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Sample records for dietary fiber fraction

  1. Dietary Fiber

    MedlinePlus

    Fiber is a substance in plants. Dietary fiber is the kind you eat. It's a type of carbohydrate. You may also see it listed on a food label as soluble fiber or insoluble fiber. Both types have important health benefits. Good sources of dietary fiber include Whole grains Nuts ...

  2. Dietary Fiber

    MedlinePlus

    Fiber is a substance in plants. Dietary fiber is the kind you eat. It's a type of carbohydrate. You may also see it listed on a food label as soluble ... types have important health benefits. Good sources of dietary fiber include Whole grains Nuts and seeds Fruit and ...

  3. Modulation of Cholesterol-Related Gene Expression by Dietary Fiber Fractions from Edible Mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Caz, Víctor; Gil-Ramírez, Alicia; Largo, Carlota; Tabernero, María; Santamaría, Mónica; Martín-Hernández, Roberto; Marín, Francisco R; Reglero, Guillermo; Soler-Rivas, Cristina

    2015-08-26

    Mushrooms are a source of dietary fiber (DF) with a cholesterol-lowering effect. However, their underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The effect of DF-enriched fractions from three mushrooms species on cholesterol-related expression was studied in vitro. The Pleurotus ostreatus DF fraction (PDF) was used in mice models to assess its potential palliative or preventive effect against hypercholesterolemia. PDF induced a transcriptional response in Caco-2 cells, suggesting a possible cholesterol-lowering effect. In the palliative setting, PDF reduced hepatic triglyceride likely because Dgat1 was downregulated. However, cholesterol-related biochemical data showed no changes and no relation with the observed transcriptional modulation. In the preventive setting, PDF modulated cholesterol-related genes expression in a manner similar to that of simvastatin and ezetimibe in the liver, although no changes in plasma and liver biochemical data were induced. Therefore, PDF may be useful reducing hepatic triglyceride accumulation. Because it induced a molecular response similar to hypocholesterolemic drugs in liver, further dose-dependent studies should be carried out. PMID:26284928

  4. In vitro determination of the indigestible fraction in foods: an alternative to dietary fiber analysis.

    PubMed

    Saura-Calixto, F; García-Alonso, A; Goñi, I; Bravo, L

    2000-08-01

    Dietary fiber (DF) intakes in Western countries only accounts for about one-third of the substrates required for colonic bacterial cell turnover. There is a general trend among nutritionists to extend the DF concept to include all food constituents reaching the colon. In this line, a method to quantify the major nondigestible components in plant foods, namely, the indigestible fraction (IF), is presented. Analytical conditions for IF determination are close to physiological. Samples, analyzed as eaten, were successively incubated with pepsin and alpha-amylase; after centrifugation and dialysis, insoluble and soluble IFs were obtained. IF values include DF, resistant starch, resistant protein, and other associated compounds. IF contents determined in common foods (cereals, legumes, vegetables, and fruits) were higher than DF contents. Calculated IF intakes were close to the estimated amount of substrates reaching the colon. IF data could be more useful than DF data from a nutritional point of view; therefore, IF is proposed as an alternative to DF for food labeling and food composition tables. PMID:10956113

  5. Composition of fractional and functional properties of dietary fiber of lupines (L. luteus and L. albus).

    PubMed

    Górecka, D; Lampart-Szczapa, E; Janitz, W; Sokolowska, B

    2000-08-01

    In this study the lupine raw materials (flour and hull) of L. luteus var. Juno and L. albus var. Wat were characterized with regard to the dietary fiber content (NDF) and its fractional composition. Functional properties, i.e. water holding capacity (WHC) and cation exchange capacity (CEC) of lupine raw material were determined, with respect to various conditions existing in each part of the human digestive tract (pH-value, time of passage). Experimental products (shortcakes, ginger breads, pancakes, minced meat and dumplings filled with meat) with addition of 5, 10 or 15% of lupine flour or shell were processed and sensory evaluation was performed according to the 5-point scale. The NDF content ranged from 75.7% to 78% in the hull of the Wat and Juno lupine vars. respectively, and 28.8% to 33.4% in the flour. Cellulose was predominant in the hull's NDF while in the flour hemicellulose was major fraction. WHC of samples depended mainly on pH-value and was higher in lupine hulls (up to 5.14 g/g dry matter (d.m.) than in the flours (up to 3.83 g/g d.m.). The CEC of lupine ranged from 0.260 to 0.750 mEq/g d.m. and from 0.330 to 0.870 mEq/g d.m. in flour of the Wat and Juno varieties. The CEC of hull was lower in the Wat var. (0.290 to 0.650 mEq/g d.m.) in comparison with the Juno variety (0.150 to 0.750 mEq/g d.m.) Sensory evaluation showed that 10% addition of flour or hull of lupine to experimental products enables preparation of good quality foodstuffs. PMID:10996894

  6. Health effects of dietary fiber.

    PubMed

    Otles, Semih; Ozgoz, Selin

    2014-01-01

    Dietary fibre is a group of food components which is resistant to digestive enzymes and found mainly in cereals, fruits and vegetables. Dietary fi ber and whole grains contain a unique blend of bioactive components including resistant starches, vitamins, minerals, phytochemicals and antioxidants. Dietary fi ber which indigestible in human small intestinal, on the other hand digested completely or partially fermented in the large intestine, is examined in two groups: water-soluble and water insoluble organic compounds. Dietary fi ber can be separated into many different fractions. These fractions include arabinoxylan, inulin, pectin, bran, cellulose, β-glucan and resistant starch. Dietary fibres compose the major component of products with low energy value that have had an increasing importance in recent years. Dietary fibres also have technological and functional properties that can be used in the formulation of foods, as well as numerous beneficial effects on human health. Dietary fibre components organise functions of large intestine and have important physiological effects on glucose, lipid metabolism and mineral bioavailability. Today, dietary fibers are known to be protective effect against certain gastrointestinal diseases, constipation, hemorrhoids, colon cancer, gastroesophageal reflux disease, duodenal ulcer, diverticulitis, obesity, diabetes, stroke, hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. In this review the physicochemical and biological properties of dietary fibers and their important implications on human health will be investigated. PMID:24876314

  7. Carbohydrates and dietary fiber.

    PubMed

    Suter, P M

    2005-01-01

    The most widely spread eating habit is characterized by a reduced intake of dietary fiber, an increased intake of simple sugars, a high intake of refined grain products, an altered fat composition of the diet, and a dietary pattern characterized by a high glycemic load, an increased body weight and reduced physical activity. In this chapter the effects of this eating pattern on disease risk will be outlined. There are no epidemiological studies showing that the increase of glucose, fructose or sucrose intake is directly and independently associated with an increased risk of atherosclerosis or coronary heart disease (CHD). On the other hand a large number of studies has reported a reduction of fatal and non-fatal CHD events as a function of the intake of complex carbohydrates--respectively 'dietary fiber' or selected fiber-rich food (e.g., whole grain cereals). It seems that eating too much 'fast' carbohydrate [i.e., carbohydrates with a high glycemic index (GI)] may have deleterious long-term consequences. Indeed the last decades have shown that a low fat (and consecutively high carbohydrate) diet alone is not the best strategy to combat modern diseases including atherosclerosis. Quantity and quality issues in carbohydrate nutrient content are as important as they are for fat. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that for cardiovascular disease prevention a high sugar intake should be avoided. There is growing evidence of the high impact of dietary fiber and foods with a low GI on single risk factors (e.g., lipid pattern, diabetes, inflammation, endothelial function etc.) as well as also the development of the endpoints of atherosclerosis especially CHD. PMID:16596802

  8. Fractionation and characterization of mushroom dietary fiber (nonstarch polysaccharides) as potential nutraceuticals from sclerotia of Pleurotus tuber-regium (Fries) singer.

    PubMed

    Cheung, P C; Lee, M Y

    2000-08-01

    The nonstarch polysaccharides (NSPs) in the total dietary fiber (TDF) from the sclerotia of Pleurotus tuber-regium (tiger milk mushroom) were fractionated by the sequential use of chemical solvents. About half of the TDF was solubilized and two major alkali-soluble fractions (1 and 4 N sodium hydroxide) that contained 126 and 293 g/kg TDF were obtained. Sugar analysis and infrared spectroscopy indicated that the NSPs in these alkali-soluble fractions were mainly beta-glucans and chitin. These alkali-soluble NSPs were further purified by anion-exchange chromatography followed by gel permeation chromatographic separation. Methylation analysis revealed that these purified glucans were highly branched and contained a mixture of sugar linkages of beta-1,3, beta-1,6, and beta-1,4. The potential use of these sclerotial beta-glucans as nutraceuticals was discussed. PMID:10956083

  9. Cardiovascular benefits of dietary fiber.

    PubMed

    Satija, Ambika; Hu, Frank B

    2012-12-01

    The relationship between dietary fiber and risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been extensively studied. There is considerable epidemiological evidence indicating an inverse association between dietary fiber intake and CVD risk. The association has been found to be stronger for cereal fiber than for fruit or vegetable fiber, and several studies have also found increased whole grain consumption to be associated with CVD risk reduction. In light of this evidence, recent US dietary guidelines have endorsed increased consumption of fiber rich whole grains. Regular consumption of dietary fiber, particularly fiber from cereal sources, may improve CVD health through multiple mechanisms including lipid reduction, body weight regulation, improved glucose metabolism, blood pressure control, and reduction of chronic inflammation. Future research should focus on various food sources of fiber, including different types of whole grains, legumes, fruits, vegetables, and nuts, as well as resistant starch in relation to CVD risk and weight control; explore the biological mechanisms underlying the cardioprotective effect of fiber-rich diets; and study different ethnic groups and populations with varying sources of dietary fiber. PMID:22872372

  10. Effects of Dietary Fiber and Its Components on Metabolic Health

    PubMed Central

    Lattimer, James M.; Haub, Mark D.

    2010-01-01

    Dietary fiber and whole grains contain a unique blend of bioactive components including resistant starches, vitamins, minerals, phytochemicals and antioxidants. As a result, research regarding their potential health benefits has received considerable attention in the last several decades. Epidemiological and clinical studies demonstrate that intake of dietary fiber and whole grain is inversely related to obesity, type two diabetes, cancer and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Defining dietary fiber is a divergent process and is dependent on both nutrition and analytical concepts. The most common and accepted definition is based on nutritional physiology. Generally speaking, dietary fiber is the edible parts of plants, or similar carbohydrates, that are resistant to digestion and absorption in the small intestine. Dietary fiber can be separated into many different fractions. Recent research has begun to isolate these components and determine if increasing their levels in a diet is beneficial to human health. These fractions include arabinoxylan, inulin, pectin, bran, cellulose, β-glucan and resistant starch. The study of these components may give us a better understanding of how and why dietary fiber may decrease the risk for certain diseases. The mechanisms behind the reported effects of dietary fiber on metabolic health are not well established. It is speculated to be a result of changes in intestinal viscosity, nutrient absorption, rate of passage, production of short chain fatty acids and production of gut hormones. Given the inconsistencies reported between studies this review will examine the most up to date data concerning dietary fiber and its effects on metabolic health. PMID:22254008

  11. Dietary Fiber - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Dietary Fiber URL of this page: https://www.nlm.nih. ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Dietary Fiber - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  12. DIETARY FIBER CONTENT IN FRESH CITRUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a wide variation in the reported values for pectin and dietary fiber content in the edible portions of fresh orange and grapefruit. Two studies done by the Produce Marketing Association in 1990 reported 4.0 g dietary fiber/ 100 g of fresh edible grapefruit and 4.4 g dietary fiber / 100 g f...

  13. Measurement of novel dietary fibers.

    PubMed

    McCleary, Barry V; Rossiter, Patricia

    2004-01-01

    With the recognition that resistant starch (RS) and nondigestible oligosaccharides (NDO) act physiologically as dietary fiber (DF), a need has developed for specific and reliable assay procedures for these components. The ability of AOAC DF methods to accurately measure RS is dependent on the nature of the RS being analyzed. In general, NDO are not measured at all by AOAC DF Methods 985.29 or 991.43, the one exception being the high molecular weight fraction of fructo-oligosaccharides. Values obtained for RS, in general, are not in good agreement with values obtained by in vitro procedures that more closely imitate the in vivo situation in the human digestive tract. Consequently, specific methods for the accurate measurement of RS and NDO have been developed and validated through interlaboratory studies. In this paper, modifications to AOAC fructan Method 999.03 to allow accurate measurement of enzymically produced fructo-oligosaccharides are described. Suggested modifications to AOAC DF methods to ensure complete removal of fructan and RS, and to simplify pH adjustment before amyloglucosidase addition, are also described. PMID:15287670

  14. Carbohydrate and dietary fiber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carbohydrate provides 50 to 60% of the calories consumed by the average American. Although relatively little carbohydrate is needed in the diet, carbohydrate spares protein and fat being metabolized for calories. The principal dietary carbohydrates are sugars and starches. Sugars (simple carbohydrat...

  15. Dietary Fibers and Cardiometabolic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Riccioni, Graziano; Sblendorio, Valeriana; Gemello, Eugenio; Di Bello, Barbara; Scotti, Luca; Cusenza, Salvatore; D’Orazio, Nicolantonio

    2012-01-01

    The high prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is largely attributable to the contemporary lifestyle that is often sedentary and includes a diet high in saturated fats and sugars and low ingestion of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), fruit, vegetables, and fiber. Experimental data from both animals and humans suggest an association between increased dietary fiber (DF) intakes and improved plasma lipid profiles, including reduced low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) concentrations. These observations underline that the intake of DF may protect against heart disease and stroke. PMID:22408406

  16. Dietary fibers and cardiometabolic diseases.

    PubMed

    Riccioni, Graziano; Sblendorio, Valeriana; Gemello, Eugenio; Di Bello, Barbara; Scotti, Luca; Cusenza, Salvatore; D'Orazio, Nicolantonio

    2012-01-01

    The high prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is largely attributable to the contemporary lifestyle that is often sedentary and includes a diet high in saturated fats and sugars and low ingestion of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), fruit, vegetables, and fiber. Experimental data from both animals and humans suggest an association between increased dietary fiber (DF) intakes and improved plasma lipid profiles, including reduced low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) concentrations. These observations underline that the intake of DF may protect against heart disease and stroke. PMID:22408406

  17. Underutilized sources of dietary fiber: a review.

    PubMed

    McKee, L H; Latner, T A

    2000-01-01

    Interest in the fiber content of foods has decreased in recent years as concerns about fat intake have increased. Fiber, however, remains an important component of the diet. Soluble dietary fiber, including pectic substances and hydrocolloids, is found naturally in foods such as fruits, vegetables, legumes and oat bran. Insoluble fiber, including cellulose and hemicellulose, is found in foods such as whole grains. Fiber supplementation has been used to enhance the fiber content of a variety of foods ranging from cereal-based products to meats, imitation cheeses and sauces. Products used to enhance fiber content of foods have traditionally come from cereals such as wheat, corn and oats. There are a variety of other products, however, such as fruits, vegetables, legumes and less commonly used cereals such as barley, which are potential sources of dietary fiber supplements. This article reviews research on some of these underutilized sources of dietary fiber. PMID:11086873

  18. Correlating Detergent Fiber Analysis and Dietary Fiber Analysis Data for Corn Stover

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfrum, E. J.; Lorenz, A. J.; deLeon, N.

    2009-01-01

    There exist large amounts of detergent fiber analysis data [neutral detergent fiber (NDF), acid detergent fiber (ADF), acid detergent lignin (ADL)] for many different potential cellulosic ethanol feedstocks, since these techniques are widely used for the analysis of forages. Researchers working in the area of cellulosic ethanol are interested in the structural carbohydrates in a feedstock (principally glucan and xylan), which are typically determined by acid hydrolysis of the structural fraction after multiple extractions of the biomass. These so-called dietary fiber analysis methods are significantly more involved than detergent fiber analysis methods. The purpose of this study was to determine whether it is feasible to correlate detergent fiber analysis values to glucan and xylan content determined by dietary fiber analysis methods for corn stover. In the detergent fiber analysis literature cellulose is often estimated as the difference between ADF and ADL, while hemicellulose is often estimated as the difference between NDF and ADF. Examination of a corn stover dataset containing both detergent fiber analysis data and dietary fiber analysis data predicted using near infrared spectroscopy shows that correlations between structural glucan measured using dietary fiber techniques and cellulose estimated using detergent techniques, and between structural xylan measured using dietary fiber techniques and hemicellulose estimated using detergent techniques are high, but are driven largely by the underlying correlation between total extractives measured by fiber analysis and NDF/ADF. That is, detergent analysis data is correlated to dietary fiber analysis data for structural carbohydrates, but only indirectly; the main correlation is between detergent analysis data and solvent extraction data produced during the dietary fiber analysis procedure.

  19. A study of the effect of dietary fiber fractions obtained from artichoke (Cynara cardunculus L. var. scolymus) on the growth of intestinal bacteria associated with health.

    PubMed

    Fissore, Eliana N; Santo Domingo, Cinthia; Gerschenson, Lía N; Giannuzzi, Leda

    2015-05-01

    The effect of different fractions enriched in soluble fiber obtained from artichoke using citric acid or citric acid/hemicellulase on the selective growth of Lactobacillus plantarum 8114 and Bifidobacterium bifidum ATCC 11863 was evaluated. Gompertz modeling of Lactobacillus plantarum 8114 growth showed a higher specific growth rate (μ: 0.16 h(-1)) in the presence of fractions isolated from stems using hemicellulase (fraction A) than in the presence of glucose (μ: 0.09 h(-1)). In the case of Bifidobacterium bifidum 11863, the highest μ was obtained for the microorganism grown in the presence of fraction A and for the fraction isolated from stems without hemicellulase, their rate being twice that observed for glucose (0.04 h(-1)). The positive prebiotic activity scores observed with respect to Escherichia coli 25922 indicated that fibers assayed are metabolized as well as glucose by Lactobacillus plantarum 8114 and Bifidobacterium bifidum ATCC 11863 and that they are selectively metabolized by these microorganisms. The potential capacity to selectively stimulate the growth of intestinal bacteria associated with health shown by fraction A can be ascribed to its high inulin and low methylation degree pectin contents. PMID:25904284

  20. Dietary fiber and blood pressure control.

    PubMed

    Aleixandre, A; Miguel, M

    2016-04-20

    In the past few years, new strategies to control blood pressure levels are emerging by developing new bioactive components of foods. Fiber has been linked to the prevention of a number of cardiovascular diseases and disorders. β-Glucan, the main soluble fiber component in oat grains, was initially linked to a reduction in plasma cholesterol. Several studies have shown afterward that dietary fiber may also improve glycaemia, insulin resistance and weight loss. The effect of dietary fiber on arterial blood pressure has been the subject of far fewer studies than its effect on the above-mentioned variables, but research has already shown that fiber intake can decrease arterial blood pressure in hypertensive rats. Moreover, certain fibers can improve arterial blood pressure when administered to hypertensive and pre-hypertensive subjects. The present review summarizes all those studies which attempt to establish the antihypertensive effects of dietary fiber, as well as its effect on other cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:26923351

  1. Dietary sources of fiber intake in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Sardinha, Aline Nascimento; Canella, Daniela Silva; Martins, Ana Paula Bortoletto; Claro, Rafael Moreira; Levy, Renata Bertazzi

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the household availability of fibers in Brazil and to identify the dietary sources of this nutrient. Data from the 2008-2009 Household Budget Survey were used to estimate national household availability and density of fibers and also according to stratifications defined by income level, five regions and area (rural or urban). The contribution of the different food groups, classified by the nature, extent and purpose of processing, to total fibers available in Brazilian households was also determined. The mean density of per capita fibers was 7.6 g/1000 kcal. Higher availability and density of fibers was observed in households situated in rural areas and among low-income families. The main dietary sources of fiber were beans, bread, rice, fruit, vegetables and manioc flour. Fiber intake was found to be insufficient. Therefore, actions promoting a healthy diet are needed to improve the dietary quality of the Brazilian population. PMID:24769296

  2. Benefits of dietary fiber in clinical nutrition.

    PubMed

    Klosterbuer, Abby; Roughead, Zamzam Fariba; Slavin, Joanne

    2011-10-01

    Dietary fiber is widely recognized as an important part of a healthy diet and is a common addition to enteral nutrition (EN) formulas. Fiber sources differ in characteristics such as solubility, fermentability, and viscosity, and it is now well known that different types of fiber exert varying physiological effects in the body. Clinical studies suggest fiber can exert a wide range of benefits in areas such as bowel function, gut health, immunity, blood glucose control, and serum lipid levels. Although early clinical nutrition products contained fiber from a single source, it is now thought that blends of fiber from multiple sources more closely resemble a regular diet and may provide a greater range of benefits for the patient. Current recommendations support the use of dietary fiber in clinical nutrition when no contraindications exist, but little information exists about which types and combinations of fibers provide the relevant benefit in certain patient populations. This article summarizes the different types of fiber commonly added to EN products and reviews the current literature on the use of fiber blends in clinical nutrition. PMID:21947646

  3. CHALLENGES IN MEASURING INSOLUBLE DIETARY FIBER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this review are to define the criteria needed to evaluate insoluble dietary fiber (IDF) methods, discuss their relevance in meeting nutritional needs, describe problems with empirical IDF methods, and assess their relative merits. The challenge for the researcher, nutritionist, and...

  4. [Estimation of dietary fiber content of feedstuffs].

    PubMed

    Lipiec, A; Grela, E; Zürcher, U; Wenk, C

    1994-01-01

    In a series of 8 concentrates, 18 roughages and 13 wet feedstuffs the interactions between different dietary fibre fractions were studied. In comparison to other analytical methods the crude fibre method (XF) did not allow a satisfactory estimation of the dietary fibre content (DF) of the experimental feedstuffs. In comparison to the NDF and the dietary fibre content and depending on the feedstuff, XF content was lowered by 2 to 3 times and 2 to 4 times, respectively. There was a surprisingly high correspondence between the contents of NDF and unsoluble dietary fibre for almost all feedstuffs. Highly significant statistical coherences could be observed between the different fibre fractions. It can be expected, that these correlations do not always follow a linear relationship, as could be observed in the regressions equations for NDF to DF and XF to ADF. PMID:7668971

  5. Dietary fiber: nutritional lessons for macronutrient substitutes.

    PubMed

    Behall, K M

    1997-05-23

    The wide array of low-fat foods containing soluble fibers have the potential for helping in weight loss or weight control. Consumption of soluble fibers in sufficient quantities has been shown to lower serum lipid concentrations and to improve glycemic response. Some individuals could, eventually, consume a significant portion of their soluble dietary fiber from processed foods containing soluble-fiber fat substitutes. Changes in dietary fiber and starch sources increase the amount of fermentable material reaching the colon. Short-chain fatty acids thus produced are used as an energy source by colonocytes and may inhibit hepatic cholesterol synthesis. However, colonic fermentation can also result in flatulence or diarrhea. In addition, some diets high in soluble fiber have been shown to change intestinal cell morphology in rats. The possible benefits from consumption of a diet high in soluble fiber fat substitutes in serum lipid reduction, glycemic response improvement, and/or weight reduction as well as potential problems in flatulence, mineral absorption, and colonic cell hyperproliferation should be investigated. PMID:9186765

  6. Dietary Fiber, Microbiota and Obesity Related Metabolic Diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The presentation summarizes our research over the past 7 years on viscous soluble dietary fibers in animal models of obesity and metabolic diseases. We found that in addition to the well known cholesterol and glucose lowering ability of soluble fibers, viscous dietary fibers also prevent most of th...

  7. Dietary fiber: classification, chemical analyses, and food sources.

    PubMed

    Slavin, J L

    1987-09-01

    Dietary fiber's role in the prevention and treatment of constipation has long been known, but now fiber is touted as a cure for many of the ills in Western countries. Although some data exist to relate dietary fiber intake to certain diseases, lack of agreement on what dietary fiber is and how it should be measured make interpreting the data difficult. Further, not all dietary fiber is created equal. Water-soluble fibers, such as pectin and gums, have little effect on stool weight and hence are not appropriate treatment for patients with constipation. Water-insoluble fibers, such as cellulose and hemicellulose, are most effective in aiding laxation but may also limit absorption of minerals and possibly vitamins. Wheat bran is a good source of hemicellulose; vegetables supply cellulose to the diet. Most agencies are recommending a doubling or tripling of dietary fiber intake. Typical recommendations are set at 25 to 50 grams of dietary fiber daily. Different analytical methods for dietary fiber yield conflicting fiber values, and dietary fiber values do not exist for many foods, making fiber recommendations controversial and difficult to achieve. Fiber in the diet should ideally be increased by the consumption of unrefined breads and cereals and more fruits and vegetables. Vegetarians routinely consume 40 to 50 gm dietary fiber daily without ill effect. Fiber supplements may be appropriate for some patients, but the composition of the fiber should be known and be appropriate for the disease being treated. Before fiber supplements are marketed, clinical trials should be conducted to support the use of the supplements in the prevention and treatment of disease.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3040839

  8. Methods And Apparatus For Acoustic Fiber Fractionation

    DOEpatents

    Brodeur, Pierre

    1999-11-09

    Methods and apparatus for acoustic fiber fractionation using a plane ultrasonic wave field interacting with water suspended fibers circulating in a channel flow using acoustic radiation forces to separate fibers into two or more fractions based on fiber radius, with applications of the separation concept in the pulp and paper industry. The continuous process relies on the use of a wall-mounted, rectangular cross-section piezoelectric ceramic transducer to selectively deflect flowing fibers as they penetrate the ultrasonic field. The described embodiment uses a transducer frequency of approximately 150 kHz. Depending upon the amount of dissolved gas in water, separation is obtained using a standing or a traveling wave field.

  9. Novel trends in development of dietary fiber rich meat products-a critical review.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Nitin; Ahlawat, S S; Sharma, D P; Dabur, R S

    2015-02-01

    Meat and meat products are generally recognized as good sources of high biological value proteins, fat-soluble vitamins, minerals, trace elements and bioactive compounds. Changes in socioeconomic factors in recent years have increased the consumer's preference for ready to eat foods including meat products. The processing of meat and meat products leads to generation of many functional compounds beneficial to human health but most of those foods are rich in fat, added salts but deficient in complex carbohydrates like dietary fiber and pose a health hazard that somehow is proved to be a predisposing factor for cardiovascular diseases, colon cancer, obesity including diabetes mellitus. With increasing consciousness among consumers about their nutrition and well being, there is a growing concern over nutritional diseases of affluence. Therefore an increase in dietary fiber inclusion in daily diet has been recommended. For adults, the recommended acceptable intakes of dietary fiber are 28-36 g/day, 70-80 % of which must be insoluble fiber. The insoluble fraction of dietary fiber has been related to intestinal regulation whereas soluble fiber is associated with decrease in cholesterol level and absorption of intestinal glucose. So incorporation of dietary fibers from different sources in meat products would help to enhance their desirability. Dietary fiber sources are generally agricultural byproducts that are comparatively cheap and incorporation in meat products reduces its overall cost. Whole grains and cereal brans are the rich source of insoluble fiber and pectins, gums, starch and other storage polysaccharides have high content of the soluble fraction. With this background, the effect of various dietary fibers on the quality attributes of meat and meat products with its physiological role has been reviewed here. PMID:25694673

  10. The optimal fiber volume fraction and fiber-matrix property compatibility in fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pan, Ning

    1992-01-01

    Although the question of minimum or critical fiber volume fraction beyond which a composite can then be strengthened due to addition of fibers has been dealt with by several investigators for both continuous and short fiber composites, a study of maximum or optimal fiber volume fraction at which the composite reaches its highest strength has not been reported yet. The present analysis has investigated this issue for short fiber case based on the well-known shear lag (the elastic stress transfer) theory as the first step. Using the relationships obtained, the minimum spacing between fibers is determined upon which the maximum fiber volume fraction can be calculated, depending on the fiber packing forms within the composites. The effects on the value of this maximum fiber volume fraction due to such factors as fiber and matrix properties, fiber aspect ratio and fiber packing forms are discussed. Furthermore, combined with the previous analysis on the minimum fiber volume fraction, this maximum fiber volume fraction can be used to examine the property compatibility of fiber and matrix in forming a composite. This is deemed to be useful for composite design. Finally some examples are provided to illustrate the results.

  11. Protective effect of dietary fibers against colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mia, M Abdur Razzaque; Siddiqui, M Nazrul Islam; Rukunuzzaman, M; Rahman, M Matiur; Deb, Kalpana

    2002-01-01

    Dietary fibers are remnant of plant cells resistant to hydrolysis by human alimentary tract enzymes. These are cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, pectins and gums. Intake of dietary fibers or foods rich in dietary fibers decreases the incidence of colorectal carcinoma. Reduced risk of colorectal carcinoma is reported when populations with diet high in red meat and total fats switched to a diet high in total fibers and certain whole grain, goods. Fibre intake is also inversely related to mortality from colorectal carcinoma. Beneficial influence of most vegetables and fruits against colorectal carcinoma is confirmed and this is due to their fibre contents. PMID:12148400

  12. Methods for dietary fiber, neutral detergent fiber, and nonstarch polysaccharides in relation to animal nutrition.

    PubMed

    Van Soest, P J; Robertson, J B; Lewis, B A

    1991-10-01

    There is a need to standardize the NDF procedure. Procedures have varied because of the use of different amylases in attempts to remove starch interference. The original Bacillus subtilis enzyme Type IIIA (XIA) no longer is available and has been replaced by a less effective enzyme. For fiber work, a new enzyme has received AOAC approval and is rapidly displacing other amylases in analytical work. This enzyme is available from Sigma (Number A3306; Sigma Chemical Co., St. Louis, MO). The original publications for NDF and ADF (43, 53) and the Agricultural Handbook 379 (14) are obsolete and of historical interest only. Up to date procedures should be followed. Triethylene glycol has replaced 2-ethoxyethanol because of reported toxicity. Considerable development in regard to fiber methods has occurred over the past 5 yr because of a redefinition of dietary fiber for man and monogastric animals that includes lignin and all polysaccharides resistant to mammalian digestive enzymes. In addition to NDF, new improved methods for total dietary fiber and nonstarch polysaccharides including pectin and beta-glucans now are available. The latter are also of interest in rumen fermentation. Unlike starch, their fermentations are like that of cellulose but faster and yield no lactic acid. Physical and biological properties of carbohydrate fractions are more important than their intrinsic composition. PMID:1660498

  13. Mechanisms linking dietary fiber, gut microbiota and colon cancer prevention

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Huawei; Lazarova, Darina L; Bordonaro, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Many epidemiological and experimental studies have suggested that dietary fiber plays an important role in colon cancer prevention. These findings may relate to the ability of fiber to reduce the contact time of carcinogens within the intestinal lumen and to promote healthy gut microbiota, which modifies the host’s metabolism in various ways. Elucidation of the mechanisms by which dietary fiber-dependent changes in gut microbiota enhance bile acid deconjugation, produce short chain fatty acids, and modulate inflammatory bioactive substances can lead to a better understanding of the beneficial role of dietary fiber. This article reviews the current knowledge concerning the mechanisms via which dietary fiber protects against colon cancer. PMID:24567795

  14. Banana (Musa sp. var. elakki bale) flower and pseudostem: dietary fiber and associated antioxidant capacity.

    PubMed

    Bhaskar, Jamuna J; S, Mahadevamma; Chilkunda, Nandini D; Salimath, Paramahans V

    2012-01-11

    Banana flower (BF) and pseudostem (PS) are byproducts of banana cultivation and are known to have health beneficial effects. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the dietary fiber composition and antioxidant effect of BF and PS. In the present study, BF and PS were found to be rich in dietary fiber (65.6 ± 1.32 and 28.8 ± 0.98%, respectively). Dietary fiber fractions were extracted and characterized in terms of sugar profile, and antioxidant activities were determined. BF and PS fractions were rich in sugars and showed wide diversity with respect to the nature of the sugars. Hemicellulose A fraction of BF showed high amounts of total polyphenols and total antioxidants, which were 121.8 ± 1.9 and 39.03 ± 0.118 μg/mg extract, respectively. HPLC analysis showed the presence of phenolic acids in hemicellulose A and B fractions of BF. These results indicate that BF and PS are rich sources of dietary fiber associated with polyphenols, which could promote health beneficial effects. PMID:22122826

  15. Prospective Association between Dietary Fiber Intake and Breast Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Deschasaux, Mélanie; Zelek, Laurent; Pouchieu, Camille; His, Mathilde; Hercberg, Serge; Galan, Pilar; Latino-Martel, Paule; Touvier, Mathilde

    2013-01-01

    Background Mechanistic hypotheses suggest a potential effect of dietary fiber on breast carcinogenesis through the modulation of insulin-like growth factor bioactivity, estrogen metabolism and inflammation. An association between dietary fiber intake and breast cancer risk has been suggested in epidemiological studies but remains inconclusive. In particular, data is lacking regarding the different types of dietary fibers. Objective The objective was to investigate the prospective relationship between dietary fiber intake and breast cancer risk, taking into account different types of dietary fiber (overall, insoluble, soluble and from different food sources: cereals, vegetables, fruits and legumes). Design 4684 women from the SU.VI.MAX cohort were included in this analysis as they completed at least three 24h-dietary records within the first two years of follow-up. Among them, 167 incident invasive breast cancers were diagnosed during a median follow-up of 12.6 years (between 1994 and 2007). The associations between quartiles of dietary fiber intake and breast cancer risk were characterized using multivariate Cox proportional hazards models. Results Total fiber intake was not associated with breast cancer risk (HRQuartile4vs.Quartile1 = 1.29 (95%CI 0.66–2.50), P-trend = 0.5), nor was fiber intake from cereals (P-trend = 0.1), fruits (P-trend = 0.9) and legumes (P-trend = 0.3). In contrast, vegetable fiber intake was related to a decreased risk of breast cancer (HRQ4vs.Q1 = 0.50 (0.29-0.88), P-trend = 0.03). Overall vegetable intake (in g/day) was not associated with breast cancer risk (P-trend = 0.2). Conclusion This prospective study suggests that vegetable fiber intake may contribute to reduce breast cancer risk, in line with experimental mechanistic data. PMID:24244548

  16. Physicochemical properties of surimi gels fortified with dietary fiber.

    PubMed

    Debusca, Alicia; Tahergorabi, Reza; Beamer, Sarah K; Matak, Kristen E; Jaczynski, Jacek

    2014-04-01

    Although dietary fiber provides health benefits, most Western populations have insufficient intake. Surimi seafood is not currently fortified with dietary fiber, nor have the effects of fiber fortification on physicochemical properties of surimi been thoroughly studied. In the present study, Alaska pollock surimi was fortified with 0-8 g/100 g of long-chain powdered cellulose as a source of dietary fiber. The protein/water concentrations in surimi were kept constant by adding an inert filler, silicon dioxide in inverse concentrations to the fiber fortification. Fiber-fortified surimi gels were set at 90 °C. The objectives were to determine (1) textural and colour properties; (2) heat-induced gelation (dynamic rheology); and (3) protein endothermic transitions (differential scanning calorimetry) of surimi formulated with constant protein/water, but variable fiber content. Fiber fortification up to 6 g/100 g improved (P<0.05) texture and colour although some decline occurred with 8 g/100g of fiber. Dynamic rheology correlated with texture and showed large increase in gel elasticity, indicating enhanced thermal gelation of surimi. Differential scanning calorimetry showed that fiber fortification did not interfere with thermal transitions of surimi myosin and actin. Long-chain fiber probably traps water physically, which is stabilized by chemical bonding with protein within surimi gel matrix. Based on the present study, it is suggested that the fiber-protein interaction is mediated by water and is physicochemical in nature. PMID:24262528

  17. The effects of dietary fiber level on nutrient digestibility in growing pigs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of total dietary fiber level on nutrient digestibility and the relationship between apparent total tract digestibility of total dietary fiber, and soluble dietary fiber, insoluble dietary fiber and available energy. Sugar beet pulp was as the only fiber source. The experiment was designed as a 6 × 6 Latin square with an adaptation period of 7 d followed by a 5-d total collection of feces and urine. Feed intake tended to decrease (P =0.10) as total dietary fiber level increased. The apparent total tract digestibility of dry matter, crude protein and gross energy decreased (P <0.01) when total dietary fiber increased but the digestibility of soluble dietary fiber and insoluble dietary fiber increased (P <0.01). The digestible energy and metabolizable energy content of diets decreased (P <0.01) as the total dietary fiber increased. PMID:23587355

  18. A Critical Look at Prebiotics Within the Dietary Fiber Concept.

    PubMed

    Verspreet, Joran; Damen, Bram; Broekaert, Willem F; Verbeke, Kristin; Delcour, Jan A; Courtin, Christophe M

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews the current knowledge of the health effects of dietary fiber and prebiotics and establishes the position of prebiotics within the broader context of dietary fiber. Although the positive health effects of specific fibers on defecation, reduction of postprandial glycemic response, and maintenance of normal blood cholesterol levels are generally accepted, other presumed health benefits of dietary fibers are still debated. There is evidence that specific dietary fibers improve the integrity of the epithelial layer of the intestines, increase the resistance against pathogenic colonization, reduce the risk of developing colorectal cancer, increase mineral absorption, and have a positive impact on the immune system, but these effects are neither generally acknowledged nor completely understood. Many of the latter effects are thought to be particularly elicited by prebiotics. Although the prebiotic concept evolved significantly during the past two decades, the line between prebiotics and nonprebiotic dietary fiber remains vague. Nevertheless, scientific evidence demonstrating the health-promoting potential of prebiotics continues to accumulate and suggests that prebiotic fibers have their rightful place in a healthy diet. PMID:26735801

  19. Some dietary fibers reduce the absorption of carotenoids in women.

    PubMed

    Riedl, J; Linseisen, J; Hoffmann, J; Wolfram, G

    1999-12-01

    Dietary fiber may be partly responsible for the lower bioavailability of carotenoids from food than from purified supplements. Due to the lack of detailed information available, we investigated the effects of different kinds of dietary fiber on the absorption of carotenoids and alpha-tocopherol. Six healthy young women received an antioxidant mixture consisting of beta-carotene, lycopene, lutein, canthaxanthin and alpha-tocopherol together with a standard meal. The meal did not contain additional dietary fiber or was enriched with pectin, guar, alginate, cellulose or wheat bran (0. 15 g. kg body weight(-1)). The increases in plasma carotenoid and alpha-tocopherol concentrations were followed over 24 h, and the areas-under-curves (AUC(24h)) were calculated. The mean AUC(24h) of beta-carotene was significantly (P < 0.05) reduced by the water-soluble fibers pectin, guar and alginate with a mean decrease of 33-43%. All tested fibers significantly reduced the AUC(24h) of lycopene and lutein by 40-74% (P < 0.05). The dietary fiber effect on the AUC(24h) of canthaxanthin was almost significant (P = 0.059) and there was no effect on the AUC(24h) of alpha-tocopherol. We conclude that the bioavailability of beta-carotene, lycopene and lutein given within a mixed supplement is markedly reduced by different kinds of dietary fiber. PMID:10573545

  20. Resistant starch and dietary fibers from cereal by-products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dried distillers grains (DDG) are a cereal byproduct from ethanol distillation process. On a dry weight basis, DDG is composed of 13% fat, 30% protein, 33% fiber, with the remainder various carbohydrates. Only 6-8% of starch in DDG is in resistant form (dietary fiber). Because only about 6% of DD...

  1. Mechanisms linking dietary fiber, gut microbiota and colon cancer prevention

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many epidemiological and experimental studies have suggested that dietary fiber plays an important role in colon cancer prevention. These findings may relate to the ability of fiber to reduce the contact time of carcinogens within the intestinal lumen and to promote healthy gut microbiota, which mod...

  2. [Interaction of the dietary fibers with different functional food ingredients].

    PubMed

    Bessonov, V V; Baĭgarin, E K; Gorshunova, K D; Semenova, P A; Nechaev, A P

    2012-01-01

    The aspects of dietary fibers' and different food ingredients' interaction are considered in this article; in particular, the questions of dietary fibers' interaction with the main foodstuff components (proteins, fats, vitamins, etc.), especially functional purpose; and the interaction of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), which is part of dietary fiber, with the main foodstuff components--protein, vitamins and antioxidants (tocopherol, and riboflavin). It was found that with increasing of MCC content in the diet, there was increase of vitamins sorption (especially tocopherol), with its maximum at 3 g of MCC. This is probably due to the relatively high porosity and properties of MCC to absorb and retain water, lipids and other food ingredients. These findings point to the need to consider the possibility of sorption of polysaccharides and, in particular in the preparation of starch-rich foods and dietary recommendations for their use. PMID:22888670

  3. Dietary Fiber, Kidney Function, Inflammation, and Mortality Risk

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hong; Huang, Xiaoyan; Risérus, Ulf; Krishnamurthy, Vidya M.; Cederholm, Tommy; Ärnlöv, Johan; Lindholm, Bengt; Sjögren, Per

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives In the United States population, high dietary fiber intake has been associated with a lower risk of inflammation and mortality in individuals with kidney dysfunction. This study aimed to expand such findings to a Northern European population. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Dietary fiber intake was calculated from 7-day dietary records in 1110 participants aged 70–71 years from the Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (examinations performed during 1991–1995). Dietary fiber was adjusted for total energy intake by the residual method. Renal function was estimated from the concentration of serum cystatin C, and deaths were registered prospectively during a median follow-up of 10.0 years. Results Dietary fiber independently and directly associated with eGFR (adjusted difference, 2.6 ml/min per 1.73 m2 per 10 g/d higher; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.3 to 4.9). The odds of C-reactive protein >3 mg/L were lower (linear trend, P=0.002) with higher fiber quartiles. During follow-up, 300 participants died (incidence rate of 2.87 per 100 person-years at risk). Multiplicative interactions were observed between dietary fiber intake and kidney dysfunction in the prediction of mortality. Higher dietary fiber was associated with lower mortality in unadjusted analysis. These associations were stronger in participants with kidney dysfunction (eGFR<60 ml/min per 1.73 m2) (hazard ratio [HR], 0.58; 95% CI, 0.35 to 0.98) than in those without (HR, 1.30; 95% CI, 0.76 to 2.22; P value for interaction, P=0.04), and were mainly explained by a lower incidence of cancer-related deaths (0.25; 95% CI, 0.10 to 0.65) in individuals with kidney dysfunction versus individuals with an eGFR≥60 ml/min per 1.73 m2 (1.61; 95% CI, 0.69 to 3.74; P value for interaction, P=0.01). Conclusions High dietary fiber was associated with better kidney function and lower inflammation in community-dwelling elderly men from Sweden. High dietary fiber was also

  4. Maximal release of highly bifidogenic soluble dietary fibers from industrial potato pulp by minimal enzymatic treatment.

    PubMed

    Thomassen, Lise V; Vigsnæs, Louise K; Licht, Tine R; Mikkelsen, Jørn D; Meyer, Anne S

    2011-05-01

    Potato pulp is a poorly utilized, high-volume co-processing product resulting from industrial potato starch manufacturing. Potato pulp mainly consists of the tuber plant cell wall material and is particularly rich in pectin, notably galactan branched rhamnogalacturonan I type pectin which has previously been shown to exhibit promising properties as dietary fiber. The objective of this study was to solubilize dietary fibers from potato pulp by a one-step minimal treatment procedure and evaluate the prebiotic potential of the fibers. Statistically designed experiments were conducted to investigate the influence of enzyme type, dosage, substrate level, incubation time, and temperature on the enzyme catalyzed solubilization to define the optimal minimal enzyme treatment for maximal fiber solubilization. The result was a method that within 1 min released 75% [weight/weight (w/w)] dry matter from 1% (w/w) potato pulp treated with 1.0% (w/w) [enzyme/substrate (E/S)] pectin lyase from Aspergillus nidulans and 1.0% (w/w) E/S polygalacturonase from Aspergillus aculeatus at pH 6.0 and 60 °C. Molecular size fractionation of the solubilized fibers revealed two major fractions: one fraction rich in galacturonic acid of 10-100 kDa indicating mainly homogalacturonan, and a fraction >100 kDa rich in galactose, presumably mainly made up of β-1,4-galactan chains of rhamnogalacturonan I. When fermented in vitro by microbial communities derived from fecal samples from three healthy human volunteers, both of the solubilized fiber fractions were more bifidogenic than fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS). Notably the fibers having molecular masses of >100 kDa selectively increased the densities of Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp. 2-3 times more than FOS. PMID:21253720

  5. Water-soluble dietary fibers and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Theuwissen, Elke; Mensink, Ronald P

    2008-05-23

    One well-established way to reduce the risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) is to lower serum LDL cholesterol levels by reducing saturated fat intake. However, the importance of other dietary approaches, such as increasing the intake of water-soluble dietary fibers is increasingly recognized. Well-controlled intervention studies have now shown that four major water-soluble fiber types-beta-glucan, psyllium, pectin and guar gum-effectively lower serum LDL cholesterol concentrations, without affecting HDL cholesterol or triacylglycerol concentrations. It is estimated that for each additional gram of water-soluble fiber in the diet serum total and LDL cholesterol concentrations decrease by -0.028 mmol/L and -0.029 mmol/L, respectively. Despite large differences in molecular structure, no major differences existed between the different types of water-soluble fiber, suggesting a common underlying mechanism. In this respect, it is most likely that water-soluble fibers lower the (re)absorption of in particular bile acids. As a result hepatic conversion of cholesterol into bile acids increases, which will ultimately lead to increased LDL uptake by the liver. Additionally, epidemiological studies suggest that a diet high in water-soluble fiber is inversely associated with the risk of CVD. These findings underlie current dietary recommendations to increase water-soluble fiber intake. PMID:18302966

  6. Effect of dietary fiber on proteolytic pancreatic enzymes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hansen, W E

    1986-12-01

    Chymotrypsin, trypsin, carboxypeptidase A and B, elastase and enterokinase activities were measured in buffer solutions and in human duodenal juice after incubation with wheat bran, cellulose, guar gum, pectin, psyllium and lignin. The different types of dietary fiber led to inhibition of enzymatic activity in most experiments, e.g., lignin could totally ablish the activity of isolated trypsin and chymotrypsin. Only in enterokinase was there no influence. Inhibition depended on incubation time; the effect was proportional to fiber concentration and inversely related to enzyme level. Treatment of fiber with hydrochloric acid (pH 1.5) and heat (95 degrees C) destroyed inhibitory activity in some experiments. The effect of lignin on one enzyme (trypsin) was reduced by the addition of another enzyme (chymotrypsin). It is concluded that dietary fiber could affect digestion by inhibiting proteolytic pancreatic enzymes. PMID:2824629

  7. Alternative dietary fiber sources in companion animal nutrition.

    PubMed

    de Godoy, Maria R C; Kerr, Katherine R; Fahey, George C

    2013-08-01

    The US has a pet population of approximately 70 million dogs and 74 million cats. Humans have developed a strong emotional bond with companion animals. As a consequence, pet owners seek ways to improve health, quality of life and longevity of their pets. Advances in canine and feline nutrition have contributed to improved longevity and well-being. Dietary fibers have gained renewed interest in the pet food industry, due to their important role in affecting laxation and stool quality. More recently, because of increased awareness of the beneficial effects of dietary fibers in health, as well as the popularity of functional foods and holistic and natural diets, alternative and novel carbohydrates have become widespread in human and pet nutrition. Fiber sources from cereal grains, whole grains and fruits have received increasing attention by the pet food industry and pet owners. While limited scientific information is available on the nutritional and nutraceutical properties of alternative fiber sources, studies indicate that corn fiber is an efficacious fiber source for pets, showing no detrimental effects on palatability or nutrient digestibility, while lowering the glycemic response in adult dogs. Fruit fiber and pomaces have good water-binding properties, which may be advantageous in wet pet food production, where a greater water content is required, along with low water activity and a firm texture of the final product. Rice bran is a palatable fiber source for dogs and may be an economical alternative to prebiotic supplementation of pet foods. However, it increases the dietary requirement of taurine in cats. Barley up to 40% in a dry extruded diet is well tolerated by adult dogs. In addition, consumption of complex carbohydrates has shown a protective effect on cardiovascular disease and oxidative stress. Alternative fiber sources are suitable ingredients for pet foods. They have been shown to be nutritionally adequate and to have potential nutraceutical

  8. Alternative Dietary Fiber Sources in Companion Animal Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    de Godoy, Maria R. C.; Kerr, Katherine R.; Fahey, George C.

    2013-01-01

    The US has a pet population of approximately 70 million dogs and 74 million cats. Humans have developed a strong emotional bond with companion animals. As a consequence, pet owners seek ways to improve health, quality of life and longevity of their pets. Advances in canine and feline nutrition have contributed to improved longevity and well-being. Dietary fibers have gained renewed interest in the pet food industry, due to their important role in affecting laxation and stool quality. More recently, because of increased awareness of the beneficial effects of dietary fibers in health, as well as the popularity of functional foods and holistic and natural diets, alternative and novel carbohydrates have become widespread in human and pet nutrition. Fiber sources from cereal grains, whole grains and fruits have received increasing attention by the pet food industry and pet owners. While limited scientific information is available on the nutritional and nutraceutical properties of alternative fiber sources, studies indicate that corn fiber is an efficacious fiber source for pets, showing no detrimental effects on palatability or nutrient digestibility, while lowering the glycemic response in adult dogs. Fruit fiber and pomaces have good water-binding properties, which may be advantageous in wet pet food production, where a greater water content is required, along with low water activity and a firm texture of the final product. Rice bran is a palatable fiber source for dogs and may be an economical alternative to prebiotic supplementation of pet foods. However, it increases the dietary requirement of taurine in cats. Barley up to 40% in a dry extruded diet is well tolerated by adult dogs. In addition, consumption of complex carbohydrates has shown a protective effect on cardiovascular disease and oxidative stress. Alternative fiber sources are suitable ingredients for pet foods. They have been shown to be nutritionally adequate and to have potential nutraceutical

  9. Isomalto/malto-polysaccharide, a novel soluble dietary fiber made via enzymatic conversion of starch.

    PubMed

    Leemhuis, Hans; Dobruchowska, Justyna M; Ebbelaar, Monique; Faber, Folkert; Buwalda, Pieter L; van der Maarel, Marc J E C; Kamerling, Johannis P; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    2014-12-10

    Dietary fibers are at the forefront of nutritional research because they positively contribute to human health. Much of our processed foods contain, however, only small quantities of dietary fiber, because their addition often negatively affects the taste, texture, and mouth feel. There is thus an urge for novel types of dietary fibers that do not cause unwanted sensory effects when applied as ingredient, while still positively contributing to the health of consumers. Here, we report the generation and characterization of a novel type of soluble dietary fiber with prebiotic properties, derived from starch via enzymatic modification, yielding isomalto/malto-polysaccharides (IMMPs), which consist of linear (α1 → 6)-glucan chains attached to the nonreducing ends of starch fragments. The applied Lactobacillus reuteri 121 GTFB 4,6-α-glucanotransferase enzyme synthesizes these molecules by transferring the nonreducing glucose moiety of an (α1 → 4)-glucan chain to the nonreducing end of another (α1 → 4)-α-glucan chain, forming an (α1 → 6)-glycosidic linkage. Once elongated in this way, the molecule becomes a better acceptor substrate and is then further elongated with (α1 → 6)-linked glucose residues in a linear way. Comparison of 30 starches, maltodextrins, and α-glucans of various botanical sources, demonstrated that substrates with long and linear (α1 → 4)-glucan chains deliver products with the highest percentage of (α1 → 6) linkages, up to 92%. In vitro experiments, serving as model of the digestive power of the gastrointestinal tract, revealed that the IMMPs, or more precisely the IMMP fraction rich in (α1 → 6) linkages, will largely pass the small intestine undigested and therefore end up in the large intestine. IMMPs are a novel type of dietary fiber that may have health promoting activity. PMID:25412115

  10. [Use of nopal dietary fiber in a powder dessert formulation].

    PubMed

    Sáenz, Carmen; Sepúlveda, Elena; Pak, Nelly; Vallejos, Ximena

    2002-12-01

    The development of diverse types of foods of low caloric value and with high content in dietary fiber have occupied a preponderant place in the food industry in the last years, due to the growing interest of the consumers for a healthy and nutritious diet. Pre-cooked or quick to prepare foods are attractive for the time they save; if to this you add their nutritious value, the attractiveness is even greater. For this reason, this study analyzes different formulations of a powder to prepare a dessert (flan), with different percentages of incorporation of nopal flour, as a source of dietary fiber (16%, 18%, 20%). Two flavors (melon and banana) were tried. It was observed that the flan flavored with banana and with 16% of nopal flour, reached better sensorial characteristics. Greater percentages of nopal flour negatively affected the sensorial characteristics, mainly flavor, color and texture. The analysis showed that the powder presented 5.7% of moisture, low water activity (0.48) and therefore a low total recount of microorganisms. The content of protein was high (27.2%), the ether extract low (2.0%) similar to the caloric contribution (40 Kcal/portion). The flan showed a 9.8% of total dietary fiber, being greater the contribution of soluble fiber (6.1%) than that of insoluble fiber (3.7%). Due to these characteristics this formulation could be considered as a food that provides benefits for the human health. PMID:12868280

  11. Dietary fiber and total enteral nutrition: fermentative assessment of five fiber supplements.

    PubMed

    McBurney, M I; Thompson, L U

    1991-01-01

    Total enteral nutrition (TEN) formulas supplemented with dietary fiber, typically soy polysaccharide, are in widespread clinical use. Five commercially available dietary fiber supplements obtained from fruits (apple, grapefruit, orange, prune, tomato) were examined for potential use in TEN formulas. In vitro fermentations of 0, 4, 8, 12, and 24 hours' duration with human fecal microbiota from three different donors were conducted to assess colonic fermentative effects. Short-chain fatty acid and hydrogen productions differed significantly with fiber source. The most rapid fermentation rate was with tomato followed by orange, grapefruit, apple, and finally prune fiber. Such differences in fermentability should be considered when fiber sources are selected to supplement TEN formulas. PMID:1650853

  12. Dietary Fiber - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Getting Enough? English 您是否摄取到足够的纤维质? - 简体中文 (Chinese - Simplified) PDF Chinese Community Health Resource Center High Fiber Foods English 含大量纤维素的食品 - 简体中文 (Chinese - Simplified) PDF Chinese Community ...

  13. Fiber Volume Fraction Influence on Fiber Compaction in Tapered Resin Injection Pultrusion Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuram, N. B.; Roux, J. A.; Jeswani, A. L.

    2015-10-01

    Liquid resin is injected into the tapered injection chamber through the injection slots to completely wetout the fiber reinforcements in a resin injection pultrusion process. As the resin penetrates through the fibers, the resin also pushes the fibers away from the wall towards the centerline causing compaction of the fiber reinforcements. The fibers are squeezed together due to compaction, making resin penetration more difficult; thus higher resin injection pressures are required to effectively penetrate through the fibers and achieve complete wetout. Fiber volume fraction in the final pultruded composite is a key to decide the mechanical and/or chemical properties of the composite. If the fiber volume fraction is too high, more fibers are squeezed together creating a fiber lean region near the wall and fiber rich region away from the wall. Also, the design of the injection chamber significantly affects the minimum injection pressure required to completely wet the fibers. A tapered injection chamber is considered such that wetout occurs at lower injection pressures due to the taper angle of the injection chamber. In this study, the effect of fiber volume fraction on the fiber reinforcement compaction and complete fiber wetout for a tapered injection chamber is investigated.

  14. Fiber Volume Fraction Influence on Fiber Compaction in Tapered Resin Injection Pultrusion Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuram, N. B.; Roux, J. A.; Jeswani, A. L.

    2016-06-01

    Liquid resin is injected into the tapered injection chamber through the injection slots to completely wetout the fiber reinforcements in a resin injection pultrusion process. As the resin penetrates through the fibers, the resin also pushes the fibers away from the wall towards the centerline causing compaction of the fiber reinforcements. The fibers are squeezed together due to compaction, making resin penetration more difficult; thus higher resin injection pressures are required to effectively penetrate through the fibers and achieve complete wetout. Fiber volume fraction in the final pultruded composite is a key to decide the mechanical and/or chemical properties of the composite. If the fiber volume fraction is too high, more fibers are squeezed together creating a fiber lean region near the wall and fiber rich region away from the wall. Also, the design of the injection chamber significantly affects the minimum injection pressure required to completely wet the fibers. A tapered injection chamber is considered such that wetout occurs at lower injection pressures due to the taper angle of the injection chamber. In this study, the effect of fiber volume fraction on the fiber reinforcement compaction and complete fiber wetout for a tapered injection chamber is investigated.

  15. Recovery of soluble dietary fiber is dependent on the method of analysis.

    PubMed

    Marlett, J A; Chesters, J G; Longacre, M J; Bogdanske, J J

    1989-09-01

    The effects of different methods on the distribution of total neutral sugars (TNS), uronic acids (UA), and beta-glucans (beta G) between the soluble (S) and insoluble (I) fractions of dietary fiber (DF) were determined for peas, kidney beans, oat bran, rice, and macaroni. Incorporation of a protease step into the Theander method "A" modestly increased, and addition of a pepsin digestion further increased the proportion of total fiber recovered in the S fraction. The effect of extraction method on the distribution of TNS, UA, and beta G between the S and I fractions varied with the food. The three methods measured the same total DF in a food and 1-3% starch in the I fraction of peas and kidney beans. Use of dimethyl sulfoxide to solubilize starch, or elevated temperature to extract S components, had no effect on the distribution of DF between S and I fractions of peas and macaroni. Incomplete protein hydrolysis did not always lower Klason lignin and excluding lignin from the fiber complex did not always substantially increase the S fraction. PMID:2549779

  16. Dietary protein and fiber in end stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Sirich, Tammy L

    2015-01-01

    Prior to the availability of hemodialysis, dietary protein restriction played a large part in the treatment of uremia. This therapy was based on observations that uremic symptoms increased with high protein intake. Early investigators thus presumed that "uremic toxins" were derived from the breakdown of dietary protein; its restriction improved uremic symptoms but caused malnutrition. After the availability of hemodialysis, protein restriction was no longer recommended. Studies in healthy subjects have shown that an intake of 0.6-0.8 g/kg/day is adequate to prevent protein malnutrition. Guidelines for hemodialysis patients, however, currently recommend higher protein intakes of 1.2 g/kg/day. A downside to higher intake may be increased production of protein-derived uremic solutes that caused the symptoms observed by early investigators. Some of these solutes are produced by colon microbes acting on protein which escapes digestion in the small intestine. Increasing dietary fiber may reduce the production of colon-derived solutes in hemodialysis patients without adverse effects of protein restriction. Fiber comprises carbohydrates and related substances that are resistant to digestion in the small intestine. Upon delivery to the colon, fiber is broken down to short chain fatty acids, providing energy to both the microbes and the host. With an increased energy supply, the microbes can incorporate dietary protein for growth rather than breaking them down to uremic solutes. Increasing fiber intake in hemodialysis patients has been shown to reduce the plasma levels of selected colon-derived solutes. Further studies are needed to test whether this provides clinical benefit. PMID:25319504

  17. In vitro hypoglycemic effects of selected dietary fiber sources.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Faiyaz; Sairam, Sudha; Urooj, Asna

    2011-06-01

    The physiological functions of dietary fiber and its role in health promotion and risk reduction of some chronic diseases has been well documented. In the present investigation, the effect of three dietary fiber sources, oats (OA), barley (BA) and psyllium husk (PH) on glucose adsorption, diffusion and starch hydrolysis were studied using in vitro techniques by simulating gastrointestinal conditions and compared with the commercial dietary fiber sources wheat bran (WB), acarbose (ACB) and guar gum (GG). The glucose binding capacity of all the samples was higher than WB and ACB at 5 mM concentration. In all the samples, the diffusion of glucose was directly proportional to the time and diffusion rate was significantly lower (p ≤ 0.01) in the system containing various samples compared to control. Glucose dialysis retardation index (GDRI) was 100 for OA, BA and PH at 60 min, at 120 min the maximal GDRI was in PH. Whereas; WB and ACB exhibited maximal GDRI at 180 and 240 min. All of these mechanisms might create a concerted function in lowering the rate of glucose absorption and as a result, decrease the postprandial hyperglycemia. PMID:23572748

  18. Antioxidative activity of animal and vegetable dietary fibers.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Nobutaka; Fujimura, Ayako; Nagai, Takeshi; Mizumoto, Iwao; Itami, Toshiaki; Hatate, Hideo; Nozawa, Takashi; Kato, Norihisa; Nomoto, Tateo; Yoda, Binkoh

    2004-01-01

    Some dietary fibers originated from insects such as silkworm (Sericin) and others along with constituents of several representative seaweeds such as wakame Undaria pinnatifida; hijiki Hizikia fusifome; and kombu Laminaria japonica, were found to have fairly large reaction rates determined by quenching experiments of emission spectra in the near-infrared region lambdamax 1270 nm for singlet oxygen 1O2, Cypridina luminescence method for superoxide, and peroxide value (POV) for autoxidation. The determined reaction rates are between 10(3)-10(5) (g/L)(-1) s(-1) for the insect and the plant dietary fibers; the larger ones are as large as that of ascorbic acid, 1.93 x 10(4) (g/L)(-1) s(-1) for singlet oxygen. Most of these seaweed constituents also showed antioxidative activity against autoxidation and superoxide as well as their immunological enhancing activity. These results suggest a possibility that dietary fibers that are supposed to prevent the large-intestine cancer by their physical properties may prevent the cancer, at least in parts, by their chemical, antioxidative activity. PMID:15630221

  19. Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Health Implications of Dietary Fiber.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Wendy J; Stewart, Maria L

    2015-11-01

    It is the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics that the public should consume adequate amounts of dietary fiber from a variety of plant foods. Dietary fiber is defined by the Institute of Medicine Food Nutrition Board as "nondigestible carbohydrates and lignin that are intrinsic and intact in plants." Populations that consume more dietary fiber have less chronic disease. Higher intakes of dietary fiber reduce the risk of developing several chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and some cancers, and have been associated with lower body weights. The Adequate Intake for fiber is 14 g total fiber per 1,000 kcal, or 25 g for adult women and 38 g for adult men, based on research demonstrating protection against coronary heart disease. Properties of dietary fiber, such as fermentability and viscosity, are thought to be important parameters influencing the risk of disease. Plant components associated with dietary fiber may also contribute to reduced disease risk. The mean intake of dietary fiber in the United States is 17 g/day with only 5% of the population meeting the Adequate Intake. Healthy adults and children can achieve adequate dietary fiber intakes by increasing their intake of plant foods while concurrently decreasing energy from foods high in added sugar and fat, and low in fiber. Dietary messages to increase consumption of whole grains, legumes, vegetables, fruits, and nuts should be broadly supported by food and nutrition practitioners. PMID:26514720

  20. Dietary Fiber Intake and Cardiometabolic Risks among US Adults, NHANES 1999–2010

    PubMed Central

    Grooms, Kya N.; Ommerborn, Mark J.; Pham, Do Quyen; Djousse, Luc; Clark, Cheryl R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Dietary fiber may decrease the risk of cardiovascular disease and associated risk factors. We examined trends in dietary fiber intake among diverse US adults between 1999 and 2010, and investigated associations between dietary fiber intake and cardiometabolic risks including metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular inflammation, and obesity. Methods Our cross-sectional analysis included 23,168 men and non-pregnant women aged 20+ years from 1999–2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. We used weighted multivariable logistic regression models to estimate predicted marginal risk ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the risks of having the metabolic syndrome, inflammation, and obesity associated with quintiles of dietary fiber intake. Results Dietary fiber intake remained consistently below recommended adequate intake levels for total fiber defined by the Institute of Medicine. Mean dietary fiber intake averaged 15.7g–17.0g. Mexican-Americans (18.8 g) consumed more fiber than non-Hispanic Whites (16.3 g) and non-Hispanic Blacks (13.1 g). Comparing the highest to lowest quintiles of dietary fiber intake, adjusted predicted marginal risk ratios (95% CI) for the metabolic syndrome, inflammation, and obesity were 0.78 (0.69–0.88), 0.66 (0.61–0.72), and 0.77 (0.71–0.84), respectively. Dietary fiber was associated with lower levels of inflammation within each racial and ethnic group, though statistically significant associations between dietary fiber and either obesity or metabolic syndrome were seen only among whites. Conclusions Low dietary fiber intake from 1999–2010 in the US, and associations between higher dietary fiber and a lower prevalence of cardiometabolic risks suggest the need to develop new strategies and policies to increase dietary fiber intake. PMID:24135514

  1. Enzymatic degradation of phytate, polyphenols and dietary fibers in Ethiopian injera flours: effect on iron bioaccessibility.

    PubMed

    Baye, Kaleab; Guyot, Jean-Pierre; Icard-Vernière, Christèle; Rochette, Isabelle; Mouquet-Rivier, Claire

    2015-05-01

    The effect of removing phytate (IP6), iron-binding polyphenols, and dietary fibers on iron bioaccessibility in wheat-red sorghum (WrS) and teff-white sorghum (TwS) flour blends used in Ethiopia to make injera, a fermented pancake, was evaluated through the application of exogenous enzymes. Phytase treatment led to >90% reduction in IP6 and to an IP6:Fe molar ratio <1, but iron bioaccessibility was not improved (P > 0.05). Phytase + xylanase + cellulase (P + X + C) treatment increased iron bioaccessibility in TwS (non-detectableto1.6%) and WrS (1.9-3.2%), whereas phytase + polyphenol oxidase (P + PPO) treatment only showed improvement in the TwS blend. P + X + C + PPO treatment of the WrS blend increased the soluble non-dialysable iron fraction (6.7%) more than P + PPO treatment (3.9%). Although responses to enzyme treatments and iron bioaccessibility were matrix dependent, a positive effect of dietary fiber hydrolysis with X + C was obtained, irrespective of the blend. Dietary fibers had a negative effect on iron bioaccessibility independent of phytates. PMID:25529652

  2. Plasma cholesterol-lowering effect on rats of dietary fiber extracted from immature plants.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, N; Taniguchi, Y; Kiriyama, S

    2000-12-01

    Crude dietary fiber samples were prepared from beet, cabbage, Japanese radish, onion and mung bean sprouts (BF, CF, RF, OF and MF, respectively). These samples contained total dietary fiber at the levels of 814, 699, 760, 693 and 666 g/kg, respectively. To examine the effect of these dietary fiber sources on the plasma cholesterol concentration, male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed on a fiber-free (FF) diet or on an FF diet supplemented with 5% or 10% dietary fiber. Dietary fiber extracted from vegetables, wood cellulose (CL), pectin (PE) and guar gum (GG) were used as the fiber sources. Compared with the rats fed on the FF diet, a significant reduction in the plasma cholesterol concentration was observed in the rats fed on BF, CF, RF, MF, PE or GG after a 21-d feeding period. Cecal acetate, n-butyrate and total short-chain fatty acids were significantly higher in the rats fed on these dietary fibers, except for CF, than in those fed on the FF diet. A negative correlation was apparent between the total dietary fiber content, hemicellulose content and pectin content of each dietary fiber source and the plasma cholesterol concentration. These results suggest that some vegetable fibers exert a plasma cholesterol-lowering effect through cecal fermentation of these fibers. PMID:11210115

  3. Dietary fiber is related to metabolic risk factors in the Framingham Offspring Cohort

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Metabolic and epidemiological evidence suggests that high fiber diets improve glucose and lipid metabolism. We examined the association between energy-adjusted dietary fiber intake and several metabolic markers of disease risk in X men and Y women in the Framingham Offspring Cohort. Dietary fiber ...

  4. Modeling dietary fiber intakes in US adults: implications for public policy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The goal of this study was to simulate the application of the dietary recommendations to increase dietary fiber (DF)-containing foods. This study used 24-hour dietary recalls from NHANES 2003-2006 to model the impact of different approaches of increasing DF with current dietary patterns of US adults...

  5. Effect of marginal dietary zinc on blood fractions of rats

    SciTech Connect

    Brenckle, L.B.; Rasmussen, A.I.

    1986-03-05

    Use of blood components as indices of zinc (Zn) status has been proposed. This study evaluated changes in whole blood counts and Zn concentration of blood fractions in rats fed marginal dietary Zn. Rats (175-199 gm) were divided into 2 groups after 1 wk acclimation on a 6 ppm soybean-based Zn ration: a low Zn group (n=72) fed the 6 ppm Zn ration ad lib, and a pair-fed Zn-adequate group (n=72) fed the same ration supplemented to 30 ppm Zn. RBC Zn, WBC/platelet Zn, RBC count. WBC count, hemoglobin (Hb), and hematocrit (Hct) were determined at 0, 2, 4, 6, and 8 wks on blood obtained by cardiac puncture. Samples from 2 rats were pooled for Zn determinations. Low Zn rats decreased food intake, failed to gain weight, and 29% exhibited hair loss and/or scaly paws. RBC count, Hb, and Hct increased with time in both groups: the increase in RBC count preceeded that of Hb. Despite this different rate of change, RBC Zn results were the same regardless of basis of expression. WBC count decreased with time in both groups. Differences in pooled RBC Zn values between or within groups were not significant. The greatest difference between groups occurred at wk 2 when pooled WBC/platelet Zn was low in both groups, body weight differences became significant, and hair loss was first seen in low Zn rats. However, convincing evidence for changes in blood fractions due to marginal dietary Zn intake is not apparent despite other evidence of Zn deficiency in the low Zn group.

  6. Importance of enzyme purity and activity in the measurement of total dietary fiber and dietary fiber components.

    PubMed

    McCleary, B V; McCleary, B V

    2000-01-01

    A study was made of the effect of the activity and purity of enzymes in the assay of total dietary fiber (AOAC Method 985.29) and specific dietary fiber components: resistant starch, fructan, and beta-glucan. In the measurement of total dietary fiber content of resistant starch samples, the concentration of alpha-amylase is critical; however, variations in the level of amyloglucosidase have little effect. Contamination of amyloglucosidase preparations with cellulase can result in significant underestimation of dietary fiber values for samples containing beta-glucan. Pure beta-glucan and cellulase purified from Aspergillus niger amyloglucosidase preparations were used to determine acceptable critical levels of contamination. Sucrose, which interferes with the measurement of inulin and fructooligosaccharides in plant materials and food products, must be removed by hydrolysis of the sucrose to glucose and fructose with a specific enzyme (sucrase) followed by borohydride reduction of the free sugars. Unlike invertase, sucrase has no action on low degree of polymerization (DP) fructooligosaccharides, such as kestose or kestotetraose. Fructan is hydrolyzed to fructose and glucose by the combined action of highly purified exo- and endo-inulinases, and these sugars are measured by the p-hydroxybenzoic acid hydrazide reducing sugar method. Specific measurement of beta-glucan in cereal flour and food extracts requires the use of highly purified endo-1,3:1,4 beta-glucanase and A. niger beta-glucosidase. Beta-glucosidase from almonds does not completely hydrolyze mixed linkage beta-glucooligosaccharides from barley or oat beta-glucan. Contamination of these enzymes with starch, maltosaccharide, or sucrose-hydrolyzing enzymes results in production of free glucose from a source other than beta-glucan, and thus an overestimation of beta-glucan content. The glucose oxidase and peroxidase used in the glucose determination reagent must be essentially devoid of catalase and alpha

  7. Potential misinterpretation of the nutritional value of dietary fiber: correcting fiber digestibility values for nondietary gut-interfering material.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Carlos A; Henare, Sharon J; Rutherfurd, Shane M; Moughan, Paul J

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this review is to identify the origin and implications of a nondietary material present in digesta and feces that interferes with the determination of dietary fiber in gastrointestinal contents. Negative values for ileal and fecal digestibility of dietary fiber are commonly reported in the literature for monogastric animal species, including humans. As negative values are not possible physiologically, this suggests the existence of a nondietary material in the gastrointestinal contents and feces that interferes with the accurate determination of dietary fiber digestibility when conventional methods of fiber determination are applied. To date, little attention has been given to this nondietary interfering material, which appears to be influenced by the type and concentration of fiber in the diet. Interestingly, estimates of dietary fiber digestibility increase substantially when corrected for the nondietary interfering material, which suggests that currently reported values underestimate the digestibility of dietary fiber and may misrepresent where, in the digestive tract, fermentation of fiber occurs. A new perspective of dietary fiber digestion in the gastrointestinal tract is developing, leading to a better understanding of the contribution of dietary fiber to health. PMID:27330145

  8. Dietary fibers and heavy metal retention in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, H.E.; Quarterman, J.

    1987-02-01

    The metal-binding capacities of some gel-forming polysaccharides and other substances have been investigated in vitro in an attempt to relate their metal-binding properties to the retention of dietary Pb and Cd in vivo. In equilibrium dialysis systems, aqueous solutions of alginic acid, pectin, agar, and carrageenan (1 g fiber/100 ml) all bound Pb and Cd to varying degrees. Alginic acid had the greatest binding capacity for Pb (50 ..mu..g Pb bound/mg fiber) and carrageenan for Cd (9.3 ..mu..g Cd bound/mg fiber). Addition of any one of these fibers, or indulin or glucuronic acid to the diet increased the tissue retention of one or both of the metals. Only cellulose supplementation reduced the retention of both Pb and Cd. Carrageenan decreased that of Pb and increased that of Cd. In another experiment alginic acid was shown to increased Pb retention in rats even when present at fairly low dietary concentrations (1 g/kg).

  9. Intestinal interaction of bile acids, phospholipids, dietary fibers, and cholestyramine.

    PubMed

    Gallaher, D; Schneeman, B O

    1986-04-01

    Binding of bile acids and phospholipids to a number of dietary fibers and cholestyramine (CH) within the small intestine was determined. The fibers used were cellulose, wheat bran, oat bran, guar gum (GG), and lignin (LG). GG, LG, and CH bound significant quantities of bile acids. However, only the CH reduced the bile acid concentration within the aqueous phase of the intestinal contents. Significant phospholipid binding was found only with CH. None of the test substances significantly reduced the quantity of solubilized lipid. Multiple regression analysis indicated that the total quantity of bile acids and phospholipids in the aqueous phase of the intestinal contents was a significant predictor of the quantity of lipid solubilized within the contents (r2 = 0.67). The failure of GG and LG to significantly decrease the amount of solubilized lipid suggests that the hypocholesterolemic effect of these fibers is due more to their bile acid binding capacity than to an effect on lipid solubilization. PMID:3008573

  10. Dietary Fiber Supplementation for Fecal Incontinence: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bliss, Donna Z.; Savik, Kay; Jung, Hans-Joachim G.; Whitebird, Robin; Lowry, Ann; Sheng, Xioayan

    2014-01-01

    Dietary fiber supplements are used to manage fecal incontinence (FI), but little is known about the fiber type to recommend or the level of effectiveness of such supplements, which appear related to the fermentability of the fiber. The aim of this single-blind, randomized controlled trial was to compare the effects of three dietary fiber supplements (carboxymethylcellulose [CMC], gum arabic [GA], or psyllium) with differing levels of fermentability to a placebo in community-living individuals incontinent of loose/liquid feces. The primary outcome was FI frequency; secondary outcomes included FI amount and consistency, supplement intolerance, and quality of life (QoL). Possible mechanisms underlying supplement effects were also examined. After a 14-day baseline, 189 subjects consumed a placebo or 16g total fiber/day of one of the fiber supplements for 32 days. FI frequency significantly decreased after psyllium supplementation versus placebo, in both intent-to-treat and per-protocol mixed model analyses. CMC increased FI frequency. In intent-to-treat analysis, the number of FI episodes/week after supplementation was estimated to be 5.5 for Placebo, 2.5 for Psyllium, 4.3 for GA, and 6.2 for CMC. Only psyllium consumption resulted in a gel in feces. Supplement intolerance was low. QoL scores did not differ among groups. Patients with FI may experience a reduction in FI frequency after psyllium supplementation, and decreased FI frequency has been shown to be an important personal goal of treatment for patients with FI. Formation of a gel in feces appears to be a mechanism by which residual psyllium improved FI. PMID:25155992

  11. Determination of insoluble, soluble, and total dietary fiber (CODEX definition) by enzymatic-gravimetric method and liquid chromatography: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    McCleary, Barry V; DeVries, Jonathan W; Rader, Jeanne I; Cohen, Gerald; Prosky, Leon; Mugford, David C; Okuma, Kazuhiro

    2012-01-01

    A method for the determination of insoluble (IDF), soluble (SDF), and total dietary fiber (TDF), as defined by the CODEX Alimentarius, was validated in foods. Based upon the principles of AOAC Official Methods 985.29, 991.43, 2001.03, and 2002.02, the method quantitates water-insoluble and water-soluble dietary fiber. This method extends the capabilities of the previously adopted AOAC Official Method 2009.01, Total Dietary Fiber in Foods, Enzymatic-Gravimetric-Liquid Chromatographic Method, applicable to plant material, foods, and food ingredients consistent with CODEX Definition 2009, including naturally occurring, isolated, modified, and synthetic polymers meeting that definition. The method was evaluated through an AOAC/AACC collaborative study. Twenty-two laboratories participated, with 19 laboratories returning valid assay data for 16 test portions (eight blind duplicates) consisting of samples with a range of traditional dietary fiber, resistant starch, and nondigestible oligosaccharides. The dietary fiber content of the eight test pairs ranged from 10.45 to 29.90%. Digestion of samples under the conditions of AOAC 2002.02 followed by the isolation, fractionation, and gravimetric procedures of AOAC 985.29 (and its extensions 991.42 and 993.19) and 991.43 results in quantitation of IDF and soluble dietary fiber that precipitates (SDFP). The filtrate from the quantitation of water-alcohol-insoluble dietary fiber is concentrated, deionized, concentrated again, and analyzed by LC to determine the SDF that remains soluble (SDFS), i.e., all dietary fiber polymers of degree of polymerization = 3 and higher, consisting primarily, but not exclusively, of oligosaccharides. SDF is calculated as the sum of SDFP and SDFS. TDF is calculated as the sum of IDF and SDF. The within-laboratory variability, repeatability SD (Sr), for IDF ranged from 0.13 to 0.71, and the between-laboratory variability, reproducibility SD (SR), for IDF ranged from 0.42 to 2.24. The within

  12. Correlation between Intake of Dietary Fiber and Adherence to the Korean National Dietary Guidelines in Adolescents from Jeonju

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sunmi; Na, Woori; Kim, Misung; Kim, Eunsoo; Sohn, Cheongmin

    2012-01-01

    This study surveyed dietary intake and adherence to the Korean national dietary guidelines in Korean adolescents. To elucidate basic data for use in nutrition education, which aims to improve adolescent compliance with the national dietary guidelines and to increase the intake of dietary fiber, we evaluated the sources of fiber in adolescent diets. This study included 182 male and 212 female students from 2 middle schools in the Jeonju province. From November 15~20, 2011, we surveyed the students for general characteristics, adherence to the Korean national dietary guidelines, and dietary intake. Dietary fiber intake was 16.57 ± 6.95 g/day for male students and 16.14 ± 7.11 g/day for female students. The food groups that contributed most to dietary fiber intake were (in descending order) cereals, vegetables, seasoning, and fruits. The fiber-containing food items consumed most were cabbage- kimchi, cooked rice, instant noodles, and cabbage. Based on adherence to the Korean national dietary guidelines, the vegetable-based intake of dietary fiber in groups 1 (score 15~45), 2 (score 46~52), and 3 (score 53~75) were 4.41 ± 2.595 g/day, 4.12 ± 2.692 g/day, and 5.49 ± 3.157 g/day, respectively (p<0.001). In addition, the total intake of dietary fiber varied significantly among the three groups (p<0.001) as follows: Group 1, 14.99 ± 6.374 g/day; Group 2, 15.32 ± 6.772 g/day; and Group 3, 18.79 ± 7.361 g/day. In this study, we discovered that adherence to the Korean national dietary guidelines correlates with improved intake of dietary fiber. Therefore, marketing and educational development is needed to promote adherence to the Korean national dietary guidelines. In addition, nutritional education is needed to improve dietary fiber consumption through the intake of vegetables and fruits other than kimchi. PMID:24471093

  13. Correlation between Intake of Dietary Fiber and Adherence to the Korean National Dietary Guidelines in Adolescents from Jeonju.

