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Sample records for dietary deficiency induces

  1. DIETARY FOLATE DEFICIENCY ENHANCES ARSENIC-INDUCED MICRONUCLEUS FORMATION IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory


    Dietary folate deficiency enhances arsenic-induced micronucleus formation in mice.

    Folate deficiency increases background levels ofDNA damage and can enhance the mutagenicity of chemical agents. Duplicate experiments were performed to investigate the effect of dietary...

  2. Dietary induced subclinical vitamin K deficiency in normal human subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Ferland, G; Sadowski, J A; O'Brien, M E

    1993-01-01

    A subclinical vitamin K deficiency was induced in 32 healthy subjects (four groups of eight males and females) aged 20-40 and 60-80 yr residing in the Metabolic Research Unit of the Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University. Volunteers were initially fed (4 d) a baseline-period diet containing the recommended daily allowance for vitamin K which is equivalent to 80 micrograms/d of phylloquinone (vitamin K1). During the baseline period various parameters of vitamin K nutritional status were monitored. The baseline period was followed by a 13-d depletion period during which the subjects were fed a very low vitamin K1 diet (approximately 10 micrograms/d). After depletion, the subjects entered a 16-d repletion period (four stages lasting 4 d each) during which time they were repleted with 5, 15, 25, and 45 micrograms of vitamin K1 per day. Vitamin K1 depletion dramatically and significantly decreased plasma vitamin K1 levels (P < 0.0001) in both elderly and young groups to values 13-18% of day 1 (elderly 0.22 nM, young 0.14 nM). Repleting the subjects with up to 45 micrograms of vitamin K1 per day failed, in the case of the young subjects, to bring plasma vitamin K1 levels back into the normal range. Dietary vitamin K1 restriction induced different responses in the urinary excretion of gamma-carboxyglutamic acid between the young and the elderly subjects with values decreasing significantly (P < 0.03) in the young while remaining unchanged in the elderly. The vitamin K1 depletion period had no significant effect on either prothrombin and activated partial thromboplastin times, or Factor VII and protein C (as determined by antigenic and functional assays). By using a monoclonal antibody, decarboxy prothrombin was found to increase slightly but significantly in both groups (P < 0.05) as a consequence of the low vitamin K1 diet. This study clearly shows that a diet low in vitamin K1 can result in a functional subclinical deficiency of vitamin K

  3. Dietary Zinc Deficiency Exaggerates Ethanol-Induced Liver Injury in Mice: Involvement of Intrahepatic and Extrahepatic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xinguo; Song, Zhenyuan; McClain, Craig J.; Zhou, Zhanxiang

    2013-01-01

    Clinical studies have demonstrated that alcoholics have a lower dietary zinc intake compared to health controls. The present study was undertaken to determine the interaction between dietary zinc deficiency and ethanol consumption in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. C57BL/6N mice were subjected to 8-week feeding of 4 experimental liquid diets: (1) zinc adequate diet, (2) zinc adequate diet plus ethanol, (3) zinc deficient diet, and (4) zinc deficient diet plus ethanol. Ethanol exposure with adequate dietary zinc resulted in liver damage as indicated by elevated plasma alanine aminotransferase level and increased hepatic lipid accumulation and inflammatory cell infiltration. Dietary zinc deficiency alone increased hepatic lipid contents, but did not induce hepatic inflammation. Dietary zinc deficiency showed synergistic effects on ethanol-induced liver damage. Dietary zinc deficiency exaggerated ethanol effects on hepatic genes related to lipid metabolism and inflammatory response. Dietary zinc deficiency worsened ethanol-induced imbalance between hepatic pro-oxidant and antioxidant enzymes and hepatic expression of cell death receptors. Dietary zinc deficiency exaggerated ethanol-induced reduction of plasma leptin, although it did not affect ethanol-induced reduction of white adipose tissue mass. Dietary zinc deficiency also deteriorated ethanol-induced gut permeability increase and plasma endotoxin elevation. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that dietary zinc deficiency is a risk factor in alcoholic liver disease, and multiple intrahepatic and extrahepatic factors may mediate the detrimental effects of zinc deficiency. PMID:24155903

  4. Dietary zinc deficiency predisposes mice to the development of preneoplastic lesions in chemically-induced hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Romualdo, Guilherme Ribeiro; Goto, Renata Leme; Henrique Fernandes, Ana Angélica; Cogliati, Bruno; Barbisan, Luis Fernando

    2016-10-01

    Although there is a concomitance of zinc deficiency and high incidence/mortality for hepatocellular carcinoma in certain human populations, there are no experimental studies investigating the modifying effects of zinc on hepatocarcinogenesis. Thus, we evaluated whether dietary zinc deficiency or supplementation alter the development of hepatocellular preneoplastic lesions (PNL). Therefore, neonatal male Balb/C mice were submitted to a diethylnitrosamine/2-acetylaminefluorene-induced hepatocarcinogenesis model. Moreover, mice were fed adequate (35 mg/kg diet), deficient (3 mg/kg) or supplemented (180 mg/kg) zinc diets. Mice were euthanized at 12 (early time-point) or 24 weeks (late time-point) after introducing the diets. At the early time-point, zinc deficiency decreased Nrf2 protein expression and GSH levels while increased p65 and p53 protein expression and the number of PNL/area. At the late time-point, zinc deficiency also decreased GSH levels while increased liver genotoxicity, cell proliferation into PNL and PNL size. In contrast, zinc supplementation increased antioxidant defense at both time-points but not altered PNL development. Our findings are the first to suggest that zinc deficiency predisposes mice to the PNL development in chemically-induced hepatocarcinogenesis. The decrease of Nrf2/GSH pathway and increase of liver genotoxicity, as well as the increase of p65/cell proliferation, are potential mechanisms to this zinc deficiency-mediated effect. PMID:27544374

  5. Dietary Deficiency of Essential Amino Acids Rapidly Induces Cessation of the Rat Estrous Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Bannai, Makoto; Ichimaru, Toru; Nakano, Sayako; Murata, Takuya; Higuchi, Takashi; Takahashi, Michio

    2011-01-01

    Reproductive functions are regulated by the sophisticated coordination between the neuronal and endocrine systems and are sustained by a proper nutritional environment. Female reproductive function is vulnerable to effects from dietary restrictions, suggesting a transient adaptation that prioritizes individual survival over reproduction until a possible future opportunity for satiation. This adaptation could also partially explain the existence of amenorrhea in women with anorexia nervosa. Because amino acid nutritional conditions other than caloric restriction uniquely alters amino acid metabolism and affect the hormonal levels of organisms, we hypothesized that the supply of essential amino acids in the diet plays a pivotal role in the maintenance of the female reproductive system. To test this hypothesis, we examined ovulatory cyclicity in female rats under diets that were deficient in threonine, lysine, tryptophan, methionine or valine. Ovulatory cyclicity was monitored by daily cytological evaluations of vaginal smears. After continuous feeding of the deficient diet, a persistent diestrus or anovulatory state was induced most quickly by the valine-deficient diet and most slowly by the lysine-deficient diet. A decline in the systemic insulin-like growth factor 1 level was associated with a dietary amino acid deficiency. Furthermore, a paired group of rats that were fed an isocaloric diet with balanced amino acids maintained normal estrous cyclicity. These disturbances of the estrous cycle by amino acid deficiency were quickly reversed by the consumption of a normal diet. The continuous anovulatory state in this study is not attributable to a decrease in caloric intake but to an imbalance in the dietary amino acid composition. With a shortage of well-balanced amino acid sources, reproduction becomes risky for both the mother and the fetus. It could be viewed as an adaptation to the diet, diverting resources away from reproduction and reallocating them to

  6. Dietary zinc deficiency fuels esophageal cancer development by inducing a distinct inflammatory signature

    PubMed Central

    Taccioli, C; Chen, H; Jiang, Y; Liu, XP; Huang, K; Smalley, KJ; Farber, JL; Croce, CM; Fong, LY

    2011-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is implicated in the pathogenesis of esophageal squamous cell cancer (ESCC). The causes of inflammation in ESCC, however, are undefined. Dietary zinc-deficiency (ZD) increases the risk of ESCC. We have previously shown that short-term ZD (6 weeks) in rats induces overexpression of the proinflammatory mediators S100a8 and S100a9 in the esophageal mucosa with accompanying esophageal epithelial hyperplasia. Here we report that prolonged ZD (21 weeks) in rats amplified this inflammation that when combined with non-carcinogenic low doses of the environmental carcinogen N-nitrosomethylbenzylamine (NMBA) elicited a 66.7% (16/24) incidence of ESCC. With zinc-sufficiency NMBA produced no cancers (0/21) (P<0.001). At tumor endpoint, the neoplastic ZD esophagus as compared with zinc-sufficient esophagus had an inflammatory gene signature with upregulation of numerous cancer-related inflammation genes (CXC and CC chemokines, chemokine receptors, cytokines, and Cox-2) in addition to S100a8 and S100a9. This signature was already activated in the earlier dysplastic stage. Additionally, time-course bioinformatics analysis of expression profiles at tumor endpoint and prior to NMBA exposure revealed that this sustained inflammation was due to ZD rather than carcinogen exposure. Importantly, zinc replenishment reversed this inflammatory signature at both the dysplastic and neoplastic stages of ESCC development, and prevented cancer formation. Thus, the molecular definition of ZD-induced inflammation as a critical factor in ESCC development has important clinical implications with regard to development and prevention of this deadly disease. PMID:22179833

  7. Dietary vitamin D3 deficiency alters intestinal mucosal defense and increases susceptibility to Citrobacter rodentium-induced colitis.

    PubMed

    Ryz, Natasha R; Lochner, Arion; Bhullar, Kirandeep; Ma, Caixia; Huang, Tina; Bhinder, Ganive; Bosman, Else; Wu, Xiujuan; Innis, Sheila M; Jacobson, Kevan; Vallance, Bruce A

    2015-11-01

    Vitamin D deficiency affects more that 1 billion people worldwide. Although thought to increase risk of bacterial infections, the importance of vitamin D on host defense against intestinal bacterial pathogens is currently unclear since injection of the active form of vitamin D, 1,25(OH)2D3, increased susceptibility to the enteric bacterial pathogen Citrobacter rodentium by suppressing key immune/inflammatory factors. To further characterize the role of vitamin D during bacteria-induced colitis, we fed weanling mice either vitamin D3-deficient or vitamin D3-sufficient diets for 5 wk and then challenged them with C. rodentium. Vitamin D3-deficient mice lost significantly more body weight, carried higher C. rodentium burdens, and developed worsened histological damage. Vitamin D3-deficient mice also suffered greater bacterial translocation to extra-intestinal tissues, including mesenteric lymph nodes, spleen, and liver. Intestinal tissues of infected vitamin D3-deficient mice displayed increased inflammatory cell infiltrates as well as significantly higher gene transcript levels of inflammatory mediators TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, TGF-β, IL-17A, and IL-17F as well as the antimicrobial peptide REG3γ. Notably, these exaggerated inflammatory responses accelerated the loss of commensal microbes and were associated with an impaired ability to detoxify bacterial lipopolysaccharide. Overall, these studies show that dietary-induced vitamin D deficiency exacerbates intestinal inflammatory responses to infection, also impairing host defense. PMID:26336925

  8. Dietary n-3 PUFAs Deficiency Increases Vulnerability to Inflammation-Induced Spatial Memory Impairment.

    PubMed

    Delpech, Jean-Christophe; Thomazeau, Aurore; Madore, Charlotte; Bosch-Bouju, Clementine; Larrieu, Thomas; Lacabanne, Chloe; Remus-Borel, Julie; Aubert, Agnès; Joffre, Corinne; Nadjar, Agnès; Layé, Sophie

    2015-11-01

    Dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are critical components of inflammatory response and memory impairment. However, the mechanisms underlying the sensitizing effects of low n-3 PUFAs in the brain for the development of memory impairment following inflammation are still poorly understood. In this study, we examined how a 2-month n-3 PUFAs deficiency from pre-puberty to adulthood could increase vulnerability to the effect of inflammatory event on spatial memory in mice. Mice were given diets balanced or deficient in n-3 PUFAs for a 2-month period starting at post-natal day 21, followed by a peripheral administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a bacterial endotoxin, at adulthood. We first showed that spatial memory performance was altered after LPS challenge only in n-3 PUFA-deficient mice that displayed lower n-3/n-6 PUFA ratio in the hippocampus. Importantly, long-term depression (LTD), but not long-term potentiation (LTP) was impaired in the hippocampus of LPS-treated n-3 PUFA-deficient mice. Proinflammatory cytokine levels were increased in the plasma of both n-3 PUFA-deficient and n-3 PUFA-balanced mice. However, only n-3 PUFA-balanced mice showed an increase in cytokine expression in the hippocampus in response to LPS. In addition, n-3 PUFA-deficient mice displayed higher glucocorticoid levels in response to LPS as compared with n-3 PUFA-balanced mice. These results indicate a role for n-3 PUFA imbalance in the sensitization of the hippocampal synaptic plasticity to inflammatory stimuli, which is likely to contribute to spatial memory impairment. PMID:25948102

  9. Dietary Fatty Acid Composition Alters Magnesium Metabolism, Distribution, and Marginal Deficiency Response in Rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Based on dietary intake recommendations, magnesium deficiency commonly occurs throughout the world. However, widespread pathological conditions induced by dietary magnesium deficiency have not been identified. This discrepancy may be caused by other dietary factors ameliorating or exacerbating the r...

  10. Dietary component isorhamnetin is a PPARγ antagonist and ameliorates metabolic disorders induced by diet or leptin deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Gu, Ming; Cai, Wujie; Yu, Lijing; Feng, Li; Zhang, Lu; Zang, Qingqing; Wang, Yahui; Wang, Dongshan; Chen, Hui; Tong, Qingchun; Ji, Guang; Huang, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Studies on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ ligands have been focused on agonists. However, PPARγ activation may induce obesity and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), one of the most challenging medical conditions. Here, we identified that isorhamnetin, a naturally occurring compound in fruits and vegetables and the metabolite of quercetin, is a novel antagonist of PPARγ. Isorhamnetin treatment inhibited the adipocyte differentiation induced by the PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone, reduced obesity development and ameliorated hepatic steatosis induced by both high-fat diet treatment and leptin deficiency. Our results suggest that dietary supplement of isorhamnetin may be beneficial to prevent obesity and steatosis and PPARγ antagonists may be useful to treat hepatic steatosis. PMID:26775807

  11. Changes in circulating levels of fibroblast growth factor 23 induced by short-term dietary magnesium deficiency in rats.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Hiroshi; Katsumata, Shinichi; Maeda, Yoshiaki; Kajita, Yasutaka

    2016-06-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is a potent regulator of phosphorus (P) and vitamin D metabolism. Long-term dietary magnesium (Mg) deficiency increases circulating levels of FGF23, whereas the effects of short-term dietary Mg deficiency are unclear. Thus, the present study investigated whether short-term dietary Mg deficiency affects circulating levels of FGF23. We also assessed changes in renal mRNA expression of vitamin D metabolizing enzymes and type II sodium-phosphate (Na/Pi) cotransporters, since these are regulated by FGF23. Rats were fed a control diet (control group) or an Mg-deficient diet (Mg-deficient group) for 2, 4 or 7 days. Serum Mg levels were significantly lower in the Mg-deficient group than in the control group at all time points. Serum FGF23 levels were significantly higher in the Mg-deficient group than in the control group at day 7. The 25-hydroxyvitamin D-24-hydroxylase (24(OH)ase) mRNA levels were significantly higher in the Mg-deficient group than in the control group at day 7 . No significant differences in types IIa and IIc Na/Pi cotransporter mRNA levels were observed between the control and Mg-deficient groups. These results suggest that dietary Mg deficiency causes a rapid increase in circulating levels of FGF23 and renal 24(OH)ase mRNA levels. PMID:27624533

  12. Dietary zinc deficiency induces oxidative stress and promotes tumor necrosis factor-α- and interleukin-1β-induced RANKL expression in rat bone

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takako; Katsumata, Shin-ichi; Matsuzaki, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Kazuharu

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of dietary zinc deficiency on oxidative stress and bone metabolism. Four-week-old male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to one of three groups for 4 weeks: a zinc-adequate group (30 ppm); a zinc-deficient group (1 ppm); and a pair-fed group (30 ppm) that was pair-fed to the zinc-deficient group. The iron content and the thiobarbituric acid reactive substance level in bone were higher in the zinc-deficient group than in the zinc-adequate and pair-fed groups. The mRNA expression level of osteoblastogenesis-related genes such as bone morphogenetic protein 2 and runt-related transcription factor 2 was lower in the zinc-deficient group than in the zinc-adequate and pair-fed groups. In contrast, the mRNA expression levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and osteoclastogenesis-related genes such as receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand and nuclear factor of activated T cells cytoplasmic 1 were higher in the zinc-deficient group than in the zinc-adequate and pair-fed groups. These findings suggested that dietary zinc deficiency reduced osteoblastogenesis via a decrease in the expression of bone morphogenetic protein 2 and increased osteoclastogenesis via enhancement of the expression of receptor for activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand induced by oxidative stress-stimulated tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β. PMID:27013778

  13. Behavioral Abnormality Induced by Enhanced Hypothalamo-Pituitary-Adrenocortical Axis Activity under Dietary Zinc Deficiency and Its Usefulness as a Model

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Atsushi; Tamano, Haruna; Nishio, Ryusuke; Murakami, Taku

    2016-01-01

    Dietary zinc deficiency increases glucocorticoid secretion from the adrenal cortex via enhanced hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis activity and induces neuropsychological symptoms, i.e., behavioral abnormality. Behavioral abnormality is due to the increase in glucocorticoid secretion rather than disturbance of brain zinc homeostasis, which occurs after the increase in glucocorticoid secretion. A major target of glucocorticoids is the hippocampus and their actions are often associated with disturbance of glutamatergic neurotransmission, which may be linked to behavioral abnormality, such as depressive symptoms and aggressive behavior under zinc deficiency. Glucocorticoid-mediated disturbance of glutamatergic neurotransmission in the hippocampus is also involved in the pathophysiology of, not only psychiatric disorders, such as depression, but also neurodegenerative disorders, e.g., Alzheimer’s disease. The evidence suggests that zinc-deficient animals are models for behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD), as well as depression. To understand validity to apply zinc-deficient animals as a behavioral abnormality model, this paper deals with the effect of antidepressive drugs and herbal medicines on hippocampal dysfunctions and behavioral abnormality, which are induced by enhanced HPA axis activity under dietary zinc deficiency. PMID:27438830

  14. Behavioral Abnormality Induced by Enhanced Hypothalamo-Pituitary-Adrenocortical Axis Activity under Dietary Zinc Deficiency and Its Usefulness as a Model.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Atsushi; Tamano, Haruna; Nishio, Ryusuke; Murakami, Taku

    2016-01-01

    Dietary zinc deficiency increases glucocorticoid secretion from the adrenal cortex via enhanced hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis activity and induces neuropsychological symptoms, i.e., behavioral abnormality. Behavioral abnormality is due to the increase in glucocorticoid secretion rather than disturbance of brain zinc homeostasis, which occurs after the increase in glucocorticoid secretion. A major target of glucocorticoids is the hippocampus and their actions are often associated with disturbance of glutamatergic neurotransmission, which may be linked to behavioral abnormality, such as depressive symptoms and aggressive behavior under zinc deficiency. Glucocorticoid-mediated disturbance of glutamatergic neurotransmission in the hippocampus is also involved in the pathophysiology of, not only psychiatric disorders, such as depression, but also neurodegenerative disorders, e.g., Alzheimer's disease. The evidence suggests that zinc-deficient animals are models for behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD), as well as depression. To understand validity to apply zinc-deficient animals as a behavioral abnormality model, this paper deals with the effect of antidepressive drugs and herbal medicines on hippocampal dysfunctions and behavioral abnormality, which are induced by enhanced HPA axis activity under dietary zinc deficiency. PMID:27438830

  15. Effects of cigarette smoke and ethanol intake on mouse oesophageal mucosa changes induced by dietary zinc deficiency and deoxycholic acid supplementation.

    PubMed

    Zapaterini, Joyce R; de Moura, Nelci A; Ribeiro, Daniel A; Rodrigues, Maria A M; Barbisan, Luis F

    2012-08-01

    The noxious effects of dietary zinc deficiency (ZD) and deoxycholic bile acid (DCA) supplementation in the oesophagus were investigated. The additional influence of cigarette smoke and ethanol intake on the changes in the oesophageal mucosa induced by dietary ZD plus DCA was also assessed. Male C57BL/6 mice were allocated into four groups: Group 1 was fed control diet and groups 2-4 were fed ZD plus DCA diet. After 5 weeks, groups 3 and 4 were exposed to 10% ethanol intake or cigarette smoke for 15 weeks, respectively. All animals were euthanized at the end of week 20, and the oesophagus, lung, liver and colon were collected and analysed by conventional morphology. Cell proliferation was assessed in the oesophageal mucosa by Ki-67 immunohistochemistry and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) protein by Western blotting. Dietary ZD plus DCA treatment induced mild hyperkeratosis and hyperplasia, increased cell proliferation index and COX-2 protein expression in the oesophagus, and intranuclear inclusion, karyocytomegaly and microvesicular fatty change in the liver. Cigarette smoke increased COX-2 protein expression in oesophageal mucosa and irregular enlargement of alveolus and alveolar ductal air spaces, while ethanol enhanced liver damage induced by ZD plus DCA diet. These findings indicate that dietary ZD plus DCA treatment during 20 weeks induces a pattern of chemical oesophageal injury but not Barrett's-like lesions. PMID:22380924

  16. Selenium and Selenoprotein Deficiencies Induce Widespread Pyogranuloma Formation in Mice, while High Levels of Dietary Selenium Decrease Liver Tumor Size Driven by TGFα

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Nianxin; Ward, Jerrold M.; Perella, Christine M.; Hoffmann, Victoria J.; Rogers, Keith; Combs, Gerald F.; Schweizer, Ulrich; Merlino, Glenn; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Hatfield, Dolph L.

    2013-01-01

    Changes in dietary selenium and selenoprotein status may influence both anti- and pro-cancer pathways, making the outcome of interventions different from one study to another. To characterize such outcomes in a defined setting, we undertook a controlled hepatocarcinogenesis study involving varying levels of dietary selenium and altered selenoprotein status using mice carrying a mutant (A37G) selenocysteine tRNA transgene (TrsptG37) and/or a cancer driver TGFα transgene. The use of TrsptG37 altered selenoprotein expression in a selenoprotein and tissue specific manner and, at sufficient dietary selenium levels, separate the effect of diet and selenoprotein status. Mice were maintained on diets deficient in selenium (0.02 ppm selenium) or supplemented with 0.1, 0.4 or 2.25 ppm selenium or 30 ppm triphenylselenonium chloride (TPSC), a non-metabolized selenium compound. TrsptG37 transgenic and TGFα/TrsptG37 bi-transgenic mice subjected to selenium-deficient or TPSC diets developed a neurological phenotype associated with early morbidity and mortality prior to hepatocarcinoma development. Pathology analyses revealed widespread disseminated pyogranulomatous inflammation. Pyogranulomas occurred in liver, lungs, heart, spleen, small and large intestine, and mesenteric lymph nodes in these transgenic and bi-transgenic mice. The incidence of liver tumors was significantly increased in mice carrying the TGFα transgene, while dietary selenium and selenoprotein status did not affect tumor number and multiplicity. However, adenoma and carcinoma size and area were smaller in TGFα transgenic mice that were fed 0.4 and 2.25 versus 0.1 ppm of selenium. Thus, selenium and selenoprotein deficiencies led to widespread pyogranuloma formation, while high selenium levels inhibited the size of TGFα–induced liver tumors. PMID:23460847

  17. Dietary Silicon Deficiency Does Not Exacerbate Diet-Induced Fatty Lesions in Female ApoE Knockout Mice123

    PubMed Central

    Jugdaohsingh, Ravin; Kessler, Katharina; Messner, Barbara; Stoiber, Martin; Pedro, Liliana D; Schima, Heinrich; Laufer, Günther; Powell, Jonathan J; Bernhard, David

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dietary silicon has been positively linked with vascular health and protection against atherosclerotic plaque formation, but the mechanism of action is unclear. Objectives: We investigated the effect of dietary silicon on 1) serum and aorta silicon concentrations, 2) the development of aortic lesions and serum lipid concentrations, and 3) the structural and biomechanic properties of the aorta. Methods: Two studies, of the same design, were conducted to address the above objectives. Female mice, lacking the apolipoprotein E (apoE) gene, and therefore susceptible to atherosclerosis, were separated into 3 groups of 10–15 mice, each exposed to a high-fat diet (21% wt milk fat and 1.5% wt cholesterol) but with differing concentrations of dietary silicon, namely: silicon-deprived (−Si; <3-μg silicon/g feed), silicon-replete in feed (+Si-feed; 100-μg silicon/g feed), and silicon-replete in drinking water (+Si-water; 115-μg silicon/mL) for 15–19 wk. Silicon supplementation was in the form of sodium metasilicate (feed) or monomethylsilanetriol (drinking water). Results: The serum silicon concentration in the −Si group was significantly lower than in the +Si-feed (by up to 78%; P < 0.003) and the +Si-water (by up to 84%; P < 0.006) groups. The aorta silicon concentration was also lower in the −Si group than in the +Si-feed group (by 65%; P = 0.025), but not compared with the +Si-water group. There were no differences in serum and aorta silicon concentrations between the silicon-replete groups. Body weights, tissue wet weights at necropsy, and structural, biomechanic, and morphologic properties of the aorta were not affected by dietary silicon; nor were the development of fatty lesions and serum lipid concentrations. Conclusions: These findings suggest that dietary silicon has no effect on atherosclerosis development and vascular health in the apoE mouse model of diet-induced atherosclerosis, contrary to the reported findings in the cholesterol

  18. Dietary vitamin B12 deficiency in an adolescent white boy.

    PubMed

    O'Gorman, P; Holmes, D; Ramanan, A V; Bose-Haider, B; Lewis, M J; Will, A

    2002-06-01

    Dietary deficiency of cobalamin resulting in tissue deficiency in white individuals is unusual. However, several patients with dietary deficiency who were neither vegan nor Hindu have been described. This report describes the case of a 14 year old boy who was a white non-Hindu with a very low intake of cobalamin, which was not apparent until a detailed dietary assessment was performed. The patient responded rapidly to a combination of oral and parenteral B12. This case illustrates the fact that severe dietary vitamin B12 deficiency can occur in non-Hindu white individuals. Inadequate dietary content of B12 may not be apparent until a detailed dietary assessment is performed. This patient is likely to have had subclinical vitamin B12 deficiency for several years. Increased vitamin B12 requirements associated with the adolescent growth spurt may have provoked overt tissue deficiency. PMID:12037034

  19. Dietary vitamin B12 deficiency in an adolescent white boy

    PubMed Central

    O'Gorman, P; Holmes, D; Ramanan, A V; Bose-Haider, B; Lewis, M J; Will, A

    2002-01-01

    Dietary deficiency of cobalamin resulting in tissue deficiency in white individuals is unusual. However, several patients with dietary deficiency who were neither vegan nor Hindu have been described. This report describes the case of a 14 year old boy who was a white non-Hindu with a very low intake of cobalamin, which was not apparent until a detailed dietary assessment was performed. The patient responded rapidly to a combination of oral and parenteral B12. This case illustrates the fact that severe dietary vitamin B12 deficiency can occur in non-Hindu white individuals. Inadequate dietary content of B12 may not be apparent until a detailed dietary assessment is performed. This patient is likely to have had subclinical vitamin B12 deficiency for several years. Increased vitamin B12 requirements associated with the adolescent growth spurt may have provoked overt tissue deficiency. PMID:12037034

  20. DIETARY FOLATE DEFICIENCY ENHANCES INDUCTION OF MICRONUCLEI BY ARSENIC IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Folate deficiency increases background levels of DNA damage and can enhance the genotoxicity of chemical agents. Arsenic, a known human carcinogen present in drinking water supplies around the world, induces chromosomal and DNA damage. The effect of dietary folate deficiency on...

  1. Iron induced nickel deficiency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is increasingly apparent that economic loss due to nickel (Ni) deficiency likely occurs in horticultural and agronomic crops. While most soils contain sufficient Ni to meet crop requirements, situations of Ni deficiency can arise due to antagonistic interactions with other metals. This study asse...

  2. Dietary Zinc Deficiency in Rodents: Effects on T-Cell Development, Maturation and Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Blewett, Heather J.; Taylor, Carla G.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for developing disease and yet we do not have a clear understanding of the mechanisms behind the increased susceptibility to infection. This review will examine the interrelationships among the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal stress axis, p56lck, and T-cell maturation in both zinc deficiency and responses during zinc repletion. We will highlight differences between the adult mouse model (wasting malnutrition) and growing rat model (stunting malnutrition) of dietary zinc deficiency and discuss the use of various controls to separate out the effects of zinc deficiency from the associated malnutrition. Elevated serum corticosterone in both zinc deficient and pair-fed rats does not support the hypothesis that zinc deficiency per se leads to corticosterone-induced apoptosis and lymphopenia. In fact, the zinc deficient rat does not have lymphopenia. Thymocytes from zinc deficient mice and rats have elevated levels of p56lck, a signalling protein with a zinc clasp structure, but this does not appear to affect thymocyte maturation. However, post-thymic T-cell maturation appears to be altered based on the lower proportion of splenic late thymic emigrants in zinc deficient rats. Fewer new T-cells in the periphery could adversely affect the T-cell repertoire and contribute to immunodeficiency in zinc deficiency. PMID:22822446

  3. Long-Term Dietary Folate Deficiency Accelerates Progressive Hearing Loss on CBA/Ca Mice

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Vega, Raquel; Murillo-Cuesta, Silvia; Partearroyo, Teresa; Varela-Moreiras, Gregorio; Varela-Nieto, Isabel; Pajares, María A.

    2016-01-01

    Dietary folic acid deficiency induced early hearing loss in C57BL/6J mice after 2-months, corroborates the epidemiological association previously described between vitamin deficiency and this sensory impairment. However, this strain is prone to early hearing loss, and hence we decided to analyze whether the effects exerted by folate deprivation follow the same pattern in a mouse strain such as CBA/Ca, which is resistant to hearing impairment. Here, we show results of a long-term study on hearing carried out on CBA/Ca mice subjected to dietary folate deprivation. Systemic changes included decreased serum folate levels, hyperhomocysteinemia and signs of anemia in the group fed with folate-deficient (FD) diet. Initial signs of hearing loss were detected in this strain after 8-months of vitamin deficiency, and correlated with histological damage in the cochleae. In conclusion, the data presented reinforce the importance of adequate folic acid levels for the auditory system and suggest that the impact of dietary deficiencies may depend on the genetic background.

  4. Selenium and selenoprotein deficiencies induce widespread pyogranuloma formation in mice, while high levels of dietary selenium decrease liver tumor size driven by TGFa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Changes in dietary selenium and selenoprotein status may influence both anti- and pro-cancer pathways, making the outcome of interventions different from one study to another. To characterize such outcomes in a defined setting, we undertook a controlled hepatocarcinogenesis study involving varying l...

  5. Iron-induced nickel deficiency in pecan

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Economic loss due to nickel (Ni) deficiency can occur in horticultural and agronomic crops. This study assesses impact of excessive iron (Fe) on expression of Ni deficiency in pecan [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch]. Field and greenhouse experiments found Ni deficiency to be inducible by ei...

  6. Induction of renal growth and injury in the intact rat kidney by dietary deficiency of antioxidants.

    PubMed Central

    Nath, K A; Salahudeen, A K

    1990-01-01

    We report induction of renal growth and injury in the intact rat kidney using a diet deficient in vitamin E and selenium. This diet was imposed in 3-wk-old male weanling rats, and after 9 wk, enhancement of growth, characterized by increased wet weight, dry weight, protein content, and DNA content appeared. Morphometric analyses revealed increased kidney volume, tubular epithelial volume, and mean glomerular volume. There were no differences in nephron number. The animals on the deficient diet displayed increased urinary protein excretion at 9 wk. Renal injury was also characterized by an interstitial cellular infiltrate and diminutions in glomerular filtration rate. Enhanced growth and injury were antedated by increased renal ammoniagenesis. The deficient diet did not induce metabolic acidosis, potassium depletion, glucose intolerance, or elevated plasma amino acid concentration. Enhancement of renal growth and ammoniagenesis by the deficient diet was not suppressible by chronic alkali therapy. Stimulation of renal growth could not be ascribed to increased intrarenal iron, induction of ornithine decarboxylase, or alterations in glomerular hemodynamics. Stimulation of renal ammoniagenesis by dietary deficiency of antioxidants is a novel finding, as is induction of growth and injury. We suggest that increased renal ammoniagenesis contributes to induction of renal growth and injury. Images PMID:2212007

  7. Maternal dietary choline deficiency alters angiogenesis in fetal mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Mehedint, Mihai G; Craciunescu, Corneliu N; Zeisel, Steven H

    2010-07-20

    We examined whether maternal dietary choline modulates angiogenesis in fetal brain. Pregnant C57BL/6 mice were fed either a choline-deficient (CD), control (CT), or choline-supplemented diet (CS) from days 12 to 17 (E12-17) of pregnancy and then fetal brains were studied. In CD fetal hippocampus, proliferation of endothelial cells (EC) was decreased by 32% (p < 0.01 vs. CT or CS) while differentiated EC clusters (expressing factor VIII related antigen (RA)) increased by 25% (p < 0.01 vs. CT or CS). These changes were associated with > 25% decrease in the number of blood vessels in CD fetal hippocampus (p < 0.01 vs. CT and CS), with no change in total cross-sectional area of these blood vessels. Expression of genes for the angiogenic signals derived from both endothelial and neuronal progenitor cells (NPC) was increased in CD fetal hippocampus VEGF C (Vegfc), 2.0-fold, p < 0.01 vs. CT and angiopoietin 2 (Angpt2), 2.1-fold, (p < 0.01 vs. CT)). Similar increased expression was observed in NPC isolated from E14 fetal mouse brains and exposed to low (5 microM), CT (70 microM), or high choline (280 microM) media for 72 h (low choline caused a 9.7-fold increase in relative gene expression of Vegfc (p < 0.001 vs. CT and high) and a 3.4-fold increase in expression of Angpt2, (p < 0.05 vs. CT and high). ANGPT2 protein was increased 42.2% (p < 0.01). Cytosine-phosphate-guanine dinucleotide islands in the proximity of the promoter areas of Vegfc and Angpt2 were hypomethylated in low choline NPC compared to CT NPC (p < 0.01). We conclude that maternal dietary choline intake alters angiogenesis in the developing fetal hippocampus. PMID:20624989

  8. Dietary factors and luteal phase deficiency in healthy eumenorrheic women

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Mary A.; Schliep, Karen C.; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Stanford, Joseph B.; Zarek, Shvetha M.; Radin, Rose G.; Sjaarda, Lindsey A.; Perkins, Neil J.; Kalwerisky, Robyn A.; Hammoud, Ahmad O.; Mumford, Sunni L.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Are prospectively assessed dietary factors, including overall diet quality, macronutrients and micronutrients, associated with luteal phase deficiency (LPD) in healthy reproductive aged women with regular menstrual cycles? SUMMARY ANSWER Mediterranean Diet Score (MDS), fiber and isoflavone intake were positively associated with LPD while selenium was negatively associated with LPD after adjusting for age, percentage body fat and total energy intake. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY LPD may increase the risk of infertility and early miscarriage. Prior research has shown positive associations between LPD and low energy availability, either through high dietary restraint alone or in conjunction with high energy expenditure via exercise, but few studies with adequate sample sizes have been conducted investigating dietary factors and LPD among healthy, eumenorrheic women. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION The BioCycle Study (2005–2007) prospectively enrolled 259 women from Western New York state, USA, and followed them for one (n = 9) or two (n = 250) menstrual cycles. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS Women aged 18–44 years, with self-reported BMI between 18 and 35 kg/m2 and cycle lengths between 21 and 35 days, were included in the study. Participants completed baseline questionnaires, four 24-h dietary recalls per cycle and daily diaries capturing vigorous exercise, perceived stress and sleep; they also provided up to eight fasting serum samples during clinic visits timed to specific phases of the menstrual cycle using a fertility monitor. Cycles were included for this analysis if the peak serum luteal progesterone was >1 ng/ml and a urine or serum LH surge was detected. Associations between prospectively assessed diet quality, macronutrients and micronutrients and LPD (defined as luteal duration <10 days) were evaluated using generalized linear models adjusting for age, percentage body fat and total energy intake. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE LPD

  9. Effect of Dietary Selenium Deficiency on the Cell Apoptosis and the Level of Thyroid Hormones in Chicken.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yunmao; Li, Wanyan; Xu, Danning; Li, Bingxin; Tian, Yunbo; Zan, Linsen

    2016-06-01

    This study assessed the effect of dietary selenium (Se) deficiency on male reproductive function in chicken. A total of 180 Hy-line laying cocks (1 day old; Weiwei) were randomly divided into 2 groups (n = 90) of Se-deficient chickens and control chickens. The control group was fed a basic diet (containing 0.15 mg of Se/kg). The Se-deficient group was fed a Se-deficient corn-soy basal diet (containing 0.033 mg of Se/kg). Fifteen chickens were killed in each group on days 30, 60, and 90, respectively. Then, serum and testes were collected and used in the detection of experimental index. Results indicated that GSH-Px activity and Bcl-2 mRNA level in the testes and thyroidal triiodothyronine (T3) and free triiodothyronine (FT3) levels in serum by dietary Se deficiency were significantly decreased compared to the corresponding control groups. Se deficiency-treated group showed a significant increase in MDA concent, TUNEL-positive cells, and mRNA level of Bax, Caspase3, and p53 in the testes and thyroidal thyroxine (T4), free thyroxine (FT4), and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels in serum. Histopathologically, Se deficiency caused impairments in the testes. These results suggested that dietary Se deficiency exerts significant harmful effects on male reproductive organ and that the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways and the upstream regulators such as p53, Bax, and Bcl-2 were all involved in Se deficiency-induced testicular apoptosis. PMID:26507440

  10. MicroRNA dysregulation and esophageal cancer development depend on the extent of zinc dietary deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Louise Y.; Taccioli, Cristian; Jing, Ruiyan; Smalley, Karl J.; Alder, Hansjuerg; Jiang, Yubao; Fadda, Paolo; Farber, John L.; Croce, Carlo M.

    2016-01-01

    Zinc deficiency (ZD) increases the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), and marginal ZD is prevalent in humans. In rats, marked-ZD (3 mg Zn/kg diet) induces a proliferative esophagus with a 5-microRNA signature (miR-31, -223, -21, -146b, -146a) and promotes ESCC. Here we report that moderate and mild-ZD (6 and 12 mg Zn/kg diet) also induced esophageal hyperplasia, albeit less pronounced than induced by marked-ZD, with a 2-microRNA signature (miR-31, -146a). On exposure to an environmental carcinogen, ∼16% of moderate/mild-ZD rats developed ESCC, a cancer incidence significantly greater than for Zn-sufficient rats (0%) (P ≤ 0.05), but lower than marked-ZD rats (68%) (P < 0.001). Importantly, the high ESCC, marked-ZD esophagus had a 15-microRNA signature, resembling the human ESCC miRNAome, with miR-223, miR-21, and miR-31 as the top-up-regulated species. This signature discriminated it from the low ESCC, moderate/mild-ZD esophagus, with a 2-microRNA signature (miR-31, miR-223). Additionally, Fbxw7, Pdcd4, and Stk40 (tumor-suppressor targets of miR-223, -21, and -31) were downregulated in marked-ZD cohort. Bioinformatics analysis predicted functional relationships of the 3 tumor-suppressors with other cancer-related genes. Thus, microRNA dysregulation and ESCC progression depend on the extent of dietary Zn deficiency. Our findings suggest that even moderate ZD may promote esophageal cancer and dietary Zn has preventive properties against ESCC. Additionally, the deficiency-associated miR-223, miR-21, and miR-31 may be useful therapeutic targets in ESCC. PMID:26918602

  11. Alterations in immune function in rats caused by dietary lipotrope deficiency: effect of age.

    PubMed

    Nauss, K M; Connor, A M; Kavanaugh, A; Newberne, P M

    1982-12-01

    Weanling male Sprague-Dawley rats were maintained on a control (C), folacin-deficient (F) or marginal methionine-choline diet (M/C) for 3 weeks, 3 months or 12 months. The immunocompetence of the animals was determined by in vivo (response to infection with salmonella typhimurium) and in vitro (lymphocyte transformation assay) methods. It was found that young animals were most sensitive to dietary lipotrope deficiency, and the in vivo response to bacterial infection did not always correlate with in vitro assessment of immune function. Histopathologic examination of spleens from S. typhimurium-infected rats maintained for 3 weeks on the experimental diets showed an overall decreased cellularity especially in the follicular areas, compared to controls. No differences were seen in the spleens of infected animals at later time points. A short-term (3-week) lipotrope deficiency resulted in a depressed lymphocyte transformation response to concanavalin A (Con A) in the spleen, thymus and lymph nodes; to phytohemagglutinin A (PHA) in the spleen and lymph nodes only. After 3 months on the F or M/C diets, a depressed Con A-induced transformation response was still seen in the spleen, but the normal aging-induced immunosuppression resulted in a low response in all animals, with few significant differences existing among groups. PMID:6754890

  12. Osteocyte-derived RANKL is a critical mediator of the increased bone resorption caused by dietary calcium deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jinhu; Piemontese, Marilina; Thostenson, Jeff D.; Weinstein, Robert S.; Manolagas, Stavros C.; O’Brien, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) excess stimulates bone resorption. This effect is associated with increased expression of the osteoclastogenic cytokine receptor activator of nuclear factor кB ligand (RANKL) in bone. However, several different cell types, including bone marrow stromal cells, osteocytes, and T lymphocytes, express both RANKL and the PTH receptor and it is unclear whether RANKL expression by any of these cell types is required for PTH-induced bone loss. Here we have used mice lacking the RANKL gene in osteocytes to determine whether RANKL produced by this cell type is required for the bone loss caused by secondary hyperparathyroidism induced by dietary calcium deficiency in adult mice. Thirty days of dietary calcium deficiency caused bone loss in control mice, but this effect was blunted in mice lacking RANKL in osteocytes. The increase in RANKL expression in bone and the increase in osteoclast number caused by dietary calcium deficiency were also blunted in mice lacking RANKL in osteocytes. These results demonstrate that RANKL produced by osteocytes contributes to the increased bone resorption and the bone loss caused by secondary hyperparathyroidism, strengthening the evidence that osteocytes are an important target cell for hormonal control of bone remodeling. PMID:24933342

  13. Zinc deficiency induces depression-like symptoms in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Tassabehji, Nadine M; Corniola, Rikki S; Alshingiti, Almamoun; Levenson, Cathy W

    2008-10-20

    There is mounting evidence suggesting a link between serum zinc levels and clinical depression. Not only is serum zinc negatively correlated with the severity of symptoms, but zinc levels appear to be lowest in patients who do not respond to antidepressant drug therapy. It is not known if reduced zinc levels are contributing to depression, or the result of dietary or other factors associated with major depression. Thus, we designed this study to test the hypothesis that dietary zinc deficiency would induce depression-like behaviors in rats. Two-month-old male rats were fed zinc adequate (ZA, 30 ppm), deficient (ZD, 1 ppm), or supplemented (ZS, 180 ppm) diets for 3 weeks. Consistent with the development of depression, ZD rats displayed anorexia (p<0.001), anhedonia (reduced saccharin:water intake, p< 0.001), and increased anxiety-like behaviors in a light-dark box test (p<0.05). Furthermore, the antidepressant drug fluoxetine (10 mg/kg body wt) reduced behavioral despair, as measured by the forced swim test, in rats fed the ZA and ZS rats (p<0.05), but was ineffective in ZD rats. Together these studies suggest that zinc deficiency leads to the development of depression-like behaviors that may be refractory to antidepressant treatment. PMID:18655800

  14. Dietary calcium and zinc deficiency risks are decreasing but remain prevalent

    PubMed Central

    Kumssa, Diriba B.; Joy, Edward J. M.; Ander, E. Louise; Watts, Michael J.; Young, Scott D.; Walker, Sue; Broadley, Martin R.

    2015-01-01

    Globally, more than 800 million people are undernourished while >2 billion people have one or more chronic micronutrient deficiencies (MNDs). More than 6% of global mortality and morbidity burdens are associated with undernourishment and MNDs. Here we show that, in 2011, 3.5 and 1.1 billion people were at risk of calcium (Ca) and zinc (Zn) deficiency respectively due to inadequate dietary supply. The global mean dietary supply of Ca and Zn in 2011 was 684 ± 211 and 16 ± 3 mg capita−1 d−1 (±SD) respectively. Between 1992 and 2011, global risk of deficiency of Ca and Zn decreased from 76 to 51%, and 22 to 16%, respectively. Approximately 90% of those at risk of Ca and Zn deficiency in 2011 were in Africa and Asia. To our knowledge, these are the first global estimates of dietary Ca deficiency risks based on food supply. We conclude that continuing to reduce Ca and Zn deficiency risks through dietary diversification and food and agricultural interventions including fortification, crop breeding and use of micronutrient fertilisers will remain a significant challenge. PMID:26098577

  15. Dietary calcium and zinc deficiency risks are decreasing but remain prevalent.

    PubMed

    Kumssa, Diriba B; Joy, Edward J M; Ander, E Louise; Watts, Michael J; Young, Scott D; Walker, Sue; Broadley, Martin R

    2015-01-01

    Globally, more than 800 million people are undernourished while >2 billion people have one or more chronic micronutrient deficiencies (MNDs). More than 6% of global mortality and morbidity burdens are associated with undernourishment and MNDs. Here we show that, in 2011, 3.5 and 1.1 billion people were at risk of calcium (Ca) and zinc (Zn) deficiency respectively due to inadequate dietary supply. The global mean dietary supply of Ca and Zn in 2011 was 684 ± 211 and 16 ± 3 mg capita(-1) d(-1) (± SD) respectively. Between 1992 and 2011, global risk of deficiency of Ca and Zn decreased from 76 to 51%, and 22 to 16%, respectively. Approximately 90% of those at risk of Ca and Zn deficiency in 2011 were in Africa and Asia. To our knowledge, these are the first global estimates of dietary Ca deficiency risks based on food supply. We conclude that continuing to reduce Ca and Zn deficiency risks through dietary diversification and food and agricultural interventions including fortification, crop breeding and use of micronutrient fertilisers will remain a significant challenge. PMID:26098577

  16. Dietary Deficiency of Cobalamin Presented Solely as Schizoaffective Disorder in a Lacto-Vegetarian Adolescent.

    PubMed

    Dhananjaya, Somashekarappa; Manjunatha, Narayana; Manjunatha, Rajashekaaiah; Kumar, Seetharamarao Udaya

    2015-01-01

    Cobalamin is an important nutrient. It is not synthesized in human body and supplied only in nonvegetarian diet. Its deficiency reported with range of psychiatric disorders. Only four pediatric cases have been reported as psychiatric disorders. Authors report a case of dietary deficiency of cobalamin presenting solely as schizoaffective disorder without hematological/neurological manifestations. Early diagnosis and treatment of cobalamin deficiency is an opportunity to reverse pathophysiology. This case highlights the importance of diet history and serum cobalamin level in atypical psychiatric presentations. PMID:26664085

  17. Response to Dietary Phosphate Deficiency is Affected by Genetic Background in Growing Pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Concern over the environmental impact of phosphate (P) excretion from pig production has led to reduced dietary P supplementation. To examine how genetics influence P utilization, 94 gilts sired by 2 genetic lines (PIC337 and PIC280) were fed either a P adequate diet (PA) or a 20% P deficient diet ...

  18. EFFECT OF DIETARY FOLATE DEFICIENCY ON ARSENIC GENOTOXICITY IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic, a human carcinogen found in drinking water supplies throughout the world, is clastogenic in human and rodent cells. An estimated ten percent of Americans are deficient in folate, a methyl donor necessary for normal nucleotide metabolism, DNA synthesis, and DNA methylatio...

  19. FOLATE DEFICIENCY ENHANCES ARSENIC-INDUCED GENOTOXICITY IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Folate deficiency increases background levels of DNA damage and can enhance the mutagenicity of chemical agents. Duplicate experiments were performed to investigate the effect of dietary folate deficiency on arsenic induction of micronuclei (MN) in peripheral blood cells. Male C5...

  20. Adolescent behavior and dopamine availability are uniquely sensitive to dietary omega-3 fatty acid deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bondi, Corina O.; Taha, Ameer Y.; Tock, Jody L.; Totah, Nelson K.; Cheon, Yewon; Torres, Gonzalo E.; Rapoport, Stanley I.; Moghaddam, Bita

    2013-01-01

    Background Understanding the nature of environmental factors that contribute to behavioral health is critical for successful prevention strategies in individuals at-risk for psychiatric disorders. These factors are typically experiential in nature, such as stress and urbanicity, but nutrition, in particular dietary deficiency of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs), has increasingly been implicated in the symptomatic onset of schizophrenia and mood disorders, which typically occurs during adolescence to early adulthood. Thus, adolescence may be the critical age range for the negative impact of diet as an environmental insult. Methods A rat model involving consecutive generations of n-3 PUFA deficiency was developed based on the assumption that dietary trends toward decreased consumption of these fats began four-five decades ago when the parents of current adolescents were born. Behavioral performance in a wide range of tasks, as well as markers of dopamine-related neurotransmission was compared in adolescents and adults fed n-3 PUFA adequate and deficient diets. Results In adolescents, dietary n-3 PUFA deficiency across consecutive generations produced a modality-selective and task-dependent impairment in cognitive and motivated behavior distinct from the deficits observed in adults. While this dietary deficiency affected expression of dopamine-related proteins in both age groups, in adolescents, but not adults, there was an increase in tyrosine hydroxylase expression that was selective to the dorsal striatum. Conclusions These data support a nutritional contribution to optimal cognitive and affective functioning in adolescents. Furthermore, they suggest that n-3 PUFA deficiency disrupts adolescent behaviors through enhanced dorsal striatal dopamine availability. PMID:23890734

  1. Pre-weaning dietary iron deficiency impairs spatial learning and memory in the cognitive holeboard task in piglets

    PubMed Central

    Antonides, Alexandra; Schoonderwoerd, Anne C.; Scholz, Gabi; Berg, Brian M.; Nordquist, Rebecca E.; van der Staay, Franz Josef

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency in humans, affecting more than two billion people worldwide. Early-life iron deficiency can lead to irreversible deficits in learning and memory. The pig represents a promising model animal for studying such deficits, because of its similarities to humans during early development. We investigated the effects of pre-weaning dietary iron deficiency in piglets on growth, blood parameters, cognitive performance, and brain histology later in life. Four to six days after birth, 10 male sibling pairs of piglets were taken from 10 different sows. One piglet of each pair was given a 200 mg iron dextran injection and fed a control milk diet for 28 days (88 mg Fe/kg), whereas the other sibling was given a saline injection and fed an iron deficient (ID) milk diet (21 mg Fe/kg). Due to severely retarded growth of two of the ID piglets, only eight ID piglets were tested behaviorally. After dietary treatment, all piglets were fed a balanced commercial pig diet (190–240 mg Fe/kg). Starting at 7.5 weeks of age, piglets were tested in a spatial cognitive holeboard task. In this task, 4 of 16 holes contain a hidden food reward, allowing measurement of working (short-term) memory and reference (long-term) memory (RM) simultaneously. All piglets received 40–60 acquisition trials, followed by a 16-trial reversal phase. ID piglets showed permanently retarded growth and a strong decrease in blood iron parameters during dietary treatment. After treatment, ID piglets' blood iron values restored to normal levels. In the holeboard task, ID piglets showed impaired RM learning during acquisition and reversal. Iron staining at necropsy at 12 weeks of age showed that ID piglets had fewer iron-containing cells in hippocampal regions CA1 and dentate gyrus (DG). The number of iron-containing cells in CA3 correlated positively with the average RM score during acquisition across all animals. Our results support the hypothesis that early

  2. Global Transcriptional Response to Hfe Deficiency and Dietary Iron Overload in Mouse Liver and Duodenum

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Alejandra; Luukkaala, Tiina; Fleming, Robert E.; Britton, Robert S.; Bacon, Bruce R.; Parkkila, Seppo

    2009-01-01

    Iron is an essential trace element whose absorption is usually tightly regulated in the duodenum. HFE-related hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is characterized by abnormally low expression of the iron-regulatory hormone, hepcidin, which results in increased iron absorption. The liver is crucial for iron homeostasis as it is the main production site of hepcidin. The aim of this study was to explore and compare the genome-wide transcriptome response to Hfe deficiency and dietary iron overload in murine liver and duodenum. Illumina™ arrays containing over 47,000 probes were used to study global transcriptional changes. Quantitative RT-PCR (Q-RT-PCR) was used to validate the microarray results. In the liver, the expression of 151 genes was altered in Hfe−/− mice while dietary iron overload changed the expression of 218 genes. There were 173 and 108 differentially expressed genes in the duodenum of Hfe−/− mice and mice with dietary iron overload, respectively. There was 93.5% concordance between the results obtained by microarray analysis and Q-RT-PCR. Overexpression of genes for acute phase reactants in the liver and a strong induction of digestive enzyme genes in the duodenum were characteristic of the Hfe-deficient genotype. In contrast, dietary iron overload caused a more pronounced change of gene expression responsive to oxidative stress. In conclusion, Hfe deficiency caused a previously unrecognized increase in gene expression of hepatic acute phase proteins and duodenal digestive enzymes. PMID:19787063

  3. Effect of selenium and vitamin E dietary deficiencies on chick lymphoid organ development (42361)

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, J.A.; Combs, G.F. Jr.; Whitacre, M.E.; Dietert, R.R.

    1986-09-01

    Diets specifically deficient in selenium (Se) and/or vitamin E or adequate in both nutrients were fed to chicks from the time of hatching. Lymphoid organs (bursa, thymus, and in some instances, spleen) were collected from chicks 7-35 days of age. Growth of the chicks fed these diets was monitored over the experimental period as was lymphoid organ growth. The development of the primary lymphoid organs was further assessed by histological techniques and the organ contents of vitamin E (..cap alpha..-tocopherol) and Se were determined. Specific deficiencies of either Se or vitamin E were found to significantly impair bursal growth as did a combined deficiency. Thymic growth was impaired only by the combined deficiency diet. Severe histopathological changes in the bursa resulted from the combined deficiency and these were detectable by 10-14 days after hatching. These changes were characterized by a gradual degeneration of the epithelium and an accompanying depletion of lymphocytes. Similar changes, although slower to develop and less severe, were observed in the thymus as a result of the combined deficiency. When both serum and tissue levels of vitamin E and Se were monitored, it was observed that these were rapidly and independently depleted by the specific deficiency diets. These data suggest that the primary lymphoid organs are major targets of Se and vitamin E dietary deficiencies and provide a possible mechanism by which immune function may be impaired.

  4. Deficit in Prepulse Inhibition in Mice Caused by Dietary n-3 Fatty Acid Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Fedorova, Irina; Alvheim, Anita R.; Hussein, Nahed; Salem, Norman

    2010-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) may be biosynthesized from a precursor α-linolenic acid (LNA) or obtained preformed in the diet. Dams were fed four diets with different levels of the various n-3 fatty acids during pregnancy and lactation, and their offspring were weaned to the same diets: “n-3 Deficient”, containing (as % total fatty acids) 0.07% of LNA; “Low LNA” (0.4%); “High LNA” (4.8%); and a “DHA+EPA” diet, containing 0.4% of LNA, 2% DHA and 2% EPA. Sensorimotor gating was measured by prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the acoustic startle response in C57Bl6 mice. The n-3 Deficient and Low LNA diets caused a substantial deficit in PPI compared to the DHA+EPA diet, whereas the High LNA diet induced a less pronounced, but significant reduction of PPI. These are the first data that demonstrate a deficit in sensorimotor gating in rodents caused by an inadequate amount of the n-3 fatty acids in the diet. Our results differentiate the effects of a High LNA diet from one with added EPA and DHA even though the difference in brain DHA content is only 12% between these dietary groups. PMID:20001105

  5. Dietary calcium deficiency in laying ducks impairs eggshell quality by suppressing shell biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Zhao, Fei; Tian, Zhi Mei; Zhang, Han Xing; Ruan, Dong; Li, Yan; Wang, Shuang; Zheng, Chun Tian; Lin, Ying Cai

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of dietary calcium deficiency on the process of shell formation. Four hundred and fifty female ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) at 22 weeks were randomly assigned to three groups. Ducks were fed one of two calcium-deficient diets (containing 1.8% or 0.38% calcium, respectively) or a calcium-adequate control diet (containing 3.6% calcium) for 67 days (depletion period) and then all ducks were fed a calcium-adequate diet for an additional 67 days (repletion period). Compared with the calcium-adequate control, the average shell thickness, egg shell weight, breaking strength, mammillae density and mammillary knob thickness of shell from ducks that consumed the diet with 0.38% calcium were significantly decreased (P<0.05) during the depletion period, accompanied by reduced tibia quality. The mRNA expression of both secreted phosphoprotein 1 (SPP1) and carbonic anhydrase 2 (CA2) in the uterus was decreased after feeding calcium-deficient diets (1.8% or 0.38% calcium). mRNA transcripts of calbindin 1 (CALB1), an important protein responsible for calcium transport, and the matrix protein genes ovocalyxin-32 (OCX-32) and ovocleidin-116 (OC-116) were reduced in ducks fed 0.38% calcium but not 1.8% calcium. Plasma estradiol concentration was decreased by both of the calcium-deficient diets (P<0.05). The impaired shell quality and suppressed functional proteins involved in shell formation could be reversed by repletion of dietary calcium. The results of the present study suggest that dietary calcium deficiency negatively affects eggshell quality and microarchitecture, probably by suppressing shell biomineralization. PMID:26385336

  6. Visual loss and optic nerve head swelling in thiamine deficiency without prolonged dietary deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Gratton, Sean M; Lam, Byron L

    2014-01-01

    Visual loss due to optic neuropathy is a rare manifestation of thiamine deficiency. We report a case of a 39-year-old woman with a body mass index (BMI) of 29 kg/m2 who developed visual loss and bilateral optic nerve head swelling after a short, self-limited gastrointestinal illness. She was disoriented and inattentive and had absent ankle jerk reflexes, diminished sensation in both legs below the knees, and marked truncal ataxia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed increased T2-signal in the medial thalami and mammillary bodies. The serum thiamine level was 8 nmol/L (normal 8–30). The diagnosis of thiamine deficiency was made, and the patient’s vision and neurologic symptoms improved significantly with intramuscular thiamine treatment. Thiamine deficiency can occur in the absence of an obvious predisposing factor such as alcoholism or low body weight. The clinician must be aware of the factors that govern vitamin availability and maintain a high index of suspicion to make the diagnosis in such cases. PMID:24899800

  7. Influence of dietary iron level and form on biochemical, hematological, and immunological changes in copper deficient rats

    SciTech Connect

    Leu, H.; Gallaher, D.D.; Kramer, T.R.

    1986-03-01

    Weanling male Lewis rats (N = 10/group) were fed ad-libitum for 42 days diets based on AIN standards containing 21% casein, 5% safflower oil, deficient (0.6 ..mu..g/g) or adequate (5.6 ..mu..g/g) levels of Cu, and adequate (50 ..mu..g/g) or high (300 ..mu..g/g) levels of Fe/sup +2/ or Fe/sup +3/. Cu-deficient rats, regardless of Fe level or form, exhibited depressed (p < 0.05) serum Cu, Fe and ceruloplasmin activity, and hemoglobin levels; and elevated (p < 0.05) unsaturated serum Fe binding capacity. Except for high Fe/sup +3/ fed rats, Cu-deficient rats showed decreased hematocrits. Decreased proliferation was exhibited by concanavalin-A (Con-A) stimulated spleen lymphoid cells (SLC) of Cu-deficient rats fed adequate dietary Fe, but not by SLC of Cu-deficient rats fed high dietary Fe. High Fe fed rats exhibited reduced proliferation and increased variability in proliferation by Con-A stimulated SLC, which apparently caused a lack of difference in proliferation by SLC of Cu-deficient and Cu-adequate rats fed high Fe. Thus, high dietary Fe did not correct biochemical and hematological parameters in Cu-deficient rats, but because of lowered proliferation and increased variability of SLC proliferation, high dietary Fe did alleviate suppressed Con-A stimulated SLC proliferation in Cu-deficiency.

  8. Metabolic adaptations to dietary fat malabsorption in chylomicron-deficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Jung, H R; Turner, S M; Neese, R A; Young, S G; Hellerstein, M K

    1999-01-01

    A mouse model of chylomicron deficiency was recently developed; these mice express a human apolipoprotein (apo) B transgene in the liver but do not synthesize any apoB in the intestine. Despite severe intestinal fat malabsorption, the mice maintain normal concentrations of plasma lipids and liver-derived apoB 100-containing lipoproteins. We investigated the metabolic mechanisms by which plasma lipid levels are kept normal. De novo lipogenesis (DNL) and cholesterogenesis were measured by mass isotopomer distribution analysis (MIDA). Plasma non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) fluxes and hepatic re-esterification of labelled plasma NEFA were also measured. Hepatic and plasma triacylglycerol (TG) concentrations and plasma NEFA fluxes were not different between chylomicron-deficient mice and controls. The contribution from DNL to the hepatic TG pool was only modestly higher in chylomicron-deficient mice [12+/-2.1% (n=7) compared with 3.7+/-1.0% (n=9); means+/-S.E.M.], whereas cholesterogenesis was markedly elevated. The fractional contribution from plasma NEFA to hepatic TG was greatly elevated in the chylomicron-deficient animals (62% compared with 23%). Accordingly, 73% of hepatic TG was neither from DNL nor from plasma NEFA in controls, presumably reflecting prior contribution from chylomicron remnants, compared with only 26% in the chylomicron-deficient group. The long-term contribution from DNL to adipose fat stores reached approximately the same steady-state values (approximately 30%) in the two groups. Body fat accumulation was much lower in chylomicron-deficient animals; thus, whole-body absolute DNL was significantly lower. We conclude that plasma and hepatic TG pools and hepatic secretion of apoB-containing particles are maintained at normal levels in chylomicron-deficient mice, not by de novo fatty acid synthesis, but by more avid re-esterification of plasma NEFA, replacing the normally predominant contribution from chylomicrons, and that some dietary fat can be

  9. Optimal management of iron deficiency anemia due to poor dietary intake

    PubMed Central

    Aspuru, Kattalin; Villa, Carlos; Bermejo, Fernando; Herrero, Pilar; López, Santiago García

    2011-01-01

    Iron is necessary for the normal development of multiple vital processes. Iron deficiency (ID) may be caused by several diseases, even by physiological situations that increase requirements for this mineral. One of its possible causes is a poor dietary iron intake, which is infrequent in developed countries, but quite common in developing areas. In these countries, dietary ID is highly prevalent and comprises a real public health problem and a challenge for health authorities. ID, with or without anemia, can cause important symptoms that are not only physical, but can also include a decreased intellectual performance. All this, together with a high prevalence, can even have negative implications for a community’s economic and social development. Treatment consists of iron supplements. Prevention of ID obviously lies in increasing the dietary intake of iron, which can be difficult in developing countries. In these regions, foods with greater iron content are scarce, and attempts are made to compensate this by fortifying staple foods with iron. The effectiveness of this strategy is endorsed by multiple studies. On the other hand, in developed countries, ID with or without anemia is nearly always associated with diseases that trigger a negative balance between iron absorption and loss. Its management will be based on the treatment of underlying diseases, as well as on oral iron supplements, although these latter are limited by their tolerance and low potency, which on occasions may compel a change to intravenous administration. Iron deficiency has a series of peculiarities in pediatric patients, in the elderly, in pregnant women, and in patients with dietary restrictions, such as celiac disease. PMID:22114518

  10. Contrasting roles of dietary selenium and selenoproteins in chemically induced hepatocarcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2013-01-01

    Selenium (Se) has long been known for its cancer prevention properties, but the molecular basis remains unclear. The principal questions in assessing the effect of dietary Se in cancer are whether selenoproteins, small molecule selenocompounds, or both, are involved, and under which conditions and genotypes Se may be protective. In this study, we examined diethylnitrosamine-induced hepatocarcinogenesis in mice lacking a subset of selenoproteins due to expression of a mutant selenocysteine tRNA gene (Trsp A37G mice). To uncouple the effects of selenocompounds and selenoproteins, these animals were examined at several levels of dietary Se. Our analysis revealed that tumorigenesis in Trsp A37G mice maintained on the adequate Se diet was increased. However, in the control, wild-type mice, both Se deficiency and high Se levels protected against tumorigenesis. We further found that the Se-deficient diet induced severe neurological phenotypes in TrspA37G mice. Surprisingly, a similar phenotype could be induced in these mice at high dietary Se intake. Overall, our results show a complex role of Se in chemically induced hepatocarcinogenesis, which involves interaction among selenoproteins, selenocompounds and toxins, and depends on genotype and background of the animals. PMID:23389288

  11. Effects of dietary carbohydrate on iron metabolism and cytochrome oxidase activity in copper-deficient rats

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.A.; Henderson, J.

    1986-03-01

    The effects of dietary carbohydrate on the metabolism of iron and the activity of cytochrome oxidase were examined in Cu-deficient and Cu-adequate rats. Male rats (n = 36) were fed one of six diets which varied in copper level (Cu-: < 0.6 ppm or Cu+: 8.2 ppm) and carbohydrate type (cornstarch, sucrose or fructose). After 31 days, Cu- rats had 50% more iron in the liver and 38, 30 and 18% less iron in the tibia, spleen and kidneys, respectively, than Cu+ rats. The activity of cytochrome oxidase in the bone marrow, heart, and liver were 59%, 51%, and 43%, respectively, of the levels in Cu/sup +/ rats. The type of dietary carbohydrate significantly affected the development of anemia during copper deficiency. Cu-rats fed cornstarch, sucrose or fructose had hematocrit levels which were 92, 83 or 73%, respectively, of Cu+ rats. Similarly, the levels of iron in the tibias of Cu- rats fed cornstarch, sucrose or fructose were 69, 66 or 54%, respectively, of Cu+ rats. The hematocrit levels of Cu- rats were positively correlated to both tibia iron levels (r = 0.64, p < 0.005) and liver cytochrome oxidase activities (r = 0.50, p < 0.05). Thus, it appears that changes in the metabolism of iron may be involved with the development of anemia in Cu- rats fed fructose or sucrose.

  12. Enhanced excitability of hippocampal mossy fibers and CA3 neurons under dietary zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Atsushi; Yamada, Kohei; Minami, Akira; Nagano, Tetsuo; Oku, Naoto

    2005-02-01

    On the basis of the evidence that susceptibility to kainate-induced seizures is enhanced by zinc deficiency and that glutamate concentrations in hippocampal extracellular fluid are excessively increased during seizures, excitability of hippocampal mossy fibers and CA3 neurons was examined using hippocampal slices, which were prepare from mice fed a zinc-deficient diet for 4 weeks. The spatio-temporal dynamics of zinc and calcium was monitored using their indicators, membrane-impermeable ZnAF-2 and membrane-permeable fura-2 AM, respectively. When the molecular layer of dentate gyrus was stimulated with 100mM KCl for 1s, the increased percentages of extracellular zinc in the stratum lucidum and CA3 pyramidal cell layer were higher in zinc-deficient mice than in the control mice, implying that glutamate release from the mossy fibers of the dentate granular cells is enhanced by zinc deficiency. Judging from the increased percentages, however, the amount of zinc released was estimated to be less in zinc-deficient mice. On the other hand, the basal calcium concentrations in the stratum lucidum and CA3 pyramidal cell layer detected with fura-2 were higher in zinc-deficient mice than in the control mice, indicating that hippocampal calcium homeostasis is affected by zinc deficiency. Furthermore, the increased percentage of intracellular calcium in the stratum lucidum by stimulation with high K+ was enhanced by the zinc deficiency. The alteration of hippocampal calcium homeostasis seems to enhance excitability of dentate granular cells in zinc deficiency, following by an enhanced excitability of postsynaptic structures in CA3 neurons. PMID:15716032

  13. Probucol-Induced α-Tocopherol Deficiency Protects Mice against Malaria Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Noriko; Kume, Aiko; Hagihara, Yoshihisa; Yoshida, Yasukazu; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of malaria pathogens having resistance against antimalarials implies the necessity for the development of new drugs. Recently, we have demonstrated a resistance against malaria infection of α-tocopherol transfer protein knockout mice showing undetectable plasma levels of α-tocopherol, a lipid-soluble antioxidant. However, dietary restriction induced α-tocopherol deficiency is difficult to be applied as a clinical antimalarial therapy. Here, we report on a new strategy to potentially treat malaria by using probucol, a drug that can reduce the plasma α-tocopherol concentration. Probucol pre-treatment for 2 weeks and treatment throughout the infection rescued from death of mice infected with Plasmodium yoelii XL-17 or P. berghei ANKA. In addition, survival was extended when the treatment started immediately after parasite inoculation. The ratio of lipid peroxidation products to parent lipids increased in plasma after 2 weeks treatment of probucol. This indicates that the protective effect of probucol might be mediated by the oxidative stressful environment induced by α-tocopherol deficiency. Probucol in combination with dihydroartemisin suppressed the proliferation of P. yoelii XL-17. These results indicated that probucol might be a candidate for a drug against malaria infection by inducing α-tocopherol deficiency without dietary α-tocopherol restriction. PMID:26296197

  14. Probucol-Induced α-Tocopherol Deficiency Protects Mice against Malaria Infection.

    PubMed

    Herbas, Maria Shirely; Shichiri, Mototada; Ishida, Noriko; Kume, Aiko; Hagihara, Yoshihisa; Yoshida, Yasukazu; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of malaria pathogens having resistance against antimalarials implies the necessity for the development of new drugs. Recently, we have demonstrated a resistance against malaria infection of α-tocopherol transfer protein knockout mice showing undetectable plasma levels of α-tocopherol, a lipid-soluble antioxidant. However, dietary restriction induced α-tocopherol deficiency is difficult to be applied as a clinical antimalarial therapy. Here, we report on a new strategy to potentially treat malaria by using probucol, a drug that can reduce the plasma α-tocopherol concentration. Probucol pre-treatment for 2 weeks and treatment throughout the infection rescued from death of mice infected with Plasmodium yoelii XL-17 or P. berghei ANKA. In addition, survival was extended when the treatment started immediately after parasite inoculation. The ratio of lipid peroxidation products to parent lipids increased in plasma after 2 weeks treatment of probucol. This indicates that the protective effect of probucol might be mediated by the oxidative stressful environment induced by α-tocopherol deficiency. Probucol in combination with dihydroartemisin suppressed the proliferation of P. yoelii XL-17. These results indicated that probucol might be a candidate for a drug against malaria infection by inducing α-tocopherol deficiency without dietary α-tocopherol restriction. PMID:26296197

  15. Magnesium deficiency induces anxiety and HPA axis dysregulation: Modulation by therapeutic drug treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sartori, S.B.; Whittle, N.; Hetzenauer, A.; Singewald, N.

    2012-01-01

    Preclinical and some clinical studies suggest a relationship between perturbation in magnesium (Mg2+) homeostasis and pathological anxiety, although the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Since there is evidence that Mg2+ modulates the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis, we tested whether enhanced anxiety-like behaviour can be reliably elicited by dietary Mg2+ deficiency and whether Mg2+ deficiency is associated with altered HPA axis function. Compared with controls, Mg2+ deficient mice did indeed display enhanced anxiety-related behaviour in a battery of established anxiety tests. The enhanced anxiety-related behaviour of Mg2+ deficient mice was sensitive to chronic desipramine treatment in the hyponeophagia test and to acute diazepam treatment in the open arm exposure test. Mg2+ deficiency caused an increase in the transcription of the corticotropin releasing hormone in the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVN), and elevated ACTH plasma levels, pointing to an enhanced set-point of the HPA axis. Chronic treatment with desipramine reversed the identified abnormalities of the stress axis. Functional mapping of neuronal activity using c-Fos revealed hyper-excitability in the PVN of anxious Mg2+ deficient mice and its normalisation through diazepam treatment. Overall, the present findings demonstrate the robustness and validity of the Mg2+ deficiency model as a mouse model of enhanced anxiety, showing sensitivity to treatment with anxiolytics and antidepressants. It is further suggested that dysregulations in the HPA axis may contribute to the hyper-emotionality in response to dietary induced hypomagnesaemia. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled ‘Anxiety and Depression’. PMID:21835188

  16. Magnesium deficiency induces anxiety and HPA axis dysregulation: modulation by therapeutic drug treatment.

    PubMed

    Sartori, S B; Whittle, N; Hetzenauer, A; Singewald, N

    2012-01-01

    Preclinical and some clinical studies suggest a relationship between perturbation in magnesium (Mg(2+)) homeostasis and pathological anxiety, although the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Since there is evidence that Mg(2+) modulates the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis, we tested whether enhanced anxiety-like behaviour can be reliably elicited by dietary Mg(2+) deficiency and whether Mg(2+) deficiency is associated with altered HPA axis function. Compared with controls, Mg(2+) deficient mice did indeed display enhanced anxiety-related behaviour in a battery of established anxiety tests. The enhanced anxiety-related behaviour of Mg(2+) deficient mice was sensitive to chronic desipramine treatment in the hyponeophagia test and to acute diazepam treatment in the open arm exposure test. Mg(2+) deficiency caused an increase in the transcription of the corticotropin releasing hormone in the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVN), and elevated ACTH plasma levels, pointing to an enhanced set-point of the HPA axis. Chronic treatment with desipramine reversed the identified abnormalities of the stress axis. Functional mapping of neuronal activity using c-Fos revealed hyper-excitability in the PVN of anxious Mg(2+) deficient mice and its normalisation through diazepam treatment. Overall, the present findings demonstrate the robustness and validity of the Mg(2+) deficiency model as a mouse model of enhanced anxiety, showing sensitivity to treatment with anxiolytics and antidepressants. It is further suggested that dysregulations in the HPA axis may contribute to the hyper-emotionality in response to dietary induced hypomagnesaemia. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Anxiety and Depression'. PMID:21835188

  17. Three successful pregnancies through dietary management of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, V; Eschrich, K; Boney, A; Sullivan, J; McDonald, M; Kishnani, P S; Koeberl, D D

    2007-10-01

    Fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase) deficiency (OMIM 229700) has been characterized as the cause of life-threatening hypoglycaemia and lactic acidaemia following prolonged fasting. The patient, an adult African-American woman, presented during the second trimester of her first pregnancy with recurrent episodes of lactic acidaemia and hypoglycaemia. She had recently been admitted to a nearby intensive care unit after presentation with profound hypoglycaemia and lactic acidosis, and was found to be pregnant. The history was remarkable for approximately 30 hospitalizations for hypoglycaemia and acidosis. She had previously undergone liver biopsy at another centre and was diagnosed with a 'glycogen storage disease', although no enzyme testing had been done for confirmation. Based on clinical symptoms, a diagnosis of FBPase deficiency was accomplished through gene sequencing, which revealed homozygosity for a panethnic, common mutation, 960/961insG in exon 7. The availability of mutation testing facilitated the confirmation of FBPase deficiency in this patient, obviating liver biopsy for enzyme activity confirmation. The patient underwent three successful pregnancies by strict compliance with dietary management, including nocturnal uncooked cornstarch to manage hypoglycaemia. The pregnancies were complicated by mild gestational diabetes, increased cornstarch requirements, and hypoglycaemia at the time of discharge from the hospital. The three infants had normal birth weights and experienced no complications during the neonatal period. The patient subsequently developed sensorineural hearing loss and early-onset cognitive impairment, despite compliance with the monitoring and treatment of hypoglycaemia. The experience with multiple pregnancies in this FBPase-deficient patient provides insight into the management of hypoglycaemia in inherited disorders of gluconeogenesis. PMID:17705024

  18. Effect of dietary iron deficiency and overload on the expression of ZIP metal-ion transporters in rat liver

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Hyeyoung; Knutson, Mitchell D.

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian ZIP (Zrt-, Irt-like Protein) family of transmembrane transport proteins consists of 14 members that share considerable homology. ZIP proteins have been shown to mediate the cellular uptake of the essential trace elements zinc, iron, and manganese. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of dietary iron deficiency and overload on the expression of all 14 ZIP transporters in the liver, the main site of iron storage. Weanling male rats (n=6/group) were fed iron-deficient (FeD), iron-adequate (FeA), or iron-overloaded (FeO) diets in two independent feeding studies. In study 1, diets were based on the TestDiet 5755 formulation and contained iron at 9 ppm (FeD), 215 ppm (FeA), and 27,974 ppm (3% FeO). In study 2, diets were based on the AIN-93G formulation and contained iron at 9 ppm Fe (FeD), 50 ppm Fe (FeA), or 18916 ppm (2% FeO). After 3 weeks, the FeD diets depleted liver non-heme iron stores and induced anemia, whereas FeO diets resulted in hepatic iron overload. Quantitative RT-PCR revealed that ZIP5 mRNA levels were 3- and 8-fold higher in 2% FeO and 3% FeO livers, respectively, compared with FeA controls. In both studies, a consistent downregulation of ZIP6, ZIP7, and ZIP10 was also observed in FeO liver relative to FeA controls. Studies in H4IIE hepatoma cells further documented that iron loading affects the expression of these ZIP transporters. Overall, our data suggest that ZIP5, ZIP6, ZIP7, and ZIP10 are regulated by iron, indicating that they may play a role in hepatic iron/metal homeostasis during iron deficiency and overload. PMID:21826460

  19. Cross-sectional dietary deficiencies among a prison population in Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To investigate the dietary adequacy of prisoners of Beon Prison, Madang, Papua New Guinea in response to a report of possible nutritional deficiency. Methods We undertook an observational, cross-sectional study. All 254 male inmates (May 2010) were eligible to answer a validated interview-based questionnaire; to have a comprehensive dietary assessment; and to provide blood for biochemical analysis (α-tocopherol, β-carotene, lutein, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, folate, homocysteine, zinc, ferritin, and vitamins A, B12 and C). Prison guards were invited to participate as a comparison group. Results 148 male prisoners (58.3%) and 13 male prison guards participated. Prison rations consisted of white rice fortified with thiamin, niacin, and iron, tinned tuna, tinned corned beef, water crackers, and black tea, with occasional intakes of fruit and vegetables. Some prisoners received supplementary food from weekend visitors. From assessment of the prisoners dietary data, median intakes of calcium (137 mg), potassium (677 mg), magnesium (182 mg), riboflavin (0.308 mg), vitamin A (54.1 μg), vitamin E (1.68 mg), vitamin C (5.7 mg) and folate (76.4 μg) were found to be below estimated average requirements (EAR). Following are the prisoners median (P25, P75) concentration of circulating nutrients and the percentage of prisoners with levels below normal reference ranges or recognized cut-off values: serum retinol 0.73 (0.40, 1.21) μmol/L, 46% below 0.7 μmol/L; plasma folate 2.0 (1.4, 2.6) nmol/L, 98% below 6.8 nmol/L; plasma vitamin C 6.3 (1.0, 19.3) μmol/L, 64% below 11.4 μmol/L; serum zinc 9.9 (8.8, 11.1) μmol/L, 66% below 10.7 μmol/L. Guards had diets with a higher dietary diversity that were associated with greater intakes of nutrients and biomarker concentrations. Conclusions The prisoners diets are likely lacking in several micronutrients and recommendations for dietary change have been made to the prison authorities. Ongoing vigilance is

  20. Vitamin A deficiency decreases and high dietary vitamin A increases disease severity in the mouse model of asthma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Th1/ Th2 paradigm has become an important issue in the pathogenesis of asthma, characterized by normal Th-1 and elevated Th-2 cytokine expression, resulting in a Th2 predominance. Vitamin A deficiency (VAD) produces a significant Th1 bias, while high-level dietary vitamin A supplementation promo...

  1. Dietary fat level and alcohol-induced pancreatic injury

    SciTech Connect

    Towner, S.J.; Inomata, T.; Largman, C.; French, S.W.

    1986-03-01

    Effects of dietary fat levels on alcohol-induced pancreatic injury were studied in a rat model which achieves sustained blood alcohol levels and maximal nutritional control. A diet containing 5, 25, or 35% of fat (corn oil; % total calories) and either ethanol or isocaloric dextrose were intragastrically infused in male Wistar rats for 30-120 days. Following intoxication, the pancreatic pathology was examined light-microscopically. None of pair-fed controls showed abnormal pancreas histology. These results indicate potentiation of alcohol-induced pancreatic injury. Particularly higher incidence of chronic interstitial pancreatitis with increased dietary fat.

  2. Effect of dietary zinc deficiency on the accumulation of cadmium and metallothionein in selected tissues of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Waalkes, M.P.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of continuous dietary zinc deficiency on the metabolism of the toxic heavy metal cadmium has not been widely studied. This investigation was designed to assess the effects of subadequate dietary zinc intake on the accumulation of dietary cadmium and on metallothionein (MT) and zinc concentrations in target organs of cadmium toxicity. Adult male Wistar rats (180-200 g) were allowed, ad libitum, diets either adequate (60 ppm) or deficient (7 ppm) in zinc for a total of 9 wk. The zinc-deficient diet resulted in an approximately 40% reduction in plasma zinc (assessed at 3, 6, and 9 wk) in the absence of overt signs of zinc deficiency (i.e., reduced weight gain, alopecia, etc.). Separate groups of rats were also maintained on zinc-defined diets for a total of 9 wk, but cadmium was added to the diet (0, 12.5, 25, 50, 100, and 200 ppm) a the end of wk 3 and maintained at that level throughout the remaining 6 wk of the study, when the rats were killed. The feeding of the zinc-deficient diet markedly enhanced the accumulation of cadmium in the liver, kidney, and testes. Hepatic, renal, and testicular zinc concentrations were not affected by suboptimal zinc intake alone. However, marked reductions in renal and testicular zinc concentrations were caused by zinc deficiency in concert with cadmium exposure. MT levels, when related to tissue cadmium concentrations, were elevated to a significantly lesser extent in the kidneys of zinc-deficient animals. These results indicate that marginal zinc deficiency markedly increases cadmium accumulation in various organs and reduces zinc content and MT induction in some organs.

  3. [Hematological indices of rats having complete and vitamin-deficient diets enriched with dietary fibers].

