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Sample records for die in-vivo messung

  1. In vivo characterization of microglial engulfment of dying neurons in the zebrafish spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Morsch, Marco; Radford, Rowan; Lee, Albert; Don, Emily K.; Badrock, Andrew P.; Hall, Thomas E.; Cole, Nicholas J.; Chung, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Microglia are specialized phagocytes in the vertebrate central nervous system (CNS). As the resident immune cells of the CNS they play an important role in the removal of dying neurons during both development and in several neuronal pathologies. Microglia have been shown to prevent the diffusion of damaging degradation products of dying neurons by engulfment and ingestion. Here we describe a live imaging approach that uses UV laser ablation to selectively stress and kill spinal neurons and visualize the clearance of neuronal remnants by microglia in the zebrafish spinal cord. In vivo imaging confirmed the motile nature of microglia within the uninjured spinal cord. However, selective neuronal ablation triggered rapid activation of microglia, leading to phagocytic uptake of neuronal debris by microglia within 20–30 min. This process of microglial engulfment is highly dynamic, involving the extension of processes toward the lesion site and consequently the ingestion of the dying neuron. 3D rendering analysis of time-lapse recordings revealed the formation of phagosome-like structures in the activated microglia located at the site of neuronal ablation. This real-time representation of microglial phagocytosis in the living zebrafish spinal cord provides novel opportunities to study the mechanisms of microglia-mediated neuronal clearance. PMID:26379496

  2. Messung und Analyse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bathelt, Hartmut; Scheinhardt, Michael; Sell, Hendrik; Sottek, Roland; Guidati, Sandro; Helfer, Martin

    Für die Beurteilung von Akustik und Fahrkomfort eines Fahrzeugs gilt in der Fahrzeugentwicklung immer noch der alte Grundsatz: "Der Kunde fährt nicht am Prüfstand, sondern auf der Straße“. Daher werden Gesamtbeurteilungen des Entwicklungsstandes und Konkurrenzvergleiche (Benchmarking) nach wie vor auf der Straße durchgeführt, meist auf ausgewählten Fahrbahnen am Prüfgelände oder im Rahmen der regelmäßigen Winter- und Sommererprobungen unter extremen Witterungsverhältnissen.

  3. Human NK cells proliferate and die in vivo more rapidly than T cells in healthy young and elderly adults.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Charles T; Karapetyan, Anush; Al-Attar, Ahmad; Shelton, Brent J; Holt, Kimberly J; Tucker, Jason H; Presnell, Steven R

    2011-04-15

    NK cells are essential for health, yet little is known about human NK turnover in vivo. In both young and elderly women, all NK subsets proliferated and died more rapidly than T cells. CD56(bright) NK cells proliferated rapidly but died relatively slowly, suggesting that proliferating CD56(bright) cells differentiate into CD56(dim) NK cells in vivo. The relationship between CD56(dim) and CD56(bright) proliferating cells indicates that proliferating CD56(dim) cells both self-renew and are derived from proliferating CD56(bright) NK cells. Our data suggest that some dying CD56(dim) cells become CD16(+)CD56(-) NK cells and that CD16(-)CD56(low) NK cells respond rapidly to cellular and cytokine stimulation. We propose a model in which all NK cell subsets are in dynamic flux. About half of CD56(dim) NK cells expressed CD57, which was weakly associated with low proliferation. Surprisingly, CD57 expression was associated with higher proliferation rates in both CD8(+) and CD8(-) T cells. Therefore, CD57 is not a reliable marker of senescent, nonproliferative T cells in vivo. NKG2A expression declined with age on both NK cells and T cells. Killer cell Ig-like receptor expression increased with age on T cells but not on NK cells. Although the percentage of CD56(bright) NK cells declined with age and the percentage of CD56(dim) NK cells increased with age, there were no significant age-related proliferation or apoptosis differences for these two populations or for total NK cells. In vivo human NK cell turnover is rapid in both young and elderly adults. PMID:21402893

  4. Loss of translation elongation factor (eEF1A2) expression in vivo differentiates between Wallerian degeneration and dying-back neuronal pathology

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Lyndsay M; Thomson, Derek; Conklin, Annalijn; Wishart, Thomas M; Gillingwater, Thomas H

    2008-01-01

    Wallerian degeneration and dying-back pathology are two well-known cellular pathways capable of regulating the breakdown and loss of axonal and synaptic compartments of neurons in vivo. However, the underlying mechanisms and molecular triggers of these pathways remain elusive. Here, we show that loss of translation elongation factor eEF1A2 expression in lower motor neurons and skeletal muscle fibres in homozygous Wasted mice triggered a dying-back neuropathy. Synaptic loss at the neuromuscular junction occurred in advance of axonal pathology and by a mechanism morphologically distinct from Wallerian degeneration. Dying-back pathology in Wasted mice was accompanied by reduced expression levels of the zinc finger protein ZPR1, as found in other dying-back neuropathies such as spinal muscular atrophy. Surprisingly, experimental nerve lesion revealed that Wallerian degeneration was significantly delayed in homozygous Wasted mice; morphological assessment revealed that ∼80% of neuromuscular junctions in deep lumbrical muscles at 24 h and ∼50% at 48 h had retained motor nerve terminals following tibial nerve lesion. This was in contrast to wild-type and heterozygous Wasted mice where < 5% of neuromuscular junctions had retained motor nerve terminals at 24 h post-lesion. These data show that eEF1A2 expression is required to prevent the initiation of dying-back pathology at the neuromuscular junction in vivo. In contrast, loss of eEF1A2 expression significantly inhibited the initiation and progression of Wallerian degeneration in vivo. We conclude that loss of eEF1A2 expression distinguishes mechanisms underlying dying-back pathology from those responsible for Wallerian degeneration in vivo and suggest that eEF1A2-dependent cascades may provide novel molecular targets to manipulate neurodegenerative pathways in lower motor neurons. PMID:19094180

  5. Das Neutron, der Kosmos und die Kräfte: Neutronen in der Teilchenphysik

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldner, Torsten

    2003-05-01

    Das Neutron besitzt eine einzigartige Kombination von Eigenschaften. Sie ermöglicht die Untersuchung aller vier elementaren Kräfte. Dabei wurden beeindruckende Resultate erzielt, wie die Präzisionsmessungen der elektrischen Ladung des Neutrons oder der Feinstrukturkonstante zeigen. Die genaue Bestimmung der schwachen Wechselwirkungsstärke der Nukleonen liefert der Astrophysik wichtige Daten. Die Messung eines von Null verschiedenen elektrischen Dipolmoments des Neutrons könnte einen entscheidenden Hinweis über die Physik jenseits des Standardmodells der Teilchenphysik geben. Doch auch zur Aufklärung von Unsicherheiten innerhalb des Standardmodells selbst tragen Neutronen bei.

  6. Dying cells program their expedient disposal: serum amyloid P component upregulation in vivo and in vitro induced by photodynamic therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Soroush; Sun, Jinghai; Korbelik, Mladen

    2007-12-01

    Serum amyloid P component (SAP) is known as a prototypic acute phase reactant in the mouse and the protein that binds to dying cells securing their swift disposal by phagocytes. Treatment of solid tumors by photodynamic therapy (PDT) triggers SAP production in the liver of host mice, its release in the circulation and accumulation in PDT-targeted lesions. In the present study, mouse Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells treated in vitro by PDT are shown to upregulate their gene encoding SAP. This effect was manifested following PDT treatment mediated by various types of photosensitizers (Photofrin, BPD, mTHPC, ALA). Generated SAP protein was not detected in tissue supernatants but remained localized to producing PDT-treated cells. The upregulation of SAP gene was observed also in untreated IC-21 macrophages after they were co-incubated for 4 h with PDT-treated LLC cells. Based on these findings, SAP that accumulates in PDT-treated tumors may originate from both systemic sources (released from the liver as acute phase reactant) and local sources; the latter could include tumor cells directly sustaining PDT injury and macrophages invading the tumor that become stimulated by signals from these affected tumor cells. Since SAP gene upregulation in LLC cells increased with the lethality of PDT dose used for their treatment, we propose that cells sensing they are inflicted with mortal injury can turn on molecular programs insuring not only that they die an innocuous form of death (apoptosis) but also that once they are dead their elimination is (facilitated by SAP) swift and efficient. PMID:18046483

  7. SPHERICAL DIE

    DOEpatents

    Livingston, J.P.

    1959-01-27

    A die is presented for pressing powdered materials into a hemispherical shape of uniforin density and wall thickness comprising a fcmale and male die element held in a stationary spaced relation with the space being equivalent to the wall thickness and defining the hemispherical shape, a pressing ring linearly moveable along the male die element, an inlet to fill the space with powdered materials, a guiding system for moving the pressing ring along the male die element so as to press the powdered material and a heating system for heating the male element so that the powdered material is heated while being pressed.

  8. Desmosomes In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Garrod, David

    2010-01-01

    The structure, function, and regulation of desmosomal adhesion in vivo are discussed. Most desmosomes in tissues exhibit calcium-independent adhesion, which is strongly adhesive or “hyperadhesive”. This is fundamental to tissue strength. Almost all studies in culture are done on weakly adhesive, calcium-dependent desmosomes, although hyperadhesion can be readily obtained in confluent cell culture. Calcium dependence is a default condition in vivo, found in wounds and embryonic development. Hyperadhesion appears to be associated with an ordered arrangement of the extracellular domains of the desmosomal cadherins, which gives rise to the intercellular midline identified in ultrastructural studies. This in turn probably depends on molecular order in the desmosomal plaque. Protein kinase C downregulates hyperadhesion and there is preliminary evidence that it may also be regulated by tyrosine kinases. Downregulation of desmosomes in vivo may occur by internalisation of whole desmosomes rather than disassembly. Hyperadhesion has implications for diseases such as pemphigus. PMID:20671997

  9. Nonimmune Chemotaxis In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, Stanley; Lendvai, Sarai; Rogers, Brad; Urivetzky, Morton; Meilman, Edward

    1973-01-01

    Wistar rats were depleted of complement components using purified cobra venom factor (CoF) administered over a 30-hour period by intraperitoneal injection. Complement depletion was confirmed by immunodiffusion assay, hemolytic assay and inhibition of the reverse Arthus reaction. Rats depleted to below 3% of their normal serum complement level showed marked inhibition of chemotaxis into inflammatory fluid produced in polyvinyl sponges 24 hours after implantation into the dorsal subcutaneous region. Subsequent studies were done to test the effect of high local concentrations of CoF on the microcirculation, the neutrophil and the connective tissue. Local exposure of these tissues and cells to CoF in vivo had no inhibiting effect on chemotaxis. Cobra venom factor did not affect neutrophil survival in vitro or in vivo. The most likely hypothesis is that CoF works by depleting complement and that in vivo chemotaxis of the nonbacterial, nonimmune type is complement dependent to the extent of 60 to 80%. The system described allows for quantitative determination of chemotaxis in vivo. PMID:4767264

  10. EDITORIAL: Nanotechnology in vivo Nanotechnology in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-04-01

    -imaging labels [4]. A surface hydroxyl group renders silicon quantum dots soluble in water and the photoluminescence can be made stable with oxygen-passivation. In addition, researchers in Japan have demonstrated how the initially modest yield in the preparation of silicon quantum dots can be improved to tens of milligrams per batch, thus further promoting their application in bio-imaging [5]. In the search for non-toxic quantum dots, researchers at the Amrita Centre for Nanoscience in India have prepared heavy metal-free quantum dot bio-probes based on single phase ZnS [6]. The quantum dots are selectively doped with metals, transition metals and halides to provide tuneable luminescence properties, and they are surface conjugated with folic acid for cancer targeting. The quantum dots were demonstrated to be water-soluble, non-toxic in normal and cancer cell lines, and have bright, tuneable luminescence. So far most of the quantum dots developed for bio-imaging have had excitation and emission wavelengths in the visible spectrum, which is highly absorbed by tissue. This limits imaging with these quantum dots to superficial tissues. This week, researchers in China and the US reported work developing functionalized dots for in vivo tumour vasculature in the infrared part of the spectrum [7]. In addition the quantum dots were functionalised with glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptides, which target the vasculature of almost all types of growing tumours, unlike antibody- or aptamer-mediated targeting strategies that are specific to a particular cancer type. In this issue, researchers in China and the US demonstrate a novel type of contrast agent for ultrasonic tumour imaging [8]. Contrast-enhanced ultrasonic tumour imaging extends the diagnostic and imaging capabilities of traditional techniques. The use of nanoparticles as ultrasound contrast agents exploits the presence of open pores in the range of 380 to 780 nm in tumour blood vessels, which enhance the permeability and retention

  11. EDITORIAL: Nanotechnology in vivo Nanotechnology in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-04-01

    -imaging labels [4]. A surface hydroxyl group renders silicon quantum dots soluble in water and the photoluminescence can be made stable with oxygen-passivation. In addition, researchers in Japan have demonstrated how the initially modest yield in the preparation of silicon quantum dots can be improved to tens of milligrams per batch, thus further promoting their application in bio-imaging [5]. In the search for non-toxic quantum dots, researchers at the Amrita Centre for Nanoscience in India have prepared heavy metal-free quantum dot bio-probes based on single phase ZnS [6]. The quantum dots are selectively doped with metals, transition metals and halides to provide tuneable luminescence properties, and they are surface conjugated with folic acid for cancer targeting. The quantum dots were demonstrated to be water-soluble, non-toxic in normal and cancer cell lines, and have bright, tuneable luminescence. So far most of the quantum dots developed for bio-imaging have had excitation and emission wavelengths in the visible spectrum, which is highly absorbed by tissue. This limits imaging with these quantum dots to superficial tissues. This week, researchers in China and the US reported work developing functionalized dots for in vivo tumour vasculature in the infrared part of the spectrum [7]. In addition the quantum dots were functionalised with glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptides, which target the vasculature of almost all types of growing tumours, unlike antibody- or aptamer-mediated targeting strategies that are specific to a particular cancer type. In this issue, researchers in China and the US demonstrate a novel type of contrast agent for ultrasonic tumour imaging [8]. Contrast-enhanced ultrasonic tumour imaging extends the diagnostic and imaging capabilities of traditional techniques. The use of nanoparticles as ultrasound contrast agents exploits the presence of open pores in the range of 380 to 780 nm in tumour blood vessels, which enhance the permeability and retention

  12. In Vivo Antioxidant Assays.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress and antioxidant deficiency have been implicated in the pathophysiology of a wide range of diseases and conditions. Consequently, over recent years many different supplementation trials have been implemented, aimed at improving clinical outcomes by boosting antioxidant levels. These trials included supplementation with individual antioxidants, antioxidant combinations, and antioxidant-rich foods such as fruit and vegetable juices and other plant extracts. To ensure that data from these trials are interpreted correctly, it is essential that suitable biomarkers are used to assess changes in in vivo antioxidant activity resulting from supplementation. Therefore, the measurement of antioxidant systems, such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase, and status of other molecules in biological fluids with their quantification methods are simplified in this chapter. PMID:26939271

  13. In vivo dosimetry for IMRT

    SciTech Connect

    Vial, Philip

    2011-05-05

    In vivo dosimetry has a well established role in the quality assurance of 2D radiotherapy and 3D conformal radiotherapy. The role of in vivo dosimetry for IMRT is not as well established. IMRT introduces a range of technical issues that complicate in vivo dosimetry. The first decade or so of IMRT implementation has largely relied upon pre-treatment phantom based dose verification. During that time, several new devices and techniques for in vivo dosimetry have emerged with the promise of providing the ultimate form of IMRT dose verification. Solid state dosimeters continue to dominate the field of in vivo dosimetry in the IMRT era. In this report we review the literature on in vivo dosimetry for IMRT, with an emphasis on clinical evidence for different detector types. We describe the pros and cons of different detectors and techniques in the IMRT setting and the roles that they are likely to play in the future.

  14. Sputtered protective coatings for die casting dies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Nieh, C. Y.; Wallace, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    This investigation determined whether selected ion beam sputtered coatings on H-13 die steel would have the potential of improving the thermal fatigue behavior of the steel used as a die in aluminum die casting. The coatings were selected to test candidate insulators and metals capable of providing protection of the die surface. The studies indicate that 1 micrometer thick W and Pt coatings reduced the thermal fatigue more than any other coating tested and are candidates to be used on a die surface to increase die life.

  15. Measuring In Vivo Mitophagy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Nuo; Yun, Jeanho; Liu, Jie; Malide, Daniela; Liu, Chengyu; Rovira, Ilsa I; Holmström, Kira M; Fergusson, Maria M; Yoo, Young Hyun; Combs, Christian A; Finkel, Toren

    2015-11-19

    Alterations in mitophagy have been increasingly linked to aging and age-related diseases. There are, however, no convenient methods to analyze mitophagy in vivo. Here, we describe a transgenic mouse model in which we expressed a mitochondrial-targeted form of the fluorescent reporter Keima (mt-Keima). Keima is a coral-derived protein that exhibits both pH-dependent excitation and resistance to lysosomal proteases. Comparison of a wide range of primary cells and tissues generated from the mt-Keima mouse revealed significant variations in basal mitophagy. In addition, we have employed the mt-Keima mice to analyze how mitophagy is altered by conditions including diet, oxygen availability, Huntingtin transgene expression, the absence of macroautophagy (ATG5 or ATG7 expression), an increase in mitochondrial mutational load, the presence of metastatic tumors, and normal aging. The ability to assess mitophagy under a host of varying environmental and genetic perturbations suggests that the mt-Keima mouse should be a valuable resource. PMID:26549682

  16. Nanocrystal targeting in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åkerman, Maria E.; Chan, Warren C. W.; Laakkonen, Pirjo; Bhatia, Sangeeta N.; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2002-10-01

    Inorganic nanostructures that interface with biological systems have recently attracted widespread interest in biology and medicine. Nanoparticles are thought to have potential as novel intravascular probes for both diagnostic (e.g., imaging) and therapeutic purposes (e.g., drug delivery). Critical issues for successful nanoparticle delivery include the ability to target specific tissues and cell types and escape from the biological particulate filter known as the reticuloendothelial system. We set out to explore the feasibility of in vivo targeting by using semiconductor quantum dots (qdots). Qdots are small (<10 nm) inorganic nanocrystals that possess unique luminescent properties; their fluorescence emission is stable and tuned by varying the particle size or composition. We show that ZnS-capped CdSe qdots coated with a lung-targeting peptide accumulate in the lungs of mice after i.v. injection, whereas two other peptides specifically direct qdots to blood vessels or lymphatic vessels in tumors. We also show that adding polyethylene glycol to the qdot coating prevents nonselective accumulation of qdots in reticuloendothelial tissues. These results encourage the construction of more complex nanostructures with capabilities such as disease sensing and drug delivery.

  17. Wege in die Zukunft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauermann, Göran; Mosler, Karl

    Die Zukunft stellt große Herausforderungen an die Arbeit der Deutschen Statistischen Gesellschaft. Sie betreffen die gestiegenen Anforderungen der Nutzer von Statistik, die Kommunikationsmöglichkeiten des Internets sowie die Dynamik der statistischen Wissenschaften und ihrer Anwendungsgebiete. Das Kapitel 5 beschreibt, wie sich die Gesellschaft diesen Herausforderungen stellt und welche Ziele sie sich in der wissenschaftlichen Zusammenarbeit und im Kampf gegen das Innumeratentum gesetzt hat.

  18. Die drool and die drool theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmalzer, A. M.; Giacomin, A. Jeffrey

    2013-04-01

    When molten plastic is extruded from a die, it sometimes collects on the open face of the die. Known as die drool, this phenomenon costs plastics manufacturers by requiring die cleaning. This has been attributed to many causes, but none of these has led to an equation for the drool rate. In this work we provide an exact analytical solution for the drool rate, and we base this solution on a postulate of a cohesive slip layer near the die walls. We thus attribute die drool to cohesive failure within the fluid at an internal surface where the fluid slips on itself. We adimensionalize the drool rate with the production rate, and call this the build up ratio, BR. We provide an exact analytical solution for BR when the cohesive slip layer either sticks at the wall. We examine the slit geometry corresponding to sheet or film extrusion.

  19. Packaged die heater

    SciTech Connect

    Spielberger, Richard; Ohme, Bruce Walker; Jensen, Ronald J.

    2011-06-21

    A heater for heating packaged die for burn-in and heat testing is described. The heater may be a ceramic-type heater with a metal filament. The heater may be incorporated into the integrated circuit package as an additional ceramic layer of the package, or may be an external heater placed in contact with the package to heat the die. Many different types of integrated circuit packages may be accommodated. The method provides increased energy efficiency for heating the die while reducing temperature stresses on testing equipment. The method allows the use of multiple heaters to heat die to different temperatures. Faulty die may be heated to weaken die attach material to facilitate removal of the die. The heater filament or a separate temperature thermistor located in the package may be used to accurately measure die temperature.

  20. Displaced capillary dies

    DOEpatents

    Kalejs, Juris P.; Chalmers, Bruce; Surek, Thomas

    1984-01-01

    An asymmetrical shaped capillary die made exclusively of graphite is used to grow silicon ribbon which is capable of being made into solar cells that are more efficient than cells produced from ribbon made using a symmetrically shaped die.

  1. Displaced capillary dies

    DOEpatents

    Kalejs, Juris P.; Chalmers, Bruce; Surek, Thomas

    1982-01-01

    An asymmetrical shaped capillary die made exclusively of graphite is used to grow silicon ribbon which is capable of being made into solar cells that are more efficient than cells produced from ribbon made using a symmetrically shaped die.

  2. Experimental Cryosurgery Investigations In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gage, A.A.; Baust, J.M.; Baust, J.G.

    2009-01-01

    Cryosurgery is the use of freezing temperatures to elicit an ablative response in a targeted tissue. This review provides a global overview of experimentation in vivo which has been the basis of advancement of this widely applied therapeutic option. The cellular and tissue-related events that underlie the mechanisms of destruction, including direct cell injury (cryolysis), vascular stasis, apoptosis and necrosis, are described and are related to the optimal methods of technique of freezing to achieve efficacious therapy. In vivo experiments with major organs, including wound healing, the putative immunological response following thawing, and the use of cryoadjunctive strategies to enhance cancer cell sensitivity to freezing, are described. PMID:19833119

  3. HIGH PRESSURE DIES

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, W.B.

    1960-05-31

    A press was invented for subjecting specimens of bismuth, urania, yttria, or thoria to high pressures and temperatures. The press comprises die parts enclosing a space in which is placed an electric heater thermally insulated from the die parts so as not to damage them by heat. The die parts comprise two opposed inner frustoconical parts and an outer part having a double frustoconical recess receiving the inner parts. The die space decreases in size as the inner die parts move toward one another against the outer part and the inner parts, though very hard, do not fracture because of the mode of support provided by the outer part.

  4. The In Vivo Salmonella gallinarum

    PubMed Central

    Buxton, A.

    1959-01-01

    The intravenous inoculation into fowls of large doses of crude polysaccharide preparations derived from a smooth strain of Salmonella gallinarum resulted in the adsorption of some of the polysaccharide on the surfaces of circulating erythrocytes. This in vivo adsorption, detectable by an antiglobulin haemagglutination test, lasted for a maximum of approximately 24 hours after inoculation of polysaccharide. Similarly, in vivo sensitization of avian erythrocytes reached a maximum at about 8-10 days following oral infection of fowls with Salm. gallinarum. These results are discussed in relation to the ability of the reticulo-endothelial system to remove polysaccharide from the blood stream, and to the possible consequences of the hosts' immunological response to sensitized erythrocytes. PMID:13806563

  5. Terahertz pulsed imaging in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickwell-MacPherson, E.

    2011-03-01

    Terahertz (1012 Hz) pulsed imaging is a totally non-destructive and non-ionising imaging modality and thus potential applications in medicine are being investigated. In this paper we present results using our hand-held terahertz probe that has been designed for in vivo use. In particular, we use the terahertz probe to perform reflection geometry in vivo measurements of human skin. The hand-held terahertz probe gives more flexibility than a typical flat-bed imaging system, but it also results in noisier data and requires existing processing methods to be improved. We describe the requirements and limitations of system geometry, data acquisition rate, image resolution and penetration depth and explain how various factors are dependent on each other. We show how some of the physical limitations can be overcome using novel data processing methods.

  6. In vivo imaging of sulfotransferases

    DOEpatents

    Barrio, Jorge R; Kepe, Vladimir; Small, Gary W; Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar

    2013-02-12

    Radiolabeled tracers for sulfotransferases (SULTs), their synthesis, and their use are provided. Included are substituted phenols, naphthols, coumarins, and flavones radiolabeled with .sup.18F, .sup.123I, .sup.124I, .sup.125I, or .sup.11C. Also provided are in vivo techniques for using these and other tracers as analytical and diagnostic tools to study sulfotransferase distribution and activity, in health and disease, and to evaluate therapeutic interventions.

  7. Die singulation method

    SciTech Connect

    Swiler, Thomas P; Garcia, Ernest J; Francis, Kathryn M

    2014-01-07

    A method is disclosed for singulating die from a semiconductor substrate (e.g. a semiconductor-on-insulator substrate or a bulk silicon substrate) containing an oxide layer (e.g. silicon dioxide or a silicate glass) and one or more semiconductor layers (e.g. monocrystalline or polycrystalline silicon) located above the oxide layer. The method etches trenches through the substrate and through each semiconductor layer about the die being singulated, with the trenches being offset from each other around at least a part of the die so that the oxide layer between the trenches holds the substrate and die together. The trenches can be anisotropically etched using a Deep Reactive Ion Etching (DRIE) process. After the trenches are etched, the oxide layer between the trenches can be etched away with a HF etchant to singulate the die. A release fixture can be located near one side of the substrate to receive the singulated die.

  8. Die singulation method

    SciTech Connect

    Swiler, Thomas P.; Garcia, Ernest J.; Francis, Kathryn M.

    2013-06-11

    A method is disclosed for singulating die from a semiconductor substrate (e.g. a semiconductor-on-insulator substrate or a bulk silicon substrate) containing an oxide layer (e.g. silicon dioxide or a silicate glass) and one or more semiconductor layers (e.g. monocrystalline or polycrystalline silicon) located above the oxide layer. The method etches trenches through the substrate and through each semiconductor layer about the die being singulated, with the trenches being offset from each other around at least a part of the die so that the oxide layer between the trenches holds the substrate and die together. The trenches can be anisotropically etched using a Deep Reactive Ion Etching (DRIE) process. After the trenches are etched, the oxide layer between the trenches can be etched away with an HF etchant to singulate the die. A release fixture can be located near one side of the substrate to receive the singulated die.

  9. Extrusion die and method

    DOEpatents

    Lipp, G. Daniel

    1994-04-26

    A method and die apparatus for manufacturing a honeycomb body of rhombic cell cross-section by extrusion through an extrusion die of triangular cell discharge slot configuration, the die incorporating feedholes at selected slot intersections only, such that slot segments communicating directly with the feedholes discharge web material and slot segments not so connected do not discharge web material, whereby a rhombic cell cross-section in the extruded body is provided.

  10. The Ambiguous Dying Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bern-Klug, Mercedes

    2004-01-01

    More than one-half of the 2.4 million deaths that will occur in the United States in 2004 will be immediately preceded by a time in which the likelihood of dying can best be described as "ambiguous." Many people die without ever being considered "dying" or "at the end of life." These people may miss out on the opportunity to close important…

  11. Sputtered protective coatings for die casting dies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Nieh, C.-Y.; Wallace, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    Three experimental research designs investigating candidate materials and processes involved in protective die surface coating procedures by sputter deposition, using ion beam technologies, are discussed. Various pre-test results show that none of the coatings remained completely intact for 15,000 test cycles. The longest lifetime was observed for coatings such as tungsten, platinum, and molybdenum which reduced thermal fatigue, but exhibited oxidation and suppressed crack initiation only as long as the coating did not fracture. Final test results confirmed earlier findings and coatings with Pt and W proved to be the candidate materials to be used on a die surface to increase die life. In the W-coated specimens, which remained intact on the surface after thermal fatigue testing, no oxidation was found under the coating, although a few cracks formed on the surface where the coating broke down. Further research is planned.

  12. Die Soldering in Aluminium Die Casting

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Q.; Kenik, E.A.; Viswanathan, S.

    2000-03-15

    Two types of tests, dipping tests and dip-coating tests were carried out on small steel cylinders using pure aluminum and 380 alloy to investigate the mechanism of die soldering during aluminum die casting. Optical and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the morphology and composition of the phases formed during soldering. A soldering mechanism is postulated based on experimental observations. A soldering critical temperature is postulated at which iron begins to react with aluminum to form an aluminum-rich liquid phase and solid intermetallic compounds. When the temperature at the die surface is higher than this critical temperature, the aluminum-rich phase is liquid and joins the die with the casting during the subsequent solidification. The paper discusses the mechanism of soldering for the case of pure aluminum and 380 alloy casting in a steel mold, the factors that promote soldering, and the strength of the bond formed when soldering occurs. conditions, an aluminum-rich soldering layer may also form over the intermetallic layer. Although a significant amount of research has been conducted on the nature of these intermetallics, little is known about the conditions under which soldering occurs.

  13. Is Dying Young Worse than Dying Old?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jecker, Nancy S.; Schneiderman, Lawrence J.

    1994-01-01

    Notes that, in contemporary Western society, people feel death of small child is greater injustice than death of older adult and experience correspondingly greater sorrow, anger, regret, or bitterness when very young person dies. Contrasts these attitudes with those of ancient Greece and shows relevance that different attitudes toward death have…

  14. Micromechanical die attachment surcharge

    DOEpatents

    Filter, William F.; Hohimer, John P.

    2002-01-01

    An attachment structure is disclosed for attaching a die to a supporting substrate without the use of adhesives or solder. The attachment structure, which can be formed by micromachining, functions purely mechanically in utilizing a plurality of shaped pillars (e.g. round, square or polygonal and solid, hollow or slotted) that are formed on one of the die or supporting substrate and which can be urged into contact with various types of mating structures including other pillars, a deformable layer or a plurality of receptacles that are formed on the other of the die or supporting substrate, thereby forming a friction bond that holds the die to the supporting substrate. The attachment structure can further include an alignment structure for precise positioning of the die and supporting substrate to facilitate mounting the die to the supporting substrate. The attachment structure has applications for mounting semiconductor die containing a microelectromechanical (MEM) device, a microsensor or an integrated circuit (IC), and can be used to form a multichip module. The attachment structure is particularly useful for mounting die containing released MEM devices since these devices are fragile and can otherwise be damaged or degraded by adhesive or solder mounting.

  15. Extrusion die and method

    DOEpatents

    Lipp, G. Daniel

    1994-05-03

    A method and die apparatus for manufacturing a honeycomb body of triangular cell cross-section and high cell density, the die having a combination of (i) feedholes feeding slot intersections and (ii) feedholes feeding slot segments not supplied from slot intersections, whereby a reduction in feedhole count is achieved while still retaining good extrusion efficiency and extrudate uniformity.