    PubMed

    Park, Sunmi; Na, Woori; Kim, Misung; Kim, Eunsoo; Sohn, Cheongmin

    2012-12-01

    This study surveyed dietary intake and adherence to the Korean national dietary guidelines in Korean adolescents. To elucidate basic data for use in nutrition education, which aims to improve adolescent compliance with the national dietary guidelines and to increase the intake of dietary fiber, we evaluated the sources of fiber in adolescent diets. This study included 182 male and 212 female students from 2 middle schools in the Jeonju province. From November 15~20, 2011, we surveyed the students for general characteristics, adherence to the Korean national dietary guidelines, and dietary intake. Dietary fiber intake was 16.57 ± 6.95 g/day for male students and 16.14 ± 7.11 g/day for female students. The food groups that contributed most to dietary fiber intake were (in descending order) cereals, vegetables, seasoning, and fruits. The fiber-containing food items consumed most were cabbage- kimchi, cooked rice, instant noodles, and cabbage. Based on adherence to the Korean national dietary guidelines, the vegetable-based intake of dietary fiber in groups 1 (score 15~45), 2 (score 46~52), and 3 (score 53~75) were 4.41 ± 2.595 g/day, 4.12 ± 2.692 g/day, and 5.49 ± 3.157 g/day, respectively (p<0.001). In addition, the total intake of dietary fiber varied significantly among the three groups (p<0.001) as follows: Group 1, 14.99 ± 6.374 g/day; Group 2, 15.32 ± 6.772 g/day; and Group 3, 18.79 ± 7.361 g/day. In this study, we discovered that adherence to the Korean national dietary guidelines correlates with improved intake of dietary fiber. Therefore, marketing and educational development is needed to promote adherence to the Korean national dietary guidelines. In addition, nutritional education is needed to improve dietary fiber consumption through the intake of vegetables and fruits other than kimchi. PMID:24471093

  14. [Biologically active food supplements as sources of flavonoids, tannins and dietary fibers].

    PubMed

    Kosheleva, O V; Berketova, L V

    2011-01-01

    The content of some biologically active substances such as bioflavonoids, tannins and dietary fiber in various type of biologically active additive was analyzed. The results are shown that the content of bioflavonoids ranger from 26.0 to 3970.0 mg%, tannins--from 1.19 to 857.0 mg%, insoluble dietary fiber--from 4.56 to 67.89% and soluble dietary fiber from 1.0 to 66.8%. PMID:22238949

  15. In vitro physicochemical, phytochemical and functional properties of fiber rich fractions derived from by-products of six fruits.

    PubMed

    Saikia, Sangeeta; Mahanta, Charu Lata

    2016-03-01

    A comparative study was done on the health promoting and functional properties of the fibers obtained as by-products from six fruits viz., pomace of carambola (Averrhoa carambola L.) and pineapple (Ananas comosus L. Merr), peels of watermelon (Citrullus lanatus), Burmese grape (Baccurea sapida Muell. Arg) and Khasi mandarin orange (Citrus reticulata Blanco), and blossom of seeded banana (Musa balbisiana, ABB). Highest yield of fiber was obtained from Burmese grape peel (BGPL, 79.94 ± 0.41 g/100 g) and seeded banana blossom (BB 77.18 ± 0.20 g/100 g). The total dietary fiber content (TDF) was highest in fiber fraction derived from pineapple pomace (PNPM, 79.76 ± 0.42 g/100 g) and BGPL (67.27 ± 0.39 g/100 g). All the samples contained insoluble dietary fiber as the major fiber fraction. The fiber samples showed good water holding, oil holding and swelling capacities. The fiber samples exhibited antioxidant activity. All the samples showed good results for glucose adsorption, amylase activity inhibition, glucose diffusion rate and glucose diffusion reduction rate index. PMID:27570274

  16. Lamb Wave Assessment of Fiber Volume Fraction in Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seale, Michael D.; Smith, Barry T.; Prosser, W. H.; Zalameda, Joseph N.

    1998-01-01

    Among the various techniques available, ultrasonic Lamb waves offer a convenient method of examining composite materials. Since the Lamb wave velocity depends on the elastic properties of a material, an effective tool exists to evaluate composites by measuring the velocity of these waves. Lamb waves can propagate over long distances and are sensitive to the desired in-plane elastic properties of the material. This paper discusses a study in which Lamb waves were used to examine fiber volume fraction variations of approximately 0.40-0.70 in composites. The Lamb wave measurements were compared to fiber volume fractions obtained from acid digestion tests. Additionally, a model to predict the fiber volume fraction from Lamb wave velocity values was evaluated.

  17. Solids Fraction Measurement with a Reflective Fiber Optic Probe

    SciTech Connect

    Seachman, S.M.; Yue, P.C.; Ludlow, J.C.; Shadle, L.J.

    2006-11-01

    A method has been developed to extract solids fraction information from a reflective fiber optic probe. The commercially available reflective fiber optic probe was designed to measure axial particle velocity (both up and down directions). However, the reflected light intensity measured is related to particle size and particle concentration. A light reflection model is used to relate the reflected light intensity to solids fraction. In this model we assume that the reflected light intensity is a fixed fraction, K1, of the total light intensity lost in penetration of a solid layer. Also, the solids fraction is related to particle concentration, N, in the light path, by N = K2 (1- ε), where (1-ε) is the solids fraction. The parameters K1 and K2 are determined through a calibration and curve fitting procedure. This paper describes this procedure and the steps taken to derive the values of K1 and K2. It is proposed that the reflective fiber optic can be used for real time measurement of solids fraction in a circulating fluid bed.

  18. Impact of dietary fibers on nutrient management and detoxification organs: gut, liver, and kidneys

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increased dietary fiber (DF) intake elicits a wide range of physiological effects, not just locally in the gut, but systemically. Dietary fibers can greatly alter the gut milieu by impacting the gut microbiome, which in turn influences the gut barrier, gastrointestinal immune and endocrine response...

  19. Adiponectin in Hamster: Characterization and Functions in Soluble Dietary Fiber Mediated Lipid Homeostatis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aim: The hypocholesterolemic and hypoglycemic effects of various natural and semisynthetic dietary fibers have been studied in the past for their potential use in the prevention and improvement of metabolic syndrome. Among these dietary fibers, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) has been shown to...

  20. Evaluation of Elevated Dietary Corn Fiber from Corn Germ Meal in Growing Female Pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To evaluate the effects of high dietary corn fiber on growth and metabolic measures, female pigs (n= 48; initial body weight of 30.8 kg) were fed diets containing 0 to 38.6% solvent-extracted corn germ meal for 28 days. Increasing the level of dietary corn fiber had no impact on average daily gain o...

  1. In-fiber all-optical fractional differentiator.

    PubMed

    Cuadrado-Laborde, C; Andrés, M V

    2009-03-15

    We demonstrate that an asymmetrical pi phase-shifted fiber Bragg grating operated in reflection can provide the required spectral response for implementing an all-optical fractional differentiator. There are different (but equivalent) ways to design it, e.g., by using different gratings lengths and keeping the same index modulation depth at both sides of the pi phase shift, or vice versa. Analytical expressions were found relating the fractional differentiator order with the grating parameters. The device shows a good accuracy calculating the fractional time derivatives of the complex field of an arbitrary input optical waveform. The introduced concept is supported by numerical simulations. PMID:19282948

  2. Effect of Dietary Fiber Extracted from Algelica keiskei Koidz on the Quality Characteristics of Chicken Patties

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun-Sang; Kim, Hyun-Wook; Kim, Young-Boong; Jeon, Ki-Hong

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effects of dietary fiber extracted from Algelica keiskei Koidz on the chemical composition, cooking characteristics, and sensory properties of chicken patties. The chicken patties with Algelica keiskei Koidz dietary fiber had significantly higher moisture and ash content, and yellowness than the control sample (p<0.05). Energy value, cooking loss, reduction in diameter, reduction in thickness, lightness, redness, hardness, cohesiveness, gumminess, and chewiness of the control samples was significantly higher than chicken patties with Algelica keiskei Koidz dietary fiber (p<0.05). The sensory evaluation indicated that the greatest overall acceptability in chicken patties was achieved at Algelica keiskei Koidz dietary fiber levels of 1% and 2%. Chicken patties supplemented with 2% Algelica keiskei Koidz dietary fiber had improved quality characteristics. PMID:26761844

  3. Effect of dietary fiber on constipation: A meta analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing; Wang, Hai-Peng; Zhou, Li; Xu, Chun-Fang

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of dietary fiber intake on constipation by a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). METHODS: We searched Ovid MEDLINE (from 1946 to October 2011), Cochrane Library (2011), PubMed for articles on dietary fiber intake and constipation using the terms: constipation, fiber, cellulose, plant extracts, cereals, bran, psyllium, or plantago. References of important articles were searched manually for relevant studies. Articles were eligible for the meta-analysis if they were high-quality RCTs and reported data on stool frequency, stool consistency, treatment success, laxative use and gastrointestinal symptoms. The data were extracted independently by two researchers (Yang J and Wang HP) according to the described selection criteria. Review manager version 5 software was used for analysis and test. Weighted mean difference with 95%CI was used for quantitative data, odds ratio (OR) with 95%CI was used for dichotomous data. Both I2 statistic with a cut-off of ≥ 50% and the χ2 test with a P value < 0.10 were used to define a significant degree of heterogeneity. RESULTS: We searched 1322 potential relevant articles, 19 of which were retrieved for further assessment, 14 studies were excluded for various reasons, five studies were included in the analysis. Dietary fiber showed significant advantage over placebo in stool frequency (OR = 1.19; 95%CI: 0.58-1.80, P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in stool consistency, treatment success, laxative use and painful defecation between the two groups. Stool frequency were reported by five RCTs, all results showed either a trend or a significant difference in favor of the treatment group, number of stools per week increased in treatment group than in placebo group (OR = 1.19; 95%CI: 0.58-1.80, P < 0.05), with no significant heterogeneity among studies (I2= 0, P = 0.77). Four studies evaluated stool consistency, one of them presented outcome in terms of percentage of hard stool

  4. Dietary fibers reduce the urinary excretion of 1-hydroxypyrene following intravenous administration of pyrene.

    PubMed

    Viau, C; Zaoui, C; Charbonneau, S

    2004-03-01

    During biological monitoring of exposure to a chemical, a possible source of interindividual variability in the measurement of a urinary metabolite that undergoes enterohepatic cycling is the presence of dietary fiber in the gastrointestinal tract. This study examined the effect of diets containing either the insoluble fiber Alphacel (nonnutritive bulk cellulose) or the soluble pectin (from citrus fruit, MW 20,000-40,000). Five groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats received one of the following diets: poor (5% w/w) or rich (15% w/w) in Alphacel, poor (5% w/w) or rich (15% w/w) in pectin, or no fiber (NF). Five micromol/kg of pyrene was administered by iv injection immediately after feeding the animals with their respective diet, and urine and feces collections started for the determination of 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHP), a metabolite of pyrene. The type of fiber had no influence on the results. The rats receiving diets both poor and rich in fiber excreted less 1-OHP (18 +/- 8 and 15 +/- 7 pmol per g of rat, respectively) in the 24-h urine samples than the NF group (28 +/- 6 pmol/g). There was a nonstatistically significant trend towards increased fecal and total (urinary + fecal) 1-OHP excretion with increasing amount of fiber in the diet. An in vitro experiment showed an inverse correlation (r(2) = 0.98) between the amount of Alphacel in suspension in a 1-OHP aqueous solution and the recovery of 1-OHP from the soluble fraction. The reduction in urinary output of the metabolite due to fiber reaching approximately 40% may contribute to its interindividual variability observed in occupational and environmental studies. PMID:14691205

  5. Adsorption of direct-acting and indirect-acting mutagens by various dietary fibers.

    PubMed

    Karakaya, S; Kavas, A

    1999-09-01

    The protective effect of dietary fiber on human cancer has received great attention during the last decades. Because dietary fiber constitutes a large group of complex polysaccharides with various solubilities, degrees of lignification, chemical compositions and structural arrangements, several mechanisms for their effects have been proposed. In this study, in vitro binding capacities of various dietary fibers (potato fiber and glucomannan) and dietary fiber constituents (pectic acid and cellulose) against indirect mutagen 2-amino-3-methyl-3H-imidazo (4,5-f) quinoline (IQ) and direct-acting mutagen sodium azide were investigated. Direct-acting mutagen sodium azide was not adsorbed to the dietary fiber and dietary fiber constituents of 0 degree C, pH 4.5 and 37 degrees C, pH 7.0. However, indirect-acting mutagen 2-amino-3-methyl-3H-imidazo (4,5-f) quinoline (IQ) were sorbed by them in variable ratios at 0 degree C, pH 4.5 and 37 degrees C, pH 7.0. The differences between the in vitro binding capacities of the samples at two experimental conditions were found to be statiscially significant (P < 0.01). IQ was not released from the dietary fibers and constituents in distilled water. PMID:10719562

  6. Fast Estimation of Dietary Fiber Content in Apple.

    PubMed

    Le Gall, Sophie; Even, Sonia; Lahaye, Marc

    2016-02-17

    Dietary fibers (DF) are one of the nutritional benefits of fleshy fruit consumption that is becoming a quality criterion for genetic selection by breeders. However, the AOAC total DF content determination is not readily amenable for screening large fruit collections. A new screening method of DF content in an apple collection based on the automated preparation of cell wall material as an alcohol-insoluble residue (AIR) is proposed. The yield of AIR from 27 apple genotypes was compared with DF measured according to AOAC method 985.29. Although residual protein content in AIRs did not affect DF measurement, subtraction of starch content above 3% dry weight in AIRs was needed to agree with AOAC measured DF. A fast colorimetric screening of starch in AIR was developed to detect samples needing correction. The proposed method may prove useful for the rapid determination of DF in collections of other fleshy fruit besides apple. PMID:26813795

  7. In vitro degradation and fermentation of three dietary fiber sources by human colonic bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although clinical benefits of dietary fiber supplementation seem to depend in part on the extent of fiber degradation and fermentation by colonic bacteria, little is known about the effect of the type of supplemented fiber on bacterial metabolism. In an experiment using a non-adapted human bacterial...

  8. Position of the American Dietetic Association: health implications of dietary fiber.

    PubMed

    Marlett, Judith A; McBurney, Michael I; Slavin, Joanne L

    2002-07-01

    Dietary fiber consists of the structural and storage polysaccharides and lignin in plants that are not digested in the human stomach and small intestine. A wealth of information supports the American Dietetic Association position that the public should consume adequate amounts of dietary fiber from a variety of plant foods. Recommended intakes, 20-35 g/day for healthy adults and age plus 5 g/day for children, are not being met, because intakes of good sources of dietary fiber, fruits, vegetables, whole and high-fiber grain products, and legumes are low. Consumption of dietary fibers that are viscous lowers blood cholesterol levels and helps to normalize blood glucose and insulin levels, making these kinds of fibers part of the dietary plans to treat cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Fibers that are incompletely or slowly fermented by microflora in the large intestine promote normal laxation and are integral components of diet plans to treat constipation and prevent the development of diverticulosis and diverticulitis. A diet adequate in fiber-containing foods is also usually rich in micronutrients and nonnutritive ingredients that have additional health benefits. It is unclear why several recently published clinical trials with dietary fiber intervention failed to show a reduction in colon polyps. Nonetheless, a fiber-rich diet is associated with a lower risk of colon cancer. A fiber-rich meal is processed more slowly, which promotes earlier satiety, and is frequently less calorically dense and lower in fat and added sugars. All of these characteristics are features of a dietary pattern to treat and prevent obesity. Appropriate kinds and amounts of dietary fiber for the critically ill and the very old have not been clearly delineated; both may need nonfood sources of fiber. Many factors confound observations of gastrointestinal function in the critically ill, and the kinds of fiber that would promote normal small and large intestinal function are usually

  9. Assessment of different dietary fibers (tomato fiber, beet root fiber, and inulin) for the manufacture of chopped cooked chicken products.

    PubMed

    Cava, Ramón; Ladero, Luis; Cantero, V; Rosario Ramírez, M

    2012-04-01

    Three dietary fibers (tomato fiber [TF], beet root fiber [BRF], and inulin) at 3 levels of addition (1%, 2%, and 3%) were assessed for the manufacture of chopped, cooked chicken products and compared with a control product without fiber added. The effect of fiber incorporation on (i) batters, (ii) cooked (30 min at 70 °C), and (iii) cooked and stored (for 10 d at 4 °C) chicken products were studied. The addition of the fiber to chicken meat products reduced the pH of chicken batters in proportional to the level of fiber addition. Fiber incorporation increased water-holding capacity but only the addition of TF reduced cook losses. The color of batters and cooked products was significantly modified by the type and level of fiber added. These changes were more noticeable when TF was added. Texture parameters were affected by the incorporation of TF and BRF; they increased the hardness in proportional to the level of addition. The addition of tomato and BRF to chicken meat products reduced lipid oxidation processes. These changes were dependent on the level of fiber added. The reduction of lipid oxidation processes was more marked in TF meat products than in products with other types of fibers. In contrast, the addition level of inulin increased TBA-RS numbers in chicken meat products. Although the addition of TF increased the redness of the meat products, the use of this fiber was more suitable as it reduced the extent of lipid oxidation processes. INDUSTRIAL APPLICATION: Nowadays, the reduction of fat and the increase of fiber content in meat products is one of the main goals of meat industry. Numerous sources of fiber can be added to the meat products; however, before that it is necessary to study their technological effect on raw and cooked meat products in order to evaluate their suitability for meat products manufacture. In addition, some of them could have beneficial effect on meat products conservation that could also increase their shelf life. PMID:22352766

  10. Dietary fibers as immunoregulatory compounds in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Wismar, René; Brix, Susanne; Frøkiaer, Hanne; Laerke, Helle Nygaard

    2010-03-01

    Many nonstarch polysaccharides (NSPs) classified as dietary fibers have been reported to possess immunoregulatory properties. The fibers reported to activate or by other means modulate immune responses originate from both plant, fungal, and microbial sources and constitute highly distinct structures. In order to enhance our understanding of factors important for the immunoregulatory activities, this article addresses the importance of chemical structure, origin, and purity of fibers for their capacity to interact with key regulatory immune cells. Furthermore, we assess bioavailability, and discuss possible mechanisms involved. The binding of some NSPs to carbohydrate receptors on immune cells is well established and this event leads to activation or other changes. Especially, certain beta-glucans and some mannans have demonstrated immunomodulatory capacity with the specific structure being important for the activity. Within beta-glucans the activity varies according to structure, molecular weight, and solubility. As many of the preparations tested constitute crude extracts or partly purified NSPs, the risk of contaminants holding immunoregulatory activities should not be ignored. To what extent NSPs enter systemic circulation has been difficult to assess, partly due to lack of sensitive analytical methods. The presence of NSPs in blood and Peyer's patches in the gut has been demonstrated, supporting encounter between NSPs and immune cells, but bioavailability studies still constitute a major challenge. Studies demonstrating in vivo effects of beta-glucans on microbial infections and cancer treatment strongly indicate an immunoregulatory mechanism behind the effects. However, the potential of NSPs as immunoregulatory food ingredients is still far from fully explored. PMID:20388138

  11. Dietary fiber intake and mortality in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yikyung; Subar, Amy F.; Hollenbeck, Albert; Schatzkin, Arthur

    2012-01-01

    Background Dietary fiber has been hypothesized to lower risk of coronary heart disease, diabetes, and some cancers. However, little is known of the effect of dietary fiber on total death and cause-specific deaths. Methods We examined dietary fiber intake in relation to total mortality and death from specific causes in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study, a prospective cohort study. Diet was assessed using a food frequency questionnaire at baseline. Cause of death was identified using the National Death Index Plus. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate relative risks (RRs) and two-sided 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results During an average of 9 years of follow-up, we identified 20,126 deaths in men and 11,330 deaths in women. Dietary fiber intake was associated with significantly lowered risk of total death in both men and women (multivariate RR comparing the highest vs. the lowest quintile =0.78, 95% CI:0.73–0.82, p-trend, <0.001 in men; 0.78. 95% CI:0.73–0.85, p-trend, <0.001 in women). Dietary fiber intake also lowered risk of death from cardiovascular, infectious, and respiratory diseases by 24%–56% in men and 34%–59% in women. Inverse association between dietary fiber intake and cancer death was observed in men, but not in women. Dietary fiber from grains, but not from other sources, was significantly inversely related to total and cause-specific death in both men and women. Conclusions Dietary fiber may reduce the risk of death from cardiovascular, infectious and respiratory diseases. Making fiber-rich food choices more often may provide significant health benefits. PMID:21321288

  12. Effect of boiling in water of barley and buckwheat groats on the antioxidant properties and dietary fiber composition.

    PubMed

    Hęś, Marzanna; Dziedzic, Krzysztof; Górecka, Danuta; Drożdżyńska, Agnieszka; Gujska, Elżbieta

    2014-09-01

    In recent years, there has been an ever-increasing interest in the research of polyphenols obtained from dietary sources, and their antioxidative properties. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of boiling buckwheat and barley groats on the antioxidant properties and dietary fiber composition. Antioxidative properties were investigated using methyl linoleate model system, by assessing the DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) radical scavenging activity and metal chelating activity. The results were compared with butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT). Raw barley and buckwheat groats extracts showed higher DPPH scavenging ability compared to boiled barley and buckwheat groats extracts. Raw barley groats extract exhibited higher antioxidant activity than boiled groats extract in the methyl linoleate emulsion. Higher chelating ability in relation to Fe (II) ions was observed for boiled groats extracts as compared to raw groats extracts. BHT showed small antiradical activity and metal chelating activity, while showing higher antioxidative activity in emulsion system. The analysis of groats extracts using HPLC method showed the presence of rutin, catechin, quercetin, gallic, p-hydroxybenzoic, p-coumaric, o-coumaric, vanillic, sinapic, and ferulic acids. Differences in the content of dietary fiber and its fractions were observed in the examined products. The highest total dietary fiber content was detected in boiled buckwheat groats, while the lowest - in boiled barley groats. The scientific achievements of this research could help consumers to choose those cereal products available on the market, such as barley and buckwheat groats, which are a rich source of antioxidative compounds and dietary fiber. PMID:24938316

  13. Perspective: Closing the Dietary Fiber Gap: An Ancient Solution for a 21st Century Problem.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Henry J; Brick, Mark A

    2016-07-01

    An important gap exists between the daily amounts of fiber recommended in the human diet (28-42 g/d) and that which is actually consumed (median intake, 12-14 g/d). In fact, <5% of Americans meet the recommended intake for dietary fiber, and the magnitude of the gap is large, approximately a 50-70% shortfall. Because considerable evidence indicates that dietary fiber affects normal physiologic function and the onset of chronic diseases and their progression, the fiber gap represents an opportune target at which dietary interventions can be directed. This perspective considers whether a scientific basis exists for the current lack of emphasis on pulse crops, that is, grain legumes (common bean, chickpea, lentils, and garden pea) as a concentrated, inexpensive, and widely available source of dietary fiber. Attention is directed to this topic because the fiber gap has existed for decades with little improvement despite nutrition labeling, consumer education about the value of whole-grain cereal crop-based products, and the introduction of many fiber-enriched foods. The time is long overdue to identify additional approaches that have the potential to close the dietary fiber gap. To this end, the potential role of pulse crops in remediating this gap is examined. PMID:27422499

  14. The effect of dietary fiber on human pancreatic enzyme activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Dunaif, G; Schneeman, B O

    1981-06-01

    Human pancreatic juice was used as a source of amylase, lipase, trypsin, and chymotrypsin. The human pancreatic juice was incubated with one of several dietary fibers, including alfalfa, oat bran, pectin. Solka Floc, wheat bran, and xylan. In addition, the human pancreatic juice was incubated without any fiber, which was used as the control. Incubation with Solka Floc (cellulose) and xylan (a hemicellulose) resulted in a substantial loss of activity in all enzymes assayed. Wheat bran and oat bran decreased amylase and chymotrypsin activity, while alfalfa decreased trypsin and chymotrypsin activity. Incubation with pectin significantly increased amylase and chymotrypsin activity. The mechanism by which sources of dietary fiber can alter enzyme activity is currently unknown. This effect of a dietary component on the activity of human pancreatic enzymes emphasizes the need to investigate further the effects of dietary fiber on digestion and absorption in the small intestine to understand fully its effects on metabolism. PMID:6165234

  15. Enhancement in fecal excretion of dioxin isomer in mice by several dietary fibers.

    PubMed

    Aozasa, O; Ohta, S; Nakao, T; Miyata, H; Nomura, T

    2001-10-01

    The effect of increased nutrients (protein, lipid, vitamins and minerals) on dioxin-induced toxic manifestations such as immune suppression, hepatic hypertrophy, splenic atrophy and enzyme induction was investigated in mice after oral administration of 1,2,3,4,7,8-HxCDD (HxCDD) as one of a representative compound of dioxin isomers. Consequently, it appeared that increased minerals and vitamins in the diet prevented immune suppression by HxCDD. In addition, to clarify the additive effect of nutrients and the ability to hasten the excretion of dioxins by dietary fiber, the adsorbing of dioxins by 16 dietary fibers was investigated by in vitro experiment. Among 16 dietary fibers, locust bean gum, pectin, alginic acid, guar gum, chitin and cellulose were effective in binding dioxin isomers. These dietary fibers also enhanced the fecal excretion of HxCDD in mice. PMID:11572611

  16. Carbohydrates, Dietary Fiber, and Resistant Starch in White Vegetables: Links to Health Outcomes12

    PubMed Central

    Slavin, Joanne L.

    2013-01-01

    Vegetables are universally promoted as healthy. Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010 recommend that you make half of your plate fruits and vegetables. Vegetables are diverse plants that vary greatly in energy content and nutrients. Vegetables supply carbohydrates, dietary fiber, and resistant starch in the diet, all of which have been linked to positive health outcomes. Fiber lowers the incidence of cardiovascular disease and obesity. In this paper, the important role of white vegetables in the human diet is described, with a focus on the dietary fiber and resistant starch content of white vegetables. Misguided efforts to reduce consumption of white vegetables will lower intakes of dietary fiber and resistant starch, nutrients already in short supply in our diets. PMID:23674804

  17. Prospective Study of Dietary Fiber, Whole Grain Foods, and Small Intestinal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schatzkin, Arthur; Park, Yikyung; Leitzmann, Michael F.; Hollenbeck, Albert R.; Cross, Amanda J.

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims Although a number of epidemiologic studies have found dietary fiber and whole grains to be inversely associated with colorectal cancer incidence, studies of dietary and other risk factors for small intestinal cancer have been sparse and all of a case-control design. We conducted a prospective cohort study to determine the relationship between intake of dietary fiber/whole grains and the incidence of small intestinal cancer. Methods We analyzed dietary data collected in 1995 and 1996 from 293,703 men and 198,618 women in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. We used multivariate Cox proportional hazards models to estimate relative risk (RR) and two-sided 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for quintiles of dietary fiber and whole grain intake. Results 165 individuals developed small intestinal cancers through 2003. Dietary fiber/whole grain intake was generally associated with a lower risk of small intestinal cancer. The multivariate RR (95% CIs; 5th vs. 1st. intake quintile) were 0.79 (0.43–1.44) (p-trend, 0.41) for total dietary fiber, 0.51 (0.29–0.89) (p-trend, 0.01) for fiber from grains, and 0.59 (0.33–1.05) (p-trend=0.06) for whole-grain foods. Conclusions Intake of fiber from grains and whole-grain foods was inversely associated with small intestinal cancer incidence; the RR values were consistent with those of the same dietary factors for large bowel cancer in this cohort. In conjunction with the anatomic and physiologic commonalities of the large and small bowel, as well as the mutually increased risks for second cancer for both organs, grain fiber and whole grain foods appear to protect against lower gastrointestinal cancers. PMID:18727930

  18. A Practical Guide for Estimating Dietary Fat and Fiber Using Limited Food Frequency Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neale, Anne Victoria; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A methodology is presented for estimating daily intake of dietary fat and fiber based on limited food frequency data. The procedure, which relies on National Food Consumption Survey data and daily consumption rates, can provide baseline estimates of dietary patterns for health promotion policymakers. (SLD)

  19. Effects of dietary fiber and low crude protein on ammonia emission from laying-hen manure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ammonia emission is a major concern for the poultry industry. The objectives of this research were to determine if inclusion of dietary fiber and a lowered dietary crude protein content would decrease ammonia emission from laying-hen manure. A total of 256 Hy-Line W-36 hens were fed diets with 2 con...

  20. High Amount of Dietary Fiber Not Harmful But Favorable for Crohn Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chiba, Mitsuro; Tsuji, Tsuyotoshi; Nakane, Kunio; Komatsu, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    Current chronic diseases are a reflection of the westernized diet that features a decreased consumption of dietary fiber. Indigestible dietary fiber is metabolized by gut bacteria, including Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, to butyrate, which has a critical role in colonic homeostasis owing to a variety of functions. Dietary fiber intake has been significantly inversely associated with the risk of chronic diseases. Crohn disease (CD) is not an exception. However, even authors who reported the inverse association between dietary fiber and a risk of CD made no recommendation of dietary fiber intake to CD patients. Some correspondence was against advocating high fiber intake in CD. We initiated a semivegetarian diet (SVD), namely a lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet, for patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Our SVD contains 32.4 g of dietary fiber in 2000 kcal. There was no untoward effect of the SVD. The remission rate with combined infliximab and SVD for newly diagnosed CD patients was 100%. Maintenance of remission on SVD without scheduled maintenance therapy with biologic drugs was 92% at 2 years. These excellent short- and long-term results can be explained partly by SVD. The fecal bacterial count of F prausnitzii in patients with CD is significantly lower than in healthy controls. Diet reviews recommend plant-based diets to treat and to prevent a variety of chronic diseases. SVD belongs to plant-based diets that inevitably contain considerable amounts of dietary fiber. Our clinical experience and available data provide a rationale to recommend a high fiber intake to treat CD. PMID:25663207

  1. Analysis of dietary insoluble and soluble fiber contents in school meal

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the contents of dietary insoluble and soluble fiber in school meal. Samples of the school meals were collected from May to June in 2008. Three elementary schools and three middle schools around Masan area were selected for analysis. Dietary soluble and insoluble fibers in the school meals were analyzed directly by the AOAC method. From the initial experiment phase, we used cellulose and pectin as a standard of dietary fiber, and average recovery rate of insoluble fiber and soluble fiber was calculated. The recovery rate was observed, the cellulose 109.7±11.7% (range 90~150%) and pectin 77.8±10.8% (range 64.7~96.7%), respectively. The amounts of insoluble fiber and soluble fiber were analyzed in the total of 66 dishes, which included 7 kinds of cooked rice (bab) made with some cereal products and vegetables, 19 kinds of soup (guk) made with meats or vegetables, 11 kinds of kimchi, 21 kinds of entrées or side dishes, and 8 special dishes. Conclusively the school meal, per serving size, would provide above 75% KDRI of total dietary fibers through mainly soups and special menu, with the exception to fruits. In addition, it might be expected that children could consume more soluble fiber from the meals with the special dishes than from the regular ones. PMID:22413038

  2. Dietary fiber intake and mortality among survivors of myocardial infarction: prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Flint, Alan; Pai, Jennifer K; Forman, John P; Hu, Frank B; Willett, Walter C; Rexrode, Kathryn M; Mukamal, Kenneth J; Rimm, Eric B

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the associations of dietary fiber after myocardial infarction (MI) and changes in dietary fiber intake from before to after MI with all cause and cardiovascular mortality. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Two large prospective cohort studies of US women and men with repeated dietary measurements: the Nurses’ Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study. Participants 2258 women and 1840 men who were free of cardiovascular disease, stroke, or cancer at enrollment, survived a first MI during follow-up, were free of stroke at the time of initial onset of MI, and provided food frequency questionnaires pre-MI and at least one post-MI. Main outcome measures Associations of dietary fiber post-MI and changes from before to after MI with all cause and cardiovascular mortality using Cox proportional hazards models, adjusting for drug use, medical history, and lifestyle factors. Results Higher post-MI fiber intake was significantly associated with lower all cause mortality (comparing extreme fifths, pooled hazard ratio 0.75, 95% confidence interval 0.58 to 0.97). Greater intake of cereal fiber was more strongly associated with all cause mortality (pooled hazard ratio 0.73, 0.58 to 0.91) than were other sources of dietary fiber. Increased fiber intake from before to after MI was significantly associated with lower all cause mortality (pooled hazard ratio 0.69, 0.55 to 0.87). Conclusions In this prospective study of patients who survived MI, a greater intake of dietary fiber after MI, especially cereal fiber, was inversely associated with all cause mortality. In addition, increasing consumption of fiber from before to after MI was significantly associated with lower all cause and cardiovascular mortality. PMID:24782515

  3. Prediction of rumen fiber pool in cattle from dietary, fecal, and animal variables.

    PubMed

    Huhtanen, P; Detmann, E; Krizsan, S J

    2016-07-01

    Feed intake control in ruminants is based on the integration of physical constraints and metabolic feedbacks. Physical constraints are related to the fill caused by the weight or volume of digesta in the reticulo-rumen. The amount of neutral detergent fiber (NDF) in the rumen (RNDF) may be used as an indicator of rumen fill. The objective of this study was to develop equations predicting RNDF from diet and animal characteristics using a meta-analysis technique. A treatment mean data set (n=314) was obtained from 84 studies, in which rumen pool size and diet digestibility were determined in lactating cows (n=231) or growing cattle (n=83). The data were analyzed using linear and nonlinear mixed models. Intake, rumen pool size, and fecal output of NDF were scaled to body weight (BW)(1.0). Due to the heterogeneous nature of dietary NDF, predictions of RNDF based on NDF intake were not precise. Predictions were markedly improved by dividing NDF into potentially digestible and indigestible fractions, because rumen turnover time of indigestible NDF was 2.7 times longer than that of potentially digestible NDF. At equal NDF intake, RNDF was negatively associated with dietary crude protein concentration and positively with the proportion of concentrate in the diet. Models based on fecal NDF output generally performed better than those based on NDF intake, probably because the effects of intrinsic characteristics of dietary cell walls and associative effects of dietary components collectively influence fecal NDF output. The model based on fecal NDF output was improved by including dietary concentration of forage NDF in the model, reflecting slower turnover of forage NDF compared with concentrate NDF. The curvilinear relationship between fecal NDF output and RNDF could be described by a quadratic, Mitscherlich, or power function equation, which performed better than the quadratic or Mitscherlich equation. In addition to fecal NDF output and dietary concentration of forage NDF

  4. CODEX-aligned dietary fiber definitions help to bridge the ‘fiber gap’

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive dietary fiber (DF) definition was adopted by the CODEX Alimentarius Commission (CAC) (1) to reflect the current state of knowledge about DF, (2) to recognize that all substances that behave like fiber regardless of how they are produced can be named as DF if they show physiological benefits, and (3) to promote international harmonization for food labeling and food composition tables. This review gives the history and evolution of the state of DF knowledge as looked at by refinements in DF methods and definitions subsequent to the launch of the DF hypothesis. The refinements parallel both interventional and epidemiological research leading to better understanding of the role of DF in contributing to the numerous physiological benefits imparted by all the various digestion resistant carbohydrates. A comparison of the CODEX definition (including its footnote that authorizes the inclusion of polymers with DP 3–9) and approved CODEX Type 1 methods with other existing definitions and methods will point out differences and emphasize the importance of adoption of CODEX-aligned definitions by all jurisdictions. Such harmonization enables comparison of nutrition research, recommendations, food composition tables and nutrition labels the world over. A case will be made that fibers are analogous to vitamins, in that they vary in structure, function and amount needed, but each when present in the right amount contributes to optimal health. Since the intake of DF is significantly below recommended levels throughout the world, the recognition that ‘all fibers fit’ is an important strategy in bridging the ‘fiber gap’ by enfranchising and encouraging greater intake of foods with inherent and added DF. Fortifying foods with added DF makes it easier to increase intakes while maintaining calories at recommended levels. PMID:24725724

  5. Are dietary fiber-induced alterations in colonic epithelial cell proliferation predictive of fiber's effect on colon cancer?

    PubMed

    Whiteley, L O; Klurfeld, D M

    2000-01-01

    Alterations in cell proliferation of the colon have been observed as a result of changes in amount and type of dietary fiber and in relation to risk of developing colon cancer. Although some human observational and intervention studies contribute to the database, most information results from experiments on rodents. Because of numerous contradictory reports linking dietary fiber, cell proliferation, and colon cancer, we undertook a critical review of existing methods in an attempt to explain the inconsistencies. Although there may be some individual types of dietary fiber that protect against chemically induced colon cancer, dietary fiber as a single entity does not appear to afford any consistent protection. Because of significant differences in experimental protocols among laboratories, it is not yet possible to state with certainty that increases in cell proliferation, induced by fiber consumption, are predictive of increased tumorigenesis. Much of what has been observed and interpreted as elevation of risk may simply be normal homeostatic changes in cell proliferation. Even though fermentation to short-chain fatty acids is a mechanistically attractive hypothesis to explain why fiber modulates cytokinetics, data do not consistently support short-chain fatty acids as biological intermediates in risk of colon cancer. The state of the art in this field has not yet progressed to the point where a clear effect of dietary fiber on cytokinetics and colon carcinogenesis can be assessed with any degree of certainty. Additional markers of apoptosis, differentiation, and cell-cell communication may be required for a more accurate analysis of the relation among fiber, cytokinetics, and colon cancer. PMID:10890023

  6. Dietary total and insoluble fiber intakes are inversely associated with prostate cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Deschasaux, Mélanie; Pouchieu, Camille; His, Mathilde; Hercberg, Serge; Latino-Martel, Paule; Touvier, Mathilde

    2014-04-01

    Although experimental data suggest a potentially protective involvement of dietary fiber in prostate carcinogenesis, very few prospective studies have investigated the relation between dietary fiber intake and prostate cancer risk, and those have had inconsistent results. Our objective was to study the association between dietary fiber intake (overall, insoluble, soluble, and from different sources, such as cereals, vegetables, fruits, and legumes) and prostate cancer risk. Stratifications by excess weight status, insulin-like growth factors, and amount of alcohol intake were also considered. This prospective analysis included 3313 men from the Supplémentation en Vitamines et Minéraux Antioxydants (SU.VI.MAX) cohort who completed at least 3 24-h dietary records. One hundred thirty-nine incident prostate cancers were diagnosed between 1994 and 2007 (median follow-up of 12.6 y). Associations between quartiles of energy-adjusted dietary fiber intake and prostate cancer risk were characterized by multivariate Cox proportional hazards models. Prostate cancer risk was inversely associated with total dietary fiber intake (HR of quartile 4 vs. quartile 1 = 0.47; 95% CI: 0.27, 0.81; P = 0.001), insoluble (HR = 0.46; 95% CI: 0.27, 0.78; P = 0.001), and legume (HR = 0.55; 95% CI: 0.32, 0.95; P = 0.04) fiber intakes. In contrast, we found no association between prostate cancer risk and soluble (P = 0.1), cereal (P = 0.7), vegetable (P = 0.9), and fruit (P = 0.4) fiber intakes. In conclusion, dietary fiber intake (total, insoluble, and from legumes but not soluble or from cereals, vegetables, and fruits) was inversely associated with prostate cancer risk, consistent with mechanistic data. PMID:24553693

  7. Intestinal fuels: glutamine, short-chain fatty acids, and dietary fiber.

    PubMed

    Evans, M A; Shronts, E P

    1992-10-01

    In recent years, considerable research has focused on the physiologic effects and clinical uses of three dietary constituents thought to be trophic to the intestinal tract in human beings: glutamine, short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), and dietary fiber. Glutamine is an important nitrogen-carrying amino acid that may be "conditionally essential" in certain disease states to support the gut barrier and immune function and overall protein use. Colonic irrigations with SCFA preparations have demonstrated enhanced healing of bowel tissue in animals and human beings. Dietary fiber supports bacterial SCFA production, normal stool output, and the gut barrier and immune function. However, optimal fiber doses for various medical conditions are not known, and the risk for gastrointestinal (GI) obstruction, diarrhea, gas, and bloating necessitates careful selection of patients and daily monitoring of fiber tolerance. A review of the current literature indicates that widespread use of glutamine and SCFA additives parenterally and enterally awaits further evidence of safety and efficacy in human beings, establishment of appropriate doses, and advances in formulation technology. Administration of dietary fiber to enhance bowel motility should be considered in long-term tube-fed patients with intact GI function and sufficient fluid tolerance to permit hydration of fiber. Industrywide agreement on fiber analysis methods and labeling standards (eg, fiber fermentability vs solubility) would facilitate selection of enteral products. To streamline studies and optimize research efforts in future clinical trials, standard criteria for evaluating GI function, diarrheagenic factors, and intestinal outcome variables should be established. PMID:1328345

  8. Effect of corn bran as dietary fiber addition on baking and sensory quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Development of wholesome and nutritious fiber rich food products with acceptable functional and sensory quality is a major industrial concern, seeking to capture consumer’s interest in healthy and functional foods. Dietary fiber in corn bran is known for its beneficial effects on human health and n...

  9. What Do We Know about Dietary Fiber Intake in Children and Health? The Effects of Fiber Intake on Constipation, Obesity, and Diabetes in Children1

    PubMed Central

    Kranz, Sibylle; Brauchla, Mary; Slavin, Joanne L.; Miller, Kevin B.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of dietary fiber intake on chronic diseases has been explored in adults but is largely unknown in children. This paper summarizes the currently existing evidence on the implications of dietary fiber intake on constipation, obesity, and diabetes in children. Current intake studies suggest that all efforts to increase children’s dietary fiber consumption should be encouraged. Available data, predominantly from adult studies, indicate significantly lower risks for obesity, diabetes, and constipation could be expected with higher dietary fiber consumption. However, there is a lack of data from clinical studies in children of various ages consuming different levels of dietary fiber to support such assumptions. The existing fiber recommendations for children are conflicting, a surprising situation, because the health benefits associated with higher dietary fiber intake are well established in adults. Data providing conclusive evidence to either support or refute some, if not all, of the current pediatric fiber intake recommendations are lacking. The opportunity to improve children’s health should be a priority, because it also relates to their health later in life. The known health benefits of dietary fiber intake, as summarized in this paper, call for increased awareness of the need to examine the potential benefits to children’s health through increased dietary fiber. PMID:22332100

  10. Relationships among dietary fiber components and the digestibility of energy, dietary fiber, and amino acids, and energy content of 9 corn co-products fed to growing pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An experiment was conducted to determine the best fitting dietary fiber (DF) assay to predict digestibility of energy, DF, and amnio acids, and energy value of 9 corn co-products: conventional corn bran (CB-NS; 37.0% total non-starch polysaccharides (NSP)), corn bran with solubles (CBS; 17.1% NSP), ...

  11. Modulation of Dendritic-Epithelial Cell Responses against Sphingomonas Paucimobilis by Dietary Fibers.

    PubMed

    Bermudez-Brito, Miriam; Faas, Marijke M; de Vos, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Non-fermenting Gram-negative bacilli, such as Sphingomonas paucimobilis (S.paucimobilis), are among the most widespread causes of nosocomial infections. Up to now, no definitive guidelines exist for antimicrobial therapy for S. paucimobilis infections. As we have shown that some dietary fibers exhibit pronounced immune-regulatory properties, we hypothesized that specific immune active dietary fibers might modulate the responses against S. paucimobilis. We studied the immunomodulatory effects of dietary fibers against S. paucimobilis on cytokine release and maturation of human dendritic cells (DCs) in co-cultures of DCs and intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). S. paucimobilis infection resulted in increased release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines by DCs/IECs; these effects were strongly attenuated by specific dietary fibers. Chicory inulin, sugar beet pectin, and both starches had the strongest regulatory effects. IL-12 and TNF-α were drastically diminished upon exposure to chicory inulin and sugar beet pectin, or both starches. High-maize 260, was more effective in the reduction of chemokine release than the others fibers tested. In summary, chicory inulin, sugar beet pectin, High-maize 260, and Novelose 330 attenuate S. paucimobilis-induced cytokines. These results demonstrate that dietary fibers with a specific chemical composition can be used to manage immune responses against pathogens such as S. paucimobilis. PMID:27452116

  12. Modulation of Dendritic-Epithelial Cell Responses against Sphingomonas Paucimobilis by Dietary Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Bermudez-Brito, Miriam; Faas, Marijke M; de Vos, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Non-fermenting Gram-negative bacilli, such as Sphingomonas paucimobilis (S.paucimobilis), are among the most widespread causes of nosocomial infections. Up to now, no definitive guidelines exist for antimicrobial therapy for S. paucimobilis infections. As we have shown that some dietary fibers exhibit pronounced immune-regulatory properties, we hypothesized that specific immune active dietary fibers might modulate the responses against S. paucimobilis. We studied the immunomodulatory effects of dietary fibers against S. paucimobilis on cytokine release and maturation of human dendritic cells (DCs) in co-cultures of DCs and intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). S. paucimobilis infection resulted in increased release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines by DCs/IECs; these effects were strongly attenuated by specific dietary fibers. Chicory inulin, sugar beet pectin, and both starches had the strongest regulatory effects. IL-12 and TNF-α were drastically diminished upon exposure to chicory inulin and sugar beet pectin, or both starches. High-maize 260, was more effective in the reduction of chemokine release than the others fibers tested. In summary, chicory inulin, sugar beet pectin, High-maize 260, and Novelose 330 attenuate S. paucimobilis-induced cytokines. These results demonstrate that dietary fibers with a specific chemical composition can be used to manage immune responses against pathogens such as S. paucimobilis. PMID:27452116

  13. Immunomodulatory Activity of Dietary Fiber: Arabinoxylan and Mixed-Linked Beta-Glucan Isolated from Barley Show Modest Activities in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Samuelsen, Anne Berit; Rieder, Anne; Grimmer, Stine; Michaelsen, Terje E.; Knutsen, Svein H.

    2011-01-01

    High intake of dietary fiber is claimed to protect against development of colorectal cancer. Barley is a rich source of dietary fiber, and possible immunomodulatory effects of barley polysaccharides might explain a potential protective effect. Dietary fiber was isolated by extraction and enzyme treatment. A mixed-linked β-glucan (WSM-TPX, 96.5% β-glucan, Mw 886 kDa), an arabinoxylan (WUM-BS-LA, 96.4% arabinoxylan, Mw 156 kDa), a mixed-linked β-glucan rich fraction containing 10% arabinoxylan (WSM-TP) and an arabinoxylan rich fraction containing 30% mixed-linked β-glucan (WUM-BS) showed no significant effect on IL-8 secretion and proliferation of two intestinal epithelial cell lines, Caco-2 and HT-29, and had no significant effect on the NF-κB activity in the monocytic cell line U937-3κB-LUC. Further enriched arabinoxylan fractions (WUM-BS-LA) from different barley varieties (Tyra, NK96300, SB94897 and CDCGainer) were less active than the mixed-linked β-glucan rich fractions (WSM-TP and WSM-TPX) in the complement-fixing test. The mixed-linked β-glucan rich fraction from NK96300 and CDCGainer showed similar activities as the positive control while mixed-linked β-glucan rich fractions from Tyra and SB94897 were less active. From these results it is concluded that the isolated high molecular weight mixed-linked β-glucans and arabinoxylans from barley show low immunological responses in selected in vitro test systems and thus possible anti-colon cancer effects of barley dietary fiber cannot be explained by our observations. PMID:21340001

  14. Effect of dietary fibers on losartan uptake and transport in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Iwazaki, Ayano; Takahashi, Naho; Miyake, Reiko; Hiroshima, Yuka; Abe, Mariko; Yasui, Airi; Imai, Kimie

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effect of dietary fibers on the transport of losartan, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker, in small intestinal cells. Using Caco-2 cells in vitro, losartan uptake and transport were evaluated in the presence of various fibers (cellulose, chitosan, sodium alginate and glucomannan). Dietary fibers caused a decrease in the uptake of losartan, with chitosan causing a significant reduction. Chitosan and glucomannan significantly reduced the transport of losartan, while cellulose or sodium alginate did not. Dietary fibers also reduced the level of free losartan; however, this did not correlate with the observed reduction in losartan uptake and transport. In summary, chitosan had the greatest inhibitory effect on losartan uptake and transport, and this potential interaction should be considered in patients taking losartan. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26748460

  15. Effects of partly replacing dietary starch with fiber and fat on milk production and energy partitioning.

    PubMed

    Boerman, J P; Potts, S B; VandeHaar, M J; Lock, A L

    2015-10-01

    The effects of partly replacing dietary starch with fiber and fat to provide a diet with similar net energy for lactation (NEL) density on yields of milk and milk components and on energy partitioning were evaluated in a crossover design experiment. Holstein cows (n = 32; 109 ± 22 d in milk, mean ± standard deviation) were randomly assigned to treatment sequence. Treatments were a high-starch diet containing 33% corn grain (mixture of dry ground and high-moisture corn; HS) or a high-fiber, high-fat diet containing 2.5% palmitic acid-enriched fatty acid (FA) supplement (HFF). Diets contained corn silage, alfalfa silage, and wheat straw as forage sources; HS contained 32% starch, 3.2% FA, and 25% neutral detergent fiber, whereas HFF contained 16% starch, 5.4% FA, and 33% neutral detergent fiber. Compared with HS, the HFF treatment reduced milk yield, milk protein concentration, and milk protein yield, but increased milk fat concentration, milk fat yield, milk energy output, and milk to feed ratio (energy-corrected milk/dry matter intake). The HFF treatment reduced the yield of de novo synthesized (< 16-carbon) milk FA and increased the yield of 16-carbon milk FA. Yield of preformed (> 16-carbon) milk FA was not different. The HFF treatment increased plasma concentrations of triglycerides and nonesterified fatty acids, but decreased plasma concentration of insulin. Compared with HS, the HFF treatment reduced body weight gain, change in body condition score, and fat thickness over the rump and rib. Calculated body energy gain, as a fraction of NEL use, was less for HFF than HS, whereas milk energy as a fraction of NEL use was increased for HFF. We concluded that the 2 treatments resulted in similar apparent NEL densities and intakes, but the HS treatment partitioned more energy toward body gain whereas the HFF treatment partitioned more energy toward milk. A high-fiber, high-fat diet might diminish the incidence of over conditioning in mid-lactation cows while

  16. Dietary fiber and fiber-rich food intake in relation to risk of stroke in male smokers

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, Susanna C; Männistö, Satu; Virtanen, Mikko J.; Kontto, Jukka; Albanes, Demetrius; Virtamo, Jarmo

    2012-01-01

    Background/Objectives There is convincing evidence that a high dietary fiber intake may lower the risk of coronary heart disease. However, the role of fiber in the prevention of stroke is unclear. We examined the associations of dietary fiber and fiber-rich food intake with risk of stroke within the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study. Subjects/Methods Between 1985 and 1988, 26 556 Finnish male smokers aged 50–69 years who had no history of stroke completed a dietary questionnaire. During a mean follow-up of 13.6 years, 2702 cerebral infarctions, 383 intracerebral hemorrhages, and 196 subarachnoid hemorrhages were ascertained. Results After adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors and folate and magnesium intakes, there was no significant association between intake of total fiber, water-soluble fiber, water-insoluble fiber, or fiber derived from fruit or cereal sources and risk of any stroke subtype. Vegetable fiber intake as well as consumption of fruit, vegetables, and cereals were inversely associated with risk of cerebral infarction; the multivariate relative risks (RR) for the highest quintile of intake compared with the lowest were 0.86 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.76–0.99) for vegetable fiber, 0.82 (95% CI: 0.73–0.93) for fruit, 0.75 (95% CI: 0.66–0.85) for vegetables, and 0.87 (95% CI: 0.74–1.03) for cereals. Vegetable consumption was inversely associated with risk of subarachnoid hemorrhage (RR for highest versus lowest quintile: 0.62; 95% CI: 0.40–0.98) and cereal consumption was inversely associated with risk of intracerebral hemorrhage (RR: 0.64; 95% CI: 0.41–1.01). Conclusions These findings suggest a beneficial effect of consumption of fruits, vegetables, and cereals on stroke risk. PMID:19319150

  17. Sugar profiles and soluble and insoluble dietary fiber contents of fruits in Thailand markets.

    PubMed

    Chareoansiri, Rin; Kongkachuichai, Ratchanee

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine sugar and dietary fiber contents in 37 varieties of Thai fruits. Sugars were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography and dietary fiber values were measured by the enzymatic-gravimetric method. The total sugar (sucrose, fructose and glucose) content ranged from 4.5 g/100 g (strawberry) to 20.3 g/100 g (ripe banana; hawm variety) edible portion. All varieties of ripe banana provided good sources of glucose, fructose and total sugar. The total dietary fiber content ranged from 0.6 g/100 g (watermelon) to 11.5 g/100 g (sapodilla) edible portion. The rank of TDF contents per 100 g edible portion was sapodilla > durian > guava and strawberry > apple > Chinese pear > sugar apple > star fruit. Other fruits contained total dietary fiber values lower than 2.4 g/100 g edible portion, especially watermelon, which had the lowest total dietary fiber content (0.6-0.7 g/100 g edible portion). PMID:19255919

  18. [Dietary fibers: current trends and health benefits in the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Mello, Vanessa D de; Laaksonen, David E

    2009-07-01

    Dietary fiber may contribute to both the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In epidemiological studies the intake of insoluble fiber, but not the intake of soluble fiber, has been inversely associated with the incidence of T2DM. In contrast, in postprandial studies, meals containing sufficiently quantities of beta-glucan, psyllium, or guar gum have decreased insulin and glucose responses in both healthy individuals and patients with T2DM. Diets enriched sufficiently in soluble fiber may also improve overall glycemic control in T2DM. Insoluble fiber has little effect on postprandial insulin and glucose responses. Fiber increases satiety. In some studies, insoluble fiber has been associated with less weight gain over time. Limited cross-sectional evidence suggests an inverse relationship between intake of cereal fiber and whole-grains and the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome. Although long-term data from trials focusing on specifically dietary fiber are lacking, meeting current recommendations for a minimum fiber intake of 25 g/d based on a diet rich in whole grains, fruits and legumes will probably decrease the risk of obesity, the metabolic syndrome and T2DM. PMID:19768242

  19. By-products of Opuntia ficus-indica as a source of antioxidant dietary fiber.

    PubMed

    Bensadón, Sara; Hervert-Hernández, Deisy; Sáyago-Ayerdi, Sonia G; Goñi, Isabel

    2010-09-01

    Dietary fiber and bioactive compounds are widely used as functional ingredients in processed foods. The market in this field is competitive and the development of new types of quality ingredients for the food industry is on the rise. Opuntia ficus-indica (cactus pear) produces edible tender stems (cladodes) and fruits with a high nutritional value in terms of minerals, protein, dietary fiber and phytochemicals; however, around 20% of fresh weight of cladodes and 45% of fresh weight of fruits are by-products. The objective of this study was therefore to determine the nutritional value of by-products obtained from cladodes and fruits from two varieties of Opuntia ficus-indica, examining their dietary fiber and natural antioxidant compound contents in order to obtain quality ingredients for functional foods and increase the added value of these by-products. PMID:20623195

  20. Whole grain, dietary fiber, and incidence of endometrial cancer in a Danish cohort study.

    PubMed

    Aarestrup, Julie; Kyrø, Cecilie; Christensen, Jane; Kristensen, Mette; Würtz, Anne Mette Lund; Johnsen, Nina Føns; Overvad, Kim; Tjønneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja

    2012-01-01

    Whole grains and dietary fiber might be inversely associated with endometrial cancer risk through their effects on sex hormone metabolism and body fat. We investigated whether a higher intake of whole grains and dietary fiber was associated with a lower incidence of endometrial cancer in the Diet, Cancer and Health cohort of 29,875 women aged 50-64 years at enrollment in 1993-1997. Information on diet and lifestyle was derived from self-administered questionnaires. The incidence rate ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated based on a Cox proportional hazards model. Of the 24,418 women included as cohort members, 217 had a diagnosis of endometrial cancer. No clear associations were found between intake of whole grains or dietary fiber and the incidence of endometrial cancer. PMID:23163844

  1. Effect of dietary fiber and crude protein content in feed on nitrogen retention in pigs.

    PubMed

    Patrás, P; Nitrayová, S; Brestenský, M; Heger, J

    2012-12-01

    Eight gilts (29.9 ± 1.7 kg initial BW) were used to evaluate effects of dietary (crude) fiber on N excretion via feces and urine at 2 levels of dietary CP. Pigs were fed 4 dietary treatments according to a double 4 × 4 Latin square. Treatments were low (14%) CP and low (3.25%) (crude) fiber (LPAA), low CP and high (4.46%) fiber (LPAABP), high (18.8%) CP and low fiber (HP), and high CP and high fiber (HPBP). Diets were based on soybean (Glycine max) meal, wheat (Triticum aestivum), and maize (Zea mays) and were supplemented with crystalline AA. High fiber diets contained 15% dried beet (Beta vulgaris) pulp. Pigs were housed in metabolic cages and fed 2 equal meals at 0700 and 1700 h at a daily rate of 90 g/kg BW(0.75). Water was offered ad libitum. Each experimental period consisted of a 6-d adaptation followed by a 4-d collection of feces and urine (bladder catheters). Data were analyzed using ANOVA. Differences between means (P < 0.05) were assessed using Fisher's LSD procedure. The N intake, fecal N excretion and absorption, and N retention increased (P < 0.05) in pigs fed high-CP diets with added fiber (HP vs. HPBR). With added fiber, urinary N excretion (g/d) was reduced (P < 0.02) only for the low-CP diet. Urinary N as a percentage of N intake was reduced (P < 0.01) in both groups fed high-fiber diets irrespective of dietary CP content. Dietary fiber level did not affect DMI. Fecal DM excretion (g/d) was higher (P < 0.02) in pigs fed diets with high CP and high fiber content than in pigs fed diets with high CP and low fiber content. In conclusion, beet pulp fiber added to diets increased fecal N and reduced urinary N and in diets with higher CP content increased overall N retention. PMID:23365315

  2. Effect of dietary fibers on physico-chemical, sensory and textural properties of Misti Dahi.

    PubMed

    Raju, P Narender; Pal, Dharam

    2014-11-01

    Misti dahi, a popular ethnic delicacy of eastern India analogous to caramel coloured set style sweetened yoghurt, besides several therapeutic virtues, contains high fat and sugar. Alike people elsewhere in the world, people in India too are now becoming health conscious and are aware of the relation between diet and health. Hence, high fat and sugar contents are causes of concern for the successful marketing of misti dahi in India. With a view to enhance the health attributes of misti dahi and improve marketability, three commercial dietary fiber preparations (inulin, soy fiber and oat fiber) were incorporated and their effect on the product's quality in terms of physicochemical, sensory and textural quality was assessed. Standard method was followed for the preparation of fiber fortified misti dahi (FFMD). Among the three dietary fibers, inulin significantly decreased viscosity and instrumental firmness and increased lightness (L*), redness (a*), yellowness (b*), syneresis and work of shear values of FFMD. Oat fiber settled at the bottom and gave a poor appearance. Soy fiber did not affect the flavor of FFMD. Although overall acceptability scores of inulin and soy fiber containing FFMD were significantly lower than control, they were still above the minimum acceptable score. Based on the results obtained in the present study, it was concluded that acceptable quality FFMD could be prepared using inulin and soy fiber at 1.5 % level of fortification. PMID:26396304

  3. Dietary Fiber and Whole Grain Intake Lessen Gains in Weight and Waist Circumference in Normal Weight Individuals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foods rich in dietary fiber, such as whole grains, may play an important role in maintaining a healthy body weight and preventing obesity because of their lower energy density. We examined the relationship between dietary fiber and whole grain consumption and changes in body weight and waist circumf...

  4. Glycemic index, glycemic load, dietary carbohydrate, and dietary fiber intake and risk of liver and biliary tract cancers in Western Europeans

    PubMed Central

    Fedirko, V.; Lukanova, A.; Bamia, C.; Trichopolou, A.; Trepo, E.; Nöthlings, U.; Schlesinger, S.; Aleksandrova, K.; Boffetta, P.; Tjønneland, A.; Johnsen, N. F.; Overvad, K.; Fagherazzi, G.; Racine, A.; Boutron-Ruault, M. C.; Grote, V.; Kaaks, R.; Boeing, H.; Naska, A.; Adarakis, G.; Valanou, E.; Palli, D.; Sieri, S.; Tumino, R.; Vineis, P.; Panico, S.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. B(as).; Siersema, P. D.; Peeters, P. H.; Weiderpass, E.; Skeie, G.; Engeset, D.; Quirós, J. R.; Zamora-Ros, R.; Sánchez, M. J.; Amiano, P.; Huerta, J. M.; Barricarte, A.; Johansen, D.; Lindkvist, B.; Sund, M.; Werner, M.; Crowe, F.; Khaw, K. T.; Ferrari, P.; Romieu, I.; Chuang, S. C.; Riboli, E.; Jenab, M.

    2013-01-01

    Background The type and quantity of dietary carbohydrate as quantified by glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL), and dietary fiber may influence the risk of liver and biliary tract cancers, but convincing evidence is lacking. Patients and methods The association between dietary GI/GL and carbohydrate intake with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC; N = 191), intrahepatic bile duct (IBD; N = 66), and biliary tract (N = 236) cancer risk was investigated in 477 206 participants of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort. Dietary intake was assessed by country-specific, validated dietary questionnaires. Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated from proportional hazard models. HBV/HCV status was measured in a nested case–control subset. Results Higher dietary GI, GL, or increased intake of total carbohydrate was not associated with liver or biliary tract cancer risk. For HCC, divergent risk estimates were observed for total sugar = 1.43 (1.17–1.74) per 50 g/day, total starch = 0.70 (0.55–0.90) per 50 g/day, and total dietary fiber = 0.70 (0.52–0.93) per 10 g/day. The findings for dietary fiber were confirmed among HBV/HCV-free participants [0.48 (0.23–1.01)]. Similar associations were observed for IBD [dietary fiber = 0.59 (0.37–0.99) per 10 g/day], but not biliary tract cancer. Conclusions Findings suggest that higher consumption of dietary fiber and lower consumption of total sugars are associated with lower HCC risk. In addition, high dietary fiber intake could be associated with lower IBD cancer risk. PMID:23123507

  5. Effects of dietary fibers on magnesium absorption in animals and humans.

    PubMed

    Coudray, Charles; Demigné, Christian; Rayssiguier, Yves

    2003-01-01

    There is overwhelming evidence that dietary fibers are an important component of human and animal diets and play an important role in human health. Because dietary fibers and some associated substances, such as phytate, have in vitro mineral-binding capacities, they have been thought to impair absorption of minerals such as calcium, iron and zinc, although magnesium absorption seems to be less affected. Indeed, the effect of dietary fibers depends largely on their own nature and characteristics, and also on mineral homeostasis. In 1977 it was observed that resistant starch, a fermentable dietary fiber, could improve Mg absorption in rats. More recently, attention has been focused on other fermentable substrates such as inulin and oligo- or polysaccharides, for their potential prebiotic and health effects. Studies conducted on different types of fermentable carbohydrates have confirmed their beneficial effect on Mg absorption in different animal species. The majority of these studies have also sought to determine the effects of fibers on other minerals such as calcium, iron and zinc. In contrast to the studies with Mg, these studies did not show a consistent effect on the absorption of these minerals. This is due to the particularities of sites and mechanism of Mg absorption. To date, four human studies have been carried out that generally confirmed the enhancing effect of fermentable oligo- or polysaccharides on Mg absorption. PMID:12514257

  6. Intake of grains and dietary fiber and prostate cancer aggressiveness by race.

    PubMed

    Tabung, Fred; Steck, Susan E; Su, L Joseph; Mohler, James L; Fontham, Elizabeth T H; Bensen, Jeannette T; Hebert, James R; Zhang, Hongmei; Arab, Lenore

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To examine the associations among intake of refined grains, whole grains and dietary fiber and aggressiveness of prostate cancer in African Americans (AA, n = 930) and European Americans (EA, n = 993) in a population-based, case-only study (The North Carolina-Louisiana Prostate Cancer Project, PCaP). Methods. Prostate cancer aggressiveness was categorized as high, intermediate or low based on Gleason grade, PSA level and clinical stage. Dietary intake was assessed utilizing the NCI Diet History Questionnaire. Logistic regression (comparing high to intermediate/low aggressive cancers) and polytomous regression with adjustment for potential confounders were used to determine odds of high prostate cancer aggressiveness with intake of refined grains, whole grains and dietary fiber from all sources. Results. An inverse association with aggressive prostate cancer was observed in the 2nd and 3rd tertiles of total fiber intake (OR = 0.70; 95% CI, 0.50-0.97 and OR = 0.61; 95% CI, 0.40-0.93, resp.) as compared to the lowest tertile of intake. In the race-stratified analyses, inverse associations were observed in the 3rd tertile of total fiber intake for EA (OR = 0.44; 95% CI, 0.23-0.87) and the 2nd tertile of intake for AA (OR = 0.57; 95% CI, 0.35-0.95). Conclusions. Dietary fiber intake was inversely associated with aggressive prostate cancer among both AA and EA men. PMID:23213538

  7. Intake of Grains and Dietary Fiber and Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness by Race

    PubMed Central

    Tabung, Fred; Steck, Susan E.; Su, L. Joseph; Mohler, James L.; Fontham, Elizabeth T. H.; Bensen, Jeannette T.; Hebert, James R.; Zhang, Hongmei; Arab, Lenore

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To examine the associations among intake of refined grains, whole grains and dietary fiber and aggressiveness of prostate cancer in African Americans (AA, n = 930) and European Americans (EA, n = 993) in a population-based, case-only study (The North Carolina-Louisiana Prostate Cancer Project, PCaP). Methods. Prostate cancer aggressiveness was categorized as high, intermediate or low based on Gleason grade, PSA level and clinical stage. Dietary intake was assessed utilizing the NCI Diet History Questionnaire. Logistic regression (comparing high to intermediate/low aggressive cancers) and polytomous regression with adjustment for potential confounders were used to determine odds of high prostate cancer aggressiveness with intake of refined grains, whole grains and dietary fiber from all sources. Results. An inverse association with aggressive prostate cancer was observed in the 2nd and 3rd tertiles of total fiber intake (OR = 0.70; 95% CI, 0.50–0.97 and OR = 0.61; 95% CI, 0.40–0.93, resp.) as compared to the lowest tertile of intake. In the race-stratified analyses, inverse associations were observed in the 3rd tertile of total fiber intake for EA (OR = 0.44; 95% CI, 0.23–0.87) and the 2nd tertile of intake for AA (OR = 0.57; 95% CI, 0.35–0.95). Conclusions. Dietary fiber intake was inversely associated with aggressive prostate cancer among both AA and EA men. PMID:23213538

  8. Chemical and Physical Properties, Safety and Application of Partially Hydrolized Guar Gum as Dietary Fiber

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Seon-Joo; Chu, Djong-Chi; Raj Juneja, Lekh

    2008-01-01

    The ideal water-soluble dietary fiber for the fiber-enrichment of foods must be very low in viscosity, tasteless, odorless, and should produce clear solutions in beverages. Partially hydrolyzed guar gum (PHGG) produced from guar gum by enzymatic process has the same chemical structure with intact guar gum but less than one-tenth the original molecular length of guar gum, which make available to be used as film former, foam stabilizer and swelling agent. The viscosity of PHGG is about 10 mPa·s in 5% aqueous solution, whereas 1% solution of guar gum shows range from 2,000 to 3,000 mPa·s. In addition, PHGG is greatly stable against low pH, heat, acid and digestive enzyme. For these reasons, PHGG seems to be one of the most beneficial dietary fiber materials. It also showed that interesting physiological functions still fully exert the nutritional function of a dietary fiber. PHGG has, therefore, been used primarily for a nutritional purpose and became fully integrated food material without altering the rheology, taste, texture and color of final products. PHGG named as Benefiber® in USA has self-affirmation on GRAS status of standard grade PHGG. PHGG named as Sunfiber® is now being used in various beverages, food products and medicinal foods as a safe, natural and functional dietary fiber in all over the world. PMID:18231623

  9. Effects of Dietary Fiber and Reduced Crude Protein on Nitrogen Balance and Egg Production in Laying Hens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ammonia (NH3) emission is a major concern for the poultry industry and can be lowered by dietary inclusion of fibrous ingredients and by lowering the dietary crude protein (CP) content. The objectives of this research were to determine the effects of dietary fiber and low-CP diets on egg production ...

  10. Transmissible microbial and metabolomic remodeling by soluble dietary fiber improves metabolic homeostasis.

    PubMed

    He, Baokun; Nohara, Kazunari; Ajami, Nadim J; Michalek, Ryan D; Tian, Xiangjun; Wong, Matthew; Losee-Olson, Susan H; Petrosino, Joseph F; Yoo, Seung-Hee; Shimomura, Kazuhiro; Chen, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Dietary fibers are increasingly appreciated as beneficial nutritional components. However, a requisite role of gut microbiota in fiber function and the overall impact of fibers on metabolomic flux remain unclear. We herein showed enhancing effects of a soluble resistant maltodextrin (RM) on glucose homeostasis in mouse metabolic disease models. Remarkably, fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) caused pronounced and time-dependent improvement in glucose tolerance in RM recipient mice, indicating a causal relationship between microbial remodeling and metabolic efficacy. Microbial 16S sequencing revealed transmissible taxonomic changes correlated with improved metabolism, notably enrichment of probiotics and reduction of Alistipes and Bacteroides known to associate with high fat/protein diets. Metabolomic profiling further illustrated broad changes, including enrichment of phenylpropionates and decreases in key intermediates of glucose utilization, cholesterol biosynthesis and amino acid fermentation. These studies elucidate beneficial roles of RM-dependent microbial remodeling in metabolic homeostasis, and showcase prevalent health-promoting potentials of dietary fibers. PMID:26040234

  11. Transmissible microbial and metabolomic remodeling by soluble dietary fiber improves metabolic homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    He, Baokun; Nohara, Kazunari; Ajami, Nadim J.; Michalek, Ryan D.; Tian, Xiangjun; Wong, Matthew; Losee-Olson, Susan H.; Petrosino, Joseph F.; Yoo, Seung-Hee; Shimomura, Kazuhiro; Chen, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Dietary fibers are increasingly appreciated as beneficial nutritional components. However, a requisite role of gut microbiota in fiber function and the overall impact of fibers on metabolomic flux remain unclear. We herein showed enhancing effects of a soluble resistant maltodextrin (RM) on glucose homeostasis in mouse metabolic disease models. Remarkably, fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) caused pronounced and time-dependent improvement in glucose tolerance in RM recipient mice, indicating a causal relationship between microbial remodeling and metabolic efficacy. Microbial 16S sequencing revealed transmissible taxonomic changes correlated with improved metabolism, notably enrichment of probiotics and reduction of Alistipes and Bacteroides known to associate with high fat/protein diets. Metabolomic profiling further illustrated broad changes, including enrichment of phenylpropionates and decreases in key intermediates of glucose utilization, cholesterol biosynthesis and amino acid fermentation. These studies elucidate beneficial roles of RM-dependent microbial remodeling in metabolic homeostasis, and showcase prevalent health-promoting potentials of dietary fibers. PMID:26040234

  12. Utilization of Food Processing By-products as Dietary, Functional, and Novel Fiber: A Review.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Satish Kumar; Bansal, Sangita; Mangal, Manisha; Dixit, Anil Kumar; Gupta, Ram K; Mangal, A K

    2016-07-26

    Fast growing food processing industry in most countries across the world, generates huge quantity of by-products, including pomace, hull, husk, pods, peel, shells, seeds, stems, stalks, bran, washings, pulp refuse, press cakes, etc., which have less use and create considerable environmental pollution. With growing interest in health promoting functional foods, the demand of natural bioactives has increased and exploration for new sources is on the way. Many of the food processing industrial by-products are rich sources of dietary, functional, and novel fibers. These by-products can be directly (or after certain modifications for isolation or purification of fiber) used for the manufacture of various foods, i.e. bread, buns, cake, pasta, noodles, biscuit, ice creams, yogurts, cheese, beverages, milk shakes, instant breakfasts, ice tea, juices, sports drinks, wine, powdered drink, fermented milk products, meat products and meat analogues, synthetic meat, etc. A comprehensive literature survey has been carried on this topic to give an overview in the field dietary fiber from food by-products. In this article, the developments in the definition of fiber, fiber classification, potential sources of dietary fibers in food processing by-products, their uses, functional properties, caloric content, energy values and the labelling regulations have been discussed. PMID:25748244

  13. Dietary fiber intake and risk of breast cancer by menopausal and estrogen receptor status

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qian; Holford, Theodore R.; Zhang, Yawei; Boyle, Peter; Mayne, Susan T.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Evaluate the hypothesis that relation of breast cancer associated with dietary fiber intakes varies by type of fiber, menopausal, and the tumor’s hormone receptor status. Methods A case-control study of female breast cancer was conducted in Connecticut. A total of 557 incident breast cancer cases and 536 age frequency-matched controls were included in the analysis. Information on dietary intakes was collected through in-person interviews with a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire and was converted into nutrient intakes. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by unconditional logistic regression. Results Among pre-menopausal women, higher intake of soluble fiber (highest versus lowest quartile of intake) was associated with a significantly reduced risk of breast cancer (OR = 0.38, 95% CI, 0.15–0.97, Ptrend = 0.08). When further restricted to pre-menopausal women with ER− tumors, the adjusted OR for the highest quartile of intake was 0.15 (95% CI, 0.03–0.69, Ptrend = 0.02) for soluble fiber intake. Among post-menopausal women, no reduced risk of breast cancer was observed for either soluble or insoluble fiber intakes or among ER+ or ER− tumor groups. Conclusions The results from this study show that dietary soluble fiber intake is associated with a significantly reduced risk of ER− breast cancer among pre-menopausal women. Additional studies with larger sample size are needed to confirm these results. PMID:22350922

  14. Effect of dietary protein and iron on the fractional turnover rate of rat liver xanthine oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Cherry, D.M.; Amy, N.K.

    1987-12-01

    Rat liver xanthine oxidase activity is regulated in response to dietary protein and iron. To investigate whether the change in activity was mediated by a change in the rate of protein degradation, we measured the fractional turnover rate using the double-isotope technique with (/sup 3/H)- and (/sup 14/C)leucine and calculated the apparent half-life of xanthine oxidase in rats fed diets containing either 20 or 5% casein with either 35 or 5 mg iron/kg diet. Under control conditions, xanthine oxidase had an apparent half-life of 4.8 d and approximately 65% of the enzyme subunits were active. Rats fed diets with low dietary protein had lower xanthine oxidase activity, but the enzyme had a slower fractional turnover rate, resulting in an apparent half-life of 6.4 d, and only 15-20% of the enzyme was active. The apparent half-life of xanthine oxidase increased to 7.5 d in rats fed diets with low dietary iron, but dietary iron did not affect the specific activity of the enzyme or the percentage of active subunits. These results suggest that the loss of enzyme activity is not due to loss of enzyme protein by increased degradation, but rather to inactivation of the enzyme.