    PubMed

    Mustafina, O K; Trushina, É N; Kosheleva, O V; Pereverzeva, O G; Kodentsova, V M; Vrzhesinskaia, O A

    2013-01-01

    The hematological indices in 48 rats Wistar male with initial body weight 58.1+/- 0.5g has been studied. The rats were divided into 6 group and fed the complete semi-synthetic diet, containing 100% or 20% of vitamin mixture (Vit) with or without addition of dietary fiber (DF) in the form of wheat bran (5% of diet mass) during 4 weeks. The animals of the 1 group received 100% of vitamin mixture (100% Vit); of the 2 group--100% Vit+DF; 3 group--20% of vitamin mixture (20% Vit); 4 group--20% of vitamin mixture and DF (20% Vit+DF). The next 5 days rats from vitamin-deficient groups were fed with diets supplemented with 80% of Vit: (5 group--20% Vit+ 80% Vit; 6 group--20% Vit+DF+80% Vit). The animals fed vitamin-deficient diet lag significantly in growth from animals fed a complete diet. The growth curve of rats fed a diet with DF took an intermediate position. The studies were carried out at the Hematology analyzer "Coulter AC TTM 5 diff OV" (Beckman Coulter, USA) under the program, developed for the study of rat blood. Mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and mean corpuscular hemoglobin content (MCHC) were significantly decreased in rats with combined vitamin deficiency (20% Vit) in the diet compared with those of control group rats, while the compensatory increase in the number of red blood cells (RBC) and leukocytopenia took place. The enrichment of vitamin-deficient diet with DF (20% Vit+DF) prevented MCV and RBC changes, but MCHC left reduced in comparison with the indicator of the rats in control group. Indicators characterizing the state of platelets had no statistically significant differences between the groups. Compensation of vitamin deficiency in the diet of rats from group 5 (20% Vit+80% Vit) led only to the normalization of MCV. After vitamin restore in the diet of group 6 (20% Vit+DF+80% Vit) all investigated parameters were indistinguishable from the parameters of the control group. This indicates a positive effect of wheat bran DF consumption on the studied

  4. ESR spin trapping study of the effect of oxidative stress and dietary Zn deficiency on free radical production in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Z.; Chen, G.; Bray, T.M. )

    1991-03-15

    The objective of this study is to examine if free radicals can be trapped in vivo in dietary Zn deficient rats using ESR spin trapping techniques. The ability of Zn deficient rats to cope with oxidative stress is also assessed. {alpha}-Phenyl-N-t-butyl-nitrone (PBN), a spin trap, was i.p injected at a dose of 75 mg or 150 mg/kg body weight. The tissue distribution and metabolism of PBN in Zn deficient, pair-fed and control rats were compared. ESR signals in liver and lung were used as a measure of free radicals generated in vivo. When the rats were challenged with free radical generating agents, CCl{sub 4}, or FeNTA, the intensity of ESR signal recorded from the Zn deficient rats was about 50% and 30% of its pair-fed and ad libitum control, respectively. Under other oxidative stress, such as exposure to ethanol and hyperoxia, there was a higher production of free radicals in the Zn deficient rats compared to its control. These results suggest that dietary Zn deficiency may either increase the susceptibility or reduce the defense ability of the animal to increased oxidative stress.

  5. Dietary zinc deficiency effects dorso-lateral and ventral prostate of Wistar rats: histological, biochemical and trace element study.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Sangeeta; Nair, Neena; Bedwal, R S

    2014-10-01

    Zinc deficiency has become a global problem affecting the developed and developing countries due to inhibitors in the diet which prevents its absorption or due to a very low concentration of bioavailable zinc in the diet. Being present in high concentration in the prostate and having diverse biological function, we investigated the effects of dietary zinc deficiency for 2 and 4 weeks on dorso-lateral and ventral prostate. Sixty prepubertal rats were divided into three groups: zinc control (ZC), pair fed (PF) and zinc deficient (ZD) and fed on 100 μg/g (zinc control and pair fed groups) and 1 μg/g (zinc deficient) diet. Zinc deficiency was associated with degenerative changes in dorso-lateral and ventral prostate as made evident by karyolysis, karyorhexis, cytoplasmolysis, loss of cellularisation, decreased intraluminar secretion and degeneration of fibromuscular stroma. In response, protein carbonyl, nitric oxide, acid phosphatase, 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase increased, exhibiting variable level of significance. Total protein and total zinc concentration in dorso-lateral and ventral prostate as well as in serum decreased (P < 0.001). Decrease (P < 0.001) was recorded in serum FSH and testosterone after 2 and 4 weeks of zinc deficiency. The changes were more prominent after 4 weeks of synthetic zinc deficient diet. The results indicate that zinc deficiency during prepubertal period affects the prostate structure, total protein concentration, enhanced protein carbonyl concentration, nitric oxide as well as acid phosphatase activities and impaired hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activities. Evidently these changes could be attributed to dysfunction of dorso-lateral and ventral prostate after dietary zinc deficiency as well as impairment of metabolic and secretory activity, reduced gonadotropin levels by hypothalamus -hypophysial system which is indicative of a critical role of zinc in maintaining the prostate integrity. PMID

  6. Obesity development in neuron-specific lipoprotein lipase deficient mice is not responsive to increased dietary fat content or change in fat composition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Taussig, Matthew D; DiPatrizio, Nicholas V; Bruce, Kimberley; Piomelli, Daniele; Eckel, Robert H

    2016-07-01

    We have previously reported that mice with neuron-specific LPL deficiency (NEXLPL-/-) become obese by 16weeks of age on chow. Moreover, these mice had reduced uptake of triglyceride (TG)-rich lipoprotein-derived fatty acids and lower levels of n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) in the hypothalamus. Here, we asked whether increased dietary fat content or altered dietary composition could modulate obesity development in NEXLPL-/- mice. Male NEXLPL-/- mice and littermate controls (WT) were randomly assigned one of three synthetic diets; a high carbohydrate diet (HC, 10% fat), a high-fat diet (HF, 45% fat), or a HC diet supplemented with n-3 PUFAs (HCn-3, 10% fat, Lovaza, GSK®). After 42weeks of HC feeding, body weight and fat mass were increased in the NEXLPL-/- mice compared to WT. WT mice fed a HF diet displayed typical diet-induced obesity, but weight gain was only marginal in HF-fed NEXLPL-/- mice, with no significant difference in body composition. Dietary n-3 PUFA supplementation did not prevent obesity in NEXLPL-/- mice, but was associated with differential modifications in hypothalamic gene expression and PUFA concentration compared to WT mice. Our findings suggest that neuronal LPL is involved in the regulation of body weight and composition in response to either the change in quantity (HF feeding) or quality (n-3 PUFA-enriched) of dietary fat. The precise role of LPL in lipid sensing in the brain requires further investigation. PMID:27282869

  7. Effect of dietary selenium levels on methylbenzylnitrosamine-induced esophageal cancer in rats.

    PubMed

    Nauss, K M; Bueche, D; Soule, N; Fu, P; Yew, K; Newberne, P M

    1986-10-01

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats fed selenium deficient diets received either 0 ppm, 0.15 ppm or 4.0 ppm selenium in the drinking water. Animals were treated with methylbenzylnitrosamine (MBN). Dietary selenium deficiency had no effect on MBN-induced esophageal carcinogenesis. Animals treated with 4 ppm selenium in the drinking water during the initiation and post-initiation period had the same number of tumors as the group which received 0.15 ppm selenium for the entire experimental period. The incidence and frequency of carcinomas was lowest in the group which was supplemented with extra selenium (4.0 ppm) during the period of carcinogen administration and highest in the group which received 4.0 ppm selenium during the post-initiation period. PMID:3768858

  8. Selenium Deficiency-Induced Inflammation and Increased Expression of Regulating Inflammatory Cytokines in the Chicken Gastrointestinal Tract.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xuejiao; Zhang, Ziwei; Xing, Houjuan; Yu, Jiao; Zhang, Naisheng; Xu, Shiwen

    2016-09-01

    Selenium (Se), a nutritionally essential trace element, plays an important role in various aspects of health for a wide range of species, including birds. Se deficiency inhibits the growth of immune organs and decreases immune function, leading to many inflammatory diseases. The present study determined the effects and mechanism of dietary Se deficiency on gastrointestinal tract tissue inflammation. The histopathological changes showed that Se deficiency induced inflammatory lesions in the gastrointestinal tract tissues (glandular stomach, gizzard, duodenum, small intestine, and rectum). The expression levels of PTGE (prostagland E synthase), COX-2 (cyclooxygenase-2), TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor α), and NF-κB (nuclear transfer factor κB) in the gastrointestinal tract tissues (glandular stomach, gizzard, duodenum, small intestine, and rectum) were determined by qPCR on days 15, 25, 35, 45, and 55, respectively. The results showed that Se deficiency induced high expression levels of PTGE, COX-2, TNF-α, and NF-κB in the gastrointestinal tract tissues. The effects were more obvious in the duodenum and small intestine than those in the glandular stomach, gizzard, and rectum. In addition, the expression levels of these proteins in the gastrointestinal tract tissue increased in a time-dependent manner with Se deficiency feeding time. Furthermore, Se deficiency induced the production of pro-inflammatory factors, thus aggravating inflammatory lesions in the gastrointestinal tract. The effect of Se deficiency on inflammation and other gastrointestinal tract diseases should be further studied. PMID:26899319

  9. Dietary methyl donor deficiency during pregnancy in rats shapes learning and anxiety in offspring.

    PubMed

    Konycheva, Galina; Dziadek, Marie A; Ferguson, Lynnette R; Krägeloh, Christian U; Coolen, Marcel W; Davison, Michael; Breier, Bernhard H

    2011-10-01

    Two important lines of research have enhanced our understanding of the molecular role of nutrition in influencing behavior. First, exposure to an adverse environment during early life can influence the long-term behavior of the offspring. Second, regulation of the nervous system development and functioning appears to involve epigenetic mechanisms that require a continuous supply of methyl group donors in food. We hypothesized that a maternal diet during pregnancy deficient in methyl donors (MDD) may lead to altered behavior in offspring through permanent changes in hippocampal DNA methylation. We used a rat model of prenatal dietary MDD to test this hypothesis in female offspring as they aged. Prenatal MDD reduced birth weight, litter size, and newborn viability. Aged female offspring of MDD mothers showed increased anxiety and increased learning ability in comparison with control diet group offspring. To explore the role of MDD on epigenetic mechanisms in the brain of adult offspring, we studied expression and methylation of 4 selected genes coding for glucocorticoid receptor, hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 11 type 2, neuronatin, and reelin proteins in the hippocampus. No major group differences in methylation or expression of the studied genes were detected, except for a significant down-regulation of the reelin gene in the MDD female offspring. The prenatal MDD diet caused intrauterine growth restriction, associated with long-term effects on the behavior of the offspring. However, the observed behavioral differences between the MDD and control diet offspring cannot be explained by epigenetic regulation of the specific genes investigated in this study. PMID:22074804

  10. Suppression of muscle protein turnover and amino acid degradation by dietary protein deficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawa, N. E. Jr; Goldberg, A. L.

    1992-01-01

    To define the adaptations that conserve amino acids and muscle protein when dietary protein intake is inadequate, rats (60-70 g final wt) were fed a normal or protein-deficient (PD) diet (18 or 1% lactalbumin), and their muscles were studied in vitro. After 7 days on the PD diet, both protein degradation and synthesis fell 30-40% in skeletal muscles and atria. This fall in proteolysis did not result from reduced amino acid supply to the muscle and preceded any clear decrease in plasma amino acids. Oxidation of branched-chain amino acids, glutamine and alanine synthesis, and uptake of alpha-aminoisobutyrate also fell by 30-50% in muscles and adipose tissue of PD rats. After 1 day on the PD diet, muscle protein synthesis and amino acid uptake decreased by 25-40%, and after 3 days proteolysis and leucine oxidation fell 30-45%. Upon refeeding with the normal diet, protein synthesis also rose more rapidly (+30% by 1 day) than proteolysis, which increased significantly after 3 days (+60%). These different time courses suggest distinct endocrine signals for these responses. The high rate of protein synthesis and low rate of proteolysis during the first 3 days of refeeding a normal diet to PD rats contributes to the rapid weight gain ("catch-up growth") of such animals.

  11. Dietary xenosterols lead to infertility and loss of abdominal adipose tissue in sterolin-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Solca, Curzio; Tint, G Stephen; Patel, Shailendra B

    2013-02-01

    The investigation of the human disease sitosterolemia (MIM 210250) has shed light not only on the pathways by which dietary sterols may traffic but also on how the mammalian body rids itself of cholesterol and defends against xenosterols. Two genes, ABCG5 and ABCG8, located at the sitosterolemia locus, each encodes a membrane-bound ABC half-transporter and constitutes a functional unit whose activity has now been shown to account for biliary and intestinal sterol excretion. Knockout mice deficient in Abcg5 or Abcg8 recapitulate many of the phenotypic features of sitosterolemia. During the course of our studies to characterize these knockout mice, we noted that these mice, raised on normal rodent chow, exhibited infertility as well as loss of abdominal fat. We show that, although sitosterolemia does not lead to any structural defects or to any overt endocrine defects, fertility could be restored if xenosterols are specifically blocked from entry and that the loss of fat is also reversed by a variety of maneuvers that limit xenosterol accumulation. These studies show that xenosterols may have a significant biological impact on normal mammalian physiology and that the Abcg5 or Abcg8 knockout mouse model may prove useful in investigating the role of xenosterols on mammalian physiology. PMID:23180829

  12. Cathepsin K Deficiency Suppresses Disuse-Induced Bone Loss.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Shuichi; Izu, Yayoi; Arayal, Smriti; Kawasaki, Makiri; Hata, Koki; Pawaputanon Na Mahasarakhahm, Chantida; Izumi, Yuichi; Saftig, Paul; Kaneko, Kazuo; Noda, Masaki; Ezura, Yoichi

    2016-05-01

    Unloading induces bone loss and causes disuse osteoporosis. However, the mechanism underlying disuse osteoporosis is still incompletely understood. Here, we examined the effects of cathepsin K (CatK) deficiency on disuse osteoporosis induced by using sciatic neurectomy (Nx) model. After 4 weeks of surgery, CatK KO and WT mice were sacrificed and subjected to analyses. For cancellous bone rich region, Nx reduced the bone mineral density (BMD) compared to the BMD in the sham operated side in wild type mice. In contrast, CatK deficiency suppressed such Nx-induced reduction of BMD in cancellous bone. Nx also reduced BMD in the mid shaft cortical bone compared to the BMD in the corresponding region on the sham operated side in wild type mice. In contrast, CatK deficiency suppressed such Nx-induced reduction of BMD in the mid shaft cortical bone. Bone volume (BV/TV) was reduced by Nx in WT mice. In contrast, Cat-K deficiency suppressed such reduction in bone volume. Interestingly, CatK deficiency suppressed osteoclast number and osteoclast surface in the Nx side compared to sham side. When bone marrow cells obtained from Nx side femur of CatK-KO mice were cultured, the levels of the calcified area in culture were increased. Further examination of gene expression indicated that Nx suppressed the expression of genes encoding osteoblast-phenotype-related molecules such as Runx2 and alkaline phosphatase in WT mice. In contrast, CatK deficiency suppressed such reduction. These data indicate that CatK is involved in the disuse-induced bone mass reduction. PMID:26460818

  13. Influences of dietary biotin and avidin on growth, survival, deficiency syndrome and hepatic gene expression of juvenile Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus.

    PubMed

    Sarker, Pallab Kumer; Yossa, Rodrigue; Karanth, Santhosh; Ekker, Marc; Vandenberg, Grant W

    2012-08-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the interactive effects of dietary biotin and avidin on growth, feed conversion, survival and deficiency syndrome of tilapia and to determine the influence of dietary biotin deficiency on the expression of key genes related to biotin metabolism in tilapia. Six iso-nitrogenous and iso-energetic diets based on a common purified basal diet (vitamin-free casein as the protein source) were prepared for this study. The six dietary groups were 0 g avidin with 0 mg biotin (A0B0), 0 g avidin with 0.06 mg biotin/kg diet (A0B1), four avidin-supplemented diets incorporating at a incremental concentrations 0.25, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 g/kg diet with 0.06 mg biotin/kg diet (A15B1, A30B1, A60B1 and A120B1). Fish were hand-fed three times a day to apparent satiation for 12 weeks. Each diet was fed to three replicate groups of fish. Fish were kept in glass aquaria in a recirculating aquaculture system under standardized environmental conditions. Growth was significantly higher in fish that received the biotin-supplemented diet (A0B1), compared to diets lacking biotin or supplemented with avidin. Tilapia fed higher concentration of avidin-supplemented diets (A60B1 and A120B1) showed significant growth depression and displayed severe deficiency syndromes such as lethargy, anorexia, circular swimming and convulsions, which ultimately lead to death. There was a strong proportional linear relationship between the avidin content of the diet and feed conversion ratio, FCR (y = 0.43x + 0.135; r = 0.960; P < 0.001) and strong inverse relationship with protein efficiency ratio, PER (y = -0.309x + 2.195; r = 0.961; P < 0.0001). Elevated levels of biotinidase, pyruvate carboxylase, propionyl-CoA carboxylase-A and propionyl-CoA carboxylase-B transcripts were noted in fish fed all graded level of avidin-supplemented diets. A broken-line analysis indicated that feeding tilapia a diet with 44.5 times more avidin than the dietary biotin

  14. Iron deficiency is uncommon among lactating women in urban Nepal, despite a high risk of inadequate dietary iron intake.

    PubMed

    Henjum, Sigrun; Manger, Mari; Skeie, Eli; Ulak, Manjeswori; Thorne-Lyman, Andrew L; Chandyo, Ram; Shrestha, Prakash S; Locks, Lindsey; Ulvik, Rune J; Fawzi, Wafaie W; Strand, Tor A

    2014-07-14

    The main objective of the present study was to examine the association between dietary Fe intake and dietary predictors of Fe status and Hb concentration among lactating women in Bhaktapur, Nepal. We included 500 randomly selected lactating women in a cross-sectional survey. Dietary information was obtained through three interactive 24 h recall interviews including personal recipes. Concentrations of Hb and plasma ferritin and soluble transferrin receptors were measured. The daily median Fe intake from food was 17·5 mg, and 70% of the women were found to be at the risk of inadequate dietary Fe intake. Approximately 90% of the women had taken Fe supplements in pregnancy. The prevalence of anaemia was 20% (Hb levels < 123 g/l) and that of Fe deficiency was 5% (plasma ferritin levels < 15 μg/l). In multiple regression analyses, there was a weak positive association between dietary Fe intake and body Fe (β 0·03, 95% CI 0·014, 0·045). Among the women with children aged < 6 months, but not those with older infants, intake of Fe supplements in pregnancy for at least 6 months was positively associated with body Fe (P for interaction < 0·01). Due to a relatively high dietary intake of non-haem Fe combined with low bioavailability, a high proportion of the women in the present study were at the risk of inadequate intake of Fe. The low prevalence of anaemia and Fe deficiency may be explained by the majority of the women consuming Fe supplements in pregnancy. PMID:24708993

  15. Repletion of copper-deficient rats with dietary copper restores duodenal hephaestin protein and iron absorption.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Philip G; Demars, Lana C S

    2005-05-01

    Copper (Cu) deficiency in rats reduces the relative concentration of duodenal hephaestin (Hp), reduces iron (Fe) absorption, and causes anemia. An experiment was conducted to determine whether these effects could be reversed by dietary Cu repletion. Five groups of eight weanling male rats each were used. Group 1 was fed a Cu-adequate diet (5.0 mg Cu/kg; CuA) and Group 2 was fed a Cu-deficient diet (0.25 mg Cu/kg; CuD) for 28 days. The rats were fed 1.0 g each of their respective diets labeled with 59Fe (37 kBq/g), and the amount of label retained was measured one week later by whole-body-counting (WBC). Group 3 was fed a CuA diet and Groups 4 and 5 were fed a CuD diet for 28 days. Group 5 was then fed the CuA diet for another week while Groups 3 and 4 continued on their previous regimens. Rats in Groups 3, 4, and 5 were fed 1.0 g of diet labeled with 59Fe, and the amount of label retained was measured by WBC one week later. Rats were killed and duodenal enterocytes isolated for Hp protein analysis, whole blood was analyzed for hematological parameters, and various organs for 59Fe content. CuD rats absorbed less (P<0.05) Fe than CuA rats, the relative amount of duodenal Hp was less (P<0.05) in CuD rats, and the CuD rats developed anemia. After the CuD rats had been repleted with Cu for one week, Fe retention rose to values even higher (P<0.05) than those in CuA rats. After two weeks, the relative amount of duodenal Hp was higher (P<0.05) than normal, and most signs of anemia were reversed. Liver 59Fe was elevated in CuD rats, but was restored to normal upon Cu repletion. These findings suggest a strong association between duodenal Hp abundance and Fe absorption in the CuD rat, and that reduced Fe absorption is an important factor in the cause of anemia. PMID:15855298

  16. Cardiac Electrophysiological Alterations in Heart/Muscle-Specific Manganese-Superoxide Dismutase-Deficient Mice: Prevention by a Dietary Antioxidant Polyphenol

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Akio; Tagashira, Motoyuki; Kanda, Tomomasa; Nakaya, Haruaki

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac electrophysiological alterations induced by chronic exposure to reactive oxygen species and protective effects of dietary antioxidant have not been thoroughly examined. We recorded surface electrocardiograms (ECG) and evaluated cellular electrophysiological abnormalities in enzymatically-dissociated left ventricular (LV) myocytes in heart/muscle-specific manganese-superoxide dismutase-deficient (H/M-Sod2−/−) mice, which exhibit dilated cardiomyopathy due to increased oxidative stress. We also investigated the influences of intake of apple polyphenols (AP) containing mainly procyanidins with potent antioxidant activity. The QRS and QT intervals of ECG recorded in H/M-Sod2−/− mice were prolonged. The effective refractory period in the LV myocardium of H/M-Sod2−/− mice was prolonged, and susceptibility to ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation induced by rapid ventricular pacing was increased. Action potential duration in H/M-Sod2−/− LV myocytes was prolonged, and automaticity was enhanced. The density of the inwardly rectifier K+ current (IK1) was decreased in the LV cells of H/M-Sod2−/− mice. The AP intake partially improved these electrophysiological alterations and extended the lifespan in H/M-Sod2−/− mice. Thus, chronic exposure of the heart to oxidative stress produces a variety of electrophysiological abnormalities, increased susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias, and action potential changes associated with the reduced density of IK1. Dietary intake of antioxidant nutrients may prevent oxidative stress-induced electrophysiological disturbances. PMID:24772433

  17. Vitamin A Deficiency Induces Congenital Spinal Deformities in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zheng; Shen, Jianxiong; Wu, William Ka Kei; Wang, Xiaojuan; Liang, Jinqian; Qiu, Guixing; Liu, Jiaming

    2012-01-01

    Most cases of congenital spinal deformities were sporadic and without strong evidence of heritability. The etiology of congenital spinal deformities is still elusive and assumed to be multi-factorial. The current study seeks to elucidate the effect of maternal vitamin A deficiency and the production of congenital spinal deformities in the offsping. Thirty two female rats were randomized into two groups: control group, which was fed a normal diet; vitamin A deficient group, which were given vitamin A-deficient diet from at least 2 weeks before mating till delivery. Three random neonatal rats from each group were killed the next day of parturition. Female rats were fed an AIN-93G diet sufficient in vitamin A to feed the rest of neonates for two weeks until euthanasia. Serum levels of vitamin A were assessed in the adult and filial rats. Anteroposterior (AP) spine radiographs were obtained at week 2 after delivery to evaluate the presence of the skeletal abnormalities especially of spinal deformities. Liver and vertebral body expression of retinaldehyde dehydrogenase (RALDHs) and RARs mRNA was assessed by reverse transcription-real time PCR. VAD neonates displayed many skeletal malformations in the cervical, thoracic, the pelvic and sacral and limbs regions. The incidence of congenital scoliosis was 13.79% (8/58) in the filial rats of vitamin A deficiency group and 0% in the control group. Furthermore, vitamin A deficiency negatively regulate the liver and verterbral body mRNA levels of RALDH1, RALDH2, RALDH3, RAR-α, RAR-β and RAR-γ. Vitamin A deficiency in pregnancy may induce congenital spinal deformities in the postnatal rats. The decreases of RALDHs and RARs mRNA expression induced by vitamin A deprivation suggest that vertebral birth defects may be caused by a defect in RA signaling pathway during somitogenesis. PMID:23071590

  18. Flavonoids, the emerging dietary supplement against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Athira, K V; Madhana, Rajaram Mohanrao; Lahkar, Mangala

    2016-03-25

    The letter illustrates the emerging potential of flavonoids as dietary supplement to ameliorate cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and refers to the recent article on ''Anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory effects of naringin on cisplatin-induced renal injury in the rat'' by Chtourou et al. They demonstrated that supplementation of naringin, a flavanone glycoside, found in grape and citrus fruit species, can attenuate cisplatin-induced renal dysfunction via restoration of redox balance and suppression of inflammation, NF-κB activation and apoptosis. The chemotherapeutic efficacy of cisplatin has always compelled the researchers to find solution to ameliorate its side effects. In recent years, numerous candidates have been evaluated for their protective potential against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and flavonoids have come up with promising results. The future prospects might be promising with a proper refinement and collective integration of the preclinical and clinical research in the field of flavonoid supplementation to cisplatin therapy. PMID:26876905

  19. Nutrigenomics analysis reveals that copper deficiency and dietary sucrose up-regulate inflammation, fibrosis and lipogenic pathways in a mature rat model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Tallino, Savannah; Duffy, Megan; Ralle, Martina; Cortés, María Paz; Latorre, Mauricio; Burkhead, Jason L

    2015-10-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) prevalence is increasing worldwide, with the affected US population estimated near 30%. Diet is a recognized risk factor in the NAFLD spectrum, which includes nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and fibrosis. Low hepatic copper (Cu) was recently linked to clinical NAFLD/NASH severity. Simple sugar consumption including sucrose and fructose is implicated in NAFLD, while consumption of these macronutrients also decreases liver Cu levels. Though dietary sugar and low Cu are implicated in NAFLD, transcript-level responses that connect diet and pathology are not established. We have developed a mature rat model of NAFLD induced by dietary Cu deficiency, human-relevant high sucrose intake (30% w/w) or both factors in combination. Compared to the control diet with adequate Cu and 10% (w/w) sucrose, rats fed either high-sucrose or low-Cu diet had increased hepatic expression of genes involved in inflammation and fibrogenesis, including hepatic stellate cell activation, while the combination of diet factors also increased ATP citrate lyase and fatty acid synthase gene transcription (fold change > 2, P < 0.02). Low dietary Cu decreased hepatic and serum Cu (P ≤ 0.05), promoted lipid peroxidation and induced NAFLD-like histopathology, while the combined factors also induced fasting hepatic insulin resistance and liver damage. Neither low Cu nor 30% sucrose in the diet led to enhanced weight gain. Taken together, transcript profiles, histological and biochemical data indicate that low Cu and high sucrose promote hepatic gene expression and physiological responses associated with NAFLD and NASH, even in the absence of obesity or severe steatosis. PMID:26033743

  20. Vitamin A-Deficient Diet Accelerated Atherogenesis in Apolipoprotein E−/− Mice and Dietary β-Carotene Prevents This Consequence

    PubMed Central

    Relevy, Noa Zolberg; Harats, Dror; Harari, Ayelet; Ben-Amotz, Ami; Bitzur, Rafael; Rühl, Ralph; Shaish, Aviv

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin A is involved in regulation of glucose concentrations, lipid metabolism, and inflammation, which are major risk factors for atherogenesis. However, the effect of vitamin A deficiency on atherogenesis has not been investigated. Therefore, the objective of the current study was to examine whether vitamin A deficiency accelerates atherogenesis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice (apoE−/−). ApoE−/− mice were allocated into the following groups: control, fed vitamin A-containing chow diet; BC, fed chow diet fortified with Dunaliella powder containing βc isomers; VAD, fed vitamin A-deficient diet; and VAD-BC group, fed vitamin A-deficient diet fortified with a Dunaliella powder. Following 15 weeks of treatment, liver retinol concentration had decreased significantly in the VAD group to about 30% that of control group. Vitamin A-deficient diet significantly increased both plasma cholesterol concentrations and the atherosclerotic lesion area at the aortic sinus (+61%) compared to the control group. Dietary βc fortification inhibited the elevation in plasma cholesterol and retarded atherogenesis in mice fed the vitamin A-deficient diet. The results imply that dietary vitamin A deficiency should be examined as a risk factor for atherosclerosis and that dietary βc, as a sole source of retinoids, can compensate for vitamin A deficiency. PMID:25802864

  1. Exercise-induced oxidative stress: glutathione supplementation and deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sen, C K; Atalay, M; Hänninen, O

    1994-11-01

    Glutathione (GSH) plays a central role in coordinating the synergism between different lipid- and aqueous-phase antioxidants. We documented 1) how exogenous GSH and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) may affect exhaustive exercise-induced changes in tissue GSH status, lipid peroxides [thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS)], and endurance and 2) the relative role of endogenous GSH in the circumvention of exercise-induced oxidative stress by using GSH-deficient [L-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO)-treated] rats. Intraperitoneal injection of GSH remarkably increased plasma GSH; exogenous GSH per se was an ineffective delivery agent of GSH to tissues. Repeated administration of GSH (1 time/day for 3 days) increased blood and kidney total GSH [TGSH; GSH+oxidized GSH (GSSG)]. Neither GSH nor NAC influenced endurance to exhaustion. NAC decreased exercise-induced GSH oxidation in the lung and blood. BSO decreased TGSH pools in the liver, lung, blood, and plasma by approximately 50% and in skeletal muscle and heart by 80-90%. Compared with control, resting GSH-deficient rats had lower GSSG in the liver, red gastrocnemius muscle, heart, and blood; similar GSSG/TGSH ratios in the liver, heart, lung, blood, and plasma; higher GSSG/TGSH ratios in the skeletal muscle; and more TBARS in skeletal muscle, heart, and plasma. In contrast to control, exhaustive exercise of GSH-deficient rats did not decrease TGSH in the liver, muscle, or heart or increase TGSH of plasma; GSSG of muscle, blood, or plasma; or TBARS of plasma or muscle. GSH-deficient rats had approximately 50% reduced endurance, which suggests a critical role of endogenous GSH in the circumvention of exercise-induced oxidative stress and as a determinant of exercise performance. PMID:7868431

  2. Immunomodulatory and Antioxidant Effects of Purple Sweet Potato Extract in LP-BM5 Murine Leukemia Virus-Induced Murine Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ok-Kyung; Nam, Da-Eun; Yoon, Ho-Geun; Baek, Sun Jung; Jun, Woojin; Lee, Jeongmin

    2015-08-01

    The immunomodulatory effects of a dietary supplement of purple sweet potato extract (PSPE) in LP-BM5 murine leukemia virus (MuLV)-induced immune-deficient mice were investigated. Mice were divided into six groups: normal control, infected control (LP-BM5 MuLV infection), positive control (LP-BM5 MuLV infection+dietary supplement of red ginseng 300 mg/kg), purple sweet potato water extract (PSPWE) (LP-BM5 MuLV infection+dietary supplement of PSPE 300 mg/kg), PSP10EE (LP-BM5 MuLV infection+dietary supplement of 10% ethanol PSPE 300 mg/kg), and PSP80EE (LP-BM5 MuLV infection+dietary supplement of 80% ethanol PSPE 300 mg/kg). Dietary supplementation began on the day of LP-BM5 MuLV infection and continued for 12 weeks. Dietary supplementation of PSPE inhibited LP-BM5 MuLV-induced splenomegaly and lymphadenopathy and attenuated the suppression of T- and B-cell proliferation and T helper 1/T helper 2 cytokine imbalance in LP-BM5 MuLV-infected mice. Dietary supplement of PSPE increased the activity of the antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase. The data suggest that PSPE may ameliorate immune dysfunction due to LP-BM5 MuLV infection by modulating antioxidant defense systems. PMID:26076116

  3. Oxidative stress induces mitochondrial fragmentation in frataxin-deficient cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lefevre, Sophie; Sliwa, Dominika; Rustin, Pierre; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Santos, Renata

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Yeast frataxin-deficiency leads to increased proportion of fragmented mitochondria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative stress induces complete mitochondrial fragmentation in {Delta}yfh1 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative stress increases mitochondrial fragmentation in patient fibroblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of mitochondrial fission in {Delta}yfh1 induces oxidative stress resistance. -- Abstract: Friedreich ataxia (FA) is the most common recessive neurodegenerative disease. It is caused by deficiency in mitochondrial frataxin, which participates in iron-sulfur cluster assembly. Yeast cells lacking frataxin ({Delta}yfh1 mutant) showed an increased proportion of fragmented mitochondria compared to wild-type. In addition, oxidative stress induced complete fragmentation of mitochondria in {Delta}yfh1 cells. Genetically controlled inhibition of mitochondrial fission in these cells led to increased resistance to oxidative stress. Here we present evidence that in yeast frataxin-deficiency interferes with mitochondrial dynamics, which might therefore be relevant for the pathophysiology of FA.

  4. Fat-specific Dicer deficiency accelerates aging and mitigates several effects of dietary restriction in mice

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Felipe C. G.; Branquinho, Jéssica L. O.; Brandão, Bruna B.; Guerra, Beatriz A.; Silva, Ismael D.; Frontini, Andrea; Thomou, Thomas; Sartini, Loris; Cinti, Saverio; Kahn, C. Ronald; Festuccia, William T.; Kowaltowski, Alicia J.; Mori, Marcelo A.

    2016-01-01

    Aging increases the risk of type 2 diabetes, and this can be prevented by dietary restriction (DR). We have previously shown that DR inhibits the downregulation of miRNAs and their processing enzymes - mainly Dicer - that occurs with aging in mouse white adipose tissue (WAT). Here we used fat-specific Dicer knockout mice (AdicerKO) to understand the contributions of adipose tissue Dicer to the metabolic effects of aging and DR. Metabolomic data uncovered a clear distinction between the serum metabolite profiles of Lox control and AdicerKO mice, with a notable elevation of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) in AdicerKO. These profiles were associated with reduced oxidative metabolism and increased lactate in WAT of AdicerKO mice and were accompanied by structural and functional changes in mitochondria, particularly under DR. AdicerKO mice displayed increased mTORC1 activation in WAT and skeletal muscle, where Dicer expression is not affected. This was accompanied by accelerated age-associated insulin resistance and premature mortality. Moreover, DR-induced insulin sensitivity was abrogated in AdicerKO mice. This was reverted by rapamycin injection, demonstrating that insulin resistance in AdicerKO mice is caused by mTORC1 hyperactivation. Our study evidences a DR-modulated role for WAT Dicer in controlling metabolism and insulin resistance. PMID:27241713

  5. Fat-specific Dicer deficiency accelerates aging and mitigates several effects of dietary restriction in mice.

    PubMed

    Reis, Felipe C G; Branquinho, Jéssica L O; Brandão, Bruna B; Guerra, Beatriz A; Silva, Ismael D; Frontini, Andrea; Thomou, Thomas; Sartini, Loris; Cinti, Saverio; Kahn, C Ronald; Festuccia, William T; Kowaltowski, Alicia J; Mori, Marcelo A

    2016-06-01

    Aging increases the risk of type 2 diabetes, and this can be prevented by dietary restriction (DR). We have previously shown that DR inhibits the downregulation of miRNAs and their processing enzymes - mainly Dicer - that occurs with aging in mouse white adipose tissue (WAT). Here we used fat-specific Dicer knockout mice (AdicerKO) to understand the contributions of adipose tissue Dicer to the metabolic effects of aging and DR. Metabolomic data uncovered a clear distinction between the serum metabolite profiles of Lox control and AdicerKO mice, with a notable elevation of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) in AdicerKO. These profiles were associated with reduced oxidative metabolism and increased lactate in WAT of AdicerKO mice and were accompanied by structural and functional changes in mitochondria, particularly under DR. AdicerKO mice displayed increased mTORC1 activation in WAT and skeletal muscle, where Dicer expression is not affected. This was accompanied by accelerated age-associated insulin resistance and premature mortality. Moreover, DR-induced insulin sensitivity was abrogated in AdicerKO mice. This was reverted by rapamycin injection, demonstrating that insulin resistance in AdicerKO mice is caused by mTORC1 hyperactivation. Our study evidences a DR-modulated role for WAT Dicer in controlling metabolism and insulin resistance. PMID:27241713

  6. Role of dietary flavonoids in amelioration of sugar induced cataractogenesis.

    PubMed

    Patil, Kapil K; Meshram, Rohan J; Dhole, Nagesh A; Gacche, Rajesh N

    2016-03-01

    Sugar induced cataractogenesis and visual impairment is more prominent ophthalmic problem in humans suffering from diabetes. Flavonoids have been identified as one of the therapeutically important class of phytochemicals possessing myriad of biological activities. Analyzing the anti-cataract effects of flavonoids from natural sources is an important aspect owing to their bioavailability in variety of dietary sources. In the present study a panel of ten dietary flavonoids like 3, 6-dihydroxy flavone, 3, 7-dihydroxy flavone, chrysin, 3-hydroxy-7-methoxy flavone, apigenin, genistein, baicalein, galangin, Biochanin-A, and diosmin were evaluated for their anti-cataract effects in sugar induced lens model studies. Series of parameters like role of flavonoids in glycation induced lens opacity, protein aggregation measurements, carbonyl group formation: a biochemical marker of glycation reaction, non-tryptophan fluorescence: a marker of formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and assessment of (experimental and in silico) aldose reductase inhibition: a key enzyme of polyol pathway involved in cataractogenesis. The results of the study clearly demonstrated the impressive anti-cataract activity of chrysin followed by significant activity by apigenin, baicalein and genistein. The results of the present study may find applications in formulation of functional foods and neutraceuticals for the management of diabetic cataract. PMID:26829674

  7. Severe but Not Moderate Vitamin B12 Deficiency Impairs Lipid Profile, Induces Adiposity, and Leads to Adverse Gestational Outcome in Female C57BL/6 Mice.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Shampa; Sinha, Jitendra Kumar; Putcha, Uday Kumar; Raghunath, Manchala

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency is widely prevalent in women of childbearing age, especially in developing countries. In the present study, through dietary restriction, we have established mouse models of severe and moderate vitamin B12 deficiencies to elucidate the impact on body composition, biochemical parameters, and reproductive performance. Female weanling C57BL/6 mice were fed for 4 weeks: (a) control AIN-76A diet, (b) vitamin B12-restricted AIN-76A diet with pectin as dietary fiber (severe deficiency group, as pectin inhibits vitamin B12 absorption), or (c) vitamin B12-restricted AIN-76A diet with cellulose as dietary fiber (moderate deficiency group as cellulose does not interfere with vitamin B12 absorption). After confirming deficiency, the mice were mated with male colony mice and maintained on their respective diets throughout pregnancy, lactation, and thereafter till 12 weeks. Severe vitamin B12 deficiency increased body fat% significantly, induced adiposity and altered lipid profile. Pregnant dams of both the deficient groups developed anemia. Severe vitamin B12 deficiency decreased the percentage of conception and litter size, pups were small-for-gestational-age and had significantly lower body weight at birth as well as weaning. Most of the offspring born to severely deficient dams died within 24 h of birth. Stress markers and adipocytokines were elevated in severe deficiency with concomitant decrease in antioxidant defense. The results show that severe but not moderate vitamin B12 restriction had profound impact on the physiology of C57BL/6 mice. Oxidative and corticosteroid stress, inflammation and poor antioxidant defense seem to be the probable underlying mechanisms mediating the deleterious effects. PMID:26835453

  8. Severe but Not Moderate Vitamin B12 Deficiency Impairs Lipid Profile, Induces Adiposity, and Leads to Adverse Gestational Outcome in Female C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Shampa; Sinha, Jitendra Kumar; Putcha, Uday Kumar; Raghunath, Manchala

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency is widely prevalent in women of childbearing age, especially in developing countries. In the present study, through dietary restriction, we have established mouse models of severe and moderate vitamin B12 deficiencies to elucidate the impact on body composition, biochemical parameters, and reproductive performance. Female weanling C57BL/6 mice were fed for 4 weeks: (a) control AIN-76A diet, (b) vitamin B12-restricted AIN-76A diet with pectin as dietary fiber (severe deficiency group, as pectin inhibits vitamin B12 absorption), or (c) vitamin B12-restricted AIN-76A diet with cellulose as dietary fiber (moderate deficiency group as cellulose does not interfere with vitamin B12 absorption). After confirming deficiency, the mice were mated with male colony mice and maintained on their respective diets throughout pregnancy, lactation, and thereafter till 12 weeks. Severe vitamin B12 deficiency increased body fat% significantly, induced adiposity and altered lipid profile. Pregnant dams of both the deficient groups developed anemia. Severe vitamin B12 deficiency decreased the percentage of conception and litter size, pups were small-for-gestational-age and had significantly lower body weight at birth as well as weaning. Most of the offspring born to severely deficient dams died within 24 h of birth. Stress markers and adipocytokines were elevated in severe deficiency with concomitant decrease in antioxidant defense. The results show that severe but not moderate vitamin B12 restriction had profound impact on the physiology of C57BL/6 mice. Oxidative and corticosteroid stress, inflammation and poor antioxidant defense seem to be the probable underlying mechanisms mediating the deleterious effects. PMID:26835453

  9. Dysferlin deficiency confers increased susceptibility to coxsackievirus-induced cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Wong, Jerry; Fung, Gabriel; Shi, Junyan; Deng, Haoyu; Zhang, Jingchun; Bernatchez, Pascal; Luo, Honglin

    2015-10-01

    Coxsackievirus infection can lead to viral myocarditis and its sequela, dilated cardiomyopathy, which represent major causes of cardiovascular mortality worldwide in children. Yet, the host genetic susceptible factors and the underlying mechanisms by which viral infection damages cardiac function remain to be fully resolved. Dysferlin is a transmembrane protein highly expressed in skeletal and cardiac muscles. In humans, mutations in the dysferlin gene can cause limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B and Miyoshi myopathy. Dysferlin deficiency has also been linked to cardiomyopathy. Defective muscle membrane repair has been suggested to be an important mechanism responsible for muscle degeneration in dysferlin-deficient patients and animals. Using both naturally occurring and genetically engineered dysferlin-deficient mice, we demonstrated that loss of dysferlin confers increased susceptibility to coxsackievirus infection and myocardial damage. More interestingly, we found that dysferlin is cleaved following coxsackieviral infection through the proteolytic activity of virally encoded proteinases, suggesting an important mechanism underlying virus-induced cardiac dysfunction. Our results in this study not only identify dysferlin deficiency as a novel host risk factor for viral myocarditis but also reveal a key mechanism by which coxsackievirus infection impairs cardiac function, leading to the development of dilated cardiomyopathy. PMID:26073173

  10. High dose zinc supplementation induces hippocampal zinc deficiency and memory impairment with inhibition of BDNF signaling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Jing, Xiao-Peng; Zhang, Shou-Peng; Gu, Run-Xia; Tang, Fang-Xu; Wang, Xiu-Lian; Xiong, Yan; Qiu, Mei; Sun, Xu-Ying; Ke, Dan; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Liu, Rong

    2013-01-01

    Zinc ions highly concentrate in hippocampus and play a key role in modulating spatial learning and memory. At a time when dietary fortification and supplementation of zinc have increased the zinc consuming level especially in the youth, the toxicity of zinc overdose on brain function was underestimated. In the present study, weaning ICR mice were given water supplemented with 15 ppm Zn (low dose), 60 ppm Zn (high dose) or normal lab water for 3 months, the behavior and brain zinc homeostasis were tested. Mice fed high dose of zinc showed hippocampus-dependent memory impairment. Unexpectedly, zinc deficiency, but not zinc overload was observed in hippocampus, especially in the mossy fiber-CA3 pyramid synapse. The expression levels of learning and memory related receptors and synaptic proteins such as NMDA-NR2A, NR2B, AMPA-GluR1, PSD-93 and PSD-95 were significantly decreased in hippocampus, with significant loss of dendritic spines. In keeping with these findings, high dose intake of zinc resulted in decreased hippocampal BDNF level and TrkB neurotrophic signaling. At last, increasing the brain zinc level directly by brain zinc injection induced BDNF expression, which was reversed by zinc chelating in vivo. These results indicate that zinc plays an important role in hippocampus-dependent learning and memory and BDNF expression, high dose supplementation of zinc induces specific zinc deficiency in hippocampus, which further impair learning and memory due to decreased availability of synaptic zinc and BDNF deficit. PMID:23383172

  11. Dietary cholesterol directly induces acute inflammasome-dependent intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Progatzky, Fränze; Sangha, Navjyot J; Yoshida, Nagisa; McBrien, Marie; Cheung, Jackie; Shia, Alice; Scott, James; Marchesi, Julian R; Lamb, Jonathan R; Bugeon, Laurence; Dallman, Margaret J

    2014-01-01

    Prolonged ingestion of a cholesterol- or saturated fatty acid-enriched diet induces chronic, often systemic, auto-inflammatory responses resulting in significant health problems worldwide. In vivo information regarding the local and direct inflammatory effect of these dietary components in the intestine and, in particular, on the intestinal epithelium is lacking. Here we report that both mice and zebrafish exposed to high-fat (HFDs) or high-cholesterol (HCDs) diets develop acute innate inflammatory responses within hours, reflected in the localized interleukin-1β-dependent accumulation of myeloid cells in the intestine. Acute HCD-induced intestinal inflammation is dependent on cholesterol uptake via Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 and inflammasome activation involving apoptosis-associated Speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain, which leads to Caspase-1 activity in intestinal epithelial cells. Extended exposure to HCD results in localized, inflammation-dependent, functional dysregulation as well as systemic pathologies. Our model suggests that dietary cholesterol initiates intestinal inflammation in epithelial cells. PMID:25536194

  12. Dietary cholesterol directly induces acute inflammasome-dependent intestinal inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Progatzky, Fränze; Sangha, Navjyot J.; Yoshida, Nagisa; McBrien, Marie; Cheung, Jackie; Shia, Alice; Scott, James; Marchesi, Julian R.; Lamb, Jonathan R.; Bugeon, Laurence; Dallman, Margaret J.

    2014-01-01

    Prolonged ingestion of a cholesterol- or saturated fatty acid-enriched diet induces chronic, often systemic, auto-inflammatory responses resulting in significant health problems worldwide. In vivo information regarding the local and direct inflammatory effect of these dietary components in the intestine and, in particular, on the intestinal epithelium is lacking. Here we report that both mice and zebrafish exposed to high-fat (HFDs) or high-cholesterol (HCDs) diets develop acute innate inflammatory responses within hours, reflected in the localized interleukin-1β-dependent accumulation of myeloid cells in the intestine. Acute HCD-induced intestinal inflammation is dependent on cholesterol uptake via Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 and inflammasome activation involving apoptosis-associated Speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain, which leads to Caspase-1 activity in intestinal epithelial cells. Extended exposure to HCD results in localized, inflammation-dependent, functional dysregulation as well as systemic pathologies. Our model suggests that dietary cholesterol initiates intestinal inflammation in epithelial cells. PMID:25536194

  13. Serum lipids in rats as related to modifications in dietary fat, fiber, and sodium with magnesium deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, C.A.; Kubena, K.S. )

    1991-03-11

    Recommendations to modify dietary intake to attenuate risk of cardiovascular disease have been released by numerous governmental and health organizations. Since magnesium is associated with lipid metabolism and normal cardiovascular function, this study was designed to determine the effect of modifications in dietary fat, fiber, and sodium with magnesium deficiency on serum lipids and tissue minerals. The control (C) diet was based upon the AIN-76 diet formulation; the American (A) diet included average fat, fiber, and sodium levels in the US; and the recommended (R) diet was lower in fat and sodium and higher in fiber. Diets contained either 1,000 or 150 (L) mg Mg/kg diet. Male weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were fed one of the diets (C, CL, A, Al, R, RL) for six weeks. Levels of tissue Mg, Ca, Zn, and P were determined. Neither initial nor final body weights varied between groups. Serum levels of triglyceride were higher in the C and Cl groups than in the others. Serum cholesterol was lower in the R and Rl groups than in the Cl and A groups. Animals which were fed the diet modified with regard to fat, fiber, and sodium had lower serum cholesterol levels than did those fed the American diet. Magnesium deficiency was not consistently related to serum lipid levels.

  14. Effect of molybdenum-induced copper deficiency on in vivo and in vitro measures of neutrophil chemotaxis both before and following an inflammatory stressor.

    PubMed

    Arthington, J D; Spell, A R; Corah, L R; Blecha, F

    1996-11-01

    Twelve Angus x Hereford heifers (avg wt = 183.6 kg) were allotted by initial liver copper (Cu) concentrations into one of two treatments. Control (n = 6) heifers were fed a basal diet supplemented to provide a dietary Cu level of 10 ppm. Molybdenum (Mo)-induced Cu-deficient heifers (n = 6) were fed an identical basal diet supplemented with sodium molybdate (Cu:Mo ratio = 1:2.5), with dietary sulfur at .3% of the total diet. Dietary treatments were delivered for 120 d, at which time Mo-supplemented heifers were considered Cu-deficient (286 and 49 ppm liver Cu for control and Mo-induced Cu-deficient, respectively). Peripheral blood neutrophils were enumerated both before and after the administration of an inflammatory stressor, a subcutaneous injection (1.5 mL) of Freund's complete adjuvant. In vitro and in vivo measures of neutrophil chemotaxis were evaluated and the expression of two adhesion molecules, CD18 and L-selectin, were analyzed by flow cytometric procedures. Molybdenum-induced Cu deficiency increased (P < .01) the number of peripheral blood neutrophils; however, in vitro neutrophil chemotaxis was not affected. In vivo neutrophil chemotaxis tended (P < .08) to be increased in Mo-induced Cu-deficient heifers (1.55 vs 2.26 x 10(6) cells/ sponge for control and Mo-supplemented, respectively). No differences in CD18 or L-selectin expression were detected between treatments. However, CD18 expression was decreased (P < .05) in both treatments following adjuvant injection. These data suggest that Mo-induced Cu deficiency results in an increase in peripheral blood neutrophil number, without altering chemotactic ability and adhesion molecule expression. PMID:8923191

  15. 5-Lipoxygenase Deficiency Reduces Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity and Lethality

    PubMed Central

    Hohmann, Miriam S. N.; Cardoso, Renato D. R.; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A.; Crespigio, Jefferson; Cunha, Thiago M.; Alves-Filho, José C.; da Silva, Rosiane V.; Pinge-Filho, Phileno; Ferreira, Sergio H.; Cunha, Fernando Q.; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A.

    2013-01-01

    5-Lipoxygenase (5-LO) converts arachidonic acid into leukotrienes (LTs) and is involved in inflammation. At present, the participation of 5-LO in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity and liver damage has not been addressed. 5-LO deficient (5-LO−/−) mice and background wild type mice were challenged with APAP (0.3–6 g/kg) or saline. The lethality, liver damage, neutrophil and macrophage recruitment, LTB4, cytokine production, and oxidative stress were assessed. APAP induced a dose-dependent mortality, and the dose of 3 g/kg was selected for next experiments. APAP induced LTB4 production in the liver, the primary target organ in APAP toxicity. Histopathological analysis revealed that 5-LO−/− mice presented reduced APAP-induced liver necrosis and inflammation compared with WT mice. APAP-induced lethality, increase of plasma levels of aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase, liver cytokine (IL-1β, TNF-α, IFN-γ, and IL-10), superoxide anion, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances production, myeloperoxidase and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase activity, Nrf2 and gp91phox mRNA expression, and decrease of reduced glutathione and antioxidant capacity measured by 2,2′-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline 6-sulfonate) assay were prevented in 5-LO−/− mice compared to WT mice. Therefore, 5-LO deficiency resulted in reduced mortality due to reduced liver inflammatory and oxidative damage, suggesting 5-LO is a promising target to reduce APAP-induced lethality and liver inflammatory/oxidative damage. PMID:24288682

  16. Mitochondrial response to the BCKDK-deficiency: Some clues to understand the positive dietary response in this form of autism.

    PubMed

    Oyarzabal, A; Bravo-Alonso, I; Sánchez-Aragó, M; Rejas, M T; Merinero, B; García-Cazorla, A; Artuch, R; Ugarte, M; Rodríguez-Pombo, P

    2016-04-01

    Mutations on the mitochondrial-expressed Branched Chain α-Keto acid Dehydrogenase Kinase (BCKDK) gene have been recently associated with a novel dietary-treatable form of autism. But, being a mitochondrial metabolism disease, little is known about the impact on mitochondrial performance. Here, we analyze the mitochondrial response to the BCKDK-deficiency in patient's primary fibroblasts by measuring bioenergetics, ultra-structural and dynamic parameters. A two-fold increase in superoxide anion production, together with a reduction in ATP-linked respiration and intracellular ATP levels (down to 60%) detected in mutants fibroblasts point to a general bioenergetics depletion that could affect the mitochondrial dynamics and cell fate. Ultrastructure analysis of BCKDK-deficient fibroblasts shows an increased number of elongated mitochondria, apparently associated with changes in the mediator of inner mitochondria membrane fusion, GTPase OPA1 forms, and in the outer mitochondrial membrane, mitofusin 2/MFN2. Our data support a possible hyperfusion response of BCKDK-deficient mitochondria to stress. Cellular fate also seems to be affected as these fibroblasts show an altered proportion of the cells on G0/G1 and G2/M phases. Knockdown of BCKDK gene in control fibroblasts recapitulates most of these features. Same BCKDK-knockdown in a MSUD patient fibroblasts unmasks the direct involvement of the accelerated BCAAs catabolism in the mitochondrial dysfunction. All these data give us a clue to understand the positive dietary response to an overload of branched-chain amino acids. We hypothesize that a combination of the current therapeutic option with a protocol that considers the oxidative damage and energy expenditure, addressing the patients' individuality, might be useful for the physicians. PMID:26809120

  17. P8 deficiency increases cellular ROS and induces HO-1.

    PubMed

    Weis, Sebastian; Bielow, Tobias; Sommerer, Ines; Iovanna, Juan; Malicet, Cédric; Mössner, Joachim; Hoffmeister, Albrecht

    2015-01-01

    The gene p8 encodes for a small cytoprotective protein with no apparent enzymatic activity being proposed to act as co-transcription factor whose expression is increased during inflammation. Recent data from astrocytes demonstrates that p8 suppression leads to induction of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1). Here, we assessed the cross-talk between p8 and HO-1 in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) observing an increased expression of HO-1 in p8-deficient (p8(-/-)) MEFs in non-treated and treated conditions. This effect was independent of the cell cycle. Our findings revealed that generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was higher in p8(-/-) MEFs. Mitochondria and NADPH oxidases were not the origin of ROS. This observation was not restricted to MEF as suppression of p8 gene transcription in MiaPaCa-2 cells also led to increased intracellular ROS. Additionally, p8 deficiency did not affect the Rac1 dependant NADPH oxidase complex. Our data shows that p8 deficiency increases ROS and subsequently the expression of anti-oxidative enzymes, such as HO-1, suggesting an involvement in the anti-oxidative defense. Moreover, we suggest that the severity of AP observed in p8(-/-) mice is induced by an impaired anti oxidative capacity of the pancreas, which is caused by increased generation of ROS. PMID:25475530

  18. Dietary Nickel Chloride Induces Oxidative Intestinal Damage in Broilers

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bangyuan; Cui, Hengmin; Peng, Xi; Fang, Jing; Zuo, Zhicai; Deng, Junliang; Huang, Jianying

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the oxidative damage induced by dietary nickel chloride (NiCl2) in the intestinal mucosa of different parts of the intestine of broilers, including duodenum, jejunum and ileum. A total of 240 one-day-old broilers were divided into four groups and fed on a corn-soybean basal diet as control diet or the same basal diet supplemented with 300, 600 or 900 mg/kg NiCl2 during a 42-day experimental period. The results showed that the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and the ability to inhibit hydroxy radical and glutathione (GSH) content were significantly (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01) decreased in the 300, 600 and 900 mg/kg groups in comparison with those of the control group. In contrast, malondialdehyde (MDA) content was significantly (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01) higher in the 300, 600 and 900 mg/kg groups than that in the control group. It was concluded that dietary NiCl2 in excess of 300 mg/kg could cause oxidative damage in the intestinal mucosa in broilers, which finally impaired the intestinal functions including absorptive function and mucosal immune function. The oxidative damage might be a main mechanism on the effects of NiCl2 on the intestinal health of broilers. PMID:23702803

  19. High fructose feeding induces copper deficiency in Sprague-Dawley rats: A novel mechanism for obesity related fatty liver

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary copper deficiency is associated with a variety of manifestations of the metabolic syndrome, including hyperlipidemia and fatty liver. Fructose feeding has been reported to exacerbate complications of copper deficiency. In this study, we investigated whether copper deficiency plays a role in ...

  20. Persistent Optically Induced Magnetism in Oxygen-Deficient Strontium Titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, W. D.; Thompson, J. D.; Crooker, S. A.; Bombeck, M.; Ambwani, P.; Leighton, C.

    2014-03-01

    Strontium titanate (SrTiO3) is a foundational material in the emerging field of complex oxide electronics. While its electronic, optical, and lattice properties have been studied for decades, SrTiO3 has recently become a renewed focus of materials research owing to the discovery of magnetism and superconductivity at interfaces between SrTiO3 and other oxides. The formation and distribution of oxygen vacancies may play an essential but as-yet-incompletely understood role. Here we observe an optically induced and persistent magnetization in slightly oxygen-deficient bulk SrTiO3-δ crystals using magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy and SQUID magnetometry. The optically induced magnetization appears below ~18 K, persists for hours below 10 K, and is tunable via the polarization and wavelength of sub-bandgap (400-500 nm) light. These effects, which only occur in oxygen-deficient samples, reveal a detailed interplay between defects, magnetism, and light in oxide materials. W. D. Rice et al. submitted. See article on arXiv.

  1. Carnitine deficiency provokes cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Al-Majed, Abdulhakeem A

    2007-03-01

    This study investigates whether or not carnitine deficiency is a risk factor and could contribute to cisplatin-induced liver toxicity. A total of 60 adult male Wistar albino rats were divided into six groups. The first three groups were injected intraperitoneally with normal saline, propionyl-l-carnitine (500 mg/kg), and d-carnitine (500 mg/kg), respectively, for 10 successive days. The fourth, fifth and sixth groups were injected intraperitoneally with the same doses of normal saline, propionyl-l-carnitine and d-carnitine, respectively, for 5 successive days before and after a single dose of cisplatin (7 mg/kg). Administration of the standard nephrotoxic dose of cisplatin did not produce any changes in serum alanine transaminase and gamma-glutamyl transferase and no morphological changes in liver tissues. However, it did produce a significant increase in thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and total nitrate/nitrite and a significant decrease in reduced glutathione content in liver tissues. On the other hand, combined treatment with cisplatin and d-carnitine induced a dramatic increase in serum alanine transaminase and gamma-glutamyl transferase, as well as progressive reduction in total carnitine and ATP content in liver tissue. Moreover, histopathological examination of liver tissues confirmed the biochemical data, where cisplatin and d-carnitine combination showed signs of liver injury manifested as focal necro-inflammatory changes and portal inflammation. Interestingly, in carnitine supplemented rats using propionyl-l-carnitine, cisplatin did not produce any biochemical and histopathological changes in liver tissues. In conclusion, data from this study suggest for the first time that (1) carnitine deficiency is a risk factor and could precipitate cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity, (2) oxidative stress is not the main cause of cisplatin-related hepatotoxicity and (3) propionyl-l-carnitine prevents the development of cisplatin-induced liver injury. PMID

  2. Exon-specific DNA hypomethylation of the p53 gene of rat colon induced by dimethylhydrazine. Modulation by dietary folate.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Y. I.; Pogribny, I. P.; Salomon, R. N.; Choi, S. W.; Smith, D. E.; James, S. J.; Mason, J. B.

    1996-01-01

    Folate deficiency enhances colorectal carcinogenesis in dimethylhydrazine-treated rats. Folate is an important mediator of DNA methylation, an epigenetic modification of DNA that is known to be dysregulated in the early stages of colorectal cancer. This study investigated the effect of dimethylhydrazine on DNA methylation of the colonic p53 gene and the modulation of this effect by dietary folate. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed diets containing 0, 2, 8, or 40 mg of folate/kg of diet. Five weeks after diet initiation, dimethylhydrazine was injected weekly for fifteen weeks. Folate-depleted and folate-replete control animals did not receive dimethylhydrazine and were fed the 0- and 8-mg folate diets, respectively. The extent of p53 methylation was determined by a quantitative HpaII-polymerase chain reaction. In exons 6 and 7, significant p53 hypomethylation was observed in all dimethylhydrazine-treated rats relative to controls (P < 0.01), independent of dietary folate. In exon 8, significant p53 hypomethylation was observed only in the dimethylhydrazine-treated folate-depleted rats compared with controls (P = 0.038) and was effectively overcome by increasing levels of dietary folate (P = 0.008). In this model, dimethylhydrazine induces exon-specific p53 hypomethylation. In some exons, this occurs independent of dietary folate, and in others, increasing levels of dietary folate effectively override the induction of hypomethylation in a dose-responsive manner. This may be a mechanism by which increasing levels of dietary folate inhibit colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:8863662

  3. Effects of dietary zinc deficiency on gonadotrophin secretion and testicular growth in young male sheep.

    PubMed

    Martin, G B; White, C L

    1992-11-01

    The hypothesis that the secretion of gonadotrophins would be reduced by zinc deficiency was tested in five groups of four young Merino rams (initial liveweight 22 kg). Four groups were fed ad libitum with diets containing 4, 10, 17 or 27 micrograms Zn g-1. The effects of loss of appetite on the deficient diet was controlled by feeding a fifth group (pair-fed control) at a rate of 27 micrograms Zn g-1, but the amount of feed offered was restricted to that eaten voluntarily by the deficient (4 micrograms Zn g-1) group. Blood was sampled every 20 min for 32 h on two occasions before the treatments were imposed and 96 days later, at the end of the experiment. The rams were injected with gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH; 10 ng kg-1 i.v.) after each serial sampling, and with naloxone (1 mg kg-1 i.v.) 24 h after the end of the final GnRH test. In the group that were fed the diet with the lowest zinc content, the concentration of zinc in blood plasma was reduced to 18% of that in the pair-fed controls (P < 0.05) and was within the deficient range. The appetite of the deficient rams was half that of the controls fed 27 micrograms Zn g-1 ad libitum and there was no increase in liveweight or testicular diameter during pubertal development. Similar, but smaller, effects were observed in the pair-fed controls. There were no significant differences between pair-fed and deficient groups in the frequency of the luteinizing hormone (LH) pulses or in the concentration of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), but the secretion of gonadotrophins was markedly lower in both groups than in the control rams fed ad libitum. The response to GnRH was not affected by treatment, but the increase in LH pulse frequency evoked by naloxone was lower in the deficient animals than in other groups. The animals fed zinc at intermediate rates (10-17 micrograms g-1) showed similar responses to the controls fed ad libitum. It is concluded that the specific effects of zinc deficiency on testicular

  4. Further studies on the effects of dietary copper deficiency on rat pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Mylroie, A.A.; Boseman, A.; Kyle, J.

    1988-01-01

    The present study was designed to obtain further information on the effect of Cu deficiency on the pancreas and on pancreatic SOD activity. In a series of experiments, groups of male weanling Sprague Dawley rats were fed either a Cu sufficient Cu or Cu deficient purified AIN-'76 diet. Cu levels were determined in blood and selected organs by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Serum ceruloplasmin, hemoglobin and hematocrit values were determined. Aliquots of homogenized pancreas were assayed for CuSOD, MnSOD and other pancreatic enzyme activities. Although the experimental conditions appeared to be identical to those used in previous experiments, the results were different. In the experiments reported here, even though pancreatic weights decreased by week 7 relative to controls, there was no evidence of pancreatic atrophy. There was no significant decrease in CuSOD, but an unexpected increase in MnSOD activity by week 9 in rats fed Cu-deficient diet. An examination of all data indicates that the difference in results between previous experiments and those reported here was due to the varying degree of Cu deficiency produced: Cu deficiency was less pronounced in the present study.

  5. Ferric carboxymaltose-mediated attenuation of Doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in an iron deficiency rat model.

    PubMed

    Toblli, Jorge Eduardo; Rivas, Carlos; Cao, Gabriel; Giani, Jorge Fernando; Funk, Felix; Mizzen, Lee; Dominici, Fernando Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Since anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity (AIC), a complication of anthracycline-based chemotherapies, is thought to involve iron, concerns exist about using iron for anaemia treatment in anthracycline-receiving cancer patients. This study evaluated how intravenous ferric carboxymaltose (FCM) modulates the influence of iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) and doxorubicin (3-5 mg per kg body weight [BW]) on oxidative/nitrosative stress, inflammation, and cardiorenal function in spontaneously hypertensive stroke-prone (SHR-SP) rats. FCM was given as repeated small or single total dose (15 mg iron per kg BW), either concurrent with or three days after doxorubicin. IDA (after dietary iron restriction) induced cardiac and renal oxidative stress (markers included malondialdehyde, catalase, Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase), nitrosative stress (inducible nitric oxide synthase and nitrotyrosine), inflammation (tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6), and functional/morphological abnormalities (left ventricle end-diastolic and end-systolic diameter, fractional shortening, density of cardiomyocytes and capillaries, caveolin-1 expression, creatinine clearance, and urine neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin) that were aggravated by doxorubicin. Notably, iron treatment with FCM did not exacerbate but attenuated the cardiorenal effects of IDA and doxorubicin independent of the iron dosing regimen. The results of this model suggest that intravenous FCM can be used concomitantly with an anthracycline-based chemotherapy without increasing signs of AIC. PMID:24876963

  6. Dietary cholesterol protects against alcohol-induced cerebral artery constriction

    PubMed Central

    Bukiya, Anna; Dopico, Alex; Leffler, Charles; Fedinec, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Background Binge drinking represents the major form of excessive alcohol (EtOH) consumption in the US. Episodic (such as binge) drinking results in blood alcohol levels (BAL) of 18–80 mM, and leads to alcohol-induced cerebral artery constriction (AICAC). AICAC was shown to arise from EtOH-induced inhibition of large-conductance, calcium/voltage-gated potassium (BK) channels in the vascular smooth muscle. Factors that modulate BK channel-mediated AICAC remain largely unknown. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were placed on high-cholesterol (2% of cholesterol) diet for 18–23 weeks. Their littermates were placed on control iso-caloric diet. AICAC was evaluated both in vivo and in vitro, by means of pial arteriole diameter monitoring through a closed cranial window and diameter measurements of isolated, pressurized cerebral arteries. Cholesterol level in the cerebral artery tissue was manipulated by methyl-β-cyclodextrin to reverse dietary-induced accumulation of cholesterol. BK channel surface presence on the plasma membrane of cerebral artery myocytes was evaluated by immunofluorescence staining. BK channel function in pressurized cerebral artery was assessed using selective BK channel blocker paxilline. Results Within 5 minutes of 50 mM EtOH injection into carotid artery in vivo, arteriole diameter decreased by 20% in control group. Pial arteriole constriction was significantly reduced in rats on high-cholesterol diet, resulting in only 10% reduction of diameter. BAL in both groups, however, remained the same. Significant reduction of AICAC in group on high-cholesterol diet compared to control was also observed after middle cerebral artery dissection and in vitro pressurization at 60 mmHg, this reduction remaining after endothelium removal. Cholesterol level in de-endothelialized cerebral arteries was significantly increased in rats on high-cholesterol diet. Removal of excessive cholesterol content restored AICAC to the level, observed in cerebral arteries of

  7. Metallothionein deficiency aggravates depleted uranium-induced nephrotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Yuhui; Huang, Jiawei; Gu, Ying; Liu, Cong; Li, Hong; Liu, Jing; Ren, Jiong; Yang, Zhangyou; Peng, Shuangqing; Wang, Weidong; Li, Rong

    2015-09-15

    Depleted uranium (DU) has been widely used in both civilian and military activities, and the kidney is the main target organ of DU during acute high-dose exposures. In this study, the nephrotoxicity caused by DU in metallothionein-1/2-null mice (MT −/−) and corresponding wild-type (MT +/+) mice was investigated to determine any associations with MT. Each MT −/− or MT +/+ mouse was pretreated with a single dose of DU (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection) or an equivalent volume of saline. After 4 days of DU administration, kidney changes were assessed. After DU exposure, serum creatinine and serum urea nitrogen in MT −/− mice significantly increased than in MT +/+ mice, with more severe kidney pathological damage. Moreover, catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) decreased, and generation of reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde increased in MT −/− mice. The apoptosis rate in MT −/− mice significantly increased, with a significant increase in both Bax and caspase 3 and a decrease in Bcl-2. Furthermore, sodium-glucose cotransporter (SGLT) and sodium-phosphate cotransporter (NaPi-II) were significantly reduced after DU exposure, and the change of SGLT was more evident in MT −/− mice. Finally, exogenous MT was used to evaluate the correlation between kidney changes induced by DU and MT doses in MT −/− mice. The results showed that, the pathological damage and cell apoptosis decreased, and SOD and SGLT levels increased with increasing dose of MT. In conclusion, MT deficiency aggravated DU-induced nephrotoxicity, and the molecular mechanisms appeared to be related to the increased oxidative stress and apoptosis, and decreased SGLT expression. - Highlights: • MT −/− and MT +/+ mice were used to evaluate nephrotoxicity of DU. • Renal damage was more evident in the MT −/− mice after exposure to DU. • Exogenous MT also protects against DU-induced nephrotoxicity. • MT deficiency induced more ROS and apoptosis after exposure to

  8. Bovine hemoglobin as the sole source of dietary iron does not support adequate iron status in copper-adequate or copper-deficient rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This experiment was designed to determine whether hemoglobin as the sole source of dietary iron (Fe) could sustain normal Fe status in growing rats. Because adequate copper (Cu) status is required for efficient Fe absorption in the rat, we also determined the effects of Cu deficiency on Fe status of...

  9. TRIBROMOMETHANE EXPOSURE AND DIETARY FOLATE DEFICIENCY IN THE FORMATION OF ABERRANT CRYPT FOCI IN THE COLONS OF F344/N RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    TRIBROMOMETHANE EXPOSURE AND DIETARY FOLATE DEFICIENCY IN THE FORMATION OF ABERRANT CRYPT FOCI IN THE COLONS OF F344/N RATS

    David R. Geter', Tanya M. Moore', Michael H. George', Steve R. Kilburn', Gloria Huggins-Clark', James W. Allen', and Anthony B. DeAngelo' 'National H...

  10. Disruption of brain redox homeostasis in glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficient mice treated with high dietary lysine supplementation.

    PubMed

    Seminotti, Bianca; Amaral, Alexandre Umpierrez; da Rosa, Mateus Struecker; Fernandes, Carolina Gonçalves; Leipnitz, Guilhian; Olivera-Bravo, Silvia; Barbeito, Luis; Ribeiro, César Augusto J; de Souza, Diogo Onofre Gomes; Woontner, Michael; Goodman, Stephen I; Koeller, David M; Wajner, Moacir

    2013-01-01

    Deficiency of glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase (GCDH) activity or glutaric aciduria type I (GA I) is an inherited neurometabolic disorder biochemically characterized by predominant accumulation of glutaric acid and 3-hydroxyglutaric acid in the brain and other tissues. Affected patients usually present acute striatum necrosis during encephalopathic crises triggered by metabolic stress situations, as well as chronic leukodystrophy and delayed myelination. Considering that the mechanisms underlying the brain injury in this disease are not yet fully established, in the present study we investigated important parameters of oxidative stress in the brain (cerebral cortex, striatum and hippocampus), liver and heart of 30-day-old GCDH deficient knockout (Gcdh(-/-)) and wild type (WT) mice submitted to a normal lysine (Lys) (0.9% Lys), or high Lys diets (2.8% or 4.7% Lys) for 60 h. It was observed that the dietary supplementation of 2.8% and 4.7% Lys elicited noticeable oxidative stress, as verified by an increase of malondialdehyde concentrations (lipid oxidative damage) and 2-7-dihydrodichlorofluorescein (DCFH) oxidation (free radical production), as well as a decrease of reduced glutathione levels and alteration of various antioxidant enzyme activities (antioxidant defenses) in the cerebral cortex and the striatum, but not in the hippocampus, the liver and the heart of Gcdh(-/-) mice, as compared to WT mice receiving the same diets. Furthermore, alterations of oxidative stress parameters in the cerebral cortex and striatum were more accentuated in symptomatic, as compared to asymptomatic Gcdh(-/-) mice exposed to 4.7% Lys overload. Histopathological studies performed in the cerebral cortex and striatum of these animals exposed to high dietary Lys revealed increased expression of oxidative stress markers despite the absence of significant structural damage. The results indicate that a disruption of redox homeostasis in the cerebral cortex and striatum of young Gcdh(-/-) mice

  11. Interactive effects of dietary fat/carbohydrate ratio and body mass index on iron deficiency anemia among Taiwanese women.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jung-Su; Chen, Yi-Chun; Owaga, Eddy; Palupi, Khairizka Citra; Pan, Wen-Harn; Bai, Chyi-Huey

    2014-09-01

    Whether being overweight or obese is associated with increased risk of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) remains controversial. We evaluated the dietary intakes and risk for IDA in relation to body mass index (BMI). One thousand two hundred and seventy-four females aged ≥ 19 years, enrolled in the third Nutrition and Health Survey in Taiwan (NAHSIT) 2005-2008, were selected. Half of the women were either overweight (24.0%) or obese (25.3%). The overall prevalence of anemia, iron deficiency and IDA among adult women was 19.5%, 8.6% and 6.2%. BMI showed a protective effect on IDA: overweight (odds ratio, OR: 0.365 (0.181-0.736)) and obese (OR: 0.480 (0.259-0.891)) when compared with normal weight. Univariate analysis identified increased IDA risk for overweight/obese women who consumed higher dietary fat but lower carbohydrate (CHO) (OR: 10.119 (1.267-80.79)). No such relationship was found in IDA women with normal weight (OR: 0.375 (0.036-4.022)). Analysis of interaction(s) showed individuals within the highest BMI tertile (T3) had the lowest risk for IDA and the risk increased with increasing tertile groups of fat/CHO ratio; OR 0.381 (0.144-1.008; p = 0.051), 0.370 (0.133-1.026; p = 0.056) and 0.748 (0.314-1.783; p = 0.513); for T1, T2 and T3, respectively. In conclusion, a protective effect of BMI on IDA may be attenuated in women who had increased fat/CHO ratio. PMID:25255383

  12. Cadmium-induced fetal growth retardation: protective effect of excess dietary zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Ahokas, R.A.; Dilts, P.V. Jr.; LaHaye, E.B.

    1980-01-15

    Reproductive performance and fetal cellular growth and development were investigated in laboratory rats chronically fed low drinking water levels (0, 1.0, 10.0, and 100 ..mu..g/ml) of cadmium (Cd), a known embryotoxic trace element, through gestation. Maternal daily food and water consumption, total weight gain, maternal weight gain, and feed efficiency all decreased with increasing Cd consumption. Term fetal weight was significantly less than that of control subjects only in the group fed 100 ..mu..g Cd/ml drinking water. Total litter weight, however, gradually decreased with increasing Cd concentration due to reduced litter size. Fetal growth retardation was a result of decreased cell division (DNA) and cell growth (protein/DNA ratio). When dams were pair-fed the average daily amount of food consumed by those fed 100 ..mu..g Cd/ml drinking water, maternal weight gain and fetal weight, DNA, and protein/DNA ratio were increased, but not to control levels. Dietary zinc (Zn) supplementation (5.0 ..mu..g/ml drinking water) of Cd-fed dams increased maternal food consumption and fetal weight, DNA, and protein/DNA ratio to control levels. Fetal levels of Cd were extremely low (0.038 to 0.095 ..mu..g/gm fetus) and did not increase with increasing Cd consumption, while placental Cd increased more than 10-fold. Fetal Zn was decreased in Cd-fed dams, and Zn supplementation increased fetal Zn levels, but not to control levels.These results suggest that Cd-induced fetal growth retardation is an indirect rather than a direct effect, resulting from reduced maternal food consumption and metabolism. Since dietary Zn blocks these effects, Cd may be a result of induced Zn deficiency.

  13. Dimethylthiourea inhibits heart weight and hematocrit changes caused by dietary copper deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Saari, J.T. )

    1991-03-11

    Feeding antioxidants to rats in a copper (Cu)-deficient diet can partially inhibit the cardiac enlargement and anemia caused by Cu deficiency. This study was done to determine whether an antioxidant which bypassed the gastrointestinal tract was also protective and whether an agent more potent than previously used was more effective in this inhibition. Male, weanling rats were fed diets deficient or sufficient in Cu for 4 wks. Dimethylthiourea (DMTU) or saline was injected (ip) 4 times a week; minimum amount of DMTU retained during the experiment was estimated to be 250 mg/kg. Unlike other antioxidants, DMTU completely prevented the increase in heart wt/body wt ratio; like the other agents, it only partially inhibited the anemia of Cu deficiency. DMTU did not affect plasma or liver Cu content of CuD rats; however, heart copper of CuD rats was significantly increased by DMTU. The effects of DMTU on heart size and hematocrit (Hct) may be attributed to its antioxidant function, but the possibility of altered mineral status must also be considered.

  14. Dietary blueberries sttenuate atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice by upregulating antioxidant enzymes expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blueberries (BB) contain high levels of polyphenols and exhibit high antioxidant capacity. In this study, protective effects of BB against atherosclerosis and possible underlying mechanisms in reducing oxidative stress were examined in ApoE deficient (apoE-/-) mice. ApoE-/- mice were fed AIN-93G die...

  15. Dietary interaction of high fat and marginal copper deficiency on cardiac contractile function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High fat and copper deficient diets impair heart function leading to cardio hypertrophy, increased lipid droplet volume and compromised contractile function, resembling liptoxic cardiac dysfunction. However, the combined effect of the two on cardiac function is unknown. The purpose or objective of t...

  16. Dietary Repletion with ω3 Fatty Acid or with COX Inhibition Reverses Cognitive Effects in F3 ω3 Fatty-Acid–Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hafandi, Ahmad; Begg, Denovan P; Premaratna, Shirmila D; Sinclair, Andrew J; Jois, Mark; Weisinger, Richard S

    2014-01-01

    Dietary deficiency of ω3 fatty acid during development leads to impaired cognitive function. However, the effects of multiple generations of ω3 fatty-acid deficiency on cognitive impairment remain unclear. In addition, we sought to test the hypothesis that the cognitive impairments of ω3 fatty-acid–deficient mice are mediated through the arachidonic acid–cyclooxygenase (COX) pathway. To address these issues, C57BL/6J mice were bred for 3 generations and fed diets either deficient (DEF) or sufficient (SUF) in ω3 fatty acids. At postnatal day 21, the F3 offspring remained on the dam's diet or were switched to the opposite diet, creating 4 groups. In addition, 2 groups that remained on the dam's diet were treated with a COX inhibitor. At 19 wk of age, spatial-recognition memory was tested on a Y-maze. Results showed that 16 wk of SUF diet reversed the cognitive impairment of F3 DEF mice. However, 16 wk of ω3 fatty-acid–deficient diet impaired the cognitive performance of the F3 SUF mice, which did not differ from that of the F3 DEF mice. These findings suggest that the cognitive deficits after multigenerational maintenance on ω3 fatty-acid–deficient diet are not any greater than are those after deficiency during a single generation. In addition, treatment with a COX inhibitor prevented spatial-recognition deficits in F3 DEF mice. Therefore, cognitive impairment due to dietary ω3 fatty-acid deficiency appears to be mediated by the arachidonic acid–COX pathway and can be prevented by 16 wk of dietary repletion with ω3 fatty acids or COX inhibition. PMID:24674584

  17. Dietary Supplementation of Genistein Alleviates Liver Inflammation and Fibrosis Mediated by a Methionine-Choline-Deficient Diet in db/db Mice.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Na-young; Jeon, Sookyoung; Nam, Yerim; Park, Youn-Jin; Won, Sae Bom; Kwon, Young Hye

    2015-05-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is a complex disorder which includes simple steatosis, steatohepatitis, fibrosis and ultimately cirrhosis. Previous studies have reported that genistein, a soy phytoestrogen, attenuates steatohepatitis induced in obese and type 2 diabetic models. Here we investigated the effect of dietary genistein supplementation (0.05%) on nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) development induced by a methionine-choline-deficient (MCD) diet in db/db mice. MCD-diet-fed mice exhibited a significantly lower body weight and a higher degree of steatohepatitis with increased oxidative stress, steatosis, inflammation, stellate cell activation, and mild fibrosis. Although genistein did not inhibit hepatic steatosis, we observed that oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and AMP-dependent kinase inactivation were alleviated by genistein. Genistein also down-regulated the augmented gene expressions associated with hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. Therefore, these results suggest that genistein may protect MCD-diet-mediated NASH development by suppressing lipid peroxidation, inflammation, and even liver fibrosis in db/db mice. PMID:25885479

  18. Increased adiposity induced by high dietary butter oil increases vertebrae trabecular structural indices in rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obesity has been associated with both improved and impaired bone health, and other dietary factors apparently affect the nature of the association. An experiment was performed to determine whether increased adiposity induced by high dietary butter oil impairs bone structure and whether that effect ...

  19. EFFECTS OF DIETARY FOLATE ON ARSENIC-INDUCED GENE EXPRESSION IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of Dietary Folate on Arsenic-induced Gene Expression in Mice

    Arsenic, a drinking water contaminant, is a known carcinogen. Human exposure to inorganic arsenic has been linked to tumors of skin, bladder, lung, and to a lesser extent, kidney and liver. Dietary fola...

  20. Pre- and postnatal dietary protein deficiency influences anxiety, memory and social behaviour in the African striped mouse Rhabdomys dilectus chakae.

