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Sample records for differential autoradiographic localizations

  1. Autoradiographic localization of benzodiazepine receptor downregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Tietz, E.I.; Rosenberg, H.C.; Chiu, T.H.

    1986-01-01

    Regional differences in downregulation of brain benzodiazepine receptors were studied using a quantitative autoradiographic method. Rats were given a 4-week flurazepam treatment known to cause tolerance and receptor downregulation. A second group of rats was given a similar treatment, but for only 1 week. A third group was given a single acute dose of diazepam to produce a brain benzodiazepine-like activity equivalent to that found after the chronic treatment. Areas studied included hippocampal formation, cerebral cortex, superior colliculus, substantia nigra, dorsal geniculate nucleus, lateral amygdala and lateral hypothalamus. There was a regional variation in the degree of downregulation after 1 week of flurazepam treatment, ranging from 12% to 25%. Extending the flurazepam treatment to 4 weeks caused little further downregulation in those areas studied, except for the pars reticulata of the substantia nigra, which showed a 13% reduction in (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam binding after 1 week and a 40% reduction after 4 weeks of treatment. In a few areas, such as the lateral hypothalamus, no significant change in binding was found after 4 weeks. Acute diazepam treatment caused no change in binding. This latter finding as well as results obtained during the development of the methodology show that downregulation was not an artifact due to residual drug content of brain slices. The regional variations in degree and rate of downregulation suggest areas that may be most important for benzodiazepine tolerance and dependence and may be related to the varying time courses for tolerance to different benzodiazepine actions.

  2. Tritiated 2-deoxy-D-glucose: a high-resolution marker for autoradiographic localization of brain metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, R.P. Jr.; Herkenham, M.

    1984-01-01

    The technique for autoradiographic localization of 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG) uptake has become a useful method for observing alterations of functional brain activity resulting from experimental manipulation. Autoradiographic resolution is improved using tritiated ((3H)) rather than carbon-14 ((14C))2DG, due to the lower energy and shorter path of tritium emissions. In addition, lower 2DG uptake by white matter relative to gray matter is exaggerated in the (3H)2DG autoradiographs due to the greater absorption of tritium emissions by lipids. Using (3H)2DG, it is possible to observe differential metabolic labeling in various individual nuclei or portions of nuclei that is unresolvable using (14C)2DG in the awake, normal animal. Heterogeneous patterns of 2DG uptake seen only with (3H)2DG are found in the nucleus accumbens, the anterior portion of the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala, specific nuclei of the inferior olivary complex, various hypothalamic regions, and a region straddling the border of the medial and lateral habenular nuclei. The lamination of differential 2DG uptake in the hippocampus is better localized using (3H)2DG. Autoradiographic resolution of labeled 2DG is further improved when the brain is perfused prior to frozen sectioning, due perhaps to selective fixation and retention of intracellular labeled 2-deoxy-glycogen. A series of (3H)2DG autoradiographs are presented together with views of the Nissl-stained sections that produced the autoradiographs.

  3. Autoradiographic localization of endothelin-1 binding sites in porcine skin

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Y.D.; Springall, D.R.; Wharton, J.; Polak, J.M. )

    1991-01-01

    Autoradiographic techniques and {sup 125}I-labeled endothelin-1 were used to study the distribution of endothelin-1 binding sites in porcine skin. Specific endothelin-1 binding sites were localized to blood vessels (capillaries, deep cutaneous vascular plexus, arteries, and arterioles), the deep dermal and connective tissue sheath of hair follicles, sebaceous and sweat glands, and arrector pili muscle. Specific binding was inhibited by endothelin-2 and endothelin-3 as well as endothelin-1. Non-specific binding was found in the epidermis and the medulla of hair follicles. No binding was found in connective tissue or fat. These vascular binding sites may represent endothelin receptors, in keeping with the known cutaneous vasoconstrictor actions of the peptide. If all binding sites are receptors, the results suggest that endothelin could also regulate the function of sweat glands and may have trophic effects in the skin.

  4. Autoradiographic localization of beta-adrenoceptors in asthmatic human lung

    SciTech Connect

    Spina, D.; Rigby, P.J.; Paterson, J.W.; Goldie, R.G. )

    1989-11-01

    The autoradiographic distribution and density of beta-adrenoceptors in human non-diseased and asthmatic bronchi were investigated using (125I)iodocyanopindolol (I-CYP). Analysis of the effects of the beta-adrenoceptor antagonists on I-CYP binding demonstrated that betaxolol (20 nM, beta 1-selective) had no significant effect on specific grain density in either nonasthmatic or asthmatic human bronchus, whereas ICI-118551 (20 nM, beta 2-selective) inhibited I-CYP binding by 85 +/- 9% and 89 +/- 3%, respectively. Thus, homogeneous populations of beta 2-adrenoceptors existed in bronchi from both sources. Large populations of beta-adrenoceptors were localized to the bronchial epithelium, submucosal glands, and airway smooth muscle. Asthmatic bronchial tissue featured epithelial damage with exfoliated cells associated with luminal mucus plugs. A thickened basement membrane and airway smooth muscle hyperplasia were also evident. High levels of specific I-CYP binding were also detected over asthmatic bronchial smooth muscle, as assessed by autoradiography and quantitation of specific grain densities. Isoproterenol and fenoterol were 10- and 13-fold less potent, respectively, in bronchi from asthmatic lung than in those from nonasthmatic lung. However, this attenuated responsiveness to beta-adrenoceptor agonists was not caused by reduced beta-adrenoceptor density in asthmatic airways. A defect may exist in the coupling between beta-adrenoceptors and postreceptor mechanisms in severely asthmatic lung.

  5. Autoradiographic localization of tritiated dihydrotestosterone in the flank organ of the albino hamster

    SciTech Connect

    Lucky, A.W.; Eisenfeld, A.J.; Visintin, I.

    1985-02-01

    In the hamster flank organ, the growth of hair and growth of sebaceous glands are androgen-dependent functions. Although dihydrotestosterone (DHT) is known to be a potent stimulator of flank organ growth, there is no information about localization of DHT receptor sites in this organ. The purpose of this study was to use steroid autoradiography to localize DHT receptors in the hamster flank organ. Because steroid hormones are functional when translocated to nuclear receptors, nuclear localization by autoradiography defines receptor sites. In order to be able to visualize autoradiographic grains from radiolabeled androgens around hair follicles, albino hamsters were studied to avoid confusion between the grains and pigment granules which are abundant in the more common Golden Syrian hamster. Mature male hamsters castrated 24 hours earlier were given tritium-labeled dihydrotestosterone ( (/sup 3/H)DHT). Using the technique of thaw-mount steroid autoradiography, 4-micron unfixed frozen sections were mounted in the dark onto emulsion-coated glass slides and allowed to develop for 4-6 months. (/sup 3/H)DHT was found to be concentrated over sebocyte nuclei. The label was present peripherally as well as in differentiating sebocytes. There was no nuclear localization of (/sup 3/H)DHT in animals pretreated with excessive quantities of unlabeled DHT. Steroid metabolites of (/sup 3/H) DHT were assessed by thin-layer chromatography in paired tissue samples. Most of the label remained with DHT. Uptake was inhibited in the flank organ of hamsters pretreated with unlabeled DHT.

  6. Autoradiographic localization of specific (/sup 3/H)dexamethasone binding in fetal lung

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, D.G.; Butley, M.S.; Cunha, G.R.; Malkinson, A.M.

    1984-10-01

    The cellular and subcellular localization of specific (/sup 3/H)dexamethasone binding was examined in fetal mouse lung at various stages of development and in human fetal lung at 8 weeks of gestation using a rapid in vitro steroid incubation technique followed by thaw-mount autoradiography. Competition studies with unlabeled steroids demonstrate the specificity of (/sup 3/H)dexamethasone labeling, and indicate that fetal lung mesenchyme is a primary glucocorticoid target during lung development. Autoradiographs of (/sup 3/H)dexamethasone binding in lung tissue at early stages of development demonstrate that the mesenchyme directly adjacent to the more proximal portions of the bronchiolar network is heavily labeled. In contrast, the epithelium which will later differentiate into bronchi and bronchioles, is relatively unlabeled. Distal portions of the growing epithelium, destined to become alveolar ducts and alveoli, do show nuclear localization of (/sup 3/H)dexamethasone. In addition, by utilizing a technique which allows the simultaneous examination of extracellular matrix components and (/sup 3/H)dexamethasone binding, a relationship is observed between extensive mesenchymal (/sup 3/H)dexamethasone binding and extensive extracellular matrix accumulation. Since glucocorticoids stimulate the synthesis of many extracellular matrix components, these results suggest a role for these hormones in affecting mesenchymal-epithelial interactions during lung morphogenesis.

  7. Autoradiographic localization of cholecystokinin receptors in rodent brain

    SciTech Connect

    Zarbin, M.A.; Innis, R.B.; Wamsley, J.K.; Snyder, S.H.; Kuhar, M.J.

    1983-04-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) receptor binding sites have been localized by autoradiography in the guinea pig and rat central nervous system. (/sup 125/I)CCK-triacontatriapeptide labeled the sites in brain slices with an observed association constant equal to 0.041 min-1 and a dissociation constant equal to 0.008 min-1. CCK-triacontatriapeptide (CCK-33) and the C-terminal octapeptide of CCK-33 (CCK-8) potently inhibited (/sup 125/I)CCK-33 binding with Ki's of 2 nM, whereas desulfated CCK-8 (CCK8-ds) and the C-terminal tetrapeptide of CCK-33 (CCK-4) were much weaker. Receptors were concentrated in the olfactory bulb, in the superficial laminae of the primary olfactory cortex, in the deep laminae of the cerebral cortex, and in the pretectal area. Substantial numbers of sites were also found in the basal ganglia, in the amygdala, and in the hippocampal formation. (/sup 125/I)CCK-33 binding sites appear to be located on fibers of the optic tract and probably on olfactory tract fibers as well. These results are discussed in terms of physiological functions associated with CCK, presynaptic receptors, and axonal flow of CCK receptors.

  8. Autoradiographic localization of relaxin binding sites in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Osheroff, P.L.; Phillips, H.S. )

    1991-08-01

    Relaxin is a member of the insulin family of polypeptide hormones and exerts its best understood actions in the mammalian reproductive system. Using a biologically active 32P-labeled human relaxin, the authors have previously shown by in vitro autoradiography specific relaxin binding sites in rat uterus, cervix, and brain tissues. Using the same approach, they describe here a detailed localization of human relaxin binding sites in the rat brain. Displaceable relaxin binding sites are distributed in discrete regions of the olfactory system, neocortex, hypothalamus, hippocampus, thalamus, amygdala, midbrain, and medulla of the male and female rat brain. Characterization of the relaxin binding sites in the subfornical organ and neocortex reveals a single class of high-affinity sites (Kd = 1.4 nM) in both regions. The binding of relaxin to two of the circumventricular organs (subfornical organ and organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis) and the neurosecretory magnocellular hypothalamic nuclei (i.e., paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei) provides the anatomical and biochemical basis for emerging physiological evidence suggesting a central role for relaxin in the control of blood pressure and hormone release. They conclude that specific, high-affinity relaxin binding sites are present in discrete regions of the rat brain and that the distribution of some of these sites may be consistent with a role for relaxin in control of vascular volume and blood pressure.

  9. In vitro autoradiographic localization of angiotensin-converting enzyme in sarcoid lymph nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.K.; Chai, S.Y.; Dunbar, M.S.; Mendelsohn, F.A.

    1986-09-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) was localized in sarcoid lymph nodes by an in vitro autoradiographic technique using a synthetic ACE inhibitor of high affinity, /sup 125/I-labelled 351A. The lymph nodes were from seven patients with active sarcoidosis who underwent mediastinoscopy and from six control subjects who had nodes resected at either mediastinoscopy or laparotomy. Angiotensin-converting enzyme was localized in the epithelioid cells of sarcoid granulomata in markedly increased amounts compared with control nodes, where it was restricted to vessels and some histiocytes. In sarcoid lymph nodes, there was little ACE present in lymphocytes or fibrous tissue. Sarcoid nodes with considerable fibrosis had much less intense ACE activity than the nonfibrotic nodes. The specific activity of ACE measured by an enzymatic assay in both the control and sarcoid lymph nodes closely reflected the ACE activity demonstrated by autoradiography. Sarcoid lymph nodes with fibrosis had an ACE specific activity of half that of nonfibrotic nodes (p less than 0.05). There was a 15-fold increase in specific ACE activity in sarcoid nodes (p less than 0.05) compared to normal. Serum ACE was significantly higher in those sarcoid patients whose lymph nodes were not fibrosed compared with those with fibrosis (p less than 0.01). This technique offers many advantages over the use of polyclonal antibodies. The 351A is a highly specific ACE inhibitor, chemically defined and in limitless supply. This method enables the quantitation of results, and autoradiographs may be stored indefinitely for later comparison.

  10. Autoradiographic localization of alpha-bungarotoxin-binding sites in the carotid body of the rat.

    PubMed

    Chen, I; Mascorro, J A; Yates, R D

    1981-01-01

    Radioiodinated alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-Bgt) was used to localize alpha-Bgt-acetylcholine receptors in the carotid body of the rat. The gamma spectrometer analyses indicated a high uptake of [125I] alpha-Bgt in carotid bodies incubated in vitro (1.51 fmole per organ). Incorporation of the isotope was effectively blocked by pretreatment of carotid bodies with d-tubocurarine and unlabeled alpha-Bgt, but not by atropine. Light microscopic autoradiography showed a heavy labeling of some parenchymal cells. Electron-microscopic autoradiography revealed that labeling was localized along the interface between parenchymal cells, especially where their cytoplasmic processes engage in complex interdigitations. The silver grain counts on electron-microscopic autoradiographs suggest that labelings are preferentially associated with the plasma membrane of certain Type I cells. It is suggested that these Type I cells in the rat's carotid body probably are provided with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on their plasma membranes. PMID:7273116

  11. Autoradiographic localization of adenosine receptors in rat brain using (/sup 3/H)cyclohexyladenosine

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, R.R.; Synder, S.H.

    1982-09-01

    Adenosine (A1) receptor binding sites have been localized in rat brain by an in vitro light microscopic autoradiographic method. The binding of (/sup 3/H)N6-cyclohexyladenosine to slide-mounted rat brain tissue sections has the characteristics of A1 receptors. It is saturable with high affinity and has appropriate pharmacology and stereospecificity. The highest densities of adenosine receptors occur in the molecular layer of the cerebellum, the molecular and polymorphic layers of the hippocampus and dentate gyrus, the medial geniculate body, certain thalamic nuclei, and the lateral septum. High densities also are observed in certain layers of the cerebral cortex, the piriform cortex, the caudate-putamen, the nucleus accumbens, and the granule cell layer of the cerebellum. Most white matter areas, as well as certain gray matter areas, such as the hypothalamus, have negligible receptor concentrations. These localizations suggest possible central nervous system sites of action of adenosine.

  12. Autoradiographic localization of adenosine uptake sites in rat brain using (/sup 3/H)nitrobenzylthioinosine

    SciTech Connect

    Bisserbe, J.C.; Patel, J.; Marangos, P.J.

    1985-02-01

    The adenosine uptake site has been localized in rat brain by an in vitro light microscopic autoradiographic method, using (/sup 3/H)nitrobenzylthioinosine ((/sup 3/H)NBI) as the probe. The binding characteristics of (/sup 3/H)NBI on slide-mounted sections are comparable to those seen in studies performed on brain homogenates. A very high density of uptake sites occurs in the nucleus tractus solitarius, in the superficial layer of the superior colliculus, in several thalamic nuclei, and also in geniculate body nuclei. A high density of sites are also observed in the nucleus accumbens, the caudate putamen, the dorsal tegmentum area, the substantia nigra, and the central gray. The localization of the adenosine uptake site in brain may provide information on the functional activity of the site and suggests the involvement of the adenosine system in the central regulation of cardiovascular function.

  13. Autoradiographic localization of mu and delta opioid receptors in the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system

    SciTech Connect

    Dilts, R.P. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    In vitro autoradiographic techniques were coupled with selective chemical lesions of the A10 dopamine cells and intrinsic perikarya of the region to delineate the anatomical localization of mu and delta opioid receptors, as well as, neurotensin receptors. Mu opioid receptors were labeled with {sup 125}I-DAGO. Delta receptors were labeled with {sup 125}I-DPDPE. Neurotensin receptors were labeled with {sup 125}I-NT3. Unilateral lesions of the dopamine perikarya were produced by injections of 6-OHDA administered in the ventral mesencephalon. Unilateral lesions of intrinsic perikarya were induced by injections of quinolinic acid in to the A10 dopamine cell region. Unilateral lesions produced with 6-OHDA resulted in the loss of neurotensin receptors in the A10 region and within the terminal fields. Mu opioid receptors were unaffected by this treatment, but delta opioid receptors increased in the contralateral striatum and nucleus accumbens following 6-OHDA administration. Quinolinic acid produced a reduction of mu opioid receptors within the A10 region with a concomitant reduction in neurotensin receptors in both the cell body region and terminal fields. These results are consistent with a variety of biochemical and behavioral data which suggest the indirect modulation of dopamine transmission by the opioids. In contrast these results strongly indicate a direct modulation of the mesolimbic dopamine system by neurotensin.

  14. Autoradiographic localization of /sup 3/H-paroxetine-labeled serotonin uptake sites in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    De Souza, E.B.; Kuyatt, B.L.

    1987-01-01

    Paroxetine is a potent and selective inhibitor of serotonin uptake into neurons. Serotonin uptake sites have been identified, localized, and quantified in rat brain by autoradiography with 3H-paroxetine; 3H-paroxetine binding in slide-mounted sections of rat forebrain was of high affinity (KD = 10 pM) and the inhibition affinity constant (Ki) values of various drugs in competing 3H-paroxetine binding significantly correlated with their reported potencies in inhibiting synaptosomal serotonin uptake. Serotonin uptake sites labeled by 3H-paroxetine were highly concentrated in the dorsal and median raphe nuclei, central gray, superficial layer of the superior colliculus, lateral septal nucleus, paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus, and the islands of Calleja. High concentrations of 3H-paroxetine binding sites were found in brainstem areas containing dopamine (substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area) and norepinephrine (locus coeruleus) cell bodies. Moderate concentrations of 3H-paroxetine binding sites were present in laminae I and IV of the frontal parietal cortex, primary olfactory cortex, olfactory tubercle, regions of the basal ganglia, septum, amygdala, thalamus, hypothalamus, hippocampus, and some brainstem areas including the interpeduncular, trigeminal, and parabrachial nuclei. Lower densities of 3H-paroxetine binding sites were found in other regions of the neocortex and very low to nonsignificant levels of binding were present in white matter tracts and in the cerebellum. Lesioning of serotonin neurons with 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine caused large decreases in 3H-paroxetine binding. The autoradiographic distribution of 3H-paroxetine binding sites in rat brain corresponds extremely well to the distribution of serotonin terminals and cell bodies as well as with the pharmacological sites of action of serotonin.

  15. Autoradiographic localization of /sup 3/H-digoxin binding by neural cells in the medulla

    SciTech Connect

    Traurig, H.H.; Bhagat, A.; Bass, N.H.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to localize binding sites for the cardiac glycoside digoxin in the medulla of the rat in vivo. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected (IV) with /sup 3/H-digoxin and killed 30 minutes later. Autoradiographs of medullas showed evidence of /sup 3/H-digoxin binding to small- and medium-sized neural cells in the regions of the nucleus solitarius, dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus, area postrema, and in the zone between the area postrema and the underlying neuropil. However, the parasympathetic preganglionic neurons of the dorsal motor nucleus were not labeled. The /sup 3/H-digoxin-labeled cells in the medulla were located mainly in the commissural and medial portions of nucleus solitarius at the level of the area postrema. Animals injected with unlabeled digoxin followed by /sup 3/H-digoxin showed reduced binding of radioactivity. The small- and medium-sized neurons of the caudal portions of the nucleus solitarius are internuncial in position with respect to cardiovascular afferents of the glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves and sympathetic and parasympathetic cardiovascular efferent neurons of the medulla. The results of this study suggest that these /sup 3/H-digoxin-labeled cells, presumably neurons of nucleus solitarius, may possess high affinity binding sites for digoxin. Further, the area postrema, which lacks a blood-brain barrier, may provide a portal of entry for /sup 3/H-digoxin into regions of the medulla known to contain neurons that play a role in the regulation of cardiac rhythm.

  16. Cholecystokinin receptors: Biochemical demonstration and autoradiographical localization in rat brain and pancreas using (/sup 3/H) cholecystokinin8 as radioligand

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dijk, A.; Richards, J.G.; Trzeciak, A.; Gillessen, D.; Moehler, H.

    1984-04-01

    Since cholecystokinin8 (CCK8) seems to be the physiological ligand of CCK receptors in the brain, it would be the most suitable probe for the characterization of CCK receptors in radioligand binding studies. (/sup 3/H)CCK8 was synthetized with a specific radioactivity sufficient for the detection of high affinity binding sites. (/sup 3/H)CCK8 binds saturably and reversibly to distinct sites in rat brain and pancreas with nanomolar affinity. While the C-terminal tetrapeptide of CCK is the minimal structure required for nanomolar affinity in the brain, the entire octapeptide sequence is required for binding affinity in pancreas. Desulfated CCK8 and several gastrin-I peptides, which are likewise unsulfated, show virtually no affinity to the binding sites in pancreas but high affinity in cerebral cortex. The ligand specificity of the CCK peptides corresponds to their electrophysiological potency in the brain and their stimulation of secretion in pancreas, respectively. Autoradiographically, high densities of (/sup 3/H)CCK8 binding sites were found in cerebral cortex and olfactory bulb, medium levels in nucleus accumbens, hippocampus, dentate gyrus, and striatum with virtually no labeling in cerebellum. This pattern is similar to the distribution of CCK-like immunoreactivity in the brain. In pancreas, equally high levels of (/sup 3/H)CCK8 labeling were found in the exocrine and endocrine region. (/sup 3/H)CCK8 binding sites differ from those identified previously with (/sup 125/I)Bolton-Hunter-CCK33 by their sensitivity to guanyl nucleotides in the brain, their ion dependency in the brain, and pancreas, and their different autoradiographical localization in some parts of the brain. The distribution of CCK binding sites labeled with (/sup 3/H)CCK8 appears to correlate better with the CCK immunoreactivity than those labeled with (/sup 125/I)Bolton-Hunter-CCK33. Thus, (/sup 3/H)CCK8 appears to be the radioligand of choice for the investigation of CCK receptors.

  17. Autoradiographic localization of (/sup 125/I-Tyr4)bombesin-binding sites in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Zarbin, M.A.; Kuhar, M.J.; O'Donohue, T.L.; Wolf, S.S.; Moody, T.W.

    1985-02-01

    The binding of (/sup 125/I-Tyr/sub 4/)bombesin to rat brain slices was investigated. Radiolabeled (Tyr/sub 4/)bombesin bound with high affinity (K/sub d/ . 4 nM) to a single class of sites (B/sub max/ . 130 fmol/mg of protein); the ratio of specific to nonspecific binding was 6/1. Also, pharmacology studies indicated that the C-terminal of bombesin was important for the high affinity binding activity. Autoradiographic studies indicated that the (/sup 125/I-Tyr4)bombesin-binding sites were discretely distributed in certain gray but not white matter regions of rat brain. Highest grain densities were present in the olfactory bulb and tubercle, nucleus accumbens, suprachiasmatic and periventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus, central medial thalamic nucleus, medial amygdaloid nucleus, hippocampus, dentate gyrus, subiculum, nucleus of the solitary tract, and substantia gelatinosa. Moderate grain densities were present in the parietal cortex, deep layers of the neocortex, rhinal cortex, caudate putamen, stria terminalis, locus ceruleus, parabrachial nucleus, and facial nucleus. Low grain densities were present in the globus pallidus, lateral thalamus, and midbrain. Negligible grain densities were present in the cerebellum, corpus callosum, and all regions treated with 1 microM unlabeled bombesin. The discrete regional distribution of binding suggests that endogenous bombesin-like peptides may function as important regulatory agents in certain brain loci.

  18. Characteristics and autoradiographic localization of 2-( sup 125 I)iodomelatonin binding sites in Djungarian hamster brain

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, M.J.; Takahashi, J.S.; Dubocovich, M.L. )

    1989-08-01

    These studies investigated the characteristics and regional distribution of 2-({sup 125}I)iodomelatonin binding in Djungarian hamster brain. The results showed that 2-({sup 125}I)iodomelatonin labels two types of binding sites, which resemble the ML-1 and ML-2 melatonin subtypes previously described in other tissues. The 2-({sup 125}I)iodomelatonin binding site identified in whole brain membranes has a nanomolar affinity (Kd = 1.48 +/- 0.26 nM) and biochemical and pharmacological characteristics identical to those of the ML-2 site of Syrian hamster whole brain. The 2-({sup 125}I)iodomelatonin site in the hypothalamus has a picomolar affinity (Kd = 43.4 +/- 5.1 pM) and resembles the ML-1 site of chicken retina. The localization of 2-({sup 125}I)iodomelatonin labeling in autoradiographic studies of the Djungarian hamster brain includes the suprachiasmatic nuclei, the median eminence, the reuniens nucleus, and the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus.

  19. Simultaneous double-isotope autoradiographic measurement of local cerebral glucose metabolic rate and acid-base status in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Lockwood, A H; Peek, K E; Berridge, M; Bogue, L; Yap, E

    1987-03-01

    We developed a double-isotope autoradiographic method for the simultaneous measurement of the local cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (1CMRG) and index of regional acid-base status (rABI) in single brain slices using [2-14C]deoxy-D-glucose (DG) and 5,5-dimethyl-[2-14C]oxazolidine-2,4,dione (DMO). After iv isotope administration, paper chromatography separates plasma DMO from DG activity using a methanol-methylene chloride solvent system. Initial tissue autoradiograms depict regional DMO plus DG and DG metabolite distribution. After 14 days in a well-ventilated hood, 97.5 +/- 0.5% of all DMO is lost from tissue sections by sublimation, and a second autoradiogram depicts DG plus DG metabolite distribution. Retention of brain lipids does not alter beta-particle self-absorption, avoiding problems associated with isotope extraction with solvents. Autoradiograms are digitized and converted to isotope-content images. The second autoradiogram is used for 1CMRG computation. After subtracting the second regional isotope-content value from the first, the DMO content is obtained and used to compute rABI. Application of this method to normal animals yields expected values for 1CMRG and rABI. This method is amenable to whole-slice digitization and creation of functional images of 1CMRG and ABI followed by pixel-by-pixel correlations of the two variables, making this a potentially valuable tool for the investigation of the relationships between glucose metabolism and brain acid-base balance. PMID:3505334

  20. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptors in intermediate lobe of the pituitary: Biochemical characterization and autoradiographic localization

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriadis, D.E.; De Souza, E.B.

    1989-01-01

    CRF receptors were characterized using radioligand binding and chemical affinity cross-linking techniques and localized using autoradiographic techniques in porcine, bovine and rat pituitaries. The binding of 125I-(Tyr0)-ovine CRF (125I-oCRF) to porcine anterior and neurointermediate lobe membranes was saturable and of high affinity with comparable KD values (200-600 pM) and receptor densities (100-200 fmoles/mg protein). The pharmacological rank order of potencies for various analogs and fragments of CRF in inhibiting 125I-oCRF binding in neurointermediate lobe was characteristic of the well-established CRF receptor in anterior pituitary. Furthermore, the binding of 125I-oCRF to both anterior and neurointermediate lobes of the pituitary was guanine nucleotide-sensitive. Affinity cross-linking studies revealed that the molecular weight of the CRF binding protein in rat intermediate lobe was identical to that in rat anterior lobe (Mr = 75,000). While the CRF binding protein in the anterior lobes of porcine and bovine pituitaries had identical molecular weights to CRF receptors in rat pituitary (Mr = 75,000), the molecular weight of the CRF binding protein in porcine and bovine intermediate lobe was slightly higher (Mr = 78,000). Pituitary autoradiograms from the three species showed specific binding sites for 125I-oCRF in anterior and intermediate lobes, with none being apparent in the posterior pituitary. The identification of CRF receptors in the intermediate lobe with comparable characteristics to those previously identified in the anterior pituitary substantiate further the physiological role of CRF in regulating intermediate lobe hormone secretion.

  1. A quantitative autoradiographic method for the measurement of local rates of brain protein synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, B.E.; Donatoni, P.; Wasterlain, C.G.

    1982-05-01

    We have developed a new method for measuring local rates of brain protein synthesis in vivo. It combines the intraperitoneal injection of a large dose of low specific activity amino acid with quantitative autoradiography. This method has several advantages: 1) It is ideally suited for young or small animals or where immobilizing an animal is undesirable. 2 The amino acid injection ''floods'' amino acid pools so that errors in estimating precursor specific activity, which is especially important in pathological conditions, are minimized. 3) The method provides for the use of a radioautographic internal standard in which valine incorporation is measured directly. Internal standards from experimental animals correct for tissue protein content and self-absorption of radiation in tissue sections which could vary under experimental conditions.

  2. GnRH receptors in human granulosa cells: Anatomical localization and characterization by autoradiographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Latouche, J.; Crumeyrolle-Arias, M.; Jordan, D.; Kopp, N.; Augendre-Ferrante, B.; Cedard, L.; Haour, F. )

    1989-09-01

    The presence of receptors for GnRH in human ovary has been investigated by quantitative autoradiography. Simultaneous visualization and characterization of specific receptors on frozen sections were obtained on six pairs of human ovaries. Among them only one exhibited a large preovulatory follicle. This dominant follicle exhibited a specific and high affinity binding capacity for {sup 125}I-GnRHa exclusively localized on the granulosa cell layer. Analysis of saturation curve indicates a Kd value of 0.22 nM and Bmax of 9.6 fmol/mg protein. In contrast LH-hCG binding sites were present in all antral follicles. These data demonstrate for the first time the presence of high affinity GnRH receptors in human granulosa cells at a late stage of follicular maturation.

  3. Autoradiographic localization of peptide YY and neuropeptide Y binding sites in the medulla oblongata

    SciTech Connect

    Leslie, R.A.; McDonald, T.J.; Robertson, H.A.

    1988-09-01

    Peptide YY is a highly potent emetic when given intravenously in dogs. We hypothesized that the area postrema, a small brain stem nucleus that acts as a chemoreceptive trigger zone for vomiting and lies outside the blood-brain barrier, might have receptors that PYY would bind to, in order to mediate the emetic response. We prepared (/sup 125/I)PYY and used autoradiography to show that high affinity binding sites for this ligand were highly localized in the area postrema and related nuclei of the dog medulla oblongata. Furthermore, the distribution of (/sup 125/I)PYY binding sites in the rat medulla oblongata was very similar to that in the dog; the distribution of (/sup 125/I)PYY binding sites throughout the rat brain was seen to be similar to the distribution of (/sup 125/I)NPY binding sites.

  4. Light microscopic localization of brain opiate receptors: a general autoradiographic method which preserves tissue quality

    SciTech Connect

    Herkenham, M.; Pert, C.B.

    1982-08-01

    A general technique is described for using slide-mounted unfixed tissue sections to characterize and visualize drug and neurotransmitter receptors in brain or other tissues. The preparation of material, from fresh frozen, unfixed brain to dried sections securely attached to slides, is described in detail. The tissue can be kept intact during incubation at varying temperatures in solutions containing radiolabeled ligand, ions, buffers, and allosteric effectors. Strategies are described for determining optimal stereospecific binding with highest signal-to-noise ratios and for determining that a meaningful receptor is being studied. Dry formaldehyde fixation by vapors from heated paraformaldehyde preserves the tissue quality and traps the ligand near its site on the receptor, permitting subsequent histological processing through alcohols, solvents, and aqueous media, including liquid nuclear track emulsion. Visualization of (/sup 3/H)naloxone- or (/sup 3/H)enkephalin-labeled opiate receptor distributions in rat and human brains is achieved by tritium-sensitive film or by classical wet emulsion autoradiography. The advantages of the film include its ease of use and the ability to quantify receptor density by densitometry which can be computer-assisted. The advantage of the emulsion is the greater resolution and the concomitant appearance of morphology in cell-stained sections. Examples of correlations of opiate receptor distributions which underlying cytoarchitecture illustrate the potential for receptor localization studies.

  5. Autoradiographic localization of epidermal growth factor receptors to all major uterine cell types

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, T.H.; Mukku, V.R.; Verner, G.; Kirkland, J.L.; Stancel, G.M.

    1988-03-01

    We have recently studied the structure and function of the uterine epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor, its hormonal regulation, and its possible role in estrogen-induced uterine DNA synthesis. Since the uterus is composed of multiple cell types, we sought, in the work reported here, to localize EGF binding in this organ by autoradiography. Prior to the actual autoradiography, we performed a companion series of experiments to insure that EGF binding to uterine tissue in situ represented a true receptor interaction. Uteri from immature female rats were incubated in vitro with 125I-EGF at 25 degrees C. Tissue binding was maximal within 120 min and remained constant for at least an additional 120 min. This binding of labeled EGF was largely abolished by excess unlabeled EGF but not by other growth factors, indicating that binding was to specific receptors. The binding of 125I-EGF was saturable and reached a plateau at 4-8 nM; specific binding was half-maximal at 1-2 nM EGF. In situ cross-linking studies revealed that 125I-EGF was bound predominantly to a 170,000 MW EGF receptor similar to that seen in isolated uterine membranes. Incubation of uteri with 125I-EGF followed by autoradiography revealed binding to epithelial cells, stroma, and myometrium. These results provide evidence for the presence of specific EGF receptors in all major uterine cell types of the immature rat.

  6. Autoradiographic localization of (/sup 125/I)-angiotensin II binding sites in the rat adrenal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Healy, D.P.; Maciejewski, A.R.; Printz, M.P.

    1985-03-01

    To gain greater insight into sites of action of circulating angiotensin II (Ang II) within the adrenal, we have localized the (/sup 125/I)-Ang II binding site using in vitro autoradiography. Autoradiograms were generated either by apposition of isotope-sensitive film or with emulsion-coated coverslips to slide-mounted adrenal sections labeled in vitro with 1.0 nM (/sup 125/I)-Ang II. Analysis of the autoradiograms showed that Ang II binding sites were concentrated in a thin band in the outer cortex (over the cells of the zona glomerulosa) and in the adrenal medulla, which at higher power was seen as dense patches. Few sites were evident in the inner cortex. The existence of Ang II binding sites in the adrenal medulla was confirmed by conventional homogenate binding techniques which revealed a single class of high affinity Ang II binding site (K/sub d/ . 0.7nM, B/sub max/ . 168.7 fmol/mg). These results suggest that the adrenal medulla may be a target for direct receptor-mediated actions of Ang II.

  7. Autoradiographic localization of a gluten peptide during organ culture of human duodenal mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Fluge, G.; Aksnes, L.

    1983-01-01

    An 125I-labeled subfraction of Frazer's fraction III (molecular weight, 8,000) was added to the culture medium during organ culture of duodenal biopsies from two patients with celiac disease in exacerbation. The isotope-labeled gluten peptide was localized by autoradiography after 6, 12, and 24 h of culture. At 6 h, labeling was located mainly in the basal layers of the biopsies. The tissue was well preserved. After 12 h in culture, the labeling had spread to the lamina propria and the crypts. A few grains were located over enterocytes and desquamated cells. Moderate histological signs of toxicity were observed. After 24 h, there was marked toxic deterioration, comparable to that seen after culture with alpha-gliadin. Labeling had spread throughout the entire section. There seemed to be no specificity of the binding, for the entire section was affected. Culture with the identical gluten fraction, in the radionegative state, produced histological deterioration comparable to that seen after exposure to the isotope-labeled peptide. Gluten peptides are presented to the target cells in a unique way during organ culture, different from in vivo conditions. This may influence the results when the organ culture method is used to investigate the pathogenesis of celiac disease.

  8. Autoradiographic localization of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the brain of the zebra finch (Poephila guttata)

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, J.T.; Adkins-Regan, E.; Whiting, P.; Lindstrom, J.M.; Podleski, T.R.

    1988-08-08

    We have localized nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the zebra finch brain by using three 125I-labelled ligands: alpha bungarotoxin and two monoclonal antibodies to neuronal nicotinic receptors. Unfixed brains from intact adult male and female zebra finches were prepared for in vitro autoradiography. Low-resolution film autoradiograms and high-resolution emulsion autoradiograms were prepared for each of the three ligands. The major brain structures that bind all three of the ligands are hippocampus; hyperstriatum dorsalis; hyperstriatum ventralis; nucleus lentiformis mesencephali; nucleus pretectalis, some layers of the optic tectum; nucleus mesencephalicus lateralis; pars dorsalis; locus ceruleus; and all cranial motor nuclei except nucleus nervi hypoglossi. The major structures labelled only by (125I)-alpha bungarotoxin binding included hyperstriatum accessorium and the nuclei: preopticus medialis, medialis hypothalami posterioris, semilunaris, olivarius inferior, and the periventricular organ. Of the song control nuclei, nucleus magnocellularis of the anterior neostriatum; hyperstriatum ventralis, pars caudalis; nucleus intercollicularis; and nucleus hypoglossus were labelled. The binding patterns of the two antibodies were similar to one another but not identical. Both labelled nucleus spiriformis lateralis and nucleus geniculatus lateralis, pars ventralis especially heavily and also labelled the nucleus habenula medialis; nucleus subpretectalis; nucleus isthmi, pars magnocellularis; nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis; nucleus reticularis lateralis; nucleus tractus solitarii; nucleus vestibularis dorsolateralis; nucleus vestibularis lateralis; nucleus descendens nervi trigemini; and the deep cerebellar nuclei.

  9. Autoradiographic location of multiple serotonin receptors. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, D.L.G.

    1983-02-01

    Autoradiographic localization of receptors in an attempt to determine the locations of different populations of serotonin (5HT) receptors in the CNS was examined. Data confirmed that the auto radiographic technique for visualizing ligand-binding sites can be used to localize 5HT-1 receptors within very small regions of the brain. The hypothesis that it should be possible to use this technique to localize different populations of the 5HT-1 sites based on their differential sensitivities to drugs was also confirmed.

