR Mechanisms  

Microsoft Academic Search

There exist inclination and selection processes in enterprises' front collaboration based on Agile Virtual Enterprises (AVE) and Collaborative Planning, Forecasting and Replenishment (CPFR) mechanisms. This paper analyzes the existing configurations and dynamic features of AVE collaborations; and it also explicates enterprises' management patterns that have shifted from vertical to horizontal integration and have displayed AVE characteristics, corresponding to CPFR mechanism

Tong Shu; Shou Chen; B. L. MacCarthy; Shouyan Wang; Kin Keung Lai; Chi Xie

2007-01-01

33

Pseudasthenes, a new genus of ovenbird (Aves: Passeriformes: Furnariidae)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Phylogenetic analysis of the family Furnariidae (Aves: Passeriformes) indicates that the genus Asthenes is polyphyletic, consisting of two groups that are not sister taxa. Pseudasthenes, a new genus of ovenbird, is described for one of these groups. The four species included in the new genus, formerly placed in Asthenes, are P. humicola, P. patagonica, P. steinbachi, and P. cactorum.

Derryberry, Elizabeth; Claramunt, Santiago; O'Quin, Kelly E.; Aleixo, Alexandre; Chesser, Terry; Remsen, J. V. Jr.; Brumfield, Robb T.

2010-01-01

34

A new crane (Aves: Gruidae) from the Miocene of Germany  

Microsoft Academic Search

Described here is a new fossil species of crane (Aves: Gruidae), Palaeogrus mainburgensis, sp. nov., from the early middle Miocene fossil site of Sandelzhausen in Bavaria, southern Germany. The study includes morphological and metric comparisons with all known Tertiary gruids from Eurasia, along with a discussion of the taxonomic distribution of morphological characters in fossil gruids. The new species is

Ursula B. Göhlich

2003-01-01

35

1. 133842 PACIFIC AVE. ITALIANATE BUILDING ON LEFT IS THE ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. 1338-42 PACIFIC AVE. ITALIANATE BUILDING ON LEFT IS THE CITIZENS BANK AND THE IRVING BUILDING (1888-89). A HOMOGENEOUS DESIGN FOR THREE SEPERATE PROPERTY OWNERS, DESIGNED BY CARL AUGUST DARMER. - Union Depot Area Study, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

36

AVE-SESAME IV: 25 mb sounding data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The rawinsonde sounding program for the AVE-SESAME 4 experiment is descirbed and tabulated data at 25 mb for the 23 National Weather Service and 20 special stations participating in the experiment are presented. Soundings were taken at 3 hr intervals beginning at 1200 GMT on May 9, 1979, and ending at 1200 GMT on May 10, 1979 (nine sounding times). The method of processing is discussed, estimates of the rms errors in the data are presented, and an example of contact data is given. Reasons are given for the termination of soundings below 100 mb, and soundings are listed which exhibit abnormal characteristics.

Sienkiewicz, M. E.; Gilchrist, L. P.; Turner, R. E.

1980-01-01

37

AVE-Sesame 3: 25-MB sounding data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The rawinsonde sounding program for the AVE-SESAME 3 experiment is described and tabulated data at 25-mb intervals from the surface to 25 mb for the 23 National Weather Service and 19 special stations participating in the experiment are presented. Soundings were taken at 3 hr intervals beginning at 1200 GMT on April 25, 1979, and ending at 1200 GMT on April 26, 1979 (nine sounding times). The method of processing is discussed briefly, estimates of the rms errors in the data presented, an example of contact data given, reasons given for the termination of soundings below 100 mb, and soundings listed which exhibit abnormal characteristics.

Williams, S. T.; Gerhard, M. L.; Gilchrist, L. P.; Turner, R. E.

1980-01-01

38

AVE-SESAME 2: The 25-MB sounding data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The rawinsonde sounding program for the AVE-SESAME II experiment is described. Data at 25 mb intervals from the surface to 25 mb for the 23 National Weather Service and 19 special stations participating in the experiment are presented. Soundings were taken at 3 hr intervals beginning at 1200 GMT on April 19, 1979, and ending at 1200 GMT on April 20, 1979 (nine sounding times). The method of processing is discussed briefly, estimates of the rms errors in the data presented, an example of contact data given, reasons given for the termination of soundings below 100 mb, and soundings listed which exhibit abnormal characteristics.

Williams, S. F.; Gerhard, M. L.; Turner, R. E.

1980-01-01

39

AVE-SESAME 6: 25-MB sounding data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The rawinsonde sounding program for the AVE-SESAME 6 experiment is described and tabulated data at 25 mb intervals from the surface to 25 mb for the 23 National Weather Service and 15 special stations participating in the experiment are presented. Soundings were taken at 3 h intervals beginning at 1200 GMT on June 7, 1979, and ending at 1200 GMT on June 8, 1979 (nine sounding times). The method of processing is discussed briefly, estimates of the rms errors in the data presented, an example of contact data given, reasons given for the termination of soundings below 100 mb, and soundings are listed which exhibit abnormal characteristics.

Sienkiewicz, M. E.; Gilchrist, L. P.; Turner, R. E.

1981-01-01

40

1. VIEW OF MILL WORKER HOUSE AT 502 ASKEW AVE. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. VIEW OF MILL WORKER HOUSE AT 502 ASKEW AVE. HOUSE IS 1 1/2 STORY, 3 BAY SIDE GABLE WITH REAR KITCHEN ELL AND PORCH EXTENDING FROM FRONT. LOCKWOOD GREENE ENGINEERS BUILT THIS AND 128 OTHER NEW HOUSES FOR NEW ENGLAND SOUTHERN MILLS IN 1923-1924. THE PREEXISTING MILL VILLAGE NEEDED TO BE EXPANDED TO ACCOMODATE WORKERS FOR THEIR NEW STARK MILL IN HOGANSVILLE. THIS HOUSE WAS BUILT WITH INDOOR PLUMBING, AND ELECTRICITY AT A COST OF APPROXIMATELY $430 PER ROOM. - 502 Askew Avenue (House), 502 Askew Avenue, Hogansville, Troup County, GA

41

NASA's participation in the AVE-SESAME '79 program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center participated with its AVE (Atmospheric Variability Experiment) in a large interagency mesoscale and severe storms experiment identified herein as AVE-SESAME '79 (Atmospheric Variability Experiment-Severe Environmental Storms and Mesoscale Experiment 1979). A primary objective of NASA was to support an effort to acquire carefully edited sets of rawinsonde data during selected severe weather events for use in correlative and diagnostic studies with satellite and radar data obtained at approximately the same times. Data were acquired during six individual 24-h experiments on both the regional and storm scales over a network in the central United States that utilized approximately 20 supplemental rawinsonde sites meshed among 23 standard National Weather Service sites. Included among the six experiments are data obtained between 1200 GMT on April 10 and 1200 GMT on April 11, encompassing the formation and development period for the tornado-producing systems that devastated Wichita Falls, Texas, and other sections of Oklahoma and Texas. The other dates for which data sets are available are April 19-20 and 25-26, May 9-10 and 20-21, and June 7-8, 1979.

Hill, K.; Turner, R. E.; Wilson, G. S.

1979-01-01

42

169. GENERAL VIEW DOWN 6TH AVE. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST DOWN ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

169. GENERAL VIEW DOWN 6TH AVE. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST DOWN 6TH AVE. SHOWING FROM LEFT TO RIGHT, BUILDING 8 (HOSPITAL) WITH PART OF ONE OF ITS 1-STORY WARD WINGS, AND THE 3 ORIGINAL DORMITORY WINGS OF BUILDING 9 (BOQ). - Quonset Point Naval Air Station, Roger Williams Way, North Kingstown, Washington County, RI

43

Ave-CPFR Working Chains on the Basis of Selection Model of Collaborative Credit-Granting Guarantee Approaches  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents AVE and CPFR concepts and their characteristics, establishes and analyzes the AVE-based CPFR working flow, and illustrates the content of the grid resource management and the mission in relation to the corresponding grid resource management system. It focuses on the working flow of the AVE-based CPFR. On this basis, it proposes the AVE-related CPFR mechanism grounded on

Tong Shu; Shou Chen; Chi Xie; Shouyang Wang; Kin Keung Lai

2010-01-01

44

AVE-SEASAME 5: 25-mb sounding data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The rewinsonde sounding program for the AVE-SESAME 5 experiment is described and tubulated data at 25 mb intervals are presented for the 23 National Weather Service stations and 20 special stations participating in the experiment. Soundings were taken at 3-hr intervals beginning at 1200 GMT on May 20, 1979, and ending at 1200 GMT on may 21, 1979 (nine sounding times). A tenth sounding was teken at many special stations between 2100 and 0000 GMT on May 20. The method of processing is discussed, estimates of the rms errors in the data are presented, and an example of contact data is given. Reasons are given for the termination of soundings below 100 mb, and soundings with abnormal characteristics are listed.

Sienkiewicz, M. E.; Gilchrist, L. P.; Turner, R. E.

1981-01-01

45

AVE/VAS 3: 25-mb sounding data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The rawinsonde sounding program for the AVE/VAS 3 experiment is described. Tabulated data are presented at 25-mb intervals for the 24 National Weather Service stations and 14 special stations participating in the experiment. Soundings were taken at 3-hr intervals, beginning at 1200 GMT on March 27, 1982, and ending at 0600 GMT on March 28, 1982 (7 sounding times). An additional sounding was taken at the National Weather Service stations at 1200 GMT on March 28, 1982, at the normal synoptic observation time. The method of processing soundings is briefly discussed, estimates of the RMS errors in the data are presented, and an example of contact data is given. Termination pressures of soundings taken in the mesos-beta-scale network are tabulated, as are observations of ground temperature at a depth of 2 cm.

Sienkiewicz, M. E.

1982-01-01

46

Tarphonomus, a new genus of ovenbird (Aves : Passeriformes : Furnariidae) from South America  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Tarphonomus, a new genus of ovenbird (Aves: Passeriformes: Furnariidae) from South America, is described. Species included in the new genus, formerly placed in Upucerthia, are T. certhioides and T. harterti.

Chesser, R.T.; Brumfield, R.T.

2007-01-01

47

A preliminary look at AVE-SESAME 3 conducted on 25-26 April 1979  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

General weather conditions, including synoptic maps, radar reports, satellite photographs, precipitation areas and amounts, and a summary of severe weather reports are presented. These data provide researchers a preliminary look at conditions during the AVE-SESAME 3 period.

Williams, S. F.; Horvath, N.; Turner, R. E.

1980-01-01

48

Impact evaluation of an Energy $avings Plan project at Holnam Incorporated.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This impact evaluation of four energy conservation measures (ECMs) that were recently installed at Holnam Incorporated (Holnam) was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) as part of an evaluation of its Energy $avings Plan (E$P) Pr...

D. R. Brown G. E. Spanner

1993-01-01

49

Nephroprotection by antifibrotic and anti-inflammatory effects of the vasopeptidase inhibitor AVE7688  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nephroprotection by antifibrotic and anti-inflammatory effects of the vasopeptidase inhibitor AVE7688.BackgroundChronic renal disease substantially increases the risk of cardiovascular events and death. Vasopeptidase inhibitors are known to show a strong antihypertensive effect. In the present study, we investigated the nephroprotective potential of the vasopeptidase inhibitor AVE7688 beyond its antihypertensive effects in a mouse model of progressive renal fibrosis.MethodsCOL4A3 ?\\/? mice

OLIVER GROSS; MARIE-LOUISE KOEPKE; BOGDAN BEIROWSKI; ECKHARD SCHULZE-LOHOFF; STEPHAN SEGERER; MANFRED WEBER

2005-01-01

50

Pressure Contact Sounding Data for NASA's Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE 3)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The basic rawinsonde data are described at each pressure contact from the surface to sounding termination for the 41 stations participating in the AVE III measurement program that began at 0000 GMT on February 6 and ended at 1200 GMT on February 7, 1975. Soundings were taken at 3-hour intervals during a large period of the experiment from most stations within the United States east of about 105 degrees west longitude. Methods of data processing, change in reduction scheme since the AVE II pilot experiment, and data accuracy are briefly discussed. An example of contact data is presented, and microfiche cards of all the contact data are included in the appendix. The AVE III project was conducted to better understand and establish the extent of applications for meteorological satellite sensor data through correlative ground truth experiments and to provide basic experimental data for use in studies of atmospheric scales of-motion interrelationships.

Fuelberg, H. E.; Hill, C. K.; Turner, R. E.; Long, K. E.

1975-01-01

51

Anticoagulant and Antithrombotic Actions of AVE5026, an Enriched Anti-Xa Hemisynthetic Ultra-Low-Molecular-Weight Heparin.  

PubMed

Introduction: AVE5026 represents a new generation of ultra-low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) with high anti-Xa and low anti-IIa activities (anti Xa-IIa ratio >30). In addition, AVE5026 exhibits a relatively higher proportion of AT components. Materials and Methods: The anticoagulant, antiplatelet, antithrombotic, and bleeding effects of AVE5026 in comparison to other heparins were investigated in this study. Results: AVE5026 demonstrated weak effects in the global clotting assays; however, in the amidolytic anti-Xa assay, AVE5026 produced strong inhibitory effects. AVE5026 showed no cross-reactivity with the heparin-induced thrombocytopenia antibodies in the platelet aggregation system. AVE5026 produced a dose-dependent antithrombotic response after intravenous (IV) and subcutaneous (SC) administration in thrombosis models. The relative bleeding effects of AVE5026 in a rat tail bleeding and rabbit blood loss model were negligible after both IV and SC administration. Conclusions: This superior safety efficacy index in animal models in comparison with other LMWH may translate into improved antithrombotic efficacy with decreased bleeding risk. PMID:23482722

Hoppensteadt, Debra A; Gray, Angel; Jeske, Walter P; Walenga, Jeanine M; Fareed, Jawed

2013-03-17

52

Data for First NASA Atmospheric Variability Experiment (Ave 1). Part 1: Data Tabulation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A tablulation is given of rawinsonde data for NASA's first Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE 1) conducted during the period February 19-22, 1964. Methods of data handling and processing, and estimates of error magnitudes are also given. Data taken o...

J. R. Scoggins O. E. Smith

1973-01-01

53

Contenido de metales pesados en hígado y plumas de aves marinas afectadas por el accidente del \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

Resumen: Las aves marinas son organismos situados en la cum- bre de las cadenas alimentarias oceánicas, lo que permite su empleo en programas de biomonitorización para evaluar el efec- to de los más diversos contaminantes sobre estos sensibles eco- sistemas. En el presente trabajo se han analizado las concentra- ciones de distintos metales pesados (Pb, Zn, Cd y Cu) en

Pérez López M; Cid Galán F; Hernández Moreno D; López Beceiro; Fidalgo Álvarez; Soler Rodríguez

2005-01-01

54

MAIN GATE, INTERSECTION OF 4TH AVE (200 NORTH) AND N ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

MAIN GATE, INTERSECTION OF 4TH AVE (200 NORTH) AND N STREET (895 EAST), SALT LAKE CITY, UT. VIEW LOOKING EAST THROUGH MAIN CEMETERY GATE TO CEMETERY'S MAIN STREET, REPHOTOGRAPH OF HISTORIC SHIPLER PHOTO # 18276, UTAH STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY COLLECTION. - Salt Lake City Cemetery, 200 N Street, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT

55

Atlas de aves: Un metodo para documentar distribucion y seguir poblaciones  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Los Atlas de Aves son proyectos nacionales o regionalies para trazar en mapas la distribucion en reproduccion de cada especie de ave. Ese procedimiento se esta usando en Europa, Australia, Nueva Zelanda, Norteamerica, y partes de Africa. El tama?o de los cuadrados varia de medio grado de latitud y Iongitud hasta 5 x 5 km. El trabajo de campo de cada proyecto exige aproxlmadamente cinco a?os, pero los aficionados pueden llevar a cabo la mayor parte del trabajo. Es posible almacenar los resultados en un computador personal. Hay muchos beneficios: (I) se presenta la distribucion corriente de las aves de la nacion, del estado, o de la Iocalidad; (2) se desarrolla nueva informacion especialmente sobre especies raras o en peligro; (3) se descubren areas que tienen una avlfauna sobresaliente o habitats raros y ayuda a su proteccion, (4) se documentan cambios de dlstribucion; (5) se pueden usar para documentar cambios de poblacion, especialmente en los tropicos donde otros metodos son mas dificiles de usar porque hay muchas especies y no hay muchos observadores calificados en la identificacion de sonidos de las aves; (6) son proyectos buenos de investigacion para estudiantes graduados; (7) los turistas y los jefes de excursiones de historia natural pueden contribuir con muchas informaciones

Robbins, C.S.; Dowell, B.A.; Dawson, D.K.

1988-01-01

56

Biogeographical and phylogenetic implications of an early Miocene wren (Aves: Passeriformes: Acanthisittidae) from New Zealand  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new species and genus of acanthisittid wren (Aves: Passeriformes: Acanthisittidae) is described from the Early Miocene (19–16 Ma) St Bathans Fauna from Otago, New Zealand, based on four fossil bones. The first Tertiary fossil passerine to be described from New Zealand, it is similar in size to New Zealand's smallest extant bird, the Rifleman Acanthisitta chloris. A phylogenetic analysis

Trevor H. Worthy; Suzanne J. Hand; Jacqueline M. T. Nguyen; Alan J. D. Tennyson; Jennifer P. Worthy; R. Paul Scofield; Walter E. Boles; Michael Archer

2010-01-01

57

14. 19th ST. AND PACIFIC AVE., SHAUB AND ELLISON BUILDING ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

14. 19th ST. AND PACIFIC AVE., SHAUB AND ELLISON BUILDING (1931) AT CENTER; WALSH AND GARDNER BUILDING (AMERICAN SUPPLY BUILDING) (1911), DESIGNED BY CARL AUGUST DARMER ON LEFT. SNOQUALMIE FALLS POWER COMPANY TRANSFORMER BUILDING IN BACKGROUND. - Union Depot Area Study, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

58

Impact evaluation of an Energy $avings Plan project at Holnam Incorporated  

Microsoft Academic Search

This impact evaluation of four energy conservation measures (ECMs) that were recently installed at Holnam Incorporated (Holnam) was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) as part of an evaluation of its Energy $avings Plan (E$P) Program. The Program makes acquisition payments to firms that install energy conservation measures in their industrial processes. The objective of this impact evaluation was

D. R. Brown; G. E. Spanner

1993-01-01

59

Data for NASA's AVE 4 experiment: 25 mb sounding data and synoptic charts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The AVE IV Experiment is described and tabulated rawinsonde data at 25 mb intervals from the surface to 25 mb for the 42 stations participating in the experiment are presented. Soundings were taken between 0000 GMT, April 24, and 1,200 GMT, April 25, 1975. The methods of data processing and accuracy are briefly discussed. Synoptic charts prepared from the data are presented, as well as an example of contact data.

Fucik, N. F.; Turner, R. E.

1976-01-01

60

Complete mitochondrial genome of the Baikal teal Anas formosa (Aves, Anseriformes, Anatidae).  

PubMed

The Baikal teal Anas formosa (Aves, Anseriformes, Anatidae) is classified as "Vulnerable" on the IUCN Red List. Here, whole mitochondrial genome of A. formosa was amplified and sequenced. The total length of the Baikal teal mitochondrial genome is 16,594 bp, which consists of 13 protein-coding, 2 rRNA, 22 tRNA genes and 1 control region. The characteristics of the mitochondrial genomes were analyzed and discussed in detail. PMID:22040069

Ryu, Shi Hyun; Hwang, Ui Wook

2011-08-01

61

Fossils reveal an early Miocene presence of the aberrant gruiform Aves: Aptornithidae in New Zealand  

Microsoft Academic Search

A member of the New Zealand endemic family (Aves: Aptornithidae) is described from the Early Miocene St Bathans Fauna of Central\\u000a Otago, South Island, New Zealand. The new species, based on two thoracic vertebrae, is provisionally referred to the highly\\u000a distinctive Late Pleistocene–Holocene extinct genus Aptornis Mantell, 1848 (in Quart J Geol Soc Lond 4:225–238, 1848). It differs from both

Trevor H. WorthyAlan; Alan J. D. Tennyson; R. Paul Scofield

2011-01-01

62

The eNOS enhancer AVE 9488: a novel cardioprotectant against ischemia reperfusion injury  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nitric oxide (NO) is an important regulator of vascular and myocardial function. Cardiac ischemia\\/reperfusion injury is reduced\\u000a in mice overexpressing endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) suggesting cardioprotection by eNOS. Novel pharmacological substances,\\u000a so called eNOS enhancers, upregulate eNOS expression and thereby increase NO production. We tested the effects of the eNOS\\u000a enhancer AVE 9488 on cardiac ischemia\\/reperfusion injury in vivo in

S. Frantz; A. Adamek; D. Fraccarollo; J. Tillmanns; J. D. Widder; C. Dienesch; A. Schäfer; A. Podolskaya; M. Held; H. Ruetten; G. Ertl; J. Bauersachs

2009-01-01

63

From the corner of E. Mccloskey Ave. and N. 10th ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

From the corner of E. Mccloskey Ave. and N. 10th St., looking west with building 135 (gas station) on the left. Beyond it is building 119 and to the right of 119 is the gable end of the north side of 120. Beyond and perpendicular to building 120 are 118 and 117. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Bounded by East Colfax to south, Peoria Street to west, Denver City/County & Adams County Line to north, & U.S. Route 255 to east, Aurora, Adams County, CO

64

Effect of Treatment of Sprague Dawley Rats with AVE7688, Enalapril, or Candoxatril on Diet-Induced Obesity  

PubMed Central

The objective of this study was to determine the effect of AVE7688, a drug that inhibits both angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and neutral endopeptidase (NEP) activity, on neural and vascular defects caused by diet induced obesity (DIO). Rats at 12 weeks of age were fed a standard or high fat diet with or without AVE7688 for 24 weeks. DIO rats had impaired glucose tolerance and developed sensory neuropathy. Vascular relaxation to acetylcholine and calcitonin gene-related peptide was decreased in epineurial arterioles of DIO rats. Rats fed a high fat diet containing AVE7688 did not become obese and vascular and sensory nerve dysfunction and impaired glucose tolerance were improved. DIO is associated with increased expression of NEP in epineurial arterioles. NEP degrades vasoactive peptides which may explain the decrease in neurovascular function in DIO.

Davidson, Eric P.; Coppey, Lawrence J.; Dake, Brian; Yorek, Mark A.

2011-01-01

65

AVE3085, an enhancer of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, restores endothelial function and reduces blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Nitric oxide (NO) plays an important role in endothelial function, and impaired NO production is involved in hypertension. Therefore, compounds that regulate endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) may be of therapeutic benefit. A novel, low molecular weight compound AVE3085 is a recently developed compound with the ability to enhance eNOS transcription. The present study investigated the effects of AVE3085 in endothelial dysfunction associated with hypertension. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) were treated with AVE 3085 (10 mg·kg·day?1, orally) for 4 weeks. Isometric force measurement was performed on rings of isolated aortae in organ baths. Protein expression of eNOS, phosphorylated-eNOS and nitrotyrosine in the aortae were examined by Western blotting. mRNA for eNOS in rat aortae were examined by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). KEY RESULTS AVE3085 greatly improved endothelium-dependent relaxations in the aortae of SHRs. This functional change was accompanied by up-regulated expression of eNOS protein and mRNA, enhanced eNOS phosphorylation and decreased formation of nitrotyrosine. Furthermore, AVE3085 treatment reduced the blood pressure in SHR without affecting that of hypertensive eNOS?/? mice. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS The eNOS-transcription enhancer AVE3085 restored impaired endothelial function in a hypertensive model. The present study provides a solid basis for the potential development of eNOS-targeting drugs to restore down-regulated eNOS, as a new strategy in hypertension.

Yang, Qin; Xue, Hong-Mei; Wong, Wing-Tak; Tian, Xiao-Yu; Huang, Yu; Tsui, Stephen KW; Ng, Patrick KS; Wohlfart, Paulus; Li, Huige; Xia, Ning; Tobias, Silke; Underwood, Malcolm John; He, Guo-Wei

2011-01-01

66

Comparative morphometric study of the vestibular system of the vertebrata: reptilia, aves, amphibia, and pisces.  

PubMed

Morphometric measurements were made from serial sections of the vestibular system in four classes of vertebrates: Reptilia, Aves, Amphibia, and Pisces. Representative species of reptile studied were the lizard (Gekko gecko), the common garter snake (Thamnophis sp.), and the common turtle (Chelonia sp.). The budgie (Melopsittacus undulatas), the common pigeon (Columba domestica), the yellow-bellied sapsucker (Sphyrapicus varius), and the horned owl (Bubo virginianus) were chosen as representative of the bird. For the amphibian, the leopard frog (Rana pipiens), and the mud puppy (Necturus maculatus) were chosen for study. As representative of the fish, the goldfish (Carassius auratus), the tilapia (Tilapia mossambica), the guppy (Lebistes sp.), and the sea horse (Hippocampus sp.) were used in these measurements. The morphometric data obtained were then used in estimates of the time constants in the Steinhausen equation which describes the biophysics of fluid flow in the semicircular canals. In general, the time constants (theta/II in the Steinhausen equation) of these representatives of Reptilia, Aves, and Amphibia were of magnitude similar to those reported in mammals, despite the dissimilarities in the diameters of the ducts, the duct radii of curvature, the dimensions of the cristae ampullares and the utricle, and volumes of endolymph within the vestibular system. However, the short-time constants in Pisces were larger (therefore providing a slower response) than those in other vertebrates, and were similar to that of the turtle and the mud puppy. PMID:3485883

Ramprashad, F; Landolt, J P; Money, K E; Laufer, J

1986-01-01

67

Radiological verification survey results at 3 Peck Ave., Pequannock, New Jersey (PJ002V)  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) conducted remedial action during 1993 at the Pompton Plains Railroad Spur and eight vicinity properties in the Wayne and Pequannock Townships in New Jersey as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). These properties are in the vicinity of the DOE-owned Wayne Interim Storage Site (WISS), formerly the W.R. Grace facility. The property at 3 Peck Ave., Pequannock, New Jersey is one of these vicinity properties. At the request of DOE, a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted an independent radiological verification survey at this property. The purpose of the survey, conducted between September and December 1993, was to confirm the success of the remedial actions performed to remove any radioactive materials in excess of the identified guidelines. The verification survey included surface gamma scans and gamma readings at 1 meter, beta-gamma scans, and the collection of soil and debris samples for radionuclide analysis. Results of the survey demonstrated that all radiological measurements on the property at 3 Peck Ave. were within applicable DOE guidelines. Based on the results of the remedial action data and confirmed by the verification survey data, the portions of the site that had been remediated during this action successfully meet the DOE remedial action objectives.

Rodriguez, R.E.; Johnson, C.A.

1995-05-01

68

Efeitos da Exploração Madeireira de Baixo Impacto sobre uma Comunidade de Aves de Sub-bosque na Floresta Nacional do Tapajós, Pará, Brasil  

Microsoft Academic Search

RESUMO Este estudo compara a resposta de uma comunidade aves à exploração madeireira de baixo impacto através da distribuição das espécies em floresta controle e manejada ao longo de cinco anos com amostragem pré e pós-exploração. O procedimento de ordenação mostrou que a similaridade da comunidade de aves após a exploração madeireira foi menor que a similaridade entre as amostras

Luiza Magalli; Pinto HENRIQUES; Joseph M. WUNdERLE; C. OREN; Michael R. WILLIG

69

The evolution dynamics of the Strigiformes in the Mediterranean islands with the description of Aegolius martae n. sp. (Aves, Strigidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Living and fossil owls (Aves, Strigiformes) constitute an important group for understanding the evolutionary dynamics of birds in island environments. After their different trends in island evolution, the Strigiformes can be seen as a representative of insular adaptations of birds as a whole. In fact they respond quickly to isolation with deep changes in body size, including dwarfism and gigantism,

Marco Pavia

2008-01-01

70

Complete mitochondrial genome of the peregrine falcon Falco peregrinus (Aves, Falconiformes, Falconidae): genetic differences between the two individuals.  

PubMed

The peregrine falcon Falco peregrinus (Aves, Falconiformes, Falconidae) is one of the most common and widespread raptor species in the world. Here, the complete mitochondrial genome of F. peregrinus from Korea, which is one of the breeding ranges, was sequenced and characterized in detail. PMID:22409757

Ryu, Shi Hyun; Lee, Jin Hee; Hwang, Ui Wook

2012-04-01

71

A partial skeleton of a new fossil loon (Aves, Gaviiformes) from the early Oligocene of Germany with preserved stomach content  

Microsoft Academic Search

A partial skeleton of a new fossil loon (Aves, Gaviiformes), ? Colymboides metzleri n.sp., is described from the early Oligocene (Rupelian) of Frauenweiler in Germany. The new species resembles the early Miocene species Colymboides minutus in size and overall morphology, but differs in several osteological details. The specimen represents the first associated remains of an early Tertiary loon. Preserved stomach

Gerald Mayr

2004-01-01

72

Characteristics of ageostrophic flow in the vicinity of a severe weather outbreak - AVE-SESAME I  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

GOES satellite data was used to examine the ageostrophic flow in the vicinity of severe weather outbreaks along the Red River between Texas and Oklahoma in April 1979. The observations were part of the NASA AVE-SESAME I data on atmospheric states close to severe weather conditions. The Barnes Objective Analysis Technique was employed to analyze the data on a 100 km grid. The ageostrophic wind was defined on a regional scale from satellite data on different levels of cloud wind vectors, with a height change signalling a short-wave system in a long-wave trough. The percentage of deviation of the subgeostrophic winds from the geostrophic wind was calculated, and maximum departure corresponded with the region of greatest storm development. Time cross sections of additions to the ageostrophic flow were made as a function of pressure at 100 mb intervals from 900-100 mb. The ageostrophic acceleration was consistently twice the geostrophic acceleration.

Arnold, J. E.

1982-01-01

73

A Megafauna's Microfauna: Gastrointestinal Parasites of New Zealand's Extinct Moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes)  

PubMed Central

We perform the first multidisciplinary study of parasites from an extinct megafaunal clade using coprolites from the New Zealand moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes). Ancient DNA and microscopic analyses of 84 coprolites deposited by four moa species (South Island giant moa, Dinornis robustus; little bush moa, Anomalopteryx didiformis; heavy-footed moa, Pachyornis elephantopus; and upland moa, Megalapteryx didinus) reveal an array of gastrointestinal parasites including coccidians (Cryptosporidium and members of the suborder Eimeriorina), nematodes (Heterakoidea, Trichostrongylidae, Trichinellidae) and a trematode (Echinostomida). Parasite eggs were most prevalent and diverse in coprolites from lowland sites, where multiple sympatric moa species occurred and host density was therefore probably higher. Morphological and phylogenetic evidence supports a possible vicariant Gondwanan origin for some of the moa parasites. The discovery of apparently host-specific parasite taxa suggests paleoparasitological studies of megafauna coprolites may provide useful case-studies of coextinction.

Wood, Jamie R.; Wilmshurst, Janet M.; Rawlence, Nicolas J.; Bonner, Karen I.; Worthy, Trevor H.; Kinsella, John M.; Cooper, Alan

2013-01-01

74

Data for NASA's AVE 3 experiment: 25-mb sounding data and synoptic charts. [investigation of atmospheric parameters detected from satellite data under conditions of heavy snow cover  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The atmospheric variability experiment (AVE 3) is described and tabulated rawinsonde data at 25-mb intervals from the surface to 25 mb for the 41 stations is presented. The experiment was conducted between February 6 and February 7, 1975. Brief discussions are given on methods of data processing, changes in the reduction scheme since the AVE 2 pilot experiment, and data accuracy. An example of contact data is presented as well as synoptic charts prepared from the data.

Fuelberg, H. E.; Turner, R. E.

1975-01-01

75

Multilocus perspectives on the monophyly and phylogeny of the order Charadriiformes (Aves)  

PubMed Central

Background The phylogeny of shorebirds (Aves: Charadriiformes) and their putative sister groups was reconstructed using approximately 5 kilobases of data from three nuclear loci and two mitochondrial genes, and compared to that based on two other nuclear loci. Results Charadriiformes represent a monophyletic group that consists of three monophyletic suborders Lari (i.e., Laridae [including Sternidae and Rynchopidae], Stercorariidae, Alcidae, Glareolidae, Dromadidae, and Turnicidae), Scolopaci (i.e., Scolopacidae [including Phalaropidae], Jacanidae, Rostratulidae, Thinocoridae, Pedionomidae), and Charadrii (i.e., Burhinidae, Chionididae, Charadriidae, Haematopodidae, Recurvirostridae, and presumably Ibidorhynchidae). The position of purported "gruiform" buttonquails within Charadriiformes is confirmed. Skimmers are most likely sister to terns alone, and plovers may be paraphyletic with respect to oystercatchers and stilts. The Egyptian Plover is not a member of the Glareolidae, but is instead relatively basal among Charadrii. None of the putative sisters of Charadriiformes were recovered as such. Conclusion Hypotheses of non-monophyly and sister relationships of shorebirds are tested by multilocus analysis. The monophyly of and interfamilial relationships among shorebirds are confirmed and refined. Lineage-specific differences in evolutionary rates are more consistent across loci in shorebirds than other birds and may contribute to the congruence of locus-specific phylogenetic estimates in shorebirds.

Fain, Matthew G; Houde, Peter

2007-01-01

76

A molecular phylogeny of Pacific honeyeaters (Aves: Meliphagidae) reveals extensive paraphyly and an isolated Polynesian radiation.  

PubMed

We investigated the molecular phylogenetic placement of 14 species of Pacific island honeyeaters (Aves: Meliphagidae) in the broader context of an existing family-level phylogeny. We examined the evolutionary history of Pacific honeyeater lineages to assess the accuracy of current taxonomies and to evaluate their biogeographic history. We compare these biogeographic patterns to other Pacific birds to identify emergent patterns across lineages. We found strong support for a previously unknown endemic radiation in central Polynesia, which comprises five genera: Meliarchus, Guadalcanaria, Gymnomyza, Xanthotis, and Foulehaio. Conversely, other Pacific lineages were found to be strongly allied with continental radiations (e.g., Philemon eichhorni, P. cockerelli, and Lichmera incana). Our results necessitated taxonomic changes, both at the generic level (e.g., Xanthotis, Melidectes/Vosea, and Glycifohia/Gliciphila) and regarding species limits within polytypic species. Here, we discuss species limits in Foulehaio and Gymnomyza and recommend elevating three nominal subspecies of Foulehaio to species status, each of which forms well-differentiated clades. PMID:24315868

Andersen, Michael J; Naikatini, Alivereti; Moyle, Robert G

2014-02-01

77

Coprolite deposits reveal the diet and ecology of the extinct New Zealand megaherbivore moa (Aves, Dinornithiformes)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The discovery in New Zealand of Late Holocene deposits of coprolites from extinct avian megaherbivores has provided a unique opportunity to gain a detailed insight into the ecology of these birds across ecologically diverse habitats. Macrofossil analysis of 116 coprolites of the giant ratite moa (Aves, Dinornithiformes) reveals a diverse diet of herbs and low shrubs in both semi-arid and high rainfall ecological zones, overturning previous models of moa as dominantly browsers of trees and shrubs. Ancient DNA analysis identified coprolites from four moa species (South Island giant moa, Dinornis robustus; upland moa, Megalapteryx didinus; heavy-footed moa, Pachyornis elephantopus and stout-legged moa, Euryapteryx gravis), revealing a larger dietary variation between habitat types than between species. The new data confirm that moa fed on a variety of endemic plant taxa with unusual growth forms previously suggested to have co-evolved with moa. Lastly, the feeding ecologies of moa are shown to be widely different to introduced mammalian herbivores.

Wood, Jamie R.; Rawlence, Nicolas J.; Rogers, Geoffery M.; Austin, Jeremy J.; Worthy, Trevor H.; Cooper, Alan

2008-12-01

78

Molecular phylogeny of the spoonbills (Aves: Threskiornithidae) based on mitochondrial DNA  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Spoonbills (genus Platalea) are a small group of wading birds, generally considered to constitute the subfamily Plataleinae (Aves: Threskiornithidae). We reconstructed phylogenetic relationships among the six species of spoonbills using variation in sequences of the mitochondrial genes ND2 and cytochrome b (total 1796 bp). Topologies of phylogenetic trees reconstructed using maximum likelihood, maximum parsimony, and Bayesian analyses were virtually identical and supported monophyly of the spoonbills. Most relationships within Platalea received strong support: P. minor and P. regia were closely related sister species, P. leucorodia was sister to the minor-regia clade, and P. alba was sister to the minor-regia-leucorodia clade. Relationships of P. flavipes and P. ajaja were less well resolved: these species either formed a clade that was sister to the four-species clade, or were successive sisters to this clade. This phylogeny is consistent with ideas of relatedness derived from spoonbill morphology. Our limited sampling of the Threskiornithinae (ibises), the putative sister group to the spoonbills, indicated that this group is paraphyletic, in agreement with previous molecular data; this suggests that separation of the Threskiornithidae into subfamilies Plataleinae and Threskiornithinae may not be warranted. Copyright ?? 2010. Magnolia Press.

Chesser, R. T.; Yeung, C. K. L.; Yao, C. -T.; Tian, X. -H.; Li, S. -H.

2010-01-01

79

Molecular phylogeny of the spoonbills (Aves: Threskiornithidae) based on mitochondrial DNA  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Spoonbills (genus Platalea) are a small group of wading birds, generally considered to constitute the subfamily Plataleinae (Aves: Threskiornithidae). We reconstructed phylogenetic relationships among the six species of spoonbills using variation in sequences of the mitochondrial genes ND2 and cytochrome b (total 1796 bp). Topologies of phylogenetic trees reconstructed using maximum likelihood, maximum parsimony, and Bayesian analyses were virtually identical and supported monophyly of the spoonbills. Most relationships within Platalea received strong support: P. minor and P. regia were closely related sister species, P. leucorodia was sister to the minor-regia clade, and P. alba was sister to the minor-regia-leucorodia clade. Relationships of P. flavipes and P. ajaja were less well resolved: these species either formed a clade that was sister to the four-species clade, or were successive sisters to this clade. This phylogeny is consistent with ideas of relatedness derived from spoonbill morphology. Our limited sampling of the Threskiornithinae (ibises), the putative sister group to the spoonbills, indicated that this group is paraphyletic, in agreement with previous molecular data; this suggests that separation of the Threskiornithidae into subfamilies Plataleinae and Threskiornithinae may not be warranted.

Chesser, R. Terry; Yeung, Carol K. L.; Yao, Cheng-Te; Tian, Xiu-Hua; Li, Shou-Hsien

2010-01-01

80

A synoptic analysis of the first AVE-SESAME '79 period  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Key features of a severe convection observed during April 10-11, 1979 as part of the Atmospheric Variability Experiment-Severe Environmental Storms and Mesoscale Experiment (AVE-SESAME) are examined. Three-hourly rawinsonde readings from 23 stations were taken, and vertical motion and divergence parameters are considered. The data were converted into a 127 km grid at the surface, and at 50 mb intervals from 900 mb to 100 mb by an objective analysis scheme, while a kinematic method was used to compute vertical motion. A weak upper tropospheric short wave trough was found to propagate from New Mexico into the Texas panhandle, while a jet maximum propagated eastward. The development of a strong wind maximum over Oklahoma and Kansas was associated with a rapid increase in upper-level divergence and the development of a small-scale pressure perturbation in the Texas panhandle, as well as a low-level jet and convergence, which led to rapid changes over the Red River Valley, where stability was decreased.

Moore, J. T.; Fuelberg, H. E.

1981-01-01

81

Resolving lost herbivore community structure using coprolites of four sympatric moa species (Aves: Dinornithiformes)  

PubMed Central

Knowledge of extinct herbivore community structuring is essential for assessing the wider ecological impacts of Quaternary extinctions and determining appropriate taxon substitutes for rewilding. Here, we demonstrate the potential for coprolite studies to progress beyond single-species diet reconstructions to resolving community-level detail. The moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes) of New Zealand are an intensively studied group of nine extinct herbivore species, yet many details of their diets and community structuring remain unresolved. We provide unique insights into these aspects of moa biology through analyses of a multispecies coprolite assemblage from a rock overhang in a montane river valley in southern New Zealand. Using ancient DNA (aDNA), we identified 51 coprolites, which included specimens from four sympatric moa species. Pollen, plant macrofossils, and plant aDNA from the coprolites chronicle the diets and habitat preferences of these large avian herbivores during the 400 y before their extinction (?1450 AD). We use the coprolite data to develop a paleoecological niche model in which moa species were partitioned based on both habitat (forest and valley-floor herbfield) and dietary preferences, the latter reflecting allometric relationships between body size, digestive efficiency, and nutritional requirements. Broad ecological niches occupied by South Island giant moa (Dinornis robustus) and upland moa (Megalapteryx didinus) may reflect sexual segregation and seasonal variation in habitat use, respectively. Our results show that moa lack extant ecological analogs, and their extinction represents an irreplaceable loss of function from New Zealand’s terrestrial ecosystems.

Wood, Jamie R.; Wilmshurst, Janet M.; Richardson, Sarah J.; Rawlence, Nicolas J.; Wagstaff, Steven J.; Worthy, Trevor H.; Cooper, Alan

2013-01-01

82

Resolving lost herbivore community structure using coprolites of four sympatric moa species (Aves: Dinornithiformes).  

PubMed

Knowledge of extinct herbivore community structuring is essential for assessing the wider ecological impacts of Quaternary extinctions and determining appropriate taxon substitutes for rewilding. Here, we demonstrate the potential for coprolite studies to progress beyond single-species diet reconstructions to resolving community-level detail. The moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes) of New Zealand are an intensively studied group of nine extinct herbivore species, yet many details of their diets and community structuring remain unresolved. We provide unique insights into these aspects of moa biology through analyses of a multispecies coprolite assemblage from a rock overhang in a montane river valley in southern New Zealand. Using ancient DNA (aDNA), we identified 51 coprolites, which included specimens from four sympatric moa species. Pollen, plant macrofossils, and plant aDNA from the coprolites chronicle the diets and habitat preferences of these large avian herbivores during the 400 y before their extinction (?1450 AD). We use the coprolite data to develop a paleoecological niche model in which moa species were partitioned based on both habitat (forest and valley-floor herbfield) and dietary preferences, the latter reflecting allometric relationships between body size, digestive efficiency, and nutritional requirements. Broad ecological niches occupied by South Island giant moa (Dinornis robustus) and upland moa (Megalapteryx didinus) may reflect sexual segregation and seasonal variation in habitat use, respectively. Our results show that moa lack extant ecological analogs, and their extinction represents an irreplaceable loss of function from New Zealand's terrestrial ecosystems. PMID:24082104

Wood, Jamie R; Wilmshurst, Janet M; Richardson, Sarah J; Rawlence, Nicolas J; Wagstaff, Steven J; Worthy, Trevor H; Cooper, Alan

2013-10-15

83

Pathology-specific effects of the IKur/Ito/IK,ACh blocker AVE0118 on ion channels in human chronic atrial fibrillation  

PubMed Central

Background and purpose This study was designed to establish the pathology-specific inhibitory effects of the IKur/Ito/IK,ACh blocker AVE0118 on atrium-selective channels and its corresponding effects on action potential shape and effective refractory period in patients with chronic AF (cAF). Experimental approach Outward K+-currents of right atrial myocytes and action potentials of atrial trabeculae were measured with whole-cell voltage clamp and microelectrode techniques, respectively. Outward currents were dissected by curve fitting. Key results Four components of outward K+-currents and AF-specific alterations in their properties were identified. Ito was smaller in cAF than in SR, and AVE0118 (10??M) apparently accelerated its inactivation in both groups without reducing its amplitude. Amplitudes of rapidly and slowly inactivating components of IKur were lower in cAF than in SR. The former was abolished by AVE0118 in both groups, the latter was partially blocked in SR, but not in cAF, even though its inactivation was apparently accelerated in cAF. The large non-inactivating current component was similar in magnitude in both groups, but decreased by AVE0118 only in SR. AVE0118 strongly suppressed AF-related constitutively active IK,ACh and prolonged atrial action potential and effective refractory period exclusively in cAF. Conclusions and implications In atrial myocytes of cAF patients, we detected reduced function of distinct IKur components that possessed decreased component-specific sensitivity to AVE0118 most likely as a consequence of AF-induced electrical remodelling. Inhibition of profibrillatory constitutively active IK,ACh may lead to pathology-specific efficacy of AVE0118 that is likely to contribute to its ability to convert AF into SR.

Christ, T; Wettwer, E; Voigt, N; Hala, O; Radicke, S; Matschke, K; Varro, A; Dobrev, D; Ravens, U

2008-01-01

84

"Represento el Pasado": Political Melodrama and Jesus Diaz's "Lejania."  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Traces contemporary literary analyses of Latin American melodrama and the romance, looking especially at the work of Peter Brooks and Janice Radway. Suggests that the film "Lejania" produces a spectatorship of shifting positionalities, which mitigate against a passive spectatorship that would serve as a reactionary force. (RS)

Silcox, S. Travis

1993-01-01

85

Energy-integrated dairy farm, Juana Diaz: Progress report  

SciTech Connect

Work continued during the fourth quarter on the Phase II ''greenfeed'' subsystem which received approval from DOE-Idaho in June of 1982. New work initiated during the fourth quarter concerned the remaining Phase II components which received DOE approval during October 1982.

Not Available

1982-02-18

86

Argas (Persicargas) keiransi n. sp. (Acari: Argasidae), a parasite of the Chimango, Milvago c. chimango (Aves: Falconiformes) in Chile.  