    PubMed

    Pillay, Neville; Rimbach, Rebecca; Rymer, Tasmin

    2016-07-01

    Dietary protein deficiency influences the behavioural phenotypes of mammals. We studied whether protein deficiency during gestation and/or post-weaning heightened anxiety, reduced memory recall and influenced competitive ability in the African striped mouse Rhabdomys dilectus chakae. Mice were subjected to five protein diet treatments, which they received continuously, or were raised on one diet to weaning and switched to an alternate diet post-weaning (Day 16): 1) HP-HP: high protein (24%); first letter pair indicates maternal diet and the second pair indicates offspring diet post-weaning; 2) BP-BP: baseline protein (19%); 3) LP-LP: low protein (10%); 4) HP-LP: switched from high to low protein diet; and 5) LP-HP: switched from low protein to high protein diet. From Day 70, when mice were sexually mature, 20 individuals (10 males, 10 females) per treatment were subjected to three successive experiments, in which we tested their anxiety responses in: 1) an open field arena (time spent in the centre of the open field); 2) novel object recognition (time spent exploring a novel object); and 3) social interactions (excluding BP-BP) in age-matched same-sex dyadic encounters (aggressive, amicable and avoidance behaviours). LP-LP and LP-HP treatment mice spent the least amount of time in the centre of the open field, did not demonstrate object preference compared to the other treatments, and were the most aggressive in dyadic encounters. Our study shows that the systemic effects of protein-deficient diets during early life shapes the behavioural phenotype in R. d. chakae, possibly through early organisation of neuro-biological pathways or competition among littermates. PMID:27080079

  1. Manganese deficiency and toxicity: are high or low dietary amounts of manganese cause for concern?

    PubMed

    Finley, J W; Davis, C D

    1999-01-01

    Manganese is an essential trace element that is required for the activity of several enzymes. Manganese is also quite toxic when ingested in large amounts, such as the inhalation of Mn-laden dust by miners. This review examines Mn intake by way of the food supply and poses the question: Is there reason to be concerned with Mn toxicity or deficiency in free-living populations in North America? Although much remains to be learned of the functions of Mn, at present there are only a few vaguely described cases of Mn deficiency in the medical literature. Given the heterogeneity of the North American food supply, it is difficult to see the possibility of more than greatly isolated and unique instances of Mn deficiency. However, low Mn-dependent superoxide dismutase activity may be associated with cancer susceptibility, and deserves further study. There may be reasons, however, to be concerned about Mn toxicity under some very specialized conditions. Increasing numbers of young people are adopting a vegetarian lifestyle which may greatly increase Mn intake. Iron deficiency may increase Mn absorption and further increase the body-burden of Mn, especially in vegetarians. Mn is eliminated primarily through the bile, and hepatic dysfunction could depress Mn excretion and further contribute to the body burden. Would such a combination of events predispose substantial numbers of people to chronic Mn toxicity? At present, there is no definite proof of this occurring, but given the state of knowledge at the present time, more studies with longer time-frames and more sensitive methods of analysis are needed. PMID:10475586

  2. Prostaglandin E₂ is critical for the development of niacin-deficiency-induced photosensitivity via ROS production.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Kazunari; Ikenouchi-Sugita, Atsuko; Nakayama, Yasuko; Yoshioka, Haruna; Nomura, Takashi; Sakabe, Jun-Ichi; Nakahigashi, Kyoko; Kuroda, Etsushi; Uematsu, Satoshi; Nakamura, Jun; Akira, Shizuo; Nakamura, Motonobu; Narumiya, Shuh; Miyachi, Yoshiki; Tokura, Yoshiki; Kabashima, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Pellagra is a photosensitivity syndrome characterized by three "D's": diarrhea, dermatitis, and dementia as a result of niacin deficiency. However, the molecular mechanisms of photosensitivity dermatitis, the hallmark abnormality of this syndrome, remain unclear. We prepared niacin deficient mice in order to develop a murine model of pellagra. Niacin deficiency induced photosensitivity and severe diarrhea with weight loss. In addition, niacin deficient mice exhibited elevated expressions of COX-2 and PGE syntheses (Ptges) mRNA. Consistently, photosensitivity was alleviated by a COX inhibitor, deficiency of Ptges, or blockade of EP4 receptor signaling. Moreover, enhanced PGE2 production in niacin deficiency was mediated via ROS production in keratinocytes. In line with the above murine findings, human skin lesions of pellagra patients confirmed the enhanced expression of Ptges. Niacin deficiency-induced photosensitivity was mediated through EP4 signaling in response to increased PGE2 production via induction of ROS formation. PMID:24131900

  3. Dietary folate deficiency with normal red cell folate and circulating blasts.

    PubMed

    Stark, G L; Hamilton, P J

    2003-04-01

    This report describes a 26 year old woman, of Pakistani origin, who presented five months postpartum with severe megaloblastic anaemia as a result of nutritional folate deficiency. This case was unusual in that a small number of myeloblasts were present in the peripheral blood at presentation, and this circulating population temporarily increased in size when folate replacement was begun. We also highlight the need to recognise the non-linear relation between haematocrit and red blood cell folate concentration when the haematocrit is very low (< 0.15) and emphasise the importance of the clinical history. PMID:12663648

  4. Dietary copper deficiency reduces iron absorption and duodenal enterocyte hephaestin protein in male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Philip G; Demars, Lana C S; Johnson, W Thomas; Lukaski, Henry C

    2005-01-01

    The mechanism for reduced Fe absorption in Cu deficiency is unknown, but may involve the intestinal Cu-dependent ferroxidase, Hephaestin (Hp). A 2 x 2 factorial experiment was designed to include Cu-deficient (CuD) and Cu-adequate (CuA) male and female rats. Weanling rats of both sexes were randomly divided into 2 groups each and fed an AIN-93G diet with low (<0.3 mg/kg; CuD) or adequate Cu (5.0 mg/kg; CuA). After 19 d, rats were fed 1.0 g each of their respective diets labeled with (59)Fe. Retained (59)Fe was monitored by whole-body counting for 12 d. Then, rats were killed for (59)Fe and Fe measurements in blood and various organs. Duodenal enterocytes were isolated for Western blot analysis of Hp. Signs of Cu and Fe deficiency were evident in both sexes. CuD male rats absorbed 60% as much Fe as CuA male rats (P < 0.001), whereas CuD female rats absorbed 70% (P < 0.001) as much as CuA females, with no difference between the sexes. Hp protein in enterocytes of CuD rats of both sexes was only 35% of that in CuA rats. The biological half-life of (59)Fe in CuD rats was only 50% (P < 0.001) of that in CuA rats, suggesting that Fe turnover was faster in CuD rats than CuA rats. Serum, spleen, and kidney Fe were lower (P < 0.001) in CuD rats than in CuA rats. Duodenal mucosa and liver Fe were higher (P < 0.01) in CuD male rats than CuA rats. Duodenal Fe but not liver Fe was higher in CuD female rats than CuA rats. Liver Fe was much higher (<0.001) overall in females than males. The data suggest that Cu deficiency reduces Fe absorption in rats through reduced expression of duodenal Hp protein. PMID:15623839

  5. Dietary choline deficiency alters global and gene-specific DNA methylation in the developing hippocampus of mouse fetal brains.

    PubMed

    Niculescu, Mihai D; Craciunescu, Corneliu N; Zeisel, Steven H

    2006-01-01

    The availability of choline during critical periods of fetal development alters hippocampal development and affects memory function throughout life. Choline deficiency during fetal development reduces proliferation and migration of neuronal precursor cells in the mouse fetal hippocampus and these changes are associated with modifications in the protein levels of some cell cycle regulators and early differentiation markers. We fed C57 BL/6 mouse dams diets deficient or normal in choline content from days 12 to 17 of pregnancy, and then collected fetal brains on embryonic day 17. Using laser-capture micro-dissection we harvested cells from the ventricular and subventricular zones of Ammon's horn and from the prime germinal zone of the dentate gyrus (hippocampus). In the ventricular and subventricular zones from the choline-deficient group, we observed increased protein levels for kinase-associated phosphatase (Kap) and for p15(INK4b) (two cell cycle inhibitors). In the dentate gyrus, we observed increased levels of calretinin (an early marker of neuronal differentiation). In fetal brain from mothers fed a choline-deficient diet, DNA global methylation was decreased in the ventricular and subventricular zones of Ammon's horn. We also observed decreased gene-specific DNA methylation of the gene (Cdkn3) that encodes for Kap, correlating with increased expression of this protein. This was not the case for p15(INK4b) or calretinin (Cdkn2b and Calb2, respectively). These data suggest that choline deficiency-induced changes in gene methylation could mediate the expression of a cell cycle regulator and thereby alter brain development. PMID:16394266

  6. Effect of dietary antioxidant supplementation (Cuminum cyminum) on bacterial susceptibility of diabetes-induced rats

    PubMed Central

    Embaby, Mohamed A.; Doleib, Nada M.; Taha, Mona M.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic patients are at risk of acquiring infections. Chronic low-grade inflammation is an important factor in the pathogenesis of diabetic complication. Diabetes causes generation of reactive oxygen species that increases oxidative stress, which may play a role in the development of complications as immune-deficiency and bacterial infection. The study aimed to investigate the role of a natural antioxidant, cumin, in the improvement of immune functions in diabetes. Diabetes was achieved by interperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ). Bacterial infection was induced by application of Staphylococcus aureus suspension to a wound in the back of rats. The antioxidant was administered for 6 weeks. Results revealed a decrease in blood glucose levels in diabetic rats (p < 0.001), in addition to improving immune functions by decreasing total IgE approaching to the normal control level. Also, inflammatory cytokine (IL-6, IL-1β and TNF) levels, as well as total blood count decreased in diabetic rats as compared to the control group. Thus, cumin may serve as anti-diabetic treatment and may help in attenuating diabetic complications by improving immune functions. Therefore, a medical dietary antioxidant supplementation is important to improve the immune functions in diabetes. PMID:27536197

  7. Dietary Salt Exacerbates Isoproterenol-induced Cardiomyopathy in Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Spontaneously Hypertensive Heart Failure rats (SHHFs) take far longer to develop compensated heart failure and congestive decompensation than common surgical models of heart failure. Isoproterenol (ISO) infusion can accelerate cardiomyopathy in young SHHFs, while dietary salt loa...

  8. Complex carbohydrates in the dietary management of patients with glycogenosis caused by glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Smit, G P; Ververs, M T; Belderok, B; Van Rijn, M; Berger, R; Fernandes, J

    1988-07-01

    Carbohydrates with digestion characteristics between those of lente uncooked starches and rapidly digestible oligosaccharides were administered in a dose of 1.5 g/kg body weight to five patients with glycogenosis from glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency. Postprandial duration of normoglycemia and concentrations of blood insulin and lactate were determined. Uncooked barley groats in water, or incorporated in a meal turned out to behave as lente carbohydrates. Uncooked couscous in water, couscous incorporated in a meal, and partially cooked macaroni given as a meal behaved as semilente carbohydrates as compared with uncooked cornstarch and glucose. The in vitro determination of the digestibility index along with the in vivo tolerance test enables us to choose and incorporate semilente carbohydrates in the day-time treatment of patients. PMID:3291600

  9. Dietary deficiency increases presenilin expression, gamma-secretase activity, and Abeta levels: potentiation by ApoE genotype and alleviation by S-adenosyl methionine.

    PubMed

    Chan, Amy; Tchantchou, Flaubert; Rogers, Eugene J; Shea, Thomas B

    2009-08-01

    Apolipoprotein E4 (ApoE4) is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Whether this risk arises from a deficient function of E4 or the lack of protection provided by E2 or E3 is unclear. Previous studies demonstrate that deprivation of folate and vitamin E, coupled with dietary iron as a pro-oxidant, for 1 month displayed increased presenilin 1 (PS-1) expression, gamma-secretase, and Abeta generation in mice lacking ApoE (ApoE-/- mice). While ApoE-/- mice are a model for ApoE deficiency, they may not reflect the entire range of consequences of E4 expression. We therefore compared herein the impact of the above deficient diet on mice expressing human E2, E3, or E4. As folate deficiency is accompanied by a decrease in the major methyl donor, S-adenosyl methionine (SAM), additional mice received the deficient diet plus SAM. E2 was more protective than murine ApoE or E3 and E4. Surprisingly, PS-1 and gamma-secretase were over-expressed in E3 to the same extent as in E4 even under a complete diet, and were not alleviated by SAM supplementation. Abeta increased only in E4 mice maintained under the complete diet, and was alleviated by SAM supplementation. These findings suggest dietary compromise can potentiate latent risk factors for AD. PMID:19457069

  10. MPK3/MPK6 are involved in iron deficiency-induced ethylene production in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Lingxiao; Li, Lin; Wang, Lu; Wang, Shoudong; Li, Sen; Du, Juan; Zhang, Shuqun; Shou, Huixia

    2015-01-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential micronutrient that participates in various biological processes important for plant growth. Ethylene production induced by Fe deficiency plays important roles in plant tolerance to stress induced by Fe deficiency. However, the activation and regulatory mechanisms of 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthase (ACS) genes in this response are not clear. In this study, we demonstrated that Fe deficiency increased the abundance of ACS2, ACS6, ACS7, and ACS11 transcripts in both leaves and roots as well as the abundance of ACS8 transcripts in leaves and ACS9 transcripts in roots. Furthermore, we investigated the role of mitogen-activated protein kinase 3 and 6 (MPK3/MPK6)-regulated ACS2/6 activation in Fe deficiency-induced ethylene production. Our results showed that MPK3/MPK6 transcript abundance and MPK3/MPK6 phosphorylation are elevated under conditions of Fe deficiency. Furthermore, mpk3 and mpk6 mutants show a lesser induction of ethylene production under Fe deficiency and a greater sensitivity to Fe deficiency. Finally, in mpk3, mpk6, and acs2 mutants under conditions of Fe deficiency, induction of transcript expression of the Fe-deficiency response genes FRO2, IRT1, and FIT is partially compromised. Taken together, our results suggest that the MPK3/MPK6 and ACS2 are part of the Fe starvation-induced ethylene production signaling pathway. PMID:26579185

  11. Tlr4 Deficiency Protects against Cardiac Pressure Overload Induced Hyperinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Boehm, Olaf; El Aissati, Sakina; Foltz, Fabian; Goelz, Lina; Goertz, David; Kebir, Sied; Weisheit, Christina; Wolf, Michael; Meyer, Rainer; Baumgarten, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Transverse aortic constriction provokes a pro-inflammatory reaction and results in cardiac hypertrophy. Endogenous ligands contribute to cardiac hypertrophy via toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 binding. A lack of TLR4 signaling diminishes hypertrophy and inflammation. Wild type mice undergoing aortic constriction respond to a lipopolysaccharide second-hit stimulus with hyperinflammation. The objective of this study was to assess whether other second-hit challenges utilizing TLR ligands provoke a comparable inflammatory reaction, and to find out whether this response is absent in TLR4 deficient mice. Assuming that cardiac stress alters the expression of pattern recognition receptors we analyzed the effects of transverse aortic constriction and second-hit virulence factor treatment on TLR expression, as well as cytokine regulation. Wild type and Tlr4-/- mice were subjected to three days of TAC and subsequently confronted with gram-positive TLR2 ligand lipoteichoic acid (LTA, 15mg/g bodyweight) or synthetic CpG-oligodesoxynucleotide 1668 thioate (20 nmol/kg bodyweight, 30 min after D-galactosamin desensitization) signaling via TLR9. Hemodynamic measurements and organ preservation were performed 6 h after stimulation. Indeed, the study revealed a robust enhancement of LTA induced pattern recognition receptor and cytokine mRNA expression and a LTA-dependent reduction of hemodynamic pressure in TAC wild type mice. Second-Hit treatment with CpG-ODNs led to similar results. However, second-hit effects were abolished in Tlr4-/- mice. In total, these data indicate for the first time that cardiac stress increases the inflammatory response towards both, gram-negative and gram-positive, TLR ligands as well as bacterial DNA. The decrease of the inflammatory response upon TLR2 and -9 ligand challenge in TAC Tlr4-/- mice demonstrates that a lack of TLR4 signaling does not only prevent left ventricular hypertrophy but also protects the mice from a cardiac stress induced hyperinflammatory

  12. Metallothionein deficiency aggravates depleted uranium-induced nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yuhui; Huang, Jiawei; Gu, Ying; Liu, Cong; Li, Hong; Liu, Jing; Ren, Jiong; Yang, Zhangyou; Peng, Shuangqing; Wang, Weidong; Li, Rong

    2015-09-15

    Depleted uranium (DU) has been widely used in both civilian and military activities, and the kidney is the main target organ of DU during acute high-dose exposures. In this study, the nephrotoxicity caused by DU in metallothionein-1/2-null mice (MT-/-) and corresponding wild-type (MT+/+) mice was investigated to determine any associations with MT. Each MT-/- or MT+/+ mouse was pretreated with a single dose of DU (10mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection) or an equivalent volume of saline. After 4days of DU administration, kidney changes were assessed. After DU exposure, serum creatinine and serum urea nitrogen in MT-/- mice significantly increased than in MT+/+ mice, with more severe kidney pathological damage. Moreover, catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) decreased, and generation of reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde increased in MT-/- mice. The apoptosis rate in MT-/- mice significantly increased, with a significant increase in both Bax and caspase 3 and a decrease in Bcl-2. Furthermore, sodium-glucose cotransporter (SGLT) and sodium-phosphate cotransporter (NaPi-II) were significantly reduced after DU exposure, and the change of SGLT was more evident in MT-/- mice. Finally, exogenous MT was used to evaluate the correlation between kidney changes induced by DU and MT doses in MT-/- mice. The results showed that, the pathological damage and cell apoptosis decreased, and SOD and SGLT levels increased with increasing dose of MT. In conclusion, MT deficiency aggravated DU-induced nephrotoxicity, and the molecular mechanisms appeared to be related to the increased oxidative stress and apoptosis, and decreased SGLT expression. PMID:26148447

  13. Thiamine deficiency induces anorexia by inhibiting hypothalamic AMPK.

    PubMed

    Liu, M; Alimov, A P; Wang, H; Frank, J A; Katz, W; Xu, M; Ke, Z-J; Luo, J

    2014-05-16

    Obesity and eating disorders are prevailing health concerns worldwide. It is important to understand the regulation of food intake and energy metabolism. Thiamine (vitamin B1) is an essential nutrient. Thiamine deficiency (TD) can cause a number of disorders in humans, such as Beriberi and Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. We demonstrated here that TD caused anorexia in C57BL/6 mice. After feeding a TD diet for 16days, the mice displayed a significant decrease in food intake and an increase in resting energy expenditure (REE), which resulted in a severe weight loss. At the 22nd day, the food intake was reduced by 69% and 74% for male and female mice, respectively in TD group. The REE increased by ninefolds in TD group. The loss of body weight (17-24%) was similar between male and female animals and mainly resulted from the reduction of fat mass (49% decrease). Re-supplementation of thiamine (benfotiamine) restored animal's appetite, leading to a total recovery of body weight. The hypothalamic adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a critical regulator of food intake. TD inhibited the phosphorylation of AMPK in the arcuate nucleus (ARN) and paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus without affecting its expression. TD-induced inhibition of AMPK phosphorylation was reversed once thiamine was re-supplemented. In contrast, TD increased AMPK phosphorylation in the skeletal muscle and upregulated the uncoupling protein (UCP)-1 in brown adipose tissues which was consistent with increased basal energy expenditure. Re-administration of thiamine stabilized AMPK phosphorylation in the skeletal muscle as well as energy expenditure. Taken together, TD may induce anorexia by inhibiting hypothalamic AMPK activity. With a simultaneous increase in energy expenditure, TD caused an overall body weight loss. The results suggest that the status of thiamine levels in the body may affect food intake and body weight. PMID:24607345

  14. Thiamine Deficiency Induces Anorexia by Inhibiting Hypothalamic AMPK

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mei; Alimov, Alexander; Wang, Haiping; Frank, Jacqueline A.; Katz, Wendy; Xu, Mei; Ke, Zun-Ji; Luo, Jia

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and eating disorders are prevailing health concerns worldwide. It is important to understand the regulation of food intake and energy metabolism. Thiamine (vitamin B1) is an essential nutrient. Thiamine deficiency (TD) can cause a number of disorders in humans, such as Beriberi and Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. We demonstrated here that TD caused anorexia in C57BL/6 mice. After feeding a TD diet for 16 days, the mice displayed a significant decrease in food intake and an increase in resting energy expenditure (REE), which resulted in a severe weight loss. At the 22nd day, the food intake was reduced by 69% and 74% for male and female mice, respectively in TD group. The REE increased by 9 folds in TD group. The loss of body weight (17–24%) was similar between male and female animals and mainly resulted from the reduction of fat mass (49% decrease). Re-supplementation of thiamine (benfotiamine) restored animal's appetite, leading to a total recovery of body weight. The hypothalamic AMPK is a critical regulator of food intake. TD inhibited the phosphorylation of AMPK in the arcuate nucleus (ARN) and paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus without affecting its expression. TD-induced inhibition of AMPK phosphorylation was reversed once thiamine was re-supplemented. In contrast, TD increased AMPK phosphorylation in the skeletal muscle and upregulated the uncoupling protein (UCP)-1 in brown adipose tissues which was consistent with increased basal energy expenditure. Re-administration of thiamine stabilized AMPK phosphorylation in the skeletal muscle as well as energy expenditure. Taken together, TD may induce anorexia by inhibiting hypothalamic AMPK activity. With a simultaneous increase in energy expenditure, TD caused an overall body weight loss. The results suggest that the status of thiamine levels in the body may affect food intake and body weight. PMID:24607345

  15. Dietary Fiber Intake Regulates Intestinal Microflora and Inhibits Ovalbumin-Induced Allergic Airway Inflammation in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiyu; Shi, Lei; Pang, Wenhui; Liu, Wenwen; Li, Jianfeng; Wang, Haibo; Shi, Guanggang

    2016-01-01

    Background Recently, academic studies suggest that global growth of airway allergic disease has a close association with dietary changes including reduced consumption of fiber. Therefore, appropriate dietary fiber supplementation might be potential to prevent airway allergic disease (AAD). Objective We investigated whether dietary fiber intake suppressed the induction of AAD and tried to elucidate the possible underlying mechanisms. Methods The control mice and AAD model mice fed with 4% standard-fiber chow, while low-fiber group of mice fed with a 1.75% low-fiber chow. The two fiber-intervened groups including mice, apart from a standard-fiber diet, were also intragastric (i.g.) administrated daily with poorly fermentable cellulose or readily fermentable pectin (0.4% of daily body weight), respectively. All animals except normal mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) to induce airway allergic inflammation. Hallmarks of AAD were examined by histological analysis and ELISA. The variation in intestinal bacterial composition was assessed by qualitative analysis of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) content in fecal samples using real-time PCR. Results Low-fiber diet aggravated inflammatory response in ovalbumin-induced allergic mice, whereas dietary fiber intake significantly suppressed the allergic responses, attenuated allergic symptoms of nasal rubbing and sneezing, decreased the pathology of eosinophil infiltration and goblet cell metaplasia in the nasal mucosa and lung, inhibited serum OVA-specific IgE levels, and lowered the levels of Th2 cytokines in NALF and BALF, but, increased Th1 (IFN-γ) cytokines. Additionally, dietary fiber intake also increased the proportion of Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria, and decreased Firmicutes and Proteobacteria. Levels of probiotic bacteria, such as Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, were upgraded significantly. Conclusion Long-term deficiency of dietary fiber intake increases the susceptibility to AAD, whereas proper

  16. Common Bean Leaves as a Source of Dietary Iron: Functional Test in an Iron-Deficient Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Zavala, Mauricio; Mora-Avilés, María Alejandra; Anaya-Loyola, Miriam Aracely; Guzmán-Maldonado, Horacio; Aguilera-Barreyro, Araceli; Blanco-Labra, Alejandro; García-Gasca, Teresa

    2016-09-01

    Recent findings made by our group indicate that the iron content in Phaseolus vulgaris leaves is at least four times greater than in grains therefore, we evaluated the effect of supplementation with bean leaf (iron content of 275 mg/kg on a dry basis) in iron-deficient rats. Anemia was induced by feeding rats with an iron-deficient diet (IDD) for 11 days and iron-recovery diets were subsequently tested for 14 days using a normal diet, a 10 % bean leaf-supplemented IDD (BLSD) or a ferrous sulfate-supplemented IDD. Decreased levels of leukocytes (64 %), erythrocytes (30 %), lymphocytes (62 %), granulocytes (72 %), hematocrit (34 %), hemoglobin (35 %), and ferritin (34 %) were observed in the iron-deficient rats compared to the control rats. BLSD supplementation showed the highest recovery values relative to those recorded for control rats: leukocytes (40 %), erythrocytes (24 %), lymphocytes (33 %), granulocytes (88 %), hematocrit (17 %), and hemoglobin (18 %), suggesting that common bean leaves could be a good source of bioavailable iron with possible immunomodulatory effects. PMID:27319012

  17. Dietary antigens limit mucosal immunity by inducing regulatory T cells in the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang Soon; Hong, Sung-Wook; Han, Daehee; Yi, Jaeu; Jung, Jisun; Yang, Bo-Gie; Lee, Jun Young; Lee, Minji; Surh, Charles D

    2016-02-19

    Dietary antigens are normally rendered nonimmunogenic through a poorly understood "oral tolerance" mechanism that involves immunosuppressive regulatory T (Treg) cells, especially Treg cells induced from conventional T cells in the periphery (pTreg cells). Although orally introducing nominal protein antigens is known to induce such pTreg cells, whether a typical diet induces a population of pTreg cells under normal conditions thus far has been unknown. By using germ-free mice raised and bred on an elemental diet devoid of dietary antigens, we demonstrated that under normal conditions, the vast majority of the small intestinal pTreg cells are induced by dietary antigens from solid foods. Moreover, these pTreg cells have a limited life span, are distinguishable from microbiota-induced pTreg cells, and repress underlying strong immunity to ingested protein antigens. PMID:26822607

  18. Dietary calcium deficiency increases Ca2+ uptake and Ca2+ extrusion mechanisms in chick enterocytes.

    PubMed

    Centeno, Viviana A; Díaz de Barboza, Gabriela E; Marchionatti, Ana M; Alisio, Arturo E; Dallorso, Maria E; Nasif, Renée; Tolosa de Talamoni, Nori G

    2004-10-01

    Ca2+ uptake and Ca2+ extrusion mechanisms were studied in enterocytes with different degree of differentiation from chicks adapted to a low Ca2+ diet as compared to animals fed a normal diet. Chicks adapted to a low Ca2+ diet presented hypocalcemia, hypophosphatemia and increased serum 1,25(OH)2D3 and Ca2+ absorption. Low Ca2+ diet increased the alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity, independently of the cellular maturation, but it did not alter gamma-glutamyl-transpeptidase activity. Ca2+ uptake, Ca2+-ATPase and Na(+)/Ca2+ exchanger activities and expressions were increased by the mineral-deficient diet either in mature or immature enterocytes. Western blots analysis shows that vitamin D receptor (VDR) expression was much higher in crypt cells than in mature cells. Low Ca2+ diet decreased the number of vitamin D receptor units in both kinds of cells. In conclusion, changes in Ca2+ uptake and Ca2+ extrusion mechanisms in the enterocytes by a low Ca2+ diet appear to be a result of enhanced serum levels of 1,25(OH)2D3, which would promote cellular differentiation producing cells more efficient to express vitamin D dependent genes required for Ca2+ absorption. PMID:15528161

  19. Dietary protein deficiency reduces lysosomal and nonlysosomal ATP-dependent proteolysis in muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawa, N. E. Jr; Kettelhut, I. C.; Goldberg, A. L.

    1992-01-01

    When rats are fed a protein deficient (PD) diet for 7 days, rates of proteolysis in skeletal muscle decrease by 40-50% (N. E. Tawa, Jr., and A. L. Goldberg. Am. J. Physiol. 263 (Endocrinol. Metab. 26): E317-325, 1992). To identify the underlying biochemical adaptations, we measured different proteolytic processes in incubated muscles. The capacity for intralysosomal proteolysis, as shown by sensitivity to methylamine or lysosomal protease inhibitors, fell 55-75% in muscles from PD rats. Furthermore, extracts of muscles of PD rats showed 30-70% lower activity of many lysosomal proteases, including cathepsins B, H, and C, and carboxypeptidases A and C, as well as other lysosomal hydrolases. The fall in cathepsin B and proteolysis was evident by 3 days on the PD diet, and both returned to control levels 3 days after refeeding of the normal diet. In muscles maintained under optimal conditions, 80-90% of protein breakdown occurs by nonlysosomal pathways. In muscles of PD rats, this ATP-dependent process was also 40-60% slower. Even though overall proteolysis decreased in muscles of PD rats, their capacity for Ca(2+)-dependent proteolysis increased (by 66%), as did the activity of the calpains (+150-250%). Thus the lysosomal and the ATP-dependent processes decrease coordinately and contribute to the fall in muscle proteolysis in PD animals.

  20. Dietary iron deficiency compromises normal development of elastic fibers in the aorta and lungs of chicks.

    PubMed

    Hill, Charles H; Ashwell, Chris M; Nolin, Shelly J; Keeley, Fred; Billingham, Catherine; Hinek, Aleksander; Starcher, Barry

    2007-08-01

    Elastic fibers play a key role in the structure and function of numerous organs that require elasticity. Elastogenesis is a complex process in which cells first produce a microfibrillar scaffold, composed of numerous structural proteins, upon which tropoelastin assembles to be cross-linked into polymeric elastin. Recently, it was demonstrated that low concentrations of free iron upregulate elastin gene expression in cultured fibroblasts. The present studies were conducted to assess whether low-iron diets would affect the deposition of elastic fibers in an in vivo model. One-day-old chicks were fed semipurified diets containing 1.3 (low), 12 (moderate), and 24 (control) mg/kg of iron. After 3 wk, chicks in the low-iron group were underweight and anemic. Their aortas were smaller with significantly thinner walls than control chicks, yet elastin or collagen content did not decrease relative to total protein. They also demonstrated a significantly lower stress-strain resistance than the controls. Electron microscopy demonstrated that aortic and lung smooth muscle cells were vacuolated and surrounded by loose extracellular matrix and disorganized elastic lamellae with diffuse and fragmented networks of elastic fibers and microfibrils. Immunohistology demonstrated that fibrillin-3 (FBN3) was disorganized and markedly reduced in amount in aortas of the low-iron chicks. Elastin messenger RNA levels were not downregulated in the tissues from the low-iron-fed chicks; however, there was a significant reduction in expression of the FBN1 and FBN3 genes compared with control chicks. The studies indicate that iron deficiency had a pronounced negative effect on elastic fiber development and suggests that fibrillin may have an important role in this pathology. PMID:17634261

  1. Combined Vitamin C & E deficiency induces motor defects in gulo−/−/SVCT2+/− mice

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Marquicia R; DiAsio, Danielle L; Rodrigues, Laurisa M; Harrison, Fiona E; May, James M

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Key antioxidants, vitamins C and E, are necessary for normal brain development and neuronal function. In this study, we depleted both of these vitamins in two mouse models to determine if oxidative stress due to combined vitamin C and E dietary deficiency altered their neurological phenotype. The first model lacked both alleles for the Gulonolactone oxidase gene (Gulo−/−) and therefore was unable synthesize vitamin C. To obtain an additional cellular deficiency of vitamin C, the second model also lacked one allele for the cellular vitamin C transporter gene (Gulo−/−/SVCT2+/−). Methods The experimental treatment was 16 weeks of vitamin E deprivation followed by 3 weeks of vitamin C deprivation. Mice were assessed for motor coordination deficits, vitamin levels, and oxidative stress biomarkers. Results In the first model, defects in motor performance were more apparent in both vitamin C-deficient groups (VE+VC−, VE−VC−) compared to vitamin C-supplemented groups (VE+VC+, VE−VC+) regardless of vitamin E level. Analysis of brain cortex and liver confirmed decreases of at least 80% for each vitamin in mice on deficient diets. Vitamin E deficiency doubled oxidative stress biomarkers (F2-isoprostanes and malondialdehyde). In the second model, Gulo−/−/SVCT2+/− mice on the doubly deficient diets showed deficits in locomotor activity, Rota-rod performance, and other motor tasks, with no concomitant change in anxiety or spatial memory. Discussion Vitamin E deficiency alone caused a modest oxidative stress in brain that did not affect motor performance. Adding a cellular deficit in vitamin C to dietary deprivation of both vitamins significantly impaired motor performance. PMID:23321552

  2. Auxin mediates patterning of cluster root development induced by phosphorus deficiency in Lupinus albus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    White lupin (Lupinus albus L.) develops cluster roots under phosphorus (P) deficiency. This species is widely used as a model system to study the morphology and physiology of cluster roots. However, the mechanism of P deficiency-induced cluster root formation is not fully understood. To evaluate the...

  3. Intestinal inflammation caused by magnesium deficiency alters basal and oxidative stress-induced intestinal function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Magnesium-deficiency (MgD)induces a systemic pro-inflammatory state. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of MgD on the functional and molecular response to mesenteric ischemia reperfusion. Rats were assigned to 4 groups and placed on magnesium sufficient or deficient diet for 1 or 3 we...

  4. Deficient synthesis of glutathione underlies oxidative stress in aging and can be corrected by dietary cysteine and glycine supplementation1234

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sanjeet G; Guthikonda, Anuradha P; Reid, Marvin; Balasubramanyam, Ashok; Taffet, George E; Jahoor, Farook

    2011-01-01

    Background: Aging is associated with oxidative stress, but underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Objective: We tested whether glutathione deficiency occurs because of diminished synthesis and contributes to oxidative stress in aging and whether stimulating glutathione synthesis with its precursors cysteine and glycine could alleviate oxidative stress. Design: Eight elderly and 8 younger subjects received stable-isotope infusions of [2H2]glycine, after which red blood cell (RBC) glutathione synthesis and concentrations, plasma oxidative stress, and markers of oxidant damage (eg, F2-isoprostanes) were measured. Elderly subjects were restudied after 2 wk of glutathione precursor supplementation. Results: Compared with younger control subjects, elderly subjects had markedly lower RBC concentrations of glycine (486.7 ± 28.3 compared with 218.0 ± 23.7 μmol/L; P < 0.01), cysteine (26.2 ± 1.4 compared with 19.8 ± 1.3 μmol/L; P < 0.05), and glutathione (2.08 ± 0.12 compared with 1.12 ± 0.18 mmol/L RBCs; P < 0.05); lower glutathione fractional (83.14 ± 6.43% compared with 45.80 ± 5.69%/d; P < 0.01) and absolute (1.73 ± 0.16 compared with 0.55 ± 0.12 mmol/L RBCs per day; P < 0.01) synthesis rates; and higher plasma oxidative stress (304 ± 16 compared with 346 ± 20 Carratelli units; P < 0.05) and plasma F2-isoprostanes (97.7 ± 8.3 compared with 136.3 ± 11.3 pg/mL; P < 0.05). Precursor supplementation in elderly subjects led to a 94.6% higher glutathione concentration, a 78.8% higher fractional synthesis rate, a 230.9% higher absolute synthesis rate, and significantly lower plasma oxidative stress and F2-isoprostanes. No differences in these measures were observed between younger subjects and supplemented elderly subjects. Conclusions: Glutathione deficiency in elderly humans occurs because of a marked reduction in synthesis. Dietary supplementation with the glutathione precursors cysteine and glycine fully restores glutathione synthesis and

  5. Hypothyroxinemia induced by maternal mild iodine deficiency impairs hippocampal myelinated growth in lactational rats.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Wang, Yi; Dong, Jing; Wang, Yuan; Min, Hui; Song, Binbin; Shan, Zhongyan; Teng, Weiping; Xi, Qi; Chen, Jie

    2015-11-01

    Hypothyroxinemia induced by maternal mild iodine deficiency causes neurological deficits and impairments of brain function in offspring. Hypothyroxinemia is prevalent in developing and developed countries alike. However, the mechanism underlying these deficits remains less well known. Given that the myelin plays an important role in learning and memory function, we hypothesize that hippocampal myelinated growth may be impaired in rat offspring exposed to hypothyroxinemia induced by maternal mild iodine deficiency. To test this hypothesis, the female Wistar rats were used and four experimental groups were prepared: (1) control; (2) maternal mild iodine deficiency diet inducing hypothyroxinemia; (3) hypothyroidism induced by maternal severe iodine deficiency diet; (4) hypothyroidism induced by maternal methimazole water. The rats were fed the diet from 3 months before pregnancy to the end of lactation. Our results showed that the physiological changes occuring in the hippocampal myelin were altered in the mild iodine deficiency group as indicated by the results of immunofluorescence of myelin basic proteins on postnatal day 14 and postnatal day 21. Moreover, hypothyroxinemia reduced the expressions of oligodendrocyte lineage transcription factor 2 and myelin-related proteins in the treatments on postnatal day 14 and postnatal day 21. Our data suggested that hypothyroxinemia induced by maternal mild iodine deficiency may impair myelinated growth of the offspring. PMID:24753110

  6. Dietary Fructose Inhibits Intestinal Calcium Absorption and Induces Vitamin D Insufficiency in CKD

    PubMed Central

    Douard, Veronique; Asgerally, Abbas; Sabbagh, Yves; Sugiura, Shozo; Shapses, Sue A.; Casirola, Donatella

    2010-01-01

    Renal disease leads to perturbations in calcium and phosphate homeostasis and vitamin D metabolism. Dietary fructose aggravates chronic kidney disease (CKD), but whether it also worsens CKD-induced derangements in calcium and phosphate homeostasis is unknown. Here, we fed rats diets containing 60% glucose or fructose for 1 mo beginning 6 wk after 5/6 nephrectomy or sham operation. Nephrectomized rats had markedly greater kidney weight, blood urea nitrogen, and serum levels of creatinine, phosphate, and calcium-phosphate product; dietary fructose significantly exacerbated all of these outcomes. Expression and activity of intestinal phosphate transporter, which did not change after nephrectomy or dietary fructose, did not correlate with hyperphosphatemia in 5/6-nephrectomized rats. Intestinal transport of calcium, however, decreased with dietary fructose, probably because of fructose-mediated downregulation of calbindin 9k. Serum calcium levels, however, were unaffected by nephrectomy and diet. Finally, only 5/6-nephrectomized rats that received dietary fructose demonstrated marked reductions in 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 levels, despite upregulation of 1α-hydroxylase. In summary, excess dietary fructose inhibits intestinal calcium absorption, induces marked vitamin D insufficiency in CKD, and exacerbates other classical symptoms of the disease. Future studies should evaluate the relevance of monitoring fructose consumption in patients with CKD. PMID:19959720

  7. Thiamine Deficiency Induced Neurochemical, Neuroanatomical, and Neuropsychological Alterations: A Reappraisal

    PubMed Central

    Höller, Yvonne; Storti, Monica; Christova, Monica; Tezzon, Frediano; Golaszewski, Stefan; Trinka, Eugen

    2013-01-01

    Nutritional deficiency can cause, mainly in chronic alcoholic subjects, the Wernicke encephalopathy and its chronic neurological sequela, the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS). Long-term chronic ethanol abuse results in hippocampal and cortical cell loss. Thiamine deficiency also alters principally hippocampal- and frontal cortical-dependent neurochemistry; moreover in WKS patients, important pathological damage to the diencephalon can occur. In fact, the amnesic syndrome typical for WKS is mainly due to the damage in the diencephalic-hippocampal circuitry, including thalamic nuclei and mammillary bodies. The loss of cholinergic cells in the basal forebrain region results in decreased cholinergic input to the hippocampus and the cortex and reduced choline acetyltransferase and acetylcholinesterase activities and function, as well as in acetylcholine receptor downregulation within these brain regions. In this narrative review, we will focus on the neurochemical, neuroanatomical, and neuropsychological studies shedding light on the effects of thiamine deficiency in experimental models and in humans. PMID:24235882

  8. Thiamine deficiency induced neurochemical, neuroanatomical, and neuropsychological alterations: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Raffaele; Höller, Yvonne; Storti, Monica; Christova, Monica; Tezzon, Frediano; Golaszewski, Stefan; Trinka, Eugen; Brigo, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Nutritional deficiency can cause, mainly in chronic alcoholic subjects, the Wernicke encephalopathy and its chronic neurological sequela, the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS). Long-term chronic ethanol abuse results in hippocampal and cortical cell loss. Thiamine deficiency also alters principally hippocampal- and frontal cortical-dependent neurochemistry; moreover in WKS patients, important pathological damage to the diencephalon can occur. In fact, the amnesic syndrome typical for WKS is mainly due to the damage in the diencephalic-hippocampal circuitry, including thalamic nuclei and mammillary bodies. The loss of cholinergic cells in the basal forebrain region results in decreased cholinergic input to the hippocampus and the cortex and reduced choline acetyltransferase and acetylcholinesterase activities and function, as well as in acetylcholine receptor downregulation within these brain regions. In this narrative review, we will focus on the neurochemical, neuroanatomical, and neuropsychological studies shedding light on the effects of thiamine deficiency in experimental models and in humans. PMID:24235882

  9. Raman studies of gluten proteins aggregation induced by dietary fibres.

    PubMed

    Nawrocka, Agnieszka; Szymańska-Chargot, Monika; Miś, Antoni; Kowalski, Radosław; Gruszecki, Wiesław I

    2016-03-01

    Interactions between gluten proteins and dietary fibre preparations are crucial in the baking industry. The addition of dietary fibre to bread causes significant reduction in its quality which is influenced by changes in the structure of gluten proteins. Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy was applied to determine changes in the structure of gluten proteins modified by seven dietary fibres. The commercially available gluten proteins without starch were mixed with the fibres in three concentrations: 3%, 6% and 9%. The obtained results showed that all fibres, regardless of their origin, caused the same kind of changes i.e. decrease in the α-helix content with a simultaneous increase in the content of antiparallel-β-sheet. The results indicated that presence of cellulose was the probable cause of these changes, and lead to aggregation or abnormal folding of the gluten proteins. Other changes observed in the gluten structure concerning β-structures, conformation of disulphide bridges, and aromatic amino acid environment, depended on the fibres chemical composition. PMID:26471530

  10. Genistein abrogates G2 arrest induced by curcumin in p53 deficient T47D cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The high cost and low level of cancer survival urge the finding of new drugs having better mechanisms. There is a high trend of patients to be “back to nature” and use natural products as an alternative way to cure cancer. The fact is that some of available anticancer drugs are originated from plants, such as taxane, vincristine, vinblastine, pacitaxel. Curcumin (diferuloylmethane), a dietary pigment present in Curcuma longa rizhome is reported to induce cell cycle arrest in some cell lines. Other study reported that genistein isolated from Glycine max seed inhibited phosphorylation of cdk1, gene involved during G2/M transition and thus could function as G2 checkpoint abrogator. The inhibition of cdk1 phosphorylation is one of alternative strategy which could selectively kill cancer cells and potentially be combined with DNA damaging agent such as curcumin. Methods T47D cell line was treated with different concentrations of curcumin and genistein, alone or in combination; added together or with interval time. Flow Cytometry and MTT assay were used to evaluate cell cycle distribution and viability, respectively. The presence of apoptotic cells was determined using acridine orange-ethidium bromide staining. Results In this study curcumin induced G2 arrest on p53 deficient T47D cells at the concentration of 10 μM. Increasing concentration up to 30 μM increased the number of cell death. Whilst genistein alone at low concentration (≤10 μM) induced cell proliferation, addition of genistein (20 μM) 16 h after curcumin resulted in more cell death (89%), 34% higher than that administered at the same time (56%). The combination treatment resulted in apoptotic cell death. Combining curcumin with high dose of genistein (50 μM) induced necrotic cells. Conclusions Genistein increased the death of curcumin treated T47D cells. Appropriate timing of administration and concentration of genistein determine the outcome of treatment and this method

  11. Modulation of miRNA Expression by Dietary Polyphenols in apoE Deficient Mice: A New Mechanism of the Action of Polyphenols

    PubMed Central

    Milenkovic, Dragan; Deval, Christiane; Gouranton, Erwan; Landrier, Jean-François; Scalbert, Augustin; Morand, Christine; Mazur, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    Background Polyphenols are the most abundant antioxidants in the human diet and are widespread constituents of fruits and beverages, such as tea, coffee or wine. Epidemiological, clinical and animal studies support a role of polyphenols in the prevention of various diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases, cancers or neurodegenerative diseases. Recent findings suggest that polyphenols could interact with cellular signaling cascades regulating the activity of transcription factors and consequently affecting the expression of genes. However, the impact of polyphenol on the expression of microRNA, small non-coding RNAs, has not yet been studied. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of dietary supplementation with polyphenols at nutritional doses on miRNA expression in the livers of apolipoprotein E-deficient mice (apoE−/−) jointly with mRNA expression profiling. Methodology/Principal Findings Using microarrays, we measured the global miRNA expression in the livers of wild-type (C57B6/J) mice or apoE−/− mice fed diets supplemented with one of nine different polyphenols or a control diet. This analysis revealed that knock-out of the apoE gene induced significant modulation in the expression of miRNA. Moreover, changes in miRNA expression were observed after polyphenol supplementation, and five miRNAs (mmu-miR-291b-5p, mmu-miR-296-5p, mmu-miR-30c-1*, mmu-miR-467b* and mmu-miR-374*) were identified as being commonly modulated by these polyphenols. We also observed that these polyphenols counteracted the modulation of miRNA expression induced by apoE mutation. Pathway analyses on these five miRNA-target genes revealed common pathways, some of which were also identified from a pathway analysis on mRNA profiles. Conclusion This in vivo study demonstrated for the first time that polyphenols at nutritional doses modulate the expression of miRNA in the liver. Even if structurally different, all polyphenols induced a similar miRNA expression profile

  12. Dietary amino acid-induced systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Montanaro, A; Bardana, E J

    1991-05-01

    The effects of dietary manipulations on autoimmune disease are understood poorly. In this article, we detail our experience with a human subject who developed autoimmune hemolytic anemia while participating in a research study that required the ingestion of alfalfa seeds. Subsequent experimental studies in primates ingesting alfalfa sprout seeds and L-canavanine (a prominent amino acid constituent of alfalfa) is presented. The results of these studies indicate a potential toxic and immunoregulatory role of L-canavanine in the induction of a systemic lupus-like disease in primates. PMID:1862241

  13. Dietary L-arginine supplementation modulates lipopolysaccharide-induced systemic inflammatory response in broiler chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to evaluate whether dietary supplementation with L-arginine (Arg) could attenuate lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced systemic inflammatory response through LPS/TLR-4 signaling pathway in broilers. The experiment was designed as a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement (n = 8 cages/treatm...

  14. Dietary copper supplementation reverses hypertrophic cardiomyopathy induced by chronic pressure overload in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sustained pressure overload causes cardiac hypertrophy and the transition to heart failure. We show here that dietary supplementation with physiologically relevant levels of copper (Cu) reverses pre-established hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in the presence of pressure overload induced by ascending aor...

  15. Dietary high-fat lard intake induces thyroid dysfunction and abnormal morphology in rats

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Shan-shan; Zhao, Yuan-fei; Song, Yong-feng; Xu, Chao; Yang, Jian-mei; Xuan, Shi-meng; Yan, Hui-li; Yu, Chun-xiao; Zhao, Meng; Xu, Jin; Zhao, Jia-jun

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Excess dietary fat intake can induce lipotoxicity in non-adipose tissues. The aim of this study was to observe the effects of dietary high-fat lard intake on thyroid in rats. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a high-fat lard diet for 24 weeks, and then the rats were fed a normal control diet (acute dietary modification) or the high-fat lard diet for another 6 weeks. The serum lipid profile, total thyroxine (TT4), free thyroxine (FT4) and thyrotropin (TSH) levels were determined at the 12, 18, 24 and 30 weeks. High-frequency ultrasound scanning of the thyroid glands was performed at the 24 or 30 weeks. After the rats were sacrificed, the thyroid glands were collected for histological and immunohistochemical analyses. Results: The high-fat lard diet significantly increased triglyceride levels in both the serum and thyroid, and decreased serum TT4 and FT4 levels in parallel with elevated serum TSH levels. Ultrasonic imaging revealed enlarged thyroid glands with lowered echotexture and relatively heterogeneous features in the high-fat lard fed rats. The thyroid glands from the high-fat lard fed rats exhibited enlarged follicle cavities and flattened follicular epithelial cells under light microscopy, and dilated endoplasmic reticulum cisternae, twisted nuclei, fewer microvilli and secretory vesicles under transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, the thyroid glands from the high-fat lard fed rats showed markedly low levels of thyroid hormone synthesis-related proteins TTF-1 and NIS. Acute dietary modification by withdrawal of the high-fat lard diet for 6 weeks failed to ameliorate the high-fat lard diet-induced thyroid changes. Conclusion: Dietary high-fat lard intake induces significant thyroid dysfunction and abnormal morphology in rats, which can not be corrected by short-term dietary modification. PMID:25263336

  16. Potassium Inhibits Dietary Salt-Induced Transforming Growth Factor-β Production

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Wei-Zhong; Aaron, Kristal; Wang, Pei-Xuan; Sanders, Paul W.

    2009-01-01

    Human and animal studies demonstrate an untoward effect of excess dietary NaCl (salt) intake on cardiovascular function and life span. The endothelium in particular augments the production of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, a fibrogenic growth factor, in response to excess dietary salt intake. This study explored the initiating mechanism that regulates salt-induced endothelial cell production of TGF-β. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given diets containing different amounts of NaCl and potassium for 4 days. A bioassay for TGF-β demonstrated increased (35.2%) amounts of active TGF-β in the medium of aortic ring segments from rats on the high-salt diet compared with rats maintained on a 0.3% NaCl diet. Inhibition of the large-conductance, calcium-activated potassium channel inhibited dietary salt-induced vascular production of TGF-β but did not affect production of TGF-β by ring segments from rats on the low-salt diet. Immunohistochemical and Western analyses demonstrated the α subunit of the calcium-activated potassium channel in endothelial cells. Increasing medium [K+] inhibited production of dietary salt-induced vascular production levels of total and active TGF-β but did not alter TGF-β production by aortic rings from rats on the 0.3% NaCl diet. Increasing dietary potassium content decreased urinary active TGF-β in animals receiving the high-salt diet but did not change urinary active TGF-β in animals receiving the low-salt diet. The findings demonstrated an interesting interaction between the dietary intake of potassium and excess NaCl and further showed the fundamental role of the endothelial calcium-activated potassium channel in the vascular response to excess salt intake. PMID:19738156

  17. A critical reappraisal of dietary practices in methylmalonic acidemia raises concerns about the safety of medical foods. Part 2: Cobalamin C deficiency (cblC).¶

    PubMed Central

    Manoli, Irini; Myles, Jennifer G.; Sloan, Jennifer L.; Carrillo-Carrasco, Nuria; Morava, Eva; Strauss, Kevin A.; Morton, Holmes; Venditti, Charles P.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Cobalamin C (cblC) deficiency impairs the biosynthesis of adenosyl- and methylcobalamin resulting in methylmalonic acidemia combined with hyperhomocysteinemia and hypomethioninemia. However, some patients with cblC deficiency are treated with medical foods, devoid of methionine and high in leucine content, that are formulated for patients with isolated propionate oxidative defects. We examined the effects of imbalanced branched-chain amino acid intake on growth outcomes in cblC patients. METHODS Dietary intake was correlated with biochemical, anthropometric, body composition measurements and other disease parameters in a cohort of 28 early-onset cblC patients. RESULTS Protein restricted diets were followed by 21% of the patients, while 32% received medical foods. Patients on protein-restricted diets had lower height-for-age Z-score (P=0.034), while patients consuming medical foods had lower head-circumference Z-scores (P=0.037), plasma methionine concentrations (P=0.001) and predicted methionine influx through the blood brain barrier Z-score (−1.29 vs. −0.0617, P=0.007). The combination of age of diagnosis, a history of seizures and the leucine/valine dietary intake ratio best predicted head circumference Z-score based on multiple regression modeling (R2= 0.945). CONCLUSIONS Patients with cblC deficiency treated with medical foods designed for isolated methylmalonic acidemia are at risk for iatrogenic methionine deficiency that could adversely affect brain growth and development. TRIAL REGISTRATION This clinical study is registered in www.clinicaltrials.gov with the ID: NCT00078078. Study URL: http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00078078 PMID:26270766

  18. Dietary repletion can replenish reduced T cell subset numbers and lymphoid organ weight in zinc-deficient and energy-restricted rats.

    PubMed

    Hosea, Heather J; Rector, Edward S; Taylor, Carla G

    2004-05-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the time course for recovery of lymphoid tissue and T cell subset numbers when Zn-deficient (ZD) or energy-restricted (ER) rats were repleted with control diet; in a second experiment, the link between the stress axis and lymphoid organs was explored. During the deficiency phase, rats were fed a ZD (<1 mg Zn/kg) or control diet (30 mg Zn/kg, nutritionally complete) either as pair-fed controls (ER) or ad libitum-fed controls (CTL) for 3 weeks. During the repletion phase, all rats were fed control diet ad libitum for 3, 7 or 23 d. After the deficiency phase, ZD and ER had lower T cell subset numbers in the thymus compared with CTL, and ZD had reduced T cell subset numbers in the spleen compared with both ER and CTL. T cell subset numbers and lymphoid organ weights recovered from dietary Zn deficiency and energy restriction by 7 d of repletion (except 23 d for thymus weight in ZD), while body weight required more than 23 d for recovery. At the end of the deficiency phase, ZD and ER had higher circulating corticosterone concentrations compared with CTL; plasma TNFalpha was not detectable and there were no differences in plasma haptoglobin, an acute-phase protein. In conclusion, Zn deficiency and energy restriction elevated circulating corticosterone and reduced T cell subset numbers in the thymus and spleen of growing rats. Repletion with a nutritionally complete diet allowed recovery of T cell subset numbers and lymphoid organ weight. PMID:15137926

  19. Strategies to Rescue the Consequences of Inducible Arginase-1 Deficiency in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ballantyne, Laurel L.; Sin, Yuan Yan; St. Amand, Tim; Si, Joshua; Goossens, Steven; Haenebalcke, Lieven; Haigh, Jody J.; Kyriakopoulou, Lianna; Schulze, Andreas; Funk, Colin D.

    2015-01-01

    Arginase-1 catalyzes the conversion of arginine to ornithine and urea, which is the final step of the urea cycle used to remove excess ammonia from the body. Arginase-1 deficiency leads to hyperargininemia in mice and man with severe lethal consequences in the former and progressive neurological impairment to varying degrees in the latter. In a tamoxifen-induced arginase-1 deficient mouse model, mice succumb to the enzyme deficiency within 2 weeks after inducing the knockout and retain <2 % enzyme in the liver. Standard clinical care regimens for arginase-1 deficiency (low-protein diet, the nitrogen-scavenging drug sodium phenylbutyrate, ornithine supplementation) either failed to extend lifespan (ornithine) or only minimally prolonged lifespan (maximum 8 days with low-protein diet and drug). A conditional, tamoxifen-inducible arginase-1 transgenic mouse strain expressing the enzyme from the Rosa26 locus modestly extended lifespan of neonatal mice, but not that of 4-week old mice, when crossed to the inducible arginase-1 knockout mouse strain. Delivery of an arginase-1/enhanced green fluorescent fusion construct by adeno-associated viral delivery (rh10 serotype with a strong cytomegalovirus-chicken β-actin hybrid promoter) rescued about 30% of male mice with lifespan prolongation to at least 6 months, extensive hepatic expression and restoration of significant enzyme activity in liver. In contrast, a vector of the AAV8 serotype driven by the thyroxine-binding globulin promoter led to weaker liver expression and did not rescue arginase-1 deficient mice to any great extent. Since the induced arginase-1 deficient mouse model displays a much more severe phenotype when compared to human arginase-1 deficiency, these studies reveal that it may be feasible with gene therapy strategies to correct the various manifestations of the disorder and they provide optimism for future clinical studies. PMID:25938595

  20. B-vitamin deficiency is protective against DSS-induced colitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Benight, Nancy M; Stoll, Barbara; Chacko, Shaji; da Silva, Vanessa R; Marini, Juan C; Gregory, Jesse F; Stabler, Sally P; Burrin, Douglas G

    2011-08-01

    Vitamin deficiencies are common in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Homocysteine (Hcys) is a thrombogenic amino acid produced from methionine (Met), and its increase in patients with IBD indicates a disruption of Met metabolism; however, the role of Hcys and Met metabolism in IBD is not well understood. We hypothesized that disrupted Met metabolism from a B-vitamin-deficient diet would exacerbate experimental colitis. Mice were fed a B(6)-B(12)-deficient or control diet for 2 wk and then treated with dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) to induce colitis. We monitored disease activity during DSS treatment and collected plasma and tissue for analysis of inflammatory tissue injury and Met metabolites. We also quantified Met cycle activity by measurements of in vivo Met kinetics using [1-(13)C-methyl-(2)H(3)]methionine infusion in similarly treated mice. Unexpectedly, we found that mice given the B-vitamin-deficient diet had improved clinical outcomes, including increased survival, weight maintenance, and reduced disease scores. We also found lower histological disease activity and proinflammatory gene expression (TNF-α and inducible nitric oxide synthase) in the colon in deficient-diet mice. Metabolomic analysis showed evidence that these effects were associated with deficient B(6), as markers of B(12) function were only mildly altered. In vivo methionine kinetics corroborated these results, showing that the deficient diet suppressed transsulfuration but increased remethylation. Our findings suggest that disrupted Met metabolism attributable to B(6) deficiency reduces the inflammatory response and disease activity in DSS-challenged mice. These results warrant further human clinical studies to determine whether B(6) deficiency and elevated Hcys in patients with IBD contribute to disease pathobiology. PMID:21596995

  1. IEX-1 deficiency induces browning of white adipose tissue and resists diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Shahid, Mohd; Javed, Ammar A.; Chandra, David; Ramsey, Haley E.; Shah, Dilip; Khan, Mohammed F.; Zhao, Liping; Wu, Mei X.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of obesity and insulin resistance. However, the primary mediators that affect energy homeostasis remain ill defined. Here, we report an unexpected role for immediate early response gene X-1 (IEX-1), a downstream target of NF-κB, in energy metabolism. We found that IEX-1 expression was highly induced in white adipose tissue (WAT) in both epidydmal and subcutaneous depots but not in interscapular brown adipose tissue (BAT) in mice fed a high fat diet (HFD). Null mutation of IEX-1 protected mice against HFD-induced adipose and hepatic inflammation, hepatic steatosis, and insulin resistance. Unexpectedly, IEX-1 knockout (IEX-1−/−) mice gained markedly less weight on HFD for 20 weeks as compared to wild-type (WT) littermates (37 ± 3 versus 48 ± 2 gm) due to increased energy expenditure. Mechanistically, we showed that IEX-1 deficiency induced browning and activated thermogenic genes program in WAT but not in BAT by promoting alternative activation of adipose macrophages. Consequently, IEX-1−/− mice exhibited enhanced thermogenesis (24 ± 0.1 versus 22 ± 0.1 kcal/hour/kg in WT mice) explaining increased energy expenditure and lean phenotype in these mice. In conclusion, the present study suggests that IEX-1 is a novel physiological regulator of energy homeostasis via its action in WAT. PMID:27063893

  2. IEX-1 deficiency induces browning of white adipose tissue and resists diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Mohd; Javed, Ammar A; Chandra, David; Ramsey, Haley E; Shah, Dilip; Khan, Mohammed F; Zhao, Liping; Wu, Mei X

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of obesity and insulin resistance. However, the primary mediators that affect energy homeostasis remain ill defined. Here, we report an unexpected role for immediate early response gene X-1 (IEX-1), a downstream target of NF-κB, in energy metabolism. We found that IEX-1 expression was highly induced in white adipose tissue (WAT) in both epidydmal and subcutaneous depots but not in interscapular brown adipose tissue (BAT) in mice fed a high fat diet (HFD). Null mutation of IEX-1 protected mice against HFD-induced adipose and hepatic inflammation, hepatic steatosis, and insulin resistance. Unexpectedly, IEX-1 knockout (IEX-1(-/-)) mice gained markedly less weight on HFD for 20 weeks as compared to wild-type (WT) littermates (37 ± 3 versus 48 ± 2 gm) due to increased energy expenditure. Mechanistically, we showed that IEX-1 deficiency induced browning and activated thermogenic genes program in WAT but not in BAT by promoting alternative activation of adipose macrophages. Consequently, IEX-1(-/-) mice exhibited enhanced thermogenesis (24 ± 0.1 versus 22 ± 0.1 kcal/hour/kg in WT mice) explaining increased energy expenditure and lean phenotype in these mice. In conclusion, the present study suggests that IEX-1 is a novel physiological regulator of energy homeostasis via its action in WAT. PMID:27063893

  3. [Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency-induced schizophrenia in a school-age boy].

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiao; Liu, Jing; Liu, Yu-Peng; Li, Xi-Yuan; Ma, Yan-Yan; Wu, Tong-Fei; Ding, Yuan; Song, Jin-Qing; Wang, Yu-Jie; Yang, Yan-Ling

    2014-01-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder. It is known that MTHFR deficiency may result in hyperhomocysteinemia, but MTHFR deficiency-induced schizophrenia has been rarely reported. Here we present the clinical course, biochemical and genetic characteristics of schizophrenia resulted from MTHFR deficiency in a school-age boy. He was 13 years old. He was admitted with a two-year history of fear, auditory hallucination, learning difficulty, sleeping problems, irascibility, drowsing and giggling. At admission, he had significantly elevated plasma and urine levels of total homocysteine, significantly decreased levels of folate in serum and cerebrospinal fluid, and a normal blood concentration of methionine. Further DNA sequencing analysis showed 665C>T homozygous mutations in the MTHFR gene. The patient was diagnosed with MTHFR deficiency-associated schizophrenia and treatment with calcium folinate, vitamin B12, vitamin B6, and betaine was initiated. After the treatment for 1 week, his plasma and urine levels of homocysteine were decreased to a normal range and the clinical symptoms were significantly improved. After 3 months of treatment, the patient returned to school. He is now living with normal school life. In summary, children with late-onset MTHFR deficiency and secondary cerebral folate deficiency may lead to schizophrenia. This rare condition can be early diagnosed through analyses of blood and urine total homocysteine, amino acids in blood and folate in blood and cerebral fluid and successfully treated with folinic acid, vitamin B6, vitamin B12 and betaine. PMID:24461181

  4. Delayed auditory conduction in diabetes: is metformin-induced vitamin B12 deficiency responsible?

    PubMed Central

    Khattar, Deepti; Khaliq, Farah; Vaney, Neelam; Madhu, Sri Venkata

    2016-01-01

    Summary The present study aims to evaluate the functional integrity of the auditory pathway in patients with diabetes taking metformin. A further aim is to assess its association with vitamin B12 deficiency induced by metformin. Thirty diabetics taking metformin and 30 age-matched non-diabetic controls were enrolled. Stimulus-related potentials and vitamin B12 levels were evaluated in all the subjects. The diabetics showed deficient vitamin B12 levels and delayed wave III latency and III–V interpeak latency in the right ear and delayed Na and Pa wave latencies in the left ear compared with the controls. The dose and duration of metformin showed no association with the stimulus-related potentials. Therefore, although vitamin B12 levels were deficient and auditory conduction impairment was present in the diabetics on metformin, this impairment cannot be attributed to the vitamin B12 deficiency. PMID:27358222

  5. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress–Related Genes in Yellow Catfish Pelteobagrus fulvidraco: Molecular Characterization, Tissue Expression, and Expression Responses to Dietary Copper Deficiency and Excess

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yu-Feng; Luo, Zhi; Huang, Chao; Chen, Qi-Liang; Pan, Ya–Xiong; Xu, Yi-Huan

    2015-01-01

    Two endoplasmic reticulum (ER) molecular chaperones [glucose-regulated protein 78 (grp78) and calreticulin (crt)] and three ER stress sensors [PKR-like ER kinase (perk), inositol requiring enzyme (ire)-1α, and activating transcription factor (atf)-6α] cDNAs were first characterized from yellow catfish, Pelteobagrus fulvidraco. The predicted amino acid sequences for the yellow catfish grp78, crt, perk, ire-1α, and atf-6α revealed that the proteins contained all of the structural features that were characteristic of the five genes in other species, including the KDEL motif, signal peptide, sensor domain, and effector domain. mRNAs of the five genes mentioned above were expressed in various tissues, but their mRNA levels varied among tissues. Dietary Cu excess, but not Cu deficiency, activated the chaperones (grp78 and crt) and folding sensors in ER, and the UPR signaling pathways (i.e., perk–eif2α and the ire1–xbp1) in a tissue-specific manner. For the first time, our study cloned grp78, crt, perk, ire-1α, and atf-6α genes in yellow catfish and demonstrated their differential expression among tissues. Moreover, the present study also indicated differential regulation of these ER stress–related genes by dietary Cu deficiency and excess, which will be beneficial for us to evaluate effects of dietary Cu levels in fish at the molecular level, based on the upstream pathway of lipid metabolism (the ER) and thus provide novel insights regarding the nutrition of Cu in fish. PMID:26276384

  6. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Related Genes in Yellow Catfish Pelteobagrus fulvidraco: Molecular Characterization, Tissue Expression, and Expression Responses to Dietary Copper Deficiency and Excess.

    PubMed

    Song, Yu-Feng; Luo, Zhi; Huang, Chao; Chen, Qi-Liang; Pan, Ya-Xiong; Xu, Yi-Huan

    2015-10-01

    Two endoplasmic reticulum (ER) molecular chaperones [glucose-regulated protein 78 (grp78) and calreticulin (crt)] and three ER stress sensors [PKR-like ER kinase (perk), inositol requiring enzyme (ire)-1α, and activating transcription factor (atf)-6α] cDNAs were first characterized from yellow catfish, Pelteobagrus fulvidraco. The predicted amino acid sequences for the yellow catfish grp78, crt, perk, ire-1α, and atf-6α revealed that the proteins contained all of the structural features that were characteristic of the five genes in other species, including the KDEL motif, signal peptide, sensor domain, and effector domain. mRNAs of the five genes mentioned above were expressed in various tissues, but their mRNA levels varied among tissues. Dietary Cu excess, but not Cu deficiency, activated the chaperones (grp78 and crt) and folding sensors in ER, and the UPR signaling pathways (i.e., perk-eif2α and the ire1-xbp1) in a tissue-specific manner. For the first time, our study cloned grp78, crt, perk, ire-1α, and atf-6α genes in yellow catfish and demonstrated their differential expression among tissues. Moreover, the present study also indicated differential regulation of these ER stress-related genes by dietary Cu deficiency and excess, which will be beneficial for us to evaluate effects of dietary Cu levels in fish at the molecular level, based on the upstream pathway of lipid metabolism (the ER) and thus provide novel insights regarding the nutrition of Cu in fish. PMID:26276384

  7. Suppression of the later stages of radiation-induced carcinogenesis by antioxidant dietary formulations.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Ann R; Ware, Jeffrey H; Carlton, William; Davis, James G

    2011-07-01

    We have previously reported data from a long-term carcinogenesis study indicating that dietary antioxidant supplements can suppress radiation-induced malignant lymphoma and harderian gland tumors induced by space radiations (specifically, 1 GeV/n iron ions or protons) in CBA/J mice. Two different antioxidant dietary supplements were used in these studies: a supplement containing a mixture of antioxidant agents [l-selenomethionine (SeM), N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), ascorbic acid, co-enzyme Q10, α-lipoic acid and vitamin E succinate], termed the AOX supplement, and another supplement known as Bowman-Birk Inhibitor Concentrate (BBIC). In the present report, the results from the earlier analysis of the harderian gland data from the published long-term animal study have been combined with new data derived from the same long-term animal study. In the earlier analysis, harderian glands were removed from animals exhibiting abnormalities (e.g. visibly swollen areas) around the eyes at the time of euthanasia or death in the long-term animal study. Abnormalities around the eyes were usually due to the development of tumors in the harderian glands of these mice. The new data presented here focused on the histopathological results obtained from analyses of the harderian glands of mice that did not have visible abnormalities around the eyes at the time of necropsy in the long-term animal study. In this paper, the original published data and the new data have been combined to provide a more complete evaluation of the harderian glands from animals in the long-term carcinogenesis study, with all available harderian glands from the animals processed and prepared for histopathological evaluation. The results indicate that, although dietary antioxidant supplements suppressed harderian gland tumors in a statistically significant fashion when all glands were analyzed, the antioxidant diets were less effective at suppressing the incidence of all harderian gland tumors than they were at

  8. Effects of dietary zinc deficiency on the reproductive system of young male sheep: testicular growth and the secretion of inhibin and testosterone.

    PubMed

    Martin, G B; White, C L; Markey, C M; Blackberry, M A

    1994-05-01

    The effects of dietary zinc deficiency on testicular development in young Merino rams (initial live mass, 22 kg) were tested. Four groups of five rams were fed ad libitum with diets containing 4, 10, 17 or 27 micrograms Zn g-1. To control the effects of loss of appetite caused by zinc deficiency, a fifth group (pair-fed control) was fed the diet containing 27 micrograms Zn g-1, but the amount of feed offered was restricted to that eaten voluntarily by the zinc deficient (4 micrograms Zn g-1) rams they were paired with. After 96 days on the diets, epididymal and testicular masses did not differ significantly between the animals fed 10, 17 or 27 micrograms Zn g-1 ad libitum, but were significantly lower in pair-fed controls, and lowest in the zinc-deficient animals. Testicular responsiveness to LH, as measured by testosterone production, increased substantially in most rams as the experiment progressed, the only exception being the zinc-deficient group, in which the response to LH was lower than in any of the other groups. Testicular concentrations of zinc and testosterone were lower in the zinc-deficient animals than in all the other groups. Plasma inhibin concentrations fell as the experiment progressed in rams fed 17 and 27 micrograms Zn g-1 ad libitum, but not in the other groups. The pair-fed control rams had smaller seminiferous tubules and less lumen development than did the controls fed ad libitum (27 micrograms Zn g-1), which were similar to the animals fed 10 or 17 micrograms Zn g-1. In zinc-deficient rams, the tubule development was further retarded and the interstitial regions were more extensive than in the other groups. We conclude that the overall effect of zinc deficiency on testicular development is due to a combination of a non-specific effect (low gonadotrophin concentrations caused by the low feed intake) and a specific effect due to the lack of zinc. The zinc-specific effect is localized within the testis where it reduces the development of the

  9. Phosphate Deficiency Induces the Jasmonate Pathway and Enhances Resistance to Insect Herbivory1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Glauser, Gaétan

    2016-01-01

    During their life cycle, plants are typically confronted by simultaneous biotic and abiotic stresses. Low inorganic phosphate (Pi) is one of the most common nutrient deficiencies limiting plant growth in natural and agricultural ecosystems, while insect herbivory accounts for major losses in plant productivity and impacts ecological and evolutionary changes in plant populations. Here, we report that plants experiencing Pi deficiency induce the jasmonic acid (JA) pathway and enhance their defense against insect herbivory. Pi-deficient Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) showed enhanced synthesis of JA and the bioactive conjugate JA-isoleucine, as well as activation of the JA signaling pathway, in both shoots and roots of wild-type plants and in shoots of the Pi-deficient mutant pho1. The kinetics of the induction of the JA signaling pathway by Pi deficiency was influenced by PHOSPHATE STARVATION RESPONSE1, the main transcription factor regulating the expression of Pi starvation-induced genes. Phenotypes of the pho1 mutant typically associated with Pi deficiency, such as high shoot anthocyanin levels and poor shoot growth, were significantly attenuated by blocking the JA biosynthesis or signaling pathway. Wounded pho1 leaves hyperaccumulated JA/JA-isoleucine in comparison with the wild type. The pho1 mutant also showed an increased resistance against the generalist herbivore Spodoptera littoralis that was attenuated in JA biosynthesis and signaling mutants. Pi deficiency also triggered increased resistance to S. littoralis in wild-type Arabidopsis as well as tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and Nicotiana benthamiana, revealing that the link between Pi deficiency and enhanced herbivory resistance is conserved in a diversity of plants, including crops. PMID:27016448

  10. Inducible Arginase 1 Deficiency in Mice Leads to Hyperargininemia and Altered Amino Acid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    St. Amand, Tim; Kyriakopoulou, Lianna; Schulze, Andreas; Funk, Colin D.

    2013-01-01

    Arginase deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder resulting from a loss of the liver arginase isoform, arginase 1 (ARG1), which is the final step in the urea cycle for detoxifying ammonia. ARG1 deficiency leads to hyperargininemia, characterized by progressive neurological impairment, persistent growth retardation and infrequent episodes of hyperammonemia. Using the Cre/loxP-directed conditional gene knockout system, we generated an inducible Arg1-deficient mouse model by crossing “floxed” Arg1 mice with CreERT2 mice. The resulting mice (Arg-Cre) die about two weeks after tamoxifen administration regardless of the starting age of inducing the knockout. These treated mice were nearly devoid of Arg1 mRNA, protein and liver arginase activity, and exhibited symptoms of hyperammonemia. Plasma amino acid analysis revealed pronounced hyperargininemia and significant alterations in amino acid and guanidino compound metabolism, including increased citrulline and guanidinoacetic acid. Despite no alteration in ornithine levels, concentrations of other amino acids such as proline and the branched-chain amino acids were reduced. In summary, we have generated and characterized an inducible Arg1-deficient mouse model exhibiting several pathologic manifestations of hyperargininemia. This model should prove useful for exploring potential treatment options of ARG1 deficiency. PMID:24224027

  11. Inducible arginase 1 deficiency in mice leads to hyperargininemia and altered amino acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sin, Yuan Yan; Ballantyne, Laurel L; Mukherjee, Kamalika; St Amand, Tim; Kyriakopoulou, Lianna; Schulze, Andreas; Funk, Colin D

    2013-01-01

    Arginase deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder resulting from a loss of the liver arginase isoform, arginase 1 (ARG1), which is the final step in the urea cycle for detoxifying ammonia. ARG1 deficiency leads to hyperargininemia, characterized by progressive neurological impairment, persistent growth retardation and infrequent episodes of hyperammonemia. Using the Cre/loxP-directed conditional gene knockout system, we generated an inducible Arg1-deficient mouse model by crossing "floxed" Arg1 mice with CreER(T2) mice. The resulting mice (Arg-Cre) die about two weeks after tamoxifen administration regardless of the starting age of inducing the knockout. These treated mice were nearly devoid of Arg1 mRNA, protein and liver arginase activity, and exhibited symptoms of hyperammonemia. Plasma amino acid analysis revealed pronounced hyperargininemia and significant alterations in amino acid and guanidino compound metabolism, including increased citrulline and guanidinoacetic acid. Despite no alteration in ornithine levels, concentrations of other amino acids such as proline and the branched-chain amino acids were reduced. In summary, we have generated and characterized an inducible Arg1-deficient mouse model exhibiting several pathologic manifestations of hyperargininemia. This model should prove useful for exploring potential treatment options of ARG1 deficiency. PMID:24224027

  12. Utilising cardiopulmonary bypass for cancer surgery. Malignancy-induced protein C deficiency and thrombophilia.

    PubMed

    Marshall, C

    2007-11-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass has evolved over the last 30 years. It is an important tool for the cardiac surgeon today and also has applications in non-cardiac operations such as surgery to extract tumours. Such patients undergoing surgery for cancer may be at an increased risk of a thromboembolic event post surgery, due to disturbances in the normal clotting pathway leading to hypercoagulability. One such disturbance is malignancy-induced Protein C deficiency. A deficiency of Protein C can cause hypercoagulabitity. Recent studies have examined cardiopulmonary bypass and inherited Protein C deficiency. However, surgery for cancer patients with a malignancy-induced Protein C deficiency involving cardiopulmonary bypass has not been reported. Surgery using CPB in these patients may result in increased morbidity and mortality. The objective of this article is to review the literature in order to discuss the occurrence, the aetiology and possible management of cancer patients with malignancy-induced Protein C deficiencies that require cardiopulmonary bypass for their surgery. PMID:18666739

  13. Folate Deficiency Induces Neurodegeneration and Brain Dysfunction in Mice Lacking Uracil DNA Glycosylase

    PubMed Central

    Kronenberg, Golo; Harms, Christoph; Sobol, Robert W.; Cardozo-Pelaez, Fernando; Linhart, Heinz; Winter, Benjamin; Balkaya, Mustafa; Gertz, Karen; Gay, Shanna B.; Cox, David; Eckart, Sarah; Ahmadi, Michael; Juckel, Georg; Kempermann, Gerd; Hellweg, Rainer; Sohr, Reinhard; Hörtnagl, Heide; Wilson, Samuel H.; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    Folate deficiency and resultant increased homocysteine levels have been linked experimentally and epidemiologically with neurodegenerative conditions like stroke and dementia. Moreover, folate deficiency has been implicated in the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders, most notably depression. We hypothesized that the pathogenic mechanisms include uracil misincorporation and, therefore, analyzed the effects of folate deficiency in mice lacking uracil DNA glycosylase (Ung−/−) versus wild-type controls. Folate depletion increased nuclear mutation rates in Ung−/− embryonic fibroblasts, and conferred death of cultured Ung−/− hippocampal neurons. Feeding animals a folate-deficient diet (FD) for 3 months induced degeneration of CA3 pyramidal neurons in Ung−/− but not Ung+/+ mice along with decreased hippocampal expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor protein and decreased brain levels of antioxidant glutathione. Furthermore, FD induced cognitive deficits and mood alterations such as anxious and despair-like behaviors that were aggravated in Ung−/− mice. Independent of Ung genotype, FD increased plasma homocysteine levels, altered brain monoamine metabolism, and inhibited adult hippocampal neurogenesis. These results indicate that impaired uracil repair is involved in neurodegeneration and neuropsychiatric dysfunction induced by experimental folate deficiency. PMID:18614692

  14. Endogenous Androgen Deficiency Enhances Diet-Induced Hypercholesterolemia and Atherosclerosis in Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hatch, Nicholas W.; Srodulski, Sarah J.; Chan, Huei-Wei; Zhang, Xuan; Tannock, Lisa R.; King, Victoria L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite numerous clinical and animal studies, the role of sex steroid hormones on lipoprotein metabolism and atherosclerosis remain controversial. Objective We sought to determine the effects of endogenous estrogen and testosterone on lipoprotein levels and atherosclerosis using mice fed a low-fat diet with no added cholesterol. Methods Male and female low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice were fed an open stock low-fat diet (10% of kcals from fat) for 2, 4, or 17 weeks. Ovariectomy, orchidectomy, or sham surgeries were performed to evaluate the effects of the presence or absence of endogenous hormones on lipid levels, lipoprotein distribution, and atherosclerosis development. Results Female mice fed the study diet for 17 weeks had a marked increase in levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, apolipoprotein-B containing lipoproteins, and atherosclerosis compared with male mice. Surprisingly, ovariectomy in female mice had no effect on any of these parameters. In contrast, castration of male mice markedly increased total cholesterol concentrations, triglycerides, apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins, and atherosclerotic lesion formation compared with male and female mice. Conclusions These data suggest that endogenous androgens protect against diet-induced increases in cholesterol concentrations, formation of proatherogenic lipoproteins, and atherosclerotic lesions formation. Conversely orchidectomy, which decreases androgen concentrations, promotes increases in cholesterol concentrations, proatherogenic lipoprotein formation, and atherosclerotic lesion formation in lowdensity lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice in response to a low-fat diet. PMID:22981166

  15. Selenium deficiency induced by zinc deprivation in a crustacean

    SciTech Connect

    Keating, K.I.; Caffrey, P.B. )

    1989-08-01

    For intact daphnids reared in circumstances of controlled trace element exposure, one consequence of insufficient zinc (Zn) is an increased demand on the animal's pool of available selenium (Se). This demand is manifested by the type of cuticle deterioration associated with Se deficiency and by a depression of reproduction. In the presence of 25 parts per billion (ppb) Zn, 1 ppb Se eliminates these symptoms. In the absence of detectable Zn, 5 ppb Se eliminates overt cuticle damage and substantially increases reproduction. A shortening of life span resulting from Zn deprivation is not ameliorated by Se addition. The authors suggest that the interplay between Zn and Se concentrations reflects an underlying interplay between interdependent, but distinct, metabolic pathways; i.e., (for Se) glutathione peroxidase and (for Zn) Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase--each offering protection against free radical damage. Because they are not necessarily localized in a given tissue, the key to recognition of such subtle, complex trace nutrient interactions has been use of intact animals in circumstances of control previously attainable only in tissue cultures.

  16. Vitamin D Deficiency Is Associated With the Severity of Radiation-Induced Proctitis in Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Ghorbanzadeh-Moghaddam, Amir; Gholamrezaei, Ali; Hemati, Simin

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced injury to normal tissues is a common complication of radiation therapy in cancer patients. Considering the role of vitamin D in mucosal barrier hemostasis and inflammatory responses, we investigated whether vitamin D deficiency is associated with the severity of radiation-induced acute proctitis in cancer patients. Methods and Materials: This prospective observational study was conducted in cancer patients referred for pelvic radiation therapy. Serum concentration of 25-hydroxyvitamin D was measured before radiation therapy. Vitamin D deficiency was defined as 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations of <35 nmol/L and <40 nmol/L in male and female patients, respectively, based on available normative data. Acute proctitis was assessed after 5 weeks of radiation therapy (total received radiation dose of 50 Gy) and graded from 0 to 4 using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) criteria. Results: Ninety-eight patients (57.1% male) with a mean age of 62.8 ± 9.1 years were studied. Vitamin D deficiency was found in 57 patients (58.1%). Symptoms of acute proctitis occurred in 72 patients (73.4%) after radiation therapy. RTOG grade was significantly higher in patients with vitamin D deficiency than in normal cases (median [interquartile range] of 2 [0.5-3] vs 1 [0-2], P=.037). Vitamin D deficiency was associated with RTOG grade of ≥2, independent of possible confounding factors; odds ratio (95% confidence interval) = 3.07 (1.27-7.50), P=.013. Conclusions: Vitamin D deficiency is associated with increased severity of radiation-induced acute proctitis. Investigating the underlying mechanisms of this association and evaluating the effectiveness of vitamin D therapy in preventing radiation-induced acute proctitis is warranted.