  10. Quantitative autoradiographic localization of cholecystokinin receptors in rat and guinea pig brain using sup 125 I-Bolton-Hunter-CCK8

    SciTech Connect

    Niehoff, D.L. )

    1989-03-01

    The autoradiographic localization of receptors for the brain-gut peptide cholecystokinin (CCK) has shown differences in receptor distribution between rat and guinea pig brain. However the full anatomical extent of the differences has not been determined quantitatively. In the present study, {sup 125}I-Bolton-Hunter-CCK8 ({sup 125}I-BH-CCK8) was employed in a comparative quantitative autoradiographic analysis of the distribution of CCK receptors in these two species. The pharmacological profile of {sup 125}I-BH-CCK8 binding in guinea pig forebrain sections was comparable to those previously reported for rat and human. Statistically significant differences in receptor binding between rat and guinea pig occurred in olfactory bulb, caudate-putamen, amygdala, several cortical areas, ventromedial hypothalamus, cerebellum, and a number of midbrain and brainstem nuclei. The results of this study confirm the presence of extensive species-specific variation in the distribution of CCK receptors, suggesting possible differences in the physiological roles of this peptide in different mammalian species.

  11. Three-dimensional autoradiographic localization of quench-corrected glycine receptor specific activity in the mouse brain using sup 3 H-strychnine as the ligand

    SciTech Connect

    White, W.F.; O'Gorman, S.; Roe, A.W. )

    1990-03-01

    The autoradiographic analysis of neurotransmitter receptor distribution is a powerful technique that provides extensive information on the localization of neurotransmitter systems. Computer methodologies are described for the analysis of autoradiographic material which include quench correction, 3-dimensional display, and quantification based on anatomical boundaries determined from the tissue sections. These methodologies are applied to the problem of the distribution of glycine receptors measured by 3H-strychnine binding in the mouse CNS. The most distinctive feature of this distribution is its marked caudorostral gradient. The highest densities of binding sites within this gradient were seen in somatic motor and sensory areas; high densities of binding were seen in branchial efferent and special sensory areas. Moderate levels were seen in nuclei related to visceral function. Densities within the reticular formation paralleled the overall gradient with high to moderate levels of binding. The colliculi had low and the diencephalon had very low levels of binding. No binding was seen in the cerebellum or the telencephalon with the exception of the amygdala, which had very low levels of specific binding. This distribution of glycine receptors correlates well with the known functional distribution of glycine synaptic function. These data are illustrated in 3 dimensions and discussed in terms of the significance of the analysis techniques on this type of data as well as the functional significance of the distribution of glycine receptors.

  12. Light microscopic autoradiographic localization of mu and delta opioid binding sites in the mouse central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, A.S.; Goodman, R.R.

    1984-05-01

    Much work has been done on opioid systems in the rat CNS. Although the mouse is widely used in pharmacological studies of opioid action, little has been done to characterize opioid systems in this species. In the present study the distribution of mu and delta opioid binding sites in the mouse CNS was examined using a quantitative in vitro autoradiography procedure. Tritiated dihydromorphine was used to visualize mu sites and (3H-d-Ala2-d-Leu5)enkephalin with a low concentration of morphine was used to visualize delta sites. Mu and delta site localizations in the mouse are very similar to those previously described in the rat (Goodman, R.R., S.H. Snyder, M.J. Kuhar, and W.S. Young, 3d (1980) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77:6239-6243), with certain exceptions and additions. Mu and delta sites were observed in sensory processing areas, limbic system, extrapyramidal motor system, and cranial parasympathetic system. Differential distributions of mu and delta sites were noted in many areas. Mu sites were prominent in laminae I, IV, and VI of the neocortex, in patches in the striatum, and in the ventral pallidum, nucleus accumbens, medial and midline thalamic nuclei, medial habenular nucleus, interpeduncular nucleus, and laminae I and II of the spinal cord. In contrast, delta sites were prominent in all laminae of the neocortex, olfactory tubercle, diffusely throughout the striatum, and in the basal, lateral, and cortical nuclei of the amygdala. The determination of the differential distributions of opioid binding sites should prove useful in suggesting anatomical substrates for the actions of opiates and opioids.

  13. Reversible and irreversible labeling and autoradiographic localization of the cerebral histamine H2 receptor using ( sup 125 I)iodinated probes

    SciTech Connect

    Ruat, M.; Traiffort, E.; Bouthenet, M.L.; Schwartz, J.C.; Hirschfeld, J.; Buschauer, A.; Schunack, W. )

    1990-03-01

    Iodoaminopotentidine (I-APT)--i.e., N-(2-(4-amino-3-iodobenzamido)ethyl)-N'-cyano-N''-(3-(3- (1-piperidinylmethyl)phenoxy)propyl)guanidine--represents one of the most potent H2-receptor antagonists known so far. In membranes of guinea pig brain 125I-APT bound reversibly, selectively, and with high affinity (Kd = 0.3 nM) to a homogeneous population of sites unambiguously identified as H2 receptors by inhibition studies conducted with a large panel of antagonists. 125I-APT binding was also inhibited by histamine, and the effect was modulated by a guanyl nucleotide, which is consistent with the association of the H2 receptor with a guanine nucleotide binding regulatory protein. The low nonspecific binding of 125I-APT generated high contrast autoradiographic pictures in brain sections and established the precise distribution of H2 receptors. Their highly heterogeneous distribution and laminated pattern in some areas suggest their major association with neuronal elements. These localizations were more consistent than those of H1 receptors with the distribution of histaminergic projections, indicating that H2 receptors mediate a larger number of postsynaptic actions of histamine--e.g., in striatum. Colocalizations of H1 and H2 receptors in some areas account for their known synergistic interactions in cAMP formation induced by histamine. The distribution of 125I-APT binding sites did not strictly parallel that of the H2-receptor-linked adenylate cyclase activity, which may reflect heterogeneity among H2 receptors. After UV irradiation and SDS/PAGE analysis, (125I)iodoazidopotentidine (125I-AZPT), a photoaffinity probe derived from 125I-APT, was covalently incorporated in several peptides, among which the labeling of two peptides of 59 and 32 kDa was prevented by H2 antagonists, suggesting that they correspond to H2-receptor binding peptides or proteolysis products of the latter.

  14. Atrial natriuretic factor receptors in rat kidney, adrenal gland, and brain: Autoradiographic localization and fluid balance dependent changes

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, David R.; Braas, Karen M.; Snyder, Soloman H.

    1986-01-01

    Mammalian atria contain natriuretic peptides designated atrial natriuretic factors (ANF). Using in vitro autoradiography with 125I-labeled ANF, we have localized high-affinity (Kd = 150 pM) ANF binding sites to the glomeruli of the kidney, zona glomerulosa of the adrenal gland, and choroid plexus of the brain. The numbers of sites in both kidney and adrenal are increased in rats deprived of water; increases are detectable within 72 hr of water deprivation in the kidney and within 24 hr in the adrenal gland. Receptor numbers decline in rats given 2.0% NaCl as drinking water and in diabetic rats. The discrete localizations and dynamic alterations of these receptors suggest that ANF regulates fluid balance through diverse but coordinated effects on receptors in numerous organs including the kidney, adrenal, and brain. Images PMID:3010291

  15. Autoradiographic localization and characterization of atrial natriuretic peptide binding sites in the rat central nervous system and adrenal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, T.R.; Wildey, G.M.; Manaker, S.; Glembotski, C.C.

    1986-07-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptides (ANP) have recently been identified in both heart and CNS. These peptides possess potent natriuretic, diuretic, and vasorelaxant activities, and are all apparently derived from a single prohormone. Specific ANP binding sites have been characterized in the adrenal zona glomerulosa and kidney cortex, and one study reported ANP binding sites in the CNS. However, a detailed examination of the localization of ANP binding sites throughout the brain has not been reported. In this study, quantitative autoradiography was employed to examine the distribution of ANP receptors in the rat CNS. The binding of (3-/sup 125/I-iodotyrosyl28) rat ANP-28 to binding sites in the rat CNS was saturable, specific for ANP-related peptides, and displayed high affinity (Kd = 600 pM). When the relative concentrations of ANP binding sites were determined throughout the rat brain, the highest levels of ANP binding were localized to the circumventricular organs, including the area postrema and subfornical organ, and the olfactory apparatus. Moderate levels of ANP binding sites were present throughout the midbrain and brain stem, while low levels were found in the forebrain, diencephalon, basal ganglia, cortex, and cerebellum. The presence of ANP binding sites in the subfornical organ and the area postrema, regions considered to be outside the blood-brain barrier, suggests that peripheral ANP levels may regulate some aspects of CNS control of salt and water balance. The possible functions of ANP binding sites in other regions of the rat brain are not known, but, like many other peptides, ANP may act as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator at these loci.

  16. Receptors for corticotropin-releasing hormone in human pituitary: Binding characteristics and autoradiographic localization to immunocytochemically defined proopiomelanocortin cells

    SciTech Connect

    Smets, G.; Vauquelin, G.; Moons, L.; Smitz, J.; Kloeppel, G. )

    1991-08-01

    Using autoradiography combined with immunocytochemistry, the authors demonstrated that the target cells of CRH in the human pituitary were proopiomelanocortin cells. Scatchard analysis of (125I)Tyr0-oCRH saturation binding revealed the presence of one class of saturable, high affinity sites on pituitary tissue homogenate. The equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) for (125I)Tyr0-oCRH ranged from 1.1-1.6 nM, and the receptor density was between 200-350 fmol/mg protein. Fixation of cryostat sections with 4% paraformaldehyde before tracer incubation improved both tissue preservation and localization of the CRH receptor at the cellular level. Additional postfixation with 1% glutaraldehyde inhibited tracer diffusion during subsequent immunocytochemistry and autoradiography. (125I)Tyr0-oCRH was found in cytoplasmic inclusions or at the cell periphery of ACTH/beta-endorphin cells in the anterior pituitary. Single cells of the posterior pituitary were also CRH receptor positive. Cells staining for PRL or GH were CRH receptor negative. They conclude that CRH binds only to high affinity receptors on ACTH/{beta}-endorphin cells in the human pituitary.

  17. Autoradiographic localization of dopamine DA1 receptors in rat kidney with ( sup 3 H)Sch 23390

    SciTech Connect

    Huo, T.; Healy, D.P. )

    1989-09-01

    Dopamine receptors in the rat kidney were characterized by homogenate binding and in vitro autoradiography using the dopamine 1 (DA1)-selective antagonist ({sup 3}H)Sch 23390. ({sup 3}H)Sch 23390 binding in cortical membrane preparations was saturable, stereoselective, and competed for by DA agonists and antagonists with a rank order of potency consistent with the labeling of the DA1 receptor. ({sup 3}H)Sch 22390 binding was best fit to a two-site model: a high affinity-low density site (KD1 4.9 +/- 1.4 nM, Bmax 1 31.4 +/- 13.8 fmol/mg protein) and a low affinity-high density site (KD2 86.4 +/- 23.9 nM, Bmax 2 848.0 +/- 227.4 fmol/mg protein). In vitro autoradiography indicated that ({sup 3}H)Sch 22390 binding sites were restricted to the cortex. High-resolution autoradiography further indicated that ({sup 3}H)Sch 22390 binding sites were localized primarily on proximal tubules. Glomeruli and other vascular elements were devoid of ({sup 3}H)Sch 23390 binding sites. These results suggest that DA and DA1 agonists may affect sodium excretion by a direct action on proximal tubule sodium reabsorption.

  18. Autoradiographic localization of /sup 3/H-dihydrotestosterone in the preoptic area, hypothalamus, and amygdala of a male rhesus monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, R.P.; Rees, H.D.

    1982-06-14

    In a preliminary study, autoradiography was used to localize target cells for /sup 3/H-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), a non-aromatizable androgen, in the brain of the rhesus monkey. One castrated male was injected intravenously with 2 mCi of /sup 3/H-DHT (0.42 ..mu..g/kg), and was killed one hour later. Neurons that concentrated radioactivity in their nuclei were located in widespread areas of the brain, which included the medial and suprachiasmatic preoptic nuclei, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, lateral septal nucleus, anterior hypothalamic area, ventromedial, arcuate, dorsomedial, and paraventricular hypothalamic nuclei, ventral premammillary nucleus, and medial, cortical, basal accessory, and lateral amygdaloid nuclei. These results indicate that the topographic distribution of androgen target neurons is considerably wider than that observed in a study using /sup 3/H-testosterone (T) in the male rhesus monkey. However, further work is needed to elucidate these differences before attempting correlations between behavioral activity and androgen receptors in the brain.

  19. The ventral surface of the medulla in the rat: pharmacologic and autoradiographic localization of GABA-induced cardiovascular effects.

    PubMed

    Keeler, J R; Shults, C W; Chase, T N; Helke, C J

    1984-04-16

    Experiments were done to evaluate a rat model for studying the cardiovascular effects of pharmacological manipulations of the ventral surface of the medulla. GABAergic drugs were used because of their well-characterized actions at the ventral surface of the medulla in the cat. GABA and muscimol, applied to the exposed ventral surface with filter paper pledgets, produced dose-dependent decreases in heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) which were reversed with bicuculline but not with strychnine. Bicuculline alone raised HR and MAP. The GABA- or bicuculline-induced cardiovascular effects were mediated primarily by inhibition of sympathetic outflow. The most sensitive site was localized to an intermediate area on the ventral surface of the medulla, between the trapezoid body and exits of the hypoglossal nerves and just lateral to the pyramids. Topical application of [3H]GABA to the intermediate area resulted in labeling that was concentrated at the site of application, and which penetrated the parenchyma 1 mm dorsally. The heaviest labeling was found primarily in the ventral halves of the lateral paragigantocellular nuclei. No tritium was detected in peripheral blood. These data provide evidence for a neuronal system at the ventral medullary surface of the rat which influences sympathetic outflow and is modulated by GABA. PMID:6326937

  20. Autoradiographic localization of supraspinal kappa-opioid receptors with (/sup 125/I-Tyr1, D-Pro10)dynorphin A-(1-11)

    SciTech Connect

    Jomary, C.; Gairin, J.E.; Cros, J.; Meunier, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    (/sup 125/I-Tyr1, D-Pro10)dynorphin A-(1-11) (/sup 125/I-DP-DYN), an opioid peptide analogue that has previously been shown to be kappa selective, displays specific, saturable, and high-affinity (Kd = 0.3 nM) binding in slide-mounted sections from nerve tissue. We have used /sup 125/I-DPDYN to autoradiographically visualize supraspinal kappa-opioid receptor sites in rats, guinea pigs, and rabbits. The autoradiographic dispositions of /sup 125/I-DPDYN in sections from cerebellum are clearly different in guinea pig and rabbit, suggesting that kappa receptors have different functions in this organ of the two species. Autoradiograms from /sup 125/I-DPDYN-labeled brain sections also reveal major species differences, in particular in thalamus, which is densely labeled in rabbit and considerably less so in rat and guinea pig. The data show that /sup 125/I-DPDYN is a useful probe to visualize kappa-opioid receptor sites in nerve tissue sections directly and rapidly.

  1. Differential flow: Locally Generated or Coronal Artifact?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alterman, B. L.; Kasper, J. C.; Stevens, M. L.; Szabo, A.; Koval, A.

    2015-12-01

    Alpha particles and proton beams differentially flow in the solar wind with respect to the proton core by about an Alfvén speed. Whether differential flow is an artifact of coronal physics or a signature of local acceleration as the solar wind propagates earthward is undetermined. A new analysis of Wind spacecraft observations in the solar wind combines Faraday Cup ion distribution functions with vector magnetic field measurements to characterize the bulk properties of the proton core, proton beam, and alpha particles with 92s time resolution. We utilize this data set to examine the occurrence of differential flow at 1 AU as a function of solar wind conditions and other parameters. We discuss the implications of observed trends on our understanding of differential flow's origin.

  2. Differentiable Cohomology on Locally Compact Groups

    PubMed Central

    Whyburn, Kenneth

    1970-01-01

    In this paper the notions of vector field and differential form are extended to locally compact groups which are the inverse limit of Lie groups. This is done using Bruhat's definition of [unk]c∞ functions on such a group. Vector fields are defined as derivations on the [unk]c∞ functions. Then tangent vectors at a point are defined as elements of the inverse limit of the tangent spaces of the Lie groups. Tangent vectors then are put together to form vector fields, corresponding to a bundle definition, and the two notions are shown to be equivalent. Differential forms are defined using a bundle type definition from continuous linear functional on the tangent space. An existence and uniqueness theorem is proven for the exterior differential. Then an analog of the Poincaré lemma leads to the de Rham theorem relating the Cech cohomology with real coefficients to the cohomology of the differential forms. PMID:16591866

  3. Differentiable cohomology on locally compact groups.

    PubMed

    Whyburn, K

    1970-09-01

    In this paper the notions of vector field and differential form are extended to locally compact groups which are the inverse limit of Lie groups. This is done using Bruhat's definition of [unk](c) (infinity) functions on such a group. Vector fields are defined as derivations on the [unk](c) (infinity) functions. Then tangent vectors at a point are defined as elements of the inverse limit of the tangent spaces of the Lie groups. Tangent vectors then are put together to form vector fields, corresponding to a bundle definition, and the two notions are shown to be equivalent. Differential forms are defined using a bundle type definition from continuous linear functional on the tangent space. An existence and uniqueness theorem is proven for the exterior differential. Then an analog of the Poincaré lemma leads to the de Rham theorem relating the Cech cohomology with real coefficients to the cohomology of the differential forms. PMID:16591866

  4. Autoradiographic method to screen for soil microorganisms which accumulate zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Zamani, B.; Knezek, B.D.; Flegler, S.L.; Beneke, E.S.; Dazzo, F.B.

    1985-01-01

    An autoradiographic method was developed to screen for and isolate soil microorganisms which accumulate zinc (ZN). Diluted soil samples (pH 5.9) were plated on soil extract-glucose agar containing radioactive /sup 65/Zn. After 7 days of incubation, individual colonies which accumulated sufficient /sup 65/Zn could be detected by autoradiography. These colonies were isolated and confirmed as Zn accumulators in pure culture by using the autoradiographic plate technique. Most Zn accumulators were filamentous fungi, identified as Penicillium janthinellum, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Paecilomyces sp. Isolates of Penicillium janthinellum were the most common Zn accumulators. The most abundant Zn-accumulating bacteria were Bacillus spp. The validity of the autoradiographic plate technique to differentiate soil microbes which accumulate Zn was examined independently by energy dispersive X-ray analysis in a scanning electron microscope. This method confirmed that fungal isolates which gave positive autoradiographic responses in the plate assay bioaccumulated more Zn in their biomass than fungal isolates from the same soil sample which gave negative autoradiographic responses. Thus, this technique can be applied to specifically screen for and isolate microbes from the environment which bioaccumulate Zn.

  5. Local actions of angiotensin II: quantitative in vitro autoradiographic localization of angiotensin II receptor binding and angiotensin converting enzyme in target tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Chai, S.Y.; Allen, A.M.; Adam, W.R.; Mendelsohn, F.A.

    1986-01-01

    In order to gain insight into the local actions of angiotensin II (ANG II) we have determined the distribution of a component of the effector system for the peptide, the ANG II receptor, and that of an enzyme-catalysing ANG II formation, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), by in vitro autoradiography in several target tissues. The superagonist ANG II analog, /sup 125/I(Sar1)ANG II, or the antagonist analog, /sup 125/I(Sar1,Ile8)ANG II, were used as specific radioligands for ANG II receptors. A derivative of the specific ACE inhibitor, lysinopril, called /sup 125/I-351A, was used to label ACE in tissues. In the adrenal, a high density of ANG II receptors occurs in the glomerulosa zone of the cortex and in the medulla. ACE is also localized in these two zones, indicating that local production of ANG II may occur close to its sites of action in the zona glomerulosa and adrenal medulla. In the kidney, a high density of ANG II receptors is associated with glomeruli in the cortex and also with vasa recta bundles in the inner stripe of the outer medulla. ACE is found in very high concentration in deep proximal convoluted tubules of the cortex, while much lower concentrations of the enzyme occur in the vascular endothelium throughout the kidney. In the central nervous system three classes of relationships between ANG II receptors and ACE are observed: In the circumventricular organs, including the subfornical organ and organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, a high concentration of both components occurs. Since these structures have a deficient blood-brain barrier, local conversion of circulating angiotensin I (ANG I) to ANG II may contribute to the action of ANG II at these sites.

  6. Development of receptors for insulin and insulin-like growth factor-I in head and brain of chick embryos: Autoradiographic localization

    SciTech Connect

    Bassas, L.; Girbau, M.; Lesniak, M.A.; Roth, J.; de Pablo, F. )

    1989-11-01

    In whole brain of chick embryos insulin receptors are highest at the end of embryonic development, while insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) receptors dominate in the early stages. These studies provided evidence for developmental regulation of both types of receptors, but they did not provide information on possible differences between brain regions at each developmental stage or within one region at different embryonic ages. We have now localized the specific binding of (125I)insulin and (125I)IGF-I in sections of head and brain using autoradiography and computer-assisted densitometric analysis. Embryos have been studied from the latter part of organogenesis (days 6 and 12) through late development (day 18, i.e. 3 days before hatching), and the binding patterns have been compared with those in the adult brain. At all ages the binding of both ligands was to discrete anatomical regions. Interestingly, while in late embryos and adult brain the patterns of (125I)insulin and (125I) IGF-I binding were quite distinct, in young embryos both ligands showed very similar localization of binding. In young embryos the retina and lateral wall of the growing encephalic vesicles had the highest binding of both (125I)insulin and (125I)IGF-I. In older embryos, as in the adult brain, insulin binding was high in the paleostriatum augmentatum and molecular layer of the cerebellum, while IGF-I binding was prominent in the hippocampus and neostriatum. The mapping of receptors in a vertebrate embryo model from early prenatal development until adulthood predicts great overlap in any possible function of insulin and IGF-I in brain development, while it anticipates differential localized actions of the peptides in the mature brain.

  7. Autoradiographic localization of delta opioid receptors within the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system using radioiodinated (2-D-penicillamine, 5-D-penicillamine)enkephalin ( sup 125 I-DPDPE)

    SciTech Connect

    Dilts, R.P.; Kalivas, P.W. )

    1990-01-01

    The enkephalin analog (2-D-penicillamine, 5-D-penicillamine)enkephalin was radioiodinated (125I-DPDPE) and shown to retain a pharmacological selectivity characteristic of the delta opioid receptor in in vitro binding studies. The distributions of 125I-DPDPE binding, using in vitro autoradiographic techniques, were similar to those previously reported for the delta opioid receptor. The nucleus accumbens, striatum, and medial prefrontal cortex contain dense gradients of 125I-DPDPE binding in regions known to receive dopaminergic afferents emanating from the mesencephalic tegmentum. Selective chemical lesions of the ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra were employed to deduce the location of the 125I-DPDPE binding within particular regions of the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system. Unilateral lesions of dopamine perikarya (A9 and A10) within the ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra produced by mesencephalic injection of 6-hydroxydopamine resulted in significant (20-30%) increases in 125I-DPDPE binding contralateral to the lesion within the striatum and nucleus accumbens. Lesions of the perikarya (dopaminergic and nondopaminergic) of the ventral tegmental area, induced by quinolinic acid injections, caused increases of less magnitude within these same nuclei. No significant alterations in 125I-DPDPE binding were observed within the mesencephalon as a result of either treatment. The specificity of the lesions was confirmed by immunocytochemistry for tyrosine hydroxylase. These results suggest that the enkephalins and opioid agonists acting through delta opioid receptors do not directly modulate dopaminergic afferents but do regulate postsynaptic targets of the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system.

  8. Autoradiographic visualization of angiotensin-converting enzyme in rat brain with (/sup 3/H)captopril: localization to a striatonigral pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Strittmatter, S.M.; Lo, M.M.S.; Javitch, J.A.; Snyder, S.H.

    1984-03-01

    The authors have visualized angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE; dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase, peptidylpeptide hydrolase, EC 3.4.15.1) in rat brain by in vitro (/sup 3/H)captopril autoradiography. (/sup 3/H)Captopril binding to brain slices displays a high affinity (K/sub d/ = 1.8 x 10/sup -9/ M) and a pharmacological profile similar to that of ACE activity. Very high densities of (/sup 3/H)captopril binding were found in the choroid plexus and the subfornical organ. High densities were present in the caudate putamen and substantia nigra, zona reticulata. Moderate levels were found in the entopeduncular nucleus, globus pallidus, and median eminence of the hypothalamus. Lower levels were detectable in the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus, the media habenula, the median preoptic area, and the locus coeruleus. Injection of ibotenic acid or colchicine into the caudate putamen decreased (/sup 3/H)captopril-associated autoradiographic grains by 85% in the ipsilateral caudate putamen and by > 50% in the ipsilateral substantia nigra. Thus, ACE in the substantia nigra is located on presynaptic terminals of axons originating from the caudate putamen, and ACE in the caudate putamen is situated in neuronal perikarya or at the terminals of striatal interneurons. The lack of effect of similar injections into the substantia nigra confirmed that the caudate putamen injections did not cause trans-synaptic changes. The presence of (/sup 3/H)captopril binding is consistent with an ACE-mediated production of angiotensin II in some brain regions. Although (/sup 3/H)captopril autoradiography reveals ACE in a striatonigral pathway, there is no evidence for angiotensin II involvement in such a neuronal pathway. 26 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  9. Radiochemical technique for intensification of underexposed autoradiographs

    SciTech Connect

    Owunwanne, A.

    1984-04-01

    A radiochemical technique has been used to recover images of underexposed and developed autoradiographs. The underexposed image was radioactivated in a solution of (/sup 35/S)thiourea, air-dried, and reexposed to Kodak NMC film which was developed and processed in a Kodak X-Omat processor. Features which were not discernible in the underexposed autoradiographs were well distinguished in the intensified autoradiograph.

  10. Autoradiographic image intensification - Applications in medical radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Askins, B. S.

    1978-01-01

    The image of an 80 to 90 percent underexposed medical radiograph can be increased to readable density and contrast by autoradiographic image intensification. The technique consists of combining the image silver of the radiograph with a radioactive compound, thiourea labeled with sulfur-35, and then making an autoradiograph from the activated negative.

  11. Pharmacological and autoradiographic characterization of sigma receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Largent, B.L.

    1986-01-01

    The existence of three types of opioid receptors - ..mu.., kappa, and sigma - was postulated to explain the effects of different opioids in the chronic spinal dog. Sigma receptors, named for the prototypic agonist SKF 10,047 (N-allylnormetazocine), were suggested to mediate the psychotomimetic-like effects of SKF 10,047 in the dog. 3-(3-Hydroxyphenyl)-N-(1-propyl)piperidine (3-PPP) has been proposed as a selective dopamine autoreceptor agonist. However, the drug specificity of (+)(/sup 3/H)3-PPP binding in brain is identical to that of sigma receptor binding sites which may mediate psychotomimetic effects of some opioids. Pharmacological and autoradiographic analyses reveal that (+)(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047, the prototypic sigma agonist, labels two sites in brain. The drug specificity of the high affinity site for (+)(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047 resembles that of putative sigma receptors labeled with (+)(/sup 3/H)3-PPP, being potently inhibited by (+)3-PPP, haloperidol, and (+/-)pentazocine, and demonstrating stereoselectivity for the (+) isomer of SKF 10,047. Autoradiographic localizations of high affinity (+)(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047 binding sites closely resemble those of (+)(/sup 3/H)3-PPP labeled sites with high levels of binding in the hippocampal pyramidal cell layer, hypothalamus, and pontine and cranial nerve nuclei. Thus, putative sigma receptors and PCP receptors represent distinct receptor populations in brain. This proposal is supported by the presence of sigma binding sites - and absence of PCP receptors - on NCB-20 cell membranes, a hybrid neurotumor cell line that provides a model system for the physiological and biochemical study of sigma receptors.

  12. Ultrastructural Studies of H-1 Parvovirus Replication VI. Simultaneous Autoradiographic and Immunochemical Intranuclear Localization of Viral DNA Synthesis and Protein Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Irwin I.; Rhode, Solon L.

    1978-01-01

    The localization of H-1 viral replicative-form double-stranded DNA and progeny single-stranded DNA replication in parasynchronously infected, simian virus 40-transformed newborn human kidney cells was studied with high-resolution electron microscope autoradiography (80-nm silver grains). We analyzed wild-type H-1 and ts1 H-1 (a conditional mutant defective in progeny single-stranded DNA synthesis). The proportion of the total DNA synthesis that was viral was estimated to be >90% by comparing the amount of [3H]thymidine uptake in cultures infected with wild-type H-1 versus ts14 (an H-1 mutant defective in DNA replication). Simultaneous staining with cytochrome c-conjugated anti-H-1 immunoglobulin G was performed to ensure that cells incorporating [3H]thymidine (2- to 60-min pulses) were H-1 infected. The sites of H-1 replicative-form (in ts1-infected cells) and progeny (in wild-type-infected cells) DNA synthesis were identical. Immunospecifically labeled nuclei at the earliest stages of infection exhibited dense clusters of silver grains over material extruded from nucleolar fibrillar centers. These foci became larger with increasing cellular damage, forming a limited number of H-1 DNA synthetic centers in the euchromatin. Each island-like focus was surrounded by tufts of heterochromatin containing high concentrations of unassembled H-1 capsid proteins. In late phases of infection, the heterochromatin became completely marginated, and the nucleoplasm contained only euchromatin that exhibited randomly distributed sites of H-1 DNA replication. This indicates that H-1 DNA synthesis begins at localized euchromatic or nucleolar sites and then spreads outward. Immunostained heterochromatin and nucleolar chromatin never incorporated [3H]thymidine. Our results suggest that H-1 proteins and cellular cofactors associated with the fibrillar component of the nucleolus and the euchromatin may play a role in the regulation of H-1 DNA synthesis. Images PMID:340710

  13. Evidence for and Localization of Vegetative Viral DNA Replication by Autoradiographic Detection of RNA·DNA Hybrids in Sections of Tumors Induced by Shope Papilloma Virus

    PubMed Central

    Orth, Gérard; Jeanteur, Philippe; Croissant, Odile

    1971-01-01

    The occurrence and localization of vegetative viral DNA replication was studied in sections of tumors induced by the rabbit Shope papilloma virus, in cottontail and domestic rabbit papillomas, in primary domestic rabbit carcinoma, and in transplantable VX2 carcinoma, by in situ hybridization of radioactive RNA complementary to viral DNA. Vegetative viral DNA replication and viral protein synthesis were compared by means of cytological hybridization and immunofluorescence techniques on adjacent frozen sections. Vegetative viral DNA replication is completely repressed in the proliferating cellular layers of these tumors, which suggests a provirus state of the viral genome, as in other cells transformed by oncogenic DNA viruses. Vegetative viral DNA replication is induced, after initiation of the keratinization, in cells of cottonail rabbit papillomas, where it is usually followed by viral protein synthesis; this illustrates the influence of the physiological state of the host cell on the control of viral functions. Vegetative viral DNA replication is deteced only in a few cells of domestic rabbit papillomas, at the end of the keratinization process; this observation provides indirect evidence that the DNA synthesis specifically induced in these tumors after the onset of keratinization reflects mostly the induction of cellular DNA synthesis. Images PMID:4331563

  14. Differential Localization of Antioxidants in Maize Leaves.

    PubMed Central

    Doulis, A. G.; Debian, N.; Kingston-Smith, A. H.; Foyer, C. H.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the compartmentation of antioxidants between the bundle-sheath and mesophyll cells of maize (Zea mays L.) leaves. Rapid fractionation of the mesophyll compartment was used to minimize modifications in the antioxidant status and composition due to extraction procedures. The purity of the mesophyll isolates was assessed via the distribution of enzyme and metabolite markers. Ribulose-1,5 bisphosphate and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase were used as bundle-sheath markers and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase was used as the mesophyll marker enzyme. Glutathione reductase and dehydroascorbate reductase were almost exclusively localized in the mesophyll tissue, whereas ascorbate, ascorbate peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase were largely absent from the mesophyll fraction. Catalase, reduced glutathione, and monodehydroascorbate reductase were found to be approximately equally distributed between the two cell types. It is interesting that, whereas H2O2 levels were relatively high in maize leaves, this oxidant was largely restricted to the mesophyll compartment. We conclude that the antioxidants in maize leaves are partitioned between the two cell types according to the availability of reducing power and NADPH and that oxidized glutathione and dehydroascorbate produced in the bundle-sheat tissues have to be transported to the mesophyll for re-reduction to their reduced forms. PMID:12223757

  15. Local random potentials of high differentiability to model the Landscape

    SciTech Connect

    Battefeld, T.; Modi, C.

    2015-03-09

    We generate random functions locally via a novel generalization of Dyson Brownian motion, such that the functions are in a desired differentiability class C{sup k}, while ensuring that the Hessian is a member of the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble (other ensembles might be chosen if desired). Potentials in such higher differentiability classes (k≥2) are required/desirable to model string theoretical landscapes, for instance to compute cosmological perturbations (e.g., k=2 for the power-spectrum) or to search for minima (e.g., suitable de Sitter vacua for our universe). Since potentials are created locally, numerical studies become feasible even if the dimension of field space is large (D∼100). In addition to the theoretical prescription, we provide some numerical examples to highlight properties of such potentials; concrete cosmological applications will be discussed in companion publications.

  16. Local random potentials of high differentiability to model the Landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battefeld, T.; Modi, C.

    2015-03-01

    We generate random functions locally via a novel generalization of Dyson Brownian motion, such that the functions are in a desired differentiability class Ck, while ensuring that the Hessian is a member of the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble (other ensembles might be chosen if desired). Potentials in such higher differentiability classes (k>= 2) are required/desirable to model string theoretical landscapes, for instance to compute cosmological perturbations (e.g., k=2 for the power-spectrum) or to search for minima (e.g., suitable de Sitter vacua for our universe). Since potentials are created locally, numerical studies become feasible even if the dimension of field space is large (0D~ 10). In addition to the theoretical prescription, we provide some numerical examples to highlight properties of such potentials; concrete cosmological applications will be discussed in companion publications.

  17. Differential localization of A-Raf regulates MST2-mediated apoptosis during epithelial differentiation.

    PubMed

    Rauch, J; Vandamme, D; Mack, B; McCann, B; Volinsky, N; Blanco, A; Gires, O; Kolch, W

    2016-08-01

    A-Raf belongs to the family of oncogenic Raf kinases that are involved in mitogenic signaling by activating the MEK-ERK pathway. Low kinase activity of A-Raf toward MEK suggested that A-Raf might have alternative functions. We recently identified A-Raf as a potent inhibitor of the proapoptotic mammalian sterile 20-like kinase (MST2) tumor suppressor pathway in several cancer entities including head and neck, colon, and breast. Independent of kinase activity, A-Raf binds to MST2 thereby efficiently inhibiting apoptosis. Here, we show that the interaction of A-Raf with the MST2 pathway is regulated by subcellular compartmentalization. Although in proliferating normal cells and tumor cells A-Raf localizes to the mitochondria, differentiated non-carcinogenic cells of head and neck epithelia, which express A-Raf at the plasma membrane. The constitutive or induced re-localization of A-Raf to the plasma membrane compromises its ability to efficiently sequester and inactivate MST2, thus rendering cells susceptible to apoptosis. Physiologically, A-Raf re-localizes to the plasma membrane upon epithelial differentiation in vivo. This re-distribution is regulated by the scaffold protein kinase suppressor of Ras 2 (KSR2). Downregulation of KSR2 during mammary epithelial cell differentiation or siRNA-mediated knockdown re-localizes A-Raf to the plasma membrane causing the release of MST2. By using the MCF7 cell differentiation system, we could demonstrate that overexpression of A-Raf in MCF7 cells, which induces differentiation. Our findings offer a new paradigm to understand how differential localization of Raf complexes affects diverse signaling functions in normal cells and carcinomas. PMID:26891695

  18. Autoradiographic detection of mucopolysaccharide accumulation in single fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Frederik, P M; Fortuin, J J; Klepper, D; Galjaard, H

    1977-01-01

    A method is described for localizing acid mucopolysaccharides autoradiographically in cultured cells. Normal fibroblasts and fibroblasts, from patients suffering from Mucopolysaccharidosis II disease (MPS II), were cultured for six days in the presence of 35SO4 and one day in unlabelled medium. The cultured cells were transferred to plastic film dish and, after settling, they were rapidly quenched, freeze-dried, fixed in osmium tetroxide vapour and embedded in Epon. Grain counting after autoradiography in 2 mum sections revealed a significant difference (P greater than 0.001) in 35SO4 incorporation in the perinuclear cytoplasm of MPS II cells and control cells grown under the same conditions. Autoradiography was also performed after mixing MPS II cells and control fibroblasts in a ratio 1:1-8 prior to freezing and the same ratio was found between labelled and unlabelled fibroblasts. These results demonstrate the feasibility of the present autoradiographic technique for the detection of the acid mucopolysaccharide storage at the single cell level. PMID:137224

  19. An Enhanced Differential Evolution with Elite Chaotic Local Search.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhaolu; Huang, Haixia; Deng, Changshou; Yue, Xuezhi; Wu, Zhijian

    2015-01-01

    Differential evolution (DE) is a simple yet efficient evolutionary algorithm for real-world engineering problems. However, its search ability should be further enhanced to obtain better solutions when DE is applied to solve complex optimization problems. This paper presents an enhanced differential evolution with elite chaotic local search (DEECL). In DEECL, it utilizes a chaotic search strategy based on the heuristic information from the elite individuals to promote the exploitation power. Moreover, DEECL employs a simple and effective parameter adaptation mechanism to enhance the robustness. Experiments are conducted on a set of classical test functions. The experimental results show that DEECL is very competitive on the majority of the test functions. PMID:26379703

  20. An Enhanced Differential Evolution with Elite Chaotic Local Search

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhaolu; Huang, Haixia; Deng, Changshou; Yue, Xuezhi; Wu, Zhijian

    2015-01-01

    Differential evolution (DE) is a simple yet efficient evolutionary algorithm for real-world engineering problems. However, its search ability should be further enhanced to obtain better solutions when DE is applied to solve complex optimization problems. This paper presents an enhanced differential evolution with elite chaotic local search (DEECL). In DEECL, it utilizes a chaotic search strategy based on the heuristic information from the elite individuals to promote the exploitation power. Moreover, DEECL employs a simple and effective parameter adaptation mechanism to enhance the robustness. Experiments are conducted on a set of classical test functions. The experimental results show that DEECL is very competitive on the majority of the test functions. PMID:26379703

  1. Differential cellular localization of antioxidant enzymes in the trigeminal ganglion.

    PubMed

    Sato, H; Shibata, M; Shimizu, T; Shibata, S; Toriumi, H; Ebine, T; Kuroi, T; Iwashita, T; Funakubo, M; Kayama, Y; Akazawa, C; Wajima, K; Nakagawa, T; Okano, H; Suzuki, N

    2013-09-17

    Because of its high oxygen demands, neural tissue is predisposed to oxidative stress. Here, our aim was to clarify the cellular localization of antioxidant enzymes in the trigeminal ganglion. We found that the transcriptional factor Sox10 is localized exclusively in satellite glial cells (SGCs) in the adult trigeminal ganglion. The use of transgenic mice that express the fluorescent protein Venus under the Sox10 promoter enabled us to distinguish between neurons and SGCs. Although both superoxide dismutases 1 and 2 were present in the neurons, only superoxide dismutase 1 was identified in SGCs. The enzymes relevant to hydrogen peroxide degradation displayed differential cellular localization, such that neurons were endowed with glutathione peroxidase 1 and thioredoxin 2, and catalase and thioredoxin 2 were present in SGCs. Our immunohistochemical finding showed that only SGCs were labeled by the oxidative damage marker 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, which indicates that the antioxidant systems of SGCs were less potent. The transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily member 1 (TRPV1), the capsaicin receptor, is implicated in inflammatory hyperalgesia, and we demonstrated that topical capsaicin application causes short-lasting mechanical hyperalgesia in the face. Our cell-based assay revealed that TRPV1 agonist stimulation in the presence of TRPV1 overexpression caused reactive oxygen species-mediated caspase-3 activation. Moreover, capsaicin induced the cellular demise of primary TRPV1-positive trigeminal ganglion neurons in a dose-dependent manner, and this effect was inhibited by a free radical scavenger and a pancaspase inhibitor. This study delineates the localization of antioxidative stress-related enzymes in the trigeminal ganglion and reveals the importance of the pivotal role of reactive oxygen species in the TRPV1-mediated caspase-dependent cell death of trigeminal ganglion neurons. Therapeutic measures for antioxidative stress should be taken to prevent

  2. Graphical construction of a local perspective on differentiation and integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Ye Yoon; Thomas, Michael O. J.

