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Sample records for dielectrophoretic field-flow fractionation

  1. Numerical simulation of bioparticle separation by dielectrophoretic field-flow-fractionation (DEP-FFF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchis, Andreea; Neculae, Adrian

    2014-11-01

    The separation systems based on dielectrophoretic field-flow-fractionation (DEP-FFF) are used for a wide range of bioparticle types, including cells, bacteria, viruses, proteins, etc. An array of interdigitated microelectrodes lining the bottom surface of a thin chamber is used to generate dielectrophoretic forces that levitate the bioparticle mixture. The balance between DEP levitation and gravitational forces determines the bioparticles position at equilibrium heights within a fluid-flow profile, and consequently determines their velocities and the corresponding elution times. The elution time depends on the voltage applied on the microelectrodes, geometry of the device, bioparticle dielectric properties and density. This paper analyses numerically the behavior of a bioparticle mixture suspended in a dense and viscous fluid under dielectrophoresis. The controlled spatial separation of bioparticle mixture is performed by a combination of dielectrophoretic and hydrodynamic forces. The theoretical background and a set of numerical results (calculated DEP force, particle trajectories, etc.) are presented. The numerical solutions are obtained using the COMSOL Multiphysics finite element solver. The presented results demonstrate that the DEP-FFF method can be successfully applicable to many biomedical cell separation problems, including microfluidic-scale diagnosis and preparative-scale purification of cell subpopulations.

  2. Dielectrophoretic Field-Flow Fractionation System for Detection of Aquatic Toxicants

    PubMed Central

    Pui-ock, Sittisak; Ruchirawat, Mathuros; Gascoyne, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Dielectrophoretic field-flow fractionation (dFFF) was applied as a contact-free way to sense changes in the plasma membrane capacitances and conductivities of cultured human HL-60 cells in response to toxicant exposure. A micropatterned electrode imposed electric forces on cells in suspension in a parabolic flow profile as they moved through a thin chamber. Relative changes in the dFFF peak elution time, reflecting changes in cell membrane area and ion permeability, were measured as indices of response during the first 150 min of exposure to eight toxicants having different single or mixed modes of action (acrylonitrile, actinomycin D, carbon tetrachloride, endosulfan, N-nitroso-N-methylurea (NMU), paraquat dichloride, puromycin, and styrene oxide). The dFFF method was compared with the cell viability assay for all toxicants and with the mitochondrial potentiometric dye assay or DNA alkaline comet assay according to the mode of action of the specific agents. Except for low doses of nucleic acid-targeting agents (actinomycin D and NMU), the dFFF method detected all toxicants more sensitively than other assays, in some cases up to 105 times more sensitively than the viability approach. The results suggest the dFFF method merits additional study for possible applicability in toxicology. PMID:18788754

  3. Model-based analysis of a dielectrophoretic microfluidic device for field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Bobby; Alazzam, Anas; Abutayeh, Mohammad; Stiharu, Ion

    2016-08-01

    We present the development of a dynamic model for predicting the trajectory of microparticles in microfluidic devices, employing dielectrophoresis, for Hyperlayer field-flow fractionation. The electrode configuration is such that multiple finite-sized electrodes are located on the top and bottom walls of the microchannel; the electrodes on the walls are aligned with each other. The electric potential inside the microchannel is described using the Laplace equation while the microparticles' trajectory is described using equations based on Newton's second law. All equations are solved using finite difference method. The equations of motion account for forces including inertia, buoyancy, drag, gravity, virtual mass, and dielectrophoresis. The model is used for parametric study; the geometric parameters analyzed include microparticle radius, microchannel depth, and electrode/spacing lengths while volumetric flow rate and actuation voltage are the two operating parameters considered in the study. The trajectory of microparticles is composed of transient and steady state phases; the trajectory is influenced by all parameters. Microparticle radius and volumetric flow rate, above the threshold, do not influence the steady state levitation height; microparticle levitation is not possible below the threshold of the volumetric flow rate. Microchannel depth, electrode/spacing lengths, and actuation voltage influence the steady-state levitation height. PMID:27322871

  4. Correlations between the Dielectric Properties and Exterior Morphology of Cells Revealed by Dielectrophoretic Field-Flow Fractionation

    PubMed Central

    Gascoyne, Peter R. C.; Shim, Sangjo; Noshari, Jamileh; Becker, Frederick F.; Stemke-Hale, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Although dielectrophoresis (DEP) has great potential for addressing clinical cell isolation problems based on cell dielectric differences, a biological basis for predicting the DEP behavior of cells has been lacking. Here, the dielectric properties of the NCI-60 panel of tumor cell types have been measured by dielectrophoretic (DEP) field-flow fractionation, correlated with the exterior morphologies of the cells during growth, and compared with the dielectric and morphological characteristics of the subpopulations of peripheral blood. In agreement with earlier findings, cell total capacitance varied with both cell size and plasma membrane folding and the dielectric properties of the NCI-60 cell types in suspension reflected the plasma membrane area and volume of the cells at their growth sites. Therefore, the behavior of cells in DEP-based manipulations is largely determined by their exterior morphological characteristics prior to release into suspension. As a consequence, DEP is able to discriminate between cells of similar size having different morphological origins, offering a significant advantage over size-based filtering for isolating circulating tumor cells, for example. The findings provide a framework for anticipating cell dielectric behavior on the basis of structure-function relationships and suggest that DEP should be widely applicable as a surface marker-independent method for sorting cells. PMID:23172680

  5. Field-Flow Fractionation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Karin D.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a technique for separating samples that range over 15 orders of magnitude in molecular weight. Discusses theory, apparatus, and sample preparation techniques. Lists several types of field-flow fractionation (FFF) and their uses: sedimentation FFF, thermal FFF, flow FFF, electrical FFF, and steric FFF. (ML)

  6. Cyclical magnetic field flow fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasci, T. O.; Johnson, W. P.; Gale, B. K.

    2012-04-01

    In this study, a new magnetic field flow fractionation (FFF) system was designed and modeled by using finite element simulations. Other than current magnetic FFF systems, which use static magnetic fields, our system uses cyclical magnetic fields. Results of the simulations show that our cyclical magnetic FFF system can be used effectively for the separation of magnetic nanoparticles. Cyclical magnetic FFF system is composed of a microfluidic channel (length = 5 cm, height = 30 μm) and 2 coils. Square wave currents of 1 Hz (with 90 deg of phase difference) were applied to the coils. By using Comsol Multiphysics 3.5a, magnetic field profile and corresponding magnetic force exerted on the magnetite nanoparticles were calculated. The magnetic force data were exported from Comsol to Matlab. In Matlab, a parabolic flow profile with maximum flow speed of 0.4 mL/h was defined. Particle trajectories were obtained by the calculation of the particle speeds resulted from both magnetic and hydrodynamic forces. Particle trajectories of the particles with sizes ranging from 10 to 50 nm were simulated and elution times of the particles were calculated. Results show that there is a significant difference between the elution times of the particles so that baseline separation of the particles can be obtained. In this work, it is shown that by the application of cyclical magnetic fields, the separation of magnetic nanoparticles can be done efficiently.

  7. Dielectrophoretic field-flow method for separating particle populations in a chip with asymmetric electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Iliescu, Ciprian; Tresset, Guillaume; Xu, Guolin

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a field-flow method for separating particle populations in a dielectrophoretic (DEP) chip with asymmetric electrodes under continuous flow. The structure of the DEP device (with one thick electrode that defines the walls of the microfluidic channel and one thin electrode), as well as the fabrication and characterization of the device, was previously described. A characteristic of this structure is that it generates an increased gradient of electric field in the vertical plane that can levitate the particles experiencing negative DEP. The separation method consists of trapping one population to the bottom of the microfluidic channel using positive DEP, while the other population that exhibits negative DEP is levitated and flowed out. Viable and nonviable yeast cells were used for testing of the separation method. PMID:20216966

  8. Field-flow fractionation of chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Giddings, J.C.

    1993-04-01

    The first topic of this project involved the preparation, fractionation by sedimentation/steric Field Flow Fractionation (FFF), and modeling of metaphase chromosomes. After numerous unsuccessful attempts to prepare chromosomes, we have implemented a procedure (in collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory) to prepare metaphase chromosomes from Chinese hamster cells. Extensive experimentation was necessary to identify a suitable FFF channel surface to minimize chromosome adsorption and a carrier liquid to stabilize and disperse the chromosomes. Under suitable operating conditions, the Chinese hamster chromosomes were purified from cell debris and partially fractionated. The purified, preenriched chromosomes that can be prepared by sedimentation/steric FFF or produced continuously by continuous SPLITT fractionation provide an enriched feed material for subsequent flow cytometry. In the second project component, flow FFF permitted successful separations of single- from double-stranded circular DNA, double-stranded circular DNAs of various sizes, and linear double-stranded DNA fragments of various lengths. Diffusion coefficients extracted from retention data agreed well with literature data as well as predictions of major polymer theories. The capacity of FFF separations was evaluated to examine potential applications to long DNA chains.

  9. Continuous field-flow separation of particle populations in a dielectrophoretic chip with three dimensional electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliescu, Ciprian; Tresset, Guillaume; Xu, Guolin

    2007-06-01

    This letter presents a dielectrophoretic (DEP) separation method of particles under continuous flow. The method consists of flowing two particle populations through a microfluidic channel, in which the vertical walls are the electrodes of the DEP device. The irregular shape of the electrodes generates both electric field and fluid velocity gradients. As a result, the particles that exhibit negative DEP can be trapped in the fluidic dead zones, while the particles that experience positive DEP are concentrated in the regions with high velocity and collected at the outlet. The device was tested with dead and living yeast cells.

  10. Field-flow fractionation of chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Giddings, J.C.

    1991-09-01

    The work done on this project is divided into two principal areas. The first involves the application of sedimentation/steric FFF to metaphase chromosomes in an attempt to fractionate the chromosomes according to their size. The preparation of chromosomes from a number of organisms was attempted; procedures were finally worked out in collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory for the preparation of metaphase chromosomes from Chinese hamster cells. After extensive experimental work was done to identify suitable operating conditions, the partial fractionation of the Chinese hamster chromosomes was achieved. In the second component of the project, flow FFF was applied to the separation of DNA fragments. Figures are provided that show considerable success in the separation of plasmid digests and in the separation of single from double stranded DNA under 10{sup 4} base pairs. Preliminary work was done on DNA fragments having a size greater than 10{sup 4} base pairs. This work has served to establish the inversion point for DNA.

  11. Field-Flow Fractionation of Carbon Nanotubes and Related Materials

    SciTech Connect

    John P. Selegue

    2011-11-17

    During the grant period, we carried out FFF studies of carbonaceous soot, single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes, carbon nano-onions and polyoxometallates. FFF alone does not provide enough information to fully characterize samples, so our suite of characterization techniques grew to include light scattering (especially Photon Correlation Spectroscopy), scanning and transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and spectroscopic methods. We developed convenient techniques to deposit and examine minute FFF fractions by electron microscopy. In collaboration with Arthur Cammers (University of Kentucky), we used Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (Fl-FFF) to monitor the solution-phase growth of keplerates, a class of polyoxometallate (POM) nanoparticles. We monitored the evolution of Mo-POM nanostructures over the course of weeks by by using flow field-flow fractionation and corroborated the nanoparticle structures by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Total molybdenum in the solution and precipitate phases was monitored by using inductively coupled plasma analyses, and total Mo-POM concentration by following the UV-visible spectra of the solution phase. We observe crystallization-driven formation of (Mo132) keplerate and solution phase-driven evolution of structurally related nanoscopic species (3-60 nm). FFF analyses of other classes of materials were less successful. Attempts to analyze platelets of layered materials, including exfoliated graphite (graphene) and TaS2 and MoS2, were disappointing. We were not able to optimize flow conditions for the layered materials. The metal sulfides react with the aqueous carrier liquid and settle out of suspension quickly because of their high density.

  12. Gravitational field-flow fractionation of human hemopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Roda, Barbara; Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Alviano, Francesco; Lanzoni, Giacomo; Bagnara, Gian Paolo; Ricci, Francesca; Buzzi, Marina; Tazzari, Pier Luigi; Pagliaro, Pasqualepaolo; Michelini, Elisa; Roda, Aldo

    2009-12-25

    New cell sorting methodologies, which are simple, fast, non-invasive, and able to isolate homogeneous cell populations, are needed for applications ranging from gene expression analysis to cell-based therapy. In particular, in the forefront of stem cell isolation, progenitor cells have to be separated under mild experimental conditions from complex heterogeneous mixtures prepared from human tissues. Most of the methodologies now employed make use of immunological markers. However, it is widely acknowledged that specific markers for pluripotent stem cells are not as yet available, and cell labelling may interfere with the differentiation process. This work presents for the first time gravitational field-flow fractionation (GrFFF), as a tool for tag-less, direct selection of human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells from cell samples obtained by peripheral blood aphaeresis. These cells are responsible to repopulate the hemopoietic system and they are used in transplantation therapies. Blood aphaeresis sample were injected into a GrFFF system and collected fractions were characterized by flow cytometry for CD34 and CD45 expression, and then tested for viability and multi-differentiation potential. The developed GrFFF method allowed obtaining high enrichment levels of viable, multi-potent hematopoietic stem cells in specific fraction and it showed to fulfil major requirements of analytical performance, such as selectivity and reproducibility of the fractionation process and high sample recovery. PMID:19647835

  13. Paper-based flow fractionation system for preconcentration and field-flow fractionation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Seokbin; Kwak, Rhokyun; Kim, Wonjung

    2015-11-01

    We present a novel paper-based flow fractionation system for preconcentration and field-flow fractionation. The paper fluidic system consisting of a straight channel connected with expansion regions can generate a fluid flow with a constant flow rate for 10 min without any external pumping devices. The flow bifurcates with a fraction ratio of up to 30 depending on the control parameters of the channel geometry. Utilizing this simple paper-based bifurcation system, we developed a continuous-flow preconcentrator and a field-flow fractionator on a paper platform. Our experimental results show that the continuous-flow preconcentrator can produce a 33-fold enrichment of the ion concentration and that the flow fractionation system successfully separates the charged dyes. Our study suggests simple, cheap ways to construct preconcentration and field-flow fractionation systems for paper-based microfluidic diagnostic devices. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea(NRF) grant funded by the Korea government(MSIP) (NRF-2015R1A2A2A04006181).

  14. Compact and tunable size-based dielectrophoretic flow fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Han-Sheng; Chung, Tien-Yu; Li, Yun

    2014-12-01

    A compact and tunable size-based flow fractionation microchip using negative dielectrophoresis (DEP) is presented in this paper. In the microchip, a sample containing a mixture of particles is hydrodynamically focused in a contraction section and then sorted by size after flowing over planar interdigitated electrodes. The electrodes and flow chamber were aligned at an angle of 45° to produce effective sorting. 1, 2.5 and 4.8 µm polystyrene (PS) particles were successfully separated into three distinct streams in a short distance (1 mm) and collected in different outlet channels. The sorting was subjected to flow rates and electric potential. The experimental sorting efficiencies of 1, 2.5 and 4.8 µm particles reached 97.2%, 79.6% and 99.8%, respectively. With the same device, lipid vesicle sorting was demonstrated. 86.9% of vesicles larger than 10 µm were effectively extracted from the sample stream. Likewise, sorting of other biological particles can be achieved in the same fashion.

  15. Illustrating Some Principles of Separation Science through Gravitational Field-Flow Fractionation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckett, Ronald; Sharma, Reshmi; Andric, Goja; Chantiwas, Rattikan; Jakmunee, Jaroon; Grudpan, Kate

    2007-01-01

    Particle separation is an important but often neglected topic in undergraduate curricula. This article discusses how the method of gravitational field-flow fractionation (GrFFF) can be used to illustrate many principles of separation science and some fundamental concepts of physical chemistry. GrFFF separates particles during their elution through…

  16. Trajectory of microscale entities in a microdevice for field-flow fractionation based on dielectrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Bobby; Alazzam, Anas; Khashan, Saud A.; El-Khasawneh, Bashar S.

    2015-06-01

    This article deals with the development of a two-dimensional dynamic model for tracking the path of cells subjected to dielectrophoresis, in a continuous flow microfluidic device, for purposes of field-flow fractionation. The nonuniform electric field exists between the top and bottom surface of the microchannel; the top electrode runs over the entire length of the microchannel while the bottom surface of the same holds multiple finite sized electrodes of opposite polarity. The model consists of two governing equations with each describing the movement of the cell in one of the two dimensions of interest. The equations governing of the cell trajectories as well as that of the electric potential inside the microchannel are solved using finite difference method. The model is subsequently used for parametric study; the parameters considered include cell radii, actuation voltage, microchannel height and volumetric flow rate. The model is particularly useful in the design of microfluidic device employing dielectrophoresis for field flow fractionation.

  17. Sedimentation field flow fractionation and flow field flow fractionation as tools for studying the aging effects of WO₃ colloids for photoelectrochemical uses.

    PubMed

    Contado, Catia; Argazzi, Roberto

    2011-07-01

    WO₃ colloidal suspensions obtained through a simple sol-gel procedure were subjected to a controlled temperature aging process whose time evolution in terms of particle mass and size distribution was followed by sedimentation field flow fractionation (SdFFF) and flow field flow fractionation (FlFFF). The experiments performed at a temperature of 60 °C showed that in a few hours the initially transparent sol of WO₃ particles, whose size was less than 25 nm, undergoes a progressive size increase allowing nanoparticles to reach a maximum equivalent spherical size of about 130 nm after 5 h. The observed shift in particle size distribution maxima (SdFFF), the broadening of the curves (FlFFF) and the SEM-TEM observations suggest a mixed mechanism of growth-aggregation of initial nanocrystals to form larger particles. The photoelectrochemical properties of thin WO₃ films obtained from the aged suspensions at regular intervals, were tested in a biased photoelectrocatalytic cell with 1M H₂SO₄ under solar simulated irradiation. The current-voltage polarization curves recorded in the potential range 0-1.8 V (vs. SCE) showed a diminution of the maximum photocurrent from 3.7 mA cm⁻² to 2.8 mA cm⁻² with aging times of 1h and 5h, respectively. This loss of performance was mainly attributed to the reduction of the electroactive surface area of the sintered particles as suggested by the satisfactory linear correlation between the integrated photocurrent and the cyclic voltammetry cathodic wave area of the W(VI)→W(V) process measured in the dark. PMID:21168138

  18. Method of electric field flow fractionation wherein the polarity of the electric field is periodically reversed

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, Fred J.

    1992-01-01

    A novel method of electric field flow fractionation for separating solute molecules from a carrier solution is disclosed. The method of the invention utilizes an electric field that is periodically reversed in polarity, in a time-dependent, wave-like manner. The parameters of the waveform, including amplitude, frequency and wave shape may be varied to optimize separation of solute species. The waveform may further include discontinuities to enhance separation.

  19. Characterization of magnetic nanoparticles using programmed quadrupole magnetic field-flow fractionation

    PubMed Central

    Williams, P. Stephen; Carpino, Francesca; Zborowski, Maciej

    2010-01-01

    Quadrupole magnetic field-flow fractionation is a relatively new technique for the separation and characterization of magnetic nanoparticles. Magnetic nanoparticles are often of composite nature having a magnetic component, which may be a very finely divided material, and a polymeric or other material coating that incorporates this magnetic material and stabilizes the particles in suspension. There may be other components such as antibodies on the surface for specific binding to biological cells, or chemotherapeutic drugs for magnetic drug delivery. Magnetic field-flow fractionation (MgFFF) has the potential for determining the distribution of the magnetic material among the particles in a given sample. MgFFF differs from most other forms of field-flow fractionation in that the magnetic field that brings about particle separation induces magnetic dipole moments in the nanoparticles, and these potentially can interact with one another and perturb the separation. This aspect is examined in the present work. Samples of magnetic nanoparticles were analysed under different experimental conditions to determine the sensitivity of the method to variation of conditions. The results are shown to be consistent and insensitive to conditions, although magnetite content appeared to be somewhat higher than expected. PMID:20732895

  20. [Effects of carrier liquid and flow rate on the separation in gravitational field-flow fractionation].

    PubMed

    Guo, Shuang; Zhu, Chenqi; Gao-Yang, Yaya; Qiu, Bailing; Wu, Di; Liang, Qihui; He, Jiayuan; Han, Nanyin

    2016-02-01

    Gravitational field-flow fractionation is the simplest field-flow fractionation technique in terms of principle and operation. The earth' s gravity is its external field. Different sized particles are injected into a thin channel and carried by carrier fluid. The different velocities of the carrier liquid in different places results in a size-based separation. A gravitational field-flow fractionation (GrFFF) instrument was designed and constructed. Two kinds of polystyrene (PS) particles with different sizes (20 µm and 6 µm) were chosen as model particles. In this work, the separation of the sample was achieved by changing the concentration of NaN3, the percentage of mixed surfactant in the carrier liquid and the flow rate of carrier liquid. Six levels were set for each factor. The effects of these three factors on the retention ratio (R) and plate height (H) of the PS particles were investigated. It was found that R increased and H decreased with increasing particle size. On the other hand, the R and H increased with increasing flow rate. The R and H also increased with increasing NaN3 concentration. The reason was that the electrostatic repulsive force between the particles and the glass channel wall increased. The force allowed the samples approach closer to the channel wall. The results showed that the resolution and retention time can be improved by adjusting the experimental conditions. These results can provide important values to the further applications of GrFFF technique. PMID:27382718

  1. Hollow-Fiber Flow Field-Flow Fractionation for Mass Spectrometry: From Proteins to Whole Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Zattoni, Andrea; Rambaldi, Diana Cristina; Roda, Aldo; Hee Moon, Myeong

    Mass spectrometry (MS) provides analyte identification over a wide molar-mass range. However, particularly in the case of complex matrices, this ability is often enhanced by the use of pre-MS separation steps. A separation, prototype technique for the "gentle" fractionation of large/ultralarge analytes, from proteins to whole cells, is here described to reduce complexity and maintain native characteristics of the sample before MS analysis. It is based on flow field-flow fractionation, and it employs a micro-volume fractionation channel made of a ca. 20 cm hollow-fiber membrane of sub-millimeter section. The key advantages of this technique lie in the low volume and low-cost of the channel, which makes it suitable to a disposable usage. Fractionation performance and instrumental simplicity make it an interesting methodology for in-batch or on-line pre-MS treatment of such samples.

  2. Determination of the functioning parameters in asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation with an exponential channel.

    PubMed

    Déjardin, P

    2013-08-30

    The flow conditions in normal mode asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation are determined to approach the high retention limit with the requirement d≪l≪w, where d is the particle diameter, l the characteristic length of the sample exponential distribution and w the channel height. The optimal entrance velocity is determined from the solute characteristics, the channel geometry (exponential to rectangular) and the membrane properties, according to a model providing the velocity fields all over the cell length. In addition, a method is proposed for in situ determination of the channel height. PMID:23885667

  3. Theory for nanoparticle retention time in the helical channel of quadrupole magnetic field-flow fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, P. Stephen; Carpino, Francesca; Zborowski, Maciej

    2009-05-01

    Quadrupole magnetic field-flow fractionation (QMgFFF) is a separation and characterization technique for magnetic nanoparticles such as those used for cell labeling and for targeted drug therapy. A helical separation channel is used to efficiently exploit the quadrupole magnetic field. The fluid and sample components therefore have angular and longitudinal components to their motion in the thin annular space occupied by the helical channel. The retention ratio is defined as the ratio of the times for non-retained and a retained material to pass through the channel. Equations are derived for the respective angular and longitudinal components to retention ratio.

  4. Asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation of superferrimagnetic iron oxide multicore nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dutz, Silvio; Kuntsche, Judith; Eberbeck, Dietmar; Müller, Robert; Zeisberger, Matthias

    2012-09-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are very useful for various medical applications where each application requires particles with specific magnetic properties. In this paper we describe the modification of the magnetic properties of magnetic multicore nanoparticles (MCNPs) by size dependent fractionation. This classification was carried out by means of asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4). A clear increase of the particle size with increasing elution time was confirmed by multi-angle laser light scattering coupled to the AF4 system, dynamic light scattering and Brownian diameters determined by magnetorelaxometry. In this way 16 fractions of particles with different hydrodynamic diameters, ranging between around 100 and 500 nm, were obtained. A high reproducibility of the method was confirmed by the comparison of the mean diameters of fractions of several fractionation runs under identical conditions. The hysteresis curves were measured by vibrating sample magnetometry. Starting from a coercivity of 1.41 kA m(-1) for the original MCNPs the coercivity of the particles in the different fractions varied from 0.41 to 3.83 kA m(-1). In our paper it is shown for the first time that fractions obtained from a broad size distributed MCNP fluid classified by AF4 show a strong correlation between hydrodynamic diameter and magnetic properties. Thus we state that AF4 is a suitable technology for reproducible size dependent classification of magnetic multicore nanoparticles suspended as ferrofluids. PMID:22875740

  5. Meeting in Florida: Using Asymmetric Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4) to Determine C60 Colloidal Size Distributions

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study of nanomaterials in environmental systems requires robust and specific analytical methods. Analytical methods which discriminate based on particle size and molecular composition are not widely available. Asymmetric Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4) is a separation...

  6. Fractionating power and outlet stream polydispersity in asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation. Part I: isocratic operation.

    PubMed

    Williams, P Stephen

    2016-05-01

    Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (As-FlFFF) has become the most commonly used of the field-flow fractionation techniques. However, because of the interdependence of the channel flow and the cross flow through the accumulation wall, it is the most difficult of the techniques to optimize, particularly for programmed cross flow operation. For the analysis of polydisperse samples, the optimization should ideally be guided by the predicted fractionating power. Many experimentalists, however, neglect fractionating power and rely on light scattering detection simply to confirm apparent selectivity across the breadth of the eluted peak. The size information returned by the light scattering software is assumed to dispense with any reliance on theory to predict retention, and any departure of theoretical predictions from experimental observations is therefore considered of no importance. Separation depends on efficiency as well as selectivity, however, and efficiency can be a strong function of retention. The fractionation of a polydisperse sample by field-flow fractionation never provides a perfectly separated series of monodisperse fractions at the channel outlet. The outlet stream has some residual polydispersity, and it will be shown in this manuscript that the residual polydispersity is inversely related to the fractionating power. Due to the strong dependence of light scattering intensity and its angular distribution on the size of the scattering species, the outlet polydispersity must be minimized if reliable size data are to be obtained from the light scattering detector signal. It is shown that light scattering detection should be used with careful control of fractionating power to obtain optimized analysis of polydisperse samples. Part I is concerned with isocratic operation of As-FlFFF, and part II with programmed operation. Graphical abstract The dash-dotted blue curve describes an assumed log-normal sample molecular weight distribution (right axis

  7. Paper-Based Flow Fractionation System Applicable to Preconcentration and Field-Flow Separation.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seokbin; Kwak, Rhokyun; Kim, Wonjung

    2016-02-01

    We present a novel paper-based flow fractionation system for preconcentration and field-flow separation. In this passive fluidic device, a straight channel is divided into multiple daughter channels, each of which is connected with an expanded region. The hydrodynamic resistance of the straight channel is predominant compared with those of expanded regions, so we can create steady flows through the straight and daughter channels. While the expanded regions absorb a great amount of water via capillarity, the steady flow continues for 10 min without external pumping devices. By controlling the relative hydrodynamic resistances of the daughter channels, we successfully divide the flow with flow rate ratios of up to 30. Combining this bifurcation system with ion concentration polarization (ICP), we develop a continuous-flow preconcentrator on a paper platform, which can preconcentrate a fluorescent dye up to 33-fold. In addition, we construct a field-flow separation system to divide two different dyes depending on their electric polarities. Our flow fractionation systems on a paper-based platform would make a breakthrough for point-of-care diagnostics with specific functions including preconcentration and separation. PMID:26713779

  8. Comprehensive triblock copolymer analysis by coupled thermal field-flow fractionation-NMR.

    PubMed

    van Aswegen, Werner; Hiller, Wolf; Hehn, Mathias; Pasch, Harald

    2013-07-12

    Thermal field-flow fractionation (ThFFF) is used as a novel fractionation technique to investigate the molecular heterogeneity of PB-b-PVP-b-PtBMA triblock copolymers. Such copolymers cause major problems in liquid chromatography due to very strong polar interactions with the stationary phase. ThFFF separates the copolymers with regard to size and/or chemical composition based on the normal and thermal diffusion coefficients. The separation mechanism in ThFFF and the chemical composition of the separated species is elucidated by online (1) H NMR. Based on the compositional analysis and a calibration of the system with the respective homopolymers, the samples are quantified regarding their molar masses, chemical compositions, and microstructures providing comprehensive information on the complex structure of these block copolymers. PMID:23722993

  9. Rational strategy for characterization of nanoscale particles by asymmetric-flow field flow fractionation: a tutorial.

    PubMed

    Gigault, Julien; Pettibone, John M; Schmitt, Charlène; Hackley, Vincent A

    2014-01-27

    This tutorial proposes a comprehensive and rational measurement strategy that provides specific guidance for the application of asymmetric-flow field flow fractionation (A4F) to the size-dependent separation and characterization of nanoscale particles (NPs) dispersed in aqueous media. A range of fractionation conditions are considered, and challenging applications, including industrially relevant materials (e.g., metal NPs, asymmetric NPs), are utilized in order to validate and illustrate this approach. We demonstrate that optimization is material dependent and that polystyrene NPs, widely used as a reference standard for retention calibration in A4F, in fact represent a class of materials with unique selectivity, recovery and optimal conditions for fractionation; thus use of these standards to calibrate retention for other materials must be validated a posteriori. We discuss the use and relevance of different detection modalities that can potentially yield multi-dimensional and complementary information on NP systems. We illustrate the fractionation of atomically precise nanoclusters, which are the lower limit of the nanoscale regime. Conversely, we address the upper size limit for normal mode elution in A4F. The protocol for A4F fractionation, including the methods described in the present work is proposed as a standardized strategy to realize interlaboratory comparability and to facilitate the selection and validation of material-specific measurement parameters and conditions. It is intended for both novice and advanced users of this measurement technology. PMID:24418128

  10. Field-flow fractionation of chromosomes. Final technical report, July 1, 1989--January 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Giddings, J.C.

    1993-04-01

    The first topic of this project involved the preparation, fractionation by sedimentation/steric Field Flow Fractionation (FFF), and modeling of metaphase chromosomes. After numerous unsuccessful attempts to prepare chromosomes, we have implemented a procedure (in collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory) to prepare metaphase chromosomes from Chinese hamster cells. Extensive experimentation was necessary to identify a suitable FFF channel surface to minimize chromosome adsorption and a carrier liquid to stabilize and disperse the chromosomes. Under suitable operating conditions, the Chinese hamster chromosomes were purified from cell debris and partially fractionated. The purified, preenriched chromosomes that can be prepared by sedimentation/steric FFF or produced continuously by continuous SPLITT fractionation provide an enriched feed material for subsequent flow cytometry. In the second project component, flow FFF permitted successful separations of single- from double-stranded circular DNA, double-stranded circular DNAs of various sizes, and linear double-stranded DNA fragments of various lengths. Diffusion coefficients extracted from retention data agreed well with literature data as well as predictions of major polymer theories. The capacity of FFF separations was evaluated to examine potential applications to long DNA chains.

  11. High Speed Size Sorting of Subcellular Organelles by Flow Field-Flow Fractionation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Joon Seon; Lee, Ju Yong; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2015-06-16

    Separation/isolation of subcellular species, such as mitochondria, lysosomes, peroxisomes, Golgi apparatus, and others, from cells is important for gaining an understanding of the cellular functions performed by specific organelles. This study introduces a high speed, semipreparative scale, biocompatible size sorting method for the isolation of subcellular organelle species from homogenate mixtures of HEK 293T cells using flow field-flow fractionation (FlFFF). Separation of organelles was achieved using asymmetrical FlFFF (AF4) channel system at the steric/hyperlayer mode in which nuclei, lysosomes, mitochondria, and peroxisomes were separated in a decreasing order of hydrodynamic diameter without complicated preprocessing steps. Fractions in which organelles were not clearly separated were reinjected to AF4 for a finer separation using the normal mode, in which smaller sized species can be well fractionated by an increasing order of diameter. The subcellular species contained in collected AF4 fractions were examined with scanning electron microscopy to evaluate their size and morphology, Western blot analysis using organelle specific markers was used for organelle confirmation, and proteomic analysis was performed with nanoflow liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (nLC-ESI-MS/MS). Since FlFFF operates with biocompatible buffer solutions, it offers great flexibility in handling subcellular components without relying on a high concentration sucrose solution for centrifugation or affinity- or fluorescence tag-based sorting methods. Consequently, the current study provides an alternative, competitive method for the isolation/purification of subcellular organelle species in their intact states. PMID:26005782

  12. Nanoparticle separation with a miniaturized asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation cartridge

    PubMed Central

    Müller, David; Cattaneo, Stefano; Meier, Florian; Welz, Roland; de Mello, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Asymmetrical Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4) is a separation technique applicable to particles over a wide size range. Despite the many advantages of AF4, its adoption in routine particle analysis is somewhat limited by the large footprint of currently available separation cartridges, extended analysis times and significant solvent consumption. To address these issues, we describe the fabrication and characterization of miniaturized AF4 cartridges. Key features of the down-scaled platform include simplified cartridge and reagent handling, reduced analysis costs and higher throughput capacities. The separation performance of the miniaturized cartridge is assessed using certified gold and silver nanoparticle standards. Analysis of gold nanoparticle populations indicates shorter analysis times and increased sensitivity compared to conventional AF4 separation schemes. Moreover, nanoparticulate titanium dioxide populations exhibiting broad size distributions are analyzed in a rapid and efficient manner. Finally, the repeatability and reproducibility of the miniaturized platform are investigated with respect to analysis time and separation efficiency. PMID:26258119

  13. Nanoparticle separation with a miniaturized asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation cartridge.

    PubMed

    Müller, David; Cattaneo, Stefano; Meier, Florian; Welz, Roland; de Mello, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Asymmetrical Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4) is a separation technique applicable to particles over a wide size range. Despite the many advantages of AF4, its adoption in routine particle analysis is somewhat limited by the large footprint of currently available separation cartridges, extended analysis times and significant solvent consumption. To address these issues, we describe the fabrication and characterization of miniaturized AF4 cartridges. Key features of the down-scaled platform include simplified cartridge and reagent handling, reduced analysis costs and higher throughput capacities. The separation performance of the miniaturized cartridge is assessed using certified gold and silver nanoparticle standards. Analysis of gold nanoparticle populations indicates shorter analysis times and increased sensitivity compared to conventional AF4 separation schemes. Moreover, nanoparticulate titanium dioxide populations exhibiting broad size distributions are analyzed in a rapid and efficient manner. Finally, the repeatability and reproducibility of the miniaturized platform are investigated with respect to analysis time and separation efficiency. PMID:26258119

  14. Nanoparticle separation with a miniaturized asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation cartridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, David; Cattaneo, Stefano; Meier, Florian; Welz, Roland; deMello, Andrew

    2015-07-01

    Asymmetrical Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4) is a separation technique applicable to particles over a wide size range. Despite the many advantages of AF4, its adoption in routine particle analysis is somewhat limited by the large footprint of currently available separation cartridges, extended analysis times and significant solvent consumption. To address these issues, we describe the fabrication and characterization of miniaturized AF4 cartridges. Key features of the scale-down platform include simplified cartridge and reagent handling, reduced analysis costs and higher throughput capacities. The separation performance of the miniaturized cartridge is assessed using certified gold and silver nanoparticle standards. Analysis of gold nanoparticle populations indicates shorter analysis times and increased sensitivity compared to conventional AF4 separation schemes. Moreover, nanoparticulate titanium dioxide populations exhibiting broad size distributions are analyzed in a rapid and efficient manner. Finally, the repeatability and reproducibility of the miniaturized platform are investigated with respect to analysis time and separation efficiency.

  15. Hydrodynamic chromatography and field flow fractionation in finite aspect ratio channels.

    PubMed

    Shendruk, T N; Slater, G W

    2014-04-25

    Hydrodynamic chromatography (HC) and field-flow fractionation (FFF) separation methods are often performed in 3D rectangular channels, though ideal retention theory assumes 2D systems. Devices are commonly designed with large aspect ratios; however, it can be unavoidable or desirable to design rectangular channels with small or even near-unity aspect ratios. To assess the significance of finite-aspect ratio effects and interpret experimental retention results, an ideal, analytical retention theory is needed. We derive a series solution for the ideal retention ratio of HC and FFF rectangular channels. Rather than limiting devices' ability to resolve samples, our theory predicts that retention curves for normal-mode FFF are well approximated by the infinite plate solution and that the performance of HC is actually improved. These findings suggest that FFF devices need not be designed with large aspect ratios and that rectangular HC channels are optimal when the aspect ratio is unity. PMID:24674643

  16. Factors affecting measurement of channel thickness in asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Dou, Haiyang; Jung, Euo Chang; Lee, Seungho

    2015-05-01

    Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) has been considered to be a useful tool for simultaneous separation and characterization of polydisperse macromolecules or colloidal nanoparticles. AF4 analysis requires the knowledge of the channel thickness (w), which is usually measured by injecting a standard with known diffusion coefficient (D) or hydrodynamic diameter (dh). An accurate w determination is a challenge due to its uncertainties arising from the membrane's compressibility, which may vary with experimental condition. In the present study, influence of factors including the size and type of the standard on the measurement of w was systematically investigated. The results revealed that steric effect and the particles-membrane interaction by van der Waals or electrostatic force may result in an error in w measurement. PMID:25817708

  17. Microfabrication of multi-layered electrodes for dielectrophoresis-based field flow fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Bobby; Alazzam, Anas; Khashan, Saud A.

    2015-06-01

    This article details the process layout required for realizing a three-dimensional arrangement of electrodes in a microfluidic device for field flow fractionation based on dielectrophoresis. The metal electrodes are placed horizontally, in a stair-case arrangement, and pass through the bulk of the fluid. Several standard microfabrication processes are employed, in realizing this microdevice, including multi-layer photolithography, casting and plasma bonding. Thus the process layout is repeatable and reproducible. The feasibility of this process layout is demonstrated using three electrodes arranged in aforementioned manner; nevertheless, this process can be extended to as many electrodes as desired in the horizontal direction. This process layout can will make applications possible that were not possible till date due to the inability in microfabricating three-dimensional horizontal metal electrodes that run through the entire width of the microchannel.

  18. A novel approach to improve operation and performance in flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Johann, Christoph; Elsenberg, Stephan; Roesch, Ulrich; Rambaldi, Diana C; Zattoni, Andrea; Reschiglian, Pierluigi

    2011-07-01

    A new system design and setup are proposed for the combined use of asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) and hollow-fiber flow field-flow fractionation (HF5) within the same instrumentation. To this purpose, three innovations are presented: (a) a new flow control scheme where focusing flow rates are measured in real time allowing to adjust the flow rate ratio as desired; (b) a new HF5 channel design consisting of two sets of ferrule, gasket and cap nut used to mount the fiber inside a tube. This design provides a mechanism for effective and straightforward sealing of the fiber; (c) a new AF4 channel design with only two fluid connections on the upper plate. Only one pump is needed to deliver the necessary flow rates. In the focusing/relaxation step the two parts of the focusing flow and a bypass flow flushing the detectors are created with two splits of the flow from the pump. In the elution mode the cross-flow is measured and controlled with a flow controller device. This leads to reduced pressure pulsations in the channel and improves signal to noise ratio in the detectors. Experimental results of the separation of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and of a mix of four proteins demonstrate a significant improvement in the HF5 separation performance, in terms of efficiency, resolution, and run-to-run reproducibility compared to what has been reported in the literature. Separation performance in HF5 mode is shown to be comparable to the performance in AF4 mode using a channel with two connections in the upper plate. PMID:21227436

  19. Electrochemical response and separation in cyclic electric field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi; Chauhan, Anuj

    2007-03-01

    Electric field-flow fractionation (EFFF) is a separation technique that couples a lateral electric field with axial Poiseuille flow to separate particles on the basis of size and/or mobility. In unidirectional EFFF, the field rapidly decreases in time due to charging of the double layer. The field strength could be increased by performing EFFF with cyclic electric fields. In cyclic electric field-flow fractionation (CEFFF), a periodic voltage, which can be either sinusoidal or square-wave, is applied in the lateral direction. In this paper, we measure the electrochemical response of CEFFF, i.e., the current-time response for a given time-dependent voltage and then utilize this electrochemical response in a transport model to predict separation. The CEFFF device studied here comprises two gold-coated glass plates separated by a spacer. The transient current profiles are measured for a step change and cyclic square-shaped voltage. The current profile is compared with the equivalent circuit model, and is fitted to a sum of two decaying exponentials. The dependence of the electrochemical response on voltage, frequency, channel thickness, and salt concentration is studied. Next, the electrochemical data are utilized in the convection-diffusion equation to develop a model for separation by CEFFF. The equations are solved by using a combination of analytical and numerical techniques to determine the mean velocity and the dispersion coefficient of molecules, and to determine the effect of various parameters on the separation efficiency of the EFFF device. Also, the model predictions are compared with experimental data available in the literature. PMID:17265539

  20. Depolymerization study of sodium hyaluronate by flow field-flow fractionation/multiangle light scattering.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ji Hye; Hwang, Euijin; Cho, Il-Hwan; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2009-09-01

    Thermal depolymerization of ultrahigh-molecular-weight (UHMW) sodium hyaluronate (NaHA) was studied systematically by using frit-inlet asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation/multiangle light scattering/differential refractive index (FI-AFlFFF/MALS/DRI). FI-AFlFFF was utilized for the size separation of NaHA samples which had been thermally degraded for varied treatment times, followed by light-scattering detection to determine MW and structural information of degraded NaHA products. Analysis of NaHA products showed time-dependent depolymerization of raw molecules into smaller-MW components, as well as unfolding of compact structures of UHMW NaHA. To determine whether the observed decrease in MW of sodium hyaluronate originated from the chain degradation of UHMW molecules or from dissociation of entangled complex particles that may have been formed by intermolecular association, narrow size fractions (1 x 10(7)-6 x 10(7) and >6 x 10(7) MW) of NaHA molecules were collected during FlFFF separation and followed by thermal treatment. Subsequent FI-AFlFFF/MALS analysis of collected fractions after thermal treatment suggested that the ultrahigh-MW region (>10(7) Da) of NaHA is likely to result from supermolecular structures formed by aggregation of large molecules. PMID:19649622

  1. Asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation of manufactured silver nanoparticles spiked into soil solution.

    PubMed

    Koopmans, G F; Hiemstra, T; Regelink, I C; Molleman, B; Comans, R N J

    2015-05-01

    Manufactured metallic silver nanoparticles (AgNP) are intensively utilized in consumer products and this will inevitably lead to their release to soils. To assess the environmental risks of AgNP in soils, quantification of both their concentration and size in soil solution is essential. We developed a methodology consisting of asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) in combination with on-line detection by UV-vis spectroscopy and off-line HR-ICP-MS measurements to quantify the concentration and size of AgNP, coated with either citrate or polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), in water extracts of three different soils. The type of mobile phase was a critical factor in the fractionation of AgNP by AF4. In synthetic systems, fractionation of a series of virgin citrate- and PVP-coated AgNP (10-90 nm) with reasonably high recoveries could only be achieved with ultrahigh purity water as a mobile phase. For the soil water extracts, 0.01% (w:v) sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) at pH 8 was the key to a successful fractionation of the AgNP. With SDS, the primary size of AgNP in all soil water extracts could be determined by AF4, except for PVP-coated AgNP when clay colloids were present. The PVP-coated AgNP interacted with colloidal clay minerals, leading to an overestimation of their primary size. Similar interactions between PVP-coated AgNP and clay colloids can take place in the environment and facilitate their transport in soils, aquifers, and surface waters. In conclusion, AF4 in combination with UV-vis spectroscopy and HR-ICP-MS measurements is a powerful tool to characterize AgNP in soil solution if the appropriate mobile phase is used. PMID:25798868

  2. Size characterization and quantification of exosomes by asymmetrical-flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Sitar, Simona; Kejžar, Anja; Pahovnik, David; Kogej, Ksenija; Tušek-Žnidarič, Magda; Lenassi, Metka; Žagar, Ema

    2015-09-15

    In the past few years extracellular vesicles called exosomes have gained huge interest of scientific community since they show a great potential for human diagnostic and therapeutic applications. However, an ongoing challenge is accurate size characterization and quantification of exosomes because of the lack of reliable characterization techniques. In this work, the emphasis was focused on a method development to size-separate, characterize, and quantify small amounts of exosomes by asymmetrical-flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) technique coupled to a multidetection system (UV and MALS). Batch DLS (dynamic light-scattering) and NTA (nanoparticle tracking analysis) analyses of unfractionated exosomes were also conducted to evaluate their shape and internal structure, as well as their number density. The results show significant influence of cross-flow conditions and channel thickness on fractionation quality of exosomes, whereas the focusing time has less impact. The AF4/UV-MALS and DLS results display the presence of two particles subpopulations, that is, the larger exosomes and the smaller vesicle-like particles, which coeluted in AF4 together with impurities in early eluting peak. Compared to DLS and AF4-MALS results, NTA somewhat overestimates the size and the number density for larger exosome population, but it discriminates the smaller particle population. PMID:26291637

  3. Retention ratio and nonequilibrium bandspreading in asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Williams, P Stephen

    2015-06-01

    In asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (As-FlFFF), only the membrane-covered accumulation wall is permeable to fluid; the opposite channel wall is impermeable. Fluid enters the channel at the inlet and exits partly through the membrane-covered accumulation wall and partly through the channel outlet. This means that not only does the volumetric channel flow rate decrease along the channel length as fluid exits through the membrane but also the cross-channel component to fluid velocity must approach zero at the impermeable wall. This dependence of cross-channel fluid velocity on distance across the channel thickness influences the equilibrium concentration profile for the sample components introduced to the channel. The concentration profile departs from the exponential profile predicted for the ideal model of field-flow fractionation. This influences both the retention ratio and the principal contribution to bandspreading--the nonequilibrium contribution. The derivation of an equation for the nonequilibrium bandspreading parameter χ in As-FlFFF is presented, and its numerical solution graphed. At high retention, it is shown that the solutions for both retention ratio R and χ converge on those for the ideal model, as expected. At lower levels of retention, the departures from the ideal model are significant, particularly for bandspreading. For example, at a level of retention corresponding to a retention parameter λ of 0.05, R is almost 4% higher than for the ideal model (0.28047 as compared to 0.27000) but the value of χ is almost 60% higher. The equations presented for both R and χ include a first-order correction for the finite size of the particles--the steric exclusion correction. These corrections are shown to be significant for particle sizes eluting well before steric inversion. For example, particles of half the inversion diameter are predicted to elute 25% slower and to show almost 40% higher bandspreading when steric effects are not accounted

  4. Optimization and evaluation of asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation of silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Loeschner, Katrin; Navratilova, Jana; Legros, Samuel; Wagner, Stephan; Grombe, Ringo; Snell, James; von der Kammer, Frank; Larsen, Erik H

    2013-01-11

    Asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF(4)) in combination with on-line optical detection and mass spectrometry is one of the most promising methods for separation and quantification of nanoparticles (NPs) in complex matrices including food. However, to obtain meaningful results regarding especially the NP size distribution a number of parameters influencing the separation need to be optimized. This paper describes the development of a separation method for polyvinylpyrrolidone-stabilized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in aqueous suspension. Carrier liquid composition, membrane material, cross flow rate and spacer height were shown to have a significant influence on the recoveries and retention times of the nanoparticles. Focus time and focus flow rate were optimized with regard to minimum elution of AgNPs in the void volume. The developed method was successfully tested for injected masses of AgNPs from 0.2 to 5.0 μg. The on-line combination of AF(4) with detection methods including ICP-MS, light absorbance and light scattering was helpful because each detector provided different types of information about the eluting NP fraction. Differences in the time-resolved appearance of the signals obtained by the three detection methods were explained based on the physical origin of the signal. Two different approaches for conversion of retention times of AgNPs to their corresponding sizes and size distributions were tested and compared, namely size calibration with polystyrene nanoparticles (PSNPs) and calculations of size based on AF(4) theory. Fraction collection followed by transmission electron microscopy was performed to confirm the obtained size distributions and to obtain further information regarding the AgNP shape. Characteristics of the absorbance spectra were used to confirm the presence of non-spherical AgNP. PMID:23261297

  5. Magnetic Nanoparticle Drug Carriers and their Study by Quadrupole Magnetic Field-Flow Fractionation

    PubMed Central

    Williams, P. Stephen; Carpino, Francesca; Zborowski, Maciej

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticle drug carriers continue to attract considerable interest for drug targeting in the treatment of cancers and other pathological conditions. The efficient delivery of therapeutic levels of drug to a target site while limiting nonspecific, systemic toxicity requires optimization of the drug delivery materials, the applied magnetic field, and the treatment protocol. The history and current state of magnetic drug targeting is reviewed. While initial studies involved micron-sized and larger carriers, and work with these microcarriers continues, it is the sub-micron carriers or nanocarriers that are of increasing interest. An aspect of magnetic drug targeting using nanoparticle carriers that has not been considered is then addressed. This aspect involves the variation in the magnetic properties of the nanocarriers. Quadrupole magnetic field-flow fractionation (QMgFFF) is a relatively new technique for characterizing magnetic nanoparticles. It is unique in its capability of determining the distribution in magnetic properties of a nanoparticle sample in suspension. The development and current state of this technique is also reviewed. Magnetic nanoparticle drug carriers have been found by QMgFFF analysis to be highly polydisperse in their magnetic properties, and the strength of response of the particles to magnetic field gradients is predicted to vary by orders of magnitude. It is expected that the least magnetic fraction of a formulation will contribute the most to systemic toxicity, and the depletion of this fraction will result in a more effective drug carrying material. A material that has a reduced systemic toxicity will allow higher doses of cytotoxic drugs to be delivered to the tumor with reduced side effects. Preliminary experiments involving a novel method of refining a magnetic nanoparticle drug carrier to achieve this result are described. QMgFFF is used to characterize the refined and unrefined material. PMID:19591456

  6. Separation and characterization of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) latex particles by asymmetric flow field flow fractionation with light-scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Collins, Melissa E; Soto-Cantu, Erick; Cueto, Rafael; Russo, Paul S

    2014-04-01

    Poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) latex particles have been analyzed and sorted according to size using asymmetric flow field flow fractionation (AF4) coupled with multiple-angle light scattering (MALS). Characterization of fractions by regular and depolarized dynamic light scattering confirmed that smaller particles elute prior to larger ones, as expected for field flow fractionation. The measured radii of the optically and geometrically anisotropic particles are consistent with those determined from transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A certain amount of heterogeneity remains in the fractions, but their uniformity for use as diffusion probes is improved. Full characterization of PTFE colloids will require a difficult assessment of the distribution, even within fractions, of the optical anisotropy. A general method to obtain number versus size distributions is presented. This approach is valid even when an online concentration detector is not available or ineffective. The procedure is adaptable to particles of almost any regular shape. PMID:24635125

  7. Use of secondary equilibria for the separation of small solutes by field-flow fractionation

    SciTech Connect

    Berthod, A.; Armstrong, D.W.; Myers, M.N.; Giddings, J.C.

    1988-10-01

    The dynamic range and selectivity of field-flow fractionation (FFF) can be increased by using secondary chemical equilibria (SCE). SCE are established by adding a macromolecular additive or aggregate, which strongly interacts with the field, to the carrier solution. In this study an oil-in-water (O/W) microemulsion was used as the carrier solution in a sedimentation FFF apparatus. The microemulsion droplets (referred to as the support) interact with the field and are retained relative to the bulk water. Small solutes that partition or bind to the microemulsion droplets are also retained relative to solutes that do not interact with the support. In this way it is possible to separate somewhat polar compounds, such as ascorbic acid and sodium benzoate, which prefer bulk water, from apolar solutes, such as toluene, which prefers the support. In addition, the study of retention times in this system allows one to calculate the average microemulsion droplet radius. It appears that SCE-FFF could be a useful way to obtain important information on the physicochemical properties of a variety of colloidal supports.

  8. Effect of asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation channel geometry on separation efficiency.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Ji Yeon; Kim, Ki Hun; Lee, Ju Yong; Williams, P Stephen; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2010-06-11

    The separation efficiencies of three different asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) channel designs were evaluated using polystyrene latex standards. Channel breadth was held constant for one channel (rectangular profile), and was reduced either linearly (trapezoidal profile) or exponentially (exponential profile) along the length for the other two. The effective void volumes of the three channel types were designed to be equivalent. Theoretically, under certain flow conditions, the mean channel flow velocity of the exponential channel could be arranged to remain constant along the channel length, thereby improving separation in AF4. Particle separation obtained with the exponential channel was compared with particle separation obtained with the trapezoidal and rectangular channels. We demonstrated that at a certain flow rate condition (outflow/inflow rate=0.2), the exponential channel design indeed provided better performance with respect to the separation of polystyrene nanoparticles in terms of reducing band broadening. While the trapezoidal channel exhibited a little poorer performance than the exponential, the strongly decreasing mean flow velocity in the rectangular channel resulted in serious band broadening, a delay in retention time, and even failure of larger particles to elute. PMID:20439106

  9. Simple functionalization strategies for enhancing nanoparticle separation and recovery with asymmetric flow field flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Mudalige, Thilak K; Qu, Haiou; Sánchez-Pomales, Germarie; Sisco, Patrick N; Linder, Sean W

    2015-02-01

    Due to the increasing use of engineered nanomaterials in consumer products, regulatory agencies and other research organizations have determined that the development of robust, reliable, and accurate methodologies to characterize nanoparticles in complex matrices is a top priority. Of particular interest are methods that can separate and determine the size of nanomaterials in samples that contain polydisperse and/or multimodal nanoparticle populations. Asymmetric-flow field flow fractionation (AF4) has shown promise for the separation of nanoparticles with wide size range distributions; however, low analyte recoveries and decreased membrane lifetimes, due to membrane fouling, have limited its application. Herein, we report straightforward strategies to minimize membrane fouling and improve nanoparticle recovery by functionalizing the surface of the nanoparticles, as well as that of the AF4 membranes. Gold nanoparticles (AuNP) were stabilized through functionalization with a phosphine molecule, whereas the surface of the membranes was coated with a negatively charged polystyrenesulfonate polymer. Improved nanoparticle separation, recoveries of 99.1 (±0.5) %, and a detection limit of 6 μg/kg were demonstrated by analyzing AuNP reference materials of different sizes (e.g., 10, 30, and 60 nm), obtained from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Furthermore, the stability of the polymer coating and its specificity toward minimizing membrane fouling were demonstrated. PMID:25556296

  10. A theory-based approach to thermal field-flow fractionation of polyacrylates.

    PubMed

    Runyon, J Ray; Williams, S Kim Ratanathanawongs

    2011-09-28

    A theory-based approach is presented for the development of thermal field-flow fractionation (ThFFF) of polyacrylates. The use of ThFFF for polymer analysis has been limited by an incomplete understanding of the thermal diffusion which plays an important role in retention and separation. Hence, a tedious trial-and-error approach to method development has been the normal practice when analyzing new materials. In this work, thermal diffusion theories based on temperature dependent osmotic pressure gradient and polymer-solvent interaction parameters were used to estimate thermal diffusion coefficients (D(T)) and retention times (t(r)) for different polymer-solvent pairs. These calculations identified methyl ethyl ketone as a solvent that would cause significant retention of poly(n-butyl acrylate) (PBA) and poly(methyl acrylate) (PMA). Experiments confirmed retention of these two polymers that have not been previously analyzed by ThFFF. Theoretical and experimental D(T)s and t(r)s for PBA, PMA, and polystyrene in different solvents agreed to within 20% and demonstrate the feasibility of this theory-based approach. PMID:21872869

  11. Flow field-flow fractionation for the analysis of nanoparticles used in drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Zattoni, Andrea; Roda, Barbara; Borghi, Francesco; Marassi, Valentina; Reschiglian, Pierluigi

    2014-01-01

    Structured nanoparticles (NPs) with controlled size distribution and novel physicochemical features present fundamental advantages as drug delivery systems with respect to bulk drugs. NPs can transport and release drugs to target sites with high efficiency and limited side effects. Regulatory institutions such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Commission have pointed out that major limitations to the real application of current nanotechnology lie in the lack of homogeneous, pure and well-characterized NPs, also because of the lack of well-assessed, robust routine methods for their quality control and characterization. Many properties of NPs are size-dependent, thus the particle size distribution (PSD) plays a fundamental role in determining the NP properties. At present, scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) are among the most used techniques to size characterize NPs. Size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) is also applied to the size separation of complex NP samples. SEC selectivity is, however, quite limited for very large molar mass analytes such as NPs, and interactions with the stationary phase can alter NP morphology. Flow field-flow fractionation (F4) is increasingly used as a mature separation method to size sort and characterize NPs in native conditions. Moreover, the hyphenation with light scattering (LS) methods can enhance the accuracy of size analysis of complex samples. In this paper, the applications of F4-LS to NP analysis used as drug delivery systems for their size analysis, and the study of stability and drug release effects are reviewed. PMID:24012480

  12. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation for the analysis of PEG-asparaginase.

    PubMed

    John, C; Herz, T; Boos, J; Langer, K; Hempel, G

    2016-01-01

    Monomethoxypolyethylene glycol L-asparaginase (PEG-ASNASE) is the PEGylated version of the enzyme L-asparaginase (ASNASE). Both are used for remission induction in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). The treatment control is generally carried out by performing activity assays, though methods to determine the actual enzyme rather than its activity are rare. Using asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) offered the chance to develop a method capable of simultaneously measuring PEG-ASNASE and PEG. A method validation was performed in accordance with FDA guidelines for PEG-ASNASE from non-biological solutions. The method unfolded a linearity of 15-750 U/mL with coefficients of correlation of r(2)>0.99. The coefficients of variation (CV) for within-run and between-run variability were 1.18-10.15% and 2.43-8.73%, respectively. Furthermore, the method was used to perform stability tests of the product Oncaspar® (PEG-ASNASE) and estimation of the molecular weight by multi-angle light scattering (MALS) of stressed samples to correlate them with the corresponding activity. The findings indicate that Oncaspar® stock solution should not be stored any longer than 24 h at room temperature and cannot be frozen in pure aqueous media. The validated method might be useful for the pharmaceutical industry and its quality control of PEG-ASNASE production. PMID:26695272

  13. Iron-rich colloids as carriers of phosphorus in streams: A field-flow fractionation study.

    PubMed

    Baken, Stijn; Regelink, Inge C; Comans, Rob N J; Smolders, Erik; Koopmans, Gerwin F

    2016-08-01

    Colloidal phosphorus (P) may represent an important fraction of the P in natural waters, but these colloids remain poorly characterized. In this work, we demonstrate the applicability of asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) coupled to high resolution ICP-MS for the characterization of low concentrations of P-bearing colloids. Colloids from five streams draining catchments with contrasting properties were characterized by AF4-ICP-MS and by membrane filtration. All streams contain free humic substances (2-3 nm) and Fe-bearing colloids (3-1200 nm). Two soft water streams contain primary Fe oxyhydroxide-humic nanoparticles (3-6 nm) and aggregates thereof (up to 150 nm). In contrast, three harder water streams contain larger aggregates (40-1200 nm) which consist of diverse associations between Fe oxyhydroxides, humic substances, clay minerals, and possibly ferric phosphate minerals. Despite the diversity of colloids encountered in these contrasting streams, P is in most of the samples predominantly associated with Fe-bearing colloids (mostly Fe oxyhydroxides) at molar P:Fe ratios between 0.02 and 1.5. The molar P:Fe ratio of the waters explains the partitioning of P between colloids and truly dissolved species. Waters with a high P:Fe ratio predominantly contain truly dissolved species because the Fe-rich colloids are saturated with P, whereas waters with a low P:Fe ratio mostly contain colloidal P species. Overall, AF4-ICP-MS is a suitable technique to characterize the diverse P-binding colloids in natural waters. Such colloids may increase the mobility or decrease the bioavailability of P, and they therefore need to be considered when addressing the transport and environmental effects of P in catchments. PMID:27140905

  14. Osmolarity effects on red blood cell elution in sedimentation field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Assidjo, N E; Chianéa, T; Clarot, I; Dreyfuss, M F; Cardot, P J

    1999-07-01

    Field-flow fractionation (FFF) is an analytical technique particularly suitable for the separation, isolation, and characterization of macromolecules and micrometer- or submicrometer-sized particles. This chromatographic-like methodology can modulate the retention of micron-sized species according to an elution mode described to date as "steric hyperlayer". In such a model, differences in sample species size, density, or other physical parameters make particle selective elution possible depending on the configuration and the operating conditions of the FFF system. Elution characteristics of micron-sized particles of biological origin, such as cells, can be modified using media and carrier phases of different osmolarities. In these media, a cells average size, density, and shape are modified. Therefore, systematic studies of a single reference cell population, red blood cells (RBCs), are performed with 2 sedimentation FFF systems using either gravity (GrFFF) or a centrifugational field (SdFFF). However, in all cases, normal erythrocyte in isotonic suspension elutes as a single peak when fractionated in these systems. With carrier phases of different osmolarities, FFF elution characteristics of RBCs are modified. Retention modifications are qualitatively consistent with the "steric-hyperlayer" model. Such systematic studies confirm the key role of size, density, and shape in the elution mode of RBCs in sedimentation FFF for living, micronsized biological species. Using polymers as an analogy, the RBC population is described as highly "polydisperse". However, this definition must be reconsidered depending on the parameters under concern, leading to a matricial concept: multipolydispersity. It is observed that multipolydispersity modifications of a given RBC population are qualitatively correlated to the eluted sample band width. PMID:10422264

  15. Determining Aqueous Fullerene Particle Size Distributions by Asymmetric Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4) without Surfactants

    EPA Science Inventory

    To determine the behavior of nanoparticles in environmental systems, methods must be developed to measure nanoparticle size. Asymmetric Flow Field Flow Fractionation (AF4) is an aqueous compatible size separation technique which is able to separate particles from 1 nm to 10 µm in...