  16. Towards a disposable in vivo miniature implantable fluorescence detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellis, Stephen; Jackson, J. Carlton; Mathewson, Alan

    2006-02-01

    In the field of fluorescent microscopy, neuronal activity, diabetes and drug treatment are a few of the wide ranging biomedical applications that can be monitored with the use of dye markers. Historically, in-vivo fluorescent detectors consist of implantable probes coupled by optical fibre to sophisticated bench-top instrumentation. These systems typically use laser light to excite the fluorescent marker dies and using sensors, such as the photo-multiplier tube (PMT) or charge coupled devices (CCD), detect the fluorescent light that is filtered from the total excitation. Such systems are large and expensive. In this paper we highlight the first steps toward a fully implantable in-vivo fluorescence detection system. The aim is to make the detector system small, low cost and disposable. The current prototype is a hybrid platform consisting of a vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) to provide the excitation and a filtered solid state Geiger mode avalanche photo-diode (APD) to detect the emitted fluorescence. Fluorescence detection requires measurement of extremely low levels of light so the proposed APD detectors combine the ability to count individual photons with the added advantage of being small in size. At present the exciter and sensor are mounted on a hybrid PCB inside a 3mm diameter glass tube.This is wired to external electronics, which provide quenching, photon counting and a PC interface. In this configuration, the set-up can be used for in-vitro experimentation and in-vivo analysis conducted on animals such as mice.

  17. Colchicine prevents tumor necrosis factor-induced toxicity in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Tiegs, G; Freudenberg, M A; Galanos, C; Wendel, A

    1992-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) toxicity was induced in vivo by intravenous administration of 15 micrograms of recombinant murine TNF-alpha per kg to galactosamine-sensitized mice. Within 8 h, the animals developed a fulminant hepatitis. Intravenous administration of 0.5 mg of colchicine per kg at 19 and 4 h prior to TNF challenge protected the animals against hepatitis. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated, bone marrow-derived macrophages from C3H/HeN mice released significant amounts of TNF in vitro. When such macrophages were intravenously given to LPS-resistant galactosamine-sensitized C3H/HeJ mice, these animals died within 24 h. Preincubation of these transferred macrophages with colchicine did not suppress the LPS-inducible TNF release from these cells. Concordantly, administration of macrophages exposed to colchicine in vitro resulted in full lethality. However, in vivo pretreatment of C3H/HeJ mice with colchicine 19 and 4 h prior to the transfer of LPS-stimulated macrophages prevented lethality. In LPS-responsive NMRI mice which had been protected against galactosamine-LPS-induced hepatitis by pretreatment with colchicine, TNF was still released into the blood. We conclude from our findings that the in vivo protection by colchicine is mediated by blocking TNF action on target cells while the effector cells of LPS toxicity, i.e., the macrophages, remain responsive. PMID:1563785

  18. Papillomavirus DNA Complementation in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jiafen; Cladel, Nancy M.; Budgeon, Lynn; Balogh, Karla K.; Christensen, Neil D.

    2009-01-01

    Recent phylogenic studies indicate that DNA recombination could have occurred in ancient papillomaviruses types. However, no experimental data is available to demonstrate this event because of the lack of human papillomavirus infection models. We have used the cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV)/rabbit model to study pathogenesis and immunogenicity of different mutant genomes in vivo. Although the domestic rabbit is not a natural host for CRPV infection, it is possible to initiate infection with naked CRPV DNA cloned into a plasmid and monitor papilloma outgrowth on these animals. Taking advantage of a large panel of mutants based on a CRPV strain (Hershey CRPV), we tested the hypothesis that two non-viable mutant genomes could induce papillomas by either recombination or complementation. We found that co-infection with a dysfunctional mutant with an E2 transactivation domain mutation and another mutant with an E7 ATG knock out generated papillomas in rabbits. DNA extracted from these papillomas contained genotypes from both parental genomes. Three additional pairs of dysfunctional mutants also showed similar results. Individual wild type genes were also shown to rescue the function of corresponding dysfunctional mutants. Therefore, we suggest that complementation occurred between these two non-viable mutant PV genomes in vivo. PMID:19379784

  19. Hydroxyl radical detection in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Chevion, M.; Floyd, R.A.

    1986-05-01

    Hydroxyl radicals have been implicated as the actual species responsible for the deleterious effects of active oxygen in biology. However, in most cases, its presence has only been inferred by circumstantial evidence. Using electrochemical detection coupled to HPLC separation technique the authors can identify and quantitate (at sub-picomole level) the hydroxylated products of 3 aromatic compounds (phenol, salicylate, and 2-deoxy-guanosine) as a direct measure of hydroxyl radical formation. Firstly, the authors showed that mixing ascorbate with copper ions (in the absence of presence of a protein) yields catechols, dihydroxybenzoic acids and 8-OH-deoxy-guanosine (8-OHdG). This approach has been used to study the formation of OH in vivo. Human granulocytes stimulated with TPA showed that 8-OHdG was formed in the cellular DNA at high levels (one 8-OHdG/800 DNA bases). Unstimulated granulocytes contained 8-OHdG below detection level. Formation of 8-OHdG in the TPA-stimulated granulocytes DNA was decreased by the addition of SOD and catalase. Using salicylate as an in vivo scavenger of hydroxyl radicals the authors showed that the level of trapped-dihydroxybenzoic acids is increased approx.8 and approx.3 fold in the lungs and liver of paraquat-poisoned mice, respectively, as compared to normal animals. Similarly, the detected level of dihydroxybenzoic acids in the hearts of adriamycin-treated rats was increased over 100-fold as compared to the hearts of control animals.

  20. Die zwei Kulturen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ankolekar, Anupriya; Krötzsch, Markus; Tran, Than; Vrandecic, Denny

    Oft werden zwei mögliche Entwicklungen des Webs diskutiert - das Web 2.0 und das Semantic Web. Wenn wir diese zwei Visionen für das zukünftige Web unter die Lupe nehmen, dann lässt sich feststellen, dass sich die Ideen in ihrem Kern und ihren Technologien gegenseitig ergänzen. Dementsprechend können und sollen beide Visionen von den Erfahrungen und Stärken der anderen profitieren. Wir glauben daran, dass zukünftige Webanwendungen den Web 2.0-Fokus auf Community und Benutzerfreundlichkeit beibehalten und, darüber hinaus, auch von Technologien des Semantic Web zur Vereinfachung der mashupähnlichen Datenintegration profitieren werden. Auf Basis eines Semantic Blog-Szenarios werden wir hier die Vorteile einer möglichen Kombination von Semantic Web und Web 2.0 illustrieren, die zeitnah realisiert werden kann. Wir werden auch auf technische Probleme eingehen, die bei der Erweiterung dieses Szenarios entstehen. Wir stellen dar, wie aktuelle Entwicklungen in der Semantic Web Forschung diese Probleme angehen können, und setzen zugleich auch Schwerpunkte für die zukünftige Forschung, die in diesem Zusammenhang relevant sind.

  1. [Towards optical in vivo electrophysiology].

    PubMed

    Lambot, Laurie; Gall, David

    Optical imaging of voltage indicators is a promising approach for detecting the activity of neuronal circuits with high spatial and temporal resolution. In this context, genetically encoded voltage indicators, combining genetic targeting and optical readout of transmembrane voltage, represent a technological breaktrough that will without doubt have a major impact in neuroscience. However, so far the existing genetically encoded voltage indicators lacked the capabilities to detect individual action potentials and fast spike trains in live animals. Here, we present a novel indicator allowing high-fidelity imaging of individual spikes and dentritic voltage dynamics in vivo. Used in combination with optogenetics, which allows to manipulate neuronal activity, this opens the possibility of an all-optical electrophysiology. PMID:27615186

  2. Measuring Vascular Permeability In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Eelco F J; Baish, James W; Padera, Timothy P; Fukumura, Dai

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decades, in vivo vascular permeability measurements have provided significant insight into vascular functions in physiological and pathophysiological conditions such as the response to pro- and anti-angiogenic signaling, abnormality of tumor vasculature and its normalization, and delivery and efficacy of therapeutic agents. Different approaches for vascular permeability measurements have been established. Here, we describe and discuss a conventional 2D imaging method to measure vascular permeability, which was originally documented by Gerlowski and Jain in 1986 (Microvasc Res 31:288-305, 1986) and further developed by Yuan et al. in the early 1990s (Microvasc Res 45:269-289, 1993; Cancer Res 54:352-3356, 1994), and our recently developed 3D imaging method, which advances the approach originally described by Brown et al. in 2001 (Nat Med 7:864-868, 2001). PMID:27581015

  3. In Vivo EPR For Dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, Harold M.; Burke, Greg; Coey, M.; Demidenko, Eugene; Dong, Ruhong; Grinberg, Oleg; Hilton, James; Iwasaki, Akinori; Lesniewski, Piotr; Kmiec, Maciej; Lo, Kai-Ming; Nicolalde, R. Javier; Ruuge, Andres; Sakata, Yasuko; Sucheta, Artur; Walczak, Tadeusz; Williams, Benjamin B.; Mitchell, Chad; Romanyukha, Alex; Schauer, David A.

    2007-01-01

    As a result of terrorism, accident, or war, populations potentially can be exposed to doses of ionizing radiation that could cause direct clinical effects within days or weeks. There is a critical need to determine the magnitude of the exposure to individuals so that those with significant risk have appropriate procedures initiated immediately, while those without a significant probability of acute effects can be reassured and removed from the need for further consideration in the medical/emergency system. In many of the plausible scenarios there is an urgent need to make the determination very soon after the event and while the subject is still present. In vivo EPR measurements of radiation-induced changes in the enamel of teeth is a method, perhaps the only such method, which can differentiate among doses sufficiently for classifying individuals into categories for treatment with sufficient accuracy to facilitate decisions on medical treatment. In its current state, the in vivo EPR dosimeter can provide estimates of absorbed dose with an error approximately ± 50 cGy over the range of interest for acute biological effects of radiation, assuming repeated measurements of the tooth in the mouth of the subject. The time required for acquisition, the lower limit, and the precision are expected to improve, with improvements in the resonator and the algorithm for acquiring and calculating the dose. The magnet system that is currently used, while potentially deployable, is somewhat large and heavy, requiring that it be mounted on a small truck or trailer. Several smaller magnets, including an intraoral magnet are under development, which would extend the ease of use of this technique. PMID:18591988

  4. Die Zeitung der Zukunft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieser, Christoph; Schaffert, Sebastian

    Schon lange wird spekuliert, wie wir in Zukunft Zeitung lesen werden. Werden wir am Frühstückstisch wie gewohnt in einer Zeitung aus Papier schmökern oder werden wir die Zeitung als biegsame Folie beschrieben mit elektronischer Tinte in Händen halten? Wird die Zeitung mit anderen Medien wie Radio und Fernsehen verschmelzen? Viele Varianten sind denkbar. Heute lässt sich schon ein Trend ablesen: Immer mehr Leser entdecken die Online-Zeitung als Informationsmedium, eine Voraussetzung für die Nutzung neuer Technologien in der Zeitung der Zukunft. In diesem Kapitel stellen wir Entwicklungsmöglichkeiten der Online-Zeitung dar, wie sie im Social Semantic Web möglich werden.

  5. When Somebody Dies

    MedlinePlus

    ... alguien muere All living things — including bugs and fish and people — die. It's difficult, even for grownups, ... kind of death for families and friends to deal with because it happens so fast. There is ...

  6. Coffee induces autophagy in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Pietrocola, Federico; Malik, Shoaib Ahmad; Mariño, Guillermo; Vacchelli, Erika; Senovilla, Laura; Chaba, Kariman; Niso-Santano, Mireia; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Madeo, Frank; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies and clinical trials revealed that chronic consumption coffee is associated with the inhibition of several metabolic diseases as well as reduction in overall and cause-specific mortality. We show that both natural and decaffeinated brands of coffee similarly rapidly trigger autophagy in mice. One to 4 h after coffee consumption, we observed an increase in autophagic flux in all investigated organs (liver, muscle, heart) in vivo, as indicated by the increased lipidation of LC3B and the reduction of the abundance of the autophagic substrate sequestosome 1 (p62/SQSTM1). These changes were accompanied by the inhibition of the enzymatic activity of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), leading to the reduced phosphorylation of p70S6K, as well as by the global deacetylation of cellular proteins detectable by immunoblot. Immunohistochemical analyses of transgenic mice expressing a GFP–LC3B fusion protein confirmed the coffee-induced relocation of LC3B to autophagosomes, as well as general protein deacetylation. Altogether, these results indicate that coffee triggers 2 phenomena that are also induced by nutrient depletion, namely a reduction of protein acetylation coupled to an increase in autophagy. We speculate that polyphenols contained in coffee promote health by stimulating autophagy. PMID:24769862

  7. In Vivo Facilitated Diffusion Model

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Maximilian; Metzler, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Under dilute in vitro conditions transcription factors rapidly locate their target sequence on DNA by using the facilitated diffusion mechanism. However, whether this strategy of alternating between three-dimensional bulk diffusion and one-dimensional sliding along the DNA contour is still beneficial in the crowded interior of cells is highly disputed. Here we use a simple model for the bacterial genome inside the cell and present a semi-analytical model for the in vivo target search of transcription factors within the facilitated diffusion framework. Without having to resort to extensive simulations we determine the mean search time of a lac repressor in a living E. coli cell by including parameters deduced from experimental measurements. The results agree very well with experimental findings, and thus the facilitated diffusion picture emerges as a quantitative approach to gene regulation in living bacteria cells. Furthermore we see that the search time is not very sensitive to the parameters characterizing the DNA configuration and that the cell seems to operate very close to optimal conditions for target localization. Local searches as implied by the colocalization mechanism are only found to mildly accelerate the mean search time within our model. PMID:23349772

  8. Coffee induces autophagy in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pietrocola, Federico; Malik, Shoaib Ahmad; Mariño, Guillermo; Vacchelli, Erika; Senovilla, Laura; Chaba, Kariman; Niso-Santano, Mireia; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Madeo, Frank; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies and clinical trials revealed that chronic consumption coffee is associated with the inhibition of several metabolic diseases as well as reduction in overall and cause-specific mortality. We show that both natural and decaffeinated brands of coffee similarly rapidly trigger autophagy in mice. One to 4 h after coffee consumption, we observed an increase in autophagic flux in all investigated organs (liver, muscle, heart) in vivo, as indicated by the increased lipidation of LC3B and the reduction of the abundance of the autophagic substrate sequestosome 1 (p62/SQSTM1). These changes were accompanied by the inhibition of the enzymatic activity of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), leading to the reduced phosphorylation of p70(S6K), as well as by the global deacetylation of cellular proteins detectable by immunoblot. Immunohistochemical analyses of transgenic mice expressing a GFP-LC3B fusion protein confirmed the coffee-induced relocation of LC3B to autophagosomes, as well as general protein deacetylation. Altogether, these results indicate that coffee triggers 2 phenomena that are also induced by nutrient depletion, namely a reduction of protein acetylation coupled to an increase in autophagy. We speculate that polyphenols contained in coffee promote health by stimulating autophagy. PMID:24769862

  9. In vivo generator for radioimmunotherapy

    DOEpatents

    Mausner, Leonard F.; Srivastava, Suresh G.; Straub, Rita F.

    1988-01-01

    The present invention involves labeling monoclonal antibodies with intermediate half-life radionuclides which decay to much shorter half-life daughters with desirable high energy beta emissions. Since the daughter will be in equilibrium with the parent, it can exert an in-situ tumoricidal effect over a prolonged period in a localized fashion, essentially as an "in-vivo generator". This approach circumvents the inverse relationship between half-life and beta decay energy. Compartmental modeling was used to determine the relative distribution of dose from both parent and daughter nuclei in target and non-target tissues. Actual antibody biodistribution data have been used to fit realistic rate constants for a model containing tumor, blood, and non-tumor compartments. These rate constants were then used in a variety of simulations for two generator systems, Ba-128/Cs-128 (t.sub.1/2 =2.4d/3.6m) and Pd-112/Ag-112 (t.sub.1/2 =0.9d/192m). The results show that higher tumor/background dose ratios may be achievable by virtue of the rapid excretion of a chemically different daughter during the uptake and clearance phases. This modeling also quantitatively demonstrates the favorable impact on activity distribution of a faster monoclonal antibody tumor uptake, especially when the antibody is labeled with a radionuclide with a comparable half-life.

  10. In vivo generator for radioimmunotherapy

    DOEpatents

    Mausner, Leonard F.; Srivastava, Suresh G.; Straub, Rita F.

    1988-11-01

    The present invention involves labeling monoclonal antibodies with intermediate half-life radionuclides which decay to much shorter half-life daughters with desirable high energy beta emissions. Since the daughter will be in equilibrium with the parent, it can exert an in-situ tumoricidal effect over a prolonged period in a localized fashion, essentially as an "in-vivo generator". This approach circumvents the inverse relationship between half-life and beta decay energy. Compartmental modeling was used to determine the relative distribution of dose from both parent and daughter nuclei in target and non-target tissues. Actual antibody biodistribution data have been used to fit realistic rate constants for a model containing tumor, blood, and non-tumor compartments. These rate constants were then used in a variety of simulations for two generator systems, Ba-128/Cs-128 (t.sub.1/2 =2.4d/3.6m) and Pd-112/Ag-112 (t.sub.1/2 =0.9d/192m). The results show that higher tumor/background dose ratios may be achievable by virtue of the rapid excretion of a chemically different daughter during the uptake and clearance phases. This modeling also quantitatively demonstrates the favorable impact on activity distribution of a faster monoclonal antibody tumor uptake, especially when the antibody is labeled with a radionuclide with a comparable half-life.

  11. Issues with dying patients.

    PubMed

    Valent, P

    1978-04-22

    Doctors have the privilege of looking after patients from the moment of birth to the moment of death. Yet, the holistic approach to patients is interfered with by the doctor's role as a warrior against death, where death's everpresent claim on our lives, and its final victory, are ignored. This paper attempts to explore why doctors are in their current position, the mechanisms for ignoring death which are shared by doctors and patients, the nature of the fear of death, and practical implications for the treatment of dying patients. More and more patients die now in medical settings. It is incumbent on doctors to understand the dying process, if much unnecessary suffering is to be prevented. PMID:661717

  12. A Comparison of General Case In Vivo and General Case Simulation Plus In Vivo Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonnell, John J.; Ferguson, Brad

    1988-01-01

    The study examined the relative effectiveness and efficiency of general case in vivo and general case simulation plus in vivo training in teaching six students with moderate and severe disabilities to purchase items in fast-food restaurants. Although both strategies led to reliable performance in nontrained settings, the in vivo instruction…

  13. Absolute calibration in vivo measurement systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kruchten, D.A.; Hickman, D.P.

    1991-02-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is currently investigating a new method for obtaining absolute calibration factors for radiation measurement systems used to measure internally deposited radionuclides in vivo. Absolute calibration of in vivo measurement systems will eliminate the need to generate a series of human surrogate structures (i.e., phantoms) for calibrating in vivo measurement systems. The absolute calibration of in vivo measurement systems utilizes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to define physiological structure, size, and composition. The MRI image provides a digitized representation of the physiological structure, which allows for any mathematical distribution of radionuclides within the body. Using Monte Carlo transport codes, the emission spectrum from the body is predicted. The in vivo measurement equipment is calibrated using the Monte Carlo code and adjusting for the intrinsic properties of the detection system. The calibration factors are verified using measurements of existing phantoms and previously obtained measurements of human volunteers. 8 refs.

  14. Experiences of the dying.

    PubMed

    Schoenbeck, Susan L

    2011-01-01

    It is often a mystery to us how we have come to know and believe in certain things. Beliefs are like guests who come up to a door. They come in only if the host opens it and invites them in. Otherwise they are turned away, unable to enter. LPNs/LVNs are invited to reflect on their experiences and expand their knowledge and beliefs. There is growing recognition that bedside talks of the dying, spirit travel and near-death events are real events for the people who experience them. LPNs/ LVNs are encouraged to expand their knowledge and beliefs about dying. PMID:23252027

  15. Assisted Dying in Canada.

    PubMed

    Schuklenk, Udo

    2014-01-01

    This paper makes an affirmative ethical case in favour of the decriminalization of assisted dying in Canada. It then proceeds to defending the affirmative case against various slippery-slope arguments that are typically deployed by opponents of assisted dying. Finally, a recent case of questionable professional conduct by anti-euthanasia campaigners cum academics is flagged as a warning to all of us not to permit the quality of the professional debate to deteriorate unacceptably, despite the personal emotional investments involved on all sides of the debate. PMID:26871530

  16. When a Baby Dies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Church, Martha Jo; And Others

    Written especially for grieving mothers whose babies have died, this booklet offers an overview of stages and experiences through which bereaved parents commonly pass. Specifically, the text is intended to give comfort to bereaved parents, offer insight into the grieving process, and provide thoughts on leave-taking ceremonies. The first section…

  17. Poetry and the Dying.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Aaron

    1992-01-01

    Demonstrates roles poetry can play as people confront the death of loved ones and their own dying. Gives examples of Heinrich Heine transforming his agony into art and, from the poetry of two college students, both in advanced stages of neurological disease, which was read aloud in class, teaching all present something about how to approach their…

  18. Tool & Die Technician.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document contains 23 units to consider for use in a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of tool and die technician. All the units listed will not necessarily apply to every situation or tech prep consortium, nor will all the competencies within each unit be appropriate. Several units appear within each specific occupation and…

  19. Tailoring vessel morphology in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Daniel Joseph

    Tissue engineering is a rapidly growing field which seeks to provide alternatives to organ transplantation in order to address the increasing need for transplantable tissues. One huge hurdle in this effort is the provision of thick tissues; this hurdle exists because currently there is no way to provide prevascularized or rapidly vascularizable scaffolds. To design thick, vascularized tissues, scaffolds are needed that can induce vessels which are similar to the microvasculature found in normal tissues. Angiogenic biomaterials are being developed to provide useful scaffolds to address this problem. In this thesis angiogenic and cell signaling and adhesion factors were incorporated into a biomimetic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel system. The composition of these hydrogels was precisely tuned to induce the formation of differing vessel morphology. To sensitively measure induced microvascular morphology and to compare it to native microvessels in several tissues, this thesis developed an image-based tool for quantification of scale invariant and classical measures of vessel morphology. The tool displayed great utility in the comparison of native vessels and remodeling vessels in normal tissues. To utilize this tool to tune the vessel response in vivo, Flk1::myr-mCherry fluorescently labeled mice were implanted with Platelet Derived Growth Factor-BB (PDGF-BB) and basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF-2) containing PEG-based hydrogels in a modified mouse corneal angiogenesis assay. Resulting vessels were imaged with confocal microscopy, analyzed with the image based tool created in this thesis to compare morphological differences between treatment groups, and used to create a linear relationship between space filling parameters and dose of growth factor release. Morphological parameters of native mouse tissue vessels were then compared to the linear fit to calculate the dose of growth factors needed to induce vessels similar in morphology to native vessels

  20. Navigating "Assisted Dying".

    PubMed

    Schipper, Harvey

    2016-02-01

    Carter is a bellwether decision, an adjudication on a narrow point of law whose implications are vast across society, and whose impact may not be realized for years. Coupled with Quebec's Act Respecting End-of-life Care it has sharply changed the legal landscape with respect to actively ending a person's life. "Medically assisted dying" will be permitted under circumstances, and through processes, which have yet to be operationally defined. This decision carries with it moral assumptions, which mean that it will be difficult to reach a unifying consensus. For some, the decision and Act reflect a modern acknowledgement of individual autonomy. For others, allowing such acts is morally unspeakable. Having opened the Pandora's Box, the question becomes one of navigating a tolerable societal path. I believe it is possible to achieve a workable solution based on the core principle that "medically assisted dying" should be a very rarely employed last option, subject to transparent ongoing review, specifically as to why it was deemed necessary. My analysis is based on 1. The societal conditions in which have fostered demand for "assisted dying", 2. Actions in other jurisdictions, 3. Carter and Quebec Bill 52, 4. Political considerations, 5. Current medical practice. Leading to a series of recommendations regarding. 1. Legislation and regulation, 2. The role of professional regulatory agencies, 3. Medical professions education and practice, 4. Public education, 5. Health care delivery and palliative care. Given the burden of public opinion, and the legal steps already taken, a process for assisted-dying is required. However, those legal and regulatory steps should only be considered a necessary and defensive first step in a two stage process. The larger goal, the second step, is to drive the improvement of care, and thus minimize assisted-dying. PMID:27169205

  1. Herausforderungen durch die deutsche Wiedervereinigung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stäglin, Reiner

    Die Wiedervereinigung stellte auch die Statistik vor große Aufgaben. Die als Organ der staatlichen Planung staatsnah orientierte Statistik der DDR musste auf das zur Neutralität und wissenschaftlichen Unabhängigkeit verpflichtete System der Bundesrepublik umgestellt werden. Ebenso verlangten die Universitäten eine Neuorientierung. Die Deutsche Statistische Gesellschaft hat sich vor allem dreier Aufgaben mit großem Engagement, aber auch mit Bedachtsamkeit angenommen: Aufnahme und Integration der Statistiker aus den neuen Bundesländern in die Gesellschaft, Begleitung der Neuausrichtung des Faches Statistik an deren Hochschulen und Sicherung sowie Nutzung von Datenbeständen der ehemaligen DDR.

  2. Modeling the Mechanical Performance of Die Casting Dies

    SciTech Connect

    R. Allen Miller

    2004-02-27

    The following report covers work performed at Ohio State on modeling the mechanical performance of dies. The focus of the project was development and particularly verification of finite element techniques used to model and predict displacements and stresses in die casting dies. The work entails a major case study performed with and industrial partner on a production die and laboratory experiments performed at Ohio State.

  3. Noninvasive photoacoustic microscopy of methemoglobin in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Min; Zhou, Yong; Zhang, Ruiying; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Due to the various causes of methemoglobinemia and its potential to be confused with other diseases, in vivo measurements of methemoglobin have significant applications in the clinic. Using photoacoustic microscopy (PAM), we quantified the average and the distributed percentage of methemoglobin both in vitro and in vivo. Based on the absorption spectra of methemoglobin, oxyhemoglobin, and deoxyhemoglobin, three wavelengths were chosen to differentiate methemoglobin from the others. The methemoglobin concentrations calculated from the photoacoustic signals agreed well with the preset concentrations. Then we imaged the methemoglobin percentage in microtubes that mimicked blood vessels. Average percentages calculated for five samples with different methemoglobin concentrations also agreed well with the preset values. Finally, we demonstrated the ability of PAM to detect methemoglobin in vivo in a mouse ear. Our results show that PAM can quantitatively image methemoglobin distribution in vivo. PMID:25760655

  4. Heated die facilitates tungsten forming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattin, J. H.; Haystrick, J. E.; Laughlin, J. C.; Leidy, R. A.

    1966-01-01

    Tungsten forming in a press brake employs a bottom die assembly with a heating manifold between two water-cooled die sections. The manifold has hydrogen-oxygen burners spaced along its length for even heat during forming.

  5. Genetic targeting of chemical indicators in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guoying; de Castro Reis, Fernanda; Sundukova, Mayya; Pimpinella, Sofia; Asaro, Antonino; Castaldi, Laura; Batti, Laura; Bilbao, Daniel; Reymond, Luc; Johnsson, Kai; Heppenstall, Paul A

    2015-02-01

    Fluorescent protein reporters have become the mainstay for tracing cellular circuitry in vivo but are limited in their versatility. Here we generated Cre-dependent reporter mice expressing the Snap-tag to target synthetic indicators to cells. Snap-tag labeling worked efficiently and selectively in vivo, allowing for both the manipulation of behavior and monitoring of cellular fluorescence from the same reporter. PMID:25486061

  6. Psychotherapy with Older Dying Persons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dye, Carol J.

    Psychotherapy with older dying patients can lead to problems of countertransference for the clinician. Working with dying patients requires flexibility to adapt basic therapeutics to the institutional setting. Goals of psychotherapy must be reconceptualized for dying clients. The problems of countertransference arise because clinicians themselves…

  7. In vivo studies of opiate receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, J.J.; Dannals, R.F.; Duelfer, T.; Burns, H.D.; Ravert, H.T.; Langstroem, B.; Balasubramanian, V.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    To study opiate receptors noninvasively in vivo using positron emission tomography, techniques for preferentially labeling opiate receptors in vivo can be used. The rate at which receptor-bound ligand clears from the brain in vivo can be predicted by measuring the equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) at 37 degrees C in the presence of 100 mM sodium chloride and 100 microM guanyl-5'-imidodiphosphate, the drug distribution coefficient, and the molecular weight. A suitable ligand for labeling opiate receptors in vivo is diprenorphine, which binds to mu, delta, and kappa receptors with approximately equal affinity in vitro. However, in vivo diprenorphine may bind predominantly to one opiate receptor subtype, possibly the mu receptor. To predict the affinity for binding to the opiate receptor, a Hansch correlation was determined between the 50% inhibitory concentration for a series of halogen-substituted fentanyl analogs and electronic, lipophilic, and steric parameters. Radiochemical methods for the synthesis of carbon-11-labeled diprenorphine and lofentanil are presented.

  8. Nitriding of Aluminum Extrusion Die: Effect of Die Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhtar, S. S.; Arif, A. F. M.; Yilbas, B. S.

    2010-04-01

    Nitriding of complex-shaped extrusion dies may result in non-uniform nitride layers and hence a required hardness may not be achieved in some regions of the bearing area. The present study is carried out to assess the effect of extrusion die profile on the characteristics and growth behavior of nitride layers so that the critical die design feature can be identified to enhance the uniformity of the nitride layer. For this purpose, AISI H13 steel samples have been manufactured with profiles similar to those of hot extrusion dies. The samples were then gas nitrided under controlled nitriding potential. The uniformity and depth of nitride layers have been investigated in terms of compound layer and total nitride case depth for selected die features. The results of this study indicated the need to include the effect of profile on the nitride layer for the optimal die design with improved service life.

  9. Dissolution DNP for in vivo preclinical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comment, Arnaud

    2016-03-01

    The tremendous polarization enhancement afforded by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) can be taken advantage of to perform preclinical in vivo molecular and metabolic imaging. Following the injection of molecules that are hyperpolarized via dissolution DNP, real-time measurements of their biodistribution and metabolic conversion can be recorded. This technology therefore provides a unique and invaluable tool for probing cellular metabolism in vivo in animal models in a noninvasive manner. It gives the opportunity to follow and evaluate disease progression and treatment response without requiring ex vivo destructive tissue assays. Although its considerable potential has now been widely recognized, hyperpolarized magnetic resonance by dissolution DNP remains a challenging method to implement for routine in vivo preclinical measurements. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the current state-of-the-art technology for preclinical applications and the challenges that need to be addressed to promote it and allow its wider dissemination in the near future.