    2015-06-01

    Recent studies of the transition from school to university mathematics have identified a number of epistemological gaps, including the need to change from an emphasis on equality to that of inequality. Another crucial epistemological change during this transition involves the movement from the pointwise and global perspectives of functions usually established through the school curriculum to a view of function that includes a local, or interval, perspective. This is necessary for study of concepts such as continuity and limit that underpin calculus and analysis at university. In this study, a first-year university calculus course in Korea was constructed that integrated use of digital technology and considered the epistemic value of the associated techniques. The aim was to encourage versatile thinking about functions, especially in relation to properties arising from a graphical investigation of differentiation and integration. In this paper, the results of this approach for the learning of derivative and antiderivative, based on integrated technology use, are presented. They show the persistence of what Tall ( Mathematics Education Research Journal, 20(2), 5-24, 2008) describes as symbolic world algebraic thinking on the part of a significant minority of students, who feel the need to introduce algebraic methods, in spite of its disadvantages, even when no explicit algebra is provided. However, the results also demonstrate the ability of many of the students to use technology mediation to build local or interval conceptual thinking about derivative and antiderivative functions.

  3. Sex, Violence, and Consonance/Differentiation: An Analysis of Local TV News Values.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davie, William R.; Lee, Jung-Sook

    1995-01-01

    Studies duplication and differentiation in local television news. Finds that local producers show a preference for sensational studies that feature acts of sex and violence and are easy to explain. Shows that little differentiation in topical areas exist for these stories built of concrete fact, but that local television news tends to…

  4. Ecological Values amid Local Interests: Natural Resource Conservation, Social Differentiation, and Human Survival in Honduras

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gareau, Brian J.

    2007-01-01

    Local peoples living in protected areas often have a different understanding about their natural space than do non-local groups that promote and declare such areas "protected." By designing protected areas without local involvement, or understandings of local social differentiation and power, natural resources management schemes will likely be…

  5. 5 CFR 591.234 - Under what circumstances may people recruited locally receive a post differential?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Under what circumstances may people recruited locally receive a post differential? 591.234 Section 591.234 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF... Post Differential-Nonforeign Areas Post Differentials § 591.234 Under what circumstances may...

  6. 5 CFR 591.234 - Under what circumstances may people recruited locally receive a post differential?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Under what circumstances may people recruited locally receive a post differential? 591.234 Section 591.234 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF... Post Differential-Nonforeign Areas Post Differentials § 591.234 Under what circumstances may...

  7. 5 CFR 591.234 - Under what circumstances may people recruited locally receive a post differential?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Under what circumstances may people recruited locally receive a post differential? 591.234 Section 591.234 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF... Post Differential-Nonforeign Areas Post Differentials § 591.234 Under what circumstances may...

  8. 5 CFR 591.234 - Under what circumstances may people recruited locally receive a post differential?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Under what circumstances may people recruited locally receive a post differential? 591.234 Section 591.234 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF... Post Differential-Nonforeign Areas Post Differentials § 591.234 Under what circumstances may...

  9. 5 CFR 591.234 - Under what circumstances may people recruited locally receive a post differential?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Under what circumstances may people recruited locally receive a post differential? 591.234 Section 591.234 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF... Post Differential-Nonforeign Areas Post Differentials § 591.234 Under what circumstances may...

  10. Autoradiographic localization of voltage-dependent sodium channels on the mouse neuromuscular junction using /sup 125/I-alpha scorpion toxin. I. Preferential labeling of glial cells on the presynaptic side

    SciTech Connect

    Boudier, J.L.; Jover, E.; Cau, P.

    1988-05-01

    Alpha-scorpion toxins bind specifically to the voltage-sensitive sodium channel in excitable membranes, and binding is potential-dependent. The radioiodinated toxin II from the scorpion Androctonus australis Hector (alpha ScTx) was used to localize voltage-sensitive sodium channels on the presynaptic side of mouse neuromuscular junctions (NMJ) by autoradiography using both light and electron microscopy. Silver grain localization was analyzed by the cross-fire method. At the light-microscopic level, grain density over NMJ appeared 6-8x higher than over nonjunctional muscle membrane. The specificity of labeling was verified by competition/displacement with an excess of native alpha ScTx. Labeling was also inhibited by incubation in depolarizing conditions, showing its potential-dependence. At the electron-microscopic level, analysis showed that voltage-sensitive sodium channels labeled with alpha ScTx were almost exclusively localized on membranes, as expected. Due to washout after incubation, appreciable numbers of binding sites were not found on the postsynaptic membranes. However, on the presynaptic side, alpha ScTx-labeled voltage-sensitive sodium channels were localized on the membrane of non-myelin-forming Schwann cells covering NMJ. The axonal presynaptic membrane was not labeled. These results show that voltage-sensitive sodium channels are present on glial cells in vivo, as already demonstrated in vitro. It is proposed that these glial channels could be indirectly involved in the ionic homeostasis of the axonal environment.

  11. Unsupervised eye pupil localization through differential geometry and local self-similarity matching.

    PubMed

    Leo, Marco; Cazzato, Dario; De Marco, Tommaso; Distante, Cosimo

    2014-01-01

    's shape that is obtained through a differential analysis of image intensities and the subsequent combination with the local variability of the appearance represented by self-similarity coefficients. The experimental evidence of the effectiveness of the method was demonstrated on challenging databases containing facial images. Moreover, its capabilities to accurately detect the centers of the eyes were also favourably compared with those of the leading state-of-the-art methods. PMID:25122452

  12. Local Analytic Solutions of a Functional Differential Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lingxia

    This paper is concerned with the existence of analytic solutions of an iterative functional differential equation. Employing the method of majorant series, we need to discuss the constant α given in Schröder transformation. we study analytic solutions of the equation in the case of α at resonance and the case of α near resonance under the Brjuno condition.

  13. Quantitative assessment and reduction of long-term autoradiographic background

    SciTech Connect

    Traub, R.K.; Famous, L.; Krishnan, R.; Olson, K.R.

    1990-01-01

    Quantitative autoradiography can measure distribution patterns in an animal exposed to radiolabeled compounds. A comparison of autoradiographs of rat brain containing low levels of 14C showed that a highly variable background signal had been produced. This resulted in several overexposed autoradiographs which could not be quantitatively compared. The background, believed to be produced by light emanating from the phosphor coating in the X-ray cassette, was a major impediment because it hindered correct analysis of the specimen. this article details our experiments demonstrating the sources of variance contributing to background and offers methods for its reduction. We found that placement of black polyethylene plastic between the slides and phosphor in the X-ray film cassette minimized autoradiographic background and effectively eliminated the effects caused by inherently different levels of radioactivity in the glass slides.

  14. Population differentiation in Pacific salmon: local adaptation, genetic drift, or the environment?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adkison, M.D.

    1995-01-01

    Morphological, behavioral, and life-history differences between Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) populations are commonly thought to reflect local adaptation, and it is likewise common to assume that salmon populations separated by small distances are locally adapted. Two alternatives to local adaptation exist: random genetic differentiation owing to genetic drift and founder events, and genetic homogeneity among populations, in which differences reflect differential trait expression in differing environments. Population genetics theory and simulations suggest that both alternatives are possible. With selectively neutral alleles, genetic drift can result in random differentiation despite many strays per generation. Even weak selection can prevent genetic drift in stable populations; however, founder effects can result in random differentiation despite selective pressures. Overlapping generations reduce the potential for random differentiation. Genetic homogeneity can occur despite differences in selective regimes when straying rates are high. In sum, localized differences in selection should not always result in local adaptation. Local adaptation is favored when population sizes are large and stable, selection is consistent over large areas, selective diffeentials are large, and straying rates are neither too high nor too low. Consideration of alternatives to local adaptation would improve both biological research and salmon conservation efforts.

  15. Statistical parametric mapping applied to an autoradiographic study of cerebral activation during treadmill walking in rats.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Peter T; Holschneider, Daniel P; Maarek, Jean-Michel I; Yang, Jun; Mandelkern, Mark A

    2004-09-01

    Autoradiographs are conventionally analyzed by a region-of-interest (ROI) analysis. However, definition of ROIs on an image set is labor intensive, is subject to potential inter-rater bias, and is not well suited for anatomically variable structures that may not consistently correspond to specific ROIs. Most importantly, the ROI method is poorly suited for whole-brain analysis, where one wishes to detect all activations resulting from an experimental paradigm. A system developed for analysis of imaging data in humans, Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM), avoids some of these limitations but has not previously been adapted as a tool for the analysis of autoradiographs. Here, we describe the application of SPM to an autoradiographic data set mapping cerebral activation in rats during treadmill walking. We studied freely moving, non-tethered rats that received injections of the cerebral blood flow tracer [14C]-iodoantipyrine, while they were performing a treadmill task (n = 7) or during a quiescent control condition (n = 6). Results obtained with SPM were compared to those previously reported using a standard ROI-based method of analysis [J. Cereb. Blood Flow Metab. 23(2003) 925]. The SPM method confirmed most areas detected as significant using the ROI approach. However, in the subcortex, SPM detected additional significant regions that, because of their irregular structures, fell short of statistical significance when analyzed by ROI. The SPM approach offers the ability to perform a semi-automated whole-brain analysis, and coupled with autoradiography, provides an effective means to globally localize functional activity in small animals. PMID:15325372

  16. On the local stability of vortices in differentially rotating discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Railton, A. D.; Papaloizou, J. C. B.

    2014-12-01

    In order to circumvent the loss of solid material through radial drift towards the central star, the trapping of dust inside persistent vortices in protoplanetary discs has often been suggested as a process that can eventually lead to planetesimal formation. Although a few special cases have been discussed, exhaustive studies of possible quasi-steady configurations available for dust-laden vortices and their stability are yet to be undertaken, thus their viability or otherwise as locations for the gravitational instability to take hold and seed planet formation is unclear. In this paper we generalize and extend the well-known Kida solution to obtain a series of steady-state solutions with varying vorticity and dust density distributions in their cores, in the limit of perfectly coupled dust and gas. We then present a local stability analysis of these configurations, considering perturbations localized on streamlines. Typical parametric instabilities found have growth rates of 0.05ΩP, where ΩP is the angular velocity at the centre of the vortex. Models with density excess can exhibit many narrow parametric instability bands while those with a concentrated vorticity source display internal shear which significantly affects their stability. However, the existence of these parametric instabilities may not necessarily prevent the possibility of dust accumulation in vortices.

  17. Autoradiographic demonstration of oxytocin-binding sites in the macula densa

    SciTech Connect

    Stoeckel, M.E.; Freund-Mercier, M.J. )

    1989-08-01

    Specific oxytocin (OT)-binding sites were localized in the rat kidney with use of a selective {sup 125}I-labeled OT antagonist ({sup 125}I-OTA). High concentrations of OT binding sites were detected on the juxtaglomerular apparatus with use of the conventional film autoradiographic technique. No labeling occurred on other renal structures. The cellular localization of the OT binding sites within the juxtaglomerular apparatus was studied in light microscope autoradiography, on semithin sections from paraformaldehyde-fixed kidney slices incubated in the presence of {sup 125}I-OTA. These preparations revealed selective labeling of the macula densa, mainly concentrated at the basal pole of the cells. Control experiments showed first that {sup 125}I-OTA binding characteristics were not noticeably altered by prior paraformaldehyde fixation of the kidneys and second that autoradiographic detection of the binding sites was not impaired by histological treatments following binding procedures. In view of the role of the macula densa in the tubuloglomerular feedback, the putative OT receptors of this structure might mediate the stimulatory effect of OT on glomerular filtration.

  18. Site of anticonvulsant action on sodium channels: autoradiographic and electrophysiological studies in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Worley, P.F.; Baraban, J.M.

    1987-05-01

    The anticonvulsants phenytoin and carbamazepine interact allosterically with the batrachotoxin binding site of sodium channels. In the present study, we demonstrate an autoradiographic technique to localize the batrachotoxin binding site on sodium channels in rat brain using (/sup 3/H)batrachotoxinin-A 20-alpha-benzoate (BTX-B). Binding of (/sup 3/H)BTX-B to brain sections is dependent on potentiating allosteric interactions with scorpion venom and is displaced by BTX-B (Kd approximately 200 nM), aconitine, veratridine, and phenytoin with the same rank order of potencies as described in brain synaptosomes. The maximum number of (/sup 3/H)BTX-B binding sites in forebrain sections also agrees with biochemical determinations. Autoradiographic localizations indicate that (/sup 3/H)BTX-B binding sites are not restricted to cell bodies and axons but are present in synaptic zones throughout the brain. For example, a particularly dense concentration of these sites in the substantia nigra is associated with afferent terminals of the striatonigral projection. By contrast, myelinated structures possess much lower densities of binding sites. In addition, we present electrophysiological evidence that synaptic transmission, as opposed to axonal conduction, is preferentially sensitive to the action of aconitine and veratridine. Finally, the synaptic block produced by these sodium channel activators is inhibited by phenytoin and carbamazepine at therapeutic anticonvulsant concentrations.

  19. Differential temperature stress measurement employing array sensor with local offset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesniak, Jon R. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The instrument has a focal plane array of infrared sensors of the integrating type such as a multiplexed device in which a charge is built up on a capacitor which is proportional to the total number of photons which that sensor is exposed to between read-out cycles. The infrared sensors of the array are manufactured as part of an overall array which is part of a micro-electronic device. The sensor achieves greater sensitivity by applying a local offset to the output of each sensor before it is converted into a digital word. The offset which is applied to each sensor will typically be the sensor's average value so that the digital signal which is periodically read from each sensor of the array corresponds to the portion of the signal which is varying in time. With proper synchronization between the cyclical loading of the test object and the frame rate of the infrared array the output of the A/D converted signal will correspond to the stress field induced temperature variations. A digital lock-in operation may be performed on the output of each sensor in the array. This results in a test instrument which can rapidly form a precise image of the thermoelastic stresses in an object.

  20. Autoradiographic localization of angiotensin II receptors in rat brain.

    PubMed Central

    Mendelsohn, F A; Quirion, R; Saavedra, J M; Aguilera, G; Catt, K J

    1984-01-01

    The 125I-labeled agonist analog [1-sarcosine]-angiotensin II ( [Sar1]AII) bound with high specificity and affinity (Ka = 2 X 10(9) M-1) to a single class of receptor sites in rat brain. This ligand was used to analyze the distribution of AII receptors in rat brain by in vitro autoradiography followed by computerized densitometry and color coding. A very high density of AII receptors was found in the subfornical organ, paraventricular and periventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus, nucleus of the tractus solitarius, and area postrema. A high concentration of receptors was found in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, lateral olfactory tracts, nuclei of the accessory and lateral olfactory tracts, triangular septal nucleus, subthalamic nucleus, locus coeruleus, and inferior olivary nuclei. Moderate receptor concentrations were found in the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, median preoptic nucleus, medial habenular nucleus, lateral septum, ventroposterior thalamic nucleus, median eminence, medial geniculate nucleus, superior colliculus, subiculum, pre- and parasubiculum, and spinal trigeminal tract. Low concentrations of sites were seen in caudate-putamen, nucleus accumbens, amygdala, and gray matter of the spinal cord. These studies have demonstrated that AII receptors are distributed in a highly characteristic anatomical pattern in the brain. The high concentrations of AII receptors at numerous physiologically relevant sites are consistent with the emerging evidence for multiple roles of AII as a neuropeptide in the central nervous system. Images PMID:6324205

  1. Autoradiographic localization of beta-adrenoreceptors in rat uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Tolszczuk, M.; Pelletier, G.

    1988-12-01

    The inhibitory effects of catecholamines on uterine smooth muscle are known to be mediated through beta-adrenergic receptors. To investigate further the distribution of these receptors in the rat uterus, we utilized in vitro autoradiography using ( SVI)-cyanopindolol (CYP), a specific beta-receptor ligand that has equal activity for both beta 1- and beta 2-receptor subtypes. The specificity of the labeling and the characterization of receptor subtypes in different cell types were achieved by displacement of radioligand with increasing concentrations of zinterol, a beta-adrenergic agonist with preferential affinity for the beta 2-adrenoreceptor subtype, and practolol, a beta-adrenergic antagonist that binds preferentially to the beta 1-subtype. Quantitative estimation of ligand binding was performed by densitometry. It was shown that the vast majority of beta-adrenoreceptors were of the beta 2-subtype and were found in high concentration not only in the myometrium but also in the endometrial and serosal epithelia. Specific labeling was also observed in glandular elements. These results suggest that beta-adrenoreceptors might be involved in different functions in the uterus.

  2. Neuropeptide Y receptors in rat brain: autoradiographic localization

    SciTech Connect

    Martel, J.C.; St-Pierre, S.; Quirion, R.

    1986-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptor binding sites have been characterized in rat brain using both membrane preparations and receptor autoradiography. Radiolabelled NPY binds with high affinity and specificity to an apparent single class of sites in rat brain membrane preparations. The ligand selectivity pattern reveals strong similarities between central and peripheral NPY receptors. NPY receptors are discretely distributed in rat brain with high densities found in the olfactory bulb, superficial layers of the cortex, ventral hippocampus, lateral septum, various thalamic nuclei and area postrema. The presence of high densities of NPY and NPY receptors in such areas suggests that NPY could serve important functions as a major neurotransmitter/neuromodulator in the central nervous system.

  3. Autoradiographic localization of angiotensin II receptors in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, F.A.O.; Quirion, R.; Saavedra, J.M.; Aguilera, G.; Catt, K.J.

    1984-03-01

    The /sup 125/I-labeled agonist analog (1-sarcosine)-angiotensin II ((Sar/sup 1/)AII) bound with high specificity and affinity (K/sub a/ = 2 x 10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/) to a single class of receptor sites in rat brain. This ligand was used to analyze the distribution of AII receptors in rat brain by in vitro autoradiography followed by computerized densitometry and color coding. A very high density of AII receptors was found in the subfornical organ, paraventricular and periventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus, nucleus of the tractus solitarius, and area postrema. A high concentration of receptors was found in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, lateral olfactory tracts, nuclei of the accessory and lateral olfactory tracts, triangular septal nucleus, subthalamic nucleus, locus coeruleus, and inferior olivary nuclei. Moderate receptor concentrations were found in the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, median preoptic nucleus, medial habenular nucleus, lateral septum, ventroposterior thalamic nucleus, median eminence, medial geniculate nucleus, superior colliculus, subiculum, pre- and parasubiculum, and spinal trigeminal tract. Low concentrations of sites were seen in caudate-putamen, nucleus accumbens, amygdala, and gray matter of the spinal cord. These studies have demonstrated that AII receptors are distributed in a highly characteristic anatomical pattern in the brain. The high concentrations of AII receptors at numerous physiologically relevant sites are consistent with the emerging evidence for multiple roles of AII as a neuropeptide in the central nervous system. 75 references, 2 figures.

  4. Localized decrease of {beta}-catenin contributes to the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Hayley; Patel, Shyam; Wong, Janelle; Chu, Julia; Li, Adrian; Li, Song

    2008-08-08

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) are pluripotent, and can be directed to differentiate into different cell types for therapeutic applications. To expand hESCs, it is desirable to maintain hESC growth without differentiation. As hESC colonies grow, differentiated cells are often found at the periphery of the colonies, but the underlying mechanism is not well understood. Here, we utilized micropatterning techniques to pattern circular islands or strips of matrix proteins, and examined the spatial pattern of hESC renewal and differentiation. We found that micropatterned matrix restricted hESC differentiation at colony periphery but allowed hESC growth into multiple layers in the central region, which decreased hESC proliferation and induced hESC differentiation. In undifferentiated hESCs, {beta}-catenin primarily localized at cell-cell junctions but not in the nucleus. The amount of {beta}-catenin in differentiating hESCs at the periphery of colonies or in multiple layers decreased significantly at cell-cell junctions. Consistently, knocking down {beta}-catenin decreased Oct-4 expression in hESCs. These results indicate that localized decrease of {beta}-catenin contributes to the spatial pattern of differentiation in hESC colonies.

  5. Progression of Intravesical Condyloma Acuminata to Locally Advanced Poorly Differentiated Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Khambati, A; Bhanji, Y; Oberlin, D T; Yang, X J; Nadler, R B; Perry, K T; Kundu, S D

    2016-07-01

    Condyloma acuminata (CA) is a common sexually transmitted disease caused by Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) infection. CA of the bladder, however, is an exceedingly rare lesion. We present a rare case of poorly differentiated locally invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) arising from recurrent CA of the bladder in an immunocompetent patient and discuss pathophysiology and management of this unusual condition. PMID:27335797

  6. The method of local linear approximation in the theory of nonlinear functional-differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Slyusarchuk, Vasilii E

    2010-10-06

    Conditions for the existence of solutions to the nonlinear functional-differential equation (d{sup m}x(t))/dt{sup m} + (fx)(t)=h(t), t element of R in the space of functions bounded on the axes are obtained by using local linear approximation to the operator F. Bibliography: 21 items.

  7. Autoradiographic studies of actinide sorption in groundwater systems

    SciTech Connect

    O'Kelley, G. D.; Beall, G. W.; Allard, B.

    1980-01-01

    Autoradiography is a convenient and sensitive technique for the study of spacial distributions of alpha radioactive nuclides on slabs of rock or on other planar surfaces. The autoradiographic camera contains an arrangement for placing in firm contact Polaroid sheet film, a plastic scintillator screen, and the radioactive face of the specimen. As an example of the use of the autoradiographic method, a series of sorption experiments were carried out in which synthetic groundwater solutions of americium, neptunium, uranium, and plutonium were contacted with Climax Stock granite under aerated and anoxic conditions at pH 8 to 9. The sorption observed at specific mineral sites was correlated with data on sorption of these actinides on pure minerals.

  8. Quantitative autoradiographic microimaging in the development and evaluation of radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Som, P.; Oster, Z.H.

    1994-04-01

    Autoradiographic (ARG) microimaging is the method for depicting biodistribution of radiocompounds with highest spatial resolution. ARG is applicable to gamma, positron and negatron emitting radiotracers. Dual or multiple-isotope studies can be performed using half-lives and energies for discrimination of isotopes. Quantitation can be performed by digital videodensitometry and by newer filmless technologies. ARG`s obtained at different time intervals provide the time dimension for determination of kinetics.

  9. Cantor-type cylindrical-coordinate method for differential equations with local fractional derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiao-Jun; Srivastava, H. M.; He, Ji-Huan; Baleanu, Dumitru

    2013-10-01

    In this Letter, we propose to use the Cantor-type cylindrical-coordinate method in order to investigate a family of local fractional differential operators on Cantor sets. Some testing examples are given to illustrate the capability of the proposed method for the heat-conduction equation on a Cantor set and the damped wave equation in fractal strings. It is seen to be a powerful tool to convert differential equations on Cantor sets from Cantorian-coordinate systems to Cantor-type cylindrical-coordinate systems.

  10. Improved positioning by addition of atmospheric corrections to local area differential GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Malkiat; Reilly, Michael H.

    2006-10-01

    A local area differential GPS (DGPS) method applies corrections from a reference GPS receiver to improve positioning accuracy for a roaming GPS receiver. Increasing separation between reference and roaming receivers dilutes this improvement, largely because ionospheric and tropospheric effects differ between their two locations. We correct differential corrections for this difference and determine the improvement with this "atmospheric" DGPS method at roaming receiver positions that are separated from a Coast Guard reference receiver at Annapolis, Maryland, by 44, 67, and 228 km. For ionospheric corrections we use our Raytrace-Ionospheric conductivity and electron density-Bent-Gallagher ionospheric propagation model with driving parameters obtained from two-frequency data of surveyed reference GPS receivers. For tropospheric corrections we use the Hopfield model and weather station data for surface temperature, pressure, and relative humidity. Internet delivery of atmospheric differential corrections is used to avoid blockage or range cutoff of radio transmissions. Some comparisons are made with Wide Area Augmentation System GPS receiver performance.

  11. Local probing of electrochemically induced negative differential resistance in TiO2 memristive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yunseok; Hyuck Jang, Jae; Park, Sang-Joon; Jesse, Stephen; Donovan, Leonard; Y Borisevich, Albina; Lee, Woo; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2013-03-01

    The early stages of electroforming in TiO2 were explored using a combination of electrochemical strain microscopy and local I-V curve measurements. Negative differential resistance and corresponding surface deformation were observed below the electroforming voltages. Electrochemical strain microscopy allowed probing of the changes in local electrochemical activity during the pre-forming and forming stages. The associated structural changes were visualized by transmission electron microscopy. The results allowed an understanding of the electrochemical processes in the early stages of electroforming, and provide a comprehensive approach for exploring irreversible and partially reversible bias-induced transformations in solids.

  12. Life history trait differentiation and local adaptation in invasive populations of Ambrosia artemisiifolia in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Meng; She, Deng-Ying; Zhang, Da-Yong; Liao, Wan-Jin

    2015-03-01

    Local adaptation has been suggested to play an important role in range expansion, particularly among invasive species. However, the extent to which local adaptation affects the success of an invasive species and the factors that contribute to local adaptation are still unclear. This study aimed to investigate a case of population divergence that may have contributed to the local adaptation of invasive populations of Ambrosia artemisiifolia in China. Common garden experiments in seven populations indicated clinal variations along latitudinal gradients, with plants from higher latitudes exhibiting earlier flowering and smaller sizes at flowering. In reciprocal transplant experiments, plants of a northern Beijing origin produced more seeds at their home site than plants of a southern Wuhan origin, and the Wuhan-origin plants had grown taller at flowering than the Beijing-origin plants in Wuhan, which is believed to facilitate pollen dispersal. These results suggest that plants of Beijing origin may be locally adapted through female fitness and plants from Wuhan possibly locally adapted through male fitness. Selection and path analysis suggested that the phenological and growth traits of both populations have been influenced by natural selection and that flowering time has played an important role through its direct and indirect effects on the relative fitness of each individual. This study evidences the life history trait differentiation and local adaptation during range expansion of invasive A. artemisiifolia in China. PMID:25362583

  13. Fine-scale genetic differentiation of a temperate herb: relevance of local environments and demographic change

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Yasuhiro; Kudoh, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The genetic structure of a plant species is shaped by environmental adaptation and demographic factors, but their relative contributions are still unknown. To examine the environment- or geography-related differentiation, we quantified genetic variation among 41 populations of a temperate herb, Arabidopsis halleri subsp. gemmifera (Brassicaceae). We analysed 19 microsatellite loci, which showed a significant population differentiation and a moderate within-population genetic diversity (global Gst = 0.42 and Hs = 0.19). Our structure analysis and phylogenetic network did not detect more than two genetic groups across the Japanese mainland but found fine-scale genetic differentiations and admixed patterns around the central area. Across the Japanese mainland, we found significant evidence for isolation-by-distance but not for isolation-by-environments. However, at least within the central area, the magnitude of genetic differentiation tended to increase with microhabitat dissimilarity under light conditions and water availability. Furthermore, most populations have been estimated to experience a recent decline in the effective population size, indicating a possibility of bottleneck effects on the pattern of genetic variation. These findings highlight a potential influence of the microhabitat conditions and demographic changes on the local-scale genetic differentiation among natural plant populations. PMID:25387749

  14. An autoradiographic study of the mouse olfactory epithelium: evidence for long-lived receptors.

    PubMed

    Hinds, J W; Hinds, P L; McNelly, N A

    1984-10-01

    In order to try to determine whether differentiated olfactory receptors turn over (die and are replaced by newly differentiated cells) during adult life, mice were injected with a single dose of 3H-thymidine at either 2 or 4 months of age and allowed to survive for up to 12 months; they were caged in a laminar flow unit to prevent rhinitis. Counts of labeled receptor cells detected autoradiographically after injection at 2 months of age revealed that, following an initial decrease from 1 to 3 months of survival, numbers of labeled cells remained approximately constant, at least up to 12 months of survival. Cells still labeled at 12 months of survival were confirmed as receptor cells by electron microscopic examination of reembedded sections. The hypothesis is suggested that in the absence of disease-related destruction of the olfactory epithelium, most or all receptor cell turnover represents newly formed cells that fail to establish synapses with the olfactory bulb; fully differentiated receptor cells may be quite long-lived. PMID:6542328

  15. Intra-Articular Synovial Sarcomas: Incidence and Differentiating Features from Localized Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis

    PubMed Central

    Nordemar, D.; Öberg, J.; Brosjö, O.; Skorpil, M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the incidence of intra-articular synovial sarcomas and investigate if any radiological variables can differentiate them from localized (unifocal) pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) and if multivariate data analysis could be used as a complementary clinical tool. Methods. Magnetic resonance images and radiographs of 7 cases of intra-articular synovial sarcomas and 14 cases of localized PVNS were blindedly reviewed. Variables analyzed were size, extra-articular growth, tumor border, blooming, calcification, contrast media enhancement, effusion, bowl of grapes sign, triple signal intensity sign, synovial low signal intensity, synovitis, age, and gender. Univariate and multivariate data analysis, the method of partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), were used. Register data on all synovial sarcomas were extracted for comparison. Results. The incidence of intra-articular synovial sarcomas was 3%. PLS-DA showed that age, effusion, size, and gender were the most important factors for discrimination between sarcomas and localized PVNS. No sarcomas were misclassified as PVNS with PLS-DA, while some PVNS were misclassified as sarcomas. Conclusions. The most important variables in differentiating intra-articular sarcomas from localized PVNS were age, effusion, size, and gender. Multivariate data analysis can be helpful as additive information to avoid a biopsy, if the tumor is classified as most likely being PVNS. PMID:26819567

  16. Local Discontinuous Galerkin Methods for Partial Differential Equations with Higher Order Derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yan, Jue; Shu, Chi-Wang; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we review the existing and develop new continuous Galerkin methods for solving time dependent partial differential equations with higher order derivatives in one and multiple space dimensions. We review local discontinuous Galerkin methods for convection diffusion equations involving second derivatives and for KdV type equations involving third derivatives. We then develop new local discontinuous Galerkin methods for the time dependent bi-harmonic type equations involving fourth derivatives, and partial differential equations involving fifth derivatives. For these new methods we present correct interface numerical fluxes and prove L(exp 2) stability for general nonlinear problems. Preliminary numerical examples are shown to illustrate these methods. Finally, we present new results on a post-processing technique, originally designed for methods with good negative-order error estimates, on the local discontinuous Galerkin methods applied to equations with higher derivatives. Numerical experiments show that this technique works as well for the new higher derivative cases, in effectively doubling the rate of convergence with negligible additional computational cost, for linear as well as some nonlinear problems, with a local uniform mesh.

  17. Differential Subcellular Localization of Leishmania Alba-Domain Proteins throughout the Parasite Development

    PubMed Central

    Dupé, Aurélien; Dumas, Carole; Papadopoulou, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Alba-domain proteins are RNA-binding proteins found in archaea and eukaryotes and recently studied in protozoan parasites where they play a role in the regulation of virulence factors and stage-specific proteins. This work describes in silico structural characterization, cellular localization and biochemical analyses of Alba-domain proteins in Leishmania infantum. We show that in contrast to other protozoa, Leishmania have two Alba-domain proteins, LiAlba1 and LiAlba3, representative of the Rpp20- and the Rpp25-like eukaryotic subfamilies, respectively, which share several sequence and structural similarities but also important differences with orthologs in other protozoa, especially in sequences targeted for post-translational modifications. LiAlba1 and LiAlba3 proteins form a complex interacting with other RNA-binding proteins, ribosomal subunits, and translation factors as supported by co-immunoprecipitation and sucrose gradient sedimentation analysis. A higher co-sedimentation of Alba proteins with ribosomal subunits was seen upon conditions of decreased translation, suggesting a role of these proteins in translational repression. The Leishmania Alba-domain proteins display differential cellular localization throughout the parasite development. In the insect promastigote stage, Alba proteins co-localize predominantly to the cytoplasm but they translocate to the nucleolus and the flagellum upon amastigote differentiation in the mammalian host and are found back to the cytoplasm once amastigote differentiation is completed. Heat-shock, a major signal of amastigote differentiation, triggers Alba translocation to the nucleolus and the flagellum. Purification of the Leishmania flagellum confirmed LiAlba3 enrichment in this organelle during amastigote differentiation. Moreover, partial characterization of the Leishmania flagellum proteome of promastigotes and differentiating amastigotes revealed the presence of other RNA-binding proteins, as well as differences in

  18. Influence of whole body irradiation and local shielding on matrix-induced endochondral bone differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wientroub, S; Weiss, J F; Catravas, G N; Reddi, A H

    1990-01-01

    Subcutaneous implantation of demineralized bone matrix into allogeneic rats induces endochondral bone formation. We have investigated the effects of irradiation on the sequelae of the interaction of collagenous matrix and mesenchymal cells and on cartilage and bone differentiation. Rats were irradiated in a vertical direction with a midline dose of 850 rad. Radiation entered the rats ventrally while a small area of the upper thorax was locally shielded. After irradiation, bone matrix was implanted in shielded and nonshielded sites, and the implants were studied at various stages. On day 3, [3H]thymidine incorporation, an index of cell proliferation, was inhibited by 70% in the nonshielded sites compared to nonirradiated control rats. The degree of inhibition (35%) was less pronounced in shielded sites. Furthermore, there was recovery of cell proliferation in the shielded sites as opposed to the nonshielded contralateral site. A similar pattern was observed on day 7 as assessed by 35SO4 incorporation into proteoglycans during chondrogenesis. Bone formation and mineralization were quantified on day 11 by alkaline phosphatase activity and 45Ca incorporation. In nonshielded sites, there was a 73% inhibition of alkaline phosphatase activity. In conclusion, radiation impaired progenitor cell proliferation which resulted in decreased cartilage and bone differentiation. These findings imply that local mesenchymal cells proliferate and differentiate into bone in response to implanted collagenous matrix. PMID:2104773

  19. Co-localization of growth QTL with differentially expressed candidate genes in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Kocmarek, Andrea L; Ferguson, Moira M; Danzmann, Roy G

    2015-09-01

    We tested whether genes differentially expressed between large and small rainbow trout co-localized with familial QTL regions for body size. Eleven chromosomes, known from previous work to house QTL for weight and length in rainbow trout, were examined for QTL in half-sibling families produced in September (1 XY male and 1 XX neomale) and December (1 XY male). In previous studies, we identified 108 candidate genes for growth expressed in the liver and white muscle in a subset of the fish used in this study. These gene sequences were BLASTN aligned against the rainbow trout and stickleback genomes to determine their location (rainbow trout) and inferred location based on synteny with the stickleback genome. Across the progeny of all three males used in the study, 63.9% of the genes with differential expression appear to co-localize with the QTL regions on 6 of the 11 chromosomes tested in these males. Genes that co-localized with QTL in the mixed-sex offspring of the two XY males primarily showed up-regulation in the muscle of large fish and were related to muscle growth, metabolism, and the stress response. PMID:26360524

  20. Accuracy of endodontic microleakage results: autoradiographic vs. volumetric measurements.

    PubMed

    Ximénez-Fyvie, L A; Ximénez-García, C; Carter-Bartlett, P M; Collado-Webber, F J

    1996-06-01

    The correlation between autoradiographic and volumetric leakage measurements was evaluated. Seventy-two anterior teeth with a single canal were selected and divided into three groups of 24. Group 1 served as control (no obturation), group 2 was obturated with gutta-percha only, and group 3 was obturated with gutta-percha and endodontic sealer. Samples were placed in a vertical position in 48-well cell culture plates and immersed in 1 ml of [14C]urea for 14 days. One-mm-thick horizontal serial sections were cut with a diamond disk cooled with liquid-nitrogen gas. Linear penetration was recorded by five independent evaluators from autoradiographs. Volumetric results were based on counts per minute registered in a liquid scintillation spectrometer. Pearson's correlation coefficient test was used to determine the lineal correlation between both methods of evaluation. No acceptable correlation values were found in any of the three groups (group 1, r = 0.34; group 2, r = 0.23; group 3, r = 0.20). Our results indicate that there is no correlation between linear and volumetric measurements of leakage. PMID:8934988

  1. Partial differential equation-based localization of a monopole source from a circular array.

    PubMed

    Ando, Shigeru; Nara, Takaaki; Levy, Tsukassa

    2013-10-01

    Wave source localization from a sensor array has long been the most active research topics in both theory and application. In this paper, an explicit and time-domain inversion method for the direction and distance of a monopole source from a circular array is proposed. The approach is based on a mathematical technique, the weighted integral method, for signal/source parameter estimation. It begins with an exact form of the source-constraint partial differential equation that describes the unilateral propagation of wide-band waves from a single source, and leads to exact algebraic equations that include circular Fourier coefficients (phase mode measurements) as their coefficients. From them, nearly closed-form, single-shot and multishot algorithms are obtained that is suitable for use with band-pass/differential filter banks. Numerical evaluation and several experimental results obtained using a 16-element circular microphone array are presented to verify the validity of the proposed method. PMID:24116418

  2. Local polynomial chaos expansion for linear differential equations with high dimensional random inputs

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yi; Jakeman, John; Gittelson, Claude; Xiu, Dongbin

    2015-01-08

    In this paper we present a localized polynomial chaos expansion for partial differential equations (PDE) with random inputs. In particular, we focus on time independent linear stochastic problems with high dimensional random inputs, where the traditional polynomial chaos methods, and most of the existing methods, incur prohibitively high simulation cost. Furthermore, the local polynomial chaos method employs a domain decomposition technique to approximate the stochastic solution locally. In each subdomain, a subdomain problem is solved independently and, more importantly, in a much lower dimensional random space. In a postprocesing stage, accurate samples of the original stochastic problems are obtained from the samples of the local solutions by enforcing the correct stochastic structure of the random inputs and the coupling conditions at the interfaces of the subdomains. Overall, the method is able to solve stochastic PDEs in very large dimensions by solving a collection of low dimensional local problems and can be highly efficient. In our paper we present the general mathematical framework of the methodology and use numerical examples to demonstrate the properties of the method.