  16. On the no-field method for void time determination in flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Martin, Michel; Hoyos, Mauricio

    2011-07-01

    Elution time measurements of colloidal particles injected in a symmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (flow FFF) system when the inlet and outlet cross-flow connections are closed have been performed. This no-field method has been proposed earlier for void time (and void volume) determination in flow FFF Giddings et al. (1977). The elution times observed were much larger than expected on the basis of the channel geometrical volume and the flow rate. In order to explain these discrepancies, a flow model allowing the carrier liquid to flow through the porous walls toward the reservoirs located behind the porous elements and along these reservoirs was developed. The ratio between the observed elution time and expected one is found to depend only on a parameter which is a function of the effective permeability and thickness of the porous elements and of the channel thickness and length. The permeabilities of the frits used in the system were measured. Their values lead to predicted elution times in reasonable agreement with experimental ones, taking into account likely membrane protrusion inside the channel on system assembly. They comfort the basic feature of the flow model, in the no-field case. The carrier liquid mostly bypasses the channel to flow along the system mainly in the reservoir. It flows through the porous walls toward the reservoirs near channel inlet and again through the porous walls from the reservoirs to the channel near channel outlet before exiting the system. In order to estimate the extent of this bypassing process, it is desirable that the hydrodynamic characteristics of the permeable elements (permeability and thickness) are provided by flow FFF manufacturers. The model applies to symmetrical as well as asymmetrical flow FFF systems. PMID:21256498

  17. Quantum dot agglomerates in biological media and their characterization by asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Moquin, Alexandre; Neibert, Kevin D; Maysinger, Dusica; Winnik, Françoise M

    2015-01-01

    The molecular composition of the biological environment of nanoparticles influences their physical properties and changes their pristine physicochemical identity. In order to understand, or predict, the interactions of cells with specific nanoparticles, it is critical to know their size, shape, and agglomeration state not only in their nascent state but also in biological media. Here, we use asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) with on-line multiangle light scattering (MALS), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and UV-Visible absorption detections to determine the relative concentration of isolated nanoparticles and agglomerates in the case of three types of semi-conductor quantum dots (QDs) dispersed in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Media (DMEM) containing 10% of fetal bovine serum (DMEM-FBS). AF4 analysis also yielded the size and size distribution of the agglomerates as a function of the time of QDs incubation in DMEM-FBS. The preferred modes of internalization of the QDs are assessed for three cell-types, N9 microglia, human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2) and human embryonic kidney cells (Hek293), by confocal fluorescence imaging of live cells, quantitative determination of the intracellular QD concentration, and flow cytometry. There is an excellent correlation between the agglomeration status of the three types of QDs in DMEM-FBS determined by AF4 analysis and their preferred mode of uptake by the three cell lines, which suggests that AF4 yields an accurate description of the nanoparticles as they encounter cells and advocates its use as a means to characterize particles under evaluation. PMID:25542679

  18. Quantifying uranium complexation by groundwater dissolved organic carbon using asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranville, James F.; Hendry, M. Jim; Reszat, Thorsten N.; Xie, Qianli; Honeyman, Bruce D.

    2007-05-01

    The long-term mobility of actinides in groundwaters is important for siting nuclear waste facilities and managing waste-rock piles at uranium mines. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) may influence the mobility of uranium, but few field-based studies have been undertaken to examine this in typical groundwaters. In addition, few techniques are available to isolate DOC and directly quantify the metals complexed to it. Determination of U-organic matter association constants from analysis of field-collected samples compliments laboratory measurements, and these constants are needed for accurate transport calculations. The partitioning of U to DOC in a clay-rich aquitard was investigated in 10 groundwater samples collected between 2 and 30 m depths at one test site. A positive correlation was observed between the DOC (4-132 mg/L) and U concentrations (20-603 μg/L). The association of U and DOC was examined directly using on-line coupling of Asymmetrical Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AsFlFFF) with UV absorbance (UVA) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) detectors. This method has the advantages of utilizing very small sample volumes (20-50 μL) as well as giving molecular weight information on U-organic matter complexes. AsFlFFF-UVA results showed that 47-98% of the DOC (4-136 mg C/L) was recovered in the AsFlFFF analysis, of which 25-64% occurred in the resolvable peak. This peak corresponded to a weight-average molecular weight of about 900-1400 Daltons (Da). In all cases, AsFlFFF-ICP-MS suggested that ≤ 2% of the U, likely present as U(VI), was complexed with the DOC. This result was in good agreement with the U speciation modeling performed on the sample taken from the 2.3 m depth, which predicted approximately 3% DOC-complexed U. This good agreement suggests that the AsFlFFF-ICP-MS method may be very useful for determining U-organic matter association in small volume samples. Because the pH (7.0-8.1) and carbonate concentrations of these waters

  19. Advanced analysis of polymer emulsions: Particle size and particle size distribution by field-flow fractionation and dynamic light scattering.

    PubMed

    Makan, Ashwell C; Spallek, Markus J; du Toit, Madeleine; Klein, Thorsten; Pasch, Harald

    2016-04-15

    Field flow fractionation (FFF) is an advanced fractionation technique for the analyses of very sensitive particles. In this study, different FFF techniques were used for the fractionation and analysis of polymer emulsions/latexes. As model systems, a pure acrylic emulsion and emulsions containing titanium dioxide were prepared and analyzed. An acrylic emulsion polymerization was conducted, continuously sampled from the reactor and subsequently analyzed to determine the particle size, radius of gyration in specific, of the latex particles throughout the polymerization reaction. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) and sedimentation field-flow fractionation (SdFFF), coupled to a multidetector system, multi-angle laser light scattering (MALLS), ultraviolet (UV) and refractive index (RI), respectively, were used to investigate the evolution of particle sizes and particle size distributions (PSDs) as the polymerization progressed. The obtained particle sizes were compared against batch-mode dynamic light scattering (DLS). Results indicated differences between AF4 and DLS results due to DLS taking hydration layers into account, whereas both AF4 and SdFFF were coupled to MALLS detection, hence not taking the hydration layer into account for size determination. SdFFF has additional separation capabilities with a much higher resolution compared to AF4. The calculated radii values were 5 nm larger for SdFFF measurements for each analyzed sample against the corresponding AF4 values. Additionally a low particle size shoulder was observed for SdFFF indicating bimodality in the reactor very early during the polymerization reaction. Furthermore, different emulsions were mixed with inorganic species used as additives in cosmetics and coatings such as TiO2. These complex mixtures of species were analyzed to investigate the retention and particle interaction behavior under different AF4 experimental conditions, such as the mobile phase. The AF4 system was coupled online

  20. Characterization of colloidal phosphorus species in drainage waters from a clay soil using asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Regelink, Inge C; Koopmans, Gerwin F; van der Salm, Caroline; Weng, Liping; van Riemsdijk, Willem H

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorus transport from agricultural land contributes to eutrophication of surface waters. Pipe drain and trench waters from a grassland field on a heavy clay soil in the Netherlands were sampled before and after manure application. Phosphorus speciation was analyzed by physicochemical P fractionation, and the colloidal P fraction in the dissolved fraction (<0.45 μm) was analyzed by asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) coupled to high-resolution inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and ultraviolet diode array detector. When no manure was applied for almost 7 mo, total P (TP) concentrations were low (<21 μmol L), and TP was almost evenly distributed among dissolved reactive P (DRP), dissolved unreactive P (DUP), and particulate P (PP). Total P concentrations increased by a factor of 60 and 4 when rainfall followed shortly after application of cattle slurry or its solid fraction, respectively. Under these conditions, DRP contributed 50% or more to TP. The P speciation within the DUP and PP fractions varied among the different sampling times. Phosphorus associated with dissolved organic matter, probably via cation bridging, comprised a small fraction of DUP at all sampling times. Colloidal P coeluted with clay particles when P application was withheld for almost 7 mo and after application of the solid cattle slurry fraction. At these sampling times, PP correlated well with particulate Fe, Al, and Si, indicating that P is associated with colloidal clay particles. After cattle slurry application, part of DUP was probably present as phospholipids. Physicochemical fractionation combined with AF4 analysis is a promising tool to unravel the speciation of colloidal P in environmental water samples. PMID:23673839

  1. Dielectrophoretic separation of bioparticles in microdevices: a review.

    PubMed

    Jubery, Talukder Z; Srivastava, Soumya K; Dutta, Prashanta

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, dielectrophoretic force has been used to manipulate colloids, inert particles, and biological microparticles, such as red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets, cancer cells, bacteria, yeast, microorganisms, proteins, DNA, etc. This specific electrokinetic technique has been used for trapping, sorting, focusing, filtration, patterning, assembly, and separating biological entities/particles suspended in a buffer medium. Dielectrophoretic forces acting on particles depend on various parameters, for example, charge of the particle, geometry of the device, dielectric constant of the medium and particle, and physiology of the particle. Therefore, to design an effective micro-/nanofluidic separation platform, it is necessary to understand the role of the aforementioned parameters on particle motion. In this paper, we review studies particularly related to dielectrophoretic separation in microfluidic devices. Both experimental and theoretical works by several researchers are highlighted in this article covering AC and DC DEP. In addition, AC/DC DEP, which uses a combination of low frequency AC and DC voltage to manipulate bioparticles, has been discussed briefly. Contactless DEP, a variation of DC DEP in which electrodes do not come in contact with particles, has also been reviewed. Moreover, dielectrophoretic force-based field flow fractionations are featured to demonstrate the bioparticle separation in microfluidic device. In numerical front, a comprehensive review is provided starting from the most simplified effective moment Stokes-drag (EMSD) method to the most advanced interface resolved method. Unlike EMSD method, recently developed advanced numerical methods consider the size and shape of the particle in the electric and flow field calculations, and these methods provide much more accurate results than the EMSD method for microparticles. PMID:24338825

  2. New Method for Sorting Endothelial and Neural Progenitors from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells by Sedimentation Field Flow Fractionation.

    PubMed

    Faye, Pierre-Antoine; Vedrenne, Nicolas; De la Cruz-Morcillo, Miguel A; Barrot, Claire-Cécile; Richard, Laurence; Bourthoumieu, Sylvie; Sturtz, Franck; Funalot, Benoît; Lia, Anne-Sophie; Battu, Serge

    2016-07-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSc) are a very useful solution to create and observe the behavior of specific and usually inaccessible cells, such as human motor neurons. Obtained from a patient biopsy by reprograming dermal fibroblasts (DF), hiPSc present the same properties as embryonic stem cells and can generate any cell type after several weeks of differentiation. Today, there are numerus protocols which aim to control hiPSC differentiation. The principal challenge is to obtain a sufficiently enriched specific cell population to study disease pathophysiology and to provide a good model for further investigation and drug screening. The differentiation process is very costly and time-consuming, because many specific factors and different culture media must be used. In this study, we used Sedimentation Field Flow Fractionation (SdFFF) to prepare enriched populations derived from hiPSc after only 10 days of culture in a classical medium. Based on phenotypic and proteomic characterization, "hyperlayer" elution resulted in a fraction expressing markers of endothelial progenitors while another fraction expressed markers of neural progenitors. The isolation of subpopulations representing various differentiation lineages is of major interest for the production of specialized, cell-enriched fractions and in the preparation of increasingly complex models for the development of new therapeutic tools. PMID:27263863

  3. Field-flow fractionation of chromosomes. Progress report, July 1, 1989--January 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Giddings, J.C.

    1991-09-01

    The work done on this project is divided into two principal areas. The first involves the application of sedimentation/steric FFF to metaphase chromosomes in an attempt to fractionate the chromosomes according to their size. The preparation of chromosomes from a number of organisms was attempted; procedures were finally worked out in collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory for the preparation of metaphase chromosomes from Chinese hamster cells. After extensive experimental work was done to identify suitable operating conditions, the partial fractionation of the Chinese hamster chromosomes was achieved. In the second component of the project, flow FFF was applied to the separation of DNA fragments. Figures are provided that show considerable success in the separation of plasmid digests and in the separation of single from double stranded DNA under 10{sup 4} base pairs. Preliminary work was done on DNA fragments having a size greater than 10{sup 4} base pairs. This work has served to establish the inversion point for DNA.

  4. Molecular characterization of solution styrene-butadiene rubber: thermal field-flow fractionation/multi-angle light scattering studies.

    PubMed

    Choi, You Jin; Kim, Sun Tae; Lee, Seung Hwa; Kim, A-Ju; Kwag, Gwanghoon; Lee, Seungho

    2013-11-01

    Solution styrene-butadiene rubber (SSBR) is mainly constituted of a random copolymer of styrene and butadiene. SSBR usually contains microgels, having ultrahigh molecular weight (M>10(7)g/mol), affecting rheological properties of the rubber. Thus, determinations of M and size distribution of these microgels are critical in performance evaluation and control for SSBR. We employ thermal field-flow fractionation (ThFFF), combined with online multi-angle light scattering (MALS), as most suited for characterization of solutions containing the microgels since they can be characterized in toto without removing the microgels from the solution. ThFFF-MALS was applied for characterization of linear and branched SBR materials from various commercial sources, and the results were compared to those from size-exclusion chromatography (SEC). ThFFF provides higher resolution than SEC for high molecular fractions and allowed gel content to be measured. The gel content was determined by subtracting the amount of sol from total injection mass, and was measured to be 10-15%. We infer from the characterization results that the microgel content may not be correlated to the microstructure, the styrene and vinyl content of butadiene but to the fraction of high molecular weight in SSBR. Finally, the macromolecular structure and the content of microgel (larger than about 100nm) were found to significantly affect various rheological parameters such as viscosity, mechanical and dynamic properties. PMID:24063984

  5. A critical evaluation of an asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation system for colloidal size characterization of natural organic matter.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhengzhen; Guo, Laodong

    2015-06-19

    Colloidal retention characteristics, recovery and size distribution of model macromolecules and natural dissolved organic matter (DOM) were systematically examined using an asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AFlFFF) system under various membrane size cutoffs and carrier solutions. Polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) standards with known molecular weights (MW) were used to determine their permeation and recovery rates by membranes with different nominal MW cutoffs (NMWCO) within the AFlFFF system. Based on a ≥90% recovery rate for PSS standards by the AFlFFF system, the actual NMWCOs were determined to be 1.9 kDa for the 0.3 kDa membrane, 2.7 kDa for the 1 kDa membrane, and 33 kDa for the 10 kDa membrane, respectively. After membrane calibration, natural DOM samples were analyzed with the AFlFFF system to determine their colloidal size distribution and the influence from membrane NMWCOs and carrier solutions. Size partitioning of DOM samples showed a predominant colloidal size fraction in the <5 nm or <10 kDa size range, consistent with the size characteristics of humic substances as the main terrestrial DOM component. Recovery of DOM by the AFlFFF system, as determined by UV-absorbance at 254 nm, decreased significantly with increasing membrane NMWCO, from 45% by the 0.3 kDa membrane to 2-3% by the 10 kDa membrane. Since natural DOM is mostly composed of lower MW substances (<10 kDa) and the actual membrane cutoffs are normally larger than their manufacturer ratings, a 0.3 kDa membrane (with an actual NMWCO of 1.9 kDa) is highly recommended for colloidal size characterization of natural DOM. Among the three carrier solutions, borate buffer seemed to provide the highest recovery and optimal separation of DOM. Rigorous calibration with macromolecular standards and optimization of system conditions are a prerequisite for quantifying colloidal size distribution using the flow field-flow fractionation technique. In addition, the coupling of AFlFFF with fluorescence

  6. Application of flow field-flow fractionation for the characterization of macromolecules of biological interest: a review

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Rashid Nazir

    2010-01-01

    An overview is given of the recent literature on (bio) analytical applications of flow field-flow fractionation (FlFFF). FlFFF is a liquid-phase separation technique that can separate macromolecules and particles according to size. The technique is increasingly used on a routine basis in a variety of application fields. In food analysis, FlFFF is applied to determine the molecular size distribution of starches and modified celluloses, or to study protein aggregation during food processing. In industrial analysis, it is applied for the characterization of polysaccharides that are used as thickeners and dispersing agents. In pharmaceutical and biomedical laboratories, FlFFF is used to monitor the refolding of recombinant proteins, to detect aggregates of antibodies, or to determine the size distribution of drug carrier particles. In environmental studies, FlFFF is used to characterize natural colloids in water streams, and especially to study trace metal distributions over colloidal particles. In this review, first a short discussion of the state of the art in instrumentation is given. Developments in the coupling of FlFFF to various detection modes are then highlighted. Finally, application studies are discussed and ordered according to the type of (bio) macromolecules or bioparticles that are fractionated. PMID:20957473

  7. Characterization of sodium hyaluronate blends using frit inlet asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation and multiangle light scattering.

    PubMed

    Ali, Muhammad; Hwang, Euijin; Cho, Il-Hwan; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2012-01-01

    We characterized ultrahigh molecular weight sodium hyaluronate (NaHA) and blended pharmaceutical products containing NaHA using flow field-flow fractionation and multiangle light scattering-differential refractive index (FlFFF-MALS-DRI). NaHA is a water-soluble polysaccharide with a range of molecular weights (MW; 10(5)~10(8) Da) that is found in body fluids and tissues. NaHA is also used commercially in pharmaceutical and cosmetic applications. We used a frit inlet asymmetrical FlFFF channel to separate aqueous polymers according to their hydrodynamic size, and we used on-line measurements of light scattering to obtain the MW distribution (MWD) as well as structural information about NaHA in aqueous solution. In this study, we investigated NaHA and anti-adhesive blend mixtures of NaHA (a commercial NaHA blend mixture containing sodium carboxymethyl cellulose and a new blend with hydroxyethyl starch (HES)) to determine the molecular weight distribution MWD of NaHA and the blend mixtures and to obtain structural information about these compounds in aqueous solution. We also examined the characteristics of NaHA-HES-polylactic-co-glycolic acid film products exposed to gamma radiation for sterilization purposes. PMID:22101460

  8. Complementary use of flow and sedimentation field-flow fractionation techniques for size characterizing biodegradable poly(lactic acid) nanospheres

    PubMed Central

    Contado, Catia; Dalpiaz, Alessandro; Leo, Eliana; Zborowski, Maciej; Williams, P. Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Poly(lactic acid) nanoparticles were synthesized using a modified evaporation method, testing two different surfactants (sodium cholate and Pluronic F68) for the process. During their formulation the prodrug 5′-octanoyl-CPA (Oct-CPA) of the antiischemic N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) was encapsulated. Three different purification methods were compared with respect to the influence of surfactant on the size characteristics of the final nanoparticle product. Flow and sedimentation field-flow fractionation techniques (FlFFF and SdFFF, respectively) were used to size characterize the five poly(lactic acid) particle samples. Two different combinations of carrier solution (mobile phase) were employed in the FlFFF analyses, while a solution of poly(vinyl alcohol) was used as mobile phase for the SdFFF runs. The separation performances of the two techniques were compared and the particle size distributions, derived from the fractograms, were interpreted with the support of observations by scanning electron microscopy. Some critical aspects, such as the carrier choice and the channel thickness determination for the FlFFF, have been investigated. This is the first comprehensive comparison of the two FFF techniques for characterizing non standard particulate materials. The two FFF techniques proved to be complementary and gave good, congruent and very useful information on the size distributions of the five poly(lactic acid) particle samples. PMID:17482199

  9. Study on steric transition in asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation and application to characterization of high-energy material.

    PubMed

    Dou, Haiyang; Lee, Yong-Ju; Jung, Euo Chang; Lee, Byung-Chul; Lee, Seungho

    2013-08-23

    In field-flow fractionation (FFF), there is the 'steric transition' phenomenon where the sample elution mode changes from the normal to steric/hyperlayer mode. Accurate analysis by FFF requires understanding of the steric transition phenomenon, particularly when the sample has a broad size distribution, for which the effect by combination of different modes may become complicated to interpret. In this study, the steric transition phenomenon in asymmetrical flow FFF (AF4) was studied using polystyrene (PS) latex beads. The retention ratio (R) gradually decreases as the particle size increases (normal mode) and reaches a minimum (Ri) at diameter around 0.5μm, after which R increases with increasing diameter (steric/hyperlayer mode). It was found that the size-based selectivity (Sd) tends to increase as the channel thickness (w) increases. The retention behavior of cyclo-1,3,5-trimethylene-2,4,6-trinitramine (commonly called 'research department explosive' (RDX)) particles in AF4 was investigated by varying experimental parameters including w and flow rates. AF4 showed a good reproducibility in size determination of RDX particles with the relative standard deviation of 4.1%. The reliability of separation obtained by AF4 was evaluated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). PMID:23871284

  10. Effects of comprehensive function of factors on retention behavior of microparticles in gravitational field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shuang; Qiu, Bai-Ling; Zhu, Chen-Qi; Yang, Ya-Ya Gao; Wu, Di; Liang, Qi-Hui; Han, Nan-Yin

    2016-09-15

    Gravitational field-flow fractionation (GrFFF) is a useful technique for separation and characterization for micrometer-sized particles. Elution behavior of micrometer-sized particles in GrFFF was researched in this study. Particles in GrFFF channel are subject to hydrodynamic lift forces (HLF), fluid inertial forces and gravity, which drive them to different velocities by carrier flow, resulting in a size-based separation. Effects of ionic strength, flow rate and viscosity as well as methanol were investigated using polystyrene latex beads as model particles. This study is devoted to experimental verification of the effect of every factor and their comprehensive function. All experiments were performed to show isolated influence of every variable factor. The orthogonal design test was used to evaluate various factors comprehensively. Results suggested that retention ratio of particles increases with increasing flow rate or the viscosity of carrier liquid by adjusting external forces acting on particles. In addition, retention ratio increases as ionic strength decreases because of decreased electrostatic repulsion between particles and channel accumulation wall. As far as methanol, there is no general trend due to the change of both density and viscosity. On the basis of orthogonal design test it was found that viscosity of carrier liquid plays a significant role in determining resolution of micrometer-sized particles in GrFFF. PMID:27447927

  11. Aggregation behavior of fullerenes in aqueous solutions: a capillary electrophoresis and asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation study.

    PubMed

    Astefanei, Alina; Núñez, Oscar; Galceran, Maria Teresa; Kok, Wim Th; Schoenmakers, Peter J

    2015-10-01

    In this work, the electrophoretic behavior of hydrophobic fullerenes [buckminsterfullerene (C60), C70, and N-methyl-fulleropyrrolidine (C60-pyrr)] and water-soluble fullerenes [fullerol (C60(OH)24); polyhydroxy small gap fullerene, hydrated (C120(OH)30); C60 pyrrolidine tris acid (C60-pyrr tris acid); and (1,2-methanofullerene C60)-61-carboxylic acid (C60CHCOOH)] in micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography (MECC) was evaluated. The aggregation behavior of the water-soluble compounds in MECC at different buffer and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) concentrations and pH values of the background electrolyte (BGE) was studied by monitoring the changes observed in the electrophoretic pattern of the peaks. Broad and distorted peaks that can be attributed to fullerene aggregation were obtained in MECC which became narrower and more symmetric by working at low buffer and SDS concentrations (below the critical micelle concentration, capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) conditions). For the characterization of the suspected aggregates formed (size and shape), asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used. The results showed that the increase in the buffer concentration promoted the aggregation of the particles, while the presence of SDS micelles revealed multiple peaks corresponding to particles of different aggregation degrees. Furthermore, MECC has been applied for the first time for the analysis of C60 in two different cosmetic products (i.e., anti-aging serum and facial mask). PMID:26314484

  12. Study on aggregation behavior of Cytochrome C-conjugated silver nanoparticles using asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Tae; Lee, Yong-Ju; Hwang, Yu-Sik; Lee, Seungho

    2015-01-01

    In this study, 40 nm silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were synthesized using the citrate reduction method and then the surface of AgNPs was modified by conjugating Cytochrome C (Cyto C) to improve stability and to enhance bioactivity and biocompatibility of AgNPs. It is known that Cyto C may undergo conformational changes under various conditions of pH, temperature, ionic strength, etc., resulting in aggregation of the particles. These parameters also affect the size and size distribution of Cyto C-conjugated AgNPs (Cyto C-AgNP). ζ-potential measurement revealed that the adsorption of Cyto C on the surface of AgNPs is saturated at the molar ratio [Cyto C]/[AgNPs] above about 300. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AsFlFFF) analysis showed that hydrodynamic diameter of AgNPs increases by about 4 nm when the particle is saturated by Cyto C. The aggregation behavior of Cyto C-AgNP at various conditions of pH, temperature and ionic strength were investigated using AsFlFFF and UV-vis spectroscopy. It was found that the aggregation of Cyto C-AgNP increases with decreasing pH, increasing temperature and ionic strength due to denaturation of Cyto C on AgNPs and reduction in the thickness of electrostatic double layer on the surface of Cyto C-AgNP. PMID:25476400

  13. Development and evaluation of methods for starch dissolution using asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation. Part II: Dissolution of amylose.

    PubMed

    Perez-Rea, Daysi; Bergenståhl, Björn; Nilsson, Lars

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate whether dissolution in water under autoclaving conditions (140 °C, 20 min) or in dimethyl sulfoxide, DMSO (100 °C, 1 h), is preferable for characterization of amylose. Two types of amylose, potato and maize, were dissolved either in water using an autoclave or in DMSO. On the aqueous solutions obtained, the extent of molecular dissolution of the sample (referred to as the dissolution yield) was determined by enzymatic analysis as well as the molecular properties, such as molar mass and root-mean-square radius, obtained with asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation coupled to multi-angle light scattering and differential refractive index detection (AF4-MALS-dRI). The results showed that both dissolution methods are efficient at dissolving amylose. However, AF4-MALS-dRI analysis revealed substantial differences. Amylose aqueous solutions obtained by dissolution in DMSO were relatively stable over time, but the dissolution method in autoclave caused some degradation of the molecules, and their solutions display a high tendency to retrograde. PMID:26232931

  14. Development and evaluation of methods for starch dissolution using asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation. Part I: Dissolution of amylopectin.

    PubMed

    Perez-Rea, Daysi; Bergenståhl, Björn; Nilsson, Lars

    2015-06-01

    We have investigated methods of starch dissolution with the aim of finding an optimum method to completely dissolve starch granules to form a molecularly dissolved starch solution without degradation of the polymers. Glycogen was used as a model molecule for amylopectin, to identify the dissolution conditions under which the degradation of the polymers was limited or not present. Dissolution was performed in water with temperatures up to 200 °C, facilitated by the use of heating in an autoclave or a microwave oven, or in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) at 100 °C. Waxy maize starch was chosen due to its high content of amylopectin and very low content of amylose. The degree of starch dissolution under different conditions was determined enzymatically. The effect of different dissolution conditions on the molar mass and root-mean-square radius of the polymers was determined with asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation coupled to multi-angle light scattering and differential refractive index (AF4-MALS-dRI) detectors under aqueous conditions. The results suggest that reliable and accurate size separation and characterization of amylopectin can be obtained by dissolution of starch granules in an aqueous environment at 140 °C by autoclaving or in DMSO at 100 °C. The results also clearly show an upper limit for heat treatment of starch, above which degradation cannot be avoided. PMID:25925852

  15. Characterization of Silver Nanoparticles under Environmentally Relevant Conditions Using Asymmetrical Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4)

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Min-Hee; Lee, Seungho; Hwang, Yu Sik

    2015-01-01

    The development of methods to monitor manufactured nanomaterials in the environment is one of the crucial areas for the assessment of their risk. More specifically, particle size analysis is a key element, because many properties of nanomaterial are size dependent. The sizing of nanomaterials in real environments is challenging due to their heterogeneity and reactivity with other environmental components. In this study, the fractionation and characterization of a mixture of polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated silver nanoparticles (PVP-AgNPs) of three different sizes were investigated using asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) coupled with UV-Vis spectrophotometry. In particular, the effects of electrolyte composition and natural organic matter (NOM) on the particle size and stability were evaluated. The fractogram peaks (i.e., stability) of three different AgNPs decreased in the presence of both 10 mM NaCl and 10mM CaCl2, while increased with increasing concentration of humic acid (HA). In addition, the hydrodynamic diameters of AgNPs in both electrolytes slightly increased with an increase of HA concentration, suggesting the adsorption (coating) of HA onto the particle surface. It is also interesting to note that an increase in the particle size depended on the types of electrolyte, which could be explained by the conformational characteristics of the adsorbed HA layers. Consistent these results, AgNPs suspended in lake water containing relatively high concentration of organic carbon (TOC) showed higher particle stability and larger particle size (i.e., by approximately 4nm) than those in river water. In conclusion, the application of AF4 coupled with highly sensitive detectors could be a powerful method to characterize nanoparticles in natural waters. PMID:26575993

  16. Characterization of Silver Nanoparticles under Environmentally Relevant Conditions Using Asymmetrical Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4).

    PubMed

    Jang, Min-Hee; Lee, Seungho; Hwang, Yu Sik

    2015-01-01

    The development of methods to monitor manufactured nanomaterials in the environment is one of the crucial areas for the assessment of their risk. More specifically, particle size analysis is a key element, because many properties of nanomaterial are size dependent. The sizing of nanomaterials in real environments is challenging due to their heterogeneity and reactivity with other environmental components. In this study, the fractionation and characterization of a mixture of polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated silver nanoparticles (PVP-AgNPs) of three different sizes were investigated using asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) coupled with UV-Vis spectrophotometry. In particular, the effects of electrolyte composition and natural organic matter (NOM) on the particle size and stability were evaluated. The fractogram peaks (i.e., stability) of three different AgNPs decreased in the presence of both 10 mM NaCl and 10 mM CaCl2, while increased with increasing concentration of humic acid (HA). In addition, the hydrodynamic diameters of AgNPs in both electrolytes slightly increased with an increase of HA concentration, suggesting the adsorption (coating) of HA onto the particle surface. It is also interesting to note that an increase in the particle size depended on the types of electrolyte, which could be explained by the conformational characteristics of the adsorbed HA layers. Consistent these results, AgNPs suspended in lake water containing relatively high concentration of organic carbon (TOC) showed higher particle stability and larger particle size (i.e., by approximately 4 nm) than those in river water. In conclusion, the application of AF4 coupled with highly sensitive detectors could be a powerful method to characterize nanoparticles in natural waters. PMID:26575993

  17. Online Coupling of Flow-Field Flow Fractionation and Single Particle Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry: Characterization of Nanoparticle Surface Coating Thickness and Aggregation State

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface coating thickness and aggregation state have strong influence on the environmental fate, transport, and toxicity of engineered nanomaterials. In this study, flow-field flow fractionation coupled on-line with single particle inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry i...

  18. Ionic strength effect on molecular structure of hyaluronic acid investigated by flow field-flow fractionation and multiangle light scattering.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bitnara; Woo, Sohee; Park, Young-Soo; Hwang, Euijin; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2015-02-01

    This study describes the effect of ionic strength on the molecular structure of hyaluronic acid (HA) in an aqueous solution using flow field-flow fractionation and multiangle light scattering (FlFFF-MALS). Sodium salts of HA (NaHA) raw materials (∼2 × 10(6) Da) dispersed in different concentrations of NaCl prepared by repeated dilution/ultrafiltration procedures were examined in order to study conformational changes in terms of the relationship between the radius of gyration and molecular weight (MW) and molecular weight distribution (MWD) of NaHA in solution. This was achieved by varying the ionic strength of the carrier solution used in a frit-inlet asymmetrical FlFFF (FIAF4) channel. Experiments showed that the average MW of NaHA increased as the ionic strength of the NaHA solution decreased due to enhanced entanglement or aggregation of HA molecules. Relatively large molecules (greater than ∼5 MDa) did not show a large increase in RMS radius value as the NaCl concentration decreased. Conversely, smaller species showed larger changes, suggesting molecular expansion at lower ionic strengths. When the ionic strength of the FlFFF carrier solution was decreased, the HA species in a salt-rich solution (0.2 M NaCl) underwent rapid molecular aggregation during FlFFF separation. However, when salt-depleted HA samples (I = 4.66∼0.38 mM) were analyzed with FFF carrier solutions of a high ionic strength, the changes in both molecular structure and size were somewhat reversible, although there was a delay in correction of the molecular structure. PMID:25542570

  19. Chip-type asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation channel coupled with mass spectrometry for top-down protein identification.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Hun; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2011-11-15

    A chip-type design asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) channel has been developed for high-speed separation of proteins and top-down proteomic analysis using online coupled electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The new miniaturized AF4 channel was assembled by stacking multilayer thin stainless steel (SS, 1.5 mm each) plates embedded with an SS frit in such a way that the total thickness of the channel assembly was about 6 mm. The efficiency of the miniaturized AF4 channel at different channel lengths was examined with the separation of protein standards by adjusting flow rates in which an identical effective channel flow rate or an identical void time can be maintained at different channels. Detection limit, overloading effect, reproducibility, and influence of channel membrane materials on separation efficiency were investigated. Desalting and purification of proteins achieved during the AF4 operation by the action of an exiting crossflow and the use of aqueous mass-spectrometry-compatible (MS-compatible) buffer were advantageous for online coupling of the chip-type AF4 with ESI-MS. The direct coupling of AF4 and ESI-MS capabilities was demonstrated for the high-speed separation and identification of carbonic anhydrase (29 kDa) and transferrin (78 kDa) by full scan MS and for the first top-down identification of proteins with AF4-ESI-MS-MS using collision-induced fragmentation (CID). The presence of intact dimers (156 kDa) of transferrin was confirmed by AF4-ESI-MS via size separation of the dimers from monomers, followed by multiply charged ion spectral analysis of the dimers and molecular mass determinations. It was also found from these experiments that AF4-ESI-MS analysis of transferrin exhibited an increased signal-to-noise ratio compared to that of direct ESI-MS analysis due to online purification of the protein sample and size separation of dimers with AF4. PMID:21981549

  20. Characterizing changes in levan physicochemical properties in different pH environments using asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Runyon, J Ray; Nilsson, Lars; Ulmius, Matilda; Castro, Alejandra; Ionescu, Ruxandra; Andersson, Claes; Schmidt, Christoph

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the stability of the polyfructan levan under different pH solution conditions by monitoring changes in the levan physicochemical properties, such as molar mass (M), root mean square radius (r(rms)), hydrodynamic radius (r(h)), structure factor (r(rms)/r(h)), and aggregation state with respect to solution pH and hydrolysis time. A commercial levan produced from Z. Mobilis was characterized using asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) in combination with online multiangle light scattering (MALS) and differential refractive index (dRI) detection. Under neutral pH solution conditions the levan was found to have a M ranging from 10(5) to 5 × 10(7) g/mol, a r(rms) ranging from ~25 to 100 nm and a r(h) from ~3 to 151 nm. Two populations were observed in the sample. One population with a M less than 106 g/mol which represented ~60 % of the sample and a second population with an ultrahigh M up to 5 × 10(7) g/mol, which comprised ~40 % of the sample. The measured r(rms)/r(h) structure factor decreased from 1.8 to 0.65 across the AF4 fractogram indicating that early eluting low M levan species had a random coil configuration and late eluting high M species had more homogeneous spherical structures. The measured apparent density values decreased from 80 to 10 kg/m(3) across the elution profile and suggest that the observed second population also contains aggregates. The stability of levan in different pH conditions ranging from 1.3 to 8.5 was assessed by tracking changes in the average M and r(h), and monitoring the formation of fructose over 1 week. The onset of levan acid hydrolysis was observed to occur sooner at lower pH conditions and no hydrolysis was observed for pH 5.5 and higher. PMID:24121433

  1. Polysaccharide characterization by hollow-fiber flow field-flow fractionation with on-line multi-angle static light scattering and differential refractometry.

    PubMed

    Pitkänen, Leena; Striegel, André M

    2015-02-01

    Accurate characterization of the molar mass and size of polysaccharides is an ongoing challenge, oftentimes due to architectural diversity but also to the broad molar mass (M) range over which a single polysaccharide can exist and to the ultra-high M of many polysaccharides. Because of the latter, many of these biomacromolecules experience on-column, flow-induced degradation during analysis by size-exclusion and, even, hydrodynamic chromatography (SEC and HDC, respectively). The necessity for gentler fractionation methods has, to date, been addressed employing asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4). Here, we introduce the coupling of hollow-fiber flow field-flow fractionation (HF5) to multi-angle static light scattering (MALS) and differential refractometry (DRI) detection for the analysis of polysaccharides. In HF5, less stresses are placed on the macromolecules during separation than in SEC or HDC, and HF5 can offer a higher sensitivity, with less propensity for system overloading and analyte aggregation, than generally found in AF4. The coupling to MALS and DRI affords the determination of absolute, calibration-curve-independent molar mass averages and dispersities. Results from the present HF5/MALS/DRI experiments with dextrans, pullulans, and larch arabinogalactan were augmented with hydrodynamic radius (RH) measurements from off-line quasi-elastic light scattering (QELS) and by RH distribution calculations and fractogram simulations obtained via a finite element analysis implementation of field-flow fractionation theory by commercially available software. As part of this study, we have investigated analyte recovery in HF5 and also possible reasons for discrepancies between calculated and simulated results vis-à-vis experimentally determined data. PMID:25578045

  2. Chemical speciation studies on DU contaminated soils using flow field flow fractionation linked to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (FlFFF-ICP-MS).

    PubMed

    Brittain, S R; Cox, A G; Tomos, A D; Paterson, E; Siripinyanond, A; McLeod, C W

    2012-03-01

    Flow field flow fractionation (FlFFF) in combination with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used to study the chemical speciation of U and trace metals in depleted uranium (DU) contaminated soils. A chemical extraction procedure using sodium pyrophosphate, followed by isolation of humic and fulvic substances was applied to two dissimilar DU contaminated sample types (a sandy soil and a clay-rich soil), in addition to a control soil. The sodium pyrophosphate fractions of the firing range soils (Eskmeals and Kirkcudbright) were found to contain over 50% of the total U (measured after aqua regia digestion), compared to approximately 10% for the control soil. This implies that the soils from the contaminated sites contained a large proportion of the U within more easily mobile soil fractions. Humic and fulvic acid fractions each gave characteristic peak maxima for analytes of interest (Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Pb and U), with the fulvic acid fraction eluting at a smaller diameter (approximately 2.1 nm on average) than the humic fraction (approximately 2.4 nm on average). DU in the fulvic acid fraction gave a bimodal peak, not apparent for other trace elements investigated, including natural U. This implies that DU interacts with the fulvic acid fraction in a different way to all other elements studied. PMID:22237634

  3. Analyzing the influence of PEG molecular weight on the separation of PEGylated gold nanoparticles by asymmetric-flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Matthew; Smith, Mackensie C; Crist, Rachael M; Clogston, Jeffrey D; McNeil, Scott E

    2015-11-01

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG) is an important tool for increasing the biocompatibility of nanoparticle therapeutics. Understanding how these potential nanomedicines will react after they have been introduced into the bloodstream is a critical component of the preclinical evaluation process. Hence, it is paramount that better methods for separating, characterizing, and analyzing these complex and polydisperse formulations are developed. We present a method for separating nominal 30-nm gold nanoparticles coated with various molecular weight PEG moieties that uses only phosphate-buffered saline as the mobile phase, without the need for stabilizing surfactants. The optimized asymmetric-flow field-flow fractionation technique using in-line multiangle light scattering, dynamic light scattering, refractive index, and UV-vis detectors allowed successful separation and detection of a mixture of nanoparticles coated with 2-, 5-, 10-, and 20-kDa PEG. The particles coated with the larger PEG species (10 and 20 kDa) were eluted at times significantly earlier than predicted by field-flow fractionation theory. This was attributed to a lower-density PEG shell for the higher molecular weight PEGylated nanoparticles, which allows a more fluid PEG surface that can be greater influenced by external forces. Hence, the apparent particle hydrodynamic size may fluctuate significantly depending on the overall density of the stabilizing surface coating when an external force is applied. This has considerable implications for PEGylated nanoparticles intended for in vivo application, as nanoparticle size is important for determining circulation times, accumulation sites, and routes of excretion, and highlights the importance and value of the use of secondary size detectors when one is working with complex samples in asymmetric-flow field-flow fractionation. PMID:26449845

  4. Bile Salt Micelles and Phospholipid Vesicles Present in Simulated and Human Intestinal Fluids: Structural Analysis by Flow Field-Flow Fractionation/Multiangle Laser Light Scattering.

    PubMed

    Elvang, Philipp A; Hinna, Askell H; Brouwers, Joachim; Hens, Bart; Augustijns, Patrick; Brandl, Martin

    2016-09-01

    Knowledge about colloidal assemblies present in human intestinal fluids (HIFs), such as bile salt micelles and phospholipid vesicles, is regarded of importance for a better understanding of the in vivo dissolution and absorption behavior of poorly soluble drugs (Biopharmaceutics Classification System class II/IV drugs) because of their drug-solubilizing ability. The characterization of these potential drug-solubilizing compartments is a prerequisite for further studies of the mechanistic interplays between drug molecules and colloidal structures within HIFs. The aim of the present study was to apply asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) in combination with multiangle laser light scattering in an attempt to reveal coexistence of colloidal particles in both artificial and aspirated HIFs and to determine their sizes. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation/multiangle laser light scattering analysis of the colloidal phase of intestinal fluids allowed for a detailed insight into the whole spectrum of submicron- to micrometer-sized particles. With respect to the simulated intestinal fluids mimicking fasted and fed state (FaSSIF-V1 and FeSSIF-V1, respectively), FaSSIF contained one distinct size fraction of colloidal assemblies, whereas FeSSIF contained 2 fractions of colloidal species with significantly different sizes. These size fractions likely represent (1) mixed taurocholate-phospholipid-micelles, as indicated by a size range up to 70 nm (in diameter) and a strong UV absorption and (2) small phospholipid vesicles of 90-210 nm diameter. In contrast, within the colloidal phase of the fasted state aspirate of a human volunteer, 4 different size fractions were separated from each other in a consistent and reproducible manner. The 2 fractions containing large particles showed mean sizes of approximately 50 and 200 nm, respectively (intensity-weighted mean diameter, Dz), likely representing mixed cholate/phospholipid micelles and phospholipid vesicles

  5. Top-down and bottom-up lipidomic analysis of rabbit lipoproteins under different metabolic conditions using flow field-flow fractionation, nanoflow liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Seul Kee; Kim, Jin Yong; Lee, Ju Yong; Chung, Bong Chul; Seo, Hong Seog; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2015-07-31

    This study demonstrated the performances of top-down and bottom-up approaches in lipidomic analysis of lipoproteins from rabbits raised under different metabolic conditions: healthy controls, carrageenan-induced inflammation, dehydration, high cholesterol (HC) diet, and highest cholesterol diet with inflammation (HCI). In the bottom-up approach, the high density lipoproteins (HDL) and the low density lipoproteins (LDL) were size-sorted and collected on a semi-preparative scale using a multiplexed hollow fiber flow field-flow fractionation (MxHF5), followed by nanoflow liquid chromatography-ESI-MS/MS (nLC-ESI-MS/MS) analysis of the lipids extracted from each lipoprotein fraction. In the top-down method, size-fractionated lipoproteins were directly infused to MS for quantitative analysis of targeted lipids using chip-type asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (cAF4-ESI-MS/MS) in selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. The comprehensive bottom-up analysis yielded 122 and 104 lipids from HDL and LDL, respectively. Rabbits within the HC and HCI groups had lipid patterns that contrasted most substantially from those of controls, suggesting that HC diet significantly alters the lipid composition of lipoproteins. Among the identified lipids, 20 lipid species that exhibited large differences (>10-fold) were selected as targets for the top-down quantitative analysis in order to compare the results with those from the bottom-up method. Statistical comparison of the results from the two methods revealed that the results were not significantly different for most of the selected species, except for those species with only small differences in concentration between groups. The current study demonstrated that top-down lipid analysis using cAF4-ESI-MS/MS is a powerful high-speed analytical platform for targeted lipidomic analysis that does not require the extraction of lipids from blood samples. PMID:26087967

  6. Size determination and quantification of engineered cerium oxide nanoparticles by flow field-flow fractionation coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-García, L; Bolea, E; Laborda, F; Cubel, C; Ferrer, P; Gianolio, D; da Silva, I; Castillo, J R

    2016-03-18

    Facing the lack of studies on characterization and quantification of cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NPs), whose consumption and release is greatly increasing, this work proposes a method for their sizing and quantification by Flow Field-flow Fractionation (FFFF) coupled to Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). Two modalities of FFFF (Asymmetric Flow- and Hollow Fiber-Flow Field Flow Fractionation, AF4 and HF5, respectively) are compared, and their advantages and limitations discussed. Experimental conditions (carrier composition, pH, ionic strength, crossflow and carrier flow rates) are studied in detail in terms of NP separation, recovery, and repeatability. Size characterization of CeO2 NPs was addressed by different approaches. In the absence of feasible size standards of CeO2 NPs, suspensions of Ag, Au, and SiO2 NPs of known size were investigated. Ag and Au NPs failed to show a comparable behavior to that of the CeO2 NPs, whereas the use of SiO2 NPs provided size estimations in agreement to those predicted by the theory. The latter approach was thus used for characterizing the size of CeO2 NPs in a commercial suspension. Results were in adequate concordance with those achieved by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and dynamic light scattering. The quantification of CeO2 NPs in the commercial suspension by AF4-ICP-MS required the use of a CeO2 NPs standards, since the use of ionic cerium resulted in low recoveries (99±9% vs. 73±7%, respectively). A limit of detection of 0.9μgL(-1) CeO2 corresponding to a number concentration of 1.8×1012L(-1) for NPs of 5nm was achieved for an injection volume of 100μL. PMID:26903472

  7. Hollow fiber flow field-flow fractionation and size-exclusion chromatography with MALS detection: A complementary approach in biopharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Marassi, V; Roda, B; Zattoni, A; Tanase, M; Reschiglian, P

    2014-10-30

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are promising reagents both for the manufacture of drug substances and for their employment as a drug themselves, but to be approved for utilization, according to FDA recommendations and WHO guidelines, they have to undergo verifications regarding their purity, stability and percentage of aggregates. Moreover, stability tests of lots have to be performed in order to verify molecular size distribution over time and lot-to-lot consistency. Recent works in literature have highlighted the need for suitable, sensitive and reliable complementary analytical techniques for the characterization of mAbs and quantification of aggregates. Size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) is the reference technique in the biopharmaceutical industry for its robustness, high performance and simple use; however it presents some limitations especially toward the separation and detection of aggregates with high molecular weight. On the other hand, flow field-flow fractionation (F4) in its miniaturized version (hollow fiber flow field-flow fractionation, HF5) shows comparable performances with interesting additional advantages: a broad size range, gentle separation mechanism with low dilution factor and higher sensitivity. To propose HF5 as a complementary technique for evaluating aggregates' content in mAbs samples, a comparative study of both SEC and HF5 performances has been made. In this work, SEC and HF5 were coupled with UV and multi-angle light scattering detection and employed first in separating standard samples of proteins mixture used as a sample model. Then, a screening of mobile phases and an evaluation of separation performances was performed on a therapeutic mAbs formulation, demonstrating the complementarities between SEC and HF5 and their possible use as a separative platform approach for the characterization and quality control of protein drugs. PMID:25468501

  8. Study on aggregation behavior of low density lipoprotein in hen egg yolk plasma by asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation coupled with multiple detectors.

    PubMed

    Dou, Haiyang; Magnusson, Emma; Choi, Jaeyeong; Duan, Fei; Nilsson, Lars; Lee, Seungho

    2016-02-01

    In this study, asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) coupled online with UV, multiangle light scattering (MALS), and fluorescence (FS) detectors (AF4-UV-MALS-FS) was employed for separation and characterization of egg yolk plasma. AF4 provided separation of three major components of the egg yolk plasma i.e. soluble proteins, low density lipoproteins (LDL) and their aggregates, based on their respective hydrodynamic sizes. Identification of LDL was confirmed by staining the sample with a fluorescent dye, Nile Red. The effect of carrier liquids on aggregation of LDL was investigated. Collected fractions of soluble proteins were characterized using sodium dodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Moreover, the effect of heat and enzymatic treatment on egg yolk plasma was investigated. The results suggest that enzymatic treatment with phospholipase A2 (PLA2) significantly enhances the heat stability of LDL. The results show that AF4-UV-MALS-FS is a powerful tool for the fractionation and characterization of egg yolk plasma components. PMID:26304341

  9. Combining asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation with on- and off-line fluorescence detection to examine biodegradation of riverine dissolved and particulate organic matter.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Tak; Yang, Boram; Kim, Jin-Yong; Park, Ji-Hyung; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2015-08-28

    This study demonstrated that asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) coupled with on-line UV and fluorescence detection (FLD) and off-line excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy can be employed to analyze the influence of microbial metabolic activity on the consumption and production of freshwater organic matter. With the AF4 system, organic matter is on-line enriched during a focusing/relaxation period, which is an essential process prior to separation. Size-fractionated chromophoric and fluorophoric organic materials were simultaneously monitored during the 30-min AF4 separation process. Two fractions of different sizes (dissolved organic matter (DOM) and particulate organic matter (POM)) of freshwater samples from three locations (up-, mid-, and downstream) along the Han River basin of Korea were incubated with the same inoculum for 14 days to analyze fraction-specific alterations in optical properties using AF4-UV-FLD. A comparison of AF4 fractograms obtained from pre- and post-incubation samples revealed that POM-derived DOM were more susceptible to microbial metabolic activity than was DOM. Preferential microbial consumption of protein-like DOM components concurred with enhanced peaks of chromophoric and humic-like fluorescent components, presumably formed as by-products of microbial processing. AF4-UV-FLD combined with off-line identification of microbially processed components using EEM fluorescence spectroscopy provides a powerful tool to study the relationship between microbial activity and composition as well as biodegradability of DOM and POM-derived DOM from different origins, especially for the analysis of chromophoric and fluorophoric organic matter that are consumed and produced by microbial metabolic activity. The proposed AF4 system can be applied to organic matter in freshwater samples having low concentration range (0.3-2.5ppm of total organic carbon) without a pre-concentration procedure. PMID:26233252

  10. The role of nanominerals and mineral nanoparticles in the transport of toxic trace metals: Field-flow fractionation and analytical TEM analyses after nanoparticle isolation and density separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plathe, Kelly L.; von der Kammer, Frank; Hassellöv, Martin; Moore, Johnnie N.; Murayama, Mitsuhiro; Hofmann, Thilo; Hochella, Michael F.

    2013-02-01

    Nanominerals and mineral nanoparticles from a mining-contaminated river system were examined to determine their potential to co-transport toxic trace metals. A recent large-scale dam removal project on the Clark Fork River in western Montana (USA) has released reservoir and upstream sediments contaminated with toxic trace metals (Pb, As, Cu and Zn), which had accumulated there as a consequence of more than a century and a half of mining activity proximal to the river's headwaters near the cities of Butte and Anaconda. To isolate the high-density nanoparticle fractions from riverbed and bank sediments, a density separation with sodium polytungstate (2.8 g/cm3) was employed prior to a standard nanoparticle extraction procedure. The stable, dispersed nanoparticulate fraction was then analyzed by analytical transmission electron microscopy (aTEM) and flow field-flow fractionation (FlFFF) coupled to both multi-angle laser light scattering (MALLS) and high-resolution, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HR-ICPMS). FlFFF analysis revealed a size distribution in the nano range and that the elution profiles of the trace metals matched most closely to that for Fe and Ti. aTEM confirmed these results as the majority of the Fe and Ti oxides analyzed were associated with one or more of the trace metals of interest. The main mineral phases hosting trace metals are goethite, ferrihydrite and brookite. This demonstrates that they are likely playing a significant role in dictating the transport and distribution of trace metals in this river system, which could affect the bioavailability and toxicity of these metals.

  11. Sedimentation field-flow fractionation for characterization of citric acid-modified Hβ zeolite particles: Effect of particle dispersion and carrier composition.

    PubMed

    Dou, Haiyang; Bai, Guoyi; Ding, Liang; Li, Yueqiu; Lee, Seungho

    2015-11-27

    In this study, sedimentation field-flow fractionation (SdFFF) was, for the first time, applied for determination of size distribution of Hβ zeolite particles modified by citric acid (CA-Hβ). Effects of the particle dispersion and the carrier liquid composition (type of dispersing reagent (surfactant) and salt added in the carrier liquid, ionic strength, and pH) on SdFFF elution behavior of CA-Hβ zeolite particles were systematically investigated. Also the SdFFF separation efficiency of the particles was discussed in terms of the forces such as van der Waals, hydrophobic, and induced-dipole interactions. Results reveal that the type of salt and pH of the carrier liquid significantly affect the SdFFF separation efficiency of the zeolite particles. It was found that addition of a salt (NaN3) into the carrier liquid affects the characteristic of the SdFFF channel surface. It was found that the use of an acidic medium (pH 3.2) leads to a particle-channel interaction, while the use of a basic medium (pH 10.6) promotes an inter-particle hydrophobic interaction. Result from SdFFF was compared with those from scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). It seems that, once the experimental conditions are optimized, SdFFF becomes a valuable tool for size characterization of the zeolite particles. PMID:26493474

  12. Agglomeration behaviour of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in river waters: A multi-method approach combining light scattering and field-flow fractionation techniques.

    PubMed

    Chekli, L; Roy, M; Tijing, L D; Donner, E; Lombi, E; Shon, H K

    2015-08-15

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) are currently one of the most prolifically used nanomaterials, resulting in an increasing likelihood of release to the environment. This is of concern as the potential toxicity of TiO2 NPs has been investigated in several recent studies. Research into their fate and behaviour once entering the environment is urgently needed to support risk assessment and policy development. In this study, we used a multi-method approach combining light scattering and field-flow fractionation techniques to assess both the aggregation behaviour and aggregate structure of TiO2 NPs in different river waters. Results showed that both the aggregate size and surface-adsorbed dissolved organic matter (DOM) were strongly related to the initial DOM concentration of the tested waters (i.e. R(2) > 0.90) suggesting that aggregation of TiO2 NPs is controlled by the presence and concentration of DOM. The conformation of the formed aggregates was also found to be strongly related to the surface-adsorbed DOM (i.e. R(2) > 0.95) with increasing surface-adsorbed DOM leading to more compact structures. Finally, the concentration of TiO2 NPs remaining in the supernatant after sedimentation of the larger aggregates was found to decrease proportionally with both increasing IS and decreasing DOM concentration, resulting in more than 95% sedimentation in the highest IS sample. PMID:26067894

  13. Asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the quantification of quantum dots bioconjugation efficiency.

    PubMed

    Menéndez-Miranda, Mario; Encinar, Jorge Ruiz; Costa-Fernández, José M; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2015-11-27

    Hyphenation of asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) to an on-line elemental detection (inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, ICP-MS) is proposed as a powerful diagnostic tool for quantum dots bioconjugation studies. In particular, conjugation effectiveness between a "model" monoclonal IgG antibody (Ab) and CdSe/ZnS core-shell Quantum Dots (QDs), surface-coated with an amphiphilic polymer, has been monitored here by such hybrid AF4-ICP-MS technique. Experimental conditions have been optimized searching for a proper separation between the sought bioconjugates from the eventual free reagents excesses employed during the bioconjugation (QDs and antibodies). Composition and pH of the carrier have been found to be critical parameters to ensure an efficient separation while ensuring high species recovery from the AF4 channel. An ICP-MS equipped with a triple quadropole was selected as elemental detector to enable sensitive and reliable simultaneous quantification of the elemental constituents, including sulfur, of the nanoparticulated species and the antibody. The hyphenated technique used provided nanoparticle size-based separation, elemental detection, and composition analysis capabilities that turned out to be instrumental in order to investigate in depth the Ab-QDs bioconjugation process. Moreover, the analytical strategy here proposed allowed us not only to clearly identify the bioconjugation reaction products but also to quantify nanoparticle:antibodies bioconjugation efficiency. This is a key issue in future development of analytical and bioanalytical photoluminescent QDs applications. PMID:26493473

  14. Different elution modes and field programming in gravitational field-flow fractionation. III. Field programming by flow-rate gradient generated by a programmable pump.

    PubMed

    Plocková, J; Chmelík, J

    2001-05-25

    Gravitational field-flow fractionation (GFFF) utilizes the Earth's gravitational field as an external force that causes the settlement of particles towards the channel accumulation wall. Hydrodynamic lift forces oppose this action by elevating particles away from the channel accumulation wall. These two counteracting forces enable modulation of the resulting force field acting on particles in GFFF. In this work, force-field programming based on modulating the magnitude of hydrodynamic lift forces was implemented via changes of flow-rate, which was accomplished by a programmable pump. Several flow-rate gradients (step gradients, linear gradients, parabolic, and combined gradients) were tested and evaluated as tools for optimization of the separation of a silica gel particle mixture. The influence of increasing amount of sample injected on the peak resolution under flow-rate gradient conditions was also investigated. This is the first time that flow-rate gradients have been implemented for programming of the resulting force field acting on particles in GFFF. PMID:11407583

  15. Characterization of ultrahigh-molecular weight cationic polyacrylamide using frit-inlet asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation and multi-angle light scattering.

    PubMed

    Woo, Sohee; Lee, Ju Yong; Choi, Woonjin; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2016-01-15

    In this study, frit inlet asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (FlFFF) with multi-angle light scattering (MALS) and differential refractive index (DRI) detection is utilized for size separation, determination of molecular weight (MW), and conformation of ultrahigh-MW (10(7)-10(9) g/mol) cationic polyacrylamides (C-PAMs), a class of water-soluble copolymers based on acrylamide and vinyl-type comonomers with quaternary ammonium cations that are widely used in wastewater treatment and in paper industries. Linear and branched C-PAM copolymers prepared in two different polymerization methods (solution and emulsion) from varying amounts of crosslinking agent and initiator were size fractionated by FlFFF with field-programming. It was found experimentally that the linear copolymers from both polymerization methods were less than 10(8) g/mol in MW with compact, nearly spherical structures, while the branched C-PAM copolymers from the emulsion polymerization showed a significant increase in average MW up to ∼ 10(9)g/mol, which was about 20-fold greater than those from the solution method, and the branched copolymers had more compact or shrunken conformations. While both linear and branched copolymers less than 10(8) g/mol MW were well resolved in an increasing order of MW (normal mode), it was noted that branched copolymers prepared through emulsion polymerization exhibited significantly larger MWs of 10(8-)10(9) g/mol and eluted in the steric/hyperlayer mode, in which the elution order is reversed in an extreme run condition (strong initial field strength followed by a fast field decay during programming). PMID:26724894

  16. Feasibility of asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation as a method for detecting protective antigen by direct recognition of size-increased target-captured nanoprobes.

    PubMed

    Shin, Kayeong; Choi, Jaeyeong; Cho, Jun-Haeng; Yoon, Moon-Young; Lee, Seungho; Chung, Hoeil

    2015-11-27

    Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) was evaluated as a potential analytical method for detection of a protective antigen (PA), an Anthrax biomarker. The scheme was based on the recognition of altered AF4 retention through the generation of the size-increased Au nanoparticle probes as a result of PA binding, in which a PA-selective peptide was conjugated on the probe surface. In the visible absorption-based AF4 fractograms, the band position shifted to a longer retention time as the PA concentration increased due to the presence of probe bound with PAs. The shift was insignificant when the concentration was relatively low at 84.3pM. To improve sensitivity, two separate probes conjugated with two different peptides able to bind on different PA epitopes were used together. The band shift then became distinguishable even at 84.3pM of PA sample. The formation of larger PA-probe inter-connected species using the dual-probe system was responsible for the enhanced band shift. In parallel, the feasibility of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) as a potential AF4 detection method was also evaluated. In the off-line SERS fractogram constructed using fractions collected during AF4 separation, a band shift was also observed for the 84.3pM PA sample, and the band intensity was higher when using the dual-probe system. The combination of AF4 and SERS is promising for the detection of PA and will become a potential tool if the reproducibility of SERS measurement is improved. PMID:26482872

  17. Asymmetric Flow Field Flow Fractionation of Aqueous C60 Nanoparticles with Size Determination by Dynamic Light Scattering and Quantification by Liquid Chromatography Atmospheric Pressure Photo-Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    EPA Science Inventory

    A size separation method was developed for aqueous C60 fullerene aggregates (aqu/C60) using asymmetric flow field flow fractionation (AF4) coupled to a dynamic light scattering detector in flow through mode. Surfactants, which are commonly used in AF4, were avoided as they may al...