  15. Dietary Fiber Future Directions: Integrating New Definitions and Findings to Inform Nutrition Research and Communication12

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Julie Miller

    2013-01-01

    The CODEX Alimentarius definition of dietary fiber includes all nondigestible carbohydrate polymers with a degree of polymerization of 3 or more as dietary fiber with the proviso that they show health benefits. The global definition, if accepted by all authoritative bodies, offers a chance for international harmonization in research, food composition tables, and food labeling. Its nonacceptance highlights problems that may develop when definitions vary by region. The definition requires that the research community agrees upon physiological effects for which there is substantial scientific agreement, e.g., fibers’ effects on laxation and gut health, on attenuating blood lipids and blood glucose and insulin, and in promoting fermentation in the large bowel. The definition also necessitates the delineation of research protocols to prove the benefits of various isolated and synthesized fibers. These should emanate from evidence-based reviews that fairly weigh epidemiological data while considering that added fibers are not reflected in many food composition databases. They then should include well-controlled, randomized, control trials and utilize animal studies to determine mechanisms. Agreement on many study variables such as the type of subject and the type of baseline diet that best fits the question under investigation will also be needed. Finally, the definition establishes that all types of fiber can address the severe fiber consumption gap that exists throughout the world by recognizing that the combination of fiber-rich and -fortified foods increases fiber intake while allowing consumers to stay within allowed energy levels. PMID:23319118

  16. Dietary fibre fractions in cereal foods measured by a new integrated AOAC method.

    PubMed

    Hollmann, Juergen; Themeier, Heinz; Neese, Ursula; Lindhauer, Meinolf G

    2013-10-01

    The reliable determination of soluble, insoluble and total dietary fibre in baked goods and cereal flours is an important issue for research, nutritional labelling and marketing. We compared total dietary fibre (TDF) contents of selected cereal based foods determined by AOAC Method 991.43 and the new AOAC Method 2009.01. Fifteen bread and bakery products were included in the study. Our results showed that TDF values of cereal products determined by AOAC Method 2009.01 were always significantly higher than those determined by AOAC Method 991.43. This was explained by the inclusion of low molecular weight soluble fibre fractions and resistant starch fractions in the TDF measurement by AOAC 2009.01. This documents that nutritional labelling of cereal products poses the challenge how to update TDF data in nutrient databases in a reasonable time with an acceptable expenditure. PMID:23601411

  17. Molecular weight distribution of soluble fiber fractions and short chain fatty acids in ileal digesta of growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Ivarsson, E; Andersson, R; Lindberg, J E

    2012-12-01

    The effect of dietary fiber source on molecular weight (MW) distribution of soluble fiber fractions and short chain fatty acids (SCFA) in ileal digesta of 7 post valve T-cecum (PVTC) cannulated growing pigs was studied. Pigs were fed semisynthetic diets with sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) pulp (SBP) or chicory (Cichorium intybus) forage (CFO) as fiber sources of which the soluble nonstarch polysaccharide (NSP) fraction originated mainly from pectin. Three MW intervals were selected-large MW (MWL): 10,000,000 to 1,000,000 g/mol, medium MW (MWM): 1,000,000 to 200,000 g/mol, and small MW (MWS): 200,000 to 10,000 g/mol-and the relative distribution (% of total) of molecules in each interval was calculated. The MWM fraction was higher (P < 0.05) in ileal digesta of pigs fed diet SBP and the MWS fraction was higher (P < 0.05) in ileal digesta of pigs fed diet CFO. The mole/100 mole of propionic acid (HPr) was higher (P < 0.010) in pigs fed diet SBP whereas pigs fed diet CFO had higher (P < 0.010) mole/100 mole of acetic acid (HAc). The proportion of the MWL and MWM fractions in ileal digesta were negatively correlated to HAc (r = -0.52, P = 0.05, and r = -0.62, P = 0.02, respectively). The proportion of MWM in ileal digesta was positively correlated to HPr (r = 0.83; P = 0.001) whereas MWS and HPr were negatively correlated (r = -0.76; P = 0.002). In conclusion, the bacterial degradation of the soluble NSP fraction is selective and MW distribution may explain differences in SCFA production. PMID:23365284

  18. [The estimation of several dietary fibers possibility to absorb in vitro vitamins A, E, C, B1 and B2].

    PubMed

    Beketova, N A; Vrzhesdinskaia, O A; Kosheleva, O V; Pereverzeva, O G; Isaeva, V A; Rudoĭ, B A; Dikovskiĭ, A V; Kodentsova, V M

    2010-01-01

    The estimation of several dietary fibers (lignins, wheat bran, microcrystalline cellulose) possibility to absorb vitamins from the solution containing simultaneously ten vitamins in vitro model (gastroenteric transit imitation) has been made. Fiber apparent capability to absorb retinol palmitate, alpha-tocopherol acetate, ascorbic acid, thiamine hydrochloride and riboflavin phosphate has been determined. It has been demonstrated that dietary fibers are able to decrease vitamins availability. PMID:20560485

  19. NEAR-INFRARED TRANSMISSION AND REFLECTANCE SPECTROSCOPY FOR DETERMINATION OF DIETARY FIBER IN BARLEY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Near-infrared (NIR) transmission and reflectance spectroscopy were investigated as rapid screening tools to evaluate the total dietary fiber content of barley. The Foss Grainspec Rice Analyzer and the NIR Systems 6500 monochromator were used to obtain transmission and reflectance spectra, respectiv...

  20. MEASUREMENT OF TOTAL DIETARY FIBER IN MILLED BARLEY USING NEAR-INFRARED TRANSMITTANCE SPECTROSCOPY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whole-grain milled barley (n=56) was scanned using a near-infrared transmittance spectroscopy (NIT)(850-1048nm) and total dietary fiber (TDF) was determined for each cultivar by AOAC enzymatic-gravimetric method (Method 991.43). The validation statistics of PLS models using calibration (n=28) and v...

  1. SINAPATE DEHYDRODIMERS AND SINAPALE-FERULATE HETERODIMERS IN CEREAL DIETARY FIBER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two 8 8-coupled sinapic acid dehydrodimers have been identified as saponification products from different insoluble and soluble cereal grain dietary fibers. The two 8-8-isomers were authenticated by comparison of their GLC retention times and mass spectra with authentic dehydrodimers synthesized fro...

  2. Dietary Supplements and Health Aids - A Critical Evaluation Part 2 - Macronutrients and Fiber.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubick, Michael A.

    1983-01-01

    Part 1 of this evaluation of dietary supplements and health aids (SE 533 788) focused on various therapeutic claims made for vitamins and minerals. This part examines health-promoting claims made for selected macronutrients and fiber. Macronutrients examined include selected proteins, amino acids, enzymes, carbohydrates, and lipids. (JN)

  3. Near-infrared transmission and reflectance spectroscopy for the measurement of dietary fiber in barley

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Near-infrared (NIR) transmission and reflectance spectroscopy were investigated as rapid screening tools to evaluate the total dietary fiber content of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) cultivars. A Foss Grainspec Rice Analyzer and an NIR Systems 6500 spectrometer were used to obtain transmission and ref...

  4. Symptoms associated with dietary fiber supplementation over time in individuals with fecal incontinence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to compare the severity of adverse gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms during supplementation with dietary fiber or placebo over time in adults with fecal incontinence. Secondary aims were to determine the relationship between symptom severity and upset and their association...

  5. Including dietary fiber and resistant starch to increase satiety and reduce aggression in gestating sows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The swine industry is under a great deal of pressure to return sows to group housing. However, aggression during mixing of pregnant sows impacts sow welfare and productivity. The aim of this study was to increase satiety and reduce aggression by including dietary fiber and fermentable carbohydrate. ...

  6. NMR CHARACTERIZATION OF LIGNINS ISOLATED FROM FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INSOLUBLE DIETARY FIBER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Compositional information for lignins in food is rare and concentrated on cereal grains and brans. As lignins are suspected to have important health roles in the dietary fiber complex, including as antioxidants and carcinogen adsorbants, and may be partially converted to mammalian lignans, the confu...

  7. Precooked bran-enriched wheat flour using extrusion: dietary fiber profile and sensory characteristics.

    PubMed

    Gajula, H; Alavi, S; Adhikari, K; Herald, T

    2008-05-01

    The effect of precooking by extrusion processing on the dietary fiber profile of wheat flour substituted with 0%, 10%, 20%, and 30% wheat bran was evaluated. Depending on the level of bran, total dietary fiber (TDF) and soluble dietary fiber (SDF) in uncooked flours ranged from 4.2% to 17.2% and 1.5% to 2.4%, respectively. Precooking by extrusion significantly increased SDF in flours (by 22% to 73%); although in most cases it also led to a significant decrease in TDF. Cookies and tortillas produced from uncooked and precooked flours with 0% and 20% substituted bran were evaluated for consumer acceptability using a 9-point hedonic scale. With a few exceptions, all cookies had scores ranging from 6 to 7 ("like slightly" to "like moderately") for each attribute, including overall acceptability, appearance, texture, crumbliness, and flavor. Tortillas were rated for the same attributes except for crumbliness, which was replaced with chewiness. In most cases, tortilla scores ranged from 5 to 7 ("neither like nor dislike" to "like moderately"). Consumer acceptability scores of cookies from uncooked flour did not change significantly with increase in bran substitution from 0% to 20%. However, consumer scores for tortillas did decrease significantly with increase in bran level. Extrusion precooking of the flours did not improve the consumer acceptability of cookies and tortillas; however, it did improve their dietary fiber profile by increasing the SDF significantly. PMID:18460140

  8. Health benefits of finger millet (Eleusine coracana L.) polyphenols and dietary fiber: a review.

    PubMed

    Devi, Palanisamy Bruntha; Vijayabharathi, Rajendran; Sathyabama, Sathyaseelan; Malleshi, Nagappa Gurusiddappa; Priyadarisini, Venkatesan Brindha

    2014-06-01

    The growing public awareness of nutrition and health care research substantiates the potential of phytochemicals such as polyphenols and dietary fiber on their health beneficial properties. Hence, there is in need to identify newer sources of neutraceuticals and other natural and nutritional materials with the desirable functional characteristics. Finger millet (Eleusine coracana), one of the minor cereals, is known for several health benefits and some of the health benefits are attributed to its polyphenol and dietary fiber contents. It is an important staple food in India for people of low income groups. Nutritionally, its importance is well recognised because of its high content of calcium (0.38%), dietary fiber (18%) and phenolic compounds (0.3-3%). They are also recognized for their health beneficial effects, such as anti-diabetic, anti-tumerogenic, atherosclerogenic effects, antioxidant and antimicrobial properties. This review deals with the nature of polyphenols and dietary fiber of finger millet and their role with respect to the health benefits associated with millet. PMID:24876635

  9. Prevention of obesity relatred metabolic diseases by processed foods containing soluble dietary fibers and flavonoids (abstract)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Asians and other non-caucasians are generally more susceptible to obesity related chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Viscous soluble dietary fibers such as cereal beta-glucans and psyllium reduce plasma cholesterol and postprandial glycemia in humans. We have stud...

  10. The Role of Viscosity and Fermentability of Dietary Fibers on Satiety- and Adiposity-Related Hormones in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Natalia; Marquart, Len F.; Gallaher, Daniel D.

    2013-01-01

    Dietary fiber may contribute to satiety. This study examined the effect of two dietary fiber characteristics, small intestinal contents viscosity and large intestinal fermentability, on satiety-and adiposity-related hormones in rats. Diets contained fiber sources that were non-viscous, somewhat viscous, or highly viscous, and either highly fermentable or non-fermentable, in a 2 × 3 factorial design. In the fed state (2 h postprandial), rats fed non-fermentable fibers had significantly greater plasma GLP-1 concentration than fermentable fibers. In the fasted state, among non-fermentable fibers, viscosity had no effect on GLP-1 concentration. However, among fermentable fibers, greater viscosity reduced GLP-1 concentration. Plasma peptide tyrosine tyrosine (PYY) concentrations in the fasted state were not influenced by the fermentability of the fiber overall, however animals consuming a fructooligosaccharide greater PYY concentration. In both the fed and fasted states, rats fed non-fermentable fibers had a significantly lower plasma ghrelin concentration than rats fed fermentable fibers. In the fasted state, rats fed non-fermentable fibers had a significantly lower plasma leptin concentration than rats fed fermentable fibers. Thus, fermentability and viscosity of dietary fiber interacted in complex ways to influence satiety- and adiposity-related plasma hormone concentrations. However, the results suggest that highly viscous, non-fermentable fibers may limit weight gain and reduce adiposity and non-fermentable fibers, regardless of viscosity, may promote meal termination. PMID:23749206

  11. The role of viscosity and fermentability of dietary fibers on satiety- and adiposity-related hormones in rats.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Natalia; Marquart, Len F; Gallaher, Daniel D

    2013-06-01

    Dietary fiber may contribute to satiety. This study examined the effect of two dietary fiber characteristics, small intestinal contents viscosity and large intestinal fermentability, on satiety-and adiposity-related hormones in rats. Diets contained fiber sources that were non-viscous, somewhat viscous, or highly viscous, and either highly fermentable or non-fermentable, in a 2 × 3 factorial design. In the fed state (2 h postprandial), rats fed non-fermentable fibers had significantly greater plasma GLP-1 concentration than fermentable fibers. In the fasted state, among non-fermentable fibers, viscosity had no effect on GLP-1 concentration. However, among fermentable fibers, greater viscosity reduced GLP-1 concentration. Plasma peptide tyrosine tyrosine (PYY) concentrations in the fasted state were not influenced by the fermentability of the fiber overall, however animals consuming a fructooligosaccharide greater PYY concentration. In both the fed and fasted states, rats fed non-fermentable fibers had a significantly lower plasma ghrelin concentration than rats fed fermentable fibers. In the fasted state, rats fed non-fermentable fibers had a significantly lower plasma leptin concentration than rats fed fermentable fibers. Thus, fermentability and viscosity of dietary fiber interacted in complex ways to influence satiety- and adiposity-related plasma hormone concentrations. However, the results suggest that highly viscous, non-fermentable fibers may limit weight gain and reduce adiposity and non-fermentable fibers, regardless of viscosity, may promote meal termination. PMID:23749206

  12. Influence of Hydrocolloids (Dietary Fibers) on Lipid Digestion of Protein-Stabilized Emulsions: Comparison of Neutral, Anionic, and Cationic Polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Qin, Dingkui; Yang, Xiaojun; Gao, Songran; Yao, Junhu; McClements, David Julian

    2016-07-01

    The impact of dietary fibers on lipid digestion within the gastrointestinal tract depends on their molecular and physicochemical properties. In this study, the influence of the electrical characteristics of dietary fibers on their ability to interfere with the digestion of protein-coated lipid droplets was investigated using an in vitro small intestine model. Three dietary fibers were examined: cationic chitosan; anionic alginate; neutral locust bean gum (LBG). The particle size, ζ-potential, microstructure, and apparent viscosity of β-lactoglobulin stabilized oil-in-water emulsions containing different types and levels of dietary fiber were measured before and after lipid digestion. The rate and extent of lipid digestion depended on polysaccharide type and concentration. At relatively low dietary fiber levels (0.1 to 0.2 wt%), the initial lipid digestion rate was only reduced by chitosan, but the final extent of lipid digestion was unaffected by all 3 dietary fibers. At relatively high dietary fiber levels (0.4 wt%), alginate and chitosan significantly inhibited lipid hydrolysis, whereas LBG did not. The impact of chitosan on lipid digestion was attributed to its ability to promote fat droplet aggregation through bridging flocculation, thereby retarding access of the lipase to the droplet surfaces. The influence of alginate was mainly ascribed to its ability to sequester calcium ions and promote depletion flocculation. PMID:27300319

  13. Fiber

    MedlinePlus

    ... short period of time can cause intestinal gas ( flatulence ), bloating , and abdominal cramps . This problem often goes ... 213. National Research Council. Dietary Reference Intakes for Energy, Carbohydrate, Fiber, Fat, Fatty Acids, Cholesterol, Protein, and ...

  14. New Horizons for the Study of Dietary Fiber and Health: A Review.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Stacey; Beck, Eleanor; Salman, Hayfa; Tapsell, Linda

    2016-03-01

    Dietary fibre has been consumed for centuries with known health benefits, but defining dietary fibre is a real challenge. From a functional perspective, dietary fibre is described as supporting laxation, attenuating blood glucose responses and assisting with cholesterol lowering. The problem is different types of dietary fibre have different effects, and new effects are increasingly observed, such as the influence on gut microbiota. Thus, a single definition may need to be described in more generic terms. Rather than being bound by a few functional definitions, we may need to embrace the possibilities of new horizons, and derive a working definition of dietary fibre based on a set of conceptual principles, rather than the limited definitions we have to date. To begin this process, a review of individual fibre types and their physiological effects would be helpful. Dietary fibre is a complex group of substances, and there is a growing interest in specific effects linked to fibre type. Different fractions of dietary fibre have different physiological properties, yet there is a paucity of literature covering the effects of all fibres. This paper describes a range of individual fibre types and identifies gaps in the literature which may expose new directions for a working definition of dietary fibre. PMID:26847187

  15. In Vitro Degradation and Fermentation of Three Dietary Fiber Sources by Human Colonic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bliss, Donna Z.; Weimer, Paul J.; Jung, Hans-Joachim G.; Savik, Kay

    2013-01-01

    Although clinical benefits of dietary fiber supplementation seem to depend partially on the extent of fiber degradation and fermentation by colonic bacteria, little is known about the effect of supplemental fiber type on bacterial metabolism. In an experiment using a non-adapted human bacterial population from three normal subjects, extent of in vitro fermentation was greater for gum arabic (GA) than for psyllium (PSY), which was greater than that for carboxymethylcellulose (CMC). In a separate experiment, in vitro incubation with feces from 52 subjects with fecal incontinence, before and after random assignment to and consumption of one of three fiber (GA, PSY, or CMC) supplements or a placebo for 20-21d, indicated that prior consumption of a specific fiber source did not increase its degradation by fecal bacteria. Results suggest that the colonic microbial community enriched on a particular fiber substrate can rapidly adapt to the presentation of a new fiber substrate. Clinical implications of the findings are that intake of a fiber source by humans is not expected to result in bacterial adaptation that would require continually larger and eventually intolerable amounts of fiber to achieve therapeutic benefits. PMID:23556460

  16. In vitro degradation and fermentation of three dietary fiber sources by human colonic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bliss, Donna Z; Weimer, Paul J; Jung, Hans-Joachim G; Savik, Kay

    2013-05-15

    Although clinical benefits of dietary fiber supplementation seem to depend partially on the extent of fiber degradation and fermentation by colonic bacteria, little is known about the effect of supplemental fiber type on bacterial metabolism. In an experiment using a nonadapted human bacterial population from three normal subjects, the extent of in vitro fermentation was greater for gum arabic (GA) than for psyllium (PSY), which was greater than that for carboxymethylcellulose (CMC). In a separate experiment, in vitro incubation with feces from 52 subjects with fecal incontinence, before and after random assignment to and consumption of one of three fiber (GA, PSY, or CMC) supplements or a placebo for 20-21 days, indicated that prior consumption of a specific fiber source did not increase its degradation by fecal bacteria. Results suggest that the colonic microbial community enriched on a particular fiber substrate can rapidly adapt to the presentation of a new fiber substrate. Clinical implications of the findings are that intake of a fiber source by humans is not expected to result in bacterial adaptation that would require continually larger and eventually intolerable amounts of fiber to achieve therapeutic benefits. PMID:23556460

  17. The Effect of Fiber Strength Stochastics and Local Fiber Volume Fraction on Multiscale Progressive Failure of Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricks, Trenton M.; Lacy, Jr., Thomas E.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    Continuous fiber unidirectional polymer matrix composites (PMCs) can exhibit significant local variations in fiber volume fraction as a result of processing conditions that can lead to further local differences in material properties and failure behavior. In this work, the coupled effects of both local variations in fiber volume fraction and the empirically-based statistical distribution of fiber strengths on the predicted longitudinal modulus and local tensile strength of a unidirectional AS4 carbon fiber/ Hercules 3502 epoxy composite were investigated using the special purpose NASA Micromechanics Analysis Code with Generalized Method of Cells (MAC/GMC); local effective composite properties were obtained by homogenizing the material behavior over repeating units cells (RUCs). The predicted effective longitudinal modulus was relatively insensitive to small (8%) variations in local fiber volume fraction. The composite tensile strength, however, was highly dependent on the local distribution in fiber strengths. The RUC-averaged constitutive response can be used to characterize lower length scale material behavior within a multiscale analysis framework that couples the NASA code FEAMAC and the ABAQUS finite element solver. Such an approach can be effectively used to analyze the progressive failure of PMC structures whose failure initiates at the RUC level. Consideration of the effect of local variations in constituent properties and morphologies on progressive failure of PMCs is a central aspect of the application of Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) principles for composite materials.

  18. Tea Dietary Fiber Improves Serum and Hepatic Lipid Profiles in Mice Fed a High Cholesterol Diet.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wenxin; Shu, Yang; Yang, Xiaoping

    2016-06-01

    Tea dietary fiber (TDF) was prepared from tea residues and modified to get cellulose-modified TDF (CTDF) by cellulase or micronized TDF (MTDF) by ultrafine grinding. The in vitro lipid-binding capacities of the three fibers and their effects on serum and hepatic lipid profiles in mice fed a high cholesterol diet were evaluated. The results showed that the three fibers had excellent lipid-binding capacities, and the cholesterol- and sodium cholate-binding capacities of CTDF and MTDF were significantly higher than those of TDF. Animal studies showed that, compared to model control, the three fibers significantly decreased mice average daily gain, gain: feed, and liver index, reduced total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride, and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol of serum and liver, increased serum and hepatic high density lipoprotein-cholesterol to TC ratio, and promoted the excretion of fecal lipids, and they also significantly increased the activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase of serum and liver, and decreased lipid peroxidation; moreover, the effects of CTDF and MTDF were better than that of TDF. It was concluded that the three fibers could improve serum and hepatic lipid profiles in mice fed a high cholesterol diet and the mechanism of action might be due to the promotion of fecal excretion of lipids through their lipid-binding ability and the inhibition of lipid peroxidation. These findings suggest that tea dietary fiber has the potential to be used as a functional ingredient to control cardiovascular disease. PMID:27040277

  19. Association Between Dietary Fiber and Incident Cases of Colon Polyps: The Adventist Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Tantamango, Yessenia M.; Knutsen, Synnove F.; Beeson, Larry; Fraser, Gary; Sabate, Joan

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Most cases of CRC arise in adenomatous polyps. It has been estimated that 25%–35% of colon adenoma risk could be avoidable by modification of dietary and life-style habits. Methods: We estimated the association between total dietary fiber and fiber intake from fruits, vegetables, and grains, and the risk of physician-diagnosed colon polyps among 2818 men and women who had undergone colonoscopy. Data were drawn from 2 cohort studies—the Adventist Health Study-1 (AHS-1) of 1976 and the Adventist Health Study-2 (AHS-2) conducted from 2002 to 2005. Dietary information was obtained from the self-administered questionnaire from AHS-1, while outcome was assessed from AHS-2 data. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the period risk of incident cases of polyps. Results: A total of 441 incident cases of colon polyps were identified. After adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, physical activity, education, and alcohol and meat consumption, total fiber intake was inversely associated with the risk of colon polyps (odds ratio [OR] for highest vs lowest quartile = 0.71, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.51–0.99). This association showed a dose-response effect (p = .04). Analyses of various sources of fiber showed the most clear effect of fiber from vegetables including legumes (OR for highest vs lowest quartile = 0.65; 95% CI 0.47–0.90; p = .02). Conclusions: In this population comprising a high proportion of vegetarians, persons who consumed low amounts of fiber, especially fiber contained in vegetables, had a higher risk of developing colon polyps. PMID:22295127

  20. Dietary Fiber, Carbohydrate Quality and Quantity, and Mortality Risk of Individuals with Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Koert N. J.; Beulens, Joline W. J.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Sluijs, Ivonne; Spijkerman, Annemieke M. W.; Sluik, Diewertje; Boeing, Heiner; Kaaks, Rudolf; Teucher, Birgit; Dethlefsen, Claus; Overvad, Kim; Tjønneland, Anne; Kyrø, Cecilie; Barricarte, Aurelio; Bendinelli, Benedetta; Krogh, Vittorio; Tumino, Rosario; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Mattiello, Amalia; Nilsson, Peter M.; Orho-Melander, Marju; Rolandsson, Olov; Huerta, José María; Crowe, Francesca; Allen, Naomi; Nöthlings, Ute

    2012-01-01

    Background Dietary fiber, carbohydrate quality and quantity are associated with mortality risk in the general population. Whether this is also the case among diabetes patients is unknown. Objective To assess the associations of dietary fiber, glycemic load, glycemic index, carbohydrate, sugar, and starch intake with mortality risk in individuals with diabetes. Methods This study was a prospective cohort study among 6,192 individuals with confirmed diabetes mellitus (mean age of 57.4 years, and median diabetes duration of 4.4 years at baseline) from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Dietary intake was assessed at baseline (1992–2000) with validated dietary questionnaires. Cox proportional hazards analysis was performed to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, while adjusting for CVD-related, diabetes-related, and nutritional factors. Results During a median follow-up of 9.2 y, 791 deaths were recorded, 306 due to CVD. Dietary fiber was inversely associated with all-cause mortality risk (adjusted HR per SD increase, 0.83 [95% CI, 0.75–0.91]) and CVD mortality risk (0.76[0.64–0.89]). No significant associations were observed for glycemic load, glycemic index, carbohydrate, sugar, or starch. Glycemic load (1.42[1.07–1.88]), carbohydrate (1.67[1.18–2.37]) and sugar intake (1.53[1.12–2.09]) were associated with an increased total mortality risk among normal weight individuals (BMI≤25 kg/m2; 22% of study population) but not among overweight individuals (P interaction≤0.04). These associations became stronger after exclusion of energy misreporters. Conclusions High fiber intake was associated with a decreased mortality risk. High glycemic load, carbohydrate and sugar intake were associated with an increased mortality risk in normal weight individuals with diabetes. PMID:22927948

  1. Relative validity and reproducibility of a food frequency questionnaire to assess dietary fiber intake in Danish adults

    PubMed Central

    Vuholm, Stine; Lorenzen, Janne K.; Kristensen, Mette

    2014-01-01

    Background Differences in habitual dietary fiber intake may modify effects of dietary fiber interventions, thus measurement of habitual dietary fiber intake is relevant to apply in intervention studies on fiber-rich foods, and food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) is a commonly used method. Rye bread is the major contributor of dietary fiber in the Danish population, and a nation-specific FFQ is therefore needed. Objective The aim of this study was to assess the relative validity and reproducibility of a self-administered quantitative FFQ designed to assess total dietary fiber intake among Danish adults. Design In order to assess the relative validity of the FFQ, a total of 125 participants completed both a 7-day weighed dietary recording (DR) and an FFQ consisting of 60 questions. To evaluate the reproducibility of the FFQ, a sub-group of 12 participants subsequently completed an FFQ approximately 6 months later. Results Estimates of mean dietary fiber intake were 24.9±9.8 and 28.1±9.4 g/day when applying the FFQ and DR, respectively, where FFQ estimates were ~12% lower (p<0.001). Pearson's correlation coefficient between the estimated dietary fiber intake of the two methods was r=0.63 (p<0.001), and 62% of the participants were grouped into the same tertile of intake according to the two methods. The estimates of mean dietary intake of first and second FFQ were very similar (22.2±4.0 and 23.3±4.1 g/day, respectively, p=0.42) and showed a correlation of r=0.95 (95% CI 0.83–0.99). Conclusion The developed FFQ showed moderate underestimation of dietary fiber intake (g/day), adequate ranking of subjects according to their dietary fiber intake, and good reproducibility. The FFQ is therefore believed to be a valuable tool for epidemiology and screening in human interventions, where intake of dietary fibers is of specific interest. PMID:25490961

  2. Cost savings of reduced constipation rates attributed to increased dietary fiber intakes: a decision-analytic model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Nearly five percent of Americans suffer from functional constipation, many of whom may benefit from increasing dietary fiber consumption. The annual constipation-related healthcare cost savings associated with increasing intakes may be considerable but have not been examined previously. The objective of the present study was to estimate the economic impact of increased dietary fiber consumption on direct medical costs associated with constipation. Methods Literature searches were conducted to identify nationally representative input parameters for the U.S. population, which included prevalence of functional constipation; current dietary fiber intakes; proportion of the population meeting recommended intakes; and the percentage that would be expected to respond, in terms of alleviation of constipation, to a change in dietary fiber consumption. A dose–response analysis of published data was conducted to estimate the percent reduction in constipation prevalence per 1 g/day increase in dietary fiber intake. Annual direct medical costs for constipation were derived from the literature and updated to U.S. $ 2012. Sensitivity analyses explored the impact on adult vs. pediatric populations and the robustness of the model to each input parameter. Results The base case direct medical cost-savings was $12.7 billion annually among adults. The base case assumed that 3% of men and 6% of women currently met recommended dietary fiber intakes; each 1 g/day increase in dietary fiber intake would lead to a reduction of 1.9% in constipation prevalence; and all adults would increase their dietary fiber intake to recommended levels (mean increase of 9 g/day). Sensitivity analyses, which explored numerous alternatives, found that even if only 50% of the adult population increased dietary fiber intake by 3 g/day, annual medical costs savings exceeded $2 billion. All plausible scenarios resulted in cost savings of at least $1 billion. Conclusions Increasing dietary fiber

  3. Dietary Sources of Fiber Intake and Its Association with Socio-Economic Factors among Flemish Preschool Children

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi; Bolca, Selin; Vandevijvere, Stefanie; De Keyzer, Willem; Van Oyen, Herman; Van Camp, John; De Backer, Guy; De Henauw, Stefaan; Huybrechts, Inge

    2011-01-01

    The objectives were to assess total dietary fiber intake, identify the major sources of dietary fiber, and examine its association with socio-economic factors among Flemish preschoolers. Three-day estimated dietary records were collected from a representative sample of preschoolers 2.5–6.5 years old (n = 661; 338 boys, 323 girls). The mean dietary fiber intake (13.4 g/d) was lower than the intake level recommended by the Belgian Superior Health Council (70% boys and 81% girls below the guidelines). The most important contributor was the group of bread and cereals (29.5%), followed by fruits (17.8%), potatoes and grains (16.0%), energy-dense, low-nutritious foods (12.4%), and vegetables (11.8%). Multiple linear regression analyses showed that total fiber intake was associated with maternal education and parents’ employment. Overall, fiber intakes from high-nutritious foods (vegetables and fruits) were higher in preschoolers of higher educated mothers and those with one or both parents being employed. In conclusion, the majority of the preschoolers had dietary fiber intakes below the recommended level. Hence, dietary fiber should be promoted among parents of preschoolers and low socio-economic status families should be addressed in particular. PMID:21673925

  4. Dietary sources of fiber intake and its association with socio-economic factors among Flemish preschool children.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi; Bolca, Selin; Vandevijvere, Stefanie; De Keyzer, Willem; Van Oyen, Herman; Van Camp, John; De Backer, Guy; De Henauw, Stefaan; Huybrechts, Inge

    2011-01-01

    The objectives were to assess total dietary fiber intake, identify the major sources of dietary fiber, and examine its association with socio-economic factors among Flemish preschoolers. Three-day estimated dietary records were collected from a representative sample of preschoolers 2.5-6.5 years old (n = 661; 338 boys, 323 girls). The mean dietary fiber intake (13.4 g/d) was lower than the intake level recommended by the Belgian Superior Health Council (70% boys and 81% girls below the guidelines). The most important contributor was the group of bread and cereals (29.5%), followed by fruits (17.8%), potatoes and grains (16.0%), energy-dense, low-nutritious foods (12.4%), and vegetables (11.8%). Multiple linear regression analyses showed that total fiber intake was associated with maternal education and parents' employment. Overall, fiber intakes from high-nutritious foods (vegetables and fruits) were higher in preschoolers of higher educated mothers and those with one or both parents being employed. In conclusion, the majority of the preschoolers had dietary fiber intakes below the recommended level. Hence, dietary fiber should be promoted among parents of preschoolers and low socio-economic status families should be addressed in particular. PMID:21673925

  5. The coupled effect of fiber volume fraction and void fraction on hydraulic fluid absorption of quartz/BMI laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurdelbrink, Keith R.; Anderson, Jacob P.; Siddique, Zahed; Altan, M. Cengiz

    2016-03-01

    Bismaleimide (BMI) resin with quartz (AQ581) fiber reinforcement is a composite material frequently used in aerospace applications, such as engine cowlings and radomes. Various composite components used in aircrafts are exposed to different types of hydraulic fluids, which may lead to anomalous absorption behavior over the service life of the composite. Accurate predictive models for absorption of liquid penetrants are particularly important as the composite components are often exposed to long-term degradation due to absorbed moisture, hydraulic fluids, or similar liquid penetrants. Microstructural features such as fiber volume fraction and void fraction can have a significant effect on the absorption behavior of fiber-reinforced composites. In this paper, hydraulic fluid absorption characteristics of quartz/BMI laminates fabricated from prepregs preconditioned at different relative humidity and subsequently cured at different pressures are presented. The composite samples are immersed into hydraulic fluid at room temperature, and were not subjected to any prior degradation. To generate process-induced microvoids, prepregs were conditioned in an environmental chamber at 2% or 99% relative humidity at room temperature for a period of 24 hours prior to laminate fabrication. To alter the fiber volume fraction, the laminates were fabricated at cure pressures of 68.9 kPa (10 psi) or 482.6 kPa (70 psi) via a hot-press. The laminates are shown to have different levels of microvoids and fiber volume fractions, which were observed to affect the absorption dynamics considerably and exhibited clear non-Fickian behavior. A one-dimensional hindered diffusion model (HDM) was shown to be successful in predicting the hydraulic fluid absorption. Model prediction indicates that as the fabrication pressure increased from 68.9 kPa to 482.6 kPa, the maximum fluid content (M∞) decreased from 8.0% wt. to 1.0% wt. The degree of non-Fickian behavior, measured by hindrance coefficient (

  6. Dietary fiber and satiety: the effects of oats on satiety.

    PubMed

    Rebello, Candida J; O'Neil, Carol E; Greenway, Frank L

    2016-02-01

    This review examines the effect of β-glucan, the viscous soluble fiber in oats, on satiety. A literature search for studies that examined delivery of the fiber in whole foods or as an extract was conducted. Viscosity interferes with the peristaltic mixing process in the small intestine to impede digestion and absorption of nutrients, which precipitates satiety signals. From measurements of the physicochemical and rheological properties of β-glucan, it appears that viscosity plays a key role in modulating satiety. However, the lack of standardized methods to measure viscosity and the inherent nature of appetite make it difficult to pinpoint the reasons for inconsistent results of the effects of oats on satiety. Nevertheless, the majority of the evidence suggests that oat β-glucan has a positive effect on perceptions of satiety. PMID:26724486

  7. Effects of soluble dietary fibers on lipid metabolism and activities of intestinal disaccharidases in rats.

    PubMed

    Choi, Y S; Cho, S H; Kim, H J; Lee, H J

    1998-10-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the effects of indigestible dextrin and polydextrose, soluble dietary fibers with low molecular weight, on lipid metabolism and disaccharidase activities of intestinal mucosa in rats fed a high sucrose diet. Their effects were compared with those of well-known soluble fibers, pectin, and guar gum, and also with an insoluble fiber, cellulose. Dietary fibers added to diets at the 5% (w/w) level were alpha-cellulose, pectin, guar gum, indigestible dextrin, and polydextrose. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given free access to test diets for 6 weeks. Body weight gain was the lowest in rats fed guar gum, the highest in rats fed cellulose, and in-between in rats fed other diets. Although guar gum, pectin, and indigestible feeding dextrin had lower plasma lipid values than cellulose feeding did, the differences were statistically insignificant. Liver triglyceride of the guar gum-fed group was about a third that of the cellulose-fed group, but although those of rats fed polydextrose, indigestible dextrin, and pectin were lower than that of cellulose, the differences were insignificant. Liver cholesterol and phospholipid concentrations were similar among groups. Daily fecal excretion of total lipid, cholesterol, and bile acids were highest in rats fed guar gum, followed by pectin-fed and cellulose-fed rats, and the lowest in rats fed indigestible dextrin and polydextrose. Jejunal sucrase activity was low in the order of guar-gum, polydextrose, indigestible dextrin, pectin, and cellulose. The results indicate that the hypolipidemic effect of soluble dietary fibers would be lessened with reduction in molecular weight, but that the lower sucrase activity by soluble fibers with low molecular weight might be beneficial for hypoglycemic effect. PMID:9919480

  8. Symptoms Associated with Dietary Fiber Supplementation over Time in Individuals with Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Bliss, Donna Z.; Savik, Kay; Jung, Hans-Joachim G.; Whitebird, Robin; Lowry, Ann

    2011-01-01

    Background Knowledge about adverse symptoms over time from fiber supplementation is lacking. Purpose To compare the severity of adverse gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms during supplementation with dietary fiber or placebo over time in adults with fecal incontinence. Secondary aims were to determine the relationship between symptom severity and emotional upset and their association with study attrition and reducing fiber dose. Methods Subjects (N=189, 77% female, 92% white, (age = 58 years, SD = 14) with fecal incontinence were randomly assigned to placebo or a supplement of 16g total dietary fiber/day from one of three sources: gum arabic, psyllium, or carboxymethylcellulose. They reported GI symptoms daily during baseline (14 days), incremental fiber dosing (6 days), and two segments of steady full fiber dose (32 days total). Results Severity of symptoms in all groups was minimal. Adjusting for study segment and day, a greater feeling of fullness in the psyllium group was the only symptom that differed from symptoms in the placebo group. Odds of having greater severity of flatus, belching, fullness, and bloating were 1.2–2.0 times greater in the steady dose segment compared to baseline. There was a positive association between symptom severity and emotional upset. Subjects with a greater feeling of fullness or bloating or higher scores for total symptom severity or emotional upset were more likely to withdraw from the study sooner or reduce fiber dose. Conclusions Persons with fecal incontinence experience a variety of GI symptoms over time. Symptom severity and emotional upset appear to influence fiber tolerance and study attrition. Supplements seemed well tolerated. PMID:21543963

  9. Intestinal absorption of dietary cadmium in women depends on body iron stores and fiber intake.

    PubMed Central

    Berglund, M; Akesson, A; Nermell, B; Vahter, M

    1994-01-01

    Measurements of intake and uptake of cadmium in relation to diet composition were carried out in 57 nonsmoking women, 20-50 years of age. A vegetarian/high-fiber diet and a mixed-diet group were constructed based on results from a food frequency questionnaire. Duplicate diets and the corresponding feces were collected during 4 consecutive days in parallel with dietary recording of type and amount of food ingested for determination of the dietary intake of cadmium and various nutrients. Blood and 24-hr urine samples were collected for determination of cadmium, hemoglobin, ferritin, and zinc. There were no differences in the intake of nutrients between the mixed-diet and the high-fiber diet groups, except for a significantly higher intake of fiber (p < 0.001) and cadmium (p < 0.002) in the high-fiber group. Fecal cadmium corresponded to 98% in the mixed-diet group and 100% in the high-fiber diet group. No differences in blood cadmium (BCd) or urinary cadmium (UCd) between groups could be detected. There was a tendency toward higher BCd and UCd concentrations with increasing fiber intake; however, the concentrations were not statistically significant at the 5% level, indicating an inhibitory effect of fiber on the gastrointestinal absorption of cadmium. Sixty-seven percent of the women had serum ferritin < 30 micrograms/l, indicating reduced body iron stores, which were highly associated with higher BCd (irrespective of fiber intake). BCd was mainly correlated with UCd, serum ferritin, age, anf fibre intake. UCd and serum ferritin explained almost 60% of the variation in BCd.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. A Figure 3. B Figure 4. Figure 5. PMID:7713018

  10. Effects of purified dietary fiber sources on beta-carotene utilization by the chick.

    PubMed

    Erdman, J W; Fahey, G C; White, C B

    1986-12-01

    Effects of various purified dietary fiber components on beta-carotene utilization by the chick were investigated in two experiments (expt.). Eight-day-old Columbian X New Hampshire male (expt. 1) or female (expt. 2) chicks were fed a vitamin A-deficient diet for 1 wk and then fed beta-carotene-supplemented diets containing 0% fiber, 7% arenaceous flour or 7% of a purified fiber source for 4 wk. Results of expt. 1 showed that hemicellulose, lignin and citrus pectin, but not arenaceous flour or polygalacturonic acid, depressed beta-carotene utilization by the chick, as measured by percentage of consumed beta-carotene stored in liver as vitamin A relative to the 0% fiber control. In expt. 2, effects of the methoxyl content of pectin were studied. High and medium methoxyl apple pectin, citrus pectin and polygalacturonic acid reduced storage of vitamin A in liver. Low methoxyl apple pectin had no significant effect on beta-carotene utilization. Thus, several purified forms of dietary fiber significantly reduced beta-carotene utilization by chicks when fed at the 7% supplementary level. Moreover, with pectin, there was an inverse relationship between methoxyl content of pectin and beta-carotene utilization. PMID:3027282

  11. Solid state NMR study of dietary fiber powders from aronia, bilberry, black currant and apple.

    PubMed

    Wawer, I; Wolniak, M; Paradowska, K

    2006-09-01

    13C CPMAS NMR spectra of dietary fiber powders from aronia (chokeberry), bilberry, black currant and apple were recorded. The spectra are complex owing to superposition of resonances from different polysaccharides and polyphenolic compounds. Standard, dipolar dephased and the TH(1rho) partially relaxed spectra enabled the identification of several constituents: microcrystalline cellulose, pectins, lignins, cutin-like polymers and condensed tannins. The fiber powders obtained from berries contain significant amounts of anthocyanins, as indicated by their dark violet color, but not verified by chemical shifts. The anthocyanin-rich extract from aronia berries and its major components, cyanidin-3-O-galactoside and (-)epicatechin were also studied. PMID:16750905

  12. Dietary fiber's benefit for gallstone disease prevention during rapid weight loss in obese patients.

    PubMed

    Sulaberidze, G; Okujava, M; Liluashvili, K; Tughushi, M; Bezarashvili, S

    2014-06-01

    The aim of present study was to compare the effects of very low calorie diets - protein rich and dietary fiber rich food based - on gallstones formation during rapid weight loss. 68 patients were involved into the study. The body weight index in all cases exceeding normal value and equaled to 35±4,7 kg/m2. For weight correction purposes during 5 weeks the patients in first group were kept on a 520-800 kcal diet of "Margi" food products, prepared according our technology, and in the second group on a protein rich diet of the same calorie content. The body weight and changes in the gall-bladder wall and content were assessed by sonography before starting the diet, after three weeks from the commencement of the diet and upon its completion. The measurement of the body weight after completion of the 5 week diet revealed decrease by 10.9±1,5kg in the first group and by 11,2±1,1kg in the second group. Sonography disclosed growth in the amount of biliary sludge in 3 cases in the first group and in 9 cases in the second group. The statistical analyses of results indicate successful and nearly equal reduction of body weight by means of dietary fiber rich and protein rich diet, but high fiber consumption showed statistically significant benefits for prevention of biliary slug accumulation. The study showed that, in the respect to weight loss, diets based on fiber rich and protein rich food are equal, but fiber rich diet has considerable privilege in prevention of gallstone disease. Our findings support the presence of known association between increased dietary fiber consumption and reduction of gallstone formation. Obesity and rapid weight loss are risk factors for development of gallstones. Taking in an account the beneficial effect of dietary fiber, the food rich with this nutrient, particularly low-calorie fiber rich food "Margi", can be recommended for rapid weight loss in obese patients. PMID:25020181

  13. Florets of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.): potential new sources of dietary fiber and phenolic acids.

    PubMed

    Liang, Qiang; Cui, Jun; Li, Hang; Liu, Jia; Zhao, Guohua

    2013-04-10

    Ray florets (Rf) and disc florets (Df) are agricultural byproducts of sunflower seeds. Their nutrition-related compounds were determined. The dietary fiber contents in Rf and Df were 42.90 mg/100 g and 58.97 mg/100 g. In both florets, palmitic, linoleic, and linolenic acids were identified as the three most abundant fatty acids, and the saturated ones constitute approximately two-thirds (w/w) of the total fatty acids. Lysine was the limiting amino acid in both florets by World Health Organization standards. Sixteen phenolic compounds, nine free and eight bound, mainly depsides, were identified in florets by RP-HPLC-DAD/ESI-TOF-MS. The free and bound phenolic compounds in Df were higher than in Rf. 1,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid was the predominant free phenolic compound in both florets. The present study revealed that the florets of sunflower are rich sources of dietary fiber, Fe, and phenols. PMID:23510166

  14. Physicochemical and Functional Properties of Insoluble Dietary Fiber Isolated from Bambara Groundnut (Vigna subterranea [L.] Verdc.).

    PubMed

    Diedericks, Claudine F; Jideani, Victoria A

    2015-09-01

    Bambara groundnut (BGN) is a widely cultivated legume with a rich nutritional profile, yet despite its many benefits it still remains underutilized. To highlight its potential value, 4 BGN varieties-brown, red, black eye, and brown eye were subjected to sequential enzymatic treatments followed by centrifugation to obtain the insoluble dietary fiber (IDF) fraction. The IDFs were vacuum-dried and evaluated for color, hydration properties, fat absorption, polyphenolic compounds, neutral sugars, and uronic acids. An optimized white bread formulation was also determined using brown BGN-IDF in an optimal (IV) mixture design. Three mixture components constrained at lower and upper limits (water: 57% to 60%, yeast: 2.3% to 5.3%, and BGN-IDF: 7% to 10%) were evaluated for their effects on responses of specific loaf volume, gumminess, chewiness, and resilience of the loaves. All BGN-IDFs differed significantly (P ≤ 0.05) across all color parameters. Polyphenols were significantly (P ≤ 0.05) highest in red and brown BGN-IDFs. Arabinose/galactose (31.04% to 37.12%), xylose (16.53% to 27.30%), and mannose (14.48% to 22.24%) were the major sugars identified. Swelling capacity was significantly (P ≤ 0.05) highest for brown eye BGN-IDF (7.72 ± 0.49 mL/g). Water retention capacity ranged from 1.63 to 2.01 g water/g dry weight. Fat absorption for red BGN-IDF differed significantly (P ≤ 0.05). Furthermore, the best optimal white bread formulation enriched with brown BGN-IDF was established with numerical optimization at 59.5% water, 4.3% yeast, and 8.5% BGN-IDF. Overall positive physicochemical and functional properties were observed for BGN-IDFs, and it was shown that an optimal white bread enriched with BGN-IDF could be produced. PMID:26256094

  15. Binding of water, oil, and bile acids to dietary fibers of the cellan type.

    PubMed

    Dongowski, G; Ehwald, R

    1999-01-01

    Dietary fibers (DF) of the "cellan" type (consisting mainly or exclusively of undestroyed cells) were prepared as ethanol-dried materials from apple, cabbage, sugar-beet, soybean hulls, wheat bran, and suspension cultures of Chenopodium album L. and investigated with respect to their interactions with water, water-oil dispersions, bile acids, and oil. Water binding and retention capacities were found to be especially high in cellans obtained from thin-walled raw material. Water damp sorption by dry cellans, when analyzed according to the GAB and BET equations, shows a considerable fraction of monolayer water. At a water activity of 0.98, the cell and capillary spaces outside the walls remained in the air-filled state but the cell wall pores are filled with water. When the water content of a concentrated aqueous cellan suspension was equal to or below the water binding capacity, its rheological behavior was found to be of pseudoplastic nature. At a given dry weight concentration, yield stress and viscosity of such concentrated suspensions were highest for cellans with the highest water binding capacity. Dry cellan particles absorbed fatty oils without swelling but swell in a detergent-stabilized oil/water emulsion with a similar liquid absorption capacity as in water. In contrast to the dry or alkane-saturated cell wall, the hydrated wall is not permeable to oils in the absence of a detergent. Oil droplets may be entrapped within the cells, yielding a stable dispersion of oil in water. As DF of the cellan type absorb bile acids, preferentially glycoconjugates, from diluted solutions, they may have a potential to decrease the serum cholesterol level. PMID:10194401

  16. Dietary protein intake impacts human skeletal muscle protein fractional synthetic rates after endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Bolster, Douglas R; Pikosky, Matthew A; Gaine, P Courtney; Martin, William; Wolfe, Robert R; Tipton, Kevin D; Maclean, David; Maresh, Carl M; Rodriguez, Nancy R

    2005-10-01

    This investigation evaluated the physiological impact of different dietary protein intakes on skeletal muscle protein synthesis postexercise in endurance runners. Five endurance-trained, male runners participated in a randomized, crossover design diet intervention, where they consumed either a low (0.8 g/kg; LP)-, moderate (1.8 g/kg; MP)-, or high (3.6 g/kg; HP)-protein diet for 4 wk. Diets were designed to be eucaloric with carbohydrate, fat, and protein approximating 60, 30, and 10%; 55, 30, and 15%; and 40, 30, and 30% for LP, MP, and HP, respectively. Substrate oxidation was assessed via indirect calorimetry at 3 wk of the dietary interventions. Mixed-muscle protein fractional synthetic rate (FSR) was measured after an endurance run (75 min at 70% V(O2 peak)) using a primed, continuous infusion of [(2)H(5)]phenylalanine. Protein oxidation increased with increasing protein intake, with each trial being significantly different from the other (P < 0.01). FSR after exercise was significantly greater for LP (0.083%/h) and MP (0.078%/h) than for HP (0.052%/h; P < 0.05). There was no difference in FSR between LP and MP. This is the first investigation to establish that habitual dietary protein intake in humans modulates skeletal muscle protein synthesis after an endurance exercise bout. Future studies directed at mechanisms by which level of protein intake influences skeletal muscle turnover are needed. PMID:15914508

  17. Quantification of the fate of dietary fiber in humans by a newly developed radiolabeled fiber marker

    SciTech Connect

    Carryer, P.W.; Brown, M.I.; Malagelada, J.R.; Carlson, G.L.; McCall, J.T.

    1982-06-01

    A radiolabeled cellulose (/sup 131/I-fiber) that retains the essential physical and chemical properties of this class of fiber was developed in our laboratory. Researchers quantified the fate of orally ingested /sup 131/I-fiber in healthy individuals by external gamma camera monitoring and fecal collections. The marker passes virtually intact through the human gastrointestinal tract with negligible release and absorption of the label in the gut. Comparison of the gastric emptying rate of /sup 131/I-fiber with that of a predominantly aqueous marker, /sup 99/mTc-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (/sup 99/mTc-DTPA), showed that /sup 131/I-fiber strands were evacuated more slowly than intragastric fluids. An important finding was that some /sup 131/I-fiber emptying occurred during most time periods, even before liquids were completely evacuated. This suggests that the human stomach is able to empty simultaneously liquids and fiber strands (1-15 mm in length) that are resistant to grinding by antral mechanical forces and to digestion by acid-peptic secretion. Thus, some nondigestible solids may be emptied with the bulk of a meal, although at a slower rate. /sup 131/I-Fiber may be a useful marker for quantifying gastric emptying of nondigestible solids. Further, the stability of /sup 131/I-fiber in the gut, as opposed to most other physiologic solid labels, should enable future investigation of intestinal and colonic transit of fiber, which is an important component of the human diet.

  18. [Effect of dietary fibers on preservation of lipid component in flour confectionery].

    PubMed

    Sidorova, L N; Baĭkov, V G; Bessonov, V V; Skobel'skaia, Z G

    2007-01-01

    Deterioration of bisquit keeping quality is usually caused by oxidation processes changing quality of fats in the composition of buisquits. The oxidation processes are characterized by changing of acidity - and peroxide number. Experimentally shown that the adding of dietary fiber to the formula of butter bisquit results in delaying of the fat oxidation process. This allows to prolong storage period of butter bisquit as compared with bisquits produced according to the traditional formula to 10 days. PMID:17674526

  19. Dietary Fiber Is Positively Associated with Cognitive Control among Prepubertal Children12

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Naiman A; Raine, Lauren B; Drollette, Eric S; Scudder, Mark R; Kramer, Arthur F; Hillman, Charles H

    2015-01-01

    Background: Converging evidence now indicates that aerobic fitness and adiposity are key correlates of childhood cognitive function and brain health. However, the evidence relating dietary intake to executive function/cognitive control remains limited. Objective: The current study assessed cross-sectional associations between performance on an attentional inhibition task and dietary fatty acids (FAs), fiber, and overall diet quality among children aged 7–9 y (n = 65). Methods: Attentional inhibition was assessed by using a modified flanker task. Three-day food records were used to conduct nutrient-level analyses and to calculate diet quality (Healthy Eating Index–2005) scores. Results: Bivariate correlations revealed that socioeconomic status and sex were not related to task performance or diet measures. However, age, intelligence quotient (IQ), pubertal staging, maximal oxygen uptake (V̇O2max), and percentage of fat mass (%fat mass) correlated with task accuracy. Hierarchical regression models were used to determine the relation between diet variables and task accuracy and reaction time across both congruent and incongruent trials of the flanker task. After adjustment of confounding variables (age, IQ, pubertal staging, V̇O2max, and %fat mass), congruent accuracy was positively associated with insoluble fiber (β = 0.26, P = 0.03) and total dietary fiber (β = 0.23, P = 0.05). Incongruent response accuracy was positively associated with insoluble fiber (β = 0.35, P < 0.01), pectins (β = 0.25, P = 0.04), and total dietary fiber (β = 0.32, P < 0.01). Higher diet quality was related to lower accuracy interference (β = −0.26, P = 0.03), whereas higher total FA intake was related to greater accuracy interference (β = 0.24, P = 0.04). No statistically significant associations were observed between diet variables and reaction time measures. Conclusion: These results demonstrate that children’s diet quality, specifically dietary fiber, is an important

  20. Lack of preventive effects of dietary fibers or chlorophyllin against acrylamide toxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Woo, Gye-Hyeong; Shibutani, Makoto; Kuroiwa, Keiko; Lee, Kyoung-Youl; Takahashi, Miwa; Inoue, Kaoru; Fujimoto, Hitoshi; Hirose, Masao

    2007-08-01

    Dietary fibers and chlorophyllin have shown to exert anti-carcinogenic effects against co-administered carcinogens. To test the possibility of chemoprevention by such dietary supplements on subacutely induced acrylamide (ACR) toxicity, Sprague-Dawley male rats were administered 2.5% sodium alginate, 5% glucomannan, 5% digestion resistant maltodextrin, 2.5% chitin or 1% chlorophyllin in the diet, and starting one week later, co-administered 0.02% ACR in the drinking water for 4 weeks. For comparison, untreated control animals given basal diet and tap water were also included. Neurotoxicity was examined with reference to gait abnormalities and by quantitative assessment of histopathological changes in the sciatic and trigeminal nerves, as well as aberrant dot-like immunoreactivity for synaptophysin in the cerebellar molecular layer. Testicular toxicity was assessed by quantitation of seminiferous tubules with exfoliation of germ cells into the lumen and cell debris in the ducts of the epididymides. Development of testicular toxicity as well as neurotoxicity was evident with ACR-treatment, but was not suppressed by dietary addition of fibers or chlorophyllin, suggesting no apparent beneficial influence of these dietary supplements on experimentally induced subacute ACR toxicity. PMID:17391825

  1. Effects of dietary fibers on disturbances clustered in the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Galisteo, Milagros; Duarte, Juan; Zarzuelo, Antonio

    2008-02-01

    Because of its growing prevalence in Western countries, the metabolic syndrome, a common metabolic disorder that clusters a constellation of abnormalities, including central obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance, is emerging as one of the most important public health problems in the world, taking into account that it is a major risk factor mainly for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases, and also for many types of cancer. Although the pathogenesis of this syndrome is complex and not fully understood, obesity and insulin resistance, accompanied by an altered profile of number of hormones and cytokines produced by the adipose tissue, seem to be the main causative agents. A prime therapeutic approach to the prevention and treatment of this syndrome involves lifestyle changes. Among dietary modifications, dietary fiber intake could play an interesting role in the management of metabolic syndrome through different mechanisms related to its dietary sources, specific chemical structure and physical properties, or fermentability in the gut. According to all of these variables, the different types of dietary fibers have been reported to take part in the control of body weight, glucose and lipid homeostasis, insulin sensitivity and in the regulation of many inflammation markers involved in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome, and which are also considered to be among its features. PMID:17618108

  2. The Role of Dietary Fiber in the Bioaccessibility and Bioavailability of Fruit and Vegetable Antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    Palafox-Carlos, Hugo; Ayala-Zavala, Jesús Fernando; González-Aguilar, Gustavo A

    2011-01-01

    Antioxidants are abundant compounds primarily found in fresh fruits and vegetables, and evidence for their role in the prevention of degenerative diseases is continuously emerging. However, the bioaccessibility and bioavailability of each compound differs greatly, and the most abundant antioxidants in ingested fruit are not necessarily those leading to the highest concentrations of active metabolites in target tissues. Fruit antioxidants are commonly mixed with different macromolecules such as carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins to form a food matrix. In fruits and vegetables, carbohydrates are the major compounds found, mainly in free and conjugated forms. Dietary fiber, the indigestible cell wall component of plant material, is considered to play an important role in human diet and health. Most studies on antioxidant bioavailability are focused on foods and beverages from which antioxidants are easily released. There is evidence indicating that food microstructure affects the bioaccessibility and bioavailability of several nutrients, referring mostly to antioxidants. Nevertheless, the specific role of dietary fiber in the absorption of antioxidants has not been widely discussed. In this context, the purpose of the present review is to compile and analyze evidence relating to the association between dietary fiber and antioxidants, and the physical and chemical interactions that modulate their release from the chyme in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:21535705

  3. Dietary fiber information for individuals with Crohn disease: reports of gastrointestinal effects.

    PubMed

    Brotherton, Carol S; Taylor, Ann Gill

    2013-01-01

    The experiences of individuals with Crohn disease before and after receiving dietary fiber information have not been described in the literature. This article offers findings from a study that used four semistructured audiorecorded interviews during a 4-week time period for the purpose of exploring the experiences of 11 individuals before and after receiving dietary fiber information from a healthcare professional. The first and second interviews occurred immediately before and after the presentation of information. Follow-up interviews occurred at 2-week intervals. Thematic analysis of the baseline interviews revealed 2 themes: (a) accepting a redefined (lower expectations) definition of normal quality of life and (b) continuing to look for answers. Three themes emerged from the follow-up interviews at Week 4: (a) reevaluating old diet-related concepts, (b) enjoying a healthier lifestyle at a self-set pace, and (c) enjoying positive physical effects of wheat bran consumption. This article examines the 3rd postintervention theme, "enjoying physical effects of wheat bran consumption." The relevance of this research is that nurses equipped with dietary fiber information may be better able to help some individuals with Crohn disease to explore the potential benefits of a well-rounded nutritious pattern of eating that includes wheat bran cereal. PMID:24084130

  4. Dietary Fiber Information for Individuals with Crohn Disease: Reports of Gastrointestinal Effects

    PubMed Central

    Brotherton, Carol S.; Taylor, Ann Gill

    2013-01-01

    The experiences of individuals with Crohn disease before and after receiving dietary fiber information have not been described in the literature. This article offers findings from a study that used four semi-structured audio recorded interviews during a 4-week time period for the purpose of exploring the experiences of 11 individuals before and after receiving dietary fiber information from a healthcare professional. The first and second interviews occurred immediately before and after the presentation of information. Follow-up interviews occurred at 2-week intervals. Thematic analysis of the baseline interviews revealed two themes: (a) accepting a redefined (lower expectations) definition of normal quality of life, and (b) continuing to look for answers. Three themes emerged from the follow-up interviews at week 4: (a) re-evaluating old diet-related concepts, (b) enjoying a healthier lifestyle at a self-set pace, and (c) enjoying positive physical effects of wheat bran consumption. This paper examines the third post-intervention theme, “enjoying physical effects of wheat bran consumption.” The relevance of this research is that nurses equipped with dietary fiber information may be better able to help some individuals with Crohn disease to explore the potential benefits of a well-rounded nutritious pattern of eating that includes wheat bran cereal. PMID:24084130

  5. Diversity of unavailable polysaccharides and dietary fiber in domesticated nopalito and cactus pear fruit (Opuntia spp.).

    PubMed

    Peña-Valdivia, Cecilia Beatriz; Trejo, Carlos; Arroyo-Peña, V Baruch; Sánchez Urdaneta, Adriana Beatriz; Balois Morales, Rosendo

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify mucilages, pectins, hemicelluloses, and cellulose of nopalitos (edible, as vegetable, young cladodes of flat-stemmed spiny cacti) of most consumed Mexican cultivars, and sweet and acid cactus pear fruits of Opuntia spp. The hypothesis is that, regardless of their unavailable polysaccharides diversity, nopalitos and cactus pear fruits are rich sources of soluble and insoluble dietary fiber. Twelve cultivars of Opuntia spp. were used. Nopalitos had a significant variation in structural polysaccharides among the cultivars: mucilages (from 3.8 to 8.6% dry matter (DM)) averaged near a half of pectins content (from 6.1 to 14.2% DM) and tightly bound hemicelluloses (from 2.2 to 4.7% DM), which were the less abundant polysaccharides, amounted 50% of the loosely bound hemicelluloses (from 4.3 to 10.7% DM). Acid fruits (or 'xoconostle') had significantly higher unavailable polysaccharides content than sweet fruit, and contain similar proportions than nopalitos. Unavailable polysaccharides represent a high proportion of dry tissues of nopalitos and cactus pear fruits, composition of both of these soluble and insoluble polysaccharides (total dietary fiber) widely vary among cultivars without an evident pattern. Nopalitos and cactus pear fruit can be considered an excellent source of dietary fiber. PMID:22899620

  6. The effect of dietary fiber from wheat processing streams on the formation of carboxylic acids and microbiota in the hindgut of rats.

    PubMed

    Haskå, Lina; Andersson, Roger; Nyman, Margareta

    2011-04-13

    Colonic fermentation of dietary fiber produces carboxylic acids and may stimulate the growth of beneficial bacteria. This study investigated how byproducts of wheat processing (distillers' grains and two fractions from the wet fractionation to starch and gluten, one of which was treated with xylanase) affect the composition of the cecal microbiota and the formation of carboxylic acids in rats. Differences were mostly found between diets based on supernatants and pellets, rather than between fiber sources. Cecal pools and levels of most carboxylic acids in portal blood were higher for rats fed the supernatant diets, while cecal pH and ratios of acetic to propionic acid in portal blood were lower. The diet based on supernatant from distillers' grains gave the highest level of bifidobacteria. Molecular weight and solubility are easier to modify with technological processes, which provides an opportunity to optimize these properties in the development of health products. PMID:21391670

  7. Adolescent Dietary Fiber, Vegetable Fat, Vegetable Protein, and Nut Intakes and Breast Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Colditz, Graham A.; Cotterchio, Michelle; Boucher, Beatrice A.; Kreiger, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The importance of early-life exposures in breast cancer development is increasingly recognized. However, limited research has evaluated the relationship between adolescent diet and subsequent risk of breast cancer and reported inconsistent results. This population-based case-control study investigated the associations of dietary fiber, vegetable protein, vegetable fat, and nuts consumed during adolescence with adult breast cancer risk. Methods Women, ages 25–74 years, who were diagnosed with first primary breast cancer between 2002 and 2003 were identified using the Ontario Cancer Registry. Controls were identified through random digit dialing and age-frequency matched to cases. Diet at ages 10–15 was assessed with a 55-item food frequency questionnaire among 2,865 cases and 3,299 controls. Logistic regression was performed to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results Inverse associations were found between intakes of dietary fiber, vegetable protein, vegetable fat, and nuts during adolescence and breast cancer risk, which persisted after controlling for adult intakes. The ORs (95% CI) for the highest versus the lowest quintile of intake were 0.66 (0.55 to 0.78; Ptrend<0.0001) for fiber, 0.80 (0.68 to 0.95; Ptrend=0.01) for vegetable protein, 0.74 (0.63 to 0.87; Ptrend=0.002) for vegetable fat, 0.76 (0.61 to 0.95 for ≥1 serving/day versus <1 serving/month intake; Ptrend=0.04) for nuts. The reduced risk for adolescent intakes of fiber, vegetable protein and nuts was largely limited to postmenopausal women (Pinteraction≤0.05). Conclusions Dietary fiber, vegetable protein, vegetable fat, and nuts consumed during adolescence were associated with reduced breast cancer risk. PMID:24737167

  8. A method to obtain a well-defined fraction of respirable para-aramid fibers.

    PubMed

    Schins, R P; Gaudichet, A; Jaurand, M C

    1993-10-01

    We developed a preparation method to obtain respirable-sized fractions of para-aramid fibers. The procedure, based on floatability, consists of stirring and subsequent settling of p-aramid pulp in distilled water. Two distinct phases are obtained, with small fibers in the upper part of the suspension, which represents about 33% of the total volume. Optimal results were obtained when 2.0 g pulp was stirred for 15 hr in 800 ml distilled water containing 0.125% ethanol and settled for 5 hr. The mass yield ranged between 0.4 and 0.6%, more than 90% of the particles had an aspect ratio > or = 3:1. The mean fiber length was about 6 microns, and the mean fiber diameter was about 0.4 microns as determined by transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The number of fibers obtained was 4 x 10(6) fibers/micrograms under our standard conditions. PMID:8119251

  9. Characterization of soluble dietary fiber from Moringa oleifera seeds and its immunomodulatory effects.

    PubMed

    Anudeep, Sandanamudi; Prasanna, Vaddi K; Adya, Shruthi M; Radha, Cheruppanpullil

    2016-10-01

    Moringa oleifera (moringa or drumstick) seeds are a potential source of dietary fiber with 6.5% w/w soluble dietary fiber. Biochemical characterization of moringa seed soluble fiber revealed that it is a glycoprotein with 5% neutral sugars. Arabinose and xylose are the major neutral sugars identified by gas liquid chromatography (GLC). Moringa seed soluble fiber was identified as protease resistant-glycoprotein and termed as moringa seed resistant protein (MSRP). MSRP was found to be a homodimer (18kDa) containing two 9kDa monomeric units as revealed by SDS-PAGE analysis with pI 10.8. Immunostimulating activity of MSRP was assessed by murine splenocyte proliferation and production of NO from macrophages. MSRP at low concentration (0.01μg/well) strongly increased proliferation of splenocytes, while MSRP at high concentration weakly responded. MSRP induced 6-fold increase in NO production when compared to the control which indicates the activation of macrophages. MSRP isolated from defatted moringa seed flour is a potent mitogen, enhancing the proliferation of lymphocytes and inducing NO from macrophages. This study concludes that moringa seed is a potential nutritional source to promote the immune system of the host. PMID:27283233

  10. Modeling dietary fiber intakes in U.S. adults in National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003–2006

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over 90 percent of adults do not obtain the Adequate Intake (AI) for dietary fiber (DF). Using only reliable recalls in NHANES 2003–2006, we modeled the following changes to assess impact on usual DF intakes in US adults 19+ yrs: 1) increase all fiber containing foods by 10, 25, 50, or 100 percent; ...

  11. Novel vinegar-derived product enriched with dietary fiber: effect on polyphenolic profile, volatile composition and sensory analysis.

    PubMed

    Marrufo-Curtido, Almudena; Cejudo-Bastante, María Jesús; Rodríguez-Dodero, M Carmen; Natera-Marín, Ramón; Castro-Mejías, Remedios; García-Barroso, Carmelo; Durán-Guerrero, Enrique

    2015-12-01

    Dietary fiber derived from citrus fruits was added to vinegar. Different sources and quantities of fiber and storage conditions have been scrutinized. Formulated vinegars were evaluated on the basis of their phenolic profile, volatile composition and sensory analysis. The addition of citrus fiber enhanced the phenolic and volatile profile of the resulted vinegars. Whereas lemon fiber contributed mostly to the enrichment of the polyphenolic composition, orange fiber was that which increased in a higher way the volatile composition of the vinegars. Moreover, the content of hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives and the majority of volatile compounds decreased as the dose of fiber increased. Furthermore, the judges preferred fiber-enriched vinegars, but in different quantities depending of the fiber source. This preference was mainly based on citric attribute, contributing several terpenes and ketones derived from them. The addition of citrus fiber to vinegar did not result in a marked storage-dependence. PMID:26604338

  12. Unique purified hydrated-gelatin diet for feeding dietary fiber to Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    deBethizy, J D; Street, J C

    1984-02-01

    A purified hydrated gelatin diet was developed for feeding dietary fibers to Wistar rats. A dry fiber mix was prepared that consisted of 54.91 dextrose, 13.80 casein, 2.97 AIN mineral mix, 1.28 AIN vitamin mix, 0.17 dl-methionine, 6.80 lard and 5.10 gelatin (g/100g total dry feed). Either cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, or pectin (15 g/100 g total dry feed) was added to the hydrated dry fiber mix and blended until complete distribution and hydration of the fiber was achieved. After gelling, these hydrated diets were stable for up to 24 hours in environmental conditions commonly encountered in animal facilities. Gel weep was minimal thus permitting feed consumption to be monitored conveniently by weighing the residue in the feeders. In situ examination of stomach contents after feeding such hydrated diets to rats indicated that the gelatin gel was readily degraded and did not confound gel formation by fiber itself. Feed efficiency values (g gain/100 kcal digestible energy) for these diets following a 26-day feeding trial were as follows: no fiber, 6.21; cellulose, 6.38; hemicellulose, 6.23; lignin, 6.52; and pectin, 5.53. PMID:6325819

  13. Radiographic analysis of the effect of dietary fibers on rat colonic transit time

    SciTech Connect

    Lupton, J.R.; Meacher, M.M. )

    1988-11-01

    The effect of different fiber sources on colonic transit time was charted using serial radiographs. Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats, 10 rats per group, were provided with either a fiber-free control diet or the control diet uniformly diluted to provide 8% dietary fiber from guar, pectin, cellulose, wheat bran, or oat bran. At surgery, radiopaque markers were inserted at defined distances in the mesentary closest to the large bowel. Three weeks postsurgery, the animals were intubated with 0.5 ml of a radiopaque marker, and radiographs were taken at 15-min intervals. Of the two poorly fermented fibers, cellulose was as slow as and wheat bran was faster than the fiber-free controls at five out of the six bowel segments measured. The fermentable fibers (pectin, guar, and oat bran) were fast through some bowel segments and slow through others. This study provides in vivo data on colonic transit time and shows that neither 24-h fecal weight nor total transit time is a good predictor of the rate of transit through particular gut segments.

  14. Low-energy density and high fiber intake are dietary concerns in female endurance athletes.

    PubMed

    Melin, A; Tornberg, Å B; Skouby, S; Møller, S S; Faber, J; Sundgot-Borgen, J; Sjödin, A

    2016-09-01

    Low or reduced energy availability (LEA) is linked to functional hypothalamic oligomenorrhea/amenorrhea (FHA), which is frequently reported in weight-sensitive sports. This makes LEA a major nutritional concern for female athletes. The aim of this study was to describe dietary characteristics of athletes with LEA and/or FHA. Endurance athletes (n = 45) were recruited from national teams and competitive clubs. Protocols included gynecological examination, body composition, eating disorder evaluation, and 7-day dietary intake and EA assessment. Athletes with disordered eating behavior/eating disorders (n = 11), menstrual dysfunction other than FHA (n = 5), and low dietary record validity (n = 4) were excluded. Remaining subjects (n = 25) were characterized by EA [optimal: ≥ 45 kcal (188 kJ)/kg fat-free mass (FFM)/day (n = 11), LEA: < 45 kcal (188 kJ)/kg FFM/day (n = 14)] and reproductive function [eumenorrhea (EUM; n = 10), FHA (n = 15)]. There was no difference in EA between FHA and EUM subjects. However, FHA and LEA subjects shared the same dietary characteristics of lower energy density (ED) [(P = 0.012; P = 0.020), respectively], and fat content [(P = 0.047; P = 0.027), respectively]. Furthermore, FHA subjects had a lower intake of carbohydrate-rich foods (P = 0.019), higher fiber content (P < 0.001), and drive for thinness score (P = 0.003). Conclusively, low ED together with high fiber content may constitute targets for dietary intervention in order to prevent and treat LEA and FHA in female athletes. PMID:26148242

  15. Dietary Inulin Fibers Prevent Proton-Pump Inhibitor (PPI)-Induced Hypocalcemia in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Mark W.; de Baaij, Jeroen H. F.; Gommers, Lisanne M. M.; Hoenderop, Joost G. J.; Bindels, René J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Proton-pump inhibitor-induced hypomagnesemia (PPIH) is the most recognized side effect of proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs). Additionally, PPIH is associated with hypocalcemia and hypokalemia. It is hypothesized that PPIs reduce epithelial proton secretion and thereby increase the pH in the colon, which may explain the reduced absorption of and Mg2+ and Ca2+. Fermentation of dietary oligofructose-enriched inulin fibers by the microflora leads to acidification of the intestinal lumen and by this enhances mineral uptake. This study aimed, therefore, to improve mineral absorption by application of dietary inulin to counteract PPIH. Methods Here, C57BL/J6 mice were supplemented with omeprazole and/or inulin. Subsequently, Mg2+ and Ca2+ homeostasis was assessed by means of serum, urine and fecal electrolyte measurements. Moreover, the mRNA levels of magnesiotropic and calciotropic genes were examined in the large intestine and kidney by real-time PCR. Results Treatment with omeprazole significantly reduced serum Mg2+ and Ca2+ levels. However, concomitant addition of dietary inulin fibers normalized serum Ca2+ but not serum Mg2+ concentrations. Inulin abolished enhanced expression of Trpv6 and S100g in the colon by omeprazole. Additionally, intestinal and renal mRNA levels of the Trpm6 gene were reduced after inulin intake. Conclusions This study suggests that dietary inulin counteracts reduced intestinal Ca2+ absorption upon PPI treatment. In contrast, inulin did not increase intestinal absorption of Mg2+ sufficiently to recover serum Mg2+. The clinical potential of dietary inulin treatment should be the subject of future studies. PMID:26397986

  16. In vitro binding capacities of three dietary fibers and their mixture for four toxic elements, cholesterol, and bile acid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Huang, Caihuan; Ou, Shiyi

    2011-02-15

    Water-soluble dietary fibers from apple peels and water-insoluble dietary fibers from wheat bran and soybean-seed hull were used to evaluate their binding capacities for four toxic elements (Pb, Hg, Cd, and As), lard, cholesterol, and bile acids. The water-soluble dietary fibers showed a higher binding capacity for three toxic cations, cholesterol, and sodium cholate; and a lower binding capacity for lard, compared to the water-insoluble ones. A mixture of the dietary fibers from all samples - apple peels, wheat bran, and soybean-seed hull - in the ratio 2:4:4 (w/w) significantly increased the binding capacity of water-insoluble dietary fibers for the three toxic cations, cholesterol, and sodium cholate; moreover, the mixture could lower the concentrations of Pb(2+) and Cd(+) in the tested solutions to levels lower than those occurring in rice and vegetables grown in polluted soils. However, all the tested fibers showed a low binding capacity for the toxic anion, AsO(3)(3-). PMID:21095057

  17. Addition of soluble soybean polysaccharides to dairy products as a source of dietary fiber.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenpu; Duizer, Lisa; Corredig, Milena; Goff, H Douglas

    2010-08-01

    Increasing consumption of dietary fiber in food leads to many important health benefits: for example, reduction in blood cholesterol, reduced risk of diabetes, and improved laxation. Water soluble soybean polysaccharide (SSPS) is a dietary fiber extracted and refined from okara, a byproduct of soy manufacturing. It was incorporated into 3 categories of dairy-based products, thickened milkshake-style beverages, puddings, and low-fat ice cream, to the maximum amount without over-texturing the food. Rheological measurements and sensory tests were used to develop desirable SSPS-fortified products. From the rheological data, 4% SSPS-fortified dairy beverages and 4% SSPS -fortified puddings were in the range of commercial products. From sensory analyses, 4% SSPS-fortified dairy beverage with 0.015%kappa-carrageenan, 4% SSPS-fortified pudding with 0.1%kappa-carrageenan, and 2% SSPS-fortified low-fat ice cream gained the highest scores in consumer hedonic rating. Panelists also indicated their willingness to consume those products if they were available commercially. Practical Application: Since the dietary fiber intake of many people is below their suggested adequate intake values, strategies to successfully fortify foods with fiber may help alleviate this gap. We have developed 3 dairy products, a beverage, a pudding, and a low-fat ice cream, that have been fortified with soluble soybean polysaccharide at levels of 4%, 4%, and 2%, respectively. These products were within acceptable ranges of rheological parameters and other physical stability measurements and were judged to be acceptable by sensory analyses. PMID:20722900

  18. Determination of total dietary fiber (CODEX definition) by enzymatic-gravimetric method and liquid chromatography: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    McCleary, Barry V; DeVries, Jonathan W; Rader, Jeanne I; Cohen, Gerald; Prosky, Leon; Mugford, David C; Champ, Martine; Okuma, Kazuhiro

    2010-01-01

    A method for the determination of total dietary fiber (TDF), as defined by the CODEX Alimentarius, was validated in foods. Based upon the principles of AOAC Official Methods 985.29, 991.43, 2001.03, and 2002.02, the method quantitates high- and low-molecular-weight dietary fiber (HMWDF and LMWDF, respectively). In 2007, McCleary described a method of extended enzymatic digestion at 37 degrees C to simulate human intestinal digestion followed by gravimetric isolation and quantitation of HMWDF and the use of LC to quantitate low-molecular-weight soluble dietary fiber (LMWSDF). The method thus quantitates the complete range of dietary fiber components from resistant starch (by utilizing the digestion conditions of AOAC Method 2002.02) to digestion resistant oligosaccharides (by incorporating the deionization and LC procedures of AOAC Method 2001.03). The method was evaluated through an AOAC collaborative study. Eighteen laboratories participated with 16 laboratories returning valid assay data for 16 test portions (eight blind duplicates) consisting of samples with a range of traditional dietary fiber, resistant starch, and nondigestible oligosaccharides. The dietary fiber content of the eight test pairs ranged from 11.57 to 47.83%. Digestion of samples under the conditions of AOAC Method 2002.02 followed by the isolation and gravimetric procedures of AOAC Methods 985.29 and 991.43 results in quantitation of HMWDF. The filtrate from the quantitation of HMWDF is concentrated, deionized, concentrated again, and analyzed by LC to determine the LMWSDF, i.e., all nondigestible oligosaccharides of degree of polymerization > or =3. TDF is calculated as the sum of HMWDF and LMWSDF. Repeatability standard deviations (Sr) ranged from 0.41 to 1.43, and reproducibility standard deviations (S(R)) ranged from 1.18 to 5.44. These results are comparable to other official dietary fiber methods, and the method is recommended for adoption as Official First Action. PMID:20334184

  19. Inverse associations of dietary fiber and menopausal hormone therapy with colorectal cancer risk in the Multiethnic Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Park, Song-Yi; Wilkens, Lynne R; Kolonel, Laurence N; Henderson, Brian E; Le Marchand, Loïc

    2016-09-15

    In the Multiethnic Cohort Study, we previously reported that dietary fiber intake was inversely associated with colorectal cancer risk in men only. In women, the inverse relationship was weaker and appeared to be confounded by menopausal hormone therapy (MHT). We re-examined this observation with a greatly increased power. Using Cox proportional hazards models, we analyzed data from 187,674 participants with 4,692 cases identified during a mean follow-up period of 16 years. In multivariable-adjusted models, dietary fiber intake was inversely associated with colorectal cancer risk in both sexes: HR = 0.73, 95% CI: 0.61-0.89 for highest vs. lowest quintile, ptrend  = 0.0020 in men and HR = 0.76, 95% CI: 0.62-0.91, ptrend  = 0.0067 in women. Postmenopausal women who ever used MHT had a 19% lower risk of colorectal cancer (95% CI: 0.74-0.89) compared with MHT never users. In a joint analysis of dietary fiber and MHT, dietary fiber intake was associated with a lower colorectal cancer risk in MHT never users (HR = 0.75, 95% CI: 0.59-0.95, ptrend  = 0.045), but did not appear to further decrease the colorectal cancer risk of MHT ever users (ptrend  = 0.11). Our results support the overall protective roles of dietary fiber and MHT against colorectal cancer and suggest that dietary fiber may not lower risk further among women who ever used MHT. If confirmed, these results would suggest that MHT and dietary fiber may share overlapping mechanisms in protecting against colorectal cancer. PMID:27137137

  20. Effects of dietary fibers with different physicochemical properties on feeding motivation in adult female pigs.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Carol Souza; van den Borne, Joost J G C; Gerrits, Walter J J; Kemp, Bas; Bolhuis, J Elizabeth

    2012-09-10

    The satiating effects of dietary fiber may depend more on physicochemical properties of the fiber than on total fiber intake. These properties are expected to affect satiety feelings and feeding motivation due to different effects in the gastrointestinal tract. The aim of the current study was to assess the effects of fibers with varying physicochemical properties (bulkiness, viscosity and fermentability) on feeding motivation in adult female pigs. Sixteen pair-housed pigs received four diets: lignocellulose (LC), pectin (PEC), resistant starch (RS), and control (C) without fiber, in four periods in a Latin square design. Each fiber was fed at a low (L) followed by a high (H) inclusion level (7 days each). At 1h, 3h, and 7h after the morning meal, feeding motivation was assessed in an operant test, where turning a wheel yielded multiple food rewards, and in a runway test, where walking a fixed U-shaped track yielded one food reward. Pigs were observed in their home pen for 6h, using 90-s instantaneous scan sampling. In the operant test, throughout the day feeding motivation was higher for pigs on PEC compared with pigs on LC. In the runway, feeding motivation increased particularly at 1h after the meal for pigs on PEC compared with pigs on RS. Also at 7h, feeding motivation tended to decrease for pigs on RS compared with pigs fed other diets. In their home pen, pigs on PEC showed more feeder-directed behavior compared with pigs on RS. In conclusion, PEC was the least satiating fiber. LC and RS, despite a lower supply of available energy, were the most satiating fibers, possibly due to their bulky and fermentation properties, respectively. PMID:22796465

  1. Regulation of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins by dietary soluble fiber in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, M L; Vergara-Jimenez, M; Conde, K; Behr, T; Abdel-Fattah, G

    1997-03-01

    Dietary soluble-fiber sources such as pectin, guar gum, or psyllium decrease plasma concentrations of low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol in guinea pigs by distinct mechanisms, including increases in LDL apolipoprotein (apo) B turnover and/or decreases in LDL apo B flux (J Lipid Res 1995; 36:2394-404). The present studies were undertaken to test whether changes in the rates of very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) apo B secretion, VLDL conversion to LDL, and hepatic uptake of VLDL were related to the cholesterol-lowering actions of these soluble fibers. Guinea pigs were fed (by wt) 12.5% pectin, 12.5% guar gum, 7.5% psyllium, or a control diet containing cellulose as the fiber source. Plasma cholesterol concentrations were significantly lower in guinea pigs fed pectin, guar gum, and psyllium by 42%, 46%, and 35%, respectively (P < 0.001), compared with those animals fed the control diet, whereas plasma triacylglycerol concentrations were lower only with guar gum intake. The secretion rate of triacylglycerol, determined after Triton was injected to block VLDL catabolism, was not different among dietary treatment groups whereas the secretion rate of apo B was lower with pectin, guar gum, and psyllium intakes (P < 0.01). In addition, pectin, guar gum, and psyllium significantly altered the composition of newly secreted VLDLs by increasing the number of triacylglycerol and phospholipid molecules in the secreted lipoprotein, indicating the presence of larger nascent VLDLs. In contrast, the average particle diameter of mature VLDLs as determined by electron microscopy was smaller in the dietary soluble-fiber groups in the following order: pectin < psyllium < guar gum. Plasma lecithin-cholesteryl acyltransferase and cholesteryl ester transfer protein activities were lower with intake of pectin, guar gum, and psyllium (P < 0.01). Injection of radiolabeled lipoproteins indicated that pectin, guar gum, and psyllium intakes resulted in more rapid VLDL and LDL apo B

  2. Precision-feeding dairy heifers a high rumen-degradable protein diet with different proportions of dietary fiber and forage-to-concentrate ratios.