  3. Localized committed differentiation of neural stem cells based on the topographical regulation effects of TiO2 nanostructured ceramics.

    PubMed

    Mou, Xiaoning; Wang, Shu; Guo, Weibo; Ji, Shaozheng; Qiu, Jichuan; Li, Deshuai; Zhang, Xiaodi; Zhou, Jin; Tang, Wei; Wang, Changyong; Liu, Hong

    2016-07-21

    In this study, a porous-flat TiO2 micropattern was fabricated with flat and nanoporous TiO2 ceramics for investigating the effect of topography on neural stem cell (NSC) differentiation. This finding demonstrates that localized committed differentiation could be achieved in one system by integrating materials with different topographies. PMID:27346410

  4. Microfluidic Device for Stem Cell Differentiation and Localized Electroporation of Postmitotic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Wonmo; Giraldo-Vela, Juan P.; Nathamgari, S. Shiva P.; McGuire, Tammy; McNaughton, Rebecca L.; Kessler, John A.; Espinosa, Horacio D.

    2014-01-01

    New techniques to deliver of nucleic acids and other molecules for gene editing and gene expression profiling, which can be performed with minimal perturbation to cell growth or differentiation, are essential for advancing biological research. Studying cells in their natural state, with temporal control, is particularly important for primary cells that are derived by differentiation from stem cells and are adherent, e.g., neurons. Existing high-throughput transfection methods either require cells to be in suspension or are highly toxic and limited to a single transfection per experiment. Here we present a microfluidic device that couples on-chip culture of adherent cells and transfection by localized electroporation. Integrated microchannels allow long-term cell culture on the device and repeated temporal transfection. The microfluidic device was validated by first performing electroporation of HeLa and HT1080 cells, with transfection efficiencies of ~95% for propidium iodide and up to 50% for plasmids. Application to primary cells was demonstrated by on-chip differentiation of neural stem cells and transfection of postmitotic neurons with a green fluorescent protein plasmid. PMID:25205561

  5. Local environment but not genetic differentiation influences biparental care in ten plover populations.

    PubMed

    Vincze, Orsolya; Székely, Tamás; Küpper, Clemens; Alrashidi, Monif; Amat, Juan A; Ticó, Araceli Argüelles; Burgas, Daniel; Burke, Terry; Cavitt, John; Figuerola, Jordi; Shobrak, Mohammed; Montalvo, Tomas; Kosztolányi, András

    2013-01-01

    Social behaviours are highly variable between species, populations and individuals. However, it is contentious whether behavioural variations are primarily moulded by the environment, caused by genetic differences, or a combination of both. Here we establish that biparental care, a complex social behaviour that involves rearing of young by both parents, differs between closely related populations, and then test two potential sources of variation in parental behaviour between populations: ambient environment and genetic differentiation. We use 2904 hours behavioural data from 10 geographically distinct Kentish (Charadrius alexandrinus) and snowy plover (C. nivosus) populations in America, Europe, the Middle East and North Africa to test these two sources of behavioural variation. We show that local ambient temperature has a significant influence on parental care: with extreme heat (above 40 °C) total incubation (i.e. % of time the male or female incubated the nest) increased, and female share (% female share of incubation) decreased. By contrast, neither genetic differences between populations, nor geographic distances predicted total incubation or female's share of incubation. These results suggest that the local environment has a stronger influence on a social behaviour than genetic differentiation, at least between populations of closely related species. PMID:23613768

  6. Local Environment but Not Genetic Differentiation Influences Biparental Care in Ten Plover Populations

    PubMed Central

    Vincze, Orsolya; Székely, Tamás; Küpper, Clemens; AlRashidi, Monif; Amat, Juan A.; Ticó, Araceli Argüelles; Burgas, Daniel; Burke, Terry; Cavitt, John; Figuerola, Jordi; Shobrak, Mohammed; Montalvo, Tomas; Kosztolányi, András

    2013-01-01

    Social behaviours are highly variable between species, populations and individuals. However, it is contentious whether behavioural variations are primarily moulded by the environment, caused by genetic differences, or a combination of both. Here we establish that biparental care, a complex social behaviour that involves rearing of young by both parents, differs between closely related populations, and then test two potential sources of variation in parental behaviour between populations: ambient environment and genetic differentiation. We use 2904 hours behavioural data from 10 geographically distinct Kentish (Charadrius alexandrinus) and snowy plover (C. nivosus) populations in America, Europe, the Middle East and North Africa to test these two sources of behavioural variation. We show that local ambient temperature has a significant influence on parental care: with extreme heat (above 40°C) total incubation (i.e. % of time the male or female incubated the nest) increased, and female share (% female share of incubation) decreased. By contrast, neither genetic differences between populations, nor geographic distances predicted total incubation or female's share of incubation. These results suggest that the local environment has a stronger influence on a social behaviour than genetic differentiation, at least between populations of closely related species. PMID:23613768

  7. 14-3-3σ regulates keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation by modulating Yap1 cellular localization

    PubMed Central

    Sambandam, Sumitha A.T.; Kasetti, Ramesh Babu; Xue, Lei; Dean, Douglas C.; Lu, Qingxian; Li, Qiutang

    2015-01-01

    The homozygous repeated epilation (Er/Er) mouse mutant of the gene encoding 14-3-3σ displays an epidermal phenotype characterized by hyperproliferative keratinocytes and undifferentiated epidermis. Heterozygous Er/+ mice develop spontaneous skin tumors and are highly sensitive to tumor-promoting DMBA/TPA induction. The molecular mechanisms underlying 14-3-3σ regulation of epidermal proliferation, differentiation, and tumor formation have not been well elucidated. In the present study, we found that Er/Er keratinocytes failed to sequester Yap1 in the cytoplasm, leading to its nuclear localization during epidermal development in vivo and under differentiation-inducing culture conditions in vitro. In addition, enhanced Yap1 nuclear localization was also evident in DMBA/TPA-induced tumors from Er/+ skin. Furthermore, shRNA knockdown of Yap1 expression in Er/Er keratinocytes inhibited their proliferation, suggesting that YAP1 functions as a downstream effector of 14-3-3σ controlling epidermal proliferation. We then demonstrated that keratinocytes express all seven 14-3-3 protein isoforms, some of which form heterodimers with 14-3-3σ, either full-length WT or the mutant form found in Er/Er mice. However Er 14-3-3σ does not interact with Yap1, as demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation. We conclude that Er 14-3-3σ disrupts the interaction between 14-3-3 and Yap1, thus fails to block Yap1 nuclear transcriptional function, causing continued progenitor expansion and inhibition of differentiation in Er/Er epidermis. PMID:25668240

  8. Autoradiographic visualization of CNS receptors for vasoactive intestinal peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, M.M.; Moody, T.W.

    1986-03-01

    Receptors for VIP were characterized in the rat CNS. /sup 125/I-VIP bound with high affinity to rat brain slices. Binding was time dependent and specific. Pharmacology studies indicated that specific /sup 125/I-VIP binding was inhibited with high affinity by VIP and low affinity by secretin and PHI. Using in vitro autoradiographic techniques high grain densities were present in the dentate gyrus, pineal gland, supraoptic and suprachiasmatic nuclei, superficial gray layer of the superior colliculus and the area postrema. Moderate grain densities were present in the olfactory bulb and tubercle, cerebral cortex, nucleus accumbens, caudate putamen, interstitial nucleus of the stria terminalis, paraventricular thalamic nucleus, medial amygdaloid nucleus, subiculum and the medial geniculate nucleus. Grains were absent in the corpus callosum and controls treated with 1 microM unlabeled VIP. The discrete regional distribution of VIP receptors suggest that it may function as an important modulator of neural activity in the CNS.

  9. Complementary effect of natural and sexual selection against immigrants maintains differentiation between locally adapted fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plath, Martin; Riesch, Rüdiger; Oranth, Alexandra; Dzienko, Justina; Karau, Nora; Schießl, Angela; Stadler, Stefan; Wigh, Adriana; Zimmer, Claudia; Arias-Rodriguez, Lenin; Schlupp, Ingo; Tobler, Michael

    2010-08-01

    Adaptation to ecologically heterogeneous environments can drive speciation. But what mechanisms maintain reproductive isolation among locally adapted populations? Using poeciliid fishes in a system with naturally occurring toxic hydrogen sulfide, we show that (a) fish from non-sulfidic sites ( Poecilia mexicana) show high mortality (95 %) after 24 h when exposed to the toxicant, while locally adapted fish from sulfidic sites ( Poecilia sulphuraria) experience low mortality (13 %) when transferred to non-sulfidic water. (b) Mate choice tests revealed that P. mexicana females exhibit a preference for conspecific males in non-sulfidic water, but not in sulfidic water, whereas P. sulphuraria females never showed a preference. Increased costs of mate choice in sulfidic, hypoxic water, and the lack of selection for reinforcement due to the low survival of P. mexicana may explain the absence of a preference in P. sulphuraria females. Taken together, our study may be the first to demonstrate independent—but complementary—effects of natural and sexual selection against immigrants maintaining differentiation between locally adapted fish populations.

  10. Differential expression and localization of TIMP-1 and TIMP-4 in human gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Groft, L L; Muzik, H; Rewcastle, N B; Johnston, R N; Knäuper, V; Lafleur, M A; Forsyth, P A; Edwards, D R

    2001-01-01

    Studies have suggested that an imbalance of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) may contribute to the malignant phenotype of gliomas. In this study, we have undertaken a detailed analysis of expression of the TIMP family in normal human brain and malignant gliomas at both the mRNA and protein level. Reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) analyses of total RNA from surgical tumour specimens revealed unique expression patterns for the 4 members of the TIMP family, with TIMP-1 and -4 showing positive and negative correlations, respectively, with glioma malignancy. By RT-PCR, TIMP-2 and TIMP-3 expression did not change with tumour grade. In situ hybridization localized TIMP-1 to glial tumour cells and also to the surrounding tumour vasculature. TIMP-4 transcripts were predominantly localized to tumour cells, though minor expression was found in vessels. Recombinant TIMP-4 reduced invasion of U251 glioma cells through Matrigel, and U87 clones overexpressing TIMP-4 showed reduced invasive capacity in vitro. TIMP-4, but not TIMP-1, blocked Membrane Type-1-MMP-mediated progelatinase-A (MMP-2) activation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. The differential expression and localization of individual TIMPs may contribute to the pathophysiology of human malignant gliomas, particularly with regard to tumour vascularization. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11437402

  11. Autoradiographic method for quantitation of radiolabeled proteins in tissues using indium-111

    SciTech Connect

    Morrell, E.M.; Tompkins, R.G.; Fischman, A.J.; Wilkinson, R.A.; Burke, J.F.; Rubin, R.H.; Strauss, H.W.; Yarmush, M.L. )

    1989-09-01

    A quantitative autoradiographic method was developed to measure 111In-labeled proteins in extravascular tissues with a spatial resolution sufficient to associate these proteins with tissue morphology. A linear relationship between measured grain density and isotope concentration was demonstrated with uniformly-labeled standard sources of epoxy-embedded gelatin containing (111In)albumin; half-distance of spatial resolution was 0.6 micron. The technique was illustrated by measuring 24-hr accumulation of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-coupled 111In-labeled human polyclonal IgG and human serum albumin (HSA) in a thigh infection model in the rat. Gamma camera images localized the infection and showed target-to-background ratios of 2.5 {plus minus} 0.3 for IgG and 1.4 {plus minus} 0.02 for human serum albumin (mean {plus minus} s.d., n = 3). Using quantitative autoradiography, significantly higher average tissue concentrations were found in the infected thighs at 4 to 4.5% of the initial plasma concentrations as compared to 0.2 to 0.3% of initial plasma concentrations in the noninfected thigh (p less than 0.05); these radiolabeled proteins were not inflammatory cell associated and localized primarily within the edematous interstitial spaces of the infection.

  12. Data analysis software for the autoradiographic enhancement process. Volumes 1, 2, and 3, and appendix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, S. P.

    1979-01-01

    The computer software developed to set up a method for Wiener spectrum analysis of photographic films is presented. This method is used for the quantitative analysis of the autoradiographic enhancement process. The software requirements and design for the autoradiographic enhancement process are given along with the program listings and the users manual. A software description and program listings modification of the data analysis software are included.

  13. Magnetic Exchange Couplings in Heterodinuclear Complexes Based on Differential Local Spin Rotations.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Rajendra P; Phillips, Jordan J; Peralta, Juan E

    2016-04-12

    We analyze the performance of a new method for the calculation of magnetic exchange coupling parameters for the particular case of heterodinuclear transition metals complexes of Cu, Ni, and V. This method is based on a generalized perturbative approach which uses differential local spin rotations via formal Lagrange multipiers (Phillips, J. J.; Peralta, J. E. J. Chem. Phys. 2013, 138, 174115). The reliability of the calculated couplings has been assessed by comparing with results from traditional energy differences with different density functional approximations and with experimental values. Our results show that this method to calculate magnetic exchange couplings can be reliably used for heteronuclear transition metal complexes, and at the same time, that it is independent from the different mapping schemes used in energy difference methods. PMID:26953521

  14. Differential biomarker expression in head and neck cancer correlates with anatomical localization.

    PubMed

    Tamás, László; Szentkúti, Gabriella; Eros, Mónika; Dános, Kornél; Brauswetter, Diána; Szende, Béla; Zsákovics, Ivett; Krenács, Tibor

    2011-09-01

    We tested the expression of known (p16(ink4), Ki67, p53, EGFR) and a new immunohistochemical (collagen XVII/BP180) biomarker in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) of diverse anatomical localization. Tissue microarrays (TMA) of 124 SCC were created, immunostained, and analyzed following whole slide digitalization using the Pannoramic Scan and the TMA Module software (3DHISTECH Kft, Budapest, Hungary). Statistical analysis of scoring results was carried out using Pearson's chi-square test. We observed the significant elevation of p16(ink4) and Ki67 expression in supraglottic, tonsillar and tonsillo-lingual SCCs compared to those affecting the oral cavity, oropharynx without tonsils, larynx without supraglottis and the hypopharynx. This differential antigen expression may reflect the diverse route of embryologic differentiation followed by the affected regions except those of the tonsils and the supraglottis which show similar antigenic pattern but diverse developmental path. All the other biomarkers tested including p53, collagen XVII and EGFR were detected in the majority of cancers including high grade cases, but did not reveal any significant regional difference. Based on our results oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas may not be regarded as one entity. Concerning the oral cavity and the oropharynx, cancers affecting the tonsils (palatine and lingual) show significantly elevated p16(ink4) and Ki67 expression; so as the cancers of the supraglottis compared to the rest of larynx. Consequently, tonsillar and supraglottic cancers show similar biomarker profiles. Correlation of differential biomarker expression with diverse biological behavior in head and neck cancers need further investigations. PMID:21487776

  15. Local Differentiation of Sugar Donor Specificity of Flavonoid Glycosyltransferase in Lamiales[W

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Akio; Horikawa, Manabu; Fukui, Yuko; Fukuchi-Mizutani, Masako; Iuchi-Okada, Asako; Ishiguro, Masaji; Kiso, Yoshinobu; Nakayama, Toru; Ono, Eiichiro

    2009-01-01

    Flavonoids are most commonly conjugated with various sugar moieties by UDP-sugar:glycosyltransferases (UGTs) in a lineage-specific manner. Generally, the phylogenetics and regiospecificity of flavonoid UGTs are correlated, indicating that the regiospecificity of UGT differentiated prior to speciation. By contrast, it is unclear how the sugar donor specificity of UGTs evolved. Here, we report the biochemical, homology-modeled, and phylogenetic characterization of flavonoid 7-O-glucuronosyltransferases (F7GAT), which is responsible for producing specialized metabolites in Lamiales plants. All of the Lamiales F7GATs were found to be members of the UGT88-related cluster and specifically used UDP-glucuronic acid (UDPGA). We identified an Arg residue that is specifically conserved in the PSPG box in the Lamiales F7GATs. Substitution of this Arg with Trp was sufficient to convert the sugar donor specificity of the Lamiales F7GATs from UDPGA to UDP-glucose. Homology modeling of the Lamiales F7GAT suggested that the Arg residue plays a critical role in the specific recognition of anionic carboxylate of the glucuronic acid moiety of UDPGA with its cationic guanidinium moiety. These results support the hypothesis that differentiation of sugar donor specificity of UGTs occurred locally, in specific plant lineages, after establishment of general regiospecificity for the sugar acceptor. Thus, the plasticity of sugar donor specificity explains, in part, the extraordinary structural diversification of phytochemicals. PMID:19454730

  16. Genomic Analysis of Differentiation between Soil Types Reveals Candidate Genes for Local Adaptation in Arabidopsis lyrata

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Thomas L.; von Wettberg, Eric J.; Nuzhdin, Sergey V.

    2008-01-01

    Serpentine soil, which is naturally high in heavy metal content and has low calcium to magnesium ratios, comprises a difficult environment for most plants. An impressive number of species are endemic to serpentine, and a wide range of non-endemic plant taxa have been shown to be locally adapted to these soils. Locating genomic polymorphisms which are differentiated between serpentine and non-serpentine populations would provide candidate loci for serpentine adaptation. We have used the Arabidopsis thaliana tiling array, which has 2.85 million probes throughout the genome, to measure genetic differentiation between populations of Arabidopsis lyrata growing on granitic soils and those growing on serpentinic soils. The significant overrepresentation of genes involved in ion transport and other functions provides a starting point for investigating the molecular basis of adaptation to soil ion content, water retention, and other ecologically and economically important variables. One gene in particular, calcium-exchanger 7, appears to be an excellent candidate gene for adaptation to low Ca∶Mg ratio in A. lyrata. PMID:18784841

  17. Local interspecies introgression is the main cause of extreme levels of intraspecific differentiation in mussels.

    PubMed

    Fraïsse, Christelle; Belkhir, Khalid; Welch, John J; Bierne, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Structured populations, and replicated zones of contact between species, are an ideal opportunity to study regions of the genome with unusual levels of differentiation; and these can illuminate the genomic architecture of species isolation, and the spread of adaptive alleles across species ranges. Here, we investigated the effects of gene flow on divergence and adaptation in the Mytilus complex of species, including replicated parental populations in quite distant geographical locations. We used target enrichment sequencing of 1269 contigs of a few kb each, including some genes of known function, to infer gene genealogies at a small chromosomal scale. We show that geography is an important determinant of the genomewide patterns of introgression in Mytilus and that gene flow between different species, with contiguous ranges, explained up to half of the intraspecific outliers. This suggests that local introgression is both widespread and tends to affect larger chromosomal regions than purely intraspecific processes. We argue that this situation might be common, and this implies that genome scans should always consider the possibility of introgression from sister species, unsampled differentiated backgrounds, or even extinct relatives, for example Neanderthals in humans. The hypothesis that reticulate evolution over long periods of time contributes widely to adaptation, and to the spatial and genomic reorganization of genetic backgrounds, needs to be more widely considered to make better sense of genome scans. PMID:26137909

  18. Drosophila dec-1 eggshell proteins are differentially distributed via a multistep extracellular processing and localization pathway.

    PubMed

    Noguerón, M I; Mauzy-Melitz, D; Waring, G L

    2000-09-15

    In Drosophila the multilayered eggshell forms during late oogenesis between the oocyte and the overlaying follicle cells. Proper eggshell assembly requires wild-type dec-1 gene function. Alternatively spliced dec-1 transcripts encode three proproteins that are cleaved extracellularly in a stage-specific manner to at least five distinct derivatives. Using polyclonal antibodies raised against fusion proteins containing different regions of the dec-1 proteins, we have localized several dec-1 derivatives in the assembling and completed eggshell. Although all of the dec-1 derivatives are generated in the oocyte proximal vitelline membrane layer, they are differentially distributed in the mature egg. Some derivatives are gradually released from the vitelline membrane and become localized within distinct regions of the chorion, while others are taken up by the oocyte or become concentrated in the endochorionic spaces or cavities. The diverse distributions of the dec-1 derivatives suggest that each derivative plays a distinct role in eggshell assembly. These results also suggest that the vitelline membrane layer, by acting as a transient storage site, may control the availability of molecules active in eggshell assembly and by extension perhaps other follicle cell products important in early embryonic pattern formation. PMID:10985863

  19. Localized committed differentiation of neural stem cells based on the topographical regulation effects of TiO2 nanostructured ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mou, Xiaoning; Wang, Shu; Guo, Weibo; Ji, Shaozheng; Qiu, Jichuan; Li, Deshuai; Zhang, Xiaodi; Zhou, Jin; Tang, Wei; Wang, Changyong; Liu, Hong

    2016-07-01

    In this study, a porous-flat TiO2 micropattern was fabricated with flat and nanoporous TiO2 ceramics for investigating the effect of topography on neural stem cell (NSC) differentiation. This finding demonstrates that localized committed differentiation could be achieved in one system by integrating materials with different topographies.In this study, a porous-flat TiO2 micropattern was fabricated with flat and nanoporous TiO2 ceramics for investigating the effect of topography on neural stem cell (NSC) differentiation. This finding demonstrates that localized committed differentiation could be achieved in one system by integrating materials with different topographies. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01874b

  20. Quantitative autoradiographic characterization of GA-BA sub B receptors in mammalian central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, D.Chin-Mei.

    1989-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of the amino acid neurotransmitter {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA) within the nervous system appear to be mediated through two distinct classes of receptors: GABA{sub A} and GABA{sub B} receptors. A quantitative autoradiographic method with {sup 3}H-GABA was developed to examine the hypotheses that GABA{sub A} and GABA{sub B} sites have distinct anatomical distributions, pharmacologic properties, and synaptic localizations within the rodent nervous system. The method was also applied to a comparative study of these receptors in postmortem human brain from individuals afflicted with Alzheimer's disease and those without neurologic disease. The results indicated that GABA{sub B} receptors occur in fewer numbers and have a lower affinity for GABA than GABA{sub A} receptors in both rodent and human brain. Within rodent brain, the distribution of these two receptor populations were clearly distinct. GABA{sub B} receptors were enriched in the medial habenula, interpeduncular nucleus, cerebellar molecular layer and olfactory glomerular layer. After selective lesions of postsynaptic neurons of the corticostriatal and perforant pathway, both GABA{sub B} and GABA{sub A} receptors were significantly decreased in number. Lesions of the presynaptic limbs of the perforant but not the corticostriatal pathway resulted in upregulation of both GABA receptors in the area of innervation. GABA{sub B} receptors were also upregulated in CA3 dendritic regions after destruction of dentate granule neurons.

  1. Registration and three-dimensional reconstruction of autoradiographic images by the disparity analysis method

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Weizhao; Ginsberg, M. . Cerebral Vascular Disease Research Center); Young, T.Y. . Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering)

    1993-12-01

    Quantitative autoradiography is a powerful radio-isotopic-imaging method for neuroscientists to study local cerebral blood flow and glucose-metabolic rate at rest, in response to physiologic activation of the visual, auditory, somatosensory, and motor systems, and in pathologic conditions. Most autoradiographic studies analyze glucose utilization and blood flow in two-dimensional (2-D) coronal sections. With modern digital computer and image-processing techniques, a large number of closely spaced coronal sections can be stacked appropriately to form a three-dimensional (3-d) image. 3-D autoradiography allows investigators to observe cerebral sections and surfaces from any viewing angle. A fundamental problem in 3-D reconstruction is the alignment (registration) of the coronal sections. A new alignment method based on disparity analysis is presented which can overcome many of the difficulties encountered by previous methods. The disparity analysis method can deal with asymmetric, damaged, or tilted coronal sections under the same general framework, and it can be used to match coronal sections of different sizes and shapes. Experimental results on alignment and 3-D reconstruction are presented.

  2. Quinolinic acid lesion of nucleus accumbens reduces D sub 1 but not D sub 2 dopamine receptors: An autoradiographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Filloux, F.; Richards, T.J.; Huff, G.F. ); Wamsley, J.K. )

    1991-01-01

    Information concerning the cellular localization of dopamine receptor subtypes in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) was obtained using receptor autoradiographic analysis. Unilateral, stereotaxic injection of the axonsparing neurotoxin, quinolinic acid, into the NAcc resulted in a prominent loss of dopamine D{sub 1} receptors (as labeled by ({sup 3}H)SCH 23390). Contrarily, no appreciable decrement in D{sub 2} receptors (labeled by ({sup 3}H)raclopride) could be identified within the same region of the NAcc. The findings support the view that accumbens D{sub 1} receptors are located postsynaptically on neurons or their processes, while D{sub 2} receptors within this nucleus are primarily located on afferent terminals.

  3. Autoradiographic analysis of muscarinic receptors in rat nasal glands.

    PubMed

    Van Megen, Y J; Teunissen, M J; Klaassen, A B; Rodrigues de Miranda, J F

    1988-01-01

    An in vitro method was developed for the biochemical and autoradiographic demonstration of low muscarinic receptor densities in peripheral tissue. Histological criteria point clearly to the necessity for fixation to preserve tissue quality. [3H]l-Quinuclidinylbenzilate bound specifically to a homogeneous class of binding sites in 0.5% glutardialdehyde-fixed cryostat sections (10 microns) of rat nasal glands with high affinity (Kd = 0.47 +/- 0.06 nM) and with a receptor density (Bmax) of 41 +/- 1 fmol/mg protein. This binding was linearly dependent on the thickness of the sections. Kinetic experiments resulted in a Kd value of 0.19 nM. Binding was stereoselectively inhibited by benzetimide enantiomers. Autoradiograms, generated after incubation with 0.6 nM [3H]l-quinuclidinylbenzilate and dipping in nuclear K2 emulsion, showed specific labelling of the glandular acini and excretory ducts. These in vitro observations provide conclusive evidence for the presence of acetylcholine receptors in the nasal glands of the rat. PMID:2450760

  4. Autoradiographic study of actinide sorption on climax stock granite

    SciTech Connect

    Beall, G.W.; O'Kelley, G.D.; Allard, B.

    1980-06-01

    An autoradiographic technique that employed an arrangement for placing in firm contact Polaroid sheet film, a scintillator screen, and the radioactive face of a specimen was applied to a study of the sorption of americium, neptunium, plutonium, and uranium on Climax Stock granite under varying conditions of pH and Eh. Qualitative agreement was found between the sorption of americium on crushed, pure minerals and on the minerals comprising the specimen of Climax Stock granite. The observations also supported a mechanism for reduction of Np(V) to Np(IV) and Pu(VI) to Pu(IV) by Fe(II)-containing minerals. There was no evidence for reduction of U(VI) by the Fe(II)-containing minerals, although the uranium, assumed to be present as UO/sub 2//sup 2 +/, appeared to be the only actinide species to exhibit sorption by a simple, cation-exchange mechanism at particular mineral sites. Some implications of these results for nuclear waste isolation are discussed briefly.

  5. Differential Gene Expression and Protein Localization of Cryptosporidium parvum Fatty Acyl-CoA Synthetase Isoforms.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fengguang; Zhang, Haili; Payne, Harold Ross; Zhu, Guan

    2016-03-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is unable to synthesize fatty acids de novo, but possesses three long-chain fatty acyl-CoA synthetase (CpACS) isoforms for activating fatty acids. We have recently shown that these enzymes could be targeted to kill the parasite in vitro and in vivo. Here, we demonstrated that the CpACS genes were differentially expressed during the parasite life cycle, and their proteins were localized to different subcellular structures by immunofluorescence and immuno-electron microscopies. Among them, CpACS1 displayed as an apical protein in sporozoites and merozoites, but no or little presence during the intracellular merogony until the release of merozoites, suggesting that CpACS1 probably functioned mainly during the parasite invasion and/or early stage of intracellular development. Both CpACS2 and CpACS3 proteins were present in all parasite life cycle stages, in which CpACS2 was present in the parasite and the parasitophorous vacuole membranes (PVM), whereas CpACS3 was mainly present in the parasite plasma membranes with little presence in the PVM. These observations suggest that CpACS2 and CpACS3 may participate in scavenging and transport of fatty acids across the PVM and the parasite cytoplasmic membranes, respectively. PMID:26411755

  6. Acoustic flight tests of rotorcraft noise-abatement approaches using local differential GPS guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Robert T. N.; Hindson, William S.; Mueller, Arnold W.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents the test design, instrumentation set-up, data acquisition, and the results of an acoustic flight experiment to study how noise due to blade-vortex interaction (BVI) may be alleviated. The flight experiment was conducted using the NASA/Army Rotorcraft Aircrew Systems Concepts Airborne Laboratory (RASCAL) research helicopter. A Local Differential Global Positioning System (LDGPS) was used for precision navigation and cockpit display guidance. A laser-based rotor state measurement system on board the aircraft was used to measure the main rotor tip-path-plane angle-of-attack. Tests were performed at Crows Landing Airfield in northern California with an array of microphones similar to that used in the standard ICAO/FAA noise certification test. The methodology used in the design of a RASCAL-specific, multi-segment, decelerating approach profile for BVI noise abatement is described, and the flight data pertaining to the flight technical errors and the acoustic data for assessing the noise reduction effectiveness are reported.

  7. The local environment orchestrates mucosal decidual macrophage differentiation and substantially inhibits HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    El Costa, H; Quillay, H; Marlin, R; Cannou, C; Duriez, M; Benjelloun, F; de Truchis, C; Rahmati, M; Ighil, J; Barré-Sinoussi, F; Nugeyre, M T; Menu, E

    2016-05-01

    Macrophages from the decidua basalis (dM), the main uterine mucosa during pregnancy, are weakly permissive to HIV-1 infection. Here, we investigated the mechanisms underlying this natural control. We show, by using freshly purified decidual macrophages and ex vivo human decidual explants, that the local decidual environment influences dM differentiation and naturally protects these cells from HIV-1 infection. Interferon (IFN)-γ, present in the decidual tissue, contributes to maintenance of the dM phenotype and restricts HIV-1 infection by mechanisms involving the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21Cip1/Waf1. We also found that activation of Toll-like receptors 7 and 8 expressed by dM reinforces the low permissivity of dM to HIV-1 by restricting viral replication and inducing secretion of cytokines in the decidual environment, including IFN-γ, that shape dM plasticity. A major challenge for HIV-1 eradication is to control infection of tissue-resident macrophages in the female reproductive tract. Our findings provide clues to the development of novel strategies to prevent HIV-1 macrophage infection. PMID:26349662

  8. Decreased biglycan expression and differential decorin localization in human abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Theocharis, Achilleas D; Karamanos, Nikos K

    2002-12-01

    obtained data suggest that the altered matrix architecture of aorta, i.e. the differential expression of biglycan and localization of decorin may well be crucial parameters accounting for the functional degeneration of the tissue and the development of aneurysmal dilatation. PMID:12417272

  9. Cyclin D1 localizes in the cytoplasm of keratinocytes during skin differentiation and regulates cell-matrix adhesion.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Hernández, Rita; Rafel, Marta; Fusté, Noel P; Aguayo, Rafael S; Casanova, Josep M; Egea, Joaquim; Ferrezuelo, Francisco; Garí, Eloi

    2013-08-01

    The function of Cyclin D1 (CycD1) has been widely studied in the cell nucleus as a regulatory subunit of the cyclin-dependent kinases Cdk4/6 involved in the control of proliferation and development in mammals. CycD1 has been also localized in the cytoplasm, where its function nevertheless is poorly characterized. In this work we have observed that in normal skin as well as in primary cultures of human keratinocytes, cytoplasmic localization of CycD1 correlated with the degree of differentiation of the keratinocyte. In these conditions, CycD1 co-localized in cytoplasmic foci with exocyst components (Sec6) and regulators (RalA), and with β1 integrin, suggesting a role for CycD1 in the regulation of keratinocyte adhesion during differentiation. Consistent with this hypothesis, CycD1 overexpression increased β1 integrin recycling and drastically reduced the ability of keratinocytes to adhere to the extracellular matrix. We propose that localization of CycD1 in the cytoplasm during skin differentiation could be related to the changes in detachment ability of keratinocytes committed to differentiation. PMID:23839032

  10. Early differential sensitivity of evoked-potentials to local and global shape during the perception of three-dimensional objects.

    PubMed

    Leek, E Charles; Roberts, Mark; Oliver, Zoe J; Cristino, Filipe; Pegna, Alan J

    2016-08-01

    Here we investigated the time course underlying differential processing of local and global shape information during the perception of complex three-dimensional (3D) objects. Observers made shape matching judgments about pairs of sequentially presented multi-part novel objects. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were used to measure perceptual sensitivity to 3D shape differences in terms of local part structure and global shape configuration - based on predictions derived from hierarchical structural description models of object recognition. There were three types of different object trials in which stimulus pairs (1) shared local parts but differed in global shape configuration; (2) contained different local parts but shared global configuration or (3) shared neither local parts nor global configuration. Analyses of the ERP data showed differential amplitude modulation as a function of shape similarity as early as the N1 component between 146-215ms post-stimulus onset. These negative amplitude deflections were more similar between objects sharing global shape configuration than local part structure. Differentiation among all stimulus types was reflected in N2 amplitude modulations between 276-330ms. sLORETA inverse solutions showed stronger involvement of left occipitotemporal areas during the N1 for object discrimination weighted towards local part structure. The results suggest that the perception of 3D object shape involves parallel processing of information at local and global scales. This processing is characterised by relatively slow derivation of 'fine-grained' local shape structure, and fast derivation of 'coarse-grained' global shape configuration. We propose that the rapid early derivation of global shape attributes underlies the observed patterns of N1 amplitude modulations. PMID:27396674

  11. Automatic quantitative evaluation of autoradiographic band films by computerized image analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Masseroli, M.; Messori, A.; Bendotti, C.; Ponti, M.; Forloni, G. )

    1993-01-01

    The present paper describes a new image processing method for automatic quantitative analysis of autoradiographic band films. It was developed in a specific image analysis environment (IBAS 2.0) but the algorithms and methods can be utilized elsewhere. The program is easy to use and presents some particularly useful features for evaluation of autoradiographic band films, such as the choice of whole film or single lane background determination; the possibility of evaluating bands with film scratch artifacts and the quantification in absolute terms or relative to reference values. The method was tested by comparison with laser-scanner densitometric quantifications of the same autoradiograms. The results show the full compatibility of the two methods and demonstrate the reliability and sensitivity of image analysis. The method can be used not only to evaluate autoradiographic band films, but to analyze any type of signal bands on other materials (e.g electrophoresis gel, chromatographic paper, etc.).

  12. Come rain or shine? Public expectation on local weather change and differential effects on climate change attitude.

    PubMed

    Lo, Alex Y; Jim, C Y

    2015-11-01

    Tailored messages are instrumental to climate change communication. Information about the global threat can be 'localised' by demonstrating its linkage with local events. This research ascertains the relationship between climate change attitude and perception of local weather, based on a survey involving 800 Hong Kong citizens. Results indicate that concerns about climate change increase with expectations about the likelihood and impacts of local weather change. Climate change believers attend to all three types of adverse weather events, namely, temperature rises, tropical cyclones and prolonged rains. Climate scepticism, however, is not associated with expectation about prolonged rains. Differential spatial orientations are a possible reason. Global climate change is an unprecedented and distant threat, whereas local rain is a more familiar and localised weather event. Global climate change should be articulated in terms that respect local concerns. Localised framing may be particularly effective for engaging individuals holding positive views about climate change science. PMID:24495900

  13. Differential localization of putative amino acid receptors in taste buds of the channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus.