PubMed

The larva of Argas (Persicargas) keiransi Estrada-Peña, Venzal & González-Acuña n. sp. is described from specimens collected on the neck of a chimango, Milvago c. chimango (Aves: Falconiformes) in the Chillán, Chile, in the Sub-Antarctic biogeographical region. The larva of the new species shares the tarsus I setal formula with A. (P.) giganteus, these being the only two Persicargas species with three pairs of ventral setae plus both av4 and pv4 setae. However, it is unique in having a dorsal plate "V" or "U" shaped, with the anterior end open, without the typical reticulated pattern present in the remaining species of the genus. PMID:14765651

Estrada-Peña, A; Venzal, J M; González-Acuña, D; Guglielmone, A A

2003-11-01

87

Serologic, parasitic, and bacteriologic assessment of captive cracids (Aves: Galliformes: Cracidae) in Brazil.  

PubMed

Captive cracids (Aves: Galliformes: Cracidae), including endangered species, were studied (n = 130) for the assessment of health status, including Aburria jacutinga (black-fronted piping-guan, n = 42), Crax blumenbachii (red-knobbed curassow, n = 54), Craxfasciolata (bare-faced curassow, n = 28), and Penelope obscura (dusky-legged guan, n = 6). The exposure to Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG), Mycoplasma synoviae (MS), Salmonella pullorum (SP), Salmonella gallinarum (SG), avian paramyxovirus-1 (APMV-1), and infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) were determined by serology, and SG and SP also were evaluated by culture. Ectoparasites and endoparasites were identified using light microscopy. Sera were negative by the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test for antibodies to MG or MS, although serum was reactive to MG (32%, 42/130) by the rapid serum agglutination test (SAT). Although positive reactions (26.9%, 35/130) for SP and SG were detected by SAT, cloacal swab cultures were negative for SP and SG. IBDV antibodies were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in two dusky-legged guans (1.5%, 2/130). HI antibody titers to APMV-1 were found in 20 (15.3%) cracids, with titers ranging from 16 to 1,024. Fifty percent of birds (65/130) had ectoparasites. Lice (Menacanthus spp.) and mites (Astigmata: Analgesidae, Megninidae; Megninia spp.) were found in red-knobbed curassow; Megninia spp. also were found in bare-faced curassow, black-fronted piping-guan, and dusky-legged guan. Eleven black-fronted piping-guans presented dual parasitism by Megninia spp. and Ornithonyssus spp. Endoparasites were detected in 16.1% (21/130) of birds, and some with multiple parasites. Oocysts of coccidia and eggs of Capillaria spp. (Nematoda: Trichuroidea) were found in the feces of red-knobbed curassow. Eggs of Strongyloides spp. were found in the feces of bare-faced curassow, and eggs of Ascaridia spp., Capillaria spp., and Strongyloides spp. were found in black-fronted piping-guan. Cysts of Blastocystis spp. were found in dusky-legged guan. Antibodies to IBDV and APMV-1 indicate previous exposure. However, considering that birds were clinically normal, immune stimulation might have been from live chicken vaccine strain infections that are widely used in Brazilian poultry. The high parasitism levels indicate that a routine inspection for internal and external parasites is warranted. PMID:23505700

Marques, Marcus Vinícius Romero; Junior, Francisco Carlos Ferreira; Andery, Danielle de Assis; Fernandes, André Almeida; de Araújo, Alessandra Vitelli; de Resende, José Sérgio; Martins, Nelson Rodrigo da Silva

2013-03-01

88

Evaluación de estimadores no paramétricos de la riqueza de especies. Un ejemplo con aves en áreas verdes de la ciudad de Puebla, México  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nuestro objetivo fue evaluar el desempeño de estimadores no paramétricos de la riqueza de especies con datos reales. Durante la temporada de cría de 2003 censamos las comunidades de aves en dos áreas verdes de la ciudad de Puebla (México), y obtuvimos las corres¬pondientes curvas de rarefacción, que fueron ajustadas a dos funciones de acumulación de especies no asintóticas y

J. A. González Oreja; A. A. De la Fuente-Díaz-Ordaz; L. Hernández-Santín; D. Buzo-Franco; C. Bonache-Regidor

2010-01-01

89

Comparison of PRE-Dilatation vs Direct Stenting In Coronary Treatment Using the Medtronic AVE S670 Coronary Stent System (The PREDICT Trial)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Current stent delivery systems make primary stenting (stent placement without predilatation) possible, but few controlled trials have been performed to evaluate the success, safety, cost saving, and potential benefit of this approach in reducing late restenosis. The Comparison of PRE-Dilatation Versus Direct Stenting In Coronary Treat- ment using the Medtronic AVE S670 Coronary Stent System trial was a 399-patient study

Donald S. Baim; Michael Flatley; Ronald Caputo; Charles O'Shaughnessy; Reginald Low; Claude Fanelli; Jeffery Popma; Peter Fitzgerald; Richard Kuntz

90

Comparison of PRE-dilatation vs Direct stenting In Coronary Treatment using the Medtronic AVE S670 Coronary Stent System (the PREDICT trial)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Current stent delivery systems make primary stenting (stent placement without predilatation) possible, but few controlled trials have been performed to evaluate the success, safety, cost saving, and potential benefit of this approach in reducing late restenosis. The Comparison of PRE-Dilatation Versus Direct Stenting In Coronary Treatment using the Medtronic AVE S670 Coronary Stent System trial was a 399-patient study comparing

Donald S Baim; Michael Flatley; Ronald Caputo; Charles O’Shaughnessy; Reginald Low; Claude Fanelli; Jeffery Popma; Peter Fitzgerald; Richard Kuntz

2001-01-01

91

Using the Spanish Online Resource "Aula Virtual de Espanol" (AVE) to Promote a Blended Teaching Approach in High School Spanish Language Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study explores the effectiveness of the implementation of blended teaching (BT) by combining the Spanish online resource "Aula Virtual de Espanol" (AVE) with the face-to-face (F2F) delivery approach in second language Spanish programs in two high schools in Alberta, Canada. Findings demonstrate the effectiveness of combining the online…

Pellerin, Martine; Montes, Carlos Soler

2012-01-01

92

Caracterização do microhabitat e vulnerabilidade de cinco espécies de arapaçus (Aves: Dendrocolaptidae) em um fragmento florestal do norte do estado do Paraná, sul do Brasil  

Microsoft Academic Search

Microhabitat characterization and vulnerability of five woodcreeper (Dendrocolaptidae) species in a forest fragment in northern state of Paraná, southern Brazil. Little information is available on the ecological requirements of the woodcreepers (Aves: Dendrocolaptidae), and on the causes of their tendency to disappear from forest fragments in the Neotropics. Here, we documented microhabitat selection of five syntopic species of woodcreepers in

Fabíola Poletto; Luiz dos Anjos; Edson Varga Lopes; Graziele Hernandes Volpato

2004-01-01

93

The enigmatic monotypic crab plover Dromas ardeola is closely related to pratincoles and coursers (Aves, Charadriiformes, Glareolidae).  

PubMed

The phylogenetic placement of the monotypic crab plover Dromasardeola (Aves, Charadriiformes) remains controversial. Phylogenetic analysis of anatomical and behavioral traits using phenetic and cladistic methods of tree inference have resulted in conflicting tree topologies, suggesting a close association of Dromas to members of different suborders and lineages within Charadriiformes. Here, we revisited the issue by applying Bayesian and parsimony methods of tree inference to 2,012 anatomical and 5,183 molecular characters to a set of 22 shorebird genera (including Turnix). Our results suggest that Bayesian analysis of anatomical characters does not resolve the phylogenetic relationship of shorebirds with strong statistical support. In contrast, Bayesian and parsimony tree inference from molecular data provided much stronger support for the phylogenetic relationships within shorebirds, and support a sister relationship of Dromas to Glareolidae (pratincoles and coursers), in agreement with previously published DNA-DNA hybridization studies. PMID:21637436

Pereira, Sergio L; Baker, Allan J

2010-07-01

94

Meso beta-scale thunderstorm/environment interactions during AVE-SESAME V (20-21 May 1979)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The atmospheric variability in a convective area was examined with data from the AVE-SESAME V experiment. Temperature increases were observed in the upper troposphere during storm development, coupled with cooling near the surface and in the lower stratosphere. A mesohigh was detected at 200 mb over the convected area, and upper level winds increased speed north of the area. Wind velocity decreases occurred at the 200 mb level, reaching a 50 percent decrease, during the 3 hr period coinciding with most storms, and a simultaneous increase (doubling) was found in the wind speeds at the 400 mb level. Other phenomena present after the storms began included low-level convergence, upper level divergence, and ascending motion.

Fuelberg, H. E.; Printy, M. F.

1983-01-01

95

Numerical simulations of the subsynoptic features associated with the AVE-SESAME I case. I - The preconvective environment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The extensive diagnostic calculations made possible by the AVE-SESAME I database are used in combination with numerical simulations from the Mesoscale Atmospheric Simulation System (MASS) model to examine the dynamics of the meso-alpha-scale features during the preconvective period from 1130 to 2030 UTC on April 10, 1979. The version of the MASS model used in this investigation is presented, and an overview of the general synoptic conditions present at the time of model initialization is presented along with the data used to initialize the model. The dynamical processes present in the numerical simulations are presented and compared with analyses of the observational data from this and other investigations of this case. The relative importance of the adiabatic and diabatic processes in creating and then initiating the release of the convective instability is discussed.

Zack, John W.; Kaplan, Michael L.

1987-01-01

96

Sensitization of Upper Airway Mechanoreceptors as a New Pharmacologic Principle to Treat Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Investigations with AVE0118 in Anesthetized Pigs  

PubMed Central

Study Objectives: Drug treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is desirable because at least 30% of patients do not tolerate continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment. The negative pressure reflex (NPR) involving superficially located mechanoreceptors in the upper airway (UA) is an important mechanism for UA patency inhibitable by topical UA anesthesia (lidocaine). The NPR may serve as a target for pharmacological intervention for a topical treatment of OSA. The objective was to determine the effect of pharmacological augmentation of the NPR on UA collapsibility. Design: We developed a model of UA collapsibility in which application of negative pressures caused UA collapses in spontaneously breathing ?-chloralose-urethane anesthetized pigs as indicated by characteristic tracheal pressure and air flow changes. Setting: N/A. Patients or Participants: N/A. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: The potassium channel blocker AVE0118 administered topically to the UA in doses of 1, 3, and 10 mg per nostril sensitized the NPR, shifting the mechanoreceptor response threshold for the genioglossus muscle to more positive pressures (P < 0.001; n = 6 per group) and dose-dependently inhibited UA collapsibility. Ten mg of AVE0118 prevented UA collapses against negative pressures of -150 mbar (P < 0.01) for > 4 h in all pigs, while in control pigs the UA collapsed at -50 mbar or less negative pressures. The effect of AVE0118 was abolished by UA lidocaine anesthesia. Acute intravenous administration of naloxone or acetazolamide was ineffective; paroxetine and mirtazepine were weakly effective and fluoxetine was moderately effective in line with reported clinical efficacy. Conclusion: Topical administration of AVE0118 to the UA is a promising pharmacologic approach for the treatment of OSA. Citation: Wirth KJ; Steinmeyer K; Ruetten H. Sensitization of upper airway mechanoreceptors as a new pharmacologic principle to treat obstructive sleep apnea: investigations with AVE0118 in anesthetized pigs. SLEEP 2013;36(5):699-708.

Wirth, Klaus J.; Steinmeyer, Klaus; Ruetten, Hartmut

2013-01-01

97

The influence of angiotensin-(1-7) Mas receptor agonist (AVE 0991) on mitochondrial proteome in kidneys of apoE knockout mice.  

PubMed

Excessive action of angiotensin II on mitochondria has been shown to play an important role in mitochondrial dysfunction, a common feature of atherogenesis and kidney injury. Angiotensin-(1-7)/Mas receptor axis constitutes a countermeasure to the detrimental effects of angiotensin II on AT1 receptors. The aim of the study was to assess the effects of angiotensin-(1-7) peptidomimetic AVE0991 on the kidney mitochondrial proteome in widely used animal model of atherosclerosis (apoE(-/-) mice). Proteins changed in apoE(-/-) mice belonged to the groups of antioxidant enzymes, apoptosis regulators, inflammatory factors and metabolic enzymes. Importantly, AVE0991 partially reversed atherosclerosis-related changes in apoE(-/-) mice. PMID:23988828

Suski, Maciej; Olszanecki, Rafa?; Stachowicz, Aneta; Madej, Józef; Bujak-Gi?ycka, Beata; Oko?, Krzysztof; Korbut, Ryszard

2013-12-01

98

Initial results from a mesoscale atmospheric simulation system and comparisons with the AVE-SESAME I data set. [Atmospheric Variability Experiment-Severe Environmental Storms And Mesoscale Experiment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The development of a comprehensive mesoscale atmospheric simulation system (MASS) is described in detail. The modeling system is designed for both research and real-time forecast applications. The 14-level numerical model, which has a 48 km grid mesh, can be run over most of North America and the adjacent oceanic regions. The model employs sixth-order accurate numerics, generalized similarity theory boundary-layer physics, a sophisticated cumulus parameterization scheme, and state of the art analysis and initialization techniques. Examples of model output on the synoptic and subsynoptic scales are presented for the AVE-SESAME I field experiment on 10-11 April 1979. The model output is subjectively compared to the observational analysis and the LFM II output on the synoptic scale. Subsynoptic model output is compared to analyses generated from the AVE-SESAME I data set.

Kaplan, M. L.; Zack, J. W.; Wong, V. C.; Tuccillo, J. J.

1982-01-01

99

A comparison between Nimbus 5 THIR and ITPR temperatures and derived winds with rawinsonde data obtained in the AVE II experiment. [Temperature-Humidity Infrared Radiometer and Infrared Temperature Profile Radiometer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During the second Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE II), atmospheric temperature profiles were computed from Nimbus 5 data, which comprised ITPR, NEMS, and SCR measurements. Rawinsonde data were obtained from NWS stations in the AVE II network and processed for each pressure contact; the soundings closest in space and time were interpolated to the Nimbus 5 sounding points for comparison purposes. Cross sections of thermal and geostrophic winds were computed from satellite-derived cross sections of temperature along the Nimbus orbital track.

Arnold, J. E.; Scoggins, J. R.; Fuelberg, H. E.

1977-01-01

100

The development of convective instability, wind shear, and vertical motion in relation to convection activity and synoptic systems in AVE 4  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Data from the Fourth Atmospheric Variability Experiment were used to investigate conditions/factors responsible for the development (local time rate-of-change) of convective instability, wind shear, and vertical motion in areas with varying degrees of convective activity. AVE IV sounding data were taken at 3 or 6 h intervals during a 36 h period on 24-25 April 1975 over approximately the eastern half of the United States. An error analysis was performed for each variable studied.

Davis, J. G.; Scoggins, J. R.

1981-01-01

101

New specimens of the Eocene Messelirrisoridae (Aves: Bucerotes), with comments on the preservation of uropygial gland waxes in fossil birds from Messel and the phylogenetic affinities of Bucerotes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Exceptionally well-preserved new specimens of the Messelirrisoridae (Aves: Bucerotes), which show previously unknown features\\u000a of the osteology and feathering of these tiny birds, are described from the Middle Eocene of Messel in Germany. Most notably\\u000a in one of the new specimens the wing and tail feathers are excellently preserved and even show the former color pattern of\\u000a the tail. A

Gerald Mayr

2006-01-01

102

Overexpression of aveBIV leading to the improvement of 4?-epidaunorubicin production in Streptomyces coeruleorubidus strain SIPI-A0707  

Microsoft Academic Search

The 4?-epidaunorubicin is the semisynthesis precursor of epirubicin which is a clinically useful antitumor drug thought to\\u000a have slightly less cardiotoxicity than doxorubin. The 4?-epidaunorubicin was formed by overexpression of heterologous Streptomyces avermitilis aveBIV in Streptomyces coeruleorubidus SIPI-A0707 dnmV mutant blocked in the biosynthesis of daunosamine, the deoxysugar component of daunorubicin. But there was a low-yield production\\u000a of 4?-epidaunorubicin. In

Lei Shao; Jia Huang; Lan Jing; Ji-Ye Chen; Shi-Dong Kan; Min Wang; Ji-An Li; Dai-Jie Chen

2010-01-01

103

Osteological histology of the Pan-Alcidae (Aves, Charadriiformes): correlates of wing-propelled diving and flightlessness.  

PubMed

Although studies of osteological morphology, gross myology, myological histology, neuroanatomy, and wing-scaling have all documented anatomical modifications associated with wing-propelled diving, the osteohistological study of this highly derived method of locomotion has been limited to penguins. Herein we present the first osteohistological study of the derived forelimbs and hind limbs of wing-propelled diving Pan-Alcidae (Aves, Charadriiformes). In addition to detailing differences between wing-propelled diving charadriiforms and nondiving charadriiforms, microstructural modifications to the humeri, ulnae and femora of extinct flightless pan-alcids are contrasted with those of volant alcids. Histological thin-sections of four species of pan-alcids (Alca torda, †Alca grandis, †Pinguinus impennis, †Mancalla cedrosensis) and one outgroup charadriiform (Stercorarius longicaudus) were compared. The forelimb bones of wing-propelled diving charadriiforms were found to have significantly thicker (?22%) cortical bone walls. Additionally, as in penguins, the forelimbs of flightless pan-alcids are found to be osteosclerotic. However, unlike the pattern documented in penguins that display thickened cortices in both forelimbs and hind limbs, the forelimb and hind limb elements of pan-alcids display contrasting microstructural morphologies with thickened forelimb cortices and relatively thinner femoral cortices. Additionally, the identification of medullary bone in the sampled †Pinguinus impennis specimen suggests that further osteohistological investigation could provide an answer to longstanding questions regarding sexual dimorphism of Great Auks. Finally, these results suggest that it is possible to discern volant from flightless wing-propelled divers from fragmentary fossil remains. PMID:24357466

Smith, N Adam; Clarke, Julia A

2014-02-01

104

Impact evaluation of a refrigeration control system installed at Vitamilk Dairy, Incorporated under the Energy $avings Plan  

SciTech Connect

This impact evaluation of a refrigeration control system (RCS) recently installed at Vitamilk Dairy, Inc. (Vitamilk) was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) as part of an evaluation of its Energy $avings Plan (E$P) Program. The RCS installation at Vitamilk uses microcomputer- based controls to automate refrigeration equipment previously controlled manually. This impact evaluation assessed how much electricity is being saved at Vitamilk as a result of the E$P and to determine how much the savings cost Bonneville and the region. On a unit savings basis, this project will save 9.7 kWh/tonne (8-8 kWh/ton) of milk and ice cream produced, based on the product mix for June 1992 through May 1993, representing a 28% reduction in energy consumption. The project was installed in 1992 for a total cost of $129,330, and Vitamilk received payment of $62,974 from Bonneville in 1993 for the acquisition of energy savings. The real levelized cost of these energy savings to Bonneville is 8.5 mills/kWh (in 1993 dollars) over the project`s assumed 15-year life, and the real levelized cost to the region is 17.9 mills/kWh (in 1993 dollars), not including transmission and distribution effects. Based on the expected project installation costs and energy savings benefits, the RCS would not have been implemented by Vitamilk without the E$P acquisition payment. The expected acquisition payment reduced the estimated payback period from 7.0 to 2.8 years. Although Vitamilk would generally require an energy conservation project to have a payback period of two years or less, the slightly longer payback period was accepted in this case.

Brown, D.R.; Dixon, D.R.; Spanner, G.E.

1995-01-01

105

An analysis of the AVE-SESAME I period using statistical structure and correlation functions. [Atmospheric Variability Experiment-Severe Environmental Storm and Mesoscale Experiment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Structure and correlation functions are used to describe atmospheric variability during the 10-11 April day of AVE-SESAME 1979 that coincided with the Red River Valley tornado outbreak. The special mesoscale rawinsonde data are employed in calculations involving temperature, geopotential height, horizontal wind speed and mixing ratio. Functional analyses are performed in both the lower and upper troposphere for the composite 24 h experiment period and at individual 3 h observation times. Results show that mesoscale features are prominent during the composite period. Fields of mixing ratio and horizontal wind speed exhibit the greatest amounts of small-scale variance, whereas temperature and geopotential height contain the least. Results for the nine individual times show that small-scale variance is greatest during the convective outbreak. The functions also are used to estimate random errors in the rawinsonde data. Finally, sensitivity analyses are presented to quantify confidence limits of the structure functions.

Fuelberg, H. E.; Meyer, P. J.

1984-01-01

106

A kinetic energy study of the meso beta-scale storm environment during AVE-SESAME 5 (20-21 May 1979)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Kinetic energy of the near storm environment was analyzed by meso beta scale data. It was found that horizontal winds in the 400 to 150 mb layer strengthen rapidly north of the developing convection. Peak values then decrease such that the maximum disappears 6 h later. Southeast of the storms, wind speeds above 300 mb decrease nearly 50% during the 3 h period of most intense thunderstorm activity. When the convection dissipates, wind patterns return to prestorm conditions. The mesoscale storm environment of AVE-SESAME 5 is characterized by large values of cross contour generation of kinetic energy, transfers of energy to nonresolvable scales of motion, and horizontal flux divergence. These processes are maximized within the upper troposphere and are greatest during times of strongest convection. It is shown that patterns agree with observed weather features. The southeast area of the network is examined to determine causes for vertical wind variations.

Printy, M. F.; Fuelberg, H. E.

1984-01-01

107

Insects found in birds' nests from Argentina. Pseudoseisura lophotes Reichenbach, 1853 and Anumbius annumbi (Vieillot, 1817) (Aves: Furnariidae), hosts of Triatoma platensis Neiva, 1913 (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Triatominae).  

PubMed

The insect fauna of the nests of Pseudoseisura lophotes (Reichenbach, 1853) (Aves: Furnariidae) from Argentina was investigated. A total of 110 species (68 identified to species, 22 identified to genus, 20 identified to family) in 40 families of 10 orders of insects was found in these nests. Triatoma platensis Neiva, 1913 (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) was found again in nests of P. lophotes, corroborating after 73 years the first observations made by Mazza in 1936. The occurrence of the insects in nests of P. lophotes is compared with the previously known insect fauna in nests of A. annumbi, Furnarius rufus (Furnariidae), and Myiopsitta monachus (Psittacidae). The insect fauna in additional nests of Anumbius annumbi from the same and/or different localities is given, and used in comparisons. The first occurrence of Cuterebridae (Diptera) in birds' nests, their pupae as the overwintering stage, and the second simultaneous infestation by two species of Philornis (Diptera: Muscidae) on the same nestlings are presented. Other simultaneous infestations of different hematophagous arthropods (Hemiptera: Cimidae; Reduviidae: Triatominae, and Acari: Argasidae) are remarked and discussed. PMID:24871037

Paola, Turienzo

2014-01-01

108

Cucolepis cincta gen.n. et sp.n. (Cestoda: Cyclophyllidea) from the squirrel cuckoo Piaya cayana lesson (Aves: Cuculiformes) from Paraguay.  

PubMed

Cucolepis gen. n. is erected as monotypic for Cucolepis cincta sp. n., a new species of cyclophyllidean cestode of the family Paruterinidae. The new species is described from the squirrel cuckoo, Piaya cayana Lesson (Aves: Cuculiformes), taken from two localities in Paraguay in 1984 and 1985. This new genus is most similar to the genus Triaenorhina Spasskii et Shumilo, 1965 in terms of the hook morphology and large epiphyseal structures extending from both the handle and guard, but differs in several aspects of the strobilar morphology, such as the shape of the cirrus sac, genital atrium, uterus and paruterine organ. The strobilar morphology of the new genus strongly resembles that of the genus Francobona Georgiev et Kornyushin, 1994, especially the shape of the cirrus sac and genital atrium, yet Francobona spp. lack, the developed epiphyseal structures observed in species of Cucolepis and Triaenorhina. Previous records and the nature of parasite-host associations between cuculiform birds and their cestode parasites are discussed. PMID:23327010

Phillips, Anna J; Mariaux, Jean; Georgiev, Boyko B

2012-12-01

109

Stratigraphic context and paleoenvironmental significance of minor taxa (Pisces, Reptilia, Aves, Rodentia) from the late Early Pleistocene paleoanthropological site of Buia (Eritrea).  

PubMed

The Buia Homo site, also known as Wadi Aalad, is an East African paleoanthropological site near the village of Buia that, due to its very rich yield from the late Early Pleistocene, has been intensively investigated since 1994. In this paper, which reports on the finds of the 2010-2011 excavations, we include new fossil evidence on previously identified taxa (i.e., reptiles), as well as the very first description of the small mammal, fish and bird remains discovered. In particular, this study documents the discovery of the first African fossil of the genus Burhinus (Aves, Charadriiformes) and of the first rodent from the site. This latter is identified as a thryonomyid rodent (cane rat), a relatively common taxon in African paleoanthropological faunal assemblages. On the whole, the new occurrences documented within the Buia vertebrate assemblage confirm the occurrence of taxa characterized by strong water dependence. The paleoenvironmental characteristics of the fauna are confirmed as fully compatible with the evidence obtained through sedimentology and facies analysis, documenting the sedimentary evolution of fluvio-deltaic and lacustrine systems. PMID:23159190

Rook, L; Ghinassi, M; Carnevale, G; Delfino, M; Pavia, M; Bondioli, L; Candilio, F; Coppa, A; Martínez-Navarro, B; Medin, T; Papini, M; Zanolli, C; Libsekal, Y

2013-01-01

110

Ancient DNA analyses of early archaeological sites in New Zealand reveal extreme exploitation of moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes) at all life stages  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The human colonisation of New Zealand in the late thirteenth century AD led to catastrophic impacts on the local biota and is among the most compelling examples of human over-exploitation of native fauna, including megafauna. Nearly half of the species in New Zealand' s pre-human avifauna are now extinct, including all nine species of large, flightless moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes). The abundance of moa in early archaeological sites demonstrates the significance of these megaherbivores in the diet of the first New Zealanders. Combining moa assemblage data, based on DNA identification of eggshell and bone, with morphological identification of bone (literature and museum catalogued specimens), we present the most comprehensive audit of moa to date from several significant 13th-15th century AD archaeological deposits across the east coast of the South Island. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was amplified from 251 of 323 (78%) eggshell fragments and 22 of 27 (88%) bone samples, and the analyses revealed the presence of four moa species: Anomalopteryx didiformis; Dinornis robustus; Emeus crassus and Euryapteryx curtus. The mtDNA, along with polymorphic microsatellite markers, enabled an estimate of the minimum number of individual eggs consumed at each site. Remarkably, in one deposit over 50 individual eggs were identified - a number that likely represents a considerable proportion of the total reproductive output of moa in the area and emphasises that human predation of all life stages of moa was intense. Molecular sexing was conducted on bones (n = 11). Contrary to previous ancient DNA studies from natural sites that consistently report an excess of female moa, we observed an excess of males (2.7:1), suggestive that males were preferential targets. This could be related to different behaviour between the two highly size-dimorphic sexes in moa. Lastly, we investigated the moa species from recovered skeletal and eggshell remains from seven Wairau Bar burials, and identified the presence of only the larger species of moa, E. curtus and D. robustus.

Oskam, Charlotte L.; Allentoft, Morten E.; Walter, Richard; Scofield, R. Paul; Haile, James; Holdaway, Richard N.; Bunce, Michael; Jacomb, Chris

2012-10-01

111

Moa's Ark or volant ghosts of Gondwana? Insights from nineteen years of ancient DNA research on the extinct moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes) of New Zealand.  

PubMed

The moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes) of New Zealand represent one of the extinct iconic taxa that define the field of ancient DNA (aDNA), and after almost two decades of genetic scrutiny of bones, feathers, coprolites, mummified tissue, eggshell, and sediments, our knowledge of these prehistoric giants has increased significantly. Thanks to molecular and morphological-based research, the insights that have been obtained into moa phylogenetics, phylogeography, and palaeobiology exceeds that of any other extinct taxon. This review documents the strengths of applying a multidisciplinary approach when studying extinct taxa but also shows that cross-disciplinary controversies still remain at the most fundamental levels, with highly conflicting interpretations derived from aDNA and morphology. Moa species diversity, for example, is still heavily debated, as well as their relationship with other ratites and the mode of radiation. In addition to increasing our knowledge on a lineage of extinct birds, further insights into these aspects can clarify some of the basal splits in avian evolution, and the evolutionary implications of the breakup of the prehistoric supercontinent Gondwana. Did a flightless moa ancestor drift away on proto New Zealand (Moa's Ark) or did a volant ancestor arrive by flight? Here we provide an overview of 19 years of aDNA research on moa, critically assess the attempts and controversies in placing the moa lineage among palaeognath birds, and discuss the factors that facilitated the extensive radiation of moa. Finally, we identify the most obvious gaps in the current knowledge to address the future potential research areas in moa genetics. PMID:21596537

Allentoft, Morten E; Rawlence, Nicolas J

2012-01-20

112

A new feather mite species of the genus Neumannella Trouessart, 1916 (Analgoidea, Dermoglyphidae) from the Red-winged Tinamou Rhynchotus rufescens (Temminck, 1815) (Aves, Tinamiformes) with remarks to the evolution of host-parasite associations of the genus.  

PubMed

Neumannella skorackii, a new species of the feather mite family Dermoglyphidae (Acari, Astigmata) is described from the Red-winged Tinamou Rhynchotus rufescens (Temminck, 1815) (Aves, Tinamiformes) from Paraguay and a key to all known species of the genus is provided. The phylogenetic relationships (MP analysis of 25 morphological characters) between Neumannella species along with the evolutionary history of host-parasite associations revealed by Jungle reconciliation method are reconstructed. Relatively low cospeciation contribution to the recent host-parasite associations is discovered. PMID:24827087

Dabert, Jacek

2014-06-01

113

[Habitat selection and metapopulation structure: a multi-year study of distribution of the Hodgson's pipit, Anthus Hodgsoni Richm. (Aves, Passeriformes)].  

PubMed

Numbers and distribution of the Hodgson's pipit (Anthus hodgson Richm.: Aves, Passeriformes) were studied in the Yenissei middle taiga region over an area of about 450 sq km. Distribution of breeding pairs was mapped on fixed study plots (up to 450 ha in total) annually during 15 years. Habitat properties were described and measured in detail on 53 4-ha homogeneous plots within the area. It is shown by means of multiple regression, an average bird abundance over these plots depends on five habitat features (R2 = 0.74) including development and accessibility of moss cover and absence of a potential competitor, the tree pipit (A. trivialis L.). Correlation with these factors ruterated every year, therefore the average bird abundance was used as an index of habitat favourability. Density deviations from the mean in years of high and low numbers appeared to be closely related to habitat favourability; in particular, the relationship can alter the sign depending on the spatial scale of population structures. Changes in abundance reversely related to favourability in adjacent habitats, according to the prediction of despotic distribution hypothesis (Fretwell, Lucas, 1970), strictly indicating dominance behaviour during selection of a breeding territory. The numbers in larger population groups occupying a patchy habitat complex changed synchronously and proportionally to their average habitat quality. This assumes another mechanism governing the distribution of individuals, requiring no local knowledge and no dominance relationships. Dynamics and distribution of individuals among population groups of different hierarchic ranks agree with investigations on establishing of individual site fixation in birds and allow splitting the process into four consecutive steps. 1. During the juvenile dispersal, birds spread around quite evenly, disregarding of habitat quality. This maintains entirety of the metapopulation and occupation of isolated habitat spots. 2. The juvenile dispersal ends with switching to a search for a nearest site containing potential breeding territories. Such a site gets imprinted as the site for next breeding. According to our data, it covers an area of a few square kilometers. 3. During the pre-breeding period, an individual chooses a territory regarding to the favourability, but dominance of old residents forces it to search around for an empty patch within the imprinted area. As a result, dominance relationships affect both breeding density in best habitats and availability of empty patches. 4. The next years, an individual keeps connection with the breeding site fixed due to site tenacity. Rising of the social status allows the individual to occupy a better territory in future. Thus, a population group proportionate to individually imprinted area, with a concentration of favourable patches in the central part, comprises an elementary structural and functional unit of a metapopulation. Its individual members share the same well-known imprinted area and the social structure in common. Its numbers are regulated by density-dependent dominance relationships. Individuals spread over such groups in proportion to their carrying capacity in density-independent manner. Groups with best habitats can be more profitable at population lows, and less densely populated ones can offer more profit at population tops. Despite this, lack of information restricts profitable movements between them. Hence each group offers the same average fitness to its members. PMID:18956571

Burski?, O V

2008-01-01

114

Insects found in birds' nests from Argentina: Coryphistera alaudina Burmeister, 1860 (Aves: Furnariidae), their inquiline birds and mammals, new hosts for Psammolestes coreodes Bergroth, 1911 and Triatoma platensis Neiva, 1913 (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Triatominae).  

PubMed

The insect fauna in nests of Coryphistera alaudina Burmeister, 1860 (Aves: Furnariidae) were studied in the provinces of Santiago del Estero, Chaco, Córdoba, and La Pampa in Argentina. A total of 7364 insect specimens comprising 77 taxa in a total of 29 families and 7 orders was found in their nests: 40 identified to species, 23 identified to genus, and 14 identified to family. Coryphistera alaudina and some of their vertebrate inquilines are new host records for the triatomine bugs Psammolestes coreodes Bergroth, 1911 and/or Triatoma platensis Neiva, 1913 (Hemiptera: Reduviidae). The insects in the nests of C. alaudina are separated by functional guilds, and their permanence time inside the nests are presented in a new manner and discussed. PMID:24943157

Turienzo, Paola; Di Iorio, Osvaldo

2014-01-01

115

Vision in the peafowl (Aves: Pavo cristatus)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The visual sense of the Indian blue-shouldered peafowl Pavo cristatus was investigated with respect to the spectral absorption characteristics of the retinal photoreceptors, the spectral transmittance of the ocular media and the topographic distribution of cells in the retinal ganglion cell layer. Microspectrophotometry revealed a single class of rod, four spectrally distinct types of single cone and a single class

Nathan S. Hart

116

Validity of Bartram's Painted Vulture (Aves: Cathartidae).  

PubMed

William Bartram described the Painted Vulture (Vultur sacra) as a new species in his 1791 book on travels in Florida and other southeastern states. However, no specimen of this bird survives, and it has not been reported by any subsequent ornithologist. Bartram's detailed description is not presently endorsed by the American Ornithologists' Union and has been widely regarded as a myth, a misdescribed King Vulture Sarcoramphus papa (Linnaeus), a misdescribed Northern Caracara Caracara cheriway (Jacquin), or a garbled mixture of species. In fact, his description bears almost no resemblance to a Northern Caracara, but it does match the King Vulture in all important respects except tail color (which is uniform dark brown in all ages and sexes of King Vultures but was white with a dark brown or black tip in Bartram's description). Most 20th century ornithologists commenting on Bartram's bird have been reluctant to accept his description because of the tail-color discrepancy. Only McAtee (1942) concluded that his description could be fully accurate as written, indicating a bird closely related to, but different from, a typical King Vulture. Paralleling Bartram's description is an apparently independent account and painting of a vulture of uncertain geographic origin by Eleazar Albin (1734). Details of Albin's description, including tail color, are very similar to those of Bartram's description. The only discrepancies are minor differences in color of softparts and tail that seem explicable as intraspecific variation. Available evidence suggests that Bartram knew nothing of Albin's description, and if so, Albin's bird provides quite persuasive support for the validity of Bartram's bird. Equally important, none of the arguments offered historically against the validity of the Painted Vulture is persuasive when examined closely. Together, these and other factors make a strong case for acceptance of Bartram's Painted Vulture as a historic resident of northern Florida and likely other adjacent regions. PMID:24698902

Snyder, Noel F R; Fry, Joel T

2013-01-01

117

On editing the Journal: Ave atque vale.  

PubMed

Dr. Braceland discusses his 13-year tenure (1965-1978) as Editor of the American Journal of Psychiatry, noting that he took office during a period of social turmoil that in many ways resembled the decade of the Journal's founding 134 years ago. He describes the advantages and disadvantages of the peer review system he introduced to the Journal and states that this approach is essential in a time of ultraspecialization. He reviews the crafts of editing and writing for medical journals, both of which are brightened by clarity and brevity. As to the future of medical journals, he considers reports of their demise premature, while acknowledging the problems they face. Dr. Braceland briefly considered a "rocking chair" approach to his retirement from the Editorship, but the Editor Emeritus will instead continue to provide whatever assistance he can to his colleagues. PMID:358844

Braceland, F J

1978-10-01

118

SIZE AND LOCOMOTION IN TERATORNS (AVES: TERATORNITHIDAE)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The extinct family Teratornithidae contains the world's largest known flying birds. A new method of determining body weights of extinct birds, based on the size of their tibiotarsi, facilitates the estimation of the wing dimensions of these giant birds. An analysis of the bones of the teratorn wing shows that they closely resemble those of condors, suggesting that teratorns flew

KENNETH E. CAMPBELL; EDUARDO P. TONNI

119

Introduction to the Aves: The Birds  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Museum of Paleontology at the University of California Berkeley (reviewed in the June 16, 1995 Scout Report) has continued to build their impressive online resource network and now offers this site on paleontology of birds. To learn more about each subject, users may click on any of the four main sections: Fossil Record, Life History & Ecology, Systematics, or Morphology. Although some bird links are under construction, the current information is instructive and contains hyperlinks to a wealth of additional information.

1996-01-01

120

Multiple cenozoic invasions of Africa by penguins (Aves, Sphenisciformes)  

PubMed Central

Africa hosts a single breeding species of penguin today, yet the fossil record indicates that a diverse array of now-extinct taxa once inhabited southern African coastlines. Here, we show that the African penguin fauna had a complex history involving multiple dispersals and extinctions. Phylogenetic analyses and biogeographic reconstructions incorporating new fossil material indicate that, contrary to previous hypotheses, the four Early Pliocene African penguin species do not represent an endemic radiation or direct ancestors of the living Spheniscus demersus (blackfooted penguin). A minimum of three dispersals to Africa, probably assisted by the eastward-flowing Antarctic Circumpolar and South Atlantic currents, occurred during the Late Cenozoic. As regional sea-level fall eliminated islands and reduced offshore breeding areas during the Pliocene, all but one penguin lineage ended in extinction, resulting in today's depleted fauna.

Ksepka, Daniel T.; Thomas, Daniel B.

2012-01-01

121

A compilation of studies from Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Five methods for obtaining the sign of vertical motion at various levels in the atmosphere were investigated to determine which gave the best explanation for areas of rain and no-rain in the southeastern United States during the period February 19-22, 1964. The methods used were the terrain-induced vertical motion, the kinematic method including the terrain effect, the adiabatic method, the omega equation, and the vorticity equation combined with Dines' Compensation Principle. Stability and moisture availability were considered but not as extensively as vertical motion. Values of vertical motion obtained by the kinetic method, including orographic lifting produced the best agreement with the observed areas. When terms in the omega equation were added through use of constant multipliers, results comparable to the adiabatic method were obtained. Without this addition large uncertainties occurred. Maps showing areas where terms of the omega equation would indicate positive vertical motion did not correlate well with the observed rainfall patterns.

Scoggins, J. R.; Fuelberg, H. E.; Carlson, R. D.; Phelps, R. W.; Bellue, D. G.

1973-01-01

122

Isleria, a new genus of antwren (Aves: Passeriformes: Thamnophilidae)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A comprehensive molecular phylogenetic analysis of the family Thamnophilidae indicated that the genus Myrmotherula is not monophyletic. The clade composed of M. guttata and M. hauxwelli is only distantly related to other members of the genus and should be removed from Myrmotherula. The phenotypic distinctiveness of the clade argues against merging it with its sister group Thamnomanes and no generic name is available for the guttata-hauxwelli clade. Consequently, we describe the genus Isleria for these two species, and designate Myrmothera guttata as its type species.

Bravo, Gustavo A.; Chesser, R. Terry; Brumfield, Robb T.

2012-01-01

123

Eye shape and retinal topography in owls (Aves: Strigiformes).  

PubMed

The eyes of vertebrates show adaptations to the visual environments in which they evolve. For example, eye shape is associated with activity pattern, while retinal topography is related to the symmetry or 'openness' of the habitat of a species. Although these relationships are well documented in many vertebrates including birds, the extent to which they hold true for species within the same avian order is not well understood. Owls (Strigiformes) represent an ideal group for the study of interspecific variation in the avian visual system because they are one of very few avian orders to contain species that vary in both activity pattern and habitat preference. Here, we examined interspecific variation in eye shape and retinal topography in nine species of owl. Eye shape (the ratio of corneal diameter to eye axial length) differed among species, with nocturnal species having relatively larger corneal diameters than diurnal species. All the owl species have an area of high retinal ganglion cell (RGC) density in the temporal retina and a visual streak of increased cell density extending across the central retina from temporal to nasal. However, the organization and degree of elongation of the visual streak varied considerably among species and this variation was quantified using H:V ratios. Species that live in open habitats and/or that are more diurnally active have well-defined, elongated visual streaks and high H:V ratios (3.88-2.33). In contrast, most nocturnal and/or forest-dwelling owls have a poorly defined visual streak, a more radially symmetrical arrangement of RGCs and lower H:V ratios (1.77-1.27). The results of a hierarchical cluster analysis indicate that the apparent interspecific variation is associated with activity pattern and habitat as opposed to the phylogenetic relationships among species. In seven species, the presence of a fovea was confirmed and it is suggested that all strigid owls may possess a fovea, whereas the tytonid barn owl (Tyto alba) does not. A size-frequency analysis of cell soma area indicates that a number of different RGC classes are represented in owls, including a population of large RGCs (cell soma area >150 µm(2)) that resemble the giant RGCs reported in other vertebrates. In conclusion, eye shape and retinal topography in owls vary among species and this variation is associated with different activity patterns and habitat preferences, thereby supporting similar observations in other vertebrates. PMID:22722085

Lisney, Thomas J; Iwaniuk, Andrew N; Bandet, Mischa V; Wylie, Douglas R

2012-01-01

124

Comparative study of visual pathways in owls (Aves: Strigiformes).  

PubMed

Although they are usually regarded as nocturnal, owls exhibit a wide range of activity patterns, from strictly nocturnal, to crepuscular or cathemeral, to diurnal. Several studies have shown that these differences in the activity pattern are reflected in differences in eye morphology and retinal organization. Despite the evidence that differences in activity pattern among owl species are reflected in the peripheral visual system, there has been no attempt to correlate these differences with changes in the visual regions in the brain. In this study, we compare the relative size of nuclei in the main visual pathways in nine species of owl that exhibit a wide range of activity patterns. We found marked differences in the relative size of all visual structures among the species studied, both in the tectofugal and the thalamofugal pathway, as well in other retinorecipient nuclei, including the nucleus lentiformis mesencephali, the nucleus of the basal optic root and the nucleus geniculatus lateralis, pars ventralis. We show that the barn owl (Tyto alba), a species widely used in the study of the integration of visual and auditory processing, has reduced visual pathways compared to strigid owls. Our results also suggest there could be a trade-off between the relative size of visual pathways and auditory pathways, similar to that reported in mammals. Finally, our results show that although there is no relationship between activity pattern and the relative size of either the tectofugal or the thalamofugal pathway, there is a positive correlation between the relative size of both visual pathways and the relative number of cells in the retinal ganglion layer. PMID:23296024

Gutiérrez-Ibáñez, Cristián; Iwaniuk, Andrew N; Lisney, Thomas J; Wylie, Douglas R

2013-01-01

125

Eye Shape and Retinal Topography in Owls (Aves: Strigiformes)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The eyes of vertebrates show adaptations to the visual environments in which they evolve. For example, eye shape is associated with activity pattern, while retinal topography is related to the symmetry or ‘openness’ of the habitat of a species. Although these relationships are well documented in many vertebrates including birds, the extent to which they hold true for species within

Thomas J. Lisney; Andrew N. Iwaniuk; Mischa V. Bandet; Douglas R. Wylie

2012-01-01

126

Dating the diversification of the major lineages of Passeriformes (Aves)  

PubMed Central

Background The avian Order Passeriformes is an enormously species-rich group, which comprises almost 60% of all living bird species. This diverse order is believed to have originated before the break-up of Gondwana in the late Cretaceous. However, previous molecular dating studies have relied heavily on the geological split between New Zealand and Antarctica, assumed to have occurred 85–82 Mya, for calibrating the molecular clock and might thus be circular in their argument. Results This study provides a time-scale for the evolution of the major clades of passerines using seven nuclear markers, five taxonomically well-determined passerine fossils, and an updated interpretation of the New Zealand split from Antarctica 85–52 Mya in a Bayesian relaxed-clock approach. We also assess how different interpretations of the New Zealand–Antarctica vicariance event influence our age estimates. Our results suggest that the diversification of Passeriformes began in the late Cretaceous or early Cenozoic. Removing the root calibration for the New Zealand–Antarctica vicariance event (85–52 Mya) dramatically increases the 95% credibility intervals and leads to unrealistically old age estimates. We assess the individual characteristics of the seven nuclear genes analyzed in our study. Our analyses provide estimates of divergence times for the major groups of passerines, which can be used as secondary calibration points in future molecular studies. Conclusions Our analysis takes recent paleontological and geological findings into account and provides the best estimate of the passerine evolutionary time-scale currently available. This time-scale provides a temporal framework for further biogeographical, ecological, and co-evolutionary studies of the largest bird radiation, and adds to the growing support for a Cretaceous origin of Passeriformes.