  17. Zinc deficiency enhanced inflammatory response by increasing immune cell activation and inducing IL6 promoter demethylation

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Carmen P.; Rinaldi, Nicole A.; Ho, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Scope Zinc deficiency results in immune dysfunction and promotes systemic inflammation. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of zinc deficiency on cellular immune activation and epigenetic mechanisms that promote inflammation. This work is potentially relevant to the aging population given that age-related immune defects, including chronic inflammation, coincide with declining zinc status. Methods and results An in vitro cell culture system and the aged mouse model were used to characterize immune activation and DNA methylation profiles that may contribute to the enhanced proinflammatory response mediated by zinc deficiency. Zinc deficiency up-regulated cell activation markers ICAM1, MHC class II, and CD86 in THP1 cells, that coincided with increased IL1β and IL6 responses following LPS stimulation. A decreased zinc status in aged mice was similarly associated with increased ICAM1 and IL6 gene expression. Reduced IL6 promoter methylation was observed in zinc deficient THP1 cells, as well as in aged mice and human lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from aged individuals. Conclusion Zinc deficiency induced inflammatory response in part by eliciting aberrant immune cell activation and altered promoter methylation. Our results suggested potential interactions between zinc status, epigenetics, and immune function, and how their dysregulation could contribute to chronic inflammation. PMID:25656040

  18. Prostaglandin E2 is critical for the development of niacin-deficiency-induced photosensitivity via ROS production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugita, Kazunari; Ikenouchi-Sugita, Atsuko; Nakayama, Yasuko; Yoshioka, Haruna; Nomura, Takashi; Sakabe, Jun-Ichi; Nakahigashi, Kyoko; Kuroda, Etsushi; Uematsu, Satoshi; Nakamura, Jun; Akira, Shizuo; Nakamura, Motonobu; Narumiya, Shuh; Miyachi, Yoshiki; Tokura, Yoshiki; Kabashima, Kenji

    2013-10-01

    Pellagra is a photosensitivity syndrome characterized by three ``D's'': diarrhea, dermatitis, and dementia as a result of niacin deficiency. However, the molecular mechanisms of photosensitivity dermatitis, the hallmark abnormality of this syndrome, remain unclear. We prepared niacin deficient mice in order to develop a murine model of pellagra. Niacin deficiency induced photosensitivity and severe diarrhea with weight loss. In addition, niacin deficient mice exhibited elevated expressions of COX-2 and PGE syntheses (Ptges) mRNA. Consistently, photosensitivity was alleviated by a COX inhibitor, deficiency of Ptges, or blockade of EP4 receptor signaling. Moreover, enhanced PGE2 production in niacin deficiency was mediated via ROS production in keratinocytes. In line with the above murine findings, human skin lesions of pellagra patients confirmed the enhanced expression of Ptges. Niacin deficiency-induced photosensitivity was mediated through EP4 signaling in response to increased PGE2 production via induction of ROS formation.

  19. DIETARY VITAMIN E DEFICIENCY AS A MODIFIER OF THE ASSOCIATIONS OF RESPIRATORY OUTCOMES WITH AIR POLLUTION IN ADOLESCENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction: We investigated whether low dietary intake of the lipophilic antioxidant vitamin E may act as a modifier of chronic air pollution's associations with respiratory outcomes among adolescents due to an increased respiratory response to the oxidative effects of air pol...

  20. Th17/Treg Imbalance Induced by Dietary Salt Variation Indicates Inflammation of Target Organs in Humans.

    PubMed

    Luo, Tao; Ji, Wen-Jie; Yuan, Fei; Guo, Zhao-Zeng; Li, Yun-Xiao; Dong, Yan; Ma, Yong-Qiang; Zhou, Xin; Li, Yu-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The functions of T helper 17 (Th17) and regulatory T (Treg) cells are tightly orchestrated through independent differentiation pathways that are involved in the secretion of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines induced by high-salt dietary. However, the role of imbalanced Th17/Treg ratio implicated in inflammation and target organ damage remains elusive. Here, by flow cytometry analysis, we demonstrated that switching to a high-salt diet resulted in decreased Th17 cells and reciprocally increased Treg cells, leading to a decreased Th17/Treg ratio. Meanwhile, Th17-related pathway was down-regulated after one day of high salt loading, with the increase in high salt loading as shown by microarray and RT-PCR. Subsequently, blood oxygen level-dependent magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-MRI) observed hypoxia in the renal medulla (increased R2(*) signal) during high-salt loading, which was regressed to its baseline level in a step-down fashion during low-salt feeding. The flow-mediated vasodilatation (FMD) of the branchial artery was significantly higher on the first day of high salt loading. Collectively, these observations indicate that a short-term increase in dietary salt intake could induce reciprocal switches in Th17/Treg ratio and related cytokines, which might be the underlying cellular mechanism of high-salt dietary induced end organ inflammation and potential atherosclerotic risk. PMID:27353721

  1. Th17/Treg Imbalance Induced by Dietary Salt Variation Indicates Inflammation of Target Organs in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Tao; Ji, Wen-jie; Yuan, Fei; Guo, Zhao-zeng; Li, Yun-xiao; Dong, Yan; Ma, Yong-qiang; Zhou, Xin; Li, Yu-ming

    2016-01-01

    The functions of T helper 17 (Th17) and regulatory T (Treg) cells are tightly orchestrated through independent differentiation pathways that are involved in the secretion of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines induced by high-salt dietary. However, the role of imbalanced Th17/Treg ratio implicated in inflammation and target organ damage remains elusive. Here, by flow cytometry analysis, we demonstrated that switching to a high-salt diet resulted in decreased Th17 cells and reciprocally increased Treg cells, leading to a decreased Th17/Treg ratio. Meanwhile, Th17-related pathway was down-regulated after one day of high salt loading, with the increase in high salt loading as shown by microarray and RT-PCR. Subsequently, blood oxygen level-dependent magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-MRI) observed hypoxia in the renal medulla (increased R2* signal) during high-salt loading, which was regressed to its baseline level in a step-down fashion during low-salt feeding. The flow-mediated vasodilatation (FMD) of the branchial artery was significantly higher on the first day of high salt loading. Collectively, these observations indicate that a short-term increase in dietary salt intake could induce reciprocal switches in Th17/Treg ratio and related cytokines, which might be the underlying cellular mechanism of high-salt dietary induced end organ inflammation and potential atherosclerotic risk. PMID:27353721

  2. Endostatin Prevents Dietary-Induced Obesity by Inhibiting Adipogenesis and Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Chen, Yang; Lu, Xin-an; Liu, Guanghua; Fu, Yan; Luo, Yongzhang

    2015-07-01

    Endostatin is a well-known angiogenesis inhibitor. Although angiogenesis has been considered as a potential therapeutic target of obesity, the inhibitory effect of endostatin on adipogenesis and dietary-induced obesity has never been demonstrated. Adipogenesis plays a critical role in controlling adipocyte cell number, body weight, and metabolic profile in a homeostatic state. Here we reveal that endostatin inhibits adipogenesis and dietary-induced obesity. The antiadipogenic mechanism of endostatin lies in its interaction with Sam68 RNA-binding protein in the nuclei of preadipocytes. This interaction competitively impairs the binding of Sam68 to intron 5 of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), causing an error in mTOR transcript. This consequently decreases the expression of mTOR, results in decreased activities of the mTOR complex 1 pathway, and leads to defects in adipogenesis. Moreover, our findings demonstrate that the antiangiogenic function of endostatin also contributes to its obesity-inhibitory activity. Through the combined functions on adipogenesis and angiogenesis, endostatin prevents dietary-induced obesity and its related metabolic disorders, including insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, and hepatic steatosis. Thus, our findings reveal that endostatin has a potential application for antiobesity therapy and the prevention of obesity-related metabolic syndromes. PMID:25605807

  3. Dietary eritadenine suppresses guanidinoacetic Acid-induced hyperhomocysteinemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Fukada, Shin-ichiro; Setoue, Minoru; Morita, Tatsuya; Sugiyama, Kimio

    2006-11-01

    We assessed the effect of eritadenine, a hypocholesterolemic factor isolated from the edible mushroom Lentinus edodes, on plasma homocysteine concentration using methyl-group acceptor-induced hyperhomocysteinemic rats. Male Wistar rats were fed a control diet or diets supplemented with a methyl-group acceptor or a precursor of methyl-group acceptor. Diets were supplemented with guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) at 2.5, 5, 7.5, and 10 g/kg, nicotinic acid (NiA) or ethanolamine (EA) at 5 and 10 g/kg, or glycine at 25 and 50 g/kg, and the rats were fed for 10 d (Expt. 1). Plasma total homocysteine concentration was increased 255 and 421% by 5 and 10 g/kg GAA, respectively, and 39 and 58% by 5 and 10 g/kg NiA, respectively, but not by EA or glycine. GAA supplementation dose-dependently decreased the hepatic S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) concentration and the activity of cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS) and increased the hepatic S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) and homocysteine concentrations. In another study in which rats were fed 5 g/kg GAA-supplemented diet for 1-10 d, plasma homocysteine and the other variables affected in Expt. 1 were affected in rats fed the GAA-supplemented diet (Expt. 2). We investigated the effect of supplementation of 5 g/kg GAA-supplemented diet with eritadenine (50 mg/kg) on plasma homocysteine concentration (Expt. 3). Eritadenine supplementation significantly suppressed the GAA-induced increase in plasma homocysteine concentration. Eritadenine also restored the decreased SAM concentration and CBS activity in the liver, whereas it further increased hepatic SAH concentration, suggesting that eritadenine might elicit its effect by both slowing homocysteine production and increasing cystathionine formation. The results confirm that GAA is a useful compound to induce experimental hyperhomocysteinemia and indicate that eritadenine can effectively counteract the hyperhomocysteinemic effect of GAA. PMID:17056803

  4. Lesions of the entopeduncular nucleus in rats prevent apomorphine-induced deficient sensorimotor gating.

    PubMed

    Lütjens, Götz; Krauss, Joachim K; Schwabe, Kerstin

    2011-07-01

    Dopamine-induced hyperactivity and deficient sensorimotor gating, measured as prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the acoustic startle response (ASR), are used as animal models for neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and Tourette's syndrome. We here investigated whether excitotoxic lesions of the rat entopeduncular nucleus (EPN), the equivalent to the human globus pallidus internus (GPi), would improve apomorphine-induced PPI-deficits and hyperactivity. Additionally, we investigated the effect of EPN lesions on cognition, motivation and motor skills. In male Sprague Dawley rats bilateral EPN lesions were induced by stereotactic injection of ibotenate (4 μg in 0.4 μl phosphate buffered saline, PBS) or sham-lesions by injection of vehicle PBS. After one week, rats were tested for learning and memory (continuous and delayed alternation, T-maze), for motivation (progressive ratio test with breakpoint of 3 min inactivity, Skinner box), and for motor skills (rotating rod). Thereafter, rats were tested for PPI of ASR (startle response system) after subcutaneous injection of apomorphine (1.0mg/kg and vehicle) and for locomotor activity (0.5mg/kg and vehicle). Ibotenate-induced EPN lesions did not affect learning and memory, motivation or motor skills. Basal locomotor activity and PPI was also not affected, but EPN lesions ameliorated apomorphine-induced hyperlocomotion and deficient PPI. This work indicates an important role of the EPN for the modulation of dopamine agonist-induced deficient sensorimotor gating and hyperlocomotion, without affecting normal behavioral function. PMID:21315767

  5. Dietary linoleic acid-induced alterations in pro- and anti-nociceptive lipid autacoids

    PubMed Central

    Ringel, Amit; Majchrzak-Hong, Sharon F; Yang, Jun; Blanchard, Helene; Zamora, Daisy; Loewke, James D; Rapoport, Stanley I; Hibbeln, Joseph R; Davis, John M; Hammock, Bruce D; Taha, Ameer Y

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic idiopathic pain syndromes are major causes of personal suffering, disability, and societal expense. Dietary n-6 linoleic acid has increased markedly in modern industrialized populations over the past century. These high amounts of linoleic acid could hypothetically predispose to physical pain by increasing the production of pro-nociceptive linoleic acid-derived lipid autacoids and by interfering with the production of anti-nociceptive lipid autacoids derived from n-3 fatty acids. Here, we used a rat model to determine the effect of increasing dietary linoleic acid as a controlled variable for 15 weeks on nociceptive lipid autacoids and their precursor n-6 and n-3 fatty acids in tissues associated with idiopathic pain syndromes. Results Increasing dietary linoleic acid markedly increased the abundance of linoleic acid and its pro-nociceptive derivatives and reduced the abundance of n-3 eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid and their anti-nociceptive monoepoxide derivatives. Diet-induced changes occurred in a tissue-specific manner, with marked alterations of nociceptive lipid autacoids in both peripheral and central tissues, and the most pronounced changes in their fatty acid precursors in peripheral tissues. Conclusions The present findings provide biochemical support for the hypothesis that the high linoleic acid content of modern industrialized diets may create a biochemical susceptibility to develop chronic pain. Dietary linoleic acid lowering should be further investigated as part of an integrative strategy for the prevention and management of idiopathic pain syndromes. PMID:27030719

  6. Early iron-deficiency-induced transcriptional changes in Arabidopsis roots as revealed by microarray analyses

    PubMed Central

    Buckhout, Thomas J; Yang, Thomas JW; Schmidt, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Background Iron (Fe) is an essential nutrient in plants and animals, and Fe deficiency results in decreased vitality and performance. Due to limited bio-availability of Fe, plants have evolved sophisticated adaptive alterations in development, biochemistry and metabolism that are mainly regulated at the transcriptional level. We have investigated the early transcriptional response to Fe deficiency in roots of the model plant Arabidopsis, using a hydroponic system that permitted removal of Fe from the nutrient solution within seconds and transferring large numbers of plants with little or no mechanical damage to the root systems. We feel that this experimental approach offers significant advantages over previous and recent DNA microarray investigations of the Fe-deficiency response by increasing the resolution of the temporal response and by decreasing non-Fe deficiency-induced transcriptional changes, which are common in microarray analyses. Results The expression of sixty genes were changed after 6 h of Fe deficiency and 65% of these were found to overlap with a group of seventy-nine genes that were altered after 24 h. A disproportionally high number of transcripts encoding ion transport proteins were found, which function to increase the Fe concentration and decrease the zinc (Zn) concentration in the cytosol. Analysis of global changes in gene expression revealed that changes in Fe availability were associated with the differential expression of genes that encode transporters with presumed function in uptake and distribution of transition metals other than Fe. It appeared that under conditions of Fe deficiency, the capacity for Zn uptake increased, most probably the result of low specificity of the Fe transporter IRT1 that was induced upon Fe deficiency. The transcriptional regulation of several Zn transports under Fe deficiency led presumably to the homeostatic regulation of the cytosolic concentration of Zn and of other transition metal ions such as Mn to

  7. Exercise-Induced Oxidative Stress and Dietary Antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    Yavari, Abbas; Javadi, Maryam; Mirmiran, Parvin; Bahadoran, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Context: Overproduction of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species during physical exercise, exercise induced oxidative stress and antioxidant supplementation is interesting and controversial concepts that have been considered during the past decades. Evidence Acquisition: In this review, we aimed to summarize current evidence in relation to antioxidant supplementation outcomes during exercise and physical activity. For this aim, we obtained relevant articles through searches of the Medline and PubMed databases between 1980 to 2013. Although major studies have indicated that antioxidants could attenuate biomarkers of exercise-induced oxidative stress and the use of antioxidant supplement is a common phenomenon among athletes and physically active people, there are some doubts regarding the benefits of these. Results: It seems that the best recommendations regarding antioxidants and exercise are having a balanced diet rich in natural antioxidants and phytochemicals. Conclusions: Regular consumption of various fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, legumes and beans, sprouts and seeds is an effective and safe way to meet all antioxidant requirements in physically active persons and athletes. PMID:25883776

  8. The Vacuolar Manganese Transporter MTP8 Determines Tolerance to Iron Deficiency-Induced Chlorosis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Eroglu, Seckin; Meier, Bastian; von Wirén, Nicolaus; Peiter, Edgar

    2016-02-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency is a widespread nutritional disorder on calcareous soils. To identify genes involved in the Fe deficiency response, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) transfer DNA insertion lines were screened on a high-pH medium with low Fe availability. This approach identified METAL TOLERANCE PROTEIN8 (MTP8), a member of the Cation Diffusion Facilitator family, as a critical determinant for the tolerance to Fe deficiency-induced chlorosis, also on soil substrate. Subcellular localization to the tonoplast, complementation of a manganese (Mn)-sensitive Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strain, and Mn sensitivity of mtp8 knockout mutants characterized the protein as a vacuolar Mn transporter suitable to prevent plant cells from Mn toxicity. MTP8 expression was strongly induced on low-Fe as well as high-Mn medium, which were both strictly dependent on the transcription factor FIT, indicating that high-Mn stress induces Fe deficiency. mtp8 mutants were only hypersensitive to Fe deficiency when Mn was present in the medium, which further suggested an Mn-specific role of MTP8 during Fe limitation. Under those conditions, mtp8 mutants not only translocated more Mn to the shoot than did wild-type plants but suffered in particular from critically low Fe concentrations and, hence, Fe chlorosis, although the transcriptional Fe deficiency response was up-regulated more strongly in mtp8. The diminished uptake of Fe from Mn-containing low-Fe medium by mtp8 mutants was caused by an impaired ability to boost the ferric chelate reductase activity, which is an essential process in Fe acquisition. These findings provide a mechanistic explanation for the long-known interference of Mn in Fe nutrition and define the molecular processes by which plants alleviate this antagonism. PMID:26668333

  9. The effect of a moderate zinc deficiency and dietary fat source on the activity and expression of the Δ(3)Δ (2)-enoyl-CoA isomerase in the liver of growing rats.

    PubMed

    Justus, Jennifer; Weigand, Edgar

    2014-06-01

    Auxiliary enzymes participate in β-oxidation of unsaturated fatty acids. The objective of the study was to investigate the impact of a moderate zinc deficiency and a high intake of polyunsaturated fat on Δ(3)Δ(2)-enoyl-CoA isomerase (ECI) in the liver and other tissues. Five groups of eight weanling rats each were fed moderately zinc-deficient (ZD) or zinc-adequate (ZA) semisynthetic diets (7 or 50 mg Zn/kg) enriched with 22 % cocoa butter (CB) or 22 % safflower oil (SO) for 4 weeks: (1) ZD-CB, fed free choice; (2) ZA-CBR, ZA-CB diet fed in equivalent amounts consumed by the ZD-CB group; (3) ZD-SO, fed free choice; (4) ZA-SOR, ZA-SO diet fed in equivalent amounts consumed by the ZD-SO group; and (5) ZA-SO, fed free choice. Growth and Zn status markers were markedly reduced in the ZD groups. ECI activity in the liver of the animals fed the ZD- and ZA-SO diets were significantly higher (approximately 2- and 3-fold, respectively) as compared with the CB-fed animals, whereas activities in extrahepatic tissues (kidneys, heart, skeletal muscle, testes, adipose tissue) were not altered by dietary treatments. Transcript levels of the mitochondrial Eci gene in the liver did not significantly differ between ZD and ZA rats, but were 1.6-fold higher in the ZA-SO- than in the ZD-CB-fed animals (P < 0.05). It is concluded that diets enriched with safflower oil as a source high in linoleic acid induce markedly increased hepatic ECI activities and that a moderate Zn deficiency does not affect transcription of the mitochondrial Eci gene in the liver. PMID:24682920

  10. Dietary Fructose and GLUT5 Transporter Activity Contribute to Antipsychotic-Induced Weight Gain.

    PubMed

    Palavicino-Maggio, Caroline B; Kuzhikandathil, Eldo V

    2016-09-01

    Receptors for antipsychotics in the hypothalamus contribute to antipsychotics-induced weight gain; however, many of these receptors are also expressed in the intestine. The role of these intestinally-expressed receptors, and their potential modulation of nutrient absorption, have not been investigated in the context of antipsychotics-induced weight gain. Here we tested the effect of dietary fructose and intestinal fructose uptake on clozapine-induced weight gain in mice. Weight gain was determined in wild type mice and mice lacking the GLUT5 fructose transporter that were "orally-administered" 20mg/kg clozapine for 28 days. To assess the role of dietary fructose, clozapine-treated mice were fed controlled diets with different levels of fructose. Effect of clozapine treatment on intestinal fructose transport activity and expression levels of various receptors that bind clozapine, as well as several genes involved in gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis were measured using real-time RT-PCR and western blotting. Oral administration of clozapine significantly increased body weight in wild type C57BL/6 mice but not in GLUT5 null mice. The clozapine-induced weight gain was proportional to the percentage of fructose in the diet. Clozapine-treated mice increased intestinal fructose uptake without changing the intestinal expression level of GLUT5. Clozapine-treated mice expressed significantly higher levels of intestinal H1 histamine receptor in the wild type but not GLUT5 null mice. Clozapine also increased the intestinal expression of fructokinase and several genes involved in gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis. Our results suggest that increased intestinal absorption and metabolism of fructose contributes to clozapine-induced weight gain. Eliminating dietary fructose might prevent antipsychotics-induced weight gain. PMID:27056716

  11. Heme deficiency of soluble guanylate cyclase induces gastroparesis

    PubMed Central

    COSYNS, S. M. R.; DHAESE, I.; THOONEN, R.; BUYS, E. S.; VRAL, A.; BROUCKAERT, P.; LEFEBVRE, R. A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) is the principal target of nitric oxide (NO) to control gastrointestinal motility. The consequence on nitrergic signaling and gut motility of inducing a heme-free status of sGC, as induced by oxidative stress, was investigated. Methods sGCβ1H105F knock-in (apo-sGC) mice, which express heme-free sGC that has basal activity, but cannot be stimulated by NO, were generated. Key Results Diethylenetriamine NONOate did not increase sGC activity in gastrointestinal tissue of apo-sGC mice. Exogenous NO did not induce relaxation in fundic, jejunal and colonic strips, and pyloric rings of apo-sGC mice. The stomach was enlarged in apo-sGC mice with hypertrophy of the muscularis externa of the fundus and pylorus. In addition, gastric emptying and intestinal transit were delayed and whole-gut transit time was increased in the apo-sGC mice, while distal colonic transit time was maintained. The nitrergic relaxant responses to electrical field stimulation at 1–4 Hz were abolished in fundic and jejunal strips from apo-sGC mice, but in pyloric rings and colonic strips, only the response at 1 Hz was abolished, indicating the contribution of other transmitters than NO. Conclusions & Inferences The results indicate that the gastrointestinal consequences of switching from a native sGC to a heme-free sGC, which cannot be stimulated by NO, are most pronounced at the level of the stomach establishing a pivotal role of the activation of sGC by NO in normal gastric functioning. In addition, delayed intestinal transit was observed, indicating that nitrergic activation of sGC also plays a role in the lower gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23551931

  12. Iodine deficiency induces a VEGF-dependent microvascular response in salivary glands and in the stomach.

    PubMed

    Vanderstraeten, Jessica; Derradji, Hanane; Craps, Julie; Sonveaux, Pierre; Colin, Ides M; Many, Marie-Christine; Gérard, Anne-Catherine

    2016-08-01

    Despite efforts to optimize iodine supply in iodine deficient countries, iodine deficiency (ID) remains a global problem worldwide. Activation of the local microvasculature by ID in the thyroid gland aims at improving the local supply of iodide. For this purpose, the thyrocytes secrete vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) that acts on adjacent capillaries, via a reactive oxygen species (ROS)/Hypoxia Inducible factor (HIF)-dependent pathway. Beside the thyroid, other organs including salivary glands and the stomach do express the sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) and are able to take iodide up, potentially rendering them sensitive to ID. To verify this hypothesis, ID-induced effects on the local microvasculature were studied in salivary glands and in the stomach. ID was induced by feeding young mice with an iodide-deficient diet and NIS inhibitor perchlorate in the drinking water. In salivary glands, ID induced a transient increase in HIF-1α protein expression accompanied by a transient, VEGF-dependent increase in blood flow. In the gastric mucosa, ID transiently increased VEGF expression in the mucin-secreting epithelium and in ghrelin-secreting endocrine cells. These observations suggest that microvascular changes in response to ID occur in NIS-expressing tissues other than the thyroid. NIS expressing cells could be viewed as iodide sensors that respond to ID by inducing vascular changes, probably to optimize iodide bioavailability at regional or systemic levels. PMID:26838679

  13. Caspase 1 deficiency reduces inflammation-induced brain transcription

    PubMed Central

    Mastronardi, Claudio; Whelan, Fiona; Yildiz, Ozlem A.; Hannestad, Jonas; Elashoff, David; McCann, Samuel M.; Licinio, Julio; Wong, Ma-Li

    2007-01-01

    The systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is a life-threatening medical condition characterized by a severe and generalized inflammatory state that can lead to multiple organ failure and shock. The CNS regulates many features of SIRS such as fever, cardiovascular, and neuroendocrine responses. Central and systemic manifestations of SIRS can be induced by LPS or IL-1β administration. The crucial role of IL-1β in inflammation has been further highlighted by studies of mice lacking caspase 1 (casp1, also known as IL-1β convertase), a protease that cleaves pro-IL-1β into mature IL-1β. Indeed, casp1 knockout (casp1−/−) mice survive lethal doses of LPS. The key role of IL-1β in sickness behavior and its de novo expression in the CNS during inflammation led us to test the hypothesis that IL-1β plays a major role modulating the brain transcriptome during SIRS. We show a gene–environment effect caused by LPS administration in casp1−/− mice. During SIRS, the expression of several genes, such as chemokines, GTPases, the metalloprotease ADAMTS1, IL-1RA, the inducible nitric oxide synthase, and cyclooxygenase-2, was differentially increased in casp1−/− mice. Our findings may contribute to the understanding of the molecular changes that take place within the CNS during sepsis and SIRS and the development of new therapies for these serious conditions. Our results indicate that those genes may also play a role in several neuropsychiatric conditions in which inflammation has been implicated and indicate that casp1 might be a potential therapeutic target for such disorders. PMID:17409187

  14. Dietary Inulin Fibers Prevent Proton-Pump Inhibitor (PPI)-Induced Hypocalcemia in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Mark W.; de Baaij, Jeroen H. F.; Gommers, Lisanne M. M.; Hoenderop, Joost G. J.; Bindels, René J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Proton-pump inhibitor-induced hypomagnesemia (PPIH) is the most recognized side effect of proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs). Additionally, PPIH is associated with hypocalcemia and hypokalemia. It is hypothesized that PPIs reduce epithelial proton secretion and thereby increase the pH in the colon, which may explain the reduced absorption of and Mg2+ and Ca2+. Fermentation of dietary oligofructose-enriched inulin fibers by the microflora leads to acidification of the intestinal lumen and by this enhances mineral uptake. This study aimed, therefore, to improve mineral absorption by application of dietary inulin to counteract PPIH. Methods Here, C57BL/J6 mice were supplemented with omeprazole and/or inulin. Subsequently, Mg2+ and Ca2+ homeostasis was assessed by means of serum, urine and fecal electrolyte measurements. Moreover, the mRNA levels of magnesiotropic and calciotropic genes were examined in the large intestine and kidney by real-time PCR. Results Treatment with omeprazole significantly reduced serum Mg2+ and Ca2+ levels. However, concomitant addition of dietary inulin fibers normalized serum Ca2+ but not serum Mg2+ concentrations. Inulin abolished enhanced expression of Trpv6 and S100g in the colon by omeprazole. Additionally, intestinal and renal mRNA levels of the Trpm6 gene were reduced after inulin intake. Conclusions This study suggests that dietary inulin counteracts reduced intestinal Ca2+ absorption upon PPI treatment. In contrast, inulin did not increase intestinal absorption of Mg2+ sufficiently to recover serum Mg2+. The clinical potential of dietary inulin treatment should be the subject of future studies. PMID:26397986

  15. Dietary trans fats enhance doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Mong, Mei-chin; Hsia, Te-chun; Yin, Mei-chin

    2013-10-01

    This study investigated the combined effects of trans fat diet (TFD) and doxorubicin upon cardiac oxidative, inflammatory, and coagulatory stress. TFD increased trans fatty acid deposit in heart (P < 0.05), and decreased protein C and antithrombin-III activities in circulation (P < 0.05). TFD plus doxorubicin treatment elevated activities of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, lactate dehydrogenase, and creatine phosphokinase (P < 0.05). This combination also raised xanthine oxidase activity, and enhanced cardiac levels of reactive oxygen species, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 than TFD or doxorubicin treatment alone (P < 0.05). TFD alone increased cardiac nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activity (P < 0.05), but failed to affect expression of NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) (P > 0.05). Doxorubicin treatment alone augmented cardiac activity, mRNA expression, and protein production of NF-κB and MAPK (P < 0.05). TFD plus doxorubicin treatment further upregulated cardiac expression of NF-κB p65, p-p38, and p-ERK1/2 (P < 0.05). These findings suggest that TFD exacerbates doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity. PMID:24024564

  16. Dietary Zinc Deficiency Affects Blood Linoleic Acid: Dihomo-γ-linolenic Acid (LA:DGLA) Ratio; a Sensitive Physiological Marker of Zinc Status in Vivo (Gallus gallus)

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Spenser; Qin, Xia; Ran-Ressler, Rinat; Brenna, James Thomas; Glahn, Raymond P.; Tako, Elad

    2014-01-01

    Zinc is a vital micronutrient used for over 300 enzymatic reactions and multiple biochemical and structural processes in the body. To date, sensitive and specific biological markers of zinc status are still needed. The aim of this study was to evaluate Gallus gallus as an in vivo model in the context of assessing the sensitivity of a previously unexplored potential zinc biomarker, the erythrocyte linoleic acid: dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (LA:DGLA) ratio. Diets identical in composition were formulated and two groups of birds (n = 12) were randomly separated upon hatching into two diets, Zn(+) (zinc adequate control, 42.3 μg/g zinc), and Zn(−) (zinc deficient, 2.5 μg/g zinc). Dietary zinc intake, body weight, serum zinc, and the erythrocyte fatty acid profile were measured weekly. At the conclusion of the study, tissues were collected for gene expression analysis. Body weight, feed consumption, zinc intake, and serum zinc were higher in the Zn(+) control versus Zn(−) group (p < 0.05). Hepatic TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 gene expression were higher in the Zn(+) control group (p < 0.05), and hepatic Δ6 desaturase was significantly higher in the Zn(+) group (p < 0.001). The LA:DGLA ratio was significantly elevated in the Zn(−) group compared to the Zn(+) group (22.6 ± 0.5 and 18.5 ± 0.5, % w/w, respectively, p < 0.001). This study suggests erythrocyte LA:DGLA is able to differentiate zinc status between zinc adequate and zinc deficient birds, and may be a sensitive biomarker to assess dietary zinc manipulation. PMID:24658588

  17. Dietary zinc deficiency affects blood linoleic acid: dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (LA:DGLA) ratio; a sensitive physiological marker of zinc status in vivo (Gallus gallus).

    PubMed

    Reed, Spenser; Qin, Xia; Ran-Ressler, Rinat; Brenna, James Thomas; Glahn, Raymond P; Tako, Elad

    2014-01-01

    Zinc is a vital micronutrient used for over 300 enzymatic reactions and multiple biochemical and structural processes in the body. To date, sensitive and specific biological markers of zinc status are still needed. The aim of this study was to evaluate Gallus gallus as an in vivo model in the context of assessing the sensitivity of a previously unexplored potential zinc biomarker, the erythrocyte linoleic acid: dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (LA:DGLA) ratio. Diets identical in composition were formulated and two groups of birds (n = 12) were randomly separated upon hatching into two diets, Zn⁺ (zinc adequate control, 42.3 μg/g zinc), and Zn⁻ (zinc deficient, 2.5 μg/g zinc). Dietary zinc intake, body weight, serum zinc, and the erythrocyte fatty acid profile were measured weekly. At the conclusion of the study, tissues were collected for gene expression analysis. Body weight, feed consumption, zinc intake, and serum zinc were higher in the Zn⁺ control versus Zn⁻ group (p < 0.05). Hepatic TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 gene expression were higher in the Zn⁺ control group (p < 0.05), and hepatic Δ⁶ desaturase was significantly higher in the Zn⁺ group (p < 0.001). The LA:DGLA ratio was significantly elevated in the Zn⁻ group compared to the Zn⁺ group (22.6 ± 0.5 and 18.5 ± 0.5, % w/w, respectively, p < 0.001). This study suggests erythrocyte LA:DGLA is able to differentiate zinc status between zinc adequate and zinc deficient birds, and may be a sensitive biomarker to assess dietary zinc manipulation. PMID:24658588

  18. Exercise-induced cramp, myoglobinuria, and tubular aggregates in phosphoglycerate mutase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Oh, Shin J; Park, Kyung-Seok; Ryan, Hewitt F; Danon, Moris J; Lu, Jiesheng; Naini, Ali B; DiMauro, Salvatore

    2006-11-01

    We report two patients in whom phosphoglycerate mutase (PGAM) deficiency was associated with the triad of exercise-induced cramps, recurrent myoglobinuria, and tubular aggregates in the muscle biopsy. Serum creatine kinase (CK) levels were elevated between attacks of myoglobinuria. Forearm ischemic exercise tests produced subnormal increases of venous lactate. Muscle biopsies showed subsarcolemmal tubular aggregates in type 2 fibers. Muscle PGAM activities were markedly decreased (3% of the normal mean) and molecular genetic studies showed that both patients were homozygous for a described missense mutation (W78X). A review of 15 cases with tubular aggregates in the muscle biopsies from our laboratory and 15 cases with PGAM deficiency described in the literature showed that this clinicopathological triad is highly suggestive of PGAM deficiency. PMID:16881065

  19. Is Metformin-Induced Vitamin B12 Deficiency Responsible for Cognitive Decline in Type 2 Diabetes?

    PubMed Central

    Khattar, Deepti; Khaliq, Farah; Vaney, Neelam; Madhu, S. V.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Diabetes mellitus has its deleterious effects on various aspects of cognition such as memory function, executive function, and information-processing speed. The present study aims to assess cognition in diabetes patients and also tries to find its association with Vitamin B12 deficiency induced by metformin. Materials and Methods: Thirty diabetics taking metformin and thirty nondiabetic controls were enrolled. Event-related potentials (ERPs) and serum Vitamin B12 levels were evaluated in them. Results: Vitamin B12 levels were found to be deficient, and latencies of waves P200 and P300 were prolonged in the diabetics as compared to the controls. The dose and duration of metformin had no association with the ERPs. Conclusions: Although the Vitamin B12 levels were deficient in diabetics on metformin, this is not the reason behind the cognitive impairment found in them. PMID:27570337

  20. Benzo(a)pyrene induced lung cancer: Role of dietary phytochemicals in chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Kasala, Eshvendar Reddy; Bodduluru, Lakshmi Narendra; Barua, Chandana C; Sriram, Chandra Shekhar; Gogoi, Ranadeep

    2015-10-01

    Lung cancer is the major cause of overall cancer deaths, and chemoprevention is a promising strategy to control this disease. Benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P], a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, is one among the principal constituents of tobacco smoke that plays a key role in lung carcinogenesis. The B(a)P induced lung cancer in mice offers a relevant model to study the effect of natural products and has been widely used by many researchers and found considerable success in ameliorating the pathophysiological changes of lung cancer. Currently available synthetic drugs that constitute the pharmacological armamentarium are themselves effective in managing the condition but not without setbacks. These hunches have accelerated the requisite for natural products, which may be used as dietary supplement to prevent the progress of lung cancer. Besides, these agents also supplement the conventional treatment and offer better management of the condition with less side effects. In the context of soaring interest toward dietary phytochemicals as newer pharmacological interventions for lung cancer, in the present review, we are attempting to give a silhouette of mechanisms of B(a)P induced lung carcinogenesis and the role of dietary phytochemicals in chemoprevention. PMID:26398396

  1. Epoxides Derived from Dietary Dihomo-Gamma-Linolenic Acid Induce Germ Cell Death in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Deline, Marshall; Keller, Julia; Rothe, Michael; Schunck, Wolf-Hagen; Menzel, Ralph; Watts, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary fats are not created equally, slight differences in structure lead to crucial differences in function. Muticellular organisms use polyunsaturated fatty acid as substrates to produce potent signaling molecules crucial for many physiological processes, including reproduction. Here we explored the mechanism responsible for germ cell loss induced by dietary supplementation of dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid (DGLA, 20:3n-6) in the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans. In this study we found that C. elegans CYP-33E2 activity produces a range of epoxy and hydroxy metabolites from dietary DGLA. Knockdown of cyp-33E2 suppressed the DGLA-induced sterility phenotype. Additionally, direct exposure of two specific DGLA-derived epoxy products, 8,9- and 14,15-epoxyeicosadienoic acids, produced germ cell abnormalities in the C. elegans gonad. We propose that sterility is mediated by the production of toxic DGLA-derived epoxides that trigger germ cell destruction. These studies are the first to establish a biological activity for a CYP-produced metabolite of DGLA. PMID:26486965

  2. Dietary Quercetin Reduces Chemotherapy-Induced Fatigue in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, Sara E.; Davis, J. Mark; Murphy, E. Angela; McClellan, Jamie L.; Pena, Marjory M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose While fatigue is the most commonly reported symptom of chemotherapy, there are currently no effective treatments for chemotherapy-induced fatigue (CIF). We used a mouse model to examine the benefits of quercetin on CIF as measured by voluntary wheel running activity and sought to determine whether quercetin may be associated with a decrease in inflammation and/or anemia. Methods Mice were assigned to 1 of 4 groups: placebo-vehicle (Plac-PBS), placebo-5-fluorouracil (Plac-5FU), quercetin-vehicle (Quer-PBS), or quercetin-5-fluorouracil (Quer-5FU). All mice were given a daily injection of either 60 mg/kg of 5-FU or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) for 5 days. Quercetin (0.02%) treatment was administered in the food 3 days prior to 5-FU administration and for the duration of the experiment (ie, days −2 to 14). A second group of mice was sacrificed at 5 and 14 days post initial injection for assessment of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and anemia. Results Voluntary wheel running was reduced in both the Plac-5FU and Quer-5FU groups following 5-FU injection (P < .05). However, the Quer-5FU group recovered to baseline levels by approximately day 7, whereas the Plac-5FU group remained suppressed. MCP-1 was significantly elevated at 14 days in Plac-5FU (P < .001), but no changes were seen with Quer-5FU. Treatment with 5-FU resulted in anemia at both 5 days and 14 days; however, quercetin blocked this effect at 14 days (P < .001). Conclusion These results demonstrate the beneficial effect of quercetin on improving recovery of voluntary physical activity following 5-FU treatment, which may be linked to a decrease in inflammation and anemia. PMID:24626097

  3. Combined Tlr2 and Tlr4 Deficiency Increases Radiation-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis in Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Paun, Alexandra; Fox, Jessica; Balloy, Viviane; Chignard, Michel; Qureshi, Salman T.; Haston, Christina K.

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To determine whether Toll-like receptor 2 or 4 genotype alters the lung response to irradiation in C57BL/6 mice using a model developing a phenotype that resembles radiotherapy-induced fibrosis in both histological characteristics and onset post-treatment. Methods and Materials: The pulmonary phenotype of C57BL/6 mice deficient in each or both of these genes was assessed after an 18-Gy single dose to the thoracic cavity by survival time postirradiation, bronchoalveolar lavage cell differential, histological evidence of alveolitis and fibrosis, and gene expression levels, and compared with that of wild-type mice. Results: The lung phenotype of Tlr4-deficient and Tlr2-deficient mice did not differ from that of wild-type mice in terms of survival time postirradiation, or by histological evidence of alveolitis or fibrosis. In contrast, mice deficient in both receptors developed respiratory distress at an earlier time than did wild-type mice and presented an enhanced fibrotic response (13.5% vs. 5.8% of the lung by image analysis of histological sections, p < 0.001). No differences in bronchoalveolar cell differential counts, nor in numbers of apoptotic cells in the lung as detected through active caspase-3 staining, were evident among the irradiated mice grouped by Tlr genotype. Gene expression analysis of lung tissue revealed that Tlr2,4-deficient mice have increased levels of hyaluronidase 2 compared with both wild-type mice and mice lacking either Tlr2 or Tlr4. Conclusion: We conclude that a combined deficiency in both Tlr2 and Tlr4, but not Tlr2 or Tlr4 alone, leads to enhanced radiation-induced fibrosis in the C57BL/6 mouse model.

  4. ATG7 deficiency suppresses apoptosis and cell death induced by lysosomal photodamage

    PubMed Central

    Kessel, David H.; Price, Michael; Reiners, Jr., John J.

    2012-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) involves photosensitizing agents that, in the presence of oxygen and light, initiate formation of cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS). PDT commonly induces both apoptosis and autophagy. Previous studies with murine hepatoma 1c1c7 cells indicated that loss of autophagy-related protein 7 (ATG7) inhibited autophagy and enhanced the cytotoxicity of photosensitizers that mediate photodamage to mitochondria or the endoplasmic reticulum. In this study, we examined two photosensitizing agents that target lysosomes: the chlorin NPe6 and the palladium bacteriopheophorbide WST11. Irradiation of wild-type 1c1c7 cultures loaded with either photosensitizer induced apoptosis and autophagy, with a blockage of autophagic flux. An ATG7- or ATG5-deficiency suppressed the induction of autophagy in PDT protocols using either photosensitizer. Whereas ATG5-deficient cells were quantitatively similar to wild-type cultures in their response to NPe6 and WST11 PDT, an ATG7-deficiency suppressed the apoptotic response (as monitored by analyses of chromatin condensation and procaspase-3/7 activation) and increased the LD50 light dose by > 5-fold (as monitored by colony-forming assays). An ATG7-deficiency did not prevent immediate lysosomal photodamage, as indicated by loss of the lysosomal pH gradient. However, unlike wild-type and ATG5-deficient cells, the lysosomes of ATG7-deficient cells recovered this gradient within 4 h of irradiation, and never underwent permeabilization (monitored as release of endocytosed 10-kDa dextran polymers). We propose that the efficacy of lysosomal photosensitizers is in part due to both promotion of autophagic stress and suppression of autophagic prosurvival functions. In addition, an effect of ATG7 unrelated to autophagy appears to modulate lysosomal photodamage. PMID:22889762

  5. Lamp-2 deficiency prevents high-fat diet-induced obese diabetes via enhancing energy expenditure

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda-Yamahara, Mako; Kume, Shinji; Yamahara, Kosuke; Nakazawa, Jun; Chin-Kanasaki, Masami; Araki, Hisazumi; Araki, Shin-ichi; Koya, Daisuke; Haneda, Masakzu; Ugi, Satoshi; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Uzu, Takashi

    2015-09-18

    Autophagy process is essential for maintaining intracellular homeostasis and consists of autophagosome formation and subsequent fusion with lysosome for degradation. Although the role of autophagosome formation in the pathogenesis of diabetes has been recently documented, the role of the latter process remains unclear. This study analyzed high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice lacking lysosome-associated membrane protein-2 (lamp-2), which is essential for the fusion with lysosome and subsequent degradation of autophagosomes. Although lamp-2 deficient mice showed little alteration in glucose metabolism under normal diet feeding, they showed a resistance against high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity, hyperinsulinemic hyperglycemia and tissues lipid accumulation, accompanied with higher energy expenditure. The expression levels of thermogenic genes in brown adipose tissue were significantly increased in HFD-fed lamp-2-deficient mice. Of some serum factors related to energy expenditure, the serum level of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 21 and its mRNA expression level in the liver were significantly higher in HFD-fed lamp-2-deficient mice in an ER stress-, but not PPARα-, dependent manner. In conclusion, a lamp-2-depenedent fusion and degradation process of autophagosomes is involved in the pathogenesis of obese diabetes, providing a novel insight into autophagy and diabetes. - Highlights: • Lamp-2 is essential for autophagosome fusion with lysosome and its degradation. • Lamp-2 deficiency lead to a resistance to diet-induced obese diabetes in mice. • Lamp-2 deficiency increased whole body energy expenditure under HFD-feeding. • Lamp-2 deficiency elevated the serum level of FGF21 under HFD-feeding.

  6. THE EFFECTS OF DIETARY VITAMIN E AND SELENIUM DEFICIENCIES ON PLASMA THYROID AND THYMIC HORMONE CONCENTRATIONS IN THE CHICKEN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beginning at hatching, male Cornell K strain single comb white leghorn chickens were fed a basal diet, with or without vitamin E (100 IU/kg) and/or selenium (Se, 0.2 ppm). After 3 weeks of treatment, animals fed either the Se-deficient or basal diet had significantly reduced plasma Se-dependent glut...

  7. Effect of dietary intake of freeze dried bitter gourd (Momordica charantia) in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Platel, K; Srinivasan, K

    1995-01-01

    Consumption of bitter gourd (Momordica charantia) by diabetic patients is a common practice in India, with the belief that it has an useful hypoglycemic potential. In the absence of conclusive information on the hypoglycemic influence of continuous intake of bitter gourd, in the present investigation, we have examined the hypoglycemic potency of dietary bitter gourd in experimentally induced diabetic rats. Wistar rats rendered hyperglycemic by streptozotocin (50 mg/kg b.w., i.p.) were maintained on a semi-synthetic diet containing freeze dried bitter gourd powder at 0.5% level for 6 weeks. The excretion of glucose, protein, urea and creatinine was monitored during the experimental period. Plasma glucose, albumin, urea and cholesterol were analysed at the end of the experimental regime. Dietary bitter gourd did not show any beneficial hypoglycemic influence as evidenced by the blood glucose levels as well as the excretion of diabetes related metabolites. PMID:7477242

  8. Resistin deficiency in mice has no effect on pulmonary responses induced by acute ozone exposure.

    PubMed

    Razvi, Shehla S; Richards, Jeremy B; Malik, Farhan; Cromar, Kevin R; Price, Roger E; Bell, Cynthia S; Weng, Tingting; Atkins, Constance L; Spencer, Chantal Y; Cockerill, Katherine J; Alexander, Amy L; Blackburn, Michael R; Alcorn, Joseph L; Haque, Ikram U; Johnston, Richard A

    2015-11-15

    Acute exposure to ozone (O3), an air pollutant, causes pulmonary inflammation, airway epithelial desquamation, and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). Pro-inflammatory cytokines-including IL-6 and ligands of chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 2 [keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC) and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2], TNF receptor 1 and 2 (TNF), and type I IL-1 receptor (IL-1α and IL-1β)-promote these sequelae. Human resistin, a pleiotropic hormone and cytokine, induces expression of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 (the human ortholog of murine KC and MIP-2), and TNF. Functional differences exist between human and murine resistin; yet given the aforementioned observations, we hypothesized that murine resistin promotes O3-induced lung pathology by inducing expression of the same inflammatory cytokines as human resistin. Consequently, we examined indexes of O3-induced lung pathology in wild-type and resistin-deficient mice following acute exposure to either filtered room air or O3. In wild-type mice, O3 increased bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) resistin. Furthermore, O3 increased lung tissue or BALF IL-1α, IL-6, KC, TNF, macrophages, neutrophils, and epithelial cells in wild-type and resistin-deficient mice. With the exception of KC, which was significantly greater in resistin-deficient compared with wild-type mice, no genotype-related differences in the other indexes existed following O3 exposure. O3 caused AHR to acetyl-β-methylcholine chloride (methacholine) in wild-type and resistin-deficient mice. However, genotype-related differences in airway responsiveness to methacholine were nonexistent subsequent to O3 exposure. Taken together, these data demonstrate that murine resistin is increased in the lungs of wild-type mice following acute O3 exposure but does not promote O3-induced lung pathology. PMID:26386120

  9. Chop Deficiency Protects Mice Against Bleomycin-induced Pulmonary Fibrosis by Attenuating M2 Macrophage Production.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yingying; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Zhijun; He, Long; Zhu, Jianghui; Zhang, Meng; He, Xiaoyu; Cheng, Zhenshun; Ao, Qilin; Cao, Yong; Yang, Ping; Su, Yunchao; Zhao, Jianping; Zhang, Shu; Yu, Qilin; Ning, Qin; Xiang, Xudong; Xiong, Weining; Wang, Cong-Yi; Xu, Yongjian

    2016-05-01

    C/EBP homologous protein (Chop) has been shown to have altered expression in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), but its exact role in IPF pathoaetiology has not been fully addressed. Studies conducted in patients with IPF and Chop(-/-) mice have dissected the role of Chop and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in pulmonary fibrosis pathogenesis. The effect of Chop deficiency on macrophage polarization and related signalling pathways were investigated to identify the underlying mechanisms. Patients with IPF and mice with bleomycin (BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis were affected by the altered Chop expression and ER stress. In particular, Chop deficiency protected mice against BLM-induced lung injury and fibrosis. Loss of Chop significantly attenuated transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) production and reduced M2 macrophage infiltration in the lung following BLM induction. Mechanistic studies showed that Chop deficiency repressed the M2 program in macrophages, which then attenuated TGF-β secretion. Specifically, loss of Chop promoted the expression of suppressors of cytokine signaling 1 and suppressors of cytokine signaling 3, and through which Chop deficiency repressed signal transducer and activator of transcription 6/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma signaling, the essential pathway for the M2 program in macrophages. Together, our data support the idea that Chop and ER stress are implicated in IPF pathoaetiology, involving at least the induction and differentiation of M2 macrophages. PMID:26883801

  10. Differential responses in pear and quince genotypes induced by Fe deficiency and bicarbonate.

    PubMed

    Donnini, Silvia; Castagna, Antonella; Ranieri, Annamaria; Zocchi, Graziano

    2009-07-15

    Most of the studies carried out on Fe deficiency condition in arboreous plants have been performed, with the exception of those carried out on plants grown in the field, in hydroponic culture utilizing a total iron depletion growth condition. This can cause great stress to plants. By introducing Fe deficiency induced by the presence of bicarbonate, we found significant differences between Pyrus communis L. cv. Conference and Cydonia oblonga Mill. BA29 and MA clones, characterized by different levels of tolerance to chlorosis. Pigment content and the main protein-pigment complexes were investigated by HPLC and protein gel blot analysis, respectively. While similar changes in the structural organization of photosystems (PSs) were observed in both species under Fe deficiency, a different reorganization of the photosynthetic apparatus was found in the presence of bicarbonate between tolerant and susceptible genotypes, in agreement with the photosynthetic electron transport rate measured in isolated thylakoids. In order to characterize the intrinsic factors determining the efficiency of iron uptake in a tolerant genotype, the main mechanisms induced by Fe deficiency in Strategy I species, such as Fe3+-chelate reductase (EC 1.16.1.7) and H+-ATPase (EC 3.6.3.6) activities, were also investigated. We demonstrate that physiological and biochemical root responses in quince and pear are differentially affected by iron starvation and bicarbonate supply, and we show a high correlation between tolerance and Strategy I activation. PMID:19269060

  11. Prevalence of prenatal zinc deficiency and its association with socio-demographic, dietary and health care related factors in Rural Sidama, Southern Ethiopia: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Several studies witnessed that prenatal zinc deficiency (ZD) predisposes to diverse pregnancy complications. However, scientific evidences on the determinants of prenatal ZD are scanty and inconclusive. The purpose of the present study was to assess the prevalence and determinants of prenatal ZD in Sidama zone, Southern Ethiopia. Methods A community based, cross-sectional study was conducted in Sidama zone in January and February 2011. Randomly selected 700 pregnant women were included in the study. Data on potential determinants of ZD were gathered using a structured questionnaire. Serum zinc concentration was measured using Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. Statistical analysis was done using logistic regression and linear regression. Results The mean serum zinc concentration was 52.4 (+/-9.9) μg/dl (95% CI: 51.6-53.1 μg/dl). About 53.0% (95% CI: 49.3-56.7%) of the subjects were zinc deficient. The majority of the explained variability of serum zinc was due to dietary factors like household food insecurity level, dietary diversity and consumption of animal source foods. The risk of ZD was 1.65 (95% CI: 1.02-2.67) times higher among women from maize staple diet category compared to Enset staple diet category. Compared to pregnant women aged 15-24 years, those aged 25-34 and 35-49 years had 1.57 (95% CI: 1.04-2.34) and 2.18 (95% CI: 1.25-3.63) times higher risk of ZD, respectively. Women devoid of self income had 1.74 (95% CI: 1.11-2.74) time increased risk than their counterparts. Maternal education was positively associated to zinc status. Grand multiparas were 1.74 (95% CI: 1.09-3.23) times more likely to be zinc deficient than nulliparas. Frequency of coffee intake was negatively association to serum zinc level. Positive association was noted between serum zinc and hemoglobin concentrations. Altitude, history of iron supplementation, maternal workload, physical access to health service, antenatal care and nutrition education were not associated to

  12. Reduced early alcohol-induced liver injury in CD14-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Yin, M; Bradford, B U; Wheeler, M D; Uesugi, T; Froh, M; Goyert, S M; Thurman, R G

    2001-04-01

    Activation of Kupffer cells by gut-derived endotoxin is associated with alcohol-induced liver injury. Recently, it was shown that CD14-deficient mice are more resistant to endotoxin-induced shock than wild-type controls. Therefore, this study was designed to investigate the role of CD14 receptors in early alcohol-induced liver injury using CD14 knockout and wild-type BALB/c mice in a model of enteral ethanol delivery. Animals were given a high-fat liquid diet continuously with ethanol or isocaloric maltose-dextrin as control for 4 wk. The liver to body weight ratio in wild-type mice (5.8 +/- 0.3%) was increased significantly by ethanol (7.3 +/- 0.2%) but was not altered by ethanol in CD14-deficient mice. Ethanol elevated serum alanine aminotransferase levels nearly 3-fold in wild-type mice, but not in CD14-deficient mice. Wild-type and knockout mice given the control high-fat diet had normal liver histology, whereas ethanol caused severe liver injury (steatosis, inflammation, and necrosis; pathology score = 3.8 +/- 0.4). In contrast, CD14-deficient mice given ethanol showed minimal hepatic changes (score = 1.6 +/- 0.3, p < 0.05). Additionally, NF-kappa B, TGF-beta, and TNF-alpha were increased significantly in wild-type mice fed ethanol but not in the CD14 knockout. Thus, chronic ethanol feeding caused more severe liver injury in wild-type than CD14 knockouts, supporting the hypothesis that endotoxin acting via CD14 plays a major role in the development of early alcohol-induced liver injury. PMID:11254735

  13. Dietary antioxidants and ozone-induced bronchial hyperresponsiveness in adults with asthma.

    PubMed

    Trenga, C A; Koenig, J Q; Williams, P V

    2001-01-01

    Ozone exposure aggravates asthma, as has been demonstrated in both controlled exposures and epidemiologic studies. In the current double-blind crossover study, the authors evaluated the effects of dietary antioxidants (i.e., 400 IU vitamin E/500 mg vitamin C) on ozone-induced bronchial hyperresponsiveness in adult subjects with asthma. Seventeen subjects were exposed to 0.12 ppm of ozone or to air for 45 min during intermittent moderate exercise. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness was assessed with 10-min sulfur dioxide (i.e., 0.10 ppm and 0.25 ppm) inhalation challenges. Subjects who were given dietary antioxidants responded less severely to sulfur dioxide challenge than subjects given a placebo (i.e., forced expiratory volume in the 1st sec: -1.2% vs. 4.4%, respectively; peak flow: +2.2% vs. -3.0%, respectively; and mid-forced expiratory flow: +2.0% vs. -4.3%, respectively). Effects were more pronounced when subjects were grouped by response to sulfur dioxide at the screening visit. The results suggest that dietary supplementation with vitamins E and C benefits asthmatic adults who are exposed to air pollutants. PMID:11480500

  14. Effect of copper deficiency on cocaine-induced seizures in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore, V. )

    1991-03-11

    The objective of the present study was to study the effects of nutritional copper (Cu) deficiency on cocaine-induced seizures in rats. Following results were obtained when cocaine was given to 10 each of Cu-deficient (CUD) and Cu-sufficient (CUS) rats after 45 days on respective diets. For CUD and CUS groups of rats, respectively, (a) incidence of seizures was 60% and 40%; (b) time of onset for seizures was 8.42 {plus minus} 0.72 and 7.63 {plus minus} 1.00; (c) seizure severity was 2.5 {plus minus} 0.75 and 1.1 {plus minus} 0.45; and (d) 24 h mortality was 40% and none. Thus, except for time of onset, all other parameters for cocaine-induced seizures were significantly higher in CUD rats. These results clearly demonstrate that Cu deficiency enhances seizure-inducing effects of cocaine in rats. It is likely that the enhancement observed is due to a decrease in the hepatic metabolism of cocaine in CUD rats. This possibility is currently being investigated.

  15. Protease-activated receptor-1 deficiency protects against streptozotocin-induced diabetic nephropathy in mice.

    PubMed

    Waasdorp, Maaike; Duitman, JanWillem; Florquin, Sandrine; Spek, C Arnold

    2016-01-01

    Endogenously administered activated protein C ameliorates diabetic nephropathy (DN) in a protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1)-dependent manner, suggesting that PAR-1 activation limits the progression of DN. Activation of PAR-1 in fibroblast-like cells, however, induces proliferation and extracellular matrix production, thereby driving fibrotic disease. Considering the key role of mesangial proliferation and extracellular matrix production during DN, PAR-1 may in fact potentiate diabetes-induced kidney injury. To determine the net effect of PAR-1 in DN, streptozotocin-induced DN was studied in wild type and PAR-1 deficient mice. Subsequent mechanistic insight was obtained by assessing profibrotic responses of mesangial and tubular epithelial cells in vitro, following PAR-1 stimulation and inhibition. Despite having similar glucose levels, PAR-1 deficient mice developed less kidney damage after induction of diabetes, as evidenced by diminished proteinuria, plasma cystatin C levels, expansion of the mesangial area, and tubular atrophy. In vitro, PAR-1 signaling in mesangial cells led to increased proliferation and expression of matrix proteins fibronectin and collagen IV. Conversely, a reduction in both proliferation and fibronectin deposition was observed in diabetic PAR-1 deficient mice. Overall, we show that PAR-1 plays an important role in the development of DN and PAR-1 might therefore be an attractive therapeutic target to pursue in DN. PMID:27618774

  16. [Correction of isoproterenol-induced myocardial injury with magnesium salts in magnesium-deficient rats].

    PubMed

    Kharitonova, M V; Zheltova, A A; Spasov, A A; Smirnov, A V; Pan'shin, N G; Iezhitsa, I N

    2013-01-01

    The effect of Mg L-asparaginate (Mg-L-Asp), Mg chloride (MgCl2) and Mg sulfate (MgSO4) on the severity of isoproterenol-induced myocardial injury in Mg-deficient rats has been evaluated. To induce Mg deficiency, twenty-eight rats were placed on a low Mg diet (Mg content < 15 mg/kg) and demineralized water for 10 weeks. Twelve control rats were fed a basal control diet (Mg content = 500 mg/kg) and water (with Mg content 20 mg/l) for equal duration. On day 49 of low Mg diet, Mg-deficient rats were randomly divided into four groups: 1) group that continued to receive low Mg diet; 2) low Mg diet plus oral MgSO4; 3) low Mg diet plus oral Mg-L-Asp and 4) low Mg diet plus oral MgCl2 (50 mg of Mg per kg of body weight). Isoproterenol was injected subcutaneously (30 mg/kg BW, twice, at an interval of 24 hours) on the day 70 of the study, when plasma and erythrocyte Mg level in rats fed a low Mg diet were significantly decreased by 47% and 45% compared to intact animals. Twenty-four hours after second injection of isoproterenol, tests for activities of creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) were run and histopathological study was carried out. Administration of isoproterenol to rats resulted in significantly elevated plasma CK, LDH and AST, however analyses in Mg deficient group demonstrated more dramatically increased activity of CK and AST compared to control rats (3,06 and 4,67 fold in Mg-deficient group vs. 1,91 and 3,92 fold in intact group). Increased leakage of cardiac injury markers was concomitant to increased volume of fuchsinophilic cardiomyocytes (54.2 +/- 1.7% in Mg-deficient group and 38.9 +/- 1.9% in intact group, p < 0.05). However, pretreatment with of MgCl2, MgSO4 and Mg-L-Asp during 21 days favorably decreased sensitivity of myocardium to isoproterenol-induced ischemic injury. All evaluated salts significantly decreased myocyte marker enzymes as well as protected myocardium against isoproterenol-induced

  17. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Deficiency Exacerbates Aging-Induced Myocardial Contractile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Turdi, Subat; Fan, Xiujuan; Li, Ji; Zhao, Junxing; Huff, Anna F.; Du, Min; Ren, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Aging is associated with myocardial dysfunction although the underlying mechanism is unclear. AMPK, a key cellular fuel sensor for energy metabolism, is compromised with aging. This study examined the role of AMPK deficiency in aging-associated myocardial dysfunction. Young or old minwild-type (WT) and transgenic mice with overexpression of a mutant AMPK α2 subunit (kinase dead, KD) were used. AMPK α isoform activity, myocardial function and morphology were examined. DCF and JC-1 fluorescence probes were employed to quantify reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), respectively. KD mice displayed significantly reduced α2 but not α1 AMPK isoform activity at both ages with a greater effect at old age. Aging itself decreased α1 isoform activity. Cardiomyocyte contractile function, intracellular Ca2+ handling and SERCA2a levels were compromised with aging, the effects of which were exacerbated by AMPK deficiency. H&E staining revealed cardiomyocyte hypertrophy with aging, which was more pronounced in KD mice. TEM micrographs displayed severe disruption of mitochondrial ultrastructure characterized by swollen, irregular shape and disrupted cristae in aged KD compared with WT mice. Aging enhanced ROS production and reduced ΔΨm, the effects of which were accentuated by AMPK deficiency. Immunoblotting data depicted unchanged Akt phosphorylation and a significant decrease in mitochondrial biogenesis cofactor PGC-1α in aged groups. AMPK deficiency but not aging decreased the phosphorylation of ACC and eNOS. Expression of membrane Glut4 and HSP90 was decreased in aged KD mice. Moreover, treatment of the AMPK activator metformin attenuated aging-induced cardiomyocyte contractile defects. Collectively, our data suggest a role for AMPK deficiency in aging-induced cardiac dysfunction possibly through disrupted mitochondrial function and ROS production. PMID:20477759

  18. Pancreas Recovery Following Caerulein-induced Pancreatitis is Impaired in Plasminogen Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lugea, Aurelia; Nan, Li; French, Samuel W.; Bezerra, Jorge A.; Gukovskaya, Anna S; Pandol, Stephen J.

    2006-01-01

    Background & Aims: The plasminogen (plg) system participates in tissue repair in several organs, but its role in pancreas repair remains poorly characterized. To better understand the role of plg in pancreas recovery following injury, we examined the course of caerulein-induced pancreatitis in plg deficient and sufficient mice. Methods: Pancreatitis was induced by caerulein administration (50 μg/kg, 7 ip injections). Mice were sacrificed either at the acute phase (7 hours after the first caerulein injection) or during recovery (at 2, 4 and 7 days). In pancreatic sections we examined: pancreatic morphology, trypsin activation, inflammatory cell infiltration, acinar cell death, cell proliferation, extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition, activation of stellate cells (PSCs), and components of the plg and metalloproteinase systems. Results: In plg sufficient mice, pancreatic plg levels and plasmin activity increased during the acute phase and remained elevated during recovery. Pancreatitis resolved in plg sufficient mice within 7 days. Pancreas recovery involved reorganization of the parenchyma structure, removal of necrotic debris, cell proliferation, transient activation of PSCs and moderate deposition of ECM proteins. Acute pancreatitis (7-h) was indistinguishable between plg deficient and sufficient mice. In contrast, pancreas recovery was impaired in plg deficient mice. Plg deficiency led to disorganized parenchyma, extensive acinar cell loss, poor removal of necrotic debris, reduced cell proliferation and fibrosis. Fibrosis was characterized by deposition of collagens and fibronectin, persistent activation of PSCs and upregulation of pancreatic TGF-β1. Conclusions: Plg/plasmin deficiency leads to features similar to those found in chronic pancreatitis such as parenchymal atrophy and fibrosis. PMID:16952557

  19. Nitric oxide is involved in phosphorus deficiency-induced cluster root development and citrate exudation in white lupin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    White lupin (Lupinus albus) forms specialized cluster roots characterized by exudation of organic anions under phosphorus (P) deficiency. Here, we evaluated the role of nitric oxide (NO) in P deficiency-induced cluster-root formation and citrate exudation in white lupin. Plants were treated with NO ...

  20. Dietary Yucca schidigera supplementation reduces arsenic-induced oxidative stress in Swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Ince, Sinan; Kucukkurt, Ismail; Turkmen, Ruhi; Demirel, Hasan Huseyin; Sever, Emine

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the effects of dietary supplementation with Yucca schidigera (Ys) on lipid peroxidation (LPO), antioxidant activity, some biochemical parameters and histopathological changes in arsenic-exposed mice. Forty Swiss albino male mice were divided into five equal groups. Group I (control group) was given normal diet and tap water for 28 days. Group II (arsenic group) was given normal diet and 100 mg/L arsenic along with drinking water for 28 days. Groups III-V were given three different doses of Ys (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg) in supplemented diet and arsenic (100 mg/L) along with drinking water throughout the entire period of 28 days. The arsenic significantly increased serum biochemical parameters and malondialdehyde levels in blood and tissue. However, arsenic significantly decreased tissue glutathione concentration, erythrocyte superoxide dismutase and catalase activities. In contrast, dietary supplementation of Ys, in a dose-dependent manner, resulted in reversal of arsenic-induced oxidative stress, LPO and activities of antioxidant enzymes. Moreover, Ys also exhibited protective action against the arsenic-induced focal gliosis and hyperemi in brain, necrosis and degeneration in liver, degeneration and dilatation in Bowman's capsule of kidney and hyaline degeneration in heart tissue of mice. Consequently, our results demonstrate that Ys especially high-dose supplementation in diet decreases arsenic-induced oxidative stress and enhances the antioxidant defence mechanism and regenerate of tissues in Swiss albino mice. PMID:22609855

  1. Dietary homocysteine promotes atherosclerosis in apoE-deficient mice by inducing scavenger receptors expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elevated plasma homocysteine (Hcy) levels have been recognized as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. However, the causative mechanisms have not been delineated. Scavenger receptors such as scavenger receptor-AI/II (SR-A), CD36, and lectin-like oxidized LDL ...

  2. The thioredoxin TRX-1 regulates adult lifespan extension induced by dietary restriction in Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Fierro-Gonzalez, Juan Carlos; Gonzalez-Barrios, Maria; Miranda-Vizuete, Antonio

    2011-03-18

    Highlights: {yields} First in vivo data for thioredoxin in dietary-restriction-(DR)-induced longevity. {yields} Thioredoxin (trx-1) loss suppresses longevity of eat-2 mutant, a genetic DR model. {yields} trx-1 overexpression extends wild-type longevity, but not that of eat-2 mutant. {yields} Longevity by dietary deprivation (DD), a non-genetic DR model, requires trx-1. {yields} trx-1 expression in ASJ neurons of aging adults is increased in response to DD. -- Abstract: Dietary restriction (DR) is the only environmental intervention known to extend adult lifespan in a wide variety of animal models. However, the genetic and cellular events that mediate the anti-aging programs induced by DR remain elusive. Here, we used the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to provide the first in vivo evidence that a thioredoxin (TRX-1) regulates adult lifespan extension induced by DR. We found that deletion of the gene trx-1 completely suppressed the lifespan extension caused by mutation of eat-2, a genetic surrogate of DR in the worm. However, trx-1 deletion only partially suppressed the long lifespan caused by mutation of the insulin-like receptor gene daf-2 or by mutation of the sensory cilia gene osm-5. A trx-1::GFP translational fusion expressed from its own promoter in ASJ neurons (Ptrx-1::trx-1::GFP) rescued the trx-1 deletion-mediated suppression of the lifespan extension caused by mutation of eat-2. This rescue was not observed when trx-1::GFP was expressed from the ges-1 promoter in the intestine. In addition, overexpression of Ptrx-1::trx-1::GFP extended lifespan in wild type, but not in eat-2 mutants. trx-1 deletion almost completely suppressed the lifespan extension induced by dietary deprivation (DD), a non-genetic, nutrient-based model of DR in the worm. Moreover, DD upregulated the expression of a trx-1 promoter-driven GFP reporter gene (Ptrx-1::GFP) in ASJ neurons of aging adults, but not that of control Pgpa-9::GFP (which is also expressed in ASJ neurons). We propose

  3. Dietary Supplement Enriched in Antioxidants and Omega-3 Protects from Progressive Light-Induced Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ramchani-Ben Othman, Khaoula; Cercy, Christine; Amri, Mohamed; Doly, Michel; Ranchon-Cole, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we have evaluated one of the dietary supplements enriched with antioxidants and fish oil used in clinical care for patient with age-related macular degeneration. Rats were orally fed by a gastric canula daily with 0.2 ml of water or dietary supplement until they were sacrificed. After one week of treatment, animals were either sacrificed for lipid analysis in plasma and retina, or used for evaluation of rod-response recovery by electroretinography (ERG) followed by their sacrifice to measure rhodopsin content, or used for progressive light-induced retinal degeneration (PLIRD). For PLIRD, animals were transferred to bright cyclic light for one week. Retinal damage was quantified by ERG, histology and detection of apoptotic nuclei. Animals kept in dim-cyclic-light were processed in parallel. PLIRD induced a thinning of the outer nuclear layer and a reduction of the b-wave amplitude of the ERG in the water group. Retinal structure and function were preserved in supplemented animals. Supplement induced a significant increase in omega-3 fatty acids in plasma by 168% for eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), 142% for docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) and 19% for docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and a decrease in the omega-6 fatty acids, DPA by 28%. In the retina, supplement induced significant reduction of linolenic acid by 67% and an increase in EPA and DPA by 80% and 72%, respectively, associated with significant decrease in omega-6 DPA by 42%. Supplement did not affect rhodopsin content or rod-response recovery. The present data indicate that supplement rapidly modified the fatty acid content and induced an accumulation of EPA in the retina without affecting rhodopsin content or recovery. In addition, it protected the retina from oxidative stress induced by light. Therefore, this supplement might be beneficial to slow down progression of certain retinal degeneration. PMID:26042773

  4. Thiamin deficiency impairs endotoxin-induced increases in hepatic glucose output.

    PubMed

    Molina, P E; Yousef, K A; Smith, R M; Tepper, P G; Lang, C H; Abumrad, N N

    1994-05-01

    We addressed the role of thiamin, a cofactor for several enzymes involved in glucose metabolism, in the glucose metabolic response to endotoxin. Characterized by hyperglycemia, increased hepatic glucose production exceeding elevated rates of whole-body glucose utilization, this response is mediated by hormones and cytokines and is dependent on the immune and nutritional status of the host. We hypothesized that a thiamin-deficient state would impair the metabolic response to endotoxin. Rats were fed a thiamin-deficient or control diet for 6 wk before in vivo assessment of glucose kinetics. In control rats, Escherichia coli endotoxin increased the rate of glucose appearance (+76%), disappearance (+70%), and metabolic clearance (+50%). Thiamin deficiency resulted in increased plasma glucose (18%) and lactate (3- to 4-fold) as well as in a 30% decrease in insulin and an increase in glucagon (2.6-fold) and corticosterone (3.6-fold). Thiamin deficiency inhibited the endotoxin-induced hyperglycemia and the rise in hepatic glucose production, glucose utilization, and metabolic clearance rate. PMID:8172089

  5. Vitamin d deficiency attenuates high-fat diet-induced hyperinsulinemia and hepatic lipid accumulation in male mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Jing; Wang, Bi-Wei; Zhang, Cheng; Xia, Mi-Zhen; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Hu, Chun-Qiu; Wang, Hua; Chen, Xi; Xu, De-Xiang

    2015-06-01

    It is increasingly recognized that vitamin D deficiency is associated with increased risks of metabolic disorders among overweight children. A recent study showed that vitamin D deficiency exacerbated inflammation in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease through activating toll-like receptor 4 in a high-fat diet (HFD) rat model. The present study aimed to further investigate the effects of vitamin D deficiency on HFD-induced insulin resistance and hepatic lipid accumulation. Male ICR mice (35 d old) were randomly assigned into 4 groups as follows. In control diet and vitamin D deficiency diet (VDD) groups, mice were fed with purified diets. In HFD and VDD+HFD groups, mice were fed with HFD. In VDD and VDD+HFD groups, vitamin D in feed was depleted. Feeding mice with vitamin D deficiency diet did not induce obesity, insulin resistance, and hepatic lipid accumulation. By contrary, vitamin D deficiency markedly alleviated HFD-induced overweight, hyperinsulinemia, and hepatic lipid accumulation. Moreover, vitamin D deficiency significantly attenuated HFD-induced up-regulation of hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, which promoted hepatic lipid uptake and lipid droplet formation, and its target gene cluster of differentiation 36. In addition, vitamin D deficiency up-regulated carnitine palmitoyltrans 2, the key enzyme for fatty acid β-oxidation, and uncoupling protein 3, which separated oxidative phosphorylation from ATP production, in adipose tissue. These data suggest that vitamin D deficiency is not a direct risk factor for obesity, insulin resistance, and hepatic lipid accumulation. Vitamin D deficiency alleviates HFD-induced overweight, hyperinsulinemia, and hepatic lipid accumulation through promoting fatty acid β-oxidation and elevating energy expenditure in adipose tissue. PMID:25774554

  6. High doses of dietary zinc induce cytokines, chemokines, and apoptosis in reproductive tissues during regression.

    PubMed

    Sundaresan, N R; Anish, D; Sastry, K V H; Saxena, V K; Nagarajan, K; Subramani, J; Leo, M D M; Shit, N; Mohan, J; Saxena, M; Ahmed, K A

    2008-06-01

    In chickens, high levels of dietary zinc cause molting, and the reproductive system undergoes complete remodeling concomitant to feather replacement. In the present study, the expression profiles of cytokines and chemokines were investigated in the ovary and oviduct of control hens and of hens induced to molt by zinc feeding. The zinc-induced feed-intake suppression, the changes in corticosterone levels, the immune cell populations in the reproductive tract, and the apoptosis of reproductive tissues were analyzed. The expression of mRNAs for interleukin-6 (IL-6), interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), the avian ortholog of mammalian IL-8 (chCXCLi2), and a chicken MIP-1beta-like chemokine (chCCLi2) in the ovary and of mRNAs for IL-1beta, IL-6, IFN-gamma, transforming growth factor-beta2, chCXCLi2, and chCCLi2 in the oviduct were upregulated significantly during zinc-induced molting. A simultaneous feed-intake reduction was observed with higher expression of cytokines and chemokines. The results of the present investigation also suggested that the upregulation of corticosterone was closely associated with the increased expression of cytokines and chemokines. An increase in apoptosis within reproductive tissue during tissue regression was also noted. We had previously observed the upregulation of these cytokines expression in an earlier study (molting by feed withdrawal). However, the pattern and the level of expression were different among these two methods. These findings indicate that cytokines might be a common mediator of tissue regression during molting induced by diverse methods, although the pattern of induction is different. Thus, a high dose of dietary zinc seems to induce reproductive regression via the upregulation of cytokines and chemokines, the suppression of feed intake, and the increase in serum corticosterone, resulting finally in the apoptosis of reproductive tissues. PMID:18351392

  7. Nr2e1 Deficiency Augments Palmitate-Induced Oxidative Stress in Beta Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaoli; Deng, Haohua; Dai, Zhe; Xu, Yancheng; Xiong, Xiaokan; Ma, Pei; Cheng, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear receptor subfamily 2 group E member 1 (Nr2e1) has been regarded as an essential regulator of the growth of neural stem cells. However, its function elsewhere is unknown. In the present study, we generated Nr2e1 knockdown MIN6 cells and studied whether Nr2e1 knockdown affected basal beta cell functions such as proliferation, cell death, and insulin secretion. We showed that knockdown of Nr2e1 in MIN6 cells resulted in increased sensitivity to lipotoxicity, decreased proliferation, a partial G0/G1 cell-cycle arrest, and higher rates of apoptosis. Moreover, Nr2e1 deficiency exaggerates palmitate-induced impairment in insulin secretion. At the molecular level, Nr2e1 deficiency augments palmitate-induced oxidative stress. Nr2e1 deficiency also resulted in decreases in antioxidant enzymes and expression level of Nrf2. Together, this study indicated a potential protective effect of Nr2e1 on beta cells, which may serve as a target for the development of novel therapies for diabetes. PMID:26649147

  8. Dietary Vitamin D Deficiency in Rats from Middle- to Old-age Leads to Elevated Tyrosine Nitration and Proteomics Changes in Levels of Key Proteins in Brain: Implications for Low Vitamin D-dependent Age-Related Cognitive Decline

    PubMed Central

    Keeney, Jeriel T. R.; Förster, Sarah; Sultana, Rukhsana; Brewer, Lawrence D.; Latimer, Caitlin S.; Cai, Jian; Klein, Jon B.; Porter, Nada M.; Butterfield, D. Allan

    2013-01-01

    In addition to the well-known effects of vitamin D (VitD) in maintaining bone health, there is increasing appreciation that this vitamin may serve important roles in other organs and tissues, including the brain. Given that VitD deficiency is especially widespread among the elderly, it is important to understand how the range of serum VitD levels that mimic those found in humans (from low to high) affects the brain during aging from middle-age to old-age. To address this issue, twenty-seven male F344 rats were split into three groups and fed isocaloric diets containing low (100 IU/kg food), control (1000 IU/kg food), or high (10000 IU/kg food) VitD beginning at middle-age (12 months) and continued for a period of 4–5 months. We compared the effects of these dietary VitD manipulations on oxidative and nitrosative stress measures in posterior brain cortices. The low VitD group showed global elevation of 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) compared to control and high VitD treated groups. Further investigation showed that this elevation may involve dysregulation of the nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) pathway and NF-κB mediated transcription of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) as indicated by translocation of NF-κB to the nucleus and elevation of iNOS levels. Proteomic techniques were used to provide insights into potential mechanisms underlying these effects. Several brain proteins were found at significantly elevated levels in low VitD group compared to the control and high VitD groups. Three of these proteins, 6-phosphofructokinase, triosephosphate isomerase, and pyruvate kinase, are involved directly in glycolysis. Two others, peroxiredoxin-3 and DJ-1/PARK7, have peroxidase activity and are found in mitochondria. Peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase A (PPIA or cyclophilin A) has been shown to have multiple roles including protein folding, regulation of protein kinases and phosphatases, immunoregulation, cell signaling, and redox

  9. Dietary vitamin D deficiency in rats from middle to old age leads to elevated tyrosine nitration and proteomics changes in levels of key proteins in brain: implications for low vitamin D-dependent age-related cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    Keeney, Jeriel T R; Förster, Sarah; Sultana, Rukhsana; Brewer, Lawrence D; Latimer, Caitlin S; Cai, Jian; Klein, Jon B; Porter, Nada M; Butterfield, D Allan

    2013-12-01

    In addition to the well-known effects of vitamin D (VitD) in maintaining bone health, there is increasing appreciation that this vitamin may serve important roles in other organs and tissues, including the brain. Given that VitD deficiency is especially widespread among the elderly, it is important to understand how the range of serum VitD levels that mimic those found in humans (from low to high) affects the brain during aging from middle age to old age. To address this issue, 27 male F344 rats were split into three groups and fed isocaloric diets containing low (100 IU/kg food), control (1000 IU/kg food), or high (10,000 IU/kg food) VitD beginning at middle age (12 months) and continued for a period of 4-5 months. We compared the effects of these dietary VitD manipulations on oxidative and nitrosative stress measures in posterior brain cortices. The low-VitD group showed global elevation of 3-nitrotyrosine compared to control and high-VitD-treated groups. Further investigation showed that this elevation may involve dysregulation of the nuclear factor κ-light-chain enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) pathway and NF-κB-mediated transcription of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) as indicated by translocation of NF-κB to the nucleus and elevation of iNOS levels. Proteomics techniques were used to provide insight into potential mechanisms underlying these effects. Several brain proteins were found at significantly elevated levels in the low-VitD group compared to the control and high-VitD groups. Three of these proteins, 6-phosphofructokinase, triose phosphate isomerase, and pyruvate kinase, are involved directly in glycolysis. Two others, peroxiredoxin-3 and DJ-1/PARK7, have peroxidase activity and are found in mitochondria. Peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase A (cyclophilin A) has been shown to have multiple roles, including protein folding, regulation of protein kinases and phosphatases, immunoregulation, cell signaling, and redox status. Together, these

  10. Effects of an induced adenosine deaminase deficiency on T-cell differentiation in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, R.W.

    1985-10-15

    Inherited deficiency of the enzyme adenosine deaminase (ADA) has been found in a significant proportion of patients with severe combined immunodeficiency disease and inherited defect generally characterized by a deficiency of both B and T cells. Two questions are central to understanding the pathophysiology of this disease: (1) at what stage or stages in lymphocyte development are the effects of the enzyme deficiency manifested; (2) what are the biochemical mechanisms responsible for the selective pathogenicity of the lymphoid system. We have examined the stage or stages of rat T-cell development in vivo which are affected by an induced adenosine deaminase deficiency using the ADA inhibitors, erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)adenine (EHNA) and 2'-deoxycoformycin (DCF). In normal rats given daily administration of an ADA inhibitor, cortical thymocytes were markedly depleted; peripheral lymphocytes and pluripotent hemopoietic stem cells (CFU-S) all were relatively unaffected. Since a deficiency of ADA affects lymphocyte development, the regeneration of cortical and medullary thymocytes and their precursors after sublethal irradiation was used as a model of lymphoid development. By Day 5 after irradiation the thymus was reduced to 0.10-0.5% of its normal size; whereas at Days 9 and 14 the thymus was 20-40% and 60-80% regenerated, respectively. When irradiated rats were given daily parenteral injections of the ADA inhibitor plus adenosine or deoxyadenosine, thymus regeneration at Days 9 and 14 was markedly inhibited, whereas the regeneration of thymocyte precursors was essentially unaffected. Thymus regeneration was at least 40-fold lower than in rats given adenosine or deoxyadenosine alone. Virtually identical results were obtained with both ADA inhibitors, EHNA and DCF.