    PubMed

    Finger, T E; Bryant, B P; Kalinoski, D L; Teeter, J H; Böttger, B; Grosvenor, W; Cagan, R H; Brand, J G

    1996-09-01

    The taste system of catfish, having distinct taste receptor sites for L-alanine and L-arginine, is highly sensitive to amino acids. A previously described monoclonal antibody (G-10), which inhibits L-alanine binding to a partial membrane fraction (P2) derived from catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) taste epithelium, was found in Western blots to recognize a single band, at apparent MW of 113,000 D. This MW differs from the apparent MW for the presumed arginine receptor identified previously by PHA-E lectin affinity. In order to test whether PHA-E lectin actually reacts with the arginine-receptor, reconstituted membrane proteins partially purified by PHA-E affinity were used in artificial lipid bilayers. These reconstituted channels exhibited L-arginine-activated activity similar to that found in taste cell membranes. Accordingly, we utilized the PHA-E lectin and G-10 antibody as probes to differentially localize the L-alanine and L-arginine binding sites on the apical surface of catfish taste buds. Each probe labels numerous, small (0.5-1.0 micron) patches within the taste pore of each taste bud. This observation suggests that each bud is not tuned to a single taste substance, but contains putative receptor sites for both L-arginine and L-alanine. Further, analysis of double-labeled tissue reveals that the PHA-E and G-10 sites tend to be separate within each taste pore. These findings imply that in catfish, individual taste cells preferentially express receptors to either L-arginine or L-alanine. In addition, PHA-E binds to the apices of solitary chemoreceptor cells in the epithelium, indicating that this independent chemoreceptor system may utilize some receptor sites similar to those in taste buds. PMID:8876468

  14. Local differentiation in the presence of gene flow in the citril finch Serinus citrinella.

    PubMed

    Senar, Juan Carlos; Borras, Antoni; Cabrera, Josep; Cabrera, Toni; Björklund, Mats

    2006-03-22

    It is well known theoretically that gene flow can impede genetic differentiation between populations. In this study, we show that in a highly mobile bird species, where dispersal is well documented, there is a strong genetic and morphological differentiation over a very short geographical scale (less than 5 km). Allocation tests revealed that birds caught in one area were assigned genetically to the same area with a very high probability, in spite of current gene flow. Populations were also morphologically differentiated. The results suggest that the relationship between gene flow and differentiation can be rather complicated and non-intuitive. PMID:17148333

  15. MALDI imaging for the localization of saponins in root tissues and rapid differentiation of three Panax herbs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shujuan; Bai, Hangrui; Cai, Zongwei; Gao, Dan; Jiang, Yuyang; Liu, Jianjun; Liu, Hongxia

    2016-07-01

    The roots of Panax genus with ginseng saponins as bioactive ingredients have been widely used as herbal medicines and food additives. Panax ginseng, Panax quinquefolius, and Panax notoginseng are three major commercial species in Panax genus, with similar morphological appearance but different pharmacological functions. Various methods have been developed and applied for the differentiation of these species. In this work, MALDI-TOF-MS imaging (MSI) was employed for the localization of saponins in root tissues and for the rapid differentiation of the three Panax species for the first time. After a simple sample preparation, MALDI-TOF-MSI analysis of root tissue allowed the detection of 51 saponins. Localization of saponins in the tissue was mapped in ion images, which were obviously related to botanical structure. The localization modes varied with Panax species, providing valuable information for the discrimination of ginseng species. Principal component analysis (PCA) of data collected from areas with abundant saponins based on ion images was applied for the differentiation. Nine characteristic saponin peaks were identified from the PCA analysis. The MALDI-TOF-MSI together with area-specific data analysis provided high potential for the rapid differentiation of Panax herbs. PMID:26990111

  16. Subnuclear localization and differentiation-dependent increased expression of DGK-zeta in C2C12 mouse myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Evangelisti, Camilla; Riccio, Massimo; Faenza, Irene; Zini, Nicoletta; Hozumi, Yasukazu; Goto, Kaoru; Cocco, L; Martelli, Alberto M

    2006-11-01

    Diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs) catalyze phosphorylation of diacylglycerol (DG) to yield phosphatidic acid (PA). Previous evidence has shown that the nucleus contains several DGK isoforms. In this study, we have analyzed the expression and subnuclear localization of DGK-zeta employing C2C12 mouse myoblasts. Immunocytochemistry coupled to confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that both endogenous and green fluorescent protein-tagged overexpressed DGK-zeta localized mostly to the nucleus. In contrast, overexpressed DGK-alpha, -beta, -delta, and -iota did not migrate to the nucleus. DGK-zeta was present in the nuclear speckle domains, as also revealed by immuno-electron microscopy analysis. Moreover, DGK-zeta co-localized and interacted with phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase Cbeta1 (PLCbeta1), that is involved in inositide-dependent signaling pathways important for the regulation of cell proliferation and differentiation. Furthermore, we report that DGK-zeta associated with nuclear matrix, the fundamental organizing principle of the nucleus where many cell functions take place, including DNA replication, gene expression, and protein phosphorylation. Nuclear DGK-zeta increased during myogenic differentiation of C2C12 cells, while DGK-zeta down-regulation by siRNA markedly impaired differentiation. Overall, our findings further support the importance of speckles and nuclear matrix in lipid-dependent signaling and suggest that nuclear DGK-zeta might play some fundamental role during myogenic differentiation of C2C12 cells. PMID:16897754

  17. Local invertible analytic solution of a functional differential equation with deviating arguments depending on the state derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Jianguo; Ma, Minghuan

    2007-03-01

    This paper is concerned with a functional differential equation of the formx'(z)=1/x(az+bx'(z)) with the distinctive feature that the argument of the unknown function depends on the state derivative, where a,b are two complex numbers. By reducing the equation with the Schroder transformation to another functional differential equation with proportional delay, we give existence of its local invertible analytic solutions. We discuss not only that the constant [alpha] given in Schroder transformation at resonance, i.e., at a root of the unity, but also those [alpha] near resonance (near a root of the unity) under the Brjuno condition.

  18. A preconditioned fast finite volume scheme for a fractional differential equation discretized on a locally refined composite mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Jinhong; Wang, Hong

    2015-10-01

    Numerical methods for fractional differential equations generate full stiffness matrices, which were traditionally solved via Gaussian type direct solvers that require O (N3) of computational work and O (N2) of memory to store where N is the number of spatial grid points in the discretization. We develop a preconditioned fast Krylov subspace iterative method for the efficient and faithful solution of finite volume schemes defined on a locally refined composite mesh for fractional differential equations to resolve boundary layers of the solutions. Numerical results are presented to show the utility of the method.

  19. The Local Brewery: A Project for Use in Differential Equations Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starling, James K.; Povich, Timothy J.; Findlay, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We describe a modeling project designed for an ordinary differential equations (ODEs) course using first-order and systems of first-order differential equations to model the fermentation process in beer. The project aims to expose the students to the modeling process by creating and solving a mathematical model and effectively communicating their…

  20. The Differential Outcomes Effect (DOE) in Spatial Localization: An Investigation with Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legge, Eric L. G.; Spetch, Marciar L.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated whether search accuracy of adult humans could be enhanced using differential reward contingencies in landmark-based spatial tasks conducted on a computer screen. We found that search accuracy was significantly enhanced by differential outcomes in a conditional spatial search task, in which the landmark-to-goal relationship depended…

  1. Localized Fgf10 expression is not required for lung branching morphogenesis but prevents differentiation of epithelial progenitors.

    PubMed

    Volckaert, Thomas; Campbell, Alice; Dill, Erik; Li, Changgong; Minoo, Parviz; De Langhe, Stijn

    2013-09-01

    Localized Fgf10 expression in the distal mesenchyme adjacent to sites of lung bud formation has long been thought to drive stereotypic branching morphogenesis even though isolated lung epithelium branches in the presence of non-directional exogenous Fgf10 in Matrigel. Here, we show that lung agenesis in Fgf10 knockout mice can be rescued by ubiquitous overexpression of Fgf10, indicating that precisely localized Fgf10 expression is not required for lung branching morphogenesis in vivo. Fgf10 expression in the mesenchyme itself is regulated by Wnt signaling. Nevertheless, we found that during lung initiation simultaneous overexpression of Fgf10 is not sufficient to rescue the absence of primary lung field specification in embryos overexpressing Dkk1, a secreted inhibitor of Wnt signaling. However, after lung initiation, simultaneous overexpression of Fgf10 in lungs overexpressing Dkk1 is able to rescue defects in branching and proximal-distal differentiation. We also show that Fgf10 prevents the differentiation of distal epithelial progenitors into Sox2-expressing airway epithelial cells in part by activating epithelial β-catenin signaling, which negatively regulates Sox2 expression. As such, these findings support a model in which the main function of Fgf10 during lung development is to regulate proximal-distal differentiation. As the lung buds grow out, proximal epithelial cells become further and further displaced from the distal source of Fgf10 and differentiate into bronchial epithelial cells. Interestingly, our data presented here show that once epithelial cells are committed to the Sox2-positive airway epithelial cell fate, Fgf10 prevents ciliated cell differentiation and promotes basal cell differentiation. PMID:23924632

  2. Localized Fgf10 expression is not required for lung branching morphogenesis but prevents differentiation of epithelial progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Volckaert, Thomas; Campbell, Alice; Dill, Erik; Li, Changgong; Minoo, Parviz; De Langhe, Stijn

    2013-01-01

    Localized Fgf10 expression in the distal mesenchyme adjacent to sites of lung bud formation has long been thought to drive stereotypic branching morphogenesis even though isolated lung epithelium branches in the presence of non-directional exogenous Fgf10 in Matrigel. Here, we show that lung agenesis in Fgf10 knockout mice can be rescued by ubiquitous overexpression of Fgf10, indicating that precisely localized Fgf10 expression is not required for lung branching morphogenesis in vivo. Fgf10 expression in the mesenchyme itself is regulated by Wnt signaling. Nevertheless, we found that during lung initiation simultaneous overexpression of Fgf10 is not sufficient to rescue the absence of primary lung field specification in embryos overexpressing Dkk1, a secreted inhibitor of Wnt signaling. However, after lung initiation, simultaneous overexpression of Fgf10 in lungs overexpressing Dkk1 is able to rescue defects in branching and proximal-distal differentiation. We also show that Fgf10 prevents the differentiation of distal epithelial progenitors into Sox2-expressing airway epithelial cells in part by activating epithelial β-catenin signaling, which negatively regulates Sox2 expression. As such, these findings support a model in which the main function of Fgf10 during lung development is to regulate proximal-distal differentiation. As the lung buds grow out, proximal epithelial cells become further and further displaced from the distal source of Fgf10 and differentiate into bronchial epithelial cells. Interestingly, our data presented here show that once epithelial cells are committed to the Sox2-positive airway epithelial cell fate, Fgf10 prevents ciliated cell differentiation and promotes basal cell differentiation. PMID:23924632

  3. Specific deletion of CMF1 nuclear localization domain causes incomplete cell cycle withdrawal and impaired differentiation in avian skeletal myoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Dees, Ellen . E-mail: ellen.dees@vanderbilt.edu; Robertson, J. Brian; Zhu, Tianli; Bader, David

    2006-10-01

    CMF1 is a protein expressed in embryonic striated muscle with onset of expression preceding that of contractile proteins. Disruption of CMF1 in myoblasts disrupts muscle-specific protein expression. Preliminary studies indicate both nuclear and cytoplasmic distribution of CMF1 protein, suggesting functional roles in both cellular compartments. Here we examine the nuclear function of CMF1, using a newly characterized antibody generated against the CMF1 nuclear localization domain and a CMF1 nuclear localization domain-deleted stable myocyte line. The antibody demonstrates nuclear distribution of the CMF1 protein both in vivo and in cell lines, with clustering of CMF1 protein around chromatin during mitosis. In more differentiated myocytes, the protein shifts to the cytoplasm. The CMF1 NLS-deleted cell lines have markedly impaired capacity to differentiate. Specifically, these cells express less contractile protein than wild-type or full-length CMF1 stably transfected cells, and do not fuse properly into multinucleate syncytia with linear nuclear alignment. In response to low serum medium, a signal to differentiate, CMF1 NLS-deleted cells enter G0, but continue to express proliferation markers and will reenter the cell cycle when stimulated by restoring growth medium. These data suggest that CMF1 is involved in regulation the transition from proliferation to differentiation in embryonic muscle.

  4. The Differential Palmitoylation States of N-Ras and H-Ras Determine Their Distinct Golgi Sub-compartment Localizations

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Stephen J.; Snitkin, Harriet; Gumper, Iwona; Philips, Mark R.; Sabatini, David; Pellicer, Angel

    2014-01-01

    Despite a high degree of structural homology and shared exchange factors, effectors and GTPase activating proteins, a large body of evidence suggests functional heterogeneity among Ras isoforms. One aspect of Ras biology that may explain this heterogeneity is the differential subcellular localizations driven by the C-terminal hypervariable regions of Ras proteins. Spatial heterogeneity has been documented at the level of organelles: palmitoylated Ras isoforms (H-Ras and N-Ras) localize on the Golgi apparatus whereas K-Ras4B does not. We tested the hypothesis that spatial heterogeneity also exists at the sub-organelle level by studying the localization of differentially palmitoylated Ras isoforms within the Golgi apparatus. Using confocal, live cell fluorescent imaging and immunogold electron microscopy we found that, whereas the doubly palmitoylated H-Ras is distributed throughout the Golgi stacks, the singly palmitoylated N-Ras is polarized with a relative paucity of expression on the trans Golgi. Using palmitoylation mutants we show that the different sub-Golgi distributions of the Ras proteins are a consequence of their differential degree of palmitoylation. Thus, the acylation state of Ras proteins controls not only their distribution between the Golgi apparatus and the plasma membrane but also their distribution within the Golgi stacks. PMID:25158650

  5. Interleukin-13 interferes with CFTR and AQP5 expression and localization during human airway epithelial cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Skowron-zwarg, Marie; Boland, Sonja; Caruso, Nathalie; Coraux, Christelle; Marano, Francelyne; Tournier, Frederic . E-mail: f-tournier@paris7.jussieu.fr

    2007-07-15

    Interleukin-13 (IL-13) is a central regulator of Th2-dominated respiratory disorders such as asthma. Lesions of the airway epithelial barrier frequently observed in chronic respiratory inflammatory diseases are repaired through proliferation, migration and differentiation of epithelial cells. Our work is focused on the effects of IL-13 in human cellular models of airway epithelial cell regeneration. We have previously shown that IL-13 altered epithelial cell polarity during mucociliary differentiation of human nasal epithelial cells. In particular, the cytokine inhibited ezrin expression and interfered with its apical localization during epithelial cell differentiation in vitro. Here we show that CFTR expression is enhanced in the presence of the cytokine, that two additional CFTR protein isoforms are expressed in IL-13-treated cells and that part of the protein is retained within the endoplasmic reticulum. We further show that aquaporin 5 expression, a water channel localized within the apical membrane of epithelial cells, is completely abolished in the presence of the cytokine. These results show that IL-13 interferes with ion and water channel expression and localization during epithelial regeneration and may thereby influence mucus composition and hydration.

  6. Autoradiographic disposition of (1-methyl-/sup 14/C)- and (2-/sup 14/C)caffeine in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lachance, M.P.; Marlowe, C.; Waddell, W.J.

    1983-11-01

    Male, C57B1/6J mice received either (1-methyl-14C)caffeine or (2-14C)caffeine via the tail vein at a dose of 0.7 or 11 mg/kg, respectively. At 0.1, 0.33, 1, 3, 9, and 24 hr after treatment, the mice were anesthetized with ether and frozen by immersion in dry ice/hexane. The mice were processed for whole-body autoradiography by the Ullberg technique; this procedure does not allow thawing or contact with solvents. All autoradiographs revealed some retention of radioactivity at early time intervals in the lacrimal glands, seminal vesicle fluid, nasal and olfactory epithelium, and retinal melanocytes. The remaining portion of the animal was densitometrically uniform except for the lower levels noted in the CNS and adipose tissues. Excretion of radioactivity by the liver and kidneys seems to be the major routes of elimination. Localization in the liver at late time intervals was confined principally to the centrilobular region. Late sites of retention, observed only after (1-methyl-14C)caffeine administration, included the pancreas, minor and major salivary glands, splenic red pulp, thymal cortex, bone marrow, and gastrointestinal epithelium. Sites of localization present in both studies included the olfactory epithelium, lacrimal glands, hair follicles, and retinal melanocytes. Further studies are needed to determine whether the localization at these various sites is due to metabolic degradation, active transport, or possibly a specific receptor interaction.

  7. Seedling traits, plasticity and local differentiation as strategies of invasive species of Impatiens in central Europe

    PubMed Central

    Skálová, Hana; Havlíčková, Vendula; Pyšek, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Invasiveness of some alien plants is associated with their traits, plastic responses to environmental conditions and interpopulation differentiation. To obtain insights into the role of these processes in contributing to variation in performance, we compared congeneric species of Impatiens (Balsaminaceae) with different origin and invasion status that occur in central Europe. Methods Native I. noli-tangere and three alien species (highly invasive I. glandulifera, less invasive I. parviflora and potentially invasive I. capensis) were studied and their responses to simulated canopy shading and different nutrient and moisture levels were determined in terms of survival and seedling traits. Key Results and Conclusions Impatiens glandulifera produced high biomass in all the treatments and the control, exhibiting the ‘Jack-and-master’ strategy that makes it a strong competitor from germination onwards. The results suggest that plasticity and differentiation occurred in all the species tested and that along the continuum from plasticity to differentiation, the species at the plasticity end is the better invader. The most invasive species I. glandulifera appears to be highly plastic, whereas the other two less invasive species, I. parviflora and I. capensis, exhibited lower plasticity but rather strong population differentiation. The invasive Impatiens species were taller and exhibited higher plasticity and differentiation than native I. noli-tangere. This suggests that even within one genus, the relative importance of the phenomena contributing to invasiveness appears to be species'specific. PMID:22247125

  8. Between Academic Theory and Folk Wisdom: Local Discourse on Differential Educational Attainment in Fiji.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Carmen M.

    2001-01-01

    In the multiethnic South Pacific nation of Fiji--a former British colony--the impact of Western theoretical hegemony on educational discourse is evident. Results of extensive fieldwork show how themes of achievement motivation, differential valuation of education, and cultural deficit theory combine with surviving colonial discourse and…

  9. Local Probing of Electrochemically Induced Negative Differential Resistance in TiO2 Memristive Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yunseok; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2013-01-01

    Early stage of electroforming in TiO2 was observed by deliberately combining conductive atomic force microscopy and electrochemical strain microscopy. The negative differential resistance and the corresponding surface deformation were observed below electroforming voltages. The surface deformations induced by surface oxidation are thermodynamically stable, reversibly controlled by applying voltage bias of different polarities, and electrochemically less active.

  10. Contemporary evolution during invasion: evidence for differentiation, natural selection, and local adaptation.

    PubMed

    Colautti, Robert I; Lau, Jennifer A

    2015-05-01

    Biological invasions are 'natural' experiments that can improve our understanding of contemporary evolution. We evaluate evidence for population differentiation, natural selection and adaptive evolution of invading plants and animals at two nested spatial scales: (i) among introduced populations (ii) between native and introduced genotypes. Evolution during invasion is frequently inferred, but rarely confirmed as adaptive. In common garden studies, quantitative trait differentiation is only marginally lower (~3.5%) among introduced relative to native populations, despite genetic bottlenecks and shorter timescales (i.e. millennia vs. decades). However, differentiation between genotypes from the native vs. introduced range is less clear and confounded by nonrandom geographic sampling; simulations suggest this causes a high false-positive discovery rate (>50%) in geographically structured populations. Selection differentials (¦s¦) are stronger in introduced than in native species, although selection gradients (¦β¦) are not, consistent with introduced species experiencing weaker genetic constraints. This could facilitate rapid adaptation, but evidence is limited. For example, rapid phenotypic evolution often manifests as geographical clines, but simulations demonstrate that nonadaptive trait clines can evolve frequently during colonization (~two-thirds of simulations). Additionally, QST-FST studies may often misrepresent the strength and form of natural selection acting during invasion. Instead, classic approaches in evolutionary ecology (e.g. selection analysis, reciprocal transplant, artificial selection) are necessary to determine the frequency of adaptive evolution during invasion and its influence on establishment, spread and impact of invasive species. These studies are rare but crucial for managing biological invasions in the context of global change. PMID:25891044

  11. Ecological differentiation and local adaptation in two sister species of Neotropical Costus (Costaceae).

    PubMed

    Chen, Grace F; Schemske, Douglas W

    2015-02-01

    Reciprocal transplant experiments have often provided evidence of local adaptation in temperate plants, but few such studies have been conducted in the tropics. To enhance our knowledge of local adaptation in tropical plants, we studied natural populations of two recently diverged Neotropical plant species, Costus allenii and C. villosissimus, in central Panama. We found that these species display a parapatric distribution that reflects local environmental differences on a fine geographic scale: C. allenii is found along ravines in the understory of primary forest, while C. villosissimus is found along forest edges. Light availability was lower in C. allenii habitats, while precipitation and soil moisture were lower in C. villosissimus habitats. We carried out reciprocal transplant experiments with seeds and clones of mature plants to test the hypothesis that the parapatric distribution of these species is due to divergent adaptation to their local habitats. We found strong evidence of local adaptation, i.e., when grown in their "home" sites, each species outperformed the species from an "away" site. Our finding that C. allenii and C. villosissimus are mainly isolated by their microhabitats provides a first step toward understanding the mechanisms of adaptation and speciation in the tropics. PMID:26240865

  12. Direct observation of strain localization along the differentially exhumed SEMP fault system, Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, E.; Dolan, J. F.; Hacker, B. R.; Ratschbacher, L.; Sammis, C. G.; Seward, G.; Cole, J.

    2009-12-01

    Structural analysis of key outcrops from ~5 to ~25 km exhumation depth along the Salzach-Ennstal-Mariazell-Puchberg (SEMP) fault-zone in Austria reveal highly localized deformation in the seismogenic crust down through the brittle-ductile transition (BDT), widening into a 2-km-wide mylonite at mid-crustal levels. Specifically, grain-size distribution analysis of brittley-deformed dolomite exhumed from the seismogenic crust reveals that strain progressively localized into a 10-m-wide fault core. Microstructural analysis of marbles and greywackes exhumed from the BDT shows off-fault ductile deformation only accommodated a minor portion of the displacement along the SEMP, with most of the strain localized along the contact between these two units. Similar analysis of gneisses and amphibolite-facies metasediments exhumed from just below the BDT shows that at this depth, the majority of displacement is focused into a 100-m-wide ductile shear zone, with further evidence for strain localization along grain boundaries, creating throughgoing shear zones at the grain-scale. At deeper exhumation levels (Rosenberg and Schneider, 2008), the SEMP is a 1-2-km-wide mylonite zone that extends to depths of at least 25 km. Collectively, these data indicate that slip along the SEMP was highly localized from throughout the seismogenic crust downward into at least the mid-crust.

  13. Monocytes become macrophages; they do not become microglia: a light and electron microscopic autoradiographic study using 125-iododeoxyuridine

    SciTech Connect

    Schelper, R.L.; Adrian, E.K. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    This light and electron microscopic autoradiographic study of stab injuries in the spinal cord of mice evaluated the ultrastructural characteristics of cells labeled by incorporation of the thymidine analogue /sup 125/I-5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine (I-UdR), injected one day prior to injury. I-UdR was used instead of tritiated thymidine (H-TdR) because H-TdR can be reutilized and is therefore not a suitable pulse label for long-term studies of cell migration. Using serial thick and thin sections for autoradiography 614 labeled cells were identified. Labeled cells included 545 monocytes/macrophages, 50 lymphocytes, 17 pericytes, one endothelial cell, and one arachnoid cell. No labeled cell had the morphology of microglia. We concluded that macrophages in stab injuries of the spinal cord of mice are derived from blood monocytes. Blood-derived lymphocytes are also involved in the reaction to spinal cord stab injury. Microglia are not blood-derived and are not seen as a transitional form in the differentiation of monocytes to macrophages.

  14. Localization of the eigenvalues of linear integral equations with applications to linear ordinary differential equations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sloss, J. M.; Kranzler, S. K.

    1972-01-01

    The equivalence of a considered integral equation form with an infinite system of linear equations is proved, and the localization of the eigenvalues of the infinite system is expressed. Error estimates are derived, and the problems of finding upper bounds and lower bounds for the eigenvalues are solved simultaneously.

  15. Thaumatin-like proteins are differentially expressed and localized in phloem tissues of hybrid poplar

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Two thaumatin-like proteins (TLPs) were previously identified in phloem exudate of hybrid poplar (Populus trichocarpa × P. deltoides) using proteomics methods, and their sieve element localization confirmed by immunofluorescence. In the current study, we analyzed different tissues to further understand TLP expression and localization in poplar, and used immunogold labelling to determine intracellular localization. Results Immunofluorescence using a TLP antiserum confirmed the presence of TLP in punctate, organelle-like structures within sieve elements. On western blots, the antiserum labeled two constitutively expressed proteins with distinct expression patterns. Immunogold labelling suggested that TLPs are associated with starch granules and starch-containing plastids in sieve elements and phloem parenchyma cells. In addition, the antiserum recognized TLPs in the inner cell wall and sieve plate region of sieve elements. Conclusions TLP localization in poplar cells and tissues is complex. TLP1 is expressed predominantly in tissues with a prominent vascular system such as midveins, petioles and stems, whereas the second TLP is primarily expressed in starch-storing plastids found in young leaves and the shoot apex. PMID:20796310

  16. Thaumatin-like proteins are differentially expressed and localized in phloem tissue of hybrid poplar

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two thaumatin-like proteins (TLPs) were previously identified in phloem exudate of hybrid poplar (Populus trichocarpa x P. deltoides) using proteomics methods, and their sieve element localization confirmed by immunofluorescence. In the current study, we analyzed different tissues to further underst...

  17. Size differentiation in Finnish house sparrows follows Bergmann's rule with evidence of local adaptation.

    PubMed

    Brommer, J E; Hanski, I K; Kekkonen, J; Väisänen, R A

    2014-04-01

    Bergmann's rule predicts that individuals are larger in more poleward populations and that this size gradient has an adaptive basis. Hence, phenotypic divergence in size traits between populations (PST ) is expected to exceed the level of divergence by drift alone (FST ). We measured 16 skeletal traits, body mass and wing length in 409 male and 296 female house sparrows Passer domesticus sampled in 12 populations throughout Finland, where the species has its northernmost European distributional margin. Morphometric differentiation across populations (PST ) was compared with differentiation in 13 microsatellites (FST ). We find that twelve traits phenotypically diverged more than FST in both sexes, and an additional two traits diverged in males. The phenotypic divergence exceeded FST in several traits to such a degree that findings were robust also to strong between-population environmental effects. Divergence was particularly strong in dimensions of the bill, making it a strong candidate for the study of adaptive molecular genetic divergence. Divergent traits increased in size in more northern populations. We conclude that house sparrows show evidence of an adaptive latitudinal size gradient consistent with Bergmann's rule on the modest spatial scale of ca. 600 km. PMID:24571622

  18. Motif discovery in promoters of genes co-localized and co-expressed during myeloid cells differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Coppe, Alessandro; Ferrari, Francesco; Bisognin, Andrea; Danieli, Gian Antonio; Ferrari, Sergio; Bicciato, Silvio; Bortoluzzi, Stefania

    2009-01-01

    Genes co-expressed may be under similar promoter-based and/or position-based regulation. Although data on expression, position and function of human genes are available, their true integration still represents a challenge for computational biology, hampering the identification of regulatory mechanisms. We carried out an integrative analysis of genomic position, functional annotation and promoters of genes expressed in myeloid cells. Promoter analysis was conducted by a novel multi-step method for discovering putative regulatory elements, i.e. over-represented motifs, in a selected set of promoters, as compared with a background model. The combination of transcriptional, structural and functional data allowed the identification of sets of promoters pertaining to groups of genes co-expressed and co-localized in regions of the human genome. The application of motif discovery to 26 groups of genes co-expressed in myeloid cells differentiation and co-localized in the genome showed that there are more over-represented motifs in promoters of co-expressed and co-localized genes than in promoters of simply co-expressed genes (CEG). Motifs, which are similar to the binding sequences of known transcription factors, non-uniformly distributed along promoter sequences and/or occurring in highly co-expressed subset of genes were identified. Co-expressed and co-localized gene sets were grouped in two co-expressed genomic meta-regions, putatively representing functional domains of a high-level expression regulation. PMID:19059999

  19. Negative differential resistance in GeSi core-shell transport junctions: the role of local sp(2) hybridization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nuo; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Xiaobin; Kong, Xianghua; Zheng, Xiaohong; Guo, Hong

    2016-09-21

    We report a theoretical investigation of nonlinear quantum transport properties of Au/GeSi/Au junctions. For GeSi semiconducting core-shell structures brought into contact with Au electrodes, a very unusual behavior is that the tunneling transport is on-resonance right at equilibrium. This resonance is not due to the alignment of a quantum level in GeSi to the electrochemical potential of Au, but due to the alignment of very sharp DOS features - hot spots, localized at the two Au/GeSi interfaces of the device. An applied bias voltage shifts the hot spots relative to each other which gives rise to substantial negative differential resistance (NDR). The hot spots localized at the two interfaces were found to be due to the unbonded pz orbital of a sp(2) hybridized interface Si atom which is surrounded by three non-sp(2) hybridized neighbors. The mechanism of inducing hot spots and NDR by a local structure unit is not limited to the GeSi. The results suggest an interesting scheme for constructing NDR devices by orbital manipulation, to be more explicit, for example, by designing local structural units having unbonded orbitals at the interfaces between electrodes and the central region of the transport junction. PMID:27546305

  20. Widespread hemodynamic depression and focal platelet accumulation after fluid percussion brain injury: a double-label autoradiographic study in rats.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, W D; Alonso, O; Busto, R; Prado, R; Dewanjee, S; Dewanjee, M K; Ginsberg, M D

    1996-05-01

    Cerebrovascular damage leading to subsequent reductions in local cerebral blood flow (lCBF) may represent an important secondary injury mechanism following traumatic brain injury (TBI). We determined whether patterns of 111-indium-labeled platelet accumulation were spatially related to alterations in lCBF determined autoradiographically 30 min after TBI. Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 8), anesthetized with halothane and maintained on a 70:30 (vol/vol) mixture of nitrous oxide/oxygen and 0.5% halothane, underwent parasagittal fluid percussion brain injury (1.7-2.2 atm). 111-Indium-tropolone-labeled platelets were injected 30 min prior to TBI while [14C]-iodoantipyrine was infused 30 min after trauma. Sham-operated animals (n = 7) underwent similar surgical procedures but were not injured. In autoradiographic images of the indium-labeled platelets, focal sites of platelet accumulation within the traumatized hemisphere were restricted to the pial surface (five of eight rats), the external capsule underlying the lateral parietal cortex (five of eight rats), and within cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) compartments (six of eight rats). In contrast, mild-to-moderate reductions in lCBF, not restricted to sites of platelet accumulation, were seen throughout the traumatized hemisphere. Flow reductions were most severe in coronal sections underlying the impact site. For example, within the lateral parietal cortex and hippocampus, lCBF was significantly reduced [p <0.01; analysis of variance (ANOVA)] from 1.71 +/- 0.34 (mean +/- SD) and 0.78 +/- 0.12 ml/g/min, respectively, versus 0.72 +/- 0.17 and 0.41 +/- 0.06 ml/g/min within the traumatized hemisphere. Significant flow reductions were also seen in remote cortical and subcortical areas, including the right frontal cortex and striatum. These results indicate that focal platelet accumulation and widespread hemodynamic depression are both early consequences of TBI. Therapeutic strategies directed at these early microvascular consequences of

  1. Localization of beta-adrenergic receptors on differentiated cells of the central nervous system in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Ventimiglia, R; Greene, M I; Geller, H M

    1987-01-01

    Hypothalamic neurons and cortical protoplasmic (type 1) astrocytes in dissociated cultures of rat brain express binding sites for antibodies specific for epitopes related to the beta-adrenergic receptor. Undifferentiated glial progenitor cells of the rat optic nerve do not detectably bind these antibodies, but both of the progeny [oligodendroglia and process-bearing (type 2) astrocytes] express immunologically identified beta-adrenergic receptors. Levels of receptor expression are variable: not all cells of each type express receptors nor is expression uniform on a given cell. The data suggest that cells of the central nervous system express beta-adrenergic receptors but that levels of expression may be determined by the differentiated state of the cells. Images PMID:3037533

  2. Autoradiographic detection of diphtheria toxin resistant mutants in human diploid fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.S.; Singh, B.

    1985-01-01

    An autoradiographic procedure for the detection of diphtheria toxin (DT) resistant (Dip/sub R/) mutants in human diploid fibroblast (HDF) cells has been developed. The assay is based on the observation that when HDFs from confluent cultures are seeded in medium containing 0.01 flocculating units/ml or higher concentration of DT, protein synthesis in sensitive cells is severely inhibited by 4-6 hr. If at this or later time, a radiolabeled protein precursor (eg, /sup 3/H-leucine) is added to the culture, it is almost exclusively incorporated into the resistant cells, which are then readily identified by autoradiography. These studies provide strong evidence that the labeled cells identified by autoradiography are bona fide Dip/sub R/ mutants. The detection of Dip/sub R/ cells by autoradiography is apparently not affected by the presence of the sensitive cells in the mixtures. The spontaneous frequency of Dip/sub R/ cells in HDFs has been found to be in the range of 1-5 x 10/sup -6/, and this increases in a dose dependent manner upon treatment with the mutagen ethyl methanesulfonate. These results indicate that the autoradiographic assay could be used for quantitative mutagenesis. Since the autoradiographic assay does not depend on cell division, it may prove useful in estimating the incidence of pre-existing mutations in cell populations that either do not divide or have very limited growth potential (eg, lymphocytes, muscle cells, neurons, senescent fibroblasts, etc.).

  3. Local Sequence Targeting in the AID/APOBEC Family Differentially Impacts Retroviral Restriction and Antibody Diversification*

    PubMed Central

    Kohli, Rahul M.; Maul, Robert W.; Guminski, Amy F.; McClure, Rhonda L.; Gajula, Kiran S.; Saribasak, Huseyin; McMahon, Moira A.; Siliciano, Robert F.; Gearhart, Patricia J.; Stivers, James T.

    2010-01-01

    Nucleic acid cytidine deaminases of the activation-induced deaminase (AID)/APOBEC family are critical players in active and innate immune responses, playing roles as target-directed, purposeful mutators. AID specifically deaminates the host immunoglobulin (Ig) locus to evolve antibody specificity, whereas its close relative, APOBEC3G (A3G), lethally mutates the genomes of retroviral pathogens such as HIV. Understanding the basis for the target-specific action of these enzymes is essential, as mistargeting poses significant risks, potentially promoting oncogenesis (AID) or fostering drug resistance (A3G). AID prefers to deaminate cytosine in WRC (W = A/T, R = A/G) motifs, whereas A3G favors deamination of CCC motifs. This specificity is largely dictated by a single, divergent protein loop in the enzyme family that recognizes the DNA sequence. Through grafting of this substrate-recognition loop, we have created enzyme variants of A3G and AID with altered local targeting to directly evaluate the role of sequence specificity on immune function. We find that grafted loops placed in the A3G scaffold all produced efficient restriction of HIV but that foreign loops in the AID scaffold compromised hypermutation and class switch recombination. Local targeting, therefore, appears alterable for innate defense against retroviruses by A3G but important for adaptive antibody maturation catalyzed by AID. Notably, AID targeting within the Ig locus is proportionally correlated to its in vitro ability to target WRC sequences rather than non-WRC sequences. Although other mechanisms may also contribute, our results suggest that local sequence targeting by AID/APOBEC3 enzymes represents an elegant example of co-evolution of enzyme specificity with its target DNA sequence. PMID:20929867

  4. Cadmium uptake and distribution in mouse embryos following maternal exposure during the organogenic period: a scintillation and autoradiographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Christley, J.; Webster, W.S.

    1983-06-01

    Pregnant C57BL/6J mice were given a single intraperitoneal injection of either a teratogenic (2,400 micrograms Cd/kg) an intermediate (40 micrograms Cd/kg) or a trace dose (0.66 micrograms Cd/kg) of cadmium chloride (CdCl/sub 2/) on day 9 of gestation; each dose contained /sup 109/CdCl/sub 2/ (20 microCi). The mice were euthanized at various times after Cd exposure, and the amount of Cd in the embryos was determined in a gamma counter. For all three doses a low, but similar, percentage of the dose rapidly entered the embryos; levels then decreased during the next 11 hours, only to rise again by 24 hours and continue to rise for the remainder of the pregnancy. When the Cd content was related to embryonic weight the Cd concentration was at its highest level after 1 hour and then decreased rapidly and continued to decrease for the rest of pregnancy. Autoradiographic studies showed that the teratogenic dose of Cd entered all tissues of the embryos but was particularly localized in cells of the neural tube, limb buds, and gut. By 12 hours, cell damage was seen in the embryos but the affected cells were not necessarily the heavily labelled cells. In embryos exposed to the nonteratogenic dose the highest Cd accumulation was seen in the embryonic gut and limb bud ectoderm but all tissues showed a low level of labelling.

  5. [Flora Differentiation among Local Ecotopes in the Transzonal Study of Forest-Steppe and Steppe Mounds].