2014-01-01

127

Courtship ethology of Wahnes’ parotia Parotia wahnesi (Aves: Paradisaeidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The concept of modularity has not been fully incorporated into current thinking about the evolution of behavioral complexity.\\u000a One limiting factor is the paucity of high-quality descriptive data exemplifying the organizational structure of complex behavioral\\u000a phenotypes in which modular units are likely to exist. In this paper, I describe the courtship ethology of Wahnes’ parotia,\\u000a Parotia wahnesi, a little known

Edwin Scholes

2008-01-01

128

Hypopi (Acari: Hypoderatidae) of the wood stork (Aves: Ciconiiformes: Ciconiidae)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A new species is described and additional host records are presented for 2 other species of deutonymphs of the family Hypoderatidae from the subcutaneous adipose tissues of the wood stork, Mycteria americana L. Phalacrodectes (Phalacrodectes) mycteria n. sp. appears to share affinities with species from both pelicaniform and ciconiiform hosts, but it most closely resembles P. (P.) punctatissimus (?erný) Pence & Courtney from pelicans in idiosomal chaetotaxy, cutdcular sclerotization, and posteriorly divergent, widely separated genital openings. The new species differs from this and other species of the genus by its small size, the degree of separation of the genital openings with papillae, no secondary sclerotization in the perigenital area or surrounding the genital openings, and the long filiform setae s and w on genu III. There was a mixed infection of Neottialges kutzeri Fain and N. mycteriae Pence in all of 7 wood storks examined from Florida and Georgia; P. (P) mycteria was found in 4 of these hosts. This is the 7th species described as a deutonymph in the genus Phalacrodectes. The apparent close affinity of P. (P.) mycteria with P. (P.) punctatissimus and allied species from pelicaniform versus ciconiiform birds appears to be inconsistent with the established host-parasite relationships based on classical avian taxonomic relationships. However, this apparent affinity may be more reflective of the close relationships between the families of pelicans, ibises and spoonbills, and storks as recently proposed by DNA-DNA hybridization studies.

Pence, D. B.; Thomas, N. J.

1995-01-01

129

A molecular phylogeny of the cotingas (Aves: Cotingidae).  

PubMed

The phylogenetic relationships of members of Cotingidae were investigated using >2100 bp of sequence data from two nuclear introns (myoglobin intron 2 and G3PDH intron 11) and one protein-coding mitochondrial gene (cytochrome b). Strong support was found for a monophyletic clade including 23 traditional cotingid genera, corresponding to the Cotingidae sensu [Remsen, J.V. Jr., Jaramillo, A., Nores, M., Pacheco, J.F., Robbins, M.B., Schulenberg, T.S., Stiles, F.G., da Silva, J.M.C., Stotz, D.F., Zimmer, K.J., 2005. Version 2005-11-15. A classification of the bird species of South America. American Ornithologists' Union. ]. Neither Oxyruncus nor any of the genera in Tityrinae sensu [Prum, R.O, Lanyon, W.E., 1989. Monophyly and phylogeny of the Schiffornis group (Tyrannoidea). Condor 91, 444-461.] are members of Cotingidae. Within Cotingidae a polytomy of four well-supported clades was recovered: (1) the fruiteaters Pipreola and Ampelioides; (2) the Ampelion group, including Phytotoma; (3) Rupicola and Phoenicircus; and (4) the 'core cotingas' consisting of the remainder of the Cotingas (e.g. fruitcrows, Cotinga, Procnias, Lipaugus, and Carpodectes), with Snowornis in a basal position. The separation of Snowornis from Lipaugus [Prum, R.O, Lanyon, W.E., 1989. Monophyly and phylogeny of the Schiffornis group (Tyrannoidea). Condor 91, 444-461.] was strongly supported, as were the close relationships between Gymnoderus and Conioptilon, and between Tijuca and Lipaugus. However, basal relationships among 'core cotinga' clades were not resolved. PMID:16876441

Ohlson, Jan I; Prum, Richard O; Ericson, Per G P

2007-01-01

130

A comprehensive multilocus assessment of sparrow (Aves: Passerellidae) relationships.  

PubMed

The New World sparrows (Emberizidae) are among the best known of songbird groups and have long-been recognized as one of the prominent components of the New World nine-primaried oscine assemblage. Despite receiving much attention from taxonomists over the years, and only recently using molecular methods, was a "core" sparrow clade established allowing the reconstruction of a phylogenetic hypothesis that includes the full sampling of sparrow species diversity. In this paper, we use mitochondrial DNA gene sequences from all 129 putative species of sparrow and four additional (nuclear) loci for a subset of these taxa to resolve both generic and species level relationships. Hypotheses derived from our mitochondrial (2184 base pairs) and nuclear (5705 base pairs) DNA data sets were generally in agreement with respect to clade constituency but differed somewhat with respect to among-clade relationships. Sparrow diversity is defined predominantly by eight well-supported clades that indicate a lack of monophyly for at least three currently recognized genera. Ammodramus is polyphyletic and requires the naming of two additional genera. Spizella is also polyphyletic with Tree Sparrow (Spizella arborea) as a taxonomic "outlier". Pselliophorus is embedded within a larger Atlapetes assemblage and should be merged with that group. This new hypothesis of sparrow relationships will form the basis for future comparative analyses of variation within songbirds. PMID:24792084

Klicka, John; Keith Barker, F; Burns, Kevin J; Lanyon, Scott M; Lovette, Irby J; Chaves, Jaime A; Bryson, Robert W

2014-08-01

131

Foraging decisions, patch use, and seasonality in egrets (Aves: ciconiiformes)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Feeding snowy (Egretta thula) and great (Casmerodius albus) egrets were observed during 2 breeding seasons in coastal New Jersey and 2 brief winter periods in northeast Florida (USA). A number of tests based on assumptions of foraging models, predictions from foraging theory, and earlier empirical tests concerning time allocation and movement in foraging patches was made. Few of the expectations based on foraging theory and/or assumptions were supported by the empirical evidence. Snowy egrets fed with greater intensity and efficiency during the breeding season (when young were being fed) than during winter. They also showed some tendency to leave patches when their capture rate declined, and they spent more time foraging in patches when other birds were present nearby. Great egrets showed few of these tendencies, although they did leave patches when their intercapture intervals increased. Satiation differences had some influence on feeding rates in snowy egrets, but only at the end of feeding bouts. Some individuals of both species revisited areas in patches that had recently been exploited, and success rates were usually higher after the 2nd visit. Apparently, for predators of active prey, short-term changes in resource availability ('resource depression') may be more important than resource depletion, a common assumption in most optimal foraging theory models.

Erwin, R.M.

1985-01-01

132

Hypopi (Acari: Hypoderatidae) of the wood stork (Aves: Ciconiiformes; Ciconiidae).  

PubMed

A new species is described and additional host records are presented for 2 other species of deutonymphs of the family Hypoderatidae from the subcutaneous adipose tissues of the wood stork, Mycteria americana L. Phalacrodectes (Phalacrodectes) mycteria n. sp. appears to share affinities with species from both pelicaniform and ciconiiform hosts, but it most closely resembles P. (P.) punctatissimus (Cerný) Pence & Courtney from pelicans in idiosomal chaetotaxy, cuticular sclerotization, and posteriorly divergent, widely separated genital openings. The new species differs from this and other species of the genus by its small size, the degree of separation of the genital openings with papillae, no secondary sclerotization in the perigenital area or surrounding the genital openings, and the long filiform setae s and w on genu III. There was a mixed infection of Neottialges kutzeri Fain and N. mycteriae Pence in all of 7 wood storks examined from Florida and Georgia; P. (P.) mycteria was found in 4 of these hosts. This is the 7th species described as a deutonymph in the genus Phalacrodectes. The apparent close affinity of P. (P.) mycteria with P. (P.) punctatissimus and allied species from pelicaniform versus ciconiiform birds appears to be inconsistent with the established host-parasite relationships based on classical avian taxonomic relationships. However, this apparent affinity may be more reflective of the close relationships between the families of pelicans, ibises and spoonbills, and storks as recently proposed by DNA-DNA hybridization studies. PMID:8551516

Pence, D B; Thomas, N J

1995-11-01

133

The karyotype of the osprey, Pandion haliaetus (Aves: Falconiformes)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The karyotype of the osprey consists of 74 chromosomes. There are no large macrochromosomes and no typical microchromosomes. Autosome No. 2 has a prominent secondary constriction in the long arm. The Z chromosome is similar in size and shape to the largest autosome, the W is a small metacentric. Among the Falconiformes, the osprey karyotype mainly resembles the karyotypes of

H. Ryttman; H. Tegelström; K. Fredga; J. Sondell

1987-01-01

134

Phylogenetic analysis of some Neogene phasianid genera (Aves: Phasianidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Phylogenetic analysis based on osteological characters of some Neogene and Recent phasianids is performed. Phylogenetic tree\\u000a shows close relationships of Plioperdix with Ammoperdix and Tologuica with Excalfactoria. Chauvireria is at the base of the clade (Alectoris + (Coturnix + (Excalfactoria + Tologuica))). Palaeoperdix is relatively close to the lineage of large pheasants.

N. V. Zelenkov

2009-01-01

135

Electromyographic studies of the syrinx in parrots (Aves, Psittacidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The vocal organ (syrinx) of a bird may contain either extrinsic muscles alone or both extrinsic and intrinsic muscles. The former arise and insert on the trachea and affect the syrinx only indirectly; the latter also arise on the trachea but insert directly on syringeal elements. It is widely supposed that syringeal muscles can affect modulations of the sounds the

A. S. Gaunt; S. L. L. Gaunt

1985-01-01

136

A stability analysis of AVE-4 severe weather soundings  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The stability and vertical structure of an average severe storm sounding, consisting of both thermodynamic and wind vertical profiles, were investigated to determine if they could be distinguished from an average lag sounding taken 3 to 6 hours prior to severe weather occurrence. The term average is defined here to indicate the arithmetic mean of a parameter, as a function of altitude, determined from a large number of available observations taken either close to severe weather occurrence, or else more than 3 hours before it occurs. The investigative computations were also done to help determine if a severe storm forecast or index could possibly be used or developed. These mean vertical profiles of thermodynamic and wind parameters as a function of severity of the weather, determined from manually digitized radar (MDR) categories are presented. Profile differences and stability index differences are presented along with the development of the Johnson Lag Index (JLI) which is determined entirely upon environmental vertical parameter differences between conditions 3 hours prior to severe weather, and severe weather itself.

Johnson, D. L.

1982-01-01

137

Taxonomy of Greater White-fronted Geese (Aves: Anatidae)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Five subspecies of the Greater White-fronted Goose, Anser albifrons (Scopoli, 1769), have been named, all on the basis of wintering birds, and up to six subspecies have been recognized. There has been confusion over the application of some names, particularly in North America, because of lack of knowledge of the breeding ranges and type localities, and incorrect taxonomic decisions. There is one clinally varying subspecies in Eurasia, one that breeds in Greenland, and three in North America, one newly named herein.

Banks, Richard C.

2011-01-01

138

AVE/VAS 4: 25-mb sounding data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The rawinsonde sounding program is described and tabulated data at 25 mb intervals for the 24 stations and 14 special stations participating in the experiment is presented. Sounding were taken at 3 hr intervals. An additional sounding was taken at the normal synoptic observation time. Some soundings were computed from raw ordinate data, while others were interpolated from significant level data.

Sienkiewicz, M. E.

1983-01-01

139

Hindlimb myology of the monk parakeet (Aves, Psittaciformes).  

PubMed

We studied the hindlimb myology of the monk parakeet (Myiopsitta monachus). Like all parrots, it has zygodactyl feet enabling perching, climbing, hanging, moving easily among trees, and handling food. Muscles were described and weighed, and physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA) of four flexors and one extensor was calculated. In comparison to other muscles, the M. tibialis cranialis and the M. fibularis brevis show increased development and high PCSA values, and therefore, large potential force production. Also, a large proportion of muscle mass was involved in flexing the digits. We hypothesize that these muscle traits are associated with the arboreal locomotion and food manipulation habits. In the monk parakeet, the M. extensor digitorum longus sends a branch to the hallux, and the connection between the M. flexor digitorum longus and the M. flexor hallucis longus is type I (Gadow's classification). We reaffirm the presence of the M. ambiens as a plesiomorphic condition that disappears in most members of the order. Among Psittaciformes, the M. fibularis brevis is stronger and the M. fibularis weaker in arboreal species than in basal terrestrial ones (e.g., Strigops). PMID:24500894

Carril, Julieta; Mosto, María C; Picasso, Mariana B J; Tambussi, Claudia P

2014-07-01

140

77 FR 61051 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...5. VILLA DIAZ, Oscar Dominguez (a.k.a. VILLA DIAZ, Oscar Domingo), Calle Acapulco No. 35 Interior 804, Colonia Roma, Delegacion Cuauhtemoc, Distrito Federal Codigo Postal 06700, Mexico; DOB 20 Sep 1945; POB Guadalajara, Jalisco,...

2012-10-05

141

Patient-Specific Dosimetry of Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy Using CC49 Fusion Protein in Patients with Gastrointestinal Malignancies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Patient-Specific Dosimetry of Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy Using CC49 Fusion Protein in Patients with Gastrointestinal Malignancies. Shen S, Forero A, Lobuglio AF, Breitz H, Khazaeli MB, Fisher DR, Wang W, Meredith RF. Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, and Radioisotopes Program at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington. Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using CC49 fusion

Shang Shen; Andres Forero; Albert F. LoBuglio; Hazel Breitz; M. B. Khazaeli; Darrell R. Fisher; Wenquan Wang; Ruby F. Meredith

2005-01-01

142

A phylogeny of the megapodes (Aves: Megapodiidae) based on nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences  

Microsoft Academic Search

DNA sequences from the first intron of the nuclear gene rhodopsin (RDP1) and from the mitochondrial gene ND2 were used to construct a phylogeny of the avian family Megapodiidae. RDP1 sequences evolved about six times more slowly than ND2 and showed less homoplasy, substitution bias, and rate heterogeneity across sites. Analysis of RDP1 produced a phylogeny that was well resolved

Sharon M Birks; Scott V Edwards

2002-01-01

143

MOLECULAR SYSTEMATICS AND BIOGEOGRAPHY OF ANTILLEAN THRASHERS, TREMBLERS, AND MOCKINGBIRDS (AVES: MIMIDAE)  

Microsoft Academic Search

We constructed phylogenetic hypotheses for Greater and Lesser Antillean Mimidae, including five endemic species of tremblers and thrashers that represent the best plausible example of an avian radiation within the Lesser Antilles. Phylogenetic relation- ships were inferred from analysis of 3,491 base pairs (bp) of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and roughly 780 bp of the nuclear-encoded myoglobin gene. We used a

Jeffrey S. Hunt; Eldredge Bermingham; Robert E. Ricklefs

2001-01-01

144

Phylogeny of "core Gruiformes" (Aves: Grues) and resolution of the Limpkin-Sungrebe problem.  

PubMed

Opinions on the systematic relationships of birds in the avian order Gruiformes have been as diverse as the families included within it. Despite ongoing debate over monophyly of the order and relationships among its various members, recent opinion has converged on the monophyly of a "core" group of five families classified as the suborder Grues: the rails (Rallidae), the cranes (Gruidae), the Limpkin (Aramidae), the trumpeters (Psophiidae), and the finfoots (Heliornithidae). We present DNA sequence data from four mitochondrial (cytochrome b, 12S rRNA, Valine tRNA, and 16S rRNA) and three nuclear loci (intron 7 of beta-fibrinogen, intron 5 of alcohol dehydrogenase-I, and introns 3 through 5 of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) to test previous hypotheses of interfamilial relationships within Grues, with particular attention to the enigmatic family Heliornithidae. Separate and combined analyses of these gene sequences confirm the monophyly of Grues as a whole, and of the five families individually, including all three species of Heliornithidae. The preferred topology unambiguously supports relationships among four of the five families, with only the position of Psophiidae remaining equivocal. Bayesian "relaxed-clock" dating methods suggest that the divergences of the three heliornithid species occurred in the mid-Tertiary, suggesting that their present disjunct pantropical distribution is a result of early- to mid-Tertiary dispersal. PMID:17419074

Fain, Matthew G; Krajewski, Carey; Houde, Peter

2007-05-01

145

Uso de hábitats modificados por aves dependientes de bosque tropical en la región caribeña de Guatemala  

Microsoft Academic Search

Modified-habitat use by tropical forest-dependent birds in the Caribbean region of Guatemala. As natural areas are reduced into isolated remnants, the importance of secondary habitats for species conser- vation will increase. Consequently, the conservation value of human-modified or created secondary habitats must be determined. in this study, we evaluated the conservation potential of three habitats associated to cattle ranching (riparian

Alexis Cerezo; Chandler S. Robbins; Barbara Dowell

146

Taxonomic revision and phylogenetic analysis of the flightless Mancallinae (Aves, Pan-Alcidae).  

PubMed

Although flightless alcids from the Miocene and Pliocene of the eastern Pacific Ocean have been known for over 100 years, there is no detailed evaluation of diversity and systematic placement of these taxa. This is the first combined analysis of morphological and molecular data to include all extant alcids, the recently extinct Great Auk Pinguinus impennis, the mancalline auks, and a large outgroup sampling of 29 additional non-alcid charadriiforms. Based on the systematic placement of Mancallinae outside of crown clade Alcidae, the clade name Pan-Alcidae is proposed to include all known alcids. An extensive review of the Mancallinae fossil record resulted in taxonomic revision of the clade, and identification of three new species. In addition to positing the first hypothesis of inter-relationships between Mancallinae species, phylogenetic results support placement of Mancallinae as the sister taxon to all other Alcidae, indicating that flightlessness evolved at least twice in the alcid lineage. Convergent osteological characteristics of Mancallinae, the flightless Great Auk, and Spheniscidae are summarized, and implications of Mancallinae diversity, radiation, and extinction in the context of paleoclimatic changes are discussed. PMID:21594108

Smith, Neil Adam

2011-01-01

147

First record of an hypopus (Acari: Hypoderatidae) from a jaeger (Aves: Charadriiformes: Stercorariidae).  

PubMed

Thalassornectes (Alcidectes) aukletae, originally described from two species of auklets (Charadriiformes: Alcidae) from maritime eastern Russia, is reported from a third species of pelagic charadriiform (Stercorariidae), the pomarine jaeger, Stercorarius pomarinus (Temminck), from Florida. The specimens from the jaeger are slightly smaller, the genital apodeme is more heavily sclerotized, paired setae gm are twice as long and there are other minor variations in the idiosomal and leg chaetotaxy. These differences are not considered sufficient to warrant taxonomic separation at the species or subspecies level from the nominate species T. (A.) aukletae. The same hypopus occurring across different families of birds is unusual in the Hypoderatidae. The diversity in hosts from several orders of birds, low intensities of infection in the two species from Africa, low prevalences in alcids from Russia, and rarity of these hypoderatids in all surveyed hosts leads us to speculate that the true host affinities of species in the genus Thalassornectes are unknown. The alternative consideration is that these are simply uncommon species that are very host specific. PMID:7616535

Pence, D B; Cole, R A

1995-05-01

148

Microanatomy and evolution of the nanostructures responsible for iridescent coloration in Trogoniformes (Aves)  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the most outstanding features of the order Trogoniformes is the presence of iridescent plumage, which is widely distributed\\u000a throughout the group except in the species of the Asian genus Harpactes. Previous studies indicated that the iridescence-producing nanostructures vary in form and array throughout the order. Thus,\\u000a the present study aimed at reconstructing the evolutionary history of those nanostructures

Esther Quintero; Alejandro Espinosa de los Monteros

2011-01-01

149

Structure and Growth Pattern of Pseudoteeth in Pelagornis mauretanicus (Aves, Odontopterygiformes, Pelagornithidae)  

PubMed Central

The extinct Odontopterygiformes are the sole birds known to possess strong and sharp bony pseudoteeth, the shape and location of which are closely mimetic of real teeth. The structure of the pseudoteeth is investigated here in a late Pliocene/early Pleistocene species, Pelagornis mauretanicus, using X-ray microtomography and thin sections. The results are interpreted with regard to the pseudotooth mode of growth, and have implications concerning aspects of Pelagornis ecology. The larger pseudoteeth are hollow and approximately cone-shaped, and the smaller ones are rostro-caudally constricted. The walls of pseudoteeth are composed of bone tissue of the fibro-lamellar type, which is intensively remodeled by Haversian substitution. The jaw bones display the same structure as the pseudoteeth, but their vascular canals are oriented parallel to the long axis of the bones, whereas they are perpendicular to this direction in the pseudoteeth. There is no hiatus or evidence of a fusion between the pseudoteeth and the jaw bones. Two possible models for pseudotooth growth are derived from the histological data. The most plausible model is that pseudotooth growth began after the completion of jaw bone growth, as a simple local protraction of periosteal osteogenic activity. Pseudotooth development thus occurred relatively late during ontogeny. The highly vascularized structure and the relative abundance of parallel-fibered bone tissue in the pseudoteeth suggest poor mechanical capabilities. The pseudoteeth were most likely covered and protected by the hardened, keratinized rhamphotheca in the adult during life. The late development of the pseudoteeth would involve a similarly late and/or partial hardening of the rhamphotheca, as displayed by extant Anseriformes, Apterygiformes and some Charadriiformes. This would add support to the hypothesis of a close phylogenetic relationship between Odontopterygiformes and Anseriformes. The late maturation of the Pelagornis feeding apparatus, and hence the delayed capability for efficient prey catching, suggests that Pelagornis was altricial.

Louchart, Antoine; Sire, Jean-Yves; Mourer-Chauvire, Cecile; Geraads, Denis; Viriot, Laurent; de Buffrenil, Vivian

2013-01-01

150

INFORMACIÓN SOBRE LA DISTRIBUCIÓN DE ALGUNAS ESPECIES DE AVES DE ECUADOR  

Microsoft Academic Search

New records or confirmation of recently reported distributional range extensions or altitudinal movements are given or 14 species of birds from Ecuador: Cairina moschata, Netta erythrophthalma, Leucopternis semiplumbeus, Forpus coelestis, Crotophaga sulcirostris, Eriocnemis mosquera, Furnarius cinnamomeus, Pseudocolaptes boissonneautii, Phlegopsis nigromaculata, Querula purpurata, Cyclarhis gujanensis, Progne subis, Haplospiza rustica y Carduelis olivacea. The new records and their releva nce to the

Diego F. Cisneros-Heredia

151

Non-Commercial Audiovisual Instructional Materials in Japan. AVE in Japan No. 24.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report outlines the history of non-commercial and local production of audiovisual instructional materials in Japan since World War II, discusses current trends in instructional materials usage, and presents four case studies of materials production at the prefectural level. Topics addressed include: (1) materials production prior to the…

Takakuwa, Yasuo

152

Comparisons of host specificity in feather louse genera (insecta: phthiraptera: philopteridae) parasitizing gulls (aves: laridae: larus).  

PubMed

Data from gene sequences and morphological structures were collected for the gull feather lice, Saemundssonia lari, Quadraceps punctatus, and Q. ornatus, parasitizing Larus crassirostris and L. schistisagus. Saemundssonia lari was collected from both gull species, and no detectable morphological and genetic differences were found between lice collected from the two different hosts. In contrast, Q. punctatus was only collected from L. crassirostris, whereas Q. ornatus was only collected from L. schistisagus. The two Quadraceps species were genetically highly divergent, and body-size differences corresponding to the gull's body size (Harrison's rule) were also detected between them. Both Quadraceps species were collected from the interbarb of the remex or rectrix, and a match in body size between the louse and the interbarb space may be important in escape from host preening defenses. In contrast, Saemundssonia is a head louse, inhabiting the finer feathers of the head and neck, which the bird cannot preen. A close match to host body size may be less important for lice in the head microhabitat. The differences in the pattern of host-specificity between Saemundssonia and Quadraceps on the two focal host species of this study were probably due to their different microhabitat preferences. More broadly, comparisons of the gene sequences of S. lari and Q. punctatus to those from other gull hosts showed that genetically almost undifferentiated populations of both species were distributed on wide range of gull species. Frequent interspecific hybridization of gulls is one possible factor that may allow these lice to maintain gene flow across multiple host species. PMID:24882099

Yamagishi, Ayaka; Yao, Izumi; Johnson, Kevin P; Yoshizawa, Kazunori

2014-06-01

153

Foraging activity of the snail kite, Rostrhamus sociabilis (Aves: Accipitridae) in wetlands of southern Brazil.  

PubMed

The snail kite (Rostrhamus sociabilis) is widely distributed in the American continent. Its specialised diet consists mostly of the gastropod mollusk Pomacea sp and its foraging strategy probably varies depending on the season, prey availability, and climate factors, which can be reflected in its semi-nomad behaviour. This study was aimed at examining the hunting strategy of the snail kite, and its association with climate factors and habitat heterogeneity. Direct observations of birds between January 2010 and March 2011 in southernmost Brazil revealed that hunting was still the predominant foraging strategy (79% of records) to capture mollusks. Despite morphological specialisations to extract mollusks from the shells, the handling time (average = 92.4 s) was twice as much the time between prey search and capture (average = 55 s). The increase in the number of mollusks ingested apparently occurs when the resting time on perches or any other substrates near the hunting sites decreases between successive unsuccessful attempts. The correlation between the number of consumed preys and the climatic variables examined was low. Regarding habitat heterogeneity, our findings suggest that birds forage preferentially in marshes with low vegetation, which may increase the access to mollusks. The hunting efficiency of the snail kite was high (76 % successful attempts) compared to those of other birds of prey. PMID:23917551

Bergmann, F B; Amaral, H L C; Pinto, D P; Chivittz, C C; Tozetti, A M

2013-05-01

154

Phylogeny and phylogenetic classification of the antbirds, ovenbirds, woodcreepers, and allies (Aves: Passeriformes: Infraorder Furnariides)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The infraorder Furnariides is a diverse group of suboscine passerine birds comprising a substantial component of the Neotropical avifauna. The included species encompass a broad array of morphologies and behaviours, making them appealing for evolutionary studies, but the size of the group (ca. 600 species) has limited well-sampled higher-level phylogenetic studies. Using DNA sequence data from the nuclear RAG-1 and RAG-2 exons, we undertook a phylogenetic analysis of the Furnariides sampling 124 (more than 88%) of the genera. Basal relationships among family-level taxa differed depending on phylogenetic method, but all topologies had little nodal support, mirroring the results from earlier studies in which discerning relationships at the base of the radiation was also difficult. In contrast, branch support for family-rank taxa and for many relationships within those clades was generally high. Our results support the Melanopareidae and Grallariidae as distinct from the Rhinocryptidae and Formicariidae, respectively. Within the Furnariides our data contradict some recent phylogenetic hypotheses and suggest that further study is needed to resolve these discrepancies. Of the few genera represented by multiple species, several were not monophyletic, indicating that additional systematic work remains within furnariine families and must include dense taxon sampling. We use this study as a basis for proposing a new phylogenetic classification for the group and in the process erect new family-group names for clades having high branch support across methods. ?? 2009 The Willi Hennig Society.

Moyle, R. G.; Chesser, R. T.; Brumfield, R. T.; Tello, J. G.; Marchese, D. J.; Cracraft, J.

2009-01-01

155

Helminth parasites of the American avocet Recurvirostra americana (Aves), from the Salt Lake basin, Utah.  

PubMed

Five species of cestodes and 1 species of trematode, for a total of 4,770 (chi- =79.5) helminths, were obtained from 60 American avocets, Recurvirostra americana, collected from July to September 1985 and 1986 in the Salt Lake basin, Utah. The most prevalent parasite was the cestode Diplophallus coili (95%). It occurred in mature pairs 90% of the time. All species of helminths showed a contagious distribution except for mature D. coili, which had a uniform distribution. This uniform distribution, which is unusual for species of helminths, has been observed for at least 4 species of large tapeworms in the recurvirostrids. The helminth community consisted of 3 specialists, 1 generalist, and 2 of uncertain status. The same specialists have been reported also in R. americana from Texas, Colorado, and Manitoba, Canada. PMID:8437049

Hinojos, J G; Campbell, B K; Canaris, A G

1993-02-01

156

Nests, eggs, and nestlings of the Restinga Antwren Formicivora littoralis (Aves: Thamnophilidae).  

PubMed

We describe the nest, eggs, and nestlings of the Restinga Antwren (Formicivora littoralis), an endangered bird of Restinga ecosystem (sandy coastal plain vegetation) that is endemic to Rio de Janeiro state. Twelve nests were found at the edges of trails or natural gaps at Massambaba Restinga region, in different supporting plants and heights from the ground (X ± SD 1.27 ± 0.97 m, range 0.27 to 3.45 m). Nests were cup-shaped and were in horizontal forks attached to branches at three to five points with whitish, soft, and thin cotton-like vegetable fiber. The nests' cup shape and measurements were similar to congeneric species, but nest material was different. Eggs were white with brown spots concentrated on the large end or around the middle, giving the appearance of a rough brown ring. Their mean (± SD) minimum diameter was 13.1 ± 0.34 mm, with maximum diameter of 18.0 ± 0.38 mm, and mass of 1.7 ± 0.18 g (n = 8). We found two nestlings completely naked on their first day after hatching. PMID:23828345

Chaves, Flávia G; Vecchi, Maurício B; Laurindo, Thiago F S; Alves, Maria Alice S

2013-01-01

157

Mitochondrial phylogeography, subspecific taxonomy, and conservation genetics of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis; Aves: Gruidae)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Six subspecies of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) have been denoted based on perceived morphological and/or breeding locality differences among them. Three subspecies are migratory, breeding from the high arctic in North America and Siberia (lesser sandhill, G. c. canadensis), south through central Canada (Canadian sandhill, G. c. rowani) and into the northern United States (greater sandhill, G. c. tabida). A review of sandhill crane taxonomy indicates that the size variation, on the basis of which these subspecies were named, may be clinal and not diagnostic. The other three subspecies, all listed as endangered or threatened, are non-migratory, resident in Florida (G. c. pratensis), Mississippi (G. c. pulla), and Cuba (G. c. nesiotes). We used analysis of mitochondrial DNA control region (CR) sequences to determine whether haplotypes representing current subspecies show any genetic cohesion or are more consistent with a pattern of clinal variation in morphology. CR sequences indicate that only two highly divergent (5.3%) lineages of sandhill cranes occur in North America: one lineage composed only of arctic-nesting G. c. canadensis, the other of the remaining North American subspecies (we lack data on the Cuban population). The deep split between lineages is consistent with an estimated isolation of approximately 1.5 Mya (mid-Pleistocene), while the distribution of mutational changes within lineages is consistent with an hypothesis of rapid, post-Pleistocene population expansions. No other phylogeographic structuring is concordant with subspecific boundaries, however, analysis of molecular variance indicates that there is significant population genetic differentiation among all subspecies except G. c. tabida and G. c. rowani, which are indistinguishable. We suggest that recognition of the recently named G. c. rowani be abandoned.

Rhymer, J. M.; Fain, M. G.; Austin, J. E.; Johnson, D. H.; Krajewski, C.

2001-01-01

158

Chewing lice (Phthiraptera) from Calidris fuscicollis (Aves: Scolopacidae) in Southern Brazil.  

PubMed

During April and September from 2010 to 2012, 80 birds of the species Calidris fuscicollis (white-rumped sandpiper) were collected for parasitological studies in the southern coast of Rio Grande do Sul, under ICMBIO license No. 26234-1. For ectoparasite collection, the birds were first submerged in water with detergent. The parasites found were fixed in 70% alcohol, cleared in 10% potassium hydroxide and mounted in Canada balsam. Of 80 birds examined, 79% were parasitized. Actornithophilus umbrinus (47.5%), Actornithophilus lacustris (37.5%), Actornithophilus spp. (13.75%), Carduiceps zonarius (26.25%), Lunaceps incoenis (27.5%), and Lunaceps spp. (16.25%) were the species found with their respective prevalence. We record for the first time parasitism by chewing lice in Calidris fuscicollis. PMID:24742904

Gomes, Sâmara Nunes; Pesenti, Tatiana Cheuiche; Cirne, Maximiano Pinheiro; Müller, Gertrud

2014-08-01

159

Taxonomic status and biology of the Cuban blackhawk, Buteogallus anthracinus gundlachii (AVES: Accipitridae)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We reevaluate the taxonomic status of the Cuban population of the Common Black-Hawk (Buteogallus anthracinus) based on our examination of additional specimens, nests, eggs, and voice data. Buteogallus a. gundlachii is smaller than mainland populations of anthracinus and differs from mainland birds in plumage coloration and pattern. The common (alarm) call of gundlachii is a series of three or four notes, differing from that of mainland anthracinus, whose call consists of 9-24 notes. In the Isla de Pinos, Cuba, we observed gundlachii eating two species of land crabs (71.4%), centipedes (7.1%), lizards (10.7%), mammals (7.1%), and a bird (3.6%). We consider Buteogallus gundlachii Cabanis 1854 (1855), the Cuban Black-Hawk, to be a full species, endemic to Cuba, Isla de Pinos, and many of the cays of the Cuban Archipelago. ?? 2005 The Raptor Research Foundation, Inc.

Wiley, J. W.; Garrido, O. H.

2005-01-01

160

Mitochondrial control region structure and single site heteroplasmy in the razorbill ( Alca torda; Aves)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The primary structure of the Alca torda mitochondrial control region was determined and conserved structural features were identified based on sequence comparisons to other bird species. In a population survey using control region analysis, five individuals were found to possess heteroplasmic point mutations at the variable 5' end of the control region. The pattern of variable nucleotide positions among individuals

Truls Moum; Ingrid Bakke

2001-01-01

161

Mitochondrial control region structure and single site heteroplasmy in the razorbill (Alca torda; Aves).  

PubMed

The primary structure of the Alca torda mitochondrial control region was determined and conserved structural features were identified based on sequence comparisons to other bird species. In a population survey using control region analysis, five individuals were found to possess heteroplasmic point mutations at the variable 5' end of the control region. The pattern of variable nucleotide positions among individuals was compared to the distribution of heteroplasmic sites and the heteroplasmic condition was further characterised by a cloning procedure applied to two individuals which harboured one and two heteroplasmic point mutations, respectively. These results are in support of recent evidence that single site heteroplasmy may be more common than previously thought. PMID:11409182

Moum, T; Bakke, I

2001-05-01

162

Variación estacional en la composición de las comunidades de aves en un gradiente urbano  

Microsoft Academic Search

Seasonal variation in the composition of bird communities in an urban gradient: Urbanization affects the birds of a region in a complex way. Several studies from the Northern Hemisphere show a particular negative incidence on migratory species. In an urban area of the province of Tucuman, a previous work found that bird richness increased with plant cover in residential areas.

MARÍA D JURI; JOSÉ M CHANI

2009-01-01

163

Comparative Phyloclimatic Analysis and Evolution of Ecological Niches in the Scimitar Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae: Pomatorhinus)  

PubMed Central

We present the first extensive and integrative analysis of niche evolution based on climatic variables and a dated molecular phylogeny of a heterogeneous avian group of Southeast Asian scimitar babblers of the genus Pomatorhinus. The four main clades of scimitar babblers have species that co-occur in similar areas across southern Asia but some have diverged at different timeframes, with the most recently evolved clade harboring the highest number of species. Ecological niche models and analysis of contributing variables within a phylogenetic framework indicate instances of convergent evolution of members of different clades onto similar ecological parameter space, as well as divergent evolution of members from within clades. Pomatorhinus species from different clades occupying Himalayan foothills show convergence towards similar climatic tolerances, whereas within a clade, allopatric sister-species occurring in the Himalayas have diverged to occupy different climatic parameter spaces. Comparisons of climatic tolerances of Himalayan foothills taxa with species distributed further south in Assam/Burma and Burma/Thailand indicate convergence towards similar parameter spaces in several climatic variables. Niche overlap was observed to be lower among species of the youngest clade (ruficollis) and higher among species of older clades (ferruginosus). Analysis of accumulation of ecological disparity through time indicates rapid divergence within recent time frames. As a result, Himalayan taxa originating at different temporal scales within the four main scimitar babbler clades have differentiated ecologically only in recently diverged taxa. Our study suggests that the repeated orogenic and climatic fluctuations of the Pliocene and Pleistocene within mainland Southeast Asia served as an important ecological speciation driver within scimitar babblers, by providing opportunities for rapid geographic expansion and filling of novel environmental niches.

Nyari, Arpad S.; Reddy, Sushma

2013-01-01

164

Complex species status for extinct moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes) from the genus Euryapteryx.  

PubMed

The exact species status of New Zealand's extinct moa remains unknown. In particular, moa belonging to the genus Euryapteryx have been difficult to classify. We use the DNA barcoding sequence on a range of Euryapteryx samples in an attempt to resolve the species status for this genus. We obtained mitochondrial control region and the barcoding region from Cytochrome Oxidase Subunit I (COI) from a number of new moa samples and use available sequences from previous moa phylogenies and eggshell data to try and clarify the species status of Euryapteryx. Using the COI barcoding region we show that species status in Euryapteryx is complex with no clear separation between various individuals. Eggshell, soil, and bone data suggests that a Euryapteryx subspecies likely exists on New Zealand's North Island and can be characterized by a single mitochondrial control region SNP. COI divergences between Euryapteryx individuals from the south of New Zealand's South Island and those from the Far North of the North Island exceed 1.6% and are likely to represent separate species. Individuals from other areas of New Zealand were unable to be clearly separated based on COI differences possibly as a result of repeated hybridisation events. Despite the accuracy of the COI barcoding region to determine species status in birds, including that for the other moa genera, for moa from the genus Euryapteryx, COI barcoding fails to provide a clear result, possibly as a consequence of repeated hybridisation events between these moa. A single control region SNP was identified however that segregates with the two general morphological variants determined for Euryapteryx; a smaller subspecies restricted to the North Island of New Zealand, and a larger subspecies, found on both New Zealand's North and South Island. PMID:24594991

Huynen, Leon; Lambert, David M

2014-01-01

165

Arboviral infection in two species of wild jays (Aves: Corvidae): evidence for population impacts.  

PubMed

We examined the prevalence of antibodies to three mosquito-borne arboviruses in blue jays, Cyanocitta cristata, and Florida scrub-jays, Aphelocoma coerulescens, to identify the effects on host survival, the influence of sex and age on infection, and the temporal patterns of antibody prevalence. Blood samples from 306 blue jays and 219 Florida scrub-jays were collected at Archbold Biological Station (Lake Placid, FL) from April 1994 through December 1995. Sera were analyzed for hemagglutination-inhibition antibody to eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) and St. Louis encephalitis (SLE) viruses, and neutralizing antibodies to EEE, Highlands J (HJ), and SLE viruses. Overall, 31.4% of blue jay samples and 22.1% of scrub-jay samples had antibodies to EEE. Antibodies to HJ were detected in slightly >15% of samples in each jay species, and SLE was detected in <3% of the samples in each jay species. A single EEE virus isolation was made from the blood of an 11-d-old scrub-jay nestling. Survival of adult blue jays seropositive to EEE was significantly lower than that of seronegative birds based on resight rates, but infection did not seem to affect survival of adult or juvenile Florida scrub-jays. PMID:15061281

Garvin, Mary C; Tarvin, Keith A; Stark, Lillian M; Woolfenden, Glen E; Fitzpatrick, John W; Day, Jonathan F

2004-03-01

166

Evolution in Australasian Mangrove Forests: Multilocus Phylogenetic Analysis of the Gerygone Warblers (Aves: Acanthizidae)  

PubMed Central

The mangrove forests of Australasia have many endemic bird species but their evolution and radiation in those habitats has been little studied. One genus with several mangrove specialist species is Gerygone (Passeriformes: Acanthizidae). The phylogeny of the Acanthizidae is reasonably well understood but limited taxon sampling for Gerygone has constrained understanding of its evolution and historical biogeography in mangroves. Here we report on a phylogenetic analysis of Gerygone based on comprehensive taxon sampling and a multilocus dataset of thirteen loci spread across the avian genome (eleven nuclear and two mitochondrial loci). Since Gerygone includes three species restricted to Australia's coastal mangrove forests, we particularly sought to understand the biogeography of their evolution in that ecosystem. Analyses of individual loci, as well as of a concatenated dataset drawn from previous molecular studies indicates that the genus as currently defined is not monophyletic, and that the Grey Gerygone (G. cinerea) from New Guinea should be transferred to the genus Acanthiza. The multilocus approach has permitted the nuanced view of the group's evolution into mangrove ecosystems having occurred on multiple occasions, in three non-overlapping time frames, most likely first by the G. magnirostris lineage, and subsequently followed by those of G. tenebrosa and G. levigaster.

Nyari, Arpad S.; Joseph, Leo

2012-01-01

167

A new subspecies of anthreptes malacensis (Scopoli) from the Soela Islands (Aves, Nectariniidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

For over a century the sunbird Anthreptes malacensis has been known to occur on the Soela Islands where it reaches the eastern limit of its distribution, and when Shelley (1877) named Anthreptes celebensis, now known as Anthreptes malacensis celebensis, he included the Soela Islands in its range. In subsequent years apparently only Hartert (1898) has in the briefest possible way

G. F. Mees

1966-01-01

168

Structure and composition of the courtship phenotype in the bird of paradise Parotia lawesii (Aves: Paradisaeidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ethology is rooted in the idea that behavior is composed of discrete units and sub-units that can be compared among taxa in a phylogenetic framework. This means that behavior, like morphology and genes, is inherently modular. Yet, the concept of modularity is not well integrated into how we envision the behavioral components of phenotype. Understanding ethological modularity, and its implications

Edwin Scholes III

2008-01-01

169

A species tree for the Australo-Papuan Fairy-wrens and allies (Aves: Maluridae).  

PubMed

We explored the efficacy of species tree methods at the family level in birds, using the Australo-Papuan Fairy-wrens (Passeriformes: Maluridae) as a model system. Fairy-wrens of the genus Malurus are known for high intensities of sexual selection, resulting in some cases in rapid speciation. This history suggests that incomplete lineage sorting (ILS) of neutrally evolving loci could be substantial, a situation that could compromise traditional methods of combining loci in phylogenetic analysis. Using 18 molecular markers (5 anonymous loci, 7 exons, 5 introns, and 1 mitochondrial DNA locus), we show that gene tree monophyly across species could be rejected for 16 of 18 loci, suggesting substantial ILS at the family level in these birds. Using the software Concaterpillar, we also detect three statistically distinct clusters of gene trees among the 18 loci. Despite substantial variation in gene trees, species trees constructed using four different species tree estimation methods (BEST, BUCKy, and STAR) were generally well supported and similar to each other and to the concatenation tree, with a few mild discordances at nodes that could be explained by rapid and recent speciation events. By contrast, minimizing deep coalescences produced a species tree that was topologically more divergent from those of the other methods as measured by multidimensional scaling of trees. Additionally, gene and species trees were topologically more similar in the BEST analysis, presumably because of the species tree prior employed in BEST which appropriately assumes that gene trees are correlated with each other and with the species tree. Among the 18 loci, we also discovered 102 independent indel markers, which also proved phylogenetically informative, primarily among genera, and displayed a ?4-fold bias towards deletions. As suggested in earlier work, the grasswrens (Amytornis) are sister to the rest of the family and the emu-wrens (Stipiturus) are sister to fairy-wrens (Malurus, Clytomyias). Our study shows that ILS is common at the family level in birds yet, despite this, species tree methods converge on broadly similar results for this family. PMID:21978990

Lee, June Y; Joseph, Leo; Edwards, Scott V

2012-03-01

170

CHANNEL RESPONSE TO SEDIMENT W AVE PROP AGA TION AND MOVEMENT, REDWOOD CREEK, CALIFORNIA, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Redwood Creek, north coastal Californa , USA, has experienced dramatic changes in channel confguation since the 1950s. A series of large floods (in 1955 , 1964, 1972 and 1975) combined with the advent of widespread commercial timber harvest and road building resulted in extensive erosion in the basin and contributed high sediment loads to Redwood Creek. Since 1975, no peak

MARY ANN MADEJ; VICKI OZAKI

171

First report of an hypopus (Acari: Hypoderatidae) from a jaeger (Aves: Charadriiformes: Stercorariidae)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Thalassornectes (Alcidectes) aukletae, originally described from two species of auklets (Charadriiformes: Alcidae) from maritime eastern Russia, is reported from a third species of pelagic charadriiform (Stercorariidae), the pomarine jaeger, Stercorarius poinarinus (Temminck), from Florida. The specimens from the jaeger are slightly smaller, the genital apodeme is more heavily sclerotized, paired setae gm are twice as long and there are other minor variations in the idiosomal and leg chaetotaxy. These differences are not considered sufficient to warrant taxonomic separation at the species or subspecies level from the nominate species T. (A.) aukletae. The same hypopus occurring across different families of birds is unusual in the Hypoderatidae. The diversity in hosts from several orders of birds, low intensities of infection in the two species from Africa, low prevalences in alcids from Russia, and rarity of these hypoderatids in all surveyed hosts leads us to speculate that the true host affinities of species in the genus Thalassornectes are unknown. The alternative consideration is that these are simply uncommon species that are very host specific.

Pence, D. B.; Cole, R. A.

1995-01-01

172

Preliminary observations on the paleobiology and evolution of teratorns (Aves: Teratornithidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

An analysis of the functional morphology of the skull of Teratomis merriami indicates that these giant flying birds were predaceous carnivores. This contrasts with prior assumptions that teratorns were scavengers like vultures. The large wingspans of teratorns limited them to savanna habitats. Teratorns probably originated in South America, sharing the dominance of the carnivore adaptive zone in the Tertiary of

Kenneth E. Campbell Jr; Eduardo P. Tonni

1981-01-01

173

The correct authorship and type locality of Melanocorypha leucoptera (Aves: Passeriformes, Alaudidae).  