  11. Androgen Deficiency Exacerbates High-Fat Diet-Induced Metabolic Alterations in Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Vanessa; Laurent, Michaël R; Jardi, Ferran; Antonio, Leen; Lemaire, Katleen; Goyvaerts, Lotte; Deldicque, Louise; Carmeliet, Geert; Decallonne, Brigitte; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Claessens, Frank

    2016-02-01

    Androgen deficiency is associated with obesity, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes mellitus in men, but the mechanisms behind these associations remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the combined effects of androgen deficiency and high-fat diet (HFD) on body composition and glucose homeostasis in C57BL/6J male mice. Two models of androgen deficiency were used: orchidectomy (ORX) and androgen receptor knockout mice. Both models displayed higher adiposity and serum leptin levels upon HFD, whereas no differences were seen on a regular diet. Fat accumulation in HFD ORX animals was accompanied by increased sedentary behavior and occurred in spite of reduced food intake. HFD ORX mice showed white adipocyte hypertrophy, correlated with decreased mitochondrial content but not function as well as increased lipogenesis and decreased lipolysis suggested by the up-regulation of fatty acid synthase and the down-regulation of hormone-sensitive lipase. Both ORX and androgen receptor knockout exacerbated HFD-induced glucose intolerance by impairing insulin action in liver and skeletal muscle, as evidenced by the increased triglyceride and decreased glycogen content in these tissues. In addition, serum IL-1β levels were elevated, and pancreatic insulin secretion was impaired after ORX. Testosterone but not dihydrotestosterone supplementation restored the castration effects on body composition and glucose homeostasis. We conclude that sex steroid deficiency in combination with HFD exacerbates adiposity, insulin resistance, and β-cell failure in 2 preclinical male mouse models. Our findings stress the importance of a healthy diet in a clinical context of androgen deficiency and may have implications for the prevention of metabolic alterations in hypogonadal men. PMID:26562264

  12. Intranasal peptide-induced tolerance and linked suppression: consequences of complement deficiency.

    PubMed

    Fossati-Jimack, Liliane; Ling, Guang Sheng; Baudino, Lucie; Szajna, Marta; Manivannan, Kiruthika; Zhao, Jade Chen; Midgley, Robert; Chai, Jian-Guo; Simpson, Elizabeth; Botto, Marina; Scott, Diane

    2015-01-01

    A role for complement, particularly the classical pathway, in the regulation of immune responses is well documented. Deficiencies in C1q or C4 predispose to autoimmunity, while deficiency in C3 affects the suppression of contact sensitization and generation of oral tolerance. Complement components including C3 have been shown to be required for both B-cell and T-cell priming. The mechanisms whereby complement can mediate these diverse regulatory effects are poorly understood. Our previous work, using the mouse minor histocompatibility (HY) model of skin graft rejection, showed that both C1q and C3 were required for the induction of tolerance following intranasal peptide administration. By comparing tolerance induction in wild-type C57BL/6 and C1q-, C3-, C4- and C5-deficient C57BL/6 female mice, we show here that the classical pathway components including C3 are required for tolerance induction, whereas C5 plays no role. C3-deficient mice failed to generate a functional regulatory T (Treg) -dendritic cell (DC) tolerogenic loop required for tolerance induction. This was related to the inability of C3-deficient DC to up-regulate the arginine-consuming enzyme, inducible nitric oxide synthase (Nos-2), in the presence of antigen-specific Treg cells and peptide, leading to reduced Treg cell generation. Our findings demonstrate that the classical pathway and C3 play a critical role in the peptide-mediated induction of tolerance to HY by modulating DC function. PMID:25039245

  13. Intranasal peptide-induced tolerance and linked suppression: consequences of complement deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Fossati-Jimack, Liliane; Ling, Guang Sheng; Baudino, Lucie; Szajna, Marta; Manivannan, Kiruthika; Zhao, Jade Chen; Midgley, Robert; Chai, Jian-Guo; Simpson, Elizabeth; Botto, Marina; Scott, Diane

    2015-01-01

    A role for complement, particularly the classical pathway, in the regulation of immune responses is well documented. Deficiencies in C1q or C4 predispose to autoimmunity, while deficiency in C3 affects the suppression of contact sensitization and generation of oral tolerance. Complement components including C3 have been shown to be required for both B-cell and T-cell priming. The mechanisms whereby complement can mediate these diverse regulatory effects are poorly understood. Our previous work, using the mouse minor histocompatibility (HY) model of skin graft rejection, showed that both C1q and C3 were required for the induction of tolerance following intranasal peptide administration. By comparing tolerance induction in wild-type C57BL/6 and C1q-, C3-, C4- and C5-deficient C57BL/6 female mice, we show here that the classical pathway components including C3 are required for tolerance induction, whereas C5 plays no role. C3-deficient mice failed to generate a functional regulatory T (Treg) –dendritic cell (DC) tolerogenic loop required for tolerance induction. This was related to the inability of C3-deficient DC to up-regulate the arginine-consuming enzyme, inducible nitric oxide synthase (Nos-2), in the presence of antigen-specific Treg cells and peptide, leading to reduced Treg cell generation. Our findings demonstrate that the classical pathway and C3 play a critical role in the peptide-mediated induction of tolerance to HY by modulating DC function. PMID:25039245

  14. Chronic treatment with a carbon monoxide releasing molecule reverses dietary induced obesity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hosick, Peter A; AlAmodi, Abdulhadi A; Hankins, Michael W; Stec, David E

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chronic, low level treatment with a carbon monoxide releasing molecule (CO-RM), CORM-A1, has been shown to prevent the development of obesity in response to a high fat diet. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that chronic, low level treatment with this CO-RM can reverse established obesity via a mechanism independent of food intake. Dietary induced obese mice were treated with CORM-A1, the inactive compound iCORM-A1, or saline every 48 hours for 30 weeks while maintained on a high fat (60%) diet. Chronic treatment with CORM-A1 resulted in a 33% decrease from initial body weight over the 30 week treatment period while treatment with iCORM and saline were associated with 18 and 25% gain in initial body weight over the same time frame. Chronic treatment with CORM-A1 did not affect food intake or activity but resulted in a significant increase in metabolism. CORM-A1 treatment also resulted in lower fasting blood glucose, improvement in insulin sensitivity and decreased heptatic steatosis. Chronic treatment with CO releasing molecules can reverse dietary induced obesity and normalize insulin resistance independent of changes in food intake or activity. These findings are likely though a mechanism which increases metabolism. PMID:27144091

  15. Dietary apple polyphenols have preventive effects against lengthening contraction-induced muscle injuries.

    PubMed

    Nakazato, Koichi; Ochi, Eisuke; Waga, Toshiaki

    2010-03-01

    We examined whether polyphenols from dietary apple have protective effects against exercise-induced muscle strain injury. Sixteen male Wistar rats were randomly assigned into the apple polyphenol (APP; N=8) and control (CON; N=8) groups. The APP and the CON groups were fed diets with and without 5% APP, respectively. After a 3-wk feeding period, the gastrocnemii of the animals were subject to lengthening contractions with electrical stimulation and forced ankle dorsiflexion. Isometric torques were measured before and after the lengthening contractions and on days 1, 2, 3, 5, and 7 after the contractions. On day 7, the animals were sacrificed and the gastrocnemii harvested. Thiobarbituric-acid-reactive substances, protein carbonyl, and mRNA of antioxidative proteins in the muscles were quantified. The APP group had significantly lower torque deficits than the CON group on days 3, 5, and 7 after the eccentric contractions. The thiobarbituric-acid-reactive substances and protein carbonyl levels in the case of the APP group were significantly lower than those in the case of the CON group. The APP group had significantly higher glutathione-S-transferase alpha1 mRNA levels than the CON group. Therefore, we conclude that dietary APPs have protective effects against lengthening contraction-induced muscle injury. PMID:19866470

  16. Dietary bioflavonoids induce cleavage in the MLL gene and may contribute to infant leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Strick, Reiner; Strissel, Pamela L.; Borgers, Susanne; Smith, Steve L.; Rowley, Janet D.

    2000-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations involving the MLL gene occur in about 80% of infant leukemia. In the search for possible agents inducing infant leukemia, we identified bioflavonoids, natural substances in food as well as in dietary supplements, that cause site-specific DNA cleavage in the MLL breakpoint cluster region (BCR) in vivo. The MLL BCR DNA cleavage was shown in primary progenitor hematopoietic cells from healthy newborns and adults as well as in cell lines; it colocalized with the MLL BCR cleavage site induced by chemotherapeutic agents, such as etoposide (VP16) and doxorubicin (Dox). Both in vivo and additional in vitro experiments demonstrated topoisomerase II (topo II) as the target of bioflavonoids similar to VP16 and Dox. Based on 20 bioflavonoids tested, we identified a common structure essential for topo II-induced DNA cleavage. Reversibility experiments demonstrated a religation of the bioflavonoid as well as the VP16-induced MLL cleavage site. Our observations support a two-stage model of cellular processing of topo II inhibitors: The first and reversible stage of topo II-induced DNA cleavage results in DNA repair, but also rarely in chromosome translocations; whereas the second, nonreversible stage leads to cell death because of an accumulation of DNA damage. These results suggest that maternal ingestion of bioflavonoids may induce MLL breaks and potentially translocations in utero leading to infant and early childhood leukemia. PMID:10758153

  17. Surgical treatment for a paraplegic patient induced by congenital factor X deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Weicheng; Zhou, Jing; Wang, Tianbing; Zhang, Peixun

    2015-01-01

    Congenital factor X (FX) deficiency is a rare disease which usually leads to coagulation disorders. We reported a case of paraplegic patient induced by traumatic spinal epidural hematoma which was associated with congenital FX deficiency. The treatments of this patient included elevating FX activity (FX: C) by adding fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) or prothrombin complex concentration (PCC) to improve his coagulation function, and doing operation to remove his spinal hematoma. Symptoms started to resolve after operation. Besides, we found one of his elder brother had the same disease as the patient himself via family follow-up. They can survive because their FX: C are relatively high enough to keep them away from fatal bleeding. PMID:26550274

  18. Acquired coagulant factor VIII deficiency induced by Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Der-Shan; Lee, Po-Chien; Kau, Jyh-Hwa; Shih, Yung-Luen; Huang, Hsin-Hsien; Li, Chen-Ru; Lee, Chin-Cheng; Wu, Yu-Ping; Chen, Kuo-Ching; Chang, Hsin-Hou

    2015-01-01

    Mice treated with anthrax lethal toxin (LT) exhibit hemorrhage caused by unknown mechanisms. Moreover, LT treatment in mice induced liver damage. In this study, we hypothesized that a suppressed coagulation function may be associated with liver damage, because the liver is the major producing source of coagulation factors. The hepatic expression of coagulant factors and the survival rates were analyzed after cultured cells or mice were exposed to LT. In agreement with our hypothesis, LT induces cytotoxicity against hepatic cells in vitro. In addition, suppressed expression of coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) in the liver is associated with a prolonged plasma clotting time in LT-treated mice, suggesting a suppressive role of LT in coagulation. Accordingly, we further hypothesized that a loss-of-function approach involving treatments of an anticoagulant should exacerbate LT-induced abnormalities, whereas a gain-of-function approach involving injections of recombinant FVIII to complement the coagulation deficiency should ameliorate the pathogenesis. As expected, a sublethal dose of LT caused mortality in the mice that were non-lethally pretreated with an anticoagulant (warfarin). By contrast, treatments of recombinant FVIII reduced the mortality from a lethal dose of LT in mice. Our results indicated that LT-induced deficiency of FVIII is involved in LT-mediated pathogenesis. Using recombinant FVIII to correct the coagulant defect may enable developing a new strategy to treat anthrax. PMID:25906166

  19. Thrombospondin 1 Deficiency Ameliorates the Development of Adriamycin-Induced Proteinuric Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Maimaitiyiming, Hasiyeti; Zhou, Qi; Wang, Shuxia

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that thrombospondin 1 (TSP1) is an important player in diabetic nephropathy. However, the role of TSP1 in podocyte injury and the development of non-diabetic proteinuric kidney disease is largely unknown. In the current study, by using a well-established podocyte injury model (adriamycin-induced nephropathy mouse model), we examined the contribution of TSP1 to the development of proteinuric kidney disease. We found that TSP1 was up-regulated in the glomeruli, notably in podocytes, in adriamycin injected mice before the onset of proteinuria. ADR treatment also stimulated TSP1 expression in cultured human podocytes in vitro. Moreover, increased TSP1 mediated ADR-induced podocyte apoptosis and actin cytoskeleton disorganization. This TSP1’s effect was through a CD36-dependent mechanism and involved in the stimulation of p38MAPK pathway. Importantly, in vivo data demonstrated that TSP1 deficiency protected mice from ADR induced podocyte loss and foot process effacement. ADR induced proteinuria, glomerulosclerosis, renal macrophage infiltration and inflammation was also attenuated in TSP1 deficient mice. Taken together, these studies provide new evidence that TSP1 contributes to the development of non-diabetic proteinuric kidney disease by stimulating podocyte injury and the progression of renal inflammation. PMID:27196103

  20. Acquired coagulant factor VIII deficiency induced by Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin in mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Der-Shan; Lee, Po-Chien; Kau, Jyh-Hwa; Shih, Yung-Luen; Huang, Hsin-Hsien; Li, Chen-Ru; Lee, Chin-Cheng; Wu, Yu-Ping; Chen, Kuo-Ching; Chang, Hsin-Hou

    2015-01-01

    Mice treated with anthrax lethal toxin (LT) exhibit hemorrhage caused by unknown mechanisms. Moreover, LT treatment in mice induced liver damage. In this study, we hypothesized that a suppressed coagulation function may be associated with liver damage, because the liver is the major producing source of coagulation factors. The hepatic expression of coagulant factors and the survival rates were analyzed after cultured cells or mice were exposed to LT. In agreement with our hypothesis, LT induces cytotoxicity against hepatic cells in vitro. In addition, suppressed expression of coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) in the liver is associated with a prolonged plasma clotting time in LT-treated mice, suggesting a suppressive role of LT in coagulation. Accordingly, we further hypothesized that a loss-of-function approach involving treatments of an anticoagulant should exacerbate LT-induced abnormalities, whereas a gain-of-function approach involving injections of recombinant FVIII to complement the coagulation deficiency should ameliorate the pathogenesis. As expected, a sublethal dose of LT caused mortality in the mice that were non-lethally pretreated with an anticoagulant (warfarin). By contrast, treatments of recombinant FVIII reduced the mortality from a lethal dose of LT in mice. Our results indicated that LT-induced deficiency of FVIII is involved in LT-mediated pathogenesis. Using recombinant FVIII to correct the coagulant defect may enable developing a new strategy to treat anthrax. PMID:25906166

  1. Role of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 in transcriptional activation of ceruloplasmin by iron deficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, C. K.; Mazumder, B.; Fox, P. L.

    2000-01-01

    A role of the copper protein ceruloplasmin (Cp) in iron metabolism is suggested by its ferroxidase activity and by the tissue iron overload in hereditary Cp deficiency patients. In addition, plasma Cp increases markedly in several conditions of anemia, e.g. iron deficiency, hemorrhage, renal failure, sickle cell disease, pregnancy, and inflammation. However, little is known about the cellular and molecular mechanism(s) involved. We have reported that iron chelators increase Cp mRNA expression and protein synthesis in human hepatocarcinoma HepG2 cells. Furthermore, we have shown that the increase in Cp mRNA is due to increased rate of transcription. We here report the results of new studies designed to elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying transcriptional activation of Cp by iron deficiency. The 5'-flanking region of the Cp gene was cloned from a human genomic library. A 4774-base pair segment of the Cp promoter/enhancer driving a luciferase reporter was transfected into HepG2 or Hep3B cells. Iron deficiency or hypoxia increased luciferase activity by 5-10-fold compared with untreated cells. Examination of the sequence showed three pairs of consensus hypoxia-responsive elements (HREs). Deletion and mutation analysis showed that a single HRE was necessary and sufficient for gene activation. The involvement of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) was shown by gel-shift and supershift experiments that showed HIF-1alpha and HIF-1beta binding to a radiolabeled oligonucleotide containing the Cp promoter HRE. Furthermore, iron deficiency (and hypoxia) did not activate Cp gene expression in Hepa c4 hepatoma cells deficient in HIF-1beta, as shown functionally by the inactivity of a transfected Cp promoter-luciferase construct and by the failure of HIF-1 to bind the Cp HRE in nuclear extracts from these cells. These results are consistent with in vivo findings that iron deficiency increases plasma Cp and provides a molecular mechanism that may help to understand these

  2. Adipocyte deficiency of angiotensinogen prevents obesity-induced hypertension in male mice.

    PubMed

    Yiannikouris, Frederique; Gupte, Manisha; Putnam, Kelly; Thatcher, Sean; Charnigo, Richard; Rateri, Debra L; Daugherty, Alan; Cassis, Lisa A

    2012-12-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that diet-induced obesity increased plasma angiotensin II concentrations and elevated systolic blood pressures in male mice. Adipocytes express angiotensinogen and secrete angiotensin peptides. We hypothesize that adipocyte-derived angiotensin II mediates obesity-induced increases in systolic blood pressure in male high fat-fed C57BL/6 mice. Systolic blood pressure was measured by radiotelemetry during week 16 of low-fat or high-fat feeding in Agt(fl/fl) and adipocyte angiotensinogen-deficient mice (Agt(aP2)). Adipocyte angiotensinogen deficiency had no effect on diet-induced obesity. Basal 24-hour systolic blood pressure was not different in low fat-fed Agt(fl/fl) compared with Agt(aP2) mice (124 ± 3 versus 128 ± 3 mm Hg, respectively). In Agt(fl/fl) mice, high-fat feeding significantly increased systolic blood pressure (24 hours; 134 ± 2 mm Hg; P<0.05). In contrast, high fat-fed Agt(aP2) mice did not exhibit an increase in systolic blood pressure (126 ± 2 mm Hg). Plasma angiotensin II concentrations were increased by high-fat feeding in Agt(fl/fl) mice (low fat, 32 ± 14; high fat, 219 ± 58 pg/mL; P<0.05). In contrast, high fat-fed Agt(aP2) mice did not exhibit elevated plasma angiotensin II concentrations (high fat, 18 ± 7 pg/mL). Similarly, adipose tissue concentrations of angiotensin II were significantly decreased in low fat- and high fat-fed Agt(aP2) mice compared with controls. In conclusion, adipocyte angiotensinogen deficiency prevented high fat-induced elevations in plasma angiotensin II concentrations and systolic blood pressure. These results suggest that adipose tissue serves as a major source of angiotensin II in the development of obesity hypertension. PMID:23108647

  3. The impact of FANCD2 deficiency on formaldehyde-induced toxicity in human lymphoblastoid cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Xuefeng; Ji, Zhiying; McHale, Cliona M.; Yuh, Jessica; Bersonda, Jessica; Tang, Maycky; Smith, Martyn T.; Zhang, Luoping

    2015-01-01

    Formaldehyde (FA), a major industrial chemical and ubiquitous environmental pollutant, has recently been classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer as a human leukemogen. The major mode of action of FA is thought to be the formation of DNA-protein crosslinks (DPCs). Repair of DPCs may be mediated by the Fanconi anemia pathway; however, data supporting the involvement of this pathway is limited, particularly in human hematopoietic cells. Therefore, we assessed the role of FANCD2, a critical component of the Fanconi anemia pathway, in FA-induced toxicity in human lymphoblast cell models of FANCD2-deficiency (PD20 cells) and FANCD2-sufficiency (PD20-D2 cells). After treatment of the cells with 0-150 μM FA for 24 hours, DPCs were increased in a dose-dependent manner in both cell lines, with greater increases in FANCD2-deficient PD20 cells. FA also induced cytotoxicity, micronuclei, chromosome aberrations, and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner in both cell lines, with greater increases in cytotoxicity and apoptosis in PD20 cells. Increased levels of γ-ATR and γ-H2AX in both cell lines suggested the recognition of FA-induced DNA damage; however, the induction of BRCA2 was compromised in FANCD2-deficient PD20 cells, potentially reducing the capacity to repair DPCs. Together, these findings suggest that FANCD2 protein and the Fanconi anemia pathway are essential to protect human lymphoblastoid cells against FA toxicity. Future studies are needed to delineate the role of this pathway in mitigating FA-induced toxicity, particularly in hematopoietic stem cells, the target cells in leukemia. PMID:22872141

  4. Autophagy deficiency in β cells blunts incretin-induced suppression of glucagon release from α cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Joo; Choi, Ok Kyong; Chae, Kyung Sil; Lee, Hakmo; Chung, Sung Soo; Ham, Dong-Sik; Kim, Ji-Won; Yoon, Kun-Ho; Park, Kyong Soo; Jung, Hye Seung

    2015-09-01

    Incretin-based therapy such as GLP-1 receptor agonists and DPP-4 inhibitors for type 2 diabetes mellitus is characterized by glucose-dependent insulin secretion and glucose-inhibited glucagon secretion. Recently, autophagy deficiency in islet β cells has been shown to contribute to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus however, with the role of incretin has not been established. To evaluate the role of autophagy in incretin effects, 8-week-old male β cell-specific Atg7 knockout (Atg7(Δβ cell)) mice and wild-type mice were administered vildagliptin for 12 weeks. Vildagliptin treatment improved glucose intolerance and hypoinsulinemia; however, it failed to suppress serum glucagon levels after glucose loading in the Atg7(Δβ cell) mice. Ex vivo glucose-induced glucagon suppression was also blunted in the islets from vildagliptin-treated Atg7(Δβ cell) mice. The α cell mass was not affected by β cell autophagy deficiency or vildagliptin. However, glucagon mRNA expression was significantly increased by vildagliptin in the autophagy-deficient islets, and was significantly reduced by vildagliptin in wild-type islets. Pancreatic glucagon contents were not in agreement with the changes in mRNA expression, suggesting a dysregulation in glucagon translation and secretion. In vitro studies revealed that glucose-stimulated cAMP production was impaired in the autophagy-deficient islets exposed to exendin-4. Taken together, the results suggest that the constitutive autophagy in β cells could regulate incretin-induced glucagon expression and release in α cells, and that cAMP may play a role in this process. PMID:26744903

  5. Autophagy deficiency in β cells blunts incretin-induced suppression of glucagon release from α cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Joo; Choi, Ok Kyong; Chae, Kyung Sil; Lee, Hakmo; Chung, Sung Soo; Ham, Dong-Sik; Kim, Ji-Won; Yoon, Kun-Ho; Park, Kyong Soo; Jung, Hye Seung

    2015-01-01

    Incretin-based therapy such as GLP-1 receptor agonists and DPP-4 inhibitors for type 2 diabetes mellitus is characterized by glucose-dependent insulin secretion and glucose-inhibited glucagon secretion. Recently, autophagy deficiency in islet β cells has been shown to contribute to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus however, with the role of incretin has not been established. To evaluate the role of autophagy in incretin effects, 8-week-old male β cell-specific Atg7 knockout (Atg7Δβ cell) mice and wild-type mice were administered vildagliptin for 12 weeks. Vildagliptin treatment improved glucose intolerance and hypoinsulinemia; however, it failed to suppress serum glucagon levels after glucose loading in the Atg7Δβ cell mice. Ex vivo glucose-induced glucagon suppression was also blunted in the islets from vildagliptin-treated Atg7Δβ cell mice. The α cell mass was not affected by β cell autophagy deficiency or vildagliptin. However, glucagon mRNA expression was significantly increased by vildagliptin in the autophagy-deficient islets, and was significantly reduced by vildagliptin in wild-type islets. Pancreatic glucagon contents were not in agreement with the changes in mRNA expression, suggesting a dysregulation in glucagon translation and secretion. In vitro studies revealed that glucose-stimulated cAMP production was impaired in the autophagy-deficient islets exposed to exendin-4. Taken together, the results suggest that the constitutive autophagy in β cells could regulate incretin-induced glucagon expression and release in α cells, and that cAMP may play a role in this process. PMID:26744903

  6. Vasodilator-Stimulated Phosphoprotein Deficiency Potentiates PAR-1-induced Increase in Endothelial Permeability in Mouse Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Profirovic, Jasmina; Han, Jingyan; Andreeva, Alexandra V.; Neamu, Radu F.; Pavlovic, Sasha; Vogel, Stephen M.; Walter, Ulrich; Voyno-Yasenetskaya, Tatyana A.

    2010-01-01

    Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) is implicated in the protection of the endothelial barrier in vitro and in vivo. VASP function in thrombin signaling in the endothelial cells (ECs) is not known. For the first time we studied the effects of VASP deficiency on EC permeability and pulmonary vascular permeability in response to thrombin receptor stimulation. We provided the evidence that VASP deficiency potentiates the increase in endothelial permeability induced by activation of thrombin receptor in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and isolated mouse lungs. Using transendothelial resistance measurement, we showed that siRNA-mediated VASP downregulation in HUVECs leads to a potentiation of thrombin- and protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR-1) agonist-induced increase in endothelial permeability. Compared to control cells, VASP-deficient HUVECs had delayed endothelial junctional reassembly and abrogated VE-cadherin cytoskeletal anchoring in the recovery phase after thrombin stimulation, as demonstrated by immunofluorescence studies and cell fractionation analysis, respectively. Measurement of the capillary filtration coefficient in isolated mouse lungs demonstrated that VASP−/− mice have increased microvascular permeability in response to infusion with PAR-1 agonist compared to wild type mice. Lack of VASP led to decreased Rac1 activation both in VASP-deficient HUVECs after thrombin stimulation and VASP−/− mouse lungs after PAR-1 agonist infusion, indicating that VASP effects on thrombin signaling may correlated with changes in Rac1 activity. This study demonstrates that VASP may play critical and complex role in the regulation of thrombin-dependent disruption of the endothelial barrier function. PMID:20945373

  7. Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Deficiency or Inhibition Attenuates MPTP-Induced Parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiaocui; Wu, Qiaoqi; Lin, Lifang; Sun, Aimin; Liu, Shuhu; Li, Xiaowen; Cao, Xiong; Gao, Tianming; Luo, Pengcheng; Zhu, Xinhong; Wang, Xuemin

    2015-08-01

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) inhibition has been demonstrated to have beneficial effects on various diseases, such as hypertension, diabetes, and brain ischemia. However, whether sEH inhibition has therapeutic potential in Parkinson's disease is still unknown. In this paper, we found that sEH expression is increased in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydro pyridine (MPTP)-treated mice, and sEH deficiency and inhibition significantly attenuated tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive cell loss and improved rotarod performance. The substrate of sEH, 14,15-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (14,15-EET), protected TH-positive cells and alleviated the rotarod performance deficits of wild-type mice but not sEH-knockout mice. Moreover, the 14,15-EET antagonist 14,15-epoxyeicosa-5(Z)-enoic acid (14,15-EEZE) abolished the neuronal protective effects of sEH deficiency. In primary cultured cortical neurons, MPP(+) induced significant Akt inactivation in neurons from sEH wild-type mice, and this effect was not observed in neurons from knockout mice. Our data indicate that sEH deficiency and inhibition increased 14,15-EET in MPTP-treated mice, which activated the Akt-mediated protection of TH-positive neurons and behavioral functioning. We also found that sEH deficiency attenuated TH-positive cell loss in a paraquat-induced mouse model of Parkinson's. Our data suggest that sEH inhibition might be a powerful tool to protect dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease. PMID:25128026

  8. Effects of an essential fatty acid deficiency, pair-feeding and level of dietary corn oil on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and other physiological parameters in the male chicken.

    PubMed

    Engster, H M; Carew, L B; Cunningham, F J

    1978-06-01

    Two studies were conducted to observe the effects of an essential fatty acid (EFA) deficiency, added dietary corn oil and pair-feeding on growth, reproduction and other physiological parameters in the mature cockerel. A purified, linoleic acid (LA)-deficient diet (0.01% LA), or additions of 5% (3.01% LA) or 15% (9.04% LA) corn oil, were fed ad libitum from hatching through 24 weeks of age. Reductions in growth, feed consumption, and comb, and testes size, incomplete spermatogenesis, increased tissue eicosatrienoic acid (20: 3 omega 9) and changes in weights of selected internal organs were observed in deficient cockerels. Total pituitary gonadotropic activity was measured by two bioassay procedures and blood luteinizing hormone was measured by radioimmunoassay. By maturity both of these parameters were significantly reduced in deficient chickens. When these chickens were fed diets with 5% or 15% corn oil under pair-feeding or ad libitum conditions from 20 to 24 weeks, the reduced growth, comb and testes size and gonadotropin metabolism appeared to be caused by depressions in appetite and energy intake rather than EFA per se. The degenerate testicular histology of the 20-week old deficient cockerels, while responding fully to the ad libitum intake of the diets containing corn oil, showed only partial rehabilitation of spermatogenesis when diets with either 5% or 15% corn oil were pair-fed. In general, increasing the level of dietary fat from 5% to 15% did not cause many physiological changes. PMID:650291

  9. Carnitine deficiency and oxidative stress provoke cardiotoxicity in an ifosfamide-induced Fanconi Syndrome rat model

    PubMed Central

    Darweesh, Amal Q; Fatani, Amal J

    2010-01-01

    In addition to hemorrhagic cystitis, Fanconi Syndrome is a serious clinical side effect during ifosfamide (IFO) therapy. Fanconi syndrome is a generalized dysfunction of the proximal tubule which is characterized by excessive urinary excretion of glucose, phosphate, bicarbonate, amino acids and other solutes excreted by this segment of the nephron including L-carnitine. Carnitine is essential cofactor for β-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids in the myocardium. IFO therapy is associated with increased urinary carnitine excretion with subsequent secondary deficiency of the molecule. Cardiac abnormalities in IFO-treated cancer patients were reported as isolated clinical cases. This study examined whether carnitine deficiency and oxidative stress, secondary to Fanconi Syndrome, provoke IFO-induced cardiomyopathy as well as exploring if carnitine supplementation using Propionyl-L-carnitine (PLC) could offer protection against this toxicity. In the current study, an animal model of carnitine deficiency was developed in rats by D-carnitine-mildronate treatment Adult male Wistar albino rats were assigned to one of six treatment groups: the first three groups were injected intraperitoneally with normal saline, D-carnitine (DC, 250 mg/kg/day) combined with mildronate (MD, 200 mg/kg/day) and PLC (250 mg/kg/day), respectively, for 10 successive days. The 4th, 5th and 6th groups were injected with the same doses of normal saline, DC-MD and PLC, respectively for 5 successive days before and 5 days concomitant with IFO (50 mg/kg/day). IFO significantly increased serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), urinary carnitine excretion and clearance, creatine phosphokinase isoenzyme (CK-MB), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), intramitochondrial acetyl-CoA/CoA-SH and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in cardiac tissues and significantly decreased adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and total carnitine and reduced glutathione (GSH) content in cardiac tissues. In carnitine

  10. Carnitine deficiency and oxidative stress provoke cardiotoxicity in an ifosfamide-induced Fanconi Syndrome rat model.

    PubMed

    Sayed-Ahmed, Mohamed M; Darweesh, Amal Q; Fatani, Amal J

    2010-01-01

    In addition to hemorrhagic cystitis, Fanconi Syndrome is a serious clinical side effect during ifosfamide (IFO) therapy. Fanconi syndrome is a generalized dysfunction of the proximal tubule which is characterized by excessive urinary excretion of glucose, phosphate, bicarbonate, amino acids and other solutes excreted by this segment of the nephron including L-carnitine. Carnitine is essential cofactor for β-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids in the myocardium. IFO therapy is associated with increased urinary carnitine excretion with subsequent secondary deficiency of the molecule. Cardiac abnormalities in IFO-treated cancer patients were reported as isolated clinical cases. This study examined whether carnitine deficiency and oxidative stress, secondary to Fanconi Syndrome, provoke IFO-induced cardiomyopathy as well as exploring if carnitine supplementation using Propionyl-L-carnitine (PLC) could offer protection against this toxicity. In the current study, an animal model of carnitine deficiency was developed in rats by D-carnitine-mildronate treatment Adult male Wistar albino rats were assigned to one of six treatment groups: the first three groups were injected intraperitoneally with normal saline, D-carnitine (DC, 250 mg/kg/day) combined with mildronate (MD, 200 mg/kg/day) and PLC (250 mg/kg/day), respectively, for 10 successive days. The 4(th), 5(th) and 6(th) groups were injected with the same doses of normal saline, DC-MD and PLC, respectively for 5 successive days before and 5 days concomitant with IFO (50 mg/kg/day). IFO significantly increased serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), urinary carnitine excretion and clearance, creatine phosphokinase isoenzyme (CK-MB), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), intramitochondrial acetyl-CoA/CoA-SH and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in cardiac tissues and significantly decreased adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and total carnitine and reduced glutathione (GSH) content in cardiac tissues. In carnitine

  11. Mice Abundant in Muricholic Bile Acids Show Resistance to Dietary Induced Steatosis, Weight Gain, and to Impaired Glucose Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Bonde, Ylva; Eggertsen, Gösta; Rudling, Mats

    2016-01-01

    High endogenous production of, or treatment with muricholic bile acids, strongly reduces the absorption of cholesterol. Mice abundant in muricholic bile acids may therefore display an increased resistance against dietary induced weight gain, steatosis, and glucose intolerance due to an anticipated general reduction in lipid absorption. To test this hypothesis, mice deficient in steroid 12-alpha hydroxylase (Cyp8b1-/-) and therefore abundant in muricholic acids were monitored for 11 weeks while fed a high fat diet. Food intake and body and liver weights were determined, and lipids in liver, serum and feces were measured. Further, responses during oral glucose and intraperitoneal insulin tolerance tests were evaluated. On the high fat diet, Cyp8b1-/- mice displayed less weight gain compared to wildtype littermates (Cyp8b1+/+). In addition, liver enlargement with steatosis and increases in serum LDL-cholesterol were strongly attenuated in Cyp8b1-/- mice on high fat diet. Fecal excretion of cholesterol was increased and there was a strong trend for doubled fecal excretion of free fatty acids, while excretion of triglycerides was unaltered, indicating dampened lipid absorption. On high fat diet, Cyp8b1-/- mice also presented lower serum glucose levels in response to oral glucose gavage or to intraperitoneal insulin injection compared to Cyp8b1+/+. In conclusion, following exposure to a high fat diet, Cyp8b1-/- mice are more resistant against weight gain, steatosis, and to glucose intolerance than Cyp8b1+/+ mice. Reduced lipid absorption may in part explain these findings. Overall, the results suggest that muricholic bile acids may be beneficial against the metabolic syndrome. PMID:26824238

  12. Opioid-Induced Androgen Deficiency (OPIAD): Diagnosis, Management, and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, Timothy K; Wosnitzer, Matthew S

    2016-10-01

    Opioid-induced androgen deficiency (OPIAD) was initially recognized as a possible consequence of opioid use roughly four decades ago. Long-acting opioid use carries risks of addiction, tolerance, and systemic side effects including hypogonadotropic hypogonadism with consequent testosterone depletion leading to multiple central and peripheral effects. Hypogonadism is induced through direct inhibitory action of opioids on receptors within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axes as well as testosterone production within the testes. Few studies have systematically investigated hormonal changes induced by long-term opioid administration or the effects of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) in patients with OPIAD. Clomiphene citrate, a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), is a testosterone enhancement treatment which upregulates endogenous hypothalamic function. This review will focus on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of OPIAD, including summary of literature evaluating OPIAD treatment with TRT, and areas of future investigation. PMID:27586511

  13. Inhibition and deficiency of the immunoproteasome subunit LMP7 attenuates LCMV-induced meningitis.

    PubMed

    Mundt, Sarah; Engelhardt, Britta; Kirk, Christopher J; Groettrup, Marcus; Basler, Michael

    2016-01-01

    In addition to antigen processing, immunoproteasomes were recently shown to exert functions influencing cytokine production by monocytes and T cells, T-helper cell differentiation, and T-cell survival. Moreover, selective inhibition of the immunoproteasome subunit LMP7 ameliorated symptoms of autoimmune diseases including CD4(+) T-cell mediated EAE. In this study, we show that LMP7 also plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV)-induced meningitis mediated by CTLs. Mice lacking functional LMP7 display delayed and reduced clinical signs of disease accompanied by a strongly decreased inflammatory infiltration into the brain. Interestingly, we found that selective inhibition and genetic deficiency of LMP7 affect the pathogenesis of LCMV-induced meningitis in a distinct manner. Our findings support the important role of LMP7 in inflammatory disorders and suggest immunoproteasome inhibition as a novel strategy against inflammation-induced neuropathology in the CNS. PMID:26464284

  14. Nuclear factor-kappaB sensitizes to benzyl isothiocyanate-induced antiproliferation in p53-deficient colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Abe, N; Hou, D-X; Munemasa, S; Murata, Y; Nakamura, Y

    2014-01-01

    Benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC), a dietary isothiocyanate derived from cruciferous vegetables, inhibits the proliferation of colorectal cancer cells, most of which overexpress β-catenin as a result of mutations in the genes for adenomatous polyposis coli or mutations in β-catenin itself. Because nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) is a plausible target of BITC signaling in inflammatory cell models, we hypothesized that it is also involved in BITC-inhibited proliferation of colorectal cancer cells. siRNA-mediated knockdown of the NF-κB p65 subunit significantly decreased the BITC sensitivity of human colorectal cancer HT-29 cells with mutated p53 tumor suppressor protein. Treating HT-29 cells with BITC induced the phosphorylation of IκB kinase, IκB-α and p65, the degradation of IκB-α, the translocation of p65 to the nucleus and the upregulation of NF-κB transcriptional activity. BITC also decreased β-catenin binding to a positive cis element of the cyclin D1 promoter and thus inhibited β-catenin-dependent cyclin D1 transcription, possibly through a direct interaction between p65 and β-catenin. siRNA-mediated knockdown of p65 confirmed that p65 negatively affects cyclin D1 expression. On the other hand, when human colorectal cancer HCT-116 cells with wild-type p53 were treated with BITC, translocation of p65 to the nucleus was inhibited rather than enhanced. p53 knockout increased the BITC sensitivity of HCT-116 cells in a p65-dependent manner, suggesting that p53 negatively regulates p65-dependent effects. Together, these results identify BITC as a novel type of antiproliferative agent that regulates the NF-κB pathway in p53-deficient colorectal cancer cells. PMID:25412312

  15. Nuclear factor-kappaB sensitizes to benzyl isothiocyanate-induced antiproliferation in p53-deficient colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Abe, N; Hou, D-X; Munemasa, S; Murata, Y; Nakamura, Y

    2014-01-01

    Benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC), a dietary isothiocyanate derived from cruciferous vegetables, inhibits the proliferation of colorectal cancer cells, most of which overexpress β-catenin as a result of mutations in the genes for adenomatous polyposis coli or mutations in β-catenin itself. Because nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) is a plausible target of BITC signaling in inflammatory cell models, we hypothesized that it is also involved in BITC-inhibited proliferation of colorectal cancer cells. siRNA-mediated knockdown of the NF-κB p65 subunit significantly decreased the BITC sensitivity of human colorectal cancer HT-29 cells with mutated p53 tumor suppressor protein. Treating HT-29 cells with BITC induced the phosphorylation of IκB kinase, IκB-α and p65, the degradation of IκB-α, the translocation of p65 to the nucleus and the upregulation of NF-κB transcriptional activity. BITC also decreased β-catenin binding to a positive cis element of the cyclin D1 promoter and thus inhibited β-catenin-dependent cyclin D1 transcription, possibly through a direct interaction between p65 and β-catenin. siRNA-mediated knockdown of p65 confirmed that p65 negatively affects cyclin D1 expression. On the other hand, when human colorectal cancer HCT-116 cells with wild-type p53 were treated with BITC, translocation of p65 to the nucleus was inhibited rather than enhanced. p53 knockout increased the BITC sensitivity of HCT-116 cells in a p65-dependent manner, suggesting that p53 negatively regulates p65-dependent effects. Together, these results identify BITC as a novel type of antiproliferative agent that regulates the NF-κB pathway in p53-deficient colorectal cancer cells. PMID:25412312

  16. High dietary phosphate intake induces hypertension and augments exercise pressor reflex function in rats.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Masaki; Mitchell, Jere H; Crawford, Scott; Huang, Chou-Long; Maalouf, Naim; Hu, Ming-Chang; Moe, Orson W; Smith, Scott A; Vongpatanasin, Wanpen

    2016-07-01

    An increasing number of studies have linked high dietary phosphate (Pi) intake to hypertension. It is well established that the rise in sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) and blood pressure (BP) during physical exertion is exaggerated in many forms of hypertension, which are primarily mediated by an overactive skeletal muscle exercise pressor reflex (EPR). However, it remains unknown whether high dietary Pi intake potentiates the EPR-mediated SNA and BP response to exercise. Accordingly, we measured renal SNA (RSNA) and mean BP (MBP) in normotensive Sprague-Dawley rats fed a normal Pi diet (0.6%, n = 13) or high Pi diet (1.2%, n = 13) for 3 mo. As previously reported, we found that resting BP was significantly increased by 1.2% Pi diet in both conscious and anesthetized animals. Activation of the EPR by electrically induced hindlimb contraction triggered greater increases in ΔRSNA and ΔMBP in the 1.2% compared with 0.6% Pi group (126 ± 25 vs. 42 ± 9%; 44 ± 5 vs. 14 ± 2 mmHg, respectively, P < 0.01). Activation of the muscle mechanoreflex, a component of the EPR, by passively stretching hindlimb muscle also evoked greater increases in ΔRSNA and ΔMBP in the 1.2% compared with 0.6% Pi group (109 ± 27 vs. 24 ± 7%, 38 ± 7 vs. 8 ± 2 mmHg, respectively, P < 0.01). A similar response was produced by hindlimb intra-arterial capsaicin administration to stimulate the metaboreflex arm of the EPR. Thus, our data demonstrate a novel action of dietary Pi loading in augmenting EPR function through overactivation of both the muscle mechanoreflex and metaboreflex. PMID:27170660

  17. Phencyclidine-induced social withdrawal results from deficient stimulation of cannabinoid CB₁ receptors: implications for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Seillier, Alexandre; Martinez, Alex A; Giuffrida, Andrea

    2013-08-01

    The neuronal mechanisms underlying social withdrawal, one of the core negative symptoms of schizophrenia, are not well understood. Recent studies suggest an involvement of the endocannabinoid system in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and, in particular, of negative symptoms. We used biochemical, pharmacological, and behavioral approaches to investigate the role played by the endocannabinoid system in social withdrawal induced by sub-chronic administration of phencyclidine (PCP). Pharmacological enhancement of endocannabinoid levels via systemic administration of URB597, an inhibitor of endocannabinoid degradation, reversed social withdrawal in PCP-treated rats via stimulation of CB1 receptors, but reduced social interaction in control animals through activation of a cannabinoid/vanilloid-sensitive receptor. In addition, the potent CB agonist CP55,940 reversed PCP-induced social withdrawal in a CB₁-dependent manner, whereas pharmacological blockade of CB₁ receptors by either AM251 or SR141716 reduced the time spent in social interaction in control animals. PCP-induced social withdrawal was accompanied by a decrease of anandamide (AEA) levels in the amygdala and prefrontal cortex, and these deficits were reversed by URB597. As CB₁ receptors are predominantly expressed on GABAergic interneurons containing the anxiogenic peptide cholecystokinin (CCK), we also examined whether the PCP-induced social withdrawal resulted from deficient CB₁-mediated modulation of CCK transmission. The selective CCK2 antagonist LY225910 blocked both PCP- and AM251-induced social withdrawal, but not URB597 effect in control rats. Taken together, these findings indicate that AEA-mediated activation of CB₁ receptors is crucial for social interaction, and that PCP-induced social withdrawal results from deficient endocannabinoid transmission. PMID:23563893

  18. Costs and trade-offs of grazer-induced defenses in Scenedesmus under deficient resource

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xuexia; Wang, Jun; Chen, Qinwen; Chen, Ge; Huang, Yuan; Yang, Zhou

    2016-01-01

    The green alga Scenedesmus obliquus can form inducible defensive morphs under grazing threat. Costs and trade-offs of inducible defense are expected to accompany the benefits of defensive morphs, but are hard to detect under nutrient-sufficient experimental conditions. To test the existence of costs associated with inducible defense, we cultured S. obliquus along resource availability gradients in the presence or absence of infochemical cues from Daphnia, and measured the strength of defensive colony formation and fitness characters. Under the lowest phosphorous concentration, the expression of inducible defensive colony resulted in decreased growth rate, which provides direct evidence for physiological costs. Along the gradient reduction of phosphorous concentration or light intensity, inducible defense in S. obliquus showed a decreasing trend. However, the photosynthetic efficiency of S. obliquus was barely affected by its defense responses, suggesting that the negative correlations between resource availability and colony formation of this alga may be due to resource-based trade-offs in the allocation of limited resources. Thus, our results indicated that expression of inducible defense of S. obliquus was impaired under insufficient phosphorus or light. Furthermore, under severe phosphate deficiency, obvious physiological costs of inducible defense could be detected even though defensive colony formation also decreased significantly. PMID:26932369

  19. Generation of Glycosylphosphatidylinositol Anchor Protein-Deficient Blood Cells From Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xuan; Braunstein, Evan M.; Ye, Zhaohui; Liu, Cyndi F.; Chen, Guibin; Zou, Jizhong; Cheng, Linzhao

    2013-01-01

    PIG-A is an X-linked gene required for the biosynthesis of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors; thus, PIG-A mutant cells have a deficiency or absence of all GPI-anchored proteins (GPI-APs). Acquired mutations in hematopoietic stem cells result in the disease paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, and hypomorphic germline PIG-A mutations lead to severe developmental abnormalities, seizures, and early death. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can differentiate into cell types derived from all three germ layers, providing a novel developmental system for modeling human diseases. Using PIG-A gene targeting and an inducible PIG-A expression system, we have established, for the first time, a conditional PIG-A knockout model in human iPSCs that allows for the production of GPI-AP-deficient blood cells. PIG-A-null iPSCs were unable to generate hematopoietic cells or any cells expressing the CD34 marker and were defective in generating mesodermal cells expressing KDR/VEGFR2 (kinase insert domain receptor) and CD56 markers. In addition, PIG-A-null iPSCs had a block in embryonic development prior to mesoderm differentiation that appears to be due to defective signaling through bone morphogenetic protein 4. However, early inducible PIG-A transgene expression allowed for the generation of GPI-AP-deficient blood cells. This conditional PIG-A knockout model should be a valuable tool for studying the importance of GPI-APs in hematopoiesis and human development. PMID:24113066

  20. Vitamin D deficiency and exercise-induced laryngospasm in young competitive rowers.

    PubMed

    Heffler, Enrico; Bonini, Matteo; Brussino, Luisa; Solidoro, Paolo; Guida, Giuseppe; Boita, Monica; Nicolosi, Giuliana; Bucca, Caterina

    2016-07-01

    Exercise-induced dyspnea is common among adolescents and young adults and often originates from exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB). Sometimes, dyspnea corresponds to exercise-induced laryngospasm (EILO), which is a paradoxical decrease in supraglottic/glottic area. Vitamin D deficiency, which occurs frequently at northern latitudes, might favor laryngospasm by impairing calcium transport and slowing striate muscle relaxation. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether vitamin D status has an influence on bronchial and laryngeal responses to exercise in young, healthy athletes. EIB and EILO were investigated during winter in 37 healthy competitive rowers (24 males; age range 13-25 years), using the eucapnic voluntary hyperventilation test (EVH). EIB was diagnosed when forced expiratory volume in the first second decreased by 10%, EILO when maximum mid-inspiratory flow (MIF50) decreased by 20%. Most athletes (86.5%) had vitamin D deficiency (below 30 ng/mL), 29 mild-moderate (78.4%) and 3 severe (8.1%). EVH showed EIB in 10 subjects (27%), EILO in 16 (43.2%), and combined EIB and EILO in 6 (16.2%). Athletes with EILO had lower vitamin D (19.1 ng/mL vs. 27.0 ng/mL, p < 0.001) and higher parathyroid hormone (30.5 pg/mL vs. 19.2 pg/mL, p = 0.006) levels. The degree of laryngoconstriction (post-EVH MIF50 as a percentage of pre-EVH MIF50) was related directly with vitamin D levels (r = 0.51; p = 0.001) and inversely with parathyroid hormone levels (r = -0.53; p = 0.001). We conclude that vitamin D deficiency is common during winter in young athletes living above the 40th parallel north and favors laryngospasm during exercise, probably by disturbing calcium homeostasis. This effect may negatively influence athletic performance. PMID:27218140

  1. Tetrahydrobiopterin Deficiency and Nitric Oxide Synthase Uncoupling Contribute to Atherosclerosis Induced by Disturbed Flow

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Chen, Wei; Rezvan, Amir; Jo, Hanjoong; Harrison, David G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is a critical cofactor for Nitric Oxide (NO) synthesis by NO synthase (NOS). Recently, we demonstrated that disturbed flow produced by partial carotid ligation decreases BH4 levels in vivo. We therefore aimed to determine whether atherosclerosis induced by disturbed flow is due to BH4 deficiency and NOS uncoupling and whether increasing BH4 would prevent endothelial dysfunction, plaque inflammation and atherosclerosis. Methods and Results We produced a region of disturbed flow in ApoE−/− mice using partial carotid ligation and fed these animals a high-fat diet. This caused eNOS uncoupling as characterized by increased vascular superoxide production, altered vascular reactivity and a change in eNOS migration on low-temperature gel. These perturbations were accompanied by severe atherosclerosis, infiltration of T cells and macrophages, and an increase in cytokine production. Treatment with BH4 recoupled NOS, decreased superoxide production, imporoved endothelium-dependent vasodilatation and virtually eliminated atherosclerosis. BH4 treatment also markedly reduced vascular inflammation and improved the cytokine milieu induced by disturbed flow. Conclusions Our results highlight a key role of BH4 deficiency and NOS uncoupling in atherosclerosis induced by disturbed flow, and provide insight into the effect of modulating vascular BH4 levels on atherosclerosis and inflammation at these sites of the circulation. PMID:21512164

  2. Plasma S-adenosylhomocysteine is a better biomarker of atherosclerosis than homocysteine in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice fed high dietary methionine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chi; Wang, Qing; Guo, Honghui; Xia, Min; Yuan, Qin; Hu, Yan; Zhu, Huilian; Hou, Mengjun; Ma, Jing; Tang, Zhihong; Ling, Wenhua

    2008-02-01

    Homocysteine (Hcy) and S-adenosylhomocysteine (AdoHcy) are critical intermediates of methionine metabolism. To investigate which, if either, of these compounds is more closely related to atherosclerosis, we fed 5 groups of apolipoprotein E (apoE)-deficient mice different diets for 8 wk to induce changes in their plasma Hcy and AdoHcy concentrations. These included an AIN-93G control diet (C), this C diet supplemented with methionine (M), the M diet deficient in folates, vitamin B-6, and vitamin B-12 (M-V), this M diet supplemented with these B vitamins (M+V), and a C diet deficient in B vitamins (C-V). Compared with controls, mice fed the C-V diet had a moderate elevation in their plasma total Hcy (tHcy) levels; however, their plasma AdoHcy concentration and atherosclerotic lesion areas were not different. In contrast, the mice fed the M+V diet had larger atherosclerotic lesion areas and elevated plasma AdoHcy concentrations but their plasma tHcy concentration did not differ from that of the group C mice. The plasma AdoHcy concentration and aortic sinus lesion areas were positively correlated (r = 0.866; P < 0.001). We observed a negative correlation between the plasma AdoHcy concentration and both the DNA methyltransferase activity (r = -0.792; P < 0.001) and global DNA methylation status (r = -0.824; P < 0.001) in the aortic tissue. Hence, our study suggests that plasma AdoHcy is a better biomarker of atherosclerosis than Hcy and may accelerate the development of atherosclerotic lesions in apoE-deficient mice that have been fed a high methionine diet. The mechanisms underlying this effect may be related to the AdoHcy-mediated inhibition of DNA methylation in the aortic tissue. PMID:18203897

  3. Progranulin deficiency promotes neuroinflammation and neuron loss following toxin-induced injury

    PubMed Central

    Martens, Lauren Herl; Zhang, Jiasheng; Barmada, Sami J.; Zhou, Ping; Kamiya, Sherry; Sun, Binggui; Min, Sang-Won; Gan, Li; Finkbeiner, Steven; Huang, Eric J.; Farese, Robert V.

    2012-01-01

    Progranulin (PGRN) is a widely expressed secreted protein that is linked to inflammation. In humans, PGRN haploinsufficiency is a major inherited cause of frontotemporal dementia (FTD), but how PGRN deficiency causes neurodegeneration is unknown. Here we show that loss of PGRN results in increased neuron loss in response to injury in the CNS. When exposed acutely to 1-methyl-4-(2′-methylphenyl)-1,2,3,6-tetrahydrophine (MPTP), mice lacking PGRN (Grn–/–) showed more neuron loss and increased microgliosis compared with wild-type mice. The exacerbated neuron loss was due not to selective vulnerability of Grn–/– neurons to MPTP, but rather to an increased microglial inflammatory response. Consistent with this, conditional mutants lacking PGRN in microglia exhibited MPTP-induced phenotypes similar to Grn–/– mice. Selective depletion of PGRN from microglia in mixed cortical cultures resulted in increased death of wild-type neurons in the absence of injury. Furthermore, Grn–/– microglia treated with LPS/IFN-γ exhibited an amplified inflammatory response, and conditioned media from these microglia promoted death of cultured neurons. Our results indicate that PGRN deficiency leads to dysregulated microglial activation and thereby contributes to increased neuron loss with injury. These findings suggest that PGRN deficiency may cause increased neuron loss in other forms of CNS injury accompanied by neuroinflammation. PMID:23041626

  4. The proinflammatory phenotype of PECAM-1-deficient mice results in atherogenic diet-induced steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Goel, Reema; Boylan, Brian; Gruman, Lynn; Newman, Peter J; North, Paula E; Newman, Debra K

    2007-12-01

    The severity of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is determined by environmental and genetic factors, the latter of which are incompletely characterized. Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) is a 130-kDa transmembrane glycoprotein expressed on blood and vascular cells. In the present study, we provide data for the novel finding that genetic deficiency of PECAM-1 potentiates the development and progression of NASH. We found that the rate of development and severity of diet-induced NASH are markedly enhanced in PECAM-1-deficient [knockout (KO)] mice relative to wild-type (WT) mice, as measured by histological and biochemical evaluation. Livers from KO mice exhibited typical histological features of NASH, including macrovesicular fat accumulation, hepatocyte injury with infiltration of inflammatory cells, fibrosis, and heightened oxidative stress. Alanine aminotransferase, a marker for liver injury, was also significantly higher in KO compared with WT mice. Consistent with a role for PECAM-1 as a suppressor of proinflammatory cytokines, plasma levels of inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-alpha and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), were also significantly higher in KO compared with WT mice. These findings are the first to show that the PECAM-1-deficient mouse develops progressive nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), supporting a role for PECAM-1 as a negative regulator of NAFLD progression. Future examination of recently identified PECAM-1 allelic isoforms in humans as potential risk factors for developing NASH may be warranted. PMID:17932230

  5. Cardiac-specific VLCAD deficiency induces dilated cardiomyopathy and cold intolerance

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Dingding; He, Huamei; James, Jeanne; Tokunaga, Chonan; Powers, Corey; Huang, Yan; Osinska, Hanna; Towbin, Jeffrey A.; Purevjav, Enkhsaikhan; Balschi, James A.; Javadov, Sabzali; McGowan, Francis X.; Strauss, Arnold W.

    2013-01-01

    The very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) enzyme catalyzes the first step of mitochondrial β-oxidation. Patients with VLCAD deficiency present with hypoketotic hypoglycemia and cardiomyopathy, which can be exacerbated by fasting and/or cold stress. Global VLCAD knockout mice recapitulate these phenotypes: mice develop cardiomyopathy, and cold exposure leads to rapid hypothermia and death. However, the contribution of different tissues to development of these phenotypes has not been studied. We generated cardiac-specific VLCAD-deficient (cVLCAD−/−) mice by Cre-mediated ablation of the VLCAD in cardiomyocytes. By 6 mo of age, cVLCAD−/− mice demonstrated increased end-diastolic and end-systolic left ventricular dimensions and decreased fractional shortening. Surprisingly, selective VLCAD gene ablation in cardiomyocytes was sufficient to evoke severe cold intolerance in mice who rapidly developed severe hypothermia, bradycardia, and markedly depressed cardiac function in response to fasting and cold exposure (+5°C). We conclude that cardiac-specific VLCAD deficiency is sufficient to induce cold intolerance and cardiomyopathy and is associated with reduced ATP production. These results provide strong evidence that fatty acid oxidation in myocardium is essential for maintaining normal cardiac function under these stress conditions. PMID:24285112

  6. GRK5 deficiency leads to susceptibility to intermittent hypoxia-induced cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Singh, Prabhakar; Peng, Wei; Zhang, Qiang; Ding, XueFeng; Suo, William Z

    2016-04-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) leads to cognitive impairment in about 25% patients, though it remains elusive what makes one more susceptible than the other to be cognitively impaired. G protein-coupled receptor kinase-5 (GRK5) deficiency is recently found to render subjects more susceptible to cognitive impairment triggered by over-expression of Swedish mutant ß-amyloid precursor protein. This study is to determine whether GRK5 deficiency also renders subjects more susceptible to the OSA-triggered cognitive impairment. Both wild type (WT) and GRK5 knockout (KO) mice were placed in conditions absence and presence of intermittent hypoxia (IH) with 8%/21% O2 90-s cycle for 8h a day for a month, and then followed by behavioral assessments with battery of tasks. We found that the selected IH condition only induced marginally abnormal behavior (slightly elevated anxiety with most others unchanged) in the WT mice but it caused significantly more behavioral deficits in the KO mice, ranging from elevated anxiety, impaired balancing coordination, and impaired short-term spatial memory. These results suggest that GRK5 deficiency indeed makes the mice more susceptible to wide range of behavioral impairments, including cognitive impairments. PMID:26778781

  7. Treatment of proteins with dietary polyphenols lowers the formation of AGEs and AGE-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinchen; Hu, Shuting; Chen, Feng; Wang, Mingfu

    2014-10-01

    Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) are a group of harmful compounds produced either endogenously or during thermal food processing. Once absorbed by humans via food intake, AGEs can cause oxidative cell damage and contribute to pathological development of various diseases. The AGE-inhibitory activity of dietary polyphenols in vitro has been extensively reported before, but the current study is pioneering in examining the antiglycation activity of five selected dietary polyphenols (phloretin, naringenin, epicatechin, chlorogenic acid, and rosmarinic acid) during the thermal protein glycation process. When added into the glucose-casein glycation model heated at 120 °C for 2 h, these polyphenols were capable of inhibiting the formation of both total fluorescent AGEs and nonfluorescent carboxymethyllysine (CML). The thermal stability and transformation of polyphenols are likely important factors affecting their antioxidant activity and inhibitory efficacy of reactive carbonyl species formation. Treatment with epicatechin would lower not only AGE formation but also AGE-induced cytotoxicity and oxidative stress to human retinal pigment epithelial (ARPE-19) cells. PMID:25208810

  8. Dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids in asthma- and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Mickleborough, T D; Rundell, K W

    2005-12-01

    Despite progress that has been made in the treatment of asthma, the prevalence and burden of this disease has continued to increase. While pharmacological treatment of asthma is usually highly effective, medications may have significant side effects or exhibit tachyphylaxis. Alternative therapies for treatment that reduce the dose requirements of pharmacological interventions would be beneficial, and could potentially reduce the public health burden of this disease. Ecological and temporal data suggest that dietary factors may have a role in recent increases in the prevalence of asthma. A possible contributing factor to the increased incidence of asthma in Western societies may be the consumption of a proinflammatory diet. In the typical Western diet, 20- to 25-fold more omega (n)-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) than n-3 PUFA are consumed, which promotes the release of proinflammatory arachidonic acid metabolites (leukotrienes and prostanoids). This review will analyze the evidence for the health effects of n-3 PUFA in asthma- and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB). While clinical data evaluating the effect of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation in asthma has been equivocal, it has recently been shown that fish oil supplementation, rich in n-3 PUFA, reduces airway narrowing, medication use, and proinflammatory mediator generation in nonatopic elite athletes with EIB. These findings are provocative and suggest that dietary fish oil supplementation may be a viable treatment modality and/or adjunct therapy in asthma and EIB. PMID:16047026

  9. Drug-induced liver injury secondary to testosterone prohormone dietary supplement use.

    PubMed

    Hoedebecke, Kyle; Rerucha, Caitlyn; Maxwell, Kimberly; Butler, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Dietary supplementation has become progressively more prevalent, with over half of the American population reporting use of various products. An increased incidence of supplement use has been reported in the military especially within Special Operations Forces (SOF) where training regimens rival those of elite athletes. Federal regulations regarding dietary supplements are minimal, allowing for general advertisement to the public without emphasis on the potentially harmful side effects. Subsequent medical care for these negative effects causes financial burden on the military in addition to the unit?s loss of an Operator and potential mission compromise. This report reviews a case of an Operator diagnosed with drug-induced liver injury secondary to a testosterone prohormone supplement called Post Cycle II. Clinical situations like this emphasize the necessity that SOF Operators and clinicians be aware of the risks and benefits of these minimally studied substances. Providers should also be aware of the Human Performance Resource Center for Health Information and Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database supplement safety ratings as well as the Food and Drug Administration?s MedWatch and Natural Medicines WATCH, to which adverse reactions should be reported. PMID:24227554

  10. Aging-associated formaldehyde-induced norepinephrine deficiency contributes to age-related memory decline.

    PubMed

    Mei, Yufei; Jiang, Chun; Wan, You; Lv, Jihui; Jia, Jianping; Wang, Xiaomin; Yang, Xu; Tong, Zhiqian

    2015-08-01

    A norepinephrine (NE) deficiency has been observed in aged rats and in patients with Alzheimer's disease and is thought to cause cognitive disorder. Which endogenous factor induces NE depletion, however, is largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of aging-associated formaldehyde (FA) on the inactivation of NE in vitro and in vivo, and on memory behaviors in rodents. The results showed that age-related DNA demethylation led to hippocampal FA accumulation, and when this occurred, the hippocampal NE content was reduced in healthy male rats of different ages. Furthermore, biochemical analysis revealed that FA rapidly inactivated NE in vitro and that an intrahippocampal injection of FA markedly reduced hippocampal NE levels in healthy adult rats. Unexpectedly, an injection of FA (at a pathological level) or 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA, a NE depletor) can mimic age-related NE deficiency, long-term potentiation (LTP) impairments, and spatial memory deficits in healthy adult rats. Conversely, an injection of NE reversed age-related deficits in both LTP and memory in aged rats. In agreement with the above results, the senescence-accelerated prone 8 (SAMP8) mice also exhibited a severe deficit in LTP and memory associated with a more severe NE deficiency and FA accumulation, when compared with the age-matched, senescence-resistant 1 (SAMR1) mice. Injection of resveratrol (a natural FA scavenger) or NE into SAMP8 mice reversed FA accumulation and NE deficiency and restored the magnitude of LTP and memory. Collectively, these findings suggest that accumulated FA is a critical endogenous factor for aging-associated NE depletion and cognitive decline. PMID:25866202

  11. FOXO1 Mediates Vitamin D Deficiency-induced Insulin Resistance in Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Songcang; Villalta, Armando; Agrawal, Devendra K.

    2015-01-01

    Prospective epidemiological studies have consistently shown a relationship between vitamin D deficiency, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). This is supported by recent trials showing that vitamin D supplementation in prediabetic or insulin-resistant patients with inadequate vitamin D levels improves insulin sensitivity. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying vitamin D deficiency-induced insulin resistance and DM2 remain unknown. Skeletal muscle insulin resistance is a primary defect in the majority of patients with DM2. While sustained activation of forkhead box O1 (FOXO1) in skeletal muscle causes insulin resistance, a relationship between vitamin D deficiency and FOXO1 activation in muscle is unknown. We generated skeletal muscle-specific vitamin D receptor (VDR)-null mice and discovered that these mice developed insulin resistance and glucose intolerance accompanied by increased expression and activity of FOXO1. We also found sustained FOXO1 activation in the skeletal muscle of global VDR-null mice. Treatment of C2C12 muscle cells with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (VD3) reduced FOXO1 expression, nuclear translocation, and activity. The VD3-dependent suppression of FOXO1 activation disappeared by knockdown of VDR, indicating that it is VDR-dependent. Taken together, these results suggest that FOXO1 is a critical target mediating VDR-null signaling in skeletal muscle. The novel findings provide the conceptual support that persistent FOXO1 activation may be responsible for insulin resistance and impaired glucose metabolism in vitamin D signaling-deficient mice, as well as evidence for the utility of vitamin D supplementation for intervention in DM2. PMID:26462119

  12. Aging-associated formaldehyde-induced norepinephrine deficiency contributes to age-related memory decline

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Yufei; Jiang, Chun; Wan, You; Lv, Jihui; Jia, Jianping; Wang, Xiaomin; Yang, Xu; Tong, Zhiqian

    2015-01-01

    A norepinephrine (NE) deficiency has been observed in aged rats and in patients with Alzheimer’s disease and is thought to cause cognitive disorder. Which endogenous factor induces NE depletion, however, is largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of aging-associated formaldehyde (FA) on the inactivation of NE in vitro and in vivo, and on memory behaviors in rodents. The results showed that age-related DNA demethylation led to hippocampal FA accumulation, and when this occurred, the hippocampal NE content was reduced in healthy male rats of different ages. Furthermore, biochemical analysis revealed that FA rapidly inactivated NE in vitro and that an intrahippocampal injection of FA markedly reduced hippocampal NE levels in healthy adult rats. Unexpectedly, an injection of FA (at a pathological level) or 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA, a NE depletor) can mimic age-related NE deficiency, long-term potentiation (LTP) impairments, and spatial memory deficits in healthy adult rats. Conversely, an injection of NE reversed age-related deficits in both LTP and memory in aged rats. In agreement with the above results, the senescence-accelerated prone 8 (SAMP8) mice also exhibited a severe deficit in LTP and memory associated with a more severe NE deficiency and FA accumulation, when compared with the age-matched, senescence-resistant 1 (SAMR1) mice. Injection of resveratrol (a natural FA scavenger) or NE into SAMP8 mice reversed FA accumulation and NE deficiency and restored the magnitude of LTP and memory. Collectively, these findings suggest that accumulated FA is a critical endogenous factor for aging-associated NE depletion and cognitive decline. PMID:25866202

  13. Malaria-associated L-arginine deficiency induces mast cell-associated disruption to intestinal barrier defenses against nontyphoidal Salmonella bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Chau, Jennifer Y; Tiffany, Caitlin M; Nimishakavi, Shilpa; Lawrence, Jessica A; Pakpour, Nazzy; Mooney, Jason P; Lokken, Kristen L; Caughey, George H; Tsolis, Renee M; Luckhart, Shirley

    2013-10-01

    Coinfection with malaria and nontyphoidal Salmonella serotypes (NTS) can cause life-threatening bacteremia in humans. Coinfection with malaria is a recognized risk factor for invasive NTS, suggesting that malaria impairs intestinal barrier function. Here, we investigated mechanisms and strategies for prevention of coinfection pathology in a mouse model. Our findings reveal that malarial-parasite-infected mice, like humans, develop L-arginine deficiency, which is associated with intestinal mastocytosis, elevated levels of histamine, and enhanced intestinal permeability. Prevention or reversal of L-arginine deficiency blunts mastocytosis in ileal villi as well as bacterial translocation, measured as numbers of mesenteric lymph node CFU of noninvasive Escherichia coli Nissle and Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium, the latter of which is naturally invasive in mice. Dietary supplementation of malarial-parasite-infected mice with L-arginine or L-citrulline reduced levels of ileal transcripts encoding interleukin-4 (IL-4), a key mediator of intestinal mastocytosis and macromolecular permeability. Supplementation with L-citrulline also enhanced epithelial adherens and tight junctions in the ilea of coinfected mice. These data suggest that increasing L-arginine bioavailability via oral supplementation can ameliorate malaria-induced intestinal pathology, providing a basis for testing nutritional interventions to reduce malaria-associated mortality in humans. PMID:23690397

  14. Malaria-Associated l-Arginine Deficiency Induces Mast Cell-Associated Disruption to Intestinal Barrier Defenses against Nontyphoidal Salmonella Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Chau, Jennifer Y.; Tiffany, Caitlin M.; Nimishakavi, Shilpa; Lawrence, Jessica A.; Pakpour, Nazzy; Mooney, Jason P.; Lokken, Kristen L.; Caughey, George H.; Tsolis, Renee M.

    2013-01-01

    Coinfection with malaria and nontyphoidal Salmonella serotypes (NTS) can cause life-threatening bacteremia in humans. Coinfection with malaria is a recognized risk factor for invasive NTS, suggesting that malaria impairs intestinal barrier function. Here, we investigated mechanisms and strategies for prevention of coinfection pathology in a mouse model. Our findings reveal that malarial-parasite-infected mice, like humans, develop l-arginine deficiency, which is associated with intestinal mastocytosis, elevated levels of histamine, and enhanced intestinal permeability. Prevention or reversal of l-arginine deficiency blunts mastocytosis in ileal villi as well as bacterial translocation, measured as numbers of mesenteric lymph node CFU of noninvasive Escherichia coli Nissle and Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium, the latter of which is naturally invasive in mice. Dietary supplementation of malarial-parasite-infected mice with l-arginine or l-citrulline reduced levels of ileal transcripts encoding interleukin-4 (IL-4), a key mediator of intestinal mastocytosis and macromolecular permeability. Supplementation with l-citrulline also enhanced epithelial adherens and tight junctions in the ilea of coinfected mice. These data suggest that increasing l-arginine bioavailability via oral supplementation can ameliorate malaria-induced intestinal pathology, providing a basis for testing nutritional interventions to reduce malaria-associated mortality in humans. PMID:23690397

  15. Radiation-induced effects in the electron-beam irradiation of dietary flavonoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamba, M.; Torreggiani, A.

    2004-09-01

    The harmful effects of oxidative processes in living organisms can be reduced by the dietary intake of flavonoids, a class of phenolic compounds ubiquitous in plants and widely found in a number of fruits, vegetables and beverages. Many fruits and vegetables are treated by irradiation to solve preservation problems and a radical-induced degradation of nutrients, including polyphenols, may occur. The free radical chemistry of two abundant flavonoids in food, catechin and quercetin, have been investigated by using pulse radiolysis technique. The central role of the phenoxyl-type radical and the strong influence of the state of protonation of the compounds on the pathway of formation and decay of the corresponding oxidized radicals has been evidenced from the spectral properties and chemical reactivity of the radicals derived from the attack of several oxidizing species ( ṡOH, N 3ṡ SO 4-ṡ).

  16. Paradoxical resistance to diet-induced obesity in UCP1-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaotuan; Rossmeisl, Martin; McClaine, Jennifer; Kozak, Leslie P.

    2003-01-01

    The availability of mice lacking the mitochondrial uncoupling protein UCP1, has provided an opportunity to analyze the relationship between the capacity for energy expenditure and the development of obesity in response to a high-fat, high-sucrose diet. Congenic UCP1-deficient mice on a C57BL/6J genetic background show a temperature-dependent resistance to diet-induced obesity when compared with wild-type mice. This resistance, which occurs at 20°C, is quickly reversed when the ambient temperature is increased to 27°C. At 20°C, total oxygen consumption and physical activity of mutant and wild-type mice are indistinguishable; however, body temperature is higher in UCP1-deficient mice by 0.1–0.3°C, and respiratory quotient is slightly reduced. A reduced respiratory quotient, together with elevated β-hydroxybutyrate and reduced plasma fatty acid levels, suggests that the mutants oxidize a greater proportion of fat than wild-type mice, and that this possibly accounts for the resistance to diet-induced obesity. Although shivering is one alternative mechanism of thermogenesis that is probably used in UCP1-deficient mice, whether there are others remains to be determined. Nevertheless, our study underscores the paradox that elimination of the major thermogenic mechanism in the animal reduces rather than increases metabolic efficiency. We propose that in the absence of nonshivering thermogenesis, alternative, calorically more costly pathways of metabolism must be used to maintain body temperature. PMID:12569166

  17. Attenuation of dextran sodium sulphate induced colitis in matrix metalloproteinase-9 deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Alfredo; Medina, Carlos; Paz-Cabrera, Maria Cristina; Díaz-Gonzalez, Federico; Farré, Esther; Salas, Antonio; Radomski, Marek W; Quintero, Enrique

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study whether matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) is a key factor in epithelial damage in the dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) model of colitis in mice. METHODS: MMP-9-deficient and wild-type (wt) mice were given 5% DSS in drinking water for 5 d followed by recovery up to 7 d. On d 5 and 12 after induction of colitis, gelatinases, MMP-2 and MMP-9, were measured in homogenates of colonic tissue by zymography and Western blot, whereas tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) were measured by reverse zymography. The gelatinolytic activity was also determined in supernatants of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) isolated from mice blood. Moreover, intestinal epithelial cells were stimulated with TNF-α to study whether these cells were able to produce MMPs. Finally, colonic mucosal lesions were measured by microscopic examination. RESULTS: On d 5 of colitis, the activity of MMP-9 was increased in homogenates of colonic tissues (0.24 ± 0.1 vs 21.3 ± 6.4, P < 0.05) and PMN from peripheral blood in wt (0.5 ± 0.1 vs 10.4 ± 0.7, P < 0.05), but not in MMP-9-deficient animals. The MMP-9 activity was also up-regulated by TNF-α in epithelial intestinal cells (2.5 ± 0.5 vs 14.7 ± 3.0, P < 0.05). Although colitis also led to increase of TIMP-1 activity, the MMP-9/TIMP-1 balance remained elevated. Finally, in the MMP-9-deficient colitic mice both the extent and severity of intestinal epithelial injury were significantly attenuated when compared with wt mice. CONCLUSION: We conclude that DSS induced colitis is markedly attenuated in animals lacking MMP-9. This suggests that intestinal injury induced by DSS is modulated by MMP-9 and that inhibition of this gelatinase may reduce inflammation. PMID:17072979

  18. Effects of testosterone replacement in men with opioid-induced androgen deficiency: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Basaria, Shehzad; Travison, Thomas G; Alford, Daniel; Knapp, Philip E; Teeter, Kjersten; Cahalan, Christine; Eder, Richard; Lakshman, Kishore; Bachman, Eric; Mensing, George; Martel, Marc O; Le, Dillon; Stroh, Helene; Bhasin, Shalender; Wasan, Ajay D; Edwards, Robert R

    2015-02-01

    Symptomatic androgen deficiency is common in patients taking opioid analgesics, as these drugs potently suppress the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. However, the efficacy of testosterone replacement in this setting remains unclear. The objective of this trial was to evaluate the efficacy of testosterone replacement on pain perception and other androgen-dependent outcomes in men with opioid-induced androgen deficiency. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, parallel placebo-controlled trial at an outpatient academic research center. Participants were men aged 18 to 64 years on opioid analgesics for chronic noncancer pain, and total testosterone levels were <350 ng/dL. Participants were randomly assigned to 14 weeks of daily transdermal gel that contained 5 g of testosterone or placebo. Primary outcomes were changes in self-reported clinical pain and objectively assessed pain sensitivity. Sexual function, quality of life, and body composition were also assessed. The mean age was 49 years. The median total and free testosterone levels at baseline were 243 ng/dL and 47 pg/mL and 251 ng/dL and 43 pg/mL in the testosterone and placebo arm, respectively. Of the 84 randomized participants, 65 had follow-up data on efficacy outcomes. Compared with men assigned to the placebo arm, those assigned to testosterone replacement experienced greater improvements in pressure and mechanical hyperalgesia, sexual desire, and role limitation due to emotional problems. Testosterone administration was also associated with an improvement in body composition. There were no between-group differences in changes in self-reported pain. In conclusion, in men with opioid-induced androgen deficiency, testosterone administration improved pain sensitivity, sexual desire, body composition, and aspects of quality of life. PMID:25599449

  19. Persistence of LPS-induced lung inflammation in surfactant protein-C-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Glasser, Stephan W; Maxfield, Melissa D; Ruetschilling, Teah L; Akinbi, Henry T; Baatz, John E; Kitzmiller, Joseph A; Page, Kristen; Xu, Yan; Bao, Erik L; Korfhagen, Thomas R

    2013-11-01

    Pulmonary surfactant protein-C (SP-C) gene-targeted mice (Sftpc(-/-)) develop progressive lung inflammation and remodeling. We hypothesized that SP-C deficiency reduces the ability to suppress repetitive inflammatory injury. Sftpc(+/+) and Sftpc(-/-) mice given three doses of bacterial LPS developed airway and airspace inflammation, which was more intense in the Sftpc(-/-) mice at 3 and 5 days after the final dose. Compared with Sftpc(+/+)mice, inflammatory injury persisted in the lungs of Sftpc(-/-) mice 30 days after the final LPS challenge. Sftpc(-/-) mice showed LPS-induced airway goblet cell hyperplasia with increased detection of Sam pointed Ets domain and FoxA3 transcription factors. Sftpc(-/-) type II alveolar epithelial cells had increased cytokine expression after LPS exposure relative to Sftpc(+/+) cells, indicating that type II cell dysfunction contributes to inflammatory sensitivity. Microarray analyses of isolated type II cells identified a pattern of enhanced expression of inflammatory genes consistent with an intrinsic low-level inflammation resulting from SP-C deficiency. SP-C-containing clinical surfactant extract (Survanta) or SP-C/phospholipid vesicles blocked LPS signaling through the LPS receptor (Toll-like receptor [TLR] 4/CD14/MD2) in human embryonic kidney 293T cells, indicating that SP-C blocks LPS-induced cytokine production by a TLR4-dependent mechanism. Phospholipid vesicles alone did not modify the TLR4 response. In vivo deficiency of SP-C leads to inflammation, increased cytokine production by type II cells, and persistent inflammation after repetitive LPS stimulation. PMID:23795648

  20. Increased dietary protein attenuates C-reactive protein and creatine kinase responses to exercise-induced energy deficit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We determined if dietary protein (P) modulates responses of C-reactive protein (CRP) and creatine kinase (CK), biomarkers of inflammation and muscle damage, during exercise-induced energy deficit (DEF). Thirteen healthy men (22 +/- 1 y, VO2peak 60 +/- 2 ml.kg-1.min-1) balanced energy expenditure (EE...

  1. DIETARY ARSENITE AFFECTS DIMETHYLHYDRAZINE (DMH)-INDUCED ABERRANT CRYPT FORMATION IN COLON AND GLOBAL DNA METHYLATION IN LIVER OF RATS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous work has shown that arsenic (As) affects methionine metabolism. Alterations in methionine metabolism can affect cancer processes. To determine the effect of dietary As on DMH-induced aberrant crypt formation in colon Fisher-344 male, weanling rats (N=20/group) were fed diets containing 0, 0...