    PubMed

    Lisetskii, F N; Sudnik-Wojcikowska, B; Moysiyenko, I I

    2016-01-01

    Flora similarity was assessed using complete floristic lists of five ecotopes in each of four mounds along the transect from meadow steppes to desert steppes. It was found that the circumapical similitude of floras is more significant than the expositional similitude. Soil analysis in separate ecotopes showed that regular changes in the biogeochemical features are manifested along the topographic gradient and under the effect of the insolation exposure of slopes in local (mound) ecosystems. It was noted that the slopes are characterized by the most abundant steppe vegetation classes in the phytosociological spectrum of mound ecotopes. PMID:27396182

  6. Differential Subplastidial Localization and Turnover of Enzymes Involved in Isoprenoid Biosynthesis in Chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Perello, Catalina; Llamas, Ernesto; Burlat, Vincent; Ortiz-Alcaide, Miriam; Phillips, Michael A.; Pulido, Pablo; Rodriguez-Concepcion, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Plastidial isoprenoids are a diverse group of metabolites with roles in photosynthesis, growth regulation, and interaction with the environment. The methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway produces the metabolic precursors of all types of plastidial isoprenoids. Proteomics studies in Arabidopsis thaliana have shown that all the enzymes of the MEP pathway are localized in the plastid stroma. However, immunoblot analysis of chloroplast subfractions showed that the first two enzymes of the pathway, deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) and reductoisomerase (DXR), can also be found in non-stromal fractions. Both transient and stable expression of GFP-tagged DXS and DXR proteins confirmed the presence of the fusion proteins in distinct subplastidial compartments. In particular, DXR-GFP was found to accumulate in relatively large vesicles that could eventually be released from chloroplasts, presumably to be degraded by an autophagy-independent process. Together, we propose that protein-specific mechanisms control the localization and turnover of the first two enzymes of the MEP pathway in Arabidopsis chloroplasts. PMID:26919668

  7. Differential Subplastidial Localization and Turnover of Enzymes Involved in Isoprenoid Biosynthesis in Chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Perello, Catalina; Llamas, Ernesto; Burlat, Vincent; Ortiz-Alcaide, Miriam; Phillips, Michael A; Pulido, Pablo; Rodriguez-Concepcion, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Plastidial isoprenoids are a diverse group of metabolites with roles in photosynthesis, growth regulation, and interaction with the environment. The methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway produces the metabolic precursors of all types of plastidial isoprenoids. Proteomics studies in Arabidopsis thaliana have shown that all the enzymes of the MEP pathway are localized in the plastid stroma. However, immunoblot analysis of chloroplast subfractions showed that the first two enzymes of the pathway, deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) and reductoisomerase (DXR), can also be found in non-stromal fractions. Both transient and stable expression of GFP-tagged DXS and DXR proteins confirmed the presence of the fusion proteins in distinct subplastidial compartments. In particular, DXR-GFP was found to accumulate in relatively large vesicles that could eventually be released from chloroplasts, presumably to be degraded by an autophagy-independent process. Together, we propose that protein-specific mechanisms control the localization and turnover of the first two enzymes of the MEP pathway in Arabidopsis chloroplasts. PMID:26919668

  8. Phosphorylation of nucleoporin Tpr governs its differential localization and is required for its mitotic function

    PubMed Central

    Rajanala, Kalpana; Sarkar, Anshuk; Jhingan, Gagan Deep; Priyadarshini, Raina; Jalan, Manisha; Sengupta, Sagar; Nandicoori, Vinay Kumar

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT A major constituent of the nuclear basket region of the nuclear pore complex (NPC), nucleoporin Tpr, plays roles in regulating multiple important processes. We have previously established that Tpr is phosphorylated in both a MAP-kinase-dependent and MAP-kinase-independent manner, and that Tpr acts as both a substrate and as a scaffold for ERK2 (also known as MAPK1). Here, we report the identification of S2059 and S2094 as the major novel ERK-independent phosphorylation sites and T1677, S2020, S2023 and S2034 as additional ERK-independent phosphorylation sites found in the Tpr protein in vivo. Our results suggest that protein kinase A phosphorylates the S2094 residue and that the site is hyperphosphorylated during mitosis. Furthermore, we find that Tpr is phosphorylated at the S2059 residue by CDK1 and the phosphorylated form distinctly localizes with chromatin during telophase. Abrogation of S2059 phosphorylation abolishes the interaction of Tpr with Mad1, thus compromising the localization of both Mad1 and Mad2 proteins, resulting in cell cycle defects. The identification of novel phosphorylation sites on Tpr and the observations presented in this study allow better understanding of Tpr functions. PMID:24938596

  9. Abnormal osteopontin and matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein localization, and odontoblast differentiation, in X-linked hypophosphatemic teeth.

    PubMed

    Salmon, B; Bardet, C; Coyac, B R; Baroukh, B; Naji, J; Rowe, P S; Opsahl Vital, S; Linglart, A; Mckee, M D; Chaussain, C

    2014-08-01

    Mutations in phosphate-regulating gene (PHEX) lead to X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (XLH), a genetic disease characterized by impaired mineralization in bones and teeth. In human XLH tooth dentin, calcospherites that would normally merge as part of the mineralization process are separated by unmineralized interglobular spaces where fragments of matrix proteins accumulate. Here, we immunolocalized osteopontin (OPN) in human XLH teeth, in a three-dimensional XLH human dental pulp stem cell-collagen scaffold culture model and in a rat tooth injury repair model treated with acidic serine- and aspartate-rich motif peptides (ASARM). In parallel, matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE) immunolocalization and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity were assessed in XLH teeth. OPN was expressed by odontoblasts in the XLH models, and localized to the abnormal calcospherites of XLH tooth dentin. In addition, ALP activity and MEPE localization were abnormal in human XLH teeth, with MEPE showing an accumulation in the unmineralized interglobular spaces in dentin. Furthermore, XLH odontoblasts failed to form a well-polarized odontoblast layer. These data suggest that both MEPE and OPN are involved in impaired tooth mineralization associated with XLH, possibly through different effects on the mineralization process. PMID:25158186

  10. Localized proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the brain differentiates the inborn metabolic encephalopathies in children.

    PubMed

    Chabrol, B; Salvan, A M; Confort-Gouny, S; Vion-Dury, J; Cozzone, P J

    1995-09-01

    Localized brain proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has been performed using a STEAM (stimulated echo-acquisition mode) method with a short-echo time (20 ms) in 10 children suffering from different lysosomal diseases, 6 boys with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) and 5 healthy children. Metabolic data from localized spectra were processed by principal component analysis (PCA) of 7 metabolic variables recorded on the MR spectra. PCA allows to delineate different clusters corresponding to the 2 pathological groups which are separated from each other and from the control group. The position of each spectrum on the patient map correlates with the clinical data and to the evolution of the patients subjected to a follow-up. These results also confirm the metabolic features characterizing the pathologies of the lysosome (increase in inositol) and the peroxisome (increase in choline and free lipids). PCA constitutes an alternative to the classical statistical methods to analyze and compare metabolic modifications in small populations of patients and allows to identify the most critical parameters defining the organization of the pathological populations. This analysis clearly increases the discrimination among pathologies based on the metabolic profiles obtained by MRS. PMID:8521083

  11. Local invertible analytic solutions for an iterative differential equation related to a discrete derivatives sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Jianguo; Zhao, Houyu

    2007-11-01

    In this paper, we are concerned with the existence of analytic solutions of a class of iterative differential equation in the complex field , where , , fi(z) denotes ith iterate of f(z), i=1,2,...,n. The above equation is closely related to a discrete derivatives sequence F'(m) (see [Y.-F.S. Pétermann, Jean-Luc Rémy, Ilan Vardi, Discrete derivative of sequences, Adv. in Appl. Math. 27 (2001) 562-584]). We first give the existence of analytic solutions of the form of power functions for such an equation. Then by constructing a convergent power series solution y(z) of an auxiliary equation of the formx'(z)=K[alpha]x'([alpha]z)(x([alpha]z))a1(x([alpha]2z))a2...(x([alpha]nz))an, invertible analytic solutions of the form f(z)=x([alpha]x-1(z)) for the original equation are obtained. We discuss not only the constant [alpha] at resonance, i.e. at a root of the unity, but also those [alpha] near resonance (near a root of the unity) under the Brjuno condition.

  12. Kullback-Leibler Divergence-Based Differential Evolution Markov Chain Filter for Global Localization of Mobile Robots.

    PubMed

    Martín, Fernando; Moreno, Luis; Garrido, Santiago; Blanco, Dolores

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important skills desired for a mobile robot is the ability to obtain its own location even in challenging environments. The information provided by the sensing system is used here to solve the global localization problem. In our previous work, we designed different algorithms founded on evolutionary strategies in order to solve the aforementioned task. The latest developments are presented in this paper. The engine of the localization module is a combination of the Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling technique and the Differential Evolution method, which results in a particle filter based on the minimization of a fitness function. The robot's pose is estimated from a set of possible locations weighted by a cost value. The measurements of the perceptive sensors are used together with the predicted ones in a known map to define a cost function to optimize. Although most localization methods rely on quadratic fitness functions, the sensed information is processed asymmetrically in this filter. The Kullback-Leibler divergence is the basis of a cost function that makes it possible to deal with different types of occlusions. The algorithm performance has been checked in a real map. The results are excellent in environments with dynamic and unmodeled obstacles, a fact that causes occlusions in the sensing area. PMID:26389914

  13. Kullback-Leibler Divergence-Based Differential Evolution Markov Chain Filter for Global Localization of Mobile Robots

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Fernando; Moreno, Luis; Garrido, Santiago; Blanco, Dolores

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important skills desired for a mobile robot is the ability to obtain its own location even in challenging environments. The information provided by the sensing system is used here to solve the global localization problem. In our previous work, we designed different algorithms founded on evolutionary strategies in order to solve the aforementioned task. The latest developments are presented in this paper. The engine of the localization module is a combination of the Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling technique and the Differential Evolution method, which results in a particle filter based on the minimization of a fitness function. The robot’s pose is estimated from a set of possible locations weighted by a cost value. The measurements of the perceptive sensors are used together with the predicted ones in a known map to define a cost function to optimize. Although most localization methods rely on quadratic fitness functions, the sensed information is processed asymmetrically in this filter. The Kullback-Leibler divergence is the basis of a cost function that makes it possible to deal with different types of occlusions. The algorithm performance has been checked in a real map. The results are excellent in environments with dynamic and unmodeled obstacles, a fact that causes occlusions in the sensing area. PMID:26389914

  14. Beacons and surface features differentially influence human reliance on global and local geometric cues when reorienting in a virtual environment.

    PubMed

    Bodily, Kent D; Kilday, Zachary A; Eastman, Caroline K; Gaskin, Katherine A; Graves, April A; Roberts, Jonathan E; Sturz, Bradley R

    2013-02-01

    In the reorientation literature, non-geometric cues include discrete objects (e.g., beacons) and surface-based features (e.g., colors, textures, and odors). To date, these types of non-geometric cues have been considered functionally similar, and it remains unknown whether beacons and surface features differentially influence the extent to which organisms reorient via global and local geometric cues. In the present experiment, we trained human participants to approach a location in a trapezoid-shaped enclosure uniquely specified by global and local geometric cues. We explored the role of beacons on the use of geometric cues by training participants in the presence or absence of uniquely-colored beacons. We explored the role of surface features on the use of geometric cues by recoloring two adjacent walls at the correct location and/or adding a line on the floor which corresponded to the major principal axis of the enclosure. All groups were then tested in novel-shaped enclosures in the absence of unique beacons and surface features to assess the relative use of global and local geometric cues. Results suggested that beacons facilitated the use of global geometric cues, whereas surface features either facilitated or hindered the use of geometric cues, depending on the feature. PMID:23089385

  15. p38 MAPK α and β isoforms differentially regulate plasma membrane localization of MRP2.

    PubMed

    Schonhoff, Christopher M; Park, Se Won; Webster, Cynthia R L; Anwer, M Sawkat

    2016-06-01

    In hepatocytes, cAMP both activates p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and increases the amount of multidrug resistance-associated protein-2 (MRP2) in the plasma membrane (PM-MRP2). Paradoxically, taurolithocholate (TLC) activates p38 MAPK but decreases PM-MRP2 in hepatocytes. These opposing effects of cAMP and TLC could be mediated via different p38 MAPK isoforms (α and β) that are activated differentially by upstream kinases (MKK3, MKK4, and MKK6). Thus we tested the hypothesis that p38α MAPK and p38β MAPK mediate increases and decreases in PM-MRP2 by cAMP and TLC, respectively. Studies were conducted in hepatocytes isolated from C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) and MKK3-knockout (MKK3(-/-)) mice and in a hepatoma cell line (HuH7) that overexpresses sodium-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) (HuH-NTCP). Cyclic AMP activated MKK3, p38 MAPK, and p38α MAPK and increased PM-MRP2 in WT hepatocytes, but failed to activate p38α MAPK or increase PM-MRP2 in MKK3(-/-) hepatocytes. In contrast to cAMP, TLC activated total p38 MAPK but decreased PM-MRP2, and did not activate MKK3 or p38α MAPK in WT hepatocytes. In MKK3(-/-) hepatocytes, TLC still decreased PM-MRP2 and activated p38 MAPK, indicating that these effects are not MKK3-dependent. Additionally, TLC activated MKK6 in MKK3(-/-) hepatocytes, and small interfering RNA knockdown of p38β MAPK abrogated TLC-mediated decreases in PM-MRP2 in HuH-NTCP cells. Taken together, these results suggest that p38α MAPK facilitates plasma membrane insertion of MRP2 by cAMP, whereas p38β MAPK mediates retrieval of PM-MRP2 by TLC. PMID:27012769

  16. Fat-containing Retroperitoneal Lesions: Imaging Characteristics, Localization, and Differential Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Shaaban, Akram M; Rezvani, Maryam; Tubay, Marc; Elsayes, Khaled M; Woodward, Paula J; Menias, Christine O

    2016-01-01

    The complex anatomy of the retroperitoneum is reflected in the spectrum of neoplastic and nonneoplastic conditions that can occur in the retroperitoneum and appear as soft-tissue masses. The presence of fat within a retroperitoneal lesion is helpful in refining the differential diagnosis. Fat is easily recognized because of its characteristic imaging appearance. It typically is hyperechoic at ultrasonography and demonstrates low attenuation at computed tomography (-10 to -100 HU). Magnetic resonance imaging is a more ideal imaging modality because it has better soft-tissue image contrast and higher sensitivity for depicting (a) microscopic fat by using chemical shift imaging and (b) macroscopic fat by using fat-suppression techniques. Whether a lesion arises from a retroperitoneal organ or from the soft tissues of the retroperitoneal space (primary lesion) is determined by examining the relationship between the lesion and its surrounding structures. Multiple imaging signs help to determine the organ of origin, including the "beak sign," the "embedded organ sign," the "phantom (invisible) organ sign," and the "prominent feeding artery sign." Adrenal adenoma is the most common adrenal mass that contains microscopic fat, while myelolipoma is the most common adrenal mass that contains macroscopic fat. Other adrenal masses, such as pheochromocytoma and adrenocortical carcinoma, rarely contain fat. Renal angiomyolipoma is the most common fat-containing renal mass. Other fat-containing renal lesions, such as lipoma and liposarcoma, are rare. Fatty replacement of the pancreas and pancreatic lipomas are relatively common, whereas pancreatic teratomas are rare. Of the primary retroperitoneal fat-containing lesions, lipoma and liposarcoma are common, while other lesions are relatively rare. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27163589

  17. A unifying retinex model based on non-local differential operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zosso, Dominique; Tran, Giang; Osher, Stanley

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we present a unifying framework for retinex that is able to reproduce many of the existing retinex implementations within a single model. The fundamental assumption, as shared with many retinex models, is that the observed image is a multiplication between the illumination and the true underlying reflectance of the object. Starting from Morel's 2010 PDE model for retinex, where illumination is supposed to vary smoothly and where the reflectance is thus recovered from a hard-thresholded Laplacian of the observed image in a Poisson equation, we define our retinex model in similar but more general two steps. First, look for a filtered gradient that is the solution of an optimization problem consisting of two terms: The first term is a sparsity prior of the reflectance, such as the TV or H1 norm, while the second term is a quadratic fidelity prior of the reflectance gradient with respect to the observed image gradients. In a second step, since this filtered gradient almost certainly is not a consistent image gradient, we then look for a reflectance whose actual gradient comes close. Beyond unifying existing models, we are able to derive entirely novel retinex formulations by using more interesting non-local versions for the sparsity and fidelity prior. Hence we define within a single framework new retinex instances particularly suited for texture-preserving shadow removal, cartoon-texture decomposition, color and hyperspectral image enhancement.

  18. The localization and differential expression of Serum Amyloid A in bovine liver and adipose tissue depots.

    PubMed

    Ceciliani, Fabrizio; Soler, Laura; Grilli, Guido; Marques, Andreia T; Giudice, Chiara; Lecchi, Cristina

    2015-11-15

    In this article the localization of the acute phase protein Serum Amyloid A (SAA) in different depots of bovine adipose tissue (AT) and liver is reported. Quantitative (Real Time) PCR was paired to immunohistochemistry after the production of a specific polyclonal antibody. SAA's mRNA was found in all analyzed AT depots included in the present study, the AT located in the withers being the major source of SAA mRNA. A polyclonal antibody was raised against bovine SAA and was used to validate gene expression analyses. Western Blotting confirmed that SAA is present in all the seven adipose tissue depots include in the present experiment. Anti-SAA polyclonal antibody also stained diffusely adipocytes. In liver, intracytoplasmic immunolabeling was observed in hepatocytes. Staining was generally mild and not diffuse: negative hepatocytes were intermixed with positive ones. A positive intracytoplasmic immunostaining was occasionally observed in endothelial cells lining small blood vessels within AT septa and liver parenchyma. Our data confirm that bovine AT may provide an important source of SAA in healthy subjects. It remains to be determined which is the contribution of AT in the serum concentration of SAA. PMID:26319890

  19. The instantaneous local transition of a stable equilibrium to a chaotic attractor in piecewise-smooth systems of differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, D. J. W.

    2016-09-01

    An attractor of a piecewise-smooth continuous system of differential equations can bifurcate from a stable equilibrium to a more complicated invariant set when it collides with a switching manifold under parameter variation. Here numerical evidence is provided to show that this invariant set can be chaotic. The transition occurs locally (in a neighbourhood of a point) and instantaneously (for a single critical parameter value). This phenomenon is illustrated for the normal form of a boundary equilibrium bifurcation in three dimensions using parameter values adapted from of a piecewise-linear model of a chaotic electrical circuit. The variation of a secondary parameter reveals a period-doubling cascade to chaos with windows of periodicity. The dynamics is well approximated by a one-dimensional unimodal map which explains the bifurcation structure. The robustness of the attractor is also investigated by studying the influence of nonlinear terms.

  20. Differential expression of embryonic epicardial progenitor markers and localization of cardiac fibrosis in adult ischemic injury and hypertensive heart disease.

    PubMed

    Braitsch, Caitlin M; Kanisicak, Onur; van Berlo, Jop H; Molkentin, Jeffery D; Yutzey, Katherine E

    2013-12-01

    During embryonic heart development, the transcription factors Tcf21, Wt1, and Tbx18 regulate activation and differentiation of epicardium-derived cells, including fibroblast lineages. Expression of these epicardial progenitor factors and localization of cardiac fibrosis were examined in mouse models of cardiovascular disease and in human diseased hearts. Following ischemic injury in mice, epicardial fibrosis is apparent in the thickened layer of subepicardial cells that express Wt1, Tbx18, and Tcf21. Perivascular fibrosis with predominant expression of Tcf21, but not Wt1 or Tbx18, occurs in mouse models of pressure overload or hypertensive heart disease, but not following ischemic injury. Areas of interstitial fibrosis in ischemic and hypertensive hearts actively express Tcf21, Wt1, and Tbx18. In all areas of fibrosis, cells that express epicardial progenitor factors are distinct from CD45-positive immune cells. In human diseased hearts, differential expression of Tcf21, Wt1, and Tbx18 also is detected with epicardial, perivascular, and interstitial fibrosis, indicating conservation of reactivated developmental mechanisms in cardiac fibrosis in mice and humans. Together, these data provide evidence for distinct fibrogenic mechanisms that include Tcf21, separate from Wt1 and Tbx18, in different fibroblast populations in response to specific types of cardiac injury. PMID:24140724

  1. New 3D parallel GILD electromagnetic modeling and nonlinear inversion using global magnetic integral and local differential equation

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, G.; Li, J.; Majer, E.; Zuo, D.

    1998-07-01

    This paper describes a new 3D parallel GILD electromagnetic (EM) modeling and nonlinear inversion algorithm. The algorithm consists of: (a) a new magnetic integral equation instead of the electric integral equation to solve the electromagnetic forward modeling and inverse problem; (b) a collocation finite element method for solving the magnetic integral and a Galerkin finite element method for the magnetic differential equations; (c) a nonlinear regularizing optimization method to make the inversion stable and of high resolution; and (d) a new parallel 3D modeling and inversion using a global integral and local differential domain decomposition technique (GILD). The new 3D nonlinear electromagnetic inversion has been tested with synthetic data and field data. The authors obtained very good imaging for the synthetic data and reasonable subsurface EM imaging for the field data. The parallel algorithm has high parallel efficiency over 90% and can be a parallel solver for elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic modeling and inversion. The parallel GILD algorithm can be extended to develop a high resolution and large scale seismic and hydrology modeling and inversion in the massively parallel computer.

  2. Autoradiographic imaging of phosphoinositide turnover in the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, P.M.; Bredt, D.S.; Snyder, S.H. )

    1990-08-17

    With ({sup 3}H)cytidine as a precursor, phosphoinositide turnover can be localized in brain slices by selective autoradiography of the product ({sup 3}H)cytidine diphosphate diacylglycerol, which is membrane-bound. In the cerebellum, glutamatergic stimulation elicits an increase of phosphoinositide turnover only in Purkinje cells and the molecular layer. In the hippocampus, both glutamatergic and muscarinic cholinergic stimulation increase phosphoinositide turnover, but with distinct localizations. Cholinergic stimulation affects CA1, CA3, CA4, and subiculum, whereas glutamatergic effects are restricted to the subiculum and CA3. Imaging phosphoinositide turnover in brain slices, which are amenable to electrophysiologic studies, will permit a dynamic localized analysis of regulation of this second messenger in response to synaptic stimulation of specific neuronal pathways.

  3. Trpm4 differentially regulates Th1 and Th2 function by altering calcium signaling and NFAT localization

    PubMed Central

    Weber, K. Scott; Hildner, Kai; Murphy, Kenneth M.; Allen, Paul M.

    2010-01-01

    T helper cell subsets have unique calcium (Ca2+) signals when activated with identical stimuli. The regulation of these Ca2+ signals and their correlation to the biological function of each T cell subset remains unclear. Trpm4 is a Ca2+-activated cation channel that we found is expressed at higher levels in Th2 cells compared to Th1 cells. Inhibition of Trpm4 expression increased Ca2+ influx and oscillatory levels in Th2 cells and decreased influx and oscillations in Th1 cells. This inhibition of Trpm4 expression also significantly altered T cell cytokine production and motility. Our experiments revealed that decreasing Trpm4 levels divergently regulates nuclear localization of NFATc1. Consistent with this, gene profiling did not show Trpm4 dependent transcriptional regulation and T-bet and GATA-3 levels remain identical. Thus, Trpm4 is expressed at different levels on T helper cells and plays a distinctive role in T cell function by differentially regulating Ca2+ signaling and NFATc1 localization. PMID:20656926

  4. Differential expression of HLA-G and ILT-2 receptor in human tuberculosis: Localized versus disseminated disease.

    PubMed

    Saurabh, Abhinav; Thakral, Deepshi; Mourya, Manish K; Singh, Amar; Mohan, Anant; Bhatnagar, Anuj K; Mitra, Dipendra K; Kanga, Uma

    2016-09-01

    Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) is an anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive molecule that can modulate immune cell activation. The role of HLA-G in tuberculosis, an immune-mediated and chronic bacterial disease remains to be elucidated. We investigated the expression profile of soluble and membrane bound HLA-G in pulmonary TB (PTB), TB pleural effusion (TB-PE, localized disease) and Miliary TB (disseminated form). The expression of HLA-G receptor, ILT-2 was also determined on the immune cells. We observed that the plasma sHLA-G levels were significantly increased in Miliary TB than in TB-PE patients. In contrast, immunophenotyping revealed that the percent frequency of CD3(+) T cells expressing HLA-G was significantly reduced in Miliary TB as compared to TB-PE, whereas frequency of CD14(+) monocytes expressing HLA-G was significantly higher in TB-PE patients. Strikingly in the TB-PE cases, comparison of disease site, i.e. pleural effusion with peripheral blood showed increased expression of both soluble and surface HLA-G, whereas ILT-2 expressing cells were reduced at the local disease site. Furthermore, we demonstrated that in TB-PE cases, HLA-G expression on CD3(+) T cells was influenced by broad spectrum MMP inhibitor. Thus, differential expression of HLA-G could potentially be a useful biomarker to distinguish different states of TB disease. PMID:26776460

  5. Ultrastructural autoradiographic localization of somatostatin-28 in the rat pituitary gland

    SciTech Connect

    Morel, G.; Leroux, P.; Pelletier, G.

    1985-04-01

    To identify the anterior pituitary cell type(s) containing somatostatin-28 (SS-28)-binding sites and to study the internalization processes of this peptide by the target cells, autoradiography was performed on rat anterior pituitaries removed at specific intervals (2-60 min) after iv injection of the (/sup 125/I)iodo-SS-28 agonist (Leu8,D-Trp22,Tyr25)SS-28 into intact, adrenalectomized, or castrated male rats. At the light microscopic level, the silver grains were found in 75% of cells. Concomitant injection of an excess of unlabeled peptide prevented the binding of label, verifying the specificity of binding. No specific labeling could be detected in the adrenocorticotrophs of adrenalectomized rats or gonadotrophs (castration cells) of castrated rats. At the electron microscopic level, three cell types (somatotrophs, thyrotrophs, and mammotrophs) appear to contain radiolabeled SS-28. The time-course study in somatotrophs of intact animals showed that 2 min after injection, most silver grains were associated with the plasma membrane. Five to 15 min after injection, label was found over both the plasma membrane and cytoplasmic organelles, especially the Golgi apparatus, lysosomes, and secretory granules. At the longest time interval (60 min), labeling was mostly associated with the cytoplasmic organelles. These results indicate that SS-28-binding sites are present only in those cell types in which somatostatin is known to regulate secretory functions. The present data also show that a rapid internalization of the radiolabeled peptide occurs.

  6. Autoradiographic localization of thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) receptors in the central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Manaker, S.

    1985-01-01

    Quantitative autoradiography was used to examine the distribution of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) receptors in the rat and human central nervous system (CNS). The binding of (/sup 3/H)-3-methyl-histidine/sup 2/-TRH ((/sup 3/H)-MeTRH) to TRH receptors was saturable, of a high affinity (K/sub d/ = 5 nM), and specific for TRH analogs. Studies with neurotoxins ibotenic acid and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) suggest that TRH receptors within the amygdala are predominantly located on cell bodies, and not nerve terminals. Finally, an examination was made of the concentrations of TRH receptors in spinal cords of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a degenerative disease of the motor neurons located in Lamina IX. Large decreases in TRH receptors were noted in ALS spinal cords, when compared to non-neurological controls, probably reflecting the loss of motor neurons. In addition, decreases in the TRH receptor concentration of Lamina II were observed. This finding may reflect the sensitivity of neurons throughout the CNS to the pathophysiologic mechanisms of neuronal degeneration which cause ALS.

  7. Characterization and autoradiographical localization of non-adrenoceptor idazoxan binding sites in the rat brain.

    PubMed Central

    Mallard, N. J.; Hudson, A. L.; Nutt, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    1. In rat whole brain homogenates, saturation analysis revealed that both [3H]-idazoxan and [3H]-RX821002, a selective alpha 2-adrenoceptor ligand, bound with high affinity to an apparent single population of sites. However, the Bmax for [3H]-idazoxan was significantly (P less than 0.01) greater than that for [3H]-RX821002. 2. In competition studies, (-)-adrenaline displaced 3 nM [3H]-idazoxan binding with an affinity consistent with [3H]-idazoxan labelling alpha 2-adrenoceptors. However, this displacement was incomplete since 23.68 +/- 1.11% of specific [3H]-idazoxan binding remained in the presence of an excess concentration (100 microM) of (-)-adrenaline. In contrast, unlabelled idazoxan promoted a complete displacement of [3H]-idazoxan binding with a Hill slope close to unity and an affinity comparable with its KD determined in saturation studies. 3. Displacement of [3H]-idazoxan binding by the alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonists yohimbine, RX821002 (2-(2-methoxy-1,4-benzodioxan-2-yl)-2-imidazoline) and RX811059 (2-(2-ethoxy-1,4-benzodioxan-2-yl)-2-imidazoline) was more complex, with Hill slopes considerably less than unity, and best described by a two-site model of interaction comprising a high and low affinity component. The proportion of sites with high affinity for each antagonist was similar (60-80%). 4. The rank order of antagonist potency for the high affinity component in each displacement curve (RX821002 greater than RX811059 greater than yohimbine) is similar to that determined against the binding of [3H]-RX821002 to rat brain, suggesting that these components reflect the inhibition of [3H]-idazoxan binding to alpha 2-adrenoceptors.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:1356565

  8. Autoradiographic localization of opioid receptor types in the rat small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Dashwood, M.R.; Sykes, R.M.; Thompson, C.S.

    1986-01-01

    The selective mu and delta ligands (/sup 3/H)DAGO and (/sup 3/H)DPDPE have been used to investigate the distribution of specific opioid subtypes in the rat small intestine by in vitro autoradiography. There was a greater density of (/sup 3/H)DPDPE binding at regions of the villi and crypts than (/sup 3/H)DAGO binding. These results suggest that the opioid receptors located in these regions are predominantly of the delta subtype.

  9. Whole-body autoradiographic localization of (/sup 3/H)phencyclidine and its metabolites in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Fand, I.; McNally, W.P.; Koul, O.; Yonekura, Y.; Som, P.; Brill, A.B.; Deutsch, D.G.

    1988-05-01

    When evaluated by whole-body autoradiography (WBAR) and quantitative densitometry, (3H)phencyclidine (PCP) equivalents were found to be removed rapidly from blood, after a single iv dose in mice, and avidly taken up as early as 1 min after dosage by glandular tissues including thyroid, salivary glands, pancreas, pituitary and, most prominently, by stomach mucosa. Stomach:blood (3H)PCP concentration ratios showed that rapid secretion of (3H)PCP from mucosa to the stomach contents occurred within 2 min after dosing. During early intervals, chromatographic analysis of tissue sections demonstrated that PCP was present in brain, liver, and gut primarily in its unaltered chemical form. Mice killed at 60 and 120 min showed persistently high levels of (3H)PCP equivalents within the stomach and intestines, these levels being the highest of all other tissues densitometrically measured. The early time course and magnitude of (3H)PCP uptake by stomach glandular mucosa strongly suggests that cycling of PCP occurs principally through gastroenteric recirculation. Very striking was the high concentration of (3H)PCP radioactivity observed within the adrenal as early as 5 min. The concentration of (3H)PCP equivalents in pituitary, choroid plexus, cortex, hippocampus, and thalamus was highest at 1-20 min following injection. Application of high-resolution quantitative WBAR was found to be a useful tool in the study of the biodistribution of labeled PCP, especially during very early post-treatment time points where alternative tissue counting techniques would not be feasible.

  10. Antigen handling in antigen-induced arthritis in mice: an autoradiographic and immunofluorescence study using whole joint sections.

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, W. B.; van Beusekom, H. J.; van de Putte, L. B.; Zwarts, W. A.; van der Sluis, M.

    1982-01-01

    Antigen localization after intraarticular antigen injection was studied in immune and nonimmune mice using autoradiographic and immunofluorescence techniques on whole joint sections. After intraarticular injection of radiolabeled methylated bovine serum albumin (125I-mBSA) in immune mice, labeling in the synovium and synovial exudate diminished rapidly, apart from some deposits in fibrinlike material present in the joint cavity. Long-term antigen retention was found in avascular and hypovascular structures lining the joint cavity, albeit not along the whole surface; eg, labeling remained present at the edges of the femoral condyle hyaline cartilage but not at the central weight-bearing region; long-term retention at ligaments was only found at the insertion sites. Immunofluorescence data in immune animals showed antigen retention together with the presence of immunoglobulins and complement, indicating that antigen is retained at least in part in the form of immune complexes. Nonimmune mice showed even higher long-term antigen retention than immune animals, probably related to physico-chemical properties of the antigen enabling nonimmune binding to articular structures, but also indicating that the presence of joint inflammation in the immune animals enhances antigen clearance. Histologic examination of the ligaments and patellar cartilage of immune mice did reveal that long-term antigen retention was not anatomically related to nearby inflammation or to local tissue damage. The importance of long-term antigen retention for the chronicity of arthritis may lie in the leakage of small amounts of this antigen to joint compartments where it does behave as an inflammatory stimulus; it may further be that it renders the joint a specifically hypersensitive area. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7046457

  11. A combination of atlas-based and voxel-wise approaches to analyze metabolic changes in autoradiographic data from Alzheimer's mice.

    PubMed

    Lebenberg, J; Hérard, A-S; Dubois, A; Dhenain, M; Hantraye, P; Delzescaux, T

    2011-08-15

    Murine models are commonly used in neuroscience research to improve our knowledge of disease processes and to test drug effects. To accurately study brain glucose metabolism in these animals, ex vivo autoradiography remains the gold standard. The analysis of 3D-reconstructed autoradiographic volumes using a voxel-wise approach allows clusters of voxels representing metabolic differences between groups to be revealed. However, the spatial localization of these clusters requires careful visual identification by a neuroanatomist, a time-consuming task that is often subject to misinterpretation. Moreover, the large number of voxels to be computed in autoradiographic rodent images leads to many false positives. Here, we proposed an original automated indexation of the results of a voxel-wise approach using an MRI-based 3D digital atlas, followed by the restriction of the statistical analysis using atlas-based segmentation, thus taking advantage of the specific and complementary strengths of these two approaches. In a preliminary study of transgenic Alzheimer's mice (APP/PS1), and control littermates (PS1), we were able to achieve prompt and direct anatomical indexation of metabolic changes detected between the two groups, revealing both hypo- and hypermetabolism in the brain of APP/PS1 mice. Furthermore, statistical results were refined using atlas-based segmentation: most interesting results were obtained for the hippocampus. We thus confirmed and extended our previous results by identifying the brain structures affected in this pathological model and demonstrating modified glucose uptake in structures like the olfactory bulb. Our combined approach thus paves the way for a complete and accurate examination of functional data from cerebral structures involved in models of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21571077

  12. Autoradiographic study of tritium-labeled misonidazole in the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Cobb, L.M.; Nolan, J.

    1989-04-01

    The localization of tritiated misonidazole metabolites in a number of normal tissues in the mouse is reported from autoradiography. The labeled misonidazole was injected at 750 or 75 mg/kg body weight (Rel. Sp. Act. 74 and 740 MBq/mg respectively). The grain count ratio, parenchyma:stroma, for selected tissues was: liver (centrilobular zone) 13; meibomian gland (acini) 68, (duct) 116; esophagus (keratinized layer) 61; enamel organ 17. It is concluded that there are a number of tissues which will accumulate MISO metabolites although they may not all be hypoxic.

  13. Whole-body autoradiographic microimaging: Applications in radiopharmaceutical and drug research

    SciTech Connect

    Som, P.; Sacker, D.F.

    1991-12-31

    The whole-body autoradiographic (WBARG) microimaging technique is used for evaluation of the temporo-spatial distribution of radiolabeled molecules in intact animals as well as to determine the sites of accumulation of parent compounds and their metabolites. This technique is also very useful to determine the metabolism of a compound, toxicity, and effects of therapeutic interventions on the distribution of a compound in the whole body, by studying animals at different time intervals after injection of the radiolabeled compound. This report discusses various aspects of WBARG.

  14. Whole-body autoradiographic microimaging: Applications in radiopharmaceutical and drug research

    SciTech Connect

    Som, P.; Sacker, D.F.

    1991-01-01

    The whole-body autoradiographic (WBARG) microimaging technique is used for evaluation of the temporo-spatial distribution of radiolabeled molecules in intact animals as well as to determine the sites of accumulation of parent compounds and their metabolites. This technique is also very useful to determine the metabolism of a compound, toxicity, and effects of therapeutic interventions on the distribution of a compound in the whole body, by studying animals at different time intervals after injection of the radiolabeled compound. This report discusses various aspects of WBARG.

  15. Double tracer autoradiographic method for sequential evaluation of regional cerebral perfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, H.; Tsuji, S.; Oba, H.; Kinuya, K.; Terada, H.; Sumiya, H.; Shiba, K.; Mori, H.; Hisada, K.; Maeda, T. )

    1989-01-01

    A new double tracer autoradiographic method for the sequential evaluation of altered regional cerebral perfusion in the same animal is presented. This method is based on the sequential injection of two tracers, {sup 99m}Tc-hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime and N-isopropyl-({sup 125}I)p-iodoamphetamine. This method is validated in the assessment of brovincamine effects on regional cerebral perfusion in an experimental model of chronic brain ischemia in the rat. The drug enhanced perfusion recovery in low-flow areas, selectively in surrounding areas of infarction. The results suggest that this technique is of potential use in the study of neuropharmacological effects applied during the experiment.

  16. An autoradiographic map of (3H)diprenorphine binding in rat brain: effects of social interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Panksepp, J.; Bishop, P.

    1981-10-01

    (3H)Diprenorphine binding was analyzed autoradiographically in the brains of 33 day old rat pups. A photographic atlas of diprenorphine binding in the coronal plane is provided to highlight the dispersion of opioid receptor systems through the brain. To determine whether brain opioid release may be induced by social interactions, half the animals were sacrificed following a 30 min period of social interaction while the other half were sacrificed following 30 min of social isolation. Opioid binding was higher in isolate-tested animals than socially-tested ones, suggesting that social interaction may promote endogenous brain opioid release.