PubMed

Mlíkovský (2013) proposed replacing the widely-used Melanocorypha leucoptera (Pallas, 1811) with Melanocorypha leucoptera (Hablizl, 1785) as the correct name for the White-winged Lark, with consequent shift in type locality from the Irtyš River-Baraba steppe region in south Siberia to the Crimea. This action breaches Art. 80.9 of the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature (ICZN 1999), hereafter "the Code". That article states that "no ruling given by the Commission in relation to a particular work, name, or nomenclatural act is to be set aside without the consent of the Commission". Melanocorypha leucoptera of Pallas (1811), as published in his Zoographia Rosso-Asiatica, was conserved explicitly in Opinion 403 of the Commission (ICZN 1956), and no consent to Mlíkovský's findings has been given since. PMID:24871735

Schodde, Richard; Bock, Walter J; Dickinson, Edward C; Dowsett, Robert J; Lecroy, Mary K; Palma, Ricardo L; Violani, Carlo

2014-01-01

174

Identification, Classification, and Growth of Moa Chicks (Aves: Dinornithiformes) from the Genus Euryapteryx  

PubMed Central

Background The analysis of growth in extinct organisms is difficult. The general lack of skeletal material from a range of developmental states precludes determination of growth characteristics. For New Zealand's extinct moa we have available to us a selection of rare femora at different developmental stages that have allowed a preliminary determination of the early growth of this giant flightless bird. We use a combination of femora morphometrics, ancient DNA, and isotope analysis to provide information on the identification, classification, and growth of extinct moa from the genus Euryapteryx. Results Using ancient DNA, we identify a number of moa chick bones for the species Euryapteryx curtus, Dinornis novaezealandiae, and Anomalopteryx didiformis, and the first chick bone for Pachyornis geranoides. Isotope analysis shows that ?15N levels vary between the two known size classes of Euryapteryx, with the larger size class having reduced levels of ?15N. A growth series for femora of the two size classes of Euryapteryx shows that early femora growth characteristics for both classes are almost identical. Morphometric, isotopic, and radiographic analysis of the smallest Euryapteryx bones suggests that one of these femora is from a freshly hatched moa at a very early stage of development. Conclusion Using morphometric, isotopic, and ancient DNA analyses have allowed the determination of a number of characteristics of rare moa chick femora. For Euryapteryx the analyses suggest that the smaller sized class II Euryapteryx is identical in size and growth to the extant Darwin's rhea.

Huynen, Leon; Gill, Brian J.; Doyle, Anthony; Millar, Craig D.; Lambert, David M.

2014-01-01

175

Saxicola syenitica Heuglin, 1869 (Aves: Passeriformes: Muscicapidae), an overlooked taxon of Oenanthe?  

PubMed

The North African population of the Black Wheatear has been treated as Oenanthe leucura syenitica for over 100 years. The type of syenitica was collected by Heuglin in June 1852 near the southern Egypt/northern Sudan border, well outside the range of the sedentary Black Wheatear. Morphometric inference and genetic analyses of partial sequences of the mitochondrial gene COI demonstrate that the type specimen of syenitica is not conspecific with O. leucura, but instead is closely related to O. lugens of the Middle East and North Africa, being most similar in plumage to O. lugens warriae of the basalt deserts of north-east Jordan and southern Syria. While syenitica was not separable in the analysed part of its mitochondrial DNA from O. l. lugens and O. l. warriae, it differs in morphometrics and plumage features from the latter. The type specimen is a first-summer bird with abraded plumage as expected for June, and may thus have been collected in its breeding range. Its morphological distinctiveness implies that syenitica might be taxonomically distinct from warriae. However, as it is known only from the type and its few associated data, we propose to treat it as a subspecies inquirenda of O. lugens. As a consequence of this, and the fact that we found no genetic or morphological differences between North African populations of O. leucura and riggenbachi Hartert, 1909, the name originally applied to the population in Western Sahara, the North African population takes the oldest available name to become O. leucura riggenbachi. PMID:24872167

Shirihai, Hadoram; Schweizer, Manuel; Kirwan, Guy M; Svensson, Lars

2014-01-01

176

Intraspecific rearrangement of duplicated mitochondrial control regions in the Luzon Tarictic Hornbill Penelopides manillae (Aves: Bucerotidae).  

PubMed

Philippine hornbills of the genera Aceros and Penelopides (Bucerotidae) are known to possess a large tandemly duplicated fragment in their mitochondrial genome, whose paralogous parts largely evolve in concert. In the present study, we surveyed the two distinguishable duplicated control regions in several individuals of the Luzon Tarictic Hornbill Penelopides manillae, compare their characteristics within and across individuals, and report on an intraspecific mitochondrial gene rearrangement found in one single specimen, i.e., an interchange between the two control regions. To our knowledge, this is the first observation of two distinct mitochondrial genome rearrangements within a bird species. We briefly discuss a possible evolutionary mechanism responsible for this pattern, and highlight potential implications for the application of control region sequences as a marker in population genetics and phylogeography. PMID:24141642

Sammler, Svenja; Ketmaier, Valerio; Havenstein, Katja; Tiedemann, Ralph

2013-12-01

177

Phylogeny of the owlet-nightjars (Aves: Aegothelidae) based on mitochondrial DNA sequence  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The avian family Aegothelidae (Owlet-nightjars) comprises nine extant species and one extinct species, all of which are currently classified in a single genus, Aegotheles. Owlet-nightjars are secretive nocturnal birds of the South Pacific. They are relatively poorly studied and some species are known from only a few specimens. Furthermore, their confusing morphological variation has made it difficult to cluster existing specimens unambiguously into hierarchical taxonomic units. Here we sample all extant owlet-nightjar species and all but three currently recognized subspecies. We use DNA extracted primarily from museum specimens to obtain mitochondrial gene sequences and construct a molecular phylogeny. Our phylogeny suggests that most species are reciprocally monophyletic, however A. albertisi appears paraphyletic. Our data also suggest splitting A. bennettii into two species and splitting A. insignis and A. tatei as suggested in another recent paper. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

Dumbacher, J. P.; Pratt, T. K.; Fleischer, R. C.

2003-01-01

178

Out of Africa? Phylogenetic relationships between Falco biarmicus and the other hierofalcons (Aves: Falconidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The phylogeographic history of the lanner falcon (Falco biarmicus) and the phylogenetic relationships among hierofalcons (F. biarmicus, Falco cherrug, Falco jugger and Falco rusticolus) were investigated using mitochondrial (mt) DNA sequences. Of the two non-coding mt sections tested, the control region (CR) appeared more suitable as phylogenetic marker sequence compared with the pseudo control region (WCR). For the comprehensive analysis

F. Nittinger; E. Haring; W. Pinsker; M. Wink; A. Gamauf

2005-01-01

179

Arteriovenous anastomoses and vascularity in the feet of eiders and gulls (Aves)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Arteriovenous anastomoses (AVAs) and vascularity were studied in the webbed feet of eiders and two species of gulls using an injection technique. The density of AVAs was high in the distal part of the web (85–126 AVAs per cm2) and decreased proximally. Anastomoses were also present in the feathered skin of the tibiotarsus (18–39 AVAs per cm2). A positive correlation

Uffe Midtgård

1980-01-01

180

A preliminary look at AVE-SESAME 5 conducted on 20-21 May 1979  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Information on data collected, synoptic conditions, and severe and unusual weather reported during the period are presented. Records of the synoptic conditions include synoptic charts, radar charts, satellite photographs, and rainfall observations.

July, M.; Turner, R. E.

1981-01-01

181

The structure and dynamics of mesoscale systems influencing severe thunderstorm development during AVE/SESAME 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Relationships between meso-beta scale systems and thunderstorm formation were examined as part of the NASA atmospheric variability experiment/severe environmental storms and mesoscale experiment 1979. The McIdas program was employed for meso-beta scale analyses of atmospheric structure and dynamics in kinematic computations of the Abilene Triangle on a grid mesh of 100 km for station spacing of 275 km. Mesoscale short wave systems were detected imbedded and propagating cyclonically around upper-level vortex circulation and creating environmental conditions conducive to thunderstorm development. TIROS-N and GOES satellite data served to connect the systems with two convective storms which developed. The necessity to use spaceborne instrumentation carried on the Shuttle or on free-flying satellites for enhancing the data-base on storm development is noted.

Wilson, G. S.

1982-01-01

182

Genetic Differentiation Among Populations of the Roseate Spoonbill (Platalea ajaja; Aves: Pelecaniformes) in Three Brazilian Wetlands.  

PubMed

Effective population size, levels of genetic diversity, gene flow, and genetic structuring were assessed in 205 colonial Roseate spoonbills from 11 breeding colonies from north, central west, and south Brazil. Colonies and regions exhibited similar moderate levels of diversity at five microsatellite loci (mean expected heterozygosity range 0.50-0.62; allelic richness range 3.17-3.21). The central west region had the highest Ne (59). F ST values revealed low but significant genetic structuring among colonies within the north and within the south regions. Significant global genetic structuring was found between the northern and central western populations as well as between the northern and southern populations. An individual-based Bayesian clustering method inferred three population clusters. Assignment tests correctly allocated up to 64% of individuals to their source regions. Collectively, results revealed complex demographic dynamics, with ongoing gene flow on a local scale, but genetic differentiation on a broader scale. Populations in the three regions may all be conserved, but special concern should be given to central western ones, which can significantly contribute to the species' gene pool in Brazil. PMID:24737052

Miño, Carolina Isabel; Del Lama, Silvia Nassif

2014-08-01

183

Identification of Bacterial Specialists in Hosts belonging to Aves, Mammalia, and Pisces  

EPA Science Inventory

Only a portion of bacteria found in animal guts are able to establish specific associations within animal hosts. Taxa that have formed these specialized relationships may have played a prominent role in host evolution and may also contribute significantly to current host physiolo...

184

New molecular evidence supports the species status of Kaempfer's Woodpecker (Aves, Picidae)  

PubMed Central

Kaempfer’s Woodpecker (Celeus obrieni) is the only species of the genus Celeus endemic to Brazil. The description of this taxon as a subspecies of the Rufous-headed Woodpecker (Celeus spectabilis) was based on a single specimen. While C. obrieni and C. spectabilis are now considered separate species based on morphological and limited molecular evidence, no study has critically tested the reciprocal monophyly and degree of evolutionary independence between these taxa with several specimens. Herein, fragments of the mitochondrial and nuclear DNA of three recently-collected specimens of C. obrieni were analyzed to evaluate the degree of evolutionary differentiation of this taxon with respect to C. spectabilis. The results confirm the reciprocal monophyly between the specimens of C. obrieni and C. spectabilis. The genetic divergence values for the two taxa also support their classification as independent species, given that they are greater than the values recorded among other closely-related but separate species of the same genus. Estimates of the divergence time between C. obrieni and C. spectabilis indicate that cladogenesis occurred in the mid-Pleistocene, during a period of major climatic fluctuations and landscape change, consistent with the hypothesis of a corridor of open bamboo dominated forests and woodland stretching.

de Sousa Azevedo, Lorena; Aleixo, Alexandre; Santos, Marcos Persio Dantas; Sampaio, Iracilda; Schneider, Horacio; Vallinoto, Marcelo; do Rego, Pericles Sena

2013-01-01

185

Subulura halli (Ascaridida: Subuluridae) from the endangered great bustard Otis tarda Linnaeus (Aves: Gruiformes) in China.  

PubMed

Subulurid nematodes identified as Subulura halli Barreto, 1918 were collected from the endangered bird Otis tarda Linnaeus (Gruiformes: Otididae) in China. A detailed redescription of the hitherto poorly known species is presented using both light and, for the first time, scanning electron microscopy. Previously unreported and erroneous morphological features of taxonomic significance are revealed. This species can be readily distinguished from its congeners by the relatively long oesophagus (1.47-1.92 mm long, representing 10.6-16.9% of body length), the number and arrangement of male caudal papillae (11 pairs in total, arranged as five pairs of precloacal and six pairs of postcloacal papillae), the equal length of spicules (1.35-1.52 mm long, representing 10.7-13.7% of body length) and the presence of a small medioventral, precloacal papilla in the male. PMID:24684055

Du, Li-Qiang; Xu, Zhen; Li, Shun-Cai; Li, Liang

2014-02-01

186

Phylogenetic signal in the song of crests and kinglets (Aves: Regulus).  

PubMed

Territorial song structures are often the most prominent characters for distinguishing closely related taxa among songbirds. Learning processes may cause convergent evolution of passerine songs, but phylogenetic information of acoustic traits can be investigated with the help of molecular phylogenies, which are not affected by cultural evolutionary processes. We used a phylogeny based on cytochrome b sequences to trace the evolution of territorial song within the genus Regulus. Five discrete song units are defined as basic components of regulid song via sonagraphic measurements. Traits of each unit are traced on a molecular tree and a mean acoustic character difference between taxon pairs is calculated. Acoustic divergence between regulid taxa correlates strongly with genetic distances. Syntax features of complete songs and of single units are most consistent with the molecular data, whereas the abundance of certain element types is not. Whether song characters are innate or learned was interpreted using hand-reared birds in aviary experiments. We found that convergent character evolution seems to be most probable for learned acoustic traits. We conclude that syntax traits of whole verses or subunits of territorial song, especially innate song structures, are the most reliable acoustic traits for phylogenetic reconstructions in Regulus. PMID:12703951

Päckert, Martin; Martens, Jochen; Kosuch, Joachim; Nazarenko, Alexander A; Veith, Michael

2003-03-01

187

Osteological evidence for sister group relationship between pseudo-toothed birds (Aves: Odontopterygiformes) and waterfowls (Anseriformes)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The phylogenetic affinities of the extinct pseudo-toothed birds have remained controversial. Some authors noted that they resemble both pelicans and allies (Pelecaniformes) and tube-nosed birds (Procellariiformes), but assigned them to a distinct taxon, the Odontopterygiformes. In most recent studies, the pseudo-toothed birds are referred to the family Pelagornithidae inside the Pelecaniformes. Here, I perform a cladistic analysis with five taxa of the pseudo-toothed birds including two undescribed new species from the Early Tertiary of Morocco. The present hypothesis strongly supports a sister group relationship of pseudo-toothed birds (Odontopterygiformes) and waterfowls (Anseriformes). The Odontoanserae (Odontopterygiformes plus Anseriformes) are the sister group of Neoaves. The placement of the landfowls (Galliformes) as the sister taxon of all other neognathous birds does not support the consensus view that the Galloanserae (Galliformes plus Anseriformes) are monophyletic.

Bourdon, Estelle

2005-12-01

188

Osteological evidence for sister group relationship between pseudo-toothed birds (Aves: Odontopterygiformes) and waterfowls (Anseriformes).  

PubMed

The phylogenetic affinities of the extinct pseudo-toothed birds have remained controversial. Some authors noted that they resemble both pelicans and allies (Pelecaniformes) and tube-nosed birds (Procellariiformes), but assigned them to a distinct taxon, the Odontopterygiformes. In most recent studies, the pseudo-toothed birds are referred to the family Pelagornithidae inside the Pelecaniformes. Here, I perform a cladistic analysis with five taxa of the pseudo-toothed birds including two undescribed new species from the Early Tertiary of Morocco. The present hypothesis strongly supports a sister group relationship of pseudo-toothed birds (Odontopterygiformes) and waterfowls (Anseriformes). The Odontoanserae (Odontopterygiformes plus Anseriformes) are the sister group of Neoaves. The placement of the landfowls (Galliformes) as the sister taxon of all other neognathous birds does not support the consensus view that the Galloanserae (Galliformes plus Anseriformes) are monophyletic. PMID:16240103

Bourdon, Estelle

2005-12-01

189

Molecular phylogeny of Threskiornithidae (Aves: Pelecaniformes) based on nuclear and mitochondrial DNA.  

PubMed

The family Threskiornithidae includes 13 genera and 32 species, and it is traditionally divided into 2 subfamilies: Plataleinae and Threskiornithinae. We present a phylogenetic reconstruction to test the monophyly of currently accepted subfamilies, including 15 species from both subfamilies and 10 genera of family Threskiornithidae. Phylogenetic trees were inferred on the basis of the mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene and the nuclear intron 7 of ?-fibrinogen. Threskiornithidae was recovered as a monophyletic group. Plataleinae formed a monophyletic group, but nested within Threskiornithinae, which was thus paraphyletic. Two major phylogenetic groups were identified: the 'endemic New World clade', including genera endemic to the American continent, and the 'widespread clade', comprising the remaining species. These phylogenetic groups diverged about 39-42 million years ago, i.e., before the separation of South America and Antarctica. Our results agree with an initial vicariance due to Gondwana break-up and subsequent colonization of species from the Old World to the New World. PMID:23979898

Ramirez, J L; Miyaki, C Y; Del Lama, S N

2013-01-01

190

Impact evaluation of an Energy $avings Plan project at Columbia Harbor Lumber Company  

SciTech Connect

This impact evaluation of an energy conservation measure (ECM) that was recently installed at Columbia Harbor Lumber Company (Columbia Harbor Lumber), Chehalis, Washington, was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) as part of an evaluation of its Energy Savings Plan (ESP) Program. The Program makes acquisition payments to firms that install energy conservation measures in their industrial processes. The objective of this impact evaluation was to assess how much electrical energy is being saved at Columbia Harbor Lumber as a result of the ESP and to determine how much the savings cost Bonneville and the region. The impact of the ECM was evaluated with a combination of engineering analysis, financial analysis, interviews, and submittal reviews (Columbia Harbor Lumber's Completion Report and Proposal). The ECM itself consists of an adjustable speed drive for controlling the speed of nine fans on a lumber drying kiln. Energy savings resulting from this ECM are expected to be 286,500 kWh/yr. On a per unit of output basis, this ECM will save 0.053 kWh/board foot, a 48% reduction. The ECM cost $24,086 to install, and Columbia Harbor Lumber received payment of $19,269 from Bonneville for the acquisition of energy savings. In all likelihood, this ECM would have been installed even without the acquisition payment from Bonneville. The levelized cost of these energy savings to Bonneville will be 5.6 mills/kWh over the ECM's expected 15-year life, and the levelized cost to the region will be 7.4 mills/kWh.

Spanner, G.E.; Sullivan, G.P.

1992-02-01

191

Impact evaluation of an Energy $avings Plan project at Columbia Harbor Lumber Company  

SciTech Connect

This impact evaluation of an energy conservation measure (ECM) that was recently installed at Columbia Harbor Lumber Company (Columbia Harbor Lumber), Chehalis, Washington, was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) as part of an evaluation of its Energy Savings Plan (ESP) Program. The Program makes acquisition payments to firms that install energy conservation measures in their industrial processes. The objective of this impact evaluation was to assess how much electrical energy is being saved at Columbia Harbor Lumber as a result of the ESP and to determine how much the savings cost Bonneville and the region. The impact of the ECM was evaluated with a combination of engineering analysis, financial analysis, interviews, and submittal reviews (Columbia Harbor Lumber`s Completion Report and Proposal). The ECM itself consists of an adjustable speed drive for controlling the speed of nine fans on a lumber drying kiln. Energy savings resulting from this ECM are expected to be 286,500 kWh/yr. On a per unit of output basis, this ECM will save 0.053 kWh/board foot, a 48% reduction. The ECM cost $24,086 to install, and Columbia Harbor Lumber received payment of $19,269 from Bonneville for the acquisition of energy savings. In all likelihood, this ECM would have been installed even without the acquisition payment from Bonneville. The levelized cost of these energy savings to Bonneville will be 5.6 mills/kWh over the ECM`s expected 15-year life, and the levelized cost to the region will be 7.4 mills/kWh.

Spanner, G.E.; Sullivan, G.P.

1992-02-01

192

An improved phylogeny of the Andean tit-tyrants (Aves, Tyrannidae): More characters trump sophisticated analyses  

PubMed Central

The phylogeny of the flycatcher genus Anairetes was previously inferred using short fragments of mitochondrial DNA and parsimony and distance-based methods. The resulting topology spurred taxonomic revision and influenced understanding of Andean biogeography. More than a decade later, we revisit the phylogeny of Anairetes tit-tyrants using more mtDNA characters, seven unlinked loci (3 mitochondrial genes, 6 nuclear loci), more closely related outgroup taxa, partitioned Bayesian analyses, and two coalescent species-tree approaches (Bayesian estimation of species trees, BEST; Bayesian evolutionary analysis by sampling trees, *BEAST). Of these improvements in data and analyses, the fourfold increase in mtDNA characters was both necessary and sufficient to incur a major shift in the topology and near-complete resolution. The species-tree analyses, while theoretically preferable to concatenation or single gene approaches, yielded topologies that were compatible with mtDNA but with weaker statistical resolution at nodes. The previous results that had led to taxonomic and biogeographic reappraisal were refuted, and the current results support the resurrection of the genus Uromyias as the sister clade to Anairetes. The sister relationship between these two genera corresponds to an ecological dichotomy between a depauperate humid cloudforest clade and a diverse dry-tolerant clade that has diversified along the latitudinal axis of the Andes. The species-tree results and the concatenation results each reaffirm the primacy of mtDNA to provide phylogenetic signal for avian phylogenies at the species and subspecies level. This is due in part to the abundance of informative characters in mtDNA, and in part to its lower effective population size that causes it to more faithfully track the species tree.

DuBay, Shane G.; Witt, Christopher C.

2012-01-01

193

An analysis of the distribution and relative abundance of moa species (Aves: Dinornithiformes)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Contributions to the understanding of moa ecology are reviewed. The distribution and relative abundance of each moa species in natural and archaeological sites is examined in detail. Eleven moa species (three dinomithids and eight emeids) are recognised in this study. The three dinomithids each had a New Zealand wide distribution. Dinornis giganteus primarily had a lowland distribution that coincided with

T. H. Worthy

1990-01-01

194

[Specific immunity and polymorphism of breeding plumage in pied flycatcher (Ficedula hypoleuca) males (Aves: passeriformes)].  

PubMed

The relationship between the type of melanin-based plumage coloration and the strength of experimentally induced immune response was studied using as an example a pied flycatcher population from the Moscow Region. The plumage of pied flycatcher males exhibits the full spectrum of transitions from contrasting black-and-white to cryptic brownish, the latter being very similar to the coloration of females. In spite of numerous studies, the nature of this polymorphism still remains vague. Unlike many other avian species with monocyclic breeding, a considerable fraction of pied flycatchers combines two energy-consuming productive processes, breeding and molt. During the main experimental treatment we activated the humoral immunity of free-living males in chick-rearing period by injection of nonpathogenic multigenic antigen (sheep red blood cells, SRBC) and estimated the strength of the immune responses after repeated captures in 6-8 days. In addition, after each capture we estimated the numbers of leucocytes (WBC), heterophil to lymphocyte ratios (H/L) and measured night time basal metabolic rates (BMR). Non-molting males of different color types showed the same immune responses. Among molting birds, the strength of the immune response was significantly higher in pale males (morphs 4-7 by Drost's scale) than in bright males with rich melanin-based coloration (morphs 2-3). This difference resulted from two opposite processes. During molting, pale males heightened the antibody titer after immunization, while bright males tended to reduce the strength of immune response. Possibly such an asymmetry in immunocompetence at the first stage of molt reflects the different life strategies of pied flycatcher males - conspicuous birds less commonly combine breeding with molt than cryptic ones. PMID:23136790

Kerimov, A B; Rogovin, K A; Ivankina, E V; Bushuev, A V; Sokolova, O V; Il'ina, T A

2012-01-01

195

Molecular characterization of haemosporidian parasites from kites of the genus Milvus (Aves: Accipitridae).  

PubMed

Despite the ecological significance and appeal of birds of prey, many aspects of their biology remain poorly known, including the diversity of parasites infecting them in the wild. We studied the diversity and prevalence of haemosporidian parasites infecting the two species of kites of the genus Milvus, aiming to describe the phylogenetic relationships among them and with other haemosporidians, as well as their distribution in the two host species. Black kites, Milvus migrans, harboured a more diverse community of parasites, including three haplotypes of each of the three genera Plasmodium, Haemoproteus and Leucocytozoon, which also occurred at a higher prevalence than in red kites. In red kites, Milvus milvus only three haplotypes of Leucocytozoon were found. Kite parasites were not closely related to one another nor were they kite-specific: their diversity spanned various branches of the haemosporidian phylogenetic tree, and their closest relatives were found in other species (including various avian orders), although some Leucocytozoon and Haemoproteus haplotypes clustered within apparently raptor-specific parasite clades. Remarkably, Plasmodium spp. and Haemoproteus spp. infected adult black kites only, an observation which supports the hypothesis that they are transmitted at the African wintering grounds, while Leucocytozoon spp. is putatively transmitted only in Europe. Intercontinental migration of the black kite might explain the divergence of parasite diversity between these two sister species. PMID:23376529

Pérez-Rodríguez, Antón; de la Puente, Javier; Onrubia, Alejandro; Pérez-Tris, Javier

2013-04-01

196

The type series of Chloris sinica tschiliensis Jacobi, 1923 (Aves, Fringillidae).  

PubMed

The Oriental Greenfinch Carduelis sinica (Linnaeus, 1766) is currently regarded as consisting of five to six subspecies (Dickinson 2003: 749; Clement 2010: 543-544; Clements et al. 2012; Gill & Donsker 2012; treated as Chloris sinica by the latter two authors). In 1923, Arnold Jacobi, then working at the Zoological Museum in Dresden, described the subspecies Chloris sinica tschiliensis, but it was recognized for just a few years before being synonymised by Howell et al. (1968: 236) under Carduelis s. sinica (Linnaeus, 1766). The description is based on twelve specimens (six males, five adult females, one juvenile female) obtained by Hugo Weigold during his participation in Walt(h)er Stötzner's 1914-1916 Sichuan expedition (Jacobi 1923). Although most of the birds have ever since been present in different collections, the whereabouts of the type series remained unclear for several years (e.g., van den Elzen 2010). Thus, in the following I present a comprehensive overview of the identity and contemporary availability of the original specimens that Jacobi had at hand. PMID:24699588

Töpfer, Till

2013-01-01

197

COMPARATIVE ANATOMY OF THE SYRINX IN THE TRIBE ARINI (AVES: PSITTACIDAE)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The syrinx is the organ responsible for producing the vast majority of bird sounds. Because its anatomy varies greatly among bird taxa, prior knowledge of variations is extremely important to studies of functional anatomy and phylogenetic systematics. With the aim of accessing and describing morphological variation in birds of the tribe Arini, this paper presents the findings of a comparative

Renato Gaban-Lima; Elizabeth Höfling

198

A New Owl Species of the Genus Otus (Aves: Strigidae) from Lombok, Indonesia  

PubMed Central

The avifauna of Indonesia is one of the richest in the world but the taxonomic status of many species remains poorly documented. The sole species of scops owl known from Lombok has long been assigned to the widespread Moluccan Scops Owl Otus magicus on the basis of superficial similarities in morphology. Field work in 2003 has shown that the territorial song of the scops owls inhabiting the foothills of Gunung Rinjani differs dramatically from that of O. magicus and is more similar to those of Rufescent Scops Owl O. rufescens and Singapore Scops Owl O. cnephaeus. Detailed comparisons of sound recordings and museum specimens with those of other scops owls in Wallacea and the Indo-Malayan region have confirmed the distinctiveness of the Lombok population. We describe Otus jolandae as a new species, the Rinjani Scops Owl. It is locally common at elevations from 25–1350 m. and occurs within Gunung Rinjani National Park. The new species is known from seven specimens collected by Alfred Everett in 1896. Otus jolandae represents the first endemic bird species from Lombok.

Sangster, George; King, Ben F.; Verbelen, Philippe; Trainor, Colin R.

2013-01-01

199

The mousebirds (Aves: Coliiformes) from the Middle Eocene of Grube Messel (Hessen, Germany)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The monophyly of the Coliiformes (Sandcoleidae + Coliidae) is well corroborated with the recognition of ten osteological synapomorphies.\\u000a So far, four species of coliiform birds are known from the Middle Eocene of Grube Messel (Hessen, Germany). Members of both\\u000a the Sandcoleidae and of the Coliidae have been identified.Eoglaucidium pallas\\u000a Fischer 1987, originally assigned to the Strigiformes (owls), is referred to

Gerald Mayr; Dieter Stefan Peters

1998-01-01

200

Data for NASA's AVE 6 experiment: 25-mb sounding data and synoptic charts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Atmospheric Variability Experiments 6 experiment is described, and tabulated rawinsonde data at 25-mb intervals from the surface to 25 mb for the 22 stations participating in the experiment is presented. Soundings were taken between 0000 GMT 27 May and 1200 GMT 28 May 1977. The methods of data processing and their accuracy are briefly discussed. Synoptic charts prepared from the data are presented together with an example of contact data.

Dupuis, L. R.; Hill, K.

1977-01-01

201

A new owl species of the genus Otus (aves: strigidae) from Lombok, Indonesia.  

PubMed

The avifauna of Indonesia is one of the richest in the world but the taxonomic status of many species remains poorly documented. The sole species of scops owl known from Lombok has long been assigned to the widespread Moluccan Scops Owl Otus magicus on the basis of superficial similarities in morphology. Field work in 2003 has shown that the territorial song of the scops owls inhabiting the foothills of Gunung Rinjani differs dramatically from that of O. magicus and is more similar to those of Rufescent Scops Owl O. rufescens and Singapore Scops Owl O. cnephaeus. Detailed comparisons of sound recordings and museum specimens with those of other scops owls in Wallacea and the Indo-Malayan region have confirmed the distinctiveness of the Lombok population. We describe Otus jolandae as a new species, the Rinjani Scops Owl. It is locally common at elevations from 25-1350 m. and occurs within Gunung Rinjani National Park. The new species is known from seven specimens collected by Alfred Everett in 1896. Otus jolandae represents the first endemic bird species from Lombok. PMID:23418422

Sangster, George; King, Ben F; Verbelen, Philippe; Trainor, Colin R

2013-01-01

202

Paraphyly of Cinclodes fuscus (Aves: Passeriformes: Furnariidae): Implications for taxonomy and biogeography  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Andes are a hotspot of global avian diversity, but studies on the historical diversification of Andean birds remain relatively scarce. Evolutionary studies on avian lineages with Andean–Patagonian distributions have focused on reconstructing species-level phylogenies, whereas no detailed phylogeographic studies on widespread species have been conducted. Here, we describe phylogeographic patterns in the Bar-winged Cinclodes (Cinclodes fuscus), a widespread and common species of ovenbird (Furnariidae) that breeds from Tierra del Fuego to the northern Andes. Traditionally, C. fuscus has been considered a single species composed of nine subspecies, but its long and narrow range suggests the possibility of considerable genetic variation among populations. Sequences of two mitochondrial genes revealed three discrete and geographically coherent groups of C. fuscus, occupying the southern, central, and northern Andes. Surprisingly, phylogenetic analyses indicated that these groups were more closely related to other species of Cinclodes than to each other. Relationships of the southern and northern C. fuscus clades to other species of Cinclodes were straightforward; in combination with available information on plumage, behavioral, and vocal variation, this suggests that each should be recognized as a distinct biological species. The central Andean group was paraphyletic with respect to C. oustaleti, and relationships among these taxa and C. olrogi were poorly resolved. We suggest that the central Andean C. fuscus should also be considered a different species, pending new information to clarify species limits in this group. These new phylogenetic data, along with recently developed methods, allowed us to review the biogeography of the genus, confirming southern South America and the central Andes as important areas for the diversification of these birds.

Sanin, Camilo; Cadena, Carlos Daniel; Maley, James M.; Lijtmaer, Dario A.; Tubaro, Pablo L.; Chesser, R. Terry

2009-01-01

203

Studies on Mechanism and Modeling of CPFR Modules on AVE Basis  

Microsoft Academic Search

As the global economic environment changes and information technology develops, demand has been oriented to individuality and diversity, product life-cycles have been shortened, and market uncertainty has greatly increased. Thus it is very difficult for the conventional pyramid-like construction to respond to market changes very quickly. The changeable market requires the corporate managerial structure to be simple and easy to

Shu Tong; Chen Shou; Kin Keung Lai; Xie Chi; Wang Shou-yan

2006-01-01

204

A Short History of Audiovisual Education in Japan. AVE in Japan No. 25.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This brief history of audiovisual education in Japan covers (1) the utilization of slides, films, and radio prior to 1945; (2) film education activities after World War II; (3) the establishment and objectives of the Audiovisual Education Division of the Ministry of Education; (4) educational film production from 1945-1954; (5) the use of films in…

Japan Audio-Visual Education Association, Tokyo.

205

The phylogenetic position of Gallinuloides Eastman (Aves: Galli- formes) from the Tertiary of North America  

Microsoft Academic Search

I have extended a recent phylogenetic analysis of morphological characters for galliform birds (pheasants, grouse, partridges and allies) to investigate the placement of the enigmatic fossil Gall- inuloides wyomingensisEastman. This analysis shows that, contrary to most previous interpreta- tions, the fossil Gallinuloides is a basal member of the 'phasianoid' assemblage within Galliformes—not basal within the order as has been previously

GARETH J. DYKE

206

A new Messel rail from the Early Eocene Fur Formation of Denmark (Aves, Messelornithidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new fossil bird is described from the Early Eocene Fur Formation of Denmark. Pellornis mikkelseni gen. et sp. nov. is represented by a single specimen that consists of three-dimensionally preserved elements of the wing and pectoral girdle together with associated parts of the left hindlimb. Comparisons based on general morphology and particular characters of the wing and most elements

Sara Bertelli; Luis M. Chiappe; Gerald Mayr

2011-01-01

207

A New Presbyornithid Bird (Aves, Anseriformes) from the Late Cretaceous of Southern Mongolia  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe a new large representative of the important fossil anseriform taxon Presbyor- nithidae from the latest Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) Nemegt Formation of southern Mongolia. This new taxon, Teviornis gobiensis, n. gen. et n. sp., is known from the associated manual portion of a right wing and the distal end of a right humerus, but is clearly diagnosable with respect to

EVGENY N. KUROCHKIN; GARETH J. DYKE; ALEXANDR A. KARHU

2002-01-01

208

Phylogeography of the Alcippe morrisonia (Aves: Timaliidae): long population history beyond late Pleistocene glaciations  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The role of Pleistocene glacial oscillations in current biodiversity and distribution patterns varies with latitude, physical topology and population life history and has long been a topic of discussion. However, there had been little phylogeographical research in south China, where the geophysical complexity is associated with great biodiversity. A bird endemic in Southeast Asia, the Grey-cheeked Fulvetta, Alcippe morrisonia,

Gang Song; Yanhua Qu; Zuohua Yin; Shouhsien Li; Naifa Liu; Fumin Lei

2009-01-01

209

A Loon Leg (Aves, Gaviidae) with Crocodilian Tooth from the Late Oligocene of Germany  

Microsoft Academic Search

The first late Oligocene fossil record of a loon (Gaviiformes) is described from the lacustrine depos- its of the German locality Enspel. The specimen is an isolated foot, which is associated with a crocodilian tooth. The fossil belongs to a species about half the size of the smallest extant loon, and is morphologically most similar to the Paleogene taxon Colymboides.

Gerald Mayr; Markus Poschmann

2009-01-01

210

Flightlessness and phylogeny amongst endemic rails (Aves:Rallidae) of the New Zealand region.  

PubMed Central

The phylogenetic relationships of a number of flightless and volant rails have been investigated using mtDNA sequence data. The third domain of the small ribosomal subunit (12S) has been sequenced for 22 taxa, and part of the 5' end of the cytochrome-b gene has been sequenced for 12 taxa. Additional sequences were obtained from outgroup taxa, two species of jacana, sarus crane, spur-winged plover and kagu. Extinct rails were investigated using DNA extracted from subfossil bones, and in cases where fresh material could not be obtained from other extant taxa, feathers and museum skins were used as sources of DNA. Phylogenetic trees produced from these data have topologies that are, in general, consistent with data from DNA-DNA hybridization studies and recent interpretations based on morphology. Gallinula chloropus moorhen) groups basally with Fulica (coots), Amaurornis (= Megacrex) ineptus falls within the Gallirallus/Rallus group, and Gallinula (= Porphyrula) martinica is basal to Porphyrio (swamphens) and should probably be placed in that genus. Subspecies of Porphyrio porphyrio are paraphyletic with respect to Porphyrio mantelli (takahe). The Northern Hemisphere Rallus aquaticus is basal to the south-western Pacific Rallus (or Gallirallus) group. The flightless Rallus philippensis dieffenbachii is close to Rallus modestus and distinct from the volant Rallus philippensis, and is evidently a separate species. Porzana (crakes) appears to be more closely associated with Porphyrio than Rallus. Deep relationships among the rails remain poorly resolved. Rhynochetus jubatus (kagu) is closer to the cranes than the rails in this analysis. Genetic distances between flightless rails and their volant counterparts varied considerably with observed 12S sequence distances, ranging from 0.3% (Porphyrio porphyrio melanotus and P. mantelli mantelli) to 7.6% (Rallus modestus and Rallus philippensis). This may be taken as an indication of the rapidity with which flightlessness can evolve, and of the persistence of flightless taxa. Genetic data supported the notion that flightless taxa were independently derived, sometimes from similar colonizing ancestors. The morphology of flightless rails is apparently frequently dominated by evolutionary parallelism although similarity of external appearance is not an indication of the extent of genetic divergence. In some cases taxa that are genetically close are morphologically distinct from one another (e.g. Rallus (philippensis) dieffenbachii and R. modestus), whilst some morphologically similar taxa are evidently independently derived (e.g. Porphyio mantelli hochstetteri and P.m. mantelli).

Trewick, S A

1997-01-01

211

Taxonomic revision and phylogenetic analysis of the flightless Mancallinae (Aves, Pan-Alcidae)  

PubMed Central

Abstract Although flightless alcids from the Miocene and Pliocene of the eastern Pacific Ocean have been known for over 100 years, there is no detailed evaluation of diversity and systematic placement of these taxa. This is the first combined analysis of morphological and molecular data to include all extant alcids, the recently extinct Great Auk Pinguinus impennis, the mancalline auks, and a large outgroup sampling of 29 additional non-alcid charadriiforms. Based on the systematic placement of Mancallinae outside of crown clade Alcidae, the clade name Pan-Alcidae is proposed to include all known alcids. An extensive review of the Mancallinae fossil record resulted in taxonomic revision of the clade, and identification of three new species. In addition to positing the first hypothesis of inter-relationships between Mancallinae species, phylogenetic results support placement of Mancallinae as the sister taxon to all other Alcidae, indicating that flightlessness evolved at least twice in the alcid lineage. Convergent osteological characteristics of Mancallinae, the flightless Great Auk, and Spheniscidae are summarized, and implications of Mancallinae diversity, radiation, and extinction in the context of paleoclimatic changes are discussed.

Smith, Neil Adam

2011-01-01

212

Molecular systematics and evolution of the Synallaxis ruficapilla complex (Aves: Furnariidae) in the Atlantic Forest.  

PubMed

The Neotropical Synallaxis ruficapilla complex is endemic to the Atlantic Forest and is comprised of three species: S. ruficapilla, S. whitneyi, and S. infuscata. This group is closely related to the Synallaxis moesta complex that occurs in the Andes, Tepuis, and Guianan shield. Here we used mitochondrial and nuclear gene sequences to infer the phylogeny and the time of diversification of the S. ruficapilla and S. moesta complexes. We also included samples of an undescribed population of Synallaxis that resembles other populations of the S. ruficapilla complex. Our results showed that different geographical lineages within the S. ruficapilla complex are reciprocally monophyletic, but the northern form (S. infuscata) grouped with an Andean taxon. This suggests that at least two lineages of this group independently colonized the Atlantic Forest. Specimens of the undescribed population formed a monophyletic clade with deep divergence. Estimated diversification dates were within the late Pliocene to Pleistocene (2.75-0.16 million of years ago). This suggests that at this time there was a higher connectivity between habitats in the rugged landscapes of the circum-Amazonian bioregions. The observed Pleistocene diversification within the Atlantic Forest is congruent in space and time with studies of other co-distributed organisms, and may be associated with climate changes and tectonic activity during this period. PMID:23340003

Batalha-Filho, Henrique; Irestedt, Martin; Fjeldså, Jon; Ericson, Per G P; Silveira, Luis F; Miyaki, Cristina Y

2013-04-01

213

75 FR 68393 - Puerto Rico Disaster # PR-00011  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Primary Counties: Patillas, Ponce, Salinas, Utuado, Yauco. Contiguous Counties: Puerto Rico: Adjuntas, Aibonito, Arecibo, Arroyo, Cayey, Ciales, Coamo, Guanica, Guayama, Guayanilla, Hatillo, Jayuya, Juana Diaz, Lares, Maricao,...

2010-11-05

214

White Paper on Factors of Safety  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Following the Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAIB) Report, the "Diaz Team" identified CAIB Report elements with Agency-wide applicability. The "Diaz Report", A Renewed Commitment To Excellence, generated an action to "Review current policies and waivers on safety factors". This document addresses this action.

Raju, Ivatury; Stadler, John; Kramer-White, Jule; Piascik, Robert

2012-01-01

215

Polyphyly of the hawk genera Leucopternis and Buteogallus (Aves, Accipitridae): multiple habitat shifts during the Neotropical buteonine diversification  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The family Accipitridae (hawks, eagles and Old World vultures) represents a large radiation of predatory birds with an almost global distribution, although most species of this family occur in the Neotropics. Despite great morphological and ecological diversity, the evolutionary relationships in the family have been poorly explored at all taxonomic levels. Using sequences from four mitochondrial genes (12S, ATP8,

Fabio S Raposo do Amaral; Matthew J Miller; Luís Fábio Silveira; Eldredge Bermingham; Anita Wajntal

2006-01-01

216

A phase I pharmacokinetic study of the vascular disrupting agent ombrabulin (AVE8062) and docetaxel in advanced solid tumours.  

PubMed

Background:The vascular disrupting agent ombrabulin shows synergy with docetaxel in vivo. Recommended phase II doses were determined in a dose escalation study in advanced solid tumours.Methods:Ombrabulin (30-min infusion, day 1) followed by docetaxel (1-h infusion, day 2) every 3 weeks was explored. Ombrabulin was escalated from 11.5 to 42?mg?m(-2) with 75?mg?m(-2) docetaxel, then from 30 to 35?mg?m(-2) with 100?mg?m(-2) docetaxel. Recommended phase II dose cohorts were expanded.Results:Fifty-eight patients were treated. Recommended phase II doses were 35?mg?m(-2) ombrabulin with 75?mg?m(-2) docetaxel (35/75?mg?m(-2); 13 patients) and 30?mg?m(-2) ombrabulin with 100?mg?m(-2) docetaxel (30/100?mg?m(-2); 16 patients). Dose-limiting toxicities were grade 3 fatigue (two patients; 42/75, 35/100), grade 3 neutropaenic infection (25/75), grade 3 headache (42/75), grade 4 febrile neutropaenia (30/100), and grade 3 thrombosis (35/100). Toxicities were consistent with each agent; mild nausea/vomiting, asthaenia/fatigue, alopecia, and anaemia were common, as were neutropaenia and leukopaenia. Diarrhoea, nail disorders and neurological symptoms were frequent at 100?mg?m(-2) docetaxel. Pharmacokinetic analyses did not show any relevant drug interactions. Ten patients had partial responses (seven at 30?mg?m(-2) ombrabulin), eight lasting >3 months.Conclusions:Sequential administration of ombrabulin with 75 or 100?mg?m(-2) docetaxel every 3 weeks is feasible. PMID:24714750

Eskens, F A L M; Tresca, P; Tosi, D; Van Doorn, L; Fontaine, H; Van der Gaast, A; Veyrat-Follet, C; Oprea, C; Hospitel, M; Dieras, V

2014-04-29

217

Fossil evidence of wing shape in a stem relative of swifts and hummingbirds (Aves, Pan-Apodiformes)  

PubMed Central

A feathered specimen of a new species of Eocypselus from the Early Eocene Green River Formation of Wyoming provides insight into the wing morphology and ecology in an early part of the lineage leading to extant swifts and hummingbirds. Combined phylogenetic analysis of morphological and molecular data supports placement of Eocypselus outside the crown radiation of Apodiformes. The new specimen is the first described fossil of Pan-Apodiformes from the pre-Pleistocene of North America and the only reported stem taxon with informative feather preservation. Wing morphology of Eocypselus rowei sp. nov. is intermediate between the short wings of hummingbirds and the hyper-elongated wings of extant swifts, and shows neither modifications for the continuous gliding used by swifts nor modifications for the hovering flight style used by hummingbirds. Elongate hindlimb elements, particularly the pedal phalanges, also support stronger perching capabilities than are present in Apodiformes. The new species is the smallest bird yet described from the Green River Formation, and supports the hypothesis that a decrease in body size preceded flight specializations in Pan-Apodiformes. The specimen also provides the first instance of melanosome morphology preserved in association with skeletal remains from the Green River Formation.

Ksepka, Daniel T.; Clarke, Julia A.; Nesbitt, Sterling J.; Kulp, Felicia B.; Grande, Lance

2013-01-01

218

The spatio-temporal colonization and diversification across the Indo-Pacific by a 'great speciator' (Aves, Erythropitta erythrogaster).  