    PubMed

    Lascano, G J; Koch, L E; Heinrichs, A J

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this experiment was to determine the effects of feeding a high-rumen-degradable protein (RDP) diet when dietary fiber content is manipulated within differing forage-to-concentrate ratio (F:C) on nutrient utilization of precision-fed dairy heifers. Six cannulated Holstein heifers (486.98±15.07kg of body weight) were randomly assigned to 2 F:C, low- (45% forage; LF) and high-forage (90% forage; HF) diets and to a fiber proportion sequence [33% grass hay and wheat straw (HS), 67% corn silage (CS; low fiber); 50% HS, 50% CS (medium fiber); and 67% HS, 33% CS (high fiber)] within forage proportion administered according to a split-plot, 3×3 Latin square design (16-d periods). Heifers fed LF had greater apparent total-tract organic matter digestibility coefficients (dC), neutral detergent fiber, and cellulose than those fed LC diets. Substituting CS with HS resulted in a linear reduction in dry matter, organic matter, and cellulose dC. Nitrogen dC was not different between F:C or with increasing proportions of HS in diets, but N retention tended to decrease linearly as HS was increased in the diets. Predicted microbial protein flow to the duodenum decreased linearly with HS addition and protozoa numbers HS interacted linearly, exhibiting a decrease as HS increased for LF, whereas no effects were observed for HF. Blood urea N increased linearly as HS was incorporated. The LF-fed heifers had a greater ruminal volatile fatty acids concentration. We noted a tendency for a greater dry matter, and a significantly higher liquid fraction turnover rate for HF diets. There was a linear numerical increase in the liquid and solid fraction turnover rate as fiber was added to the diets. Rumen fermentation parameters and fractional passages (solid and liquid) rates support the reduction in dC, N retention, and microbial protein synthesis observed as more dietary fiber is added to the rations of dairy heifers precision-fed a constant proportion of rumen

  3. Impact of dietary fiber/starch ratio in shaping caecal microbiota in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yanli; Wang, Chunyang; Li, Fuchang

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this experiment was to determine whether changing the dietary neutral detergent fiber (NDF)/starch ratio affected caecal microbiota when 4 different diets (diet A: 2.3 NDF/starch, diet B: 1.9, diet C: 1.4, diet D: 1.0) were formulated. A total of 200 weaned rabbits (35 days old, 50 per group) were used for the experiment, which started after an adaptation period of 7 days (i.e., day 42). Caecal contents were obtained from rabbits fed different NDF/starch diets at 52, 62, 72, and 82 days of life. The bacterial community structure was characterized by high-throughput 16S rRNA sequencing. Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Synergistetes, and Tenericutes did not significantly change with diet or age. However, Bacteroidetes (P < 0.05), Proteobacteria (P < 0.01), and Verrucomicrobia (P < 0.05) reads were significantly affected by diet, and Proteobacteria (P < 0.01) and Verrucomicrobia (P < 0.05) reads were significantly influenced by age. At the genus level, Escherichia/Shigella (P < 0.01) was overrepresented in diet A (high fiber) relative to diet D (high starch) in 52- and 62-day-old rabbits. Venn diagrams and heat map plot analyses revealed that the number of gut species shared between animals with different diet treatments increased with age. These results suggest that dietary fiber per starch ratios and age significantly alter the composition of caecal microbiota in growing rabbits. PMID:26361938

  4. Modification of deoiled cumin dietary fiber with laccase and cellulase under high hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Ma, Mengmei; Mu, Taihua

    2016-01-20

    In this study, we evaluated the effects of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) and enzyme (laccase and cellulase) treatment on the structural, physicochemical, and functional properties and antioxidant activity of deoiled cumin dietary fiber (DF). HHP-enzyme treatment increased the contents of soluble dietary fiber (SDF) (30.37 g/100g), monosaccharides (except for glucose), uronic acids, and total polyphenol. HHP-enzyme treatment altered the honey-comb structure of DF and generated new polysaccharides. DF modified by HHP-enzyme treatment exhibited improved water retention capacity (10.02 g/g), water swelling capacity (11.19 mL/g), fat and glucose absorption capacities (10.44 g/g, 22.18-63.54 mmol/g), α-amylase activity inhibition ration (37.95%), and bile acid retardation index (48.85-52.58%). The antioxidant activity of DF was mainly correlated to total polyphenol content (R=0.8742). Therefore, DF modified by HHP-enzyme treatment from deoiled cumin could be used as a fiber-rich ingredient in functional foods. PMID:26572332

  5. Dietary Fat, Fiber, and Carbohydrate Intake and Endogenous Hormone Levels in Premenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xiaohui; Rosner, Bernard; Willett, Walter C; Hankinson, Susan E

    2011-01-01

    The authors conducted a cross-sectional study to investigate the associations of fat, fiber and carbohydrate intake with endogenous estrogen, androgen, and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) levels among 595 premenopausal women. Overall, no significant associations were found between dietary intake of these macronutrients and plasma sex steroid hormone levels. Dietary fat intake was inversely associated with IGF-I and IGF-binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3) levels. When substituting 5% of energy from total fat for the equivalent amount of energy from carbohydrate or protein intake, the plasma levels of IGF-I and IGFBP-3 were 2.8% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.3, 5.3) and 1.6% (95% CI 0.4, 2.8) lower, respectively. Animal fat, saturated fat and monounsaturated fat intakes also were inversely associated with IGFBP-3 levels (P < 0.05). Carbohydrates were positively associated with plasma IGF-I level. When substituting 5% of energy from carbohydrates for the equivalent amount of energy from fat or protein intake, the plasma IGF-I level was 2.0% (95% CI 0.1, 3.9%) higher. No independent associations between fiber intake and hormone levels were observed. The results suggest that a low-fat/high-fiber or carbohydrate diet is not associated with endogenous levels of sex steroid hormones, but it may modestly increase IGF-I and IGFBP-3 levels among premenopausal women. PMID:21761370

  6. Effects of pH on the in Vitro Sorption of Mutagens to Dietary Fibers.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, C; Nagai, T; Yano, T

    1992-01-01

    Dietary fibers, alginate and defatted corn fiber, sorbed food mutagens, Trp-P-1 and Glu-P-1, which are heterocyclic amines formed in the cooking process. The sorption behavior of the heterocyclic amines to defatted corn fiber and alginates was analyzed under pH-controlled conditions. Glu-P-1 and alginic acid had pKa values of 4.2 and 3.6, respectively, whereas Trp-P-1, which showed alkaline in solution, possessed two pKa values of 4.8 and 7.7. Defatted corn fiber, which was mainly composed of cellulose and hemicellulose, did not show a significant pKa value. The amount of sorbed Trp-P-1 to the alginates increased as the pH value of the buffer was elevated, and was much more than that sorbed to defatted corn fiber at each pH condition. These results suggest that the alginates held the amino group of Trp-P-1 or Glu-P-1 on their carboxyl group as a cation exchanger. PMID:27286385

  7. Dietary fiber, organic acids and minerals in selected wild edible fruits of Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Magaia, Telma; Uamusse, Amália; Sjöholm, Ingegerd; Skog, Kerstin

    2013-12-01

    The harvesting, utilization and marketing of indigenous fruits and nuts have been central to the livelihoods of the majority of rural communities in African countries. In this study we report on the content of dietary fiber, minerals and selected organic acids in the pulps and kernels of the wild fruits most commonly consumed in southern Mozambique. The content of soluble fiber in the pulps ranged from 4.3 to 65.6 g/100 g and insoluble fiber from 2.6 to 45.8 g/100 g. In the kernels the content of soluble fiber ranged from 8.4 to 42.6 g/100 g and insoluble fiber from 14.7 to 20.9 g/100 g. Citric acid was found in all fruits up to 25.7 g/kg. The kernels of Adansonia digitata and Sclerocarya birrea were shown to be rich in calcium, iron, magnesium and zinc. The data may be useful in selecting wild fruit species appropriate for incorporation into diets. PMID:23539474

  8. [Dietary fibers of secondary vegetable raw material for correction of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in laboratory animals].

    PubMed

    Shchelkunov, L F

    2001-01-01

    Drop of consumption by the population of dietary fibers is one of the causes of increase of sickness rate by diabetes in particular, and violation of carbohydrate metabolism in general. The purpose of research is definition of a degree of effect of dietary fibers of by-products of grapes processing (grape seed-cakes and press cake of grape pyrenes in an mixture with sorbite) on a carbohydrate and lipide metabolism in laboratory animals. During examinations is detected, that the vegetable products based on dietary fibers do not have negative action on physical development of animals, their body weight. The parameters of an amount of reticulocytes, erythrocytes, lymphocytes, hematocrit were in normal range. In animal, receiving dietary fibers of secondary grape raw material in a ration, the concentration of a cholesterol in blood serum was lower on 2-3% (5.6-5.9 +/- 0.2 mmol/l) as against control (6.0 +/- 0.2 mmol/l). The basal level of a glucose has appeared equal for control: 6.1 +/- 0.5 mmol/l, and for others groups of rats, consuming a dietary fibers with sorbite from 5.6 +/- 0.4 up to 6.0 +/- 0.5 mmol/l. PMID:11517682

  9. Dietary Fiber Intake Regulates Intestinal Microflora and Inhibits Ovalbumin-Induced Allergic Airway Inflammation in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiyu; Shi, Lei; Pang, Wenhui; Liu, Wenwen; Li, Jianfeng; Wang, Haibo; Shi, Guanggang

    2016-01-01

    Background Recently, academic studies suggest that global growth of airway allergic disease has a close association with dietary changes including reduced consumption of fiber. Therefore, appropriate dietary fiber supplementation might be potential to prevent airway allergic disease (AAD). Objective We investigated whether dietary fiber intake suppressed the induction of AAD and tried to elucidate the possible underlying mechanisms. Methods The control mice and AAD model mice fed with 4% standard-fiber chow, while low-fiber group of mice fed with a 1.75% low-fiber chow. The two fiber-intervened groups including mice, apart from a standard-fiber diet, were also intragastric (i.g.) administrated daily with poorly fermentable cellulose or readily fermentable pectin (0.4% of daily body weight), respectively. All animals except normal mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) to induce airway allergic inflammation. Hallmarks of AAD were examined by histological analysis and ELISA. The variation in intestinal bacterial composition was assessed by qualitative analysis of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) content in fecal samples using real-time PCR. Results Low-fiber diet aggravated inflammatory response in ovalbumin-induced allergic mice, whereas dietary fiber intake significantly suppressed the allergic responses, attenuated allergic symptoms of nasal rubbing and sneezing, decreased the pathology of eosinophil infiltration and goblet cell metaplasia in the nasal mucosa and lung, inhibited serum OVA-specific IgE levels, and lowered the levels of Th2 cytokines in NALF and BALF, but, increased Th1 (IFN-γ) cytokines. Additionally, dietary fiber intake also increased the proportion of Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria, and decreased Firmicutes and Proteobacteria. Levels of probiotic bacteria, such as Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, were upgraded significantly. Conclusion Long-term deficiency of dietary fiber intake increases the susceptibility to AAD, whereas proper

  10. Development of the dietary fiber functional food and studies on its toxicological and physiologic properties.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yan; Zi-Jun, Wang; Jian, Xiong; Ying-jie, Dai; Fang, Ma

    2012-09-01

    Dietary fiber (DF) obtained from wheat bran by microbial fermentation was used as a food additive to cookies. The cookies were evaluated sensorally through an orthogonal test to gain the optimized production conditions as follows: the suitable DF content 8%, leavening agent 1.5%, standing time 5 min, and baking time of the cookies is 8 min. A series of toxicological and physiological functions of the cookies were studied using KM mice as the experimental animal in this paper. No deaths or abnormal behaviors of mice occurred either in acute toxicity tests or in short-term feeding tests. Besides, the weight gains, food utilization ratios, blood and serum biochemical parameters, organ coefficients and the results of organ histopathology tests of all doses groups exhibited no significant differences with the control group. This reveals that the dietary fiber functional cookies made by this formula have no acute or sub-chronic toxicity. In terms of physiological function, compared with the control group, the total cholesterol (TC) and triglycerides (TG) were 17.0-21.7% and 18.7-35.0% lower in mice serum of all DF cookie doses groups, respectively, but this difference was not significant (P>0.05). Compared with positive control group, the Cd(2+) and Pb(2+) excretion ratios of DF group were 27.4% and 25.2% higher, respectively. Thus, a conclusion has been drawn that dietary fiber functional cookies made by this formula have no toxic or harmful actions on animals or humans, and the DF food was able to decrease TC and TG concentrations to some extent in serum and increase excretion of Cd(2+) and Pb(2+) in Feces. PMID:22609425

  11. Comparative analysis of the digestibility of sewage fine sieved fraction and hygiene paper produced from virgin fibers and recycled fibers.

    PubMed

    Ghasimi, Dara S M; Zandvoort, Marcel H; Adriaanse, Michiel; van Lier, Jules B; de Kreuk, Merle

    2016-07-01

    Sewage fine sieved fraction (FSF) is a heterogeneous substrate consisting of mainly toilet paper fibers sequestered from municipal raw sewage by a fine screen. In earlier studies, a maximum biodegradation of 62% and 57% of the sewage FSF was found under thermophilic (55°C) and mesophilic (35°C) conditions, respectively. In order to research this limited biodegradability of sewage FSF, this study investigates the biodegradation of different types of cellulosic fibers-based hygiene papers including virgin fibers based toilet paper (VTP), recycled fiber based toilet paper (RTP), virgin pulp for paper production (VPPP) as a raw material, as well as microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) as a kind of fiberless reference material. The anaerobic biodegradation or digestibility tests were conducted under thermophilic and mesophilic conditions. Results of the experiments showed different biomethane potential (BMP) values for each tested cellulose fiber-based substrate, which might be associated with the physical characteristics of the fibers, type of pulping, presence of lignin encrusted fibers, and/or the presence of additive chemicals and refractory compounds. Higher hydrolysis rates (Kh), higher specific methane production rates (SMPR) and shorter required incubation times to achieve 90% of the BMP (t90%CH4), were achieved under thermophilic conditions for all examined substrates compared to the mesophilic ones. Furthermore, the biodegradability of all employed cellulose fiber-based substrates was in the same range, 38-45%, under both conditions and less than the observed FSF biodegradability, i.e. 57-62%. MCC achieved the highest BMP and biodegradability, 86-91%, among all cellulosic substrates. PMID:27172811

  12. Instantaneous frequency measurement by in-fiber 0.5th order fractional differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poveda-Wong, L.; Carrascosa, A.; Cuadrado-Laborde, C.; Cruz, J. L.; Díez, A.; Andrés, M. V.

    2016-07-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the possibility to retrieve the instantaneous frequency profile of a given temporal light pulse by in-fiber fractional order differentiation of 0.5th-order. The signal's temporal instantaneous frequency profile is obtained by simple dividing two temporal intensity profiles, namely the intensities of the input and output pulses of a spectrally-shifted fractional order differentiation. The results are supported by the experimental measurement of the instantaneous frequency profile of a mode-locked laser.

  13. Influence of two dietary fibers in the oral bioavailability and other pharmacokinetic parameters of ethinyloestradiol.

    PubMed

    García, J J; Fernández, N; Diez, M J; Sahagún, A; González, A; Alonso, M L; Prieto, C; Calle, A P; Sierra, M

    2000-11-01

    Dietary fibers are widely used in hypoglycaemic, hypolipidemic, slimming diets. It is probable that their ingestion coincides with the oral administration of drugs and a modification of their pharmacokinetics can appear. In the present study, the influence of two soluble fibers (guar gum and psyllium) was evaluated on the pharmacokinetics of ethinyloestradiol (EE) when they were administered together to female rabbits via the oral route. Three groups of rabbits were used. All animals received 1 mg/kg of EE; this compound was administered alone in the control group and with 3.5 g of guar gum or psyllium in the other two groups. When guar gum was administered, there was a decrease in the extent of EE absorbed, but no change was observed in the rate of absorption. When psyllium was administered, the extent of EE absorbed increased slightly and the rate of absorption was slower. PMID:11172796

  14. Physicochemical and functional properties of dietary fiber from maca (Lepidium meyenii Walp.) liquor residue.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinjin; Zhao, Qingsheng; Wang, Liwei; Zha, Shenghua; Zhang, Lijun; Zhao, Bing

    2015-11-01

    Using maca (Lepidium meyenii) liquor residue as the raw material, dietary fiber (DF) was prepared by chemical (MCDF) and enzymatic (MEDF) methods, respectively, of which the physicochemical and functional properties were comparatively studied. High contents of DF were found in MCDF (55.63%) and MEDF (81.10%). Both fibers showed good functional properties, including swelling capacity, water holding capacity, oil holding capacity, glucose adsorption capacity and glucose retardation index. MEDF showed better functional properties, which could be attributed to its higher content of DF, more irregular surface and more abundant monosaccharide composition. The results herein suggest that maca DF prepared by enzymatic method from liquor residue is a good functional ingredient in food products. PMID:26256376

  15. Dietary Fiber Supplements: Effects in Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome and Relationship to Gastrointestinal Functions

    PubMed Central

    Papathanasopoulos, Athanasios; Camilleri, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Dietary fiber (DF) is a term that reflects to a heterogenous group of natural food sources, processed grains and commercial supplements. Several forms of DF have been used as complementary or alternative agents in the management of manifestations of the metabolic syndrome, including obesity. Not surprisingly, there is a great variation in the biological efficacy of DF in metabolic syndrome and body weight control. Diverse factors and mechanisms have been reported as mediators of the effects of DF on the metabolic syndrome and obesity. Among this array of mechanisms, the modulation of gastric sensorimotor influences appears to be crucial for the effects of DF, but also quite variable. This article focuses on the role, mechanism of action and benefits of different forms of fiber and supplements on obesity and metabolic syndrome, glycemia, dyslipidemia, cardiovascular risk, and explores the effects of DF on gastric sensorimotor function and satiety in mediating these actions of DF. PMID:19931537

  16. Sex, Body Mass Index, and Dietary Fiber Intake Influence the Human Gut Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Dominianni, Christine; Sinha, Rashmi; Goedert, James J.; Pei, Zhiheng; Yang, Liying; Hayes, Richard B.; Ahn, Jiyoung

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that the composition of the human gut microbiome is important in the etiology of human diseases; however, the personal factors that influence the gut microbiome composition are poorly characterized. Animal models point to sex hormone-related differentials in microbiome composition. In this study, we investigated the relationship of sex, body mass index (BMI) and dietary fiber intake with the gut microbiome in 82 humans. We sequenced fecal 16S rRNA genes by 454 FLX technology, then clustered and classified the reads to microbial genomes using the QIIME pipeline. Relationships of sex, BMI, and fiber intake with overall gut microbiome composition and specific taxon abundances were assessed by permutational MANOVA and multivariate logistic regression, respectively. We found that sex was associated with the gut microbiome composition overall (p=0.001). The gut microbiome in women was characterized by a lower abundance of Bacteroidetes (p=0.03). BMI (>25 kg/m2 vs. <25 kg/m2) was associated with the gut microbiome composition overall (p=0.05), and this relationship was strong in women (p=0.03) but not in men (p=0.29). Fiber from beans and from fruits and vegetables were associated, respectively, with greater abundance of Actinobacteria (p=0.006 and false discovery rate adjusted q=0.05) and Clostridia (p=0.009 and false discovery rate adjusted q=0.09). Our findings suggest that sex, BMI, and dietary fiber contribute to shaping the gut microbiome in humans. Better understanding of these relationships may have significant implications for gastrointestinal health and disease prevention. PMID:25874569

  17. Fractionation, characterization and study of emulsifying properties of corn fiber gum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn fiber gum has been fractionated by hydrophobic interaction chromatography on Amberlite XAD-1180 resin using ionic, acidic, basic and hydrophobic solvents of different polarity. Characterization, including determination of total carbohydrate, acidic sugar and protein content has been done for e...

  18. Dietary fat content and fiber type modulate hind gut microbial community and metabolic markers in the pig.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hui; Potu, Ramesh; Lu, Hang; Vezzoni de Almeida, Vivian; Stewart, Terry; Ragland, Darryl; Armstrong, Arthur; Adeola, Olayiwola; Nakatsu, Cindy H; Ajuwon, Kolapo M

    2013-01-01

    Obesity leads to changes in the gut microbial community which contribute to the metabolic dysregulation in obesity. Dietary fat and fiber affect the caloric density of foods. The impact of dietary fat content and fiber type on the microbial community in the hind gut is unknown. Effect of dietary fat level and fiber type on hindgut microbiota and volatile fatty acid (VFA) profiles was investigated. Expression of metabolic marker genes in the gut, adipose tissue and liver was determined. A 2 × 2 experiment was conducted in pigs fed at two dietary fat levels (5% or 17.5% swine grease) and two fiber types (4% inulin, fermentable fructo-oligosaccharide or 4% solka floc, non-fermentable cellulose). High fat diets (HFD) resulted in a higher (P<0.05) total body weight gain, feed efficiency and back fat accumulation than the low fat diet. Feeding of inulin, but not solka floc, attenuated (P<0.05) the HFD-induced higher body weight gain and fat mass accumulation. Inulin feeding tended to lead to higher total VFA production in the cecum and resulted in a higher (P<0.05) expression of acyl coA oxidase (ACO), a marker of peroxisomal β-oxidation. Inulin feeding also resulted in lower expression of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c (SREBP-1c), a marker of lipid anabolism. Bacteria community structure characterized by DGGE analysis of PCR amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments showed that inulin feeding resulted in greater bacterial population richness than solka floc feeding. Cluster analysis of pairwise Dice similarity comparisons of the DGGE profiles showed grouping by fiber type but not the level of dietary fat. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) of PCR- DGGE profiles showed that inulin feeding negatively correlated with back fat thickness. This study suggests a strong interplay between dietary fat level and fiber type in determining susceptibility to obesity. PMID:23573202

  19. In vitro binding of estrogens by dietary fiber and the in vivo apparent digestibility tested in pigs.

    PubMed

    Arts, C J; Govers, C A; van den Berg, H; Wolters, M G; van Leeuwen, P; Thijssen, J H

    1991-05-01

    Within the framework of experiments related to the association between dietary fiber and breast cancer an in vitro test system was used to study the binding of estrogens to various fibers (e.g. cholestyramin, lignin and cellulose) and fiber sources (e.g. wheat bran, cereals, seeds and legumes). Furthermore, the in vivo apparent digestibility of the different fiber sources was tested using a mobile nylon bag technique in intestine-cannulated pigs. Estradiol-17 beta (E2) bound more strongly to the various fibers than did estrone (E1), estriol or estrone-3-glucuronide. At increasing pH (greater than 7) binding of both E1 and E2 to wheat bran decreased significantly. Cholestyramine and lignin bound almost all estrogens present in the medium. Linseed (91%), oats (83%), barley chaff (88%) and wheat bran (82%) are other excellent binders of E2. Corn, rye and white wheat flour showed lower binding capacity with a relatively low affinity. Cereals with the highest percentage of lignin in the fiber (greater than 3%) were also the fiber sources with the lowest apparent digestibility. Estrogens bound with the highest affinity (relative to bovine serum albumin) to these fiber sources. Together with wheat bran and lignin, oats, linseed and soybean seem to be products with good perspectives for in vivo evaluation of the lowering effect of dietary fiber on estrogen exposure of estrogen-sensitive tissues. PMID:1645589

  20. Fermentable dietary fibers elevate urinary methylmalonate and decrease propionate oxidation in rats deprived of vitamin B-12.

    PubMed

    Cullen, R W; Oace, S M

    1989-08-01

    This study examines the effect of dietary fiber supplements of different degrees of bacterial fermentability on biochemical indicators of vitamin B-12 deficiency in rats. Groups of rats were fed a fiber-free diet deficient in vitamin B-12 or the fiber-free diet diluted with 5% of a poorly fermentable dietary fiber (cellulose, lignin or alginic acid) or a highly fermentable fiber (pectin, guar gum or xylan). Poorly fermentable fibers had no significant effect on apparent B-12 status, whereas the highly fermentable fibers significantly increased urinary methylmalonic acid and depressed oxidation of [14C]propionate to 14CO2. Pectin consistently induced significantly greater effects than did xylan or guar gum. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that fermentable fibers stimulate bacterial propionate production and exaggerate certain biochemical indicators of B-12 deficiency. Since pectin had a more pronounced effect than did other fermentable fibers, the possibility that pectin may also interfere with B-12 absorption requires further study. PMID:2550598

  1. Effect of four types of dietary fiber on the technological quality of pasta.

    PubMed

    Bustos, M C; Pérez, G T; León, A E

    2011-06-01

    The development of dietary fiber-enriched foods permits to obtain products with functional properties but can cause several problems in technological quality. The aim of this study was to study the quality of pasta obtained by replacing bread wheat flour with resistant starch II (RSII), resistant starch IV (RSIV), oat bran (OB) and inulin (IN) with the purpose of improving their nutritional quality. RSII, RSIV, OB and IN were substituted for a portion of bread wheat flour at levels 2.5%, 5.0%, 7.5% and 10.0%. Cooking properties, amylose and inulin losses, color and texture were measured. Finally, nutritional quality of enriched pasta was evaluated by protein losses during cooking and total dietary fiber. Microstructure of pasta was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Addition of RSII into pasta formulation improved the quality of the final product. RSIV-enriched pasta presented an improvement in textural characteristics and OB affected cooking properties positively up to 5% of substitution. Inulin was lost during cooking; besides, its addition negatively affected the technological quality of pasta. The results obtained in this study prove that it is possible to elaborate pasta with acceptable cooking quality and with improved nutritional characteristics by adding 10% of RSII and RSIV and 5% of OB. PMID:21593287

  2. Dietary fibers from mushroom sclerotia: 1. Preparation and physicochemical and functional properties.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ka-Hing; Cheung, Peter C K

    2005-11-30

    Preparation of three novel dietary fibers (DFs) from mushroom sclerotia, namely, Pleurotus tuberregium, Polyporous rhinocerus, and Wolfiporia cocos, by a scale-up modified AOAC procedure using industrial enzymes was investigated. A remarkably high level of total dietary fiber (TDF) ranging from 81.7 to 96.3% sample dry matter (DM), in which a content of nonstarch polysaccharide (NSP) ranging from 86.6 to 94.3% sclerotial TDF DM, was obtained from the three sclerotia. All sclerotial DFs were rich in beta-glucan (the glucose residue ranged from 89.7 to 94.5% NSP DM) with a very low level of resistant glycogen (ranged from 3.77 to 3.94% sclerotial TDF DM). All three novel sclerotial DFs also exhibited similar, if not better, physicochemical and functional properties (pH, color, water binding capacity, oil holding capacity, and emulsifying properties) as those of barely DF control and commercial DF-rich ingredients. The potential use of the three mushroom sclerotial DFs as a new beta-glucan type DF-rich ingredient in the food industry was discussed. PMID:16302753

  3. Adsorption of a hydrophobic mutagen to five contrasting dietary fiber preparations.

    PubMed

    Roberton, A M; Ferguson, L R; Hollands, H J; Harris, P J

    1991-03-01

    The ability of five plant cell wall (dietary fiber) preparations with contrasting compositions to adsorb in vitro the hydrophobic, environmental mutagen, 1,8-dinitropyrene (DNP), was investigated. Many of the fruits and vegetables in Western diets are from dicotyledonous (broad leaved) plants and the dietary fiber from these consists mainly of unlignified cell walls. A representative of this wall type, prepared from immature cabbage leaves, showed little ability to adsorb DNP. Two other cell-wall preparations, representing lignified walls of dicotyledons and unlignified walls of vegetative parts of grasses and cereals (monocotyledons belonging to the family Poaceae), adsorbed DNP much more effectively. However, two further preparations, representing suberized walls of cork cells and lignified walls of vegetative parts of grasses and cereals, were the most effective in adsorbing DNP. Extrapolation of these data to the in vivo situation would indicate that increased consumption of the vegetative parts of grasses or cereals and plant material containing cork cells, for example potato skins, could be effective in removing hydrophobic mutagens from potential contact with colonic mucosal cells. PMID:1848354

  4. Effect of Dietary Fibers on Cecal Microbiota and Intestinal Tumorigenesis in Azoxymethane Treated A/J Min/+ Mice.

    PubMed

    Moen, Birgitte; Henjum, Kristi; Måge, Ingrid; Knutsen, Svein Halvor; Rud, Ida; Hetland, Ragna Bogen; Paulsen, Jan Erik

    2016-01-01

    Foods naturally high in dietary fiber are generally considered to protect against development of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the intrinsic effect of dietary fiber on intestinal carcinogenesis is unclear. We used azoxymethane (AOM) treated A/J Min/+ mice, which developed a significantly higher tumor load in the colon than in the small intestine, to compare the effects of dietary inulin (IN), cellulose (CE) or brewers spent grain (BSG) on intestinal tumorigenesis and cecal microbiota. Each fiber was tested at two dose levels, 5% and 15% (w/w) content of the AIN-93M diet. The microbiota was investigated by next-generation sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene (V4). We found that mice fed IN had approximately 50% lower colonic tumor load than mice fed CE or BSG (p<0.001). Surprisingly, all three types of fiber caused a dose dependent increase of colonic tumor load (p<0.001). The small intestinal tumor load was not affected by the dietary fiber interventions. Mice fed IN had a lower bacterial diversity than mice fed CE or BSG. The Bacteroidetes/Firmicutes ratio was significantly (p = 0.003) different between the three fiber diets with a higher mean value in IN fed mice compared with BSG and CE. We also found a relation between microbiota and the colonic tumor load, where many of the operational taxonomic units (OTUs) related to low tumor load were significantly enriched in mice fed IN. Among the OTUs related to low tumor load were bacteria affiliated with the Bacteroides genus. These results suggest that type of dietary fiber may play a role in the development of CRC, and that the suppressive effect of IN on colonic tumorigenesis is associated with profound changes in the cecal microbiota profile. PMID:27196124

  5. Effect of Dietary Fibers on Cecal Microbiota and Intestinal Tumorigenesis in Azoxymethane Treated A/J Min/+ Mice

    PubMed Central

    Måge, Ingrid; Knutsen, Svein Halvor; Rud, Ida; Hetland, Ragna Bogen; Paulsen, Jan Erik

    2016-01-01

    Foods naturally high in dietary fiber are generally considered to protect against development of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the intrinsic effect of dietary fiber on intestinal carcinogenesis is unclear. We used azoxymethane (AOM) treated A/J Min/+ mice, which developed a significantly higher tumor load in the colon than in the small intestine, to compare the effects of dietary inulin (IN), cellulose (CE) or brewers spent grain (BSG) on intestinal tumorigenesis and cecal microbiota. Each fiber was tested at two dose levels, 5% and 15% (w/w) content of the AIN-93M diet. The microbiota was investigated by next-generation sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene (V4). We found that mice fed IN had approximately 50% lower colonic tumor load than mice fed CE or BSG (p<0.001). Surprisingly, all three types of fiber caused a dose dependent increase of colonic tumor load (p<0.001). The small intestinal tumor load was not affected by the dietary fiber interventions. Mice fed IN had a lower bacterial diversity than mice fed CE or BSG. The Bacteroidetes/Firmicutes ratio was significantly (p = 0.003) different between the three fiber diets with a higher mean value in IN fed mice compared with BSG and CE. We also found a relation between microbiota and the colonic tumor load, where many of the operational taxonomic units (OTUs) related to low tumor load were significantly enriched in mice fed IN. Among the OTUs related to low tumor load were bacteria affiliated with the Bacteroides genus. These results suggest that type of dietary fiber may play a role in the development of CRC, and that the suppressive effect of IN on colonic tumorigenesis is associated with profound changes in the cecal microbiota profile. PMID:27196124

  6. DIETARY FIBER AND SERUM 16α-HYDROXYESTRONE, AN ESTROGEN METABOLITE ASSOCIATED WITH LOWER SYSTOLIC BLOOD PRESSURE

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Shawn; Hawkley, Louise C.; Cacioppo, John T.; Masi, Christopher M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective We recently identified an inverse relationship between systolic blood pressure (SBP) and serum 16α-hydroxyestrone, a metabolite of 17β-estradiol, in postmenopausal women. Formation of 16α-hydroxyestrone is catalyzed primarily by CYP1A2, a cytochrome P450 enzyme. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationships between known modifiers of CYP1A2 activity and serum 16α-hydroxyestrone in postmenopausal women. We hypothesized that fruits, vegetables, and grains, which contain more soluble fiber (a known inducer of CYP1A2) as a proportion of total fiber, would be more positively associated with serum 16α-hydroxyestrone than legumes, which contain less soluble fiber as a proportion of total fiber. Materials and Methods Serum from a population-based sample of 42 postmenopausal women aged 55–69 living in Cook County, Illinois, was assayed for 16α-hydroxyestrone using mass spectrometry. Ordinal logistic regression was used to evaluate the cross-sectional relationship between dietary fiber and serum 16α-hydroxyestrone after adjusting for multiple covariates. Results Relative to dietary fiber from legumes, dietary fiber from fruits and vegetables was associated with a greater log odds (B = 0.201, p = 0.036) of having higher serum concentrations of 16α-hydroxyestrone. The log odds of having higher serum concentrations of 16α-hydroxyestrone was also lower among African-American women (B = −2.300, p = .030) compared to white women. Conclusion These results are consistent with previous studies demonstrating a negative relationship between SBP and dietary fruits and vegetables and a positive relationship between African-American race and SBP. Further research is needed regarding dietary factors that may influence the serum concentration of 16α-hydroxyestrone. PMID:21035306

  7. Dietary fibers and crude protein content alleviate hepatic fat deposition and obesity in broiler breeder hens.

    PubMed

    Mohiti-Asli, M; Shivazad, M; Zaghari, M; Aminzadeh, S; Rezaian, M; Mateos, G G

    2012-12-01

    The effects of inclusion of cellulose or inulin as a source of dietary fiber and CP content of the diet on hepatic fat deposition were investigated in hens fed restricted or close to ad libitum consumption. There were 12 dietary treatments forming a 2 × 3 × 2 factorial with 2 feeding regimens [restricted and liberal (close to ad libitum consumption; LIB)], 3 fiber sources (control, 3% inulin, and 3% cellulose), and 2 levels of CP (14.5 and 17.4%). Hens were assigned in groups of 6 to 60 floor pens. From 43 to 55 wk of age, hens fed LIB showed increased activity of the hepatic malic enzyme (MalE; P < 0.01), which led to an increase (P < 0.001) in liver weight and hepatic lipid deposition and was associated with enhancements (P < 0.05) in plasma levels of glucose, triglyceride, total cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Abdominal fat deposition and BW of the hens increased (P < 0.001) with liberal feeding. Inclusion of inulin in the diet reduced (P < 0.05) liver and abdominal fat weight, whereas cellulose inclusion decreased (P < 0.05) feed intake, abdominal fat, and BW. An increase in CP content of the diet from 14.5 to 17.4% reduced MalE activity (P < 0.001), liver weight (P < 0.001), and the accumulation of lipids and cholesterol in the liver, as well as plasma triglyceride concentration and abdominal fat pad weight (P < 0.05). It is concluded that fiber inclusion reduced abdominal fat and liver weight, with effects being more pronounced with cellulose than with inulin. An increase in dietary CP reduced MalE activity and alleviated hepatic and plasma lipid concentration; therefore, it might be a practical approach to reduce the incidence of obesity-linked problems in broiler breeder hens. The combination of high-CP diets and the inclusion of a fiber source did not suppress liver lipid content over that observed with the high-CP diet, exclusively. PMID:23155020

  8. Flaxseed dietary fibers lower cholesterol and increase fecal fat excretion, but magnitude of effect depend on food type

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Dietary fibers have been proposed to play a role in cardiovascular risk as well as body weight management. Flaxseeds are a good source of dietary fibers, and a large proportion of these are water-soluble viscous fibers. Method Here, we examine the effect of flaxseed dietary fibers in different food matrices on blood lipids and fecal excretion of fat and energy in a double-blind randomized crossover study with 17 subjects. Three different 7-d diets were tested: a low-fiber control diet (Control), a diet with flaxseed fiber drink (3/day) (Flax drink), and a diet with flaxseed fiber bread (3/day) (Flax bread). Total fat and energy excretion was measured in feces, blood samples were collected before and after each period, and appetite sensation registered 3 times daily before main meals. Results Compared to control, Flax drink lowered fasting total-cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol by 12 and 15%, respectively, (p < 0.01), whereas Flax bread only produced a reduction of 7 and 9%, respectively (p < 0.05). Fecal fat and energy excretion increased by 50 and 23% with Flax drink consumption compared to control (p < 0.05), but only fecal fat excretion was increased with Flax bread compared to control (p < 0.05). Conclusion Both Flax drink and Flax bread resulted in decreased plasma total and LDL-cholesterol and increased fat excretion, but the food matrix and/or processing may be of importance. Viscous flaxseed dietary fibers may be a useful tool for lowering blood cholesterol and potentially play a role in energy balance. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00953004 PMID:22305169

  9. Dietary fiber intake and pancreatic cancer risk: a meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chun-Hui; Qiao, Chong; Wang, Ruo-Chen; Zhou, Wen-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Evidence on the association between dietary fiber intake and pancreatic cancer risk has been controversial. Therefore, we carried out this meta-analysis to summarize available evidence from epidemiologic studies on this point. Relevant studies were identified by searching PubMed, Embase and Web of Science databases as well as by reviewing the rence lists of relevant articles. Random or fixed-effects model was used to calculate the summary risk estimates and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). This meta-analysis included one cohort and thirteen case-control studies which involving a total of 3287 subjects with pancreatic cancer. After summarizing the risk estimates of these studies, we yielded a significant association between dietary fiber intake and pancreatic cancer risk among case-control studies (odds ratio = 0.54; 95%CI = 0.44–0.67; I2 = 41.4%; P = 0.043) but a non-significant result in cohort study (hazard ratio = 1.01; 95%CI = 0.59–1.74). Additionally, significant inverse associations were observed when we carried out the stratify analyses by the study characteristics and adjustment for potential confounders among case-control studies. Given only one cohort study included in the present meta-analysis, further prospective-designed studies should validate our findings and report more detail results, including those for subtypes of fiber, the risk estimates which corrected the impact of measurement errors and fully adjust for the potential confounders. PMID:26035410

  10. Beyond fractional anisotropy: extraction of bundle-specific structural metrics from crossing fiber models.

    PubMed

    Riffert, Till W; Schreiber, Jan; Anwander, Alfred; Knösche, Thomas R

    2014-10-15

    Diffusion MRI (dMRI) measurements are used for inferring the microstructural properties of white matter and to reconstruct fiber pathways. Very often voxels contain complex fiber configurations comprising multiple bundles, rendering the simple diffusion tensor model unsuitable. Multi-compartment models deliver a convenient parameterization of the underlying complex fiber architecture, but pose challenges for fitting and model selection. Spherical deconvolution, in contrast, very economically produces a fiber orientation density function (fODF) without any explicit model assumptions. Since, however, the fODF is represented by spherical harmonics, a direct interpretation of the model parameters is impossible. Based on the fact that the fODF can often be interpreted as superposition of multiple peaks, each associated to one relatively coherent fiber population (bundle), we offer a solution that seeks to combine the advantages of both approaches: first the fiber configuration is modeled as fODF represented by spherical harmonics and then each of the peaks is parameterized separately in order to characterize the underlying bundle. In this work, the fODF peaks are approximated by Bingham distributions, capturing first and second-order statistics of the fiber orientations, from which we derive metrics for the parametric quantification of fiber bundles. We propose meaningful relationships between these measures and the underlying microstructural properties. We focus on metrics derived directly from properties of the Bingham distribution, such as peak length, peak direction, peak spread, integral over the peak, as well as a metric derived from the comparison of the largest peaks, which probes the complexity of the underlying microstructure. We compare these metrics to the conventionally used fractional anisotropy (FA) and show how they may help to increase the specificity of the characterization of microstructural properties. While metrics relying on the first moments of

  11. High dietary fiber intake is associated with decreased inflammation and all-cause mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Raj Krishnamurthy, Vidya M.; Wei, Guo; Baird, Bradley C.; Murtaugh, Maureen; Chonchol, Michel B.; Raphael, Kalani L.; Greene, Tom; Beddhu, Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is considered an inflammatory state and a high fiber intake is associated with decreased inflammation in the general population. Here, we determined whether fiber intake is associated with decreased inflammation and mortality in chronic kidney disease, and whether kidney disease modifies the associations of fiber intake with inflammation and mortality. To do this, we analyzed data from 14,543 participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III. The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerular filtration rate less than 60 ml/min per 1.73 m2) was 5.8%. For each 10-g/day increase in total fiber intake, the odds of elevated serum C-reactive protein levels were decreased by 11% and 38% in those without and with kidney disease, respectively. Dietary total fiber intake was not significantly associated with mortality in those without but was inversely related to mortality in those with kidney disease. The relationship of total fiber with inflammation and mortality differed significantly in those with and without kidney disease. Thus, high dietary total fiber intake is associated with lower risk of inflammation and mortality in kidney disease and these associations are stronger in magnitude in those with kidney disease. Interventional trials are needed to establish the effects of fiber intake on inflammation and mortality in kidney disease. PMID:22012132

  12. Dietary Fiber, Carbohydrates, Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load in Relation to Breast Cancer Prognosis in the HEAL Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Belle, Fabiën N.; Kampman, Ellen; McTiernan, Anne; Bernstein, Leslie; Baumgartner, Kathy; Baumgartner, Richard; Ambs, Anita; Ballard-Barbash, Rachel; Neuhouser, Marian L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Dietary intake of fiber, carbohydrate, glycemic index (GI), and glycemic load (GL) may influence breast cancer survival, but consistent and convincing evidence is lacking. Methods We investigated associations of dietary fiber, carbohydrates, GI, and GL with breast cancer prognosis among n=688 stage 0 to IIIA breast cancer survivors in the Health, Eating, Activity, and Lifestyle (HEAL) study. Pre- and postmenopausal women from Western Washington State, Los Angeles County, and New Mexico participated. Usual diet was assessed with a food frequency questionnaire. Total mortality, breast cancer mortality, non-fatal recurrence and second occurrence data were obtained from SEER registries and medical records. Cox proportional hazards regression estimated multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios and 95% CIs. Results During a median of 6.7 years follow-up after diagnosis, n= 106 total deaths, n=83 breast cancer-specific deaths and n=82 non-fatal recurrences were confirmed. We observed an inverse association between fiber intake and mortality. Multivariate-adjusted HRRs comparing high to low intake were 0.53 (95% CI 0.23-1.23) and 0.75 (95% CI 0.43-1.31). A threshold effect was observed whereby no additional benefit was observed for intakes >9 g/day. Fiber intake was suggestively inversely associated with breast-cancer specific mortality (HRR=0.68, 95% CI 0.27-1.70) and risk of non-fatal recurrence or second occurrence (HRR=0.68, 95% CI 0.27-1.70), but results were not statistically significant. Conclusion Dietary fiber was associated with a non-significant inverse association with breast cancer events and total mortality. Further studies to assess and confirm this relationship are needed in order to offer effective dietary strategies for breast cancer patients. Impact Increasing dietary fiber may an effective lifestyle modification strategy for breast cancer survivors. PMID:21430298

  13. A method to obtain a well-defined fraction of respirable para-aramid fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Schins, R P; Gaudichet, A; Jaurand, M C

    1993-01-01

    We developed a preparation method to obtain respirable-sized fractions of para-aramid fibers. The procedure, based on floatability, consists of stirring and subsequent settling of p-aramid pulp in distilled water. Two distinct phases are obtained, with small fibers in the upper part of the suspension, which represents about 33% of the total volume. Optimal results were obtained when 2.0 g pulp was stirred for 15 hr in 800 ml distilled water containing 0.125% ethanol and settled for 5 hr. The mass yield ranged between 0.4 and 0.6%, more than 90% of the particles had an aspect ratio > or = 3:1. The mean fiber length was about 6 microns, and the mean fiber diameter was about 0.4 microns as determined by transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The number of fibers obtained was 4 x 10(6) fibers/micrograms under our standard conditions. Images p414-a Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:8119251

  14. [Use of algarrobo (Prosopis chilensis (Mol) Stuntz) flour as protein and dietary fiber source in cookies and fried chips manufacture].

    PubMed

    Escobar, Berta; Estévez, Ana María; Fuentes, Carolina; Venegas, Daniela

    2009-06-01

    Limiting amino acids of the protein from chilean "algarrobo" are isoleucine, theronine and methionine/cyteine. Cereals and legume blends allow to improve the amino acid balance, since legume have more lysine, and cereals are richer in sulphur amino acids. Due to the nutritional interest of "algarrobo" cotyledons, the use of "algarrobo cotyledon" flour (ACF) in sweet and salty snack manufacture was evaluated. Cookies and fried salty chips with 0%, 10% and 20% ACF were prepared. Flours were analyzed for color, particle size, moisture, proximate composition, available lysine, and soluble, insoluble and total dietary fiber. Cookies and chips were analyzed for the same characteristics (except for particle size); besides there were determined water activity, weight and size of the units, and also, the caloric value was computed. Sensory quality and acceptance of both products were evaluated. It is noticeable the high amount of protein, lipids, ash, crude fiber (63.6; 10.2; 4.3 and 4.2 g/100 g dmb, respectively), available lysine (62.4 mg/g protein) and total dietary fiber (24.2 g/100 g dmb) of ACF. Both, cookies and chips with ACF, showed a significant increase in the amount of protein, lipids, ash, crude fiber and, available lysine (from 15.5 to 19,3 and from 20.3 a 29.6 mg lisina/g protein, respectively), and total dietary fiber (from 1.39 to 2.80 and from 1.60 a 5.60 g/100 g dmb, respectively). All of the cookies trials were well accepted ("I like it very much"); chips with 10% of AFC showed the highest acceptance ("I like it"). It can be concluded that the use of ACF in cookies and chips manufacture increases the contribution of available lysine; their protein and dietary fiber content, improving the soluble/insoluble fiber ratio, without affect neither their physical nor their sensory acceptance. PMID:19719017

  15. Effects of polysaccharide-based edible coatings enriched with dietary fiber on quality attributes of fresh-cut apples.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Maria R; Cassani, Lucía; Martín-Belloso, Olga; Soliva-Fortuny, Robert

    2015-12-01

    Little information is available regarding the incorporation of dietary fiber into edible films and coatings. In this work, apple fiber and inulin were incorporated into polysaccharide-based (alginate, pectine and gellan gum) edible coating formulations and their effects on the quality attributes of fresh-cut apples were evaluated. Antioxidant properties, color, firmness, sensory quality and microbial growth of fresh-cut apple were studied during 16 days of storage at 4 °C. Results show that dietary fiber extracts incorporated to gellan gum, pectin and alginate-based coatings together with calcium chloride and ascorbic acid successfully maintained the firmness and color of coated fresh-cut apples in comparison with uncoated control samples, which presented severe texture softening and browning. The firmness of apple pieces coated with polysaccharide-based coating formulations incorporating apple fiber doubled, and sometimes tripled, that of uncoated samples. Any of the assayed coatings exhibited a positive effect on the sensory properties of fresh-cut apples. The incorporation of apple fiber, together with the use of ascorbic acid, contributed to keep the antioxidant potential of the fruit at least during the first week of storage. Furthermore, gellan gum coatings had a marked effect in reducing mesophilic and psychrophilic counts on fresh-cut apples throughout storage regardless the addition of dietary fibers. The results achieved demonstrate the feasibility of the addition of dietary fiber to edible coating formulations for increasing the nutritional value of fresh-cut apples without compromising their fresh-like quality attributes. PMID:26604352

  16. Hollow-Fiber Flow Field-Flow Fractionation for Mass Spectrometry: From Proteins to Whole Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Zattoni, Andrea; Rambaldi, Diana Cristina; Roda, Aldo; Hee Moon, Myeong

    Mass spectrometry (MS) provides analyte identification over a wide molar-mass range. However, particularly in the case of complex matrices, this ability is often enhanced by the use of pre-MS separation steps. A separation, prototype technique for the "gentle" fractionation of large/ultralarge analytes, from proteins to whole cells, is here described to reduce complexity and maintain native characteristics of the sample before MS analysis. It is based on flow field-flow fractionation, and it employs a micro-volume fractionation channel made of a ca. 20 cm hollow-fiber membrane of sub-millimeter section. The key advantages of this technique lie in the low volume and low-cost of the channel, which makes it suitable to a disposable usage. Fractionation performance and instrumental simplicity make it an interesting methodology for in-batch or on-line pre-MS treatment of such samples.

  17. Protease and hemicellulase assisted extraction of dietary fiber from wastes of Cynara cardunculus.

    PubMed

    Domingo, Cinthia Santo; Soria, Marcelo; Rojas, Ana M; Fissore, Eliana N; Gerschenson, Lía N

    2015-01-01

    The action of protease and hemicellulase for the extraction of fractions enriched in soluble fiber from bracts and stems of Cynara cardunculus was evaluated. Using a two-factor simplex design comprising protease amounts of 0-200 μL and hemicellulase amounts of 0-200 mg for 5 g of material, we explored the effect of a 5 h enzymatic treatment at 40 °C on the chemical composition and yield of the fractions isolated. The fractions contained inulin and pectin. In general, the protein, inulin, and polyphenol contents and also the yields were higher for fractions obtained from stems. The most marked effects were observed when enzymes were used at higher concentrations, especially for hemicellulase. The inclusion of a pre-heating step increased the yield and the inulin content for fractions isolated from bracts and stems and decreased the protein and polyphenol contents, and the galacturonic acid for bracts. These fractions, in general, contained the polyphenolic compounds monocaffeoylquinic acid, apigenin, and pinoresinol. PMID:25809605

  18. Protease and Hemicellulase Assisted Extraction of Dietary Fiber from Wastes of Cynara cardunculus

    PubMed Central

    Santo Domingo, Cinthia; Soria, Marcelo; Rojas, Ana M.; Fissore, Eliana N.; Gerschenson, Lía N.

    2015-01-01

    The action of protease and hemicellulase for the extraction of fractions enriched in soluble fiber from bracts and stems of Cynara cardunculus was evaluated. Using a two-factor simplex design comprising protease amounts of 0–200 μL and hemicellulase amounts of 0–200 mg for 5 g of material, we explored the effect of a 5 h enzymatic treatment at 40 °C on the chemical composition and yield of the fractions isolated. The fractions contained inulin and pectin. In general, the protein, inulin, and polyphenol contents and also the yields were higher for fractions obtained from stems. The most marked effects were observed when enzymes were used at higher concentrations, especially for hemicellulase. The inclusion of a pre-heating step increased the yield and the inulin content for fractions isolated from bracts and stems and decreased the protein and polyphenol contents, and the galacturonic acid for bracts. These fractions, in general, contained the polyphenolic compounds monocaffeoylquinic acid, apigenin, and pinoresinol. PMID:25809605

  19. Postprandial lipid response following a high fat meal in rats adapted to dietary fiber.

    PubMed

    Redard, C L; Davis, P A; Middleton, S J; Schneeman, B O

    1992-02-01

    Rats were adapted to diets containing 5 g/100 g cellulose (CL), 5 g/100 g oat bran fiber (OB) or 5 g/100 g psyllium husk (Psy) for 4 wk. Following a 12-h fast, animals were either killed at 0 h (baseline) or fed 4.5 g of a test meal that provided 50% energy from fat, then killed at 1, 4 or 6 h postprandially. Fasting plasma and HDL cholesterol concentrations were lower in Psy-fed animals than in rats fed either CL or OB. Plasma triglycerides increased significantly from baseline (0 h) in all groups but did not differ among diet treatments. Increases in triglyceride content of the treatments. Increases in triglyceride content of the chylomicron/VLDL fraction occurred in the CL- and OB-fed groups and in the HDL fraction of the Psy-fed group during the postprandial period. In unfed animals the hepatic and intestinal levels of apolipoprotein A-IV mRNA were higher in the CL-fed group than in the groups fed OB and Psy. Apolipoprotein B mRNA was higher in the intestine of the OB-fed group than in the groups fed CL and Psy and had a significant gradient along the small intestine, increasing in the distal third. The results suggest that chronic consumption of fiber is less likely to modify the acute plams triglyceride response to a fat-containing test meal than if a fiber supplement is incorporated into the meal. PMID:1310107

  20. Preparation of dietary fiber powder from tiger nut (Cyperus esculentus) milk ("Horchata") byproducts and its physicochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Zapata, Elena; Fuentes-Zaragoza, Evangélica; Fernández-López, Juana; Sendra, Esther; Sayas, Estrella; Navarro, Casilda; Pérez-Alvarez, Jose Angel

    2009-09-01

    "Horchata" is a vegetable milk obtained from tiger nuts. The solid waste from horchata production was analyzed for physicochemical and microbial properties, aiming to determine its potential use as a fiber source for the food industry. The solid waste contains a high proportion of total dietary fiber (59.71 g/100 g), composed mainly of insoluble dietary fiber (99.8%). It has a high water-holding capacity (8.01 g/g) and oil-holding capacity (6.92 g/g) and a low water absorption (1.79 g/g) and water adsorption (0.23 g/g) capacities, in comparison with other dietary fiber sources. The emulsifying ability was 70.33 mL/100 mL, and the wastes showed high emulsion stability (100 mL/100 mL). The physicochemical properties indicate that tiger nut byproducts are rich in fiber and may be considered a potential ingredient in a healthy diet. However, the microbial quality was poor, meaning that it must be pasteurized prior to its addition to any food product. PMID:19670887

  1. Dietary Fiber Intake is Associated with Increased Colonic Mucosal GPR43+ Polymorphonuclear Infiltration in Active Crohn’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Mingli; Zhu, Weiming; Gong, Jianfeng; Zuo, Lugen; Zhao, Jie; Sun, Jing; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor 43/free fatty acid receptor 2 (GPR43/FFAR2) is essential for polymorphonuclear (PMN) recruitment. We investigated the expression of GPR43/FFAR2 in the colon from Crohn’s disease patients and whether dietary fiber in enteral nutrition increases GPR43+ polymorphonuclear infiltration in mucosa. Segments of ascending colon and white blood cells from peripheral blood were obtained from 46 Crohn’s disease patients and 10 colon cancer patients. The Crohn’s disease patients were grouped by the activity of disease (active or remission) and enteral nutrition with or without dietary fiber. Histological feature, expression and location of GPR43/FFAR2 and level of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukine-6 (IL-6) and myeloperoxidase were assessed. The results of hematoxylin-eosin and immunohistochemistry staining revealed that the infiltration of immune cells, including GPR43+ PMN, was more severe in active Crohn’s disease patients who consumed normal food or enteral nutrition with dietary fiber than in remission patients and colon cancer patients. This finding was supported by the results of GPR43 and myeloperoxidase expression. Active Crohn’s disease (CD) patients who consumed enteral nutrition without dietary fiber exhibited severe immune cell infiltration similar to the other active CD patients, but GPR43+ PMNs were rarely observed. The level of TNF-α mRNA in active Crohn’s disease patients was higher than those of the other patients. In conclusion, the use of dietary fiber in enteral nutrition by active Crohn’s disease patients might increase GPR43+ PMNs infiltration in colon mucosa. This effect was not observed in Crohn’s disease patients in remission. PMID:26140540

  2. In vitro fermentation of bacterial cellulose composites as model dietary fibers.

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, Deirdre; Gidley, Michael J; Williams, Barbara A

    2011-04-27

    Plant cell walls within the human diet are compositionally heterogeneous, so defining the basis of nutritive properties is difficult. Using a pig fecal inoculum, in vitro fermentations of soluble forms of arabinoxylan, mixed-linkage glucan, and xyloglucan were compared with the same polymers incorporated into bacterial cellulose composites. Fermentation rates were highest and similar for the soluble polysaccharides. Cellulose composites incorporating those polysaccharides fermented more slowly and at similar rates to wheat bran. Bacterial cellulose and cotton fermented most slowly. Cellulose composite fermentation resulted in a different short-chain fatty acid profile, compared with soluble polysaccharides, with more butyrate and less propionate. The results suggest that physical form is more relevant than the chemistry of plant cell wall polysaccharides in determining both rate and end-products of fermentation using fecal bacteria. This work also establishes bacterial cellulose composites as a useful model system for the fermentation of complex cell wall dietary fiber. PMID:21417282

  3. Functional metagenomics to mine the human gut microbiome for dietary fiber catabolic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Tasse, Lena; Bercovici, Juliette; Pizzut-Serin, Sandra; Robe, Patrick; Tap, Julien; Klopp, Christophe; Cantarel, Brandi L; Coutinho, Pedro M; Henrissat, Bernard; Leclerc, Marion; Doré, Joël; Monsan, Pierre; Remaud-Simeon, Magali; Potocki-Veronese, Gabrielle

    2010-11-01

    The human gut microbiome is a complex ecosystem composed mainly of uncultured bacteria. It plays an essential role in the catabolism of dietary fibers, the part of plant material in our diet that is not metabolized in the upper digestive tract, because the human genome does not encode adequate carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZymes). We describe a multi-step functionally based approach to guide the in-depth pyrosequencing of specific regions of the human gut metagenome encoding the CAZymes involved in dietary fiber breakdown. High-throughput functional screens were first applied to a library covering 5.4 × 10(9) bp of metagenomic DNA, allowing the isolation of 310 clones showing beta-glucanase, hemicellulase, galactanase, amylase, or pectinase activities. Based on the results of refined secondary screens, sequencing efforts were reduced to 0.84 Mb of nonredundant metagenomic DNA, corresponding to 26 clones that were particularly efficient for the degradation of raw plant polysaccharides. Seventy-three CAZymes from 35 different families were discovered. This corresponds to a fivefold target-gene enrichment compared to random sequencing of the human gut metagenome. Thirty-three of these CAZy encoding genes are highly homologous to prevalent genes found in the gut microbiome of at least 20 individuals for whose metagenomic data are available. Moreover, 18 multigenic clusters encoding complementary enzyme activities for plant cell wall degradation were also identified. Gene taxonomic assignment is consistent with horizontal gene transfer events in dominant gut species and provides new insights into the human gut functional trophic chain. PMID:20841432

  4. Functional metagenomics to mine the human gut microbiome for dietary fiber catabolic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Tasse, Lena; Bercovici, Juliette; Pizzut-Serin, Sandra; Robe, Patrick; Tap, Julien; Klopp, Christophe; Cantarel, Brandi L.; Coutinho, Pedro M.; Henrissat, Bernard; Leclerc, Marion; Doré, Joël; Monsan, Pierre; Remaud-Simeon, Magali; Potocki-Veronese, Gabrielle

    2010-01-01

    The human gut microbiome is a complex ecosystem composed mainly of uncultured bacteria. It plays an essential role in the catabolism of dietary fibers, the part of plant material in our diet that is not metabolized in the upper digestive tract, because the human genome does not encode adequate carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZymes). We describe a multi-step functionally based approach to guide the in-depth pyrosequencing of specific regions of the human gut metagenome encoding the CAZymes involved in dietary fiber breakdown. High-throughput functional screens were first applied to a library covering 5.4 × 109 bp of metagenomic DNA, allowing the isolation of 310 clones showing beta-glucanase, hemicellulase, galactanase, amylase, or pectinase activities. Based on the results of refined secondary screens, sequencing efforts were reduced to 0.84 Mb of nonredundant metagenomic DNA, corresponding to 26 clones that were particularly efficient for the degradation of raw plant polysaccharides. Seventy-three CAZymes from 35 different families were discovered. This corresponds to a fivefold target-gene enrichment compared to random sequencing of the human gut metagenome. Thirty-three of these CAZy encoding genes are highly homologous to prevalent genes found in the gut microbiome of at least 20 individuals for whose metagenomic data are available. Moreover, 18 multigenic clusters encoding complementary enzyme activities for plant cell wall degradation were also identified. Gene taxonomic assignment is consistent with horizontal gene transfer events in dominant gut species and provides new insights into the human gut functional trophic chain. PMID:20841432

  5. Dietary fiber supplements: effects on serum and liver lipids and on liver phospholipid composition in rats.

    PubMed

    Kritchevsky, D; Tepper, S A; Satchithanandam, S; Cassidy, M M; Vahouny, G V

    1988-04-01

    Rats (6 per group) were fed semipurified diets containing either particulate fibers (alfalfa, 10%; cellulose, 10%; bran, 10%), a soluble ionic fiber (pectin 5%), soluble, nonionic fibers (guar gum, 5%; Metamucil, 10%), a mixed fiber preparation (Fibyrax, 10%, or an insoluble, ionic bile acid-binding resin (cholestyramine, 2%). The control group was fed the unsupplemented diet. The feeding period, during which diet and water were provided ad libitum, was 28 days. Compared with the control group, serum total cholesterol levels were increased by more than 10% in rats fed alfalfa and decreased by more than 10% in rats fed cellulose, guar gum, Fibyrax and cholestyramine. There were no significant differences in percentage of plasma HDL cholesterol. Serum triglycerides were elevated in the groups fed alfalfa, pectin, guar gum or Fibyrax and reduced in the group fed Metamucil. Plasma phospholipids were elevated in rats fed alfalfa or bran, unaffected in rats fed pectin or Metamucil and reduced in the other groups. Liver total cholesterol was elevated in all groups but those fed wheat bran and cholestyramine. The percentage of liver cholesterol present as ester was elevated in every group except that fed cholestyramine. Liver triglycerides were reduced in rats fed guar gum or Metamucil and elevated in those fed alfalfa. Liver phospholipids were lowered in the group fed cellulose. Liver phospholipids were fractionated by thin layer chromatography to give phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), sphingomyelin (Sph), lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) and phosphatidylinositol plus phosphatidylserine (PI + PS).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2840544

  6. Effects of dietary fibers with different fermentation characteristics on feeding motivation in adult female pigs.

    PubMed

    Souza da Silva, Carol; Bolhuis, J Elizabeth; Gerrits, Walter J J; Kemp, Bas; van den Borne, Joost J G C

    2013-02-17

    Dietary fibers can be fermented in the colon, resulting in production of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) and secretion of satiety-related peptides. Fermentation characteristics (fermentation kinetics and SCFA-profile) differ between fibers and could impact their satiating potential. We investigated the effects of fibers with varying fermentation characteristics on feeding motivation in adult female pigs. Sixteen pair-housed pigs received four diets in four periods in a Latin square design. Starch from a control (C) diet was exchanged, based on gross energy, for inulin (INU), guar gum (GG), or retrograded tapioca starch (RS), each at a low (L) and a high (H) inclusion level. This resulted in a decreased metabolizable energy intake when feeding fiber diets as compared with the C diet. According to in vitro fermentation measurements, INU is rapidly fermentable and yields relatively high amounts of propionate, GG is moderately rapidly fermentable and yields relatively high amounts of acetate, and RS is slowly fermentable and yields relatively high amounts of butyrate. Feeding motivation was assessed using behavioral tests at 1h, 3h and 7h after the morning meal, and home pen behavioral observations throughout the day. The number of wheel turns paid for a food reward in an operant test was unaffected by diet. Pigs on H-diets ran 25% slower for a food reward in a runway test than pigs on L-diets, and showed less spontaneous physical activity and less stereotypic behavior in the hours before the afternoon meal, reflecting increased interprandial satiety. Reduced feeding motivation with increasing inclusion level was most pronounced for RS, as pigs decreased speed in the runway test and tended to have a lower voluntary food intake in an ad libitum food intake test when fed RS-H. In conclusion, increasing levels of fermentable fibers in the diet seemed to enhance satiety in adult pigs, despite a reduction in metabolizable energy supply. RS was the most satiating fiber

  7. Distinct difference in absorption pattern in pigs of betaine provided as a supplement or present naturally in cereal dietary fiber.

    PubMed

    Hedemann, Mette Skou; Theil, Peter Kappel; Lærke, Helle Nygaard; Bach Knudsen, Knud Erik

    2015-03-18

    The net absorption of betaine and choline was determined for 4 h after the first meal of the day in three experiments with porto-arterial catheterized pigs in which betaine was added as a supplement to a low-betaine diet (n=4 pigs) and compared to the net absorption of betaine and choline from high-fiber breads differing in amount and source of dietary fiber (two experiments, n=6 pigs each). Plasma betaine peaked after 30 min when betaine was fed as a supplement, whereas it peaked after 120-180 min when high-fiber breads were fed. Plasma betaine showed no diet×time interaction after feeding with high-fiber breads, indicating that the absorption kinetic did not differ between fiber sources. The net absorption of choline was not affected by the experimental diets. In conclusion, betaine in cereal sources has to be liberated from the matrix prior to absorption, causing delayed absorption. PMID:25716171

  8. Milk production and composition responds to dietary neutral detergent fiber and starch ratio in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Meng; Bu, Dengpan; Wang, Jiaqi; Zhou, Xiaoqiao; Zhu, Dan; Zhang, Ting; Niu, Junli; Ma, Lu

    2016-06-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether dietary neutral detergent fiber (NDF) : starch ratio could be considered as a nutritional indicator to evaluate carbohydrate composition and manipulate milk production and composition synthesis. Eight primiparous dairy cows were assigned to four total mixed rations with NDF : starch ratios of 0.86, 1.18, 1.63 and 2.34 from T1 to T4 in a replicated 4 × 4 Latin square design. Dry matter intake and milk production were decreased from T1 to T4. Digestibility of dry matter, organic matter, NDF and crude protein were linearly decreased from T1 to T4. As NDF : starch ratio increased, milk protein content and production, and milk lactose content and production were linearly reduced. However, milk fat content was linearly increased from T1 to T4. Quadratic effect was observed on milk fat production with the highest level in T3. Averaged rumen pH was linearly increased from T1 to T4, and subacute rumen acidosis occurred in T1. Ruminal propionate and butyrate concentration were linearly decreased, and microbial crude protein and metabolizable protein decreased from T1 to T4. It is concluded that NDF : starch ratio can be considered as a potential indicator to evaluate dietary carbohydrate composition and manipulate milk production and composition synthesis. PMID:26712573

  9. [Role of dietary fibers in the nutritional management of chronic renal failure].

    PubMed

    Younes, H; Alphonse, J Cl; Deteix, R

    2004-01-01

    During the past few decades, considerable attention has been given to the impact of nutrition on kidney disease. Although most dietary attempts to treat chronic renal failure (CRF) and to decrease uremia recommend a protein restriction, another dietetic approach, based on dietary fibers (DF), can lead to the same urea-lowering effect by increasing urea-nitrogen (N) excretion in stool with a concomitant decrease of the total N quantity excreted in urine. In fact, feeding DF results in a greater rate of urea N transfer from blood to large bowel, where it will be hydrolyzed by bacterial ureases before subsequent microflora metabolism and proliferation. Because elevated concentration of serum urea N have been associated with adverse clinical symptoms of CRF, these results suggested a possible usefulness of combining DF with a low protein diet to increase N excretion via the fecal route. These results have been shown in animal models of experimental renal failure and in CRF patients. Further investigations in this population of patients are currently in progress to study whether DF may be beneficial on CRF progression and on CRF terminal stage tolerance. A part of this work is financed by the French Society of Nephrology. PMID:15584637

  10. The immune response of rat spleen to dietary fibers and to low doses of carcinogen: morphometric and immunohistochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Zusman, I; Gurevich, P; Benhur, H; Berman, V; Sandler, B; Tendler, Y; Madar, Z

    1998-01-01

    The effects of high-fiber diets on anticancer immune response are often masked by the effects of high-dose carcinogens. Using low levels of carcinogen the splenic immune response can be evaluated. Colon tumors were induced in rats with low doses of 1, 2-dimethylhydrazine, in the following experimental groups: rats fed with low fiber diet without exposure to carcinogen; rats exposed to the carcinogen and fed with low-fiber diet; rats exposed to carcinogen, and maintained on high-fiber diets, and did not develop tumors; and rats that developed tumors after exposure to carcinogen and maintenance on either low-fiber or high-fiber diets. After 24 weeks their spleens were studied immunohistochemically and morphometrically. In tumor-free rats, low doses of carcinogen caused significant response of the lymphoid system. This was manifested in the intensive blast transformation and in an increase in the number of dendritic cells and macrophages in different structures of the spleen. Dietary fibers activated these processes: the number of Ki-67 positive cells, macrophages and plasma cells increased significantly in the red pulp. A positive correlation was found between the effects of the carcinogen and proliferation of lymphocytes in the white pulp, and to lesser degree between high-fiber diets and lymphocytic abundance in the red pulp. The number of splenic apoptotic lymphocytes decreased in rats exposed to carcinogen. In tumor-bearing rats, immune insufficiency of the splenic responses was seen in the significant decrease of the areas of the mantle layer and the periarterial sheaths, as result of the decreased number of lymphocytes. Dietary fibers reduced the degree of this insufficiency. Even low doses of carcinogen cause a significant splenic immune response. This reaction has a compensatory character with macrophages, B and T cells participating. Addition of any high-fiber diet after the exposure to carcinogen activated the lymphocyte proliferation in the spleen. PMID

  11. Photodynamic therapy of malignant brain tumors: supplementary postoperative light delivery by implanted optical fibers: field fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Paul J.; Wilson, Brian C.

    1991-06-01

    Sixty-three patients with malignant brain tumors were treated with intraoperative photodynamic therapy (PDT) using an argon dye pump laser and preoperatively administered hematoporphyrin derivative or dihematoporphyrin ether. In 13 cases, in addition to cavitary photo-illumination, cylindrical diffusion fibers were used to increase the amount of light energy administered to the tumor tissue intraoperatively. This interstitial photo-illumination was tolerated at light energy densities of less than 450 J/cm. In six recent cases, all of whom had large malignant gliomas and could not be illuminated adequately at a single session, cylindrical diffusion fibers were left in situ after intraoperative cavitary photo-illumination of the tumor residuum. The fibers were protected from fracturing by placing all but the exposed diffusing end in a red rubber catheter of the appropriate diameter. The fibers were externalized through a separate stab wound as would be the case for a ventricular drain. Photo-illumination was continued one or two days post-operatively. The optimal fiber couple to the argon dye pump laser was achieved by assessing the fiber side scatter with a photometer. These six patients received 585-2730 Joules during the post-operative photo-illumination. The patients tolerated the fractionated photo-illumination well. A transient scalp inflammation occurred as the consequence light transmission to skin from the implanted fibers in one case. The median survival for the whole series was 8.5 months (40 weeks) with a 1- and 2-year actuarial survival rate of 33, respectively.