  17. JULIDE: a software tool for 3D reconstruction and statistical analysis of autoradiographic mouse brain sections.

    PubMed

    Ribes, Delphine; Parafita, Julia; Charrier, Rémi; Magara, Fulvio; Magistretti, Pierre J; Thiran, Jean-Philippe

    2010-01-01

    In this article we introduce JULIDE, a software toolkit developed to perform the 3D reconstruction, intensity normalization, volume standardization by 3D image registration and voxel-wise statistical analysis of autoradiographs of mouse brain sections. This software tool has been developed in the open-source ITK software framework and is freely available under a GPL license. The article presents the complete image processing chain from raw data acquisition to 3D statistical group analysis. Results of the group comparison in the context of a study on spatial learning are shown as an illustration of the data that can be obtained with this tool. PMID:21124830

  18. Localization of transforming growth factor-beta at the human fetal-maternal interface: role in trophoblast growth and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Graham, C H; Lysiak, J J; McCrae, K R; Lala, P K

    1992-04-01

    We examined the localization of transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta in first-trimester and term human decidua and chorionic villi and explored the role of this factor on the proliferation and differentiation of cultured trophoblast cells. Two antibodies, 1D11.16.8, a mouse monoclonal neutralizing antibody capable of recognizing both TGF-beta 1 and TGF-beta 2 and CL-B1/29, a rabbit polyclonal antibody capable of recognizing TGF-beta 2, were used to immunolocalize TGF-beta in fixed, paraffin-embedded, or fixed, frozen sections of placenta and decidua, providing similar results. Intense labeling was observed in the extracellular matrix (ECM) of the first-trimester decidua and cytoplasm of term decidual cells. Syncytiotrophoblast cell cytoplasm as well as the ECM in the core of the chorionic villi of both first-trimester and term placentas exhibited a moderate degree of labeling. Strong cytoplasmic labeling was observed in the cytotrophoblastic shell of the term placenta. To examine the role of TGF-beta on trophoblast proliferation and differentiation, early passage cultures of first-trimester and primary cultures of term trophoblast cells were established and characterized on the basis of numerous immunocytochemical and functional markers. These cells expressed cytokeratin, placental alkaline phosphatase, urokinase-type plasminogen activator, and pregnancy-specific beta glycoprotein, but not factor VIII or 63D3; they also produced hCG and collagenase type IV. Exposure of first-trimester trophoblast cultures to TGF-beta 1 significantly inhibited proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. An antiproliferative effect was also noted in the presence of TGF-beta 2. These effects were abrogated in the presence of the neutralizing anti-TGF-beta antibody (1D11.16.8) in a concentration-dependent manner. In a 3-day culture, exogenous TGF-beta 1 stimulated formation of multinucleated cells by the first trimester as well as term trophoblast cells. Addition of neutralizing anti

  19. Autoradiographic quantification of adrenergic receptors in rat kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Calianos, T. II; Muntz, K.H. )

    1990-07-01

    The adrenergic nervous system is active in kidney function, and the kidney has large numbers of adrenergic receptor subtypes. Because of the cellular complexity of the kidney, it is difficult to obtain direct assessments of adrenergic receptor binding characteristics over specific tissue compartments. Qualitative autoradiography allows the localization of adrenergic receptors over tissue types in the kidney, but quantitative autoradiography allows direct comparison of adrenergic receptor number over different cellular compartments. The purpose of this study was to obtain direct assessments of alpha 1, alpha 2, and beta adrenergic receptor numbers over different tissue compartments of the kidney using quantitative autoradiography. Sections of Sprague-Dawley rat kidney were incubated in several concentrations of 3H-dihydroalprenolol to label beta receptors, 3H-prazosin to label alpha 1 receptors and 3H-rauwolscine to label the alpha 2 receptors. Sections of rat heart incubated in 3H-dihydroalprenolol were included as standards. The sections were then prepared for receptor autoradiography. After processing, the grains were then quantified on an image analysis system, and binding curves constructed from the specific binding. In some animals, the proximal tubules were stained to localize the proximal convoluted tubules. Significant Scatchard analyses were obtained in the glomeruli with dihydroalprenolol (5.18 X 10(9) receptors/mm3) and with rauwolscine (2.48 X 10(9) receptors/mm3). Significant Scatchard analyses were obtained in the cortex with rauwolscine (9.47 X 10(9) receptors/mm3) and with prazosin (3.9 X 10(9)). In addition, specific binding was seen with rauwolscine and prazosin to the kidney arterioles.

  20. Strong stability of a scheme on locally uniform meshes for a singularly perturbed ordinary differential convection-diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishkin, G. I.

    2012-06-01

    The Dirichlet problem for a singularly perturbed ordinary differential convection-diffusion equation with a small parameter ɛ (ɛ ∈ (0, 1]) multiplying the higher order derivative is considered. For the problem, a difference scheme on locally uniform meshes is constructed that converges in the maximum norm conditionally, i.e., depending on the relation between the parameter ɛ and the value N defining the number of nodes in the mesh used; in particular, the scheme converges almost ɛ-uniformly (i.e., its accuracy depends weakly on ɛ). The stability of the scheme with respect to perturbations in the data and its conditioning are analyzed. The scheme is constructed using classical monotone approximations of the boundary value problem on a priori adapted grids, which are uniform on subdomains where the solution is improved. The boundaries of these subdomains are determined by a majorant of the singular component of the discrete solution. On locally uniform meshes, the difference scheme converges at a rate of O(min[ɛ-1 N - K ln N, 1] + N -1ln N), where K is a prescribed number of iterations for refining the discrete solution. The scheme converges almost ɛ-uniformly at a rate of O( N -1ln N) if N -1 ≤ ɛν, where ν (the defect of ɛ-uniform convergence) determines the required number K of iterations ( K = K(ν) ˜ ν-1) and can be chosen arbitrarily small from the half-open interval (0, 1]. The condition number of the difference scheme satisfies the bound κ P = O(ɛ-1/ K ln1/ K ɛ-1δ-( K + 1)/ K ), where δ is the accuracy of the solution of the scheme in the maximum norm in the absence of perturbations. For sufficiently large K, the scheme is almost ɛ-uniformly strongly stable.

  1. Differentiating mucosal and hepatic metabolism of budesonide by local pretreatment with increasing doses of ketoconazole in the proximal jejunum.

    PubMed

    Seidegård, Janeric; Nyberg, Lars; Borgå, Olof

    2012-08-15

    Many drugs undergo first-pass metabolism both in the gut mucosa and the liver, but little is known about the relative efficiency of these two pathways. The objective of this study was to differentiate between mucosal and hepatic metabolism using budesonide as a probe. After a light breakfast, budesonide, 3mg, was infused locally in the proximal jejunum of eight healthy men on seven occasions, on six occasions after administering the CYP3A4 inhibitor ketoconazole 5 min before in the same jejunal position. The dose range of local inhibitor was 1-128 mg, the highest dose also preceded by an oral dose of 200mg given 12h earlier. Simultaneously with intrajejunal budesonide, deuterium-labelled budesonide (0.2mg) was administered intravenously. Pharmacokinetics of unlabelled and labelled budesonide in plasma was evaluated after LC-MS/MS analysis. Bioavailability of budesonide without inhibition was 27(12-42)%. All ketoconazole doses increased budesonide bioavailability. However, systemic clearance of labelled budesonide was unaffected by ketoconazole doses up to 16 mg but decreased significantly at doses of 64 mg and above. At the two highest doses (128 mg and above) bioavailability approached 100%, showing that budesonide was completely absorbed from jejunum. Ketoconazole doses up to 16 mg appeared to inhibit only mucosal enzymes, while higher doses inhibited also hepatic metabolism. Applying sigmoid E(max)-models of the mean inhibitions in mucosa and liver indicated that, in this study performed under fed conditions, their uninhibited extraction ratios of budesonide were approximately 0.32 and 0.60, respectively. Ketoconazole doses that inhibited half the metabolism were estimated at about 1mg in the mucosa and about 50mg in the liver. In conclusion, this study gave a rough estimate of the relation between mucosal and hepatic first-pass metabolism of budesonide. PMID:22538054

  2. Changes in localization of human discs large (hDlg) during keratinocyte differentiation is associated with expression of alternatively spliced hDlg variants

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, S. . E-mail: s.roberts@bham.ac.uk; Calautti, E.; Vanderweil, S.; Nguyen, H.O.; Foley, A.; Baden, H.P.; Viel, A.

    2007-07-15

    Alternative spliced variants of the human discs large (hDlg) tumour suppressor are characterized by combinations of insertions. Here, using insertions I2- and I3-specific antibodies, we show that I2 and I3 variants have distinct distributions in epidermal and cervical epithelia. In skin and cervix, I3 variants are found in the cytoplasm. Cytoplasmic localization of I3 variants decreases as cervical keratinocytes differentiate, concomitant with relocalization to the cell periphery. I2 variants are found at the cell periphery of differentiated epidermal and cervical keratinocytes. Nuclear localization of I2 variants was evident in both tissues, with concentration of nuclear I2 variants in basal and parabasal cervical keratinocytes. A prominent nuclear localization of hDlg in cells of hyperproliferative layers of psoriatic lesions, but not in mature differentiated keratinocytes, together with I2 redistribution in differentiating keratinocytes, suggests that nuclear hDlg functions may be pertinent to growth of undifferentiated cells. Supporting our findings in squamous tissues, a decrease of nuclear hDlg and an increase of membrane-bound and cytoplasmic hDlg upon calcium-induced keratinocyte differentiation were not concomitant processes. Furthermore, we confirm that the exit of I2 variants from the nucleus is linked to stimulation of epithelial differentiation. The dynamic redistribution of hDlg also correlated with a marked increase in the expression of I3 variants while the level of I2 variants showed only a moderate decrease. Because changes in the intracellular distribution of hDlg splice variants, and in their expression levels, correlate with changes in differentiation state we hypothesize that the different hDlg isoforms play distinct roles at various stages of epithelial differentiation.

  3. Differential involvement of 5-HT projections within the amygdala in prepulse inhibition but not in psychotomimetic drug-induced hyperlocomotion.

    PubMed

    Kusljic, Snezana; van den Buuse, Maarten

    2006-03-15

    While there is abundant evidence for a role of 5-HT and the amygdala in anxiety and depression, the role of 5-HT in this brain region in schizophrenia is less well understood. We therefore examined the effects of local 5-HT depletion in the amygdala on psychotomimetic drug-induced locomotor hyperactivity and prepulse inhibition, two animal model of aspects of schizophrenia. Pentobarbital-anaesthetized (60 mg/kg, i.p.) male Sprague-Dawley rats were stereotaxically micro-injected with 0.5 microl of a 5 microg/mul solution of the 5-HT neurotoxin 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT) into either the basolateral (BLA) or central nucleus of amygdala (CeN). Two weeks after the surgery, rats with BLA lesions did not show changes in either psychotomimetic drug-induced locomotor hyperactivity or prepulse inhibition. In contrast, rats with CeN lesions showed significant disruption of prepulse inhibition, but no changes in psychotomimetic drug-induced locomotor hyperactivity. Neurochemical analysis and autoradiographic labelling of 5-HT transporter sites showed that a good degree of anatomical selectivity was obtained. Following administration of 5,7-DHT into the amygdala, the concentration of 5-HT was significantly reduced. Similarly, 5-HT transporter autoradiographs showed differential and selective lesions of 5-HT innervation in targeted subregions of the amygdala. These results provide evidence for differential involvement of 5-HT projections within the amygdala in prepulse inhibition but not locomotor hyperactivity. Thus, the present study supports the view that 5-HT in the amygdala may be involved in aspects of schizophrenia and a target for antipsychotic drug action. PMID:16303186

  4. Differential Localization of Carbohydrate Epitopes in Plant Cell Walls in the Presence and Absence of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi.

    PubMed Central

    Balestrini, R.; Hahn, M. G.; Faccio, A.; Mendgen, K.; Bonfante, P.

    1996-01-01

    Two monoclonal antibodies (McAbs) generated against rhamnogalacturonan I and characterized as specific for a terminal [alpha]-(1->2)-linked fucosyl-containing epitope (CCRC-M1) and for an arabinosylated [beta]-(1,6)-galactan epitope (CCRC-M7) were used in immunogold experiments to determine the distribution of the epitopes in four plants. Allium porrum, Zea mays, Trifolium repens, and Nicotiana tabacum plants were chosen as representatives of monocots and dicots with different wall structures. Analyses were performed on root tissues in the presence and absence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. A differential localization of the two cell wall epitopes was found between tissues and between species: for example, in leek, CCRC-M1 labeled epidermal and hypodermal cells, whereas CCRC-M7 labeled cortical cells only. Clover walls were labeled by both McAbs, whereas maize and tobacco were only labeled by CCRC-M7. In the presence of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, labeling was additionally found in an apoplastic compartment typical of the symbiosis (the interface) occurring around the intracellular hyphae. Epitopes binding both McAbs were found in the interfacial material, and their distribution mirrored the pattern found in the host cell wall. These findings demonstrate that the composition of the interface zone in a fungus-plant symbiosis reflects the composition of the wall of the host cell. PMID:12226286

  5. Ground and building extraction from LiDAR data based on differential morphological profiles and locally fitted surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mongus, Domen; Lukač, Niko; Žalik, Borut

    2014-07-01

    This paper proposes a new framework for ground extraction and building detection in LiDAR data. The proposed approach constructs the connectivity of a grid over the LiDAR point-cloud in order to perform multi-scale data decomposition. This is realised by forming a top-hat scale-space using differential morphological profiles (DMPs) on points' residuals from the approximated surface. The geometric attributes of the contained features are estimated by mapping characteristic values from DMPs. Ground definition is achieved by using features' geometry, whilst their surface and regional attributes are additionally considered for building detection. A new algorithm for local fitting surfaces (LoFS) is proposed for extracting planar points. Finally, transitions between planar ground and non-ground regions are observed in order to separate regions of similar geometrical and surface properties but different contexts (i.e. bridges and buildings). The methods were evaluated using ISPRS benchmark datasets and show superior results in comparison to the current state-of-the-art.

  6. Transcripts of two ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase genes differentially localize in rice plants according to their distinct biological roles

    PubMed Central

    Toyomasu, Tomonobu; Usui, Masami; Sugawara, Chizu; Kanno, Yuri; Sakai, Arisa; Takahashi, Hirokazu; Nakazono, Mikio; Kuroda, Masaharu; Miyamoto, Koji; Morimoto, Yu; Mitsuhashi, Wataru; Okada, Kazunori; Yamaguchi, Shinjiro; Yamane, Hisakazu

    2015-01-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are diterpenoid phytohormones that regulate various aspects of plant growth. Tetracyclic hydrocarbon ent-kaurene is a biosynthetic intermediate of GAs, and is converted from geranylgeranyl diphosphate, a common precursor of diterpenoids, via ent-copalyl diphosphate (ent-CDP) through successive cyclization reactions catalysed by two distinct diterpene synthases, ent-CDP synthase and ent-kaurene synthase. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) has two ent-CDP synthase genes, OsCPS1 and OsCPS2. It has been thought that OsCPS1 participates in GA biosynthesis, while OsCPS2 participates in the biosynthesis of phytoalexins, phytocassanes A–E, and oryzalexins A–F. It has been shown previously that loss-of-function OsCPS1 mutants display a severe dwarf phenotype caused by GA deficiency despite possessing another ent-CDP synthase gene, OsCPS2. Here, experiments were performed to account for the non-redundant biological function of OsCPS1 and OsCPS2. Quantitative reverse transcription–PCR (qRT–PCR) analysis showed that OsCPS2 transcript levels were drastically lower than those of OsCPS1 in the basal parts, including the meristem of the second-leaf sheaths of rice seedlings. qRT–PCR results using tissue samples prepared by laser microdissection suggested that OsCPS1 transcripts mainly localized in vascular bundle tissues, similar to Arabidopsis CPS, which is responsible for GA biosynthesis, whereas OsCPS2 transcripts mainly localized in epidermal cells that address environmental stressors such as pathogen attack. Furthermore, the OsCPS2 transgene under regulation of the OsCPS1 promoter complemented the dwarf phenotype of an OsCPS1 mutant, oscps1-1. The results indicate that transcripts of the two ent-CDP synthase genes differentially localize in rice plants according to their distinct biological roles, OsCPS1 for growth and OsCPS2 for defence. PMID:25336684

  7. Plasticity-related binding of GABA and muscarinic receptor sites in piriform cortex of rat: An autoradiographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, A.P.; Westrum, L.E. )

    1989-09-01

    This study has used the recently developed in vitro quantitative autoradiographic technique to examine the effects of olfactory bulb (OB) removal on receptor-binding sites in the deafferented piriform cortex (PC) of the rat. The gamma-aminobutyric acid-benzodiazepine receptor (GABA-BZR)- and muscarinic cholinergic receptor (MChR)-binding sites in layer I of PC were localized using (3H)flunitrazepam and (3H)quinuclidinyl benzilate as ligands, respectively. From the resultant autoradiograms the optical densities were measured using a Drexel-DUMAS image analysis system. The densities of BZR and MChR-binding sites were markedly increased in the PC ipsilateral to the lesion as compared to the contralateral side in those subjects that were operated in adulthood (Postnatal Day 100, PN 100). Comparisons between the unoperated and PN 100 operated animals also showed significant increases in the deafferented PC. In the animals operated on the day of birth (PN 0) no significant differences were seen between the operated and the contralateral PC. The difference between the PN 0 deafferented PC and the unoperated controls shows a slight decrease in BZR density in the former group; however, in case of the MChR there is a slight increase on the side of the lesion. These results demonstrate that deafferentation of PC by OB removal appears to modulate both the BZR-binding sites that are coupled with the GABA-A receptor complex and the MChR-binding sites. The results also suggest that possibility of a role for these neurotransmitter receptor-binding sites in plasticity following deafferentation.

  8. Autoradiographic distribution of cerebral blood flow increases elicited by stimulation of the nucleus basalis magnocellularis in the unanesthetized rat.

    PubMed

    Vaucher, E; Borredon, J; Seylaz, J; Lacombe, P

    1995-09-11

    The nucleus basalis magnocellularis (NBM) of the rat, equivalent of Meynert's nucleus in the primate, is the origin of the main cholinergic innervation of the cerebral cortex. Stimulation of this area has been previously shown to induced marked, cholinergically mediated, blood flow increases in the frontal and parietal cortices. However, the complete distribution of the cerebrovascular effects of NBM stimulation within the whole brain has not been determined. In the present study, we used the [14C]iodoantipyrine autoradiographic method to measure local cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the unanesthetized rat, chronically implanted with a stimulation electrode. We performed unilateral electrical stimulation of the NBM in order to compare both the interhemispheric differences in blood flow and the differences with a group of sham-stimulated rats. Considerable blood flow increases were found in most neocortical areas, exceeding 400% in the frontal area, compared to the control group. Marked responses also appeared in discrete subcortical regions such as the zona incerta, some thalamic nuclei and structures of the extrapyramidal system. These responses were mostly ipsilateral to the stimulation. The significance and the distribution of these blood flow increases are related first, to anatomical and functional data on mainly the cholinergic projections from the NBM, but also non-cholinergic pathways connected with the NBM, second, to biochemical data on the basalocortical system, and third, to the limited ultrastructural data on the innervation of microvascular elements. This cerebrovascular study represents a step in the elucidation of the function of the basalocortical system and provides data which may be related to certain deficits of degenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease in which this system is consistently affected. PMID:8590065

  9. Interlaboratory comparison of autoradiographic DNA profiling measurements: precision and concordance.

    PubMed

    Duewer, D L; Lalonde, S A; Aubin, R A; Fourney, R M; Reeder, D J

    1998-05-01

    Knowledge of the expected uncertainty in restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) measurements is required for confident exchange of such data among different laboratories. The total measurement uncertainty among all Technical Working Group for DNA Analysis Methods laboratories has previously been characterized and found to be acceptably small. Casework cell line control measurements provided by six Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) and 30 U.S. commercial, local, state, and Federal forensic laboratories enable quantitative determination of the within-laboratory precision and among-laboratory concordance components of measurement uncertainty typical of both sets of laboratories. Measurement precision is the same in the two countries for DNA fragments of size 1000 base pairs (bp) to 10,000 bp. However, the measurement concordance among the RCMP laboratories is clearly superior to that within the U.S. forensic community. This result is attributable to the use of a single analytical protocol in all RCMP laboratories. Concordance among U.S. laboratories cannot be improved through simple mathematical adjustments. Community-wide efforts focused on improved concordance may be the most efficient mechanism for further reduction of among-laboratory RFLP measurement uncertainty, should the resources required to fully evaluate potential cross-jurisdictional matches become burdensome as the number of RFLP profiles on record increases. PMID:9608684

  10. Distribution of dopamine D2-like receptors in the human thalamus: autoradiographic and PET studies.

    PubMed

    Rieck, Richard W; Ansari, M S; Whetsell, William O; Deutch, Ariel Y; Kessler, Robert M

    2004-02-01

    The distribution of dopamine (DA) D(2)-like receptors in the human thalamus was studied using in vitro autoradiographic techniques and in vivo positron emission tomography in normal control subjects. [(125)I]Epidepride, which binds with high affinity to DA D(2) and D(3) receptors, was used in autoradiographic studies to determine the distribution and density of D(2)-like receptors, and the epidepride analogue [(18)F]fallypride positron was used for positron emission tomography studies to delineate D(2)-like receptors in vivo. Both approaches revealed a heterogeneous distribution of thalamic D(2/3) receptors, with relatively high densities in the intralaminar and midline thalamic nuclei, including the paraventricular, parataenial, paracentral, centrolateral, and centromedian/parafascicular nuclei. Moderate densities of D(2/3) sites were seen in the mediodorsal and anterior nuclei, while other thalamic nuclei expressed lower levels of D(2)-like receptors. Most thalamic nuclei that express high densities of D(2)-like receptors project to forebrain DA terminal fields, suggesting that both the thalamic neurons expressing D(2)-like receptors and the projection targets of these neurons are regulated by DA. Because the midline/intralaminar nuclei receive prominent projections from both the ascending reticular activating core and the hypothalamus, these thalamic nuclei may integrate activity conveying both interoceptive and exteroceptive information to telencephalic DA systems involved in reward and cognition. PMID:14627996

  11. An autoradiographic analysis of cholinergic receptors in mouse brain after chronic nicotine treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Pauly, J.R.; Marks, M.J.; Gross, S.D.; Collins, A.C. )

    1991-09-01

    Quantitative autoradiographic procedures were used to examine the effects of chronic nicotine infusion on the number of central nervous system nicotinic cholinergic receptors. Female DBA mice were implanted with jugular cannulas and infused with saline or various doses of nicotine (0.25, 0.5, 1.0 or 2.0 mg/kg/hr) for 10 days. The animals were then sacrificed and the brains were removed and frozen in isopentane. Cryostat sections were collected and prepared for autoradiographic procedures as previously described. Nicotinic cholinergic receptors were labeled with L-(3H)nicotine or alpha-(125I)bungarotoxin; (3H)quinuclidinyl benzilate was used to measure muscarinic cholinergic receptor binding. Chronic nicotine infusion increased the number of sites labeled by (3H)nicotine in most brain areas. However, the extent of the increase in binding as well as the dose-response curves for the increase were widely different among brain regions. After the highest treatment dose, binding was increased in 67 of 86 regions measured. Septal and thalamic regions were most resistant to change. Nicotinic binding measured by alpha-(125I)bungarotoxin also increased after chronic treatment, but in a less robust fashion. At the highest treatment dose, only 26 of 80 regions were significantly changes. Muscarinic binding was not altered after chronic nicotine treatment. These data suggest that brain regions are not equivalent in the mechanisms that regulate alterations in nicotinic cholinergic receptor binding after chronic nicotine treatment.

  12. Application of a local linearization technique for the solution of a system of stiff differential equations associated with the simulation of a magnetic bearing assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kibler, K. S.; Mcdaniel, G. A.

    1981-01-01

    A digital local linearization technique was used to solve a system of stiff differential equations which simulate a magnetic bearing assembly. The results prove the technique to be accurate, stable, and efficient when compared to a general purpose variable order Adams method with a stiff option.

  13. Population genetics of the understory fishtail palm Chamaedorea ernesti-augusti in Belize: high genetic connectivity with local differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Cibrián-Jaramillo, Angélica; Bacon, Christine D; Garwood, Nancy C; Bateman, Richard M; Thomas, Meredith M; Russell, Steve; Bailey, C Donovan; Hahn, William J; Bridgewater, Samuel GM; DeSalle, Rob

    2009-01-01

    Background Developing a greater understanding of population genetic structure in lowland tropical plant species is highly relevant to our knowledge of increasingly fragmented forests and to the conservation of threatened species. Specific studies are particularly needed for taxa whose population dynamics are further impacted by human harvesting practices. One such case is the fishtail or xaté palm (Chamaedorea ernesti-augusti) of Central America, whose wild-collected leaves are becoming progressively more important to the global ornamental industry. We use microsatellite markers to describe the population genetics of this species in Belize and test the effects of climate change and deforestation on its recent and historical effective population size. Results We found high levels of inbreeding coupled with moderate or high allelic diversity within populations. Overall high gene flow was observed, with a north and south gradient and ongoing differentiation at smaller spatial scales. Immigration rates among populations were more difficult to discern, with minimal evidence for isolation by distance. We infer a tenfold reduction in effective population size ca. 10,000 years ago, but fail to detect changes attributable to Mayan or contemporary deforestation. Conclusion Populations of C. ernesti-augusti are genetically heterogeneous demes at a local spatial scale, but are widely connected at a regional level in Belize. We suggest that the inferred patterns in population genetic structure are the result of the colonization of this species into Belize following expansion of humid forests in combination with demographic and mating patterns. Within populations, we hypothesize that low aggregated population density over large areas, short distance pollen dispersal via thrips, low adult survival, and low fruiting combined with early flowering may contribute towards local inbreeding via genetic drift. Relatively high levels of regional connectivity are likely the result of

  14. Estrogen receptors in the temporomandibular joint of the baboon (Papio cynocephalus): an autoradiographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Aufdemorte, T.B.; Van Sickels, J.E.; Dolwick, M.F.; Sheridan, P.J.; Holt, G.R.; Aragon, S.B.; Gates, G.A.

    1986-04-01

    Using an autoradiographic method, the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) complex of five aged female baboons was studied for the presence of receptors for estradiol-17 beta. The study was performed in an effort to learn more of the pathophysiology of this joint and in an attempt to provide a scientific basis to explain the reported preponderance of women who seek and undergo treatment for signs and symptoms referable to the TMJ. This experiment revealed that the TMJ complex contains numerous cells with receptors for estrogen, particularly the articular surface of the condyle, articular disk, and capsule. Muscles of mastication contained relatively fewer receptors. As a result, one may postulate a role for the sex steroid hormones in the maintenance, repair, and/or pathogenesis of the TMJ. Additional studies are necessary to fully determine the significance of hormone receptors in this site and any correlation between diseases of the TMJ and the endocrine status of affected patients.

  15. Exosomes from bulk and stem cells from human prostate cancer have a differential microRNA content that contributes cooperatively over local and pre-metastatic niche

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Catherine A.; Andahur, Eliana I.; Valenzuela, Rodrigo; Castellón, Enrique A.; Fullá, Juan A.; Ramos, Christian G.; Triviño, Juan C.

    2016-01-01

    The different prostate cancer (PCa) cell populations (bulk and cancer stem cells, CSCs) release exosomes that contain miRNAs that could modify the local or premetastatic niche. The analysis of the differential expression of miRNAs in exosomes allows evaluating the differential biological effect of both populations on the niche, and the identification of potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Five PCa primary cell cultures were established to originate bulk and CSCs cultures. From them, exosomes were purified by precipitation for miRNAs extraction to perform a comparative profile of miRNAs by next generation sequencing in an Illumina platform. 1839 miRNAs were identified in the exosomes. Of these 990 were known miRNAs, from which only 19 were significantly differentially expressed: 6 were overexpressed in CSCs and 13 in bulk cells exosomes. miR-100-5p and miR-21-5p were the most abundant miRNAs. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that differentially expressed miRNAs are highly related with PCa carcinogenesis, fibroblast proliferation, differentiation and migration, and angiogenesis. Besides, miRNAs from bulk cells affects osteoblast differentiation. Later, their effect was evaluated in normal prostate fibroblasts (WPMY-1) where transfection with miR-100-5p, miR-21-5p and miR-139-5p increased the expression of metalloproteinases (MMPs) -2, -9 and -13 and RANKL and fibroblast migration. The higher effect was achieved with miR21 transfection. As conclusion, miRNAs have a differential pattern between PCa bulk and CSCs exosomes that act collaboratively in PCa progression and metastasis. The most abundant miRNAs in PCa exosomes are interesting potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets. PMID:26675257

  16. Texture analysis of collagen second-harmonic generation images based on local difference local binary pattern and wavelets differentiates human skin abnormal scars from normal scars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yao; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Huang, Zufang; Cai, Jianyong; Chen, Rong; Xiong, Shuyuan; Chen, Guannan; Zeng, Haishan

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative methods for noninvasive diagnosis of scars are a challenging issue in medicine. This work aims to implement a texture analysis method for quantitatively discriminating abnormal scars from normal scars based on second-harmonic generation (SHG) images. A local difference local binary pattern (LD-LBP) operator combined with a wavelet transform was explored to extract diagnosis features from scar SHG images that were related to the alteration in collagen morphology. Based on the quantitative parameters including the homogeneity, directional and coarse features in SHG images, the scar collagen SHG images were classified into normal or abnormal scars by a support vector machine classifier in a leave-one-out cross-validation procedure. Our experiments and data analyses demonstrated apparent differences between normal and abnormal scars in terms of their morphological structure of collagen. By comparing with gray level co-occurrence matrix, wavelet transform, and combined basic local binary pattern and wavelet transform with respect to the accuracy and receiver operating characteristic analysis, the method proposed herein was demonstrated to achieve higher accuracy and more reliable classification of SHG images. This result indicated that the extracted texture features with the proposed method were effective in the classification of scars. It could provide assistance for physicians in the diagnostic process.

  17. Texture analysis of collagen second-harmonic generation images based on local difference local binary pattern and wavelets differentiates human skin abnormal scars from normal scars.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yao; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Huang, Zufang; Cai, Jianyong; Chen, Rong; Xiong, Shuyuan; Chen, Guannan; Zeng, Haishan

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative methods for noninvasive diagnosis of scars are a challenging issue in medicine. This work aims to implement a texture analysis method for quantitatively discriminating abnormal scars from normal scars based on second-harmonic generation (SHG) images. A local difference local binary pattern (LD-LBP) operator combined with a wavelet transform was explored to extract diagnosis features from scar SHG images that were related to the alteration in collagen morphology. Based on the quantitative parameters including the homogeneity, directional and coarse features in SHG images, the scar collagen SHG images were classified into normal or abnormal scars by a support vector machine classifier in a leave-one-out cross-validation procedure. Our experiments and data analyses demonstrated apparent differences between normal and abnormal scars in terms of their morphological structure of collagen. By comparing with gray level co-occurrence matrix, wavelet transform, and combined basic local binary pattern and wavelet transform with respect to the accuracy and receiver operating characteristic analysis, the method proposed herein was demonstrated to achieve higher accuracy and more reliable classification of SHG images. This result indicated that the extracted texture features with the proposed method were effective in the classification of scars. It could provide assistance for physicians in the diagnostic process. PMID:25611867

  18. Autoradiographic distribution of /sup 14/C-labeled 3H-imidazo(4,5-f)quinoline-2-amines in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, K.

    1985-03-01

    The highly mutagenic heterocyclic amines, 2-amino-3-methylimidazo(4,5-f)quinoline (IQ) and 2-amino-3,4-dimethylimidazo(4,5-f)quinoline (MeIQ), are formed during heating of protein-rich foods. In order to gain information about the distribution and fate of IQ and MeIQ in vivo, a whole-body autoradiographic study of i.v.-injected /sup 14/C-labeled IQ and MeIQ has been performed in male NMRI, pregnant NMRI, and female C3H mice. IQ and MeIQ showed similar distribution patterns. At short survival times, the autoradiograms were characterized by an accumulation of radioactivity in metabolic and excretory organs (liver, kidney, bile, urine, gastric and intestinal contents, salivary glands, nasal mucosa, and Harder's gland), as well as in lymphomyeloid tissues (bone marrow, thymus, spleen and lymph nodes) and in endocrine and reproductive tissues (adrenal medulla, pancreatic islets, thyroid, hypophysis, testis, epididymis, seminal vesicles, ampulla, and prostate). The liver and kidney cortex were identified as sites of retention of nonextractable radioactivity. IQ and MeIQ showed a strong affinity for melanin. IQ and MeIQ passed the placenta, but no radioactivity was retained in fetal tissues. The results pinpoint the liver as a site of IQ- and MeIQ-mediated toxicity. Future studies of IQ and MeIQ may be guided by and clarify the role of other tissue localizations in the toxicity of IQ and MeIQ.

  19. Quantitative autoradiographic analysis of /sup 125/I-pindolol binding in Fischer 344 rat brain: changes in beta-adrenergic receptor density with aging

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.A.; Zahniser, N.R.

    1988-05-01

    Age-related changes in beta-adrenergic receptor density in Fischer 344 rat brain were examined using in vitro /sup 125/I-pindolol (IPIN) binding and quantitative autoradiographic analysis. Localized protein concentrations were determined using a new quantitative histological technique, and these were used to normalize the densities of receptors. Saturation binding studies in brain sections revealed 40-50% decreases in beta-adrenergic receptor density in the thalamus of 23-25-month-old and the cerebellum and brainstem of both 18-19-month-old and 23-25-month-old compared to 4-6-month-old rats. The loss of cerebellar beta-adrenergic receptors may be correlated with reports of deficits in sensitivity to beta-adrenergic-mediated transmission in the cerebellum of aged rats. No changes in specific IPIN binding with age were observed in rat cortex or hippocampus. In all areas examined no age-related differences were observed in receptor affinity. No changes in protein concentration were found in any of the areas examined in the different aged animals. These results demonstrate a region-specific loss of beta-adrenergic receptors with age in the brain of Fischer 344 rats.

  20. Flow towards diagonalization for many-body-localization models: adaptation of the Toda matrix differential flow to random quantum spin chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monthus, Cécile

    2016-07-01

    The iterative methods to diagonalize matrices and many-body Hamiltonians can be reformulated as flows of Hamiltonians towards diagonalization driven by unitary transformations that preserve the spectrum. After a comparative overview of the various types of discrete flows (Jacobi, QR-algorithm) and differential flows (Toda, Wegner, White) that have been introduced in the past, we focus on the random XXZ chain with random fields in order to determine the best closed flow within a given subspace of running Hamiltonians. For the special case of the free-fermion random XX chain with random fields, the flow coincides with the Toda differential flow for tridiagonal matrices which is related to the classical integrable Toda chain and which can be seen as the continuous analog of the discrete QR-algorithm. For the random XXZ chain with random fields that displays a many-body-localization transition, the present differential flow should be an interesting alternative to compare with the discrete flow that has been proposed recently to study the many-body-localization properties in a model of interacting fermions (Rademaker and Ortuno 2016 Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 010404).

  1. SOX2 and OCT4 mRNA-Expressing Cells, Detected by Molecular Beacons, Localize to the Center of Neurospheres during Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ilieva, Mirolyuba; Dufva, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Neurospheres are used as in vitro assay to measure the properties of neural stem cells. To investigate the molecular and phenotypic heterogeneity of neurospheres, molecular beacons (MBs) targeted against the stem cell markers OCT4 and SOX2 were designed, and synthesized with a 2’-O-methyl RNA backbone. OCT4 and SOX2 MBs were transfected into human embryonic mesencephalon derived cells, which spontaneously form neurospheres when grown on poly-L-ornitine/fibronectin matrix and medium complemented with bFGF. OCT4 and SOX2 gene expression were tracked in individual cell using the MBs. Quantitative image analysis every day for seven days showed that the OCT4 and SOX2 mRNA-expressing cells clustered in the centre of the neurospheres cultured in differentiation medium. By contrast, cells at the periphery of the differentiating spheres developed neurite outgrowths and expressed the tyrosine hydroxylase protein, indicating terminal differentiation. Neurospheres cultured in growth medium contained OCT4 and SOX2-positive cells distributed throughout the entire sphere, and no differentiating neurones. Gene expression of SOX2 and OCT4 mRNA detected by MBs correlated well with gene and protein expression measured by qRT-PCR and immunostaining, respectively. These experimental data support the theoretical model that stem cells cluster in the centre of neurospheres, and demonstrate the use of MBs for the spatial localization of specific gene-expressing cells within heterogeneous cell populations. PMID:24013403

  2. Differential Regulation of Disheveled in a Novel Vegetal Cortical Domain in Sea Urchin Eggs and Embryos: Implications for the Localized Activation of Canonical Wnt Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Peng, ChiehFu Jeff; Wikramanayake, Athula H.

    2013-01-01

    Pattern formation along the animal-vegetal (AV) axis in sea urchin embryos is initiated when canonical Wnt (cWnt) signaling is activated in vegetal blastomeres. The mechanisms that restrict cWnt signaling to vegetal blastomeres are not well understood, but there is increasing evidence that the egg’s vegetal cortex plays a critical role in this process by mediating localized “activation” of Disheveled (Dsh). To investigate how Dsh activity is regulated along the AV axis, sea urchin-specific Dsh antibodies were used to examine expression, subcellular localization, and post-translational modification of Dsh during development. Dsh is broadly expressed during early sea urchin development, but immunolocalization studies revealed that this protein is enriched in a punctate pattern in a novel vegetal cortical domain (VCD) in the egg. Vegetal blastomeres inherit this VCD during embryogenesis, and at the 60-cell stage Dsh puncta are seen in all cells that display nuclear β-catenin. Analysis of Dsh post-translational modification using two-dimensional Western blot analysis revealed that compared to Dsh pools in the bulk cytoplasm, this protein is differentially modified in the VCD and in the 16-cell stage micromeres that partially inherit this domain. Dsh localization to the VCD is not directly affected by disruption of microfilaments and microtubules, but unexpectedly, microfilament disruption led to degradation of all the Dsh pools in unfertilized eggs over a period of incubation suggesting that microfilament integrity is required for maintaining Dsh stability. These results demonstrate that a pool of differentially modified Dsh in the VCD is selectively inherited by the vegetal blastomeres that activate cWnt signaling in early embryos, and suggests that this domain functions as a scaffold for localized Dsh activation. Localized cWnt activation regulates AV axis patterning in many metazoan embryos. Hence, it is possible that the VCD is an evolutionarily conserved

  3. EPHA7 and EPHA10 Physically Interact and Differentially Co-localize in Normal Breast and Breast Carcinoma Cell Lines, and the Co-localization Pattern Is Altered in EPHB6-expressing MDA-MB-231 Cells.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Candace; Segovia, Briana; Kandpal, Raj P

    Erythropoietin-producing hepatocellular carcinoma cell (EPH) receptors comprise the most abundant receptor tyrosine kinase family characterized to date in mammals including humans. These proteins are involved in axon guidance, tissue organization, vascular development and the intricate process of various diseases including cancer. These diverse functions of EPH receptors are attributed, in part, to their abilities for heterodimerization. While the interacting partners of kinase-deficient EPHB6 receptor have been characterized, the interaction of the kinase-dead EPHA10 with any other receptor has not been identified. By using co-immunoprecipitation, we demonstrated physical interaction between kinase-deficient EPHA10 with kinase-sufficient EPHA7 receptor. Immunocytochemical analyses have revealed that these two receptors co-localize on the cell surface, and soluble portions of the receptors exist as a complex in the cytoplasm as well as the nuclei. While EPHA7 and EPHA10 co-localize similarly on the membrane in MCF10A and MCF7 cells, they were differentially co-localized in MDA-MB-231 cells stably transfected with empty pcDNA vector (MDA-MB-231-PC) or an expression construct of EPHB6 (MDA-MB-231-B6). The full-length isoforms of these receptors were co-localized on the cell surface, and the soluble forms were present as a complex in the cytoplasm as well as the nucleus in MDA-MB-231-PC cells. MDA-MB-231-B6 cells, on the other hand, were distinguished by the absence of any signal in the nuclei. Our results represent the first demonstration of physical interaction between EPHA10 and EPHA7 and their cellular co-localization. Furthermore, these observations also suggest gene-regulatory functions of the complex of the soluble forms of these receptors in breast carcinoma cells of differential invasiveness. PMID:27566654

  4. Solution of elliptic partial differential equations by fast Poisson solvers using a local relaxation factor. 2: Two-step method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S. C.