PubMed

The Indo-Pacific region has arguably been the most important area for the formulation of theories about biogeography and speciation, but modern studies of the tempo, mode and magnitude of diversification across this region are scarce. We study the biogeographic history and characterize levels of diversification in the wide-ranging passerine bird Erythropitta erythrogaster using molecular, phylogeographic and population genetics methods, as well as morphometric and plumage analyses. Our results suggest that E. erythrogaster colonized the Indo-Pacific during the Pleistocene in an eastward direction following a stepping stone pathway, and that sea-level fluctuations during the Pleistocene may have promoted gene flow only locally. A molecular species delimitation test suggests that several allopatric island populations of E. erythrogaster may be regarded as species. Most of these putative new species are further characterized by diagnostic differences in plumage. Our study reconfirms the E. erythrogaster complex as a 'great speciator': it represents a complex of up to 17 allopatrically distributed, reciprocally monophyletic and/or morphologically diagnosable species that originated during the Pleistocene. Our results support the view that observed latitudinal gradients of genetic divergence among avian sister species may have been affected by incomplete knowledge of taxonomic limits in tropical bird species. PMID:23554394

Irestedt, Martin; Fabre, Pierre-Henri; Batalha-Filho, Henrique; Jønsson, Knud A; Roselaar, Cees S; Sangster, George; Ericson, Per G P

2013-05-22

219

Diet of eared doves (Zenaida auriculata, Aves, Columbidae) in a sugar-cane colony in South-eastern Brazil.  

PubMed

Farmers in the Paranapanema Valley (São Paulo, Brazil) have reported problems with flocks of Eared Doves (Zenaida auriculata) eating sprouting soybeans. In this region these birds breed colonially in sugar-cane, and eat four crop seeds, using 70% of the dry weight, in the following order of importance: maize, wheat, rice, and soybeans. Three weeds (Euphorbia heterophylla, Brachiaria plantaginea, and Commelina benghalensis) were important. This information suggests that the doves adapted particularly well to the landscape created by the agricultural practices in the region, exploiting many available foods. PMID:12071322

Ranvaud, R; de Freitas, K C; Bucher, E H; Dias, H S; Avanzo, V C; Alberts, C C

2001-11-01

220

Testing founder effect speciation: Divergence population genetics of the Spoonbills Platalea regia and Pl. minor (Threskiornithidae, Aves)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Although founder effect speciation has been a popular theoretical model for the speciation of geographically isolated taxa, its empirical importance has remained difficult to evaluate due to the intractability of past demography, which in a founder effect speciation scenario would involve a speciational bottleneck in the emergent species and the complete cessation of gene flow following divergence. Using regression-weighted approximate Bayesian computation, we tested the validity of these two fundamental conditions of founder effect speciation in a pair of sister species with disjunct distributions: the royal spoonbill Platalea regia in Australasia and the black-faced spoonbill Pl. minor in eastern Asia. When compared with genetic polymorphism observed at 20 nuclear loci in the two species, simulations showed that the founder effect speciation model had an extremely low posterior probability (1.55 × 10-8) of producing the extant genetic pattern. In contrast, speciation models that allowed for postdivergence gene flow were much more probable (posterior probabilities were 0.37 and 0.50 for the bottleneck with gene flow and the gene flow models, respectively) and postdivergence gene flow persisted for a considerable period of time (more than 80% of the divergence history in both models) following initial divergence (median = 197,000 generations, 95% credible interval [CI]: 50,000-478,000, for the bottleneck with gene flow model; and 186,000 generations, 95% CI: 45,000-477,000, for the gene flow model). Furthermore, the estimated population size reduction in Pl. regia to 7,000 individuals (median, 95% CI: 487-12,000, according to the bottleneck with gene flow model) was unlikely to have been severe enough to be considered a bottleneck. Therefore, these results do not support founder effect speciation in Pl. regia but indicate instead that the divergence between Pl. regia and Pl. minor was probably driven by selection despite continuous gene flow. In this light, we discuss the potential importance of evolutionarily labile traits with significant fitness consequences, such as migratory behavior and habitat preference, in facilitating divergence of the spoonbills.

Yeung, Carol K. L.; Tsai, Pi-Wen; Chesser, R. Terry; Lin, Rong-Chien; Yao, Cheng-Te; Tian, Xiu-Hua; Li, Shou-Hsien

2011-01-01

221

Karyotype and C-banding pattern of the domestic geese Anser anser populations (Aves: Anatidae) in Egypt.  

PubMed

The karyotype and C-banding pattern of domestic Greylag geese Anser anser anser populations collected from five localities in El Minia, Egypt, that have either whitish grey or white feather color patterns were described. All populations have a diploid number of 2n= 80 chromosomes. Of the 80 chromosomes, 10 pairs, including ZW chromosomes, were macrochromosomes and the remaining 30 pairs were microchromosomes. Slight variation in the size of macrochromosomes was observed amongst populations. However, obvious variation of C-banding distribution was found and attributed to variation of euchromatin content and its correlation with chromosome size and arrangement of constitutive heterochromatin. Nevertheless, significant variation in the mean number of C-heterochromatin blocks in microchromosomes was attributed to either transformation of heterochromatin into euchromatin and vice versa or to involvement of structural chromosomal aberrations during karyotype evolution. The present results show that A. anser populations common in Egypt could be distinguished from those of A. anser and A. cygnoides occurring elsewhere in Europe and Asiaviavariability in chromosome morphology of pairs nos. 2, 3 and 4. PMID:24745149

Shahin, Adel A Basyouny; Ata, Abdel Tawab Mohammed; Shnaf, Anwaar S Mohammed Abu

2014-01-01

222

Petasiger islandicus n. sp. (Digenea: Echinostomatidae) in the horned grebe Podiceps auritus (L.) (Aves: Podicipedidae) from Iceland.  

PubMed

Petasiger islandicus n. sp. is described and figured from a demographically isolated population of the horned grebe Podiceps auritus auritus (L.) in Lake Mývatn (Iceland). This new species belongs to the group of species with 19 collar spines which possess a large elongate-oval cirrus-sac, well-developed pars prostatica and massive bulb-like cirrus. Within this group, P. islandicus appears most similar to P. oschmarini Kostadinova & Gibson, 1998, a form with similar body dimensions described from the same host, but differs in having a larger head collar, collar spines, oral sucker, pharynx, testes and sucker-width ratio, and a smaller cirrus-sac, cirrus and eggs. Two Nearctic species resemble P. islandicus in general morphology but differ as follows: P. pseudoneocomense Bravo-Hollis, 1969 has a larger body and collar width, notably shorter collar spines, smaller testes and sucker-width ratio, and a shorter but much wider cirrus-sac which is also smaller relative to the ventral sucker and almost entirely anterior to it; and P. caribbensis Nassi, 1980 has a smaller body, shorter collar spines and a seminal vesicle which is small in relation to the cirrus-sac, vitelline fields reaching anteriorly to the level of the genital pore and the intestinal bifurcation is located more anteriorly. PMID:17896189

Kostadinova, Aneta; Skirnisson, Karl

2007-11-01

223

Dinosauria and Fossil Aves Footprints from the Lower Cantwell Formation (latest Cretaceous), Denali National Park and Preserve  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several new Mesozoic-aged vertebrate fossil sites have been discovered in Denali. These sites are located in the Igloo Creek\\/Tattler Creek area and the northern side of Double Mountain. Some sites contain individual tracks while other localities contain hundreds of tracks. The most frequent footprint type found among all sites is the track of a medium-sized theropod. The tracks attribut- able

Anthony R. Fiorillo; Paul J. McCarthy; Brent H. Breithaupt; Phil F. Brease

224

Speciation on Oceanic Islands: Rapid Adaptive Divergence vs. Cryptic Speciation in a Guadalupe Island Songbird (Aves: Junco)  

PubMed Central

The evolutionary divergence of island populations, and in particular the tempo and relative importance of neutral and selective factors, is of central interest to the study of speciation. The rate of phenotypic evolution upon island colonization can vary greatly among taxa, and cases of convergent evolution can further confound the inference of correct evolutionary histories. Given the potential lability of phenotypic characters, molecular dating of insular lineages analyzed in a phylogenetic framework provides a critical tool to test hypotheses of phenotypic divergence since colonization. The Guadalupe junco is the only insular form of the polymorphic dark-eyed junco (Junco hyemalis), and shares eye and plumage color with continental morphs, yet presents an enlarged bill and reduced body size. Here we use variation in mtDNA sequence, morphological traits and song variables to test whether the Guadalupe junco evolved rapidly following a recent colonization by a mainland form of the dark-eyed junco, or instead represents a well-differentiated “cryptic” lineage adapted to the insular environment through long-term isolation, with plumage coloration a result of evolutionary convergence. We found high mtDNA divergence of the island lineage with respect to both continental J. hyemalis and J. phaeonotus, representing a history of isolation of about 600,000 years. The island lineage was also significantly differentiated in morphological and male song variables. Moreover, and contrary to predictions regarding diversity loss on small oceanic islands, we document relatively high levels of both haplotypic and song-unit diversity on Guadalupe Island despite long-term isolation in a very small geographic area. In contrast to prevailing taxonomy, the Guadalupe junco is an old, well-differentiated evolutionary lineage, whose similarity to mainland juncos in plumage and eye color is due to evolutionary convergence. Our findings confirm the role of remote islands in driving divergence and speciation, but also their potential role as repositories of ancestral diversity.

Aleixandre, Pau; Hernandez Montoya, Julio; Mila, Borja

2013-01-01

225

A new genus of quill mites of the family Syringophilidae (Acari: Cheyletoidea) associated with mousebirds (Aves: Coliiformes).  

PubMed

A new monotypic genus Colisyringophilus n. g. is established for C. tanzanicus n. sp., quill mites parasitising two mouse bird species from Tanzania, Colius striatus Gmelin and Urocolius macrourus (Linnaeus). This new genus is closely related to Neoaulobia Fain, Bochkov & Mironov, 2000, but differs from it by the following features: the stylophore is rounded posteriorly, the propodonotal shield is reduced to triangular sclerite bearing bases of setae vi and ve, the hysteronotal shield is absent, legs I are longer than legs II, and apodemes I are distinctly elongated. This is the first record of syringophilid mites from hosts of the order Coliiformes. PMID:23793495

Skoracki, Maciej; Unsoeld, Markus; Ozminski, Micha?

2013-07-01

226

Genetic evaluation of the mating system in the blue-and-yellow macaw (Ara ararauna, Aves, Psittacidae) by DNA fingerprinting  

PubMed Central

More than 90% of birds are socially monogamous, although genetic studies indicate that many are often not sexually monogamous. In the present study, DNA fingerprinting was used to estimate the genetic relationships between nestlings belonging to the same broods to evaluate the mating system in the socially monogamous macaw, Ara ararauna. We found that in 10 of 11 broods investigated, the nestlings showed genetic similarity levels congruent with values expected among full-sibs, suggesting that they shared the same parents. However, in one brood, the low genetic similarity observed between nestlings could be a result of intraspecific brood parasitism, intraspecific nest competition or extra-pair paternity. These results, along with available behavioral and life-history data, imply that the blue-and-yellow macaw is not only socially, but also genetically monogamous. However, the occurrence of eventual cases of extra-pair paternity cannot be excluded.

Caparroz, Renato; Miyaki, Cristina Y.; Baker, Allan J.

2011-01-01

227

Genetic evaluation of the mating system in the blue-and-yellow macaw (Ara ararauna, Aves, Psittacidae) by DNA fingerprinting.  

PubMed

More than 90% of birds are socially monogamous, although genetic studies indicate that many are often not sexually monogamous. In the present study, DNA fingerprinting was used to estimate the genetic relationships between nestlings belonging to the same broods to evaluate the mating system in the socially monogamous macaw, Ara ararauna. We found that in 10 of 11 broods investigated, the nestlings showed genetic similarity levels congruent with values expected among full-sibs, suggesting that they shared the same parents. However, in one brood, the low genetic similarity observed between nestlings could be a result of intraspecific brood parasitism, intraspecific nest competition or extra-pair paternity. These results, along with available behavioral and life-history data, imply that the blue-and-yellow macaw is not only socially, but also genetically monogamous. However, the occurrence of eventual cases of extra-pair paternity cannot be excluded. PMID:21637560

Caparroz, Renato; Miyaki, Cristina Y; Baker, Allan J

2011-01-01

228

Reconstruction and in vivo analysis of the extinct tbx5 gene from ancient wingless moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes)  

PubMed Central

Background The forelimb-specific gene tbx5 is highly conserved and essential for the development of forelimbs in zebrafish, mice, and humans. Amongst birds, a single order, Dinornithiformes, comprising the extinct wingless moa of New Zealand, are unique in having no skeletal evidence of forelimb-like structures. Results To determine the sequence of tbx5 in moa, we used a range of PCR-based techniques on ancient DNA to retrieve all nine tbx5 exons and splice sites from the giant moa, Dinornis. Moa Tbx5 is identical to chicken Tbx5 in being able to activate the downstream promotors of fgf10 and ANF. In addition we show that missexpression of moa tbx5 in the hindlimb of chicken embryos results in the formation of forelimb features, suggesting that Tbx5 was fully functional in wingless moa. An alternatively spliced exon 1 for tbx5 that is expressed specifically in the forelimb region was shown to be almost identical between moa and ostrich, suggesting that, as well as being fully functional, tbx5 is likely to have been expressed normally in moa since divergence from their flighted ancestors, approximately 60 mya. Conclusions The results suggests that, as in mice, moa tbx5 is necessary for the induction of forelimbs, but is not sufficient for their outgrowth. Moa Tbx5 may have played an important role in the development of moa’s remnant forelimb girdle, and may be required for the formation of this structure. Our results further show that genetic changes affecting genes other than tbx5 must be responsible for the complete loss of forelimbs in moa.

2014-01-01

229

Les particularités morphofonctionnelles des appareils du bec et hyoïdien chez les touracos ( Aves, Musophagidae ) : relations avec la frugivorie  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study points to morpho-anatomical features that allow vegetarian but mainly frugivorous turacos to fill at best their specific feeding requirements. Mechanisms are analysed which the bird can use to detach a fruit and avoid it rolls out of the bill. It is also examined how vegetable items can be processed particularly when they have to be cut, and what

Léonide P Korzoun; Christian Erard; Jean-Pierre Gasc

2001-01-01

230

Keratinization and lipogenesis in epidermal derivatives of the zebrafinch, Taeniopygia guttata castanotis (Aves, Passeriformes, Ploecidae) during embryonic development.  

PubMed

Little is known of the lipid content of beta-keratin-producing cells such as those of feathers, scutate scales, and beak. The sequence of epidermal layers in some apteria and in interfollicular epidermis in the zebrafinch embryo (Taeniopygia guttata castanotis) was studied. Also, the production of beta-keratin in natal down feathers and beak was ultrastructurally analyzed in embryos from 3-4 to 17-18 days postdeposition, before hatching. Two layers of periderm initially cover the embryo, but there are eventually 6-8 over the epidermis of the beak. In the beak and sheath cells of feathers, peridermal granules are numerous at 12-14 days postdeposition but they are less frequent in apteria. These granules swell and disappear during sheath or peridermal degeneration at 15-17 days postdeposition. A thin beta-keratin layer forms under the periderm among feather germs of pterylous areas but is discontinuous or disappears in apteria. In differentiating cells of barbs, barbules, and calamus cells of natal down, electron-dense beta-keratin filaments form bundles oriented along the main axis of these cells. Cells of the pulp epidermis and collar, at the base of the follicle, contain lipids and bundles of alpha-keratin filaments. Degenerating pulp cells show vacuolization and nuclear pycnosis. During beta-keratin packing, keratin bundles turn electron-pale, perhaps due to the addition of lipids to produce the final, homogenous beta-keratin matrix. In contrast to the situation in feathers, in the cells of beak beta-keratin packets are irregularly oriented. In both feather and beak epidermal cells the Golgi apparatus and smooth endoplasmic reticulum produce vesicles containing lipid-like material which is also found among forming beta-keratin. The contribution of lipids or lipoprotein to the initial aggregation of beta-keratin molecules is discussed. PMID:11835366

Alibardi, Lorenzo

2002-03-01

231

Uso de gemas de ovos de aves hiperimunizadas contra Escherichia coli suína no controle da diarréia neonatal de leitões  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of yolks from birds hipperimmunized birds against Escherichia coli (E. coli) pathogenic for swine on the passive immunity of newborn piglets in a producer unit of piglets was studied. It was evaluated ELISA optical density (OD) of antibodies against E. coli, body weight and the frequency of diarrhea (FcD) in 137 newborn piglets born from 25 primiparous gilts

Andréa Machado Leal Ribeiro; Liliane Rudnik; Cláudio Wageck Canal; Lilian Ribeiro Kratz; Carolina Farias

2005-01-01

232

Full mitochondrial genome sequences of two endemic Philippine hornbill species (Aves: Bucerotidae) provide evidence for pervasive mitochondrial DNA recombination  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Although nowaday it is broadly accepted that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) may undergo recombination, the frequency of such recombination remains controversial. Its estimation is not straightforward, as recombination under homoplasmy (i.e., among identical mt genomes) is likely to be overlooked. In species with tandem duplications of large mtDNA fragments the detection of recombination can be facilitated, as it can lead

Svenja Sammler; Christoph Bleidorn; Ralph Tiedemann

2011-01-01

233

Characterization of chromosome structures of Falconinae (Falconidae, Falconiformes, Aves) by chromosome painting and delineation of chromosome rearrangements during their differentiation.  

PubMed

Karyotypes of most bird species are characterized by around 2n = 80 chromosomes, comprising 7-10 pairs of large- and medium-sized macrochromosomes including sex chromosomes and numerous morphologically indistinguishable microchromosomes. The Falconinae of the Falconiformes has a different karyotype from the typical avian karyotype in low chromosome numbers, little size difference between macrochromosomes and a smaller number of microchromosomes. To characterize chromosome structures of Falconinae and to delineate the chromosome rearrangements that occurred in this subfamily, we conducted comparative chromosome painting with chicken chromosomes 1-9 and Z probes and microchromosome-specific probes, and chromosome mapping of the 18S-28S rRNA genes and telomeric (TTAGGG)( n ) sequences for common kestrel (Falco tinnunculus) (2n = 52), peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus) (2n = 50) and merlin (Falco columbarius) (2n = 40). F. tinnunculus had the highest number of chromosomes and was considered to retain the ancestral karyotype of Falconinae; one and six centric fusions might have occurred in macrochromosomes of F. peregrinus and F. columbarius, respectively. Tandem fusions of microchromosomes to macrochromosomes and between microchromosomes were also frequently observed, and chromosomal locations of the rRNA genes ranged from two to seven pairs of chromosomes. These karyotypic features of Falconinae were relatively different from those of Accipitridae, indicating that the drastic chromosome rearrangements occurred independently in the lineages of Accipitridae and Falconinae. PMID:18293111

Nishida, Chizuko; Ishijima, Junko; Kosaka, Ayumi; Tanabe, Hideyuki; Habermann, Felix A; Griffin, Darren K; Matsuda, Yoichi

2008-01-01

234

RELACION ENTRE LAS CARACTERISTICAS DEL PAISAJE URBANO Y LA COMUNIDAD DE AVES INTRODUCIDAS EN LA CIUDAD DE VALENCIA (ESPAÑA)  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY.—Relationships between the characteristics of the urban landscape and the introduced bird community in the city of Valencia (Spain). Aims: We describe the community of introduced birds in the city of Valencia and the relationships between this community and the characteristics of the urban landscape at two spatial scales. Location: The study was carried out in the urban and rural

Enrique MURGUI; Anna VALENTÍN

2003-01-01

235

New species of the feather mite genus Protolichus Trouessart, 1884 (Astigmata, Pterolichidae) from lories and lorikeets (Aves: Psittaciformes).  

PubMed

Five new species of the feather mite genus Protolichus Trouessart, 1884 (Astigmata, Pterolichidae) are described from parrots of the subfamily Loriinae (Psittaciformes: Psittacidae): Protolichus ornatus sp. n. from Trichoglossus ornatus (Linnaeus, 1758), P. lorinus sp. n. from Lorius lory (Linnaeus, 1758), P. placentis sp. n. from Charmosyna placentis (Temminck, 1835), P. pulchellae sp. n. from C. pulchella (Gray GR, 1859), and P. rubiginosus sp. n. from T. rubiginosus (Bonaparte, 1850). Protolichus ornatus belongs to the brachiatus species group; the other new species belong to the crassior species group. PMID:24871411

Mironov, Sergey V; Ehrnsberger, Rainer; Dabert, Jacek

2014-01-01

236

The feather mites of nightjars (Aves: Caprimulgidae), with descriptions of two new species from Brazil (Acari: Xolalgidae, Gabuciniidae).  

PubMed

Two new species of feather mites are described from nightjars (Caprimulgiformes: Caprimulgidae) of Brazil: Hartingiella neotropica sp. n. (Xolalgidae) described from Hydropsalis parvula (Gould) and Paragabucinia brasiliensis sp. n. (Gabuciniidae) from H. albicollis (Gmelin). The former differs from the type species by having, in males, the anterior projections on epimerites III towards setae 3b and the adanal shield bearing setae ps3 present; in both sexes, a pair of small sclerites situated posterior to setae se have flat suprategumental processes. Paragabucinia brasiliensis sp. n. differs from P. petitoti (Gaud et Mouchet, 1959) by the smaller size of the incisions in the internal margins of opisthosomal lobes of males. These mites are the first representatives of corresponding genera described from the Neotropical region. The genus Hartingiella Gaud, 1980 was previously known solely from its type species. Keys to males and females of the genus Paragabucinia Gaud et Atyeo, 1975 are presented. In addition, all previous records of feather mites associated with birds of the order Caprimulgiformes of the world are summarised. PMID:24822323

Hernandes, Fabio Akashi

2014-04-01

237

Interacting effects of ambient light and plumage color patterns in displaying Wire-tailed Manakins (Aves, Pipridae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sending color signals to conspecifics may attract predators, leading to opposing selection pressures on the evolution of signal expression and display behavior in animals. The costs of signaling can be reduced, however, because conspicuousness is the combined result of the reflectance spectra of the displayer's color pattern and the spectra of ambient light illuminating the animal. Changes in ambient light

Martin Heindl; Hans Winkler

2003-01-01

238

Investigations of severe/tornadic thunderstorm development and evolution based on satellite and AVE/SESAME/VAS data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Development of cloud relative tracking for severe thunderstorm identification and the beginning of the development of mesoscale airmass characteristics based on vertical atmospheric sounding data were accomplished.

Vonderhaar, T. H.; Purdom, J. F. W.

1985-01-01

239

Natural born indicators: Great cormorant Phalacrocorax carbo (Aves: Phalacrocoracidae) as monitors of river discharge influence on estuarine ichthyofauna  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ecological traits of piscivorous marine birds have been acknowledged to reflect ecosystem changes. We used the great cormorant as our indicator species in the Minho estuary (NW-Iberian Peninsula, Europe) to assess the temporal variation of their diet and the factors that could influence that variation. Pellets were collected in a night roost, located centrally in the estuary, during two consecutive wintering periods (2005-2006 and 2006-2007). The great cormorant population showed a high degree of feeding plasticity and most of the variation in cormorants' diet was attributed to river discharge fluctuations. Overall, during periods of increased river discharge, marine and marine opportunistic species disappeared from diet, whereas freshwater species increased. The cormorants in this study were using a roost in the middle of the estuary, so they were facing a changing food base over time, in accordance to variation in river discharges. The birds did not keep their diet constant but rather took what became locally available, notwithstanding their broad foraging range. Therefore, we suggest that great cormorants may be considered good samplers of local ichthyofauna and thus, temporal variation in the local prey can be followed by analyzing cormorants' diet.

Dias, Ester; Morais, Pedro; Leopold, Mardik; Campos, Joana; Antunes, Carlos

2012-10-01

240

DNA evidence for a Paleocene origin of the Alcidae (Aves: Charadriiformes) in the Pacific and multiple dispersals across northern oceans.  

PubMed

The Alcidae is a group of marine, wing-propelled diving birds known as auks that are distributed along the coasts of the northern oceans. It has been suggested that auks originated in the Pacific coastal shores as early as the Miocene, and dispersed to the Atlantic either through the Arctic coasts of Eurasia and North America (northern dispersal route), or through upwelling zones in the coastal areas of California to Florida (southern dispersal route), before the closure of the Isthmus of Panama in the Pliocene. These hypotheses have not been tested formally because proposed phylogenies failed to recover fully bifurcating, well-supported phylogenetic relationships among and within genera. We therefore constructed a large data set of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences for 21 of the 23 species of extant auks. We also included sequences from two other extant and one extinct species retrieved from GenBank. Our analyses recovered a well-supported phylogenetic hypothesis among and within genera. Aethia is the only genus for which we could not obtain strong support for species relationships, probably due to incomplete lineage sorting. By applying a Bayesian method of molecular dating that allows for rate variation across lineages and genes, we showed that auks became an independent lineage in the Early Paleocene and radiated gradually from the Early Eocene to the Quaternary. Reconstruction of ancestral areas strongly suggests that auks originated in the Pacific during the Paleocene. The southern dispersal route seems to have favored the subsequent colonization of the northern Atlantic Ocean during the Eocene and Oligocene. The northern route across the Arctic Ocean was probably only used more recently after the opening of the Norwegian Sea in the Middle Miocene and the opening of the Bering Strait in the Late Miocene. We postulate that the ancestors of auks lived in a warmer world than that currently occupied by auks, and became gradually adapted to feeding in cool marine currents with high biomass productivity. Hence, warmer tropical waters are now a barrier for the dispersal of auks into the Southern Hemisphere, as it is for penguins in the opposite direction. PMID:18178108

Pereira, Sergio L; Baker, Allan J

2008-02-01

241

CracidMex1: a comprehensive database of global occurrences of cracids (Aves, Galliformes) with distribution in Mexico  

PubMed Central

Abstract Cracids are among the most vulnerable groups of Neotropical birds. Almost half of the species of this family are included in a conservation risk category. Twelve taxa occur in Mexico, six of which are considered at risk at national level and two are globally endangered. Therefore, it is imperative that high quality, comprehensive, and high-resolution spatial data on the occurrence of these taxa are made available as a valuable tool in the process of defining appropriate management strategies for conservation at a local and global level. We constructed the CracidMex1 database by collating global records of all cracid taxa that occur in Mexico from available electronic databases, museum specimens, publications, “grey literature”, and unpublished records. We generated a database with 23,896 clean, validated, and standardized geographic records. Database quality control was an iterative process that commenced with the consolidation and elimination of duplicate records, followed by the geo-referencing of records when necessary, and their taxonomic and geographic validation using GIS tools and expert knowledge. We followed the geo-referencing protocol proposed by the Mexican National Commission for the Use and Conservation of Biodiversity. We could not estimate the geographic coordinates of 981 records due to inconsistencies or lack of sufficient information in the description of the locality. Given that current records for most of the taxa have some degree of distributional bias, with redundancies at different spatial scales, the CracidMex1 database has allowed us to detect areas where more sampling effort is required to have a better representation of the global spatial occurrence of these cracids. We also found that particular attention needs to be given to taxa identification in those areas where congeners or conspecifics co-occur in order to avoid taxonomic uncertainty. The construction of the CracidMex1 database represents the first comprehensive research effort to compile current, available global geographic records for a group of cracids. The database can now be improved by continuous revision and addition of new records. The CracidMex1 database will provide high quality input data that could be used to generate species distribution models, to assess temporal changes in species distributions, to identify priority areas for research and conservation, and in the definition of management strategies for this bird group. This compilation exercise could be replicated for other cracid groups or regions to attain a better knowledge of the global occurrences of the species in this vulnerable bird family.

Pinilla-Buitrago, Gonzalo; Martinez-Morales, Miguel Angel; Gonzalez-Garcia, Fernando; Enriquez, Paula L.; Rangel-Salazar, Jose Luis; Romero, Carlos Alberto Guichard; Navarro-Siguenza, Adolfo G.; Monterrubio-Rico, Tiberio Cesar; Escalona-Segura, Griselda

2014-01-01

242

Food supply for waders (Aves: Charadrii) in an estuarine area in the Bay of Cádiz (SW Iberian Peninsula)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We studied the composition, density, size distribution and biomass of the food supply for waders in an estuarine area in the Bay of Cádiz (SW Iberian Peninsula), in winter (January-February) and in the pre-migratory period (late March). The estuarine area comprises an intertidal mudflat and an adjacent salina or salt-pan. On the intertidal mudflat, the biomass was 53 and 37 g AFDW .m -2in winter and the pre-migratory period, respectively. The main food source on mudflat was the polychaete Nereis diversicolor (44-54 % of the total biomass). On the other hand, the biomass in the salina was comparatively very poor, ranging from 0.008 to 0.079 g AFDW .m -2in winter and ranging from 0.011 to 0.09 g AFDW in late March. The main source of food in the salina was the crustacean Artemia. The total biomass on the mudflat during the pre-migratory period was 1.4 times lower than in February. This depletion could be caused by wader predation, mainly by Nereis diversicolor consumption. Although the potential food on the mudflats could allow high intertidal densities of waders, the availability of high tide foraging areas in the salina seems to contribute to the maintenance of these high intertidal densities.

Masero, José A.; Pérez-González, Maite; Basadre, Marta; Otero-Saavedra, Mónica

1999-07-01

243

Molecular phylogeny of Old World swifts (Aves: Apodiformes, Apodidae, Apus and Tachymarptis) based on mitochondrial and nuclear markers.  

PubMed

We provide a molecular phylogeny for Old World swifts of genera Apus and Tachymarptis (tribe Apodini) based on a taxon-complete sampling at the species level. Phylogenetic reconstructions were based on two mitochondrial (cytochrome b, 12S rRNA) and three nuclear markers (introns of fibrinogen and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase plus anonymous marker 12884) while the myoglobin intron 2 did not show any intergeneric variation or phylogenetic signal among the target taxa at all. In contrast to previous hypotheses, the two genera Apus and Tachymarptis were shown as reciprocally monophyletic in all reconstructions. Apus was consistently divided into three major clades: (1) East Asian clade of A. pacificus and A. acuticauda, (2) African-Asian clade of A. caffer, A. batesi, A. horus, A. affinis and A. nipalensis, (3) African-Palearctic clade of eight currently accepted species among which sequences of A. apus and A. pallidus clustered in a terminal crown clade. Phylogenetic signal of all four nuclear markers was extremely shallow within and among species of tribe Apodini and even among genera, such that intra- and intergeneric relationships of Apus, Tachymarptis and Cypsiurus were poorly resolved by nuclear data alone. Four species, A. pacificus, A. barbatus, A. affinis and A. caffer were consistently found to be paraphyletic with respect to their closest relatives and possible taxonomic consequences are discussed without giving particular recommendations due to limitations of sampling. Incomplete mitochondrial lineage sorting with cytochrome-b haplotypes shared among species and across large geographic distances was observed in two species pairs: A. affinis/A. nipalensis and A. apus/A. pallidus. Mitochondrial introgression caused by extant or past gene flow was ruled out as an explanation for the low interspecific differentiation in these two cases because all nuclear markers appeared to be highly unsorted among Apus species, too. Apparently, the two extant species pairs originated from very recent dispersal and/or speciation events. The currently accepted superspecies classification within Apus was not supported by our results. PMID:22361213

Päckert, Martin; Martens, Jochen; Wink, Michael; Feigl, Anna; Tietze, Dieter Thomas

2012-06-01

244

Comparative chromosome painting between chicken and spectacled owl (Pulsatrix perspicillata): implications for chromosomal evolution in the Strigidae (Aves, Strigiformes).  

PubMed

The spectacled owl (Pulsatrix perspicillata), a species found in the Neotropical region, has 76 chromosomes, with a high number of biarmed chromosomes. In order to define homologies between Gallus gallus and Pulsatrixperspicillata (Strigiformes, Strigidae), we used chromosome painting with chicken DNA probes of chromosomes 1-10 and Z and telomeric sequences. This approach allowed a comparison between Pulsatrixperspicillata and other species of Strigidae already analyzed by chromosome painting (Strix nebulosa and Bubo bubo, both with 2n = 80). The results show that centric fusions and fissions have occurred in different chromosomal pairs and are responsible for the karyotypic variation observed in this group. No interstitial telomeric sequences were found. Although the largest pair of chromosomes in P. perspicillata and Bubo bubo are submetacentric, they are homologous to different chicken chromosomes: GGA1/GGA2 in P. perspicillata and GGA2/GGA4 in B. bubo. PMID:19096211

de Oliveira, E H C; de Moura, S P; dos Anjos, L J S; Nagamachi, C Y; Pieczarka, J C; O'Brien, P C M; Ferguson-Smith, M A

2008-01-01

245

New information on the anatomy of the Chinese Early Cretaceous Bohaiornithidae (Aves: Enantiornithes) from a subadult specimen of Zhouornis hani  

PubMed Central

Enantiornithines are the most diverse avian clade in the Cretaceous. However, morphological specializations indicative of specific ecological roles are not well known for this clade. Here we report on an exquisitely well-preserved specimen from the Lower Cretaceous Jehol Group of northeastern China, which pedal morphology is suggestive of a unique ecological specialization within Enantiornithes. The morphology of the new specimen is largely indistinguishable from that of the holotype of the bohaiornithid enantiornithine Zhouornis hani, albeit the latter is somewhat larger. The new specimen provides important and previously unknown details of the skull of Zhouornis hani, which add to the limited knowledge about the cranial anatomy and evolution of enantiornithines. The information offered by the new specimen also augments our understanding of the postcranial morphology of bohaiornithid enantiornithines, a clade that has been only recently recognized. With the description of this specimen, Zhouornis hani becomes one of the most anatomically complete known enantiornithine species, which will facilitate future morphological studies.

Zhang, Yuguang; O'Connor, Jingmai; Di, Liu; Qingjin, Meng; Sigurdsen, Trond

2014-01-01

246

PANTHER Data from SOLVE-II Through CR-AVE: A Contrast Between Long and Short Lived Compounds.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

PANTHER (PAN and other Trace Hydrohalocarbons ExpeRiment) is an airborne 6-channel gas chromatograph that measures approximately 20 important atmospheric trace gases whose changing burdens impact air quality, climate change and both stratospheric and tropospheric ozone. In this presentation we will contrast measurements of the long-lived compounds against the short-lived compounds. The long-lived compounds tend to have well-defined troposphere boundary conditions and develop spatial gradients due to stratospheric processing. These measurements have played a major role in quantifying stratospheric transport, stratosphere- troposphere exchange, and ozone loss. In contrast the short-lived species develop spatial and temporal gradients in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL), due to variations in the surface boundary layer concentrations and the coupling of this surface boundary layer to the TTL via convective processes. Deep convection acts like a "conveyor belt" between the source region in the boundary layer and the relatively stable TTL region, often bypassing the free troposphere where scavenging of these short lived species takes place. Loss rates due to reaction with OH and thermal decomposition are reduced in the cold, dry air of the TTL, resulting in longer survival times. Isolation of the TTL region from the free troposphere can last from days to over a month. Significant amounts of these short-lived compound and their byproducts can therefore be transported into the lower stratosphere (LS). Of particular interest are compounds that contain bromine, iodine, and sulfur, not only because of their intrinsic harmful effects in the atmosphere, but also because they have unique source and sink regions that can help to de- convolve transport.

Moore, F. L.; Dutton, G. S.; Elkins, J. W.; Hall, B. D.; Hurst, D. F.; Nance, J. D.; Thompson, T. M.

2006-12-01

247

[Conditioning of the avoidance to the contact call in the red face lovebird (Agapornis roseicollis, Aves, Psittacidae)].  

PubMed

Two experiments were run on 10 lovebirds to test the reinforcing effect of the social call in an operant conditioning task. In the first experiment, the reinforced behavior (perching) which provoked the occurence of the call decreased. In the second experiment, where the same behavior stopped the continuous emission of the call, the behavior increased. This behavior may results from an avoidance to the call recorded from a lovebird which do not belong to the group of our experimental birds. PMID:135621

Delsaut, M; Roy, J C

1976-10-01

248

MOLECULAR SYSTEMATICS AND THE ROLE OF THE “VÁRZEA”–“TERRA-FIRME” ECOTONE IN THE DIVERSIFICATION OF XIPHORHYNCHUS WOODCREEPERS (AVES: DENDROCOLAPTIDAE)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The phylogeny of all known Xiphorhynchus (Dendrocolaptidae) species and many of its subspecies was reconstructed to evaluate species limits in this taxonomically challenging genus and investigate the possible role played by the Amazonian ''varzea'' (floodplain forest)-''terra-firme'' (upland forest) ecotone in its diversification. Phylogenies were inferred based on 2,430 bp of the mitochondrial DNA genes ND2, ND3, and cytochrome b. All

Alexandre Aleixo

2002-01-01

249

A comprehensive multilocus phylogeny for the wood-warblers and a revised classification of the Parulidae (Aves)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The birds in the family Parulidae-commonly termed the New World warblers or wood-warblers-are a classic model radiation for studies of ecological and behavioral differentiation. Although the monophyly of a 'core' wood-warbler clade is well established, no phylogenetic hypothesis for this group has included a full sampling of wood-warbler species diversity. We used parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian methods to reconstruct relationships among all genera and nearly all wood-warbler species, based on a matrix of mitochondrial DNA (5840 nucleotides) and nuclear DNA (6 loci, 4602 nucleotides) characters. The resulting phylogenetic hypotheses provide a highly congruent picture of wood-warbler relationships, and indicate that the traditional generic classification of these birds recognizes many non-monophyletic groups. We recommend a revised taxonomy in which each of 14 genera (Seiurus, Helmitheros, Mniotilta, Limnothlypis, Protonotaria, Parkesia, Vermivora, Oreothlypis, Geothlypis, Setophaga, Myioborus, Cardellina, Basileuterus, Myiothlypis) corresponds to a well-supported clade; these nomenclatural changes also involve subsuming a number of well-known, traditional wood-warbler genera (Catharopeza, Dendroica, Ergaticus, Euthlypis, Leucopeza, Oporornis, Parula, Phaeothlypis, Wilsonia). We provide a summary phylogenetic hypothesis that will be broadly applicable to investigations of the historical biogeography, processes of diversification, and evolution of trait variation in this well studied avian group. ?? 2010 Elsevier Inc.

Lovette, I. J.; Perez-Eman, J. L.; Sullivan, J. P.; Banks, R. C.; Fiorentino, I.; Cordoba-Cordoba, S.; Echeverry-Galvis, M.; Barker, F. K.; Burns, K. J.; Klicka, J.; Lanyon, S. M.; Bermingham, E.

2010-01-01

250

The spatio-temporal colonization and diversification across the Indo-Pacific by a 'great speciator' (Aves, Erythropitta erythrogaster)  

PubMed Central

The Indo-Pacific region has arguably been the most important area for the formulation of theories about biogeography and speciation, but modern studies of the tempo, mode and magnitude of diversification across this region are scarce. We study the biogeographic history and characterize levels of diversification in the wide-ranging passerine bird Erythropitta erythrogaster using molecular, phylogeographic and population genetics methods, as well as morphometric and plumage analyses. Our results suggest that E. erythrogaster colonized the Indo-Pacific during the Pleistocene in an eastward direction following a stepping stone pathway, and that sea-level fluctuations during the Pleistocene may have promoted gene flow only locally. A molecular species delimitation test suggests that several allopatric island populations of E. erythrogaster may be regarded as species. Most of these putative new species are further characterized by diagnostic differences in plumage. Our study reconfirms the E. erythrogaster complex as a ‘great speciator’: it represents a complex of up to 17 allopatrically distributed, reciprocally monophyletic and/or morphologically diagnosable species that originated during the Pleistocene. Our results support the view that observed latitudinal gradients of genetic divergence among avian sister species may have been affected by incomplete knowledge of taxonomic limits in tropical bird species.

Irestedt, Martin; Fabre, Pierre-Henri; Batalha-Filho, Henrique; J?nsson, Knud A.; Roselaar, Cees S.; Sangster, George; Ericson, Per G. P.

2013-01-01

251

CracidMex1: a comprehensive database of global occurrences of cracids (Aves, Galliformes) with distribution in Mexico.  

PubMed

Cracids are among the most vulnerable groups of Neotropical birds. Almost half of the species of this family are included in a conservation risk category. Twelve taxa occur in Mexico, six of which are considered at risk at national level and two are globally endangered. Therefore, it is imperative that high quality, comprehensive, and high-resolution spatial data on the occurrence of these taxa are made available as a valuable tool in the process of defining appropriate management strategies for conservation at a local and global level. We constructed the CracidMex1 database by collating global records of all cracid taxa that occur in Mexico from available electronic databases, museum specimens, publications, "grey literature", and unpublished records. We generated a database with 23,896 clean, validated, and standardized geographic records. Database quality control was an iterative process that commenced with the consolidation and elimination of duplicate records, followed by the geo-referencing of records when necessary, and their taxonomic and geographic validation using GIS tools and expert knowledge. We followed the geo-referencing protocol proposed by the Mexican National Commission for the Use and Conservation of Biodiversity. We could not estimate the geographic coordinates of 981 records due to inconsistencies or lack of sufficient information in the description of the locality. Given that current records for most of the taxa have some degree of distributional bias, with redundancies at different spatial scales, the CracidMex1 database has allowed us to detect areas where more sampling effort is required to have a better representation of the global spatial occurrence of these cracids. We also found that particular attention needs to be given to taxa identification in those areas where congeners or conspecifics co-occur in order to avoid taxonomic uncertainty. The construction of the CracidMex1 database represents the first comprehensive research effort to compile current, available global geographic records for a group of cracids. The database can now be improved by continuous revision and addition of new records. The CracidMex1 database will provide high quality input data that could be used to generate species distribution models, to assess temporal changes in species distributions, to identify priority areas for research and conservation, and in the definition of management strategies for this bird group. This compilation exercise could be replicated for other cracid groups or regions to attain a better knowledge of the global occurrences of the species in this vulnerable bird family. PMID:25061374

Pinilla-Buitrago, Gonzalo; Martínez-Morales, Miguel Angel; González-García, Fernando; Enríquez, Paula L; Rangel-Salazar, José Luis; Romero, Carlos Alberto Guichard; Navarro-Sigüenza, Adolfo G; Monterrubio-Rico, Tiberio César; Escalona-Segura, Griselda

2014-01-01

252

Higher-order phylogeny of modern birds (Theropoda, Aves: Neornithes) based on comparative anatomy. II. Analysis and discussion.  

PubMed

In recent years, avian systematics has been characterized by a diminished reliance on morphological cladistics of modern taxa, intensive palaeornithogical research stimulated by new discoveries and an inundation by analyses based on DNA sequences. Unfortunately, in contrast to significant insights into basal origins, the broad picture of neornithine phylogeny remains largely unresolved. Morphological studies have emphasized characters of use in palaeontological contexts. Molecular studies, following disillusionment with the pioneering, but non-cladistic, work of Sibley and Ahlquist, have differed markedly from each other and from morphological works in both methods and findings. Consequently, at the turn of the millennium, points of robust agreement among schools concerning higher-order neornithine phylogeny have been limited to the two basalmost and several mid-level, primary groups. This paper describes a phylogenetic (cladistic) analysis of 150 taxa of Neornithes, including exemplars from all non-passeriform families, and subordinal representatives of Passeriformes. Thirty-five outgroup taxa encompassing Crocodylia, predominately theropod Dinosauria, and selected Mesozoic birds were used to root the trees. Based on study of specimens and the literature, 2954 morphological characters were defined; these characters have been described in a companion work, approximately one-third of which were multistate (i.e. comprised at least three states), and states within more than one-half of these multistate characters were ordered for analysis. Complete heuristic searches using 10 000 random-addition replicates recovered a total solution set of 97 well-resolved, most-parsimonious trees (MPTs). The set of MPTs was confirmed by an expanded heuristic search based on 10 000 random-addition replicates and a full ratchet-augmented exploration to ascertain global optima. A strict consensus tree of MPTs included only six trichotomies, i.e. nodes differing topologically among MPTs. Bootstrapping (based on 10 000 replicates) percentages and ratchet-minimized support (Bremer) indices indicated most nodes to be robust. Several fossil Neornithes (e.g. Dinornithiformes, Aepyornithiformes) were placed within the ingroup a posteriori either through unconstrained, heursitic searches based on the complete matrix augmented by these taxa separately or using backbone-constraints. Analysis confirmed the topology among outgroup Theropoda and achieved robust resolution at virtually all levels of the Neornithes. Findings included monophyly of the palaeognathous birds, comprising the sister taxa Tinamiformes and ratites, respectively, and the Anseriformes and Galliformes as monophyletic sister-groups, together forming the sister-group to other Neornithes exclusive of the Palaeognathae (Neoaves). Noteworthy inferences include: (i) the sister-group to remaining Neoaves comprises a diversity of marine and wading birds; (ii) Podicipedidae are the sister-group of Gaviidae, and not closely related to the Phoenicopteridae, as recently suggested; (iii) the traditional Pelecaniformes, including the shoebill (Balaeniceps rex) as sister-taxon to other members, are monophyletic; (iv) traditional Ciconiiformes are monophyletic; (v) Strigiformes and Falconiformes are sister-groups; (vi) Cathartidae is the sister-group of the remaining Falconiformes; (vii) Ralliformes (Rallidae and Heliornithidae) are the sister-group to the monophyletic Charadriiformes, with the traditionally composed Gruiformes and Turniciformes (Turnicidae and Mesitornithidae) sequentially paraphyletic to the entire foregoing clade; (viii) Opisthocomus hoazin is the sister-taxon to the Cuculiformes (including the Musophagidae); (ix) traditional Caprimulgiformes are monophyletic and the sister-group of the Apodiformes; (x) Trogoniformes are the sister-group of Coliiformes; (xi) Coraciiformes, Piciformes and Passeriformes are mutually monophyletic and closely related; and (xii) the Galbulae are retained within the Piciformes. Unresolved portions of the Neornithes (nodes having more than one most-parsi

Livezey, Bradley C; Zusi, Richard L

2007-01-01

253

DNA evidence for a Paleocene origin of the Alcidae (Aves: Charadriiformes) in the Pacific and multiple dispersals across northern oceans  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Alcidae is a group of marine, wing-propelled diving birds known as auks that are distributed along the coasts of the northern oceans. It has been suggested that auks originated in the Pacific coastal shores as early as the Miocene, and dispersed to the Atlantic either through the Arctic coasts of Eurasia and North America (northern dispersal route), or through

Sergio L. Pereira; Allan J. Baker

2008-01-01

254

Re-examination of Psilopterus lemoinei (Aves, Phorusrhacidae), a late early Miocene little terror bird from Patagonia (Argentina)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Psilopterus lemoinei, the largest species in this genus, was a small terror bird weighing 8–9 kg, and was a ground bird with functionally tridactyl feet. New remains of this phorusrhacid, including an exceptionally preserved anterior part of a skull recovered from the Patagonian Killik Aike Norte locality (Santa Cruz Formation, late early Miocene), is now available for study. The main

Federico J. Degrange; Claudia P. Tambussi

2011-01-01

255

New fossil penguins (Aves, Sphenisciformes) from the Oligocene of New Zealand reveal the skeletal plan of stem penguins  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three skeletons collected from the late Oligocene Kokoamu Greensand of New Zealand are among the most complete Paleogene penguins known. These specimens, described here as Kairuku waitaki, gen. et sp. nov., and Kairuku grebneffi, sp. nov., reveal new details of key elements of the stem penguin skeleton associated with underwater flight, including the sternum, flipper, and pygostyle. Relative proportions of

Daniel T. Ksepka; R. Ewan Fordyce; Tatsuro Ando; Craig M. Jones

2012-01-01

256

The Top-Awarded Reports: The First Contest of Internet Application to Educational Activities in Japan. AVE in Japan.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet presents two activities that received awards in the First Contest of Internet Application to Educational Activities in Japan. The first paper describes CHaTNet (Children Homes and Teachers Network) at the Tamagawa Gakuen school, winner of the Prime Minister's Award. CHaTNet is a network of 4,500 participants, including parents,…

Japan Audiovisual Information Center for International Service, Tokyo.