  18. Dissolution and nanoparticle generation behavior of Be-associated materials in synthetic lung fluid using inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy and flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenjie; Fernandez, Diego; Rudd, Abigail; Johnson, William P; Deubner, David; Sabey, Philip; Storrs, Jason; Larsen, Rod

    2011-07-01

    Various Be-containing micro-particle suspensions were equilibrated with simulated lung fluid (SLF) to examine their dissolution behavior as well as the potential generation of nanoparticles. The motivation for this study was to explore the relationship between dissolution/particle generation behaviors of Be-containing materials relevant to Be-ore processing, and their epidemiologically indicated inhalation toxicities. Limited data suggest that BeO is associated with higher rates of beryllium sensitization (BS) and chronic beryllium disease (CBD) relative to the other five relevant materials studied: bertrandite-containing ore, beryl-containing ore, frit (a processing intermediate), Be(OH)₂ (a processing intermediate), and silica (control). These materials were equilibrated with SLF at two pH values (4.5 and 7.2) to reflect inter- and intra-cellular environments in lung tissue. Concentrations of Be, Al, and Si in SLF increased linearly during the first 20 days of equilibration, and then rose slowly, or in some cases reached a maximum, and subsequently decreased. Relative to the other materials, BeO produced relatively low Be concentration in solution at pH 7.2; and relatively high Be concentration in solution at pH 4.5 during the first 20 days of equilibration. For both pH values, however, the Be concentration in SLF normalized to Be content of the material was lowest for BeO, demonstrating that BeO was distinct among the four other Be-containing materials in terms of its persistence as a source of Be to the SLF solution. Following 149 days of equilibration, the SLF solutions were fractionated using flow-field flow fractionation (FlFFF) with detection via ICP-MS. For all materials, nanoparticles (which were formed during equilibration) were dominantly distributed in the 10-100 nm size range. Notably, BeO produced the least nanoparticle-associated Be mass (other than silica) at both pH values. Furthermore, BeO produced the highest Be concentrations in the size

  19. Quantitative characterization by asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation of IgG thermal aggregation with and without polymer protective agents.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dewang; Martin, Nicolas; Tribet, Christophe; Winnik, Françoise M

    2014-11-01

    Complexes formed between poly(acrylates) and polyclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG) in its native conformation and after heat stress were characterized using asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) coupled with on-line UV-Vis spectroscopy and multi-angle light-scattering detection (MALS). Mixtures of IgG and poly(acrylates) of increasing structural complexity, sodium poly(acrylate) (PAA), a sodium poly(acrylate) bearing at random 3 mol % n-octadecyl groups, and a random copolymer of sodium acrylate (35 mol%), N-n-octylacrylamide (25 mol%) and N-isopropylacrylamide (40 mol%), were fractionated in a sodium phosphate buffer (0.02 M, pH 6.8) in the presence, or not, of 0.1 M NaCl. The AF4 protocol developed allowed the fractionation of solutions containing free poly(acrylates), native IgG monomer and dimer, poly(acrylates)/IgG complexes made up of one IgG molecule and a few polymer chains, and/or larger poly(acrylates)/IgG aggregates. The molar mass and recovery of the soluble analytes were obtained for mixed solutions of poly(acrylates) and native IgG and for the same solutions incubated at 65 °C for 10 min. From the combined AF4 results, we concluded that in solutions of low ionic strength, the presence of PAA increased the recovery ratio of IgG after thermal stress because of the formation of electrostatically-driven PAA/IgG complexes, but PAA had no protective effect in the presence of 0.1 M NaCl. Poly(acrylates) bearing hydrophobic groups significantly increased IgG recovery after stress, independently of NaCl concentration, because of the synergistic effect of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. The AF4 results corroborate conclusions drawn from a previous study combining four analytical techniques. This study demonstrates that AF4 is an efficient tool for the analysis of protein formulations subjected to stress, an important achievement given the anticipated important role of proteins in near-future human therapies. PMID:25323742

  20. Detection and Quantification of Silver Nanoparticles at Environmentally Relevant Concentrations Using Asymmetric Flow Field-Flow Fractionation Online with Single Particle Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Khanh An; Siska, Emily; Heithmar, Edward; Tadjiki, Soheyl; Pergantis, Spiros A

    2016-05-01

    The presence of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in aquatic environments could potentially cause adverse impacts on ecosystems and human health. However, current understanding of the environmental fate and transport of AgNPs is still limited because their properties in complex environmental samples cannot be accurately determined. In this study, the feasibility of using asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) connected online with single particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (spICPMS) to detect and quantify AgNPs at environmentally relevant concentrations was investigated. The AF4 channel had a thickness of 350 μm and its accumulation wall was a 10 kDa regenerated cellulose membrane. A 0.02% FL-70 surfactant solution was used as an AF4 carrier. With 1.2 mL/min AF4 cross-flow rate, 1.5 mL/min AF4 channel flow rate, and 5 ms spICPMS dwell time, the AF4-spICPMS can detect and quantify 40-80 nm AgNPs, as well as Ag-SiO2 core-shell nanoparticles (51.0 nm diameter Ag core and 21.6 nm SiO2 shell), with good recovery within 30 min. This system was not only effective in differentiating and quantifying different types of AgNPs with similar hydrodynamic diameters, such as in mixtures containing Ag-SiO2 core-shell nanoparticles and 40-80 nm AgNPs, but also suitable for differentiating between 40 nm AgNPs and elevated Ag(+) content. The study results indicate that AF4-spICPMS is capable of detecting and quantifying AgNPs and other engineered metal nanomaterials in environmental samples. Nevertheless, further studies are needed before AF4-spICPMS can become a routine analytical technique. PMID:27104795

  1. Physicochemical characterization of titanium dioxide pigments using various techniques for size determination and asymmetric flow field flow fractionation hyphenated with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Helsper, Johannes P F G; Peters, Ruud J B; van Bemmel, Margaretha E M; Rivera, Zahira E Herrera; Wagner, Stephan; von der Kammer, Frank; Tromp, Peter C; Hofmann, Thilo; Weigel, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    Seven commercial titanium dioxide pigments and two other well-defined TiO2 materials (TiMs) were physicochemically characterised using asymmetric flow field flow fractionation (aF4) for separation, various techniques to determine size distribution and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) for chemical characterization. The aF4-ICPMS conditions were optimised and validated for linearity, limit of detection, recovery, repeatability and reproducibility, all indicating good performance. Multi-element detection with aF4-ICPMS showed that some commercial pigments contained zirconium co-eluting with titanium in aF4. The other two TiMs, NM103 and NM104, contained aluminium as integral part of the titanium peak eluting in aF4. The materials were characterised using various size determination techniques: retention time in aF4, aF4 hyphenated with multi-angle laser light spectrometry (MALS), single particle ICPMS (spICPMS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and particle tracking analysis (PTA). PTA appeared inappropriate. For the other techniques, size distribution patterns were quite similar, i.e. high polydispersity with diameters from 20 to >700 nm, a modal peak between 200 and 500 nm and a shoulder at 600 nm. Number-based size distribution techniques as spICPMS and SEM showed smaller modal diameters than aF4-UV, from which mass-based diameters are calculated. With aF4-MALS calculated, light-scattering-based "diameters of gyration" (Øg) are similar to hydrodynamic diameters (Øh) from aF4-UV analyses and diameters observed with SEM, but much larger than with spICPMS. A Øg/Øh ratio of about 1 indicates that the TiMs are oblate spheres or fractal aggregates. SEM observations confirm the latter structure. The rationale for differences in modal peak diameter is discussed. PMID:27469116

  2. Quantitative characterization of gold nanoparticles by field-flow fractionation coupled online with light scattering detection and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Bjørn; Loeschner, Katrin; Hadrup, Niels; Mortensen, Alicja; Sloth, Jens J; Koch, Christian Bender; Larsen, Erik H

    2011-04-01

    An analytical platform coupling asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF(4)) with multiangle light scattering (MALS), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) was established and used for separation and quantitative determination of size and mass concentration of nanoparticles (NPs) in aqueous suspension. Mixtures of three polystyrene (PS) NPs between 20 and 100 nm in diameter and mixtures of three gold (Au) NPs between 10 and 60 nm in diameter were separated by AF(4). The geometric diameters of the separated PS NPs and the hydrodynamic diameters of the Au and PS NPs were determined online by MALS and DLS, respectively. The three separated Au NPs were quantified by ICPMS and recovered at 50-95% of the injected masses, which ranged between approximately 8-80 ng of each nanoparticle size. Au NPs adhering to the membrane in the separation channel was found to be a major cause for incomplete recoveries. The lower limit of detection (LOD) ranged between 0.02 ng Au and 0.4 ng Au, with increasing LOD by increasing nanoparticle diameter. The analytical platform was applied to characterization of Au NPs in livers of rats, which were dosed with 10 nm, 60 nm, or a mixture of 10 and 60 nm nanoparticles by intravenous injection. The homogenized livers were solubilized in tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH), and the recovery of Au NPs from the livers amounted to 86-123% of their total Au content. In spite of successful stabilization with bovine serum albumin even in alkaline medium, separation of the Au NPs by AF(4) was not possible due to association with undissolved remains of the alkali-treated liver tissues as demonstrated by electron microscopy images. PMID:21355549

  3. Comparison of the molecular mass and optical properties of colored dissolved organic material in two rivers and coastal waters by flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Zanardi-Lamardo, Eliete; Clark, Catherine D; Moore, Cynthia A; Zika, Rod G

    2002-07-01

    Colored dissolved organic material (CDOM) is an important sunlight absorbing substance affecting the optical properties of natural waters. However, little is known about its structural and optical properties mainly due to its complex matrix and the limitation of the techniques available. A comparison of two southwestern Florida rivers [the Caloosahatchee River (CR) and the Shark River (SR)] was done in terms of molecular mass (MM) and diffusion coefficients (D). The novel technique Frit inlet/frit outlet-flow field-flow fractionation (FIFO-FIFFF) with absorbance and fluorescence detectors was used to determine these properties. The SR receives organic material from the Everglades. By contrast, the CR arises from Lake Okeechobee in central Florida, receiving anthropogenic inputs, farming runoff, and natural organics. Both rivers discharge to the Gulf of Mexico. Fluorescence identified, for both rivers, two different MM distributions in low salinity water samples: the first was centered at approximately 1.7 kDa (CR) and approximately 2 kDa (SR); the second centered at approximately 13 kDa for both rivers, which disappeared gradually in the river plumes to below detection limit in coastal waters. Absorbance detected only one MM distribution centered at approximately 2 kDa (CR) and 2.2-2.4 kDa (SR). Fluorescence in general peaked at a lower MM than absorbance, suggesting a different size distribution for fluorophores vs chromophores. A photochemical study showed that, after sunlight, irradiated freshwater samples have similar characteristics to more marine waters, including a shift in MM distribution of chromophores. The differences observed between the rivers in the optical characteristics, MM distributions, and D values suggest that the CDOM sources, physical, and photochemical degradation processes are different for these two rivers. PMID:12144250

  4. Characterization of aggregates of surface modified fullerenes by asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation with multi-angle light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Astefanei, Alina; Kok, Wim Th; Bäuerlein, Patrick; Núñez, Oscar; Galceran, Maria Teresa; de Voogt, Pim; Schoenmakers, Peter J

    2015-08-21

    Fullerenes are carbon nanoparticles with widespread biomedical, commercial and industrial applications. Attributes such as their tendency to aggregate and aggregate size and shape impact their ability to be transported into and through the environment and living tissues. Knowledge of these properties is therefore valuable for their human and environmental risk assessment as well as to control their synthesis and manufacture. In this work, asymmetrical flow-field flow fractionation (AF4) coupled to multi-angle light scattering (MALS) was used for the first time to study the size distribution of surface modified fullerenes with both polyhydroxyl and carboxyl functional groups in aqueous solutions having different pH (6.5-11) and ionic strength values (0-200mM) of environmental relevance. Fractionation key parameters such as flow rates, flow programming, and membrane material were optimized for the selected fullerenes. The aggregation of the compounds studied appeared to be indifferent to changes in solution pH, but was affected by changes in the ionic strength. Polyhydroxy-fullerenes were found to be present mostly as 4nm aggregates in water without added salt, but showed more aggregation at high ionic strength, with an up to 10-fold increase in their mean hydrodynamic radii (200mM), due to a decrease in the electrostatic repulsion between the nanoparticles. Carboxy-fullerenes showed a much stronger aggregation degree in water (50-100nm). Their average size and recoveries decreased with the increase in the salt concentration. This behavior can be due to enhanced adsorption of the large particles to the membrane at high ionic strength, because of their higher hydrophobicity and much larger particle sizes compared to polyhydroxy-fullerenes. The method performance was evaluated by calculating the run-to-run precision of the retention time (hydrodynamic radii), and the obtained RSD values were lower than 1%. MALS measurements showed aggregate sizes that were in good

  5. Binding and transport of rare earth elements by organic and iron-rich nanocolloids in Alaskan rivers, as revealed by field-flow fractionation and ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolpe, Björn; Guo, Laodong; Shiller, Alan M.

    2013-04-01

    Water samples were collected from six small rivers in the Yukon River basin in central Alaska to examine the role of nanocolloids (0.5-40 nm) in the dynamics and transport of rare earth elements (REEs) in northern high latitude watersheds influenced by permafrost. Total dissolved (<0.45 μm) concentrations and the 'nanocolloidal size distributions' (0.5-40 nm) of UV-absorbing dissolved organic matter, Fe, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb and Lu were determined by on-line coupling of flow field-flow fractionation (FFF) with a UV-absorbance detector and ICP-MS. Total dissolved and nanocolloidal concentrations of the REEs co-varied with dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in all rivers and between spring flood and late summer baseflow. The nanocolloidal size distributions indicated the presence of three major components of nanocolloids: the 0.5-3 nm 'fulvic-rich nanocolloids' occurring throughout the sampling season, the 'organic/iron-rich nanocolloids' residing in the <8 nm size range during the spring flood, and the 4-40 nm iron-rich nanocolloids occurring during summer baseflow. REEs associated with all the three components of nanocolloids, but the proportions associated with the fulvic-rich nanocolloids during summer baseflow increased with increasing REE molar mass, which is consistent with the increase in stability of organic REE-complexes with increasing REE molar mass. Normalization of the measured REE-concentrations with the average REE-concentrations of the upper continental crust revealed a dynamic change in the physicochemical fractionation of REEs. During the spring flood, REE-binding in all the rivers was dominated by the <8 nm organic/iron-rich nanocolloids, likely being eroded from the upper organic-rich soil horizon by the strong surface runoff of snowmelt water. During the summer, the REE-binding in rivers with large groundwater input was dominated by small (<0.5 nm) organic and/or inorganic complexes, while lower proportions of the REEs

  6. The use of asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation with on-line detection in the study of drug retention within liposomal nanocarriers and drug transfer kinetics.

    PubMed

    Hinna, Askell Hvid; Hupfeld, Stefan; Kuntsche, Judith; Brandl, Martin

    2016-05-30

    Due to their solubilizing capabilities, liposomes (phospholipid vesicles) are suited for designing formulations for intravenous administration of drug compounds which are poorly water-soluble. Despite the good in-vitro stability of such formulations with minimal drug leakage, upon i.v. injection there is a risk of premature drug loss due to drug transfer to plasma proteins and cell membranes. Here we report on the refinement of a recently introduced simple in vitro predictive tool by Hinna and colleagues in 2014, which brings small drug loaded (donor) liposomes in contact with large acceptor liposomes, the latter serving as a model mimicking biological sinks in the body. The donor- and acceptor-liposomes were subsequently separated using asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4), during which the sample is exposed to a large volume of eluent which corresponds to a dilution factor of approximately 600. The model drug content in the donor- and acceptor fraction was quantified by on-line UV/VIS extinction measurements with correction for turbidity and by off-line HPLC measurements of collected fractions. The refined method allowed for (near) baseline separation of donor and acceptor vesicles as well as reliable quantification of the drug content not only of the donor- but now also of the acceptor-liposomes due to their improved size-homogeneity, colloidal stability and reduced turbidity. This improvement over the previously reported approach allowed for simultaneous quantification of both drug transfer and drug release to the aqueous phase. By sampling at specific incubation times, the release and transfer kinetics of the model compound p-THPP (5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-hydroxyphenyl)21H,23H-porphine) was determined. p-THPP is structurally closely related to the photosensitizer temoporfin, which is in clinical use and under evaluation in liposomal formulations. The transfer of p-THPP to the acceptor vesicles followed 1st order kinetics with a half-life of

  7. Dielectrophoretic columnar focusing device

    DOEpatents

    James, Conrad D.; Galambos, Paul C.; Derzon, Mark S.

    2010-05-11

    A dielectrophoretic columnar focusing device uses interdigitated microelectrodes to provide a spatially non-uniform electric field in a fluid that generates a dipole within particles in the fluid. The electric field causes the particles to either be attracted to or repelled from regions where the electric field gradient is large, depending on whether the particles are more or less polarizable than the fluid. The particles can thereby be forced into well defined stable paths along the interdigitated microelectrodes. The device can be used for flow cytometry, particle control, and other process applications, including cell counting or other types of particle counting, and for separations in material control.

  8. Silver and gold nanoparticle separation using asymmetrical flow-field flow fractionation: Influence of run conditions and of particle and membrane charges.

    PubMed

    Meisterjahn, Boris; Wagner, Stephan; von der Kammer, Frank; Hennecke, Dieter; Hofmann, Thilo

    2016-04-01

    Flow-Field Flow Fractionation (Flow-FFF), coupled with online detection systems is one of the most promising tools available for the separation and quantification of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) in complex matrices. To correctly relate the retention of nanoparticles in the Flow-FFF-channel to the particle size, ideal separation conditions must be met. This requires optimization of the parameters that influence the separation behavior. The aim of this study was therefore to systematically investigate and evaluate the influence of parameters such as the carrier liquid, the cross flow, and the membrane material, on the separation behavior of two metallic ENPs. For this purpose the retention, recovery, and separation efficiency of sterically stabilized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and electrostatically stabilized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), which represent two materials widely used in investigations on environmental fate and ecotoxicology, were investigated against a parameter matrix of three different cross-flow densities, four representative carrier solutions, and two membrane materials. The use of a complex mixture of buffers, ionic and non-ionic surfactants (FL-70 solution) together with a medium cross-flow density provided an acceptable compromise in peak quality and recovery for both types of ENPs. However, these separation conditions do not represent a perfect match for both particle types at the same time (maximized recovery at maximized retention). It could be shown that the behavior of particles within Flow-FFF channels cannot be predicted or explained purely in terms of electrostatic interactions. Particles were irreversibly lost under conditions where the measured zeta potentials suggested that there should have been sufficient electrostatic repulsion to ensure stabilization of the particles in the Flow-FFF channel resulting in good recoveries. The wide variations that we observed in ENP behavior under different conditions, together with the different

  9. Feasibility of asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation coupled to ICP-MS for the characterization of wear metal particles and metalloproteins in biofluids from hip replacement patients.

    PubMed

    Loeschner, Katrin; Harrington, Chris F; Kearney, Jacque-Lucca; Langton, David J; Larsen, Erik H

    2015-06-01

    Hip replacements are used to improve the quality of life of people with orthopaedic conditions, but the use of metal-on-metal (MoM) arthroplasty has led to poor outcomes for some patients. These problems are related to the generation of micro- to nanosized metal wear particles containing Cr, Co or other elements, but the current analytical methods used to investigate the processes involved do not provide sufficient information to understand the size or composition of the wear particles generated in vivo. In this qualitative feasibility study, asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF(4)) coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used to investigate metal protein binding and the size and composition of wear metal particles present in serum and hip aspirates from MoM hip replacement patients. A well-established HPLC anion exchange chromatography (AEC) separation system coupled to ICP-MS was used to confirm the metal-protein associations in the serum samples. Off-line single particle ICP-MS (spICP-MS) analysis was used to confirm the approximate size distribution indicated by AF(4) of the wear particles in hip aspirates. In the serum samples, AF(4) -ICP-MS suggested that Cr was associated with transferrin (Tf) and Co with albumin (Alb) and an unidentified species; AEC-ICP-MS confirmed these associations and also indicated an association of Cr with Alb. In the hip aspirate sample, AF(4)-ICP-MS suggested that Cr was associated with Alb and Tf and that Co was associated with Alb and two unidentified compounds; AEC analysis confirmed the Cr results and the association of Co with Alb and a second compound. Enzymatic digestion of the hip aspirate sample, followed by separation using AF(4) with detection by UV absorption (280 nm), multi-angle light scattering and ICP-MS, suggested that the sizes of the Cr-, Co- and Mo-containing wear particles in a hip aspirate sample were in the range 40-150 nm. Off-line spICP-MS was used to confirm these

  10. Interaction of bentonite colloids with Cs, Eu, Th and U in presence of humic acid: A flow field-flow fractionation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouby, Muriel; Geckeis, Horst; Lützenkirchen, Johannes; Mihai, Silvia; Schäfer, Thorsten

    2011-07-01

    The interaction of Cs(I), Eu(III), Th(IV) and U(VI) with montmorillonite colloids was investigated in natural Grimsel Test Site groundwater over a 3 years period. The asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation combined with various detectors was applied to study size variations of colloids and to monitor colloid association of trace metals. The colloids suspended directly in the low ionic strength ( I), slightly alkaline granitic groundwater ( I = 10 -3 mol/L, pH 9.6) showed a gradual agglomeration with a size distribution shift from initially 10-200 nm to 50-400 nm within over 3 years. The Ca 2+ concentration of 2.1 × 10 -4 mol/L in the ground water is believed to be responsible for the slow agglomeration due to Ca 2+ ion exchange against Li + and Na + at the permanently charged basal clay planes. Furthermore, the Ca 2+ concentration lies close to the critical coagulation concentration (CCC) of 10 -3 mol L -1 for clay colloids. Slow destabilization may delimit clay colloid migration in this specific groundwater over long time scales. Eu(III) and Th(IV) are found predominantly bound to clay colloids, while U(VI) prevails as the UO 2(OH) 3- complex and Cs(I) remains mainly as aquo ion under our experimental conditions. Speciation calculations qualitatively represent the experimental data. A focus was set on the reversibility of metal ion-colloid binding. Addition of humic acid as a competing ligand induces rapid metal ion dissociation from clay colloids in the case of Eu(III) even after previous aging for about 3 years. Interestingly only partial dissociation occurs in the case of Th(IV). Experiments and calculations prove that the humate complexes dominate the speciation of all metal ions under given conditions. The partial irreversibility of clay bound Th(IV) is presently not understood but might play an important role for the colloid-mediated transport of polyvalent actinides over wide distances in natural groundwater.

  11. Size fractionation and size characterization of nanoemulsions of lipid droplets and large unilamellar lipid vesicles by asymmetric-flow field-flow fractionation/multi-angle light scattering and dynamic light scattering.

    PubMed

    Vezočnik, Valerija; Rebolj, Katja; Sitar, Simona; Ota, Katja; Tušek-Žnidarič, Magda; Štrus, Jasna; Sepčić, Kristina; Pahovnik, David; Maček, Peter; Žagar, Ema

    2015-10-30

    Asymmetric-flow field-flow fractionation technique coupled to a multi-angle light-scattering detector (AF4-MALS) was used together with dynamic light-scattering (DLS) in batch mode and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to study the size characteristics of the trioleoylglycerol lipid droplets covered by a monolayer of sphingomyelin and cholesterol, in water phase. These lipid droplet nanoemulsions (LD) were formed by ultrasonication. In parallel, the size characteristics of large unilamellar lipid vesicles (LUV) prepared by extrusion and composed of sphingomyelin and cholesterol were determined. LD and LUV were prepared at two different molar ratios (1/1, 4/1) of sphingomyelin and cholesterol. In AF4-MALS, various cross-flow conditions and mobile phase compositions were tested to optimize the separation of LD or LUV particles. The particle radii, R, as well as the root-mean-square radii, Rrms, of LD and LUV were determined by AF4-MALS, whereas the hydrodynamic radii, Rh, were obtained by DLS. TEM visualization revealed round shape particles of LD and LUV. PMID:26409772

  12. Dielectrophoretic systems without embedded electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Cummings, Eric B.; Singh, Anup K.

    2006-03-21

    Method and apparatus for dielectrophoretic separation of particles in a fluid based using array of insulating structures arranged in a fluid flow channel. By utilizing an array of insulating structures, a spatially inhomogeneous electric field is created without the use of the embedded electrodes conventionally employed for dielectrophoretic separations. Moreover, by using these insulating structures a steady applied electric field has been shown to provide for dielectrophoresis in contrast to the conventional use of an alternating electric field. In a uniform array of posts, dielectrophoretic effects have been produced flows having significant pressure-driven and electrokinetic transport. Above a threshold applied electric field, filaments of concentrated and rarefied particles appear in the flow as a result of dielectrophoresis. Above a higher threshold applied voltage, dielectrophoresis produces zones of highly concentrated and immobilized particles. These patterns are strongly influenced by the angle of the array of insulating structures with respect to the mean applied electric field and the shape of the insulating structures.

  13. Continuous flow dielectrophoretic particle concentrator

    DOEpatents

    Cummings, Eric B.

    2007-04-17

    A continuous-flow filter/concentrator for separating and/or concentrating particles in a fluid is disclosed. The filter is a three-port device an inlet port, an filter port and a concentrate port. The filter separates particles into two streams by the ratio of their dielectrophoretic mobility to their electrokinetic, advective, or diffusive mobility if the dominant transport mechanism is electrokinesis, advection, or diffusion, respectively.Also disclosed is a device for separating and/or concentrating particles by dielectrophoretic trapping of the particles.

  14. In-house validation of a method for determination of silver nanoparticles in chicken meat based on asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Loeschner, Katrin; Navratilova, Jana; Grombe, Ringo; Linsinger, Thomas P J; Købler, Carsten; Mølhave, Kristian; Larsen, Erik H

    2015-08-15

    Nanomaterials are increasingly used in food production and packaging, and validated methods for detection of nanoparticles (NPs) in foodstuffs need to be developed both for regulatory purposes and product development. Asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric detection (AF(4)-ICP-MS) was applied for quantitative analysis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in a chicken meat matrix following enzymatic sample preparation. For the first time an analytical validation of nanoparticle detection in a food matrix by AF(4)-ICP-MS has been carried out and the results showed repeatable and intermediately reproducible determination of AgNP mass fraction and size. The findings demonstrated the potential of AF(4)-ICP-MS for quantitative analysis of NPs in complex food matrices for use in food monitoring and control. The accurate determination of AgNP size distribution remained challenging due to the lack of certified size standards. PMID:25794724

  15. Separation of silver nanoparticles by hollow fiber flow field-flow fractionation: Addition of tannic acid into carrier liquid as a modifier.

    PubMed

    Saenmuangchin, Rattaporn; Mettakoonpitak, Jaruwan; Shiowatana, Juwadee; Siripinyanond, Atitaya

    2015-10-01

    A homemade hollow fiber flow-field fractionation (Hf-FlFFF) coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was set-up for silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) separation by using polysulfone hollow fiber membrane (30,000 MW cutoff) as a separation channel. Tannic acid and citrate stabilized AgNPs were synthesized and introduced into Hf-FlFFF. The effects of carrier liquid and stabilizing agent on retention behavior of AgNPs were investigated. Different elution behaviors were observed as follows: with 0.02% (w/v) FL-70, all of AgNPs were eluted from Hf-FlFFF but differences in retention behaviors were observed for AgNPs with tannic acid and citrate stabilizing agents; and with 30mM TRIS buffer, only tannic acid stabilized AgNPs were eluted from Hf-FlFFF, whereas citrate stabilized AgNPs were not eluted. In this work, tannic acid addition into carrier liquid was proposed to modify the surface of AgNPs and the surface of the membrane, and thereby adjusting the retention behaviors of AgNPs. Various concentrations of tannic acid were added into FL-70 and TRIS buffer. With the use of 0.1mM tannic acid in 30mM TRIS buffer as the carrier liquid, retention behaviors of both tannic acid stabilized- and citrate stabilized-AgNPs were similar and with similar fractionation recovery. PMID:26341593

  16. Influence of protein formulation and carrier solution on asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation: a case study of the plant-produced recombinant anthrax protective antigen pp-PA83.

    PubMed

    Palais, Caroline; Chichester, Jessica A; Manceva, Slobodanka; Yusibov, Vidadi; Arvinte, Tudor

    2015-02-01

    Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (afFFF) was used to investigate the properties of a plant-produced anthrax toxin protective antigen, pp-PA83. The afFFF fractogram consisted of two main peaks with molar masses similar to the molecular mass of pp-PA83 monomer. afFFF carrier solutions strongly influenced the ratio and the intensity of the two main peaks. These differences indicate that conformation changes in the pp-PA83 molecule occurred during the afFFF analysis. Similar fractograms were obtained for different pp-PA83 formulations when the afFFF carrier solution and the protein formulation were the same (or very similar). The data show that in specific cases, afFFF could be used to study protein conformation and document the importance of studying the influence of the carrier solution on afFFF. PMID:25417936

  17. Hollow-fiber flow field-flow fractionation and multi-angle light scattering investigation of the size, shape and metal-release of silver nanoparticles in aqueous medium for nano-risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Marassi, Valentina; Casolari, Sonia; Roda, Barbara; Zattoni, Andrea; Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Panzavolta, Silvia; Tofail, Syed A M; Ortelli, Simona; Delpivo, Camilla; Blosi, Magda; Costa, Anna Luisa

    2015-03-15

    Due to the increased use of silver nanoparticles in industrial scale manufacturing, consumer products and nanomedicine reliable measurements of properties such as the size, shape and distribution of these nano particles in aqueous medium is critical. These properties indeed affect both functional properties and biological impacts especially in quantifying associated risks and identifying suitable risk-mediation strategies. The feasibility of on-line coupling of a fractionation technique such as hollow-fiber flow field flow fractionation (HF5) with a light scattering technique such as MALS (multi-angle light scattering) is investigated here for this purpose. Data obtained from such a fractionation technique and its combination thereof with MALS have been compared with those from more conventional but often complementary techniques e.g. transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, atomic absorption spectroscopy, and X-ray fluorescence. The combination of fractionation and multi angle light scattering techniques have been found to offer an ideal, hyphenated methodology for a simultaneous size-separation and characterization of silver nanoparticles. The hydrodynamic radii determined by fractionation techniques can be conveniently correlated to the mean average diameters determined by multi angle light scattering and reliable information on particle morphology in aqueous dispersion has been obtained. The ability to separate silver (Ag(+)) ions from silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) via membrane filtration during size analysis is an added advantage in obtaining quantitative insights to its risk potential. Most importantly, the methodology developed in this article can potentially be extended to similar characterization of metal-based nanoparticles when studying their functional effectiveness and hazard potential. PMID:25698553

  18. Examining concentrations and molecular weights of thiols in microorganism cultures and in Churchill River (Manitoba) using a fluorescent-labeling method coupled to asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Mangal, Vaughn; Guéguen, Celine

    2015-06-01

    In this study, molecular weights of thiols from four laboratory cultures (Scenedesmus obliquus, Chlorella vulgaris, Euglena gracilis, and Attheya septentrionalis) and the Churchill River (Manitoba) were assessed using a fluorescent-labeling method such as monobromotrimethylammoniobimane (qBBr) and asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) coupled to a fluorescence detector. Concentrations of thiols in extracellular fractions ranged from 6.39 ± 3.39 to 39.2 ± 7.43 μmol g(-1), and intracellular concentrations ranged from 11.5 ± 4.52 to 41.0 ± 4.1 μmol g(-1). In addition, molecular weights (MW) of intracellular thiol ranged from 493 ± 24 to 946 ± 12 Da whereas extracellular thiol MWs varied from 443 ± 36 to 810 ± 174 Da. The novel method of combining AF4 to an on-line fluorometer and the incorporation of the thiol tag provided information regarding thiol concentration and composition of controlled and natural systems. Furthermore, the proposed methods allow for the simultaneous measurement of thiol and DOM MWs produced by microorganisms. By assessing characteristics of naturally produced thiols and lab-grown thiols, information regarding heavy metal complexation can be determined. PMID:25772566

  19. Dielectrophoretic levitation of droplets and bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. B.

    1982-01-01

    Uncharged droplets and bubbles can be levitated dielectrophoretically in liquids using strong, nonuniform electric fields. The general equations of motion for a droplet or bubble in an axisymmetric, divergence-free electrostatic field allow determination of the conditions necessary and sufficient for stable levitation. The design of dielectrophoretic (DEP) levitation electrode structures is simplified by a Taylor-series expansion of cusped axisymmetric electrostatic fields. Extensive experimental measurements on bubbles in insulating liquids verify the simple dielectrophoretic model. Other have extended dielectrophoretic levitation to very small particles in aqueous media. Applications of DEP levitation to the study of gas bubbles, liquid droplets, and solid particles are discussed. Some of these applications are of special interest in the reduced gravitational field of a spacecraft.

  20. Asymmetric Flow-Field Flow Fractionation Hyphenated ICP-MS as an Alternative to Cloud Point Extraction for Quantification of Silver Nanoparticles and Silver Speciation: Application for Nanoparticles with a Protein Corona.

    PubMed

    Mudalige, Thilak K; Qu, Haiou; Linder, Sean W

    2015-07-21

    Production and application of nanoparticles in consumer products is at an all-time high due to the emerging field of nanotechnology. Direct detection and quantification of trace levels of nanoparticles within consumer products is very challenging and problematic. Although multiple methodologies are available for this purpose, each method has its own set of limitations. Herein, we developed an analytical platform consisting of asymmetric flow-field flow fractionation (AF4) coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) for the speciation and quantification of silver ions and silver nanoparticles at the ng/kg level (ppt). AF4 is utilized to concentrate the nanoparticles, and ICP-MS acts as the detector. The protein corona that forms upon exposure of nanoparticles to bovine serum albumin was utilized as a nanoparticle stabilization and AF4 recovery enhancement mechanism. Speciation of silver ions and nanoparticles was achieved with the assistance of penicillamine as a complexation ligand. The effect of nanoparticle size, surface coating, and ionization state toward the detection and quantification of the developed methodology was evaluated. The detection limit was found to be 4 ng/kg with the application of a 5 mL sample loop. Further application of this developed methodology on environmentally relevant samples was demonstrated by the analysis of Arkansas River water spiked with silver nanoparticles and nanoparticle spiked into humic acid solution (50 mg/L) at an environmentally relevant level. PMID:26095720

  1. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation coupled with multi-angle light scattering and refractive index detections for characterization of ultra-high molar mass poly(acrylamide) flocculants.

    PubMed

    Leeman, Mats; Islam, Mohammad T; Haseltine, William G

    2007-11-23

    The molar mass distributions of ultra-high molar mass polyacrylamide-based flocculants were measured using asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AFFFF) coupled with multi-angle light scattering and refractive index detectors. The mass load onto the separation channel was found to be critical in obtaining a good size separation. The detailed investigation with ultra-high molar mass polyacrylamides found that the injected amount should be

  2. Characterization of hydrophilic coated gold nanoparticles via capillary electrophoresis and Taylor dispersion analysis. Part II: Determination of the hydrodynamic radius distribution - Comparison with asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Pyell, Ute; Jalil, Alaa H; Urban, Dominic A; Pfeiffer, Christian; Pelaz, Beatriz; Parak, Wolfgang J

    2015-11-01

    In the first paper of this series we have shown for hydrophilic coated Au nanoparticles that capillary electrophoresis in combination with Taylor dispersion analysis in fused silica capillaries with an inner diameter of 75 μm allows for the unbiased precise determination of the number-weighted mean hydrodynamic diameter, the zeta potential and the effective charge number, although mobility corrected double layer polarization has to be taken into account. In this second paper we investigate whether the modified approximate analytic expression developed by Ohshima (2001) permits the calculation of calibration lines and the concomitant conversion of electropherograms into number-weighted particle radius distributions. We show that with the method developed size distributions are obtained which are independent of the measurement conditions. These size distributions are much narrower than those obtained via dynamic light scattering and data evaluation by the CONTIN algorithm. Capillary electrophoresis together with the proposed data evaluation method reveals that the analyzed nanoparticle populations have very narrow size distributions with a width of 2-4 nm. The hydrodynamic radius distributions of the coated NPs are only slightly broader than the solid particle radius distribution of the Au-NP cores. The presence of monomodal/bimodal size distributions is confirmed by asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation. PMID:26164244

  3. Size and mass determination of silver nanoparticles in an aqueous matrix using asymmetric flow field flow fractionation coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer and ultraviolet-visible detectors.

    PubMed

    Geiss, Otmar; Cascio, Claudia; Gilliland, Douglas; Franchini, Fabio; Barrero-Moreno, Josefa

    2013-12-20

    The powerful antibacterial properties of engineered silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have, in recent years, led to a great increase in their use in consumer products such as textiles and personal care products offers. This widespread and often indiscriminate use of nano-silver is inevitably increasing the probability that such materials be accidentally or deliberately lost into the environment. Once present in the environment the normally useful antibacterial properties of the silver may instead become a potential hazard to both man and the environment. In the face of such concerns it therefore desirable to develop easy, reliable and sensitive analytical methods for the determination of nano-sized silver in various matrices. This paper describes a method for the simultaneous determination of particles-size and mass-concentration of citrate-stabilized silver nano-particles in aqueous matrices by asymmetric flow field flow fractionation coupled to an ICP-mass spectrometer and UV/vis detector. In particular, this work has evaluated the use of pre-channel injections of mono-dispersed silver nano-particles as a means of accurate size and mass-calibration. The suitability of the method as a means to generate accurate and reliable results was verified by determination of parameters such as precision under repeatability conditions, linearity, accuracy, recovery and analytical sensitivity. PMID:24238704

  4. Application of asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AsFlFFF) coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) to the quantitative characterization of natural colloids and synthetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bouby, M; Geckeis, H; Geyer, F W

    2008-12-01

    A straightforward quantification method is presented for the application of asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AsFlFFF) combined with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) to the characterization of colloid-borne metal ions and nanoparticles. Reproducibility of the size calibration and recovery of elements are examined. Channel flow fluctuations are observed notably after initiation of the fractionation procedure. Their impact on quantification is considered by using (103)Rh as internal reference. Intensity ratios measured for various elements and Rh are calculated for each data point. These ratios turned out to be independent of the metal concentration and total sample solution flow introduced into the nebulizer within a range of 0.4-1.2 mL min(-1). The method is applied to study the interaction of Eu, U(VI) and Th with a mixture of humic acid and clay colloids and to the characterization of synthetic nanoparticles, namely CdSe/ZnS-MAA (mercaptoacetic acid) core/shell-coated quantum dots (QDs). Information is given not only on inorganic element composition but also on the effective hydrodynamic size under relevant conditions. Detection limits (DLs) are estimated for Ca, Al, Fe, the lanthanide Ce and the natural actinides Th and U in colloid-containing groundwater. For standard crossflow nebulizer, estimated values are 7 x 10(3), 20, 3 x 10(2), 0.1, 0.1 and 7 x 10(-2) microg L(-1), respectively. DLs for Zn and Cd in QD characterization are 28 and 11 microg L(-1), respectively. PMID:18931997

  5. Toward full spectrum speciation of silver nanoparticles and ionic silver by on-line coupling of hollow fiber flow field-flow fractionation and minicolumn concentration with multiple detectors.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Jing-Fu; Guo, Xiao-Ru; Yin, Yong-Guang; Byeon, Seul Kee; Moon, Myeong Hee; Jiang, Gui-Bin

    2015-08-18

    The intertransformation of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and ionic silver (Ag(I)) in the environment determines their transport, uptake, and toxicity, demanding methods to simultaneously separate and quantify AgNPs and Ag(I). For the first time, hollow fiber flow field-flow fractionation (HF5) and minicolumn concentration were on-line coupled together with multiple detectors (including UV-vis spectrometry, dynamic light scattering, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry) for full spectrum separation, characterization, and quantification of various Ag(I) species (i.e., free Ag(I), weak and strong Ag(I) complexes) and differently sized AgNPs. While HF5 was employed for filtration and fractionation of AgNPs (>2 nm), the minicolumn packed with Amberlite IR120 resin functioned to trap free Ag(I) or weak Ag(I) complexes coming from the radial flow of HF5 together with the strong Ag(I) complexes and tiny AgNPs (<2 nm), which were further discriminated in a second run of focusing by oxidizing >90% of tiny AgNPs to free Ag(I) and trapped in the minicolumn. The excellent performance was verified by the good agreement of the characterization results of AgNPs determined by this method with that by transmission electron microscopy, and the satisfactory recoveries (70.7-108%) for seven Ag species, including Ag(I), the adduct of Ag(I) and cysteine, and five AgNPs with nominal diameters of 1.4 nm, 10 nm, 20 nm, 40 nm, and 60 nm in surface water samples. PMID:26222150

  6. Abundance, size distributions and trace-element binding of organic and iron-rich nanocolloids in Alaskan rivers, as revealed by field-flow fractionation and ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolpe, Björn; Guo, Laodong; Shiller, Alan M.; Aiken, George R.

    2013-03-01

    Water samples were collected from six small rivers in the Yukon River basin in central Alaska to examine the role of colloids and organic matter in the transport of trace elements in Northern high latitude watersheds influenced by permafrost. Concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), selected elements (Al, Si, Ca, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb, Sr, Ba, Pb, U), and UV-absorbance spectra were measured in 0.45 μm filtered samples. 'Nanocolloidal size distributions' (0.5-40 nm, hydrodynamic diameter) of humic-type and chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM), Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, and Pb were determined by on-line coupling of flow field-flow fractionation (FFF) to detectors including UV-absorbance, fluorescence, and ICP-MS. Total dissolved and nanocolloidal concentrations of the elements varied considerably between the rivers and between spring flood and late summer base flow. Data on specific UV-absorbance (SUVA), spectral slopes, and the nanocolloidal fraction of the UV-absorbance indicated a decrease in aromaticity and size of CDOM from spring flood to late summer. The nanocolloidal size distributions indicated the presence of different 'components' of nanocolloids. 'Fulvic-rich nanocolloids' had a hydrodynamic diameter of 0.5-3 nm throughout the sampling season; 'organic/iron-rich nanocolloids' occurred in the <8 nm size range during the spring flood; whereas 'iron-rich nanocolloids' formed a discrete 4-40 nm components during summer base flow. Mn, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn were distributed between the nanocolloid components depending on the stability constant of the metal (+II)-organic complexes, while stronger association of Cr to the iron-rich nanocolloids was attributed to the higher oxidation states of Cr (+III or +IV). Changes in total dissolved element concentrations, size and composition of CDOM, and occurrence and size of organic/iron and iron-rich nanocolloids were related to variations in their sources from either the upper organic

  7. Light-Induced Dielectrophoretic Manipulation of DNA

    PubMed Central

    Hoeb, Marco; Rädler, Joachim O.; Klein, Stefan; Stutzmann, Martin; Brandt, Martin S.

    2007-01-01

    Light-induced dielectrophoretic movement of polystyrene beads and λ-DNA is studied using thin films of amorphous hydrogenated silicon as local photoaddressable electrodes with a diameter of 4 μm. Positive (high-field seeking) dielectrophoretic movement is observed for both types of objects. The absence of strong negative (low-field seeking) dielectrophoresis of DNA at high frequencies is in agreement with the similarity of the dielectric constants of DNA and water, the real part of the dielectric function. The corresponding imaginary part of the dielectric function governed by the conductivity of DNA can be determined from a comparison of the frequency dependence of the dielectrophoretic drift velocity with the Clausius-Mossotti relation. PMID:17483160

  8. Mechanism and kinetics of the loss of poorly soluble drugs from liposomal carriers studied by a novel flow field-flow fractionation-based drug release-/transfer-assay.

    PubMed

    Hinna, Askell Hvid; Hupfeld, Stefan; Kuntsche, Judith; Bauer-Brandl, Annette; Brandl, Martin

    2016-06-28

    Liposomes represent a versatile drug formulation approach e.g. for improving the water-solubility of poorly soluble drugs but also to achieve drug targeting and controlled release. For the latter applications it is essential that the drug remains associated with the liposomal carrier during transit in the vascular bed. A range of in vitro test methods has been suggested over the years for prediction of the release of drug from liposomal carriers. The majority of these fail to give a realistic prediction for poorly water-soluble drugs due to the intrinsic tendency of such compounds to remain associated with liposome bilayers even upon extensive dilution. Upon i.v. injection, in contrast, rapid drug loss often occurs due to drug transfer from the liposomal carriers to endogenous lipophilic sinks such as lipoproteins, plasma proteins or membranes of red blood cells and endothelial cells. Here we report on the application of a recently introduced in vitro predictive drug transfer assay based on incubation of the liposomal drug carrier with large multilamellar liposomes, the latter serving as a biomimetic model sink, using flow field-flow fractionation as a tool to separate the two types of liposomes. By quantifying the amount of drug remaining associated with the liposomal drug carrier as well as that transferred to the acceptor liposomes at distinct times of incubation, both the kinetics of drug transfer and release to the water phase could be established for the model drug p-THPP (5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-hydroxyphenyl)21H,23H-porphine). p-THPP is structurally similar to temoporfin, a photosensitizer which is under clinical evaluation in a liposomal formulation. Mechanistic insights were gained by varying the donor-to-acceptor lipid mass ratio, size and lamellarity of the liposomes. Drug transfer kinetics from one liposome to another was found rate determining as compared to redistribution from the outermost to the inner concentric bilayers, such that the overall

  9. Dielectrophoretic Traps for Single-Particle Patterning

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Adam; Voldman, Joel

    2005-01-01

    We present a novel microfabricated dielectrophoretic trap designed to pattern large arrays of single cells. Because flowing away untrapped cells is often the rate-limiting step during cell patterning, we designed the trap to be strong enough to hold particles against practical flow rates. We experimentally validated the trap strength by measuring the maximum flow rate that polystyrene beads could withstand while remaining trapped. These bead experiments have shown excellent agreement with our model predictions, without the use of fitting parameters. The model was able to provide us with a fundamental understanding of how the traps work, and additionally allowed us to establish a set of design rules for optimizing the traps for a wide range of cell sizes. We provide the foundations for an enabling technology that can be used to pattern cells in unique ways, allowing us to do novel cell biology experiments at the microscale. PMID:15613624

  10. Nanoscale dielectrophoretic spectroscopy of individual immobilized mammalian blood cells.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Brian P; Hilton, Al M; Simpson, Garth J

    2006-10-01

    Dielectrophoretic force microscopy (DEPFM) and spectroscopy have been performed on individual intact surface-immobilized mammalian red blood cells. Dielectrophoretic force spectra were obtained in situ in approximately 125 ms and could be acquired over a region comparable in dimension to the effective diameter of a scanning probe microscopy tip. Good agreement was observed between the measured dielectrophoretic spectra and predictions using a single-shell cell model. In addition to allowing for highly localized dielectric characterization, DEPFM provided a simple means for noncontact imaging of mammalian blood cells under aqueous conditions. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of using DEPFM to monitor localized changes in membrane capacitance in real time with high spatial resolution on immobilized cells, complementing previous studies of mobile whole cells and cell suspensions. PMID:16798803

  11. Dielectrophoresis and dielectrophoretic impedance detection of adenovirus and rotavirus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Michihiko; Ding, Zhenhao; Suehiro, Junya

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is the electrical detection of pathogenic viruses, namely, adenovirus and rotavirus, using dielectrophoretic impedance measurement (DEPIM). DEPIM consists of two simultaneous processes: dielectrophoretic trapping of the target and measurement of the impedance change and increase in conductance with the number of trapped targets. This is the first study of applying DEPIM, which was originally developed to detect bacteria suspended in aqueous solutions, to virus detection. The dielectric properties of the viruses were also investigated in terms of their dielectrophoretic behavior. Although their estimated dielectric properties were different from those of bacteria, the trapped viruses increased the conductance of the microelectrode in a manner similar to that in bacteria detection. We demonstrated the electrical detection of viruses within 60 s at concentrations as low as 70 ng/ml for adenovirus and 50 ng/ml for rotavirus.

  12. Fifty years of dielectrophoretic cell separation technology

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    In 1966, Pohl and Hawk [Science 152, 647–649 (1966)] published the first demonstration of dielectrophoresis of living and dead yeast cells; their paper described how the different ways in which the cells responded to an applied nonuniform electric field could form the basis of a cell separation method. Fifty years later, the field of dielectrophoretic (DEP) cell separation has expanded, with myriad demonstrations of its ability to sort cells on the basis of differences in electrical properties without the need for chemical labelling. As DEP separation enters its second half-century, new approaches are being found to move the technique from laboratory prototypes to functional commercial devices; to gain widespread acceptance beyond the DEP community, it will be necessary to develop ways of separating cells with throughputs, purities, and cell recovery comparable to gold-standard techniques in life sciences, such as fluorescence- and magnetically activated cell sorting. In this paper, the history of DEP separation is charted, from a description of the work leading up to the first paper, to the current dual approaches of electrode-based and electrodeless DEP separation, and the path to future acceptance outside the DEP mainstream is considered. PMID:27462377

  13. Fifty years of dielectrophoretic cell separation technology.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Michael P

    2016-05-01

    In 1966, Pohl and Hawk [Science 152, 647-649 (1966)] published the first demonstration of dielectrophoresis of living and dead yeast cells; their paper described how the different ways in which the cells responded to an applied nonuniform electric field could form the basis of a cell separation method. Fifty years later, the field of dielectrophoretic (DEP) cell separation has expanded, with myriad demonstrations of its ability to sort cells on the basis of differences in electrical properties without the need for chemical labelling. As DEP separation enters its second half-century, new approaches are being found to move the technique from laboratory prototypes to functional commercial devices; to gain widespread acceptance beyond the DEP community, it will be necessary to develop ways of separating cells with throughputs, purities, and cell recovery comparable to gold-standard techniques in life sciences, such as fluorescence- and magnetically activated cell sorting. In this paper, the history of DEP separation is charted, from a description of the work leading up to the first paper, to the current dual approaches of electrode-based and electrodeless DEP separation, and the path to future acceptance outside the DEP mainstream is considered. PMID:27462377

  14. Dielectrophoretic Force Imaging of Biological Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Garth J.

    2004-03-01

    A new scanning probe microscopic technique is demonstrated, exploiting AC electrokinetic forces for real-time functional imaging of biological interfaces with nanometer-scale spatial resolution. Dielectrophoresis (DEP) describes the mobility of particles in radio-frequency AC electric fields and is related to the frequency-dependent polarizability. Similar to the forces in optical trapping, DEP interactions are greatest for large field gradients, such as those adjacent to highly curved electrodes. Moderate AC potentials (5 Vpp) are more than sufficient to induce surface forces strong enough for reliable feedback during imaging. Simply changing the AC frequency can change the nature of the DEP force from repulsive to attractive. By scanning the AC frequency, dielectrophoretic spectroscopy using light with a wavelength of ˜ 1/2 km can be performed with spatial resolution of a few nanometers (about 11 to 12 orders of magnitude below the diffraction-limit), representing a new level of achievement in near-field microscopy. Among other things, the facile applicability of DEP imaging in aqueous media is ideally suited for ultrahigh resolution microscopy of biological systems, including supported lipid bilayer membranes, immobilized organelles, and living cells.

  15. Movement of particles using sequentially activated dielectrophoretic particle trapping

    DOEpatents

    Miles, Robin R.

    2004-02-03

    Manipulation of DNA and cells/spores using dielectrophoretic (DEP) forces to perform sample preparation protocols for polymerized chain reaction (PCR) based assays for various applications. This is accomplished by movement of particles using sequentially activated dielectrophoretic particle trapping. DEP forces induce a dipole in particles, and these particles can be trapped in non-uniform fields. The particles can be trapped in the high field strength region of one set of electrodes. By switching off this field and switching on an adjacent electrodes, particles can be moved down a channel with little or no flow.

  16. Dielectrophoretic Separation of Cancer Cells from Blood

    PubMed Central

    Gascoyne, Peter R. C.; Wang, Xiao-Bo; Huang, Ying; Becker, Frederick F.

    2009-01-01

    Recent measurements have demonstrated that the dielectric properties of cells depend on their type and physiological status. For example, MDA-231 human breast cancer cells were found to have a mean plasma membrane specific capacitance of 26 mF/m2, more than double the value (11 mF/m2) observed for resting T-lymphocytes. When an inhomogeneous ac electric field is applied to a particle, a dielectrophoretic (DEP) force arises that depends on the particle dielectric properties. Therefore, cells having different dielectric characteristics will experience differential DEP forces when subjected to such a field. In this article, we demonstrate the use of differential DEP forces for the separation of several different cancerous cell types from blood in a dielectric affinity column. These separations were accomplished using thin, flat chambers having microelectrode arrays on the bottom wall. DEP forces generated by the application of ac fields to the electrodes were used to influence the rate of elution of cells from the chamber by hydrodynamic forces within a parabolic fluid flow profile. Electrorotation measurements were first made on the various cell types found within cell mixtures to be separated, and theoretical modeling was used to derive the cell dielectric parameters. Optimum separation conditions were then predicted from the frequency and suspension conductivity dependencies of cell DEP responses defined by these parameters. Cell separations were then undertaken for various ratios of cancerous to normal cells at different concentrations. Eluted cells were characterized in terms of separation efficiency, cell viability, and separation speed. For example, 100% efficiency was achieved for purging MDA-231 cells from blood at the tumor to normal cell ratio 1:1 × 105 or 1:3 × 105, cell viability was not compromised, and separation rates were at least 103 cells/s. Theoretical and experimental criteria for the design and operation of such separators are presented. PMID

  17. A novel concept of dielectrophoretic engine oil filter.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yueyang; Elele, Ezinwa; Khusid, Boris

    2011-09-01

    A novel concept of an alternating current (AC) dielectrophoretic filter with a three-dimensional electrode array is presented. A filter is constructed by winding into layers around the core tube two sheets of woven metal wire-mesh with several sheets of woven insulating wire-mesh sandwiched in between. Contrary to conventional dielectrophoretic devices, the proposed design of electrodes generates a high-gradient field over a large working volume by applying several hundred volts at a standard frequency of 60 Hz. The operating principle of filtration is based on our recently developed method of AC dielectrophoretic gating for microfluidics. The filtration efficiency is expressed in terms of two non-dimensional parameters, which describe the combined influence of the particle polarizability and size, the oil viscosity and flow rate, and the field gradient on the particle captivity. The proof-of-concept is tested by measuring the single-pass performance of two filters on positively polarized particles dispersed in engine oil: spherical glass beads, fused aluminum oxide powder, and silicon metal powder, all smaller than the mesh opening. The results obtained are used to consider the potential of using AC dielectrophoretic filtration and provide critical design guidelines for the development of a filter based on the retention capability of challenge particles. PMID:21853447

  18. Nanofluidic devices for dielectrophoretic mobility shift assays by soft lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viefhues, M.; Regtmeier, J.; Anselmetti, D.

    2012-11-01

    We report development and application of 3D structured nano-microfluidic devices that were produced via soft lithography with poly(dimethylsiloxane). The procedure does not rely on hazardous or time-consuming production steps. Here, the nanochannels were created by channel-spanning ridges that reduce the flow height of the microchannel. Several realizations of the ridge layout and nanochannel height are demonstrated, depicting the high potential of this technique. The nanochannels proved to be stable even for width-to-height aspect ratios of 873:1. Additionally, an application of these submicrometer structures is presented with a new technique of a dielectrophoretic mobility shift assay (DEMSA). The DEMSA was used to detect different DNA variants, e.g. protein-DNA-complexes, via a shift in (dielectrophoretically retarded) migration velocities within an array of nanoslits.

  19. Dielectrophoretic Stretching of DNA Tethered to a Fiber Tip

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Changbae; Kaur, Harpreet; McNabb, David S.; Li, Jiali

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we studied the stretching of λ phage DNA molecules immobilized on an optical fiber tip attached to a force sensitive tuning fork under AC electric fields. We designed a two electrodes stretching system in a small chamber: one is a gold-coated optical fiber tip electrode, and the other is a gold-coated flat electrode. By applying a dielectrophoretic force, the immobilized λ DNA molecules on the tip are stretched and the stretching process is monitored by a fluorescent microscope. The DNA stretching in three-dimensional space is optimized by varying electrode shape, electrode gap distance, AC frequency, and solution conductivity. By observing the vibrational amplitude change of a quartz tuning fork, we measured the effects due to Joule heating and the dielectrophoretic force on the tethered DNA molecules in solution. This work demonstrates a method to manipulate and characterize immobilized λ DNA molecules on a probe tip for further study of single DNA molecules. PMID:25741602

  20. Dielectrophoretic mobility determination in DC insulator-based dielectrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Noah G.; Jones, Paul V.; Mahanti, Prasun; Chen, Kang Ping; Taylor, Thomas J.; Hayes, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Insulator based dielectrophoresis is powerful tool for separating and charactering particles, yet it is limited by a lack of quantitative characterizations. Here this limitation is addressed by employing a method capable of quantifying the dielectrophoretic mobility of particles. Using streak-based velocimetry the particle properties are deduced from their motion in a microfluidic channel with a constant electric field gradient. From this approach the dielectrophoretic mobility of 1 μm polystyrene particles was found to be −2 ± 0.4 × 10−8 cm4/(V2·s). In the future, such quantitative treatment will allow for the elucidation of unique insights and rational design of devices. PMID:21823129

  1. A novel concept of dielectrophoretic engine oil filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khusid, Boris; Shen, Yueyang; Elele, Ezinwa

    2011-11-01

    A novel concept of an alternating current (AC) dielectrophoretic filter with a three-dimensional electrode array is presented. A filter is constructed by winding into layers around the core tube two sheets of woven metal wire-mesh with several sheets of woven insulating wire-mesh sandwiched in between. Contrary to conventional dielectrophoretic devices, the proposed design of electrodes generates a high-gradient field over a large working volume by applying several hundred volts at a standard frequency of 60 Hz. The operating principle of filtration is based on our recently developed method of AC dielectrophoretic gating for microfluidics. The filtration efficiency is expressed in terms of two non-dimensional parameters which describe the combined influence of the particle polarizability and size, the oil viscosity and flow rate, and the field gradient on the particle captivity. The proof-of-concept is tested by measuring the single-pass performance of two filters on positively polarized particles dispersed in engine oil: spherical glass beads, fused aluminum oxide powder, and silicon metal powder, all smaller than the mesh opening. The results obtained provide critical design guidelines for the development of a filter based on the retention capability of challenge particles. The work was supported in part by ONR and NSF.

  2. Development of a 3D graphene electrode dielectrophoretic device.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hongyu; Tewari, Radheshyam; Fukushima, Hiroyuki; Narendra, Jeffri; Heldt, Caryn; King, Julia; Minerick, Adrienne R

    2014-01-01

    The design and fabrication of a novel 3D electrode microdevice using 50 µm thick graphene paper and 100 µm double sided tape is described. The protocol details the procedures to construct a versatile, reusable, multiple layer, laminated dielectrophoresis chamber. Specifically, six layers of 50 µm x 0.7 cm x 2 cm graphene paper and five layers of double sided tape were alternately stacked together, then clamped to a glass slide. Then a 700 μm diameter micro-well was drilled through the laminated structure using a computer-controlled micro drilling machine. Insulating properties of the tape layer between adjacent graphene layers were assured by resistance tests. Silver conductive epoxy connected alternate layers of graphene paper and formed stable connections between the graphene paper and external copper wire electrodes. The finished device was then clamped and sealed to a glass slide. The electric field gradient was modeled within the multi-layer device. Dielectrophoretic behaviors of 6 μm polystyrene beads were demonstrated in the 1 mm deep micro-well, with medium conductivities ranging from 0.0001 S/m to 1.3 S/m, and applied signal frequencies from 100 Hz to 10 MHz. Negative dielectrophoretic responses were observed in three dimensions over most of the conductivity-frequency space and cross-over frequency values are consistent with previously reported literature values. The device did not prevent AC electroosmosis and electrothermal flows, which occurred in the low and high frequency regions, respectively. The graphene paper utilized in this device is versatile and could subsequently function as a biosensor after dielectrophoretic characterizations are complete. PMID:24998694

  3. Development of a 3D Graphene Electrode Dielectrophoretic Device

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Hongyu; Tewari, Radheshyam; Fukushima, Hiroyuki; Narendra, Jeffri; Heldt, Caryn; King, Julia; Minerick, Adrienne R.

    2014-01-01

    The design and fabrication of a novel 3D electrode microdevice using 50 µm thick graphene paper and 100 µm double sided tape is described. The protocol details the procedures to construct a versatile, reusable, multiple layer, laminated dielectrophoresis chamber. Specifically, six layers of 50 µm x 0.7 cm x 2 cm graphene paper and five layers of double sided tape were alternately stacked together, then clamped to a glass slide. Then a 700 μm diameter micro-well was drilled through the laminated structure using a computer-controlled micro drilling machine. Insulating properties of the tape layer between adjacent graphene layers were assured by resistance tests. Silver conductive epoxy connected alternate layers of graphene paper and formed stable connections between the graphene paper and external copper wire electrodes. The finished device was then clamped and sealed to a glass slide. The electric field gradient was modeled within the multi-layer device. Dielectrophoretic behaviors of 6 μm polystyrene beads were demonstrated in the 1 mm deep micro-well, with medium conductivities ranging from 0.0001 S/m to 1.3 S/m, and applied signal frequencies from 100 Hz to 10 MHz. Negative dielectrophoretic responses were observed in three dimensions over most of the conductivity-frequency space and cross-over frequency values are consistent with previously reported literature values. The device did not prevent AC electroosmosis and electrothermal flows, which occurred in the low and high frequency regions, respectively. The graphene paper utilized in this device is versatile and could subsequently function as a biosensor after dielectrophoretic characterizations are complete. PMID:24998694

  4. Dielectrophoretic Manipulation and Separation of Microparticles Using Microarray Dot Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Yafouz, Bashar; Kadri, Nahrizul Adib; Ibrahim, Fatimah

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces a dielectrophoretic system for the manipulation and separation of microparticles. The system is composed of five layers and utilizes microarray dot electrodes. We validated our system by conducting size-dependent manipulation and separation experiments on 1, 5 and 15 μm polystyrene particles. Our findings confirm the capability of the proposed device to rapidly and efficiently manipulate and separate microparticles of various dimensions, utilizing positive and negative dielectrophoresis (DEP) effects. Larger size particles were repelled and concentrated in the center of the dot by negative DEP, while the smaller sizes were attracted and collected by the edge of the dot by positive DEP. PMID:24705632

  5. Dielectrophoretic particle-particle interaction under AC electrohydrodynamic flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Doh-Hyoung; Yu, Chengjie; Papazoglou, Elisabeth; Farouk, Bakhtier; Noh, Hongseok M

    2011-09-01

    We used the Maxwell stress tensor method to understand dielectrophoretic particle-particle interactions and applied the results to the interpretation of particle behaviors under alternating current (AC) electrohydrodynamic conditions such as AC electroosmosis (ACEO) and electrothermal flow (ETF). Distinct particle behaviors were observed under ACEO and ETF. Diverse particle-particle interactions observed in experiments such as particle clustering, particles keeping a certain distance from each other, chain and disc formation and their rotation, are explained based on the numerical simulation data. The improved understanding of particle behaviors in AC electrohydrodynamic flows presented here will enable researchers to design better particle manipulation strategies for lab-on-a-chip applications. PMID:21823132

  6. Collection, Measurement and Treatment of Microorganism Using Dielectrophoretic Micro Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Satoshi

    Constant monitoring of manufacturing processes has been essential in food industry because of global expansion of microbial infection. Micro-scale dielectrophoretic method is an attractive technique for direct operation and quantitative detection of bioparticles. The electrical system is capable of rapid and simple treatments corresponding to severe legal control for food safety. In this paper, newly developed techniques are reviewed for bacterial concentration, detection and sterilization using dielectrophoresis in a micro reactor. The perspective to an integrated micro device of those components is also discussed.