    1986-01-01

    A two-step semidirect procedure is developed to accelerate the one-step procedure described in NASA TP-2529. For a set of constant coefficient model problems, the acceleration factor increases from 1 to 2 as the one-step procedure convergence rate decreases from + infinity to 0. It is also shown numerically that the two-step procedure can substantially accelerate the convergence of the numerical solution of many partial differential equations (PDE's) with variable coefficients.

  5. Cellular localization of NRF2 determines the self-renewal and osteogenic differentiation potential of human MSCs via the P53–SIRT1 axis

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, D S; Choi, Y; Lee, J W

    2016-01-01

    NRF2 (nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2) plays an important role in defense against oxidative stress at the cellular level. Recently, the roles of NRF2 in embryonic and adult stem cells have been reported, but its role in maintaining self-renewal and differentiation potential remains unknown. We studied the mechanisms of NRF2 action in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from human bone marrow. We found that the cellular localization of NRF2 changed during prolonged cell passage and osteogenic differentiation. Blocking the nuclear import of NRF2 using ochratoxin A (OTA) induced the loss of the self-renewal and osteogenic potential of early-passage (EP) MSCs. Conversely, reinforcing the nuclear import of NRF2 using tert-butylhydroquinone (t-BHQ) improved the self-renewal capacity and maintained the differentiation potential in the osteogenic lineage of EP MSCs. Real-time quantitative PCR and western blot analysis showed that NRF2 positively regulates sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) at the mRNA and protein levels via the negative regulation of p53. The self-renewal and osteogenic potential suppressed in OTA-treated or NRF2-targeting small hairpin RNA (shRNA)-infected EP MSCs were rescued by introducing small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting p53. t-BHQ treatment in late-passage (LP) MSCs, which lost their self-renewal and osteogenic potential, reversed these effects. In LP MSCs treated with t-BHQ for ∼7 days, the phosphorylation and nuclear localization of NRF2 improved and SIRT1 protein level increased, whereas p53 protein levels decreased. Therefore, our results suggest that NRF2 plays an important role in regulating p53 and SIRT1 to maintain MSC stemness. This study is the first to establish a functional link between NRF2 and SIRT1 expression in the maintenance of MSC self-renewal and differentiation potential. PMID:26866273

  6. Intercellular Communication between Keratinocytes and Fibroblasts Induces Local Osteoclast Differentiation: a Mechanism Underlying Cholesteatoma-Induced Bone Destruction.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Yoriko; Nishikawa, Keizo; Imai, Ryusuke; Furuya, Masayuki; Uenaka, Maki; Ohta, Yumi; Morihana, Tetsuo; Itoi-Ochi, Saori; Penninger, Josef M; Katayama, Ichiro; Inohara, Hidenori; Ishii, Masaru

    2016-06-01

    Bone homeostasis is maintained by a balance in activity between bone-resorbing osteoclasts and bone-forming osteoblasts. Shifting the balance toward bone resorption causes osteolytic bone diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and periodontitis. Osteoclast differentiation is regulated by receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL), which, under some pathological conditions, is produced by T and B lymphocytes and synoviocytes. However, the mechanism underlying bone destruction in other diseases is little understood. Bone destruction caused by cholesteatoma, an epidermal cyst in the middle ear resulting from hyperproliferation of keratinizing squamous epithelium, can lead to lethal complications. In this study, we succeeded in generating a model for cholesteatoma, epidermal cyst-like tissue, which has the potential for inducing osteoclastogenesis in mice. Furthermore, an in vitro coculture system composed of keratinocytes, fibroblasts, and osteoclast precursors was used to demonstrate that keratinocytes stimulate osteoclast differentiation through the induction of RANKL in fibroblasts. Thus, this study demonstrates that intercellular communication between keratinocytes and fibroblasts is involved in the differentiation and function of osteoclasts, which may provide the molecular basis of a new therapeutic strategy for cholesteatoma-induced bone destruction. PMID:27001307

  7. A new 3D parallel high resolution electromagnetic nonlinear inversion based on new global magnetic integral and local differential decomposition (GILD)

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, G.; Li, J.

    1997-05-01

    A new 3D electromagnetic modeling and nonlinear inversion algorithm is presented based on global integral and local differential equations decomposition (GILD). The GILD parallel nonlinear inversion algorithm consists of five parts: (1) the domain is decomposed into subdomain SI and subdomain SII; (2) a new global magnetic integral equation in SI and the local magnetic differential equations IN SII will be used together to obtain the magnetic field in the modeling step; (3) the new global magnetic integral Jacobian equation in SI and the local magnetic differential Jacobian equations in SII will be used together to update the electric conductivity and permittivity from the magnetic field data in the inversion step; (4) the subdomain SII can naturally and uniformly be decomposed into 2{sup n} smaller sub-cubic-domains; the sparse matrix in each sub-cubic-domain can be eliminated separately, in parallel; (5) a new parallel multiple hierarchy substructure algorithm will be used to solve the smaller full matrices in SI, in parallel. The applications of the new 3D parallel GILD EM modeling and nonlinear inversion algorithm and software are: (1) to create high resolution controlled-source electric conductivity and permittivity imaging for interpreting electromagnetic field data acquired from cross hole, surface to borehole, surface to surface, single hole, and multiple holes; (2) to create the magnetotelluric high resolution imaging from the surface impedance and field data. The new GILD parallel nonlinear inversion will be a 3D/2.5D powerful imaging tool for the oil geophysical exploration and environmental remediation and monitoring.

  8. A novel imaging method for quantitative Golgi localization reveals differential intra-Golgi trafficking of secretory cargoes

    PubMed Central

    Tie, Hieng Chiong; Mahajan, Divyanshu; Chen, Bing; Cheng, Li; VanDongen, Antonius M. J.; Lu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Cellular functions of the Golgi are determined by the unique distribution of its resident proteins. Currently, electron microscopy is required for the localization of a Golgi protein at the sub-Golgi level. We developed a quantitative sub-Golgi localization method based on centers of fluorescence masses of nocodazole-induced Golgi ministacks under conventional optical microscopy. Our method is rapid, convenient, and quantitative, and it yields a practical localization resolution of ∼30 nm. The method was validated by the previous electron microscopy data. We quantitatively studied the intra-Golgi trafficking of synchronized secretory membrane cargoes and directly demonstrated the cisternal progression of cargoes from the cis- to the trans-Golgi. Our data suggest that the constitutive efflux of secretory cargoes could be restricted at the Golgi stack, and the entry of the trans-Golgi network in secretory pathway could be signal dependent. PMID:26764092

  9. Decreased benzodiazepine receptor binding in epileptic El mice: A quantitative autoradiographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Shirasaka, Y.; Ito, M.; Tsuda, H.; Shiraishi, H.; Oguro, K.; Mutoh, K.; Mikawa, H. )

    1990-09-01

    Benzodiazepine receptors and subtypes were examined in El mice and normal ddY mice with a quantitative autoradiographic technique. Specific (3H)flunitrazepam binding in stimulated El mice, which had experienced repeated convulsions, was significantly lower in the cortex and hippocampus than in ddY mice and unstimulated El mice. In the amygdala, specific ({sup 3}H)flunitrazepam binding in stimulated El mice was lower than in ddY mice. There was a tendency for the ({sup 3}H)flunitrazepam binding in these regions in unstimulated El mice to be intermediate between that in stimulated El mice and that in ddY mice, but there was no significant difference between unstimulated El mice and ddY mice. ({sup 3}H)Flunitrazepam binding displaced by CL218,872 was significantly lower in the cortex of stimulated El mice than in that of the other two groups, and in the hippocampus of stimulated than of unstimulated El mice. These data suggest that the decrease in ({sup 3}H)flunitrazepam binding in stimulated El mice may be due mainly to that of type 1 receptor and may be the result of repeated convulsions.

  10. Dual tracer autoradiographic study with thallium-201 and radioiodinated fatty acid in cardiomyopathic hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Kurata, C.; Kobayashi, A.; Yamazaki, N.

    1989-01-01

    To investigate the usefulness of myocardial scintigraphy with radioiodinated 15-(p-iodophenyl)-3-R,S-methylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) in cardiomyopathy, quantitative dual tracer autoradiographic study with /sup 201/Tl and (/sup 125/I)BMIPP was performed in 27 cardiomyopathic Bio 14.6 Syrian hamsters and eight normal hamsters. Furthermore, 16 Bio 14.6 Syrian hamsters aged 21 days were divided into verapamil-treated (during 70 days) and control groups (respectively, n = 8), and autoradiography with /sup 201/Tl and (/sup 125/I)BMIPP was performed. Quantitative autoradiography demonstrated an uncoupling of /sup 201/Tl and (/sup 125/I)BMIPP distributions and a regional heterogeneity of (/sup 125/I)BMIPP distribution in cardiomyopathic hamsters aged more than 2 mo, while normal hamsters showed only mild heterogeneity of (/sup 125/I)BMIPP distribution without an uncoupling of tracers. Age-matched comparison between normal and cardiomyopathic hamsters (5-8 mo old) demonstrated that a difference between their (/sup 125/I)BMIPP distributions are more marked than that between their /sup 201/Tl distributions. Furthermore, (/sup 125/I)BMIPP visualized effects of verapamil on cardiomyopathy more distinctly than did /sup 201/Tl. In conclusion, myocardial imaging with (/sup 123/I)BMIPP could be useful for investigating cardiomyopathy and evaluating the efficacy of therapeutic intervention in patients with cardiomyopathy.

  11. The site of action of intrahypothalamic estrogen implants in feminine sexual behavior: an autoradiographic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, P.G.; Krieger, M.S.; Barfield, R.J.; McEwen, B.S.; Pfaff, D.W.

    1982-11-01

    Estrogenic stimulation of the ventromedial hypothalamus is sufficient to prime progesterone-facilitated estrous behavior in ovariectomized rats. To determine precisely the site(s) of estrogenic stimulation and the locus of its priming action on estrous behavior, we used steroid autoradiographic methods to assess the diffusion of (/sup 3/H)estradiol ((/sup 3/H)E/sub 2/) from behaviorally effective implants diluted 1:300 with cholesterol. Ovariectomized rats received (/sup 3/H)E/sub 2/-cholesterol implants aimed at the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMN). Females were tested twice for feminine sexual behavior after stereotaxic surgery. They received progesterone on the day of behavioral testing. Animals were killed on the day after the second behavior test, cannulae were removed, and the brains were frozen rapidly and processed for autoradiography. Five of eight females with bilateral implants aimed at the VMN exhibited female sexual behavior in at least one of the two tests. Of these, four also showed proceptive behavior. Histological examination of brain sections indicated that behaviorally effective implants were located in, or adjacent to, the central portions of VMN. Implants from nonreceptive animals were located at the extreme anterior or posterior aspects of the VMN. The data collected are consistent with the view that estrogen acts within a sharply defined region of the VMN to prime estrons behavior.

  12. Autoradiographic studies of chromosome replication during the cell cycle of Streptococcus faecium

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, M.L.; Koch, A.L.; Dicker, D.T.; Daneo-Moore, L.

    1986-11-01

    Analysis of the distribution of autoradiographic grains around cells of Streptococcus faecium which had been either continuously or pulse-labeled with tritiated thymidine (mass doubling time, 90 min) showed a non-Poisson distribution even when the distribution of cell sizes in the populations studied was taken into account. These non-Poisson distributions of grains were assumed to reflect the discontinuous nature of chromosome replication. To study this discontinuous process further, an equation was fitted to the grain distribution observed for the pulse-labeled cells that assumed that in any population of cells there were subpopulations in which there were zero, one, or two replicating chromosomes. This analysis predicted an average time for chromosome replication and for the period between completion of rounds of chromosome replication and division of 55 and 43 min, respectively, which were in excellent agreement with estimates made by other techniques. The present investigation extended past studies in indicating that the initiation and completion of rounds of chromosome replication are poorly phased with increases in cell volume and that the amount of chromosome replication may be different in different cell halves.

  13. Whole-body autoradiographic distribution of exogenously administered renal renin in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, S; Iwao, H; Nakamura, N; Ikemoto, F; Yamamoto, K

    1987-05-01

    We studied, by whole-body autoradiography, the distribution of exogenously administered renal renin in rat. Rat renal renin was completely purified and labeled with 125I ([125I]-renin) and was then injected into the tail veins of conscious rats at a dose of 30 microCi, 430 ng. After various intervals, rats were killed by an overdose of ether, the whole body rapidly frozen in acetone-dry ice, and autoradiography performed on sagittal whole-body sections. To remove breakdown products ([125I]-tyrosine and free 125I) from [125I]-renin, sections were treated with perchloric acid solution. The main accumulation of [125I]-renin acid-insoluble radioactivity was observed in liver and renal cortex. The accumulation in these organs was already evident 2 min after the injection, reached a maximum level by 15 min, then gradually decreased. A small amount of [125I]-renin was also evident in spleen, bone marrow, and adrenal gland. Thirty min after the injection, radioactivity began to appear in the thyroid gland, stomach, and small intestine, but disappeared with acid treatment, except in the thyroid. Radioactivity was negligible in other organs including brain, submaxillary gland, lung, heart, and testis. These autoradiographs clearly demonstrate that exogenously administered renal renin is distributed mainly in the liver and renal cortex. PMID:3549890

  14. Whole-body autoradiographic distribution of exogenously administered renal renin in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.; Iwao, H.; Nakamura, N.; Ikemoto, F.; Yamamoto, K.

    1987-05-01

    We studied, by whole-body autoradiography, the distribution of exogenously administered renal renin in rat. Rat renal renin was completely purified and labeled with /sup 125/I ((/sup 125/I)-renin) and was then injected into the tail veins of conscious rats at a dose of 30 microCi, 430 ng. After various intervals, rats were killed by an overdose of ether, the whole body rapidly frozen in acetone-dry ice, and autoradiography performed on sagittal whole-body sections. To remove breakdown products ((/sup 125/I)-tyrosine and free /sup 125/I) from (/sup 125/I)-renin, sections were treated with perchloric acid solution. The main accumulation of (/sup 125/I)-renin acid-insoluble radioactivity was observed in liver and renal cortex. The accumulation in these organs was already evident 2 min after the injection, reached a maximum level by 15 min, then gradually decreased. A small amount of (/sup 125/I)-renin was also evident in spleen, bone marrow, and adrenal gland. Thirty min after the injection, radioactivity began to appear in the thyroid gland, stomach, and small intestine, but disappeared with acid treatment, except in the thyroid. Radioactivity was negligible in other organs including brain, submaxillary gland, lung, heart, and testis. These autoradiographs clearly demonstrate that exogenously administered renal renin is distributed mainly in the liver and renal cortex.

  15. Correlation of 125I-LSD autoradiographic labeling with serotonin voltage clamp responses in Aplysia neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, M.L.; Kadan, M.J.; Hartig, P.R.; Carpenter, D.O. )

    1991-05-01

    Autoradiographic receptor binding studies using 125I-LSD (2-(125I)lysergic acid diethyamide) revealed intense labelling on the soma of a symmetrically located pair of cells in the abdominal ganglion of Aplysia californica. This binding was blocked by micromolar concentrations of serotonin and lower concentrations of the serotonergic antagonists, cyproheptadine and mianserin. Electrophysiological investigation of responses to serotonin of neurons in the left upper quadrant, where one of the labeled neurons is located, revealed a range of serotonin responses. Cells L3 and L6 have a K+ conductance increase in response to serotonin that is not blocked by cyproheptadine or mianserin. Cells L2 and L4 have a biphasic response to serotonin: a Na+ conductance increase, which can be blocked by cyproheptadine and mianserin, followed by a voltage dependent Ca2+ conductance which is blocked by Co2+ but not the serotonergic antagonists. Cell L1, and its symmetrical pair, R1, have in addition to the Na+ and Ca2+ responses observed in L2 and L4, a Cl- conductance increase blocked by LSD, cyproheptadine and mianserin. LSD had little effect on the other responses. The authors conclude that the symmetrically located cells L1 and R1 have a Cl- channel linked to a cyproheptadine- and mianserin-sensitive serotonin receptor that is selectively labelled by 125I-LSD. This receptor has many properties in common with the mammalian serotonin 1C receptor.

  16. Quantitative autoradiographic analysis of muscarinic receptor subtypes and their role in representational memory

    SciTech Connect

    Messer, W.S.

    1986-01-01

    Autoradiographic techniques were used to examine the distribution of muscarinic receptors in rat brain slices. Agonist and selective antagonist binding were examined by measuring the ability for unlabeled ligands to inhibit (/sup 3/H)-1-QNB labeling of muscarinic receptors. The distribution of high affinity pirenzepine binding sites (M/sub 1/ subtype) was distinct from the distribution of high affinity carbamylcholine sites, which corresponded to the M/sub 2/ subtype. In a separate assay, the binding profile for pirenzepine was shown to differ from the profile for scopolamine, a classical muscarinic antagonist. Muscarinic antagonists, when injected into the Hippocampus, impaired performance of a representational memory task. Pirenzepine, the M/sub 1/ selective antagonist, produced representational memory deficits. Scopolamine, a less selective muscarinic antagonist, caused increases in running times in some animals which prevented a definitive interpretation of the nature of the impairment. Pirenzepine displayed a higher affinity for the hippocampus and was more effective in producing a selective impairment of representational memory than scopolamine. The data indicated that cholinergic activity in the hippocampus was necessary for representation memory function.

  17. Autoradiographic distribution of /sup 125/I-galanin binding sites in the rat central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Skofitsch, G.; Sills, M.A.; Jacobowitz, D.M.

    1986-11-01

    Galanin (GAL) binding sites in coronal sections of the rat brain were demonstrated using autoradiographic methods. Scatchard analysis of /sup 125/I-GAL binding to slide-mounted tissue sections revealed saturable binding to a single class of receptors with a Kd of approximately 0.2 nM. /sup 125/I-GAL binding sites were demonstrated throughout the rat central nervous system. Dense binding was observed in the following areas: prefrontal cortex, the anterior nuclei of the olfactory bulb, several nuclei of the amygdaloid complex, the dorsal septal area, dorsal bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the ventral pallidum, the internal medullary laminae of the thalamus, medial pretectal nucleus, nucleus of the medial optic tract, borderline area of the caudal spinal trigeminal nucleus adjacent to the spinal trigeminal tract, the substantia gelatinosa and the superficial layers of the dorsal spinal cord. Moderate binding was observed in the piriform, periamygdaloid, entorhinal, insular cortex and the subiculum, the nucleus accumbens, medial forebrain bundle, anterior hypothalamic, ventromedial, dorsal premamillary, lateral and periventricular thalamic nuclei, the subzona incerta, Forel's field H1 and H2, periventricular gray matter, medial and superficial gray strata of the superior colliculus, dorsal parts of the central gray, peripeduncular area, the interpeduncular nucleus, substantia nigra zona compacta, ventral tegmental area, the dorsal and ventral parabrachial and parvocellular reticular nuclei. The preponderance of GAL-binding in somatosensory as well as in limbic areas suggests a possible involvement of GAL in a variety of brain functions.

  18. Localization of RHO-4 Indicates Differential Regulation of Conidial versus Vegetative Septation in the Filamentous Fungus Neurospora crassa▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Carolyn G.; Glass, N. Louise

    2007-01-01

    rho-4 mutants of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa lack septa and asexual spores (conidia) and grow slowly. In this report, localization of green fluorescent protein-tagged RHO-4 is used to elucidate the differences in factors controlling RHO-4 localization during vegetative growth versus asexual development. RHO-4 forms a ring at incipient vegetative septation sites that constricts with the formation of the septum toward the septal pore; RHO-4 persists around the septal pore after septum completion. During the formation of conidia, RHO-4 localizes to the primary septum but subsequently is relocalized to the cytoplasm after the placement of the secondary septum. Cytoplasmic localization and inactivation of RHO-4 are mediated by a direct physical interaction with RDI-1, a RHO guanosine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor. Inappropriate activation of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A pathway during vegetative growth causes mislocalization of RHO-4 away from septa to the cytoplasm, a process which was dependent upon RDI-1. An adenylate cyclase cr-1 mutant partially suppresses the aconidial defect of rho-4 mutants but only rarely suppresses the vegetative septation defect, indicating that conidial septation is negatively regulated by CR-1. These data highlight the differences in the regulation of septation during conidiation versus vegetative septation in filamentous fungi. PMID:17496127

  19. Intracellular localization of human ZBP1: Differential regulation by the Z-DNA binding domain, Z{alpha}, in splice variants

    SciTech Connect

    Hong Thanh Pham; Park, Mi-Young; Kim, Kyeong Kyu; Kim, Yang-Gyun; Ahn, Jin-Hyun . E-mail: jahn@med.skku.ac.kr

    2006-09-15

    We investigated the subcellular distribution of human ZBP1, which harbors the N-terminal Z-DNA binding domains, Z{alpha} and Z{beta}. ZBP1 was distributed primarily in the cytoplasm and occasionally as nuclear foci in interferon (IFN)-treated primary hepatocellular carcinoma cells, and in several other transfected cell types. In leptomycin B (LMB)-treated cells, endogenous ZBP1 efficiently accumulated in nuclear foci, which overlapped PML oncogenic domains (PODs) or nuclear bodies (NBs). In transfection assays, the unique C-terminal region of ZBP1 was necessary for its typical cytoplasmic localization. Interestingly, the Z{alpha}-deleted form displayed an increased association with PODs compared to wild-type and, unlike wild-type, perfectly accumulated in PODs in LMB-treated cells, implying that the presence of Z{alpha} domain also facilitates the cytoplasmic localization. Our results demonstrate that ZBP1 is localized primarily in the cytoplasm but also associated with nuclear PODs in IFN or LMB-treated cells. Given that about half of ZBP1 mRNA lacks exon 2 encoding the Z{alpha} domain, our data also suggest that the localization of ZBP1 may be differentially regulated by the Z-DNA binding domain, Z{alpha}, in splice variants.

  20. Two-way regulation between cells and aligned collagen fibrils: local 3D matrix formation and accelerated neural differentiation of human decidua parietalis placental stem cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; Zhu, Bofan; Strakova, Zuzana; Wang, Rong

    2014-08-01

    It has been well established that an aligned matrix provides structural and signaling cues to guide cell polarization and cell fate decision. However, the modulation role of cells in matrix remodeling and the feedforward effect on stem cell differentiation have not been studied extensively. In this study, we report on the concerted changes of human decidua parietalis placental stem cells (hdpPSCs) and the highly ordered collagen fibril matrix in response to cell-matrix interaction. With high-resolution imaging, we found the hdpPSCs interacted with the matrix by deforming the cell shape, harvesting the nearby collagen fibrils, and reorganizing the fibrils around the cell body to transform a 2D matrix to a localized 3D matrix. Such a unique 3D matrix prompted high expression of β-1 integrin around the cell body that mediates and facilitates the stem cell differentiation toward neural cells. The study offers insights into the coordinated, dynamic changes at the cell-matrix interface and elucidates cell modulation of its matrix to establish structural and biochemical cues for effective cell growth and differentiation. PMID:25003322

  1. Local adaptation and oceanographic connectivity patterns explain genetic differentiation of a marine diatom across the North Sea–Baltic Sea salinity gradient

    PubMed Central

    Sjöqvist, C; Godhe, A; Jonsson, P R; Sundqvist, L; Kremp, A

    2015-01-01

    Drivers of population genetic structure are still poorly understood in marine micro-organisms. We exploited the North Sea–Baltic Sea transition for investigating the seascape genetics of a marine diatom, Skeletonema marinoi. Eight polymorphic microsatellite loci were analysed in 354 individuals from ten locations to analyse population structure of the species along a 1500-km-long salinity gradient ranging from 3 to 30 psu. To test for salinity adaptation, salinity reaction norms were determined for sets of strains originating from three different salinity regimes of the gradient. Modelled oceanographic connectivity was compared to directional relative migration by correlation analyses to examine oceanographic drivers. Population genetic analyses showed distinct genetic divergence of a low-salinity Baltic Sea population and a high-salinity North Sea population, coinciding with the most evident physical dispersal barrier in the area, the Danish Straits. Baltic Sea populations displayed reduced genetic diversity compared to North Sea populations. Growth optima of low salinity isolates were significantly lower than those of strains from higher native salinities, indicating local salinity adaptation. Although the North Sea–Baltic Sea transition was identified as a barrier to gene flow, migration between Baltic Sea and North Sea populations occurred. However, the presence of differentiated neutral markers on each side of the transition zone suggests that migrants are maladapted. It is concluded that local salinity adaptation, supported by oceanographic connectivity patterns creating an asymmetric migration pattern between the Baltic Sea and the North Sea, determines genetic differentiation patterns in the transition zone. PMID:25892181

  2. [Genetic Differentiation of Local Populations of the Dark European Bee Apis mellifera mellifera L. in the Urals].

    PubMed

    Il'yasov, R A; Poskryakov, A V; Petukhov, A V; Nikolenko, A G

    2015-07-01

    For the last two centuries, beekeepers in Russia and Europe have been introducing bees from the southern regions to the northern ones, subjecting the genetic pool of the dark European bee Apis mellifera mellifera L. subspecies to extensive hybridization. In order to reconfirm on the genetic level the previously published morphological data on the native bee population in the Urals, the Bashkortostan Republic, and the Perm Krai, we analyzed the polymorphism of the mitochondrial (mtDNA COI-COII intergenic locus) and nuclear (two microsatellite loci, ap243 and 4a110) DNA markers. Four local populations of the dark European bee A. m. mellifera surviving in the Urals have been identified, and their principal genetic characteristics have been determined. Data on the genetic structure and geographical localization of the areals of the dark European bee local populations in the Urals may be of use in restoring the damaged genetic pool of A. m. mellifera in Russia and other northern countries. PMID:26410933

  3. Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Locally Advanced and Borderline Resectable Nonsquamous Sinonasal Tumors (Esthesioneuroblastoma and Sinonasal Tumor with Neuroendocrine Differentiation)

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Vijay M.; Joshi, Amit; Noronha, Vanita; Sharma, Vibhor; Zanwar, Saurabh; Dhumal, Sachin; Kane, Shubhada; Pai, Prathamesh; D'Cruz, Anil; Chaturvedi, Pankaj; Bhattacharjee, Atanu; Prabhash, Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Sinonasal tumors are chemotherapy responsive which frequently present in advanced stages making NACT a promising option for improving resection and local control in borderline resectable and locally advanced tumours. Here we reviewed the results of 25 such cases treated with NACT. Materials and Methods. Sinonasal tumor patients treated with NACT were selected for this analysis. These patients received NACT with platinum and etoposide for 2 cycles. Patients who responded and were amenable for gross total resection underwent surgical resection and adjuvant CTRT. Those who responded but were not amenable for resection received radical CTRT. Patients who progressed on NACT received either radical CTRT or palliative radiotherapy. Results. The median age of the cohort was 42 years (IQR 37–47 years). Grades 3-4 toxicity with NACT were seen in 19 patients (76%). The response rate to NACT was 80%. Post-NACT surgery was done in 12 (48%) patients and radical chemoradiation in 9 (36%) patients. The 2-year progression free survival and overall survival were 75% and 78.5%, respectively. Conclusion. NACT in sinonasal tumours has a response rate of 80%. The protocol of NACT followed by local treatment is associated with improvement in outcomes as compared to our historical cohort. PMID:26955484

  4. Solution of elliptic partial differential equations by fast Poisson solvers using a local relaxation factor. 1: One-step method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S. C.

    1986-01-01

    An algorithm for solving a large class of two- and three-dimensional nonseparable elliptic partial differential equations (PDE's) is developed and tested. It uses a modified D'Yakanov-Gunn iterative procedure in which the relaxation factor is grid-point dependent. It is easy to implement and applicable to a variety of boundary conditions. It is also computationally efficient, as indicated by the results of numerical comparisons with other established methods. Furthermore, the current algorithm has the advantage of possessing two important properties which the traditional iterative methods lack; that is: (1) the convergence rate is relatively insensitive to grid-cell size and aspect ratio, and (2) the convergence rate can be easily estimated by using the coefficient of the PDE being solved.

  5. A constitutive region is responsible for nuclear targeting of 4.1R: modulation by alternative sequences results in differential intracellular localization.

    PubMed

    Luque, C M; Correas, I

    2000-07-01

    Red blood cell protein 4.1, 4.1R, is an extreme variation on the theme of isoform multiplicity. The diverse 4.1R isoforms, mainly generated by alternative pre-mRNA splicing, are localized at different intracellular sites, including the nucleus. To characterize nonerythroid 4.1 proteins lacking the most upstream translation initiation site, analyze their intracellular localization and define specific domains involved in differential intracellular targeting of 4.1R, we cloned 4.1 cDNAs lacking that translation initiation site. Seven different 4.1R cDNAs were isolated. Four of these encoded 4.1R proteins localized predominantly to the nucleus and the other three localized to the cytoplasm. Three of the nuclear 4.1R isoforms did not contain the nuclear localization signal previously identified in the alternative exon 16. A comparative analysis of the exon composition of the naturally occurring 4.1R cDNAs cloned and of appropriate composite cDNA constructs, with the subcellular distribution of their respective products, demonstrated that a region encoded by constitutive exons, which is therefore common to all 4.1R isoforms and has been termed 'core region', had the capacity of localizing to the nucleus. This region was able to confer nuclear targeting to a cytosolic reporter. In protein 4.1R isoforms, the nuclear targeting of the core region is modulated by the expression of alternative exons. Thus, exon 5-encoded sequences eclipsed nuclear entry of the core region, resulting in 4.1R isoforms that predominantly distributed to the cytoplasm. Exon 5 was also able to confer cytoplasmic localization to a nuclear reporter. In protein 4.1R isoforms, when exons 5 and 16 were both expressed the nuclear targeting effect of exon 16 was dominant to the inhibitory effect observed by the expression of exon 5, yielding proteins that predominantly localized to the nucleus. Taken together, these results indicate that all 4.1R molecules contain a conserved region that is sufficient to

  6. High RhoA expression at the tumor front in clinically localized prostate cancer and association with poor tumor differentiation

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, WEIHUA; DELONGCHAMPS, NICOLAS BARRY; MAO, KAILI; BEUVON, FRÉDÉRIC; PEYROMAURE, MICHAËL; LIU, ZHONGMIN; DINH-XUAN, ANH TUAN

    2016-01-01

    Ras homolog gene family, member A (RhoA) has been reported as essential to the invasion process and aggressiveness of numerous cancers. However, there are only sparse data on the expression and activity of RhoA in clinically localised prostate cancer. In numerous cancers, tumour cells at the invasive front demonstrate more aggressive behaviour in comparison with the cells in the central regions. In the present study, the expression and activity of RhoA was evaluated in 34 paraffin-embedded and 20 frozen prostate tissue specimens obtained from 45 patients treated with radical prostatectomy for clinically localised cancer. The expression patterns of RhoA were assessed by immunohistochemical staining and western blotting. Additional comparisons were performed between the tumour centre, tumour front and distant peritumoural tissue. RhoA activity was assessed by G-LISA. Associations between RhoA expression and the clinical features and outcome of the patients were also analysed. The present study found an increasing gradient of expression from the centre to the periphery of index tumour foci. RhoA expression was significantly increased at the tumour front compared to the tumour centre, which was determined using immunohistochemistry (P=0.001). Increased RhoA expression was associated with poor tumour differentiation in the tumour front (P=0.044) and tumour centre (P=0.039). Subsequent to a median follow-up period of 52 months, the rate of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse was increased in patients with higher RhoA expression at the tumour front when compared with patients with lower RhoA expression (62.5 vs. 35.0%), although the difference was not significant (P=0.09). There was no association between RhoA expression and the PSA level or pathological stage in the present study. In conclusion, RhoA expression was increased at the tumour front and was associated with poor tumour differentiation in the tumour front and tumour centre, indicating the potential role of

  7. [The effect of salicylic acid on epidermal cell proliferation kinetics in psoriasis. Autoradiographic in vitro-investigations(author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Pullmann, H; Lennartz, K J; Steigleder, G K

    1975-01-01

    Salicylic acid in the therapeutic concentrations from 0.5 to 10% does not affect the rate of proliferation of psoriatic epidermal cells. In 18 patients suffering from psoriasis the H3-I (H3-thymidine labelling index) was determined using autoradiographic in vitro labelling techniques. In 12 of these patients double-labelling with C14-and H3-thymidine was used to determine the H3-I, the DNA-synthesis time (ts) and the duration of the cell-cycle (tc). No significant changes were observed following external application of salicyclic acid in white Vaseline in concentrations of 0.5, 2 and 10% for one week. PMID:1119844

  8. An autoradiographic study of the afferent innervation of the trachea, syrinx and extrapulmonary primary bronchus of Gallus gallus domesticus.

    PubMed Central

    Bower, A J; Parker, S; Molony, V

    1978-01-01

    A method for injecting a small quantity of tritiated leucine directly into the nodose ganglion of the adult hen is described. The presence of an inner and an outer nerve plexus in the trachea and extrapulmonary primary bronchus is confirmed. Structures in the luminal epithelium of the trachea, syrinx and extrapulmonary primary bronchus having an afferent innervation are described and their possible function is discussed. The question of positive chemography in autoradiographic studies is discussed. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:649496

  9. Memory consolidation and amnesia modify 5-HT6 receptors expression in rat brain: an autoradiographic study.

    PubMed

    Meneses, A; Manuel-Apolinar, L; Castillo, C; Castillo, E

    2007-03-12

    Traditionally, the search for memory circuits has been centered on examinations of amnesic and AD patients, cerebral lesions and, neuroimaging. A complementary alternative might be the use of autoradiography with radioligands. Indeed, ex vivo autoradiographic studies offer the advantage to detect functionally active receptors altered by pharmacological tools and memory formation. Hence, herein the 5-HT(6) receptor antagonist SB-399885 and the amnesic drugs scopolamine or dizocilpine were used to manipulate memory consolidation and 5-HT(6) receptors expression was determined by using [(3)H]-SB-258585. Thus, memory consolidation was impaired in scopolamine and dizocilpine treated groups relative to control vehicle but improved it in SB-399885-treated animals. SB-399885 improved memory consolidation seems to be associated with decreased 5-HT(6) receptors expression in 15 out 17 brain areas. Scopolamine or dizocilpine decreased 5-HT(6) receptors expression in nine different brain areas and increased it in CA3 hippocampus or other eight areas, respectively. In brain areas thought to be in charge of procedural memory such basal ganglia (i.e., nucleus accumbens, caudate putamen, and fundus striate) data showed that relative to control animals amnesic groups showed diminished (scopolamine) or augmented (dizocilpine) 5-HT(6) receptor expression. SB-399885 showing improved memory displayed an intermediate expression in these same brain regions. A similar intermediate expression occurs with regard to amygdala, septum, and some cortical areas in charge of explicit memory storage. However, relative to control group amnesic and SB-399885 rats in the hippocampus, region where explicit memory is formed, showed a complex 5-HT(6) receptors expression. In conclusion, these results indicate neural circuits underlying the effects of 5-HT(6) receptor antagonists in autoshaping task and offer some general clues about cognitive processes in general. PMID:17267053

  10. An accurate locally active memristor model for S-type negative differential resistance in NbOx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Gary A.; Musunuru, Srinitya; Zhang, Jiaming; Vandenberghe, Ken; Lee, James; Hsieh, Cheng-Chih; Jackson, Warren; Jeon, Yoocharn; Henze, Dick; Li, Zhiyong; Stanley Williams, R.

    2016-01-01

    A number of important commercial applications would benefit from the introduction of easily manufactured devices that exhibit current-controlled, or "S-type," negative differential resistance (NDR). A leading example is emerging non-volatile memory based on crossbar array architectures. Due to the inherently linear current vs. voltage characteristics of candidate non-volatile memristor memory elements, individual memory cells in these crossbar arrays can be addressed only if a highly non-linear circuit element, termed a "selector," is incorporated in the cell. Selectors based on a layer of niobium oxide sandwiched between two electrodes have been investigated by a number of groups because the NDR they exhibit provides a promisingly large non-linearity. We have developed a highly accurate compact dynamical model for their electrical conduction that shows that the NDR in these devices results from a thermal feedback mechanism. A series of electrothermal measurements and numerical simulations corroborate this model. These results reveal that the leakage currents can be minimized by thermally isolating the selector or by incorporating materials with larger activation energies for electron motion.