257

A subsynoptic-scale kinetic energy study of the Red River Valley tornado outbreak (AVE-SESAME 1)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The subsynoptis-scale kinetic energy balance during the Red River Valley tornado outbreak is presented in order to diagnose storm environment interactions. Area-time averaged energetics indicate that horizontal flux convergence provides the major energy source to the region, while cross contour flow provides the greatest sink. Maximum energy variability is found in the upper levels in association with jet stream activity. Area averaged energetics at individual observation times show that the energy balance near times of maximum storm activity differs considerably from that of the remaining periods. The local kinetic energy balance over Oklahoma during the formation of a limited jet streak receives special attention. Cross contour production of energy is the dominant local source for jet development. Intense convection producing the Red River Valley tornadoes may have contributed to this local development by modifying the surrounding environment.

Jedlovec, G. J.; Fuelberg, H. E.

1981-01-01

258

Lineage diversification and morphological evolution in a large-scale continental radiation: The neotropical ovenbirds and woodcreepers (Aves: Furnariidae)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Patterns of diversification in species-rich clades provide insight into the processes that generate biological diversity. We tested different models of lineage and phenotypic diversification in an exceptional continental radiation, the ovenbird family Furnariidae, using the most complete species-level phylogenetic hypothesis produced to date for a major avian clade (97% of 293 species). We found that the Furnariidae exhibit nearly constant rates of lineage accumulation but show evidence of constrained morphological evolution. This pattern of sustained high rates of speciation despite limitations on phenotypic evolution contrasts with the results of most previous studies of evolutionary radiations, which have found a pattern of decelerating diversity-dependent lineage accumulation coupled with decelerating or constrained phenotypic evolution. Our results suggest that lineage accumulation in tropical continental radiations may not be as limited by ecological opportunities as in temperate or island radiations. More studies examining patterns of both lineage and phenotypic diversification are needed to understand the often complex tempo and mode of evolutionary radiations on continents.

Derryberry, Elizabeth P.; Claramunt, Santiago; Derryberry, Graham; Chesser, R. Terry; Cracraft, Joel; Aleixo, Alexandre; Pérez-Emán, Jorge; Remsen, J. V., Jr.; Brumfield, Robb T.

2011-01-01

259

Lineage diversification and morphological evolution in a large-scale continental radiation: The neotropical ovenbirds and woodcreepers (aves: furnariidae)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Patterns of diversification in species-rich clades provide insight into the processes that generate biological diversity. We tested different models of lineage and phenotypic diversification in an exceptional continental radiation, the ovenbird family Furnariidae, using the most complete species-level phylogenetic hypothesis produced to date for a major avian clade (97% of 293 species). We found that the Furnariidae exhibit nearly constant rates of lineage accumulation but show evidence of constrained morphological evolution. This pattern of sustained high rates of speciation despite limitations on phenotypic evolution contrasts with the results of most previous studies of evolutionary radiations, which have found a pattern of decelerating diversity-dependent lineage accumulation coupled with decelerating or constrained phenotypic evolution. Our results suggest that lineage accumulation in tropical continental radiations may not be as limited by ecological opportunities as in temperate or island radiations. More studies examining patterns of both lineage and phenotypic diversification are needed to understand the often complex tempo and mode of evolutionary radiations on continents. ?? 2011 The Author(s). Evolution ?? 2011 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

Derryberry, E. P.; Claramunt, S.; Derryberry, G.; Chesser, R. T.; Cracraft, J.; Aleixo, A.; Perez-Eman, J.; Remsen, J. V.; Brumfield, R. T.

2011-01-01

260

Interspecifc variation in eye shape and retinal topography in seven species of galliform bird (Aves: Galliformes: Phasianidae).  

PubMed

Eye morphology and the retinal topography of animals that live in either 'open' (e.g., grassland) or 'enclosed' (e.g., forest) terrestrial habitats show common adaptations to constraints imposed by these different habitat types. Although relationships between habitat and the visual system are well documented in most vertebrates, relatively few studies have examined this relationship in birds. Here, we compare eye shape and retinal topography across seven species from the family Phasianidae (Galliformes) that are diurnally active in either open or enclosed habitats. Species from enclosed habitats have significantly larger corneal diameters, relative to transverse diameters, than species from open habitats, which we predict serves to enhance visual sensitivity. Retinal topography, however, was similar across all seven species and consisted of a centrally positioned area centralis and a weak horizontal visual streak, with no discernible fovea. In the Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica), there was also a dorso-temporal extension of increased neuron density and, in some specimens, a putative area dorsalis. The total number of neurons in the retinal ganglion cell layer was correlated with retinal whole-mount area. Average and peak neuron densities were similar across species, with the exception of the Japanese quail, which had greater average and peak densities. Peak anatomical spatial resolving power was also similar among species, ranging from approximately 10-13 cycles/°. Overall, the pattern of retinal topography we found in phasianids is associated with ground-foraging in birds and presumably facilitates the identification of small food items on the ground as well as other visually guided behaviors, irrespective of habitat type. PMID:22806571

Lisney, Thomas J; Iwaniuk, Andrew N; Kolominsky, Jeffrey; Bandet, Mischa V; Corfield, Jeremy R; Wylie, Douglas R

2012-10-01

261

Aromatase expression in the brain of the ruffed grouse (Bonasa umbellus) and comparisons with other galliform birds (Aves, Galliformes).  

PubMed

The enzyme aromatase is important for regulating sexual and aggressive behaviors during the reproductive season, including many aspects of courtship. In birds, aromatase is expressed at high levels in a number of different brain regions. Although this expression does vary among species, the extent to which the distribution of aromatase positive cells reflects species differences in courtship and other behaviors is not well established. Here, we examine the distribution of aromatase immunoreactive (ARO) neurons in the brain of a species with a unique courtship display, the ruffed grouse (Bonasa umbellus). Unlike most other galliforms, male ruffed grouse do not vocalize as part of their courtship and instead use their wings to create a non-vocal auditory signal to attract females. Because aromatase is involved in courtship behaviors in several bird species, including other galliforms, we hypothesized that aromatase distribution in the ruffed grouse would differ from that of other galliforms. We used an antibody raised against quail aromatase to examine aromatase immunoreactivity in the ruffed grouse, the closely related spruce grouse (Falcipennis canadensis) and the Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica). In all three species, ARO neurons were identified in the medial preoptic nucleus, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and the nucleus ventromedialis hypothalami. Both grouse species had ARO neurons in two regions of the telencephalon, the hyperpallium, and entopallium, and the ruffed grouse also in field L. ARO neurons were only found in one region in the telencephalon of the Japanese quail, the septum. In general, breeding male ruffed grouse had significantly more ARO neurons and those neurons were larger than that of both the non-breeding male and female ruffed grouse. Aromatase expression in the telencephalon of the ruffed grouse suggests that steroid hormones might modulate responses to visual and acoustic stimuli, but how this relates to species differences in courtship displays and co-expression with estrogenic receptors is yet to be determined. PMID:23266340

Corfield, Jeremy R; Harada, Nobuhiro; Iwaniuk, Andrew N

2013-01-01

262

Downregulation of IRF4 induces lytic reactivation of KSHV in primary effusion lymphoma cells.  

PubMed

Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), associated with the latent infection by KSHV, constitutively expresses interferon-regulatory factor 4 (IRF4). We recently showed that IRF4 differentially regulates expression of cellular interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) and viral genes (Forero et al., 2013). Here, using inducible IRF4 knockdown, we demonstrate that IRF4 silencing results in enhanced transcription of KSHV replication transactivator RTA. As a result viral transcription is increased leading to virus reactivation. Taken together, our results show that IRF4 helps maintain the balance between latency and KSHV reactivation in PEL cells. PMID:24928034

Forero, Adriana; McCormick, Kevin D; Jenkins, Frank J; Sarkar, Saumendra N

2014-06-01

263

Presentación de PowerPoint  

Cancer.gov

QUALITY INDICATORS OF COLORECTAL CANCER SCREENING PROGRAMME IN CATALONIA (SPAIN) Merc Peris, Gemma Binefa, Nria Diaz, Montse Garcia, Matilde Navarro Cancer Prevention and Control Department Institut Catal dOncologia International Cancer Screening Network,

264

76 FR 32241 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Planning and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...references if such rescheduling would result in a major inconvenience. If attending this meeting, please contact Ms. Jessie Delgado (Telephone 301-415-7360) to be escorted to the meeting room. Dated: May 26, 2011. Yoira Diaz-Sanabria,...

2011-06-03

265

76 FR 22934 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Reliability...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...references if such rescheduling would result in a major inconvenience. If attending this meeting, please contact Ms. Jessie Delgado (Telephone 301-415-7360) to be escorted to the meeting room. Dated: April 19, 2011. Yoira Diaz-Sanabria,...

2011-04-25

266

76 FR 27102 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on U.S. Advanced...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...references if such rescheduling would result in a major inconvenience. If attending this meeting, please contact Ms. Jessie Delgado (Telephone 301-415-7360) to be escorted to the meeting room. Dated: May 3, 2011. Yoira Diaz-Sanabria, Acting...

2011-05-10

267

76 FR 38212 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Planning and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...references if such rescheduling would result in a major inconvenience. If attending this meeting, please contact Ms. Jessie Delgado (Telephone 301-415-7360) to be escorted to the meeting room. Dated: June 22, 2011. Yoira Diaz-Sanabria,...

2011-06-29

268

I3P Overview  

NASA Video Gallery

Deborah Diaz, the NASA's Deputy Chief Information Officer, talks about the Information Technology Infrastructure Integration Program (I3P). I3P is NASA's initiative to provide Agency-wide managemen...

269

75 FR 14128 - Approval for Manufacturing Authority, Foreign-Trade Zone 7, CooperVision Caribbean Corporation...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Board [Order No. 1669] Approval for Manufacturing Authority, Foreign-Trade Zone 7, CooperVision Caribbean Corporation (Contact Lenses), Juana Diaz, Puerto Rico Pursuant to its authority under the Foreign-Trade Zones Act of June 18, 1934, as...

2010-03-24

270

Method for Improving the Extraction Properties of a Tributyl Phosphate Solution.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A method is given for improving the extraction properties of a tributyl phosphate extractant used for reprocessing irradiated nuclear reactor fuel (Purex Process) containing degradation products of tributyl phosphate. The extractant is contacted with diaz...

E. C. Martin L. E. Bruns

1976-01-01

271

STS-34 crewmembers conduct DSO 0470 on OV-104's middeck  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-34 Mission Specialist (MS) Ellen S. Baker, a medical doctor, conducts a medical examination on MS Franklin R. Chang-Diaz. The examination completed on the middeck of Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, is part of Detailed Supplementary Objective (DSO) 0470 Relationship of Space Adaptation Syndrome (SAS) to Cerebral Blood Flow. Baker holds an instrument to Chang-Diaz's neck while balancing him upside down by his head in front of the starboard wall-mounted sleep restraints.

1989-01-01

272

Good Teachers (the Movie You Will Never See)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It began with a trip to the cinema to see Cameron Diaz in her new comedy, "Bad Teacher." It was a bad choice. Not a great flick, but as a parody of bad employees, in terms of things that can get one fired--drugs, alcohol , cheating, foul language, inappropriate sexual behavior--Diaz slams pedal to the metal. She nips out of airline booze bottles…

Gillard, Colleen

2012-01-01

273

61 FR 32036 - Hotel and Motel Fire Safety Act National Master List, 1996  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...276-8884 AK0049 BEST WESTERN GOLDEN LION 1600 E. 36TH AVE.......... ANCHORAGE...DAYS INN ANCHORAGE........... 321 E. 5TH AVE............ ANCHORAGE...AK0033 SHERATON ANCHORAGE HOTEL..... 401 E. 6TH AVE...............

1996-06-21

274

75 FR 65647 - National Register of Historic Places; Notification of Pending Nominations and Related Actions  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...22th Ave., W, Newton, 10000917 Polk County Hubbell Warehouse, 340 SW 5th St, Des Moines, 10000894 Story County Delta Upsilon Chapter House, 117 Ash Ave., Ames, 10000919 Webster County Fort Dodge Downtown Historic District, 1st Ave N,...

2010-10-26

275

75 FR 7536 - Environmental Impact Statement: Ottawa County, MI  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Grand Haven. Crockery Township, 17431 112th Ave., Nunica. Holland Township, 353 N. 120th Ave...Haven. Grand Haven Township, 13300 168th Ave...Holland. Ottawa County Planning & Grants Office...Grand Rapids. MDOT Muskegon Transportation...

2010-02-19

276

Diversification of Ramphastinae (Aves, Ramphastidae) prior to the Cretaceous\\/Tertiary boundary as shown by molecular clock of mtDNA sequences  

Microsoft Academic Search

Partial cytochrome b and 12S rDNA mitochondrial DNA sequences of eight representatives of the Ramphastidae family were analyzed. We applied the linearized tree method to identify sequences evolving at similar rates and estimated the divergence times among some of the taxa analyzed. After excluding Ramphastos tucanus and Capito dayi from our data set, the remaining taxa presented a constant rate

Laila Alves Nahum; Sérgio Luiz Pereira; Flora Maria de Campos Fernandes; Sergio Russo Matioli; Anita Wajntal

2003-01-01

277

Temporal and spatial diversification of Pteroglossus araçaris (AVES: Ramphastidae) in the neotropics: Constant rate of diversification does not support an increase in radiation during the Pleistocene  

Microsoft Academic Search

We use the small-bodied toucan genus Pteroglossus to test hypotheses about diversification in the lowland Neotropics. We sequenced three mitochondrial genes and one nuclear intron from all Pteroglossus species and used these data to reconstruct phylogenetic trees based on maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian analyses. These phylogenetic trees were used to make inferences regarding both the pattern and timing

Swati Patel; Jason D. Weckstein; José S. L. Patané; John M. Bates; Alexandre Aleixo

2011-01-01

278

Hidden generic diversity in Neotropical birds: Molecular and anatomical data support a new genus for the “ Scytalopus” indigoticus species-group (Aves: Rhinocryptidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The genus Scytalopus is a species-rich and taxonomically complicated component of the Neotropical avian family Rhinocryptidae. Probably because Scytalopus is a superficially uniform assemblage, its monophyly has not been seriously questioned. We investigated phylogenetic relationships of a representative set of species in the genus using nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences as well as anatomical data, and provided the first test

Giovanni Nachtigall Maurício; Helena Mata; Marcos Ricardo Bornschein; Carlos Daniel Cadena; Herculano Alvarenga; Sandro L. Bonatto

2008-01-01

279

Associação entre aves e flores de duas espécies de árvores do gênero Erythrina (Fabaceae) na Mata Atlântica do sudeste do Brasil  

Microsoft Academic Search

Association between birds and flowers of two species of trees of the genus Erythrina (Fabaceae) in the Atlantic forest of southeastern Brazil. Flowers are considered important resources in the diet of birds during the dry season. We studied the interaction between birds and two species of the trees of genus Erythrina (E. falcata and E. verna) at four localities in

Ricardo Parrini; Marcos A. Raposo

2008-01-01

280

Phylogeny of shorebirds, gulls, and alcids (Aves: Charadrii) from the cytochrome-b gene: parsimony, Bayesian inference, minimum evolution, and quartet puzzling.  

PubMed

Charadrii (shorebirds, gulls, and alcids) have exceptional diversity in ecological, behavioral, and life-history traits. A phylogenetic framework is necessary to fully understand the relationships among these traits. Despite several attempts to resolve the phylogeny of the Charadrii, none have comprehensively utilized molecular sequence data. Complete and partial cytochrome-b gene sequences for 86 Charadrii and five Falconides species (as outgroup taxa) were obtained from GenBank and aligned. We analyzed the resulting matrices using parsimony, Bayesian inference, minimum evolution, and quartet puzzling methods. Posterior probabilities, decay indices, and bootstrapping provide strong support for four major lineages consisting of gulls, alcids, plovers, and sandpipers, respectively. The broad structure of the trees differ significantly from all previous hypotheses of Charadrii phylogeny in placing the plovers at the base of the tree below the sandpipers in a pectinate sequence towards a large clade of gulls and alcids. The parsimony, Bayesian, and minimum evolution models provide strong evidence for this phylogenetic hypothesis. This is further corroborated by non-tree based measures of support and conflict (Lento plots). The quartet puzzling trees are poorly resolved and inconclusive. PMID:15012936

Thomas, Gavin H; Wills, Matthew A; Székely, Tamás

2004-03-01

281

Wind shear and wet and dry thermodynamic indices as predictors of thunderstorm motion and severity and application to the AVE 4 experimental data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Two types of parameters are computed and mapped for use in assessing their individual merits as predictors of occurrence and severity of thunderstorms. The first group is comprised of equivalent potential temperature, potential temperature, water vapor mixing ratio, and wind speed. Equivalent potential temperature maxima and strong gradients of equivalent potential temperature at the surface correlate well with regions of thunderstorm activity. The second type, comprised of the energy index, shear index, and energy shear index, incorporates some model dynamics of thunderstorms, including nonthermodynamic forcing. The energy shear index is found to improve prediction of tornadic and high-wind situations slightly better than other indices. It is concluded that further development and refinement of nonthermodynamic aspects of predictive indices are definitely warranted.

Connell, J. R.; Ey, L.

1977-01-01

282

The geographic scale of diversification on islands: genetic and morphological divergence at a very small spatial scale in the Mascarene grey white-eye (Aves: Zosterops borbonicus)  

PubMed Central

Background Oceanic islands provide unique scenarios for studying the roles of geography and ecology in driving population divergence and speciation. Assessing the relative importance of selective and neutral factors in driving population divergence is central to understanding how such divergence may lead to speciation in small oceanic islands, where opportunities for gene flow and population mixing are potentially high. Here we report a case of genetic and morphological structure in the Mascarene grey white-eye (Zosterops borbonicus) a species that shows a striking, geographically structured plumage polymorphism on the topographically and ecologically complex island of Réunion, yet is monotypic on the relatively uniform neighbouring island of Mauritius. Results Analysis of 276 AFLP loci in 197 individuals revealed prolonged independent evolution of Réunion and Mauritius populations, which is congruent with previous mtDNA assessments. Furthermore, populations on Réunion showed significant differentiation into three main genetic groups separating lowland from highland areas despite the small geographic distances involved. Genetic differentiation along the altitudinal gradient is consistent with morphometric analysis of fitness-related traits. Birds in the highlands were larger, yet had relatively smaller beaks than in the lowlands, suggesting the role of selection in shaping morphology and restricting gene flow along the gradient. No genetic differentiation between plumage morphs was detected in neutral markers, suggesting that plumage differences are of recent origin. Conclusions Our results suggest a dual role of vicariance and natural selection in differentiating populations of a passerine bird in an oceanic island at very small spatial scales. We propose a combination of past microallopatry driven by volcanic activity and selection-constrained dispersal along steep ecological gradients to explain the striking levels of population structure found within the island, although the possibility that genetic differences evolved in situ along the gradient cannot be ruled out at present. The lack of congruence between genetic groups and plumage morphs suggests that the latter are of recent origin and likely due to social or sexual selection acting on few loci. The presence of sharp and stable contact zones between plumage morphs suggests that they could be on independent evolutionary trajectories, yet whether or not they represent incipient species will require further research to directly assess the degree of reproductive isolation among them.

2010-01-01

283

Pituitary extract of the ricefield eel Monopterus albus (Synbranchidae, Teleostei) exhibits gonadotropic activity in the classes Mammalia, Aves, Reptilia and Amphibia.  

PubMed

Pituitary extract of the ricefield eel Monopterus albus demonstrated gonadotropic activity in mammals and non-mammalian vertebrates. Using the rat as the recipient, FSH activity was detected in Monopterus pituitaries in the HCG augmentation test and LH activity in the ovarian ascorbic acid depletion test. Cyclic AMP level in superovulated ovaries, ovarian lactate production and glucose uptake in vitro, plasma testosterone level in males, testicular enzymes, ventral prostate weight and other androgen-dependent parameters were stimulated after treatment with Monopterus pituitary extract. Testicular and ovarian 32P5+ uptake in the chick, testicular weight in the grass turtle Chinemys reevesi, and ovulation in the amphibians Xenopus laevis and Rana tigrina were enhanced. Both the FSH-like and LH-like activities in Monopterus pituitaries were sensitive to proteolytic enzymes and chemicals that attack the disulfide linkage, carbohydrate moiety, tyrosine, tryptophan and histidine residues. This constitutes the first report of dual gonadotropic activities elicited by a teleost pituitary extract in the mammal in vivo. PMID:2873938

Ng, T B; Lee, Y H; Chan, S T

1986-01-01

284

Pituitary–gonadal axis and secondary sex characters in the spontaneously masculinized pintail, Anas acuta (Anatidae, Aves), with special regard to the gonadotrophs  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes some aspects of the pituitary gland, gonads, and secondary sex characters of unusual pintails, Anas acuta, found in the wild. They were demonstrated to be females with partially masculinized plumage; i.e., their plumage showed various degrees of intersex, but the genital organs, syrinx, and electrophoretic pattern of sex-specific DNA were of the female type. Their left ovary

A. Chiba; H. Sakai; M. Sato; R. Honma; K. Murata; F. Sugimori

2004-01-01

285

Pituitary-gonadal axis and secondary sex characters in the spontaneously masculinized pintail, Anas acuta (Anatidae, Aves), with special regard to the gonadotrophs.  

PubMed

This paper describes some aspects of the pituitary gland, gonads, and secondary sex characters of unusual pintails, Anas acuta, found in the wild. They were demonstrated to be females with partially masculinized plumage; i.e., their plumage showed various degrees of intersex, but the genital organs, syrinx, and electrophoretic pattern of sex-specific DNA were of the female type. Their left ovary underwent a marked involution and was associated with the mesonephros (the Wolffian body), as was the degenerated right ovary. Neither testicular tissue nor ovotestis was found in the gonad of either side. The oviduct was anatomically normal and comparable to that of the control adult. The plasma concentration of estradiol-17beta (E2) was shown to be 5.7+/-0.5 (mean+/-SE)pg/ml in the masculinized birds, 7.0+/-0.7 pg/ml in control males, and 22.5+/-6.1 pg/ml in control females, whereas plasma testosterone (T) was below the detection level in all of the samples. As to the pituitary gland, hypertrophy and/or deformity of the pars distalis was evident in the majority of the masculinized birds. Among others, hyperactive gonadotrophs, mainly luteinizing hormone (LH)- and LH/follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)-immunoreactive cells, were prominent in the entire gland; and typical signet ring cells (castration cells) or giant gonadotrophs were frequently observed. These changes in the gonadotrophs may have been caused by a feedback response to the physiologically ovariectomized condition in the masculinized birds. Causal factor(s) of the ovarian degeneration remain to be further investigated. PMID:15094335

Chiba, A; Sakai, H; Sato, M; Honma, R; Murata, K; Sugimori, F

2004-05-15

286

Three new species of chewing lice of the genus Emersoniella Tendeiro, 1965 (Insecta: Phthiraptera: Ischnocera: Philopteridae) from Papua New Guinean kingfishers and kookaburras (Aves: Coraciiformes: Alcedinidae).  

PubMed

Three new species of the ischnoceran louse genus Emersoniella (Phthiraptera) are described from four species of New Guinean kingfishers and kookaburras (Coraciiformes: Alcedinidae: Halcyoninae). They are: Emersoniella crassicarina n. sp. ex Dacelo gaudichaud Quoy & Gaimard (rufous-bellied kookaburra) and Dacelo leachii intermedia Salvadori (blue-winged kookaburra); E. reninoda n. sp. ex Melidora macrorrhina macrorhina Lesson (hook-billed kingfisher); and E. persei n. sp. ex Tanysiptera danae Sharpe (brown-headed paradise-kingfisher). In addition, we illustrate Emersoniella regis Emerson & Price, Emersoniella halcyonis Tendeiro, and the male genitalia of Emersoniella galateae Emerson & Price, as well as provide a complete host-louse checklist, and an updated key to all seven species of this genus.  PMID:24870691

Gustafsson, Daniel R; Bush, Sarah E

2014-01-01

287

Study on the blackbird (Agelaius ruficapillus Viellot- Emberizidae, Aves) in the rice production areas of Southern Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil : basis for a population control management program  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rice is one of the main components of the Brazilian diet. The State of Rio Grande do Sul produces approximately 4,6 millions tons per year - more than 54% of total Brazilian rice production. The average production in Southern Brazil is 5,2 tons per ha, with yields of 10 tons per ha being recorded. The rice production sector of Rio

J. J. Centeno da Silva

1999-01-01

288

New records of the restinga antwren Formicivora littoralis Gonzaga and Pacheco (Aves, Thamnophilidae) in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: inland extended range and threats.  

PubMed

The Restinga Antwren (Formicivora littoralis) has a narrow distribution range in southeastern Brazil, and it is a typical species of restinga habitat (sandy coastal plain vegetation). In this paper, we describe two new records for the species (22 degrees 51' 45" S and 42 degrees 14' 13" W; 22 degrees 51' 14" S and 42 degrees 11' 47" W) in the northern margin of the Araruama Lagoon, which represent a new inland limit for its distribution (11 km), besides assessing the current state of its habitat. We recorded supposed isolated subpopulations, most of them due the accelerated human-made fragmentation. The Massambaba Environmental Protection Area comprises the larger continuous extent of the suitable habitat for the Restinga Antwren, being essential to its long-term existence. However, the region lacks effective protected areas and, besides urgent practical measures, we recommend an accurate mapping and populational studies on this species. PMID:18660969

Vecchi, M B; Alves, M A S

2008-05-01

289

Phylogeny of Amazona barbadensis and the Yellow-Headed Amazon Complex (Aves: Psittacidae): A New Look at South American Parrot Evolution.  

PubMed

The Yellow-shouldered Amazon (Amazona barbadensis) is the sole parrot of the genus Amazona that inhabits only dry forests. Its population has been dropping; therefore it has been the topic of many studies and conservation efforts. However, the phylogenetic relationship of this species to potential relatives classified within the Yellow-Headed Amazon (YHA) complex are still not clear. Therefore, we used more extensive data sets, including the newly sequenced mitochondrial genome of A. barbadensis, to conduct phylogenetic analyses. Various combinations of genes and many phylogenetic approaches showed that A. barbadensis clustered significantly with A. ochrocephala ochrocephala from Colombia and Venezuela, which created the Northern South American (NSA) lineage, clearly separated from two other lineages within the YHA complex, the Central (CA) and South American (SA). Tree topology tests and exclusion of rapidly evolving sites provided support for a NSA+SA grouping. We propose an evolutionary scenario for the YHA complex and its colonization of the American mainland. The NSA lineage likely represents the most ancestral lineage, which derived from Lesser Antillean Amazons and colonized the northern coast of Venezuela about a million years ago. Then, Central America was colonized through the Isthmus of Panama, which led to the emergence of the CA lineage. The southward expansion to South America and the origin of the SA lineage happened almost simultaneously. However, more intensive or prolonged gene flow or migrations have led to much weaker geographic differentiation of genetic markers in the SA than in the CA lineage. PMID:24823658

Urantówka, Adam Dawid; Mackiewicz, Pawe?; Strza?a, Tomasz

2014-01-01

290

Temporal and spatial diversification of Pteroglossus araçaris (AVES: Ramphastidae) in the neotropics: constant rate of diversification does not support an increase in radiation during the Pleistocene.  

PubMed

We use the small-bodied toucan genus Pteroglossus to test hypotheses about diversification in the lowland Neotropics. We sequenced three mitochondrial genes and one nuclear intron from all Pteroglossus species and used these data to reconstruct phylogenetic trees based on maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian analyses. These phylogenetic trees were used to make inferences regarding both the pattern and timing of diversification for the group. We used the uplift of the Talamanca highlands of Costa Rica and western Panama as a geologic calibration for estimating divergence times on the Pteroglossus tree and compared these results with a standard molecular clock calibration. Then, we used likelihood methods to model the rate of diversification. Based on our analyses, the onset of the Pteroglossus radiation predates the Pleistocene, which has been predicted to have played a pivotal role in diversification in the Amazon rainforest biota. We found a constant rate of diversification in Pteroglossus evolutionary history, and thus no support that events during the Pleistocene caused an increase in diversification. We compare our data to other avian phylogenies to better understand major biogeographic events in the Neotropics. These comparisons support recurring forest connections between the Amazonian and Atlantic forests, and the splitting of cis/trans Andean species after the final uplift of the Andes. At the subspecies level, there is evidence for reciprocal monophyly and groups are often separated by major rivers, demonstrating the important role of rivers in causing or maintaining divergence. Because some of the results presented here conflict with current taxonomy of Pteroglossus, new taxonomic arrangements are suggested. PMID:21055476

Patel, Swati; Weckstein, Jason D; Patané, José S L; Bates, John M; Aleixo, Alexandre

2011-01-01

291

Distribution and 16S rDNA sequences of Argas monachus (Acari: Argasidae), a soft tick parasite of Myiopsitta monachus (Aves: Psittacidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Specimens of Argas monachus Keirans et al. were collected from Myiopsitta monachus nests in 42 localities in Argentina and Paraguay from 2006 to 2010. A list of localities where this tick has been found is\\u000a presented. 16S rDNA sequences of specimens of A. monachus from different localities were compared to confirm whether they belong to the same specific taxon. Argas

Mariano MastropaoloPaola; Paola Turienzo; Osvaldo Di Iorio; Santiago Nava; José M. Venzal; Alberto A. Guglielmone; Atilio J. Mangold

292

Distribution and 16S rDNA sequences of Argas monachus (Acari: Argasidae), a soft tick parasite of Myiopsitta monachus (Aves: Psittacidae).  

PubMed

Specimens of Argas monachus Keirans et al. were collected from Myiopsitta monachus nests in 42 localities in Argentina and Paraguay from 2006 to 2010. A list of localities where this tick has been found is presented. 16S rDNA sequences of specimens of A. monachus from different localities were compared to confirm whether they belong to the same specific taxon. Argas monachus is present in the phytogeographic provinces of Chaco, Espinal, and Monte, but not in the Pampa (all from de Chaco Domain) where the host is well distributed. No differences were found among 16S rDNA sequences of geographically distant specimens. PMID:21739257

Mastropaolo, Mariano; Turienzo, Paola; Di Iorio, Osvaldo; Nava, Santiago; Venzal, José M; Guglielmone, Alberto A; Mangold, Atilio J

2011-11-01

293

Coccidia of New World psittaciform birds (Aves: Psittaciformes): Eimeria ararae n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the blue-and-yellow macaw Ara ararauna (Linnaeus).  

PubMed

In the New World, the avian order Psittaciformes comprises 142 species, yet to date only 3 (2%) of the species have been examined for coccidia, and from these only four species of Eimeria Schneider, 1875 have been described. In this study, a new coccidian species (Protozoa: Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) obtained from the blue-and-yellow macaw Ara ararauna (Linnaeus) is reported from Brazil. Oöcysts of Eimeria ararae n. sp. are ovoidal, measure 28.7 × 20.2 ?m and have a smooth, bi-layered wall c.1.1 ?m thick. Both micropyle and oöcyst residuum are absent, but polar granules are present. Sporocysts are ovoidal and measure 17.0 × 8.3 µm, with knob-like, prominent Stieda body and sporocyst residuum is composed of granules; sub-Stieda body is absent. Sporozoites are vermiform with one refractile body and a nucleus. This is the fifth description of an eimerid coccidian infecting a New World psittaciform bird. PMID:24832188

do Bomfim Lopes, Bruno; Berto, Bruno Pereira; de Carvalho Balthazar, Lianna Maria; Coelho, Cleide Domingues; Neves, Daniel Medeiros; Lopes, Carlos Wilson Gomes

2014-06-01

294

Cryptic patterns of diversification of a widespread Amazonian woodcreeper species complex (Aves: Dendrocolaptidae) inferred from multilocus phylogenetic analysis: implications for historical biogeography and taxonomy.  

PubMed

Inferring evolutionary relationships between recently diverged taxa is still challenging, especially taking into account the likely occurrence of incomplete lineage sorting and/or introgression. The Xiphorhynchus pardalotus/ocellatus species complex includes between two to three polytypic species and eight to nine subspecies distributed throughout most of lowland Amazonia and the foothills of the eastern Andes. To understand its historical diversification and address the main unsettled issues of phylogenetic relationships and taxonomy, we apply several approaches using data from two mitochondrial (Cyt b and ND2) and three nuclear genes (?-fibint7, CPZint3 and CRYAAint1) for all described species and most subspecies of this complex. We compared single gene trees with a multilocus concatenated tree and Bayesian species tree inferred under a coalescent framework ((*)BEAST). Our results showed a general pattern of incongruence among gene trees and multilocus trees. Despite of this, the coalescent-based species tree analysis supports the sister-taxa relationship of X. ocellatus and X. chunchotambo, while X. pardalotus comes out as the basal taxon. With exception of the last, our results revealed within both X. ocellatus and X. chunchotambo high levels of genetic differentiation (p-distances 0.5-5.5%) with well-supported lineages. Our phylogenetic analyses showed several incongruences with current subspecies taxonomy, revealing that X. o. ocellatus is paraphyletic relative to X. o. perplexus, and the currently recognized subspecies X. c. napensis corresponds to two distinct evolutionary lineages, which are not supported as sister-lineages. In addition, the deep level of genetic divergence between X. o. beauperthuysii and the extant subspecies of X. ocellatus is more consistent with species-level differences found in this complex. Divergence time estimates were consistent with a historical scenario of intense population subdivision and speciation during the Early-mid Pleistocene. The spatial pattern and timing of diversification overlap broadly with that reported for other Amazonian vertebrate lineages. PMID:23643970

Sousa-Neves, Tiago; Aleixo, Alexandre; Sequeira, Fernando

2013-09-01

295

Phylogenetics of a recent radiation in the mallards and allies (Aves: Anas): inferences from a genomic transect and the multispecies coalescent.  

PubMed

Reconstructing species trees by incorporating information from many independent gene trees reduces the confounding influence of stochastic lineage sorting. Such analyses are particularly important for taxa that share polymorphisms due to incomplete lineage sorting or introgressive hybridization. We investigated phylogenetic relationships among 14 closely related taxa from the mallard (Anas spp.) complex using the multispecies coalescent and 20 nuclear loci sampled from a genomic transect. We also examined how treating recombining loci and hybridizing species influences results by partitioning the data using various protocols. In general, topologies were similar among the various species trees, with major clades consistently composed of the same taxa. However, relationships among these clades and among taxa within clades changed among partitioned data sets. Posterior support generally decreased when filtering for recombination, whereas excluding mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) increased posterior support for taxa known to hybridize with them. Furthermore, branch lengths decreased substantially for recombination-filtered data. Finally, concordance between nuclear and morphometric topologies conflicted with those in the mitochondrial tree, particularly with regard to the placement of the Hawaiian duck (A. wyvilliana), Philippine duck (A. luzonica), and two spot-billed ducks (A. zonorhyncha and A. poecilorhyncha). These results demonstrate the importance of maximizing sequence length and taxon sampling when inferring taxonomic relationships that are confounded by extensive allele sharing. PMID:23994490

Lavretsky, Philip; McCracken, Kevin G; Peters, Jeffrey L

2014-01-01

296

New evidence of Ara autochthones from an archeological site in Puerto Rico: a valid species of West Indian macaw of unknown geographical origin (Aves: Psittacidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The exinct macaw Ara autochthones, previously known only from a single bone from an archaeological site on St. Croix, Virgin Islands, is here identified from several associated bones from an archaeological site in south-central Puerto Rico. The species belongs to a distinctive intermediate size-class and was larger than the Cuban Macaw Ara tricolor. It is assumed to have been endemic

STORES L. OLSON

297

Mitochondrial control region I and microsatellite analyses of endangered Philippine hornbill species (Aves; Bucerotidae) detect gene flow between island populations and genetic diversity loss  

PubMed Central

Background The Visayan Tarictic Hornbill (Penelopides panini) and the Walden’s Hornbill (Aceros waldeni) are two threatened hornbill species endemic to the western islands of the Visayas that constitute - between Luzon and Mindanao - the central island group of the Philippine archipelago. In order to evaluate their genetic diversity and to support efforts towards their conservation, we analyzed genetic variation in ~ 600 base pairs (bp) of the mitochondrial control region I and at 12–19 nuclear microsatellite loci. The sampling covered extant populations, still occurring only on two islands (P. panini: Panay and Negros, A. waldeni: only Panay), and it was augmented with museum specimens of extinct populations from neighboring islands. For comparison, their less endangered (= more abundant) sister taxa, the Luzon Tarictic Hornbill (P. manillae) from the Luzon and Polillo Islands and the Writhed Hornbill (A. leucocephalus) from Mindanao Island, were also included in the study. We reconstructed the population history of the two Penelopides species and assessed the genetic population structure of the remaining wild populations in all four species. Results Mitochondrial and nuclear data concordantly show a clear genetic separation according to the island of origin in both Penelopides species, but also unravel sporadic over-water movements between islands. We found evidence that deforestation in the last century influenced these migratory events. Both classes of markers and the comparison to museum specimens reveal a genetic diversity loss in both Visayan hornbill species, P. panini and A. waldeni, as compared to their more abundant relatives. This might have been caused by local extinction of genetically differentiated populations together with the dramatic decline in the abundance of the extant populations. Conclusions We demonstrated a loss in genetic diversity of P. panini and A. waldeni as compared to their sister taxa P. manillae and A. leucocephalus. Because of the low potential for gene flow and population exchange across islands, saving of the remaining birds of almost extinct local populations - be it in the wild or in captivity - is particularly important to preserve the species’ genetic potential.

2012-01-01

298

The evolution of contact calls in isolated and overlapping populations of two white-eye congeners in East Africa (Aves, Zosterops)  

PubMed Central

Background Closely related species often occur in geographic isolation, yet sometimes form contact zones with the potential to hybridize. Pre-zygotic barriers may prevent cross breeding in such contact zones. In East Africa, White-eye birds have evolved into various species, inhabiting different habitat types. Zosterops poliogaster is found in cool and moist cloud forests at higher elevations, whereas Z. abyssinicus is distributed across the dry and hot lowland savannahs. In most areas, these two species occur allopatrically, but in the contact zone where the mountain meets the savannah, the distributions of these species sometimes overlap (parapatry), and in a few areas the two taxa occur sympatrically. Acoustic communication is thought to be an important species recognition mechanism in birds and an effective prezygotic barrier for hybridisation. We recorded contact calls of both the lowland and highland species in (i) distinct populations (allopatry), (ii) along contact zones (parapatry), and (iii) in overlapping populations (sympatry) to test for species and population differentiation. Results We found significant differences in call characteristics between the highland and lowland species, in addition to call differentiation within species. The highland Z. poliogaster shows a strong call differentiation among local populations, accompanied by comparatively low variability in their contact calls within populations (i.e. a small acoustic space). In contrast, calls of the lowland Z. abyssinicus are not differentiated among local sites but show relatively high variability in calls within single populations. Call patterns in both species show geographic clines in relation to latitude and longitude. Calls from parapatric populations from both species showed greater similarity to the other taxon in comparison to heterospecific populations found in allopatry. However, where the two species occur sympatrically, contact calls of both species are more distinct from each other than in either allopatric or parapatric populations. Conclusion The contrasting patterns reflect divergent spatial distributions: the highland Z. poliogaster populations are highly disjunct, while Z. abyssinicus lowland populations are interconnected. Higher similarity in contact calls of heterospecific populations might be due to intermixing. In contrast, sympatric populations show reproductive character displacement which leads to strongly divergent call patterns.

2014-01-01

299

Phylogeny of Amazona barbadensis and the Yellow-Headed Amazon Complex (Aves: Psittacidae): A New Look at South American Parrot Evolution  

PubMed Central

The Yellow-shouldered Amazon (Amazona barbadensis) is the sole parrot of the genus Amazona that inhabits only dry forests. Its population has been dropping; therefore it has been the topic of many studies and conservation efforts. However, the phylogenetic relationship of this species to potential relatives classified within the Yellow-Headed Amazon (YHA) complex are still not clear. Therefore, we used more extensive data sets, including the newly sequenced mitochondrial genome of A. barbadensis, to conduct phylogenetic analyses. Various combinations of genes and many phylogenetic approaches showed that A. barbadensis clustered significantly with A. ochrocephala ochrocephala from Colombia and Venezuela, which created the Northern South American (NSA) lineage, clearly separated from two other lineages within the YHA complex, the Central (CA) and South American (SA). Tree topology tests and exclusion of rapidly evolving sites provided support for a NSA+SA grouping. We propose an evolutionary scenario for the YHA complex and its colonization of the American mainland. The NSA lineage likely represents the most ancestral lineage, which derived from Lesser Antillean Amazons and colonized the northern coast of Venezuela about a million years ago. Then, Central America was colonized through the Isthmus of Panama, which led to the emergence of the CA lineage. The southward expansion to South America and the origin of the SA lineage happened almost simultaneously. However, more intensive or prolonged gene flow or migrations have led to much weaker geographic differentiation of genetic markers in the SA than in the CA lineage.

Strzala, Tomasz

2014-01-01

300

Diet of the Fuscous Flycatcher Cnemotriccus fuscatus (Wied, 1831) - Aves, Tyrannidae - in three habitats of the northern Pantanal, Mato Grosso, Brazil.  

PubMed

The Fuscous Flycatcher (Cnemotriccus fuscatus) is a medium-sized Tyrannidae widespread in South America. Despite its large distribution, there have been very few studies on its diet, especially in different habitats. This study presents data on diet variation in three habitats in the Pantanal wetlands in the state of Mato Grosso, Brazil. The specimens were captured through a mist-netting programme between February 2000 and May 2010, in the Retiro Novo Farm, in the Poconé municipality. Birds were captured in three vegetation types: Landizal, Cambarazal and Cordilheira. Tartar emetic was used to obtain the regurgitation samples identified at order level. We captured 61 individuals (21, 26 and 14 in the above described habitats, respectively). Diet of C. fuscatus differed between the three habitats. Ants and beetles were the most relevant prey items either in numerical frequency (NF) or in frequency of occurrence (OF), in terms of the overall diet (NF = 27.34% and 37.89%; OF = 36.06% and 75.4%, respectively). However, in Cordilheira, seeds and beetles dominated the NF (21.8% and 38.1%, respectively) and OF (28.5% and 85.7%, respectively). Cnemotriccus fuscatus was found to have an omnivorous diet, although in Cambarazal, individuals preyed exclusively on arthropods. The present study provides an important contribution to the knowledge of the diet of a poorly studied Neotropical bird. PMID:24789401

Gaiotti, Mg; Pinho, Jb

2013-11-01

301

Convective Inhibition as a Predictor of the Outbreak of Convection in AVE-SESAME II (Severe Environmental Storms and Mesoscale Experiment).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In this paper, one data set from the Sever Environmental Storms and Mesosclae Experiment (SESAME) is examined. The case involves a squall line which developed in a region of weak convergence. Both observational analysis and modeling are used to determine ...

F. P. Colby

1983-01-01

302

Differentiation of Z and W chromosomes revealed by replication banding and FISH mapping of sex-chromosome-linked DNA markers in the cassowary (Aves, Ratitae).  