  12. Blasting extrusion processing: the increase of soluble dietary fiber content and extraction of soluble-fiber polysaccharides from wheat bran.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiaoguang; Ye, Ran; Chen, Ye

    2015-08-01

    In this study, soluble dietary fiber (SDF) content of wheat bran was significantly increased from 9.82 ± 0.16 (w/w, %) to 16.72 ± 0.28 (w/w, %) by a novel blasting extrusion processing with enhanced water retention capacity and the swelling capacity. In addition, a water-soluble polysaccharide (WBP) was isolated and extracted from extruded SDF. WBP was successfully purified from SDF by column chromatography systems with the average molecular weight (Mw) of 4.7 × 10(4)Da, containing arabinose, xylose, glucose, and galactose. With the molar ratio of 0.76:0.99:1.00:0.12. Our results suggest that WBP owned 1 → 2, 1 → 3, 1 → 2, 6 and 1 → 4, 1 → 4, 6 glycosidic bonds in the absence of 1 →, 1 → 6 glycosidic bonds. In vitro antioxidant assays (DPPH, ABTS+ radical scavenging capacities, and ferric ion reducing capacity) demonstrated that WBP possesses good antioxidant capacity, and it could be potentially used as a natural antioxidant for use in functional food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries. PMID:25766807

  13. Hypolipidemic effect of fruit fibers in rats fed with high dietary fat.

    PubMed

    Esmael, O A; Sonbul, S N; Kumosani, T A; Moselhy, S S

    2015-03-01

    The hypolipidemic effect of 10% fruit fibers in rats fed with high-fat diet (HFD) was evaluated. This study was conducted on a total of 50 male Albino rats divided into 10 equal groups fed with different types of dietary fruits. The feeding period lasted for 24 weeks. Fasting blood samples were collected and sera separated and subjected to lipid profile assay and atherogenic index. In addition, total antioxidant activity of different fruits was determined. The results obtained showed that pomegranate had higher content of antioxidants followed by apple, strawberry and guava compared with other fruits. Rats fed with 20% coconut oil showed a highly significant elevation in the levels of serum total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and atherogenic factor while the level of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol was significantly decreased when compared with control rats. Histological examination revealed that there was a large lipid and cholesterol deposition in the livers of rats fed with HFD. The potential in lowering the levels of plasma total cholesterol and triglyceride is in the following order: pomegranate > apple > strawberry > guava > papaya > mandarin and orange. Accumulation of hepatic lipid droplets was diminished when compared with the HFD group. Also, antiatherogenic is better than the untreated groups. Accordingly these hypolipidemic effects may be due to high-fiber content and antioxidant activity of these fruits. PMID:23315090

  14. Influence of different soluble dietary fibers on the bioaccessibility of the minor Fusarium mycotoxin beauvericin.

    PubMed

    Meca, G; Meneghelli, G; Ritieni, A; Mañes, J; Font, G

    2012-05-01

    Beauvericin (BEA) is a bioactive compound produced by the secondary metabolism of several Fusarium strains and is known to have various biological activities. This study investigated the bioaccessibility of the BEA tested in concentrations of 5 and 25mg/L, in a model solution and in wheat crispy breads elaborated with different natural binding compounds as the soluble alimentary dietary fibers β-1,3 glucan, chitosan low molecular weight (L.M.W.), chitosan medium molecular weight (M.M.W.), fructooligosaccharides (FOS), galattomannan, inulin and pectin, added at concentrations of 1% and 5%. The bioaccessibility was determinated by employing a simulated gastrointestinal digestion that simulates the physiologic conditions of the digestive tract until the colonic compartment. The determination of BEA in the intestinal fluids was carried out by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry detection (LC-MS). The mean BEA bioaccessibility data in the model solutions ranged from 31.8% of the samples treated with only the duodenal digestion until 54.0% of the samples processed including the colonic fermentation, whereas in the alimentary system composed by the wheat crispy breads produced with different fiber concentration the duodenal and the duodenal+colonic BEA bioaccessibility resulted in 1.9% and 27.0% respectively. PMID:22391461

  15. Comparison of konjac glucomannan digestibility and fermentability with other dietary fibers in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yu-Ting; Stewart, Maria

    2012-02-01

    Konjac glucomannan (KGM) is a dietary fiber found in Amophophallus konjac. This fiber is fermentable based on human and animal trials, but short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) production profiles are unknown. The aim of this study is to characterize the digestibility and fermentability in vitro of two preparations of KGM, to better understand how KGM improves human health. Konnyaku (yam cake made of A. konjac), isolated KGM, inulin, and guar gum were subjected to in vitro digestion and in vitro fermentation. Fermentation samples were removed at 0, 4, 8, 12, and 24 hours for gas volume, pH, and SCFA measurements. Acetate, propionate, and butyrate were measured with gas chromatography. Results of the in vitro digestion confirm that KGM and konnyaku are resistant to degradation by digestive enzymes. Gas production in fermentation vessels containing konnyaku and KGM was lower than for inulin from 8 to 24 hours. Both samples produced SCFA concentrations similar to guar gum, which favored acetate and propionate over butyrate production. This study is the first to characterize SCFA production by KGM in its isolated form and in food form. Fermentation patterns presented in this study may provide a mechanism for the previously published health benefit of konnyaku and KGM. PMID:22149628

  16. Functional Properties and Morphological Characters of Soluble Dietary Fibers in Different Edible Parts of Angelica Keiskei.

    PubMed

    Xie, Fan; Wang, Yuqiang; Wu, Jinhong; Wang, Zhengwu

    2016-09-01

    This study comparatively investigated the functional properties, chemical compositions, and morphological characters of soluble dietary fibers (SDFs) from the root, stem, and leaf of Angelica keiskei. The SDFs showed relevant functional properties, with the root SDF (RSDF) exhibiting the highest water-holding capacity (22.6 g/g), oil-holding capacity (6.29 mL/g), swelling capacity (36.6 mL/g), emulsion stability, and fat adsorption (5.66 g/g). Stem SDF (SSDF) gave the highest foam stability, toxic ions adsorption (Pb: 1.12 mg/g; As: 3.22 mg/g), and bile acid salts adsorption (sodium cholate: 85.6 mg/g; sodium glycocholate: 93.1 mg/g; sodium taurocholate: 125.7 mg/g). RSDF and SSDF presented similar monosaccharide compositions, thermal property, chemical bonds and groups, and irregular, rough, and porous surfaces. It can be concluded that the obtained SDFs, especially for RSDF and SSDF, can be used in the food industry as fiber-rich functional ingredients. PMID:27481763

  17. Dietary fibers affect viscosity of solutions and simulated human gastric and small intestinal digesta.

    PubMed

    Dikeman, Cheryl L; Murphy, Michael R; Fahey, George C

    2006-04-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the viscosities of both soluble and insoluble dietary fibers. In Expt. 1, corn bran, defatted rice bran, guar gum, gum xanthan, oat bran, psyllium, soy hulls, stabilized rice bran, wheat bran, wood cellulose, and 2 methylcellulose controls (Ticacel 42, Ticacel 43) were hydrated in water overnight at 0.5, 1, 1.5, or 2% concentrations. In Expt. 2, guar gum, oat bran, psyllium, rice bran, wheat bran, and wood cellulose were subjected to a 2-stage in vitro gastric and small intestinal digestion simulation model. Viscosity was measured every 2 and 3 h during gastric and small intestinal simulation, respectively. Viscosities in both experiments were measured at multiple shear rates. Viscosities of all fiber solutions were concentration- and shear rate-dependent. Rice brans, soy hulls, and wood cellulose had the lowest viscosities, whereas guar gum, psyllium, and xanthan gum had the highest viscosities, regardless of concentration. During gastric simulation, viscosity was higher (P < 0.05) at 4 h than at 0 h for guar gum, psyllium, rice bran, and wheat bran. During small intestinal simulation, viscosities were higher (P < 0.05) between 3 and 9 h compared with 18 h for guar gum, oat bran, and rice bran. Guar gum, psyllium, and oat bran exhibited viscous characteristics throughout small intestinal simulation, indicating potential for these fibers to elicit blood glucose and lipid attenuation. Wheat and rice brans and wood cellulose did not exhibit viscous characteristics throughout small intestinal digestion; thus, they may be beneficial for laxation. PMID:16549450

  18. Low Adherence to Dietary Recommendations for Saturated Fat, Fiber, and Sodium Found Among American Indians and Other U.S. Adults with Diabetes*

    PubMed Central

    Eilat-Adar, Sigal; Xu, Jiaqiong; Zephier, Ellie; O’Leary, Veronica; Howard, Barbara V.; Resnick, Helaine E.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this article was to evaluate how well American Indians with diabetes met dietary recommendations and to compare adherence to dietary recommendations with those of U.S. adults with diabetes in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Dietary intake in both studies was assessed using a 24-h recall questionnaire. Dietary intakes were evaluated against American Diabetes Association (ADA) dietary recommendations. The analysis sample consisted of 1,008 participants from SHS examined from 1997–1999 and 373 participants from NHANES examined from 1999–2000, all with diabetes. In both samples, intake of protein, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), and carbohydrates met the 1997 ADA dietary recommendations. However, intakes of saturated fatty acid (SFA) as well as sodium were higher and dietary fiber intake was lower than recommended. In the SHS and NHANES, only 4.6% and 8.5% of persons with diabetes met recommendations for both SFA and fiber (p = 0.02), respectively. However, only 8.3% of the NHANES sample met the 2006 recommendations for SFA and fiber, and none of the SHS sample met those recommendations. This cross-sectional study shows low adherence to ADA dietary recommendations for saturated fat, fiber, and sodium by American Indians with diabetes and by the broader U.S. population of adults with diabetes, and shows that in American Indians with diabetes programs to decrease SFA and increase fiber intakes are warranted. PMID:18716172

  19. Incorporation of buriti endocarp flour in gluten-free whole cookies as potential source of dietary fiber.

    PubMed

    Becker, Fernanda Salamoni; Damiani, Clarissa; de Melo, Adriane Alexandre Machado; Borges, Paulo Rogério Siriano; Boas, Eduardo Valério de Barros Vilas

    2014-12-01

    Cookies were prepared by replacing a mixture of brown rice flour (70%) and corn starch (30%) (BRFCS) by buriti endocarp flour (BEF) (0, 5, 10, 15 or 20%). BEF figured as a potential source of dietary fiber (70.53 g 100 g(-1)), especially of insoluble fiber (67.50 g 100 g(-1)), and gluten-free whole cookies showed increased dietary fiber content by adding 5, 10, 15 and 20% BEF (8.58 to 20.02 g 100 g(-1)) when compared to control cookie (6.91 g 100 g(-1)). The addition of BEF affected diameter, spread ratio, color and texture of cookies. All cookies added with BEF were darker, harder and presented smaller diameter and smaller spread ratio than the control cookie. These difference increased proportionally to level of substitution of BRFSC by BEF. Gluten-free whole cookies with up to 15% BEF were well accepted by consumers. Therefore, the use of BEF in cookies may increase the availability of functional ingredients source of dietary fiber for celiac consumers, add economic value to buriti processing by-products and decrease environmental impacts due to the high amounts of waste generated by buriti processing industries. PMID:25315266

  20. Functional properties and dietary fiber characterization of mango processing by-products (Mangifera indica L., cv Ataulfo and Tommy Atkins).

    PubMed

    García-Magaña, María de Lourdes; García, Hugo S; Bello-Pérez, Luis A; Sáyago-Ayerdi, Sonia G; de Oca, Miguel Mata-Montes

    2013-09-01

    Several reports have focused on utilization of post-harvest residues of crops, while neglecting those residues produced by mango processing. These residues represent a waste of nutrients and a source of environmental contaminants. Such by-products could be valuable sources of dietary fiber (DF), antioxidant compounds, and single carbohydrates. The aim of this study was to evaluate some functional properties (FP), and the content of DF and polyphenols (PP) of the peel and coarse material obtained from residues during the industrial processing of Ataulfo and Tommy Atkins mangoes. The total dietary fiber (TDF) content was about 225 mg/g and 387 mg/g (dry weight) for the coarse material and the peel, respectively, from which soluble dietary fiber represented 23 and 42%, respectively. The main neutral sugar identified was rhamnose, especially in peels; the klason lignin (KL) content was 92 mg/g, which highlights the Ataulfo peel (Ataulfo-P) and the Tommy Atkins peel (Tommy Atkins-P). The extractable PP content in Ataulfo-P was higher than in Tommy-Atkins-P, and interesting data for non-extractable PP were obtained in the residues. FP as swelling, water holding, oil holding, and glucose absorption in the residues was studied, obtaining better functional properties when compared to cellulose fiber. The results show that mango industrial by-products, mainly from the Ataulfo-P variety, could be used as ingredients in food products because of their functional properties as well as their DF and PP content. PMID:23715790

  1. Effects of Dietary Fibers on Weight Gain, Carbohydrate Metabolism and Gastric Ghrelin Gene Expression in High Fat Diet Fed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhong Q.; Zuberi, Aamir; Zhang, Xian H.; Macgowan, Jacalyn; Qin, Jianhua; Ye, Xin; Son, Leslie; Wu, Qinglin; Lian, Kun; Cefalu, William T.

    2009-01-01

    Diets that are high in dietary fiber are reported to have substantial health benefits. We sought to compare the metabolic effects for three types of dietary fibers, i.e. sugar cane fiber (SCF), psyllium (PSY) and cellulose (CEL) on body weight, carbohydrate metabolism and stomach ghrelin gene expression in a high-fat diet fed mouse model. Thirty-six male mice (C57BL/6) were randomly divided into four groups that consumed high fat-diets or high fat diet containing 10% SCF, PSY, and CEL respectively. After baseline measurements were assessed for body weight, plasma insulin, glucose, leptin and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), animals were treated for 12 weeks. Parameters were re-evaluated at end of study. Whereas there was no difference at the baseline, body weight gains in the PSY and SCF groups were significantly lower than in CEL group at end of study, No difference in body weight was observed between the PSY and SCF animals. Body composition analysis demonstrated that fat mass in the SCF group was considerably lower than in the CEL and HFD groups. In addition, fasting plasma glucose and insulin and areas under curve of IPGTT were also significantly lower in the SCF and PSY groups than in the CEL and HFD groups. Moreover, fasting plasma concentrations of leptin were significantly lower and GLP-1 level was two-fold higher in the SCF and PSY mice than in the HFD and CEL mice. Ghrelin mRNA levels of stomach in SCF groups were significantly lower than in CEL and HFD groups as well. These results suggest differences in response to dietary fiber intake in this animal model as high fat diets incorporating dietary fibers such as SCF and PSY appeared to attenuate weight gain, enhance insulin sensitivity, and modulate leptin and GLP-1 secretion and gastric ghrelin gene expression. PMID:17998014

  2. Variation in the content of dietary fiber and components thereof in wheats in the HEALTHGRAIN Diversity Screen.

    PubMed

    Gebruers, Kurt; Dornez, Emmie; Boros, Danuta; Fraś, Anna; Dynkowska, Wioletta; Bedo, Zoltan; Rakszegi, Mariann; Delcour, Jan A; Courtin, Christophe M

    2008-11-12

    Within the HEALTHGRAIN diversity screening program, the variation in the content of dietary fiber and components thereof in different types of wheat was studied. The wheat types were winter (131 varieties) and spring (20 varieties) wheats (both Triticum aestivum L., also referred to as common wheats), durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf., 10 varieties), spelt wheat (Triticum spelta L., 5 varieties), einkorn wheat (T. monococcum L., 5 varieties), and emmer wheat (Triticum dicoccum Schubler, 5 varieties). Common wheats contained, on average, the highest level of dietary fiber [11.5-18.3% of dry matter (dm)], whereas einkorn and emmer wheats contained the lowest level (7.2-12.8% of dm). Intermediate levels were measured in durum and spelt wheats (10.7-15.5% of dm). Also, on the basis of the arabinoxylan levels in bran, the different wheat types could be divided this way, with ranges of 12.7-22.1% of dm for common wheats, 6.1-14.4% of dm for einkorn and emmer wheats, and 10.9-13.9% of dm for durum and spelt wheats. On average, bran arabinoxylan made up ca. 29% of the total dietary fiber content of wheat. In contrast to what was the case for bran, the arabinoxylan levels in flour were comparable between the different types of wheat. For wheat, in general, they varied between 1.35 and 2.75% of dm. Einkorn, emmer, and durum wheats contained about half the level of mixed-linkage beta-glucan (0.25-0.45% of dm) present in winter, spring, and spelt wheats (0.50-0.95% of dm). All wheat types had Klason lignin, the levels of which varied from 1.40 to 3.25% of dm. The arabinoxylan contents in bran and the dietary fiber contents in wholemeal were inversely and positively related with bran yield, respectively. Aqueous wholemeal extract viscosity, a measure for the level of soluble dietary fiber, was determined to large extent by the level of water-extractable arabinoxylan. In conclusion, the present study revealed substantial variation in the contents of dietary fiber and

  3. Adaptation of healthy adult cats to select dietary fibers in vivo affects gas and short-chain fatty acid production from fiber fermentation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Barry, K A; Wojcicki, B J; Bauer, L L; Middelbos, I S; Vester Boler, B M; Swanson, K S; Fahey, G C

    2011-10-01

    Nine young adult (1.73 ± 0.03 yr) male cats were used to determine the effects of microbial adaptation to select dietary fiber sources on changes in pH in vitro and on total and hydrogen gas, short-chain fatty acid (SCFA), and branched-chain fatty acid (BCFA) production. Cats were adapted to diets containing 4% cellulose, fructooligosaccharides (FOS), or pectin for 30 d before fecal sampling. Each cat was used as a single donor, and fecal inoculum was reacted with each of the aforementioned fiber substrates. Adaptation to dietary FOS resulted in a greater change in pH when exposed to FOS than pectin (adaptation × substrate, P < 0.001). When exposed to the FOS substrate, adaptation to dietary FOS or pectin increased hydrogen gas production (adaptation × substrate, P = 0.021). Adaptation to dietary FOS increased acetate and total SCFA production when exposed to FOS substrate in vitro (adaptation × substrate, P = 0.001). When exposed to the FOS substrate, propionate production tended to increase with adaptation to dietary cellulose (adaptation × substrate, P = 0.060). The BCFA + valerate tended to decrease with adaptation to dietary FOS when exposed to FOS substrate in vitro (adaptation × substrate, P = 0.092). Fructooligosaccharides resulted in the greatest change in pH and production of total gas (P < 0.001), hydrogen gas (P < 0.001), acetate (P < 0.001), propionate (P < 0.001), butyrate (P < 0.001), total SCFA (P < 0.001), and total BCFA + valerate production (P < 0.001). Adaptation to the FOS or pectin diet increased production of hydrogen gas with FOS and pectin substrates. Adaptation to pectin increased (P = 0.033) total gas production with FOS and pectin substrates. Overall, adaptation to either FOS or pectin led to greater SCFA and gas production, but adaptation to FOS resulted in the greatest effect overall. PMID:21531846

  4. Some dietary fibers increase elimination of orally administered polychlorinated biphenyls but not that of retinol in mice.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yasuhiro; Nagata, Yasuo; Buddington, Randal K

    2004-01-01

    Dietary fiber supplementation can increase the size and nutrient absorption capacities of the small intestine in some mammals, but does this increase the risk of accumulating environmental contaminants? This study addressed this question by feeding mice diets containing various types of fiber at 0 or 100 g/kg (cellulose, lactosucrose, polydextrose, indigestible dextrin, soy polysaccharide, rice bran and chitosan) for 10 wk. During the final 2 wk, the mice were fed retinol and a dose of Arochlor 1254 [polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB)] estimated to be 5% of the median lethal dose. Accumulation was determined using whole blood samples collected on days 1, 3 and 7 as well as eight tissues (whole blood, small and large intestine, liver, gall bladder, mesentery, kidney and brain). Elimination of Arochlor 1254 and retinol was determined using daily collections of feces and urine. The patterns of accumulation and elimination differed between Arochlor 1254 and retinol, among tissues, and among mice fed diets with various amounts and types of fiber. Dietary fiber supplementation did not decrease accumulation of PCB. However, the diet with chitosan increased fecal excretion of Arochlor 1254 compared to the fiber-free diet (P<0.05). The diets with fermentable fiber (polydextrose, indigestible dextrin and soy polysaccharides) increased urinary excretion of PCB compared to the diets with water-insoluble fiber (cellulose, rice bran and chitosan; P<0.05). The most efficacious diets for minimizing accumulation of environmental contaminants and accelerating elimination likely include a combination of soluble and insoluble fiber, but the specific types, proportions and amounts remain to be determined. PMID:14704306

  5. Dietary adherence and satisfaction with a bean-based high-fiber weight loss diet: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Turner, Tonya F; Nance, Laura M; Strickland, William D; Malcolm, Robert J; Pechon, Susan; O'Neil, Patrick M

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Dietary fiber can reduce hunger and enhance satiety, but fiber intake during hypocaloric weight loss diets typically falls short of recommended levels. We examined the nutritional effects and acceptability of two high-fiber hypocaloric diets differing in sources of fiber: (a) beans or (b) fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. Methods. Subjects were 2 men, 18 women, mean age = 46.9, and mean BMI = 30.6. Subjects completed 3-day food diaries in each of the two baseline weeks. Subjects were then randomized to four weeks on one of two 1400-calorie diets including 25-35 g fiber primarily from 1.5 cups beans/day or from fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. Recommended fiber-rich foods were provided. Subjects kept weekly 3-day food diaries and were assessed weekly. Results. Diet conditions did not differ on outcome measures. Both diets increased fiber intake from 16.6 g/day (SD = 7.1) at baseline to (treatment average) 28.4 g/day (SD = 6.5) (P < 0.001). Fiber intake was consistent over treatment. Caloric intake dropped from 1623.1 kcal/day (SD = 466.9) (baseline) to 1322.2 kcal/day (SD = 275.8) (P = 0.004). Mean weight loss was 1.4 kg (SD = 1.5; P < 0.001). Energy density and self-reported hunger decreased (P's < 0.01) while self-reported fullness increased (P < 0.05). Both diets were rated as potentially acceptable as long as six months. Conclusions. Both diets significantly increased fiber intake by 75%, increased satiation, and reduced hunger. Results support increasing fiber in weight loss diets with a variety of fiber sources. PMID:24555159

  6. Dietary Adherence and Satisfaction with a Bean-Based High-Fiber Weight Loss Diet: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Tonya F.; Nance, Laura M.; Strickland, William D.; Malcolm, Robert J.; Pechon, Susan; O'Neil, Patrick M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Dietary fiber can reduce hunger and enhance satiety, but fiber intake during hypocaloric weight loss diets typically falls short of recommended levels. We examined the nutritional effects and acceptability of two high-fiber hypocaloric diets differing in sources of fiber: (a) beans or (b) fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. Methods. Subjects were 2 men, 18 women, mean age = 46.9, and mean BMI = 30.6. Subjects completed 3-day food diaries in each of the two baseline weeks. Subjects were then randomized to four weeks on one of two 1400-calorie diets including 25–35 g fiber primarily from 1.5 cups beans/day or from fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. Recommended fiber-rich foods were provided. Subjects kept weekly 3-day food diaries and were assessed weekly. Results. Diet conditions did not differ on outcome measures. Both diets increased fiber intake from 16.6 g/day (SD = 7.1) at baseline to (treatment average) 28.4 g/day (SD = 6.5) (P < 0.001). Fiber intake was consistent over treatment. Caloric intake dropped from 1623.1 kcal/day (SD = 466.9) (baseline) to 1322.2 kcal/day (SD = 275.8) (P = 0.004). Mean weight loss was 1.4 kg (SD = 1.5; P < 0.001). Energy density and self-reported hunger decreased (P's < 0.01) while self-reported fullness increased (P < 0.05). Both diets were rated as potentially acceptable as long as six months. Conclusions. Both diets significantly increased fiber intake by 75%, increased satiation, and reduced hunger. Results support increasing fiber in weight loss diets with a variety of fiber sources. PMID:24555159

  7. Carbon isotope fractionation of amino acids in fish muscle reflects biosynthesis and isotopic routing from dietary protein.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Kelton W; Fogel, Marilyn L; Elsdon, Travis S; Thorrold, Simon R

    2010-09-01

    1. Analysis of stable carbon isotopes is a valuable tool for studies of diet, habitat use and migration. However, significant variability in the degree of trophic fractionation (Delta(13)C(C-D)) between consumer (C) and diet (D) has highlighted our lack of understanding of the biochemical and physiological underpinnings of stable isotope ratios in tissues. 2. An opportunity now exists to increase the specificity of dietary studies by analyzing the delta(13)C values of amino acids (AAs). Common mummichogs (Fundulus heteroclitus, Linnaeus 1766) were reared on four isotopically distinct diets to examine individual AA Delta(13)C(C-D) variability in fish muscle. 3. Modest bulk tissue Delta(13)C(C-D) values reflected relatively large trophic fractionation for many non-essential AAs and little to no fractionation for all essential AAs. 4. Essential AA delta(13)C values were not significantly different between diet and consumer (Delta(13)C(C-D) = 0.0 +/- 0.4 per thousand), making them ideal tracers of carbon sources at the base of the food web. Stable isotope analysis of muscle essential AAs provides a promising tool for dietary reconstruction and identifying baseline delta(13)C values to track animal movement through isotopically distinct food webs. 5. Non-essential AA Delta(13)C(C-D) values showed evidence of both de novo biosynthesis and direct isotopic routing from dietary protein. We attributed patterns in Delta(13)C(C-D) to variability in protein content and AA composition of the diet as well as differential utilization of dietary constituents contributing to the bulk carbon pool. This variability illustrates the complicated nature of metabolism and suggests caution must be taken with the assumptions used to interpret bulk stable isotope data in dietary studies. 6. Our study is the first to investigate the expression of AA Delta(13)C(C-D) values for a marine vertebrate and should provide for significant refinements in studies of diet, habitat use and migration using

  8. Effect of micronization on the physicochemical properties of insoluble dietary fiber from citrus (Citrus junos Sieb. ex Tanaka) pomace.

    PubMed

    Ye, Fayin; Tao, Bingbing; Liu, Jia; Zou, Yan; Zhao, Guohua

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of micronization (mechanical and jet grindings) on the physicochemical properties of the insoluble dietary fiber from citrus pomace in comparison with ordinary grinding. The results showed that micronization treatment effectively pulverized the IDF-CP powders to micron scale and significantly increased the soluble dietary fiber content (p < 0.05). Compared with mechanical grinding, jet grinding was more effective in size reduction and resulted in IDF-CP powders with narrower particle size distributions. Micronized IDF-CP powders had smaller particle size, smoother surface, higher fluidity, cation-exchange capacity, and metal cation binding capacity values, but lower water holding capacity, oil holding capacity, and swelling capacity values. These functional properties were significantly dependent on surface area and particle size (D0.5). The present study suggested that micronization treatments could modify functional properties of IDF-CP powders, which promotes their use in food applications. PMID:26130646

  9. Chemical composition, techno-functional and sensory properties and effects of three dietary fibers on the quality characteristics of Tunisian beef sausage.

    PubMed

    Ktari, Naourez; Smaoui, Slim; Trabelsi, Imen; Nasri, Moncef; Ben Salah, Riadh

    2014-01-01

    This study determined the effects of three dietary fibers namely, VITACEL LC200 powdered cellulose (LC200), barley beta-glucan concentrate (BBC), and VITACEL KF500 potato fiber (KF500), on the techno-functional and sensory properties and quality characteristics of Tunisian beef sausage. The findings revealed interesting functional properties for LC200 fiber. This fiber displayed high water binding capacity (WBC) and oil binding capacity (OBC), values of 16.2 g/g and 10.2 g/g, respectively, which are higher than reported for most fruit and vegetable fiber concentrates. The application of LC200 improved the masticability and elasticity of beef sausage formulations and minimized their hardness and production costs without negatively affecting their sensory properties. Overall, the findings demonstrate the potential functional and economic utility of LC200 fiber as a promising source of dietary fiber. PMID:24013695

  10. Dietary fiber and the glycemic index: a background paper for the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations 2012

    PubMed Central

    Øverby, Nina Cecilie; Sonestedt, Emily; Laaksonen, David E.; Birgisdottir, Bryndis Eva

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to review recent data on dietary fiber (DF) and the glycemic index (GI), with special focus on studies from the Nordic countries regarding cardiometabolic risk factors, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and total mortality. In this study, recent guidelines and scientific background papers or updates on older reports on DF and GI published between 2000 and 2011 from the US, EU, WHO, and the World Cancer Research Fund were reviewed, as well as prospective cohort and intervention studies carried out in the Nordic countries. All of the reports support the role for fiber-rich foods and DF as an important part of a healthy diet. All of the five identified Nordic papers found protective associations between high intake of DF and health outcomes; lower risk of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, colorectal and breast cancer. None of the reports and few of the Nordic papers found clear evidence for the GI in prevention of risk factors or diseases in healthy populations, although association was found in sub-groups, e.g. overweight and obese individuals and suggestive for prevention of type 2 diabetes. It was concluded that DF is associated with decreased risk of different chronic diseases and metabolic conditions. There is not enough evidence that choosing foods with low GI will decrease the risk of chronic diseases in the population overall. However, there is suggestive evidence that ranking food based on their GI might be of use for overweight and obese individuals. Issues regarding methodology, validity and practicality of the GI remain to be clarified. PMID:23538683

  11. Beneficial Effect of Higher Dietary Fiber Intake on Plasma HDL-C and TC/HDL-C Ratio among Chinese Rural-to-Urban Migrant Workers

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Quan; Wu, Jiang; Tang, Jie; Wang, Jia-Ji; Lu, Chu-Hong; Wang, Pei-Xi

    2015-01-01

    Research has shown that high-dose supplemental dietary fiber intake has beneficial effects on cardiovascular risk factors. To clarify such a relationship, we examined the association between daily dietary fiber intake and plasma lipids using a cross-sectional design including 1034 (M 502, F 532) rural-to-urban workers in China. We found a dose-response relationship between increased dietary fiber intakes and increase of HDL cholesterol in male workers. There was also a dose-response relationship between increased dietary fiber intake and decreased total cholesterol to HDL cholesterol (TC/HDL-C) ratio in both male and female workers, after adjusting for potential confounders (p for trend, all p < 0.05). When the average dietary fiber intake increased from less than 18 g/day to over 30 g/day, the average HDL cholesterol level increased by 10.1%, and the TC/HDL-C ratio decreased by 14.4% for males (p = 0.020) and by 11.1% for females (p = 0.048). In conclusion, higher daily dietary fiber consumption is associated with beneficial effect on cholesterol for rural-to-urban workers in China, suggesting its potential beneficial effect on decreasing the risk of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25938914

  12. Effects of lowering dietary fiber before marketing on finishing pig growth performance, carcass characteristics, carcass fat quality, and intestinal weights.

    PubMed

    Asmus, M D; Derouchey, J M; Tokach, M D; Dritz, S S; Houser, T A; Nelssen, J L; Goodband, R D

    2014-01-01

    A total of 264 pigs (initially 41.0 kg BW) were used in a 90-d study to determine the effects of lowering dietary fiber before market on pigs fed high dietary fiber [provided by wheat middlings (midds) and distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS)] on growth performance, carcass characteristics, carcass fat quality, and intestinal weights of growing-finishing pigs. Pens of pigs were randomly allotted by initial BW and sex to 1 of 6 treatments with 6 replications per treatment and 7 or 8 pigs per pen. A positive control (corn-soybean meal-based) diet containing no DDGS or midds (9.3% NDF) and a negative control diet with 30% DDGS and 19% midds (19% NDF) were fed throughout the entire trial (d 0 to 90). The other 4 treatments were arranged in a 2 × 2 factorial with the main effects of length of fiber reduction (23 or 47 d before marketing) and fiber level fed during the reduction period (low or medium). Pigs on these treatments were fed the negative control before the reduction treatment. The medium-fiber diet contained 15% DDGS and 9.5% midds (14.2% NDF) with the low-fiber diet was the positive control diet. Increasing the feeding duration of the low-fiber diets lowered overall ADFI (linear, P = 0.03) and improved G:F (linear, P < 0.01). Lowering the fiber level for the last 23 d did not influence growth performance; however, lowering the fiber level improved carcass yield (P = 0.002), with a greater response (P < 0.001) when the low-fiber diet was fed for 23 d. Jowl fat iodine value (IV) decreased when the longer lower fiber diets were fed (linear, P < 0.01) and was lower (P < 0.001) for pigs fed the low-fiber diet during the fiber reduction period than pigs fed the medium-fiber diet during the same time period; however, increasing the time lower fiber diets were fed from 23 to 47 d further reduced (P < 0.01) jowl IV. Increasing the duration that the control diet was fed by increasing the reduction time from 23 to 47 d increased (P < 0.01) backfat depth

  13. Effects of Carbohydrate and Dietary Fiber Intake, Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load on HDL Metabolism in Asian Populations

    PubMed Central

    Yanai, Hidekatsu; Katsuyama, Hisayuki; Hamasaki, Hidetaka; Abe, Shinichi; Tada, Norio; Sako, Akahito

    2014-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is a lipoprotein which has anti-atherogenic property by reverse cholesterol transport from the peripheral tissues to liver. Low HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) levels are associated with the development of coronary artery diseases (CADs). Various epidemiological studies have suggested that the development of CAD increase in individuals with less than 40 mg/dL of HDL-C. In spite of accumulation of evidences which suggest a significant association between low HDL-C and cardiovascular diseases, effects of dietary factors on HDL metabolism remained largely unknown. There may be interracial differences in effects of dietary factors on HDL metabolism. Here we reviewed published articles about effects of carbohydrate and dietary fiber intake, glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL), on HDL-C metabolism, regarding meta-analyses and clinical studies performed in Asian population as important articles. Low carbohydrate intake, GI and GL may be beneficially associated with HDL metabolism. Dietary fiber intake may be favorably associated with HDL metabolism in Asian populations. PMID:25110535

  14. Dietary fiber and short-chain fatty acids affect cell proliferation and protein synthesis in isolated rat colonocytes.

    PubMed

    Marsman, K E; McBurney, M I

    1996-05-01

    Colonic metabolism may be affected by dietary fiber and short-chain fatty acids, the products of fiber fermentation. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of fiber supplementation (150 g/kg diet) on dynamic measurements of metabolism in isolated rat colonic epithelial cells. Additionally, we investigated the effect of in vitro short-chain fatty acid and glutamine concentrations and media osmolarity on oxygen uptake, protein synthesis, cell proliferation and anaplerotic flux. Colonocyte oxygen consumption did not differ due to fiber supplementation or the inclusion of short -chain fatty acids in incubation media. Cell proliferation (3H-thymidine uptake) was increased by fiber consumption (P fiber supplementation but was decreased when short-chain fatty acids were present in incubation media (P fiber supplementation increases in vitro colonocyte proliferation, the unchanged oxygen uptake rate indicates that there was no concurrent increase in energy expenditure. PMID:8618140

  15. [Dietary fiber in industrial tomato residue and its effects on glycaemic response and seric cholesterol in rats].

    PubMed

    Alvarado, M; Pacheco-Delahaye, E; Schnell, M; Hevia, P

    1999-06-01

    The left over after ketchup sauce is obtained is a tomato residue (RIT) that contains skin and seeds. Proximal analysis of the flour of this industrial product reveals that it has 50% dietary fiber, 18% protein and 10% fat. Due to the high dietary fiber content the effect on glucose absorption and seric cholesterol was studied. Sprague-Dawley rats were given an intragastric meal after a 12 hours fast containing 263 g tomato residue flour (RIT)/diet or a control meal (0% RIT) and glucose plasma levels were determined. Results show that the presence of RIT in the test meal flattened glucose response curves. Ad lib administration of four diets differing in RIT content to four groups of rats for 18 days showed that although animals on a high RIT diet ate increased amounts of cholesterol the plasma lipid levels remained constant which suggest that the presence of RIT fibre on the diet is responsible for this effect. The results reported in this paper suggest that the dietary fiber of RIT diminishes glucose absorption and reduces seric cholesterol levels, which in turn could be useful in the treatment of NIDD and hypercholesterolaemic patients. PMID:10488392

  16. A simplified modification of the AOAC official method for determination of total dietary fiber using newly developed enzymes.

    PubMed

    Tada, Shusaku; Innami, Satoshi

    2007-01-01

    Since 1985, AOAC Method 985.29 has been globally adopted as a standard method for determination of total dietary fiber in foods. Nevertheless, an aspect of AOAC Method 985.29 that needs to be improved is the laborious process to treat 3 enzymes separately at their individual proper pH, which is quite time-consuming. Several examinations have been carried out to resolve this problem. The characteristics of newly developed thermostable alpha-amylase, neutral protease, and amyloglucosidase were evaluated based on the pH-activity profile and the property of starch hydrolysis in comparison with those of the conventional enzyme reagents. These 3 developed enzymes were found to work under the same pH condition and to accomplish sufficient digestion for the typical 3 starches: soluble starch, corn starch, and wheat starch. The experimental results revealed that the dietary fiber determination in foods could be performed without pH adjustment in the enzymatic digestion process. The modified method will be greatly helpful in determining the total dietary fiber contents in food materials with less laborious work and with an accuracy equivalent to that of AOAC Method 985.29. PMID:17373453

  17. Dietary fibers from mushroom sclerotia. 4. In vivo mineral absorption using ovariectomized rat model.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ka-Hing; Katsumata, Shin-Ichi; Masuyama, Ritsuko; Uehara, Mariko; Suzuki, Kazuharu; Cheung, Peter C K

    2006-03-01

    The effect of three novel dietary fibers (DFs) prepared from mushroom sclerotia, namely, Pleurotus tuber-regium, Polyporus rhinocerus, and Wolfiporia cocos, on calcium and magnesium absorption was evaluated in ovariectomized (OVX) rats fed with sclerotial DF based and low Ca (0.3%) diets for 14 days. The animals in the W. cocos DF diet group possessed significantly (p < 0.05) higher levels of cecal total short-chain fatty acids (204 mumol/g of cecal content) and had an acidic pH (5.88) in their cecum when compared with those of the cellulose control group. Such an acidic environment was found to promote the ionization of the unabsorbed Ca and Mg in their cecum, which in turn significantly (p < 0.05) increased the concentrations of cecal soluble Ca (2.56-fold) and Mg (1.22-fold). Besides, the apparent Ca and Mg absorptions of the W. cocos DF group were also significantly (p < 0.05) enhanced (Ca, 16.5%; Mg, 15.3%) together with significantly (p < 0.05) higher serum Ca (3.61 mmol/L) and Mg (1.07 mmol/L) levels when compared with those of the cellulose control group. These data suggest that ingestion of W. cocos DF could improve the overall Ca and Mg absorptions of the OVX rats fed a low Ca diet. The potential use of sclerotial DFs as a functional food ingredient for enhancing mineral absorption is also discussed. PMID:16506854

  18. How does the preparation of rye porridge affect molecular weight distribution of extractable dietary fibers?

    PubMed

    Rakha, Allah; Aman, Per; Andersson, Roger

    2011-01-01

    Extractable dietary fiber (DF) plays an important role in nutrition. This study on porridge making with whole grain rye investigated the effect of rest time of flour slurries at room temperature before cooking and amount of flour and salt in the recipe on the content of DF components and molecular weight distribution of extractable fructan, mixed linkage (1→3)(1→4)-β-d-glucan (β-glucan) and arabinoxylan (AX) in the porridge. The content of total DF was increased (from about 20% to 23% of dry matter) during porridge making due to formation of insoluble resistant starch. A small but significant increase in the extractability of β-glucan (P = 0.016) and AX (P = 0.002) due to rest time was also noted. The molecular weight of extractable fructan and AX remained stable during porridge making. However, incubation of the rye flour slurries at increased temperature resulted in a significant decrease in extractable AX molecular weight. The molecular weight of extractable β-glucan decreased greatly during a rest time before cooking, most likely by the action of endogenous enzymes. The amount of salt and flour used in the recipe had small but significant effects on the molecular weight of β-glucan. These results show that whole grain rye porridge made without a rest time before cooking contains extractable DF components maintaining high molecular weights. High molecular weight is most likely of nutritional importance. PMID:21686191

  19. How Does the Preparation of Rye Porridge Affect Molecular Weight Distribution of Extractable Dietary Fibers?

    PubMed Central

    Rakha, Allah; Åman, Per; Andersson, Roger

    2011-01-01

    Extractable dietary fiber (DF) plays an important role in nutrition. This study on porridge making with whole grain rye investigated the effect of rest time of flour slurries at room temperature before cooking and amount of flour and salt in the recipe on the content of DF components and molecular weight distribution of extractable fructan, mixed linkage (1→3)(1→4)-β-d-glucan (β-glucan) and arabinoxylan (AX) in the porridge. The content of total DF was increased (from about 20% to 23% of dry matter) during porridge making due to formation of insoluble resistant starch. A small but significant increase in the extractability of β-glucan (P = 0.016) and AX (P = 0.002) due to rest time was also noted. The molecular weight of extractable fructan and AX remained stable during porridge making. However, incubation of the rye flour slurries at increased temperature resulted in a significant decrease in extractable AX molecular weight. The molecular weight of extractable β-glucan decreased greatly during a rest time before cooking, most likely by the action of endogenous enzymes. The amount of salt and flour used in the recipe had small but significant effects on the molecular weight of β-glucan. These results show that whole grain rye porridge made without a rest time before cooking contains extractable DF components maintaining high molecular weights. High molecular weight is most likely of nutritional importance. PMID:21686191

  20. Dietary fibers from mushroom sclerotia: 3. In vitro fermentability using human fecal microflora.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ka-Hing; Wong, King-Yee; Kwan, Hoi-Shan; Cheung, Peter C K

    2005-11-30

    The in vitro fermentability of three novel dietary fibers (DFs) prepared from mushroom sclerotia, namely, Pleurotus tuber-regium, Polyporous rhinocerus, and Wolfiporia cocos, was investigated and compared with that of the cellulose control. All DF samples (0.5 g each) were fermented in vitro with a human fecal homogenate (10 mL) in a batch system (total volume, 50 mL) under strictly anaerobic conditions (using oxygen reducing enzyme and under argon atmosphere) at 37 degrees C for 24 h. All three novel sclerotial DFs exhibited notably higher dry matter disappearance (P. tuber-regium, 8.56%; P. rhinocerus, 13.5%; and W. cocos, 53.4%) and organic matter disappearance (P. tuber-regium, 9.82%; P. rhinocerus, 14.6%; and W. cocos, 57.4%) when compared with those of the cellulose control. Nevertheless, only the W. cocos DF was remarkably degraded to produce considerable amounts of total short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) (5.23 mmol/g DF on organic matter basis, with a relatively higher molar ratio of propionate) that lowered the pH of its nonfermented residue to a slightly acidic level (5.89). Variations on the in vitro fermentability among the three sclerotial DFs might mainly be attributed to their different amounts of interwoven hyphae present (different amounts of enzyme inaccessible cell wall components) as well as the possible different structural arrangement (linkage and degree of branching) of their beta-glucans. PMID:16302755

  1. Income and race/ethnicity influence dietary fiber intake and vegetable consumption.

    PubMed

    Storey, Maureen; Anderson, Patricia

    2014-10-01

    Grains, fruits, and vegetables are the primary sources of dietary fiber (DF), with the white potato contributing nearly 7% of the DF to the US food supply. The DF composition of the white potato-with or without the skin and regardless of cooking method-compares well with the DF content of other vegetables. Many health benefits, including improved gastrointestinal health, are attributed to greater DF consumption; however, less than 3% of males and females have an adequate intake of DF. Because of this population-wide shortfall, DF is considered to be a nutrient of concern. In this study, using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2009 to 2010, we examined the mean intake of DF across sex, age, race/ethnicity, family income, and poverty threshold. This study shows that mean intake of DF is far below recommendations, with children and adolescents aged 2 to 19 years consuming an average of less than 14 g of DF per day. Adults 20+ years old consume, on average, about 17 g of DF per day, and men consume significantly more DF than women. Non-Hispanic black adults consume significantly less DF compared with other race/ethnic groups. Lower family income and living at less than 131% of poverty were associated with lower DF intakes among adults. Federal and local government policies should encourage consumption of all vegetables, including the white potato, as an important source of DF. PMID:25262170

  2. Application of dietary fiber in clinical enteral nutrition: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Gang; Wu, Xiao-Ting; Zhou, Yong; Wang, Ying-Li

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effects of dietary fiber (DF) as a part of enteral nutrition (EN) formula on diarrhea, infection, and length of hospital stay. METHODS: Following electronic databases were searched for randomized controlled trials about DF: Chinese Biomedicine Database (CBM), MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Controlled Trials Register. RevMan 4.1 was used for statistical analysis. RESULTS: Seven randomized controlled trials with 400 pat-ients were included. The supplement of DF in EN was compared with standard enteral formula in five trials. Combined analysis did not show a significant reduction in occurrence of diarrhea, but there were valuable results for non-critically ill patients. Combined analysis of two trials observing the infection also did not show any valid evidence that DF could decrease the infection rate, though the length of hospital stay was reduced significantly. CONCLUSION: Based on the current eligible randomized controlled trials, there is no evidence that the value of DF in the diarrhea can be proved. Though length of hospital stay was shortened by the use of DF, there is no available evidence in preventing infection by DF. Further studies are needed for evaluating the value of DF in EN. PMID:15991297

  3. Serum lipids in rats as related to modifications in dietary fat, fiber, and sodium with magnesium deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, C.A.; Kubena, K.S. )

    1991-03-11

    Recommendations to modify dietary intake to attenuate risk of cardiovascular disease have been released by numerous governmental and health organizations. Since magnesium is associated with lipid metabolism and normal cardiovascular function, this study was designed to determine the effect of modifications in dietary fat, fiber, and sodium with magnesium deficiency on serum lipids and tissue minerals. The control (C) diet was based upon the AIN-76 diet formulation; the American (A) diet included average fat, fiber, and sodium levels in the US; and the recommended (R) diet was lower in fat and sodium and higher in fiber. Diets contained either 1,000 or 150 (L) mg Mg/kg diet. Male weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were fed one of the diets (C, CL, A, Al, R, RL) for six weeks. Levels of tissue Mg, Ca, Zn, and P were determined. Neither initial nor final body weights varied between groups. Serum levels of triglyceride were higher in the C and Cl groups than in the others. Serum cholesterol was lower in the R and Rl groups than in the Cl and A groups. Animals which were fed the diet modified with regard to fat, fiber, and sodium had lower serum cholesterol levels than did those fed the American diet. Magnesium deficiency was not consistently related to serum lipid levels.

  4. Effect of dietary fiber and starch on fecal composition in preschool children consuming maize, amaranth, or cassava flours.

    PubMed

    Hamaker, B R; Rivera, K; Morales, E; Graham, G G

    1991-07-01

    Metabolic balance studies were carried out in young children fed diets based on maize, amaranth, or cassava flours and in corresponding casein controls. Dietary fiber intakes were 22.2, 20.5, and 9.0 g/day for the maize, amaranth, and cassava groups, respectively. Fecal energy losses at least doubled in all test diets when compared with the corresponding controls and could generally be accounted for by recovered fiber in the feces. Fecal starch was also a significant contributor to fecal energy in the cassava group. All cassava fiber was recovered in the feces, whereas only 48.4 and 16.3% were recovered from ingested maize and amaranth. 2,6-Diaminopimelic acid (DAPA), an indicator of bacterial mass, was highest in the cassava group. Expired breath hydrogen was highest for those consuming maize or cassava. Resistant starch may have been responsible for the high DAPA and breath hydrogen values in the cassava group. PMID:1656007

  5. Dietary fiber from Tunisian common date cultivars (Phoenix dactylifera L.): chemical composition, functional properties, and antioxidant capacity.

    PubMed

    Mrabet, Abdessalem; Rodríguez-Arcos, Rocío; Guillén-Bejarano, Rafael; Chaira, Nizar; Ferchichi, Ali; Jiménez-Araujo, Ana

    2012-04-11

    The dietary fibers (DF) of 10 date varieties from Tunisian oases have been investigated. Further knowledge on the content, composition, and technological applications of those fibers could support their genetic variability and promote the socioeconomical development of growing areas. The composition, water- and oil-holding capacities, solubility, and antiradical activity have been determined. The DF content ranged from 4.7% (Matteta, Rochdi) to >7% (Deglé Nour, Garen Gaze, Smeti). Composition varied significantly among cultivars, and the results evidenced that uronic acids and lignin determine to a great extent the organoleptic quality of dates. Many of the varieties that have been studied (Garen Gaze, Matteta, Kenta, Rochdi, Mermella, Korkobbi, Eguwa) were selected because of great interest from technological and functional points of view. Among their physicochemical characteristics, these samples presented water- and oil-holding capacities of higher than 17 and 4 mL/g fiber, respectively, which make them suitable for use as additives in fiber-enriched foods. Also, DF of Garen Gaze, Smeti, Mermella, and Eguwa had a high antiradical capacity (>230 Trolox equiv/kg fiber). It was concluded that some of these varieties could be grown as potential sources of DF, which could be included in the formulation of fiber- and antioxidant-enriched foods. PMID:22443221

  6. No association of dietary fiber intake with inflammation or arterial stiffness in youth with type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Jaacks, Lindsay M.; Crandell, Jamie; Liese, Angela D.; Lamichhane, Archana P.; Bell, Ronny A.; Dabelea, Dana; D'Agostino, Ralph B.; Dolan, Lawrence M.; Marcovina, Santica; Reynolds, Kristi; Shah, Amy S.; Urbina, Elaine M.; Wadwa, R. Paul; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J.

    2014-01-01

    Aim To examine the association of dietary fiber intake with inflammation and arterial stiffness among youth with type 1 diabetes (T1D) in the US. Methods Data are from youth ≥ 10 years old with clinically diagnosed T1D for ≥ 3 months and ≥ 1 positive diabetes autoantibody in the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study. Fiber intake was assessed by food frequency questionnaire with measurement error (ME) accounted for by structural sub-models derived using additional 24-hour dietary recall data in a calibration sample and the respective exposure-disease model covariates. Markers of inflammation, measured at baseline, included IL-6 (n=1405), CRP (n=1387), and fibrinogen (n=1340); markers of arterial stiffness, measured approximately 19 months post-baseline, were available in a subset of participants and included augmentation index (n=180), pulse wave velocity (n=184), and brachial distensibility (n=177). Results Mean (SD) T1D duration was 47.9 (43.2) months; 12.5% of participants were obese. Mean (SD) ME-adjusted fiber intake was 15 (2.8) g/day. In multivariable analyses, fiber intake was not associated with inflammation or arterial stiffness. Conclusion Among youth with T1D, fiber intake does not meet recommendations and is not associated with measures of systemic inflammation or vascular stiffness. Further research is needed to evaluate whether fiber is associated with these outcomes in older individuals with T1D or among individuals with higher intakes than those observed in the present study. PMID:24613131

  7. Dietary assessment of adolescents undergoing laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery: macro- and micronutrient, fiber and supplement intake

    PubMed Central

    Jeffreys, Renee M.; Hrovat, Kathleen; Woo, Jessica G.; Schmidt, Marcia; Inge, Thomas H.; Xanthakos, Stavra A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Extremely obese adolescents are increasingly undergoing bariatric procedures, which restrict dietary intake. However, there are as yet no data available which describe the change in caloric density or composition of the adolescent bariatric patient’s diet pre- and post-operatively. Objective Assess the 1-year change in dietary composition of adolescents undergoing bariatric surgery. Setting Tertiary care children’s hospital Methods Twenty-seven subjects [67% female, 77% white, age 16.7 ± 1.4 years, baseline body mass index (BMI) 60.1 ± 14.1 kg/m2] were prospectively enrolled into an observational cohort study one month prior to laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) between August 2005 and March 2008. Three-day dietary intake was recorded at baseline (n=24), at 2 weeks (n=16), 3 months (n=11), and 1 year (n=9) post-operatively. Dietary record data were verified by structured interview and compared with Dietary Reference Intake (DRI) values for ages 14–18. Results By 1 year post-surgery, mean caloric intake adjusted for BMI was 1015 ± 182 kcal/day, a 35% reduction from baseline. The proportion of fat, protein and carbohydrate intake did not differ from baseline. However, protein intake was lower than recommended postoperatively. Calcium and fiber intake was also persistently lower than recommended. Calcium and vitamin B12 supplementation increased the likelihood of meeting daily minimal recommendations (p≤0.02). Conclusions One year after RYGB, adolescents’ caloric intake remained restricted with satisfactory macronutrient composition, but with lower than desirable intake of calcium, fiber and protein. PMID:22260884

  8. Cupuassu (Theobroma grandiflorum) peel as potential source of dietary fiber and phytochemicals in whole-bread preparations.

    PubMed

    Salgado, Jocelem Mastrodi; Rodrigues, Bruno Sanches; Donado-Pestana, Carlos Mario; dos Santos Dias, Carlos Tadeu; Morzelle, Maressa Caldeira

    2011-11-01

    Cupuassu (Theobroma grandiflorum) is a fruit tree native to the Brazilian Amazon. Cupuassu beans are extensively used in the Brazilian food industry. Fat from cupuassu beans, which are a rich source of triacylglycerols and fatty acids, is used extensively in the production of candies and confectionery in the northern and northeastern regions of Brazil. The potential use of the agro-industrial by-products of cupuassu has only slightly been addressed by the scientific community. Often, such by-products are sources of bioactive compounds with functional properties. Thus, the aims of this study were to characterize the use of cupuassu peel flour (CPF) and to examine the potential of CPF as a partial replacement in the preparation of breads through various means: chemical analyses, determination of protein digestibility, tannins, phytic acid and phenolic contents, pH, color, volume, and acceptance tests. The results show that CPF is a potential source of dietary fiber (79.81%), mainly insoluble fiber (78.29%), and breads made with added CPF present high dietary fiber content (5.40 and 6.15 g/100 g for inclusions with 6 and 9% CPF, respectively) and phytochemical values. The use of this by-product did not produce substantial changes in the physical, chemical or rheological characteristics of breads. Therefore, breads enhanced with CPF may be a convenient functional food, offering a good source of dietary fiber and phytochemicals. Breads prepared with 6% added CPF presented an acceptable overall quality to consumers. PMID:21948632

  9. A Prospective Study of Long-term Intake of Dietary Fiber and Risk of Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N.; Khalili, Hamed; Konijeti, Gauree G.; Higuchi, Leslie M.; de Silva, Punyanganie; Korzenik, Joshua R.; Fuchs, Charles S.; Willett, Walter C.; Richter, James M.; Chan, Andrew T.

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims Increased intake of dietary fiber has been proposed to reduce risk of inflammatory bowel diseases (Crohn’s disease [CD], ulcerative colitis [UC]). However, few prospective studies have examined associations between long-term intake of dietary fiber and risk of incident CD or UC. Methods We collected and analyzed data from 170,776 women, followed over 26 y, who participated in the Nurses’ Health Study, followed for 3,317,425 person-y. Dietary information was prospectively ascertained via administration of a validated semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire every 4 y. Self-reported CD and UC were confirmed through review of medical records. Cox proportional hazards models, adjusting for potential confounders, were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs). Results We confirmed 269 incident cases of CD (incidence 8/100,000 person-y) and 338 cases of UC (incidence 10/100,000 person-y). Compared to the lowest quintile of energy-adjusted cumulative average intake of dietary fiber, intake of the highest quintile (median of 24.3 g/day) was associated with a 40% reduction in risk of CD (multivariate HR for CD, 0.59; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.39–0.90). This apparent reduction appeared to be greatest for fiber derived from fruits; fiber from cereals, whole grains, or legumes did not modify risk. In contrast, neither total intake of dietary fiber (multivariate HR, 0.82; 95% CI 0.58–1.17) nor intake of fiber from specific sources appeared to be significantly associated with risk of UC. Conclusion Based on data from the Nurses’ Health Study, long-term intake of dietary fiber, particularly from fruit, is associated with lower risk of CD but not UC. Further studies are needed to determine the mechanisms that mediate this association. PMID:23912083

  10. Therapeutic effects of soluble dietary fiber consumption on type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chunye; Zeng, Yuan; Xu, Jing; Zheng, Hongting; Liu, Jun; Fan, Rong; Zhu, Wenyi; Yuan, Lijia; Qin, Yu; Chen, Shihui; Zhou, Yong; Wu, Ying; Wan, Jing; Mi, Mantian; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Soluble dietary fiber (DF) reduces the risk of developing diabetes and may have therapeutic effects in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). The present study aimed to investigate the effect of soluble DF on metabolic control in patients with DM2. A total of 117 patients with DM2 between the ages of 40 and 70 were assessed. Patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups, and administered extra soluble DF (10 or 20 g/day), or to a control group (0 g/day) for one month. Blood glucose, serum insulin and connecting peptide (C-peptide) levels, and the insulin resistance index, as determined using the homeostatic model assessment method, were measured during fasting and up to 2-h postprandially prior to and following one month of treatment. Other measurements included serum levels of glycated albumin (GA), blood lipid profiles, and an analysis of the blood pressure, body weight and waist/hip ratio of all patients. Following intervention, the levels of 2-h blood glucose, fasting insulin and lipoprotein(a), and the insulin resistance index, were significantly improved in all groups. Furthermore, the fasting blood glucose, 2-h insulin, fasting C-peptide, 2-h C-peptide, GA and triglyceride (TG) levels were significantly improved in the soluble DF groups. The 20 g/day soluble DF group exhibited significantly improved fasting blood glucose and low-density lipoprotein levels, as well as a significantly improved insulin resistance index. In addition, 10 and 20 g/day soluble DF significantly improved the waist and hip circumferences and levels of TGs and apolipoprotein A. The results of the present study suggested that increased and regular consumption of soluble DF led to significant improvements in blood glucose levels, insulin resistance and metabolic profiles, without improving the secretory function of the islets of Langerhans, over a short-term intervention period in patients with DM2. PMID:27446349

  11. Linseed dietary fibers reduce apparent digestibility of energy and fat and weight gain in growing rats.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Mette; Knudsen, Knud Erik Bach; Jørgensen, Henry; Oomah, David; Bügel, Susanne; Toubro, Søren; Tetens, Inge; Astrup, Arne

    2013-08-01

    Dietary fibers (DF) may affect energy balance, an effect often ascribed to the viscous nature of some water soluble DF, which affect luminal viscosity and thus multiple physiological processes. We have tested the hypothesis that viscous linseed DF reduce apparent nutrient digestibility, and limit weight gain, in a randomized feeding trial where 60 male, growing, Wistar rats, with an initial weight of ~200 g, were fed different diets (n = 10 per group): low DF control (C), 5% DF from cellulose (5-CEL), CEL + 5% DF from whole (5-WL) or ground linseed (5-GL), CEL + 5% DF from linseed DF extract (5-LDF), and CEL + 10% DF from linseed DF extract (10-LDF). Diets were provided ad libitum for 21 days. Feed intake and faecal output were measured during days 17-21. Faecal fat excretion increased with increasing DF content and was highest in the 10-LDF group. Apparent fat digestibility was highest with the C diet (94.9% ± 0.8%) and lowest (74.3% ± 0.6%) with the 10-LDF diet, and decreased in a non-linear manner with increasing DF (p < 0.001). Apparent fat digestibility also decreased with increased accessibility of DF (5-WL vs. 5-GL) and when the proportion of viscous DF increased (5-GL vs. 5-LDF). The 10-LDF resulted in a lower final body weight (258 ± 6.2 g) compared to C (282 ± 5.9 g), 5-CEL (281 ± 5.9 g), and 5-WL (285 ± 5.9 g) (p < 0.05). The 10-LDF diet reduced body fat compared to 5-CEL (p < 0.01). In conclusion, DF extracted from linseed reduced apparent energy and fat digestibility and resulted in restriction of body weight gain in growing rats. PMID:23966109

  12. Importance of cooking temperature and pancreatic amylase in determination of dietary fiber in dried legumes.

    PubMed

    Mongeau, R; Brassard, R

    1995-01-01

    Total dietary fiber (TDF) was measured in large lima, roman, black turtle, light red kidney, white navy, pinto, black-eyed, and soya beans and in chick peas by the Mongeau rapid method (A), the Prosky method (B), and the Lee method (C). When the samples were soaked and cooked according to package instructions (gentle boiling, 95 degrees C), TDF values by method A were all within 19.7-22.1%, except for black-eyed beans (9.9%) and chick peas (11.3%) (g/100 g, cooked dry matter). For large lima beans (20.0-21.3%) and soya beans (19.2-19.7%), TDF values by methods A, B, and C were in agreement. For 7 samples, however, TDF values were up to 81% higher by method B (17.4-34.7%) and up to 122% higher by method C (21.1-39.8%) than those by method A (P < or = 0.01). For 6 legumes, TDF values by method C were 15-28% higher (P < or = 0.013) than by method B. White navy beans were analyzed also after different cooking conditions, varying from no cooking to autoclaving for 15 min at 120 degrees C. TDF values by method A were independent from cooking conditions and remained between 20.2 and 22.4%. For navy beans cooked at 95 degrees C, TDF values by method B (up to 34.7 +/- 1.4%) and C (up to 39.8 +/- 0.3%) were unpredictable, but autoclaving at 120 degrees C reduced them to about 22%. Incorporation of a pancreatic amylase in methods B and C consistently decreased the aforementioned analytical discrepancies, as did the absence of cooking. Only autoclaving (for at least 15 min at 120 degrees C) fully restored agreement among methods A-C. PMID:8664580

  13. Dietary fibers reduce food intake by satiation without conditioned taste aversion in mice.

    PubMed

    Rasoamanana, Rojo; Even, Patrick C; Darcel, Nicolas; Tomé, Daniel; Fromentin, Gilles

    2013-02-17

    It is well known that intake of dietary fiber (DF) potently decreases food intake and feelings of hunger and/or promotes satiety ratings. However, the mechanisms explaining these effects are not well characterized. This work was performed to determine which of satiation and/or satiety mechanisms provoke the decrease of food intake induced by DF in mice. We tested in an intra-group protocol a low-viscosity (LV, fructo-oligosaccharide), a viscous (VP, guar gum) and a high-viscosity (HV, mixture of guar gum and fructo-oligosaccharide) preload. These were given to mice by intra-gastric gavage. It appeared that viscous preloads such as VP and HV reduced the daily energy intake by 14% and 21% respectively. The strong effect of HV was mainly due to a large decrease of meal size (by 57%) and meal duration (by 65%) with no effect on ingestion rate during the first 30 min after administration. Therefore, the DF-induced decrease of energy intake was due to a satiation mechanism. This is further supported by a 3-fold increased sensitization of neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract as observed by c-Fos protein immunolabelling. No compensation of food intake was observed during the rest of the day, a phenomenon that may be explained by the fact that metabolic rate remained high despite the lower food intake. We have also shown that the DF-induced inhibition of food intake was not paired with a conditioned taste aversion. To conclude, this work demonstrates that DF inhibits food intake by increasing satiation during ~1h after administration. PMID:23268328

  14. The fermentation of different dietary fibers is associated with fecal clostridia levels in men.

    PubMed

    Chinda, Daisuke; Nakaji, Shigeyuki; Fukuda, Shinsaku; Sakamoto, Juichi; Shimoyama, Tadashi; Nakamura, Teruo; Fujisawa, Tomohiko; Terada, Atsushi; Sugawara, Kazuo

    2004-08-01

    Only a few reports have compared the fermentation of pectin and cellulose using the hydrogen-breath test, and no studies have examined the relation between the hydrogen breathing pattern and colonic microflora. Using breath-hydrogen measurements, we investigated whether different dietary fibers (DFs) were fermented differently and whether there were individual differences after ingestion of the same DF; we also examined the relation between individual fecal microflora and the fermentation of DF. Results of hydrogen tests in 14 men were compared after they had ingested 20 g of pectin, 20 g of cellulose, or 6 g of lactulose (a DF-like substance). We examined the relation between the breath hydrogen results and the subjects' fecal microflora. We defined significant fermentation (i.e., positive cases) as a continuous rise in hydrogen in the expiratory air of >19 ppm. The subjects were divided into 3 groups according to their hydrogen breath test pattern, i.e., positive for lactulose and pectin (Group LP, n = 4); positive for lactulose alone (Group L, n = 7); and negative for pectin, cellulose, and lactulose (Group N, n = 3). Individual differences were noted in subjects from Group LP and Group L. The detection frequency of lecithinase-negative clostridia was higher in Group LP than in the other groups (P < 0.05), and the detection frequency and the number of lecithinase-positive clostridia were higher in Groups LP and L than in Group N (P < 0.05). These findings suggest that the Clostridium species are associated with hydrogen production. The hydrogen breath test results of DFs depend on both the type of DF and the individual colonic microflora. The amount and constitution of colonic microflora might be predicted by the hydrogen-breath test using different DFs. PMID:15284370

  15. Linseed Dietary Fibers Reduce Apparent Digestibility of Energy and Fat and Weight Gain in Growing Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Mette; Bach Knudsen, Knud Erik; Jørgensen, Henry; Oomah, David; Bügel, Susanne; Toubro, Søren; Tetens, Inge; Astrup, Arne

    2013-01-01

    Dietary fibers (DF) may affect energy balance, an effect often ascribed to the viscous nature of some water soluble DF, which affect luminal viscosity and thus multiple physiological processes. We have tested the hypothesis that viscous linseed DF reduce apparent nutrient digestibility, and limit weight gain, in a randomized feeding trial where 60 male, growing, Wistar rats, with an initial weight of ~200 g, were fed different diets (n = 10 per group): low DF control (C), 5% DF from cellulose (5-CEL), CEL + 5% DF from whole (5-WL) or ground linseed (5-GL), CEL + 5% DF from linseed DF extract (5-LDF), and CEL + 10% DF from linseed DF extract (10-LDF). Diets were provided ad libitum for 21 days. Feed intake and faecal output were measured during days 17–21. Faecal fat excretion increased with increasing DF content and was highest in the 10-LDF group. Apparent fat digestibility was highest with the C diet (94.9% ± 0.8%) and lowest (74.3% ± 0.6%) with the 10-LDF diet, and decreased in a non-linear manner with increasing DF (p < 0.001). Apparent fat digestibility also decreased with increased accessibility of DF (5-WL vs. 5-GL) and when the proportion of viscous DF increased (5-GL vs. 5-LDF). The 10-LDF resulted in a lower final body weight (258 ± 6.2 g) compared to C (282 ± 5.9 g), 5-CEL (281 ± 5.9 g), and 5-WL (285 ± 5.9 g) (p < 0.05). The 10-LDF diet reduced body fat compared to 5-CEL (p < 0.01). In conclusion, DF extracted from linseed reduced apparent energy and fat digestibility and resulted in restriction of body weight gain in growing rats. PMID:23966109

  16. Randomized phase II trial of sulindac, atorvastatin, and prebiotic dietary fiber for colorectal cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Limburg, Paul J; Mahoney, Michelle R; Ziegler, Katie L Allen; Sontag, Stephen J; Schoen, Robert E; Benya, Richard; Lawson, Michael J; Weinberg, David S; Stoffel, Elena; Chiorean, Michael; Heigh, Russell; Levine, Joel; Della'Zanna, Gary; Rodriguez, Luz; Richmond, Ellen; Gostout, Christopher; Mandrekar, Sumithra J; Smyrk, Thomas C

    2011-02-01

    Sulindac, atorvastatin, or prebiotic dietary fiber may reduce colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. However, clinical trial data are currently limited. We conducted a randomized, phase II chemoprevention trial involving subjects 40 years or older, with previously resected colon cancer or multiple/advanced colorectal adenomas. Magnification chromoendoscopy (MCE) was performed to identify and characterize rectal aberrant crypt foci (ACF); eligibility criteria required five or more rectal ACFs at baseline. Intervention assignments were as follows: (a) atorvastatin 20 mg qd; (b) sulindac 150 mg bid; (c) oligofructose-enriched inulin (as ORAFTI®Synergy1) 6 gm bid; or (d) control (maltodextrin) 6 gm bid, for 6 months. Percent change in rectal ACF number (%ΔACF) within arm was the primary endpoint. Secondary endpoints included changes in proliferation (Ki67) and apoptosis (caspase-3), as measured from normal mucosa biopsy samples. Among 85 eligible randomized subjects, 76 (86%) completed the trial per protocol. The median (range) of rectal ACF was 9 (5-34) and 8 (0-37) at baseline and postintervention, respectively. The median (SD) for %ΔACF was 5.6 (-69% to 143%), -18.6 (-83% to 160%), -3.6 (-88% to 83%), and -10.0 (-100% to 117%) in the atorvastatin, sulindac, ORAFTI®Synergy1 and control arms, respectively. Neither within-arm (P = 0.12-0.59) nor between-arm (P = 0.30-0.92) comparisons of %ΔACF were statistically significant. The active and control interventions also seemed to have similar effects on mucosal proliferation and apoptosis (P > 0.05 for each comparison). Data from this multicenter, phase II trial do not provide convincing evidence of CRC risk reduction from 6-month interventions with atorvastatin, sulindac, or ORAFTI®Synergy1, although statistical power was limited by the relatively small sample size. PMID:21209397

  17. Effect of dietary physically effective fiber on ruminal fermentation and the fatty acid profile of milk in dairy goats.

    PubMed

    Li, Fei; Li, Zongjun; Li, Shengxiang; Ferguson, James D; Cao, Yangchun; Yao, Junhu; Sun, Feifei; Wang, Xiao; Yang, Ting

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this experiment was to characterize the relationship among rumen fermentation variables, milk fatty acid profile, and dietary physically effective neutral detergent fiber (peNDF) content in a study that controlled for the potential confounding effects of dissimilar dry matter intake among treatments. Ten multiparous Xinong Saanen dairy goats were divided into 2 groups with 2 ruminally cannulated goats per group. Goats in each group were assigned to 1 of 2 dietary treatments (high and low peNDF) according to a 2×2 crossover design with 2 periods. The peNDF content of alfalfa hay (proportion of neutral detergent fiber retained on an 8.0-mm screen) was 42.1% for the high-peNDF and 14.5% for the low-peNDF group. To ensure similar dry matter intake, each morning the amount of alfalfa hay consumed on the prior day by the high-peNDF group was determined (amount offered minus morning refusals), and this was the amount of hay offered to the low-peNDF group that day. Each adaptation period consisted of 21d, followed by a 9-d sampling period. Dry matter intake and milk production and composition were similar between treatments. Milk energy efficiency increased with low dietary peNDF. Duration of pH below 5.60 was longer for goats fed the low-peNDF ration compared with the high-peNDF ration (4.08 vs. 0.41h/d); however, mean rumen pH (6.05 vs. 6.13) was not different between treatments. Reducing dietary peNDF increased rumen total volatile fatty acids (114.6 vs. 95.1mM) and decreased chewing time (404 vs. 673min/d), but did not affect the ratios of acetate, propionate, and butyrate. The relative abundance of Fibrobacter succinogenes and Ruminococcus flavefaciens increased with reduced dietary peNDF, but Ruminococcus albus proportions were not influenced by treatment. Reducing dietary peNDF decreased the proportion of iso C14:0, iso C15:0, and trans-11 C18:1 in milk fat, whereas the iso C17:0 and trans-10 C18:1 increased. This study demonstrated that low

  18. [The influence of dietary fibers on cell immunity under the adequate nutrition and in the presence of alimentary polyhypovitaminosis in rats].

    PubMed

    Trushina, É N; Mustafina, O K; Vrzhesinskaia, O A

    2013-01-01

    The effect of wheat bran on cell immunity in rats adequately provided with vitamins or insufficiently supplied with vitamins has been investigated. 48 male Wistar rats (58.1 +/- 0.5 g) were divided into 6 group and fed with complete semi-synthetic diet, containing 100% or 20% of vitamin mixture (Vit) with or without supplement of insoluble dietary fiber (DF) in the dose corresponding to the upper allowable level of its consumption (5% wheat bran of diet mass) for 4 weeks. The animals of the 1 group received 100% of vitamin mixture (100% Vit); 2 group--100% Vit+DF; 3 group--20% of vitamin mixture (20% Vit); 4 group--20% of vitamin mixture and DF (20% Vit+DF). The next 5 days rats from vitamin-deficient groups were fed with diets supplemented with 80% of Vit: (5 group--20% Vit+80% Vit; 6 group--20% Vit+DF+80% Vit). The contents of lymphocytes, relative quantity of B-(CD45RA+) and T-lymphocytes (CD3+), subpopulations of T-lymphocytes: T-helper (CD3+CD4+) and cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CD3+CD8+), NK-cells (CD161a+) in the peripheral blood of rats were determined by the method of flow cytometry using Beckman Coulter FC 500 (USA) cytometer. In rats fed complete semi-synthetic diet supplemented with DF (100% Vit+DF) the reduction of relative contents of T-lymphocytes and the increase of the fraction of cytotoxic T-lymphocytes in peripheral blood has been found. The analogous changes and more pronounced degree of immunosupression, that appeared in a lymphocytopenia, much smaller level of T-lymphocytes, T-helper and increase of cytotoxic T-lymphocytes content in rats fed a low vitamins diet (20% Vit) in comparison with these parameters of control group, have been detected. In rats received 20% Vit+DF the suppressed cell immunity was accompanied with decreased level of NK-cells. Normalization of vitamins content in the diets of rat deficient groups led to an almost complete recovery of cell immunity indicators to the level of the animals from the corresponding control groups

  19. Responses of dietary ileal amino acid digestibility to consumption of different cultivars of potatoes and conventional fibers in grower pigs fed a high-fat basal diet.

    PubMed

    Wang, Q; Yang, X; Leonard, S; Archbold, T; Sullivan, J A; Duncan, A M; Ma, W D L; Bizimungu, B; Murphy, A; Htoo, J K; Fan, M Z

    2012-12-01

    Whereas dietary fibers are well recognized for nutritional management of human health issues, fiber is also known to be one of the dietary factors potentially affecting digestive use of dietary proteins. As a staple food, potato (Solanum tuberosum) may be a significant dietary fiber source. The objective of this study was to examine effects of dietary supplementation of six potato cultivar-genotype samples that differ in soluble fiber content and two conventional fiber components (i.e., cellulose and guar gum) on the apparent ileal AA digestibility in pigs fed a high-fat basal diet. The basal diet was formulated as a zero-fiber negative control (NC) to contain 41.5% poultry meal, 4% casein, 15% animal fat-oil blend, 2.8% sucrose, 31% corn (Zea mays) starch, 0.50% salt, and 0.40% trace mineral-vitamin supplement with fat contributing to 47% of the dietary GE. The two fiber diets were formulated by respectively diluting the basal diet with 10% guar gum and 10% cellulose at the expense of corn starch. Six other test diets were formulated by including 8.5% guar gum and further diluting the basal diet with 25.1% one of the six cultivar-genotype samples of dehydrated potato tuber powder to contain about 10% total dietary fiber at the expense of corn starch. Eighty-one 25-kg barrows were fitted with a simple T-cannula at the distal ileum and fed the diets according to a completely randomized block design with each block lasting 28 d. Compared with the NC, the ileal digestibility of Ala, Gly, and Pro were decreased (P < 0.05) by 10% guar gum whereas the digestibility of Gly was reduced (P < 0.05) by 10% cellulose. The ileal digestibility of several AA was decreased (P < 0.05) by the test potatoes plus 8.5% guar gum compared with the NC. Our results suggest that dietary inclusion of fiber at 10% from guar gum and cellulose and contributed by potatoes may adversely affect digestive use of dietary protein. PMID:23365378

  20. Effect of Wheat Dietary Fiber Particle Size during Digestion In Vitro on Bile Acid, Faecal Bacteria and Short-Chain Fatty Acid Content.

    PubMed

    Dziedzic, Krzysztof; Szwengiel, Artur; Górecka, Danuta; Gujska, Elżbieta; Kaczkowska, Joanna; Drożdżyńska, Agnieszka; Walkowiak, Jarosław

    2016-06-01

    The influence of bile acid concentration on the growth of Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp. bacteria was demonstrated. Exposing these bacteria to the environment containing bile acid salts, and very poor in nutrients, leads to the disappearance of these microorganisms due to the toxic effect of bile acids. A multidimensional analysis of data in the form of principal component analysis indicated that lactic acid bacteria bind bile acids and show antagonistic effect on E. coli spp. bacteria. The growth in E. coli spp. population was accompanied by a decline in the population of Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp. with a simultaneous reduction in the concentration of bile acids. This is direct proof of acid binding ability of the tested lactic acid bacteria with respect to cholic acid, lithocholic acid and deoxycholic acid. This research demonstrated that the degree of fineness of wheat dietary fibre does not affect the sorption of bile acids and growth of some bacteria species; however, it has an impact on the profile of synthesized short-chained fatty acids. During the digestion of a very fine wheat fibre fraction (WF 90), an increase in the concentration of propionic and butyric acids, as compared with the wheat fiber fraction of larger particles - WF 500, was observed. Our study suggested that wheat fibre did not affect faecal bacteria growth, however, we observed binding of bile acids by Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp. PMID:26924312

  1. Apple pectin, a dietary fiber, ameliorates myocardial injury by inhibiting apoptosis in a rat model of ischemia/reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sun Ha; Kim, Mi Young

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE Myocardial cell death due to occlusion of the coronary arteries leads to myocardial infarction, a subset of coronary heart disease (CHD). Dietary fiber is known to be associated with a reduced risk of CHD, the underlying mechanisms of which were suggested to delay the onset of occlusion by ameliorating risk factors. In this study, we tested a hypothesis that a beneficial role of dietary fiber could arise from protection of myocardial cells against ischemic injury, manifested after occlusion of the arteries. MATERIALS/METHODS Three days after rats were fed apple pectin (AP) (with 10, 40, 100, and 400 mg/kg/day), myocardial ischemic injury was induced by 30 min-ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery, followed by 3 hr-reperfusion. The area at risk and infarct area were evaluated using Evans blue dye and 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining, respectively. DNA nicks reflecting the extent of myocardial apoptosis were assessed by TUNEL assay. Levels of cleaved caspase-3, Bcl-2, and Bax were assessed by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS Supplementation of AP (with 100 and 400 mg/kg/day) resulted in significantly attenuated infarct size (IS) (ratio of infarct area to area at risk) by 21.9 and 22.4%, respectively, in the AP-treated group, compared with that in the control group. This attenuation in IS showed correlation with improvement in biomarkers involved in the apoptotic cascades: reduction of apoptotic cells, inhibition of conversion of procaspase-3 to caspase-3, and increase of Bcl-2/Bax ratio, a determinant of cell fate. CONCLUSIONS The findings indicate that supplementation of AP results in amelioration of myocardial infarction by inhibition of apoptosis. Thus, the current study suggests that intake of dietary fiber reduces the risk of CHD, not only by blocking steps leading to occlusion, but also by protecting against ischemic injury caused by occlusion of the arteries. PMID:25110558

  2. Effects of dietary fibers and their mixtures on short chain fatty acids and microbiota in mice guts.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xichun; Li, Shaoting; Luo, Jianming; Wu, Xiyang; Liu, Liu

    2013-06-01

    Dietary fiber (DF) can be broken down into short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) such as acetic, propionic and n-butyric acid by gut microbiota to obtain energy. Therefore, dietary fibers have effects on the balance of gut microbiota and the production of SCFAs. In the four-week feeding, mice were fed with four dietary fibers, including pectin, resistant starch (RS), fructo-oligosaccharide (FOS) and cellulose. The results showed that the mice body-weight gain was the smallest (7.0 ± 2.3 g) when the mixture of RS-FOS-cellulose was ingested, followed by the mixture of RS-cellulose (7.2 ± 3.5 g) and FOS-cellulose (8.3 ± 2.5 g). Ingestion of the mixture of pectin-FOS-cellulose, RS-FOS and RS-FOS-cellulose can respectively increase the diversity of the gut microbiota with 12, 11 and 11 terminal restriction fragments (TRFs) detected (digested by Hha I). The maximum amount of total SCFAs were produced by the mixture of FOS-cellulose (5.504 ± 0.029 μmol mL(-1)), followed by pectin-FOS-cellulose (3.893 ± 0.024 μmol mL(-1)) and pectin-RS-FOS-cellulose (3.309 ± 0.047 μmol mL(-1)). In conclusion, the addition of DFs (pectin, RS, FOS and cellulose), in single or mixture pattern, can exert different effects. An amount of 10.7% of single DF in the diet cannot be conducive to the balance of gut microbiota after ingestion for a long time, however, it can help with body weight loss like the mixtures of DFs in this study; FOS is a very important component in the mixture of DFs for both the balance of the gut microbiota and the production of SCFAs. PMID:23669739

  3. Total dietary fiber intakes in the US population are related to whole grain consumption: results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2009 to 2010.