  2. The dietary histone deacetylase inhibitor sulforaphane induces human β-defensin-2 in intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Markus; Reynders, Veerle; Loitsch, Stefan; Steinhilber, Dieter; Schröder, Oliver; Stein, Jürgen

    2008-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides like human β-defensin-2 (HBD-2) play an important role in the innate immune system protecting the intestinal mucosa against bacterial invasion. The dietary histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors sulforaphane (SFN) and butyrate have received a great deal of attention because of their ability to simultaneously modulate multiple cellular targets involved in cellular protection. In this study the influence of SFN and butyrate on HBD-2 expression as well as the molecular pathways involved in SFN-mediated induction of HBD-2 were scrutinized. Treatment of Caco-2, HT-29 and SW480 cells with SFN led to a time- and dose-dependent upregulation of HBD-2 mRNA expression as determined by semi-quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction. Moreover, HBD-2 protein production increased in response to SFN, measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Induction of HBD-2 was also observed in response to butyrate. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that the protein was localized in the cytosol. Coincubation of SFN with a vitamin D receptor (VDR), or an extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 or a nuclear factor-κB inhibitor all reduced HBD-2 mRNA upregulation. In contrast, transfection of cells with a dominant-negative peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) mutant vector to inhibit PPARγ wild-type action and inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling did not affect SFN-mediated upregulation of HBD-2 mRNA. Moreover, SFN induced the expression of VDR, PPARγ and phosphorylated ERK1/2 but did not affect p38 MAPK activation. The data clearly demonstrate for the first time that the dietary HDAC inhibitor SFN is able to induce antimicrobial peptides in colonocytes. In this process HBD-2 expression is regulated via VDR, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/extracellular-regulated kinase and nuclear factor-κB signalling. PMID:18373608

  3. Dietary flaxseed intake exacerbates acute colonic mucosal injury and inflammation induced by dextran sodium sulfate.

    PubMed

    Zarepoor, Leila; Lu, Jenifer T; Zhang, Claire; Wu, Wenqing; Lepp, Dion; Robinson, Lindsay; Wanasundara, Janitha; Cui, Steve; Villeneuve, Sébastien; Fofana, Bourlaye; Tsao, Rong; Wood, Geoffrey A; Power, Krista A

    2014-06-15

    Flaxseed (FS), a dietary oilseed, contains a variety of anti-inflammatory bioactives, including fermentable fiber, phenolic compounds (lignans), and the n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) α-linolenic acid. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of FS and its n-3 PUFA-rich kernel or lignan- and soluble fiber-rich hull on colitis severity in a mouse model of acute colonic inflammation. C57BL/6 male mice were fed a basal diet (negative control) or a basal diet supplemented with 10% FS, 6% kernel, or 4% hull for 3 wk prior to and during colitis induction via 5 days of 2% (wt/vol) dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) in their drinking water (n = 12/group). An increase in anti-inflammatory metabolites (hepatic n-3 PUFAs, serum mammalian lignans, and cecal short-chain fatty acids) was associated with consumption of all FS-based diets, but not with anti-inflammatory effects in DSS-exposed mice. Dietary FS exacerbated DSS-induced acute colitis, as indicated by a heightened disease activity index and an increase in colonic injury and inflammatory biomarkers [histological damage, apoptosis, myeloperoxidase, inflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and IL-1β), and NF-κB signaling-related genes (Nfkb1, Ccl5, Bcl2a1a, Egfr, Relb, Birc3, and Atf1)]. Additionally, the adverse effect of the FS diet was extended systemically, as serum cytokines (IL-6, IFNγ, and IL-1β) and hepatic cholesterol levels were increased. The adverse effects of FS were not associated with alterations in fecal microbial load or systemic bacterial translocation (endotoxemia). Collectively, this study demonstrates that although consumption of a 10% FS diet enhanced the levels of n-3 PUFAs, short-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, and lignans in mice, it exacerbated DSS-induced colonic injury and inflammation. PMID:24763556

  4. Growth hormone secretagogue receptor deficiency in mice protects against obesity‐induced hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Louise E.; Morgan, David G.; Balthasar, Nina

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS‐R) signaling has been associated with growth hormone release, increases in food intake and pleiotropic cardiovascular effects. Recent data demonstrated that acute GHS‐R antagonism leads to increases in mean arterial pressure mediated by the sympathetic nervous system in rats; a highly undesirable effect if GHS‐R antagonism was to be used as a therapeutic approach to reducing food intake in an already obese, hypertensive patient population. However, our data in conscious, freely moving GHS‐R deficient mice demonstrate that chronic absence of GHS‐R signaling is protective against obesity‐induced hypertension. GHS‐R deficiency leads to reduced systolic blood pressure variability (SBPV); in response to acute high‐fat diet (HFD)‐feeding, increases in the sympathetic control of SBPV are suppressed in GHS‐R KO mice. Our data further suggest that GHS‐R signaling dampens the immediate HFD‐mediated increase in spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity. In diet‐induced obesity, absence of GHS‐R signaling leads to reductions in obesity‐mediated hypertension and tachycardia. Collectively, our findings thus suggest that chronic blockade of GHS‐R signaling may not result in adverse cardiovascular effects in obesity. PMID:24760503

  5. Paradoxical Relationship between Mn Superoxide Dismutase Deficiency and Radiation-Induced Cognitive Defects

    PubMed Central

    Corniola, Rikki; Zou, Yani; Leu, David; Fike, John R.; Huang, Ting-Ting

    2012-01-01

    Radiation therapy of the CNS, even at low doses, can lead to deficits in neurocognitive functions. Reduction in hippocampal neurogenesis is usually, but not always, associated with cognitive deficits resulting from radiation therapy. Generation of reactive oxygen species is considered the main cause of radiation-induced tissue injuries, and elevated levels of oxidative stress persist long after the initial cranial irradiation. Consequently, mutant mice with reduced levels of the mitochondrial antioxidant enzyme, Mn superoxide dismutase (MnSOD or Sod2), are expected to be more sensitive to radiation-induced changes in hippocampal neurogenesis and the related functions. In this study, we showed that MnSOD deficiency led to reduced generation of immature neurons in Sod2−/+ mice even though progenitor cell proliferation was not affected. Compared to irradiated Sod2+/+ mice, which showed cognitive defects and reduced differentiation of newborn cells towards the neuronal lineage, irradiated Sod2−/+ mice showed normal hippocampal-dependent cognitive functions and normal differentiation pattern for newborn neurons and astroglia. However, we also observed a disproportional decrease in newborn neurons in irradiated Sod2−/+ following behavioral studies, suggesting that MnSOD deficiency may render newborn neurons more sensitive to stress from behavioral trainings following cranial irradiation. A positive correlation between normal cognitive functions and normal dendritic spine densities in dentate granule cells was observed. The data suggest that maintenance of synaptic connections, via maintenance of dendritic spines, may be important for normal cognitive functions following cranial irradiation. PMID:23145165

  6. Defective development of pristane-oil-induced plasmacytomas in interleukin-6-deficient BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Lattanzio, G; Libert, C; Aquilina, M; Cappelletti, M; Ciliberto, G; Musiani, P; Poli, V

    1997-09-01

    Interleukin (IL)-6 is known to be an essential growth factor for myeloma cells, both in vitro and in vivo. In mice, IL-6 is required for development of B cell tumors upon infection with a retrovirus expressing the myc/raf oncogenes. In the present study, we used the pristane-oil-induced plasmacytoma model, which more closely mimics tumor transformation and progression in human multiple myeloma. Also using this system, we found that IL-6-deficient BALB/c mice are protected against tumor development. Although the pristane-induced inflammatory reaction was less pronounced in IL-6-deficient mice versus their wild-type littermates, both B cell differentiation and plasma cell formation took place, and even morphological evidence of plasma cell transformation was detected, albeit at a low frequency. However, in the absence of IL-6, there were never signs of uncontrolled proliferation of either normal B lymphocytes or tumor cells, suggesting that the role of IL-6 in murine plasmacytoma and possibly also in human multiple myeloma is to ensure abnormal survival and proliferation of previously transformed tumor cells and therefore tumor development and progression. PMID:9284817

  7. Deficiency and pharmacological stabilization of mast cells reduce diet-induced obesity and diabetes in mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian; Divoux, Adeline; Sun, Jiusong; Zhang, Jie; Clément, Karine; Glickman, Jonathan N.; Sukhova, Galina K.; Wolters, Paul J.; Du, Juan; Gorgun, Cem Z.; Doria, Alessandro; Libby, Peter; Blumberg, Richard S.; Kahn, Barbara B.; Hotamisligil, Gokhan S.; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2009-01-01

    Although mast cell functions classically relate to allergic responses1–3, recent studies indicate that these cells contribute to other common diseases such as multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis, aortic aneurysm, and cancer4–8. This study presents evidence that mast cells contribute importantly to diet-induced obesity and diabetes. White adipose tissues (WAT) from obese humans and mice contain more mast cells than WAT from their lean counterparts. Genetically determined mast cell deficiency and pharmacological stabilization of mast cells in mice reduce body weight gain and levels of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and proteases in serum and WAT, in concert with improved glucose homeostasis and energy expenditure. Mechanistic studies reveal that mast cells contribute to WAT and muscle angiogenesis and associated cell apoptosis and cathepsin activity. Adoptive transfer of cytokine-deficient mast cells established that these cells contribute to mice adipose tissue cysteine protease cathepsin expression, apoptosis, and angiogenesis, thereby promoting diet-induced obesity and glucose intolerance by production of IL6 and IFN-γ. Mast cell stabilizing agents in clinical use reduced obesity and diabetes in mice, suggesting the potential of developing novel therapies for these common human metabolic disorders. PMID:19633655

  8. Mice heterozygous for cathepsin D deficiency exhibit mania-related behavior and stress-induced depression.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Rui; Lu, Yi; Han, Yong; Li, Xia; Lou, Huifang; Zhu, Liya; Zhen, Xuechu; Duan, Shumin

    2015-12-01

    Mutations in cathepsin D (CTSD), an aspartic protease in the endosomal-lysosomal system, underlie congenital neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinosis (cNCL, also known as CLN10), a devastating neurodegenerative disease. CLN10 patients die within the first few days of life, and in the few patients who live into adulthood psychopathological symptoms have not been reported. Extensive neuropathology and altered neurotransmission have been reported in CTSD-deficient mice; however signs of neuropsychiatric behavior in these mice are not well characterized due to the severe movement disorder and premature death of the animal. In the present study, we show that heterozygous CTSD-deficient (CTSD HET) mice display an overall behavioral profile that is similar to human mania, including hyperlocomotion, d-amphetamine-induced hyperactivity, sleep-disturbance, and reduced anxiety-like behavior. However, under stressful conditions CTSD HET mice manifest depressive-like behavior, including anhedonia, behavioral despair, and enhanced learned helplessness. Chronic administration of lithium chloride or valproic acid, two clinically effective mood stabilizers, reverses the majority of these behavioral abnormalities. In addition, CTSD HET mice display stress-induced hypersecretion of corticosterone. These findings suggest an important role for CTSD in the regulation of mood stabilization. PMID:26092248

  9. IFN-γ deficiency attenuates hepatic inflammation and fibrosis in a steatohepatitis model induced by a methionine- and choline-deficient high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiao-Yu; Takahara, Terumi; Kawai, Kengo; Fujino, Masayuki; Sugiyama, Toshiro; Tsuneyama, Koichi; Tsukada, Kazuhiro; Nakae, Susumu; Zhong, Liang; Li, Xiao-Kang

    2013-12-01

    Cytokines play important roles in all stages of steatohepatitis, including hepatocyte injury, the inflammatory response, and the altered function of sinusoidal cells. This study examined the involvement of a major inflammatory cytokine, interferon-γ (IFN-γ), in the progression of steatohepatitis. In a steatohepatitis model by feeding a methionine- and choline-deficient high-fat (MCDHF) diet to both wild-type and IFN-γ-deficient mice, the liver histology, expression of genes encoding inflammatory cytokines, and fibrosis-related markers were examined. To analyze the effects of IFN-γ on Kupffer cells in vitro, we examined the tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) production by a mouse macrophage cell line. Forty two days of MCDHF diet resulted in weight loss, elevated aminotransferases, liver steatosis, and inflammation in wild-type mice. However, the IFN-γ-deficient mice exhibited less extensive changes. RT-PCR revealed that the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), transforming growth factor-β, inducible nitric oxide synthase, interleukin-4 and osteopontin were increased in wild-type mice, although they were suppressed in IFN-γ-deficient mice. Seventy days of MCDHF diet induced much more liver fibrosis in wild-type mice than in IFN-γ-deficient mice. The expression levels of fibrosis-related genes, α-smooth muscle actin, type I collagen, tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1, and matrix metalloproteinase-2, were dramatically increased in wild-type mice, whereas they were significantly suppressed in IFN-γ-deficient mice. Moreover, in vitro experiments showed that, when RAW 264.7 macrophages were treated with IFN-γ, they produced TNF-α in a dose-dependent manner. The present study showed that IFN-γ deficiency might inhibit the inflammatory response of macrophages cells and subsequently suppress stellate cell activation and liver fibrosis. These findings highlight the critical role of IFN-γ in the progression of steatohepatitis. PMID

  10. Novel Toll-like receptor-4 deficiency attenuates trastuzumab (Herceptin) induced cardiac injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cardiac inflammation and generation of oxidative stress are known to contribute to trastuzumab (herceptin) induced cardiac toxicity. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a part of the innate immune system and are involved in cardiac stress reactions. Since TLR4 might play a relevant role in cardiac inflammatory signaling, we investigated whether or not TLR4 is involved in trastuzumab induced cardiotoxicity. Methods Seven days after a single injection of herceptin (2 mg/kg; i.p.), left ventricular pressure volume loops were measured in HeN compotent (TLR4+/+) and HeJ mutant (TLR4-/-) treated with trastuzumab and control mice. Immunofluorescent staining for monocyte infiltration and analyses of plasma by (ELISAs) for different chemokines including: MCP-1and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), Western immunoblotting assay for ICAM-1, and used troponin I for cardiac injury marker. Results Trastuzumab injection resulted in an impairment of left ventricular function in TLR-4 competent (HeN), in contrast TLR4-/- trastuzumab mice showed improved left ventricular function EF%, CO; p < 0.05, attenuation of mononuclear cell infiltration in TLR4 -/-; p < 0.05 vs.TLR-4 competent (HeN), reduced level of cytokines TNF-α, MCP-1 and ICAM-1 expression in TLR4-/-, marked reduction of myocardial troponin-I levels in TLR4-deficient mice. Data are presented as means ± SE; n = 8 in each group p < 0.05 vs.TLR-4 competent (HeN). Conclusions Treatment with trastuzumab induces an inflammatory response that contributes to myocardial tissue TLR4 mediates chemokine expression (TNF-α, MCP-1and ICAM-1), so in experimental animals TLR4 deficiency improves left ventricular function and attenuates pathophysiological key mechanisms in trastuzumab induced cardiomyopathy. PMID:21999911

  11. TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand deficiency enhances survival in murine colon ascendens stent peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Beyer, Katharina; Stollhof, Laura; Poetschke, Christian; von Bernstorff, Wolfram; Partecke, Lars Ivo; Diedrich, Stephan; Maier, Stefan; Bröker, Barbara M; Heidecke, Claus-Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Background Apart from inducing apoptosis in tumor cells, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) influences inflammatory reactions. Murine colon ascendens stent peritonitis (CASP) represents a model of diffuse peritonitis. Recently, it has been demonstrated that administration of exogenous TRAIL not only induces apoptosis in neutrophils but also enhances survival in this model. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of genetic TRAIL deficiency on the course of CASP. Methods Peritonitis was induced in 6- to 8-week-old female TRAIL−/− mice as well as in wild-type mice. The sepsis severity score and survival of mice were monitored. Bacterial loads in blood as well as in the lymphoid organs were examined. Additionally, the number of apoptotic cells within the lymphoid organs was determined. Results As early as 8 hours postinduction of CASP, TRAIL−/− mice were significantly more affected by sepsis than wild-type mice, as measured by the sepsis severity score. However, during the further course of sepsis, TRAIL deficiency led to significantly decreased sepsis severity scores, resulting in an enhanced overall survival in TRAIL−/− mice. The better survival of TRAIL−/− mice was accompanied by a decreased bacterial load within the blood. In marked contrast, the number of apoptotic cells within the lymphoid organs was highly increased in TRAIL−/− mice 20 hours after induction of CASP. Conclusion Hence, exogenous and endogenous TRAIL is protective during the early phase of sepsis, while endogenous TRAIL appears to be detrimental in the later course of this disease. PMID:27366100

  12. Spinal cord injury-induced immune deficiency syndrome enhances infection susceptibility dependent on lesion level.

    PubMed

    Brommer, Benedikt; Engel, Odilo; Kopp, Marcel A; Watzlawick, Ralf; Müller, Susanne; Prüss, Harald; Chen, Yuying; DeVivo, Michael J; Finkenstaedt, Felix W; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Liebscher, Thomas; Meisel, Andreas; Schwab, Jan M

    2016-03-01

    Pneumonia is the leading cause of death after acute spinal cord injury and is associated with poor neurological outcome. In contrast to the current understanding, attributing enhanced infection susceptibility solely to the patient's environment and motor dysfunction, we investigate whether a secondary functional neurogenic immune deficiency (spinal cord injury-induced immune deficiency syndrome, SCI-IDS) may account for the enhanced infection susceptibility. We applied a clinically relevant model of experimental induced pneumonia to investigate whether the systemic SCI-IDS is functional sufficient to cause pneumonia dependent on spinal cord injury lesion level and investigated whether findings are mirrored in a large prospective cohort study after human spinal cord injury. In a mouse model of inducible pneumonia, high thoracic lesions that interrupt sympathetic innervation to major immune organs, but not low thoracic lesions, significantly increased bacterial load in lungs. The ability to clear the bacterial load from the lung remained preserved in sham animals. Propagated immune susceptibility depended on injury of central pre-ganglionic but not peripheral postganglionic sympathetic innervation to the spleen. Thoracic spinal cord injury level was confirmed as an independent increased risk factor of pneumonia in patients after motor complete spinal cord injury (odds ratio = 1.35, P < 0.001) independently from mechanical ventilation and preserved sensory function by multiple regression analysis. We present evidence that spinal cord injury directly causes increased risk for bacterial infection in mice as well as in patients. Besides obvious motor and sensory paralysis, spinal cord injury also induces a functional SCI-IDS ('immune paralysis'), sufficient to propagate clinically relevant infection in an injury level dependent manner. PMID:26754788

  13. Collagenase-3 (MMP-13) deficiency protects C57BL/6 mice from antibody-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are important in tissue remodelling. Here we investigate the role of collagenase-3 (MMP-13) in antibody-induced arthritis. Methods For this study we employed the K/BxN serum-induced arthritis model. Arthritis was induced in C57BL/6 wild type (WT) and MMP-13-deficient (MMP-13–/–) mice by intraperitoneal injection of 200 μl of K/BxN serum. Arthritis was assessed by measuring the ankle swelling. During the course of the experiments, mice were sacrificed every second day for histological examination of the ankle joints. Ankle sections were evaluated histologically for infiltration of inflammatory cells, pannus tissue formation and bone/cartilage destruction. Semi-quantitative PCR was used to determine MMP-13 expression levels in ankle joints of untreated and K/BxN serum-injected mice. Results This study shows that MMP-13 is a regulator of inflammation. We observed increased expression of MMP-13 in ankle joints of WT mice during K/BxN serum-induced arthritis and both K/BxN serum-treated WT and MMP-13–/– mice developed progressive arthritis with a similar onset. However, MMP-13–/– mice showed significantly reduced disease over the whole arthritic period. Ankle joints of WT mice showed severe joint destruction with extensive inflammation and erosion of cartilage and bone. In contrast, MMP-13–/– mice displayed significantly decreased severity of arthritis (50% to 60%) as analyzed by clinical and histological scoring methods. Conclusions MMP-13 deficiency acts to suppress the local inflammatory responses. Therefore, MMP-13 has a role in the pathogenesis of arthritis, suggesting MMP-13 is a potential therapeutic target. PMID:24369907

  14. Resveratrol prevents rapamycin-induced upregulation of autophagy and selectively induces apoptosis in TSC2-deficient cells

    PubMed Central

    Alayev, Anya; Sun, Yang; Snyder, Rose B; Berger, Sara Malka; Yu, Jane J; Holz, Marina K

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling pathway is hyperactivated in a variety of cancers and disorders, including lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) and tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), which are characterized by mutations in tumor suppressors TSC1 or TSC2. The concern with the use of mTORC1 inhibitors, such as rapamycin or its analogs (rapalogs), is that they cause upregulation of autophagy and suppress the negative feedback loop to Akt, which promotes cell survival, causing the therapy to be only partially effective, and relapse occurs upon cessation of treatment. In this study, we investigate the use of rapamycin in combination with resveratrol, a naturally occurring polyphenol, in TSC2-deficient cells. We tested whether such combination would prevent rapamycin-induced upregulation of autophagy and shift the cell fate toward apoptosis. We found that this combination treatment blocked rapamycin-induced upregulation of autophagy and restored inhibition of Akt. Interestingly, the combination of rapamycin and resveratrol selectively promoted apoptosis of TSC2-deficient cells. Thus, the addition of resveratrol to rapamycin treatment may be a promising option for selective and targeted therapy for diseases with TSC loss and mTORC1 hyperactivation. PMID:24304514

  15. Therapeutic role of dietary fibre.

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, R.; Fedorak, R.; Frohlich, J.; McLennan, C.; Pavilanis, A.

    1993-01-01

    The current status of dietary fibre and fibre supplements in health and disease is reported, and the components of dietary fibre and its respective mechanical and metabolic effects with emphasis on its therapeutic potential are reviewed. Practical management guidelines are provided to help physicians encourage patients identified as having fibre deficiency to increase dietary fibre intake to the recommended level. PMID:8388284

  16. Chronic Zinc Deficiency Alters Chick Gut Microbiota Composition and Function

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Spenser; Neuman, Hadar; Moscovich, Sharon; Glahn, Raymond P.; Koren, Omry; Tako, Elad

    2015-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) deficiency is a prevalent micronutrient insufficiency. Although the gut is a vital organ for Zn utilization, and Zn deficiency is associated with impaired intestinal permeability and a global decrease in gastrointestinal health, alterations in the gut microbial ecology of the host under conditions of Zn deficiency have yet to be studied. Using the broiler chicken (Gallus gallus) model, the aim of this study was to characterize distinct cecal microbiota shifts induced by chronic dietary Zn depletion. We demonstrate that Zn deficiency induces significant taxonomic alterations and decreases overall species richness and diversity, establishing a microbial profile resembling that of various other pathological states. Through metagenomic analysis, we show that predicted Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways responsible for macro- and micronutrient uptake are significantly depleted under Zn deficiency; along with concomitant decreases in beneficial short chain fatty acids, such depletions may further preclude optimal host Zn availability. We also identify several candidate microbes that may play a significant role in modulating the bioavailability and utilization of dietary Zn during prolonged deficiency. Our results are the first to characterize a unique and dysbiotic cecal microbiota during Zn deficiency, and provide evidence for such microbial perturbations as potential effectors of the Zn deficient phenotype. PMID:26633470

  17. Iron and exercise induced alterations in antioxidant status. Protection by dietary milk proteins.

    PubMed

    Zunquin, Gautier; Rouleau, Vincent; Bouhallab, Said; Bureau, Francois; Theunynck, Denis; Rousselot, Pierre; Arhan, Pierre; Bougle, Dominique

    2006-05-01

    Lipid peroxidation stress induced by iron supplementation can contribute to the induction of gut lesions. Intensive sports lead to ischemia reperfusion, which increases free radical production. Athletes frequently use heavy iron supplementation, whose effects are unknown. On the other hand, milk proteins have in vitro antioxidant properties, which could counteract these potential side effects. The main aims of the study were: (1) to demonstrate the effects of combined exercise training (ET) and iron overload on antioxidant status; (2) to assess the protective properties of casein in vivo; (3) to study the mechanisms involved in an in vitro model. Antioxidant status was assessed by measuring the activity of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase (SOD); glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px)), and on the onset of aberrant crypts (AC) in colon, which can be induced by lipid peroxidation. At day 30, all ET animals showed an increase in the activity of antioxidant enzymes, in iron concentration in colon mucosa and liver and in the number of AC compared to untrained rats. It was found that Casein's milk protein supplementation significantly reduced these parameters. Additional information on protective effect of casein was provided by measuring the extent of TBARS formation during iron/ascorbate-induced oxidation of liposomes. Free casein and casein bound to iron were found to significantly reduce iron-induced lipid peroxidation. The results of the overall study suggest that Iron supplementation during intensive sport training would decrease anti-oxidant status. Dietary milk protein supplementation could at least partly prevent occurrence of deleterious effects to tissue induced by iron overload. PMID:17390518

  18. The role of dietary nucleotides in reduction of DNA damage induced by T-2 toxin and deoxynivalenol in chicken leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Frankic, T; Pajk, T; Rezar, V; Levart, A; Salobir, J

    2006-11-01

    The objective of present study was to determine the effect of T-2 toxin and deoxynivalenol (DON) on DNA fragmentation in spleen leukocytes and oxidative stress in chickens, and furthermore, to evaluate the potential of dietary nucleotides in reduction of toxin-induced DNA damage. Male broiler chickens were exposed to 10mg/kg feed of either T-2 toxin or DON with or without addition of dietary nucleotides. After 17 days of treatment DNA damage of spleen leukocytes was measured by Comet assay, lipid peroxidation was studied by malondialdehyde (MDA), total antioxidant status (TAS) of plasma and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) assays, and the hepatotoxicity was studied by measuring plasma liver enzyme levels (ALT, AST and GGT) levels. T-2 toxin and DON induced DNA fragmentation in chicken spleen leukocytes and supplementation with nucleotides reduced the amount of damage only when added to T-2 toxin. In comparison to control group, values of TAS and AST decreased significantly in the groups fed T-2 toxin with or without nucleotide supplementation. Plasma and liver MDA content in groups fed T-2 toxin and DON did not differ significantly from the control. Dietary nucleotides did not affect MDA formation when added to the diets with mycotoxins. The results obtained suggest that dietary nucleotides have the potency to reduce the extent of DNA damage induced by the action of T-2 toxin in immune cells. This underlines their possible beneficial effect on the immune system in mycotoxin intoxication. PMID:16875771

  19. CD147 deficiency blocks IL-8 secretion and inhibits lung cancer-induced osteoclastogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hongkai; Zhuo, Yunyun; Hu, Xu; Shen, Weiwei; Zhang, Ying; Chu, Tongwei

    2015-03-06

    Bone is a frequent target of lung cancer metastasis, which is associated with significant morbidity and poor prognosis; however, the molecular basis of this process is still unknown. This study investigated the role of extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (also known as cluster of differentiation (CD)147) in osteoclastogenesis resulting from bone metastasis, based on the enrichment of this glycoprotein on the surface of many malignant bone tumors. RNA interference was used to silence CD147 expression in A549 human lung cancer cells. Compared with conditioned medium (CM) from control cells (A549-CM), CM from CD147-deficient cells (A549-si-CM) suppressed receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand-stimulated osteoclastogenesis in RAW 264.7 cells and bone marrow-derived macrophages. The mRNA levels of osteoclast-specific genes such as tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, calcitonin receptor, and cathepsin K were also reduced in the presence of A549-si-CM. CD147 knockdown in A549 cells decreased interleukin (IL)-8mRNA and protein expression. IL-8 is present in large amounts in A549-CM and mimicked its inductive effect on osteoclastogenesis; this was reversed by depletion of IL-8 from the medium. Taken together, these results indicate that CD147 promotes lung cancer-induced osteoclastogenesis by modulating IL-8 secretion, and suggest that CD147 is a potential therapeutic target for cancer-associated bone resorption in lung cancer patients. - Highlights: • Bone loss frequently results from lung cancer metastasis. • Cluster of differentiation (CD)147 was depleted in A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells. • RAW 264.7 cell osteoclastogenesis was blocked by medium from CD147-deficient cells. • Interleukin (IL)-8 level was reduced in the conditioned medium. • Osteoclastogenesis induced by lung tumor cells requires CD147-mediated IL-8 release.

  20. Endothelial cell tetrahydrobiopterin deficiency attenuates LPS-induced vascular dysfunction and hypotension☆

    PubMed Central

    Chuaiphichai, Surawee; Starr, Anna; Nandi, Manasi; Channon, Keith M.; McNeill, Eileen

    2016-01-01

    Overproduction of nitric oxide (NO) is thought to be a key mediator of the vascular dysfunction and severe hypotension in patients with endotoxaemia and septic shock. The contribution of NO produced directly in the vasculature by endothelial cells to the hypotension seen in these conditions, vs. the broader systemic increase in NO, is unclear. To determine the specific role of endothelium derived NO in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced vascular dysfunction we administered LPS to mice deficient in endothelial cell tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), the essential co-factor for NO production by NOS enzymes. Mice deficient in endothelial BH4 production, through loss of the essential biosynthesis enzyme Gch1 (Gch1fl/flTie2cre mice) received a 24 hour challenge with LPS or saline control. In vivo LPS treatment increased vascular GTP cyclohydrolase and BH4 levels in aortas, lungs and hearts, but this increase was significantly attenuated in Gch1fl/flTie2cre mice, which were also partially protected from the LPS-induced hypotension. In isometric tension studies, in vivo LPS treatment reduced the vasoconstriction response and impaired endothelium-dependent and independent vasodilatations in mesenteric arteries from wild-type mice, but not in Gch1fl/flTie2cre mesenteric arteries. Ex vivo LPS treatment decreased vasoconstriction response to phenylephrine in aortic rings from wild-type and not in Gch1fl/flTie2cre mice, even in the context of significant eNOS and iNOS upregulation. These data provide direct evidence that endothelial cell NO has a significant contribution to LPS-induced vascular dysfunction and hypotension and may provide a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of systemic inflammation and patients with septic shock. PMID:26276526

  1. Myeloperoxidase deficiency induces MIP-2 production via ERK activation in zymosan-stimulated mouse neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Tateno, N; Matsumoto, N; Motowaki, T; Suzuki, K; Aratani, Y

    2013-05-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO), a major constituent of neutrophils, catalyzes the production of hypochlorous acid (HOCl) from hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and chloride anion. We have previously reported that MPO-deficient (MPO(-/-)) neutrophils produce greater amount of macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) in vitro than do wild type when stimulated with zymosan. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms governing the up-regulation of MIP-2 production in the mutant neutrophils. Interestingly, we found that zymosan-induced production of MIP-2 was blocked by pre-treatment with U0126, an inhibitor of mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and with BAY11-7082, an inhibitor of nuclear factor (NF)-κB. Western blot analysis indicated that U0126 also inhibited the phosphorylation of p65 subunit of NF-κB (p65), indicating that MIP-2 was produced via the ERK/NF-κB pathway. Intriguingly, we found that ERK1/2, p65, and alpha subunit of inhibitor of κB (IκBα) in the MPO(-/-) neutrophils were phosphorylated more strongly than in the wild type when stimulated with zymosan. Exogenous H2O2 treatment in addition to zymosan stimulation enhanced the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 without affecting the zymosan-induced MIP-2 production. In contrast, exogenous HOCl inhibited the production of MIP-2 as well as IκBα phosphorylation without affecting ERK activity. The zymosan-induced production of MIP-2 in the wild-type neutrophils was enhanced by pre-treatment of the MPO inhibitor 4-aminobenzoic acid hydrazide. Collectively, these results strongly suggest that both lack of HOCl and accumulation of H2O2 due to MPO deficiency contribute to the up-regulation of MIP-2 production in mouse neutrophils stimulated with zymosan. PMID:23438680

  2. Lack of effect of dietary fat on N-nitrosomethyl urea (NMU)-induced colon tumorigenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Nauss, K M; Locniskar, M; Sondergaard, D; Newberne, P M

    1984-02-01

    The effect of alterations in the quality and quantity of dietary fat on N-nitrosomethyl urea (NMU)-induced colon cancer in rats was studied. Weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were fed semipurified diets containing 24% beef fat, 24% corn oil, 24% Crisco or the three fats in equal parts to make a total of 5% fat. Macronutrients and micronutrients were adjusted to balance the nutrient to calorie ratios. After 4 weeks of dietary treatment, all rats, except vehicle-treated animals received NMU (1.5 mg) via intrarectal instillation, twice a week for 2 weeks. The animals continued receiving the experimental diets until intestinal tumors developed and surviving animals were sacrificed at 43 weeks. There was no effect of any of the high fat diets tested on intestinal tumor incidence, latency, distribution or size. Cumulative probability of death with colon carcinoma did not differ significantly among the dietary groups. PMID:6697442

  3. Mitochondrial Contagion Induced by Parkin Deficiency in Drosophila Hearts and Its Containment by Suppressing Mitofusin

    PubMed Central

    Bhandari, Poonam; Song, Moshi; Chen, Yun; Burelle, Yan; Dorn, Gerald W.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Dysfunctional Parkin-mediated mitophagic culling of senescent or damaged mitochondria is a major pathological process underlying Parkinson disease and a potential genetic mechanism of cardiomyopathy. Despite epidemiological associations between Parkinson disease and heart failure, the role of Parkin and mitophagic quality control in maintaining normal cardiac homeostasis is poorly understood. Objective We used germline mutants and cardiac-specific RNA interference to interrogate Parkin regulation of cardiomyocyte mitochondria and examine functional crosstalk between mitophagy and mitochondrial dynamics in Drosophila heart tubes. Methods and Results Transcriptional profiling of Parkin knockout mouse hearts revealed compensatory upregulation of multiple related E3 ubiquitin ligases. Because Drosophila lack most of these redundant genes, we examined heart tubes of parkin knockout flies and observed accumulation of enlarged hollow donut mitochondria with dilated cardiomyopathy, which could be rescued by cardiomyocyte-specific Parkin expression. Identical abnormalities were induced by cardiomyocyte-specific Parkin suppression using 2 different inhibitory RNAs. Parkin-deficient cardiomyocyte mitochondria exhibited dysmorphology, depolarization, and reactive oxygen species generation without calcium cycling abnormalities, pointing to a primary mitochondrial defect. Suppressing cardiomyocyte mitochondrial fusion in Parkin-deficient fly heart tubes completely prevented the cardiomyopathy and corrected mitochondrial dysfunction without normalizing mitochondrial dysmorphology, demonstrating a central role for mitochondrial fusion in the cardiomyopathy provoked by impaired mitophagy. Conclusions Parkin deficiency and resulting mitophagic disruption produces cardiomyopathy in part by contamination of the cardiomyocyte mitochondrial pool through fusion between improperly retained dysfunctional/senescent and normal mitochondria. Limiting mitochondrial contagion by

  4. Animal Models for Elucidation of the Mechanisms of Neuropsychiatric Disorders Induced by Sleep and Dietary Habits.

    PubMed

    Yaoita, Fukie

    2016-01-01

    Numerous changes in human lifestyle in modern life increase the risk of disease. Especially, modern sleep and dietary habits are crucial factors affecting lifestyle disease. In terms of sleep, decreases in total sleep time and in rapid eye movement sleep time have been observed in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) patients. From a dietary perspective, mastication during eating has several good effects on systemic, mental, and physical functions of the body. However, few animal experiments have addressed the influence of this decline in sleep duration or of long-term powdered diet feeding on parameters reflecting systemic health. In our studies, we examined both the influence of intermittent sleep deprivation (SD) treatment and long-term powdered diet feeding on emotional behavior in mice, and focused on the mechanisms underlying these impaired behaviors. Our findings were as follows: SD treatment induced hypernoradrenergic and hypodopaminergic states within the frontal cortex. Furthermore, hyperactivity and an explosive number of jumps were observed. Both the hypernoradrenergic state and the jumps were improved by treatment with ADHD therapeutic drugs. On the other hand, long-term powdered diet feeding increased social interaction behaviors. The feeding affected the dopaminergic function of the frontal cortex. In addition, the long-term powdered diet fed mice presented systemic illness signs, such as elevations of blood glucose, and hypertension. This review, describing the SD mice and long-term powdered diet fed mice can be a useful model for elucidation of the mechanism of neuropsychiatric disorders or the discovery of new therapeutic targets in combatting effects of the modern lifestyle. PMID:27252067

  5. Vitamin D deficiency exacerbates atypical antipsychotic-induced metabolic side effects in rats: involvement of the INSIG/SREBP pathway.

    PubMed

    Dang, Ruili; Jiang, Pei; Cai, Hualin; Li, Huande; Guo, Ren; Wu, Yanqin; Zhang, Lihong; Zhu, Wenye; He, Xin; Liu, Yiping; Xu, Ping

    2015-08-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a major concern in psychotic patients receiving atypical antipsychotics. Recent evidence suggests that sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) and insulin-induced genes (INSIGs) are implicated in the antipsychotic-induced metabolic side-effects. Vitamin D (VD) deficiency, a highly prevalent phenomenon among patients with psychosis, might also predispose individuals to metabolic syndrome Considering that VD has modulating effects on the INSIG/SREBP pathway, it is possible that VD may have a role in the antipsychotic-induced metabolic disturbances involving its effects on the INSIG/SREBP system. Thus, the present study aimed to evaluate the effects of VD deficiency and VD supplementation on antipsychotic-induced metabolic changes in rats. After 4-week administration, clozapine (10mg/kg/d) and risperidone (1mg/kg/d) both caused glucose intolerance and insulin resistance in VD deficient rats, but not in rats with sufficient VD status. Antipsychotic treatments, especially clozapine, elevated serum lipid levels, which were most apparent in VD deficient rats, but alleviated in VD-supplemented rats. Additionally, antipsychotic treatments down-regulated INSIGs and up-regulated SREBPs expression in VD deficient rats, and these effects were attenuated when VD status was more sufficient. Collectively, this study disclose the novel findings that antipsychotic-induced metabolic disturbances is exacerbated by VD deficiency and can be alleviated by VD supplementation, providing new evidence for the promising role of VD in prevention and treatment of metabolic disorders caused by antipsychotic medications. Furthermore, our data also suggest the involvement of INSIG/SREBP pathway in the antipsychotic-induced hyperlipidemia and beneficial effects of VD on lipid profile. PMID:26003080

  6. Role of peptide YY in 5-fluorouracil-induced reduction of dietary intake.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Hiroyasu; Kai, Yuki; Takase, Kazuhide; Sato, Ken; Kimura, Minami; Tabata, Shoko; Yaegashi, Miyabi; Sato, Fumiaki; Yomoto, Tetsuro; Narita, Minoru

    2016-08-01

    5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is part of the standard care for cancer treatment but is associated with high incidences of appetite loss and reduced food intake, which may contribute to chemotherapy-induced cachexia (weakness and wasting of tissue). The role of gastrointestinal satiety hormones in chemotherapy-induced appetite loss has not been intensively investigated. Peptide YY (PYY) and glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 are important signals of gastrointestinal satiety, so this study examined the roles of these gut hormones in 5-FU-induced reduction of dietary intake. Mice were given 5-FU (50 mg/kg, intraperitoneal [i.p.]) every day for 4 consecutive days. Gene expression levels of proglucagon (Pro-Gcg), a precursor of GLP-1, and PYY in the colon were examined by real-time RT-PCR. Serum levels of GLP-1 and PYY were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Some mice were pretreated with the GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin9-39 (1 mg/kg) or the neuropeptide Y type 2 (NPY2) receptor antagonist BIIE0246 (2 mg/kg) via the i.p. route 30 minutes before 5-FU administration. Mice receiving 5-FU exhibited a significant reduction in food intake that was correlated with body weight loss. These mice also showed significantly enhanced expression levels of mRNAs encoding pro-GLP-1 and PYY in the transverse and distal colon as well as elevated serum concentrations of GLP-1 and PYY compared to vehicle-treated controls. The 5-FU-induced reduction in food intake was attenuated by BIIE0246 but not by exendin9-39. These data suggest that administration of a NPY2 receptor antagonist may be effective for attenuating the anorexia caused by 5-FU chemotherapy. PMID:27130783

  7. Dietary cholesterol promotes AOM-induced colorectal cancer through activating the NLRP3 inflammasome.

    PubMed

    Du, Qianming; Wang, Qing; Fan, Huimin; Wang, Jianing; Liu, Xiuting; Wang, Hong; Wang, Yajing; Hu, Rong

    2016-04-01

    Prolonged ingestion of a cholesterol-enriched diet induces chronic, auto-inflammatory responses resulting in significant health problems including colorectal cancer. Inflammasomes are thought to mediate intestinal homeostasis, and their dysregulation contributes to inflammatory bowel diseases and colitis-associated cancer (CAC). However, in vitro and in vivo information regarding the inflammation-inducing and tumor-promoting effect of cholesterol is lacking. Here we show that the cholesterol promoted colon carcinogenesis in azoxymethane (AOM)-treated mice through activating the NLRP3 inflammasome. High cholesterol diet (HCD) significantly increased inflammatory responses and tumor burden. Cholesterol crystals, detected in the colon of mice fed with HCD, also promoted NLRP3 inflammasome activation in macrophages, as indicated by elevated expression of cleaved caspase-1, formation of NLRP3-ASC-caspase-1 complex assembly, and higher IL-1β secretion. Importantly, cholesterol was found to inhibit the activity of AMPKα in macrophages, leading to a significant production of mitochondrial ROS, which in turn activated the NLRP3 inflammasome. Moreover, crystal uptake and cathepsin B accounted for cholesterol crystal-induced inactivation of AMPKα. Finally, HCD-induced increase in IL-1β secretion, macrophage infiltration and tumor burden was diminished by the deletion of NLRP3 in AOM-treated mice. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that the pro-inflammatory and cancer-promoting effects of HCD are mediated by the activation of NLRP3 inflammasome. Our study extended our knowledge on how dietary choices can influence processes involved in chronic inflammatory disorders and colorectal cancer. PMID:26921636

  8. Nox2 Deficiency Prevents Hypertension-Induced Vascular Dysfunction and Hypertrophy in Cerebral Arterioles

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Siu-Lung; Baumbach, Gary L.

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress is involved in many hypertension-related vascular diseases in the brain, including stroke and dementia. Thus, we examined the role of genetic deficiency of NADPH oxidase subunit Nox2 in the function and structure of cerebral arterioles during hypertension. Arterial pressure was increased in right-sided cerebral arterioles with transverse aortic banding for 4 weeks in 8-week-old wild-type (WT) and Nox2-deficient (-/y) mice. Mice were given NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 10 mg/kg) or vehicle to drink. We measured the reactivity in cerebral arterioles through open cranial window in anesthetized mice and wall cross-sectional area and superoxide levels ex vivo. Aortic constriction increased systolic and pulse pressures in right-sided carotid arteries in all groups of mice. Ethidium fluorescence showed increased superoxide in right-sided cerebral arterioles in WT, but not in Nox2-/y mice. Dilation to acetylcholine, but not sodium nitroprusside, was reduced, and cross-sectional areas were increased in the right-sided arterioles in WT, but were unchanged in Nox2-/y mice. L-NAME reduced dilation to acetylcholine but did not result in hypertrophy in right-sided arterioles of Nox2-/y  mice. In conclusion, hypertension-induced superoxide production derived from Nox2-containing NADPH oxidase promotes hypertrophy and causes endothelial dysfunction in cerebral arterioles, possibly involving interaction with nitric oxide. PMID:23573415

  9. Determinants of G quadruplex-induced epigenetic instability in REV1-deficient cells

    PubMed Central

    Schiavone, Davide; Guilbaud, Guillaume; Murat, Pierre; Papadopoulou, Charikleia; Sarkies, Peter; Prioleau, Marie-Noëlle; Balasubramanian, Shankar; Sale, Julian E

    2014-01-01

    REV1-deficient chicken DT40 cells are compromised in replicating G quadruplex (G4)-forming DNA. This results in localised, stochastic loss of parental chromatin marks and changes in gene expression. We previously proposed that this epigenetic instability arises from G4-induced replication fork stalls disrupting the accurate propagation of chromatin structure through replication. Here, we test this model by showing that a single G4 motif is responsible for the epigenetic instability of the BU-1 locus in REV1-deficient cells, despite its location 3.5 kb from the transcription start site (TSS). The effect of the G4 is dependent on it residing on the leading strand template, but is independent of its in vitro thermal stability. Moving the motif to more than 4 kb from the TSS stabilises expression of the gene. However, loss of histone modifications (H3K4me3 and H3K9/14ac) around the transcription start site correlates with the position of the G4 motif, expression being lost only when the promoter is affected. This supports the idea that processive replication is required to maintain the histone modification pattern and full transcription of this model locus. PMID:25190518

  10. Glia Maturation Factor Deficiency Suppresses 1-Methyl-4-Phenylpyridinium-Induced Oxidative Stress in Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mohammad Moshahid; Kempuraj, Duraisamy; Zaheer, Smita; Zaheer, Asgar

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is closely intertwined with pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Increasing evidence suggests that inhibition of glia-mediated inflammation might represent a promising therapeutic target for PD. Glia maturation factor (GMF), an inflammatory protein, predominantly localized in astrocytes is previously isolated, sequenced and cloned in our laboratory. In the present investigation, we demonstrate that GMF-deficiency in astrocytes upregulates the antioxidant status and limit the extent of lipid peroxidation and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) along with diminished nuclear factor-κB-mediated inflammatory responses in 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+)-induced toxicity. Primary astrocytes obtained from wild-type (Wt) and GMF-deficient (GMF-KO) mice were treated with 5, 10, and 20 μM MPP+ for 24, 48, and 72 h in vitro. Our results show decreased release of ROS and increased level of glutathione in astrocytes obtained from GMF-KO mice when compared to astrocytes derived from Wt mice following MPP+ treatment. Additionally, we found decreased activity of NF-κB, and reduced levels of proinflammatory tumor necrosis factor- α, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-17, IL-33, and chemokine (C–C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) in GMF-KO astrocytes when compared to Wt astrocytes. Our overall results suggest that GMF-KO astrocytes are significantly resistant to MPP+ toxicity when compared to Wt astrocytes. PMID:24430624

  11. Amelioration of Stroke-Induced Neurological Deficiency by Lyophilized Powder of Catapol and Puerarin

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Xue, Qiang; Li, Xu; Zhang, Jifen; Fu, Zhifeng; Feng, Binbin; Chen, Yi; Xu, Xiaoyu

    2014-01-01

    Catalpol and puerarin are active ingredients isolated from Rehmannia glutinosa Libosch and Radix Puerariae, respectively. They are popular in research for their poly-pharmacological effects. This research focused on effect of anti-stroke by lyophilized powder of catalpol and puerarin (C-P) and potential mechanisms. At the beginning of research, C-P was identified and analyzed by HPLC. Neurological function was evaluated by Longa score, neurological complex function score and beam balance score after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (PMCAO) in mice. Infarct volume and water content were evaluated after treatment of C-P. Anti-oxidative stress, anti-apoptosis, angiogenesis and neurogenesis were investigated by ELISA, WB and immunohistochemical stain respectively. With treatment of C-P, neurological deficiency of PMCAO mice was ameliorated. Morphologically, infarct volume and water content in ischemic hemisphere were significantly reduced by C-P. In vivo and in vitro, oxidative stress injury was extenuated by C-P. Meanwhile, Caspase-3 was down-regulated and Bxl-2 was up-regulated by C-P in vivo. In addition, C-P enhanced angiogenesis around the infarct of cortex and neurogenesis in the Hippocampal Dentate Gyrus (DG). Hence, C-P ameliorated stroke-induced neurological deficiency through its multiple neuroprotections. What's more, this article provides us a novel formula of active ingredients for stroke. PMID:24719562

  12. Induced polarized state in intentionally grown oxygen deficient KTaO{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Mota, D. A.; Romaguera-Barcelay, Y.; Tkach, A.; Agostinho Moreira, J.; Almeida, A.; Perez de la Cruz, J.; Vilarinho, P. M.; Tavares, P. B.

    2013-07-21

    Deliberately oxygen deficient potassium tantalate thin films were grown by RF magnetron sputtering on Si/SiO{sub 2}/Ti/Pt substrates. Once they were structurally characterized, the effect of oxygen vacancies on their electric properties was addressed by measuring leakage currents, dielectric constant, electric polarization, and thermally stimulated depolarization currents. By using K{sub 2}O rich KTaO{sub 3} targets and specific deposition conditions, KTaO{sub 3-{delta}} oxygen deficient thin films with a K/Ta = 1 ratio were obtained. Room temperature X-ray diffraction patterns show that KTaO{sub 3-{delta}} thin films are under a compressive strain of 2.3% relative to KTaO{sub 3} crystals. Leakage current results reveal the presence of a conductive mechanism, following the Poole-Frenkel formalism. Furthermore, dielectric, polarization, and depolarization current measurements yield the existence of a polarized state below T{sub pol} {approx} 367 Degree-Sign C. A Cole-Cole dipolar relaxation was also ascertained apparently due to oxygen vacancies induced dipoles. After thermal annealing the films in an oxygen atmosphere at a temperature above T{sub pol}, the aforementioned polarized state is suppressed, associated with a drastic oxygen vacancies reduction emerging from annealing process.

  13. Glia maturation factor deficiency suppresses 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium-induced oxidative stress in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammad Moshahid; Kempuraj, Duraisamy; Zaheer, Smita; Zaheer, Asgar

    2014-08-01

    Inflammation is closely intertwined with pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Increasing evidence suggests that inhibition of glia-mediated inflammation might represent a promising therapeutic target for PD. Glia maturation factor (GMF), an inflammatory protein, predominantly localized in astrocytes is previously isolated, sequenced and cloned in our laboratory. In the present investigation, we demonstrate that GMF-deficiency in astrocytes upregulates the antioxidant status and limit the extent of lipid peroxidation and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) along with diminished nuclear factor-κB-mediated inflammatory responses in 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+))-induced toxicity. Primary astrocytes obtained from wild-type (Wt) and GMF-deficient (GMF-KO) mice were treated with 5, 10, and 20 μM MPP(+) for 24, 48, and 72 h in vitro. Our results show decreased release of ROS and increased level of glutathione in astrocytes obtained from GMF-KO mice when compared to astrocytes derived from Wt mice following MPP(+) treatment. Additionally, we found decreased activity of NF-κB, and reduced levels of proinflammatory tumor necrosis factor- α, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-17, IL-33, and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) in GMF-KO astrocytes when compared to Wt astrocytes. Our overall results suggest that GMF-KO astrocytes are significantly resistant to MPP(+) toxicity when compared to Wt astrocytes. PMID:24430624

  14. Physiological responses of Tunisian grapevine varieties to bicarbonate-induced iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ksouri, Riadh; Gharsalli, Mohamed; Lachaal, Mokhtar

    2005-03-01

    Plants are frequently submitted to iron deficiency when growing on calcareous soils, which contain high concentrations of bicarbonate. The purpose of this study was to investigate the variability of physiological responses of Tunisian grapevine varieties to bicarbonate-induced iron chlorosis. Vine woodcuttings of seven autochthonous Tunisian varieties (Khamri, Mahdaoui, Blan3, Saouadi, Arich Dressé, Beldi and Balta4), two rootstocks (140Ru and S.O.4), and an introduced table variety (Cardinal) were cultivated on inert sand for 2 months using a complete nutrient solution (20 microM Fe) that was either well supplied or not supplied with 10 mM HCO3-. Young leaves of plants cultivated on bicarbonate-enriched medium showed characteristic symptoms of iron chlorosis, although the intensity of the symptoms depended on the variety and the rootstock. Chlorosis score confirmed these observations since the most sensitive varieties showed the highest values. This variability in tolerance to iron deficiency was also displayed when analysing the physiological parameters (shoot length, plant dry weight, and chlorophyll concentration) and the iron contents in the 4th leaf. Analysis of morphological and physiological parameters showed three behaviour groups. The first one corresponded to tolerant varieties (Khamri, Mahdaoui, and the root-stock: 140Ru), the second included moderately tolerant vines (Saouadi, Arich Dressé, Blanc3, and the rootstock: S.O.4) and the third represented the sensitive ones (Balta4, Beldi, and Cardinal). PMID:15832686

  15. Rapamycin Regulates Bleomycin-Induced Lung Damage in SP-C-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Madala, Satish K; Maxfield, Melissa D; Davidson, Cynthia R; Schmidt, Stephanie M; Garry, Daniel; Ikegami, Machiko; Hardie, William D; Glasser, Stephan W

    2011-01-01

    Injury to the distal respiratory epithelium has been implicated as an underlying cause of idiopathic lung diseases. Mutations that result in SP-C deficiencies are linked to a small subset of spontaneous and familial cases of interstitial lung disease (ILD) and interstitial pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Gene-targeted mice that lack SP-C (Sftpc(-/-)) develop an irregular ILD-like disease with age and are a model of the human SP-C related disease. In the current study, we investigated whether rapamycin could ameliorate bleomycin-induced fibrosis in the lungs of Sftpc(-/-) mice. Sftpc(+/+) and -/- mice were exposed to bleomycin with either preventative administration of rapamycin or therapeutic administration beginning eight days after the bleomycin injury. Rapamycin-treatment increased weight loss and decreased survival of bleomycin-treated Sftpc(+/+) and Sftpc(-/-) mice. Rapamycin did not reduce the fibrotic disease in the prophylactic or rescue experiments of either genotype of mice. Further, rapamycin treatment augmented airway resistance and reduced lung compliance of bleomycin-treated Sftpc(-/-) mice. Rapamycin treatment was associated with an increased expression of profibrotic Th2 cytokines and reduced expression of INF-γ. These findings indicate that novel therapeutics will be required to treat individuals with SP-C deficient ILD/IPF. PMID:21660239

  16. Dietary fatty acid modulation of mucosally-induced tolerogenic immune responses.

    PubMed

    Harbige, L S; Fisher, B A

    2001-11-01

    Immunological unresponsiveness or hyporesponsiveness (tolerance) can be induced by feeding protein antigens to naive animals. Using a classical oral ovalbumin gut-induced tolerance protocol in BALB/c mice we investigated the effects of dietary n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) on high-and low-dose oral tolerance (and in non-tolerised animals, i.e. effects of antigen challenge alone) in relation to lymphoproliferative, cytokine and antibody responses. Fish oil rich in long-chain n-3 fatty acids decreased both T-helper (Th) 1- and Th2-like responses. In contrast, borage (Borago officinalis) oil rich in n-6 PUFA, of which gamma-linolenic acid is rapidly metabolised to longer-chain n-6 PUFA, increased Thl-like responses and decreased Th2-like responses, and possibly enhanced suppressor cell or Th3-like activity. These findings are in general agreement with other studies on the effects of long chain n-3 PUFA on immune system functions, and characterise important differences between long-chain n-3 and n-6 PUFA, defining more precisely and broadly the immunological regulatory mechanisms involved. They are also discussed in relation to autoimmune disease. PMID:12069397

  17. Effects of dietary supplements on space radiation-induced oxidative stress in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Guan, Jun; Wan, X Steven; Zhou, Zhaozong; Ware, Jeffrey; Donahue, Jeremiah J; Biaglow, John E; Kennedy, Ann R

    2004-11-01

    Of particular concern for the health of astronauts during space travel is radiation from protons and high-mass, high-atomic-number (Z), and high-energy particles (HZE particles). Space radiation is known to induce oxidative stress in astronauts after extended space flight. In the present study, the total antioxidant status was used as a biomarker to evaluate oxidative stress induced by gamma rays, protons and HZE-particle radiation. The results demonstrate that the plasma level of total antioxidants in Sprague-Dawley rats was significantly decreased (P < 0.01) in a dose-dependent manner within 4 h after exposure to gamma rays. Exposure to protons and HZE-particle radiation also significantly decreased the serum or plasma level of total antioxidants in the irradiated animals. Diet supplementation with L-selenomethionine alone or a combination of selected antioxidant agents was shown to partially or completely prevent the decrease in the serum or plasma levels of total antioxidants in animals exposed to gamma rays, protons or HZE particles. These findings suggest that exposure to space radiation may compromise the capacity of the host antioxidant defense and that this adverse biological effect can be prevented at least partially by dietary supplementation with L-selenomethionine and antioxidants. PMID:15624312

  18. Influence of dietary menhaden oil on 7,12-dimethylbenzanthracene induced mammary tumorigenesis in rats

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, T.P.; Peterson, F.; Campbell, T.C.

    1986-03-05

    The effect of dietary menhaden oil on 7,12-dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA) induced mammary tumorigenesis was examined in female Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were obtained at age 28 days and acclimated until age 50 days when they received a single i.g. dose of 5 mg DMBA dissolved in 1 ml corn oil. Rats were then randomly assigned to one of four treatment groups with 25 rats per group. One group was fed a diet based on fish protein (freeze-dried cod) and corn oil (F/C). The second group received a diet based on fish protein and menhaden oil (F/M). The third group received a casein based diet with corn oil as the lipid source (C/C). The fourth group was fed a casein based diet with menhaden oil as the lipid source (C/M). Both the protein and lipid sources were fed at a level of 20% by weight of the diets. Rats were palpated weekly to check for mammary tumor development and the experiment was terminated 24 weeks after DMBA administration. Rats fed menhaden oil as a lipid source (F/M and C/M groups) developed significantly fewer mammary tumors than animals on the corn oil based diets (F/C and C/C groups, respectively). Thus, menhaden oil, rich in omega-3 fatty acids, significantly inhibited the development of DMBA induced mammary tumors in this experiment.

  19. Dietary Uptake of Wedelia chinensis Extract Attenuates Dextran Sulfate Sodium-Induced Colitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yung-Hsiang; Huang, Wen-Ching; Huang, Li-Ting; Lin, Wen-Ching; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Lin, Shu-Hui; Hsiao, Pei-Wen; Kuo, Sheng-Chu; Yang, Ning-Sun

    2013-01-01

    Scope Traditional medicinal herbs are increasingly used as alternative therapies in patients with inflammatory diseases. Here we evaluated the effect of Wedelia chinensis, a medicinal herb commonly used in Asia, on the prevention of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced acute colitis in mice. General safety and the effect of different extraction methods on the bioactivity of W. chinensis were also explored. Methods and Results C57BL/6 mice were administrated hot water extract of fresh W. chinensis (WCHF) orally for one week followed by drinking water containing 2% DSS for nine days. WCHF significantly attenuated the symptoms of colitis including diarrhea, rectal bleeding and loss of body weight; it also reduced the shortening of colon length and histopathological damage caused by colonic inflammation. Among four W. chinensis extracts prepared using different extraction techniques, WCHF showed the highest anti-colitis efficacy. Analyses of specific T-cell regulatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-4, IFN-γ, IL-17, TGF-β, IL-12) revealed that WCHF treatment can suppress the Th1 and Th17, but not Th2, responses in colon tissues and dendritic cells of DSS-induced colitis mice. A 28-day subacute toxicity study showed that daily oral administration of WCHF (100, 500, 1000 mg/kg body weight) was not toxic to mice. Conclusion Together, our findings suggest that specific extracts of W. chinensis have nutritional potential for future development into nutraceuticals or dietary supplements for treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:23734189

  20. Dietary agents in the prevention of alcohol-induced hepatotoxicty: preclinical observations.

    PubMed

    Shivashankara, Arnadi Ramachandrayya; Azmidah, Aysha; Haniadka, Raghavendra; Rai, Manoj Ponadka; Arora, Rajesh; Baliga, Manjeshwar Shrinath

    2012-02-01

    Long term alcohol consumption is one of the important causes for liver failure and death. To complicate the existing problem there are no dependable hepatoprotective drugs and a large number of patients prefer using complementary and alternative medicines for treating and managing hepatic complications. Almost 25 centuries ago, Hippocrates, the father of medicine, proclaimed "Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food." Exploring the association between diet and health continues even today. Preclinical studies carried out in the recent past have shown that the commonly used dietary agents like Allium sativum (garlic), Camellia sinensis (tea), Curcuma longa (turmeric), Emblica officinalis (Indian gooseberry), Ferula asafoetida (asafoetida), Garcinia cambogia (Malabar tamarind), Glycine max (soyabean), Murraya koenigii (curry leaves), Piper betle (beetle leaf), Prunus armeniaca (apricot), Ocimum gratissimum (wild basil), Theobroma cacao (cocoa), Trigonella foenum-graecum (fenugreek) and Vitis vinifera (grapes) protect against ethanol-induced hepatotoxicity. Mechanistic studies have shown that the beneficial effects of these phytochemicals in preventing the ethanol-induced hepatotoxicity are mediated by the antioxidant, free radical scavenging, anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic effects. The present review for the first time collates the hepatoprotective effects of these agents and also emphasizes on aspects that need future research to establish their utility in humans. PMID:22119904

  1. Dietary flavonoid fisetin targets caspase-3-deficient human breast cancer MCF-7 cells by induction of caspase-7-associated apoptosis and inhibition of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pei-Ming; Tseng, Ho-Hsing; Peng, Chih-Wen; Chen, Wen-Shu; Chiu, Shu-Jun

    2012-02-01

    The outcome of producing apoptotic defects in cancer cells is the primary obstacle that limits the therapeutic efficacy of anticancer agents, and hence the development of novel agents targeting novel non-canonical cell death pathways has become an imperative mission for clinical research. Fisetin (3,3',4',7-tetrahydroxyflavone) is a naturally occurring flavonoid commonly found in fruits and vegetables. In this study, we investigated the potential anticancer effects of fisetin on breast cancer cells. The result showed fisetin induced higher cytotoxicity in human breast cancer MCF-7 than in MDA-MB-231 cells otherwise it did not exert any detectable cytotoxicity in non-tumorigenic MCF-10A cells. We found fisetin can trigger a novel form of atypical apoptosis in caspase-3-deficient MCF-7 cells, which was characterized by several apoptotic features, including plasma membrane rupture, mitochondrial depolarization, activation of caspase-7, -8 and -9, and PARP cleavage; however, neither DNA fragmentation and phosphotidylserine (PS) externalization was observed. Although p53 was also activated by fisetin, the fisetin-induced apoptosis was not rescued by the p53 inhibitor pifithrin-α. In contrast, the fisetin-induced apoptosis was abrogated by pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. Furthermore, inhibition of autophagy by fisetin was shown as additional route to prompt anticancer activity in MCF-7 cells. These data allow us to propose that fisetin appears as a new potential anticancer agent which can be applied to develop a clinical protocol of human breast cancers. PMID:21922137

  2. Rotation induced octupole correlations in the neutron-deficient 109Te nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Angelis, G.; Fahlander, C.; Gadea, A.; Farnea, E.; Bazzacco, D.; Belcari, N.; Blasi, N.; Bizzeti, P. G.; Bizzeti-Sona, A.; de Acuña, D.; de Poli, M.; Grawe, H.; Johnson, A.; Lo Bianco, G.; Lunardi, S.; Napoli, D. R.; Nyberg, J.; Pavan, P.; Persson, J.; Rossi Alvarez, C.; Rudolph, D.; Schubart, R.; Spolaore, P.; Wyss, R.; Xu, F.

    1998-10-01

    High spin states in the neutron deficient nucleus 109Te have been populated with the 58Ni+54Fe reaction at 220 MeV and investigated through γ-spectroscopy methods at the GASP spectrometer making use of reaction channel selection with the ISIS Si-ball. The level scheme has been extended up to an excitation energy of ~12.1 MeV. The spins and parities of the observed levels are assigned tentatively supporting the identification of two bands of opposite parity connected by strong dipole transitions inferred to be of E1 character. Octupole correlations in 109Te induced by rotation are suggested as the cause of this effect.

  3. Induced Structural Disorder as a Molecular Mechanism for Enzyme Dysfunction in Phosphoglucomutase 1 Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Stiers, Kyle M; Kain, Bailee N; Graham, Abigail C; Beamer, Lesa J

    2016-04-24

    Human phosphoglucomutase 1 (PGM1) plays a central role in cellular glucose homeostasis, mediating the switch between glycolysis and gluconeogenesis through the conversion of glucose 1-phosphate and glucose 6-phosphate. Recent clinical studies have identified mutations in this enzyme as the cause of PGM1 deficiency, an inborn error of metabolism classified as both a glycogen storage disease and a congenital disorder of glycosylation. Reported here are the first crystal structures of two disease-related missense variants of PGM1, along with the structure of the wild-type enzyme. Two independent glycine-to-arginine substitutions (G121R and G291R), both affecting key active site loops of PGM1, are found to induce regions of structural disorder, as evidenced by a nearly complete loss of electron density for as many as 23 aa. The disordered regions are not contiguous in sequence to the site of mutation, and even cross domain boundaries. Other structural rearrangements include changes in the conformations of loops and side chains, some of which occur nearly 20 Å away from the site of mutation. The induced structural disorder is correlated with increased sensitivity to proteolysis and lower-resolution diffraction, particularly for the G291R variant. Examination of the multi-domain effects of these G➔R mutations establishes a correlation between interdomain interfaces of the enzyme and missense variants of PGM1 associated with disease. These crystal structures provide the first insights into the structural basis of enzyme dysfunction in PGM1 deficiency and highlight a growing role for biophysical characterization of proteins in the field of precision medicine. PMID:26972339

  4. Relaxin deficiency attenuates pregnancy-induced adaptation of the mesenteric artery to angiotensin II in mice.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Sarah A; Leo, Chen Huei; Senadheera, Sevvandi N; Girling, Jane E; Tare, Marianne; Parry, Laura J

    2016-05-01

    Pregnancy is associated with reduced peripheral vascular resistance, underpinned by changes in endothelial and smooth muscle function. Failure of the maternal vasculature to adapt correctly leads to serious pregnancy complications, such as preeclampsia. The peptide hormone relaxin regulates the maternal renal vasculature during pregnancy; however, little is known about its effects in other vascular beds. This study tested the hypothesis that functional adaptation of the mesenteric and uterine arteries during pregnancy will be compromised in relaxin-deficient (Rln(-/-)) mice. Smooth muscle and endothelial reactivity were examined in small mesenteric and uterine arteries of nonpregnant (estrus) and late-pregnant (day 17.5) wild-type (Rln(+/+)) and Rln(-/-) mice using wire myography. Pregnancy per se was associated with significant reductions in contraction to phenylephrine, endothelin-1, and ANG II in small mesenteric arteries, while sensitivity to endothelin-1 was reduced in uterine arteries of Rln(+/+) mice. The normal pregnancy-associated attenuation of ANG II-mediated vasoconstriction in mesenteric arteries did not occur in Rln(-/-) mice. This adaptive failure was endothelium-independent and did not result from altered expression of ANG II receptors or regulator of G protein signaling 5 (Rgs5) or increases in reactive oxygen species generation. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase with l-NAME enhanced ANG II-mediated contraction in mesenteric arteries of both genotypes, whereas blockade of prostanoid production with indomethacin only increased ANG II-induced contraction in arteries of pregnant Rln(+/+) mice. In conclusion, relaxin deficiency prevents the normal pregnancy-induced attenuation of ANG II-mediated vasoconstriction in small mesenteric arteries. This is associated with reduced smooth muscle-derived vasodilator prostanoids. PMID:26936785

  5. Taurine deficiency is a cause of vigabatrin-induced retinal phototoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Jammoul, Firas; Wang, Qingping; Nabbout, Rimas; Coriat, Caroline; Duboc, Agnès; Simonutti, Manuel; Dubus, Elisabeth; Craft, Cheryl M.; Ye, Wen; Collins, Stephen D.; Dulac, Olivier; Chiron, Catherine; Sahel, José A.; Picaud, Serge

    2008-01-01

    Objective Although vigabatrin irreversibly constricts the visual field, it remains a potent therapy for infantile spasms and a third-line drug for refractory epilepsies. In albino animals, this drug induces a reduction in retinal cell function, retinal disorganisation and cone photoreceptor damage. The objective of this study was to investigate the light dependence of the vigabatrin-elicited retinal toxicity and to screen for molecules preventing this secondary effect of vigabatrin. Methods Rats and mice were treated daily with vigabatrin 40mg and 3mg, respectively. Retinal cell lesions were demonstrated by assessing cell function with electroretinogram measurements, and quantifying retinal disorganization, gliosis and cone cell densities. Results Vigabatrin-elicited retinal lesions were prevented by maintaining animals in darkness during treatment. Different mechanisms including taurine deficiency were reported to produce such phototoxicity; we therefore measured amino acid plasma levels in vigabatrin-treated animals. Taurine levels were 67% lower in vigabatrin-treated animals than in control animals. Taurine supplementation reduced all components of retinal lesions in both rats and mice. Among 6 vigabatrin-treated infants, the taurine plasma level was found to be below normal in three patients and undetectable in two patients. Interpretation These results indicate that vigabatrin generates a taurine deficiency responsible for its retinal phototoxicity. Future studies will investigate whether co-treatment with taurine and vigabatrin can limit epileptic seizures without inducing the constriction of the visual field. Patients on vigabatrin could gain immediate benefit from reduced light exposures and dietetic advice on taurine-rich foods. PMID:19194884

  6. Bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis is attenuated in gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Annie; Ruiz, Victor; Arreola, José Luis; Ramírez, Remedios; Cisneros-Lira, José; Gaxiola, Miguel; Barrios, Roberto; Kala, Subbarao V; Lieberman, Michael W; Selman, Moisés

    2003-03-15

    To investigate repair mechanisms in bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, we used mice deficient in gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT-/-), a key enzyme in glutathione (GSH) and cysteine metabolism. Seventy-two hours after bleomycin (0.03 U/g), GGT-/- mice displayed a different inflammatory response to wild-type mice as judged by a near absence of neutrophils in lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage and a less pronounced rise in matrix metalloproteinase-9. Inflammation in GGT-/- mice consisted mainly of lymphocytes and macrophages. At 1 month, lungs from bleomycin-treated GGT-/- mice exhibited minimal areas of fibrosis compared with wild-type mice(light microscopy fibrosis index: 510 +/- 756 versus 1975 +/- 817, p < 0.01). Lung collagen content revealed a significant increase in bleomycin-treated wild-type (15.1 +/- 3.8 versus 8.5 +/- 0.7 microg hydroxy(OH)-proline/mg dry weight, p < 0.01) but not in GGT-/- (10.4 +/- 1.7 versus 8.8 +/- 0.8). Control lungs from GGT-/- showed a significant reduction of cysteine (0.03 +/- 0.005 versus 0.055 +/- 0.001, p < 0.02) and GSH levels (1.24 +/- 0.055 versus 1.79 +/- 0.065, p < 0.002). These values decreased after 72 hours of bleomycin in both GGT-/- and wild-type but reached their respective control values after 1 month. Supplementation with N-acetyl cysteine partially ameliorated the effects of GGT deficiency. These findings suggest that increased neutrophils and matrix metalloproteinase-9 during the early inflammatory response and adequate thiol reserves are key elements in the fibrotic response after bleomycin-induced pulmonary injury. PMID:12468440

  7. Cdc42 deficiency induces podocyte apoptosis by inhibiting the Nwasp/stress fibers/YAP pathway

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Z; Zhang, L; Chen, Y; Zhang, H; Zhang, Q; Li, R; Ma, J; Li, Z; Yu, C; Lai, Y; Lin, T; Zhao, X; Zhang, B; Ye, Z; Liu, S; Wang, W; Liang, X; Liao, R; Shi, W

    2016-01-01

    Podocyte apoptosis is a major mechanism that leads to proteinuria in many chronic kidney diseases. However, the concert mechanisms that cause podocyte apoptosis in these kidney diseases are not fully understood. The Rho family of small GTPases has been shown to be required in maintaining podocyte structure and function. Recent studies have indicated that podocyte-specific deletion of Cdc42 in vivo, but not of RhoA or Rac1, leads to congenital nephrotic syndrome and glomerulosclerosis. However, the underlying cellular events in podocyte controlled by Cdc42 remain unclear. Here, we assessed the cellular mechanisms by which Cdc42 regulates podocyte apoptosis. We found that the expression of Cdc42 and its activity were significantly decreased in high glucose-, lipopolysaccharide- or adriamycin-injured podocytes. Reduced Cdc42 expression in vitro and in vivo by small interfering RNA and selective Cdc42 inhibitor ML-141, respectively, caused podocyte apoptosis and proteinuria. Our results further demonstrated that insufficient Cdc42 or Nwasp, its downstream effector, could decrease the mRNA and protein expression of YAP, which had been regarded as an anti-apoptosis protein in podocyte. Moreover, our data indicated that the loss of stress fibers caused by Cdc42/Nwasp deficiency also decreased Yes-associated protein (YAP) mRNA and protein expression, and induced podocyte apoptosis. Podocyte apoptosis induced by Cdc42/Nwasp/stress fiber deficiency was significantly inhibited by overexpressing-active YAP. Thus, the Cdc42/Nwasp/stress fibers/YAP signal pathway may potentially play an important role in regulating podocyte apoptosis. Maintaining necessary Cdc42 would be one potent way to prevent proteinuria kidney diseases. PMID:26986510

  8. NLRP3 Deficiency Reduces Macrophage Interleukin-10 Production and Enhances the Susceptibility to Doxorubicin-induced Cardiotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Motoi; Usui, Fumitake; Karasawa, Tadayoshi; Kawashima, Akira; Kimura, Hiroaki; Mizushina, Yoshiko; Shirasuna, Koumei; Mizukami, Hiroaki; Kasahara, Tadashi; Hasebe, Naoyuki; Takahashi, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    NLRP3 inflammasomes recognize non-microbial danger signals and induce release of proinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-1β, leading to sterile inflammation in cardiovascular disease. Because sterile inflammation is involved in doxorubicin (Dox)-induced cardiotoxicity, we investigated the role of NLRP3 inflammasomes in Dox-induced cardiotoxicity. Cardiac dysfunction and injury were induced by low-dose Dox (15 mg/kg) administration in NLRP3-deficient (NLRP3(-/-)) mice but not in wild-type (WT) and IL-1β(-/-) mice, indicating that NLRP3 deficiency enhanced the susceptibility to Dox-induced cardiotoxicity independent of IL-1β. Although the hearts of WT and NLRP3(-/-) mice showed no significant difference in inflammatory cell infiltration, macrophages were the predominant inflammatory cells in the hearts, and cardiac IL-10 production was decreased in Dox-treated NLRP3(-/-) mice. Bone marrow transplantation experiments showed that bone marrow-derived cells contributed to the exacerbation of Dox-induced cardiotoxicity in NLRP3(-/-) mice. In vitro experiments revealed that NLRP3 deficiency decreased IL-10 production in macrophages. Furthermore, adeno-associated virus-mediated IL-10 overexpression restored the exacerbation of cardiotoxicity in the NLRP3(-/-) mice. These results demonstrated that NLRP3 regulates macrophage IL-10 production and contributes to the pathophysiology of Dox-induced cardiotoxicity, which is independent of IL-1β. Our findings identify a novel role of NLRP3 and provided new insights into the mechanisms underlying Dox-induced cardiotoxicity. PMID:27225830

  9. Deficiency of interleukin-15 enhances susceptibility to acetaminophen-induced liver injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Hou, Hsein-San; Liao, Ching-Len; Sytwu, Huey-Kang; Liao, Nan-Shih; Huang, Tien-Yu; Hsieh, Tsai-Yuan; Chu, Heng-Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Hepatocytes have a direct necrotic role in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury (AILI), prolonged secondary inflammatory response through innate immune cells and cytokines also significantly contributes to APAP hepatotoxicity. Interleukin 15 (IL-15), a multifunction cytokine, regulates the adaptive immune system and influences development and function of innate immune cells. To better understand the role of IL-15 in liver injury, we treated wild-type (WT) and IL-15-knockout (Il15⁻/⁻) mice with a hepatotoxic dose of APAP to induce AILI and evaluated animal survival, liver damage, APAP metabolism in livers and the inflammatory response. Production of pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines was greater in Il15⁻/⁻ than WT mice. Subanalysis of hepatic infiltrated monocytes revealed greater neutrophil influx, along with greater hepatic induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), in Il15⁻/⁻ than WT mice. In addition, the level of hepatic hemeoxygenase 1 (HO-1) was partially suppressed in Il15⁻/⁻ mice, but not in WT mice. Interestingly, elimination of Kupffer cells and neutrophils did not alter the vulnerability to excess APAP in Il15⁻/⁻ mice. However, injection of galactosamine, a hepatic transcription inhibitor, significantly reduced the increased APAP sensitivity in Il15⁻/⁻ mice but had minor effect on WT mice. We demonstrated that deficiency of IL-15 increased mouse susceptibility to AILI. Moreover, Kupffer cell might affect APAP hepatotoxicity through IL-15. PMID:23028657

  10. Deficient PKR in RAX/PKR Association Ameliorates Ethanol-Induced Neurotoxicity in the Developing Cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Chen, Jian; Qi, Yuanlin; Dai, Lu; Zhang, Mingfang; Frank, Jacqueline A; Handshoe, Jonathan W; Cui, Jiajun; Xu, Wenhua; Chen, Gang

    2015-08-01

    Ethanol-induced neuronal loss is closely related to the pathogenesis of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. The cerebellum is one of the brain areas that are most sensitive to ethanol. The mechanism underlying ethanol neurotoxicity remains unclear. Our previous in vitro studies have shown that the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-activated protein kinase (PKR) regulates neuronal apoptosis upon ethanol exposure and ethanol activates PKR through association with its intracellular activator RAX. However, the role of PKR and its interaction with RAX in vivo have not been investigated. In the current study, by utilizing N-PKR-/- mice, C57BL/6J mice with a deficient RAX-binding domain in PKR, we determined the critical role of RAX/PKR association in PKR-regulated ethanol neurotoxicity in the developing cerebellum. Our data indicate that while N-PKR-/- mice have a similar BAC profile as wild-type mice, ethanol induces less brain/body mass reduction as well as cerebellar neuronal loss. In addition, ethanol promotes interleukin-1β (IL-1β) secretion, and IL-1β is a master cytokine regulating inflammatory response. Importantly, ethanol-promoted IL-1β secretion is inhibited in the developing cerebellum of N-PKR-/- mice. Thus, RAX/PKR interaction and PKR activation regulate ethanol neurotoxicity in the developing cerebellum, which may involve ethanol-induced neuroinflammation. Further, PKR could be a possible target for pharmacological intervention to prevent or treat fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). PMID:25592072

  11. Cnr2 Deficiency Confers Resistance to Inflammation-Induced Preterm Birth in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaofei; Cappelletti, Monica; Li, Yingju; Karp, Christopher L.; Divanovic, Senad

    2014-01-01

    Infection-induced inflammation, frequently associated with increased production of proinflammatory cytokines, is considered a significant contributor to preterm birth. A G protein-coupled cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2), encoded by Cnr2, is expressed in various immune cells and was shown to modulate immune responses. We show here that Cnr2, but not Cnr1, deficient mice are resistant to lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-driven preterm birth and suppression of serum progesterone levels. After LPS challenge, Cnr2−/− mice exhibited increased serum levels of IL-10 with decreased IL-6 levels. These changes were associated with reduced LPS-induced Ptgs2 expression at the maternal-conceptus interface on day 16 of pregnancy. LPS stimulation of Cnr2−/− dendritic cells in vitro resulted in increased IL-10 with reduced IL-6 production and correlated with increased cAMP accumulation. Collectively, our results suggest that increased IL-10 production occurring via augmented cAMP accumulation represents a potential mechanism for the resistance of Cnr2−/− mice to LPS-induced preterm birth. These results may have clinical relevance, because currently, there are limited options to prevent preterm birth. PMID:25051450

  12. Sphingosine Kinase 1 Deficiency Confers Protection against Hyperoxia-Induced Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Harijith, Anantha; Pendyala, Srikanth; Reddy, Narsa M.; Bai, Tao; Usatyuk, Peter V.; Berdyshev, Evgeny; Gorshkova, Irina; Huang, Long Shuang; Mohan, Vijay; Garzon, Steve; Kanteti, Prasad; Reddy, Sekhar P.; Raj, J. Usha; Natarajan, Viswanathan

    2014-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia of the premature newborn is characterized by lung injury, resulting in alveolar simplification and reduced pulmonary function. Exposure of neonatal mice to hyperoxia enhanced sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) levels in lung tissues; however, the role of increased S1P in the pathobiological characteristics of bronchopulmonary dysplasia has not been investigated. We hypothesized that an altered S1P signaling axis, in part, is responsible for neonatal lung injury leading to bronchopulmonary dysplasia. To validate this hypothesis, newborn wild-type, sphingosine kinase1−/− (Sphk1−/−), sphingosine kinase 2−/− (Sphk2−/−), and S1P lyase+/− (Sgpl1+/−) mice were exposed to hyperoxia (75%) from postnatal day 1 to 7. Sphk1−/−, but not Sphk2−/− or Sgpl1+/−, mice offered protection against hyperoxia-induced lung injury, with improved alveolarization and alveolar integrity compared with wild type. Furthermore, SphK1 deficiency attenuated hyperoxia-induced accumulation of IL-6 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids and NADPH oxidase (NOX) 2 and NOX4 protein expression in lung tissue. In vitro experiments using human lung microvascular endothelial cells showed that exogenous S1P stimulated intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, whereas SphK1 siRNA, or inhibitor against SphK1, attenuated hyperoxia-induced S1P generation. Knockdown of NOX2 and NOX4, using specific siRNA, reduced both basal and S1P-induced ROS formation. These results suggest an important role for SphK1-mediated S1P signaling–regulated ROS in the development of hyperoxia-induced lung injury in a murine neonatal model of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. PMID:23933064

  13. Dietary tocopherols inhibit PhIP-induced prostate carcinogenesis in CYP1A-humanized mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jayson X; Li, Guangxun; Wang, Hong; Liu, Anna; Lee, Mao-Jung; Reuhl, Kenneth; Suh, Nanjoo; Bosland, Maarten C; Yang, Chung S

    2016-02-01

    Tocopherols, the major forms of vitamin E, exist as alpha-tocopherol (α-T), β-T, γ-T and δ-T. The cancer preventive activity of vitamin E is suggested by epidemiological studies, but recent large-scale cancer prevention trials with high dose of α-T yielded disappointing results. Our hypothesis that other forms of tocopherols have higher cancer preventive activities than α-T was tested, herein, in a novel prostate carcinogenesis model induced by 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo [4,5-b] pyridine (PhIP), a dietary carcinogen, in the CYP1A-humanized (hCYP1A) mice. Treatment of hCYP1A mice with PhIP (200 mg/kg b.w., i.g.) induced high percentages of mouse prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (mPIN), mainly in the dorsolateral glands. Supplementation with a γ-T-rich mixture of tocopherols (γ-TmT, 0.3% in diet) significantly inhibited the development of mPIN lesions and reduced PhIP-induced elevation of 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine, COX-2, nitrotyrosine, Ki-67 and p-AKT, and the loss of PTEN and Nrf2. Further studies with purified δ-T, γ-T or α-T (0.2% in diet) showed that δ-T was more effective than γ-T or α-T in preventing mPIN formations and p-AKT elevation. These results indicate that γ-TmT and δ-T could be effective preventive agents of prostate cancer. PMID:26582657

  14. Epigenetic Alterations in Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced Skin Carcinogenesis: Interaction of Bioactive Dietary Components on Epigenetic Targets†

    PubMed Central

    Katiyar, Santosh K.; Singh, Tripti; Prasad, Ram; Sun, Qian; Vaid, Mudit

    2011-01-01

    The importance of epigenetic alterations in the development of various diseases including the cancers has been realized. As epigenetic changes are reversible heritable changes, these can be utilized as an effective strategy for the prevention of cancers. DNA methylation is the most characterized epigenetic mechanism that can be inherited without changing the DNA sequence. Although limited, but available data suggest that silencing of tumor suppressor genes in ultraviolet (UV) radiation-exposed epidermis leads to photocarcinogenesis and is associated with a network of epigenetic modifications including alterations in DNA methylation, DNA methyltransferases and histone acetylations. Various bioactive dietary components have been shown to protect skin from UV radiation-induced skin tumors in animal models. The role of bioactive dietary components, such as, (−)-epicatechins from green tea and proanthocyanidins from grape seeds, has been assessed in chemoprevention of UV-induced skin carcinogenesis and underlying epigenetic mechanism in vitro and in vivo animal models. These bioactive components have the ability to block UV-induced DNA hypermethylation and histone modifications in the skin required for the silencing of tumor suppressor genes (e.g., Cip1/p21, p16INK4a). These information are of importance for understanding the role of epigenetic modulation in UV-induced skin tumor and the chemopreventive mechanism of bioactive dietary components. PMID:22017262

  15. Preservation and promotion of bone formation in the mandible as a response to a novel calcium-phosphate based biomaterial in mineral deficiency induced low bone mass male versus female rats

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Kritika; Naula, Diana P.; Mijares, Dindo Q.; Janal, Malvin N.; LeGeros, Raquel Z.; Zhang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Calcium and other trace mineral supplements have previously demonstrated to safely improve bone quality. We hypothesize that our novel calcium-phosphate based biomaterial (SBM) preserves and promotes mandibular bone formation in male and female rats on mineral deficient diet (MD). Sixty Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to receive one of three diets (n = 10): basic diet (BD), MD or mineral deficient diet with 2% SBM. Rats were sacrificed after 6 months. Micro-Computed Tomography (μCT) was used to evaluate bone volume and 3D-microarchitecture while microradiography (Faxitron) was used to measure bone mineral density from different sections of the mandible. Results showed that bone quality varied with region, gender and diet. MD reduced bone mineral density (BMD) and volume and increased porosity. SBM preserved BMD and bone mineral content (BMC) in the alveolar bone and condyle in both genders. In the alveolar crest and mandibular body, while preserving more bone in males, SBM also significantly supplemented female bone. Results indicate that mineral deficiency leads to low bone mass in skeletally immature rats, comparatively more in males. Furthermore, SBM administered as a dietary supplement was effective in preventing mandibular bone loss in all subjects. This study suggests that the SBM preparation has potential use in minimizing low peak bone mass induced by mineral deficiency and related bone loss irrespective of gender. PMID:26914814

  16. Preservation and promotion of bone formation in the mandible as a response to a novel calcium-phosphate based biomaterial in mineral deficiency induced low bone mass male versus female rats.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Kritika; Naula, Diana P; Mijares, Dindo Q; Janal, Malvin N; LeGeros, Racquel Z; Zhang, Yu

    2016-07-01

    Calcium and other trace mineral supplements have previously demonstrated to safely improve bone quality. We hypothesize that our novel calcium-phosphate based biomaterial (SBM) preserves and promotes mandibular bone formation in male and female rats on mineral deficient diet (MD). Sixty Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to receive one of three diets (n = 10): basic diet (BD), MD or mineral deficient diet with 2% SBM. Rats were sacrificed after 6 months. Micro-computed tomography (µCT) was used to evaluate bone volume and 3D-microarchitecture while microradiography (Faxitron) was used to measure bone mineral density from different sections of the mandible. Results showed that bone quality varied with region, gender and diet. MD reduced bone mineral density (BMD) and volume and increased porosity. SBM preserved BMD and bone mineral content (BMC) in the alveolar bone and condyle in both genders. In the alveolar crest and mandibular body, while preserving more bone in males, SBM also significantly supplemented female bone. Results indicate that mineral deficiency leads to low bone mass in skeletally immature rats, comparatively more in males. Furthermore, SBM administered as a dietary supplement was effective in preventing mandibular bone loss in all subjects. This study suggests that the SBM preparation has potential use in minimizing low peak bone mass induced by mineral deficiency and related bone loss irrespective of gender. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1622-1632, 2016. PMID:26914814

  17. Metabolite-sensing receptors GPR43 and GPR109A facilitate dietary fibre-induced gut homeostasis through regulation of the inflammasome.