  10. In Vivo Production of Entomopathogenic Nematodes.

    PubMed

    Shapiro-Ilan, David I; Morales-Ramos, Juan A; Rojas, M Guadalupe

    2016-01-01

    In nature, entomopathogenic nematodes in the genera Heterorhabditis and Steinernema are obligate parasites of insects. The nematodes are used widely as biopesticides for suppression of insect pests. More than a dozen entomopathogenic nematode species have been commercialized for use in biological control. Most nematodes intended for commercial application are produced in artificial media via solid or liquid fermentation. However, for laboratory research and small greenhouse or field trials, in vivo production of entomopathogenic nematodes is the common method of propagation. Additionally, small companies continue to produce nematodes using in vivo methods for application in niche markets. Advances in mechanization and alternative production routes (e.g., production geared toward application of nematodes in infected host cadavers) can improve efficiency and economy of scale. The objective of this chapter is to describe basic and advanced procedures for in vivo production of entomopathogenic nematodes. PMID:27565497

  11. Grueneisen relaxation photoacoustic microscopy in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jun; Shi, Junhui; Hai, Pengfei; Zhou, Yong; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-06-01

    Grueneisen relaxation photoacoustic microscopy (GR-PAM) can achieve optically defined axial resolution, but it has been limited to ex vivo demonstrations so far. Here, we present the first in vivo image of a mouse brain acquired with GR-PAM. To induce the GR effect, an intensity-modulated continuous-wave laser was employed to heat absorbing objects. In phantom experiments, an axial resolution of 12.5 μm was achieved, which is sixfold better than the value achieved by conventional optical-resolution PAM. This axial-resolution improvement was further demonstrated by imaging a mouse brain in vivo, where significantly narrower axial profiles of blood vessels were observed. The in vivo demonstration of GR-PAM shows the potential of this modality for label-free and high-resolution anatomical and functional imaging of biological tissues.

  12. Dissolution DNP for in vivo preclinical studies.

    PubMed

    Comment, Arnaud

    2016-03-01

    The tremendous polarization enhancement afforded by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) can be taken advantage of to perform preclinical in vivo molecular and metabolic imaging. Following the injection of molecules that are hyperpolarized via dissolution DNP, real-time measurements of their biodistribution and metabolic conversion can be recorded. This technology therefore provides a unique and invaluable tool for probing cellular metabolism in vivo in animal models in a noninvasive manner. It gives the opportunity to follow and evaluate disease progression and treatment response without requiring ex vivo destructive tissue assays. Although its considerable potential has now been widely recognized, hyperpolarized magnetic resonance by dissolution DNP remains a challenging method to implement for routine in vivo preclinical measurements. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the current state-of-the-art technology for preclinical applications and the challenges that need to be addressed to promote it and allow its wider dissemination in the near future. PMID:26920829

  13. Outer Hair Cell Electromotility in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamoorthy, Sripriya; Nuttall, Alfred L.

    2011-11-01

    The effectiveness of outer hair cell (OHC) electro-motility in vivo has been challenged by the expected low-pass filtering of the transmembrane potential due to the cell's own capacitance. The OHC electromotility is characterized here by an electromechanical ratio defined as the ratio of the OHC contraction to the transmembrane potential. This ratio has been measured in isolated cells to be approximately 26 nm/mV. We estimate the OHC electromechanical ratio in vivo from the recently measured displacements of the reticular lamina and the basilar membrane near the 19 kHz characteristic frequency in the basal region of guinea pig cochlea. Our analysis strongly suggests OHC electromotility process is effective for cochlear amplification in vivo at least around the characteristic frequency of the basal location in spite of the low-pass filtering.

  14. Accurate defect die placement and nuisance defect reduction for reticle die-to-die inspections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Vincent; Huang, L. R.; Lin, C. J.; Tseng, Y. N.; Huang, W. H.; Tuo, Laurent C.; Wylie, Mark; Chen, Ellison; Wang, Elvik; Glasser, Joshua; Kelkar, Amrish; Wu, David

    2015-10-01

    Die-to-die reticle inspections are among the simplest and most sensitive reticle inspections because of the use of an identical-design neighboring-die for the reference image. However, this inspection mode can have two key disadvantages: (1) The location of the defect is indeterminate because it is unclear to the inspector whether the test or reference image is defective; and (2) nuisance and false defects from mask manufacturing noise and tool optical variation can limit the usable sensitivity. The use of a new sequencing approach for a die-to-die inspection can resolve these issues without any additional scan time, without sacrifice in sensitivity requirement, and with a manageable increase in computation load. In this paper we explore another approach for die-to-die inspections using a new method of defect processing and sequencing. Utilizing die-to-die double arbitration during defect detection has been proven through extensive testing to generate accurate placement of the defect in the correct die to ensure efficient defect disposition at the AIMS step. The use of this method maintained the required inspection sensitivity for mask quality as verified with programmed-defectmask qualification and then further validated with production masks comparing the current inspection approach to the new method. Furthermore, this approach can significantly reduce the total number of defects that need to be reviewed by essentially eliminating the nuisance and false defects that can result from a die-to-die inspection. This "double-win" will significantly reduce the effort in classifying a die-to-die inspection result and will lead to improved cycle times.

  15. In vivo fluorescence lifetime optical projection tomography

    PubMed Central

    McGinty, James; Taylor, Harriet B.; Chen, Lingling; Bugeon, Laurence; Lamb, Jonathan R.; Dallman, Margaret J.; French, Paul M. W.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate the application of fluorescence lifetime optical projection tomography (FLIM-OPT) to in vivo imaging of lysC:GFP transgenic zebrafish embryos (Danio rerio). This method has been applied to unambiguously distinguish between the fluorescent protein (GFP) signal in myeloid cells from background autofluorescence based on the fluorescence lifetime. The combination of FLIM, an inherently ratiometric method, in conjunction with OPT results in a quantitative 3-D tomographic technique that could be used as a robust method for in vivo biological and pharmaceutical research, for example as a readout of Förster resonance energy transfer based interactions. PMID:21559145

  16. Graphite/Thermoplastic-Pultrusion Die

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Maywood L.; Frye, Mark W.; Johnson, Gary S.; Stanfield, Clarence E.

    1990-01-01

    Attachment to extruder produces thermoplastic-impregnated graphite tape. Consists of profile die, fiber/resin collimator, and crosshead die body. Die designed to be attached to commercially available extrusion machine capable of extruding high-performance thermoplastics. Simple attachment to commercial extruder enables developers of composites to begin experimenting with large numbers of proprietary resins, fibers, and hybrid composite structures. With device, almost any possible fiber/resin combination fabricated.

  17. Foreigners dying in Istanbul.

    PubMed

    Uzun, Ibrahim; Celbis, Osman; Baydar, Cetin Lutfi; Alkan, Nevzat; Arslan, Murat Nihat

    2009-09-01

    The study included 411 deaths selected from 14,647 medicolegal deaths autopsied in the Morgue Department of Forensic Medicine Institute Directorate, affiliated with the Ministry of Justice, between 1998 and 2002. Data were collected from court documents, coroner's investigation reports, and autopsy reports. The parameters of age, gender, nationality and origin, cause and place of death in foreigners dying in Istanbul were evaluated in the study. Out of 14,647 medicolegal deaths, 3.5% were foreigners from 34 different nationalities. The nationality with the highest rate of foreigner deaths (34%) was Romanian. Out of 411 deaths, 74.3% were male and 25.7% were female. Of all cases, 64.4% were tourists visiting Istanbul and 35.6% had a job in Istanbul. Of 146 foreigners employed in Istanbul, 94.5% did not have a work permit, while only 5.5% had a work permit. PMID:19674242

  18. Toward Localized In Vivo Biomarker Concentration Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaojuan; Reeves, Daniel; Shi, Yipeng; Gimi, Barjor; Nemani, Krishnamurthy V.; Perreard, Irina M.; Toraya-Brown, Seiko; Fiering, Steven; Weaver, John B.

    2015-01-01

    We know a great deal about the biochemistry of cells because they can be isolated and studied. The biochemistry of the much more complex in vivo environment is more difficult to study because the only ways to quantitate concentrations is to sacrifice the animal or biopsy the tissue. Either method disrupts the environment profoundly and neither method allows longitudinal studies on the same individual. Methods of measuring chemical concentrations in vivo are very valuable alternatives to sacrificing groups of animals. We are developing microscopic magnetic nanoparticle (mNP) probes to measure the concentration of a selected molecule in vivo. The mNPs are targeted to bind the selected molecule and the resulting reduction in rotational freedom can be quantified remotely using magnetic spectroscopy. The mNPs must be contained in micrometer sized porous shells to keep them from migrating and to protect them from clearance by the immune system. There are two key issues in the development of the probes. First, we demonstrate the ability to measure concentrations in the porous walled alginate probes both in phosphate buffered saline and in blood, which is an excellent surrogate for the complex and challenging in vivo environment. Second, sensitivity is critical because it allows microscopic probes to measure very small concentrations very far away. We report sensitivity measurements on recently introduced technology that has allowed us to improve the sensitivity by two orders of magnitude, a factor of 200 so far. PMID:26203196

  19. HIV control in vivo: Dynamical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumel, A. B.; Moghadas, S. M.

    2004-10-01

    A deterministic model for the immunological and therapeutic control of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in vivo is studied qualitatively. In addition to analyzing the local stability of the equilibria, the global stability of the infection-free equilibrium is established. The optimal efficacy level of anti-retroviral therapy needed to eradicate HIV from the body of an HIV-infected individual is obtained.

  20. In-vivo optical investigation of psoriasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapsokalyvas, Dimitrios; Cicchi, Riccardo; Bruscino, Nicola; Alfieri, Domenico; Massi, Daniela; Lotti, Torello; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2011-03-01

    Psoriasis is an autoimmune disease of the skin characterized by hyperkeratosis, hyperproliferation of the epidermis, inflammatory cell accumulation and increased dilatation of dermal papillary blood vessels. Cases of psoriasis were investigated in vivo with optical means in order to evaluate the potential of in vivo optical biopsy. A Polarization Multispectral Dermoscope was employed for the macroscopic observation. Features such as the 'dotted' blood vessels pattern was observed with high contrast. The average size of dot vessels in Psoriasis was measured to be 974 μm2 which is much higher compared to healthy skin. High resolution image sections of the epidermis and the dermis were produced with a custom made Multiphoton Microscope. Imaging extended from the surface of the lesion down to the papillary dermis, at a depth of 200 μm. In the epidermis, a characteristic morphology of the stratum corneum found only in Psoriasis was revealed. Additionally, the cytoplasmic area of the cells in the stratum spinosum layer was found to be smaller than normal. In the dermis the morphological features were more pronounced, where the elongated dermal papillae dominated the papillary layer. Their length exceeds 100μm, which is a far greater value compared to that of healthy skin. These in vivo observations are consistent with the ex vivo histopathological observations, supporting both the applicability and potentiality of multispectral dermoscopy and multiphoton microscopy in the field of in vivo optical investigation and biopsy of skin.

  1. In vivo dosimetry in external beam radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mijnheer, Ben; Beddar, Sam; Izewska, Joanna; Reft, Chester

    2013-07-15

    In vivo dosimetry (IVD) is in use in external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) to detect major errors, to assess clinically relevant differences between planned and delivered dose, to record dose received by individual patients, and to fulfill legal requirements. After discussing briefly the main characteristics of the most commonly applied IVD systems, the clinical experience of IVD during EBRT will be summarized. Advancement of the traditional aspects of in vivo dosimetry as well as the development of currently available and newly emerging noninterventional technologies are required for large-scale implementation of IVD in EBRT. These new technologies include the development of electronic portal imaging devices for 2D and 3D patient dosimetry during advanced treatment techniques, such as IMRT and VMAT, and the use of IVD in proton and ion radiotherapy by measuring the decay of radiation-induced radionuclides. In the final analysis, we will show in this Vision 20/20 paper that in addition to regulatory compliance and reimbursement issues, the rationale for in vivo measurements is to provide an accurate and independent verification of the overall treatment procedure. It will enable the identification of potential errors in dose calculation, data transfer, dose delivery, patient setup, and changes in patient anatomy. It is the authors' opinion that all treatments with curative intent should be verified through in vivo dose measurements in combination with pretreatment checks.

  2. Two Piece Compaction Die Design

    SciTech Connect

    Coffey, Ethan N

    2010-03-01

    Compaction dies used to create europium oxide and tantalum control plates were modeled using ANSYS 11.0. Two-piece designs were considered in order to make the dies easier to assemble than the five-piece dies that were previously used. The two areas of concern were the stresses at the interior corner of the die cavity and the distortion of the cavity wall due to the interference fit between the two pieces and the pressure exerted on the die during the compaction process. A successful die design would have stresses less than the yield stress of the material and a maximum wall distortion on the order of 0.0001 in. Design factors that were investigated include the inner corner radius, the value of the interference fit, the compaction force, the size of the cavity, and the outer radius and geometry of the outer ring. The results show that for the europium oxide die, a 0.01 in. diameter wire can be used to create the cavity, leading to a 0.0055 in. radius corner, if the radial interference fit is 0.003 in. For the tantalum die, the same wire can be used with a radial interference fit of 0.001 in. Also, for the europium oxide die with a 0.003 in. interference fit, it is possible to use a wire with a diameter of 0.006 in. for the wire burning process. Adding a 10% safety factor to the compaction force tends to lead to conservative estimates of the stresses but not for the wall distortion. However, when the 10% safety factor is removed, the wall distortion is not affected enough to discard the design. Finally, regarding the europium oxide die, when the cavity walls are increased by 0.002 in. per side or the outer ring is made to the same geometry as the tantalum die, all the stresses and wall distortions are within the desired range. Thus, the recommendation is to use a 0.006 in. diameter wire and a 0.003 in. interference fit for the europium oxide die and a 0.01 in. diameter wire and a 0.001 in. interference fit for the tantalum die. The dies can also be made to have the

  3. Adapt or die?

    PubMed

    Visser, S S; Nel, A H

    1996-12-01

    The worldwide economic recession and the concomitant limited stock of finances have had an influence on the available money of every household and have also inhibited the improvement of socio-economic conditions and medicine. The Reconstruction and Development Programme (RDP) has the objective of improving the living conditions of the people with regard to housing, education, training and health care. The latter seems to be a major problem which has to be addressed with the emphasis on the preventive and promotional aspects of health care. A comprehensive health care system did not come into being property in the past because of the maldistribution of health care services, personnel and differences in culture and health care beliefs and values. The question that now arises, is how to render a quality health care service within the constraints of inadequate financing and resources. A comprehensive literature study has been done with reference to quality health care and financing followed by a survey of existing health services and finances. Recommendations are made about minimum requirements to be accepted if one were to adapt rather than die in terms of the provision of healthcare: the decentralization and rationalization of the administration of health care, the stress on and realization of effective and efficient primary health care, the acceptance of participative management in health providing organizations, the provision of financial management training for health care managers and the application of management accounting principles for the improvement of the efficiency and effectiveness of management. PMID:9283343

  4. Dying and multiplying life.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Arias, David

    2014-09-01

    It was only after James P. Lovette's death, in 2006, that I discovered that the twenty-four-year-old colleague and friend with whom I had spent so many afternoons debating issues in organ transplantation had been the first successful child heart transplantee in the world and one of the longest-living survivors of a second transplant. During the years we met, he never even hinted at the fact that three different hearts had beaten in his chest. The revelation that his life had been an almost uninterrupted chain of medical challenges suddenly made me appreciate his quirkiness in a whole new light. Organ transplantation crudely exemplifies a traditional moral dilemma between means and ends: in order to save a life, someone else has to die. Bioethicists involved in this field have the role of identifying the ethical issues surrounding organ donation and helping others to argue in an intelligible and convincing way. In my view, bioethicists have the obligation to foster a discussion as open and transparent as possible on these matters. Still, I sometimes fear that I may be helping to cause unnecessary harms to potential recipients who are desperately waiting for a vital organ. Scholars would be chillingly cold if their quest for truth systematically came at the cost of lives lost. Every life can be meaningful and provide meaning to many others. This is true even with organ recipients, who often have short lives full of considerable suffering. PMID:25231665

  5. Chitosan mouthwash: toxicity and in vivo validation.

    PubMed

    Costa, E M; Silva, S; Costa, M R; Pereira, M; Campos, D A; Odila, J; Madureira, A R; Cardelle-Cobas, A; Tavaria, F K; Rodrigues, A S; Pintado, M M

    2014-10-13

    A previous study showed that a chitosan mouthwash would be a valid alternative to current mouthwashes as it demonstrated, in vitro, significantly higher antibiofilm activity than two commercial mouthwashes. As such, the aim of this work was to verify the safety of the developed product and to validate, in vivo, the biological activity ascertained in vitro. Chitosan mouthwash safety was evaluated through Ames, MTT and V79 chromosomal aberration assay while antimicrobial activity was evaluated through in vivo assays. The results showed that the chitosan mouthwash was safe, presenting lower cytotoxicity than a commercial mouthwash, and that it effectively reduced viable counts of Streptococcus spp. and Enterococcus spp. by ca. 5.5 log of CFU. Furthermore, in direct comparison with a commercial mouthwash the chitosan mouthwash possessed significantly higher antimicrobial activity. The conjunction of these results proves that the chitosan mouthwash is a safe, effective, natural alternative to the existent chemical mouthwashes. PMID:25037365

  6. Preconditioning Stem Cells for In Vivo Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Sart, Sébastien; Ma, Teng

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Stem cells have emerged as promising tools for the treatment of incurable neural and heart diseases and tissue damage. However, the survival of transplanted stem cells is reported to be low, reducing their therapeutic effects. The major causes of poor survival of stem cells in vivo are linked to anoikis, potential immune rejection, and oxidative damage mediating apoptosis. This review investigates novel methods and potential molecular mechanisms for stem cell preconditioning in vitro to increase their retention after transplantation in damaged tissues. Microenvironmental preconditioning (e.g., hypoxia, heat shock, and exposure to oxidative stress), aggregate formation, and hydrogel encapsulation have been revealed as promising strategies to reduce cell apoptosis in vivo while maintaining biological functions of the cells. Moreover, this review seeks to identify methods of optimizing cell dose preparation to enhance stem cell survival and therapeutic function after transplantation. PMID:25126478

  7. Laser spectrofluorometry of agronomic plants in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posudin, Yuri I.

    1997-05-01

    Laser spectrofluorometry of agronomic plants in vivo at the single leaf level permits to investigate the effects of the growth phase, part, nodal position and age of the leaf, agrochemical treatment, external physical factors and plant diseases on the chlorophyll fluorescence. Such a spectroscopic approach can give the possibility to monitoring the development and health status of agronomic plants during ontogenesis and under different stresses. The relevant spectral wavelengths and criteria which correlate with status of the plant were determined.

  8. Evaluation of vaginal antifungal formulations in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    McRipley, R. J.; Erhard, P. J.; Schwind, R. A.; Whitney, R. R.

    1979-01-01

    Relatively simple and rapid procedures have been developed for evaluating the local efficacy of vaginal antifungal agents in vivo in a vaginal candidiasis model in ovariectomized rats. The results of this investigation indicate that the model and methods described are quite suitable for screening potential antifungal substances and for assessing the chemotherapeutic effectiveness of new antifungal agents and formulations before carrying out clinical studies. PMID:392480

  9. Photosensitizer quantitation in vivo by flourescence microsampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogue, Brian W.; Burke, Gregory C.; Lee, Claudia C.; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2000-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy can provide a reliable method of tumor destruction when the appropriate dosimetry is applied. Current dosimetry practice involves quantification of the drug and light doses applied to the tumor, but it would be desirable to monitor in vivo light and drug levels to provide the most accurate determination of dosimetry. In vivo measurements can be used to minimize variations in treatment response due to inter-animal variability, by providing animal-specific or patient-specific treatment planning. This study reports on the development of a micro-sampling method to measure fluorescence from tissue, which is not significantly affected by the tissue optical properties. The system measures fluorescence from the surface of a tissue, using a fiber bundle composed of individual 100 micron fibers which ar all spaced apart by 700 microns from one another at the tissue contact end. This design provides sampling of the fluorescence at multiple sites to increase the signal intensity, while maintaining a micro- sampling of the tissue volume just below the surface. The calibration studies here indicate that the 1/e sampling depth is near 60 microns when measured in optical phantoms, which are similar to typical tissue properties. The probe fluorescence signal is independent of blood concentration up to a maximum of 10% blood by volume, which is similar to most tumor tissue. Animal tests indicate that the sensitivity to drug concentration is essentially the same in when measured in murine liver and muscle tissues, both in vivo and ex vivo. These preliminary calibration results suggest that the probe can be used to measure photosensitizer uptake in vivo non- invasively and rapidly via conversion of fluorescence intensity to photosensitizer concentration.

  10. In vivo imaging of neocortical epilepsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Theodore

    2003-03-01

    Epilepsy is a disease affecting 1-2Electrical recordings from chronic animal models and human neocortical epileptic foci indicate that the population of neurons underlying each interictal epileptiform discharge varies over time. The spatial relationship between interictal events and the ictal onset zone, thought to be the critical area of epileptogenesis, is not well understood and critical to the surgical treatment of epilepsy. Electrophysiological recording methods, although currently the "gold standard", are inadequate to address these questions based on restrictions due to volume conduction or sampling limitations, many of which can be overcome with optical recording techniques. In vivo optical recording of intrinsic signals can be used to generate high-resolution, real-time maps of the population of neurons participating in an epileptiform event. The goal of our laboratory is to examine the shifting spatio-temporal dynamics of the epileptogenic aggregate in both acute and chronic experimental models of in vivo rodent epilepsy. In particular we are interested in the precise relationship between the optical signal and the interictal and ictal epileptiform events using well-established acute and chronic in vivo rodent models. Optical epilepsy maps recorded at various wavelengths are correlated with maps derived from electrophysiological recordings from multiple surface electrodes.

  11. Laser Nanosurgery of Cerebellar Axons In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Allegra Mascaro, Anna L.; Sacconi, Leonardo; Pavone, Francesco Saverio

    2014-01-01

    Only a few neuronal populations in the central nervous system (CNS) of adult mammals show local regrowth upon dissection of their axon. In order to understand the mechanism that promotes neuronal regeneration, an in-depth analysis of the neuronal types that can remodel after injury is needed. Several studies showed that damaged climbing fibers are capable of regrowing also in adult animals1,2. The investigation of the time-lapse dynamics of degeneration and regeneration of these axons within their complex environment can be performed by time-lapse two-photon fluorescence (TPF) imaging in vivo3,4. This technique is here combined with laser surgery, which proved to be a highly selective tool to disrupt fluorescent structures in the intact mouse cortex5-9. This protocol describes how to perform TPF time-lapse imaging and laser nanosurgery of single axonal branches in the cerebellum in vivo. Olivocerebellar neurons are labeled by anterograde tracing with a dextran-conjugated dye and then monitored by TPF imaging through a cranial window. The terminal portion of their axons are then dissected by irradiation with a Ti:Sapphire laser at high power. The degeneration and potential regrowth of the damaged neuron are monitored by TPF in vivo imaging during the days following the injury. PMID:25146130

  12. Cells in Dengue Virus Infection In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Noisakran, Sansanee; Onlamoon, Nattawat; Songprakhon, Pucharee; Hsiao, Hui-Mien; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Perng, Guey Chuen

    2010-01-01

    Dengue has been recognized as one of the most important vector-borne emerging infectious diseases globally. Though dengue normally causes a self-limiting infection, some patients may develop a life-threatening illness, dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF)/dengue shock syndrome (DSS). The reason why DHF/DSS occurs in certain individuals is unclear. Studies in the endemic regions suggest that the preexisting antibodies are a risk factor for DHF/DSS. Viremia and thrombocytopenia are the key clinical features of dengue virus infection in patients. The amounts of virus circulating in patients are highly correlated with severe dengue disease, DHF/DSS. Also, the disturbance, mainly a transient depression, of hematological cells is a critical clinical finding in acute dengue patients. However, the cells responsible for the dengue viremia are unresolved in spite of the intensive efforts been made. Dengue virus appears to replicate and proliferate in many adapted cell lines, but these in vitro properties are extremely difficult to be reproduced in primary cells or in vivo. This paper summarizes reports on the permissive cells in vitro and in vivo and suggests a hematological cell lineage for dengue virus infection in vivo, with the hope that a new focus will shed light on further understanding of the complexities of dengue disease. PMID:22331984

  13. Shigella impairs T lymphocyte dynamics in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Salgado-Pabón, Wilmara; Celli, Susanna; Arena, Ellen T.; Nothelfer, Katharina; Roux, Pascal; Sellge, Gernot; Frigimelica, Elisabetta; Bousso, Philippe; Sansonetti, Philippe J.; Phalipon, Armelle

    2013-01-01

    The Gram-negative enteroinvasive bacterium Shigella flexneri is responsible for the endemic form of bacillary dysentery, an acute rectocolitis in humans. S. flexneri uses a type III secretion system to inject effector proteins into host cells, thus diverting cellular functions to its own benefit. Protective immunity to reinfection requires several rounds of infection to be elicited and is short-lasting, suggesting that S. flexneri interferes with the priming of specific immunity. Considering the key role played by T-lymphocyte trafficking in priming of adaptive immunity, we investigated the impact of S. flexneri on T-cell dynamics in vivo. By using two-photon microscopy to visualize bacterium–T-cell cross-talks in the lymph nodes, where the adaptive immunity is initiated, we provide evidence that S. flexneri, via its type III secretion system, impairs the migration pattern of CD4+ T cells independently of cognate recognition of bacterial antigens. We show that bacterial invasion of CD4+ T lymphocytes occurs in vivo, and results in cell migration arrest. In the absence of invasion, CD4+ T-cell migration parameters are also dramatically altered. Signals resulting from S. flexneri interactions with subcapsular sinus macrophages and dendritic cells, and recruitment of polymorphonuclear cells are likely to contribute to this phenomenon. These findings indicate that S. flexneri targets T lymphocytes in vivo and highlight the role of type III effector secretion in modulating host adaptive immune responses. PMID:23417297

  14. What Happens When Someone Dies?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and sleepiness Mental confusion Constipation or incontinence Nausea Refusal to eat or drink Each of these symptoms, ... having a "non-hospital DNR" (see Understanding Health Care Decisions ) if the person is dying at home. ...

  15. Improving care of dying children.

    PubMed Central

    Martinson, I M

    1995-01-01

    Every year about 5,000 children aged 0 to 14 years need hospice care in the United States. Children seem to know that they are dying, although this is difficult for parents to accept. Clear, empathic understanding is needed. Communication with clarity and understanding is imperative with the changes in goals from cure to palliation to comfort. The ideal place for most dying children is at home, where symptoms can be managed as effectively as in a hospital. PMID:7571589

  16. REFRACTORY DIE FOR EXTRUDING URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Creutz, E.C.

    1959-08-11

    A die is presented for the extrusion of metals, said die being formed of a refractory complex oxide having the composition M/sub n/O/sub m/R/sub x/O/sub y/ where M is magnesium, zinc, manganese, or iron, R is aluminum, chromic chromium, ferric iron, or manganic manganese, and m, n, x, and y are whole numbers. Specific examples are spinel, magnesium aluminate, magnetite, magnesioferrite, chromite, and franklinite.

  17. Unexpected requirement for ELMO1 in clearance of apoptotic germ cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Michael R; Zheng, Shuqiu; Park, Daeho; Woodson, Robin I; Reardon, Michael A; Juncadella, Ignacio J; Kinchen, Jason M; Zhang, Jun; Lysiak, Jeffrey J; Ravichandran, Kodi S

    2010-09-16

    Apoptosis and the subsequent clearance of dying cells occurs throughout development and adult life in many tissues. Failure to promptly clear apoptotic cells has been linked to many diseases. ELMO1 is an evolutionarily conserved cytoplasmic engulfment protein that functions downstream of the phosphatidylserine receptor BAI1, and, along with DOCK1 and the GTPase RAC1, promotes internalization of the dying cells. Here we report the generation of ELMO1-deficient mice, which we found to be unexpectedly viable and grossly normal. However, they had a striking testicular pathology, with disrupted seminiferous epithelium, multinucleated giant cells, uncleared apoptotic germ cells and decreased sperm output. Subsequent in vitro and in vivo analyses revealed a crucial role for ELMO1 in the phagocytic clearance of apoptotic germ cells by Sertoli cells lining the seminiferous epithelium. The engulfment receptor BAI1 and RAC1 (upstream and downstream of ELMO1, respectively) were also important for Sertoli-cell-mediated engulfment. Collectively, these findings uncover a selective requirement for ELMO1 in Sertoli-cell-mediated removal of apoptotic germ cells and make a compelling case for a relationship between engulfment and tissue homeostasis in vivo. PMID:20844538

  18. Could magnetic resonance provide in vivo histology?

    PubMed Central

    Dominietto, Marco; Rudin, Markus

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of a suspected tumor lesion faces two basic problems: detection and identification of the specific type of tumor. Radiological techniques are commonly used for the detection and localization of solid tumors. Prerequisite is a high intrinsic or enhanced contrast between normal and neoplastic tissue. Identification of the tumor type is still based on histological analysis. The result depends critically on the sampling sites, which given the inherent heterogeneity of tumors, constitutes a major limitation. Non-invasive in vivo imaging might overcome this limitation providing comprehensive three-dimensional morphological, physiological, and metabolic information as well as the possibility for longitudinal studies. In this context, magnetic resonance based techniques are quite attractive since offer at the same time high spatial resolution, unique soft tissue contrast, good temporal resolution to study dynamic processes and high chemical specificity. The goal of this paper is to review the role of magnetic resonance techniques in characterizing tumor tissue in vivo both at morphological and physiological levels. The first part of this review covers methods, which provide information on specific aspects of tumor phenotypes, considered as indicators of malignancy. These comprise measurements of the inflammatory status, neo-vascular physiology, acidosis, tumor oxygenation, and metabolism together with tissue morphology. Even if the spatial resolution is not sufficient to characterize the tumor phenotype at a cellular level, this multiparametric information might potentially be used for classification of tumors. The second part discusses mathematical tools, which allow characterizing tissue based on the acquired three-dimensional data set. In particular, methods addressing tumor heterogeneity will be highlighted. Finally, we address the potential and limitation of using MRI as a tool to provide in vivo tissue characterization. PMID:24454320

  19. In Vivo Nanodetoxication for Acute Uranium Exposure.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, Luis; Durán-Lara, Esteban F; Donoso, Wendy; Nachtigall, Fabiane M; Santos, Leonardo S

    2015-01-01

    Accidental exposure to uranium is a matter of concern, as U(VI) is nephrotoxic in both human and animal models, and its toxicity is associated to chemical toxicity instead of radioactivity. We synthesized different PAMAM G4 and G5 derivatives in order to prove their interaction with uranium and their effect on the viability of red blood cells in vitro. Furthermore, we prove the effectiveness of the selected dendrimers in an animal model of acute uranium intoxication. The dendrimer PAMAM G4-Lys-Fmoc-Cbz demonstrated the ability to chelate the uranyl ion in vivo, improving the biochemical and histopathologic features caused by acute intoxication with uranium. PMID:26083036

  20. Methods of in vivo radiation measurement

    DOEpatents

    Huffman, Dennis D.; Hughes, Robert C.; Kelsey, Charles A.; Lane, Richard; Ricco, Antonio J.; Snelling, Jay B.; Zipperian, Thomas E.

    1990-01-01

    Methods of and apparatus for in vivo radiation measurements relay on a MOSFET dosimeter of high radiation sensitivity with operates in both the passive mode to provide an integrated dose detector and active mode to provide an irradiation rate detector. A compensating circuit with a matched unirradiated MOSFET is provided to operate at a current designed to eliminate temperature dependence of the device. Preferably, the MOSFET is rigidly mounted in the end of a miniature catheter and the catheter is implanted in the patient proximate the radiation source.