    PubMed

    Reicks, Marla; Jonnalagadda, Satya; Albertson, Ann M; Joshi, Nandan

    2014-03-01

    Whole grain (WG) foods have been shown to reduce chronic disease risk and overweight. Total dietary fiber is associated with WG and its health benefits. The purpose was to determine whether associations exist between WG intake (no-WG intake, 0 ounce equivalent [oz eq]; low, >0-<3 oz eq; high, ≥3 oz eq) and total dietary fiber intake among Americans 2 years and older. One-day food intake data from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2009 to 2010 (n = 9042) showed that only 2.9% and 7.7% of children/adolescents (2-18 years) and adults (≥19 years) consumed at least 3 WG oz eq/d, respectively. For children/adolescents and adults, individuals in the high WG intake group were 59 and 76 times more likely to fall in the third fiber tertile, respectively, compared with those with no-WG intake. Total dietary fiber intake from food sources varied by WG intake group for children/adolescents and adults with more total dietary fiber consumed from ready-to-eat (RTE) and hot cereals and yeast breads/rolls in the high WG intake group compared with the no-WG intake group. Major WG sources for children/adolescents and adults included yeast bread/rolls (24% and 27%, respectively), RTE cereals (25% and 20%, respectively), and oatmeal (12% and 21%, respectively). Among those with the highest WG intake, WG RTE cereal with no added bran was the greatest contributor to total dietary fiber compared with other RTE cereal types. Whole grain foods make a substantial contribution to total dietary fiber intake and should be promoted to meet recommendations. PMID:24655489

  4. CELL WALL HYDROXYCINNAMATES IN WILD RICE (ZIZANIA AQUATICA L.) INSOLUBLE DIETARY FIBER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The contents of ester-linked phenolic acids in wild rice (Zizania aquatica L.) dietary fibre were quantified by HPLC analysis, and oligosaccharide hydroxycinnamates were isolated and identified to investigate the linkages of hydroxycinnamic acids to cell wall polymers. In wild rice insoluble dietary...

  5. The Interaction of Dietary Fibers and Cholesterol upon the Plasma Lipids and Lipoproteins, Sterol Balance, and Bowel Function in Human Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Thomas L.; Connor, William E.; Lin, Don S.; Warner, Susan; Fry, Martha M.; Connor, Sonja L.

    1977-01-01

    To identify any metabolic effects of dietary fiber upon cholesterol metabolism in man, six adult volunteer subjects were fed eucaloric cholesterol-free formula diets, with and without added dietary fiber for two 4-wk periods. A large quantity of dietary fiber was fed, some 60 g of plant cell wall material (or 16 g of crude fiber) derived from corn, beans, bran, pectin, and purified cellulose. This provided about five times the fiber intake of the typical American diet. The addition of fiber to the cholesterol-free diet did not change either the plasma cholesterol level (171±21 mg/dl, SEM, to 167±18) or the triglyceride (103±39 to 93±27 mg/dl). The excretion of both endogenous neutral steroids and bile acids were unchanged with fiber (505±41 to 636±75 mg/day and 194±23 to 266±47 mg/day, respectively.) However, total fecal steroid excretion was increased 699±29 to 902±64 mg/day, P < 0.025). With fiber, intestinal transit time was decreased (59±9 to 35±8 h, P < 0.005), and both the wet and dry stool weights were greatly increased. A second group of six subjects was fed similar diets containing 1,000 mg cholesterol derived from egg yolk. The addition of fiber to the 1,000-mg cholesterol diet did not alter either plasma cholesterol level (233±26 to 223±36 mg/dl) or triglyceride (102±19 to 83±11 mg/dl). The excretion of endogenous neutral steroids (618±84 to 571±59 mg/day), of bile acids (423±122 to 401±89 mg/day), and of total fecal steroids (1,041±175 to 972±111 mg/day) were unchanged by fiber. The absorption of dietary cholesterol was not altered when fiber was added to the 1,000-mg cholesterol diet (44.0±3.3 to 42.9±2.5%). A two-way analysis of variance utilizing both groups of subjects indicated a significant (P < 0.001) effect of dietary cholesterol upon the plasma cholesterol concentration. We concluded that a large quantity of dietary fiber from diverse sources had little or no effect upon the plasma lipids and sterol balance in man in

  6. Sources of Dietary Fiber and the Association of Fiber Intake with Childhood Obesity Risk (in 2–18 Year Olds) and Diabetes Risk of Adolescents 12–18 Year Olds: NHANES 2003–2006

    PubMed Central

    Brauchla, Mary; Juan, WenYen; Story, Jon; Kranz, Sibylle

    2012-01-01

    Increased fiber intake has been linked with lower risk of overweight and obesity in adults, but data are sparse for children. To address this issue, NHANES 2003–2006 data was used to evaluate (1) the food sources of fiber in children, (2) the dietary fiber density levels and risk of being classified as overweight/obese, and (3) the association between fiber intake level and impaired glucose metabolism in children. Analyses were restricted to the subsample of children with biological plausible diet reports (N = 4,667) and stratified by 2–11 year olds (n = 2072) and 12–18 year olds (n = 2595). Results showed that the food sources are predominantly foods that are low in dietary fiber, but are consumed at high levels. In 2–18 year old plausible reporters, the risk for overweight/obesity decreased by 17% from children in the medium tertile of fiber density intake compared to the lowest tertile (OR = 0.83, P value = 0.043) and by 21% between the highest compared to the lowest tertile (OR = 0.79, P value = 0.031). There was a protective effect of being in the medium tertile of dietary fiber density (OR = 0.68, P value <0.001) on impaired glucose metabolism. These results indicate a beneficial effect of higher fiber density in children's diets. PMID:22957219

  7. Sources of Dietary Fiber and the Association of Fiber Intake with Childhood Obesity Risk (in 2-18 Year Olds) and Diabetes Risk of Adolescents 12-18 Year Olds: NHANES 2003-2006.

    PubMed

    Brauchla, Mary; Juan, Wenyen; Story, Jon; Kranz, Sibylle

    2012-01-01

    Increased fiber intake has been linked with lower risk of overweight and obesity in adults, but data are sparse for children. To address this issue, NHANES 2003-2006 data was used to evaluate (1) the food sources of fiber in children, (2) the dietary fiber density levels and risk of being classified as overweight/obese, and (3) the association between fiber intake level and impaired glucose metabolism in children. Analyses were restricted to the subsample of children with biological plausible diet reports (N = 4,667) and stratified by 2-11 year olds (n = 2072) and 12-18 year olds (n = 2595). Results showed that the food sources are predominantly foods that are low in dietary fiber, but are consumed at high levels. In 2-18 year old plausible reporters, the risk for overweight/obesity decreased by 17% from children in the medium tertile of fiber density intake compared to the lowest tertile (OR = 0.83, P value = 0.043) and by 21% between the highest compared to the lowest tertile (OR = 0.79, P value = 0.031). There was a protective effect of being in the medium tertile of dietary fiber density (OR = 0.68, P value <0.001) on impaired glucose metabolism. These results indicate a beneficial effect of higher fiber density in children's diets. PMID:22957219

  8. [Effects of dietary fibers on hepatocyte apoptosis in rats with alimentary polyhypovitaminosis].

    PubMed

    Trushina, É N; Mustafina, O K; Beketova, N A; Vrzhesinskaia, O A; Kodentsova, V M

    2014-01-01

    The effect of dietary fibers (DF) of wheat bran on hepatocyte apoptosis in rats adequately provided with vitamins or insufficiently supplied with vitamins has been investigated. 48 male Wistar rats (initial body mass--58.1 +/- 0.5 g) were randomly divided into 6 groups and fed with semi-synthetic diet, containing 100% or 20% of vitamin mixture (Vit) with or without addition of DF in the dose corresponding to the upper allowable level of its consumption (5% of diet mass) for 4 weeks. The animals of the 1 group received 100% of vitamin mixture (100% Vit); 2 group--100% Vit + DF; 3 group--20% of vitamin mixture with full exclusion of vitamins E, B1 and B2 (20% Vit); 4 group--20% of vitamin mixture and DF (20% Vit + DF). The next 5 days rats from vitamin-deficient groups were fed with diets supplemented with 80% of vitamins from their content in control group: (5 group--20% Vit + 80% Vit; 6 group--20% Vit + DF + 80% Vit). The suspension of hepatocytes was received by Becton Dickinson Medimachine System (USA). Hepatocyte apoptosis was assessed by the method of flow cytometry using Beckman Coulter FC 500 (USA) cytometer by stained cells with Annexin V-FITC/ 7-Amino-Actinomycin D Kit (Beckman Coulter, USA). In rats fed complete semi-synthetic diet supplemented with DF (100% Vit + DF) the hepatocyte apoptosis was higher by 22% (p < 0.10) than that in rats of control group (4.99 +/- 1.82%). In rats fed diets with low vitamin content (groups: 20% Vit and 20% Vit + DF) the hepatocyte apoptosis was significantly higher (p < 0.05) than that in the control group and reached 7.03 +/- 1.74 and 7.26 +/- 1.13% accordingly. Normalization of vitamin content in the diets of rats from deficient groups during 5 days had no effect on the severity of apoptosis regardless from presence (8.02 +/- 2.18%) or absence of the DF (8.04 +/- 1.66%). Adding DF in dose corresponding to the upper allowable level of consumption, on the background of adequate vitamin content in the diet is accompanied by

  9. [Hematological indices of rats having complete and vitamin-deficient diets enriched with dietary fibers].

    PubMed

    Mustafina, O K; Trushina, É N; Kosheleva, O V; Pereverzeva, O G; Kodentsova, V M; Vrzhesinskaia, O A

    2013-01-01

    The hematological indices in 48 rats Wistar male with initial body weight 58.1+/- 0.5g has been studied. The rats were divided into 6 group and fed the complete semi-synthetic diet, containing 100% or 20% of vitamin mixture (Vit) with or without addition of dietary fiber (DF) in the form of wheat bran (5% of diet mass) during 4 weeks. The animals of the 1 group received 100% of vitamin mixture (100% Vit); of the 2 group--100% Vit+DF; 3 group--20% of vitamin mixture (20% Vit); 4 group--20% of vitamin mixture and DF (20% Vit+DF). The next 5 days rats from vitamin-deficient groups were fed with diets supplemented with 80% of Vit: (5 group--20% Vit+ 80% Vit; 6 group--20% Vit+DF+80% Vit). The animals fed vitamin-deficient diet lag significantly in growth from animals fed a complete diet. The growth curve of rats fed a diet with DF took an intermediate position. The studies were carried out at the Hematology analyzer "Coulter AC TTM 5 diff OV" (Beckman Coulter, USA) under the program, developed for the study of rat blood. Mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and mean corpuscular hemoglobin content (MCHC) were significantly decreased in rats with combined vitamin deficiency (20% Vit) in the diet compared with those of control group rats, while the compensatory increase in the number of red blood cells (RBC) and leukocytopenia took place. The enrichment of vitamin-deficient diet with DF (20% Vit+DF) prevented MCV and RBC changes, but MCHC left reduced in comparison with the indicator of the rats in control group. Indicators characterizing the state of platelets had no statistically significant differences between the groups. Compensation of vitamin deficiency in the diet of rats from group 5 (20% Vit+80% Vit) led only to the normalization of MCV. After vitamin restore in the diet of group 6 (20% Vit+DF+80% Vit) all investigated parameters were indistinguishable from the parameters of the control group. This indicates a positive effect of wheat bran DF consumption on the studied

  10. Dietary Fiber and Bacterial SCFA Enhance Oral Tolerance and Protect against Food Allergy through Diverse Cellular Pathways.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jian; McKenzie, Craig; Vuillermin, Peter J; Goverse, Gera; Vinuesa, Carola G; Mebius, Reina E; Macia, Laurence; Mackay, Charles R

    2016-06-21

    The incidence of food allergies in western countries has increased dramatically in recent decades. Tolerance to food antigens relies on mucosal CD103(+) dendritic cells (DCs), which promote differentiation of regulatory T (Treg) cells. We show that high-fiber feeding in mice improved oral tolerance and protected from food allergy. High-fiber feeding reshaped gut microbial ecology and increased the release of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), particularly acetate and butyrate. High-fiber feeding enhanced oral tolerance and protected against food allergy by enhancing retinal dehydrogenase activity in CD103(+) DC. This protection depended on vitamin A in the diet. This feeding regimen also boosted IgA production and enhanced T follicular helper and mucosal germinal center responses. Mice lacking GPR43 or GPR109A, receptors for SCFAs, showed exacerbated food allergy and fewer CD103(+) DCs. Dietary elements, including fiber and vitamin A, therefore regulate numerous protective pathways in the gastrointestinal tract, necessary for immune non-responsiveness to food antigens. PMID:27332875

  11. Including dietary fiber and resistant starch to increase satiety and reduce aggression in gestating sows.

    PubMed

    Sapkota, A; Marchant-Forde, J N; Richert, B T; Lay, D C

    2016-05-01

    Aggression during mixing of pregnant sows impacts sow welfare and productivity. The aim of this study was to increase satiety and reduce aggression by including dietary fiber and fermentable carbohydrates. Sows were housed in individual stalls 7 to 14 d after breeding (moving day was considered d 0 of treatment) and were fed (at 0700 h) with a CONTROL (corn-soybean meal based with no additional fiber sources), RSTARCH (10.8% resistant starch), BEETPULP (27.2% sugar beet pulp), SOYHULLS (19.1% soybean hulls), or INCSOY (14.05% soybean hulls) for 21 d (5 sows/diet × 5 diets × 8 replications = 200 sows). The CONTROL diet was targeted to contain 185 g(d∙sow) NDF and the other diets were targeted to contain 350 g(d∙sow) NDF. The INCSOY diet was fed at 2.2 kg/(d∙sow) and the other diets were fed at 2 kg(d∙sow). On d 22, sows were mixed in groups of 5 (at 1200 h). Behaviors in stalls (on d 1, 7, 14, and 21) and after mixing (d 22 and 23), heart rate (on d 1, 7, 14, and 21), blood metabolites (on d 2, 8, 15, 22, and 25), and the effects of diets on production were collected and analyzed. Sows stood more ( < 0.01) and rested less ( < 0.001) over time irrespective of the diet. Sows on BEETPULP stood more ( < 0.01) and sows on SOYHULLS rested more ( < 0.01). Sham chewing increased over days irrespective of the diet. Chewing behavior (bar and feeder) increased with days on diet ( < 0.001) and was lowest in sows on the SOYHULLS diet ( = 0.045). When mixed, biting frequency in the first hour was highest for sows on the CONTROL diet (236.5 ± 62.6) and lowest for sows on the RSTARCH diet (90.5 ± 30.5). Skin lesions increased ( < 0.001) 24 h after mixing sows irrespective of diet. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN) concentration was lowest in sows fed BEETPULP and SOYHULLS ( < 0.001). Serum glucose concentration was highest in sows fed RSTARCH and BEETPULP ( = 0.04), but there was no day effect ( = 0.62) or diet × day interaction ( = 0.60). The NEFA was greatest in sows fed

  12. Influence of maturity on alfalfa hay nutritional fractions and indigestible fiber content.

    PubMed

    Palmonari, A; Fustini, M; Canestrari, G; Grilli, E; Formigoni, A

    2014-12-01

    This study focused on changes in fibrous and protein fractions, changes in fiber digestibility and amount of indigestible neutral detergent fiber (NDF) as a consequence of increased maturity in alfalfa. A total area of 720 m(2) was divided in 18 blocks randomly assigned to 3 treatments, differing in cutting intervals. Treatment 1 was harvested with a 21-d cutting schedule, at a prebloom stage; treatment 2 with a 28-d schedule, at about first-bloom stage; whereas a full bloom was observed in treatment 3, harvested with a 35-d cutting schedule. Treatments were replicated 4 times through the spring-summer period for 2 subsequent years, 2011 and 2012. Statistical differences were observed for crude protein [treatment 1: 20.8%, treatment 2: 17.3%, and treatment 3: 17.0%; standard error of the mean (SEM)=0.83], soluble protein, and nonprotein nitrogen among treatments on a dry matter basis. Similar results were observed for acid detergent lignin (6.3, 6.9, and 7.3%, respectively; SEM=0.39), lower in treatment 1 compared with others, and in vitro NDF digestibility at 24 or 240 h. Indigestible NDF at 240 h resulted in lower values for treatment 1 compared with treatments 2 and 3 (15.5, 17.2, and 18.3%, respectively; SEM=1.54). Moreover, the indigestible NDF:acid detergent lignin ratio varied numerically but not statistically among treatments, being as much as 9% greater than the 2.4 fixed value applied for rate of digestion calculation and Cornell Net Carbohydrate Protein System (Cornell University, Ithaca, NY)-based model equations. Assuming the diet composition remained unchanged, treatment 3 (35-d cutting interval) would be expected to yield 1.4 kg less milk per day based on energy supply, and 2.8 kg less milk daily based on protein supply than treatment 1. PMID:25262189

  13. Effect of varying dietary starch and fiber levels and inoculum source (mule deer vs. dairy cow) on simulated rumen fermentation characteristics.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Matthew A; Harvey, Robyn M; Johnson, Nichole F; Koutsos, Elizabeth A; Kerley, Monty S

    2014-01-01

    This study measured starch and fiber digestion and microbial fermentation of three commercial exotic animal feeds using mule deer (MD) or dairy cow (DC) rumen inoculum. Diets were formulated to provide either high starch/low fiber (based on neutral detergent fiber fraction; NDF) with either alfalfa (diet A) or grain and oilseed byproducts (diet B) as the major fiber sources or low starch/high NDF (diet C). An initial batch culture incubation was run with diets inoculated with each rumen inoculum (n = 6; N = 36) over a 48 hr period with samples taken at different hour points for ammonia, pH, lactate, and volatile fatty acids (VFA). A second experiment was conducted where two continuous culture incubations (MD or DC) were run with six single-flow polycarbonate fermentation vessels per dietary treatment. Diets were fed two times a day over an 8-day period and sampled for ammonia, pH, and VFA before and after feeding on the last 3 days. On day 8, fermenter and effluent contents were collected and analyzed for nitrogen, dry matter digestibility (DMD), and organic matter digestibility (OMD). OMD was greater in MD (P = 0.02) and DMD tended to do the same (P = 0.06), but there were no differences due to diet (P > 0.05). Ammonia concentration was greater in DC (P < 0.01), and diets A and B had greater concentrations than diet C (P < 0.01). The greater digestibility, higher acetate:propionate (A:P) ratio and increased lactate levels prior to feeding likely led to diet C having a lower pH than diet A (6.59 vs. 6.66, respectively; P < 0.01) and led the tendency of A to be lower than C after feeding (P = 0.08). A:P ratio was greater in DC than MD before and after feeding (P < 0.01) and was greater in diet C than diets A or B (P < 0.01). Total VFA production tended to be greater in diets B and C in DC (P = 0.06). Rumen fluid source did affect fermentation. Increasing fiber level did not negatively affect fermentation and may

  14. Production and anti-diabetic activity of soluble dietary fiber from apricot pulp by Trichoderma viride fermentation.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jie; Gu, Xin; Zhang, Qiaohui; Ou, Yangjie; Wang, Jianzhong

    2015-05-01

    Soluble dietary fiber (SDF) was prepared by Trichoderma viride fermentation by using apricot pulp as the raw material. A four-factor and three-level response surface methodology was applied to optimize the fermentation conditions affecting the extraction rate of SDF. The optimum fermentation conditions were listed: crude enzyme volume, 9.59 mL g(-1); fermentation temperature, 43 °C; initial pH, 5.36; fermentation time, 6.47 h. Under these conditions, 15.69% yield was obtained and its relative error with the predicted theoretical value (15.87%) was 1.14%. The dietary fiber content of SDF was 84.0% whereas it was found to be 43.1% in apricot pulp flour. The anti-diabetic effect of apricot pulp SDF on rat models of diabetes was investigated. Both the blood glucose level and body weight were significantly changed in apricot pulp SDF-treated groups compared with the diabetic group (p < 0.01) after intragastric administration for 28 days. In addition, SDF elicited inhibitory effects on the α-glucosidase activity with an IC50 of 17.458 mg mL(-1). These results implied that apricot pulp SDF relieved the symptoms of diabetic rats. PMID:25882161

  15. Metabolites in contact with the rat digestive tract after ingestion of a phenolic-rich dietary fiber matrix.

    PubMed

    Touriño, Sonia; Pérez-Jiménez, Jara; Mateos-Martín, María Luisa; Fuguet, Elisabet; Vinardell, María Pilar; Cascante, Marta; Torres, Josep Lluís

    2011-06-01

    Grape antioxidant dietary fiber (GADF) is a phenolic-rich dietary fiber matrix. The aim of this work was to determine which phenolic compounds come into contact with colonic epithelial tissue after the ingestion of GADF. By use of HPLC-ESI-MS/MS techniques phenolic metabolites were detected in feces, cecal content, and colonic tissue from rats. Free (epi)catechin (EC) was detected in all three sources, and more than 20 conjugated metabolites of EC were also detected in feces. Fourteen microbially derived phenolic metabolites were also identified in feces, cecal content, and/or colonic tissue. These results show that during transit along the digestive tract, proanthocyanidin oligomers and polymers are depolymerized into EC units. After ingestion of GADF, free EC and its conjugates, as well as free and conjugated microbially derived phenolic metabolites, come into contact with the intestine epithelium for more than 24 h and may be partly responsible for the positive influence of GADF on gut health. PMID:21526861

  16. Response of the rat lung to respirable fractions of composite fiber-epoxy dusts

    SciTech Connect

    Luchtel, D.L.; Martin, T.R.; Boatman, E.S. )

    1989-02-01

    It is unknown whether respirable dusts derived from the machining of composite fiber-epoxy materials pose a health risk. To evaluate the potential pulmonary toxicity of these materials, we studied the effects of six samples of dusts previously well characterized physically, chemically, and morphologically in the lungs of specific pathogen-free rats. A single intratracheal bolus of 5 mg of each sample was injected into separate groups of five rats each. For comparison, free crystalline silica (quartz) and aluminum oxide were used as positive and negative controls in additional animals. One month later, the lungs were fixed and sectioned for light microscopy. Histopathology scores for the six composite-epoxy samples showed a continuum of lung injury that was between the negative and positive controls. None of the composite dusts had effects that paralleled those of quartz; however, four of the composite dusts produced reactions that were more severe than that seen with aluminum oxide. Therefore, respirable fractions of some types of composite materials can induce pathological changes in lungs of experimental animals. The features responsible for the variation in host response between samples are, as yet, unclear.

  17. Evaluation of the relative available energy of several dietary fiber preparations using breath hydrogen evolution in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Oku, Tsuneyuki; Nakamura, Sadako

    2014-01-01

    A standardized simple, indirect method for assessing the relative energy of dietary fiber carbohydrates is not yet established. There is a need for a standardized in vivo assay. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the relative available energy (RAE) for 9 major dietary fiber materials (DFMs) based on fermentability from breath hydrogen excretion (BHE) in subjects. Fructooligosaccharide (FOS) was used as a reference. The study was conducted using a within-subject, repeated measures design and approved by the Ethical Committee of University of Nagasaki. After DFM ingestion, end-expiratory gas (750-mL) was collected at 1-h intervals for 8 h, as well as at 2-h intervals between 8 h and 14 h, and 30 min after waking up and 24 h after DFM ingestion. Breath hydrogen concentration was assessed with a gas chromatograph. The RAE of DFMs tested was evaluated based on the area under the curve (AUC) of BHE of FOS. Based on the ratio of AUC for 8 h, the RAE of polydextrose, partially hydrolysed guar gum, resistant maltodextrin and partially hydrolysed alginate was 1 kcal/g, and that of glucomannan, heat-moisture treatment and high-amylose cornstarch and cellulose was 0 kcal/g, while the RAE of all tested DEMs including cellulose and glucomannan was 1 kcal/g in the calculation based on AUCs for 14 h and 24 h in subjects. We suggest that a breath hydrogen collection period of 14 h or more could be used to measure RAE for a range of fiber preparations in vivo. PMID:25297613

  18. Insight into interfacial effect on effective physical properties of fibrous materials. I. The volume fraction of soft interfaces around anisotropic fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenxiang; Wang, Han; Niu, Yanze; Bai, Jingtao

    2016-01-01

    With advances in interfacial properties characterization technologies, the interfacial volume fraction is a feasible parameter for evaluating effective physical properties of materials. However, there is a need to determine the interfacial volume fraction around anisotropic fibers and a need to assess the influence of such the interfacial property on effective properties of fibrous materials. Either ways, the accurate prediction of interfacial volume fraction is required. Towards this end, we put forward both theoretical and numerical schemes to determine the interfacial volume fraction in fibrous materials, which are considered as a three-phase composite structure consisting of matrix, anisotropic hard spherocylinder fibers, and soft interfacial layers with a constant dimension coated on the surface of each fiber. The interfacial volume fraction actually represents the fraction of space not occupied by all hard fibers and matrix. The theoretical scheme that adopts statistical geometry and stereological theories is essentially an analytic continuation from spherical inclusions. By simulating such three-phase chopped fibrous materials, we numerically derive the interfacial volume fraction. The theoretical and numerical schemes provide a quantitative insight that the interfacial volume fraction depends strongly on the fiber geometries like fiber shape, geometric size factor, and fiber size distribution. As a critical interfacial property, the present contribution can be further drawn into assessing effective physical properties of fibrous materials, which will be demonstrated in another paper (Part II) of this series.

  19. Rearing Tenebrio molitor in BLSS: Dietary fiber affects larval growth, development, and respiration characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Leyuan; Stasiak, Michael; Li, Liang; Xie, Beizhen; Fu, Yuming; Gidzinski, Danuta; Dixon, Mike; Liu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Rearing of yellow mealworm (Tenebrio molitor L.) will provide good animal nutrition for astronauts in a bioregenerative life support system. In this study, growth and biomass conversion data of T. molitor larvae were tested for calculating the stoichiometric equation of its growth. Result of a respiratory quotient test proved the validity of the equation. Fiber had the most reduction in mass during T. molitor‧s consumption, and thus it is speculated that fiber is an important factor affecting larval growth of T. molitor. In order to further confirm this hypothesis and find out a proper feed fiber content, T. molitor larvae were fed on diets with 4 levels of fiber. Larval growth, development and respiration in each group were compared and analyzed. Results showed that crude-fiber content of 5% had a significant promoting effect on larvae in early instars, and is beneficial for pupa eclosion. When fed on feed of 5-10% crude-fiber, larvae in later instars reached optimal levels in growth, development and respiration. Therefore, we suggest that crude fiber content in feed can be controlled within 5-10%, and with the consideration of food palatability, a crude fiber of 5% is advisable.

  20. A Gnotobiotic Mouse Model Demonstrates that Dietary Fiber Protects Against Colorectal Tumorigenesis in a Microbiota- and Butyrate–Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Donohoe, Dallas R.; Holley, Darcy; Collins, Leonard B.; Montgomery, Stephanie A.; Whitmore, Alan C.; Hillhouse, Andrew; Curry, Kaitlin P.; Renner, Sarah W.; Greenwalt, Alicia; Ryan, Elizabeth P.; Godfrey, Virginia; Heise, Mark T.; Threadgill, Deborah S.; Han, Anna; Swenberg, James A.; Threadgill, David W.; Bultman, Scott J.

    2014-01-01

    It is controversial whether dietary fiber protects against colorectal cancer because of conflicting results from human epidemiologic studies. However, these studies and mouse models of colorectal cancer have not controlled the composition of gut microbiota, which ferment fiber into short-chain fatty acids such as butyrate. Butyrate is noteworthy because it has energetic and epigenetic functions in colonocytes and tumorsuppressive properties in colorectal-cancer cell lines. We utilized gnotobiotic mouse models colonized with wild-type or mutant strains of a butyrate-producing bacterium to demonstrate that fiber does have a potent tumor-suppressive effect but in a microbiota- and butyrate-dependent manner. Furthermore, due to the Warburg effect, butyrate was metabolized less in tumors where it accumulated and functioned as an HDAC inhibitor to stimulate histone acetylation and affect apoptosis and cell proliferation. To support the relevance of this mechanism in human cancer, we demonstrate that butyrate and histone-acetylation levels are elevated in colorectal adenocarcinomas compared to normal colonic tissues. PMID:25266735

  1. Modified Dietary Fiber from Cassava Pulp and Assessment of Mercury Bioaccessibility and Intestinal Uptake Using an In Vitro Digestion/Caco-2 Model System.

    PubMed

    Kachenpukdee, Natta; Santerre, Charles R; Ferruzzi, Mario G; Oonsivilai, Ratchadaporn

    2016-07-01

    The ability of modified dietary fiber (MDF) generated from cassava pulp to modulate the bioaccessibility and intestinal absorption of heavy metals may be helpful to mitigate health risk associated with select foods including select fish high in methyl mercury. Using a coupled in vitro digestion/Caco-2 human intestinal cell model, the reduction of fish mercury bioaccessibility and intestinal uptake by MDF was investiaged. MDF was prepared from cassava pulp, a byproduct of tapioca production. The highest yield (79.68%) of MDF was obtained by enzymatic digestion with 0.1% α-amylase (w/v), 0.1% amyloglucosidase (v/v) and 1% neutrase (v/v). MDF and fish tissue were subjected to in vitro digestion and results suggest that MDF may reduce mercury bioaccessibility from fish to 34% to 85% compared to control in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, accumulation of mercury from digesta containing fish and MDF was only modestly impacted by the presence of MDF. In conclusion, MDF prepared from cassava pulp may be useful as an ingredient to reduce mercury bioavailability from food such as fish specifically by inhibiting mercury transfer to the bioaccessibile fraction during digestion. PMID:27220052

  2. Dietary Fiber-Induced Changes in the Structure and Thermal Properties of Gluten Proteins Studied by Fourier Transform-Raman Spectroscopy and Thermogravimetry.

    PubMed

    Nawrocka, Agnieszka; Szymańska-Chargot, Monika; Miś, Antoni; Wilczewska, Agnieszka Z; Markiewicz, Karolina H

    2016-03-16

    Interactions between gluten proteins and dietary fiber supplements at the stage of bread dough formation are crucial in the baking industry. The dietary fiber additives are regarded as a source of polysaccharides and antioxidants, which have positive effects on human health. The fiber enrichment of bread causes a significant reduction in its quality, which is connected with changes in the structure of gluten proteins. Changes in the structure of gluten proteins and their thermal properties induced by seven commercial dietary fibers (fruit, vegetable, and cereal) were studied by FT-Raman spectroscopy and thermogravimetry (TGA), respectively. For this aim the bread dough at 500 FU consistency was made of a blend of wheat starch and wheat gluten as well as the fiber, the content of which ranged from 3 to 18% w/w. The obtained results revealed that all dietary fibers apart from oat caused similar changes in the secondary structure of gluten proteins. The most noticeable changes were observed in the regions connected with hydrogen-bonded β-sheets (1614 and 1684 cm(-1)) and β-turns (1640 and 1657 cm(-1)). Other changes observed in the gluten structure, concerning other β-structures, conformation of disulfide bridges, and aromatic amino acid microenvironment, depend on the fibers' chemical composition. The results concerning structural changes suggested that the observed formation of hydrogen bonds in the β-structures can be connected with aggregation or abnormal folding. This hypothesis was confirmed by thermogravimetric results. Changes in weight loss indicated the formation of a more complex and strong gluten network. PMID:26927821

  3. Effects of Cactus Fiber on the Excretion of Dietary Fat in Healthy Subjects: A Double Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Crossover Clinical Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Uebelhack, Ralf; Busch, Regina; Alt, Felix; Beah, Zhi-Ming; Chong, Pee-Win

    2014-01-01

    Background Cactus (Opuntia ficus-indica) fiber was shown to promote weight loss in a 3-month clinical investigation. As demonstrated by in vitro studies, cactus fiber binds to dietary fat and its use results in reduced absorption, which in turn leads to reduced energy absorption and ultimately the reduction of body weight. Objective The objective of our study was to elucidate the dietary fat binding capacity of cactus fiber through determination of fecal fat excretion in healthy volunteers. Subjects and Methods This clinical investigation was performed as a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study in healthy subjects for a period of approximately 45 days. Twenty healthy volunteer subjects were randomized to receive cactus fiber or placebo, 2 tablets thrice daily with main meals. All subjects were provided with meals during the study period (except washout) according to a standardized meal plan, with 35% of daily energy need coming from fat. Two 24-hour feces samples were collected during both the baseline and treatment periods for analysis of the fat content. Results Cactus fiber showed an increased fecal fat excretion compared with placebo (mean [SD] = 15.79% [5.79%] vs 4.56% [3.09%]; P < 0.001). No adverse events were reported throughout the study period. Conclusions Cactus fiber has been shown to significantly promote fecal fat excretion in healthy adults. The results of our study support the hypothesis that cactus fiber helps in reducing body weight by binding to dietary fat and increasing its excretion, thus reducing dietary fat available for absorption. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01590667. PMID:25067985

  4. High-fiber foods

    MedlinePlus

    Dietary fiber - self-care ... Dietary fiber adds bulk to your diet. Because it makes you feel full faster, it can help you ... Grains are another important source of dietary fiber. Eat more: ... Whole-grain breads Brown rice Popcorn High-fiber cereals, such ...

  5. Addition of dried 'Ataulfo' mango (Mangifera indica L) by-products as a source of dietary fiber and polyphenols in starch-molded mango snacks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The increasing demand of healthier foods favors the consumption of natural bioactive compounds such as antioxidants and dietary fiber (DF) that confers protection against cardiovascular diseases and other degenerative diseases. On the industrial processing of mango, 35-60 % of this fruit is discarde...

  6. Effects of dietary fiber concentrations supplied by corn bran on feed intake growth and feed efficiency of channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present study examined the effects of dietary fiber and digestible energy on the feed intake, growth, and feed efficiency of juvenile channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus. Fish with an initial weight of 9.8 ± 0.1 g/fish (mean ± SD) were stocked in 110-L flow-through aquariums and fed for 9 weeks ...

  7. Cost-of-illness analysis reveals potential healthcare savings with reductions in type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease following recommended intakes of dietary fiber in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Mohammad M. H.; Gyles, Collin L.; Marinangeli, Christopher P. F.; Carlberg, Jared G.; Jones, Peter J. H.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Type 2 diabetes (T2D) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) are leading causes of mortality and two of the most costly diet-related ailments worldwide. Consumption of fiber-rich diets has been repeatedly associated with favorable impacts on these co-epidemics, however, the healthcare cost-related economic value of altered dietary fiber intakes remains poorly understood. In this study, we estimated the annual cost savings accruing to the Canadian healthcare system in association with reductions in T2D and CVD rates, separately, following increased intakes of dietary fiber by adults. Methods: A three-step cost-of-illness analysis was conducted to identify the percentage of individuals expected to consume fiber-rich diets in Canada, estimate increased fiber intakes in relation to T2D and CVD reduction rates, and independently assess the potential annual savings in healthcare costs associated with the reductions in rates of these two epidemics. The economic model employed a sensitivity analysis of four scenarios (universal, optimistic, pessimistic, and very pessimistic) to cover a range of assumptions within each step. Results: Non-trivial healthcare and related savings of CAD$35.9-$718.8 million in T2D costs and CAD$64.8 million–$1.3 billion in CVD costs were calculated under a scenario where cereal fiber was used to increase current intakes of dietary fiber to the recommended levels of 38 g per day for men and 25 g per day for women. Each 1 g per day increase in fiber consumption resulted in annual CAD$2.6 to $51.1 million savings for T2D and $4.6 to $92.1 million savings for CVD. Conclusion: Findings of this analysis shed light on the economic value of optimal dietary fiber intakes. Strategies to increase consumers’ general knowledge of the recommended intakes of dietary fiber, as part of healthy diet, and to facilitate stakeholder synergy are warranted to enable better management of healthcare and related costs associated with T2D and CVD in Canada. PMID

  8. Effects of adding some dietary fibers to a cystine diet on the activities of liver antioxidant enzymes and serum enzymes in rats.

    PubMed

    He, Guochun; Aoyama, Yoritaka

    2003-03-01

    This study investigates whether some dietary fibers can the toxicity due to cystine added to the diet. Wistar rats were investigated for the effects of adding pectin, sugar beet fiber or konjac mannan to a cystine diet on the growth rate and on the activities of liver antioxidant enzymes and serum enzymes. The addition of pectin, sugar beet fiber or konjac mannan to the cystine diet resulted in a significant increase in both the food intake and body weight gain. Feeding the cystine diet caused lower activities of total and Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase, and of catalase in the liver. The addition of pectin to the cystine diet counteracted the activities of the total and Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase, and of catalase in liver. Of the dietary fibers tested, konjac mannan prevented the elevation of the two enzyme activities in the serum induced by feeding the cystine diet, indicating that this fiber might have the ability to alleviate hepatic damage due to dietary cystine. PMID:12723612

  9. A diet rich in fat and poor in dietary fiber increases the in vitro formation of reactive oxygen species in human feces.

    PubMed

    Erhardt, J G; Lim, S S; Bode, J C; Bode, C

    1997-05-01

    Production of reactive oxygen species in the lumen of the colon, a process that is influenced by nutritional factors, may be important in the etiology of colorectal cancer. Because research on humans in support of this hypothesis is lacking, the objective of this study was to measure the effect of different dietary compositions on the in vitro oxygen radical production in human feces. Over a period of 12 d, seven healthy subjects received a diet rich in fat (50%) and meat and poor in dietary fiber. After a period of 1 wk, they received a vegetarian diet poor in fat (20%) and rich in dietary fiber. At the end of each study period, feces were collected and analyzed for in vitro oxygen radical production with dimethylsulfoxide as the free radical scavenger. The mean hydroxyl radical production was 13 times greater in feces of subjects when they consumed the diet rich in fat and poor in dietary fiber [52.7 +/- 29.5 micromol/(g feces x h)] than when they consumed the diet poor in fat and rich in dietary fiber [3.9 +/- 3.9 micromol/(g feces x h); P < 0.05]. This difference was associated with a 42% higher fecal iron concentration when they consumed the first diet (7.0 +/- 19.2 micromol/g feces) than when they consumed the second (4.9 +/- 1.9 micromol/g feces; P < 0.05). The results of this study confirm that diets high in fat and meat and low in fiber markedly increase the potential for hydroxyl radical formation in the feces, which in turn may contribute to an enhanced risk of colorectal cancer. PMID:9164990

  10. Association of Low Dietary Intake of Fiber and Liquids with Constipation: Evidence from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES)

    PubMed Central

    Markland, Alayne D.; Palsson, Olafur; Goode, Patricia S.; Burgio, Kathryn L.; Busby-Whitehead, Jan; Whitehead, William E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Epidemiological studies support an association of self-defined constipation with fiber and physical activity, but not liquid intake. The aims of this study were to assess the prevalence and associations of dietary fiber and liquid intake to constipation. Methods Analyses were based on data from 10,914 adults (≥20 years) from the 2005-2008 cycles of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES). Constipation was defined as hard or lumpy stools (Bristol Stool Scale types 1 or 2) as the “usual or most common stool type.” Dietary fiber and liquid intake from total moisture content were obtained from dietary recall. Co-variables included: age, race, education, poverty income ratio, body mass index, self-reported general health status, chronic illnesses, and physical activity. Prevalence estimates and prevalence odds ratios (POR) were analyzed in adjusted multivariable models using appropriate sampling weights. Results Overall, 9,373 (85.9%) adults (4,787 women and 4,586 men) had complete stool consistency and dietary data. Constipation rates were 10.2% (95% CI: 9.6,10.9) for women and 4.0 (95% CI: 3.2,5.0) for men (p<.001). After multivariable adjustment, low liquid consumption remained a predictor of constipation among women (POR: 1.3, 95% CI: 1.0,1.6) and men (POR: 2.4, 95% CI: 1.5,3.9); however, dietary fiber was not a predictor. Among women, African-American race/ethnicity (POR: 1.4, 95% CI: 1.0,1.9), being obese (POR: 0.7, 95% CI: 0.5,0.9), and having a higher education level (POR: 0.8, 95% CI: 0.7,0.9) were significantly associated with constipation. Conclusions The findings support clinical recommendations to treat constipation with increased liquid, but not fiber or exercise. PMID:23567352

  11. Dietary Intake of Fiber, Fruit, and Vegetables Decrease the Risk of Incident Kidney Stones in Women: A Women's Health Initiative (WHI) Report

    PubMed Central

    Sorensen, Mathew D.; Hsi, Ryan S.; Chi, Thomas; Shara, Nawar; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Kahn, Arnold J.; Wang, Hong; Hou, Lifang; Stoller, Marshall L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the relationship between dietary fiber, fruit, and vegetable intake, and the risk of kidney stone formation. Methods Overall, 83,922 postmenopausal women from the WHI Observational Study were included and followed prospectively. Cox proportional hazards regression analyses evaluated the associations between total dietary fiber, fruits, and vegetable intake, and the risk of incident kidney stone formation adjusting for nephrolithiasis risk factors (age, race/ethnicity, geographic region, diabetes mellitus, calcium supplementation, hormone therapy use, body mass index, calibrated caloric intake, and dietary water, sodium, animal protein, and calcium intake). Women with a prior history of kidney stones (3,471 women) were analyzed separately. Results Mean age was 64±7 years, 85% of women were Caucasian and 2,937 women (3.5%) experienced a kidney stone occurrence in 8 years median follow-up. In women with no history of kidney stones, higher total dietary fiber (6-26% decreased risk, p<0.001), higher fruit intake (12-25% decreased risk, p<0.001), and higher vegetable intake (9-22% decreased risk, p=0.002) were associated with a decreased risk of incident kidney stone formation in separate adjusted models. In women with a history of stones, there were no significant protective effects of fiber, fruits, or vegetable intake on the risk of kidney stone recurrence. Conclusions Greater dietary intake of fiber, fruits and vegetables were each associated with a reduced risk of incident kidney stones in postmenopausal women. The protective effects were independent of other known risk factors for kidney stones. In contrast, there was no reduction in risk in women with a history of stones. PMID:24859445

  12. Preparation and characterization of a novel pH-response dietary fiber: chitosan-coated konjac glucomannan.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaoguo; Li, Jing; Jin, Weiping; Geng, Xiaopeng; Xu, Wei; Ye, Ting; Lei, Jieqiong; Li, Bin; Wang, Ling

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to prepare a kind of novel pH-response dietary fiber from chitosan-coated konjac glucomannan (KGM) powders (KGM/Chitosan or K/C powders) by a physical grind method. The K/C powders were selectively soluble in aqueous solutions of different pH. Meanwhile, the coated chitosan could largely decrease the viscosity of KGM in neutral condition, which is the main limitation for KGM application in food industry. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), swelling ability and rheological measurements were utilized to characterize the performance of K/C powders. K/C powders exhibited much higher viscosity and swelling ability in acidic condition than in neutral condition. Therefore, this study will extend the application of KGM in food industry and in other pH-specific applications as well. PMID:25498602

  13. Metabolite production during in vitro colonic fermentation of dietary fiber: analysis and comparison of two European diets.

    PubMed

    Tabernero, Maria; Venema, Koen; Maathuis, Annet J H; Saura-Calixto, Fulgencio D

    2011-08-24

    Metabolite production and antioxidant released during colonic fermentation of naturally occurring dietary fiber (DF) from two European diets (Mediterranean and Scandinavian) were determined. With this aim, DF and associated components were isolated from both whole diets, as well as from cereals and fruits and vegetables comprising the diets. DF was used as substrate for colonic fermentation in a dynamic in vitro model of the colon, samples were collected, and fermentation metabolites were analyzed. Statistical differences between samples were observed in the concentrations of short-chain fatty acids and ammonia and in the ratio acetate/propionate/butyrate. Whole grain cereal DF generated a larger amount of propionate than refined flour cereal DF. Fruit and vegetable DF generated higher amounts of butyrate than cereal DF. Most antioxidant compounds were released from DF during in vitro colonic fermentation. It is concluded that different sources of DF may play a specific role in health maintenance mediated by metabolites produced during colonic fermentation. PMID:21761861

  14. Dietary fiber prevents obesity-related liver lipotoxicity by modulating sterol-regulatory element binding protein pathway in C57BL/6J mice fed a high-fat/cholesterol diet

    PubMed Central

    Han, Shufen; Jiao, Jun; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Jiaying; Wan, Zhongxiao; Zhang, Weiguo; Gao, Xiaoran; Qin, Liqiang

    2015-01-01

    Adequate intake of dietary fibers has proven metabolic and cardiovascular benefits, molecular mechanisms remain still limited. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of cereal dietary fiber on obesity-related liver lipotoxicity in C57BL/6J mice fed a high-fat/cholesterol (HFC) diet and underlying mechanism. Forty-eight adult male C57BL/6J mice were randomly given a reference chow diet, or a high fat/choleserol (HFC) diet supplemented with or without oat fiber or wheat bran fiber for 24 weeks. Our results showed mice fed oat or wheat bran fiber exhibtied lower weight gain, lipid profiles and insulin resistance, compared with HFC diet. The two cereal dietary fibers potently decreased protein expressions of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 and key factors involved in lipogenesis, including fatty acid synthase and acetyl-CoA carboxylase in target tissues. At molecular level, the two cereal dietary fibers augmented protein expressions of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and gamma, liver X receptor alpha, and ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 in target tissues. Our findings indicated that cereal dietary fiber supplementation abrogated obesity-related liver lipotoxicity and dyslipidemia in C57BL/6J mice fed a HFC diet. In addition, the efficacy of oat fiber is greater than wheat bran fiber in normalizing these metabolic disorders and pathological profiles. PMID:26510459

  15. Impact of dietary fiber coatings on behavior of protein-stabilized lipid droplets under simulated gastrointestinal conditions.

    PubMed

    Tokle, Tanushree; Lesmes, Uri; Decker, Eric Andrew; McClements, David Julian

    2012-01-01

    Multilayer emulsions containing lipid droplets coated by lactoferrin (LF) - anionic polysaccharide layers have improved resistance to environmental stresses (such as pH, salt, and temperature), but their behavior within the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) is currently unknown. The objective of this research was therefore to monitor changes in the physicochemical properties and digestibility of these systems under simulated GIT conditions. Primary emulsions (5% corn oil, 0.5% LF) were prepared using a high-pressure homogenizer. Secondary emulsions (5% corn oil, 0.5% LF, 0.5% polysaccharide) were prepared by incorporating alginate, low methoxyl pectin (LMP) or high methoxyl pectin (HMP) into primary emulsions. Emulsions were then subjected to simulated gastric fluid (SGF) and simulated intestinal fluid (SIF) conditions in sequence. LF, LF-LMP and LF-HMP emulsions were stable to droplet aggregation in the stomach but aggregated in the small intestine, whereas LF-alginate emulsions aggregated in both the stomach and small intestine. The presence of a dietary fiber coating around the initial lipid droplets had little influence on the total extent of lipid digestion in SIF, but LF-alginate emulsions had a slower initial digestion rate than the other emulsions. These results suggest that the dietary fiber coatings may become detached in the small intestine, or that they were permeable to digestive enzymes. Pepsin was found to have little influence on the physical stability or digestibility of the emulsions. The knowledge obtained from this study is important for the design of delivery systems for encapsulation and release of lipophilic bioactive ingredients. PMID:22086435

  16. A dietary portfolio approach to cholesterol reduction: combined effects of plant sterols, vegetable proteins, and viscous fibers in hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, David J A; Kendall, Cyril W C; Faulkner, Dorothea; Vidgen, Edward; Trautwein, Elke A; Parker, Tina L; Marchie, Augustine; Koumbridis, George; Lapsley, Karen G; Josse, Robert G; Leiter, Lawrence A; Connelly, Philip W

    2002-12-01

    Plant sterols, soy proteins, and viscous fibers are advised for cholesterol reduction but their combined effect has never been tested. We therefore assessed their combined effect on blood lipids in hyperlipidemic subjects who were already consuming a low-saturated fat, low-cholesterol diet before starting the study. The test (combination) diet was 1 month in duration and was very low in saturated fat and high in plant sterols (1 g/1,000 kcal), soy protein (23 g/1,000 kcal), and viscous fibers (9 g/1,000 kcal) obtained from foods available in supermarkets and health food stores. One subject also completed 2 further diet periods: a low-fat control diet and a control diet plus 20 mg/d lovastatin. Fasting blood lipids, blood pressure, and body weight were measured prior to and at weekly intervals during the study. The combination diet was rated as acceptable and very filling. The diet reduced low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol by 29.0% +/- 2.7% (P <.001) and the ratio of LDL-cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol by 26.5% +/- 3.4% (P <.001). Near maximal reductions were seen by week 2. In the subject who took Mevacor and control diets each for 4 weeks, the reduction in LDL:HDL-cholesterol on Mevacor was similar to the combination diet. We conclude that acceptable diets of foods from supermarkets and health food stores that contain recognized cholesterol-lowering dietary components in combination (a dietary portfolio) may be as effective as the starting dose of older first-line drugs in managing hypercholesterolemia. PMID:12489074

  17. Dietary fibers solubilized in water or an oil emulsion induce satiation through CCK-mediated vagal signaling in mice.

    PubMed

    Rasoamanana, Rojo; Chaumontet, Catherine; Nadkarni, Nachiket; Tomé, Daniel; Fromentin, Gilles; Darcel, Nicolas

    2012-11-01

    This study focused on the fate of the satiating potency of dietary fibers when solubilized in a fat-containing medium. Fourteen percent of either guar gum (GG) or fructo-oligosaccharide (FOS) or a mixture of the 2 (GG-FOS, 5% GG and 9% FOS) were solubilized in water or an oil emulsion (18-21% rapeseed oil in water, v:v) and administered by gavage to mice before their food intake was monitored. When compared with water (control), only GG-FOS solubilized in water or in the oil emulsion reduced daily energy intake by 21.1 and 14.1%, respectively. To further describe this effect, the meal pattern was characterized and showed that GG-FOS increased satiation without affecting satiety by diminishing the size and duration of meals for up to 9 h after administration independently of the solubilization medium. The peripheral blockade of gut peptide receptors showed that these effects were dependent on the peripheral signaling of cholecystokinin but not of glucagon-like peptide 1, suggesting that anorectic signals emerge from the upper intestine rather than from distal segments. Measurements of neuronal activation in the nucleus of solitary tract supported the hypothesis of vagal satiation signaling because a 3-fold increase in c-Fos protein expression was observed in that nucleus after the administration of GG-FOS, independently of the solubilization medium. Taken together, these data suggest that a mixture of GG and FOS can maintain its appetite suppressant effect in fatty media. Adding these dietary fibers to fat-containing foods might therefore be useful in managing food intake. PMID:23054308

  18. Impact of dietary fibers [methyl cellulose, chitosan, and pectin] on digestion of lipids under simulated gastrointestinal conditions.

    PubMed

    Espinal-Ruiz, Mauricio; Parada-Alfonso, Fabián; Restrepo-Sánchez, Luz-Patricia; Narváez-Cuenca, Carlos-Eduardo; McClements, David Julian

    2014-12-01

    A simulated in vitro digestion model was used to elucidate the impact of dietary fibers on the digestion rate of emulsified lipids. The influence of polysaccharide type (chitosan (cationic), methyl cellulose (non-ionic), and pectin (anionic)) and initial concentration (0.4 to 3.6% (w/w)) was examined. 2% (w/w) corn oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by 0.2% (w/w) Tween-80 were prepared, mixed with polysaccharide, and then subjected to an in vitro digestion model (37 °C): initial (pH 7.0); oral (pH 6.8; 10 min); gastric (pH 2.5; 120 min); and, intestinal (pH 7.0; 120 min) phases. The impact of polysaccharides on lipid digestion, ζ-potential, particle size, viscosity, and stability was determined. The rate and extent of lipid digestion decreased with increasing pectin, methyl cellulose, and chitosan concentrations. The free fatty acids released after 120 min of lipase digestion were 46, 63, and 81% (w/w) for methyl cellulose, pectin, and chitosan, respectively (3.6% (w/w) initial polysaccharide), indicating that methyl cellulose had the highest capacity to inhibit lipid digestion, followed by pectin, and then chitosan. The impact of the polysaccharides on lipid digestion was attributed to their ability to induce droplet flocculation, and/or due to their interactions with molecular species involved in lipid hydrolysis, such as bile salts, fatty acids, and calcium. These results have important implications for understanding the influence of dietary fibers on lipid digestion. The control of lipid digestibility within the gastrointestinal tract might be important for the development of reduced-calorie emulsion-based functional food products. PMID:25312704

  19. Improving Effect of the Acute Administration of Dietary Fiber-Enriched Cereals on Blood Glucose Levels and Gut Hormone Secretion

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Dietary fiber improves hyperglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes through its physicochemical properties and possible modulation of gut hormone secretion, such as glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). We assessed the effect of dietary fiber-enriched cereal flakes (DC) on postprandial hyperglycemia and gut hormone secretion in patients with type 2 diabetes. Thirteen participants ate isocaloric meals based on either DC or conventional cereal flakes (CC) in a crossover design. DC or CC was provided for dinner, night snack on day 1 and breakfast on day 2, followed by a high-fat lunch. On day 2, the levels of plasma glucose, GLP-1, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), and insulin were measured. Compared to CC, DC intake exhibited a lower post-breakfast 2-hours glucose level (198.5±12.8 vs. 245.9±15.2 mg/dL, P<0.05) and a lower incremental peak of glucose from baseline (101.8±9.1 vs. 140.3±14.3 mg/dL, P<0.001). The incremental area under the curve (iAUC) of glucose after breakfast was lower with DC than with CC (P<0.001). However, there were no differences in the plasma insulin, glucagon, GLP-1, and GIP levels. In conclusion, acute administration of DC attenuates postprandial hyperglycemia without any significant change in the representative glucose-regulating hormones in patients with type 2 diabetes (ClinicalTrials.gov. NCT 01997281). PMID:26839476

  20. [Comparison of some enzymatic methods for dietary fiber determination in foods].

    PubMed

    Gronowska-Senger, A; Drywień, M; Nowierska, B

    1992-01-01

    Comparison of three different enzymatic techniques for dietary fibre determination (Hellendoorn, Asp, AOAC)) in five kinds of food (white bread, rye rolls, white cabbage, carrot and red beet) was the main purpose of this study. It was found that our results obtained by Hellendoorn's method are overestimated and therefore are somewhat doubtful. For this reason the AOAC method can be recommended as more accurate. PMID:1335163

  1. [Determination of the dietary fiber content of some foods using a biological method].

    PubMed

    Gronowska-Senger, A; Drywień, M; Wysokińska, M

    1989-01-01

    The evaluation of a biological method for dietary fibre determination in food was the main purpose of this study. Three-week old Wistar rats were used in this experiments. The rats were administered during two weeks a diet containing 1% of crude fibre from bread, grits, green beans, white cabbage and carrot. It was found that the biological method gave results similar to those obtained by the enzymatic one. PMID:2561577

  2. Effects of Dietary Protein and Fiber at Breakfast on Appetite, ad Libitum Energy Intake at Lunch, and Neural Responses to Visual Food Stimuli in Overweight Adults

    PubMed Central

    Sayer, R. Drew; Amankwaah, Akua F.; Tamer, Gregory G.; Chen, Ningning; Wright, Amy J.; Tregellas, Jason R.; Cornier, Marc-Andre; Kareken, David A.; Talavage, Thomas M.; McCrory, Megan A.; Campbell, Wayne W.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing either protein or fiber at mealtimes has relatively modest effects on ingestive behavior. Whether protein and fiber have additive or interactive effects on ingestive behavior is not known. Fifteen overweight adults (5 female, 10 male; BMI: 27.1 ± 0.2 kg/m2; aged 26 ± 1 year) consumed four breakfast meals in a randomized crossover manner (normal protein (12 g) + normal fiber (2 g), normal protein (12 g) + high fiber (8 g), high protein (25 g) + normal fiber (2 g), high protein (25 g) + high fiber (8 g)). The amount of protein and fiber consumed at breakfast did not influence postprandial appetite or ad libitum energy intake at lunch. In the fasting-state, visual food stimuli elicited significant responses in the bilateral insula and amygdala and left orbitofrontal cortex. Contrary to our hypotheses, postprandial right insula responses were lower after consuming normal protein vs. high protein breakfasts. Postprandial responses in other a priori brain regions were not significantly influenced by protein or fiber intake at breakfast. In conclusion, these data do not support increasing dietary protein and fiber at breakfast as effective strategies for modulating neural reward processing and acute ingestive behavior in overweight adults. PMID:26742068

  3. Effects of Dietary Protein and Fiber at Breakfast on Appetite, ad Libitum Energy Intake at Lunch, and Neural Responses to Visual Food Stimuli in Overweight Adults.

    PubMed

    Sayer, R Drew; Amankwaah, Akua F; Tamer, Gregory G; Chen, Ningning; Wright, Amy J; Tregellas, Jason R; Cornier, Marc-Andre; Kareken, David A; Talavage, Thomas M; McCrory, Megan A; Campbell, Wayne W

    2016-01-01

    Increasing either protein or fiber at mealtimes has relatively modest effects on ingestive behavior. Whether protein and fiber have additive or interactive effects on ingestive behavior is not known. Fifteen overweight adults (5 female, 10 male; BMI: 27.1 ± 0.2 kg/m²; aged 26 ± 1 year) consumed four breakfast meals in a randomized crossover manner (normal protein (12 g) + normal fiber (2 g), normal protein (12 g) + high fiber (8 g), high protein (25 g) + normal fiber (2 g), high protein (25 g) + high fiber (8 g)). The amount of protein and fiber consumed at breakfast did not influence postprandial appetite or ad libitum energy intake at lunch. In the fasting-state, visual food stimuli elicited significant responses in the bilateral insula and amygdala and left orbitofrontal cortex. Contrary to our hypotheses, postprandial right insula responses were lower after consuming normal protein vs. high protein breakfasts. Postprandial responses in other a priori brain regions were not significantly influenced by protein or fiber intake at breakfast. In conclusion, these data do not support increasing dietary protein and fiber at breakfast as effective strategies for modulating neural reward processing and acute ingestive behavior in overweight adults. PMID:26742068

  4. Molecular pathways: gene-environment interactions regulating dietary fiber induction of proliferation and apoptosis via butyrate for cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Bultman, Scott J

    2014-02-15

    Gene-environment interactions are so numerous and biologically complicated that it can be challenging to understand their role in cancer. However, dietary fiber and colorectal cancer prevention may represent a tractable model system. Fiber is fermented by colonic bacteria into short-chain fatty acids such as butyrate. One molecular pathway that has emerged involves butyrate having differential effects depending on its concentration and the metabolic state of the cell. Low-moderate concentrations, which are present near the base of colonic crypts, are readily metabolized in the mitochondria to stimulate cell proliferation via energetics. Higher concentrations, which are present near the lumen, exceed the metabolic capacity of the colonocyte. Unmetabolized butyrate enters the nucleus and functions as a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor that epigenetically regulates gene expression to inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis as the colonocytes exfoliate into the lumen. Butyrate may therefore play a role in normal homeostasis by promoting turnover of the colonic epithelium. Because cancerous colonocytes undergo the Warburg effect, their preferred energy source is glucose instead of butyrate. Consequently, even moderate concentrations of butyrate accumulate in cancerous colonocytes and function as HDAC inhibitors to inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis. These findings implicate a bacterial metabolite with metaboloepigenetic properties in tumor suppression. PMID:24270685

  5. Comparison and assessment of the difference in total dietary fiber in cooked dried legumes as determined by five methods.

    PubMed

    Mongeau, R; Brassard, R

    1994-01-01

    Dried beans (kidney and great northern) and dried peas (chick, green, and yellow) were cooked according to package instructions. Total dietary fiber (TDF) was measured by the Mongeau (AOAC 992.16), Prosky (AOAC 985.29), and Lee (AOAC 991.43) methods (A, B, and C, respectively). Nonstarch polysaccharides (NSP) were measured by the Englyst gas-chromatographic method that included dimethyl sulfoxide treatment, and the lignin measured separately was added to NSP (method D). TDF was also measured by the Li method (E). TDF values ranged from 7 to 48 g/100 g dry weight. Methods B and C gave similar TDF values, which were higher than those from other methods. For kidney beans I, TDF values by methods B and C were up to 2.5 times higher because of the inclusion of starch. The fiber residues from methods A and C contained the same amounts of arabinose, xylose, mannose, galactose, and uronic acid, but glucose was 4 times higher in residue C than in residue A. When alpha-amylase from porcine pancreas was incorporated in methods B or C for 5 samples, the discrepancies among methods A, B, and C were reduced by 60-98%. PMID:7950419

  6. The adsorption of lead(II) ions by dynamic high pressure micro-fluidization treated insoluble soybean dietary fiber.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Huang, Tao; Tu, Zong-Cai; Ruan, Chuan-Ying; Lin, Derong

    2016-06-01

    Insoluble dietary fiber from soybean residue (SIDF) was treated with dynamic high-pressure microfluidization (DHPM) and used as adsorbent for Pb(II) ion. The effects of pressure on the Pb(II) adsorption capacity, primary cilia structure and surface topography of SIDF were determined using a gastrointestinal simulated model in vitro. SIDF (at pH 7.0) showed maximum binding capacity (261.42 ± 2.77 μmol/g), which was about 1.13 times higher than that of untreated sample (233.47 ± 1.84 μmol/g), when pressure reached 80 MPa. However, the net adsorption value of SIDF in a simulated small intestine (~ 9 μmol/g) was significantly lower than that in the stomach (~ 48 μmol/g), because of the competitive adsorption of Pb(2+) by pancreatin, cholate and several enzymes in the small intestine. In addition, the adsorption capacity of SIDF exhibited good linear relationship with the physicochemical properties of total negative charges, and the adsorption behavior presumably occurred on the surface area of granules fiber. PMID:27478208

  7. Rice Cakes Containing Dietary Fiber Supplemented with or without Artemisia Annua and Gynura Procumbens Merr. Alleviated the Risk Factors of Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether the consumption of Korean rice cakes enriched with dietary fiber with or without polyphenol rich plants might decrease the risk factors of metabolic syndrome (MetS). Rice cakes were manufactured using fructooligosaccharides, resistant starch, and psyllium as sources of dietary fibers with and without polyphenol rich Artemisia annua and Gynura procumbens Merr. (RC+FP and RC+F, respectively), and prepared in three forms (songpyeon, seolgidduk, and chaldduk). Ninety subjects with at least one MetS risk factor were recruited for 6 weeks of dietary intervention. Sixty subjects were finally included for the analysis. Compared to the initial values, RC+FP group had decreased levels of fasting blood glucose (FBG), HOMA-IR and blood pressure after 6 weeks, whereas RC+F group didn't have significant changes in them. Regarding the improvement of individual MetS risk factors, RC+FP group showed significant reduction in FBG and blood pressures but RC+F group only had reduction in systolic blood pressure. After the intervention, a reduction in the number of MetS risk factors was greatert in the RC+FP group than in the RC+F group. In conclusion, Dietary fiber enriched rice cakes with or without polyphenols decreased the number and/or the levels of MetS risk factors. Polyphenol rich plant components may provide additional health benefits in controlling FBG and blood pressure. PMID:27152297

  8. Rice Cakes Containing Dietary Fiber Supplemented with or without Artemisia Annua and Gynura Procumbens Merr. Alleviated the Risk Factors of Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Na Rae; Yoon, Sun; Lee, Seung-Min

    2016-04-01

    We investigated whether the consumption of Korean rice cakes enriched with dietary fiber with or without polyphenol rich plants might decrease the risk factors of metabolic syndrome (MetS). Rice cakes were manufactured using fructooligosaccharides, resistant starch, and psyllium as sources of dietary fibers with and without polyphenol rich Artemisia annua and Gynura procumbens Merr. (RC+FP and RC+F, respectively), and prepared in three forms (songpyeon, seolgidduk, and chaldduk). Ninety subjects with at least one MetS risk factor were recruited for 6 weeks of dietary intervention. Sixty subjects were finally included for the analysis. Compared to the initial values, RC+FP group had decreased levels of fasting blood glucose (FBG), HOMA-IR and blood pressure after 6 weeks, whereas RC+F group didn't have significant changes in them. Regarding the improvement of individual MetS risk factors, RC+FP group showed significant reduction in FBG and blood pressures but RC+F group only had reduction in systolic blood pressure. After the intervention, a reduction in the number of MetS risk factors was greatert in the RC+FP group than in the RC+F group. In conclusion, Dietary fiber enriched rice cakes with or without polyphenols decreased the number and/or the levels of MetS risk factors. Polyphenol rich plant components may provide additional health benefits in controlling FBG and blood pressure. PMID:27152297

  9. High-viscosity dietary fibers reduce adiposity and decrease hepatic steatosis in rats fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Brockman, David A; Chen, Xiaoli; Gallaher, Daniel D

    2014-09-01

    Viscous dietary fiber consumption lowers the postprandial glucose curve and may decrease obesity and associated comorbidities such as insulin resistance and fatty liver. We determined the effect of 2 viscous fibers, one fermentable and one not, on the development of adiposity, fatty liver, and metabolic flexibility in a model of diet-induced obesity. Rats were fed a normal-fat (NF) diet (26% energy from fat), a high-fat diet (60% energy from fat), each containing 5% fiber as cellulose (CL; nonviscous and nonfermentable), or 5% of 1 of 2 highly viscous fibers-hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC; nonfermentable) or guar gum (GG; fermentable). After 10 wk, fat mass percentage in the NF (18.0%; P = 0.03) and GG groups (17.0%; P < 0.01) was lower than the CL group (20.7%). The epididymal fat pad weight of the NF (3.9 g; P = 0.04), HPMC (3.9 g; P = 0.03), and GG groups (3.6 g; P < 0.01) was also lower than the CL group (5.0 g). The HPMC (0.11 g/g liver) and GG (0.092 g/g liver) groups had lower liver lipid concentrations compared with the CL group (0.14 g/g liver). Fat mass percentage, epididymal fat pad weight, and liver lipid concentration were not different among the NF, HPMC, and GG groups. The respiratory quotient was higher during the transition from the diet-deprived to fed state in the GG group (P = 0.002) and tended to be higher in the HPMC group (P = 0.06) compared with the CL group, suggesting a quicker shift from fatty acid (FA) to carbohydrate oxidation. The HPMC group [15.1 nmol/(mg ⋅ h)] had higher ex vivo palmitate oxidation in muscle compared with the GG [11.7 nmol/(mg ⋅ h); P = 0.04] and CL groups [10.8 nmol/(mg ⋅ h); P < 0.01], implying a higher capacity to oxidize FAs. Viscous fibers can reduce the adiposity and hepatic steatosis that accompany a high-fat diet, and increase metabolic flexibility, regardless of fermentability. PMID:24991042

  10. Soluble and insoluble fiber (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Dietary fiber is the part of food that is not affected by the digestive process in the body. ... of the stool. There are two types of dietary fiber, soluble and insoluble. Soluble fiber retains water and ...

  11. Improvement of Endurance Based on Muscle Fiber-Type Composition by Treatment with Dietary Apple Polyphenols in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Shinpei; Akahoshi, Mariko; Suzuki, Takahiro; Do, Mai-Khoi Q.; Ohtsubo, Hideaki; Komiya, Yusuke; Lan, Mu; Waga, Toshiaki; Iwata, Akira; Nakazato, Koichi; Ikeuchi, Yoshihide; Anderson, Judy E.; Tatsumi, Ryuichi

    2015-01-01

    A recent study demonstrated a positive effect of apple polyphenol (APP) intake on muscle endurance of young-adult animals. While an enhancement of lipid metabolism may be responsible, in part, for the improvement, the contributing mechanisms still need clarification. Here we show that an 8-week intake of 5% (w/w) APP in the diet, up-regulates two features related to fiber type: the ratio of myosin heavy chain (MyHC) type IIx/IIb and myoglobin protein expression in plantaris muscle of 9-week-old male Fischer F344 rats compared to pair-fed controls (P < 0.05). Results were demonstrated by our SDS-PAGE system specialized for MyHC isoform separation and western blotting of whole muscles. Animal-growth profiles (food intake, body-weight gain, and internal-organ weights) did not differ between the control and 5% APP-fed animals (n = 9/group). Findings may account for the increase in fatigue resistance of lower hind limb muscles, as evidenced by a slower decline in the maximum isometric planter-flexion torque generated by a 100-s train of electrical stimulation of the tibial nerve. Additionally, the fatigue resistance was lower after 8 weeks of a 0.5% APP diet than after 5% APP, supporting an APP-dose dependency of the shift in fiber-type composition. Therefore, the present study highlights a promising contribution of dietary APP intake to increasing endurance based on fiber-type composition in rat muscle. Results may help in developing a novel strategy for application in animal sciences, and human sports and age-related health sciences. PMID:26222548

  12. Improvement of Endurance Based on Muscle Fiber-Type Composition by Treatment with Dietary Apple Polyphenols in Rats.

    PubMed

    Mizunoya, Wataru; Miyahara, Hideo; Okamoto, Shinpei; Akahoshi, Mariko; Suzuki, Takahiro; Do, Mai-Khoi Q; Ohtsubo, Hideaki; Komiya, Yusuke; Lan, Mu; Waga, Toshiaki; Iwata, Akira; Nakazato, Koichi; Ikeuchi, Yoshihide; Anderson, Judy E; Tatsumi, Ryuichi

    2015-01-01

    A recent study demonstrated a positive effect of apple polyphenol (APP) intake on muscle endurance of young-adult animals. While an enhancement of lipid metabolism may be responsible, in part, for the improvement, the contributing mechanisms still need clarification. Here we show that an 8-week intake of 5% (w/w) APP in the diet, up-regulates two features related to fiber type: the ratio of myosin heavy chain (MyHC) type IIx/IIb and myoglobin protein expression in plantaris muscle of 9-week-old male Fischer F344 rats compared to pair-fed controls (P < 0.05). Results were demonstrated by our SDS-PAGE system specialized for MyHC isoform separation and western blotting of whole muscles. Animal-growth profiles (food intake, body-weight gain, and internal-organ weights) did not differ between the control and 5% APP-fed animals (n = 9/group). Findings may account for the increase in fatigue resistance of lower hind limb muscles, as evidenced by a slower decline in the maximum isometric planter-flexion torque generated by a 100-s train of electrical stimulation of the tibial nerve. Additionally, the fatigue resistance was lower after 8 weeks of a 0.5% APP diet than after 5% APP, supporting an APP-dose dependency of the shift in fiber-type composition. Therefore, the present study highlights a promising contribution of dietary APP intake to increasing endurance based on fiber-type composition in rat muscle. Results may help in developing a novel strategy for application in animal sciences, and human sports and age-related health sciences. PMID:26222548

  13. The fraction of myosin motors that participate in isometric contraction of rabbit muscle fibers at near-physiological temperature.

    PubMed

    Tsaturyan, Andrey K; Bershitsky, Sergey Y; Koubassova, Natalia A; Fernandez, Manuel; Narayanan, Theyencheri; Ferenczi, Michael A

    2011-07-20

    The duty ratio, or the part of the working cycle in which a myosin molecule is strongly attached to actin, determines motor processivity and is required to evaluate the force generated by each molecule. In muscle, it is equal to the fraction of myosin heads that are strongly, or stereospecifically, bound to the thin filaments. Estimates of this fraction during isometric contraction based on stiffness measurements or the intensities of the equatorial or meridional x-ray reflections vary significantly. Here, we determined this value using the intensity of the first actin layer line, A1, in the low-angle x-ray diffraction patterns of permeable fibers from rabbit skeletal muscle. We calibrated the A1 intensity by considering that the intensity in the relaxed and rigor states corresponds to 0% and 100% of myosin heads bound to actin, respectively. The fibers maximally activated with Ca(2+) at 4°C were heated to 31-34°C with a Joule temperature jump (T-jump). Rigor and relaxed-state measurements were obtained on the same fibers. The intensity of the inner part of A1 during isometric contraction compared with that in rigor corresponds to 41-43% stereospecifically bound myosin heads at near-physiological temperature, or an average force produced by a head of ~6.3 pN. PMID:21767493

  14. Use of Sodium Butyrate as an Alternative to Dietary Fiber: Effects on the Embryonic Development and Anti-Oxidative Capacity of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yan; Fang, Zheng-feng; Che, Lian-qiang; Xu, Sheng-yu; Wu, De; Wu, Cai-mei; Wu, Xiu-qun

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effect of replacing dietary fiber with sodium butyrate on reproductive performance and antioxidant defense in a high fat diet during pregnancy by using a rat model. Eighty virgin female Sprague Dawley rats were fed one of four diets—(1) control diet (C group), (2) high fat + high fiber diet (HF group), (3) high-fat +5% sodium butyrate diet (SB group), and (4) HF diet + α-cyano-4-hydroxy cinnamic acid (CHC group)—intraperitoneally on days 8, 10, 12, 14, and 16 of gestation. SB and dietary fiber had similar effects on improving fetal number and reducing the abortion rate; however, the anti-oxidant capacity of maternal serum, placenta, and fetus was superior in the HF group than in the SB group. In comparison, CHC injection decreased reproductive performance and antioxidant defense. Both dietary fiber (DF) and SB supplementation had a major but different effect on the expression of anti-oxidant related genes and nutrient transporters genes. In summary, our data indicate that SB and DF showed similar effect on reproductive performance, but SB cannot completely replace the DF towards with respect to redox regulation in high-fat diet; and SB might influence offspring metabolism and health differently to DF. PMID:24852604

  15. Effects of dietary fibers on weight gain, carbohydrate metabolism, and gastric ghrelin gene expression in mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhong Q; Zuberi, Aamir R; Zhang, Xian H; Macgowan, Jacalyn; Qin, Jianhua; Ye, Xin; Son, Leslie; Wu, Qinglin; Lian, Kun; Cefalu, William T

    2007-12-01

    Diets that are high in dietary fiber are reported to have substantial health benefits. We sought to compare the metabolic effects of 3 types of dietary fibers -- sugarcane fiber (SCF), psyllium (PSY), and cellulose (CEL) -- on body weight, carbohydrate metabolism, and stomach ghrelin gene expression in a high-fat diet-fed mouse model. Thirty-six male mice (C57BL/6) were randomly divided into 4 groups that consumed high-fat diet alone (HFD) or high-fat diet containing 10% SCF, PSY, and CEL, respectively. After baseline measurements were assessed for body weight, plasma insulin, glucose, leptin, and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), animals were treated for 12 weeks. Parameters were reevaluated at the end of study. Whereas there was no difference at the baseline, body weight gains in the PSY and SCF groups were significantly lower than in the CEL group at the end of study. No difference in body weight was observed between the PSY and SCF animals. Body composition analysis demonstrated that fat mass in the SCF group was considerably lower than in the CEL and HFD groups. In addition, fasting plasma glucose and insulin and areas under the curve of intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test were also significantly lower in the SCF and PSY groups than in the CEL and HFD groups. Moreover, fasting plasma concentrations of leptin were significantly lower and GLP-1 level was 2-fold higher in the SCF and PSY mice than in the HFD and CEL mice. Ghrelin messenger RNA levels of stomach in the SCF group were significantly lower than in the CEL and HFD groups as well. These results suggest differences in response to dietary fiber intake in this animal model because high-fat diets incorporating dietary fibers such as SCF and PSY appeared to attenuate weight gain, enhance insulin sensitivity, and modulate leptin and GLP-1 secretion and gastric ghrelin gene expression. PMID:17998014

  16. Dietary fiber intake and risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women: the National Institutes of Health–AARP Diet and Health Study1234

    PubMed Central

    Brinton, Louise A; Subar, Amy F; Hollenbeck, Albert; Schatzkin, Arthur

    2009-01-01

    Background: Although dietary fiber has been hypothesized to lower risk of breast cancer by modulating estrogen metabolism, the association between dietary fiber intake and risk of breast cancer by hormone receptor status is unclear. Objective: The objective was to examine the relation of dietary fiber intake to breast cancer by hormone receptor status and histologic type among postmenopausal women in the National Institutes of Health–AARP Diet and Health Study (n = 185,598; mean age: 62 y). Design: Dietary intakes were assessed with a food-frequency questionnaire. Incident breast cancer cases were identified through linkage with state cancer registries. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate relative risks (RRs) and 2-sided 95% CIs. Results: During an average of 7 y of follow-up, 5461 breast cancer cases were identified, of which 3341 cases had estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) status. Dietary fiber intake was inversely associated with breast cancer risk [RR for the highest quintile (Q5) compared with the lowest quintile (Q1): 0.87; 95% CI: 0.77, 0.98; P for trend: 0.02]. The inverse association appeared to be stronger for ER−/PR− tumors (RRQ5vsQ1: 0.56; 95% CI: 0.35, 0.90; P for trend: 0.008; 366 cases) than for ER+/PR+ tumors (RRQ5vsQ1: 0.95; 95% CI: 0.76, 1.20; P for trend: 0.47; 1641 cases). The RRQ5vsQ1 of lobular tumors was 0.66 (95% CI: 0.44, 0.97; P for trend: 0.04), and the RRQ5vsQ1 of ductal tumors was 0.90 (95% CI: 0.77, 1.04; P for trend: 0.10). Fiber from grains, fruit, vegetables, and beans was not related to breast cancer. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that dietary fiber can play a role in preventing breast cancer through nonestrogen pathways among postmenopausal women. PMID:19625685

  17. Dietary iron deficiency compromises normal development of elastic fibers in the aorta and lungs of chicks.

    PubMed

    Hill, Charles H; Ashwell, Chris M; Nolin, Shelly J; Keeley, Fred; Billingham, Catherine; Hinek, Aleksander; Starcher, Barry

    2007-08-01

    Elastic fibers play a key role in the structure and function of numerous organs that require elasticity. Elastogenesis is a complex process in which cells first produce a microfibrillar scaffold, composed of numerous structural proteins, upon which tropoelastin assembles to be cross-linked into polymeric elastin. Recently, it was demonstrated that low concentrations of free iron upregulate elastin gene expression in cultured fibroblasts. The present studies were conducted to assess whether low-iron diets would affect the deposition of elastic fibers in an in vivo model. One-day-old chicks were fed semipurified diets containing 1.3 (low), 12 (moderate), and 24 (control) mg/kg of iron. After 3 wk, chicks in the low-iron group were underweight and anemic. Their aortas were smaller with significantly thinner walls than control chicks, yet elastin or collagen content did not decrease relative to total protein. They also demonstrated a significantly lower stress-strain resistance than the controls. Electron microscopy demonstrated that aortic and lung smooth muscle cells were vacuolated and surrounded by loose extracellular matrix and disorganized elastic lamellae with diffuse and fragmented networks of elastic fibers and microfibrils. Immunohistology demonstrated that fibrillin-3 (FBN3) was disorganized and markedly reduced in amount in aortas of the low-iron chicks. Elastin messenger RNA levels were not downregulated in the tissues from the low-iron-fed chicks; however, there was a significant reduction in expression of the FBN1 and FBN3 genes compared with control chicks. The studies indicate that iron deficiency had a pronounced negative effect on elastic fiber development and suggests that fibrillin may have an important role in this pathology. PMID:17634261

  18. Fiber

    MedlinePlus

    ... it can help with weight control. Fiber aids digestion and helps prevent constipation . It is sometimes used ... fiber attracts water and turns to gel during digestion. This slows digestion. Soluble fiber is found in ...