PubMed

We identified sex chromosomes of the double-wattled cassowary (Casuarius casuarius) by a replication banding method. The acrocentric Z chromosome, the fifth largest pair in males and slightly smaller W chromosome show no sign of heterochromatinization and share a nearly identical banding pattern in the distal half of the long arm. These chromosomes were further characterized by FISH with three probes linked either to Z or W chromosome in most avian species examined thus far. Contrary to the situation in the chicken, we obtained positive signals with Z-specific ZOV3 and W-specific EEO.6 in the distal region of both Z and W chromosomes. However, IREBP signals localized to the proximal half of the Z chromosome were not detected on the W chromosome. Thus, structural rearrangements such as deletions and inversions might have been the initial step of W chromosome differentiation from an ancestral homomorphic pair in this species. PMID:10628664

Nishida-Umehara, C; Fujiwara, A; Ogawa, A; Mizuno, S; Abe, S; Yoshida, M C

1999-01-01

303

First molecular characterization of a Hepatozoon species (Apicomplexa: Hepatozoidae) infecting birds and description of a new species infecting storm petrels (Aves: Hydrobatidae).  

PubMed

During a survey of blood parasites in a population of Leach's and black storm petrels ( Oceanodroma leucorhoa and Oceanodroma melania) in Mexico, infection by a Hepatozoon species in erythrocytes of several birds was noted. Here we describe the species as Hepatozoon peircei sp. nov. Some species of Hepatozoon described from birds have been identified as lankesterellids when DNA molecular analyses were conducted. However, a sequence of 1,774 bp of the parasite found infecting storm petrels in this study clearly show the parasite is a species of the genus Hepatozoon. This is the first Hepatozoon species infecting birds to be characterized at the molecular level and the first found infecting erythrocytes and not leucocytes. PMID:24926864

Merino, Santiago; Martínez, Javier; Masello, Juan F; Bedolla, Yuliana; Quillfeldt, Petra

2014-06-01

304

Limited phylogenetic distribution of a long tandem-repeat cluster in the mitochondrial control region in Bubo (Aves, Strigidae) and cluster variation in Blakiston's fish owl (Bubo blakistoni).  

PubMed

To investigate the phylogenetic position of Blakiston's fish owl (Bubo blakistoni), we sequenced the mitochondrial (mt) DNA control region and cytochrome b (cyt b) for nine Bubo species. Maximum-likelihood analyses of combined control region and cyt b sequences, and cyt b sequences alone, showed that species formerly placed in genus Ketupa comprise a monophyletic group. Unexpectedly, we discovered a long cluster of 20-25 tandem repeat units 77 or 78bp long in the third control region domain in four of the nine Bubo species for which the control region was sequenced (B. blakistoni, B. flavipes, and B. ketupu in the Ketupa clade; B. lacteus), leading to overall control region lengths of 3.0-3.8kpb estimated from agarose gel electrophoresis. The control region in B. lacteus is the longest (3.8kbp) reported to date in vertebrates. Sequencing of eight repeat units at each end of the cluster in 20 B. blakistoni individuals detected several types of repeat units 77 or 78bp long, and six patterns in the order of unit types. The occurrence of a repeat cluster in all three species examined in the Ketupa clade suggests their common ancestor also had a cluster, whereas a maximum parsimony tree showed repeat-unit types grouping by species, rather than by paralog groups, suggesting independent origins of the clusters. We reconcile these results with a turnover model, in which the range in cluster-length variation and unit types at the 5' end are hypothetically functionally constrained by the protein-binding function of the control region, but otherwise there is a continual turnover of units in evolutionary time, with new unit types arising through mutations, proliferating by duplication of single and double repeat blocks, and being lost through deletion. Estimated free energies for reconstructed secondary structures of single and especially pairs of repeat units were higher than for homologous single-unit blocks in species lacking a repeat cluster, supporting slipped-strand mispairing as the mechanism of cluster turnover. PMID:23211719

Omote, Keita; Nishida, Chizuko; Dick, Matthew H; Masuda, Ryuichi

2013-03-01

305

On the Promotion System of the Utilization and Application of Educational Media in Regions Responding to the Changing Society. AVE in Japan No. 36.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet contains the report of the Educational Media Sub-Committee (Japan) on a new way of distributing a media-based learning system in regional communities. Highlights of the report include: (1) new movements in the utilization of educational media, including basic tendencies in the establishment of educational media, trends of educational…

Japan Audio-Visual Education Association, Tokyo.

306

DNA sequence analysis to guide the release of blue-and-yellow macaws (Ara ararauna, Psittaciformes, Aves) from the illegal trade back into the wild.  

PubMed

The illegal wildlife trade is one of the major threats to Brazil's biodiversity. Approximately 80 % of illegally captured animals are birds, and 4 % of those are parrots. Although many seized birds do not survive, those that are recovered may be returned to the wild. The release of seized individuals into the wild should be conducted with caution, as local populations may suffer adverse effects if genetically different individuals are introduced. In this study, we evaluated the genetic relationships between 13 illegally captured blue-and-yellow macaws selected for release in northeastern Goiás, Brazil, and previously studied Brazilian macaw populations. We identified the seized macaws that were genetically similar to those from northwestern Goiás and that were therefore most suitable for release in that area. The genetic relationship was evaluated by sequence analysis of 403 bp of mitochondrial DNA control region. Relationships between mitochondrial haplotypes were computed via a median-joining network. Only six of the seized macaws were closely related to the macaws of northeastern Goiás, indicating that those macaws were potential candidates for release in that area. However, the release of these birds should follow all technical recommendations required by the Brazilian environmental authorities. PMID:23184047

Fernandes, Gislaine A; Caparroz, Renato

2013-03-01

307

A phylogeny for the Cisticolidae (Aves: Passeriformes) based on nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequence data, and a re-interpretation of an unique nest-building specialization  

Microsoft Academic Search

Based on some general similarities in feeding adaptations, a large number of Old World passerine birds were in the past lumped in one broad family, the Sylviidae. Recent molecular studies, starting with the DNA–DNA hybridization work by Sibley et al. [Sibley, C.G., Ahlquist, J.E., 1990. Phylogeny and Classification of Birds: A Study in Molecular Evolution, Yale University Press, New Haven,

Billy Nguembock; Jon Fjeldså; Annie Tillier; Eric Pasquet

2007-01-01

308

Primobucco mcgrewi (Aves: Coracii) from the Eocene Green River Formation: new anatomical data from the earliest constrained record of stem rollers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Eocene Green River Formation provides one of the richest records of fossil birds worldwide. As part of a reevaluation of this avifauna, we describe 12 new specimens of the stem roller Primobucco mcgrewi from the well-dated (51.66 ± 0.09 Ma) Fossil Butte Member (FBM) of the Green River Formation of Wyoming. FBM specimens represent most of avian diversity in

Daniel T. Ksepka; Julia A. Clarke

2010-01-01

309

Well-preserved new skeleton of the Middle Eocene Messelastur substantiates sister group relationship between Messelasturidae and Halcyornithidae (Aves, ?Pan-Psittaciformes)  

Microsoft Academic Search

A virtually uncrushed skeleton of Messelastur gratulator from the Middle Eocene of Messel (Germany) is described, which for the first time preserves the feet of this poorly known avian species. The new fossil corroborates a close relationship between Messelastur and the early Eocene Tynskya eocaena, from which M. gratulator differs in its more raptor-like feet. The specimen further shows that

Gerald Mayr

2011-01-01

310

A giant flightless pigeon gen. et sp. nov. and a new species of Ducula (Aves: Columbidae), from Quaternary deposits in Fiji  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new genus and species are erected for a giant flightless pigeon described from post?cranial fossil bones from four Quaternary sites on Viti Levu, Fiji, in the South Pacific Lack of cranial material and transformations associated with large size and loss of flight obscure its relationships, but some characters of the tarsometatarsus, tibiotarsus, and humerus are closer to Goura than

T. H. Worthy

2001-01-01

311

Development and multiplex PCR amplification of novel microsatellite markers in the White-tailed Sea Eagle, Haliaeetus albicilla (Aves: Falconiformes, Accipitridae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report the development of 14 novel polymorphic microsatellite markers cloned from the White-tailed Sea Eagle, Haliaeetus albicilla , a formerly threatened raptor that has received much conservation attention throughout Eurasia. We also present a protocol for multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the loci. Among 40 unrelated H. albicilla individuals from southern Sweden, the markers produced two to

FRANK HAILER; BARBARA GAUTSCHI; BJORN HELANDER

2005-01-01

312

Organochlorine residues and shell thickness in eggs of the clapper rail, common gallinule, purple gallinule, and limpkin (Class Aves), eastern and southern United States, 1972-74  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Organochlorine residues and shell thicknesses were surveyed in eggs of the clapper rail (Rallus longirostris), purple gallinule (Porphyrula martinica), common gallinule (Gallinula chloropas), and limpkin (Aramus guarauna) from the eastern and southern United States. Clapper rail eggs were collected during 1972-73 in New Jersey, Virginia, and South Carolina. During 1973-74, gallinule eggs were collected in Florida, South Carolina, and Louisiana, and limpkin eggs were collected in Florida. Egg contents were analyzed for residues of organochlorine pesticides, including DDT, TDE, DDE, dieldrin, mirex, heptachlor epoxide, oxychlordane, cis-chlordane (and/or trans-nonachlor), cis-nonachlor, hexachlorobenzene (HCB), toxaphene, and endrin, and for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Shell thicknesses of recent eggs of these species were compared with archival eggs that had been collected before 1947. With the exception of the limpkin, the majority of eggs analyzed contained residues of p,p'-DDE and PCBs. Geometric means ranged from 0.10 ppm to 1.3 ppm. Small amounts (less than 1.0 ppm) of mirex, dieldrin, cis-chlordane (and/or trans-nonachlor), TDE, and DDT were detected in a few eggs. No evidence of eggshell thinning was found for any of the species studied. DDE residues in clapper rail eggs were higher in New Jersey and Virginia than in South Carolina.

Klaas, E.E.; Ohlendorf, H.M.; Cromartie, E.

1980-01-01

313

Crianza Practica de Aves (Practical Poultry Raising). Appropriate Technologies for Development. Peace Corps Information Collection & Exchange Manual Series [No.] M-34.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Written in Spanish, this manual is designed to provide development workers with the information and tools needed to begin or to improve poultry production. Covered in the individual chapters are the following topics: the nature and scope of poultry production, assessment of local poultry selections, basic information about chickens, country…

French, Kenneth M.

314

Organization of the Biosynthetic Gene Cluster for the Polyketide Anthelmintic Macrolide Avermectin in Streptomyces avermitilis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Analysis of the gene cluster from Streptomyces avermitilis that governs the biosynthesis of the polyketide anthelmintic avermectin revealed that it contains four large ORFs encoding giant multifunctional polypeptides of the avermectin polyketide synthase (AVES 1, AVES 2, AVES 3, and AVES 4). These clustered polyketide synthase genes responsible for avermectin biosynthesis together encode 12 homologous sets of enzyme activities (modules),

Haruo Ikeda; Tomoko Nonomiya; Masayo Usami; Toshio Ohta; Satoshi Omura

1999-01-01

315

Synthesis, characterization and antimicrobial studies of mixed ligand silver(I) complexes of triphenylphosphine and heterocyclic thiones: Crystal structure of bis[{(? 2-diazinane-2-thione)(diazinane-2-thione)(triphenylphosphine)silver(I) nitrate}  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mixed ligand silver(I) complexes of triphenylphosphine and heterocyclic thiones (imidazolidine-2-thione (Imt), diazinane-2-thione (Diaz) and 2-mercaptopyridine (Mpy)) having the general formulae [(Ph3P)Ag(thione)2]NO3 and [(Ph3P)2Ag(thione)]NO3 were prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, IR and NMR (1H, 13C and 31P) spectroscopic methods. The crystal structure of one of the complexes, [Ag(Ph3P)(Diaz)2]2(NO3)2 (1) was determined by X-ray crystallography. The title complex (1) is dinuclear,

Sidra Nawaz; Anvarhusein A. Isab; Klaus Merz; Vera Vasylyeva; Nils Metzler-Nolte; Muhammad Saleem; Saeed Ahmad

2011-01-01

316

Discovering Creativity. Proceedings of the International Creativity & Innovation Networking Conference (6th, Greensboro, North Carolina, September 1992).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The conference proceedings contain the following papers: "Hard Organizational Development" (Anthony); "Positive Impact of Humor in the Workplace or TQM (Total Quality Mirth) in Organizations" (Collier); "Introducing the Integrated Programme for the Creative Training of Leaders" (Diaz-Carrera); "Vision of Quality versus the Quality Vision" (Green);…

Gryskiewicz, Stanley S., Ed.

317

Science and Technology Review. A Nanoscience Approach to Fighting Bioterrorism.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This month's issue has the following articles: (1) 'A Multidisciplinary Attack on Bioterrorism'--Commentary by Tomas Diaz de la Rubia. (2) 'Life at the Nanoscale'--Livermore researchers are exploring the molecules of life at the nanoscale to fight bioterr...

2004-01-01

318

A Bishop's Description of the Christianized Indians of Spanish Florida, 1675. Lesson Plan.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides a lesson centered on excerpts from a 1675 letter from the bishop of Cuba, Gabriel Diaz Vara Calderon, to Queen Mariana of Spain that describes life in Spanish Florida missions. Includes a list of questions and excerpts from the letter. (CMK)

Cowdrey, Peter A., Jr.

2000-01-01

319

Monitoring for Temporal Changes in Soil Salinity using Electromagnetic Induction Techniques  

Microsoft Academic Search

struments have received the most attention for field- scale agricultural applications, particularly the EM-38. Electromagnetic induction surveys are often used in practice to In 1992, Diaz and Herrero discussed the monitoring estimate field-scale soil salinity patterns, and to infer changing salinity of soil salinity conditions with time in two fields using conditions with time. We developed a statistical monitoring strategy

S. M. Lesch; J. D. Rhoades; J. Herrero

1998-01-01

320

Grand Conversations across Texts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This issue of "School Talk" brings together the ideas of purposefulness and intertextuality together in a teaching practice called intentional intertextual inquiry. "Making Inquiry Intentional and Intertextual" (Karen Smith, Sarah Diaz, and Silvia Edgerton) discusses the framework that combines inquiry-based learning and intertextuality within…

Crafton, Linda K., Ed.; Johnson, Nancy J., Ed.

2008-01-01

321

Asthma & Physical Activity in the School  

MedlinePLUS

... Diaz-Sanchez, Ph.D. David Rowson, M.S. Alisa Smith, Ph.D. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Virginia S. Taggart, ... her daily long-term control medication, if prescribed. • YELLOW ZONE = Caution. The yellow zone means that the ...

322

Interview no. 368  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nacio en Arriaga (Sierra Panjano) en la tribu Otomin; padre, trabajador de campo; madre, quehaceres domesticos; tuvo 24 hermanos; no tuvo escuela; vivia en cuevas; trabajo desde nino; habla del gobierno, economia, etc. de su tribu; su alistamiento en el ejercito; recuerda la entrevista Taft y Diaz de 1909; su encuentro con Francisco Villa; pertenecio al Segundo Batallon de Porfirio

Jose Ramirez G

1979-01-01

323

Effects of diesel exhaust on influenza-induced nasal inflammation  

EPA Science Inventory

Title: Effects of Diesel Exhaust on Influenza-Induced Nasal Inflammation T L Noah, MD1,2, K Horvath, BS3, C Robinette, RN2, 0 Diaz Sanchez, PhD4 and I Jaspers, PhD1,2. 1UNC Dept. of Pediatrics, United States; 2UNC Center for Environmental Medicine, Asthma and Lung Biology, ...

324

Interview no. 366  

Microsoft Academic Search

Born near Dona Ana, New Mexico, in Shalam Colony (home for orphan children run by his family): family history; childhood and school recollections in El Paso (came to El Paso in 1903); experiences as a paper boy in South El Paso, later as a messenger boy for BH&SA railroad; Diaz-Taft meeting in 1909; brief comments on the Mexican Revolution; Juarez

Richard C. Vandewater

1979-01-01

325

Use of Wildfire Smoke Forcasting Model to Mitigate Burden on a Population's Health and Wellbeing Presentation for International Society of Environmental Epidemiology meeting  

EPA Science Inventory

Use of Wildfire Smoke Forecasting Model to Mitigate Burden on a Population’s Health and Wellbeing Ana G. Rappold, Neal Fann, Wayne E. Cascio, Robert B. Devlin, David Diaz-Sanchez Background Wildfires are a major source of fine particular matter and other air pollutants as...

326

STS-46 Special Events Resource Tape, Part 1 of 2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Footage shows the inflight interviews of the crew of the STS-46 Atlantis Orbiter. An Italian VIP call and press conference (both spoken in Italian) are seen, and Mission Specialist Franklin R. Chang-Diaz participates in a Costa Rican VIP call (spoken in Spanish). See also 'STS-46 Special Events Resource Tape, Part 2 of 2'.

1992-01-01

327

STS-91: Flight Crew Meets with Family and Friends at Launch Complex 39A  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The crew (Commander Charles J. Precourt, Pilot Dominic L. Pudwill Gorie, Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, Janet L. Kavandi and Valery Victorovitch Ryumin) take time from their busy schedule to chat with friends and family, at a distance. They also pose for group and single pictures.

1998-01-01

328

Science and Technology Review.July/August 2006. Understanding Shocked Materials.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Experiments at the Scale of Simulations--Commentary by Tomas Diaz de la Rubia; (2) A New Realm of Materials Science--Livermore scientists are combining experiment, theory, and simulation to study the resp...

H. B. Radousky

2006-01-01

329

Improving International Relations: Is There a Role for Community Colleges?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents essays by five prominent public servants/educators discussing the role of community colleges in enhancing international/intercultural understanding and global cooperation. Authors are Carlos Diaz, political science instructor; Gerhard Hess, international studies director; Daniel Inouye, U.S. Senator; Stephen Nicholson, college president;…

Diaz, Carlos F.; And Others

1985-01-01

330

Folk Media in Development.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This issue is dedicated to folk media. Using Indonesia for his case study, Dr. Nat Colletta analyzes traditional culture as a medium for development. Juan Diaz Bordenave expresses doubts about adapting folk media to development objectives; Susan Hostetler and Arthur Gillette report on uses of the theater to promote development objectives; and…

Instructional Technology Report, 1975

1975-01-01

331

Levantamento bibliografico de trabalhos realizados sobre aves, peixes e produtos de peixe, especiarias e condimentos irradiados. (Bibliographic review of works accomplished about irradiated chicken, fish and fish products , spices and condiments).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Table of foods that can be irradiated and its respective nominal doses are shown. Bibliographic reviews of works performed about irradiated chicken, fish and fish products, spices and condiments are shown. The irradiation purpose in chicken were to increa...

B. Bernardes M. Dias Filho

1983-01-01

332

Measurement of CH_3D Absorption Cross Sections, Pressure Broadening, and Shft Coefficients in the 1.65 ?m Spectral Region by Using Continuous Ave Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Quantitative spectroscopy of CH_3D in the near-IR is of importance for an ongoing project to build an instrument to measure the H/D isotopic ratio of methane gas. Continuous-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) has been used to examine the absorption cross sections, the pressure-broadening and pressure-shift coefficients at around 1652 nm. The absorption cross sections of CH_3D were quantified in the wavenumber region between 6046 and 6060 Cm-1. The maximum peak is located at 6055.17 Cm-1, which gives (8.58 ± 0.37) × 10-21 cm^2/molecule at the total pressure of ˜ 8.2 Torr of the N_2 buffer gas. By using the small step size of the laser wavenumber scan, we measured the pressure-broadening effects, and the pressure-shift effects, on CH_4 and CH_3D absorption lines. The N_2, O_2 and CO_2 pressure broadening coefficients of CH_3D are 0.058, 0.054 and 0.049 Cm-1/atm, respectively, at the wavenumber we employed. Under the experimental conditions we used, N_2 and O_2 have very similar pressure broadening effects, and their effects on CH_3D is very similar to those of CH_4. At the wavenumber we employed, the same values of N_2 and O_2 pressure-shift coefficient , - 0.012 Cm-1/atm, and a little higher value of CO_2, - 0.013 Cm-1/atm, were found.

Tang, Yongxin; Yang, Shaoyue L.; Lehmann, Kevin K.; Benner, D. Chris

2011-06-01

333

County: Bannock Station # 253 District: 05 Route: STC 7141 Ascending Direction: East Segment Code and Milepost: 003200 000.560 200 Feet West of Yellowstone Ave, Pocatello (Maple Street) Volumes and Percent of Daily Traffic  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hour Volume % of day Volume % of day Volume % of day Volume % of day Volume % of day Volume % of day Volume % of day Volume % of day Volume % of day Volume % of day 0:00 28 1.5% 9 0.2% 17 0.4% 16 0.3% 15 0.3% 17 0.4% 32 1.0% 14 0.3% 30 1.2%

Sunday Monday

2007-01-01

334

LEVELS OF IMMUNOGLOBULIN-A IN TRACHEA, GUT AND BILE SAMPLES OF CHICKENS VACCINATED AGAINST NEWCASTLE DISEASE. Niveles de inmunoglobulina A en muestras de tráquea, intestino y bilis provenientes de aves vacunadas contra la enfermedad de Newcastle  

Microsoft Academic Search

Immunoglobulin-A (IgA) response to Newcastle diseases virus (NDV) vaccination was assessed using enzyme-linked immu- nosorbent assay. Total and NDV specific IgA levels were de- termined in tracheal washings, intestinal washings and bile. Chickens were primed with an in ovo recombinant avian adeno-associated vaccine coding for the NDV hemagglutinin- neuraminidase gene (rAAAV) and revaccinated with B1 or La- Sota strains of

Francisco Perozo; Giovanny Finol; Yaneth Mavárez

335

County: Ada Station # 080 District: 03 Route: SMA 7643 Ascending Direction: North Segment Code and Milepost: 002140 004.144 0.5 Miles South of Warm Springs Ave, Boise (Eckert Road) Volumes and Percent of Daily Traffic  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hour Volume % of day Volume % of day Volume % of day Volume % of day Volume % of day Volume % of day Volume % of day Volume % of day Volume % of day Volume % of day 0:00 29 1.0% 14 0.4% 9 0.2% 14 0.4% 34 0.9% 16 0.4% 25 0.7% 18 0.5% 27 0.9%

Sunday Monday

2009-01-01

336

The dating of the ornithological section of Middendorff's Reise in den äussersten Norden und Osten Sibiriens, with comments on the nomenclature of Pallas's Bunting Emberiza pallasi Cabanis (Aves: Emberizidae).  

PubMed

Middendorff's work on the Säugethiere, Vögel und Amphibien, published as part 2 of volume 2 of his Reise in den äussersten Norden und Osten Sibiriens, was variably dated from 1851, 1852 or 1853. I document that the work was published shortly before 15 December 1852 and I recommend using this date for the purposes of zoological nomenclature.Due to this, Emberiza polaris Middendorff, 1852 has precedence over Cynchramus pallasi Cabanis, 1853. This bunting species thus should be called Emberiza polaris and its four subspecies should be called Emberiza polaris polaris Middendorff, 1852, E. polaris minor Middendorff, 1852, E. polaris pallasi (Cabanis, 1853) and E. polaris lydiae Portenko, 1929.  PMID:24870494

Mlíkovský, Ji?í

2014-01-01

337

77 FR 32133 - National Register of Historic Places; Notification of Pending Nominations and Related Actions  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...County Osler Building, 1200 N. Walker Ave., Oklahoma City, 12000347 Tulsa County Whittier Square Historic District, (Route 66 and Associated Resources in Oklahoma AD MPS) Roughly between Lewis, & Zunis Aves., E. 1st St., & I-244,...

2012-05-31

338

77 FR 4400 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Jorge Andres FERNANDEZ CARBAJAL, 2 Calle 6AVE, Barrio El Centro San Pedro Sula, Cortes, Honduras, Registration RUC...Jorge Andres FERNANDEZ CARBAJAL, 2 Calle 6AVE, Barrio El Centro San Pedro Sula, Cortes, Honduras, Registration...

2012-01-27

339

77 FR 56630 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Officer, Chief Information Office, 6916 Cooper Avenue, Fort Meade, MD 20755-7901...Information Office (CIO), 6916 Cooper Ave., Ft. Meade, MD 20755-7901...Chief Information Office (CIO), 6916 Cooper Ave., Fort Meade, MD...

2012-09-13

340

78 FR 46929 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Officer, Chief Information Office, 6916 Cooper Avenue, Fort Meade, MD 20755-7901...Operations (COOP), OPS/GO51, 6910 Cooper Ave, Fort Meade, MD 20755-7901...Operations (COOP), OPS/GO51, 6910 Cooper Ave, Fort Meade, MD...

2013-08-02

341

78 FR 45184 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Officer, Chief Information Office, 6916 Cooper Avenue, Fort Meade, MD 20755-7901...Chief Information Office (CIO), 6916 Cooper Ave., Ft. Meade, MD 20755-7901...Chief Information Office (CIO), 6916 Cooper Ave, Fort Meade, MD...

2013-07-26

342

76 FR 40092 - Department Regulatory Agenda; Semiannual Summary  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...MC-PRR), 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE...rulemaking for development of a single...Administration, 1200 New Jersey Ave., SE...Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation...Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation, 1200 New Jersey Ave.,...

2011-07-07

343

76 FR 56156 - Application(s) for Duty-Free Entry of Scientific Instruments  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Commerce in Room 3720. Docket Number: 11-056. Applicant: Battelle Energy Alliance, 2525 North Freemont Ave., Idaho Falls...August 16, 2011. Docket Number: 11-057. Applicant: Battelle Energy Alliance, 2525 North Freemont Ave., Idaho...

2011-09-12

344

76 FR 18537 - Notice-Nationwide Categorical Waivers Under Section 1605 (Buy American) of the American Recovery...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Ave., Ste. 163, Lackland AFB, Tx 78236- 98612. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: Sharon Money, Contracting Officer, 772d ESS/ PKA, 2261 Hughes Ave., Ste. 163, Lackland AFB, Tx 78236-98612. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Section 1605 of the...

2011-04-04

345

76 FR 44309 - Notice of Intent To Grant a Partially Exclusive Patent License; TransMembrane Bioscience, Inc.  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Naval Medical Research Center, 503 Robert Grant Ave., Silver Spring, MD 20910-7500. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Roxanne Charles, Office of Legal and Technology Services, Naval Medical Research Center, 503 Robert Grant Ave., Silver...

2011-07-25

346

76 FR 21712 - Notice of Intent To Grant a Partially Exclusive Patent License; PopTest Cortisol LLC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Naval Medical Research Center, 503 Robert Grant Ave., Silver Spring, MD 20910-7500. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Roxanne Charles, Office of Legal and Technology Services, Naval Medical Research Center, 503 Robert Grant Ave., Silver...

2011-04-18

347

77 FR 25195 - National Register of Historic Places; Notification of Pending Nominations and Related Actions  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Downtown Historic District, Roughly bounded by N. McDonough St., E. Howard Ave., Hillyer, & Commercial Sts., & E. Ponce De Leon Ave., Decatur, 12000281 MICHIGAN Calhoun County Camp Custer Veterans Administration Hospital--United States...

2012-04-27

348

National Center On Deaf-Blindness  

MedlinePLUS

... Hall of Fame > NCDB : The Teaching Research Institute : Western Oregon University : 345 N. Monmouth Ave. : Monmouth, OR ... NCDB info@nationaldb.org : The Teaching Research Institute : Western Oregon University : 345 N. Monmouth Ave. : Monmouth, OR ...

349

76 FR 50494 - National Register of Historic Places; Notification of Pending Nominations and Related Actions  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...123 NE. 3rd Ave., Portland, 11000625 WASHINGTON King County Liggett Building, 1424 4th Ave., Seattle, 11000626 Pierce County Skansie, Andrew & Bertha, Net Shed and House, 3207 Harborview Dr., Gig Harbor, 11000627 [FR Doc....

2011-08-15

350

76 FR 70544 - OFAC Implementation of Certain Sanctions Imposed on Seven Persons by the Secretary of State...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...House, The Parade, St. Helier JE2 3QQ, Jersey; Ave. 54, Yimpash Business Center, No. 506, 507, Ashkhabad 744036, Turkmenistan; No. 21 End of 9th St, Gandi Ave, Tehran, Iran; 21, Africa Boulevard, Tehran, Iran; Registration ID 77283...

2011-11-14

351

31 CFR Appendix A to Part 560 - Persons Determined To Be the Government of Iran, as Defined in § 560.304 of This Part  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Lebanon; 2nd Floor, No 181 Makhtoomgholi Ave, Ashgabat, Turkmenistan; PO Box 4182, Almaktoum Rd, Dubai City, United Arab...Yimpash Business Center, No. 506, 507, Ashkhabad 744036, Turkmenistan; No. 21 End of 9th St, Gandi Ave, Tehran, Iran;...

2011-07-01

352

31 CFR Appendix A to Part 560 - Persons Determined To Be the Government of Iran, as Defined in § 560.304 of This Part  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Lebanon; 2nd Floor, No 181 Makhtoomgholi Ave, Ashgabat, Turkmenistan; PO Box 4182, Almaktoum Rd, Dubai City, United Arab...Yimpash Business Center, No. 506, 507, Ashkhabad 744036, Turkmenistan; No. 21 End of 9th St, Gandi Ave, Tehran, Iran;...

2012-07-01

353

76 FR 22917 - National Register of Historic Places; Notification of Pending Nominations and Related Actions  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Company 3, (Firehouses in Washington DC MPS) 1018 13th St., NW., Washington, 11000281...Company 22, (Firehouses in Washington DC MPS) 5760 Georgia Ave., NW., Washington...Company 26, (Firehouses in Washington DC MPS) 1340 Rhode Island Ave., NW.,...

2011-04-25

354

78 FR 58346 - National Register of Historic Places; Notification of Pending Nominations and Related Actions  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Park Field House, (Chicago Park District MPS), 2732 N. Avers Ave., Chicago, 13000830...Architectural Legacy of Proudfoot & Bird in Iowa MPS), 405 6th Ave., Des Moines, 13000829...Apartment Buildings in Kansas City, Missouri MPS), 4712 Roanoke Pkwy., Kansas...

2013-09-23

355

75 FR 49521 - National Register of Historic Places; Notification of Pending Nominations and Related Actions  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...School, (Public Schools of Detroit MPS) 10125 King Richard Ave, Detroit, 10000634...Edmund, School, (Public Schools of Detroit MPS) 4900 E Hildale Ave, Detroit, 10000635...School, (Public Schools of Detroit MPS) 8100 Curtis St., Detroit,...

2010-08-13

356

75 FR 14181 - National Register of Historic Places; Notification of Pending Nominations and Related Actions  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Historic District, (Chicago Bungalows MPS) Bounded roughly by S. Perry Ave...Historic Railroad Depots of Arkansas MPS) 200 SE Fifth St., Abilene, 10000177...Producers Produce Company Plant, (Springfield MPS) 501 N. Main Ave., Springfield,...

2010-03-24

357

78 FR 44149 - National Register of Historic Places; Notification of Pending Nominations and Related Actions  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...13000599 Monroe County Shantz Button Factory, 340 & 330 Rutgers St., 795 Monroe Ave., Rochester, 13000600 TEXAS Travis County German American Ladies College, 1604 E. 11th St., Austin, 13000601 Kappa Kappa Gamma House, 2001 University Ave.,...

2013-07-23

358

GRIPE AVIÁRIA - ALERTA E RESPONSABILIDADE (Influenza H5N1)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Os recentes casos de infecção pelo vírus influenza A aviária (H5N1), em criações de aves domésticas na Ásia, resultaram em importantes prejuízos econômicos e repercussões em saúde pública, além de casos de infecção humana de alta letalidade. A maioria dos casos está associada com a exposição direta a aves infectadas ou superfícies contaminadas com excrementos dessas aves. Controlar a ocorrência

Michel Carvalho Franco; Antonio Pasqualetto

359

76 FR 34648 - Tehama County Resource Advisory Committee  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...is to travel to and discuss current Tehama RAC projects for monitoring...comments received at 825 N. Humboldt Ave., Willows, CA 95988...Grindstone Ranger District, 825 N. Humboldt Ave, Willows, CA 95988...Grindstone Ranger District, 825 N. Humboldt Ave, Willows, CA 95988...

2011-06-14

360

77 FR 50929 - Security Zones; 2012 RNC Bridge Security Zones, Captain of the Port St. Petersburg Zone, Tampa, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Causeway/150th Ave); Seminole Bridge (Bay Pines Blvd./19/595); Johns Pass Bridge...Causeway/150th Ave); Seminole Bridge (Bay Pines Blvd./19/595); Johns Pass Bridge...150th Ave), (10) Seminole Bridge (Bay Pines Blvd./19/595), (11) Johns...

2012-08-23

361

STS-34 crewmembers train with the IMAX camera in JSC's Bldg 9B mockup area  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-34 crewmembers participate in IMAX camera training session held in JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9B. The crew is briefed on the operation and handling of the IMAX camera scheduled to fly aboard Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104. Standing behind the IMAX camera is Mission Specialist (MS) Franklin R. Chang-Diaz with IMAX instructors Grant Ferguson and David Douglas on his left. Commander Donald E. Williams (looking at IMAX lens) is at the right edge of the photo.

1989-01-01

362

Elementary teachers in a science inquiry study group: Concerns, uses, and reflections  

Microsoft Academic Search

Professional development is evolving into an ongoing learning process of self-disclosure, reflection, and growth that produces the best results when it is job-embedded over a period of time (Diaz-Maggioli, 2003). One promising approach to use is that of study groups (National Science Education Standards, 2006). A study group is a series of weekly sessions in which a small group of

Christina Hundzynski

2008-01-01

363

NASA Standard for Models and Simulations: Philosophy and Requirements Overview  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Following the Columbia Accident Investigation Board report, the NASA Administrator chartered an executive team (known as the Diaz Team) to identify those CAIB report elements with NASA-wide applicability and to develop corrective measures to address each element. One such measure was the development of a standard for the development, documentation, and operation of models and simulations. This report describes the philosophy and requirements overview of the resulting NASA Standard for Models and Simulations.

Blattnig, St3eve R.; Luckring, James M.; Morrison, Joseph H.; Sylvester, Andre J.; Tripathi, Ram K.; Zang, Thomas A.

2009-01-01

364

NASA Standard for Models and Simulations: Philosophy and Requirements Overview  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Following the Columbia Accident Investigation Board report, the NASA Administrator chartered an executive team (known as the Diaz Team) to identify those CAIB report elements with NASA-wide applicability and to develop corrective measures to address each element. One such measure was the development of a standard for the development, documentation, and operation of models and simulations. This report describes the philosophy and requirements overview of the resulting NASA Standard for Models and Simulations.

Blattnig, Steve R.; Luckring, James M.; Morrison, Joseph H.; Sylvester, Andre J.; Tripathi, Ram K.; Zang, Thomas A.

2013-01-01

365

?-Hydroxybutyric Acid Intake in Ethanol-preferring sP and -nonpreferring sNP Rats  

Microsoft Academic Search

COLOMBO, G., R. AGABIO, G. DIAZ, M. FÀ, C. LOBINA, R. REALI AND G. L. GESSA. ?-Hydroxybutyric acid intake in ethanol-preferring sP and -nonpreferring sNP rats. Physiol Behav 64(2) 197–202, 1998. ?-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) and ethanol share several pharmacological similarities, suggesting that GHB may exert ethanol-like effects in the central nervous system. The present study was designed to test whether

Giancarlo Colombo; Roberta Agabio; Giacomo Diaz; Mauro Fà; Carla Lobina; Roberta Reali; Gian Luigi Gessa

1998-01-01

366

Study of Zernike polynomials of an elliptical aperture obscured with an elliptical obscuration: reply.  

PubMed

In our previous paper [Appl. Opt.51, 8490 (2012)] we considered the Zernike polynomials for a unit annular ellipse aperture. In that paper many equations were used and were solved by MATLAB language and by hand, and many times these rewritten equations had some written mistakes. In the Diaz and Mahajan comment [Appl. Opt.52, 5962 (2013)] on the work, some remarks were true and others were not. In this reply, we will discuss their comment in detail. PMID:24084999

Hasan, Sundus Y; Shaker, Ali S

2013-08-20

367

The performance of robust test statistics with categorical data.  

PubMed

This paper reports on a simulation study that evaluated the performance of five structural equation model test statistics appropriate for categorical data. Both Type I error rate and power were investigated. Different model sizes, sample sizes, numbers of categories, and threshold distributions were considered. Statistics associated with both the diagonally weighted least squares (cat-DWLS) estimator and with the unweighted least squares (cat-ULS) estimator were studied. Recent research suggests that cat-ULS parameter estimates and robust standard errors slightly outperform cat-DWLS estimates and robust standard errors (Forero, Maydeu-Olivares, & Gallardo-Pujol, 2009). The findings of the present research suggest that the mean- and variance-adjusted test statistic associated with the cat-ULS estimator performs best overall. A new version of this statistic now exists that does not require a degrees-of-freedom adjustment (Asparouhov & Muthén, 2010), and this statistic is recommended. Overall, the cat-ULS estimator is recommended over cat-DWLS, particularly in small to medium sample sizes. PMID:22568535

Savalei, Victoria; Rhemtulla, Mijke

2013-05-01

368

77 FR 45373 - National Register of Historic Places; Notification of Pending Nominations and Related Actions  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Independent city, Armitage Manufacturing Company, 3200 Williamsburg Ave., Richmond (Independent City), 12000545 Southern Biscuit Company, 900 Terminal Pl., Richmond (Independent City), 12000546 Virginia Beach Independent city, Briarwood, 1500...

2012-07-31

369

75 FR 48939 - National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory of Michigan State University; Notice of Decision on...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...International Trade Administration National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory of Michigan State...Constitution Ave., NW., Washington, DC. Docket Number: 10-043. Applicant: National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory of Michigan...

2010-08-12

370

78 FR 29120 - Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Main Operating Base 2 (MOB...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Moon Township, Pennsylvania. Thursday, June 6, Portsmouth Public Library, Levensen Community Meeting Room, 175 Parrott Ave., Portsmouth, New Hampshire. Thursday, June 6, Rickenbacker International Airport Terminal, 7161 Second...

2013-05-17

371

Validating growth and development of a seabird as an indicator of food availability: Captive-reared Caspian Tern chicks fed ad libitum and restricted diets [La validaci??n del crecimiento y desarrollo de un ave marina como un indicador de la disponibilidad de comida: pichones de Hydrogprogne caspia criados en cautiverio y alimentados ad libitum y dietas restringidas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

For seabirds raising young under conditions of limited food availability, reducing chick provisioning and chick growth rates are the primary means available to avoid abandonment of a breeding effort. For most seabirds, however, baseline data characterizing chick growth and development under known feeding conditions are unavailable, so it is difficult to evaluate chick nutritional status as it relates to foraging conditions near breeding colonies. To address this need, we examined the growth and development of young Caspian Terns (Hydroprogne caspia), a cosmopolitan, generalist piscivore, reared in captivity and fed ad libitum and restricted (ca. one-third lower caloric intake) diets. Ad libitum-fed chicks grew at similar rates and achieved a similar size at fledging as previously documented for chicks in the wild and had energetic demands that closely matched allometric predictions. We identified three general characteristics of food-restricted Caspian Tern chicks compared to ad libitum chicks: (1) lower age-specific body mass, (2) lower age-specific skeletal and feather size, such as wing chord length, and (3) heightened levels of corticosterone in blood, both for baseline levels and in response to acute stress. Effects of diet restriction on feather growth (10-11% slower growth in diet-restricted chicks) were less pronounced than effects on structural growth (37-52% slower growth) and body mass (24% lower at fledging age), apparently due to preferential allocation of food resources to maintain plumage growth. Our results suggest that measurements of chick body mass and feather development (e.g., wing chord or primary length) or measurement of corticosterone levels in the blood would allow useful evaluation of the nutritional status of chicks reared in the wild and of food availability in the foraging range of adults. Such evaluations could also inform demography studies (e.g., predict future recruitment) and assist in evaluating designated piscivorous waterbird conservation (colony) sites. ?? 2011 The Authors. Journal of Field Ornithology ?? 2011 Association of Field Ornithologists.

Lyons, D. E.; Roby, D. D.

2011-01-01

372

40 CFR 52.726 - Control strategy: Ozone.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Done 0.030000 SIG CONN Ogden Ave. (IL 43 to 31st Street) Awarded 0.013000 SIG CONN US 12 (Long GroveâHicks Road) Awarded 0.055200 SIG CONN North Ave. (Oak Park to Ridgeland) Awarded 0.007000 SIG CONN...

2013-07-01

373

40 CFR 52.726 - Control strategy: Ozone.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Done 0.030000 SIG CONN Ogden Ave. (IL 43 to 31st Street) Awarded 0.013000 SIG CONN US 12 (Long GroveâHicks Road) Awarded 0.055200 SIG CONN North Ave. (Oak Park to Ridgeland) Awarded 0.007000 SIG CONN...

2010-07-01

374

40 CFR 52.726 - Control strategy: Ozone.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Done 0.030000 SIG CONN Ogden Ave. (IL 43 to 31st Street) Awarded 0.013000 SIG CONN US 12 (Long GroveâHicks Road) Awarded 0.055200 SIG CONN North Ave. (Oak Park to Ridgeland) Awarded 0.007000 SIG CONN...

2009-07-01

375

77 FR 68746 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...CONTACT: Jeanette Weathers-Jenkins, 6916 Cooper Avenue, Fort Meade, MD 20755-7901...Systems Agency, Acquisition Building, 6914 Cooper Ave, Ft. Meade, MD 20755-7088. Notification...Enterprise Service Directorate (ESD), 6914 Cooper Ave, Fort Meade, MD 20755-7088....

2012-11-16

376

Phylogeny and comparative biogeography of Pionopsitta parrots and Pteroglossus toucans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Studies of Neotropical birds, and their distributions and areas of endemism, in particular, have been central in the formulation of hypotheses proposed to explain the high species diversity in the Neotropics. We used mtDNA sequence data (ATPase 6 and 8, COI, and cyt b) to reconstruct the species-level phylogenies for two genera, Pionopsitta (Aves: Psittacidae) and Pteroglossus (Aves: Ramphastidae), compare

Jessica R. Eberhard; Eldredge Bermingham

2005-01-01

377

40 CFR 201.26 - Procedures for the measurement on receiving property of retarder and car coupling noise.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...average maximum A-weighted sound level (Lave max ). This value is then adjusted...be reported. Table 2âAdjustment to Lave max To Obtain Ladj ave max for Retarders...to 4.467 +6 1 Ladj ave max =Lave max +C in dB. Values in...

2010-07-01

378

40 CFR 201.26 - Procedures for the measurement on receiving property of retarder and car coupling noise.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...average maximum A-weighted sound level (Lave max ). This value is then adjusted...be reported. Table 2âAdjustment to Lave max To Obtain Ladj ave max for Retarders...to 4.467 +6 1 Ladj ave max =Lave max +C in dB. Values in...

2009-07-01

379

Fermented Wheat Germ Extract Inhibits Glycolysis\\/Pentose Cycle Enzymes and Induces Apoptosis through Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase Activation in Jurkat T-cell Leukemia Tumor Cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

The fermented extract of wheat germ, trade name Ave- mar, is a complex mixture of biologically active mole- cules with potent anti-metastatic activities in various human malignancies. Here we report the effect of Ave- mar on Jurkat leukemia cell viability, proliferation, cell cycle distribution, apoptosis, and the activity of key gly- colytic\\/pentose cycle enzymes that control carbon flow for nucleic

B. Comin-Anduix; Silvia Marin; Joan Boren; Carles Callol-Massot; Josep J. Centelles; Josep L. Torres; Neus Agell; Sara Bassilian; Marta Cascante

2002-01-01

380

Annual report on adverse events related with vaccines use in Calabria (Italy): 2012  

PubMed Central

Vaccines are administered to large population of healthy individuals, particularly to millions of infants every year, through national immunization programs. Although vaccines represent a good defense against some infectious diseases, their administration may be related with the development of adverse vaccine events (AVEs); therefore their use is continually monitored to detect these side effects. In the presents work, we reported the suspected AVEs recorded in 2012 in Calabria, Italy. We performed a retrospective study on report forms of patients that developed AVEs in Calabria from January 1, 2012 to December 31, 2012. Naranjo score was used to evaluate the association between AVEs and vaccines and only suspected AVEs definable as certain, probable, or possible were included in this analysis. During the study period, we evaluated 461 records of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and 18 (3.9%) were probably induced by vaccination. AVEs were common in females (almost 77.7%) and in children aged 0-3 years. The largest number of non-serious AVEs involved “skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders” and “general disorders and administration site conditions.” In conclusion, we documented that in Calabria the total number of AVEs is very low and it may be useful to increase the pharmacovigilance culture in order to evaluate the safety of these products in large populations.

Staltari, Orietta; Cilurzo, Felisa; Caroleo, Benedetto; Greco, Alexia; Corasaniti, Francesco; Genovesi, Maria Antonietta; Gallelli, Luca

2013-01-01

381

A Study of Collaborative Planning, Forecasting and Replenishment Mechanism of Agile Virtual Enterprises  

Microsoft Academic Search

The agile virtual enterprise (AVE) is a new and effective corporate organizational and production concept in the virtual economic environment; collaborative planning, forecasting and replenishment (CPFR) is a scheme in which enterprise partners can pursue collaborative supply chains by sharing information, thus making it a forceful supplement for the concrete mechanism and principles of execution in AVE. Building on an

Tong Shu; Shou Chen; Kin Keung Lai; Chi Xie; Shouyang Wang

2006-01-01

382

75 FR 29363 - National Register of Historic Places; Notification of Pending Nominations and Related Actions  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Architecture in Central Phoenix, 1870-1963, MPS), Roughly bounded by McDowell Rd., 3rd...Architecture in Central Phoenix, 1870-1963, MPS), Roughly bounded by 7th and 15th Aves...Architecture in Central Phoenix, 1870-1963, MPS), Roughly bounded by 7th Ave.,...