  7. A unified approach to dielectric single cell analysis: impedance and dielectrophoretic force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Valero, Ana; Braschler, Thomas; Renaud, Philippe

    2010-09-01

    In this review we present a unified approach for single cell dielectric spectroscopy. Impedance spectroscopy and dielectrophoretic cell sorting, current microtechnologies applied in electrical analysis of single cells are discussed based on their closely related physical principles. In addition, examples of microfluidic devices will be presented: a microfabricated flow cytometer for single cell discrimination based on impedance analysis and a miniaturized continuous dielectrophoretic cell sorter, both using the concept of liquid electrodes. Using the experimental results obtained from both microdevices, we give a comparative overview over the dielectrophoretic sorting and impedance spectroscopy. PMID:20664865

  8. Dielectrophoretic behaviours of microdroplet sandwiched between LN substrates

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lipin; Li, Shaobei; Fan, Bolin; Yan, Wenbo; Wang, Donghui; Shi, Lihong; Chen, Hongjian; Ban, Dechao; Sun, Shihao

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a sandwich configuration for microfluidic manipulation in LiNbO3 platform based on photovoltaic effect, and the behaviours of dielectric microdroplet under this sandwich configuration are investigated. It is found that the microdroplet can generate in the form of liquid bridge inside the LiNbO3-based sandwich structure under the governing dielectrophoretic force, and the dynamic process of microdroplet generation highly depends on the substrate combinations. Dynamic features found for different combinations are explained by the different electrostatic field distribution basing on the finite-element simulation results. Moreover, the electrostatic field required by the microdroplet generation is estimated through meniscus evolution and it is found in good agreement with the simulated electrostatic field inside the sandwich gap. Several kinds of microdroplet manipulations are attempted in this work. We suggest that the local dielectrophoretic force acting on the microdroplet depends on the distribution of the accumulated irradiation dosage. Without using any additional pumping or jetting actuator, the microdroplet can be step-moved, deformed or patterned by the inconsecutive dot-irradiation scheme, as well as elastically stretched out and back or smoothly guided in a designed pass by the consecutive line-irradiation scheme. PMID:27383027

  9. Embryo formation from low sperm concentration by using dielectrophoretic force

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hong-Yuan; Huang, Yu-Hsuan; Kao, Wei-Lun

    2015-01-01

    A biochip system imitates the oviduct of mammals with a microfluidic channel to achieve fertilization in vitro of imprinting-control-region (ICR) mice. We apply a method to manipulate and to position the oocyte and the sperm of ICR mice at the same time in our microfluidic channel with a positive dielectrophoretic (DEP) force. The positive dielectrophoretic response of the oocyte and sperm was exhibited under applied bias conditions AC 10 Vpp waveform, 1 MHz, 10 min. With this method, the concentration of sperm in the vicinity of the oocyte was increased and enhanced the probability of natural fertilization. We used commercial numerical software (CFDRC-ACE+) to simulate the square of the electric field and analyzed the location at which the oocyte and sperm are trapped. The microfluidic devices were designed and fabricated with poly(dimethylsiloxane). The results of our experiments indicate that a positive DEP served to drive the position of the oocyte and the sperm to natural fertilization (average rate of fertilization 51.58%) in our microchannel structures at insemination concentration 1.5 × 106 sperm ml−1. Embryos were cultured to two cells after 24 h and four cells after 48 h. PMID:25825615

  10. Dielectrophoretic Tweezers and Micropost Arrays for Cell and Particle Manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Tom; Lee, Hakho; Westervelt, Robert

    2005-03-01

    We describe a micromanipulator system that uses dielectrophoresis to capture and release cells or particles. Dielectrophoretic tweezers are capable of applying hundreds of piconewtons of force to micron scale objects suspended in liquid and precisely positioning objects in three dimensions. Metal electrodes on either side of a sharp pipette tip provide the electric field gradient necessary. This manipulation technique compliments our micropost array (1) for the manipulation of particles in a microfluidic system. We will discuss applications of dielectrophoresis using hybrid integrated circuit/microfluidic devices (2) with applications that include cell sorting and tissue assembly. This work made possible by a gift from Phillip Morris and the NSEC NSF grant PHY-0117795. 1. T. P. Hunt H. Lee and R. M. Westervelt, ``Addressable micropost array for the dielectrophoretic manipulation of particles in fluid," Appl. Phys. Lett. In Press. 2. H. Lee, et Al. ``An IC/ microfluidic hybrid microsystem for 2D magnetic manipulation of individual biological cells," To appear in IEEE ISSCC, Feb. 2005.

  11. Dielectrophoretic behaviours of microdroplet sandwiched between LN substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lipin; Li, Shaobei; Fan, Bolin; Yan, Wenbo; Wang, Donghui; Shi, Lihong; Chen, Hongjian; Ban, Dechao; Sun, Shihao

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate a sandwich configuration for microfluidic manipulation in LiNbO3 platform based on photovoltaic effect, and the behaviours of dielectric microdroplet under this sandwich configuration are investigated. It is found that the microdroplet can generate in the form of liquid bridge inside the LiNbO3-based sandwich structure under the governing dielectrophoretic force, and the dynamic process of microdroplet generation highly depends on the substrate combinations. Dynamic features found for different combinations are explained by the different electrostatic field distribution basing on the finite-element simulation results. Moreover, the electrostatic field required by the microdroplet generation is estimated through meniscus evolution and it is found in good agreement with the simulated electrostatic field inside the sandwich gap. Several kinds of microdroplet manipulations are attempted in this work. We suggest that the local dielectrophoretic force acting on the microdroplet depends on the distribution of the accumulated irradiation dosage. Without using any additional pumping or jetting actuator, the microdroplet can be step-moved, deformed or patterned by the inconsecutive dot-irradiation scheme, as well as elastically stretched out and back or smoothly guided in a designed pass by the consecutive line-irradiation scheme.

  12. Dielectrophoretic behaviours of microdroplet sandwiched between LN substrates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lipin; Li, Shaobei; Fan, Bolin; Yan, Wenbo; Wang, Donghui; Shi, Lihong; Chen, Hongjian; Ban, Dechao; Sun, Shihao

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a sandwich configuration for microfluidic manipulation in LiNbO3 platform based on photovoltaic effect, and the behaviours of dielectric microdroplet under this sandwich configuration are investigated. It is found that the microdroplet can generate in the form of liquid bridge inside the LiNbO3-based sandwich structure under the governing dielectrophoretic force, and the dynamic process of microdroplet generation highly depends on the substrate combinations. Dynamic features found for different combinations are explained by the different electrostatic field distribution basing on the finite-element simulation results. Moreover, the electrostatic field required by the microdroplet generation is estimated through meniscus evolution and it is found in good agreement with the simulated electrostatic field inside the sandwich gap. Several kinds of microdroplet manipulations are attempted in this work. We suggest that the local dielectrophoretic force acting on the microdroplet depends on the distribution of the accumulated irradiation dosage. Without using any additional pumping or jetting actuator, the microdroplet can be step-moved, deformed or patterned by the inconsecutive dot-irradiation scheme, as well as elastically stretched out and back or smoothly guided in a designed pass by the consecutive line-irradiation scheme. PMID:27383027

  13. Dielectrophoretic micropatterning with microparticle monolayers covalently linked to glass surfaces.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Masato; Yasukawa, Tomoyuki; Mase, Yoshiaki; Oyamatsu, Daisuke; Shiku, Hitoshi; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2004-12-01

    Two-dimensional micropatterns of microparticles were fabricated on glass substrates with negative dielectrophoretic force, and the patterned microparticles were covalently bound on the substrate via cross-linking agents. The line and grid patterns of microparticles were prepared using the repulsive force of negative dielectrophoresis (n-DEP). The template interdigitated microband array (IDA) electrodes (width and gap 50 mum) were incorporated into the dielectrophoretic patterning cell with a fluidic channel. The microstructures on the glass substrates with amino or sulfhydryl groups were immobilized with the cross-linking agents disuccinimidyl suberate (DSS) and m-maleimidobenzoyl-N-hydroxy-succinimide ester (MBS). Diaphorase (Dp), a flavoenzyme, was selectively attached on the patterned microparticles using the maleimide groups of MBS. The enzyme activity on the patterned particles was electrochemically characterized with a scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM) in the presence of NADH and ferrocenylmethanol as a redox mediator. The SECM images proved that Dp was selectively immobilized onto the surface of microparticles to maintain its catalytic activity. PMID:15568852

  14. Dielectrophoretic Sorting of Membrane Protein Nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Bahige G.; Chao, Tzu-Chiao; Kupitz, Christopher; Fromme, Petra; Ros, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    Structure elucidation of large membrane protein complexes still comprises a considerable challenge yet is a key factor in drug development and disease combat. Femtosecond nanocrystallography is an emerging technique with which structural information of membrane proteins is obtained without the need to grow large crystals, thus overcoming the experimental riddle faced in traditional crystallography methods. Here, we demonstrate for the first time a microfluidic device capable of sorting membrane protein crystals based on size using dielectrophoresis. We demonstrate the excellent sorting power of this new approach with numerical simulations of selected sub-micrometer beads in excellent agreement with experimental observations. Crystals from batch crystallization broths of the huge membrane protein complex photosystem I were sorted without further treatment, resulting in a high degree of monodispersity and crystallinity in the ~ 100 nm size range. Microfluidic integration, continuous sorting, and nanometer-sized crystal fractions make this method ideal for direct coupling to femtosecond nanocrystallography. PMID:24004002

  15. Dielectrophoretic manipulation of the mixture of isotropic and nematic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Soo-Dong; Lee, Bomi; Kang, Shin-Woong; Song, Jang-Kun

    2015-08-01

    In various applications involving liquid crystals, the manipulation of the nanoscale molecular assembly and microscale director alignment is highly useful. Here we show that a nematic-isotropic mixture, a unique bi-liquid system, has potential for the fabrication of microstructures having an ordered phase within a disordered phase, or vice versa. The volume expansion and shrinkage, migration, splitting, mergence and elongation of one phase within the other are easily accomplished via thermal treatment and dielectrophoretic manipulation. This is particularly achievable when one phase is suspended in the middle. In that case, a highly biased ordered-phase preference of surfaces, that is, the nematic-philic nature of a polyimide layer and the nematic-phobic nature of a self-assembled monolayer of chlorosilane derivatives, is used. Further, by combining this approach with photopolymerization, the patterned microstructure is solidified as a patterned polymer film having both isotropic and anisotropic molecular arrangements simultaneously, or as a template with a morphological variation.

  16. Cell Patterning for Liver Tissue Engineering via Dielectrophoretic Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Yahya, Wan Nurlina Wan; Kadri, Nahrizul Adib; Ibrahim, Fatimah

    2014-01-01

    Liver transplantation is the most common treatment for patients with end-stage liver failure. However, liver transplantation is greatly limited by a shortage of donors. Liver tissue engineering may offer an alternative by providing an implantable engineered liver. Currently, diverse types of engineering approaches for in vitro liver cell culture are available, including scaffold-based methods, microfluidic platforms, and micropatterning techniques. Active cell patterning via dielectrophoretic (DEP) force showed some advantages over other methods, including high speed, ease of handling, high precision and being label-free. This article summarizes liver function and regenerative mechanisms for better understanding in developing engineered liver. We then review recent advances in liver tissue engineering techniques and focus on DEP-based cell patterning, including microelectrode design and patterning configuration. PMID:24991941

  17. Dielectrophoretic stretching of DNA tethered to a fiber tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun, Changbae; Kaur, Harpreet; McNabb, David S.; Li, Jiali

    2015-03-01

    In this work, we studied the stretching of λ phage DNA molecules immobilized on an optical fiber tip attached to a force sensitive tuning fork under ac electric fields. We designed a two electrodes stretching system in a small chamber: one is a gold-coated optical fiber tip electrode, and the other is a gold-coated flat electrode. By applying a dielectrophoretic (DEP) force, the immobilized λ DNA molecules on the tip are stretched and the stretching process is monitored by a fluorescent microscope. The DNA stretching in three-dimensional space is optimized by varying electrode shape, electrode gap distance, ac frequency, and solution conductivity. By observing the vibrational amplitude change of a quartz tuning fork, we measured the effects due to Joule heating and the DEP force on the tethered DNA molecules in solution. This work demonstrates a method to manipulate and characterize immobilized λ DNA molecules on a probe tip for further study of single DNA molecules.

  18. Structural and Transport Properties of Dielectrophoretically Assembled Interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozturk, Birol; Talukdar, Ishan; Thapa, Prem; Blackledge, Charles; Grischkowsky, Daniel; Flanders, Bret

    2006-03-01

    Dielectrophoresis was used to form ˜140nm diameter interconnects composed of gold nanorods between targeted points in a circuit. Cleanroom-based lithographic procedures were used to produce identical arrays of electrodes, improving the sample-to-sample reproducibility of the interconnect-conductances to ˜10%. Transmission electron microscopy and low temperature conductivity analyses indicate that the Coulomb Blockade associated with the individual nanorods is the primary conductance-limiting feature. To further improve the reproducibility of the structural and transport properties of dielectrophoretic interconnects, we investigate submicron wire formation in aqueous solutions of indium acetate. Our preliminary data show that single crystal wires with submicron diameters may be fabricated from such solutions.

  19. Dielectrophoretic immobilization of proteins: Quantification by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Laux, Eva-Maria; Knigge, Xenia; Bier, Frank F; Wenger, Christian; Hölzel, Ralph

    2015-09-01

    The combination of alternating electric fields with nanometer-sized electrodes allows the permanent immobilization of proteins by dielectrophoretic force. Here, atomic force microscopy is introduced as a quantification method, and results are compared with fluorescence microscopy. Experimental parameters, for example the applied voltage and duration of field application, are varied systematically, and the influence on the amount of immobilized proteins is investigated. A linear correlation to the duration of field application was found by atomic force microscopy, and both microscopical methods yield a square dependence of the amount of immobilized proteins on the applied voltage. While fluorescence microscopy allows real-time imaging, atomic force microscopy reveals immobilized proteins obscured in fluorescence images due to low S/N. Furthermore, the higher spatial resolution of the atomic force microscope enables the visualization of the protein distribution on single nanoelectrodes. The electric field distribution is calculated and compared to experimental results with very good agreement to atomic force microscopy measurements. PMID:26010162

  20. Dielectrophoretic capture of low abundance cell population using thick electrodes.

    PubMed

    Marchalot, Julien; Chateaux, Jean-François; Faivre, Magalie; Mertani, Hichem C; Ferrigno, Rosaria; Deman, Anne-Laure

    2015-09-01

    Enrichment of rare cell populations such as Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs) is a critical step before performing analysis. This paper presents a polymeric microfluidic device with integrated thick Carbon-PolyDimethylSiloxane composite (C-PDMS) electrodes designed to carry out dielectrophoretic (DEP) trapping of low abundance biological cells. Such conductive composite material presents advantages over metallic structures. Indeed, as it combines properties of both the matrix and doping particles, C-PDMS allows the easy and fast integration of conductive microstructures using a soft-lithography approach while preserving O2 plasma bonding properties of PDMS substrate and avoiding a cumbersome alignment procedure. Here, we first performed numerical simulations to demonstrate the advantage of such thick C-PDMS electrodes over a coplanar electrode configuration. It is well established that dielectrophoretic force ([Formula: see text]) decreases quickly as the distance from the electrode surface increases resulting in coplanar configuration to a low trapping efficiency at high flow rate. Here, we showed quantitatively that by using electrodes as thick as a microchannel height, it is possible to extend the DEP force influence in the whole volume of the channel compared to coplanar electrode configuration and maintaining high trapping efficiency while increasing the throughput. This model was then used to numerically optimize a thick C-PDMS electrode configuration in terms of trapping efficiency. Then, optimized microfluidic configurations were fabricated and tested at various flow rates for the trapping of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line. We reached trapping efficiencies of 97% at 20 μl/h and 78.7% at 80 μl/h, for 100 μm thick electrodes. Finally, we applied our device to the separation and localized trapping of CTCs (MDA-MB-231) from a red blood cells sample (concentration ratio of 1:10). PMID:26392836

  1. Optimization of coil geometries for bone fracture healing via dielectrophoretic force stimulation - a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Kibritoğlu, Erman; Gülçür, Halil Özcan

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we propose a novel technique for shortening fracture healing times based on the use of dielectrophoretic forces (DEPFs). If a non-uniform electromagnetic field is applied around a fracture site, red blood cells within the blood will be polarized; creating electrical dipoles. The dielectrophoretic forces resulting from the interaction of these dipoles and the electromagnetic field, can be used to manipulate blood flow at a fracture site, promote vascularization, increase transmembrane signaling, increase supply of nutrients, necessary hormones and growth factors at the fracture site and thus may help bone healing. For the generation of non-uniform fields we considered three different coil designs (linear, parabolic and square root) and using Mathcad numerically studied the dielectrophoretic forces for a long bone fracture where the main arteries are vertically-oriented and the blood flow is downward. The gravitational force and the drag force on the red blood cells determine the steady state blood flow. The dielectrophoretic force added to the force balance is functional in increasing the blood flow. The ratio of the velocity in the presence of dielectrophoresis to the velocity without dielectrophoresis (called here as the Dielectrophoretic Force Factor, K(DEpF)) is a good measure of the performance of the dielectrophoresis, since it indicates the increase in blood flow. It was found that the dielectorophoretic force reaches peak levels at a frequency range between 5-15 Hz. At 5 Hz, the average value of dielectrophoretic force factor is 1.90, 2.51 and 1.61 for the linear, parabolic and the square root coils, respectively. The parabolic coil results in the best DEPF and therefore would be the configuration to use in an experimental study to determine if DEPF is useful for bone healing. PMID:26737886

  2. Dielectrophoretic registration of living cells to a microelectrode array.

    PubMed

    Gray, Darren S; Tan, John L; Voldman, Joel; Chen, Christopher S

    2004-02-15

    We present a novel microfabricated device to simultaneously and actively trap thousands of single mammalian cells in alignment with a planar microelectrode array. Thousands of 3 micromdiameter trapping electrodes were fabricated within the bottom of a parallel-plate flow chamber. Cells were trapped on the electrodes and held against destabilizing fluid flows by dielectrophoretic forces generated in the device. In general, each electrode trapped only one cell. Adhesive regions were patterned onto the surface in alignment with the traps such that cells adhered to the array surface and remained in alignment with the electrodes. By driving the device with different voltages, we showed that trapped cells could be killed by stronger electric fields. However, with weaker fields, cells were not damaged during trapping, as indicated by the similar morphologies and proliferation rates of trapped cells versus controls. As a test of the device, we patterned approximately 20000 cells onto a 1cm(2) grid of rectangular adhesive regions, with two electrodes and thus two cells per rectangle. Our method obtained 70+/-1% fidelity versus 17+/-1% when using an existing cell-registration technique. By allowing the placement of desired numbers of cells at specified locations, this approach addresses many needs to manipulate and register cells to the surfaces of biosensors and other devices with high precision and fidelity. PMID:14709396

  3. Dielectrophoretic registration of living cells to a microelectrode array.

    PubMed

    Gray, Darren S; Tan, John L; Voldman, Joel; Chen, Christopher S

    2004-07-15

    We present a novel microfabricated device to simultaneously and actively trap thousands of single mammalian cells in alignment with a planar microelectrode array. Thousands of 3 Ipm diameter trapping electrodes were fabricated within the bottom of a parallel-plate flow chamber. Cells were trapped on the electrodes and held against destabilizing fluid flows by dielectrophoretic forces generated in the device. In general, each electrode trapped only one cell. Adhesive regions were patterned onto the surface in alignment with the traps such that cells adhered to the array surface and remained in alignment with the electrodes. By driving the device with different voltages, we showed that trapped cells could be killed by stronger electric fields. However, with weaker fields, cells were not damaged during trapping, as indicated by the similar morphologies and proliferation rates of trapped cells versus controls. As a test of the device, we patterned approximately 20,000 cells onto aI cm2 grid of rectangular adhesive regions, with two electrodes and thus two cells per rectangle. Our method obtained 70 +/- 1% fidelity versus 17 +/- 1% when using an existing cell-registration technique. By allowing the placement of desired numbers of cells at specified locations, this approach addresses many needs to manipulate and register cells to the surfaces of biosensors and other devices with high precision and fidelity. PMID:15198083

  4. Dielectrophoretic manipulation of the mixture of isotropic and nematic liquid.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo-Dong; Lee, Bomi; Kang, Shin-Woong; Song, Jang-Kun

    2015-01-01

    In various applications involving liquid crystals, the manipulation of the nanoscale molecular assembly and microscale director alignment is highly useful. Here we show that a nematic-isotropic mixture, a unique bi-liquid system, has potential for the fabrication of microstructures having an ordered phase within a disordered phase, or vice versa. The volume expansion and shrinkage, migration, splitting, mergence and elongation of one phase within the other are easily accomplished via thermal treatment and dielectrophoretic manipulation. This is particularly achievable when one phase is suspended in the middle. In that case, a highly biased ordered-phase preference of surfaces, that is, the nematic-philic nature of a polyimide layer and the nematic-phobic nature of a self-assembled monolayer of chlorosilane derivatives, is used. Further, by combining this approach with photopolymerization, the patterned microstructure is solidified as a patterned polymer film having both isotropic and anisotropic molecular arrangements simultaneously, or as a template with a morphological variation. PMID:26242251

  5. Numerical study on dielectrophoretic chaining of two ellipsoidal particles.

    PubMed

    House, Dustin L; Luo, Haoxiang; Chang, Siyuan

    2012-05-15

    Electric field-induced assembly of biological and synthetic particles has proven useful in two- and three-dimensional fabrication of composite materials, microwires, photonic crystals, artificial tissues, and more. Biological particles are typically irregularly shaped, and using non-spherical synthetic particles has the ability to expand current applications. However, there is much to be understood about the dielectrophoretic (DEP) interaction that takes place between particles of general shape. In this work, we numerically study the DEP interaction between two prolate spheroid particles suspended in an unbounded fluid. The boundary-element method (BEM) is applied to solve the coupled electric field, Stokes flow, and particle motion, and the DEP forces are obtained by integrating the Maxwell stress tensor over the particle surfaces. Effects of the initial configuration and aspect ratio are investigated. Results show that the particles go through a self-rotation process, that is, electro-orientation, while translating slowly to form a chain pair. The final formation resembles the chaining pattern observed previously in experiments using densely distributed ellipsoidal particles. Thus, the transient behavior and particle-particle interaction exhibited in the current study could be used as the fundamental mechanism to explain the phenomenon in the experiment. PMID:22340950

  6. Dielectrophoretic discrimination of cancer cells on a microchip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chengjun; Liu, Chengxun; Minne, Bart; Ramirez Hernandez, Juan Enrique; Stakenborg, Tim; Lagae, Liesbet

    2014-10-01

    The analysis of single cell type typically requires expensive equipments in combination with labeling techniques. As a label-free alternative, in this letter, the characteristic dielectric properties of various cancer cell lines (MCF-7, SKOV-3, MDA-MB-231, and LnCap) and healthy peripheral blood mononuclear cells were examined and compared using the dielectrophoretic (DEP) crossover frequency technique. We found that each type of the cancer cells shows a distinct DEP crossover frequency with an order of SKOV-3, MDA-MB-231, MCF-7, and LnCap from low to high frequency, from which the specific cell membrane capacitance and membrane conductance could be derived. Cell fixation and antibody coupling were found to have minimal or no effects on the cell dielectric properties while cell permeabilization significantly changed the DEP crossover frequency. These findings suggested that the DEP crossover frequency is promising to be used as a "dielectric finger print" to discriminate different cell types and may even enable the specific manipulation of certain cell types, for example, to isolate cancer cells from blood.

  7. Dielectrophoretic Rayleigh-Bénard convection under microgravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, H. N.; Tadie Fogaing, M.; Crumeyrolle, O.; Mutabazi, I.

    2013-04-01

    Thermal convection in a dielectric fluid layer between two parallel plates subjected to an alternating electric field and a temperature gradient is investigated under microgravity conditions. A thermoelectric coupling resulting from the thermal variation of the electric permittivity of the fluid produces the dielectrophoretic (DEP) body force, which can be regarded as thermal buoyancy due to an effective gravity. This electric gravity can destabilize a stationary conductive state of the fluid to develop convection. The similarity of the DEP thermal convection with the Rayleigh-Bénard (RB) convection is examined by considering its behavior in detail by a linear stability theory and a two-dimensional direct numerical simulation. The results are analyzed from an energetic viewpoint and in the framework of the Ginzburg-Landau (GL) equation. The stabilizing effects of a thermoelectric feedback make the critical parameters different from those in the RB instability. The nonuniformity of the electric gravity arising from the finite variation of permittivity also affects the critical parameters. The characteristic constants of the GL equation are comparable with those for the RB convection. The heat transfer in the DEP convection is weaker than in the RB convection as a consequence of the feedback that impedes the convection.

  8. Dielectrophoretic Rayleigh-Bénard convection under microgravity conditions.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, H N; Tadie Fogaing, M; Crumeyrolle, O; Mutabazi, I

    2013-04-01

    Thermal convection in a dielectric fluid layer between two parallel plates subjected to an alternating electric field and a temperature gradient is investigated under microgravity conditions. A thermoelectric coupling resulting from the thermal variation of the electric permittivity of the fluid produces the dielectrophoretic (DEP) body force, which can be regarded as thermal buoyancy due to an effective gravity. This electric gravity can destabilize a stationary conductive state of the fluid to develop convection. The similarity of the DEP thermal convection with the Rayleigh-Bénard (RB) convection is examined by considering its behavior in detail by a linear stability theory and a two-dimensional direct numerical simulation. The results are analyzed from an energetic viewpoint and in the framework of the Ginzburg-Landau (GL) equation. The stabilizing effects of a thermoelectric feedback make the critical parameters different from those in the RB instability. The nonuniformity of the electric gravity arising from the finite variation of permittivity also affects the critical parameters. The characteristic constants of the GL equation are comparable with those for the RB convection. The heat transfer in the DEP convection is weaker than in the RB convection as a consequence of the feedback that impedes the convection. PMID:23679509

  9. Dielectrophoretic stretching of DNA tethered to a fiber tip.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Changbae; Kaur, Harpreet; McNabb, David S; Li, Jiali

    2015-03-27

    In this work, we studied the stretching of λ phage DNA molecules immobilized on an optical fiber tip attached to a force sensitive tuning fork under ac electric fields. We designed a two electrodes stretching system in a small chamber: one is a gold-coated optical fiber tip electrode, and the other is a gold-coated flat electrode. By applying a dielectrophoretic (DEP) force, the immobilized λ DNA molecules on the tip are stretched and the stretching process is monitored by a fluorescent microscope. The DNA stretching in three-dimensional space is optimized by varying electrode shape, electrode gap distance, ac frequency, and solution conductivity. By observing the vibrational amplitude change of a quartz tuning fork, we measured the effects due to Joule heating and the DEP force on the tethered DNA molecules in solution. This work demonstrates a method to manipulate and characterize immobilized λ DNA molecules on a probe tip for further study of single DNA molecules. PMID:25741602

  10. Performance characterization of an insulator-based dielectrophoretic microdevice.

    PubMed

    Ozuna-Chacón, Sandra; Lapizco-Encinas, Blanca H; Rito-Palomares, Marco; Martínez-Chapa, Sergio O; Reyes-Betanzo, Claudia

    2008-08-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP), the motion of particles in nonuniform electric fields, is a nondestructive electrokinetic (EK) transport mechanism can be used to concentrate and separate bioparticles. Traditionally, DEP has been performed employing microelectrodes, an approach that is expensive due to the cost of microelectrode fabrication. An alternative is insulator-based DEP (iDEP), an inexpensive method where nonuniform electric fields are created with arrays of insulating structures. This study presents the effects of operating conditions on the dielectrophoretic behavior of polystyrene microparticles under iDEP. Experiments were performed employing microchannels containing insulating structures that worked as insulators. The parameters varied were pH (8-9) and conductivity (25-100 microS/cm) of the bulk medium, and the magnitude of the applied field (200-850 V/cm). Optimal operating conditions in terms of pH and conductivity were obtained, and the microdevice performance was characterized in terms of concentration factor and minimum electric field required (minimum energy consumption). This is the first report on improving iDEP processes when EOF is present. DEP and EOF have been studied extensively, however, this study integrates the effect of suspending medium characteristics on both EK phenomena. These findings will allow improving the performance of iDEP microdevices achieving the highest concentration fold with the lowest energy consumption. PMID:18654979

  11. Dielectrophoretic characterization of antibiotic-treated Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex cells.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Shinnosuke; Lee, Hyun-Boo; Becker, Annie L; Weigel, Kris M; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Lee, Kyong-Hoon; Cangelosi, Gerard A; Chung, Jae-Hyun

    2015-10-01

    Multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) has become a serious concern for proper treatment of patients. As a phenotypic method, dielectrophoresis can be useful but is yet to be attempted to evaluate Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex cells. This paper investigates the dielectrophoretic behavior of Mycobacterium bovis (Bacillus Calmette-Guérin, BCG) cells that are treated with heat or antibiotics rifampin (RIF) or isoniazid (INH). The experimental parameters are designed on the basis of our sensitivity analysis. The medium conductivity (σ(m)) and the frequency (f) for a crossover frequency (f(xo1)) test are decided to detect the change of σ(m)-f(xo1) in conjunction with the drug mechanism. Statistical modeling is conducted to estimate the distributions of viable and nonviable cells from the discrete measurement of f (xo1). Finally, the parameters of the electrophysiology of BCG cells, C(envelope) and σ(cyto), are extracted through a sampling algorithm. This is the first evaluation of the dielectrophoresis (DEP) approach as a means to assess the effects of antimicrobial drugs on M. tuberculosis complex cells. PMID:26231690

  12. Dielectrophoretic Capture and Genetic Analysis of Single Neuroblastoma Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Erica L.; Rader, JulieAnn; Ruden, Jacob; Rappaport, Eric F.; Hunter, Kristen N.; Hallberg, Paul L.; Krytska, Kate; O’Dwyer, Peter J.; Mosse, Yael P.

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of the diversity of cells that escape the primary tumor and seed micrometastases remains rudimentary, and approaches for studying circulating and disseminated tumor cells have been limited by low throughput and sensitivity, reliance on single parameter sorting, and a focus on enumeration rather than phenotypic and genetic characterization. Here, we utilize a highly sensitive microfluidic and dielectrophoretic approach for the isolation and genetic analysis of individual tumor cells. We employed fluorescence labeling to isolate 208 single cells from spiking experiments conducted with 11 cell lines, including 8 neuroblastoma cell lines, and achieved a capture sensitivity of 1 tumor cell per 106 white blood cells (WBCs). Sample fixation or freezing had no detectable effect on cell capture. Point mutations were accurately detected in the whole genome amplification product of captured single tumor cells but not in negative control WBCs. We applied this approach to capture 144 single tumor cells from 10 bone marrow samples of patients suffering from neuroblastoma. In this pediatric malignancy, high-risk patients often exhibit wide-spread hematogenous metastasis, but access to primary tumor can be difficult or impossible. Here, we used flow-based sorting to pre-enrich samples with tumor involvement below 0.02%. For all patients for whom a mutation in the Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase gene had already been detected in their primary tumor, the same mutation was detected in single cells from their marrow. These findings demonstrate a novel, non-invasive, and adaptable method for the capture and genetic analysis of single tumor cells from cancer patients. PMID:25133137

  13. Insulator-based dielectrophoretic diagnostic tool for babesiosis.

    PubMed

    Adekanmbi, Ezekiel O; Ueti, Massaro W; Rinaldi, Brady; Suarez, Carlos E; Srivastava, Soumya K

    2016-05-01

    Babesia species are obligate intraerythrocytic tick-borne protozoan parasites that are the etiologic agents of babesiosis, a potentially life-threatening, malaria-like illness in humans and animals. Babesia-infected people have been known to suffer from complications including liver problems, severe hemolytic anemia, and kidney failure. As reported by the Food and Drug Administration, 38% of mortality cases observed in transfusion recipients were associated with transfusion transmitted diseases of which babesiosis is the chief culprit. As of now, no tests have been licensed yet for screening blood donors for babesiosis. Current diagnostic tools for babesiosis including enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and polymerase chain reaction are expensive and burdened with multifarious shortcomings. In this research, a low-cost, high-specificity, quick, and easy-to-use insulator-based dielectrophoretic diagnostic tool is developed for characterizing and concentrating Babesia-infected cells in their homogenous mixture with healthy cell population. In this work, a mixture of Babesia-infected (varying parasitemia) and healthy red blood cells (RBCs or erythrocytes) was exposed to non-uniform electric fields in a fabricated microfluidic platform to manipulate and sort the Babesia-infected cells within a minute. At DC voltage configurations of 10 V and 0/6 V in the inlet and the two outlet channels, respectively, the diseased cells were seen to flow in a direction different from the healthy RBCs. Bright field and fluorescence microscopy were utilized to present qualitative differentiation of the healthy erythrocytes from the infected cells. The proposed micro device platform was able to enrich RBCs from 0.1% to ∼70% parasitemia. This device, when finally developed into a point-of-care diagnostic chip, would enhance the detection of Babesia-infected erythrocytes and as well serve as a precursor to babesiosis vaccine development. PMID

  14. A hybrid dielectrophoretic system for trapping of microorganisms from water

    PubMed Central

    Allahrabbi, Narjes; Chia, Yi Shi Michelle; Saifullah, Mohammad S. M.; Lim, Kian-Meng; Yung, Lin Yue Lanry

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of the microbial safety of water resources is among the most critical issues in global water safety. As the current detection methods have limitations such as high cost and long process time, new detection techniques have transpired among which microfluidics is the most attractive alternative. Here, we show a novel hybrid dielectrophoretic (DEP) system to separate and detect two common waterborne pathogens, Escherichia coli (E. coli), a bacterium, and Cryptosporidium parvum (C. parvum), a protozoan parasite, from water. The hybrid DEP system integrates a chemical surface coating with a microfluidic device containing inter-digitated microelectrodes to impart positive dielectrophoresis for enhanced trapping of the cells. Trimethoxy(3,3,3-trifluoropropyl) silane, (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane, and polydiallyl dimethyl ammonium chloride (p-DADMAC) were used as surface coatings. Static cell adhesion tests showed that among these coatings, the p-DADMAC-coated glass surface provided the most effective cell adhesion for both the pathogens. This was attributed to the positively charged p-DADMAC-coated surface interacting electrostatically with the negatively charged cells suspended in water leading to increased cell trapping efficiency. The trapping efficiency of E. coli and C. parvum increased from 29.0% and 61.3% in an uncoated DEP system to 51.9% and 82.2% in the hybrid DEP system, respectively. The hybrid system improved the cell trapping by encouraging the formation of cell pearl-chaining. The increment in trapping efficiency in the hybrid DEP system was achieved at an optimal frequency of 1 MHz and voltage of 2.5 Vpp for C. parvum and 2 Vpp for E. coli, the latter is lower than 2.5 Vpp and 7 Vpp, respectively, utilized for obtaining similar efficiency in an uncoated DEP system. PMID:26180567

  15. A hybrid dielectrophoretic system for trapping of microorganisms from water.

    PubMed

    Allahrabbi, Narjes; Chia, Yi Shi Michelle; Saifullah, Mohammad S M; Lim, Kian-Meng; Yung, Lin Yue Lanry

    2015-05-01

    Assessment of the microbial safety of water resources is among the most critical issues in global water safety. As the current detection methods have limitations such as high cost and long process time, new detection techniques have transpired among which microfluidics is the most attractive alternative. Here, we show a novel hybrid dielectrophoretic (DEP) system to separate and detect two common waterborne pathogens, Escherichia coli (E. coli), a bacterium, and Cryptosporidium parvum (C. parvum), a protozoan parasite, from water. The hybrid DEP system integrates a chemical surface coating with a microfluidic device containing inter-digitated microelectrodes to impart positive dielectrophoresis for enhanced trapping of the cells. Trimethoxy(3,3,3-trifluoropropyl) silane, (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane, and polydiallyl dimethyl ammonium chloride (p-DADMAC) were used as surface coatings. Static cell adhesion tests showed that among these coatings, the p-DADMAC-coated glass surface provided the most effective cell adhesion for both the pathogens. This was attributed to the positively charged p-DADMAC-coated surface interacting electrostatically with the negatively charged cells suspended in water leading to increased cell trapping efficiency. The trapping efficiency of E. coli and C. parvum increased from 29.0% and 61.3% in an uncoated DEP system to 51.9% and 82.2% in the hybrid DEP system, respectively. The hybrid system improved the cell trapping by encouraging the formation of cell pearl-chaining. The increment in trapping efficiency in the hybrid DEP system was achieved at an optimal frequency of 1 MHz and voltage of 2.5 Vpp for C. parvum and 2 Vpp for E. coli, the latter is lower than 2.5 Vpp and 7 Vpp, respectively, utilized for obtaining similar efficiency in an uncoated DEP system. PMID:26180567

  16. A capillary dielectrophoretic chip for real-time blood cell separation from a drop of whole blood

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Shu-Hsien; Chang, Ching-Yu; Chang, Hsien-Chang

    2013-01-01

    This study proposes a capillary dielectrophoretic chip to separate blood cells from a drop of whole blood (approximately 1 μl) sample using negative dielectrophoretic force. The separating efficiency was evaluated by analyzing the image before and after dielectrophoretic force manipulation. Blood samples with various hematocrits (10%–60%) were tested with varied separating voltages and chip designs. In this study, a chip with 50 μm gap design achieved a separation efficiency of approximately 90% within 30 s when the hematocrit was in the range of 10%–50%. Furthermore, glucose concentration was electrochemically measured by separating electrodes following manipulation. The current response increased significantly (8.8-fold) after blood cell separation, which was attributed not only to the blood cell separation but also to sample disturbance by the dielectrophoretic force. PMID:24404015

  17. Experimental and theoretical study of dielectrophoretic particle trapping in arrays of insulating structures: Effect of particle size and shape.

    PubMed

    Saucedo-Espinosa, Mario A; Lapizco-Encinas, Blanca H

    2015-05-01

    Insulator-based dielectrophoresis (iDEP) employs insulating structures embedded in a microchannel to produce electric field gradients. This contribution presents a detailed analysis of the regions within an iDEP system where particles are likely to be retained due to dielectrophoretic trapping in a microchannel with an array of cylindrical insulating structures. The effects of particle size and shape on dielectrophoretic trapping were analyzed by employing 1 and 2 μm polystyrene particles and Escherichia coli cells. This research aims to study the mechanism behind dielectrophoretic trapping and develop a deeper understanding of iDEP systems. Mathematical modeling with COMSOL Multiphysics was employed to assess electrokinetic and dielectrophoretic particle velocities. Experiments were carried out to determine the location of dielectrophoretic barriers that block particle motion within an iDEP microchannel; this supported the estimation of a correction factor to match experiments and simulations. Particle velocities were predicted with the model, demonstrating how the different forces acting on the particles are in equilibrium when particle trapping occurs. The results showed that particle size and shape have a significant effect on the magnitude, location, and shape of the regions of dielectrophoretic trapping of particles, which are defined by DEP isovelocity lines and EK isovelocity lines. PMID:25487065

  18. Platinum black electrodeposited thread based electrodes for dielectrophoretic assembly of microparticles.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Renny Edwin; Koklu, Anil; Mansoorifar, Amin; Beskok, Ali

    2016-05-01

    We report dielectrophoretic (DEP) assembly of biological cells and microparticles using platinum-black electrodeposited conductive textile fiber. The three-dimensional conductive structures with high aspect ratios were found to facilitate high electric field regions, as revealed by scanning electron microscope characterization. The effective conducting area (Aeff) and its stability of thread electrodes were estimated using electrochemical methods. Potential of platinum black electrodeposited thread as 3-D electrodes for creating high gradient electrical field for dielectrophoretic assembly of microspheres and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast cells) into 1D and two-dimensional structures over long ranges under the application of low voltages (4-10 Vpp) has been demonstrated. The formation of highly ordered pearl chains of microparticles using thread electrodes when subjected to dielectrophoresis (DEP) has been discussed in detail. PMID:27158295

  19. Particle Removal by Electrostatic and Dielectrophoretic Forces for Dust Control During Lunar Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, C. I.; Buhler, C. R.; McFall, J. L.; Snyder, S. J.

    2009-01-01

    Particle removal during lunar exploration activities is of prime importance for the success of robotic and human exploration of the moon. We report on our efforts to use electrostatic and dielectrophoretic forces to develop a dust removal technology that prevents the accumulation of dust on solar panels and removes dust adhering to those surfaces. Testing of several prototypes showed solar shield output above 90% of the initial potentials after dust clearing.

  20. Effect of surface charge convection and shape deformation on the dielectrophoretic motion of a liquid drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Shubhadeep; Bandopadhyay, Aditya; Chakraborty, Suman

    2016-04-01

    The dielectrophoretic motion and shape deformation of a Newtonian liquid drop in an otherwise quiescent Newtonian liquid medium in the presence of an axisymmetric nonuniform dc electric field consisting of uniform and quadrupole components is investigated. The theory put forward by Feng [J. Q. Feng, Phys. Rev. E 54, 4438 (1996), 10.1103/PhysRevE.54.4438] is generalized by incorporating the following two nonlinear effects—surface charge convection and shape deformation—towards determining the drop velocity. This two-way coupled moving boundary problem is solved analytically by considering small values of electric Reynolds number (ratio of charge relaxation time scale to the convection time scale) and electric capillary number (ratio of electrical stress to the surface tension) under the framework of the leaky dielectric model. We focus on investigating the effects of charge convection and shape deformation for different drop-medium combinations. A perfectly conducting drop suspended in a leaky (or perfectly) dielectric medium always deforms to a prolate shape and this kind of shape deformation always augments the dielectrophoretic drop velocity. For a perfectly dielectric drop suspended in a perfectly dielectric medium, the shape deformation leads to either increase (for prolate shape) or decrease (for oblate shape) in the dielectrophoretic drop velocity. Both surface charge convection and shape deformation affect the drop motion for leaky dielectric drops. The combined effect of these can significantly increase or decrease the dielectrophoretic drop velocity depending on the electrohydrodynamic properties of both the liquids and the relative strength of the electric Reynolds number and electric capillary number. Finally, comparison with the existing experiments reveals better agreement with the present theory.

  1. Dielectrophoretic differentiation of mouse ovarian surface epithelial cells, macrophages, and fibroblasts using contactless dielectrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Salmanzadeh, Alireza; Kittur, Harsha; Sano, Michael B.; C. Roberts, Paul; Schmelz, Eva M.; Davalos, Rafael V.

    2012-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynecological malignancies in women. The primary challenge is the detection of the cancer at an early stage, since this drastically increases the survival rate. In this study we investigated the dielectrophoretic responses of progressive stages of mouse ovarian surface epithelial (MOSE) cells, as well as mouse fibroblast and macrophage cell lines, utilizing contactless dielectrophoresis (cDEP). cDEP is a relatively new cell manipulation technique that has addressed some of the challenges of conventional dielectrophoretic methods. To evaluate our microfluidic device performance, we computationally studied the effects of altering various geometrical parameters, such as the size and arrangement of insulating structures, on dielectrophoretic and drag forces. We found that the trapping voltage of MOSE cells increases as the cells progress from a non-tumorigenic, benign cell to a tumorigenic, malignant phenotype. Additionally, all MOSE cells display unique behavior compared to fibroblasts and macrophages, representing normal and inflammatory cells found in the peritoneal fluid. Based on these findings, we predict that cDEP can be utilized for isolation of ovarian cancer cells from peritoneal fluid as an early cancer detection tool. PMID:22536308

  2. Gravitational Effects on Near-Field Flow Structure of Low-Density Gas Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yep, Tze-Wing; Agrawal, Ajay K.; Griffin, DeVon

    2004-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in earth gravity and micro gravity to acquire quantitative data on near field flow structure of helium jets injected into air. Microgravity conditions were simulated in the 2.2 s drop tower at NASA John H. Glenn Research Center. The jet flow was observed by quantitative rainbow schlieren deflectometry, a non-intrusive line of sight measurement technique suited for the microgravity environment. The flow structure was characterized by distribution of helium mole fraction obtained from color schlieren images taken at 60 Hz. Results show that the jet in microgravity was up to 70% wider than that in Earth gravity. Experiments reveal that the global flow oscillations observed in Earth are absent in microgravity. Quantitative deatails are provided of the evolution as the experiment undergoes changes in gravity in the drop tower.

  3. Using Asymmetric Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4) to Determine C60 Colloidal Size Distributions

    EPA Science Inventory

    The formation of aqueous fullerene suspensions by solvent exchange, sonication, or extended mixing in water is widely reported. Commonly used methods for determining the size of these aggregates rely on static and dynamic light scattering, electron microscopy (EM), or atomic forc...

  4. Polarizability of Six-Helix Bundle and Triangle DNA Origami and Their Escape Characteristics from a Dielectrophoretic Trap.

    PubMed

    Gan, Lin; Camacho-Alanis, Fernanda; Ros, Alexandra

    2015-12-15

    DNA nanoassemblies, such as DNA origamis, hold promise in biosensing, drug delivery, nanoelectronic circuits, and biological computing, which require suitable methods for migration and precision positioning. Insulator-based dielectrophoresis (iDEP) has been demonstrated as a powerful migration and trapping tool for μm- and nm-sized colloids as well as DNA origamis. However, little is known about the polarizability of origami species, which is responsible for their dielectrophoretic migration. Here, we report the experimentally determined polarizabilities of the six-helix bundle origami (6HxB) and triangle origami by measuring the migration times through a potential landscape exhibiting dielectrophoretic barriers. The resulting migration times correlate to the depth of the dielectrophoretic potential barrier and the escape characteristics of the origami according to an adapted Kramer's rate model, allowing their polarizabilities to be determined. We found that the 6HxB polarizability is larger than that of the triangle origami, which correlates with the variations in charge density of both origamis. Further, we discuss the orientation of both origami species in the dielectrophoretic trap and discuss the influence of diffusion during the escape process. Our study provides detailed insight into the factors contributing to the migration through dielectrophoretic potential landscapes, which can be exploited for applications with DNA and other nanoassemblies based on dielectrophoresis. PMID:26570981

  5. Three-Dimensional Dielectrophoretic Microparticle Separator Fabricated by Ultraviolet-Assisted Direct-Write Assembly.

    PubMed

    Dalir, Hamid; Farahani, Rouhollah D; Hernandez, Lewith; Aldebert, Clément; Lévesque, Martin; Therriault, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The design and fabrication of complex microfluidic devices is a subject of broad biomedical and technological interest. In this paper, we demonstrate the fabrication of a three-dimensional (3D) dielectrophoretic microparticle separator involving ultraviolet (UV)-assisted direct-write assembly of a UV-curable polyurethane. This approach yields a series of 3D microcoil interdigitated electrodes with defined geometry promoting particle separation through dielectrophoresis. These vertical microcoils give rise to considerable improvements in separation relative to standard planar (2D) microelectrodes. We envisage that the complex 3D electrodes will provide an enabling platform for a wide array of fluidic- and electronic-based applications. PMID:27398520

  6. Mach-Zehnder interferometer for separation of platelets from red blood cells using dielectrophoretics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shwetha, M.; Narayan, K.

    2016-03-01

    In this work, separation of platelets from red blood cells using Mach-Zehnder interferometer is shown using Dielectrophoretics (DEP). The proposed model demonstrates continuous separation of platelets from red blood cells. Mach-Zehnder Interferometer (MZI) has two arms, in which sensing arm will sense according to the applied voltage and separate the platelets from mixed blood cells. The platelets and the red blood cells will flow in two outlets of MZI. Microfluidic device is used to separate the RBC's and the platelets from the mixed blood cells.

  7. Quantitative characterization for dielectrophoretic behavior of biological cells using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, In Soo; Hee Park, Se; Woo Lee, Sang; Sung Yoon, Dae; Kim, Beop-Min

    2014-02-01

    We report a method to precisely quantify dielectrophoretic (DEP) forces and cutoff frequencies (fc) of viable and nonviable yeast cells. The method consists of a two-step process in which generated DEP forces act upon a cell through a micro-electrode device, followed by direct measurement of DEP forces using optical tweezers. DEP behaviors of viable and nonviable yeast cells are monitored as a function of AC frequency. We believe that the proposed method can be used as a powerful platform for cell-based assays to characterize the DEP behavior of various cell types including cancer and normal cells.

  8. Low-frequency dielectrophoretic response of a single particle in aqueous suspensions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingyu; Wei, Ming-Tzo; Ou-Yang, H Daniel

    2016-01-01

    We use optical tweezers-based dielectrophoresis (DEP) force spectroscopy to investigate the roles of the electrical double layer in the AC dielectric response of an individual colloidal particle in an aqueous medium. Specifically, we measure the DEP crossover frequency as a function of particles size, medium viscosity, and temperature. Experimental results were compared to low frequency relaxation mechanisms predicted by Schwarz, demonstrating the dielectrophoretic responses in the frequency range between 10 kHz and 1 MHz were dominated by counterion diffusion within the electric double layer. PMID:26858820

  9. Dielectrophoretic isolation of cells using 3D microelectrodes featuring castellated blocks.

    PubMed

    Xing, Xiaoxing; Yobas, Levent

    2015-05-21

    We present 3D microelectrodes featuring castellated blocks for dielectrophoretically isolating cells. These electrodes provide a more effective dielectrophoretic force field than thin-film surface electrodes and yet immobilize cells near stagnation points across a parabolic flow profile for enhanced cell viability and separation efficiency. Unlike known volumetric electrodes with linear profiles, the electrodes with structural variations introduced along their depth scale are versatile for constructing monolithic structures with readily integrated fluidic paths. This is exemplified here in the design of an interdigitated comb array wherein electrodes with castellated surfaces serve as building blocks and form digits with an array of fluidic pores. Activation of the design with low-voltage oscillations (±5 Vp, 400 kHz) is found adequate for retaining most viable cells (90.2% ± 3.5%) while removing nonviable cells (88.5% ± 5%) at an increased throughput (5 × 10(5) cells h(-1)). The electrodes, despite their intricate profile, are structured into single-crystal silicon through a self-aligned etching process without a precision layer-by-layer assembly. PMID:25857455

  10. Dielectrophoretic behavior of PEGylated RNase A inside a microchannel with diamond-shaped insulating posts.

    PubMed

    Mata-Gómez, Marco A; Gallo-Villanueva, Roberto C; González-Valdez, José; Martínez-Chapa, Sergio O; Rito-Palomares, Marco

    2016-02-01

    Ribonuclease A (RNase A) has proven potential as a therapeutic agent, especially in its PEGylated form. Grafting of PEG molecules to this protein yields mono-PEGylated (mono-PEG) and di-PEGylated (di-PEG) RNase A conjugates, and the unreacted protein. Mono-PEG RNase A is of great interest. The use of electrokinetic forces in microdevices represents a novel alternative to chromatographic methods to separate this specie. This work describes the dielectrophoretic behavior of the main protein products of the RNase A PEGylation inside a microchannel with insulators under direct current electric fields. This approach represents the first step in route to design micro-bioprocesses to separate PEGylated RNase A from unreacted native protein. The three proteins exhibited different dielectrophoretic behaviors. All of them experienced a marked streaming pattern at 3000 V consistent with positive dielectrophoresis. Native protein was not captured at any of the conditions tested, while mono-PEG RNase A and di-PEG RNase A were captured presumably due to positive dielectrophoresis at 4000 and 2500 V, respectively. Concentration of mono-PEG RNase A with a maximal enrichment efficiency of ≈9.6 times the feed concentration was achieved in few seconds. These findings open the possibility of designing novel devices for rapid separation, concentration, and recovery of PEGylated RNase A in a one-step operation. PMID:26530024

  11. Dielectrophoretic forces and potentials induced on pairs of cells in an electric field.

    PubMed Central

    Foster, K R; Sowers, A E

    1995-01-01

    A combined numerical/experimental study is reported of the membrane potentials and dielectrophoretically induced forces between cells, membrane pressures, and velocity of attraction of cells under the influence of an electric field. This study was designed to explore electrical and mechanical effects produced by a field on cells in close proximity or undergoing electrically induced fusion. Laplace's equation for pairs of membrane-covered spheres in close proximity was solved numerically by the boundary element method, and the electrically induced forces on the cells and between cells were obtained by evaluating the Maxwell stress tensor. The velocity of approach of erythrocyte ghosts or fused ghosts in a 60-Hz field of 6 V/mm was measured experimentally, and the data were interpreted by using Batchelor's theory for hydrodynamic interaction of hard spheres. The numerical results show clearly the origin of the dielectrophoretic pressures and forces in fused and unfused cells and the effects of a nearby cell on the induced membrane potentials. The experimental results agree well with predictions based on the simple electrical model of the cell. The analysis shows the strong effect of hydrodynamic interactions between the cells in determining their velocity of approach. PMID:8519978

  12. Prototype for Automatable, Dielectrophoretically-Accessed Intracellular Membrane–Potential Measurements by Metal Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Sukhorukov, Vladimir L.; Zimmermann, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Functional access to membrane proteins, for example, ion channels, of individual cells is an important prerequisite in drug discovery studies. The highly sophisticated patch-clamp method is widely used for electrogenic membrane proteins, but is demanding for the operator, and its automation remains challenging. The dielectrophoretically-accessed, intracellular membrane–potential measurement (DAIMM) method is a new technique showing high potential for automation of electrophysiological data recording in the whole-cell configuration. A cell suspension is brought between a mm-scaled planar electrode and a μm-scaled tip electrode, placed opposite to each other. Due to the asymmetric electrode configuration, the application of alternating electric fields (1–5 MHz) provokes a dielectrophoretic force acting on the target cell. As a consequence, the cell is accelerated and pierced by the tip electrode, hence functioning as the internal (working) electrode. We used the light-gated cation channel Channelrhodopsin-2 as a reporter protein expressed in HEK293 cells to characterize the DAIMM method in comparison with the patch-clamp technique. PMID:22994967

  13. Tracking and synchronization of the yeast cell cycle using dielectrophoretic opacity.

    PubMed

    Valero, Ana; Braschler, Thomas; Rauch, Alex; Demierre, Nicolas; Barral, Yves; Renaud, Philippe

    2011-05-21

    Cell cycle synchronization is an important tool for the study of the cell division stages and signalling. It provides homogeneous cell cultures that are of importance to develop and improve processes such as protein synthesis and drug screening. The main approach today is the use of metabolic agents that block the cell cycle at a particular phase and accumulate cells at this phase, disturbing the cell physiology. We provide here a non-invasive and label-free continuous cell sorting technique to analyze and synchronize yeast cell division. By balancing opposing dielectrophoretic forces at multiple frequencies, we maximize sensitivity to the characteristic shape and internal structure changes occurring during the yeast cell cycle, allowing us to synchronize the culture in late anaphase. PMID:21445448

  14. Dielectrophoretic bending of directly printed free-standing ultra-soft nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Galliker, P.; Schneider, J.; Poulikakos, D.

    2014-02-17

    Electrohydrodynamic printing has shown superior resolution compared to conventional ink-jet printing, but the use of electrically charged liquid commonly leads to unwanted repulsion effects posing a threshold to resolution capabilities. However, a recently demonstrated controlled dripping process of nanoscale, particle-laden droplets, could circumvent such resolution obstacles even on insulating substrates. Here, we show that so-printed free-standing nanostructures can be autonomously deformed, and mechanically characterized due to the presence of the electrified nozzle, or, after voltage termination, due to transient charge residuals on the structures themselves. Dielectrophoretic forces, arising between two subsequently printed nanopillars lead to their contactless bending and to the formation of out-of-plane arc structures arising from the connection of the pillar apexes. Once connected, the ultra-soft nanopillars are found to be tightly merged and could, for example, serve in electronics as out of plane nanobonds.

  15. Estimation of Metabolism Characteristics for Heat-Injured Bacteria Using Dielectrophoretic Impedance Measurement Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amako, Eri; Enjoji, Takaharu; Uchida, Satoshi; Tochikubo, Fumiyoshi

    Constant monitoring and immediate control of fermentation processes have been required for advanced quality preservation in food industry. In the present work, simple estimation of metabolic states for heat-injured Escherichia coli (E. coli) in a micro-cell was investigated using dielectrophoretic impedance measurement (DEPIM) method. Temporal change in the conductance between micro-gap (ΔG) was measured for various heat treatment temperatures. In addition, the dependence of enzyme activity, growth capacity and membrane situation for E. coli on heat treatment temperature was also analyzed with conventional biological methods. Consequently, a correlation between ΔG and those biological properties was obtained quantitatively. This result suggests that DEPIM method will be available for an effective monitoring technique for complex change in various biological states of microorganisms.

  16. Nanopore sensing at ultra-low concentrations using single-molecule dielectrophoretic trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, Kevin J.; Otto, Lauren M.; Ivanov, Aleksandar P.; Barik, Avijit; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Edel, Joshua B.

    2016-01-01

    Single-molecule techniques are being developed with the exciting prospect of revolutionizing the healthcare industry by generating vast amounts of genetic and proteomic data. One exceptionally promising route is in the use of nanopore sensors. However, a well-known complexity is that detection and capture is predominantly diffusion limited. This problem is compounded when taking into account the capture volume of a nanopore, typically 108-1010 times smaller than the sample volume. To rectify this disproportionate ratio, we demonstrate a simple, yet powerful, method based on coupling single-molecule dielectrophoretic trapping to nanopore sensing. We show that DNA can be captured from a controllable, but typically much larger, volume and concentrated at the tip of a metallic nanopore. This enables the detection of single molecules at concentrations as low as 5 fM, which is approximately a 103 reduction in the limit of detection compared with existing methods, while still maintaining efficient throughput.

  17. Dielectrophoretic bending of directly printed free-standing ultra-soft nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galliker, P.; Schneider, J.; Poulikakos, D.

    2014-02-01

    Electrohydrodynamic printing has shown superior resolution compared to conventional ink-jet printing, but the use of electrically charged liquid commonly leads to unwanted repulsion effects posing a threshold to resolution capabilities. However, a recently demonstrated controlled dripping process of nanoscale, particle-laden droplets, could circumvent such resolution obstacles even on insulating substrates. Here, we show that so-printed free-standing nanostructures can be autonomously deformed, and mechanically characterized due to the presence of the electrified nozzle, or, after voltage termination, due to transient charge residuals on the structures themselves. Dielectrophoretic forces, arising between two subsequently printed nanopillars lead to their contactless bending and to the formation of out-of-plane arc structures arising from the connection of the pillar apexes. Once connected, the ultra-soft nanopillars are found to be tightly merged and could, for example, serve in electronics as out of plane nanobonds.

  18. Charged nanoparticle in a nanochannel: Competition between electrostatic and dielectrophoretic forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulings, Zachery K.; Melnikov, Dmitriy V.; Gracheva, Maria E.

    2015-06-01

    Nanochannels made in solid-state materials are used for various applications such as nanoparticle separation or DNA manipulation. In this work we examine the effects of the electric and dielectrophoretic forces on a charged nanoparticle confined in a nanochannel. To this end, we solve the Poisson equation for the nanochannel with a wedgelike geometry and consider how channel geometry and electrolyte concentration affect the electrostatic potential distribution and forces acting on nanoparticles of various sizes. On the basis of our calculations, we establish conditions necessary for the particle's attraction to the corners of a channel. We find that for large particles, the net force is attractive only for low concentrations of the electrolyte irrespective of the wedge angle, while small enough particles are attracted to the vertex for either larger electrolyte concentrations or small wedge angle.

  19. Nanopore sensing at ultra-low concentrations using single-molecule dielectrophoretic trapping

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Kevin J.; Otto, Lauren M.; Ivanov, Aleksandar P.; Barik, Avijit; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Edel, Joshua B.

    2016-01-01

    Single-molecule techniques are being developed with the exciting prospect of revolutionizing the healthcare industry by generating vast amounts of genetic and proteomic data. One exceptionally promising route is in the use of nanopore sensors. However, a well-known complexity is that detection and capture is predominantly diffusion limited. This problem is compounded when taking into account the capture volume of a nanopore, typically 108–1010 times smaller than the sample volume. To rectify this disproportionate ratio, we demonstrate a simple, yet powerful, method based on coupling single-molecule dielectrophoretic trapping to nanopore sensing. We show that DNA can be captured from a controllable, but typically much larger, volume and concentrated at the tip of a metallic nanopore. This enables the detection of single molecules at concentrations as low as 5 fM, which is approximately a 103 reduction in the limit of detection compared with existing methods, while still maintaining efficient throughput. PMID:26732171

  20. Toward a Boron-Doped Ultrananocrystalline Diamond Electrode-Based Dielectrophoretic Preconcentrator.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenli; Radadia, Adarsh D

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents results on immunobeads-based isolation of rare bacteria and their capture at a boron-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond (BD-UNCD) electrode in a microfluidic dielectrophoretic preconcentrator. We systematically vary the bead surface chemistry and the BD-UNCD surface chemistry and apply dielectrophoresis to improve the specific and the nonspecific capture of bacteria or beads. Immunobeads were synthesized by conjugating antibodies to epoxy-/sulfate, aldehyde-/sulfate, or carboxylate-modified beads with or without poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) coimmobilization. The carboxylate-modified beads with PEG provided the highest capture efficiency (∼65%) and selectivity (∼95%) in isolating live Escherichia coli O157:H7 from cultures containing 1000 E. coli O157:H7 colony-forming units (cfu)/mL, or ∼500 E. coli O157:H7 and ∼500 E. coli K12 cfu/mL. Higher specificity was achieved with the addition of PEG to the antibody-functionalized bead surface, highest with epoxy-/sulfate beads (85-86%), followed by carboxylate-modified beads (76-78%) and aldehyde-/sulfate beads (74-76%). The bare BD-UNCD electrodes of the preconcentrator successfully withstood 240 kV/m for 100 min that was required for the microfluidic dielectrophoresis of 1 mL of sample. As expected, the application of dielectrophoresis increased the specific and the nonspecific capture of immunobeads at the BD-UNCD electrodes; however, the capture specificity remained unaltered. The addition of PEG to the antibody-functionalized BD-UNCD surface had little effect on the specificity in immunobeads capture. These results warrant the fabrication of electrical biosensors with BD-UNCD so that dielectrophoretic preconcentration can be performed directly at the biosensing electrodes. PMID:26829879

  1. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modelling of Microfluidic Channel for Dielectrophoretic BioMEMS Application

    PubMed Central

    Low, Wan Shi; Kadri, Nahrizul Adib; Wan Abas, Wan Abu Bakar bin

    2014-01-01

    We propose a strategy for optimizing distribution of flow in a typical benchtop microfluidic chamber for dielectrophoretic application. It is aimed at encouraging uniform flow velocity along the whole analysis chamber in order to ensure DEP force is evenly applied to biological particle. Via the study, we have come up with a constructive strategy in improving the design of microfluidic channel which will greatly facilitate the use of DEP system in laboratory and primarily focus on the relationship between architecture and cell distribution, by resorting to the tubular structure of blood vessels. The design was validated by hydrodynamic flow simulation using COMSOL Multiphysics v4.2a software. Simulations show that the presence of 2-level bifurcation has developed portioning of volumetric flow which produced uniform flow across the channel. However, further bifurcation will reduce the volumetric flow rate, thus causing undesirable deposition of cell suspension around the chamber. Finally, an improvement of microfluidic design with rounded corner is proposed to encourage a uniform cell adhesion within the channel. PMID:25136701

  2. Theory of the dielectrophoretic behavior of clustered colloidal particles in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ren-Ming; Huang, J. P.