  19. Effects of dietary fiber on cecal short-chain fatty acid and cecal microbiota of broiler and laying-hen chicks.

    PubMed

    Walugembe, M; Hsieh, J C F; Koszewski, N J; Lamont, S J; Persia, M E; Rothschild, M F

    2015-10-01

    This experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of feeding dietary fiber on cecal short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentration and cecal microbiota of broiler and laying-hen chicks. The lower fiber diet was based on corn-soybean meal (SBM) and the higher fiber diet was formulated using corn-SBM-dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS) and wheat bran to contain 60.0 g/kg of both DDGS and wheat bran from 1 to 12 d and 80.0 g/kg of both DDGS and wheat bran from 13 to 21 d. Diets were formulated to meet or exceed NRC nutrient requirements. Broiler and laying-hen chicks were randomly assigned to the high and low fiber diets with 11 replicates of 8 chicks for each of the 4 treatments. One cecum from 3 chicks was collected from each replicate: one cecum underwent SCFA concentration analysis, one underwent bacterial DNA isolation for terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP), and the third cecum was used for metagenomics analyses. There were interactions between bird line and dietary fiber for acetic acid (P = 0.04) and total SCFA (P = 0.04) concentration. There was higher concentration of acetic acid (P = 0.02) and propionic acid (P < 0.01) in broiler chicks compared to laying-hen chicks. TRFLP analysis showed that cecal microbiota varied due to diet (P = 0.02) and chicken line (P = 0.03). Metagenomics analyses identified differences in the relative abundance of Helicobacter pullorum and Megamonas hypermegale and the genera Enterobacteriaceae, Campylobacter, Faecalibacterium, and Bacteroides in different treatment groups. These results provide insights into the effect of dietary fiber on SCFA concentration and modulation of cecal microbiota in broiler and laying-hen chicks. PMID:26316341

  20. Optimum values of air-filling fraction for photonic crystal fibers with different configurations and fixed number of air rings.

    PubMed

    Zendehnam, Akbar; Hosseinpour, Maryam; Mirzaei, Mahmood; Hedayati, Kambiz

    2014-02-20

    In this study, a Gaussian amp function related to the Gaussian family is employed to approximate the output intensity profile of various arrangements of air holes in photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) with a fixed number of air rings (N=4). It is shown that d/Λ=0.5 can be the best minimum value of air-filling fraction for all of the studied PCFs when λ=1.35  μm, whereas, for λ=1.55 and 1.65 μm, d/Λ=0.6 is suitable for achieving the maximum output intensity with very low confinement loss. PMID:24663304

  1. Dietary fiber down-regulates colonic tumor necrosis factor alpha and nitric oxide production in trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid-induced colitic rats.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Cabezas, Maria Elena; Gálvez, Julio; Lorente, Maria Dolores; Concha, Angel; Camuesco, Desirée; Azzouz, Shamira; Osuna, Antonio; Redondo, Luis; Zarzuelo, Antonio

    2002-11-01

    Previous studies have revealed the beneficial effects exerted by dietary fiber in human inflammatory bowel disease, which were associated with an increased production of SCFA in distal colon. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the probable mechanisms involved in the beneficial effects of a fiber-supplemented diet (5% Plantago ovata seeds) in the trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) model of rat colitis, with special attention to its effects on the production of some of the mediators involved in the inflammatory response, such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) and nitric oxide (NO). Rats were fed the fiber-supplemented diet for 2 wk before TNBS colitis induction and thereafter until colonic evaluation 1 wk later. The results obtained showed that dietary fiber supplementation facilitated recovery from intestinal insult as evidenced both histologically, by a preservation of intestinal cytoarchitecture, and biochemically, by a significant reduction in colonic myeloperoxidase activity and by restoration of colonic glutathione levels. This intestinal anti-inflammatory effect was associated with lower TNFalpha levels and lower NO synthase activity in the inflamed colon, showing significant differences when compared with nontreated colitic rats. Moreover, the intestinal contents from fiber-treated colitic rats showed a significantly higher production of SCFA, mainly butyrate and propionate. We conclude that the increased production of these SCFA may contribute to recovery of damaged colonic mucosa because they constitute substrates for the colonocyte and, additionally, that they can inhibit the production of proinflammatory mediators, such as TNFalpha and NO. PMID:12421838

  2. Effects of forage-to-concentrate ratio and dietary fiber manipulation on gas emissions and olfactometry from manure of Holstein heifers.

    PubMed

    Lascano, G J; Heinrichs, A J; Gary, R R; Topper, P A; Brandt, R C; Adviento-Borbe, A; Fabian, E E

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this experiment was to determine the effects of differing ratios of forage to concentrate (F:C) and fiber levels on odor and gas emissions from manure. Eight Holstein dairy heifers (362.45±4.53 d of age and 335.6±7.41 kg of body weight) were randomly assigned to a split-plot, 4×4 Latin square design (21-d periods) with F:C as the whole plot (20 or 80% forage) and fiber level as sub-plot (0, 20, 40, or 60% inclusion of corn stover). Gas concentration was determined using an infrared photoacoustic analyzer over a 24-h period using a steady-state flux chamber setup. Odorous air samples were collected from chamber headspace and evaluated by 6 human assessors using a forced-choice dynamic olfactometry technique. Emissions of CO2 were greater for the low than high concentrate diets, and no differences were observed for NH3 and CH4 emissions between F:C. Although F:C had no effect on NH3 emissions, as dietary fiber increased, a linear interaction with opposite effects was found for high and low concentrate diets. Nitrous oxide emissions were below minimum detectable levels. Neither F:C nor neutral detergent fiber level affected odor intensity. Odor emissions were successfully assessed, and manipulation of dietary fiber has the potential to influence CH4 and NH3 emissions. PMID:25622867

  3. 3-D Numerical Simulation and Analysis of Complex Fiber Geometry RaFC Materials with High Volume Fraction and High Aspect Ratio based on ABAQUS PYTHON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, BoCheng

    2011-12-01

    Organic and inorganic fiber reinforced composites with innumerable fiber orientation distributions and fiber geometries are abundantly available in several natural and synthetic structures. Inorganic glass fiber composites have been introduced to numerous applications due to their economical fabrication and tailored structural properties. Numerical characterization of such composite material systems is necessitated due to their intrinsic statistical nature, which renders extensive experimentation prohibitively time consuming and costly. To predict various mechanical behavior and characterizations of Uni-Directional Fiber Composites (UDFC) and Random Fiber Composites (RaFC), we numerically developed Representative Volume Elements (RVE) with high accuracy and efficiency and with complex fiber geometric representations encountered in uni-directional and random fiber networks. In this thesis, the numerical simulations of unidirectional RaFC fiber strand RVE models (VF>70%) are first presented by programming in ABAQUS PYTHON. Secondly, when the cross sectional aspect ratios (AR) of the second phase fiber inclusions are not necessarily one, various types of RVE models with different cross sectional shape fibers are simulated and discussed. A modified random sequential absorption algorithm is applied to enhance the volume fraction number (VF) of the RVE, which the mechanical properties represents the composite material. Thirdly, based on a Spatial Segment Shortest Distance (SSSD) algorithm, a 3-Dimentional RaFC material RVE model is simulated in ABAQUS PYTHON with randomly oriented and distributed straight fibers of high fiber aspect ratio (AR=100:1) and volume fraction (VF=31.8%). Fourthly, the piecewise multi-segments fiber geometry is obtained in MATLAB environment by a modified SSSD algorithm. Finally, numerical methods including the polynomial curve fitting and piecewise quadratic and cubic B-spline interpolation are applied to optimize the RaFC fiber geometries

  4. Effect of two dietary fibers on satiety and glycemic parameters: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, exploratory study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dietary carbohydrates may affect metabolic and physiologic parameters. The present study evaluated whether a combination of two dietary fibers, oligofructose (OFS) and pectin (P), altered satiety and glycemic parameters. The primary objective of this study was to determine whether dietary supplementation for 3 weeks with OFS + P would produce a greater reduction in energy intake of an ad libitum test meal compared to control. Methods This was a single center, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group study in overweight and obese, otherwise healthy, subjects (N = 96). There were two OFS + P treatment groups: high-dose (30 g/d), low-dose (15 g/d), and a control group (maltodextrin 15 g/d). Energy intake, appetite measures based on Satiety Labeled Intensity Magnitude (SLIM) scale, fasting and post-prandial glucose, and insulin levels and body weight were measured at baseline and at the end of 3 weeks. Adverse events and gastrointestinal tolerability of the treatments were also assessed. Results An analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) performed on the primary endpoint change from baseline in energy intake, showed no statistically significant difference in energy intake among the three treatment groups (p = 0.5387). The LS mean changes (SE) in energy intake from baseline to week 3 were −58.3 (42.4) kilocalories (kcal) for the high dose group, −74.2 (43.6) kcal for the low dose group, and −9.0 (42.9) kcal for the control group. For the pairwise comparisons of OFS + P doses and control, confidence intervals were constructed around the difference in LS mean changes. All study products were generally well tolerated. Conclusion There was a directional benefit in ad libitum energy intake for both OFS + P doses compared to control, with a greater reduction in kilocalories in the low dose comparison, but the reductions were not significant. Further studies are warranted. Clinical trial registration GSK Clinical Study

  5. Dietary modulation of erythrocyte insulin receptor interaction and the regulation of adipose tissue pyruvate dehydrogenase enzyme activity in growing rats; a mechanism of action of dietary fiber in metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Ogunwole, J.O.A.

    1984-01-01

    The metabolic effects of graded cellulose (a dietary fiber) intake were studied at minimal (10%) and maximal (20%) protein levels in male weanling Sprague Dawley rats. The hypothesis was tested that the hypoglycemic effect of high fiber diets is partly mediated through increased tissue sensitivity to insulin at the cell receptor level. Erythrocyte insulin receptor interaction (IRI) and percent insulin stimulation of adipose tissue pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity (PDS) were used as indices of tissue sensitivity to insulin. IRI was determined by a standardized radioceptor assay PDS by the rate of oxidation of 1-/sup 14/C-pyruvate to /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ in epidymal fat pads and serum insulin levels by radioimmunoassay. In both protein groups, the addition of fiber in the diet resulted in a significant (P < 0.05) increase in food intake (FI) for calorie compensation. Fiber and protein intake had a significant (P < 0.01) effect on IRI and both basal (PDB) and PDS activities of PDH. At all fiber levels, specific percent /sup 125/I-insulin binding (SIB) was higher in the 20% protein groups while in the fiber-free group, a higher SIB was observed in the 10% protein group.

  6. Modification to AOAC official methods 2009.01 and 2011.25 to allow for minor overestimation of low molecular weight soluble dietary fiber in samples containing starch.

    PubMed

    Mccleary, Barry V

    2014-01-01

    AOAC Official Methods 2009.01 and 2011.25 have been modified to allow removal of resistant maltodextrins produced on hydrolysis of various starches by the combination of pancreatic alpha-amylase and amyloglucosidase (AMG) used in these assay procedures. The major resistant maltodextrin, 6(3),6(5)-di-alpha-D-glucosyl maltopentaose, is highly resistant to hydrolysis by microbial alpha-glucosidases, isoamylase, pullulanase, pancreatic, bacterial and fungal alpha-amylase and AMG. However, this oligosaccharide is hydrolyzed by the mucosal alpha-glucosidase complex of the pig small intestine (which is similar to the human small intestine), and thus must be removed in the analytical procedure. Hydrolysis of these oligosaccharides has been by incubation with a high concentration of a purified AMG at 60 degrees C. This incubation results in no hydrolysis or loss of other resistant oligosaccharides such as FOS, GOS, XOS, resistant maltodextrins (e.g., Fibersol 2) or polydextrose. The effect of this additional incubation with AMG on the measured level of low molecular weight soluble dietary fiber (SDFS) and of total dietary fiber in a broad range of samples is reported. Results from this study demonstrate that the proposed modification can be used with confidence in the measurement of dietary fiber. PMID:25051640

  7. Characterization of Cell Wall Components and Their Modifications during Postharvest Storage of Asparagus officinalis L.: Storage-Related Changes in Dietary Fiber Composition.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Judith; Wagner, Steffen; Trierweiler, Bernhard; Bunzel, Mirko

    2016-01-20

    Changes in cell wall composition during storage of plant foods potentially alter the physiological effects of dietary fiber components. To investigate postharvest cell wall modifications of asparagus and their consequences in terms of insoluble dietary fiber structures, asparagus was stored at 20 and 1 °C for different periods of time. Structural analyses demonstrated postharvest changes in the polysaccharide profile, dominated by decreased portions of galactans. Increasing lignin contents correlated with compositional changes (monolignol ratios and linkage types) of the lignin polymer as demonstrated by chemical and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D-NMR) methods. Depending on the storage time and temperature, syringyl units were preferentially incorporated into the lignin polymer. Furthermore, a drastic increase in the level of ester-linked phenolic monomers (i.e., p-coumaric acid and ferulic acid) and polymer cross-links (di- and triferulic acids) was detected. The attachment of p-coumaric acid to lignin was demonstrated by 2D-NMR experiments. Potential consequences of postharvest modifications on physiological effects of asparagus dietary fiber are discussed. PMID:26671648

  8. Determination of relationship between sensory viscosity rating and instrumental flow behaviour of soluble dietary fibers.

    PubMed

    Arora, Simran Kaur; Patel, A A; Kumar, Naveen; Chauhan, O P

    2016-04-01

    The shear-thinning low, medium and high-viscosity fiber preparations (0.15-1.05 % psyllium husk, 0.07-0.6 % guar gum, 0.15-1.20 % gum tragacanth, 0.1-0.8 % gum karaya, 0.15-1.05 % high-viscosity Carboxy Methyl Cellulose and 0.1-0.7 % xanthan gum) showed that the consistency coefficient (k) was a function of concentration, the relationship being exponential (R(2), 0.87-0.96; P < 0.01). The flow behaviour index (n) (except for gum karaya and CMC) was exponentially related to concentration (R(2), 0.61-0.98). The relationship between k and sensory viscosity rating (SVR) was essentially linear in nearly all cases. The SVR could be predicted from the consistency coefficient using the regression equations developed. Also, the relationship of k with fiber concentration would make it possible to identify the concentration of a particular gum required to have desired consistency in terms of SVR. PMID:27413236

  9. Dietary intake of soluble fiber and risk of islet autoimmunity by 5 y of age: results from the TEDDY study12

    PubMed Central

    Beyerlein, Andreas; Liu, Xiang; Uusitalo, Ulla M; Harsunen, Minna; Norris, Jill M; Foterek, Kristina; Virtanen, Suvi M; Rewers, Marian J; She, Jin-Xiong; Simell, Olli; Lernmark, Åke; Hagopian, William; Akolkar, Beena; Ziegler, Anette-G; Krischer, Jeffrey P; Hummel, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Deficient soluble fiber intake has been suggested to dysregulate the immune response either directly or through alterations of the microbial composition in the gut. Objective: We hypothesized that a high intake of dietary soluble fiber in early childhood decreases the risk of type 1 diabetes (T1D)–associated islet autoimmunity. Design: We analyzed 17,620 food records collected between age 9 and 48 mo from 3358 children from the United States and Germany prospectively followed in the TEDDY (The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young) study. HRs for the development of any/multiple islet autoantibodies (242 and 151 events, respectively) and T1D (71 events) by soluble fiber intake were calculated in Cox regression models and adjusted for potential confounders. Results: There were no statistically significantly protective associations observed between a high intake of soluble fiber and islet autoimmunity or T1D. For example, the adjusted HRs (95% CIs) for high intake (highest compared with lowest quintile) at age 12 mo were 0.90 (0.55, 1.45) for any islet autoantibody, 1.20 (0.69, 2.11) for multiple islet autoantibodies, and 1.24 (0.57, 2.70) for T1D. In analyzing soluble fiber intake as a time-varying covariate, there were also no short-term associations between soluble fiber intake and islet autoimmunity development, with adjusted HRs of 0.85 (0.51, 1.42) for high intake and development of any islet autoantibody, for example. Conclusion: These results indicate that the intake level of dietary soluble fiber is not associated with islet autoimmunity or T1D in early life. PMID:26156735

  10. The potential of an insoluble dietary fiber-rich source from barley to protect from DMH-induced intestinal tumors in rats.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, G H; Jorgensen, L; Royle, P

    1993-01-01

    The influence of soluble and insoluble dietary fiber supplements from barley and wheat on colon cancer risk was assessed using male Sprague-Dawley rats from four weeks of age on a semipurified (AIN76A) rat diet modified to contain 20% fat of mixed animal and plant origin and 5% dietary fiber. Gastrointestinal tumors were induced with dimethylhydrazine given weekly for five weeks at 15 mg/kg body wt by subcutaneous injection, commencing four weeks after rats were established on the experimental diets. At 32 weeks of age, rats were killed and tumors assessed. The insoluble dietary fiber-rich source from barley (spent barley grain, SBG) was significantly more effective at preventing induced tumors than soluble fiber-rich commercial barley bran. There were no significant differences among the results for the other three fiber sources, which were intermediate in their influence. Both incidence of rats affected and tumor mass index were reduced, the latter significantly, when SBG was compared with commercial barley bran. SBG also produced a significant reduction in plasma cholesterol concentration (down 17%, p < 0.05) relative to wheat bran, but commercial barley bran was not different from wheat bran at this stage. Pure cellulose and outer-layer barley bran were, by comparison, only moderately effective in cancer prevention. SBG, like wheat bran, is a good source of cellulose and hemicellulose. It is also a good source of proteins, polyphenolics, fatty acids (including alpha-linolenic), vitamin E, and minerals. Further research is needed to clarify the relevance of these other factors to the differences observed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8389043

  11. The health benefits of dietary fiber: beyond the usual suspects of type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaczmarczyk, Melissa M; Miller, Michael J; Freund, Gregory G

    2012-08-01

    Dietary fiber (DF) is deemed to be a key component in healthy eating. DF is not a static collection of undigestible plant materials that pass untouched or unencumbered through the gastrointestinal (GI) tract; instead, DFs are a vast array of complex saccharide-based molecules that can bind potential nutrients and nutrient precursors to prevent their absorption. Some DFs are fermentable, and the GI tract catabolism leads to the generation of various bioactive materials, such as short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), that can markedly augment the GI tract biomass and change the composition of the GI tract flora. The health benefits of DFs include the prevention and mitigation of type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease and colon cancer. By modulating food ingestion, digestion, absorption and metabolism, DFs reduce the risk of hyperlipidemia, hypercholesterolemia and hyperglycemia. Emerging research has begun to investigate the role of DFs in immunomodulation. If substantiated, DFs could facilitate many biologic processes, including infection prevention and the improvement of mood and memory. This review describes the accepted physiologic functions of DFs and explores their new potential immune-based actions. PMID:22401879

  12. Phytic acid, in vitro protein digestibility, dietary fiber, and minerals of pulses as influenced by processing methods.

    PubMed

    Chitra, U; Singh, U; Rao, P V

    1996-06-01

    The objective of this project was to determine the effect of various types of processing on selected nutrition related parameters of commonly consumed Indian pulses and soybean. Germination reduced the phytic acid content of chickpea and pigeonpea seeds by over 60%, and that of mung bean, urd bean, and soybean by about 40%. Fermentation reduced phytic acid contents by 26-39% in all these legumes with the exception of pigeonpea in which it was reduced by more than 50%. Autoclaving and roasting were more effective in reducing phytic acid in chickpea and pigeonpea than in urd bean, mung bean, and soybean. Germination and fermentation greatly increased the in vitro protein digestibility (IVPD). IVPD was only slightly increased by roasting and autoclaving of all legumes. Germination and fermentation also remarkably decreased the total dietary fiber (TDF) in all legumes. Autoclaving and roasting resulted in slight increases in TDF values. All the processing treatments had little effect on calcium, magnesium and iron contents. PMID:8983057

  13. [Dietary fiber intake and intake patterns among the general population in Aomori, calculated using modified Southgate and Prosky methods].

    PubMed

    Nakaji, S; Sakamoto, J; Sugawara, K; Iwane, S; Ohta, M; Mori, B

    1993-06-01

    Based on the result of the Aomori Nutrition Survey, we have calculated daily dietary fiber (DF) intake using modified Southgate and Prosky methods. Result obtained were as follows: DF intake in Aomori was 23.7 +/- 8.4g by the modified Southgate method, and 22.2 +/- 8.5g by the modified Prosky method. As for supply sources of DF, 32.3% was from grains; 22.7%, vegetables; 15.6%, beans; and 7.8%, fruits calculated by the modified Southgate method, and 31.3%, vegetables; 19.0%, grains; 18.0%, beans; and 11.6%, fruits by the modified Prosky method. As to types of DF, intake of hemicellulose was 11.5 +/- 4.2g, cellulose 7.8 +/- 3.0g and lignin 4.4 +/- 2.3g. In the group with DF intake below 10.0g, DF came mainly from grains and fruits, while the group with DF intake above 30.0g took DF from various foods. PMID:8393118

  14. Associations between Dietary Fiber Intake in Infancy and Cardiometabolic Health at School Age: The Generation R Study.

    PubMed

    van Gijssel, Rafaëlle M A; Braun, Kim V E; Kiefte-de Jong, Jessica C; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Franco, Oscar H; Voortman, Trudy

    2016-01-01

    Dietary fiber (DF) intake may be beneficial for cardiometabolic health. However, whether this already occurs in early childhood is unclear. We investigated associations between DF intake in infancy and cardiometabolic health in childhood among 2032 children participating in a population-based cohort in The Netherlands. Information on DF intake at a median age of 12.9 months was collected using a food-frequency questionnaire. DF was adjusted for energy intake using the residual method. At age 6 years, body fat percentage, high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol, insulin, triglycerides, and blood pressure were assessed and expressed in age- and sex-specific standard deviation scores (SDS). These five factors were combined into a cardiometabolic risk factor score. In models adjusted for several parental and child covariates, a higher DF intake was associated with a lower cardiometabolic risk factor score. When we examined individual cardiometabolic factors, we observed that a 1 g/day higher energy-adjusted DF intake was associated with 0.026 SDS higher HDL-cholesterol (95% CI 0.009, 0.042), and 0.020 SDS lower triglycerides (95% CI -0.037, -0.003), but not with body fat, insulin, or blood pressure. Results were similar for DF with and without adjustment for energy intake. Our findings suggest that higher DF intake in infancy may be associated with better cardiometabolic health in later childhood. PMID:27589791

  15. Preparation and physicochemical properties of soluble dietary fiber from orange peel assisted by steam explosion and dilute acid soaking.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Xu, Honggao; Yuan, Fang; Fan, Rui; Gao, Yanxiang

    2015-10-15

    The coupled pretreatment of orange peel with steam explosion (SE) and sulfuric-acid soaking (SAS) was investigated to enhance the yield and improve the functionality of soluble dietary fiber (SDF). When orange peel was pretreated by SE at 0.8MPa for 7 min, combined with 0.8% SAS, the content of SDF was increased from 8.04% to 33.74% in comparison to the control and SDF prepared with SE-SAS showed the high water solubility, water-holding capacity, oil-holding capacity, swelling capacity, emulsifying activity, emulsion stability and foam stability. SDF from orange peel treated by SE-SAS exhibited significantly (p < 0.05) higher binding capacity for three toxic cations (Pb, As and Cu) and smaller molecular weight (Mw = 174 kDa). Furthermore, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurement showed that SDF from orange peel treated by SE-SAS had a higher peak temperature (170.7 ± 0.4 °C) than that of the untreated sample (163.4 ± 0.3 °C). Scanning electron micrograph (SEM) images demonstrated that the surface of SDF from orange peel treated by SE-SAS was rough and collapsed. It can be concluded that SDF from orange peel treated by SE-SAS has the higher potential to be applied as a functional ingredient in food products. PMID:25952845

  16. The health benefits of dietary fiber: beyond the usual suspects of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kaczmarczyk, Melissa M.; Miller, Michael J.; Freund, Gregory G.

    2012-01-01

    Dietary fiber (DF) is deemed to be a key component in healthy eating. DF is not a static collection of undigestible plant materials that pass untouched or unencumbered through the gastrointestinal (GI) tract; instead, DFs are a vast array of complex saccharide-based molecules that can bind potential nutrients and nutrient precursors to prevent their absorption. Some DFs are fermentable, and the GI tract catabolism leads to the generation of various bioactive materials, such as short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), that can markedly augment the GI tract biomass and change the composition of the GI tract flora. The health benefits of DFs include the prevention and mitigation of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and colon cancer. By modulating food ingestion, digestion, absorption and metabolism, DFs reduce the risk of hyperlipidemia, hypercholesterolemia and hyperglycemia. Emerging research has begun to investigate the role of DFs in immunomodulation. If substantiated, DFs could facilitate many biologic processes, including infection prevention and the improvement of mood and memory. This review describes the accepted physiologic functions of DFs and explores their new potential immune-based actions. PMID:22401879

  17. A study of fiber volume fraction effects in notched unidirectional SCS-6/Ti-15V-3Cr-3Al-3Sn composite. Ph.D. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Covey, Steven J.

    1993-01-01

    Notched unidirectional SCS-6/Ti-15-3 composite of three different fiber volume fractions (vf = 0.15, 0.37, and 0.41) was investigated for various room temperature microstructural and material properties including: fatigue crack initiation, fatigue crack growth, and fracture toughness. While the matrix hardness is similar for all fiber volume fractions, the fiber/matrix interfacial shear strength and matrix residual stress increases with fiber volume fraction. The composite fatigue crack initiation stress is shown to be matrix controlled and occurs when the net maximum matrix stress approaches the endurance limit stress of the matrix. A model is presented which includes residual stresses and presents the composite initiation stress as a function of fiber volume fraction. This model predicts a maximum composite initiation stress at vf approximately 0.15 which agrees with the experimental data. The applied composite stress levels were increased as necessary for continued crack growth. The applied Delta(K) values at crack arrest increase with fiber volume fraction by an amount better approximated using an energy based formulation rather than when scaled linear with modulus. After crack arrest, the crack growth rate exponents for vf37 and vf41 were much lower and toughness much higher, when compared to the unreinforced matrix, because of the bridged region which parades with the propagating fatigue crack. However, the vf15 material exhibited a higher crack growth rate exponent and lower toughness than the unreinforced matrix because once the bridged fibers nearest the crack mouth broke, the stress redistribution broke all bridged fibers, leaving an unbridged crack. Degraded, unbridged behavior is modeled using the residual stress state in the matrix ahead of the crack tip. Plastic zone sizes were directly measured using a metallographic technique and allow prediction of an effective matrix stress intensity which agrees with the fiber pressure model if residual stresses

  18. Microvascular oxygen pressures in muscles comprised of different fiber types: Impact of dietary nitrate supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Scott K.; Holdsworth, Clark T.; Wright, Jennifer L.; Fees, Alex J.; Allen, Jason D.; Jones, Andrew M.; Musch, Timothy I.; Poole, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Nitrate (NO3−) supplementation via beetroot juice (BR) preferentially improves vascular conductance and O2 delivery to contracting skeletal muscles comprised predominantly of type IIb + d/x (i.e. highly glycolytic) fibers following its reduction to nitrite and nitric oxide (NO). To address the mechanistic basis for NO3− to improve metabolic control we tested the hypothesis that increased NO bioavailability via BR supplementation would elevate microvascular PO2 (PO2mv) in fast twitch but not slow twitch muscle. Twelve young adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered BR ([NO3−] 1 mmol/kg/day, n=6) or water (control, n=6) for 5 days. PO2mv (phosphorescence quenching) was measured at rest and during 180s of electrically induced 1-Hz twitch contractions (6–8 V) of the soleus (9% type IIb +d/x) and mixed portion of the gastrocnemius (MG, 91% type IIb + d/x) muscles. In the MG, but not the soleus, BR elevated contracting steady state PO2mv by ~43% (control: 13.7 ± 0.5, BR: 19 ± 1.6 mmHg, (P<0.05). This higher PO2mv represents a greater blood-myocyte O2 driving force during muscle contractions thus providing a potential mechanism by which NO3− supplementation via BR improves metabolic control in fast twitch muscle. Recruitment of higher order type II muscle fibers is thought to play a role in the development of the V.O2 slow component which is inextricably linked to the fatigue process. These data therefore provide a putative mechanism for the BR-induced improvements in high-intensity exercise performance seen in humans. PMID:25280991

  19. Microvascular oxygen pressures in muscles comprised of different fiber types: Impact of dietary nitrate supplementation.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Scott K; Holdsworth, Clark T; Wright, Jennifer L; Fees, Alex J; Allen, Jason D; Jones, Andrew M; Musch, Timothy I; Poole, David C

    2015-08-01

    Nitrate (NO3(-)) supplementation via beetroot juice (BR) preferentially improves vascular conductance and O2 delivery to contracting skeletal muscles comprised predominantly of type IIb + d/x (i.e. highly glycolytic) fibers following its reduction to nitrite and nitric oxide (NO). To address the mechanistic basis for NO3(-) to improve metabolic control we tested the hypothesis that BR supplementation would elevate microvascular PO2 (PO2mv) in fast twitch but not slow twitch muscle. Twelve young adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered BR ([NO3(-)] 1 mmol/kg/day, n = 6) or water (control, n = 6) for 5 days. PO2mv (phosphorescence quenching) was measured at rest and during 180 s of electrically-induced 1-Hz twitch contractions (6-8 V) of the soleus (9% type IIb +d/x) and mixed portion of the gastrocnemius (MG, 91% type IIb + d/x) muscles. In the MG, but not the soleus, BR elevated contracting steady state PO2mv by ~43% (control: 14 ± 1, BR: 19 ± 2 mmHg (P < 0.05)). This higher PO2mv represents a greater blood-myocyte O2 driving force during muscle contractions thus providing a potential mechanism by which NO3(-) supplementation via BR improves metabolic control in fast twitch muscle. Recruitment of higher order type II muscle fibers is thought to play a role in the development of the VO2 slow component which is inextricably linked to the fatigue process. These data therefore provide a putative mechanism for the BR-induced improvements in high-intensity exercise performance seen in humans. PMID:25280991

  20. Enhanced excitability of hippocampal mossy fibers and CA3 neurons under dietary zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Atsushi; Yamada, Kohei; Minami, Akira; Nagano, Tetsuo; Oku, Naoto

    2005-02-01

    On the basis of the evidence that susceptibility to kainate-induced seizures is enhanced by zinc deficiency and that glutamate concentrations in hippocampal extracellular fluid are excessively increased during seizures, excitability of hippocampal mossy fibers and CA3 neurons was examined using hippocampal slices, which were prepare from mice fed a zinc-deficient diet for 4 weeks. The spatio-temporal dynamics of zinc and calcium was monitored using their indicators, membrane-impermeable ZnAF-2 and membrane-permeable fura-2 AM, respectively. When the molecular layer of dentate gyrus was stimulated with 100mM KCl for 1s, the increased percentages of extracellular zinc in the stratum lucidum and CA3 pyramidal cell layer were higher in zinc-deficient mice than in the control mice, implying that glutamate release from the mossy fibers of the dentate granular cells is enhanced by zinc deficiency. Judging from the increased percentages, however, the amount of zinc released was estimated to be less in zinc-deficient mice. On the other hand, the basal calcium concentrations in the stratum lucidum and CA3 pyramidal cell layer detected with fura-2 were higher in zinc-deficient mice than in the control mice, indicating that hippocampal calcium homeostasis is affected by zinc deficiency. Furthermore, the increased percentage of intracellular calcium in the stratum lucidum by stimulation with high K+ was enhanced by the zinc deficiency. The alteration of hippocampal calcium homeostasis seems to enhance excitability of dentate granular cells in zinc deficiency, following by an enhanced excitability of postsynaptic structures in CA3 neurons. PMID:15716032

  1. A study of fiber volume fraction effects in notched unidirectional SCS-6/Ti-15V-3Cr-3Al-3Sn composite. Ph. D. Thesis Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Covey, S.J.

    1993-09-01

    Notched unidirectional SCS-6/Ti-15-3 composite of three different fiber volume fractions (vf = 0.15, 0.37, and 0.41) was investigated for various room temperature microstructural and material properties including: fatigue crack initiation, fatigue crack growth, and fracture toughness. While the matrix hardness is similar for all fiber volume fractions, the fiber/matrix interfacial shear strength and matrix residual stress increases with fiber volume fraction. The composite fatigue crack initiation stress is shown to be matrix controlled and occurs when the net maximum matrix stress approaches the endurance limit stress of the matrix. A model is presented which includes residual stresses and presents the composite initiation stress as a function of fiber volume fraction. This model predicts a maximum composite initiation stress at vf approximately 0.15 which agrees with the experimental data. The applied composite stress levels were increased as necessary for continued crack growth. The applied Delta(K) values at crack arrest increase with fiber volume fraction by an amount better approximated using an energy based formulation rather than when scaled linear with modulus. After crack arrest, the crack growth rate exponents for vf37 and vf41 were much lower and toughness much higher, when compared to the unreinforced matrix, because of the bridged region which parades with the propagating fatigue crack. However, the vf15 material exhibited a higher crack growth rate exponent and lower toughness than the unreinforced matrix because once the bridged fibers nearest the crack mouth broke, the stress redistribution broke all bridged fibers, leaving an unbridged crack. Degraded, unbridged behavior is modeled using the residual stress state in the matrix ahead of the crack tip.

  2. Effect of dietary zinc and ractopamine hydrochloride on pork chop muscle fiber type distribution, tenderness, and color characteristics.

    PubMed

    Paulk, C B; Tokach, M D; Nelssen, J L; Burnett, D D; Vaughn, M A; Phelps, K J; Dritz, S S; Derouchey, J M; Goodband, R D; Woodworth, J C; Houser, T A; Haydon, K D; Gonzalez, J M

    2014-05-01

    A total of 320 finishing pigs (PIC 327 × 1050; initially 98 kg) were used to determine the effects of adding Zn to diets containing ractopamine HCl (RAC) on muscle fiber type distribution, fresh chop color, and cooked meat characteristics. Dietary treatments were fed for approximately 35 d and consisted of a corn-soybean meal-based negative control (CON), a positive control diet with 10 mg/kg of RAC (RAC+), and the RAC+ diet plus 75, 150, or 225 mg/kg added Zn from either ZnO or Availa-Zn. Loins randomly selected from each treatment (n = 20) were evaluated using contrasts: CON vs. RAC+, interaction of Zn level × source, Zn level linear and quadratic polynomials, and Zn source. There were no Zn source effects or Zn source × level interactions throughout the study (P > 0.10). Pigs fed RAC+ had increased (P < 0.02) percentage type IIX and a tendency for increased (P = 0.10) percent type IIB muscle fibers. Increasing added Zn decreased (linear, P = 0.01) percentage type IIA and tended to increase (P = 0.09) IIX muscle fibers. On d 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 of display, pork chops from pigs fed the RAC+ treatment had greater (P < 0.03) L* values compared to the CON. On d 0 and 3 of display, increasing added Zn tended to decrease (quadratic, P = 0.10) L* values and decreased (quadratic, P < 0.03) L* values on d 1, 2, 4, and 5. Pigs fed RAC+ had decreased (P < 0.05) a* values on d 1 and 4 of display and tended to have decreased (P < 0.10) a* values on d 0 and 2 compared to CON pork chops. Pork chops from the RAC+ treatment had a tendency for increased (P < 0.08) oxymyoglobin percentage compared to CON pork chops on d 1, 2, 4, and 5. On d 0, as dietary Zn increased in RAC+ diets, there was a decrease (linear, P < 0.01) in the formation of pork chop surface oxymyoglobin percentage. Metmyoglobin reducing ability (MRA) of pork chops on d 5 was decreased in the RAC+ group. Chops from pigs fed added Zn had increased (quadratic, P < 0.03) MRA on d 3 and 5 of the display period. There

  3. Enzymatic hydrolysis of hardwood and softwood harvest residue fibers released by sulfur dioxide-ethanol-water fractionation.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Minna; Iakovlev, Mikhail; Bankar, Sandip; Tunc, Mehmet Sefik; van Heiningen, Adriaan

    2014-09-01

    The enzymatic hydrolysis of hardwood and softwood harvest residues treated by SO2-ethanol-water (SEW) fractionation was studied. The target was to convert these fibers with high yield into glucose monomers which could be further converted into biofuel by a subsequent fermentation stage. Hardwood biomass residues were efficiently digested at low enzyme dosage (5 FPU/g cellulose) whereas the softwood residues required notably higher enzyme dosage (20 FPU) for sufficient conversion. However, cellulase dosage of softwood could be reduced mannanase supplementation. Especially the high lignin content of softwood biomass pulps impairs the digestibility and thereby, improved delignification could notably enhance the hydrolysis yields. It was shown that inferior delignification of SW biomass is due to persistent polyphenolic acids present in coniferous bark, whereas no evidence of the negative effect of inorganics and acetone extractives was observed. Additionally, SW hydrolyzate was successfully converted into a mixture of butanol, acetone and ethanol through ABE fermentation. PMID:25022728

  4. Single-mode pumped high air-fill fraction photonic crystal fiber taper for high-power deep-blue supercontinuum sources.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Simon T; Larsen, Casper; Jakobsen, Christian; Thomsen, Carsten L; Bang, Ole

    2014-02-15

    Dispersion control with axially nonuniform photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) permits supercontinuum (SC) generation into the deep-blue from an ytterbium pump laser. In this Letter, we exploit the full degrees of freedom afforded by PCFs to fabricate a fiber with longitudinally increasing air-fill fraction and decreasing diameter directly on the draw-tower. We demonstrate SC generation extending down to 375 nm in one such monolithic fiber device that is single-mode at 1064 nm at the input end. PMID:24562287

  5. Sweet potato beta-carotene bioefficacy is enhanced by dietary fat and not reduced by soluble fiber intake in Mongolian gerbils.

    PubMed

    Mills, Jordan P; Tumuhimbise, Gaston A; Jamil, Kazi M; Thakkar, Sagar K; Failla, Mark L; Tanumihardjo, Sherry A

    2009-01-01

    Orange-fleshed sweet potato (OFSP) is an important source of beta-carotene (betaC). Provitamin A bioefficacy from plant foods is influenced by dietary fat and fiber. We fed 3% OFSP powder diets with varying amounts of fat and soluble fiber to vitamin A (VA)-depleted Mongolian gerbils (n = 85) for 3 wk (8 groups, n = 10/group; control, n = 9) following a baseline kill (n = 6). OFSP diets differing in fat (3, 6, and 12%) contained 0.24% soluble fiber. Two additional 3% OFSP diets contained 6% fat and 3 or 9% white-fleshed sweet potato (WFSP) powder with soluble fiber contents of 0.42 and 0.80%, respectively. Control, VA-, and betaC-supplemented groups were included. Simulated digestion experiments compared the bioaccessibility of betaC from boiled vs. oil stir-fried OFSP. All OFSP diets maintained VA status and 12% fat and WFSP-added diets improved VA status above baseline (P < 0.05). Bioefficacy, as bioconversion factors, in gerbils fed 12% fat (3.5 +/- 1.4 microg betaC:1 microg VA) was improved over the 3% fat and betaC groups (6.5 +/- 3.7 and 6.7 +/- 3.7 microg betaC:1 microg VA, respectively) (P < 0.05) but did not differ from WFSP-added groups or the 6% fat group with no WFSP. Stir-frying doubled the efficiency of betaC incorporation into micelles during small intestinal digestion in support of the stimulatory effect of dietary fat on bioefficacy in vivo. Soluble fiber intake derived from WFSP did not influence bioefficacy. Replacing WFSP with OFSP will affect VA status if adopted by target groups. PMID:19056651

  6. Effect of dietary fibers on cholic acid induced cell proliferation in the colonic epithelium of C57BL/6J mice

    SciTech Connect

    Robblee, N.M.; Bruce, W.R.; Bird, R.P.

    1986-03-01

    It has been postulated that high fat diets promote tumorigenesis by increasing the level of secondary bile acids in the colonic lumen. Dietary fibers are thought to be protective perhaps through their interaction with bile acids. In the present study, animals were fed diets containing either 0%, 5%, or 10% cellulose (C), pectin (P), or wheat bran (WB). The diets were formulated to contain either 0% (control) or 0.2% cholic acid (test). After two weeks of dietary treatment the animals were injected with (/sup 3/H)-thymidine and their colons were processed for autoradiography. The number of labeled cells (LC) in the colonic crypts was determined. Among the control diets, 10%P induced a two-fold increase in the LC. All the test groups had significantly higher LC than in their controls. However, the C group excited a higher LC than the P or WB groups (5.2 +/- 0.8 vs 3.9 +/- 0.8 or 3.9 +/- 0.6). These results were substantiated by metaphase arrest technique. The authors results show that nonfermentable fiber does not alleviate bile acid induced cell proliferative activity in the colon whereas fermentable fibers will counteract the promotional effect of a high fat diet.

  7. The effect of dietary water soluble carbohydrate to nitrogen ratio on nitrogen partitioning and isotopic fractionation of lactating goats offered a high-nitrogen diet.

    PubMed

    Cheng, L; Edwards, G R; Dewhurst, R J; Nicol, A M; Pacheco, D

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between nitrogen (N) partitioning and isotopic fractionation in lactating goats consuming diets with a constant high concentration of N and increasing levels of water soluble carbohydrate (WSC). Eight lactating goats were offered four different ratios of WSC : N in the diet. A two-period incomplete cross-over design was used, with two goats assigned to each treatment in each period. N balance measurements were conducted, with measurement of feed N intake and total output of N in milk, faeces and urine. Treatment, period and infusion effects were tested using general ANOVA; the relationships between variables were analysed by linear regression. Dietary treatment and period had significant effects on dry matter (DM) intake (g/day). DM digestibility (g/kg DM) and N digestibility (g/kg N) increased as the ratio of WSC : N increased in the diet. No treatment effect was observed on milk urea N concentration (g/l) or urinary excretion of purine derivatives (mM/day). Although dietary treatment and period had significant effects on N intake, the change of N intake was small; no effect was observed for N partitioning among faeces, milk and urine. Milk, plasma and faeces were enriched in 15N compared with feed, whilst urine was depleted in 15N relative to feed. No significant relationship was established between N partitioning and isotopic fractionation. This study failed to confirm the potential to use N isotopic fractionation as an indicator of N partitioning in dairy goats when diets provided N in excess to requirements, most likely because the range of milk N output/N intake and urinary N output/N intake were narrow. PMID:26556633

  8. Application of the cruciform specimen geometry to obtain transverse interface-property data in a high-fiber-volume-fraction SiC/Titanium alloy composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehlert, C. J.; Majumdar, B. S.; Miracle, D. B.

    2001-12-01

    A combined experimental and computational methodology was used to determine the relevant strength and residual-stress parameters in a manufactured, high-fiber-volume-fraction multiply metal matrix composite (MMC). The method was similar to that previously demonstrated on single-fiber composites, which had an extremely low fiber volume fraction. Variabilities in residual stresses and debond strengths in high-fiber-volume-fraction multiply composites, as well as current demands on the micromechanics-based computational prediction and validation of complex composite systems, necessitated the establishment of the test methodology described here. The model material chosen for this investigation was a plasma-processed six-ply, unidirectional Sigma-1240/Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo (wt pct) MMC containing 32 vol pct continuous fibers. Room-temperature transverse tensile experiments were conducted on cruciform specimens. In addition, rectangular specimens were also evaluated in order to verify their applicability in obtaining valid interfacial property data. Debonding events, evaluated at different positions within a given specimen geometry, were captured by stress-strain curves and metallographic examination. Analytical and finite-element stress analyses were conducted to estimate the geometrical stress-concentration factors associated with the cruciform geometry. Residual stresses were estimated using etching and computational procedures. For the cruciform specimens, the experimental fiber-matrix debond strength was determined to be 22 MPa. Separation occurred within the carbon-rich interfacial layer, consistent with some previous observations on similar systems. Thus, the cruciform test methodology described here can be successfully used for transverse interfacial-property evaluation of high-fiber-volume-fraction composites. For the rectangular specimens, the strain gages at different positions along the specimen width confirmed that the interface crack had initiated from the

  9. Fractionation of corn fiber treated by soaking in aqueous ammonia (SAA) for isolation of hemicellulose B and production of C5 sugars by enzyme hydrolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A process was developed to fractionate and isolate the hemicellulose B component of corn fiber generated by corn wet milling. The process consisted of pretreatment by soaking in aqueous ammonia (SAA) followed by enzymatic cellulose hydrolysis, during which the hemicellulose B was solubilized by cle...

  10. Microstructure and Tensile Properties of Mg (AM60)/Al2O3 Metal Matrix Composites with Varying Volume Fractions of Fiber Reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuezhi; Fang, Li; Xiong, Bojun; Hu, Henry

    2015-12-01

    Magnesium alloy AM60 matrix-based composite reinforced with 7, 9, 11, 22, and 35 vol.% of Al2O3 fibers was squeeze cast. The microstructure and mechanical properties were investigated in comparison with the matrix alloy AM60. The results of tensile testing indicated that the addition of Al2O3 fibers to magnesium alloy AM60 led to a significant improvement in mechanical properties. As the fiber volume fraction increased, the strengths and moduli of the composites were enhanced considerably. However, the notable increase in strengths was at sacrifice in elongation. Microstructural analyses via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that the grain size decreased with increasing volume fractions of reinforcement. The restriction of grain growth by the limited inter-fiber spacing could be the primary mechanism for a reduction in the grain size of the matrix alloy. The SEM fractography evidently reveals that the debonding of fibers from the matrix alloy and the fiber cracking were two primary mechanisms for the tensile failure of the composites.

  11. Dietary Fiber and Saturated Fat Intake Associations with Cardiovascular Disease Differ by Sex in the Malmö Diet and Cancer Cohort: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Wallström, Peter; Sonestedt, Emily; Hlebowicz, Joanna; Ericson, Ulrika; Drake, Isabel; Persson, Margaretha; Gullberg, Bo; Hedblad, Bo; Wirfält, Elisabet

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to examine associations between intake of macronutrients and dietary fiber and incident ischemic cardiovascular disease (iCVD) in men and women. Methods We used data from 8,139 male and 12,535 female participants (aged 44–73 y) of the Swedish population-based Malmö Diet and Cancer cohort. The participants were without history of CVD and diabetes mellitus, and had reported stable dietary habits in the study questionnaire. Diet was assessed by a validated modified diet history method, combining a 7-d registration of cooked meals and cold beverages, a 168-item food questionnaire (covering other foods and meal patterns), and a 1-hour diet interview. Sociodemographic and lifestyle data were collected by questionnaire. iCVD cases, which included coronary events (myocardial infarctions or deaths from chronic ischemic heart disease) and ischemic strokes, were ascertained via national and local registries. Nutrient-disease associations were examined by multivariate Cox regressions. Results During a mean follow-up of 13.5 years, we identified 1,089 male and 687 female iCVD cases. High fiber intakes were associated with lower incidence rates of iCVD in women and of ischemic stroke in men. In post-hoc analysis, we discovered statistically significant interactions between intake of fiber and saturated fat; these interactions also differed between men and women (p<0.001). Conclusions In this well-defined population, a high fiber intake was associated with lower risk of iCVD, but there were no robust associations between other macronutrients and iCVD risk. Judging from this study, gender-specific nutrient analysis may be preferable in epidemiology. PMID:22384046

  12. Effects of Heat Flux, Oxygen Concentration and Glass Fiber Volume Fraction on Pyrolysate Mass Flux from Composite Solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rich, D. B.; Lautenberger, C. W.; Yuan, Z.; Fernandez-Pello, A. C.

    2004-01-01

    Experimental work on the effects of heat flux, oxygen concentration and glass fiber volume fraction on pyrolysate mass flux from samples of polypropylene/glass fiber composite (PP/G) is underway. The research is conducted as part of a larger project to develop a test methodology for flammability of materials, particularly composites, in the microgravity and variable oxygen concentration environment of spacecraft and space structures. Samples of PP/G sized at 30 x 30 x 10 mm are flush mounted in a flow tunnel, which provides a flow of oxidizer over the surface of the samples at a fixed value of 1 m/s and oxygen concentrations varying between 18 and 30%. Each sample is exposed to a constant external radiant heat flux at a given value, which varies between tests from 10 to 24 kW/sq m. Continuous sample mass loss and surface temperature measurements are recorded for each test. Some tests are conducted with an igniter and some are not. In the former case, the research goal is to quantify the critical mass flux at ignition for the various environmental and material conditions described above. The later case generates a wider range of mass flux rates than those seen prior to ignition, providing an opportunity to examine the protective effects of blowing on oxidative pyrolysis and heating of the surface. Graphs of surface temperature and sample mass loss vs. time for samples of 30% PPG at oxygen concentrations of 18 and 21% are presented in the figures below. These figures give a clear indication of the lower pyrolysis rate and extended time to ignition that accompany a lower oxygen concentration. Analysis of the mass flux rate at the time of ignition gives good repeatability but requires further work to provide a clear indication of mass flux trends accompanying changes in environmental and material properties.

  13. Effects of Heat Flux, Oxygen Concentration and Glass Fiber Volume Fraction on Pyrolysate Mass Flux from Composite Solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rich, D. B.; Lautenberger, C. W.; Yuan, Z.; Fernandez-Pello, A. C.

    2004-01-01

    Experimental work on the effects of heat flux, oxygen concentration and glass fiber volume fraction on pyrolysate mass flux from samples of polypropylene/glass fiber composite (PP/G) is underway. The research is conducted as part of a larger project to develop a test methodology for flammability of materials, particularly composites, in the microgravity and variable oxygen concentration environment of spacecraft and space structures. Samples of PP/G sized at 30x30x10 mm are flush mounted in a flow tunnel, which provides a flow of oxidizer over the surface of the samples at a fixed value of 1 m/s and oxygen concentrations varying between 18 and 30%. Each sample is exposed to a constant external radiant heat flux at a given value, which varies between tests from 10 to 24 kW/m2. Continuous sample mass loss and surface temperature measurements are recorded for each test. Some tests are conducted with an igniter and some are not. In the former case, the research goal is to quantify the critical mass flux at ignition for the various environmental and material conditions described above. The later case generates a wider range of mass flux rates than those seen prior to ignition, providing an opportunity to examine the protective effects of blowing on oxidative pyrolysis and heating of the surface. Graphs of surface temperature and sample mass loss vs. time for samples of 30% PPG at oxygen concentrations of 18 and 21% are presented in the figures below. These figures give a clear indication of the lower pyrolysis rate and extended time to ignition that accompany a lower oxygen concentration. Analysis of the mass flux rate at the time of ignition gives good repeatability but requires further work to provide a clear indication of mass flux trends accompanying changes in environmental and material properties.

  14. Effects of varying dietary ratios of corn silage to alfalfa silage on digestion of neutral detergent fiber in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Lopes, F; Cook, D E; Combs, D K

    2015-09-01

    An in vivo study was performed to test an in vitro procedure and model that predicts total-tract neutral detergent fiber (NDF) digestibility for lactating dairy cattle. Corn silage (CS) and alfalfa silage (AS) were used as forages for this study. These forages had similar NDF composition, but fiber in the CS contained less indigestible NDF compared with AS (35.5 and 47.8% of indigestible NDF, respectively). The in vitro method estimated rate of digestion of alfalfa potentially digestible NDF to be approximately 2 times faster than CS fiber (6.11 and 3.21%/h, respectively). Four diets were formulated containing different proportions of CS to AS: 100CS:0AS, 67CS:33AS, 33CS:67AS, and 0CS:100AS, as percentage of diet DM basis. The objective was to construct diets that contained approximately similar levels of NDF but with different pool sizes and rates of digestion of potentially digestible NDF. Diets were fed to 8 ruminally cannulated, multiparous, lactating dairy cows in a replicated 4×4 Latin square with 21-d periods. Total-tract fiber digestibility and fiber digestion kinetic parameters observed in vivo were compared with the values predicted by the in vitro assay and model. Total-tract NDF digestibility coefficients were similar (41.8 and 40.6% of total NDF) for the in vitro and in vivo methods, respectively. As the proportion of dietary alfalfa increased, the digestibility of NDF increased. The rate of digestion of potentially digestible NDF predicted from the in vitro assay was also similar to what was observed in vivo. Results suggest that the in vitro total-tract NDF digestibility model could be used to predict rate of fiber digestion and NDF digestibility for lactating dairy cattle. PMID:26162794

  15. [Carbohydrates and fiber].

    PubMed

    Lajolo, F M; de Menezes, E W; Filisetti-Cozzi, T M

    1988-09-01

    Dietary carbohydrates comprise two fractions that may be classified as digestible, and which are useful as energy sources (simple and complex carbohydrates) and fiber, which is presumed to be of no use to the human body. There are insufficient epidemiologic data on the metabolic effects of simple carbohydrates and it is not advisable to make quantitative recommendations of intake. It is questionable to recommend in developing countries that a fixed proportion of dietary energy be derived from simple sugars, due to the high prevalence of deficient energy intake, cultural habits, and regional differences in food intake and physical activity. In relation to recommendations of complex carbohydrates, it should be considered that their absorption is influenced by many factors inherent to the individual and to the foods. Fiber is defined as a series of different substances derived from tissue structures, cellular residues and undigested chemical substances that may be partially utilized after intestinal bacteria have acted on them. There is not a clear definition of the chemical composition of fiber, but it consists mainly of polysaccharides (such as cellulose, hemicellulose and pectins), lignin and end products of the interactions of various food components. The effects of fiber, such as control of food intake, regulation of gastrointestinal transit, post-prandial blood concentrations of cholesterol, glucose and insulin, flatulence and alterations in nutrient bioavailability are due to various physical properties inherent to its chemical components. Impairment of nutrient absorption may be harmful, mainly among populations whose food intake is lower than their energy needs, and with a high fiber content. This may be particularly important in pregnant women, growing children and the elderly, and should be considered when making nutrient recommendations. A precise knowledge of fiber is also important to calculate the real energy value of foods, mainly for two reasons: 1

  16. Effects of extraction methods and particle size distribution on the structural, physicochemical, and functional properties of dietary fiber from deoiled cumin.

    PubMed

    Ma, Meng-Mei; Mu, Tai-Hua

    2016-03-01

    This study evaluated the effects of alkali extraction, enzymatic hydrolysis, shear emulsifying assisted enzymatic hydrolysis, and particle size distribution on the chemical composition and the structural, physicochemical, and functional properties of deoiled cumin dietary fibers (AEDF, EHDF and SEDF). Compared to AEDF and EHDF, SEDF had the highest total dietary fiber, crystalline regions, water swelling capacity (6.79-7.98ml/g), oil adsorption capacity (6.12-7.25%), α-amylase activity inhibition ratio (14.79-21.84%), glucose adsorption capacity (2.02-60.86%), and bile acid retardation index (16.34-50.08%). DFs sieved with mesh sizes >80 exhibited better physicochemical and functional properties than unsieved DFs. The physicochemical properties of sieved DFs improved with increasing sieve mesh sizes (40-120), but decreased with sieve mesh sizes >120, while the functional properties increased with increasing sieve mesh sizes. SEDF sieved with mesh sizes 100-150 can be used as functional ingredients due to its excellent physicochemical and functional properties. PMID:26471550

  17. Optimization of extraction efficiency by shear emulsifying assisted enzymatic hydrolysis and functional properties of dietary fiber from deoiled cumin (Cuminum cyminum L.).

    PubMed

    Ma, Mengmei; Mu, Taihua; Sun, Hongnan; Zhang, Miao; Chen, Jingwang; Yan, Zhibin

    2015-07-15

    This study evaluated the optimal conditions for extracting dietary fiber (DF) from deoiled cumin by shear emulsifying assisted enzymatic hydrolysis (SEAEH) using the response surface methodology. Fat adsorption capacity (FAC), glucose adsorption capacity (GAC), and bile acid retardation index (BRI) were measured to evaluate the functional properties of the extracted DF. The results revealed that the optimal extraction conditions included an enzyme to substrate ratio of 4.5%, a reaction temperature of 57 °C, a pH value of 7.7, and a reaction time of 155 min. Under these conditions, DF extraction efficiency and total dietary fiber content were 95.12% and 84.18%, respectively. The major components of deoiled cumin DF were hemicellulose (37.25%) and cellulose (33.40%). FAC and GAC increased with decreasing DF particle size (51-100 μm), but decreased with DF particle sizes <26 μm; BRI increased with decreasing DF particle size. The results revealed that SEAEH is an effective method for extracting DF. DF with particle size 26-51 μm had improved functional properties. PMID:25722165

  18. In vitro characterization of the impact of selected dietary fibers on fecal microbiota composition and short chain fatty acid production.

    PubMed

    Yang, Junyi; Martínez, Inés; Walter, Jens; Keshavarzian, Ali; Rose, Devin J

    2013-10-01

    The effects of six dietary fibers [pectin, guar gum, inulin, arabinoxylan, β-glucan, and resistant starch] on the human fecal microbiota during in vitro fermentation were determined. Bifidobacterium increased almost 25% on pectin compared with the control; a significant increase in Bifidobacterium adolescentis type-2 was observed on resistant starch. Bacteroides exhibited a positive correlation with propionate/short chain fatty acid (SCFA) production (r = 0.59, p < 0.01), while Ruminococcaceae and Faecalibacterium displayed positive correlations with butyrate/SCFA production (r = 0.39, 0.54, p < 0.01). A negative correlation was detected between inulin utilization and Subdoligranulum (r = -0.73, p ≤ 0.01), while strong positive relationships were found between β-glucan utilization and Firmicutes (r = 0.73, p ≤ 0.01) and resistant starch utilization and Blautia wexlerae (r = 0.82, p < 0.01). Dietary fibers have specific and unique impacts on intestinal microbiota composition and metabolism. These findings provide a rationale for the development of functional ingredients targeted towards a targeted modulation of the gut microbiota. PMID:23831725

  19. The association between dietary lignans, phytoestrogen-rich foods, and fiber intake and postmenopausal breast cancer risk: a German case-control study.

    PubMed

    Zaineddin, Aida Karina; Buck, Katharina; Vrieling, Alina; Heinz, Judith; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Linseisen, Jakob; Chang-Claude, Jenny

    2012-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are structurally similar to estrogens and may affect breast cancer risk by mimicking estrogenic/antiestrogenic properties. In Western societies, whole grains and possibly soy foods are rich sources of phytoestrogens. A population-based case-control study in German postmenopausal women was used to evaluate the association of phytoestrogen-rich foods and dietary lignans with breast cancer risk. Dietary data were collected from 2,884 cases and 5,509 controls using a validated food-frequency questionnaire, which included additional questions phytoestrogen-rich foods. Associations were assessed using conditional logistic regression. All analyses were adjusted for relevant risk and confounding factors. Polytomous logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate the associations by estrogen receptor (ER) status. High and low consumption of soybeans as well as of sunflower and pumpkin seeds were associated with significantly reduced breast cancer risk compared to no consumption (OR = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.70-0.97; and OR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.77-0.97, respectively). The observed associations were not differential by ER status. No statistically significant associations were found for dietary intake of plant lignans, fiber, or the calculated enterolignans. Our results provide evidence for a reduced postmenopausal breast cancer risk associated with increased consumption of sunflower and pumpkin seeds and soybeans. PMID:22591208

  20. [Comparison of analized and calculated energy, fat, protein, dietary fiber, iron and zinc values in diets from different socioeconomic levels in northern México].

    PubMed

    Estrada, R O; Wyatt, C J

    1995-06-01

    Traditional methods of dietary assessment such as measuring nutrient intake with 24 h dietary recalls, food frequency questionnaires and multiple-day food records, depend upon the use of data base systems to estimate nutrient data. Certain problems exist with the data from these sources. For Mexico, the most serious one is that in many of the systems certain nutrient data is lacking and many of the traditional foods are not included. The objective of this study was to analyze regional diets for protein, fat, dietary fiber, iron and zinc and compare these values with those estimated from two different data bases, ALIM 10.000 which includes regional dishes and foods and Nutritionist III, which includes data from Handbook 8. Energy values were calculated using reported values. The results showed that the bases produced comparable values to those analyzed for energy, protein, fat, however for micronutrients the data bases generally overestimate the analyzed values. The results of this study emphasize the need to update data bases with new product information, re-examine certain values on basis of newer methods, and to include data for ethnic foods. PMID:8729268

  1. Dietary cholecalciferol regulates the recruitment and growth of skeletal muscle fibers and the expressions of myogenic regulatory factors and the myosin heavy chain in European sea bass larvae.

    PubMed

    Alami-Durante, Hélène; Cluzeaud, Marianne; Bazin, Didier; Mazurais, David; Zambonino-Infante, José L

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether dietary cholecalciferol affects the recruitment and growth of axial skeletal muscle fibers in first-feeding European sea bass. Larvae were fed diets containing 0.28 (VD-L, low dose), 0.69 (VD-C, control dose), or 3.00 (VD-H, high dose) mg cholecalciferol/kg from 9 to 44 d posthatching (dph). Larvae were sampled at 44 dph for quantification of somatic growth, muscle growth, and muscle growth dynamics and at 22 and 44 dph for the relative quantification of transcripts encoded by genes involved in myogenesis, cell proliferation, and muscle structure. The weight increase of the VD-L-fed larvae was less than that of the VD-H-fed group, whereas that of VD-C-fed larvae was intermediate. The level of expression of genes involved in cell proliferation (PCNA) and early myogenesis (Myf5) decreased between 22 and 44 dph, whereas that of the myogenic determination factor MyoD1 and that of genes involved in muscle structure and function (myosin heavy chain, myosin light chains 2 and 3) increased. Dietary cholecalciferol regulated Myf5, MyoD1, myogenin, and myosin heavy chain gene expression, with a gene-specific shape of response. The maximum hypertrophy of white muscle fibers was higher in larvae fed the VD-C and VD-H diets than in larvae fed the VD-L diet. White muscle hyperplasia was highly stimulated in VD-H-fed larvae compared to VD-L- and VD-C-fed ones. These findings demonstrate a dietary cholecalciferol effect on skeletal muscle growth mechanisms of a Teleost species. PMID:22013200

  2. Fiber

    MedlinePlus

    ... broccoli, spinach, and artichokes legumes (split peas, soy, lentils, etc.) almonds Look for the fiber content of ... salsa, taco sauce, and cheese for dinner. Add lentils or whole-grain barley to your favorite soups. ...

  3. Upgrading of residues of bracts, stems and hearts of Cynara cardunculus L. var. scolymus to functional fractions enriched in soluble fiber.

    PubMed

    Fissore, Eliana N; Santo Domingo, Cinthia; Pujol, Carlos A; Damonte, Elsa B; Rojas, Ana M; Gerschenson, Lía N

    2014-03-01

    Since only the central portion of the immature flowers of artichoke (Cynara cardunculus L. var. scolymus) is consumed (<20%) it is interesting to upgrade its residues to render value added products. In this research, bracts (B), hearts (H) or stems (S) were used to isolate fractions enriched in soluble fiber. Extraction was performed in citrate buffer with or without hemicellulase. Additionally, the effect of preheating (70 °C - 5 min) prior to extraction was also tested. Polysaccharides were precipitated with ethanol and the fractions obtained were freeze-dried. The presence of the enzyme increased fiber yields and preheating produced an additional increment, especially from stems (≈21%). Isolated fibers were constituted by 70-84% of carbohydrates and 2-25% of proteins, and contained phenolics (2.1-8.2 g/100 g). Carbohydrates included uronic acids (12-25%) and neutral sugars (NS, 4-55%) of pectins, and inulin (13-55%). The lowest protein and NS contents and the highest inulin content were obtained with the enzyme and preheating. The behavior of fractions isolated with higher yields was characterized, observing a pseudoplastic behavior in water and gelation with Ca(2+). They also showed antioxidant activity and an inhibitory effect against herpes simplex virus type 1 without cytotoxicity. The isolated fractions retaining bioactive compounds can be useful as functional food ingredients. PMID:24481481

  4. Ameliorative Effects of Chloroform Fraction of Cocos nucifera L. Husk Fiber Against Cisplatin-induced Toxicity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Adaramoye, Oluwatosin Adekunle; Azeez, Adesola Fausat; Ola-Davies, Olufunke Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cisplatin (Cis) is used in the treatment of solid tumors and is known to elicit serious side effects. Objective: The present study investigated the protective effects of chloroform fraction of Cocos nucifera husk fiber (CFCN) against Cis-induced organs’ damage and chromosomal defect in rats. Quercetin (QUE), standard antioxidant, served as positive control. Materials and Methods: Thirty male Wistar rats were assigned into six groups and treated with corn oil (control), Cis alone, Cis + CFCN, CFCN alone, Cis + QUE, and QUE alone. QUE and CFCN were given at 50 and 200 mg/kg/day, respectively, by oral gavage for 7 days before the rats were exposed to a single dose of Cis (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) at the last 36 h of study. Results: Administration of Cis alone caused a significant (P < 0.05) increase in the levels of serum creatinine and urea by 72% and 70%, respectively, when compared with the control. The activity of serum aspartate aminotransferase was significantly (P < 0.05) increased while alanine aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase were insignificantly (P > 0.05) affected in Cis-treated rats. Furthermore, the activities of hepatic and renal catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione S-transferase, glutathione peroxidase, and levels of reduced glutathione were significantly (P < 0.05) decreased in Cis-treated rats with concomitant elevation of malondialdehyde. Cis exposure increased the frequency of micro nucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (mPCE) by 92%. Pretreatment with CFCN inhibited lipid peroxidation, enhanced the activities of some antioxidative enzymes and reduced the frequency of mPCE. Conclusions: Chloroform fraction of CFCN may protect against organs damage by Cis. Further studies are required to determine the component of the plant responsible for this activity. SUMMARY Cisplatin (Cis) is used in the treatment of solid tumors and is known to elicit serious side effects. This study investigated the protective effects of

  5. Effect on fecal output of various dietary nitrogen sources in pig-tailed monkeys (Macaca nemestrina) fed fiber-free, semisynthetic diets.

    PubMed

    Spiller, G A; Saperstein, S; Beigler, M A; Amen, R J

    1975-05-01

    Fiber-free liquid diets containing isonitrogenous amounts of various dietary nitrogen sources were fed to five adult male pig-tailed monkeys (Macaca nemestrina) with a mean weight of approximately 10 kg. All liquid diets supplied 3.0 g N/DAY PER MONKEY AND MAINTAINED THE ANIMALS IN A POSTIVE NITROGEN BALANCE. Initial baseline fecal output data were obtained by feeding the animals a commercial solid monkey chow. The dietary nitrogen sources fed were a) egg white protein, b) an enzymatic hydrolysate of fish protein supplemented with L-amino acids to simulate the egg albumin pattern, c) a mixture of pure L-amino acids simulating the egg pattern, d) a casein hydrolysate supplemented with amino acids, and e) an amino acid mixture with Rose's pattern. Total fecal matter, dry fecal matter, percent of moisture, fecal nitrogen, lipids and ash were determined for a 10-day period for each experimental diet. A very significant difference (P smaller than 0.001) was noted between each liquid diet and the solid chow, but no significant differences were found between the various fiber-free liquid diets, pointing to the effect of fiber as a major factor affecting fecal output. Monkeys fed liquid diets excreted fecal matter with a mean of 12.9 g/day, of which 4.7 g/day was dry feces (fecal dry matter 28.5%). Fecal nitrogen was found to be 0.25 g, fecal lipids were 0.19 g, and fecal ash was 0.59 g/day per monkey, respectively. PMID:1130309

  6. Endogenous and environmental factors influence the dietary fractionation of 13C and 15N in hissing cockroaches Gromphadorhina portentosa.

    PubMed

    McCue, Marshall D

    2008-01-01

    Since DeNiro and Epstein's discovery that the (13)C and (15)N isotopic signatures of animals approximate those of their respective diets, the measurement of stable isotope signatures has become an important tool for ecologists studying the diets of wild animals. This study used Madagascar hissing cockroaches (Gromphadorhina portentosa) to examine several preexisting hypotheses about the relationship between the isotopic composition of an animal and its diet. Contrary to my predictions, the results revealed that the tissues of adult cockroaches raised for two generations on a diet of known isotopic composition did not demonstrate enrichment of heavy stable isotopes. Moreover, the (15)N signatures of cockroaches were neither influenced by periods of rapid growth (i.e., 300-fold increase in dry body mass over 120 d) nor by imposed periods of starvation lasting up to 80 d. The offspring born to mothers raised on known diets were enriched in (15)N. Diet-switching experiments showed that turnover times of (13)C were highly correlated with age and ranged from 9 to 10 d to 60 to 75 d in subadults and adults, respectively. Adults subjected to diet switches differed from the subadults in that the adults achieved equilibrated isotopic signatures that were shifted approximately 1.0 per thousand toward their respective original diets. Lipid fractions of adult cockroaches averaged 2.9 per thousand more depleted in (13)C than in lipid-free fractions, but no changes in (13)C were observed in aging adults. Exposure to reduced ambient temperature from 33 degrees C to 23 degrees C over 120 d did not influence isotopic signatures of tissues. Overall, the results of this study reveal that different endogenous and exogenous factors can influence the isotopic signatures of cockroaches. These findings reinforce the need to conduct controlled studies to further examine environmental factors that influence the relationships between the isotopic signatures of animals and their diets. PMID

  7. Chitosan Interaction with Iron from Yoghurt Using an In Vitro Digestive Model: Comparative Study with Plant Dietary Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Staffolo, Marina Dello; Martino, Miriam; Bevilacqua, Alicia; Montero, Mirta; Rodríguez, María Susana; Albertengo, Liliana

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the interaction of chitosan with iron from yoghurt by an in vitro gastrointestinal tract model. Taking into account that chitosan is a polysaccharide included in fiber definition by Codex Alimentarius; chitosan behavior was studied and compared with different plant fiber (wheat, bamboo, apple, psyllium and inulin) behaviors, in the same in vitro conditions. Ferrous sulfate was added to yoghurts with each type of fiber. The gastric environment was simulated with HCl (pH 1.0–2.0). The duodenal environment was simulated with NaHCO3 (pH 6.8–7.2) and a dialysis tubing cellulose membrane. Results showed that chitosan had the highest iron retention percentages (53.2% at 30 min; 56.8% at 60 min) interacting in a more pronounced manner with iron than the plant fibers used in this work. PMID:21845102

  8. Chitosan interaction with iron from yoghurt using an in vitro digestive model: comparative study with plant dietary fibers.

    PubMed

    Staffolo, Marina Dello; Martino, Miriam; Bevilacqua, Alicia; Montero, Mirta; Rodríguez, María Susana; Albertengo, Liliana

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the interaction of chitosan with iron from yoghurt by an in vitro gastrointestinal tract model. Taking into account that chitosan is a polysaccharide included in fiber definition by Codex Alimentarius; chitosan behavior was studied and compared with different plant fiber (wheat, bamboo, apple, psyllium and inulin) behaviors, in the same in vitro conditions. Ferrous sulfate was added to yoghurts with each type of fiber. The gastric environment was simulated with HCl (pH 1.0-2.0). The duodenal environment was simulated with NaHCO(3) (pH 6.8-7.2) and a dialysis tubing cellulose membrane. Results showed that chitosan had the highest iron retention percentages (53.2% at 30 min; 56.8% at 60 min) interacting in a more pronounced manner with iron than the plant fibers used in this work. PMID:21845102

  9. Effects of distillers' dried grains with solubles and soybean oil on dietary lipid, fiber, and amino acid digestibility in corn-based diets fed to growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, N A; Serão, N V L; Patience, J F

    2016-04-01

    The use of corn coproducts increases the concentration of fiber and, often, the use of supplemental lipids in swine diets, which may affect energy and nutrient digestibility. An experiment was conducted to determine the effects of reduced-oil distillers' dried grains with solubles (DDGS) and soybean oil (SBO) on dietary AA, acid hydrolyzed ether extract (AEE), and NDF digestibility in corn-based diets fed to growing pigs. Eighteen growing pigs (33.8 ± 2.2 kg BW) were surgically fitted with a T-cannula in the distal ileum and allocated to 1 of 6 dietary treatment groups in a 3-period incomplete Latin square design, with 9 observations per treatment. Six dietary treatments were obtained by adding 0, 20, and 40% DDGS to corn-casein diets formulated with 2 and 6% SBO. Ileal digesta and fecal samples were collected and the apparent ileal digestibility (AID) and apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD) of AEE and NDF and the AID of AA were determined. Apparent values were corrected for endogenous losses of lipids, and true ileal (TID) and true total tract digestibility (TTTD) values of lipids were calculated. Results showed that the AID of Lys decreased ( < 0.001) with the inclusion of DDGS but was not affected ( = 0.63) by the inclusion of SBO. An interaction between DDGS and SBO on the AID ( = 0.002) and ATTD ( = 0.009) of NDF was observed, where the AID and ATTD of NDF decreased with DDGS at 6% SBO but no effect was observed at 2% SBO. The AID of NDF increased with SBO at 0% DDGS, but no effect was observed at 20 or 40% DDGS. An interaction between DDGS and SBO on the AID ( = 0.011) and ATTD ( = 0.008) of AEE was observed, where the AID and ATTD of AEE increased with SBO. The AID and ATTD of AEE increased with DDGS at 2% SBO, but no effect was observed at 6% SBO. Correction by ileal and fecal endogenous loss of AEE (9.5 and 13.6 g/kg of DMI, respectively) showed that increasing dietary AEE had no effect on the TID and TTD of AEE ( > 0.05). In conclusion, the AID of

  10. Physicochemical and functional properties of micronized jincheng orange by-products (Citrus sinensis Osbeck) dietary fiber and its application as a fat replacer in yogurt.

    PubMed

    Yi, Tian; Huang, Xingjian; Pan, Siyi; Wang, Lufeng

    2014-08-01

    Orange by-products from juice extraction are generally discarded or used in animal feed due to their low market value. However, orange by-products show potential as dietary fiber (DF) and fat replacers in products such as yogurt. This study assessed the benefits of using orange by-products in DF-enriched materials such as DF powders (OP) and micronized DF with ball-milling (MDF). The study also investigated the effects of adding different levels of OP and MDF on the quality of low-fat yogurt. Results show that MDF showed better physicochemical and functional properties than OP, and that 2% MDF as a fat replacer in yogurt retained most of the textural and sensory properties of full-fat yogurt. Therefore, this study showed that MDF is a promising alternative as a fat replacer in low-fat yogurt, without sacrificing good taste and other qualities of full-fat yogurt. PMID:24625022

  11. The effect of fractional thermoelasticity on a two-dimensional problem of a mode I crack in a rotating fiber-reinforced thermoelastic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, E. Abouelregal; Ashraf, M. Zenkour

    2013-10-01

    This article is concerned with the effect of rotation on the general model of the equations of the generalized thermoelasticity for a homogeneous isotropic elastic half-space solid, whose surface is subjected to a Mode-I crack problem. The fractional order theory of thermoelasticity is used to obtain the analytical solutions for displacement components, force stresses, and temperature. The boundary of the crack is subjected to a prescribed stress distribution and temperature. The normal mode analysis technique is used to solve the resulting non-dimensional coupled governing equations of the problem. The variations of the considered variables with the horizontal distance are illustrated graphically. Some particular cases are also discussed in the context of the problem. Effects of the fractional parameter, reinforcement, and rotation on the variations of different field quantities inside the elastic medium are analyzed graphically. Comparisons are made between the results in the presence and those in the absence of fiber-reinforcing, rotating and fractional parameters.