  1. In vivo friction properties of human skin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, M; Mak, A F

    1999-08-01

    In vivo frictional properties of human skin and five materials, namely aluminium, nylon, silicone, cotton sock, Pelite, were investigated. Normal and untreated skin over six anatomic regions of ten normal subjects were measured under a controlled environment. The average coefficient of friction for all measurements is 0.46+/-0.15 (p<0.05). Among all measured sites, the palm of the hand has the highest coefficient of friction (0.62+/-0.22). For all the materials tested, silicone has the highest coefficient of friction (0.61+/-0.21), while nylon has the lowest friction (0.37+/-0.09). PMID:10493141

  2. In vivo toxicity study of Lantana camara

    PubMed Central

    Pour, Badakhshan Mahdi; Sasidharan, Sreenivasan

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the toxicity of methanol extract of various parts (Root, Stem, Leaf, Flower and Fruit) of Lantana camara (L. Camara) in Artemia salina. Methods The methanol extracts of L. camara were tested for in vivo brine shrimp lethality assay. Results All the tested extract exhibited very low toxicity on brine shrimp larva. The results showed that the root extract was the most toxic part of L. camara and may have potential as anticancer agent. Conclusions Methanolic extract of L. camara is relatively safe on short-term exposure. PMID:23569765

  3. Imaging Protein-protein Interactions in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Seegar, Tom; Barton, William

    2010-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are a hallmark of all essential cellular processes. However, many of these interactions are transient, or energetically weak, preventing their identification and analysis through traditional biochemical methods such as co-immunoprecipitation. In this regard, the genetically encodable fluorescent proteins (GFP, RFP, etc.) and their associated overlapping fluorescence spectrum have revolutionized our ability to monitor weak interactions in vivo using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)1-3. Here, we detail our use of a FRET-based proximity assay for monitoring receptor-receptor interactions on the endothelial cell surface. PMID:20972411

  4. In vivo virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Seunghoon Kim, Sehui Kim, Jeehyun E-mail: chulhong@postech.edu; Lee, Changho Jeon, Mansik; Kim, Chulhong E-mail: chulhong@postech.edu

    2013-11-11

    We developed a virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy system by combining with a commercial surgical microscope and photoacoustic microscope (PAM). By sharing the common optical path in the microscope and PAM system, we could acquire the PAM and microscope images simultaneously. Moreover, by employing a beam projector to back-project 2D PAM images onto the microscope view plane as augmented reality, the conventional microscopic and 2D cross-sectional PAM images are concurrently mapped on the plane via an ocular lens of the microscope in real-time. Further, we guided needle insertion into phantom ex vivo and mice skins in vivo.

  5. Laser microspectrofluorometry of photopigments in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombetti, G.; Ghetti, F.; Lenci, F.; Polacco, E.; Posudin, Yu I.; Campani, E.

    1981-12-01

    A study of the spectral properties of photopigments of microorganisms is of major importance for the understanding of molecular mechanisms whereby these can respond to changes in external illumination conditions. Microspectroscopy in vivo using a tunable dye laser as an excitation source was employed to solve this problem for the case of the unicellular algae Euglena gracilis. This experimental approach made it possible to study fluorescence excitation spectra of photopigments, their average lifetime, and any photochemical reactions which may accompany the absorption of light.

  6. Activities of Psilostachyin A and Cynaropicrin against Trypanosoma cruzi In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Cristiane França; Batista, Denise da Gama Jaen; De Araújo, Julianna Siciliano; Batista, Marcos Meuser; Lionel, Jessica; de Souza, Elen Mello; Hammer, Erica Ripoll; da Silva, Patricia Bernardino; De Mieri, Maria; Adams, Michael; Zimmermann, Stefanie; Hamburger, Matthias; Brun, Reto; Schühly, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    In vitro and in vivo activities against Trypanosoma cruzi were evaluated for two sesquiterpene lactones: psilostachyin A and cynaropicrin. Cynaropicrin had previously been shown to potently inhibit African trypanosomes in vivo, and psilostachyin A had been reported to show in vivo effects against T. cruzi, albeit in another test design. In vitro data showed that cynaropicrin was more effective than psilostachyin A. Ultrastructural alterations induced by cynaropicrin included shedding events, detachment of large portions of the plasma membrane, and vesicular bodies and large vacuoles containing membranous structures, suggestive of parasite autophagy. Acute toxicity studies showed that one of two mice died at a cynaropicrin dose of 400 mg/kg of body weight given intraperitoneally (i.p.). Although no major plasma biochemical alterations could be detected, histopathology demonstrated that the liver was the most affected organ in cynaropicrin-treated animals. Although cynaropicrin was as effective as benznidazole against trypomastigotes in vitro, the treatment (once or twice a day) of T. cruzi-infected mice (up to 50 mg/kg/day cynaropicrin) did not suppress parasitemia or protect against mortality induced by the Y and Colombiana strains. Psilostachyin A (0.5 to 50 mg/kg/day given once a day) was not effective in the acute model of T. cruzi infection (Y strain), reaching 100% animal mortality. Our data demonstrate that although it is very promising against African trypanosomes, cynaropicrin does not show efficacy compared to benznidazole in acute mouse models of T. cruzi infection. PMID:23939901

  7. Aggregation states of phosphoribulokinase (PRK) in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, M.A.; Hartman, F.C. )

    1989-04-01

    Spinach PRK, extracted from either light- or dark-harvested tissue (LHT or DHT) in the presence of DTT, has a M{sub r} of 90 kDa and is fully active. Consistent with an earlier study extraction of LHT in the absence of DTT results in two forms of inactive PRK, M{sub r} 90 kDa (LMW) and M{sub r}> 550 kDa (HMW). If 400 mM (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} without DTT is included during extraction, the active LMW predominates implicating it as the major, functional form in vivo during periods of illumination. Either high- or low-sale extraction of DHT reveals mostly HMW; prolonged incubation of the high-salt extract causes disaggregation of LMW without activation. These data suggest that the dark form of PRK in vivo is an aggregate, formed by either self-association or by interactions with other proteins. Salt-induced disaggregation of HMW is inconsistent with intermolecular disulfides crosslinking the aggregated PRK; therefore, oxidation-induced conformational changes must promote aggregation.

  8. Aneuploidy in mammalian somatic cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cimino, M C; Tice, R R; Liang, J C

    1986-01-01

    Aneuploidy is an important potential source of human disease and of reproductive failure. Nevertheless, the ability of chemical agents to induce aneuploidy has been investigated only sporadically in intact (whole-animal) mammalian systems. A search of the available literature from the EMCT Aneuploidy File (for years 1970-1983) provided 112 papers that dealt with aneuploidy in mammalian somatic cells in vivo. 59 of these papers did not meet minimal criteria for analysis and were rejected from subsequent review. Of the remaining 53 papers that dealt with aneuploidy induction by chemical agents in mammalian somatic cells in vivo, only 3 (6%) contained data that were considered to be supported conclusively by adequate study designs, execution, and reporting. These 3 papers dealt with 2 chemicals, one of which, mercury, was negative for aneuploidy induction in humans, and the other, pyrimethamine, was positive in an experimental rodent study. The majority of papers (94%) were considered inconclusive for a variety of reasons. The most common reasons for calling a study inconclusive were (a) combining data on hyperploidy with those on hypoploidy and/or polyploidy, (b) an inadequate or unspecified number of animals and/or cells per animal scored per treatment group, and (c) poor data presentation such that animal-to-animal variability could not be assessed. Suggestions for protocol development are made, and the future directions of research into aneuploidy induction are discussed. PMID:3941670

  9. Multidimensional In Vivo Hazard Assessment Using Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Tanguay, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    There are tens of thousands of man-made chemicals in the environment; the inherent safety of most of these chemicals is not known. Relevant biological platforms and new computational tools are needed to prioritize testing of chemicals with limited human health hazard information. We describe an experimental design for high-throughput characterization of multidimensional in vivo effects with the power to evaluate trends relating to commonly cited chemical predictors. We evaluated all 1060 unique U.S. EPA ToxCast phase 1 and 2 compounds using the embryonic zebrafish and found that 487 induced significant adverse biological responses. The utilization of 18 simultaneously measured endpoints means that the entire system serves as a robust biological sensor for chemical hazard. The experimental design enabled us to describe global patterns of variation across tested compounds, evaluate the concordance of the available in vitro and in vivo phase 1 data with this study, highlight specific mechanisms/value-added/novel biology related to notochord development, and demonstrate that the developmental zebrafish detects adverse responses that would be missed by less comprehensive testing strategies. PMID:24136191

  10. Activity ratios of thorium daughters in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Toohey, R.E.; Rundo, J.; Sha, J.Y.; Essling, M.A.; Pedersen, J.C.; Slane, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    A computerized method of least squares has been used to analyze the /sup 228/Ac and /sup 212/Pb-/sup 212/Bi and daughter ..gamma..-ray spectra obtained in vivo from 133 former workers at a thorium refinery. In addition, the exhalation rate of /sup 220/Rn was determined for each subject and expressed as pCi of emanating /sup 224/Ra. This value was added to the /sup 212/Pb value determined from the ..gamma..-ray measurements to obtain the total /sup 224/Ra present, and the ratio of /sup 224/Ra to /sup 228/Ac was calculated. Values of the ratio ranged from 0.52 +- 0.32 to 2.1 +- 1.7, with a weighted mean of 0.92 +- 0.17. However, it appears that the ratio observed in a given case is characteristic for that case alone; the computed mean value may not be meaningful. The least squares fitting procedure and the overall calibration of the counting system were validated by measurements of /sup 224/Ra in the lungs of one subject postmortem, compared with results obtained from the same subject in vivo. 6 references, 5 figures.

  11. In vivo pharmacodynamic imaging of proteasome inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kimbrel, Erin A; Davis, Tina N; Bradner, James E; Kung, Andrew L

    2009-01-01

    Inhibiting the proteolytic activity of the 26S proteasome has been shown to have selective apoptotic effects on cancer cells and to be clinically efficacious in certain malignancies. There is an unmet medical need for additional proteasome inhibitors, and their development will be facilitated by surrogate markers of proteasome function. Toward this end, ectopic fusion of the destruction domain from ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) to reporter proteins is often used for assessing proteasome function. For luciferase-based reporters, we hypothesized that the oxygen-dependent destruction domain (ODD) from hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1 alpha) may provide improved sensitivity over luciferase-ODC, owing to its extremely rapid turnover by the proteasome (HIF-1 alpha has a half-life of less than 5 minutes). In the current study, we show that ODD-luciferase affords a greater dynamic range and faster kinetics than luciferase-ODC in sensing proteasome inhibition in vitro. Importantly, ODD-luciferase also serves as an effective in vivo marker of proteasome function in xenograft tumor models, with inhibition being detected by noninvasive imaging within 3 hours of bortezomib administration. These data establish ODD-luciferase as a surrogate marker of proteasome function that can be used both in vitro and in vivo for the development of novel proteasome inhibitors. PMID:19723471

  12. Spectroscopy analysis of tissues in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loschenov, Victor B.; Poleshkin, P. V.; Stratonnikov, Alexander A.; Torshina, Nadezgda L.

    1995-01-01

    The spectral analysis of biological tissues in vivo is widely used in various fields particularly in medical diagnostics and therapy control. Great possibilities of spectral tissue analysis exist to be realized in the future. Among them are the complete non-invasive clinical blood analysis with evaluation of, for example, sugar concentration in blood; the evaluation of chemical state and localization on subcell level of various drugs binded with biological structures. These facts were shown to affect drastically the drug therapeutic activity. The main advantage of spectral analysis of tissues in vivo is its noninvasivity. This allows one to get information about tissue condition without affecting the dynamic of various biological processes. Another advantage of optical tissue analysis is the possibility to process data in real time and to control parameters of therapy process according to information acquired. For example the in situ analysis of photosensitizer concentration and its chemical state during photodynamic therapy makes it possible to correct the laser irradiation intensity (the photobleaching of photosensitizer requires the decrease in laser intensity).

  13. In vivo identification of periodontal progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Roguljic, H; Matthews, B G; Yang, W; Cvija, H; Mina, M; Kalajzic, I

    2013-08-01

    The periodontal ligament contains progenitor cells; however, their identity and differentiation potential in vivo remain poorly characterized. Previous results have suggested that periodontal tissue progenitors reside in perivascular areas. Therefore, we utilized a lineage-tracing approach to identify and track periodontal progenitor cells from the perivascular region in vivo. We used an alpha-smooth muscle actin (αSMA) promoter-driven and tamoxifen-inducible Cre system (αSMACreERT2) that, in combination with a reporter mouse line (Ai9), permanently labels a cell population, termed 'SMA9'. To trace the differentiation of SMA9-labeled cells into osteoblasts/cementoblasts, we utilized a Col2.3GFP transgene, while expression of Scleraxis-GFP was used to follow differentiation into periodontal ligament fibroblasts during normal tissue formation and remodeling following injury. In uninjured three-week-old SMA9 mice, tamoxifen labeled a small population of cells in the periodontal ligament that expanded over time, particularly in the apical region of the root. By 17 days and 7 weeks after labeling, some SMA9-labeled cells expressed markers indicating differentiation into mature lineages, including cementocytes. Following injury, SMA9 cells expanded, and differentiated into cementoblasts, osteoblasts, and periodontal ligament fibroblasts. SMA9-labeled cells represent a source of progenitors that can give rise to mature osteoblasts, cementoblasts, and fibroblasts within the periodontium. PMID:23735585

  14. Towards Quantitative Phosphotyrosine Profiling In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Hannah; White, Forest M.

    2012-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation is a dynamic reversible post-translational modification that regulates many aspects of cell biology. To understand how this modification controls biological function, it is necessary to not only identify the specific sites of phosphorylation, but also to quantify how phosphorylation levels on these sites may be altered under specific physiological conditions. Due to its sensitivity and accuracy, mass spectrometry (MS) has widely been applied to the identification and characterization of phosphotyrosine signaling across biological systems. In this review we highlight the advances in both MS and phosphotyrosine enrichment methods that have been developed to enable the identification of low level tyrosine phosphorylation events. Computational and manual approaches to ensure confident identification of phosphopeptide sequence and determination of phosphorylation site localization are discussed along with methods that have been applied to the relative quantification of large numbers of phosphorylation sites. Finally, we provide an overview of the challenges ahead as we extend these technologies to the characterization of tyrosine phosphorylation signaling in vivo. With these latest developments in analytical and computational techniques, it is now possible to derive biological insight from quantitative MS-based analysis of signaling networks in vitro and in vivo. Application of these approaches to a wide variety of biological systems will define how signal transduction regulates cellular physiology in health and disease. PMID:22677333

  15. Methods of assessment of thrombosis in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Dewanjee, M.K.

    1987-01-01

    The contributions of platelets and clotting factors in thrombosis on injured vessel and cardiovascular prostheses have been quantified with several tracers. Thrombus formation in vivo could be measured semiquantitatively in animal models and humans with /sup 111/In-labeled platelets, /sup 123/I- and /sup 131/I-labeled fibrinogen, /sup 111/In-labeled antibody to the fibrinogen receptor on the platelet membrane and to fibrin. Thrombus localization by imaging was possible for large thrombus in vessel with deep injury of thrombogenic surface in the acute phase. A single layer of adherent platelets could not be imaged, due to the high background radioactivity present in blood. Thrombogenicity of grafts was compared with that of contralateral vessel. The dynamic process of platelet deposition could be followed accurately using the in vivo imaging technique. In addition, in vitro quantification permits determination of platelet and fibrin density and of the number of fibrin monomers per platelet in thrombus. The roles of prostacyclin, thromboxane inhibitors, and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs have also been evaluated in animals models and humans. The tracer techniques thus provide invaluable information about platelet-fibrin deposition, its organization and dissolution, and for development of less thrombogenic surfaces for use in cardiovascular prostheses. 53 references.

  16. NANOSTRUCTURED PROBES FOR IN VIVO GENE DETECTION

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Gang; Santangelo, Phillip; Nitin, Nitin; Rhee, Won Jong

    2010-01-01

    The ability to visualize in real-time the expression dynamics and localization of specific RNAs in vivo offers tremendous opportunities for biological and disease studies including cancer detection. However, quantitative methods such as real-time PCR and DNA microarrays rely on the use of cell lysates thus not able to obtain important spatial and temporal information. Fluorescence proteins and other reporter systems cannot image endogenous RNA in living cells. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assays require washing to achieve specificity, therefore can only be used with fixed cells. Here we review the recent development of nanostructured probes for living cell RNA detection, and discuss the biological and engineering issues and challenges of quantifying gene expression in vivo. In particular, we describe methods that use oligonucleotide probes, combined with novel delivery strategies, to image the relative level, localization and dynamics of RNA in live cells. Examples of detecting endogenous mRNAs, as well as imaging their subcellular localization are given to illustrate the biological applications, and issues in probe design, delivery and target accessibility are discussed. The nanostructured probes promise to open new and exciting opportunities in sensitive gene detection for a wide range of biological and medical applications. PMID:22138717

  17. In vivo imaging of zebrafish embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Philipp J.

    2013-01-01

    The zebrafish Danio rerio has emerged as a powerful vertebrate model system that lends itself particularly well to quantitative investigations with live imaging approaches, owing to its exceptionally high optical clarity in embryonic and larval stages. Recent advances in light microscopy technology enable comprehensive analyses of cellular dynamics during zebrafish embryonic development, systematic mapping of gene expression dynamics, quantitative reconstruction of mutant phenotypes and the system-level biophysical study of morphogenesis. Despite these technical breakthroughs, it remains challenging to design and implement experiments for in vivo long-term imaging at high spatio-temporal resolution. This article discusses the fundamental challenges in zebrafish long-term live imaging, provides experimental protocols and highlights key prop1erties and capabilities of advanced fluorescence microscopes. The article focuses in particular on experimental assays based on light sheet-based fluorescence microscopy, an emerging imaging technology that achieves exceptionally high imaging speeds and excellent signal-to-noise ratios, while minimizing light-induced damage to the specimen. This unique combination of capabilities makes light sheet microscopy an indispensable tool for the in vivo long-term imaging of large developing organisms. PMID:23523701

  18. Intracranial nonthermal irreversible electroporation: in vivo analysis.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Paulo A; Rossmeisl, John H; Neal, Robert E; Ellis, Thomas L; Olson, John D; Henao-Guerrero, Natalia; Robertson, John; Davalos, Rafael V

    2010-07-01

    Nonthermal irreversible electroporation (NTIRE) is a new minimally invasive technique to treat cancer. It is unique because of its nonthermal mechanism of tumor ablation. Intracranial NTIRE procedures involve placing electrodes into the targeted area of the brain and delivering a series of short but intense electric pulses. The electric pulses induce irreversible structural changes in cell membranes, leading to cell death. We correlated NTIRE lesion volumes in normal brain tissue with electric field distributions from comprehensive numerical models. The electrical conductivity of brain tissue was extrapolated from the measured in vivo data and the numerical models. Using this, we present results on the electric field threshold necessary to induce NTIRE lesions (495-510 V/cm) in canine brain tissue using 90 50-mus pulses at 4 Hz. Furthermore, this preliminary study provides some of the necessary numerical tools for using NTIRE as a brain cancer treatment. We also computed the electrical conductivity of brain tissue from the in vivo data (0.12-0.30 S/m) and provide guidelines for treatment planning and execution. Knowledge of the dynamic electrical conductivity of the tissue and electric field that correlates to lesion volume is crucial to ensure predictable complete NTIRE treatment while minimizing damage to surrounding healthy tissue. PMID:20668843

  19. In Vivo Bioluminescence Imaging of Intratumoral Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Michelle; Akin, Ali R; Francis, Kevin P; Tangney, Mark

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes the use of whole-body bioluminescent imaging (BLI) for the study of bacterial trafficking in live mice, with an emphasis on the use of bacteria in therapy of cancer. Bacteria present an attractive class of vector for cancer therapy, possessing a natural ability to grow preferentially within tumors following systemic administration. Bacteria engineered to express the lux gene cassette permit BLI detection of the bacteria and tumor sites concurrently. The location and levels of bacteria within tumors over time can be readily examined, visualized in two or three dimensions. The method is applicable to a wide range of bacterial species and tumor xenograft types. This article describes the protocol for analysis of bioluminescent bacteria within subcutaneous tumor-bearing mice. This powerful, and inexpensive, real-time imaging strategy represents an ideal method for the study of bacteria in vivo in the context of cancer research. This protocol outlines the procedure for studying lux-tagged Escherichia coli and Bifidobacterium breve in mice, demonstrating the spatial and temporal readout from 2D and 3D BLI achievable with whole-body in vivo luminescence imaging. PMID:26846803

  20. Continuous measurements of ATP secretion in vivo.

    PubMed

    Smith, J B; Burke, S E; Lefer, A M; Freilich, A

    1984-01-01

    Blood was withdrawn continuously from femoral veins of anesthetized rabbits at a rate of 0.07 ml/min. Sodium citrate was pumped into the blood to prevent coagulation, and luciferin-luciferase reagent was added to permit the continuous detection of extracellular ATP. Subsequently, the red blood cells were lysed and the platelet count was recorded continuously. Injection of platelet activating factor or collagen into rabbit ear veins caused an almost immediate but short-lived increase in extracellular ATP with a simultaneous but more prolonged decrease in the platelet count. Although both the endoperoxide analog 9,11-azo-PGH2 and ADP also decreased the platelet count, little extracellular ATP was detected after the azo-PGH2 and none after ADP. These studies demonstrate that those agents that cause platelet secretion from rabbit platelets in vitro also cause secretion in vivo. The method described should be useful in evaluating the capacity of antithrombotic drugs to modify platelet secretion in vivo. PMID:24277184

  1. Biomedical Applications of Sodium MRI In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Madelin, Guillaume; Regatte, Ravinder R.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we present an up-to-date overview of the potential biomedical applications of sodium MRI in vivo. Sodium MRI is a subject of increasing interest in translational imaging research as it can give some direct and quantitative biochemical information on the tissue viability, cell integrity and function, and therefore not only help the diagnosis but also the prognosis of diseases and treatment outcomes. It has already been applied in vivo in most of human tissues, such as brain for stroke or tumor detection and therapeutic response, in breast cancer, in articular cartilage, in muscle and in kidney, and it was shown in some studies that it could provide very useful new information not available through standard proton MRI. However, this technique is still very challenging due to the low detectable sodium signal in biological tissue with MRI and hardware/software limitations of the clinical scanners. The article is divided in three parts: (1) the role of sodium in biological tissues, (2) a short review on sodium magnetic resonance, and (3) a review of some studies on sodium MRI on different organs/diseases to date. PMID:23722972

  2. Multidimensional in vivo hazard assessment using zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Truong, Lisa; Reif, David M; St Mary, Lindsey; Geier, Mitra C; Truong, Hao D; Tanguay, Robert L

    2014-01-01

    There are tens of thousands of man-made chemicals in the environment; the inherent safety of most of these chemicals is not known. Relevant biological platforms and new computational tools are needed to prioritize testing of chemicals with limited human health hazard information. We describe an experimental design for high-throughput characterization of multidimensional in vivo effects with the power to evaluate trends relating to commonly cited chemical predictors. We evaluated all 1060 unique U.S. EPA ToxCast phase 1 and 2 compounds using the embryonic zebrafish and found that 487 induced significant adverse biological responses. The utilization of 18 simultaneously measured endpoints means that the entire system serves as a robust biological sensor for chemical hazard. The experimental design enabled us to describe global patterns of variation across tested compounds, evaluate the concordance of the available in vitro and in vivo phase 1 data with this study, highlight specific mechanisms/value-added/novel biology related to notochord development, and demonstrate that the developmental zebrafish detects adverse responses that would be missed by less comprehensive testing strategies. PMID:24136191

  3. In vivo proton range verification: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knopf, Antje-Christin; Lomax, Antony

    2013-08-01

    Protons are an interesting modality for radiotherapy because of their well defined range and favourable depth dose characteristics. On the other hand, these same characteristics lead to added uncertainties in their delivery. This is particularly the case at the distal end of proton dose distributions, where the dose gradient can be extremely steep. In practice however, this gradient is rarely used to spare critical normal tissues due to such worries about its exact position in the patient. Reasons for this uncertainty are inaccuracies and non-uniqueness of the calibration from CT Hounsfield units to proton stopping powers, imaging artefacts (e.g. due to metal implants) and anatomical changes of the patient during treatment. In order to improve the precision of proton therapy therefore, it would be extremely desirable to verify proton range in vivo, either prior to, during, or after therapy. In this review, we describe and compare state-of-the art in vivo proton range verification methods currently being proposed, developed or clinically implemented.

  4. Netrin-4 induces lymphangiogenesis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Larrieu-Lahargue, Frederic; Welm, Alana L; Thomas, Kirk R; Li, Dean Y

    2010-07-01

    Netrin-4, a laminin-related secreted protein is an axon guidance cue recently shown essential outside of the nervous system, regulating mammary and lung morphogenesis as well as blood vascular development. Here, we show that Netrin-4, at physiologic doses, induces proliferation, migration, adhesion, tube formation and survival of human lymphatic endothelial cells in vitro comparable to well-characterized lymphangiogenic factors fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A), and vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C). Netrin-4 stimulates phosphorylation of intracellular signaling components Akt, Erk and S6, and their specific inhibition antagonizes Netrin-4-induced proliferation. Although Netrin receptors Unc5B and neogenin, are expressed by human lymphatic endothelial cells, suppression of either or both does not suppress Netrin-4-promoted in vitro effects. In vivo, Netrin-4 induces growth of lymphatic and blood vessels in the skin of transgenic mice and in breast tumors. Its overexpression in human and mouse mammary carcinoma cancer cells leads to enhanced metastasis. Finally, Netrin-4 stimulates in vitro and in vivo lymphatic permeability by activating small GTPases and Src family kinases/FAK, and down-regulating tight junction proteins. Together, these data provide evidence that Netrin-4 is a lymphangiogenic factor contributing to tumor dissemination and represents a potential target to inhibit metastasis formation. PMID:20407033

  5. In vivo peripheral nervous system insulin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Grote, Caleb W.; Ryals, Janelle M.; Wright, Douglas E.

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in peripheral nervous system (PNS) insulin support may contribute to diabetic neuropathy (DN); yet, PNS insulin signaling is not fully defined. Here, we investigated in vivo insulin signaling in the PNS and compared the insulin-responsiveness to that of muscle, liver, and adipose. Nondiabetic mice were administered increasing doses of insulin to define a dose response relationship between insulin and Akt activation in the DRG and sciatic nerve. Resulting EC50 doses were used to characterize the PNS insulin signaling time course and make comparisons between insulin signaling in the PNS and other peripheral tissues (i.e., muscle, liver, adipose). The results demonstrate that the PNS is responsive to insulin and that differences in insulin signaling pathway activation exist between PNS compartments. At a therapeutically relevant dose, Akt was activated in the muscle, liver, and adipose at 30 minutes, correlating with the changes in blood glucose levels. Interestingly, the sciatic nerve showed a similar signaling profile as insulin-sensitive tissues, however there was not a comparable activation in the DRG or spinal cord. These results present new evidence regarding PNS insulin signaling pathways in vivo and provide a baseline for studies investigating the contribution of disrupted PNS insulin signaling to DN pathogenesis. PMID:24028189

  6. Nutritional abrogation of photoimmunosuppression: in vivo investigations.

    PubMed

    Pilkington, Suzanne M; Gibbs, Neil K; Friedmann, Peter S; Rhodes, Lesley E

    2014-01-01

    Skin cancer is a major public health concern, and the primary aetiological factor in the majority of skin cancers is ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure. UVR not only induces potentially mutagenic DNA damage but also suppresses cell-mediated immunity (CMI), allowing cancerous cells to escape destruction and progress to tumours. A considerable proportion of an individual's annual sun exposure is obtained outside the vacation period when topical and physical measures for photoprotection are irregularly used. Certain nutrients could provide an adjunctive protective role, and evidence is accruing from experimental studies to support their use in abrogation of photoimmunosuppression. Moreover, developments in clinical research methods to evaluate impact of solar-simulated radiation on cutaneous CMI allow the immune protective potential of nutritional agents to be examined in humans in vivo. This article summarises the mediation of CMI and its suppression by UVR, evaluates the methodology for quantitative assessment in vivo, reviews the human studies reported on nutritional abrogation of photoimmunosuppression including recent randomized controlled trials and discusses the mechanisms of photoprotection by the nutrients. This includes, in addition to antioxidants, novel studies of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and nicotinamide. PMID:24283330

  7. In vivo imaging of neuroinflammation in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Pasternak, Ofer; Kubicki, Marek; Shenton, Martha E

    2016-06-01

    In recent years evidence has accumulated to suggest that neuroinflammation might be an early pathology of schizophrenia that later leads to neurodegeneration, yet the exact role in the etiology, as well as the source of neuroinflammation, are still not known. The hypothesis of neuroinflammation involvement in schizophrenia is quickly gaining popularity, and thus it is imperative that we have reliable and reproducible tools and measures that are both sensitive, and, most importantly, specific to neuroinflammation. The development and use of appropriate human in vivo imaging methods can help in our understanding of the location and extent of neuroinflammation in different stages of the disorder, its natural time-course, and its relation to neurodegeneration. Thus far, there is little in vivo evidence derived from neuroimaging methods. This is likely the case because the methods that are specific and sensitive to neuroinflammation are relatively new or only just being developed. This paper provides a methodological review of both existing and emerging positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging techniques that identify and characterize neuroinflammation. We describe \\how these methods have been used in schizophrenia research. We also outline the shortcomings of existing methods, and we highlight promising future techniques that will likely improve state-of-the-art neuroimaging as a more refined approach for investigating neuroinflammation in schizophrenia. PMID:26048294

  8. Use of RSP Tooling to Manufacture Die Casting Dies

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin McHugh

    2004-07-01

    The technology and art used to construct die casting dies has seen many improvements over the years. However, the time lag from when a design is finalized to the time a tool is in production has remained essentially the same. The two main causes for the bottleneck are the need to qualify a part design by making prototypes (usually from an alternative process), and the production tooling lead time after the prototypes are approved. Production tooling costs are high due to the labor and equipment costs associated with transforming a forged block of tool steel into a finished tool. CNC machining, sink EDM, benching, engraving and heat treatment unit operations are typically involved. As a result, there is increasing interest in rapid tooling (RT) technologies that shorten the design-to-part cycle and reduce the cost of dies. There are currently more than 20 RT methods being developed and refined around the world (1). The "rapid" in rapid tooling suggests time compression for tool delivery, but does not address robustness as nearly all RT approaches are intended for low-volume prototype work, primarily for molding plastics. Few options exist for die casting. An RT technology suitable for production-quality tooling in the time it normally takes for prototype tooling is highly desirable. In fact, there would be no need for a distinction between prototype and production tooling. True prototype parts could be made using the same processing conditions and materials intended for production. Qualification of the prototype part would allow the manufacturer to go directly into production with the same tool. A relatively new RT technology, Rapid Solidification Process (RSP) Tooling, is capable of making production-quality tooling in an RT timeframe for die casting applications. RSP Tooling, was developed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), and commercialized with the formation of RSP Tooling, LLC (2). This paper describes the process, and

  9. Blood rheology in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lowe, G D

    1987-09-01

    Blood rheology tests are traditionally used for detection of organic disease and for monitoring disease activity. More recently they have been used for prediction of blood flow in vivo, not only in overt hyperviscosity syndromes but also in the covert hyperviscosity of low-flow states. The traditional ESR test result increases with red cell aggregation induced by increases in large, asymmetrical plasma globulins. However, small increases in haematocrit and large increases in plasma viscosity each decrease the ESR, reducing both its diagnostic utility and its ability to predict blood flow in vivo. The ESR should be corrected to a standard haematocrit, or else replaced by the ZSR or plasma viscosity, which are more rapid, simple, sensitive and independent of haematocrit. For prediction of blood flow in vivo, these tests can be supplemented by measurement of whole-blood viscosity, which can be performed simply and cheaply in capillary viscometers at high shear rates. Whole-blood viscosity is determined by plasma viscosity, haematocrit and red cell deformability at high shear rates. Its measurement is useful in overt hyperviscosity syndromes, particularly in estimating the effect of red cell transfusion in anaemic patients with plasma hyperviscosity, hyperleukocytic leukaemias or sickling disorders. Blood viscosity should be related to the haematocrit or haemoglobin concentration in order to estimate oxygen delivery to tissues. Changes in blood viscosity can be compensated readily in the normal circulation but not in the compromised, low-flow circulation. In these circumstances, systemic increases in plasma viscosity, haematocrit, whole-blood viscosity, red cell aggregation and in the numbers of circulating rigid red or white blood cells can perpetuate low-flow states and ischaemia. Red cell deformability in narrow vessels is best measured by micropore filtration systems, in which the effect of white cells has been eliminated. Red cell deformability is reduced by

  10. Acting to let someone die.

    PubMed

    McGee, Andrew

    2015-02-01

    This paper examines the recent prominent view in medical ethics that withdrawing life-sustaining treatment (LST) is an act of killing. I trace this view to the rejection of the traditional claim that withdrawing LST is an omission rather than an act. Although that traditional claim is not as problematic as this recent prominent view suggests, my main claim is that even if we accepted that withdrawing LST should be classified as an act rather than as an omission, it could still be classified as letting die rather than killing. Even though omissions are contrasted with acts, letting die need not be, for one can let die by means of acts. The remainder of the paper is devoted to establishing this claim and addresses certain objections to it. PMID:24320715

  11. Clinical management of dying patients.

    PubMed Central

    Gavrin, J; Chapman, C R

    1995-01-01

    Dying is universal, and death should be a peaceful time. Myriad comfort measures are available in the last weeks before life ends. Discussions about end-of-life issues often suffer from lack of informed opinion. Palliative care experts have identified specific somatic and psychological sources of distress for dying patients and their loved ones. Pain, shortness of breath, nausea and vomiting, and fear of abandonment contribute substantially to both physical and psychological discomfort toward the end of life. Simple, effective methods exist for relieving those symptoms. Knowledge about the natural events associated with dying and an informed approach to medical and psychological interventions contribute to systematic and successful comfort care. We describe the origin of physical and psychological distress at the end of life and provide strategies for alleviating many of the discomforts. PMID:7571591

  12. Seeing Stem Cells at Work In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Amit K.; Bulte, Jeff W. M.

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell based-therapies are novel therapeutic strategies that hold key for developing new treatments for diseases conditions with very few or no cures. Although there has been an increase in the number of clinical trials involving stem cell-based therapies in the last few years, the long-term risks and benefits of these therapies are still unknown. Detailed in vivo studies are needed to monitor the fate of transplanted cells, including their distribution, differentiation, and longevity over time. Advancements in non-invasive cellular imaging techniques to track engrafted cells in real-time present a powerful tool for determining the efficacy of stem cell-based therapies. In this review, we describe the latest approaches to stem cell labeling and tracking using different imaging modalities. PMID:23975604

  13. Quantifying drug-protein binding in vivo.

    SciTech Connect

    Buchholz, B; Bench, G; Keating III, G; Palmblad, M; Vogel, J; Grant, P G; Hillegonds, D

    2004-02-17

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) provides precise quantitation of isotope labeled compounds that are bound to biological macromolecules such as DNA or proteins. The sensitivity is high enough to allow for sub-pharmacological (''micro-'') dosing to determine macromolecular targets without inducing toxicities or altering the system under study, whether it is healthy or diseased. We demonstrated an application of AMS in quantifying the physiologic effects of one dosed chemical compound upon the binding level of another compound in vivo at sub-toxic doses [4].We are using tissues left from this study to develop protocols for quantifying specific binding to isolated and identified proteins. We also developed a new technique to quantify nanogram to milligram amounts of isolated protein at precisions that are comparable to those for quantifying the bound compound by AMS.