2010-05-25

383

75 FR 9925 - National Register of Historic Places; Notification of Pending Nominations and Related Actions  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Suburbs in the United States, 1830-1960 MPS) Roughly bounded by 172nd Pl., E. side...Suburbs in the United States, 1830-1960 MPS) Roughly bounded by Emerson Ave., Linwood...Working and Middle Class Streetcar Suburbs MPS) 2857 Lafayette Ave., Saint Louis,...

2010-03-04

384

78 FR 39769 - National Register of Historic Places; Notification of Pending Nominations and Related Actions  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...House No. 1, (Case Study House Program MPS) 10152 Toluca Lake Ave., Los Angeles...House No. 22, (Case Study House Program MPS) 1635 Woods Dr., Los Angeles, 13000519...House No. 10, (Case Study House Program MPS) 711 S. San Rafael Ave., Los...

2013-07-02

385

78 FR 68470 - National Register of Historic Places; Notification of Pending Nominations and Related Actions  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Influence of the Arts and Crafts Movement MPS) 1111 N. Los Robles Ave., Pasadena...Influence of the Arts and Crafts Movement MPS) 1121-1123 N. Los Robles Ave., Pasadena...County Harmon Park Swale, (Santa Fe Trail MPS) 7700 Mission Rd., Prairie...

2013-11-14

386

75 FR 3454 - Proposed Emergency Agency Information Collection  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Street, NW., Washington, DC 20503; and Frank Norcross, EE-2K, U.S. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Ave., SW...instrument and instructions should be directed to Frank Norcross, EE-2K, U.S. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Ave.,...

2010-01-21

387

77 FR 13313 - Agency Information Collection Extension  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Written comments may be sent to Christine Platt Patrick, EE- 2K, U.S. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Ave. SW...FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Christine Platt Patrick, EE-2K, U.S. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Ave....

2012-03-06

388

78 FR 59660 - Extension of a Currently Approved Information Collection for the Weatherization Assistance Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Written comments may be sent to Christine Platt Patrick, EE- 2K, U.S. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Ave. SW...instrument and instructions should be directed to: Lauren Hall, EE-2K, U.S. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Ave....

2013-09-27

389

75 FR 57910 - Proposed Agency Information Collection  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Washington, DC 20503; and to Christine Platt Patrick, EE-2K, U.S. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Ave., SW...FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Christine Platt Patrick, EE-2K, U.S. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Ave.,...

2010-09-23

390

75 FR 62807 - Proposed Agency Information Collection  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Street, NW., Washington, DC 20503 and Tyler Huebner, EE-2K, U.S. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Ave., SW...instrument and instructions should be directed to Tyler Huebner, EE-2K, U.S. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Ave.,...

2010-10-13

391

76 FR 38380 - Proposed Agency Information Collection  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Street, NW., Washington, DC 20503. And to Keith Dennis, EE-2K, U.S. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Ave., SW...gov. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Keith Dennis, EE-2K, U.S. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Ave.,...

2011-06-30

392

75 FR 40796 - Proposed Agency Information Collection  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...ADDRESSES: Written comments may be sent to: Frank Norcross, EE-2K, U.S. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Ave., SW...and instructions should be directed to: Frank Norcross, EE-2K, U.S. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Ave.,...

2010-07-14

393

75 FR 81257 - Proposed Agency Information Collection  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Street, NW., Washington, DC 20503; and Tyler Huebner, EE-2K, U.S. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Ave., SW...and instructions should be directed to: Tyler Huebner, EE-2K, U.S. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Ave.,...

2010-12-27

394

78 FR 45518 - Extension of a Currently Approved Information Collection for the Weatherization Assistance Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Written comments may be sent to Christine Platt Patrick, EE- 2K, U.S. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Ave., SW...instrument and instructions should be directed to: Lauren Hall, EE-2K, U.S. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Ave.,...

2013-07-29

395

75 FR 60094 - Proposed Agency Information Collection  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Street, NW., Washington, DC 20503; and Frank Norcross, EE-2K, U.S. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Ave., SW...instrument and instructions should be directed to Frank Norcross, EE-2K, U.S. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Ave.,...

2010-09-29

396

eXtraembryonic ENdoderm (XEN) Stem Cells Produce Factors that Activate Heart Formation  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundInitial specification of cardiomyocytes in the mouse results from interactions between the extraembryonic anterior visceral endoderm (AVE) and the nascent mesoderm. However the mechanism by which AVE activates cardiogenesis is not well understood, and the identity of specific cardiogenic factors in the endoderm remains elusive. Most mammalian studies of the cardiogenic potential of the endoderm have relied on the use

Kemar Brown; Michael Xavier Doss; Stephanie Legros; Jérôme Artus; Anna-Katerina Hadjantonakis; Ann C. Foley; Bernadette Breant

2010-01-01

397

Energy analysis of convectively induced wind perturbations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Budgets of divergent and rotational components of kinetic energy (KD and KR) are examined for four upper level wind speed maxima that develop during the fourth Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE IV) and the first AVE-Severe Environmental Storms and Mesoscale Experiment (AVE-SESAME I). A similar budget analysis is performed for a low-level jet stream during AVE-SESAME I. The energetics of the four upper level speed maxima is found to have several similarities. The dominant source of KD is cross-contour flow by the divergent wind, and KD provides a major source of KR via a conversion process. Conversion from available potential energy provides an additional source of KR in three of the cases. Horizontal maps reveal that the conversions involving KD are maximized in regions poleward of the convection. Low-level jet development during AVE-SESAME I appears to be assisted by convective activity to the west.

Fuelberg, Henry E.; Buechler, Dennis E.

1989-01-01

398

STS-34 crew poses on flight deck of JSC's crew compartment trainer (CCT)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-34 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, crewmembers pose on flight deck of JSC's crew compartment trainer (CCT) for group portrait. Taking a break from training and wearing launch and entry suits (LESs) are (left to right) Pilot Michael J. McCulley, Mission Specialist (MS) Shannon W. Lucid, MS Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, MS Ellen S. Baker, and Commander Donald E. Williams. All crewmembers are in their designated stations for launch and entry except Baker who will occupy a seat on OV-104's middeck. The CCT is located in JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9A. The photograph was taken by Bill Bowers, a crew trainer at JSC.

1989-01-01

399

Early radium experiments in Guadalajara, M'exico  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In April 01, 1904, two catholic lay priests, Severo D'iaz Galindo and Jos'e Mar'ia Arreola Mendoza, performed firsts Radium experiments in Guadalajara, M'exico, just after Radium experiments realized in Mexico City by Prof. Luis G. Le'on. Results of such experiences where published in the Bolet'in Eclesi'astico y Cient'ifico del Arzobispado de Guadalajara/ (Eclesiastic and Scientific Bulletin of the Guadalajara Archbishopric), here is show this paper and some of the first Radium plates obtained. Scientific and educational situation in Guadalajara is described and how both persons became founders of the modern scientific activity in the city.

de Alba Martínez, Durruty Jesús

2005-04-01

400

Oxygen abundances of HII regions (Perez-Montero+, 2005)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

[SII] electron densities, [OII] and [OIII] electron temperatures and oxygen chemical abundances for a sample of HII regions compiled in the paper. Electron densities have been calculated from the I(6717)/I(6731) quotient. When these lines have not been available, in order to calculate te[OII] it has been supposed a value of ne=100cm-3. te[OII] have been calculated from the I(3727)/I(7325) quotient. When the auroral line has not been available, it has been used photoionization models to deduce it from te(OIII) taking into account the density value (see Perez-Montero & Diaz, 2003MNRAS.346..105P). (2 data files).

Perez-Montero, E.; Diaz, A. I.

2005-08-01

401

STS-34 crewmembers sit in M1-13 APC during emergency egress training at KSC  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-34 crewmembers sit in M1-13 Armored Personnel Carrier (APC) during emergency egress training at KSC's shuttle landing facility (SLF) prior to terminal countdown demonstration test (TCDT) activities. Wearing launch and entry suits (LESs), are (from left) Mission Specialist (MS) Ellen S. Baker, MS Shannon W. Lucid, Commander Donald E. Williams (right side, in back), MS Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, and Pilot Michael J. McCulley (holding headset). View provided by KSC with alternate number KSC-89PC-871.

1989-01-01

402

STS-91 Day 03 Highlights  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On this third day of the STS-91 mission, the flight crew, Cmdr. Charles J. Precourt, Pilot Dominic L. Pudwill Gorie and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, Janet L. Kavandi, and Valery Victorovitch Ryumin prepare for docking with the Mir Space Station and a reunion with U.S. Astronaut Andy Thomas, who is about to conclude his more-than-four-month mission to the Russian outpost. After the docking the two crews open the entry hatch and greet each other. The astronauts and cosmonauts transfer supplies from the shuttle to Mir.

1998-01-01

403

STS-46 crewmembers handle water hoses during fire training at JSC's Fire Pit  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-46 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, crewmembers, directing the spray of two water hoses, approach a blaze in JSC's Fire Training Pit located across from the Gilruth Center Bldg 207. Manning the hose in the foreground are Commander Loren J. Shriver (left) and Italian Payload Specialist Franco Malerba. Holding a second hose are European Space Agency (ESA) Mission Specialist (MS) Claude Nicollier and MS Franklin R. Chang-Diaz who is aiming nozzle at the fire. Between the water hoses is a fire fighting training instructor. In the distance JSC's water tower and building facilities can be seen.

1992-01-01

404

STS-34 Atlantis, OV-104, crew eats preflight breakfast at KSC O and C Bldg  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-34 crewmembers, wearing mission t-shirts, eat preflight breakfast at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Operations and Checkout (O and C) Building before boarding Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104. Sitting around table (left to right) are Commmander Donald E. Williams, Mission Specialist (MS) Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, MS Shannon W. Lucid, MS Ellen S. Baker, and Pilot Michael J. McCulley. A jack-o-lantern (pumpkin) carved with the STS-34 mission insignia is in the center of the table decorated with a mission baseball cap and sitting atop a flight jacket.

1989-01-01

405

NASA Restructuring Draws Mixed Reactions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Some scientists are optimistic about what they say will be new opportunities and clout that the Earth and space sciences will have under the organizational restructuring that NASA announced 24 June, while others are concerned that these sciences may be buried bureaucratically, and suffer fiscally. Under the restructuring, which takes effect on 1 August, Goddard Space Flight Center director Alphonso Diaz will become the Science associate administrator. Associate administrator for space science Edward Weiler will become the new head of Goddard. Associate administrator for Earth Science, Ghassem Asrar, will become science deputy associate administrator and chief scientist for exploration.

Showstack, Randy

2004-07-01

406

Nurse characteristics and attitudes to active voluntary euthanasia: a survey in the Australian Capital Territory.  

PubMed

While surveys of Australian nurses' attitudes to active voluntary euthanasia (AVE) have found that the majority are in favour, there may be important differences between subgroups of nurses. This paper investigates the role of the following nurse characteristics on nurses' attitudes to AVE: age, gender, religion, amount of contact with terminally ill patients, area of specialty, and degree of interest taken in the issue of AVE. A postal survey on AVE was carried out in late 1996 of 2000 randomly selected registered nurses from the Australian Capital Territory. Responses were received from 1218 nurses (61%). The survey included a question asking whether the law should be changed to allow doctors to take active steps to bring about a patient's death under some circumstances. Overall, 69% of respondents agreed that the law should be changed. Those nurses who were more likely to agree were under the age of 40 years, agnostic, atheist or of the Anglican religion, to have less contact with terminally ill patients, to work in the area of critical care or mental health, and to take less interest in the issue of AVE. Palliative care nurses were the only subgroup without a majority in favour (33%). There is other evidence in the euthanasia literature, that nurses and doctors are less in favour of AVE than the general public. Taken together with the present findings, it can be concluded that attitudes towards AVE are more favourable in people who have less contact with the terminally ill. PMID:9687132

Kitchener, B A

1998-07-01

407

High rates of evolution preceded the origin of birds.  

PubMed

The origin of birds (Aves) is one of the great evolutionary transitions. Fossils show that many unique morphological features of modern birds, such as feathers, reduction in body size, and the semilunate carpal, long preceded the origin of clade Aves, but some may be unique to Aves, such as relative elongation of the forelimb. We study the evolution of body size and forelimb length across the phylogeny of coelurosaurian theropods and Mesozoic Aves. Using recently developed phylogenetic comparative methods, we find an increase in rates of body size and body size dependent forelimb evolution leading to small body size relative to forelimb length in Paraves, the wider clade comprising Aves and Deinonychosauria. The high evolutionary rates arose primarily from a reduction in body size, as there were no increased rates of forelimb evolution. In line with a recent study, we find evidence that Aves appear to have a unique relationship between body size and forelimb dimensions. Traits associated with Aves evolved before their origin, at high rates, and support the notion that numerous lineages of paravians were experimenting with different modes of flight through the Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous. PMID:24471891

Puttick, Mark N; Thomas, Gavin H; Benton, Michael J

2014-05-01

408

The Average Quality Factors by TEPC for Charged Particles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The quality factor used in radiation protection is defined as a function of LET, Q(sub ave)(LET). However, tissue equivalent proportional counters (TEPC) measure the average quality factors as a function of lineal energy (y), Q(sub ave)(Y). A model of the TEPC response for charged particles considers energy deposition as a function of impact parameter from the ion s path to the volume, and describes the escape of energy out of sensitive volume by delta-rays and the entry of delta rays from the high-density wall into the low-density gas-volume. A common goal for operational detectors is to measure the average radiation quality to within accuracy of 25%. Using our TEPC response model and the NASA space radiation transport model we show that this accuracy is obtained by a properly calibrated TEPC. However, when the individual contributions from trapped protons and galactic cosmic rays (GCR) are considered; the average quality factor obtained by TEPC is overestimated for trapped protons and underestimated for GCR by about 30%, i.e., a compensating error. Using TEPC's values for trapped protons for Q(sub ave)(y), we obtained average quality factors in the 2.07-2.32 range. However, Q(sub ave)(LET) ranges from 1.5-1.65 as spacecraft shielding depth increases. The average quality factors for trapped protons on STS-89 demonstrate that the model of the TEPC response is in good agreement with flight TEPC data for Q(sub ave)(y), and thus Q(sub ave)(LET) for trapped protons is overestimated by TEPC. Preliminary comparisons for the complete GCR spectra show that Q(sub ave)(LET) for GCR is approximately 3.2-4.1, while TEPC measures 2.9-3.4 for QQ(sub ave)(y), indicating that QQ(sub ave)(LET) for GCR is underestimated by TEPC.

Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Nikjoo, Hooshang; Cucinotta, Francis A.

2004-01-01

409

Eye rivalry and object rivalry in the intact and split-brain.  

PubMed

Both the eye of origin and the images themselves have been found to rival during binocular rivalry. We presented traditional binocular rivalry stimuli (face to one eye, house to the other) and Diaz-Caneja stimuli (half of each image to each eye) centrally to both a split-brain participant and a control group. With traditional rivalry stimuli both the split-brain participant and age-matched controls perceived more coherent percepts (synchronised across the hemifields) than non-synchrony, but our split-brain participant perceived more non-synchrony than our controls. For rival stimuli in the Diaz-Caneja presentation condition, object rivalry gave way to eye rivalry with all participants reporting more non-synchrony than coherent percepts. We have shown that splitting the stimuli across the hemifields between the eyes leads to greater eye than object rivalry, but that when traditional rival stimuli are split as the result of the severed corpus callosum, traditional rivalry persists but to a lesser extent than in the intact brain. These results suggest that communication between the early visual areas is not essential for synchrony in traditional rivalry stimuli, and that other routes for interhemispheric interactions such as subcortical connections may mediate rivalry in a traditional binocular rivalry condition. PMID:23973439

Ritchie, Kay L; Bannerman, Rachel L; Turk, David J; Sahraie, Arash

2013-10-18

410

STS-111 Flight Day 2 Highlights  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On Flight Day 2 of STS-111, the crew of Endeavour (Kenneth Cockrell, Commander; Paul Lockhart, Pilot; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Mission Specialist; Philippe Perrin, Mission Specialist) and the Expedition 5 crew (Valery Korzun, Commander; Peggy Whitson, Flight Engineer; Sergei Treschev, Flight Engineer), having successfully entered orbit around the Earth, begin to maneuver towards the International Space Station (ISS), where the Expedition 5 crew will replace the Expedition 4 crew. Live video is shown of the Earth from several vantage points aboard the Shuttle. The center-line camera, which will allow Shuttle pilots to align the docking apparatus with that on the ISS, provides footage of the Earth. Chang-Diaz participates in an interview, in Spanish, conducted from the ground via radio communications, with Cockrell also appearing. Footage of the Earth includes: Daytime video of the Eastern United States with some cloud cover as Endeavour passes over the Florida panhandle, Georgia, and the Carolinas; Daytime video of Lake Michigan unobscured by cloud cover; Nighttime low-light camera video of Madrid, Spain.

2002-01-01

411

40 CFR 763.97 - Compliance and enforcement.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT ASBESTOS Asbestos-Containing Materials in Schools § 763.97 ...complaint to the Governor of the State or the EPA Asbestos Ombudsman, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., NW.,...

2013-07-01

412

75 FR 44281 - National Register of Historic Places; Notification of Pending Nominations and Related Actions  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...10000558 CALIFORNIA Fresno County Fulton Mall, Inyo St to Tuolumne St, Kern and Merced Malls-Congo Alley to Federal Alley, Mariposa Mall-Congo Alley to Van Ness Ave Fresno, 10000557 MONTANA Ravalli County St. Mary's Mission Historic...

2010-07-28

413

50 CFR 15.3 - Definitions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...from the work. Exotic bird means any live or dead member of the Class Aves that is not indigenous...thereof, but does not include domestic poultry, dead sport-hunted birds, dead museum specimens, dead scientific...

2013-10-01

414

Volume Reverberation Measurements in the Eastern Carribean Sea.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Volume reverberation measurements were made utilizing explosive sources and an omnidirectional receiver in the Caribbean Sea along the Aves Ridge during June 1974 and February through March 1977. This report presents results of those measurements in the f...

C. Levenson R. A. Love M. A. Wilson R. A. Fisher

1981-01-01

415

77 FR 64099 - Snohomish County Resource Advisory Committee (RAC)  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...located at the Wall Street Building, 2930 Wetmore Ave., Everett, Washington 98201. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Peter Forbes, District Ranger, Darrington Ranger District, phone (360) 436-2301, email pforbes@fs.fed.us. Individuals...

2012-10-18

416

77 FR 19694 - National Register of Historic Places; Notification of Pending Nominations and Related Actions  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...City), 12000233 NORTH CAROLINA Catawba County George, Lee & Helen, House, 16 9th Ave., NE., Hickory, 12000234 Davidson County Chapel Hill Church Tabernacle, 1457 Chapel Hill Church Rd., Denton, 12000235 Gaston County...

2012-04-02

417

78 FR 59766 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...contiguo a DIPPSA, Tocoa, Colon, Honduras; Barrio El Centro, Tocoa, Colon, Honduras; RTN 08019009234360 (Honduras...PALMEROS DEL BAJO AGUAN''), Tocoa, Colon, Honduras; El Centro Principal, 1 Ave 2 Cll, No. 13, Tocoa, Colon,...

2013-09-27

418

77 FR 41441 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FEDERAL SURPLUS PROPERTY PROGRAM FEDERAL REGISTER REPORT FOR 07/13/2012 Suitable/Available Properties Building Alaska Mustang Moorings Bldg. 17003 1320 Fourth Ave. Seward AK 99664 Landholding Agency: Coast Guard Property Number: 88201220003...

2012-07-13

419

76 FR 14372 - Glenn/Colusa County Resource Advisory Committee  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DFO, 825 N. Humboldt Ave., Willows, CA 95988 or Laurie Pearson, Glenn/Colusa RAC Coordinator, USDA, Mendocino National...Stonyford, CA 95979. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Laurie Pearson, Glenn/Colusa RAC Coordinator, USDA, Mendocino...

2011-03-16

420

75 FR 433 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate a Cultural Item: Seton Hall University Museum, Seton Hall...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Dr. Thomas W. Kavanagh, Seton Hall University Museum, Seton Hall University, 400 South Orange Ave...claimants come forward. The Seton Hall University Museum is responsible...1-4-10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE...

2010-01-05

421

21 CFR 822.12 - Do you have any information that will help me prepare my submission or design my postmarket...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Web site and from the Food and Drug Administration, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, Office of Surveillance and Biometrics, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Bldg. 66, rm. 3219, Silver Spring, MD 20993-0002. Guidance documents...

2014-04-01

422

75 FR 16109 - Antimicrobial Pesticide Products; Registration Applications  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...oxide. Proposed Use: For formulation of antifoulant paints. Contact: Martha Terry...name and address: International Paint LLC, 2270 Morris Ave., Union...Proposed Uses: For antifoulant paint to be used below the...

2010-03-31

423

THE INTEGRATED USE OF COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY, SCANNING PROBE MICROSCOPY, AND VIRTUAL REALITY TO PREDICT THE CHEMICAL REACTIVITY OF ENVIRONMENTAL SURFACES  

EPA Science Inventory

In the last decade three new techniques scanning probe microscopy (SPM), virtual reality (YR) and computational chemistry ave emerged with the combined capability of a priori predicting the chemically reactivity of environmental surfaces. Computational chemistry provides the cap...

424

77 FR 31858 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Pathologic Complete Response in Neoadjuvant Treatment of High-Risk...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Food and Drug Administration, 5630 Fishers Lane, Rm. 1061, Rockville, MD 20852. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Tatiana Prowell, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Bldg....

2012-05-30

425

75 FR 43141 - United States Standards for Grades of Frozen Vegetables  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Ave., SW., Room 0709 South Building, STOP 0247, Washington, DC...or by accessing the AMS Web site at: http://www.ams...the Internet on the PPB Web site at: http://www.ams...standards. Update terminology. Onion Rings,...

2010-07-23

426

40 CFR 98.9 - Addresses.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...following address: (a) For U.S. mail. Director, Climate Change Division, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., NW., Mail Code...20460. (b) For package deliveries. Director, Climate Change Division, 1310 L St, NW., Washington, DC...

2013-07-01

427

Democratic Politics and the Culture of American Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Addresses arguments about the "hidden curriculum" of the schools and outlines the conflict between democratic politics and "the basic shape of schooling." Available from The American Political Science Association, 1527 New Hampshire Ave., N.W., Washington, DC 20036. (IRT)

Merelman, Richard M.

1980-01-01

428

76 FR 2702 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Engineering Command, Washington Navy Yard, 1330 Patterson Ave...Diego CA Landholding Agency: Navy Property Number: 77201040019...Maryland 24 Bldgs. NSA S. Potomac Indian Head MD 20640 Landholding Agency: Navy Property Number:...

2011-01-14

429

21 CFR 803.11 - What form should I use to submit reports of individual adverse events and where do I obtain these...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Publications Office, Beltsville Service Center, 6351 Ammendale Rd., Landover, MD 20705; (b) FDA, MEDWATCH (HF-2...and Radiological Health, Division of Small Manufacturers, International and Consumer Assistance, 10903 New Hampshire Ave.,...

2013-04-01

430

Uncovering Buried Volcanoes: New Data for Probabilistic Volcanic Hazard Assessment at Yucca Mountain.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Basaltic volcanism poses a potential hazard to the proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository because multiple episodes of basaltic volcanism have occurred in the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) in the past 11 Ma. Intervals between eruptive episodes ave...

R. E. Kelley A. H. Cogbill F. V. Perry

2005-01-01

431

77 FR 74511 - National Register of Historic Places; Notification of Pending Nominations and Related Actions  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Knitting Mills, 883 Highland Ave., SE., Hickory, 12001087 Durham County Wright's Automatic Machinery Company, 915 Holloway St., Durham, 12001088 Johnston County Harrison, Richard B., School, 605 W. Noble & 405 S. Brevard Sts.,...

2012-12-14

432

Sex-Role Strain and Personality Adjustment of China-born Students in America: A Pilot Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Study based on a paper presented at the Western Psychological Assoc Convention, San Francisco, 1967. Reprints from: H. Peskin, Dept of Psychology, San Francisco State College, 1600 Holloway Ave., San Francisco, Calif. 94132.

Fong, Stanley L. M.; Peskin, Harvey

1969-01-01

433

76 FR 14051 - Notice of Inventory Completion: San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...human remains should contact Jeffrey Boland Fentress, NAGPRA Coordinator, San Francisco State University, Admin. 447, 1600 Holloway Ave., San Francisco, CA 95132, telephone (415) 338-3075, before April 14, 2011. Repatriation of the human...

2011-03-15

434

77 FR 41415 - Single-Ingredient, Immediate-Release Drug Products Containing Oxycodone for Oral Administration...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...oxycodone hydrochloride for oral administration and are labeled for human...published with an incorrect Web link. This document corrects...and Research, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave...in the last paragraph, the Web link...

2012-07-13

435

78 FR 25443 - Notice of Agreements Filed  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Jeffrey, Esq., Goodwin Procter LLP, 901 New York Ave. NW., Washington, DC 20001. Synopsis: The amendment would delete Malta, Spain, and Italy from the geographic scope of the agreement, eliminate authority regarding vessel strings operated...

2013-05-01

436

76 FR 70422 - Procurement List Additions  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...200 Federal Plaza, Paterson, NJ 955 Springfield Ave, Springfield, NJ 107 Charles Lindbergh Blv, Garden City, NY 1180 Vets Mem Hwy, Hauppauge, NY 50 Clinton St., Hempstead, NY 290 BWY--Foley Square, New York, NY 2283 Third Avenue, New...

2011-11-14

437

78 FR 42555 - Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities, Arts and Artifacts Indemnity Panel Advisory...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...on the Arts and the Humanities, for exhibitions beginning on or after October 1, 2013...CONTACT: Lisette Voyatzis, Committee Management Officer, 1100 Pennsylvania Ave. NW...2013. Lisette Voyatzis, Committee Management Officer. [FR Doc. 2013-16901...

2013-07-16

438

Find a Healthcare Professional  

MedlinePLUS

... 2001644|||-73.7287787|||Dr. Elie M. Abemayor|||91 Smith Ave|||Mt Kisco|||10549|||NY|||(914) 241.9026||||||, ... html||| 364775552|||39.0985878|||-77.1921146|||Kathleen Kennedy-Smith, CRNP|||14955 Shady Grove Rd|||Rockville|||20850|||MD|||( ...

439

Minority Graduate Fellowship Honorable Mentions for Fiscal Year 1997  

NSF Publications Database

... 6th Ave. , San Francisco CA 94122 MOLEC BIOL CALIF, U-SAN DIEGO CAL, U-SAN FRANCISCO Dirks, Clarissa ... HARVARD UNIV/MA BROWN UNIVERSITY/RI Machuca, Francisco Javier 4921 Fratus Drive , Temple City CA ...

440

75 FR 25002 - Notice of Applications for Deregistration Under Section 8(f) of the Investment Company Act of 1940  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...at http://www.sec.gov/search/search.htm or by calling (202)551-8090...2010. Applicants' Address: Federated Investors Funds, 4000 Ericsson...Park Ave., New York, NY 10166. Federated High Yield Municipal Income...

2010-05-06

441

75 FR 71183 - Twelfth Meeting: Joint RTCA Special Committee 213: EUROCAE WG-79: Enhanced Flight Vision Systems...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Honeywell Deer Valley Facility, 2111 N. 19th Ave...affiliation and citizenship to gail.dunda@honeywell.com and thea.feyereisen@honeywell.com prior to January 3, 2011. Please...

2010-11-22

442

78 FR 40513 - Division of Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation; Proposed Extension of Existing...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Labor, 200 Constitution Ave. NW., Room S-3201, Washington, DC 20210, telephone (202) 693-0372, fax (202) 693-1447, Email alvarez.vincent@dol.gov. Please use only one method of transmission for comments (mail, fax, or Email)....

2013-07-05

443

78 FR 72717 - Division of Coal Mine Workers' Compensation; Proposed Collection; Comment Request  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Labor, 200 Constitution Ave. NW., Room S-3201, Washington, DC 20210, telephone (202) 693-0701, fax (202) 693-1447, Email Ferguson.Yoon@dol.gov. Please use only one method of transmission for comments (mail, fax, or Email)....

2013-12-03

444

78 FR 55760 - Proposed Extension of Existing Collection; Comment Request  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Labor, 200 Constitution Ave. NW., Room S-32331, Washington, DC 20210, telephone (202) 693-0701, fax (202) 693-1447, Email Ferguson.Yoon@dol.gov. Please use only one method of transmission for comments (mail, fax, or Email)....

2013-09-11

445

78 FR 55761 - Proposed Extension of Existing Collection; Comment Request  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Labor, 200 Constitution Ave. NW., Room S-32331, Washington, DC 20210, telephone (202) 693-0701, fax (202) 693-1447, Email Ferguson.Yoon@dol.gov. Please use only one method of transmission for comments (mail, fax, or Email)....

2013-09-11

446

78 FR 35982 - Division of Coal Mine Workers' Compensation; Proposed Collection; Comment Request  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Labor, 200 Constitution Ave. NW., Room S-3201, Washington, DC 20210, telephone (202) 693-0372, fax (202) 693-1447, Email alvarez.vincent@dol.gov. Please use only one method of transmission for comments (mail, fax, or Email)....

2013-06-14

447

78 FR 11683 - Division of Federal Employees' Compensation; Proposed Extension of Existing Collection; Comment...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Labor, 200 Constitution Ave. NW., Room S-3233, Washington, DC 20210, telephone (202) 693-0701, fax (202) 693-1447, Email Ferguson.Yoon@dol.gov. Please use only one method of transmission for comments (mail, fax, or Email)....

2013-02-19

448

78 FR 40513 - Division of Federal Employees' Compensation; Proposed Extension of Existing Collection; Comment...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Labor, 200 Constitution Ave. NW., Room S-3201, Washington, DC 20210, telephone (202) 693-0372, fax (202) 693-1447, Email alvarez.vincent@dol.gov. Please use only one method of transmission for comments (mail, fax, or Email)....

2013-07-05

449

78 FR 15742 - Division of Federal Employees' Compensation Proposed Extension of Existing Collection; Comment...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Labor, 200 Constitution Ave. NW., Room S-3233, Washington, DC 20210, telephone (202) 693-0701, fax (202) 693-1447, Email Ferguson.Yoon@dol.gov. Please use only one method of transmission for comments (mail, fax, or Email)....

2013-03-12

450

77 FR 32140 - Division of Coal Mine Workers' Compensation Proposed Extension of Existing Collection; Comment...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Labor, 200 Constitution Ave. NW., Room S-3201, Washington, DC 20210, telephone (202) 693-0701, fax (202) 693-1447, Email ferguson.yoon@dol.gov. Please use only one method of transmission for comments (mail, fax, or...

2012-05-31

451

77 FR 6823 - Proposed Extension of Existing Collection; Comment Request  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Labor, 200 Constitution Ave. NW., Room S-3201, Washington, DC 20210, telephone (202) 693-0701, fax (202) 693-1447, Email Alvarez.Vincent@dol.gov. Please use only one method of transmission for comments (mail, fax, or Email)....

2012-02-09

452

78 FR 12364 - Proposed Extension of Existing Collection; Comment Request  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Labor, 200 Constitution Ave. NW., Room S-32331, Washington, DC 20210, telephone (202) 693-0701, fax (202) 693-1447, Email Ferguson.Yoon@dol.gov. Please use only one method of transmission for comments (mail, fax, or Email)....

2013-02-22

453

77 FR 13636 - Division of Coal Mine Workers' Compensation; Proposed Extension of Existing Collection; Comment...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Labor, 200 Constitution Ave. NW., Room S-3201, Washington, DC 20210, telephone (202) 693-0701, fax (202) 693-1447, Email yoonferguson@dol.gov. Please use only one method of transmission for comments (mail, fax, or Email)....

2012-03-07

454

77 FR 6824 - Proposed Extension of Existing Collection; Comment Request  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Labor, 200 Constitution Ave. NW., Room S-3201, Washington, DC 20210, telephone (202) 693-0701, fax (202) 693-1447, Email Ferguson.Yoon@dol.gov. Please use only one method of transmission for comments (mail, fax, or Email)....

2012-02-09

455

78 FR 57416 - Division of Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Proposed Revision of Existing Collection...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Labor, 200 Constitution Ave. NW., Room S-3201, Washington, DC 20210, telephone (202) 693-0701, fax (202) 693-1447, Email ferguson.yoon@dol.gov. Please use only one method of transmission for comments (mail, fax, or Email)....

2013-09-18

456

76 FR 23876 - Clarifications to Indian Tribes' Clean Air Act Regulatory Requirements; Direct Final Amendments  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...for the Air Docket is (202) 566-1742. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Darrel Harmon, Office of Air and Radiation (OAR/IO 6101A), Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., NW., Washington, DC 20460; telephone number:...

2011-04-29

457

77 FR 27072 - Gastrointestinal Drugs Advisory Committee; Cancellation  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...NDA 200-436 and, as needed, may schedule an Advisory Committee meeting in the future. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Minh Doan, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Bldg. 31,...

2012-05-08

458

76 FR 80948 - Draft Guidance for Industry, Clinical Investigators, Institutional Review Boards, and Food and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Identify comments with the docket number found in brackets in the heading of this document. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Owen Faris, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Bldg. 66, rm....

2011-12-27

459

75 FR 3246 - National Register of Historic Places; Notification of Pending Nominations and Related Actions  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...3rd St., Lee's Summit, 10000007 NEW YORK Essex County Mt. Van Hoevenberg Olympic Bobsled Run, 220 Bob Run Ln., Lake Placid, 10000008 Kings County Jewish Center of Kings Highway, 1202-1218 Ave. P., Brooklyn, 10000009 Kingsway Jewish...

2010-01-20

460

12 CFR Appendix A to Part 203 - Form and Instructions for Completion of HMDA Loan/Application Register  

...Board, Attention: HMDA Processing, (insert name of your institution's regulatory agency), 20th & Constitution Ave, NW., MS N502, Washington, DC 20551-0001. B. If your institution is regulated by the Federal Reserve System, you should...

2014-01-01

461

12 CFR Appendix A to Part 1003 - Form and Instructions for Completion of HMDA Loan/Application Register  

...Attention: HMDA Processing, (insert name of the appropriate Federal agency for your institution), 20th & Constitution Ave NW., MS N502, Washington, DC 20551-0001. B. If the Federal Reserve System (but not the Bureau of Consumer Financial...

2014-01-01

462

76 FR 15302 - Nationwide Categorical Waivers Under Section 1605 (Buy American) of the American Recovery and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Ste, 163, Lackland AFB, TX 78236- 98612. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Sharon Money, Contracting Officer, 772d ESS/PKA, 2261 Hughes Ave., Ste, 163, Lackland AFB, TX 78236-98612. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Section 1605 of the...

2011-03-21

463

42 CFR 137.432 - What happens after the hearing?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Appeals...following address: Department of Health and Human Services, 200 Independence Ave....

2012-10-01

464

78 FR 20926 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Providing Postmarket Periodic Safety Reports in the International...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Food and Drug Administration, 5630 Fishers Lane, Rm. 1061, Rockville, MD 20852. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Jean Chung, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Bldg. 22, Rm....

2013-04-08

465

76 FR 68310 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Snapper-Grouper Fishery Off the...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...estimates or other aspects of the collection-of-information requirements contained in this final rule may be submitted to Rich Malinowski, Southeast Regional Office, NMFS, 263 13th Ave South, St. Petersburg, FL 33701; and OMB, by email at...

2011-11-04

466

34 CFR 222.153 - How must a local educational agency request an administrative hearing?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Director, Impact Aid Program, 600 Independence Ave., SW, Portals 4200, Washington, DC 20202-6244; or (2) If it hand-delivers...request, deliver it to the Director, Impact Aid Program, Portals Building, Room 4200, 1250 Maryland Avenue, SW,...

2013-07-01

467

76 FR 79184 - Notice of Agreements Filed  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Angeles, CA 90013; Eric Jeffrey, Esq., Goodwin Proctor LLP, 901 New York Ave. NW., Washington, DC 20001; and David F. Smith, Esq., Cozen O'Connor, 1627 I Street NW., Washington, DC 20006. Synopsis: The amendment removes...

2011-12-21

468

Contributions of Divergent and Nondivergent Winds to the Kinetic Energy Balance of a Severe Storm Environment.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Divergent and rotational components of the synoptic scale kinetic energy balance are presented using rawinsonde data at 3 and 6 h intervals from the Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE 4). Two intense thunderstorm complexes occurred during the period....

P. A. Browning H. E. Fuelberg

1983-01-01

469

76 FR 10342 - Availability of Fiscal Years 2011-2016 Draft Strategic Plan and Request for Public Comment  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...address in the text of the message. Comments may also be submitted by surface mail to: Department of Energy, Office of Program Analysis and Evaluation (CF-20), 1000 Independence Ave., SW., Washington, DC 20585. Respondents are...

2011-02-24

470

77 FR 40376 - National Register of Historic Places; Notification of Pending Nominations and Related Actions  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...12000438 SOUTH CAROLINA Greenville County Southern Bleachery and Print Works...Taylors, 12000439 TENNESSEE Robertson County Glenn, Mollie and Neel, House, 307 5th Ave., Springfield, 12000440 Shelby County National Cotton Council...

2012-07-09

471

77 FR 69916 - SJI Board of Directors Meeting; Notice  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...and other business. All portions of this meeting are open to the public. ADDRESSES: New Mexico Supreme Court, 237 Don Gaspar Ave., Santa Fe, NM 87501, 505-827-4860. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Jonathan Mattiello, Executive...

2012-11-21

472

Stuccoed building within greenhouse complex, north and west (front) sides, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Stuccoed building within greenhouse complex, north and west (front) sides, looking south towards building no. 121 (tennis courts) across W. Pennington Ave. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Greenhouse, West Pennington Avenue, East of Building No. 139, Aurora, Adams County, CO

473

77 FR 20025 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Compliance Policy for Reporting Drug Sample Distribution...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...and Drug Administration, 5630 Fishers Lane, Rm. 1061, Rockville, MD 20852. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Donovan F. Duggan, Jr., Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Bldg. 51,...

2012-04-03

474

Spatial and Temporal Distribution of Precipitation Chemistry across Maryland in 1984. Volume 2,  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Summary statistics; January through March: Total precipitation, average concentrations, pH, and total depositions; April through June: Total precipitation, average concentrations, pH, and total depositions; July through September: Total precipitation, ave...

C. Maxwell S. Mahn

1987-01-01

475

21 CFR 189.110 - Calamus and its derivatives.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Ave., suite 500, Gaithersburg, MD 20877, also from the Office of Food Additive Safety (HFS-200), Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, Food and Drug Administration, 5100 Paint Branch Pkwy., College Park, MD 20740,...

2013-04-01

476

77 FR 15804 - Employment and Training Administration Program Year (PY) 2012 Workforce Investment Act (WIA...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Ave. NW., Room N-4702, Washington, DC 20210, Attention: Mr. Samuel Jerome Cooper, (202) 693-2833 (phone), (202) 693-2859 (fax), email: Cooper.Samuel@dol.gov. Commenters are advised that mail delivery in the...

2012-03-16

477

78 FR 24774 - National Register of Historic Places; Notification of Pending Nominations and Related Actions  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...13000309 Warren County Delaware and Hudson Passenger Station, 57 Beach Rd., Lake George, 13000310 OREGON Marion County Hobson--Gehlen General Merchandise Store, (Downtown Area of Stayton MPS) 189 N. 2nd Ave., Stayton, 13000311 Wheeler...

2013-04-26

478

76 FR 4148 - Notice of Opportunity for Public Comment on Surplus Property Release at Brunswick-Golden Isles...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...address: Atlanta Airports District Office, Attn: Aimee A. McCormick, Program Manager, 1701 Columbia Ave., Campus Bldg...Brunswick, GA 31525. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Aimee McCormick, Program Manager, Atlanta Airports District Office,...

2011-01-24

479

78 FR 9771 - Notice of Opportunity for Public Comment on Surplus Property Release at Brunswick-Golden Isles...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...address: Atlanta Airports District Office, Attn: Aimee A. McCormick, Program Manager, 1701 Columbia Ave., Suite 2-260...Brunswick, GA 31525. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Aimee McCormick, Program Manager, Atlanta Airports District Office,...

2013-02-11

480

76 FR 51120 - Notice of Opportunity for Public Comment on Release of Federally Obligated Property at Hartsfield...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...address: Atlanta Airports District Office, Attn: Aimee A. McCormick, Program Manager, 1701 Columbia Ave., Campus Building...GA 30320-2509. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Aimee McCormick, Program Manager, Atlanta Airports District Office,...

2011-08-17

481

Understanding the Mechanisms of Platelet Alloimmunization and its Prevention.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of our experiments is to identify methods of preventing alloimmunization to donor platelets in a dog platelet transfusion model. We ave established DLA Class II typing to select antigen incompatible donor-recipient pairs for our transfusion ex...

S. J. Slichter

2008-01-01

482

Independent Schools: Landscape and Learnings.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines American independent schools (parochial, southern segregated, and private institutions) in terms of their funding, expenditures, changing enrollment patterns, teacher-student ratios, and societal functions. Journal available from Daedalus Subscription Department, 1172 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, MA 02132. (AM)

Oates, William A.

1981-01-01

483

75 FR 9410 - Notice of Meeting of the EPA's Children's Health Protection Advisory Committee (CHPAC)  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Committee (CHPAC) will be held March 24-25, 2010 at the Melrose Hotel, 2430 Pennsylvania Ave, NW., Washington, DC, 20037. The...Children's Health Protection Advisory Committee, Melrose Hotel, Potomac Rooms I, II, and III, 2430 Pennsylvania...

2010-03-02

484

76 FR 38208 - Federal Register, Volume 76 Issue 125 (Wednesday, June 29, 2011)  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...County Eager, Almeron, Funerary Monument and Plot, 8012 N. Cemetery Rd., Evansville, 11000477 Sauk County Rest Haven Motel, E5116 U.S. 14, Spring Green, 11000478 Vernon County Vernon County Normal School, 410 S. Center Ave., Viroqua,...

2011-06-29

485

75 FR 53709 - National Register of Historic Places; Notification of Pending Nominations and Related Actions  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Lord, Acting Chief, National Register of Historic Places/National Historic Landmarks Program. CALIFORNIA Alameda County Iceland, 2727 Milvia St, Berkley, 10000769 Los Angeles County Bungalow Court at 1516 N. Serrano Ave, 1516-1528\\1/2\\...

2010-09-01

486

40 CFR Appendix E to Subpart E of... - Interim Method of the Determination of Asbestos in Bulk Insulation Samples  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Military Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90064 (washed with dilute HCl to remove small amount of calcite impurity); India tremolite, Rajasthan State, India. ⢠Actinolite Asbestos 2.6.2Adhesive Tape, petroleum jelly, etc. (for attaching silver...

2010-07-01

487

40 CFR Appendix E to Subpart E of... - Interim Method of the Determination of Asbestos in Bulk Insulation Samples  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Military Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90064 (washed with dilute HCl to remove small amount of calcite impurity); India tremolite, Rajasthan State, India. ⢠Actinolite Asbestos 2.6.2Adhesive Tape, petroleum jelly, etc. (for attaching silver...

2009-07-01

488

21 CFR 320.30 - Inquiries regarding bioavailability and bioequivalence requirements and review of protocols by...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...methodology shall be submitted to the Food and Drug Administration, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Office of Clinical Pharmacology, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Silver Spring, MD 20993-0002. (2) General inquiries relating to bioequivalence...

2013-04-01

489

78 FR 9386 - Procurement List; Addition  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Housekeeping Service, Veterinary Clinic, 533 Solomons Rd, Fort Story, VA. Health/Dental Clinic, Bldg. 649, New Guinea Road, Fort Story, VA. McDonald Army Health Center (MCAHC), 576 Jefferson Ave., Fort Eustis, VA. NPA:...

2013-02-08

490

21 CFR 184.1024 - Bromelain.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Constitution Ave. NW., Washington, DC, or may be examined at Office of Food Additive Safety (HFS-200), Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, Food and Drug Administration, 5100 Paint Branch Pkwy., College Park, MD 20740,...

2013-04-01

491

21 CFR 184.1195 - Calcium citrate.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...available from the National Academy Press, 2101 Constitution Ave. NW., Washington, DC 20418, and the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (HFS-200), 5100 Paint Branch Pkwy., College Park, MD 20740, or may be examined...

2013-04-01

492

21 CFR 589.2001 - Cattle materials prohibited in animal food or feed to prevent the transmission of bovine...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...www.aocs.org ), 2211 W. Bradley Ave., Champaign, IL 61821. Copies may be examined at the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition's Library, 5100 Paint Branch Pkwy., College Park, MD 20740, or at the National...

2013-04-01

493

21 CFR 184.1911 - Triethyl citrate.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...available from the National Academy Press, 2101 Constitution Ave. NW., Washington, DC 20418, and the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (HFS-200), 5100 Paint Branch Pkwy., College Park, MD 20740, or may be examined...

2013-04-01

494

21 CFR 184.1311 - Ferrous lactate.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...the National Academy Press, 2101 Constitution Ave. NW., Washington, DC 20418, or may be examined at the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition's library, 5100 Paint Branch Pkwy., College Park, MD 20740, or at the National...

2013-04-01