    2004-04-01

    Clustering behaviors in real colloidal suspensions can often be seen. In such clusters, the separation between the suspended particles is so close that we cannot neglect the multiple image effect on the dielectrophoresis of the particles. Since the exact multiple image method, so far, exists in two-dimensional cases, rather than in three-dimensional cases, as an initial model we have investigated the cluster colloidal suspension, in which many circular or cylindrical particles are randomly distributed in a sheet cluster. We have applied the multiple image method and the Maxwell-Garnett approximation (MGA) to study the dielectrophoretic (DEP) spectrum of the cluster. The dipole factor of a particle in the cluster has been exactly expressed in the spectral representation, thus simplifying the study. To ones interest, the multiple image method has been found to be in a good agreement with the MGA, even though they were founded in the light of different physical thoughts. To this end, it is found that the multiple image method predicts two characteristic frequencies, at which the dielectric dispersion occurs in the DEP spectrum. By choosing the appropriate material or geometrical parameters, the lower characteristic frequency can be achieved.

  3. Design of insulator-based dielectrophoretic devices: Effect of insulator posts characteristics.

    PubMed

    Saucedo-Espinosa, M A; Lapizco-Encinas, B H

    2015-11-27

    Insulator-based dielectrophoresis (iDEP) is a leading technique for the enrichment and manipulation of target bioparticles by exploiting physical and electrical properties of the particles and the suspending medium. Dielectrophoretic forces are produced by employing insulator posts that distort an otherwise uniform electric field. The optimal design for iDEP devices involves a careful balance between electrokinetics (EK) and dielectrophoresis (DEP) in the DEP-active area, where the design of the insulator posts is crucial for their performance. This contribution demonstrates the selection of a geometrical set of parameters that enhances particle capture and enrichment in an iDEP device. Numerical simulations, comprising an average trapping condition (TC) and the average lateral-to-longitudinal force ratio (FR) experienced by particles, were used to determine improved geometrical parameters (e.g., shape, length and width) and arrangement (e.g., lateral and longitudinal spacing) of the insulator posts. Experiments with polystyrene particles demonstrated the enhancement in particle enrichment, validating the employed key output parameters. The fabrication feasibility of the improved devices by a soft-lithographic process was also explored through numerical simulations and experiments. Optimal designs for this study were selected and their capture capacity was examined, demonstrating a decrease up to 84% in the electric potential necessary to generate a clear band of trapped particles. The findings from this study provide a systematic approach toward the design of high performance iDEP devices for their lab-on-a-chip integration. PMID:26518498

  4. Bacterial handling under the influence of non-uniform electric fields: dielectrophoretic and electrohydrodynamic effects.

    PubMed

    Fernádez-Morales, Flavio H; Duarte, Julio E; Samitier-Martí, Josep

    2008-12-01

    This paper describes the modeling and experimental verification of a castellated microelectrode array intended to handle biocells, based on common dielectrophoresis. The proposed microsystem was developed employing platinum electrodes deposited by lift-off, silicon micromachining, and photoresin patterning techniques. Having fabricated the microdevice it was tested employing Escherichia coli as bioparticle model. Positive dielectrophoresis could be verified with the selected cells for frequencies above 100 kHz, and electrohydrodynamic effects were observed as the dominant phenomena when working at lower frequencies. As a result, negative dielectrophoresis could not be observed because its occurrence overlaps with electrohydrodynamic effects; i.e. the viscous drag force acting on the particles is greater than the dielectrophoretic force at frequencies where negative dielectrophoresis should occur. The experiments illustrate the convenience of this kind of microdevices to micro handling biological objects, opening the possibility for using these microarrays with other bioparticles. Additionally, liquid motion as a result of electrohydrodynamic effects must be taken into account when designing bioparticle micromanipulators, and could be used as mechanism to clean the electrode surfaces, that is one of the most important problems related to this kind of devices. PMID:19039486

  5. Dynamic evolution of interacting carbon nanotubes suspended in a fluid using a dielectrophoretic framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliva-Avilés, A. I.; Zozulya, V. V.; Gamboa, F.; Avilés, F.

    2016-09-01

    A theoretical investigation of the dynamic response of interacting carbon nanotubes (CNTs) dispersed in a liquid medium under alternating current electric fields is presented. The proposed modeling strategy is based on the dielectrophoretic theory and classical electrodynamics of rigid bodies, and considers the coupled rotation-translation motion of interacting CNTs represented as electrical dipoles. Based on experimental evidence, the parameters which are expected to cause a major contribution to the CNTs' motion are investigated for different initial configurations of CNTs. It is predicted that high electric field frequencies, long CNTs, high values of electrical permittivity and conductivity of the CNTs immersed in solvents of high polarity promote faster equilibrium conditions, achieved by CNT tip-to-tip contact and alignment along the electric field direction. For the majority of the scenarios, CNT alignment along the field direction is predicted as the first event, followed by the translation of aligned CNTs until the tip-to-tip contact condition is reached. For systems with interacting CNTs with different lengths, equilibrium of the shorter CNT is achieved faster. Predictions also show that the initial rotation angles and initial location of CNTs have a paramount influence on the evolution of the system towards the equilibrium configuration.

  6. Direct numerical simulation of AC dielectrophoretic particle-particle interactive motions.

    PubMed

    Ai, Ye; Zeng, Zhenping; Qian, Shizhi

    2014-03-01

    Under an AC electric field, individual particles in close proximity induce spatially non-uniform electric field around each other, accordingly resulting in mutual dielectrophoretic (DEP) forces on these particles. The resulting attractive DEP particle-particle interaction could assemble individual colloidal particles or biological cells into regular patterns, which has become a promising bottom-up fabrication technique for bio-composite materials and microscopic functional structures. In this study, we developed a transient multiphysics model under the thin electric double layer (EDL) assumption, in which the fluid flow field, AC electric field and motion of finite-size particles are simultaneously solved using an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) numerical approach. Numerical simulations show that negative DEP particle-particle interaction always tends to attract particles and form a chain parallel to the applied electric field. Particles usually accelerate at the first stage of the attractive motion due to an increase in the DEP interactive force, however, decelerate until stationary at the second stage due to a faster increase in the repulsive hydrodynamic force. Identical particles move at the same speed during the interactive motion. In contrast, smaller particles move faster than bigger particles during the attractive motion. The developed model explains the basic mechanism of AC DEP-based particle assembly technique and provides a versatile tool to design microfluidic devices for AC DEP-based particle or cell manipulation. PMID:24407661

  7. An Inverted Dielectrophoretic Device for Analysis of Attached Single Cell Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Urbano, Rebecca Lownes; Clyne, Alisa Morss

    2016-01-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP), the force induced on a polarizable body by a non-uniform electric field, has been widely used to manipulate single cells in suspension and analyze their stiffness. However, most cell types do not naturally exist in suspension but instead require attachment to the tissue extracellular matrix in vivo. Cells alter their cytoskeletal structure when they attach to a substrate, which impacts cell stiffness. It is therefore critical to be able to measure mechanical properties of cells attached to a substrate. We present a novel inverted quadrupole dielectrophoretic device capable of measuring changes in the mechanics of single cells attached to a micropatterned polyacrylamide gel. The device is positioned over a cell of defined size, a directed DEP pushing force is applied, and cell centroid displacement is dynamically measured by optical microscopy. Using this device, single endothelial cells showed greater centroid displacement in response to applied DEP pushing force following actin cytoskeleton disruption by cytochalasin D. In addition, transformed mammary epithelial cell (MCF10A-NeuT) showed greater centroid displacement in response to applied DEP pushing force compared to untransformed cells (MCF10A). DEP device measurements were confirmed by showing that the cells with greater centroid displacement also had a lower elastic modulus by atomic force microscopy. The current study demonstrates that an inverted DEP device can determine changes in single attached cell mechanics on varied substrates. PMID:26738543

  8. Microfluidic multifunctional probe array dielectrophoretic force spectroscopy with wide loading rates.

    PubMed

    Park, In Soo; Eom, Kilho; Son, Jongsang; Chang, Woo-Jin; Park, Kidong; Kwon, Taeyun; Yoon, Dae Sung; Bashir, Rashid; Lee, Sang Woo

    2012-10-23

    The simultaneous investigation of a large number of events with different types of intermolecular interactions, from nonequilibrium high-force pulling assays to quasi-equilibrium unbinding events in the same environment, can be very important for fully understanding intermolecular bond-rupture mechanisms. Here, we describe a novel dielectrophoretic force spectroscopy technique that utilizes microsized beads as multifunctional probes for parallel measurement of intermolecular forces with an extremely wide range of force rate (10(-4) to 10(4) pN/s) inside a microfluidic device. In our experiments, various forces, which broadly form the basis of all molecular interactions, were measured across a range of force loading rates by multifunctional probes of various diameters with a throughput of over 600 events per mm(2), simultaneously and in the same environment. Furthermore, the individual bond-rupture forces, the parameters for the characterization of entire energy landscapes, and the effective stiffness of the force spectroscopy were determined on the basis of the measured results. This method of determining intermolecular forces could be very useful for the precise and simultaneous examination of various molecular interactions, as it can be easily and cost-effectively implemented within a microfluidic device for a range of applications including immunoassays, molecular mechanics, chemical and biological screening, and mechanobiology. PMID:22967242

  9. An inverted dielectrophoretic device for analysis of attached single cell mechanics.

    PubMed

    Lownes Urbano, Rebecca; Morss Clyne, Alisa

    2016-02-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP), the force induced on a polarizable body by a non-uniform electric field, has been widely used to manipulate single cells in suspension and analyze their stiffness. However, most cell types do not naturally exist in suspension but instead require attachment to the tissue extracellular matrix in vivo. Cells alter their cytoskeletal structure when they attach to a substrate, which impacts cell stiffness. It is therefore critical to be able to measure mechanical properties of cells attached to a substrate. We present a novel inverted quadrupole dielectrophoretic device capable of measuring changes in the mechanics of single cells attached to a micropatterned polyacrylamide gel. The device is positioned over a cell of defined size, a directed DEP pushing force is applied, and cell centroid displacement is dynamically measured by optical microscopy. Using this device, single endothelial cells showed greater centroid displacement in response to applied DEP pushing force following actin cytoskeleton disruption by cytochalasin D. In addition, transformed mammary epithelial cell (MCF10A-NeuT) showed greater centroid displacement in response to applied DEP pushing force compared to untransformed cells (MCF10A). DEP device measurements were confirmed by showing that the cells with greater centroid displacement also had a lower elastic modulus by atomic force microscopy. The current study demonstrates that an inverted DEP device can determine changes in single attached cell mechanics on varied substrates. PMID:26738543

  10. Dielectrophoretic concentration and separation of live and dead bacteria in an array of insulators.

    PubMed

    Lapizco-Encinas, Blanca H; Simmons, Blake A; Cummings, Eric B; Fintschenko, Yolanda

    2004-03-15

    Insulator-based (electrodeless) dielectrophoresis (iDEP) is an innovative approach in which the nonuniform electric field needed to drive DEP is produced by insulators, avoiding problems associated with the use of electrodes. Live and dead Escherichia coli were concentrated and selectively released by applying stepped DC voltages across a microchannel containing an array of insulating posts etched in glass. The only electrodes present were two platinum wires placed in the inlet and outlet reservoirs, producing mean electric fields of up to 200 V/mm across the insulators. The cells were labeled with Syto 9 and propidium iodide and imaged through a fluorescent microscope. Cell trapping and release were controlled by modifying the relative responses of electrokinesis and DEP by adjusting the magnitude of the applied voltage. Dead cells were observed to have significantly lower dielectrophoretic mobility than live cells, whereas the electrokinetic mobilities of live and dead cells were indistinguishable. The locations of the bands of differentially trapped cells were consistent with predictions. In addition, cells were selectively trapped and concentrated against backgrounds of 1- and 0.2-microm carboxylate-modified polystyrene particles. This first application of iDEP for simultaneous live/dead bacteria separation and concentration illustrates its potential as a front-end method for bacterial analysis. PMID:15018553

  11. A review of microfabrication techniques and dielectrophoretic microdevices for particle manipulation and separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Li, W. H.; Zhang, J.; Alici, G.; Wen, W.

    2014-02-01

    The development of lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices over the past decade has attracted growing interest. LOC devices aim to achieve the miniaturization, integration, automation and parallelization of biological and chemical assays. One of the applications, the ability to effectively and accurately manipulate and separate micro- and nano-scale particles in an aqueous solution, is particularly appealing in biological, chemical and medical fields. Among the technologies that have been developed and implemented in microfluidic microsystems for particle manipulation and separation (such as mechanical, inertial, hydrodynamic, acoustic, optical, magnetic and electrical methodologies), dielectrophoresis (DEP) may prove to be the most popular because of its label-free nature, ability to manipulate neutral bioparticles, analyse with high selectivity and sensitivity, compatibility with LOC devices, and easy and direct interface with electronics. The required spatial electric non-uniformities for the DEP effect can be generated by patterning microelectrode arrays within microchannels, or placing insulating obstacles within a microchannel and curving the microchannels. A wide variety of electrode- and insulator-based DEP microdevices have been developed, fabricated, and successfully employed to manipulate and separate bioparticles (i.e. DNA, proteins, bacteria, viruses, mammalian and yeast cells). This review provides an overview of the state-of-the-art of microfabrication techniques and of the structures of dielectrophoretic microdevices aimed towards different applications. The techniques used for particle manipulation and separation based on microfluidics are provided in this paper. In addition, we also present the theoretical background of DEP.

  12. Dielectrophoretic spectra of translational velocity and critical frequency for a spheroid in traveling electric field

    PubMed Central

    Bunthawin, Sakshin; Wanichapichart, Pikul; Tuantranont, Adisorn; Coster, Hans G. L.

    2010-01-01

    An analysis has been made of the dielectrophoretic (DEP) forces acting on a spheroidal particle in a traveling alternating electric field. The traveling field can be generated by application of alternating current signals to an octapair electrode array arranged in phase quadrature sequence. The frequency dependent force can be resolved into two orthogonal forces that are determined by the real and the imaginary parts of the Clausius–Mossotti factor. The former is determined by the gradient in the electric field and directs the particle either toward or away from the tip of the electrodes in the electrode array. The force determined by the imaginary component is in a direction along the track of the octapair interdigitated electrode array. The DEP forces are related to the dielectric properties of the particle. Experiments were conducted to determine the DEP forces in such an electrode arrangement using yeast cells (Saccharomyces cervisiate TISTR 5088) with media of various conductivities. Experimental data are presented for both viable and nonviable cells. The dielectric properties so obtained were similar to those previously reported in literature using other DEP techniques. PMID:20644671

  13. Device for dielectrophoretic separation and collection of nanoparticles and DNA under high conductance conditions.

    PubMed

    Song, Youngjun; Sonnenberg, Avery; Heaney, Yvonne; Heller, Michael J

    2015-05-01

    Most dielectrophoretic (DEP) separations of cells, nanoparticles, and other entities are carried out on microelectrode arrays or in microfluidic device formats. Less work has been directed at designing pipette-type formats that would allow dipping into and recovering specific analytes from samples in microtiter plate formats. In order to address this important area, we have fabricated micropipette tip devices containing a 2% agarose gel plug, a buffer chamber, and platinum electrode as the DEP collection device, to be used in combination with separate sample wells that contain a circular gold electrode. We demonstrated that 200 nm fluorescent nanoparticles could be isolated into DEP high-field regions and separated from 10 μm fluorescent microbeads in high conductance buffer (1× PBS) by applying an alternating current at 10 kHz with a peak-to-peak voltage (Vpp) of 160 Vpp. The collected nanoparticles were then transferred to a new buffer solution. We also demonstrated the DEP isolation and separation of genomic DNA (>50 kbps) from the 10 μm microbeads in high conductance buffer (1× PBS) with transfer of collected DNA to another solution. PMID:25780998

  14. Dielectrophoretic applications for disease diagnostics using lab-on-a-chip platforms.

    PubMed

    Adekanmbi, Ezekiel O; Srivastava, Soumya K

    2016-06-21

    Dielectrophoresis is a powerful technique used to distinguish distinct cellular identities in heterogeneous cell populations and to monitor changes in the cell state without the need for biochemical tags, including live and dead cells. Recent studies in the past decade have indicated that dielectrophoresis can be used to discriminate the disease state of cells by exploring the differences in the dielectric polarizabilities of the cells. Factors controlling the dielectric polarizability are dependent on the conductivity and permittivity of the cell and the suspending medium, the cell morphology, the internal structure, and the electric double layer effects associated with the charges on the cell surface. Diseased cells, such as those associated with malaria, cancer, dengue, anthrax and human African trypanosomiasis, could be spatially trapped by positive dielectrophoresis or spatially separated from other healthy cells by negative dielectrophoretic forces. The aim of this review was to provide a better and deeper understanding on how dielectrophoresis can be utilized to manipulate diseased cells. This review compiles and compares the significant findings obtained by researchers in manipulating abnormal or unhealthy cells. PMID:27191245

  15. Combined dielectrophoretic and impedance system for on-chip controlled bacteria concentration: Application to Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Del Moral-Zamora, Beatriz; Punter-Villagrassa, Jaime; Oliva-Brañas, Ana M; Álvarez-Azpeitia, Juan Manuel; Colomer-Farrarons, Jordi; Samitier, Josep; Homs-Corbera, Antoni; Miribel-Català, Pere Ll

    2015-05-01

    The present paper reports a bacteria autonomous controlled concentrator prototype with a user-friendly interface for bench-top applications. It is based on a microfluidic lab-on-a-chip and its associated custom instrumentation, which consists of a dielectrophoretic actuator, to preconcentrate the sample, and an impedance analyzer, to measure concentrated bacteria levels. The system is composed of a single microfluidic chamber with interdigitated electrodes and an instrumentation with custom electronics. The prototype is supported by a real-time platform connected to a remote computer, which automatically controls the system and displays impedance data used to monitor the status of bacteria accumulation on-chip. The system automates the whole concentrating operation. Performance has been studied for controlled volumes of Escherichia coli samples injected into the microfluidic chip at constant flow rate of 10 μL/min. A media conductivity correcting protocol has been developed, as the preliminary results showed distortion of the impedance analyzer measurement produced by bacterial media conductivity variations through time. With the correcting protocol, the measured impedance values were related to the quantity of bacteria concentrated with a correlation of 0.988 and a coefficient of variation of 3.1%. Feasibility of E. coli on-chip automated concentration, using the miniaturized system, has been demonstrated. Furthermore, the impedance monitoring protocol had been adjusted and optimized, to handle changes in the electrical properties of the bacteria media over time. PMID:25752513

  16. Analysis of pairwise cell interactions using an integrated dielectrophoretic-microfluidic system

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Zhizhong; Noren, David; Wang, C Joanne; Hang, Rob; Levchenko, Andre

    2008-01-01

    Blood vessel formation, during either normal vascular reconstruction or pathogenic tumour formation, relies upon highly organized cell–cell interactions. Isolating the function of any particular component of this cell–cell communication is often difficult, given the vast complexity of communication networks in multicellular systems. One way to address this problem is to analyse cell–cell communication on the most elementary scale—cell pairs. Here, we describe an integrated dielectrophoretic (DEP)-microfluidic device allowing for such analysis. Single cancer and endothelial cells (ECs) and cell pairs were patterned using DEP force and cultured within a minimally stressful microfluidic channel network. Controlling both the initial cell positions and extracellular environment, we investigated cell motility in homo- and heterotypic cell pairs under diverse conditions. We found that secreted collagen IV and soluble vascular endothelial growth factor have considerable guidance effect on ECs at the level of two interacting cells. Cell interaction rules extracted from the experiments of cell pairs were used to mathematically predict branching patterns characteristic of developing multicellular blood vessels. This integrative analysis method can be extended to other systems involving complex multicellular interactions. PMID:19096359

  17. Highly efficient single cell arraying by integrating acoustophoretic cell pre-concentration and dielectrophoretic cell trapping.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Hyeon; Antfolk, Maria; Kobayashi, Marina; Kaneda, Shohei; Laurell, Thomas; Fujii, Teruo

    2015-11-21

    To array rare cells at the single-cell level, the volumetric throughput may become a bottleneck in the cell trapping and the subsequent single-cell analysis, since the target cells per definition commonly exist in a large sample volume after purification from the original sample. Here, we present a novel approach for high throughput single cell arraying by integrating two original microfluidic devices: an acoustofluidic chip and an electroactive microwell array. The velocity of the cells is geared down in the acoustofluidic chip while maintaining a high volume flow rate at the inlet of the microsystem, and the cells are subsequently trapped one by one into the microwell array using dielectrophoresis. The integrated system exhibited a 10 times improved sample throughput compared to trapping with the electroactive microwell array chip alone, while maintaining a highly efficient cell recovery above 90%. The results indicate that the serial integration of the acoustophoretic pre-concentration with the dielectrophoretic cell trapping drastically improves the performance of the electroactive microwell array for highly efficient single cell analysis. This simple and effective system for high throughput single cell arraying with further possible integration of additional functions, including cell sorting and downstream analysis after cell trapping, has potential for development to a highly integrated and automated platform for single-cell analysis of rare cells. PMID:26439940

  18. Dielectrophoretic sample preparation for environmental monitoring of microorganisms: Soil particle removal

    PubMed Central

    Fatoyinbo, Henry O.; McDonnell, Martin C.; Hughes, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Detection of pathogens from environmental samples is often hampered by sensors interacting with environmental particles such as soot, pollen, or environmental dust such as soil or clay. These particles may be of similar size to the target bacterium, preventing removal by filtration, but may non-specifically bind to sensor surfaces, fouling them and causing artefactual results. In this paper, we report the selective manipulation of soil particles using an AC electrokinetic microfluidic system. Four heterogeneous soil samples (smectic clay, kaolinitic clay, peaty loam, and sandy loam) were characterised using dielectrophoresis to identify the electrical difference to a target organism. A flow-cell device was then constructed to evaluate dielectrophoretic separation of bacteria and clay in a continous flow through mode. The average separation efficiency of the system across all soil types was found to be 68.7% with a maximal separation efficiency for kaolinitic clay at 87.6%. This represents the first attempt to separate soil particles from bacteria using dielectrophoresis and indicate that the technique shows significant promise; with appropriate system optimisation, we believe that this preliminary study represents an opportunity to develop a simple yet highly effective sample processing system. PMID:25379100

  19. High-throughput particle manipulation by hydrodynamic, electrokinetic, and dielectrophoretic effects in an integrated microfluidic chip

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shunbo; Li, Ming; Bougot-Robin, Kristelle; Cao, Wenbin; Yeung Yeung Chau, Irene; Li, Weihua; Wen, Weijia

    2013-01-01

    Integrating different steps on a chip for cell manipulations and sample preparation is of foremost importance to fully take advantage of microfluidic possibilities, and therefore make tests faster, cheaper and more accurate. We demonstrated particle manipulation in an integrated microfluidic device by applying hydrodynamic, electroosmotic (EO), electrophoretic (EP), and dielectrophoretic (DEP) forces. The process involves generation of fluid flow by pressure difference, particle trapping by DEP force, and particle redirect by EO and EP forces. Both DC and AC signals were applied, taking advantages of DC EP, EO and AC DEP for on-chip particle manipulation. Since different types of particles respond differently to these signals, variations of DC and AC signals are capable to handle complex and highly variable colloidal and biological samples. The proposed technique can operate in a high-throughput manner with thirteen independent channels in radial directions for enrichment and separation in microfluidic chip. We evaluated our approach by collecting Polystyrene particles, yeast cells, and E. coli bacteria, which respond differently to electric field gradient. Live and dead yeast cells were separated successfully, validating the capability of our device to separate highly similar cells. Our results showed that this technique could achieve fast pre-concentration of colloidal particles and cells and separation of cells depending on their vitality. Hydrodynamic, DC electrophoretic and DC electroosmotic forces were used together instead of syringe pump to achieve sufficient fluid flow and particle mobility for particle trapping and sorting. By eliminating bulky mechanical pumps, this new technique has wide applications for in situ detection and analysis. PMID:24404011

  20. Dielectrophoretic lab-on-CMOS platform for trapping and manipulation of cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyoungchul; Kabiri, Shideh; Sonkusale, Sameer

    2016-02-01

    Trapping and manipulation of cells are essential operations in numerous studies in biology and life sciences. We discuss the realization of a Lab-on-a-Chip platform for dielectrophoretic trapping and repositioning of cells and microorganisms on a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology, which we define here as Lab-on-CMOS (LoC). The LoC platform is based on dielectrophoresis (DEP) which is the force experienced by any dielectric particle including biological entities in non-uniform AC electrical field. DEP force depends on the permittivity of the cells, its size and shape and also on the permittivity of the medium and therefore it enables selective targeting of cells based on their phenotype. In this paper, we address an important matter that of electrode design for DEP for which we propose a three-dimensional (3D) octapole geometry to create highly confined electric fields for trapping and manipulation of cells. Conventional DEP-based platforms are implemented stand-alone on glass, silicon or polymers connected to external infrastructure for electronics and optics, making it bulky and expensive. In this paper, the use of CMOS as a platform provides a pathway to truly miniaturized lab-on-CMOS or LoC platform, where DEP electrodes are designed using built-in multiple metal layers of the CMOS process for effective trapping of cells, with built-in electronics for in-situ impedance monitoring of the cell position. We present electromagnetic simulation results of DEP force for this unique 3D octapole geometry on CMOS. Experimental results with yeast cells validate the design. These preliminary results indicate the promise of using CMOS technology for truly compact miniaturized lab-on-chip platform for cell biotechnology applications. PMID:26780441

  1. Creation of carbon nanotube based bioSensors through dielectrophoretic assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mani, Nilan S.; Kim, Steve; Annam, Kaushik; Bane, Danielle; Subramanyam, Guru

    2015-08-01

    Due to their excellent electrical, optical, and mechanical properties, nanosized single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have attracted significant attention as a transducing element in nano-bio sensor research. Controlled assembly, device fabrication, and bio-functionalization of the SWNTs are crucial in creating the sensors. In this study, working biosensor platforms were created using dielectrophoretic assembly of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as a bridge between two gold electrodes. SWNTs in a commercial SDS surfactant solution were dispensed in the gap between the two gold electrodes, followed by applying an ac voltage across the two electrodes. The dielectrophoresis aligns the CNTs and forms a bridge between the two electrodes. A copious washing and a subsequent annealing of the devices at 200 °C remove the surfactants and create an excellent semiconducting (p-type) bridge between the two electrodes. A liquid gated field effect transistor (LGFET) was built using DI water as the gate dielectric and the SWNT bridge as the channel. Negative gate voltages of the FET increased the drain current and applying a positive gate voltage of +0.5V depleted the channel of charges and turned the device off. The biosensor was verified using both the two terminal and three terminal devices. Genomic salmon DNA dissolved in DI water was applied on the SWNT bridge in both type of devices. In the two terminal device, the conductance of the bridge dropped by 65x after the binding of the DNA. In the LGFET, the transconductance of the device decreased 2X after the binding of the DNA. The binding of the DNA also suppressed hysteresis in the Drain Current vs Gate Voltage characteristics of the LGFET.

  2. Rapid electrical immunoassay of the cardiac biomarker troponin I through dielectrophoretic concentration using imbedded electrodes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Abhinav; Han, Chang-Ho; Jang, Jaesung

    2016-08-15

    Rapidity and high sensitivity are critical factors for the diagnoses of heart attacks, and cardiac troponin I (cTnI) is at present a clinical standard for its diagnosis. Here we report a rapid, label-free, and highly sensitive single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) electrical immunosensor, featuring two pairs of electrodes. Two concentration electrodes (gaps: 25 and 80µm) and two detection electrodes (source and drain; gap: 20µm; width: 50µm) were used for dielectrophoretic concentration of cTnI on the SWCNT channels and resistance measurements of the dielectrophoresis (DEP)-concentrated cTnI, respectively. The two concentration electrodes were imbedded between upper and lower dielectric layers, facing each other, underneath the -COOH-functionalized SWCNT channels deposited between the detection electrodes. Therefore, the gap between these imbedded concentration electrodes can be reduced to maximize the electric field intensity for DEP-mediated concentration of cTnI, thereby greatly reducing the detection time (1min) and enhancing the limit of detection (0.7-0.8pgmL(-)(1)). Relative resistance changes of the SWCNTs were measured as cTnI concentration in Tris-Borate-EDTA (TBE; 0.0025×) and human serum diluted 500-fold with 0.0025× TBE decreased from 100ngmL(-)(1) to 1pgmL(-1), and they were shown to be linear with the logarithm of cTnI concentration (R(2)=0.99 and 0.97, respectively). These immunosensors also showed high specificity over another cardiac biomarker, myoglobin, TBE medium (0.0025×), and 500-fold diluted human serum. The DEP-capture of cTnI depended on the frequency of the applied electric field, demonstrating the qualitative nature of the real part of the Clausius-Mossotti factor for cTnI. PMID:27043478

  3. Lab on a chip for multiplexed immunoassays to detect bladder cancer using multifunctional dielectrophoretic manipulations.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Cheng-Hsin; Wu, Ting-Feng; Chen, Cheng-Ho; Chang, Kai-Chieh; Ju, Jing-Wei; Huang, Yao-Wei; Van Nhan, Vo

    2015-07-21

    A multiplexed immunosensor has been developed for the detection of specific biomarkers Galectin-1 (Gal-1) and Lactate Dehydrogenase B (LDH-B) present in different grades of bladder cancer cell lysates. In order to immobilize nanoprobes with different antibodies on a single chip we employed three-step programmable dielectrophoretic manipulations for focusing, guiding and trapping to enhance the fluorescent response and reduce the interference between the two antibody arrays. The chip consisted of a patterned indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode for sensing and a middle fish bone shaped gold electrode for focusing and guiding. Using ITO electrodes for the sensing area can effectively eliminate the background noise of fluorescence response as compared to metal electrodes. It was also observed that the three step manipulation increased fluorescence response after immunosensing by about 4.6 times as compared to utilizing DEP for just trapping the nanoprobes. Two different-grade bladder cancer cell lysates (grade I: RT4 and grade III: T24) were individually analyzed for detecting the protein expression levels of Gal-1 and LDH-B. The fluorescence intensity observed for Gal-1 is higher than that of LDH-B in the T24 cell lysate; however the response observed in RT4 is higher for LDH-B as compared to Gal-1. Thus we can effectively identify the different grades of bladder cancer cells. In addition, the platform for DEP manipulation developed in this study can enable real time detection of multiple analytes on a single chip and provide more practical benefits for clinical diagnosis. PMID:26087450

  4. Capillary-driven microfluidic chips with evaporation-induced flow control and dielectrophoretic microbead trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temiz, Yuksel; Skorucak, Jelena; Delamarche, Emmanuel

    2014-07-01

    This work reports our efforts on developing simple-to-use microfluidic devices for point-of-care diagnostic applications with recent extensions that include the trapping of microbeads using dielectrophoresis (DEP) and the modulation of the liquid flow using integrated microheaters. DEP serves the purpose of trapping microbeads coated with receptors and analytes for detection of a fluorescent signal. The microheater is actuated once the chip is filled by capillarity, creating an evaporation-induced flow tuned according to assay conditions. The chips are composed of a glass substrate patterned with 50-nm-thick Pd electrodes and microfluidic structures made using a 20-μm-thick dry-film resist (DFR). Chips are covered/sealed by low temperature (50°C) lamination of a 50-μm-thick DFR layer having excellent optical and mechanical properties. To separate cleaned and sealed chips from the wafer, we used an effective chip singulation technique which we informally call the "chip-olate" process. In the experimental section, we first studied dielectrophoretic trapping of 10-μm beads for flow rates ranging from 80 pL s-1 to 2.5 nL s-1 that are generated by an external syringe pump. Then, we characterized the embedded microheater in DFR-covered chips. Flow rates as high as 8 nL s-1 were generated by evaporation-induced flow when the heater was biased by 10 V, corresponding to 270-mW power. Finally, DEP-based trapping and fluorescent detection of functionalized beads were demonstrated as the flow was generated by evaporation-induced flow after the microfluidic structures were filled by capillarity.

  5. Polarization behavior of polystyrene particles under direct current and low-frequency (<1 kHz) electric fields in dielectrophoretic systems.

    PubMed

    Saucedo-Espinosa, Mario A; Rauch, Mallory M; LaLonde, Alexandra; Lapizco-Encinas, Blanca H

    2016-02-01

    The relative polarization behavior of micron and submicron polystyrene particles was investigated under direct current and very low frequency (<1 kHz) alternating current electric fields. Relative polarization of particles with respect to the suspending medium is expressed in terms of the Clausius-Mossotti factor, a parameter of crucial importance in dielectrophoretic-based operations. Particle relative polarization was studied by employing insulator-based dielectrophoretic (iDEP) devices. The effects of particle size, medium conductivity, and frequency (10-1000 Hz) of the applied electric potential on particle response were assessed through experiments and mathematical modeling with COMSOL Multiphysics(®). Particles of different sizes (100-1000 nm diameters) were introduced into iDEP devices fabricated from polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and their dielectrophoretic responses under direct and alternating current electric fields were recorded and analyzed in the form of images and videos. The results illustrated that particle polarizability and dielectrophoretic response depend greatly on particle size and the frequency of the electric field. Small particles tend to exhibit positive DEP at higher frequencies (200-1000 Hz), while large particles exhibit negative DEP at lower frequencies (20-200 Hz). These differences in relative polarization can be used for the design of iDEP-based separations and analysis of particle mixtures. PMID:26531799

  6. An integrated acoustic and dielectrophoretic particle manipulation in a microfluidic device for particle wash and separation fabricated by mechanical machining.

    PubMed

    Çetin, Barbaros; Özer, Mehmet Bülent; Çağatay, Erdem; Büyükkoçak, Süleyman

    2016-01-01

    In this study, acoustophoresis and dielectrophoresis are utilized in an integrated manner to combine the two different operations on a single polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) chip in sequential manner, namely, particle wash (buffer exchange) and particle separation. In the washing step, particles are washed with buffer solution with low conductivity for dielectrophoretic based separation to avoid the adverse effects of Joule heating. Acoustic waves generated by piezoelectric material are utilized for washing, which creates standing waves along the whole width of the channel. Coupled electro-mechanical acoustic 3D multi-physics analysis showed that the position and orientation of the piezoelectric actuators are critical for successful operation. A unique mold is designed for the precise alignment of the piezoelectric materials and 3D side-wall electrodes for a highly reproducible fabrication. To achieve the throughput matching of acoustophoresis and dielectrophoresis in the integration, 3D side-wall electrodes are used. The integrated device is fabricated by PDMS molding. The mold of the integrated device is fabricated using high-precision mechanical machining. With a unique mold design, the placements of the two piezoelectric materials and the 3D sidewall electrodes are accomplished during the molding process. It is shown that the proposed device can handle the wash and dielectrophoretic separation successfully. PMID:26865905

  7. Effect of far-field flow on a columnar crystal in the convective undercooled melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Xiao-Jian; Chen, Ming-Wen; Xu, Xiao-Hua; Wang, Zi-Dong

    2015-01-01

    The growth behavior of a columnar crystal in the convective undercooled melt affected by the far-field uniform flow is studied and the asymptotic solution for the interface evolution of the columnar crystal is derived by means of the asymptotic expansion method. The results obtained reveal that the far-field flow induces a significant change of the temperature around the columnar crystal and the convective flow caused by the far-field flow accelerates the growth velocity of the interface of the growing columnar crystal in the upstream direction and inhibits its growth velocity in the downstream direction. Our results are similar to the experimental data and numerical simulations. Project supported by the Overseas Distinguished Scholar Program by the Ministry of Education of China (Grant No. MS2010BJKJ005), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 10972030), and the Science and Technology Support Project of Jiangxi, China (Grant No. 20112BBE50006).

  8. Enhanced Dielectrophoretic Enrichment of Nanoparticles Using a Nanostructured Tip for Nanoengineered Medicine and Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Woonhong

    2011-12-01

    Enrichment of low-concentration nanoparticles (NPs) is of great interest in the fields of medicine, biology, and environment. In particular, the enrichment of bioparticles such as virus, quantum dots, DNA, or protein can have broad impacts on disease diagnosis, drug discovery, and environmental monitoring. Currently available NP enrichment methods employ centrifugation, microfiltration, or magnetic field. However, these methods are limited in cumbersome preparation steps, low yield, and low throughput. Electric field-based methods have demonstrated potential for NP enrichment, but two-dimensional planar electrodes are limited in sensitivity, molecular transfer, and imaging capability. In addition, the detection of low abundance, non-amplifiable particles such as proteins and metals is very challenging due to the low efficiency of current methods. In this dissertation, the challenges are addressed by nanotip-based NP enrichment. Fundamentals of NP enrichment are studied with a nanostructured tip. The nanotip-based NP enrichment is investigated by correlating a dielectrophoretic (DEP) force with Brownian motion force. In experiment, the predicted NP enrichment is validated by using gold (Au) NPs. The DEP effective distance for NP enrichment with a nanotip is suggested. Sequence-specific enrichment of oligonucleotides is studied by considering DEP force, Brownian motion, and affinity binding. In experiment, the optimal parameters for ultimate enrichment performance are studied using a hybridization assay. In the assay, a nanotip is functionalized with probe-oligonucleotides for sequence-specific binding. Size-specific NP enrichment is explored by studying DEP, capillary action, and viscosity. The capillary action force with a nanotip is calculated analytically, which is then compared with the DEP force. The viscosity effect is considered for NP capturing on a nanotip. The studied size-specific enrichment mechanism is validated in experiment by using various

  9. Study of Ac Dielectrophoretic Process of SiC Nanowires: A Universal Method for Alignment of Semiconductor Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Yao, Limei; Cui, Yan; Cong, Haining; Zheng, Jinju; Shang, Minghui; Yang, Zuobao; Yang, Weiyou; Wei, Guodong; Gao, Fengmei

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the dielectrophoretic processes of SiC nanowires suspended in three typical solvents, (highly purified water, ethanol and isopropanol) were systematically investigated. Optical microscope and SEM characterizations were used to observe the order of SiC nanowires on the surface of gold microchannels. The gold microchannels were induced by Ac dielectrophoresis of the corresponding dispersion solutions of SiC nanowires, with a concentration of 0.1 mg/mL. The study shows that the dielectrophoresis process is an effective way of synthesizing highly oriented SiC nanoarrays using isopropanol solution. The results also show that the arrangement of SiC nanowires on the interdigital electrode configuration not only depend on the kind of solvent used, but also on the applied frequency (1000 Hz~1 MHz) and voltage (1 V~20 V). PMID:27451739

  10. The development of malaria diagnostic techniques: a review of the approaches with focus on dielectrophoretic and magnetophoretic methods.

    PubMed

    Kasetsirikul, Surasak; Buranapong, Jirayut; Srituravanich, Werayut; Kaewthamasorn, Morakot; Pimpin, Alongkorn

    2016-01-01

    The large number of deaths caused by malaria each year has increased interest in the development of effective malaria diagnoses. At the early-stage of infection, patients show non-specific symptoms or are asymptomatic, which makes it difficult for clinical diagnosis, especially in non-endemic areas. Alternative diagnostic methods that are timely and effective are required to identify infections, particularly in field settings. This article reviews conventional malaria diagnostic methods together with recently developed techniques for both malaria detection and infected erythrocyte separation. Although many alternative techniques have recently been proposed and studied, dielectrophoretic and magnetophoretic approaches are among the promising new techniques due to their high specificity for malaria parasite-infected red blood cells. The two approaches are discussed in detail, including their principles, types, applications and limitations. In addition, other recently developed techniques, such as cell deformability and morphology, are also overviewed in this article. PMID:27405995

  11. [Dependence of dielectrophoretic force on the size of cylindrical particles by the example of a suspension of erythrocytes].

    PubMed

    Zehe, A; Ramirez, A; Starostenko, O

    2006-01-01

    For the modeling of erythrocyte rouleaux (linear cell aggregations), we propose an approximation procedure for the dipole moment in short cylinders, which contains the case of ellipsoidal bodies only as a first approximation. The method allows one to introduce corrections that are more representative for these particles. Depending on the number of erythrocytes forming an aggregation, i.e., on different but discrete measures of rouleaux lengths, the dielectrophoretic force is calculated and represented against the frequency of the applied a.c. field. As a result, frequency regions in the upper MHz range appear in which the strength and direction of DEP forces are different for different rouleaux sizes. This property is suitable for the detection and spatial separation of rouleaux populations of different length in blood samples by means of a microelectronic array. PMID:16909852

  12. Numerical investigation of 22 seconds of convection under the effect of dielectrophoretic force in an annular gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crumeyrolle, Olivier; Egbers, Christoph; Mutabazi, Innocent; Dahley, M. Norman; Smieszek, Marlene

    2012-07-01

    We investigate numerically the thermal convection of an annular dielectric liquid sheet under the effect of the dielectrophoretic force, as observed when a dielectric liquid is permeated by an inhomogeneous electric field. This is of particular interest for space applications as natural convection cannot appear and forced convection from moving parts such as pumps is undesirable due to the expected wearing and lower reliability. Hence heat exchanger relying on the dielectrophoretic force to create convection could provide light, compact and reliable heat exchanger for aerospace cooling systems \\cite{crumeyrolleP}. We investigate the case of a radius ratio equal to 0.5 and Prandtl number of 65. This setup is under experimental investigation at LAS, BTU Cottbus, both on ground and during parabolic flight. The 3D linear stability analysis, that takes the finite size of the system into account, shows that the critical mode is non-axisymmetric and under the form of two counteroriented helices, rather than under the form of rolls as predicted in past investigations\\cite{crumeyrolleT}. Due to the short duration of microgravity during parabolic flight (22 seconds), 3D time-dependent DNS are required with realistic initial conditions. The simulations show that the helices are difficult to observe, as the flow pattern is dominated by convection plumes. We report that transient thermal transfer at the inner cylinder is strongly enhanced by those structures, while the thermal transfer close to the outer cylinder is weaker. J.S. Paschkewitz and {D.M.} Pratt, Exp. Therm. Fluid Sci., 21,, 187 (2000). M. Takashima, Q. J. Mech. appl. Math. 33,, 93 (1980).

  13. Role of peroxide in AC electrical field exposure effects on Friend murine erythroleukemia cells during dielectrophoretic manipulations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xujing; Yang, Jun; Gascoyne, Peter R.C.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of AC field exposure on the viability and proliferation of mammalian cells under conditions appropriate for their dielectrophoretic manipulation and sorting were investigated using DS19 murine erythroleukemia cells as a model system. The frequency range 100 Hz-10 MHz and medium conductivities of 10 mS/m, 30 mS/m and 56 mS/m were studied for fields generated by applying signals of up to 7V peak to peak (p-p) to a parallel electrode array having equal electrode widths and gaps of 100 μm. Between 1 kHz and 10 MHz, cell viability after up to 40 min of field exposure was found to be above 95% and cells were able to proliferate. However, cell growth lag phase was extended with decreasing field frequency and with increasing voltage, medium conductivity and exposure duration. Modified growth behavior was not passed on to the next cell passage, indicating that field exposure did not cause permanent alterations in cell proliferation characteristics. Cell membrane potentials induced by field exposure were calculated and shown to be well below values typically associated with cell damage. Furthermore, medium treated by field exposure and then added to untreated cells produced the same modifications of growth as exposing cells directly, and these modifications occurred only when the electrode polarization voltage exceeded a threshold of ~0.4 V p-p. These findings suggested that electrochemical products generated during field exposure were responsible for the changes in cell growth. Finally, it was found that hydrogen peroxide was produced when sugar-containing media were exposed to fields and that normal cell growth could be restored by addition of catalase to the medium, whether or not field exposure occurred in the presence of cells. These results show that AC fields typically used for dielectrophoretic manipulation and sorting of cells do not damage DS19 cells and that cell alterations arising from electrochemical effects can be completely mitigated. PMID

  14. Fractional oscillator.

    PubMed

    Stanislavsky, A A

    2004-11-01

    We consider a fractional oscillator which is a generalization of the conventional linear oscillator in the framework of fractional calculus. It is interpreted as an ensemble average of ordinary harmonic oscillators governed by a stochastic time arrow. The intrinsic absorption of the fractional oscillator results from the full contribution of the harmonic oscillator ensemble: these oscillators differ a little from each other in frequency so that each response is compensated by an antiphase response of another harmonic oscillator. This allows one to draw a parallel in the dispersion analysis for media described by a fractional oscillator and an ensemble of ordinary harmonic oscillators with damping. The features of this analysis are discussed. PMID:15600586

  15. Gravitational Effects on Near Field Flow Structure of Low Density Gas Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, D. W.; Yep, T. W.; Agrawal, A. K.

    2005-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in Earth gravity and microgravity to acquire quantitative data on near field flow structure of helium jets injected into air. Microgravity conditions were simulated in the 2.2- second drop tower at NASA Glenn Research Center. The jet flow was observed by quantitative rainbow schlieren deflectometry, a non-intrusive line of site measurement technique for the whole field. The flow structure was characterized by distributions of angular deflection and helium mole percentage obtained from color schlieren images taken at 60 Hz. Results show that the jet in microgravity was up to 70 percent wider than that in Earth gravity. The global jet flow oscillations observed in Earth gravity were absent in microgravity, providing direct experimental evidence that the flow instability in the low density jet was buoyancy induced. The paper provides quantitative details of temporal flow evolution as the experiment undergoes change in gravity in the drop tower.

  16. Gravitational Effects on Near Field Flow Structure of Low Density Gas Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yep, Tze-Wing; Agrawal, Ajay K.; Griffin, DeVon; Salzman, Jack (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in Earth gravity and microgravity to acquire quantitative data on near field flow structure of helium jets injected into air. Microgravity conditions were simulated in the 2.2-second drop tower at NASA Glenn Research Center. The jet flow was observed by quantitative rainbow schlieren deflectometry, a non-intrusive line of site measurement technique for the whole field. The flow structure was characterized by distributions of angular deflection and helium mole percentage obtained from color schlieren images taken at 60 Hz. Results show that the jet flow was significantly influenced by the gravity. The jet in microgravity was up to 70 percent wider than that in Earth gravity. The jet flow oscillations observed in Earth gravity were absent in microgravity, providing direct experimental evidence that the flow instability in the low density jet was buoyancy induced. The paper provides quantitative details of temporal flow evolution as the experiment undergoes a change in gravity in the drop tower.

  17. Fraction Reduction through Continued Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carley, Holly

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a method of reducing fractions without factoring. The ideas presented may be useful as a project for motivated students in an undergraduate number theory course. The discussion is related to the Euclidean Algorithm and its variations may lead to projects or early examples involving efficiency of an algorithm.

  18. Theoretical and experimental study of the role of cell-cell dipole interaction in dielectrophoretic devices: application to polynomial electrodes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We aimed to investigate the effect of cell-cell dipole interactions in the equilibrium distributions in dielectrophoretic devices. Methods We used a three dimensional coupled Monte Carlo-Poisson method to theoretically study the final distribution of a system of uncharged polarizable particles suspended in a static liquid medium under the action of an oscillating non-uniform electric field generated by polynomial electrodes. The simulated distributions have been compared with experimental ones observed in the case of MDA-MB-231 cells in the same operating conditions. Results The real and simulated distributions are consistent. In both cases the cells distribution near the electrodes is dominated by cell-cell dipole interactions which generate long chains. Conclusions The agreement between real and simulated cells’ distributions demonstrate the method’s reliability. The distribution are dominated by cell-cell dipole interactions even at low density regimes (105 cell/ml). An improved estimate for the density threshold governing the interaction free regime is suggested. PMID:24903282

  19. Rapid identification of bacteria utilizing amplified dielectrophoretic force-assisted nanoparticle-induced surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, I.-Fang; Chen, Tzu-Ying; Lu, Rong-Ji; Wu, Hung-Wei

    2014-06-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP) has been widely used to manipulate, separate, and concentrate microscale particles. Unfortunately, DEP force is difficult to be used in regard to the manipulation of nanoscale molecules/particles. For manipulation of 50- to 100-nm particles, the electrical field strength must be higher than 3 × 106 V/m, and with a low applied voltage of 10 Vp-p, the electrode gap needs to be reduced to submicrons. Our research consists of a novel and simple approach, using a several tens micrometers scale electrode (low cost and easy to fabricate) to generate a dielectrophoretic microparticle assembly to form nanogaps with a locally amplified alternating current (AC) electric field gradient, which is used to rapidly trap nanocolloids. The results show that the amplified DEP force could effectively trap 20-nm colloids in the nanogaps between the 5-μm particle aggregates. The concentration factor at the local detection region was shown to be approximately 5 orders of magnitude higher than the bulk solution. This approach was also successfully used in bead-based surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) for the rapid identification of bacteria from diluted blood.

  20. The patterning mechanism of carbon nanotubes using surface acoustic waves: the acoustic radiation effect or the dielectrophoretic effect.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhichao; Guo, Jinhong; Liu, Yan Jun; Ai, Ye

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we present a simple technique capable of assembling and patterning suspended CNTs using a standing surface acoustic wave (SSAW) field. Individual CNTs could be assembled into larger CNT bundles and patterned in periodic positions on a substrate surface. The mechanism of the SSAW-based patterning technique has been investigated using both numerical simulation and experimental study. It has been found that the acoustic radiation effect due to the acoustic pressure field and the dielectrophoretic (DEP) effect induced by the electric field co-existing in the patterning process however play different roles depending on the properties of the suspended particles and the suspension medium. In the SSAW-based patterning of highly conductive CNTs with high aspect ratio geometry, the positive DEP effect dominates over the acoustic radiation effect. In contrast, the acoustic radiation effect dominates over the DEP effect when manipulating less conductive, spherical or low aspect ratio particles or biological cells. These results provide a meaningful insight into the mechanism of SSAW-based patterning, which is of great help to guide the effective use of this patterning technique for various applications. PMID:26239679

  1. Effect of island shape on dielectrophoretic assembly of metal nanoparticle chains in a conductive-island-based microelectrode system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Haitao; Shao, Jinyou; Ding, Yucheng; Liu, Weiyu; Li, Xiangming; Tian, Hongmiao; Zhou, Yaopei

    2015-03-01

    The electrical conduction quality of an electric circuit connection formed by dielectrophoretic (DEP)-assembled metal nanoparticle wires between small conductive elements plays a significant role in electronic devices. One of the major challenges for improving the electrical conductance of nanowires is optimizing their geometric morphology. So far, the electrical conduction quality has been enhanced by optimizing the AC frequency and conductivity of nanoparticle suspensions. Herein, the effect of the conductive island shapes on the dynamic process occurring in a DEP assembly of 10 nm gold nanoparticles was investigated in a conductive-island-based microelectrode system. The nanoparticle wires between the microelectrodes were assembled in situ from colloidal suspensions. The wires were grown in a much straighter route by increasing the geometric angle of the conductive-island tip. To validate the experiments, the effects of mutual DEP interactions and electrothermally induced fluid flow on the dynamic behavior of particle motion for different island geometric configurations in the conductive-island-based microelectrode system were determined by numerical simulations. The simulation results are consistent with those of experiments. This indicates that different conductive island shapes change the distribution of DEP force and increase the electrothermally induced fluid flow to different extents in the vicinity, leading to different morphologies of DEP-assembled nanoparticle wires.

  2. Continuous-flow system and monitoring tools for the dielectrophoretic integration of nanowires in light sensor arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Marín, A.; García Núñez, C.; Rodríguez, P.; Shen, G.; Kim, S. M.; Kung, P.; Piqueras, J.; Pau, J. L.

    2015-03-01

    Although nanowires (NWs) may improve the performance of many optoelectronic devices such as light emitters and photodetectors, the mass commercialization of these devices is limited by the difficult task of finding reliable and reproducible methods to integrate the NWs on foreign substrates. This work shows the fabrication of zinc oxide NWs photodetectors on conventional glass using transparent conductive electrodes to effectively integrate the NWs at specific locations by dielectrophoresis (DEP). The paper describes the careful preparation of NW dispersions by sedimentation and the dielectrophoretic alignment of NWs in a home-made system. This system includes an impedance technique for the assessment of the alignment quality in real time. Following this procedure, ultraviolet photodetectors based on the electrical contacts formed by the DEP process on the transparent electrodes are fabricated. This cost-effective mean of contacting NWs enables front-and back-illumination operation modes, the latter eliminating shadowing effects caused by the deposition of metals. The electro-optical characterization of the devices shows uniform responsivities in the order of 106 A W-1 below 390 nm under both modes, as well as, time responses of a few seconds.

  3. Effect of Gravity on the Near Field Flow Structure of Helium Jet in Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Ajay K.; Parthasarathy, Ramkumar; Griffin, DeVon

    2002-01-01

    Experiments have shown that a low-density jet injected into a high-density surrounding medium undergoes periodic oscillations in the near field. Although the flow oscillations in these jets at Richardson numbers about unity are attributed to the buoyancy, the direct physical evidence has not been acquired in the experiments. If the instability were indeed caused by buoyancy, the near-field flow structure would undergo drastic changes upon removal of gravity in the microgravity environment. The present study was conducted to investigate this effect by simulating microgravity environment in the 2.2-second drop tower at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The non-intrusive, rainbow schlieren deflectometry technique was used for quantitative measurements of helium concentrations in buoyant and non-buoyant jets. Results in a steady jet show that the radial growth of the jet shear layer in Earth gravity is hindered by the buoyant acceleration. The jet in microgravity was 30 to 70 percent wider than that in Earth gravity. The microgravity jet showed typical growth of a constant density jet shear layer. In case of a self-excited helium jet in Earth gravity, the flow oscillations continued as the jet flow adjusted to microgravity conditions in the drop tower. The flow oscillations were however not present at the end of the drop when steady microgravity conditions were reached.

  4. Dynamic drag force based on iterative density mapping: A new numerical tool for three-dimensional analysis of particle trajectories in a dielectrophoretic system.

    PubMed

    Knoerzer, Markus; Szydzik, Crispin; Tovar-Lopez, Francisco Javier; Tang, Xinke; Mitchell, Arnan; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar

    2016-02-01

    Dielectrophoresis is a widely used means of manipulating suspended particles within microfluidic systems. In order to efficiently design such systems for a desired application, various numerical methods exist that enable particle trajectory plotting in two or three dimensions based on the interplay of hydrodynamic and dielectrophoretic forces. While various models are described in the literature, few are capable of modeling interactions between particles as well as their surrounding environment as these interactions are complex, multifaceted, and computationally expensive to the point of being prohibitive when considering a large number of particles. In this paper, we present a numerical model designed to enable spatial analysis of the physical effects exerted upon particles within microfluidic systems employing dielectrophoresis. The model presents a means of approximating the effects of the presence of large numbers of particles through dynamically adjusting hydrodynamic drag force based on particle density, thereby introducing a measure of emulated particle-particle and particle-liquid interactions. This model is referred to as "dynamic drag force based on iterative density mapping." The resultant numerical model is used to simulate and predict particle trajectory and velocity profiles within a microfluidic system incorporating curved dielectrophoretic microelectrodes. The simulated data are compared favorably with experimental data gathered using microparticle image velocimetry, and is contrasted against simulated data generated using traditional "effective moment Stokes-drag method," showing more accurate particle velocity profiles for areas of high particle density. PMID:26643028

  5. Effect of dielectrophoretic structuring on piezoelectric and pyroelectric properties of lead titanate-epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanbareh, H.; van der Zwaag, S.; Groen, W. A.

    2014-10-01

    Functional granular composites of lead titanate particles in an epoxy matrix prepared by dielectrophoresis show enhanced dielectric, piezoelectric and pyroelectric properties compared to 0-3 composites for different ceramic volume content from 10% to 50%. Two structuring parameters, the interparticle distance and the percentage of 1-3 connectivity are used based on the Bowen model and the mixed connectivity model respectively. The degree of structuring calculated according to both models correlate well with the increase in piezoelectric and pyroelectric sensitivities of the composites. Higher sensitivity of the electroactive properties are observed at higher ceramic volume fractions. The effect of electrical conductivity of the matrix on the pyroelectric responsivity of the composites has been demonstrated to be a key parameter in governing the pyroelectric properties of the composites.

  6. Energy Production Calculations with Field Flow Models and Windspeed Predictions with Statistical Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüstemoǧlu, Sevinç; Barutçu, Burak; Sibel Menteş, Å.ž.

    2010-05-01

    The continuous usage of fossil fuels as primary energy source is the reason of the emission of CO and powerless economy of the country affected by the great flactuations in the unit price of energy sources. In recent years, developments in wind energy sector and the supporting new renewable energy policies of the countries allow the new wind farm owners and the firms who expect to be an owner to consider and invest on the renewable sources. In this study, the annual production of the turbines with 1.8 kW and 30 kW which are available for Istanbul Technical University in Energy Institute is calculated by Wasp and WindPro Field Flow Models and the wind characteristics of the area are analysed. The meteorological data used in calculation includes the period between 02.March.2000 and 31.May.2004 and is taken from the meteorological mast ( ) in Istanbul Technical University's campus area. The measurement data is taken from 2 m and 10 m heights with hourly means. The topography, roughness classes and shelter effects are defined in the models to make accurate extrapolation to the turbine sites. As an advantage, the region is nearly 3.5 km close to the Istanbul Bosphorous but as it can be seen from the Wasp and WindPro Model Results, the Bosphorous effect is interrupted by the new buildings and hight forestry. The shelter effect of these high buildings have a great influence on the wind flow and decrease the high wind energy potential which is produced by the Bosphorous effect. This study, which determines wind characteristics and expected annual production, is important for this Project Site and therefore gains importance before the construction of wind energy system. However, when the system is operating, developing the energy management skills, forecasting the wind speed and direction will become important. At this point, three statistical models which are Kalman Fitler, AR Model and Neural Networks models are used to determine the success of each method for correct

  7. Dielectrophoretic Microfluidic Chip Enables Single-Cell Measurements for Multidrug Resistance in Heterogeneous Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patient Samples.

    PubMed

    Khamenehfar, Avid; Gandhi, Maher K; Chen, Yuchun; Hogge, Donna E; Li, Paul C H

    2016-06-01

    The front-line treatment for adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is anthracycline-based combination chemotherapy. However, treatment outcomes remain suboptimal with relapses frequently observed. Among the mechanisms of treatment failure is multidrug resistance (MDR) mediated by the ABCB1, ABCC1, and ABCG2 drug-efflux transporters. Although genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity between leukemic blast cells is a well-recognized phenomenon, there remains minimal data on differences in MDR activity at the individual cell level. Specifically, functional assays that can distinguish the variability in MDR activity between individual leukemic blasts are lacking. Here, we outline a new dielectrophoretic (DEP) chip-based assay. This assay permits measurement of drug accumulation in single cells, termed same-single-cell analysis in the accumulation mode (SASCA-A). Initially, the assay was optimized in pretherapy samples from 20 adults with AML whose leukemic blasts had MDR activity against the anthracyline daunorubicin (DNR) tested using multiple MDR inhibitors. Parameters tested were initial drug accumulation, time to achieve signal saturation, fold-increase of DNR accumulation with MDR inhibition, ease of cell trapping, and ease of maintaining the trapped cells stationary. This enabled categorization into leukemic blast cells with MDR activity (MDR(+)) and leukemic blast cells without MDR activity (MDR(-ve)). Leukemic blasts could also be distinguished from benign white blood cells (notably these also lacked MDR activity). MDR(-ve) blasts were observed to be enriched in samples taken from patients who went on to enter complete remission (CR), whereas MDR(+) blasts were frequently observed in patients who failed to achieve CR following front-line chemotherapy. However, pronounced variability in functional MDR activity between leukemic blasts was observed, with MDR(+) cells not infrequently seen in some patients that went on to achieve CR. Next, we tested MDR activity in two

  8. Instrument and method to determine the electrophoretic mobility of nanoparticles and proteins by combining electrical and flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Johann, Christoph; Elsenberg, Stephan; Schuch, Horst; Rösch, Ulrich

    2015-04-21

    A new FFF method is presented which combines asymmetrical flow-FFF (AF4) and electrical FFF (ElFFF) in one channel to electrical asymmetrical flow-FFF (EAF4) to overcome the restrictions of pure ElFFF. It allows for measuring electrophoretic mobility (μ) as a function of size. The method provides an absolute value and does not require calibration. Results of μ for two particle standards are in good agreement with values determined by phase analysis light scattering (PALS). There is no requirement for low ionic strength carriers with EAF4. This overcomes one of the main limitations of ElFFF, making it feasible to measure proteins under physiological conditions. EAF4 has the capability to determine μ for individual populations which are resolved into separate peaks. This is demonstrated for a mixture of three polystyrene latex particles with different sizes as well as for the monomer and dimer of BSA and an antibody. The experimental setup consists of an AF4 channel with added electrodes; one is placed beneath the frit at the bottom wall and the other covers the inside of the upper channel plate. This design minimizes contamination from the electrolysis reactions by keeping the particles distant from the electrodes. In addition the applied voltage range is low (1.5-5 V), which reduces the quantity of gaseous electrolysis products below a threshold that interferes with the laminar flow profile or detector signals. Besides measuring μ, the method can be useful to improve the separation between sample components compared to pure flow-FFF. For two proteins (BSA and a monoclonal antibody), enhanced resolution of the monomer and dimer is achieved by applying an electric field. PMID:25789885

  9. Size Determination of Aqueous C60 by Asymmetric Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4) and in-Line Dynamic Light Scattering

    EPA Science Inventory

    To date, studies on the environmental behaviour of aggregated aqueous fullerene nanomaterials have used the entire size distribution of fullerene aggregates and do not distinguish between different aggregate size classes. This is a direct result of the lack of analytical methods ...

  10. Asymmetric Flow Field Flow Fractionation Online with Single Particle – Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry: Detection and Quantification of Silver Nanoparticles in Aqueous Samples

    EPA Science Inventory

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are increasingly being used in many consumer products as disinfectants. Through the use of these products, AgNPs could likely enter aquatic environments. Because recent studies have shown that AgNPs are toxic to various species, including microorgan...