  14. Modeling Melanoma In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Beaumont, Kimberley A.; Mohana-Kumaran, Nethia; Haass, Nikolas K.

    2013-01-01

    The behavior of melanoma cells has traditionally been studied in vitro in two-dimensional cell culture with cells adhering to plastic dishes. However, in order to mimic the three-dimensional architecture of a melanoma, as well as its interactions with the tumor microenvironment, there has been the need for more physiologically relevant models. This has been achieved by designing 3D in vitro models of melanoma, such as melanoma spheroids embedded in extracellular matrix or organotypic skin reconstructs. In vivo melanoma models have typically relied on the growth of tumor xenografts in immunocompromised mice. Several genetically engineered mouse models have now been developed which allow the generation of spontaneous melanoma. Melanoma models have also been established in other species such as zebrafish, which are more conducive to imaging and high throughput studies. We will discuss these models as well as novel techniques that are relevant to the study of the molecular mechanisms underlying melanoma progression.

  15. In Vivo Molecular Imaging in Retinal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Fang; Luo, Wenting; Zhang, Zhongyu; Sun, Dawei

    2012-01-01

    There is an urgent need for early diagnosis in medicine, whereupon effective treatments could prevent irreversible tissue damage. The special structure of the eye provides a unique opportunity for noninvasive light-based imaging of ocular fundus vasculature. To detect endothelial injury at the early and reversible stage of adhesion molecule upregulation, some novel imaging agents that target retinal endothelial molecules were generated. In vivo molecular imaging has a great potential to impact medicine by detecting diseases or screening disease in early stages, identifying extent of disease, selecting disease and patient-specific therapeutic treatment, applying a directed or targeted therapy, and measuring molecular-specific effects of treatment. Current preclinical findings and advances in instrumentation such as endoscopes and microcatheters suggest that these molecular imaging modalities have numerous clinical applications and will be translated into clinical use in the near future. PMID:22363836

  16. Spectral reflectance of human skin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Andersen, P H; Bjerring, P

    1990-02-01

    A newly developed skin reflectance spectrophotometer was evaluated for measurements of both melanin pigmentation and erythema. Physiological changes in blood flow and blood content in normal humans were induced by compression with an arm cuff during recording of skin reflectance spectra. Reflectance spectra of UV-induced erythema were also recorded and compared with laser-Doppler flow measurements. Spectral reflectance measurements were found to be highly sensitive in determining minimal erythema, which was not clinically detectable. The measurements of erythema using reflectance spectroscopy and UV irradiation were very highly correlated (r = 0.996). It was possible to calculate the in vivo absorbance of oxygenized haemoglobin. The melanin pigmentation following UV irradiation was quantified by reflectance spectroscopy and correlates highly with the dose of UV irradiation (r = 0.995). Furthermore, regional variations in skin melanin and haemoglobin were analysed for fair Caucasian skin. PMID:2196543

  17. In Vivo Cytogenetic Studies on Aspartame

    PubMed Central

    AlSuhaibani, Entissar S.

    2010-01-01

    Aspartame (a-Laspartyl-L-phenylalanine 1-methylester) is a dipeptide low-calorie artificial sweetener that is widely used as a nonnutritive sweetener in foods and drinks. The safety of aspartame and its metabolic breakdown products (phenylalanine, aspartic acid and methanol) was investigated in vivo using chromosomal aberration (CA) test and sister chromatid exchange (SCE) test in the bone marrow cells of mice. Swiss Albino male mice were exposed to aspartame (3.5, 35, 350 mg/kg body weight). Bone marrow cells isolated from femora were analyzed for chromosome aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges. Treatment with aspartame induced dose dependently chromosome aberrations at all concentrations while it did not induce sister chromatid exchanges. On the other hand, aspartame did not decrease the mitotic index (MI). However, statistical analysis of the results show that aspartame is not significantly genotoxic at low concentration. PMID:20689731

  18. Nucleosome dynamics during chromatin remodeling in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Srinivas; Henikoff, Steven

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Precise positioning of nucleosomes around regulatory sites is achieved by the action of chromatin remodelers, which use the energy of ATP to slide, evict or change the composition of nucleosomes. Chromatin remodelers act to bind nucleosomes, disrupt histone-DNA interactions and translocate the DNA around the histone core to reposition nucleosomes. Hence, remodeling is expected to involve nucleosomal intermediates with a structural organization that is distinct from intact nucleosomes. We describe the identification of a partially unwrapped nucleosome structure using methods that map histone-DNA contacts genome-wide. This alternative nucleosome structure is likely formed as an intermediate or by-product during nucleosome remodeling by the RSC complex. Identification of the loss of histone-DNA contacts during chromatin remodeling by RSC in vivo has implications for the regulation of transcriptional initiation. PMID:26933790

  19. Corneal In Vivo Confocal Microscopy: Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    You, Jae Young; Botelho, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    In vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) has become a widely accepted imaging technique to study the human living cornea. It provides a unique opportunity to visualize the corneal tissue at the cellular level without damage and longitudinally observe its pathologic and normative changes. With rapidly evolving technology, there has been an abundance of interest in maximizing its potential to better understand the human cornea in health and disease. This is evidenced by a growing literature analyzing acquired and inherited corneal and also systemic diseases using corneal IVCM. This article provides a narrative review of IVCM and its applications. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2016-06.asp, free with no login]. PMID:27247970

  20. Nucleosome dynamics during chromatin remodeling in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Srinivas; Henikoff, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Precise positioning of nucleosomes around regulatory sites is achieved by the action of chromatin remodelers, which use the energy of ATP to slide, evict or change the composition of nucleosomes. Chromatin remodelers act to bind nucleosomes, disrupt histone-DNA interactions and translocate the DNA around the histone core to reposition nucleosomes. Hence, remodeling is expected to involve nucleosomal intermediates with a structural organization that is distinct from intact nucleosomes. We describe the identification of a partially unwrapped nucleosome structure using methods that map histone-DNA contacts genome-wide. This alternative nucleosome structure is likely formed as an intermediate or by-product during nucleosome remodeling by the RSC complex. Identification of the loss of histone-DNA contacts during chromatin remodeling by RSC in vivo has implications for the regulation of transcriptional initiation. PMID:26933790

  1. An excitatory GABA loop operating in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Astorga, Guadalupe; Bao, Jin; Marty, Alain; Augustine, George J.; Franconville, Romain; Jalil, Abdelali; Bradley, Jonathan; Llano, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    While it has been proposed that the conventional inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA can be excitatory in the mammalian brain, much remains to be learned concerning the circumstances and the cellular mechanisms governing potential excitatory GABA action. Using a combination of optogenetics and two-photon calcium imaging in vivo, we find that activation of chloride-permeable GABAA receptors in parallel fibers (PFs) of the cerebellar molecular layer of adult mice causes parallel fiber excitation. Stimulation of PFs at submaximal stimulus intensities leads to GABA release from molecular layer interneurons (MLIs), thus creating a positive feedback loop that enhances excitation near the center of an activated PF bundle. Our results imply that elevated chloride concentration can occur in specific intracellular compartments of mature mammalian neurons and suggest an excitatory role for GABAA receptors in the cerebellar cortex of adult mice. PMID:26236197

  2. THz Medical Imaging: in vivo Hydration Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Zachary D.; Singh, Rahul S.; Bennett, David B.; Tewari, Priyamvada; Kealey, Colin P.; Bajwa, Neha; Culjat, Martin O.; Stojadinovic, Alexander; Lee, Hua; Hubschman, Jean-Pierre; Brown, Elliott R.; Grundfest, Warren S.

    2015-01-01

    The application of THz to medical imaging is experiencing a surge in both interest and federal funding. A brief overview of the field is provided along with promising and emerging applications and ongoing research. THz imaging phenomenology is discussed and tradeoffs are identified. A THz medical imaging system, operating at ~525 GHz center frequency with ~125 GHz of response normalized bandwidth is introduced and details regarding principles of operation are provided. Two promising medical applications of THz imaging are presented: skin burns and cornea. For burns, images of second degree, partial thickness burns were obtained in rat models in vivo over an 8 hour period. These images clearly show the formation and progression of edema in and around the burn wound area. For cornea, experimental data measuring the hydration of ex vivo porcine cornea under drying is presented demonstrating utility in ophthalmologic applications. PMID:26085958

  3. 'Die Zeit' im Konversationsunterricht ('Die Zeit' in a Conversation Class)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker-Cantarino, Barbel

    1975-01-01

    The German weekly newspaper "Die Zeit" contains a very rich variety of topics and is therefore an inexhaustable source for an exciting conversation class. This article outlines and lists the advantages of a German conversation course organized around this newspaper. (Text is in German.) (TL)

  4. Dying radio galaxies in clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murgia, M.; Parma, P.; Mack, K.-H.; de Ruiter, H. R.; Fanti, R.; Govoni, F.; Tarchi, A.; Giacintucci, S.; Markevitch, M.

    2011-02-01

    Aims: We present a study of five "dying" nearby (z ≤ 0.2) radio galaxies belonging to both the WENSS minisurvey and the B2 bright catalogs WNB1734+6407, WNB1829+6911, WNB1851+5707, B2 0120+33, and B2 1610+29. Methods: These sources have been selected on the basis of their extremely steep broad-band radio spectra, which strongly indicates that either these objects belong to the rare class of dying radio galaxies or we are observing "fossil" radio plasma remaining from a previous instance of nuclear activity. We derive the relative duration of the dying phase from the fit of a synchrotron radiative model to the radio spectra of the sources. Results: The modeling of the integrated spectra and the deep spectral index images obtained with the VLA confirmed that in these sources the central engine has ceased to be active for a significant fraction of their lifetime, although their extended lobes have not yet completely faded away. We found that WNB1851+5707 is in reality composed of two distinct dying galaxies, which appear blended together as a single source in the WENSS. In the cases of WNB1829+6911 and B2 0120+33, the fossil radio lobes are seen in conjunction with a currently active core. A very faint core is also detected in a MERLIN image of WNB1851+5707a, one of the two dying sources composing WNB1851+5707. We found that all sources in our sample are located (at least in projection) at the center of an X-ray emitting cluster. Conclusions: Our results suggest that the duration of the dying phase for a radio source in a cluster can be significantly higher than that of a radio galaxy in the field, although no firm conclusions can be drawn because of the small number statistics involved. The simplest interpretation of the tendency for dying galaxies to be found in clusters is that the low-frequency radio emission from the fading radio lobes lasts longer if their expansion is somewhat reduced or even stopped. Another possibility is that the occurrence of dying

  5. Die Herz-Lungen-Maschine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krane, Markus; Bauernschmitt, Robert; Lange, Rüdiger

    Das Kapitel der modernen Herzchirurgie mit Einsatz der Herz-Lungen-Maschine am Menschen beginnt am 6. Mai 1953, als J. Gibbon bei einer 18-jährigen Patientin einen angeborenen Defekt in der Vorhofscheidewand verschließt [1]. Mit ersten experimentellen Versuchen zur extrakorporalen Zirkulation begann Gibbon bereits in den 30er Jahren des 20. Jahrhunderts. Die Grundlage für die heute gebräuchliche Rollerpumpe schufen Porter und Bradley mit ihrer "rotary pump“, welche sie 1855 zum Patent anmeldeten. Diese Pumpe wurde von DeBakey und Schmidt modifiziert und entspricht im Wesentlichen noch der heute sich im Routinebetrieb befindlichen Rollerpumpe [2].

  6. Portable punch and die jig

    DOEpatents

    Lewandowski, Edward F.; Anderson, Petrus A.

    1978-01-01

    A portable punch and die jig includes a U-shaped jig of predetermined width having a slot of predetermined width in the base thereof extending completely across the width of the jig adapted to fit over the walls of rectangular tubes and a punch and die assembly disposed in a hole extending through the base of the jig communicating with the slot in the base of the jig for punching a hole in the walls of the rectangular tubes at precisely determined locations.

  7. Nebivolol increases arterial distensibility in vivo.

    PubMed

    McEniery, Carmel M; Schmitt, Matthias; Qasem, Ahmad; Webb, David J; Avolio, Alberto P; Wilkinson, Ian B; Cockcroft, John R

    2004-09-01

    Arterial stiffness is a key determinant of cardiovascular risk in hypertensive patients. beta-Blockers appear to be less effective than other drugs in improving outcome in hypertensive patients, and a potential explanation may be that beta-blockers are less effective in reducing arterial stiffness. The aim of this study was to assess the direct effect of beta-blockade on pulse wave velocity (PWV), a robust measure of arterial distensibility, using a local, ovine, hind-limb model. In addition, we hypothesized that the vasodilating beta-blocker nebivolol, but not atenolol, would increase arterial distensibility in vivo. All studies were conducted in anesthetized sheep. PWV was recorded in vivo using a dual pressure-sensing catheter placed in the common iliac artery. Intraarterial infusion of nebivolol reduced PWV by 6+/-3% at the higher dose (P<0.001), but did not alter mean arterial pressure (change of -1+/-3 mm Hg, P=0.1). In contrast, atenolol had no effect on PWV (P=0.11) despite a small drop in mean pressure (change of -5+/-3 mm Hg, P<0.01). Infusion of glyceryl trinitrate led to a dose-dependent fall in PWV, and 2 nmol/min produced a similar reduction in PWV to the higher dose of nebivolol (500 nmol/min). The effect of nebivolol on PWV was significantly attenuated during coinfusion of N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (P=0.003) and also during coinfusion of butoxamine (P=0.02). These results demonstrate that nebivolol, but not atenolol, increases arterial distensibility. This effect of nebivolol is mediated through the release of NO via a beta2 adrenoceptor-dependent mechanism. Thus, nebivolol may be of benefit in conditions of increased large artery stiffness, such as isolated systolic hypertension. PMID:15262912

  8. In vivo nanotoxicity assays in plant models.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Mamta; Ernest, Vinita; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan

    2012-01-01

    Increasing application of silver nanoparticles (SNPs) and zinc oxide nanoparticles (nZnO) in consumer products like textiles, cosmetics, washing machines and other household products increases their chance to reach the environment. Intensive research is required to assess the nanoparticles' toxicity to the environmental system. The toxicological effect of nanoparticles has been studied at the miniscule scale and requires intensive research to be conducted to assess its unknown effects. Plants are the primary target species which need to be included to develop a comprehensive toxicity profile for nanoparticles. So far, the mechanisms of toxicity of nanoparticles to the plant system remains largely unknown and little information on the potential uptake of nanoparticles by plants and their subsequent fate within the food chain is available. The phytoxicological behaviour of silver and zinc oxide nanoparticles on Allium cepa and seeds of Zea mays (maize), Cucumis sativus (cucumber) and Lycopersicum esculentum (tomato) was done. The in vitro studies on A. cepa have been done to check the cytotoxicological effects including mitotic index, chromosomal aberrations, vagrant chromosomes, sticky chromosomes, disturbed metaphase, breaks and formation of micronucleus. In vitro and in vivo studies on seed systems exposed to different concentration of nanoparticles dispersion to check phytotoxicity end point as root length, germination effect, adsorption and accumulation of nanoparticles (uptake studies) into the plant systems. In vivo studies in a seed system was done using phytagel medium. Biochemical studies were done to check effect on protein, DNA and thiobarbituric acid reactive species concentration. FT-IR studies were done to analyze the functional and conformational changes in the treated and untreated samples. The toxicological effects of nanoparticles had to be studied at the miniscule scale to address existing environment problems or prevent future problems. The

  9. 3D ultrafast ultrasound imaging in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Esteban Arango, Juan; Imbault, Marion; Fink, Mathias; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-10-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in 3D based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32  ×  32 matrix-array probe. Its ability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging, and, finally, 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler Imaging. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, at thousands of volumes per second, the complex 3D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, as well as the 3D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3D mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra—and inter-observer variability.

  10. 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Arango, Juan Esteban; Imbault, Marion; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-01-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative real-time imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in three dimensions based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32×32 matrix-array probe. Its capability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3-D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3-D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging and finally 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3-D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3-D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, for the first time, the complex 3-D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, and the 3-D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3-D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3-D real-time mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra- and inter-observer variability. PMID:25207828

  11. In Vivo Dedifferentiation of Adult Adipose Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Feng; Dong, Ziqing; Chang, Qiang; Gao, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Adipocytes can dedifferentiate into fibroblast-like cells in vitro and thereby acquire proliferation and multipotent capacities to participate in the repair of various organs and tissues. Whether dedifferentiation occurs under physiological or pathological conditions in vivo is unknown. Methods A tissue expander was placed under the inguinal fat pads of rats and gradually expanded by injection of water. Samples were collected at various time points, and morphological, histological, cytological, ultrastructural, and gene expression analyses were conducted. In a separate experiment, purified green fluorescent protein+ adipocytes were transplanted into C57 mice and collected at various time points. The transplanted adipocytes were assessed by bioluminescence imaging and whole-mount staining. Results The expanded fat pad was obviously thinner than the untreated fat pad on the opposite side. It was also tougher in texture and with more blood vessels attached. Hematoxylin and eosin staining and transmission electron microscopy indicated there were fewer monolocular adipocytes in the expanded fat pad and the morphology of these cells was altered, most notably their lipid content was discarded. Immunohistochemistry showed that the expanded fat pad contained an increased number of proliferative cells, which may have been derived from adipocytes. Following removal of the tissue expander, many small adipocytes were observed. Bioluminescence imaging suggested that some adipocytes survived when transplanted into an ischemic-hypoxic environment. Whole-mount staining revealed that surviving adipocytes underwent a process similar to adipocyte dedifferentiation in vitro. Monolocular adipocytes became multilocular adipocytes and then fibroblast-like cells. Conclusions Mature adipocytes may be able to dedifferentiate in vivo, and this may be an adipose tissue self-repair mechanism. The capacity of adipocytes to dedifferentiate into stem cell-like cells may also have a

  12. Dimerization of visual pigments in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Cao, Li-Hui; Kumar, Sandeep; Enemchukwu, Nduka O; Zhang, Ning; Lambert, Alyssia; Zhao, Xuchen; Jones, Alex; Wang, Shixian; Dennis, Emily M; Fnu, Amrita; Ham, Sam; Rainier, Jon; Yau, King-Wai; Fu, Yingbin

    2016-08-01

    It is a deeply engrained notion that the visual pigment rhodopsin signals light as a monomer, even though many G protein-coupled receptors are now known to exist and function as dimers. Nonetheless, recent studies (albeit all in vitro) have suggested that rhodopsin and its chromophore-free apoprotein, R-opsin, may indeed exist as a homodimer in rod disk membranes. Given the overwhelmingly strong historical context, the crucial remaining question, therefore, is whether pigment dimerization truly exists naturally and what function this dimerization may serve. We addressed this question in vivo with a unique mouse line (S-opsin(+)Lrat(-/-)) expressing, transgenically, short-wavelength-sensitive cone opsin (S-opsin) in rods and also lacking chromophore to exploit the fact that cone opsins, but not R-opsin, require chromophore for proper folding and trafficking to the photoreceptor's outer segment. In R-opsin's absence, S-opsin in these transgenic rods without chromophore was mislocalized; in R-opsin's presence, however, S-opsin trafficked normally to the rod outer segment and produced functional S-pigment upon subsequent chromophore restoration. Introducing a competing R-opsin transmembrane helix H1 or helix H8 peptide, but not helix H4 or helix H5 peptide, into these transgenic rods caused mislocalization of R-opsin and S-opsin to the perinuclear endoplasmic reticulum. Importantly, a similar peptide-competition effect was observed even in WT rods. Our work provides convincing evidence for visual pigment dimerization in vivo under physiological conditions and for its role in pigment maturation and targeting. Our work raises new questions regarding a potential mechanistic role of dimerization in rhodopsin signaling. PMID:27462111

  13. In vivo light dosimetry for pleural PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimofte, Andreea; Zhu, Timothy C.; Finlay, Jarod C.; Culligan, Melissa; Edmonds, Christine E.; Friedberg, Joseph S.; Cengel, Keith; Hahn, Stephen M.

    2009-02-01

    In-vivo light Dosimetry for patients undergoing photodynamic therapy (PDT) is one of the important dosimetry quantities critical for predicting PDT outcome. This study examines the light fluence (rate) delivered to patients undergoing pleural PDT as a function of treatment time, treatment volume and surface area, and its accuracy as a function of the calibration accuracies of each isotropic detector and the calibration integrating sphere. The patients studied here were enrolled in Phase II clinical trial of Photofrin-mediated PDT for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer with pleural effusion. The ages of the patients studied varied from 34 to 69 year old. All patients were administered 2mg per kg body weight Photoprin 24 hours before the surgery. Patients undergoing photodynamic therapy (PDT) are treated with laser light with a light fluence of 60 J/cm^2 at 630nm. Fluence rate (mW/cm^2) and cumulative fluence (J/cm^2) was monitored at 7 different sites during the entire light treatment delivery. Isotropic detectors were used for in-vivo light dosimetry. The anisotropy of each isotropic detector was found to be within 30%. The mean fluence rate delivery varied from 37.84 to 94.05 mW/cm^2 and treatment time varied from 1762 to 5232s. We have established a correlation between the treatment time and the treatment volume. The results are discussed using an integrating sphere theory and the measured tissue optical properties. The result can be used as a clinical guideline for future pleural PDT treatment.

  14. In vivo Raman spectroscopy of cervix cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubina, S.; Sathe, Priyanka; Dora, Tapas Kumar; Chopra, Supriya; Maheshwari, Amita; Krishna, C. Murali

    2014-03-01

    Cervix-cancer is the third most common female cancer worldwide. It is the leading cancer among Indian females with more than million new diagnosed cases and 50% mortality, annually. The high mortality rates can be attributed to late diagnosis. Efficacy of Raman spectroscopy in classification of normal and pathological conditions in cervix cancers on diverse populations has already been demonstrated. Our earlier ex vivo studies have shown the feasibility of classifying normal and cancer cervix tissues as well as responders/non-responders to Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). The present study was carried out to explore feasibility of in vivo Raman spectroscopic methods in classifying normal and cancerous conditions in Indian population. A total of 182 normal and 132 tumor in vivo Raman spectra, from 63 subjects, were recorded using a fiberoptic probe coupled HE-785 spectrometer, under clinical supervision. Spectra were acquired for 5 s and averaged over 3 times at 80 mW laser power. Spectra of normal conditions suggest strong collagenous features and abundance of non-collagenous proteins and DNA in case of tumors. Preprocessed spectra were subjected to Principal Component-Linear Discrimination Analysis (PCLDA) followed by leave-one-out-cross-validation. Classification efficiency of ~96.7% and 100% for normal and cancerous conditions respectively, were observed. Findings of the study corroborates earlier studies and suggest applicability of Raman spectroscopic methods in combination with appropriate multivariate tool for objective, noninvasive and rapid diagnosis of cervical cancers in Indian population. In view of encouraging results, extensive validation studies will be undertaken to confirm the findings.

  15. Robert Merton Dies at 92

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snell, Joel C.

    2006-01-01

    This article features Robert Merton, who died recently at age 92. Merton came into this world as a Jewish baby named Meyer Schkolnick. He lived in South Philly where his parents wrenched a living as blue-collar workers. Merton chose an Anglicized name to move into the Yankee dominated America of the 20's and 30's. At Harvard, he studied under…

  16. Attitudes on Death and Dying.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrus, Charles E.

    This paper explored attitudes toward death and dying revealed through interviews with members of the clergy, the medical profession, funeral directors, nursing home residents, and selected others. The sampling was small and results are not intended to be representative of the groups to which these people belong. Rather, the study may be used as a…

  17. In Vivo Monitoring Program Manual, PNL-MA-574

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, Timothy P.

    2010-07-01

    An overview of the administration for the In Vivo Monitoring Program (IVMP) for Hanford. This includes organizational structure and program responsibilities; coordination of in vivo measurements; scheduling measurements; performing measurements; reporting results; and quality assurance. Overall responsibility for the management of the IVMP rests with the Program Manager (PM). The PM is responsible for providing the required in vivo counting services for Hanford Site contractor employees in accordance with Department of Energy (DOE) requirements and the specific statements of work.

  18. Passive in vivo elastography from skeletal muscle noise

    SciTech Connect

    Sabra, Karim G.; Conti, Stephane; Roux, Philippe; Kuperman, W. A.

    2007-05-07

    Measuring the in vivo elastic properties of muscles (e.g., stiffness) provides a means for diagnosing and monitoring muscular activity. The authors demonstrated a passive in vivo elastography technique without an active external radiation source. This technique instead uses cross correlations of contracting skeletal muscle noise recorded with skin-mounted sensors. Each passive sensor becomes a virtual in vivo shear wave source. The results point to a low-cost, noninvasive technique for monitoring biomechanical in vivo muscle properties. The efficacy of the passive elastography technique originates from the high density of cross paths between all sensor pairs, potentially achieving the same sensitivity obtained from active elastography methods.

  19. Integrated Forming Simulations and Die Structural Analysis for Optimal Die Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitharaju, Venkat; Liu, Malcolm; Dong, Jennifer; Zhang, Jimmy; Wang, Chuan-tao

    2005-08-01

    After gaining a huge success in applying stamping simulations and formability analysis to validate die face developments, GM moves forward to winning total manufacturability in stamping process. Of which, ensuring die structure integrity and minimizing weight is one of the important initiatives. Stamping die design (or solid modeling of stamping dies) was traditionally conducted by following the die design manuals and standards. For any design changes beyond the standards, however, there are no math-based tools available to die designers to verify the outcome of the changes. Die structural analysis (DSA) provides a math-tool to validate the design changes and quantify the safety factors. Several years ago, GM Manufacturing Engineering — Die Center started die structural analysis to meet the increasing demands of customer needs in various areas: (1) to validate design changes; (2) to identify root cause of die breakage during the tryout and stamping operations and propose repair schemes; (3) to optimize the die design for weight reduction; (4) to improve press throughput via optimizing the scrap chute openings, and (5) to provide a math-based tool to validate revisions to the current die design standards. In the integrated forming and die structural analysis, after successful line die surface developments, the forming loads (binder force, pad force, and forming tonnages) are extracted from forming simulations and applied to solid die members for structural analyses of stress, strains, and deflections. In the past few years, Die Center conducted static, dynamic and fatigue analysis for many dies that covers the die design changes requested by die design, die construction and stamping plants. This paper presents some fundamentals and issues of integrated forming and die structural analysis and illustrates the significant impact of die structural analysis on die design, die construction and production stamping.

  20. Exploratory study on H13 steel dies

    SciTech Connect

    Sunwoo, A.J.