  12. Fractionation of human bone marrow cell suspensions in nylon fiber columns: an efficient method for the removal of cells that produce colony stimulating factor (CSF).

    PubMed

    Sullivan, R; Gans, P J

    1980-09-01

    In this report, we describe an efficient technique for the extraction of CSF-producing cells from human marrow suspensions. Prior to plating in agar cultures, we incubated buoyant human marrow cells for 45 min in columns packed with nylon fiber or subjected the cells to two one-hour incubations in glass petri dishes. Recoveries of total cells, differential marrow elements, and committed granulocyte-monocyte progenitor cells (CFUc) were similar after each separative procedure. However, spontaneous CFUc proliferation was more effectively eliminated when cells were fractionated in nylon fiber columns. After the removal of cells which were adherent to glass, spontaneous CFUc proliferation in cultures containing no exogenous CSF accounted for 2.1% of total CFUc at a plating concentration of 10(5) cells/ml and 7.8% at a concentration of 3 X 10(5) cells/ml. After the fractionation of marrow cell suspensions in nylon fiber columns, spontaneous CFUc growth was completely obliterated at a plating concentration of 10(5) cells/ml, and at a concentration of 3 X 10(5) cells/ml accounted for only 0.09% of total CFUc. Further experiments were undertaken which demonstrated that buoyant marrow cells after incubation in nylon fiber columns may be employed to assay CSF in extremely dilute concentrations. Because of the simplicity and efficiency of this procedure, nylon fiber chromatography appears to be a highly useful technique for the rapid semi-purification of marrow suspensions for use in the assay of human CSF. PMID:6970676

  13. [Changes in cell respiration of postural muscle fibers under long-term gravitational unloading after dietary succinate supplementation].

    PubMed

    Ogneva, I V; Veselova, O M; Larina, I M

    2011-01-01

    The intensity of cell respiration of the rat m. soleus, m. gastrocnemius c.m. and tibialis anterior fibers during 35-day gravitational unloading, with the addition of succinate in the diet at a dosage rate of 50 mg per 1 kg animal weight has been investigated. The gravitational unloading was modeled by antiorthostatic hindlimb suspension. The intensity of cell respiration was estimated by polarography. It was shown that the rate of oxygen consumption by soleus and gastrocnemius fibers on endogenous and exogenous substrates and with the addition of ADP decreases after the discharge. This may be associated with the transition to the glycolytic energy path due to a decrease in the EMG-activity. At the same time, the respiration rate after the addition of exogenous substrates in soleus fibers did not increase, indicating a disturbance in the function of the NCCR-section of the respiratory chain and more pronounced changes in the structure of muscle fibers. In tibialis anterior fibers, no changes in oxygen consumption velocity were observed. The introduction of succinate to the diet of rats makes it possible to prevent the negative effects of hypokinesia, although it reduces the basal level of intensity of cell respiration. PMID:21442893

  14. The deleterious effects of bed rest on human skeletal muscle fibers are exacerbated by hypercortisolemia and ameliorated by dietary supplementation.

    PubMed

    Fitts, R H; Romatowski, J G; Peters, J R; Paddon-Jones, D; Wolfe, R R; Ferrando, A A

    2007-07-01

    Prolonged inactivity associated with bed rest in a clinical setting or spaceflight is frequently associated with hypercortisolemia and inadequate caloric intake. Here, we determined the effect of 28 days of bed rest (BR); bed rest plus hypercortisolemia (BRHC); and bed rest plus essential amino acid (AA) and carbohydrate (CHO) supplement (BRAA) on the size and function of single slow- and fast-twitch muscle fibers. Supplementing meals, the BRAA group consumed 16.5 g essential amino acids and 30 g sucrose at 1100, 1600, and 2100 h, and the BRHC subjects received 5 daily doses of 10-15 mg of oral hydrocortisone sodium succinate throughout bed rest. Bed rest induced atrophy and loss of force (mN) and power (muN.FL.s(-1)) in single fibers was exacerbated by hypercortisolemia where soleus peak force declined by 23% in the type I fiber from a prevalue of 0.78 +/- 0.02 to 0.60 +/- 0.02 mN post bed rest (compared to a 7% decline with bed rest alone) and 27% in the type II fiber (1.10 +/- 0.08 vs. 0.81 +/- 0.05 mN). In the BRHC group, peak power dropped by 19, 15, and 11% in the soleus type I, and vastus lateralis (VL) type I and II fibers, respectively. The AA/CHO supplement protected against the bed rest-induced loss of peak force in the type I soleus and peak power in the VL type II fibers. These results provide evidence that an AA/CHO supplement might serve as a successful countermeasure to help preserve muscle function during periods of relative inactivity. PMID:17409123

  15. TDLAS-based NH3 mole fraction measurement for exhaust diagnostics during selective catalytic reduction using a fiber-coupled 2.2-µm DFB diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stritzke, Felix; Diemel, Oliver; Wagner, Steven

    2015-04-01

    A new developed tunable diode laser spectrometer for the measurement of ammonia (NH3) mole fractions in exhaust gas matrices with strong CO2 and H2O background at temperatures up to 800 K is presented. In situ diagnostics in harsh exhaust environments during SCR after treatment are enabled by the use of ammonia transitions in the ν2 + ν3 near-infrared band around 2300 nm. Therefore, three lines have been selected, coinciding near 2200.5 nm (4544.5 cm-1) with rather weak temperature dependency and minimal interference with CO2 and H2O. A fiber-coupled 2.2-μm distributed feedback laser diode was used and attached to the hot gas flow utilizing adjustable gas tight high-temperature fiber ports. The spectrometer spans four coplanar optical channels across the measurement plane and simultaneously detects the direct absorption signal via a fiber-coupled detector unit. An exhaust simulation test rig was used to characterize the spectrometer's performance in ammonia-doped hot gas environments. We achieved a temporal resolution of 13 Hz and temperature-dependent precisions of NH3 mole fraction ranging from 50 to 70 ppmV. There the spectrometer achieved normalized ammonia detection limits of 7-10 and 2-3.

  16. Effects of corn silage hybrids and dietary nonforage fiber sources on feed intake, digestibility, ruminal fermentation, and productive performance of lactating Holstein dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Holt, M S; Williams, C M; Dschaak, C M; Eun, J-S; Young, A J

    2010-11-01

    This experiment was conducted to determine the effects of corn silage hybrids and nonforage fiber sources (NFFS) in high forage diets formulated with high dietary proportions of alfalfa hay (AH) and corn silage (CS) on ruminal fermentation and productive performance by early lactating dairy cows. Eight multiparous Holstein cows (4 ruminally fistulated) averaging 36±6.2 d in milk were used in a duplicated 4 × 4 Latin square design experiment with a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments. Cows were fed 1 of 4 dietary treatments during each of the four 21-d replicates. Treatments were (1) conventional CS (CCS)-based diet without NFFS, (2) CCS-based diet with NFFS, (3) brown midrib CS (BMRCS)-based diet without NFFS, and (4) BMRCS-based diet with NFFS. Diets were isonitrogenous and isocaloric. Sources of NFFS consisted of ground soyhulls and pelleted beet pulp to replace a portion of AH and CS in the diets. In vitro 30-h neutral detergent fiber (NDF) degradability was greater for BMRCS than for CCS (42.3 vs. 31.2%). Neither CS hybrids nor NFFS affected intake of dry matter (DM) and nutrients. Digestibility of N, NDF, and acid detergent fiber tended to be greater for cows consuming CCS-based diets. Milk yield was not influenced by CS hybrids and NFFS. However, a tendency for an interaction between CS hybrids and NFFS occurred, with increased milk yield due to feeding NFFS with the BMRCS-based diet. Yields of milk fat and 3.5% fat-corrected milk decreased when feeding the BMRCS-based diet, and a tendency existed for an interaction between CS hybrids and NFFS because milk fat concentration further decreased by feeding NFFS with BMRCS-based diet. Although feed efficiency (milk/DM intake) was not affected by CS hybrids and NFFS, an interaction was found between CS hybrids and NFFS because feed efficiency increased when NFFS was fed only with BMRCS-based diet. Total volatile fatty acid production and individual molar proportions were not affected by diets. Dietary

  17. Selective deposition of dietary α-Lipoic acid in mitochondrial fraction and its synergistic effect with α-Tocoperhol acetate on broiler meat oxidative stability

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The use of bioactive antioxidants in feed of broiler to mitigate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in biological systems is one of promising nutritional strategies. The aim of present study was to alleviate ROS production in mitochondrial fraction (MF) of meat by supplemented dietary antioxidant in feed of broiler. For this purpose, mitochondria specific antioxidant: α-lipoic acid (25 mg, 75 mg and 150 mg) with or without combination of α-tocopherol acetate (200 mg) used in normal and palm olein oxidized oil (4%) supplemented feed. One hundred and eighty one day old broiler birds were randomly divided into six treatments and provided the mentioned feed from third week. Feed intake, feed conversion ratio (FCR) remained statistically same in all groups while body weight decreased in supplemented groups accordingly at the end of study. The broiler meat MF antioxidant potential was significantly improved by feeding supplemented feed estimated as 1,1-di phenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging activity, 2,2-azinobis-(3- ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS+) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). The maximum antioxidant activity was depicted in group fed on 150 mg/kg α-lipoic acid (ALA) and 200 mg/kg α-tocopherol acetate (ATA) (T4) in both breast and leg MF. Moreover, TBARS were higher in leg as compared to breast MF. Although, oxidized oil containing feed reduced the growth, lipid stability and antioxidant potential of MF whilst these traits were improved by receiving feed containing ALA and ATA. ALA and ATA showed higher deposition in T4 group while least in group received oxidized oil containing feed (T5). Positive correlation exists between DPPH free radical scavenging activity and the ABTS + reducing activity. In conclusion, ALA and ATA supplementation in feed had positive effect on antioxidant status of MF that consequently diminished the oxidative stress in polyunsaturated fatty acid enriched meat. PMID:23617815

  18. Selective deposition of dietary α-lipoic acid in mitochondrial fraction and its synergistic effect with α-tocoperhol acetate on broiler meat oxidative stability.

    PubMed

    Parveen, Rashida; Asghar, Ali; Anjum, Faqir M; Khan, Muhammad I; Arshad, Muhammad Sajid; Yasmeen, Ammara

    2013-01-01

    The use of bioactive antioxidants in feed of broiler to mitigate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in biological systems is one of promising nutritional strategies. The aim of present study was to alleviate ROS production in mitochondrial fraction (MF) of meat by supplemented dietary antioxidant in feed of broiler. For this purpose, mitochondria specific antioxidant: α-lipoic acid (25 mg, 75 mg and 150 mg) with or without combination of α-tocopherol acetate (200 mg) used in normal and palm olein oxidized oil (4%) supplemented feed. One hundred and eighty one day old broiler birds were randomly divided into six treatments and provided the mentioned feed from third week. Feed intake, feed conversion ratio (FCR) remained statistically same in all groups while body weight decreased in supplemented groups accordingly at the end of study. The broiler meat MF antioxidant potential was significantly improved by feeding supplemented feed estimated as 1,1-di phenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging activity, 2,2-azinobis-(3- ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS+) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). The maximum antioxidant activity was depicted in group fed on 150 mg/kg α-lipoic acid (ALA) and 200 mg/kg α-tocopherol acetate (ATA) (T4) in both breast and leg MF. Moreover, TBARS were higher in leg as compared to breast MF. Although, oxidized oil containing feed reduced the growth, lipid stability and antioxidant potential of MF whilst these traits were improved by receiving feed containing ALA and ATA. ALA and ATA showed higher deposition in T4 group while least in group received oxidized oil containing feed (T5). Positive correlation exists between DPPH free radical scavenging activity and the ABTS + reducing activity. In conclusion, ALA and ATA supplementation in feed had positive effect on antioxidant status of MF that consequently diminished the oxidative stress in polyunsaturated fatty acid enriched meat. PMID:23617815

  19. Comparison of in situ versus in vitro methods of fiber digestion at 120 and 288 hours to quantify the indigestible neutral detergent fiber fraction of corn silage samples.

    PubMed

    Bender, R W; Cook, D E; Combs, D K

    2016-07-01

    Ruminal digestion of neutral detergent fiber (NDF) is affected in part by the proportion of NDF that is indigestible (iNDF), and the rate at which the potentially digestible NDF (pdNDF) is digested. Indigestible NDF in forages is commonly determined as the NDF residue remaining after long-term in situ or in vitro incubations. Rate of pdNDF digestion can be determined by measuring the degradation of NDF in ruminal in vitro or in situ incubations at multiple time points, and fitting the change in residual pdNDF by time with log-transformed linear first order or nonlinear mathematical treatments. The estimate of indigestible fiber is important because it sets the pool size of potentially digestible fiber, which in turn affects the estimate of the proportion of potentially digestible fiber remaining in the time series analysis. Our objective was to compare estimates of iNDF based on in vitro (IV) and in situ (IS) measurements at 2 fermentation end points (120 and 288h). Further objectives were to compare the subsequent rate, lag, and estimated total-tract NDF digestibility (TTNDFD) when iNDF from each method was used with a 7 time point in vitro incubation of NDF to model fiber digestion. Thirteen corn silage samples were dried and ground through a 1-mm screen in a Wiley mill. A 2×2 factorial trial was conducted to determine the effect of time of incubation and method of iNDF analysis on iNDF concentration; the 2 factors were method of iNDF analysis (IS vs. IV) and incubation time (120 vs. 288h). Four sample replicates were used, and approximately 0.5g/sample was weighed into each Ankom F 0285 bag (Ankom Technology, Macedon, NY; pore size=25 µm) for all techniques. The IV-120 had a higher estimate of iNDF (37.8% of NDF) than IS-120 (32.1% of NDF), IV-288 (31.2% of NDF), or IS-288 technique (25.7% of NDF). Each of the estimates of iNDF was then used to calculate the rate of degradation of pdNDF from a 7 time point in vitro incubation. When the IV-120 NDF residue was

  20. Antihyperlipidemic bioactivity of Alpinia officinarum (Hance) Farw Zingiberaceae can be attributed to the coexistance of curcumin, polyphenolics, dietary fibers and phytosterols.

    PubMed

    Lin, Li-Yun; Peng, Chiung-Chi; Yeh, Xian-Yü; Huang, Bor-Yü; Wang, Hui-Er; Chen, Kuan-Chou; Peng, Robert Y

    2015-05-01

    Rhizoma A. officinarum (Hance) Farw, synonymously is called rhizoma galangae or smaller galangal (hereafter abbreviated as AO). Numerous studies reported that AO possesses anti-inflammatory, anticancer, chemoprotective, antibacterial, antifungal and diuretic properties. To understand whether AO exhibits antihyperlipidemic bioactivity and what is the mechanism of action, we performed chemical and animal studies using hamsters (age: 4 weeks, body weight: 45 ± 4 g). The grouping of the animals was as follows: control, high fat (HF) diet, HF + AO2%, HF + AO4%, HF + AO6%, HF + AO8% and HF + AO10%. AO contained curcumin 5.67 mg g(-1) (on wet basis), crude fiber 1.3% ± 0.0%, soluble diet fiber 92 ± 2 mg g(-1), insoluble diet fiber 502 ± 5 mg g(-1), and phytosterols 63.9 ± 1.6 mg/100 g. Its methanolic extract consisted of high polyphenolics 4927.8 ± 101.1 mgGAE/100 g and flavonoids 593.2 ± 22.2 mgQE/100 g. The enlarged organs, including liver, kidney, and spleen, which were elicited by HF were completely alleviated by AO supplement diets. Levels of serum cholesterol, triglyceride, LDL-C, HDL-C and LDL-C/HDL-C ratio for the control originally were 138 ± 6, 98 ± 4, 40 ± 5, 168 ± 7 mg dL(-1) and 0.24, which were elevated by HF to 319 ± 12, 223 ± 13, 108 ± 11, 194 ± 6 mg dL(-1) and 0.05, and alleviated completely by HF + AO8% and HF + AO10%. In vitro, AO extracts showed potent DPPH free radical-scavenging and superoxide anion scavenging capabilities. In vivo, AO (at dose ≥8%) dose-dependently alleviated levels of superoxide dismutase, catalase, GSH, and MDA to 117 ± 6.9 U mL(-1), 32.9 ± 3.7 U mL(-1), 7.0 ± 1.7 μmol mL(-1) and 1.8 ± 0.4 nmol L(-1), respectively, exhibiting the remarkable antioxidative and antihyperlipidemic effects of AO. Conclusively, we are the first to report the occurrence of curcumin in rhizoma A. officinarum. Curcumin synergistically elicits promising anti-dyslipidemic bioactivity with coexisting total polyphenolics, dietary fibers

  1. Separation of silver nanoparticles by hollow fiber flow field-flow fractionation: Addition of tannic acid into carrier liquid as a modifier.

    PubMed

    Saenmuangchin, Rattaporn; Mettakoonpitak, Jaruwan; Shiowatana, Juwadee; Siripinyanond, Atitaya

    2015-10-01

    A homemade hollow fiber flow-field fractionation (Hf-FlFFF) coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was set-up for silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) separation by using polysulfone hollow fiber membrane (30,000 MW cutoff) as a separation channel. Tannic acid and citrate stabilized AgNPs were synthesized and introduced into Hf-FlFFF. The effects of carrier liquid and stabilizing agent on retention behavior of AgNPs were investigated. Different elution behaviors were observed as follows: with 0.02% (w/v) FL-70, all of AgNPs were eluted from Hf-FlFFF but differences in retention behaviors were observed for AgNPs with tannic acid and citrate stabilizing agents; and with 30mM TRIS buffer, only tannic acid stabilized AgNPs were eluted from Hf-FlFFF, whereas citrate stabilized AgNPs were not eluted. In this work, tannic acid addition into carrier liquid was proposed to modify the surface of AgNPs and the surface of the membrane, and thereby adjusting the retention behaviors of AgNPs. Various concentrations of tannic acid were added into FL-70 and TRIS buffer. With the use of 0.1mM tannic acid in 30mM TRIS buffer as the carrier liquid, retention behaviors of both tannic acid stabilized- and citrate stabilized-AgNPs were similar and with similar fractionation recovery. PMID:26341593

  2. Long-term effects of dietary fiber on glucose tolerance and gastric emptying in noninsulin-dependent diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Ray, T K; Mansell, K M; Knight, L C; Malmud, L S; Owen, O E; Boden, G

    1983-03-01

    Effects of long-term (2 months) supplementation of diet with 20 g of guar gum and 10 g of wheat bran on metabolic control was studied in 12 obese, poorly controlled noninsulin-dependent diabetic patients. Addition of fiber reduced urinary excretion of glucose from 30.5 +/- 6 to 8.3 +/- 2 g/24 h, (p less than 0.025), fasting plasma glucose concentration from 301 +/- 24 to 184 +/- 15 mg/dl (p less than 0.025), and plasma cholesterol concentration from 277 +/- 24 to 193 +/- 9 mg/dl (p less than 0.025). No significant changes were observed in the patients weight and serum concentrations of triglycerides, high-density lipoproteins, free fatty acids, and insulin. Addition of fiber also delayed gastric emptying of liquids and solids. This effect became statistically significant 60 and 90 min after intake of a test meal for liquids and solids, respectively. We conclude that addition of guar and bran to the diet resulted in long-term improvement of metabolic control in these patients and that delayed gastric emptying may be one of the mechanisms responsible for this beneficial effect. PMID:6299089

  3. Family income per capita, age, and smoking status are predictors of low fiber intake in residents of São Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Santos, Paula Victória Félix Dos; Sales, Cristiane Hermes; Vieira, Diva Aliete Santos; de Mello Fontanelli, Mariane; Marchioni, Dirce Maria; Fisberg, Regina Mara

    2016-05-01

    We hypothesized that dietary total fiber intake may be less than recommendations and that the intake of total, soluble, and insoluble fiber may be associated with demographic, lifestyle, and socioeconomic factors. Data were drawn from the Health Survey of São Paulo, a cross-sectional population-based study. Adolescents, adults, and elderly persons living in São Paulo city were included. Demographic, lifestyle, and anthropometric data were collected from households. Dietary intake was measured using two 24-hour dietary recalls. All analyses were conducted based on the sample design of the study. The proportion of individuals who met the adequate intake (AI) for total fiber intake was examined, and foods that contributed to the intake of fiber and fractions were evaluated. The relationship of total, soluble, and insoluble fiber intake with demographic, socioeconomic, and lifestyle characteristics was determined using multiple linear regression models. A low proportion of individuals met the AI for dietary fiber. The foods that most contributed to total fiber intake were beans, French bread, and rice. Total fiber intake was negatively associated with former and current smokers and positively associated with family income per capita and age. Soluble fiber intake was negatively associated with current smokers and positively associated with female sex, age, and family income per capita. Insoluble fiber intake was negatively associated with former or current smokers and positively associated with age. In summary, residents in the city of São Paulo had a low fiber intake, and demographic, socioeconomic, and lifestyle factors were associated with dietary fiber and intake of its fractions. PMID:27101765

  4. Effect of fiber fractions of prickly pear cactus (nopal) on quality and sensory properties of wheat bread rolls.

    PubMed

    Guevara-Arauza, Juan Carlos; Bárcenas, Diego Guadalupe; Ortega-Rivas, Enrique; Martínez, Jaime David Pérez; Hernández, Jaime Reyes; de Jesús Ornelas-Paz, José

    2015-05-01

    In this study the addition of total fiber (TF), insoluble fiber (IF), and soluble fiber (SF) from nopal to wheat flour used to make bread rolls was assessed. The rheological properties of dough as well as quality, texture, sensorial and physical characteristics of the crumb rolls produced were evaluated. The storage (23.50 MPa) and loss modulus (11.95 MPa) for SF-dough were the lowest indicating that a less visco-elastic behavior was obtained. Polarized light microscopy showed that a more homogeneous size and a better distribution of starch granules were developed into SF-dough. Crumb hardness (3.25-4.78 N) and chewiness (0.31-0.81 N) of SF-rolls were lower than the control experiment (3.99-5.81 N and 0.35-1.01 N respectively). Springiness for all treatments was constant (1.0) compared with the control (1.02-0.87) for 2 days of storage. The lowest cohesiveness values (0.24-014) were computed by IF treatment for a similar storage time. The specific crumb volume increased by 12.46, 9.03 and 1.10 % by the addition of SF, TF and IF respectively. The lowest rate of staling was shown by SF-rolls (0.199) and it was followed by TF (0.296), IF (0.381) and control (0.458) treatments. As a result, the highest scores on quality (9.3 out of 10) and sensorial attributes (from 8.9 up to 9.7) were assigned to SF-rolls. PMID:25892800

  5. Assessment of dietary fiber fermentation: effect of Lactobacillus reuteri and reproducibility of short-chain fatty acid concentrations.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Maria L; Savarino, Vincenzo; Slavin, Joanne L

    2009-05-01

    This investigation had two aims: (i) to determine the reproducibility of SCFA production of two fibers: wheat dextrin and inulin, in two separate in vitro batch fermentation systems, and (ii) to determine if the addition Lactobacillus reuteri, a probiotic bacterium, enhanced the fermentation of wheat dextrin, inulin, and psyllium using in vitro batch fermentation. Samples were removed at 0, 4, 8, 12, and 24 h. SCFAs were measured by GC. L. reuteri improved inulin's fermentation profile by reducing the total SCFA peak at 4 h and enhancing fermentation at 8 and 12 h. Wheat dextrin and psyllium were largely unaffected. Wheat dextrin's total SCFA and propionate production curves were steady and replicable, but concentration values varied between fermentations. Partially hydrolyzed guar gum (PHGG) and wheat dextrin had similar fermentation patterns from 0-8 h, but PHGG plateaued at 8 h for all measures. Psyllium produced peak SCFA concentrations at 8 h, similar to inulin. L. reuteri could be combined with inulin for enhancing fermentation, but it does not improve wheat dextrin or psyllium fermentation. Wheat dextrin will likely produce similar physiological within a group of individuals due to the reproducibility of fermentation. PMID:18837468

  6. Slc5a8, a Na+-coupled high-affinity transporter for short-chain fatty acids, is a conditional tumor suppressor in colon that protects against colitis and colon cancer under low-fiber dietary conditions

    PubMed Central

    Gurav, Ashish; Sivaprakasam, Sathish; Bhutia, Yangzom D.; Boettger, Thomas; Singh, Nagendra; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2016-01-01

    Summary Mammalian colon harbors trillions of bacteria under physiologic conditions; this symbiosis is made possible because of a tolerized response from the mucosal immune system. The mechanisms underlying this tolerogenic phenomenon remain poorly understood. Here we show that Slc5a8, a Na+-coupled high-affinity transporter in colon for the bacterial fermentation product butyrate, plays a critical role in this process. Among various immune cells in colon, dendritic cells (DCs) are unique not only in their accessibility to luminal contents but also in their ability to induce tolerogenic phenotype in T cells. We found that DCs exposed to butyrate express the immunosuppressive enzymes indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) and aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A2 (Aldh1A2), promote conversion of naïve T cells into immunosuppressive FoxP3+ Tregs, and suppress conversion of naïve T cells into pro-inflammatory IFN-γ-producing cells. Slc5a8-null DCs do not induce IDO1 and Aldh1A2 and do not generate Tregs or suppress IFN-γ-producing T cells in response to butyrate. We also provide in vivo evidence for an obligatory role for Slc5a8 in suppression of IFN-γ-producing T cells. Furthermore, Slc5a8 protects against colitis and colon cancer under conditions of low-fiber intake but not when dietary fiber intake is optimal. This agrees with the high-affinity nature of the transporter to mediate butyrate entry into cells. We conclude that Slc5a8 is an obligatory link between dietary fiber and mucosal immune system via the bacterial metabolite butyrate, and that this transporter is a conditional tumor suppressor in colon linked to dietary fiber content. PMID:25984582

  7. Polysaccharide characterization by hollow-fiber flow field-flow fractionation with on-line multi-angle static light scattering and differential refractometry.

    PubMed

    Pitkänen, Leena; Striegel, André M

    2015-02-01

    Accurate characterization of the molar mass and size of polysaccharides is an ongoing challenge, oftentimes due to architectural diversity but also to the broad molar mass (M) range over which a single polysaccharide can exist and to the ultra-high M of many polysaccharides. Because of the latter, many of these biomacromolecules experience on-column, flow-induced degradation during analysis by size-exclusion and, even, hydrodynamic chromatography (SEC and HDC, respectively). The necessity for gentler fractionation methods has, to date, been addressed employing asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4). Here, we introduce the coupling of hollow-fiber flow field-flow fractionation (HF5) to multi-angle static light scattering (MALS) and differential refractometry (DRI) detection for the analysis of polysaccharides. In HF5, less stresses are placed on the macromolecules during separation than in SEC or HDC, and HF5 can offer a higher sensitivity, with less propensity for system overloading and analyte aggregation, than generally found in AF4. The coupling to MALS and DRI affords the determination of absolute, calibration-curve-independent molar mass averages and dispersities. Results from the present HF5/MALS/DRI experiments with dextrans, pullulans, and larch arabinogalactan were augmented with hydrodynamic radius (RH) measurements from off-line quasi-elastic light scattering (QELS) and by RH distribution calculations and fractogram simulations obtained via a finite element analysis implementation of field-flow fractionation theory by commercially available software. As part of this study, we have investigated analyte recovery in HF5 and also possible reasons for discrepancies between calculated and simulated results vis-à-vis experimentally determined data. PMID:25578045

  8. 1,450-nm diode laser in combination with the 1550-nm fractionated erbium-doped fiber laser for the treatment of steatocystoma multiplex: a case report.

    PubMed

    Moody, Megan N; Landau, Jennifer M; Goldberg, Leonard H; Friedman, Paul M

    2012-07-01

    Steatocystoma multiplex (SM) is a rare condition characterized by multiple, small, asymptomatic dermal cysts. Treatment options are limited, with varying degrees of success; these include oral isotretinoin, surgical excision or drainage, and liquid nitrogen cryotherapy. The most effective method is excision, but cosmetic considerations, time, overall cost, and pain must be considered, because patients tend to have multiple cysts. Lasers, especially nonablative devices, have not frequently been used to treat SM. Herein, we present the case of a patient with isolated steatocystoma multiplex on the abdomen and lower chest with substantial clearance after two laser treatment sessions using two complementary lasers: a 1,450-nm diode laser to target the abnormal sebaceous glands and a 1,550-nm fractionated erbium-doped fiber laser to target the dermal cysts. PMID:22487444

  9. Fractionation of corn fiber treated by soaking in aqueous ammonia (SAA) for isolation of hemicellulose B and production of C5 sugars by enzyme hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Nghiem, Nhuan P; Montanti, Justin; Johnston, David B; Drapcho, Caye

    2011-08-01

    A process was developed to fractionate and isolate the hemicellulose B component of corn fiber generated by corn wet milling. The process consisted of pretreatment by soaking in aqueous ammonia followed by enzymatic cellulose hydrolysis, during which the hemicellulose B was solubilized by cleavage into xylo-oligosaccharides and subsequently recovered by precipitation with ethanol. The pretreatment step resulted in high retention of major sugars and improvement of subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis. The recovered hemicellulose B was hydrolyzed by a cocktail of enzymes that consisted of β-glucosidase, pectinase, xylanase, and ferulic acid esterase (FAE). Xylanase alone was ineffective, demonstrating yields of less than 2% of xylose and arabinose. The greatest xylose and arabinose yields, 44% and 53%, respectively, were obtained by the combination of pectinase and FAE. A mass balance accounted for 87% of the initially present glucan, 91% of the xylan, and 90% of the arabinan. The developed process offered a means for production of corn fiber gum as a value-added co-product and C5 sugars, which could be converted to other valuable co-products through fermentation in a corn wet-milling biorefinery. PMID:21399929

  10. Bioaccessibility of polyphenols associated with dietary fiber and in vitro kinetics release of polyphenols in Mexican 'Ataulfo' mango (Mangifera indica L.) by-products.

    PubMed

    Blancas-Benitez, Francisco J; Mercado-Mercado, Gilberto; Quirós-Sauceda, Ana E; Montalvo-González, Efigenia; González-Aguilar, Gustavo A; Sáyago-Ayerdi, Sonia G

    2015-03-01

    The biological properties of polyphenol (PP) depend on its bioaccessibility and bioavailability. Therefore, part of PP released from the food matrix in the gastrointestinal tract through enzymatic hydrolysis is at least partially absorbed. The aim of this study is to determine the bioaccessibility of PP associated with dietary fiber (DF) and the kinetics release of PP in mango (Mangifera indica L.) 'Ataulfo' by-products by an in vitro model. Soluble and insoluble DF values were 7.99 and 18.56% in the mango paste and 6.98 and 22.78% in the mango peel, respectively. PP associated with soluble and insoluble DF was 6.0 and 3.73 g GAE per 100 g in the paste and 4.72 and 4.50 g GAE per 100 g in the peel. The bioaccessibility of PP was 38.67% in the pulp paste and 40.53% in the peel. A kinetics study shows a release rate of 2.66 and 3.27 g PP min(-1) in the paste and peel, respectively. The antioxidant capacity of the paste increased as digestion reached a value of 2.87 mmol TE min(-1) at 180 min. The antioxidant capacity of the peel had its maximum (28.94 mmol TE min(-1)) between 90 and 120 min of digestion; it started with a value of 2.58 mmol TE min(-1), and thereafter increased to 4.20 mmol TE min(-1) at 180 min. The major PPs released during the digestion of paste were gallic and hydroxybenzoic acids, while in the peel, they were hydroxycinnamic and vanillic acids. It was concluded that these phenolic compounds are readily available for absorption in the small intestine and exert different potential health benefits. PMID:25608953

  11. Effects of Replacing Pork Back Fat with Brewer's Spent Grain Dietary Fiber on Quality Characteristics of Reduced-fat Chicken Sausages

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Min-Sung; Choi, Yun-Sang; Kim, Hyun-Wook; Hwang, Ko-Eun; Song, Dong-Heon; n Lee, Soo-Yeo; Kim, Cheon-Jei

    2014-01-01

    The effects of replacing pork back fat with brewer's spent grain (BSG) pre-emulsion for physicochemical, textural properties, and sensory evaluations of reduced-fat chicken sausages are evaluated. Control was prepared with 15% pork back fat, and three reduced-fat chicken sausages were formulated with the replacement of 20, 25, and 30% pork back fat with BSG pre-emulsion. The pH level of reduced-fat sausages formulated with BSG pre-emulsion is lower than that of the control (p<0.05). The redness, yellowness, and apparent viscosity of reduced-fat chicken sausages increase proportionally with increasing BSG pre-emulsion (p<0.05). With increasing BSG pre-emulsion concentration, the fat contents and energy values are decreased in reduced-fat chicken sausages (p<0.05). The BSG pre-emulsion improves the hardness, gumminess, and chewiness of reduced-fat chicken sausages (p<0.05), and the reduction in fat and the addition of BSG pre-emulsion had no influence on the cohesiveness of the chicken sausage. And there is no significant difference in the overall acceptability among control, T1 (chicken sausage with 20% of BSG pre-emulsion, 10% of fat addition), and T2 (chicken sausage with 25% of BSG pre-emulsion, 5% of fat addition) (p>0.05). Therefore, our results indicate that BSG is effective dietary fiber source for manufacturing of reduced-fat meat product and suggest that 20-25% of BSG pre-emulsion is suitable for pork back fat in chicken sausages. PMID:26760933

  12. Safety, Tolerance, and Enhanced Efficacy of a Bioavailable Formulation of Curcumin With Fenugreek Dietary Fiber on Occupational Stress: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Pandaran Sudheeran, Subash; Jacob, Della; Natinga Mulakal, Johannah; Gopinathan Nair, Gopakumar; Maliakel, Abhilash; Maliakel, Balu; Kuttan, Ramadasan; Im, Krishnakumar

    2016-06-01

    Drug delivery systems capable of delivering free (unconjugated) curcuminoids is of great therapeutic significance, since the absorption of bioactive and permeable form plays a key factor in mediating the efficacy of a substance which undergoes rapid biotransformation. Considering the recent understanding on the relatively high bioactivities and blood-brain-barrier permeability of free curcuminoids over their conjugated metabolites, the present human study investigated the safety, antioxidant efficacy, and bioavailability of CurQfen (curcumagalactomannoside [CGM]), a food-grade formulation of natural curcumin with fenugreek dietary fiber that has shown to possess improved blood-brain-barrier permeability and tissue distribution in rats. In this randomized double-blinded and placebo-controlled trial, 60 subjects experiencing occupational stress-related anxiety and fatigue were randomized to receive CGM, standard curcumin, and placebo for 30 days (500 mg twice daily). The study demonstrated the safety, tolerance, and enhanced efficacy of CGM in comparison with unformulated standard curcumin. A significant improvement in the quality of life (P < 0.05) with considerable reduction in stress (P < 0.001), anxiety (P < 0.001), and fatigue (P < 0.001) was observed among CGM-treated subjects as compared with the standard curcumin group, when monitored by SF-36, Perceived Stress Scale with 14 items, and Beck Anxiety Inventory scores. Improvement in the quality of life was further correlated with the significant enhancement in endogenous antioxidant markers (P < 0.01) and reduction in lipid peroxidation (P < 0.001). Further comparison of the free curcuminoids bioavailability after a single-dose (500 mg once per day) and repeated-dose (500 mg twice daily for 30 days) oral administration revealed enhanced absorption and improved pharmacokinetics of CGM upon both single- (30.7-fold) and repeated-dose (39.1-fold) administrations. PMID:27043120

  13. Biochemical Characterization of the Lactobacillus reuteri Glycoside Hydrolase Family 70 GTFB Type of 4,6-α-Glucanotransferase Enzymes That Synthesize Soluble Dietary Starch Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yuxiang; van der Kaaij, Rachel Maria; Leemhuis, Hans; Pijning, Tjaard; van Leeuwen, Sander Sebastiaan; Jin, Zhengyu

    2015-01-01

    4,6-α-Glucanotransferase (4,6-α-GTase) enzymes, such as GTFB and GTFW of Lactobacillus reuteri strains, constitute a new reaction specificity in glycoside hydrolase family 70 (GH70) and are novel enzymes that convert starch or starch hydrolysates into isomalto/maltopolysaccharides (IMMPs). These IMMPs still have linear chains with some α1→4 linkages but mostly (relatively long) linear chains with α1→6 linkages and are soluble dietary starch fibers. 4,6-α-GTase enzymes and their products have significant potential for industrial applications. Here we report that an N-terminal truncation (amino acids 1 to 733) strongly enhances the soluble expression level of fully active GTFB-ΔN (approximately 75-fold compared to full-length wild type GTFB) in Escherichia coli. In addition, quantitative assays based on amylose V as the substrate are described; these assays allow accurate determination of both hydrolysis (minor) activity (glucose release, reducing power) and total activity (iodine staining) and calculation of the transferase (major) activity of these 4,6-α-GTase enzymes. The data show that GTFB-ΔN is clearly less hydrolytic than GTFW, which is also supported by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis of their final products. From these assays, the biochemical properties of GTFB-ΔN were characterized in detail, including determination of kinetic parameters and acceptor substrate specificity. The GTFB enzyme displayed high conversion yields at relatively high substrate concentrations, a promising feature for industrial application. PMID:26253678

  14. Dietary fibers from mushroom Sclerotia: 2. In vitro mineral binding capacity under sequential simulated physiological conditions of the human gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ka-Hing; Cheung, Peter C K

    2005-11-30

    The in vitro mineral binding capacity of three novel dietary fibers (DFs) prepared from mushroom sclerotia, namely, Pleurotus tuber-regium, Polyporous rhinocerus, and Wolfiporia cocos, to Ca, Mg, Cu, Fe, and Zn under sequential simulated physiological conditions of the human stomach, small intestine, and colon was investigated and compared. Apart from releasing most of their endogenous Ca (ranged from 96.9 to 97.9% removal) and Mg (ranged from 95.9 to 96.7% removal), simulated physiological conditions of the stomach also attenuated the possible adverse binding effect of the three sclerotial DFs to the exogenous minerals by lowering their cation-exchange capacity (ranged from 20.8 to 32.3%) and removing a substantial amount of their potential mineral chelators including protein (ranged from 16.2 to 37.8%) and phytate (ranged from 58.5 to 64.2%). The in vitro mineral binding capacity of the three sclerotial DF under simulated physiological conditions of small intestine was found to be low, especially for Ca (ranged from 4.79 to 5.91% binding) and Mg (ranged from 3.16 to 4.18% binding), and was highly correlated (r > 0.97) with their residual protein contents. Under simulated physiological conditions of the colon with slightly acidic pH (5.80), only bound Ca was readily released (ranged from 34.2 to 72.3% releasing) from the three sclerotial DFs, and their potential enhancing effect on passive Ca absorption in the human large intestine was also discussed. PMID:16302754

  15. Biochemical Characterization of the Lactobacillus reuteri Glycoside Hydrolase Family 70 GTFB Type of 4,6-α-Glucanotransferase Enzymes That Synthesize Soluble Dietary Starch Fibers.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yuxiang; van der Kaaij, Rachel Maria; Leemhuis, Hans; Pijning, Tjaard; van Leeuwen, Sander Sebastiaan; Jin, Zhengyu; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    2015-10-01

    4,6-α-Glucanotransferase (4,6-α-GTase) enzymes, such as GTFB and GTFW of Lactobacillus reuteri strains, constitute a new reaction specificity in glycoside hydrolase family 70 (GH70) and are novel enzymes that convert starch or starch hydrolysates into isomalto/maltopolysaccharides (IMMPs). These IMMPs still have linear chains with some α1→4 linkages but mostly (relatively long) linear chains with α1→6 linkages and are soluble dietary starch fibers. 4,6-α-GTase enzymes and their products have significant potential for industrial applications. Here we report that an N-terminal truncation (amino acids 1 to 733) strongly enhances the soluble expression level of fully active GTFB-ΔN (approximately 75-fold compared to full-length wild type GTFB) in Escherichia coli. In addition, quantitative assays based on amylose V as the substrate are described; these assays allow accurate determination of both hydrolysis (minor) activity (glucose release, reducing power) and total activity (iodine staining) and calculation of the transferase (major) activity of these 4,6-α-GTase enzymes. The data show that GTFB-ΔN is clearly less hydrolytic than GTFW, which is also supported by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis of their final products. From these assays, the biochemical properties of GTFB-ΔN were characterized in detail, including determination of kinetic parameters and acceptor substrate specificity. The GTFB enzyme displayed high conversion yields at relatively high substrate concentrations, a promising feature for industrial application. PMID:26253678

  16. Dietary Assessment

    Cancer.gov

    The Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program's goals in Dietary Assessment are to increase the precision of dietary intake estimates by improving self-report of dietary intake and the analytic procedures for processing reported information.

  17. Investigation of protocols to extraction and quantification of folates in vegetables matrices split into liquor and fiber fraction using factorial design.

    PubMed

    Prado de Paiva, Emmanuela; Anderson de Azevedo Filho, Clayton; Ferreira, Sabrina Gomes; Stamford, Tânia Lucia Montenegro; da Paixão, Jose Almiro

    2012-10-19

    The main protocols of extraction were investigated for the six folate forms in vegetable matrices, treated in two fractions, liquor and fiber. In a pilot study, it was used ammonium acetate added of 2-mercaptoetanol and ascorbic acid as extraction solution. The condition of use of protease and folate conjugase was evaluated, besides alternative treatments without enzyme use. Based on the results of this stage, it was built the factorial design 2(4), with three replications at the central point, using the following variables: temperature, time for reaction, molar concentration of the extraction solution and ratio sample/solution as independent variables and dependent variable, the amount of each folate form extracted as well as spectral and chromatographic parameters. In the pilot study it was verified that the enzyme use can cause an increase in the variability of the folate content, which enabled to build the factorial design without the enzyme use. The binomial time and temperature showed greatest impact on the extraction profile, besides high concentrations of ammonium acetate resulting in bifurcation of some peaks. 5-Methyltetrahydrofolate was extracted primordially in the liquor fraction, indicating that this treatment on the matrix provoked suitable extraction condition to this folate. PMID:22980643

  18. [Role of food fiber in nutrition].

    PubMed

    Rigó, J

    1982-01-01

    Numerous experiments indicate that in the pathogenesis of so-called civilization diseases, low consumption of dietary fibers seems to be one of etiological factors. Therefore, it is not surprising that dietary fibers play an ever increasing role both in prevention and dietetic management of the diseases. Among these fibers wheat bran containing about 50% of dietary fibers has the most beneficial physiological effect. Besides, wheat bran is fit very well for production of different foodstuffs. Data are reported on the content of crude and dietary fibers in cabbage, radish, carrot, wheat bran and brown bread. PMID:6289526

  19. Influence of dietary fiber type and amount on energy and nutrient digestibility, fecal characteristics, and fecal fermentative end-product concentrations in captive exotic felids fed a raw beef-based diet.

    PubMed

    Kerr, K R; Morris, C L; Burke, S L; Swanson, K S

    2013-05-01

    Little nutritional or metabolic information has been collected from captive exotic cats fed raw diets. In particular, fiber types and concentrations for use in raw meat-based diets for captive exotic felids have not been well studied. Our objective was to evaluate the effects of fiber type and concentration on apparent total tract energy and macronutrient digestibility, fecal characteristics, and fecal fermentative end-products in captive exotic felids. Four animals of each captive exotic species (jaguar (Panthera onca), cheetah (Acinonyz jubatus), Malayan tiger (Panthera tigris corbetti), and Siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) were randomized in four 4 × 4 Latin square designs (1 Latin square per species) to 1 of the 4 raw beef-based dietary treatments (94.7 to 96.7% beef trimmings): 2 or 4% cellulose or 2 or 4% beet pulp. Felid species, fiber type, and fiber concentration all impacted digestibility and fecal fermentative end-products. Inclusion of beet pulp increased (P ≤ 0.05) fecal short-chain fatty acids and fecal output in all cats. Inclusion of 2 and 4% cellulose, and 4% beet pulp increased (P ≤ 0.05) fecal bulk and diluted fecal branched-chain fatty acid concentrations compared with 2% beet pulp. Apparent total tract DM, OM, fat, and GE digestibility coefficients decreased (P ≤ 0.05) linearly with BW of cats. Additionally, fecal moisture, fecal score, and concentrations of fermentative end-products increased (P ≤ 0.05) with BW. Although the response of many outcomes was dependent on cat size, in general, beet pulp increased wet fecal weight, fecal scores, and fecal metabolites, and reduced fecal pH. Cellulose generally reduced DM and OM digestibility, but increased dry fecal weight and fecal percent DM. Although beet pulp and cellulose fibers were tested individually in this study, these data indicate that the optimum fiber type and concentration for inclusion in captive exotic felid diets is likely a combination of fermentable and

  20. Saturated fat supplementation interacts with dietary forage neutral detergent fiber content during the immediate postpartum and carryover periods in Holstein cows: Production responses and digestibility of nutrients.

    PubMed

    Piantoni, P; Lock, A L; Allen, M S

    2015-05-01

    Forty-eight multiparous cows were used in a randomized complete block design experiment with a 2×2 factorial arrangement of treatments to determine the interaction between a highly saturated free FA supplement (SFFA) and dietary forage neutral detergent fiber (fNDF) content on production responses and nutrient digestibility of dairy cows in the postpartum period. Treatment diets were offered from 1 to 29d postpartum (postpartum period; PP) and contained 20 or 26% fNDF (50:50 corn silage:alfalfa silage and hay, dry matter basis) and 0 or 2% SFFA [Energy Booster 100 (Milk Specialties Global, Eden Prairie, MN); 96.1% FA: 46.2% C18:0 and 37.0% C16:0]. From 30 to 71d postpartum (carryover period), a common diet (~23% fNDF, 0% SFFA) was offered to all cows to evaluate carryover effects of the treatment diets early in lactation. During the PP, higher fNDF decreased dry matter intake (DMI) by 2.0 kg/d, whereas SFFA supplementation increased it by 1.4kg/d. In addition, high fNDF with 0% SFFA decreased DMI compared with the other diets and this difference increased throughout the PP. Treatments did not affect 3.5% fat-corrected milk yield during the PP but did during the carryover period when SFFA supplementation decreased 3.5% fat-corrected milk yield for the low-fNDF diet (51.1 vs. 58.7kg/d), but not for the high-fNDF diet (58.5 vs. 58.0kg/d). During the PP, lower fNDF and SFFA supplementation decreased body condition score loss. A tendency for an interaction between fNDF and SFFA indicated that low fNDF with 2% SFFA decreased body condition score loss compared with the other diets (-0.49 vs. -0.89). During the PP, lower fNDF and 2% SFFA supplementation decreased feed efficiency (3.5% fat-corrected milk/DMI) by 0.30 and 0.23 units, respectively. The low-fNDF diet with 2% SFFA decreased feed efficiency compared with other diets early in the PP, but this difference decreased over time. Supplementation of SFFA in the PP favored energy partitioning to body reserves and

  1. Hollow fiber flow field-flow fractionation and size-exclusion chromatography with MALS detection: A complementary approach in biopharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Marassi, V; Roda, B; Zattoni, A; Tanase, M; Reschiglian, P

    2014-10-30

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are promising reagents both for the manufacture of drug substances and for their employment as a drug themselves, but to be approved for utilization, according to FDA recommendations and WHO guidelines, they have to undergo verifications regarding their purity, stability and percentage of aggregates. Moreover, stability tests of lots have to be performed in order to verify molecular size distribution over time and lot-to-lot consistency. Recent works in literature have highlighted the need for suitable, sensitive and reliable complementary analytical techniques for the characterization of mAbs and quantification of aggregates. Size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) is the reference technique in the biopharmaceutical industry for its robustness, high performance and simple use; however it presents some limitations especially toward the separation and detection of aggregates with high molecular weight. On the other hand, flow field-flow fractionation (F4) in its miniaturized version (hollow fiber flow field-flow fractionation, HF5) shows comparable performances with interesting additional advantages: a broad size range, gentle separation mechanism with low dilution factor and higher sensitivity. To propose HF5 as a complementary technique for evaluating aggregates' content in mAbs samples, a comparative study of both SEC and HF5 performances has been made. In this work, SEC and HF5 were coupled with UV and multi-angle light scattering detection and employed first in separating standard samples of proteins mixture used as a sample model. Then, a screening of mobile phases and an evaluation of separation performances was performed on a therapeutic mAbs formulation, demonstrating the complementarities between SEC and HF5 and their possible use as a separative platform approach for the characterization and quality control of protein drugs. PMID:25468501

  2. Water-insoluble fiber-rich fraction from pineapple peel improves intestinal function in hamsters: evidence from cecal and fecal indicators.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ya-Ling; Tsai, Yung-Hsiang; Chow, Chau-Jen

    2014-04-01

    Pineapple peel, a byproduct of agricultural processing, contains high levels of water-insoluble fiber-rich fraction (WIFF) (~42%, wt/wt). Our previous work has demonstrated that cellulose, hemicellulose (xylan and xyloglucan), and pectic substances are the major polysaccharides of pineapple-peel WIFF. Based on its chemical composition and unique characteristics, we hypothesized that daily consumption of WIFF would improve intestinal function in hamsters. Male Golden Syrian hamsters were fed a diet supplemented with either 5% cellulose or various amounts of WIFF (2.5%, 5%, or 10%). Activities of fecal bacterial enzymes, short-chain fatty acid concentrations, and microbial number in the cecal content, and also biochemical indicators in the cecal and feces of hamsters, were evaluated in all groups. The supplementation of WIFF in a diet at a level of 2.5% significantly (P < .05) decreased the daily fecal ammonia output; shortened the gastrointestinal transit time; reduced the activities of β-D-glucosidase, β-D-glucuronidase, mucinase, and urease in feces; and also enhanced the total amounts of short-chain fatty acid in the cecal content and the growth of gut microflora such as Lactobacillus spp and Bifidobacterium spp. These results indicate that WIFF could improve cecal ecosystem function of hamsters by reducing the toxic compounds excreted by intestinal microflora. Therefore, pineapple-peel WIFF could be a promising candidate for a functional ingredient beneficial to human intestinal function and health. PMID:24774071

  3. Investigation of the impact of increased dietary insoluble fiber through the feeding of distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) on the incidence and severity of Brachyspira-associated colitis in pigs.

    PubMed

    Wilberts, Bailey L; Arruda, Paulo H; Kinyon, Joann M; Frana, Tim S; Wang, Chong; Magstadt, Drew R; Madson, Darin M; Patience, John F; Burrough, Eric R

    2014-01-01

    Diet has been implicated as a major factor impacting clinical disease expression of swine dysentery and Brachyspira hyodysenteriae colonization. However, the impact of diet on novel pathogenic strongly beta-hemolytic Brachyspira spp. including "B. hampsonii" has yet to be investigated. In recent years, distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS), a source of insoluble dietary fiber, has been increasingly included in diets of swine. A randomized complete block experiment was used to examine the effect of increased dietary fiber through the feeding of DDGS on the incidence of Brachyspira-associated colitis in pigs. One hundred 4-week-old pigs were divided into five groups based upon inocula (negative control, Brachyspira intermedia, Brachyspira pilosicoli, B. hyodysenteriae or "B. hampsonii") and fed one of two diets containing no (diet 1) or 30% (diet 2) DDGS. The average days to first positive culture and days post inoculation to the onset of clinical dysentery in the B. hyodysenteriae groups was significantly shorter for diet 2 when compared to diet 1 (P = 0.04 and P = 0.0009, respectively). A similar difference in the average days to first positive culture and days post inoculation to the onset of clinical dysentery was found when comparing the "B. hampsonii" groups. In this study, pigs receiving 30% DDGS shed on average one day prior to and developed swine dysentery nearly twice as fast as pigs receiving 0% DDGS. Accordingly, these data suggest a reduction in insoluble fiber through reducing or eliminating DDGS in swine rations should be considered an integral part of any effective disease elimination strategy for swine dysentery. PMID:25485776

  4. Investigation of the Impact of Increased Dietary Insoluble Fiber through the Feeding of Distillers Dried Grains with Solubles (DDGS) on the Incidence and Severity of Brachyspira-Associated Colitis in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Wilberts, Bailey L.; Arruda, Paulo H.; Kinyon, Joann M.; Frana, Tim S.; Wang, Chong; Magstadt, Drew R.; Madson, Darin M.; Patience, John F.; Burrough, Eric R.

    2014-01-01

    Diet has been implicated as a major factor impacting clinical disease expression of swine dysentery and Brachyspira hyodysenteriae colonization. However, the impact of diet on novel pathogenic strongly beta-hemolytic Brachyspira spp. including “B. hampsonii” has yet to be investigated. In recent years, distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS), a source of insoluble dietary fiber, has been increasingly included in diets of swine. A randomized complete block experiment was used to examine the effect of increased dietary fiber through the feeding of DDGS on the incidence of Brachyspira-associated colitis in pigs. One hundred 4-week-old pigs were divided into five groups based upon inocula (negative control, Brachyspira intermedia, Brachyspira pilosicoli, B. hyodysenteriae or “B. hampsonii”) and fed one of two diets containing no (diet 1) or 30% (diet 2) DDGS. The average days to first positive culture and days post inoculation to the onset of clinical dysentery in the B. hyodysenteriae groups was significantly shorter for diet 2 when compared to diet 1 (P = 0.04 and P = 0.0009, respectively). A similar difference in the average days to first positive culture and days post inoculation to the onset of clinical dysentery was found when comparing the “B. hampsonii” groups. In this study, pigs receiving 30% DDGS shed on average one day prior to and developed swine dysentery nearly twice as fast as pigs receiving 0% DDGS. Accordingly, these data suggest a reduction in insoluble fiber through reducing or eliminating DDGS in swine rations should be considered an integral part of any effective disease elimination strategy for swine dysentery. PMID:25485776

  5. A genetic variant of the CAPN10 gene in Mexican subjects with dyslipidemia is associated with increased HDL-cholesterol concentrations after the consumption of a soy protein and soluble fiber dietary portfolio.

    PubMed

    Guevara-Cruz, Martha; Torres, Nimbe; Tovar, Armando R; Tejero, M Elizabeth; Castellanos-Jankiewicz, Ashley; del Bosque-Plata, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Dyslipidemia is a major public health problem, and therefore, it is important to develop dietary strategies to diminish the prevalence of this disorder. It was recently reported that diet may play an important role in triggering insulin resistance by interacting with genetic variants at the CAPN10 gene locus in patients with metabolic syndrome. Nonetheless, it remains unknown whether genetic variants of genes involved in the development of type 2 diabetes are associated with variations in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). The study used a single-center, prospective, cohort design. Here, we assessed the effect of four variants of the CAPN10 gene on HDL-C levels in response to a soy protein and soluble fiber dietary portfolio in subjects with dyslipidemia. In 31 Mexican dyslipidemic individuals, we analyzed four CAPN10 gene variants (rs5030952, rs2975762, rs3792267, and rs2975760) associated with type 2 diabetes. Subjects with the GG genotype of the rs2975762 variant of the CAPN10 gene were better responders to dietary intervention, showing increased HDL-C concentrations from the first month of treatment. HDL-C concentrations in participants with the wild type genotype increased by 17.0%, whereas the HDL-C concentration in subjects with the variant genotypes increased by only 3.22% (p = 0.03); the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels of GG carriers tended to decrease (-12.6%). These results indicate that Mexican dyslipidemic carriers of the rs2975762-GG genotype are better responders to this dietary intervention. PMID:25238846

  6. Fiber optic monitoring device

    DOEpatents

    Samborsky, James K.

    1993-01-01

    A device for the purpose of monitoring light transmissions in optical fibers comprises a fiber optic tap that optically diverts a fraction of a transmitted optical signal without disrupting the integrity of the signal. The diverted signal is carried, preferably by the fiber optic tap, to a lens or lens system that disperses the light over a solid angle that facilitates viewing. The dispersed light indicates whether or not the monitored optical fiber or system of optical fibers is currently transmitting optical information.

  7. Dietary Supplements

    MedlinePlus

    Dietary supplements are vitamins, minerals, herbs, and many other products. They can come as pills, capsules, powders, drinks, ... possible Tell your health care provider about any dietary supplements you use Do not take a bigger dose ...

  8. Physicochemical properties and sensory characteristics of reduced-fat frankfurters with pork back fat replaced by dietary fiber extracted from makgeolli lees.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yun-Sang; Kim, Hyun-Wook; Hwang, Ko-Eun; Song, Dong-Heon; Choi, Ji-Hun; Lee, Mi-Ai; Chung, Hai-Jung; Kim, Cheon-Jei

    2014-02-01

    The effects of reducing pork fat levels from 30% to 20%, 15%, and 10% by partially substituting pork back fat with a makgeolli lees fiber were investigated regarding approximate composition, energy value, pH, color, cooking loss, emulsion stability, texture profile analysis, apparent viscosity, and sensory evaluation. The moisture and ash contents, redness, and yellowness were higher in reduced-fat frankfurters containing makgeolli lees fiber than in the control with 30% fat. With increasing fat levels, samples displayed higher pH, lightness, hardness, cohesiveness, gumminess, chewiness, apparent viscosity, and sensory quality, while displaying lower cooking loss and total expressible fluid. The results show that fat levels of frankfurters with added makgeolli lees fiber can be successfully reduced. Thus, 20% fat frankfurters with the addition of 2% makgeolli lees fiber are similar in quality to regular frankfurters with 30% fat. PMID:24200582

  9. A study on relation of dietary fiber from different sources, acceptable daily intake of calcium and colorectal cancer of 30 to 45 years old.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongjie; An, Yan; Zhu, Huifang; Yang, Libin

    2014-07-01

    This paper selects Jiashan, Zhejiang, the high incidence area of colorectal cancer in China, as research site and adopts case control as research method to study relative hazards of colorectal cancer, especially the relation between dietary factor and colorectal cancer. It makes a further understanding of the possible cause of high incidence of colorectal cancer in Jiashan in order to provide a scientific basis for the prevention of colorectal cancer. PMID:25016262

  10. Effects of Dietary Fiber Extracted from Pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima Duch.) on the Physico-Chemical and Sensory Characteristics of Reduced-Fat Frankfurters

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Cheon-Jei; Kim, Hyun-Wook; Hwang, Ko-Eun; Song, Dong-Heon; Ham, Youn-Kyung; Choi, Ji-Hun

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of reducing fat levels from 30% to 25, 20, and 15% by substituting pork fat with water and pumpkin fiber (2%) on the quality of frankfurters compared with control. Decreasing the fat concentration from 30% to 15% significantly increased moisture content, redness of meat batter and frankfurter, cooking loss, and water exudation, and decreased fat content, energy value, pH, and lightness of meat batter and frankfurter, hardness, cohesiveness, gumminess, chewiness, and apparent viscosity. The addition of 2% pumpkin fiber was significantly increased moisture content, yellowness of meat batter and frankfurter, hardness, cohesiveness, gumminess, chewiness, and apparent viscosity, whereas reduced cooking loss and emulsion stability. The treatment of reduced-fat frankfurters formulated with 20 and 25% fat levels and with pumpkin fiber had sensory properties similar to the high-fat control frankfurters. The results demonstrate that when the reduced-fat frankfurter with 2% added pumpkin fiber and water replaces fat levels can be readily made with high quality and acceptable sensory properties. PMID:27433101

  11. Effects of Dietary Fiber Extracted from Pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima Duch.) on the Physico-Chemical and Sensory Characteristics of Reduced-Fat Frankfurters.

    PubMed

    Kim, Cheon-Jei; Kim, Hyun-Wook; Hwang, Ko-Eun; Song, Dong-Heon; Ham, Youn-Kyung; Choi, Ji-Hun; Kim, Young-Boong; Choi, Yun-Sang

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of reducing fat levels from 30% to 25, 20, and 15% by substituting pork fat with water and pumpkin fiber (2%) on the quality of frankfurters compared with control. Decreasing the fat concentration from 30% to 15% significantly increased moisture content, redness of meat batter and frankfurter, cooking loss, and water exudation, and decreased fat content, energy value, pH, and lightness of meat batter and frankfurter, hardness, cohesiveness, gumminess, chewiness, and apparent viscosity. The addition of 2% pumpkin fiber was significantly increased moisture content, yellowness of meat batter and frankfurter, hardness, cohesiveness, gumminess, chewiness, and apparent viscosity, whereas reduced cooking loss and emulsion stability. The treatment of reduced-fat frankfurters formulated with 20 and 25% fat levels and with pumpkin fiber had sensory properties similar to the high-fat control frankfurters. The results demonstrate that when the reduced-fat frankfurter with 2% added pumpkin fiber and water replaces fat levels can be readily made with high quality and acceptable sensory properties. PMID:27433101

  12. Effects of New Dietary Fiber from Japanese Apricot (Prunus mume Sieb. et Zucc.) on Gut Function and Intestinal Microflora in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Motoi; Ohnishi, Yuriko; Kotani, Tatsuya; Gato, Nobuki

    2011-01-01

    Much attention has been focused recently on functional foods. Ume, the Japanese name for the apricot of Prunus mume Sieb. et Zucc., is an example of a Japanese traditional functional food. There are, however, few reports on the effects of fiber from this fruit on bowel function. With this objective, we prepared ume fiber to test the hypothesis that it can change gut function and intestinal flora in mice. Mice were fed an ume fiber (UF) or cellulose (CF) diet (control) for 40 days. The fecal weight, fecal lipids, plasma lipids and cecal composition of the microflora were analyzed. The amount of feces was significantly greater in the UF group than in the CF group (p < 0.01). The fecal lipids content (% DW) of the feces sampled on the final day of the experiment were significantly greater in the UF group than in the CF group (p < 0.01). Plasma non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) concentrations tended to be lower in the UF compared to the CF group (p = 0.058). Occupation ratios of Bacteroides and Clostridium cluster IV were significantly greater in the cecal flora of the UF group. Our results suggest that ume fiber possesses the fecal lipid excretion effects and feces bulking effects. PMID:21731428

  13. Effects of new dietary fiber from Japanese Apricot (Prunus mume Sieb. et Zucc.) on gut function and intestinal microflora in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Motoi; Ohnishi, Yuriko; Kotani, Tatsuya; Gato, Nobuki

    2011-01-01

    Much attention has been focused recently on functional foods. Ume, the Japanese name for the apricot of Prunus mume Sieb. et Zucc., is an example of a Japanese traditional functional food. There are, however, few reports on the effects of fiber from this fruit on bowel function. With this objective, we prepared ume fiber to test the hypothesis that it can change gut function and intestinal flora in mice. Mice were fed an ume fiber (UF) or cellulose (CF) diet (control) for 40 days. The fecal weight, fecal lipids, plasma lipids and cecal composition of the microflora were analyzed. The amount of feces was significantly greater in the UF group than in the CF group (p < 0.01). The fecal lipids content (% DW) of the feces sampled on the final day of the experiment were significantly greater in the UF group than in the CF group (p < 0.01). Plasma non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) concentrations tended to be lower in the UF compared to the CF group (p = 0.058). Occupation ratios of Bacteroides and Clostridium cluster IV were significantly greater in the cecal flora of the UF group. Our results suggest that ume fiber possesses the fecal lipid excretion effects and feces bulking effects. PMID:21731428

  14. Fiber and prebiotics: mechanisms and health benefits.

    PubMed

    Slavin, Joanne

    2013-04-01

    The health benefits of dietary fiber have long been appreciated. Higher intakes of dietary fiber are linked to less cardiovascular disease and fiber plays a role in gut health, with many effective laxatives actually isolated fiber sources. Higher intakes of fiber are linked to lower body weights. Only polysaccharides were included in dietary fiber originally, but more recent definitions have included oligosaccharides as dietary fiber, not based on their chemical measurement as dietary fiber by the accepted total dietary fiber (TDF) method, but on their physiological effects. Inulin, fructo-oligosaccharides, and other oligosaccharides are included as fiber in food labels in the US. Additionally, oligosaccharides are the best known "prebiotics", "a selectively fermented ingredient that allows specific changes, both in the composition and/or activity in the gastrointestinal microflora that confers benefits upon host well-bring and health." To date, all known and suspected prebiotics are carbohydrate compounds, primarily oligosaccharides, known to resist digestion in the human small intestine and reach the colon where they are fermented by the gut microflora. Studies have provided evidence that inulin and oligofructose (OF), lactulose, and resistant starch (RS) meet all aspects of the definition, including the stimulation of Bifidobacterium, a beneficial bacterial genus. Other isolated carbohydrates and carbohydrate-containing foods, including galactooligosaccharides (GOS), transgalactooligosaccharides (TOS), polydextrose, wheat dextrin, acacia gum, psyllium, banana, whole grain wheat, and whole grain corn also have prebiotic effects. PMID:23609775

  15. Fiber and Prebiotics: Mechanisms and Health Benefits

    PubMed Central

    Slavin, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    The health benefits of dietary fiber have long been appreciated. Higher intakes of dietary fiber are linked to less cardiovascular disease and fiber plays a role in gut health, with many effective laxatives actually isolated fiber sources. Higher intakes of fiber are linked to lower body weights. Only polysaccharides were included in dietary fiber originally, but more recent definitions have included oligosaccharides as dietary fiber, not based on their chemical measurement as dietary fiber by the accepted total dietary fiber (TDF) method, but on their physiological effects. Inulin, fructo-oligosaccharides, and other oligosaccharides are included as fiber in food labels in the US. Additionally, oligosaccharides are the best known “prebiotics”, “a selectively fermented ingredient that allows specific changes, both in the composition and/or activity in the gastrointestinal microflora that confers benefits upon host well-bring and health.” To date, all known and suspected prebiotics are carbohydrate compounds, primarily oligosaccharides, known to resist digestion in the human small intestine and reach the colon where they are fermented by the gut microflora. Studies have provided evidence that inulin and oligofructose (OF), lactulose, and resistant starch (RS) meet all aspects of the definition, including the stimulation of Bifidobacterium, a beneficial bacterial genus. Other isolated carbohydrates and carbohydrate-containing foods, including galactooligosaccharides (GOS), transgalactooligosaccharides (TOS), polydextrose, wheat dextrin, acacia gum, psyllium, banana, whole grain wheat, and whole grain corn also have prebiotic effects. PMID:23609775

  16. Effects of dietary factors on energy regulation: Consideration of multiple- versus single-dietary-factor models

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While short-term studies demonstrate consistent effects of dietary protein, fiber, glycemic index and energy density on energy intake, long-term effectiveness trials typically indicate small or non-significant effects of these dietary factors on long-term weight change. In consequence, most lifestyl...

  17. Dietary hydroxypropyl methylcellulose increases excretion of saturated and trans fats by hamsters fed fast food diets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The hypocholesterolemic and hypoglycemic effects of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC), a semisynthetic nonfermentable soluble dietary fiber, are well established. However, effects of HPMC on dietary saturated fatty acids and trans fatty acids are largely unknown. This study investigated the eff...

  18. In vitro bile acid binding and short-chain fatty acid profile of flax fiber and ethanol co-products.

    PubMed

    Fodje, Adele M L; Chang, Peter R; Leterme, Pascal

    2009-10-01

    Fibers from flaxseed and co-products from ethanol production could be potential sources of dietary fiber in human diet. In vitro fermentation and bile acid binding models were used to investigate the metabolic effects of lignaMax (Bioriginal Food and Science Corp., Saskatoon, SK, Canada) flax meal, spent flax meal, soluble flax gum, wheat insoluble fiber (WIF), and rye insoluble fiber (RIF). Wheat and rye bran were used as reference samples. Bile acid binding of substrates was analysed at taurocholate ([(14)C]taurocholate) concentration of 12.5 mM. Soluble flax gum showed the highest bile acid binding (0.57 micromol/mg of fiber) (P fiber) and WIF (0.26 micromol/mg of fiber). RIF had higher (P fiber) than rye bran (0.13 micromol/mg of fiber). Substrates were hydrolyzed and incubated with pig fecal samples. Short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) profile and gas accumulation (G(f)) were compared. Soluble flax gum generated the highest amount of acetic and propionic acids. SCFA profiles of wheat/rye brans and WIF/RIF were similar (except for butyric acid). G(f) for soluble flax gum was greater (P < .001) than that of spent flax meal. G(f) values of the wheat samples were similar, whereas the G(f) of the rye bran was higher (P < .001) than that of RIF. Fractional degradation rate (micro(t = T/2)) (P < .001) was also recorded. The highest mu(t = T/2) was observed for the soluble flax gum. Oil-depleted flaxseed fractions and WIF/RIF (co-products from ethanol production) could be potential sources of dietary fiber in human nutrition. PMID:19857071

  19. Changes in plasma and hepatic lipids, small intestinal histology and pancreatic enzyme activity due to aging and dietary fiber in rats.

    PubMed

    Schneeman, B O; Richter, D

    1993-07-01

    Rats were fed either a control diet or a control diet supplemented with wheat bran, psyllium husk or oat bran to increase intake of fiber. Groups of rats were killed after 3.5, 10, 15, or 18.5 mo of consuming the diets. Plasma cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations were significantly higher in 18.5-mo-old than younger animals. Fiber supplementation did not prevent the age-related increase in lipids. Cecal weight, including contents, was higher in the psyllium husk and oat bran groups than control, and smooth muscle thickness in the ileum of psyllium husk and oat bran animals was greater than control. The score for torn villi in the small intestine was lower than expected in the wheat bran group. Amylase activity in the pancreas declined significantly with age in all groups. In aging animals fiber supplementation may enhance ileal compensation for decreases in proximal intestinal function but does not prevent age-related changes in the gut or in lipid concentrations. PMID:7686573

  20. Effects of Two Dietary Fibers as Part of Ready-to-Eat Cereal (RTEC) Breakfasts on Perceived Appetite and Gut Hormones in Overweight Women

    PubMed Central

    Lafond, David W.; Greaves, Kathryn A.; Maki, Kevin C.; Leidy, Heather J.; Romsos, Dale R.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of an enzyme-hydrolyzed arabinoxylan from wheat (AXOS) versus an intact arabinoxylan from flax (FLAX) added to a ready-to-eat cereal (RTEC) on the postprandial appetitive, hormonal, and metabolic responses in overweight women (BMI 25.0–29.9 kg/m2) were evaluated. Subsequent meal energy intake was also assessed. Two randomized, double-blind, crossover design studies were completed. For trial 1, the participants consumed the following RTEC breakfast, matched for total weight and varied in energy content: low-fiber (LF, 4 g); high-fiber (HF, 15 g) as either AXOS or FLAX. For trial 2, the participants consumed LF, HF-AXOS, and HF-FLAX RTECs but also consumed another LF breakfast that was isocaloric (LF-iso) to that of the HF breakfasts. Perceived appetite and blood samples (trial 2 only) were assessed before and after breakfast. An ad libitum lunch was offered 4 h post-breakfast. No differences in postprandial appetite responses were observed among any breakfasts in either trial. The HF-AXOS and HF-FLAX led to increased postprandial GLP-1 and peptide YY (PYY) concentrations vs. LF-iso. No differences were observed in lunch meal energy intake among breakfast meals in either trial. Collectively, these data suggest that 15 g of low molecular weight fiber added to RTECs did not affect perceived appetite or subsequent energy intake despite differences in satiety hormone signaling in overweight females. PMID:25689743

  1. Effects of two dietary fibers as part of ready-to-eat cereal (RTEC) breakfasts on perceived appetite and gut hormones in overweight women.

    PubMed

    Lafond, David W; Greaves, Kathryn A; Maki, Kevin C; Leidy, Heather J; Romsos, Dale R

    2015-01-01

    The effects of an enzyme-hydrolyzed arabinoxylan from wheat (AXOS) versus an intact arabinoxylan from flax (FLAX) added to a ready-to-eat cereal (RTEC) on the postprandial appetitive, hormonal, and metabolic responses in overweight women (BMI 25.0-29.9 kg/m2) were evaluated. Subsequent meal energy intake was also assessed. Two randomized, double-blind, crossover design studies were completed. For trial 1, the participants consumed the following RTEC breakfast, matched for total weight and varied in energy content: low-fiber (LF, 4 g); high-fiber (HF, 15 g) as either AXOS or FLAX. For trial 2, the participants consumed LF, HF-AXOS, and HF-FLAX RTECs but also consumed another LF breakfast that was isocaloric (LF-iso) to that of the HF breakfasts. Perceived appetite and blood samples (trial 2 only) were assessed before and after breakfast. An ad libitum lunch was offered 4 h post-breakfast. No differences in postprandial appetite responses were observed among any breakfasts in either trial. The HF-AXOS and HF-FLAX led to increased postprandial GLP-1 and peptide YY (PYY) concentrations vs. LF-iso. No differences were observed in lunch meal energy intake among breakfast meals in either trial. Collectively, these data suggest that 15 g of low molecular weight fiber added to RTECs did not affect perceived appetite or subsequent energy intake despite differences in satiety hormone signaling in overweight females. PMID:25689743

  2. Soluble and insoluble fiber (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Dietary fiber is the part of food that is not affected by the digestive process in the body. Only a small amount of ... grains. Fiber is very important to a healthy diet and can be a ... legumes, the group of food containing dried peas and beans.

  3. Dietary Supplements

    MedlinePlus

    Dietary supplements are vitamins, minerals, herbs, and many other products. They can come as pills, capsules, powders, drinks, and energy bars. Supplements do not have to go through the testing that drugs do. Some ...

  4. Association of dietary fiber intake with serum total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in Urban Asian-Indian adults with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Shreya; Lakshmipriya, Nagarajan; Vaidya, Ruchi; Bai, Mookambika Ramya; Sudha, Vasudevan; Krishnaswamy, Kamala; Unnikrishnan, Ranjit; Anjana, Ranjit Mohan; Mohan, Viswanathan

    2014-01-01

    Context: There is little data correlating dietary fibre (DF) intake and cardiovascular risk in Asian Indians with diabetes. Aim: To assess the DF intake and its association with lipid profile (total serum cholesterol and low density lipoprotein [LDL] - cholesterol levels) in urban Asian Indians with diabetes. Subjects and Methods: Dietary assessment using validated Food Frequency Questionnaire was conducted in 1191 free-living adults with known diabetes in the Chennai Urban Rural Epidemiology Study. Subjects taking medication for dyslipidemia, and those with cardiovascular disease and implausible energy intake (n = 262) were excluded, leaving 929 participants. Anthropometric and relevant biochemical parameters were measured using standardized techniques. Results: Diabetic individuals who consumed DF < median intake (29 g/day) had a higher prevalence of hypercholesterolemia (49.5% vs. 40.1% [P = 0.01]) and higher LDL cholesterol (46.2% vs. 35.5% [P = 0.001]) than those in the > median intake of DF group. The risk of hypercholesterolemia (odds ratio [OR] =1.38 [95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.02–1.85], P = 0.04), and high LDL cholesterol (OR: 1.43 [95% CI: 1.06–1.94], P = 0.02) was higher among those whose DF intake was less than the median. Serum triglycerides and high density lipoprotein cholesterol were not associated with DF intake. The main sources of DF were vegetables and legumes. Conclusion: In urban Asian Indians with diabetes, lower DF intake is positively related to total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol levels. PMID:25285277

  5. Effect of weight fraction of carbon black and number of plies of E-glass fiber to reflection loss of E-glass/ripoxy composite for radar absorbing structure (RAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widyastuti, Ramadhan, Rizal; Ardhyananta, Hosta; Zainuri, Mochamad

    2013-09-01

    Nowadays, studies on investigating radar absorbing structure (RAS) using fiber reinforced polymeric (FRP) composite materials are becoming popular research field because the electromagnetic properties of FRP composites can be tailored effectively by just adding some electromagnetic powders, such as carbon black, ferrite, carbonyl iron, and etc., to the matrix of composites. The RAS works not only as a load bearing structure to hold the antenna system, but also has the important function of absorbing the in-band electromagnetic wave coming from the electromagnetic energy of tracking systems. In this study, E-glass fiber reinforced ripoxy resin composite was fabricated by blending the conductive carbon black (Ketjenblack EC300J) with the binder matrix of the composite material and maximizing the coefficient of absorption more than 90% (more than -10 dB) within the X-band frequency (8 - 12 GHz). It was measured by electrical conductivity (LCR meter) and vector network analyzer (VNA). Finally, the composite RAS with 0.02 weight fraction of carbon black and 4 plies of E-glass fiber showed thickness of 2.1 mm, electrical conductivity of 8.33 × 10-6 S/m, and maximum reflection loss of -27.123 dB, which can absorb more than 90% of incident EM wave throughout the entire X-band frequency range, has been developed.

  6. Healthy-eater self-schema and dietary intake.

    PubMed

    Noureddine, Samar; Stein, Karen

    2009-03-01

    The types and amounts of foods consumed have been shown to influence the health risks of individuals. Empirical evidence has documented a link between high dietary fat and low fiber intake and the risks for cardiovascular disease, some types of cancer, and obesity. Dietary surveys of Americans show higher fat and lower fiber intake than stipulated in the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, despite the noted increase in public awareness regarding the importance of adopting healthy eating habits. The lack of congruence between the availability of dietary knowledge and behavioral adherence to dietary recommendations suggests a need to fur