    PubMed

    Macia, Laurence; Tan, Jian; Vieira, Angelica T; Leach, Katie; Stanley, Dragana; Luong, Suzanne; Maruya, Mikako; Ian McKenzie, Craig; Hijikata, Atsushi; Wong, Connie; Binge, Lauren; Thorburn, Alison N; Chevalier, Nina; Ang, Caroline; Marino, Eliana; Robert, Remy; Offermanns, Stefan; Teixeira, Mauro M; Moore, Robert J; Flavell, Richard A; Fagarasan, Sidonia; Mackay, Charles R

    2015-01-01

    Diet and the gut microbiota may underpin numerous human diseases. A major metabolic product of commensal bacteria are short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) that derive from fermentation of dietary fibre. Here we show that diets deficient or low in fibre exacerbate colitis development, while very high intake of dietary fibre or the SCFA acetate protects against colitis. SCFAs binding to the 'metabolite-sensing' receptors GPR43 and GPR109A in non-haematopoietic cells mediate these protective effects. The inflammasome pathway has hitherto been reported as a principal pathway promoting gut epithelial integrity. SCFAs binding to GPR43 on colonic epithelial cells stimulates K(+) efflux and hyperpolarization, which lead to NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Dietary fibre also shapes gut bacterial ecology, resulting in bacterial species that are more effective for inflammasome activation. SCFAs and metabolite receptors thus explain health benefits of dietary fibre, and how metabolite signals feed through to a major pathway for gut homeostasis. PMID:25828455

  18. High dietary calcium intake does not counteract disuse-induced bone loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baecker, N.; Boese, A.; Smith, S. M.; Heer, M.

    Reduction of mechanical stress on bone inhibits osteoblast-mediated bone formation, increases osteoclast-mediated bone resorption, and leads to what has been called disuse osteoporosis. Prolonged therapeutic bed rest, immobilization and space flight are common causes of disuse osteoporosis. There are sufficient data supporting the use of calcium in combination with vitamin D in the prevention and treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis. In our study we examined the potential of high dietary calcium intake as a nutrition therapy for disuse-induced bone loss during head-down bed rest in healthy young men. In 2 identical metabolic ward, head-down bed rest (HDBR) experiments (crossover design), we studied the effect of high dietary calcium intake (2000 mg/d) in comparison to the recommended calcium intake of 1000 mg/d on markers of bone turnover. Experiment A (EA) was a 6-day randomized, controlled HDBR study. Experiment B (EB) was a 14-day randomized, controlled HDBR study. In both experiments, the test subjects stayed under well-controlled environmental conditions in our metabolic ward. Subjects' diets in the relevant study phases (HDBR versus Ambulatory Control) of EA and EB were identical except for the calcium intake. The subjects obtained 2000 mg/d Calcium in EA and 2000 mg/d in EB. Blood was drawn at baseline, before entering the relevant intervention period, on day 5 in study EA, and on days 6, 11 and 14 in study EB. Serum calcium, bone formation markers - Procollagen-I-C-Propeptide (PICP) and bone alkaline phosphatase (bAP) were analyzed in serum. 24h-urine was collected throughout the studies for determination of the excretion of calcium (UCaV) and a bone resorption marker, C-terminal telopeptide of collagen type I (UCTX). In both studies, serum calcium levels were unchanged. PICP tended to decrease in EA (p=0.08). In EB PICP decreased significantly over time (p=0.003) in both the control and HDBR periods, and tended to further decrease in the HDBR period (p

  19. Flesh Quality Loss in Response to Dietary Isoleucine Deficiency and Excess in Fish: A Link to Impaired Nrf2-Dependent Antioxidant Defense in Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Lu; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Wu, Pei; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Jun; Li, Shu-Hong; Tang, Ling; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Feng, Lin; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2014-01-01

    The present study explored the impact of dietary isoleucine (Ile) on fish growth and flesh quality and revealed a possible role of muscle antioxidant defense in flesh quality in relation to dietary Ile. Grass carp (weighing 256.8±3.5 g) were fed diets containing six graded levels of Ile (3.8, 6.6, 9.3, 12.5, 15.2 and 18.5 g/kg) for eight weeks. The results indicated that compared with Ile deficiency (3.8 g/kg diets) and excess (18.5 g/kg diets) groups, 9.3–15.2 g Ile/kg diet supplementations promoted fish growth and muscle fat deposition, whereas 6.6–15.2 g Ile/kg diets supplementation enhanced muscle nutrients (protein and total EAAs) deposition. Furthermore, muscle shear force, pH value, and hydroxyproline concentration were improved by 9.3–12.5, 9.3 and 9.3 g Ile/kg diet supplementations, respectively. However, muscle cooking loss, lactate content, and activities of cathepsin B and L were decreased by 6.6–15.2, 9.3–12.5, 9.3–12.5 and 9.3–15.2 g Ile/kg diet supplementations, respectively. Additionally, 6.6–15.2 and 6.6–12.5 g Ile/kg diet supplementations attenuated malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl contents, respectively. The activities of copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione content were enhanced by 6.6–9.3, 6.6–12.5 and 6.6–15.2 g Ile/kg diet supplementations, respectively. Moreover, the relative mRNA expressions of antioxidant enzymes, including Cu/Zn-SOD (6.6–12.5 g/kg diets) and GPx (12.5 g/kg diets), as well as antioxidant-related signaling molecules, including NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) (6.6–12.5 g/kg diets), target of rapamycin (6.6–12.5 g/kg diets), ribosomal S6 protein kinase 1 (9.3–12.5 g/kg diets) and casein kinase 2 (6.6–12.5 g/kg diets), were up-regulated when Ile diet supplementations were administered at these levels, respectively, whereas the relative mRNA expression of Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 was down-regulated with 9.3 g Ile/kg diet

  20. Dietary L-arginine supplementation attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory response in broiler chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of dietary L-arginine (Arg) supplementation on inflammatory response and innate immunity of broilers. Experiment 1 was designed as a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement (n = 8 cages/treatment; 6 birds/cage) with 3 dietary Arg concentrations (1.05, 1.4...

  1. Rapamycin and dietary restriction induce metabolically distinctive changes in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhen; Wang, Rong; Fok, Wilson C; Coles, Alexander; Salmon, Adam B; Pérez, Viviana I

    2015-04-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) is the gold standard intervention used to delay aging, and much recent research has focused on the identification of possible DR mimetics. Energy sensing pathways, including insulin/IGF1 signaling, sirtuins, and mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR), have been proposed as pathways involved in the antiaging actions of DR, and compounds that affect these pathways have been suggested to act as DR mimetics, including metformin (insulin/IGF1 signaling), resveratrol (sirtuins), and rapamycin (mTOR). Rapamycin is a promising DR mimetic because it significantly increases both health span and life span in mice. Unfortunately, rapamycin also leads to some negative effects, foremost among which is the induction of insulin resistance, potentially limiting its translation into humans. To begin clarifying the mechanism(s) involved in insulin resistance induced by rapamycin, we compared several aspects of liver metabolism in mice treated with DR or rapamycin for 6 months. Our data suggest that although both DR and rapamycin inhibit lipogenesis, activate lipolysis, and increased serum levels of nonesterified fatty acids, only DR further activates β-oxidation of the fatty acids leading to the production of ketone bodies. PMID:24755936

  2. Are dietary fiber-induced alterations in colonic epithelial cell proliferation predictive of fiber's effect on colon cancer?

    PubMed

    Whiteley, L O; Klurfeld, D M

    2000-01-01

    Alterations in cell proliferation of the colon have been observed as a result of changes in amount and type of dietary fiber and in relation to risk of developing colon cancer. Although some human observational and intervention studies contribute to the database, most information results from experiments on rodents. Because of numerous contradictory reports linking dietary fiber, cell proliferation, and colon cancer, we undertook a critical review of existing methods in an attempt to explain the inconsistencies. Although there may be some individual types of dietary fiber that protect against chemically induced colon cancer, dietary fiber as a single entity does not appear to afford any consistent protection. Because of significant differences in experimental protocols among laboratories, it is not yet possible to state with certainty that increases in cell proliferation, induced by fiber consumption, are predictive of increased tumorigenesis. Much of what has been observed and interpreted as elevation of risk may simply be normal homeostatic changes in cell proliferation. Even though fermentation to short-chain fatty acids is a mechanistically attractive hypothesis to explain why fiber modulates cytokinetics, data do not consistently support short-chain fatty acids as biological intermediates in risk of colon cancer. The state of the art in this field has not yet progressed to the point where a clear effect of dietary fiber on cytokinetics and colon carcinogenesis can be assessed with any degree of certainty. Additional markers of apoptosis, differentiation, and cell-cell communication may be required for a more accurate analysis of the relation among fiber, cytokinetics, and colon cancer. PMID:10890023

  3. S-adenosylmethionine reduces the progress of the Alzheimer-like features induced by B-vitamin deficiency in mice.

    PubMed

    Fuso, Andrea; Nicolia, Vincenzina; Ricceri, Laura; Cavallaro, Rosaria A; Isopi, Elisa; Mangia, Franco; Fiorenza, Maria Teresa; Scarpa, Sigfrido

    2012-07-01

    Methylation reactions linked to homocysteine in the one-carbon metabolism are increasingly elicited in Alzheimer's disease, although the association of hyperhomocysteinemia and of low B vitamin levels with the disease is still debated. We previously demonstrated that hyperhomocysteinemia and DNA hypomethylation induced by B vitamin deficiency are associated with PSEN1 and BACE1 overexpression and amyloid production. The present study is aimed at assessing S-adenosylmethionine effects in mice kept under a condition of B vitamin deficiency. To this end, TgCRND8 mice and wild-type littermates were assigned to control or B vitamin deficient diet, with or without S-adenosylmethionine supplementation. We found that S-adenosylmethionine reduced amyloid production, increased spatial memory in TgCRND8 mice and inhibited the upregulation of B vitamin deficiency-induced PSEN1 and BACE1 expression and Tau phosphorylation in TgCRND8 and wild-type mice. Furthermore, S-adenosylmethionine treatment reduced plaque spreading independently on B vitamin deficiency. These results strengthen our previous observations on the possible role of one-carbon metabolism in Alzheimer's disease, highlighting hyperhomocysteinemia-related mechanisms in dementia onset/progression and encourage further studies aimed at evaluating the use of S-adenosylmethionine as a potential candidate drug for the treatment of the disease. PMID:22221883

  4. [Dysfunction of serotonergic systems in thiamine-deficient diet fed mice: effects of SSRI on abnormality induced by thiamine deficiency].

    PubMed

    Murata, Atsunobu; Nakagawasai, Osamu; Yamadera, Fumihiro; Oba, Akira; Wakui, Kenji; Arai, Yuichiro; Tadano, Takeshi

    2004-04-01

    Mice fed a thiamine deficient (TD) diet, showed some abnormal behaviors such as amnesia and mood abnormality. It is known that several neurons, especially marked in serotonergic neuron, are damaged in humans and rodents in the earlier phase of TD. The symptoms derived from dysfunction of serotonergic neurons are observed in Wernicke-Korsakoff patients (WKS)-derived TD, and it is known that fluvoxamine is effective for WKS. However, the mechanism of this dysfunction is still unclear. For that reason, we studied the relative mechanism between abnormal behaviors and selective dysfunction of serotonergic neurons in TD animals. As a result, this dysfunction by TD is much affected by the brainstem region. But the effect of fluvoxamine on depressive symptoms in WKS patients is not reported; therefore we also studied the effects of fluvoxamine on the depressive behaviors in TD mice as a model of WKS. The increase of immobility time in a forced swimming test as depressive behavior in TD mice was significantly inhibited by fluvoxamine, suggesting an improvable effect on depressive symptoms. With those results of ours, the possible mechanisms between the abnormal behaviors derived from the dysfunction of serotonergic neurons and the role of serotonin in TD and WKS are reviewed here. PMID:15164618

  5. Hepatic Deficiency of Augmenter of Liver Regeneration Exacerbates Alcohol-Induced Liver Injury and Promotes Fibrosis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sudhir; Wang, Jiang; Rani, Richa; Gandhi, Chandrashekhar R

    2016-01-01

    Why only a subpopulation (about 15%) of humans develops liver cirrhosis due to alcohol is a critical as yet unanswered question. Liver-specific depletion of augmenter of liver regeneration (ALR) protein in mice causes robust steatosis and hepatocyte apoptosis by 2 weeks; these pathologies regress subsequently with return of ALR expression even at lower than control levels, but the mice develop modest steatohepatitis by 8 weeks. We aimed to investigate whether chronic alcohol ingestion promotes excessive hepatic fibrosis in these ALR-deficient mice. Liver-specific ALR-deficient and wild type (WT) female mice (8-10 weeks old) were placed on 4% alcohol-supplemented or isocaloric diet for 4 weeks. Liver sections were examined for histopathology, and parameters of steatosis and fibrosis were quantified. The mRNA expression of alcohol dehydrogenase-1, acetaldehyde dehydrogenase-1 and cytochrome P450-2E1 increased in WT mice but decreased in ALR-deficient mice upon alcohol ingestion. While alcohol induced steatosis and mild inflammation in WT mice, ALR-deficient mice showed minimal steatosis, strong hepatocellular injury and inflammation, prominent ductular proliferation, and robust fibrosis. Compared to the WT mice, alcohol feeding of ALR-deficient mice resulted in significantly greater increase in hepatic TNFα and TGFβ, and oxidative stress; there was also hepatic iron accumulation, robust lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial DNA damage. Importantly, similar to ALR-deficient mice, lower hepatic ALR levels in human alcoholic liver cirrhosis were associated with increased iron content, reduced expression of alcohol dehydrogenase and acetaldehyde dehydrogenase, and elevated fibrogenic markers. We conclude that ALR deficiency or anomaly can play a critical role in alcohol-induced hepatic fibrosis/cirrhosis, mechanisms of which may involve dysregulation of alcohol metabolism and iron homeostasis, mitochondrial damage and oxidative injury. PMID:26808690

  6. Hepatic Deficiency of Augmenter of Liver Regeneration Exacerbates Alcohol-Induced Liver Injury and Promotes Fibrosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sudhir; Wang, Jiang; Rani, Richa; Gandhi, Chandrashekhar R.

    2016-01-01

    Why only a subpopulation (about 15%) of humans develops liver cirrhosis due to alcohol is a critical as yet unanswered question. Liver-specific depletion of augmenter of liver regeneration (ALR) protein in mice causes robust steatosis and hepatocyte apoptosis by 2 weeks; these pathologies regress subsequently with return of ALR expression even at lower than control levels, but the mice develop modest steatohepatitis by 8 weeks. We aimed to investigate whether chronic alcohol ingestion promotes excessive hepatic fibrosis in these ALR-deficient mice. Liver-specific ALR-deficient and wild type (WT) female mice (8–10 weeks old) were placed on 4% alcohol-supplemented or isocaloric diet for 4 weeks. Liver sections were examined for histopathology, and parameters of steatosis and fibrosis were quantified. The mRNA expression of alcohol dehydrogenase-1, acetaldehyde dehydrogenase-1 and cytochrome P450-2E1 increased in WT mice but decreased in ALR-deficient mice upon alcohol ingestion. While alcohol induced steatosis and mild inflammation in WT mice, ALR-deficient mice showed minimal steatosis, strong hepatocellular injury and inflammation, prominent ductular proliferation, and robust fibrosis. Compared to the WT mice, alcohol feeding of ALR-deficient mice resulted in significantly greater increase in hepatic TNFα and TGFβ, and oxidative stress; there was also hepatic iron accumulation, robust lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial DNA damage. Importantly, similar to ALR-deficient mice, lower hepatic ALR levels in human alcoholic liver cirrhosis were associated with increased iron content, reduced expression of alcohol dehydrogenase and acetaldehyde dehydrogenase, and elevated fibrogenic markers. We conclude that ALR deficiency or anomaly can play a critical role in alcohol-induced hepatic fibrosis/cirrhosis, mechanisms of which may involve dysregulation of alcohol metabolism and iron homeostasis, mitochondrial damage and oxidative injury. PMID:26808690

  7. Thiamine deficiency induces oxidative stress and exacerbates the plaque pathology in Alzheimer’s mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Karuppagounder, Saravanan S.; Xu, Hui; Shi, Qingli; Chen, Lian H.; Pedrini, Steve; Pechman, David; Baker, Harriet; Beal, M. Flint; Gandy, Sam E.; Gibson, Gary E.

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and reductions in thiamine-dependent enzymes have been implicated in multiple neurological disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Experimental thiamine deficiency (TD) is an established model for reducing the activities of thiamine-dependent enzymes in brain. TD diminishes thiamine dependent enzymes throughout the brain, but produces a time-dependent selective neuronal loss, glial activation, inflammation, abnormalities in oxidative metabolism and clusters of degenerating neurites in only specific thalamic regions. The present studies tested how TD alters brain pathology in Tg19959 transgenic mice over expressing a double mutant form of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). TD exacerbated amyloid plaque pathology in transgenic mice and enlarged the area occupied by plaques in cortex, hippocampus and thalamus by 50%, 200% and 200%, respectively. TD increased Aβ1–42 levels by about three-fold, β-CTF (C99) levels by 33% and β-secretase (BACE1) protein levels by 43%. TD induced inflammation in areas of plaque formation. Thus, the induction of mild impairment of oxidative metabolism, oxidative stress and inflammation induced by TD alters metabolism of APP and/or Aβ and promotes accumulation of plaques independent of neuron loss or neuritic clusters. PMID:18406011

  8. Plasmepsin 4-Deficient Plasmodium berghei Are Virulence Attenuated and Induce Protective Immunity against Experimental Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Spaccapelo, Roberta; Janse, Chris J.; Caterbi, Sara; Franke-Fayard, Blandine; Bonilla, J. Alfredo; Syphard, Luke M.; Di Cristina, Manlio; Dottorini, Tania; Savarino, Andrea; Cassone, Antonio; Bistoni, Francesco; Waters, Andrew P.; Dame, John B.; Crisanti, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Plasmodium parasites lacking plasmepsin 4 (PM4), an aspartic protease that functions in the lysosomal compartment and contributes to hemoglobin digestion, have only a modest decrease in the asexual blood-stage growth rate; however, PM4 deficiency in the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium berghei results in significantly less virulence than that for the parental parasite. P. berghei Δpm4 parasites failed to induce experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) in ECM-susceptible mice, and ECM-resistant mice were able to clear infections. Furthermore, after a single infection, all convalescent mice were protected against subsequent parasite challenge for at least 1 year. Real-time in vivo parasite imaging and splenectomy experiments demonstrated that protective immunity acted through antibody-mediated parasite clearance in the spleen. This work demonstrates, for the first time, that a single Plasmodium gene disruption can generate virulence-attenuated parasites that do not induce cerebral complications and, moreover, are able to stimulate strong protective immunity against subsequent challenge with wild-type parasites. Parasite blood-stage attenuation should help identify protective immune responses against malaria, unravel parasite-derived factors involved in malarial pathologies, such as cerebral malaria, and potentially pave the way for blood-stage whole organism vaccines. PMID:20019192

  9. Antiosteoclastic activity of milk thistle extract after ovariectomy to suppress estrogen deficiency-induced osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Lye; Kim, Yun-Ho; Kang, Min-Kyung; Gong, Ju-Hyun; Han, Seoung-Jun; Kang, Young-Hee

    2013-01-01

    Bone integrity abnormality and imbalance between bone formation by osteoblasts and bone resorption by osteoclasts are known to result in metabolic bone diseases such as osteoporosis. Silymarin-rich milk thistle extract (MTE) and its component silibinin enhanced alkaline phosphatase activity of osteoblasts but reduced tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity of osteoclasts. The osteoprotective effects of MTE were comparable to those of estrogenic isoflavone. Low-dose combination of MTE and isoflavone had a pharmacological synergy that may be useful for osteogenic activity. This study attempted to reveal the suppressive effects of MTE on bone loss. C57BL/6 female mice were ovariectomized (OVX) as a model for postmenopausal osteopenia and orally administered 10 mg/kg MTE or silibinin for 8 weeks. The sham-operated mice served as estrogen controls. The treatment of ovariectomized mice with nontoxic MTE and silibinin improved femoral bone mineral density and serum receptor activator of nuclear factor- κB ligand/osteoprotegerin ratio, an index of osteoclastogenic stimulus. In addition, the administration of MTE or silibinin inhibited femoral bone loss induced by ovariectomy and suppressed femoral TRAP activity and cathepsin K induction responsible for osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption. Collectively, oral dosage of MTE containing silibinin in the preclinical setting is effective in preventing estrogen deficiency-induced bone loss. PMID:23781510

  10. Kindling-induced learning deficiency and possible cellular and molecular involved mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sherafat, Mohammad Amin; Ronaghi, Abdolaziz; Ahmad-Molaei, Leila; Nejadhoseynian, Mohammad; Ghasemi, Rasoul; Hosseini, Arman; Naderi, Nima; Motamedi, Fereshteh

    2013-06-01

    Hippocampus learning disturbance is a major symptom of patients with seizure, hence hippocampal dysfunction has essential role in worsening the disease. Hippocampal formation includes neurons and myelinated fibers that are necessary for acquisition and consolidation of memory, long-term potentiation and learning activity. The exact mechanism by which seizure can decrease memory and learning activity of hippocampus remains unknown. In the present study, electrical kindling-induced learning deficit in rats was evaluated by Morris water maze (MWM) test. The hippocampus was removed and changes in neurons and myelin sheaths around hippocampal fibers were investigated using histological and immunohistochemical methods. Demyelination was assessed by luxol fast blue staining, and immunohistological staining of myelin-binding protein (MBP). The TUNEL assay was used for evaluation of neuronal apoptosis and the glial fibriliary acetic protein (GFAP) was used for assessment of inflammatory reaction. The results indicated that electrical kindling of hippocampus could induce deficiency in spatial learning and memory as compared to control group. In addition, electrical kindling caused damage to the myelin sheath around hippocampal fibers and produced vast demyelination. Furthermore, an increase in the number of apoptotic cells in hippocampal slices was observed. In addition, inflammatory response was higher in kindled animals as compared to the control group. The results suggested that the decrease in learning and memory in kindled animals is likely due to demyelination and augmentation in apoptosis rate accompanied by inflammatory reaction in hippocampal neurons of kindled rats. PMID:22744648

  11. Influence of Corticosteroids and Vitamin E Deficiency on Onset and Cytopathology of Radiation-Induced Cataract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junk, A. K.; Worgul, B. V.

    Cataracts characteristic of those arising from radiation exposure have been reported among the astronaut and cosmonaut corps. This being the case it is critical to appreciate how radiogenic cataracts relate to those arising from other exogenous causes such as therapeutics, which may, one day, have to be administered on an extended mission. Because they produce precisely the same clinical picture, corticosteroids are examples of a class of drugs that potentially can exacerbate damage to the lens from radiation. On the other hand, Vitamin E, a free radical scavenger, has been shown to ameliorate oxidative damage as caused by ionizing radiation and evidence is accumulating that it may constitute protection from radiogenic damage. An experimental study was conducted to understand if corticosteroids with and in the absence of Vitamin E deficiency modulate the onset of cataract induced by ionizing radiation. The right eyes of 72 28-day-old Brown-Norway rats were irradiated with 6 Gy of 240 kV X-rays, the shielded left eyes served as controls. Half of the animals were maintained on a Vitamin E free diet after irradiation, the others were kept on regular chow. In each nutritional group 18 rats additionally received dexamethasone. The initial daily dose of 10 mg/kg body weight injected subcutaneously was reduced to 0.5 mg/kg over the course of 6 months. Cataract onset and development were followed by weekly slit-lamp exam. After 6 month the lenses were harvested for microscopic analyses. Irradiated eyes in all treatment subgroups showed early cataract onset [5 wks versus 11 wks in controls (p<0.0001)]. Corticosteroids accounted for accelerated cataract development in both irradiated (p<0.0005) and non-irradiated eyes (p<0.0001) relative to respective control eyes. Vitamin E deficiency did not affect cataract incidence in combination with radiation or steroids alone. Unexpectedly, when compared to irradiated controls, cataract development was inhibited in the group that

  12. Influence of corticosteroids and vitamin E deficiency on onset of radiation-induced cataract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junk, A. K.; Worgul, B. W.

    Cataracts characteristic of those arising from radiation exposure have been reported among the astronaut and cosmonaut corps. This being the case it is critical to appreciate how radiogenic cataracts relate to those arising from other exogenous causes such as therapeutics, which may, one day, have to be administered on an extended mission. Because they produce precisely the same clinical picture, corticosteroids are examples of a class of drugs that potentially can exacerbate damage to the lens from radiation. On the other hand, Vitamin E, a free radical scavenger, has been shown to ameliorate oxidative damage as caused by ionizing radiation and evidence is accumulating that it may constitute protection from radiogenic damage. An experimental study was conducted to understand if corticosteroids with, and in the absence of Vitamin E deficiency modulate the onset of cataract induced by ionizing radiation. The right eyes of seventy-two 28-day-old Brown-Norway rats were irradiated with 6 Gy of 240 kV X-rays, the shielded left eyes served as controls. Half of the animals were maintained on a Vitamin E free diet after irradiation, the others were kept on standard chow. Fifty per cent of the animals in each nutritional group received dexamethasone. The initial daily dose of 10 mg/kg body weight injected subcutaneously was reduced to 0.5 mg/kg over the course of six months. Cataract onset and development were followed by weekly slit-lamp exam. After six month the lenses were harvested for microscopic analyses. Irradiated eyes in all treatment subgroups showed early cataract onset [5 wks vs. 11 wks in controls ( p < 0.0001)]. Corticosteroids accounted for accelerated cataract development in both irradiated ( p < 0.0005) and non-irradiated eyes ( p < 0.0001) relative to respective control eyes. Vitamin E deficiency did not affect cataract incidence in combination with radiation or steroids alone. Unexpectedly, when compared to irradiated controls, cataract development was

  13. Dietary antioxidants protect gut epithelial cells from oxidant-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Mark JS; Angeles, Fausto M; Reuter, Brian K; Bobrowski, Paul; Sandoval, Manuel

    2001-01-01

    Background The potential of ascorbic acid and two botanical decoctions, green tea and cat's claw, to limit cell death in response to oxidants were evaluated in vitro. Methods Cultured human gastric epithelial cells (AGS) or murine small intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-18) were exposed to oxidants – DPPH (3 μM), H2O2 (50 μM), peroxynitrite (300 μM) – followed by incubation for 24 hours, with antioxidants (10 μg/ml) administered as a 1 hour pretreatment. Cell number (MTT assay) and death via apoptosis or necrosis (ELISA, LDH release) was determined. The direct interactions between antioxidants and DPPH (100 μM) or H2O2 (50 μM) were evaluated by spectroscopy. Results The decoctions did not interact with H2O2, but quenched DPPH although less effectively than vitamin C. In contrast, vitamin C was significantly less effective in protecting human gastric epithelial cells (AGS) from apoptosis induced by DPPH, peroxynitrite and H2O2 (P < 0.001). Green tea and cat's claw were equally protective against peroxynitrite and H2O2, but green tea was more effective than cat's claw in reducing DPPH-induced apoptosis (P < 0.01). Necrotic cell death was marginally evident at these low concentrations of peroxynitrite and H2O2, and was attenuated both by cat's claw and green tea (P < 0.01). In IEC-18 cells, all antioxidants were equally effective as anti-apoptotic agents. Conclusions These results indicate that dietary antioxidants can limit epithelial cell death in response to oxidant stress. In the case of green tea and cat's claw, the cytoprotective response exceed their inherent ability to interact with the injurious oxidant, suggestive of actions on intracellular pathways regulating cell death. PMID:11749672

  14. Nitric Oxide Induction of Parkin Translocation in PTEN-induced Putative Kinase 1 (PINK1) Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ji-Young; Kang, Min-Ji; Kim, Kyung-Hee; Han, Pyung-Lim; Kim, Hyun-Seok; Ha, Ji-Young; Son, Jin H.

    2015-01-01

    The failure to trigger mitophagy is implicated in the pathogenesis of familial Parkinson disease that is caused by PINK1 or Parkin mutations. According to the prevailing PINK1-Parkin signaling model, mitophagy is promoted by the mitochondrial translocation of Parkin, an essential PINK1-dependent step that occurs via a previously unknown mechanism. Here we determined that critical concentrations of NO was sufficient to induce the mitochondrial translocation of Parkin even in PINK1 deficiency, with apparent increased interaction of full-length PINK1 accumulated during mitophagy, with neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). Specifically, optimum levels of NO enabled PINK1-null dopaminergic neuronal cells to regain the mitochondrial translocation of Parkin, which appeared to be significantly suppressed by nNOS-null mutation. Moreover, nNOS-null mutation resulted in the same mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) enzyme deficits as PINK1-null mutation. The involvement of mitochondrial nNOS activation in mitophagy was further confirmed by the greatly increased interactions of full-length PINK1 with nNOS, accompanied by mitochondrial accumulation of phospho-nNOS (Ser1412) during mitophagy. Of great interest is that the L347P PINK1 mutant failed to bind to nNOS. The loss of nNOS phosphorylation and Parkin accumulation on PINK1-deficient mitochondria could be reversed in a PINK1-dependent manner. Finally, non-toxic levels of NO treatment aided in the recovery of PINK1-null dopaminergic neuronal cells from mitochondrial ETC enzyme deficits. In summary, we demonstrated the full-length PINK1-dependent recruitment of nNOS, its activation in the induction of Parkin translocation, and the feasibility of NO-based pharmacotherapy for defective mitophagy and ETC enzyme deficits in Parkinson disease. PMID:25716315

  15. ACETAMINOPHEN-INDUCED HEPATIC NEUTROPHIL ACCUMULATION AND INFLAMMATORY LIVER INJURY IN CD18-DEFICIENT MICE

    PubMed Central

    Williams, C. David; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2014-01-01

    Background Acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity is currently the most frequent cause of acute liver failure in the US and many European countries. Although intracellular signaling mechanisms are critical for hepatocellular injury, a contribution of inflammatory cells, especially neutrophils, has been suggested. However, conflicting results were obtained when using immunological intervention strategies. Aims The role of neutrophils was investigated using a CD18-deficient mouse model. Results Treatment of C57Bl/6 wild type mice with 300 mg/kg APAP resulted in severe liver cell necrosis at 12 and 24 h. This injury was accompanied by formation of cytokines and chemokines and accumulation of neutrophils in the liver. However, there was no difference in the inflammatory response or liver injury in CD18-deficient mice compared to wild type animals. In contrast to treatment with endotoxin, no upregulation of CD11b or priming for reactive oxygen was observed on neutrophils isolated from the peripheral blood or the liver after APAP administration. Furthermore, animals treated with endotoxin 3 h after APAP experienced an exaggerated inflammatory response as indicated by substantially higher cytokine and chemokine formation and twice the number of neutrophils in the liver. However, liver injury in the two-hit model was the same as with APAP alone. Conclusions Our data do not support the hypothesis that neutrophils contribute to APAP hepatotoxicity or that a neutrophil-mediated injury phase could be provoked by a second, pro-inflammatory hit. Thus, APAP-induced liver injury in mice is dominated by intracellular mechanisms of cell death rather than by neutrophilic inflammation. PMID:20500806

  16. Autophagy deficiency in myeloid cells increases susceptibility to obesity-induced diabetes and experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hae-Youn; Kim, Jinyoung; Quan, Wenying; Lee, June-Chul; Kim, Min-Soo; Kim, Seok-Hyung; Bae, Jin-Woo; Hur, Kyu Yeon; Lee, Myung-Shik

    2016-08-01

    Autophagy, which is critical for the proper turnover of organelles such as endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, affects diverse aspects of metabolism, and its dysregulation has been incriminated in various metabolic disorders. However, the role of autophagy of myeloid cells in adipose tissue inflammation and type 2 diabetes has not been addressed. We produced mice with myeloid cell-specific deletion of Atg7 (autophagy-related 7), an essential autophagy gene (Atg7 conditional knockout [cKO] mice). While Atg7 cKO mice were metabolically indistinguishable from control mice, they developed diabetes when bred to ob/w mice (Atg7 cKO-ob/ob mice), accompanied by increases in the crown-like structure, inflammatory cytokine expression and inflammasome activation in adipose tissue. Mφs (macrophages) from Atg7 cKO mice showed significantly higher interleukin 1 β release and inflammasome activation in response to a palmitic acid plus lipopolysaccharide combination. Moreover, a decrease in the NAD(+):NADH ratio and increase in intracellular ROS content after treatment with palmitic acid in combination with lipopolysaccharide were more pronounced in Mφs from Atg7 cKO mice, suggesting that mitochondrial dysfunction in autophagy-deficient Mφs leads to an increase in lipid-induced inflammasome and metabolic deterioration in Atg7 cKO-ob/ob mice. Atg7 cKO mice were more susceptible to experimental colitis, accompanied by increased colonic cytokine expression, T helper 1 skewing and systemic bacterial invasion. These results suggest that autophagy of Mφs is important for the control of inflammasome activation in response to metabolic or extrinsic stress, and autophagy deficiency in Mφs may contribute to the progression of metabolic syndrome associated with lipid injury and colitis. PMID:27337687

  17. Strigolactones are required for nitric oxide to induce root elongation in response to nitrogen and phosphate deficiencies in rice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huwei; Bi, Yang; Tao, Jinyuan; Huang, Shuangjie; Hou, Mengmeng; Xue, Ren; Liang, Zhihao; Gu, Pengyuan; Yoneyama, Koichi; Xie, Xiaonan; Shen, Qirong; Xu, Guohua; Zhang, Yali

    2016-07-01

    The response of the root system architecture to nutrient deficiencies is critical for sustainable agriculture. Nitric oxide (NO) is considered a key regulator of root growth, although the mechanisms remain unknown. Phenotypic, cellular and genetic analyses were undertaken in rice to explore the role of NO in regulating root growth and strigolactone (SL) signalling under nitrogen-deficient and phosphate-deficient conditions (LN and LP). LN-induced and LP-induced seminal root elongation paralleled NO production in root tips. NO played an important role in a shared pathway of LN-induced and LP-induced root elongation via increased meristem activity. Interestingly, no responses of root elongation were observed in SL d mutants compared with wild-type plants, although similar NO accumulation was induced by sodium nitroprusside (SNP) application. Application of abamine (the SL inhibitor) reduced seminal root length and pCYCB1;1::GUS expression induced by SNP application in wild type; furthermore, comparison with wild type showed lower SL-signalling genes in nia2 mutants under control and LN treatments and similar under SNP application. Western blot analysis revealed that NO, similar to SL, triggered proteasome-mediated degradation of D53 protein levels. Therefore, we presented a novel signalling pathway in which NO-activated seminal root elongation under LN and LP conditions, with the involvement of SLs. PMID:27194103

  18. Folate deficiency-induced oxidative stress contributes to neuropathy in young and aged zebrafish--implication in neural tube defects and Alzheimer's diseases.

    PubMed

    Kao, Tseng-Ting; Chu, Chia-Yi; Lee, Gang-Hui; Hsiao, Tsun-Hsien; Cheng, Nai-Wei; Chang, Nan-Shan; Chen, Bing-Hung; Fu, Tzu-Fun

    2014-11-01

    Folate is a nutrient essential for the development, function and regeneration of nervous systems. Folate deficiency has been linked to many neurological disorders including neural tube defects in fetus and Alzheimer's diseases in the elderly. However, the etiology underlying these folate deficiency-associated diseases is not completely understood. In this study, zebrafish transgenic lines with timing and duration-controllable folate deficiency were developed by ectopically overexpressing a recombinant EGFP-γ-glutamyl hydrolase (γGH). Impeded neural crest cell migration was observed in the transgenic embryos when folate deficiency was induced in early stages, leading to defective neural tube closure and hematopoiesis. Adding reduced folate or N-acetylcysteine reversed the phenotypic anomalies, supporting the causal link between the increased oxidative stress and the folate deficiency-induced abnormalities. When folate deficiency was induced in aged fish accumulation of beta-amyloid and phosphorylated Tau protein were found in the fish brain cryo-sections. Increased autophagy and accumulation of acidic autolysosome were apparent in folate deficient neuroblastoma cells, which were reversed by reduced folate or N-acetylcysteine supplementation. Decreased expression of cathepsin B, a lysosomal protease, was also observed in cells and tissue with folate deficiency. We concluded that folate deficiency-induced oxidative stress contributed to the folate deficiency-associated neuropathogenesis in both early and late stages of life. PMID:25131448

  19. The Vacuolar Manganese Transporter MTP8 Determines Tolerance to Iron Deficiency-Induced Chlorosis in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency is a widespread nutritional disorder on calcareous soils. To identify genes involved in the Fe deficiency response, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) transfer DNA insertion lines were screened on a high-pH medium with low Fe availability. This approach identified METAL TOLERANCE PROTEIN8 (MTP8), a member of the Cation Diffusion Facilitator family, as a critical determinant for the tolerance to Fe deficiency-induced chlorosis, also on soil substrate. Subcellular localization to the tonoplast, complementation of a manganese (Mn)-sensitive Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strain, and Mn sensitivity of mtp8 knockout mutants characterized the protein as a vacuolar Mn transporter suitable to prevent plant cells from Mn toxicity. MTP8 expression was strongly induced on low-Fe as well as high-Mn medium, which were both strictly dependent on the transcription factor FIT, indicating that high-Mn stress induces Fe deficiency. mtp8 mutants were only hypersensitive to Fe deficiency when Mn was present in the medium, which further suggested an Mn-specific role of MTP8 during Fe limitation. Under those conditions, mtp8 mutants not only translocated more Mn to the shoot than did wild-type plants but suffered in particular from critically low Fe concentrations and, hence, Fe chlorosis, although the transcriptional Fe deficiency response was up-regulated more strongly in mtp8. The diminished uptake of Fe from Mn-containing low-Fe medium by mtp8 mutants was caused by an impaired ability to boost the ferric chelate reductase activity, which is an essential process in Fe acquisition. These findings provide a mechanistic explanation for the long-known interference of Mn in Fe nutrition and define the molecular processes by which plants alleviate this antagonism. PMID:26668333

  20. Jian carp (Cyprinus carpio var. Jian) intestinal immune responses, antioxidant status and tight junction protein mRNA expression are modulated via Nrf2 and PKC in response to dietary arginine deficiency.

    PubMed

    Wang, Biao; Feng, Lin; Chen, Gang-Fu; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Liu, Yang; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Jiang, Jun; Tang, Ling; Wu, Pei; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhao, Juan; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the effect of dietary arginine on the immune response, antioxidant status and tight junction mRNA expression in the intestine of juvenile Jian carp (Cyprinus carpio var. Jian). A total of 1200 juvenile Jian carp with an average initial weight of 6.33 ± 0.03 g were fed graded levels of arginine (9.8-24.5 g kg(-1) diet) for nine weeks. The study showed that arginine deficiency up-regulated interleukin 1, interleukin 8 and transforming growth factor-β and down-regulated tumour necrosis factor α gene expression (P < 0.05). Additionally, arginine deficiency increased malondialdehyde (MDA), protein carbonyl (PC) and glutathione contents and decreased the activities of copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT) and glutathione reductase (GR) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) (P < 0.05). Meanwhile, arginine deficiency significantly increased claudin 7, occludin, protein kinase C, NF-E2-related factor 2 and Kelch-like-ECH- associated protein 1 mRNA expression and decreased SOD1, CAT and GR mRNA expression (P < 0.05). All of these results indicated that arginine deficiency impaired intestinal immune function via the regulation of mRNA expression of cytokines, tight junction proteins, antioxidant enzymes, Nrf2/Keap1 and PKC in fish intestine. PMID:26518504

  1. RMI1 deficiency in mice protects from diet and genetic-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Suwa, Akira; Yoshino, Masayasu; Yamazaki, Chihiro; Naitou, Masanori; Fujikawa, Rie; Matsumoto, Shun-Ichiro; Kurama, Takeshi; Shimokawa, Teruhiko; Aramori, Ichiro

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study is to discover and characterize novel energy homeostasis-related molecules. We screened stock mouse embryonic stem cells established using the exchangeable gene trap method, and examined the effects of deficiency of the target gene on diet and genetic-induced obesity. The mutant strain 0283, which has an insertion at the recQ-mediated genome instability 1 (RMI1) locus, possesses a number of striking features that allow it to resist metabolic abnormalities. Reduced RMI1 expression, lower fasting-blood glucose and a reduced body weight (normal diet) were observed in the mutant mice. When fed a high-fat diet, the mutant mice were resistant to obesity, and also showed improved glucose intolerance and reduced abdominal fat tissue mass and food intake. In addition, the mutants were also resistant to obesity induced by the lethal yellow agouti (A(y)) gene. Endogenous RMI1 genes were found to be up-regulated in the liver and adipose tissue of KK-A(y) mice. RMI1 is a component of the Bloom's syndrome gene helicase complex that maintains genome integrity and activates cell-cycle checkpoint machinery. Interestingly, diet-induced expression of E2F8 mRNA, which is an important cell cycle-related molecule, was suppressed in the mutant mice. These results suggest that the regulation of energy balance by RMI1 is attributable to the regulation of food intake and E2F8 expression in adipose tissue. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that RMI1 is a novel molecule that regulates energy homeostasis. PMID:20050919

  2. Promotion of bone growth by dietary soy protein isolate: Comparision with dietary casein, whey hydrolysate and rice protein isolate in growing female rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of different dietary protein sources(casein (CAS), soy protein isolate (SPI), whey protein hydrolysate (WPH) and rice protein isolate (RPI)) on bone were studied in intact growing female rats and in ovarectomized (OVX) rats showing sex steroid deficiency-induced bone loss. In addition, S...

  3. Resistance of essential fatty acid-deficient rats to endotoxin-induced increases in vascular permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Li, E.J.; Cook, J.A.; Spicer, K.M.; Wise, W.C.; Rokach, J.; Halushka, P.V. )

    1990-06-01

    Resistance to endotoxin in essential fatty acid-deficient (EFAD) rats is associated with reduced synthesis of certain arachidonic acid metabolites. It was hypothesized that EFAD rats would manifest decreased vascular permeability changes during endotoxemia as a consequence of reduced arachidonic acid metabolism. To test this hypothesis, changes in hematocrit (HCT) and mesenteric localization rate of technetium-labeled human serum albumin (99mTc-HSA) and red blood cells (99mTc-RBC) were assessed in EFAD and normal rats using gamma-camera imaging. Thirty minutes after Salmonella enteritidis endotoxin, EFAD rats exhibited less hemoconcentration as determined by % HCT than normal rats. Endotoxin caused a less severe change in permeability index in the splanchnic region in EFAD rats than in normal rats (1.2 +/- 0.6 x 10(-3)min-1 vs. 4.9 +/- 1.7 x 10(-3)min-1 respectively, P less than 0.05). In contrast to 99mTc-HSA, mesenteric localization of 99mTc-RBC was not changed by endotoxin in control or EFAD rats. Supplementation with ethyl-arachidonic acid did not enhance susceptibility of EFAD rats to endotoxin-induced splanchnic permeability to 99mTc-HSA. Leukotrienes have been implicated as mediators of increased vascular permeability in endotoxin shock. Since LTC3 formation has been reported to be increased in EFA deficiency, we hypothesized that LTC3 may be less potent than LTC4. Thus the effect of LTC3 on mean arterial pressure and permeability was compared to LTC4 in normal rats. LTC3-induced increases in peak mean arterial pressure were less than LTC4 at 10 micrograms/kg (39 +/- 5 mm Hg vs. 58 +/- 4 mm Hg respectively, P less than 0.05) and at 20 micrograms/kg (56 +/- 4 mm Hg vs. 75 +/- 2 mm Hg respectively, P less than 0.05). LY171883 (30 mg/kg), an LTD4/E4 receptor antagonist, attenuated the pressor effect of LTC4, LTD4, and LTC3.

  4. MicroRNA-155 deficiency promotes nephrin acetylation and attenuates renal damage in hyperglycemia-induced nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xu; You, Yanwu; Wang, Jie; Qin, Youling; Huang, Peng; Yang, Fafen

    2015-04-01

    MiR-155 has been reported to be involved in both innate and adaptive immune responses. But the role of miR-155 in hyperglycemia-induced nephropathy is still unknown. In our current study, 3-month-old male wild-type C57 mice and Mir-155(-/-) mice were used to establish hyperglycemia-induced nephropathy. In our hyperglycemia-induced nephropathy model, the expression of podocyte injury marker desmin was markedly increased in the diabetes group when compared with control. Diabetes also significantly decreased the levels of nephrin and acetylated nephrin, whereas the expression of miR-155 was markedly increased in diabetes group when compared with control. MiR-155(-/-) mice showed significantly increased expression of nephrin, acetylated nephrin, and Wilm's tumor-1 protein (WT-1) when compared with wild-type control. MiR-155 deficiency results in significantly decrease in IL-17A expression both in vivo and in vitro. And the increased expression of WT-1, nephrin, and ac-nephrin was reversed with additional treatment of rmIL-17. Furthermore, we found that the inhibited Th17 differentiation induced by miR-155 deficiency was dependent on increased expression of SOCS1. In conclusion, miR-155 deficiency promotes nephrin acetylation and attenuates renal damage in hyperglycemia-induced nephropathy. This was associated with inhibited IL-17 production through enhancement of SOCS1 expression. PMID:24969676

  5. Alterations in immune function in rats caused by dietary lipotrope deficiency: effect of culture medium, 2-mercaptoethanol and mitogen dose on the in vitro lymphocyte transformation response.

    PubMed

    Nauss, K M; Connor, A M; Newberne, P M

    1982-12-01

    The effect of variations in culture media, mitogen dose, harvest time, 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME) addition and length of [3H]thymidine pulse on the concanavalin A (Con A)-stimulated splenic lymphocyte transformation response of male, weanling Sprague-Dawley rats maintained on a control (C), folacin-deficient (F) or marginal methionine-choline (M/C) diet was examined. Splenocytes cultured in minimal essential medium reached an optimal response on day 4. The response of F rats was significantly lower than C rats on day 3 and day 4. The response of M/C rats were lower on day 3. The addition of 2-ME to the culture medium shifted the cell cycle kinetics toward and earlier peak response time (day 2), and significant differences among groups were seen only under suboptimal conditions. Cells cultured in Medium 199 had a low transformation response, which reached peak stimulation on day 5. The response of F and M/C rats was significantly lower than C animals on days 3 and 4. In contrast, splenocytes cultured in medium 199 + 2-ME reached optimal stimulation on day 2, with no significantly differences between groups. No effect on cell viability was seen from 2-ME, but it did accelerate cell cycle kinetics and reversed the normal age-induced immunosuppression seen in C animals. PMID:7143115

  6. Dietary Selenium as a Modulator of PCB 126–Induced Hepatotoxicity in Male Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Ian K.; Chai, Yingtao; Simmons, Donald; Watson, Walter H.; Tan, Rommel; Haschek, Wanda M.; Wang, Kai; Wang, Bingxuan; Ludewig, Gabriele; Robertson, Larry W.

    2011-01-01

    Homeostasis of selenium (Se), a critical antioxidant incorporated into amino acids and enzymes, is disrupted by exposure to aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists. Here we examined the importance of dietary Se in preventing the toxicity of the most toxic polychlorinated biphenyl congener, 3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126), a potent AhR agonist. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a modified AIN-93 diet with differing dietary Se levels (0.02, 0.2, and 2 ppm). Following 3 weeks of acclimatization, rats from each dietary group were given a single ip injection of corn oil (vehicle), 0.2, 1, or 5 μmol/kg body weight PCB 126, followed 2 weeks later by euthanasia. PCB exposure caused dose-dependent increases in liver weight and at the highest PCB 126 dose decreases in whole body weight gains. Hepatic cytochrome P-450 (CYP1A1) activity was significantly increased even at the lowest dose of PCB 126, indicating potent AhR activation. PCB exposure diminished hepatic Se levels in a dose-dependent manner, and this was accompanied by diminished Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase activity. Both these effects were partially mitigated by Se supplementation. Conversely, thioredoxin (Trx) reductase activity and Trx oxidation state, although significantly diminished in the lowest dietary Se groups, were not affected by PCB exposure. In addition, PCB 126–induced changes in hepatic copper, iron, manganese, and zinc were observed. These results demonstrate that supplemental dietary Se was not able to completely prevent the toxicity caused by PCB 126 but was able to increase moderately the levels of several key antioxidants, thereby maintaining them roughly at normal levels. PMID:21865291

  7. Dietary feeding of Opuntia humifusa inhibits UVB radiation-induced carcinogenesis by reducing inflammation and proliferation in hairless mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-A; Jung, Bock-Gie; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Lee, Su-Gil; Park, Young-Seok; Lee, Bong-Joo

    2013-01-01

    It has been validated that ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation induced both squamous and basal cell carcinomas, as a tumor initiator and promoter. Opuntia humifusa is a member of the Cactaceae family which has been demonstrated in our previous study to have a chemopreventive effect in 7, 12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate induced skin carcinogenesis models. Therefore, this study was designed to determine the protective effects of O. humifusa against photocarcinogenesis. O. humifusa was administrated to mice as a dietary feeding, following exposure to UVB radiation (180 mJ/cm(2)) twice a week of 30 weeks for skin tumor development in hairless mice. Dietary O. humifusa inhibited UVB-induced epidermal hyperplasia, infiltration of leukocytes, level of myeloperoxidase and the levels of proinflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), in UVB exposed skin. Also, O. humifusa significantly inhibited both protein and mRNA expression level of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and cyclin D1 compared to the non-O. humifusa treated group. Collectively, these results suggest that O. humifusa could inhibit photocarcinogenesis in mouse skin and that protective effect is associated with the inhibition of not only UVB-induced inflammatory responses involving COX-2, iNOS and proinflammatory cytokines, but also the down-regulation of UVB-induced cellular proliferation. PMID:23789636

  8. Dietary histidine increases mouse skin urocanic acid levels and enhances UVB-induced immune suppression of contact hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Reilly, S K; De Fabo, E C

    1991-04-01

    Urocanic Acid (UCA) exists in mammalian skin primarily as the trans isomer and is photoisomerized to cis UCA upon UVB absorption. Our previous studies indicated that the photoisomerization of UCA is the initiating event in UBV-induced suppression of cell-mediated immunity (tUCA----cUCA----immune suppression). The purpose of this study was to verify the role of UCA in UV-induced immune suppression of contact hypersensitivity (CHS) in BALB/c mice. Since UCA is a metabolite of the amino acid L-histidine, we reasoned that increased dietary levels of histidine should raise skin tUCA levels. If skin tUCA is the UVB photoreceptor for immune suppression, this increase should enhance UV-induced suppression of CHS. HPLC analysis of skin from BALB/c mice given a histidine-rich diet (10%) showed that the total amount of UCA is significantly higher in these animals than in mice fed a normal diet. Further, levels of suppression of CHS of 3% and 49% in control fed mice, induced by 4.8 and 7.2 kJ/m2 UVB were significantly increased to 21% and 71% respectively in histidine-fed animals at these same UVB doses. These findings provide additional support for the UCA model for immune suppression, and provide the first evidence that UV-induced immune suppression can be enhanced by a dietary component, L-histidine. PMID:1857737

  9. Effects of High Fat Feeding and Diabetes on Regression of Atherosclerosis Induced by Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor Gene Therapy in LDL Receptor-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Willecke, Florian; Yuan, Chujun; Oka, Kazuhiro; Chan, Lawrence; Hu, Yunying; Barnhart, Shelley; Bornfeldt, Karin E.; Goldberg, Ira J.; Fisher, Edward A.

    2015-01-01

    We tested whether a high fat diet (HFD) containing the inflammatory dietary fatty acid palmitate or insulin deficient diabetes altered the remodeling of atherosclerotic plaques in LDL receptor knockout (Ldlr-/-) mice. Cholesterol reduction was achieved by using a helper-dependent adenovirus (HDAd) carrying the gene for the low-density lipoprotein receptor (Ldlr; HDAd-LDLR). After injection of the HDAd-LDLR, mice consuming either HFD, which led to insulin resistance but not hyperglycemia, or low fat diet (LFD), showed regression compared to baseline. However there was no difference between the two groups in terms of atherosclerotic lesion size, or CD68+ cell and lipid content. Because of the lack of effects of these two diets, we then tested whether viral-mediated cholesterol reduction would lead to defective regression in mice with greater hyperglycemia. In both normoglycemic and streptozotocin (STZ)-treated hyperglycemic mice, HDAd-LDLR significantly reduced plasma cholesterol levels, decreased atherosclerotic lesion size, reduced macrophage area and lipid content, and increased collagen content of plaque in the aortic sinus. However, reductions in anti-inflammatory and ER stress-related genes were less pronounced in STZ-diabetic mice compared to non-diabetic mice. In conclusion, HDAd-mediated Ldlr gene therapy is an effective and simple method to induce atherosclerosis regression in Ldlr-/- mice in different metabolic states. PMID:26046657

  10. Effects of folic acid deficiency and MTHFR C677T polymorphism on spontaneous and radiation-induced micronuclei in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Leopardi, Paola; Marcon, Francesca; Caiola, Stefania; Cafolla, Arturo; Siniscalchi, Ester; Zijno, Andrea; Crebelli, Riccardo

    2006-09-01

    Folic acid plays a key role in the maintenance of genomic stability, providing methyl groups for the conversion of uracil to thymine and for DNA methylation. Besides dietary habits, folic acid metabolism is influenced by genetic polymorphism. The C677T polymorphism of the methylene-tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene is associated with a reduction of catalytic activity and is suggested to modify cancer risk differently depending on folate status. In this work the effect of folic acid deficiency on genome stability and radiosensitivity has been investigated in cultured lymphocytes of 12 subjects with different MTHFR genotype (four for each genotype). Cells were grown for 9 days with 12, 24 and 120 nM folic acid and analyzed in a comprehensive micronucleus test coupled with centromere characterization by CREST immunostaining. In other experiments, cells were grown with various folic acid concentrations, irradiated with 0.5 Gy of gamma rays and analyzed in the micronucleus test. The results obtained indicate that folic acid deficiency induces to a comparable extent chromosome loss and breakage, irrespective of the MTHFR genotype. The effect of folic acid was highly significant (P < 0.001) and explained >50% of variance of both types of micronuclei. Also nucleoplasmic bridges and buds were significantly increased under low folate supply; the increase in bridges was mainly observed in TT cells, highlighting a significant effect of the MTHFR genotype (P = 0.006) on this biomarker. Folic acid concentration significantly affected radiation-induced micronuclei (P < 0.001): the increased incidence of radiation-induced micronuclei with low folic acid was mainly accounted for by carriers of the variant MTHFR allele (both homozygotes and heterozygotes), but the overall effect of genotype did not attain statistical significance. Treatment with ionizing radiations also increased the frequency of nucleoplasmic bridges. The effect of folic acid level on this end-point was

  11. Deficiency of the Two-Pore-Domain Potassium (K2P) Channel TREK-1 Promotes Hyperoxia-Induced Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Schwingshackl, Andreas; Teng, Bin; Makena, Patrudu; Ghosh, Manik; Sinclair, Scott E.; Luellen, Charlean; Balasz, Louisa; Rovnaghi, Cynthia; Bryan, Robert M.; Lloyd, Eric E.; Fitzpatrick, Elizabeth; Saravia, Jordy S.; Cormier, Stephania A.; Waters, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective We previously reported the expression of the 2-pore domain K+ channel TREK-1 in lung epithelial cells and proposed a role for this channel in the regulation of alveolar epithelial cytokine secretion. In this study we focused on investigating the role of TREK-1 in vivo in the development of hyperoxia-induced lung injury. Design Laboratory animal experiments. Setting University research laboratory. Subjects Wild type and TREK-1 deficient mice. Interventions Mice were anesthetized and exposed to 1) room air, no mechanical ventilation, 2) 95% hyperoxia for 24 hours, 3) 95% hyperoxia for 24 hours followed by mechanical ventilation for 4 hours. Measurements and Main Results Hyperoxia exposure accentuated lung injury in TREK-1 deficient mice but not controls, resulting in increased in Lung Injury Scores (LIS), broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) fluid cell numbers and cellular apoptosis, and a decrease in quasi-static lung compliance. Exposure to a combination of hyperoxia and injurious mechanical ventilation resulted in further morphological lung damage, increased LIS and BAL fluid cell numbers in control but not TREK-1 deficient mice. At baseline and after hyperoxia exposure BAL cytokine levels were unchanged in TREK-1 deficient mice compared to controls. Exposure to hyperoxia and mechanical ventilation resulted in an increase in BAL IL-6, MCP-1 and TNF-α levels in both mouse types, but the increase in IL-6 and MCP-1 levels was less prominent in TREK-1 deficient mice than in controls. Lung tissue MIP-2, KC and IL-1β gene expression was not altered by hyperoxia in TREK-1 deficient mice compared to controls. Furthermore, we show for the first time TREK-1 expression on alveolar macrophages and unimpaired TNF-α secretion from TREK-1 deficient macrophages. Conclusion TREK-1 deficiency resulted in increased sensitivity of lungs to hyperoxia but this effect is less prominent if overwhelming injury is induced by the combination of hyperoxia and injurious mechanical

  12. Vitamin B-12 deficiency induces anomalies of base substitution and methylation in the DNA of rat colonic epithelium.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sang-Woon; Friso, Simonetta; Ghandour, Haifa; Bagley, Pamela J; Selhub, Jacob; Mason, Joel B

    2004-04-01

    Derangements of one-carbon metabolism can directly affect the integrity of the genome by producing inappropriate uracil insertion into DNA and by altering patterns of DNA methylation. Vitamin B-12, a one-carbon nutrient, serves as a cofactor in the synthesis of precursors of biological methylation and in nucleotide synthesis. We therefore examined whether vitamin B-12 deficiency can induce these molecular anomalies in the colonic mucosa of rats. Weanling male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 30) were divided into 2 groups and fed either a vitamin B-12-deficient diet or a similar diet containing adequate amounts of the vitamin. Rats from each group were killed at 6 and 10 wk. Uracil misincorporation into DNA was measured by GC/MS and genomic DNA methylation was measured by LC/MS. Plasma vitamin B-12 concentrations in deficient rats were below detectable limits at 6 and 10 wk; in control rats, concentrations were 0.46 +/- 0.07 and 0.42 +/- 0.10 nmol/L at those times. Although the colon total folate concentration did not differ between the groups, the proportion that was methylfolate was marginally greater in the deficient rats at 10 wk (P = 0.05) compared with control, consistent with the "methylfolate trap" that develops during vitamin B-12 deficiency. After 10 wk, the colonic DNA of the deficient rats displayed a 35% decrease in genomic methylation and a 105% increase in uracil incorporation (P < 0.05). This vitamin B-12-deficient diet, which was of insufficient severity to cause anemia or illness, created aberrations in both base substitution and methylation of colonic DNA, which might increase susceptibility to carcinogenesis. PMID:15051821

  13. Photoprotection by dietary phenolics against melanogenesis induced by UVA through Nrf2-dependent antioxidant responses

    PubMed Central

    Chaiprasongsuk, Anyamanee; Onkoksoong, Tasanee; Pluemsamran, Thanyawan; Limsaengurai, Saowalak; Panich, Uraiwan

    2015-01-01

    Dietary phenolics may play a protective role in UV-mediated skin pigmentation through their antioxidant and UV-absorbing actions. In this study, we investigated whether genetic silencing of Nrf2, regulating the transcription of antioxidant genes, affected melanogenesis in primary human epidermal melanocytes (HEMn) and B16F10 melanoma cells subjected to UVA (8 J/cm2) exposure. Then, we explored the antimelanogenic actions of phenolics; caffeic acid (CA) and ferulic acid (FA) providing partial UVA protection; quercetin (QU) and rutin (RU) providing strong UVA protection and; avobenzone (AV), an efficient UVA filter, in association with modulation of Nrf2-mediated antioxidant defenses in response to UVA insults in B16F10 cells. Upon oxidative insults, Nrf2 silencing promoted melanogenesis in both HEMn and B16F10 cells irradiated with UVA. Stimulation of melanogenesis by UVA correlated with increased ROS and oxidative DNA damage (8-OHdG), GSH depletion as well as a transient downregulation of Nrf2 nuclear translocation and of Nrf2-ARE signaling in B16F10 cells. All test compounds exerted antimelanogenic effects with respect to their abilities to reverse UVA-mediated oxidative damage as well as downregulation of Nrf2 activity and its target antioxidants (GCLC, GST and NQO1) in B16F10 cells. In conclusion, defective Nrf2 may promote melanogenesis under UVA irradiation through oxidative stress mechanisms. Compounds with antioxidant and/or UVA absorption properties could protect against UVA-induced melanogenesis through indirect regulatory effect on Nrf2-ARE pathway. PMID:26765101

  14. Photoprotection by dietary phenolics against melanogenesis induced by UVA through Nrf2-dependent antioxidant responses.

    PubMed

    Chaiprasongsuk, Anyamanee; Onkoksoong, Tasanee; Pluemsamran, Thanyawan; Limsaengurai, Saowalak; Panich, Uraiwan

    2016-08-01

    Dietary phenolics may play a protective role in UV-mediated skin pigmentation through their antioxidant and UV-absorbing actions. In this study, we investigated whether genetic silencing of Nrf2, regulating the transcription of antioxidant genes, affected melanogenesis in primary human epidermal melanocytes (HEMn) and B16F10 melanoma cells subjected to UVA (8J/cm(2)) exposure. Then, we explored the antimelanogenic actions of phenolics; caffeic acid (CA) and ferulic acid (FA) providing partial UVA protection; quercetin (QU) and rutin (RU) providing strong UVA protection and; avobenzone (AV), an efficient UVA filter, in association with modulation of Nrf2-mediated antioxidant defenses in response to UVA insults in B16F10 cells. Upon oxidative insults, Nrf2 silencing promoted melanogenesis in both HEMn and B16F10 cells irradiated with UVA. Stimulation of melanogenesis by UVA correlated with increased ROS and oxidative DNA damage (8-OHdG), GSH depletion as well as a transient downregulation of Nrf2 nuclear translocation and of Nrf2-ARE signaling in B16F10 cells. All test compounds exerted antimelanogenic effects with respect to their abilities to reverse UVA-mediated oxidative damage as well as downregulation of Nrf2 activity and its target antioxidants (GCLC, GST and NQO1) in B16F10 cells. In conclusion, defective Nrf2 may promote melanogenesis under UVA irradiation through oxidative stress mechanisms. Compounds with antioxidant and/or UVA absorption properties could protect against UVA-induced melanogenesis through indirect regulatory effect on Nrf2-ARE pathway. PMID:26765101

  15. Zinc deficiency induces apoptosis via mitochondrial p53- and caspase-dependent pathways in human neuronal precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Seth, Rohit; Corniola, Rikki S; Gower-Winter, Shannon D; Morgan, Thomas J; Bishop, Brian; Levenson, Cathy W

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that zinc deficiency leads to apoptosis of neuronal precursor cells in vivo and in vitro. In addition to the role of p53 as a nuclear transcription factor in zinc deficient cultured human neuronal precursors (NT-2), we have now identified the translocation of phosphorylated p53 to the mitochondria and p53-dependent increases in the pro-apoptotic mitochondrial protein BAX leading to a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential as demonstrated by a 25% decrease in JC-1 red:green fluorescence ratio. Disruption of mitochondrial membrane integrity was accompanied by efflux of the apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) from the mitochondria and translocation to the nucleus with a significant increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) after 24h of zinc deficiency. Measurement of caspase cleavage, mRNA, and treatment with caspase inhibitors revealed the involvement of caspases 2, 3, 6, and 7 in zinc deficiency-mediated apoptosis. Down-stream targets of caspase activation, including the nuclear structure protein lamin and polyADP ribose polymerase (PARP), which participates in DNA repair, were also cleaved. Transfection with a dominant-negative p53 construct and use of the p53 inhibitor, pifithrin-μ, established that these alterations were largely dependent on p53. Together these data identify a cascade of events involving mitochondrial p53 as well as p53-dependent caspase-mediated mechanisms leading to apoptosis during zinc deficiency. PMID:25467851

  16. Withdrawal of dietary phytoestrogens in adult male rats affects hypothalamic regulation of food intake, induces obesity and alters glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Andreoli, María Florencia; Stoker, Cora; Rossetti, María Florencia; Alzamendi, Ana; Castrogiovanni, Daniel; Luque, Enrique H; Ramos, Jorge Guillermo

    2015-02-01

    The absence of phytoestrogens in the diet during pregnancy has been reported to result in obesity later in adulthood. We investigated whether phytoestrogen withdrawal in adult life could alter the hypothalamic signals that regulate food intake and affect body weight and glucose homeostasis. Male Wistar rats fed from conception to adulthood with a high phytoestrogen diet were submitted to phytoestrogen withdrawal by feeding a low phytoestrogen diet, or a high phytoestrogen-high fat diet. Withdrawal of dietary phytoestrogens increased body weight, adiposity and energy intake through an orexigenic hypothalamic response characterized by upregulation of AGRP and downregulation of POMC. This was associated with elevated leptin and T4, reduced TSH, testosterone and estradiol, and diminished hypothalamic ERα expression, concomitant with alterations in glucose tolerance. Removing dietary phytoestrogens caused manifestations of obesity and diabetes that were more pronounced than those induced by the high phytoestrogen-high fat diet intake. PMID:25486512

  17. Beyond the role of dietary protein and amino acids in the prevention of diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Petzke, Klaus J; Freudenberg, Anne; Klaus, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    High-protein diets have been shown to prevent the development of diet-induced obesity and can improve associated metabolic disorders in mice. Dietary leucine supplementation can partially mimic this effect. However, the molecular mechanisms triggering these preventive effects remain to be satisfactorily explained. Here we review studies showing a connection between high protein or total amino nitrogen intake and obligatory water intake. High amino nitrogen intake may possibly lower lipid storage, and prevent insulin resistance. Suggestions are made for further systematical studies to explore the relationship between water consumption, satiety, and energy expenditure. Moreover, these examinations should better distinguish between leucine-specific and unspecific effects. Research in this field can provide important information to justify dietary recommendations and strategies in promoting long-term weight loss and may help to reduce health problems associated with the comorbidities of obesity. PMID:24447927

  18. Restraint stress induces and exacerbates intestinal inflammation in interleukin-10 deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Seong-Joon; Kim, Ji Won; Kim, Byeong Gwan; Lee, Kook Lae; Kim, Joo Sung

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of restraint stress on chronic colitis in interleukin (IL)-10 deficient (IL-10-/-) mice. METHODS: The first experiment compared the effect of restraint stress on the development of intestinal inflammation in wild-type and IL-10-/- mice. Both wild-type and IL-10-/- mice were physically restrained in a well-ventilated, 50 cm3 conical polypropylene tube for 2 h per day for three consecutive days. The second experiment was performed to assess the effect of restraint stress on exacerbation of colitis induced by piroxicam in IL-10-/- mice. The IL-10-/- mice were exposed to restraint stress for 2 h per day for 3 consecutive days, and then treated with piroxicam for 4 d at a dose of 200 ppm administered in the rodent chow. RESULTS: In the first experiment, none of the wild-type mice with or without restraint stress showed clinical and histopathological abnormality in the gut. However, IL-10-/- mice exposed to restraint stress exhibited histologically significant intestinal inflammation as compared to those without restraint stress. In the second experiment, restraint stress significantly reduced body weight and increased the severity of intestinal inflammation assessed by histopathologic grading in IL-10-/- mice. Colonic IL12p40 mRNA expression was strongly increased in mice exposed to restraint stress. CONCLUSION: This novel animal model could be useful in future study of psychological stress in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:26229400

  19. Dose dependency of time of onset of radiation-induced growth hormone deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, P.E.; Shalet, S.M. )

    1991-02-01

    Growth hormone (GH) secretion during insulin-induced hypoglycemia was assessed on 133 occasions in 82 survivors of childhood malignant disease. All had received cranial irradiation with a dose range to the hypothalamic-pituitary axis of 27 to 47.5 Gy (estimated by a schedule of 16 fractions over 3 weeks) and had been tested on one or more occasions between 0.2 and 18.9 years after treatment. Results of one third of the GH tests were defined as normal (GH peak response, greater than 15 mU/L) within the first 5 years, in comparison with 16% after 5 years. Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis showed that dose (p = 0.007) and time from irradiation (p = 0.03), but not age at therapy, had a significant influence on peak GH responses. The late incidence of GH deficiency was similar over the whole dose range (4 of 26 GH test results normal for less than 30 Gy and 4 of 25 normal for greater than or equal to 30 Gy after 5 years), but the speed of onset over the first years was dependent on dose. We conclude that the requirement for GH replacement therapy and the timing of its introduction will be influenced by the dose of irradiation received by the hypothalamic-pituitary axis.

  20. Lead phytotoxicity in soils and nutrient solutions is related to lead induced phosphorus deficiency.

    PubMed

    Cheyns, Karlien; Peeters, Sofie; Delcourt, Dorien; Smolders, Erik

    2012-05-01

    This study was set up to relate lead (Pb) bioavailability with its toxicity to plants in soils. Tomato and barley seedlings were grown in six different PbCl(2) spiked soils (pH: 4.7-7.4; eCEC: 4.2-41.7 cmol(c)/kg). Soils were leached and pH corrected after spiking to exclude confounding factors. Plant growth was halved at 1600-6500 mg Pb/kg soil for tomato and at 1900-8300 mg Pb/kg soil for barley. These soil Pb threshold were unrelated to soil pH, organic carbon, texture or eCEC and neither soil solution Pb nor Pb(2+) ion activity adequately explained Pb toxicity among soils. Shoot phosphorus (P) concentrations significantly decreased with increasing soil Pb concentrations. Tomato grown in hydroponics at either varying P supply or at increasing Pb (equal initial P) illustrated that shoot P explained growth response in both scenarios. The results suggest that Pb toxicity is partially related to Pb induced P deficiency, likely due to lead phosphate precipitation. PMID:22377902

  1. Glucose-induced production of recombinant proteins in Hansenula polymorpha mutants deficient in catabolite repression.

    PubMed

    Krasovska, Olena S; Stasyk, Olena G; Nahorny, Viktor O; Stasyk, Oleh V; Granovski, Nikolai; Kordium, Vitaliy A; Vozianov, Oleksandr F; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2007-07-01

    The most commonly used expression platform for production of recombinant proteins in the methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha relies on the strong and strictly regulated promoter from the gene encoding peroxisomal enzyme alcohol (or methanol) oxidase (P(MOX)). Expression from P(MOX) is induced by methanol and is partially derepressed in glycerol or xylose medium, whereas in the presence of hexoses, disaccharides or ethanol, it is repressed. The need for methanol for maximal induction of gene expression in large-scale fermentation is a significant drawback, as this compound is toxic, flammable, supports a slow growth rate and requires extensive aeration. We isolated H. polymorpha mutants deficient in glucose repression of P(MOX) due to an impaired HpGCR1 gene, and other yet unidentified secondary mutations. The mutants exhibited pronounced defects in P(MOX) regulation only by hexoses and xylose, but not by disaccharides or ethanol. With one of these mutant strains as hosts, we developed a modified two-carbon source mode expression platform that utilizes convenient sugar substrates for growth (sucrose) and induction of recombinant protein expression (glucose or xylose). We demonstrate efficient regulatable by sugar carbon sources expression of three recombinant proteins: a secreted glucose oxidase from the fungus Aspergillus niger, a secreted mini pro-insulin, and an intracellular hepatitis B virus surface antigen in these mutant hosts. The modified expression platform preserves the favorable regulatable nature of P(MOX) without methanol, making a convenient alternative to the traditional system. PMID:17163508

  2. Calvarial Cleidocraniodysplasia-like defects with ENU-induced Nell-1 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinli; Ting, Kang; Pathmanathan, Dharmini; Ko, Theodore; Chen, Weiwei; Chen, Feng; Lee, Haofu; James, Aaron W.; Siu, Ronald K.; Shen, Jia; Culiat, Cymbeline T; Soo, Chia

    2011-01-01

    NELL-1, first identified by its overexpression in synostotic cranial sutures, is a novel osteoinductive growth and differentiation factor. In order to further define Nell-1’s role in craniofacial patterning, we characterized defects of the ENU-induced Nell-1 deficient (END) mice, focusing on both intramembranous and endochondral cranial bones. Results showed that calvarial bones of neonatal END mice were reduced in thickness and density, with a phenotype resembling calvarial cleidocraniodysplasia (CCD). In addition, a global reduction in osteoblast markers was observed, including reductions in Runx2, alkaline phosphatase, and osteocalcin. Remarkably, detailed analysis of endochondral bones showed dysplasia as well. The chondrocranium in the END mouse showed enrichment for early, proliferating Sox9+ chondrocytes, while in contrast markers of chondrocytes maturation were reduced. These data suggest that Nell-1 is an important growth factor for regulation of osteochondral differentiation, by regulating both Runx2 and Sox9 expression within the calvarium. In summary, Nell-1 is required for normal craniofacial membranous and endochondral skeletal development. PMID:22337375

  3. Calvarial cleidocraniodysplasia-like defects with ENU-induced Nell-1 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinli; Ting, Kang; Pathmanathan, Dharmini; Ko, Theodore; Chen, Weiwei; Chen, Feng; Lee, Haofu; James, Aaron W; Siu, Ronald K; Shen, Jia; Culiat, Cymbeline T; Soo, Chia

    2012-01-01

    Nell-1, first identified by its overexpression in synostotic cranial sutures, is a novel osteoinductive growth and differentiation factor. To further define Nell-1's role in craniofacial patterning, we characterized defects of the ENU-induced Nell-1-deficient (END) mice, focusing on both intramembranous and endochondral cranial bones. Results showed that calvarial bones of neonatal END mice were reduced in thickness and density, with a phenotype resembling calvarial cleidocraniodysplasia. In addition, a global reduction in osteoblast markers was observed, including reductions in Runx2, alkaline phosphatase, and osteocalcin. Remarkably, detailed analysis of endochondral bones showed dysplasia as well. The chondrocranium in the END mouse showed enrichment for early, proliferating Sox9⁺ chondrocytes, whereas in contrast markers of chondrocytes maturation were reduced. These data suggest that Nell-1 is an important growth factor for regulation of osteochondral differentiation, by regulating both Runx2 and Sox9 expression within the calvarium. In summary, Nell-1 is required for normal craniofacial membranous and endochondral skeletal development. PMID:22337375

  4. Myostatin deficiency but not anti-myostatin blockade induces marked proteomic changes in mouse skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Salzler, Robert R; Shah, Darshit; Doré, Anthony; Bauerlein, Roy; Miloscio, Lawrence; Latres, Esther; Papadopoulos, Nicholas J; Olson, William C; MacDonald, Douglas; Duan, Xunbao

    2016-07-01

    Pharmacologic blockade of the myostatin (Mstn)/activin receptor pathway is being pursued as a potential therapy for several muscle wasting disorders. The functional benefits of blocking this pathway are under investigation, in particular given the findings that greater muscle hypertrophy results from Mstn deficiency arising from genetic ablation compared to post-developmental Mstn blockade. Using high-resolution MS coupled with SILAC mouse technology, we quantitated the relative proteomic changes in gastrocnemius muscle from Mstn knockout (Mstn(-/-) ) and mice treated for 2-weeks with REGN1033, an anti-Mstn antibody. Relative to wild-type animals, Mstn(-/-) mice had a two-fold greater muscle mass and a >1.5-fold change in expression of 12.0% of 1137 quantified muscle proteins. In contrast, mice treated with REGN1033 had minimal changes in muscle proteome (0.7% of 1510 proteins >1.5-fold change, similar to biological difference 0.5% of 1310) even though the treatment induced significant 20% muscle mass increase. Functional annotation of the altered proteins in Mstn(-/-) mice corroborates the mutiple physiological changes including slow-to-fast fiber type switch. Thus, the proteome-wide protein expression differs between Mstn(-/-) mice and mice subjected to specific Mstn blockade post-developmentally, providing molecular-level insights to inform mechanistic hypotheses to explain the observed functional differences. PMID:27214824

  5. Fatty Acid Binding Protein 4 Deficiency Protects against Oxygen-Induced Retinopathy in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Saint-Geniez, Magali; Ghelfi, Elisa; Liang, Xiaoliang; Yu, Chenwei; Spencer, Carrie; Abend, Stephanie; Hotamisligil, Gokhan; Cataltepe, Sule

    2014-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a leading cause of blindness in children worldwide due to increasing survival rates of premature infants. Initial suppression, followed by increased production of the retinal vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF) expression are key events that trigger the pathological neovascularization in ROP. Fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) is an intracellular lipid chaperone that is induced by VEGF in a subset of endothelial cells. FABP4 exhibits a pro-angiogenic function in cultured endothelial cells and in airway microvasculature, but whether it plays a role in modulation of retinal angiogenesis is not known. We hypothesized that FABP4 deficiency could ameliorate pathological retinal vascularization and investigated this hypothesis using a well-characterized mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR). We found that FABP4 was not expressed in retinal vessels, but was present in resident macrophages/microglial cells and endothelial cells of the hyaloid vasculature in the immature retina. While FABP4 expression was not required for normal development of retinal vessels, FABP4 expression was upregulated and localized to neovascular tufts in OIR. FABP4−/− mice demonstrated a significant decrease in neovessel formation as well as a significant improvement in physiological revascularization of the avascular retinal tissues. These alterations in retinal vasculature were accompanied by reduced endothelial cell proliferation, but no effect on apoptosis or macrophage/microglia recruitment. FABP4−/− OIR samples demonstrated decreased expression of genes involved in angiogenesis, such as Placental Growth Factor, and angiopoietin 2. Collectively, our findings suggest FABP4 as a potential target of pathologic retinal angiogenesis in proliferative retinopathies. PMID:24802082

  6. Fatty acid binding protein 4 deficiency protects against oxygen-induced retinopathy in mice.

    PubMed

    Saint-Geniez, Magali; Ghelfi, Elisa; Liang, Xiaoliang; Yu, Chenwei; Spencer, Carrie; Abend, Stephanie; Hotamisligil, Gokhan; Cataltepe, Sule

    2014-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a leading cause of blindness in children worldwide due to increasing survival rates of premature infants. Initial suppression, followed by increased production of the retinal vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF) expression are key events that trigger the pathological neovascularization in ROP. Fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) is an intracellular lipid chaperone that is induced by VEGF in a subset of endothelial cells. FABP4 exhibits a pro-angiogenic function in cultured endothelial cells and in airway microvasculature, but whether it plays a role in modulation of retinal angiogenesis is not known. We hypothesized that FABP4 deficiency could ameliorate pathological retinal vascularization and investigated this hypothesis using a well-characterized mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR). We found that FABP4 was not expressed in retinal vessels, but was present in resident macrophages/microglial cells and endothelial cells of the hyaloid vasculature in the immature retina. While FABP4 expression was not required for normal development of retinal vessels, FABP4 expression was upregulated and localized to neovascular tufts in OIR. FABP4-/- mice demonstrated a significant decrease in neovessel formation as well as a significant improvement in physiological revascularization of the avascular retinal tissues. These alterations in retinal vasculature were accompanied by reduced endothelial cell proliferation, but no effect on apoptosis or macrophage/microglia recruitment. FABP4-/- OIR samples demonstrated decreased expression of genes involved in angiogenesis, such as Placental Growth Factor, and angiopoietin 2. Collectively, our findings suggest FABP4 as a potential target of pathologic retinal angiogenesis in proliferative retinopathies. PMID:24802082

  7. Induced expression of nucleolin phosphorylation-deficient mutant confers dominant-negative effect on cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shu; Caglar, Elif; Maldonado, Priscilla; Das, Dibash; Nadeem, Zaineb; Chi, Angela; Trinité, Benjamin; Li, Xin; Saxena, Anjana

    2014-01-01

    Nucleolin (NCL) is a major nucleolar phosphoprotein that has pleiotropic effects on cell proliferation and is elevated in a variety of tumors. NCL is highly phosphorylated at the N-terminus by two major kinases: interphase casein kinase 2 (CK2) and mitotic cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1). Earlier we demonstrated that a NCL-mutant that is partly defective in undergoing phosphorylation by CK2 inhibits chromosomal replication through its interactions with Replication Protein A, mimicking the cellular response to DNA damage. We further delineated that the N-terminus of NCL associates with Hdm2, the most common E3 ubiquitin ligase of p53. We reported that NCL antagonizes Hdm2 to stabilize p53 and stimulates p53 transcriptional activity. Although NCL-phosphorylation by CK2 and ribosomal DNA transcription are closely coordinated during interphase, the role of NCL phosphorylation in regulating cell proliferation remains unexplored. We have therefore engineered unique human cells that specifically induce expression of NCL-wild type (WT) or a phosphorylation-deficient NCL-mutant, 6/S*A where all the six CK2 consensus serine sites residing in the N-terminus NCL were mutated to alanine. Here we show that this NCL-mutant is defective in undergoing phosphorylation by CK2. We also demonstrate that NCL-phosphorylation by CK2 is required through the S-phase progression in cell cycle and hence proliferation. Induced expression of NCL with mutated CK2 phosphorylation sites stabilizes p53, results in higher expression of Bcl2 (B-cell lymphoma 2) homology 3 (BH3)-only apoptotic markers and causes a dominant-negative effect on cell viability. Our unique cellular system thus provides the first evidential support to delineate phospho-specific functions of NCL on cell proliferation. PMID:25313645

  8. Oxidative stress responses and root lignification induced by Fe deficiency conditions in pear and quince genotypes.

    PubMed

    Donnini, Silvia; Dell'Orto, Marta; Zocchi, Graziano

    2011-01-01

    We analysed Pyrus communis cv. Conference and Cydonia oblonga BA29, differently tolerant to lime-induced chlorosis, to identify the key mechanisms involved in their different performance under Fe deficiency induced by the absence of Fe (-Fe) or by the presence of bicarbonate (+FeBic). Under our experimental conditions, a decrease in root elongation was observed in BA29 under bicarbonate supply. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POD) activities were analysed and the relative isoforms were detected by native electrophoresis. The data obtained for both genotypes under -Fe and for BA29 +FeBic suggest the occurrence of overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and, at the same time, of a scarce capacity to detoxify them. The detection of ROS (O(2)(-) and H(2)O(2)) through histochemical localization supports these results and suggests that they could account for the modifications of mechanical properties of the cell wall during stress adaptation. On the other hand, in the cv. Conference +FeBic, an increase in non-specific POD activity was detected, confirming its higher level of protection in particular against H(2)O(2) accumulation. Peroxidases involved in lignification were assayed and histochemical analysis was performed. The results suggest that only in BA29 under bicarbonate supply can the presence of ROS in root apoplast be correlated with lignin deposits in external layers and in endodermis as a consequence of the shift of PODs towards a lignification role. We suggest that in BA29 the decrease in root growth could impair mineral nutrition, generating susceptibility to calcareous soils. In the cv. Conference, the allocation of new biomass to the root system could improve soil exploration and consequently Fe uptake. PMID:21389006

  9. Induced Expression of Nucleolin Phosphorylation-Deficient Mutant Confers Dominant-Negative Effect on Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Shu; Caglar, Elif; Maldonado, Priscilla; Das, Dibash; Nadeem, Zaineb; Chi, Angela; Trinité, Benjamin; Li, Xin; Saxena, Anjana

    2014-01-01

    Nucleolin (NCL) is a major nucleolar phosphoprotein that has pleiotropic effects on cell proliferation and is elevated in a variety of tumors. NCL is highly phosphorylated at the N-terminus by two major kinases: interphase casein kinase 2 (CK2) and mitotic cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1). Earlier we demonstrated that a NCL-mutant that is partly defective in undergoing phosphorylation by CK2 inhibits chromosomal replication through its interactions with Replication Protein A, mimicking the cellular response to DNA damage. We further delineated that the N-terminus of NCL associates with Hdm2, the most common E3 ubiquitin ligase of p53. We reported that NCL antagonizes Hdm2 to stabilize p53 and stimulates p53 transcriptional activity. Although NCL-phosphorylation by CK2 and ribosomal DNA transcription are closely coordinated during interphase, the role of NCL phosphorylation in regulating cell proliferation remains unexplored. We have therefore engineered unique human cells that specifically induce expression of NCL-wild type (WT) or a phosphorylation-deficient NCL-mutant, 6/S*A where all the six CK2 consensus serine sites residing in the N-terminus NCL were mutated to alanine. Here we show that this NCL-mutant is defective in undergoing phosphorylation by CK2. We also demonstrate that NCL-phosphorylation by CK2 is required through the S-phase progression in cell cycle and hence proliferation. Induced expression of NCL with mutated CK2 phosphorylation sites stabilizes p53, results in higher expression of Bcl2 (B-cell lymphoma 2) homology 3 (BH3)-only apoptotic markers and causes a dominant-negative effect on cell viability. Our unique cellular system thus provides the first evidential support to delineate phospho-specific functions of NCL on cell proliferation. PMID:25313645

  10. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Deficient Mice Are Protected from Lipopolysaccharide Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Christine M.; Rafikov, Ruslan; Kumar, Sanjiv; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Ham III, P. Benson; Meadows, Mary Louise; Cherian-Shaw, Mary; Kangath, Archana; Sridhar, Supriya; Lucas, Rudolf; Black, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) derived from the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria induces acute lung injury (ALI) in mice. This injury is associated with lung edema, inflammation, diffuse alveolar damage, and severe respiratory insufficiency. We have previously reported that LPS-mediated nitric oxide synthase (NOS) uncoupling, through increases in asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), plays an important role in the development of ALI through the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Therefore, the focus of this study was to determine whether mice deficient in endothelial NOS (eNOS-/-) are protected against ALI. In both wild-type and eNOS-/- mice, ALI was induced by the intratracheal instillation of LPS (2 mg/kg). After 24 hours, we found that eNOS-/-mice were protected against the LPS mediated increase in inflammatory cell infiltration, inflammatory cytokine production, and lung injury. In addition, LPS exposed eNOS-/- mice had increased oxygen saturation and improved lung mechanics. The protection in eNOS-/- mice was associated with an attenuated production of NO, NOS derived superoxide, and peroxynitrite. Furthermore, we found that eNOS-/- mice had less RhoA activation that correlated with a reduction in RhoA nitration at Tyr34. Finally, we found that the reduction in NOS uncoupling in eNOS-/- mice was due to a preservation of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH) activity that prevented the LPS-mediated increase in ADMA. Together our data suggest that eNOS derived reactive species play an important role in the development of LPS-mediated lung injury. PMID:25786132

  11. Glutamic acid ameliorates estrogen deficiency-induced menopausal-like symptoms in ovariectomized mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Na-Ra; Kim, Hee-Yun; Yang, Woong Mo; Jeong, Hyun-Ja; Kim, Hyung-Min

    2015-09-01

    Some amino acids are considered alternative therapies for improving menopausal symptoms. Glutamic acid (GA), which is abundant in meats, fish, and protein-rich plant foods, is known to be a neurotransmitter or precursor of γ-aminobutyric acid. Although it is unclear if GA functions in menopausal symptoms, we hypothesized that GA would attenuate estrogen deficiency-induced menopausal symptoms. The objective to test our hypothesis was to examine an estrogenic effect of GA in ovariectomized (OVX) mice, estrogen receptor (ER)-positive human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells, and ER-positive human breast cancer MCF-7 cells. The results demonstrated that administration with GA to mice suppressed body weight gain and vaginal atrophy when compared with the OVX mice. A microcomputed tomographic analysis of the trabecular bone showed increases in bone mineral density, trabecular number, and connectivity density as well as a significant decrease in total porosity of the OVX mice treated with GA. In addition, GA increased serum levels of alkaline phosphatase and estrogen compared with the OVX mice. Furthermore, GA induced proliferation and increased ER-β messenger RNA (mRNA) expression, estrogen response element (ERE) activity, extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation, and alkaline phosphatase activity in MG-63 cells. In MCF-7 cells, GA also increased proliferation, Ki-67 mRNA expression, ER-β mRNA expression, and ERE activity. Estrogen response element activity increased by GA was inhibited by an estrogen antagonist. Taken together, our data demonstrated that GA has estrogenic and osteogenic activities in OVX mice, MG-63 cells, and MCF-7 cells. PMID:26144993

  12. NLRP3 Deficiency Reduces Macrophage Interleukin-10 Production and Enhances the Susceptibility to Doxorubicin-induced Cardiotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Motoi; Usui, Fumitake; Karasawa, Tadayoshi; Kawashima, Akira; Kimura, Hiroaki; Mizushina, Yoshiko; Shirasuna, Koumei; Mizukami, Hiroaki; Kasahara, Tadashi; Hasebe, Naoyuki; Takahashi, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    NLRP3 inflammasomes recognize non-microbial danger signals and induce release of proinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-1β, leading to sterile inflammation in cardiovascular disease. Because sterile inflammation is involved in doxorubicin (Dox)-induced cardiotoxicity, we investigated the role of NLRP3 inflammasomes in Dox-induced cardiotoxicity. Cardiac dysfunction and injury were induced by low-dose Dox (15 mg/kg) administration in NLRP3-deficient (NLRP3−/−) mice but not in wild-type (WT) and IL-1β−/− mice, indicating that NLRP3 deficiency enhanced the susceptibility to Dox-induced cardiotoxicity independent of IL-1β. Although the hearts of WT and NLRP3−/− mice showed no significant difference in inflammatory cell infiltration, macrophages were the predominant inflammatory cells in the hearts, and cardiac IL-10 production was decreased in Dox-treated NLRP3−/− mice. Bone marrow transplantation experiments showed that bone marrow-derived cells contributed to the exacerbation of Dox-induced cardiotoxicity in NLRP3−/− mice. In vitro experiments revealed that NLRP3 deficiency decreased IL-10 production in macrophages. Furthermore, adeno-associated virus-mediated IL-10 overexpression restored the exacerbation of cardiotoxicity in the NLRP3−/− mice. These results demonstrated that NLRP3 regulates macrophage IL-10 production and contributes to the pathophysiology of Dox-induced cardiotoxicity, which is independent of IL-1β. Our findings identify a novel role of NLRP3 and provided new insights into the mechanisms underlying Dox-induced cardiotoxicity. PMID:27225830

  13. Reduced endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis and impaired unfolded protein response in TRPC3-deficient M1 macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Solanki, Sumeet; Dube, Prabhatchandra R.; Tano, Jean-Yves; Birnbaumer, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a prominent mechanism of macrophage apoptosis in advanced atherosclerotic lesions. Recent studies from our laboratory showed that advanced atherosclerotic plaques in Apoe−/− mice with bone marrow deficiency of the calcium-permeable channel Transient Receptor Potential Canonical 3 (TRPC3) are characterized by reduced areas of necrosis and fewer apoptotic macrophages than animals transplanted with Trpc3+/+ bone marrow. In vitro, proinflammatory M1 but not anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages derived from Trpc3−/−Apoe−/− animals exhibited reduced ER stress-induced apoptosis. However, whether this was due to a specific effect of TRPC3 deficiency on macrophage ER stress signaling remained to be determined. In the present work we used polarized macrophages derived from mice with macrophage-specific deficiency of TRPC3 to examine the expression level of ER stress markers and the activation status of some typical mediators of macrophage apoptosis. We found that the reduced susceptibility of TRPC3-deficient M1 macrophages to ER stress-induced apoptosis correlates with an impaired unfolded protein response (UPR), reduced mitochondrion-dependent apoptosis, and reduced activation of the proapoptotic molecules calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and signal transducer and activator of transcription 1. Notably, none of these pathways was altered in TRPC3-deficient M2 macrophages. These findings show for the first time an obligatory requirement for a member of the TRPC family of cation channels in ER stress-induced apoptosis in macrophages, underscoring a rather selective role of the TRPC3 channel on mechanisms related to the UPR signaling in M1 macrophages. PMID:25031020

  14. Developmental vitamin D (DVD) deficiency alters pup-retrieval but not isolation-induced pup ultrasonic vocalizations in the rat.