    1994-04-01

    Ultrahigh-strength H13 steel is a recommended die material for aluminum die casting; dies made from H13 steel can be safely water- cooled during hot working operations without cracking. However, after time the dies exhibited surface cracking and excessive wear. Erosive wear also occurs owing to high pressure injection of molten Al. An exploratory study was made of the causes for surface cracking of H13 dies. Results suggest that surface cracking is caused by interrelated factors, internal to the die material as well as externally induced conditions.

  1. Viral Vectors for in Vivo Gene Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thévenot, E.; Dufour, N.; Déglon, N.

    The transfer of DNA into the nucleus of a eukaryotic cell (gene transfer) is a central theme of modern biology. The transfer is said to be somatic when it refers to non-germline organs of a developed individual, and germline when it concerns gametes or the fertilised egg of an animal, with the aim of transmitting the relevant genetic modification to its descendents [1]. The efficient introduction of genetic material into a somatic or germline cell and the control of its expression over time have led to major advances in understanding how genes work in vivo, i.e., in living organisms (functional genomics), but also to the development of innovative therapeutic methods (gene therapy). The efficiency of gene transfer is conditioned by the vehicle used, called the vector. Desirable features for a vector are as follows: Easy to produce high titer stocks of the vector in a reproducible way. Absence of toxicity related to transduction (transfer of genetic material into the target cell, and its expression there) and no immune reaction of the organism against the vector and/or therapeutic protein. Stability in the expression of the relevant gene over time, and the possibility of regulation, e.g., to control expression of the therapeutic protein on the physiological level, or to end expression at the end of treatment. Transduction of quiescent cells should be as efficient as transduction of dividing cells. Vectors currently used fall into two categories: non-viral and viral vectors. In non-viral vectors, the DNA is complexed with polymers, lipids, or cationic detergents (described in Chap. 3). These vectors have a low risk of toxicity and immune reaction. However, they are less efficient in vivo than viral vectors when it comes to the number of cells transduced and long-term transgene expression. (Naked DNA transfer or electroporation is rather inefficient in the organism. This type of gene transfer will not be discussed here, and the interested reader is referred to the

  2. The thermal fatigue resistance of H-13 Die Steel for aluminum die casting dies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The effects of welding, five selected surface coatings, and stress relieving on the thermal fatigue resistance of H-13 Die Steel for aluminum die casting dies were studied using eleven thermal fatigue specimens. Stress relieving was conducted after each 5,000 cycle interval at 1050 F for three hours. Four thermal fatigue specimens were welded with H-13 or maraging steel welding rods at ambient and elevated temperatures and subsequently, subjected to different post-weld heat treatments. Crack patterns were examined at 5,000, 10,000, and 15,000 cycles. The thermal fatigue resistance is expressed by two crack parameters which are the average maximum crack and the average cracked area. The results indicate that a significant improvement in thermal fatigue resistance over the control was obtained from the stress-relieving treatment. Small improvements were obtained from the H-13 welded specimens and from a salt bath nitrogen and carbon-surface treatment. The other surface treatments and welded specimens either did not affect or had a detrimental influence on the thermal fatigue properties of the H-13 die steel.

  3. Thermal Assisted In Vivo Gene Electrotransfer.

    PubMed

    Donate, Amy; Bulysheva, Anna; Edelblute, Chelsea; Jung, Derrick; Malik, Mohammad A; Guo, Siqi; Burcus, Niculina; Schoenbach, Karl; Heller, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Gene electrotransfer is an effective approach for delivering plasmid DNA to a variety of tissues. Delivery of molecules with electric pulses requires control of the electrical parameters to achieve effective delivery. Since discomfort or tissue damage may occur with high applied voltage, the reduction of the applied voltage while achieving the desired expression may be an important improvement. One possible approach is to combine electrotransfer with exogenously applied heat. Previous work performed in vitro demonstrated that increasing temperature before pulsing can enhance gene expression and made it possible to reduce electric fields while maintaining expression levels. In the study reported here, this combination was evaluated in vivo using a novel electrode device designed with an inserted laser for application of heat. The results obtained in this study demonstrated that increased temperature during electrotransfer increased expression or maintained expression with a reduction in applied voltage. With further optimization this approach may provide the basis for both a novel method and a novel instrument that may greatly enhance translation of gene electrotransfer. PMID:27029944

  4. Platelet generation in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Biao; Zheng, Jiansheng

    2016-01-01

    Platelet (PLT) transfusion, which is the primary cell therapy for thrombocytopenia, has been a source of concern in recent years due to its limitations of donor-dependent supply and soaring costs. In vitro platelet generation on an industrial scale is a possible solution requiring exploration. The technology of platelet generation ex vivo has been widely studied across the world, though the mechanisms of physiological thrombopoiesis and platelet biology function in vivo still remain elusive today. Various culture systems have been studied, most of which proved quite inefficient in generating functional platelets ex vivo, so there is still a long way to reach our ultimate goal of generating a fully functional platelet in vitro on an industrial scale. This review integrates the latest research into physiological platelet biogenesis and ex vivo-platelet/megakaryocyte (MK) generation protocols with a focus on the ability to generate PLT/MK in large quantities, summarizes current culture systems based on induced human pluripotent stem cells and adipose-derived stem cells, and discusses significant challenges that must be overcome for these approaches to be perfected. PMID:27390629

  5. Wireless Monitoring of Liver Hemodynamics In Vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Akl, Tony; Wilson, Mark A.; Ericson, Milton Nance; Farquhar, Ethan; Cote, Gerard L.

    2014-01-01

    Liver transplants have their highest technical failure rate in the first two weeks following surgery. Currently, there are limited devices for continuous, real-time monitoring of the graft. In this work, a three wavelengths system is presented that combines near-infrared spectroscopy and photoplethysmography with a processing method that can uniquely measure and separate the venous and arterial oxygen contributions. This strategy allows for the quantification of tissue oxygen consumption used to study hepatic metabolic activity and to relate it to tissue stress. The sensor is battery operated and communicates wirelessly with a data acquisition computer which provides the possibility of implantation provided sufficient miniaturization. In two in vivo porcine studies, the sensor tracked perfusion changes in hepatic tissue during vascular occlusions with a root mean square error (RMSE) of 0.135 mL/min/g of tissue. We show the possibility of using the pulsatile wave to measure the arterial oxygen saturation similar to pulse oximetry. The signal is also used to extract the venous oxygen saturation from the direct current (DC) levels. Arterial and venous oxygen saturation changes were measured with an RMSE of 2.19% and 1.39% respectively when no vascular occlusions were induced. This error increased to 2.82% and 3.83% when vascular occlusions were induced during hypoxia. These errors are similar to the resolution of a commercial oximetry catheter used as a reference. This work is the first realization of a wireless optical sensor for continuous monitoring of hepatic hemodynamics.

  6. Feasibility of in vivo cardiac HIFU ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikura, Kana; Otsuka, Ryo; Homma, Shunichi; Muratore, Robert; Ketterling, Jeffrey A.; Lizzi, Frederic L.

    2001-05-01

    The potential for cardiac applications of HIFU remains unexamined. In order to create reproducible lesions in a beating heart, it is necessary to maintain focusing at a certain position within moving myocardial tissue. One technique is to use multiple short HIFU exposures (0.2 s) and synchronize them with an EKG signal and respiration. The left ventricular free wall (LVFW) of calf hearts were cut into 4-cm cubes, degassed in phosphate buffer saline (PBS), and heated to 37°C. An 80-mm-diam spherical-cap transducer with a focus of 90 mm was operated at a frequency of 4.67 MHz and a nominal focal point intensity of 26.9 kW/cm2. The transducer was coupled to the LVFW using degassed PBS. First, the effect of pericardial fat, focal depth, and temperature on lesion size was individually evaluated. Then the 0.2-s HIFU exposure was applied 10 to 30 times at 4-s intervals. The same HIFU transducer was applied to an open-chest canine LVFW with the same triggering protocol. Dimensions of all lesions were measured by visual examination of the fresh, unstained tissue. A histopathological examination of the lesion was also performed. The in vivo lesions were created in similar size to those in vitro.

  7. Imaging inflammatory plasma leakage in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kenne, E; Lindbom, L

    2011-05-01

    Increased vascular permeability and consequent plasma leakage from postcapillary venules is a cardinal sign of inflammation. Although the movement of plasma constituents from the vasculature to the affected tissue aids in clearing the inflammatory stimulus, excessive plasma extravasation can lead to hospitalisation or death in cases such as influenza-induced pneumonia, burns or brain injury. The use of intravital imaging has significantly contributed to the understanding of the mechanisms controlling the vascular permeability alterations that occur during inflammation. Today, intravital imaging can be performed using optical and non-optical techniques. Optical techniques, which are generally used in experimental settings, include traditional intravital fluorescence microscopy and near-infrared fluorescence imaging. Magnetic resonance (MRI) and radioisotopic imaging are used mainly in the clinical setting, but are increasingly used in experimental work, and can detect plasma leakage without optics. Although these methods are all able to visualise inflammatory plasma leakage in vivo, the spatial and temporal resolution differs between the techniques. In addition, they vary with regards to invasiveness and availability. This overview discusses the use of imaging techniques in the visualisation of inflammatory plasma leakage. PMID:21437352

  8. Optical stimulation of peripheral nerves in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Jonathon D.

    This dissertation documents the emergence and validation of a new clinical tool that bridges the fields of biomedical optics and neuroscience. The research herein describes an innovative method for direct neurostimulation with pulsed infrared laser light. Safety and effectiveness of this technique are first demonstrated through functional stimulation of the rat sciatic nerve in vivo. The Holmium:YAG laser (lambda = 2.12 mum) is shown to operate at an optimal wavelength for peripheral nerve stimulation with advantages over standard electrical neural stimulation; including contact-free stimulation, high spatial selectivity, and lack of a stimulation artifact. The underlying biophysical mechanism responsible for transient optical nerve stimulation appears to be a small, absorption driven thermal gradient sustained at the axonal layer of nerve. Results explicitly prove that low frequency optical stimulation can reliably stimulate without resulting in tissue thermal damage. Based on the positive results from animal studies, these optimal laser parameters were utilized to move this research into the clinic with a combined safety and efficacy study in human subjects undergoing selective dorsal rhizotomy. The clinical Holmium:YAG laser was used to effectively stimulate human dorsal spinal roots and elicit functional muscle responses recorded during surgery without evidence of nerve damage. Overall these results predict that this technology can be a valuable clinical tool in various neurosurgical applications.

  9. Controlled cobalt doping of magnetosomes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Staniland, Sarah; Williams, Wyn; Telling, Neil; Van Der Laan, Gerrit; Harrison, Andrew; Ward, Bruce

    2008-03-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria biomineralize iron into magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles that are surrounded by lipid vesicles. These 'magnetosomes' have considerable potential for use in bio- and nanotechnological applications because of their narrow size and shape distribution and inherent biocompatibility. The ability to tailor the magnetic properties of magnetosomes by chemical doping would greatly expand these applications; however, the controlled doping of magnetosomes has so far not been achieved. Here, we report controlled in vivo cobalt doping of magnetosomes in three strains of the bacterium Magnetospirillum. The presence of cobalt increases the coercive field of the magnetosomes--that is, the field necessary to reverse their magnetization--by 36-45%, depending on the strain and the cobalt content. With elemental analysis, X-ray absorption and magnetic circular dichroism, we estimate the cobalt content to be between 0.2 and 1.4%. These findings provide an important advance in designing biologically synthesized nanoparticles with useful highly tuned magnetic properties. PMID:18654488

  10. Stability of blocked replication forks in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Mettrick, Karla A.; Grainge, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Replication of chromosomal DNA must be carried out to completion in order for a cell to proliferate. However, replication forks can stall during this process for a variety of reasons, including nucleoprotein ‘roadblocks’ and DNA lesions. In these circumstances the replisome copying the DNA may disengage from the chromosome to allow various repair processes to restore DNA integrity and enable replication to continue. Here, we report the in vivo stability of the replication fork when it encounters a nucleoprotein blockage in Escherichia coli. Using a site-specific and reversible protein block system in conjunction with the temperature sensitive DnaC helicase loader and DnaB replicative helicase, we monitored the disappearance of the Y-shaped DNA replication fork structures using neutral-neutral 2D agarose gels. We show the replication fork collapses within 5 min of encountering the roadblock. Therefore, the stalled replication fork does not pause at a block in a stable confirmation for an extended period of time as previously postulated. PMID:26490956

  11. Translational In Vivo Models for Cardiovascular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Fliegner, Daniela; Gerdes, Christoph; Meding, Jörg; Stasch, Johannes-Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are still the first leading cause of death and morbidity in developed countries. Experimental cardiology research and preclinical drug development in cardiology call for appropriate and especially clinically relevant in vitro and in vivo studies. The use of animal models has contributed to expand our knowledge and our understanding of the underlying mechanisms and accordingly provided new approaches focused on the improvement of diagnostic and treatment strategies of various cardiac pathologies.Numerous animal models in different species as well as in small and large animals have been developed to address cardiovascular complications, including heart failure, pulmonary hypertension, and thrombotic diseases. However, a perfect model of heart failure or other indications that reproduces every aspect of the natural disease does not exist. The complexity and heterogeneity of cardiac diseases plus the influence of genetic and environmental factors limit to mirror a particular disease with a single experimental model.Thus, drug development in the field of cardiology is not only very challenging but also inspiring; therefore animal models should be selected that reflect as best as possible the disease being investigated. Given the wide range of animal models, reflecting critical features of the human pathophysiology available nowadays increases the likelihood of the translation to the patients. Furthermore, this knowledge and the increase of the predictive value of preclinical models help us to find more efficient and reliable solutions as well as better and innovative treatment strategies for cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26552402

  12. In vivo measurement of the redox state.

    PubMed

    Praticò, D

    2001-01-01

    As part of an aerobic life, we oxidize a large pool of biomolecules to obtain chemical energy. During this process, several intermediates are formed; some are chemically unstable and are referred to as free radicals (FR). FR tend to react quickly with their surrounding biological environment; depending on the nature of the molecule attacked, different reactions can occur, i.e., lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, or DNA oxidation products. As aerobic life has evolved, antioxidant defense systems against FR have developed. When an imbalance between production of FR (oxidants) and defense systems against them (antioxidants) happens, a situation of oxidative stress occurs. This can lead to irreversible biochemical changes, with subsequent tissue damage and disease. Establishing the involvement of FR in the pathogenesis of a disease has been difficult because of the lack of sensitive and specific methodology to detect them. No ideal biomarkers for in vivo FR-induced damage are available as yet. However, some reliable indices of FR formation are now available, and in some pathologic conditions, evidence is accumulating to show that FR damage might play a functional role. The task for the near future will be to try to simplify the analytical methodology and elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the formation, disposition, and kinetics of FR marker molecules. PMID:11837992

  13. Astrocytes regulate cortical state switching in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Poskanzer, Kira E.; Yuste, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    The role of astrocytes in neuronal function has received increasing recognition, but disagreement remains about their function at the circuit level. Here we use in vivo two-photon calcium imaging of neocortical astrocytes while monitoring the activity state of the local neuronal circuit electrophysiologically and optically. We find that astrocytic calcium activity precedes spontaneous circuit shifts to the slow-oscillation–dominated state, a neocortical rhythm characterized by synchronized neuronal firing and important for sleep and memory. Further, we show that optogenetic activation of astrocytes switches the local neuronal circuit to this slow-oscillation state. Finally, using two-photon imaging of extracellular glutamate, we find that astrocytic transients in glutamate co-occur with shifts to the synchronized state and that optogenetically activated astrocytes can generate these glutamate transients. We conclude that astrocytes can indeed trigger the low-frequency state of a cortical circuit by altering extracellular glutamate, and therefore play a causal role in the control of cortical synchronizations. PMID:27122314

  14. Macrophage plasticity and polarization: in vivo veritas

    PubMed Central

    Sica, Antonio; Mantovani, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Diversity and plasticity are hallmarks of cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage. In response to IFNs, Toll-like receptor engagement, or IL-4/IL-13 signaling, macrophages undergo M1 (classical) or M2 (alternative) activation, which represent extremes of a continuum in a universe of activation states. Progress has now been made in defining the signaling pathways, transcriptional networks, and epigenetic mechanisms underlying M1-M2 or M2-like polarized activation. Functional skewing of mononuclear phagocytes occurs in vivo under physiological conditions (e.g., ontogenesis and pregnancy) and in pathology (allergic and chronic inflammation, tissue repair, infection, and cancer). However, in selected preclinical and clinical conditions, coexistence of cells in different activation states and unique or mixed phenotypes have been observed, a reflection of dynamic changes and complex tissue-derived signals. The identification of mechanisms and molecules associated with macrophage plasticity and polarized activation provides a basis for macrophage-centered diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. PMID:22378047

  15. In vivo photoacoustic imaging of mouse embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laufer, Jan; Norris, Francesca; Cleary, Jon; Zhang, Edward; Treeby, Bradley; Cox, Ben; Johnson, Peter; Scambler, Pete; Lythgoe, Mark; Beard, Paul

    2012-06-01

    The ability to noninvasively image embryonic vascular anatomy in mouse models is an important requirement for characterizing the development of the normal cardiovascular system and malformations in the heart and vascular supply. Photoacoustic imaging, which can provide high resolution non invasive images of the vasculature based upon optical absorption by endogenous hemoglobin, is well suited to this application. In this study, photoacoustic images of mouse embryos were obtained ex vivo and in vivo. The images show intricate details of the embryonic vascular system to depths of up to 10 mm, which allowed whole embryos to be imaged in situ. To achieve this, an all-optical photoacoustic scanner and a novel time reversal image reconstruction algorithm, which provide deep tissue imaging capability while maintaining high spatial resolution and contrast were employed. This technology may find application as an imaging tool for preclinical embryo studies in developmental biology as well as more generally in preclinical and clinical medicine for studying pathologies characterized by changes in the vasculature.

  16. Astrocytes regulate cortical state switching in vivo.

    PubMed

    Poskanzer, Kira E; Yuste, Rafael

    2016-05-10

    The role of astrocytes in neuronal function has received increasing recognition, but disagreement remains about their function at the circuit level. Here we use in vivo two-photon calcium imaging of neocortical astrocytes while monitoring the activity state of the local neuronal circuit electrophysiologically and optically. We find that astrocytic calcium activity precedes spontaneous circuit shifts to the slow-oscillation-dominated state, a neocortical rhythm characterized by synchronized neuronal firing and important for sleep and memory. Further, we show that optogenetic activation of astrocytes switches the local neuronal circuit to this slow-oscillation state. Finally, using two-photon imaging of extracellular glutamate, we find that astrocytic transients in glutamate co-occur with shifts to the synchronized state and that optogenetically activated astrocytes can generate these glutamate transients. We conclude that astrocytes can indeed trigger the low-frequency state of a cortical circuit by altering extracellular glutamate, and therefore play a causal role in the control of cortical synchronizations. PMID:27122314

  17. Responsive corneosurfametry following in vivo skin preconditioning.

    PubMed

    Uhoda, E; Goffin, V; Pierard, G E

    2003-12-01

    Skin is subjected to many environmental threats, some of which altering the structure and function of the stratum corneum. Among them, surfactants are recognized factors that may influence irritant contact dermatitis. The present study was conducted to compare the variations in skin capacitance and corneosurfametry (CSM) reactivity before and after skin exposure to repeated subclinical injuries by 2 hand dishwashing liquids. A forearm immersion test was performed on 30 healthy volunteers. 2 daily soak sessions were performed for 5 days. At inclusion and the day following the last soak session, skin capacitance was measured and cyanoacrylate skin-surface strippings were harvested. The latter specimens were used for the ex vivo microwave CSM. Both types of assessments clearly differentiated the 2 hand dishwashing liquids. The forearm immersion test allowed the discriminant sensitivity of CSM to increase. Intact skin capacitance did not predict CSM data. By contrast, a significant correlation was found between the post-test conductance and the corresponding CSM data. In conclusion, a forearm immersion test under realistic conditions can discriminate the irritation potential between surfactant-based products by measuring skin conductance and performing CSM. In vivo skin preconditioning by surfactants increases CSM sensitivity to the same surfactants. PMID:15025702

  18. In Vivo Gait Analysis During Bone Transport.

    PubMed

    Mora-Macías, J; Reina-Romo, E; Morgaz, J; Domínguez, J

    2015-09-01

    The load bearing characteristics of the intervened limb over time in vivo are important to know in distraction osteogenesis and bone healing for the characterization of the bone maturation process. Gait analyses were performed for a group of sheep in which bone transport was carried out. The ground reaction force was measured by means of a force platform, and the gait parameters (i.e., the peak, the mean vertical ground reaction force and the impulse) were calculated during the stance phase for each limb. The results showed that these gait parameters decreased in the intervened limb and interestingly increased in the other limbs due to the implantation of the fixator. Additionally, during the process, the gait parameters exponentially approached the values for healthy animals. Corresponding radiographies showed an increasing level of ossification in the callus. This study shows, as a preliminary approach to be confirmed with more experiments, that gait analysis could be used as an alternative method to control distraction osteogenesis or bone healing. For example, these analyses could determine the appropriate time to remove the fixator. Furthermore, gait analysis has advantages over other methods because it provides quantitative data and does not require instrumented fixators. PMID:25650097

  19. Imaging axon pathfinding in zebrafish in vivo.

    PubMed

    Leung, Louis; Holt, Christine E

    2012-09-01

    Axon pathfinding in the developing animal involves a highly dynamic process in which the axonal growth cone makes continuous decisions as it navigates toward its target. Changes occurring in the growth cone with respect to retracting from or extending into complex new territories can occur in minutes. Thus, the advent of strategies to visualize axon path-finding in vivo in a live intact animal is crucial for a better understanding of how the growth cone makes such rapid decisions in response to multiple cues. Combining these strategies with loss-of-function and/or gain-of-function techniques, one can gain some insight as to which molecules are crucial to particular growth cone behaviors at specific choice points during navigation. The major advantage of using zebrafish lies in the accessibility of major axon tracts for live microscopy, as their embryonic development occurs ex utero. Furthermore, the robust embryos remain healthy during immobilization and allow for good imaging for long periods. This protocol describes the method for stabilizing and preparing live zebrafish embryos for imaging labeled axonal tracts at high spatial and temporal resolution for up to 72 h. It has been used for retinotectal axon pathfinding, but can be adapted to visualize other axon tracts of interest. PMID:22949713

  20. Imaging axon pathfinding in Xenopus in vivo.

    PubMed

    Leung, Louis; Holt, Christine E

    2012-09-01

    Axon pathfinding in the developing animal involves a highly dynamic process in which the axonal growth cone makes continuous decisions as it navigates toward its target. Changes occurring in the growth cone with respect to retracting from or extending into complex new territories can occur in minutes. Thus, the advent of strategies to visualize axon path-finding in vivo in a live intact animal is crucial for a better understanding of how the growth cone makes such rapid decisions in response to multiple cues. Combining these strategies with loss-of-function and/or gain-of-function techniques allows one to gain some insight as to which molecules are crucial to particular growth cone behaviors at specific choice points during navigation. The main advantage of using Xenopus lies in the accessibility of major axon tracts for live microscopy, as their embryonic development occurs ex utero. Furthermore, the robust embryos remain healthy during immobilization and allow for good imaging for long periods. This protocol describes the methods for stabilizing and preparing live Xenopus embryos for imaging labeled axonal tracts at high spatial and temporal resolution for up to 72 h. This approach can been used to investigate how the knockdown of certain gene functions can affect the speed of navigation through the well-studied Xenopus retinotectal pathway. It can be adapted to visualize other axon tracts of interest. PMID:22949712

  1. Difficulty in dislodging in vivo fixed radiostrontium.

    PubMed

    Sonawane, V R; Jagtap, V S; Pahuja, D N; Rajan, M G R; Samuel, A M

    2004-07-01

    Many trials based on the basic phenomena of isotopic dilution, adsorption, ion exchange, chelation, etc., have been attempted for the decorporation of radiostrontium, particularly Sr, after its entry in the in vivo system. We have recently demonstrated a non-isotopic carrier effect of some common calcium salts (calcium = 9 mg mL) to reduce the whole body retention of radiostrontium, if administered within 2 h after radiostrontium exposure and furthermore once daily, in rats, supplemented with calcium fortified diet. However, 25-30% of radiostrontium (compared to 50-60% in untreated animals) was still found to be retained in the animal even after 2 wk of treatment. Trial of some simple interventional measures, which would not adversely affect the animal metabolism, like pyrophosphate and magnesium sulfate, sodium citrate, chitin (a bio-absorbent), crown ether (a metal-chelator), and ammonium chloride, was therefore attempted to dislodge this remaining radiostrontium by switching over these animals to normal diet and subjecting them to different lines of treatment with these simple interventions through diet and drinking water separately for a further 4 wk. However, this remaining portion of radiostrontium is fixed in the bone and is difficult to dislodge. PMID:15194921

  2. Guide for extrusion dies eliminates straightening operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyorgak, C. A.; Hoover, R. J.

    1964-01-01

    To prevent distortion of extruded metal, a guidance assembly is aligned with the die. As the metal emerges from the extrusion dies, it passes directly into the receiver and straightening tube system, and the completed extrusion is withdrawn.

  3. [Dying with cancer: Hollywood lessons].

    PubMed

    Niemeyer, Fernanda; Kruse, Maria Henriqueta Luce

    2013-12-01

    The study attempts to understand how dying from cancer is portrayed by five movies produced in Hollywood between 1993 and 2006. Based on the cultural studies and their post-structuralism version and supported by the notions of discourse and subjectivity, as proposed by philosopher Michel Foucault, we suggest one of the possible readings of the movie picture corpus. We assess how the movie picture discourse acts as a cultural pedagogy that produces ways of seeing dying with cancer: immortalizing the healthy body image, silencing death, taking care of the dead body and, finally, accepting death. Our proposal is intended to stimulate reflections that may contribute to care and education in nursing. PMID:25080714

  4. In vivo and in vitro mixture modeling of endocrine disruptors

    EPA Science Inventory

    Humans, fish and wildlife are exposed to more than one chemical at a time. There is concern over the potential effects of exposure to mixtures of EDs. We have conducted invitro and in vivo studies to determine how EDs in mixtures interact. Our in vivo studies have examined the ef...

  5. In Vivo Target Validation Using Biological Molecules in Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Sim, Derek S; Kauser, Katalin

    2016-01-01

    Drug development is a resource-intensive process requiring significant financial and time investment. Preclinical target validation studies and in vivo testing of the therapeutic molecules in clinically relevant disease models can accelerate and significantly de-risk later stage clinical development. In this chapter, we will focus on (1) in vivo animal models and (2) pharmacological tools for target validation. PMID:26552401

  6. Adolescents’ Perceived Risk of Dying

    PubMed Central

    Fischhoff, Baruch; de Bruin, Wändi Bruine; Parker, Andrew M.; Millstein, Susan G.; Halpern-Felsher, Bonnie L.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Although adolescents’ expectations are accurate or moderately optimistic for many significant life events, they greatly overestimate their chances of dying soon. We examine here whether adolescents’ mortality judgments are correlated with their perceptions of direct threats to their survival. Such sensitivity would indicate the importance of ensuring that adolescents have accurate information about those threats, as well as the psychological support needed to deal with them. Methods Data from two separate studies were used: a national study of 3,436 14–18 year old adolescents and a regional sample of 124 7th graders and 132 9th graders, 12–16 years old. Participants were asked about their chance of dying in the next year and before age 20, and about the extent of various threats to their physical well being. Results Adolescents in both samples greatly overestimated their chance of dying. Those mortality estimates were higher for adolescents who reported direct threats (e.g., an unsafe neighborhood). Thus, adolescents were sensitive to the relative size of threats to their survival, but not to the implications for absolute risk levels. Conclusions Contrary to the folk wisdom that adolescents have a unique sense of invulnerability, those studied here reported an exaggerated sense of mortality, which was highest among those reporting greater threats in their lives. Such fears could affect adolescents’ short-term well being and future planning. PMID:20159504

  7. Killing, letting die and euthanasia.

    PubMed

    Husak, D N

    1979-12-01

    Medical ethicists debate whether or not the moral assessment of cases of euthanasia should depend on whether the patient is 'killed' or 'allowed to die'. The usual presupposition is that a clear distinction between killing and letting die can be drawn so that this substantive question is not begged. I contend that the categorisation of cases of instances of killing rather than as instances of letting die depends in part on a prior moral assessment of the case. Hence is it trivially rather than substantively true that the distinction has moral significance. But even if a morally neutral (ie non-question begging) distinction could be drawn, its application to the euthanasia controversy is problematic. I illustrate the difficulties of employing this distinction to reach moral conclusions by critically discussing Philippa Foot's recent treatment of euthanasia. I conclude that even if an act of euthanasia is an instance of killing, and there exists a prima facie moral duty not to kill, and no more stringent duty overrides this duty, one still cannot determine such an act to be morally impermissible. PMID:541821

  8. Jewish tradition in death and dying.

    PubMed

    Ross, H M

    1998-10-01

    Death is often a spiritually difficult time for the dying and their families. Judaism approaches dying with some unique views that can differ from other religious traditions. Through an understanding of Jewish tradition, nurses can ease the dying process for Jewish patients and their families. PMID:10036429

  9. Contoured Orifice for Silicon-Ribbon Die

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackintosh, B. H.

    1985-01-01

    Die configuration encourages purity and stable growth. Contour of die orifice changes near ribbon edges. As result, silicon ribbon has nearly constant width and little carbon contamination. Die part of furnace being developed to produce high-quality, low-cost material for solar cells.

  10. Multifunctional in vivo imaging of pancreatic islets during diabetes development.

    PubMed

    Li, Ge; Wu, Binlin; Ward, Meliza G; Chong, Angie C N; Mukherjee, Sushmita; Chen, Shuibing; Hao, Mingming

    2016-07-15

    Pancreatic islet dysfunction leading to insufficient glucose-stimulated insulin secretion triggers the clinical onset of diabetes. How islet dysfunction develops is not well understood at the cellular level, partly owing to the lack of approaches to study single islets longitudinally in vivo Here, we present a noninvasive, high-resolution system to quantitatively image real-time glucose metabolism from single islets in vivo, currently not available with any other method. In addition, this multifunctional system simultaneously reports islet function, proliferation, vasculature and macrophage infiltration in vivo from the same set of images. Applying our method to a longitudinal high-fat diet study revealed changes in islet function as well as alternations in islet microenvironment. More importantly, this label-free system enabled us to image real-time glucose metabolism directly from single human islets in vivo for the first time, opening the door to noninvasive longitudinal in vivo studies of healthy and diabetic human islets. PMID:27270669

  11. Cross-linking Measurements of In Vivo Protein Complex Topologies*

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Chunxiang; Yang, Li; Hoopmann, Michael R.; Eng, Jimmy K.; Tang, Xiaoting; Weisbrod, Chad R.; Bruce, James E.

    2011-01-01

    Identification and measurement of in vivo protein interactions pose critical challenges in the goal to understand biological systems. The measurement of structures and topologies of proteins and protein complexes as they exist in cells is particularly challenging, yet critically important to improve understanding of biological function because proteins exert their intended function only through the structures and interactions they exhibit in vivo. In the present study, protein interactions in E. coli cells were identified in our unbiased cross-linking approach, yielding the first in vivo topological data on many interactions and the largest set of identified in vivo cross-linked peptides produced to date. These data show excellent agreement with protein and complex crystal structures where available. Furthermore, our unbiased data provide novel in vivo topological information that can impact understanding of biological function, even for cases where high resolution structures are not yet available. PMID:21697552

  12. Wireless Monitoring of Liver Hemodynamics In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Akl, Tony J.; Wilson, Mark A.; Ericson, M. Nance; Farquhar, Ethan; Coté, Gerard L.