  11. Asymmetric Flow-Field Flow Fractionation (AF4) of Aqueous C60 Aggregates with Dynamic Light Scattering Size and LC-MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current methods for the size determination of nanomaterials in aqueous suspension include dynamic or static light scattering and electron or atomic force microscopy techniques. Light scattering techniques are limited by poor resolution and the scattering intensity dependence on p...

  12. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation coupled with multi-angle laser light scattering for stability comparison of virus-like particles in different solution environments.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Zhang, Yan; Zhou, Yuefang; Luo, Jian; Su, Zhiguo

    2016-06-01

    The stabilities of two commercially available virus like particles, CHO-HBsAg expressed by Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and Hans-HBsAg expressed by Hansenula polymorpha (Hans), were compared using AF4-MALLS under different treatment processes. The initial molecular weight and hydrodynamic diameter of CHO-HBsAg measured with AF4-MALLS were 4727kDa and 29.4nm, while those of Hans-HBsAg were 3039kDa and 22.8nm respectively. In salt solution of 2M ammonium sulfate, the molecular weight and size of CHO-HBsAg had little change, and its antigenicity remained 95%, while those of Hans-HBsAg changed greatly, resulting in aggregation and 75% antigenicity loss. In freeze-thaw operations, Hans-HBsAg aggregated heavily. Most of the aggregates precipitated and the rest soluble aggregates reached 10(5)-10(6)kDa in molecular weight. The antigenicity of Hans-HBsAg decreased to 26.9% after five freeze-thaw cycles. For CHO-HBsAg, there was no obvious aggregation in freeze-thaw, and the antigenicity retained above 98%. In heating process, Hans-HBsAg gradually aggregated to large particles with temperature and the antigenicity decreased to 10% when the temperature reached 80°C. In contrast, CHO-HBsAg would not aggregate with temperature, remained 92% antigenicity at 80°C. The study demonstrated that CHO-HBsAg appeared to be a superior vaccine antigen in term of particle stability and constant antigenicity, which are important in production, transportation and storage. PMID:27129428

  13. Microfluidic-Based Amplification-Free Bacterial DNA Detection by Dielectrophoretic Concentration and Fluorescent Resonance Energy Transfer Assisted in Situ Hybridization (FRET-ISH) †,‡

    PubMed Central

    Packard, Michelle M.; Shusteff, Maxim; Alocilja, Evangelyn C.

    2012-01-01

    Although real-time PCR (RT-PCR) has become a diagnostic standard for rapid identification of bacterial species, typical methods remain time-intensive due to sample preparation and amplification cycle times. The assay described in this work incorporates on-chip dielectrophoretic capture and concentration of bacterial cells, thermal lysis, cell permeabilization, and nucleic acid denaturation and fluorescence resonance energy transfer assisted in situ hybridization (FRET-ISH) species identification. Combining these techniques leverages the benefits of all of them, allowing identification to be accomplished completely on chip less than thirty minutes after receipt of sample, compared to multiple hours required by traditional RT-PCR and its requisite sample preparation. PMID:25586031

  14. Fractional vector calculus and fractional Maxwell's equations

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2008-11-15

    The theory of derivatives and integrals of non-integer order goes back to Leibniz, Liouville, Grunwald, Letnikov and Riemann. The history of fractional vector calculus (FVC) has only 10 years. The main approaches to formulate a FVC, which are used in the physics during the past few years, will be briefly described in this paper. We solve some problems of consistent formulations of FVC by using a fractional generalization of the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. We define the differential and integral vector operations. The fractional Green's, Stokes' and Gauss's theorems are formulated. The proofs of these theorems are realized for simplest regions. A fractional generalization of exterior differential calculus of differential forms is discussed. Fractional nonlocal Maxwell's equations and the corresponding fractional wave equations are considered.

  15. Initialized Fractional Calculus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.; Hartley, Tom T.

    2000-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the need for a nonconstant initialization for the fractional calculus and establishes a basic definition set for the initialized fractional differintegral. This definition set allows the formalization of an initialized fractional calculus. Two basis calculi are considered; the Riemann-Liouville and the Grunwald fractional calculi. Two forms of initialization, terminal and side are developed.

  16. Tempered fractional calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabzikar, Farzad; Meerschaert, Mark M.; Chen, Jinghua

    2015-07-01

    Fractional derivatives and integrals are convolutions with a power law. Multiplying by an exponential factor leads to tempered fractional derivatives and integrals. Tempered fractional diffusion equations, where the usual second derivative in space is replaced by a tempered fractional derivative, govern the limits of random walk models with an exponentially tempered power law jump distribution. The limiting tempered stable probability densities exhibit semi-heavy tails, which are commonly observed in finance. Tempered power law waiting times lead to tempered fractional time derivatives, which have proven useful in geophysics. The tempered fractional derivative or integral of a Brownian motion, called a tempered fractional Brownian motion, can exhibit semi-long range dependence. The increments of this process, called tempered fractional Gaussian noise, provide a useful new stochastic model for wind speed data. A tempered fractional difference forms the basis for numerical methods to solve tempered fractional diffusion equations, and it also provides a useful new correlation model in time series.

  17. Tempered fractional calculus

    SciTech Connect

    Sabzikar, Farzad; Meerschaert, Mark M.; Chen, Jinghua

    2015-07-15

    Fractional derivatives and integrals are convolutions with a power law. Multiplying by an exponential factor leads to tempered fractional derivatives and integrals. Tempered fractional diffusion equations, where the usual second derivative in space is replaced by a tempered fractional derivative, govern the limits of random walk models with an exponentially tempered power law jump distribution. The limiting tempered stable probability densities exhibit semi-heavy tails, which are commonly observed in finance. Tempered power law waiting times lead to tempered fractional time derivatives, which have proven useful in geophysics. The tempered fractional derivative or integral of a Brownian motion, called a tempered fractional Brownian motion, can exhibit semi-long range dependence. The increments of this process, called tempered fractional Gaussian noise, provide a useful new stochastic model for wind speed data. A tempered fractional difference forms the basis for numerical methods to solve tempered fractional diffusion equations, and it also provides a useful new correlation model in time series.

  18. TEMPERED FRACTIONAL CALCULUS

    PubMed Central

    MEERSCHAERT, MARK M.; SABZIKAR, FARZAD; CHEN, JINGHUA

    2014-01-01

    Fractional derivatives and integrals are convolutions with a power law. Multiplying by an exponential factor leads to tempered fractional derivatives and integrals. Tempered fractional diffusion equations, where the usual second derivative in space is replaced by a tempered fractional derivative, govern the limits of random walk models with an exponentially tempered power law jump distribution. The limiting tempered stable probability densities exhibit semi-heavy tails, which are commonly observed in finance. Tempered power law waiting times lead to tempered fractional time derivatives, which have proven useful in geophysics. The tempered fractional derivative or integral of a Brownian motion, called a tempered fractional Brownian motion, can exhibit semi-long range dependence. The increments of this process, called tempered fractional Gaussian noise, provide a useful new stochastic model for wind speed data. A tempered difference forms the basis for numerical methods to solve tempered fractional diffusion equations, and it also provides a useful new correlation model in time series. PMID:26085690

  19. Selective nanomanipulation of fluorescent polystyrene nano-beads and single quantum dots at gold nanostructures based on the AC-dielectrophoretic force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jinsik; Hwang, Kyo Seon; Lee, Sangyoup; Park, Jung Ho; Shin, Hyun-Joon

    2015-11-01

    We introduced the selective manipulation of polystyrene (PS) nano-beads and single quantum dots (QDs) at a gold nanostructure by using the AC-dielectrophoretic (DEP) force. Manipulation in three degrees of freedom (end-facet, side, and position-selective manipulation) was accomplished in gold nanostructures between microelectrodes. A 10 μm gap between the microelectrodes, which has a 100 nm-wide nanowire and 200 nm-wide vortex nanostructures at the inside of the gap, was fabricated, and nanostructures were not connected with the electrodes. We also performed theoretical calculations to verify the selective manipulation through the floating AC-DEP force. A sufficiently high gradient of the square of the electric field (∇|E|2, ~1019 V2 m-3) was accomplished and controlled for achieving a strong attaching force of nanoparticles using the gap between microelectrodes and nanostructures as well as the rotation of structures. Fluorescent PS nano-beads and QDs were attached at the designed end facet, side, and position of nanostructures with high selectivity. A single QD attachment was also realized at gold nanostructures, and the attached QDs were verified as single using optical ``blinking'' measurements.We introduced the selective manipulation of polystyrene (PS) nano-beads and single quantum dots (QDs) at a gold nanostructure by using the AC-dielectrophoretic (DEP) force. Manipulation in three degrees of freedom (end-facet, side, and position-selective manipulation) was accomplished in gold nanostructures between microelectrodes. A 10 μm gap between the microelectrodes, which has a 100 nm-wide nanowire and 200 nm-wide vortex nanostructures at the inside of the gap, was fabricated, and nanostructures were not connected with the electrodes. We also performed theoretical calculations to verify the selective manipulation through the floating AC-DEP force. A sufficiently high gradient of the square of the electric field (∇|E|2, ~1019 V2 m-3) was accomplished and

  20. FRACTIONAL INTEGRATION TOOLBOX

    PubMed Central

    Marinov, Toma M.; Ramirez, Nelson; Santamaria, Fidel

    2014-01-01

    The problems formulated in the fractional calculus framework often require numerical fractional integration/differentiation of large data sets. Several existing fractional control toolboxes are capable of performing fractional calculus operations, however, none of them can efficiently perform numerical integration on multiple large data sequences. We developed a Fractional Integration Toolbox (FIT), which efficiently performs fractional numerical integration/differentiation of the Riemann-Liouville type on large data sequences. The toolbox allows parallelization and is designed to be deployed on both CPU and GPU platforms. PMID:24812536

  1. DIY Fraction Pack.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Alan; Graham, Louise

    2003-01-01

    Describes a very successful attempt to teach fractions to year 5 pupils based on pupils making their own fraction pack. Children decided for themselves how to make the fractional slices used in the activity using colored cardboard sheets and templates of a paper circle consisting of 24 equal slices. (Author/NB)

  2. On-chip concentration of bacteria using a 3D dielectrophoretic chip and subsequent laser-based DNA extraction in the same chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Yoon-Kyoung; Kim, Tae-hyeong; Lee, Jeong-Gun

    2010-06-01

    We report the on-chip concentration of bacteria using a dielectrophoretic (DEP) chip with 3D electrodes and subsequent laser-based DNA extraction in the same chip. The DEP chip has a set of interdigitated Au post electrodes with 50 µm height to generate a network of non-uniform electric fields for the efficient trapping by DEP. The metal post array was fabricated by photolithography and subsequent Ni and Au electroplating. Three model bacteria samples (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus mutans) were tested and over 80-fold concentrations were achieved within 2 min. Subsequently, on-chip DNA extraction from the concentrated bacteria in the 3D DEP chip was performed by laser irradiation using the laser-irradiated magnetic bead system (LIMBS) in the same chip. The extracted DNA was analyzed with silicon chip-based real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The total process of on-chip bacteria concentration and the subsequent DNA extraction can be completed within 10 min including the manual operation time.

  3. A study on the competing effects of the dielectrophoretic force and buoyancy on nucleate boiling heat transfer rates and an analogy with variable gravity boiling results

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, T.J.; Chung, J.N.; Schneider, J.B.

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to form a more general understanding of the effect an electric field has on boiling heat transfer by considering non-boiling electroconvection and boiling bubble dynamics separately. In an attempt to decouple these two heat transfer mechanisms, an electric field was utilized which produced a uniform dielectrophoretic force (DEP force) across a horizontal platinum wire. It was concluded that the effect of the DEP force on the bubbles is analogous to reducing or increasing the gravity locally or inducing vapor flow across the heater surface similar to forced-convection. In terms of the relationship between the bubble dynamics and the heat transfer, it was concluded that nucleate boiling heat transfer will be enhanced if the effective gravity acts to hold the vapor bubbles near the heater surface, while at the same time permitting access of the liquid to the surface in order to prevent dryout. However, a large electroconvective effect can dominate and possibly reverse this trend. For the critical heat flux (CHF) it was discovered that for 1

  4. High-Density Dielectrophoretic Microwell Array for Detection, Capture, and Single-Cell Analysis of Rare Tumor Cells in Peripheral Blood

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Yasuyuki; Katayama, Koji; Futami, Toru; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Sawada, Takeshi; Koizumi, Fumiaki; Koh, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Development of a reliable platform and workflow to detect and capture a small number of mutation-bearing circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from a blood sample is necessary for the development of noninvasive cancer diagnosis. In this preclinical study, we aimed to develop a capture system for molecular characterization of single CTCs based on high-density dielectrophoretic microwell array technology. Spike-in experiments using lung cancer cell lines were conducted. The microwell array was used to capture spiked cancer cells, and captured single cells were subjected to whole genome amplification followed by sequencing. A high detection rate (70.2%–90.0%) and excellent linear performance (R2 = 0.8189–0.9999) were noted between the observed and expected numbers of tumor cells. The detection rate was markedly higher than that obtained using the CellSearch system in a blinded manner, suggesting the superior sensitivity of our system in detecting EpCAM− tumor cells. Isolation of single captured tumor cells, followed by detection of EGFR mutations, was achieved using Sanger sequencing. Using a microwell array, we established an efficient and convenient platform for the capture and characterization of single CTCs. The results of a proof-of-principle preclinical study indicated that this platform has potential for the molecular characterization of captured CTCs from patients. PMID:26107884

  5. Full field flow visualization and computer-aided velocity measurements in a bank of cylinders in a wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, M. J.; Canacci, V. A.; Russell, L. M.

    1992-01-01

    The full field flow tracking (FFFT) method that is presented in this paper uses a laser-generated, mechanically strobed planar sheet of light, a low luminosity TV camera coupled with a long distance microscope, and a computer-controlled video recorder to study nonintrusively and qualitatively the flow structures in a bank of cylinders that are placed in a wind tunnel. This setup simulates an upscale version of the geometry of internal cooling passageways characteristic of small air-cooled radial turbines. The qualitative images supplied by the FFFT system are processed by means of a computer-integrated image quantification (CIIQ) method into quantitative information, trajectories and velocities, that describe the flow upstream of and within the bank of cylinders. The tracking method is Lagrangian in concept, and permits identification and tracking of the same particle, thus facilitating construction of time dependent trajectories and the calculation of true velocities and accelerations. The error analysis evaluates the accuracy with which the seed particles follow the flow and the errors incurred during the quantitative processing of the raw data derived from the FFFT/CIIQ method.

  6. Full field flow visualization and computer-aided velocity measurements in a bank of cylinders in a wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, M. J.; Canacci, V. A.; Russell, L. M.

    1992-06-01

    The full field flow tracking (FFFT) method that is presented in this paper uses a laser-generated, mechanically strobed planar sheet of light, a low luminosity TV camera coupled with a long distance microscope, and a computer-controlled video recorder to study nonintrusively and qualitatively the flow structures in a bank of cylinders that are placed in a wind tunnel. This setup simulates an upscale version of the geometry of internal cooling passageways characteristic of small air-cooled radial turbines. The qualitative images supplied by the FFFT system are processed by means of a computer-integrated image quantification (CIIQ) method into quantitative information, trajectories and velocities, that describe the flow upstream of and within the bank of cylinders. The tracking method is Lagrangian in concept, and permits identification and tracking of the same particle, thus facilitating construction of time dependent trajectories and the calculation of true velocities and accelerations. The error analysis evaluates the accuracy with which the seed particles follow the flow and the errors incurred during the quantitative processing of the raw data derived from the FFFT/CIIQ method.

  7. Dividing Fractions: A Pedagogical Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Robert

    2016-01-01

    When dividing one fraction by a second fraction, invert, that is, flip the second fraction, then multiply it by the first fraction. To multiply fractions, simply multiply across the denominators, and multiply across the numerators to get the resultant fraction. So by inverting the division of fractions it is turned into an easy multiplication of…

  8. FRACTIONAL PEARSON DIFFUSIONS

    PubMed Central

    Leonenko, Nikolai N.; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    2013-01-01

    Pearson diffusions are governed by diffusion equations with polynomial coefficients. Fractional Pearson diffusions are governed by the corresponding time-fractional diffusion equation. They are useful for modeling sub-diffusive phenomena, caused by particle sticking and trapping. This paper provides explicit strong solutions for fractional Pearson diffusions, using spectral methods. It also presents stochastic solutions, using a non-Markovian inverse stable time change. PMID:23626377

  9. Size fractionation and characterization of natural aquatic colloids and nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Baalousha, M; Lead, J R

    2007-11-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to image and quantify natural nanoparticles (prefiltered <25 nm) from three different freshwater sites (Vale Lake, Bailey Brook and Tern Rivers). Four fractions were analysed by AFM; the prefiltered fraction (<25 nm) and three fractions collected after separation of this prefiltered sample by flow field-flow fractionation (FlFFF) which corresponds to material which has size ranges of <4.2 nm, 4.2-15.8 nm and 15.8-32.4 nm, as determined by FlFFF theory. The large majority of materials in all samples appeared as <3 nm nanoparticles, nearly spherical and rich in chromophores active at 254 nm UV, which thus correspond to natural organic matter. However, nanoparticles were also imaged up to slightly more than 25 nm in size, indicating a slight disagreement in sizing between filtration and FlFFF. In addition, some particles in certain fractions were found to be covered with a thin film of less than 0.5-1.0 nm. Substantial differences between sites were observed. PMID:17644161

  10. An Appetite for Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkerson, Trena L.; Bryan, Tommy; Curry, Jane

    2012-01-01

    This article describes how using candy bars as models gives sixth-grade students a taste for learning to represent fractions whose denominators are factors of twelve. Using paper models of the candy bars, students explored and compared fractions. They noticed fewer different representations for one-third than for one-half. The authors conclude…

  11. Can Kindergartners Do Fractions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cwikla, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Mathematics professor Julie Cwikla decided that she needed to investigate young children's understandings and see what precurricular partitioning notions young minds bring to the fraction table. Cwikla realized that only a handful of studies have examined how preschool-age and early elementary school-age students solve fraction problems…

  12. The Future of Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usiskin, Zalman P.

    2007-01-01

    In the 1970s, the movement to the metric system (which has still not completely occurred in the United States) and the advent of hand-held calculators led some to speculate that decimal representation of numbers would render fractions obsolete. This provocative proposition stimulated Zalman Usiskin to write "The Future of Fractions" in 1979. He…

  13. (Carbon isotope fractionation inplants)

    SciTech Connect

    O'Leary, M.H.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of this research are: To develop a theoretical and experimental framework for understanding isotope fractionations in plants; and to develop methods for using this isotope fractionation for understanding the dynamics of CO{sub 2} fixation in plants. Progress is described.

  14. Fractional calculus in bioengineering.

    PubMed

    Magin, Richard L

    2004-01-01

    Fractional calculus (integral and differential operations of noninteger order) is not often used to model biological systems. Although the basic mathematical ideas were developed long ago by the mathematicians Leibniz (1695), Liouville (1834), Riemann (1892), and others and brought to the attention of the engineering world by Oliver Heaviside in the 1890s, it was not until 1974 that the first book on the topic was published by Oldham and Spanier. Recent monographs and symposia proceedings have highlighted the application of fractional calculus in physics, continuum mechanics, signal processing, and electromagnetics, but with few examples of applications in bioengineering. This is surprising because the methods of fractional calculus, when defined as a Laplace or Fourier convolution product, are suitable for solving many problems in biomedical research. For example, early studies by Cole (1933) and Hodgkin (1946) of the electrical properties of nerve cell membranes and the propagation of electrical signals are well characterized by differential equations of fractional order. The solution involves a generalization of the exponential function to the Mittag-Leffler function, which provides a better fit to the observed cell membrane data. A parallel application of fractional derivatives to viscoelastic materials establishes, in a natural way, hereditary integrals and the power law (Nutting/Scott Blair) stress-strain relationship for modeling biomaterials. In this review, I will introduce the idea of fractional operations by following the original approach of Heaviside, demonstrate the basic operations of fractional calculus on well-behaved functions (step, ramp, pulse, sinusoid) of engineering interest, and give specific examples from electrochemistry, physics, bioengineering, and biophysics. The fractional derivative accurately describes natural phenomena that occur in such common engineering problems as heat transfer, electrode/electrolyte behavior, and sub

  15. Multiple daily fractionation schedules

    SciTech Connect

    Peschel, R.E.; Fischer, J.J.

    1982-10-01

    Although conventional fractionation schedules have been satisfactory for the treatment of some tumors, there is reason to believe that the results of radiation therapy could be improved in some cases by appropriate alterations in treatment schedules. The pharmacological characteristics of some of the electron affinic radiation sensitizers have provided added incentive to investigate newer fractionation schemes, particularly ones which deliver the majority of the radiation dose in short periods of time. This editorial discusses three papers describing preliminary clinical studies using multi-daily fractionated (MDF) radiation therapy. Two of these studies also make use of the radiation sensitizer misonidazole. (KRM)

  16. FCC main fractionator revamps

    SciTech Connect

    Golden, S.W.; Martin, G.R.; Sloley, A.W. )

    1993-03-01

    Structured packing use in fluid catalytic cracker (FCC) main fractionators significantly impacts unit pressure profile. Unit pressure balance links the FCC main fractionator, reactor, regenerator, air compressor and wet gas compressor. Unit pressure balance should be viewed as a design variable when evaluating FCC unit revamps. Depending upon limitations of the particular FCC unit, capacity increases of 12.5% to 22.5% have been achieved without modifications to major rotating equipment, by revamping FCC main fractionators with structured packing. An examination of three FCC main fractionator revamps show improvements to pressure profiles and unit capacity. The three revamps described included a wet gas compressor volume limit; an air blower limitation; and a wet gas compressor motor limitation.

  17. Intracellular Cadmium Isotope Fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horner, T. J.; Lee, R. B.; Henderson, G. M.; Rickaby, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    Recent stable isotope studies into the biological utilization of transition metals (e.g. Cu, Fe, Zn, Cd) suggest several stepwise cellular processes can fractionate isotopes in both culture and nature. However, the determination of fractionation factors is often unsatisfactory, as significant variability can exist - even between different organisms with the same cellular functions. Thus, it has not been possible to adequately understand the source and mechanisms of metal isotopic fractionation. In order to address this problem, we investigated the biological fractionation of Cd isotopes within genetically-modified bacteria (E. coli). There is currently only one known biological use or requirement of Cd, a Cd/Zn carbonic anhydrase (CdCA, from the marine diatom T. weissfloggii), which we introduce into the E. coli genome. We have also developed a cleaning procedure that allows for the treating of bacteria so as to study the isotopic composition of different cellular components. We find that whole cells always exhibit a preference for uptake of the lighter isotopes of Cd. Notably, whole cells appear to have a similar Cd isotopic composition regardless of the expression of CdCA within the E. coli. However, isotopic fractionation can occur within the genetically modified E. coli during Cd use, such that Cd bound in CdCA can display a distinct isotopic composition compared to the cell as a whole. Thus, the externally observed fractionation is independent of the internal uses of Cd, with the largest Cd isotope fractionation occurring during cross-membrane transport. A general implication of these experiments is that trace metal isotopic fractionation most likely reflects metal transport into biological cells (either actively or passively), rather than relating to expression of specific physiological function and genetic expression of different metalloenzymes.

  18. Symmetric continued fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Panprasitwech, Oranit; Laohakosol, Vichian; Chaichana, Tuangrat

    2010-11-11

    Explicit formulae for continued fractions with symmetric patterns in their partial quotients are constructed in the field of formal power series. Similar to the work of Cohn in 1996, which generalized the so-called folding lemma to {kappa}-fold symmetry, the notion of {kappa}-duplicating symmetric continued fractions is investigated using a modification of the 1995 technique due to Clemens, Merrill and Roeder.

  19. soil organic matter fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osat, Maryam; Heidari, Ahmad

    2010-05-01

    Carbon is essential for plant growth, due to its effects on other soil properties like aggregation. Knowledge of dynamics of organic matter in different locations in the soil matrix can provide valuable information which affects carbon sequestration and soil the other soil properties. Extraction of soil organic matter (SOM) fractions has been a long standing approach to elucidating the roles of soil organic matter in soil processes. Several kind fractionation methods are used and all provide information on soil organic matter function. Physical fractionation capture the effects on SOM dynamics of the spatial arrangement of primary and secondary organomineral particles in soil while chemical fractionation can not consider the spatial arrangement but their organic fractions are suitable for advanced chemical characterization. Three method of physical separation of soil have been used, sieving, sedimentation and densitometry. The distribution of organic matter within physical fractions of the soil can be assessed by sieving. Sieving separates soil particles based strictly on size. The study area is located on north central Iran, between 35° 41'- 36° 01' N and 50° 42'- 51° 14' E. Mean annual precipitation about 243.8 mm and mean annual air temperature is about 14.95 °C. The soil moisture and temperature regime vary between aridic-thermic in lower altitudes to xeric-mesic in upper altitudes. More than 36 surface soil samples (0-20 cm) were collected according to land-use map units. After preliminary analyzing of samples 10 samples were selected for further analyses in five size fractions and three different time intervals in September, January and April 2008. Fractionation carried out by dry sieving in five classes, 1-2 mm, 0.5-1 mm, 270 μm-0.5mm, 53-270 μm and <53 μm. Organic matter and C/N ratio were determined for all fractions at different time intervals. Chemical fractionation of organic matter also carried out according to Tan (2003), also Mineralogical

  20. Modern plasma fractionation.

    PubMed

    Burnouf, Thierry

    2007-04-01

    Protein products fractionated from human plasma are an essential class of therapeutics used, often as the only available option, in the prevention, management, and treatment of life-threatening conditions resulting from trauma, congenital deficiencies, immunologic disorders, or infections. Modern plasma product production technology remains largely based on the ethanol fractionation process, but much has evolved in the last few years to improve product purity, to enhance the recovery of immunoglobulin G, and to isolate new plasma proteins, such as alpha1-protease inhibitor, von Willebrand factor, and protein C. Because of the human origin of the starting material and the pooling of 10,000 to 50,000 donations required for industrial processing, the major risk associated to plasma products is the transmission of blood-borne infectious agents. A complete set of measures--and, most particularly, the use of dedicated viral inactivation and removal treatments--has been implemented throughout the production chain of fractionated plasma products over the last 20 years to ensure optimal safety, in particular, and not exclusively, against HIV, hepatitis B virus, and hepatitis C virus. In this review, we summarize the practices of the modern plasma fractionation industry from the collection of the raw plasma material to the industrial manufacture of fractionated products. We describe the quality requirements of plasma for fractionation and the various treatments applied for the inactivation and removal of blood-borne infectious agents and provide examples of methods used for the purification of the various classes of plasma protein therapies. We also highlight aspects of the good manufacturing practices and the regulatory environment that govern the whole chain of production. In a regulated and professional environment, fractionated plasma products manufactured by modern processes are certainly among the lowest-risk therapeutic biological products in use today. PMID:17397761

  1. A discrete fractional random transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhengjun; Zhao, Haifa; Liu, Shutian

    2005-11-01

    We propose a discrete fractional random transform based on a generalization of the discrete fractional Fourier transform with an intrinsic randomness. Such discrete fractional random transform inheres excellent mathematical properties of the fractional Fourier transform along with some fantastic features of its own. As a primary application, the discrete fractional random transform has been used for image encryption and decryption.

  2. FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION FEED ENVELOPE

    SciTech Connect

    HERTING DL

    2008-03-19

    Laboratory work was completed on a set of evaporation tests designed to establish a feed envelope for the fractional crystallization process. The feed envelope defines chemical concentration limits within which the process can be operated successfully. All 38 runs in the half-factorial design matrix were completed successfully, based on the qualitative definition of success. There is no feed composition likely to be derived from saltcake dissolution that would cause the fractional crystallization process to not meet acceptable performance requirements. However, some compositions clearly would provide more successful operation than other compositions.

  3. Multipartite Fully Entangled Fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jianwei

    2016-06-01

    Fully entangled fraction is a definition for bipartite states, which is tightly related to bipartite maximally entangled states, and has clear experimental and theoretical significance. In this work, we generalize it to multipartite case, we call the generalized version multipartite fully entangled fraction (MFEF). MFEF measures the closeness of a state to GHZ states. The analytical expressions of MFEF are very difficult to obtain except for very special states, however, we show that, the MFEF of any state is determined by a system of finite-order polynomial equations. Therefore, the MFEF can be efficiently numerically computed.

  4. Release Fraction Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, Judith A.; Glissmeyer, John A.

    2004-01-01

    This document presents results of experiments conducted to measure release fractions during certain tank retrieval processes. The tests were performed in a 1/4 scale model of a waste storage tank. The retrieval processes simulated were: (1) Discharging liquid or slurry from the mouth of a vertically oriented two-in. Schedule 40 pipe. The discharging material was in free-fall from the mouth of the pipe near the top of the tank into a liquid or slurry pool at the bottom of the tank. (2) The jet from a 9/16-in.-diameter nozzle transferring liquid or slurry waste from one side of the tank to the other. The discharging liquid was aimed at the opposite side of the tank from the nozzle and either impacted the tank wall or fell into a liquid or slurry pool in the bottom of the tank. (3) A high pressure fan jet of liquid striking a steel plate or simulated waste from a stand-off distance of a few inches. For each process, a water-soluble fluorescent dye was added to the liquid fraction as a tracer. Kaolin clay was used to represent the solids. The tank was covered and there was no forced ventilation in the tank during the tests. Six air samples were collected during each test. The air samples were collected at fixed positions in the tank. The air sample filters were dried and weighed to determine the solids collection. The fluorescent dye was then leached from each filter and quantified with a fluorometer to determine the collection of liquid. Samples of the slurry and liquid simulants were also collected to determine the quantities of simulant used in each test. To calculate the release fraction, the quantity collected on each air sample was adjusted for the fraction of the tank volume sampled and divided by the quantity of material exposed in the simulation. The method was not as sensitive for the solids content as it was for the liquid content, but in those instances where a solids release fraction was determined, it was in relatively good agreement with that of the

  5. Sweet Work with Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinogradova, Natalya; Blaine, Larry

    2013-01-01

    Almost everyone loves chocolate. However, the same cannot be said about fractions, which are loved by markedly fewer. Middle school students tend to view them with wary respect, but little affection. The authors attempt to sweeten the subject by describing a type of game involving division of chocolate bars. The activity they describe provides a…

  6. Momentum fractionation on superstrata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bena, Iosif; Martinec, Emil; Turton, David; Warner, Nicholas P.

    2016-05-01

    Superstrata are bound states in string theory that carry D1, D5, and momentum charges, and whose supergravity descriptions are parameterized by arbitrary functions of (at least) two variables. In the D1-D5 CFT, typical three-charge states reside in high-degree twisted sectors, and their momentum charge is carried by modes that individually have fractional momentum. Understanding this momentum fractionation holographically is crucial for understanding typical black-hole microstates in this system. We use solution-generating techniques to add momentum to a multi-wound supertube and thereby construct the first examples of asymptotically-flat superstrata. The resulting supergravity solutions are horizonless and smooth up to well-understood orbifold singularities. Upon taking the AdS3 decoupling limit, our solutions are dual to CFT states with momentum fractionation. We give a precise proposal for these dual CFT states. Our construction establishes the very nontrivial fact that large classes of CFT states with momentum fractionation can be realized in the bulk as smooth horizonless supergravity solutions.

  7. Fraction collector for electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bier, M.

    1977-01-01

    Rotating-tube electrophoresis apparatus employs rotating jet of eluting buffer to reduce effects of convection during separation. Designed for separation of microorganisms and biological species, system combines gravity/gradient compensating of lumen with buffer flush at fraction outlet to increase separation efficiency.

  8. Fractionation of Soil Phosphorus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An understanding of the qualitative and quantitative information provided by soil phosphorus (P) fractionation methods is important for addressing agronomic and water quality problems, as well as evaluating P biogeochemistry in extreme environments. This chapter provides a schematic overview of and ...

  9. Fractional statistics and confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaete, P.; Wotzasek, C.

    2005-02-01

    It is shown that a pointlike composite having charge and magnetic moment displays a confining potential for the static interaction while simultaneously obeying fractional statistics in a pure gauge theory in three dimensions, without a Chern-Simons term. This result is distinct from the Maxwell-Chern-Simons theory that shows a screening nature for the potential.

  10. An Introduction to Continued Fractions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Charles G.

    Provided is an introduction to the properties of continued fractions for the intellectually curious high school student. Among the topics included are (1) Expansion of Rational Numbers into Simple Continued Fractions, (2) Convergents, (3) Continued Fractions and Linear Diophantine Equations of the Type am + bn = c, (4) Continued Fractions and…

  11. Goal Sketches in Fraction Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sophian, Catherine; Madrid, Samara

    2003-01-01

    To examine how conceptual knowledge about fraction magnitudes changes as students' learning progresses, 5th and 7th-grade students were asked to solve fraction magnitude problems that entailed finding a fraction between two given fractions and then to evaluate solutions for similar problems that were modeled for them. When the given fractions…

  12. Breakdown of doublet re-circulation and direct line drives by far-field flow in reservoirs: Implications for geothermal and hydrocarbon well placement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weijermars, R.; van Harmelen, A.

    2016-04-01

    An important real world application of doublet flow occurs in well design of both geothermal and hydrocarbon reservoirs. A guiding principle for fluid management of injection and extraction wells is that mass balance is commonly assumed between the injected and produced fluid. Because the doublets are considered closed loops, the injection fluid is assumed to eventually reach the producer well and all the produced fluid ideally comes from stream tubes connected to the injector of the well pair making up the doublet. We show that when an aquifer background flow occurs, doublets will rarely retain closed loops of fluid re-circulation. When the far-field flow rate increases relative to the doublet's strength, the area occupied by the doublet will diminish and eventually vanishes. Alternatively, rather than using a single injector (source) and single producer (sink), a linear array of multiple injectors separated by some distance from a parallel array of producers can be used in geothermal energy projects as well as in waterflooding of hydrocarbon reservoirs. Fluid flow in such an arrangement of parallel source-sink arrays is shown to be macroscopically equivalent to that of a line doublet. Again, any far-field flow that is strong enough will breach through the line doublet, which then splits into two vortices. Apart from fundamental insight into elementary flow dynamics, our new results provide practical clues that may contribute to improve the planning and design of doublets and direct line drives commonly used for flow management of groundwater, geothermal and hydrocarbon reservoirs.

  13. Breakdown of doublet recirculation and direct line drives by far-field flow in reservoirs: implications for geothermal and hydrocarbon well placement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weijermars, R.; van Harmelen, A.

    2016-07-01

    An important real world application of doublet flow occurs in well design of both geothermal and hydrocarbon reservoirs. A guiding principle for fluid management of injection and extraction wells is that mass balance is commonly assumed between the injected and produced fluid. Because the doublets are considered closed loops, the injection fluid is assumed to eventually reach the producer well and all the produced fluid ideally comes from stream tubes connected to the injector of the well pair making up the doublet. We show that when an aquifer background flow occurs, doublets will rarely retain closed loops of fluid recirculation. When the far-field flow rate increases relative to the doublet's strength, the area occupied by the doublet will diminish and eventually vanishes. Alternatively, rather than using a single injector (source) and single producer (sink), a linear array of multiple injectors separated by some distance from a parallel array of producers can be used in geothermal energy projects as well as in waterflooding of hydrocarbon reservoirs. Fluid flow in such an arrangement of parallel source-sink arrays is shown to be macroscopically equivalent to that of a line doublet. Again, any far-field flow that is strong enough will breach through the line doublet, which then splits into two vortices. Apart from fundamental insight into elementary flow dynamics, our new results provide practical clues that may contribute to improve the planning and design of doublets and direct line drives commonly used for flow management of groundwater, geothermal and hydrocarbon reservoirs.

  14. Testing fractional action cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchigolev, V. K.

    2016-08-01

    The present work deals with a combined test of the so-called Fractional Action Cosmology (FAC) on the example of a specific model obtained by the author earlier. In this model, the effective cosmological term is proportional to the Hubble parameter squared through the so-called kinematic induction. The reason of studying this cosmological model could be explained by its ability to describe two periods of accelerated expansion, that is in agreement with the recent observations and the cosmological inflation paradigm. First of all, we put our model through the theoretical tests, which gives a general conception of the influence of the model parameters on its behavior. Then, we obtain some restrictions on the principal parameters of the model, including the fractional index, by means of the observational data. Finally, the cosmography parameters and the observational data compared to the theoretical predictions are presented both analytically and graphically.

  15. New Dry Fractionation Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, David S.; Cooper, Bonnie L.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation describes new fractionation methods that are used to create dust that is respirable for testing the effects of inhalation of lunar dust in preparation for future manned lunar exploration. Because lunar dust is a very limited commodity, a method that does not result in loss of the material had to be developed. The dust separation system that is described incorporates some traditional methods, while preventing the dust from being contaminated or changed in reactivity properties while also limiting losses.

  16. Fractional Galilean symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseiny, Ali; Rouhani, Shahin

    2016-09-01

    We generalize the differential representation of the operators of the Galilean algebras to include fractional derivatives. As a result a whole new class of scale invariant Galilean algebras are obtained. The first member of this class has dynamical index z = 2 similar to the Schrödinger algebra. The second member of the class has dynamical index z = 3 / 2, which happens to be the dynamical index Kardar-Parisi-Zhang equation.

  17. Model Fractional Chern Insulators.

    PubMed

    Behrmann, Jörg; Liu, Zhao; Bergholtz, Emil J

    2016-05-27

    We devise local lattice models whose ground states are model fractional Chern insulators-Abelian and non-Abelian topologically ordered states characterized by exact ground state degeneracies at any finite size and infinite entanglement gaps. Most saliently, we construct exact parent Hamiltonians for two distinct families of bosonic lattice generalizations of the Z_{k} parafermion quantum Hall states: (i) color-entangled fractional Chern insulators at band filling fractions ν=k/(C+1) and (ii) nematic states at ν=k/2, where C is the Chern number of the lowest band. In spite of a fluctuating Berry curvature, our construction is partially frustration free: the ground states reside entirely within the lowest band and exactly minimize a local (k+1) body repulsion term by term. In addition to providing the first known models hosting intriguing states such as higher Chern number generalizations of the Fibonacci anyon quantum Hall states, the remarkable stability and finite-size properties make our models particularly well suited for the study of novel phenomena involving, e.g., twist defects and proximity induced superconductivity, as well as being a guide for designing experiments. PMID:27284668

  18. Model Fractional Chern Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrmann, Jörg; Liu, Zhao; Bergholtz, Emil J.

    2016-05-01

    We devise local lattice models whose ground states are model fractional Chern insulators—Abelian and non-Abelian topologically ordered states characterized by exact ground state degeneracies at any finite size and infinite entanglement gaps. Most saliently, we construct exact parent Hamiltonians for two distinct families of bosonic lattice generalizations of the Zk parafermion quantum Hall states: (i) color-entangled fractional Chern insulators at band filling fractions ν =k /(C +1 ) and (ii) nematic states at ν =k /2 , where C is the Chern number of the lowest band. In spite of a fluctuating Berry curvature, our construction is partially frustration free: the ground states reside entirely within the lowest band and exactly minimize a local (k +1 ) body repulsion term by term. In addition to providing the first known models hosting intriguing states such as higher Chern number generalizations of the Fibonacci anyon quantum Hall states, the remarkable stability and finite-size properties make our models particularly well suited for the study of novel phenomena involving, e.g., twist defects and proximity induced superconductivity, as well as being a guide for designing experiments.

  19. Solvent Fractionation of Lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Sabornie; Saito, Tomonori

    2014-01-01

    Lignin is a highly abundant source of renewable carbon that can be considered as a valuable sustainable source of biobased materials. The major issues for the commercial production of value added high performance lignin products are lignin s physical and chemical heterogenities. To overcome these problems, a variety of procedures have been developed to produce pure lignin suitable for high performace applications such as lignin-derived carbon materials. However, most of the isolation procedures affect lignin s properties and structure. In this chapter, a short review of the effect of solvent fractionation on lignin s properties and structure is presented.

  20. Fractional channel multichannel analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Anderson, G.A.

    1994-08-23

    A multichannel analyzer incorporating the features of the present invention obtains the effect of fractional channels thus greatly reducing the number of actual channels necessary to record complex line spectra. This is accomplished by using an analog-to-digital converter in the asynchronous mode, i.e., the gate pulse from the pulse height-to-pulse width converter is not synchronized with the signal from a clock oscillator. This saves power and reduces the number of components required on the board to achieve the effect of radically expanding the number of channels without changing the circuit board. 9 figs.

  1. Fractional channel multichannel analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbush, Larry W.; Anderson, Gordon A.

    1994-01-01

    A multichannel analyzer incorporating the features of the present invention obtains the effect of fractional channels thus greatly reducing the number of actual channels necessary to record complex line spectra. This is accomplished by using an analog-to-digital converter in the asynscronous mode, i.e., the gate pulse from the pulse height-to-pulse width converter is not synchronized with the signal from a clock oscillator. This saves power and reduces the number of components required on the board to achieve the effect of radically expanding the number of channels without changing the circuit board.

  2. Clean fractionation of biomass

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The US DOE Alternative Feedstocks (AF) program is forging new links between the agricultural community and the chemicals industry through support of research and development (R&D) that uses green feedstocks to produce chemicals. The program promotes cost-effective industrial use of renewable biomass as feedstocks to manufacture high-volume chemical building blocks. Industrial commercialization of such processes would stimulate the agricultural sector by increasing the demand of agricultural and forestry commodities. A consortium of five DOE national laboratories has been formed with the objectives of providing industry with a broad range of expertise and helping to lower the risk of new process development through federal cost sharing. The AF program is conducting ongoing research on a clean fractionation process, designed to convert biomass into materials that can be used for chemical processes and products. The focus of the clean fractionation research is to demonstrate to industry that one technology can successfully separate all types of feedstocks into predictable types of chemical intermediates.

  3. Microwave Dielectrophoretic Levitation In Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, John L.; Jackson, Henry W.; Barmatz, Martin B.

    1993-01-01

    Two reports propose use of dielectrophoresis in microwave resonant cavities to levitate samples of materials for containerless processing in microgravity in vacuum or in any suitable atmosphere. Also describe experiments undertaken to verify feasibility of proposal.

  4. What is a fractional derivative?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortigueira, Manuel D.; Tenreiro Machado, J. A.

    2015-07-01

    This paper discusses the concepts underlying the formulation of operators capable of being interpreted as fractional derivatives or fractional integrals. Two criteria for required by a fractional operator are formulated. The Grünwald-Letnikov, Riemann-Liouville and Caputo fractional derivatives and the Riesz potential are accessed in the light of the proposed criteria. A Leibniz rule is also obtained for the Riesz potential.

  5. Fractional diffusion on bounded domains

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Defterli, Ozlem; D'Elia, Marta; Du, Qiang; Gunzburger, Max Donald; Lehoucq, Richard B.; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    2015-03-13

    We found that the mathematically correct specification of a fractional differential equation on a bounded domain requires specification of appropriate boundary conditions, or their fractional analogue. In this paper we discuss the application of nonlocal diffusion theory to specify well-posed fractional diffusion equations on bounded domains.

  6. Using Steffe's Advanced Fraction Schemes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCloskey, Andrea V.; Norton, Anderson H.

    2009-01-01

    Recognizing schemes, which are different from strategies, can help teachers understand their students' thinking about fractions. Using Steffe's advanced fraction schemes, the authors describe a progression of development that upper elementary and middle school students might follow in understanding fractions. Each scheme can be viewed as a…

  7. How Weird Are Weird Fractions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuffelbeam, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    A positive rational is a weird fraction if its value is unchanged by an illegitimate, digit-based reduction. In this article, we prove that each weird fraction is uniquely weird and initiate a discussion of the prevalence of weird fractions.

  8. Fractions--Concepts before Symbols.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Albert B., Jr.

    The learning difficulties that students experience with fractions begin immediately when they are shown fraction symbols with one numeral written above the other and told that the "top number" is called the numerator and the "bottom number" is called the denominator. This introduction to fractions will usually include a few visual diagrams to help…

  9. Fractional M2-branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharony, Ofer; Bergman, Oren; Jafferis, Daniel Louis

    2008-11-01

    We consider two generalizations of the Script N = 6 superconformal Chern-Simons-matter theories with gauge group U(N) × U(N). The first generalization is to Script N = 6 superconformal U(M) × U(N) theories, and the second to Script N = 5 superconformal O(2M) × USp(2N) and O(2M+1) × USp(2N) theories. These theories are conjectured to describe M2-branes probing C4/Zk in the unitary case, and C4/{\\widehat{D}}k in the orthogonal/symplectic case, together with a discrete flux, which can be interpreted as |M-N| fractional M2-branes localized at the orbifold singularity. The classical theories with these gauge groups have been constructed before; in this paper we focus on some quantum aspects of these theories, and on a detailed description of their M theory and type IIA string theory duals.

  10. Fractionation of Subcellular Organelles.

    PubMed

    Graham, John M

    2015-01-01

    This unit provides both a theoretical and a practical background to all the techniques associated with the application of differential and density gradient centrifugation for the analysis of subcellular membranes. The density gradient information focuses on the use of the modern gradient solute iodixanol, chosen for its ease of use, versatility, and compatibility with biological particles. Its use in both pre-formed discontinuous and continuous gradients and in self-generated gradients is discussed. Considerable emphasis is given to selection of the appropriate centrifuge rotors and tubes and their influence on the methods used for creation, fractionation, and analysis of density gradients. Without proper consideration of these critical ancillary procedures, the resolving power of the gradient can be easily compromised. PMID:26621372

  11. Soot Volume Fraction Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Paul S.; Ku, Jerry C.

    1994-01-01

    A new technique is described for the full-field determination of soot volume fractions via laser extinction measurements. This technique differs from previously reported point-wise methods in that a two-dimensional array (i.e., image) of data is acquired simultaneously. In this fashion, the net data rate is increased, allowing the study of time-dependent phenomena and the investigation of spatial and temporal correlations. A telecentric imaging configuration is employed to provide depth-invariant magnification and to permit the specification of the collection angle for scattered light. To improve the threshold measurement sensitivity, a method is employed to suppress undesirable coherent imaging effects. A discussion of the tomographic inversion process is provided, including the results obtained from numerical simulation. Results obtained with this method from an ethylene diffusion flame are shown to be in close agreement with those previously obtained by sequential point-wise interrogation.

  12. Fraction reduction in membrane systems.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ping; Zhang, Hong; Chen, Haizhu; Liu, Ran

    2014-01-01

    Fraction reduction is a basic computation for rational numbers. P system is a new computing model, while the current methods for fraction reductions are not available in these systems. In this paper, we propose a method of fraction reduction and discuss how to carry it out in cell-like P systems with the membrane structure and the rules with priority designed. During the application of fraction reduction rules, synchronization is guaranteed by arranging some special objects in these rules. Our work contributes to performing the rational computation in P systems since the rational operands can be given in the form of fraction. PMID:24772037

  13. Toward lattice fractional vector calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2014-09-01

    An analog of fractional vector calculus for physical lattice models is suggested. We use an approach based on the models of three-dimensional lattices with long-range inter-particle interactions. The lattice analogs of fractional partial derivatives are represented by kernels of lattice long-range interactions, where the Fourier series transformations of these kernels have a power-law form with respect to wave vector components. In the continuum limit, these lattice partial derivatives give derivatives of non-integer order with respect to coordinates. In the three-dimensional description of the non-local continuum, the fractional differential operators have the form of fractional partial derivatives of the Riesz type. As examples of the applications of the suggested lattice fractional vector calculus, we give lattice models with long-range interactions for the fractional Maxwell equations of non-local continuous media and for the fractional generalization of the Mindlin and Aifantis continuum models of gradient elasticity.

  14. CHARACTERIZATION OF SUB-MICRON AQUEOUS IRON(III) COLLOIDS FORMED IN THE PRESENCE OF PHOSPHATE BY SEDIMENTATION FIELD FLOW FRACTIONATION WITH MULTI-ANGLE LASER LIGHT SCATTERING DETECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iron colloids play a major role in the water chemistry of natural watersheds and of engineered drinking water distribution systems. Phosphate is frequently added to distribution systems to control corrosion problems, so iron-phosphate colloids may form through reaction of iron in...

  15. Fractionally charged skyrmions in fractional quantum Hall effect.

    PubMed

    Balram, Ajit C; Wurstbauer, U; Wójs, A; Pinczuk, A; Jain, J K

    2015-01-01

    The fractional quantum Hall effect has inspired searches for exotic emergent topological particles, such as fractionally charged excitations, composite fermions, abelian and nonabelian anyons and Majorana fermions. Fractionally charged skyrmions, which support both topological charge and topological vortex-like spin structure, have also been predicted to occur in the vicinity of 1/3 filling of the lowest Landau level. The fractional skyrmions, however, are anticipated to be exceedingly fragile, suppressed by very small Zeeman energies. Here we show that, slightly away from 1/3 filling, the smallest manifestations of the fractional skyrmion exist in the excitation spectrum for a broad range of Zeeman energies, and appear in resonant inelastic light scattering experiments as well-defined resonances slightly below the long wavelength spin wave mode. The spectroscopy of these exotic bound states serves as a sensitive tool for investigating the residual interaction between composite fermions, responsible for delicate new fractional quantum Hall states in this filling factor region. PMID:26608906

  16. Fractionally charged skyrmions in fractional quantum Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Balram, Ajit C.; Wurstbauer, U.; Wójs, A.; Pinczuk, A.; Jain, J. K.

    2015-11-26

    The fractional quantum Hall effect has inspired searches for exotic emergent topological particles, such as fractionally charged excitations, composite fermions, abelian and nonabelian anyons and Majorana fermions. Fractionally charged skyrmions, which support both topological charge and topological vortex-like spin structure, have also been predicted to occur in the vicinity of 1/3 filling of the lowest Landau level. The fractional skyrmions, however, are anticipated to be exceedingly fragile, suppressed by very small Zeeman energies. Here we show that, slightly away from 1/3 filling, the smallest manifestations of the fractional skyrmion exist in the excitation spectrum for a broad range of Zeeman energies, and appear in resonant inelastic light scattering experiments as well-defined resonances slightly below the long wavelength spin wave mode. The spectroscopy of these exotic bound states serves as a sensitive tool for investigating the residual interaction between composite fermions, responsible for delicate new fractional quantum Hall states in this filling factor region.

  17. Fractionally charged skyrmions in fractional quantum Hall effect

    PubMed Central

    Balram, Ajit C.; Wurstbauer, U.; Wójs, A.; Pinczuk, A.; Jain, J. K.

    2015-01-01

    The fractional quantum Hall effect has inspired searches for exotic emergent topological particles, such as fractionally charged excitations, composite fermions, abelian and nonabelian anyons and Majorana fermions. Fractionally charged skyrmions, which support both topological charge and topological vortex-like spin structure, have also been predicted to occur in the vicinity of 1/3 filling of the lowest Landau level. The fractional skyrmions, however, are anticipated to be exceedingly fragile, suppressed by very small Zeeman energies. Here we show that, slightly away from 1/3 filling, the smallest manifestations of the fractional skyrmion exist in the excitation spectrum for a broad range of Zeeman energies, and appear in resonant inelastic light scattering experiments as well-defined resonances slightly below the long wavelength spin wave mode. The spectroscopy of these exotic bound states serves as a sensitive tool for investigating the residual interaction between composite fermions, responsible for delicate new fractional quantum Hall states in this filling factor region. PMID:26608906

  18. Fractionally charged skyrmions in fractional quantum Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balram, Ajit C.; Wurstbauer, U.; Wójs, A.; Pinczuk, A.; Jain, J. K.

    2015-11-01

    The fractional quantum Hall effect has inspired searches for exotic emergent topological particles, such as fractionally charged excitations, composite fermions, abelian and nonabelian anyons and Majorana fermions. Fractionally charged skyrmions, which support both topological charge and topological vortex-like spin structure, have also been predicted to occur in the vicinity of 1/3 filling of the lowest Landau level. The fractional skyrmions, however, are anticipated to be exceedingly fragile, suppressed by very small Zeeman energies. Here we show that, slightly away from 1/3 filling, the smallest manifestations of the fractional skyrmion exist in the excitation spectrum for a broad range of Zeeman energies, and appear in resonant inelastic light scattering experiments as well-defined resonances slightly below the long wavelength spin wave mode. The spectroscopy of these exotic bound states serves as a sensitive tool for investigating the residual interaction between composite fermions, responsible for delicate new fractional quantum Hall states in this filling factor region.

  19. Functional fractionation-ratchets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griess, G. A.; Serwer, P.

    2002-08-01

    Electrophoretic ratchets have been developed for both analytical and preparative electrophoresis. These ratchets use a new type of pulsed field. The quality of the fractionations meets the usual standards for biochemistry-based electrophoresis. The supporting medium is either an agarose gel or a capillary-contained polymer solution. The electrophoretic ratchets are effective with a particle that has an electrophoretic mobility (μ=velocity/electrical field) that varies as the electrical field varies. A ratchet developed for DNA molecules is effective because μ increases in magnitude as the electrical field increases in magnitude. Ratchets developed for both DNA-protein complexes and spheres are effective because of the opposite dependence of μ on the electrical field. Ratchet-based gel electrophoresis can be performed in a continuous, preparative mode. Ratchet-based capillary electrophoresis provides a necessary component for cyclic capillary electrophoresis. Cyclic capillary electrophoresis of DNA is a procedure for analyzing a DNA profile in several segments. These segments are separated by electrophoretic enhancements of the DNA profile. Cyclic capillary electrophoresis is being developed for increasing both the length and the accuracy of the analysis of a DNA-sequencing ladder.

  20. Dynamical fractional chaotic inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harigaya, Keisuke; Ibe, Masahiro; Schmitz, Kai; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.

    2014-12-01

    Chaotic inflation based on a simple monomial scalar potential, V (ϕ )∝ϕp, is an attractive large-field model of inflation capable of generating a sizable tensor-to-scalar ratio r . Therefore, assuming that future cosmic microwave background observations will confirm the large r value reported by BICEP2, it is important to determine what kind of dynamical mechanism could possibly endow the inflaton field with such a simple effective potential. In this paper, we answer this question in the context of field theory, i.e. in the framework of dynamical chaotic inflation, where strongly interacting supersymmetric gauge dynamics around the scale of grand unification dynamically generate a fractional power-law potential via the quantum effect of dimensional transmutation. In constructing explicit models, we significantly extend our previous work, as we now consider a large variety of possible underlying gauge dynamics and relax our conditions on the field content of the model. This allows us to realize almost arbitrary rational values for the power p in the inflaton potential. The present paper may hence be regarded as a first step toward a more complete theory of dynamical chaotic inflation.

  1. Fractional telegrapher's equation from fractional persistent random walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoliver, Jaume

    2016-05-01

    We generalize the telegrapher's equation to allow for anomalous transport. We derive the space-time fractional telegrapher's equation using the formalism of the persistent random walk in continuous time. We also obtain the characteristic function of the space-time fractional process and study some particular cases and asymptotic approximations. Similarly to the ordinary telegrapher's equation, the time-fractional equation also presents distinct behaviors for different time scales. Specifically, transitions between different subdiffusive regimes or from superdiffusion to subdiffusion are shown by the fractional equation as time progresses.

  2. Fractional telegrapher's equation from fractional persistent random walks.

    PubMed

    Masoliver, Jaume

    2016-05-01

    We generalize the telegrapher's equation to allow for anomalous transport. We derive the space-time fractional telegrapher's equation using the formalism of the persistent random walk in continuous time. We also obtain the characteristic function of the space-time fractional process and study some particular cases and asymptotic approximations. Similarly to the ordinary telegrapher's equation, the time-fractional equation also presents distinct behaviors for different time scales. Specifically, transitions between different subdiffusive regimes or from superdiffusion to subdiffusion are shown by the fractional equation as time progresses. PMID:27300830

  3. Fractionation, rearrangement and subgenome dominance

    PubMed Central

    Sankoff, David; Zheng, Chunfang

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Fractionation is arguably the greatest cause of gene order disruption following whole genome duplication, causing severe biases in chromosome rearrangement-based estimates of evolutionary divergence. Results: We show how to correct for this bias almost entirely by means of a ‘consolidation’ algorithm for detecting and suitably transforming identifiable regions of fractionation. We characterize the process of fractionation and the performance of the algorithm through realistic simulations. We apply our method to a number of core eudicot genomes, we and by studying the fractionation regions detected, are able to address topical issues in polyploid evolution. Availability and implementation: Code for the consolidation algorithm, and sample data, is available at: http://137.122.149.195/Software/Fractionation/fractionation.html Contact: sankoff@uottawa.ca PMID:22962459

  4. Method development for VOST Fractionator

    SciTech Connect

    St. Germain Wickham, M.E.; Cummins, S.B.; Radolovich, G. )

    1994-01-01

    A VOST Fractionator was designed and tested to fractionate an original VOST sample into two samples: one large and one small sample. The device allows for quantitation of high levels of compounds in the small fraction and trace levels in the large fraction. Several preliminary validation samples were prepared, split, and analyzed to test the feasibility of the VOST Fractionator. These validation samples contained 40,000 ng of three terpene compounds and 100 ng of 42 other volatile target analytes. Analyte recoveries ranged from 70 to 130 percent, except for five water-soluble compounds. Recovery for the terpene compounds was 110 to 118 percent. Precision for triplicate spiked samples was less than 30 percent relative standard deviation (%RSD) for most compounds. Results indicate that the VOST Fractionator accurately splits the sample and allows quantitation of extremely high levels of compounds without sacrificing sensitivity for trace compounds. 3 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  5. Field Flows of Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Cahn, Robert N.; de Putter, Roland; Linder, Eric V.

    2008-07-08

    Scalar field dark energy evolving from a long radiation- or matter-dominated epoch has characteristic dynamics. While slow-roll approximations are invalid, a well defined field expansion captures the key aspects of the dark energy evolution during much of the matter-dominated epoch. Since this behavior is determined, it is not faithfully represented if priors for dynamical quantities are chosen at random. We demonstrate these features for both thawing and freezing fields, and for some modified gravity models, and unify several special cases in the literature.

  6. Nonbiological fractionation of iron isotopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anbar, A. D.; Roe, J. E.; Barling, J.; Nealson, K. H.

    2000-01-01

    Laboratory experiments demonstrate that iron isotopes can be chemically fractionated in the absence of biology. Isotopic variations comparable to those seen during microbially mediated reduction of ferrihydrite are observed. Fractionation may occur in aqueous solution during equilibration between inorganic iron complexes. These findings provide insight into the mechanisms of iron isotope fractionation and suggest that nonbiological processes may contribute to iron isotope variations observed in sediments.

  7. Fractional (Chern and topological) insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neupert, Titus; Chamon, Claudio; Iadecola, Thomas; Santos, Luiz H.; Mudry, Christopher

    2015-12-01

    We review various features of interacting Abelian topological phases of matter in two spatial dimensions, placing particular emphasis on fractional Chern insulators (FCIs) and fractional topological insulators (FTIs). We highlight aspects of these systems that challenge the intuition developed from quantum Hall physics—for instance, FCIs are stable in the limit where the interaction energy scale is much larger than the band gap, and FTIs can possess fractionalized excitations in the bulk despite the absence of gapless edge modes.

  8. Accessible solitons of fractional dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Wei-Ping; Belić, Milivoj; Zhang, Yiqi

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate that accessible solitons described by an extended Schrödinger equation with the Laplacian of fractional dimension can exist in strongly nonlocal nonlinear media. The soliton solutions of the model are constructed by two special functions, the associated Legendre polynomials and the Laguerre polynomials in the fraction-dimensional space. Our results show that these fractional accessible solitons form a soliton family which includes crescent solitons, and asymmetric single-layer and multi-layer necklace solitons.

  9. Trigonometric Integrals via Partial Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, H.; Fulford, M.

    2005-01-01

    Parametric differentiation is used to derive the partial fractions decompositions of certain rational functions. Those decompositions enable us to integrate some new combinations of trigonometric functions.

  10. COMMERCIAL SNF ACCIDENT RELEASE FRACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    S.O. Bader

    1999-10-18

    The purpose of this design analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that are released from an accident event at the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions will be used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the MGR. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total CSNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. The radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses. This subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Potential accidents may involve waste forms that are characterized as either bare (unconfined) fuel assemblies or confined fuel assemblies. The confined CSNF assemblies at the MGR are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or disposal containers (waste packages). In contrast to the bare fuel assemblies, the container that confines the fuel assemblies has the potential of providing an additional barrier for diminishing the total release fraction should the fuel rod cladding breach during an accident. However, this analysis will not take credit for this additional bamer and will establish only the total release fractions for bare unconfined CSNF assemblies, which may however be

  11. Rational Exponentials and Continued Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denny, J. K.

    2012-01-01

    Using continued fraction expansions, we can approximate constants, such as pi and e, using an appropriate integer n raised to the power x[superscript 1/x], x a suitable rational. We review continued fractions and give an algorithm for producing these approximations.

  12. Searches for Fractionally Charged Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, Martin L.; Lee, Eric R.; Loomba, Dinesh; /New Mexico U.

    2012-04-12

    Since the initial measurements of the electron charge were made a century ago, experimenters have faced the persistent question of the existence of elementary particles with charges that are fractional multiples of the electron charge. In this review, we discuss the results of recent searches for these fractionally charged particles.

  13. Fractionation process for petroleum wax

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.L.; Mitchael, M.R.; Krenowicz, R.A.; Southard, W.M.

    1991-07-16

    This patent describes a process which comprises separating a petroleum wax into a lower boiling wax fraction of a narrow melting range and a higher boiling wax fraction of wider melting range by subjecting the petroleum wax to distillation in a wiped film evaporator.

  14. Understanding Magnitudes to Understand Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabriel, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Fractions are known to be difficult to learn and difficult to teach, yet they are vital for students to have access to further mathematical concepts. This article uses evidence to support teachers employing teaching methods that focus on the conceptual understanding of the magnitude of fractions.