    PubMed

    Burne, Thomas H J; O'Loan, Jonathan; Splatt, Karisha; Alexander, Suzanne; McGrath, John J; Eyles, Darryl W

    2011-02-01

    Evidence from animal experiments now demonstrates that prenatal vitamin D levels influence brain development. The aims of this study were to examine isolation-induced pup ultrasonic vocalizations and maternal-infant interactions using a pup-retrieval test in developmental vitamin D (DVD) deficient and control rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a vitamin D deficient diet or control diet six weeks prior to mating until birth and housed under UVB-free lighting conditions. In two separate experiments we recorded ultrasonic vocalizations at 46KHz in isolated pups and we performed a pup-retrieval test on the day of birth. There was no significant effect of maternal diet on the calling rate of isolation-induced ultrasonic vocalizations by pups. We found that DVD-deficient dams retrieved their pups sooner than control dams and engaged in more pup directed activities (sniffing and carrying pups) and had a longer latency for self-grooming and rearing than control dams. We also assessed vitamin D related measures from a terminal blood sample immediately after the pup-retrieval test and found that DVD-deficient dams and pups had significantly lower levels of 25 OH D₃, 1,25 (OH)₂D₃ and phosphate, elevated levels of parathyroid hormone (PTH) but there was no significant effect of maternal diet on calcium levels. We speculate that the altered maternal-pup interactions identified in the DVD model may impact on early periods of brain development and behaviour. PMID:21059363

  15. CD47 Deficiency Protects Mice From Diet-induced Obesity and Improves Whole Body Glucose Tolerance and Insulin Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Maimaitiyiming, Hasiyeti; Norman, Heather; Zhou, Qi; Wang, Shuxia

    2015-01-01

    CD47 is a transmembrane protein with several functions including self-recognition, immune cell communication, and cell signaling. Although it has been extensively studied in cancer and ischemia, CD47 function in obesity has never been explored. In this study, we utilized CD47 deficient mice in a high-fat diet induced obesity model to study for the first time whether CD47 plays a role in the development of obesity and metabolic complications. Male CD47 deficient and wild type (WT) control mice were fed with either low fat (LF) or high fat (HF) diets for 16 weeks. Interestingly, we found that CD47 deficient mice were protected from HF diet-induced obesity displaying decreased weight gain and reduced adiposity. This led to decreased MCP1/CCR2 dependent macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue and reduced inflammation, resulting in improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. In addition, CD47 deficiency stimulated the expression of UCP1 and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1b (CPT1b) levels in brown adipose tissue, leading to increased lipid utilization and heat production. This contributes to the increased energy utilization and reduced adiposity observed in these mice. Taken together, these data revealed a novel role for CD47 in the development of obesity and its related metabolic complications. PMID:25747123

  16. Sigma-1 receptor deficiency reduces MPTP-induced parkinsonism and death of dopaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hong, J; Sha, S; Zhou, L; Wang, C; Yin, J; Chen, L

    2015-01-01

    Sigma-1 receptor (σ1R) has been reported to be decreased in nigrostriatal motor system of Parkinson's disease patients. Using heterozygous and homozygous σ1R knockout (σ1R+/− and σ1R−/−) mice, we investigated the influence of σ1R deficiency on 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-impaired nigrostriatal motor system. The injection of MPTP for 5 weeks in wild-type mice (MPTP-WT mice), but not in σ1R+/− or σ1R−/− mice (MPTP-σ1R+/− or MPTP-σ1R−/− mice), caused motor deficits and ~40% death of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta with an elevation of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAr) NR2B phosphorylation. The σ1R antagonist NE100 or the NR2B inhibitor Ro25-6981 could alleviate the motor deficits and the death of dopaminergic neurons in MPTP-WT mice. By contrast, MPTP-σ1R+/− mice treated with the σ1R agonist PRE084 or MPTP-σ1R−/− mice treated with the NMDAr agonist NMDA appeared to have similar motor deficits and loss of dopaminergic neurons as MPTP-WT mice. The pharmacological or genetic inactivation of σ1R suppressed the expression of dopamine transporter (DAT) in substantia nigra, which was corrected by NMDA. The activation of σ1R by PRE084 enhanced the DAT expression in WT mice or σ1R+/− mice. By contrast, the level of vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) in σ1R+/− mice or σ1R−/− mice had no difference from WT mice. Interestingly, MPTP-WT mice showed the reduction in the levels of DAT and VMAT2, but MPTP-σ1R−/− mice did not. The inactivation of σ1R by NE100 could prevent the reduction of VMAT2 in MPTP-WT mice. In addition, the activation of microglia cells in substantia nigra was equally enhanced in MPTP-WT mice and MPTP-σ1R−/− mice. The number of activated astrocytes in MPTP-σ1R−/− mice was less than that in MPTP-WT mice. The findings indicate that the σ1R deficiency through suppressing NMDAr function and DAT expression can reduce MPTP-induced death of

  17. Inhibition of carcinogen induced c-Ha-ras and c-fos proto-oncogenes expression by dietary curcumin

    PubMed Central

    Limtrakul, Porn-ngarm; Anuchapreeda, Songyot; Lipigorngoson, Suwiwek; Dunn, Floyd W

    2001-01-01

    Background We investigated the chemopreventive action of dietary curcumin on 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-initiated and 12,0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-promoted skin tumor formation in Swiss albino mice. Curcumin, a yellow coloring matter isolated from roots of Curcuma longa Linn, is a phenolic compound possessing antioxidant, free radical scavenger, and antiinflammatory properties. It has been shown by previously reported work that TPA-induced skin tumors were inhibited by topical application of curcumin, and curcumin has been shown to inhibit a variety of biological activities of TPA. Topical application of curcumin was reported to inhibit TPA-induced c-fos, c-jun and c-myc gene expression in mouse skin. This paper reports the effects of orally administered curcumin, which was consumed as a dietary component at concentrations of 0.2 % or 1 %, in ad libitum feeding. Results Animals in which tumors had been initiated with DMBA and promoted with TPA experienced significantly fewer tumors and less tumor volume if they ingested either 0.2% or 1% curcumin diets. Also, the dietary consumption of curcumin resulted in a significantly decreased expression of ras and fos proto-oncogenes in the tumorous skin, as measured by enhanced chemiluminesence Western blotting detection system (Amersham). Conclusions Whereas earlier work demonstrated that topical application of curcumin to mouse skin inhibited TPA-induced expression of c-fos, c-jun and c-myc oncogenes, our results are the first to show that orally consumed curcumin significantly inhibited DMBA- and TPA-induced ras and fos gene expression in mouse skin. PMID:11231886

  18. Dietary feeding of silibinin prevents early biomarkers of UVB radiation-induced carcinogenesis in SKH-1 hairless mouse epidermis.

    PubMed

    Gu, Mallikarjuna; Dhanalakshmi, Sivanandhan; Singh, Rana P; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2005-05-01

    Solar radiation is the causal etiologic factor in the development of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC). Depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer leads to an increase in ambient UV radiation loads, which are expected to further raise skin cancer incidence in many temperate parts of the world, including the United States, suggesting that skin cancer chemopreventive approaches via biomarker efficacy studies or vice versa are highly warranted. Based on our recent study reporting strong efficacy of silibinin against photocarcinogenesis, we assessed here the protective effects of its dietary feeding on UVB-induced biomarkers involved in NMSC providing a mechanistic rationale for an early-on silibinin efficacy in skin cancer prevention. Dietary feeding of silibinin at 1% dose (w/w) to SKH-1 hairless mice for 2 weeks before a single UVB irradiation at 180 mJ/cm(2) dose resulted in a strong and significant (P < 0.001) decrease in UVB-induced thymine dimer-positive cells and proliferating cell nuclear antigen, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling, and apoptotic sunburn cells together with an increase (P < 0.001) in p53 and p21/cip1-positive cell population in epidermis. These findings suggest that dietary feeding of silibinin affords strong protection against UVB-induced damages in skin epidermis by (a) either preventing DNA damage or enhancing repair, (b) reducing UVB-induced hyperproliferative response, and (c) inhibiting UVB-caused apoptosis and sunburn cell formation, possibly via silibinin-caused up-regulation of p53 and p21/cip1 as major UVB-damage control sensors. PMID:15894701

  19. Modulatory effects of dietary inclusion of garlic (Allium sativum) on gentamycin-induced hepatotoxicity and oxidative stress in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ademiluyi, Adedayo O; Oboh, Ganiyu; Owoloye, Tosin R; Agbebi, Oluwaseun J

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the ameliorative effect of dietary inclusion of garlic (Allium sativum) on gentamycin-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Methods Adult male rats were randomly divided into four groups with six animals in each group. Groups 1 and 2 were fed basal diet while Groups 3 and 4 were fed diets containing 2% and 4% garlic respectively for 27 d prior to gentamycin administration. Hepatotoxicity was induced by the intraperitoneal administration of gentamycin (100 mg/kg body weight) for 3 d. The liver and plasma were studied for hepatotoxicity and antioxidant indices. Results Gentamycin induces hepatic damage as revealed by significant (P<0.05) elevation of liver damage marker enzymes (aspartate transaminase and alanine aminotransferase) and reduction in plasma albumin level. Gentamycin also caused a significant (P<0.05) alteration in plasma and liver enzymatic (catalase, glutathione and super oxygen dehydrogenises) and non-enzymatic (glutathione and vitamin C) antioxidant indices with concomitant increase in the malondialdehyde content; however, there was a significant (P<0.05) restoration of the antioxidant status coupled with significant (P<0.05) decrease in the tissues' malondialdehyde content, following consumption of diets containing garlic. Conclusions These results suggest that dietary inclusion of garlic powder could protect against gentamycin-induced hepatotoxicity, improve antioxidant status and modulate oxidative stress; a function attributed to their phenolic constituents. PMID:23730560

  20. High β-cell mass prevents streptozotocin-induced diabetes in thioredoxin-interacting protein-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Masson, Elodie; Koren, Shlomit; Razik, Fathima; Goldberg, Howard; Kwan, Edwin P.; Sheu, Laura; Gaisano, Herbert Y.; Fantus, I. George

    2010-01-01

    Thioredoxin-interacting protein (TxNIP) is an endogenous inhibitor of thioredoxin, a ubiquitous thiol oxidoreductase, that regulates cellular redox status. Diabetic mice exhibit increased expression of TxNIP in pancreatic islets, and recent studies suggest that TxNIP is a proapoptotic factor in β-cells that may contribute to the development of diabetes. Here, we examined the role of TxNIP deficiency in vivo in the development of insulin-deficient diabetes and whether it impacted on pancreatic β-cell mass and/or insulin secretion. TxNIP-deficient (Hcb-19/TxNIP−/−) mice had lower baseline glycemia, higher circulating insulin concentrations, and higher total pancreatic insulin content and β-cell mass than control mice (C3H). Hcb-19/TxNIP−/− did not develop hyperglycemia when injected with standard multiple low doses of streptozotocin (STZ), in contrast to C3H controls. Surprisingly, although β-cell mass remained higher in Hcb-19/TxNIP−/− mice compared with C3H after STZ exposure, the relative decrease induced by STZ was as great or even greater in the TxNIP-deficient animals. Consistently, cultured pancreatic INS-1 cells transfected with small-interfering RNA against TxNIP were more sensitive to cell death induced by direct exposure to STZ or to the combination of inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β, interferon-γ, and tumor necrosis factor-α. Furthermore, when corrected for insulin content, isolated pancreatic islets from TxNIP−/− mice exhibited reduced glucose-induced insulin secretion. These data indicate that TxNIP functions as a regulator of β-cell mass and influences insulin secretion. In conclusion, the relative resistance of TxNIP-deficient mice to STZ-induced diabetes appears to be because of an increase in β-cell mass. However, TxNIP deficiency is associated with sensitization to STZ- and cytokine-induced β-cell death, indicating complex regulatory roles of TxNIP under different physiological and pathological conditions. PMID

  1. A model to produce pure zinc deficiency in rats and its use to demonstrate that dietary phytate increases the excretion of endogenous zinc.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, P R

    1984-03-01

    An early effect of zinc deficiency in rats is loss of appetite with consequent malnourishment. To obviate the need for pair-feeding, rats were fed liquid semipurified diets by gastric tube feeding. Rats tube fed a zinc-deficient diet at a daily rate of 90-110 g/kg thrived for 6-7 days and then rapidly became seriously ill. In contrast rats fed the deficient diet ad libitum stopped growing after 3 days but remained relatively healthy. Animals tube fed a zinc-replete diet or the deficient diet with subcutaneous injections of zinc grew normally and suffered no ill effects. Rats tube fed the deficient diet and supplemented parenterally with zinc excreted significantly more endogenous zinc into small intestinal luminal washings and into feces than unsupplemented rats. Sodium phytate, added to the tube feed in three groups of rats fed the deficient diet and supplemented daily with 0, 0.33 and 3.3 mg Zn/kg, significantly increased the zinc content of luminal washings in all three groups, increased fecal zinc excretion in two groups and lowered body zinc levels, estimated by femur zinc, in two groups. Tube feeding provides a means to study: 1) pure zinc deficiency without malnourishment of other nutrients; and 2) the excretion of endogenous zinc into the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:6422015

  2. TLR4 Deficiency Protects against Hepatic Fibrosis and Diethylnitrosamine-Induced Pre-Carcinogenic Liver Injury in Fibrotic Liver

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Susanne Nicole; Bohner, Annika; Dapito, Dianne H.; Schwabe, Robert F.; Lammert, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Background The development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common consequence of advanced liver fibrosis but the interactions between fibrogenesis and carcinogenesis are still poorly understood. Recently it has been shown that HCC promotion depends on Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. Pre-cancerogenous events can be modelled in mice by the administration of a single dose of diethylnitrosamine (DEN), with HCC formation depending amongst others on interleukin (IL) 6 production. Mice lacking the hepatocanalicular phosphatidylcholine transporter ABCB4 develop liver fibrosis spontaneously, resemble patients with sclerosing cholangitis due to mutations of the orthologous human gene, and represent a valid model to study tumour formation in pre-injured cholestatic liver. The aim of this study was to investigate DEN-induced liver injury in TLR4-deficient mice with biliary fibrosis. Methods ABCB4-deficient mice on the FVB/NJ genetic background were crossed to two distinct genetic backgrounds (TLR4-sufficient C3H/HeN and TLR4-deficient C3H/HeJ) for more than 10 generations. The two congenic knockout and the two corresponding wild-type mouse lines were treated with a single dose of DEN for 48 hours. Phenotypic differences were assessed by measuring hepatic collagen contents, inflammatory markers (ALT, CRP, IL6) as well as hepatic apoptosis (TUNEL) and proliferation (Ki67) rates. Results Hepatic collagen accumulation is significantly reduced in ABCB4-/-:TLR4-/-double-deficient mice. After DEN challenge, apoptosis, proliferation and inflammatory markers are decreased in TLR4-deficient in comparison to TLR4-sufficient mice. When combining ABCB4 and TLR4 deficiency with DEN treatment, hepatic IL6 expression and proliferation rates are lowest in fibrotic livers from the double-deficient line. Consistent with these effects, selective digestive tract decontamination in ABCB4-/- mice also led to reduced tumor size and number after DEN. Conclusion This study demonstrates that liver

  3. Protein profile of Beta vulgaris leaf apoplastic fluid and changes induced by Fe deficiency and Fe resupply

    PubMed Central

    Ceballos-Laita, Laura; Gutierrez-Carbonell, Elain; Lattanzio, Giuseppe; Vázquez, Saul; Contreras-Moreira, Bruno; Abadía, Anunciación; Abadía, Javier; López-Millán, Ana-Flor

    2015-01-01

    The fluid collected by direct leaf centrifugation has been used to study the proteome of the sugar beet apoplastic fluid as well as the changes induced by Fe deficiency and Fe resupply to Fe-deficient plants in the protein profile. Plants were grown in Fe-sufficient and Fe-deficient conditions, and Fe resupply was carried out with 45 μM Fe(III)-EDTA for 24 h. Protein extracts of leaf apoplastic fluid were analyzed by two-dimensional isoelectric focusing-SDS-PAGE electrophoresis. Gel image analysis revealed 203 consistent spots, and proteins in 81% of them (164) were identified by nLC-MS/MS using a custom made reference repository of beet protein sequences. When redundant UniProt entries were deleted, a non-redundant leaf apoplastic proteome consisting of 109 proteins was obtained. TargetP and SecretomeP algorithms predicted that 63% of them were secretory proteins. Functional classification of the non-redundant proteins indicated that stress and defense, protein metabolism, cell wall and C metabolism accounted for approximately 75% of the identified proteome. The effects of Fe-deficiency on the leaf apoplast proteome were limited, with only five spots (2.5%) changing in relative abundance, thus suggesting that protein homeostasis in the leaf apoplast fluid is well-maintained upon Fe shortage. The identification of three chitinase isoforms among proteins increasing in relative abundance with Fe-deficiency suggests that one of the few effects of Fe deficiency in the leaf apoplast proteome includes cell wall modifications. Iron resupply to Fe deficient plants changed the relative abundance of 16 spots when compared to either Fe-sufficient or Fe-deficient samples. Proteins identified in these spots can be broadly classified as those responding to Fe-resupply, which included defense and cell wall related proteins, and non-responsive, which are mainly protein metabolism related proteins and whose changes in relative abundance followed the same trend as with Fe-deficiency

  4. Protein profile of Beta vulgaris leaf apoplastic fluid and changes induced by Fe deficiency and Fe resupply.

    PubMed

    Ceballos-Laita, Laura; Gutierrez-Carbonell, Elain; Lattanzio, Giuseppe; Vázquez, Saul; Contreras-Moreira, Bruno; Abadía, Anunciación; Abadía, Javier; López-Millán, Ana-Flor

    2015-01-01

    The fluid collected by direct leaf centrifugation has been used to study the proteome of the sugar beet apoplastic fluid as well as the changes induced by Fe deficiency and Fe resupply to Fe-deficient plants in the protein profile. Plants were grown in Fe-sufficient and Fe-deficient conditions, and Fe resupply was carried out with 45 μM Fe(III)-EDTA for 24 h. Protein extracts of leaf apoplastic fluid were analyzed by two-dimensional isoelectric focusing-SDS-PAGE electrophoresis. Gel image analysis revealed 203 consistent spots, and proteins in 81% of them (164) were identified by nLC-MS/MS using a custom made reference repository of beet protein sequences. When redundant UniProt entries were deleted, a non-redundant leaf apoplastic proteome consisting of 109 proteins was obtained. TargetP and SecretomeP algorithms predicted that 63% of them were secretory proteins. Functional classification of the non-redundant proteins indicated that stress and defense, protein metabolism, cell wall and C metabolism accounted for approximately 75% of the identified proteome. The effects of Fe-deficiency on the leaf apoplast proteome were limited, with only five spots (2.5%) changing in relative abundance, thus suggesting that protein homeostasis in the leaf apoplast fluid is well-maintained upon Fe shortage. The identification of three chitinase isoforms among proteins increasing in relative abundance with Fe-deficiency suggests that one of the few effects of Fe deficiency in the leaf apoplast proteome includes cell wall modifications. Iron resupply to Fe deficient plants changed the relative abundance of 16 spots when compared to either Fe-sufficient or Fe-deficient samples. Proteins identified in these spots can be broadly classified as those responding to Fe-resupply, which included defense and cell wall related proteins, and non-responsive, which are mainly protein metabolism related proteins and whose changes in relative abundance followed the same trend as with Fe-deficiency

  5. Modulation of obesity-induced inflammation by dietary fats: mechanisms and clinical evidence

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Obesity plays a pivotal role in the development of low-grade inflammation. Dietary fatty acids are important modulators of inflammatory responses. Saturated fatty acids (SFA) and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) have been reported to exert pro-inflammatory effects. n-3 PUFA in particular, possess anti-inflammatory properties. Numerous clinical studies have been conducted over decades to investigate the impact of dietary fatty acids on inflammatory response in obese individuals, however the findings remained uncertain. High fat meals have been reported to increase pro-inflammatory responses, however there is limited evidence to support the role of individual dietary fatty acids in a postprandial state. Evidence in chronic studies is contradictory, the effects of individual dietary fatty acids deserves further attention. Weight loss rather than n-3 PUFA supplementation may play a more prominent role in alleviating low grade inflammation. In this context, the present review provides an update on the mechanistic insight and the influence of dietary fats on low grade inflammation, based on clinical evidence from acute and chronic clinical studies in obese and overweight individuals. PMID:24476102

  6. Diet-induced alterations in gut microflora contribute to lethal pulmonary damage in TLR2/TLR4 deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yewei; Sun, Shengyi; Goodrich, Julia K.; Kim, Hana; Poole, Angela C.; Duhamel, Gerald E.; Ley, Ruth E.; Qi, Ling

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Chronic intake of Western diet has driven an epidemic of obesity and metabolic syndrome, but how it induces mortality remains unclear. Here we show that chronic intake of a high-fat diet (HFD), not a low-fat diet (LFD), leads to severe pulmonary damage and mortality in mice deficient in Toll-like receptors (TLR) 2 and 4 (DKO hereafter). Diet-induced pulmonary lesions are blocked by antibiotics treatment and transmissible to wildtype mice upon either cohousing or fecal transplantation, pointing to the existence of bacterial pathogens. Indeed, diet and innate deficiency exert significant impact on gut microbiota composition. Thus, chronic intake of HFD promotes severe pulmonary damage and mortality in DKO mice in part via gut dysbiosis, a finding that may be important for immunodeficient patients, particularly those on chemotherapy or radiotherapy, where gut microbiota-caused conditions are often life-threatening. PMID:24953658

  7. Effect of threonine deficiency on intestinal integrity and immune response to coccidiosis in broiler chicks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We hypothesized that threonine (Thr) deficiency would exacerbate the intestinal damage induced by feed withdraw combined with coccidiosis, because of its high obligatory requirement by the gut. In this study, two dietary Thr treatments (0.49 and 0.90%) were fed to chicks from 1-21 d of age. At 13 d ...

  8. Soluble epoxide hydrolase deficiency inhibits dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis and carcinogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wanying; Li, Haonan; Dong, Hua; Liao, Jie; Hammock, Bruce D; Yang, Guang-Yu

    2013-12-01

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) hydrolyses/inactivates anti-inflammatory epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) to their corresponding diols, and targeting sEH leads to strong anti-inflammatory effects. In the present study, using a tissue microarray and immunohistochemical approach, a significant increase of sEH expression was identified in ulcerative colitis (UC)-associated dysplasia and adenocarcinoma. The effects of deficiency in the sEH gene were determined on dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) colitis-induced carcinogenesis. The effects of EETs on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated macrophages were analyzed in vitro. With extensive histopathological and immunohistochemical analyses, compared to wild-type mice, sEH(-/-) mice exhibited a significant decrease in tumor incidence (13/20 vs. 6/19, p<0.05) and a markedly reduced average tumor size (59.62±20.91 mm(3) vs. 22.42±11.22 mm(3)), and a significant number of pre-cancerous dysplasia (3±1.18 vs. 2±0.83, p<0.01). The inflammatory activity, as measured by the extent/proportion of erosion/ulceration/dense lymphoplasmacytosis (called active colitis index) in the colon, was significantly lower in sEH(-/-) mice (44.7%±24.9% vs. 20.2%±16.2%, p<0.01). The quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays demonstrated significantly low levels of cytokines/chemokines including monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), vasopressin-activated calcium-mobilizing (VCAM-1), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). In vitro, LPS-activated macrophages treated with 14,15-EET showed a significant reduction of LPS-triggered IL-1β and TNF-α expression. Eicosanoic acid metabolic profiling revealed a significant increase of the ratios of EETs/ dihydroeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs) and epoxyoctadecennoic acid/dihydroxyoctadecenoic acid (EpOMEs/DiHOMEs). These results indicate that sEH plays an important role in the development of colitis and in inducing carcinogenesis

  9. Mechanism of altered B-cell response induced by changes in dietary protein type in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Bounous, G.; Shenouda, N.; Kongshavn, P.A.; Osmond, D.G.

    1985-11-01

    The effect of 20 g/100 g dietary lactalbumin (L) or casein (C) diets or a nonpurified (NP) diet on the immune responsiveness of C57Bl/6J, C3H/HeJ and BALB/cJ mice has been investigated by measuring the response to the T cell-independent antigen, TNP-Ficoll. To investigate the possible influence of dietary protein type on the supply of B lymphocytes, bone marrow lymphocyte production has been examined by a radioautographic assay of small lymphocyte renewal and an immunofluorescent stathmokinetic assay of pre-B cells and their proliferation. The humoral response of all mice fed the L diet was found to be higher than that of mice fed the C diet or nonpurified diet. A similar pattern of dietary protein effect in (CBA/N X DBA/2J) F1 mice carrying the xid defect was observed following challenge with sheep red blood cells (SRBC). An even greater enhancing effect of dietary L was noted in normal (DBA/2J X CBA/N) F1 mice after immunization with SRBC, but in contrast, the normal large-scale production of B lymphocytes in mouse bone marrow was independent of the type of dietary protein. Dietary protein type did not affect blood level of minerals and trace metals. The free plasma amino acid profile essentially conformed to the amino acid composition of the ingested protein, suggesting that the changes in plasma amino acid profile might be a crucial factor in diet-dependent enhancement or depression of the B-cell response.

  10. Adipocyte (Pro)Renin-Receptor Deficiency Induces Lipodystrophy, Liver Steatosis and Increases Blood Pressure in Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chia-Hua; Mohammadmoradi, Shayan; Thompson, Joel; Su, Wen; Gong, Ming; Nguyen, Genevieve; Yiannikouris, Frédérique

    2016-07-01

    Adipose tissue dysfunction related to obesity is overwhelmingly associated with increased risk of developing cardiovascular diseases. In the setting of obesity, (pro)renin receptor (PRR) is increased in adipose tissue of mice. We sought to determine the physiological consequences of adipocyte-PRR deficiency using adiponectin-Cre mice. We report a unique model of adipocyte-PRR-deficient mice (PRR(Adi/Y)) with almost no detectable white adipose tissues. As a consequence, the livers of PRR(Adi/Y) mice were enlarged and demonstrated a marked accumulation of lipids. Adipocyte-specific deficiency of PRR increased systolic blood pressure and the concentration of soluble PRR in plasma. To determine whether adipocyte-PRR was involved in the development of obesity-induced hypertension, mice were fed a low-fat or a high-fat diet for 16 weeks. Adipocyte-PRR-deficient mice were resistant to diet-induced obesity. Both high-fat- and low-fat-fed PRR(Adi/Y) mice had elevated insulin levels. Interestingly, adipocyte-PRR deficiency improved glucose tolerance in high-fat-fed PRR(Adi/Y) mice. In response to feeding either low-fat or high-fat diets, systolic blood pressure was greater in PRR(Adi/Y) mice than in control mice. High-fat feeding elevated soluble PRR concentration in control and PRR(Adi/Y) mice. In vitro knockdown of PRR by siRNA significantly decreased mRNA abundance of PPARγ (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma), suggesting an important role for PRR in adipogenesis. Our data indicate that adipocyte-PRR is involved in lipid homeostasis and glucose and insulin homeostasis, and that soluble PRR may be a predictor of metabolic disturbances and play a role in systolic blood pressure regulation. PMID:27185751

  11. Diet-induced iron deficiency anemia and pregnancy outcome in rhesus monkeys12

    PubMed Central

    Golub, Mari S; Hogrefe, Casey E; Tarantal, Alice F; Germann, Stacey L; Beard, John L; Georgieff, Michael K; Calatroni, Agustin; Lozoff, Betsy

    2006-01-01

    Background Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is relatively common in the third trimester of pregnancy, but causal associations with low birth weight and compromised neonatal iron status are difficult to establish in human populations. Objective The objective was to determine the effects of diet-induced IDA on intrauterine growth and neonatal iron status in an appropriate animal model for third-trimester IDA in women. Design Hematologic and iron-status measures, pregnancy outcomes, and fetal and neonatal evaluations were compared between pregnant rhesus monkeys (n = 14) fed a diet containing 10 μg Fe/g diet from the time of pregnancy detection (gestation days 28–30) and controls (n = 24) fed 100 μg Fe/g diet. Results By the third trimester, 79% of the iron-deprived dams and 29% of the control monkeys had a hemoglobin concentration <11 g/dL. There were also significant group differences in hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, transferrin saturation, serum ferritin, and serum iron. At birth, the newborns of monkeys iron-deprived during pregnancy had significantly lower hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume, and mean corpuscular hemoglobin values and a lower ratio of erythroid to total colony-forming units in bone marrow than did the control newborns. Pregnancy weight gain did not differ significantly between the iron-deprived and control dams, and the fetuses and newborns of the iron-deprived dams were not growth retarded relative to the controls. Gestation length, the number of stillbirths, and neonatal neurobehavioral test scores did not differ significantly by diet group. Conclusion These data indicate that an inadequate intake of iron from the diet during pregnancy in rhesus monkeys can lead to compromised hematologic status of the neonate without indications of growth retardation or impaired neurologic function at birth. PMID:16522913

  12. Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 deficiency is protective in rhabdomyolysis-induced kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Boddu, Ravindra; Hull, Travis D; Bolisetty, Subhashini; Hu, Xianzhen; Moehle, Mark S; Daher, João Paulo Lima; Kamal, Ahmed Ibrahim; Joseph, Reny; George, James F; Agarwal, Anupam; Curtis, Lisa M; West, Andrew B

    2015-07-15

    Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene are the most common known genetic cause of Parkinson's disease, and LRRK2 is also linked to Crohn's and Hansen's disease. LRRK2 is expressed in many organs in mammals but is particularly abundant in the kidney. We find that LRRK2 protein is predominantly localized to collecting duct cells in the rat kidney, with much lower expression in other kidney cells. While genetic knockout (KO) of LRRK2 expression is well-tolerated in mice and rats, a unique age-dependent pathology develops in the kidney. The cortex and medulla of LRRK2 KO rat kidneys become darkly pigmented in early adulthood, yet aged animals display no overt signs of kidney failure. Accompanying the dark pigment we find substantial macrophage infiltration in LRRK2 KO kidneys, suggesting the presence of chronic inflammation that may predispose to kidney disease. Unexpectedly, the dark kidneys of the LRRK2 KO rats are highly resistant to rhabdomyolysis-induced acute kidney injury compared with wild-type rats. Biochemical profiling of the LRRK2 KO kidneys using immunohistochemistry, proteomic and lipidomic analyses show a massive accumulation of hemoglobin and lipofuscin in renal tubules that account for the pigmentation. The proximal tubules demonstrate a corresponding up-regulation of the cytoprotective protein heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) which is capable of mitigating acute kidney injury. The unusual kidney pathology of LRRK2 KO rats highlights several novel physiological roles for LRRK2 and provides indirect evidence for HO-1 expression as a protective mechanism in acute kidney injury in LRRK2 deficiency. PMID:25904107

  13. Developmental hypothyroxinaemia induced by maternal mild iodine deficiency delays hippocampal axonal growth in the rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Wei, W; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Dong, J; Min, H; Song, B; Teng, W; Xi, Q; Chen, J

    2013-09-01

    Iodine is essential for the biosynthesis of thyroid hormones, including triiodothyronine and thyroxine. Thyroid hormones are important for central nervous system development. Mild maternal iodine deficiency (ID)-induced hypothyroxinaemia causes neurological deficits and mental retardation of the foetus. However, the detailed mechanism underlying these deficits is still largely unknown. Given that the growth-associated protein of 43 kDa (GAP-43), semaphorin 3A (Sema3A) and the glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β)/collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP2) pathway are essential for axonal development, we hypothesise that hippocampal axonal growth-related proteins may be impaired, which may contribute to hippocampal axonal growth delay in rat offspring exposed to maternal hypothyroxinaemia. To test this hypothesis, maternal hypothyroxinaemia models were established in Wistar rats using a mild ID diet. Besides a negative control group, two maternal hypothyroidism models were created with either a severe ID diet or methimazole in the water. Our results showed that maternal hypothyroxinaemia exposure delayed offspring axonal growth on gestational day 19, postnatal day (PN) 7, PN14 and PN21. Consistent with this, the mean intensity of hippocampal CRMP2 and Tau1 immunofluorescence axonal protein was reduced in the mild ID group. Moreover, maternal hypothyroxinaemia disrupted expressions of GAP-43 and Sema3A. Furthermore, the phosphorylation of GSK3β and CRMP2 was also affected in the treated offspring, implying a potential mechanism by which hypothyroxinaemia-exposure affects neurodevelopment. Taken together, our data support the hypothesis that maternal hypothyroxinaemia may impair axonal growth of the offspring. PMID:23763342

  14. Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 1b Deficiency Protects Mice from Diet-Induced Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Teayoun; He, Lan; Johnson, Maria S.; Li, Yan; Zeng, Ling; Ding, Yishu; Long, Qinqiang; Moore, John F.; Sharer, Jon D.; Nagy, Tim R.; Young, Martin E.; Wood, Philip A.; Yang, Qinglin

    2014-01-01

    Background Carnitine Palmitoyl Transferase 1 (CPT1) is the rate-limiting enzyme governing long-chain fatty acid entry into mitochondria. CPT1 inhibitors have been developed and exhibited beneficial effects against type II diabetes in short-term preclinical animal studies. However, the long-term effects of treatment remain unclear and potential non-specific effects of these CPT1 inhibitors hamper in-depth understanding of the potential molecular mechanisms involved. Methods We investigated the effects of restricting the activity of the muscle isoform CPT1b in mice using heterozygous CPT1b deficient (Cpt1b+/−) and Wild Type (WT) mice fed with a High Fat Diet (HFD) for 22 weeks. Insulin sensitivity was assessed using Glucose Tolerance Test (GTT), insulin tolerance test and hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamps. We also examined body weight/composition, tissue and systemic metabolism/energetic status, lipid profile, transcript analysis, and changes in insulin signaling pathways. Results We found that Cpt1b+/− mice were protected from HFD-induced insulin resistance compared to WT littermates. Cpt1b+/− mice exhibited elevated whole body glucose disposal rate and skeletal muscle glucose uptake. Furthermore, Cpt1b+/− skeletal muscle showed diminished ex vivo palmitate oxidative capacity by ~40% and augmented glucose oxidation capacity by ~50% without overt change in whole body energy metabolism. HFD feeding Cpt1b+/− but not WT mice exhibited well-maintained insulin signaling in skeletal muscle, heart, and liver. Conclusion The present study on a genetic model of CPT1b restriction supports the concept that partial CPT1b inhibition is a potential therapeutic strategy. PMID:25309812

  15. Targeted gene correction of α1-antitrypsin deficiency in induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Yusa, Kosuke; Rashid, S. Tamir; Strick-Marchand, Helene; Varela, Ignacio; Liu, Pei-Qi; Paschon, David E.; Miranda, Elena; Ordóñez, Adriana; Hannan, Nick; Rouhani, Foad Jafari; Darche, Sylvie; Alexander, Graeme; Marciniak, Stefan J.; Fusaki, Noemi; Hasegawa, Mamoru; Holmes, Michael C.; Di Santo, James P.; Lomas, David A.; Bradley, Allan; Vallier, Ludovic

    2011-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hIPSCs) represent a unique opportunity for regenerative medicine since they offer the prospect of generating unlimited quantities of cells for autologous transplantation as a novel treatment for a broad range of disorders1,2,3,4. However, the use of hIPSCs in the context of genetically inherited human disease will require correction of disease-causing mutations in a manner that is fully compatible with clinical applications3,5. The methods currently available, such as homologous recombination, lack the necessary efficiency and also leave residual sequences in the targeted genome6. Therefore, the development of new approaches to edit the mammalian genome is a prerequisite to delivering the clinical promise of hIPSCs. Here, we show that a combination of zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs)7 and piggyBac8,9 technology in hIPSCs can achieve bi-allelic correction of a point mutation (Glu342Lys) in the α1-antitrypsin (A1AT, also called SERPINA1) gene that is responsible for α1-antitrypsin deficiency (A1ATD). Genetic correction of hIPSCs restored the structure and function of A1AT in subsequently derived liver cells in vitro and in vivo. This approach is significantly more efficient than any other gene targeting technology that is currently available and crucially prevents contamination of the host genome with residual non-human sequences. Our results provide the first proof of principle for the potential of combining hIPSCs with genetic correction to generate clinically relevant cells for autologous cell-based therapies. PMID:21993621

  16. Attenuation of high sucrose diet–induced insulin resistance in tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase deficient Drosophila melanogaster vermilion mutants

    PubMed Central

    Navrotskaya, Valeriya; Oxenkrug, Gregory; Vorobyova, Lyudmila; Summergrad, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to high sugar diet (HSD) serves as an experimental model of insulin resistance (IR) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) in mammals and insects. Peripheral IR induced by HSD delays emergence of pupae from larvae and decreases body weight of Drosophila imago. Understanding of mechanisms of IR/T2D is essential for refining T2D prevention and treatment strategies. Dysregulation of tryptophan (TRP) – kynurenine (KYN) pathway was suggested as one of the mechanisms of IR development. Rate-limiting enzyme of TRP – KYN pathway in Drosophila is TRP 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO), an evolutionary conserved ortholog of human TDO. In insects TDO is encoded by vermilion gene. TDO is not active in vermilion mutants. In order to evaluate the possible impact of deficient formation of KYN from TRP on the inducement of IR by HSD, we compared the effect of HSD in wild type (Oregon) and vermilion mutants of Drosophila melanogaster by assessing the time of white pupae emergence from larva and body weight of imago. Delay of emergence of pupae from larvae induced by high sucrose diet was less pronounced in vermilion (1.4 days) than in Oregon flies (3.3 days) in comparison with flies maintained on standard diet. Exposure to high sucrose diet decreased body weight of Oregon (but not vermilion) imago. Attenuation of high sucrose diet–induced IR/T2D in vermilion flies might depend on deficiency of TRP – KYN pathway. Besides IR/T2D, HSD induces obesity in Drosophila. Future studies of HSD-induced obesity and IR/T2D in TDO deficient vermilion mutants of Drosophila might help to understand the mechanisms of high association between IR/T2D and obesity. Modulation of TRP – KYN metabolism might be utilized for prevention and treatment of IR/T2D. PMID:26191458

  17. Effect of dietary resveratrol in ameliorating aflatoxin B1-induced changes in broiler birds.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, M; Suganthi, R U; Thammiaha, V

    2015-12-01

    Consumption of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) contaminated feed by poultry affects the health of broiler birds causing severe economic losses. The use of phytochemicals is a safe, effective, alternative and practical approach to combat the toxic effect of AF in broilers. Resveratrol, a polyphenol derived from red grapes, berries and peanuts, exerts anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and immunomodulatory effects. Our study was aimed at evaluating the possible protective effects of resveratrol against the adverse effects of AFB1 in broiler birds. A feeding trial of 42 days of duration was undertaken in a completely randomized design with five dietary treatments: G1-AFB1(1.0 ppm); G2-CTR (basal diet alone); G3-AFB1(1.0 ppm)+Resv 0.5%; G4-AFB1(1.0 ppm)+Resv 1%; and G5-Resv 1%. Gain in body weight (BWG) and feed intake (FI) was observed to be highest (p < 0.05) in the AFB1 birds followed by the control group. Feed conversion ratio was lowest in G2-CTR birds and failed to record any significant variation (p > 0.05) between groups as well as within groups. Birds fed resveratrol at both 0.5% and 1.0% levels in combination with AFB1 as well as alone along with basal diet had lower BWG and FI between the fourth and fifth week and also at the fifth week (p < 0.05). No variation (p > 0.05) was obtained in the FCR of AFB1 and resveratrol group of broiler birds. AFB1 feeding significantly increased the activities of aspartate-(AST) and alanine-(ALT) amino transferase, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities (p < 0.05) but lowered glucose, cholesterol and triglyceride levels in serum. Supplementation of resveratrol helped in increasing the activities of the oxidative enzymes and in improving the plasma total antioxidant capacity (TAOC) and total protein (TP) significantly (p < 0.05) and protein values. The livers of AFB1 group showed degeneration of hepatocytes, bile duct hyperplasia and microgranuloma formation. In resveratrol supplemented birds, the severity and degree of the

  18. Dietary Polyphenols Promote Growth of the Gut Bacterium Akkermansia muciniphila and Attenuate High-Fat Diet–Induced Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Carmody, Rachel N.; Kuhn, Peter; Moskal, Kristin; Rojas-Silva, Patricio; Turnbaugh, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary polyphenols protect against metabolic syndrome, despite limited absorption and digestion, raising questions about their mechanism of action. We hypothesized that one mechanism may involve the gut microbiota. To test this hypothesis, C57BL/6J mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) containing 1% Concord grape polyphenols (GP). Relative to vehicle controls, GP attenuated several effects of HFD feeding, including weight gain, adiposity, serum inflammatory markers (tumor necrosis factor [TNF]α, interleukin [IL]-6, and lipopolysaccharide), and glucose intolerance. GP lowered intestinal expression of inflammatory markers (TNFα, IL-6, inducible nitric oxide synthase) and a gene for glucose absorption (Glut2). GP increased intestinal expression of genes involved in barrier function (occludin) and limiting triglyceride storage (fasting-induced adipocyte factor). GP also increased intestinal gene expression of proglucagon, a precursor of proteins that promote insulin production and gut barrier integrity. 16S rRNA gene sequencing and quantitative PCR of cecal and fecal samples demonstrated that GP dramatically increased the growth of Akkermansia muciniphila and decreased the proportion of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes, consistent with prior reports that similar changes in microbial community structure can protect from diet-induced obesity and metabolic disease. These data suggest that GP act in the intestine to modify gut microbial community structure, resulting in lower intestinal and systemic inflammation and improved metabolic outcomes. The gut microbiota may thus provide the missing link in the mechanism of action of poorly absorbed dietary polyphenols. PMID:25845659

  19. Dietary Polyphenols Promote Growth of the Gut Bacterium Akkermansia muciniphila and Attenuate High-Fat Diet-Induced Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Roopchand, Diana E; Carmody, Rachel N; Kuhn, Peter; Moskal, Kristin; Rojas-Silva, Patricio; Turnbaugh, Peter J; Raskin, Ilya

    2015-08-01

    Dietary polyphenols protect against metabolic syndrome, despite limited absorption and digestion, raising questions about their mechanism of action. We hypothesized that one mechanism may involve the gut microbiota. To test this hypothesis, C57BL/6J mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) containing 1% Concord grape polyphenols (GP). Relative to vehicle controls, GP attenuated several effects of HFD feeding, including weight gain, adiposity, serum inflammatory markers (tumor necrosis factor [TNF]α, interleukin [IL]-6, and lipopolysaccharide), and glucose intolerance. GP lowered intestinal expression of inflammatory markers (TNFα, IL-6, inducible nitric oxide synthase) and a gene for glucose absorption (Glut2). GP increased intestinal expression of genes involved in barrier function (occludin) and limiting triglyceride storage (fasting-induced adipocyte factor). GP also increased intestinal gene expression of proglucagon, a precursor of proteins that promote insulin production and gut barrier integrity. 16S rRNA gene sequencing and quantitative PCR of cecal and fecal samples demonstrated that GP dramatically increased the growth of Akkermansia muciniphila and decreased the proportion of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes, consistent with prior reports that similar changes in microbial community structure can protect from diet-induced obesity and metabolic disease. These data suggest that GP act in the intestine to modify gut microbial community structure, resulting in lower intestinal and systemic inflammation and improved metabolic outcomes. The gut microbiota may thus provide the missing link in the mechanism of action of poorly absorbed dietary polyphenols. PMID:25845659

  20. Exercise and dietary change ameliorate high fat diet induced obesity and insulin resistance via mTOR signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Ju Yong; Shin, Ki Ok; Woo, Jinhee; Woo, Sang Heon; Jang, Ki Soeng; Lee, Yul Hyo; Kang, Sunghwun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of exercise and dietary change on obesity and insulin resistance and mTOR signaling protein levels in skeletal muscles of obese rats. [Methods] Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into CO (Normal diet) and HF (High Fat diet) groups in order to induce obesity for 15 weeks. The rats were then subdivided into CO, COT (CO + Training), HF, HFT (HF + Training), HFND (Dietary change), and HFNDT (HFND + Training) groups (10 rats / group). The training groups underwent moderate-intensity treadmill exercise for 8 weeks, after which soleus muscles were excised and analyzed. Data was statistically analyzed by independent t-test and One-way ANOVA tests with a 0.05 significance level. [Results] Fasting blood glucose, plasma insulin, and HOMA-IR in the HF group were significantly higher, as compared with other groups (p <.05). Protein levels of insulin receptor subunit-1 (IRS-1), IRS-2, and p-Akt were significantly higher in the HFT, HFND, and HFNDT groups, as compared with HF group. In addition, the protein levels of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and ribosomal S6 protein kinase 1 were significantly decreased by exercise and dietary change (p <.05). However, mTORC2 and phosphoinositide 3-kinase were significantly increased (p <.05). [Conclusion] In summary, despite the negative impact of continuous high fat intake, regular exercise and dietary change showed a positive effect on insulin resistance and mTOR signaling protein levels. PMID:27508151

  1. Too tempting to resist? Past success at weight control rather than dietary restraint determines exposure-induced disinhibited eating.

    PubMed

    Houben, Katrijn; Nederkoorn, Chantal; Jansen, Anita

    2012-10-01

    As the prevalence of obesity is increasing, many people resort to dieting to achieve a healthy body weight. Such dietary restraint has been suggested to cause counterproductive effects leading to disinhibited eating. However, it is more likely that dietary restraint is a by-product of previous difficulties in weight control and disinhibited eating. If so, disinhibition should be related more strongly to unsuccessful weight control than dietary restraint. This possibility was examined in the present study. Participants were exposed to palatable food or to neutral objects. Before and after exposure, we measured craving, general inhibitory control and inhibition of food-related responses with the Stop-Signal Task (SST), and food consumption during a taste test. Results showed that exposure increased craving in both successful and unsuccessful weight regulators. People who were successful at controlling their weight, however, were better able to regulate this temptation compared to unsuccessful weight regulators: while exposure to palatable food reduced inhibitory control over food-related responses and increased food consumption in unsuccessful weight regulators, successful weight regulators did not show such disinhibition. Dietary restraint did not influence any of these findings. Further, the exposure-induced difference in inhibition between successful and unsuccessful weight regulators was specific for food-related responses, as regulatory success did not influence general inhibitory control. Thus, while successful and unsuccessful weight regulators seem equally tempted by palatable food, those who are successful in controlling their weight seem better able to resist these temptations by exerting inhibitory control over appetitive responses toward palatable food. PMID:22796949

  2. Vitamin D receptor is required for dietary calcium-induced repression of calbindin-D9k expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Bolt, Merry J G; Cao, Li-Ping; Kong, Juan; Sitrin, Michael D; Li, Yan Chun

    2005-05-01

    Calbindin (CaBP), the vitamin D-dependent calcium-binding protein, is believed to play an important role in intracellular calcium transport. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of high dietary calcium on the expression of CaBP-D9k and CaBP-D28k in the presence and absence of a functional vitamin D receptor (VDR). Treatment with the HCa-Lac diet containing 2% calcium, 1.5% phosphorus and 20% lactose reversed the hypocalcemia seen in adult VDR-null mice in 3 weeks but did not significantly change the blood ionized calcium in wild-type mice. This dietary treatment dramatically suppressed both the duodenal and the renal CaBP-D9k expression in wild-type mice at both mRNA and protein levels but had little effect on the expression of the same gene in VDR-null mice. Removal of this diet gradually restored the expression of CaBP-D9k to the untreated level in wild-type mice. Only moderate or little change in CaBP-D28k expression was seen in wild-type and VDR-null mice fed with the HCa-Lac diet. The VDR content in the duodenum or kidney of wild-type mice was not altered by the dietary treatment. These results suggest that calcium regulates CaBP-D9k expression by modulating the circulating 1,25-dihydrxyvitamin D(3) level and that VDR is thus required for the dietary calcium-induced suppression of CaBP-D9k expression. Calcium regulation of the CaBP-D9k level may represent an important mechanism by which animals maintain their calcium balance. PMID:15866228

  3. Effects of induced energy deficiency on lactoferrin concentration in milk and the lactoferrin reaction of primary bovine mammary epithelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Danowski, K; Gross, J J; Meyer, H H D; Kliem, H

    2013-08-01

    A dietary energy restriction to 49% of total energy requirements was conducted with Red Holstein cows for three weeks in mid-lactation. At the last day of the restriction phase, primary bovine mammary epithelial cells (pbMEC) of eight restriction (RF) and seven control-fed (CF) cows were extracted out of one litre of milk and cultured. In their third passage, an immune challenge with the most prevalent, heat-inactivated mastitis pathogens Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) was conducted. Lactoferrin (LF) was determined on gene expression and protein level. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed to determine LF in milk samples taken twice weekly throughout the animal trial, beginning on day 20 pp (post-partum) until day 150 pp, in cell culture total protein and in cell culture supernatant. Milk LF increased throughout the lactation and decreased significantly during the induced energy deficiency in the RF group. At the beginning of realimentation, LF concentration increased immediately in the RF group and reached higher levels than before the induced deficit following the upward trend seen in the CF group. Cell culture data revealed higher levels (up to sevenfold up-regulation in gene expression) and significant higher LF protein concentration in the RF compared to the CF group cells. A further emphasized effect was found in E. coli compared to S. aureus exposed cells. The general elevated LF levels in the RF pbMEC group and the further increase owing to the immune challenge indicate an unexpected memory ability of milk-extracted mammary cells that were transposed into in vitro conditions and even displayed in the third passage of cultivation. The study confirms the suitability of the non-invasive milk-extracted pbMEC culture model to monitor the influence of feeding experiments on immunological situations in vivo. PMID:22540894

  4. Diquat induces renal proximal tubule injury in glutathione reductase-deficient mice

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Lynette K. . E-mail: rogersl@ccri.net; Bates, Carlton M.; Welty, Stephen E.; Smith, Charles V.

    2006-12-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been associated with many human diseases, and glutathione (GSH)-dependent processes are pivotal in limiting tissue damage. To test the hypothesis that Gr1{sup a1Neu} (Neu) mice, which do not express glutathione reductase (GR), would be more susceptible than are wild-type mice to ROS-mediated injury, we studied the effects of diquat, a redox cycling toxicant. Neu mice exhibited modest, dose- and time-dependent elevations in plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activities, 126 {+-} 36 U/l at 2 h after 5 {mu}mol/kg of diquat, but no ALT elevations were observed in diquat-treated C3H/HeN mice for up to 6 h after 50 {mu}mol/kg of diquat. Histology indicated little or no hepatic necrosis in diquat-treated mice of either strain, but substantial renal injury was observed in diquat-treated Neu mice, characterized by brush border sloughing in the proximal tubules by 1 h and tubular necrosis by 2 h after doses of 7.5 {mu}mol/kg. Decreases in renal GSH levels were observed in the Neu mice by 2 h post dose (3.4 {+-} 0.4 vs 0.2 {+-} 0.0 {mu}mol/g tissue at 0 and 50 {mu}mol/kg, respectively), and increases in renal GSSG levels were observed in the Neu mice as early as 0.5 h after 7.5 {mu}mol/kg (105.5 {+-} 44.1 vs 27.9 {+-} 4.8 nmol/g tissue). Blood urea nitrogen levels were elevated by 2 h in Neu mice after doses of 7.5 {mu}mol/kg (Neu vs C3H, 32.8 {+-} 4.1 vs 17.9 {+-} 0.3 mg/dl). Diquat-induced renal injury in the GR-deficient Neu mice offers a useful model for studies of ROS-induced renal necrosis and of the contributions of GR in defense against oxidant-mediated injuries in vivo.

  5. Vitamin D deficiency is a potential risk factor for contrast-induced nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Luchi, Weverton M; Shimizu, Maria Heloisa M; Canale, Daniele; Gois, Pedro Henrique F; de Bragança, Ana Carolina; Volpini, Rildo A; Girardi, Adriana C C; Seguro, Antonio C

    2015-08-01

    Vitamin D deficiency (VDD) is widespread in the general population. Iodinated (IC) or gadolinium-based contrast media (Gd) may decrease renal function in high-risk patients. This study tested the hypothesis that VDD is a predisposing factor for IC- or Gd-induced nephrotoxicity. To this end, male Wistar rats were fed standard (SD) or vitamin D-free diet for 30 days. IC (diatrizoate), Gd (gadoterate meglumine), or 0.9% saline was then administered intravenously and six groups were obtained as the following: SD plus 0.9% saline (Sham-SD), SD plus IC (SD+IC), SD plus Gd (SD+Gd), vitamin D-free diet for 30 days plus 0.9% saline (Sham-VDD30), vitamin D-free diet for 30 days plus IC (VDD30+IC), and vitamin D-free diet for 30 days plus Gd (VDD30+Gd). Renal hemodynamics, redox status, histological, and immunoblot analysis were evaluated 48 h after contrast media (CM) or vehicle infusion. VDD rats showed lower levels of total serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], similar plasma calcium and phosphorus concentration, and higher renal renin and angiotensinogen protein expression compared with rats fed SD. IC or Gd infusion did not affect inulin clearance-based estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in rats fed SD but significantly decreased GFR in rats fed vitamin D-free diet. Both CM increased renal angiotensinogen, and the interaction between VDD and CM triggered lower renal endothelial nitric oxide synthase abundance and higher renal thiobarbituric acid reactive substances-to-glutathione ratio (an index of oxidative stress) on VDD30+IC and VDD30+Gd groups. Conversely, worsening of renal function was not accompanied by abnormalities on kidney structure. Additionally, rats on a VDD for 60 days displayed a greater fall in GFR after CM administration. Collectively, our findings suggest that VDD is a potential risk factor for IC- or Gd-induced nephrotoxicity most likely due to imbalance in intrarenal vasoactive substances and oxidative stress. PMID:26041113

  6. GLAST Deficiency in Mice Exacerbates Gap Detection Deficits in a Model of Salicylate-Induced Tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hong; Vikhe Patil, Kim; Han, Chul; Fabella, Brian; Canlon, Barbara; Someya, Shinichi; Cederroth, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    Gap detection or gap pre-pulse inhibition of the acoustic startle (GPIAS) has been successfully used in rat and guinea pig models of tinnitus, yet this system has been proven to have low efficacy in CBA mice, with low basal GPIAS and subtle tinnitus-like effects. Here, we tested five mouse strains (CBA, BalbC, CD-1, C57BL/6 and 129sv) for pre-pulse inhibition (PPI) and gap detection with varying interstimulus intervals (ISI) and found that mice from a CBA genetic background had the poorest capacities of suppressing the startle response in the presence of a pre-pulse or a gap. CD-1 mice displayed variable responses throughout all ISI. Interestingly, C57BL/6, 129sv and BalbC showed efficient suppression with either pre-pulses or gaps with shorter ISI. The glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST) is expressed in support cells from the cochlea and buffers the excess of glutamate. We hypothesized that loss of GLAST function could sensitize the ear to tinnitus-inducing agents, such as salicylate. Using shorter ISI to obtain a greater dynamic range to assess tinnitus-like effects, we found that disruption of gap detection by salicylate was exacerbated across various intensities of a 32-kHz narrow band noise gap carrier in GLAST knockout (KO) mice when compared to their wild-type (WT) littermates. Auditory brainstem responses (ABR) and distortion-product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) were performed to evaluate the effects on hearing functions. Salicylate caused greater auditory threshold shifts (near 15 dB) in GLAST KO mice than in WT mice across all tested frequencies, despite similarly reduced DPOAE. Despite these changes, inhibition using broad-band gap carriers and 32 kHz pre-pulses were not affected. Our study suggests that GLAST deficiency could become a useful experimental model to decipher the mechanisms underlying drug-induced tinnitus. Future studies addressing the neurological correlates of tinnitus in this model could provide additional insights into the

  7. GLAST Deficiency in Mice Exacerbates Gap Detection Deficits in a Model of Salicylate-Induced Tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hong; Vikhe Patil, Kim; Han, Chul; Fabella, Brian; Canlon, Barbara; Someya, Shinichi; Cederroth, Christopher R

    2016-01-01

    Gap detection or gap pre-pulse inhibition of the acoustic startle (GPIAS) has been successfully used in rat and guinea pig models of tinnitus, yet this system has been proven to have low efficacy in CBA mice, with low basal GPIAS and subtle tinnitus-like effects. Here, we tested five mouse strains (CBA, BalbC, CD-1, C57BL/6 and 129sv) for pre-pulse inhibition (PPI) and gap detection with varying interstimulus intervals (ISI) and found that mice from a CBA genetic background had the poorest capacities of suppressing the startle response in the presence of a pre-pulse or a gap. CD-1 mice displayed variable responses throughout all ISI. Interestingly, C57BL/6, 129sv and BalbC showed efficient suppression with either pre-pulses or gaps with shorter ISI. The glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST) is expressed in support cells from the cochlea and buffers the excess of glutamate. We hypothesized that loss of GLAST function could sensitize the ear to tinnitus-inducing agents, such as salicylate. Using shorter ISI to obtain a greater dynamic range to assess tinnitus-like effects, we found that disruption of gap detection by salicylate was exacerbated across various intensities of a 32-kHz narrow band noise gap carrier in GLAST knockout (KO) mice when compared to their wild-type (WT) littermates. Auditory brainstem responses (ABR) and distortion-product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) were performed to evaluate the effects on hearing functions. Salicylate caused greater auditory threshold shifts (near 15 dB) in GLAST KO mice than in WT mice across all tested frequencies, despite similarly reduced DPOAE. Despite these changes, inhibition using broad-band gap carriers and 32 kHz pre-pulses were not affected. Our study suggests that GLAST deficiency could become a useful experimental model to decipher the mechanisms underlying drug-induced tinnitus. Future studies addressing the neurological correlates of tinnitus in this model could provide additional insights into the

  8. Generation of CD44 gene-deficient mouse derived induced pluripotent stem cells: CD44 gene-deficient iPSCs.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhenwei; Ji, Qianqian; Zhao, Haijing; Nie, Yu; He, Zuyong; Chen, Yaosheng; Cong, Peiqing

    2014-10-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) show good promise for the treatment of defects caused by numerous genetic diseases. Herein, we successfully generated CD44 gene-deficient iPSCs using Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and vitamin C. The generated iPSCs displayed a characteristic morphology similar to the well-characterized embryonic stem cells. Alkaline phosphatase, cell surface (SSEA1, NANOG, and OCT4), and pluripotency markers were expressed at high levels in these cells. The iPSCs formed teratomas in vivo and supported full-term development of constructed porcine embryos by inter-species nuclear transplantation. Importantly, incubation with trichostatin A increased the efficiency of iPSCs generation by increasing the histone acetylation levels. Moreover, more iPSCs colonies appeared following cell passaging during colony picking, thus increasing the effectiveness of iPSCs selection. Thus, our work provides essential stem cell materials for the treatment of genetic diseases and proposes a novel strategy to enhance the efficiency of induced reprogramming. PMID:24952030

  9. Cardiac deficiency of single cytochrome oxidase assembly factor scox induces p53-dependent apoptosis in a Drosophila cardiomyopathy model

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Morentin, Leticia; Martínez, Lidia; Piloto, Sarah; Yang, Hua; Schon, Eric A.; Garesse, Rafael; Bodmer, Rolf; Ocorr, Karen; Cervera, Margarita; Arredondo, Juan J.

    2015-01-01

    The heart is a muscle with high energy demands. Hence, most patients with mitochondrial disease produced by defects in the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system are susceptible to cardiac involvement. The presentation of mitochondrial cardiomyopathy includes hypertrophic, dilated and left ventricular noncompaction, but the molecular mechanisms involved in cardiac impairment are unknown. One of the most frequent OXPHOS defects in humans frequently associated with cardiomyopathy is cytochrome c oxidase (COX) deficiency caused by mutations in COX assembly factors such as Sco1 and Sco2. To investigate the molecular mechanisms that underlie the cardiomyopathy associated with Sco deficiency, we have heart specifically interfered scox expression, the single Drosophila Sco orthologue. Cardiac-specific knockdown of scox reduces fly lifespan, and it severely compromises heart function and structure, producing dilated cardiomyopathy. Cardiomyocytes with low levels of scox have a significant reduction in COX activity and they undergo a metabolic switch from OXPHOS to glycolysis, mimicking the clinical features found in patients harbouring Sco mutations. The major cardiac defects observed are produced by a significant increase in apoptosis, which is dp53-dependent. Genetic and molecular evidence strongly suggest that dp53 is directly involved in the development of the cardiomyopathy induced by scox deficiency. Remarkably, apoptosis is enhanced in the muscle and liver of Sco2 knock-out mice, clearly suggesting that cell death is a key feature of the COX deficiencies produced by mutations in Sco genes in humans. PMID:25792727

  10. Fibrin-Induced Skin Fibrosis in Mice Deficient in Tissue Plasminogen Activator

    PubMed Central

    de Giorgio-Miller, Alexander; Bottoms, Steve; Laurent, Geoffrey; Carmeliet, Peter; Herrick, Sarah

    2005-01-01

    The deposition of fibrin is an integral part of the tissue repair process, but its persistence is also associated with a number of fibrotic conditions. This study addressed the hypothesis that reduced fibrinolysis and fibrin persistence are associated with an enhanced accumulation of collagen and the development of skin fibrosis. Decreased fibrinolysis was confirmed in fibrin gel cultures that contained human dermal fibroblasts plus the specific plasmin inhibitor α2-antiplasmin or dermal fibroblasts isolated from plasminogen activator (PA)-deficient mice. Collagen accumulation was significantly increased in the presence of inhibitor and in tPA-deficient, but not uPA-deficient, fibroblasts compared with controls. These findings were also confirmed using a skin fibrosis model in which multiple injections of fibrin were given subcutaneously to PA-deficient mice. Injection sites from tPA-deficient mice displayed significantly increased collagen levels compared with uPA-deficient mice and wild-type controls. Up-regulation of fibroblast procollagen gene expression and reduced activation of pro-MMP-1 appeared to mediate the increase in collagen by human dermal fibroblasts in the presence of α2-antiplasmin. These findings suggest that persistent fibrin is associated with enhanced collagen accumulation that may result in the development of fibrotic skin disorders in which reduced fibrinolysis is a feature. PMID:16127152

  11. Dietary-induced cancer prevention: An expanding research arena of emerging diet related to healthcare system

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Dilipkumar; Banerjee, Subham; Ghosh, Ashoke Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Diet plays a vital role in the management of cancer because they are the source of important physiologically functional components. Scientific observations support the idea that dietary supplement can prevent breast cancer recurrences. Strong correlations are established between the high intake of saturated fat and the incidence of different types of cancer. It is found that chronic alcohol consumption is associated with increased risk of cancers of oral cavity, pharynx, esophagus, and larynx. Again, some evidences are also found regarding phosphorous, glutamate level in the body, and incidence of cancer. Different physiologically functional components are found in the dietary materials. Fibers, the major dietary components, have long been recognized for the unique properties in the treatment of cancer, which are related to its antineoplastic functions. Antioxidant rich diet has been added to the list of cancer-preventing dietary components. Also, recently published research has shown that natural carotenoids in the diet leads to a normalization of body epithelial cells and protects against the risk of stomach and esophagus cancer, and improves the immune system's response. Again, fruit juices, processed vegetable juices, orange peel, green tea, vitamins, flavonoids, and trace materials have cancer inhibitory properties. Clearly, there has been increasing recognition of chemoprotective functions. Now, it can be recognized for another kind of functionality for the improvement of the health of mankind. PMID:22470889

  12. A deficiency in Mdm2 binding protein (MTBP) inhibits Myc-induced B cell proliferation and lymphomagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Odvody, Jessica; Vincent, Tiffaney; Arrate, Maria Pia; Grieb, Brian; Wang, Shuo; Garriga, Judit; Lozano, Guillermina; Iwakuma, Tomoo; Haines, Dale S.; Eischen, Christine M.

    2010-01-01

    Mdm2 binding protein (MTBP) has been implicated in cell cycle arrest and the Mdm2-p53 tumor suppressor pathway through its interaction with Mdm2. To determine the function of MTBP in tumorigenesis and its potential role in the Mdm2-p53 pathway, we crossed Mtbp deficient mice to Eµ-myc transgenic mice, in which overexpression of the oncogene c-Myc induces B cell lymphomas primarily through inactivation of the Mdm2-p53 pathway. We report that Myc-induced B cell lymphoma development in Mtbp heterozygous mice was profoundly delayed. Surprisingly, reduced levels of Mtbp did not lead to an increase in B cell apoptosis or affect Mdm2. Instead, an Mtbp deficiency inhibited Myc-induced proliferation and the upregulation of Myc target genes necessary for cell growth. Consistent with a role in proliferation, Mtbp expression was induced by Myc and other factors that promote cell cycle progression and was elevated in lymphomas from humans and mice. Therefore, Mtbp functioned independent of Mdm2 and was a limiting factor for the proliferative and transforming functions of Myc. Thus, Mtbp is a previously unrecognized regulator of Myc-induced tumorigenesis. PMID:20305689

  13. Nitric Oxide Deficiency Accelerates Chlorophyll Breakdown and Stability Loss of Thylakoid Membranes during Dark-Induced Leaf Senescence in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Guo, Fang-Qing

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been known to preserve the level of chlorophyll (Chl) during leaf senescence. However, the mechanism by which NO regulates Chl breakdown remains unknown. Here we report that NO negatively regulates the activities of Chl catabolic enzymes during dark-induced leaf senescence. The transcriptional levels of the major enzyme genes involving Chl breakdown pathway except for RED CHL CATABOLITE REDUCTASE (RCCR) were dramatically up-regulated during dark-induced Chl degradation in the leaves of Arabidopsis NO-deficient mutant nos1/noa1 that exhibited an early-senescence phenotype. The activity of pheide a oxygenase (PAO) was higher in the dark-induced senescent leaves of nos1/noa1 compared with wild type. Furthermore, the knockout of PAO in nos1/noa1 background led to pheide a accumulation in the double mutant pao1 nos1/noa1, which retained the level of Chl during dark-induced leaf senescence. The accumulated pheide a in darkened leaves of pao1 nos1/noa1 was likely to inhibit the senescence-activated transcriptional levels of Chl catabolic genes as a feed-back inhibitory effect. We also found that NO deficiency led to decrease in the stability of photosynthetic complexes in thylakoid membranes. Importantly, the accumulation of pheide a caused by PAO mutations in combination with NO deficiency had a synergistic effect on the stability loss of thylakoid membrane complexes in the double mutant pao1 nos1/noa1 during dark-induced leaf senescence. Taken together, our findings have demonstrated that NO is a novel negative regulator of Chl catabolic pathway and positively functions in maintaining the stability of thylakoid membranes during leaf senescence. PMID:23418559

  14. Galanin 3 receptor-deficient mice show no alteration in the oxazolone-induced contact dermatitis phenotype.

    PubMed

    Botz, Bálint; Brunner, Susanne M; Kemény, Ágnes; Pintér, Erika; McDougall, Jason J; Kofler, Barbara; Helyes, Zsuzsanna

    2016-09-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is an inflammatory skin disease induced by allergen exposure and characterized by erythema, oedema and immune cell infiltration. The sensory peptide galanin (GAL) and its three receptors (GAL1-3 ) are involved in regulating inflammation. As GAL and its receptors are expressed in human and murine skin and GAL expression is increased in oxazolone-induced contact allergy, it could play a role in dermatitis. As GAL reduces neurogenic plasma extravasation in the mouse skin via GAL3 activation, the role of GAL3 in the oxazolone-induced dermatitis model was explored. Following topical challenge with oxazolone, GAL3 gene-deficient mice showed a trend towards reduced ear thickness. Plasma extravasation and neutrophil infiltration increased considerably upon oxazolone challenge in both GAL3 knockout animals and wild-type controls without any observable effect of the gene deletion. We conclude that a lack of GAL3 does not influence oxazolone-induced ACD. PMID:27121264

  15. Altering dietary levels of protein or vitamins and minerals does not modify morphine-induced analgesia in male rats.

    PubMed

    Kanarek, R B; D'Anci, K E; Przypek, J M; Mathes, W F

    1999-02-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that chronic intake of nutritive sweet solutions, but not nonnutritive sweet solutions, enhances morphine's analgesic potency. To separate out the effects of sweet taste from other changes in dietary intake, which result when rats consume a sucrose solution, the effects of altering dietary levels of protein, or vitamins and minerals on morphine-induced analgesia were examined. In Experiment 1, 40 male Long-Evans rats were fed standard chow or a semipurified diet containing either 10, 20, or 40% protein. Three weeks later, antinociceptive responses to morphine were examined using the tail flick procedure. Tail flick latencies were measured immediately prior to and 30, 60, and 90 min after the administration of morphine sulfate (0.0, 1.25, 2.5, and 5.0 mg/kg, SC). At all three measurement times, antinociceptive responses increased directly as a function of the dose of morphine, but did not differ as a function of diet. In Experiment 2, 24 rats were maintained on either standard laboratory chow or semipurified diets containing 20% protein and either 100% or 25% of the recommended levels of vitamins and minerals for 3 weeks. Tail flick latencies were measured immediately prior to and 30 min after injections (SC) of 2.5 mg/kg morphine sulfate. This procedure was repeated until a cumulative dose of 10.0 mg/kg was obtained. Tail flick latencies increased significantly as a function of drug dose, but did not differ across dietary conditions. These results demonstrate that the increase in morphine-induced analgesia seen in rats consuming a sucrose solution is not due to alterations in either protein or micronutrient intake. PMID:9972684

  16. Strain-induced significant increase in metal-insulator transition temperature in oxygen-deficient Fe oxide epitaxial thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, Kei; Kan, Daisuke; Ichikawa, Noriya; Mibu, Ko; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Andreeva, Marina; Shimakawa, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen coordination of transition metals is a key for functional properties of transition-metal oxides, because hybridization of transition-metal d and oxygen p orbitals determines correlations between charges, spins and lattices. Strain often modifies the oxygen coordination environment and affects such correlations in the oxides, resulting in the emergence of unusual properties and, in some cases, fascinating behaviors. While these strain effects have been studied in many of the fully-oxygenated oxides, such as ABO3 perovskites, those in oxygen-deficient oxides consisting of various oxygen coordination environments like tetrahedra and pyramids as well as octahedra remain unexplored. Here we report on the discovery of a strain-induced significant increase, by 550 K, in the metal-insulator transition temperature of an oxygen-deficient Fe oxide epitaxial thin film. The observed transition at 620 K is ascribed to charge disproportionation of Fe3.66+ into Fe4+ and Fe3+, associated with oxygen-vacancy ordering. The significant increase in the metal-insulator transition temperature, from 70 K in the bulk material, demonstrates that epitaxial growth of oxygen-deficient oxides under substrate-induced strain is a promising route for exploring novel functionality.

  17. Strain-induced significant increase in metal-insulator transition temperature in oxygen-deficient Fe oxide epitaxial thin films

    PubMed Central

    Hirai, Kei; Kan, Daisuke; Ichikawa, Noriya; Mibu, Ko; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Andreeva, Marina; Shimakawa, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen coordination of transition metals is a key for functional properties of transition-metal oxides, because hybridization of transition-metal d and oxygen p orbitals determines correlations between charges, spins and lattices. Strain often modifies the oxygen coordination environment and affects such correlations in the oxides, resulting in the emergence of unusual properties and, in some cases, fascinating behaviors. While these strain effects have been studied in many of the fully-oxygenated oxides, such as ABO3 perovskites, those in oxygen-deficient oxides consisting of various oxygen coordination environments like tetrahedra and pyramids as well as octahedra remain unexplored. Here we report on the discovery of a strain-induced significant increase, by 550 K, in the metal-insulator transition temperature of an oxygen-deficient Fe oxide epitaxial thin film. The observed transition at 620 K is ascribed to charge disproportionation of Fe3.66+ into Fe4+ and Fe3+, associated with oxygen-vacancy ordering. The significant increase in the metal-insulator transition temperature, from 70 K in the bulk material, demonstrates that epitaxial growth of oxygen-deficient oxides under substrate-induced strain is a promising route for exploring novel functionality. PMID:25600001

  18. 1,25(OH)2D3 Deficiency Induces Colon Inflammation via Secretion of Senescence-Associated Inflammatory Cytokines.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Chen, Lulu; Zhi, Chunchun; Shen, Ming; Sun, Weiwei; Miao, Dengshun; Yuan, Xiaoqin

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies showed that 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D[1,25(OH)2D3] insufficiency appears to be associated with aging and colon cancer while underlying biological mechanisms remain largely unknown. Inflammatory bowel disease is one of the risk factors for colon cancer. In this study, we investigated whether 1,25(OH)2D3 deficiency has an impact on the colon of 25-hydroxyvitamin D 1α-hydroxylase knockout [Cyp27b1(-/-)] mice fed on a rescue diet (high calcium, phosphate, and lactose) from weaning to 10 months of age. We found that 1,25(OH)2D3 deficient mice displayed significant colon inflammation phenotypes including shortened colon length, thinned and disordered mucosal structure, and inflammatory cell infiltration. DNA damage, cellular senescence and the production of senescence-associated inflammatory cytokines were also increased significantly in the colon of Cyp27b1(-/-)mice. Furthermore, the levels of ROS in the colon were increased significantly, whereas the expression levels of antioxidative genes were down-regulated dramatically in the colon of Cyp27b1(-/-)mice. Taken together, our results demonstrated that 1,25(OH)2D3 deficiency could induce colon inflammation, which may result from increased oxidative stress and DNA damage, subsequently, induced cell senescence and overproduction of senescence-associated secretory factors. Therefore, our findings suggest that 1,25(OH)2D3 may play an important role in preventing the development and progression of colon inflammation and colon cancer. PMID:26790152

  19. Iatrogenic nutritional deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Young, R C; Blass, J P

    1982-01-01

    This article catalogs the nutritional deficiencies inadvertently introduced by certain treatment regimens. Specifically, the iatrogenic effects on nutrition of surgery, hemodialysis, irradiation, and drugs are reviewed. Nutritional problems are particularly frequent consequences of surgery on the gastrointestinal tract. Gastric surgery can lead to deficiencies of vitamin B12, folate, iron, and thiamine, as well as to metabolic bone disease. The benefits of small bowel bypass are limited by the potentially severe nutritional consequences of this procedure. Following bypass surgery, patients should be monitored for signs of possible nutritional probems such as weight loss, neuropath