    2014-01-01

    Liver transplants have their highest technical failure rate in the first two weeks following surgery. Currently, there are limited devices for continuous, real-time monitoring of the graft. In this work, a three wavelengths system is presented that combines near-infrared spectroscopy and photoplethysmography with a processing method that can uniquely measure and separate the venous and arterial oxygen contributions. This strategy allows for the quantification of tissue oxygen consumption used to study hepatic metabolic activity and to relate it to tissue stress. The sensor is battery operated and communicates wirelessly with a data acquisition computer which provides the possibility of implantation provided sufficient miniaturization. In two in vivo porcine studies, the sensor tracked perfusion changes in hepatic tissue during vascular occlusions with a root mean square error (RMSE) of 0.135 mL/min/g of tissue. We show the possibility of using the pulsatile wave to measure the arterial oxygen saturation similar to pulse oximetry. The signal is also used to extract the venous oxygen saturation from the direct current (DC) levels. Arterial and venous oxygen saturation changes were measured with an RMSE of 2.19% and 1.39% respectively when no vascular occlusions were induced. This error increased to 2.82% and 3.83% when vascular occlusions were induced during hypoxia. These errors are similar to the resolution of a commercial oximetry catheter used as a reference. This work is the first realization of a wireless optical sensor for continuous monitoring of hepatic hemodynamics. PMID:25019160

  13. Characterization of Bacillus anthracis Persistence In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Sarah A.; Xu, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary exposure to Bacillus anthracis spores initiates inhalational anthrax, a life-threatening infection. It is known that dormant spores can be recovered from the lungs of infected animals months after the initial spore exposure. Consequently, a 60-day course antibiotic treatment is recommended for exposed individuals. However, there has been little information regarding details or mechanisms of spore persistence in vivo. In this study, we investigated spore persistence in a mouse model. The results indicated that weeks after intranasal inoculation with B. anthracis spores, substantial amounts of spores could be recovered from the mouse lung. Moreover, spores of B. anthracis were significantly better at persisting in the lung than spores of a non-pathogenic Bacillus subtilis strain. The majority of B. anthracis spores in the lung were tightly associated with the lung tissue, as they could not be readily removed by lavage. Immunofluorescence staining of lung sections showed that spores associated with the alveolar and airway epithelium. Confocal analysis indicated that some of the spores were inside epithelial cells. This was further confirmed by differential immunofluorescence staining of lung cells harvested from the infected lungs, suggesting that association with lung epithelial cells may provide an advantage to spore persistence in the lung. There was no or very mild inflammation in the infected lungs. Furthermore, spores were present in the lung tissue as single spores rather than in clusters. We also showed that the anthrax toxins did not play a role in persistence. Together, the results suggest that B. anthracis spores have special properties that promote their persistence in the lung, and that there may be multiple mechanisms contributing to spore persistence. PMID:23750280

  14. Wireless monitoring of liver hemodynamics in vivo.

    PubMed

    Akl, Tony J; Wilson, Mark A; Ericson, M Nance; Farquhar, Ethan; Coté, Gerard L

    2014-01-01

    Liver transplants have their highest technical failure rate in the first two weeks following surgery. Currently, there are limited devices for continuous, real-time monitoring of the graft. In this work, a three wavelengths system is presented that combines near-infrared spectroscopy and photoplethysmography with a processing method that can uniquely measure and separate the venous and arterial oxygen contributions. This strategy allows for the quantification of tissue oxygen consumption used to study hepatic metabolic activity and to relate it to tissue stress. The sensor is battery operated and communicates wirelessly with a data acquisition computer which provides the possibility of implantation provided sufficient miniaturization. In two in vivo porcine studies, the sensor tracked perfusion changes in hepatic tissue during vascular occlusions with a root mean square error (RMSE) of 0.135 mL/min/g of tissue. We show the possibility of using the pulsatile wave to measure the arterial oxygen saturation similar to pulse oximetry. The signal is also used to extract the venous oxygen saturation from the direct current (DC) levels. Arterial and venous oxygen saturation changes were measured with an RMSE of 2.19% and 1.39% respectively when no vascular occlusions were induced. This error increased to 2.82% and 3.83% when vascular occlusions were induced during hypoxia. These errors are similar to the resolution of a commercial oximetry catheter used as a reference. This work is the first realization of a wireless optical sensor for continuous monitoring of hepatic hemodynamics. PMID:25019160

  15. In Vivo Imaging of Human Neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Daniel S; Granziera, Cristina; Hooker, Jacob M; Loggia, Marco L

    2016-04-20

    Neuroinflammation is implicated in the pathophysiology of a growing number of human disorders, including multiple sclerosis, chronic pain, traumatic brain injury, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. As a result, interest in the development of novel methods to investigate neuroinflammatory processes, for the purpose of diagnosis, development of new therapies, and treatment monitoring, has surged over the past 15 years. Neuroimaging offers a wide array of non- or minimally invasive techniques to characterize neuroinflammatory processes. The intent of this Review is to provide brief descriptions of currently available neuroimaging methods to image neuroinflammation in the human central nervous system (CNS) in vivo. Specifically, because of the relatively widespread accessibility of equipment for nuclear imaging (positron emission tomography [PET]; single photon emission computed tomography [SPECT]) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we will focus on strategies utilizing these technologies. We first provide a working definition of "neuroinflammation" and then discuss available neuroimaging methods to study human neuroinflammatory processes. Specifically, we will focus on neuroimaging methods that target (1) the activation of CNS immunocompetent cells (e.g. imaging of glial activation with TSPO tracer [(11)C]PBR28), (2) compromised BBB (e.g. identification of MS lesions with gadolinium-enhanced MRI), (3) CNS-infiltration of circulating immune cells (e.g. tracking monocyte infiltration into brain parenchyma with iron oxide nanoparticles and MRI), and (4) pathological consequences of neuroinflammation (e.g. imaging apoptosis with [(99m)Tc]Annexin V or iron accumulation with T2* relaxometry). This Review provides an overview of state-of-the-art techniques for imaging human neuroinflammation which have potential to impact patient care in the foreseeable future. PMID:26985861

  16. Noncanonical autophagy inhibits the autoinflammatory, lupus-like response to dying cells.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Jennifer; Cunha, Larissa D; Park, Sunmin; Yang, Mao; Lu, Qun; Orchard, Robert; Li, Quan-Zhen; Yan, Mei; Janke, Laura; Guy, Cliff; Linkermann, Andreas; Virgin, Herbert W; Green, Douglas R

    2016-05-01

    Defects in clearance of dying cells have been proposed to underlie the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Mice lacking molecules associated with dying cell clearance develop SLE-like disease, and phagocytes from patients with SLE often display defective clearance and increased inflammatory cytokine production when exposed to dying cells in vitro. Previously, we and others described a form of noncanonical autophagy known as LC3-associated phagocytosis (LAP), in which phagosomes containing engulfed particles, including dying cells, recruit elements of the autophagy pathway to facilitate maturation of phagosomes and digestion of their contents. Genome-wide association studies have identified polymorphisms in the Atg5 (ref. 8) and possibly Atg7 (ref. 9) genes, involved in both canonical autophagy and LAP, as markers of a predisposition for SLE. Here we describe the consequences of defective LAP in vivo. Mice lacking any of several components of the LAP pathway show increased serum levels of inflammatory cytokines and autoantibodies, glomerular immune complex deposition, and evidence of kidney damage. When dying cells are injected into LAP-deficient mice, they are engulfed but not efficiently degraded and trigger acute elevation of pro-inflammatory cytokines but not anti-inflammatory interleukin (IL)-10. Repeated injection of dying cells into LAP-deficient, but not LAP-sufficient, mice accelerated the development of SLE-like disease, including increased serum levels of autoantibodies. By contrast, mice deficient in genes required for canonical autophagy but not LAP do not display defective dying cell clearance, inflammatory cytokine production, or SLE-like disease, and, like wild-type mice, produce IL-10 in response to dying cells. Therefore, defects in LAP, rather than canonical autophagy, can cause SLE-like phenomena, and may contribute to the pathogenesis of SLE. PMID:27096368

  17. Optimized in vivo transfer of small interfering RNA targeting dermal tissue using in vivo surface electroporation.

    PubMed

    Broderick, Kate E; Chan, Amy; Lin, Feng; Shen, Xuefei; Kichaev, Gleb; Khan, Amir S; Aubin, Justin; Zimmermann, Tracy S; Sardesai, Niranjan Y

    2012-01-01

    Electroporation (EP) of mammalian tissue is a technique that has been used successfully in the clinic for the delivery of genetic-based vaccines in the form of DNA plasmids. There is great interest in platforms which efficiently deliver RNA molecules such as messenger RNA and small interfering RNA (siRNA) to mammalian tissue. However, the in vivo delivery of RNA enhanced by EP has not been extensively characterized. This paper details the optimization of electrical parameters for a novel low-voltage EP method to deliver oligonucleotides (both DNA and RNA) to dermal tissue in vivo. Initially, the electrical parameters were optimized for dermal delivery of plasmid DNA encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) using this novel surface dermal EP device. While all investigated parameters resulted in visible transfection, voltage parameters in the 10 V range elicited the most robust signal. The parameters optimized for DNA, were then assessed for translation of successful electrotransfer of siRNA into dermal tissue. Robust tagged-siRNA transfection in skin was detected. We then assessed whether these parameters translated to successful transfer of siRNA resulting in gene knockdown in vivo. Using a reporter gene construct encoding GFP and tagged siRNA targeting the GFP message, we show simultaneous transfection of the siRNA to the skin via EP and the concomitant knockdown of the reporter gene signal. The siRNA delivery was accomplished with no evidence of injection site inflammation or local tissue damage. The minimally invasive low-voltage EP method is thus capable of efficiently delivering both DNA and RNA molecules to dermal tissue in a tolerable manner. PMID:23344722

  18. Optimized In Vivo Transfer of Small Interfering RNA Targeting Dermal Tissue Using In Vivo Surface Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Broderick, Kate E; Chan, Amy; Lin, Feng; Shen, Xuefei; Kichaev, Gleb; Khan, Amir S; Aubin, Justin; Zimmermann, Tracy S; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.

    2012-01-01

    Electroporation (EP) of mammalian tissue is a technique that has been used successfully in the clinic for the delivery of genetic-based vaccines in the form of DNA plasmids. There is great interest in platforms which efficiently deliver RNA molecules such as messenger RNA and small interfering RNA (siRNA) to mammalian tissue. However, the in vivo delivery of RNA enhanced by EP has not been extensively characterized. This paper details the optimization of electrical parameters for a novel low-voltage EP method to deliver oligonucleotides (both DNA and RNA) to dermal tissue in vivo. Initially, the electrical parameters were optimized for dermal delivery of plasmid DNA encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) using this novel surface dermal EP device. While all investigated parameters resulted in visible transfection, voltage parameters in the 10 V range elicited the most robust signal. The parameters optimized for DNA, were then assessed for translation of successful electrotransfer of siRNA into dermal tissue. Robust tagged-siRNA transfection in skin was detected. We then assessed whether these parameters translated to successful transfer of siRNA resulting in gene knockdown in vivo. Using a reporter gene construct encoding GFP and tagged siRNA targeting the GFP message, we show simultaneous transfection of the siRNA to the skin via EP and the concomitant knockdown of the reporter gene signal. The siRNA delivery was accomplished with no evidence of injection site inflammation or local tissue damage. The minimally invasive low-voltage EP method is thus capable of efficiently delivering both DNA and RNA molecules to dermal tissue in a tolerable manner. PMID:23344722

  19. Percutaneous Valve Replacement: Significance of Different Delivery Systems In Vitro and In Vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Attmann, Tim; Lutter, Georg Quaden, Rene; Jahnke, Thomas; Rumberg, Kristin; Cremer, Jochen; Muller-Hulsbeck, Stefan

    2006-06-15

    Background and purpose. Percutaneous heart valve replacement is an exciting growing field in cardiovascular medicine yet still with some major problems. Only sophisticated improvement of the instruments could make it a real alternative to conventional surgery. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate different delivery devices for percutaneous heart valve replacement in vitro and in vivo. Methods. A catheter prototype designed by our group, and two commercially available devices for the delivery of esophageal stents and aortic endoprostheses, were tested. After in vitro experiments, an ovine animal model of transfemoral pulmonary valve implantation was established using biological valved self-expanding stents. Only the delivery device for aortic endografts (Medtronic, Talent, Santa Rosa, CA, USA) allowed fast in vitro procedures without material fatigue. This device was chosen for the in vivo tests. Results. Technical success was achieved in 9 of 10 animals (90%). One animal died after perforation of the ventricular wall. Orthotopic pulmonary placement was performed in 6 animals and intentional supravalvular valved stent placement in 3 animals. Conclusions. An adequate in vitro model for this evolving field of interventional heart valve replacement is presented. Furthermore, the present study pinpoints the key characteristics that are mandatory for a delivery system in percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation. With regard to the delivery device's ductility observed during this 'venous' study, an approach to transfemoral aortic valve implantation seems feasible.

  20. Viral Nanoparticles for In vivo Tumor Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Amy M.; Lee, Karin L.; Yildiz, Ibrahim; Bruckman, Michael A.; Shukla, Sourabh; Steinmetz, Nicole F.

    2012-01-01

    proteinaceous nanoparticles while enhancing their pharmacokinetics 8,11. We demonstrate tumor homing of PEGylated VNPs using a mouse xenograft tumor model. A combination of fluorescence imaging of tissues ex vivo using Maestro Imaging System, fluorescence quantification in homogenized tissues, and confocal microscopy is used to study biodistribution. VNPs are cleared via the reticuloendothelial system (RES); tumor homing is achieved passively via the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect12. The VNP nanotechnology is a powerful plug-and-play technology to image and treat sites of disease in vivo. We are further developing VNPs to carry drug cargos and clinically-relevant imaging moieties, as well as tissue-specific ligands to target molecular receptors overexpressed in cancer and cardiovascular disease. PMID:23183850

  1. Die Welt des Herrn Kuhn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Daniela

    Eines Morgens erwachte Herr Kuhn fröstelnd und staunte darüber, dass es in seinerWohnung eiskalt war. Dennoch quälte er sich aus seiner kuscheligen Bettdecke heraus und schlurfte ins Bad. "Hoffentlich wird wenigstens das Wasser warm", dachte er sich, als er den Wasserhahn betätigte - aber es kam nicht nur kein warmesWasser, außer einem unheilvollen Gluckser kam gar nichts aus der Leitung. "Dann werde ich wohl mal den Klempner anrufen", sprach er sich leise in den Bart und griff zu seinem Handy - doch das Netz war tot! Herr Kuhn begann nun, sich ernsthaft Sorgen zu machen, "Oje, was ist denn heute nur los? Ist irgendetwas Schlimmes passiert?" Um einen besseren Überblick über die Lage zu bekommen und sich austauschen zu können, brannte er nun förmlich darauf, rauszugehen und zur Arbeit zu fahren. An anderen Tagen, die er frisch geduscht und mit Kaffee und Marmeladen-Brot begann, war er selten so motiviert. So ging er also nun mit leerem Magen aus dem Haus. Hätte er den Versuch unternommen, sein tägliches Marmeladenbrot zuzubereiten, und dafür den Kühlschrank geöffnet, um das Marmeladenglas herauszunehmen, wäre ihm aufgefallen, dass auch die Stromversorgung Störungen unterworfen war, unschön zu erkennen an den ersten grünen, felligen Inseln auf seinem Lieblingskäse.

  2. Vascular cell biology in vivo: a new piscine paradigm?

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Brant

    2002-09-01

    Understanding how blood vessels form has become increasingly important in recent years yet remains difficult to study. The architecture and context of blood vessels are difficult to reproduce in vitro, and most developing blood vessels in vivo are relatively inaccessible to observation and experimental manipulation. Zebrafish, however, provide several advantages. They have small, accessible, transparent embryos and larvae, facilitating high-resolution imaging in vivo. In addition, genetic and experimental tools and methods are available for functional manipulation of the entire organism, vascular tissues or even single vascular- or non-vascular cells. Together, these features make the fish amenable to 'in vivo vascular cell biology'. PMID:12220865

  3. Contamination of in vivo bone-lead measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, A. C.

    2000-01-01

    This paper addresses one aspect of the calibration of a 109 Cd-based K-shell x-ray fluorescence measurement system, namely the treatment of the calibration line intercept. Under circumstances of contamination, the intercept may warrant statistical treatment different from that currently performed. This paper proposes refinements to the existing method of subtracting the phantom calibration line intercept from in vivo responses in the calculation of in vivo concentrations. These refinements are recommended because the existing method can underestimate in vivo concentrations by a small amount under normal operating conditions. Contamination of the calibration standard matrix of plaster of Paris by both lead and non-lead contaminants is addressed.

  4. Plasma and Cavitation Dynamics during Pulsed Laser Microsurgery in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Hutson, M. Shane; Ma Xiaoyan

    2007-10-12

    We compare the plasma and cavitation dynamics underlying pulsed laser microsurgery in water and in fruit fly embryos (in vivo)--specifically for nanosecond pulses at 355 and 532 nm. We find two key differences. First, the plasma-formation thresholds are lower in vivo --especially at 355 nm--due to the presence of endogenous chromophores that serve as additional sources for plasma seed electrons. Second, the biological matrix constrains the growth of laser-induced cavitation bubbles. Both effects reduce the disrupted region in vivo when compared to extrapolations from measurements in water.

  5. In Vivo Metal Ion Imaging Using Fluorescent Sensors.

    PubMed

    Van de Bittner, Genevieve C; Hirayama, Tasuku

    2016-01-01

    In vivo imaging in living animals provides the ability to monitor alterations of signaling molecules, ions, and other biological components during various life stages and in disease. The data gained from in vivo imaging can be used for biological discovery or to determine elements of disease progression and can inform the development and translation of therapeutics. Herein, we present theories behind small-molecule, fluorescent, metal ion sensors as well as the methods for their successful application to in vivo metal ion imaging, including ex vivo validation. PMID:27283424

  6. Label-free optical activation of astrocyte in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Myunghwan; Yoon, Jonghee; Ku, Taeyun; Choi, Kyungsun; Choi, Chulhee

    2011-07-01

    As the most abundant cell type in the central nervous system, astrocyte has been one of main research topics in neuroscience. Although various tools have been developed, at present, there is no tool that allows noninvasive activation of astrocyte in vivo without genetic or pharmacological perturbation. Here we report a noninvasive label-free optical method for physiological astrocyte activation in vivo using a femtosecond pulsed laser. We showed the laser stimulation robustly induced astrocytic calcium activation in vivo and further verified physiological relevance of the calcium increase by demonstrating astrocyte mediated vasodilation in the brain. This novel optical method will facilitate noninvasive physiological study on astrocyte function.

  7. Sequestrated Thrombolysis: Comparative Evaluation In Vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Sumit; Laerum, Frode; Brosstad, Frank; Kvernebo, Knut; Sakariassen, Kjell S.

    2000-03-15

    Purpose: Lysis of a thrombus is a function of the local concentration of thrombolytic enzymes. This study was designed to determine in a porcine model of acute deep vein thrombosis (DVT) whether perithrombic sequestration of small volumes of a concentrated enzyme solution can accelerate the process of thrombolysis.Methods: DVT was induced in both hind limbs using a previously described technique (n = 32). Thirty minutes later the animal was heparinized and unilateral thrombolysis was attempted using 8 mg recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA); saline was administered in the opposite leg. For conventional high-volume infusion (CI) (n = 5) rt-PA (0.067 mg/ml) was infused at 1 ml/min. For sequestrated thrombolysis the external iliac vein was endoluminally occluded, and rt-PA (0.25 mg/ml) administered either for proximal injection (ST-P) (n = 5), as a bolus every 3 min through a microcatheter placed via the balloon catheter, or for transthrombic injection (ST-T) (n = 5), as a bolus every 3 min through a Katzen wire in the balloon catheter. At autopsy, the thrombus mass in the iliofemoral veins was measured, and the extent of residual thrombosis in the venous tributaries graded at four sites. From these data a thrombolysis score was calculated.Results: One pig died before thrombolysis could be performed. Only with ST-T was residual thrombus mass in the test limb normalized to control, residual thrombus index (RTI), consistently less than unity. The median RTI of this group was 0.50 (range 0.39-0.97) compared with 1.22 (0.64-1.38) for ST-P and 0.88 (0.37-1.13) for CI. Compared with contralateral controls, a lower grade of residual thrombosis in tributaries was observed in test limbs at more venous sites with ST-T (8/20; 95% confidence interval 5-13) and ST-P (9/20; confidence interval 5-13) than with CI (2/20; confidence interval 0-5) (p= 0.04). A trend toward lower thrombolysis scores was observed with ST-T (p = 0.08). Systemic fibrinogenolysis was not

  8. Evaluation of permanent die coatings to improve the wear resistance of die casting dies. Final project report, January 1, 1995--April 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Shivpuri, R.

    1997-09-18

    Die Casting dies are subject to severe service conditions during the die casting operation. While these severe conditions are necessary to achieve high production rates, they cause the dies which are commonly made of H13 die steel, to suffer frequent failures. The major die failure mechanisms are erosion or washout, Heat checking, soldering and corrosion. Due to their geometrical complexity, die casting dies are very expensive (some dies cost over a million dollars), and thus a large number of parts have to be produced by a die, to justify this cost and leverage the advantages of the die casting process (high production rates, low manpower costs). A potential increase in the die service life, thus has a significant impact on the economics of the die; casting operation. There are many ways to extend die life: developing new wear resistant die materials, developing new surface treatments including coatings, improving heat treatment of existing H13 dies, using better lubricants that can protect the die material, or modifying the die geometry and process parameters to reduce the intensity of wear. Of these the use of coatings to improve the wear resistance of the die surface has shown a lot of promise. Consequently, use of coatings in the die casting industry and their wide use to decrease die wear can improve significantly the productivity of shop operations resulting in large savings in material and energy usage.

  9. Elevated in vivo strontium-90 from nuclear weapons test fallout among cancer decedents: a case-control study of deciduous teeth.

    PubMed

    Mangano, Joseph J; Sherman, Janette D

    2011-01-01

    Risks to health from large-scale atmospheric nuclear weapons testing are still relatively unknown. A sample of 85,000 deciduous teeth collected from Americans born during the bomb-testing years assessed risk by in vivo measurement of residual strontium-90 (Sr-90) concentrations, using liquid scintillation spectrometry. The authors' analysis included 97 deciduous teeth from persons born between 1959 and 1961 who were diagrosed with cancer, and 194 teeth of matched controls. Average Sr-90 in teeth of persons who died of cancer was significantly greater than for controls (OR = 2.22; p < 0.04). This discovery suggests that many thousands have died or will die of cancer due to exposure to fallout, far more than previously believed. PMID:21319726

  10. Novel Molecular and Nanosensors for In Vivo Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Eckert, Mark A.; Vu, Priscilla Q.; Zhang, Kaixiang; Kang, Dongku; Ali, M. Monsur; Xu, Chenjie; Zhao, Weian

    2013-01-01

    In vivo sensors are an emerging field with the potential to revolutionize our understanding of basic biology and our treatment of disease. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the fields of in vivo electrochemical, optical, and magnetic resonance biosensors with a focus on recent developments that have been validated in rodent models or human subjects. In addition, we discuss major challenges in the development and translation of in vivo biosensors and present potential solutions to these problems. The field of nanotechnology, in particular, has recently been instrumental in driving the field of in vivo sensors forward. We conclude with a discussion of emerging paradigms and techniques for the development of future biosensors. PMID:23946824

  11. The kinetics of ER fusion protein activation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Catherine H.; Gamper, Ivonne; Perfetto, Alessandra; Auw, Jeremy; Littlewood, Trevor D.; Evan, Gerard I.

    2014-01-01

    Reversibly switchable proteins are powerful tools with which to explore protein function in vitro and in vivo. For example, the activity of many proteins fused to the hormone-binding domain of the modified estrogen receptor (ERTAM) can be regulated by provision or removal of 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT). Despite the widespread use of ERTAM fusions in vivo, inadequate data are available as to the most efficacious routes for systemic tamoxifen delivery. In this study, we have used two well-characterised ERTAM fusion proteins, both reversibly activated by 4-OHT, to compare the effectiveness and kinetics of 4-OHT delivery in mice in vivo by either tamoxifen in food or by intraperitoneal injection. Our data indicate that dietary tamoxifen offers an effective, facile and ethically preferable means for long term activation of ERTAM fusion proteins in vivo. PMID:24662815

  12. A method to study in vivo stability of DNA nanostructures☆

    PubMed Central

    Surana, Sunaina; Bhatia, Dhiraj; Krishnan, Yamuna

    2013-01-01

    DNA nanostructures are rationally designed, synthetic, nanoscale assemblies obtained from one or more DNA sequences by their self-assembly. Due to the molecularly programmable as well as modular nature of DNA, such designer DNA architectures have great potential for in cellulo and in vivo applications. However, demonstrations of functionality in living systems necessitates a method to assess the in vivo stability of the relevant nanostructures. Here, we outline a method to quantitatively assay the stability and lifetime of various DNA nanostructures in vivo. This exploits the property of intact DNA nanostructures being uptaken by the coelomocytes of the multicellular model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. These studies reveal that the present fluorescence based assay in coelomocytes of C. elegans is an useful in vivo test bed for measuring DNA nanostructure stability. PMID:23623822

  13. The Expanding Toolbox of In Vivo Bioluminescent Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tingting; Close, Dan; Handagama, Winode; Marr, Enolia; Sayler, Gary; Ripp, Steven

    2016-01-01

    In vivo bioluminescent imaging (BLI) permits the visualization of engineered bioluminescence from living cells and tissues to provide a unique perspective toward the understanding of biological processes as they occur within the framework of an authentic in vivo environment. The toolbox of in vivo BLI includes an inventory of luciferase compounds capable of generating bioluminescent light signals along with sophisticated and powerful instrumentation designed to detect and quantify these light signals non-invasively as they emit from the living subject. The information acquired reveals the dynamics of a wide range of biological functions that play key roles in the physiological and pathological control of disease and its therapeutic management. This mini review provides an overview of the tools and applications central to the evolution of in vivo BLI as a core technology in the preclinical imaging disciplines. PMID:27446798

  14. Cystoscopic optical coherence tomography for urinary bladder imaging in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. G.; Adler, H.; Chan, D.; Jain, A.; Xie, H. K.; Wu, Z. L.; Pan, Y. T.

    2006-02-01

    This paper summarizes the development of new 2D MEMS mirrors and the pertinent modification to improve OCT endoscopic catheter packaging suitable for in vivo imaging diagnosis of bladder cancers. Comparative study of the newly developed endocopic OCT versus the bench-top OCT is presented. Results of in vivo OCT cystoscopy based on a porcine acute inflammation model are presented to compare time-domain OCT and spectral-domain OCT for in vivo imaging. In addition, results of spectral-domain Doppler OCT are presented to image blood flow in the lamina propria of the bladder. The results of our in vivo animal study using the presented OCT endoscope are discussed for potential problems in the future clinical applications.

  15. Imaging agents for in vivo magnetic resonance and scintigraphic imaging

    DOEpatents

    Engelstad, Barry L.; Raymond, Kenneth N.; Huberty, John P.; White, David L.

    1991-01-01

    Methods are provided for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging and/or scintigraphic imaging of a subject using chelated transition metal and lanthanide metal complexes. Novel ligands for these complexes are provided.

  16. Insights on TRP Channels from In Vivo Studies in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Minke, Baruch; Parnas, Moshe

    2007-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels mediate responses in a large variety of signaling mechanisms. Most studies on mammalian TRP channels rely on heterologous expression, but their relevance to in vivo tissues is not entirely clear. In contrast, Drosophila TRP and TRP-like (TRPL) channels allow direct analyses of in vivo function. In Drosophila photoreceptors, activation of TRP and TRPL is mediated via the phosphoinositide cascade, with both Ca2+ and diacylglycerol (DAG) essential for generating the light response. In tissue culture cells, TRPL channels are constitutively active, and lipid second messengers greatly facilitate this activity. Inhibition of phospholipase C (PLC) completely blocks lipid activation of TRPL, suggesting that lipid activation is mediated via PLC. In vivo studies in mutant Drosophila also reveal an acute requirement for lipid-producing enzyme, which may regulate PLC activity. Thus, PLC and its downstream second messengers, Ca2+ and DAG, constitute critical mediators of TRP/TRPL gating in vivo. PMID:16460287

  17. Imaging agents for in vivo magnetic resonance and scintigraphic imaging

    DOEpatents

    Engelstad, B.L.; Raymond, K.N.; Huberty, J.P.; White, D.L.

    1991-04-23

    Methods are provided for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging and/or scintigraphic imaging of a subject using chelated transition metal and lanthanide metal complexes. Novel ligands for these complexes are provided. No Drawings

  18. In vivo spectral micro-imaging of tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Demos, Stavros G; Urayama, Shiro; Lin, Bevin; Saroufeem, Ramez; Ghobrial, Moussa

    2012-11-27

    In vivo endoscopic methods an apparatuses for implementation of fluorescence and autofluorescence microscopy, with and without the use of exogenous agents, effectively (with resolution sufficient to image nuclei) visualize and categorize various abnormal tissue forms.

  19. The Expanding Toolbox of In Vivo Bioluminescent Imaging.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tingting; Close, Dan; Handagama, Winode; Marr, Enolia; Sayler, Gary; Ripp, Steven

    2016-01-01

    In vivo bioluminescent imaging (BLI) permits the visualization of engineered bioluminescence from living cells and tissues to provide a unique perspective toward the understanding of biological processes as they occur within the framework of an authentic in vivo environment. The toolbox of in vivo BLI includes an inventory of luciferase compounds capable of generating bioluminescent light signals along with sophisticated and powerful instrumentation designed to detect and quantify these light signals non-invasively as they emit from the living subject. The information acquired reveals the dynamics of a wide range of biological functions that play key roles in the physiological and pathological control of disease and its therapeutic management. This mini review provides an overview of the tools and applications central to the evolution of in vivo BLI as a core technology in the preclinical imaging disciplines. PMID:27446798

  20. Reactive polymer enables efficient in vivo bioorthogonal chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Devaraj, Neal K.; Thurber, Greg M.; Keliher, Edmund J.; Marinelli, Brett; Weissleder, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    There has been intense interest in the development of selective bioorthogonal reactions or “click” chemistry that can proceed in live animals. Until now however, most reactions still require vast surpluses of reactants because of steep temporal and spatial concentration gradients. Using computational modeling and design of pharmacokinetically optimized reactants, we have developed a predictable method for efficient in vivo click reactions. Specifically, we show that polymer modified tetrazines (PMT) are a key enabler for in vivo bioorthogonal chemistry based on the very fast and catalyst-free [4 + 2] tetrazine/trans-cyclooctene cycloaddition. Using fluorescent PMT for cellular resolution and 18F labeled PMT for whole animal imaging, we show that cancer cell epitopes can be easily reacted in vivo. This generic strategy should help guide the design of future chemistries and find widespread use for different in vivo bioorthogonal applications, particularly in the biomedical sciences. PMID:22411831

  1. Portable optical fiber probe for in vivo brain temperature measurements

    PubMed Central

    Musolino, Stefan; Schartner, Erik P.; Tsiminis, Georgios; Salem, Abdallah; Monro, Tanya M.; Hutchinson, Mark R.