  15. Dividing Fractions and Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Kathleen; Monson, Debra; Whitney, Stephanie; Leavitt, Seth; Wyberg, Terry

    2010-01-01

    Fraction division is generally introduced in sixth or seventh grade with this rule: "Invert and multiply." The authors examined current commercial curricula and found that few textbooks use context as a way to build meaning for the division of fractions. When context is used, the connection between the invert-and-multiply rule and the context is…

  16. Unwrapping Students' Ideas about Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Rebecca M.; Gibbons, Lynsey K.; Kazemi, Elham; Lind, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Supporting students to develop an understanding of the meaning of fractions is an important goal of elementary school mathematics. This involves developing partitioning strategies, creating representations, naming fractional quantities, and using symbolic notation. This article describes how teachers can use a formative assessment problem to…

  17. Radiating subdispersive fractional optical solitons.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, J; Espinosa, A; Rodríguez, R F; Malomed, B A

    2014-09-01

    It was recently found [Fujioka et al., Phys. Lett. A 374, 1126 (2010)] that the propagation of solitary waves can be described by a fractional extension of the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation which involves a temporal fractional derivative (TFD) of order α > 2. In the present paper, we show that there is also another fractional extension of the NLS equation which contains a TFD with α < 2, and in this case, the new equation describes the propagation of radiating solitons. We show that the emission of the radiation (when α < 2) is explained by resonances at various frequencies between the pulses and the linear modes of the system. It is found that the new fractional NLS equation can be derived from a suitable Lagrangian density, and a fractional Noether's theorem can be applied to it, thus predicting the conservation of the Hamiltonian, momentum and energy. PMID:25273201

  18. Radiating subdispersive fractional optical solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujioka, J.; Espinosa, A.; Rodríguez, R. F.; Malomed, B. A.

    2014-09-01

    It was recently found [Fujioka et al., Phys. Lett. A 374, 1126 (2010)] that the propagation of solitary waves can be described by a fractional extension of the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation which involves a temporal fractional derivative (TFD) of order α > 2. In the present paper, we show that there is also another fractional extension of the NLS equation which contains a TFD with α < 2, and in this case, the new equation describes the propagation of radiating solitons. We show that the emission of the radiation (when α < 2) is explained by resonances at various frequencies between the pulses and the linear modes of the system. It is found that the new fractional NLS equation can be derived from a suitable Lagrangian density, and a fractional Noether's theorem can be applied to it, thus predicting the conservation of the Hamiltonian, momentum and energy.

  19. Radiating subdispersive fractional optical solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Fujioka, J. Espinosa, A.; Rodríguez, R. F.; Malomed, B. A.

    2014-09-01

    It was recently found [Fujioka et al., Phys. Lett. A 374, 1126 (2010)] that the propagation of solitary waves can be described by a fractional extension of the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation which involves a temporal fractional derivative (TFD) of order α > 2. In the present paper, we show that there is also another fractional extension of the NLS equation which contains a TFD with α < 2, and in this case, the new equation describes the propagation of radiating solitons. We show that the emission of the radiation (when α < 2) is explained by resonances at various frequencies between the pulses and the linear modes of the system. It is found that the new fractional NLS equation can be derived from a suitable Lagrangian density, and a fractional Noether's theorem can be applied to it, thus predicting the conservation of the Hamiltonian, momentum and energy.

  20. Fractional active disturbance rejection control.

    PubMed

    Li, Dazi; Ding, Pan; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-05-01

    A fractional active disturbance rejection control (FADRC) scheme is proposed to improve the performance of commensurate linear fractional order systems (FOS) and the robust analysis shows that the controller is also applicable to incommensurate linear FOS control. In FADRC, the traditional extended states observer (ESO) is generalized to a fractional order extended states observer (FESO) by using the fractional calculus, and the tracking differentiator plus nonlinear state error feedback are replaced by a fractional proportional-derivative controller. To simplify controller tuning, the linear bandwidth-parameterization method has been adopted. The impacts of the observer bandwidth ωo and controller bandwidth ωc on system performance are then analyzed. Finally, the FADRC stability and frequency-domain characteristics for linear single-input single-output FOS are analyzed. Simulation results by FADRC and ADRC on typical FOS are compared to demonstrate the superiority and effectiveness of the proposed scheme. PMID:26928516

  1. Rapid flow fractionation of particles combining liquid and particulate dielectrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael R. (Inventor); Lomakin, Oleg (Inventor); Jones, Thomas B. (Inventor); Ahmed, Rajib (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Rapid, size-based, deposition of particles from liquid suspension is accomplished using a nonuniform electric field created by coplanar microelectrode strips patterned on an insulating substrate. The scheme uses the dielectrophoretic force both to distribute aqueous liquid containing particles and, simultaneously, to separate the particles. Size-based separation is found within nanoliter droplets formed along the structure after voltage removal. Bioparticles or macromolecules of similar size can also be separated based on subtle differences in dielectric property, by controlling the frequency of the AC current supplied to the electrodes.

  2. Photo-induced isotopic fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Charles E.; Yung, Yuk L.

    2000-12-01

    This paper presents a systematic method for the analysis of photo-induced isotopic fractionation. The physical basis for this fractionation mechanism centers on the fact that isotopic substitution alters the energy levels, molecular symmetries, spin statistical weights and other fundamental molecular properties, producing spectroscopic signatures distinguishable from that of the parent isotopomer. These mass-dependent physical properties are identical to those invoked by Urey to explain stable isotope fractionation in chemical systems subject to thermodynamic equilibrium. Photo-induced isotopic fractionation is a completely general phenomenon and should be observable in virtually all gas phase photochemical systems. Water photo-induced isotopic fractionation has been examined in detail using experimental and theoretical data. These results illustrate the salient features of this fractionation mechanism for molecules possessing continuous UV absorption spectra and unit photodissociation quantum yields. Using the photo-induced isotopic fractionation methodology in conjunction with standard photochemical models, we predict substantial deuterium enrichment of water vapor in the planetary atmospheres of Earth and Mars.

  3. An Introduction to Fractional Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, B. I.; Langlands, T. A. M.; Straka, P.

    The mathematical description of diffusion has a long history with many different formulations including phenomenological models based on conservation of mass and constitutive laws; probabilistic models based on random walks and central limit theorems; microscopic stochastic models based on Brownian motion and Langevin equations; and mesoscopic stochastic models based on master equations and Fokker-Planck equations. A fundamental result common to the different approaches is that the mean square displacement of a diffusing particle scales linearly with time. However there have been numerous experimental measurements in which the mean square displacement of diffusing particles scales as a fractional order power law in time. In recent years a great deal of progress has been made in extending the different models for diffusion to incorporate this fractional diffusion. The tools of fractional calculus have proven very useful in these developments, linking together fractional constitutive laws, continuous time random walks, fractional Langevin equations and fractional Brownian motions. These notes provide a tutorial style overview of standard and fractional diffusion processes.

  4. Fractionally charged skyrmions in fractional quantum Hall effect

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Balram, Ajit C.; Wurstbauer, U.; Wójs, A.; Pinczuk, A.; Jain, J. K.

    2015-11-26

    The fractional quantum Hall effect has inspired searches for exotic emergent topological particles, such as fractionally charged excitations, composite fermions, abelian and nonabelian anyons and Majorana fermions. Fractionally charged skyrmions, which support both topological charge and topological vortex-like spin structure, have also been predicted to occur in the vicinity of 1/3 filling of the lowest Landau level. The fractional skyrmions, however, are anticipated to be exceedingly fragile, suppressed by very small Zeeman energies. Here we show that, slightly away from 1/3 filling, the smallest manifestations of the fractional skyrmion exist in the excitation spectrum for a broad range of Zeemanmore » energies, and appear in resonant inelastic light scattering experiments as well-defined resonances slightly below the long wavelength spin wave mode. The spectroscopy of these exotic bound states serves as a sensitive tool for investigating the residual interaction between composite fermions, responsible for delicate new fractional quantum Hall states in this filling factor region.« less

  5. Relationship between fractional calculus and fractional Fourier transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanshan; Zhang, Feng; Lu, Mingfeng

    2015-09-01

    The fractional calculus (FC) deals with integrals and derivatives of arbitrary (i.e., non-integer) order, and shares its origins with classical integral and differential calculus. The fractional Fourier transform (FRFT), which has been found having many applications in optics and other areas, is a generalization of the usual Fourier transform. The FC and the FRFT are two of the most interesting and useful fractional areas. In recent years, it appears many papers on the FC and FRFT, however, few of them discuss the connection of the two fractional areas. We study their relationship. The relational expression between them is deduced. The expectation of interdisciplinary cross fertilization is our motivation. For example, we can use the properties of the FC (non-locality, etc.) to solve the problem which is difficult to be solved by the FRFT in optical engineering; we can also through the physical meaning of the FRFT optical implementation to explain the physical meaning of the FC. The FC and FRFT approaches can be transposed each other in the two fractional areas. It makes that the success of the fractional methodology is unquestionable with a lot of applications, namely in nonlinear and complex system dynamics and image processing.

  6. Packing fraction of continuous distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouwers, Jos

    2014-03-01

    This study addresses the packing and void fraction of polydisperse particles with geometric and lognormal size distribution. It is demonstrated that a bimodal discrete particle distribution can be transformed into said continuous particle-size distributions. Furthermore, original and exact expressions are presented that predict the packing fraction of these particle assemblies. For a number of particle shapes and their packing modes (close, loose) the applicable parameters are given. The closed-form analytical expression governing the packing fractions are thoroughly compared with empirical and computational data reported in the literature, and good agreement is found.

  7. Fractional trajectories: Decorrelation versus friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svenkeson, A.; Beig, M. T.; Turalska, M.; West, B. J.; Grigolini, P.

    2013-11-01

    The fundamental connection between fractional calculus and subordination processes is explored and affords a physical interpretation of a fractional trajectory, that being an average over an ensemble of stochastic trajectories. Heretofore what has been interpreted as intrinsic friction, a form of non-Markovian dissipation that automatically arises from adopting the fractional calculus, is shown to be a manifestation of decorrelations between trajectories. We apply the general theory developed herein to the Lotka-Volterra ecological model, providing new insight into the final equilibrium state. The relaxation time to achieve this state is also considered.

  8. Fractional Carbon Dioxide Laser Resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    Ramsdell, William M.

    2012-01-01

    Currently available ablative fractional CO2 lasers provide excellent results and diminish down time with fewer complications than previous generation CO2 lasers. Mechanisms of action, treatment parameters, as well as pre- and postoperative care will be discussed. PMID:23904820

  9. Ejection Fraction Heart Failure Measurement

    MedlinePlus

    ... 70. You can have a normal ejection fraction reading and still have heart failure (called HFpEF or ... to be made. Here we delve into the importance of shared decision making. HF Resources For Life ...

  10. The Future of Fractional Lasers.

    PubMed

    Paasch, Uwe

    2016-06-01

    Recent insights to the potential of fractional skin treatments have established standard laser procedures to treat aged, sun-damaged skin and scars. On top of this, the concept has been extended to fibrosing conditions, to remove foreign bodies and to treat inflammatory skin diseases. The biggest potential, however, is foreseen with the option of a contact-free temporary opening of the epidermal barrier (TOR, German: gate) to promote new and intensified treatment regimen. To date these concepts are predominantly experimental, although first clinical studies already show a better response rate if actinic keratoses are treated by fractional laser-intensified photodynamic therapy (PDT) in comparison to the conventional PDT. Possible risks may arise due to the fact that fractional laser home devices are at hand. Used in conjunction with topicals of all origins, toxic and allergic reactions may occur. Principles of current fractional laser interventions are presented as facts while visions are given as future indications. PMID:27248023

  11. Australia's Next Top Fraction Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Peter Gould suggests Australia's next top fraction model should be a linear model rather than an area model. He provides a convincing argument and gives examples of ways to introduce a linear model in primary classrooms.

  12. Commercial SNF Accident Release Fractions

    SciTech Connect

    J. Schulz

    2004-11-05

    The purpose of this analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that could be potentially released from an accident at the repository involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions are used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the repository. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total commercial SNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. Radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses; this subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Accidents may involve waste forms characterized as: (1) bare unconfined intact fuel assemblies, (2) confined intact fuel assemblies, or (3) canistered failed commercial SNF. Confined intact commercial SNF assemblies at the repository are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or waste packages. Four categories of failed commercial SNF are identified: (1) mechanically and cladding-penetration damaged commercial SNF, (2) consolidated/reconstituted assemblies, (3) fuel rods, pieces, and debris, and (4) nonfuel components. It is assumed that failed commercial SNF is placed into waste packages with a mesh screen at each end (CRWMS M&O 1999). In contrast to bare unconfined fuel assemblies, the

  13. Arsenic speciation in the dispersible colloidal fraction of soils from a mine-impacted creek.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Susana; Gomez-Gonzalez, Miguel Angel; O'Day, Peggy A; Laborda, Francisco; Bolea, Eduardo; Garrido, Fernando

    2015-04-01

    Arsenic and iron speciation in the dispersible colloid fraction (DCF; 10-1000 nm) from an As-rich mine waste pile, sediments of a streambed that collects runoff from waste pile, the streambed subsoil, and the sediments of a downstream pond were investigated by combining asymmetrical-flow field-flow fractionation (AsFlFFF)/inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray absorption (XAS) spectroscopy. Calcium, Fe and As (Fe/As molar ratio ∼ 1) were the main components of the DCF from waste pile. TEM/EDS and As and Fe XAS analysis revealed the presence of nanoparticle scorodite in this same DCF, as well as Fe nanoparticles in all samples downstream of the waste pile. Arsenic and Fe XAS showed As(V) adsorbed onto nanoparticulate ferrihydrite in the DCF of downstream samples. Micro-X-ray fluorescence indicated a strong correlation between Fe and As in phyllosilicate/Fe(3+) (oxi) hydroxide aggregates from the sediment pond. Fractionation analysis showed the mean particle size of the DCF from the streambed sample to be smaller than that of the streambed subsoil and sediment ponds samples. These results show that an important and variable fraction of As may be bound to dispersible colloids that can be released from contaminated soils and transported downstream in natural systems. PMID:25576781

  14. Fractional characteristic times and dissipated energy in fractional linear viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colinas-Armijo, Natalia; Di Paola, Mario; Pinnola, Francesco P.

    2016-08-01

    In fractional viscoelasticity the stress-strain relation is a differential equation with non-integer operators (derivative or integral). Such constitutive law is able to describe the mechanical behavior of several materials, but when fractional operators appear, the elastic and the viscous contribution are inseparable and the characteristic times (relaxation and retardation time) cannot be defined. This paper aims to provide an approach to separate the elastic and the viscous phase in the fractional stress-strain relation with the aid of an equivalent classical model (Kelvin-Voigt or Maxwell). For such equivalent model the parameters are selected by an optimization procedure. Once the parameters of the equivalent model are defined, characteristic times of fractional viscoelasticity are readily defined as ratio between viscosity and stiffness. In the numerical applications, three kinds of different excitations are considered, that is, harmonic, periodic, and pseudo-stochastic. It is shown that, for any periodic excitation, the equivalent models have some important features: (i) the dissipated energy per cycle at steady-state coincides with the Staverman-Schwarzl formulation of the fractional model, (ii) the elastic and the viscous coefficients of the equivalent model are strictly related to the storage and the loss modulus, respectively.

  15. Delayed coker fractionator advanced control

    SciTech Connect

    Jaisinghani, R.; Minter, B. ); Tica, A.; Puglesi, A.; Ojeda, R. )

    1993-08-01

    In a delayed coking process, as coke drum switches are made, rapid changes occur in both the fractionator feed rate and composition. With conventional control, it is not unusual to see long transient behavior of large swings in both quality and flowrates of coker gas oils. This can extract a heavy economic toll, not only in coker operation, but in the operation of downstream units as the upset is propagated. An advanced process control application (APC) was recently implemented on the coker fractionator at the Yacimentos Petroliferos Fiscales (YPF), Lujan de Cuyo Refinery, in Mendoza, Argentina. This coker fractionator control design was unique as it handled two different operating objectives: control of product qualities via tower temperature profile during normal operation and control of gas oil product flow ratio during drum switch. This combination of control objectives in one multivariable predictive control program was achieved by including special logic to decouple the individual tuning requirements. Also, additional logic was included to unambiguously detect and identify drum switch and drum steam out as discrete events within 30 seconds of their actual occurrence. These discrete events were then used as disturbance variables to minimize fractionator transient behavior. As a performance measure, the overhead temperature was controlled within 2 C to 2.5 C of its target, gas oil flows were stabilized during drum switches and steam generation via pump around was maximized. Overall, implementing advanced control for the delayed coker fractionator resulted in substantial benefits from product quality control, product flow control and minimized energy consumption.

  16. Fractionalized gapless quantum vortex liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chong; Senthil, T.

    2015-05-01

    The standard theoretical approach to gapless spin liquid phases of two-dimensional frustrated quantum antiferromagnets invokes the concept of fermionic slave particles into which the spin fractionalizes. As an alternate we explore different kinds of gapless spin liquid phases in frustrated quantum magnets with X Y anisotropy where the vortex of the spin fractionalizes into gapless itinerant fermions. The resulting gapless fractionalized vortex liquid phases are studied within a slave particle framework that is dual to the usual one. We demonstrate the stability of some such phases and describe their properties. We give an explicit construction in an X Y -spin-1 system on triangular lattice, and interpret it as a critical phase in the vicinity of spin-nematic states.

  17. Search for fractionally charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Lackner, K.S.; Zweig, G.

    1982-01-01

    Quarks, the constituents of hadrons and fermion fields of quantum chromodynamics, have fractional charges -1/3e and 2/3e. All charges are integral multiples of 1/3e and not e, as was previously believed. Therefore it is natural to ask if isolated particles of fractional charge exist, either as an intrinsic part of matter, or as particles that can be produced at high energy accelerators. This question can only be answered by experiment, and remains interesting even if quantum chromodynamics turns out to be an absolutely confining theory of quarks. For example, small deviations from the standard version of quantum chromodynamics, or the incorporation of quantum chromodynamics into a more comprehensive theory, could require the existence of free fractionally charged particles.

  18. REFractions: The Representing Equivalent Fractions Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Stephen I.

    2014-01-01

    Stephen Tucker presents a fractions game that addresses a range of fraction concepts including equivalence and computation. The REFractions game also improves students' fluency with representing, comparing and adding fractions.

  19. Anisotropic fractional diffusion tensor imaging

    PubMed Central

    Meerschaert, Mark M; Magin, Richard L; Ye, Allen Q

    2015-01-01

    Traditional diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) maps brain structure by fitting a diffusion model to the magnitude of the electrical signal acquired in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Fractional DTI employs anomalous diffusion models to obtain a better fit to real MRI data, which can exhibit anomalous diffusion in both time and space. In this paper, we describe the challenge of developing and employing anisotropic fractional diffusion models for DTI. Since anisotropy is clearly present in the three-dimensional MRI signal response, such models hold great promise for improving brain imaging. We then propose some candidate models, based on stochastic theory.

  20. On Fractional Model Reference Adaptive Control

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Bao; Dong, Chao

    2014-01-01

    This paper extends the conventional Model Reference Adaptive Control systems to fractional ones based on the theory of fractional calculus. A control law and an incommensurate fractional adaptation law are designed for the fractional plant and the fractional reference model. The stability and tracking convergence are analyzed using the frequency distributed fractional integrator model and Lyapunov theory. Moreover, numerical simulations of both linear and nonlinear systems are performed to exhibit the viability and effectiveness of the proposed methodology. PMID:24574897

  1. On fractional Model Reference Adaptive Control.

    PubMed

    Shi, Bao; Yuan, Jian; Dong, Chao

    2014-01-01

    This paper extends the conventional Model Reference Adaptive Control systems to fractional ones based on the theory of fractional calculus. A control law and an incommensurate fractional adaptation law are designed for the fractional plant and the fractional reference model. The stability and tracking convergence are analyzed using the frequency distributed fractional integrator model and Lyapunov theory. Moreover, numerical simulations of both linear and nonlinear systems are performed to exhibit the viability and effectiveness of the proposed methodology. PMID:24574897

  2. Isotopic Fractionation in Interstellar Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Isotopically fractionated material is found in many solar system objects, including meteorites and comets. It is thought, in some cases, to trace interstellar material that was incorporated into the solar sys tem without undergoing significant processing. In this poster, we sho w the results of several models of the nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon f ractionation in proto-stellar cores.

  3. Staircase and Fractional Part Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amram, Meirav; Dagan, Miriam; Ioshpe, Michael; Satianov, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    The staircase and fractional part functions are basic examples of real functions. They can be applied in several parts of mathematics, such as analysis, number theory, formulas for primes, and so on; in computer programming, the floor and ceiling functions are provided by a significant number of programming languages--they have some basic uses in…

  4. Activities: Understanding Division of Fractions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bezuk, Nadine S.; Armstrong, Barbara E.

    1993-01-01

    Presents a series of five activities that introduce division of fractions through real-world situations. Discusses problems related to resurfacing a highway, painting dividing stripes on a highway, covering one area A with another area B, looking for patterns, and maximizing the result of a division problem. Includes reproducible worksheets. (MDH)

  5. Pythagorean Approximations and Continued Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peralta, Javier

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we will show that the Pythagorean approximations of [the square root of] 2 coincide with those achieved in the 16th century by means of continued fractions. Assuming this fact and the known relation that connects the Fibonacci sequence with the golden section, we shall establish a procedure to obtain sequences of rational numbers…

  6. Fractional quantum Hall effect revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacak, J.; Łydżba, P.; Jacak, L.

    2015-10-01

    The topology-based explanation of the fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE) is summarized. The cyclotron braid subgroups crucial for this approach are introduced in order to identify the origin of the Laughlin correlations in 2D (two-dimensional) Hall systems. Flux-tubes and vortices for composite fermions in their standard constructions are explained in terms of cyclotron braids. The derivation of the hierarchy of the FQHE is proposed by mapping onto the integer effect within the topology-based approach. The experimental observations of the FQHE supporting the cyclotron braid picture are reviewed with a special attention paid to recent experiments with a suspended graphene. The triggering role of a carrier mobility for organization of the fractional state in Hall configuration is emphasized. The prerequisites for the FQHE are indicated including topological conditions substantially increasing the previously accepted set of physical necessities. The explanation of numerical studies by exact diagonalizations of the fractional Chern insulator states is formulated in terms of the topology condition applied to the Berry field flux quantization. Some new ideas withz regard to the synthetic fractional states in the optical lattices are also formulated.

  7. Math Fair: Focus on Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mokashi, Neelima A.

    2009-01-01

    This article depicts the rewarding experience of creating mathematical environments for kindergarten and elementary students by focusing on one of the most important and often difficult-to-grasp concepts (fractions) through play methods incorporated into a math fair. The basic concept of a math fair is threefold: (1) to create preplanned,…

  8. The Bootstrap Fraction in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, G. T.

    1997-04-15

    The TRANSP plasma analysis code is used to calculate the bootstrap current generated during neutral-beam injection and ion cyclotron resonance frequency heating for a wide variety of TFTR discharges. An empirical scaling relation is given for the bootstrap current fraction using the ratio of the peakedness of the thermal pressure and the total current density.

  9. Fractions, trees and unfinished business

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shraiman, Boris

    In this talk, mourning the loss of a teacher and a dear friend, I would like to share some unfinished thoughts loosely connecting - via Farey fraction trees - Kadanoff's study of universality of quasi-periodic route to chaos with the effort to understand universal features of genealogical trees.

  10. Optimization in fractional aircraft ownership

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Septiani, R. D.; Pasaribu, H. M.; Soewono, E.; Fayalita, R. A.

    2012-05-01

    Fractional Aircraft Ownership is a new concept in flight ownership management system where each individual or corporation may own a fraction of an aircraft. In this system, the owners have privilege to schedule their flight according to their needs. Fractional management companies (FMC) manages all aspects of aircraft operations, including utilization of FMC's aircraft in combination of outsourced aircrafts. This gives the owners the right to enjoy the benefits of private aviations. However, FMC may have complicated business requirements that neither commercial airlines nor charter airlines faces. Here, optimization models are constructed to minimize the number of aircrafts in order to maximize the profit and to minimize the daily operating cost. In this paper, three kinds of demand scenarios are made to represent different flight operations from different types of fractional owners. The problems are formulated as an optimization of profit and a daily operational cost to find the optimum flight assignments satisfying the weekly and daily demand respectively from the owners. Numerical results are obtained by Genetic Algorithm method.

  11. Evaluating fractionated space systems - Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornford, S.; Jenkins, S.; Wall, S.; Cole, B.; Bairstow, B.; Rouquette, N.; Dubos, G.; Ryan, T.; Zarifian, P.; Boutwell, J.

    DARPA has funded a number of teams to further refine its Fractionated Spacecraft vision. Several teams, including this team led by JPL, have been tasked to develop a tool for the evaluation of the Business case for a fractionated system architecture. This evaluation is to understand under what conditions and constraints the fractionated architecture make more sense (in a cost/benefit sense) than the traditional monolithic paradigm. Our approach to this evaluation is to generate and evaluate a variety of trade space options. These options include various sets of stimuli, various degrees of fractionation and various subsystem element properties. The stimuli include many not normally modeled such as technology obsolescence, funding profile changes and changes in mission objectives during the mission itself. The degrees of fractionation enable various traditional subsystem elements to be distributed across different free flyers which then act in concert as needed. This will enable key technologies to be updated as need dictates and availability allows. We have described our approach in a previous IEEE Aerospace conference paper but will briefly summarize here. Our approach to generate the Business Case evaluation is to explicitly model both the implementation and operation phases for the life cycle of a fractionated constellation. A variety of models are integrated into the Phoenix ModelCenter framework and are used to generate various intermediate data which is aggregated into the Present Strategic Value (PSV). The PSV is essentially the value (including the value of the embedded real options) minus the cost. These PSVs are calculated for a variety of configurations and scenarios including variations of various stimuli or uncertainties (e.g. supply chain delays, launch vehicle failures and orbital debris events). There are various decision options (e.g. delay, accelerate, cancel) which can now be exercised for each stimulus. We can compute the PSV for the various comb

  12. Using Number Sense to Compare Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bray, Wendy S.; Abreu-Sanchez, Laura

    2010-01-01

    One mathematical focus for third graders is to develop deep understanding of fractions and fraction equivalence, including comparing fractions through use of models and reasoning strategies. Before reading further, consider how you might solve the following problem: Which fraction is greater, 14/24 or 17/36? The initial impulse of many adults is…

  13. STOCHASTIC INTEGRATION FOR TEMPERED FRACTIONAL BROWNIAN MOTION

    PubMed Central

    MEERSCHAERT, MARK M.; SABZIKAR, FARZAD

    2014-01-01

    Tempered fractional Brownian motion is obtained when the power law kernel in the moving average representation of a fractional Brownian motion is multiplied by an exponential tempering factor. This paper develops the theory of stochastic integrals for tempered fractional Brownian motion. Along the way, we develop some basic results on tempered fractional calculus. PMID:24872598

  14. 12 CFR 5.67 - Fractional shares.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... fair price upon the fraction not being issued through its sale, or the purchase of the additional fraction required for a full share, if there is an established and active market in the national bank's stock; (c) Remit the cash equivalent of the fraction not being issued to those to whom fractional...

  15. Astrophysical Applications of Fractional Calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanislavsky, Aleksander A.

    The paradigm of fractional calculus occupies an important place for the macroscopic description of subdiffusion. Its advance in theoretical astrophysics is expected to be very attractive too. In this report we discuss a recent development of the idea to some astrophysical problems. One of them is connected with a random migration of bright points associated with magnetic fields at the solar photosphere. The transport of the bright points has subdiffusive features that require the fractional generalization of the Leighton's model. Another problem is related to the angular distribution of radio beams, being propagated through a medium with random inhomogeneities. The peculiarity of this medium is that radio beams are trapped because of random wave localization. This idea can be useful for the diagnostics of interplanetary and interstellar turbulent media.

  16. Symmetry fractionalization and twist defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarantino, Nicolas; Lindner, Netanel H.; Fidkowski, Lukasz

    2016-03-01

    Topological order in two-dimensions can be described in terms of deconfined quasiparticle excitations—anyons—and their braiding statistics. However, it has recently been realized that this data does not completely describe the situation in the presence of an unbroken global symmetry. In this case, there can be multiple distinct quantum phases with the same anyons and statistics, but with different patterns of symmetry fractionalization—termed symmetry enriched topological order. When the global symmetry group G, which we take to be discrete, does not change topological superselection sectors—i.e. does not change one type of anyon into a different type of anyon—one can imagine a local version of the action of G around each anyon. This leads to projective representations and a group cohomology description of symmetry fractionalization, with the second cohomology group {H}2(G,{{ A }}{{abelian}}) being the relevant group. In this paper, we treat the general case of a symmetry group G possibly permuting anyon types. We show that despite the lack of a local action of G, one can still make sense of a so-called twisted group cohomology description of symmetry fractionalization, and show how this data is encoded in the associativity of fusion rules of the extrinsic ‘twist’ defects of the symmetry. Furthermore, building on work of Hermele (2014 Phys. Rev. B 90 184418), we construct a wide class of exactly-solvable models which exhibit this twisted symmetry fractionalization, and connect them to our formal framework.

  17. Electrochemically controlled iron isotope fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Jay R.; Young, Edward D.; Kavner, Abby

    2010-02-01

    Variations in the stable isotope abundances of transition metals have been observed in the geologic record and trying to understand and reconstruct the physical/environmental conditions that produced these signatures is an area of active research. It is clear that changes in oxidation state lead to large fractionations of the stable isotopes of many transition metals such as iron, suggesting that transition metal stable isotope signatures could be used as a paleo-redox proxy. However, the factors contributing to these observed stable isotope variations are poorly understood. Here we investigate how the kinetics of iron redox electrochemistry generates isotope fractionation. Through a combination of electrodeposition experiments and modeling of electrochemical processes including mass-transport, we show that electron transfer reactions are the cause of a large isotope separation, while mass transport-limited supply of reactant to the electrode attenuates the observed isotopic fractionation. Furthermore, the stable isotope composition of electroplated transition metals can be tuned in the laboratory by controlling parameters such as solution chemistry, reaction overpotential, and solution convection. These methods are potentially useful for generating isotopically-marked metal surfaces for tracking and forensic purposes. In addition, our studies will help interpret stable isotope data in terms of identifying underlying electron transfer processes in laboratory and natural samples.

  18. Fire effects on silica fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unzué-Belmonte, Dácil; Schaller, Jörg; Vandevenne, Floor; Barao, Lúcia; Struyf, Eric; Meire, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    Fire events are expected to increase due to climate change, both in number and intensity Effects range from changes in soil biogeochemistry up to the whole ecosystem functioning and morphology. While N, P and C cycling have received quite some attention, little attention was paid to fire effects on the biogeochemical Si cycle and the consequences after a fire event. The Si cycle is a globally important biogeochemical cycle, with strong connections to other biogeochemical cycles, including C. Dissolved silica is taken up by plants to form protective structures called phytoliths, which become a part of the soil and contribute strongly to soil Si cycling upon litter burial. Different silica fractions are found in soils, with phytoliths among the most easily soluble, especially compared to silicate minerals. A whole set of secondary non-biogenic fractions exist, that also have a high reactivity (adsorbed Si, reactive secondary minerals…). Biogenic and other pedogenic secondary Si stocks form an important filter between weathering of mineral silicates and eventual transport of dissolved Si to rivers and the coastal zone. We used a new method to analyze the different reactive fractions of silica in the litter layer of 3 ecosystems after different fire treatments. Using a continuous extraction of Si and Al in 0.5M NaOH at 85°C, biogenic and non-biogenic alkaline reactive Si fractions can be separated based on their Si/Al ratios and their reactivity. We analyzed the silica fractionation after two burning treatments (no heating, 350°C and 550°C) from three types of litter (spruce forest, beech forest and Sphagnum peat). Reactive Si from litter of spruce and beech forest was purely biogenic, based on the observed Si/Al ratio. Beech litter (~2.2 % BSi) had two different biogenic silica pools, one reactive and one more refractory. Spruce litter (~1.5% BSi) showed only one fraction of biogenic Si. There was negligible biogenic Si present in the peat samples (<0.1%). While

  19. Identification and characterization of specific hydatid antigen fraction(s).

    PubMed

    Maher, K M; Kaddah, M A; Hassanein, H I; Shaker, Z A; Khalafallah, A M

    1992-08-01

    A specific hydatid antigen was prepared in this study from Echinococcus granulosus cyst in livers and lungs of camels. Elimination of host "camel" protein from crude hydatid fluid was achieved by two methods: Salting out using ammonium sulfate precipitation method and immunoaffinity purification using coupled anticamel antibody to cyanogenbromide activated sepharose 4B gel. Testing the prepared hydatid antigen against anticamel serum, using immunodiffusion method, indicated that the affinity purified hydatid antigen was almost completely purified from camel protein. Characterization of the affinity purified hydatid antigen, using immunoelectrophoresis, showed positive arc 5 precipitation when tested against known positive antihydatid sera. Further characterization with gradient gel electrophoresis, showed with silver stain that the dominant and most consistently demonstrable proteins occurred as a complex in the 52/62 KDa region. Strong reaction with the 52/62 KDa complex was consistently observed when the affinity purified hydatid antigen was probed with known positive reference antihydatid sera. The identified hydatid antigen fraction(s) with 52/62 KDa complex can provide promising non-invasive parameter for diagnosis of Hydatidosis. PMID:1500792

  20. Theory of fractional-ordered thermoelastic diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Soumen; Mukhopadhyay, Basudeb

    2016-06-01

    In this note, the traditional theory of thermoelastic diffusion is replaced by fractional ordered thermoelasticity based on fractional conservation of mass, fractional Taylor series and fractional divergence theorem. We replace the integer-order Taylor series approximation for flux with the fractional-order Taylor series approximation which can remove the restriction that the flux has to be linear, or piece-wise linear and the restriction that the control volume must be infinitesimal. There are two important distinctions between the traditional thermoelastic diffusion, and its fractional equivalent. The first is that the divergence term in the heat conduction and mass diffusion equations are the fractional divergence, and the second is the appearance of strain tensor term in the fractional equation is in the form of "incomplete fractional-strain measures".

  1. Modeling equilibrium Fe isotope fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anbar, A.; Jarzecki, A.; Spiro, T.

    2003-04-01

    Research into the stable isotope biogeochemistry of Fe and other transition metals has been driven primarily by analytical innovations which have revealed significant isotope effects in nature and the laboratory. Further development of these new isotope systems requires complementary theoretical research to guide analytical efforts. The results of the first such studies show some discrepancies with experiments. For example, Johnson et al. (2002) report an experimentally-determined 56Fe/54Fe equilibrium fractionation factor between Fe(II) and Fe(III) aquo complexes of ˜1.0025. This effect is ˜50% smaller than predicted theoretically by Schauble et al. (2001). It is important to resolve such discrepancies. Equilibrium isotope fractionation factors can be predicted from vibrational spectroscopic data of isotopically-substituted complexes, or from theoretical predictions of some or all of these frequencies obtained using force field models. The pioneering work of Schauble et al. (2001) utilized a modified Urey-Bradley force field (MUBFF) model. This approach is limiting in at least three ways: First, it is not ab initio, requiring as input some measured vibrational frequencies. Such data are not always available, or may have significant uncertainties. Second, the MUBFF does not include potentially important effects of solvent interaction. Third, because it makes certain assumptions about molecular symmetry, the MUBFF-based approach is not able to model the spectra of mixed-ligand complexes. To address these limitations, we are evaluating the use of density functional theory (DFT) as an ab initio method to predict vibrational frequencies of isotopically-substituted complexes and, hence, equilibrium fractionation factors. In a preliminary examination of the frequency shift upon isotope substitution of the bending and asymmetric stretching modes of the tetrahedral FeCl_42- complex, we find substantial differences between MUBFF and DFT predictions. Results for other Fe

  2. FRACTIONATING COLUMN PRODUCT COLLECTOR CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Paxson, G.D. Jr.

    1964-03-10

    Means for detecting minute fluid products from a chemical separation column and for advancing a collector tube rack in order to automatically separate and collect successive fractionated products are described. A charge is imposed on the forming drops at the column orifice to create an electric field as the drop falls in the vicinity of a sensing plate. The field is detected by an electrometer tube coupled to the plate causing an output signal to actuate rotation of a collector turntable rack, thereby positioning new collectors under the orifice. The invention provides reliable automatic collection independent of drop size, rate of fall, or chemical composition. (AEC)

  3. Conformable Fractional Nikiforov—Uvarov Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karayer, H.; Demirhan, D.; Büyükkılıç, F.

    2016-07-01

    We introduce conformable fractional Nikiforov—Uvarov (NU) method by means of conformable fractional derivative which is the most natural definition in non-integer calculus. Since, NU method gives exact eigenstate solutions of Schrödinger equation (SE) for certain potentials in quantum mechanics, this method is carried into the domain of fractional calculus to obtain the solutions of fractional SE. In order to demonstrate the applicability of the conformable fractional NU method, we solve fractional SE for harmonic oscillator potential, Woods—Saxon potential, and Hulthen potential.

  4. Dean flow fractionation of chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockin, Matt; Sant, Himanshu J.; Capecchi, Mario; Gale, Bruce K.

    2016-03-01

    Efforts to transfer intact mammalian chromosomes between cells have been attempted for more than 50 years with the consistent result being transfer of sub unit length pieces regardless of method. Inertial microfluidics is a new field that has shown much promise in addressing the fractionation of particles in the 2-20 μm size range (with unknown limits) and separations are based upon particles being carried by curving confined flows (within a spiral shaped, often rectangular flow chamber) and migrating to stable "equilibrium" positions of varying distance from a chamber wall depending on the balance of dean and lift forces. We fabricated spiral channels for inertial microfluidic separations using a standard soft lithography process. The concentration of chromosomes, small contaminant DNA and large cell debris in each outlets were evaluated using microscope (60X) and a flow cytometer. Using Dean Flow Fractionation, we were able to focus 4.5 times more chromosomes in outlet 2 compared to outlet 4 where most of the large debris is found. We recover 16% of the chromosomes in outlet #1- 50% in 2, 23% in 3 and 11% in 4. It should be noted that these estimates of recovery do not capture one piece of information- it actually may be that the chromosomes at each outlet are physically different and work needs to be done to verify this potential.

  5. Fractional diffusions with time-varying coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garra, Roberto; Orsingher, Enzo; Polito, Federico

    2015-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the fractionalized diffusion equations governing the law of the fractional Brownian motion BH(t). We obtain solutions of these equations which are probability laws extending that of BH(t). Our analysis is based on McBride fractional operators generalizing the hyper-Bessel operators L and converting their fractional power Lα into Erdélyi-Kober fractional integrals. We study also probabilistic properties of the random variables whose distributions satisfy space-time fractional equations involving Caputo and Riesz fractional derivatives. Some results emerging from the analysis of fractional equations with time-varying coefficients have the form of distributions of time-changed random variables.

  6. Fractional Topological Insulators in Three Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Maciejko, Joseph; Zhang Shoucheng; Qi Xiaoliang; Karch, Andreas

    2010-12-10

    Topological insulators can be generally defined by a topological field theory with an axion angle {theta} of 0 or {pi}. In this work, we introduce the concept of fractional topological insulator defined by a fractional axion angle and show that it can be consistent with time reversal T invariance if ground state degeneracies are present. The fractional axion angle can be measured experimentally by the quantized fractional bulk magnetoelectric polarization P{sub 3}, and a 'halved' fractional quantum Hall effect on the surface with Hall conductance of the form {sigma}{sub H}=(p/q)(e{sup 2}/2h) with p, q odd. In the simplest of these states the electron behaves as a bound state of three fractionally charged 'quarks' coupled to a deconfined non-Abelian SU(3) 'color' gauge field, where the fractional charge of the quarks changes the quantization condition of P{sub 3} and allows fractional values consistent with T invariance.

  7. Fractional Levy motion through path integrals

    SciTech Connect

    Calvo, Ivan; Sanchez, Raul; Carreras, Benjamin A

    2009-01-01

    Fractional Levy motion (fLm) is the natural generalization of fractional Brownian motion in the context of self-similar stochastic processes and stable probability distributions. In this paper we give an explicit derivation of the propagator of fLm by using path integral methods. The propagators of Brownian motion and fractional Brownian motion are recovered as particular cases. The fractional diffusion equation corresponding to fLm is also obtained.

  8. Early Predictors of Middle School Fraction Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Drew H.; Siegler, Robert S.; Geary, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Recent findings that earlier fraction knowledge predicts later mathematics achievement raise the question of what predicts later fraction knowledge. Analyses of longitudinal data indicated that whole number magnitude knowledge in first grade predicted knowledge of fraction magnitudes in middle school, controlling for whole number arithmetic…

  9. 12 CFR 5.67 - Fractional shares.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fractional shares. 5.67 Section 5.67 Banks and... CORPORATE ACTIVITIES Payment of Dividends § 5.67 Fractional shares. To avoid complicated recordkeeping in connection with fractional shares, a national bank issuing additional stock by stock dividend,...

  10. Identifying Fractions on a Number Line

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Monica

    2013-01-01

    Fractions are generally introduced to students using the part--whole model. Yet the number line is another important representation which can be used to build fraction concepts (Australian Curriculum Assessment and Reporting Authority [ACARA], 2012). Number lines are recognised as key in students' number development not only of fractions, but…

  11. Stretching Student Teachers' Understanding of Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Roger

    2012-01-01

    The teaching of fractions in elementary school is known to be challenging. Literature indicates that teachers' and prospective teachers' lack of depth of fraction content knowledge and associated pedagogical knowledge is of concern. This study investigated the fraction content knowledge of prospective teachers and their ability to use that…

  12. Mode analysis in optics through fractional transforms.

    PubMed

    Alieva, T; Bastiaans, M J

    1999-09-01

    The relationship between the mode content and the fractional Fourier and fractional Hankel transforms of a function is established. It is shown that the Laguerre-Gauss spectrum of a rotationally symmetric wave front can be determined from the wave front's fractional Hankel transforms taken at the optical axis. PMID:18073985

  13. 16 CFR 500.17 - Fractions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fractions. 500.17 Section 500.17 Commercial... LABELING ACT § 500.17 Fractions. (a) SI metric declarations of net quantity of contents of any consumer commodity may contain only decimal fractions. Other declarations of net quantity of contents may...

  14. Teaching Fractions. Educational Practices Series-22

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fazio, Lisa; Siegler, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Students around the world have difficulties in learning about fractions. In many countries, the average student never gains a conceptual knowledge of fractions. This research guide provides suggestions for teachers and administrators looking to improve fraction instruction in their classrooms or schools. The recommendations are based on a…

  15. 16 CFR 500.17 - Fractions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fractions. 500.17 Section 500.17 Commercial... LABELING ACT § 500.17 Fractions. (a) SI metric declarations of net quantity of contents of any consumer commodity may contain only decimal fractions. Other declarations of net quantity of contents may...

  16. An Alternative Starting Point for Fraction Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortina, José Luis; Višnovská, Jana; Zúñiga, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the results of a study conducted for the purpose of assessing the viability of an alternative starting point for teaching fractions. The alternative is based on Freudenthal's insights about fraction as comparison. It involves portraying the entities that unit fractions quantify as always being apart from the reference unit, instead of…

  17. Locating Fractions on a Number Line

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Monica

    2013-01-01

    Understanding fractions remains problematic for many students. The use of the number line aids in this understanding, but requires students to recognise that a fraction represents the distance from zero to a dot or arrow marked on a number line which is a linear scale. This article continues the discussion from "Identifying Fractions on a…

  18. Building Understanding of Multiplication of Fractions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Marilyn

    It is not complex to teach the algorithm for multiplying fractions so that children can multiply numerators and denominators to arrive at correct answers. However, it is a challenge to teach so that students build understanding of multiplication of fractions, extending what they have already learned about fractions and about multiplication of…

  19. Helices of fractionalized Maxwell fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamil, Muhammad; Abro, Kashif Ali; Khan, Najeeb Alam

    2015-12-01

    In this paper the helical flows of fractionalized Maxwell fluid model, through a circular cylinder, is studied. The motion is produced by the cylinder that at the initial moment begins to rotate around its axis with an angular velocity Omegatp, and to slide along the same axis with linear velocity Utp. The solutions that have been obtained using Laplace and finite Hankel transforms and presented in series form in terms of the newly defined special function M(z), satisfy all imposed initial and boundary conditions. Moreover, the corresponding solutions for ordinary Maxwell and Newtonian fluid obtained as special cases of the present general solution. Finally, the influence of various pertinent parameters on fluid motion as well as the comparison among different fluids models is analyzed by graphical illustrations.

  20. Copolyamino acid fractionation and protobiochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.

    1981-01-01

    Investigation of the origins of living things by the uniquely appropriate method of successive approximation in attempted retracement of steps in molecular evolution has yielded: a comprehensive theoretical flowsheet from archaic inanimate matter to an infrastructured, microscopic, protoreproductive, protometabolic protocell; a laboratory model of the same; and an explanatory assessment of the natural variation component of Darwinian evolution. For each of these, the significance is dependent upon awareness of the intrinsic tendency of amino acids, in mixed sets, to order themselves. Without such awareness, it is believed these vistas would have been delayed for decades. Selfordering would have in turn been difficult to recognize and support were it not for the chromatographic developments in fractionation of copolyamino acids.

  1. Fractional-calculus diffusion equation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Sequel to the work on the quantization of nonconservative systems using fractional calculus and quantization of a system with Brownian motion, which aims to consider the dissipation effects in quantum-mechanical description of microscale systems. Results The canonical quantization of a system represented classically by one-dimensional Fick's law, and the diffusion equation is carried out according to the Dirac method. A suitable Lagrangian, and Hamiltonian, describing the diffusive system, are constructed and the Hamiltonian is transformed to Schrodinger's equation which is solved. An application regarding implementation of the developed mathematical method to the analysis of diffusion, osmosis, which is a biological application of the diffusion process, is carried out. Schrödinger's equation is solved. Conclusions The plot of the probability function represents clearly the dissipative and drift forces and hence the osmosis, which agrees totally with the macro-scale view, or the classical-version osmosis. PMID:20492677

  2. Equation of motion using fractional calculus

    SciTech Connect

    Kihong, Kwon.

    1991-01-01

    One-dimensional motion of a particle was studied using fractional calculus, which is the differentiation and the integration of arbitrary order. By fractional differentiation, equation of motion could be written in compact form. Fractional parameters were numerically calculated by using the known solutions of general relativistic free fall motion. Also, from the approximate forms for fractional parameters, the physical meanings were found. The fractional parameters depended on the proper time, the mass of gravitating body, and the initial radial coordinate of the particle.

  3. Hydrologic transport and partitioning of phosphorus fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berretta, C.; Sansalone, J.

    2011-06-01

    SummaryPhosphorus (P) in rainfall-runoff partitions between dissolved and particulate matter (PM) bound phases. This study investigates the transport and partitioning of P to PM fractions in runoff from a landscaped and biogenically-loaded carpark in Gainesville, FL (GNV). Additionally, partitioning and concentration results are compared to a similarly-sized concrete-paved source area of a similar rainfall depth frequency distribution in Baton Rouge, LA (BTR), where in contrast vehicular traffic represents the main source of pollutants. Results illustrate that concentrations of P fractions (dissolved, suspended, settleable and sediment) for GNV are one to two orders of magnitude higher than BTR. Despite these differences the dissolved fraction ( f d) and partitioning coefficient ( K d) distributions are similar, illustrating that P is predominantly bound to PM fractions. Examining PM size fractions, specific capacity for P (PSC) indicates that the P concentration order is suspended > settleable > sediment for GNV, similarly to BTR. For GNV the dominant PM mass fraction is sediment (>75 μm), while the mass of P is distributed predominantly between sediment and suspended (<25 μm) fractions since these PM mass fractions dominated the settleable one. With respect to transport of PM and P fractions the predominance of events for both areas is mass-limited first-flush, although each fraction illustrated unique washoff parameters. However, while transport is predominantly mass-limited, the transport of each PM and P fraction is influenced by separate hydrologic parameters.

  4. Magnetite fractionation of "chalcophile" elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavrogenes, J. A.; Jenner, F. E.; Arculus, R. J.

    2008-12-01

    Submarine-quenched glasses provide the clearest record of magmatic evolution available, especially with respect to potentially volatile elements and compounds. A comprehensive suite of arc- and backarc glasses recovered during several research voyages in the SW Pacific are being analysed by a number of research teams in an effort to document genesis and fractionation processes involved in the evolution of subduction- related magma systems. As part of these studies, a suite of basalt to dacite composition glasses recovered from the arc-like Pacmanus Site in the Manus Backarc Basin have been examined in detail. Sun et al. (2004) found trends of increasing enrichments of Re, Cu, and Au with SiO2 in the range from 50 to 60 wt% SiO2. From this stage of magmatic evolution, marked depletions in all these elements are observed in glasses of higher SiO2 contents. The reasons for this trend have been unclear, although a mechanism involving the cessation of olivine and initiation of magnetite saturation was proposed by Sun et al. Our analysis of a larger suite of glasses from the Manus Basin has now confirmed these trends, and found the same behaviour for Zn and Mn. Similarly, analysis of a suite of basalt to dacite glasses recovered from the arc-like Valu Fa Ridge in the Lau Backarc Basin has produced trends for these elements very similar to those of the Pacmanus location. LA-ICP-MS analysis of microphenocrysts in these glasses has shown that magnetite is highly enriched in Re relative to the coexisting melt (Kd up to 7.8 for Re). Magnetite/melt partition coefficients for Re, Mn and Yb can be used to precisely model the liquid line of descent during magnetite (plus clinopyroxene and plagioclase) fractionation using Re vs. Mn/Yb. The variation of Pt abundances with SiO2 for both these suites contrasts with other nominally chalcophile trace elements in showing rapid early depletion from the most Mg-rich basalt through to more SiO2-rich compositions, with no maximum at 60 wt

  5. WATER FRACTIONS IN EXTRASOLAR PLANETESIMALS

    SciTech Connect

    Jura, M.; Xu, S. E-mail: sxu@astro.ucla.edu

    2012-01-15

    With the goal of using externally polluted white dwarfs to investigate the water fractions of extrasolar planetesimals, we assemble from the literature a sample that we estimate to be more than 60% complete of DB white dwarfs warmer than 13,000 K, more luminous than 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} L{sub Sun }, and within 80 pc of the Sun. When considering all the stars together, we find that the summed mass accretion rate of heavy atoms exceeds that of hydrogen by over a factor of 1000. If so, this sub-population of extrasolar asteroids treated as an ensemble has little water and is at least a factor of 20 drier than CI chondrites, the most primitive meteorites. Furthermore, while an apparent 'excess' of oxygen in a single DB can be interpreted as evidence that the accreted material originated in a water-rich parent body, we show that at least in some cases, there can be sufficient uncertainties in the time history of the accretion rate that such an argument may be ambiguous. Regardless of the difficulty associated with interpreting the results from an individual object, our analysis of the population of polluted DBs provides indirect observational support for the theoretical view that a snow line is important in disks where rocky planetesimals form.

  6. Generalized hydrodynamic correlations and fractional memory functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Rosalio F.; Fujioka, Jorge

    2015-12-01

    A fractional generalized hydrodynamic (GH) model of the longitudinal velocity fluctuations correlation, and its associated memory function, for a complex fluid is analyzed. The adiabatic elimination of fast variables introduces memory effects in the transport equations, and the dynamic of the fluctuations is described by a generalized Langevin equation with long-range noise correlations. These features motivate the introduction of Caputo time fractional derivatives and allows us to calculate analytic expressions for the fractional longitudinal velocity correlation function and its associated memory function. Our analysis eliminates a spurious constant term in the non-fractional memory function found in the non-fractional description. It also produces a significantly slower power-law decay of the memory function in the GH regime that reduces to the well-known exponential decay in the non-fractional Navier-Stokes limit.

  7. Possible isotopic fractionation effects in sputtered minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haff, P. K.; Watson, C. C.; Tombrello, T. A.

    1980-01-01

    A model which makes definite predictions for the fractionation of isotopes in sputtered material is discussed. The fractionation patterns are nonlinear, and the pattern for a particular set of isotopes depends on the chemical matrix within which those isotopes are contained. Calculations are presented for all nonmonoisotopic elements contained in the minerals perovskite, anorthite, ackermanite, enstatite, and troilite. All isotopes are fractionated at the level of approximately 4-6 deg/o per atomic mass unit. Oxygen is always positively fractionated (heavier isotopes sputtered preferentially), and heavier elements are generally negatively fractioned (light isotopes sputtered preferentially). The value of Delta (O-18:O-16) is always less by about 1.8 deg/o than a linear extrapolation based upon the calculated delta (O-17:O-16) value would suggest. The phenomenon of both negative and positive fractionation patterns from a single target mineral are used to make an experimental test of the proposed model.

  8. Unpacking the Division Interpretation of a Fraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poon, Rebecca C.; Lewis, Priscilla Eide

    2015-01-01

    One of the challenges in learning fractions is understanding how and why a fraction can have multiple interpretations. As presented in one textbook, a fraction is "a symbol, such as 2/3, 5/1, or 8/5, used to name a part of a whole, a part of a set, a location on a number line, or a division of whole numbers" (Charles et al. 2012, p.…

  9. Space–time fractional Zener wave equation

    PubMed Central

    Atanackovic, T.M.; Janev, M.; Oparnica, Lj.; Pilipovic, S.; Zorica, D.

    2015-01-01

    The space–time fractional Zener wave equation, describing viscoelastic materials obeying the time-fractional Zener model and the space-fractional strain measure, is derived and analysed. This model includes waves with finite speed, as well as non-propagating disturbances. The existence and the uniqueness of the solution to the generalized Cauchy problem are proved. Special cases are investigated and numerical examples are presented. PMID:25663807

  10. Complex order fractional derivatives in viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanacković, Teodor M.; Konjik, Sanja; Pilipović, Stevan; Zorica, Dušan

    2016-06-01

    We introduce complex order fractional derivatives in models that describe viscoelastic materials. This cannot be carried out unrestrictedly, and therefore we derive, for the first time, real valued compatibility constraints, as well as physical constraints that lead to acceptable models. As a result, we introduce a new form of complex order fractional derivative. Also, we consider a fractional differential equation with complex derivatives, and study its solvability. Results obtained for stress relaxation and creep are illustrated by several numerical examples.

  11. Microfluidic dielectrophoretic sorter using gel vertical electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jason; Nelson, Edward L.; Li, G. P.; Bachman, Mark

    2014-01-01

    We report the development and results of a two-step method for sorting cells and small particles in a microfluidic device. This approach uses a single microfluidic channel that has (1) a microfabricated sieve which efficiently focuses particles into a thin stream, followed by (2) a dielectrophoresis (DEP) section consisting of electrodes along the channel walls for efficient continuous sorting based on dielectric properties of the particles. For our demonstration, the device was constructed of polydimethylsiloxane, bonded to a glass surface, and conductive agarose gel electrodes. Gold traces were used to make electrical connections to the conductive gel. The device had several novel features that aided performance of the sorting. These included a sieving structure that performed continuous displacement of particles into a single stream within the microfluidic channel (improving the performance of downstream DEP, and avoiding the need for additional focusing flow inlets), and DEP electrodes that were the full height of the microfluidic walls (“vertical electrodes”), allowing for improved formation and control of electric field gradients in the microfluidic device. The device was used to sort polymer particles and HeLa cells, demonstrating that this unique combination provides improved capability for continuous DEP sorting of particles in a microfluidic device. PMID:24926390

  12. Dielectrophoretic concentration of particles under electrokinetic flow

    DOEpatents

    Miles, Robin R.; Bettencourt, Kerry A.; Fuller, Christopher K.

    2004-09-07

    The use of dielectrophoresis to collect particles under the conditions of electrokinetically-driven flow. Dielectrophortic concentration of particles under electrokinetic flow is accomplished by interdigitated electrodes patterned on an inner surface of a microfluid channel, a DC voltage is applied across the ends to the channel, and an AC voltage is applied across the electrodes, and particles swept down the channel electrokinetically are trapped within the field established by the electrodes. The particles can be released when the voltage to the electrodes is released.

  13. Effect of dielectrophoretic force on swimming bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tran, Ngoc Phu; Marcos

    2015-07-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP) has been applied widely in bacterial manipulation such as separating, concentrating, and focusing. Previous studies primarily focused on the collective effects of DEP force on the bacterial population. However, the influence of DEP force on the swimming of a single bacterium had not been investigated. In this study, we present a model to analyze the effect of DEP force on a swimming helically flagellated bacterium, particularly on its swimming direction and velocity. We consider a simple DEP force that acts along the X-direction, and its strength as well as direction varies with the X- and Y-positions. Resistive force theory is employed to compute the hydrodynamic force on the bacterium's flagellar bundle, and the effects of both DEP force and rotational diffusion on the swimming of the bacterium are simultaneously taken into consideration using the Fokker-Planck equation. We show the mechanism of how DEP force alters the orientation and velocity of the bacterium. In most cases, the DEP force dominantly influences the orientation of the swimming bacterium; however, when the DEP force strongly varies along the Y-direction, the rotational diffusion is also responsible for determining the bacterium's reorientation. More interestingly, the variance of DEP force along the Y-direction causes the bacterium to experience a translational velocity perpendicular to its primary axis, and this phenomenon could be utilized to focus the bacteria. Finally, we show the feasibility of applying our findings to achieve bacterial focusing. PMID:25785901

  14. Dielectrophoretic separation of mouse melanoma clones

    PubMed Central

    Sabuncu, Ahmet C.; Liu, Jie A.; Beebe, Stephen J.; Beskok, Ali

    2010-01-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP) is employed to differentiate clones of mouse melanoma B16F10 cells. Five clones were tested on microelectrodes. At a specific excitation frequency, clone 1 showed a different DEP response than the other four. Growth rate, melanin content, recovery from cryopreservation, and in vitro invasive studies were performed. Clone 1 is shown to have significantly different melanin content and recovery rate from cryopreservation. This paper reports the ability of DEP to differentiate between two malignant cells of the same origin. Different DEP responses of the two clones could be linked to their melanin content. PMID:20697600

  15. Continuous dielectrophoretic separation of cell mixtures.

    PubMed

    Pohl, H A; Kaler, K

    1979-03-01

    Use of stream-centered dielectrophoresis (1-4) produced continuous separations on three cell mixtures (1) Chorella vulgaris with Netrium digitus, (2) Ankistrodesmus falcatus with Staurastrum gracile, and (3) Saccharomyces cerevisiae with Netrium digitus. Maximal separations were obtained for these mixtures of live cells at 100 kHz, 600 kHz, and 2.0 MHz, respectively. The technique was restricted to a frequency range of 0.01-32 MHz, and to suspensions of low conductivity in which microorganisms such as these algae and yeast are tolerant. Extension, however, to cellular organisms requiring higher osmolarity is readily feasible through the use of nonionic solutes such as sucrose, mannose, glycine, etc. PMID:95165

  16. THEORETICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL ASPECTS OF ISOTOPIC FRACTIONATION.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Neil, James R.

    1986-01-01

    Essential to the interpretation of natural variations of light stable isotope ratios is knowledge of the magnitude and temperature dependence of isotopic fractionation factors between the common minerals and fluids. These fractionation factors are obtained in three ways: (1) Semi-empirical calculations using spectroscopic data and the methods of statistical mechanics. (2) Laboratory calibration studies. (3) Measurements of natural samples whose formation conditions are well-known or highly constrained. In this chapter methods (1) and (2) are evaluated and a review is given of the present state of knowledge of the theory of isotopic fractionation and the fraction that influence the isotopic properties of minerals.

  17. The derivative of a continued fraction

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, Kimiko o

    2009-01-01

    The paper considers second order continued fractions associated with (I) the Psi function {psi}(z), (II) the continued fraction component in ln {Gamma}(z) due to Stieltjes. The second order sequences k*{sub s}/k{sub s} provide approximants, some of which are remarkably close. In addition a series form for the convergent {chi}{sub s}={omega}{sub s} associated with a continued fraction provides an expression for the derivatives of a continued fraction. The implementation uses a Maple code for derivatives.

  18. Fractionalized topological defects in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xing-Hai; Fan, Wen-Jun; Shi, Jin-Wei; Kou, Su-Peng

    2015-10-01

    Topological objects are interesting topics in various fields of physics ranging from condensed matter physics to the grand unified and superstring theories. Among those, ultracold atoms provide a playground to study the complex topological objects. In this paper we present a proposal to realize an optical lattice with stable fractionalized topological objects. In particular, we generate the fractionalized topological fluxes and fractionalized skyrmions on two-dimensional optical lattices and fractionalized monopoles on three-dimensional optical lattices. These results offer a new approach to study the quantum many-body systems on optical lattices of ultracold quantum gases with controllable topological defects, including dislocations, topological fluxes and monopoles.

  19. Control of Initialized Fractional-Order Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartly, Tom T.; Lorenzo, Carl F.

    2002-01-01

    Due to the importance of historical effects in fractional-order systems, this paper presents a general fractional-order control theory that includes the time-varying initialization response. Previous studies have not properly accounted for these historical effects. The initialization response, along with the forced response, for fractional-order systems is determined. Stability properties of fractional-order systems are presented in the complex Airplane, which is a transformation of the s-plane. Time responses are discussed with respect to pole positions in the complex Airplane and frequency response behavior is included. A fractional-order vector space representation, which is a generalization of the state space concept, is presented including the initialization response. Control methods for vector representations of initialized fractional-order systems are shown. Nyquist, root-locus, and other input-output control methods are adapted to the control of fractional-order systems. Finally, the fractional-order differintegral is generalized to continuous order-distributions that have the possibility of including a continuum of fractional orders in a system element.

  20. On the entangled fractional squeezing transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Hong-Yi; Chen, Jun-Hua; Zhang, Peng-Fei

    2015-04-01

    We propose an entangled fractional squeezing transformation (EFrST) generated by using two mutually conjugate entangled state representations with the following operator: ; this transformation sharply contrasts the complex fractional Fourier transformation produced by using (see Front. Phys. DOI: 10.1007/s11467-014-0445-x). The EFrST is obtained by converting the triangular functions in the integration kernel of the usual fractional Fourier transformation into hyperbolic functions, i.e., tan α → tanh α and sin α → sinh α. The fractional property of the EFrST can be well described by virtue of the properties of the entangled state representations.

  1. Oxygen isotope fractionation in double carbonates.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yong-Fei; Böttcher, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen isotope fractionations in double carbonates of different crystal structures were calculated by the increment method. Synthesis experiments were performed at 60 °C and 100 °C to determine oxygen and carbon isotope fractionations involving PbMg[CO3]2. The calculations suggest that the double carbonates of calcite structure are systematically enriched in (18)O relative to those of aragonite and mixture structures. Internally consistent oxygen isotope fractionation factors are obtained for these minerals with respect to quartz, calcite and water at a temperature range of 0-1200 °C. The calculated fractionation factors for double carbonate-water systems are generally consistent with the data available from laboratory experiments. The experimentally determined fractionation factors for PbMg[CO3]2, BaMg[CO3]2 and CaMg[CO3]2 against H2O not only fall between fractionation factors involving pure carbonate end-members but are also close to the calculated fractionation factors. In contrast, experimentally determined carbon isotope fractionation factors between PbMg[CO3]2 and CO2 are much closer to theoretical predictions for the cerussite-CO2 system than for the magnesite-CO2 system, similar to the fractionation behavior for BaMg[CO3]2. Therefore, the combined theoretical and experimental results provide insights into the effects of crystal structure and exchange kinetics on oxygen isotope partitioning in double carbonates. PMID:25393769

  2. A Fractional Variational Approach to the Fractional Basset-Type Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baleanu, Dumitru; Garra, Roberto; Petras, Ivo

    2013-08-01

    In this paper we discuss an application of fractional variational calculus to the Basset-type fractional equations. It is well known that the unsteady motion of a sphere immersed in a Stokes fluid is described by an integro-differential equation involving derivative of real order. Here we study the inverse problem, i.e. we consider the problem from a Lagrangian point of view in the framework of fractional variational calculus. In this way we find an application of fractional variational methods to a classical physical model, finding a Basset-type fractional equation starting from a Lagrangian depending on derivatives of fractional order.

  3. Control of Initialized Fractional-Order Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Tom T.; Lorenzo, Carl F.

    2004-01-01

    Fractional-Order systems, or systems containing fractional derivatives and integrals, have been studied by many in the engineering area. Additionally, very readable discussions, devoted specifically to the subject, are presented by Oldham and Spanier, Miller and Ross, and Pudlubny (1999a). It should be noted that there are a growing number of physical systems whose behavior can be compactly described using fractional system theory. Of specific interest to electrical engineers are long lines, electrochemical processes, dielectric polarization, colored noise, viscoelastic materials, and chaos. With the growing number of applications, it is important to establish a theory of control for these fractional-order systems, and for the potential use of fractional-order systems as feedback compensators. This topic is addressed in this paper. The first section discusses the control of fractional-order systems using a vector space representation, where initialization is included in the discussion. It should be noted that Bagley and Calico and Padovan and Sawicki both present a fractional state-space representation, which do not include the important historic effects. Incorporation of these effects based on the initialized fractional calculus is presented . The control methods presented in this paper are based on the initialized fractional order system theory. The second section presents an input-output approach. Some of the problems encountered in these sections are: a) the need to introduce a new complex plane to study the dynamics of fractional-order systems, b) the need to properly define the Laplace transform of the fractional derivative, and c) the proper inclusion of the initialization response in the system and control formulation. Following this, the next section generalizes the proportional-plus-integral-control (PI-control) and PID-control (PI-plus- derivative) concepts using fractional integrals. This is then further generalized using general fractional- order

  4. In Search of the Prototypical Fraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Vince

    2013-01-01

    Vince Wright makes a convincing argument for presenting children with a different "prototype" of a fraction to the typical one-half. Consider how the prototype that Wright mentions may be applied to a variety of fraction concepts. We are sure that you will never look at a doughnut in quite the same way.

  5. Making Sense of Fractions and Percentages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitin, David J.; Whitin, Phyllis

    2012-01-01

    Because fractions and percentages can be difficult for children to grasp, connecting them whenever possible is beneficial. Linking them can foster representational fluency as children simultaneously see the part-whole relationship expressed numerically (as a fraction and as a percentage) and visually (as a pie chart). NCTM advocates these…

  6. Fractions Instruction: Linking Concepts and Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitsolantis, Nicole; Osana, Helena P.

    2013-01-01

    It is not surprising, as research has shown, that fractions are one of the most difficult of the elementary school math topics to teach and learn in ways that are meaningful. The authors reference a work by James Hiebert, "Mathematical, Cognitive, and Instructional Analyses of Decimal Fractions" (1992), that mathematical concepts should…

  7. Tin isotope fractionation in terrestrial cassiterites

    SciTech Connect

    McNaughton, N.J. ); Rosman, K.J.R. )

    1991-02-01

    The isotopic composition of tin has been measured in a range of cassiterites and pure reagents to assess the extent to which this element is isotopically fractionated in natural processes. Only two samples showed evidence of isotopic fractionation, and it is concluded that natural Sn isotope fractionation is small and uncommon. This feature reflects the world dominance of Sn-oxide ores Sn-sulfide ores, and the highly efficient processes of Sn dissolution and precipitation which negate equilibrium and kinetic fractionation of Sn isotopes, respectively. The two samples which show slight fractionation are a highly purified and cassiterite from the Archaean Greenbushes pegmatite, Western Australia. The latter Sn is 0.15{per thousand} per mass unit heavier than the authors laboratory standard, whereas the former is 0.12{per thousand} per mass unit lighter. Although the cassiterite fractionation is considered to result from natural geological processes, the fractionation of purified Sn may be either natural or relate to the purification process, the fractionation of this magnitude has a negligible effect on the current best estimate of the atomic weight of Sn, but it does place a lower limit on its associated accuracy.

  8. Representations of the Magnitudes of Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Michael; Siegler, Robert S.

    2010-01-01

    We tested whether adults can use integrated, analog, magnitude representations to compare the values of fractions. The only previous study on this question concluded that even college students cannot form such representations and instead compare fraction magnitudes by representing numerators and denominators as separate whole numbers. However,…

  9. Mathematical Analogs and the Teaching of Fractions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, Kathy; Nason, Rod; Cooper, Tom

    The literature has noted that some mathematical analogs are more effective than others for the teaching of fractions. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of seven mathematical analogs commonly used in the teaching of the partitive quotient fraction construct. A sample of twelve purposively selected Year Three children were presented with…

  10. Nonlinear Filtering with Fractional Brownian Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Amirdjanova, A.

    2002-12-19

    Our objective is to study a nonlinear filtering problem for the observation process perturbed by a Fractional Brownian Motion (FBM) with Hurst index 1/2 fractional' Zakai equation for the unnormalized optimal filter is derived.

  11. Procedural and Conceptual Knowledge: Adults Reviewing Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William J.; Czarnocha, Bronislaw; Dias, Olen; Doyle, Kathleen; Kennis, James R.

    2012-01-01

    In the United States a majority of the students who enroll in community colleges require a review of secondary math before they are eligible for college level mathematics. In the pre-algebra course, that has a high drop-out rate, the most difficult topic for students is fractions. In order to better understand the fraction concept, Kieren…

  12. Strategies in the Management of Tenure Fraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weart, Harry W.

    Tenure fraction has become recognized as an important factor to be taken into account in the administration of institutions of higher education, but there is danger that pursuit of lower fractions per se may lead to actions that unnecessarily weaken the institution or its educational programs. With the aid of an extremely simple mathematical model…

  13. [Carbon isotope fractionation inplants]. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    O`Leary, M.H.

    1990-12-31

    The objectives of this research are: To develop a theoretical and experimental framework for understanding isotope fractionations in plants; and to develop methods for using this isotope fractionation for understanding the dynamics of CO{sub 2} fixation in plants. Progress is described.

  14. Using Technology Effectively to Teach about Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hensberry, Karina K. R.; Moore, Emily B.; Perkins, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe classroom use of technology that successfully engaged fourth grade students (typically aged 9-10) in the United States in learning about fractions. The activities involved the use of an interactive simulation designed to support student learning of fractions, and whole-class discussion where students were…

  15. Fractional populations in sex-linked inheritance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyo Lee, Seung; Chung, Myung-Hoon; Koo Kim, Chul; Nahm, Kyun

    2001-03-01

    We study the fractional populations in chromosome inherited diseases. The governing equations for the fractional populations are found and solved in the presence of mutation and selection. The physical fixed points obtained are used to discuss the cases of color blindness and hemophilia.

  16. Void Fraction Instrument operation and maintenance manual

    SciTech Connect

    Borgonovi, G.; Stokes, T.I.; Pearce, K.L.; Martin, J.D.; Gimera, M.; Graves, D.B.

    1994-09-01

    This Operations and Maintenance Manual (O&MM) addresses riser installation, equipment and personnel hazards, operating instructions, calibration, maintenance, removal, and other pertinent information necessary to safely operate and store the Void Fraction Instrument. Final decontamination and decommissioning of the Void Fraction Instrument are not covered in this document.

  17. Engaging Students with Multiple Models of Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Xiaofen; Clements, M. A.; Ellerton, Nerida F.

    2015-01-01

    An understanding of unit fractions, and especially of one-half, one-third, and one-fourth, is crucially important for elementary school children's development of number sense (CCSSI 2010). We describe multimodal activities designed to assist elementary school students in gaining a rich understanding of unit fractions. Research has shown (Zhang,…

  18. Egyptian Fractions: Ahmes to Fibonacci to Today.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurd, Spencer P.

    1991-01-01

    Presented is the ancient Egyptian algorithm for the operations of multiplication and division of integers and fractions. Theorems involving unit fractions, proved by Fibonacci, justifying and extending the Egyptian or Ahmes' methods into the Hindu-Arabic numeric representational system are given. (MDH)

  19. Mathematical Knowledge for Teaching Fraction Multiplication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Izsak, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The present study contrasts mathematical knowledge that two sixth-grade teachers apparently used when teaching fraction multiplication with the Connected Mathematics Project materials. The analysis concentrated on those tasks from the materials that use drawings to represent fractions as length or area quantities. Examining the two teachers'…

  20. Levels of Students' "Conception" of Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pantziara, Marilena; Philippou, George

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we examine sixth grade students' degree of conceptualization of fractions. A specially developed test aimed to measure students' understanding of fractions along the three stages proposed by Sfard ("1991") was administered to 321 sixth grade students. The Rasch model was applied to specify the reliability of the test across the…

  1. Estimation's Role in Calculations with Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johanning, Debra I.

    2011-01-01

    Estimation is more than a skill or an isolated topic. It is a thinking tool that needs to be emphasized during instruction so that students will learn to develop algorithmic procedures and meaning for fraction operations. For students to realize when fractions should be added, subtracted, multiplied, or divided, they need to develop a sense of…

  2. Unpacking Referent Units in Fraction Operations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philipp, Randolph A.; Hawthorne, Casey

    2015-01-01

    Although fraction operations are procedurally straightforward, they are complex, because they require learners to conceptualize different units and view quantities in multiple ways. Prospective secondary school teachers sometimes provide an algebraic explanation for inverting and multiplying when dividing fractions. That authors of this article…

  3. Discrete Fractional Diffusion Equation of Chaotic Order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guo-Cheng; Baleanu, Dumitru; Xie, He-Ping; Zeng, Sheng-Da

    Discrete fractional calculus is suggested in diffusion modeling in porous media. A variable-order fractional diffusion equation is proposed on discrete time scales. A function of the variable order is constructed by a chaotic map. The model shows some new random behaviors in comparison with other variable-order cases.

  4. Neutron Imaging Calibration to Measure Void Fraction

    SciTech Connect

    Geoghegan, Patrick J; Bilheux, Hassina Z; Sharma, Vishaldeep; Fricke, Brian A

    2015-01-01

    Void fraction is an intuitive parameter that describes the fraction of vapor in a two-phase flow. It appears as a key variable in most heat transfer and pressure drop correlations used to design evaporating and condensing heat exchangers, as well as determining charge inventory in refrigeration systems. Void fraction measurement is not straightforward, however, and assumptions on the invasiveness of the measuring technique must be made. Neutron radiography or neutron imaging has the potential to be a truly non-invasive void fraction measuring technique but has until recently only offered qualitative descriptions of two-phase flow, in terms of flow maldistributions, for example. This paper describes the calibration approach necessary to employ neutron imaging to measure steady-state void fraction. Experiments were conducted at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Cold Guide 1D neutron imaging facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN, USA.

  5. Variable-order fuzzy fractional PID controller.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lu; Pan, Feng; Xue, Dingyu

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a new tuning method of variable-order fractional fuzzy PID controller (VOFFLC) is proposed for a class of fractional-order and integer-order control plants. Fuzzy logic control (FLC) could easily deal with parameter variations of control system, but the fractional-order parameters are unable to change through this way and it has confined the effectiveness of FLC. Therefore, an attempt is made in this paper to allow all the five parameters of fractional-order PID controller vary along with the transformation of system structure as the outputs of FLC, and the influence of fractional orders λ and μ on control systems has been investigated to make the fuzzy rules for VOFFLC. Four simulation results of different plants are shown to verify the availability of the proposed control strategy. PMID:25440947

  6. Reply to "Comment on 'Fractional quantum mechanics' and 'Fractional Schrödinger equation' ".

    PubMed

    Laskin, Nick

    2016-06-01

    The fractional uncertainty relation is a mathematical formulation of Heisenberg's uncertainty principle in the framework of fractional quantum mechanics. Two mistaken statements presented in the Comment have been revealed. The origin of each mistaken statement has been clarified and corrected statements have been made. A map between standard quantum mechanics and fractional quantum mechanics has been presented to emphasize the features of fractional quantum mechanics and to avoid misinterpretations of the fractional uncertainty relation. It has been shown that the fractional probability current equation is correct in the area of its applicability. Further studies have to be done to find meaningful quantum physics problems with involvement of the fractional probability current density vector and the extra term emerging in the framework of fractional quantum mechanics. PMID:27415398

  7. Reply to "Comment on `Fractional quantum mechanics' and `Fractional Schrödinger equation' "

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Nick

    2016-06-01

    The fractional uncertainty relation is a mathematical formulation of Heisenberg's uncertainty principle in the framework of fractional quantum mechanics. Two mistaken statements presented in the Comment have been revealed. The origin of each mistaken statement has been clarified and corrected statements have been made. A map between standard quantum mechanics and fractional quantum mechanics has been presented to emphasize the features of fractional quantum mechanics and to avoid misinterpretations of the fractional uncertainty relation. It has been shown that the fractional probability current equation is correct in the area of its applicability. Further studies have to be done to find meaningful quantum physics problems with involvement of the fractional probability current density vector and the extra term emerging in the framework of fractional quantum mechanics.

  8. Biochemical characterization of three mycobacterial ribosomal fractions.

    PubMed

    Portelance, V; Beaudet, R

    1983-02-01

    The induction of antituberculous immunity by crude ribosomal fractions isolated from Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain H37Ra, M. bovis strain BCG, and M. smegmatis was studied in CF-1 mice. Levels of antituberculous immunity similar to that induced by live BCG were induced by the BCG and H37Ra ribosomal fractions whereas that isolated from M. smegmatis was found to be inactive. Electrophoresis of the three ribosomal fractions in sodium dodecyl sulfate - polyacylamide gels followed by differential staining showed the two active ribosomal fractions to be similar in their proteins, carbohydrate-containing substances, and lipid profiles. The inactive smegmatis ribosomal fraction differed mainly from the active ones on the basis of its carbohydrate-containing substances profile and by the absence of lipids. The polysaccharides and the ribosomes present in the H37Ra ribosomal fractions were purified by affinity chromatography on concanavalin A - Sepharose 4B. Each purified preparation showed no or only low antituberculous activity when injected separately, but when mixed together a high protection was observed. The formation of complexes between the ribosomes and the polysaccharide fraction was suggested and appears to be necessary for the induction of antituberculous immunity. PMID:6189570

  9. CCII based fractional filters of different orders.

    PubMed

    Soltan, Ahmed; Radwan, Ahmed G; Soliman, Ahmed M

    2014-03-01

    This paper aims to generalize the design of continuous-time filters to the fractional domain with different orders and validates the theoretical results with two different CCII based filters. In particular, the proposed study introduces the generalized formulas for the previous fractional-order analysis of equal orders. The fractional-order filters enhance the design flexibility and prove that the integer-order performance is a very narrow subset from the fractional-order behavior due to the extra degrees of freedom. The general fundamentals of these filters are presented by calculating the maximum and minimum frequencies, the half power frequency and the right phase frequency which are considered a critical issue for the filter design. Different numerical solutions for the generalized fractional order low pass filters with two different fractional order elements are introduced and verified by the circuit simulations of two fractional-order filters: Kerwin-Huelsman-Newcomb (KHN) and Tow-Tomas CCII-based filters, showing great matching. PMID:25685483

  10. CCII based fractional filters of different orders

    PubMed Central

    Soltan, Ahmed; Radwan, Ahmed G.; Soliman, Ahmed M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to generalize the design of continuous-time filters to the fractional domain with different orders and validates the theoretical results with two different CCII based filters. In particular, the proposed study introduces the generalized formulas for the previous fractional-order analysis of equal orders. The fractional-order filters enhance the design flexibility and prove that the integer-order performance is a very narrow subset from the fractional-order behavior due to the extra degrees of freedom. The general fundamentals of these filters are presented by calculating the maximum and minimum frequencies, the half power frequency and the right phase frequency which are considered a critical issue for the filter design. Different numerical solutions for the generalized fractional order low pass filters with two different fractional order elements are introduced and verified by the circuit simulations of two fractional-order filters: Kerwin–Huelsman–Newcomb (KHN) and Tow-Tomas CCII-based filters, showing great matching. PMID:25685483

  11. Fractional Modeling of Viscoelasticity in Brain Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yue; Karniadakis, George

    2014-11-01

    We develop fundamental new numerical methods for fractional order PDEs, and investigate corresponding models for arterial walls. Specifically, the arterial wall is a heterogeneous soft tissue with complex biomechanical properties, and its constitutive laws are typically derived using integer-order differential equations. However, recent simulations on 1D model have indicated that fractional order models may offer a more powerful alternative for describing arterial wall mechanics, because they are less sensitive to the parameter estimation compared with the integer-calculus-based models. We study the specific fractional PDEs that better model the properties of the 3D arterial walls, and for the first time employ them in simulating flow structure interactions for patient-specific brain aneurysms. A comparison study indicates that for the integer order models, the viscous behavior strongly depends on the relaxation parameters while the fractional order models are less sensitive. This finding is consistent with what is observed in the 1D models for arterial networks (Perdikaris & Karniadakis, 2014), except that when the fractional order is small, the 3D fractional-order models are more sensitive to the fractional order compared to the 1D models.

  12. The active fraction of psyllium seed husk.

    PubMed

    Marlett, Judith A; Fischer, Milton H

    2003-02-01

    A series of experiments and evaluations of fractions isolated from psyllium seed husk (PSH) were used to test the overall hypothesis that a gel-forming component of PSH is not fermented and that it is this component that is responsible for the laxative and cholesterol-lowering properties of PSH. A gel is isolated from human stools collected during a controlled diet study when PSH is consumed but not when the control diet only is consumed. Evaluations of three fractions isolated from PSH suggest that gel-forming fraction B, which is about 55% of PSH, is poorly fermented and is the component that increases stool moisture and faecal bile acid excretion, the latter leading to lower blood cholesterol levels. Fraction C, representing < 15% of PSH, is viscous, but is rapidly fermented. Fraction A is alkali-insoluble material that is not fermented. In concentrations comparable with their presence in PSH, fractions A and C do not alter moisture and bile acid output. The active fraction of PSH is a highly-branched arabinoxylan consisting of a xylose backbone and arabinose- and xylose-containing side chains. In contrast to arabinoxylans in cereal grains that are extensively fermented, PSH possesses a structural feature, as yet unidentified, that hinders its fermentation by typical colonic microflora. PMID:12749348

  13. Identification of constitutive parameters for fractional viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Zhao; Haitian, Yang; Yiqian, He

    2014-01-01

    This paper develops a numerical model to identify constitutive parameters in the fractional viscoelastic field. An explicit semi-analytical numerical model and a finite difference (FD) method based numerical model are derived for solving the direct homogenous and regionally inhomogeneous fractional viscoelastic problems, respectively. A continuous ant colony optimization (ACO) algorithm is employed to solve the inverse problem of identification. The feasibility of the proposed approach is illustrated via the numerical verification of a two-dimensional identification problem formulated by the fractional Kelvin-Voigt model, and the noisy data and regional inhomogeneity etc. are taken into account.

  14. Light SOM fraction in postpyrogenic soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimova, Ekaterina; Abakumov, Evgeny

    2014-05-01

    Soils affected by forest wildfires in 2010 in Russia were studied on postfire and mature plots near the Togljatty city, Samara region. This investigation showed that wildfires cause the serious changes in a soil profile. A soil organic matter content as a key component of the carbon cycle of forest ecosystem is of special interest in pyrogenic soil-plant associations. The most intensive were the processes of soil organic matter losses that result from burning of a forest floor and sod (humic) horizon. The content of a humus in the top horizons of soils in 2010 at a local fire (2,08±0,85%) is less, than at riding (2,45±0,53%), and is much lower than in case of unaffected (control) site (3,35±2,32%). These data confirm the fact of a dehumification of soils after wildfires and proof the idea that more intensive losses of a humus are occured under the local wildfire (which result in full burning out of a laying and the top horizon). The above mentioned processes were confirmed by results of the light SOM fraction evaluation. The light SOM fraction was studied in order to specify the origin of soil organic matter. This fraction is presented by free organic matter of slightly decomposed organic remnants either by black carbon fraction. Light SOM fraction was evaluated by density fractionation method. The content of light fraction in the solum in 2010 after wildfires was less, than in control plot. The average content of the light fraction in soil organic matter varies from 12 to 20%. It testifies that well-decomposed forms of humus predominate in the organic matter of the studied soils. The light fraction content in the solum in 2010 at a local fire (9-13%) is less, than at riding (12-16%), and is much lower than in case of unaffected (control) site (16-19%). Therefore, black carbon was possibly present in the light SOM fraction. The light SOM fraction is the essential indication of SOM system in case of postfire demutation change. Data obtained shows that the light

  15. The Riesz-Bessel Fractional Diffusion Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Anh, V.V. McVinish, R.

    2004-05-15

    This paper examines the properties of a fractional diffusion equation defined by the composition of the inverses of the Riesz potential and the Bessel potential. The first part determines the conditions under which the Green function of this equation is the transition probability density function of a Levy motion. This Levy motion is obtained by the subordination of Brownian motion, and the Levy representation of the subordinator is determined. The second part studies the semigroup formed by the Green function of the fractional diffusion equation. Applications of these results to certain evolution equations is considered. Some results on the numerical solution of the fractional diffusion equation are also provided.

  16. Quantum spin chains with fractional revival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genest, Vincent X.; Vinet, Luc; Zhedanov, Alexei

    2016-08-01

    A systematic study of fractional revival at two sites in XX quantum spin chains is presented. Analytic models with this phenomenon are obtained by combining two basic ways of realizing fractional revival in a spin chain. The first proceeds through isospectral deformations of spin chains with perfect state transfer. The second makes use of couplings provided by the recurrence coefficients of polynomials with a bi-lattice orthogonality grid. The latter method leads to analytic models previously identified that can exhibit perfect state transfer in addition to fractional revival.

  17. Fractional calculus in bioengineering, part 3.

    PubMed

    Magin, Richard L

    2004-01-01

    Fractional calculus (integral and differential operations of noninteger order) is not often used to model biological systems. Although the basic mathematical ideas were developed long ago by the mathematicians Leibniz (1695), Liouville (1834), Riemann (1892), and others and brought to the attention of the engineering world by Oliver Heaviside in the 1890s, it was not until 1974 that the first book on the topic was published by Oldham and Spanier. Recent monographs and symposia proceedings have highlighted the application of fractional calculus in physics, continuum mechanics, signal processing, and electromagnetics, but with few examples of applications in bioengineering. This is surprising because the methods of fractional calculus, when defined as a Laplace or Fourier convolution product, are suitable for solving many problems in biomedical research. For example, early studies by Cole (1933) and Hodgkin (1946) of the electrical properties of nerve cell membranes and the propagation of electrical signals are well characterized by differential equations of fractional order. The solution involves a generalization of the exponential function to the Mittag-Leffler function, which provides a better fit to the observed cell membrane data. A parallel application of fractional derivatives to viscoelastic materials establishes, in a natural way, hereditary integrals and the power law (Nutting/Scott Blair) stress-strain relationship for modeling biomaterials. In this review, I will introduce the idea of fractional operations by following the original approach of Heaviside, demonstrate the basic operations of fractional calculus on well-behaved functions (step, ramp, pulse, sinusoid) of engineering interest, and give specific examples from electrochemistry, physics, bioengineering, and biophysics. The fractional derivative accurately describes natural phenomena that occur in such common engineering problems as heat transfer, electrode/electrolyte behavior, and sub

  18. Antioxidant activity of cod (Gadus morhua) protein hydrolysates: Fractionation and characterisation of peptide fractions.

    PubMed

    Sabeena Farvin, K H; Andersen, Lisa Lystbæk; Otte, Jeanette; Nielsen, Henrik Hauch; Jessen, Flemming; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to characterise peptide fractions (>5kDa, 3-5kDa and <3kDa) with antioxidative activity obtained from a cod protein hydrolysate. The free amino acids in all fractions were dominated by Ala, Gly, Glu and Ser. The total amino acid composition had high proportions of Lys, Ala and Glu. The 3-5kDa and <3kDa fractions were further fractionated by size exclusion chromatography. All sub-fractions showed high Fe(2+) chelating activity. The DPPH radical-scavenging activity of the 3-5kDa fraction was exerted mainly by one sub-fraction dominated by peptides with masses below 600Da. The DPPH radical-scavenging activity of the <3kDa fraction was exerted by sub-fractions with low molecular weight. The highest reducing power was found in a sub-fraction containing peptides rich in Arg, Tyr and Phe. Both free amino acids and low molecular weight peptides thus seemed to contribute to the antioxidative activity of the peptide fractions, and Tyr seemed to play a major role in the antioxidant activity. PMID:26988519

  19. Matrix approach to discrete fractional calculus II: Partial fractional differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podlubny, Igor; Chechkin, Aleksei; Skovranek, Tomas; Chen, YangQuan; Vinagre Jara, Blas M.

    2009-05-01

    A new method that enables easy and convenient discretization of partial differential equations with derivatives of arbitrary real order (so-called fractional derivatives) and delays is presented and illustrated on numerical solution of various types of fractional diffusion equation. The suggested method is the development of Podlubny's matrix approach [I. Podlubny, Matrix approach to discrete fractional calculus, Fractional Calculus and Applied Analysis 3 (4) (2000) 359-386]. Four examples of numerical solution of fractional diffusion equation with various combinations of time-/space-fractional derivatives (integer/integer, fractional/integer, integer/fractional, and fractional/fractional) with respect to time and to the spatial variable are provided in order to illustrate how simple and general is the suggested approach. The fifth example illustrates that the method can be equally simply used for fractional differential equations with delays. A set of MATLAB routines for the implementation of the method as well as sample code used to solve the examples have been developed.

  20. The fractional Fourier transform and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, David H.; Swarztrauber, Paul N.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the 'fractional Fourier transform', which admits computation by an algorithm that has complexity proportional to the fast Fourier transform algorithm. Whereas the discrete Fourier transform (DFT) is based on integral roots of unity e exp -2(pi)i/n, the fractional Fourier transform is based on fractional roots of unity e exp -2(pi)i(alpha), where alpha is arbitrary. The fractional Fourier transform and the corresponding fast algorithm are useful for such applications as computing DFTs of sequences with prime lengths, computing DFTs of sparse sequences, analyzing sequences with noninteger periodicities, performing high-resolution trigonometric interpolation, detecting lines in noisy images, and detecting signals with linearly drifting frequencies. In many cases, the resulting algorithms are faster by arbitrarily large factors than conventional techniques.

  1. A fractional-order infectivity SIR model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angstmann, C. N.; Henry, B. I.; McGann, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    Fractional-order SIR models have become increasingly popular in the literature in recent years, however unlike the standard SIR model, they often lack a derivation from an underlying stochastic process. Here we derive a fractional-order infectivity SIR model from a stochastic process that incorporates a time-since-infection dependence on the infectivity of individuals. The fractional derivative appears in the generalised master equations of a continuous time random walk through SIR compartments, with a power-law function in the infectivity. We show that this model can also be formulated as an infection-age structured Kermack-McKendrick integro-differential SIR model. Under the appropriate limit the fractional infectivity model reduces to the standard ordinary differential equation SIR model.

  2. Preface: Recent Advances in Fractional Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, H M; Baleanu, Dumitru; Li, Changpin

    2016-08-01

    This Special Focus Issue contains several recent developments and advances on the subject of Fractional Dynamics and its widespread applications in various areas of the mathematical, physical, and engineering sciences. PMID:27586617

  3. Bio-oil fractionation and condensation

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Robert C; Jones, Samuel T; Pollard, Anthony

    2013-07-02

    A method of fractionating bio-oil vapors which involves providing bio-oil vapors comprising bio-oil constituents is described. The bio-oil vapors are cooled in a first stage which comprises a condenser having passages for the bio-oil separated by a heat conducting wall from passages for a coolant. The coolant in the condenser of the first stage is maintained at a substantially constant temperature, set at a temperature in the range of 75 to 100.degree. C., to condense a first liquid fraction of liquefied bio-oil constituents in the condenser of the first stage. The first liquid fraction of liquified bio-oil constituents from the condenser in the first stage is collected. Also described are steps for subsequently recovering further liquid fractions of liquefied bio-oil constituents. Particular compositions of bio-oil condensation products are also described.

  4. Early Predictors of Middle School Fraction Knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Drew H.; Siegler, Robert S.; Geary, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Recent findings that earlier fraction knowledge predicts later mathematics achievement raise the question of what predicts later fraction knowledge. Analyses of longitudinal data indicated that whole number magnitude knowledge in first grade predicted knowledge of fraction magnitudes in middle school, controlling for whole number arithmetic proficiency, domain general cognitive abilities, parental income and education, race, and gender. Similarly, knowledge of whole number arithmetic in first grade predicted knowledge of fraction arithmetic in middle school, controlling for whole number magnitude knowledge in first grade and the other control variables. In contrast, neither type of early whole number knowledge uniquely predicted middle school reading achievement. We discuss the implications of these findings for theories of numerical development and for improving mathematics learning. PMID:24576209

  5. Colloidal component of granulodensimetric soil fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedotov, G. N.; Artem'eva, Z. S.

    2015-01-01

    Granulodensimetric soil fractions isolated from chernozem, gray forest soil, and soddy-podzolic soil have been studied using a scanning electron microscope. The studies confirmed that the light fractions with density <1.8 g/cm3 and particle size >53 μm mainly consists of plant residues; however, they also contain mineral particles covered with relatively thick organomineral films and carbonaceous substances. It has been shown that the clay fraction consists of a mixture of ultramicroaggregates of clay minerals ≤1 μm in size covered with a hydrophilic organomineral gel, and the organic matter of the residual fraction includes a stable highly aromatized (lignin-like) material, as well as coals and coal-like materials.

  6. Fractionalized Majorana modes in ultracold bosonic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghrebi, Mohammad F.; Ganeshan, Sriram; Clarke, David; Gorshkov, Alexey; Sau, Jay Deep

    2015-03-01

    Fractionalized Majorana fermions, also known as parafermions, are exotic topologically protected modes that go beyond the simplest non-Abelian anyons, Majorana fermions. They commute up to a nontrivial phase factor in contrast to the minus sign for fermions. These modes are proposed to emerge in devices fabricated from a fractional quantum Hall system and a superconductor. With recent advances towards the realization of fractional quantum Hall states of bosonic ultracold atoms, we propose a realization of parafermions in a system consisting of two Bose-Einstein-condensate trenches within a bosonic fractional quantum Hall state. We show that parafermionic zero modes emerge at the endpoints of the trench and give rise to a topologically protected degeneracy. We also discuss methods for preparing and detecting these modes. University of Maryland for start-up support, and NSF PFC at the JQI.

  7. On fractional order of an oscillatory system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, S. A.; Valentim, C. A., Jr.

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, we applied the Riemann-Liouville approach and the fractional Euler-Lagrange equations in order to obtain the fractional nonlinear dynamic equations involving the classical physical application "Spring-Mass-Dumper System" to both, integer order calculus (IOC) and fractional order calculus (FOC) approaches. After the numerical simulations, we outlined the main results through time histories and the investigation of phase portraits. Thereafter, we believe that the results showed on this paper are pertinent enough to be thoroughly analyzed and maybe it can be the very beginning of a stride towards more realistic and more precise results about fractional-order models when compared to the integer order models in these applications.

  8. Fractional diffusion-reaction stochastic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayati, Basil S.

    2013-03-01

    A novel method is presented for the simulation of a discrete state space, continuous time Markov process subject to fractional diffusion. The method is based on Lie-Trotter operator splitting of the diffusion and reaction terms in the master equation. The diffusion term follows a multinomial distribution governed by a kernel that is the discretized solution of the fractional diffusion equation. The algorithm is validated and simulations are provided for the Fisher-KPP wavefront. It is shown that the wave speed is dictated by the order of the fractional derivative, where lower values result in a faster wave than in the case of classical diffusion. Since many physical processes deviate from classical diffusion, fractional diffusion methods are necessary for accurate simulations.

  9. Casimir Energy Associated With Fractional Derivative Field

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, S. C.

    2007-04-28

    Casimir energy associated with fractional derivative scalar massless field at zero and positive temperature can be obtained using the regularization based on generalized Riemann zeta function of Epstein-Hurwitz type.

  10. Exact solution to fractional logistic equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Bruce J.

    2015-07-01

    The logistic equation is one of the most familiar nonlinear differential equations in the biological and social sciences. Herein we provide an exact solution to an extension of this equation to incorporate memory through the use of fractional derivatives in time. The solution to the fractional logistic equation (FLE) is obtained using the Carleman embedding technique that allows the nonlinear equation to be replaced by an infinite-order set of linear equations, which we then solve exactly. The formal series expansion for the initial value solution of the FLE is shown to be expressed in terms of a series of weighted Mittag-Leffler functions that reduces to the well known analytic solution in the limit where the fractional index for the derivative approaches unity. The numerical integration to the FLE provides an excellent fit to the analytic solution. We propose this approach as a general technique for solving a class of nonlinear fractional differential equations.

  11. Isotopic fractionation of stratospheric nitrous oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Yung, Yuk L.; Miller, C.L.

    1997-12-05

    An isotopic fractionation mechanism is proposed, based on photolytic destruction to explain the {sup 15}N/{sup 14}N and {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O fractionation of stratospheric nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) and reconcile laboratory experiments with atmospheric observations. The theory predicts that (i) the isotopomers {sup 15}N{sup 14}N{sup 16}O and {sup 14}N{sup 15}N{sup 16}O have very different isotopic fractionations in the stratosphere, and (ii) laboratory photolysis experiments conducted at 205 nanometers should better simulate the observed isotopic fractionation of stratospheric N{sub 2}O. Modeling results indicate that there is no compelling reason to invoke a significant chemical source of N{sub 2}O in the middle atmosphere and that individual N{sub 2}O isotopomers might be useful tracers of stratospheric air parcel motion. 32 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. ON THE FRACTION OF BARRED SPIRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, Preethi B.; Abraham, Roberto G. E-mail: abraham@astro.utoronto.c

    2010-05-10

    We investigate the stellar masses of strongly barred spiral galaxies. Our analysis is based on a sample of {approx}14,000 visually classified nearby galaxies given by Nair and Abraham. The fraction of barred spiral galaxies is found to be a strong function of stellar mass and star formation history, with a minimum near the characteristic mass at which bimodality is seen in the stellar populations of galaxies. We also find that bar fractions are very sensitive to the central concentration of galaxies below the transition mass but not above it. This suggests that whatever process is causing the creation of the red and blue sequences is either influencing, or being influenced by, structural changes which manifest themselves in the absence of bars. As a consequence of strong bar fractions being sensitive to the mass range probed, our analysis helps resolve discrepant results on the reported evolution of bar fractions with redshift.

  13. Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction

    PubMed Central

    Gladden, James D.; Linke, Wolfgang A.

    2014-01-01

    As part of this series devoted to heart failure (HF), we review the epidemiology, diagnosis, pathophysiology, and treatment of HF with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Gaps in knowledge and needed future research are discussed. PMID:24663384

  14. Multiplication with Fractions: A Constructivist Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamii, Constance; Warrington, Mary Ann

    1997-01-01

    Describes a method for teaching multiplication of fractions based on Piaget's constructivism. Instead of teaching the algorithm of multiplying the numerators and denominators, students are presented with many problems and ask to invent their own ways of solving them. (DDR)

  15. Fractional calculus in bioengineering, part 2.

    PubMed

    Magin, Richard L

    2004-01-01

    Fractional calculus (integral and differential operations of noninteger order) is not often used to model biological systems. Although the basic mathematical ideas were developed long ago by the mathematicians Leibniz (1695), Liouville (1834), Riemann (1892), and others and brought to the attention of the engineering world by Oliver Heaviside in the 1890s, it was not until 1974 that the first book on the topic was published by Oldham and Spanier. Recent monographs and symposia proceedings have highlighted the application of fractional calculus in physics, continuum mechanics, signal processing, and electromagnetics, but with few examples of applications in bioengineering. This is surprising because the methods of fractional calculus, when defined as a Laplace or Fourier convolution product, are suitable for solving many problems in biomedical research. For example, early studies by Cole (1933) and Hodgkin (1946) of the electrical properties of nerve cell membranes and the propagation of electrical signals are well characterized by differential equations of fractional order. The solution involves a generalization of the exponential function to the Mittag-Leffler function, which provides a better fit to the observed cell membrane data. A parallel application of fractional derivatives to viscoelastic materials establishes, in a natural way, hereditary integrals and the power law (Nutting/Scott Blair) stress-strain relationship for modeling biomaterials. In this review, I will introduce the idea of fractional operations by following the original approach of Heaviside, demonstrate the basic operations of fractional calculus on well-behaved functions (step, ramp, pulse, sinusoid) of engineering interest, and give specific examples from electrochemistry, physics, bioengineering, and biophysics. The fractional derivative accurately describes natural phenomena that occur in such common engineering problems as heat transfer, electrode/electrolyte behavior, and sub

  16. The Vertical Linear Fractional Initialization Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.; Hartley, Tom T.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a solution to the initialization problem for a system of linear fractional-order differential equations. The scalar problem is considered first, and solutions are obtained both generally and for a specific initialization. Next the vector fractional order differential equation is considered. In this case, the solution is obtained in the form of matrix F-functions. Some control implications of the vector case are discussed. The suggested method of problem solution is shown via an example.

  17. Water dynamics in different biochar fractions.

    PubMed

    Conte, Pellegrino; Nestle, Nikolaus

    2015-09-01

    Biochar is a carbonaceous porous material deliberately applied to soil to improve its fertility. The mechanisms through which biochar acts on fertility are still poorly understood. The effect of biochar texture size on water dynamics was investigated here in order to provide information to address future research on nutrient mobility towards plant roots as biochar is applied as soil amendment. A poplar biochar has been stainless steel fractionated in three different textured fractions (1.0-2.0 mm, 0.3-1.0 mm and <0.3 mm, respectively). Water-saturated fractions were analyzed by fast field cycling (FFC) NMR relaxometry. Results proved that 3D exchange between bound and bulk water predominantly occurred in the coarsest fraction. However, as porosity decreased, water motion was mainly associated to a restricted 2D diffusion among the surface-site pores and the bulk-site ones. The X-ray μ-CT imaging analyses on the dry fractions revealed the lowest surface/volume ratio for the coarsest fraction, thereby corroborating the 3D water exchange mechanism hypothesized by FFC NMR relaxometry. However, multi-micrometer porosity was evidenced in all the samples. The latter finding suggested that the 3D exchange mechanism cannot even be neglected in the finest fraction as previously excluded only on the basis of NMR relaxometry results. X-ray μ-CT imaging showed heterogeneous distribution of inorganic materials inside all the fractions. The mineral components may contribute to the water relaxation mechanisms by FFC NMR relaxometry. Further studies are needed to understand the role of the inorganic particles on water dynamics. PMID:25594163

  18. Volatile fractionation and tektite source material

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, L.S. )

    1989-09-01

    In discounting the possibility that vapor fractionation played a part in the origin of bediasites, it has been assumed that Na and K are lost to the vapor phase. Experimental work shows, however, that, under oxidizing conditions, neither Na nor K exhibit particularly volatile behavior. Indeed, the compositional variations exhibited by bediasites are very similar to those obtained during experimental high-temperature vapor fractionation of a high-silica melt.

  19. Laser Resurfacing: Full Field and Fractional.

    PubMed

    Pozner, Jason N; DiBernardo, Barry E

    2016-07-01

    Laser resurfacing is a very popular procedure worldwide. Full field and fractional lasers are used in many aesthetic practices. There have been significant advances in laser resurfacing in the past few years, which make patient treatments more efficacious and with less downtime. Erbium and carbon dioxide and ablative, nonablative, and hybrid fractional lasers are all extremely effective and popular tools that have a place in plastic surgery and dermatology offices. PMID:27363765

  20. Partial oxidation of heavy refinery fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Dille, R.M.; Rhodes, H.A.; Wallon, S.B.

    1984-07-31

    This is a partial oxidation process in which heavy hydrocarbonaceous fractions from a petroleum refinery and light liquid paraffinic hydrocarbon extractants are used in the production of synthesis gas, reducing gas, or fuel gas i.e., gaseous mixtures comprising H/sub 2/ and CO. In the process, substantially all of the particulate carbon and soot that are simultaneously produced are recovered and recycled to the reaction zone. A dispersion of carbon-soot-light paraffinic hydrocarbon extractant from the decanting zone is combined with a heavy refinery fraction in admixture with a liquid aromatic-rich hydrocarbon to produce a pumpable single liquid phase mixture which is introduced into a fractionation zone where the following streams are separated from each other: (a) a stream of light paraffinic hydrocarbon extractant which is recycled to the decanting zone, (b) a stream comprising at least a portion of the aromatic-rich hydrocarbon which is recycled for mixing with the heavy refinery fraction, and (c) a stream of pumpable dispersion of carbon-soot heavy refinery fraction and any remaining aromatic-rich hydrocarbon which may be used as fuel in the system or exported. Troublesome asphaltene precipitation that causes operational problems and increased viscosity is avoided by the subject process. Comparatively low cost heavy refinery fractions which ordinarily are difficult to handle may be now used along with light liquid paraffinic hydrocarbon extractants.

  1. Maximizing Tumor Immunity With Fractionated Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Schaue, Doerthe; Ratikan, Josephine A.; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; McBride, William H.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Technologic advances have led to increased clinical use of higher-sized fractions of radiation dose and higher total doses. How these modify the pathways involved in tumor cell death, normal tissue response, and signaling to the immune system has been inadequately explored. Here we ask how radiation dose and fraction size affect antitumor immunity, the suppression thereof, and how this might relate to tumor control. Methods and Materials: Mice bearing B16-OVA murine melanoma were treated with up to 15 Gy radiation given in various-size fractions, and tumor growth followed. The tumor-specific immune response in the spleen was assessed by interferon-{gamma} enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay with ovalbumin (OVA) as the surrogate tumor antigen and the contribution of regulatory T cells (Tregs) determined by the proportion of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup hi}Foxp3{sup +} T cells. Results: After single doses, tumor control increased with the size of radiation dose, as did the number of tumor-reactive T cells. This was offset at the highest dose by an increase in Treg representation. Fractionated treatment with medium-size radiation doses of 7.5 Gy/fraction gave the best tumor control and tumor immunity while maintaining low Treg numbers. Conclusions: Radiation can be an immune adjuvant, but the response varies with the size of dose per fraction. The ultimate challenge is to optimally integrate cancer immunotherapy into radiation therapy.

  2. Fractions as percepts? Exploring cross-format distance effects for fractional magnitudes.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Percival G; Chesney, Dana L

    2015-05-01

    This study presents evidence that humans have intuitive, perceptually based access to the abstract fraction magnitudes instantiated by nonsymbolic ratio stimuli. Moreover, it shows these perceptually accessed magnitudes can be easily compared with symbolically represented fractions. In cross-format comparisons, participants picked the larger of two ratios. Ratios were presented either symbolically as fractions or nonsymbolically as paired dot arrays or as paired circles. Response patterns were consistent with participants comparing specific analog fractional magnitudes independently of the particular formats in which they were presented. These results pose a challenge to accounts that argue human cognitive architecture is ill-suited for processing fractions. Instead, it seems that humans can process nonsymbolic ratio magnitudes via perceptual routes and without recourse to conscious symbolic algorithms, analogous to the processing of whole number magnitudes. These findings have important implications for theories regarding the nature of human number sense - they imply that fractions may in some sense be natural numbers, too. PMID:25797529

  3. A two-sided fractional conservation of mass equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Jeffrey S.; Mortensen, Jeff; Telyakovskiy, Aleksey S.

    2016-05-01

    A two-sided fractional conservation of mass equation is derived by using left and right fractional Mean Value Theorems. This equation extends the one-sided fractional conservation of mass equation of Wheatcraft and Meerschaert. Also, a two-sided fractional advection-dispersion equation is derived. The derivations are based on Caputo fractional derivatives.

  4. Fractional Adams-Bashforth/Moulton methods: An application to the fractional Keller-Segel chemotaxis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zayernouri, Mohsen; Matzavinos, Anastasios

    2016-07-01

    We first formulate a fractional class of explicit Adams-Bashforth (A-B) and implicit Adams-Moulton (A-M) methods of first- and second-order accuracy for the time-integration of τ 0 CDt u (x , t) = g (t ; u), τ ∈ (0 , 1 ], where τ 0 CDt denotes the fractional derivative in the Caputo sense. In this fractional setting and in contrast to the standard Adams methods, an extra history load term emerges and the associated weight coefficients are τ-dependent. However when τ = 1, the developed schemes reduce to the well-known A-B and A-M methods with standard coefficients. Hence, in terms of scientific computing, our approach constitutes a minimal modification of the existing Adams libraries. Next, we develop an implicit-explicit (IMEX) splitting scheme for linear and nonlinear fractional PDEs of a general advection-reaction-diffusion type, and we apply our scheme to the time-space fractional Keller-Segel chemotaxis system. In this context, we evaluate the nonlinear advection term explicitly, employing the fractional A-B method in the prediction step, and we treat the corresponding diffusion term implicitly in the correction step using the fractional A-M scheme. Moreover, we perform the corresponding spatial discretization by employing an efficient and spectrally-accurate fractional spectral collocation method. Our numerical experiments exhibit the efficiency of the proposed IMEX scheme in solving nonlinear fractional PDEs.

  5. Fractional Adams-Bashforth/Moulton methods: An application to the fractional Keller-Segel chemotaxis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zayernouri, Mohsen; Matzavinos, Anastasios

    2016-07-01

    We first formulate a fractional class of explicit Adams-Bashforth (A-B) and implicit Adams-Moulton (A-M) methods of first- and second-order accuracy for the time-integration of 0 CD t τ u (x , t) = g (t ; u), τ ∈ (0 , 1 ], where 0 CD t τ denotes the fractional derivative in the Caputo sense. In this fractional setting and in contrast to the standard Adams methods, an extra history load term emerges and the associated weight coefficients are τ-dependent. However when τ = 1, the developed schemes reduce to the well-known A-B and A-M methods with standard coefficients. Hence, in terms of scientific computing, our approach constitutes a minimal modification of the existing Adams libraries. Next, we develop an implicit-explicit (IMEX) splitting scheme for linear and nonlinear fractional PDEs of a general advection-reaction-diffusion type, and we apply our scheme to the time-space fractional Keller-Segel chemotaxis system. In this context, we evaluate the nonlinear advection term explicitly, employing the fractional A-B method in the prediction step, and we treat the corresponding diffusion term implicitly in the correction step using the fractional A-M scheme. Moreover, we perform the corresponding spatial discretization by employing an efficient and spectrally-accurate fractional spectral collocation method. Our numerical experiments exhibit the efficiency of the proposed IMEX scheme in solving nonlinear fractional PDEs.

  6. On the origins of generalized fractional calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiryakova, Virginia

    2015-11-01

    In Fractional Calculus (FC), as in the (classical) Calculus, the notions of derivatives and integrals (of first, second, etc. or arbitrary, incl. non-integer order) are basic and co-related. One of the most frequent approach in FC is to define first the Riemann-Liouville (R-L) integral of fractional order, and then by means of suitable integer-order differentiation operation applied over it (or under its sign) a fractional derivative is defined - in the R-L sense (or in Caputo sense). The first mentioned (R-L type) is closer to the theoretical studies in analysis, but has some shortages - from the point of view of interpretation of the initial conditions for Cauchy problems for fractional differential equations (stated also by means of fractional order derivatives/ integrals), and also for the analysts' confusion that such a derivative of a constant is not zero in general. The Caputo (C-) derivative, arising first in geophysical studies, helps to overcome these problems and to describe models of applied problems with physically consistent initial conditions. The operators of the Generalized Fractional Calculus - GFC (integrals and derivatives) are based on commuting m-tuple (m = 1, 2, 3, …) compositions of operators of the classical FC with power weights (the so-called Erdélyi-Kober operators), but represented in compact and explicit form by means of integral, integro-differential (R-L type) or differential-integral (C-type) operators, where the kernels are special functions of most general hypergeometric kind. The foundations of this theory are given in Kiryakova 18. In this survey we present the genesis of the definitions of the GFC - the generalized fractional integrals and derivatives (of fractional multi-order) of R-L type and Caputo type, analyze their properties and applications. Their special cases are all the known operators of classical FC, their generalizations introduced by other authors, the hyper-Bessel differential operators of higher integer

  7. Minimizing metastatic risk in radiotherapy fractionation schedules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badri, Hamidreza; Ramakrishnan, Jagdish; Leder, Kevin

    2015-11-01

    Metastasis is the process by which cells from a primary tumor disperse and form new tumors at distant anatomical locations. The treatment and prevention of metastatic cancer remains an extremely challenging problem. This work introduces a novel biologically motivated objective function to the radiation optimization community that takes into account metastatic risk instead of the status of the primary tumor. In this work, we consider the problem of developing fractionated irradiation schedules that minimize production of metastatic cancer cells while keeping normal tissue damage below an acceptable level. A dynamic programming framework is utilized to determine the optimal fractionation scheme. We evaluated our approach on a breast cancer case using the heart and the lung as organs-at-risk (OAR). For small tumor α /β values, hypo-fractionated schedules were optimal, which is consistent with standard models. However, for relatively larger α /β values, we found the type of schedule depended on various parameters such as the time when metastatic risk was evaluated, the α /β values of the OARs, and the normal tissue sparing factors. Interestingly, in contrast to standard models, hypo-fractionated and semi-hypo-fractionated schedules (large initial doses with doses tapering off with time) were suggested even with large tumor α/β values. Numerical results indicate the potential for significant reduction in metastatic risk.

  8. Local volume fraction fluctuations in random media

    SciTech Connect

    Quintanilla, J.; Torquato, S.

    1997-02-01

    Although the volume fraction is a constant for a statistically homogeneous random medium, on a spatially local level it fluctuates. We study the full distribution of volume fraction within an observation window of finite size for models of random media. A formula due to Lu and Torquato for the standard deviation or {open_quotes}coarseness{close_quotes} associated with the {ital local} volume fraction {xi} is extended for the nth moment of {xi} for any n. The distribution function F{sub L} of the local volume fraction of five different model microstructures is evaluated using analytical and computer-simulation methods for a wide range of window sizes and overall volume fractions. On the line, we examine a system of fully penetrable rods and a system of totally impenetrable rods formed by random sequential addition (RSA). In the plane, we study RSA totally impenetrable disks and fully penetrable aligned squares. In three dimensions, we study fully penetrable aligned cubes. In the case of fully penetrable rods, we will also simplify and numerically invert a prior analytical result for the Laplace transform of F{sub L}. In all of these models, we show that, for sufficiently large window sizes, F{sub L} can be reasonably approximated by the normal distribution. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. On sampling fractions and electron shower shapes

    SciTech Connect

    Peryshkin, Alexander; Raja, Rajendran; /Fermilab

    2011-12-01

    We study the usage of various definitions of sampling fractions in understanding electron shower shapes in a sampling multilayer electromagnetic calorimeter. We show that the sampling fractions obtained by the conventional definition (I) of (average observed energy in layer)/(average deposited energy in layer) will not give the best energy resolution for the calorimeter. The reason for this is shown to be the presence of layer by layer correlations in an electromagnetic shower. The best resolution is obtained by minimizing the deviation from the total input energy using a least squares algorithm. The 'sampling fractions' obtained by this method (II) are shown to give the best resolution for overall energy. We further show that the method (II) sampling fractions are obtained by summing the columns of a non-local {lambda} tensor that incorporates the correlations. We establish that the sampling fractions (II) cannot be used to predict the layer by layer energies and that one needs to employ the full {lambda} tensor for this purpose. This effect is again a result of the correlations.

  10. Hamiltonian theory of fractionally filled Chern bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy, Ganpathy; Shankar, R.

    2012-11-01

    There is convincing numerical evidence that fractional quantum-Hall-like ground states arise in fractionally filled Chern bands. Here, we show that the Hamiltonian theory of composite fermions (CF) can be as useful in describing these states as it was in describing the fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE) in the continuum. We are able to introduce CFs into the fractionally filled Chern-band problem in two stages. First, we construct an algebraically exact mapping which expresses the electron density projected to the Chern band ρFCB as a sum of Girvin-MacDonald-Platzman density operators ρGMP that obey the magnetic translation algebra. Next, following our Hamiltonian treatment of the FQH problem, we rewrite the operators ρGMP in terms of CF variables which reproduce the same algebra. This naturally produces a unique Hartree-Fock ground state for the CFs, which can be used as a springboard for computing gaps, response functions, temperature-dependent phenomena, and the influence of disorder. We give two concrete examples, one of which has no analog in the continuum FQHE with ν=(1)/(5) and σxy=(2)/(5). Our approach can be easily extended to fractionally filled, strongly interacting two-dimensional time-reversal-invariant topological insulators.

  11. Attitude Estimation in Fractionated Spacecraft Cluster Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaegh, Fred Y.; Blackmore, James C.

    2011-01-01

    An attitude estimation was examined in fractioned free-flying spacecraft. Instead of a single, monolithic spacecraft, a fractionated free-flying spacecraft uses multiple spacecraft modules. These modules are connected only through wireless communication links and, potentially, wireless power links. The key advantage of this concept is the ability to respond to uncertainty. For example, if a single spacecraft module in the cluster fails, a new one can be launched at a lower cost and risk than would be incurred with onorbit servicing or replacement of the monolithic spacecraft. In order to create such a system, however, it is essential to know what the navigation capabilities of the fractionated system are as a function of the capabilities of the individual modules, and to have an algorithm that can perform estimation of the attitudes and relative positions of the modules with fractionated sensing capabilities. Looking specifically at fractionated attitude estimation with startrackers and optical relative attitude sensors, a set of mathematical tools has been developed that specify the set of sensors necessary to ensure that the attitude of the entire cluster ( cluster attitude ) can be observed. Also developed was a navigation filter that can estimate the cluster attitude if these conditions are satisfied. Each module in the cluster may have either a startracker, a relative attitude sensor, or both. An extended Kalman filter can be used to estimate the attitude of all modules. A range of estimation performances can be achieved depending on the sensors used and the topology of the sensing network.

  12. Variable Order and Distributed Order Fractional Operators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.; Hartley, Tom T.

    2002-01-01

    Many physical processes appear to exhibit fractional order behavior that may vary with time or space. The continuum of order in the fractional calculus allows the order of the fractional operator to be considered as a variable. This paper develops the concept of variable and distributed order fractional operators. Definitions based on the Riemann-Liouville definitions are introduced and behavior of the operators is studied. Several time domain definitions that assign different arguments to the order q in the Riemann-Liouville definition are introduced. For each of these definitions various characteristics are determined. These include: time invariance of the operator, operator initialization, physical realization, linearity, operational transforms. and memory characteristics of the defining kernels. A measure (m2) for memory retentiveness of the order history is introduced. A generalized linear argument for the order q allows the concept of "tailored" variable order fractional operators whose a, memory may be chosen for a particular application. Memory retentiveness (m2) and order dynamic behavior are investigated and applications are shown. The concept of distributed order operators where the order of the time based operator depends on an additional independent (spatial) variable is also forwarded. Several definitions and their Laplace transforms are developed, analysis methods with these operators are demonstrated, and examples shown. Finally operators of multivariable and distributed order are defined in their various applications are outlined.

  13. Current Status of Fractional Laser Resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Carniol, Paul J; Hamilton, Mark M; Carniol, Eric T

    2015-01-01

    Fractional lasers were first developed based on observations of lasers designed for hair transplantation. In 2007, ablative fractional laser resurfacing was introduced. The fractionation allowed deeper tissue penetration, leading to greater tissue contraction, collagen production and tissue remodeling. Since then, fractional erbium:YAG resurfacing lasers have also been introduced. These lasers have yielded excellent results in treating photoaging, acne scarring, and dyschromia. With the adjustment of microspot density, pulse duration, number of passes, and fluence, the surgeon can adjust the treatment effects. These lasers have allowed surgeons to treat patients with higher Fitzpatrick skin types (types IV to VI) and greater individualize treatments to various facial subunits. Immunohistochemical analysis has demonstrated remodeling effects of the tissues for several months, producing longer lasting results. Adjuvant treatments are also under investigation, including concomitant face-lift, product deposition, and platelet-rich plasma. Finally, there is a short recovery time from treatment with these lasers, allowing patients to resume regular activities more quickly. Although there is a relatively high safety profile for ablative fractionated lasers, surgeons should be aware of the limitations of specific treatments and the associated risks and complications. PMID:26133312

  14. Models of Isotopic Fractionation in Prestellar Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, Steven B.

    2012-01-01

    Anomalously fractionated isotopic material is found in many primitive Solar System objects, such as meteorites and comets. It is thought, in some cases, to trace interstellar matter that was incorporated into the Solar Nebula without undergoing significant processing. We will present the results of models of the nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon fractionation chemistry in dense molecular clouds, particularly in cores where substantial freeze-out of molecules on to dust has occurred. The range of fractionation ratios expected in different interstellar molecules will be discussed and compared to the ratios measured in molecular clouds, comets and meteoritic material. These studies make several predictions that can be tested in the near future by high-resolution molecular line observations with ALMA.

  15. Models of Isotopic Fractionation in Prestellar Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, Steven B.; Cordiner, Martin A.

    2011-01-01

    Anomalously fractionated isotopic material is found in many primitive Solar System objects, such as meteorites and comets. It is thought, in some cases, to trace interstellar matter that was incorporated into the Solar Nebula without undergoing significant processing. We will present the results of models of the nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon fractionation chemistry in dense molecular clouds, particularly in cores where substantial freeze-out of molecules on to dust has occurred. The range of fractionation ratios expected in different interstellar molecules will be discussed and compared to the ratios measured in molecular clouds, comets and meteoritic material. These studies make several predictions that can be tested in the near future by high-resolution molecular line observations with ALMA.

  16. Oxygen isotope fractionation in divalent metal carbonates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Neil, J.R.; Clayton, R.N.; Mayeda, T.K.

    1969-01-01

    Equilibrium fractionation factors for the distribution of 18O between alkaline-earth carbonates and water have been measured over the temperature range 0-500??C. The fractionation factors ?? can be represented by the equations CaCO3-H2O, 1000 ln??=2.78(106 T-2)-3.39, SrCO3-H 2O, 1000 ln??=2.69(106 T-2)-3.74, BaCO3-H2O, 1000 ln??=2.57(106 T -2)-4.73. Measurements on MnCO3, CdCO3, and PbCO3 were made at isolated temperatures. A statistical-mechanical calculation of the isotopic partition function ratios gives reasonably good agreement with experiment. Both cationic size and mass are important in isotopic fractionation, the former predominantly in its effect on the internal vibrations of the anion, the latter in its effect on the lattice vibrations.

  17. Volatile fractionation and tektite source material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, L. S.

    1989-09-01

    The arguments used by Love and Woronow (1988) to assess the role played in the origin of bediasites by extensive volatile fractionation are critically examined. Using the ratios of 'refractory' oxides, CaO, Al2O3, and MgO, to the 'volatile' oxides, Na2O and K2O, these authors concluded that vapor fractionation did not play a significant role. In this paper, experimental evidence is presented that shows that the assumption of volatility for the alkali elements (as least with respect to silica) to be not valid under the conditions under which tektites formed. It is shown that the results of vapor fractionation in experiments on glasses of tektite composition are approximately parallel the trends seen in bediasite analysis.

  18. Confinement of Fractional Quantum Hall States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willett, Robert; Manfra, Michael; West, Ken; Pfeiffer, Loren

    2008-03-01

    Confinement of small-gapped fractional quantum Hall states facilitates quasiparticle manipulation and is an important step towards quasiparticle interference measurements. Demonstrated here is conduction through top gate defined, narrow channels in high density, ultra-high mobility heterostructures. Transport evidence for the persistence of a correlated state at filling fraction 5/3 is shown in channels of 2μm length but gated to near 0.3μm in width. The methods employed to achieve this confinement hold promise for interference devices proposed for studying potential non-Abelian statistics at filling fraction 5/2. R.L. Willett, M.J. Manfra, L.N. Pfeiffer, K.W. West, Appl. Phys. Lett. 91, 052105 (2007).

  19. Isotope Fractionation in the Interstellar Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Anomalously fractionated isotopic material is found in many primitive Solar System objects, such as meteorites and comets. It is thought, in some cases, to trace interstellar matter that was incorporated into the Solar Nebula without undergoing significant processing. We will present the results of models of the nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon fractionation chemistry in dense molecular clouds, particularly in cores where substantial freeze-out of molecules on to dust has occurred. The range of fractionation ratios expected in different interstellar molecules will be discussed and compared to the ratios measured in molecular clouds, comets and meteoritic material. These models make several predictions that can be tested in the near future by molecular line observations, particularly with ALMA.

  20. Fractional quantum Hall states of Rydberg polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghrebi, Mohammad F.; Yao, Norman Y.; Hafezi, Mohammad; Pohl, Thomas; Firstenberg, Ofer; Gorshkov, Alexey V.

    2015-03-01

    We propose a scheme for realizing fractional quantum Hall states of light. In our scheme, photons of two polarizations are coupled to different atomic Rydberg states to form two flavors of Rydberg polaritons that behave as an effective spin. An array of optical cavity modes overlapping with the atomic cloud enables the realization of an effective spin-1 /2 lattice. We show that the dipolar interaction between such polaritons, inherited from the Rydberg states, can be exploited to create a flat, topological band for a single spin-flip excitation. At half filling, this gives rise to a photonic (or polaritonic) fractional Chern insulator—a lattice-based, fractional quantum Hall state of light.