    2016-01-01

    This work reports on the development of an optical fiber based probe for in vivo measurements of brain temperature. By utilizing a thin layer of rare-earth doped tellurite glass on the tip of a conventional silica optical fiber a robust probe, suitable for long-term in vivo measurements of temperature can be fabricated. This probe can be interrogated using a portable optical measurement setup, allowing for measurements to be performed outside of standard optical laboratories. PMID:27570698

  2. Portable optical fiber probe for in vivo brain temperature measurements.

    PubMed

    Musolino, Stefan; Schartner, Erik P; Tsiminis, Georgios; Salem, Abdallah; Monro, Tanya M; Hutchinson, Mark R

    2016-08-01

    This work reports on the development of an optical fiber based probe for in vivo measurements of brain temperature. By utilizing a thin layer of rare-earth doped tellurite glass on the tip of a conventional silica optical fiber a robust probe, suitable for long-term in vivo measurements of temperature can be fabricated. This probe can be interrogated using a portable optical measurement setup, allowing for measurements to be performed outside of standard optical laboratories. PMID:27570698

  3. Monitoring Retroviral RNA Dimerization In Vivo via Hammerhead Ribozyme Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Bijay K.; Scherer, Lisa; Zelby, Laurie; Bertrand, Edouard; Rossi, John J.

    1998-01-01

    We have used a strategy for colocalization of Psi (Ψ)-tethered ribozymes and targets to demonstrate that Ψ sequences are capable of specific interaction in the cytoplasm of both packaging and nonpackaging cells. These results indicate that current in vitro dimerization models may have in vivo counterparts. The methodology used may be applied to further genetic analyses on Ψ domain interactions in vivo. PMID:9733882

  4. In vivo decomposition study of coated magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Desiree; Piersma, Tyler; Lecronier, David; Cheng, Xingguo; Rabago-Smith, Montserrat

    2010-04-01

    In the last decade, magnesium has resurged as an important biomaterial. Its mechanical properties are very similar to natural bone, and it degrades in vivo to non toxic substances. Unfortunately, corrosion of pure magnesium in vivo is rapid, thus coated alloys that decrease its corrosion could be used as implants in orthopedics. This presentation will describe the degradation results in cell cultures and in rats.

  5. Defining human mesenchymal stem cell efficacy in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bonfield, Tracey L; Nolan Koloze, Mary T; Lennon, Donald P; Caplan, Arnold I

    2010-01-01

    Allogeneic human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) can suppress graft versus host disease (GvHD) and have profound anti-inflammatory and regenerative capacity in stroke, infarct, spinal cord injury, meniscus regeneration, tendinitis, acute renal failure, and heart disease in human and animal models of disease. There is significant clinical hMSC variability in efficacy and the ultimate response in vivo. The challenge in hMSC based therapy is defining the efficacy of hMSC in vivo. Models which may provide insight into hMSC bioactivity in vivo would provide a means to distinguish hMSCs for clinical utility. hMSC function has been described as both regenerative and trophic through the production of bioactive factors. The regenerative component involves the multi-potentiality of hMSC progenitor differentiation. The secreted factors generated by the hMSCs are milieu and injury specific providing unique niches for responses in vivo. These bioactive factors are anti-scarring, angiogenic, anti-apoptotic as well as regenerative. Further, from an immunological standpoint, hMSC's can avoid host immune response, providing xenographic applications. To study the in vivo immuno-regulatory effectiveness of hMSCs, we used the ovalbumin challenge model of acute asthma. This is a quick 3 week in vivo pulmonary inflammation model with readily accessible ways of measuring effectiveness of hMSCs. Our data show that there is a direct correlation between the traditional ceramic cube score to hMSCs attenuation of cellular recruitment due to ovalbumin challenge. The results from these studies verify the in vivo immuno-modulator effectiveness of hMSCs and support the potential use of the ovalbumin model as an in vivo model of hMSC potency and efficacy. Our data also support future directions toward exploring hMSCs as an alternative therapeutic for the treatment of airway inflammation associated with asthma. PMID:20974000

  6. Automatic in vivo portal dosimetry of all treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olaciregui-Ruiz, I.; Rozendaal, R.; Mijnheer, B.; van Herk, M.; Mans, A.

    2013-11-01

    At our institution EPID (electronic portal imaging device) dosimetry is routinely applied to perform in vivo dose verification of all patient treatments with curative intent since January 2008. The major impediment of the method has been the amount of work required to produce and inspect the in vivo dosimetry reports (a time-consuming and labor-intensive process). In this paper we present an overview of the actions performed to implement an automated in vivo dosimetry solution clinically. We reimplemented the EPID dosimetry software and modified the acquisition software. Furthermore, we introduced new tools to periodically inspect the record-and-verify database and automatically run the EPID dosimetry software when needed. In 2012, 95% of our 3839 treatments scheduled for in vivo dosimetry were analyzed automatically (27 633 portal images of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) fields, 5551 portal image data of VMAT arcs, and 2003 portal images of non-IMRT fields). The in vivo dosimetry verification results are available a few minutes after delivery and alerts are immediately raised when deviations outside tolerance levels are detected. After the clinical introduction of this automated solution, inspection of the detected deviations is the only remaining work. These newly developed tools are a major step forward towards full integration of in vivo EPID dosimetry in radiation oncology practice.

  7. Repeated swim stress alters brain benzodiazepine receptors measured in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Weizman, R.; Weizman, A.; Kook, K.A.; Vocci, F.; Deutsch, S.I.; Paul, S.M.

    1989-06-01

    The effects of repeated swim stress on brain benzodiazepine receptors were examined in the mouse using both an in vivo and in vitro binding method. Specific in vivo binding of (/sup 3/H)Ro15-1788 to benzodiazepine receptors was decreased in the hippocampus, cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, midbrain and striatum after repeated swim stress (7 consecutive days of daily swim stress) when compared to nonstressed mice. In vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding was unaltered after repeated swim stress in the cerebellum and pons medulla. The stress-induced reduction in in vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding did not appear to be due to altered cerebral blood flow or to an alteration in benzodiazepine metabolism or biodistribution because there was no difference in (14C)iodoantipyrine distribution or whole brain concentrations of clonazepam after repeated swim stress. Saturation binding experiments revealed a change in both apparent maximal binding capacity and affinity after repeated swim stress. Moreover, a reduction in clonazepam's anticonvulsant potency was also observed after repeated swim stress (an increase in the ED50 dose for protection against pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures), although there was no difference in pentylenetetrazol-induced seizure threshold between the two groups. In contrast to the results obtained in vivo, no change in benzodiazepine receptor binding kinetics was observed using the in vitro binding method. These data suggest that environmental stress can alter the binding parameters of the benzodiazepine receptor and that the in vivo and in vitro binding methods can yield substantially different results.

  8. Automatic in vivo portal dosimetry of all treatments.

    PubMed

    Olaciregui-Ruiz, I; Rozendaal, R; Mijnheer, B; van Herk, M; Mans, A

    2013-11-21

    At our institution EPID (electronic portal imaging device) dosimetry is routinely applied to perform in vivo dose verification of all patient treatments with curative intent since January 2008. The major impediment of the method has been the amount of work required to produce and inspect the in vivo dosimetry reports (a time-consuming and labor-intensive process). In this paper we present an overview of the actions performed to implement an automated in vivo dosimetry solution clinically. We reimplemented the EPID dosimetry software and modified the acquisition software. Furthermore, we introduced new tools to periodically inspect the record-and-verify database and automatically run the EPID dosimetry software when needed. In 2012, 95% of our 3839 treatments scheduled for in vivo dosimetry were analyzed automatically (27,633 portal images of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) fields, 5551 portal image data of VMAT arcs, and 2003 portal images of non-IMRT fields). The in vivo dosimetry verification results are available a few minutes after delivery and alerts are immediately raised when deviations outside tolerance levels are detected. After the clinical introduction of this automated solution, inspection of the detected deviations is the only remaining work. These newly developed tools are a major step forward towards full integration of in vivo EPID dosimetry in radiation oncology practice. PMID:24201085

  9. Reinraumtechnik für die Medizintechnik

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petek, Max; Jungbluth, Martin; Krampe, Erhard

    Die Reinraumtechnik ist heute ein unverzichtbarer Bestandteil bei der Fertigung von Produkten der Life Sciences, den Bereichen Pharma, Lebensmittel, Kosmetik und Medizintechnik. In Anbetracht der langen Historie der Medizintechnik ist sie jedoch eine sehr junge Disziplin. Die Bedeutung von Keimen und die richtige Einschätzung ihrer Größe wurden zwar sehr früh bereits durch Paracelsus erkannt, jedoch wurden daraus noch keine speziellen oder kontinuierlich umgesetzten Hygienevorschriften abgeleitet. Die erste bekannte technische Umsetzung von Hygieneempfehlungen geht auf den Franzosen François Nicolas Appert zurück, der eine aseptische Abfüllmethode für Lebensmittel entwickelte und diese 1810 veröffentlichte [1]. Die erste dokumentierte medizinische Umsetzung stellten Hygienevorschriften für Ärzte dar, die Ignaz Philipp Semmelweis nach 1847 in der Wiener Klinik für Geburtshilfe einführte [2].

  10. Vacuum die attach for integrated circuits

    DOEpatents

    Schmitt, Edward H.; Tuckerman, David B.

    1991-01-01

    A thin film eutectic bond for attaching an integrated circuit die to a circuit substrate is formed by coating at least one bonding surface on the die and substrate with an alloying metal, assembling the die and substrate under compression loading, and heating the assembly to an alloying temperature in a vacuum. A very thin bond, 10 microns or less, which is substantially void free, is produced. These bonds have high reliability, good heat and electrical conduction, and high temperature tolerance. The bonds are formed in a vacuum chamber, using a positioning and loading fixture to compression load the die, and an IR lamp or other heat source. For bonding a silicon die to a silicon substrate, a gold silicon alloy bond is used. Multiple dies can be bonded simultaneously. No scrubbing is required.

  11. Die singulation method and package formed thereby

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Robert C.; Shul, Randy J.; Clews, Peggy J.; Baker, Michael S.; De Boer, Maarten P.

    2012-08-07

    A method is disclosed for singulating die from a substrate having a sacrificial layer and one or more device layers, with a retainer being formed in the device layer(s) and anchored to the substrate. Deep Reactive Ion Etching (DRIE) etching of a trench through the substrate from the bottom side defines a shape for each die. A handle wafer is then attached to the bottom side of the substrate, and the sacrificial layer is etched to singulate the die and to form a frame from the retainer and the substrate. The frame and handle wafer, which retain the singulated die in place, can be attached together with a clamp or a clip and to form a package for the singulated die. One or more stops can be formed from the device layer(s) to limit a sliding motion of the singulated die.

  12. Vacuum die attach for integrated circuits

    DOEpatents

    Schmitt, E.H.; Tuckerman, D.B.

    1991-09-10

    A thin film eutectic bond for attaching an integrated circuit die to a circuit substrate is formed by coating at least one bonding surface on the die and substrate with an alloying metal, assembling the die and substrate under compression loading, and heating the assembly to an alloying temperature in a vacuum. A very thin bond, 10 microns or less, which is substantially void free, is produced. These bonds have high reliability, good heat and electrical conduction, and high temperature tolerance. The bonds are formed in a vacuum chamber, using a positioning and loading fixture to compression load the die, and an IR lamp or other heat source. For bonding a silicon die to a silicon substrate, a gold silicon alloy bond is used. Multiple dies can be bonded simultaneously. No scrubbing is required. 1 figure.

  13. Should assisted dying be legalised?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    When an individual facing intractable pain is given an estimate of a few months to live, does hastening death become a viable and legitimate alternative for willing patients? Has the time come for physicians to do away with the traditional notion of healthcare as maintaining or improving physical and mental health, and instead accept their own limitations by facilitating death when requested? The Universities of Oxford and Cambridge held the 2013 Varsity Medical Debate on the motion “This House Would Legalise Assisted Dying”. This article summarises the key arguments developed over the course of the debate. We will explore how assisted dying can affect both the patient and doctor; the nature of consent and limits of autonomy; the effects on society; the viability of a proposed model; and, perhaps most importantly, the potential need for the practice within our current medico-legal framework. PMID:24423249

  14. In Vivo Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells Embedded in an Injectable In Vivo-Forming Hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ja Yong; Park, Seung Hun; Park, Ji Hoon; Lee, Bo Keun; Yun, Jeong-Ho; Lee, Bong; Kim, Jae Ho; Min, Byoung Hyun; Kim, Moon Suk

    2016-08-01

    In this study, human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) are examined as a cellular source for bone tissue engineering using an in vivo-forming hydrogel. The hDPSCs are easily harvested in large quantities from extracted teeth. The stemness of harvested hDPSCs indicates their relative tolerance to ex vivo manipulation in culture. The in vitro osteogenic differentiation of hDPSCs is characterized using Alizarin Red S (ARS), von Kossa (VK), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) staining. The solution of hDPSCs and a methoxy polyethylene glycol-polycaprolactone block copolymer (PC) is easily prepared by simple mixing at room temperature and in no more than 10 s it forms in vivo hydrogels after subcutaneous injection into rats. In vivo osteogenic differentiation of hDPSCs in the in vivo-forming hydrogel is confirmed by micro-computed tomography (CT), histological staining, and gene expression. Micro-CT analysis shows evidence of significant tissue-engineered bone formation in hDPSCs-loaded hydrogel in the presence of osteogenic factors. Differentiated osteoblasts in in vivo-forming hydrogel are identified by ARS and VK staining and are found to exhibit characteristic expression of genes like osteonectin, osteopontin, and osteocalcin. In conclusion, hDPSCs embedded in an in vivo-forming hydrogel may provide benefits as a noninvasive formulation for bone tissue engineering applications. PMID:27074749

  15. In vivo exposure to hyperoxia increases airway responsiveness in rats. Demonstration in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Szarek, J L

    1989-10-01

    Studies regarding O2-induced lung injury have concentrated on damage to alveolar structures and pulmonary vasculature without consideration of alterations that may be occurring in airways. This study was undertaken to determine the effects of in vivo hyperoxic exposure on airway responses to excitatory stimuli in intact, anesthetized rats and in intrapulmonary bronchi isolated from hyperoxia-exposed rats. Using lung conductance (G1) as an index of bronchoconstriction, intravenously administered 5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT) elicited greater bronchoconstrictor responses in anesthetized, mechanically ventilated rats that had been exposed to 85% O2 for 7 days rather than to air. Further, airways of hyperoxia-exposed rats were more sensitive to the effects of intravenously administered 5HT as evidenced by the lower log dose of 5HT required to decrease G1 30%. Cylindrical segments of intrapulmonary bronchi isolated from hyperoxia-exposed rats were more responsive to the contractile effects of 5HT and electrical field stimulation. However, no differences in responsiveness to bethanechol or KCl were observed between the two groups. The log concentration of 5HT and the log frequency of electrical field stimulation that elicited half-maximal responses were smaller in bronchi isolated from hyperoxia-exposed animals, indicating an increase in sensitivity of the airways to these stimuli. These results suggest that prolonged exposure to greater than ambient levels of O2 can alter airway function; however, the mechanism responsible for these changes remains to be determined. PMID:2802379

  16. In vivo bubble nucleation probability in sheep brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Gateau, J; Aubry, J-F; Chauvet, D; Boch, A-L; Fink, M; Tanter, M

    2011-11-21

    Gas nuclei exist naturally in living bodies. Their activation initiates cavitation activity, and is possible using short ultrasonic excitations of high amplitude. However, little is known about the nuclei population in vivo, and therefore about the rarefaction pressure required to form bubbles in tissue. A novel method dedicated to in vivo investigations was used here that combines passive and active cavitation detection with a multi-element linear ultrasound probe (4-7 MHz). Experiments were performed in vivo on the brain of trepanated sheep. Bubble nucleation was induced using a focused single-element transducer (central frequency 660 kHz, f-number = 1) driven by a high power (up to 5 kW) electric burst of two cycles. Successive passive recording and ultrafast active imaging were shown to allow detection of a single nucleation event in brain tissue in vivo. Experiments carried out on eight sheep allowed statistical studies of the bubble nucleation process. The nucleation probability was evaluated as a function of the peak negative pressure. No nucleation event could be detected with a peak negative pressure weaker than -12.7 MPa, i.e. one order of magnitude higher than the recommendations based on the mechanical index. Below this threshold, bubble nucleation in vivo in brain tissues is a random phenomenon. PMID:22015981

  17. In Vivo Application of Photocleavable Protein Interaction Reporter Technology

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Zheng, Chunxiang; Weisbrod, Chad R.; Tang, Xiaoting; Munske, Gerhard R.; Hoopmann, Michael R.; Eng, Jimmy K.; Bruce, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Summary In vivo protein structures and protein-protein interactions are critical to the function of proteins in biological systems. As a complementary approach to traditional protein interaction identification methods, cross-linking strategies are beginning to provide additional data on protein and protein complex topological features. Previously, photocleavable protein interaction reporter (pcPIR) technology was demonstrated by cross-linking pure proteins and protein complexes and the use of ultraviolet light to cleave or release cross-linked peptides to enable identification. In the present report, the pcPIR strategy is applied to E. coli cells and in vivo protein interactions and topologies are measured. More than 1600 labeled peptides from E. coli were identified, indicating many protein sites react with pcPIR in vivo. From those labeled sites, 53 in vivo inter-cross-linked peptide pairs were identified and manually validated. Approximately half of the interactions have been reported using other techniques, although detailed structures exist for very few. Three proteins or protein complexes with detailed crystallography structures are compared to the cross-linking results obtained from in vivo application of pcPIR technology. PMID:22168182

  18. In Vitro and In Vivo Neurotoxicity of Prion Protein Oligomers

    PubMed Central

    Simoneau, Steve; Rezaei, Human; Salès, Nicole; Kaiser-Schulz, Gunnar; Lefebvre-Roque, Maxime; Vidal, Catherine; Fournier, Jean-Guy; Comte, Julien; Wopfner, Franziska; Grosclaude, Jeanne; Schätzl, Hermann; Lasmézas, Corinne Ida

    2007-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying prion-linked neurodegeneration remain to be elucidated, despite several recent advances in this field. Herein, we show that soluble, low molecular weight oligomers of the full-length prion protein (PrP), which possess characteristics of PrP to PrPsc conversion intermediates such as partial protease resistance, are neurotoxic in vitro on primary cultures of neurons and in vivo after subcortical stereotaxic injection. Monomeric PrP was not toxic. Insoluble, fibrillar forms of PrP exhibited no toxicity in vitro and were less toxic than their oligomeric counterparts in vivo. The toxicity was independent of PrP expression in the neurons both in vitro and in vivo for the PrP oligomers and in vivo for the PrP fibrils. Rescue experiments with antibodies showed that the exposure of the hydrophobic stretch of PrP at the oligomeric surface was necessary for toxicity. This study identifies toxic PrP species in vivo. It shows that PrP-induced neurodegeneration shares common mechanisms with other brain amyloidoses like Alzheimer disease and opens new avenues for neuroprotective intervention strategies of prion diseases targeting PrP oligomers. PMID:17784787

  19. Endocavitary in vivo Dosimetry for IMRT Treatments of Gynecologic Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Cilla, Savino; Macchia, Gabriella; Digesu, Cinzia; Deodato, Francesco; Sabatino, Domenico; Morganti, Alessio G.; Piermattei, Angelo

    2011-01-01

    The accuracy and reproducibility of endometrial carcinoma treatment with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) was assessed by means of in vivo dosimetry. Six patients who had previously undergone radical hysterectomy for endometrial carcinoma were treated with IMRT using a vaginal applicator with radio-opaque fiducial markers. An ion-chamber inserted into the applicator supplied an endocavitary in vivo dosimetry for quality assurance purposes. The ratio R = D/D{sub TPS} between the in vivo measured dose D and the predicted dose by the treatment planning system D{sub TPS} was determined for every fraction of the treatment. Results showed that 90% and 100% of the ratios resulted equal to 1 within 5% and 10%, respectively. The mean value of the ratios distribution for the 6 patients was R = 0.995 and the SD = 0.034. The ratio R* between the measured and predicted total doses for each patient was near to 1, within 2%. The dosimetric results suggest that the use of a vaginal applicator in an image-guided approach could make the interfractions target position stable and reproducible, allowing a safe use of the IMRT technique in the treatment of postoperative vaginal vault. In vivo dosimetry may supply useful information about the discrimination of random vs. systematic errors. The workload is minimum and this in vivo dosimetry can be applied also in the clinical routine.

  20. Transcriptional complexity of vaccinia virus in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Paoletti, E; Grady, L J

    1977-01-01

    The transcriptional complexity of vaccinia virus both in vivo and in vitro has been measured by using DNA:RNA hybridization with RNA in excess. In vivo, "early" or prereplicative RNA was found to saturate at 25% or one-half of the viral genome. "Late" or postreplicative RNA from infected HeLa cells saturated at 52% or essentially the entire genome. This well-regulated transcriptional pattern of the virus in vivo was not maintained in vitro. In a number of experiments a range of saturation values from 40 to 50% was obtained for in vitro synthesized RNA. The complexity of polyadenylated and non-polyadenylated RNA, as well as total purified 8 to 12S RNA released from the virus, was indistinguishable from purified high-molecular-weight virion-associated RNA with a sedimentation value of greater than 20S and equivalent to total in vitro synthesized RNA. No additional hybrid formation was observed in experiments in which total in vitro RNA and late in vivo RNA from infected HeLa cells were combined, suggesting that the virus does not transcribe in vitro DNA sequences that are not also transcribed during productive infection. Approximately 15% complementary RNA was detected when radiolabeled total in vitro RNA was allowed to reanneal with late in vivo RNA, while as much as 8% of the in vitro synthesized RNA was found to be complementary. PMID:894791

  1. Analysis of the structure of human telomerase RNA in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Antal, Mária; Boros, Éva; Solymosy, Ferenc; Kiss, Tamás

    2002-01-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein reverse transcriptase that synthesises telomeric DNA. The RNA component of telomerase acts as a template for telomere synthesis and binds the reverse transcriptase. In this study, we have performed in vivo and in vitro structural analyses of human telomerase RNA (hTR). In vivo mapping experiments showed that the 5′-terminal template domain of hTR folds into a long hairpin structure, in which the template sequence occupies a readily accessible position. Intriguingly, neither in vivo nor in vitro mapping of hTR confirmed formation of a stable ‘pseudoknot’ helix, suggesting that this functionally essential long range interaction is formed only temporarily. In vitro control mappings demonstrated that the 5′-terminal template domain of hTR cannot fold correctly in the absence of cellular protein factors. The 3′-terminal domain of hTR, both in vivo and in vitro, folds into the previously predicted box H/ACA snoRNA-like ‘hairpin–hinge–hairpin–tail’ structure. Finally, comparison of the in vivo and in vitro modification patterns of hTR revealed several regions that might be directly involved in binding of telomerase reverse transcriptase or other telomerase proteins. PMID:11842102

  2. Reproduction of in vivo motion using a parallel robot.

    PubMed

    Howard, Ryan A; Rosvold, Joshua M; Darcy, Shon P; Corr, David T; Shrive, Nigel G; Tapper, Janet E; Ronsky, Janet L; Beveridge, Jillian E; Marchuk, Linda L; Frank, Cyril B

    2007-10-01

    Although alterations in knee joint loading resulting from injury have been shown to influence the development of osteoarthritis, actual in vivo loading conditions of the joint remain unknown. A method for determining in vivo ligament loads by reproducing joint specific in vivo kinematics using a robotic testing apparatus is described. The in vivo kinematics of the ovine stifle joint during walking were measured with 3D optical motion analysis using markers rigidly affixed to the tibia and femur. An additional independent single degree of freedom measuring device was also used to record a measure of motion. Following sacrifice, the joint was mounted in a robotic/universal force sensor test apparatus and referenced using a coordinate measuring machine. A parallel robot configuration was chosen over the conventional serial manipulator because of its greater accuracy and stiffness. Median normal gait kinematics were applied to the joint and the resulting accuracy compared. The mean error in reproduction as determined by the motion analysis system varied between 0.06 mm and 0.67 mm and 0.07 deg and 0.74 deg for the two individual tests. The mean error measured by the independent device was found to be 0.07 mm and 0.83 mm for the two experiments, respectively. This study demonstrates the ability of this system to reproduce in vivo kinematics of the ovine stifle joint in vitro. The importance of system stiffness is discussed to ensure accurate reproduction of joint motion. PMID:17887900

  3. Systemic inflammation regulates microglial responses to tissue damage in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gyoneva, Stefka; Davalos, Dimitrios; Biswas, Dipankar; Swanger, Sharon A; Garnier-Amblard, Ethel; Loth, Francis; Akassoglou, Katerina; Traynelis, Stephen F

    2014-08-01

    Microglia, the resident immune cells of the central nervous system, exist in either a "resting" state associated with physiological tissue surveillance or an "activated" state in neuroinflammation. We recently showed that ATP is the primary chemoattractor to tissue damage in vivo and elicits opposite effects on the motility of activated microglia in vitro through activation of adenosine A2A receptors. However, whether systemic inflammation affects microglial responses to tissue damage in vivo remains largely unknown. Using in vivo two-photon imaging of mice, we show that injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) at levels that can produce both clear neuroinflammation and some features of sepsis significantly reduced the rate of microglial response to laser-induced ablation injury in vivo. Under proinflammatory conditions, microglial processes initially retracted from the ablation site, but subsequently moved toward and engulfed the damaged area. Analyzing the process dynamics in 3D cultures of primary microglia indicated that only A2A , but not A1 or A3 receptors, mediate process retraction in LPS-activated microglia. The A2A receptor antagonists caffeine and preladenant reduced adenosine-mediated process retraction in activated microglia in vitro. Finally, administration of preladenant before induction of laser ablation in vivo accelerated the microglial response to injury following systemic inflammation. The regulation of rapid microglial responses to sites of injury by A2A receptors could have implications for their ability to respond to the neuronal death occurring under conditions of neuroinflammation in neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24807189

  4. Assisted dying: a review of international legislation.

    PubMed

    Field, Charlotte; Curtice, Martin

    2009-05-01

    The issue of assisted dying in the UK is increasingly receiving media and academic journal attention. Such reporting often cites, but in little depth, existing legislation in other countries. Such international legislation may also shape future UK assisted dying legislation. PMID:19451872

  5. The Right To Die. Public Talk Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pasquerella, Lynn

    This program guide on the right to die provides policy issue information where ethical concerns have a prominent place. Three positions about the right to die are presented: (1) mercy killing and assisted suicide should be legally permitted in certain cases; (2) legal status should be given to living wills and other advance directives that would…

  6. Die Evolution der Religiosität

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voland, Eckart

    Ein konsequent darwinischer Blick auf den Menschen bedeutet, auch im Denken, Fühlen und Handeln biologische Anpassungsgeschichte zu suchen, denn auch die psychischen und mentalen Eigenheiten des Homo sapiens unterliegen der natürlichen Selektion. Lässt sich die religiöse Lebenspraxis von Menschen daher auch aus einer Fitnessperspektive betrachten?

  7. Prediction of Part Distortion in Die Casting

    SciTech Connect

    R. Allen Miller

    2005-03-30

    The die casting process is one of the net shape manufacturing techniques and is widely used to produce high production castings with tight tolerances for many industries. An understanding of the stress distribution and the deformation pattern of parts produced by die casting will result in less deviation from the part design specification, a better die design and eventually more productivity and cost savings. This report presents methods that can be used to simulate the die casting process in order to predict the deformation and stresses in the produced part and assesses the degree to which distortion modeling is practical for die casting at the current time. A coupled thermal-mechanical finite elements model was used to simulate the die casting process. The simulation models the effect of thermal and mechanical interaction between the casting and the die. It also includes the temperature dependant material properties of the casting. Based on a designed experiment, a sensitivity analysis was conducted on the model to investigate the effect of key factors. These factors include the casting material model, material properties and thermal interaction between casting and dies. To verify the casting distortion predictions, it was compared against the measured dimensions of produced parts. The comparison included dimensions along and across the parting plane and the flatness of one surface.

  8. Student Nurses' Perception of Death and Dying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niederriter, Joan E.

    2009-01-01

    Student nurses are involved in caring for patients who are actively dying or who have been told they have a terminal illness and are faced with the process of dying. Students encounter these patients in hospitals, nursing homes, at home or in hospice care settings. According to Robinson (2004), "nurses are the healthcare providers that are most…

  9. Apparatus for restraining and transporting dies

    DOEpatents

    Allison, James W.; LaBarre, Timothy L.

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus for restraining and transporting dies in punch press operations is provided. A floatation platen for supporting a die on the platen's upper surface has a plurality of recessed gas exhaust ports on the platen's lower surface. A source of pressurized gas delivers gas to a platen manifold, for delivery to orifices located in the gas exhaust ports. The flow of gas is controlled by a first valve adjacent the gas source and a second valve adjacent the manifold, with the second valve being used to control the gas flow during movement of the die. In this fashion, a die may be moved on a cushion of air from one workstation to a selected second workstation. A moveable hydraulically operated restraining fixture is also provided, for clamping the die in position during the compacting phase, and for releasing the die after completion of the compacting phase by releasing the hydraulic pressure on the restraining fixture. When pressure in the hydraulic cylinders on the restraining fixture is reversed, the restraining fixture will retract so that there is no contact between the die and the restraining fixture, thereby allowing the die to be removed from a first workstation and moved to a second selected workstation.

  10. Energy Consumption of Die Casting Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Jerald Brevick; clark Mount-Campbell; Carroll Mobley

    2004-03-15

    Molten metal processing is inherently energy intensive and roughly 25% of the cost of die-cast products can be traced to some form of energy consumption [1]. The obvious major energy requirements are for melting and holding molten alloy in preparation for casting. The proper selection and maintenance of melting and holding equipment are clearly important factors in minimizing energy consumption in die-casting operations [2]. In addition to energy consumption, furnace selection also influences metal loss due to oxidation, metal quality, and maintenance requirements. Other important factors influencing energy consumption in a die-casting facility include geographic location, alloy(s) cast, starting form of alloy (solid or liquid), overall process flow, casting yield, scrap rate, cycle times, number of shifts per day, days of operation per month, type and size of die-casting form of alloy (solid or liquid), overall process flow, casting yield, scrap rate, cycle times, number of shifts per day, days of operation per month, type and size of die-casting machine, related equipment (robots, trim presses), and downstream processing (machining, plating, assembly, etc.). Each of these factors also may influence the casting quality and productivity of a die-casting enterprise. In a die-casting enterprise, decisions regarding these issues are made frequently and are based on a large number of factors. Therefore, it is not surprising that energy consumption can vary significantly from one die-casting enterprise to the next, and within a single enterprise as function of time.